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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01501
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: February 5, 2010
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01501

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Volume: 106 No.62


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010


PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)


ird


Bahamian
economy set
for minor
turnaround
II --- -- I


Ie ai po


Latest arrest in

alleged organised

stealing racket


By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net
POLICE at the Lynden
Pindling International Airport
have arrested a third airport
worker allegedly involved in
an organised stealing racket
targeting Haitians.
The latest worker was
detained yesterday, one day
after her colleague was called


off the job and handcuffed by
the police. Both were charged
with stealing and are expected
to appear before the courts
next Thursday.
Assistant Superintendent
Dennis Dames said investiga-
tions are continuing. He was
unable to say if further arrests
are expected.
Another airport worker, 26-
SEE page 11


Killings bring year's
homicide total to eight
By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
TWO killings have brought this year's homicide toll to eight,
putting the figure in line with last year's record figures.
The latest death involved a woman who was stabbed in her
stomach and side by a man who had trespassed at her home in
SEE page 13


By TANEKA
2 THOMPSON
_ Tribune Staff
- Reporter
8 tthompson@
tribunemedia.net
- WORKERS' Party
U leader Rodney Moncur
yesterday surprised
Parliamentary Com-
missioner Errol Bethel
at his office requesting
that Dr Duane Sands
be disqualified from
the Elizabeth by-elec-
tion.
Mr Moncur, also a
hopeful in the race,
called for Mr Bethel to
start an investigation
into his claims that Dr
Sands, the FNM candi-
date, did not make the
public disclosures
SEE page 13

m"wn


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
AFTER taking a bat-
tering in 2009, the
Bahamian economy
looks set for a minor
turnaround this year
with the US and inter-
national markets rally-
ing and new business-
boosting initiatives set
to kick in locally.
Projecting that 2010
will be a "better year"
for the Bahamas after a
"difficult" 2009, Prime
SEE page 12


International
firms 'set to bring
investment dollars
into the Bahamas'
NUMEROUS large inter-
national companies are set to
establish a business presence
in the Bahamas, bringing new
investment dollars into the
country, the Prime Minister
has revealed.
Although there has been an
overall decline in foreign
investment in the country over
the last year as global eco-
nomic conditions remained
gloomy, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham last night
pointed to certain parts of the
domestic economy which have
SEE page 12


PM in Jamaica for funeral of Archbishop Burke
I .;: PRIME Minister
, , . Hubert Ingraham tray-
Cc yelledd to Jamaica to attend
yesterday's funeral service
for Catholic Archbishop
Lawrence Aloysius
Burke, SJ, at the Holy
Trinity Cathedral in
Kingston.
Mr Ingraham is pic-
tured here with Pearnell
Charles, acting Prime
Minister of Jamaica, and
John Issa, chairman of the
SuperClubs Resorts, in
the lobby of the Pegasus
Hotel in Jamaica.
Archbishop Burke, the
first archbishop of the
Bahamas, died in
Kingston on January 24
after a long battle with
cancer.
SEE page 12


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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010


L O C A L E S


0 Crime news in brief
......................................................................................................0....


House break-ins
investigation:
Two in custody

POLICE last night said that
they have in custody two of the
five men wanted for question-
ing in the investigation into a
spree of 66 house break-ins.
Following the publication of
the names and photos of the
men in the media, 65-year-old
Gary Sweeting of Zion Boule-
vard was located and picked up
by police on Wednesday night.
A second man, 40-year-old
Fred Harold Miller of 2nd
Street, The Grove, turned
himself in on the same night,
Supt Stephen Dean, officer-
in-charge of the National
Crime Prevention Office, said.

Rings
Police hope to break up sev-
eral robbery rings that are
believed to behind the recent
drastic rise in house break-ins.
Robbers have been mainly
targeting empty residences
and are after high-priced elec-
tronic goods like flat-screen
televisions and laptops to sell
to drug dealers or buyers on
the street.
In New Providence, the vul-
nerable areas are mostly in
the southwest, southeast and
the Grove.


'I


I 7~"- M


THE TRIBUNE


L I



Government moving



to boost health and



education systems


Five shooting victims

recovering in hospital

A TOTAL of five people shot in Nassau's streets within
hours of each other are recovering in hospital with serious
injuries, according to police press officer Sergeant Chrislyn
Skippings.
The Royal Bahamas Police Force are investigating two shoot-
ing incidents which took place on Wednesday night.
In the first incident, at around 7.40pm, a drive-by gunman
shot four people as they were standing in the yard of a property
in Montel Heights, off Robinson Road.
Police say the gunman may have been with others when he
passed the group in a Honda driving west along Ethel Street and
opened fire.
The four injured people were taken to hospital and remain
there in serious but stable condition.
Just three hours later, at 10.30pm, a man was shot in the
back after he was robbed by three men dressed in dark clothing
while on Wulff Road and Market Street.
One of the robbers threatened the man with a handgun and
after they stole his cash and went to make their exit, the gun-
man turned to shoot the robbed man in his left upper back.
The man drove himself to the hospital despite his injuries,
however, police were not able to comment on his condition yes-
terday.
Active investigations have been launched into both shootings.
And in other crime news, a man and a woman have been tak-
en in for questioning in connection with the recovery of 6.5 lbs
of marijuana and cash found by police officers at a property in
Brougham Street at 3pm on Wednesday.
Anyone with any information that might assist in investiga-
tions should call police urgently on 911, 919 or call Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477).


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one in which the primary focus
of teachers is tutoring their
charges; in which parents are
committed partners in their chil-
dren's education and in which
students are stimulated to attain
their very best.
He also said that government
has substantially "increased
funding for government educa-
tion loans and merit scholar-
ships so as to maximise the
number of qualifying students
able to pursue higher education
and training to meet the
demands in our economy."
Last year, government sus-
pended the guaranteed educa-
tional loan programme because
of the high default rate.
In order to help achieve a
healthier population, the Min-
istry of Health will continue to
expand programmes that pro-
mote healthy lifestyles; main-
tain and sustain gains achieved
in infant and child immunisa-
tion and infant and maternal
health; and continue to combat
the spread of HIV/AIDS and
other sexually transmitted dis-
eases, said Mr Ingraham.
In addition, the government
has plans to introduce a nation-
al prescription drug benefit plan


"Good, quality edu-
cation - academic
and technical - is the
basis for successful
careers, is the child
of innovation and is
the source of our
progress.
this year. The plan will be avail-
able to elderly patients and
school children at participating
licensed pharmacies for 11 spec-
ified chronic and catastrophic
illnesses including asthma,
arthritis, glaucoma, high cho-
lesterol, ischaemic heart disease,
diabetes, breast cancer, prostate
cancer, hypertension, major
depression and psychosis.
Mr Ingraham said the list of
conditions will be reviewed peri-
odically and modifications made
to add or exclude conditions
according to defined criteria.
The benefits schedule will
include prescription drugs and
specific medical supplies
deemed necessary by the
attending physician for treating
the patient's condition, he
added.


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PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham last night outlined his
government's efforts to bolster
the national health and educa-
tion systems.
"Good, quality education -
academic and technical - is the
basis for successful careers, is
the child of innovation and is
the source of our progress.
"We continue efforts to pro-
mote a culture of learning,
improving our education sys-
tem by upgrading and expand-
ing school facilities, ensuring
the engagement of adequate
numbers of teachers - both gen-
eralists and specialists - and
making our school campuses
safer, healthier environments,"
he said during his first national
address for the year.
Mr Ingraham said his admin-
istration plans to work on mak-
ing the public education system


AL


T"ou-






7Th


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010, PAGE 3


* SALNEWS


SRMEM~INISTRSAtDDmRESSuTOiTHE Iuu


PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham last night outlined
what he described as his gov-
ernment's "full-frontal attack"
on the country's crime prob-
lem.
In his first national address
for the year, Mr Ingraham said
his administration is focused on
judicial strengthening, legisla-
tive reform, enhanced police
enforcement, the use of modern
technology and partnership
with church and civic groups -
all in an effort to stamp out
crime.
He also promised to institute
electronic bracelets this year to
monitor persons accused of
serious crimes who are out on
bail.
These comments were not
new - he also outlined these
initiatives last month when
speaking at the swearing-in cer-
emony of new police Commis-
sioner Ellison Greenslade.
Last night's remarks came on
the heels of a drive-by shoot-
ing in the Montell Heights area
that left four people in hospital,
two murders and escalating
housebreaking and armed rob-
bery rates.
However, Mr Ingraham said
he is positive that his govern-
ment's current and future
crime-fighting initiatives will be
successful in bringing down the
crime rate.
"I am confident that mea-
sures we have and are taking
will produce positive results in
our fight. Ours is a full-frontal
attack on the criminal elements
in our communities," he said.
"Our quality of life is very
much tied to our sense of secu-
rity and safety. We must take
back that which the criminals
have stolen and restore our
sense of peace and security.
This year we will achieve gains
in this regard and will continue
to build on those gains until we
restore the sense of tranquility
and civility that once charac-
terised our beautiful isles".
In order to slash the
"lengthy" backlog of cases
before the courts, the govern-
ment is trying to increase the
number of judges, magistrates,
courtrooms, legal officers and
support staff as quickly as pos-
sible, said Mr Ingraham.
His administration also plans
to expedite the appointment of
circuit magistrates in Abaco,
Andros, Exuma, Eleuthera and
Long Island.
Mr Ingraham also spoke
about new weapons in the gov-
ernment's crime fighting arse-
nal, including the close circuit
television system being installed
in the capital and the new Cess-
na aircraft acquired for the
Royal Bahamas Police Force
to improve mobility and aid in
prisoner transport.
He also spoke of continuing
to empower the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force and
promised to open its new
Ragged Island base at some
point this year.

Govt's stamp tax

exemptions 'net

86m in savings'

GOVERNMENT'S stamp
tax exemptions for homeown-
ers netted more than 1,100
applicants some $6 million in
savings, said Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham in his address
to the nation last night.
This occurred between July
and December 2009, he added.
The exemptions applied to
purchases of dwellings and
building lots, as well as for
mortgage transfers and debt
consolidation through mort-
gages. While giving his first
national address for 2010, Mr
Ingraham also noted plans to
make affordable housing more
available to the community.
Home ownership continues
to be a major source of eco-
nomic empowerment of the
Bahamian people, he said.
The prime minister said that
two new government subdivi-
sions, consisting of more than
1,000 lots are to be developed.
They first will be in the
Carmichael Road area and the
other near the South Beach
Town Centre and nearby CV
Bethel High School.
At least half of these will be
"serviced lots", available for
purchase by individuals who
want to construct their homes


without government assistance,
said Mr Ingraham.
The remaining lots will be
developed by the Department
of Housing to meet the demand
of individuals qualifying for
mortgages and who want the
department's help in the con-
struction of their homes.


Work on two Family Island


hospitals

THE government will start
construction of two Family
Island hospitals this year, the
Prime Minister has revealed.
Plans are being devised for
medical facilities in Abaco and
Exuma, he said, noting that
these islands are also set to ben-
efit from two new ports that are
also in the developmental
stages at present.
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham gave an update as he
addressed the nation during his
yearly televised speech last
night.
Speaking to the use of public
funds on infrastructural devel-
opment in the last year, and
going into 2010, Mr Ingraham
said the government has cho-
sen to "invest heavily" in the
area of capital works as it felt
such spending would not only
create jobs but place the coun-
try "in a better position to take
advantage of the turn around
in our economic fortune.
"We were careful during the
economic crisis to target gov-
ernment spending on initiatives
that would yield returns for our
nation long into the future,"
said Mr Ingraham.
"All these projects are help-
ing to maintain existing jobs
and to create hundreds of new
jobs in the construction sector.
They are also broadening
opportunities for spin-off busi-
nesses in the economy which in
turn create additional jobs
boosting individual and family
incomes. We expect that these
projects will generate enormous
economic gains for our people
well into the future."


'to start this year'


PRIME MINISTER
Hubert Ingraham last night.
Among the projects already
under way or due to see con-
struction begin this year, Mr
Ingraham spoke of: the $12 mil-
lion straw market, the $8 mil-
lion extension to Sandilands
Hospital, the new magistrates'
complex on South Street,
designed to house 12 magis-
trates courts, refurbishment of
the Supreme Court complex
and Ansbacher House, which
will be adapted to become part
of the new judicial complex on
Bank Lane, the new Ministry
of Tourism complex on JFK
Drive, now nearing completion,
the $130 million New Provi-
dence Road Enhancement Pro-
ject and new power plants in
the Family Islands.

Office
Construction soon to com-
mence on new government
office complexes in central
Abaco and in Freeport, Grand
Bahama, after contracts are
awarded next month will cre-
ate "as many as 525 construc-


tion jobs on those islands," said
Mr Ingraham. The successful
and timely execution of the $45
million Nassau harbour dredg-
ing project, allowed for the
arrival of the world's biggest
cruise ship - the Oasis of the
Seas - and provided 114 jobs
for Bahamians, was one of
2009's projects with which the
Prime Minister said he was
"especially pleased."
Looking ahead, Mr Ingra-
ham said the government
expects to conclude an agree-
ment to relocate the freight
handling activity from down-
town Bay Street to Arawak
Cay, leasing land in the vicinity
to a company formed to under-
take the $65 million port's con-
struction.
"The company will be owned
40 per cent by the Government,
20 per cent by the general pub-
lic and 40 per cent by the pri-
vate sector engaged in shipping
and freight handling for the
island of New Providence.
"A container depot will be
constructed at Gladstone Road
to facilitate the timely transfer
of large containers not sched-
uled for direct delivery to busi-
nesses from Arawak Cay. It is
intended that most containers,
bearing non-perishable goods,
will be transferred during the
night-time hours thereby reduc-
ing the impact on traffic and
alleviating much of the conges-
tion now caused by the move-
ment of large container-bear-
ing trucks on our busy road-
ways during peak traffic peri-
ods," added the Prime Minis-
ter.


Stalled tourism projects may get kick-start


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SOME tourism develop-
ments that ground to a halt in
the wake of the global finan-
cial crisis may get a kick-start
this year, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham suggested.
"While foreign direct invest-
ment flows into our country
have declined, there are new
signs that several of the tourism
related developments which
stalled because of the global
recession and international
financial crisis are preparing to
move forward this year," said
the prime minister last night.
He said: "We are hopeful
that a number of the stalled
previously approved tourism
related projects will re-start or
commence in 2010. Several pro-
jects in Eleuthera, Abaco, Long
Island, Cat Island and Rose
Island are also encouraging."
It is not clear if Mr Ingra-
ham's final reference was to the
halted development of the lux-
urious Ritz Carlton hotel and
marina on Rose Island.
That mixed-use project, ini-
tially slated to be completed in
2009, came to a shuddering halt
when investment bank Lehman
Brothers collapsed in 2008, tak-
ing with it much of the devel-
opment's financing.
Speaking more broadly on
developments in the tourism
and second home industry, Mr
Ingraham suggested that the


recent opening of the new lux-
ury 183-room Sandals Resort
in Exuma is expected to "sta-
bilise Exuma's economy this
year" having created jobs for
300 Bahamians.
Mr Ingraham advised that as
many as 200 new construction
jobs will be created through the
second phase of the $75 million
Caves development now get-
ting underway.

Employment
Meanwhile, he heralded the
current employment levels at
the Albany project in south-
western New Providence, not-
ing that 862 construction work-
ers are now engaged at the mul-
ti-million dollar luxury golf and
marina resort and another 71
Bahamians are engaged by the
Albany Development Compa-
ny, bringing the total to 943.
Mr Ingraham noted that the
second home market, in which
Albany will play a significant
part upon completion,
"remained soft" in 2009, but
did not do as badly as some
expected.
According to Mr Ingraham,
there is a "growing trend inter-
nationally" for the development
of "exclusive specialty boutique
resorts which are proving to be
less susceptible to the ups and
downs of the world economy."
In the Bahamas, the reopen-
ing of the Tiamo Resort in
Andros, the upscale Delphi


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Club in South Abaco, and the
scheduled April opening of the
new S&T Beach Club in San
Salvador reflect this trend, he
suggested. "Tourism is, of
course, our business. We are
focused on making our islands
more accessible, more afford-
able, and more convenient.
And, we have been able to
maintain our market share,
maintain our room rates, and
grow certain segments of our
business," said Mr Ingraham.
Success in this regard has
already come in the form of the
bigger than ever cruise arrivals
last year - 3.5 million.
"There have been double-
digit increases in cruise passen-
ger delivery each month dur-
ing 2009 to New Providence,
Grand Bahama and the Family
Islands," said Mr Ingraham.
The Bahamas now also has
"more air service than ever
before", with numerous airlines
having announced new routes
to the Bahamas in the latter
part of last year. This equates to
an increase of almost 400,000
new "seats" available for those
wishing to fly here this year
from the US and Canada.


