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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: February 23, 2010
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01515

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U. S E W M A N ECT O NI


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010


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Christie hits out at

PM for 'litany of lies'
[ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter .
e a alowe@tribunemedia.net


Homicide, four

armed robberies and

stabbing in 24 hours


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
ARMED burglars tied up
two women in their home and
shot and killed a man before
getting away with their stolen
goods early yesterday morn-
ing.
It was one of four armed
robberies that took place on
Monday in addition to a stab-
bing.
Police say two men armed
with handguns broke into the
home of Henry McPhee, 46,
at Oleander Avenue, across


from the park in South Beach
estates, just before 1.30am.
They reportedly tied up
McPhee's girlfriend and
daughter, then rummaged for
jewellery and other valuables
to steal.
McPhee was also robbed by
the armed intruders before
they shot him in the head. He
was taken to hospital by
ambulance where he died of
his injuries.
McPhee, who owned a
construction company, also
worked at Mr Pool's fish fry
SEE page 10


ia


Man facing retrial charged
with another murder
By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
A 22-YEAR-OLD man facing a retrial in a 2008 murder
case was arraigned in a magistrate's court yesterday on anoth-
er murder charge.
SEE page 12


Government set to
amend net fishing law
By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
THE government is set to amend the law to
prohibit "purse seine" or net fishing in The
Bahamas after receiving a flood of calls and e-
mails from concerned Bahamians, environ-
mentalists and sportsfishermen fearing that a
large fishing vessel is set to wreak havoc on
Bahamian tuna stocks using the controversial
SEE page 10


AFTER being accused by the
Prime Minister of a history of
failing to pay debts owed and of
being unwilling to accept the will
of the people in elections, PLP
leader Perry Christie yesterday
lashed out at Mr Ingraham for
what he termed "a rambling,
incoherent, litany of lies."
Mr Ingraham stated in a Sun-
day press conference that the FNM would seek to have the
PLP put up "', mi,') 'funds to pay for the election court
SEE page three

HPolice Sergeant
acquitted of sex
EFEDIN c, : with underage girls
[lie T0i 'iri,,Ic,' F lle. I '1"
ee i : By DENISE MAYCOCK
nn[;i n lhr In1 ,;1ime ,:,1 Tribune Freeport
irte 2.-,1_1 Arirnil Hu,;ll Reporter
n:,:,mtell Bi,,el:,i, II .l ,- dmaycock@tribunemedia.net


POLICE Sergeant Juan
Pratt, who was accused of
having sex with two under-
age girls, was yesterday
acquitted at Freeport Mag-
istrate's Court.
Deputy Chief Magistrate
Helen Jones delivered the
judgment in Court 3, where
Pratt was indicted on two
counts of unlawful sexual
intercourse in May 2007.
Pratt, the son of St Cecilia
MP Cynthia Pratt, was
arrested on May 7, 2007,
with the summary trial
beginning in November
2007.
SEE page 12

Mrs Eileen
Farmer dies
MRS Eileen Farmer died at
her San Souci home at 6 pm on
Sunday.
The Farmer family arrived in
Nassau from the UK in 1948
when Mr Farmer joined the late
Sir Victor Sassoon as his
accountant. The family made
Nassau their home.
Mrs Farmer was predeceased
by her husband, John Farmer;
son, Christopher Farmer, and
daughter Alannah Martin.
She is survived by her daugh-
ter, Frances Farmer; sons, John,
Damien, Michael and Patrick
Farmer; son-in-law, Michael
Martin; daughters-in-law, Pia,
Denise and Laura Farmer; and
grandchildren, David and
Natasha Martin, Daniel,
Meghan and Timothy Kelly,
Sonia, Liam, Danielle,
Dominique and Ethan Farmer.
Funeral services will be held
for Mrs Farmer at Sacred Heart
Church on Saturday, February
27, at 3pm.


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
THE North Andros High School student
who blew the whistle on allegations of sex-
ual misconduct involving a teacher has
reportedly been punished by island school
officials, according to sources in Andros.
The 17-year-old youth who, according
to reports, alleged he was subjected to rude
SEE page 12


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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


i oI _l i I ,i I ,II





New national stadium ,..




starts to take shape i.


YINQING SUN, Chief of Technical Matters for the Qilu Construction
Group Corporation, leads the tour of the new stadium construction site
with Minister of State for Culture, Charles Maynard, and Chinese


Ambassador Dingxian Hu.
By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE Chinese construction
company building the new
national stadium yesterday
treated a delegation led by Min-
ister of State for Culture
Charles Maynard to a tour of
the facility.
The stadium is taking shape


with the near completion of the
first level of the western stand,
according to stadium namesake
Tommy A Robinson.
Mr Robinson has monitored
the development of the stadium
closely, with weekly site visits.
He is pleased with the pace of
construction and confident the
builders are sticking closely to
the design plans.
Two more levels are to be


CONSTRUCTION of the new Thomas A Robinson stadium is on track for completion in July 2011. Min-


ister of State for Culture, Charles
Dingxian Hu, Monday.
added to the western stand
before the canopy roof is
added. The one-level eastern
stand will be completed in time
for all of the roofing to be
applied simultaneously. Forty
technical workers from China
are expected in the country for
a three-month stay starting at
the end of May to work on the
roof construction, according to
Yinqing Sun, Chief of Techni-
cal Matters for the Qilu Con-
struction Group Corporation.
Ten technical workers are
expected in April for a one-
month stay to work on the four
light towers that will stretch 80
feet high. The foundations for
the light structures already sit
firmly 42-feet into the ground.
"Aside from the gift of the
physical structure, students
from local high schools come
to apprentice at the work site,
so there is a transfer of tech-
nology and knowledge to
empower Bahamians," Minis-
ter Maynard pointed out.
The Chinese construction
company is handling work in
the designated red zone. They
indicated that work is on track
for completion by the projected
June 30, 2011 launch date. The
timeline was not impacted by
a January incident in which 40
Chinese workers walked off the
job after allegedly not being
paid before the New Year's
holiday.
Chinese Ambassador, Dingx-
ian Hu, said this matter was
resolved amicably after talks.
He said the problem stemmed
from a misunderstanding in the
interpretation of some elements
of the workers' contracts.
The ambassador said the
embassy co-ordinated discus-
sions, as it was their responsi-
bility to protect the legal inter-
ests of the workers and the
company.
"This is the first major pro-
ject between the two govern-
ments. This project is a very
good test of best practices to
get experience for further co-

PHOTOS:
Tim Clarke
/Tribune staff


Maynard, toured the construction site with Chinese Ambassador


THE WESTERN stand of the new Thomas A Robinson stadium takes
shape on the Chinese-run construction site. The concrete pillars
supporting the towering cranes are to be demolished once major con-
struction is complete.


operation," said Ambassador
Hu. He said the highway con-
struction project on John F
Kennedy Drive, between the
airport and Thompson Boule-
vard, would be the next major
project undertaken by the two
governments.
Unlike the stadium project,
which was a $30 million gift
from the Chinese government,
in line with their policy of inter-


national aid to small island
nations for public utility works,
the highway project is being
facilitated through a Chinese
government concessionary
loan. The project is expected
to start at the end of July.
"The concept is to help to
raise the capacity of recipient
countries, to strengthen local
development through co-oper-
ation," said Ambassador Hu.


By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of State for Culture Charles Maynard presented
the master plan for the Sports Centre Redevelopment Project to
a Chinese delegation during a visit to the new stadium con-
struction site.
This was the first time the plans were presented to the Chinese
Ambassador, Dingxian Hu, who said he was looking forward to
seeing the red and green zones completed together. He said
the projects would allow the Bahamian workers and the Chinese
technical team to exchange techniques and experience.
The Bahamas government is responsible for the development
of the green zone, which consists of stadium utilities and the land-
scaped area surrounding the new stadium, parking lots and new
roadways. The development of the green zone is to run concur-
rently to the development of the red zone, which is the respon-
sibility of the Chinese construction company, Qilu Construc-
tion Group Corporation. Work on the red zone started months
ago, and is on track for completion by the end of July 2011.
Work on the green zone is yet to begin, but Minister Maynard
said that should change before the end of June. He said the
green zone should be completed two to three months ahead of
the red zone.
No budget allocations have been made for the green zone as
yet. Mr Maynard said the work will be included in the 2010/2011
budget that comes into effect July 1. He said the ministry is
using savings from the 2009/2010 budget to get the project start-
ed. "Just as you see progress on your side, progress will begin on
our side within the next month to develop the green zone. It will
be a team effort between the red zone and the green zone,"
said Mr Maynard.
Among the projects associated with the stadium are several
new road corridors, including a road to divert traffic around
the stadium. Mr Maynard said traffic will no longer have to
pass through the stadium to go from Thompson Boulevard to the
Tonique Williams-Darling highway.
He said the ministry is almost ready to take bids for the road-
work and parking lots, as the final drawings were submitted
just over a week ago. Two or three Bahamian construction com-
panies are expected to work simultaneously on the various pro-
jects. Plans for the Sports Centre Redevelopment Project were
submitted by the design contractors, IBS Group, last November.
Long term plans for the stadium include a new grand entrance
with a hero's park that will recognize local sports icons; and a new
baseball stadium, which is a priority according to the minister.
Plans also include adding a diving centre to the Betty Kenning
Aquatic Centre, moving the race track, and building an ath-
lete's village.
The vision is for the final sports complex is to have a facility
capable of hosting international sporting events, such as the
Pan American Games and Commonwealth Games. The Minis-
ter projects it will take five years for the entire master plan to
materialise.


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+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010, PAGE 3


Christie accuses the speaks yesterday.



PM of 'intimidation'


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

OPPOSITION leader Perry
Christie yesterday accused Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham of
"continuing a pattern of intimi-
dation" on behalf of the FNM
by "personally attacking" a num-
ber of voters who cast protest
ballots.
At a press conference on Sun-
day, Mr Ingraham said the FNM
has "very good evidence" that
the voters in question "had no
entitlement to vote whatsoev-
er", adding that ultimately those
voters, when called to election
court to defend themselves, have
the option to "let go, let be, or
expose (themselves) to the other
place" - a comment that some
took to be referring to Her
Majesty's Prison.
Yesterday, at a press confer-
ence at the party's headquarters
at Gambier House, Farrington
Road, PLP leader Perry Christie


RYAN PINDER with PLP leader Perry
Christie in background.


said he "deplored" Mr Ingra-
ham's statement, which covered
this and several other topics
relating to the by-election and
its aftermath.
"He should be ashamed of
talking such utter nonsense. It
goes to show how dizzy and
dazed he is after the shock of
the by-election," said Mr
Christie.
Speaking of Mr Ingraham's
comments about the five protest
voters who the PLP believe vot-
ed for their candidate, Ryan Pin-
der, Mr Christie said: "The
prime minister was attacking
those people personally. I am
surprised, even (though) it is
him.
"(He) suggested) that they
will be subject to the most exten-
sive scrutiny...The Prime minis-
ter should not seek to intimidate
these people and say that
because they spoke up for their
rights. This is continuing a pat-
tern of intimidation."
Mr Christie accused Mr Ingra-


ham of "denigrating" the elec-
tion court and those who would
wish to seek electoral justice
through it.
On Sunday, Mr Ingraham
said: "The FNM expects to win
what the PLP is taking to court
so we don't need to consider any
further steps. We challenged
those five voters. In the case of
four of them, we have very good
evidence that they had no enti-
tlement whatsoever to vote."
He later added, "The PLP
can't go to court and succeed
unless those five persons also
show up to court. They have to
come themselves and we call
upon them to come and take
that Bible in their hand and
swear an oath (indicating) their
qualifications to vote in Eliza-
beth, then be cross-examined by
the FNM team of lawyers."
Each of the five candidates in
the election would also have the
option to question each of the
protested voters and cross-exam-
ine them in the election court,


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net


FACING a charge from the FNM that his eli-
gibility to nominate as a candidate in the Eliz-
abeth by-election will be challenged by the par-
ty during election court proceedings, PLP leader
Perry Christie said his party is "satisfied by
Ryan Pinder's assurances" that he is "a qualified
candidate to be elected and to serve."
Responding to FNM leader and Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham's assertions at a Sun-
day press conference that the governing party
will be looking to see "where (Pinder's) passport
was marked 'cancelled' by the Americans
before the nomination date", Mr Christie went
on to claim that it is for the government to
prove Pinder is not eligible as a result of his cit-
izenship rather than the other way round.
When asked about the revelation by Mr
Ingraham that Mr Pinder's U.S. citizenship -
which he stated he renounced prior to nomi-
nating to run in the Elizabeth by-election on
January 29th -would be a "preliminary issue
for the party in the election court, Mr Christie
turned the tables on Mr Ingraham, telling the
media he is encouraged by the fact that the
FNM leader raised the point.
"For the Prime Minister to raise that issue
tells me that he knows we are going to win the
election court case. That's the first thing.
Because that only becomes relevant if we win it
- that he could make such a challenge -
because then the court has someone to go
against. (Pinder's citizenship) doesn't matter
to (Ingraham) if Duane (Sands) wins it. So I'm
confident by the fact that by him raising that
issue, he knows (that the PLP will win the elec-
tion court case)," said Mr Christie.


