The Tribune
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01505
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: February 10, 2010
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01505

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GIVE

HANDTO
HAITI RELIEF ". R

HIGH 76F
LOW 61F

r^ SUNNY AND
-*- WINDY


The


Tribune


4MUSA700
BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


WAKE UP.
TalAum OOf
Prmtnum Ro-t Cuff.


Volume: 106 No.66


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2010


PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)


a love*


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'S' SECION BHMSBGETSORSSAT NPG


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Govt criticised over return

of 78 migrants to Haiti


Sid Haiti cs


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net


THE return of 78 undocumented Haitian migrants to
Haiti yesterday has been criticised as an attempt by the Gov-
ernment to win political favour before Tuesday's by-election.
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham maintains his position on
Haitian repatriation has not changed since the earthquake
which brought the country to a standstill on January 12, and
he declared it would be impossible to send undocumented
Haitians back to their homeland in the circumstances.
At that time, while stating that repatriations were to be sus-
pended, Mr Ingraham added that "if new Haitians come
and we apprehend them before they arrive in The Bahamas
or otherwise, we will have a different position to take."


SEE page 11


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
INTERNATIONAL crime
fighters and academics fear
the chaos and desperation in a
post-earthquake Haiti, com-
bined with the escape of thou-
sands of criminals with drug
ties from its main prison, will
cause a huge rise in drug traf-
ficking missions that will like-
ly be felt in the Bahamas.
With this warning sounded,
Minister of National Securi-
ty Tommy Turnquest yester-
day stated that the Govern-
ment's "excellent" drug inter-
diction programme operating
internally and in conjunction
with US and Turks and
Caicos forces through the
Operation Bahamas Turks
and Caicos programme
(OPBAT) "would be able to
deal with any possible
increase."


According to US media
reports, combined with its
ever high unemployment lev-
els and already weakened law
enforcement forces, the dev-
astation wrought in Haiti by
the 7.0 earthquake is causing
concern among officials that
drug traffickers will emerge
stronger than ever.
Like The Bahamas, Haiti
has consistently been identi-
fied in US State Department
reports on drug trafficking as
a "major transit point" for
narcotics in the region.
Most commonly, drugs are
brought into the country from
South America - Colombia
and Venezuela - and then
re-shipped from Haiti to
Europe and the US.
The Bahamas and the
Dominican Republic have
suffered most from this flow,
becoming midway points in
SEE page eight


Never start your

6�i1L�JIIQV \ without us!


race,
aart choice is
nagement.
)u can trust.


E MANAGEMENT

Pr oJrn I |n


FROM LEFT: R':'drew Nona"ri': m ce Wooi edi K ry.
Firide ol Me FLF. Di Andie HiR~ms w Me finn rc [eel
or'lirieril F 1i r ssd C WO ol rMe Sne nus vc'~Dern':''


FOUR candidates in
the Elizabeth by-election
race yesterday partici-
pated in what was billed
as the "Great Debate"
for that constituency -
with the three candidates
from the "fringe" parties
saying it is time for vot-
ers to kick out the FNM
and the PLP and the
PLP's Ryan Pinder
telling of the "fresh per-
spective and solutions"
he wants to bring to Eliz-
abeth.
The debate - only the
second political debate
to be televised or aired
on radio - saw each
candidate make a short
statement to the packed
Epiphany Anglican
Church Hall before
answering a number of
questions relating to the


qualities their candidacy
offers and what their
intentions are for the
constituency if elected.
Each candidate who
participated - Worker's
Party leader Rodney
Moncur, PLP candidate
Ryan Pinder, the Nation-
al Development Party's
Andre Rollins and the
Bahamas Democratic
Movement's Cassius Stu-
art - stood behind a
colourful podium as they
fielded questions from
moderator, Jones Com-
SEE page eight


Workers' Party steps up bid to
have FNM candidate disqualified


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
IN his latest call to see by-
election opponent Dr Duane
Sands "disqualified" from the
Elizabeth by-election vote,
Workers' Party Leader Rodney
Moncur claims the FNM can-
didate did not fully disclose his
company's contractual dealings
with the Government as man-
dated by the Constitution.
Mr Moncur yesterday argued
that the doctor's published dis-
closure of assets did not reveal
the complete picture of their
working relationship.
The political hopeful claims
this would be grounds for dis-
qualification based on Consti-


tution rules for persons wish-
ing to be elected to the House
of Assembly.
"Dr Sands failed to tell us the
name of the company. Dr Sands
has failed to tell us the amount
of shares he has in the compa-
ny. Dr Sands has failed to tell us
the value of the shares that he
has in the company.
"Dr Sands has failed to tell us
the name of the Government
agency or ministry that the con-
tract was signed with. Dr Sands
has failed to tell us the value of
the entire contract," Mr Mon-
cur said.
He was referring to informa-
tion in a disclosure letter the
FNM candidate provided to by-
SEE page eight


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


Bahamas warned

of massive rise in

trafficking missions







+>


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNWI


GB Police Force donates

$3,000 to Haiti Relief Fund


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - The Royal
Bahamas Police Force on
Grand Bahama donated $3,000
to the Haiti Relief Fund on
Tuesday.
Quinn McCartney, senior
Assistant Commissioner of
Police, presented the cheque
to representatives of the Grand
Bahama Centre for the Red
Cross at the Garnet Levarity
Justice Centre. Mr McCartney
said a decision was made dur-
ing a regular monthly meeting
two weeks ago to make a dona-
tion to assist earthquake vic-
tims in Haiti.
"An appeal was made to
members of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force for a
donation and some persons
donated $100.
"We want to give back to the
community and we are indeed
pleased that officers and


reserves responded so gener-
ously," he said.
Mary Russell, Red Cross
administrator, thanked Mr
McCartney and his officers for
their donation.
"It is indeed a pleasure to
receive this cheque to aid the
Haitian Relief Fund because it
will go a long way," she said.
Ms Russell said that dona-
tions continue to come in at the
centre on Jobson Avenue.
She said there is a need for
medical supplies, baby items,
and feminine hygiene products.
"The relief efforts are going
really well, however, we are
getting more clothes than we
really need at this moment.
"The emphasis is on femi-
nine products, water and med-
ical supplies. We are not turn-
ing away the clothes, but that is
not a priority at this time," Ms
Russell said.
The Red Cross is preparing
to ship its trailer with relief sup-
plies to Haiti.


'Positive results' from



Customs shift system


By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net
THE Department of Cus-
toms is touting positive
results from the govern-
ment's newly implemented
shift system for its officers.
"We've gotten good
reports so far on our shift
system which has been
around for the past three
weeks. Bit by bit we're try-
ing to improve the face of
Customs," said Customs
Comptroller Glenn Gomez.
The system allows both
Customs and Immigration
officers to work a rotating
eight-hour shift, five days a
week. It is meant to elimi-
nate or reduce the need for
gross overtime incurred in
those departments.

Success
While heralding its initial
success, Mr Gomez could
not readily say how much
money the public purse has
saved because of the new
shift system.
Despite his positive take


on the scheme, he conceded
that not all Customs offi-
cers are happy with the
change, which came into
effect nearly a month ago.
"With any new thing
there are mixed feelings,
but I think as we move fur-
ther into it people will
realise it's a good thing,"
he said, adding that the
plan allows single parents
more flexible time to drop
off and pick up their chil-
dren from school while
allowing others to avoid
early morning traffic jams.

Issues
John Pinder, president of
the Bahamas Public Service
Union (BPSU) which rep-
resents Customs and Immi-
gration officers, said his
union still has several issues
regarding the new time
schedule it wants addressed.
He said he is awaiting a
meeting with Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham to dis-
cuss possible improvements
on the salary currently
offered to Customs guards.
"It is the government's
wish that all Customs
guards be reclassified to


BAHAMAS Public Service
Union president John Pinder
said there are still several
issues the union wants
addressed.
Customs officers. Until the
reclassification is done they
want to stay on overtime or
get a better salary until
then," he said.
As for the Department


of Immigration, Mr Pinder
said it is fighting staffing
challenges due to the new
shift system.
"Customs went and hired
130 training officers to
accommodate the new shift
system but Immigration
hasn't started their training
yet. And so they are com-
plaining that they haven't
had a proper roster for the
shift system," said Mr Pin-
der. "So we're hoping that
Immigration would quickly
recruit training officers to
accommodate the shift sys-
tem."
His union is also fighting
for increments which are
due some Customs and
Immigration personnel to
maintain their level of
seniority. Some lower rank-
ing officers are still await-
ing promotions to grade
two officers, Mr Pinder
said.


PM: Christie failed

to do anything with

$100,000 allocation


OPPOSITION Leader
Perry Christie failed to do
anything with the $100,000
allocated to him in the
2007/08 budget to have
improvements made in his
constituency, Prime Minis-
ter Ingraham revealed.
"Presumably he thought
nothing should be done,"
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said.
Mr Ingraham made this
observation on Sunday as
he defended the FNM's
record of carrying out pub-
lic works against accusa-
tions from the PLP that he
had threatened Elizabeth
voters that failure to sup-
port the FNM's candidate
in the upcoming by-election
could threaten their access
to public goods and ser-
vices, such as capital works.
In response, the Prime
Minister noted that his gov-
ernment was thanked by

Frle Fungicide,-.

Pest"ontro


former MP for Elizabeth
Malcolm Adderley in his
resignation speech for the
constituency allowance it
provided him that had
enabled him to carry out
much needed improvement
projects in what was then
his constituency.
"We continue to demon-
strate that we do not do
work in constituencies
because of who they sup-
port.
"In fact in some con-
stituencies where we made
monies available, like
$100,000 for the MP to
decide on what should be
done in the constituency,
people like Mr Christie in
the first year didn't spend
any of the money at all.
Presumably he thought
nothing should be done (in
the Farm Road constituen-
cy).
Mr Ingraham said "there
is no credible allegation that
can be made against the
government that (he)
head(s) that we show
favouritism in terms of
essential public works in
any constituency during the
course of our tenure in
office."


