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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01519
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: February 27, 2010
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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System ID: UF00084249:01519

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No.81


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010


up ll ig t


d j ptrlisnowue
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PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)


i cm


Commissioner


says incidents


are 'isolated'


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
THE country's top police
chief yesterday sought to reas-
sure the public that the recent
spate of terrifying home inva-
sions are not part of a wider
trend.
Commissioner Ellison
Greenslade described the
attacks - which have includ-
ed a murder and a double kid-
napping - as "isolated" inci-
dents.
He said police are taking the
matters "very, very seriously."
"There are some categories
of crime that, when they hap-
pen, create tremendous fear in
our communities, and so if you
have one home invasion it caus-
es tremendous fear. (Howev-
er) I don't want to take that out
of context you don't have peo-
ple in every community on
every street corner going into
homes. That's not happening,
I have no information in that
regard," said Mr Greenslade
yesterday.
On Monday, Henry McPhee


was murdered by an intruder
who broke into his home at
Oleander Drive, Coral Har-
bour.
Mr McPhee was shot in the
head while his girlfriend and
daughter were tied up and
robbed of valuables.
On Tuesday, a policeman's
wife and daughter were kid-
napped from their Gladstone
Road home by two gunmen
who had demanded cash.
After being told there was
no money in the house, the ter-
rified couple were bundled into
the family's Ford SUV.
After a short drive, the wife
was released while the daughter
escaped by leaping from the car
as it was moving.
Commissioner Greenslade
said he could not say whether
the incidents are connected.
However two men have been
arrested in connection with the
Oleander Drive attack, while
police are following "active
leads" into the second matter,
SEE page seven


'No more Police

questions for

talk show host'
POLICE Commis-
sioner Ellison
Greenslade went on
record yesterday to state
that controversial radio
talk show host Ortland
Bodie Jr will not face
any more questions from
his officers.
Mr Bodie was picked
up by the police on
Wednesday evening and
questioned in relation to
his possible possession
of an illegal firearm after
he claimed on national
SEE page 7


'I I I I II I' 'II









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Sands and Pinder lawyers


set for court
By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
LAWYERS for by-election
contenders Dr Duane Sands
and Ryan Pinder will appear
before the Supreme Court next
Thursday for a date for a hear-
ing to be set.
It is expected the court will
settle on a date for the case to
begin. "There is a fixture date


* Government
investment for
public farmers'
market - PAGE 3
0 Law
students
urged to view
potentials of
arbitration
- PAGE 6


appearance
set for March 4," confirmed
Milton Evans, of Evans and Co,
who is part of Dr Sands' legal
team.
"That is the date appointed
when the court indicates that it
wants to see the interested par-
ties. The court will normally
give an indication as to the
direction of how they want to
proceed in terms of time and
scheduling. We should be able
to get a better indication as to
when the court will be able to
hear the case."
Thomas Evans, QC, also of
Evans and Co will serve as Dr
Sand's lead counsel.
This week, the PLP filed an
election court application to
have Mr Pinder declared the
winner of the hotly-contested
Elizabeth by-election arguing
that a clear majority of the vot-
ers voted for him. The crux of
their argument centres around
five protest ballots they claim
were cast in favour of Ryan Pin-
der.
Due to the slim margin of
SEE page seven


Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff
COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade presents Sergeant Audley Dean with a "Pinnacle" award. SEE PAGE TWO for full story and more photos.


Tourist recovering after cutlass attack

By MEGAN REYNOLDS U Two men appear in Magistrate's court
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
AN AMERICAN tourist
is recovering in a Florida
hospital after he was slashed
with a cutlass by intruders
to his Harbour Island hotel..
room early Thursday morn-
ing.
Sources say Eddie Bryant, -
44, of Stamford, Connecti-
, ..-- . 3-- - - _ '. .
cut, nearly lost a finger when--- .-
he held up his arms to pro. ----
tect his face from the attack -'-
after two men broke into his - -_ --
Tingum Village room at .. -
around 2am.
Mr Bryant was airlifted to .
hospital in Nassau and then 7_7
flown to a Fort Lauderdale .
hospital where he is receiv-
ing treatment for seriousC
injuries to his right arm and C
CL
SEE page 7 CHARGED: MARIO MOSS CHARGED: KARON PARKS


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PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


*OCAL NEWS I


A Force for good


Commissioner presents awards to 19 retired police officers


COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade presents
PC Clifford Wood with a "Pinnacle" award.


PC LEASER GAITOR receives her "Pinnacle" award from
Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade.


COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade (left) pre-
sents Sergeant Leroy Brown with a "Pinnacle" award.

PHOTOS: Felipe Major/Tribune staff


I .- -Y . . .

4^' .-1 9' - '





RETIRED policemen pose with Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade (centre) and senior officers yesterday at
police headquarters. The retired officers were all honoured for their service and given the new "Pinnacle" award.


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

USHERING in what top
officers described as a new era
of recognition for police offi-
cers and the sacrifice they make
for the Force and their com-
munities, Commissioner of
Police Ellison Greenslade yes-
terday presented awards to 19
recently retired police officers.
He also offered apologies to
those contracted officers of the
sergeant rank and below, who
from "time immemorial" have
left the police force without
adequate recognition for their
service. Mr Greenslade told the
media he believes that by doing
the "right and decent" thing by
formally recognizing the con-
tributions and sacrifices made
by officers of all ranks, the
Force will be able to "make a
tremendous difference in terms
of our responses to the whole
issue of crime."
"Trust me, there is a con-
nect," said Mr Greenslade, who
suggested the retirement cere-
mony was part of an evolving
culture of "care, respect and
trust" within the Royal
Bahamas Police Force.
All the officers were of
sergeant rank and below, and
would previously have only
informally received a certificate
of discharge upon retirement
in a quick "two second" meet-
ing with the commissioner in


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his office. Yesterday, each was
photographed, personally con-
gratulated for their service and
given the newly-created "Pin-
nacle" award by Mr Greenslade
to take home.
"These men and women
have given stellar service, they
have sacrificed and some have
even been injured. (Commis-
sioner Greenslade) felt it should
be mandatory for an organisa-
tion to recognize that," said
Assistant Commissioner of
Police Hulan Hanna, modera-
tor at the retirement ceremony
held at police headquarters.
Mr Greenslade described the
officers, who together have


served almost 600 years in the
various divisions and agencies
of the RBPF, as "men and
women who have committed
themselves to the police force
as youngsters right out of
school. All they know is law
enforcement and serving the
people of the Bahamas."
He thanked them for their
"selfless contribution" in mak-
ing the Bahamas safer.
Commissioner Greenslade
said that he intends for such
ceremonies to become a staple
of the police calendar as they
will be instituted for all retir-
ing officers. At the retirement
ceremony yesterday, Mr
Greenslade spoke casually to
the officers, who he called his
"family", about his desire to see
more unity among all ranks of
the force and suggested that
with this achieved, their effec-
tiveness in tackling crime would
only be enhanced.
"Imagine how powerful we
can be, all 4,500 of us, truly con-
nected. Eyes and ears open.
Demonstrating care, respect
and trust among one another.
And if we get that right, imag-
ine conveying that to the wider
community in the Bahamas and
getting people to reciprocate
and love you back. There's
nothing that the public wouldn't
tell you. Imagine what they'll
tell us. If we work on care,
respect and trust, it's going to
pay tremendous benefits," he
said.


SERGEANT Ernett Rahming (right) is given his "Pinnacle"
award by Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade.


COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade presents PC
Rudolph Burrows with his "Pinnacle" award.


COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade presents
and PC Anton Lockhart with his "Pinnacle" award.


COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade with
Sergeant Gregory Munroe who was presented with a
"Pinnacle" award.


*1'1 C.




EXCITING AND CHALLENGING OPPORTUNITIES FOR

YOUNG BAHAMIANS

Iliginf a ane r Wfiti ill takeW o t"We wo l IMia ng port I a rer d ung
dlatkilonww A Maritime caer could lake you thee.

Do you he, or ae likely to hve, 5 BGCSE pami, hicuag Malh, RiyclcuComtined
Slea nd Engllsh Language at grade'C or above?

Hlae you obtalned, or d y pect ip acta , a oombiined SAT score af at lmst 1500?

Ae youphyeIcay lt?

Are you betwwn the ags of16 nda 3 years?

If you h anewmred YESto ti qumta, above dthun red on.

The BWohms ioftlme Authortty oaa rd rwUw keciw teorMip to young
aCaudatmically somd Bhhmfialr who m kn o tati or an anting nld dmallnghi
career bi the Martln. huty which bi gpilig IncrueH nilliial ImportiMS.

The scholmahip is Iictfl of uion ie, courmm aMIIdal, ccomodm"on ad
trnhportlMou cftu. Conmwncg In SepteWmer 2010 t0w umcciIful cmdaSD iNl
flaw a4 year argrem prqnmm al Cillamila lMrtlhr IAcflmy, I uilqu ca pus
of tihm Catfa Ste Univeslty. Upon compienfin of ft dgre,% t qualfied oflcr will
b xpect d to a er on board a Bamlen mt ed l m or lew l 2 year providing
ft sold foudallnon m whichito bull hlhw Iridime comer.


Further iontmeuoo and appllcalfn orms
eaen e obalnald from Mm Erma RSSingq
Mackey, Deputy Diwrctr, Balm
MItdal Auhborty, Maien Cpat C men,,
Wet Bay SIreet P 0 Bo NH47, NeNau.
nBhamoe, mWHl:
r nac ananaus m Ii: 3B3
5772 n: 356 5-. CaNplad
appMll must be lublnd o wth
cplN ol ci mic c rllttw rancriple
ind proof of Bhhmilm caunnip, Mal
klter thin 31' Mard 2010. Interve il
lake place in Nas during the week
ikAprL


/
_ --


r


Man accused of unlawful sex with 12-year-old girl


A 20-year-old Nassau man
has been charged with having
unlawful sex with a 12-year-





'11,1.


old girl and was arraigned in a
Magistrates Court yesterday.
Johinan Gaudin, of Cow-
pen Road, has been remand-
ed in custody until Wednes-
day.
He was arraigned before
Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomex in Court One, Bank
Lane, at around 4pm yester-
day and charged with having
unlawful sexual intercourse
with the child on February 17.