FROM page one Christie


action they intend to initiate in
the wake of the Elizabeth by-
election in anticipation of the
possibility that they will lose,
given that the PLP owes
$236,000 to ZNS dating back
to the 2007 general election
and around $1 million for the
resulting Marco City election
court case.
But Mr Christie retorted
that the issue of a security
deposit does not come into
play "in this instance, as Mr
Ingraham is aware", and that
the party itself does not owe
any debt on the Marco City
case - but the candidate who
undertook the challenge, ex-
senator Pleasant Bridgewater.
"Have I paid the debt? No.
Has the PLP paid it? No. Has
Pleasant Bridgewater paid it?
You'll have to ask her," said
Mr Christie, noting however
that the party stands behind
Bridgewater.
As further support for why
a security deposit would not
be necessary in an Elizabeth
by-election election court mat-
ter, PLP MP for Fox Hill,
Fred Mitchell, noted that the
candidate (Ryan Pinder) and
not the party will be the liti-
gant in this challenge.
Meanwhile, Mr Christie
said that when the FNM con-
tested the MICAL seat in the
election court following the
2002 general election, and its
candidate - Johnley Fergu-
son - lost to the PLP's Alfred
Gray, the debt for this case
was not paid by Mr Ferguson
until "the eve of the general
election, so that he could run
again."
Therefore, he suggested it
was disingenuous for the
Prime Minister to criticise the
PLP candidate for not having
yet cleared the Marco City
debt.
As for any other debts
owed, Mr Christie said the
party will "honour all legiti-
mate debts that it owes."
"From time to time parties
go through challenges with
raising funds but the PLP has


always and will always hon-
our its debts."
Having been hit by Mr
Ingraham with claims that the
PLP is yet again unwilling to
accept the outcome of an elec-
tion as determined by the peo-
ple, as the FNM said the PLP
was in 2007 at the general
election when they launched
ultimately unsuccessful elec-
tion court challenges in Marco
City, Pinewood and Blue
Hills, Mr Christie said it is not
him, but the law that says an
election court must decide
what happens to the votes cast
on coloured "protest" ballots
in last week's by-election, giv-
en that the regular votes plus
protest votes cast for a candi-
date (in this case Ryan Pin-
der) exceeds the number of
regular votes cast for the oth-
er candidate.
"The election court move is
in accordance with the law -
it's not what Perry Christie
says, it's what the law says.
The returning officer has no
legal authority to conduct such
a scrutiny (of the protest votes
to see if they should be con-
sidered eligible to be count-
ed)."
At present, there are six
such votes that were not
counted because the voter's
entitlement to vote was called
into question. Five of these
are said to be for Ryan Pinder,
while one was for Bahamas
Democratic Movement can-
didate Cassius Stuart.
These five votes, if count-
ed, would put the PLP candi-
date ahead of the FNM can-
didate, Dr Duane Sands, who
won 1,501 "regular" votes, to
Mr Pinder's 1,499. According
to PLP attorney Valentine
Grimes, the names of two of
the five " pi ' -1, i ' voters in fact
appeared on the voter's regis-
ter.
Mr Christie added: "(Going
to election court is) not about
winning what you couldn't win
in the battlefield. It's all about
making sure the way those in
Elizabeth did vote is reflected


added Mr Ingraham.
"At the end of the day, the
court will make a decision. If
these persons turn out to be per-
sons that committed perjury or
who lied, then there are laws to
deal with that."
"So each of these persons will
have to make their own decision
on what they want to do.
"Let go, let be or expose your-
self to the other place."


On Sunday, Mr Ingraham said that there is
no issue over a person holding dual citizenship
and running for office unless that person has
been "taking advantage of that citizenship by for
instance, registering to vote, participating in
US elections and paying income taxes."
"Those are some of the things that say a per-
son has accepted US citizenship," he added,
noting that "just being a citizen (of the US) is
not an offence."
Mr Pinder lived in the US for just under a
decade, working for a U.S.-based law firm,
Becker and Poliakoff, and also voted in a U.S.
election.
Yesterday Mr Christie said: "At all material
times, the Prime Minister must be aware of the
fact...that we understand the issues that affect
our candidates, and we accept their assurance
that they are Bahamian citizens and otherwise
fully qualified to offer themselves in this case, in
Ryan Pinder's case, in the by-election for Eliz-
abeth.
"So when Ryan Pinder went forth, we were
satisfied on the basis of all of the assurances, that
he was qualified and a qualified candidate to be
elected and to serve.
"Since the Prime Minister wants to raise it, I
just want to remind him of the principle again in
law, that he who asserts, must prove and we
leave it to him to present his application and to
prove."
Mr Christie also condemned the FNM leader
for terming his candidate, Dr Duane Sands,
the "member elect" for Elizabeth, during his
Sunday press conference.
"We are seeking to determine who the new
MP for Elizabeth is. In our view the evidence is
clear that the people voted for Ryan Pinder
and not Duane Sands. They know the truth,
there's no certified winner."


in the final vote. Rather than
trying to frustrate the will of
the people of Elizabeth, the
purpose of the election court
is to ensure the will of the peo-
ple is correctly determined.
We are satisfied that they are
entitled to vote ... by mistake
their names were left off the
register.
"We do not need all five of
them to be upheld. What we
need to be upheld is sufficient
to win," said Mr Christie.
Speaking on the by-election
outcome at FNM headquar-
ters on Sunday, Mr Ingraham
said: "I never tire of saying
that we are different from (the
PLP); distinctly different.
"In 2007 we mounted a
challenge in MICAL and we
lost. We paid costs of almost
$225,000 to Davis & Co., the
PLP's legal representatives.
As a party, we take ownership
and responsibility for our elec-
tion court cases.
"The PLP take ownership
and responsibility for nothing.
When they lose an election
case, they claim that the indi-
vidual took the case to Elec-
tion Court not the party, and
they pay nothing; ignore the
debt.
"The PLP mounted three
challenges - in Pinewood, in
Marco City, in Blue Hills. All
failed. In one case alone, the
Election Court assessed $1
million in costs. They have not
paid a red nickel. We have not
yet assessed the costs for
Pinewood and Blue Hills; be
assured however, we will do
so.
"They have a new mantra
now. When they lose, they
declare victory, tell their sup-
porters that the election isn't
over yet; send their operatives
to all the radio stations to spill
their vile mistruths and half
truths. They drag their mat-
ters on for as long as possible,
hoping that some how they
will be able to reverse the
decision made by the people
on election day.
"Now, they appear to be on
the verge of this same self-
serving delaying tactic follow-
ing the Elizabeth by-election."


The PLP have ten days
from the date the recount end-
ed - Thursday, February 19
- to file their application for
an election court hearing. Yes-
terday Mr Christie said this
has not yet been done but will
be seen to by the end of the
week.


-x U


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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


EDI *A - S T6TS TO THE EDITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


Some PLPs have short memories


CALLING FOR electoral reform, Oppo-
sition Leader Perry Christie described the
weeks leading up to the Elizabeth by-elec-
tion as "the worst" he'd seen in terms of
allegations that FNM members were using
their government clout to sway voters. "Up
to Monday (the day before the election)," he
said, "government was giving people jobs
with a clear intention of influencing the vote.
That's not proper, ethical or fair."
And this is what Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham had to say about the May 2, 2007
election in which Mr Christie, then the prime
minister, lost the government to Mr Ingra-
ham, who was Opposition leader.
On becoming prime minister, Mr Ingra-
ham told his supporters that the 2007 elec-
tion was the most interfered with election in
Bahamian history.
"I am ashamed that on Perry Christie's
watch there was more political interference
in the electoral process than at any time,
even under Pindling," said Mr Ingraham.
It was claimed that $80 million was award-
ed to contractors "a few months ago and
days leading up to the 2007 election."
However, in our opinion the June 19,1987
general election in the Crooked Island con-
stituency, followed by the November 24,
1989 by-election - called after the MP elect-
ed in the 1987 election was sent to prison for
offering a drug court magistrate $10,000 to
drop a case before her - were two of the
worst elections that we recall. The late Basil
Kelly, who had been MP for the Crooked
Island constituency for about 20 years,
offered as the FNM candidate in both elec-
tions. He lost both.
In last week's Elizabeth by-election the
PLP protested the presence of National
Security Minister Tommy Turnquest - who
is the minister responsible for Parliamen-
tary Elections - in the recount room at
Thelma Gibson Primary School. However,
they forget that in the Crooked Island by-
election in 1989, Prime Minister Sir Lynden
Pindling at the end of a Cabinet meeting
flew to Crooked Island, ordering all of his
Cabinet ministers to get themselves to the
island to fight the by-election and watch
over the stations. Sir Lynden himself gave all
of the Long Cay school children a gift of a
hand held video camera with a $400,000 con-
tract going to a PLP council member in the
constituency to construct an administrative
building. During that by-election Yamacraw
MP Janet Bostwick said that the by-elec-
tion reminded her of 1982 when the PLP
took tankers of asphalt to the district and
told voters that if they wanted the roads
repaired they had to vote for Wilbert Moss.
The people voted for Mr Moss and a week
after the elections, the equipment was taken
away. In the 1989 by-election the people
were again told that if they wanted the roads


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repaired, electricity installed and running
water into their homes they had to "walk
with Walkine." This, said Mrs Bostwick, was
just another PLP ploy to fool voters of that
impoverished district. She rightly predicted
that after the election the flurry of jobs hand-
ed out during the campaign would come to
an end.
As Mr Kelly pointed out in his report on
the 1987 election one must understand that
at the time there were no job opportunities
in the entire Crooked Island district except
for government employment and one small
tourist facility that employed no more than
10 people at any one time. During the 1987
election, he said, these people were given
jobs off and on from nomination day until
election day weeding the road, as assistant
janitresses, assisting in the polls on election
day, nurses assistants and "whatever could be
dreamt up and paid for out of the Treasury."
Campaigning were two civil servants,
school teachers, and the returning officer,
who did not openly campaign, but who was
"directed by PLP generals throughout the
campaign."
The helicopter, ostensibly at the island
for the PLP candidates, was "also used to fer-
ry government presiding officers, the return-
ing officer, the mailboat captain, and in fact,
picked up the ballot boxes after polling on
election day. It was openly admitted by the
pilot of the helicopter that this was govern-
ment's helicopter," wrote Mr Kelly. What
everyone wanted to know was whether the
Treasury paid for the helicopter.
"There was a new trick that I had never
seen before in the form of intimidation,"
Mr Kelly wrote of the 1987 election. "Voters
were told during the campaign by leading
PLP generals and civil servants that when a
particular voter voted, the presiding officer
was instructed to write his signature on the
back of his ballot differently to others so
that his ballot would be easily identifiable.
This way he could tell how that particular
voter voted when the ballots were counted,
and if the voter did not vote right (in other
words, for the PLP) his daughter or whoev-
er was working for government would lose
their job."
Throughout that campaign civil servants
acted as PLP generals, and the few civil ser-
vants who were known FNM supporters
were ordered not to vote. Whatever the
FNM might have done during the Elizabeth
by-election, which Mr Christie claims was
"not proper, ethical or fair" cannot be con-
doned.
But when the PLP held the helm of state,
they were absolutely ruthless, particularly
in some of these impoverished Family
Islands. Now maybe some of them will know
what it is like to be on the receiving end.
Retribution has come full circle.


