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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: January 29, 2010
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Heineken in talks to
buy Burns House and
Commonwealth Brewery
WELL-KNOWN businessman Sir Garet "Tiger" Finlayson
and his family are in talks with global brewing giant Heineken
to sell their ownership interests in the Burns House liquor
distribution/retail operation, plus Commonwealth Brewery.
LeRoy Archer, managing director of the Burns House
Group of Companies, confirmed yesterday in correspondence
delivered to The Tribune that Heineken - which also holds
stakes in Burns House and Commonwealth Brewery - was
"exploring" the possibility of buying out their partner, the
Associated Bahamian Distillers and Brewers (ABDAB),
which is owned by the Finlayson family and their fellow
investors.
The statement read: "Heineken wishes to announce that it
is in conversations with the Associated Bahamian Distillers and
SEE page eight


Falling crawfish prices and rising
fuel costs force switch in catches


By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net


IN THE wake of declining
crawfish prices and rising fuel
costs, crawfishermen from
Andros to Spanish Wells are
abandoning their trade, switch-
ing to conch and snapper as their
mainstay. This has the fishing
industry in crisis, according to
local fishermen and government
officials.
"Ain' nobody bothering with
crawfish. It is hard for every-
body, not only the Andros crew
getting it, Spanish Wells, Abaco,
everybody is feeling the pinch,"
said Derick Bastian, owner of
the Mama Doo, formerly a craw-
fish boat from Andros.


In 2008, Mr Bastian said he
could get as much as $17 per
pound for crawfish. The going
rate at the close of the 2009 sea-
son last march was $9.50 per
pound. He said, today he makes
between $5 and $7. Over that
same period of time, he said fuel
prices increased at a higher rate.
Last year, the Mama Doo had 17
employees, and now it has three.
The opportunity cost, according
to Mr Bastian, is too high, and
not worth his while.
"From what I understand
South Africa just opened its
crawfish industry. They had
closed it down for a few years,
now they have more crawfish
than they know what to do with.
SEE page eight


FNM's Elizabeth
candidate speaks
out on healthcare
DECLARING his passion
for building the country's
healthcare system and criticis-
ing the PLP for their handling
of it, the FNM's candidate for
the Elizabeth by-election took
to the stage at a party rally last
night.
Dr Duane Sands, a heart
surgeon who said the Princess
Margaret Hospital and Doctors
Hospital have been his "battle-
grounds" for the last 15 years,
said he knows how much
Bahamians are suffering, and
not only medically.
"Even as I continued to do
battle on the frontlines of med-
ical and surgical care, I could
SEE page eight


Six canidats st t cotes


SIX candidates are
expected to nominate to
contest the Elizabeth con-
stituency by-election this
morning.
The men - members of
parties ranging from politi-
cal juggernauts to one less
than one-month old - will
submit their nomination
papers at the Thelma Gib-
son Primary School, on
Commonwealth Drive, Eliz-
abeth Estates.
Progressive Liberal Party
candidate Ryan Pinder, Free
National Movement candi-
date Dr Duane Sands,
Bahamas Democratic
Movement leader Cassius
Stuart, National Develop-


ment Party nominee Andre
Rollins, Workers Party
leader Rodney Moncur and
United Christian Love Rev-
olution Movement aspirant
Godfrey "Pro" Pinder all
committed themselves yes-
terday with going through
the motions necessary to
ensure their names are on
the ballot on February 16th.
Following a short but
intensive few weeks of cam-
paigning on the ground,
each also expressed satis-
faction with constituents'
responses to their campaigns
and calls for support for
their party as the one that
SEE page two


Broadcasting codes
limiting by-election
advertising 'will
not be withdrawn'
By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
THE Utilities Regulation
and Competition Authority has
said it will not withdraw con-
troversial broadcasting codes
which limit television and radio
by-election advertising.
Despite criticism on its Inter-
im Code of Practice for Political
Broadcast (ICP), URCA offi-
cials say they will keep the rules
in place until new codes are cre-
ated. The ICP restricts, in part,
content, length of time and fre-
quency of election ads.
Yesterday, radio station boss-
SEE page eight


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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


* EIZBET B-ELCTON OMNATONDA


DR DUANE SANDS
DR DUANE SANDS
FREE NATIONAL MOVEMENT

FOR the next 19 days the
FNM candidate in the Eliza-
beth by-election plans to can-
vas the constituency to con-
vince voters that he is the best
man for the job.
In the meantime, Dr Duane
Sands told The Tribune, the
FNM "has a lot more work to
do" to weed out ineligible vot-
ers who may be able to vote in
the by-election although they
no longer live in the area.
On the campaign trail, Dr
Sands said he has been sur-
prised by how many Bahami-
ans are barely making ends
meet. He has also been put
off by a small number of
greedy voters who demand
money or goods in return for
their support.
Dr Sands said the topmost
concern of constituents -
aside from crime and unem-
ployment - is fair and
accountable representation.
He said his time in the area
revealed that many con-
stituents have low expecta-
tions from a representative,
something he feels is due to
the representation the con-
stituency had over the past six
years.
"We're going to go out and
talk to every single registered
voter that we can get to and
hear what their concerns are,"
Dr Sands said, ahead of the
FNM's rally last night and








FROM page one

can best represent the
area's interests in parlia-
ment.
Nominations will take
place between 9am and
noon today.
Returning officer,
Director of Immigration
Jack Thompson, will pre-
side over the process. In
order to nominate, a can-
didate must present cer-
tain documentation -
including evidence that his
candidacy is supported by
at least five constituents
and $400 in cash.


nomination day today.
"Our strategy is to demon-
strate to people that the FNM
and Duane Sands would be a
much better alternative and
that we could offer better gov-
ernance. "
"(Voters') expectations
have been diminished in part
because they've been let
down. Many of the con-
stituents are not demanding a
pound of flesh. They have a
reasonable expectation that
their concerns are listened to,
and want accountability, avail-
ability, and access to govern-
ment," he said.
His party is also still focus-
ing on limiting possible ballot
tainting due to a loophole in
the voter registry which may
allow residents who no longer
live in the Elizabeth con-
stituency to vote.
"Even the Registrar Gen-
eral has alluded to the fact
that this is a huge challenge
even for them and we are
obviously trying to make sure
that there is a proper correla-
tion between the register and
what we find on the ground. I
expect that as we get closer to
February 16 we would have
made some headway in iden-
tifying some of the people
who ought not be eligible, but
I doubt that it's going to be
perfect," he said.
Campaigning in Elizabeth,
Dr Sands, a noted heart sur-
geon, said he has been struck
by how many Bahamians have
to endure financial hardship.
"While I happen to see peo-
ple at their worst in the hospi-
tal, Bahamians are really
struggling, and as you enter
their homes and see them as
they are it (adds to) the imme-
diate need of restoring hope,"
he said.
The Elizabeth seat was held
by Malcolm Adderley, who
resigned from Parliament and
the PLP last month. Although
the PLP won the constituency
two terms in a row, their last
win was a narrow one of only
45 votes over the FNM.
More than 4,000 voters are
expected to cast their votes in
the by-election on February
16.

RYAN PINDER
PROGRESSIVE
LIBERAL PARTY

Mr Pinder said the response
to the "hectic and fast" cam-
paign the PLP has so far
mounted ahead of the Febru-
ary 16 by-election has been
"extremely positive".
The tax attorney said he will
move in a motorcade with
PLP supporters and leaders
from the party's Elizabeth
Headquarters at around
9.30am tomorrow, making it


to Thelma Gibson Primary
School by around 10.30am to
nominate.
"It's very encouraging. I'm
in the area every day meeting
with residents. I've certainly
been able to speak with a lot
of the constituents and the
response has been very posi-
tive and encouraging," he said.
"We had a mass rally
(Wednesday) night, thousands
and thousands of people were
there. At the opening of the
Prince Charles (party) head-
quarters we had in excess of
1,000 people show up. The
energy level in the area is very
high."
He added: "Elizabeth's con-
cerns revolve around the dif-
ficulty with the Bahamian eco-
nomic situation, there's a high
level of unemployment in
Elizabeth just like throughout
country. There's a real con-
cern that there's not an oppor-
tunity to succeed in business
and there's a real entrepre-
neurial spirit but many feel
they don't have the right
opportunities and pro-
grammes and platforms to
succeed. They are also con-
cerned about the crime rate
in the country and particular-
ly in the constituency," said
the candidate.
With regards to the con-
cerns that some people who
were registered to vote in the
constituency in the last elec-
tion have since moved out of
the area but still appear on
the register - making it possi-
ble they could vote despite not
living in the constituency - Mr
Pinder said the party has been
"on the ground meeting with
constituents night after night
seven days a week" and he is
confident that by election day,
February 16, the party will
have a strong handle on who
is and is not entitled to vote.

CASSIUS STUART
BAHAMAS DEMOCRATIC
MOVEMENT

Mr Stuart said the BDM's
effort to win over the Eliza-
beth constituency has "been
going very well" but com-
plained that the party encoun-
tered some "disturbing issues"
as went around the con-
stituency knocking on doors.
"These guys (FNM and
PLP campaigners) have been
playing extremely nasty.
FNMs and PLPs have been
telling constituents I dropped
out of the race. What they are
finding out is that more and
more people are tired of the
PLP and the FNM and so they
are telling them I dropped out.
I want to let people know I'm
still in the race and I'll be
nominating (today)," said Mr
Stuart.


In speaking with the "hun-
dreds" of residents he has thus
far been able to encounter on
the campaign trail, Mr Stuart
said he's found that they are
concerned primarily about
crime.
Other issues raised include
the two "shanty towns" with-
in the constituency's borders
and infrastructural problems
such as a lack of speed bumps
and street signs. Flooding and
traffic congestion in the area
are also concerns.
Mr Stuart called out the
FNM for allegedly "using gov-
ernment resources to aid their
candidate".
"If you go in Kool Acres
Drive, the Ministry of Works
has equipment out there now
paving roads, so we want to
make that known.
"It is very unfair, you're
using power of government
against other candidates," he
claimed.

