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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01504
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: February 9, 2010
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01504

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Police make arrest after passing motorist rescues woman


By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net
A PASSING motorist
saved a woman from being
badly injured, and possibly
killed, by holding her cutlass-
wielding attacker at gunpoint.
The hero driver stopped to
rescue the woman after her
screams for help were ignored
by passers-by.
It is reported he pulled out
a licensed firearm and
ordered the man to stop his
vicious attack.
He then kept him at gun-
point until the police arrived.
The incident happened as
the woman, who has not been
named, was walking behind
Marathon Mall, near Claridge
Road, sometime on Sunday.


It was the second such
attack on that day.
Earlier a 68-year-old man
was left with a 12cm cut to his
head and lacerations on his
right hand after being set
upon as he walked along Mini
Street.
Last night, officers at Wulff
Road police station were
questioning a man about the
attacks and three other simi-
lar incidents in the north east-
ern division.
A police spokesman said:
"It is a very unusual incident,
for a man to walk up on
someone and chap them up
for no apparent reason."
The two victims are being
treated at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital (PMH) after
SEE page 15


Betty Kelly Kenning
dies at the age of 85
By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net


A A


PHILANTHROPIST and former long-
time president of the Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety Betty Kelly Kenning died on Saturday,
aged 85.
Mrs Kenning, who is survived by her hus-
band John Kenning, was remembered yes-
terday by her family and friends as a very


I





By ALISON LOWE make this country their des-
Tribune Staff Reporter tination in the face of com-
alowe@tribunemedia.net plaints from gay rights
activists that gay rights
ORGANISERS of a gay groups should not bring
cruise to the Bahamas have
In defended their decision to SEE page 11

Airport authorities
T deny claims that
ham a cd security department
n is being isolated
o By NOELLE NICOLLS
S c y Tribune Staff Reporter
* *. 0 - 6 nnicolls@tribunemedia.net


AIRPORT AUTHORITIES are deny-
ing claims from employees that one securi-
ty department is being isolated, in light of a
series of public complaints about the prac-
tices of management.
At least one supervisor and other employ-
ees at the Lynden Pindling International
Airport reported they received directives
from senior management in the security
division not to associate with employees
from the Computed Tomography X Ray
(CTX) department, which handles baggage
screening for United States departures.
"I was cautioned by my superior officer
not to speak to anybody, she specifically
mentioned the CTX department. This is
the type of police based mentality they use
to divide and conquer; they use to intimi-
date the staff. It needs to be made a big
deal because we are being treated like a
military function, which we are not," said
one supervisor, who claimed management is
SEE page 11





By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
THE government's decision to repa-
triate a group of Haitian migrants found
onboard a boat in Bahamian waters has
been called into question by a former
Immigration minister and a human rights
activist.
Former Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson said the revelation that the gov-
ernment plans to escort the migrants
directly from their vessel in Exuma back
to Haiti begs the question of why the
government is not repatriating all Haitian
migrants, including those who reach
Bahamian soil.
Meanwhile, Erin Greene, a human
SEE page 10


Former PLP official to 'drop
political bombshell' at FNM rally


By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
FORMER PLP campaign general Ezra
Russell is scheduled to drop a political
bombshell at the FNM's rally in Elizabeth
on Thursday night, The Tribune was told.


Speaking with this newspaper yesterday,
the former campaign general for the PLP's
deputy Leader Philip "Brave" Davis said he
will address the voters in that constituency
to highlight only that the upcoming election
in Elizabeth should be based on the issues
SEE page 15


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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


There are too many


people here in Haiti


By SHAUN INGRAHAM
TODAY I drove through
the downtown area of the city
for the fist time along with
fellow Rotarian George Nico-
las (I now call him St Nic after
all of his distribution efforts).
I was on the phone with fel-


low Rotarian Dick McCombe
who was back in Nassau try-
ing to co-ordinate the arrival
of another flight of medicine
and other logistical support.
I mentioned to Dick that the
best way that I could describe
it was like a bomb had been
dropped in the centre of town.
Building after building had
either partially or totally col-
lapsed. The most striking of
all was the palace, the central
nerve of the government and
the symbol of prosperity and
stability.
The government has aban-
doned the city centre for obvi-
ous reasons and the internal-
ly displaced people now occu-
py the side walks, park areas,
and even the rooftops. Tents
and tarps were everywhere.
Hanging on the security rails
were the laundry of the new
inhabitants of the city streets.
As we passed the new living
quarters of the displaced, we
looked into the eyes and faces
of the people. It was hard to
read their thoughts but their
actions suggested that it was
business as usual. No matter
what happened on the other
side of the palace fence, the
people know that for the most
part, they have to pretty much
make life happen themselves.
They bought out their daily
goods that they had for sale,
in some cases you could even
get the latest in aid rations at
a great price. A staff member
of an one aid organisation,
after seeing one of their kits


for sale, joked and said they
could buy the disaster kit
cheaper on the street then
they had bought them from
the manufacturer.
Some of the newly dis-
placed were repositioning or
strengthening their tents. A
common scene in and around
the camps is persons either
clothed or partially nude
washing from a broken tap or
a barrel of water. There seems
to be a deliberate attempt to
stay clean. The lack of privacy
makes it difficult for one to
take photos or be fully
engaged with the local com-
munity. The occasional child
begging for food or water
from afar or running behind
our vehicle was heart wrench-
SEE page eight


701 U


TENTS on the rooftop of a
building in Port-au-Prince,
Haiti.