Netting tuna:




An open letter




to Minister of




Agriculture

EDITOR, The Tribune. * --.p.... . .i ing may result in the collapse


This is an open letter to the
Hon Lawrence Cartwright,
Minister of Agriculture and
Marine Resources regarding
netting tuna in The Bahamas
Dear Minister Cartwright,
I am writing to you on
behalf of the Bahamas
Marine Mammal Research
Organisation to express con-
cern about a permit to use a
purse-seine vessel to fish for
yellow-fin tuna in The
Bahamas.
Due to the lack of current
regulations to govern such
fishing activities, I urge your
Ministry to decline the
requested fishing permit for
this vessel and to immediate-
ly place a moratorium on
large-scale pelagic fishing
operations until regulations
are in place to ensure the sus-
tainable use of our pelagic
marine resources. Our coun-
try has a history of putting
moratoriums in place when
necessary to ensure sustain-
able use of our natural
resources where regulations
have been lacking. For exam-
ple, applications for new cap-
tive dolphin facilities were
declined until the Marine
Mammal Protection Act was
enacted in 2005 providing
regulations for improved care
of captive dolphins and pro-
tection of wild populations.
Having reviewed our Agri-


culture and Fisheries and the
Fisheries Resources (Juris-
diction and Conservation)
Acts (both out-dated and in
need of revision), it is clear
that you have a legal obliga-
tion to follow this precedent
and deny this permit applica-
tion due to the complete lack
of regulations and the possi-
ble unsustainable nature of
this proposed operation.
Purse-seine fisheries are well
documented to incidentally
catch many non-target species
during fishing operations.
Many of these species carry
high economic and social val-
ue in The Bahamas both for
Bahamians and tourists, pri-
marily through the sport-fish-
ing industry.
Tuna aggregate with other
species so when a purse-seine
net surrounds a tuna school,
everything in the surface
waters are caught as well,
including juvenile and adult
billfish, mahi mahi, jacks, trig-
gerfish, and even pelagic dol-
phins. So, although current
tuna harvests in the Atlantic
are reported by the Interna-
tional Commission for the
Conservation of Atlantic
Tuna (ICCAT) at near sus-
tainable levels, there are con-
cerns that the indiscriminate
by-catch in purse-seine fish-


of pelagic ecosystems on
which many species depend,
including our resident popu-
lations of dolphins and
whales.
A recent article in Science
one (February 12, 2010) out-
lines the importance of gov-
ernance when facing issues
relating to the development
of fisheries and the increas-
ing pressure on countries to
ensure the sustainable use of
the marine environment. Now
is not the time for compro-
mises or experimentation with
new fishing methods - with-
out adequate regulations, we
simply have too much to lose.
In closing, I leave you with
the following:
"The right to fish carries
with it the obligation to do so
in a responsible manner so as
to ensure effective conserva-
tion and management of the
living aquatic resources."
FAO's Code of Conduct for
Responsible Fisheries.
I trust that you will make
the right decision and deny
this permit application. As a
member of the United
Nations FAO, we have global
responsibility to do so.
DIANE CLARIDGE
Executive Director
Bahamas Marine
Mammal Research
Organisation
Marsh Harbour,
Abaco,
February 17, 2010.


Assault of DPM at election recount


EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me a few
lines to express my views
about the Deputy Prime
Minister's encounter with
that PLP woman.
What happened on Feb-
ruary 17, 2010 was a sad day
in Bahamian politics and the
Bahamas in general. When
the sitting Deputy Prime
Minister of the Bahamas can
be physically struck by a
member of the public in
view of hundreds and noth-
ing happened to that person
speaks volumes of the vio-
lence we have in the
Bahamas today. I don't
expect for the woman who
assaulted the Deputy Prime


Minister to do any better
because it was her "bamboo
god" Lynden Pindling and
the PLP who introduced
political violence as I know
it to the Bahamas.
The Lewis Yard attack
was the beginning of the
physical attack and the
throwing of the mace was
the attack on the nation.
That is why the PLP think
they own the Bahamas and
have no respect for authori-
ty.
They were brassy enough
to proclaim that the
Bahamas belonged to the
PLP.
My brothers and sisters,
you and I who want a better
Bahamas know that as long
as the PLP remains as a
political party in the
Bahamas, we will always
have these kinds of prob-
lems because many practice
violence, they openly vic-
timise and the ways and
means of many of them are
questionable.


I don't know what world
Mr Christie is living in or his
memory must have left him.
The other day he said that
the Elizabeth Estates elec-
tion was the most corrupt
election he had seen in his
life.
Well blow me down! So
when PLP agents printed
thousands of sample ballots
similar to the ones being
used by the Parliamentary
Registration Department
and took them from polling
station to polling station
some of which were found
in the boxes in the 2007 elec-
tions, what was that? Cor-
ruption at its best.
So my brothers and sisters
who wants a better
Bahamas, let Mr Christie
and the PLP know who
owns the Bahamas in the
2012 and every election
after.

KRH
Nassau,
February 19, 2010.


EDITOR, TheTribune.

Will Opposition Leader Perry Christie publicly con-
demn the slapping of the deputy prime minister by a
PLP supporter?

ATHENA DAMIANOS
Nassau,
February 19, 2010.













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+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010, PAGE 5


Staff make demands !




over 'toxic' smoke


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
CONCERNS over "tox-
ic" smoke from the fire at
the city dump has Environ-
mental Health employees
demanding either hazard
pay or the relocation of their
on-site offices.
Smoke continued to rise
from the landfill site off
Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway yesterday as fire-
fighters worked to control
the burning of tonnes of
waste.
The Department of Envi-
ronmental Health's sanitary
landfill caught fire on Fri-
day, February 12 and is
expected to bum for months
as it has spread across the
100-acre site and deep
underground.
Fire Services director Jef-
frey Deleveaux and his team
worked throughout the
weekend to control the blaze
and he said yesterday's light
rainfall made their job a little
easier.
"It's on the surface so it
would have to be a big
downpour to really be effec-
tive, but it's keeping the dust
down and making it a bit
easier for us to work with,"
he said.
"It is still deep under-
ground and there are times
when the fire is recurring,
but it is under control and
it's just the smoke we are
trying to reduce."
Smoke from the city dump
fire, believed to be toxic, is
said to be infiltrating the
Department of Environ-
mental Health's office on-
site, and staff yesterday com-


FIREFIGHTERS tackle the
linUirp. Emmionniental Heall:"em ml~P l
1eiirniiring eitliei ha:jid piy or the reloc;
11i [ lie :ri 1 - 'ii ' ..


plained that black soot is
accumulating in their work-
place.
They want to be relocated
or given hazard pay while
the fire continues to burn.
An employee said: "When
we come to work we can't
breathe. Our things are
going black with smoke, so
imagine what it is like in our
lungs.
"We don't know what is
in our lungs, or what is in
our body right now with all
this smoke."


Residents in the govern-
ment housing subdivisions
of Jubilee Gardens and Vic-
toria Gardens, which border
on the city dump, also fear
the toxic fumes will endan-
ger their health.
They have been advised
to keep their windows closed
and take whatever precau-
tions they can by Minister of
Health Dr Hubert Minnis.
Department of Environ-
mental Health director
Melanie McKenzie is said to
have been fighting the fire


on the frontline. She did not
return calls from The Tri-
bune to discuss the hazards.
A portion of the landfill is
still open for materials to be
disposed while the fire con-
tinues.
TR:OP:ICA
I EX : T MINA1 OR
PEST COlNiTRL


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net
A HAITIAN freighter
caught fire off the coast of
Eleuthera on Saturday
afternoon, prompting the
dramatic rescue of six
Haitians and two Bahami-
ans.
The 90ft steel hull motor
vessel 'C J' was en route
from New Providence to
Haiti when an explosion in
the engine room sparked
the blaze at around
1.40pm.
Passing motor vessel
'Ballistic' chanced upon the
flaming freighter near Ship
Channel Cay, 21 miles west
of Cape Eleuthera, and
rescued Captain Walter
Noel, of Andros Avenue,
New Providence, and his
crew.
The men were unharmed


in the blaze and taken to
Immigration authorities in
Rock Sound, Eleuthera.
Immigration Department
officials said the six
Haitians had Bahamian
visas, one had a Haitian
passport and ID certificate,
while the other two proved
to have Bahamian citizen-
ship.
They told officials they
had set off from Potters
Cay dock and were trans-
porting vehicles and other
items to Haiti.
All have been released
by Immigration officials.
The Royal Bahamas
Defence Force (RBDF)
reported the freighter had
been completely destroyed
by fire.
The RBDF's HMBS
P121 scoured the area after
the rescue to ensure there
was no debris in the water
which could pose a naviga-
tional hazard.


:~


Man wanted for

questioning in

connection with

armed robberies
A 53-YEAR-OLD Rock
Crusher man is wanted by
police for questioning in con-
nection with numerous armed
robberies throughout New
Providence.
Jeffrey Wilson is described
as 5'9" of slim build and a
light brown complexion. He
is considered armed and dan-
gerous. Police encourage per-
sons with any information to
call Crime Stoppers at 328-
8477.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


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Bahamas Regional Office
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Nassau, N.P., Bahamas


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+


PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


New govt complex




to create 300 jobs
m"I I l�- ...m jr


By BETTY VEDRINE
MARSH HARBOUR,
Abaco - ALMOST 300
construction jobs are
expected to be created as
a result of a new govern-
ment administration com-
plex to be built in Abaco.
A $19.2 million-contract
was signed last week


$19.2m contract signed

for construction in Abaco


between the National
Insurance Board (NIB)
and WOSLEE Contrac-
tors Limited for the 64,390
sq ft complex.


Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham was present
during the signing and
said that the complex is
part of a "conceptual
plan" for a new township
in Central Abaco with the
view to one day evolving
into a city.
"There are many parts
to this township which, as
envisioned, will be con-
nected by way of a new
highway to the Marsh
Harbour International
Airport," he said.
"Adjacent to the Cen-
tral Pines subdivision, the
township is in close prox-
imity to Marsh Harbour,
Dundas and Murphy
Towns."

