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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01523
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: March 4, 2010
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01523

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The


Tribune


5ATODWAI4
BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


Volume: 106 No.85


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THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 2010


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NIB contributions

to rise on June 1
By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
WORKERS and employers will face the first ever
rise in National Insurance Board contributions from
June 1 to pay for the national unemployment benefit
scheme.
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham approved the
National Insurance Board (NIB) request to raise con-
tributions this week and set a date for payments to rise
by one per cent in June, with half of the increase paid
by the employer and the other half by the employee.
Employers contributions will go up from 5.4 to 5.9
per cent, while the contributions for employees rise
from 3.4 to 3.9 per cent; bringing the current 8.8 per
cent contribution rate up to 9.8 per cent.
NIB maintains the rise translates to a maximum
SEE page 15


IC apt







p0 p ula


FNMs say former State

Minister must run in

next general election


AS the most popular can-
didate within the party,
sources within the FNM said
they feel it would be a gross
error for the party not to have
Branville McCartney run in
the next general election.
Speaking out on the specu-
lation that the former Minis-
ter of State for Immigration
could have faced some sort of
"disciplinary action" for
resigning from Cabinet in the
form of being denied a nomi-
nation, many FNMs
expressed their hope that the
party would not stoop to this
level to destroy one of their
most "promising" rising stars.
"They would be fools!
Worse than fools! He is a
hard worker, and the people
support him," said an FNM
source who spoke on the con-
dition of anonymity.
"If I were to handle this, I
would use the man's popular-
ity to assist the party going


forward. If he is ambitious as
he says he is then fine, give
him a ministry that he will
have to handle next time and
let it be a sink or swim exer-
cise for him.
"This time we will be able
to see if it is all smoke and
mirrors or if the man is made
of substance. It makes no
political sense to make an
enemy out of what could be
one of your best assets," he
said.
As a man who has
expressed his interest in lead-
ing the FNM one day in the
future, it is also believed
amongst some political pun-
dits that Mr McCartney
would never see a shot at the
party's top post as long as
FNM leader Hubert Ingra-
ham remains on the political
scene.
Having resigned from his
SEE page 14


Anglican Archdeacon 'can
be removed' from Most
Holy Trinity Anglican Church
By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
WITHIN hours after a judge lifted an
injunction that prohibited the removal of
Anglican Archdeacon Etienne Bowleg as
rector of the Most Holy Trinity Anglican
Church, locksmiths were busy on the church
grounds changing locks.
The protracted court battle involving
Archdeacon Bowleg and the Anglican Arch-
diocese came to an end yesterday following a
hearing that lasted some three hours before
Senior Justice Jon Isaacs.
Senior Justice Isaacs had granted an
injunction blocking Anglican Archbishop
Laish Boyd or anyone else from removing
Archdeacon Bowleg until his court matter
SEE page 15


II. r 1S. fimwrp'


By NOELLE
NICOLLS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
nnicolls@
tribunemedia.net
FOX Hill Member
of Parliament Fred
Mitchell is urging the
Caribbean Community to speak up
in the face of criticism from the
developed world over any number
of issues from corruption to incom-
petence.
"One incident of corruption and
the whole country is corrupt," said
SEE page 14


International body
satisfied with IOSCO
AN international regulatory body yes-
terday announced it had ceased monitor-
ing the Securities Commission of the
Bahamas' ability to exchange information
and assist overseas securities regulators,
meaning it is now satisfied this nation has
addressed weaknesses over its co-opera-
tion with peers.
The International Organisation of Secu-
rities Commissions (IOSCO), whose
members are global securities industry
regulators, advised that its Standing Com-
mittee 4 had ceased monitoring the Secu-
rities Commission of the Bahamas' inter-
national assistance and exchange of infor-
mation activities.
Hillary Deveaux, the Securities Com-
mission's executive director, said in a
statement: "The Commission has worked
SEE page 13


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PAGE^LOCAL 2,WS THUIDA, MRCH4, 010THETRB


Man dies after his


car hits utility pole


A 20-YEAR-OLD MAN
died when his Honda
Accord crashed into a utili-
ty pole in Prince Charles
Drive early yesterday morn-
ing.
Wendall Smith, of Win-
ton Meadows, was found by
police just before 2am and
Emergency Medical Ser-
vices paramedics pro-
nounced him dead at the
scene.
Police investigating the
incident say no other dri-
vers were involved in the
crash and there were no
passengers in the car, regis-
tration number 21692, when
Mr Smith hit the post near
Marco's Pizza, west of Eliz-
abeth Estates.
Detectives have not yet
ascertained the circum-


stances of the crash.
Meanwhile, officers based
at the Elizabeth Estates and
Fox Hill stations took to the
streets of their divisions yes-
terday for a walkabout with
officers from the Criminal
Detective Unit, the Nation-
al Crime Prevention Office
and the Central Intelligence
Bureau.
In addition to advising
the public on how to stay
safe and warning criminals
of the zero-tolerance policy
on crime, officers executed
several search warrants.
Police Press Officer
Sargeant Chrislyn Skippings
said eight people were
arrested in connection with
various offences including
drug possession and caus-
ing harm.


Island-wide power outage



delays flights at airport


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
FLIGHTS to and from Lyn-
den Pindling International Air-
port were delayed for about an
hour yesterday morning due to
an island-wide power outage,
airport officials said.
The outage disrupted air traf-
fic controllers' communications
and radar equipment preventing
them from communicating with
air traffic personnel at other air-
ports.
This prompted officials to
ground incoming and outgoing
flights as a safety measure.
The Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration said the outage
occurred after a 33,000 volt
underground cable faulted,
causing a few generators to go
off-line around 7.45am. The
remaining generators tripped
off-line around 8.08 am, caus-
ing a loss of electricity to the
rest of the island.
"We had power fluctuations
in the air traffic environment,
in the communications fre-
quency, they were affected
somewhat when the power went
off at 8.06am lasting for about


half an hour," said deputy direc-
tor of civil aviation Eugene But-
ler.
While they waited for power
to be restored, the airport was
running on a generator that
switched on around 8.15am, Mr
Butler said.
Shonalee Johnson, a
spokesman for Nassau Airport
Development Company,
which oversees LPIA's devel-
opment said: "At the time, the
air traffic control would not
have been able to communi-
cate with the air traffic head-
ing into Nassau."
"The outage took place at
8.06am, and flights were
restored at 8.43am, so we're
looking at 37 minutes in total
that services were suspended.
As far as impact on our site in
Nassau, flights were delayed an
hour on average - there were
only one or two flights leaving
at that time. In Miami, there
were some delays because air
traffic had to wait until the air
tower reopened."
One American Eagle flight
enroute to Nassau from Miami
had to be turned around yes-
terday morning because of the
power disruption. There were
no major delays to domestic
flights, said Ms Johnson.
Full power was restored to
the airport around 9am yester-
day.
BEC said its restoration
process began immediately
adding that power was restored
to most customers by 8.45am,
with the exception of one cir-
cuit. Full power was restored to
the capital at around 9.30am
yesterday.
"Our operations staff worked
diligently to ensure that elec-
tricity was restored in a timely
manner. Further the corpora-


tion is presently having a review
of the protective systems car-
ried out by an international
firm. This will assist us in the


1



-o


N-


THE Committee to Protect and Preserve the Bahamas for
Future Generations continued its push for the resignation of Envi-
ronment Minister Earl Deveaux yesterday.
Saying they were "shocked and appalled" by Mr Deveaux's
response to the very "serious issues" they raised regarding the ero-
sion of Saunders Beach, committee members accused the minister
of being evasive and said this was a sign of his "obvious insecuri-
ty".
"Quite frankly his response was disrespectful and an insult to the
intelligence of many Bahamians who consider this issue of para-
mount importance. The minister's attempt to belittle the issue is fur-
ther evidence of the committee's claim that he should resign
immediately," said committee chairman and PLP Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald.
According to Mr Fitzgerald and his supporters, the govern-
ment's dredging activities around Arawak Cay ahead of the estab-
lishment of a new port are responsible for the considerable erosion
at Saunders Beach.
Responding to these claims on Tuesday, Mr Deveaux put them
down to Senator Fitzgerald's "political agenda", as the senator has
already expressed his intention to run against the minister in the
next general election.
Mr Deveaux acknowledged that a great deal of sand has disap-
peared from Saunders Beach, but said this was due to the recent
extreme weather, which he said has effected the entire Northern
Shore of New Providence.
The minister said the sand has disappeared from many areas, but
is expected to eventually be redeposited by weather and wave
action.
However, yesterday Mr Fitzgerald said the committee had
warned the minister and the government in advance that Saunders
Beach would be eroded by the dredging, and claimed the beach "is
not coming back".
Mr Fitzgerald said politics plays no part in the committee's con-
cerns.
Meanwhile, reports have reached The Tribune that the senator
has been seen actively campaigning in Mr Deveaux's Marathon
constituency for some time. PLP insiders say he is tipped to get the
party's nomination to run for the seat in 2012.


prevention and possible elimi-
nation of such outages," said
BEC general manager Kevin
Basden.


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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 2010


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 2010, PAGE 3


ELIZABETH BY-ELECTION



Election Court hearing


may get under

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net


ALTHOUGH attorneys for by-election
candidates Ryan Pinder and Dr Duane
Sands are expected to meet in the Supreme
Court for a fixture date this morning, there
is a possibility the actual election court
hearing may begin today.
Thomas Evans, QC, said he has been
informed that Supreme Court Justices Ani-
ta Allen and Jon Isaacs want to begin the
highly anticipated case today, rather than
simply setting a date for the trial to begin as
was initially reported.
"They've indicated to us that they intend
to start the trial tomorrow, so we'll see what
happens," said Mr Evans, lead counsel for
Free National Movement candidate Dr
Duane Sands.
The election court petition was filed by
Ryan Pinder of the PLP, who gained 1,499
votes to Dr Sands' 1,501 in the February 16
race. Mr Pinder is claiming that five protest
votes cast in his favour should be counted,
thus making him the elected MP for Eliza-


OEnvironment


Plan to turn city

dump into waste-

to-energy facility
By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A WASTE management
plan aims to transform Nassau's
stinking, smouldering city dump
into an attractive, odourless
waste-to-energy facility within
five years.
Minister of the Environment
Earl Deveaux explained the
long-term plans for the site as
toxic smoke continued to blow
from the 100 acre landfill site
off the Tonique Williams-Dar-
ling Highway into homes across
New Providence for the third
week. Although government
has committed $480,000 to
extinguish the blaze set on Feb-
ruary 12, residents living in the
growing communities around
the towering wasteland want it
to be permanently closed.
Homeowners in the nearby
government subdivision Jubilee
Gardens held a press confer-
ence in the neighbourhood
park yesterday afternoon to
draw attention to the health
and safety risk posed by the
dump.
Rashad Amahad said: "We
the residents feel the dump
have to be moved or there
should be a better system to
ensure the facility is managed at
such a degree we the Bahamian
citizens deserve.
"We are asking the govern-
ment to relocate this facility or
put in place better management
to ensure we do not suffer the
way we have, and those harm-
ful toxins do not contaminate
anyone in this immediate area
and the surrounding areas."
While Mr Deveaux said
there are no plans to relocate
the dump as yet, the govern-
ment is working to improve
management of the facility and
convert it to a waste-to-energy
plant within five years.
The government has com-
menced discussions with pri-
vate companies to manage the
solid waste facility and Mr
Deveaux's department hopes
to reach an agreement with a
company which has a history
of working in Grand Bahama
and the Caribbean by the end
of the month, and perfect an
arrangement for site manage-
ment before the beginning of
the financial year in June.
"The first step is to ensure
proper collection, disposal,
recycling and security of the
facility," Mr Deveaux said.
"The second step is to inte-
grate the operations to ensure a
clear path to waste-to-energy.
"The final step is to have a
solid waste facility providing
energy from waste and one
which is odourless and attrac-
tive. It will take five years to
achieve these steps."
He added: "This is the only
area in New Providence suit-
able for a solid waste facility.
"It has been poorly managed.
With the approach we are tak-
ing, its life can be extended to
50 years, by which time tech-
nologies, management, costs
and other factors will have
changed the parameters and we
may be in a position to explore
other options similar to Singa-
pore (where they use separate
islands for garbage, power and
sewerage facilities).
"However, our immediate
goal is proper management and
in the shortest time to have a
waste-to-energy facility oper-
ating at the site."


i E


DUANE SANDS


RYAN P


beth. Because the hearing is exp
focus on only five votes, rather
usual lengthy list of disputed vo
parties involved believe the matte
resolved quickly.
"This is not your typical electi
case. This is a discreet issue that t
will have to decide on relative to t
ity of the protest votes that were
that constituency and so it depends
much evidence they think they
order to determine the rights of th
ers who were required to vote
coloured ballot.


way today

"They're certainly not going to be hear-
ing evidence from a large number of resi-
dents which you typically find in an election
court case. It will generally centre around
whose name appears on the registry in each
(polling division)," Mr Evans said.
Third party by-election candidates Cas-
sius Stuart of the Bahamas Democratic
Movement, Dr Andre Rollins of the
National Development Party and Rodney
Moncur of the Workers' Party, all have the
INDER right to participate in the hearing and call
witnesses if they choose to. Earlier this
)ected to week Mr Moncur threatened to file a formal
than the complaint to Chief Justice Michael Barnett
ters, the about Justice Allen's involvement in the
-r will be case. Mr Moncur claims Justice Allen's hus-
band Algernon Allen campaigned on behalf
on court of the PLP in the lead-up to the by-election.
the court Mr Allen, and the PLP, have vigorously
he valid- denied these assertions.
made in Yesterday, Mr Moncur told The Tribune
s on how he was off the island and would not be pre-
need in sent when the proceedings commenced, but
hose vot- remained adamant that he would file his
on the complaint at the earliest possibly opportu-
nity.