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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


EIOI AULETE S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, c, tiin,,') 322-1986
Ad c, iiving Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


Archbishop leaves his mark on Bahamas


WHEN ARCHBISHOP Lawrence Burke
of Kingston, Jamaica, arrived in Nassau to
head the Catholic Diocese in 1981 it was
against a backdrop of nationalism in a new-
ly independent nation. There were isolated
grumbles questioning Vatican wisdom in
selecting a Jamaican over a Bahamian to
head the local Diocese.
However, 29 years later when the Vati-
can, again in its wisdom, decided in 2004 to
appoint Archbishop Burke the fourth arch-
bishop of Kingston, Bahamians were again at
their grumbling best - only this time they
were a little louder. Why was the Vatican
taking away "our Archbishop", especially
as he had just spearheaded the design and
construction of a magnificent cathedral and
still had so many plans and so much work to
do? The fact that with his transfer they at last
got their own Bahamian archbishop did not
seem to pacify them.
Whenever there has been a celebration
since then for "our Archbishop" in Kingston
a large Catholic delegation from the
Bahamas has flown down to be with him.
Yesterday was his funeral. And as was to
be expected Bahamian Catholics attended
the funeral Mass at Holy Trinity Cathedral in
Kingston. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham,
not a Catholic, but a good friend of the arch-
bishop's was there as was Senate president
Lynn Holowesko, herself a Catholic, and
Sister Cecilia Albury of St Martin's Con-
vent in Nassau. Many others were also there
from Nassau and, before the funeral mass,
they were treated to lunch at the Pegasus
hotel by Mr John Issa of SuperClub Breezes,
and his family. The Burke and Issa families
were very close with the Issa children calling
the Archbishop "Uncle Larry."
Photographer Peter Ramsey, on the staff
of Bahamas Information Services, flew to
Jamaica in his private capacity to make a
photographic record of the funeral. "I
thought it was the least I could do," he said
in explanation, "after all he did so much for
us."
A few years after leaving Nassau, Arch-
bishop Burke was diagnosed with cancer.
He didn't go into retirement. He took his
treatment and did his job until eventually
cancer forced him to step down and pre-
pare for death. He died Sunday evening with
his three loving sisters at his bedside. An
older brother and sister had predeceased
him.
Archbishop Burke was the Bahamas' first
archbishop - he was appointed Bishop to


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the Bahamas Diocese in 1981, becoming
archbishop when the Diocese was elevated
to an Archdiocese in 1999.
A charismatic man, his voice was heard
throughout the country on many controver-
sial issues.
In 2001 he bluntly told political and reli-
gious leaders that it was time they stopped
giving Bahamians "mixed signals."
"When we talk about the Bahamas being
a Christian nation," he said, "rather than
zeroing on the politicians, I would zero in on
our people. If our people lived a more Chris-
tian life and they demanded more, then I
think our politicians will get in line rather
than the other way around.
"In a democracy, it should be the people
who should be leading and the elected
should know the mind of the people and try
to do what the people want."
As for churches and the status of the
Bahamas as a Christian nation, he called for
a higher sense of spirituality. "I think we
have a lot of churches, but we don't have
enough spirituality," he said. He feared many
churches were being founded because too
many believed it was a good money-making
business.
He also believed that many church lead-
ers give a "mixed signal" to their congrega-
tions by living lifestyles unattainable by most,
certainly not like the life of Jesus.
"We are giving a mixed signal to our peo-
ple that wealth is a sign that you are
blessed," he said. He then dared his listeners
"to find that in the New Testament. If that
were true, then Jesus was not blessed, and
yet He was God. He was the one who was
loved by his father and who loved his father.
He died terribly on the cross. He didn't have
a place to lay his head. Come and see where
I live he said. We have moved away from
that," said the archbishop.
Archbishop Burke's voice was heard
throughout the Bahamas, telling it like it
should be on many troubling issues. He nev-
er ran from the difficult question. And
Bahamians respected him because they knew
that he was a good, humble and decent man
who always had their interest at heart.
And so yesterday "our Archbishop" was
laid to rest in Kingston, but he will always be
"our Archbishop" because he left us so many
decent and tangible memories. The new St
Francis Xavier's Cathedral will always be
Archbishop Burke's cathedral - a beautiful
legacy by which to remember a humble, a
good man.


Junkanoo


the


strongest political




force in Bahamas


EDITOR, The Tribune.
It is amazing how members
of the Bahamian Junkanoo
Community can mobilise,
excite, and thrill a small little
nation known as the Bahamas
for two separate days of parade
celebrations. These parades add
the necessary ingredients and
substance to make what we
affectionately refer to as a
"Bahamian Christmas" and a
"Bahamian New Years" cele-
bration. Imagine the Christmas
holiday season in the Bahamas
without junkanoo.
It remains astonishing that
from August 1st, through to
January 1st of the following
year, young men and women
become discipline myrmidons
and become so engaged and
focused on every aspect of the
preparatory process for
junkanoo; "The Shack"
becomes a cultural web shop
and a University of higher
social and cultural develop-
ment. If only The Department
of Social Services can study the
social interaction in junkanoo
"Shacks" during those periods,
they can prepare themselves as
this experience offers a micro-
scopic view of our nation, and
the key performance indicators
of our culture under one roof.
Historically, crime in the island
of New Providence in particu-
lar, decreases when the
Junkanoo Shacks are fully
operational, so I would think
that the police department
would by now partner with the
junkanoo community to assist
in providing a panacea to this
plague that is destroying our
nation.
The young men and women
who participate in junkanoo
become national heroes
overnight and are praised
sometimes by the politician,
sometimes by the religious
community, and sometimes by
other relevant stakeholders in
our country who experience
first hand the flavour and force
of junkanoo.
On January 2nd, or shortly
thereafter, it is unfortunate that
many of the productive
Junkanoo participants end up
doing the "bank lane shuffle"
and find themselves in debt and
many with their lights off at
home.
Suddenly, they find all com-
munication cut off from many
members who they basically
lived with for the last five to six
months.
Some of their parasitic lead-
ers disappear and members of
their respective groups who
transported these faithful young
participants and provided their
daily meals during the
junkanoo period, suddenly
become incommunicado with
no minutes on their cell phones
or a different cell phone num-
ber.
In their desperation dealing
with life's reality, some just dis-
appear until next August or


return to Fox Hill prison.
In my thirty plus years of par-
ticipating in junkanoo, I had
the opportunity to sit in the
company of many "real"
junkanoo icons and stakehold-
ers.
As I listened yearly to these
iconic figures express their
uncanny and rational realities
about the future of junkanoo,
so often discussion erupts about
the marginal respect, and the
often condescending disrespect
that some persons in the vari-
ous government ministries, and
I dare say appear to be sup-
ported by some ministers from
time to time, have adopted this
behaviour as a benchmark
towards many junkanoo partic-
ipants when partnering, pursu-
ing and/or developing cultural
initiatives and activities.
Many government ministries
and relevant individuals holding
office in these ministries make
the mistake by discounting the
intellect and capacity of
junkanoo participants because
of the intense judging contro-
versies that seem to erupt every
year after every parade.
They continue to underesti-
mate the underlying force and
the masses of people that
junkanoo has in its power that
can be mobilised quicker than
any disciplined uniformed force
in the Bahamas.
I urge them not to think that
junkanoo does not contribute
anything to this country, it can
contribute more if the proper
funding is made available so
that junkanoo will one day be
able to generate sufficient rev-
enue to support itself and
reduce government funding at
first, and eventually eliminate
the subsidized financial support
from the government.
The time has come for
junkanoo leaders, the entire
junkanoo community, and the
directors of junkanoo to under-
stand that this cultural centre
piece of all things Bahamian is
one of the most powerful polit-
ical forces in this country if unit-
ed, and all groups must com-
bine their forces, similar to the
Baptist community, the trade
unions, the "now" Haitian com-
munity, and other institutions
that used their force in the
quest of gaining political influ-
ence to advance their interest,
equality and/or justice.
Junkanoo can and has shaped
many political decisions while
bringing about a level of respect
to each person who partici-
pates.
It is amazing to watch the
Elizabeth constituency bi-elec-
tions and to see how some
politicians undermine the
Bahamian people.
They make time to go and
speak to many illegal immigrant
communities throughout a cer-
tain part of the island pandering
for votes and addressing their
concerns and issues for the
moment, many might get
legalised overnight for one pur-
pose.


This is done because politi-
cians realise the voting power
that has emerged in these com-
munities and politicians seek to
exploit by whatever means nec-
essary.
What they should also con-
sider in the quest for votes, is
those very children of illegal
immigrants to the Bahamas
have contributed, participated
and have been members of
many respective junkanoo
groups in the Bahamas.
Notwithstanding the Hotel
Union and other unions that
are a part of the Trade Union
Congress (TUC) or CTUC,
Junkanoo is the largest Union
in this country not recognized
by the law. Although partici-
pants in "The Junkanoo
Union" do not pay dues,
nonetheless they pay a higher
human price with loyalty, love,
dedication, creativity, blood,
sweat and tears, which in my
opinion is priceless.
I urge leaders to put down
the competitive "swords" and
collectively get the best minds
to come together and bring
about the change that is neces-
sary to harness the power that
Junkanoo generates.
I urge all the groups individ-
ually and collectively to com-
pete only on Bay Street but not
in the corporate board rooms.
Junkanoo at this juncture sur-
vived many of the negative
media attacks, the stereotypi-
cal views of an illiterate indi-
vidual making noise in the
streets, the "Judases" within its
ranks, the opportunistic busi-
ness parasites that now see
opportunities to exploit rev-
enue streams generated by the
very essence of this craft.
Junkanoo can emerge when
groups respect each other irre-
spective of size or wins,
Junkanoo can engineer funda-
mental changes in the Bahamas
by its very nature when forces
combine on relevant issues of
importance that can and will
effect positive change in our
country.
Junkanoo participants and
leaders especially, must finally
wake up and realise that there
is strength in numbers.
Many in government may
not listen to you now, but com-
bine your numbers and you will
certainly get their respected
attention as democracy only
wins when supported by the
majority.
Junkanoo participants must
realise that they have the abili-
ty to change political parties in
this country; they have the abil-
ity to force the politicians to lis-
ten to the power of the people.
Junkanoo must position itself
now to be the most powerful
political force in the Bahamas.
It's not about two days of
"rushing" on the calendar, it's
about being an architect of new
ideas and forcing what is not
only right but best for the
Bahamas.
When an organised, respect-
ed group of people are united,
they will always influence who
remain in power.

ANTHONY U BOSTWICK
Nassau,
February 2, 2010.


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THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010, PAGE 5


LOCALN


The NDP 'gives

Bahamians a say

at party level'
By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ELIZABETH by-elec-
tion candidate Dr Andre
Rollins says his fledgling
National Development Par-
ty (NDP) breaks the mould
by giving Bahamians a say
at the party level.
Dr Rollins, 34, an ortho-
dontist by profession, said
the NDP is in a better posi-
tion to serve the Bahami-
an people as it moves away
from practices ingrained in
the long-established Pro-
gressive Liberal Party
(PLP) and Free National
Movement (FNM).
Speaking as a guest on
the Love 97 radio talk show
"Issues of the Day" on
Wednesday, Dr Rollins said
that unlike PLP and FNM
representatives, he will not
be bound to follow a strict
party line in order to win
favour.
And the NDP will focus
more on the individual rep-
resentative of the people
than on party politics.
He said his party adheres
to a new system for the
selection of parliamentary
candidates whereby voters
are invited to select their
representative from the
start.
NDP chairman Dr
Rollins was selected by
Elizabeth constituents to be
the party's by-election can-
didate, rather than by a
small faction within the par-
ty as is the case with the
PLP and FNM.
And in the same way the
steering committee-run
NDP will invite voters to
choose the party leader.
Dr Rollins claims this
strategy empowers people
in a new way.
"We are about nation
building," he said. "We say
'come along with us, listen
to what we have to say',
and all of those people will
have a say in who becomes
the party leader. That's

SEE page 12


ATTORNEY Godfrey
"Pro" Pinder has filed an
appeal against the rejection of
his bid to run in the Elizabeth
by-election.
The Parliamentary Depart-
ment, Parliamentary Commis-
sioner Errol Bethel, Immigra-
tion Director Jack Thompson
and the Department of Immi-
gration are all listed as respon-
dents in the appeal.
Mr Thompson served as the
Returning Officer during the
nomination process on Janu-
ary 28, and rejected Mr Pin-
der's nomination papers
because he attempted to pay
the required $400 with a per-
sonal cheque.
Mr Thompson explained that
only cash or a certified bank
cheque could be accepted.
According to documents
filed in the Supreme Court on
February 3, Mr Pinder is argu-
ing that Mr Thompson did not
endorse and sign his nomina-
tion papers stating the facts and
grounds for his decision to
reject the forms.
This, argues Mr Pinder, is in
violation Section 38 (5) of the
Parliamentary Election Act,
1992, Chapter 7.
He further claims that he
presented his nomination
papers to Mr Thompson along
with a personal cheque to cov-
er the $400 application fee on
January 28 at the required time
and place.
The appeal alleges that Mr
Thompson said he would have
to call the Parliamentary Com-
missioner to see if this method
of payment was acceptable.
Mr Pinder also claims that
Mr Thompson, after speaking
with someone on the phone,
told him that Mr Bethel want-
ed to see him.
This, the appeal states, "lift-
ed" Mr Pinder's spirit, leading
him to believe that the Parlia-
mentary Commissioner had the
power to "okay" a personal
cheque.


Pharmacy industry has 23 days



to comply with new regulations


By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE clock is ticking for the phar-
macy industry to comply with new
regulations under the recently enact-
ed Pharmacy Act of 2009.
All existing registrations and
licences were rendered invalid as of
December 17, 2009, as they were
administered by the old regulating
body, the Health Professions Coun-
cil.
All licences must now be trans-
ferred to the new governing body,
the Pharmacy Council, by February
28 to avoid late fees and other pos-
sible penalties that come into effect
after a 30-day grace period.


About 200 pharmacists and phar-
macy technicians will be affected,
along with 50 to 100 pharmacies and
close to 10 wholesalers across the
country.
Licence transfers are the first pri-
ority of the council, and then pend-
ing and new applications. Family
Island applicants can download
forms on the new website -
www.pharmacycouncil.net - and
mail in documents. They must be
notarised. Forms have also been e-
mailed to all licensees on the coun-
cil's e-mail mailing list, which they
say is fairly comprehensive.
For the first time, pharmacies,
wholesalers and manufacturers will
have to be registered and licensed
with the authorities.


The new fee schedule for this
group is stipulated in the Act. Pro-
visional licences also will be
assigned for the first time to stu-
dents, interns and other provisional
workers such as international con-
ference presenters, for a period of
three months to one year.
Registration fees are one-time
payments, while licence fees are
renewed annually. Other regulations
that are now in effect include new
importation and exportation guide-
lines, and requirements for 40-hours
of continuing education annually for
licensed workers.
The council together with the
Bahamas Pharmacy Association will
provide Continuing Education Lec-
tures (CEES) online and by tele-


conference. The act does not allow
for internet-based pharmacy opera-
tions in the Bahamas.
This is the first announcement of
the February 28 deadline, but coun-
cil members said all industry players
have been involved with the process,
extending back several years, and
were expecting an announcement.
Already, the council is investi-
gating a restaurant for allegedly dis-
pensing illegal pharmaceutical
drugs, purporting to be Viagra.
The drugs in question did not
come from an authorised whole-
saler, said council member Vivienne
Lockhart. They were labelled as
originating in Australia, which is
outside the range of authorised
regional distributors.


MP denies constituents illegally recruited to vote in Elizabeth


THE PLP member of par-
liament for Englerston has
denied claims that residents
of her constituency were
recruited to illegally register
to vote in the Elizabeth by-
election.
Glenys Hanna-Martin's
statement came in response
to what she termed "wild"
and "reckless" claims made
by-election hopeful Cassius
Stuart, leader of the Bahamas
Democratic Movement.
Mr Stuart claimed to have
information that a number of
persons from Englerston and
other areas were paid $100
to register to vote in the Eliz-
abeth area on the last day of
registration, with a promise
of another $100 after their
votes were cast. He claimed
these persons were "bused"
into Elizabeth in droves by
senior members of the PLP.
On Tuesday, Mr Stuart
told the press that he
informed Assistant Commis-
sioner Glenn Miller of these
allegations and also gave a
him a list naming several inel-
igible voters.
While ACP Miller con-
firmed that this information
was conveyed to him, he said


no formal complaint against
any person was made, adding
that the claims have not been
substantiated. The police are
continuing their investiga-
tion.
According to Mrs Hanna-
Martin, the assertions mis-
represent the character of the
people of Englerston.
"Mr Stuart is reported as
asserting that he has credi-
ble information that people
by the busload have been
transported into Elizabeth
from Englerston and else-
where at a price of $200 to
fraudulently register in that
constituency in violation of
the laws of the Bahamas,"
said the former PLP chair-
man.
"Mr Stuart claims he has
made a specific and detailed
complaint supported by evi-


dence to both the police and
the Parliamentary Registrar,
however in both instances
public statements have been
issued refuting his assertions
and stating that nothing oth-
er than a general assertion
has been made.
"It appears that Mr Stuart
is quite comfortable making
wild and reckless allegations
which impute the integrity of
a community comprised of
decent and hardworking men
and women who have con-
tributed fully to the develop-
ment of the Bahamas.
"I decry his tactics and
urge him to conduct his cam-
paign in a way which disclos-
es a respect for the citizens


of this country and to aban-
don this circus-like approach
to the important affairs of
our people," she said.
Meanwhile, the FNM is
actively investigating the sta-
tus of at least 70 voters who,
the party claims, registered
"with the assistance of PLP
operatives" just before the
voter registry was closed. The
FNM insists that these people
do not live in Elizabeth.
Both the FNM and the
BDM have named the same
high ranking PLP - who is
not Mrs Hanna-Martin - as
either buying votes in Eliza-
beth or persuading residents
from other areas to register
in the constituency.


It is further alleged that Mr
Pinder headed to his car with
his nomination papers and per-
sonal cheque in hand, only to
discover that he left his keys in
the nomination room.
Upon returning to the room,
Mr Pinder claims, he was hand-
ed his car keys and a "piece of
white paper that read 'Nomi-
nation paper rejected in accor-
dance with Section 37(3)'" by a
female police officer, which


bore a signature he did not
recognize.
Mr Pinder's appeal also
argues that the $400 nomina-
tion fee is unconstitutional and
"discriminates" against "poor"
political hopefuls like carpen-
ters, masons and garbage col-
lectors.
His also claims that he was
treated differently than the oth-
er by-election hopefuls because
of his "political opinion."