GODFREY PINDER
UNITED CHRISTIAN LOVE
REVOLUTION MOVEMENT

Despite recent profession-
al tribulations (Pinder was sus-
pended from practicing law
by the Bahamas Bar Council
earlier this month following a
complaint from a former
client, but has appealed the
suspension), Mr Pinder said
he is ready to "ask Lizzie to be
my valentine" in the Febru-
ary 16 by-election.
The colourful candidate
said that thus far his cam-
paign, launched after he
announced the formation of
his Love Revolution Move-
ment earlier this month, has
been "going marvellously."
"Basically I'm love in
action," said Mr Pinder, whose
manifesto states his desire to
set up "Love Universities."
The would-be candidate
claims he plans to send a love
poem to "the lady of every
household" in the constituen-
cy in his bid to woo Elizabeth
into his camp.
"I'm going to touch every-
one in a very, very nice way,"
he stated.
Yesterday Parliamentary
Registrar Errol Bethel said
that "as far as he knows" Mr
Pinder's recent professional
issues should not affect his
ability to nominate.

RODNEY MONCUR
WORKERS' PARTY

DESPITE meagre cam-
paign funding, Workers' Party
candidate Rodney Moncur
thinks he will overcome the
political heavyweights in next
month's by-election in the


Elizabeth constituency.
He launched his campaign
on January 7, a day after for-
mer MP Malcolm Adderley
resigned from Parliament.
Without the money to hold
mass rallies, run ads or blan-
ket the area with posters, Mr
Moncur gets up before sun-
rise every day to knock on
doors and lobby for precious
votes.
His group of about a dozen
supporters spends most of the
day in people's living rooms
and on porches getting to the
core of residents' concerns.
Chief among these com-
plaints are high unemploy-
ment levels, rising crime lev-
els, while the government's
recent suspension of its edu-
cation loan programme came
in third place on their list of
concerns.
While he tries to sway vot-
ers with minimal resources,
Mr Moncur accused opera-
tives of the two major political
parties of running dirty cam-
paigns.
He charged that the PLP
and FNM are "exploiting"
constituents with money woes
by offering them liquor and
jobs.
"The PLP and FNM have
resorted to some of the most
unethical forms of campaign-
ing that I have ever seen. They
are keeping the men drunk,
that kind of thing," said Mr
Moncur.
"I think the FNM and PLP
in a very ungodly manner are
exploiting the poor - they
call it campaigning, I call it
gangsterism."
Like FNM candidate Dr
Duane Sands, Mr Moncur has
also been moved by the dis-
parity between the " i. , %. and
have-nots" in the Elizabeth
constituency.
"As you move through cer-
tain areas of the constituency
you can see the economic des-
peration and the hardship,"
he said.
"I went to a Haitian com-
munity off Joe Farrington
Road and they are living in
abject poverty. And these per-
sons are supporters of the PLP
and FNM but they are living
in squalor."
If he wins, the activist is
prepared to sacrifice his time
to be a man for the people,
working out of an office in
Elizabeth every day and fore-
going other employment.
"I will go to work at my
office in Elizabeth every day,
they would be my employers,
as opposed to the other can-
didates who will return to
their law practice, medical
practice or other profession.
The candidate who is elected
as a representative should
report to his constituency
office every day and if the


salary is not sufficient he
should not seek office."
Up to press time, Mr Mon-
cur said he had raised most of
the nomination fee with a final
donation of $80 expected to
arrive last night.

DR ANDRE ROLLINS
NATIONAL
DEVELOPMENT PARTY

THE newly formed Nation-
al Development Party and its
candidate Dr Andre Rollins
are hoping to finally part the
sea of red and yellow - colours
of the FNM and PLP respec-
tively - at the upcoming Eliz-
abeth by-election.
The NDP hopes that voter
frustration with the estab-
lished parties will sweep Dr
Rollins into the House of
Assembly.
Although in its infancy, the
NDP believes that its message
and policy platform will sway
many voters.
Dr Rollins was elected as
the party's candidate in the
Elizabeth by-election after a
public political debate and pri-
mary election - trials which
other political parties shied
away from.
A newcomer to politics, the
34-year-old dentist feels
Bahamians are ready for a
change, starting with their
political representatives.
His party's approach to the
race has been to offer more
accountability.
Without the money for ral-
lies or other election gim-
micks, Dr Rollins hopes that
each candidate's message, not
campaign funding, will be the
deciding factor in the hotly
contested race.
Whether he wins or loses,
Dr Rollins plans to continue
to hold both major parties to
account, criticising them when
appropriate.
"If you don't do the job that
you were entrusted to do we
are not going to show any fear
or favour. We are going to go
straight down the middle
whether you are FNM or
PLP," he told The Tribune
recently.
Dr Rollins beat out NDP
member C Rashad Amahad
at Wednesday's event. Both
men took blind questions
from the audience and mod-
erator Judy Hamilton.
At the primary, Dr Rollins
urged supporters to be opti-
mistic that the underdog can
be victorious at the by-elec-
tion polls.
Dr Rollins served as presi-
dent of the Bahamas Dental
Association from December,
2004 to December, 2009. He is
a founding member of the
NDP, formed in October
2008.


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7Th


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010, PAGE 3


iINTRIEW WTHiaCARIisBBE^AN COURT OF JUST~ICEJUDGE^^^^


Caribbean Court of Justice maintains



'balanced' approach to death penalty
By MEGAN REYNOLDS balanced as the Privy Council form of punishment, but the
Tribune Staff Reporter on the issue, Caribbean Court personal views of the judge
�4 mreynolds@tribunemedia.net of Justice (CCJ), Judge Adri- should not impair the judicial


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
A BACKLOG of nearly
10,000 cases waiting to be
heard in Nassau's courts
could be reduced by way
of simple systematic
changes, one of the
region's leading judges has
suggested.
In an exclusive interview
with The Tribune yester-
day, Caribbean Court of
Justice Judge Adrian
Saunders noted how many
Caribbean courts suffer
similar challenges and
have found different ways
to ease the strain.
Justice Saunders sug-
gested moving this enor-
mous backlog does not
necessarily require more
manpower, but a review
and reorganisation of the
way cases are heard.
In St Lucia, heavy back-
logged areas were identi-
fied and adjusted when the
judiciary found that wait-
ing times for preliminary
inquiries were one of the
biggest hold-ups, he said.
The bottleneck was
eased by eliminating pre-
liminary inquiries alto-
gether and replacing the
drawn-out process with a
case conference where
police can submit evidence
before a judge to ascertain
if it is sufficient for a trial
without giving the defence
opportunities to challenge
them on every point. This
streamlined approach
saves a remarkable
amount of time, Justice
Saunders said. He added:
"Inevitably you find that
throwing more personnel,
more judges and staff in
was not necessarily the
most effective way of cop-
ing with the backlog prob-
lem, and that a better way
was to examine what was
happening, where the bot-
tlenecks were, and re-engi-
neering the work flow with
the court's offices to try to
eliminate those bottle-
necks."
And the need to reduce
such hold-ups is evident in
the Bahamas as it is in sev-
eral other Caribbean
nations where crime and
homicide rates are rising
as gang culture and the
drug trade prevails.

Bail
Although Justice Saun-
ders has seen murder sus-
pects granted bail in
Jamaica and in his current
home of Trinidad, he said
he still finds the notion
shocking. "In some coun-
tries they don't usually
allow bail for murder
where there's capital pun-
ishment," he said.
"Because you are already
potentially facing a death
sentence, and therefore
you have very little to
lose."
The Attorney General's
Office in the Bahamas cur-
rently has around 8,700
cases on the books, includ-
ing around 200 murder
cases, while the majority
are cases for the Coroner's
Court.
Newly appointed Attor-
ney General John Delaney
has declared his aim of
working through pending
homicide trials this year,
and realigning his staff and
resources to ensure greater
efficiency in dealing with
criminal cases as a priority.
He said many of the cas-
es on the books may no
longer be able to be heard,
and yet they are cited as
one of the reasons why
judges release murder and
armed robbery suspects on
bail and give potentially
serious offenders the
opportunity to re-offend as
the homicide rate soars.
In addition, there are an
estimated 40,000 outstand-
ing warrants to be served,
according to the most
recent count obtained by
The Tribune in 2004.

SIn some countries
they don't usually
allow bail for mur-
der where there's capital
punishment."


Felipe Major/Tribune staff
JUDGE Adrian Saunders speaks to
the media yesterday.


Lecture looks at
By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
THE fading relevance of the
Privy Council for Caribbean
nations was explored by
Caribbean Court of Justice
Judge Adrian Saunders at a lec-
ture in Nassau last night.
As one of seven judges on
the regional alternative to the
Privy Council as the final court
of appeal for the Caribbean
Community (Caricom), Justice
Saunders was invited to host
the second annual Eugene
Dupuch distinguished lecture
held by the Eugene Dupuch
Law School and Dupuch and
Turnquest at the British Colo-
nial Hilton.
And in his discussion on
"The Relevance of the Privy
Council in Post Independent
West Indian Nation States" Jus-
tice Saunders showed how
moving from one high court to
another is only a matter of time.
Last year Privy Council Lord
Nicholas Phillips voiced his dis-
tress at the number of appeal
cases from former British
colonies consuming a third of
their time, taking away from
their ability to work on British
cases. And meanwhile the
Caribbean Court of Justice
(CCJ) established as the region-
al judicial tribunal in Trinidad
five years ago is able to per-
form that function for
Caribbean nation states with
greater understanding of
Caribbean cases.
However, only Barbados,
Guyana, and soon Belize, cur-
rently utilise the court as their
final court of appeal, as the rest
of the 12 CCJ signatory coun-
tries employ the court for its
function as an original jurisdic-
tion for the interpretation and
application of the Treaty Estab-
lishing the Caribbean Commu-
nity. Reluctance to let go of
long-established ties with the
Privy Council, and doubt in the
abilities of the rising regional
court have meant a slow start
for the CCH but Justice Saun-
ders expects faith in the new


A CLEAR position on the
death penalty has been taken
by the Caribbean Court of Jus-
tice following the controversy
over capital punishment that
surrounded the court's found-
ing in 2005.
Caribbean Court of Justice
Judge Adrian Saunders said
the establishment of the new
court in Trinidad as the highest
court in the region and an alter-
native to the British Privy
Council stirred debate between
human rights activists and sup-
porters of capital punishment.
Those in favour of hanging
murderers hoped the new court
would be more sympathetic to
the specific challenges of the
region and therefore more like-
ly to uphold death sentences
than the far-off Privy Council in
London. And human rights
advocates opposed to capital
punishment vowed to boycott
the new court if this was the
case.
But the highest appellate
court for Guyana and Barba-
dos, and potentially all
Caribbean nations, is as fair and


fading relevance
institution will build and links
to the old institutions fade.
Justice Saunders said: "There
are often very serious questions
of social policy that come
before the courts, questions
that require the court to weigh
and to balance the rights of the
individual as against the rights
of the state, and it's difficult to
see how a court that exists
thousands of miles away, whose
judges are not from the soci-
ety, and who do not live in the
society for which they give a
judgment (and therefore do not
experience the consequences of
the decisions they make) could
be in as good a position as
judges who are of Caribbean
society, or who live in the
Caribbean, and who have a
much better vantage point to
prescribe solutions that are
much more effective for the
societies.

