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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01497
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: February 1, 2010
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01497

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GIVE AOTO
HAND I 1
HAITI RELIEF i'm iovin' it
HIGH 84F
LOW 72F

SMCLOUDS, SUN,
* .. SHOWER


The


Tribune


BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


Volume: 106 No.58


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010


PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)


MEET


T H E T R I B U N E ' S


..........................................................................


LATEST


PAGE


FIVE


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Standards could force

the Bahamas to lose

core export markets


By NOELLE NICOLI
Tribune Staff
Reporter
nnicolls@
tribunemedia.net


~JLS I


NEW standards for R,
international certifica-
tion in the crawfish inous-
try are placing the Bahamas at
risk of losing huge sectors of its
export market.
Leading seafood retailers in
the United States and Europe,
the core export markets for the
Bahamas' $80 million crawfish
industry, have signed up to the
certification programme of the
Marine Stewardship Council
(MSC). The MSC is the inter-
national leader in certification
and eco-labelling for sustain-
able seafood.
The Bahamas is the fifth
largest producer of crawfish
tails in the world. In 2008, it
exported 4.5 million pounds.
The fishing industry is the third
largest income producer in the
Bahamas behind tourism and
the financial sector.
At its core, the MSC certifi-
cation programme is about
ensuring the sustainability of
wild fish populations globally. It
encourages governments, pri-
vate sector companies, con-


go


sumers and all stake-
holders to embrace sus-
tainable practices, such
Sas documenting fish
populations, imple-
menting management
..- plans, enforcing catch
Sze limits, and respecting
season bans. The Bahamas
has yet to comply.
Certification is granted to the
fishing industry as a whole, not
individual stakeholders. In
order to qualify for certifica-
tion, all stakeholders have to
be mobilised, including fisher-
men, processors, exporters,
retailers, consumers, and
marine resource regulators. It is
not a mandatory certification,
but the global industry is trend-
ing towards and embracing it.
"Bahamian products are sold
to a global audience, so it is
extremely important that high
standards are maintained. We
are going to need to comply
with MSC standards which are
the future of the lobster indus-
try," said Jon Chaiton, director
of Quality Assurance, Tropic
Seafood Ltd, one of the largest
crawfish exporters.
"They will either give us
MSC certification or not. If they
SEE page 11


e


FNM accuses PLP

of 'nasty' campaign
THE Free National Movement has accused the Opposi-
tion of running a "nasty" by-election campaign filled with
"lies" and "name-calling".
The statement is the latest in a war of words between the
parties after critics of FNM candidate Dr Duane Sands
lambasted him for what they claim was a disparaging quote
about the voters in Elizabeth.
Last week, a Tribune report told how Dr Sands had met
a number a small number of voters who had asked for
money and goods in return for their support.
In paraphrasing Dr Sands' statement, the word "greedy"
was used, and this newspaper has clarified that it was not a
direct quote.
However, the Opposition has demanded an apology from
SEE page 11


'I ~k~ VESEL ARRING (ARG 1111Ol TO i HA ~IT FI RUNS AGRUND I


- - - - ---
THE HAITIAN MOTOR VESSEL, Mon DesirExpress, carrying cargo to the earthquake-stricken island nation, ran aground across from the Mon-
tagu foreshore on Saturday. The Mon DesirExpress had been docked at Potter's Cay while her captain appealed for help to raise funds for fuel
desperately needed to transport supplies to Haiti. The vessel was in the Bahamas taking on freight and cargo throughout the month, and was
ready to sail, but the fuel shortage problem along with mechanical difficulties delayed the departure. The cargo included useful earthquake relief
items such as mattresses, five gallon plastic buckets and large containers.


Bahamas and Haiti talks
could bring forward date
for residential status
By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net
DISCUSSIONS between the government
of Haiti and the Bahamas could make it eas-
ier to regularise the status of Haitians in the
Bahamas.
At the moment, a 1995 Memorandum of
Understanding (MOU), which was estab-
lished by the two governments, gives consid-
eration to Haitians living in the Bahamas pri-
or to 1985 in achieving permanent residential
status.
But that date could be moved forward if
talks on strengthening ties between the two
SEE page 11


Elizabeth voters
'may back PLP' as
message to govt
By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
VOTERS in the Elizabeth constituency
may throw their support behind the Oppo-
sition's by-election candidate as a mes-
sage that they are unhappy with the Gov-
ernment, a major political observer
believes.
However, even if the Opposition is suc-
cessful in securing a by-election win, this
may not transcend into a General Elec-
tion victory, the observer noted.
"Some people, just to send a message to
SEE page 11


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POLICE in New Providence report that
Grand Bahama lawyer Destini Thompson-
Pinder is in "critical" condition in Doc-
tor's Hospital after reportedly falling from
a three-storey house over the weekend.
Mrs Thompson-Pinder, daughter of
FNM Senator David Thompson, report-
edly underwent surgery after being airlift-
ed to Nassau last Friday. She reportedly
sustained an injury to her head and
sprained an ankle after the fall.
Yesterday, press liaison officer Sergeant
Chrislyn Skippings said the circumstances
surrounding the lawyer's fall are still under
investigation by police on Grand Bahama.
"Inquiries are still being conducted into
SEE page 11


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t 1.






+>


PAGE 2, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


I [ 11 1 ILOC* NEWSA [


Rodney
McKenzie-Bethel


Welbourne Bootle Tyrone Bethel Philip Wilson-Dames


Cleophas Cooper


Dennis Dames


Lucas Armbrister


Livingston Bevans


POLICE


IN accordance with Arti-
cle 119 (2) of the Constitu-
tion, and acting in accor-
dance with the recommen-
dation of the Prime Minister
after consultation with the
Police Service Commission,
the Governor General has
approved the following pro-
motions with effect from
January 18:

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT
TO SUPERINTENDENT
OF POLICE
Rodney McKenzie-Bethel
and Welbourne Bootle.

CHIEF INSPECTOR/
INSPECTOR TO ASSISTANT
SUPERINTENDENT
Tyrone Bethel, Philip Wil-
son-Dames, Cleophas Coop-
er, Dennis Dames, Glennis
Demeritte-Butler, Lucas
Armbrister, Derek Butler,
Wendal Smith, Wendal
Clarke and Livingstone
Bevans.


TOICA

E lTEiNU
FO IETPOLM


SOISCS STOIE ON THI 0AG 0LG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


Derek Butler


Wendal Clarke


BUSINESS

OPPORTUNITY

Chevron Bahamas Limited, a subsidiary of
Chevron Corporation, has an exciting and
challenging opportunity for a Retailer to manage
and market Petroleum Products at one of our
strategic sites in the Bahamas.

Applicants must meet the
following minimum requirements:

* Fair knowledge of the petroleum industry
* Appreciation for a safe work environment
0 Appreciation for customer service
* Exhibit excellent leadership and managerial skills

Application packages are available at our Thompson
Boulevard office.

All applications must be forwarded to the
following address:

Retail District Manager,
Chevron Bahamas Limited,
Thompson Boulevard,
Nassau, Bahamas.

The closing date for accepting applications is
February 17, 2010 at 4:30 p.m.


Caribbean Bottling Company and The Coca-Cola
Company Assist Humanitarian Efforts in Haiti


















As a result of the earthquake, which occurred January 12 in Haiti, Caribbean
Bottling Company joined the hundreds of Coca-Cola System associates
and bottlers worldwide that have been mobilized to help those affected.
Walter Wells, President of CBC, The Bottling Company of Coca-Cola in The
Bahamas, said that the company shares the pain of the families whose loved ones
lives were lost and for those who were injured, trapped or left homeless.
"I would like to update you on some of the efforts Caribbean Bottling
Company has made in helping the people of Haiti amid their difficult recovery
from the devastating earthquake. As we sympathize with the plight of the
Haitian people, we also share an urgent concern and responsibility to help".
As part of CBC's humanitarian response to some of the most urgent needs of the
people in Haiti, we have provided the following assistance:
Two 40 feet containers with 3100 cases of 20oz. Dasani water have been donated
to help alleviate the serious lack of potable water, which is vital for the hydration
of those who have survived this terrible incident.
Given the state of emergency that has struck Haiti, CBC has allocated funds
for employees to assist their family members in Haiti, as well as provided
airfares for those who needed to fly to Haiti to assist relatives after this disaster.
Also, we have coordinated additional product donations in Nassau to various
local fund-raisers for Haiti.
We are also contributing to a program, together with The Coca Cola Company and
other bottlers around the Caribbean, to rebuild homes for those families employed
with our Bottler in Haiti, who has lost their homes.

Our support will be sustained as the situation in Haiti evolves over the coming
weeks and months, as it will take them several years to recover from this
catastrophe and the suffering which has been inflicted.

Walter Wells, President & CEO
Caribbean Bottling Company
Nassau, Bahamas.







+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010, PAGE 3


LOCALN


Shootings and stabbings


leave four in hospital


FOUR men are in hospital
today after becoming the vic-
tims of knife and gun crimes
over the weekend.
The first shooting occurred
at around 8.25pm on Satur-
day when police received
information of gunshots
being fired in the area of
Market Street and Whylly's
Close.
It is believed that a group
of men were standing on a
corner when a grey Suzuki
SUV with several passengers
pulled up alongside them.
One of the vehicle's occu-
pants fired several shots at
the men, resulting in one of
them being shot in both of
his thighs. The victim was
taken to hospital where he
is presently being treated.
Then, on Sunday at
around 8am yesterday, police
received information of a
shooting on Soldier Road
and Sumner Street.
According to reports, a
man who was walking in the
area observed two other men
involved in an argument and
later heard what appeared to
be gunshots.

Well-known

Eleuthera

resident dies in

traffic accident
THE Eleuthera community
is mourning the death of a well-
known German resident of
Governor's Harbour who was
killed in a traffic accident on
his way to church.
Dieter Haschker, 77, of
Eleuthera, was one of two traf-
fic fatalities recorded yester-
day.
In New Providence, a 37-
year-old man who lived at
Quintine Alley died of injuries
he sustained in a two-car colli-
sion on Thompson Boulevard
and Portago Road at lam yes-
terday.
The victim, who has not yet
been named, was driving a blue
2006 Ford EchoStar, licence
plate number 169290, travelling
north on Thompson Boulevard.
At the same time, a white
2009 Toyota Camry, licence
plate number SD2889, driven
by a 28-year-old man of Oakes
Field was coming from the east.
The two cars collided, result-
ing in damage to both vehicles.
Both men had to be taken to
hospital.
Shortly after arriving at the
hospital, the 37-year-old died
of his injuries.
A few hours later in
Eleuthera, at around 10.45am,
Mr Haschker died after crash-
ing into a wall on Queen's
Highway in central Eleuthera.
According to police, Mr
Haschker, driving a white 1997
Suzuki truck with the licence
plate number T77, was travel-
ling south on the highway when
he lost control of his vehicle,
crashing into a wall. He was
badly injured in the accident
and died at the scene.
Eleutherans told The Tri-
bune that Mr Haschker was a
well-known and well-liked res-
ident of in Governor's Harbour
for many years.
He was married to a local
woman and attended most
churches on the island.
On the morning of his death
he was on the way to a Sunday
church service.
Members of the community
said they were shocked and
saddened by his sudden
death.


The man who was walking
was shot to the right chest.
He was taken to hospital by
emergency medical person-
nel where he is listed in seri-
ous but stable condition.
Sometime around 8.30pm
on Saturday a man was
stabbed on Coco Plum Road
off East Street.
The victim told police he


was walking through Coco
Plum Road when he got into
an altercation with a group
of men which resulted in him
being stabbed multiple times
about the body.
The second stabbing of the
weekend occurred on Satur-
day at 1.35am on East and
Hay streets.
Police were told that a


man and a woman got into
an altercation which resulted
in the man being stabbed to
the left side of his neck. He
was taken to hospital where
he is listed in stable condi-
tion.
Police have taken a
woman into custody who is
assisting with the investiga-
tion.


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POLICE are still inves-
tigating death threats sent
to a Cabinet minister.
A probe was launched
last Monday after Charles
Maynard, Minister of
Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture, received an anony-
mous letter at his office
on Thompson Boulevard
threatening an attack on
him and his wife.
The letter, signed by
"The Brothers", detailed
how a gun would be
placed to Mr Maynard's
head.
"The investigation is
continuing, though there's
no significant break-
through to report," said
Assistant Commissioner
of Police Hulan Hanna.
Mr Hanna would not
elaborate when asked
whether the Royal
Bahamas Police Force
had added a security
detail to Mr Maynard and
his family since the
threat.
"We are not prepared
to discuss his personal
safety," said Mr Hanna.
Last week, Commis-
sioner of Police Ellison


Greenslade said his best
team of officers had been
placed on the case.
He added that he was
"satisfied" that the RBPF
had taken steps to ensure
that Mr Maynard's safety
was a top priority.
Mr Maynard has not
commented publicly on
the threats.


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PAGE 4, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


EIOI AULETE S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


'Utter Bar' being boosted by appointments


EFFORTS are being made not only to
improve the physical facilities of our courts,
but to rebuild the judicial tradition of Inner
and Outer (Utter Bar), which had almost
totally collapsed under the two PLP adminis-
trations.
When Prime Minister Ingraham first took
office in 1992 Kendal Isaacs was the only
practising Queen's Counsellor at the Inner
Bar. By then Ernest Callender, who had been
appointed Queen's Counsellor in November
1970, had retired from practice.
The late Eugene Dupuch, QC, for whom
the Eugene Dupuch Law School has been
named, often deplored the neglect of the age-
old and respected traditions of the courts.
It was known that now Governor-General
Arthur Hanna, and then Attorney General
Paul Adderley were against the English hon-
ours system, but no effort seemed to have
been made - as had been in other Com-
monwealth countries where the Queen was no
longer head of state - to establish an equiv-
alent title in the courts unconnected with the
British system. Many other jurisdictions sub-
stituted the term
"State Counsel" for the British terms -
King or Queen's Counsel. It is understood
that Paul Adderley, who held the position of
Attorney General during most of the Pin-
dling administration, was so strongly against
the use of British titles that he refused "silk"
for himself - in other words becoming a
Queen's Counselor -under both the Pin-
dling and Ingraham administrations. Mean-
while, Mr Adderley, while attorney general,
had put the dead hand on the ambitions of all
other Bahamian attorneys deserving of the
distinction.
It had been customary - before the PLP
- for lawyers, who had excelled in the prac-
tise of their profession, to be chosen for ele-
vation in recognition of their leadership qual-
ities and their intellectual skills. It is from
this experienced group that the Bench would
normally draw its judges. But in those days
when a judge looked down from the Bench,
he only saw members of the Inner Bar prac-
tising before him. The Utter Bar - or Outer
Bar - was no more.
When Prime Minister Ingraham took
office, Sir Orville Turnquest was the first
attorney to "take silk."
This honour had been denied him for so
many years, and so annoyed Mr Dupuch, that
in July 1978, Mr Dupuch took the extraordi-
nary step of presenting his junior - then Sen-
ator Orville Turnquest - with a Red Bag.
In making the presentation, Mr Dupuch said
that it was an ancient tradition of the Inns of
Court of England that members of the Outer
Bar were entitled to carry a Blue Bag to court
while members of the Inner Bar (Queen's
Counsel) carried a Red Bag. He said it was a
little known custom of the English Bar,
because of its rarity, that a Queen's Counsel
could present a junior with a Red Bag in


appreciation of his services in a particular
case and in recognition of his talents as an
advocate. The case that Mr Dupuch used to
show his appreciation for Mr Turnquest's
legal ability, and his annoyance with the
Bahamas government for denying worthy
attorneys their deserved recognition, was the
petition of National Oil Corporation of Libya
for the winding-up of the Grand Bahama
Petroleum Company Limited (Petco) on the
grounds that Petco had refused to pay an
alleged debt of $136,000,000. Mr Dupuch,
QC, and Mr Turnquest represented Petco.
During that case, said Mr Dupuch, Mr Turn-
quest had carried a burden "above and
beyond the call of duty."
Mr Dupuch said that only circumstances
such as these warranted the award of a Red
Bag and added that "Red Bag juniors" are
more rare in England than Queen's Counsel
and Mr Turnquest would be the first lawyer in
the Bahamas in living memory to be so hon-
oured.
And then came the sting in the tail. Mr
Dupuch hoped that Mr Turnquest would soon
carry a Red Bag in his own right as a Queen's
Counsel. However, on that particular day Mr
Dupuch made the presentation in apprecia-
tion of the yeoman services given by his junior
partner in the Petco case and in recognition of
his extraordinary talents in the field of advo-
cacy. Mr Turnquest (now Sir Orville Turn-
quest, former governor-general) had to wait
another 14 years for this recognition with the
advent of the Ingraham government. Mr
Dupuch did not live long enough to see the
day. He died in September, 1981.
No QCs were appointed during the
Christie administration, but under Mr Ingra-
ham's two terms, the Inner Bar has been
greatly strengthened with the appointments of
Henry Bostwick, Thomas Evans, Harvey
Tynes, and most recently Colin Callender,
Emerick Knowles, Brian Simms, Brian
Moree, Sean McWeeney, Fred Smith and
Philip Dunkley. John Delaney, QC, is Attor-
ney General and Sir Michael Barnett, Chief
Justice.
The Appeals Court is now in need of some
remedial care with the retirement last week of
Mr Hartman Longley, vice president, who
opted to step down at age 55 instead of con-
tinuing to 65. He has been transferred to
Freeport to be a Supreme Court judge there.
The Court of Appeal is now one justice
short, and soon will be two. In November
Dame Joan Sawyer, who was earlier granted
her two-year extension on reaching 68, will
retire at the age of 70. Moving up as vice
president of the Court of Appeal to replace
Mr Longley is Mr Justice Christopher Black-
man of Barbados. Mr Stanley John of
Trinidad is also an appeals judge, and the
post of Mr Justice Emmanuel Osadebay, who
retired last year on reaching the statutory age
of 65, is being temporarily replaced by Mr
George Newman of the UK.