IALLEGD R ,G TAFK= E, / _I;


Jamaica under pressure from US over

refusal to act on extradition request


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Jamaican government
is coming under growing pres-
sure from the United States
government, the country's offi-
cial opposition and others for its
refusal to act on an extradition
request from the US for a
Jamaican accused of drug and
gun trafficking.
In the 2009 International
Narcotics Control Strategy
Report, released by the US
State Department Monday, the
Jamaican Government came in
for unusually severe criticism
from the Americans over its
delay in dealing with the
request relating to Christopher
"Dudus" Coke, an alleged
benefactor of the ruling
Jamaica Labour Party based in
Prime Minister Bruce Golding's
West Kingston constituency.
The report, which named
Jamaica, along with 19 other
countries, including The
Bahamas, as a "major illicit
drug-producing and/or drug-
transit" country, said the Gov-
ernment of Jamaica's (GOJ's)
"unusual handling of the
August request for the extra-
dition of a high-profile
Jamaican crime lord with
reported ties to the ruling
JLP...on alleged drug and
firearms trafficking charges
marked a dramatic change in
GOJ's previous cooperation on
extradition" and "calls into
question" Kingston's commit-
ment to cooperation with the
U.S. on law enforcement issues
in general.
It linked "pervasive public
corruption" with the continued
ability for drugs and drug pro-
ceeds to find "safe passage"
through Jamaica and called on
the Jamaican government "to
demonstrate its political will to
address corruption by success-
fully investigating, prosecuting,
and convicting corrupt officials


at all levels of
government
service and by
the timely
extradition of
: fugitives in
accordance
with the provi-
'Dudus' sions of the
Coke bilateral extra-
dition treaty
without regard to political influ-
ence or party affiliation."
In relation to the "Dudus"
matter specifically, it accused
the government, which asserts
that the delay in signing off on
the extradition request is a
result of the administration hav-
ing "unanswered questions"
about the basis for it and its
desire to protect the constitu-
tional rights of a citizen, of
"unprecedented delays, unex-
plained disclosure of law-
enforcement information to the
press, and unfounded allega-
tions questioning US compli-
ance with the Mutual Legal
Assistance Treaty and
Jamaican law."
The U.S. government's clear
dissatisfaction with Kingston's
handling of the "Dudus"
request has in the last week
been widely linked in the coun-
try with the revocation of a US
visa to another influential
Jamaican and good friend of
Prime Minister Bruce Golding,
Wayne Chen. Many Jamaicans
believe the sudden and unex-
plained revocation of the non-
immigrant visa issued to Mr
Chen, Chairman of the Urban
Development Corporation and
CEO of the Super Plus Foods
supermarket chain in Jamaica,
was an act of reprisal by the
U.S. government intended to
subtly persuade the govern-
ment to stop dragging its feet
on the extradition request.
Mr Chen, who has stated that
he is baffled by the move and
has since reapplied for his visa
to be reinstated, was uncere-
moniously informed of the


revocation as he sought to
board an American Airlines
plane in Kingston to travel to
the U.S. with his family last
week. Attempts by the
Jamaican government and
media to get an explanation
from U.S. government officials
in the country on the decision
have so far been fruitless.
Jamaicans also point to the
fact that Jamaica has been with-
out a US ambassador for a year
and two months as an indica-
tion of the cooling of relations
between the two countries.
"This is the longest in living
memory that Jamaica has been
without a US ambassador," said
a leading Jamaican business-
man. Meanwhile, The Bahamas
also came in for scrutiny in rela-
tion to extradition matters in
the international narcotics con-
trol strategy report.
The U.S. State Department
expressed concern about the
extent to which this country's
"overburdened" legal system is
to blame for delays in trials
which provide an opportunity
for those accused of serious
crimes to be released on bail.
"There have been credible
reports of subjects of US extra-
dition requests continuing to
participate in illegal drug smug-
gling activities while on bail
awaiting resolution of their cas-
es," the report states. It added
that despite Bahamian prose-
cutors' vigorous pursuit of US
extradition requests defendants
are able to appeal a magis-
trate's decision locally and at
our ultimate court of appeal,
the United Kingdom's Privy
Council.


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PAGE4,THURSDABYMRCH,20T10 TH TRIBETOUNE


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991


EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


Angry youth educated in prison


IN THIS column yesterday in discussing
the "Haitian problem" and the fact that the
Haitian has become the favourite whipping
boy for anything that goes wrong in this
country, we confirmed with prison authori-
ties that crime is a Bahamian, not a Haitian
problem. Of course, this fact is contrary to
the popular belief of most Bahamians.
However, Prison Superintendent Ellis-
ton Rahming said on Tuesday that the belief
that Haitians are to blame for the present
increase in crime is a "myth."
This, said the superintendent, is a
"Bahamian problem." Bahamians - full
blooded Bahamians, no trace of Haitian
blood - make up 94 per cent of the prison
population. And so for those who say that
Haitians have introduced bad blood into the
national blood stream is just a way of allow-
ing their unfounded prejudices take them
on an uninformed joy ride.
We were told that most of the prison
population is made up of those who have
either dropped out of school or been
expelled. In, other words, they have little
education and most of them cannot read.
Not being able to read, it is presumed they
cannot write. Some of them probably sign
their names with an 'X'.
Kicked out of school at the age of 14 or 15
for fighting, they turn to crime and eventu-
ally qualify for prison charged with murder
or armed robbery, or both.
Mr Doan Cleare, chairman of the Classi-
fication Board and information technology
manager, said that on entry each prisoner has
to go through a classification process and
their treatment is recommended according to
their classification. They have to follow what-
ever sentence plan is assigned them. This
includes education. The programme is
mandatory.
When they enter prison there is "anger
somewhere and so we have to find that,"
said Mr Cleare.
Obviously, if they have been found guilty
of abuse of any kind, including inflicting
grievous harm, they go through an anger
management programme. If drugs are the
problem they will enter a drug treatment
programme.
Education is mandatory for all of them
as retired teachers conduct classes daily from
9am to 3pm to get their education up to high
school level. They are prepared for their
BJCs in Mathematics and English. They take
technical and vocational courses, and litera-
cy and computer classes.
"The inmates in Maths and English class-
es," said Mr Cleare, "do very well. As a mat-
ter of fact they do better than the ones on the
outside. Up here they don't have much dis-
traction!"
"It's a challenge," he added, "but it is
playing a pivotal role in lessening crime in
society - in fact the recidivism rate has
declined."
Bahamians are advised to concentrate on


the upbringing of their own children, and
to stop making the Haitian the excuse for
their failures.


To be a beach - or not a beach
It is suggested that PLP Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald has his eye on Environment Min-
ister Earl Deveaux's Marathon constituency,
which, it is said, he plans to make a bid for in
the 2012 election.
Between now and then, Mr Fitzgerald
will probably find many issues to talk about,
but for the time being a denuded Saunders
Beach is giving him grist for his election mill
as he tries to push Minister Deveaux aside.
Mr Fitzgerald's committee - The Com-
mittee to Protect and Preserve the Bahamas
for Future Generations - contends that the
Arawak Cay dredging has destroyed Saun-
ders Beach - rocks are now showing where
there was once abundant sand. Mr
Deveaux's answer is that the extreme weath-
er has shifted the sand, which will return
when the weather settles. We do not know
who is right, but we offer our observations
gleaned over more than 40 years of living on
the waterfront.
When we moved into our waterfront
home a small quoin was constructed to
attract the sand to our beach. For the first
few years we spent all of our spare cash
keeping this beach clean - removing the
debris from seashore party-goers and passing
boats, getting rid of the seasonal build up of
seaweed and wringing our hands in agony
when all the sand disappeared.
Eventually years of observation left us
with some knowledge and we decided to
save our spare cash and settle in with nature.
This is what nature taught us - there is a
time and a season for all things. When the
tide flows in a certain direction it brings with
it the unwanted detritus. Have patience and
the tide shifts again and washes the beach
clean. Then comes the summer seaweed -
the beach is piled high - two feet in some
areas and seaweed covers the sea as far as
the eye can see. Our brother would send his
truck and cart away the seaweed for his fruit
trees. Whatever was left we ignored, because
we had learned to rely on nature to again
wash the beach in its good time. And then
during the night the waters would crash and
churn and by morning a beach of nothing but
rocks was exposed. Not to panic - again
give nature a chance. The rocks were pol-
ished by the action of the angry water. Even-
tually when nature became at peace with
itself, the oceans calmed, the sand returned,
the beach was pristine and beautiful again -
and according to Pippa's song, God was in
His heaven and all was right with the world.
Just give nature time and we shall see
who is right - Minister Deveaux or Mr
Fitzgerald.


q -


I ] m~ q u~o u/l~l ]i~]-I


EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am writing this letter to
give voice to a serious matter
that plagues our Abaco
islands. The Bahamas is facing
the same financial struggles
as the rest of the world and
we, as Bahamian citizens, are
struggling to find work to sup-
port our families. Work has
become very scarce in many
professions, but one in par-
ticular, that of construction,
has taken a huge hit in this
recession. With so many com-
panies and individuals out of
work I feel the need to say
"Shame on you, our local
Immigration". There seems
to be an over abundance of
work permits being handed
out to foreigners for jobs that
Bahamians are not only qual-
ified to do, but are standing in
line waiting for.
I have a personal com-
plaint against Immigration.
Myself and a number of other
Guana Cay construction
workers were let go off a
house we were in the middle
of building and replaced by
foreigner workers who had
obtained "temporary" work
permits within hours from an
Immigration officer in Trea-
sure Cay. Since when does
Immigration give out "legal"
permits to foreigners for jobs
that Bahamians should be
doing without the proper
steps as outlined by our gov-
ernment? Apparently, since
right now! The same day this
incident occurred our crew
flooded the local Immigration
office with calls and even per-
sonal visits to voice our com-
plaints. When this did not


result in any action we began
calling Freeport and Nassau
who assured us the local
Immigration officers would
look into it.
After two weeks and many
heated phone conversations
between our unemployed
workers and the local Immi-
gration officers we were final-
ly rewarded to see one of the
head officers from Marsh
Harbour come out to Guana
to "investigate" these foreign
workers who had taken over
our job.
However, our joy was
short lived when we had to
watch the foreign workers
escort the officer out to lunch
at Grabbers. After lunch the
officer left with no explana-
tion to any of us who had filed
the complaint and the foreign
workers returned to our for-
mer job to continue working,
secure in their new found
positions.
This incident occurred the
third week of October and
here we are over three
months later and nothing has
been done. We have contin-
ued to call and make com-
plaints but we are left with
unanswered questions and
have received no assistance
from Immigration.
Our complaint deals with
Guana Cay, but we have
heard cries of foul play from
many of the Outer Islands
with the same complaints


against foreign workers get-
ting these new "fast pass"
types of permits that are
obtained within minutes.
There are also the complaints
of foreigners getting work
permits allegedly based on
false information or permits
granted for work that can be
done by a local Bahamian.
It is truly a sad state of
affairs when the only people
seemingly breaking Immigra-
tion laws are the very ones
who have sworn to protect
them. We recognize that for-
eign tourist, visitors, and sec-
ond homeowners provide our
economy with an abundance
of revenue and for that we
are grateful and welcome
them. We do, however, think
it is a Bahamian's God-given
right to work in his own coun-
try to support himself and his
family.
As a Bahamian citizens we
have to stand up and say "No
More!" to Immigration. "No
More" work permits given
out randomly within minutes
or hours. "No More" work
permits given out to foreign-
ers for jobs that a Bahamian
can do. "No More" ignoring
our valid cries of complaints
against these infractions!
It is time for our local
Immigration to be called on
the carpet and to answer to
the people they are sworn to
protect, we the people of
Bahama Land!


PROBLEMS
FACING
ABACO
Abaco,
February, 2010.


Concern over Olympics condom distribution


EDITOR, The Tribune.


Reports of post-competition partying and
condom hand-outs at the Olympics show the
need for athletes to be more grounded in their
religious faith and the need for the sporting
world to recover the idea of athletics as a forge
for virtue.
Olympians have a "play hard, party hard"
reputation. The massive condom distribution
seems to be evidence of that lifestyle and sends
the message that such a lifestyle is permitted
and even encouraged at the Olympic Village.
On the contrary, athletes should be grounded
in their faith and encouraged to engage in
prayer and spiritual reading.
They should also have a discipleship-rela-
tionship with a spiritual mentor to help combat
the dangers of off-the-field activities.
Historically, sports was considered to be a
virtue-making machine.
The values that correspond with sports were


For all of your hydraulic hose requirements


considered to go hand in hand with those that
go into being a person of integrity and faith.
Vince Lombardi, the former NFL coach of
the Green Bay Packers football team, was a
good example of that.
He lived his faith and it was integral to his
coaching.
Today, however, sports is increasingly asso-
ciated with vice. It should be a vehicle to devel-
op good character, to make a man courageous,
a generous loser, and a gracious victor.
We have to recover these original princi-
ples of sports so that we can work to forge
greater bonds between people and help over-
come the real, terrible social problems of our
time such as genetic manipulation, human traf-
ficking, the depletion of the earth's resources,
poverty, famine, and illness.