Ideal
"In my view each state
should have drawn from among
its ranks its own judges at every
tier, but that ideal sometimes
cannot be followed because we
are very small island states, so
there's an advantage in pulling
together in order to deliver a
product that if at least is not
ideal, it's a lot closer to the ide-
al than having a court that's
thousands of miles away made
up of British judges."
The Privy Council's original
function as an expert mediator
between two parties becomes
more challenging for foreign
Law Lords as judgments are
wrapped in social policy known
better by experienced judges in
the Caribbean. And the Law
Lords often admit this in their
judgments, Justice Saunders
said. A body of regional judges
will have a greater understand-
ing of life in the countries
where judgment has been
passed, of the challenges fac-
ing those islands, and can look
at cases with greater empathy,
he added.
And the costs are cheaper,
there will be a greater chance


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an Saunders told The Tribune
yesterday in an exclusive inter-
view.
Judges at the Caribbean
Court maintain independence
just as Privy Council law lords
do on such matters and this was
proved in an appeal hearing
submitted by Barbados, Justice
Saunders said.

Constitutions
"We are not a hanging court
and we respect the Bill of
Rights and respect our Consti-
tutions," he said.
"We understand and appre-
ciate the impact international
conventions on human rights
have on the executive's ability
to hang murderers, and there-
fore would sanction death sen-
tences, but only in instances
where we are careful to ensure
that scrupulous care has been
taken to ensure that due
process is followed, that human
rights are being observed in the
process, and that there is no
lawful impediment.
"Some of us probably believe
the death penalty is a desirable


of Privy Council
for exposure of Caribbean
counsel arguing appeals, and
the regional court will open
opportunities for rare interac-
tion and communication
between judges at all levels
from across the Caribbean.
Justice Saunders said:
"Sometimes there might be
instances where something the
judge said might be ambiguous,
but if you know the judge it
makes it easier to solve the
anomalies in your own mind.
"But there can be disadvan-
tages of knowing them as well,
and what you need is a bal-
ance."
Justice Saunders believes the
CCJ could provide that bal-
ance, between distance and
familiarity, and the shift from
the Privy Council to the CCJ is
only a matter of time.
"It's going to happen," he
said. "It cannot continue like
this indefinitely so we have to
ask if not now, when? And why
not now? Why later? And
sometimes I don't get satisfac-
tory answers to those questions
from retentionists."
Those suspicious of the new
court have based their fears in
doubts over adequate funding,
and of impartial, fair and suffi-
ciently qualified judges.
However Justice Saunders
said the CCJ has addressed
these by ensuring the transpar-
ent appointment of judges
according to their merit, and a
$100 million loan secured from
the Caribbean Development
Bank to be paid off by the sig-
natory countries in amounts
proportionate to their Gross
Domestic Product (GDP).
The Bahamas is not yet sig-
natory to the CCJ and Justice
Saunders held discussions about
the court with Attorney Gen-
eral John Delaney, leaders in
the judiciary and Bahamas Bar
prior to last night's lecture.


0

0







0



S


function."
He said that it was unfortu-
nate that the controversy arose
over the issue at a time when
the new court was just being
established.
Justice Saunders explained:
"Some Caribbean people felt
that the Privy Council decisions
on the death penalty were not
what they wanted, so it was
good to have a Caribbean
Court set up that would hang
people, and the anti-death
penalty people jumped on this


66We are not a
hanging court
and we respect
the Bill of Rights and
respect our Constitu-
tion."

and said we won't support a
hanging court.
"That was very unfortunate
because no one wants a judge
or a court that is not indepen-
dent, and there was almost a
inkage of this notion that the
court is going to start doing
what the Privy Council should
have been doing and isn't
doing. But the truth of the mat-
ter is, if one's disposition to the
death penalty and notion of
hanging is a yard stick for
assessing whether we would be
or would not be on the court
some of us wouldn't be there."


IN1X O4bII .: O1 > J'l IIJI:;IAM IJ. Al l


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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


EIOI AULETE S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


Bahamians also tired of 'shouting and pettiness'


ON WEDNESDAY night President
Barack Obama stood before Congress to
deliver his first State of the Union message
to congressmen and the American people.
In typical Obama style, the speech was
well thought out, well reasoned and power-
fully delivered. And, yes, there were a few
paragraphs in it that could have been effec-
tively directed to Bahamians - especially
Bahamian politicians, even more especially
those in opposition.
From the day of President Obama's elec-
tion, it seems the policy of the Republican
party has been to throw every roadblock in
his way.
"No" has been their blind response to
almost every government proposal put for-
ward to try to get Americans back on their
economic feet.
Frankly we are shocked by that party's
behaviour. Obviously we were mistaken in
believing it to be composed of men and
women who would realise the seriousness
of the times in which we all now live. How-
ever, in President Obama's own words, they
seem not to understand that they were elect-
ed to Congress to serve the citizens, not
their ambitions.
Surprise, disappointment, and even dis-
gust is our reaction to the extent to which
some of the naysayers have gone over the
past year to lie, twist, and by malicious innu-
endo misrepresent a position.
After the President's speech we listened
for a short time to Larry King's show on
which four panelists were his guests - one
of them, Nancy Pfotenhauer, a former John
McCain campaign manager. The quote we
are using from her contribution is picayune,
but will suffice as an illustration of some of
the misrepresentation to which we refer.
Ms Pfotenhauer acknowledged that the
President is "smart, talented and a great
orator", but a man with his "chin in the air."
For her "if there is a sin, it's hubris." And,
obviously, the President - "chin in the air"
- was puffed up with hubris. And to give an
example of what she was talking about she
referred to a remark that she claims he made
while discussing health care during his
speech.
This is what she had to say as she "quot-
ed" the President: "Hey, you're not with
me, but that's okay, I understand, I didn't
speak clearly enough to you, like if I slow
down and talk in smaller words, maybe you'll
get it -"
In other words, you poor saps down there
on planet Earth, maybe if I descend from my
Mount Olympus and talk your lingo we'll
better communicate - and just maybe we'll
get health care through.
Larry King pointed out that what she
had just said was nothing like what the Pres-
ident had said.
"He never said anything about small
words," Mr King protested.


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She then rattled on to try to justify the
words that she had put into the President's
mouth. We quickly crossed her off our list as
a "reliable source."
In fact the following is what the President
actually did say:
"Still, this is a complex issue (health care),
and the longer it was debated, the more
sceptical people became. I take my share of
the blame for not explaining it more clearly
to the American people. And I know that
with all the lobbying and horse-trading, the
process left most Americans wondering,
'What's in it for me?'"
This is what he said, so where is Ms
Pfotenhauer coming from? Her thinking
seems to be as obtuse as her unpronounce-
able name.
"They (Americans) are tired of partisan-
ship and the shouting and the pettiness. They
know we can't afford it. Not now." Mr Oba-
ma could easily have been talking to our
own Bahamian politicians.
The president realises that there are polit-
ical differences in his nation and that debate
is the very essence of America's democracy.
"But," he said, "what frustrates the
American people is a Washington where
every day is Election Day.
"We can't wage a perpetual campaign
where the only goal is to see who can get the
most embarrassing headlines about the oth-
er side - a belief that if you lose, I win.
Neither party should delay or obstruct every
single bill just because they can... Washing-
ton may think that saying anything about
the other side, no matter how false, no mat-
ter how malicious, is just part of the game.
But it's precisely such politics that has
stopped either party from helping the Amer-
ican people.
"Worse yet, it's sowing further division
among our citizens, further distrust in our
government."
"So, no, I will not give up on trying to
change the tone of our politics. I know it's an
election year.
"And after last week, it's clear that cam-
paign fever has come even earlier than usu-
al. But we still need to govern ...
"Just saying no to everything may be
good short-term politics, but it's not leader-
ship...
"So, let's show the American people that
we can do it together."
The same can be said of Bahamians ...
they are sick and tired of politics, politicians
and their political hatchetmen ... they, like
the Americans, trust none of them.
All they want to know is why can't both
sides put their egos behind them and work
for the good of their country, and all of its
people. Leave politics at the back door with
a "no entry" sign blocking its passage when
deliberating the future of this country.
Remember the 2007 election is over.


A chance to




show solidarity




to all peoples


EDITOR, The Tribune.
Contrary to some, Jesus
warns us not to see the
events taking place in Haiti
as somehow the wrath of an
angry God.
Evil came into the world
not by God's willing it, but
through the devil and
human sin.
Natural disasters suggest
that our planet itself is in
"rebellion" against the orig-
inal order of a loving God.
That rebellion seen in
nature can be said to mirror
the rebellion of the human
heart.