Agencies
Mr Ingraham said the
complex is designed to
house all the principal
government agencies
located in Abaco includ-
ing the Ministry of
Finance - Business
Licence and Real Proper-


ty Tax Units; the Treasury
and Auditor-General's
Department; the Magis-
trates Courts; the Road
Traffic Department; the
Ministry of Agriculture
and Marine Resources;
the Department of
Labour; Department of
Immigration; the Passport
Office; the Post Office;
the Ministry of Tourism;
the Department of Hous-
ing and the Mortgage Cor-
poration; the Department
of Education; Ministry of
Youth Sports and Culture;
the National Insurance
Board and the Office of
the Prime Minister.
The construction of the
new Marsh Harbour Port
Facility enabled the gov-
ernment to locate the Cus-
toms Department there
and transfer the Ministry
of Agriculture and Marine
Resources to the new
complex upon completion,
thereby giving Customs
the additional space
required, the prime min-
ister said.
"I advise that we expect
to be in a position to go
to tender for the con-
struction of the new ter-
minal and air traffic con-
trol buildings at the Marsh
Harbour Airport this sum-


mer and for construction
to commence on that pro-
ject sometime during the
third quarter of this year,"
he said.
Minister of Public
Works and Transport
Neko Grant said the pro-
ject represents the cen-
tralisation of all govern-
ment ministries and
departments on the island
of Abaco.
According to the NIB
director Algernon Cargill,
this loan to the govern-
ment meets one of the
NIB's key objectives.
Challenge
"Currently, the NIB's
reserves stand at some
$1.6 billion. A constant
challenge for NIB is find-
ing safe and productive
investment opportunities
for the National Insurance
Fund."
He said although loans
make up a very small per-
centage of the Board's
investment portfolio, it is
a significant portion
because the alternative
would be that the funds
would not be 'optimally'
deployed and in some cas-
es, earning no interest at
all.


PRIME MINISTER Hubert
Ingraham said the complex is
part of a 'conceptual plan' for a
new township.

"Projects, like this one,
where NIB enters into a
finance lease agreement
with the government, con-
tinue to serve the NIB
well and also allows us to
simultaneously fulfill our
mandate of assisting with
infrastructural develop-
ment of the Bahamas," Mr
Cargill said.
In addition to the com-
plex in Abaco, the NIB is
also financing a second
administrative complex in
Freeport for $18.
Mr Ingraham expects
the project to create some
250 construction jobs in
Grand Bahama.


Legal Notice
NOTICE
FALLIZIA FALLS INC.
- 6-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of FALLIZIA FALLS INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


DAMAANYO SLOPES INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of DAMAANYO SLOPES INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
SHENDI VENTRY CORPORATION




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SHENDI VENTRY CORPORATION
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


BLUEMAVERICK COAST INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of BLUEMAVERICK COAST
INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
NEW MATRIX GLOBAL INC.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NEW MATRIX GLOBAL INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
VIBRANT S.A.

- 4-


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of VIBRANT S.A. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


FLORISTICA ACCENT INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of FLORISTICA ACCENT
INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

FIRE TOWER LANE GROUP LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of FIRE TOWER LANE
GROUP LIMITED has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


DOOMSBERRY CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of DOOMSBERRY CORP. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

IRIS & LILAC INVESTMENTS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of IRIS & LILAC
INVESTMENTS LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


I







+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010, PAGE 7


LOSALNEWS


STEEL pan entertainment was provided by Kevin Symonette and
Kendall Underwood of Spanish Wells.


A 25-acre
nature sanc-
tuary being
created on
Eleuthera is projected to
inject more than $2 million
into the local economy.
A first of its kind in the
Caribbean, the Leon Levy
Native Plant Preserve is being
established in partnership
between the Bahamas
National Trust and the Leon
Levy Foundation to showcase
the Bahamas' rich plant life.
The preserve is being cre-
ated by famed landscape
designer Raymond Jungles in
concert with Wilderness
Graphics of Tallahassee,
Florida and world renowned
expert on subtropical plants
Dr Ethan Freid working with
the BNT.
When completed, the pre-
serve will present a rare
opportunity for visitors to
learn the history of the native
plants of the Bahamas.
It will feature medicinal
plants used for centuries to
make teas and infusions that
still hold curative powers.

Abundant
The site's abundant native
plants include orchids,
bromeliads, black, red, and
white mangroves, wild coffee,
mahogany trees, five fingers
and numerous other plant
species and birds indigenous
to the area.
The preserve will also fea-
ture some of the culinary and
herbal plants native to the
islands.
Visitors will be able to
walk a mile of trail for a
unique native plant experi-
ence.
The Leon Levy Native
Plant Preserve will be donat-
ed to the BNT by the Leon
Levy Foundation, a New
York foundation created from
the estate of the late Leon
Levy, considered a Wall
Street genius who founded
the Oppenheimer Mutual


EARL DEVEAUX, Minister of the Environment, speaking at the open
house event to celebrate the creation of the Leon Levy Native Plant
Preserve in Eleuthera.


PERLENE Barth offered information on Bahamian Bus. Visitors will
be able to walk a mile of trail for a unique native plant experience.


Nature sanctuary seen





as $2m economic boost


BNT COUNCIL members and guests - John F Bethell; Robin Symonette; Earlston McPhee; Angela Cleare; D Stewart Morrison; Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux; Shelby White; BNT president Glenn Bannister; Lawrence Glinton, Neil McKinney; Pericles Maillis, BNT executive direc-
tor Eric Carey.


Funds. In 2006, Shelby White,
Mr Levy's widow, approached
the Trust about creating an
appropriate memorial to her
husband who loved the island
where the couple had a home
for many years.
Mr Levy had a passion for


knowledge and was intrigued
by the possible medicinal val-
ue of the plants growing all
around them, but whose use
was rapidly diminishing.
Working with the Trust's
executive director, Eric
Carey, the Leon Levy Foun-


dation intends the preserve
to be an educational resource,
a habitat for migrating birds
and a major attraction for vis-
itors. The Leon Levy Native
Plant Preserve will serve as a
centre for excellence for envi-
ronmental education and as


a major public access facility
for Bahamians to learn about
their resident flora and its cul-
tural impact on the daily life
of island inhabitants.
Portia Sweeting, BNT's
director of education, said:
"This will become a living


"This will
become a living
classroom for
Bahamian stu-
dents who are
studying plants
and their value
to Bahamians."

Portia Sweeting
classroom for Bahamian stu-
dents who are studying plants
and their value to Bahami-
ans."

Dream
Shelby White added: "This
project has been a long stand-
ing dream of mine.
"Working with the
Bahamas National Trust as
our partners, I believe we will
create the finest nature pre-
serve in the Bahamas, a place
that will make Eleuthera a
must-visit tourist destination
and of which we will all be
proud."
To celebrate the creation
of this unique sanctuary, a
open house event was held in
Governor's Harbour,
Eleuthera last week.
Those attending included
Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux and his wife; mem-
bers of the Bahamas National
Trust Council; Eric Carey,
BNT executive director; Shel-
by White, founding trustee of
the Leon Levy Foundation;
local government officials,
community members and oth-
ers. The Leon Levy Founda-
tion, founded in 2004, is a pri-
vate, not-for-profit founda-
tion created from the estate
of Leon Levy, an investor
with a long-standing commit-
ment to philanthropy. The
Foundation's overarching
goal is to support scholarship
at the highest level, ultimate-
ly advancing knowledge and
improving the lives of indi-
viduals and society in general.


I'.I

* .. I S l s .-, .,
' .,:* i, <, '..1: "* . La'it


C Nassau * Town Centre Mall (Up the Escalator)

B (242) 397-PLUS 5Bss7

Fax: (242) 325-6368


FURNI E



Niiua * Grand Bahamea * Abaco Coming Soon


- - -'- - -0-0- - - 10


T1~7







+


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


Pharmacy industry cutting it close


By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE local pharmacy indus-
try is cutting it close in terms
of meeting the February 28
deadline for registering with
the recently established Phar-
macy Council.
At the start of this week,
less than 20 per cent of total
registered pharmacies were
regularised under the new sys-
tem, which requires them to
pay a $2,000 registration fee.
None of the operating fac-
tories or warehouses were
registered. Like the pharma-
cies, they are facing first time
registration fees under the


February 28 deadline looming for

registering with Pharmacy Council


new Pharmacy Act that range
from $2,000 and $5,000.
"We are working towards
compliance. We knew from
last year and we are fully in a
position to follow through. I
haven't heard any major com-
plaints. Obviously money may
be a little tight, but I do
believe everyone agrees," said
Barbera Henderson, pharma-
ceutical manager at Nassau
Agencies Ltd.


Legal Notice
NOTICE
HUSSNOUR INC.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of HUSSNOUR INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
THE TENGCHONG COMPANY LTD.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of THE TENGCHONG
COMPANY LTD. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
BLUE WATER VALLEY INC.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of BLUE WATER VALLEY
INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


"Business licence comes up
every year and I am sure
there are times when people
can't afford to pay it. The
(Pharmacy Council) is are not
going to browbeat them. I am
sure they will find a way to
work with them," said Ms
Henderson.

Compliant
Pharmacists are the most
compliant category. More
than 50 per cent of the regis-
trations from the former gov-
erning body, the Health Pro-
fessionals Council, were trans-
ferred to the Pharmacy Coun-
cil. Of the remaining 50 per
cent, about 10 per cent have
come in their records and set-
tled outstanding fees.
"The process has been
smooth. We recognize there
is quite a bit of documents
people had to collect. Most
people have been collecting
those so they can complete
their licence this week. If they
have any concerns they
should contact the council and
we can assist them through
the process," said council
chairman, Philip Gray.
Late fees will apply after
February 28 for all industry
practitioners who are yet to
comply with the new regula-
tions. This grace period will
last for 30-days. Asked about
the status of compliance, the
Pharmacy Association


deferred comment at this
time.
Council registrar, Shelly
Collymore, said people have
generally been co-operative.
They have had a few queries
and appeals for consideration,
and she said the council is
actively working on those
matters.
"We just got the registra-
tion forms. We haven't had
time to pay them yet. I am
sure that they will be paid.
We are working on our regis-
tration forms right now.
Everyone is working to com-
ply, that is the impression I
got, and we are working
towards the deadline," said
Caroll Sands, council mem-
ber and chief executive officer
of Lowe's Wholesale Drug
Agency Ltd.
The fees will be used by the
council to advance its primary
areas of focus this year. Chair-
man Gray said this will
include cleaning up the indus-
try to ensure that those selling
drugs illegally are stopped.
Pharmacy wholesaler Ms
Henderson said the upgrade
to the industry was long over-
due.
"When you think about it,
it benefits the pharmacists so
people are not just selling
drugs all over the place arbi-
trarily. We have run an open
market where anyone can do
anything and now that is
going to change," she said.


LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE


DON PEPE BUSINESS CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of DON PEPE BUSINESS
CORP. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


A STANDARD orange prescription bottle full of yellow pills. The
information on the label has been covered. A few pills sit out-
side the bottle, at its base. At the start of this week, less than
20 per cent of total registered pharmacies were regularised
under the new system.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

SOLSONA LIMITED



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of SOLSONA LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE


BIANCA VALLEY INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of BIANCA VALLEY INC.. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE


VILLADALE VALLEY LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of VILLADALE VALLEY LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE


ARA CETUS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of ARA CETUS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
SANDSTONE VALLEY INC.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of SANDSTONE VALLEY
INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
COSPILLOT BUSINESS CORP.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of COSPILLOT BUSINESS
CORP has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)







+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010, PAGE 9


LOSALNEWS


New Providence Development


Company, Tommy Hilfiger co-sponsor


the Second Annual Paradise Plates


HANDS For Hunger has
named the New Providence
Development Company and
Tommy Hilfiger as co-present-
ing sponsors for their Second
Annual Paradise Plates
fundraiser.
Both companies have each
donated $10,000 for the unique
event, which will feature an
even larger array of gourmet
food from celebrated chefs and
restaurants in the Bahamas.
Held on Saturday, May 15
from 7pm - 11pm in the
Atlantis Crown Ballroom, Par-
adise Plates will feature fine
food and beverages, live enter-
tainment as well as a raffle and
silent auction.
Chefs will gather from across
New Providence under one
roof to prepare their signature
dishes, complemented by drink
purveyors serving samples of
wine, local beer and spirits.
All proceeds will benefit
Hands For Hunger, the non-
profit, food-rescue programme
committed to the elimination
of hunger and the reduction of
food waste in the Bahamas.
"The New Providence
Development Company is
pleased to continue our spon-
sorship of Paradise Plates," said
Rhys Duggan, president and
CEO of the New Providence
Development Company.
"Hands For Hunger fulfills
a real need on the island by
providing food to those who
need it most. Starting a fledg-
ling non-profit is not a simple
task. We have seen the impact
that Hands For Hunger has had
in a short period of time. They
have been successful and con-
tinue to expand and make a
real difference in our commu-
nity. Their approach of using


food that would otherwise go
to waste makes so much sense
and we will continue to support
their efforts."
Proprietor of Tommy Hil-
figer (Bahamas) Elizabeth Cov-
ington said: "Tommy Hilfiger
believes in taking a proactive
stance and giving back to the
community by working with
and empowering young people
who are trying to make a dif-
ference.

Impressed
"I attended last year's Par-
adise Plates and was impressed
by the passion of young
Bahamians wishing to address
an urgent need in this country -
hunger. A hungry child can't
learn at school; a hungry person
can't think properly to do their
job. In a wealthy country such
as the Bahamas, people should
not go hungry. We are proud
to support Hands for Hunger
as a co-presenting sponsor. It
is an amazing organisation
doing great work for the good
of the community and we hope
more Bahamians support this
great and urgent cause."
Rosamund Roberts, who
along with Andrea Strommer,
serves as co-director of
fundraising for the organisation
and in charge of leading the
event planning, said the gener-
ous donations from New Prov-
idence Development Compa-
ny and Tommy Hilfiger
(Bahamas) will help to offset
the costs of Paradise Plates.
Chefs from many of Nassau's
finest restaurants are returning
this year to showcase their
extraordinary food including:
Old Fort Bay Club; British


Legal Notice
NOTICE
PINEWOOD STARS INC.

- 6-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of PINEWOOD STARS
INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
VASIVO MANAGEMENT LTD.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of VASIVO MANAGEMENT
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
GOLDEN BOREALIS VERA S.A.

- 0-


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GOLDEN BOREALIS VERA S.A. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Colonial Hilton; Lucianos;
Mesa Grill; Nobu; Dune; The
Patisserie; Van Brugels; Com-
pass Point; Goodfellow Farms
and Cacique to name a few.
Other sponsors include:
Atlantis, Pearle Vision, Men-
doza Wine Imports and Cre-
ative Relations. All proceeds
from Paradise Plates will go to
Hands For Hunger and its food
rescue programs. Each day,
Hands For Hunger picks-up
fresh, high quality food that
would otherwise go to waste
and delivers it to community
centers, shelters, churches and
soup kitchens throughout New
Providence.


I-'.
I..


.. .:..::4 . T

.4f " ' -


' i.v 'V I


TEAMING up for 'Paradise Plates', Hands For Hunger's annual fundraiser are (1-r) Elizabeth Covington, pro-
prietor of Tommy Hilfiger, Bahamas; Ashley Lepine, of Hands For Hunger and Rhys Duggan, president and
CEO of the New Providence Development Company Limited.


Legal Notice
NOTICE
FOUR SEASONS OVERSEAS LTD.

- -

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Compa-
nies Act 2000, the dissolution of FOUR SEASONS
OVERSEAS LTD. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE


CERF DES ALPES LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of CERF DES ALPES LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
LINDWALL VENTURES INC.

-p-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of LINDWALL VENTURES
INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
STERNLEIN SEAS INC.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of STERNLEIN SEAS
INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
URSA MINOR CO. LTD.

- J#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of URSA MINOR CO.
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

UPWARD LIMITED



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of UPWARD LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


ITDISCUS TOIESONTHS PGELO0ONTOWW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE


ALIOSKA OCEAN INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of ALIOSKA OCEAN INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
MIAN TAN CO. LTD.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of MIAN TAN CO. LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


I ----I







+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010, PAGE 11


LOSALNEWS


Bahamas to host CDB's


40th Annual Board of


Governors Meeting

By BAHAMAS donors from around the First place winners in both
INFORMATION SERVICES world. categories will have the
The first scheduled event chance to attend the Vybzing
THE Bahamas will host the will be the Board of Direc- session in Nassau.
Caribbean Development tors meeting on Monday, The first place winners in
Bank's (CDB) 40th Annual May 17. both competitions will win a
Board of Governors' Meet- The annual meeting of con- netbook, second place win-
ing during the week of May tributors to the Bank's spe- ners will receive an iPod
16-21 at the Sheraton Cable cial development fund, which Nano and third place winners
Beach Resort. is a concessionary fund for will receive an iPod Shuffle.
The CDB was established the borrowing members, will However, all participants will
by an agreement signed on be held on Tuesday, May 18. receive a prize, Ms Parris
October 18, 1969, in Other events include the said.


Kingston, Jamaica, and
entered into force on Janu-
ary 26, 1970.
The Bank came into exis-
tence for the purpose of con-
tributing to the harmonious
economic growth and devel-
opment of the member coun-
tries in the Caribbean and
promoting economic cooper-
ation and integration among
them, having special and
urgent regard to the needs of
the less developed members
of the region.
Dr Sharon Marshall, infor-
mation officer, CDB
explained that the Bank has a
very special relationship with
the Bahamas.
"The very first meeting of
the Board of Governors was
held in the Bahamas, and at
10-year intervals the
Bahamas very regularly hosts
the meetings," Dr Marshall
said.
This year's meeting will
bring together delegates from
the Bank's 17 borrowing
member countries as well as


William G Demas Memorial
Lecture and the opening cer-
emony for the Annual Board
of Governors' Meeting on
Wednesday, May 19.
The CDB will also host a
youth forum called Vybzing
Bahamas on Thursday, May
20.
Angela Parris, manager of
the information services unit
said that the main objective
of Vybzing is to sensitise the
youth about CDB's mandate,
role and function to young
people in the Bank's borrow-
ing member countries.
Ms Parris said the CDB in
partnership with the Ministry
of Education and the Inter-
American Institute for Coop-
eration on Agriculture will
host an essay and poster com-
petition as part of Vybzing
Bahamas.
The theme will be "Sus-
tainable Agriculture for
Regional Food Security" and
it will be opened to all senior
secondary school students
throughout the country.


Legal Notice
NOTICE
LEAD ASSOCIATES INC.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LEAD ASSOCIATES INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
POWER MANAGEMENT
HOLDING INC.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of POWER MANAGEMENT HOLDING
INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


HI|HCHEQUEFHAIELIEF I


- . .,.




INSURANCE COMMISSIONS staff members present the Bahamas Red Cross with a cheque for the
Haiti Relief Fund at their Charlotte House Office, Wednesday, February 17. Pictured presenting the
cheque is Lorna Longley-Rolle, Legal Council (left) to Caroline Turnquest, Director General, the
Bahamas Red Cross. Letisha Henderson/BIS


Legal Notice
NOTICE
XILE CORPORATION.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of XILE CORPORATION. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
NURA MANAGEMENT LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NURA MANAGEMENT LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
RUBY LILY LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RUBY LILY LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
ENRICHSTAR PACIFIC LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ENRICHSTAR PACIFIC LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
E-NEWS HOLDINGS INC.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of E-NEWS HOLDINGS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
RIVERSIDE RESOURCES INC.

-^-


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RIVERSIDE RESOURCES INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
E-NEWS ASSETS INC.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of E-NEWS ASSETS INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
WADESBORO LTD.

- 4-


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WADESBORO LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


ITDISCUS TOIESONTHS PGELO0ONTOWW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE


SALAMANDA FALLS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of SALAMANDA FALLS INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)







+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010, PAGE 13


I OC^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^STSHH AL I


Grand Bahama





students to name





baby dolphins


(Photo by Dr Robert Eiser)
UNEXSO Dolphin Experience' dolphins - mother Robala and her calf.


THE International Under-
water Explorer's Society
(UNEXSO) is looking to cre-
ative young minds to name two
baby dolphins they welcomed
to the Dolphin Experience fam-
ily in 2009.
UNEXSO has launched a
competition to find unique
'Bahamian' names for the two
young calves born at the facili-
ty. All elementary schools
throughout Grand Bahama are
eligible to participate.
Each class is being asked to
collectively submit a name for
consideration.
Operations manager for the
Dolphin Experience Dr Robert
Eiser said this way of naming
the dolphins has become tradi-
tion.
"Most, if not all, our captive
bred dolphins have been named
by school children. It's our way
of not only giving something
back to the community, but a
very special way of getting kids
more involved with the Dol-
phin Experience and possibly
generating interest in marine
life." The dolphins at UNEX-
SO are currently named after
Bahamian islands and Mr Eiser
suggested that contest partici-
pants should stick with the
Bahamian theme.
General manager at UNEX-
SO Linda Osborne is excited
to see what names students
come up with.
"Kids by nature are very cre-
ative. We are happy to give
them an outlet to express their
creativity and name our two
bundles of joy at the same
time," she said.
Dolphins Taino and Robala
are the proud mothers of the
calves.
Fourteen-year-old Taino
gave birth to a healthy calf on
September 24, 2009; she is the
largest of the younger dolphins
at the Dolphin Experience.
Robala, 28 years old, is the
largest female and had her baby
one month later on October
23. The two babies bring the
dolphin count at UNEXSO to
16.
The Dolphin Experience'
neo-natal team has determined
both calves are male, and that
the mothers and babies are
doing well.
The neo-natal team is com-
prised of the Dolphin Experi-
ence senior staff with specific
personnel assigned to feed and
care for each dolphin mother
and calf.
Besides looking after the dol-
phins, this team also has a hand


V I
&bh
- ~ -- -. .---. .


I.


I S j n gd ns - e el n ed s shsI


in educating children about
them.
More than 1,000 kids from
schools throughout Grand
Bahama have so far benefitted
from the Dolphin Experience
education programme.
The unique programme
offers students a one-on-one
encounter with the dolphins
and teaches conservation.
"UNEXSO and the Dolphin
Experience remain committed
to educating children of all ages
about our most valuable
resource; the ocean and all
creatures within it," said Ms
Osborne. "We hope that in ask-
ing the school children of
Grand Bahama to help us name
our newest additions at the


Dolphin Experience, we pique
their interest in marine mam-
mals. Several of our current
dolphin trainers have come
through local schools and we
want to continue that tradi-
tion."
The class with the winning
baby dolphin names will receive
a free dolphin encounter with
group photo.
All entries should be sent via
e-mail to contest@unexso.com
or via fax to 373-8956 attention:
Dolphin Experience. Each
entry should include: Name of
school, class and teacher, con-
tact number, name they suggest
and why they suggested it.
Deadline for entries is March
31, 2010.


(Photo by Dr Robert Eiser)
PROUD MOM Taino and her calf at UNEXSO's Dolphin Experience - One of the younger dolphins at the
Unexso Dolphin Experience, Taino swims alongside her playful calf.