PAUL KOKOSKI
Canada,
February 22, 2010.


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Shame on you




Immigration for




not protecting




Bahamians' jobs


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 2010


THE TRIBUNE












'Too great a risk ., M.... ..M.-
y J amolJ Rolle


for the Bahamas'

Conservationist sounds warning about Yellow-fin Tuna fishing


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - The com-
mercial fishing of Yellow-fin
Tuna using purse seine nets in
Bahamian waters poses too
great a risk for the Bahamas,
fisheries conservationist Dr
David Philip warned.
He is urging the government
not to permit the use of this
technique - in which, he says,
large game fish, dolphins, sea
turtles, and other species are
likely to be caught and killed
along with the tuna in the large
nets. "This is a huge issue and
the Bahamas should take lead-
ership and stand to be leaders
in this manner and say no to
this kind of fishing," said Dr
Philips, a representative of the
Fisheries Conservation Foun-
dation. The government has
already said it plans to outlaw
the method, but has failed to
say when. This is cause for con-
cern among conservationists in
light of reports that one
Freeport company's request to
use purse seine nets is about to
be approved.
Dr Philip attended a town
meeting on Monday evening at
the Bahamas National Trust's
Rand Nature Centre in
Freeport to stress his opposi-
tion to the venture, which has
been proposed by Paul and


David Mellor of the Bahamas
Pelagic Fisheries and Aquacul-
ture Limited. The Mellors say
that while they plan to harvest
tuna, they also want to create a
tuna farm to replenish the stock
and prevent over-fishing. They
have acquired a vessel and are
still waiting for a permit.
The plan has evoked strong
opposition from Grand
Bahama residents, some local
fishermen, environmentalists
and conservationists.
Dr Philips said tuna is
already over-fished, and the
species' ability to reproduce is
being severely compromised.
"Adding to that will further
exacerbate the problem, par-
ticularly with the fact that there
may be fish spawning right here
in the Tongue of the Ocean,"
he said.
The Mellors say that any oth-
er fish caught with the tuna will
be released, but Dr Philip
insists that "if harvested that
way, those fish will be killed."
He added that major sport
fish species like Marlin, Wahoo
and Sailfish school with tuna,
as do sea turtles and dolphins.
According to Dr Philip,
sportfishing injects $134 mil-
lion a year into the economy.
"That will be put at risk if
there is even the perception
that the Bahamas is going to
allow this kind of fishing . . .
and the fallout from that will


be huge," he said. "The reality
is that very few people will reap
financial benefits from this
operation. All of the high end
jobs and scientists will be for-
eign ... and the number of peo-
ple employed, compared to the
sports fishing industry that
employs thousands and thou-
sands of people, is a drop in the
bucket.
"What we are doing is mort-
gaging our future. We are eat-
ing the fish of the future and
we are eating our kids' fish.
"These fish are not going to
pop back in a matter of a few
years; it will take generations
of laying off these fish to do
that," he said.
Craig Riker, president of the
Grand Bahama Dive Associa-
tion, says no one wins with
purse seine fishing. "If you take
the big fish out of the ocean,
what fills its place is jellyfish.
Jellyfish eat baby fish and fish
eggs, and even if you leave
some fish to breed they can't
because the jellyfish get them.
"Once that happens there is
very little chance of getting fish
back. It is a very dangerous
slope to jump off," he said.
Meanwhile, David Mellor
assured the meeting that the
operation would be "transpar-
ent", and allow for an observer
onboard to make sure the cap-
ture of other species remains
at a minimum.


STP IVING IN EA -AV IDBIGNX


Go and tell your young
men these things.
It is not a police officer's -
job to determine your inno-
cence or guilt. So don't be /
surprised if you are arrested '
during an altercation, even
if you are the victim. This * .
may mean being handcuffed,
thrown to the ground or even manhandled.
Comply with the officer while stating emphati-
cally, "I am the victim here!"
Do not assume that you are having a rational
conversation with an equal. Lt Col Grossman in
his book, "On Combat" most aptly states, "The
police are the ones that are tasked with running
towards violence to contain the situation."


Tell your young men that when an officer is
using his best judgment to bring a situation
under control, that is the time to exercise your
self control - or you are going to be controlled.
The greater your resistance, the greater the lev-
el of force the officer can and will use on you.
Always remember, we outnumber the Bad
Guys.
* D'Arcy Rahming is a violent crime
researcher and adjunct faculty member at the
College of the Bahamas. He holds Black Belts in
several martial arts and is an internationally
renowned seminar leader for corporations, pri-
vate groups and police and security groups. You
can follow him on his blog at www.stopliving-
infear.org.


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 2010, PAGE 5












Minister of Environment




tours marina subdivisions


By GENA GIBBS


DEVELOPERS of the
South Seas Marina
Community met with
Minister of the
Environment Earl
Deveaux to explain
how their develop-
ments will help the
country's economy to
rebound. Pictured
from left: Patrick
Turnquest, South
Seas developer;
Minister Deveaux;
Tennyson Wells,
South Seas developer;
Ronald Thompson,
Environment Perma-
nent Secretary and
Douglas Turnquest,
South Seas developer.



03
U)



CD


A------


MARINA subdivisions cur-
rently being built in Nassau
will help turn the country's
economy around, according to
developers.
Minister of the Environ-
ment Earl Deveaux and sev-
eral developers toured three
marina subdivisions - South
Seas, Venice Bay and Albany
last Friday.
During the tour the subdi-
visions, developers told the
minister that although there
may have been some setbacks
due to the downturn in the
economy, they believe their
developments will help the
economy rebound.
Tennyson Wells, South Seas
developer said, "The recession
has temporarily changed a few
of our plans, but we employ
about 50 Bahamians right now
in construction and will
employ more as the project
develops."
The South Seas develop-
ment has 280 residential lots
and will complete construction
in the next 18 months, Mr
Wells said.
"Our marina site has six and
a half acres and we want to
play a part in the governmen-
t's plan to develop a network
of maritime community devel-
opments."
Venice Bay developer Roo-
sevelt Whyms told Minister
Deveaux that the concerns
over what impact the Bacardi
plant had on his development
have been addressed.
When the Bacardi plant was
in operation potential buyers


VENICE Bay developer Roosevelt Whyms (right) shows Minister of
the Environment Earl Deveaux (centre) a map and the site where
the proposed marina in Venice Bay will be constructed. Mr Whyms
currently allows tour guides to use the saltwater creeks as a tourist
attraction for bone fishing. Also pictured is the Permanent Secre-
tary in the Ministry of the Environment.


of lots in the development
became concerned about
fumes and black smoke being
emitted from the plant.
Mr Whyms said he wants to
move forward with the com-
pletion of the Venice Bay's
marina and beach-front resort
development, which is cur-
rently attracting bone-fishing
tourists.
"The property has 208.5
acres with 500 lots on it,
including two swimming pools,
a tennis court, a park, a his-
toric site to be reconstructed, a
clubhouse, and a beach area,"
he said.
Bahamians, Americans,
Canadians and Europeans
have all shown interest in the
community, Mr Whyms
added.


Albany Developer Jason
Callender said Albany recruit-
ed some of the top architects
in the world to design an inter-
national resort, which will offer
an eclectic appeal and become
a signature attraction for
Albany's world-class clientele.
"For the most part it has
been very well received and
we have not started market-
ing it yet, not until we are in a
position to open the commu-
nity sometime this year," Mr
Callender said.
Albany will be hiring
Bahamians to work during dif-
ferent stages of the communi-
ty development. These posi-
tions will require a training
period for new employees to
adjust to the service needs of
Albany's residents.


ALBANY developers Jason Callender (right) and Dr Tyrone McKenzie (left) show Environment Minister
Earl Deveaux an architectural small-scale model of the marina community to be constructed at the
Albany Development in the South Ocean area.


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 2010, PAGE 7


AM.























TENDER FOR THE


PURCHASE OF



RETIRED FLEET VEHICLES
Located At The Transport Department
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Big Pond Compound, Blue Hill Road,
Nassau, Bahamas









uni r equir A s b.i. A Sa.


DESCRIPTION OF VEHICLES
NISSAN SENTRA
FORD CARGO VAN
NISSAN SENTRA
FORD SUPER DUTY
FORD F-800
FORD F-800
FORD F-350
FORD F-350
GMC FUEL PINCHER
NISSAN UD21
TOYOTA TERCEL
FORD F-450
FORD F-600
NISSAN SD21
GMC TOP KICK
NISSAN SENTRA
NISSAN SENTRA
BACKHOE
TOYOTA TERCEL
GMC 2500
FORD F-250
FORD F-250
FORD F-350
FORD F-350
TOYOTA TERCEL
FORD F-350
GMC 2500
FORD F-350
GMC
FORD F-350
FORD F-700
GMC 7000
FORD F-600
CHEVROLET VAN
FORD F-450
FORD F-450
FORD TRACTOR
TOYOTA TERCEL
FORD F-350
BUS
CLARKE FORKLIFT
GMC STEP VAN
FORD F-350
NISSAN SENTRA
FORD F-800
FORD F-800
FORD F-450
GMC 3500
FORD F-800


VIN NUMBER LICENSE
EN1 BDAB14T008063
1FTJE34M7NHB55643
3N1DB4159ZK012532
2FDCF47M7NCB14455
1 FDWF80C2SVA47369
1FDXF80C1SVA49263
2FTJW35M2ACA01895
1FDKF37MXNB14563
1GDK7D1F4LV509946
5LBUD2100114
EL50-0079725
1FDLF47F5VEA68555
1FUNK64B1VA46494
5LBGD21000863BLGD2
1GDM7H1J2SJ520079
3N1BEAB135008042
3N1BEAB135009308
C704212
EL500080022
1GDGC24J5ME506612
1FTJW35F6TEA14980
1FTJW35F5TEA14981
1FTJW35F1TEA14983
1FTJW35F3TEA14984
EL500080121
1FTJW35F5TEA14985
1GDGC24J8ME508418
1FTJW35F7TEA14986
1GDL7D1 F4LV509577
2FDHF25F7TCA04033
1 FDPK74P8PVA01267
1GDJ701 E5HV5199453
1FDNK64P5MVA12044
1GCHP32JOJ3305147
1FDLF47F5TEA06246
1FDL47F5SEA24471
352809M
EL500081299
1FTJE34M5NHB55642
1 FBHE31 MINHB55644
Y101513970130B
1GTGP32J9M3500471
1FDKF37M6NNB17878
3N1BEAB13R001641
1 FDNT74POHVA50873
1 FDXK84A3JVA48182
1FDXF46F9XEC61796
1GDKC34F8XF025327
1FDXK84A9LVA03251


PLATE #
2105
T-5793
56004
T-5799
T-5716
M-160
T-5608
M-390
M-143
T-1164
69659
T-1480
T-5767
T-4066
M-463
29618
29617
M-472
69660
T-5782
T-5719
T-5722
T-5723
T-5718
69654
T-5726
T-5784
T-5721
M-40
T-5724
T-5798
M-179
T-5735
T-5743
T-5725
T-5729
M-465
69658
T-5794
B-1453
M-242
T-5754
M-291
29680
M-52
M-54
MAYAGU
M-198
NIL


Potential Bidders are invited to view and examine the vehicles at the Corporation's
Transport Department located within its Big Pond Complex, Blue Hill Road,
Nassau, Bahamas between the hours of 8am and 1pm or 2pm and 4pm Monday
through Friday only from February 24th, 2010 inclusive.

Potential Bidders are encouraged to use the form of tender for a single bid or a
multiple bid so as to ensure the vehicle and the bid are properly identified. Bid
Forms may be collected from the security booth of the Corporation's Big Pond
Office location on the same days and at the same time the vehicles are viewed.

Tenders are to be delivered in an envelope on or before 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday,
March 11th, 2009 and addressed as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Marked: Tender No. 721/10
RETIRED VEHICLES

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject the whole or such part of
any tender the Corporation deems necessary.
FEB 2010


CpI I IIn o







I' I. . I II


KENDRICK David
Kemp, the winner of the
Male Model Muse Compe-
tition at the Islands of the
World Fashion Week last
November, has been select-
ed by the Miss World
Bahamas organizers to rep-
resent the Bahamas at the
Mr World Competition.
The competition is sched-
uled to be held on Satur-
day, March 27, in Incheon,
South Korea. Mr Kemp
leaves the Bahamas for
South Korea on March 11
to prepare for the final and
participate in a number of
preliminary events.
At Muse Model Search
Competition held as a part
of the Islands of the World
Fashion Week, Mr Kemp
was chosen over eight final-
ists representing the
Bahamas, Barbados, Haiti,
St Kitts and Nevis, and
Trinidad and Tobago.
The title of Female Mod-
el Muse was won by Gio-
vara Gertruida of Curacao.
The winners of the Muse
Model Search Competition
receive a cash prize and
become the face of Islands
of the World Fashion Week
for the ensuing year.
In addition, they appear
in promotional campaigns
for designers and sponsors,
and travel with the team on
the newly launched Islands
of the World Fashion Tour,
with scheduled appearances
in Palm Springs, California,
Chicago, and Miami.
Mr Kemp has also been
recently featured on the
runway of the Joann
Berman show during Mer-
cedes Benz Fashion Week
in New York in February.