We experience nature's
rebellion because Adam and
Eve's original sin made all
creation subject to futility.
Ultimately, God does not
cause but rather permits
such disasters in order to
shake the consciences of
insensitive people who see
so many in need but do
nothing.
Jesus' death on the cross
shows us that God stands


with us in all our suffering.
His death demonstrates that
despair, destruction, death
will not have the last word:
rather the transformative
power of his resurrection
will define the human pro-
ject as one anchored in
hope.
The present humanitari-
an crisis in Haiti is an oppor-
tunity for us to open our
hearts and show our soli-
darity not only to the people
of Haiti but to all peoples.

PAUL KOKOSKI
Canada,
January 25, 2010.


EDITOR, The Tribune.
Congratulations to Roger Bannister (pub-
lic auction idea for straw market stalls -
December 31, 2010) for suggesting a just
and efficient solution for allotting stalls in
the new straw market.
Stall sites will have rental value because of
vendors demand for a publicly owned loca-
tion.
As Bannister says, it is an independent
way to determine lease value.
This rental value, over time, should pay
for the required public infrastructure.
Now that the Bahamas is looking for alter-
native ways to raise government revenue
the public auction suggestion should be
extended to all natural resources (beaches,
harbours, housing sites, marine life, etc) in
the Bahamas.
After all it is the collective action (roads,


EDITOR, The Tribune.
In today's Tribune Ivoine
W Ingraham wrote about
the need for Bahamians to
"change our ways."
He did this by reporting
the comments of Bill Cosby
at the annual
Rainbow/PUSH conference
in May 2009 and recently at
a NAACP dinner in Wash-
ington.
Bill Cosby argued that
Afro-Americans \\i c
betraying the legacy of civil
rights victories" by aban-
doning their responsibilities


Temple Christian High School






Temple Christian High School will hold
its Entrance Examination on SATURDAY,
FEBRUARY 6th, 2010 at the school on
Shirley Street from 8:00a.m. - 12noon for
students wishing to enter grades, 7,8,9 and
10.

Application forms are available at the High
School Office. The application fee is twenty
five dollars ($25.00). Application forms
should be completed and returned to the
school by Friday, February 5th, 2010.


For further information please

call
394-4481 or 394-4484


hotels, water lines, boats, etc) of Bahamians
and sometimes foreigners that give value to
these free gifts of nature.
Whereas it seems a given that rental space
in the straw market be limited to Bahamians,
the rental opportunities for natural resources
throughout the Bahamas should be open to
the world and the rent collected by the gov-
ernment be used for social needs and per-
haps a social dividend.
The latter would compensate Bahamians
for use of their locations and resources by
foreign interests.
In this way users of the Bahamian Com-
monwealth would pay the Bahamian Com-
monwealth.
JOHN FISHER
Fresh Creek,
Andros Island.
January 3, 2010.


in good parenting. Bill Cos-
by argued that heb1, :, you
get to the point where you
say 'I can't do something
with them (their children)'
do something with them.'"
His comments on the need
to change Afro-American
culture received a standing
ovation.
Your readers should refer
to the Nassau Institute web-


site (http://www.nassauinsti-
tute.ora/articles/article859.php)
and the four videos just
released.
The fourth video "Culture
Really Counts" specifically
addresses the cultural issues
raised by Bill Cosby.
RALP J MASSEY
Nassau,
January 27, 2010.


+>


Well done, Roger Bannister,


on stall market suggestion


Bill Cosby's comments on parenting and


the need to change Afro-American culture


I ody 5ht Satra 3tIna







+


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010, PAGE 5


LOCALN


Gaming Reform Committee



hits out at tourism minister


THE Bahamas Gaming
Reform committee has criticised
Tourism Minister Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace, saying his latest
remarks on efforts to amend the
country's gambling laws demon-
strate that the government is
"clueless" about how to address
the issue and "oblivious" of the
urgency involved.
Earlier this week, Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said considerable
consultation and review is still
needed before the gaming laws
can be reformed, adding that a
committee made up of tourism
stakeholders and government offi-
cials has been assigned to this task
and is "moving along" with its
work.
Many of those who want to see
a change, including the Bahamas
Gaming Reform committee
(BGR), want Bahamian nation-
als and foreigners who live here to
be granted the same rights as vis-
itors. Currently, neither group is
allowed to gamble.
BGR chairperson Sidney Stra-
chan asked, "How came we trust a
government that is unable to get
the simple and obvious things
right?


VINCENT VANDERPOOL-
WALLACE
"Our government refuses to
recognize it has failed, and con-
tinues to mishandle and botch the
gaming issue. The government's
apathetic attitude to date is further
negatively impacting our tourism
product."
Mr Strachan claimed that in
spite of "these tough troubling
times", Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
does not appear to consider
reform of the "discriminatory"
gaming laws urgent.
"This government's commit-


tee, if it exists at all, needs to show
its face, admit its failure and
accept the assistance offered by
local and international profes-
sionals," he said.
The committee Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace referred to was
formed after the Bahamas Hotel
Association (BHA) made a pre-
sentation to government last year
calling for a major overhaul of the
regulatory framework guiding the
casino industry.
The current legislation is con-
sidered outdated by many in the
industry, including BHA presi-
dent Robert Sands and Kerzner
International (Bahamas) presi-
dent George Markantonis. Last
March, Mr Sands called for "rad-
ical change."
According to Mr Strachan, the
BGR said it has repeatedly indi-
cated to government that it is in
contact with several gaming
experts, including an internation-
al law firm; Dr Bo Bernhard, PhD
(UNLV Sociology Department);
the Innovation Group and oth-
ers, who are all willing to sit down
with the government to discuss
reform strategies.
"The Bahamas is lagging


Group wants request for injunction


against BEC po
A GROUP of Abaco residents and landown-
ers want the country's final court of appeal to
hear their request for an injunction against the
fast-advancing construction of the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporations' new power plant.
Responsible Development for Abaco Ltd
(RDA) is calling on the Court of Appeal to allow
them to take their appeal against the decision
of one of its judges before the Privy Council in
London.
The group is afraid that if the court does not
order BEC to stop work on the $105 million
development in Wilson City, Abaco, it will be
completed before the judicial review of the deci-
sion-making processes leading up to the com-
mencement of the project can take place.
Fred Smith, QC, of Callenders and Co, filed
the notice of motion for leave to appeal to the
Privy Council with the Court of Appeal on Jan-
uary 25 on behalf of the group.
RDA's initial bid for an injunction was refused
by Justice of Appeal Sir George Newman earli-


wer plant heard
er this month.
In its application to the Court of Appeal with
respect to the matter - which names the Queen,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux, Health Minister Hubert
Minnis, Works Minister Neko Grant, the South
Abaco District Council, Attorney General John
Delaney and the Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion as respondents - RDA proposes it should
be given the chance to appeal Justice Newman's
refusal to grant the injunction because "the mat-
ter is of great public importance."
"The appellants (RDA and Abaco resident
Matthew McCoy) substantive and interlocutory
applications seek to protect the environment,
public health and the tourist industry from threats
posed by the proposed power plant at Wilson
City, Abaco," it says.
RDA suggests it should be allowed to appeal
Justice Newman's dismissal of its request for an
injunction on work at Wilson City because the
judge "erred in law and/or fact" on 11 grounds.


behind its competitors in neigh-
bouring jurisdictions," Mr Stra-
chan said. "While our casinos sit
empty and jurisdictions like
Jamaica, Cayman, Bermuda,
Dominican Republic and South
Florida are positioning them-
selves, the government sanctioned
committee sits idly by like a bump
on a log drifting aimlessly."
In The Turks and Caicos, a
nearby jurisdiction that has a more
progressive gaming stance than
the Bahamas, residents who make
a minimum of $75,000 annually
are allowed to gamble. In Puerto
Rico and Curaqao, there are des-
ignated times when locals are
allowed to play in casinos.
Mr Strachan said: "Yes, it is
important that we allow legal res-
idents to game but the Bahamas
has a bigger problem of illegal
gambling. Again, Minister Van-
derpool-Wallace's mystery com-
mittee seems to be overwhelmed
and out to lunch.
"There is total disregard for the
rule of law in the Bahamas and
the government, either through
its malfeasance or nonfeasance,
seems to have thrown up its hands
in despair in the face of this anar-
chy instead of simply fixing it by
introducing a national gaming pol-
icy.
"Illegal gambling will not go
away. Bahamians are tired of
being treated as second class citi-
zens, they want to game and have
obviously taken the situation into
their own hands, daring the gov-
ernment to act."
US Embassy Narcotics Affairs
Officer John Moppert stated in
an interview that illegal gambling
operators are "breaking the coun-
try laws" and that "Internet gam-
ing in the country could lead to
major problems for both the
Bahamas and the US."


Feril c I Iizer \, Fung[cide,t=

PestConrodtl


Freeport's first traffic


victim of 2010 named


FREEPORT'S first traf-
fic fatality was identified as
Bette C McLaughlin, 64, of
South Carolina, a cruise
ship passenger, who, with
her husband, was spending
a day in Freeport.
Her husband, Joseph W
McLaughlin, 63, also of
South Carolina, was treat-
ed of his injuries and dis-
charged from hospital
Wednesday.
The couple, who arrived
in Freeport by Norwegian
Cruise Lines Tuesday
morning, was touring
Freeport on a rented
motorcycle when the acci-
dent occurred around 10am
on Queens Highway near


West Sunrise Highway.
Mr McLaughlin was the
driver of the motorcycle
with his wife, the passen-
ger. They were to leave
Grand Bahama the same
evening on the Norwegian.
They were both taken
to Rand Memorial Hospi-
tal, where Mrs McLaugh-
lin died of her injuries.
Their motorcycle was
involved in a collision with
a Nissan Maxima car dri-
ven by a 29-year-old male
resident of Freeport.
Officers at the Police
Traffic Department in
Freeport are continuing
their investigations into the
accident.