Mr Gomez adjourned the
matter until Wednesday and
prosecutors requested for
Gaudin to be remanded in
custody as police are unsure
of his immigration status.
A preliminary inquiry will
be held to determine whether
there is enough evidence
against him for the matter to
be tried in the Supreme
Court.


7:30 a.m.



9:00 a.m.



11:00 a.m.



11:15 a.m.


Holy Communion with Sermon



Sung Holy Eucharist with Sermon



ANUlAL GENERAL MEETING



Holy Communion with Sermon


PLEASE NOTE: There wiU be no Evening Service.


IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I


Service Times for



Christ Church Cathedral
Anglican/Episcopal Church
George Street
Nassau, Bahamas


Sunday, February 28th, 2010

Second Sunday In Lent


ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING



The Parish's Annual General Meeting will take place
on Sunday, February 28%, 2010.

ALL Services will be held at their usual times with the
exception of Evensong.






T1~7


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


EIOI AULETE S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm



Disparate cultures on display on Hill


WASHINGTON - Corporate leaders
in Japan are affable cheerleaders who solic-
it everyone's views and avoid confrontation
at almost any cost. It's called "nemawashi."
U.S. lawmakers are cutthroat partisans who
clamour for the spotlight, especially in an
election year. It's called politics.
These cultures collided Wednesday in the
appearance of a polite man from a distant
land before a congressional committee
stocked with angry men and women with
axes to grind.
Toyota President Akio Toyoda's moment
was one brought to us by globalization, the
integration of economies and societies
through a worldwide network of trade and
communications. Toyoda's appearance illus-
trated two stark realities: Nations are more
knitted together than ever, and still oh-so far
apart.
A generation ago, it was good politics in
Congress to bash Japan and buy American.
Now U.S. lawmakers grab campaign money
from Toyota executives and scramble to
save Toyota jobs in their districts.
Auto workers used to take sledgeham-
mers to foreign cars. Now thousands of them
work for foreign companies, and U.S. car
dealers wear "I am Toyota in America" but-
tons to Capitol Hill.
And consider the hearing itself, where
American directness confronted Japanese
subtlety as Toyoda apologized for life-threat-
ening safety lapses and for a corporate cul-
ture that may have made things worse.
The grandson of the company's founder
noted that the vehicles bear his name. "For
me," Toyoda said in a thin, reedy voice,
"when the cars are damaged, it is as though
I am as well."
It was a uniquely Japanese way to lead
in crisis. How often do troubled U.S. leaders
call themselves damaged goods?
Unlike in the United States, where self-
promoting corporate leaders cast themselves
as buck-stops-here demigods, the heads of
Japanese companies are chosen for their
skills at team decision-making. Most climbed
the corporate ladder without rocking the
boat, and humility is prized.
Their job is to ensure stability and har-
mony.
Harmony? Not a word usually associated
with the U.S. corporate culture. Or Con-
gress.
"This is appalling, sir," said Rep. John
Mica, R-Fla., waving copies of a July 2009
presentation at Toyota's Washington office.
The confidential document bragged of saving
$100 million or more by negotiating an
"equipment recall" of floor mats involving
55,000 Toyota vehicles in September 2007.
"I'm embarrassed for you, sir," Mica said.
Toyoda, who earned a business degree in
Massachusetts, is no stranger to the United
States. But he's probably unaccustomed to


the impatience - and at times the imperti-
nence - of U.S. lawmakers.
Their questions came "with all due
respect," a caveat that paves the way for
countless slights on Capitol Hill.
Rep. Edolphus Towns, D-N.Y., pressed
Toyoda about whether the company could
correct the acceleration problem. Toyoda
gave a long, indirect answer - establishing
a pattern for the hearing.
"I'm trying to find out," an exasperated
Towns said, "is that a yes or a no?"
Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., who received
a $1,000 campaign contribution in December
from the president of a Toyota dealership in
California, jumped to Toyoda's defence. He
explained that a complicated problem
required complicated answers.
Toyoda gave his opening statement in
heavily accented English. He fielded ques-
tions through a translator, but clearly had
command of the situation - and used the
extra time to consider his answers.
Early on, the company president reached
across the table to pull a microphone closer
to his translator, and when asked a ques-
tion, he nodded to her and said, "Will trans-
late."
And so it went, this lively blend of busi-
ness and political cultures played out before
the cameras - globalization in a box, the
21st century condensed into a single Capitol
Hill committee room.
But it wasn't pretty. Not with so many
lives at risk or already wasted by mechanical
defects. Not with so many lawmakers and
Obama administration officials hoping the
accountability stops with Toyoda and Toy-
ota, sparing them.
The National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration received more than 2,500
consumer complaints about Toyota before
aggressively dogging the company in late
2009. Congress, which has oversight author-
ity on NHTSA, is only now asking tough
questions.
"NHTSA failed the taxpayers," Towns,
the committee chairman, said before swear-
ing in Toyoda. "Toyota failed their cus-
tomers."
Still, after two days of hearings, there is
too much we don't know.
Why did some cars accelerate out of con-
trol? Why did others not stop? What else
might go wrong?
Is my car safe?
At the end of the day, Congress and Toy-
ota delivered more theatre than answers.
Cultures collide. Globalization enters the
so-what phase. Political and business leaders
struggle to lead. All true.
But whether in Japan or on Capitol Hill,
in a car accident you're just as dead.

(This article was written by Ron Fournier
of the Associated Press).


An open letter to




Matthew McCoy




from BEC


management


EDITOR, The Tribune.


Reference is made to your
letter addressed to Fred Got-
tlieb, the former Chairman of
BEC and which was published
in The Abaconian.
It is most unfortunate that
you attempt to discredit Mr
Gottlieb by taking his state-
ments out of context. You
should be aware that the sul-
phur emissions (in Abaco) are
directly related to the sulphur
content of oil. Hence, by using
oil with a lower sulphur con-
tent (percentage), the sulphur
emissions (parts per million)
would be reduced.
Therefore, as stated by Mr
Gottlieb, the use of a lower sul-
phur oil will result in lower sul-
phur emissions. This is a fact.
Further, the emissions will meet
international standards.
With regards to monitoring
of the emissions in Abaco, as
previously stated, ambient air
monitoring devices have been
installed not only on the site,
but also in surrounding areas.
The data captured from the
same will be collected by an
independent environmental
specialist firm and made acces-
sible to various stakeholders.
Additionally, an Environ-
mental Officer will be stationed
at the site to further re-enforce
the Corporation's commitment
to the safety and sustainability
of the environment.
We trust that this informa-
tion provides clarity to the read-
ers and corrects your attempts
to discredit Mr Gottlieb by tak-
ing his statements out of con-
text.

Management
Bahamas Electricity
Corporation

Matthew McCoy responds to
BEC
Dear Sirs,
Not only did I not take Mr
Gottlieb's statements out of
context, but BEC missed a real
opportunity for community
education and relations with
their misleading letter pub-
lished in response to mine.
Please allow me to explain.
At the 2009 September pub-
lic meeting Mr Gottlieb was
talking about international safe-
ty standards, and he stated:
"The HFO fuel that will be
used will result in less than 2
per cent sulfur emissions, which
is well below the World Health
Organisation's (WHO), accept-
ed standards." Later in the
same meeting Phenton Ney-
mour stated that 2 per cent sul-
fur content in the fuel meets
the World Bank standards.
Then, during the tour of the


plant in December, Mr Got-
tlieb was shown on Cable 12
saying that the plant would
meet international emissions
standards by having 2 per cent
sulfur content in the fuel.
The context of all these state-
ments, and others to the press,
is meeting emission standards.
And BEC representatives have
been saying that a fuel source
with 2 per cent sulfur will meet
those standards. The WHO, the
World Bank, and the US Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency
have published their emission
standards online, and all are
easy to contact to confirm their
standards. None present any
standards for sulfur content in
the fuel source, only standards
for the emissions themselves.
Also the emissions are not mea-
sured in percentages but in
micro grams per cubic meter.
Simple context, simple state-
ments, simply wrong.
In their letter to me, BEC
further states that "the sulfur
emissions content is directly
related to the sulfur content of
the oil. Hence, by using a lower
sulfur content (percentage) the
sulfur emissions (parts per mil-
lion) would be reduced." It is
true that it will result in lower
sulfur dioxide emissions, but
this is not the whole story.
First, you cannot directly
convert fuel content into emis-
sions, there are too many com-
bustion and mechanical factors
specific to each engine. There is
no straight formula to go from 2
per cent sulfur content to meet-
ing the WHO standards. How-
ever, in the United States, HFO
plants without proper emission
controls cannot meet the fed-
erally enforced emission stan-
dards. Because BEC will have
no emission controls (like
scrubbers), and because the
WHO and World Bank stan-
dards are tougher than those
of the United States, it would
be a major miracle if this new
plant, using HFO fuel, can meet
those standards. It simply, phys-
ically, cannot.
BEC will argue that it has
emission controls in the form
of stack height manipulation,
however, this does not change
the amount of emissions, only
where the emissions go. This is
not a legal emission reduction
technique in the US or the EU.
It is sort of like saying it's okay
to throw your trash out of the
window as long as you throw it
far enough in a certain direc-
tion.