SCENES FROM YESTERDAY'S PIP PRESS CONFERENCE PHOTOS: Felipd Major/Tribune staff


PLP LEADER Perry Christie speaks to PLP candidate for Elizabeth,
Ryan Pinder, yesterday at a press conference at the PLP headquarters.


ONLOOKERS at the PLP press
conference.

SEE PAGES 1 and 3


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


1~.~.~~. I


PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, Rotary International (R.I.), which was founded 105 years ago on
February 23rd, 1905 in Chicago, Illinois, has the dual distinction of being both
the world's first, as well as one of the largest non-profit service organizations in
existence today, comprising of more than 1.2 million club members drawn from
professional and business leaders in over 33,000 clubs in 200 countries and
geographic areas;

AND WHEREAS, for the 105 years of its existence, the Rotary motto, "Service
Above Self", has inspired members to provide humanitarian service, encourage
high ethical standards and promote good will and peace through a variety of
service projects and voluntary efforts dedicated to improving the human condition
in local communities as well as worldwide;

AND WHEREAS, Rotary International is the world's largest privately-funded
source of international scholarships through which it promotes international
understanding, exchange programs and humanitarian grants;

AND WHEREAS, club projects have included the provision of medical supplies,
health care, clean water, food production, job training and education to millions
in need, particularly in developing countries;

AND WHEREAS, in 1985 Rotary International launched its major service project,
PolioPlus, and spearheaded collaborative efforts with the World Health Organization,
United States Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, and UNICEF to
immunize children worldwide against polio;

AND WHEREAS, polio cases have dropped by 99 percent since 1988 and the
world stands on the threshold of eradicating the disease as a result of the PolioPlus
effort;

AND WHEREAS, todate, Rotary International has contributed nearly US$850
million and countless volunteer hours to the protection of more than two billion
children in 122 countries;

AND WHEREAS, three are over 420 Rotarians in nine (9) clubs throughout
Rotary Bahamas, District 7020, sponsoring service projects to address critical
issues such as poverty, health, hunger, illiteracy and the environment in our local
communities and abroad;

AND WHEREAS, the local Rotary Clubs will commemorate the birthday of
Rotary International by educating the public on the global fight to eradicate polio
from the face of the earth;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim Tuesday, February 23rd,
2010 as "ROTARY DAY".

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have
hereunto set my Hand and Seal
this 22nd day of February, 2010.



Hubert A. Ingraha
PRIME MINISTER







+>


PAGE 16, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


A journey to the



centre of the Earth


The first of four articles telling the story of

Gabrielle Misiewicz's African adventure


By GABRIELLE MISIEWICZ
TRAVELLING has always
been a great love of mine, and
when I was younger I had
grand dreams of learning at
least seven languages and using
them to facilitate settling for
long periods in different parts
of the world. This past semester
I was able to live out a modified
form of this dream - I spent
fourth months in Ghana, a
country on the coast of West
Africa.
Overall, it was an amazing
semester, a time for great per-
sonal and academic growth.
Aside from daily encounters
that challenged me on a per-
sonal level, my course of study
provoked me on an academic
one. I thought it would be a
good idea to write a few articles
sharing my experience with
whoever was willing to read
about it, and so this article and
the ones to follow are intended
to examine a few aspects of my
life abroad and how they have
informed the way that I now
view myself and the world.
Like many people from the
West Indies, I have often won-
dered about the people and cul-
tures of Africa, because of the
fact that the majority of our
people are descendants of
African slaves. At the Univer-
sity of Richmond, where I am
currently in my third year of
study, I have taken my interest
in these historical and cultural
links to another level - my
scholarship focuses on the con-
nection between Africa and the
African Diaspora.
Although my family was a
little nervous when they heard
of my plans to spend the semes-
ter in Ghana, I was beyond
excited. One of my best friends
at school is Ghanaian and over
the course of our relationship,
we have exchanged stories
about our lives in our respective
homelands. In fact, I think the
similarities we've found
between our cultures is one of
the reasons that we get along
so well and was also an influ-
ence on my decision to study
the connection between Africa
and the Diaspora.
I knew that living and study-
ing in Ghana was going to be at
least a little different from the
way my friend grew up and the
life she described to me. This
thought was confirmed when I
read 'mosquito net with inter-
nal frame' and 'water purifica-
tion tablets' on my packing list.
It took weeks of preparation - I
needed vaccinations, prophy-


THE STUDENTS on a trip to Shai Hills. The rugged terrain in this area protected its inhabitants from
capture during the slave trade. Gabrielle is standing on the far right in the red shirt.


lactic medications and lots of
batteries in anticipation of 'light
off'. I did experience light off a
few times while there, and it
was just like what we know as
'current off' here. Actually, I've
experienced worse power out-
ages at home than I did in
Ghana. There were many
aspects of my semester in
Ghana that were similar to life
here, and in many ways I felt as
though I had come to another
home.
When I arrived, the first
thing that reminded me of
home was the vegetation.
Growing up, I spent a lot of
time with my grandmother, and
she would tell me the local
names of plants and trees in her
garden and point them out as
we drove along the road. I
knew that the climate in Ghana
would be similar to that of the
Bahamas, but I was still sur-
prised when I recognized
"match-me-if-you-can" bushes
and "woman's tongue" trees
among others.
Another thing that reminded
me of home was the spirituality
of Ghanaians. There were stick-
ers on the backs of taxis and
mini-vans that proclaimed God
as the driver's "Redeemer" or
warned people to "Repent".
Entrepreneurs named their
businesses after key tenets of
Christianity, such as "Forgive-
ness." This was done regard-
less of the services that were
offered. My personal favourites
were "Blood of Jesus" - the
name of a seamstress's business
- and "Son's of God Match
Forward" - the name of a kiosk
selling lotto tickets (incidental-
ly, spelling and grammar mis-


GABRIELLE overlooking the Mole National Park, where the group
went in search of elephants (but didn't see any).


takes were common and made
for great jokes).
There were many sights,
sounds and smells that remind-
ed me of home - I remember
walking down the road on one
occasion and smelling chicken
souse and on another, curry,
although I'm pretty sure I was
hallucinating - but there were
differences as well.
One of the most noticeable
was the culture of carrying
goods on one's head. Nothing
could really have prepared me
for this tradition. I anticipated
perhaps seeing women with
buckets of water or baskets of
fruit on their heads, but I had
no idea how prevalent using the
head as a tool really was. Peo-
ple use their heads the way we
use our shoulders or our hands.


Furthermore, it's not only
women, as I originally thought;
men and children could also be
seen with goods on their heads.
Women and children usually
carried food or water, while
men carried objects like towels
or flags. I know this must be a
little hard to imagine, but peo-
ple sell everything you could
think of on the street in Ghana,
and if there is a way for them to
get it on their head and thus
move around with it, they will.
The size or weight of the item
has little to do with it either. I
helped a lady remove a giant
aluminium bowl of fish from
her head and I nearly died in
the process. It was incredibly
heavy! Easily 501bs.
The tallest thing I saw on a
person's head was about 3ft - a


i.



A STREET SCENE from a market in Kumasi, the centre of the
Asante kingdom.


man was carrying what looked
like a hamper of washcloths.
The widest was a little over 2ft,
and that was a suitcase. I did
say suitcase, and the lady in
question actually had two of
them on her head. I tried walk-
ing with a bowl of tomatoes on
my head in my host family's
kitchen once and I could hard-
ly stand up straight, much less
think of moving. That really
impressed upon me the skill
and strength required to carry
things on one's head, and
although I admire Ghanaians
for being able to do so, it's not
really something I would like
to do myself.


There were many other small
aspects of Ghanaian lifestyle
that struck me throughout the
semester. On their own they
might be unimpressive, but
when considered in concert
they allowed me to see just how
much our African ancestors
have shaped our culture. Of
course, this was something that
I knew beforehand, but actual-
ly being able to see it was
incredible.
* See next week's Tribune for
the second installment of
Gabrielle's African journal:
"Reflections of an (Almost)
Dreadlock Rasta Girl


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+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010, PAGE 9B


WOMAN


By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

SOME of the women

were more comfortable
than I expected," said
Farreno Ferguson, a photog-
rapher, about an edgy pho-
to shoot he has done for the
Sister Sister Breast Cancer
Support Group. Acclaimed
for his works of unconven-
tional quality, Mr Ferguson
says the exhibit is one of his
best.
Breast Cancer strikes home, as his
grandmother was diagnosed with the
disease years ago and became a sur-
vivor at 73 years of age. It was a
conversation with a good friend in
New York about his grandmother's
story that sparked the idea for Pret-
ty In Pink, a photographic exhibi-
tion/auction and a high-end social
networking event bringing aware-
ness to the ongoing fight against can-
cer.
It was his personal experience with
his grandmother's fight with the dis-
ease that encouraged him to work
with other survivors.
Mr Ferguson's conversation with
a colleague birthed a vision for the
Pretty in Pink promotional event-
an exhibition of pictures he took of
the women from the support group.
Most of them are long term sur-
vivors, at least 3-4 years.
It's been said that the survivors
have reinvented themselves in an
edgy photo shoot by Mr Ferguson, to
be revealed at his 'Pretty In Pink'
exhibit in the Buillon room at the
British Colonial Hilton on February
26.
Superimposed with the six virtues
he says breast cancer patients need
in order to survive, is a peaceful-
looking female in the background,
photographed from the collarbone
up with a pink scarf donned on her
head.
She is in her 20's. Why use this
young model? Mr Ferguson says the
reason was to encourage young
women to have their breast cancer
screenings, as they are not exempt
from cancer either.
At the main event on Friday, Mr
Ferguson says guests can expect a
"visual overload." The collection has
the most images the photographer
has ever used in a series, to date.
He had a vision, a vision that is
similar to the poster made for the
big event.
"Each of them used the pink scarf.
I tried to use positions that they were
comfortable with. We did different
themes, like unity, strength, courage,
determination, faith and love."
In total, there will be over 20
pieces at the show. More than 15 of
the women are cancer survivors, and
some are commercial models.
"I figured that some of the women
wouldn't be totally comfortable with
the ideas that I had in mind, so I
invited commercial models that I


would normally shoot to take those
kinds of photos."
Ferguson says he wanted to make
the show more diverse by taking
photos of them in "new age photog-
raphy" looks.
"Breast cancer strikes women who
are in many cases the backbone of
the family; the wife, mother, aunt,
and grammy," said Andrea Sweet-
ing, the president of the Sister Sister
Breast Cancer Support Group who
likes to "give people another topic
when she walks into a room."
"When I walk into a room, I
would prefer for persons to look at
me and see me for who I am and
why I'm there instead of whispering
'this woman has breast cancer' and
trying to figure out which breast I
have off," says Mrs Sweeting.
"I'd prefer for them to know up
front so that they have a new topic to
talk about," she told Tribune Health.
"When I took those photos, I felt
as though you can still look at me,
and see that I am gorgeous."
"This is tremendous seeing that
many of the survivors don't know
what it's like to feel beautiful in their
skin since being diagnosed with can-


cer.
"I thought this would be some-
thing I could do that would count at
the end of the day," Mr Ferguson
explained.
Other stories of the survival
include Maxcine Missick, who was
initially diagnosed with breast cancer
in 2005. She later discovered that
there was a tumor resting on a brain
stem inside of her head, and learned
that she had to have surgery.
Breast Cancer survivors often say
they don't get the kind of attention
they need and deserve. Compared
to foreign organizations which pro-
mote the cause, the Bahamas is no
match for the kind of fanfare that
they have, said Mrs Sweeting.
To prepare himself for the photo
shoot, Mr Ferguson sat through
some of the support group meetings
and shot a video about their stories
and their tremendous struggle to
beat the disease.
The footage he has put together in
the documentary film will show the
process of capturing the pho-
tographs, and chronicle in the wom-
en's own words their plight with the
disease.