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ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


Godfrey Pinder files injunction


against by-election bid rejection


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+


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010, PAGE 5


LOCALN


The NDP 'gives

Bahamians a say

at party level'
By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ELIZABETH by-elec-
tion candidate Dr Andre
Rollins says his fledgling
National Development Par-
ty (NDP) breaks the mould
by giving Bahamians a say
at the party level.
Dr Rollins, 34, an ortho-
dontist by profession, said
the NDP is in a better posi-
tion to serve the Bahami-
an people as it moves away
from practices ingrained in
the long-established Pro-
gressive Liberal Party
(PLP) and Free National
Movement (FNM).
Speaking as a guest on
the Love 97 radio talk show
"Issues of the Day" on
Wednesday, Dr Rollins said
that unlike PLP and FNM
representatives, he will not
be bound to follow a strict
party line in order to win
favour.
And the NDP will focus
more on the individual rep-
resentative of the people
than on party politics.
He said his party adheres
to a new system for the
selection of parliamentary
candidates whereby voters
are invited to select their
representative from the
start.
NDP chairman Dr
Rollins was selected by
Elizabeth constituents to be
the party's by-election can-
didate, rather than by a
small faction within the par-
ty as is the case with the
PLP and FNM.
And in the same way the
steering committee-run
NDP will invite voters to
choose the party leader.
Dr Rollins claims this
strategy empowers people
in a new way.
"We are about nation
building," he said. "We say
'come along with us, listen
to what we have to say',
and all of those people will
have a say in who becomes
the party leader. That's

SEE page 12


ATTORNEY Godfrey
"Pro" Pinder has filed an
appeal against the rejection of
his bid to run in the Elizabeth
by-election.
The Parliamentary Depart-
ment, Parliamentary Commis-
sioner Errol Bethel, Immigra-
tion Director Jack Thompson
and the Department of Immi-
gration are all listed as respon-
dents in the appeal.
Mr Thompson served as the
Returning Officer during the
nomination process on Janu-
ary 28, and rejected Mr Pin-
der's nomination papers
because he attempted to pay
the required $400 with a per-
sonal cheque.
Mr Thompson explained that
only cash or a certified bank
cheque could be accepted.
According to documents
filed in the Supreme Court on
February 3, Mr Pinder is argu-
ing that Mr Thompson did not
endorse and sign his nomina-
tion papers stating the facts and
grounds for his decision to
reject the forms.
This, argues Mr Pinder, is in
violation Section 38 (5) of the
Parliamentary Election Act,
1992, Chapter 7.
He further claims that he
presented his nomination
papers to Mr Thompson along
with a personal cheque to cov-
er the $400 application fee on
January 28 at the required time
and place.
The appeal alleges that Mr
Thompson said he would have
to call the Parliamentary Com-
missioner to see if this method
of payment was acceptable.
Mr Pinder also claims that
Mr Thompson, after speaking
with someone on the phone,
told him that Mr Bethel want-
ed to see him.
This, the appeal states, "lift-
ed" Mr Pinder's spirit, leading
him to believe that the Parlia-
mentary Commissioner had the
power to "okay" a personal
cheque.


E OICIL
E /TEI] rRS
FOR / PES Pv I RO'BLEMS


Pharmacy industry has 23 days



to comply with new regulations


By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE clock is ticking for the phar-
macy industry to comply with new
regulations under the recently enact-
ed Pharmacy Act of 2009.
All existing registrations and
licences were rendered invalid as of
December 17, 2009, as they were
administered by the old regulating
body, the Health Professions Coun-
cil.
All licences must now be trans-
ferred to the new governing body,
the Pharmacy Council, by February
28 to avoid late fees and other pos-
sible penalties that come into effect
after a 30-day grace period.


About 200 pharmacists and phar-
macy technicians will be affected,
along with 50 to 100 pharmacies and
close to 10 wholesalers across the
country.
Licence transfers are the first pri-
ority of the council, and then pend-
ing and new applications. Family
Island applicants can download
forms on the new website -
www.pharmacycouncil.net - and
mail in documents. They must be
notarised. Forms have also been e-
mailed to all licensees on the coun-
cil's e-mail mailing list, which they
say is fairly comprehensive.
For the first time, pharmacies,
wholesalers and manufacturers will
have to be registered and licensed
with the authorities.


The new fee schedule for this
group is stipulated in the Act. Pro-
visional licences also will be
assigned for the first time to stu-
dents, interns and other provisional
workers such as international con-
ference presenters, for a period of
three months to one year.
Registration fees are one-time
payments, while licence fees are
renewed annually. Other regulations
that are now in effect include new
importation and exportation guide-
lines, and requirements for 40-hours
of continuing education annually for
licensed workers.
The council together with the
Bahamas Pharmacy Association will
provide Continuing Education Lec-
tures (CEES) online and by tele-


conference. The act does not allow
for internet-based pharmacy opera-
tions in the Bahamas.
This is the first announcement of
the February 28 deadline, but coun-
cil members said all industry players
have been involved with the process,
extending back several years, and
were expecting an announcement.
Already, the council is investi-
gating a restaurant for allegedly dis-
pensing illegal pharmaceutical
drugs, purporting to be Viagra.
The drugs in question did not
come from an authorised whole-
saler, said council member Vivienne
Lockhart. They were labelled as
originating in Australia, which is
outside the range of authorised
regional distributors.


MP denies constituents illegally recruited to vote in Elizabeth


THE PLP member of par-
liament for Englerston has
denied claims that residents
of her constituency were
recruited to illegally register
to vote in the Elizabeth by-
election.
Glenys Hanna-Martin's
statement came in response
to what she termed "wild"
and "reckless" claims made
by-election hopeful Cassius
Stuart, leader of the Bahamas
Democratic Movement.
Mr Stuart claimed to have
information that a number of
persons from Englerston and
other areas were paid $100
to register to vote in the Eliz-
abeth area on the last day of
registration, with a promise
of another $100 after their
votes were cast. He claimed
these persons were "bused"
into Elizabeth in droves by
senior members of the PLP.
On Tuesday, Mr Stuart
told the press that he
informed Assistant Commis-
sioner Glenn Miller of these
allegations and also gave a
him a list naming several inel-
igible voters.
While ACP Miller con-
firmed that this information
was conveyed to him, he said


no formal complaint against
any person was made, adding
that the claims have not been
substantiated. The police are
continuing their investiga-
tion.
According to Mrs Hanna-
Martin, the assertions mis-
represent the character of the
people of Englerston.
"Mr Stuart is reported as
asserting that he has credi-
ble information that people
by the busload have been
transported into Elizabeth
from Englerston and else-
where at a price of $200 to
fraudulently register in that
constituency in violation of
the laws of the Bahamas,"
said the former PLP chair-
man.
"Mr Stuart claims he has
made a specific and detailed
complaint supported by evi-


dence to both the police and
the Parliamentary Registrar,
however in both instances
public statements have been
issued refuting his assertions
and stating that nothing oth-
er than a general assertion
has been made.
"It appears that Mr Stuart
is quite comfortable making
wild and reckless allegations
which impute the integrity of
a community comprised of
decent and hardworking men
and women who have con-
tributed fully to the develop-
ment of the Bahamas.
"I decry his tactics and
urge him to conduct his cam-
paign in a way which disclos-
es a respect for the citizens


of this country and to aban-
don this circus-like approach
to the important affairs of
our people," she said.
Meanwhile, the FNM is
actively investigating the sta-
tus of at least 70 voters who,
the party claims, registered
"with the assistance of PLP
operatives" just before the
voter registry was closed. The
FNM insists that these people
do not live in Elizabeth.
Both the FNM and the
BDM have named the same
high ranking PLP - who is
not Mrs Hanna-Martin - as
either buying votes in Eliza-
beth or persuading residents
from other areas to register
in the constituency.


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It is further alleged that Mr
Pinder headed to his car with
his nomination papers and per-
sonal cheque in hand, only to
discover that he left his keys in
the nomination room.
Upon returning to the room,
Mr Pinder claims, he was hand-
ed his car keys and a "piece of
white paper that read 'Nomi-
nation paper rejected in accor-
dance with Section 37(3)'" by a
female police officer, which


bore a signature he did not
recognize.
Mr Pinder's appeal also
argues that the $400 nomina-
tion fee is unconstitutional and
"discriminates" against "poor"
political hopefuls like carpen-
ters, masons and garbage col-
lectors.
His also claims that he was
treated differently than the oth-
er by-election hopefuls because
of his "political opinion."


% 0Utthc to1mIs


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


Godfrey Pinder files injunction


against by-election bid rejection


it (BamN) Likited






+>


PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


Exuma parents threaten to



take children out of school


By ALESHA CADET


ACCUSING the government
of failing to supply the LN Coak-
ley High School in Exuma with
teachers for core subjects, par-
ents are threatening to keep
their children out of class until
the situation is rectified.
In a statement issued to the
press yesterday, the school's Par-
ent-Teacher Association (PTA)
said that in September 2009, the


Government accused of not

providing enough teachers


school was promised that impor-
tant teaching vacancies would
be filled by January 15, 2010.
However, to date, this promise
has not been fulfilled.
The PTA is therefore calling
on the Ministry of Education to


assign six teachers to the school
by Monday, February 8. Failure
to do so will result in students
not being allowed to attend
classes, the statement said.
Teachers are reportedly need-
ed for biology, chemistry,


physics, mathematics, English
and computer science. There is
also need for an auto mechanic
teacher, a physical education
assistant and a guidance coun-
sellor.
According to the PTA, sever-
al students will be taking
BGCSE exams in these subjects
at the end of the school year in
May and desperately need
expert guidance and help with
coursework.


The statement said the min-
istry's failure to meet the Janu-
ary 15 deadline is a sign of its
"blatant disregard" for the stu-
dents of LN Coakley.
It said: "Is it the ministry's
intent to destroy the dreams of
our children? Is it that the chil-
dren of Exuma dare not dream
of careers of scientific propor-
tions? Whatever the intent of
the ministry, we the parents have
arrived at out own conclusions."


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Date: February 6, 2010
Time: 7am - I lain


Kingsway Academy


celebrates a legend


KINGSWAY Academy
recently honoured Kelcine
Hamilton for her 38 years of
service as a teacher, vice-
principal, principal and
Academy affairs manager at
the institution.
Many alumni, including
Minister of State for Immi-
gration Branville McCartney,
Terez "Ms Daisy" Davis,
ZNS reporter Clint Watson,
Philip Simon, executive
director of the Chamber of
Commerce, and countless
others sung her praises dur-
ing a special assembly.
Ms Hamilton joined
Kingsway Academy in 1971
and taught grades three and
four for several years. In
1979, when the high school
was established, she was
appointed the new teacher
for this pioneering group of
28 students who had just
completed grade six.


Ms Hamilton remembers
the excitement of seeing the
new high school building
erected and dedicated in
1979.
She taught all of the grade
seven subjects, with the
exception of mathematics,
Spanish and boys' physical
education.
Ms Hamilton continued
teaching language arts, his-
tory and social studies at the
high school, then moved up
the ranks to eventually
become the high school's
vice-principal and principal.
In 2000, she was appointed
Academy affairs manager,
the position that she held
until her retirement in
December 2009.
Over the years, Ms Hamil-
ton combined her love for
teaching with her own pur-
suit of academic excellence.
She holds a diploma in
Christian Education from the
Eastern Pentecostal Bible
College in Canada, and
received both her Bachelor
of Science degree in Educa-
tion and a Masters of Busi-
ness Administration from the
University of Miami.
Ms Hamilton's call to edu-
cation and ministry extended
beyond Kingsway and into
the community, her church
and even overseas.
She has taught at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas and
Success Training College.
For years, Ms Hamilton
assisted in the Music Min-
istry of Evangelistic Centre,
served as treasurer for the
National Youth Department
of the Assemblies of God in
the Bahamas, and as assis-
tant national Sunday School
director for the Assemblies


of God and Turks and
Caicos.
As a long-time member of
Evangelistic Centre, Ms
Hamilton formed a chil-
dren's choir, led teams of
missionaries to the Willamae
Pratt Home for Girls, and to
the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital. She also organised
many church trips to the
Family Islands and many


countries in Europe, Asia,
and the Caribbean.
Arnold Dorsett, chairman
of the Kingsway Academy
committee of management,
said: "Ms Hamilton is irre-
placeable. Her commitment
to Kingsway (in the face of
many changes) is remark-
able. Ms Hamilton has left
an indelible mark, not only
on this institution but on the
Bahamas, through the lives
of the many alumni who
have passed through this
institution and who now fill
significant roles in our soci-
ety. She is truly a national
treasure and Kingsway was
blessed by her service for 38
years. May God continue to
reward her abundantly for
her contribution."


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


1 THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visit our website at www.cob.ed&bs


NOTICE FROM

THE OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS


The deadline for Fall (September) 2010 appli-
cations is Friday, February 5th 2010.


Please ensure that your application and all
supporting documents are submitted by that
deadline.


For more information,
call The Office of Admissions at
302-4499/302-4394 or
c-mail admissions@cob.edu.bs.


INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays







+


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010, PAGE 7


LOCALN


Entertainer's




son sentenced


to



THE son of legendary
entertainer John "Chippie"
Chipman was sentenced to
30 months in prison and
fined $10,000 after pleading
guilty to two marijuana pos-
session charges.
Shayan Chipman, 36, of
Lifebouy Street, appearing
before
Magistrate Carolita
Bethel yesterday, pleaded
guilty to the charges of pos-
session of marijuana with
the intent to supply.
According to the prose-
cutor, Inspector Ercell
Dorsett, the police, while
executing a search warrant
on an apartment complex
on Lifebouy Street, found
13 lbs of marijuana in plastic
bags in a bedroom, and
another two lbs of marijuana
in a freezer which was in an
outside shed.
Chipman was arraigned
with his father John Chip-
man, 81, who owns the
apartment complex, and a
relative, Kentrell Mackey,
27, of Carmichael Road.
The prosecution with-
drew the charges against Mr
John Chipman yesterday
afternoon, but indicated that
it would pursue the case
against Mackey.
Attorney Ian Cargill, who
represents Shayan Chipman,
said his client, who is also
an entertainer and a father
of one, had fallen on hard


30 months


RIGHT: 36-year-old
Shayan Chipman appears
in court yesterday.

LEFT: Entertainer John
'Chippie' Chipman outside
of court.


Photos: Tim Clarke/
Tribune staff _ _A_____ B___


times. Mr Cargill asked the
court to be lenient with his
client, noting that he had
taken responsibility for the
drugs from the onset and
had apologised to his father
for the embarrassment he
had caused. Magistrate
Bethell sentenced Chipman
to 30 months in prison on


the first marijuana posses-
sion charge. She also fined
him $10,000 on that charge.
Failure to pay the fine will
result in an additional year
in jail. He was also sen-
tenced to a year in jail on
the second drug charge. The
sentences will run concur-
rently.


Date set for Anglican



Archdeacon hearing


By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net


A DATE has been set for a Supreme
Court hearing in the ongoing controversy
surrounding Anglican Archdeacon Eti-
enne Bowleg.
"The matter has been adjourned to
March 3. We are to provide Father
Bowleg's attorneys with our submissions
in writing by next week Friday and his
attorneys are to send me a copy of their
written submissions by the 22," attorney
Damian Gomez said yesterday following
a closed hearing in Supreme Court.
Senior Justice Jon Isaacs recently grant-
ed an injunction blocking Anglican Arch-
bishop Laish Boyd or anyone else from
removing Archdeacon Bowleg until his
court matter is heard.
Archdeacon Bowleg contends that he is
64 years old, although with a 1937 birth
certificate, he is recognized by the Angli-
can Diocese as being 72, two years beyond


the mandatory retirement age for Angli-
can priests.
"We are seeking to have the injunc-
tion set aside and to have the action
struck out. My clients will be observing
the court order. Father Bowleg will
remain at the church of The Most Holy
Trinity until this matter is resolved," Mr
Gomez who represents the Anglican
Archdioceses said.
"It's a top priority matter for us and the
proper administration of the church hope-
fully, will resume immediately after the
hearing on March 3," Mr Gomez said.
Archdeacon Bowleg also alleges that
Archbishop Boyd does not have the
authority to remove him as rector because
the church regulation under which the
bishop acted was never gazetted.
However Mr Gomez said yesterday:
"We have set out in the affidavit of Bish-
op Gomez, the defendant's position and
we have made reference to the 1967 reg-
ulations which predate the Interpretation
and General Clauses Act."


C


COMMONWEALTH
BANK


CHAIRMAN'S REPORT ON UNAUDITED RESULTS DECEMBER 31, 2009

Commonwealth Bank was able to report solid results for 2009, notwithstanding the global
economic crisis and downturn in the local Bahamian economy. As the market declined, the
Bank stuck steadfastly to its conservative personal banking focused business model. This
focuses upon delivering superior quality service, creating value for our shareholders while
promoting economic growth and stability, where possible, throughout our community. The
Bank pays careful and ongoing attention to ensuring the safety, soundness and ongoing
sustainability of the Bank through a rigorous process of control and a sustained and effective
governance regime.

The results speak for themselves. Despite the faltering economy, total assets neared $1.4
Billion, a marginal increase over 2008, and a new record for the Bank. For 2009, net
earnings from the Bank's operations totaled $42 Million, a 14.8% reduction over fiscal year
2008. The major contributor to the decline in profitability was primarily associated with the
continuing conservative approach to credit risk management taken by the Bank. Total loan
losses in 2009 exceeded the same category in 2008 by 41%, or $7.6 million, the standard
being a stringent 180 day contractual write off policy for consumer loans. In addition
management applied a very conservative approach, in estimating allowances for loan
impairment due to the nature of our portfolio. As a result balance sheet loan impairment
allowances increased by 40% or more than $10 million in 2009.

The results achieved, surpassed industry norms in the commonly used financial institution
metrics such as the Return on Assets (ROA), Return on Equity (ROE) and Earnings Per Share
(EPS), though they still represented declines for the Bank based on recent years performance
in a thriving economy. Through close attention to cost control measures, operational
efficiency exceeded the Bank's target measures and in all cases the Bank materially exceeds
Central Bank guidelines and directives concerning operational performance.

The Credit Risk portfolio continues to be subject to rigorous monitoring and assessment
techniques and is supported by a conservative philosophy to ensure that any current or
anticipated portfolio impairment is identified promptly and assessed for potential loss on
an individual and or collective basis. We continue to build on a solid foundation of key
strengths, including a strong capital base, and a well recognized credit risk and expense
management process. This has enabled the Bank to continuously report lower than average
levels of non performing loans. (3% vs 9.4% for the industry at December 31st 2009).