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Second, the sulfur content of
diesel used for industrial uses is
.05 per cent. So we can see that
Abaco's new fuel source will
have 40 times the sulfur con-
tent of our regular diesel fuel
source.
Third, and finally, sulfur
dioxide is not the only emis-
sion, and may be the least wor-
risome. In the WHO Air Qual-
ity Guidelines (freely available
online) it is explained that cur-
rent scientific research indicates
that sulfur dioxide is probably
not as harmful or dangerous as
other emissions, particularly
nitrogen oxide and particulate
matter. Particulate matter is a
very real, very serious, health
hazard. HFO is loaded with
particulate matter, and as over
the years as the refining process
of crude oil has become more
sophisticated, more and more
of this dangerous stuff has been
concentrated in HFO, the left
over sludge.
And because diesel is a dis-
tilled fuel source, it has ZERO
particulate matter.
The missed opportunity here
is that BEC could have apolo-
gised for their mistake about
emission standards while simul-
taneously inviting all concerned
residents to engage in mean-
ingful discussions about the
future of the plant and offered
to share all their data collec-
tion results and techniques with
the whole public.
BEC has repeatedly said that
they want to be more open
about this plant, yet they con-
tinue to try and discredit all
those who raise serious ques-
tions about the plant with out-
dated, and made up data. They
continue to raise walls of secre-
cy between the real reasons for
the plant and the general pub-
lic. They continue to do busi-
ness as usual.
But in the modern world,
business as usual no longer
works. It used to be that BEC
and the government could do
something of questionable and
then cover it up with vague
speeches about the betterment
of the community and lots of
outdated and false data. They
could then count on the pub-
lic's lack of access to raw data
and information, most of it
deliberately controlled by the
government's secrecy policies.
This can no longer work.
We live in a world where
everything is recorded and
searchable, context and all.
Anything BEC or any politi-
cian publicly states can be
looked up later in free online
newspaper archives as well as
audio and video archives. All
of which provide the original
context. Now, our leaders can
really be held accountable, and
they should be. They need to
be.
We also live in a world where
anyone with access to the inter-
net can by-pass the govern-
ment's attempts to limit knowl-
edge and education to go
straight to the real information.
It doesn't take long, and it can
be confirmed easily with other
sources outside of the country.
Anyone can contact any expert
or corporation or, say, the
World Health Organisation.
The real information is avail-
able, and it often contradicts
and discredits what the politi-
cians and BEC are trying to sell
the public.
It is too bad BEC didn't use
this opportunity to try and open
themselves up to real collabo-
ration with the community
instead of trying to beat it into
submission with false state-
ments and aggressive market-
ing.
Collaboration with an edu-
cated population is the only
way to create a sustainable
economy on Abaco, or any oth-
er island in the Bahamas. We
need local input and local initi-
ation.
And we need to be able to
let local people hold central
government accountable for the
bad decisions and mistakes they
make.
That is the future. BEC's cur-
rent strategy is the past, and it is
economically, socially, and envi-
ronmentally crippling.
BEC may not want to
acknowledge the real standards,
but anyone who cares about
Abaco should go straight to the
source and look it up them-
selves.
MATTHEW
McCOY
Abaco,
February, 2010.


+>


A leading 'ewe1enrv tiilIr k is eking a person for this senior -o�LfflE] iI its Nassau
{ peiarionn




1 'he successRA candidates vwill be f wsponsible for cwJu ring sales ind profits are

icc, rdi ii,, o esablished compa~ny procedures.

TFhe ickal candidare should pmsess:
w I nrcgrii ,I nk I rgvc I.it ioi%�iL.1 niil k1 dIl-.nJ dA ,� in cnri*v
' Aminimui of 5 vwir multi store mnaiugcm ilt L- xpericflc in retail jewellery
gales is prcftirred
*k The aLIihh to mainAgv arid survived stort iin:iri~kor,;
'the ihifir, to pvn'w'i morna ri~n and1demnsntrate leadership ro improve
ctllt ERMFMr S.U'hiciiconiand %:Ao Lrflurrnqncc
G ood Educacinnal Rack in A wc:iac LJr~ rax in LBus~ni


.ccrktl cird jwelkrr piofe~ssonaI quali~ication ,GI A 'or eqLuivarn�ikn:is pre ferrced
* I'i11I1L'Il A019 w~.irh LllvcfTory mITtili flW1nT, r mL ~1Vh.)flIhiiZ~g, t CCfl g 111 iid
ft-irnng
* ('rood 1i1i IWINL4ILP of i~iinipi Irii, InjAIilikninrio~ni

.1 hc po~iiton offe-r; an ac~clicnr rcflhlncration .inid benbfir package.

Inrctieresd pcnr.on should tiabmit your res~ume to:

The Human Resources Man~gr
P.O. Box N4623
Nassau, Bahamnas
Fax(2-J-SU






+


THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010, PAGE 5


LOSALNEWS

Qey- S IR SIBDNEY POIIIN THE BA MAS I


THIS week In Days Gone By looks back at some of the time American-Bahamian actor Sir Sid-
ney Poitier spent in the Bahamas. This past week, the College of the Bahamas held a lecture series
and film festival celebrating his life's work. The event was also marked by a minor controversy.
The most vocal critic of the festival, filmmaker and founder of the Bahamas Film Festival Celi
Moss, publicly lambasted the college for using its resources to honour Sir Sidney, questioning what
the Academy Award-winning actor and diplomat has done to further arts in the Bahamas.


THE MOUNTAIN TO MUHAMMED - As in the old adage, when it
became clear that a tight shooting schedule would prevent Bahamian
actor Sidney Poitier from accepting an invitation to lunch with execu-
tives of the Bahamas Film Promotion Bureau, the luncheon was
brought to the film star...aboard a 40-foot 'luxury yacht', according to
a Bahamas News Bureau release. Poitier, "working in his native time
in his successful movie career", was involved in shooting a sequence
from an upcoming Disney feature, "Mountain King". Pictured from left
are Cordell Thompson, deputy director of the Bahamas Film Promotion
Bureau; Darlene Davis, executive coordinator of the bureau; Mr Poiti-
er, Julia Burnside, a cousin of the star who works at the Ministry of
Tourism, and E John Deleveaux, director of the Film Promotion Bureau.


JANUARY 27, 1972


CAUGHT IN THE ACT? - Not quite, Sidney Poitier
was merely presenting the authentic Western gun
used by him in "Buck and the Preacher" to Lady
Thurlow; he was not robbing her. Mr Poitier gener-
ously donated the gun along with antique silver
cases, one a calling card case, the other a matchbox
case; a pair of powerful binoculars and two inter-
esting sculptors books hand-done in pewter which
original designs done by H Dessaunt in aid of a
auction held at Government House.


AUGUST 13, 1987
ACTORS SCUFFLE -
Under the direction of
Roger Spottiswoode (left),
actor Sidney Poitier scuf-
fles with Clancey Brown
in rehearsal for a scene
from the new Disney
adventure movie, "Moun-
tain King". A crucial
sequence from the movie
was shot in the Bahamas.
JUNE 14, 1974
THIS scene looks like a meet-
ing of the Sidney Poitier fan club
with all the admiring looks on the
faces of the four children. Actual-
ly, they were the four lucky ones
chosen to meet the super star
when he arrived at the Nassau
Airport yesterday. Bringing with
him a copy of his latest film
"Uptown Saturday Night" which
premieres tonight at the Shirley
Street Theatre, the actor paused
to chat with the children, stu-
dents of the Stapledon School for
Retarded Children, the beneficia-
ry of the world premiere showing
of the film.


w BAS


I
I


LOWEI 6DIND!9



COVIRNMINT



NOUN1 GRIOUND


MWEI ISI i
MU NOn, mNIL
11 MOO-UMH


"Wo FMB Fmily hlenalniuen'


IN DAYS

GONE BY-j,..'o


world school


St Andrew's School, The International School of The Bahamas,
an authorized International Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites
applications from qualified and experienced Bahamian candidates
for the following teaching vacancies, with effect from August 2010.
Full information regarding the school may be found at its website:
www. st-andrews.com.

Candidates should be qualified teachers who possess the necessary
academic qualifications for the positions) for which they apply, including
a teaching qualification and a bachelor's degree, and normally need
to have a minimum of two years successful school-based experience.
Desirable qualifications, in addition to those specified for individual
posts, are that teachers have successful experience in an independent
and/or international school and an advanced degree. Applications from
candidates able to coach team sports or advise school clubs and activities
are particularly welcomed. Secondary (i.e. middle and upper) school
teachers will be expected to undertake the responsibility of a homeroom.

Please note that applications received from non-Bahamian candidates
will not be considered at this time, although permanent residents with the
right to work are invited to submit their papers for future consideration.
Applications from candidates living outside The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas will not be acknowledged or considered at this stage of the
recruiting process. If the school is unable to recruit any position locally, it
will advertise internationally.


PRIMARY SCHOOL


The school is authorized to teach the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of
the International Baccalaureate Organization. Candidates for all posts in
the primary school should be committed to the principles of, and preferably
trained in, the PYP.

Primary School Spanish: Candidates should be familiar with ACTFL
standards and be able to work as a contributing member of a school-wide
team.

Primary School Music: Candidates must be fully qualified and have
successful teaching experience at all Years from Pre Reception to Year 6.
They must also have successful experience in organizing primary school
music and drama performances.

Primary School Library Media Specialist: The primary school library
media specialist develops, implements and interprets an effective library
media and IT programme for students in Pre Reception to Year 6.
Candidates must be fully qualified and have successful experience as
a school librarian, multi media specialist, educational technologist or IT
teacher.

Interested candidates should apply by letter, email or fax as soon as
possible. All applications MUST include the following:

* Letter of application
* A personal statement detailing the candidate's educational philosophy
* A full curriculum vitae,
* Eitherthe names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and email
numbers of three people who may be approached for confidential
professional references or the name and address of the recruiting
agency from which the candidate's confidential dossiers may be
obtained.

Please direct all correspondence to:
Allison Collie, Head of the Primary School:
Email: Allison.Collie(kst-andrews.com
Fax: (1 242) 677 7846

The closing date for applications is 12Lh March 2010. Applications
from unqualified candidates, applications arriving without
the full information requested, applications from outside The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas or applications received after this
date will not be considered


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


If you have any sugges-
tions for future 'In Days
Gone By' please e-mail them
to Rupert Missick, Jr, at
rmissick@tribunemedia.net


JUNE 13, 1974
'AND HOW ARE YOU DOING
TODAY?', Sidney Poitier seems to
be asking these four lucky chil-
dren who greeted him at the airport
today. Bringing with him a copy
of his latest film "Uptown Saturday
Night" which premieres Friday
night at the Shirley Street Theatre.
Sir Sidney paused for a chat with
the children, students of the Sta-
pledon School for Retarded Chil-
dren, the beneficiary of the world
premiere showing of his film. Pos-
ing with the children is their
teacher Ms Gwen Robertson.