Detainees'





release was





the right





thing to do


EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thirteen days ago Haiti
suffered a devastating earth-
quake which resulted in
tens, maybe even hundreds
of thousands of deaths. This
undoubtedly was one of the
most devastating tragedies
this region has ever seen.
That country suffered sub-
stantial damage and the
human toll on the people,
no doubt is immeasurable.
Every day since the tragedy
one can see the continued
suffering and desperation in
the faces of the people there.
Shortly, after the devasta-
tion, the Government of the
Bahamas through the Rt
Hon Prime Minister Hubert
A Ingraham indicated that
as a result of the earthquake
and devastation in Haiti,
that it would release the 102
Haitians being held at the
Detention Centre and give
them temporary status. The
controversy which resulted
from the decision was a star-
tling surprise to me and oth-
ers.
This move by the Gov-
ernment was not unprece-
dented. The United States
and Canada did something
similar and so has Dominica
and others. We often pride
ourselves on being a "Chris-
tian Nation" and obviously
ought to display Christian
Virtues. It seems, however,
that for some people the
Christian Virtue is only to
be displayed on Sundays
and for the rest of the week
we become Machiavellis.
This duplicitous and hyp-
ocritical attitude is prevalent
throughout our society. In
every endeavour from the
Church, politics and the rest,
we have a society so steeped
in hypocrisy that it is mind
b, 2,21n112 What is ever more
surprising is that we throw
our hands up in the air when
young people don't listen
and go on a rampage, pil-
laging and pummeling our
society.
That brings me back to
the central point of my let-
ter. There are people who
have vehemently objected
to the Government releas-
ing the 102 persons, at the


Detention Centre. Some of
the reasons being they were
not consulted, that it was a
unilateral decision, ad hoc,
with no sound reasoning
behind it.
Well firstly, if the Gov-
ernment consulted everyone
on every decision nothing
would ever get done in this
country.
This is what happened
from 2002 to 2007 and these
people still have not grasped
that yet.
Secondly, these same peo-
ple have not grasped the fact
that the Bahamian people
voted them out of office and
therefore they are not enti-
tled to dictate government
policy.
Thirdly, unlike some peo-
ple the current Prime Min-
ister is a man of action, he
takes the necessary action
and the consequences lie
where they lie. Unlike other
folk he does not stick his
head in the sand and hope
that the situation will resolve
itself or just go away.
Having considered the
detainees' release, I had to
admit that for sound human-
itarian reasons it was the
right thing to do.
However, it was also a
sound economic thing to do.
No one knows how long
it will take for Haiti to
recover.
As it is Haiti is in no posi-
tion to receive their citizens
(migrants) at this time.
No one can say when they
will be.
The Government, and
therefore the people of the
Bahamas would have to
take care, house, feed and
supervise the immigrants
until such time as they could
have been deported. Even
the weak minded could see
and appreciate that.
Would it not be a sensi-
ble thing to grant such per-
sons temporary status, mon-
itor them and allow their
friends and family in the
Bahamas to help and sup-


port them? Would that not
help to reduce the tax payers
burden in an economy that
is still in recession?
Some have indicated that
these released immigrants
will take jobs from Bahami-
ans. I have to disagree.
Whether one believes it or
not, there are Bahamians in
this country who are work-
ing two and three jobs. In
some cases they have been
doing it for years.
Part of the problem is that
Bahamians for the most
part, believe that they
should start at the top.
They don't be believe that
they should start where they
are currently, and work their
way up.
Some of us think that we
are entitled and therefore
certain jobs are not for us
"they are for them."
Some Bahamians refuse
to engage themselves in
hard work. If some Bahami-
ans can work at Atlantis, at
the Service Station and still
engage in landscaping, hav-
ing three jobs, then others
with a little ingenuity can
find work or create their
own jobs.
We have heard some say
that Haitians themselves
have indicated that they
"coming to take over this
country."
Such scaremongering
should find no resting place
in our society. What should
be prevalent, however, is
compassion and diligence in
protecting our boarders and
being good conscientious cit-
izens.
Bahamians are resilient
and I submit that if we
return to the values of our
grandparents and great-
grandparents the Bahamas
will survive for many gener-
ations.
Finally, I would like to
state that the Rt Hon Prime
Minister Hubert A Ingra-
ham should have been
applauded and commended
for taking the action which
he took.

RAYMOND A
ROLLE & CO
Nassau,
January 19, 2010.


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PAGE 6, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


Caribbean Diplomacy: An endangered species


By SIR RONALD SANDERS
(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
Diplomat)
CARIBBEAN govern-
ments are in danger of weak-
ening still further their diplo-
matic capacity endangering its
effectiveness, and imperiling
their countries' manoeuvra-


ability in a harsh world.
Industrialized nations have
several instruments on which
to draw in their relations with
other countries. Among these
are military might, economic
clout and diplomatic capaci-
ty.
If their security is threat-
ened by other states or non-
state actors, such as drug traf-
fickers and terrorists, they are


night

WORLD VIEW -


able to deploy their military;
on the economic front, they
can apply trade sanctions with-


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daily and from 9am to 12pm on Saturday)


draw financial assistance or
institute measures to halt
cross-border transactions; in
diplomacy, they have well-
staffed, well trained and well
informed foreign ministries
and missions abroad who bar-
gain for their interests. When
diplomacy fails, big countries
have economic clout and mil-
itary might on which to fall
back.
For small states, such as
those in the Caribbean, diplo-
macy is the only instrument
they have to advance their
cause and defend their inter-
ests in the international com-
munity.
In this connection,
Caribbean governments
should place enormous
emphasis on making their
diplomatic capacity as strong
as possible.
But, there is a growing ten-
dency in many countries of
the region to focus diplomacy
in the Head of Government.
Many Heads of government,
already bogged down with
urgent and pressing domestic
problems have assigned the
foreign affairs portfolio to
themselves. In doing so, they
either do not attend crucial
meetings that impact their
countries, or they attend with-
out the full understanding of
complex issues that only exclu-
sive ministerial responsibility
backed by expert analysis
allows. In each case, their
country's interest is not well
served.
Beyond this, even where
governments have appointed
foreign ministers, foreign min-
istries are not seen as vital -
or even on par - with min-
istries concerned with domes-
tic issues. Therefore, the
financial and other resources
that they get in annual bud-
gets are inadequate to the
extremely important job they
have to do on behalf of their
nations.
Worse yet, little attention
appears to be paid to where
and why overseas missions
should be located, and who
would be best to man them.
In many cases, governments
have followed the traditional
road establishing missions
where they are now least
needed and neglecting capi-
tals and international organi-
zations, such as the World
Trade Organization (WTO),
where they are most required.
It cannot be in the best
interest of any country for its
diplomatic missions to be
regarded as a pasture to send


States, to seek to adopt, as far
as possible, common positions
on international issues, and to
establish and maintain, wher-
ever possible, arrangements
for joint overseas representa-
tion and/or common services."
Words such as "fullest pos-
sible", "as far as possible" and
%\ licic e possible" are usu-
ally inserted in Treaties of this
kind where the governments
intend to make the least
change to the existing situa-
tion and where the real inten-
tion is to carry on business as
usual. The signal that this
sends is unfortunate, for the
six independent members of
the OECS would benefit enor-
mously from a fully joined-up
diplomatic service particularly
in the present precarious con-
ditions that confront their
economies.
They least, of all, can afford
layer upon layer of govern-
ment. Already their tax payers
are paying contributions to
upkeep both the Caribbean
Community and Common
Market (CARICOM) Secre-
tariat and the OECS Secre-
tariat. Arguably, they main-
tain the OECS Secretariat
because they believe that par-
ticipation in it brings them
greater strength than they
have individually. If that is the
case, then surely establishing
and strengthening joint diplo-
matic capacity is not only in
their bargaining interest, it
would also reduce their indi-
vidual expenditure on foreign
affairs or more effectively
focus their spending.
Of course, a major difficul-
ty the OECS faces is their
neglect of the requirement of
the existing Treaty to harmo-
nize their foreign policies "as
far as possible."
Thus, three of the six inde-
pendent states are members
of the Venezuelan-initiated
organization, ALBA, and
three are not, and three of
them have diplomatic rela-
tions with China while three
maintain formal relations with
Taiwan. Only a serious and
visionary dialogue, supported
by rigorous analysis of their
long-term interests, will cre-
ate a rational policy.
The global political econo-
my is not friendly to small
states or even tolerant of
them.
In a world being remorse-
lessly driven by the interests of
the larger and more econom-
ically powerful states - in
which China and Brazil must
now be included with the US,
the EU and Japan -
Caribbean countries need bet-
ter and stronger diplomatic
capacity to advance their caus-
es and protect their interests.
Responses and
previous commentaries:
www.sirronaldsanders.com


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IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


unwanted nuisances or reward
political friends. Diplomacy,
as has been pointed out, is a
vital tool for small countries
and its best brains should be
appointed to its service.
There is a most important
role for Heads of Government
in a nation's diplomacy. But, it
is a role best played after the
most careful diplomatic prepa-
ration that lays the ground-
work for success. Otherwise,
what should be the tool that
clinches a deal in a blaze of
glory will fail like a damp
squib. Occasional successful
forays by Heads of Govern-
ment in international and
bilateral negotiations should
not be mistaken as a prescrip-
tion for how accomplishment
is to be achieved. Often, in
these circumstances, the
apparent success simply hap-
pens to serve the interests of
the other government or insti-
tution involved.
When the European Union
(EU), a grouping of 27 large
nations, recently brought their
new Constitution into effect,
they appointed a Foreign Min-
ister in addition to a President.
In effect, what the EU nations
did was to strengthen their
global diplomatic outreach in
trade, economic cooperation
and investment. In addition to
their own national foreign
ministries, they now have the
additional services of EU mis-
sions around the world, most
of which have been beefed-
up with additional expert staff.
In this connection, while
the recently initialed Eco-
nomic Union Treaty of the
Organization of Eastern
Caribbean States (OECS) is
to be welcomed as the right
step forward, it is disappoint-
ing that it failed to advance
the diplomatic capacity of six
small independent states who
would most benefit from
strengthened and unified
diplomacy.
The draft Treaty, which is
to be ratified by the parlia-
ments of each country before
formal signature and imple-
mentation, reads as follows in
relation to foreign policy:
"The organisation shall
seek to achieve the fullest pos-
sible harmonisation of foreign
policy among the Member


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THE TRIBUNE


A -.
- 1'*


OVERWHELMING SUPPORT for Haiti Relief drop-off boxes has prompted the programme's extension. Pic-
tured left to right are Major Oral Morris, Salvation Army, Barbara Harvey, Kelly's Home Centre, Nikki Sim-
mons, City Markets, Dania Ferguson, Bank of the Bahamas and Ethelyn Wong, Kelly's Home Centre.


Bank of the Bahamas


extends Haiti relief


drop-off boxes deadline


F� I --AQo4WNdWAMWM..o


THE local outpouring of
support for victims of the
earthquake which devastated
Port-au-Prince and sur-
rounding areas has prompted
Bank of The Bahamas and
its partners, City Market and
Kelly's, to extend the time it
will leave large drop-off box-
es in place for relief supplies.
"Boxes in some locations
are continuing to fill up dai-
ly," said Dania Ferguson, the
bank's marketing coordina-
tor.
"As long as the need for
medical supplies, bandages,
blankets, baby goods, toi-
letries, bedding, bandages
and clothing remains press-
ing, and as long as our part-
ners are willing to devote
floor space to relief efforts,
we want to do everything we
can to facilitate those
efforts."
Boxes were originally
intended to remain in place
until January 27, but the
deadline will now be extend-


ed for at least one week.
Relief supplies, including
ready-to-eat foods, are being
collected by the bank at its 13
branches throughout The
Bahamas as well as City
Market and Kelly's. All
goods collected are donated
to The Salvation Army with
distribution and transporta-


tion assistance from the
Rotary clubs of The
Bahamas.
For those who want to
make a cash or credit card
offering, the bank's Haiti
relief telethon account will
continue to accept donations.
Thet account number is
5510032762.


Burns House designates a


portion of Heineken and


Vitamalt sales for Haiti relief


It's more than engineering.

It's performance art.


THE Burns House Group
officially launches its fund
drive today to assist the
people of Haiti.
The group has designat-
ed ten cents from every
Heineken bottle or can sold
and five cents from every
Vitamalt bottle or can sold
until April 30 for support of
Haiti earthquake relief
efforts.
Given the popularity of
Heineken and Vitamalt
brands in the Bahamas, the
Burns House Group stands
to make a substantial con-
tribution to the organisa-
tions it chooses to support
relief efforts.

Critical
LeRoy Archer, managing
director for the Burns
House Group said: "Our
company values oblige us to
contribute to the betterment
of our communities locally,
and when necessary, inter-
nationally. As we have all
learned from the various
news reports, the situation
in Haiti is an extremely crit-
ical one. Much help is need-
ed to assist the victims and
the country on the long road
to recovery. We at The
Burns House Group look
forward to doing our part."
Total relief funds derived
from Heineken sales will be
donated to Habitat for
Humanity International, a
not-for-profit organisation
which builds homes in dis-
advantaged and often dis-
aster-stricken communities
around the world.
Habitat, according to its
website, has built more than
350,000 homes, positively
impacting 3,000 communi-
ties.


Regarding the choice of
Habitat for Humanity,
Wendell Seymour, corpo-
rate relations manager for
The Burns House Group
explained: "There are a
number of reputable not-
for-profit international and
local organizations which
will each play a very
important role in the
recovery of Haiti.
"They all need support
at this time, so our choice
was not an easy one. In the
end, we chose Habitat
because of its vital 26 years
of experience working in
the communities of Haiti."


Regarding the relief
funds derived from the
sales of Vitamalt, The
Burns House Group is con-
sidering a number of local
not-for-profit organisa-
tions.
Company officials are
confident that they will
make an excellent choice
here as well.
To support The Burns
House Group relief efforts
for Haiti, consumers sim-
ply need to purchase Vita-
malt and Heineken brands
wherever they are sold in
the Bahamas, from Febru-
ary ito April 30, 2010.


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PAGE 10, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


BABAIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMANoard impressed
Edison Key (left) and deputy
ABAIC board impressed chairman Ronald Darville Sr,
In ''r .ih t'C'ild holl El rrp b
,tinn f.i ol r i:,,- r Ad i b .. -
with farmers on Andros


THE board of directors of
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) and its executive
team have expressed satis-


faction with the progress of
agriculture in North Andros.
They accompanied execu-
tive director Edison Key and
his deputy Ronald Darville


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Sr on a weekend tour of
North Andros farms.
"They were very
impressed, and already they
are saying there is room for
improvement and that more
will be done for this island,"
said BAIC's North Andros
domestic investment officer,
Alphonso Smith.
"BAIC has been spending
a lot of money purchasing
equipment, preparing land
and generally assisting farm-
ers here.
"But the board was yet to
see what the money was
doing. So we decided to bring
them over so they can see
first hand the success of
BAIC's investment in
empowering farmers.
"This has been a banner
season. Through BAIC's ini-
tiative we have more new
farmers coming on the scene.
Things are really moving in
Andros. We are well on the
way to food security thanks
to the new BAIC."
Deputy chairman Mr
Darville, who is based in
Freeport, recently relaunched
the Ministry of Agriculture's
backyard farming project
there.
"This is beyond my wildest
dream," he said. "I never
realized that Andros farming
has reached this level. It is a
wonderful experience.
"BAIC's money is not only
being well spent, but it is also
being well managed. This is
truly a new BAIC. Under the
direction of Mr Key we are
doing the right thing and we
are doing it in a timely fash-
ion which conserves expen-
diture and enhancs produc-
tion. "
A variety of crops including
onions, tomatoes, cabbages,
egg plants, pumpkins, pep-
pers, were in various stages
of development.
"We have made tremen-
dous progress in the devel-
opment of agriculture and
our support of Andros farm-
ers," said Mr Key.
"So, I thought it would
have been a good idea to


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VETERAN
NORTH
ANDROS
farmer Noah
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shows off
some of his
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BAIC executive
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member Lon-
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7Th


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010, PAGE 11


* SALNEWS


FROM page one Crawfish


don't it will be difficult to com-
pete in the global market-
place," said Mr Chaiton.
According to the MSC, two
fisheries in the Latin America
and the Caribbean block have
been certified sustainable. In
2004, the Mexican Baja Cali-
fornia red rock lobster was the
first fishery in the developing
world to be certified to the
MSC standard. In 2006, the
Patagonian scallop fishery was
certified. The Gulf of Califor-
nia, Mexico sardine fishery is
under active assessment by the
MSC.
"While there are fisheries
in Latin America that are cer-
tified or in assessment, much
of the fish is exported and the
MSC has not yet engaged the
local retail sector in those
countries. As additional fish-
eries become certified, it will
enhance the opportunity for
Latin American and
Caribbean seafood commer-
cial sectors - processors, pack-
aging companies, distributors,
suppliers, retail stores and
food service outlets - to incor-
porate MSC certified seafood
into their supply chains and
present MSC-labelled sustain-
able seafood to their end con-
sumers," states the MSC web-
site.
There is no hard and fast
date in 2011, but some local
exporters received communi-
cation from their international
clients coaxing them to get on
board with international sus-
tainable fishing standards or
risk being cut loose.
"We were issued a notice
from buyers in Europe and the
US that they are participating
in these programmes that they
have a choice to buy all over
the world, which means we
have to read between the lines.
They are adopting the MSC
standards and they have a
choice. We better get in the
game and become MSC com-
pliant and have a fishery that is
sustainable and proven to be
sustainable," said Mr Chaiton.
He suggested the Bahamas
would still be in a competitive
position if it could at least
demonstrate within the next
two years that it was well on its
way to compliance by taking
positive action across the
board.
In 2006, Wal-Mart, and Dar-
den Restaurants Inc - owners
of Red Lobster, Olive Garden


and other restaurant chains -
as well as other retailers, rolled
out new regulations for the
shrimp industry, requiring sup-
pliers to be certified by the
Global Aquaculture Alliance
(GAA) Best Aquaculture
Practices programme. The
move to require MSC certifi-
cation for crawfish is one of a
series of industry moves dating
back at least four years.
The government is looking
favourably to facilitate the cer-
tification process, but
Lawrence Cartwright, Minis-
ter of Agriculture and marine
Resources, said it is going to
be a tedious process to get the
country where it needs to be.
"Most definitely if we do
not become MSC certified the
industry will be impacted in a
negative way. When we
become MSC certified it will
allow us to operate as normal,"
said Mr Cartwright.
"The process is still in the
discussion stage. The Govern-
ment has not made a fixed
decision. The stakeholders are
more than willing to assist to
defer the financial burden of
the Bahamas being MSC cer-
tified," he said.
Tropic Seafood is not leav-
ing the process to chance. It is
playing a leading role in public
education and mobilisation
activities. Last week it made
a presentation to the North
Abaco Fishing Cooperative in
collaboration with the non-
profit Friends of the Environ-
ment organisation.
"We have work to do. We
have to get everybody on
board, on the same game plan.
There are some challenges, but
we have made great progress.
We have been working on this
privately for a couple of years.
We have a zero tolerance pro-
gramme at Tropic Seafood for
accepting undersized lobster-
tail. We don't buy them or put
up with people trying to deliv-
er them to us. If it is inadver-
tently delivered it is returned
to the fisherman," said Mr
Chaiton.
"We are working diligently
to stay in communication with
all aspects of the industry. We
are getting everyone on board
because the future success of
the lobster fishing industry
rides on this. There is a lot to
do, but it is moving forward
very nicely," he said.