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A dvt..................................................... P 16
BUSINESSWOMAN SECTION
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C om ics................................................... P8
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THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2010, PAGE 5


LOCALN


Student one of two



knife attack victims


A HIGH school student was one of two people
stabbed in separate knife attacks yesterday.
At around 2.30pm, police were called to the
CR Walker High School on Baillou Hill Road
after an altercation between two students led to
one of them being stabbed.
The victim was taken to the Princess Margaret
Hospital by paramedics where he is listed in seri-
ous but stable condition.
Officers are questioning another student in
connection with the matter.
Earlier, at around 9.30am, officers were called
to the corner of Wulff Road and Market Street
were witnesses said a man had been stabbed sev-


eral times.
Man arraigned on
murder charge
By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
A MAN charged in the mur-
der of a woman earlier this
month was arraigned in the
Magistrate's Court yesterday.
Junior John Pierre Sawyer,
33, of Jackson Street, Nassau
Village, was arraigned in Court
8, Bank Lane, yesterday before
Magistrate Carolita Bethell.
It is alleged that the accused,
who is also known by the alias-
es Sean Sawyer and John
Sawyer Jr, caused the death of
Prestina Fernander on Wednes-
day, February 3. Sawyer, who
was not represented by an
attorney, was not required to
enter a plea to the murder
charge.
According to initial reports,
Ms Fernander was stabbed in
her stomach and side by a man
who had trespassed on her
home in Mahogany Street,
Pinewood Gardens, at around
11pm on Wednesday February
3. Ms Fernander, 22, was taken
to hospital but died later that
night, becoming the country's
eighth homicide victim for the
year. Sawyer was ordered to be
remanded to Her Majesty's
Prison. A preliminary inquiry
will be held to determine
whether there is sufficient evi-
dence against him for him to
stand trial in the Supreme
Court.
The case has been adjourned
to February 12 when Sawyer is
expected to appear in Court 10,
Nassau Street. A date is expect-
ed to be set for a preliminary
inquiry.


The victim, a resident of Charles Vincent
Street, was said to have been attacked by a man
who he knows. Last night, he was listed in serious
condition at the Princess Margaret Hospital.
Police also reported a traffic fatality which
took place at around 1.40am yesterday.
A Grey 2000 Honda Civic was reportedly
heading east on Carmichael road when it collid-
ed with a blue 1997 Ford F150 truck travelling in
the opposite direction near the Meat Max store.
Both vehicles suffered extensive damage and
the driver of the Honda Civic was seriously
injured. He was transported to the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital where he later died of his injuries.
Police are investigating the incident.


By DENISE MAYCOCK ,
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - Although Grand Bahama
Port Authority executives say former chair-
man Hannes Babak is not working on the
island for the company, he still has access to
a company vehicle designated for the chair-
man.
Mr Babak's work permit application has
not been renewed by the government. To
date, no chairman has been appointed to HANNES BABAK
replace him since his permit expired last
year. In December, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said that
Mr Babak's permit to work with the Port Authority would not
be renewed. On Friday, Port president Ian Rolle said the com-
pany had not received anything in writing from the govern-
ment regarding the status of Mr Babak's application.
Even though Mr Rolle made it clear that the former chairman
is not working inside the Port Building or on the island for the
company, Mr Babak has been seen on several occasions driving
around Freeport in a vehicle with the Port's emblem on it.
The Tribune tried several times to contact Mr Rolle in an
attempt to clarify whether Mr Babak is still allowed to drive a
company vehicle, however the calls were not returned.
Mr Babak, a native of Austria, is an investor in Freeport. He
owns shares in the Freeport Home Centre and Freeport Con-
crete, and has been granted permanent residence in the
Bahamas. An article in The Freeport News quoted Mr Babak as
saying he hopes the prime minister will reconsider his decision.
The investor claimed he was told that once he met certain con-
ditions, his work permit would be renewed.
While on Grand Bahama last week, Bahamas Democratic
Movement leader Cassius Stuart mentioned the story, adding:
"Mr Babak has said that he had certain conditions to meet and
that he met those conditions. The question we have in the
BDM is, What are those conditions and are these conditions uni-
versal for all investors? The prime minister said he will not
renew Babak's work permit, but he did not make it clear as to
why. We are not big fans of Mr Babak, but you have to spell out
the conditions and the nation needs to know what conditions he
had to meet. Should every investor feel that the prime minister
can wake up any day and revoke their licences, or not renew
their work permit?"


Celebration Cruise Line no longer to stop in Nassau


By ALESHA CADET
THE management of the
Celebration Cruise Line has
announced that beginning
March 15, the itinerary of the
Bahamas Celebration is trans-
ferring exclusively to Grand
Bahama Island.



T :ilICL


The final cruise into Nassau
will be March 12, departing the
following day.
Celebration Cruise Line
started in March of 2009 and
has been sailing, particularly to
the Bahamas, three times a
week. It was very popular due
to its 10-baggage pieces per
cabin policy.
The cruise line hastily point-
ed out that the decision was in
no way reflective of any nega-
tive experience had in Nassau
and Paradise Island.
Charles Kinnear, president
of the cruise line, said: "Our
management team is very grate-
ful for all the support shown to
us by the people of Nassau,


both as passengers and busi-
ness partners."
"Feedback from our passen-
gers has always been very pos-
itive about the Nassau and Par-
adise Island experience," Mr
Kinnear said.
According to Mr Kinnear,
the Bahamas Celebration will
be offering two night cruises
from the Port of Palm Beach, in
addition to four and six night
cruise and hotel stay packages.
"This should provide a much
needed boost to the island's
economy as well as accessing
new markets for Grand
Bahama.
Mr Kinnear added: "Our
ship is designed to carry both
passengers and cargo, not only
will we be providing Grand
Bahama Island with 3,500 to
4,000 passengers a week, but
also a steady means of trans-
porting goods between Florida
and the island."
Tourism Director-General of
Vernice Walkine said: "We
applaud Celebration Cruise
Lines for their initiative in
opening a new port to Grand
Bahama for the popular short
cruise as well as cruise-and-stay
over options which represent
unique opportunities for Grand
Bahama due its proximity to
South Florida."
Ms Walkine added that she
was confident there would be a
boost in stopover passengers to
Grand Bahama.