The premier retailer in The
Bahamas, has an opening for
the position of:


Jr. Graphic Designer
(Marketing experience a plus)


Please hand to:

The Marketing Department
#284 Bay St.
P.O. Box N-3737
Nassau, Bahamas


He said he is now "look-
ing forward to representing
the Bahamas proudly at Mr.
World."
"I feel that I truly


embody the characteristics
for which the competition
is known, namely identify-
ing that man in the world
who can best show his
'strength, stamina, mental
agility and determination to
succeed in the face of
adversity'.
"I am confident that I will
do my best. I wish to thank
the local Miss Bahamas
World organisation,
Michelle Malcolm, and
Macumbla Smith who has
stepped in to assist with
training and choreography
and, of course, my family,
Mode Iles and Mr Owen
Bethel for their support,"
Mr Kemp said.


John Bull Ltd. is looking for people who:
* Know what it means to give outstanding
customer service
* Have an interest in retail sales and
management
* Desire to bring fun and enthusiasm to our
family
* Truly believe the customer always comes first
We offer:
* A great group of people to work with
* A competitive benefits package
* An outstanding employee discount policy
* All of the training you'll need to be highly
successful

Only those interested in helping us uphold our
world famous reputation for customer service
need apply. If you want to learn more about
retail for a future career or would like to grow
with us, please complete an application form
(available at all locations) and attach a current
resume, photo and a copyof current police
certificate, NIB card and Passport (first 4
pages).


I 1 0 S S' '1


FLEET #
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YEAR
1997
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1999
1999
1990


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


I WeShold Tlk









Young Butler


takes over


his family's


40-year-old


business


FRANKLIN Butler II,
newly appointed president
of Milo B Butler and Sons
Ltd, has been chosen to lead
a business almost twice his
age which was established
over four decades ago by his
late grandfather Sir Milo B
Butler, first Bahamian-born
Governor General of the
Bahamas, along with his late
father Franklyn Butler, Sr
and other family members.
The 27-year-old former
deputy head Boy of St
Anne's College and 2003
graduate of the University
of Warwick in England, who
holds a Bachelor of Science
degree in Accounting and
Finance, said he is deter-
mined to take the company
to greater heights.
He said he believes that
key to the company's suc-
cess will be his ability to
empower the organisation's
53 employees and managers
to take ownership, while
providing exceptional cus-
tomer service. Technology
and the internet will also
play an integral role in the
company.
The company, he said, has
over the years positively
impacted the community by
creating business opportu-
nities for small and large
scale business owners
involved in the food and
grocery sector as well as
through its various dona-
tions to civic organizations.
From the age of nine,
Franklyn Butler II grew up
working in his family's busi-
ness on Peach Street off
Montrose Avenue, helping
out wherever help was need-
ed, beginning with odd tasks
to eventually becoming a
"problem solver."
"My dad was someone
who never made us believe
that because he ran a busi-
ness that we were entitled
to anything," he said, not-
ing that he greatly appreci-
ates his family's values about
hard work.
Franklyn Butler II will be
featured in a special inter-


"My dad was
someone who
never made us
believe that
because he ran a
business that we
were entitled to
anything."
view on Visionaries Wealth
Management and Business
Show tomorrow at 8.30pm
on ZNS TV-13 and on Sun-
day, March 7, at 8.30pm on
JCN Channel 14.


NOTED BUSINESSMAN, the
late Franklyn Butler Sr (at
left), with son Franklyn Butler
II. The younger Butler now
leads his family's business as
president of Milo B Butler and
Sons Ltd.


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THE TRIBUNE


I


THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 2010, PAGE 9


WANTED






to oversee multiple retail outlets.
Minimum 5 years supervisory
experience. We are opened 7 days a
week. Shift work 8:00am-4:00pm
and 4:OOpm-Midnight.

Salary will commensurate with
experience.
Please send Resume and passport
size photo along with a Cover Letter
in your own handwriting to:
P.O. Box CB-11392,
Nassau, Bahamas.










Three-year project to .



identify and protect



resilient coral reefs


4:00pm-Midnight.S
Salary will commensurate with













experience.
Island end Resume and 7 dpays a week.









size photo along with a Cover Letter
in your own handwriting to:

P.O. Box CB-11392,

Nassau, Bahamas.


WASHINGTON - Peter
Mumby, Ph D, a professor at
the University of Exeter in the
United Kingdom, has been
awarded a 2010 Pew Fellowship
in Marine Conservation for his
project to develop scientific
models that will identify which
coral reef systems are most
resilient to, or can best with-
stand, environmental threats.
He will use these models to pro-
mote a network of marine
reserves around the Bahamas.
The Pew Fellowship in
Marine Conservation is a pres-
tigious programme that gives
recipients US $150,000 for a
three-year scientific research or
conservation project designed
to address critical challenges
facing our oceans.
Dr Mumby's fellowship will
combine otherwise unrelated
datasets, such as hurricane risk,
ocean pollution, interactions
between coral reefs and corals'
reaction to stress, all of which
contribute to the "resilience" of
coral reefs.
This integrated research
approach will better inform
decisions about which reef sys-
tems have the greatest chance
for survival and would benefit
from additional protection.
Dr Mumby will work closely
with partners at the Bahamas
National Trust, the Nature Con-
servancy and Bahamas Depart-
ment for Marine Resources in
order to provide scientific sup-
port for on-going plans to devel-
op networks of marine reserves.
"Because coral reefs are vul-
nerable to so many different
threats, it is crucial we put
resources toward reefs that have
the greatest opportunity for
long-term survival," said Dr
Mumby.
"The Pew Marine Fellowship
offers an opportunity to develop
the models needed make man-
agement decisions that best pro-
tect coral reefs."
Coral reefs, like other marine
life, are facing a myriad of


threats, including climate
change. Although rising sea lev-
els, more intense hurricanes,
increasing ocean acidification
and water temperatures all
greatly impact coral reefs, these
impacts are difficult to address
through specific management
decisions.
Instead, managers often focus
their efforts on protecting coral
reefs that demonstrate greater
natural resilience.
Yet, reef systems may be
resilient to some threats but not
to others, making these man-
agement decisions difficult.
Dr Mumby's project will


develop a method for present-
ing an overall picture of coral
reefs' resistance to multiple
threats in order to better inform
management decisions.
"Coral reefs are home to
extraordinary marine life and
are essential to the functioning
of many ocean ecosystems,"
said Joshua S Reichert, manag-
ing director of the Pew Envi-
ronment Group.
"Dr Mumby's project to map
the resilience of coral reefs
using innovative modeling tech-
niques will go a long way
toward ensuring their long-term
protection."


Dr Mumby received his doc-
torate degree from the Univer-
sity of Sheffield in the United
Kingdom. His work as a marine
ecologist primarily focuses on
tropical coastal ecosystems, and
his field work spans the
Caribbean and Pacific with
long-term research interests in
Belize, the Bahamas and Palau.
In April 2010, Dr Mumby will
move from the University of
Exeter to the University of
Queensland School of Biologi-
cal Sciences to take up a presti-
gious Laureate Fellowship fund-
ed by the Australian Research
Council.


BRITISH HIGH
COMMISSIONER
TO THE BAHAMAS
PAYS CALL ON AG
HOWARD Drake, OBE,
the newly appointed British
High Commissioner to
Ja,,a,,a a,, ,o ,,-, ..,le,,[
Bil li.1.1 HI -(11i1'.1-1 ( -""...lO, n.Oi
o lci e i. Hnoiii r i'i'eal lli 0r i[e
Baliarna'.. paicl a C u.let ..,
call oni [Ilei A oI i ine'. Gene -
al ancdi IVIii.lt i o01 Leiial
Attllas. SenailolJioln Delaneii"
a:t 11 li 0 tthe O ' t Il i A o i nev
Geneiial, Monidai. Mail'.i 1.
Patrick Hanna


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Spanish Wells Fried Fish Fillet
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children
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Sea-Grilled Mahi Mahi
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or visit sheratonnassau.com.


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Apply for admission on Tuesday, M h , from 630- 8:30 pm.,
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TO DISCUSS STS ON TS PE LG O


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 2010


THE TRIBUNE







THE^^W TRIBUNEITHURSDAYTMARCH 4, 2010, PAGE


LEG TWO OF LIGHTBOURNE MARINE'S THIRD ANNUAL WAHOO CHALLENGE






Captured! Record


91.7lbs


Wahoo


LEG TWO and overall tournament
champions: Captain Teddy Pratt,
Alex Cartwright, and Donnie Lis-
garis with a total of 2251bs.


A record size Wahoo, weigh-
ing over 901bs, was captured
during leg two of Lightbourne
Marine's Third Annual Wahoo
Challenge.
Ten Bahamian boats ranging
from 24 to 74 feet fished leg
two of the tournament on Sat-
urday, February 27.
Anglers left Hurricane Hole
on Paradise Island at 6am and
took off for an exciting day of
intense high speed trolling from
Abaco and Andros to the Berry
Islands, Eleuthera and the Exu-
ma Sound for the coveted game
fish.
Favoured with a calm breeze
out of the south and gorgeous
sunny weather, the crews gave
it their everything up to the
weigh-in time at 4pm when one
by one they pulled in to Hurri-
cane Hole to tally up their four
heaviest Wahoo.
Rachel Lightbourne, tourna-
ment organiser and Nassau rep-
resentative for the Internation-
al Game Fish Association
(IGFA), said:

Exciting
"This is definitely the most
exciting leg yet with regards to
the average size of fish caught
and the large number of spec-
tators at the weigh-in. I am
blown away by the 91.71bs
Wahoo caught on 'Rook'.
"This is a new record fish for
the Lightbourne Marine
Wahoo Challenge and just goes
to show you that a local tour-
nament like ours can compete
with the international ones
hosted in the Bahamas."
Chris Lloyd of BASRA and
Ms Lightbourne presented the
winners with hand-crafted tro-
phies later that evening at the
Green Parrot Bar and Grill on
East Bay Street.
Team "Rook" took first
place, fished by Captain Ted-
dy Pratt, Alex Cartwright, and
Donnie Lisgaris; followed by
"Paws 2 Fish" in second place
with Robert Darville, Chris
Lloyd, Dr Greg Neil, and David
Jenkins; and team "Zephros"
in third with Basil Goulandris
and Jacob Disston.
Everyone enjoyed delicious
fresh Wahoo donated by the


LEG TWO second place winners: Robert Darville, Chris Lloyd, Dr
Greg Neil, and David Jenkins.


tournament organizers and pre-
pared by the chefs at Green
Parrot.
Leg one of the tournament,
held on December 12, was won
by Robert Wells on
'D'Fish'N'Seas' who landed the
four heaviest Wahoo, followed
by Peter Maury on 'Too Reel',
and Scott Kelly on 'White Rat'.
Lightbourne Marine thanked
its sponsors, including Graham
Real Estate and Cabela's Tro-
phy Properties, Bahamas


HII i Bh a








SStudenit I estiimniac
u-~ ...,.C I.ii q..4R' Uni4 r )iFly Af Wales - BA II'l . 8uMne 4


D' 1 tn't el . y o w ur . J *; I sIundr



I T iwj a d:'rk ' w ll n di i s ll Int luddrr

4. f . .r I uppI, o. fI-, were q '.in
i e,,. I II �n e I a I
iw. fric .I. .. . .1.
I * " I ," I n . .." ...
N.R, ... Y . WA E M * A







LTOL )o J "yJ











to fast-tracjrk you ][eei


Wholesale Agency, Sands Beer,
and Green Parrot Bar and
Grill, as well as the committee
members and volunteers who
helped, for making the event
possible. "We are so excited for
next year's tournament, said Ms
Lightbourne, "and I'd really
like to see more local anglers
come out to fish with us."
"It's such an exhilarating
sport, and you don't have to
have the biggest boat to catch
the biggest fish."


i-,rp up) - ;sppciali.n %r in arkring,
inarince nniin n9
4 Uriiverity or Sunrderlanrd - BA (Huri
Business & Maniageent (lop upi. BA
IHc rs: Accountancycv & Financial
ManagemenL Itop up)
m I I'.l'.NtiL-, nl t r 'o h, - 65C (H1 ns)'
Piychology
* University of Teesside - LLB, BSc Hirsr-
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M ,RA - l1niuprt.ilr ot Bradford (AMBA,
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5underl.nd, Lniverity of Wdals
MSc In Pubilc Adminlitraiion &
Developmefl Jnri. crrsi of Birmingham
* MSc Mairketingl & anagermen - UnwverNilv
of Bradford
* Mc Finance, Arrnun: n A vi&Mr.rain�mrint
Lniverity or Bradford
S.Sc Infrormatilon TechnologV - Univfersov
of ressde
* MSc Telecommunications - Birrninqham
C ity L niv rity
* MSc Intemat nial Hr..;piinaial M.iaqerrnr
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THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 2010, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE







PAGELOCAL 2,S THURSDAYIMARCH4,2010THETRB


Tour of Island School and Cape Eleuthera Institute



Students learn



about conservation




and sustainability


THE Island School welcomed C R
Walker High School, Wemyss Bight Pri-
mary, and Rock Sound Primary to its
campus last week, where the students
learned about conservation and sus-
tainability.
Students ranged from grade one to
grade twelve, and all came away with a
better understanding of the importance
of protecting the Bahamas' precious
resources.
Rock Sound Primary and Wemyss
Bight Primary each spent a day at the
school, learning fish identification skills
in the morning and touring the Island
School and Cape Eleuthera Institute
(CEI) campuses in the afternoon.
During their time touring the cam-
pus, the grade one students learned
about sustainable systems like waste
water treatment, renewable energy,
rainwater catchment, green building,
recycling, and food production.
On Friday, C R Walker students from
Nassau visited the Island School as a
reward for their second place finish in
the United States Embassy's energy
competition.
The students spent time learning
about the campus' renewable energy
sources, then shared their winning "I
Can Do Click!" marketing campaign
and jingle with Island School faculty
and staff.
"The Island School is always happy to
share our knowledge and research on
sustainability, waste management, and


"Our hope is that these stu-
dents return to their schools
inspired by what they have seen
and willing to make a commit-
ment to improve their own
communities."