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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


Card of



Thanks


The family of the late



. .4 -

















PETER

CHRISTOPHER

OUTTEN

would like to extend our heartfelt thanks and
appreciation for the thoughtfulness and acts of
kindness that have been expressed to us during
this time of bereavement. We are saddened by
his passing and your presence, cards, phone calls.
recollection of fond memories, gifts and the many'
meals you provided, helped to lighten our burden.
Please know that your love, generosity and
support during this most difficult time is greatly
appreciated and is a source of comfort and
strength to our entire family.
We will continue to cherish his memory and let
it live on, doing what he would want ... smiling,
opening our eyes, loving and going on. God is
with us all especially when we mourn.
It is well, it is well with my soul.
The Outten Family


By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com
IT IS of the essence that
the Ministry of Tourism
places stronger emphasis on
the furtherance of eco-
tourism.
Tourist-related projects, if
mismanaged and allowed to
pop-up unabatedly, can lead
to the exploitation and pol-
lution of aquifers and water
resources, pollution and dis-
ruption of wildlife habi-
tats/niches, soil erosion,
damage to reefs and beach-
fronts, and the destruction
of vegetation.
While glitzy and glam-
orous resorts may appeal to
sight, all stakeholders in
tourism-owners, construc-
tion workers, hotel workers,
the government-should
help to conserve our natural
environment. Tourism
depends heavily upon how
we preserve and improve
our environment.
For the Bahamas, greater
input in ecotourism cannot
only foster environmental-
ly-conscious tourism but also
serve as a viable source of
income. There are many
benefits that can derived
from ecotourism, ranging
from stimulating the econ-
omy of remote, rural
areas-particularly on the
Family Islands-via eco-
tourism-related tours and
excursions to providing
additional attractions for vis-
itors. Ecotourism can create
opportunities for employ-
ment (tour guides, boat cap-
tains, park wardens, fishing
guides, eco-lodge jobs, etc),
heightened foreign exchange
earnings and a variety of
other social benefits.
As Bahamians, we must
encourage ecologically-
sound tourism that protects


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our beaches, wetlands and
our unique-and in some
instances endangered-flora
and fauna. Ecotourism, oth-
erwise known as adventure
tourism, has much to do
with outdoor activities that
can be commercialized and
bolster our tourism offer-
ings.
Frankly, although eco-
tourism can be a productive
aspect of our overall tourism
package, we must ensure
that all major touristic devel-
opers respect our ecological
processes and biological
diversity and resources.
Responsible and reasonable
preservation efforts-that
takes into account that there
must be development in to
advance the country-is
vital to the maintenance of
the foundations of present
and future Bahamian soci-
eties and our environment.
That said, certain recent
developmental undertakings
have shown the catastroph-
ic environmental degrada-
tion that can result from the
unrepressed removal of veg-
etation, destruction of
ecosystems and dredging
into water lens to create
waterways for pretentious
persons to dock their boats
at their front doors.
We must preserve our
already fragile environs as
they are being raped, van-
dalized and torn down on a
daily basis. There are a num-
ber of eco-touristic experi-
ences such as hiking, bird
watching, deep sea diving,
snorkeling and plant study
that can potentially be
altered, or completely anni-
hilated, if greater efforts are
not made to judiciously pre-
serve what's left of our envi-
ronment. Over time, I've
noticed that certain parts
our surroundings have casu-
ally been made more vul-
nerable by overzealous con-
struction companies carry-
ing out excavation exercis-
es-often illegally-in hot
pursuit of landfill, and by
greedy fishermen using
chemicals.
Vandalism of our envi-


ronment, I've discovered, is
insistently creeping into
both our marine and terres-
trial environs. At sea, poach-
ers and other fishermen who
overfish or use dragnets
unquestionably disrupt the
habitats of many marine
organisms and extirpate our
reefs. Greedy fishermen
lessen the natural attraction
of various areas for snorkel-
ing, deep sea diving or even
sports fishing, and are there-
by ruined and made barren.
Further adding to the
spate of environmental van-
dalism is the penchant of
some Bahamians to litter
and dump garbage on our
beaches, in bushes (in places
that can serve as hiking
trails), and so on. Even
more, when the sea bed is
uprooted and hacked into
to create private marinas,
much of the wildlife is
destroyed and severely
impacted.
When quarry is moved in
abundance from anywhere,
it defaces the landscape. In
many instances, quarry is
removed from the out-
skirts-in ecologically-rich
areas that could become
tourist attractions-to be
sold, leaving an oversized
pit in the ground. The use
of heavy machinery to tear
down mangroves and bird
nesting and feeding grounds
are other acts of vandalism
that ruin eco-tourist sites
and thereby limit local
attractions.
Surely, there is an urgent
need to strictly enforce envi-
ronmental laws. We must
wake up and limit the num-
ber of investors who are giv-
en licenses for marinas. The
large numbers of marina
licenses being granted will
not only limit the available
docking sites for locals, but
also obliterate marine habi-
tats. In truly developing our
eco-touristic product and
simultaneously protecting
our environment, it is imper-
ative that more park war-
dens and environmental
inspectors are hired and
deployed.


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Tourism depends on us



preserving environment


The PLP's radio
advertisements
and the NDP
Hands down, the PLP's
advertisements for the Eliz-
abeth by-election campaign
are better produced and far
more appealing when com-
pared to the FNM's. The
NDP has also put together
some interesting election
advertisements.
Near ly
three weeks
ago, while
listening to
a talk show,
I heard one
of the earli-
er PLP
campaign
ads, which
featured PLP LEADER
sound bites Perry Christie
of Opposi-
tion leader Perry Christie's
initial campaign speech
accompanied by singer Bey-
once Knowles' song "Halo."
Mr Christie's performance
was nothing short of poetic
and emotive. Upon hearing
it the first time, I found the
on-air spot quite electrify-
ing and have no doubt that
the PLP's base was rallied.
Since that commercial, there
has been a plethora of ads
featuring PLP candidate
Ryan Pinder and sponsored
by the PLP that appear to
appeal to a cross-section of
voters and seem to have far
outdone the FNM's multi-
media machine that, in the
2007 elections, put the PLP
to shame.
While I can appreciate the
NDP's democratic approach
to selecting a candidate-a
primary format that I think
should be duplicated across
the board-the public spec-
tacle arising from their fight
to have the thumb symbol
placed on the ballot is noth-
ing more than a non-issue, a
mere public relations exer-
cise.
Lawyer Halson Moultrie's
Bahamas Freedom Alliance
(BFA) also used the thumb
symbol in the past on their
letterheads, leaflets and fly-
ers even though the symbol
was not their main sign
(which was a shield).
Frankly, the NDP appears
to be irritating the Parlia-
mentary Registrar, seem-
ingly attempting to force
him into accepting their
symbol. While the statute
has a variety of symbols, it is
possible that one hand on
the ballot-in an already
acrimonious by-election
race-may be enough, as
two hand symbols (PLP and
NDP) may, as the Parlia-
mentary Registrar seems to
have suggested, confuse
some voters, particularly in
instances where a voter
intends to vote for the PLP
and mistakenly votes for the
NDP.
Medical doctor and law
professor Dr Dexter John-
son shares my view, saying:
"The Parliamentary Reg-
istrar has given a reasonable
explanation to avoid confu-
sion and for the process
without such distractions. I
accept his rationale. Also,
the use of the symbol is
already claimed by another
group, not as a main sym-
bol but a minor symbol."
I believe that the NDP
will lose the challenge.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
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area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
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+


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010, PAGE 7


LOCALN


Ammunition and

firearm found

in house search
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - A search
of a residence in Freeport
resulted in the seizure of
ammunition and a firearm,
and the arrest of a man on
Tuesday.
Acting on information,
Drug Enforcement Unit
officers executed a search
warrant at a house on
Adventurers Way around
10.25am on Tuesday.
Officers discovered a
black bag containing one
grey firearm magazine.
A Llama .380 pistol with
one magazine contain containing six
rounds of .380 ammunition
was also discovered in a
vehicle parked outside the
residence.
A male resident was tak-
en into police custody.
Police are continuing
investigations into the mat-
ter.
HOUSE BREAKING
A thief was caught in the
act by police hiding in the
closet of a house that he had
broken into on Tuesday.
According to reports,
sometime around 11.15am
police officers received
information and went to
Section 3 of the Coral Reef
Estates Subdivision.
Police surrounded a
house. The owner and resi-
dent of the house arrived on
the scene shortly after-
wards.
Officers were given keys
to the house.
During a search, a 22-
year-old male resident of
Coral Reef Estates, who is
not a resident of the home,
was found hiding in a bed-
room closet.
Jewellery, cash and other
items, reported stolen by
the complainant, were
recovered from the suspec-
t's pants pocket. The culprit
was arrested.
Police are continuing
their investigations into the
matter.


Grand Bahama housebreaking



spike sparks police concern


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Police are con-
cerned about the spike in
housebreaking incidents
occurring on island and are
urging residents to take
appropriate steps to protect


their property.
Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said the police have
increased patrols in residen-
tial areas, and are encourag-
ing residents to be "their
brothers' keepers".
"We have noticed that
thieves are breaking into
persons' homes when they
are out to work and the chil-
dren are in school.


"We certainly need to
form a strong partnership
with the residents of Grand
Bahama in this fight against
crime and in particular,
housebreaking and stealing
at this time," she said.
Asst Supt Mackey noted
that culprits tend to steal
jewellery, cash, and elec-
tronic goods such as laptops,
cameras and video games.


She said homeowners
should consider marking
their property so that the
event of a break-in, the items
can be easily identified when
recovered by the police.
Ms Mackey said the police
are encouraging homeown-
ers to contact their neigh-
bours about forming neigh-
bourhood watch groups,
which could work in tandem


with the more frequent
police patrols.
"We commend residents
who are assisting the police
and also the officers who are
out there catching the cul-
prits.
"We want to work togeth-
er with all stakeholders in
making this island a safer
place to live, work, and vis-
it," said Asst Supt Mackey.