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Florence Lockhart, 85

f of Johnson Road died
at the Princess
Margaret Hospital on
' X Saturday February
6th, 2010.

She is survived by her
children, Gene and
Roy-Ann Albury,
Phyllis and Peter Garaway, Louie Theresa
"Baby Lou" and Dwayne Pepper, Cherry
and Garvin Upton,, Nettie Peakes, Debby
Isaacs, Louie Isaacs Jr, James Isaacs, Van
Isaacs, Eunice and Donald Mortimer;
sisters, Patricia Wilcox and Carolyn
Lockhart; brothers, James and Cecil
Lockhart; numerous grandchildren,
great grandchildren, nieces and
nephews and a host of other relatives and
friends.

Funeral arrangements will be
announced at a later date.


..a







+>


PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


Lady Ingrid Darling .



honoured at the 38th



annual Red Cross Ball I


LADY Ingrid Darling was hon-
oured at the 38th Annual Red
Cross Ball. She received her
Lalique vase that is mounted
on mahogany from Brendon
Watson, president of the
Bahamas Red Cross, and at
right is Lady Rowena Finlayson,
ball committee chair.
* Photos: Azaleta Ishmael-Newry


LADY Ingrid Darling with dignitaries and Red Cross officials. (1-r) Brendon Watson, president of Bahamas
Red Cross; Nicole Avant, US Ambassador to the Bahamas; Governor General Arthur Hanna, Lady Rowe-
na Finlayson, Red Cross Ball committee chair; Caroline Turnquest, deputy director of the Bahamas Red
Cross.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

AYMYRA VISTAS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

WORTHING PARK INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


KATMAI INDUSTRIES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


JUGGLESTRASE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


FRIENDS, family and well-
wishers came together last
month to celebrate Lady Ingrid
Darling being honoured at the
38th Annual Red Cross Ball.
"I will always have the Red
Cross at heart," said Lady Dar-
ling, who was honoured for her
contributions to the Bahamas
Red Cross Society on January
30. "When Lady Darling joined
the Red Cross in her year as
president we had a $77,000
deficit and her goal was to
make sure that it was behind
us, and with a strong team and
good volunteers, she succeed-
ed," explained Beverly Wal-
lace-Whitfield, past president.
Marina Glinton, retired
director general who also
worked with Lady Darling,
attributed this achievement to
"Lady Darling's team con-
sist(ing) of people whom she
could pull the best from."
The Red Cross Ball was held
at the Wyndham Nassau Beach
Resort and Crystal Palace Casi-
no in an elegantly decorated
ballroom where almost all of


the tables were occupied and
support for the Haiti Relief Ini-
tiative was paramount.
The entertainment was top
notch and included the Lou
Adams Band and Visage.
The internationally
acclaimed Chi-Lites group was
the highlight of the evening and
lead vocalist Marshall Thomp-
son announced that he was cel-
ebrating his 50th year with the
group. They sang their famous
song, "Have you seen her," to a
joyous crowd, and the audience
participated on stage with a few
numbers as well.
During the evening, Lady


Legal Notice
NOTICE

PALANA TARRAN CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


GUCHINNE LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


RIVERS OF TREASURES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Finlayson, chairperson of the
ball committee, and Brendon
Watson, president of the
Bahamas Red Cross, present-
ed Lady Darling with a Lalique
vase as a token of appreciation
for her work with the Red
Cross. "You are a person who
has done so much for the Red
Cross Society and the Red
Cross Ball. The committee felt
that you should be honoured
for your work and we thank
you for your humanitarian
efforts and for giving so much
to society," said Lady Fin-
layson.
In response, Lady Darling


thanked those who assisted her,
including Dame Marguerite
Pindling, past fundraising chair-
man, Lady Rowena Finlayson,
deputy fair committee chair-
man, past presidents Rev C B
Moss, Pauline Allen-Dean and
Beverly Wallace- Whitfield as
well as Marina Glinton, retired
director general, and Dorothy
King, retired deputy director
general.
Lady Darling's personal
highlight of the evening was
having her immediate family
who flew in from many parts
of the United States celebrate
with her. They included her
three sons, George, Philip and
Timothy Collier, their wives
and children, as well as her
brother Jonathan Smith.
Her husband Sir Clifford
Darling was unable to attend.
However, members of his fam-
ily were on hand to support
Lady Darling. The Bahamas
Red Cross welcomes donations
for Haiti. They help prepare
communities for emergencies
and also assist those in need.


Legal Notice
NOTICE
SEVENTEEN-SEVENTEEN LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

ARTESIA WELLS CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


NOIRMONT LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O







+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2010, PAGE 7


Bahamas maintains share of tourist market


BY BAHAMAS
INFORMATION SERVICES
THE Bahamas maintained
its share of the tourist market,
bringing in a record 3.5 million
cruise visitors and increasing
airlift by almost 400,000 seats
in 2009, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said Thursday.
The Prime Minister said in
his New Year's Address to the
Nation that the Government is
focused on making the islands
of The Bahamas more accessi-
ble, affordable and convenient.
"We have been able to main-
tain our market share, main-
tain our room rates and grow
certain segments of our busi-
ness," Prime Minister Ingraham
said.
"We have more cruise ships
visiting our shores than ever
before, bringing in last year
more than 3.5 million visitors.


There have been double-digit
increases in cruise passenger
delivery each month during
2009 to New Providence, Grand
Bahama and the Family
Islands," he added.
The Prime Minister said the
month of December was par-
ticularly exciting when The
Bahamas welcomed the newest
addition of the Royal
Caribbean fleet of ships, the
first in the Genesis class, the
Oasis of the Seas.
He also said that the three
major cruise lines that operate
private beach experiences in
The Bahamas have undertak-
en significant upgrade and in
some instances, expansion of
their Bahamian facilities in the
Berry Islands, Abaco and
Eleuthera.
"We now have more air ser-
vice than ever before; new and
expanded service from the


United States and Canada
resulted in an increase of
almost 400,000 seats," the
Prime Minister said.
He said the opening of the
new luxury 183-room Sandals
resort at Ocean Bight has cre-
ated employment for some 300
Bahamians and is expected to
stabilise Exuma's economy this
year.