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


Sutler's funeral nmes

& (grenmatorium
Telephone: 3 9-2022, York 8 Ermsft St.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Hahamas



EDNISHA
SMITH, 3

of E[izabeth Estat es illr
bc held at Victory
Fundamental Raptist
Church, Grlf Coturse
Blvd., Su Brt z e at 2:00
p.m. Thursday February
Iith 2010. Officiatin2
will bc Pastor Ivan Carci,
assisted by other
ministers . Interment will follow in Old Trail
Cemetery, Abundant Life Road..
Left to cherish her memories are her mother: J.
Natasha Cartwright; her father: Edward Smith: one
brother:. Courtncy Barry; grand parents: Veorrin
and VeroniQnt Adderle1y, Carlos LouiB and Butty
Ramsey step-grandmother Catherine Louis, adopted
grandmother: Linda Johnson and Etra Ward, nine
aunts: Dr. Kenya Ward, Sanshaycca Adderley.
Valerie and Monique Smith, Carolyn Longley and
Sandra Harris, Fcrnand Russell, Carlaine Smith and
Antoinette Louis; three ucndest Leading Seaman
Roberto Adderley, Dr. E. Anthone Ward and Basil
Longley Sr.. and David Louis, fifteen cousins, her
god parents, and a host of other relatives and
friends too numerous to mention.
Friends may pay their last repects at Butlers'
Funeral llomes & Crematorium, Ernest & York
Streets on Wednesday, February 10th, 2010 at
10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and at the church on
Thurday from 1:00 p.m., until service time.


3 Wings $295


6 Wings $555


2 N u Wings $995
24 Wings $1925


Add a 22oz Drink & Regular Fries for $210
HIC ~ ~ ~ , ,rtrs.,,a ,,,ia,,,� ,.s ieR~sw~K lM *a^iK NU, fxaVSR .







+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2010, PAGE 3


Two men in court in connection


with fatal Milton Street shooting i


By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

TWO men charged in a
fatal shooting on Milton
Street last July were
arraigned in a Magistrate's
Court yesterday on murder
and attempted murder
charges.
Police have charged
Raphael Neymour, 23, alias
"Mad ass"; and Jason Fer-
guson, 29, of Strachan's Cor-
ner with the July 21, 2009,
murder of Marvin Sears.
According to police
reports, two gunmen turned
onto Milton Street off East
Street in a dark coloured
vehicle, got out of the car and
fired shots at a group of
about six men. Sears, 36, was
hit in the stomach. He was
rushed to hospital and later
died of his injuries.
Neymour and Ferguson
have also been charged with


the attempted murder of
Mathias Williams, who was
reportedly shot in the elbow.
The accused, who were
arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in


Photos: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff
Court 1, Bank Lane, were
not represented by an attor-
ney and were not required
to enter a plea to the charges.
Ferguson, who is also
known as "Fat head" and


"Shorts", was charged last
January with the August
2007 murder of Theophilus
Dean, 24.
Neymour is also accused
of the attempted murder of
Samantha Eden. It is alleged
that he attempted to cause
Eden's death on Monday,
August 3, 2009.
It is also alleged that he
was in possession of a hand-
gun with the intent to endan-
ger the life of Nadley
Flesnier.
Neymour told the magis-
trate he did not know his co-
accused and that they had
never been placed on an
identification parade.
Neymour added that he
had been informed that he
was being held in connection
with another murder.
The accused were both
remanded to Her Majesty's
Prison. Their case was
adjourned to Friday, Febru-
ary 12, for a fixture hearing.


Baaa AgaistCrm
pln Crva fPae


wI


By ALESHA CADET


THE rising tide of crime shows no sign
of abating in the new year and the activist
group Bahamas Against Crime has
declared that it is critical for the nation
to say "enough is enough" in 2010.
According to Rev Dr William Thomp-
son, chairman of BAC, while the official
homicide count for the year stands at 10 -
already surpassing the number at this point
in 2009, a record breaking year for murders
- the unofficial number is thought to be
even higher.
Rev Thompson also pointed out that far
more drugs have been confiscated since
the beginning of 2010, compared to the
same period the previous year.
He added: "The rate of armed robberies,
burglaries, and other serious crimes is well
above last year's rate. This is inflicting
much pain and suffering upon families,
friends and the entire society."
BAC is intent on fighting this trend by
replacing the developing culture of crime,
violence and hostility with one of peace,
unity and tranquility.


"A Caravan of Peace is being organised
which will travel throughout New Provi-
dence communities staging peace rallies
and concerts, working with residents and
community groups to lower the level of
crime and violence," Rev Thompson said.
He said this effort could begin as early as
next month.
BAC will also host a private sector
"Crime Summit" on March 22 and 23 at
the Wyndham Resort, under the theme
"Enough is Enough."
The event will bring together organisa-
tions from the religious, business, profes-
sional and academic sectors to produce an
action plan that BAC wants to implement
across the capital with the help of private
sector partners.
BAC president Rev CB Moss said: "This
summit is designed to put into play some
of the plans that have been made over the
years. Now is the time for action."
Rev Thompson said government agen-
cies will be invited to assist with the facil-
itation of certain aspects of the action plan,
however the driving force must be indi-
viduals and non-governmental entities.


REV DR WILLIAM THOMPSON and Rev
CB Moss speak to the press yesterday.


Crawfish 'size matters' in Abaco


By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net
THE Abaco fishing commu-
nity says when it comes to craw-
fish, size definitely matters -
although the jury is still out in
other islands.
Friends of the Environment,
an Abaco-based environmen-
tal health advocacy organisa-
tion, launched the Size Matters
campaign to combat the cap-
ture of juvenile crawfish in
Abaco.
The campaign is intended to
encourage a culture of self-reg-
ulation as a matter of national
pride to help preserve and pro-
tect the country's fisheries
resources, which have recently
come under threat from inter-
nal and external forces.
In addition to the widespread
capture of juveniles, invasive
lionfish has become a major
threat to the crawfish popula-
tion, as it feeds on crawfish lar-
vae, slowing the regenerative
process of the species.
Meanwhile, global trends are
a major threat to the commer-
cial crawfish industry, as inter-
national markets for Bahami-

Women in court on gun,
ammunition charges
THREE women were
arraigned in Magistrates'
Court yesterday on gun and
ammunition charges.
Princess Saunders, 40;
Annacalia Saunders, 18; and
Ciayvonna Lockhart, 22, all
of East Street, were arraigned
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethell in Court 8, Bank
Lane, charged with posses-
sion of an unlicensed firearm
and possession of ammuni-
tion.
It is alleged that on Satur-
day, February 6, the women
were found in possession of
a 9mm Beretta pistol and 15
live rounds of ammunition.
The women pleaded not
guilty to the charges. Princess
Saunders was granted $7,500
bail.
Her co-accused were
remanded to Her Majesty's
Prison and will return to court
on February 11 for a bail
hearing.


an crawfish are demanding
Marine Steward Council
(MSC) certification of local
exports.
However, research conduct-
ed by Friends of the Environ-
ment in collaboration with
Florida International Univer-
sity's Department of Marine
Resources, shows the number
one threat is the illegal capture
of egg-bearing females.
The joint team published a
threat ranking after widespread
consultation with Abaco stake-
holders that also identified pol-
lution, invasive lionfish, wet-
land degradation and climate
change as threats, in declining
order of significance.
"We are using a marketing
approach by raising the level
of pride. Abaco fishermen are
ultimately responsible for the
future of fisheries. That one
lobster they fish, even if they
sell that to a local wholesaler,
can ultimately end up being
sold in Nassau and exported
out of the country as far as
Europe," said d'Shan Maycock,


the campaign's manager.
"(Responding to potential
threats) will force us as a coun-
try to implement more sustain-
able practices, which is the goal
of this campaign. Fishermen
will have to comply with the
regulations already in place as
well as implement best practice
skills in their fishing business
which will only benefit the
country in the long run and
enable us to achieve interna-
tional certification in the
future," said Ms Maycock.
In 2009, Abaco landed
729,000 plus pounds of craw-
fish, valued at about $6 million.
This was almost one fifth of the
Bahamas' 2008 export total of
4.5 million pounds.
The "Size Matters" pride
campaign is one of several
efforts that should move the
Bahamas further in line with
sustainable practices in the
commercial fishing industry.
Major crawfish exporter Trop-
ic Seafood Ltd has been
involved in rigorous public edu-
cation campaigns and policy-


based advocacy with the gov-
ernment.
Minister of Agriculture and
Marine Resources, Larry
Cartwright, said the greatest
challenge the Bahamas faces is
quantifying fish stocks.
Despite the challenges, he
said, all export fisheries facili-
ties can pass international
inspections on any given day.
He added that the existence
of open seasons for stone crab,
grouper and crawfish puts the
Bahamas ahead of the game,
not to mention the govern-
ment's active plans to increase
the number of marine protected
areas (MPA) from one - the
Exuma Land and Sea National
Park - to eight.
The minister noted that he
tabled legislation in the House
of Assembly last month for the
creation of the Berry Islands
MPA. Legislation for the Exu-
ma South-side MPA is ready
for tabling. Next on the list are
parks in South Eleuthera, Bimi-
ni, Abaco, and an area between
Exuma and Long Island.


C



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ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N TO WW.TIBUE22CO


T1~7


CECILIA'S CATrOLIC CHGURC




iNUALBAZAR RAFRLE


utural & Hritage Site, Arawak Cay



Ourday, February 13th, 2010


2NOON- UNTIi


~CRPF7S

,CWLL
'PASTRII
OXE CREI
-HOTOO(
-HXCAA
.PuvIR
~BINGO


lAJSIC

-FACE PA

'JERK P1



, GAME T
, ~~BARGAI


* COLINA



OPERATING

HOURS


Dear Valued Client, please be advised that
operating hours for all branches and offices of
Colina Insurance Limited in Nassau will be
I pm to 5pm on
Wednesday I 0 February 2010
to allow for the Company's
annual employee and agent meeting.


For your added convenience, payment facilities are
available every Saturday at our 21 Collins Avenue branch.