FertilzerSFnicide,-

Petonro
Toici Ete inos


ECRONEM


Ek 1% RL


Lo







+


PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNWI


Future financing and preventive


component
PHASE I of the $8 million
National Prescription Drug
Plan is being financed entirely
by the medical benefits branch
of the National Insurance
Board (NIB), however, future
phases will be funded by a com-
bination of payroll deductions,
government grants and coordi-
nation of benefits with insur-
ers, NIB director Algernon - -
Cargill recently told health pro-
fessionals at a meeting held in
Palmetto Point, Eleuthera.
"In the second phase we've NURSES
estimated a one per cent con- Plan.
tribution from the insurable
wage to fund the programme that in
so that works out to a maxi- with pr
mum of $4 a week or $2 for the will rea
employer and $2 for the from th
employee per week based on private
the insurable wage ceiling of Pre-r
$400," Mr Cargill said. of the
He also said NIB will work Drug
with private insurance compa- progre
nies to coordinate benefits so Baham


of Drug Plan highlighted


S and doctors from Eleuthera's clinics attended the presentation on the National Prescription Drug


future phases members
ivate health insurance
ap the maximum value
[e Drug Plan and their
plans.
registration for Phase I
National Prescription
Plan is currently in
ss throughout the
as for approximately


NOTICE is hereby given that ANDLEY JEAN BAPTISTE of
MARGARETTE AVENUE OFF CARMICHAEL ROAD,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th
day of FEBRUARY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




Sales Jobs





Jewelry Stores on Bay Street and
Paradise Island

We are looking for some energetic and outgoing
individuals to join the sales team immediately.

Experience with jewelry is a plus but we are
willing to train non-experienced people who
have the right attitude and personality
Salary plus generous commission plan.
Fax resume to 393-5102
for immediate consideration.


&r Ja't~uls, JT W Pei L-Ie




Come. join us.95wknwJusPrnal
by/ IiSt~nlinq and Studying thL3. Worad of Gim




SUNDAY SER14CES


2L .1'


WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.




FRIDAY o' 7:30 p mr
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EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE
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35,000 NIB pensioners, invalids
and children with one or more
of eleven chronic conditions.

Additional
According to Mr Cargill, the
next phase of the Drug Plan
will include an additional
100,000 persons.
During the meeting in
Eleuthera, Dr Stanley Lalta,
project manager for the Drug
Plan, also outlined details of
the Plan's future preventive or
"healthy people" component
which will focus on funding
health promotion and wellness
projects in the community.
"We want to make an invest-
ment in health promotion well-
ness, and prevention. What we
said is that we will set aside
some of the funds from the Plan
in order to engage organisa-


tions in preparing very good
projects that can be funded. I
have to tell you that it's not free
money. It has to be a very well
designed project. A project that
has a clear start date and end
date, clearly stipulated objec-
tives, clearly stipulated targets
and the management team has
to be very clearly indicated so
that we can have confidence
that the money put into the
project is going to create the
value that we're looking for,"
Dr Lalta said.
He emphasised that such
projects will be monitored and
evaluated to determine their
effectiveness and ability to be
replicated in other communi-
ties. He also predicted that an
accumulation of small, success-
ful projects by non-govern-
mental organizations would
have a major impact on health
and wellness in the Bahamas.


PRIVATE physician Dr Cliff Bacchus (centre) of Eleuthera says the
National Prescription Drug Plan is a "good step forward".


I'wIn' - I,


%.~- ~j

()


ALGERNON Cargill,
director of the National
Insurance Board (cen-
tre) recently addressed
Eleuthera health profes-
sionals on the National
Prescription Drug Plan.
Seated are Dr Stanley
Lalta, project manager
(left), and Alexander
Williams, island admin-
istrator of Governor's
Harbour, Eleuthera.


PHOTOS: Dominique Thompson


BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
80LDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL
i'71UvJ,:hy Sd'UD.'. Qrri FUDWAMENTAL,
Preaching 1 1m & 7:30pm EVAMGELISTIC
Radio Bie Hour
Pauair:H. Mils
^ji ic' 6pm - /N; 2
'Vied Prayer &Praise ?:30om

Preaching th mebia g oS, to man en Mthey am"
Pasar: H. Mills Phci: 395-t6 i3 * B N6 N .2 I


CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS * Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2010
11:30am Speaker
Pastor Marcel Lightbourne
Topic: "Our Responsibilities To The World"
(Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. * Breaking of Bread Service-
* Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. * Evening Service:)
* Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays) I


.. " LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

SGrounded In The Past &
eGeared To The Future


Worship time: 11am & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place: The Madeira
Shopping Center

Pastor Knowles can be heard each
morning on Joy 101.9 at 8:30 a.m,


La stuens ugI


to viwth otnials


of pi I tio


L---
PICTURED (left to right) JUSTICE Hugh Small, Tonya Bastian-
Galanis, principal of the Eugene Dupuch Law School and Attorney
General and Minister of Legal Affairs Senator John Delaney at the
Eugene Dupuch Law School Students' Association seminar on
Wednesday as a part of Legal Education Week.


ATTORNEY General and
Minister of Legal Affairs Sena-
tor John Delaney encouraged
lawyers and lawyers-to-be to
view arbitration as a new area
within which they might equip
themselves.
"You may be called upon to
draft arbitral provisions, to serve
as counsel in arbitration proceed-
ings, expert witnesses on Bahami-
an law, as a member of an arbi-
tration panel," said the Attorney
General.
Senator Delaney addressed
the Eugene Dupuch Law School
Students' Association arbitration
seminar on Wednesday as part
of Legal Education Week. He
addressed the topic "The Arbi-
tration Act 2009".


ATTORNEY General and Min-
ister of Legal Affairs Senator
John Delaney addresses the
arbitration seminar spon-
sored by the Eugene Dupuch
Law School Students' Asso-
ciation on Wednesday. He
addressed the topic "The
Arbitration Act 2009".


The Attorney General said in 2010 the legal profession and
the commercial community will meet a new arbitration regime
following the enactment of the Arbitration Act, 2009 and the
Arbitration (Foreign Arbitral Awards) Act 2009 at the end of
last year. "Together they comprise a new Bahamian arbitral
regime which is expected to be brought in force in the coming
months by Appointed Day Notice. The Foreign Arbitral
Awards law gives effect in the Bahamas to the New York Con-
vention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbi-
tral Awards, to which the Bahamas became party effective
2007," he said.
"On commencement, the new Bahamian regime will whol-
ly replace the law of 1889 which governs arbitration in the
Bahamas. In so doing, it will establish state-of-the-art legal
infrastructure for arbitration in the Bahamas."
Senator Delaney explained that arbitration provides a pri-
vate means of determining disputes arising under contractual
relationships and is an alternative to the court process.
He pointed out some of the major advantages of arbitra-
tion including privacy, speed, cost effectiveness, technical
expertise and convenience in matters of procedure, venue
and time. "Where there is good arbitral regime and availabil-
ity of suitable arbitrators, the relative disadvantages in com-
mercial matters are few," he said.
"The new Bahamian regime is robust comprehensive and
modern. It substantially corresponds with the statutory pro-
visions of England, which is a major international seat for
commercial arbitration. We have every confidence that it will
serve our jurisdiction well both in the context of domestic
and international arbitration."
He encouraged lawyers and law students to equip them-
selves, embrace the opportunities and do their part to make
the country a "preferred seat for commercial arbitration."










CHIEF Justice Sir Michael Barnett addresses the sixth annual
Eugene Dupuch Law School Students' Association seminar held
at the British Colonial Hilton on Wednesday.

Gant's T:',n Slei et::li
, K,,ll,, 1, H Il ,l hFl- - I- : . - . F- 1: , ,, , 1- l, -
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28TH, 2010

7:00 a.m. Rev.Carla Culmer/Sis. Rosemary Williams
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Katherine Thompson
7:00 p.m. Sis. Tezel Anderson/Board of General Education














Church School during Worh p Senrice

Place- Iwynaln IHeiglhts
off Prince Ckarhle r Dmrk

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P O.Bx SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2.538
Telofax number: 324-25V7
CE-O YU. U.It' ' UL. I -E 7, TOSi.- E


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


r.


Knowles


ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@batelnet.bsI








+


THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010, PAGE 7


FROM page one Police chief's vow


he said.
"We responded very swiftly
to those and we've had some
successful interventions."
On Thursday, a man identi-
fied by Tribune sources as 50-
year-old Hubert Hall was shot
dead by police in Tower Estates


Drive after he threatened offi-
cers who were investigating
claims that two men were seen
going from house to house try-
ing to open the doors of cars
and homes. Police are still look-


LOCALNW


ing for the second man.
Mr Greenslade said part of
the police's recent approach to
tackling such crimes is ensur-
ing they have "lots of people
on the front lines."
"We are up and about. All
of our commanders have been
tasked to put officers on the
front line. We've asked them
to get those officers out of the


'No more Police questions for talk show host'


FROM page one
radio that he knew the whereabouts of illegal
weapons.
Accepting responsibility for this "reprehensi-
ble" remark, Mr Bodie himself informed The
Tribune that he was initially flabbergasted by
the request of the police to search his home, but
naturally consented to their requests.
"The statement was made in response to a
caller's concerns about the prevalence of crime
and firearms being used to perpetuate them.
Loose sensational lips do sink ships. Words are
capable of being interpreted and misinterpreted
based on the environment they are uttered.
"I have not been charged, but was released


'pending further investigations'. There is
absolutely no doubt in my mind that I will, at the
end of those investigations, that I will be exon-
erated. I wish to thank the scores of persons who
came down to CDU to offer me comfort."
Speaking with The Tribune yesterday in rela-
tion to the matter, Commissioner Greenslade
commended his officers for acting swiftly and
professionally.
He said that as Mr Bodie had made some com-
ments that caused the police to have reasonable
suspicion, they were duty bound to act.
"Subsequent to the investigation that was
launched we were satisfied there was nothing
else to be done. No charges are being offered
against Mr Bodie. It's a done deal," he said.


station, into police cars and on
cycles out into the communi-
ties," said the top officer, who
credited this strategy with hav-
ing resulted in the "successful
intervention" in Tower Estates
Drive. When quizzed as to what
advice he may have for the pub-
lic on further protecting them-
selves from becoming victims
of crime, Mr Greenslade turned



K. U


the tables, suggesting that the
country's crime problem could
be "solved overnight" if more
people "took responsibility."
"Take responsibility for
yourself, take responsibility for
your household, take responsi-
bility for your communities.
Again I come back to the busi-
ness of how you are safe when
the people who live with you


conduct themselves in a respon-
sible manner.
"The people who commit
crimes in the Bahamas are not
phantoms. These are our peo-
ple, they live in our homes and
in our communities and we
know who they are. So we can
solve this overnight. We have
the ability to do it, do we have
the will to do it?"