The Bank's continuing and growing strong capital base supported by the existence of an
available well developed and closely monitored liquidity profile provides the Bank with the
tools necessary to achieve additional and cost-effective revenue generation.

A key element of the Bank's success belongs to the continuing support of shareholders and
its customers. Based on 2009 earnings, the Bank was again able to distribute more than
$24.5 million to its more than 6,500 common shareholders.

Employee engagement remains an important objective for the Bank and we are committed
to increasing this important attribute on a constant basis. We believe our extraordinary
workplace is a true sense of strength for the Bank as well as a competitive advantage as
we move forward.

On behalf of the Board I would like to acknowledge the ongoing contribution of the
individual directors and the personnel throughout the Bank who continue to contribute to the
growth and success of the Bank.


Absent juror halts Brenton

Smith Coroner's inquest


THE Coroner's inquest
into the death of Brenton
Smith did not proceed as
planned yesterday as a juror
was unable to attend court.
Smith, 18, was shot on the
night of July 9, 2009 as he and
a friend walked along a short-
cut near the City Market food
store on Village and Wulff
Roads.
Earlier that night the food
store had been robbed. Coro-
ner William Campbell said
that he had received a letter
from the juror who indicated
that she had an emergency
minor surgery and was unfit
to attend court.
The inquest will now
resume on February 15 and
16 which had already been
scheduled for the continua-
tion of the hearing.
Attorney Romona Far-
quharson represents Corpo-
ral Kelsie Munroe - the
police officer who is alleged to
have shot Brenton. Deputy


Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Cheryl Grant-Bethel
and Stephanie Pintard appear


for the Crown. Attorney
Roger Gomez Jr is represent-
ing the Smith family.


Man charged with

gas station robbery
A 22-YEAR-OLD man charged in an armed robbery at a
Texaco gas station earlier this week was remanded to Her
Majesty's Prison yesterday.
Ryan Wayne Johnson of Florida Court is accused of robbing
Treco Pratt of $151, the property of the Texaco service station
on Wulff Road, as well as receiving the cash. He is also accused
of being in possession of a black Taurus 9mm handgun and nine
9mm bullets.
Johnson is further accused of robbing Romel Alfred of a $500
Blackberry cellular phone, nine $20 phone cards, nine $10
phone cards, 25 $5 phone cards, his Bahamian driver's licence
and $2,000 in cash. In addition, Johnson is accused of robbing
Myrline Gelin of a $120 Nine West handbag, a $400 black
Apple Iphone, a Haitian passport and other personal items.
Johnson, who was arraigned in Court 11, Nassau Street, was
not required to enter a plea to the charges and was remanded
to Her Majesty's Prison. His case has been adjourned to June
24.


COMMONWEALTH BANK LTD.
UNAUDITED RESULTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2009


2009 2008


ASSETS ($'Millions)


1,376


1,323


NET INCOME ($'Millions) 42 49
NET INCOME AVAILABLE TO COMMON SHAREHOLDERS ($'Millions) 36 43
EPS (IN CENTS) BASIC AND FULLY DILUTED 37 44
RETURN ON EQUITY 27% 35%




William. hands, Jr. T..,Donaldson
President & CEO Chairman

N.B. A full set of audited financial statements will be published within the time frame
established by BISX.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7







+>


PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNWI


LOCAL METHODISTS VISIT HAITI DELIVERING CRITICAL




AID TO HAITIANS FLEEING PORT-AU-PRINCE


"We had people
coming to our town
bleeding and
broken with
missing limbs. We
had no help. But
when we heard
planes were
coming from the
Bahamas with
supplies, there
was much singing
in the village."


A YOUNG boy suffering from earthquake crush injuries
to his head and arm at the Cite Lumiere hospital, a
recipient hospital of medical supplies delivered through
flights by Bahamas Methodist Habitat


280






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Delegation from the
Bahamas Confer-
ence of the
Methodist Church recently vis-
ited Les Cayes, Haiti to assess
the situation in the Haitian
province and get firsthand
experience of how and where
the emergency supplies the
church sends to the region is
received and distributed. Les
Cayes is located 120 miles
southwest of Port au Prince
and is the third largest city in
Haiti.
The delegation was led by
Henry Knowles, General Sec-
retary of the Methodist Con-
ference and Abraham McIn-
tyre, executive director of the
Bahamas Methodist Habitat,
the mission arm of the Con-
ference. Cameron King, long
term volunteer and pilot for
Methodist Habitat, along with
other volunteer pilots from the
United States also made the
trip. The delegation flew into
Haiti with two airplanes of
loaded with supplies for the
community.
In partnership with the
Rotary Club of the Bahamas
and Odyssey Aviation,
Methodist Habitat continues
to fly airplanes into provinces
outside of Port au Prince.
"Most people do not realise
that Haiti is more than just
Port au Prince and though the
capital city was most directly
affected by the earthquake, as
a result of the devastation in
Port au Prince millions of peo-
ple have relocated into the oth-
er much smaller provinces,
completely overwhelming the
resources of the communities",
said Mr Knowles.
"The commitment of the
Methodist Church and Rotary
is to provide emergency aid to
these provinces. America is in
Port au Prince now, but very
little attention is being given


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to the rest of Haiti."
Within 48 hours of the earth-
quake the team began organ-
ising local and foreign volun-
teer pilots to fly items into
Haiti. More than 45 flights
have been made, delivering
60,000 pounds of badly needed
medical and humanitarian sup-
plies, into such provinces as
Les Cayes, Jeremie, Port de
Paix, Cap Haitian, Jacmel,
Pignon, and the island of La
Gonave.
According to Mr McIntrye,
"this trip to Les Cayes was an
important one for us. Not only
did we want to see the distrib-
ution network but we wanted
to meet some of the wonderful
people who have assisted us
on the ground in Haiti and vis-
it some of the places we are
helping. We did not want to
be tourists in Haiti, snapping
pictures and doing photo ops,
we wanted to be participants in
ministry, "he said.
Dan Shoemaker, President
of the Reciprocal Ministries
International, the hub of
humanitarian aid in Les Cayes,
shared with the Methodist del-
egation, "we need help here
too. Everyone focuses on Port
au Prince, no one focusing on
us. Half of Port au Prince has
moved out. Homes in Les
Cayes have taken in up to 20
people from Port au Prince.
We have a growing disaster on
our hands too and we do not
have the resources to cope
with it." According to Shoe-
maker, "1,500 airplanes have
been turned away from Port
au Prince but rather than send-
ing them to other places in
Haiti, they are sent back
home."
The Methodist delegation
first visited the Cite Luiere
Clinic, a mission hospital
where medical aid was sent
from the Bahamas. The hos-


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pital was inundated with hun-
dreds of earthquake victims
from Port au Prince, all with
different degrees of crush
injuries.
"We have limited supplies
here in this hospital, on a nor-
mal day we are outmatched by
the medical care needed. We
have to make do with whatev-
er we can to treat people," said
Dr Bell, the chief administrator
and surgeon at the hospital, as
he showed the delegation a
man whose crushed leg had to
be braced with construction
rebar and Bondo.
He added, "This is a diffi-
cult environment to work in,
but the spirit of you guys from
the Bahamas is so encourag-
ing." The doctor also reas-
sured the team that all the
medical supplies were being
put to use as soon as they
arrived at the hospital. The
team was assured by Dr Bell
that all medical supplies were
being put to use as soon as
they arrived at the hospital.
"Everything is put to use
immediately. We have no time
to store anything. The people
need them now."
The advantage of the small
airplanes being used by the
Methodist Habitat for Haiti is
that they can land on the short
airstrips in the rural Haitian
provinces, which most large
aircraft cannot. "Small planes
can bring 1,0001bs of essential
aid to save lives", said Dr Bell.
Benjamin, the local mission
centre's administrator and Cre-
ole translator highlighted the
impact that the Methodist
Church and Rotary Club of the
Bahamas are having on Les
Cayes, "In two days after the
earthquake we had people
coming to our town bleeding
and broken with missing limbs.
We had no help. But when we
heard planes were coming
from the Bahamas with sup-
plies, there was much singing
in the village." He continued,
"God always provides. God
always put people in your way
to help you."
In the midst of all the pain
and suffering happening at the
hospital, as the delegation were
about to leave for their next
stop, singing could be heard
from the patients. It was in
Creole but it had a profound
impact on the group.
The next stop was a refugee
tent city established for per-
sons from Port au Prince
where about 50 tents each able
to house were set up. The del-
egation met Dr Robert Leger,
Past Assistant Governor of
Rotary and chief logistics coor-
dinator for Rotary in the
region.
Although retired from active
medicine, Dr Leger was the
only skilled surgeon in the
region as the earthquake vic-
tims began to arrive from Port
au Prince, and he found him-
self treating hundreds of trau-
ma patients, using whatever
supplies he could find or cre-
ate. The group presented Dr.
Leger with the supplies that
they flew in with them and
toured General Hospital.
Another day ends and
another one begins. With every
sunrise the many volunteer air-
planes of Methodist Habitat
take to the southern sky. Their
cargos vary but the mission
remains the same - bring hope
and help to the people of Haiti.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


Fm rail In any Fam1 Tr~ack cortdW1att coo r*
and lot So eem Training CoRWg prepert
you tor * lhig6 P3�yhat jol I" juOsk * ~w wo~k*

Seltet I("ma "e fallowing FaOKI Track Certificate







+


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010, PAGE 9


How can we -




heal Haiti? iB


* Shaun Ingraham is an international disaster response con-
sultant who trained with the United Nation Civilian Military
Co-ordination (UNCMCoord) programme. He has worked
with international logistics teams responding to most of the
major disasters that occurred over the last 15 years, including
hurricanes Andrew, Ivan, Frances, Jeanne, Katrina and Rita.
Mr Ingraham was in Indonesia following the Tsunami in
North Sumatra working with the New Providence Community
Church and Food For the Hungry International. He is the pres-
ident of the Rotary Club of Eleuthera and founder of South
Eleuthera Emergency Partners. In partnership with the Rotary
Clubs of the Bahamas, Rotary District 7020, New Providence
Community Church/Centre and Habitat for Humanity, he is
currently in Haiti making sure aid and supplies are distributed
to those most in need. Mr Ingraham has agreed to update our
readers regularly on the progress of his mission and share his
-., t,. li,, and impressions of the catastrophe in Haiti.


By SHAUN INGRAHAM

Wednesday, February 3
- As we continued our
tours today, the big ques-
tion was, "How can we heal
Haiti?"
Will Haiti get the support
it needs to pull through this
period and emerge a more
economically stable coun-
try?
Or, will the world quickly
forget once the cameras
turn to the next sensational
news item? Is this indeed
Haiti's time to turn lemons
into lemonade?
As we rode and my host
and I discussed this, we
decided there is more than
one issue to be considered.
While having lunch, the
observation was made that
healing Haiti is like peeling
an onion.
Some of the challenges
include:

A crumbling infrastruc-
ture
It is reported that at least
100 boats now wait off the
coast to land their cargo in
the crumbling harbour of
Port au Prince. It is depress-


ing to know that some of
this cargo just might be can-
vass tents, food, bedding,
water and/or clothing. Or,
do they have heavy machin-
ery, excavators, front-end
loaders, vehicles, building
materials and/or medical
supplies on board? In any
event, whenever they arrive
they will not be a moment
too soon.
The approximately 60
mile journey from Pignon
to Port au Prince takes four
hours to complete and the
broken, uneven roads leave
travellers sore and tired.
Roadways clogged with
traffic jams delay workers
for hours, cutting into pro-
ductivity.

An acute brain drain
Each year thousands of
Haitians leave their home
in search of a better way of
life. Some end up in New
York, Canada, France, and
others in Miami. They trav-
el to give their children "a
better way of life." All of
our hosts are quick to point
out that they have no plans
to leave. They feel like
Haiti needs them. What


would happen if Haiti
began a Come Back Home
Programme? Will the dias-
pora return to apply their
skills to the economic, polit-
ical, educational and cul-
tural institutions? What
about the Haitian nurses
and doctors abroad? I have
seen the local ones work-
ing in some of the most
adverse conditions.

75 per cent Unemploy-
ment
Can any country survive
with this crippling statistic?
While this percentage
points to the number of
individuals who do not have
a paying job and do not pay
taxes, it does not mean that
Haitians do not work hard.
Each morning, men, women
and children gather beside
the street with their goods
to sell to those passing by.
Some have fruit or vegeta-
bles, others have phone
cards and still others sell
flowers at the local flower
market.
Today at one of the col-
lapsed buildings, two sto-
ries high, I saw a man of
about 32 sluggishly swing a


TOP: Collecting water in earthquake-devastated Haiti.
ABOVE: A street scene clearly shows the post-earthquake destruction.


sledge hammer at the tie
beam, a task that in a more
modern society is reserved
for heavy machinery. His


wow*


comrade had a hacksaw and
was diligently working on
cutting away the rebar that
held the huge chunks of
concrete together. I'm not
sure how this ended but am
willing to guess they didn't
accomplish much and will
have to return tomorrow
and the next day and maybe
even for a week at two dol-
lars a day to complete this
task.

The world's lack of
understanding
If you travel to Haiti and
meet the local people, visit
their homes and see the
beauty of the beaches and
hills, immediately the hope-
lessness and doom and
gloom that we often see on
television is replaced by an
impression of a spirit-filled
people who refuse to give
up; a people who are proud
of their history, even if they
have sometimes been pun-
ished for it and by it.
A friend of mine, when
he heard that I was travel-
ling to Haiti, asked me to
deliver something to a
friend of his who worked at
a hotel here. Upon pulling
up to the hotel, I soon
realized that this could have
been on a beach in Bermu-


da, the Bahamas or the
Cayman Islands. It was
beautiful. Most significant-
ly, it was owned and oper-
ated by locals. I inquired
about this facility, and the
driver informed me that just
recently a former US presi-
dent had lived there on his
visit to Haiti.
Our conversations went
on for hours as we sat in the
midday traffic.
We pointed out some
obvious as well as not-so-
obvious problems. I kept
pushing the driver, who did
not always understand my
Eleuthera (Tarpum Bay)
English, to help me come
up with solutions. I wanted
to understand and know
Haiti.
His response was, "It is
not easy to understand our
problems." He suggested
that one had to be an insid-
er to understand. I began
to agree with him. As I
peeled away one layer,
another one appeared.
Tomorrow we will travel
into the city again and con-
tinue to seek strategic ways
to carry out our mission. I
am sure of one thing, there
are no easy answers and no
quick solutions. We are in
this one for the long run ...


L.I~0 01 4I,*11~ 4414


THE Nassau Airport Develop-
ment Company (NAD) presented
a cheque for more than $20,000 to
the Bahamas Red Cross Haiti
Relief Fund.
Shortly after the major earth-
quake struck Port-au-Prince last
month, staff members formed the
NAD Helping Haiti committee
with the goal of raising $5,000.
Company executives agreed to
match whatever the staff raised
dollar for dollar.
"In the aftermath of the earth-
quake, people from all around the
company kept asking what they
could to do help Haiti," said John
Terpstra, vice-president of opera-
tions at NAD.
"Our executive team was so
inspired by the response that we
agreed to match whatever the
committee raised within a two-
week period."
In addition to traditional dona-
tion boxes in the staff lunch room,
the committee sold lunch and held
a private auction. They appealed to
corporate sponsors for assistance


and were overwhelmed by the sup-
port when donations including air-
line tickets, spa services, golf pass-
es and more poured in.
"We would like to thank our
NAD family for supporting this
drive. We have a small team here,
less than 150 on staff and we were
able to not only meet our initial
goal of $5,000 but exceed it by
more than $15,000," said Deborah
Coleby, director of operations at
NAD.
"We would also like to thank
our corporate partners who gave
generously to this cause. The peo-
ple of Haiti will no doubt appreci-
ate your kindness."
Corporate sponsors included
American Eagle, WestJet, JetBlue,
SkyBahamas, Pineapple Air,
Ocean Club, Lucianos, Winder-
mere Spa, Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Sheraton Nassau Beach
Resort, The Paint Place, Nassau
Glass, Sandals Royal Bahamian,
The $20 Shop, Outback Steak-
house and the Cable Beach Golf
Club.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7







+>


PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNWI


Pope to priests: Go forth and blog


By ARIEL DAVID
VATICAN CITY


POPE Benedict XVI has a new com-
mandment for priests struggling to get their
message across: Go forth and blog, accord-
ing to the Associated Press.
The pope, whose own presence on the
Web has heavily grown in recent years,
urged priests on Saturday to use all multi-
media tools at their disposal to preach the
Gospel and engage in dialogue with people
of other religions and cultures.
And just using e-mail or surfing the Web
is often not enough: Priests should use cut-
ting-edge technologies to express them-
selves and lead their communities, Benedict
said in a message released by the Vatican.
"The spread of multimedia communi-
cations and its rich 'menu of options' might
make us think it sufficient simply to be pre-
sent on the Web," but priests are "chal-
lenged to proclaim the Gospel by employ-
ing the latest generation of audiovisual
resources," he said.


The message, prepared for the World
Day of Communications, suggests such pos-
sibilities as images, videos, animated fea-
tures, blogs, and Web sites.
Benedict said young priests should
become familiar with new media while still
in seminary, though he stressed that the
use of new technologies must reflect theo-
logical and spiritual principles.
"Priests present in the world of digital
communications should be less notable for
their media savvy than for their priestly
heart, their closeness to Christ," he said.
The 82-year-old pope has often been
wary of new media, warning about what
he has called the tendency of entertain-
ment media, in particular, to trivialize sex
and promote violence, while lamenting that
the endless stream of news can make peo-
ple insensitive to tragedies.
But Benedict has also praised new ways
of communicating as a "gift to humanity"
when used to foster friendship and under-
standing.
The Vatican has tried hard to keep up to
speed with the rapidly changing field.