I


!F Ankh,






T1~7


PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


EIOI AULETE S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, cI tiinn') 322-1986
Ad c,' iiing Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm



Haitians become political fodder


POLITICS is a cruel game of creating
divisions and playing on the prejudices
of a community.
In the Elizabeth by-election the long-
suffering Haitian has become a political
football.
One would have thought that a peo-
ple's compassion on the suffering of
others would have put this subject out
of bounds for all politicians.
But no. One minute government is
criticised for releasing Haitians from
the Carmichael Road Detention Centre
and granting them temporary amnesty
during a period when Haiti, after the
destruction of Port-au-Prince, was in
no position to take them back.
Another minute, it was being berated
for prosecuting Haitians who illegally
landed at Coral Harbour, and now it
is being criticised for picking the
migrants up at sea and returning them
to Haiti.
Shane Gibson, immigration minis-
ter in the Christie government, wanted
to know why if Government could
return Haitians intercepted in Bahami-
an waters to their homeland, it could
not also repatriate immigrants who had
landed on Bahamian soil. Mr Gibson is
mischief making.
He, as well as all Bahamians, having
daily watched the chaos in Haiti knows
the answer so we shall not even waste
the ink of our presses to engage him in
argument.
He was upset that the government
took the Haitians from their "unsea-
worthy boat", put them on the Defence
Force vessel and returned them to Haiti
without first bringing them to Nassau
for processing. Surely Mr Gibson is not
being serious.
Why would the government go to the
extra expense of bringing them to Nas-
sau, processing them, charging them in
court - remember they had not landed
on our soil - putting them in jail and at
some future date going to even more
expense to repatriate them?


+Don Shminto(Proedox) Ltd.


Ml 5UMTHIES N2-6160W-2= 19





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It just does not make practical sense,
and Mr Gibson knows this.
But it does make mischievous politics.
Mr Gibson also knows this, and this is
the game he is playing at the expense of
the unfortunate Haitian.
"We will do all we can to assist Haiti
except we cannot absorb Haiti's popu-
lation in the Bahamas," Mr Ingraham
told the Associated Press.
All Bahamians of whatever political
hue will agree with that statement.
Even the great United States with
its vast territories says the same thing.
Like the Bahamas the United States
announced it would deport Haitians
who arrived in that country after the
catastrophic earthquake of January 12.
US Homeland Security Secretary Janet
Napolitano made it clear that Haiti's
misfortunate "is not an opportunity for
migration." The Bahamas government
is saying the same thing.
Washington announced that it was
giving temporary status to about
100,000 Haitians living illegally in the
US before the quake.
The Bahamas did the same, releasing
102 Haitians being held at the Deten-
tion Centre for repatriation. They have
about a six-month reprieve.
And, of course, both countries are
patrolling the waters to turn the boats
back before they can land on either
shore.
If Mr Gibson wants the migrants
brought to Nassau instead of being tak-
en back to Haiti then why have the
Defence Force waste its time on the
open seas?
Surely, not to give them safe escort
to Nassau.
It is about time that politicians stop
playing Russian roulette with the lives
of the unfortunate Haitians and get on
with solving the immediate needs of
the constituents of the Elizabeth con-
stituency.


The Prime Minister



responds to article


on Haitian


EDITOR, The Tribune.
THIS letter is in response to
the article by your reporter Ali-
son Lowe appearing in this
morning's edition of The Tri-
bune (Tuesday, Feb. 9).
When the terrible earth-
quake struck Haiti's capital city
on January 12th, I announced
on the following day that in
light of conditions in that coun-
try in the immediate aftermath
of the quake, the Bahamas
Government would suspend its
programme of apprehension of
illegal Haitian migrants living
in the country. As reported in
the press, I said:
"The Department of Immi-
gration will release from the
Detention Centre those
Haitians who are currently
there and give them some tem-
porary status until such time as
things have changed." I went
on to say "If new Haitians come
and we apprehend them before
they arrive in The Bahamas or
otherwise, we will have a dif-
ferent position to take."
I also reported that all repa-
triation exercises had been sus-
pended.
As a result some 102 illegal
Haitian immigrants awaiting
repatriation from the
Carmichael Detention Centre
were released and given tem-
porary status allowing them to
remain in the country for up to
six months.
When I addressed a news
conference on the January 17th,
I reaffirmed my Government's
decision to suspend apprehen-
sion, detention and repatriation
of Haitians found living illegal-
ly in The Bahamas. And, I not-
ed that other countries like the
US had done the same and
were granting illegal Haitian
nationals special temporary sta-
tus. I also said the following:
"They (the US) have also,
like us, (my emphasis) made it
clear that no new immigrants
from Haiti will be allowed in.
The American and interna-
tional media have already tak-


en note of our decisi
Hence, when 49 n
immigrants landed in
ity of Coral Harbour
ary 26th, they were
charged before our c
subsequently convi
sentenced to six mon
ceration at Her IN
prison.
According to press
the men are confin
prison in Fox Hill; tl
and three minor ch
being detained
Carmichael Detenti(
It can be expected tha
all be repatriated to
Most Bahamian
aware of increased sui
by both Bahamian
authorities aimed at
boats seeking to de
since the earthquake
intention of transport
migrants to foreign
These increased sui
efforts are meant to
containing the flow o
mented migrants fr
to the seas on unseaw
sels and exposing tl
to still more danger.
When such boats a
ed, they are escorted
their home ports wit!
ever reaching a forei
That was the case
78 Haitians detec
RBDF patrol vessel
were travelling on
sloop in waters off t!
chain last Saturday
their vessel was uns
the migrants were tr
to a RBDF vessel an
being returned safe]
Haitian port. The
Guard is assisting in t
Nothing in the ha
this latest group of ill
grants is in any way
tory to announced Go


migrants

policy on the treatment of
Haitians found in The Bahamas
following the events of Janu-
ary 12, 2010.
Clearly, as events evolve in
Haiti the response from The
on." Bahamas will be adjusted to
new illegal take changes into account.
Sthe vicin- I also attach a copy of the
r on Janu- press release issued by the Min-
arrested, istry of National Security yes-
courts and terday.
icted and
iths incar- PRIME MINISTER
Majesty's HUBERT A
INGRAHAM
ss reports, Nassau,
ied at the February 9th, 2010.
he women
ildren are Ministry of National Security
at the release:
on Centre. Haitian Immigrants
at they will returned to Haiti
Haiti. The Ministry of National
s will be Security has confirmed that on
irveillance Saturday, 6 February 2010, 78
n and US Haitian migrants were inter-
detecting cepted in waters near the Exu-
part Haiti ma chain when the sloop in
e with the which they were sailing was
ting illegal sighted by the Royal Bahamas
countries. Defence Force on a routine
rveillance patrol.
o assist in Defence Force vessel HMBS
)f undocu- P-45 spotted the 30-foot Hait-
om taking ian sailing sloop approximately
worthy ves- 13 nautical miles southwest of
themselves Barreterre, Exuma. The Hait-
ian migrants, 64 males and 14
are detect- females, were transferred from
d back to their unseaworthy vessel and
hout them taken aboard Defence Force
ign port. craft P-45 and P-49.
e with the The migrants, all of whom
;ted by a appeared to be in fair health,
while they have been transferred to
a Haitian HMBS Bahamas. The United
he Exuma States Coast Guard is assisting
. Because the Royal Bahamas Defence
eaworthy, Force in returning the migrants
transferred to Haiti.
d they are The return of the migrants to
ly to their Haiti is in conformity with
US Coast enunciated policy that Haitian
his matter. migrants coming to The
handling of Bahamas illegally after the
egal immi- earthquake will be apprehend-
contradic- ed and returned to Haiti.
government February 8, 2010.


Corruption seems to be embedded deep in PLP


EDITOR, The Tribune.

Since time immemorial the
PLP has been associated with
one form of underhandedness
or the other.
Various forms of suspicious
manoeuvrings, especially in
elections have been the hall-
mark of that shameless bunch.
The FNM cannot forget how
the 1987 election was literally
stolen in broad daylight.
We all can remember how
the PLP emptied the grave-
yards. Zombies, ghosts and
goblins voted, so what is hap-
pening in the Elizabeth by
elections is actually expected,
especially how desperate the
PLP seem to be.
The election court exposed

;A7N�^


BoalhEcamas H
Fi .rmu.dbeiy *6 j'reame n. l r 6 Refdi~jh.f
f fo[r~.i,A .4, " r
T~j 13�171 F")I3I l 6


how those managing the elec-
tion under the Christie admin-
istration that served 2002-
2007 confused us all from the
way people were shuffled
from constituency to con-
stituency so that certain can-
didates could win.
The election court showed
us clearly that serious gerry-
mandering occurred. Natural
boundary lines were erased
in favour for unusual lines
that ran through people's
homes.
During the 2007 election,
some even bragged how they
voted in several constituen-
cies. But who could forget the
brazen attempt of a well
known lawyer who was fever-
ishly moving between Sandi-
lands Primary School and
Faith Temple School on
Prince Charles, trying to plan
his fake ballots.
Even though he was literal-
ly and physically monitored
and chased by me, he still con-
tinued to manoeuvre hell-
bent on gaining an advantage
for the PLP.
So the recent cry from the
FNM, NDP and BDM about
hundreds of voters who can-
not be found, only reminds us


of elections past when people
who were registered claimed
to reside in vacant lots.
So dishonesty and corrup-
tion seems to be embedded
deep in the foundation of the
PLP - even one of their
number, Loftus Roker,
warned many years ago that
"corruption was rocking" the
PLP to its very foundation.
It is too bad though that the
atmosphere of crime in the
Bahamas today would only
be enhanced when criminals
believe that a political party
cheats just to gain power. It
confirms that "power corrupts
and absolute power corrupts
absolutely."
On another note, the PLP
said at one of their rallies that
they would rescue the Eliza-
beth Constituency.
Now the real joke is Eliza-
beth was represented by the
PLP for the past eight years.
Do you think that the PLPs
just have bad memories or
they are habitual liars? In my
opinion they are both.

IVOINE
INGRAHAM
Nassau,
February, 2010.


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Invites applications for the
following positions:



* COOKS


* ROOM ATTENDANTS


The applicants should have experience in
the areas application.

Send applications to
sebhr@grp.sandals.com







+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2010, PAGE 5


LOCALN


Police believe teen



hidden to prevent



giving evidence


Search for missing 18-year-old


US actress visits Haiti as goodwill ambassador for UN


PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
ANGELINA JOLIE began
two days of meetings with
Haiti earthquake victims
Tuesday in her role as a good-
will ambassador for the U.N.
refugee agency, according to
Associated Press.
The actress, representing
the U.N. High Commissioner
for Refugees, met with U.N.
officials in Port-au-Prince and
visited an SOS Villages camp


for orphans outside the capi-
tal, where she was cheered by
Haitians yelling, "Angie!
Angie!"
That same camp took care
of 33 Haitian children after a
U.S.-based Baptist group was
arrested at the Dominican
border trying to take the kids
out of the country.
It wasn't known if Jolie
spoke with any of the chil-
dren, and journalists were
kept at a distance throughout


her visit.
The American missionaries
have been accused of trying
to take the children out of
Haiti without proper docu-
mentation.
The group says it was head-
ing to a Dominican orphan-
age following Haiti's quake
and had only good intentions.
Jolie also toured a Doctors
Without Borders hospital in
a Port-au-Prince suburb, wav-
ing to onlookers.