Lucaya International School raises almost $30,000 for Haiti


IN the wake of the earthquake dis-
aster in Haiti, the teachers and stu-
dents of Lucaya International School
(LIS) quickly held a casual day last
week Friday to raise funds for the Save
the Children Foundation to aid Haiti.
At that time they were able to raise
$3,200.
In addition to this, a parent and local
company owner pledged to double
what was given up to $25,000.
"We were overwhelmed by this
news," said Chris Mockrish, LIS direc-
tor. "We passed this news on to our
students and parents, and the dona-
tions are flowing in."
The director and the LIS teachers
have been particularly astounded by
how the students have taken this so
personally and really got involved.
"Every day we witness case after case
of students coming to school to fill up
our water bottle with their own money,
money they have raised from setting
up lemonade stands or raiding their
own personal piggy banks, savings and
allowances," he said.
The students' parents have begun
adding their own personal and com-
pany donations to the fundraising
efforts.
As of Friday the school had collect-
ed $13,959, which meant they have
raised a total of $27,918.
In addition to the financial dona-
tions the director's wife, Lotta Mock-
rish, is now in Haiti and working with
the Save the Children Foundation,
which she has been working with for
six years.
Mrs Mockrish has been giving the


b ~


,-%NI


.1.00


I IS T DE T clec oeyt asstertqae itisinH it..


school updates on the situation in Haiti
and has promised to find other ways
that the school and community can
help. This includes arranging for a
trailer of supplies that parent Eddie
Whan has collected for the island into
a viable port and checking on proce-
dures for adopting Haitian orphans
for LIS families who expressed interest


in opening up their homes.
Mr Mockrish went on to add: "I
believe that what we are doing right
now at LIS is truly a special effort and
a testament to our community. In the
space of five days, we have raised
$27,918 for Save the Children, and we
have witnessed the genuine goodness
of people."


Mr Mockrish is new to the island,
having started with the school in Sep-
tember 2009.
"This truly is the definition of a
grass roots effort and an example of
what can be accomplished when a car-
ing and ambitious community works
together to get something done," he
said.


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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


*OCAL NEWS I


FROM page one

es met with URCA officials to
voice their objections on the
rules, to no avail.
Michael Symonette,
URCA's chief executive offi-
cer, said the regulations should
not have taken broadcasters
by surprise as they have been
on the country's law books for
nearly 20 years. He said the
main provisions laid out in the
ICP were lifted verbatim from
the Broadcasting Rules, 1992,
and Broadcasting (Licensing)
Rules, 1993.
These rules were in place
from June 17, 1992, and
December 16, 1993, respec-
tively until they were repealed
in September, 2009, the Com-
munications Act, 2009, was
enforced.
At a press conference yes-
terday to voice URCA's side
of the argument, Mr Symon-
ette said the ICP was "modi-
fied" simply to "reflect the new
environment introduced
through the Communications


Broadcasting codes limiting by-election

advertising 'will not be withdrawn'


Act".
He said the agency was
about to begin consultation
with broadcasters in order to
create new election regulations
when they were caught off
guard by the resignation of for-
mer MP Malcolm Adderley.
"The codes were in place
since 1993 so they were not
new, not prepared by URCA.
We were in the process of
preparing to do a public con-
sultation when we had this res-
ignation of a Member of Par-
liament. And consequently
they called for a by-election so
we had to do something to
ensure that there were some
rules in place that would cover
the by-election.
"We couldn't conclude our
public consultation that we
were planning to do in time to
cover the by-election."
Former Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie has condemned the
regulations as censorship. He


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has argued that the ICP vio-
lates the constitutional right of
free speech.
But URCA officials dis-
agree.
"We have not been able to
determine where we have pre-
vented any individual or party
from free speech," said Mr
Symonette, flanked by
URCA's Director of Policy
Regulations Usman Saadat
and legal advisor Vincent Wal-
lace-Whitfield.
At a mass rally on Wednes-
day night, Opposition leader
Mr Christie called for broad-
casters and political parties to
ignore the regulations.
Under procedure, if a
licensee is found in violation
of the ICP, the broadcaster
would be asked to fix the
breach within a certain peri-
od. If not remedied in the
allotted time, the broadcaster
would be subject to certain
penalties. URCA officials
shied away from discussing
specific penalties a broadcast-
er would incur for breaking its
interim rules.
Meantime, URCA has plans
to create new election adver-
tising rules for the electronic
media. This will be done after
consultation with and input
from broadcast stakeholders.
URCA is the agency respon-
sible for communications reg-
ulation.


FROM page one

see and feel the pain. Don't mind the smiles
and cheerful dispositions. People are hurting,"
he said.
"Many have been carrying heavy loads car-
ing for family members, educating children,
paying mortgages. They have been staggering
under the burden of catastrophic medical prob-
lems and the huge bills that sometimes come
with it. But Bahamians have been carrying on,
sometimes with only Jesus to share the load."
However, most troubling to him, Dr Sands
said, was the revelation that many no longer
believe that the Bahamas could turn things
around again.
"In 2006, the PLP government of the day
introduced the most comprehensive new health-
care reform initiative in two decades. They
called it National Health Insurance or NHI.
On the face of it, it appeared to be the answer to
many people's prayers. In truth, it was noth-
ing of the sort. Since I was a senior civil servant,
I felt obliged to contribute to the debate based
on my technical expertise. I did not then, as I do
not now, oppose National Health Insurance," he
said.
Dr Sands said that what he opposed then,
and still is against today, is "the poorly con-
ceived, bloated programme that promised to
provide everything to everybody for little or
next to nothing at little or no cost while ignor-
ing the huge infrastructural problems and inef-
ficiencies and systems problems that had to be
fixed if the much needed reform was to suc-
ceed."
"I opposed the plan that was presented then
and I would oppose any similar slip-shod plan
now."
During his campaign in the constituency, Dr
Sands said he has heard the people's concerns
and troubles first-hand.
"I have seen your resilience and your pride.
I have seen anger and disappointment. I have
seen commitment to community and country.


FROM page one Fishermen


That is not a problem for South
Africa, obviously, but it becomes
a problem for us. The fact that
South Africa made the right
move to close down to rebuild
itself, they are now experienc-
ing this glut of crawfish," said
Sam Duncombe, environmental
activist from reEarth.
Minister of Agriculture and
Marine Resources, Lawrence
Cartwright said he suspects the
Bahamas is being impacted by
the global market, because sev-
eral countries, like Brazil, Belize,
Cuba and South Africa, extend-
ed, or re-opened their crawfish
seasons in response to the glob-
al economic crisis.
He said there is definitely
more crawfish on the interna-
tional market now. He said oth-
er market have less stringent reg-
ulations, allowing smaller crops
to be harvested. This is appealing
to the consumer, he said, who
would be more inclined to pur-
chase four small tails than two
big tails. With two months left in
the open crawfish season, the
Mama Doo is now in the busi-
ness of conch. The conch market
has been of little consolation,
since Mr Bastian said prices are
down even with conch. On Mon-
day, he fished 10,000 pounds of
conch. As of Thursday, he was
yet to sell 1000 pounds. This
would never be the case with
crawfish, he said, as any amount
they caught on a given day -
from 10,000 to 50,000 pounds -
they could sell in one day and
pick up the cheque within min-
utes.
"It can certainly be looked at
as a crisis. It has knocked the
wind out of a lot of fishermen's
sails. They are suffering as a
result of that; they still have fam-
ilies to feed. We are in a reces-
sion and it is affecting everyone,"
said Mr Cartwright. He said the
government extended the 2009
grouper season by one month,
closing it on January 1, 2010, in
order to compensate for the
challenges being experienced by
fishermen.


With so many fishermen in
the conch business, Mr Bastian
said wholesalers quickly reach
their export quotas and stop buy-
ing conch. Sales to local distrib-
utors, such as restaurants only
bring in a fraction of their typical
income.
The Bahamas is a signatory
to the Convention on Interna-
tional Trade in Endangered
Species of Wild Fauna and Flora
(CITES), which regulates the
trade of endangered species.
Conch is a CITES regulated
species. The Bahamas agrees to
annual quotas with CITES for
the export of conch. The 2009
quota was 400,000 pounds,
according to Mr Cartwright. The
quota is distributed between the
various exporters: new exporters
gain a license for about 20,000
pounds, while quotas for estab-
lished exporters are determined
based on their export quantities
in the previous year.
Mr Bastian suggested the gov-
ernment increase the quota to
open up the market for more
fishermen to participate in the
conch industry. He suggested a
one million pound quota would
create many new opportunities
in the industry. Mr Cartwright
said the government was yet to
negotiate 2010 quotas, but it was
highly unlikely it would increase
by such a large proportion. The
local industry is not regulated
by CITES quotas.
Other crawfish fishermen
have switched to snapper. The
affect has been an over supply of
conch and snapper, and a drop in
the purchasing price by whole-
salers.
Ray Roberts, owner of a
crawfish boat and two snapper
boats from Spanish Wells, said
his crawfish boat turned to fish-
ing, since fish is available all year
around. He said a typical bag of
snapper used to sell for $120 per
40 to 40-pound bag. Lately, the
price dropped to $100 per bag. In
some cases, as low as $80 per
bag.