Tourist recovering after cutlass attack


FROM page one

hand.
The brutal attack has rocked
the community of around 2,000
residents who fear crime is spi-
raling out of control in the idyl-
lic tourist destination which is
home to hundreds of winter vis-
itors and a popular haven for
the rich and famous.
However, nine burglaries on
the island over the last week
has instilled fear of crime for
winter visitors and permanent
residents who are concerned
crime could negatively impact
the lucrative tourist economy.
North Eleuthera MP and
Speaker of the House of
Assembly Alvin Smith said the
crime rate in Harbour Island is
the highest in his constituency,
which stretches across the
mainland and cays north of
Governor's Harbour airport.
He has called on Royal
Bahamas Police Force (RBPF)
Commissioner Ellison
Greenslade to step up security
on the island, which was
manned by seven police offi-
cers under a police sergeant


until Chief Inspector Roston
Moss was posted there perma-
nently the day before the
attack.
Local police further struggle
with limited resources claims
Mr Smith. He said their most
reliable vehicle is a golf cart not
nearly fast enough to catch
criminals.
"I think the police are going
to put more resources and focus
into Harbour Island because
these break-ins have been hap-
pening for quite a while and I
don't think police were taking
them as seriously as they ought
to," the MP said.
"We shouldn't have to wait
until such a degree of violence
occurs before we address crime.
"But I am convinced now
that police will put more
resources out there and take
these matters more seriously.
"I am pleased with the
recommitment of the police and
the assurances the Commis-
sioner has given me in review-
ing manpower and equipment
in North Eleuthera, particular-
ly in Harbour Island, where we
have had the highest number
of criminal activity and regular


break-ins. It's making things
bad for the whole island."
Rising crime cannot be
attributed to the island's econ-
omy as Mr Smith said many
residents have more than one
job, and there is work for any-
one who wants it.
And he hopes the rising
crime rate will be curbed as the
new chief inspector builds ties
with the community, increases
patrols and maximises local
resources.
"I expect some good to come
out of this terrible incident in
terms of recommitment from
the police and the community,"
Mr Smith said.
Two men appeared in a Nas-
sau court yesterday in connec-
tion with Thursday's incident.
Karon Parks, 28, of Cole-
brooke Street, and Mario Moss,
35, of Clarence Street, both
Harbour Island, were charged
on three counts of burglary,
armed robbery and causing
grievous harm.
They were remanded in cus-
tody until a preliminary inquiry,
which will be heard by a local
magistrate in Harbour Island
on April 8 and 9.


Sands and Pinder lawyers set for court appearance


FROM page one

votes between Dr Sands of the
FNM and Mr Pinder of the
PLP - who received 1,501 and
1,499 regular votes respectively
- these protest votes are cru-
cial and prevent an official win-
ner from being certified, it is
argued.
Under the law, these protest
votes can only be certified and
added to the ballot box by an
election court, which can also
determine a lawful winner in
the race.
Prime Minister and leader of
the FNM Hubert Ingraham has
indicated that his party will
question Ryan Pinder's eligi-
bility to run in the Elizabeth
constituency by-election during
election court.
Mr Pinder, born to a
Bahamian father and an Amer-
ican mother, held American
and Bahamian citizenship for


years. According to a letter
received by The Tribune, Mr
Pinder renounced his Ameri-
can citizenship on January 20,
2010, nine days before the nom-
ination date, confirming his eli-
gibility to run in the recently
held by-election.
"The government of the
United States no longer con-
siders Mr Pinder to be a US cit-
izen," the letter read.
"His US passport is no
longer valid and has been for-
warded to the issuing agency
within the US government."
Yesterday, Mr Evans would
not confirm if this argument
would still be part of the FNM's
strategy.
"I can't speak to that. When
we get there we will indicate
what all issues we have agreed
to deal with," he said.
In addition to Messrs Pin-
der and Sands, fringe party can-
didates Cassius Stuart, Rodney
Moncur and Dr Andre Rollins


are also listed as respondents
in the court case.
Their participation, or lack
of, would contribute to the
duration of the court battle,
said Mr Evans.
"The case could be very
short or it could be prolonged.
There are three others involved
in the matter, Mr Moncur, Mr
Stuart and Mr Rollins they
have all been named as respon-
dents and they do have a right
to put in a position. If they have
one or if they don't have one
would also indicate how long
the case will take."


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700 500 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 676 676 000 0419 0300 161 44 %
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2 8869 28266 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2 9061 066 1 23 31 Jan 10
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95795 9 1005 Royal Fidelity Bah Infl investment Fund 95795 533 533 31-Dec-09
1 2361 100000 Royal Fidelity Bah Inl Investent Fund 12361 1 2 36 1 2 36 31Dec-09

Bi SX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1000 00 YIELD - last 12 onth dividends divided by closing price
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M&EULMlMi


Machinery & Energy Limited Caterpillar dealer in
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* Have training in Ordering and Receiving
Parts Importation;
* Be able to Audit Parts Inventory; Cyclic
Count Procedure;
* Degree from an accredited University
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staff in the Parts Department;
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or email:me()me-ltd.com.
NOTE: Only persons being interviewed for this
position will be contacted.







+


Knights


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net


THE CR Walker Knights tight-
ened their stranglehold of the Gov-
ernment Secondary Schools Sports
Association Track and Field Cham-
pionship by winning their seventh
straight title.
Dedicated to veteran national
coach Frank 'Pancho' Rahming, the
Knights on Friday closed out anoth-
er dominating performance with a
212 point margin over a heated
showdown for second place between
the CV Bethel Stingrays and the RM
Bailey Pacers.
At the Thomas A. Robinson
Track and Field Stadium as they
tried to chase down head coach
Floyd Armbrister and assistant
coach Tyrice Curry to dose them
both with water, the Knights cele-
brated with a huge 636.50 point deci-
sion.
The Stingrays held off the Pacers
in a stunning head-to-head clash to
take second place with 414.50, just a
half point ahead of the third place
Pacers.
For Armbrister, who used his 800
metre fame as a high school/colle-
giate athlete to avoid the water rush
by his team-mates, said their ability
to go out and recruit a whole new
crop of athletes was the key to their
success.
"We had a lot of new ten graders
who came into us, especially from
HO Nash and we also had some par-
ents who really wanted their chil-
dren to be a structured programme
in high school," Armbrister said.
"We put the unit together and we
trained only in the mornings when
we came out here at the track and at
the fort (Charlotte) at 4:30 to 6
o'clock. We put in the time in the
morning. We never once came on
this track and trained in the after-
noon."
Thanks to their principal, Arm-


shine


HEAD coach Floyd Armbrister talks about his CR Walker Knights' success as the GSS-
SA Senior High Track and Field Championships.


brister said they were able to acquire
a new Coaster bus that made it
accessible to transport their 30-plus
athletes to and from the training site.
"But I have to say that these kids
have a lot of discipline. We had to
keep molding them and keep push-
ing them to the level. We never
slacked up on them," Armbrister
said. "Some of them who ran today
came from the getto, Quarry Road,
Mason Addition, Farm Road, the
Groove and even Fox Hill.
"I think it was the discipline and
the unity on the this team that made
the difference."
There were also some superb indi-
vidual performances that helped out
as well.
Leading the way was Marva Eti-
enne, who swept the intermediate
girls sprints by adding the 200 metres


(25.26 seconds) to the 100 and 400
she claimed on day one on Thursday.
Shafara Lewis also got some of the
spotlight by cleaning up the middle
distance races when she took the 800
(2:35.53) to go along with the 1,500
the day before. She also won the
long jump (14-feet, 10 1/2-inches).
In the intermediate boys division,
Ashley Riley was another triple win-
ner with his record breaking triumph
in the 800 (2:04.30) to go along with
his feats in both the 400 and 1,500.
The outstanding performances in
the senior boys and girls divisions
were spread around the other
schools with Tonia-Kaye Johnson of
RM Bailey emerging as the female
sprint queen as she clinched the 200
(26.33) to go with her 100 win and
Trevor Mackey of Doris Johnson
duplicating the senior boys feat with


again


his 200 time of 22.43 after he pulled
off the 100 win.
"They stepped up their game. All
of the athletes stepped up their game
110 percent today and we came back
and tried to win three out of the four
relays," Armbrister noted.
"We got three out of the four, but
we didn't get the three that we real-
ly wanted. The senior girls came as a
major surprise to us and the 4 x 4
senior boys, we wanted that. But
RM Bailey beat us. RM Bailey feel
as if they win the meet if they win
the 4 x 4. They came to the meet for
that and they got it."
The senior boys 4 x 4 relay, spon-
sored by Muck-A-Mucks and the
Sports Center, brought the curtains
down on the meet as the Pacers pre-
vailed in 4:17.62, leaving the Knights
trailing in 4:17.96.
But as Armbrister stated, the
Knights turned in a stellar perfor-
mance in capturing the senior girls' 4
x 4, which was sponsored by A-Plus
Enterprises, in 4:20.05. The Gov-
ernment High Magicmen finished a
distant second in 4:32.52.
They added the other relay titles
in the intermediate girls (4:14.97) in
another fabulous run and their inter-
mediate boys came through in a
come-from-behind fashion in 3:40.90,
holding off the Pacers (3:46.42).
In what turned out to be a keenly
contested battle behind the Knights,
the Stingrays had coach John Mills
smiling from ear-to-ear because of
their 1/2-point decision over the Pac-
ers.
"Most of our kids did pretty well,
but our downfall was the kids who
didn't show," said Mills, who had
anticipated that they would have giv-
en the Knights a run for their money
this year. "One of our better dis-
tance runners, Ronald Woodside,
was representing the country in box-
ing.
"Luckily for us, we edged out RM
Bailey by a half a point. Who say
one point don't make a difference in


GSSSA

FINAL RESULTS


HERE'S a look at the final
team results from the two days
of competition in the senior divi-
sion of the Government Sec-
ondary Schools Sports Associa-
tion's track and field champi-
onships concluded on Friday at
the Thomas A. Robinson Track
and Field Stadium:


Schools
CR Walker Knights
CV Bethel Stingrays
RM Bailey Pacers
CC Sweeting Cobras
Cl Gibson Rattlers
Anatol Rodgers High
Doris Johnson Mys. Marlins
Government High Magicmen


Pts
636.50
414.50
414
298.50
278
250
242
190.50


Intermediates (Under-27) combined
CR Walker Knights 346
CV Bethel Stingrays 212
RM Bailey Pacers 188
ASnatol Rodgers High 157
CC Sweeting Cobras 145
Doris Johnson Mys. Marlins 114
Cl Gibson Rattlers 111
Government High Magicmen 19

Seniors (Under-20) combined
CR Walker Knights 290.50
RM Bailey Pacers 226
CV Bethel Stingrays 202.50
Government High Magicmen 171.50
Cl Gibson Rattlers 167
CC Sweeting Cobras 153.50
Doris Johnson Mys. Marlins 128
Anatol Rodgers High 93


a victory? Hopefully we will do a
little better in the (BAAA's/Scotia-
bank) Nationals."
The Nationals is scheduled for the
weekend of March 11-13 and Arm-
brister say his Knights intend to do
the same thing as they did at the
GSSSA. So watch out defending
champions St. Augustine's College
Big Red Machine and the Queen's
College Comets.