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net


FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama police are search-
ing for a missing 18-year-
old girl who they believe
is being hidden to prevent ...
her from giving evidence ,-
in a court case.
Charleah Edwina \-
Wilchcombe of No 11
Brink Hill Road, Lincoln
Green, is a witness in a case
before the Magistrate's Court.
She was last seen six months
ago on August 4 at the Columbus
House for Girls, two months before
the court matter was scheduled to be
heard.

Public

Police declined to divulge the details of the
case, but said they do not believe that any
harm has come to the girl. They are now
appealing to the public to help them find
the missing teenager.
Asst Supt Loretta Mackey said the police
released a missing poster of the teen to the
media in October 2009 and again on Febru-
ary 4, 2010.
Ms Mackey said police have not received
any information to date concerning the
whereabouts of the girl.
Anyone with information pertaining to
this matter is asked to call police at 350-
3107, 352-9774/5 or 911.
WOMAN CHARGED
IN STABBING
A 45-year-old Eight Mile Rock woman,
who was charged in connection with last
week's stabbing of a 55-year-old Holmes


Rock man, was granted bail on
Monday.
Ernestine Bartlett was
being held in police custody
following her arraignment
on Friday in the Eight
Mile Rock Magistrate's
S Court pending the out-
come of doctors' attempts
to stabilise the victim,
who was in hospital in the
critical condition at the
time.
During her reappearance
j /in court on Monday,
Bartlett pleaded not guilty to
causing grievous harm and
elected to have a summary trial.
Magistrate Gwen Claude granted
Bartlett bail in the amount of $5,000
with one or two sureties.
The matter was adjourned to April 29 for
trial.
BURGLARY
CHARGE
Frederick Antonio, 55, of Holmes Rock,
was arraigned on attempted burglary charges
in the Freeport Magistrate's Court on Mon-
day.
Antonio was charged in Court 3 before
Deputy Chief Magistrate Helen Jones with
attempted burglary, causing damage, and
resisting arrest.
It is alleged that on February 5, the
accused attempted to gain entry and caused
damage at a home in South Bahamia. It is
further alleged that he resisted arrest.
He pleaded guilty to causing damage and
was sentenced to one year at Her Majesty's
Prison in Nassau.
Antonio pleaded not guilty to resisting
arrest. He did not enter a plea to the charge
of attempted burglary.
Magistrate Jones adjourned the matters to
April 13.


Sentence deferred on



'dangerous driving' man


A MAN who pleaded
guilty last December to
killing a woman and a one-
year-old girl in the course of
dangerous driving will have
to wait a few more weeks
before he is sentenced.
Garelle Gabriel, 23, of
South Beach Drive, has also
pleaded guilty to driving
without a valid driver's
license and driving while not
covered by third party risk
insurance.
Court dockets allege that
at about 4.20pm on Sunday,
September 20, Gabriel
drove a water truck south
on Marathon Road in the
area of the Marathon Mall
in a manner dangerous to
the public, thereby causing
the deaths of Lavonya
Miller and Rondea Dean.
Ms Miller, 20, and her
one-year-old niece were pas-
sengers in the water truck
driven by Gabriel which was
travelling on Marathon


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story


Road when it crashed into
a maroon coloured Cadillac
Seville, causing the truck to
flip over.
Both the woman and the
young child were thrown
from the vehicle and sus-
tained fatal injuries.
Gabriel, who is represent-
ed by attorney Mark Rolle,
appeared before Magistrate
Ancella Williams in Court
6 yesterday. He was
informed by the Magistrate,
however, that his sentence
would be deferred as his


probation report was not
available. His sentencing has
been deferred to February
26. Magistrate Williams told
Gabriel, who is on $10,000
bail, to continue with his
grief counselling.

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about Service.

The applicants should meet the following
minimum requirements:

* Methodical, standards driven individual
* Excellent Guest Service skills
* Previous experience of dealing with
luxury motor vehicles will be an
advantage

Applications should be email to
cmajor@grp.sandals.com

Application close February 26th.2010.


IARN. I ISUROANCEN


Insurance Management (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau is seeking
young professionals interested in developing a career in insurance.

The position is diverse and interesting and will involve
dealing with customers.

Previous experience is not necessary.
We are seeking individuals who have:-
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Interpersonal skills

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Successful candidates will be afforded the opportunity to study for
the examinations of the Chartered Insurance Institute and should
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+>


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


How we became hooked


on overea


AS CHRISSY LOVE said
recently on the ZNS call-in
show Immediate Response,
"Chile I been on more diet than
Oprah."
Her point was that diets
don't work - at least not in
the long-term. As we all know,
it's hard to stick to any diet,
and sooner or later we give up
and rejoin the world of uncon-
trolled eating, usually gaining
back the few pounds we lost
plus a little more.
Most of us simply shrug our
shoulders and move on. But a
groundbreaking new book by


S UQQCHALL
Ac


the former head of the US
Food and Drug Administration
reveals that food is now a top
public health issue, and he tries
to explain how we can scientif-
ically address our compulsive
urge to overeat.
The unfortunate fact is, says


KEmP' FUNERAL HON LTED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.PR, The Bahamas





,Mrs. Mary Elizabeth

S(Betty) Kelly

Kenning, OBE, 85

of Cable icM ach, Nassau, The
Bahamas, who dicd at Doctor s
Hospital on Saturday, 6th
February, 2010 will be held at St.
Andr w' Pruhsbktrian Kirk,
PriMnce Slrcct on Wcdntsdd '.
A lth FcbrLlay at 11.* a.nm. Rcv.
Charl=s Sccling will officiate,
Mrs. Kennin issurvived by her husband, John Kenning.OBFF;
crT Oins, Godfrey Kclly,CMG and his wife Sonia and their
daughter, Linda and her daughter, Katherine; Paula Kelly,
widow of the late Basil Kelly and their children, Steven KeOly,
his daughter. Jennifer ad his wife Susan; Gar) Kelly and his
wi.e. Karen arid their children. Ashlky and Travis; Linn Lowe
and her husband, Chris and children, Kelly, Lauren and
Maithlw; Nancy Kcllv, widow of ihc late David Kely and
their children Andrew Kelly and his sons, Jordan and Oliver;
Gregory, Kelly and his wife, Shelle and their children, Avery
and Jack; Scott Kelly and his wife Candy and their daughter,
Katie: George Kelfy,MBE and his wife Norma and their
children Maureen and ChurIle and his wife Candice and their
daughter Skylar Rose; her hmlhirs-in-Law Alexander Kenning
and his liic Jo n and their children, lDavid and Gary; David
Noel Kenning and his wifc Elizabeth and their children, Jill,
Alan and Caroline: special friends. Jack and Betty Sands,
Loree Kelly Delahey and Pam, Stuart.
Special thanks to Mrs, Kcnnings staff, Phillipc Pierre, Beryl
Pratt Gloliia Milki, Presley Seymour and Samuel Mortimer
and to Dr. C. Dean Tseretopoulos, Dr. Angea Kunz, Dr.
Michael Neville, Edith DepLia Capara.s, A.N., Don0van
CaparaS, Agatha .ightlhournc.T.C.N., Justina Knowles, R.N,
Inez Cartwright, I'.C.N., Sbhil Alien, R.N.,Shirley Cooper,
R.N, Ruthlyn RollC., CI., May Fcrguson, T.C.N,.Shcllcc
Smith. T.CN., Hazel Knowles. Nancy Betihel. Kimberlcv
Walkine, R,N, Indera S!tubba. RN., and Linda Abere. R.N.
In lieu of flowers, friends who wish may make a donation to
the Bahamas Humane Society, PO. Box N 242, Nassau in
memory of the late Mrs. Betty Kelly Kenning.OBE.


Dr David Kessler in The End of
Overeating, that we have all
become addicts - hooked by
overstimulated brain chemicals
on huge portions of food lay-
ered and loaded with sugar, fat
and salt, which offers little or no
nutritional value.
Kessler, a Harvard-educated
paediatrician, argues that until
we fundamentally alter our eat-
ing behaviour, we will continue
to waste money on ineffective
weight-loss schemes while run-
ning the risk of all those deadly
medical conditions that are
caused by obesity - including
diabetes, heart disease, stroke,
liver disease, arthritis and some
cancers.
Naturally, his book focuses
on Americans and the Ameri-
can food industry in particular.
But Bahamians are in the same
overloaded boat, as Health
Minister Dr Hubert Minnis has
frequently pointed out. And
since most of our prepared
foods and chain restaurants are
American, Kessler's facts about
overeating are just as applicable
here.
Kessler is perhaps best
known for his efforts to inves-
tigate and regulate the tobacco
industry, and his accusation that
cigarette makers intentionally
manipulated nicotine content
to make their products more
addictive. His new book com-
pares the food industry to big
tobacco, and shows how our
responses to food need to
change.
"The attitudes that created
the social acceptability of smok-
ing shifted, and many of us
began to see smoking as
deviant, even repulsive behav-
iour. A consensus emerged that
the cigarette, and the industry
that manufactured it, was
abhorrent. We moved from glo-
rification to demonisation."
So we need to change our
thinking about big food in the
same way. As Kessler says, "Its
ubiquitous presence, large por-
tion sizes, incessant marketing,
and the cultural assumption
that its acceptable to eat any-
where at any time (are you lis-
tening civil servants?) puts us at
risk...And people need to hear
repeatedly, from many sources,
that selling, serving, and eating
food layered and loaded with
sugar, fat and salt has negative,
unhealthy consequences."
The book begins with the
observation that for thousands
of years human body weight
stayed remarkably stable, so
that people who were over-
weight stood apart from the
general population. A perfect
biological system seemed to be
at work, until something hap-
pened in the 1980s.
When researchers surveyed
government health and nutri-
tion data collected from 1988
to 1991 it became apparent that
fully one-third of the entire
American adult population was