FROM page one Flizabeth Lawyer in'critical' condition after 'falling'


the FNM would vote for PLP, party wan
but in the General Election Pinder's n
they probably would vote for by-electio
who they think is the better Ryan P
leader. This is not a terribly Marvin Pi
important election and the represent
General Election is so far beth cons
away we will have forgotten called Ma
who won this," said the promi- Still, th
nent businessman, thinks tha
But a staunch Free Nation- area - whc
al Movement supporter towards t
argued that voters in the con- their vote
stituency are too "smart" to Ryan Pinc
vote for the Opposition after to the Go
nearly a decade of being While
"shortchanged" by their rep- most to c
resentative. are in a
"The people in Elizabeth deliver or
are a lot smarter than people make beca
think and will not select a purse stri
member of the PLP after they feels that
have been treated with disre- for a job
spect for the last seven years," Oppositio
said FNM Ivoinne Ingraham, to a win f(
in a dig towards former MP "If you
for the area and ex-PLP Mal- anything
colm Adderley. you have
He added: "If the PLP was tion, and
interested in the welfare of the that the (
Elizabeth constituency why anything b
would they fight to nominate vote for ti
someone in 2007 they said win for th
they knew wasn't up to probably
scratch. That proves that the that the G
PLP wasn't interested in the solved th
people of Elizabeth they were country. "
interested in winning for them- The obs
selves." early to sa
Mr Ingraham also lashed victory on
out at the PLP's choice, tax is confide
attorney Ryan Pinder, claim- in the la
ing he was picked because the fringe par


FROM page one

countries are successful.
"I met with the foreign minister of Haiti
last year, cordially meeting to speak about
certain revisions to that agreement, including
possibly changing the date," said Brent
Symonette, Minister of Foreign Affairs.
Mr Symonette said the discussions are an
indication of the relationship between the
two countries, both of which are seeking to
strengthen trading and diplomatic relations.
They occurred before the huge earthquake
devastated Haiti's capital city, Port-au-Prince.
Louis Harold Joseph, the Haitian Ambas-
sador, said: "It is true that in October my
minister of foreign affairs met in the
Bahamas and we discussed a number of
issues, among them immigration. We were
looking to have the same type of arrange-
ment (under the MOU) with a date closer to
the present.
"The answer at that time was negative,
saying that yes the Bahamas understood the
situation - and that was before the earth-


ted to "suck Marvin
money" to fund their
on campaign.
Pinder is the son of
inder, a former PLP
ative for the Eliza-
stituency, formerly
lcolm Creek.
e political observer
t fed up voters in the
o may have leanings
he FNM - may cast
for PLP candidate
der as a wake-up call
vernment.
the FNM has the
)ffer because "they
better situation to
n any promises they
cause they control the
wings " the observer
voters not looking
will side with the
n ... which could lead
or the PLP.
u don't really need
from government,
a job and an educa-
'ou really don't think
Government can do
better for you, then a
he Opposition and a
e Opposition would
send the message
Government has not
he problems of the

server says it is too
y who will clinch the
February 16, but he
nt a win will not fall
p of one the three
ty candidates.


FROM page one

this matter," said Sgt Skippings,
adding that at last report Mrs Pin-
der's condition was listed as "criti- � ....
cal".
On Friday, Senator Thompson
told The Tribune that he received
information that his daughter had .
fallen from a window on to a con-
crete surface and sustained injuries
to her foot and head.
"She is at Doctor's Hospital now
undergoing surgery. We are con- DESTINI THOMPSON-PINDER
cerned about the bleeding in her pictured at her wedding.
head and we are hoping that everything is OK," he said.
According to reports, it is believed the incident occurred in the
early morning hours of Friday at a residence in the Lucaya area off
Balao Road.
FROM page one FNM accuses


Dr Sands for what they termed
as "elitist" and "insensitive"
statements.
The FNM, in response, said:
"The PLP are continuing with a
nasty campaign of deliberate lies
and name-calling. Their latest
press release called on Dr Duane
Sands to apologise for a com-
ment that he never made.
"At no time did Dr Sands
ever use the word 'greedy' to
describe any resident of the Eliz-
abeth constituency," said the
FNM in a statement released
yesterday.
"It shows the immaturity and
desperation of the PLP that they
would continue to spread an
obvious untruth, while calling
Dr Sands all sorts of names,
rather than to admit that they


Bahamas, Haiti talks
quake - but we have a problem here too, so
it is difficult for us to accommodate the Hait-
ian people at this time," said Ambassador
Joseph, who noted some Haitian nationals,
with 12 to 15 years in the Bahamas on work
permits, were denied renewal last year.
"We understand their position, because
there is a very difficult situation here and
around the world, so it is very difficult for
them to accommodate foreigners for jobs,"
he said.
Although the government declined to
change the date during last year's discus-
sion, the option is still on the table.
This comes in the wake of public percep-
tion by some Bahamians that too many ille-
gal Haitian migrants are in the country. The
extremist view is that Haitians have the
potential to "take over the country" or neg-
atively impact Bahamian culture.
Dr Eugene Newry, former Bahamas
Ambassador to Haiti, said the hysteria over
illegal immigration expressed by some


jumped to the wrong conclusion
before checking and finding out
exactly what the true facts were."
As was clarified, Dr Sands
never used the word "greedy"
to describe voters in the Eliza-
beth constituency. He did say
that while on the campaign he
had met a small number of vot-
ers who asked for goods or mon-
ey in exchange for their support.
He also added that he was struck
by the number of people in the
area who are barely making ends
meet. The PLP also hit out at
Dr Sands for not knowing the
"hardships" many of the resi-
dents in Elizabeth have endured,
while blaming Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham's policies for
their plight.


Bahamians is not based on sound principles.
"That is total nonsense, they will never
dominate the Bahamas, and anyone who
says that has no knowledge of this history of
sociology and the sociology of immigrants in
all countries. Immigrants become like the
country of adoption, the country does not
become like the immigrant. One of the dra-
mas is that young Haitian-Bahamians want
nothing to do with their Haitian heritage;
they want to be as Bahamian as peas and
rice," said Dr Newry.
"They have these slum dwellings, not
because they are slum dwellers in their spir-
its or minds, but because you have to start
somewhere."
He noted that only a small number of
Haitians in proportion to the total number of
regularised and undocumented Haitians in
the country are responsible for criminal acts.
The majority, he said, are positively con-
tributing in all sectors of society, including
performing above par to Bahamians in edu-
cation.

* SEE INSIGHT SECTION


TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF BEC

GENERAL INSURANCES


The Bahamas Electricity

Corporation invites tenders from

any Bidder who is authorized to

do business in The Bahamas;

who satisfies all eligibility and

qualification requirements of the

CORPORATION and is registered

with and licensed by the Registrar

of Insurance to issue insurances for

the services described below.

Bidders are required to collect packages from
the Corporation's Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Phone No. 302-1158

Bids are to be hand delivered on or before
5th March, 2010 by 4:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour


Submissions should
be marked as follows:

Tender No.: 715/10
All Risks General
Insurance
A. Commercial Property
Insurance (Buildings,
Plant, Content)
B. Computers,
IT Infrastructure,
(Mobile & Electronic
Equipment)

Tender No.: 716/10
Motor Insurance
Commercial & Private
Motor Vehicle

Tender No.: 717/10
Accident Insurance
Money & Fidelity

Tender No.: 718/10
Liability Insurance
Personal & Public

Tender No.: 719/10
Indemnity (Directors &
Officers Liability)

Tender No.: 720/10
Marine Cargo


For all enquiries regarding the Tenders, contact Mrs. Cecile Greene at
telephone 302-1159 or email: cbgreene@bahamaselectricity.com.
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals.


Are you a Bahamian and looking for employment with a
progressive, team-oriented, organization? A reputable, local
company is seeking qualified individuals to become part of its
growing, dynamic team. Immediate career opportunities exist
in the following areas:


FINANCIAL CONTROLLER
The successful candidate must have:
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* Expertise in Cost Accounting.
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(FOR THE EXECUTIVE OFFICE)
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+






+


PAGE 12B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


A PROPER

BURIAL FOR

EARTHQUAKE

VICTIMS

FROM page 14B

and its anchor Anderson
Cooper for uncovering the
fact that more than 2,500
bodies had been unceremo-
niously dumped in the set-
tlement of Ti-Tanyen.
"Please note that
Haitians always show
tremendous respect for
our dead and that this
thoughtless act should not
in any way reflect who we
are," Mr Rouzier said in a
letter to CNN which he
wished to be distributed in
the Bahamas and through-
out the region.
"Consequently, I want
you to also report that as
of today, Haitians have
started the process to pro-
vide all the bodies
dumped in Ti-Tanyen a
decent sepulture. In reali-
ty, over 1,500 bodies were
buried today and the
remaining 1,000 or so will
be buried tomorrow."

Volunteers
The pictures sent by Mr
Rouzier show that on Fri-
day, January 29, less than
12 hours after Mr Coop-
er's report, Bishop Pierre
Andr6 Dumas, Father
Richard Leo Frechette
and volunteers from Food
for the Poor burnt
incense, sprinkled holy
water on the bodies, recit-
ed the rosary of the
painful mysteries of
Christ's life, dug mass
graves and gave these
pour souls a decent Christ-
ian burial.
"Once again, on behalf
of a mourning nation
please accept the expres-
sion of our deepest grati-
tude for taking the time to
inform us about an atro-
cious situation and allow-
ing us to correct it as
quickly and as decently as
we know how," Mr Rouzi-
er said.


tIF


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MASS GRAVES are dug outside the settlement of Ti-Tanyen in Haiti for the earthquake victims.


a


imagination at work


JONEBa800

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ICH SO I


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* Circle any 2 eligible products on receipt (Cottonelle Double roll 4-pack,
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Contest ends March 5, 2010


Distributed by
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IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


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Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


I


INSIGHT I


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sports



CRICKET
PEPSI ICC TOURNEY
THE Bahamas Cricket Association will host the Pepsi Inter-
national Cricket Council's (ICC) Americas Region Division II
Tournament starting today at both Haynes Oval and Windsor
Park.
A 20-member team from Brazil was the first to have arrived in
town. They participated in an exhibition match with a select team
from the BCA over the weekend at Windsor Park and will be
joined by Suriname, Panama, the Turks & Caicos.
Today, the Bahamas will host Brazil at Haynes Oval, while
Suriname will play Panama at Windsor Park. The teams are stay-
ing at the Nassau Palm Hotel.
The Mnistry of Tourism's Sports Department and the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and Culture are both assisting the BSC in the
tournament.
BASKETBALL
NPWBA ACTION
THE New Providence Women's Basketball Association con-
tinued its regular season action over the weekend at the DW
Davis Gymnasium with another double header on tap.
The College of the Bahamas Lady Caribs knocked off the
Junior All-Stars 83-32 as Gabrielle McKay scored 19 points and
Tisha Silver had 14. For the All-Stars, Brittany Harrison had 14 and
Brittany Greenslade added 12.
In the other game played, the Bommer George Lady Angels
defeated the Electro Telecom Cybots 91-63. Shanae Armbrister
and Chrshandra Kelly both had 16. Christine Sinclair scored 22 and
Tania Bodie chipped in with 15 in the loss.
BASKETBALL
SHOCKERS IN 20T OVER CRIMESTOPPERS
THE Real Deal Shockers are proving that they are indeed for
real as they continue to make an impressive return to the New
Providence Basketball Association.
On Friday night at the CI Gibson Gymnasium, the Shockers
needed double overtime as they prevailed 121-117 over the Police
Crimestoppers.
The Shockers got off to a slow start as the Crimestoppers
crashed the board and led 37-23 before they surged ahead 57-
47 at the half.
The second half was a full out battle from start to finish with the
Shockers cuffing the Crimestoppers and muscling the game into
overtime, not once but twice.
Cory Williams scored 27 points for the Real Deal and Vernon
Stubbs had a game high 35 in a losing effort for the Police.
CHESS
FEDERATION PREPARE FOR TOURNEY
KEAN Smith, president of the Bahamas Chess Federation
(BCF), announced that the BCF will host Grand Master Dave Nor-
wood (2503) in a 30 Board Chess Simultaneous on Saturday, Feb-
ruary 6th, 2010 at 11 a.m.
Smith said GM Norwood has been a strong supporter of the
BCF's efforts to win the bid to host the Caribbean Sub Zonal
2010 and is expected to make a financial contribution at the Chess
Simultaneous towards defraying the costs of the event.
GM Norwood would be the third GM to play a chess simulta-
neous in the Bahamas since the BCF became a member of the
World Chess Federation (FIDE) in 1974. The other Grand Masters
were GM Lothar Schmid, who played a simultaneous in 1974 fol-
lowed by GM Raymond Keene in the mid 1980's.
GM Norwood was recently in London during the London
Chess Classic 2009, which was the strongest tournament orga-
nized there in 25 years. The Category 19 Tournament included
Carlson, Kramnik, Nakamura, Short, Adams, Hua Ni, McShane,
and Howell. The tournament was won by 19 year old GM Magnus
Carlson.
The Bahamian chess playing community is invited to participate.
For further details, interested parties should contact Warren Sey-
mour at 325-6210 or Kean Smith at keansmith@ymail.com.


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Three Bahamians represent Commonwealth team


CHRISTINE AMERTIL


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
THREE Bahamians repre-
sented the Commonwealth
team as they competed at the
Aviva International Match on
Saturday in Glasgow, United
Kingdom.
Quarter-miler Christine
Amertil posted a second place
finish in the women's 200


M e ntagueCall Us at
M- tagueor 394-323/5
or 394-1377


metres, clocking a season's
best in her indoor debut in
24.18 seconds.
The winning time was 23.65
by American LaShuantea
Moore.
Veteran sprinter Chandra
Sturrup, who hinted that this
could be her final year on the
circuit, placed third in the
women's 60 in 7.38.
American Carmelita Jeter
won in 7.19 and Great


Britain's Bernice Wilson was
second in 7.37.
The 37-year-old Sturrup's
time was well of her season's
best of 7.28 that she posted
on January 23 in a meet in
Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
And Grand Bahamian
Andrae Williams ended up
fifth in the men's 400 in his
season's best of 49.15. The
SEE page 14


BAAA relays: Big Red Machine secure three titles
THE St. Augustine's College Big Red Machine secured three of
the divisional titles at the Bahamas Association of Athletic Asso-
ciations National high School Relays over the weekend.
The Big Red Machine rolled away from the Thomas A. Robin-
son Track and Field Stadium with the under-17 girls division with
28 points, the under-20 girls with 24 and the under-20 boys with 16.
The CH Reeves Raptors picked up victories in the under-13 girls
with 16 and the under-13 boys with 24. The Queen's College
comets took the under-15 girls with 26 and the under-15 boys
with 28.
The St. John's Giants won the under-17 boys with 22.
* The full results will be printed at a later date.


I ODSUSSOISO HSIPAGE LG ON5T WWW.TIBUE22CO5


THE


^








+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010, PAGE 13B


FROM page 14B

In order to gain access to international trade, in
1825 Haiti agreed to pay France reparations of 150
million gold francs in exchange for recognition
and an end to the embargo. French accountants
and actuaries valued land, animals, former slaves,
and other commercial properties and services.
Haiti borrowed money from American Citibank to
service this debt. It took more than 100 years to
buy its recognition in the international communi-
ty.
While the reparations debate for African
descendants is scorned by the West, and avoided
by the descendants themselves, France stands
proudly having lived large off the modern equiv-
alent of $21 billion in reparations for losing land
and human property while enslaving Haitians.
"Haiti was crushed by this debt repayment. It
descended into financial and social chaos. France
was enriched and it took pleasure from the fact
that having been defeated by Haitians on the bat-
tlefield, it had won on the field of finance," said Sir
Hilary Beckles.
At the 2001 United Nations Conference on
Race in Durban, South Africa, the Caribbean
made strong representation for France to repay
Haiti. The Caribbean Community (Caricom) reaf-
firmed this call in 2007, during the anniversary
celebrations for the two hundredth anniversary
of the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade.
Former Haitian president Jean-Bertrand Aris-
tide was a strong proponent of this initiative. His
tenure was heralded as a return to order for Haiti,
until he was finally escorted out of the country in
2004, under armed guard by American Central
Intelligence Agency (CIA) officials. Haiti became


Conspiring to destroy Haiti: Past and present


a United Nations protectorate.
Thousands of government officials under the
Aristide-government were removed from office
during the questionable coup. The Americans
claim they gave President Aristide a plane ride to
the Central Africa Republic, where he now lives in
exile. President Aristide maintains he was kid-
napped. The new Haitian government, still in
power, wasted little time to withdraw the request
from France to repay the reparations money.
America pundits in the mainstream media
rarely, if ever, talk about America's involvement
in Haiti, although America invaded the country in
1915 and occupied it for almost 20 years to secure
its economic interests. Americans oversaw the
introduction of foreign land ownership to the
Haitian constitution, never present since inde-
pendence. During their rule, foreign economic
interests in the country grew, and racial stratifica-
tion between blacks and mulattos became more
ingrained, akin to segregated American states.
Under American rule, Haitian financial
reserves were managed from Washington. Debt
servicing accounted for 40 per cent of Haiti's annu-
al income, primarily to service American financial
institutions. America's grip on Haiti's finances
was so tight that they withheld the salaries of gov-
ernment officials on one occasion to coerce them
to sign a bilateral agreement without modifica-
tion, according to historians.
Even after the Americans left in 1934, they
did not return control of the national treasury to
Haiti until the 1940s. The only stable public insti-
tution they left was the US-trained Haitian mili-


tary. A series of military coups followed for the
next few decades, ending with the infamous Duva-
lier dynasty.
Former Haitian president Francois "Papa Doc"
Duvalier, said to be born in the Bahamas to a
father from Mayaguana and mother from Haiti, is
blamed for many of Haiti's current social and eco-
nomic troubles. During his 14 year rule, he estab-
lished the infamous secret police force, the Tonton
Macoute, and crippled the Haitian national army.
He embezzled money and was responsible for
political assassinations. His presidency was sup-
ported by the United States because of his anti-
Communist views. He was succeeded by his 19-
year-old son, Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier,
who was just as oppressive.
Much of Haiti's debt, still being serviced today,
was accumulated under the Duvalier regimes.
Rather than being used for national development,
much of the borrowed money was squandered
and outright stolen.
Massive deforestation in Haiti was another
source of instability, particularly for the natural
environment. Most commentators attribute this to
the "poor masses" cutting down trees to burn fire
wood. Dr Newry said this is only half of the story.
Haitian poverty has contributed to deforestation
in modern days, but, he said, the problem began
with the French, Spanish and other European
countries, cutting down forests to grow coffee,
sugar, tobacco and other products on a commercial
scale.
In the 1940s, Haitians also endured the vio-
lent anti-Voodoo crusade of Catholic missionaries.