Rahming resigns as BAAA Technical Director


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IN a stunning and surpris-
ing move, Frank 'Pancho'
Rahming resigned from the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Association as the Tech-
nical Director.
Rahming, who very rarely
speaks publicly, wrote a letter
dated Thursday, February 25
to BAAA's secretary Timo-
thy Munnings, which read as
follows:
"At a recent executive
meeting, I was told that I was
the problem. Whatever the
speaker's interpretation or
context, I do not wish to be
the problem for any person or
organisation's progress.
"Because this was not dis-
puted by any other present,
like other utterances at execu-
tive meetings by inner circle


members, I take it to be the
consensus.
"I, therefore, offer my res-
ignation as Technical Direc-
tor of the Bahamas Associa-
tion of Athletic Association."
Rahming, who is now in
pre-retirement as the Assis-
tant Director of Sports at the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture, was re-elected to
serve as the Technical Director
after he defeated Rupert Gar-
diner at the BAAA's annual
general meeting and election
of officers in November.
He was the only member
from incumbent president
Curt Hollingsworth's slate that
was voted in when Sands was
returned to office after a two-
year hiatus due to a vote of no
confidence in 2007.
When contacted yesterday
for further comments, Rah-
ming declined, indicating that
he just simply wished not to
be the subject of any headline


news. He referred The Tri-
bune to the BAAA for com-
ments.
There was some indication
that some of the discussion
that prompted Rahming's res-
ignation came as a result of
the conflict in the schedule of
the BAAA's/ScotiaBank
National High School Track
and Field Championships that
will collide with the Grand
Bahama Schools Sports Asso-
ciation's Track and Field
Championships.
Both events are scheduled
for March 11-13, which means
that the Grand Bahama
schools would not be coming
to the Nationals. In the past,
the Nationals were normally
held at the end of the Carifta
Games.
But for the second consecu-
tive year, they have been
moved up and staged before
Carifta, which will be held
over the Easter holiday week-


end in the Cayman Islands.
Efforts to contact BAAA's
president Mike Sands or
Munnings was unsuccessful,
but first vice president Sher-
win Stuart said he was really
shocked and surprised when
he heard the news yesterday
morning.
"There was no prior warn-
ing or acknowledgment that I
am aware of," Stuart said.
"Like I said, I just found out
this morning. So there's really
nothing I can comment on,
except that it's unfortunate
that he has resigned."
Pressed further by The Tri-
bune for comments, Stuart
said the BAAA has always
held Rahming in high esteem
in reference to his technical
knowledge of the sport and
they were looking forward to
him continuing to make his
contribution in the way for-
ward.
"He's decided that he wants


to move on, so we in the
BAAA are very appreciative
of his services over the many
decades that he has been a
part of the association and the
contribution he has made to
the programme and we wish
him nothing but the very best
in his future endeavours and
hope that he will continue to
work closely with the sport."
Based on the constitution,
Stuart said Sands, as president,
has the power to appoint
someone to fill the vacancy in
the interim and that is the
course of action that they
intend to pursue.
"There will be an appoint-
ment at this point, but I can
not say if there will be an elec-
tion any time soon," Stuart
said. "We will just try to fill
the void in the meantime and
then in the way forward, we
will make a decision or
whether or not we will have
an election for that position."


The BAAA was scheduled
to hold their monthly meet-
ing last night. Rahming's res-
ignation and his new appoint-
ment was expected to be dis-
cussed as well as the selection
of the national coaches and
the national team for the
IAAF World Indoor Cham-
pionships in Doha next
month.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


m







+


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010


TRIBUNE SPORTS


G.S.S.S.A. 17th Annual Track &
Field Meet - 2/25/2010 to 2 2'r 2' 11)
THE Government of Secondary
Schools Sports Association complet-
ed its Senior High Schools Champi-
onship on Friday at the Thomas A.
Robinson Track & Field Stadium.
Below is a look at the individual
results posted over the past two days
of competition:

* GIRLS 100 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17) FINALS
(w: 0.1) 1, 843 Etienne, Marva, C.R.
Walker 25, 12.44. 2, 987 Andrews,
Khadijah, Doris Johnson 27, 13.17. 3,
782 Rolle, Lakeisha, C.I. Gibson 16,
13.23.

* GIRLS 200 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
(w: -0.6) 1, 843 Etienne, Marva, C.R.
Walker 25, 25.62. 2, 909 Higgs,
Gregria, C.V. Bethel 26, 26.40. 3, 987
Andrews, Khadijah, Doris Johnson 27,
27.54.

* GIRLS 400 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 843 Etienne, Marva, C.R. Walker 25,
1:02.91. 2, 857 Stubbs, Ashley, C.R.
Walker 25, 1:06.80. 3, 925 Stanislaus,
Greann, C.V. Bethel 26, 1:10.02.

* GIRLS 800 METER RUN
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 850 Lewis, Shafara, C.R. Walker 25,
2:35.53. 2, 857 Stubbs, Ashley, C.R.
Walker 25, 2:39.42. 3, 662 Lotus, Kelly,
Anatol Rodgers, 2:51.25.

* GIRLS 1500 METER RUN
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 850 Lewis, Shafara, C.R. Walker 25,
5:50.11. 2, 851 Martin, Nevelicia, C.R.
Walker 25, 6:02.60. 3, 1166 Sturrup,
Mataya, R.M. Bailey 2, 6:30.88.

* GIRLS 100 METER HURDLES
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
(w: 0.9) 1, 918 Minus, Raygene, C.V.
Bethel 26, 17.32. 2, 783 Rolle, Tiffany,
C.I. Gibson 16, 17.42. 3, 861 Whylly,
Lashawn, C.R. Walker 25, 18.05.

* GIRLS 300 METER HURDLES
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 858 Stubbs, Keithra, C.R. Walker 25,
50.48. 2, 850 Lewis, Shafara, C.R.
Walker 25, 52.35. 3, 714 Ferguson,
Tanisha, C.C. Sweeting 7, 56.28.

* GIRLS 4X100 METER RELAY
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, C. V. Bethel (26) Stingrays (Minus,
Raygene 16, Stubbs, Rouiqua 15, Gib-
son, Julia 16, Higgs, Gregria 16),
53.09. 2, C. I. Gibson (16) Rattlers
(Brice, Jalisa 16, Rolle, Lakeisha 16,
Louis Jean, Louise Anna 16, Rolle,
Tiffany 16), 54.88. 3, Anatol Rodgers
High School (Knowles, Rashae 16,
Lightbourne, Khadyjah 16, Bowe,
Lashawn 16, Frazer, Natori 16), 55.52.

* GIRLS 4X400 METER RELAY
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, C. R. Walker (25) Knights 4:14.97. 2,
C. V. Bethel (26) Stingrays 4:39.05. 3,
R. M. Bailey (2) Pacers 4:52.59.

* GIRLS LONG JUMP
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 850 Lewis, Shafara, C.R. Walker 25,
4.53m, w:NWI (14-10.50). 2, 987
Andrews, Khadijah, Doris Johnson 27,
4.41m, w:NWI (14-05.75). 3, 843 Eti-
enne, Marvar, C.R. Walker 25, 4.35m,
w:NWI (14-03.25).

* GIRLS SHOT PUT (8LBS)
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 760 Arahna, Precious, C.I. Gibson
16, 10.14m, (33-03.25). 2, 725 Smith,
Karnesia, C.C. Sweeting 7, 8.86m, (29-
01). 3, 676 Williams, Sherceil, Anatol
Rodgers, 8.50m, (27-10.75).

* GIRLS DISCUS THROW (1K)
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 760 Arahna, Precious, C.I. Gibson
16, 25.00m, (82-00). 2, 1150 Johnson,
Kingslee, R.M. Bailey 2, 20.17m, (66-
02). 3, 994 Curry, Donisha, Doris John-
son 27, 19.57m, (64-02).


* GIRLS JAVELIN THROW (600GMS)
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 760 Arahna, Precious, C.I. Gibson
16, 26.30m, (86-03). 2, 722 Poitier,
Angenette, C.C. Sweeting 7, 24.83m,
(81-05). 3, 854 Rose, Akia, C.R. Walker
25, 23.15m, (75-11).

* BOYS 100 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
(w: 0.7) 1, 945 Farrington, Anthony,
C.V. Bethel 26, 11.26*. 2, 868 Dames,
Xavier, C.R. Walker 25, 11.37. 3, 867
Culmer, Tomiko, C.R. Walker 25, 11.71.

* BOYS 200 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
(w: 2.0) 1, 677 Anderson, Enrico, Ana-
tol Rodgers, 23.87. 2, 867 Culmer,
Tomiko, C.R. Walker 25, 23.99. 3, 886
Russell, Silvano, C.R. Walker 25, 24.15.

* BOYS 400 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 885 Riley, Ashley, C.R. Walker 25,
52.66. 2, 734 Davis, Patrick, C.C.
Sweeting 7, 55.45. 3, 1194 Perry,
Shorn, R.M. Bailey 2, 56.69.

* BOYS 800 METER RUN
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 885 Riley, Ashley, C.R. Walker 25,
2:04.30*. 2, 691 Gray, Rashad, Anatol
Rodgers, 2:13.57. 3, 734 Davis,
Patrick, C.C. Sweeting 7, 2:14.05.

* BOYS 1500 METER RUN
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 885 Riley, Ashley, C.R. Walker 25,
4:53.56. 2, 1172 Black, Jachris, R.M.
Bailey 2, 5:03.27. 3, 814 Louis,
Wilbens, C.I. Gibson 16, 5:13.28.