overweight - an abrupt
increase. The landmark study
showing that the rate of obesity
in America had exploded was
published in the July 1994 issue
of the Journal of the American
Medical Association.
Kessler's book is the result
of the years of thinking and
study he went through to try to
make sense of those results. As
he points out, food had become
more readily available in the
1970s and 80s, along with larg-
er portion sizes, more chain
restaurants, more neighbour-
hood food outlets, and a cul-
ture that promoted more out-
of-home eating. But there had
to be something more driving
us to overeat.
His conclusion - in a nut-
shell - is that sugar, fat and salt
cause us to eat more sugar fat
and salt. It's all about "palata-
bility", a term scientists use to
refer to food that has the capac-
ity to stimulate the appetite and
drive us to eat more. "It's the
stimulation, rather than gener-
al hunger," he says, "that makes
us put food into our mouths
long after our caloric needs are
satisfied."
Decades of research into
human taste, food preferences
and dietary choices, have con-
firmed that what stimulates us
most is a combination of sugar
and fat. Mix the same amount
of sugar into low fat and high
fat products and people always
choose the higher-fat mixtures
- something that restaurants
like the Cheesecake Factory
were quick to figure out.
Kessler cites one experiment
with two strains of rats. One
was bred to overfeed when a
high-calorie diet was available,
producing an obesity-prone rat.
The other strain did not ordi-
narily overfeed - an obesity-
resistant rat.
After a period of eating extra
calories, the obesity-resistant
group cut back their food
intake much faster. But when
both groups were offered high-
ly palatable foods rich in sugar
and fat, all the animals ate with-
out restraint.
Another experiment let one
group of animals eat freely
while restricting the diet of
another group.
Both groups then headed
towards a chocolate-flavoured
cereal high in sugar and fat at
almost the same speed. The
absence of hunger made no dif-
ference to the appeal of the
reward.
But it is Kessler's insights
into the food industry that are
the most interesting part of the
book. He reports inside infor-
mation from a variety of food
consultants who confirmed that
the industry creates dishes
specifically to hit the three
points of the compass - sugar,
fat and salt.
"Chicken tenders," he
writes, "are so loaded with bat-
ter and fat that my source jokes
that they're a UFO - an
unidentified fried object. Salt
and sugar are loaded into the
fat. The White Chocolate
Mocha Frappuccino served at
Starbucks is coffee diluted with
a mix of sugar, fat and salt.


~%.


jv00~p*,


N


'4


Blooming Onions - the trade-
mark Outback Steakhouse dish
- provide plenty of surface
area to absorb fat. Fried in bat-
ter and topped with sauce their
flavour comes from salt on sug-
ar on fat."
Eating high-sugar, high-fat
foods produces opioids in our
brains that help calm us down
and make us feel better - at
least in the short term. That's
why infants cry less when given
sugar water and animals feel
less pain when administered
opioid-like drugs. "Eating high-
ly palatable food activates the
opioid circuits...The more
rewarding the food, the greater
the attention we direct toward
it and the more vigorously we
pursue it."
In addition to that, the con-
ditions under which we
encounter foods switch on pow-
erful brain chemicals that com-
pel us to eat. We learn to want
a food or some other substance
we once liked. Putting all this
together gives the following pic-
ture, he says: "A cue triggers a
dopamine-fueled
urge...dopamine leads us to
food...eating food leads to opi-
oid release...and the production
of both dopamine and opioids
stimulates further eating...The
more rewarding the food, the
stronger the learning experi-
ence that creates the automatic
behaviour."
And the goal of food design
is to make products as reward-
ing as possible. For example,
Kessler describes the boneless
chicken wings at Chili's Restau-
rant. The meat is injected with
a solution of water, soy protein,
salt and sodium phosphate. At
the manufacturing plant the
chicken is battered, breaded,
and pre-dusted to create a salty
coating that becomes crispy
when fried in fat at the restau-
rant.
The coating is some 40 per
cent fat and represents up to
half of the volume of nuggets
that end up on your plate.
Added to this is a sweet and
salty sauce and a mayonnaise-
based dressing - it's hyper-
palatable food that requires lit-
tle chewing and goes down eas-
ily. The fact is that chemical-
based processing has created a
sort of adult baby food.


According to US govern-
ment figures we are eating
more of everything these days.
Per capital consumption of fats
and oils jumped 63 per cent
over the past 30-odd years. Use
of sugars and sweeteners was
up 19 per cent. We ate 43 per
cent more grain and 7 per cent
more meat, eggs, and nuts over
the same period. We are also
eating 24 per cent more veg-
etables - but most of those are
deep-fried potatoes, otherwise
known as french fries.
Then there are the portion
sizes. Food designers say that
if you make plates bigger and
fill them more, everyone makes
more money.
Supersize options and all-
you-can-eat specials give con-
sumer access to a bottomless
well of food for a fractional
increase in cost. It's cheap and
its always available.
"Based on these findings,"
Kessler says, "an argument can
be made that conditioned
overeating is a syndrome, or a
condition characterized by a
cluster of symptoms...These
patterns almost certainly con-
tribute significantly to the
exploding obesity epidemic...A
conducive environment is nec-
essary to trigger hypereating.
That's exactly what we have
today."
The bad news is that there's
no quick fix - it's simply
impossible to avoid the temp-
tation of highly palatable foods
all the time in today's world.
The good news is that we can
begin to train ourselves to alter
the reactions that are generated
by stimulation.
And awareness of the prob-
lem is the first step along this
road, Kessler says.
"Once I thought a big plate
of food was what I wanted and
needed to feel better. Now I
see that plate for what it is -
layers of fat on sugar on fat that
will never provide lasting satis-
faction and only keep me com-
ing back for more. I have
changed the reward value of
the stimulus."
Over to you Chrissy.
What do you think?
Send comments to
larrv@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


*f' i







+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2010, PAGE 7


Artisans 'on cusp of



handicraft revolution' -,. o


150 GRADUATE
BAHAMIAN artisans are "on the
cusp of a revolution in the handicraft
industry," Agriculture and Marine
Resources Minister Larry Cartwright
has declared.
The minister was speaking during the
graduation ceremony last Friday for 150
Eleutherans from Princess Cay to Har-
bour Island who took part in the
Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial
Corporation's (BAIC) courses in shell,
coconut, straw and sisal craft.
BAIC executive chairman Edison Key
said the target is to produce $300 million
worth of authentically Bahamian made
souvenirs.
"That is the estimated value of sou-
venirs and other memorabilia that we
import for our tourists," he said.
"From what I see here in Eleuthera
and elsewhere in our Bahamaland, that
expenditure to foreign concerns is total- ELEUTHI
ly unnecessary. coconut
"Imagine what it would do for the complete
Bahamian economy if just a third of that
was spent in support of the Bahamian
handicraft industry!" The
Mr Cartwright said that "more people Bahama
are being trained, organised and pre- Eleuthe
pared to be symbols of our creativity Culmer
and genius." presided
Mr Key has pledged BAIC's support ciation.
as artisans move to cash in on the multi- Minis
million-dollar Bahamian souvenir indus- handicr
try. been a v
He is advocating that only authentic "Man
Bahamian items should be sold in the ing grace
new straw market being constructed consiste
downtown Nassau. said.
Trainers for the courses were nation- He inm
ally acclaimed Emily Munnings of Savan- inner r
nah Sound, Eleuthera; Salomie known I
Cartwright of Gregory Town, Eleuthera; apply yo
and April Martin-Fox for Nassau, New ufacture
Providence. at an ev


FROM BAIC


COURSES


I / . / ,,

IERA CRAFT ASSOCIATION president Susan Culmer (centre) shows off
t craft on exhibit during ceremony marking the graduation of artisans who
ted BAIC courses in handicraft last Friday.


president and treasurer of the
is National Craft Association are
rans Martha Smith and Susan
respectively. Ms Culmer is also
nt of the Eleuthera Craft Asso-
ster Cartwright noted that the
aft and souvenir industry has
viable sector of the economy.
ny vendors still regard it as a sav-
e in terms of income providing a
;nt and better way of life," he
nplored artisans to "summon the
esolve that Bahamians were
for, to redouble your efforts and
our ingenuity to design and man-
e keepsakes and cherished pieces
en more rapid pace which is com-


parable to international standards, nev-
er allowing our handicraft to lose the
indigenous stamp."
He recognized the "pivotal role"
BAIC is playing in "providing an incu-
bation environment" for small and medi-
um-sized businesses and entrepreneurs.
"Now that BAIC has sought to under-
take these training programmes and to
raise the awareness of our artisans and
entrepreneurs to what the possibilities
are, a more concerted effort must be
made on the part of all concerned," he
said.
As a result of the unwavering effort of
Eleuthera artisans, Mr Cartwright said,
the volume, standard and quality of craft
and souvenir items from this island have
increased over the years.


SHELL WORK, on exhibit during the graduation ceremony, was one of the cours-
es BAIC offered in Eleuthera.


He underscored the need for authen-
tically Bahamian items to be presented in
the new straw market being constructed
downtown Nassau.
"What you are doing in Eleuthera and
throughout the other islands with regard
to craft," he said, "I see no reason why
anyone should have to go out of the
country to find souvenir items.
"We have the raw material that is


indigenous to the Bahamas, we have the
trained personnel who are producing
products that are as good as you can buy
anywhere in the world, and we certainly
have the market for it in the five mil-
lion and more tourists who come to our
islands each year."
BAIC executive chairman Edison M
Key urged artisans to "take heart and
stay focused."