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - Lucaya MP
Neko Grant announced that
free computer lessons are now
available for his constituents
at the new computer centre
which was dedicated in the
memory of his late daughter
Nekcarla Grant.
The centre, which is located
at the rear of the Charthouse
House on Beachway Drive, is
open from 11am to 6pm.
Mr Grant said that 10 new
computers have been installed
and an instructor has been
hired at the facility.
"We are pleased to
announce that the Nek's Team
Lucaya Community Centre
which was opened just before
Christmas has commenced


phase one of our community
programme, offering free com-
puter lessons to adults and
children in the Lucaya Con-
stituency.
"The computer centre is
dedicated to the memory of
my late daughter Nekcarla
Grant, who was committed to
helping people and this com-
puter centre will do that. I
think it is a fitting tribute to
her life," said Mr Grant.
Nekcarla Grant, a lawyer,
was employed at the Grand
Bahama Port Authority's legal
department when she died in
September last year.
Mr Grant is urging con-
stituents to take advantage of
the free lessons offered. He
said that lessons run for about
one hour and 10 persons can
be accommodated per session.
Phase two of the communi-


ty programme, he said, will
offer after-school homework
assistance, which will begin in
the second quarter.


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Car catches fire

on Dolphin Drive


A CAR caught on fire on
Dolphin Drive after it
stalled due to overheating
on Tuesday morning. Own-
er Ernest Green, a resident
of Tropical Gardens, pushed
his car to the side of the


road with the intention of
waiting until it had cooled
down. As he sat in the car
waiting for assistance he
noticed smoke coming from
underneath the hood.
Mr Green explained: "I


thought the smoke was just
from the car overheating but
then when I saw the paint
start to flake off of the hood
- I knew it was something
more and I quickly got my
stuff out of the car."
The smoke continued and
eventually the sports utility
vehicle (SUV) caught on fire,
burning for around 15 min-
utes before a fire truck
arrived.
Fire Services are investi-
gating the cause of the fire.


SAC wins 2000

IBS Build-A-

Bridge Challenge

IBS Build-A-Bridge Chal-
lenge 2009 winning school
team, St Augustine's College,
shown with (1 to r) Nick Dean,
Principal, IBS; George Green,
mentor teacher; and Deshon
Fox, Engineer, IBS. The win-
ning bridge, constructed only
of 100 Popsicle sticks and all
purpose school glue, held
160.40 lbs before failing. St.
John's College finished in sec-
ond place and Kingsway Acad-
emy finished in third place.


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cI Im I


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TlieVmayseod fleir wrftwisubmons or oxnnr*ts on the public
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5OD0IPM on 12 March, 2010.


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+


PAGE 12, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNWI


Man in hospital

after stabbing
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 55-
year-old man is in hospital
in critical condition after
being stabbed.
The victim, a resident of
Holmes Rock, is being
treated in the Intensive
Care Unit at Rand Memo-
rial Hospital with an
injury to the jaw.
Asst Supt Loretta
Mackey said the Eight
Mile Rock police station
received a report some-
time around 11.20pm on
Tuesday that a man was
hit in the face with an
object by a woman.
Police and emergency
medical personnel
responded to the scene.
The victim was taken by
ambulance to hospital
where he was treated by
doctors.
Initial reports revealed
that the victim was
stabbed with a knife in the
jaw.
Ms Mackey said that a
45-year-old woman, a resi-
dent of Eight Mile Rock,
is assisting police with
their investigation.

COURT MATTERS
A 26-year-old High
Rock man was charged in
the Freeport Magistrate's
Court with several
offences, including house-
breaking.
Emmet Collins
appeared on Wednesday
before Deputy Chief Mag-
istrate Helen Jones in
Court Two, where he
pleaded guilty to house-
breaking, stealing and
receiving in connection
with a complaint that was
made on February 1 by a
resident of High Rock.
Magistrate Jones sen-
tenced Collins to one year
in prison for housebreak-
ing and stealing and dis-
missed the receiving
count. A teenager pleaded
guilty to stealing and was
sentenced to two years in
prison.
Ronel Gary, 19, of Eight
Mile Rock, appeared
before Deputy Chief Mag-
istrate Helen Jones on the
charge of stealing from a
shop.
The matter is in connec-
tion with a complaint
made on January 31, when
the accused stole from
Atlantic Meat and Veg-
etable Store an assortment
of copper pipes valued at
$20,000.


Prime Minister pays tribute



to Emeritus Rex Nettleford


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham
has expressed his sympathy on the
passing of "proverbial renaissance
man", former University of West
Indies Vice-Chancellor Emeritus Rex
Nettleford.
"Both Jamaica and the wider
Caribbean have lost a native son
whose extraordinary talents will be
missed. The Bahamas joins
Caribbean people throughout the
world in mourning the death of this
revered cultural icon," said Mr Ingra-
ham in a statement released yester-
day.
Rhodes scholar, author, cultural
and social commentator and
Caribbean icon, Mr Nettleford died


in Washington, DC, on
Tuesday after suffering a
heart attack on January
27. He had been in the US .ti
to attend a fundraising
gala for the University of
the West Indies.
He was 77, due to turn
78 just hours later.
Mr Ingraham said: "On
behalf of the government
and people of the
Bahamas I offer condo-
lences to the family of Ral-
ston Milton "Rex" Nettle- FORMER I
ford, OM, who passed West Indie
away yesterday. I also wish cellar Emer
to express sympathy to the tleford.
Jamaican people on the
passing of their native son who was
the proverbial Renaissance man."
"Rex Nettleford made extraordi-


Uni
s V
ritu


nary contributions to
Jamaica, the wider
Caribbean, and the
Caribbean Diaspora as an
educator, sociologist,
S writer, social critic, dancer,
� choreographer and trade
S unionist. He was a commit-
4* ted regionalist who was
- _ also internationally recog-
nised for his intellectual
and creative pursuits," he
stated.
Mr Ingraham noted the
versity of major contributions Mr
/ice-Chan- Nettleford made to the cul-
s Rex Net- tural landscape of Jamaica,
for example through his
founding of and service as
the artistic director and principal
choreographer of the National Dance
Theatre Company (NDTC) of


Jamaica.
"He led the company for nearly
50 years and was himself a brilliant
dancer," said the prime minister.
"He was a profoundly Caribbean
man who celebrated the unique his-
tory of the region through his writ-
ings and artistic expression. He was
deeply committed to education as a
major vehicle for regional develop-
ment."
Mr Nettleford was the cultural
advisor to the Prime Minister of
Jamaica, and served as a cultural
advisor to Carifesta and UNESCO,
as well as to the government of
Ghana.
After serving as UWI's vice-chan-
cellor for many years, Mr Nettleford
held the post of professor of extra
mural studies at the Caribbean uni-
versity at the time of his death.


Bahamian economy set for minor turnaround


FROM page one

Minister Hubert Ingraham
last night said indications are
that the "worst of the reces-
sion is over".
"Some improvement in the
job market is under way.
Tourism numbers are improv-
ing and government revenue
is showing signs of some firm-
ing up," Mr Ingraham said in
his yearly televised address to
the nation.
Last year, the Bahamian
economy declined by about
four per cent as it felt the
brunt of the global downturn.
"Tourism contracted
sharply. Construction activi-
ty weakened as foreign direct
investments fell. Unemploy-
ment rose and government
revenue decreased. It was
indeed a difficult year," said
the Prime Minister.


No country was spared the
impact of the economic fall
off, but signs in early 2010 are
that conditions are beginning
to improve, bringing with
them meagre stimulus for a
slow revival in prosperity.
However, Mr Ingraham
warned that this will take time
and the Bahamas' economy
remains "inextricably linked
to the world economy and
predominantly the economy
of the United States" which
continues to shed jobs despite
its six per cent growth rate in
the last quarter of 2009 being
the fastest in six years.
Despite the fourth quarter
bump, the US economy
shrank by 2.4 per cent overall
in 2009.
"A US and international
recovery will positively impact
our economy. The economy
of the Bahamas is inextricably


linked to the world economy
and predominantly the econ-
omy of the United States. We
will use these gains as they
occur to begin reclaiming
ground lost due to the reces-
sion. We will also move
aggressively on initiatives we
are taking to transform our
nation and achieve greater
peace, productivity and pros-
perity in the years ahead,"
said the Prime Minister.
Outlining some of initia-
tives to boost the economy in
the short to medium term,
Mr Ingraham said the gov-
ernment intends to deliver on:
"a new investment promotion
thrust; a more refined and
diversified tourism initiative
aimed at today's more dis-
cerning international travel-
ers; an enhanced framework
for supporting and promoting
small and medium size busi-


ness development; targeted
efforts toward securing and
growing financial services;
continued emphasis on pro-
moting home ownership;
modernization of our fiscal
regime for enhanced efficien-
cy and business facilitation; a
new Planning and Subdivision
Act and regulations to bring
better order to our develop-
ment going forward and the
exploration of alternative
sources of energy and relat-
ed green initiatives."
The Prime Minister advised
that he "fully expects" that as
the country's economic for-
tunes begin to reverse, the
government "will be able to
refocus on our traditional fis-
cal targets - lower government
deficits, less borrowing and
more favourable debt - GDP
ratio."
The government has


recently seen its debt to gross
domestic product ratio rise to
around the 50 per cent level
as a result of its increased
public spending in hard times,
meaning that in a time of
squeezed revenue, it has been
forced to put aside greater
sums for debt servicing whilst
also seeing a downgrading in
its international credit rating
that will inhibit the ease with
which it can access funds on
the international market until
matters improves.
"An economic turnaround
will permit us to reinvest in
our fiscal health and reestab-
lish the necessary fiscal space
to weather the next economic
storm when it comes," said
the Prime Minister.


* SEE PAGES
TWO AND THREE


International firms 'set to bring investment dollars into the Bahamas'


FROM page one

received a boost in recent times.
In this regard, Mr Ingraham
revealed that these businesses are in
the process of opening "corporate
headquarters, sales offices and training
facilities in the Bahamas".
He made his comments during his
annual televised address to the nation,
during which he touched on a selection
of issues relevant to the nation's eco-
nomic and social health and its out-
look in the year ahead.
As foreign direct investment in the
tourism and second-home sectors
dropped last year and have yet to


begin to recover, the Prime Minister
sought to focus on some brighter spots
on the economic landscape.
"Most notably, the exclusive Swiss
watchmaker Rolex (Caribbean) has
received approval to locate its watch-
making and repair training centre in
New Providence; Oldcastle Building
Products (Caribbean) was approved
to operate its sales office for the region
and North America from New Provi-
dence, and Brimac Environmental
Group received approval to transfer
its corporate headquarters to The
Bahamas," said Mr Ingraham of the
international companies entering the
country.
Mr Ingraham also hailed the nearly-


completed $200 million redevelopment
of the BORCO Pinder's Point and
Lewis Yard oil storage and refining
facility by owners Vopak Terminal
Bahamas in Grand Bahama and the
further $300 million expansion of the
facility scheduled to commence later
this spring as projects which enhance
employment prospects for Bahamians.
"Vopaks continued investment in
its Grand Bahama facilities bring
increased job security to the 169
Bahamians engaged at the facility and
is expected to create an additional 30
jobs once the expansion comes on
stream."
"Work associated with the expan-
sion has already created some 250 con-


struction jobs and this number is pro-
jected to increase to as many as 600
jobs at the peak of construction," said
Mr Ingraham.
The Prime Minister pointed to the
acquisition of South Riding Point
Holdings by Statoilhydro in Grand
Bahama late last year as a move which
"provides an excellent opportunity for
that facility to once again become an
important contributor to the Grand
Bahama economy".
"The upgrade and refurbishment of
the facility will result in the arrest and
reversal of the substantial environ-
mental degradation which has taken
place at the site over the years," added
Mr Ingraham.


Legal Notice

NOTICE

DAZZLING STARS INC.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of DAZZLING STARS INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

SANDOR INVESTMENTS LTD.





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of SANDOR INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice

NOTICE

PADUA HOLDINGS INC.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of PADUA HOLDINGS INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

ABDERA OCEAN INC.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of ABDERA OCEAN INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Prime Minister in Jamaica


FROM page one

While in the Bahamas the
Jamaican-born archbishop
headed a number of religious,
educational, and social pro-
grammes that targeted the
personal needs of the people
in the community.
He established the Roman
Catholic Stewardship pro-
gramme, Forward Together
in Faith, an umbrella pro-
gramme designed to create a
higher level of involvement,


enthusiasm, and commitment
within the church. He spear-
headed the building of the
new St Francis Xavier's
Cathedral, which was just
completed before he was
transferred to Jamaica in 2004
to become the fourth arch-
bishop of Kingston.
He was appointed Bishop
of the Catholic Diocese in the
Bahamas in 1981. When the
Diocese was elevated to an
Archdiocese he became the
Bahamas' first archbishop.


NDP 'gives Bahamians


a say at party level

FROM page five

how we will progress.
"I think you have to make every effort to give individuals
(candidates) the opportunity to speak in front of persons who
are truly looking for an individual who is going to be a strong
representative, not necessarily of the party of their choice, but
who they can identify with."
He added: "We believe the FNM and the PLP are one and
the same. The decision making in those political parties has
much to do with a small group with special interests making
decisions in the best interest of their cliques and special inter-
est groups.
"Your chance of growing in those parties will be about fol-
lowing whatever is going on regardless of your view."
Dr Rollins said the current political system is not truly demo-
cratic and should be based on ideas, rather than the aspirations
of individuals.
"We have to remember that this is not about us," Dr Rollins
said.
"This is not about individuals elected to office, it's about the
Bahamian people. We have to cast our egos aside and work for
the greater good."
The NDP candidate's plans for Elizabeth include installing a
shelter at the bus stop near Her Majesty's Prison on Joe Far-
rington Road, removing derelict and abandoned vehicles,
addressing shanty town settlements, and extending opening
hours at the Elizabeth Estates library and health clinic.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O






+


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010, PAGE 13


Workers' Party demands


disqualification of FNM


candidate Dr Duane Sands I


FROM page one
required by the Constitution
of any candidate who wishes
to be eligible to be elected
to the House of Assembly.
"I've come to ask you to
investigate it and to have his
(Dr Sands') name withdrawn
from the ballot. Let us not
have to go to court where a
judge will once again have to
condemn this office. The rule
of law must prevail or else
we are going to have anar-
chy in the country," Mr Mon-
cur said, reiterating com-
ments he made on Tuesday
regarding Dr Sands' eligibil-
ity.
The stunned regulator said
he would look into Mr Mon-
cur's claims.
While he declined to issue
a full statement, Mr Bethel
told the media that he did
not think he had the power
to remove Dr Sands' name
from the ballot and added
that he did not think the
returning officer made any
mistake when he accepted
the doctor's nomination
papers last week.
Outside the Parliamentary
Registrar's Office, Mr Mon-
cur remained confident that
he had seen off one of his
heavyweight opponents. He
said his focus now lies on dis-
qualifying the Progressive
Liberal Party's candidate
Ryan Pinder from the race
and the other candidates.
"Now that we have
knocked Dr Sands out, the
same constitution is about to
be used to knock Leo Ryan
Pinder out. Having knocked
out the mulatto, I shall pur-
sue the white man!"
Despite Mr Moncur's con-
fidence, The Tribune spoke
with a number of lawyers
who all argued that his point


is invalid.
Mr Moncur's argument is
based on his interpretation
of Article 48, section one,
subsection (J) of the Consti-
tution which states: "No per-
son shall be qualified to be
elected as a member of the
House of Assembly who is
interested in any government
contract and has not dis-
closed the nature of such
contract and of his interest
therein by publishing a notice
in the gazette within one
month before the day of elec-
tion."
Mr Moncur asserts that
this would have required Dr
Sands to make the required
disclosure a full month
before February 16.
Attorney Wayne Munroe
explained that the section of
the Constitution that Mr
Moncur cited, would only
apply to a person already
elected to the House of
Assembly and could only be
tried in an election court.
"His problem is moot, the
only time it would arise to be
tried if Duane Sands is elect-
ed - it's not as clear cut as
Mr Moncur (asserts). Dr
Sands can't be stopped from
running," he said.
Fred Smith, QC, said the
word "within" refers to the
time between the date of call-
ing the election and the actu-
al election - not a month
before the race.
"I think that Mr Moncur's
argument does not have any
merit. Otherwise, the Gov-
ernment calling the election
could effectively manipulate
the system to deprive an
Opposition candidate of the
opportunity of running," he
said.
On Monday, in the disclo-
sure of assets of all candi-
dates published in the Gov-
ernment Notice of Nomina-


tion gazette, Dr Sands
revealed that he "owns
shares in a medical company
which has a contract with the
Bahamas government to pro-
vide cancer treatment ser-
vices."
Dr Sands has dismissed Mr
Moncur's arguments and said
he has no plans to withdraw
from the race. His party also
contends that Mr Moncur's
argument is not legally
sound.


Killings bring year's homicide total to eight


FROM page one
Mahogany Street, Pinewood Gardens,
Nassau, at around 11pm on Wednesday.
Trestina Fernander, 22, was taken
to hospital but died later that night.
Police are questioning a man.
Ms Fernander was listed as the
eighth homicide victim of the year,
as she died just hours after a man
who had been shot in Plantol Street
four weeks ago died in hospital.
Rashid Woodside, 23, was shot
several times by a drive-by gunman
in a black Honda Accord at around
3.20pm on January 5 and was taken
to hospital in a private vehicle
where he remained for nearly a
month until his death at around 7pm


on Wednesday.
The eight deaths amounts to near-
ly two a week in the fifth week of
2010, and matches the murder rate
at the same time last year.
However police hope murders will
not soar to the heights of 2009's 87
homicides as they have a number of
new measures in place to help
reduce violent crime.
The 2009 murder toll followed 72
murders in 2008, which Minister of
National Security noted was four
times higher than the five murders
per 100,000 people deemed accept-
able by international standards.
Assistant Superintendent Bethel
said he does not expect the murder
rate to continue breaking records


year on year as new Commissioner
of Police Ellison Greenslade intro-
duces new strategies for the Royal
Bahamas Police Force.
Mr Bethel said: "Because of the
initiatives that we have in place
now, we are going to reduce a num-
ber of the incidents of crime. I can-
not give you the details about what
we have in place specifically, but it
is all geared towards reducing these
serious matters; shootings, stab-
bings, armed robberies, and mur-
ders."
Any information relating to the
latest killings should be submitted to
police as a matter of urgency by call-
ing 911, 919 or Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477).