* BOYS 3000 METER RUN
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1,1192 Newbold, Adam, R.M. Bailey 2,
11:14.97. 2, 1029 Armbrister, Kadashi-
an, Doris Johnson 27, 11:33.20. 3, 814
Louis, Wilbens, C.I. Gibson 16,
11:38.31.

* BOYS 100 METER HURDLES
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
(w: 1.5) 1, 1187 Marshall, Andre, R.M.
Bailey 2, 16.96. 2, 962 Johnson,
Jameal, C.V. Bethel 26, 18.21. 3, 884
Riley, Alex, C.R. Walker 25, 18.46.

* BOYS 400 METER HURDLES
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 734 Davis, Patrick, C.C. Sweeting 7,
1:04.38. 2, 685 Evans, Tre, Anatol
Rodgers, 1:05.62. 3, 737 Fernander,
Leon, C.C. Sweeting 7, 1:05.67.

* BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, Anatol Rodgers High School (Ander-
son, Enrico 16, Mossa, Owen 16,
Evans, Tre 16, Evans, Trevel 16), 45.49.
2, C. V. Bethel (26) Stingrays (Burrows,
Raymonte 16, Ferguson, Richard 16,
Darville, Tanaghe 16, Farrington,
Anthony 16), 45.98. 3, R. M. Bailey (2)
Pacers (Perry, Shorn 16, Bain, Shac-
quille 16, Gibson, Keishon 15, Gale,
Raymond 16), 48.06.

* BOYS 4X400 METER RELAY
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, C. R. Walker (25) Knights 3:40.90. 2,
R. M. Bailey (2) Pacers 3:46.42. 3, C. V.
Bethel (26) Stingrays 3:51.62.

* BOYS LONG JUMP
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 703 Wilmotte, Donovan, Anatol
Rodgers, 5.94m, w:NWI (19-06). 2,
889 Sweeting, Ricardo, C.R. Walker 25,
5.75m, w:NWI (18-10.50). 3, 697
Mossa, Owen, Anatol Rodgers, 5.52m,
w:NWI (18-01.50).

* BOYS TRIPLE JUMP
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 886 Russell, Silvano, C.R. Walker 25,
12.46m, w:NWI (40-10.50). 2, 889
Sweeting, Ricardo, C.R. Walker 25,
12.23m, w:NWI (40-01.50). 3, 703
Wilmotte, Donovan, Anatol Rodgers,
12.11 m, w:NWI (39-08.75).

* BOYS SHOT PUT (12LBS)


INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 945 Farrington, Anthony, C.V. Bethel
26, 11.37m, (37-03.75). 2, 871
Dorsette, Tavari, C.R. Walker 25,
10.45m, (34-03.50). 3, 949 Ferguson,
Richard, C.V. Bethel 26, 10.00m, (32-
09.75).

* BOYS DISCUS THROW (1.5K)
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 887 Saintillis, Harl, C.R. Walker 25,
25.52m, (83-09). 2, 945 Farrington,
Anthony, C.V. Bethel 26, 25.41 m, (83-
04). 3, 737 Fernander, Leon, C.C.
Sweeting 7, 24.23m, (79-06).

* BOYS JAVELIN THROW (700GMS)
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 871 Dorsette, Tavari, C.R. Walker 25,
44.23m, (145-01). 2, 945 Farrington,
Anthony, C.V. Bethel 26, 43.73m, (143-
06). 3, 1033 Burrows, Nicholas, Doris
Johnson 27, 39.90m, (130-11).

* GIRLS 100 METER DASH
SENIOR (U20)
(w: 0.2) 1, 1151 Johnson, Tonia-Kaye,
R.M. Bailey 2, 12.65. 2, 788 Stubbs,
Jarona, C.I. Gibson 16, 13.07. 3, 655
Demeritt, Ariel, Anatol Rodgers, 13.17.

* GIRLS 200 METER DASH
SENIOR (U20)
(w: 1.7) 1, 1151 Johnson, Tonia-Kaye,
R.M. Bailey 2, 26.33. 2, 655 Demeritt,
Ariel, Anatol Rodgers, 27.15. 3, 788
Stubbs, Jarona, C.I. Gibson 16, 27.46.

* GIRLS 400 METER DASH
SENIOR (U20)
1,1090 Miller, Shauntae, Government
High, 1:01.09. 2, 853 Rahming, Edric-
ka, C.R. Walker 25, 1:03.63. 3, 723
Rodgers, Terranique, C.C. Sweeting 7,
1:04.59.

* GIRLS 800 METER RUN
SENIOR (U20)
1, 891 Adderley, Teshona, C.V. Bethel
26, 2:23.24. 2, 653 Cherilus, Angela,
Anatol Rodgers, 2:35.86. 3, 855 Rus-
sell, Florazell, C.R. Walker 25, 2:40.25.

* GIRLS 1500 METER RUN
SENIOR (U20)
1, 653 Cherilus, Angela, Anatol
Rodgers, 5:43.82. 2, 847 Humed,
Kendra, C.R. Walker 25, 6:10.76. 3,
1156 McIntosh, Crystal, R.M. Bailey 2,
6:16.84.

* GIRLS 3000 METER RUN
SENIOR (U20)
1, 653 Cherilus, Angela, Anatol
Rodgers, 14:07.67. 2, 847 Humed,
Kendra, C.R. Walker 25, 15:24.23. 3,
1156 McIntosh, Crystal, R.M. Bailey 2,
15:36.58.

* GIRLS 100 METER HURDLES
SENIOR (U20)
(w: -0.4) 1, 724 Sears, Hollina, C.C.
Sweeting 7, 16.98. 2, 1151 Johnson,
Tonia-Kaye, R.M. Bailey 2, 18.28. 3,
765 Brown, Vanessa, C.I. Gibson 16,
18.47.

* GIRLS 400 METER HURDLES
SENIOR (U20)
1, 891 Adderley, Teshona, C.V. Bethel
26, 1:06.40. 2, 1090 Miller, Shauntae,
Government High, 1:09.20. 3, 724
Sears, Hollina, C.C. Sweeting 7,
1:11.32.

* GIRLS 4X100 METER RELAY
SENIOR (U20)
1, C. V. Bethel (26) Stingrays (Adderley,
Teshona 17, Gaitor, Lyndera 18, Stuart,
Shatyna 17, Lewis, Vashonique 18),
52.42. 2, C. I. Gibson (16) Rattlers
(Stubbs, Jarona 17, Colebrooke, Vashti
17, Brown, Vanessa 19, Adderley, Nasia
17), 52.78. 3, C. R. Walker (25) Knights
(Strachan, Opal 17, Rahming, Edricka
17, Capron, Lechea 17, Dean, Roshan-
da 17), 53.35.

* GIRLS 4X400 METER RELAY
SENIOR (U20)
1, C. R. Walker (25) Knights 4:20.05. 2,
Government High School (3) Mag
4:32.52. 3, Anatol Rodgers High School
4:35.85.


* GIRLS LONG JUMP
SENIOR (U20)
1, 1087 Kelly, Cache, Government High,
4.69m, w:NWI (15-04.75). 2, 914
Lewis, Vashonique, C.V. Bethel 26,
4.63m, w:NWI (15-02.25). 3, 655
Demeritt, Ariel, Anatol Rodgers, 4.55m,
w:NWI (14-11.25).

* GIRLS TRIPLE JUMP
SENIOR (U20)
1,1159 Rodgers, Shonice, R.M. Bailey
2, 10.07m, w:NWI (33-00.50). 1, 723
Rodgers, Terranique, C.C. Sweeting 7,
10.07m, w:NWI (33-00.50). 3, 860
Thompson, Brittaney, C.R. Walker 25,
9.96m, w:NWI (32-08.25).

* GIRLS HIGH JUMP (4'3")
SENIOR (U20)
1, 862 Young, Lyndia, C.R. Walker 25,
1.45m, (4-09). 2, 1090 Miller,
Shauntae, Government High, 1.40m,
(4-07). 3, 1087 Kelly, Cache, Govern-
ment High, J1.40m, (4-07).

* GIRLS SHOT PUT (8LBS)
SENIOR (U20)
1, 934 Williams, Racquel, C.V. Bethel
26, 12.22m#, (40-01.25). 2, 716 Gor-
don, Giovann, C.C. Sweeting 7, 9.10m,
(29-10.25). 3, 836 Bastian, Samantha,
C.R. Walker 25, 8.79m, (28-10.25).

* GIRLS DISCUS THROW (1K)
SENIOR (U20)
1, 934 Williams, Racquel, C.V. Bethel
26, 35.65m#, (116-11). 2, 1145
Estorcien, Vernice, R.M. Bailey 2,
23.31 m, (76-06). 3, 859 Taylor, Jewel,
C.R. Walker 25, 22.69m, (74-05).

* GIRLS JAVELIN THROW (600GMS)
SENIOR (U20)
1, 920 Prosper, Tawanna, C.V. Bethel
26, 29.03m, (95-03). 2, 934 Williams,
Racquel, C.V. Bethel 26, 28.75m, (94-
04). 3, 716 Gordon, Giovann, C.C.
Sweeting 7, 26.13m, (85-09).

* BOYS 100 METER DASH
SENIOR (U20)
(w: -0.3) 1,1053 Mackey, Trevor, Doris
Johnson 27, 10.90. 2, 1115 Innocent,
Nathan, Government High, 11.61. 3,
680 Brooks, Brandon, Anatol Rodgers,
11.61.

* BOYS 200 METER DASH
SENIOR (U20)
(w: 2.4) 1,1053 Mackey, Trevor, Doris
Johnson 27, 22.43. 2, 872 Ferguson,
O'Jay, C.R. Walker 25, 22.51. 3, 1038
Cooper, Randolph, Doris Johnson 27,
22.80.

* BOYS 400 METER DASH
SENIOR (U20)
1, 872 Ferguson, O'Jay, C.R. Walker
25, 50.38. 2, 1201 Swann, Leeward,
R.M. Bailey 2, 52.84. 3, 866 Cartwright,
Leon, C.R. Walker 25, 53.03.

* BOYS 800 METER RUN
SENIOR (U20)
1, 866 Cartwright, Leon, C.R. Walker
25, 2:05.15.2, 1175 Darville, Brandon,
R.M. Bailey 2, 2:05.53. 3, 795 Bain,
Carlide, C.I. Gibson 16, 2:07.47.