Legal Notice
NOTICE
VENETIAN PARADISE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
HUEN WA HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
CLASSIC WINDMILL INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
TIGER BALLOON INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
WRYTH MOUNTAIN
VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
SANGRIA VALLEY LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
WORLD EXCLUSIVE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
LIGMA OCEAN INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
MIKANDRI HILLS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7







+


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNWI


Elizabeth candidates
FROM page one

munications Network CEO, Wendell Jones.
The debate, organised by JCN, was aired
on television on JCN channel 14 and Love
97FM.
As the first person to address the hall, Mr
Moncur, who was the most lively and vocal
of all the candidates, accused Mr Pinder
of "not having the support of Perry
Christie."
Mr Pinder, in turn, presented himself,
spoke of the problems which he believes
must be addressed in Elizabeth, includ-
ing "rising unemployment, sky-rocketing
crime and the disintegration of family val-
ues."
He said his "number one priority is to
provide opportunities for the economic
expansion and economic empowerment for
Bahamians in this constituency."
The NDP's Mr Rollins hit out at the two
major political parties for making promis-
es to the populace that they have failed to
fulfil, leaving the country "largely under-
developed" in many regards.
Speaking after him, Mr Stuart said it is
"time for a change."
"We have the highest national debt in
history of our nation, we have the highest
debt ratio, the highest crime rate in history
of our nation and the highest unemploy-
ment in the history of our nation and the
worst educational system in the history of
our nation," he said.
Mr Moncur caused a stir at the debate, at
one point breaking into Creole - causing
him to be reprimanded by moderator Wen-
dall Jones who said he "ought to speak
English" during the event - and making
statements which Mr Jones suggested were
slanderous and could result in him being
evicted from the debate should he do so
again.
Questions fielded touched on the integri-
ty of the voter's register, immigration and
crime, among other issues.
As had been forecast, FNM candidate
Dr Duane Sands did not participate. FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham told the media he
would not join in "Mr Wendall Jone's
debate", and that the decision was the par-
ty's and not the candidate's.


Workers'

FROM page one

election returning officer Jack Thompson on
January 29. This letter was part of the disclo-
sure of assets all candidates published in the
Government Notice of Nomination gazette on
February 1. It revealed that Dr Sands "owns
shares in a medical company which has a con-
tract with the Bahamas government to pro-
vide cancer treatment services."
According to Mr Moncur, the disclosure
does not meet constitutional guidelines.
The centrepiece of his new argument hinges
on Article 48.1(J) of the Constitution, which
states: "No person shall be qualified to be
elected as a member of the House of Assembly
who is interested in any government contract
and has not disclosed the nature of such con-
tract and of his interest therein by publishing a
notice in the Gazette within one month before
the day of election."
Said Mr Moncur: "So even if you accept the


Party *
argument of the FNM, that he did
disclose on January, 29, he has not
disclosed the nature (of the con-
tract) - so he still is not in strict
compliance with the Constitution."
Based on this, Mr Moncur said
that Mr Thompson, also the Direc- U..
tor of Immigration, should have
rejected Dr Sands' nomination
papers under Part V, Section 38
(4a) of the Election Act.
That portion of the Act states:
"The returning officer shall reject a
nomination paper: (if) he is satis-
fied that the intending candidate
is dead or that he has withdrawn or that he is
disqualified from being elected by virtue of
any of the provisions of the Constitution or
this Act."
Meantime, Mr Moncur said he will await
the outcome of next Tuesday's by-election
before potentially taking his argument before
a court.


I


"At the end of the race, that is
., when you go to court. So the deci-
Ssion to go to court depends on
what happens at the end of the
race, if he wins, and depending on
| the circumstances on that day. But
when you examine the Constitu-
tion and the law, he's not com-
S plied."
Last week, Mr Moncur called for
* Dr Sands to be eliminated from
:. the by-election, arguing he was
ineligible for nomination because
he did not make public his com-
pany's contractual relationship
with the Government within a
month before the by-election.
This call was based on his inter-
pretation of the phrase "within one
month before the day of election."
The FNM and Dr Sands dismissed Mr
Moncur's arguments.
Fred Smith, QC, told The Tribune that the
word "within" refers to the time between the
date of calling the election and the actual
election - not within 30 days a month before
the race.


New drug fears amid Haiti crisis


FROM page one

the illicit trade.
Captain Peter Brown, who
commands the US Coast Guard
efforts in the Caribbean, advised
that while drug smuggling activi-
ty was temporarily disrupted in
the immediate aftermath of the
January 12 quake, traffickers
have now resumed their missions.
Meanwhile, the 5,000 plus con-
victs who escaped from the coun-
try's main prison, the National
Penitentiary, after it collapsed
during the earthquake, are antic-
ipated to boost an already serious
problem that has greatly con-
tributed to the destabilisation of
the country.
Mark Schneider, vice president
of the International Crisis Group,
a Belgium-based research foun-


dation, said around 1,000 of those
who are now back on the streets
are drug gang members.
Their comments appeared in
the USA Today yesterday, just
over two weeks after the inter-
ception of a Haitian freighter off
Great Inagua in a joint Bahamas-
US anti-nartcotics operation
resulted in five Haitian men
appearing before a Bahamian
magistrate on drug charges.
The vessel was found to con-
tain 4041bs of cocaine and 511bs
of marijuana, worth more than
$3 million.
"We're prepared and alert to
the possibility that as Haiti is
reconstructed, criminals might
try to use it as a transit point,"
Capt Brown said.
Robert Perito, director of the
Haiti programme at the US Insti-
tute of Peace, a Washington


think-tank that promotes conflict
resolution, suggested the worst
of the spike could be seen once
the foreign military presence in
the country ebbs away in the
coming months.
"There wasn't much law
enforcement to begin with, and
now there's even less. Right now
we've got (foreign) military
crawling all over the island," Per-
ito said.
"But they won't be there for-
ever."
The flow of drugs into the
country has been fingered by its
president, Rene Preval, as a
major destabilising force in a
country already struggling to get
on its feet economically.
Now as the country needs to
have all hands on deck as it tries
to rebuild and revive a sense of
normalcy, the threat that the


tragic conditions will be exploit-
ed by drug gangs may hamper
that effort.
"The chaos and desperation
that have set in provide an open-
ing that trafficking organizations
will undoubtedly seek to
exploit," Cindy Arnson of the
Woodrow Wilson International
Centre for Scholars, a Washing-
ton think tank that studies
national and world affairs, told
USA Today.
Ivelaw Griffith, an expert on
crime in the Caribbean at the
City University of New York,
agreed.
"Haiti has always been a weak
link against drug trafficking. It's
a grave situation, and it's going to
get graver, because people are
now going to be even more sus-
ceptible to whatever corrupting
forces are out there."


Legal Notice
NOTICE

QUISTCLOSE LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

BEL SNOW CIRCLE LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

TACERTO INVESTMENT LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

PEACH VALLEY INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

LICCONE HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

MILUCE INCORPORATION LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

UNCHAINED LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

NEU AFFORD

HOLDINGS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

XELA VALLEY INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O







7Th


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2010, PAGE 11


* SALNEWS


FROM page one Govt criticized over petupn of 78 migrants


The Government later said
that any new illegal arrivals from
Haiti would be charged before
the courts with breaking
Bahamian law.
Three weeks after Mr Ingra-
ham's announcement, the 64 men
and 14 women found in "fair
health" on an "unseaworthy"
30ft Haitian sloop 13 miles
southwest of Barreterre, Exu-
ma, on Saturday, were loaded
on to the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force (RBDF) vessel
HMBS Bahamas and trans-
ported to Haiti yesterday with
assistance from the United
States Coast Guard, according
to the Ministry of National
Security.
The Ministry could not con-
firm whether the illegals were
documented, where in Haiti
they were taken, who received
them, or how much the exercise
cost when questioned by The
Tribune yesterday.
However a statement from
the Ministry of National Securi-
ty said: "The return of the
migrants to Haiti is in confor-
mity with enunciated policy that


Haitian migrants coming to the
Bahamas illegally after the
earthquake will be apprehended
and returned to Haiti."
In a letter to The Tribune yes-
terday, penned in response to
an article which appeared in the
newspaper that morning in
which former immigration min-
ister Shane Gibson suggested
the move to return the Haitians
found at sea directly to Haiti
was a "new policy" and begged
the question of why all migrants
could not be repatriated, the
Prime Minister said the move,
which he did not describe as a
"repatriation" exercise, was "in
no way contradictory to
announced government policy
on the treatment of Haitians
found in The Bahamas following
the events of January 12, 2010."
(See Mr Ingraham's letter on
page 4).
He pointed to the fact that
the Haitians did not "ever reach
a foreign port."
Mr Ingraham stated: "Most
Bahamians will be aware of
increased surveillance by both
Bahamian and US authorities


aimed at detecting boats seeking
to depart Haiti since the earth-
quake with the intention of
transporting illegal migrants to
foreign countries.
"These surveillance efforts are
meant to assist in containing the
flow of undocumented migrants
from taking to the seas on
unseaworthy vessels and expos-
ing themselves to still more dan-
ger."
"When such boats are detect-
ed they are escorted back to
their home without ever reach-
ing a foreign port.
"That was the case with the 78
migrants detected by a RBDF
patrol vessel while they were
travelling on a Haitian sloop in
waters off the Exuma chain last
Saturday.
"Because their vessel was
unseaworthy, the migrants were
transferred to an RBDF vessel
and they are being returned
safely to their Haitian port. The
US Coast Guard is assisting in
this matter."
Mr Ingraham added: "Clear-
ly, as events evolve in Haiti the
response from The Bahamas


C-,


MINISTER OF IMMIGRATION
Brent Symonette
will be adjusted to take changes
into account."
However, the Prime Minis-
ter's political opponents have
accused the Free National
Movement (FNM) government
of backing down from their orig-
inal stance in an attempt to win
public approval.
Prime Minister Ingraham was
applauded and cheered by the
crowd Monday night as he
announced the return of the
migrants to Haiti while speaking
at the opening of one of his par-


ty's Elizabeth constituency head-
quarters.
The move to send the
Haitians back to their homeland
comes after Mr Ingraham
approved and defended the
release of 102 Haitians from the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre on January 17 amidst
public criticism, and two weeks
after 49 Haitian migrants found
off the coast of New Providence
were charged and detained for
six months to avoid immediate
repatriation to Haiti in the after-
math of the earthquake.
Minister of Immigration
Brent Symonette asserted on
Monday the Government is
reviewing policy "as it goes
along" and any apparent
changes can be attributed to
changing times over the last four
weeks. But Progressive Liberal
Party (PLP) chairman Bradley
Roberts said the Prime Minis-
ter was sending out an ambigu-
ous message typical of the FNM
government.
"They are here one day and
over there the next day, and so
forth," Mr Roberts said.
"I clearly recall them saying
they would not send any of them
back with the conditions in


Haiti, but obviously the condi-
tions in Haiti have changed in
Hubert Ingraham's mind."
Rodney Moncur, the Work-
ers' Party candidate for Eliza-
beth, said: "It would appear
Bahamians were opposed to the
Government releasing the
Haitians from the Detention
Centre to get out of that political
mess they have gone against
international law and gone
against what is Christian and
what is humane.
"This is strict politics that is
being played and I think it's
wrong The Government should
have brought those Haitians in
as they were found in territorial
waters of the Bahamas and
offences were committed under
our law. They are changing the
policy during the elections so
perhaps after the election day
they will get back to their
humanitarian stance."
The Elizabeth by-election
will be held on Tuesday and five
candidates are vying for the post,
including Dr Duane Sands for
the FNM and tax-attorney Ryan
Pinder for the PLP.