Krista Sherman

renewable energy with visiting groups,"
said Krista Sherman, assistant manager
of visiting programmes. "Our hope is
that these students return to their
schools inspired by what they have seen
and willing to make a commitment to
improve their own communities."
Visiting programmes are welcomed
year round to the Island School and
Cape Eleuthera Institute.
The Island School is a three-month
semester leadership programme for high
school students.
Participants have come from over 300
schools to study the tropical marine
environment and take place-based
courses in math, history, English, and
art.
The Cape Eleuthera Institute (CEI)
promotes sustainable development
through education, tropical marine and
terrestrial research, and modelling sys-
tems that encourage responsible
resource management.


-


(BIS photo: Derek Smith)
GRADE SIX STUDENTS and teachers from Bennett's Harbour and New Bight Primary schools in Cat Island pose with Gov-
ernor General Arthur D Hanna (standing centre) during a courtesy call at Government House, Friday February 26.




Antigua, 4 other Carib spots on US laundering list


SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico
The island where financier R. Allen Stanford
allegedly based a $7 billion Ponzi scheme is one
of five Caribbean spots on the latest U.S. list of
major money laundering countries, according to
Associated Press.
A State Department report said Monday that
money laundering problems in Antigua and Bar-
buda tied to schemes involving investment fraud


and advance fee fraud have not been corrected.
The report, however, does not mention Stan-
ford, a Texas financier accused of promising
inflated returns on certificates of deposit from an
Antigua bank. He has pleaded not guilty.
The overseas British territory of the Cayman
Islands, which has been lobbying in Washing-
ton to thwart a crackdown on offshore financial
centers, also remains on the list, along with the
Bahamas, Dominican Republic and Haiti.


Legal Notice
NOTICE
FLORES ISLAND LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
CRESTWEALTH INVESTMENTS
LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
STRAVROPOL CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
BEDWICK LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
PINEWOOD EQUITIES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
HILL CHARM INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) CYBELE LTD. is in dissolution under the provisions of the Inter
national Business Companies Act 2000
(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on March 2, 2010
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the
Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.
(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the day of 14th day of April, 2010 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be ex-
cluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts
are proved.
March 4, 2010
ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY


Legal Notice
NOTICE
LADYWELL INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
DELTOIDS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


oI_ STUDENTS IPA1 COURES


AI'.







THEW TRIBUNEITHURSDAYTMARCH 4, 2010, PAGE13


FROM page one
diligently over the past five
years to adhere as best it
could to standards for inter-
national assistance and the
exchange of information."
The IOSCO announcement
also effectively addresses
many of the concerns raised
in the House of Assembly this
week by former attorney gen-
eral, and Fort Charlotte MP,
Alfred Sears.
Mr Sears had expressed
concern that the Bahamas
could be branded by the
Financial Stability Board
(FSB), and the G-20 group of
nations, as "non-cooperative"
on securities regulation
because it had failed to
address the Securities Com-
mission's legislative weak-
nesses, "under funding and
under staffing."
In late 2005, the Financial
Stability Forum, now the FSB,
and IOSCO started a joint ini-
tiative to assess international
assistance and information
exchange among the latter's


International
body satisfied
with IOSCO
members.
As part of this initiative, the
FSB and IOSCO established
a confidential review process
in which they named "priori-
ty" jurisdictions, including the
Bahamas. The Bahamas was
named a priority jurisdiction
on the basis of its significance
to the international financial
markets, and the size of cross-
border transactions it han-
dled.
Once identified as a priori-
ty jurisdiction, the Bahamas'
international assistance and
exchange of information
regime was reviewed and a
report setting out results of
that review was issued. This
report identified certain
weaknesses in the Securities
Commission's co-operation
regime.
As a result of the various
weaknesses identified in the


exchange of information
regime into compliance with
IOSCO's Memorandum of
Understanding (MoU).
2. Regular reports on the
status of international
requests for assistance
received by the Commission
from foreign regulators.
The Securities Commission
provided the information


required by IOSCO, and was
advised in mid-January 2010
that the monitoring of its
information exchange activi-
ties had ceased.
The chairman of IOSCO
Standing Committee 4,
Georgina Phillipou, said the
Securities Commission had
obtained signatory 'B' status
to IOSCO's MoU.


She said: "In light of this
positive development and the
fact that IOSCO Standing
Committee 4 members con-
tinue to report positive expe-
riences regarding co-opera-
tion with the Commission,
IOSCO has decided to cease
monitoring the Commission
in the context of the IOSCO
initiative."


report, IOSCO's standing
committee monitored the
Securities Commission's
exchange of information
activities.
The Securities Commission
was directed to submit the fol-
lowing reports to IOSCO's
Standing Committee 4 on a
quarterly basis:
1. Reports on the progress
and timetable for obtaining
the amendments to the rele-
vant legislation to bring the


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 2010, PAGE 13


I ~j i ,[ri 11 11i I ,[I 'L I11 1(� .IItII% t l '.II







PAGELOCAL 4,S THURSDAYIMARCH4,2010THETRB


FROM page one

Mr Mitchell in the House of
Assembly, yesterday, about
the perception of the devel-
oped world. He said issues
are made "larger than life"
and every Caribbean gov-
ernment suffers.
He indicated the US is
plagued with political scan-
dals, such as the recent
investigation of the New
York State governor over
sexual impropriety involv-
ing prostitutes, and still alle-
gations of corruption in that
country are treated as iso-
lated incidents in the public
eye.
Despite the US general
election fiasco of 2000 that
handed power to US presi-
dent George Bush, the US
electoral system is not
broadly categorised as cor-
rupt.
"We see this sort of
duplicity, this sort of
hypocrisy all the time. They
look at The Bahamas (and
the developing world) as
being these little banana


Mitchell hits back at





criticism of Caribbean


republics, where politicians
are corrupt from top to bot-
tom and no one plays by the
rules," said a former high
ranking government official
and attorney.
"The Bahamas and most
other off shore financial cen-
tres are held to a much high-
er standard and to much
more intense scrutiny than
the first world countries sub-
ject themselves to. The clas-
sic example is that of the US
State of Delaware which is
the biggest off shore centre
in the world," he said.
In April 2009, the Organ-
isation for Economic Co-


McCartney 'too

popular to lose'
FROM page one
cabinet, it was said, was a great � "-
affront to the party's leader
who sources suggest was not
too pleased with Mr McCart-
ney's decision.
"As long as the PM is there
he might as well forget it. History will show what happens to
you when you get on the wrong side of Hubert Ingraham.
The PM is a master of this game and no one else plays it like
him," he said.
* SEE PUSHIN' DA ENVELOPE: PAGE 5


Legal Notice
NOTICE
ABIES OVERSEAS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
ALTIMA GROUP LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
SOUTH SHORE VALLEY INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


operation and Development
(OECD) placed the
Bahamas on a grey list, char-
acterising it as a jurisdiction
engaged in unfair tax prac-
tices. This resulted in a
major French bank, BNP
Paribas, leaving the territo-
ry.
The 2000 "blacklisting" of
the country cost the Gov-
ernment $40 million in
expended or lost revenue
and more-than-halved its
number of registered banks
and trust companies, accord-
ing to former Bahamian
attorney-general Alfred
Sears. International busi-
nesses migrated from the
Bahamas to the British Vir-
gin Islands, Hong Kong, Sin-
gapore and other jurisdic-
tions.
"(Delaware) is doing
exactly the same things we
are being black listed for.
Switzerland is another
example. They treat Switzer-
land totally differently," said
the attorney interviewed by
The Tribune.
A number of bodies have
input into the OECD black
listing, such as the Financial
Action Task Force and the
G-20. The US is a promi-
nent member of all of these
organizations.
"They are tentacles of the


most powerful industrialized
democracies in the world.
They are the ones making
the rules, they are the ones
who are the policemen of
the world, and they don't
hold themselves accountable
to the same standards they
hold us to," he said.
"Who wants to be known
as a country that does not
conform to civilized norms
when it is subject to these
kind of negative listings. It is
an insult to a nation's digni-
ty."
The same dynamic is
played out when the Unit-
ed States publishes its annu-
al International Narcotics
Control Strategy Report
(INCSR) that often lam-
bastes Caribbean countries
over their extradition prac-
tices.
Caricom member,
Jamaica, was criticised heav-
ily in the 2009 INCSR over
its failure to extradite Pres-
ley Bingham to the US on
narcotics charges. Mr
Mitchell said with all the
pressure placed on Jamaica,
the US government failed
to look at its own failures
where extradition is con-
cerned.
He pointed to the extra-
dition case of alleged Nazi
death camp guard John


Legal Notice
NOTICE
BROOX CROIX VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
MALLOW STREAM LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
GOLDENRAIN VALLEY INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Demjanjuk. His extradition
to Germany for trial on war
crimes took 10 years.
In the 1980s and 1990s,
the US government "clob-
bered" the Bahamas, in a
similar manner to the treat-
ment of Jamaica today,
according to the attorney
interviewed by The Tribune.
Every year, the narcotics
report pointed to the case
of Nigel Bowe, who was
eventually extradited to the
US on narcotics related
charges. Bahamian politi-
cians were charged with pro-
tecting drug traffickers.
"The point is it took a
long time, but if you have a
lot of money, because extra-
dition is such a highly tech-
nical multi-layered multi-
level process you can spin it
out a long, long time. The
same is true for the US, UK
and any developed system
of law based on all the dif-
ferent avenues of appeal and
judicial review. It has noth-
ing to do with the govern-
ment, it is the judicial
process that has to run its
course," said the attorney.
Mr Mitchell is proposing
CARICOM produce its own
analysis of the US, examin-
ing aspects of its judicial sys-
tem, political system and
economic system. He said


the Bahamas government
should "speak up" for the
country more.
"The answer is not going
out there and mimicking
what they do. Caricom sim-
ply lacks the resources to
fund that kind of oversight.
Most of the members can't
even pay their dues. Some
states are in a chronic state
of delinquency where they
can't pay their membership
dues. External funding is
not going to be available,
because the developed
countries are not going to
investigate themselves. It is
a nice idea about giving
these people some of their
own medicine, but it is a
pipe dream," said the attor-
ney.
He said a rapid response
public relations mechanism
might be a more practical
way to address the prob-
lem. He said it should be a
priority in the same way
that the government allo-
cates millions to high pow-
ered public relations firms
to help promote tourism.
"I think we need to allo-
cate the same investments
in PR firms and lobbyists
to ensure the interests are
fully protected when nega-
tive stories appear," he
said.


Legal Notice
NOTICE
FOSTERIANA LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
DALICHA VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
MURANO UNITED LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 2010


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 2010, PAGE 15


LOS AL NEWS I


FROM page one

weekly increase of $2 for the
employer and $2 for the
employee, that is no more than
a $104 annual increase for
employees and $104 per mem-
ber of staff for employers.
The first contribution rise in
the organisation's 35-year his-
tory is expected to strengthen
NIB's social security safety net
with no more than $10 million
per year, NIB director Alger-
non Cargill said.
Employers and workers were
warned the increase could be
implemented early this year as
funding would be needed for
the unemployment benefit
scheme launched in April last
year.
The scheme was launched
with a $20 million fund to help
thousands of people unable to
find work during the recession.
Unemployment had hit 14.6
per cent in New Providence and
17.2 per cent in Grand Bahama,
and the scheme aimed to help
those out of work while they


NIB contributions to rise on June 1


applied for jobs through the
Department of Labour.
A total of 14,692 unem-
ployed Bahamians had claimed
$21.9 million from NIB
between April and January,
and Bahamas Employers Fed-
eration president Brian Nutt
said businesses have been
braced for the increase for sev-
eral months.
"This has been a long time
coming," Mr Nutt said.
"Everybody has been aware
it will eventually impact us, so I
am just glad that we did get a
few more months respite from
having to pay.
"June will give enough time
for everybody to alter their pay-
roll programme to be able to
correct the contribution rate
and calculate deductions."
The increase will allow NIB
to initiate the second, perma-
nent, phase of the programme
in June.