During this period, called the Rejete massacre,
they killed Voodoo priests, destroyed sacred tem-
ples and burned forests with centuries-old trees
that were honoured by the Haitians.
Haiti's history of triumph and tragedy is too
complex to unravel in one article. External forces
were at play at the same time destabilizing inter-
nal forces that were at play. The internal forces are
not to be absolved. The hands of many Haitian
nationals are no doubt stained with the tears of
many in the starving masses, from corrupt prac-
tices, mismanagement, incompetence and war-
fare. These conditions appear to be ingrown
defects of ancient and modern governmental sys-
tems, as many nations well know. But to take a
simplistic look at Haiti, as many seem inclined to
do, and pass judgment on the nation without
understanding or perspective is to be blinded by
ignorance.
As the international community convened in
Canada late last month to begin forming a strate-
gic plan for the reconstruction of Haiti, many in the
Caribbean community were watching keenly with
an eye on the past and an eye on the future. A
major international conference is to be held in
the spring to further the strategic planning agenda.
The heart of the matter is: Haiti is inextricably
linked to the Bahamas, the Americas and the
modem world. Those who know this to be true are
watching closely as the world mobilizes behind
the latest international fad that is Haiti. As donor
fatigue will inevitably set in, those who know will
be the ones still standing shoulder-to-shoulder
with Haiti, embracing Haitians as their brothers
and sisters, wondering if the rallying cry, "not
without Haiti" will ever light a fire in the Bahami-
an psyche.


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010, PAGE 13


Dillette pays price of






'coaching mistake'


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

OVER the last four
months, Alana Dillette was
hoping that a "coaching mis-
take" would have worked in
her favour and she would
have been allowed to com-
plete her tenure as a Tiger
with the Auburn University
Swimming team.
However, the US National
Collegiate Athletic Associa-
tion (NCAA) stuck with its
decision that has kept Dillette
ineligible to compete in her
senior year with the Auburn
Swimming & Diving Wom-
en's team.
Dillette, in her freshman
season in 2005-06, was "red
shirt" by then Auburn's head
coach David Marsh. Howev-
er, Marsh admitted that he
had entered her in too many
meets as an exhibition swim-
mer and they should not have.
When Dillette, 22, was
headed into her senior year
at Auburn, leading the team
in the 100 and 50 metres but-
terfly, was the second fastest
100 back and fourth fastest in
both the 50 and 100 free when
she got the news in Septem-
ber that she would not be
allowed to compete and she
was trying to get vindicated
ever since.
Having been denied the
opportunity to compete or
train with the Tigers, Dillette
has been working out with a
professional programme as
she prepares for the Com-
monwealth Games in India in
October.
"Senior year is a special
year and not to be able to be a
part of a team that has been
such a significant part of my
life for the past four years is
very disappointing, especially


22-year-old ineligible to compete in her senior year

with the Auburn Swimming & Diving Women's team


" ^







ALANA DILET
j>-
.* - t
.. J~

- / a y
* e^ " *,�b, .-



- * a


through something that was
no fault of mine," she said.
"I was also disappointed
not to be able to help the
Auburn team in competition
this season in the areas where
they depended on my perfor-
mance.
"However, I have still been
able to train at the elite level
and I have already put this
behind me. My focus has
always been to compete for
The Bahamas and I am look-
ing forward to the CAC
Games this summer and to
continuing to represent the
country."
Dillette, a member of the
Bahamas Olympic team in
2008 and the World Champi-
onships last year, said she was
first informed about the prob-
lem in September 2009 and it
was hard to wait through the
NCAA appeals process. "I


was still hopeful that the ini-
tial NCAA ruling might have
been overturned in my favour
because the reason for the
ineligibility was so clearly a
coaching error," she said.
Throughout her ordeal,
Dillette said she was appre-
ciative of the support she
received from such persons
former Minister of Sports,
Desmond Bannister; Welling-
ton Miller, president of the
Olympic Association; Alger-
non Cargill, president of the
Bahamas Swimming Federa-
tion and Cynthia 'Mother'
Pratt, Member of Parliament
for St. Cecilia's.
"I have been privileged in
my swimming career so far to
help pave the way for some
of the younger girls in swim-
ming in the Bahamas and I
will always try to do my best,"
she said.


"There are some exciting
times ahead for me personal-
ly and for Team Bahamas in
swimming and I am commit-
ted to play my part. I would
also like to thank the former
Auburn Head Coach David
Marsh for assisting in the
NCAA appeals process and
attempting to make this right
and most especially I thank
the current Auburn Head
Coach Brett Hawke and his
team for their support."
Dillette said she hope that
this never happens to any oth-
er swimmer because it isn't
right for an athlete to be
penalized for a coaching mis-
take.
"I was a walk-on athlete
and I was told right from the
beginning that I would be red
shirted," she said. "I followed
what the Auburn Coach,
David Marsh told me to do
and I never thought anything
more about it until they told
me in September that I may
not be eligible to compete."
Dillette, who held several
records at Auburn University,
will graduate in May with a
Bachelor of Science in Hos-
pitality Management as a first
degree.
She will eventually finish
her US collegiate career as a
CSCAA All Academic (Aca-
demic All American by the
College Swimming Coaches
Association of America),
SEC Honour Roll Athlete
and member of one NCAA
and two SEC Championship
teams.


INTERNATIONAL PLAYER OF THE WEEK IN THE WESTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE




Magnum Rolle honoured


But one night later Louisiana Tech Bulldogs suffer big loss |


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ONE night after being
named the International
Player of the Week in the
Western Athletic Confer-
ence, Magnum Rolle and his
Louisiana Tech Bulldogs
suffered a big loss to the
New Mexico State Aggies.
Rolle, a senior from
Grand Bahama, led all scor-
ers with 27 points and 15
rebounds for his 10th dou-
ble-double of the season. He
ended up playing 40 minutes
for the second-straight
game.
Prior to that game, Rolle
received his honour from
Netscouts Basketball, the
second for the season.
Netscouts is the largest col-
legiate basketball scouting
service in the country.
In receiving the honor,
Rolle average 17 points and
11.5 rebounds as he led LA
Tech to a 1-1 record last
week.

Rebounds

During those two games,
he had 17 rebounds, includ-
ing nine offensive boards
against Hawaii on January
23 to tie a career high. He
also scored 23 points to lead
the Bulldogs to their 18th
win.
but in a loss to San Jose
State on on January 21,
Rolle scored 11 points with
six rebounds, five offensive-
ly.
With their latest loss to
the Aggies, the Bulldogs
dropped to 18-4 overall in
6-2 in the Western Athletic
Conference.
A number of other
Bahamian players were also
in action over the weekend.
Dynile Forbes, a starting
senior guard, played 36 min-
utes and scored a game high


23 points for the University
of Louisiana at Munroe
Warhawks in a 72-67 lost to
Louisiana-Lafayette.
On Thursday, Forbes,
another one of those Grand
Bahamian standouts, also
played 35 minutes and
scored 11 points as the
Warhawks also lost a 75-56
decision.
David Nesbitt, yet anoth-
er Grand Bahamian, had
nine points to help his St.
Thomas University Bobcats
hold off the visiting Ave
Maria Gyrenes 70-53.


And Marin Gray, also
from Grand Bahama, came
off the bench and played 16
minutes as he ended up eith
fourb points and three
rebounds in Southern Indi-
ana Eagles routed Lewis
University 80-57.
Meanwhile Tehran Cox,
a former CI Gibson guard,
played 24 minutes and con-
tributed five points with as
many assists and rebounds
as the High Point Panthers
prevailed with an 82-80 tri-
umph over the Gardner-
Webb Runnin' Bulldogs.


ggnorhi poursI



in fo arto


PICTURED Are Franklyn Wilson, Chairman of Sunshine Insurance,
Dr. Keith Wisdom, Director of Public Affairs for Cable Bahamas and
Brian Moodie, President of Sunshine Insurance Marathon Bahamas.

WITH the historic Marathon Bahamas less than two weeks
away, the sponsorship has been pouring into the organising
committee at Sunshine Insurance.
Over the weekend, Brian Moodie, president of Sunshine
Insurance Marathon Bahamas, announced that Cable Bahamas
Limited has joined the team as a sponsor.
This, according to Moodie, adds another exciting dimension
to this soon to be iconic event on the Bahamian sporting cal-
endar.
Cable Channel 12 will provide live coverage of the race on
Sunday, February 14, so that fans in the far flung ambit of
Cable 12 will be able to join in the thrills of race day.
Fans will be able to tune in for the start and finish of the race.
Those who are taking part will be able to see themselves in lat-
er broadcasts of the event.
Speaking for Cable Bahamas, Dr. Keith Wisdom, Director
of Public Affairs for Cable Bahamas and Executive Producer of
Cable 12, said that the company "noted with excitement the
many individuals and corporate entities that have decided to
partner with you and we feel that this has greatly enhanced the
potential for establishing a world class event and even higher
standards for productions by Bahamians."
Cable Bahamas Channel 12 participation provides a great
boost to getting the positive message of the Marathon out to the
wide Bahamian community.
Also, Bahamasair has come on board with a special promo-
tion for all visiting competitors.
Mike Sands, Bahamasair's Director of Sales and Marketing
announced today that Bahamasair, the National Airline, will be
offering a special $99 round trip fare for all family island par-
ticipants and an accompanying guest (booking and travelling
together) to the February 14th event.
Sands is encouraging as many family islanders as possible to
take advantage of this offer and to support Marathon Bahamas.
He especially appealed to Family Island Schools track teams
that are considering putting together a relay team.
As an incentive for schools to enter relay teams, Marathon
Bahamas has waived the relay team registration fee for two
relays from all schools in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
Additionally, to encourage local participation, he added
that Bahamasair will be offering a round trip ticket for the top
male and female Bahamian/Bahamian Residents finishers, in the
adult and junior categories, for the marathon and half marathon
divisions.
The special $99 round trip offer may be purchased at all
Bahamasair Family Island ticket offices and in order to be eli-
gible persons must present marathon registration confirma-
tion at time of purchase. The accompanying guest must book at
the same time, and both persons must travel together.
Moodie, speaking on behalf of Marathon Bahamas, wel-
comed Bahamasair as a partner and thanked the organization
for its reduced rates to family island participants and for prizes
for local participants.
For more details about Marathon Bahamas, please visit the
website at www.marathonbahamas.com.





, � , - 54







PICTURED ARE Mike Sands, BahamasAir Director of Sales and
Marketing and Brian Moodie, President of Sunshine Insurance
Marathon Bahamas.


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SPORTS











MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1,2010


+

p


The stories behind the news


ConspiPing to dest ro








Haiti: Past and present


By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net


THE transformative power
of the spoken word has been
proven throughout the cen-
turies, but one wonders if declar-
ing the Bahamas a Christian
nation through constitutional
declaration and use of the pub-
lic pulpit is sufficient to make it
actually so. The nation's claim to
Christian credentials is proba-
bly most questionable when sift-
ing through the public percep-
tion of Haiti and Haitians.
The word "Haitian", once a
symbol of black liberation, has
morphed into a derogatory
insult in the Bahamian psyche,
parallel only to the likes of racial
epitaphs like ,.-'- I 'or "boy".
Former Member of Parlia-
ment, Keod Smith, furiously
refuted claims of his Haitian her-
itage probably as a strategy to
preserve his political career. He
could very well have manufac-
tured signs reading: "Not a Hait-
ian."
Young Haitian-Bahamians
go to great lengths to hide or
subdue their Haitian heritage to
increase their chances of gaining
basic social acceptance.
Unfortunately, it is clear that
public perception of Haiti is
heavily influenced by what Sir
Hilary Beckles, pro-vice chan-
cellor of the University of the
West Indies (UWI), calls "impe-
rial propaganda". It is no sur-
prise that some people like
Tony, a Bahamian with Haitian
heritage, are rendered speech-
less by the "ignorance" of peo-
ple.
Someone like Tony could
wonder where the context, the
perspective, the truth went in
the debate about Haiti. It is
telling how an American news
reporter says with full self-assur-
ance, "Haiti's government was
incompetent at best, even before
the earthquake", and some
Bahamians believe this to be a
fact. There seems to be no for-
mulae to break the stranglehold
on the Bahamian psyche from
this lingering colonial mentality.
Haiti was battered by the 7.0
magnitude earthquake striking
10-miles off the coast of Port-
au-Prince on January 12. The
quake reduced the capital to
rubble and dust. Hundreds of
thousands of people lost their
lives; almost as many lost their
limbs in a wave of sweeping
amputations, and even more lost
their homes and livelihoods. Just
two years ago, Haiti was bat-
tered by a series of four hurri-
canes in the space of two weeks.
The damage was so severe that
there was enough international
goodwill for Haiti to secure $1.2
billion in debt relief from the
World Bank, International
Monetary Fund (IMF) and oth-
er creditors.
In the wake of the quake, the
international community is
pushing for total debt relief for
Haiti. Most of the country's
remaining debt is owed to Tai-
wan and Venezuela.
Just last week, Venezuela


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President Hugo Chavez
announced the Bolivarian
Alliance for the Americas
(ALBA) plan for Haiti, includ-
ing debt relief, a $20 million
donation for the health sector
and further investment funds.
"Haiti has no debt with
Venezuela, just the opposite:
Venezuela has a historical debt

"Young Haitian-
Bahamlans go to
great lengths to
hide or subdue
their Haitian
heritage to
increase their
chances of
gaining basic
social acceptance."

with that nation, with that peo-
ple for whom we feel not pity
but rather admiration, and we
share their faith, their hope,"
said Chavez after the meeting
of ALBA foreign ministers.
The case of Haiti is far from
black and white, although it is
easy to apply labels such as
ungodly, corrupt and backwards
to account for its status as the
most economically impover-
ished country in the western
hemisphere.
Superficially, it would appear
that Haiti is doomed, even
cursed, but the natural disasters
in Haiti's history barely match
the political, socio-economic
earthquakes that have been
engineered by external forces
for centuries; those seeking to
undermine Haiti's ability to be a
beacon of light for African peo-
ple.
Napoleon Bonaparte, French
Emperor during Haiti's revolu-
tion, said of his colonial empire:
"My decision to destroy the
authority of the blacks in Saint
Dominque (Haiti) is not so
much based on considerations
of commerce and money, as on
the need to block forever the
march of the blacks in the
world."
In the minds of some, this
endeavour has been successful,
but there are those who see
through the disparity, into the
hope that is Haiti.
"Wake up Bahamas! Ours is
a country that has been built -
for literally the last 30 years -
on the strength, sweat and hard
work of our Haitian brethren.
Many of us are descended from
immigrants, recent or old, from
Haiti, even though we may nei-
ther know nor admit it," said Dr
Nicolette Bethel, COB lecturer
and former Director of Culture.
Haitians may flee their coun-
try in search of better economic
conditions, but their national
pride is largely unshaken. Pros-
per Bazard has lived in the
Bahamas for 28 years. The
biggest thing that makes him
proud to be a Haitian is the
knowledge that his forefathers


fought the heavily equipped
French army with their bare-
hands and won.
"Another thing that makes
me feel proud is we are a nation
that can fight for a living. We
don't have so much money but
we can manage to find a way to
live. Even if a Haitian is very
poor, they will find a way to sur-
vive. He is not going to steal.
We believe in hard work, we
prefer to suffer and not steal,"
said Mr Bazard.
Haiti is the second free
republic in the western hemi-
sphere following the United
States, but the first black repub-
lic in the post-colonial world.
This might appear to be an his-
torical footnote, even ancient
history, but on the contrary, all
progress in the modern world,
particularly for people of
African descent, rests firmly on
the back of the ten-year war
waged by Haitian freedom fight-
ers for self-rule from the French.
The legacy of Haiti and the con-
tribution of Haitians in shaping
liberation consciousness in the
modern world is more like a
keystone, indispensable and per-
petually relevant.
"Bahamians probably do not


know much about Haitian his-
tory. I don't think history is high
on the list; neither is context.
Haitian people have been demo-
nized as beggars of the
Caribbean and I think that is
what is ingrained in our psyche,"
said Fred Mitchell, opposition
spokesperson on foreign affairs.
"It is nonsense, because first
of all they bring their talents,
expertise and skills as migrants
to the country. They helped us
to build our country," he said.
Few Bahamians learn about
the Haitian revolution, or the
history of Haitian-Bahamian
relations, because the standard
Bahamian school curriculum
does not feature Haiti. Not sur-
prisingly, with its roots still
grounded in the colonial world
view, "Discovery Day" is still
celebrated in the Bahamas after
all. This is despite the fact that
next to the United States, Haiti
probably has the largest external
influence on the Bahamas, for
good and for bad.
Even Dr Gail Saunders,
scholar in residence at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas and former
Director General of Heritage,
said she was not well versed in
Haitian history. She welcomed


the opportunity created by this
latest tragedy to spread aware-
ness of Haitian issues and histo-
ry. (Next week in Insight: an in
depth look at the Bahamas and
the world without Haiti).
"When Haiti became inde-
pendent, no country on earth
recognized Haiti, and they did
so for practical reasons. Haiti
was a slave economy and the
slaves threw off the slave mas-
ters. Haiti's present day eco-
nomic woes began back in 1804.
Haiti did not just become like
it is now," said Dr Eugene
Newry, former Bahamas
Ambassador to Haiti.
"They won their indepen-
dence militarily. Psychologically
it has a different effect than sit-
ting around a table with some-
one coming back from London
with some papers saying you are
free," he said.
The audacity of the Haitian
revolution was an unbearable
embarrassment to the French.
It was threatening to the slave-
based economy of the United
States, which failed to live up to
its promise of life, liberty and
the pursuit of happiness for all.
In its first constitution, Haiti
declared it would grant auto-


matic citizenship to any person
of African descent arriving on
its shores. The world decided to
starve the population with eco-
nomic embargo and isolation
instead of recognizing its free-
dom.
"It was the most vicious
example of national strangula-
tion recorded in modern history.
Haiti did not fail. It was
destroyed by two of the most
powerful nations on earth, both
of which continue to have pri-
mary interest in its current con-
dition. The sudden quake has
come in the aftermath of sum-
mers of hate. In many ways the
quake has been less destructive
than the hate. Human life was
snuffed out by the quake, while
the hate has been a long and
inhumane suffocation - a crime
against humanity," stated Sir
Hilary Beckles, in an article
widely published by Caribbean
news agencies.
The UWI is currently con-
vening a major conference on
the theme "Rethinking and
Rebuilding Haiti" to dig
beneath the rubble of public
perception.
SEE page 13B