I AHSLE NY


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


K


KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED
22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas




Mrs. Edna Mae Albury, 91

of Warwick Street, *
Nassau, The Bahamas,
will be held at Ebenezer
Methodist Church, East
Shirley Street, Nassau,
on Monday, 8th
February, 2010 at
2:30p.m.

Reverend William R.
Higgs, President of The
Bahamas Conference of The Methodist Church
will officiate and interment will be in Ebenezer
Methodist Cemetery, East Shirley Street.

Mrs. Albury is predeceased by her husband,
Leonard Parks Albury and is survived by her
sons, Gary and Lester Albury, daughter, Mary
Lou Saunders, grandsons, Andrew Saunders
and Lenny Albury, granddaughters, Debbie
Ranson, Dawn Walkine, Valerie Albury, Hope
Albury, Patrice Lleida and Amanda Albury,
brother, Sidney Albury, son-in-law, Cedric
Saunders, daughters-in-law, Teddy Albury and
Patricia Albury, grandson-in-law, Stephen
Lleida, granddaughter-in-law, Ingrid Saunders,
sisters-in-law, Persis Albury and Norma Albury,
great-grandchildren, Tara Van Volkom,
Kimberly Ranson, Kristen Scarsellato, Michelle
Ranson, Chelsea Saunders, Alex Saunders,
Madison Saunders, Ashlyn Lleida, Amber
Lleida, Andre Walkine and Jasmine Walkine,
great-grand son-in-law, Ian Scarsellato and
many other relatives and friends.

Instead of flowers the family request that
donations be sent to the Cancer Society of The
Bahamas, P.O. Box S.S. 6539, Nassau in
memory of Mrs. Edna M. Albury.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited.


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By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net
WITH the second slate of
BAISS sudden death playoffs
in the books, four champi-
onship series' are now set,
with the junior matchups
playing out as the seeding sug-
gested.

JUNIOR BOYS
#2 St. John's College Giants - 56
#3 C.W Saunders Cougars - 44
* The Giants dynamic duo
accounted for nearly 80 per-
cent of their teams total
points and withstood a sec-
ond half rally from the
Cougars to advance to the
championship round.
Anwar Neely scored a
game high 24 points while
Aaron Campbell added 20
points to earn the Giants sec-
ond junior boys championship
berth within the last three
years.
Neely opened with the
game's first pair of baskets
and the duo scored each of
the team's baskets in the
opening quarter.
The Cougars came within
two, 8-6, after a pair of free
throws from Andre Stubbs,
however Campbell answered
with a three point play and
Neely added a runner late in
the shot clock to give the
Giants a 13-6 lead at the end
of the first quarter.
The Giants' lead reached
double figures for the first
time when Neely made two
at the charity stripe for a 19-8
lead with 3:37 left to play in
the second quarter.
The lighting quick and elu-
sive guard gave the Giants
their biggest lead of the game
with when he was fouled on a
reverse layup and successful-
ly converted on a three point
play for a 31-12 advantage.
A frenetic full court trap
sparked a 7-0 run for the
Cougars, but with just seconds
remaining, Neely dribbled by
a series of defenders to get
off a layup attempt which
Campbell rebounded and
tipped in just before time
expired.
The Giants led 33-19 at the
half.
With Campbell in foul trou-
ble, the Cougars defense
keyed in on Neely and limited
the Giants to their lowest
scoring quarter of the game.
The Cougars opened the
quarter on a 12-6 run to come
within single digits for the first
time since the early second
quarter.
A deep jumper by Dane
Rolle trimmed the deficit, 39-
31 with 1:05 left to play in the
quarter.
Neely answered with a pair
of free throws to extend the
lead to 10, but the Giants inte-
rior defense struggled to con-
tend with the size Stubbs.
Stubbs scored nine of his
team high 20 points in the
third quarter and his jump
hook brought the Cougars
within seven, 41-34 with 20
seconds left in the period.
Neely again had an answer
when he drained a three
pointer from the right wing
as time expired to regain the
Giants double figure margin
headed into the fourth quar-
ter, 44-34.
With Campbell back on the
floor in the fourth, the
Cougars never threatened
again and failed to come with-
in single digits.
The duo scored the opening
baskets of the quarter and
Campbell gave the Giants
their biggest lead of the fourth
with a driving layup for a 51-
36 lead.
Kiano Thompson chipped


AARON Campbell drives the lane for a runner. Campbell finished
with 20 points in the Giants 56-44 win yesterday at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.


KIANO Thompson goes up for two of his six points on a fastbreak
layup.


in with six points for the
Giants while Rolle added
eight for the Cougars.
The Giants advance to face
the undefeated and top seed-
ed SAC Big Red Machine.

JUNIOR GIRLS
#2 St. Augustine's College Big Red
Machine - 24
#3 Jordan Prince William Falcons - 17
* The Big Red Machine
matched their male counter-
parts in the junior division,
making it a perfect sweep of
the Falcons in both elimina-
tion rounds.
SAC led 13-6 at the end of
the third quarter, but foul
trouble and sharpshooting at
the free throw line brought
the Falcons within striking
distance late in the contest.
Four Big Red Machine
players fouled out in the final
period and the Falcons Jone-
tria Kelly capitalised.
Kelly made seven of eight
from the line in the period
and her final shot brought


the Falcons within three, 20-
17 with 1:21 left to play.
Mica Cunningham stepped
up when the Big Red
Machine needed it most with
three of her seven points in
the game's waning moments.
Cunningham made one of
two at the line to give her
team a two possession lead.
Kelly fouled on the next
possession, leaving the Fal-
cons without a scoring option
late in the game.
Sheyanne Thompson led
the Big Red Machine with
eight points, Cunningham
added seven and Kayshell
Adderley chipped in with six.
Kelly led all scorers with
13.
Results of the Senior Girls
matchup between the Big
Red Machine and Westmin-
ster Diplomats and the
Senior Boys matchup
between the Big Red
Machine and the St. John's
Giants were unavailable to
press time.


ITDISCUS TOIESONTHS PGELO0ONTOWW.TIBUE22CO0


-I ...



-T "


BAISS PLAYO F F S







+


TRIBUNE SPORTS


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010, PAGE 15


Masters Softball

League All-Star


contest on Sunday

THE M MNlstcrs Sol'thill LL-c u- \\ ill s',le'I it' All-Stel
contlCt this Sunda\. FEch Lii\ 7th. hc-1,innine dlt 1pm.
The- pcnnintl Icdding and undclicLdl , alNIicholcllc
SliIokcrs \\ill licld a Icade uc hih s-c\cn all star, hijhlit-
cd b\ honc- ltins dand RBI IcdL-i C'ulbt cr E\(,I . hilt
leader T\ ~nc Stuhbs. and \\ins and ERA lcadci Hc-c-
lor Rollkc.

MASTERS SOFTBALL LEAGUE ALL-STARS

* PINEAPPLE PICKERS *


PLAYER
Mike Malor


Geoiger Turnei

Secondbase Andrew StuibbsL
Eddie FeiQluson


TEAM
Willlm's Consti action
Jets
St. Agnes Lions

Bamboo Shack Bulls
Alco Air Condition
Raiders


Edv.in Culmer Andeaus Insuiance
Bi ciei s
Joe McPhee Tony's Tigei Royals


Ronald SevrniC'ir
Mik'e Mo'ss


Micholette Strokers
Andeaus Insuiance
Brokers


Adlli Moss Micholette Strokers
Lester Dean Micholette Strokers


Culbeilt Evans
Addington


Micholette Strokers
AndeauJs Ins. Brokers


Cami bridge

Lany Thompson SI. PackI Abs
Hei nies Ferguson Sri Pack Abs


Lionel Pleely
Anthony Bov.re


Hectoi Rolle
Robert Gilbeil
Ken O'Brien


Bamboo Shack Bulls
Alco Air Condition
Raiders

Micholette Strokers
Si. PackI Abs
St. Agnes Lions


Lary Foibes Andeaus Insuiance
Bi ci leis
Gaylord Knovles Aico An Condition


Carlton leely


What Dat? It's the story of 'Who Dat'


FOOTBALL
NEW ORLEANS
Associated Press


WITH New Orleans Saints
flags fluttering from its roof,
the black SUV rolled past a
bus stop on Tchoupitoulas
Street early in the morning.
"Who Dat!" came the
cheer from the SUV's open
windows.
"I Dat!" cried the fans at
the stop.
"You Dat!"
Then, everybody together:
"We Dat!"
Smiles and fist bumps all
around.
With the Saints in the
Super Bowl for the first time,
the team's "Who Dat" cheer
has become something a little
bit more: A greeting, a chant,
a taunt and a ritual in a city
where love of the home team
has rarely correlated to vic-
tories in 43 years of NFL foot-
ball.
The origins of "Who Dat"
aren't clear, though the
phrase apparently goes back
to late 19th-century minstrel
shows.
The story of "Who Dat"
and the Saints goes back to
one of the club's rare hopeful
moments in its first two
decades. In 1983, New
Orleans hired coach Bum
Phillips, a guy who wore a
white cowboy hat and
promised big wins. The Saints
won four of their first six
games, and for the ever-opti-
mistic fans, the future looked
bright.
That's when Ron Swoboda
- who had heard a New
Orleans high school use it -
decided the "Who Dat" chant
perfectly captured the hopeful
mood. The chant, "Who dat,


IN THIS photo taken on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010, a" Who Dat" flag with a fleur-de-lis hangs
in the French Quarter in New Orleans. The New Orleans Saints play the Indianapolis Colts in


Super Bowl XLIV on Sunday in M

who dat, who dat say gonna
beat dem Saints," is fre-
quently shortened to just
"Who Dat."
"Things were looking so
good for the Saints, people
were thinking playoffs and
rightfully so," remembered
Swoboda, who gained fame
with a key World Series catch
for the 1969 New York Mets,
and was a local sportscaster
in 1983. "That 'Who Dat'
chant seemed to connect the
fans to the team and how they
felt for them."
Swoboda got five Saints
players- Dave Waymer,
Brad Edelman, John Hill,
Reggie Lewis and Louis
Oubre - to chant the "Who
Dats", and Aaron Neville to


sing "When the Saints Go
Marching In" on a record that
became an instant best-seller
in New Orleans.
"It was a fun thing to do,"
Neville said. "We wanted to
do something the fans would
like and something that would
show the team the kind of
support they had."
After Neville's first record-
ing, at least 11 more versions
have been recorded, includ-
ing a recent one by Neville
himself. Among the others
are such classics as: "Are You
A Who Dat?"; "Who Dat is
Coming Out"; and, "A Who
Dat Christmas" by the Who
Dat Children's Choir.
"'Who Dat' belongs to this
city," said 69-year-old Rick


Sins, a season ticketholder
since the first year. "That's
the way a lot of us talk, any-
way. But it's ours. You saw
how fast the NFL backed
down on that issue."
The slogan has been repro-
duced on T-shirts, head
bands, signs, the back win-
dows of cars and sides of
buildings throughout the area.
The NFL, which was not
bothered by the merchandise
for years, moved to stop T-
shirt shops from selling shirts
with the slogan immediately
after the Saints beat the Min-
nesota Vikings in the NFC
Championship game, earning
the right to play the Indi-
anapolis Colts in the Super
Bowl on Sunday.


Raiders
Tony's Tiger Royals


Hugh O'Biien St. Agnes Lions
Joey Dementle Alco An Condition
Raiders
Ray Johnson Si. PacI' Abs


Pat Evans


Anthony Huyler


Williams Construction
Jets

Bamboo Shack Bulls


Sonny Haven Willianms Construction
Jets


* WATERMELON SPLASHERS *


POSITION PLAYER
Firstbase Tony Robinson
Lopez Huyler

Secondbase Biad Smith

Tyione Stubbs


TEAM
Micholette Stiokleis
Bamboo Shlack Bulls

Willam's Consti action
Jets
Micholetle Stio,'eis


Gary Johnson Willam's Constiuction
Jets
Dennis Davis Si. Pack Abs


Maiio Ford

Keith Airnbristei

James Sands
Joe Jones

Addington Godet
Jeff Cooper


Ken Symonette
Victoi Bain

Whitney Sands
Lee Rahning


Willam's ConstiLiction
Jets
BanmbOO Shlack Bulls

Barnboo Shack Bulls
Tony's Tigei Royals

St. Agnes Lions
Willanm's Construction
Jets

BaimbOO Shlack Bulls
BalmbOO Shlack Bulls

St. Agnes Lions
Willani's Construction
Jets


Paul Moss Bamboo Shack Bulls
Beilie MUiray Willani's Construction


Harold Fitzgerald

Anthony Weech

Anthony Roberts
Rodney Albury
John Wallace


Jets
Tony's Tiger Royals

Willam's Construction
Jets
St. Agnes Lions
Bamboo Shack Bulls
Alco An Condition
Raiders


Johnny Ainibiistei Bamboo Shack Bulls
Michael Cairoll Bamboo Shack Bulls

Samnly Addeiley Micholette Stiolers

Lawv.rence Smith Tony's Tiger Royals

Audley Williamins Alco An Condition
Raiders


ITDISCUS TOIE O0TIS AG0LG N 0O'WW.RIUN24.CM0


POSITION
Firstbase


Thirdbase



Shortstop



Leftfield


Centerfield


Rightfield


Catcher


Pitcher



Utility


Manager


Coach

Coach


Thirdbase



Shortstop



Leftfield


Centerfield



Rightfield


Catcher



Pitcher


Utility


Manager

Coach

Coach


SPORTS






+


TRIBUNE I/




uSir
-FRIDAY,
F R I DAY,


SS


FEBRUARY 5, 2010


54CTO Bo uinestibueei~e


* Attorney for those


'Critical'


says court hearing
dates of 'extreme
urgency', as July
completion dates could
lead to 'justice delayed
being justice denied'
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Opponents of the
Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration's (BEC) $105 million
Abaco power plant have
again applied to the
Supreme Court for an
injunction to stop construc-
tion work at a hearing where
both sides are present, amid
concerns that their Judicial
Review application could be
rendered 'null and void' by
the facility's completion.
Fred Smith QC, the Cal-
lenders & Co attorney and
partner representing the
Responsible Development
for Abaco (RDA) organisa-
tion in its action against
BEC and various govern-
ment ministers/agencies,
told Tribune Business yes-
terday that he and his clients
feared "justice delayed
being justice denied".
Mr Smith said he had cur-
rently been unable to obtain
a date from the Supreme
Court on which it would
hear RDA's new injunction
application, nor get a date
for the main Judicial Review
application trial.
He was also seeking a
date from the Court of
Appeal on RDA's applica-
tion for permission to appeal
to the Privy Council the pre-
vious rulings denying the
first injunction application.
The Callenders & Co QC
said obtaining an early date
for the hearing of all these
matters was critical, since
BEC's general manager,
Kevin Basden, had said in
an affidavit supporting the
Government's anti-injunc-
tion case that the Wilson
City power plant was sched-
uled to be completed in July
2010.
RDA's new injunction
application seeks an inter
parties hearing where all sides
are represented by their attor-
neys.
It has adopted this tactic
because Supreme Court Jus-
tice Estelle Gray-Evans
SEE page 7B


$8m asset


set for tender bids

* New Providence Development Company finally gets go-ahead for
wastewater treatment plant and system after five-six years of talks,


fighting $105m project with tender set for release in 7-10 days


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
RND Holdings' chairman
will today respond to the five
questions posed to him by the
Securities Commission in rela-
tion to Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) majority takeover,
telling Tribune Business the
regulator wanted more details
on how many shares both he
and the company sold to the
BISX-listed insurer.
Jerome Fitzgerald, the PLP
Senator, confirmed he yester-
day had a "cordial" meeting
with the capital markets regu-
lator to address its concerns
about whether there had been
full public disclosure of the Col-
ina deal, adding that he had
agreed to supply them with the
information requested.
"They [the Securities Com-
mission] wanted some addi-
tional information that I agreed
to supply to them, and I am in
the process of putting that
together for them," Mr Fitzger-
ald told Tribune Business.
"They just wanted some
basic stuff on the amount of
shares issued [by RND to Col-
ina]. We had sent them a letter
to that effect, but they also
wanted to know the amount of
shares I personally had sold to
Colina, too."
Mr Fitzgerald confirmed the
Securities Commission had
issued him with five questions
they wanted answers to, adding:


* 3,000 lots under development in western New Providence, which
has space for 7,500 more homes - even 10,000 lots by 2020
* 'One of the last opportunities to provide affordable housing for
Bahamians', as developer aims to 'change perceptions' of west
* 140 lot industrial park receives final subdivision approval, with


Town Centre foundations to go in in next 60 da�
By NEIL HARTNELL
- Tribune Business Editor


T. RHYS DUGGAN


New Providence Develop-
ment Company yesterday said
it plans to "go out to tender"
next week on the $8 million
first phase infrastructure "crit-
ical" to further developing the
island's western end, its senior
executive telling Tribune
Business that the area could
accommodate another 7,500
homes - with some 3,000 lots
already in development.
T. Rhys Duggan, the devel-
oper's president and chief
executive, said that after five-
six years of negotiations with


Ys
the Government and Water
& Sewerage Corporation, it
would put out within the next
seven to 10 days the tender
for its wastewater treatment
system's first phase.
He told Tribune Business
that apart from construction
of the initial plant itself, the
first phase project would also
involve construction of "the
main collection system" to
take wastewater from prop-
erties between Mount Pleas-
ant and the Airport Industri-
al Park.
SEE page 4B


PAS


$4.31


so $4.32


$4.38 |

,,,, ,nj rr, ,,,,- ,, -, ,-, r n . . r,-n


* Senator to respond to
Securities Commission today on
Colina Holdings buyout, saying
it wanted details on shares both
he and company sold
* 'Surprised' if Colina offers to
buyout minority investors, as
sources suggest
"I told them I would send it
back to them tomorrow
[today]."
The RND Holdings chair-
man also told Tribune Business
he had informed the regulator
that he would have "no prob-
lem" in making a further public
SEE page 3B


Direct debit

target before

'end of March'

* Electronic payments system handling
'well over' 10,000 cheques per day
* Four million cheque transactions in
Bahamas per year
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Bahamian commercial banks yesterday said they were
hoping to go live with the Automated Clearing House's
(ACH) direct debit/credit functions "before the end of
March", with the electronic payments system already pro-
cessing "well over" 10,000 cheque transactions per day.
Paul McWeeney, Bank of the Bahamas International's
managing director, who also headed the Clearing Banks
Association's (CBA) ACH committee, told Tribune Busi-
ness that since going live on January 22, 2010, the system
had been working well and no problems had been encoun-
tered.
The ACH is already processing cheque transactions
electronically, enabling them to clear into the recipient's
account within 24 hours, and Mr McWeeney said: "Some
consumers are already seeing the impact of it. There's a lot
of talk about the speed of the payment of cheques.
"What we're looking forward to now is to move for-
ward on to the second phase, direct debits and credits. I sus-
pect that before the end of March that will be in place."
The Clearing Banks Association will conduct a "post
mortem" on the ACH going live when it meets today, and
Mr McWeeney said he would "not be surprised" if some
consumers had seen cheques bounce as a result of the 24-
hour settlement and clearing.
SEE page 3B


Three companies

in Bahamas move
Three international companies have received government
approval to relocate head offices, sales and training centres to
the Bahamas, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said last night,
as he moved to eliminate the gloom that enveloped the econ-
omy and employment last year.
In his address to the nation, the Prime Minister said the
Caribbean subsidiary of Swiss watchmaker, Rolex, had received
approval to base its watch making and repair training centre in
New Providence, while Brimac Environmental Group had
been allowed to transfer its corporate head office to the
Bahamas.
No information was disclosed about the number of jobs like-
ly to be created for Bahamians and anticipated economic
impact for these projects, which were joined by Oldcastle
Building Products (Caribbean). This company will operate its
SEE page 2B


7Th


FAMILY GUARDIAN
INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED


Regulator's five questions

for RND Holdings' chairman


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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


NEW APPOINTMENT


Citco Fund Services
(Bahamas) Limited ".. I:
'. ".. :. ..=.--J - _. ,.... r ..:,. r --._-:, . - "
,"] - . -" I "";" -' I "




DIRK W.