* BOYS 1500 METER RUN
SENIOR (U20)
1, 813 Louis, Harold, C.I. Gibson 16,
4:49.54. 2, 1175 Darville, Brandon,
R.M. Bailey 2, 4:53.76. 3, 1199 Storr,
Lyndrick, R.M. Bailey 2, 5:03.68.

* BOYS 5000 METER RUN
SENIOR (U20)
1, 827 Serveus, Vicknel, C.I. Gibson 16,
19:08.50. 2, 869 Davis, Matthew, C.R.
Walker 25, 19:20.71. 3, 756 Wells,
Denzil, C.C. Sweeting 7, 19:27.24.

* BOYS 3000 METER
STEEPLECHASE SENIOR (U20)
1, 827 Serveus, Vicknel, C.I. Gibson 16,
11:34.11. 2, 888 Stuart, Trevonn, C.R.
Walker 25, 12:04.36. 3, 756 Wells,
Denzil, C.C. Sweeting 7, 12:14.29.

* BOYS 110 METER HURDLES
SENIOR (U20)
(w: 1.2) 1, 936 Adderley, Tre, C.V.


Bethel 26, 15.39. 2, 947 Ferguson,
Donshannon, C.V. Bethel 26, 16.09. 3,
733 Dames, Jaleel, C.C. Sweeting 7,
16.75.

* BOYS 400 METER HURDLES
SENIOR (U20)
1, 874 Higgs, Delvano, C.R. Walker 25,
59.64. 2, 754 Thompson, Ishmael, C.C.
Sweeting 7, 1:01.38. 3, 1183 Henfield,
Melvin, R.M. Bailey 2, 1:01.63.

* BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY
SENIOR (U20)
1, Doris Johnson (27) Marlins
(Walkine, Marco 17, Clarke, Fredrick
19, Cooper, Randolph 18, Mackey,
Trevor 18), 44.13. 2, C. V. Bethel (26)
Stingrays (Lockhart, David 17, Adder-
ley, Tre 17, Forbes, Jarad 18,
Cartwright, Elvis 16), 44.99. 3, R. M.
Bailey (2) Pacers (Bullard, Delmarro 17,
Swann, Leeward 17, Knowles, Terrell
17, Munroe, Sean 17), 45.33.

* BOYS 4X400 METER RELAY
SENIOR (U20)
1, R. M. Bailey (2) Pacers 4:17.61.2, C.
R. Walker (25) Knights 4:17.96. 3,
Doris Johnson (27) Marlins 4:21.48.

* BOYS LONG JUMP SENIOR (U20)
1, 792 Adderley, Patrizio, C.I. Gibson
16, 6.03m, w:NWI (19-09.50). 2, 1119
Martin, Wayne, Government High,
5.90m, w:NWI (19-04.25). 3,1173
Bullard, Delmarro, R.M. Bailey 2,
5.88m, w:NWI (19-03.50).

* BOYS TRIPLE JUMP
SENIOR (U20)
1, 1120 McDonald, Jerome, Govern-
ment High, 13.83m, w:NWI (45-04.50).
2, 863 Babbs, Tehneil, C.R. Walker 25,
12.92m, w:NWI (42-04.75). 3, 940
Burns, Michael, C.V. Bethel 26,
12.50m, w:NWI (41-00.25).

* BOYS HIGH JUMP (5'5")
SENIOR (U20)
1, 810 Ingraham, Ryan, C.I. Gibson 16,
1.94m, (6-04.25). 2, 808 Hall,
Jerwaine, C.I. Gibson 16, 1.91m, (6-
03.25). 3, 959 Hinsey, Jaran, C.V.
Bethel 26, 1.85m, (6-00.75). 3, 1120
McDonald, Jerome, Government High,
1.85m, (6-00.75).

* BOYS SHOT PUT (14LBS)
SENIOR (U20)
1, 881 Nottage, Deangelo, C.R. Walker
25, 12.06m, (39-07). 2, 1098 Arnett,
Jonathan, Government High, 11.70m,
(38-04.75). 3, 1116 Johnson, Welling-
ton, Government High, 11.64m, (38-
02.25).

* BOYS DISCUS THROW 1.75K
SENIOR (U20)
1, 1201 Swann, Leeward, R.M. Bailey
2, 40.34m#, (132-04). 2, 881 Nottage,
Deangelo, C.R. Walker 25, 37.22m,
(122-01). 3, 1197 Rolle, Cardell, R.M.
Bailey 2, 36.83m, (120-10).

* BOYS JAVELIN THROW (800GMS)
SENIOR (U20)
1, 880 MACKEY, Samuel, C.R. Walker
25, 50.54m, (165-10). 2, 936 Adderley,
Tre, C.V. Bethel 26, 45.98m, (150-10).
3, 1119 Martin, Wayne, Government
High, 45.17m, (148-02).

* BOYS POLE VAULT SENIOR (U20)
1, 970 Roker, Terrane, C.V. Bethel 26,
3.07m*, (10-00.75). 2, 953 Goodman,
Ritchie, C.V. Bethel 26, 2.98m, (9-
09.25).

* GIRLS HIGH JUMP (4'0")
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 918 Minus, Raygene, C.V. Bethel 26,
1.42m, (4-07.75). 2, 850 Lewis,
Shafara, C.R. Walker 25, J1.42m, (4-
07.75). 3, 709 Cox, Jaynell, C.C. Sweet-
ing 7, J1.42m, (4-07.75).

* BOYS HIGH JUMP (4'8")
INTERMEDIATE (U17)
1, 889 Sweeting, Ricardo, C.R. Walker
25, 1.78m, (5-10). 2, 1033 Burrows,
Nicholas, Doris Johnson 27, J1.78m,
(5-10). 3, 1032 Bowles, Dion, Doris
Johnson 27, 1.62m, (5-03.75).


Subway 2010 Junior Tennis Classic results


THE first Bahamas Lawn and Ten-
nis Association sanctioned junior ten-
nis tournament of the year took place
this past weekend (February 19-22,
2010) at the Gully Bowe Tennis Cen-
ter at the Lucayan Bath & Racquet
Club. The Grand Bahama Tennis
Association hosted 35 junior tennis
players from Nassau, Eleuthera and
Grand Bahama for several days of
healthy tennis competition with sev-
eral hundred spectators in attendance
during the four-day event.
Tournament director Gully Bowe
said that this year's event was very
competitive and a great success. "I
enjoyed the tournament and I know
that the young tennis players did as
well," he added. "This year's players
displayed a high level of competive-
ness and good sportsmanship as they
vied for the first place trophies in the
various age categories."
He thanked all the participants,
parents and coaches for their contri-
butions to the tournament. He
expressed special thanks to the tour-
nament sponsor, Shuffel Hepburn and
Subway. "Despite the economic chal-


lenges being faced by many, Mr Shuf-
fle Hepburn, owner of SUBWAY
restaurants, continues his commit-
ment to youth development in spon-
soring this year's tournament once
again," said Bowe.
President of the Grand Bahama
Tennis Association, Mrs Charmine
Wallace, dubbed this year's tourna-
ment a huge success and extended
sincere appreciation to Mr Shuffle
Hepburn of Subway restaurants, the
players and their parents for con-
tributing to such a successful tourna-
ment.
The tournament results are as fol-
lows: Girls under 12 Singles: lesha
Shepherd d. Lily Evert 5-7, 6-0, 6-3;
Girls Under 14: Gabriella Bowe d.
Lily Evert 6-1, 6-0; Girls Under 16:
Gabriella Bowe d. Dominique Morti-
er 6-0, 6-1; Boys Under 10: Cole
Majra d. Kofi Bowe 6-0,6-0; Boys
Under 12: Oneil Mortimer d. Ashton
Major 6-4, 6-0; Boys Under 14: Philip
Major d. Rasheed Carey 6-4, 6-0;
Boys Under 16: Kevin Major d.
Ondre Cargil Bye; Boys Under 18:
Johnathan Taylor d. Kevin Major


Bye; Girls Under 14 Doubles:
Shaytonya Missick & Gabriella Bowe
def Lily Evert & Iesha Shepherd Bye;
Boys Under 14 Doubles: Shannon


Francis & Ashton Major d. Oneil
Mortimer & Malik Jones 8-3; Boys
Under 18 Doubles: Hubert Russell
& Philip Major d. Johnathan Miller &


GABRIELLA
Bowe cracks a
forehand at the
2010 Subway
Junior Tennis
Classic at the
Gully Bowe Ten-
nis Center at the
Lucayan Bath &
Racquet Club.




E
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Dirnaj Saunders 8-1.
Bahamas tennis fans can see a full
gallery of photos from the event
atwww.bahamastennis.com.


IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I


SPORTS





GSSSA DIVISIONAL RESULTS







+


THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010, PAGE 13


LOCALNW


EXECUTIVE Members of the Bahamas
Professional Photographers and Videog-
raphers Association (BPPVA) present a
cheque, food, water and shoes to the
Bahamas Red Cross Society.
The money and goods were raised after
two weeks of partnering with the Mall at
Marathon and Robin Hood Mega Store.
The theme for this drive was "Preserving
the Family to Rebuild Haiti".
Pictured presenting the cheque (from I-r)
is Vincent Vaughan, assistant secretary
of the BPPVA; Raphael Munnings, pub-
lic relations; Portia King, vice-president
of the BPPVA; Caroline Turnquest, direc-
tor general of the Bahamas Red Cross
Society; Kemuel Stubbs, president of the
BPPVA; Willamae Jenoure Evans, finan-
cial officer of the Bahamas Red Cross
Society; Fabian Whymms, treasurer of
BPPVA, Peter Campbell; assistant
sergeant at-arms.


THE WEATHER REPORT (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
THE W EATHE REPORT ObO INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


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Eleuthera, Bahamas



2010

Saturday

March 20

Ride for Hope is a truly memorable
annual charitable bike-a-thon which
raises money for cancer patient
care, treatment, early detection, and
Bahamas-based cancer research.
Here's what participants say:
"Congratulations on organizing such
a truly amazing day. Thank you
so much for the countless hours
you put into organizing an incredible
day for a great caused! We had
a ball and can't stop talking about
how well it was done! ... it was
truly an inspiring time, what a
great experience!"


JOIN US!

MORE INFO AND REGISTER
RIDEFORHOPEBAHAMAS.COM


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