BISHOP PIERRE ANDRE DUMAS. F1i[le ei :i ch,1il Leo Fiec: eille[[. ,in1 vol Iiun; l -e I rio Fooi1. l i 1 [ie FPo-i ir-1led irere,' i-
sprinkled holy watei on [lie bOdieS in an ellOill [ give [lie eal [liquake victims in Ti-Tanyen a plopei Chli tian bul ial.


ALMOST immediately follow-
ing the worldwide publication of
photos showing the dumping of
earthquake victims in mass graves
in Haiti, religious leaders and vol-


unteers of the charity Food for
Poor-Haiti mobilised to make every
effort to give them a proper Chris-
tian burial.
Daniel-G6rard Rouzier, chair-


man of the board of Trustees for
Food for the Poor-Haiti, thanked
the American news station CNN

SEE page 12B


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+


PAGE 14, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Collie warms up for marathon



Breezes through Baptist Sports Council's 2010 Joanne 'Mother' Webb Family Fun Run/Walk Race


pr


~I ~


ASHLEY WEBB receives her winning trophy in the
BSC's 2010 Joanne 'Mother' Webb Family Fun
Run/Walk Race women's walk category from BAAA's
Special Projects Officer Foster Dorsett (left) and race
patron Joanne Webb.


orw


I


MACKEY WILLIAMS receives his winning trophy in
the BSC's 2010 Joanne 'Mother' Webb Family Fun
Run/Walk Race men's walk category from BAAA's
Special Projects Officer Foster Dorsett (left) and race
patron Joanne Webb.


SIDNEY Collie, preparing
for Marathon Bahamas easily
breezed through the Baptist
Sports Council's 2010 Joanne
'Mother' Webb Family Fun
Run/Walk Race on Saturday.
Collie, competing in the
under-30 male division, won
the four-mile race in 25 min-
utes, leaving his coach Ash-
land Murray a distant behind
in second place. Murray, run-
ning in the under-50 division,
clocked 27.24. Raymond
Rudon, competing in the 50-
59 category, was third in
30.44. "It was a good race and
I felt comfortable out there
getting ready for the
marathon," Collie said. "But I
was surprised to see coach
(Murray) right there behind
me. I expected more people
to come out, but I want to
thank God for allowing me to
pull through."
Murray noted that the race
was nice and comfortable.
"I had my partner, but I
couldn't push him too far
because the marathon is com-
ing up in wo weeks. I had to
give him a break," Murray
said. "If I push him too hard,
him might not want to run the
marathon."
There were no female com-


petitors entered n the run that
started from the Charles W.
Saunders High School, Jean
Street and traveled north to
Prince Charles Drive, east to
Fox Hill Road, south to
Bernard Road and west back
to Jean Street.
In the shorter walk, which
went from Jean Street north
to Bernard Road, west to Vil-
lage Road, south to Prince
Charles Drive and east back
to Jean Street, Mackey
Williams took the men's title
in 27.44 as he opted out of the
run. "I'm just consevsing my
energy for the marathon,"
Williams said. "This race this
morning was more like a
workout to get myself in that
good mental and physical con-
dition. This is just a part of
my training, but I'm going to
run the half marathon."
The under-50 divisional
champion was followed by St.
John's Ellis Bodie-Young out
of the 60-and-over category
in 30.17.
Freddie Nabbie of Golden
Gates Native Baptist Church
took third place in 30.53.
Ashley Webb of Golden
Gates Native Baptist Church
emerged as the first female
finisher. Competing out of the


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under-15 division, she took
the title in 42.43.
Two other members from
Golden Gates Native Baptist,
competing in the under-19
division, were second and
third respectively. They were
Ariel Webb in 44.35 and
Johnnain Webb in 44.39.
"It was good. I got in some
good exercise," said 12-year-
old Ashley Webb, who
attends Kingsway Academy.
And in the Pastors/Minis-
ters category, the Rev. Harri-
son Thompson of Faith Unit-
ed took first place, followed
by the Rev. Ian Webb from
Kemp Road Ministries and
the Rev. Ellerston Smith from
St. John's Native Baptist.
Golden Gates Native Bap-
tist Church was crowned the
overall winner in the Church
category, having had more
finishers than anybody else.
"I was hppy with the
turnout of the members of
our Church, especially
because it was in honor of one
of our Deaconness," said
Jesse Hinsey, wife of Alonzo
Hinsey, pastor of the Golden
Gates Native Baptist Church.
"I enjoyed the walk.
"I look forward to compet-
ing in it."

- -


A~i


SIDNEY COLLIE receives his winning trophy in the BSC's 2010 Joanne 'Mother' Webb Family Fun Run/Walk Race
men's run category from BAAA's Special Projects Officer Foster Dorsett (left) and race patron Joanne Webb.


MEMBERS of the Golden Gates Native Baptist Church are pictured above with their overall title won at the Bap-
tist Sports Council's 2010 Deaconness Joanne 'Mother' Webb Family Fun Run/Walk Race on Saturday. At left
is BAAA's Special Projects Officer Foster Dorsett and at right is BSC's Public Relations Officer Rev. Ellerston Smith.


THE Baptist Sports Council showed its appreciation to
the officials and sponsors at the end of the 2010
Joanne 'Mother' Webb Family Fun Run/Walk Race. I
the front from left are BACO's Caroline Young and
Shena Williams; race patron Joanne Webb and BACO's
Val Kemp and Ralph McKinney. In back are BSC direc-
tor Brent Stubbs; John Curry of Thompson Trad-
ing/Gatorade; BAAA's/BACO's Frank 'Pancho' Rah-
ming and Rodney Curry of Thompson
Trading/Gatorade.

Christine Amertil comes

FROM page 12
winning time was 47.19 by American Jamaal
Torrence.
Demetrius Pinder, who won back-to-back
meets in College Station, Texas on January
16 and 23, still holds the two fastest times in the
world so far of 46.01 and 46.03.
The quartet helped the Commonwealth
Select to finish fourth with 49 points out of a
field of five countries. Great Britian won with
63, followed by the United States with 60.
Germany was third with 51 and Sweden
brought up the rear with 30.
On Sunday at the BW-Bank Meeting in
Karlsruhe, Shamar Sands competed in the
men's 60 metres hurdles where he finished
fourth in a time of 7.72.
Winning the race was Petr Svoboda of the
Czech Republic in a world leading and nation-
al record of 7.50. Americans Allen
Johnson and Eric Mitchum followed in second
and third in 7.58 and 7.63 respectively.
Prior to the final, Sands had finished third in
the first of two heats in 7.74 to qualify. Svo-
boda won the race in what then was listed as
the world leading and national record of 7.55.
A number of athletes also competed in the
United States on the collegiate circuit.
At the Clemson Invitational, Shaniqua 'Q'
Ferguson, competing for Auburn University,
won the women's 60 in 7.22. She also had the
fastest qualifying time of 7.35.
Warren Fraser, competing for Clemson, was
third in the men's 60 in 6.84 behind the
Auburn 1-2 punch of Marcus Rowland (6.61)
and Harry Adams (6.72).
Fraser was also third behind the duo in the
preliminaries in 6.79.
But Fraser came back and posted the win-
ning time in the men's 200 in 22.02.
And he competed on the third leg of the


RACE PATRON Joanne 'Mother' Webb gets a physical
check up from Nurse Sargent at the BSC's Family Fun
Run/Walk Race on Saturday. In the background, Nurse
Ruth Coakley administers a physical on Johnnain Webb.


second in Glasgow event
men's 4 x 400 relay team that won in 3:18.44.
Cache Armbrister of Auburn got seventh
in the women's 200 in 25.15. Brianna Rollins
led a Clemson sweep of the top four spots in
24.17.
Armbrister also ran the second leg on
Auburn women's 4 x 400 relay team that fin-
ished second in 3:40.82. Clemson won in
3:40.78. Gerard Brown, rounding out Auburn's
participation at the meet, finished fourth in
the men's long jump with a best leap of 6.85
metres on his second attempt.
At the Big 12-SCE-Pac-10 Challenge in Col-
lege Station, Texas, junior Jamal Wilson turned
in a second place finish in his second meet for
the University of Texas Longhorns with a leap
of 2.11 metres or 6-feet, 11-inches.
Sprinter Marcus Thompson, competing for
Baylor University, was 11th in 22.06 and 16th
in the 60 in 6.98.
At the Indiana Relays, Tia Rolle of Lincoln
was fourth in the women's 60 in 7.67. She was
also fourth in her heat of the semifinal in 7.68.
Her team-mate Michelle Cumberbatch was
sixth in the women's 400 in 57.57. The winning
time was 55.59 by Leander Ernest.
And Dennis Bain of Rend Lake came in
second in the men's 60 hurdles in 8.30. The
winning time was 8.30 by Logan Griffith from
Indiana. At the Montana State Open, Jamal
'Snickers' Forbes from Dickinson State, won
the men's 55 in 6.41; Ramon Miller, unat-
tached, won the men's 400 in 48.02 with
LaSean Pickstock of Dickinson State taking
second in 48.27. Pickstock won the 200 in 21.73
with Miller second in 22.89.
At Penn State, Nathaniel McKinney, com-
peting unattached, posted a seventh place fin-
ish in the men's 400 in 48.90.
At the Rodney McCraw Invite in Kentucky,
Bianca Stuart, competing unattached, was 19th
in the 60 in 7.87 and 34th in the 200 in 26.12.


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TRIBUNE ^/




uSir
MONDAY,
MONDAY,


SS


FEBRUARY 1, 2010


54CTO Bo uinestibueei~e


BISX chief:

Audit flpms,

companies

must wopk

mope closely


KEITH DAVIES
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange's
(BISX) chief executive has
urged publicly traded com-
panies and their external
auditors to work more close-
ly together to ensure their
year-end financial can be
released on time, given that
they are likely to soon have
only 90 days in which to
accomplish this.
Keith Davies, speaking to
Tribune Business in a recent
interview, told this newspa-
per that the relationship
between public companies
and their auditors needed to
"change" and be more
"proactive", with the former
ensuring the accountants
had access to all the neces-
sary documents and materi-
als from the moment they
began their audit.
SEE page 9B

Chamber campus

to 'empower staff

to empower firms'
* Private sector body
planning Chamber Institute
and new 'career, business
and vocational development
campus'
* Absence of quality labour
'the single most limiting
factor' for 75% of Bahamian
firms
* Awards programmes
planned to get businesses
'involved in and fired up
about education'
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce is planning to estab-
lish its own "career, business
and vocational development
campus" in a bid to "empower
workers to empower their com-
panies", given that the absence
of quality labour is "the single
most limiting factor" for at least
75 per cent of Bahamian busi-
nesses.
Robert Myers, who heads the
Chamber's Labour and Train-
ing Committee, told Tribune
Business that while the project
was still in its relative infancy,
the Chamber was looking to
obtain a Crown Land grant as a
site for the campus, which it
currently hoped to establish in
the Oakes Field area.
The Chamber Institute,
which the Chamber was moving
to establish in partnership with
the Bahamas Employers Con-
federation (BECon), and the
campus would be focused on
SEE page 10B


CLICO asset sale




to generate $10m

Bahamas-based assets yet to be placed on market likely to
fetch more than initial real estate advertised to buyers


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
CLICO (Bahamas) liq-
uidator is expecting to raise
a collective $10 million from
selling the 11 properties it has
currently advertised for sale,
informed sources have told
Tribune Business, with a
greater sum likely to be
realized once assets owned by
the insolvent insurer's affili-
ate are put on the market.
Craig A. 'Tony' Gomez, the
Baker Tilly Gomez accoun-
tant and partner, has largely


advertised the former CLICO
(Bahamas) branch and sales
office, along with associated
land parcels, and the Centre-
ville Medical Centre to
prospective buyers, as he
moves to monetise the insur-
er's real estate assets and gen-
erate liquid cash, which will
be used to repay the compa-
ny's creditors and policyhold-
ers.
Yet while representing a
significant recovery for CLI-
CO (Bahamas) creditors and
policyholders, the Bahamas-
based assets advertised by Mr


Gomez to date do not repre-
sent the so-called 'crown jew-
els' that the insurer's affiliate,
CLICO Enterprises, owns in
this jurisdiction.
Apart from the Florida-
based Wellington Preserve
real estate development, CLI-
CO Enterprises, as confirmed
by the liquidator, also owns
GB Millworks (Grand
Bahama Millwork and Build-
ing Supplies Ltd), a retail-
er/wholesaler of hardware,
SEE page 4B


BAS
"i ' j 2/ - P*J


$4.31


;o $4.38


$4.38

.i i i .. .. . .1 i. "r
r, A,- rh . f .1l


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Cable Bahamas has access
to some $30 million-plus of
working capital for invest-
ment/expansion opportunities
that may arise in 2010, its
president telling Tribune
Business the BISX-listed firm
had tonness" of available
financing even after complet-
ing the $80 million buyout of
its controlling shareholder.
Anthony Butler said the
purchase of the 30.2 per cent
stake held by Columbus Com-
munications, the Barbados-
domiciled vehicle owned by
Canadian investors, had elim-
inated the need for Cable
Bahamas to go through the
Government's Investments
Board/National Economic
Council (NEC) process every
time it targeted an acquisition
or expansion.
"If lifts an approval process
that Cable Bahamas used to
have to go through with the
Government; it actually
releases us from having to go
through that," Mr Butler said,
pointing out that the transac-
tion's completion this week
meant the company was now
a 100 per cent Bahamian-
owned, fully public company.
Although Mr Butler did not
say so explicitly, Tribune
Business understands that
both Cable Bahamas and
Columbus Communications
had become increasingly frus-
trated with the need to obtain
government approval for all
their expansion plans.
It is understood that both
entities felt this had been used
to frustrate their plans, name-
ly through blocking the
planned acquisition of Sys-
tems Resource Group (SRG),
the IndiGo Networks parent,
and when Cable Bahamas'
Caribbean Crossings sub-
sidiary had proposed devel-
oping a fibre optic cable link-
ing the southern Bahamian
islands and Jamaica. That,
too, was never approved.
As a result, Columbus
Communications felt it was
never going to get the return
on investment it was seeking,
a key reason behind its deci-
sion to exit.
Now, with the Columbus
deal behind it, Cable
Bahamas is free to focus on
the opportunities to expand
into new Bahamian telecoms
markets, in line with the sec-
tor's liberalisation and the
SEE page 6B


* Majority
shareholder buyout
removes need to go
through government
approval process
* Despite recession,
still seeing 'year-over-
year growth' in all
business units


Colina deal


unlocks 'full


potential' of


RND's value

* Chairman says strong financial partner
needed to return RND to paying dividends,
and reduce debt, payables and monthly
payments to creditors
* Company generating $1.3m rental revenues
per annum
* RND to be absorbed into majority-owner's
insurance firm, with call centre used for
latter's inquiries
* Fitzgerald hints stepping down as chairman
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Edi-
tor
Selling a majority stake
to Colina Holdings will II
unlock "the full cash flow
and potential of RND"
Holdings, its chairman has -
told Tribune Business, 0'
explaining that the compa-
ny required a strong finan- , 0 "
cial investor/partner if it
was to resume dividend *
payments to shareholders. JEROME FITZGERALD
Jerome Fitzgerald, who
is also a PLP Senator, told this newspaper that Colina
Holdings (Bahamas), parent company of Colina Insur-
ance Company, had obtained a greater-then 50 per
cent stake in publicly-held RND Holdings through
acquiring some of his stake, as well as the issuance of
new shares.
SEE page 8B


7Th


KIN'S REALTY

TI: (24t)323-8ON
Fhc (242) 323-8013
mwwkgalnaltyxm


$30 million tonness' of

financing set at Cable






7Th


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010, PAGE 3B


St George estate attorney






wins against Babak firm


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The St George estate attor-
ney, Fred Smith QC, has put
one over bitter opponent
Hannes Babak in a matter
unrelated to the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) ownership dispute,
winning a Supreme Court ver-
dict requiring the latter's
BISX-listed company to pay
his law firm $20,787 plus 1.5
per cent interest annually.
Mr Smith, acting on behalf
of his firm Callenders & Co,
obtained the award as pay-
ment for legal advice ren-
dered to Freeport Concrete
over whether certain actions
by the Bahamas Customs
Department were legal, and
could be challenged, under
the provisions of the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement.
In her written ruling, Jus-
tice Estelle Gray-Evans said
the two sides had been "argu-
ing 'apples and oranges'",
with Callender's & Co seek-
ing payment for work per-
formed on Freeport Con-
crete's behalf before it sub-
mitted a retainer letter, and
the company's attorney argu-
ing that no money was due
because it had not signed the
retainer letter.
Outlining the case, Justice
Gray-Evans's judgment said
Callender's & Co was claim-
ing fees due for professional
services rendered in provid-
ing legal advice to Freeport
Concrete on whether it could
challenge the Bahamas Cus-
toms Department's proposed
policy changes.
Callender's & Co had
alleged that in March 2006,
several months before the
GBPA ownership dispute


broke out in earnest, Mr
Babak had "orally instruct-
ed" Mr Smith to provide
advice on whether Customs'
proposed policy of requiring
all duty-free transactions - by
both retailers and wholesalers
-to be pre-approved by itself
was lawful under the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement.
In addition, Callenders &
Co alleged that Mr Babak
had also sought, on Freeport
Concrete's behalf, a legal
opinion on whether Customs'
requirement that only duty-
paid goods could be displayed
on store shelves was lawful,
and if it could be challenged
under the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement.