* SEE LETTERS ON
PAGE FOUR


!j
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* .1


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7Th


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2010, PAGE 7B


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PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


Here are a few events you and
your significant other can enjoy
this Valentine's day.
* FIRST OFFICIAL HOTEL
WORKERS PARTY AT BAMBU
Discover Atlantis and Water
Features invites you to start
the year off right with their
first official Hotel Workers
Party, Thursday, February
11, 9pm at Bambu Night-
club. Tickets are $20.
..............................
*46TH ANNUAL HEART BALL
The Heart Ball Committee
presents its annual fund-
raising event, Saturday, Feb-
ruary 13, 7 pm at the Shera-
ton Nassau Beach Resort.
This event generates
finances to aid the Sir Victor
Sassoon of the Bahamas
Heart Foundation in provid-
ing assistance for the treat-
ment of heart disease in
Bahamian children. The
ball includes a presentation
of the Golden Heart Award
to an individual for their
contribution to society.
* LOVE FEST 2010
Enjoy a night of laughter
and entertainment at Love
Fest 2010, Saturday, Febru-
ary 13, 8.30pm at the Rain-
forest Theatre, Crystal
Palace Casino. Show stars
Drew Thomas, Shang, Ripp
Michaels, Dexter Angry and
Nikki Carr with a mystery
celebrity guest headliner.
Cost: $30 advanced; $40 at
the door.
.......o......................
* ST VALENTINE'S DAY SAILING
REGATTAS ON MONTAGU BAY
The 23rd Annual St Valen-
tine's Day Massacre Regatta
on Montagu Bay will take
place on February 13-14 and
features three C-Class
native sloop races and then
junior sailor's optimist class
races from noon to 5 pm. On
Sunday, the 'Catch Me If
You Can' race features A-
and B-Class sloops. A-Class
sloops include the re-built
Lady Muriel, Tida Wave,
Rupert's Legend, New
Courageous, Redstripe,
Who Dat, Good News and
The Southern Cross. Come
enjoy all the sailing fun and
great Bahamian food!
www.bahamassailing.org
..............................
* RUSSIAN ROULETTE
VALENTINE'S AFFAIR
Uptown Lounge hosts a red
and white Valentine's Day
affair with cash and prize
giveaways on Sunday, Feb-
ruary 14. Cost: $5/ladies and
$10/gents before 1lpm.
* A BALLING NIGHT OF LOVE
Oscar and The Ballers Club
present an all white Valen-
tine's night at Fort Charlotte
on February 14. Music by
an array of DJs, including
Selecta Ty, DJ Fynes, DJ
Flex, Selecta Chronic and
Selecta Rydim. Cost:
$10/ladies; $15/gents.
........es...g..t.............
* COUPLES RETREAT VALENTINE
GETAWAY EXCURSION
Silent Breeze Entertainment
wants you and your signifi-
cant other to enjoy a night
of love together at Sun Cay
Island on Sunday, February
14 with music from legends
like Luther Vandross, Percy
Sledge, Marvin Gaye and so
much more! Tickets are
$150 V.I.P., $200 platinum.
Cost includes 3-course
gourmet meal and a
roundtrip boat ride. Boat
leaves Woodes Rogers
Wharf, 6pm and 8pm and
departs from Sun Cay Island
9pm and 11pm.
* CEDRIC THE ENTERTAINER
AND FRIENDS COMEDY SHOW
The Sheraton Nassau Beach
Resort invites all guests to a
laughter-filled evening with
comedian Cedric The Enter-
tainer and his friends J.J. from
BET's Comic View and fel-
low comedian Malik S in the
resort's ballroom. The event
is slated for February 14, tick-
ets and VIP tables are priced
at $75/per person. Call 327-
6000 for more information.


Fall in with



Emerald Palms


By CHESTER ROBARDS
crobards@tribunemedia.net

HERE the starlight
is never dimmed
by tungsten bulbs
and moonlight ekes out a
footpath from room to
shore, Emerald Palms
Resort invites you to fall in
love with it.
This weekend, though, when lovers
claim one special day just for them-
selves, the resort is inviting couples to
come fall in love with each other "all
over again", with a Valentine's package
loaded with food, surprises and a sexy
seclusion that only the family islands -
Andros especially - can muster.
The resort where "miles of secluded
beach and hundreds of palm trees
awaits you", offers the allure of the
invitation to break free from the pomp
of flowers and candy and immerse your-


Top o10 Romantic

Songs of All Time

1) Lionel Richie & Diana Ross -
ENDLESS LOVE
2) Whitney Houston-
I WILL ALWAYS LOVE YOU
3) Celine Dion-
MY HEART WILL GO ON
4)KC & Jojo-
ALL MY LIFE
5) Boys II Men-
I'LL MAKE LOVE TO YOU
6) Bryan Adams -
EVERYTHING I DO, I DO IT FOR YOU
7) Vanessa Williams -
SAVE THE BEST FOR LAST
8) Brian Mcknight -
STILL IN LOVE
9) Bryan Adams -
EVERYTHING I DO
10)Luther Vandross -
HERE AND NOW


I'M TRYING
8) Lifehouse -
YOU AND ME
9) Tyrese -
ONE
10) All for One -
I SWEAR


Top 10 Caribbean

Love Songs
1) Jah Cure-
SEARCHING
2) Tarrus Riley -
SHE'S ROYAL
3) Beres Hammond -
THEY GONNA TALK
3) Ronnie Butler -
ECHOES OF MY MIND
4) Jah Cure -
NEVER FIND
5) Sammi Starr -
I LOVE YOU
6) Bodine Johnson -
I LOVE YOU
7) Ta Da -
WHEN I FOUND YOU
8) Glen Washington -
STRANGERS IN NIGHT
9) Smokey 007 -
LAURA
10) Sweet Emily/Ronnie Butler -
LOOK WHAT YA' DO


Top o10 Main- Top o10 Romantic

stream Love Songs Movies


1) Beyonce -
YOU ARE MY ROCK
2) Mariah Carey -
I STAY IN LOVE
3) Avant -
WHEN IT HURTS
4) Shania Twain -
_ YOU'RE STILL THE
ONE
5) Usher-
MOVING MOUNTAINS
6) Faith Hill -
BREATHE
= 7) Omarion -


Antonius Roberts
FROM page 10
in many parts of the world
including Italy, South Africa,
the U.S. Canada and Ger-
many.
His most recent work at
Collins House on Shirley
Street, designing and creating
7 acres of special feature
landscaping for public use is


described in his A
Statement for that pr
'as a sculptor it is imj
that the ideals of coi
tion and preservati
reflected in my work
this by utilizing indigo
materials and locati
installations, where p(
in places of historical
chance. Thus the p
recorded, re-create
remembered as a livi
torical record of our B


1) Titanic
2) Grease
3) The Notebook
4) Moulin Rouge
5) Pretty Woman
6) Sleepless in Seatle
7) Ghost
8) Casablanca
9) Dirty Dancing
10) The English Patient


Top 10 Fictional

Couples

rtist's an heritage.'
project - A Lucayan Tree house was
)ortant constructed from Casuarinas
nserva- reclaimed from the South
on are Pond area as were benches
. I do and swings and his own 20
genous foot Driftwood totem was
ng the also installed. Plantings con-
ossible, sist mostly of indigenous
signifi- shrubs and all vegetation
)ast is material from the initial clear-
*d and ing of the site was preserved
ng his- and mulched on site for
ahami- future use within the gardens.


self in your sweetie.
Their Valentine's package includes
two nights and three days in one of
the Emerald Palms' amazing Club-
rooms, with a daily continental break-
fast.
And if Venus smiles down on the
weekend of love (the weather is good),
Valentine's dinner will be hosted under
the stars on Saturday night.
With no distractions from contem-
porary media, Driggs Hill is a weekend
playground for the intrepid couple.
Bicycles are available for guest use
at the resort and the ride to the tip of
South Andros, where one can view
North Andros and the Autec marine
base, is an energising experience.
Along the way, stop for some conch
salad at 'Muddasick' Bar and chat it up
.. " with the most interesting couple in
Driggs Hill, who love to tell lies about
each other and Andros but don't wor-
ry... they come clean with a burst of
laughter and a "man I just jokin'".
Getting to this secluded paradise,
takes an easy 15 minute flight to Con-
go Town airport from Nassau and just
a 5 minute drive to the resort.
Options for that romantic getaway
are never limited in the Islands of the
Bahamas and Emerald Palms and
Driggs Hill epitomise that experience.
Emerald palms encourages local
lovers and those abroad to experience
the magic that is the out islands.

1) Romeo & Juliet
(Romeo & Juliet)
2) Jack Dawson & Rose DeWitt Bukater
(Titanic)
3) Mickey and Minnie
(Disney)
4) Barbie and Ken
(Mattel)
5) Edward Cullen & Bella Swann
(Twilight)
6) Fitzwilliam Darcy & Elizabeth Bennet
(Pride and Prejudice)
7) Fred and Wilma Flintstone
(The Flintstones)
8) Harry and Sally
(When Harry Met Sally)
9) Cinderella and Prince Charming
(Cinderella)
10) Catherine and Heathcliff
(Wuthering Heights)


Top 10 Real Life

Couples
1) President Barack & Michelle Obama
2)Anthony and Cleopatra
3)Wallis Simpson and The Duke of Windsor
4) Mary and Joseph
5)Prince Rainer and Grace Kelly
6)Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt
7) John Lennon and Yoko Ono
8)Napoleon Bonaparte and Josephine de
Beauharnais
9)Lauren Bacall and Humphrey Bougart
10)Ronald and Nancy Reagan a


Currently his exhibition
'Naked Truth' is open to the
public at the Central Bank
reflecting yet another aspect
of the artist's social con-
science and sense of respon-
sibility. The paintings are of
nude women, real women
not glamorised or airbrushed
and speak to the way some
segments of society view
them and abuse them. The
intention is to make the
viewer pause and reflect with


the hope that these depic-
tions will provoke positive
discussion and action to cor-
rect some of the ills in our
society. The sculptures, all
of blackened wood, are dark-
ly complementary to the
artist's viewpoint.
This artist continues in his
quest to educate and unite
the community in a positive
way with his thought-pro-
voking and sometimes chal-
lenging work.