Refurbishment
"The acquisition, refurbish-
ment and reopening of the
small boutique Tiamo Resort
in Andros, the opening of the
upscale Delphi Club in South
Abaco, and the scheduled April
opening of the new S&T Beach
Club in San Salvador reflect a
growing trend internationally
of the development of exclu-
sive specialty boutique resorts


Pppppan uthepti


MINISTER .:.I Si :l , L: Lind ,rid L:.,::iI ,:-,...irii.ri y By ir
Woodside presents North Andros and the Berry Islands
Administrator Huntley Christie with a laptop on January 29.



Sandals Royal Bahamian
Resort @ Offshore Island


invites applications for the position of:





Sandals seek to identify a results-oriented
and strategic thinker, who is passionate
about Service.

The applicants should meet the following
minimum requirements:

* Methodical, standards driven individual
* Excellent Guest Service skills
* Previous experience of dealing with
luxury motor vehicles will be an
advantage

Applications should be email to
cmajor@grp.sandals.com

Application close February 26th.2010.


THE disaster that occurred
as a result of an earthquake in
Haiti on January 12 should
serve as a lesson to Bahamians,
said Minister of Lands and
Local Government Byran
Woodside.
There must be plans to mit-
igate against any disaster that
might befall the country, he
added during a town meeting
in the Central Andros District
on Friday, January 29.
"This means that the time is
now to examine our disaster
preparedness plans, to organ-
ise our committees and be
ready for any eventuality," Mr
Woodside said.

Legislation
"Additionally, I invite the
local town planning committee,
district council and administra-
tor to become familiar with the
newly passed town planning
legislation so that building are
properly built and newly devel-
oped communities are planned
to ensure that services such as
water, telephone, electricity,
and properly paved access
roads are provided."
He urged town planning
committees to take their charge
to develop orderly communi-
ties seriously and to ensure that
setbacks and zoning laws are
enforced.


which are proving to be less
susceptible to the ups and
downs of the world economy,"
the Prime Minister said.
He said the viability of these
small resorts is being demon-
strated by the success of other
small bed-and-breakfast resorts
around the Family Islands.
"Many of them used the tra-
ditional summer lull last year
to access concessions under the
Hotels Encouragement Act for
a host of refurbishment and
enhancement projects," Prime
Minister Ingraham said.
He said some 862 construc-
tion workers are now engaged
in the construction at the multi-
million dollar luxury golf and
marina resort, Albany, in south-
western New Providence.
Another 71 Bahamians, he
said, are engaged by the Albany
Development Company, bring-
ing the total number of


MINISTER ,:,.I i:- h, L:i L nd, rind
L:.: :iI i:-. rini .ri i B',i r VV .:..:.d-
s.idE Ii"nri"' .nrilijl. Aridii,,
Adlmiriin l i:, l Hi ,lo, i.ini : hi li
villh a laptop. The laptop vias ori6
of several given to the Bahamas
government during the high-level
visit of Wu Bangguo, Chairman
of the Standing Committee of the
National People's Congress of
the People's Republic of China.
"The development of Cen-
tral Andros to a large extent
depends on how you fulfil these
responsibilities," he said. Mr
Woodside also said he was
aware that consideration of
Crown Land applications is a
sore point in Andros and the
entire Bahamas. "Persons
should be reminded, however,
that the construction of build-
ings on Crown Land without
approval is illegal and must not
be allowed to happen."
"We in the Office of the
Prime Minister are committed
to processing applications in a
timely fashion and not with-
standing the challenges we
intend to improve our response
time so as to do our part in
orderly community develop-
ment," he said.


Bahamians engaged at the
Albany project to some 943
individuals. The Prime Minis-
ter noted that the $75 million
first phase of the Caves Heights
condominium development on
West Bay Street and Blake


Road is nearing completion.
"It is projected that as many
as 200 construction jobs will be
created during the $25 million
Phase II construction of the
upscale Caves which is now get-
ting underway," he added.


ANNUAL BAR & RAFFLE


Cultural & Heritage Site, Arawak Cay


Saturday, February 13th, 2010


12NOON - UNTIM


,CANDY LAN
* PASTRIES



HOOPLA



BOUNCIIW,.CASTLE
-MUMC

-FACE PANTING
JERKPff
DOWN HOME C000
-GANIE TRAILER
.. BARGAINN MARTL


JOB VACANCY





CATV-ADEND CONSULTANT_
Cable Baharnas Lid, operating one of the rviost advainced broadban~d netwoirks,
5eek5 dIhe services of a topi-notch prafe~sionaI. The ideal candidate will have
extensi e xperience in the receptirin and distr~ibuion of off-air, satellite anbd
We-originated prograrnmirwgi tip the outside plant utilizingj riweir optic
t~rainsliicn tech nolog 'e5.

WNEERSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
" Ernglneer, design and uipqrade exist ng and new head-ends and hubs.
" Evaluation and procuremenet of headerid equipment options based aon
sound judgment of perfornianc quality and costofsinw.
" Support the deveolovmrinet arK1 deployment of high capacity and Metro
SONIET firvices, sub~ysemi and Ekevicei.