Unlike the first phase that
helped those who have been
out of work since 2004, the per-
manent unemployment benefit
scheme will only be paid to the
recently unemployed from
June.
Claimants must have paid at
least 52 NIB contributions
throughout their working life
and of those payments 20 must
have been paid in the 40 weeks
prior to becoming unemployed,
and seven during the 13 weeks
before unemployment.
Those eligible to receive the
benefit will then receive the
unchanged rate of 50 per cent
of the average insurable income
for up to 13 weeks, that is a
maximum of $200 per week
paid by a NIB cheque every
two weeks.
Mr Cargill said: "You have
to be looking for work and cer-
tify that on a weekly basis with
the Department of Labour to


receive the benefit.
"The structures we have in
place would prevent fraud from
that perspective, as well as from
those who are employed."
Employers and workers have
also been warned of another
one per cent rise in contribu-
tions to cover the cost of the
National Drug Prescription
Plan to be implemented in
June.
But Mr Cargill said he does
not expect NIB contributions
to rise to 10.8 per cent this year.
When brought into force
employers and employees will
both face another 0.5 per cent
rise in contributions.
The National Drug Prescrip-
tion Plan aims to provide 170
prescription medications free
of charge to patients making
NIB contributions who suffer
from the most common 11
chronic non-communicable dis-
eases.


Anglican Archdeacon 'can be removed' from Most Holy Trinity Anglican Church


FROM page one

had been heard.
Attorney Damian Gomez, who repre-
sents the Anglican Archdiocese, told
reporters after the hearing yesterday: "We
presented our arguments and the attorney
for Father Bowleg conceded that he ought
to have disclosed but failed to disclose his
deed of institution.
"On that basis, and on the additional
basis that damages would have been a more
appropriate remedy, the injunction was dis-
charged with costs."
Mr Gomez said this means that Anglican
Archbishop Laish Boyd can now install
whomever he desires as rector of the
Stapeldon Gardens parish.
The court battle stemmed from a dispute
that had arisen over Archdeacon Bowleg's
contention that he is 64, although with a
1937 birth certificate, he is recognized by
the Anglican Diocese as being 72, two years


beyond the mandatory retirement age for
Anglican priests.
Following yesterday's proceedings,
Archbishop Laish Boyd stated: "I am very
happy with the decision that the court has
made. We are grateful that justice was
done."
Former Archbishop Drexel Gomez
added: "I think it is unfortunate that the
issue had to be raised but it's good to have
it clarified and I hope it will bring peace to
the church."
Locksmiths got to work changing the
locks at the parish shortly after 2pm yes-
terday afternoon, minutes after Archbish-
op Boyd and several other Anglican cler-
gymen arrived at the church grounds.
Bishop Boyd assured parishioners yes-
terday that the parish would still function as
usual.
Archdeacon Bowleg was said to be out of
office when The Tribune arrived at the
church grounds yesterday and was report-
edly making preparations to travel.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

TECHNO ADVANCE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

GOLDEN ANKA OCEAN LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

WESTBROOKE VALLEY INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


ANGLICAN Archbishop Laish Boyd
speaks to the media yesterday.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

ALTA MAR SEAS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

TOK JUNCTION CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

RYTTE MOUNTAIN CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


HOW THE INCREASE WILL


AFFECT YOUR SALARY

The increase will affect salaries up to a maximum week-
ly income of $400, and monthly income of $1,600

* If you earn $400 per week you now pay a 3.4 per cent
contribution of $13.60 per week or $54.40 per month.
From June you will pay a 3.9 per cent contribution of
$15.60 per week or $62.40 per month

* If you earn $300 per week or $1,200 per month you now
pay a 3.4 per cent contribution of $10.20 per week or
$40.80 per month.
From June you will pay a 3.9 per cent contribution of
$11.70 per week or $46.80 per month.

* If you earn $200 per week or $800 per month you now
pay a 3.4 per cent contribution of $6.80 per week or
$27.20 per month,
From June you will pay a 3.9 per cent contribution of
$7.80 per week or $31.20 per month.

* If you earn $100 per week or $400 per month you now
pay a 3.4 per cent contribution of $3.40 per week or
$13.60 per month.
From June you will pay a 3.9 per cent contribution or
$3.90 per week or $15.60 per month.


















Legal Notice
NOTICE

AVENIDA BALBOA INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

CHARA ELECTRA INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

MATCHING COLOURS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 2nd day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 2010, PAGE 19


LOS AL NEWS I


MEMBERS of the Nassau Tourism Development Board and the Down-
town Nassau Partnership meet for a second time with the leadership
of the Central and Tourism Police Units.


Security 'absolutely


essential' to Nassau


redevelopment


CALLING it "the first and
most significant step in the revi-
talisation of downtown Nas-
sau," Nassau Tourism Devel-
opment Board Chairman and
co-chair of the Downtown Nas-
sau Partnership (DNP) Charles
Klonaris said security was
"absolutely essential" to the
success of Nassau's rejuvena-
tion.
"The Nassau Tourism Devel-
opment Board has been push-
ing for the redevelopment and
revitalisation of downtown Nas-
sau for many, many years.
Finally, today we are at an
important crossroads. But with-
out security, whatever we do in
terms of structure and infra-
structure will be irrelevant. We
can have the most beautiful
buildings, but without security,
especially for families coming
downtown at night, those build-
ings will be empty. We won't
have business. We look at the
city of Nassau as an economic
opportunity for Bahamians so
our partnership with the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and, in
particular with the Tourism
Unit is critical to the success
and revitalization of the city."
Ms Klonaris' comments came
during a second meeting with


the new leadership of the Cen-
tral and Tourism Police units.
Held at the British Colonial
Hilton, which has been instru-
mental in supporting the
Tourism Police Unit, the work-
ing meeting and frank discus-
sions brought downtown busi-
ness owners and taxi and tour
representatives to the table with
police and the Ministry of
Tourism.
According to DNP manag-
ing director Vaughn Roberts,
security is critical in expanding
the city's growing nightlife.
"Any revitalisation effort is
dependent upon a vibrant night
life and a vibrant night life will
only exist as long as people feel
comfortable about their safe-
ty," he said.
"As long as we can address
these concerns and issues har-
moniously in a working rela-
tionship with the police, we will
be making the progress we
need to make."
ASP Ellsworth Moss told the
group that the increased police
visibility in highly-trafficked
tourist areas including down-
town, Paradise Island and
Cable Beach was just part of a
"new commitment to policing
in the entire Bahamas."


THE Bahamas Electricity Corporation has opened a math clin-
ic for 9th and 11th grade students from selected junior and senior
high schools.
The clinic, organised in conjunction with the Ministry of Edu-
cation, will run through May 6, 2010.
"BEC is committed to empowering Bahamians," said Mr Kevin
Basden, BEC's general manager. "And in so doing, we see it only
fitting to assist with the education of our country's youth as there
have been many negatives said about their educational progress.
"As we work in union with the Ministry of Education to quell
these negatives, we have put together a math tutoring programme
that, when executed, will assist with the mathematical needs of our
participants and move them forward not only academically, but
from a well rounded perspective."
Mr Basden also thanked the employees who volunteered to
tutor the students.
BEC's Public Relations Department, headed by Sharnette Cur-
ry, assisted the ministry with organising the clinic. Ms Curry not-
ed the enthusiasm of the staff.
"The staff at the corporation is elated to be a part of this clinic,"
she said. "We have been excited from the inception of planning the
clinic and are very dedicated to this cause and willing to assist in
whatever way needed to make this a tremendous success."
The participants include students from AF Adderley, CR Walk-
er, TA Thompson, CH Reeves, SC McPherson, CC Sweeting,
RM Bailey, St John's College, St Augustine's College and Gov-
ernment High School.
They were carefully selected by the Ministry of Education's
Math Officer, with the help of math teachers from the participat-
ing high schools.
Ethan Munroe, a Government High 11th grader said, "I think
what the corporation is doing is splendid. The fact that BEC is giv-
ing back to the community is awesome and I will take in everything
learned here and apply it to my upcoming exams."
Volunteers from the corporation's staff and the Ministry of
Education will aid and monitor the students as they take part in the
clinic on Tuesdays and Thursdays between the hours of 4pm and
6pm at the BEC's headquarters on Baillou Hill Road.


248 Bay Street: 302.2800* Marathon Mall: 393.4406


ITDISCUS TOIESONTHS PGELO0ONTOWW.TIBUE22CO0







The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, March 4, 2010 * PG 29


A\ Bahamas State Council Preoares for an exciting


of The Pentecostal Assemblies of The World Inc.
March 7th - 12th, 2010

Greater Bethel Cathedral
Faith Way.oif Blue Hill Road South
{Corner of Carlton E- Francis School)


Host Pastor
Suffragan Bishop Christopher Minnis

Ea rly Mor ning Prayer - 5--00 am - 6:00 am
Day Sessions - 12:00 noon - 2-00 pm
Evening Worship Service - 7:30 pm

Theme: "Spread The Fire"
"But thO' shall rpefivp power when the Holy Spirit has cnme upon
you; and you shall be wiltnes to Me in Jersu!alern, and in all Judea
and Samaria, and to th end of the earth."
Script jre Text Act 1:1-8

Suffraga n Bishop Win so n Redwood
Day Session Speakers: Pastor Thomas Mackey
Bishop Ellis Farrinqton J.P.
Prophetess Dorothy McPhee


Evening Worship Speakers:


B�sh p I I i LI'rlr ,.in Bishq1 | |.,, Ir i k I:,|,
-.1 'rifni.'on Ezekiel Munnings iR.lAinas n, I riliani
CoIu il. Pre it'. Il


District EIder
Fiul RI.ll ,


lirlin s join ri jni's


Don't Miss
Your
Pressing!
Re There1


Suffragan BiskMp
Christopher Min nis


Pastor
NA 'nttniel Curtis







PG 30 * Thursday, March 4, 2010


RELIGION


The Tribune


Staying single



and celibate


By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer


FOR many single women
wanting to walk the straight
and narrow path, taming
their sexual desires and resist-
ing the urge to engage in pre-
marital sexual affairs can be
challenging.
To help women with their sexual
struggles, Debra Elliott and the
Daughters of Light International will
host a seminar under the theme
"Single, Saved, Over 40 and Still
Having Sex".
The event will be held at the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel in the Exuma
Room starting at 8am on March 26.
During the seminar, women will find
the key to unlocking the tower of
strength they need to override any and
every temptation.
"This tower of strength which is
Christ is the only remedy to the prob-
lem," Debra Elliot president of
Daughters of Light International told
Tribune Religion.
During her experiences as a coun-


selor she has been greeted by many
woman who face the challenge of
celibacy.
And while she has mentored young
women who face the same issue, she
said that now more than ever middle
aged women have fallen victims to the
spirit of lust.
"I realized that these women are bat-
tling with the flesh. For them their
greatest struggle is singleness," she
said.
Because modern day society has
casually accepted sex before marriage,
women have fallen weak to the pres-
sures of men she said.
Fearing that these men will leave to
find someone who's willing to have sex
with them is what she said causes the
women to break their celibacy commit-
ment.
"The spirit of lust is very rampant in
our society and it is hard for these
women to resist the temptation since
their main fear is getting older and
being alone," she said.
Additionally, she explained that
some men take advantage of the
women's vulnerability and their fear of
loneliness.
SEE page 35


Yadah


By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net


'YADAH' is one of seven Hebrew
words used to describe unrestrained,
uninhibited praise, engaging the full
participation of Christian worshippers.
It is at this level of praising God where
you may witness some persons being
caught up in the 'Holy Ghost' during
an extreme hand-clapping, power-
packed worship service.
This is the idea behind Yaddah Fest-
-an Easter Sunday concert at New
Covenant Baptist Church planned by
minister Glenmore Johnson, who
hopes that Bahamians will attend the
event in large numbers.
"When we praise God, a lot of good
things happen," said Mr Johnson. "We
are reflecting on the death and resur-


reaction of Christ, and out of this event,
there's going to be a death to evil and a
resurrection to righteousness.
Yadah Fest is described as "some-

SEE page 35


Bringing all people closer to God
through Worship, Ministry and Service
As part of its 200th Anniversary and the celebration of
the 450th Anniversary of the Reformation
presents its
2010 Lenten Lectures Series

"Giants of the Reformation"
* Lecture 1: 7pm February 23rd - The Series OVERVIEW
by Rev Scott Kirkland- Minister of Lucaya Presbyterian Church in Grand Bahama
* Lecture 2: 7pm March 2nd - The APOSTLE PAUL
by Rev Franklin Knowles - Minister of Light & Life Community Church in Nassau
* Lecture 3:7pm March 9th - AUGUSTINE
by Rev Dr Norman "Norry" Maciver - Ret. Minister from Aberdeen, Scotland
* Lecture 4: 7pm March 16th - JOHN CALVIN - Speaker TBA
* Lecture 5: 7pm March 23rd - JOHN KNOX
by Rev Richard Gibbons - Senior Pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Greenville, South Carolina
This is an open invitation to anyone who would like to learn more about the Protestant Reformation and some of the
"Giants" who helped shape the Reformed Faith that, in part or in whole, is central to most Protestant denominations
of Christianity... including the Presbyterian denomination.
With CHRIST at the center and Chief Cornerstone, we will learn how dedicated men of the gospel starting with the
Apostle Paul on to Augustine and beyond to Calvin and Knox helped to frame what we have come to know as the
Reformed Faith, with Knox being referred to as the founder of the Presbyterian denomination.