FNM candidate
"I watched Mr Samuel Bain (of Elizabeth
Estates) fight to hold back tears as he told me of
these troubles he has had since his recent stroke
and his inability to reach much needed physio-
therapy services for rehabilitation.
"I have watched a 25-year-old disabled res-
ident crawl around on the floor of her home
because her family could not afford a wheel-
chair."
"People of Elizabeth," he addressed the ral-
ly crowd. "The Free National Movement has
started a conversation intended to renew your
trust. We want you to believe again.
"Elizabeth, this constituency has existed too
low and too long below its calling and its poten-
tial. Elizabeth, I stand before you with a caring
government behind me; a government you can
trust. I have heard your requests for improved
parks and better youth programmes.
"I have heard how long you wait to get
through the intersection of Sea Breeze Lane
and Bay Lilly. I have heard you ask for some-
thing as simple as signs to identify the streets on
which you live.
"I have heard about the flooding on Fox
Hill Road and Joe Farrington Road. I have
heard your request for speed bumps on 1-95, 1-
96, and 1-97 otherwise known as Joe Farrington
Road, Sandilands Village and Pine Barren
Roads. I have heard you ask for side-walks in
the community so your children can be safe. I
have heard your wishes for fair, compassionate
and humane resolution of our immigration chal-
lenges.
"I have heard your concerns about crime,
about housebreaking and car thefts in polling
division number five and elsewhere. I have
heard your request for access to jobs so that
you can care for your families. Most of all, I
have heard your demand for true representa-
tion," he said.
* SEE PAGE TWO


ing another look at size limits.
"I think the biggest problem is
that we don't have the proper
baseline data for our fish stock.
We don't have what we need to
really, really know how serious
the problem is. But there is a
worldwide over-fishing problem.
We have a serious problem with
Nassau grouper, conch, snapper:
these are all culturally and eco-
nomically important species.
They are fragile and we have to
take the necessary measures to
sustain our natural resources
with habitat conservation and
preservation and sustainable
fishing practices. They are not
always going to be there for us to
take," said Kristin Williams,
executive director, Friends of the
Environment.
With 50 years of experience
under his belt, Mr Roberts said
fishermen should be smart and
put money aside when business
is good to compensate for down
cycles, like the current one.
Minister Cartwright said: "As
the economy catches itself of
course it will pick up. Fish is a
very expensive commodity, even
Bahamians cannot afford as
much as when things were doing
much better. Once things level
out the fishermen will return to
their glory days." As to when
this will occur, Mr Cartwright
said an economist would have
to answer that question.


UrLnILlr DfOlI IANIJ,
owner of the Mama Doo.
"When crawfish prices go
down everything goes down. The
price of crawfish going down
hurts even more than the diesel
prices going up. There is nothing
we can do to compensate really.
We work hard, try to do our
best, but you just make less mon-
ey," he said.
Some environmentalist fear
for the sustainability of snapper
supply, with the changing
dynamics in the market. Mr
Cartwright said crawfish fisher-
men often switch to conch and
grouper towards the end of the
crawfish season, since supplies
begin to decline, but this year
the shift is happening much ear-
lier. Some in the fisheries indus-
try are even suggesting the gov-
ernment protect snapper by tak-


Heineken in talks to buy Burns House
FROM page one
Brewers Limited (ABDAB) to explore the possibility of acquiring
their shares in the Burns House Group and Commonwealth Brew-
ery businesses in the Bahamas."
ABDAB currently own 47 per cent of Commonwealth Brewery,
giving Heineken the majority 53 per cent equity stake. However, the
position is reversed at Burns House, where ABDAB holds a 78.8 per
cent stake. Heineken, though, has Board and management control at
Burns House, which became the largest liquor distributor and whole-
saler in the Bahamas via the 2000 purchase of Butler & Sands. The
Board and management arrangement, concluded in 2004, provided
the Finlaysons with the financing needed to complete the purchase
of the Solomon's Mines luxury goods retail chain.
Apart from the Finlaysons, ABDAB's third largest shareholder is
understood to be PLP chairman Bradley Roberts.
* SEE TRIBUNE BUSINESS FOR FULL STORY


IODSCUS STOIE ON THI 0AG 0LG ON TOWWTIUE4.O







+


THE


NOTE


VOLLEYBALL
NPVA PLAYOFFS CONTINUE
* TUESDAY night over at the D W Davis gymnasi-
um, the NPVA continued with their best of five Champi-
onship series.
In the ladies games, the Johnson Lady Truckers took a
hard fought five set marathon over the Scottsdale Vix-
ens. The Truckers won the first set 25-16 before losing a
nail biting second set 30-28.
In the third set, the Truckers would regroup for a 25-23
victory, however the Vixens would remain tough to tie
the game at two sets each with a 25-15 win.
In the 5th and deciding set, the table would turn as the
Truckers jumped out to an early lead and held on to win
the set and match 15-10.
Anastasia Sands-Moultrie finished the game with 24
points to secure the win.
Jackie Conyers scored 19 points for the Vixens in a los-
ing effort. With the win, the Truckers evened the series at
1-1. Over on the men's side, another five set thriller as the
National Fence Intruders took a 2-1 lead over the Scotia
Defenders.
The Intruders came from behind to steal the first set 27-
25 and would go on to win the second set 25-22.
The Scotia Defenders then won sets three and four 25-
19 and 25-18 before losing a tough fifth set and the game
16-14.
Glen Rolle led the Intruders with 20 points and Shedrick
Forbes scored a game high 24 points in a losing effort.
Games continue today with the ladies match starting at
7:30pm.
CRICKET
BAHAMAS CRICKET ASSOCIATION
TO FIELD A SELECT TEAM
* THE Bahamas Cricket Association will field a
select team to compete against regional competition in
an International Cricket Council sanctioned event.
The Pepsi ICC Americas Region Division Two tour-
nament is scheduled to begin in less than a week at
Haynes Oval featuring several of the region's top
teams.
The Bahamas will open competition, Monday Febru-
ary, 1st against Brazil while Suriname will face Panama
in the second match of the day at Windsor Park.
ICC Executives, Umpires will arrive a few days before
the commencement of the tournament, January 30-31.
Turks and Caicos will be the tournament's fifth team.


RM Bailey Pacers point guard Lyndrick Storr defends Michael Reckley as he attempts to drive to the basket. Storr finished with 10 points in
the Pacers 62-29 win yesterday at the DW Davis Gymnasium.




Pacers dominate Knights


By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net
ALREADY a proven
powerhouse in the GSSSA
senior boys division, the RM
Bailey Pacers continued to
cement their status as a


We Take


Any Trade-ins


championship contender
with another lopsided win.
The Pacers dominated the
CR Walker Knights 62-29
yesterday in the opening
game yesterday at the D.W
Davis Gymnasium.
Stephen Strachan led the
Pacers and nearly outscored
the entire Knights roster
with a game high 22 points.
Strachan was three of six
from beyond the arch and
seven of eight from the free
throw line en route to the
game high.
Both teams were short-
handed with several key
players inactive, but a 30
point explosion for the Pac-
ers in the second quarter
ultimately sealed the win.
The Knights reached the
scoreboard first when
Michael Reckley drove the
lane for a layup and the
teams traded baskets for the


game's opening minutes.
Shalamar Caambdrige's
long range jumper from the
left wing gave the Pacers a
6-5 lead, one they would
keep for the remainder of
the contest.
The Pacers ended the
quarter on a 14-2 run to
take control.
Strachan scored his first
basket of the game for a 10-
5 lead and dished an assist
to Harry Durham on the
next possession.
R.M Bailey netted several
easy baskets with quick ball
movement and the play of
D'Shon Taylor in the high
post.
Taylor passed an assist to
Shaquille Percentie and
scored on the next posses-
sion with a jump hook just
before the buzzer sounded
as the Pacers took an 18-7
lead after the first quarter.


After the Knights scored
on the opening possession
of the second quarter, the
Leading 20-9, the Pacers
went on an 11-2 run to surge
ahead.
Lyndrick Storr began the
run with a three point play,
followed by back to back
three pointers from Stra-
chan and Percentie.
Artel Bethune gave the
Pacers their first 20 point
advantage with a turn-
around jumper of the glass
for a 31-11 lead with 4:00
left to play in the quarter.
The lead reached 30, 46-
16 when Strachan made two
of two at the line.
After a hard foul on the
way to the basket as time
expired, Strachan recovered
to sink another pair of free
throws with no time remain-
ing as they took a 48-16 lead
SEE page 11


Diplomats finish


season undefeated


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By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net
THE Westminster College
Diplomats completed another
dominant regular season and
head into the BAISS playoffs as
the number one seed after clos-
ing out the season with an
unblemished record.
The Diplomats capped an
undefeated regular season yes-
terday with an 86-66 win over
the Faith Temple Warriors.
Westminster's big three again
led the team with Marako
Lundy topping in points,
Thomas Mackey in rebounds,
and floor general Shaquille
Bain in assists
Lundy, the league's top scor-
er finished with 42 points, with
18 from beyond the arch on six
three pointers, and added 11
rebounds and three assists.
Mackey dominated the
boards to finish with 25 points
and 27 rebounds while Bain
added 10 assists, four rebounds
and three steals.
John Kemp came off the
bench to pull down 15 rebounds
as the Diplomats received the
usual balanced contribution
from its reserves.
Heading into the postseason,
Diplomats Head Coach Geno
Bullard said the results over the
past few seasons, and this team
in particular, have been the
results of consistency and hard
work.
"It goes much deeper than
just the regular season, the play-
offs and tournaments for these


IN THIS Tribune file photo, Shaquille Bain of the Westminster Col-
lege Diplomats makes a pass in a BAISS game against Kingsway
Academy Saints.


guys. We work year round. It
takes hard work, consistency,
and sticking with the program
to come out with success," he
said, "The toughest test is keep-
ing the guys mentally focused.
Before this season began our
goal was the perfect season and
the three peat and to have one
part of that goal come to
fruition is a great feeling."
Bullard credits his team's off-
season preparation to its suc-
cess and ability to remain
focused despite being the
league's front-runners all year.
"These guys are young but
they are an experienced team.
We play in the offseason and
always find new ways to keep


us sharp. For instance, this off-
season we went to Cuba to play
against some of their national
team program members and it
forced up to step our game up
and keep sharp and you can see
the benefits," he said, "We are
confident but we will still take
things one game at a time. We
will not fall into the trap of get-
ting too complacent and look
to far ahead. Like I always tell
my guys, 'If you fail to prepare,
you prepare to fail' so we will
be ready for whoever we face in
the playoffs."
The BAISS playoffs are set
to begin February 2nd, with
sudden death elimination in
each of the four divisions.