Licence

Ray Simpson, Freeport
Concrete's chief executive,
then supplied Mr Smith with a
copy of the company's
GBPA-issued business
licence, and between March
23, 2006, and April 10, 2006,
Callender's & Co assessed the
evidence and rendered a 25-
page legal opinion.
The work was performed
by Mr Smith and UK-based
QC, Jonathan Adkin, and
sent to Mr Babak in an April
10, 2006, letter.
A second letter, sent on
the same day, said Callender's
& Co would be pleased to
enter into a retainer agree-
ment, setting out the terms
for such and stating that a
$10,000 initial payment would
be required.
No signed retainer letter
was received by Callender's
& Co, nor were its terms
negotiated. Instead, the judge
found that Callender's & Co
issued an invoice for $20,787


to Freeport Concrete on
August 14, 2006, some
$20,750 of that being for pro-
fessional fees and the remain-
der for photocopying.
Yet no payment was
received, leading Mr Smith to
e-mail Mr Babak on May 19,
2009, asking for the funds to
be sent.
Mr Simpson, on Freeport
Concrete's behalf, replied two
days later, stating that he
could find no signed retainer
agreement or copy of a letter
he had signed authorising Cal-
lender's & Co to perform the
work.
Mr Smith replied on May
22, 2009, warning that legal
action would be initiated if
the outstanding sum was not
paid within seven days.
That led to himself and Mr
Simpson agreeing that if
Freeport Concrete paid
$19,000 by the week's end,
Callender's & Co would
write-off the remaining bal-
ance and interest.
However, the sum was nev-
er paid, leading to Callender's
& Co instigating legal action.
Justice Gray-Evans found: "In
a nutshell, the plaintiff's case
is that it was agreed between
the parties for the plaintiff to
provide legal services, which it
did, to the defendant by way
of a legal opinion on the
issues.
"Shortly thereafter, the
plaintiff forwarded the legal
opinion to the defendant, and
approximately four months
later, tendered its bill for ser-
vices rendered, which the
defendant has not paid,
despite a subsequent agree-
ment by the defendant's chief
executive to pay an agreed
discounted amount of
$19,000."


The judge said it was not
disputed that Callender's &
Co and Freeport Concrete
had an agreement for the for-
mer to provide a legal opin-
ion, which was delivered on
April 10, 2006.
There was no agreement on
fees, though, and Justice
Gray-Evans said that while
Callender's & Co clearly
expected a long-term rela-
tionship to be established with
Freeport Concrete, that never
happened.

Informal

While the arrangement
between the two sides was an
informal one, Justice Gray-
Evans found: "Their princi-
pals obviously know each oth-
er, and I do not believe that
Mr Babak would have sought
the services of the plaintiff
through its managing partner,
Mr Smith, expecting those
services to be rendered gra-
tuitously."
Despite the fact that fees
were not discussed, Justice
Gray-Evans said there was
nothing to prevent Callen-
der's & Co charging a rea-
sonable sum for its services.
She found the $20,787 to be
reasonable, given that
Freeport Concrete did not
dispute this and offered to set-
tle the issue for $19,000.
The thrust of the defence
mounted by Freeport Con-
crete and its attorney, Andre
Feldman, was that Freeport
Concrete signed no retainer
and did not pay the $10,000
fee.
"It seems to me that the
parties were arguing 'apples'
and 'oranges'," Justice Gray-
Evans wrote.
"The plaintiff was obvious-


ly seeking to be paid for work
done before it submitted its
retainer letter, whereas the
retainer letter was in respect
of an anticipated future rela-
tionship between the parties
that did not materialise.
"Counsel for the defendant
seems to be of the view that
the defendant's failure to sign
the retainer letter meant that
it had not instructed the plain-
tiff to do any work on its
behalf.
"However, the evidence is
that the defendant would
have received the advice at
or about the same time as it
received the retainer letter,
so it must have realized that
the plaintiff had already done
some work on its behalf."
Finding in favour of Cal-


lender's & Co, Justice Gray-
Evans said: "So, the defen-
dant does not deny that it
sought the plaintiff's advice; it
does not deny that it sent its
licence agreement with the
Port Authority to the plain-
tiff, nor does it provide any
reason for so providing the
said licence agreement other
than the reason advanced by
the plaintiff; it does not deny
that it received the opinion;
it does not deny that it
received the invoice; it does
not say that the sum charged
was unreasonable; it does not
deny that its chief executive
offered to pay $19,000 to set-
tle the debt; and it does not
say that it did not expect to be
charged."


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+


LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE


INTERCITRUS INVESTMENTS LIMITED


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, INTERCITRUS INVESTMENTS LIMITED
has been dissolved and struck off the Register according
to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 4 day of December, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 4 day of December, A.D., 2009.


Dartley Bank & Trust Limited
Liquidator







+>


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


CLICO asset sale t


FROM page 1B
housewares and lumbers. The
real estate and operations are
owned by CLICO Enterpris-


es. Other assets that can be
sold by Mr Gomez, if and
when he so chooses, include
some 12.472 acres, divided
into 12 lots, at Westridge


Human Resources

Officer

Bahamas Regional Office

The successful candidate should possess the
following qualifications:

* AICB or ABIFS Diploma or a Bachelor's Degree in
Human Resources or Finance would be a plus
* At least 5 or more years Human Resources
experience. Previous experience in Banking would
be an asset
* Demonstrated ability in the area of Supervision
and Operations is required

Key Skills Required:
* Leadership & Coaching
* Teamwork & Cooperation
* Strong Communication Skills both Verbal and
Written
* Organization Skills
* Microsoft Office Proficiency with a concentration
in Excel, Word, Outlook and Power Point
* Multi-tasking skills
Reconciliation skills
* Must respect confidentiality
* Must be innovative and pro-active

Responsibilities include:
* Providing support to the Assistant Manager,
Human Resources, Benefits & Compensation by
ensuring the efficient maintenance of Human
Resources records, the payroll system, Pension,
and RESSOP administration
* Responsible for the reconciliation of NIB, Medical,
Suspense, RESSOP and Pension accounts monthly.
* Responsible for updating Business Continuity Plan
monthly
* Facilitating the annual Fun Run Walk, Uniform
Program, Vice President and Managing Director's
Awards, RBC Performance Awards and Royal
Recognition Plan

A competitive compensation package (base salary &
bonus) commensurate with relevant experience and
qualifications is offered.
Please apply before February 5,2010 to:


Regional Manager
Human Resources
Caribbean Banking
RBC Royal Bank of Canada
Bahamas Regional Office
P.O. Box N-7549
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Via fax: (242)322-1367
Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com


RENT


* 1.214 sq.fI, and 1,629 sq.ft.
* Ample Parking
* Immediate Occupancy
* For more information call 396-0000


Estates. They were previous-
ly appraised for $3.43 million,
with the property a peninsula
on the northwestern side of
Lake Cunningham.
And in Grand Bahama,
CLICO Enterprises owns an
eight-unit apartment complex
at Rum Cay Drive, Freeport.
The key to any liquidation,
though, is the fate of Welling-
ton Preserve. Sources familiar
with the situation have indi-
cated a sales agreement with
the potential purchaser has
been concluded, with the pur-
chase price in the region of
$50 million, although that can-
not be confirmed.
Tribune Business revealed
early last month that the pre-
ferred buyer for Wellington
Preserve is the Hines Group.


o gen

And this newspaper also
revealed that Colina Insur-
ance Company was the likely
purchaser of CLICO
(Bahamas) remaining life and
health insurance policy port-
folio, with Mr Gomez hoping
to finalise the transaction and
transfer of those policies by
January's end - before
Supreme Court Justice Cheryl
Albury, who has carriage of
the liquidation, steps down
from the bench.
It is unclear whether those
goals have been met, though,
and Tribune Business under-
stands that Mr Gomez's legal
team, Michael Scott and Tra-
cy Ferguson at Callender's &
Co, have been working had
behind the scenes in prepara-
tion to move the case to


FINANCE
MANAGER
An established Bahamian local company
is seeking applications from suitably
qualified persons to fill the position of
Finance Manager for long-term
commitment, growth and longevity.

The ideal candidate should possess:
* Professional accounting qualifications
(ACCA, CA,CPA or MBA)
* Proficiency in Information Technology
* Knowledge of finance, accounting,
budgeting and cost control principles
* Knowledge of automated financial and
accounting reporting systems
* Ability to analyze financial data and
prepare financial reports, statements and
projections.
* Working knowledge of short and long
term budgeting and forecasting and
product-line profitability analysis.
* Professional written and verbal
communication and interpersonal skills
* Ability and willingness to work a flexible
schedule
* Supervisory and Management skills
* Proven leadership skills
* The capacity to work with and develop
the team
An attractive compensation package is
offered which includes Group Medical and
Pension Plan benefits.
Salary commensurate with qualifications
and experience.

Interested persons should send resumes
and supporting documents to:
P.O. Box CB-11651
Nassau, Bahamas
All applications must be submitted on or
before February 26, 2010.


BAHAMAS REALTY iLm
COMMERCE AL


CBRE
CB RICHARD ELUS
AI..ATINj, A NtW AFlPa


rate $10m


another judge. The liquida-
tor's second report to the
Bahamian Supreme Court is
also being prepared.
On the Wellington Preserve
front, its sale - and maximising
the purchase price - will be
key in determining how much
CLICO (Bahamas) creditors -
especially its policyholders -
recover in terms of their
investment.
While a successful deal with
the Hines Group or any other
bidder cannot be guaranteed,
Mr Gomez said in a previous
report to the Supreme Court
that he had been presented
with three different sales price
estimates for Wellington Pre-
serve, based on various time-
lines and scenarios.
A sale within three to nine
months could realise an esti-
mated sales price of around
$40 million, the liquidator had
been told, with a sale in six
months to one year generat-
ing possible proceeds of $69
million. And a sale of
Wellington Preserve one year
from now could generate up
to $120 million, Mr Gomez
said he had been advised.
CLICO (Bahamas) had
advanced about $73 million
in loans to its affiliate, CLICO
Enterprises, over a four-year
period beginning at end-2003.
In turn, the latter entity
advanced these funds to vari-
ous entities, but the lion's
share went into Wellington
Preserve.
The likelihood that CLICO
(Bahamas) would recover
that loan at full value, given
that CLICO Enterprises' 2008
unaudited financial state-
ments showed it had a sol-
vency deficiency of $21 mil-
lion, with assets of $108 mil-
lion and liabilities of $129 mil-
lion, was a key factor behind
why the insurer was peti-
tioned into court-supervised
liquidation.
Some $70 million had been
loaned by CLICO Enterpris-
es to Wellington Preserve, in


addition to a $13 million
direct investment, taking its
total exposure to the Florida-
based real estate project to
$83 million. While valued at
$127 million in January 2009,
Wellington Preserve was said
by Mr Gomez's report to now
have an 'as is' value of $62
million.
This illustrates why the pro-
ject's sale, and Mr Gomez's
ability to maximise its value -
especially if he can achieve
prices nearer to the two
longer-term valuations - are
key to CLICO (Bahamas) liq-
uidation. Currently, CLICO
(Bahamas) has some $124.484
million in assets and $154. 191
million in liabilities, render-
ing it insolvent to the tune of
an $29.707 million solvency
deficiency. The greatest per-
centage of those assets are the
loans to CLICO Enterprises,
so achieving a purchase price
for Wellington Preserve
above what was invested in it
will help to close the solvency
gap.
In his first Supreme Court
report, Mr Gomez said the
523-acre Wellington Preserve
site, designed to incorporate
80 residential lots and an
equestrian centre, had been
acquired for $55 million, a
deal part-financed by a $35
million mortgage.
Only $1 million was out-
standing on the mortgage,
which was due to be paid off
in July. While a $42 million
investment was supposedly
required to bring Wellington
Preserve into a condition suit-
able for sale, Mr Gomez said
the project owed $150,000 to
its suppliers. It also owed
some $1.3 million in county
and local taxes, and $500,000
in taxes were past due on lot
sales. Wellington Preserve
had also settled litigation via a
settlement under which it was
due to pay $200,000 per year
for eight years, one-and-a-half
years remaining on the agree-
ment.


- 6 Ye 0/d,5f


Join us at our Early Learning Centre Open House for prospective
Pre School, Pre Reception, and Reception students.
Saturday, 6 February, 2010 from 9-11am
At the St. Andrew's School Early Learning Centre, Yamacraw Rd.

Learn about our inquiry-based. child-centred programmes for 2-5 year olds.
Children and parents welcome!
* Tour classrooms
* Meet teachers, parents, and administrators
* Learn about our curriculum
h ,a E And discover why our ELC is such a special place!


For more information. contact:
Allison Collie
Head of Primary
allison.collie@sl-andrews corn


Sal Py Varanli Jones
AdmissionsOffi1cer
saIly.varani ,Ones@sI-andrews .com


SNNDRSCHOOL
SCHOOL


nhf Am s5wt. /


.CJ03O"iiand



A=01 a


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


PARADISE
SHOPPING VILLAGE
CASINO DRIVE, PARADISE ISLAND
www.bahamascrnmmernrcial.com
www.cbrichardellis.com

NEWLY REFURBISHED

RETAIL SHOP SPACES


x Uneel Yo War mWtreNeed Eto t amldf Pt s'wia,y"

DEAN & ASSOCIATES PROFESSIONAL

INSURANCE AGENTS & BROKERS










^J^^lmeC ancd ResidetIW















Deala Plaza, Mackey Streel
Phone 356-0986 Fax 356-0987
Hours 8:30am - 4:30pm
Email: deanagentsandbrokers@yahoo.com


BUSINESS I






7Th


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010, PAGE 5B


Filit pktITERATIOAL MARKETS
C.FOREX Rates Weekly %oChangeI


t was an active week
of trading in the
Bahamian stock market.
Investors traded in nine out
of the 24 listed securities, of
which two advanced, three
declined and four remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET
A total of 6,048,597 shares
changed hands, represent-
ing a significant increase of
5,982,767 shares compared
to the previous week's trad-
ing volume of 65,830 shares.
AML Foods (AML) was
the lead decline, trading
1,000 shares, with its stock
closing down by $0.02 at
$1.12.
Cable Bahamas (CAB)
was the big volume leader
and advancer, trading
5,959,441 shares to close up
by $3.43 at $13.43.

BOND MARKET
Some 380 FBB Series D
bonds traded on the
Bahamian exchange during
last week, representing a
total par value of $380,000.

COMPANY NEWS:
Dividend Notes:
Freeport Oil Holdings
(FCL) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.04 per share,
payable on February 11,


BISX DESCRIPTION
SYMBOL
FBB13 FBB Series C
Notes Due 2013
FBB15 FBB Series D
Notes Due 2015
FBB17 FBB Series A
Notes Due 2017
FBB22 FBB Series B
Notes Due 2022


EQUITY MARKET - TRADING STATISTICS


CLOSING PRICE
$ 1.12
$ 0.63
$ 5.90
$ 10.74
$ 10.06
$ 3.15
$ 13.43
$ 6.99
$ 2.72
$ 10.00
$ 2.70
$ 2.55
$ 6.49
$ 2.37
$ 0.27
$ 4.77
$ 1.00
$ 9.27
$ 5.59
$ 9.95
$ 10.00


2010, to all ordinary share-
holders of record date Janu-
ary 29, 2010.

ICD Utilities (ICD) has
declared a dividend of $0.14
per share, payable on Feb-
ruary 12, 2010, to all ordi-
nary shareholders of record
date February 5, 2010.


VOLUME PAR VALUE


0 $1,000
380 $1,000
0 $1,000
0 $1,000


WKLY PRICE
CHANGE
$-0.02
$-3
$-0
$-0
$-0
$-0
$3.43
$-0.01
$-
$0.01
$0.12
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-0.01
$-
$-
$-


VOLUME
1,000
0
8,986
0
0
0
5,959,441
14,886
0
7,297
0
0
350
0
0
50,605
0
2,695
3,337
0
0


YTD PRICE
CHANGE
-4.27%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
34.57%
-0.14%
0.00%
0.10%
-5.26%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
-0.11%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%


ALVIN INGRAHAM JR.


The above-mentioned individual is no
longer associated with Dean and Associates
Professional Insurance Agents & Brokers Co.Ltd.
Therefore he is not authorized to conduct any
business on behalf of this company.

Signed Management


CAD
GBP
EUR
Commodities
Commodity
Crude Oil
Gold


0.9348
1.5996
1.3864


Weekly
72.79
1,082.00


-1.08
-0.73
-1.91
% Change
-1.83
-1.10


BISX
SYMBOL
AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FBB
FCC
FCL
FCLB
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE


CAREER OPPORTUNITIES


FirstCaribbean ats

Are you seeking an exciting career opportunity? lg.