I ODSUS STOIE ON THI 0AG 0LG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


TASTE I







7Th


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2010, PAGE 9B


Heart Ball Committee prepares for Saturday's ball


f you're ready to make a difference in a
child's life and preserve a heart, make sure
you attend the 46th Annual Heart Ball or
make a donation to The Sir Victor Sassoon
(Bahamas) Heart Foundation.


Each year many Bahamians
die and suffer from heart dis-
ease and related conditions.
Heart disease does not dis-
criminate against age, gender,
religion, race, or color. When
it affects one person in a fam-
ily, it directly and indirectly
affects all. Sadly, many peo-
ple can't afford the health care
they or their love ones need
when they discover that they
have a heart disease or condi-
tion. The Heart Ball Commit-
tee wishes to encourage the
Bahamian public to take pre-
ventative measures this Feb-
ruary (Heart Month) and
ensure they are heart healthy
and help to repair the heart of
a child.
This year's event will take
place at the Sheraton Hotel
on Saturday, February 13 at
7.15 pm under the theme -
"Give a gift of life - Preserve a
Heart." One of the highlights
of the evening will be the pre-
sentation of The Lady Sassoon
Golden Heart Award to an
individual nominated for pro-
moting human welfare and
dignity.
The Heart Foundation is a
non-profit organisation estab-
lished in 1961 by Lady Evelyn
Sassoon to assist persons in
need, with heart care. Today, it
primarily assists the children
of The Bahamas, who are
medically challenged, specifi-
cally those who are born with
heart defects. The Heart
Foundation gives support and
understanding to parents and
families, who need heart care,


whether in hospitals in The
Bahamas or in Florida. Addi-
tionally, The Heart Founda-
tion works along with The
Bahamas Heart Association
to educate and inform people
about heart care and heart
healthy lifestyles as a preven-
tive measure.
Since its inception, The
Heart Foundation has helped
over 4,000 patients obtain
heart care. Despite The Heart
Foundation's best efforts and
the increase in number of local
cardiologists and equipment,
there is still a need for funding
for persons who must travel
abroad for care.
The ball and the Annunal
Tea Party and Fashion Show
are the organisation's two
major fundrasing events. Oth-
er fundraising activities include
giving heart bracelets, and
benefit performances for a
donation. In addition, The
Heart Foundation accepts
gifts, memorial donations and
tax-deductible donations. No
amount is ever too small.
The Foundation runs pri-
marily on a voluntary and con-
tributory basis. Being a non-
profit organization, The Heart
Foundation relies heavily on
the generosity of others to
meet their goals and encour-
age the public and Corporate
Bahamas to lend their support,
especially in these tough eco-
nomic times.
For information on ticket
purchases or donations please
contact The Heart Foundation
at telephone number 327-0806.


PICTURED are Heart Ball Committee members. Seated: (L-R) Elsa Johnson-Mackenzie, Lady Sheila Butler (Co-chair), Ingrid Sears (PR),
Maria Symonette. Standing: (L-R) Rosemarie Thompson, Michelangiolo Baccelli, Alexandria Newbold (Co-chair), Portia Nottage (Co-Chair),
Nadia Campbell (Co-chair), Marilyn Cambridge, Claire Howorth, Inez Johnson, Coretta Owen, Linda Lafleur (Treasurer). Missing: Sue Rid-
ing, Rochelle Sealy, Charmaine Miller, Zelia Bethel, Barbara Sawyer, Marilyn Dean, Natasha Lightbourne, Marilyn Dean, Valerie Clarke.


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Fall in

love with

Emerald

Palms

See page eight


Aphrodisiacs -

Do they work?

See page seven


TJh


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2010


By JEFFARAH GIBSON

R OSES are beautiful, and choco-
lates are absolutely delicious, but
what makes the perfect Valentines t
Day gift- The beauty of an intricate
piece of artwork. That is the thought
the Grand Bahama Artist Association
wants art lovers to buy into as they
view the work displayed at the group's
(Iynnual Valentines Day exhibit.


Antonius


ANTONIUlS Robciis is ,oUc o
The Bahaimllail 1110 si ll'sijlndin''
AI IINI a'nd INs pi tl lmitn .ii SCullpt -ii
,aid Open Spacc Dcsignci. O(ci
the years he has gathered many
awards and accolades both here
and abroad, all well-deserved and
gained, not only through pure tal-
ent but hard work, dedication to
the process and the expression,
through his work, of his artistic
philosophy. The Post House Studio
& Gallery is his home base and
works are always in progress.
His ethic comprises several ele-
ments - conservation, preservation
and transformation of existing


I 'St uII C', and Ihl imptii anC1 L ii
Ipc'cl IIn' t11111 B h m1,111n 11ccIII la
\N II J N 10 '2 Jd\ ii00C�\ h10 [ d tlk'J-
tionl did coulllnunlCdation did the
relevance of artistic integrity.
In the forthcoming 2010 Trans-
forming Spaces exhibition, visitors
to the Post House Studio &
Gallery will see a selection of his
paintings as well as those of Max
Taylor on display. More of
Roberts' beautiful blackened wood
sculptures, tables and other pieces
will also be exhibited to dramatic
effect.
His public profile as a Curator
has given him prominence in both


Leslie Duncombe's art
EAT BEEF --


IlK puIliih and pii\' aI tChI ii | plj\ -
n1'2 I ''il1it111 1 It i L \\ t h IIKI11 CLI 11 -
I1'' and pi'tIICIhiJ ni' it il I lundM LI
III,. oitl.p l I. :P411h 1 Pj di.s N IN.I41d
Pi ih iiit hI t I i iiI B, t ld li I t I ii liI-
[Iiil. |Il,\1n'1' 2 IC,1j_.d' ii,_,11cIII llc
i.,"loial h l 1 1 Ilh., \ lllj D ,l\I,_
\\11 i Nih il n i llt h ii i ilc 1 Tlhe
Niliinal .Aii (- illlc \ ol The
('liiiih i oilThe 1 1 ('c ill ll B ltlk A ni
(aillli\ Hi% iihl ci tcdits incliidc
being the former coordinator for
the highly successful Finco Sum-
mer Art programme as well as
mentoring and teaching innumer-
able students at various schools,
the College of The Bahamas and
the Lyford Cay International
School.
The conservationist is demon-
strated in his sculptures and his
furniture pieces. Whether carved
in situ or done in his studio they are
all made from reclaimed or dis-
carded wood or stone. His first


!Fhe show which is an emotionally stimu-
a citing experience encompasses a diverse dis-
play -including oil on canvas paintings, water
coloured paintings, handmade paper col-
lages, sculptures and even some functional art
pieces like jewelry designs.
The exhibit kicked off last Thursday
attracting fine art enthusiast around the com-
munity and new inquisitive art lovers.
The art and crafts on display were so well
received by the attendees that several of the
pieces were sold on spot to both local busi-
ness for their offices and residents for their
homes.
The pieces currently showcased are either
paintings of the sun and sand, or works of art
that portray a realistic depiction of the world
in which we live.
However, the exhibition is not only limit-
ed to those island images. There are also
expressionistic pieces of the mind, heart, and
soul.
And by using vibrant colour palettes the
artists hope their ideas, thoughts, and beliefs
are not only communicated effectively but
also invite meaningful reflection.
"The artists who took part in the exhibition
n^, this year took the local historical sites, and
the local scenes and transferred all of those
experiences onto their mediums. They also
used their own discretion, and worked on
whatever they felt," Del Foxton spokesper-
son and member of the Grand Bahama Artist
Association said in an interview with Tri-
bune Arts.
There are approximately 75 pieces on dis-
play at the Glory Banks Art Gallery in the
Rand Nature Centre in Grand Bahama.
"If you love art come out and support the
show. If you never had a interest in art still
come out and see what is on display, you
mav never know a passion might spark the
k,,,iniiik you take a look at a painting or a
1.,11 % ork," she said.
Ms, Foxton said those interested in pur-
. . ' ...y a piece should allow that same free
"" 'l 1o flourish leaving you with the open-
n.. i>, select a piece of art or craft that
,I ,k, to you.
1i ig ,inal art is a very good gift because
Ili i' i something that a person can have for-
c i 1 However if you want to purchase the
,li ." k for yourself purchase one that
. some sort of emotion.
I- I i -*_wJ ,1i ng about artwork is that
hI, i ,i i f ..< ,,,i hang it or put it you will
l 'I,. .i .. il 11' every time you look at
iI - . said.a
I ' int to en urage persons to come out
ii. I i.ILL i he said.
. q i. G lb '1 ik. art gallery at the Rand
ii.. ( .' i is open Monday to Friday
.,' '.. M "'s An artist will always be pre-
o L, ih.f her (or f
GranBah Artist Association is a
group of .1it1L as well as full time pro-
fessional artists who aim to attract persons
with an inclination in various art forms as
well as harness their skills. The group is com-
prised of art teachers, professional artists,
local artists and international artists.
The Grand Bahama Artist Association
* membership also includes art teachers who
* provide art classes in a variety of mediums.
The exhibition runs for the entire month of
February. For more information contact Del
* Fo\Ion ii


1\Ct11111 nll i2 i i Chid lll'n iIn lid
\\ aB al Ci hu iii Ca c\ \\ h cli Ill N
ittl. iaiialit l 1Thil SaCiLd i
ii lln'yl. i.Cn l d itill b ii c'\c I u- t
Il1t 11-'t1ii lund (C '. iU.I:i li ',.".".
Bahamian \Iiican htiila''t. hi,,






display at The National Art
Gallery.
By invitation in 2006, he trav-
eled to China and created a 12 foot
Bronze sculpture named 'Rebirth'
as a permanent installation in the
Art Park in Changchun. Much
of his work, in wood, bronze and
stone is now in private collections


SEE page eight


Yr



r




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