ON AND MAINTENANCE OF:
" All headiirid %ignal-procesin equipmentMfrar nalog and diqiral vki-o
" Highi-speed d~c ntworeWUk Compornents ad rixuhliloring equipment also
ah11nas, di shetowers and m~icrowave equipment.
" Fibher optic path cabling and rrainac)enent systems
" Assistwith planning and Implewrntation of nmw produci introd~uctions
" Coord iriite completion -of project-s an 5ched~i~e abd on budget
" Prepare, submit and manage departmental budget
" Plan and insure heaclendfhub preventative mnalntenarce prog rams

616�;�M QUALIAUCATIONS:
A University degree in ElectdcalI'Ellectroni( Er~lmeeIrg or equivalent with at
lea~t 10-115 years of experience in Headend OperafIMr5 and eNgineefiNg, of
which frve 151 years, should be as an intemational consuftant.
Cable Bahamas Ltd owns arnd operates one of the wod's.d most idyanCid
2rimdbairvJ rwtww~ksand piv~idus odd-cIasstelevision service and high-speed
internment acce55 servtices througi'lo4t The B~aharma The company own5 and
DperartEs a private submarine. fiber-Wfic system connecting the Baiwanas an~d
Florida. Cable Bahaimas ordinary shares trade on The 2Biharnas International
Stock Exchange (symnbol; CAB). A~d~onaI informaia~on w~ be obtahw~d from the
compa~nys website at www~cabkbehamwA.com.


FR'sunes are to be s
Reso~rCeS -OFsent ele


C"bbahMMLMhF


sutx-nitted by' February 13, 2010 W tode Director of Human
4emtonial Iy to bded@@cwblbWhmas~carn


I
W


I ODSCUSSSTORES O THS PGELO N O WWTIBUE22CO


K


AilEi- LNJ INSURAN E


Insurance Management (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau is seeking
young professionals interested in developing a career in insurance.

The position is diverse and interesting and will involve
dealing with customers.

Previous experience is not necessary.
We are seeking individuals who have:-

* obtained a minimum of 5 BGCSE's (including Math and
English at Grade C or above)

* excellent organisational, team working and
interpersonal skills

* a positive attitude and willingness to learn

* strong oral and written communication skills

Successful candidates will be afforded the opportunity to study for
the examinations of the Chartered Insurance Institute and should
be prepared to obtain the Certificate of Insurance qualification
(at a minimum) within a reasonable time frame.

Interested persons should send their resumes to:-



l UMWilE -mMs t (M(Ban) Limite
P.AI. 884
W elllT PT







+>


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


affected area has slept in
their houses, as they are
afraid that another quake
might happen and their fate
might be the same as the
250,000 estimated to have
died. So, Port au Prince has
become almost a totally out-
door population. Tent cities
have been set up on roof
tops, in the middle of the
streets, next to dumps and
even in front of the palace.
It should be noted howev-


Invites applications for the
following positions:


* COOKS


* ROOM ATTENDANTS


The applicants should have experience in
the areas application.

Send applications to
sebhr@grp.sandals.com



Legal Notice
NOTICE


ALCADIANE ENTERPRISE LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

KARBALA LIMITED



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of KARBALA LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


PICAZZOES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


FROM page two

ing. We know there is not a
lack of food in Haiti as the
food stores have reopened.
We do know that there is a
distribution problem.
As night began to fall and
we began to leave the city,
we realized that people were
beginning to line the streets
with their bedding. Since the
earthquake, no one in the


Legal Notice
NOTICE

WHISTLEBLOWN INC.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of WHISTLEBLOWN INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


BISON FUTE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


TARANAKI ENTERPRISE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
BIGHORNE VALLEY INC.


-"-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of BIGHORNE VALLEY
INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


PANSAT LITE CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


LEAF-MOTIF CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


SThere are too many people here in Haiti


er, not every tent is the
same.
A few of my friends have
asked me how this disaster is
any different from the oth-
ers that I have been involved
in. After reflecting on this
over the past few days I am
now ready to attempt to
answer this question.
My first reaction is "dif-
ferent script same cast".
When I arrived in Haiti I
was less optimistic about it
recovering to a brighter day
than I had been arriving in
any other country. The
streets were swarming with
people, garbage and vehi-
cles of international non-
governmental organizations
(NGOs). Most of them have
been here for years and oth-
ers have just arrived. One
Haitian journalist on a radio
station stated that all they
do is hang out at local clubs
and drink. Another col-
league pointed out when I
complained about spending
half my day in traffic,
"There are too many peo-
ple here". Although I did-
n't ask her what she meant
by this statement, what I
think she meant was that
there are too many outsiders
coming to tell the Haitian
people what they must do.
Another Haitian col-
league and friend pointed
out that in the rest of the
world, it is estimated that 20
per cent of aid goes to
administration, while in
Haiti, this figure is estimated
at 80 per cent. This means

SEE page nine







+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2010, PAGE 9


ISOALNW


FROM page eight

that only 20 per cent of all
aid actually reaches the
point of greatest need. This
might explain why in the
land of so many NGOs, it
seems like little progress is
being made.
The apparent lack of nat-
ural resources increases my
doubt of a brighter day.
Banda Aceh had oil, South
Africa had diamonds and
Grenada has sunny beach-
es and great harbours. There
are no multinational com-
panies pushing their way
into Haiti. In fact the trend
tends to be the opposite in
the last few years. They
seem to want to get out.
There is also the issue of a
government that has very lit-
tle to offer its people at this
time. The president has
complained on the radio
that most of the aid is going
to aid groups. Therefore,
leaving the government with
very little funds to operate.
When I left Indonesia
after the tsunami and
Grenada after Hurricane
Ivan, I left knowing that
things would get better. I did
have doubts about South
Africa, which I was almost
sure would have erupted
into civil war just before the
elections. But in each of
these situations, the right
leader or economic oppor-
tunity or shift in the nation-
al consciousness or even a
well planned civil sector,
helped bring about a more
sustainable economy. None


rn~ -. *


OUTSIDE THE WALLS of the palace in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Damage to the palace from the Janu-
ary 12 earthquake can be seen at the top left of the picture.


of these are readily evident
in Haiti. There are however
some very dim flickers of
hope. I came into contact
with a few of them, and I
will share their story in my
future writings. A little
investment in certain pro-
jects can go a long way.
The truth is, like my col-
league said, the problem
might be there are just too
many people in Haiti. Like a
good missiologist friend of
mine used to say, "We have
to make sure our help is
helpful".