"I had emotional connections after
meeting some of the ladies two
weeks ago at their support group
meeting. It helped me to figure out
beforehand what they would be
comfortable with in the photo shot,"
he said.
And some of them were more
comfortable than Mr Ferguson
anticipated. He had a vision for
each photo shot with the 15 ladies, a
vision that is similar to the poster
made for the big event.
Some of the survivors were more
comfortable than Ferguson had
expected.
In the photographs, a pink cloth is
embodied by each subject. For
some, Ferguson draped the cloth
around the forehead letting the hair
be exposed in tomahawk.
Some of the subjects for the pho-
to shot have lost their hair in
chemotherapy treatments, and that
has been a mountain that they have
had to climb. Baldness is known to
be the sign to the world that some-
thing is wrong, that breast cancer
has struck your life.
But even with baldness, or short
hair, they have come to realise that


they can still feel beautiful.
"The pictures from the photo shot
showed that you can drape yourself,
and still look gorgeous," said Mrs
Sweeting
This is the British Colonial
Hilton's tenth year anniversary, and
in lieu of the celebration they are
highlighting health causes around
the nation.
Funds from Pretty in Pink will go
toward the expenses of the Sister
Sister Breast Cancer Support
Group. One initiative that they
have taken on is the distribution of
port-a-caths, a device that is used
to make administration of
chemotherapy easier.
Port-a-caths normally costs $750
from Doctors Hospital and the Can-
cer Society of the Bahamas sells
them for $500. Sister Sister Breast
Cancer Support Group donates the
devices to women who can't afford
them.
"Some of them never saw them-
selves doing something like this, and
in turn they found new light in
themselves, and all came away feel-
ing more comfortable in their own
skin," said Mr Ferguson.
"There's always that atmosphere
of fear every time you go for a
checkup or follow-up to your breast
cancer, even when you are in remis-
sion," Mrs Sweeting.
"Breast cancer is just waiting for
you to miss a treatment so that it
could thrive all over again inside
the body."
The British Colonial Hilton hotel
is celebrating its tenth anniversary,
marked by the recent $15 million
renovation. Their way of giving
back to the Bahamian community
is to be charitable to organizations
supporting health causes around the
country.
They were excited and thankful
for the project, because it's all to
raise money for their cause. "They
never saw themselves doing some-
thing like that," he said. "Some of
them saw new light in themselves,
and all came away feeling more
comfortable in their own skin."
Guests can expect to be visually
stimulated during this awesome cel-
ebration of breast cancer survivors,
said Mr Ferguson about the social
networking event.
The guest list is heavy with pro-
fessionals, and local socialites. They
are all excited and thankful for the
project, which will raise money for
breast cancer.
"There will be some performances
by local artist, door prizes, and they
will give out sapphire pendants.
Ferguson got the idea for the
"Pretty in Pink, I'm a Survivor"
campaign while in New York having
a "pink drink." He says the colour,
which is the colour for breast cancer
inspired him, and he tied it all into
the event that he is planning. It's
one that he hopes will yield many
follow ups as part of a series he will
present each year. A small donation
of $20 is asked of attendees to help
the Sister Sister Breast Cancer Sup-
port Group defray the cost of the
exhibit.


Glaucoma-The silent thief


By JEFFARAH GIBSON

KNOWN as the "silent thief",
glaucoma, a disease where the major
nerve in the eye is damaged, poses a
risk for everyone, and if not detect-
ed, or treated within a reasonable
time frame can lead to complete loss
of sight.
Just as it is important to get a full
body check up, it is equally as impor-
tant to get an annual eye checkup, as
doing so increases the chance of nip-
ping things in the bud.
Tribune Health spoke with Dr
Kenneth Rodgers, an ophthalmolo-
gist at Pearle Vision who said that
while there is no sure way of pre-
venting glaucoma, an annual eye
examination can increase chances of
catching the disease at a treatable
state.
Glaucoma is described by
www.medicinenet.com "as a disease
where the major nerve of vision,
called the optic nerve becomes dam-
aged. The optic nerve receives light
from the retina and transmits impuls-
es to the brain that we perceive as
vision. It is characterized by a par-
ticular pattern of progressive damage
to the optic nerve that generally


begins with a subtle loss of side
vision (peripheral vision). If glauco-
ma is not diagnosed and treated, it
can progress to loss of central vision
and blindness," the website stated.
There are two types of glaucoma-
open angle glaucoma, and closed
angle glaucoma. "Open angle glau-
coma is by far the most common
type of glaucoma. Moreover, its fre-
quency increases greatly with age.
This increase occurs because the
drainage mechanism gradually may
become clogged with aging. As a
consequence, the aqueous fluid does
not drain from the eye properly. The
pressure within the eye, therefore,
builds up painlessly and without
symptoms," the website explained.
Elevated pressure in the eye is
what actually leads to the damage
of the optic nerve.
And though the elevated pressure
in the eye is one of main causes of
the optic nerve becoming damaged,
impairment can also occur within a
normal eye pressure.
"Open angle glaucoma is the most
common glaucoma that is seen
among people in the Caribbean, Dr
Rodgers said.
As mentioned before when it
comes to glaucoma everyone is at


risk for the disease. However there
are some people who are at a greater
risk than others.
"People over the age of 65, per-
sons who have a family history of
glaucoma, those who take steroids,
people who suffer from nearsight-
edness or persons who have been
predisposed to chronic migraines,"
Dr Rodgers explained.
Although people at an elderly age
are at risk, this is not to say that
younger persons are in the clear.
Glaucoma does not discriminate
against age groups, since there have
been instances where very young
children have developed juvenile
glaucoma.
"Many think that this is something
that does not happen but it does and
it is a serious situation when a nine
or ten year old is losing his or her
sight," he said.
Unfortunately, there are no symp-
toms of glaucoma, and whenever
persons do realise that something is
wrong they have already begin to
lose their vision. "At this point the
disease is at a very far stage," he
said.
While sight loss from the disease
is irreversible, there are ways that
the disease is treated that can pre-


-K


vent further damage to the eye. The
first things used are eye drops and
oral tablets.
"After a few years or so some per-
sons make the decision to get
surgery done on the eye," he said.
Dr Rodgers encourages everyone
to make the right health decisions
in life. He said in order to patrol
glaucoma one must get consistent
eye examinations.
"Live a healthy lifestyles, and do


what it is that is needed to be done
to ensure that your body is healthy.
However if glaucoma is detected
then I want to advise persons to lis-
ten to their prognosis and do as their
doctor orders them to do.
"If one is advised to take medica-
tion, continue with the medication
since the majority of times when a
person progress is slow is because
they don't take medication when
advised to do so," Dr Rodgers said.


ITDISCUS TOIESONTHS PGELO0ONTOWW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


"I had emotional connections after meeting some of

the ladies two weeks ago at their support group

meeting. It helped me to figure out beforehand what

they would be comfortable with in the photo shot."

I







+>


PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


WOMAN


(n^^y WOMEN & SEX I


Jealousy


DO YOU think it is possible to
go through life and not be hit by the
tidal waves of jealousy? Not to expe-
rience the explosive flame that oblit-
erates all rational thinking and trans-
forms us into a whole different
being. What does it mean when we
feel gentle pangs over someone, but
massive physical turbulence for
another? Does the degree of jeal-
ousy accurately reflect the depth of
love or connection to another human
being? Or is it our past thoughts and
experiences playing havoc with our
minds?
As loathsome and wretched as
jealousy makes you feel, it certainly
is not a state of mind that we would
like to remain in. The wide range of
emotions that it triggers may alter
depending on the circumstance.


-




Feelings may involve anger, humili-
ation, betrayal, fear, abandonment,
sorrow and envy. We may logically
try and explain away some of the
feelings but find it a losing battle as
the remainder close the gap and con-
sume us.
Being blinded by jealousy often
produces extreme behavior from
obsessive vigilance to violence. We
can see that with our own eyes and
barely need to be told that it is the


leading cause of wife battering and
homicide. Are we to believe people
when they say they are 'not a jealous
person', or is it just a matter of con-
trol?
One theory is that jealousy is
'wounded pride' producing an imma-
ture response. This is considered a
childish reaction, and reflects a lack
of self confidence and esteem. It is a
reaction to the fear of loss. Other
theorists say that it is in fact an
evolved and necessary emotion
caused by a threat to a valued rela-
tionship. Linking both these theo-
ries it would seem that the more
insecure, dependent partner feels
the more intense jealousy, because
of the perceived loss.
Many of us cringe at the memories
of instability and inability to control
ourselves in those episodes of jeal-
ousy. The neurotic following of our
partners every action and the need
to control can be explained scientif-
ically. We know that women's brains
are activated in the posterior supe-
rior temporal sulcus when there is a
suggestion of sexual and emotional


infidelity. This is the area of the
brain that is responsible for the
detection of intention, deception and
trustworthiness. This explains why
women are acutely sensitive to oth-
ers, and often are labeled 'overly
sensitive' or 'controlling'.
Men's brains on the other hand
are stimulated in the testosterone
rich areas in the amygdala and hypo-
thalamus, which is involved in sexu-
al and aggressive behavior. An
extreme example of this is the prac-
tice of female circumcision, or muti-
lation, in order to control a wom-
an's sexual fidelity. Knowing this,
we can see why men and women act
differently when faced with green-
eyed emotions.
Provoking a little jealousy, partic-
ularity at the beginning of a rela-
tionship, is often used as a test or
measure of future commitment. It
lets you know how much your mate
cares and considers you valuable. A
little smile, name dropping or mild
flirting can certainly increase your
own desirability. However, it is a
fine tight rope to walk and often has


the opposite desired effect. Certain-
ly, having sex with someone in order
to provoke jealousy rarely works.
Men hold highly a woman's sexual
fidelity and her desirability as a suit-
able mate is often determined by
this.
Go ahead and critique yourself
and your relationship. Are you self
assured and feel safe in your rela-
tionship? Or are you a person who
moves quickly from one person to
another in order to avoid any emo-
tional involvement? Perhaps you fit
some where in between the two
extremes. Just remember that rela-
tionships are what makes life worth
living and are worth all that you can
invest.


* Margaret Bain is an individual and
couples relationship therapist. She is a
registered nurse and a certified clinical
sex therapist. For appointments call 364-
7230 or e-mail her at relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com or www.relateba-
hamas.blogspot.com. She is also avail-
able for speaking engagements.