MANAGING DIRECTOR - BAHAMAS
Will be jointly accountable for the overall financial and
operational performance, ensuring the enhancement of market
share and strengthening the bank's reputation in the market.
Application expiration date: February 12th, 2010.


For further information on this and
other available positions, please visit
our website:

www.firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm


( FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK
GET THERE. TOGETHER.


I T ICS TRE NTI AELGO OWWTIUE4.O


+


International Stock Market Indexes
Index Weekly % Change
DJIA 10,067.33 -1.04
S & P 500 1,073.87 -1.64
NASDAQ 2,147.35 -2.63
Nikkei 10,198.04 -3.71








Temple Christian High School







Temple Christian High School will hold
its Entrance Examination on SATURDAY,
FEBRUARY 6th, 2010 at the school on
Shirley Street from 8:00a.m. - 12noon for
students wishing to enter grades, 7,8,9 and
10.

Application forms are available at the High
School Office. The application fee is twenty
five dollars ($25.00). Application forms
should be completed and returned to the
school by Friday, February 5th, 2010.


For further information please

call

394-4481 or 394-4484


BOND MARKET - TRADING STATISTICS


KINGSWAY ACADEMY

Immediate Vacancy: Part-time Woodwork
Teacher for the High School


Teacher Vacancies for

September 2010

KingswayAcademy invites applicants from qualified
and experienced candidates for teaching positions at
the Elementary School level and all subjects at the
High School level (Grades 7 through 12).

The successful candidates should have the following:
* An Academic Degree in the area of specialization
* A Teaching Certificate
* Excellent Communication Skills
* A love for children and learning
* High standards of morality
* Be a born-again Christian

Letters of application together with a recent color
photograph and detailed curriculum vita (including
the names and addresses of at least three references,
one being the name of one's church minister)
should be forwarded to:

The Academy Affairs Manager
Kingsway Academy
Box N-4378
Bernard Road
Nassau, The Bahamas

Deadline for applications is
Friday, February 19, 2010







+


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


V - m- v.


L4


A_


Doctors certifies





security officers


PICTURED LEFT TO RIGHT: Michele Rassin, vice-president, opera-
tions; Leon Wilchcombe, security officer; Troy Curtis, security officer;
Anton Saunders, chief of security; Livingston Grant, security officer
and Paul Haven, vice-president, human resources, Doctors Hospital.


Doctors Hospital Health Systems
(DHHS) security staff have been certified
by an internationally accredited body, the
International Association for Healthcare
Security & Safety (IAHSS).
The only recognized body for certifica-
tion that meets the Joint Commission Inter-
national standards, the IAHSS recently
DDHS officers in a three-month training
course covering the 40 units of study con-
tained in the Association's manual.


Leon Wilchcombe, Troy Curtis and Liv-
ingstone Grant successfully completed and
passed the international certification.
The three officers join a large group of
international professionals, and a short list
of Bahamians, to have this distinction.
Anton Saunders, DHHS security coor-
dinator, said it was the department's plan to
ensure that all the officers employed by
the hospital are certified by IAHSS.
"Doctors Hospital is definitely proud


of our security officers in taking the next
step in pursing their professional and per-
sonal goals. This achievement speaks to
the commitment of our organisation to
invest in our staff so that they are equipped
to meet and exceed the expectations of our
customers.
"We also hope that this will encourage
others to further their professional growth,"
said Paul Haven, DHHS vice-president of
human resources.


FROM page 1B
Utilities Regulatory & Com-
petition Authority's (URCA)
plans. Two of those areas are
thought to be fixed-line and
cellular services, once the
time is right.
Mr Butler declined to com-


$30 million tonness' of financing set at Cable


ment on which additional
telecoms industry areas Cable
was targeting, but added that
the buyout was designed to
help the company "to take
advantage of opportunities


(In Voluntary Liquidation)
Company is in dissolution, which commencediit


on the 29th day of January 2010. The Liquidator








is Argosa Corp. Inc., P 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Legal Notice
NOTICE
ARNESTO HOLDINGS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 29th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., Fra 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA COR R INC.
(Liquidator)










IIImloiI In' lir


Employment


Opportunity



TRAILERS.

0 Requirements:
U U
0 * Must be a High School Graduate
0 * Must have excellent Inter-personal
0 Skills U
0 * Must have excellent Oral & Written
0 Communication Skills
* * Professionalism required
U U
* McDonald's offers excellent benefits!
U U
Please submit Resume to: U
U U
0 Human Resources Department
0 McDonald's Head Office U
0 on Market St. North I
0 P.O.Box SS-5925
0 Telephone: 325-4444 U
* Nassau, The Bahamas
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII


going forward".
"We've built in enough
financing for the short-term,"
Mr Butler told Tribune Busi-
ness.
"We've refinanced the
company to put us on a sound
footing to take up opportuni-
ties going forward.
"There'll be more access to
telecoms services for Cable
Bahamas going forward, and
the refinancing takes that into
consideration. We're proba-
bly just shy of $30 million in
working capital, and have
access to another $10 million
if an opportunity comes up in
2010.
"We're in the $30 millions.


If anything comes up on the
horizon, we've got tonnes
there."
Mr Butler added that Cable
Bahamas was forecasting a
"steady" 2010 performance.
While the 2009 audit of its
financial was not complete,
he said: "We've seen year-
over-year growth in our busi-
ness units despite some chal-
lenges in consumer disposable
spending, and are managing
expenses really hard.
"We're happy with the
increased uptake on broad-
band Internet, and video has
been steady."
The acquisition of Colum-
bus Communications'


NOTICE is hereby given that RACHEL GINA MAUREEN
ROBINSON of Simms General Post Office, Long
Island, Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 1st day of February, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



























*li'm lovir.'i,








A leading fast food franchise is looking for ane
SAdinistorative Assistant

l for its Human Resources Department the
l successful candidate must have:
* * Exceptional organtionion skills and the
* ability to multi-task n
I * Good computer and time management
I skills.
I * The ability to maintain a high level of
I accuracy and confidentiality.
O * Excellent oral and written communication
N skills s
N * Excellent inter-personal skills
1 * The ability to perform duties in an effective l
I and efficient manner.

I McDonald's offers excellent benefits! *
l U
l Please submit Resume to: U
l U
Human Resources Department U
McDonald's Head Office U
on Market St. North U
P.O. Box SS-5925 U
Telephone: 325-4444 0
l Nassau, The Bahamas 0
IIIIIIIIIIIIII I ..I II


5,954,600 ordinary shares was
funded through the combina-
tion of a $95 million syndicat-
ed credit facility and $40 mil-
lion in preference shares.
Currently, Cable Bahamas
has more than 78,000 sub-
scribers on its broadband net-
work, 44,000 high-speed Inter-
net subscribers and over 2,000
customers using international
and domestic private line data
circuits, IP transit and tele-
com/data co-location.
Tribune Business revealed
earlier this month how Cable
Bahamas had to restructure
the deal to obtain Federal
Communications Commission
(FCC) approval, creating a
trust overseen by an indepen-
dent trustee to hold five mil-
lion shares, equivalent to
26.74 per cent of its outstand-
ing ordinary capital, which
will be repurchased from
Columbus Communications.
The BISX-listed electronic
communications provider has


appointed Dr Keva Bethel,
the former College of the
Bahamas (COB) president, to
act as trustee in a bid to keep
the Government's total equi-
ty stake in the company below
25 per cent once the Colum-
bus Communications transac-
tion is completed.
Documents filed with the
Federal Communications
Commission (FCC), the US
regulatory authority, showed
that without the trust's cre-
ation the Bahamian govern-
ment would hold a combined
29.2 per cent equity stake in
Cable Bahamas once the
Columbus Communications
buyout was completed.
This would have placed the
Government's ownership
interest in Cable Bahamas
above the 25 per cent thresh-
old.
This benchmark is critical,
since if the Government's
stake was less than 25 per
cent, the Columbus Commu-
nications purchase would
qualify for faster processing
by the FCC.


NOTICE
IN THE ESTATE OF EULAH MAE
FRANCIS late of Thompson Court, Oakes Field in
the Western District of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claims or demands against the above-
named Estate are requested to send the same duly
certified to the undersigned on or before
Friday the 26th day of February 2010 after which
the Personal Representatives will proceed to
distribute the assets of the Deceased among the
persons entitled thereto having regard only to the
claims of which the Personal Representatives shall
then have had notice.
AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate are requested
to make full settlement on or before the date
hereinbefore mentioned.
CASH, FOUNTAIN
Attorneys-at-Law
P.O.Box N-476
Armstrong Street
Nassau, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Personal Representatives












Employment


Opportunity

S M tA leading Fast Food Franchise
* is looking for



individuals to work its late night shift
* from 11:00p.m.-7:00a.m.
* on weekends and holidays

Requirements:

S* Must be a High School Graduate
0 * Must be customer service driven
0 * Must have excellent Oral & Written
0 Communication Skills

McDonald's offers excellent benefits!

* Please submit Resume to:

S Human Resources Department
McDonald's Head Office l
on Market St. North l
P.O.Box SS-5925
* Telephone: 325-4444
* Nassau, The Bahamas

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


BUSINESS I






+


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


Colina deal unlocks 'full potential' of RND's value


FROM page 1B
While unable to detail the
precise size of the stake now
held by Colina Holdings
(Bahamas), Mr Fitzgerald
indicated that despite RND


"We've done that now,
and wanted to ensure the
next step would be to pay a
dividend to shareholders. To
do that, we needed to
restructure our payables and
long-term debt, to reduce
the monthly debt pay-


issued some additional
shares," Mr Fitzgerald
explained. "They have a
controlling stake."
It is likely that RND
Holdings' minority
investors, who suffered
through several years of sus-


IV PICTET
1805


PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-




REOUIRED SKILLS:-

-Ability to work independently.
-Strong organisational skills.
-Commitment to excellent customer service.
-Must be a team player.
-Excellent oral and written communication skills.
-Excellent problem solving skills.
-Ability to work under pressure and to meet strict
deadlines.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

-Excellent knowledge of investment instruments.
-Very good understanding of Securities Administration.
-Good understanding of Independent Manager activities.
-Ability to speak/write French would be an asset.
-Knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese would be an asset.
-Bachelor's Degree in Finance or related subject.
-At least five (5) years Private Banking experience.
-NASD Series 7 Certification.
-Proficiency in a variety of software applications including
Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED

Please hand deliver Resume and two (2) references

NO LATER THAN MONDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2010 to:

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
Building No. 1
Nassau, Bahamas


investment trust (REIT) or
mutual fund through its
RND Properties subsidiary,
its only other business being
the TicketXpress call cen-
tre. Now, not only are the
Bahamian minority
investors in a different com-
pany, but it is one under
new controlling ownership
to boot.
Many RND Holdings
investors are likely to ques-
tion whether their owner-
ship stakes have been dilut-
ed as a result of the issuance
of new shares to Colina
Holdings, and are likely to
question why they were not
given new stock in propor-
tion to their existing hold-
ings - in other words, why
they were not offered the
same terms, and why no
offer has been made to buy
them out.
Mr Fitzgerald explained
to Tribune Business that
RND Holdings would effec-
tively function as a sub-


sidiary of Colina Holdings
(Bahamas), although it
would retain its over-the-
counter listing.
He added that Ken
Donathan, RND's chief
executive, and the three
TicketXpress staff would be
absorbed into the Colina
structure, with the latter sub-
sidiary functioning as the
insurance company's call
centre, handling client
inquiries and chasing up
receivables owed.
Arguing that both RND
Holdings and Colina held
the same long-term objec-
tives, Mr Fitzgerald told Tri-
bune Business: "It was a
move I felt was really nec-
essary to ensure the compa-
ny had strong financial back-
ing and a major investment
partner, and we will see
increased shareholder value
in the short-term.
"Colina has the financial
wherewithal to restructure
the debt, lower debt pay-


Z THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visit our weibsde at www.ceb.edbs


The College of The Bahamas

wishes to engage the services of an

Executive Search firm

to support in the search for a

College President.



Detailed information is available

in a Request for Proposal (RFP) document

which may be obtained by visiting

The College's website,

www.cob.edu.bs,

by email request at

communication @ cob.edu.bs,

or

by telephoning the office

of External Affairs at 302 4304.


"Colina has the
financial wherewith-
al to restructure the
debt, lower debt
payments, and
ensure RND is cash
flow positive every
month, going to the
benefit of
shareholders and
dividends. When we
looked at it, we had
to restructure some
things to realise the
full potential and
cash flow of RND."

Jerome Fitzgerald

ments, and ensure RND is
cash flow positive every
month, going to the benefit
of shareholders and divi-
dends. When we looked at
it, we had to restructure
some things to realise the
full potential and cash flow
of RND."
When asked when RND
Holdings would be in a posi-
tion to pay a dividend, Mr
Fitzgerald replied: "I think
that by the end of the year
we'll be in a position to
ascertain exactly where we
are with that."
He added that "end of the
year" meant December 31,
2010, as RND Holdings was
aligning its year-end, for-
merly end-February, with
those of Colina Holdings
and the remainder of the
group controlled by A. F.
Holdings.
When asked by Tribune
Business whether he would
remain RND Holdings'
chairman, Mr Fitzgerald said
that had not been discussed,
but dropped a heavy hint
that he might step down.
He told this newspaper
that it was becoming "a bit
tight to discharge my
responsibilities" given his
political duties/ambitions
and role as head of
Chancery Law Associates.
Several observers sug-
gested yesterday that the
deal with Colina was
designed to provide Mr
Fitzgerald with an exit route,
given that RND Holdings
had not proven to be a run-
away financial success.
Its 2008 annual report
showed an $18,636 net prof-
it on a top line of $1.72 mil-
lion, with an accumulated
deficit of $2.253 million.
The Colina takeover at
RND Holdings also comes
as little surprise, having been
potentially in the works for
some time. As at December
31, 2008, Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) had accumulated
2.198 million shares in the
company for a 24.8 per cent
stake, setting the stage for
it to acquire more.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

No. 45 of 2000

LEXUS INVEST S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 of The International Business
Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, LEXUS INVEST S.A.
is in dissolution. The date of commencement of
dissolution was the 28th day of January, 2010.
Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
LEXUS INVEST S.A.


Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR




NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

No. 45 of 2000

LYNNDIE MANAGEMENT LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, LYNNDIE MANAGEMENT LTD.
is in dissolution. The date of commencement of
dissolution was the 28th day of January, 2010.
Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
LYNNDIE MANAGEMENT LTD.


Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR


TENDER FOR
CAFETERIA OPERATION



tooperatc.rhb. ~F(-tnria f rlii N-irion n~i iur~inc.cB1%i iri1'� I fend O()f,%J. Ciffordt)aiiing
Conpin, BaillouuiLll Road.

The RfIlkming REQUIREMENTS must he nict:

1, Lv, h ndc i miT x Lf lSiceodith (he pvp.c[,r l'ck1b1 1 .i Il ilt i1i�ic

2. Tco~dusr rn'i~r TUCT .L[ :h-u T&rL'%TTII '4IfthUi. l NiLLTryof Health amid other rekxnunt
,I uru ' -,% C ic i dawill "~f, 1-Ise Ci'~c~

3. Tundurs nw�4c be able to provide I~xcd for23 r or more purxnsi iafl

4. All NAL HIl Ldnsurance contniiurions shoiukldIx pa~idup to tdot.

II-Afoi'rcdip io il m iillocr a Bid Application Ftum rh(c Direciofs ("if icc. w (the
Nati~naiI'1nurance Wuard's I Ic-,d (Officv. (:'liffnrd Darling CompIux, BaiII~u I [ill R, 'ad.

;u-nThc i i Uid&in a '::-I 1d C"un L 1IPc: .-inf4k] "Bid f~, afcr i ddwLLJ 4&idur(

The (,.idL~fctera(A'mrnitt~c
THEW NATIONAL I N-SURANCFJ BOARD
(' :[ffi~rd Dadflng Complex







+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010, PAGE 9B


BISX chief: Audit firms




and companies must




work more closely


FROM page 1B
The Securities Commis-
sion, in the draft Securities
Industry Act it has forward-
ed to the Ministry of
Finance and the Attorney
General's Office, moved to
require that Bahamian pub-
lic companies publish their
audited financial statements
within 90 days of year-end,
rather than the current 120
days.
"I am not aware of where
the Commission came down
ultimately, but I can say
this," Mr Davies told Tri-
bune Business. "Where the
Commission comes down
will be the law of the land,
and companies will have to
comply.
"Will there be teething
pains, growing problems?
Yes. We need to work with
the companies and the
auditing companies to meet
these guidelines."
He added: "The relation-
ship between auditing com-
panies and the public com-
panies needs to change.
There needs to be more
proactive engagement
between companies and
their auditors, so that when
the auditors come in, the
groundwork is already pre-
pared to enable them to do
the audit relatively quickly."
The 90-day year-end
audited financial deadline
attracted much comment
from both auditors and
Bahamian public companies,
with both arguing that the
timeline was too tight, and
that there were resource
constraints on both sides.
And many Bahamian
public companies have diffi-
culty in meeting the present
120-day deadline, albeit for
very different reasons. With-
in the last few months,
FOCOL Holdings, Freeport
Concrete and Premier Real
Estate Investment Corpora-
tion all applied for - and
obtained - extensions from
BISX regarding the filing
and publication of their
year-end audited financial.
In FOCOL's case, it need-
ed more time for accoun-
tants to complete the audit
of a subsidiary in which it
had a 60 per cent stake, hav-
ing acquired its interest in
that company to obtain a
petroleum tanker fleet that
supplies its Bahamian oper-
ations.
Freeport Concrete also
sought more time, and
obtained a share trading sus-
pension, as it did not want
material information to leak
out before its figures were
published. And Premier
requested an extension due
to a change in auditors.
In an interview with Tri-
bune Business last year,
Hillary Deveaux, the Secu-
rities Commission's execu-
tive director, said that most
of the industry feedback on
the proposed Securities
Industry Act reforms cen-
tred on the Securities Com-
mission's powers, enforce-
ment, disclosure, the "ongo-
ing requirements of public
companies", and the move
to file the audited financial
statements of Bahamian
public companies within 90
days of year-end, rather than
the current 120 days.
The reforms are also
proposing that Bahamian
public companies file their
unaudited quarterly man-
agement accounts within 60
days of period end, rather
than the current 90 days
they are allowed.
"The touchy one really
was the requirement to have
audited financial statements
move from a 120-day filing
to a 90-day filing, and there's
going to have to be a major
discussion," Mr Deveaux
told Tribune Business.