Legal Notice
NOTICE


NUMBER ONE FOREST LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


MONETTE OCEAN CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

MAGNA ARROW LTD.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of MAGNA ARROW LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


* Shaun Ingraham is an international disaster response con-
sultant who trained with the United Nation Civilian Military
Co-ordination (UNCMCoord) programme. He has worked
with international logistics teams responding to most of the
major disasters that occurred over the last 15 years, including
hurricanes Andrew, Ivan, Frances, Jeanne, Katrina and Rita.
Mr Ingraham was in Indonesia following the Tsunami in
North Sumatra working with the New Providence Community
Church and Food For the Hungry International. He is the
president of the Rotary Club of Eleuthera and founder of
South Eleuthera Emergency Partners. In partnership with the
Rotary Clubs of the Bahamas, Rotary District 7020, New
Providence Community Church/Centre and Habitat for
Humanity, he is currently in Haiti making sure aid and sup-
plies are distributed to those most in need. Mr Ingraham has
agreed to update our readers regularly on the progress of his
mission and share his -l,, .-o. 1n' and impressions of the cata-
strophe in Haiti.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

MEGA WORLD INC.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of MEGA WORLD INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

MARIAS S.A.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of MARIUS S.A. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
TENWICH SLOPES INC.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of TENWICH SLOPES INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


ITDISCUS TOIESONTHS PGELO0ONTOWW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


Act 2000, the dissolution of NUVILLY HOLDINGS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


KRINSHAW SLOPES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

ANDA-SING VALLEY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


ELFIN VALLEY INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


CATALPA VISTA S.A.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

NUVILLY HOLDINGS LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies







+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2010, PAGE 9B


WOMAN


Spice up your love




this Valentine's


and beyond


By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net


WITH Valentine's Day fast
approaching, Tribune
Health spoke with our
relationship columnist Maggie
Bain to discuss how couples can
ensure that their relationships stay
healthy and happy.

1. Remember that love is in the longing --
Mrs Bain says both men and women crave
more passion in their relationships. "You
get more passion by deepening the intimacy,
not necessarily sexual intimacy, but by deep-
ening the relational aspect." Asking your
partner intimate questions can deepen your
relationship and give you a greater sense of
connection. Many relationships stay on the
surface of life and talk about the dishes,
trash, and bills without ever sharing the heart
and soul of their lives.

2. Increase the honesty and intimacy -- By
saying, "I can imagine how you feel," you
empathise with the other person. Mrs Bain
said, "put yourself in the other person's
shoes." Then you are really feeling for your
partner. "We can all relate stories to each
other but it's your partner that can really
relate and feel what you are feeling. You will
feel more connected because that person
really understands you," she said.

3. Increase the spontaneity -- You can still
have spontaneity by planning date nights.
People say you should understand your part-
ner's fantasies, what they dream about,
where they see you fulfilling some dream of
theirs, she said.
"Take note of the little things they like.
Littering the bed with rose petals may not be
your partner's fetish, make sure you get it
right. Change up the routine from time to
time.
It's the thought of that anticipation of see-
ing them that makes it all worth it. If there's
an activity that one of you would like to do,
finding some compromise is the best way to
make it all worth it.
"Your lover may feel more comfortable
communicating with them indirectly on a
phone call, or through a text message."

4. Good girl, or Naughty girl? -- Play on
the fact that most men like the idea that
their partner can be the element of good girl
or naughty girl. It's important to establish
how you would foster a healthy sex life
behind closed doors.
For some, this may put them off. But it's
balancing what feels safe to your partner.
"Taking risks and adding something new,
and bringing something new to the bedroom
is all important for both partners to keep in
mind," says Mrs Bain. "So take it up a


notch."

5. Date Nights --You don't always have
to be the only person deciding the details
of your date nights. Mrs Bain suggest that
you keep it as a surprise for each other. It's
that "element of surprise"--finding out
where the date will be which is all too
important.
Establish early on where your
date is going to be, what you will
eat and drink, and what you will
do. You must make each other a
priority for the night. Sex is a
major priority in the relation-
ship. "Sex is the glue that keeps
couples together," says Mrs
Bain. "The more you do it, the
more you want it," she said.
"You must stimulate each oth-
er's sex hormones over and over
again."

6. Men and women respond well
to being appreciated -- That goes
such a long way for people to feel that
they are wanted, needed and appreci-
ated, she said. The famous telling some-
one "I love you," is all too important.
Mrs Bain explained that this is a
common complaint when people are
single at Christmastime. If you don't
have a partner to spend time with,
depression could come on, as society
has put tremendous weight on hav-
ing a love relationship. Compare
Valentine's to how you would cele-
brate Christmastime and New
Year's. You can share a love rela-
tionship with family and friends in
your life.
The obvious question in all this is
whether you hold February 14 as
very important, says Mrs Bain. "If
you're single, getting worked up
unnecessarily about Valentine's will
cause you to lose sight of the big
picture. Don't let Valentine's Day
highlight the deficit in your love
life. You should see it as an
opportunity to go out and cele-
brate the day with others."
"Don't bring negativity on
yourself," said Mrs Bain. "It's
your attitude toward singleness
that makes Valentine's Day bear-
able. If you find yourself in the
dumps, you can turn it around,
and realize that even though you
don't have someone to share
with, you can still feel good."
When we do meet the right
person we've got to feel confi-
dent and self assured that we
accept ourselves as who we are.
"It's how you love yourself and
where you want the relationship
to go that is important. You've
got to think about what you want
out of life, and where you want to
go," she said.