GREEN SCENE By GardenerJack-


Jujube and ti-es


I MUST confess I cannot write
about all garden produce with
equal enthusiasm. The jujube, for
instance, is a fruit I have never ever
taken more than one of at a time.
The taste is far too musky for my
liking but others seem to relish it.
The Indian jujube (Ziziphus
Mauritania) is native to China and
is often spelled ju-ju or jube-jube.
The tree grows well in The
Bahamas in a wide variety of soils,
even in marshy land. It is, however,
a very unfriendly tree. The branch-
es are covered with small but
intensely sharp thorns that make
fruit picking quite an adventure.
The worst feature of the tree is
displayed at flowering time. Jujube


flowers are pollinated by flies and
so they exude a scent that could
only be attractive to flies and
resembles a compost heap that has
gone sour. It would not be a good
idea to grow jujube tree anywhere
near your house - anywhere near
civilisation as far as I am con-
cerned.
Jujube seeds seem to have a 25
per cent viability rate and the
young trees are particularly attrac-
tive with their distinctive small
veined leaves. The tree becomes
less appealing is it ages.
A lady once told me that I would
love jujubes if I ate them pickled
and she promised to make me some
pickled jujubes. That was over ten


years ago and I am glad to say she
seems to have forgotten.
The father of modern taxonomy
was Carl Linnaeus. In the 18th cen-
tury it was he who organised plants
into that list we all had to learn at
school: kingdoms, classes, orders,
genera, species. He also started the
binomial nomenclature that
allowed for positive identification
of plants, based upon shared fea-
tures. I do not know what we would
do without binomial nomenclature
because local and regional names
often differ very widely.
Linnaeus had to be interested in
names because his father diverted
from regular Swedish naming to
the Latin for linden. Later on Carl
turned his first name to the Latin
Carolus. Then he was celebrated
as a genius and took on the title
von Linnd. A man who went
through three name changes should


give us confidence as to his naming
system for plants (and creatures).
The importance of a scientific
rather than colloquial name is
demonstrated by a rather humble
fruit that is known as egg fruit, yel-
low sapote, mammee sapote, mam-
mee supporter, canistel and ti-es.
No matter what common name you
wish to know it by, its Linnaean
name is Pouteria compechiana and
that stops all arguments about
identification. I like to call the tree
and fruit ti-es because that name is
used only in The Bahamas.
The ti-es tree is native to Central
America. It is handsome and erect
and grows to about 20 feet in The
Bahamas. The fruit is like an upside-
down teardrop that contains two to
four seeds. The flesh of the ti-es is
yellow and starchy, almost like dried
egg (for those old enough to remem-
ber such things) in texture but with


an appealing sweetness.
I have been told that if you mix
the ripe pulp of ti-es with pound
cake batter the resultant cake has
better flavour and colour.
June plum (Spondas anarcar-
diaceae) goes under the names
ambarella and otaheite apple and
has just finished its time of fruit
production.
The tree has pinnately compound
shiny leaves and despite it name
fruits from October to February.
The fruit is kiwi-shaped and
tends to fall off the tree while green
and unripe. The skin later turns
yellow and this is the time to eat.
The flavour is like mango to
some and pineapple to others. I
think it has a very similar taste to
ceriman.


* j.hardy@coralwave.com


When an irregular heartbeat should send you to the doctor


(ARA) - You may chalk
up that flutter in your chest
to too much rich food, or
think that your heart occa-
sionally skips a beat in
response to stress at work.
For most people, such irreg-
ularities are harmless.
But if your irregular heart
rhythms are combined with
a diagnosis of heart failure,
they can be serious -- and
ignoring them may make
your condition worse.
Your heart is essentially a
powerful electric pump. If a
breakdown occurs in the
heart's complex internal
communication system, it can
cause your heart to beat
irregularly. It's possible for
healthy people to experience
occasional irregular heart
beats. But if you already have
heart problems, you should
be aware of the symptoms of
an irregular heart beat.
On its Web site
www.abouthf.org, the Heart
Failure Society of America
points to these common
symptoms of an irregular
heart beat:
* If your heart skips a beat,
flutters or pounds in your
chest.
* You experience dizziness
or feel "light-headed."
* You experience sudden
shortness of breath not relat-
ed to physical exertion.


* You feel inexplicably
weak from time to time.
* You faint or suddenly
lose consciousness.
If you regularly experience
these symptoms, see your
doctor. In order to diagnose
your condition, your doctor
will likely start with an elec-
trocardiogram (ECG) that
monitors electrical activity in
your heart. If the ECG does-
n't explain your irregular
heart rhythm, your doctor


may next ask you to wear a
Holter Monitor, a small,
portable device
He'll also ask you to keep
a diary of your symptoms
while wearing the monitor.
There are several other tests
that can help diagnose heart
rhythm problems. Talk to
your doctor about what's best
for you.
If tests show that you have
a heart rhythm problem, you
may not necessarily need


your irregular heart rhythm.
Check with your health care
provider before taking any
over-the-counter medica-
tions, including nutritional
supplements. Immediately
tell your doctor if you expe-
rience muscle cramps, nau-
sea, vomiting, unusual fatigue
or weakness or a dry mouth -
these can indicate a potassi-
um imbalance that can make
your heart problems worse.
If you smoke, quit, and


reduce your alcohol con-
sumption. Exercise under the
guidance of your doctor;
don't start any exercise pro-
gram until you've consulted
with him or her.
You can learn more about
irregular heart rhythms and
heart failure at
www.abouthf.org, the Web
site of the Heart Failure Soci-
ety of America.

Courtesy of ARAcontent


Ft- NU:l ( 71e l sat.


treatment. Your doctor will
develop a treatment plan for
you if the problem requires
treatment. This plan may
include medicines such as
blood thinners that help pre-
vent blood clots and reduce
the risk of stroke, an
implantable device like a
pacemaker or defibrillator to
help regulate your heart
beats, or even surgery.
You can take some steps
to minimise the impact of


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O








+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010, PAGE 11B


AWOMAN
ANEWadori!!!PAN
^I^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^#V


T HE Japanese's equiva-
lent to Caribbean carni-
val. With only one word '
to describe it awesome! For . 1
about 4 days Tokushima is -
rocking with people from
evervwhere bouncing to the


same tune.
The difference with this one as
opposed to some other street festi-
vals is that it is completely free to
watch, I did not see one single
policeman, there was no gap
between groups, everyone keeps on
dancing and you could walk around
with glass bottled beer.
I was like whoa total culture
chock!! The groups basically wear
the same kind of outfits and the
women in the group wear the exact
same outfit. My Asian friend told
us to come and watch her dance but
we realized that would be an impos-
sible feat early on. To find your
Asian female friend who is dressed
exactly like 50 other women in her
group from the hat right down to
the shoes is seriously like trying to
find a needle in a haystack. We nev-
er did find her.
Another thing that got me about
Awa Odori is that amidst all that
action, music, beautiful costumes
etc. some people were taking a pic-
ture of me! It didn't happen every
two seconds but it happened enough
times for me to mention.
This photographer was taking a
picture of a stall so I naturally
moved out of the way. When I
moved she put her camera away.
Japanese people asked me to take a
picture so I naturally assumed that
they wanted for me to take a picture
of them but they wanted me to be in
their picture. This random guy start-


ed to talk to my friend and asked if
he could take a picture of me and
asked where I was from. There was
a part when people from the crowd
could join in to dance. So I joined in
and two photographers came and
just started to snap before I could
think.
I am like dang if they like this for
big eyed short me what would they
do if they saw Halle Berry?
I asked my friend if my shirt was
on backwards or something. And
she said no it's rare to have lighter
skinned black people here (whatev-
er that means) so people take pic-
tures. Shoots, if I had known that I
would have been charging a fee per
shot to help me pay for this new
Ipod that I've been eyeing.

My summer vacation
In August my friend from Singa-
pore, her boyfriend from Czech
Republic and my friend from France
came to visit and we went exploring
Japan together.
One question though- why is that
no matter what nationality, age or
race men REFUSE to ask for direc-
tions?????????? Seriously, if you
know then please tell me. A couple
of times we wanted to go some-
where and there was a tourist office
two steps away or a tour guide that
was in arms reach and they just
wanted to follow the map and not
ask. Seriously! (insert rolling eyes
here). But we had a fabulous time


FOR about 4 days Tokushima is rocking with the Awa Dance.


no doubt. Went to Osaka which is a
huge city and where everyone looks
like an anime character. Kyoto
which is very old Japan complete
with a million and one temples and
shrines (I think we saw them all)
and few other places by car which
had beautiful scenery.
In Japan they have different
styles of accommodation as opposed
to only hotels like in Western Cul-
ture.
Manga Cafe- You rent out a


space like a computer and desk for
several hours to rest any where from
1 hour to the whole night. You
know how you sometimes wish that
you can go to sleep at your desk at
work? Well here you can with no
fear of your boss looking over your
shoulder.
Capsule hotels - It is as the name
suggests you sleep in a capsule (by
yourself). I loved it. Kind of creepy
(but cheap) like a morgue box. If
you have claustrophobia this is not


the place for you.
Ryokin - Traditional Japanese
hotel with tatami mat (Japanese car-
pet) no beds only futons that you
pull out (very comfortable). Here
they serve you traditional Japanese
breakfast which is basically what we
would eat at Christmas dinner. Rice,
fish, meat, tofu and the list goes on.

I went directly to the gym after
my vacation. Ok OK not entirely
true I went a week later.


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TI i E I) A Y


F E I; R IIi_\ RY


2) 2") I 1 II


TRENDS FOR









By JEFFARAH GIBSON

WHEN it comes to Caucasian hair, cut and colour are
everything! Retro styles like classic finger waves or
short bob cuts can be super hot. There are many
styles women can wear no matter what hair type they have. If
you want to "rock it out", giving the punk hairstyles a try or
fringe boyish inspired trims, the ball is in your court, just make
sure you select a cut that will suit your personal flair.


"Its really more of the hair cut when
it comes to Caucasian hair. When the
hair is shaped in a way that compli-
ments the features of the face managing
it will be breeze," Inger King profes-
sional stylist at Hair Team told Tribune
Woman.
Women with long straight hair can
spruce things up by adding a little color
bringing out that extra edge.
"If a person wears their hair straight
the majority of the time, to change
things up a bit they can get low lights or
highlights and add a few curls for a little
bounce and volume," Princess Knowles
stylist at The Plaza Beauty Spot & Nail
Spa said.
Also women with naturally straight
hair can get a different look by just one
squeeze of a bottle.
"Products like Paul Mitchell sculpting
lotion can do the hair very good. It
allows versatility and can give straight
hair that 'scrunch' or wavy look. It holds
firm so you don't have to worry about
losing your waves," Ms Knowles
explained.
Short cuts can also be a good choice
making a bold statement that will
unleash your inner sexy at the same
time. And despite what many may
think, you can get multiple looks with
hair this length.
Even though short cuts are not for
everyone, there is a chance you may
find a short style compliments your fea-
tures more than a longer one.
For instance a short boy cut might
hit the nail on the head, accentuating
your eyes and lips, while framing the
face. Or get a messy cut that appears to
be unkempt but is contrasted graceful-
ly with an elegant sweep bang. Short
choppy cuts can add a lot of definition.
"Short cuts are very nice since they
accentuate the physical features of the
face and allow for detailed texture of the


hair," Ms Knowles said.
After getting a cut, maintaining the
style should involve washing regularly,
and using the proper hair care products
that will keep the hair looking and feel-
ing great.
"Products are also very important
because one should use a product that
protects the hair," Ms King said.
Since people with this hair type often
wash more regularly than others, Ms
King said that while using a quality blow
dryer is a good idea, allowing the hair to
dry naturally so that you don't lose that
extra shine can give your hair that per-
fect glow.
"If one decides to blow dry then they
should use a hair seal to protect it from
the heat. However I would suggest per-
sons allow their hair to dry by itself to
prevent breakage," Ms King explained.
If you ever thought about extensions
as way of doing things different, Ms
Knowles recommends avoiding bonding
agents, or getting the extensions sewn in,
because it is difficult to wash the hair ,
also the hair damages considerably by
bonding agents.
She explained: "If the extensions are
bonded to the hair and it is removed
before it gets loose then this can result in
complete loss of the hair follicle. When
the hair follicle is lost then that particu-
lar portion of the hair will not grow
back," Ms Knowles said.
"When it comes to getting the hair
sewn in, I would suggest that be done
for a short period. This is because this
type of hair is soft and getting hair sewn
in requires braids and it will not last at
all," Ms Knowles said.
Face shape, and skin tone is key when
it comes to selecting a style and hair
colour. But before you make that step
research, look at different hair maga-
zines and consult professionals so that
you get the most out of your look.


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