Parking availableftom te Peck's Slope entranc
FKOM PXUL OF T�BKi S TO KNOX F HDI KO






The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, March 4, 2010 * PG 31


A cold wind


THE TEMPERATURE for the
next several days is supposed to be
on the cool and breezy side. This
means bundling up to protect the
body and moving outdoor events
indoor if the wind is too blustery or
the cold front brings rain. Now
imagine what it must be like to live
in a family where the emotional tem-
perature is like this or worse. No
smiles, no hugs, no warm and loving
words only cold stares, the cold
shoulder, and icy tones dripping with
icicles of sarcasm. What does this do
to the heart? How does it affect the
spirit?
The spiritual deep freeze is only
able to thaw when the love of God is
permitted to melt the heart. Healing
and forgiveness must accompany the
journey to warm relations. We have



Catholic schools


at center of


abuse scandal

BERLIN
IT HAPPENED for years, again and
again. Every morning before class, the
boys had to undress and Father Ludger
Stueper sprayed them with cold water
from the hose, front and back, according
to the Associated Press.
The boys also had to lie down on
Stueper's couch where the Roman
Catholic priest would take their temper-
ature - rectally for seven minutes.
And then there were the photos.
"One time, Stueper took pictures of a
friend and me while we were in the show-
er. He also made us go outside and we
had to pose naked for him, lean against
stones and trees in the park, the foam
from the shampoo still in our hair,"
recalled Miguel Abrantes, a former stu-
dent at the Jesuit-run boarding school
Aloisius Kolleg in Bonn.
Abrantes, now 37 and an actor in
Duesseldorf, is one of the few victims
willing to speak out about the abuse and
humiliation he suffered as an 11-year-old
boy at the school.
He is one of at least 150 victims in an
ever-widening scandal involving allega-


Tr.


-I


REV \N(,ELX


. PALAX( .I )I ,,

to, first of all, admit that we need
God's presence to be our ever-pres-
ent fireplace keeping our lives bright
and cheery (filled with joy). Next,
we need the power of the cross to
keep the Blood of Christ flowing
over us, and the Holy Eucharist min-
gling with the blood in our veins.
Finally, the Holy Spirit keeps us
aglow, so that we radiate the warmth
of God's love wherever we go.
If you have ever lived in a very
cold climate you know what is need-

tions of priests sexually abusing their
pupils at several Catholic high schools
across Germany. The scandal has spi-
raled since seven alumni of the presti-
gious Catholic Canisius Kolleg in Berlin


C,



O

'--I


ed to survive. I lived in Montreal,
Canada, for several years and learnt
how to layer clothing to be comfort-
able outside in the bitter cold, and
inside in a heated, crowded room. It
is a matter of taking off and putting
on as the need arises. Caps on the
head and over the ears, mittens on
the hands, scarves around the neck
and nose, winter coats, fur lined
boots, thermal undergarments and
various sweaters, snow suits and any-
thing else suitable for the occasion.
Likewise, cold hearts are often
buried under layers of hurt, anger,
bitterness and unforgiveness. There
are many walls and barriers careful-
ly placed to protect the individual
who lives in the winter of isolation,
loneliness, rejection or betrayal.
As we come into contact with the


first came forward with allegations of
abuse in January, shocking the homeland
of Pope Benedict XVI.
While the focus of the sex abuse scan-
dal in the Catholic church centered on


Living God, we begin to shed our
layers because it is so uncomfortable
to keep a distance from God's grace.
If we are willing to come closer to
the hearth of God's heart, we find
ourselves stripped of unnecessary
barriers and the crippling bondage
that has wrapped itself around us.
It is time for us all to come out of
the cold, and come home to God.
We no longer have to stand outside
looking in through the window at
the loving family seated around the
lavishly spread table. We no longer
have to brace ourselves as we are
buffeted off course by gale force
winds.
Ask God to bless you with rebirth
or renewal and come join the family
in the warmth of God's embrace.
Come, come, come out of the cold.


the United States for several years, abuse
scandals have in recent years erupted in
other countries as well, including Ireland,
the Philippines, Poland, Mexico, Italy,
Canada and elsewhere.


,i.,t i '. ff.i, fi'd f ,t ,f , . .".




'AA( y Unylcaati


&, -


S4. /iwhl o0

c rtldfr 'lar lh 71,. 2010





at.

4:00apm


ApoesdC Ade
Prefsidin


I







I


THERE WILL BE NO 10:00 a.m. DIVINE WORSHIP
f SERVICE







PG 32 * Thursday, March 4, 2010


RELIGION


The Tribune


Are we religious or spiritual?


IN THE Bahamas, we like to think of
ourselves as a religious nation. More
precisely, we say we are a Christian
nation. But are we a spiritual nation? Is
there a difference? I believe there is a
subtle, but important difference. To be
religious implies that we hold to a lim-
ited view of spiritual truth - we strive to
live according to certain ideals that we
believe have been endorsed by God.
We may, for example, always end our
prayers in a certain way for fear of not
being heard by God if we do not.
Similarly, we may always attend a par-
ticular church, believing that to attend
any other is wrong. To be religious also
implies that we have strong beliefs
about God, and that we feel our ver-
sion of religious truth-and the version
of those who agree with us- is the only
correct version. This is, in my view,
detrimental to our spiritual growth and
to the progress of a nation.
Spirituality, on the other hand is like
swimming in a vast ocean and realising
that the same ocean that carries you
also holds and supports everyone else.
When you are spiritual, you do not feel
you have special access to God, or that
you have found the absolute truth; you
feel alive and blessed by a presence
that is loving and generous to all. You
feel no need to compete for God's
attention; no need to be right. You are
free to be who you are, to explore and


DESHON



investigate religious teachings with an
unbiased eye.
How would our society change if we
matured into a spiritual nation? This
question is one every Bahamian should
ponder.
Our society is, by any reasonable
yard stick, in trouble. Our children are
killing each other at school, the very
place where they should be maturing
into thoughtful adults. Our educational
system is largely outdated and ineffec-
tive. Our politics is petty. We have
rightfully lost respect for many of our
religious leaders. And yet, amidst this
worsening social decay, we still claim to
be a religious nation. Very strange!
What would help us to move forward as
a nation is not more bombastic preach-
ing from pulpits, but a deeper aware-
ness of our common aspirations as
human beings and as Bahamians.
This does not require us to abandon
our religious ideals; indeed, it requires
us to reassess what true religion is and
to independently evaluate our religious
beliefs. If we did this sincerely, with an


open mind and with absolute detach-
ment, we would become more enlight-
ened and would gradually be trans-
formed into more compassionate
human beings. Such a global shift in
spiritual awareness would fundamen-
tally change our society. A kinder, gen-
tler Bahamas would gradually emerge.
Our political discourse would be ele-
vated. Crime would be reduced as we
perceive more fully the sacredness of
all life. The Bahamas would become an
island nation known not only for its
physical beauty, but also for the spiritu-
al beauty of its people.
And so, while we may and should
pride ourselves on being a nation of
strong religious traditions, let us strive
to be more spiritual than religious.
Being religious cannot and should not
take the place of being spiritual. Our
ultimate goal should be to become spir-
itually enlightened. Religious activities
and traditions may, for some, be the
vehicle to this enlightenment, but it is
only a vehicle, not the destination. As
we "travel" towards spiritual enlighten-
ment, we should respect and value the
different paths that others may take
towards the same goal. We should
wholeheartedly embrace even those
who hold vastly different religious
beliefs than us. With spiritual eyes, we
would be able to see their humanity
and love them unconditionally.


This love must find expression in our
actions. Tolerance becomes divisive
when it is the kind of tolerance that
breeds pretense. Political rhetoric that
sings the praises of compromise and
consultation becomes background
noise when it is not harmonised by uni-
fying policies and behaviour. Attempts
to stem crime become a waste of
human resources when humility and
kindness are not consistently modeled
by parents and teachers. Without true
spirituality-an enlightened awareness
that allows us to perceive the beauty
and sacredness of all life-our efforts to
forge a unified and prosperous
Bahamas will only have incremental
benefits.
If we want to launch forward, to see
monumental changes in our country in
the coming years, our religious values
must move beyond our heads to our
hearts. Our actions, not simply our
words, must be aligned with the central
teachings of our faiths. If this does not
happen, positive change will be slow
and painful, and our country will con-
tinue to be just a religious nation.


* Deshon Fox is the author of The Middle
Theory. He is also a professional engineer
and columnist. To learn more about his
new book, visit
www.themiddletheory.com.


St Saviour's Anglican Parish hosts Holy Redeemer Catholic Parish

ANGLICANS and Catholics from .
all over Cat Island came together toI
mark the solemn start of the Lenten
season in a joint Ash Wednesday serv-
ice held at St Mark's in Port Howe.
The mass was celebrated in true
Lenten form; no flowers adorning the
altar and no alleluias and the Gloria
which are omitted during the Lenten
season. Fr Edward "Rex" Seymour
was the celebrant for the Eucharist and
Fr Chester Burton gave the introduc-
tion to the guest preacher. Fr Burton in .
his warm hearted welcome thanked
God that the Catholic Church has now
filled the void left vacant for many
years with the appointment of Fr
Andrew Burrows.
He further reminded his congrega-
tion of the tightly knitted relationship
that the Anglican/Episcopal Church


SEE page 34







The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, March 4, 2010 * PG 33


Seventh Day Adventist Movement


THE BEGINNING of the Seventh
Day Adventist Movement is attributed
to William Miller (1782 - 1849) an
American Baptist preacher. In the
1830s, he interpreted Daniel 8.14:
"Unto two thousand and three hun-
dred days; then shall the sanctuary be
cleansed," to mean that the cleansing
of the sanctuary represented the
Earth's purification by fire at Christ's
second coming. The Adventist move-
ment and its observance of the Sabbath
was transformed from an obscure,
regional movement into a national
campaign.
The cause of the Seventh Day
Adventists was advanced by Ellen G
White. She was a woman of remark-
able spiritual gifts who lived most of
her life during the nineteenth century
(1827-1915), yet through her writings
she is still making a revolutionary
impact on millions of people around
the world. During her lifetime she
wrote more than 5,000 periodical arti-
cles and 40 books
As a Christian church, Seventh-day
Adventists are a faith community root-
ed in the beliefs described by the Holy
Scriptures. Adventists describe these
beliefs in the following ways:
God's greatest desire is for you to see
a clear picture of His character. When
you see Him clearly, you will find His
love irresistible. Scripture is a road
map. The Bible is God's voice, speak-
ing His love personally to you today.
Jesus is the one who never changes in


Members of Temple of the Word
Ministries members discuss:



"What my


pastor


means


to me"


-LV )
. LA\\L()1R


a universe that always does. Jesus is
Creator, Sustainer, Saviour, Friend,
God's Son, and God Himself!
God's vision for you is life as He lives
it! God loves you, and wants to give
you the highest quality of life imagi-
nable.
In the heart of God is a place you
can experience as home. God loves
you, and wants to spend time with you
personally, one on one, as two close
friends.
Eternal life, peace, purpose, forgive-
ness, transforming grace, hope:
Everything He promises is ours,
because He's offering it and He's
shown we can trust Him to do exactly
as He promises. Accept His gifts, and
you immediately become an active
part of His family, and He joyfully
becomes part of yours.
In 1893, Seventh Day Adventist
Missionary, C H Richards and his wife
came to the Bahamas which he report-
ed had a population of about 50,000 -
one third of the population was
Caucasian and the balance with shades
from yellow to black. Richards implied
that the Bahamas was a virgin territo-
ry and that "no one of whom so far as


ON THE eve of his tenth pas-
toral anniversary, members of the
Temple of the World Ministries
explain the impact Pastor
Kenneth Adderley has had on
their lives. Pastor Adderley will
be honoured this week under the
theme - " A servant with a pas-
sion and a purpose"
KIYOSHI MAJOR - "Pastor Ken
is a person that comes to your
aid when the world has turned its
back on you, and you feel that
there is no way out of life's
issues."
CERON ROLLE - " Pastor Ken is
one of the most inspiring role
modes in my life. He is smart,
funny and knows his Bible really
well. His teachings stand out like
a shining beacon of light in a cor-
rupted world of evil and dark-


we know, fully understands and obeys
the (Sabbath) truth for this time."
In March of 1895, Mr and Mrs C. E.
Parmele, also literature evangelists,
under the directive of the Foreign
Mission Board, succeeded the
Richards in the Bahamas.
Charles Antonio, a shoemaker was
the first Bahamian to accept the
Seventh-day Adventist message. His
son, Brother William W Antonio,
was among the first Bahamians to
serve on the Bahamas Mission of
Seventh Day Adventist Executive
Committee.
Pastors Silas N McKinney and
Neville E Scavella, were the first
Bahamians to train for the ministry. In
1956, upon completion of their theo-
logical studies they were employed by
the Bahamas Mission. Silas McKinney
(1964 - 1976 ) became the first
Bahamian President and was followed
by Leslie V McMillan (1976 - 1980),
Hugh A Roach (1980 - 1986) Silas N
McKinney (1986 - 1990), Jeremiah
Duncombe (1990 - 1996), Keith D
Albury (1996 - January 10, 2003) and
Leonard Johnson - January 10, 2003 -
to date).
Great things come from humble
beginnings. The oldest Adventist
Church in The Bahamas is Centreville
Church which started on Shirley
Street but relocated to the corner of
Collins Avenue and 5th Terrace.
The Hillview Seventh-day
Adventist Church began as far back as