SIMMONS

as Managing Director.


0- E.iCc .-rjfu:-I A -,' Y "I C31 I iJd.J.- jr


,~*":1 1.'iI ' J ,Ire if.: III I: LI I:- A-0 1 3-1 11 11-iir I: :: r~r

T - J 1.- 1,.: .1r r. ..~-re I I :-1.- vF)c.: KI rI Ii
L i _,u I, Nas -:.-,I own% "rm*. h:.n -- r-A

F .................. - .....1.......................


FROM page 1B

Caribbean and North Ameri-
ca sales force from New Prov-
idence.
A subsidiary of Oldcastle
Building Products, the com-
pany's current Bahamian
product distributor is Builders
Mall, the 'one-stop shop'
building materials supplier on
Wulff Road, which features
the Tile King, FYP and The
Paint Centre as its three
anchor stores. Located on 10
acres, Builders Mall will also
feature M. R. Higgs & Co.,
Appliance & Electronics
Super Centre, Granite &
Marble Kingdom, FYP Con-
crete & Block, and Wulff
Road Storage.
In a bid to further boost
business, investor and con-
sumer confidence, which was
battered in 2009 by a reces-
sion and increased unem-
ployment, the Prime Minister
said Vopak Terminal
Bahamas was set to invest a
further $300 million in
expanding the Grand
Bahama-based former BOR-
CO oil storage terminal. This
investment, coming after an
initial $200 million tranche
that has almost been com-
pleted, is set to start this
Spring and create another 30
jobs.
Some 169 staff are already
employed at Vopak Terminal
Bahamas, and Mr Ingraham
said: "Work associated with
the expansion has already cre-
ated some 250 construction
jobs and this number is pro-
jected to increase to as many


Three companies


in Bahamas move


as 600 jobs at the peak of con-
struction."
The Prime Minister
expressed optimism that 2010
would be "a better year", and
that the worst of the reces-
sion was over. He expressed
hope that stalled resort devel-
opments, such as the Ritz-
Carlton project on Rose
Island, being developed by
the Miami-based Gencom
group, will restart again soon.
Some 943 persons were
engaged on the Albany pro-
ject in southwestern New
Providence, Mr Ingraham
added, of whom 862 were
construction workers and 71
full-time Albany employees.
"The acquisition, refur-
bishment and reopening of
the small boutique Tiamo
Resort in Andros, the open-
ing of the upscale Delphi
Club in South Abaco, and the
scheduled April opening of
the new S & T Beach Club in
San Salvador reflect a grow-
ing trend internationally of
the development of exclusive
specialty boutique resorts
which are proving to be less
susceptible to the ups and
downs of the world econo-
my," the Prime Minister said.
"The viability of these small
resorts is being demonstrat-
ed by the success of other
small bed-and-breakfast


Minimum load 50 pallets


[ori
i1"(242) 376-7770o


resorts around our islands.
Many of them used the tradi-
tional summer lull last year
to access concessions under
the Hotels Encouragement
Act for a host of refurbish-
ment and enhancement pro-
jects."
Meanwhile, Mr Ingraham
said the Government had
issued 1100 Stamp Tax
exemptions, worth a collec-
tive $6 million, for Bahamian
home buyers, plus those
engaged in mortgage trans-
fers and debt consolidation
via re-mortgaging.
Meanwhile, Mr Ingraham
expressed optimism that the
Government would conclude
an agreement with the
Arawak Cay Port Develop-
ment Company, and its 19
shareholders, for the reloca-
tion of commercial shipping
facilities from downtown Nas-
sau to Arawak Cay.
He also confirmed Tribune
Business's revelation that the
company will be owned 40
per cent by the Government,
which gets its equity stake
through leasing the land for
the project, 40 per cent by the
shipping companies and 20
per cent by the Bahamian
public through an initial pub-
lic offering (IPO).
Mr Ingraham's comments
are a clear indication that the
Government is determined
not to let the Arawak Cay
port become "dead in the
water", as some had feared if
there was no progress this
year and the PLP - who are
vehemently opposed to it -
are re-elected in 2012.
No mention was made,
though, of the $2.6 billion
Baha Mar project at Cable
Beach. That is still awaiting
completion of the agreement
between Baha Mar and the
Chinese, with the developer
and Scotiabank still negotiat-
ing over the latter's demands
that the Izmirlian family pay
down more than $50 million
on the existing syndicated
loan credit facility.


Tell the world how you feel about your special


What better way to let your love

know how much they mean to

you, than by having your love

note displayed in The Tribune as

part of our Valentine's feature

section. You can drop off your

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this week for just $30. All messages

should be under 50 words.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


BUSINESS I







+


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010, PAGE 3B


'Shooting yourself in foot' training warning
By CHESTER ROBARDS tion triggers" in personal detail the Bahamas will meet the State Minister for Finance,
Business Reporter changes and changes to their March 2010 deadline to get off Zhivargo Laing, said he
crobards@tribunemedia.net facilities and account usage. that 'grey list' of countries that remains confident that the


BAHAMIAN FINANCIAL
services providers were yester-
day warned that they were
"shooting themselves in the
foot" if they did not expose
their staff to anti-money laun-
dering training.
Rowena Bethel, the Compli-
ance Commission's executive
commissioner and Ministry of
Finance's legal advisor, speak-
ing to the Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants
(BICA), said the industry's reg-
ulatory framework will ensure
the Bahamas is in line with
international standards.
Ms Bethel warned, though,
that financial services providers
that did not expose their staff to
anti-money laundering training
were "shooting themselves in
the foot".
"The Bahamas is a location
where it is wise to do enhanced
due diligence, depending on the
service they [clients] approach a
financial services provider for,"
Ms Bethel said.
She added that financial
providers, when doing due dili-
gence, must look for "verifica-

FROM page 1B
disclosure on the material
nature of the Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) transaction, via a
newspaper advertisement, if the
Securities Commission felt it
was warranted. He added that
the regulator could also
approve the ad.
Meanwhile, Mr Fitzgerald


"There is a general obliga-
tion to report money launder-
ing," said Ms Bethel.
The Bahamas has been on
the Organisation for Economic
Cooperation and Develop-
ment's (OECD) 'grey list' for
its role as a 'tax haven'.
With a number of Tax Infor-
mation Exchange Agreement
signing lined up for this month,


are not currently in total com-
pliance with international tax
transparency standards.
Despite no TIEA signing
throughout the month of Janu-
ary, after a flurry in December,
the total signed by the Bahamas
is now 10 - two short of the 12
required from so-called "tax
havens" by the OECD to meet
new international standards.


Bahamas will do what it has to
do to protect its financial ser-
vices industry.
And the Compliance Com-
mission is moving to position
financial services providers to
protect themselves form poten-
tial scrutiny and prosecution
through its regulatory frame-
work.


Direct debit target before 'end of March'


FROM page 1B
Many Bahamians had been used to writing
cheques without having the funds in their account
to pay, safe in the knowledge that the monies
would be available within the five days it previ-
ously took to clear. Those days are gone, and
Mr McWeeney acknowledged that some Bahami-
an consumers - both residential and business-
would undergo a period of "adjustment".
Brian Smith, the ACH's general manager, also
told Tribune Business that he expected to be
dealing with direct debits/credits "within three
months" of the January 22, 2010, going live date.
"That's the most important part as far as I'm
concerned," Mr Smith said. "The public will real-
ly benefit."
While 24-hour cheque clearance was good, he


Five questions
said he was unaware of any
plans by Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) to offer the same
pro rata terms to buy out RND
Holdings' minority sharehold-
ers, something sources had told
Tribune Business on Wednes-


added: "It's even better when you do not have to
leave home to drop off a cheque or write a
cheque. When that happens, you'll have a lot of
noise about that."
As for the volume of cheques the ACH was
handling, Mr Smith told Tribune Business: "Basi-
cally, we're handling well over 10,000 cheques
every day."
He added that he had initially been surprised
by this volume, but said that based on the Central
Bank of the Bahamas' data that showed there
were four million cheque transactions in the
Bahamas per year, and 250-260 working days
annually, the 10,000 per day volume was about
correct. "The system seems to be taking it in its
stride," Mr Smith said. "It's used in much larger
jurisdictions, so we're pretty comfortable with
these volumes."


day was being planned, as this
possibility had never been
raised when he discussed his
transaction with the insurer.
"I don't think they'd [Coli-
na] have a problem with it, but
I haven't spoken to them about
that," Mr Fitzgerald said.
"I'd be surprised if they came
out and made a general offer.
That was never part of our dis-
cussions. It never came up with
them in any conversation that
I'd had."
Mr Fitzgerald said he would
be "surprised" by any minority
buyout, because in the letter
sent to RND Holdings' share-
holders informing them of his
decision to sell a majority stake
to Colina Holdings (Bahamas),
he had suggested that the deal
would enhance the value of the
minority investors' holdings.
"By the end of the year, with
Colina as the majority share-
holder, they will see positive
movement in the share price
because of improved prof-
itability and cash flow," he said.
However, several RND
Holdings investors have told
Tribune Business that their
concerns over the deal would
be eliminated if Colina Hold-
ings (Bahamas) was to make
an offer to buy them and the
other minority investors out,
using the same price, terms and
conditions offered to Mr
Fitzgerald. Their complaints
have also centred on a per-


PROCLAMATION


WHEREAS, TheS Bahamnas Christar Council IBCC'i an unt~rella nrgaizalion wtom
mm~~4twip cnmprb~ many ol i he Chnisfan d~ercirnat~o-s irewnt in -rt Bahw*raswas
buflded in 111a


AND WHERE-AS, the BCC, as crs~ilukedpromrfes undeis1riftadviM1 LbeLwftn 1he
wanmn spaftc4olhCirist`5 Chuirch in TI)-.Bahamas~ at all Ieyebs, !he fiwlneranfe of (>hris1's trek~on of
service t-ircugh I'inl Wcnapo ndI Chi~wsoa n .iuss toall miaiidfieg av= The Bahama~s,
Incluilve of matterm of sciVland rvj oiinoiwe'ncs.


AND WHEREAS, ift 6CU is awyc wca OrntrrBiabout Iihe hi~h rale of cri and
criniinaliy in The Bahamas, paimulaiiyas it relaWeE to crines of *Ience, phy~icl. emotionaI. ix
!BexuaI, abtfteaga~iit Y~cIms of all ages and gender:


AND WHFIEAS, 1w BCC, having init and contfred with s wmrmrmhop.has d~cide l
des~nailc Wrdnesdayr. 11)t FebmrJer 201D from i6Z0 am, tD7:00 pn- ~as aNationalDay o
Fasrhg and Prayeir, uniier the theme "Cr~me Is Everybody's &AhIrtas', dudnfg whiCh Muie al
Chnstian Ctwhninr ~ iThe Baha'nas wil be wked Lo observe: a day cd fsting ard Vpfr th r e
mo~~,~ral, hiBJa, %KW, canoric ad oit~~IIIical ld�e of the nao;


NO~W, THEREFORE, 1, Huberi A. Irngr~han, iNme Min~isi of thie Ccn'rnonweailh ofrThe
Bahaw5, do hemby prodciam We1fl~sdka, 1CP Februxy, 20 10 frwn 6 Gt a~nin o 7-00 px as "
NATHMIAL DAY OF FASTING AND PRAYER".


IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I hay
hereunto ,S my Hand and Seal
this -z' day of January. 210



HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER


ceived lack of disclosure regard-
ing details on the material deal.
The transaction effectively
means that RND Holdings will
become a majority-owned sub-
sidiary of Colina Holdings
(Bahamas), with its manage-
ment and direction undergoing
a complete overhaul. The Tick-
etXpress business will now be
absorbed into Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) as the call centre
for its subsidiary, Colina Insur-
ance Company.
The main attraction for Col-
ina, though, is likely to be RND
Holdings' property subsidiary,
RND Properties, which owns
the JFK Drive plaza in Nassau,
where tenants include Galleria
Cinemas, FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas) and
Lickety Split. It also owns the
RND Plazas in Freeport and
Abaco, although it has been
attempting to sell the latter for
some time. The real estate
earnings streams, some $1.3
million per year, are a good fit
for Colina Holdings (Bahamas),
given its existing real estate
portfolio.


HUMAN RESOURCES
Re: Assistant Manager,
Trusts & Corporate Services
51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau, Bahamas
F: 328.1108
careers@royalfidelity.com

[ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS]


environment at a senior level;
* Advanced knowledge of trust administration and
company management / administration;
* Possess STEP designation;
* Strong writing skills;
* Ability to understand and execute operational functions.


SUMMARY
The successful applicant will be required to act in a
fiduciary capacity and conduct management activities


relative to the administration of trusts, management
and administration of companies.

Dealine: February 19th, 2010
Only Short Listed Individuals will be contacted




AN ATTRACTIVE COMPENSATION PACKAGE, INCLUDING A COMPREHENSIVE RANGE OF EMPLOYEE
BENEFITS IS BEING OFFERED. SALARY RANGE SUBJECT TO QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


K


Legal Notice

NOTICE

SAILFAST FX FUND LTD.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000 the
Dissolution of SAILFAST FX FUND LTD. has been
completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register of
Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was the
23rd November 2009.

./"

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An entrepreneurial spirit, original thinking, and a passion to succeed.
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THE SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATE WILL HAVE THE
FOLLOWING MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:
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* A minimum of 5-7 years experience working in a trust


BUSINESS


Legal Notice
NOTICE


BROWALLIA INVESTMENTS INC.
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, BROWALLIA INVESTMENTS INC. is in
dissolution as of January 27, 2010.


International Liquidators Services Inc situated at
35A Regent Street, P.O.Box 1777 Belize City, Belize
is the Liquidator.



LIQUIDATOR













Please be advised

Starting


S Feh. ith







+>


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


Legal Notice
NOTICE

LESAGIO VILLAGE CORP.

--'-


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of LESAGIO VILLAGE
CORP. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

ROBLE MANAGEMENT LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of ROBLE MANAGEMENT
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
JAZEL INTERNATIONAL LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of JAZEL INTERNATIONAL
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)









I'm lovln'Ifr


Employment


Opportunity:

* A leading Fast Food Franchise is looking
* for mature individuals to WORK ITS
TRAILERS.

* Requirements:

* Must be a High School Graduate
S* Must have excellent Inter-personal
Skills U
* Must have excellent Oral & Written
* Communication Skills
S* Professionalism required

SMcDonald's offers excellent benefits!

- Please submit Resume to: U


* U
U U
* Human Resources Department
McDonald's Head Office U
on Market St. North I
* P.O.Box SS-5925
Telephone: 325-4444
* Nassau, The Bahamas
p. .. .. .. .. .. .