Flea facts and information


FLEA infestations are the most
common parasite problem in dogs
and cats. It is estimated that
Bahamian pet owners spend over a
million dollars each year on flea
products, most of which do not
work. As a result of my annual trip
to the North American Veterinary
Conference in Orlando, I have seen
in the last few years that there has
been much research done on the life
cycle of the fleas that attack dogs
and cats in an effort to develop bet-
ter flea control methods. There are
over 200 species of fleas, but only
few actually attack dogs and cats.
In fact, the cat flea ctenocephalides
felis afflicts pets most often.

1. FLEA EGGS are white and
about the size of a grain of sand.
The eggs are laid while the flea is
on the pet and easily roll off the
fur into the environment. Eggs
usually hatch in 1 to 10 days
depending on the temperature and
humidity. Once the eggs hatch the
larva move deeper in the carpet or


grass to get away from light and to
search for food. Temperatures
below 6S degrees Fahrenheit and
relative humidity slows the growth
of the flea. The larva then
becomes a silk like cocoon. This is
sticky and debris from the envi-
ronment attaches to it and helps
camouflage it. This stage can last 9
to 17 days. Adult fleas emerge
from the cocoon when stimulated
by the heat. In The Bahamas, the
entire life cycle takes 3 to 4 weeks.

2. ADULT FLEAS are attracted
to house pets by the warmth of the
pet's body, movement and changes
in light intensity and exhaled car-
bon dioxide. Fleas have tremen-


dously powerful back legs, which
they use for jumping on the pet. It
is estimated that if we had this
power in our legs as the flea does,
we could jump over the Queen's
Water Tower. It is reported that
fleas can jump as high as 13 feet.

3. IT IS NOW KNOWN THAT
THE ADULT FLEA species that
attacks dogs and cats spends its
entire adult life on the pet. Once
the adult flea begins to feed on the
pet, it must have almost constant
access to the blood of the pet for it
to survive.

4. EGG PRODUCTION begins
within 48 hours of the first blood
meal. Female fleas can produce
over 2,000 eggs during their life.
While only a fraction of these eggs
will develop into adults, this high
rate of reproduction ensures that
there will always be fleas.

5. NEW ADULT FLEAS must
have a blood meal within 2 to 3


I~ w "% pIVC 9"%'RW~


weeks after hatching. The higher
the temperature and the lower the
humidity, the quicker the fleas will
die.

6. IT IS COMMON FOR PEO-
PLE to be attacked by fleas after
returning from vacation or being
away from home for several days.

7. FLEAS CONSUME 15 TIMES
their body weight with every blood
meal. The majority of blood con-
sumed is passed out as partially
digested feces (Flea Dirt) that
serve as essential food for flea lar-


vae in the carpet and other areas.

8. FLEA CONTROL must include
treatment of the yard, house and
pet. Too often I am told that a rec-
ommended product does not work
and it is because only the pet was
treated. So I always stress to the
client to treat animal and environ-
ment for success.

9. FLEAS belong to a group of
insects designated as wingless
suckers. The flea cuts into the
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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


h G EEN SCENE WOMANBGadnrJcI


Corn and




watermelons


Corn has been a staple in The Bahamas
for generations. Back then the corn
grown was flint corn with very hard ker-
nels, perfect for grinding into grits. Today we
prefer soft, sweet corn that can be boiled or
roasted with ease.


Most modern corn vari-
eties are 'sugar enhanced',
meaning they are hybrids
that are much sweeter than
was previously available. A
few minutes in barely boil-
ing water and you have the
perfect vegetable to accom-
pany barbecues.
The pollen of corn hangs
in the air like smoke and
therefore we must plant our
corn seeds in blocks rather
than in rows. The soil should
be as rich as possible for
good returns and side dress-
ings of fertilizer should be
added to the developing
plants.
As the plants approach
maturity the male parts, tas-
sels, form at the top and
release pollen. The corn ears
produce 'silk', thread-like
strands that protrude from
the top. Each strand of silk
is attached to what will
become a single kernel on
the cob. If a few strands are
un-pollinated you will have
gaps in the otherwise neat
rows of kernels.
When to tell when the
corn is ready to pick? Peel
back the husk and pierce a
kernel with your thumbnail.
If it is firm and hard, you
must wait a few days. A
clear juice means you have
to wait perhaps one more
day. A spurt of milky juice
means that it is mealtime.
I would hate to have to
produce modern sugar
enhanced corn organically.
I am sure it can be done but


would need a lot of effort
because very few vegetables,
if any, are attacked by
insects quite as much as
modern corn.
A regular gardener who
does not mind using the
occasional poison can use a
wide spectrum insecticide
such as Sevin in dust or liq-
uid form to help protect the
crop. The applications
should be once a week until
the silk appears, then once
every two days.
Corn likes a long dry peri-
od while it is growing so
February is a good time to
sow corn seeds.
Watermelons also like a
dry period and can also be
planted now.
Unlike all the other mel-
ons, watermelons enjoy un-
mulched sandy soil. The
seeds should be planted
about 18-inches apart in
hills 6-feet apart, three or
four seeds to a hill. The
seeds and seedlings should
be watered regularly to pro-
mote strong initial growth
and because the plants are
fast growing they should be
well fed with 6-6-6 fertilizer.
There are many varieties
of watermelon to choose
from but if you are growing
the crop for the first time I
suggest you choose between
Congo, Charleston Gray or
Jubilee. These are cultiva-
tors that have been around
for a long time and are
extremely dependable pro-
ducers.