"Where the
Commission
comes down will
be the law of the
land, and compa-
nies will have to
comply."
Keith Davies
"I think our approach to
dealing with the transition
period for that will be based
on how prepared the com-
panies are - whether they


have the proper systems in
place for them to get the
financial statements, man-
agement accounts to the
auditor, along with support-
ing documents, to ensure
this can be accomplished."
Mr Deveaux added that
the Securities Commission
was "overly concerned that
we don't put in into law a
provision that can't be main-
tained or sustained, and then
have people inferring that
the jurisdiction is unable to
adhere to the legislation. It
has some serious implica-
tions for the jurisdiction."


NOTICE is hereby given that WILSON DONJOIE of SANDY
POINT, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 25th day of JANUARY, 2010
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


Legal Notice


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
ELLENTON LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), ELLENTON
LIMITED has been dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registrar General on the 26th day of
November, 2009.

Mr. Nigel Bradley
22, Rue de Villereuse
1207 Geneva
Switzerland
Liquidator




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 1987
IN THE SUPREME COURT No.951
Equity Side
BETWEEN
IN THE MATTER OF ARTOC BANK and
TRUST LIMITED
(In Liquidation)

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT
(Chapter 279)

NOTICE OF SECOND DIVIDEND

Rule 68 of the Companies (Winding -Up) Rules, 1975
Name of Company Artoc Bank & Trust
Limited (in Liquidation)
Addresss of Registered Office 3rd Floor, Charlotte
House, Charlotte Street,
Nassau
Nature of Business Bank and Trust Company
Court The Supreme Court of
The Bahamas Equity Side
Action Number 951 of 1987
Amount of Dividend 7� per $1.00
When Payable 4th February, 2010
Where Payable Pannell House, Elizabeth
Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas


Dated this 26th day of January, A.D.,2010
McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes
Mareva House
#4 George Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Offical Liquidator


ElcfiaIadPlmingSouton
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Whirlpool Tub it fits in the samne spot as
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jH THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visit Our websile at wwwxob*dudhb


NOTICE FROM

THE OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS


The deadline for Fall (September) 2010 appli-
cations is Friday, February 5th 2010.


Please ensure that your application and all
supporting documents are submitted by that
deadline.


For more information,
call The Office of Admissions at
302-4499/302-4394 or
e-mail admissions@cob.edu.bs.











THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY


NOTICE


TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF X-RAY FILMS
AND PROCESSING CHEMICALS
PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL

Tenders are invited from qualified contractors to provide x-ray films and
processing chemicals for the Princess Margaret Hospital for a period of one
(1) year.

Tender documents, which include instructions to tenderers, specifications
and other relevant information, can be collected 9am - 5:00 pm Monday to
Friday at the Public Hospitals Authority, Corporate Centre "B", Third and
West Terraces, Collins Avenue.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicate in a sealed envelope or package
identified as "Tender for the provision of x-ray films and processing
chemicals, Princess Margaret Hospital" and addressed to:

The Chairman
Tenders Committee
The Public Hospitals Authority
Corporate Centre "B"
Third & West Terraces, Collins Avenue
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau Bahamas.

Tenders are to arrive at the Public Hospitals Authority no later than
5:00 p.m. Friday, 26th February, 2010. Late tender(s) will not be
accepted.

A copy of a valid business license and a letter of good standing from the
National Insurance Board should accompany all proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to reject any or all
Tender(s).


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


BUSINESS








+


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


FROM page 1B
"career, business and vocation-
al development", Mr Myers
explained, with classrooms
geared for multiple courses in
trades such as landscaping,
mechanics and tile laying.
Apart from the vocational
courses, Mr Myers said the
campus could also act as a
"microwave incubator" for
Bahamian entrepreneurs and
their fledgling ideas, helping


Chamber campus
them to fully develop and
realise their potential "under
the watchful eye of the Cham-
ber and the Institute".
Mr Myers told Tribune Busi-
ness that he was asked to head
the Chamber's Labour and
Training Committee following
the success enjoyed by the
Bahamas Landscapers Associ-
ation (BLA). which he co-


chairs. That Association, he
explained, was started to pro-
vide "career training, vocation-
al training and certification" for
workers in that sector, working
with the Florida Nursery Grow-
ers Association to provide this.
With the BLA having been
in existence for two-and-a-half
years, Mr Myers, who heads
Caribbean Landscaping, part
of the Caribbean Group, said
that all his company's mainte-
nance supervisors, maintenance
technicians and landscape tech-
nicians were now fully certified
in key aspects of horticulture.
"What we have done already
is raise the bar and empower
the workforce, which in turn
empowers our company," Mr
Myers told Tribune Business.
The same ethos and objectives
that had guided the BLA were
now what the Chamber Insti-
tute and proposed campus were
seeking to mirror, and accom-
plish, on a much wider scale for
the broader Bahamian econo-
my's benefit.
Given the urgent need for
education and training reform
in the Bahamas, Mr Myers said:
"The Chamber is a good plat-
form to push for that, because
every businessman in the coun-
try is struggling for good peo-
ple, and Immigration is being
pressured for lack thereof."
Asked about how pressing
the Bahamian economy's need
for skilled labour was, Mr
Myers replied: "If you ask
them, I would guess that 75 per
cent of them [businesses] would
tell you the number one prob-
lem is quality labour; quality,
trained, educated labour.
"It is the single most limit-
ing factor in our businesses.
Our single biggest problem is
educated and trained labour."
He added: "Anybody in the
services business, services sec-


tor, has got the same problem.
Quite frankly, the number of
work permits being issued is
evidence of that.......... You can't
believe what I go through to
find cashiers trained on a point
of sale (POS) system.
"And it's one thing to find
them, but another thing to get
them to show up for work on
time five days a week. There's a
massive need for education and
labour reform. The Chamber
recognizes that, and that's one
of its biggest objectives."
Mr Myers said the Cham-
ber's Labour and Training
Committee, which was estab-
lished in August 2009, now had
a permanent staffer, Russ
Abrams, who was running it on
a day-to-day basis and moving
it towards the goals set out.
While the Chamber Institute
and campus goals might seem
"aggressive", Mr Myers told
Tribune Business it was a pro-
ject that the Chamber and
wider private sector had to be
involved with for the good of
their own interests and the
long-term Bahamas.
He explained that the Cham-
ber Institute and campus would
eventually target high school
pupils in the 10th-12th grades,
and was focused chiefly on the
75 per cent of Bahamian society
that were not going to become
attorneys, doctors, accountants
and bankers. The goal, Mr
Myers said, was to "direct some
of those very good minds" that
were not academically inclined
towards a career, "and encour-
age people to become func-
tional members of society, with
goals, objectives, ability to earn
and to be productive.
"Along with that is the chal-
lenge - very sad, but very real -
of getting the group that are
not going to become attorneys,
bankers, lawyers and accoun-


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

e\ ^VisU omw websie at www.eob.e ubs


CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE,

INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

COURSE TUITION A
SEC CODE BEQaNO ENDS DURATION DAYS TIME FEES RMi
CCOK 6 X -
Gaumat Gociklrg 1 E24 Mar. 17 April. 2B 5E w ks _ m'%lnsday ._ 00.pm $45, 03 MK
CalmL&Pastby CCOK I6SM -
IaMng II I M14 Mar. y. 1 8 we8ws Tkwrday 0 02pm :)25 X) PK

COfOK 6 f -
Coke Decorming II 1 81E Kar.1? May 12 B wee . WA WneJh ? DpOM 5J73 70D PK
All e �re included in Ihe prie qgnoed jb 'L; mew LaftidIde pay a rne-lime mpplicltion Fi of$44.-LM(NON R F I]

Appllcation Deadline: March 3, 2010 at4:00 p.m.
Fur fIuntr rIF.riiiulh tI k) iCL up W1 a:fuM-U'Iun L M L- Inr. 1 Al Tr"airu I kMl l r i ll itn Culimr &A I Iuililiy iMrralyrialI Ili61
-hN ,4. 323-04f f te .232-o




ROYALi FIDELITY M OKE E11MILU
H/S^HMonSr 4K wek C m-
C F A L . ,i> [. L 1. I .A i_-
THU-RSD-Y *3 J-NUL.RY --I10
BIS:� LL S, rE INDE,1 (-L FINDEf: (ULO 'f - . , ..I. I T i,, - , - 1 1
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM I TELEPHOME:242-323-2330 I FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
1 49 1 03 AML Foods Limited 1 12 1 12 000 0283 0000 40 000%
10 75 9 90 Bahamas Property Fund 10 74 1074 000 0992 0 200 108 1 86%
700 50 Bank of Bahamas575 575 000 0244 0260 236 452%
063 063 Benchmark 06 063 000 0 877 0000 N/M 000%
349 315 Bahamas Waste 315 315 000 0168 0090 188 286%
215 2 14 Fidelity Bank 237 237 000 0055 0 040 431 1 69%
1343 9 62 Cable Bahamas 985 13 43 3 58 5,954,900 1 406 0 250 9 6 1 86%
2 88 2 72 Colina Holdings 272 272 000 0249 0 040 109 1 47%
700 5 00 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 699 699 000 0419 0 300 167 429%
365 221 Consolidated Water BDRs 258 276 018 0111 0052 249 188%
2 55 1 32 Doctors Hospital 255 255 000 0 627 0 080 41 314%
780 5 94 Famguard 649 649 000 0 420 0240 155 370%
1 1 80 875 Finco 927 927 000 0322 0520 288 561%
1045 9 80 FirstCarbbean Bank 999 999 000 0631 0350 158 350%
553 375 Focol (S) 477 477 000 0326 0150 14 6 314%
100 100 Focol Class B Preference 100 100 000 0000 0000 N/M 000%
0 30 027 Freeport Concrete 0 27 027 000 0 035 0000 77 0 00%
559 500 lcD Utilities 559 559 000 0407 0500 137 894%
1050 995 J S Johnson 995 995 000 0952 0640 105 643%
1000 1000 Prenmier Real Estate 10 00 1 000 000 0 156 0000 641 000%
52wk- H 52wk Low Security Sym bol Last Sale Change Daily Vol Interest Maturity
1000 OO 100 1000 OO Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100 OO 00 7% 19 October 2017
1000 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 10000 0 00 Prime + 1 75% 19 October 2022
100000 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 0 0 00 7% 30 May 2013
100000 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 10000 0 00 Prime + 1 75% 29 May 2015

1460 7 92 Bahamas Supermarkets 10 06 11 06 1400 -2 246 0 000 N/M 000%
8 00 6 00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2 00 6 25 400 0 000 0 480 N/M 7 80%
0 54 020 RND Holdings 0 35 0 40 0 35 0 001 0 000 256 6 000%

0 55 0 40 RND Holdings 0 45 0 55 0 55 0 002 0000 261 90 000%
. . . . .. - , 1 , I , , r ,I - ,
1.4387 1.3535 CFAL Bond Fund 1.4387 6.30 6.30 31-Dec-09
28869 2 8266 CFAL MS= Preferred Fund 2 8869 -1 81 - 81 31 Dec09
1 5101 1 4356 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 5101 017 518 15-Jan-10
3 3201 2 9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3 1168 -7 94 -7 94 31-Dec-09
132400 12 6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13 2400 4 93 590 31 Oct-09
1039873 931999 CFAL Global Bond Fund 1039873 341 341 31 Dec-09
101 7254 96 4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund 101 7254 5 52 552 31-Dec-09
0898 1 0000 FG Financial Preferred Incoe Fund 1 0898 522 522 9-Dec-09
10680 1 0000 FG Financial GrowthFund 1 0680 339 339 9Dec09
1 0907 1 0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1 0907 515 515 9 Dec 09
9 5795 9 1005 Royal Fidelity Bah Intl Investment Fund 9 5795 5 33 533 31-Dec-09
Principal Protected TIGRS, Senes 1
11 2361 10 0000 Royal Fidty Bah In InvestmentFund 11 2361 12 36 12 36 31-Dec-09
77171 48105 Royal Fdehlty Inl Fund - Equities Sub Fund 7 7171 40 05 40 05 31-Dec-09
MARKET TERMS
BISX ALL SHARE INDE 19 Dec 02 = 1,00000 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing pce
x s EPS$ As m .~i".g ... . _.2=
52wk - D Highest closing pice in last 52 meks - Buying p e of Cona and Fde
Prevous Close -Previous days lighted prce for dally volume Last Pice -Last trded over-the-counter pice
Today's Close cuent day's lighted pice for da.ly volume Weekly Vol Trading volume of the piorweek
Change C- change in closing price fr dayto day EP -S -A company repoded earnings pershar for the last 12 mths
.aly Vol urbe. o. total shares tr t y NetdAsset V
P/E - Closing pce divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidety Bahamas Stock Index January 1, 1994 = 100
(S) - 4for-1 Stock Split -Effective Date 8/8/2007
rO TRADE CALL CFAL 242 502 7010 I ROYALFIDELITY 242 356 7764 , FO CAprIAL IVIARKETS 242 396-4000 , COLONIAL 242 502 7525


tants to be literate and numer-
ate. A lot of time is wasted at
the front end getting them lit-
erate and numerate before they
can become productive. We're
not going for the top 25 per
cent - we're going for the rest."
Mr Myers said the Cham-
ber's plans aimed to act as a
"catalyst" for many industries
when it came to vocational
training and certification, and
the proposals had received a
positive response when placed
before the Bahamas Motor
Dealers Association (BMDA),
Bahamas Hotel Association
and other businesses.
Most employee training in
the Bahamas was limited to
"ad-hoc" in-house programmes
by individual businesses, and
Mr Myers told Tribune Busi-
ness: "It's high time these spe-
cific industries turn to specific
standards that are recognized
nationally and internationally."
Mr Myers said the Cham-
ber's Institute and campus
would be different from what
the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BTVI)
offered because they would be
linked directly to industry.
With the private sector set-
ting the standards they wanted
persons to attain, there would
be no reason to reject poten-


tial candidates once they
attained these.
Mr Myers said the Chamber
planned to "get businesses
involved and fired up about
education", and aimed to
launch a 'Gold Star Awards'
programme to reward compa-
nies focusing on improved edu-
cation and training.
Those looking to earn these
awards had to submit plans on
how many employees were
being trained, their apprentice-
ship programmes and business
development plans. Another
award programme under con-
sideration was the Golden
Apple Awards, which will go
to the best public and private
school teachers in lower, middle
and upper high schools. And
Mr Myers said the Chamber
was also testing a planned Job
Search website, where candi-
dates seeking employment
could post their resumes and
employers advertise vacant
posts.
He added that it was vital for
the private sector and broader
Bahamian community to get
involved in reforming this
nation's education system,
because this country was
"already becoming less and less
competitive as a nation because
of education".


BKG/410.03

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS


Sealed tenders for B$56,209,000.00 of 91-Day Treasury Bills
will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank
of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on
Tuesday, February 2, 2010. Successful tenderers, who will be
advised should take up their bills against payment on Thursday,
February 4, 2010. These bills will be in minimum multiples of
B$100.00. Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable from
the Central Bank of The Bahamas or Commercial Banks.


Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked "Tender". The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.



assesses KeVsa s lAOAsustat'sa tn
^ls~r'i~ff^"t^l~-


CAREER OPPORTUNITIES



FirstCaribbean ae rti ,


Are you seeking an exciting career opportunity? aWs


PERSONAL CREDIT SERVICES - MANAGER
Responsible for assessing personal credit applications for the Retail, Wealth
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TODSUS STOIE ON THI 0AG 0LG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE THAT Angela Hanna claims to be the owner of i F. , ..
piece parcel or lot of land designed as lots 118-119 -.,iiiilt,. hi i ,i . known
as Pansa Comer Southern District, New Providence.

That she has been in full free and undisturbed possession of the said land for well
.. , 1,I i, i ,. ly (40) years.

Anyone having a claim or right to the said land may, ..... it in l in, i ;:n .1 or her
,.11 , i writing showing claim by certified documents within thirty * , Ii 1.,

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land containing 25,241 square feet situate
approximately 336 feet West of Market Street and North side of Bi, , u,"ii 1111 i
in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence, Bahamas.

Angela Hanna
PO. Box 1590
Brougham Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Or
Leslie Vernon Rolle
Attorney At-Law
No. 29 Sixth Terrance
PO. Box N 10156
Centreville
Nassau, Bahamas







UNITAVWOkL[)
COLLEGES

The Bahamas National Committee invites students
and parents from public and private schools to attend
a United World Colleges Scholarship Recruitment
Reception, at Holy Cross Church Activity Centre
Soldier Road on February 6, 2010 from 4 p.m. to 6
p.m.

Applications are now available for two-year
scholarships beginning September 2010 (except as
noted). Scholarships include room, board and tuition
costs to the extent indicated below:

Lester B. Pearson College of the Pacific, Canada 100%

Armand Hammer United World College, U.S.A. 50%

Li Po Chun United World College of South East Asia,
Hong Kong 50%

United World College of Costa Rica, Cost Rica 50%

United World College of Southern Africa, Swaziland
(January 2011) 25%

Fee-paying placement is also available at United World
College of the Atlantic in Wales.

These international colleges afford exceptional
opportunities to individuals possessing strong academic
and social skills. Successful completion of the program
leads to the International Baccalaureate Diploma.

APPLICANTS SHOULD
Have or expect to acquire by June 2010, "B" Grade
passes or above in at least six (6) subjects at B.G.C.S.E.
level; Be not older than 18 years in September 2010.
Submit applications no later than February 19, 2010

Visit www.bahamas-uwc.org
for information and application forms
Or call 456-8620


BUSINESS I




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