FROM page 1B

"I think it's going to be an
$8 million spend for the first
phase," Mr Duggan told Tri-
bune Business, "including the
collection phase and the first
phase of the plant."
The wastewater treatment
plant will be located at the
Airport Industrial Park, and
Mr Duggan said it was being
designed for expansion to
cope with ever-increasing
demand from population,
business and community
growth in western New Prov-
idence.
The New Providence
Development Company pres-
ident said that the remaining
land in western New Provi-
dence, including the develop-
er's own real estate holdings,
could accommodate another
7,500 homes. He added that
some 3,000 lots were already
in development, and it was


'Critical' $8m asset




set for tender bids


possible that another 10,000
could come on stream in the
decade to 2020.
When asked how important
the wastewater system's
approval had been to New
Providence Development
Company's development
plans for western New Provi-
dence, Mr Duggan replied:
"Critical. We can't do them
without it.
"The days of having a
pump truck going out and
pumping out the lift stations
are behind us, I hope. We've


Legal Notice
NOTICE

TAVERNA ORO

INVESTMENTS INC.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of TAVERNA ORO INVEST-
MENTS INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Disso-
lution has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
GRAND ELITE TRADING
COMPANY LTD.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of GRAND ELITE TRADING
COMPANY LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has there-
fore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)









i'm lovin'it


: Employment


Opportunity

1 A leading Fast Food Franchise
* is looking for

I CUSTOMER SERVICE
individuals to work its late night shift 0
from 11:00p.m.-7:00a.m.0
0 on weekends and holidays 0

0 Requirements:

* Must be a High School Graduate
0 * Must be customer service driven
0 * Must have excellent Oral & Written
0 Communication Skills

� McDonald's offers excellent benefits!
l U
0 Please submit Resume to:
0
l Human Resources Department
l McDonald's Head Office
on Market St. North U
ll P.O.Box SS-5925
l Telephone: 325-4444
l Nassau, The Bahamas
l .
.mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm


designed the system for
expansion."
Mr Duggan said the plant
and collection system were
needed "desperately to sup-
port and service" existing
communities, such as Lyford
Cay, Old Fort Bay, Mount
Pleasant and Serenity, and
also for when further real
estate development took
place.

Challenge
Earlier, addressing the
Rotary Club of west Nassau,
in response to a question from
a western New Providence
resident, Mr Duggan
acknowledged that obtaining
government/Water & Sewer-
age Corporation approval had
been a "challenge", taking
some five to six years.
"We have been in discus-
sions since I got on the island
three-and-a-half years ago,
and those discussions pre-dat-
ed me by two years, so it has
been about five to six years,"
Mr Duggan said. "We view it
as critical to the development
of those lands.
"We had some roadblocks
to getting that approved, and
I apologise for the delay. But
we will take it out to bid in
the next 10 days."
Meanwhile, Mr Duggan
said New Providence Devel-
opment Company had
obtained final subdivision for
its planned 78-acre light


industrial park near the air-
port.
The park will consist of
some 140 lots, either half an
acre or one acre in size, and
will be targeted at Bahamian-
owned businesses such as cab-
inet makers, shipping compa-
nies and contractors needing
storage.
"We're just waiting for
market conditions to improve
before we do the infrastruc-
ture," Mr Duggan said of the
industrial park. "We have 140
lots ready to go to market
with in the next year."
And the developer's $30
million new Town Centre for
western New Providence was
set to start pouring the foun-
dations within the next 60
days, Mr Duggan said, with
bank, restaurant and gas sta-
tion tenants already signed
up.
"We've got a good stable,"
he added. "Many are clients
we have a relationship with.
They're the strongest of the
Bahamian retail sector."
With AML Foods'
Solomon's Fresh Market,
modelled on the US-based
Whole Foods chain, already
secured as the anchor tenant,
Mr Duggan said the Town
Centre's 64,000 square foot
space was split 50/50 between
office and retail. Professionals
such as doctors, lawyers and
accountants had already
SEE page 5B


Legal Notice
NOTICE

EASTERN SHORES

VENTURES LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of EASTERN SHORES VEN-
TURES LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Disso-
lution has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

SANDY RIVERS LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of SANDY RIVERS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

TUXPAN COMPANY LTD.


- J#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of TUXPAN COMPANY LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


BUSINESS I








+


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010, PAGE 5B


FROM page 4B

expressed interest in leasing
the office space.
Describing New Providence
Development Company as
the largest private landown-
er in New Providence, with
some 2,300-2,400 acres of
undeveloped land in the west
of the island, Mr Duggan said
holdings represented "one of
the last opportunities on this
island to provide housing for
Bahamians that is more
affordable".
More than 3,000 lots were
in development in western
New Providence, Mr Duggan
added, many of those in real
estate projects being carried
out by Bahamians. He cited
as examples of this the Lyford
Hills development, owned by
Tennyson Wells and his
Bahamian investor group, and


Serenity, being developed by
Kingsley Edgecombe, of
King's Real Estate, and Mar-
tin Solomon.
Lots in western New Prov-
idence were being sold at
price points ranging from
$70,000 to $170,000, and Mr
Duggan said: "Land is such a
diminishing commodity that
we are trying to pay a lot of
attention to how we develop
the 2,400 acres we have left."
New Providence Develop-
ment Company was attempt-
ing to "masterplan" the west-
ern area of the island in a way
that was "sensitive" to envi-
ronmental, transportation,
proper planning, community
and business needs. "We


NOTICE is hereby given that EMANIE JONASSAINT of
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 29th day of JANUARY, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.




NOTICE is hereby given that KENO RICHARD of CHAISER
ROAD, EASTERN ESTATES, P.O. BOX N-805, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29th day of
JANUARY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE is hereby given that CHANTAL JEAN-PIERRE
of FOX HILL, REEVES STREET, P.O. BOX N-1671,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29th
day of JANUARY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE is hereby given that PRINCESS ANNE
NORA HARRIS of Coral Reef Estates, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 29th day of JANUARY, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



MEMORY HOLDINGS LIMITED
(Company number 118,214B)

An International Business Company
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



We, Pine Limited, Liquidator of MEMORY
HOLDINGS LIMITED hereby certify that the
winding up and dissolution of MEMORY HOLDINGS
LIMITED has been completed in accordance with
the Articles of Dissolution and that MEMORY
HOLDINGS LIMITED has been dissolved as of
17th day of December, 2009.



Dated this 2nd day of February, 2010

Pine Limited
Liquidator



NEW ERA COMMUNICATIONS
FUND LTD.
(Company number 147,687B)

An International Business Company
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

We, Pine Limited, Liquidator of NEW ERA
COMMUNICATIONS FUND LTD. hereby certify
that the winding up and dissolution of NEW ERA
COMMUNICATIONS FUND LTD. has been completed
in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution and that
NEW ERA COMMUNICATIONS FUND LTD. has been
dissolved as of 24th day of December, 2009.


Dated this 2nd day of February, 2010


Pine Limited
Liquidator


struggle to bring quality plan-
ning to our lands," Mr Dug-
gan said.

Land

And he added: "We have
large tracts of land for resi-


dential and commercial devel-
opment. It's important to
make a distinction between
the types of development that
have gone on in the west and
what's going to happen in the
next 20 years."
Existing developments
included the likes of gated


WATERWAYS LTD.
(Company number 91,706B)

An International Business Company
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



We, Pine Limited, Liquidator of WATERWAYS LTD.
hereby certify that the winding up and dissolution
of WATERWAYS LTD. has been completed in
accordance with the Articles of Dissolution and that
WATERWAYS LTD. has been dissolved as of 24th
day of December, 2009.




Dated this 2nd day of February, 2010

Pine Limited
Liquidator




NEC Investment Management Ltd.
(Company number 147,546B)

An International Business Company
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



We, Pine Limited, Liquidator of NEC Investment
Management Ltd. hereby certify that the winding up
and dissolution of NEC Investment Management
Ltd. has been completed in accordance with the
Articles of Dissolution and that NEC Investment
Management Ltd. has been dissolved as of 29th
day of December, 2009.


Dated this 2nd day of February, 2010

Pine Limited
Liquidator





SCOLE INVESTMENTS LTD.
(Company number 127,850B)

An International Business Company
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



We, Pine Limited, Liquidator of SCOLE
INVESTMENTS LTD. hereby certify that the winding
up and dissolution of SCOLE INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed in accordance with the Articles
of Dissolution and that SCOLE INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been dissolved as of 24th day of
December, 2009.


Dated this 2nd day of February, 2010


Pine Limited
Liquidator


communities such as Old Fort
Bay and Lyford Cay, and Mr
Duggan said: "I think the per-
ception of the western region
of the island is that presently
it is an exclusive enclave of
foreigners. I think we're going
to change that perception."
Mr Duggan said New Prov-


idence Development Compa-
ny had just 11 lots in Old Fort
Bay to sell, with "25 homes
under construction at any one
time."
New Providence Develop-
ment Company is also going
to move into its new head-
quarters building in two
months time, with four to five
tenants, such as banks and
hedge funds, also leasing
space in the complex.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ZIBIBBO LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on February 4, 2010
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 19th day of March, 2010 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

FEBRUARY 5, 2010

ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY




Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) RAPTOR OVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on February 4, 2010
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 19th day of March, 2010 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

FEBRUARY 5, 2010

ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY





THE FLY GROUP LTD.
(Company number 94,893B)

An International Business Company
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



We, Pine Limited, Liquidator of THE FLY GROUP LTD.
hereby certify that the winding up and dissolution of THE
FLY GROUP LTD. has been completed in accordance
with the Articles of Dissolution and that THE FLY GROUP
LTD. has been dissolved as of 24th day of December,
2009.


Dated this 2nd day of February, 2010


Pine Limited
Liquidator


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


K


'Critical' $8m asset set for tender bids


W FG CAPrITA. MARKETS
5j - ROYAL FIDELITY M E &^M_ W
EF1250 rMoney KA Week -
C F A L. c)1 I "
P_-:- LI= TPCL ,. i. T - - C, c =P ., ,l -IE = - = .-,P
THIJRSD.AY 4 FEBRUARY 2'01
EI ;:, *LL _ -, rE IN O _:' .L .) .E 1 ,, |(. ,- ' I (- '-_- 'i' I TO - _ T - " -
FII'J E : *:L bE . .. . . TI- , ,, , , I _. ,I. , _ - 1
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM i TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
1 49 1 03 AML Foods Limited 1 12 1 12 0 00 0283 0 000 40 0 00%
10 75 9 90 Bahamas Property Fund 10 74 10 74 0 O0 0 992 0 200 108 1 86%
7 00 550 Bank of Bahamas 590 590 0 00 0244 0260 242 441%
0 63 063 Benchmark 063 063 0 00 -0877 0 000 N/M 0 00%
3 49 315 Bahamas Waste 315 315 0 00 0168 0 090 188 286%
215 2 14 Fidelity Bank 237 237 0 00 0055 0040 43 1 1 69%
1343 962 Cable Bahamas 143 1343 000 1406 0250 96 1 86%
2 88 2 72 Colina Holdings 2 72 2 72 0 O0 0249 0 040 109 1 47%
7 00 500 Commonwealth Bank (Sl) 699 699 000 0419 0300 167 429%
365 221 Consolidated Water BDRs 274 271 003 0111 0052 244 1 92%
2 55 1 32 Doctors Hospital 2 55 2 55 0 O0 0627 0 080 41 314%
780 594 Famguard 649 649 000 0420 0240 155 370%
11 80 875 Finco 927 927 0 00 0322 0520 288 5 61%
1045 9 80 FirstCarbbean Bank 10 00 10 00 0 00 0631 0 350 158 3 50%
553 375 Focl (S) 477 477 000 0326 0150 146 314%
1 0 10 Focol Class B Preference 10 10 00 0000 0 000 N/M 0 0 %
S30 0 27 Freeport Concrete O 27 0 27 0 O 0035 0 000 77 0 0%
559 500 ICD Utilities 559 559 000 0407 0500 137 894%
1050 995 J S Johnson 995 995 000 0952 0640 105 643%
10 00 10 00 Premier Real Esate 10 00 10 00 0 00 0156 0 000 641 0 00%
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds tiade on a Per aentage Pricing b ashes)
52wk-HI 52wk- Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol Interest Maturity
1000 00 1000 0 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 10 00 0 00 7% 19 October 2017
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100 00 0 O0 Prime + 1 75% 19 October 2022
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 00 0 O0 7% 30 May 2013
100000 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 10000 000 Prime + 1 75% 29 May 2015
1460 7 92 Bahamas Supermarkets 10 06 11 06 14 00 -2 246 0 000 N/M 0 00%
8 00 6 00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2 00 6 25 4 00 0 000 0 480 N/M 7 80%
054 0 20 RND Holdings 0 35 0 40 0 35 0 001 0 000 256 6 0 00%
055 0 40 RND Holdings 0 45 0 55 0 55 0 002 0 000 261 90 0 00%
1 4387 1 3535 CFAL Bond Fund 1 4387 630 6 30 31-Dec-09
28869 28266 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 28869 -1 81 -1 81 31 Dec-09
1 5127 1 4387 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 5127 0 35 5 14 29-Jan-10
3 3201 2 9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3 1168 -7 94 -7 94 31-Dec-09
13 2400 12 6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13 2400 4 93 5 90 31 -Oct-09
103 9873 93 1999 CFAL Global Bond Fund 1039873 341 341 31 Dec09
101 7254 964070 CFAL Global Equity Fund 101 7254 552 552 31 Dec-09
1 0898 10000 FG Financial Preferred Incoe Fund 1 0898 522 522 9-Dec-09
10680 1 0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1 0680 339 339 9-Dec-09
10907 1 0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1 0907 515 515 9-Dec-09
9 5795 9 1005 Royal Fty Bah In Invesment und 9 5795 5 33 5 33 31-Dec-09
Principal Proteted TIGRS, Series 1
11 2361 10 0000 Royal Fdety Bah2361 1236 1236 31De09
77171 48105 Royal Fideity Intl Fund - Equities Sub Fund 77171 4005 4005 31-Dec09
MARKET TERMS
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000 00 YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing pnce
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 eks Bid $ Buying price of Cohina and Fidehty
52wk-Low -Lowst closing pice in last 52 weks Ask $ S-elhing pce of Cohna and fidehty
Change Change in closing pice fon dayto day EPS -A compans posed eamlngs pershae for the last 12 nmths
Dally vol -Number of total shaes traded today NAV Net Asset value
P/E - Closing pnce divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1, 1994 = 100
(S) 4 for 1 Stock Sphit -Eleave Date 8/8/2007
(S1 ) - 3-for1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL OCFA.L 242-S02-7010 I ROY1ALFIDLELrTY 242-35G-7764 I FGS CAPITAL luIARKETS 242-396-4000 I COLONIAL 242-502-7525


BUSINESS








+


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010, PAGE 7B


Power plant opponents bid for new injunction


FROM page 1B

refused the initial application largely
because it was made ex-parte, where only
RDA was present, thus giving BEC and
the Government no opportunity to argue
their case.
In the February 2, 2010, inter parties
summons, RDA is again seeking a
Supreme Court injunction to prevent
BEC "from proceeding with, or contin-
uing to undertake, any works in further-
ance of the construction of the power
plant at Wilson City, Abaco, the roads
and pipeline, dock and/or the works con-
templated by the permits and approvals"
already granted.
It is also seeking a bar on any new per-
mits/approvals being given for the Wilson
City power plant construction, and a pro-
hibition on existing permits being
renewed.
And, finally, RDA wants the Supreme
Court to order that the Government and
BEC provide it with copies of all docu-
ments relating to the power plant's con-
struction, including plans, applications,
Environmental Impact Assessments
(EIAs) and Management Plans (EMPs).
Mr Smith said yesterday: "In addition


to asking the Supreme Court to hear our
application and have a speedy trial, as
ordered by [Appeal] Justice Newman, I
have also been asking the Court of
Appeal for an early date in our applica-
tion for permission to appeal to the Privy
Council.
"What I am very concerned about is
justice delayed being justice denied.
There is no sense in giving me a hearing
after the smokestacks are up, or not up,
as the case may be.

Challenge

"That is a great challenge parties face
in the Bahamas - getting their matters
heard in an efficient time.
"This [BEC power plant] is due to be
built by July, and if we do not get before
the Privy Council and Supreme Court
to hear their Judicial Review application
very soon, it will be a wasted effort."
Emphasising that he did not want to be
critical of either the Supreme Court or
Court of Appeal, due to the huge case
workload judges at both levels were hav-
ing to deal with, Mr Smith suggested that
the Government should appoint more
judges or ensure that Judicial


Review/constitutional matters were giv-
en priority. "It is better administration of
governance for public matters to be
determined quickly," Mr Smith told Tri-
bune Business.
He added that if the Wilson City pow-
er plant was completed before, or just
after, the courts heard RDA's various
applications, the action would effective-
ly be rendered a 'nullity' because the
plant was already in existence and histo-
ry could not be reversed.
"This is what happened with Guana
Cay," Mr Smith alleged , "and what the
Government is banking on with Wilson
City. They are banking on the backlog in
the courts depriving us of a remedy."
In a February 2, 2010, letter to Justice
Gray-Evans's clerk, Mr Smith said the
need for an early trial date on the Judicial
Review's substantive arguments was
"one of extreme urgency".
He alleged that one of the key rea-
sons why Appeal Justice Newman decid-
ed not to grant RDA's original injunction
and document discovery application was
because he had been advised that the
Supreme Court could hear the main tri-
al soon.


GIVE A HAND



PURCHASE A BIG MAC


EXTRA VALUE MEAL AND



HELP US HELP HAITI


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THE WEATHER REPORT(BAHAMAS) LIMITED
THE W*HE *REPO%^RT UU INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


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TDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22.O


T1~7


LEGAL NOTICE


H.SDC 1ntematimal (Baftuwn) Limited




Notice is hiereby givn hat in pissuance, of Section 239rd to
Companie Act n Extirnwy Gwwr Maeiri of% th
Members of Ow a~o'e-rname Ci Cr~wy WI1be hold at1ft
offie of FT Ccnsuiants Ltd., One Mont** iePlaw, 2m Flow,
East 84 SMI. Nasau, Bkiarnas; en tie@ 12th day ofFbur
2010,Oi1:Dla1k.kW t he p " f " i~arka A aio~d
befutuuthem, iho~ng thernorrmw in voichthe winding up lhad
�e IwnLiduc, md the p'upe'ty cof l1eComnpany md of,
aid hu'lrig anyexpWnsiabnr' 1t may ~be 4wei'by the
Uquidator, and aio of detemniing bV Ex'aiwdriry Rewlutohjc
tht mw bin thoft WK accourntsand docurrients of d
Company, and of M Uqiibbm shflUM Mpomd d.



DoW m le 51' day of Fabiuy, 2010



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