Although watermelons
like dry, well drained con-
ditions they should not be
subject to drought. Water
once a week when there is
no rain. When fruits form
they should be protected
from the sun if the leaf
growth is not sufficient to
do the job. A cardboard
sheet bent in half to form a
tent is an easy form of pro-
tection against sunscald.
It is always very disap-
pointing to spend so long
growing watermelons and
then pick your first one and
find the flesh is light pink
rather than red. The best
indications of ripeness are
the 'pigtail' at the stem end
and the yellow-white area
on the belly of the fruit. The
pigtail should be dry and
the pale area will change
from a straw colour to a
deeper yellow. If in doubt it
is better to wait for a few
days more until you are
sure. A slightly winey
watermelon is better than
a raw one.
I know you have been
told that the best way to
test the ripeness of a water-
melon is to spank it with
your ear close by. That is
true if you are an expert
who has spanked and
immediately cut open
dozens of watermelons until
your ear is finely tuned. For
the amateur, spanking is a
nowhere exercise.
If all goes well you will
be having late spring/early
summer barbecues featur-
ing corn as your veggie and
watermelon as your dessert.
Don't forget to invite me!

* gardenerjack@coral-
wave.com


I ODSCUS SOIS ON THI PAGE LOG ONT WRBUE4.O








+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2010, PAGE 11B


WOMAN


The bartering of sex


The week of love and romance has arrived
again. Red and white and heart shapes
seem to be everywhere. Do you think we
notice it more because we need to be remind-
ed, or that it highlights what is missing in our
lives?
Compare it to seeing pregnant women at every
turn when you want to conceive. Or do we think
of it as another hyped up day to encourage us to
spend our hard earned dollars? Whichever way we
choose to look at it the fact remains that we all
crave love, romance and passion in our lives. Yes,
we know we should be expressing it throughout
the year but we are human, and some of us need
a little nudge or kick start.
To give a gift or not give a gift? That is the
question. How much to spend and should the val-
ue reflect the amount of love and appreciation
felt? Sorry women, evidence does reflect that
men are often the sole gift givers, and if not, then
theirs usually has the greater monetary value.
The practice of gift giving to win and ultimately
gain access to a woman sexually has been pre-
sent for centuries and in all cultures.
Men's natural instinct to appreciate the female
form produces a competitiveness and a drive to
win the prize. Women, on the other hand do not
generally see all men in this way and therefore are
in a position to be more selective. Throw into the
mix the fact that pregnancy is a greater investment
and women hold the ability to bestow or withhold
as they wish.
Even in societies where there is greater equal-
ity between the genders, there is still an imbalance
in the gift giving.
Whether we call it 'sugar baby', 'sugar daddy',
or 'sweetie' the concept of financially secure man
supporting a woman in exchange for gifts is very
common in our society. The number of websites
highlights the popularity of this lifestyle. For many
women ,this is a clear choice which enables them
to live the 'high life' without enduring the
drudgery of a 9 to 5 job. For many, romance and
loyalty develops from the constant gift giving.
When we reduce it to this level it all sounds so
unromantic; sex equals gifts. A gentler way of
looking at this trade is an exchange for closeness,
affirmation of love, and a deeper intimacy. Does-
n't this happen in marriage and other committed
relationships? Gifts can also be given as money.
Here we get into the murky demarcation line


By AGI
BAN


between gift giving and prostitution. Would it be
wrong to say that one way or another men have to
barter for sex?
For many the world of prostitution highlights
the high demand for sexual services that will nev-
er change. It can make women vulnerable to
abuse, dominance and exploitation as a sex com-
modity. Others argue that the same can be said
about models, actors and athletes as they use their
bodies to gain high fees and sponsorships.
When we sit on our judgment seat we should
remember women in parts of the world who have
to resort to prostitution because of their limited
options for survival. In some countries a single,
divorced or disfigured woman with children is
considered 'tarnished' and can not remarry. She is
forced then, by circumstance, to support herself
and her children by prostitution. Of course, in no
way can we compare this to sex trafficking which
preys on the women's poverty. They are lured by
greedy traffickers who enslave girls and women
against their will. Again supply and demand
makes this a difficult circle to break.
Today, we also hear the term 'friends with ben-
efits' and 'booty calls'. This has become an attrac-
tive option for both men and women due to fears
of sexually transmitted diseases. The idea of casu-
al, non committal sex with someone you know,
rather than a stranger, becomes very appealing.
This concept may seem alarming to the older gen-
eration but it is important to understand that
young women have been educated to enjoy their
sexuality. Again it is sexual pleasure that is being
bartered.
Knowing all of this, is it the symbolism, rather
than the monetary value, that we attach to these
gifts that makes it acceptable? In sex therapy we
now know that a woman's level of arousal is high-
ly influenced by what she anticipates she will
gain. Be encouraged men, buy those Valentine
gifts, and delight in the return of your investment.


THE WEATHER REPORT (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
THE W ATHEREPO T INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


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THF TRIBTNEF


TI i E I) A Y


21 I 1 11


SECIO B HATH Bd and in


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alone


By JEFFARAH GIBSON

The sensuality of Valentine's Day makes it
particularly easy to feel down in the
dumps or sad if you don't have a mate.


Society has been made to believe that
this day was only established for inti-
mqte crmpninc n t, celebrate their !ove
1 1 ..i1 I! ). ..i _ h I




I I 1 .l , l ,, I, I.II i. ,
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ness from within, and doing the things
that will uplift your spirits is the key to
making it through Valentine's Dqv alnne


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happiness with their partners may trig-
ger feelings of loneliness or sadness.
While these feelings are normal, Ms
McDonald said that rather than dwell on
it, you should occupy yourself by doing
something you enjoy.
"From my experience, I must say that
before I started an intimate relationship
when Valentines Day came around I did
not wait on someone to tell me I am spe-
cial. I did not wait on someone else to
send me flowers or chocolates. I lit my
own candle and I did those things that
made me feel good about myself," she
told Tribune Woman.
Planning a day with just your friends
is another idea since as Ms McDonald
said: "nothing is better than having a
few good friends to get loose with and
have a good time," she said.
Throwing a "singles" party can be
great fun giving you the opportunity to
mix and mingle with others.
But if you are not the type who takes
keen interest in socializing , Ms
McDonald suggests using this time for
a little introspection, and self pamper-
ing.
"This is the perfect time to direct
most of your attention to yourself. Do
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