1942 - Haddassah Poitier then, a
member of the Grant's Town Seventh-
day Adventist Church invited all of
the children in the neighborhood to
Friday evening vespers and Branch
Sabbath School classes on the follow-
ing day. In 1952 under the leadership
of Elder Mote, Mission President, the
company was organised into a church.
Charter Members included
Haddassah Poitier, Jane Brown, Pearl
McMillan and Hamfreth Rahming
from the Grant's Town Adventist
Church.
The Breath of Life Seventh Day
Adventist Church came into being in
1993 following a six-week crusade,
held by Dr Charles Brooks, at the H.
D. Colburn Auditorium, Wulff Road.
Pastor Leonard and Denise Johnson
were chosen to lead the fledgling
church.
Thus from humble beginnings, the
church in the Bahamas began. Today,
the Seventh-day Adventist Church is
the fourth largest denomination in the
country. The total of the Bahamas
Conference Membership as of
November 5, 2009 was 15,020. There
are 44 Adventist Churches and
Companies in the Bahamas
Conference. Twenty-four are located
in Nassau, and 20 are on eight of the
central and southern Family Islands.
The Islands of Grand Bahama,
Abaco, Bimini, and the Berry Islands,
constitute the Northern Bahamas
Conference.


ness."
KATIE SYMONETTE - "Pastor
Ken has great character. He dis-
plays humbleness, confidence
and pride. Most importantly, he
shows love for anyone no matter
who they are."
TALITHA CARTWRIGHT - "When
you walk in this church with evil
and no care of God's word, you
walk out with a clean spirit and
with a Bible in your hand.
Pastor Ken is friendly and you
can go to his office and tell him
your complaints."
TRACEY SYMONETTE - "Despite
the challenges and obstacles he
has been through, his purpose in
life is to follow God. Pastor Ken
is loyal and trustworthy. He has a
deep kindness that teaches us to
be content in our everyday life."








PG 34 * Thursday, March 4, 2010


RELIGION


The Tribune


Empowerment


As I've stated before; we've perfect-
ed the art of riding the waves of words
without dissecting and understanding
fully the meaning thereof. Therefore
no matter how we try to eloquently
politicise or spiritualise a word; the
scripture (Hosea.4:6) always meets us
at the front door as our ignorance
shines forth like the morning sun.
The national word of today is
Empowerment. It seems as if no mat-
ter what arena or gathering one goes
into; the word empowerment is some-
what the thrust of the conference or
meeting. As the scriptures are being
fulfilled everyday before our eyes; peo-
ple from all walks of life can be heard
crying out in various ways for spiritual,
emotional, financial, or psychological
help, yet to no avail.
This leads me to conclude that
despite all of the rhetoric about
empowerment for the most part; 95
per cent of the people who are talking
about empowerment have a precon-
ceived, distorted, unclear view of
empowerment itself. The following
statement can be often heard over the
air waves and throughout our commu-
nities, "The Government needs to do
more to empower its people."
I would double dog dare you to ask
those who are echoing empowerment
to expound on their meaning of
empowerment? To make a long story
short; empowerment to many is creat-
ing employment opportunities or some
kind of hand out to the needy. Listen!
By no means am I knocking the cre-
ation of employment opportunities and
assisting the needy; for this in itself is


good also.
Follow me for a few moments as I
paint the picture of that which I'm say-
ing; and if you're honest, you know that
what I am saying is the truth.
Here's the Webster Dictionary defi-
nition of empowerment: 1) to give
authority or power, and 2) to enable.
Where do you think Mr Webster got
his definition of empowerment? Being
the religious people that we are- does
Webster's definition sounds familiar?
Watch this! Speaking of Yeshuwa
Messiah (a.k.a. Jesus the Christ) here's
what the scripture says.
Luke.9:1: Then he called his twelve
disciples together, and gave them
power and authority over all devils, and
to cure diseases.
: 2. And he sent them to preach the
kingdom of God, and to heal the sick.
: 3. And he said unto them, Take
nothing for your journey, neither
staves, nor scrip, neither bread, neither
money; neither have two coats apiece.
This word power in the Greek is:
dunamis, doo'-nam-is; which means 1)
ability, and 2) the abundance of
strength and might.
The word authority in the Greek is:
exousia, ex-oo-see'-ah; which also has
several meanings as follows: 1) force, 2)


capacity, 3) competency, 4) freedom, 5)
mastery, 6) magistrate, 7) potentate, 8)
token of control, 9) delegated influ-
ence, and 10) jurisdiction.
As a people / nation, we've become
so comfortable with mediocrity that
even in our cry of empowerment; we
will settle for being the recipients of a
weekly or monthly pay-check or chari-
table hand outs. The two most influen-
tial systems of the world (political and
religious) have not been established to
empower the masses of people; but
rather to govern and keep the masses
looking to, and depending upon their
leaders for answers and support.
Do yourself a favor and follow the
trail of authority in this country; maybe
then you will get some idea of that
which I'm speaking. Because, true
empowerment calls for the denying of
one's self and the preferring, the
advancement and the substantial wel-
fare of others above self.
Now, check your list / trail of author-
ity figures and see who is denying
themselves so that you or others can
succeed? How about your honourable
member of parliament, or better still;
how about your anointed religious
leader?
Again, the leaders of the systems
(political and religious) fully embrace
the lyrics of the Great Ronnie Butler's
song "I know them long time, them
people they're mine" for the politicians
are fully aware of the fact that the
grassroots have been well trained and
conditioned to receive political rhetoric
and futile promises.
Likewise, the religious leaders know


that the people are trenched in tradi-
tion and religion; and its only a matter
of opening a Bible and quoting a few
scriptures to move their agenda and
their people in a desired direction.
True empowerment comes from
Father Yahweh through the obedience
of His word from which man has taken
and twisted to form their various reli-
gions thereby financially and materially
empowering themselves.
In speaking to a people here's what
Yahweh says: Deut.8:18. But thou shalt
remember the LORD thy God: for it is
he that giveth thee power to get wealth,
that he may establish his covenant
which he sware unto thy fathers, as it is
this day.
People, wake up! The empowerment
that your spirit man knows that you're
entitled to through a covenant relation-
ship will never be obtained in religion.
This empowerment can't be found at
political rallies or religious confer-
ences, but rather it is found in getting
back to basics studying and obedience
to God's word. Again, there's always
much more to say, but this ought to be
enough to cause you to get up and do
the right things for your children's chil-
dren sake.

May the FOG (Favor of God) be
with you


* For questions or comments contact us
via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
kmfci@live.com or Ph.1-242-441-2021
Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l


Holy Redeemer Catholic Parish


FROM page 32

has with the Catholic Church from his-
tory with the separation due in large
part to King Henry VIII marriage. He
also thanked God that the two denom-
inations can share joint services.
Deacon Burrows took his text from
the gospel passage appropriate for the
Ash Wednesday Eucharist service-
Matthew 6 vs. 1-6 and 16-18. In the pas-
sage Jesus spoke specifically to the
nature and tenets which the Lenten
season is hinged upon.
First, Jesus spoke about almsgiving
and not letting your left hand know
what your right hand is doing. Second,
Jesus spoke about praying and said this


should be done within the confines of
one's room instead of promenading on
street corners and intersections and
finally Jesus said when fasting, you
shouldn't look dismal and exhibit the
look of fasting, it is only important to
be seen by God.
Deacon Burrows in his sermon
emphasised that Lenten acts of devo-
tions should be focused on getting
God's attention not man's attention. He
admonished that every Lenten season
Christians should peel away a layer of
our beings that it is not pleasing to God
(indicative of the layers of an onion.)
Throughout the season of Lent, the
Anglicans and Catholics will visit and
host each other for alternative Fridays
for Stations of the Cross.







The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, March 4, 2010 * PG 35


Staying single and celibate


FROM page 30

"I have had many women come to
me in positions like this who explain
that the men, knowing how much it
means to them to get married, paint a
picture that they are for keeps. Then
after they have somehow persuaded
the woman to have sex with them, they
tell the woman they need space from
the relationship when she starts talking
about marriage," Mrs Eliott explained.
An explanation for why this
becomes a cycle for some women is
because the strength of their connec-
tion with Christ is weak she said.
"Its not that they don't love the
Lord. Some of these women have told
me that they want to do what is right
and live a celibate life until they get
married. But to be honest if your bond
with God is not strong, this is next to
impossible," she explained.
Although the struggle may seem
challenging, Mrs Eliott said with help
from God it is possible for one's life to
turn around and evidence of that is her
own life.
"This is my testimony. I never lived a
celibate life before I got married. I had
kids out of marriage and I was one of
those women who dated married men.
After realising that this is not the kind
of life I wanted, God grabbed a hold
on me and ever since that day my life
has turned around. I remained celibate
and God has blessed me with a hus-
band that loves me more than ever,"
she said.
She hopes that women all over will
seek God first and believe that he
knows what's best for their lives.




Yadah

FROM page 30

thing positive," with music behind the
cause. It is the first of a series of con-
certs to be held at New Covenant
Baptist Church. Barak, Landlord, Mr
Lynxx, Tracy Tracy, Stichie, Kirk Davis,
Ricardo Clarke, Twiggy, June
Flemming, Mr God Bless, Christian
Massive and several other gospel reg-
gae artists will provide entertainment;
crossing a wide array of musical genres.
"Music plays an integral part in cor-
recting some of the problems of society,
and we wanted to bring on artists who
would attract young people to uplift the
name of Christ," said Mr Johnson.
In a statement to Tribune Religion,
the church's pastor Bishop Simeon Hall


" If that man really loves you, he will
wait on you until you are ready to get
married. So there is no need to fear
that he will leave if you don't give
yourself to him. And it may be hard
accepting the fact that he might not be

emphasized his concern for the crime sit-
uation in the country and called on the
Christian community and everyone else
to look to God during their tests and tri-
als.
"One of the tragedies in modern life
is that we are always feeding our fleshly
desires, and callously living our lives.
But we are also spirit beings, and we
need to feed our spirit as we do our
flesh. And we believe that this concert
will help to feed the spirits of our peo-
ple," said Bishop Hall.
Bishop Hall made a "clarion and
urgent call" to the country's leaders to
move quickly to seek greater response
to the nightmare of crime which engulfs
this land.
"There is a powerful group of persons
who are benefiting from crime and the
change we so badly need cannot be
expected to be initiated by them," said
Bishop Hall.
The statement went on to say: "The
dark night of lawlessness must be met


.:-. : M" "



- 'S. = }

' 'If that man really
loves you, he will
wait on you until you
are ready to get mar-
S ried. So there is no

the one, because you love him, but need to fear that he
trust God and he will send someone will leave if you don't
who will love you selflessly," she said. . .
It is her prayer that the seminar will give yourself to him.'
provide valuable information, uplift-
ment and encouragement to women. DEBRA ELLIOTT


with laws which are draconian and
enforceable. While all sectors must par-
ticipate in this crusade, parliamentari-
ans and lawyers must lead in this fight."
"When a man is out on bail and mur-
ders again, it is time to act," said Bishop
Hall. "It seems to me an obvious fact
that it is the law that must remain at the
vanguard of the crusade against lawless-
ness in our Bahamas."
Yadah Fest is just one another initia-
tive that New Convenant Baptist
Church has taken on to put a Band-Aid
on the crime situation in the region,
which the church believes can be mend-
ed through spiritual renewal.
Last year, Bishop Hall praised the
construction of his church's memorial
wall, located on the grounds of the
church on Independence Highway.
The structure is a significant and
symbolic tool commemorating the lives
of Bahamians who were taken in hor-
rific and unjust fashions.
Bishop Hall lamented that the


courts, lawyers, magistrates, and judges
are not doing enough to protect inno-
cent persons in Bahamian society. He
called on higher officials to "rid (the
country) of persons who are intent on
destroying the civility which we once
enjoyed."
Still, the laws and legal infrastruc-
ture of the country pillars are difficult
to heed for some, and Bishop Hall
believes that the solution is for persons
to return to the Christian faith.
"The church is at its best when it
caters to the whole man, meeting the
spiritual, mental and physical needs,"
he said.
Bahamian minister Glen Johnson
who now lives in the US has coordinat-
ed the event, and according to Bishop
Hall, Mr Miller has put on power-
packed concerts in the past.
Part of the proceeds generated from
the concert, will be donated to the
Children's Hostel and Haitian Relief
Fund.






PG 36 0 Thursday, March 4, 2010 RELIGION The Tribune


WASTING NO TIME




(CONCERT
N THE heels of yet another smash
hit song "Wasting No Time"
Ricardo Clarke is staging yet
another gospel concert to inspire, encour-
age new talent and celebrate the release
of his official follow up to his breakthrough
hit song and album "Not Settling". Ricardo
shot to the national spotlight as his song
crossed over into heavy rotation and
became an anthem and soundtrack to peo-
i. ..pie's lives.
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