I ODSUSSOISO HSIPAGE LG ON0T WWW.TIBUE22CO0






+


TRIBUNE ^/



uSir
-FRIDAY,
F R ID AY,


SS


JANUARY 29, 2010


54CTO Bo uinestibnmdaet:


Minister

No Senate

changeto

Planning

Bill likely


EAHL U-V-AUX
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The minister responsible
for the Planning and Sub-
divisions Bill yesterday
said he "did not anticipate"
the Senate making any fur-
ther amendments to the
legislation, telling Tribune
Business he was "enor-
mously satisfied" with
what had been accom-
plished and the accommo-
dations of the various
interests involved in real
estate development.
Arguing that the Bill
"sets a clear path for the
development of land going
forward", Earl Deveaux,
minister of the environ-
ment, suggested that some
of the concerns still har-
boured by attorneys, real-
tors and developers may be
misconceived.
Asked by Tribune Busi-
ness to address the con-
cerns expressed in this
newspaper by William
Wong, the Bahamas Real
Estate Association's
(BREA) president, based
on a document drawn up
by attorney Sharlyn Smith,
of Sharon Wilson & Co, Dr
Deveaux said the Govern-
ment and its agencies
needed to protect the pub-
lic from potentially
unscrupulous developers.
Mr Wong and Ms Smith
had expressed concern
about lot purchasers, and
any financial institutions
that had provided debt
financing to them, if full
subdivision approval was
to lapse after one year - as
provided for in the Bill.
The relevant section, 46
SEE page 8B


7'-
j-~.
A. ~


N'. We~\'


Heineken to buy




out Finlaysons

Global brewing giant set to acquire stakes in Burns House
and Commonwealth Brewery held by family's ABDAB
holding company for possible 'nine-figure sum'


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
and NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
HEINEKEN yesterday
confirmed to Tribune Busi-
ness it was in talks to acquire
the stakes in Burns House
and Commonwealth Brewery
that are currently held by its
partner, the holding vehicle
for Sir Garet 'Tiger' Finlayson
and his family, in what
sources suggested could be a
blockbuster deal worth more
than $100 million.
The Dutch-headquartered
global brewing giant, in
response to persistent Tribune
Business inquiries, confirmed
the negotiations to acquire
the stakes held by Associated
Bahamian Distillers and
Brewers' (ABDAB) in the
Bahamas' largest liquor dis-
tributor/wholesaler and brew-


'TIGER' FINLAYSON


ery.
LeRoy Archer, managing
director of the Burns House
Group of Companies, con-
firmed yesterday in corre-
spondence delivered to Tri-
bune Business that Heineken
- which also holds stakes in
the company and Common-
wealth Brewery - was "explor-
ing" the possibility of buying
out the Finlayson family and
their fellow investors.
The statement read:


Cable accuses SRG of

being 'a free rider'

* Argues rival not attempting to be
'serious competitor in its own right',
and says its proposals would work
against Bahamian consumers
* BISX-listed firm says Internet market
shows competition benefits, swinging
from 80% BTC dominance 10 years
ago to 70% majority Cable share now


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Cable Bahamas has accused
IndiGo Networks' parent com-
pany of preferring to be "a free
rider" on its network rather
than "a serious competitor in
its own right", arguing that its
proposed regulatory remedies
would work against Bahamian
consumer interests.
In its latest submission to the
Utilities Regulatory and Com-
petition Authority's (URCA)
consultation on interim regula-
tory remedies for its perceived
Significant Market Power
(SMP) in the cable TV and data
connectivity industries, the
SEE page 10B


Call 356-5030
Fw we cmah go t
~w wQ'IJtq~ww~cn
Lis~ling 44364


"Heineken wishes to
announce that it is in conver-
sations with the Associated
Bahamian Distillers and
Brewers Limited (ABDAB)
to explore the possibility of
acquiring their shares in the
Burns House Group and
Commonwealth Brewery
businesses in the Bahamas."
In response to further Tri-
bune Business inquiries, Mr
Archer said in a return e-mail
that he might be able to say
more on the possible acquisi-
tion in two weeks' time, indi-
cating that a deal could be
reached imminently.
Many observers yesterday
suggested that the deal was
being driven by the financial
woes being experienced by
Solomon's Mines, the trou-
bled luxury goods retailer that
the Finlaysons acquired in
SEE page 4B


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FAMILY GUARDIAN
INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED


BISX: $300m

listing shows

'can handle

entire public

debt market'

* Exchange 'actively pursuing' secondary
listing by existing issuer and mutual fund
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas International Securities Exchange's
(BISX) chief executive yesterday said he hoped the
potential listing of the Government's latest $300 mil-
lion sovereign bond issue on the exchange was an
indication that all its other debt securities would
soon follow, telling Tribune Business he hoped that
and two additional listings would be completed by
end-February 2010.
Confirming that he was working with officials at
the Attorney General's Office to facilitate the listing
of the US$ 300 million bond on BISX's secondary
market, Keith Davies told this newspaper that he
hoped to use it to demonstrate that the Bahamian
exchange could handle the entire government secu-
rities debt market - estimated as being worth up to $2
billion and above.
SEE page 9B


The Bahamas told to

throw off protectionism
Chamber of Commerce eyeing $200,000-
$250,000 cost for three key initiatives
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


The Bahamas has been urged to throw
off its "protectionist" shackles and "work
just a little bit harder to get people to the
level where they will benefit" from trade
agreements such as the Economic Part-
nership Agreement (EPA), the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce's president said
yesterday.
Acknowledging that the Chamber's
role would be "education" and preparing
SEE page 5B


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+


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


Ministry


firms


seeks


for top


local


proj ects


MINISTER OF TOURISM AND AVIATION, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace is pictured (centre). The
Ministry is urging more Bahamian businesses to take on the projects vital to the growth of the tourism
industry.


1805


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Invites qualified applicants for the following position: -



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deadlines.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

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Please hand deliver Resume and two (2) references

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The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
Building No. 1
Nassau, Bahamas


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
THE MINISTRY of
Tourism is attempting to
position Bahamian compa-
nies to supplement and aug-
ment its anchor projects,
having recently handed over
the day-to-day logistics of
Bahamas.com to a local
firm.
Minister of Tourism and
Aviation, Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace, told Tribune
Business that they are urg-
ing more Bahamian busi-
nesses to take on the pro-
jects vital to the growth of
the tourism industry.
He said the bid for the
maintenance and technical
development of this coun-
try's premier online portal
went out to several Bahami-
an and foreign firms, with
Providence Technology
Group capturing the con-
tract.
Caroline Moncur, vice-
president of consulting aolu-
tions for Providence Tech-
nology, said in a release that
the company's role was to
provide daily maintenance
of Bahamas.com and pro-
vide strategic direction and
expertise to ensure that it
"remains on the leading
edge of tourism sites".
Providence's managing
director, Ian Hepburn, laud-
ed his company's ability to
manage large, complex web-
sites, and touted its experi-
ence in the Drupal Platform
in which Bahamas.com is
built.
"Providence is very


pleased to become a strate-
gic partner of the Ministry
of Tourism and Aviation,
and to be able to assist the
Ministry with its achieve-
ment of the vision and mis-
sion for this critical site," he
said.
Powerful
According to the release,
Drupal is the most power-
ful open source content
management system avail-
able on the market.
Bahamas.com stands next to
Sony Music's myplay.com,
Warner Brothers Records'
warnerbrosrecords.com, and
Y a h o o ' s
research.yahoo.com in the
arena of robust and accessi-
ble websites.
"Given this platform,
Bahamas.com is in a posi-
tion to continue to grow and
evolve with the tourism
industry," the release said.
"Equipped with a powerful
blend of features, Drupal is
supporting a variety of well
known websites."


Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said the content of
Bahamas.com will continue
to be provided by the Min-
istry of Tourism.
Ms Moncur added that
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
emphasised the importance
of the development by
pointing out that over 60 per
cent of travel to the
Bahamas is now being
booked on the Internet.
"We had promised a year
ago differentiation on the
site, and this is the next great
forward leap in terms of
content," he said.




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If so, call us on 322-1986
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THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010, PAGE 3B


Cable concludes buyout


of ma
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Cable Bahamas last night
confirmed it had completed the
$80 million purchase of the 30.2
per cent stake held in the com-
pany by Columbus Communi-
cations, its former controlling
shareholder, making it 100 per
cent Bahamian-owned.
Confirming that all necessary
government approvals had
been received, Cable Bahamas
said the acquisition of 5,954,600
of its ordinary shares had been
funded through the combina-
tion of a $95 million syndicated
credit facility and $40 million
in preference shares.
The remaining funds will
allow it to upgrade and expand
its services, and Cable
Bahamas' president, Anthony
Butler, said: ""As a 100-per-
cent owned Bahamian compa-
ny, we will continue to strength-
en our financial position, and
lay a strong foundation on
which to build a fully integrated
communications company,
offering expanded telecommu-
nications services to the
Bahamian people."
Currently, Cable Bahamas
has more than 78,000 sub-
scribers on its broadband net-
work, 44,000 high-speed Inter-
net subscribers and over 2,000
customers using international
and domestic private line data
circuits, IP transit and tele-
com/data co-location.
Tribune Business revealed
earlier this month how Cable
Bahamas had to restructure the
deal to obtain Federal Com-
munications Commission
(FCC) approval, creating a trust
overseen by an independent
trustee to hold five million
shares, equivalent to 26.74 per
cent of its outstanding ordinary
capital, which will be repur-
chased from Columbus Com-
munications.
The BISX-listed electronic
communications provider has
appointed Dr Keva Bethel, the
former College of the Bahamas
(COB) president, to act as
trustee in a bid to keep the
Government's total equity
stake in the company below 25
per cent once the Columbus
Communications transaction is
completed.
Documents filed with the
Federal Communications Com-
mission (FCC), the US regula-
tory authority, showed that
without the trust's creation the
Bahamian government would
hold a combined 29.2 per cent


jority
equity stake in Cable Bahamas
once the Columbus Communi-
cations buyout was completed.
This would have placed the
Government's ownership inter-
est in Cable Bahamas above
the 25 per cent threshold. This
benchmark is critical, since if
the Government's stake was
less than 25 per cent, the
Columbus Communications
purchase would qualify for
faster processing by the FCC.
In a December 2, 2009, fil-
ing with the FCC, Cable
Bahamas/Caribbean Crossings
said five million common shares
repurchased from Columbus
Communications would be
"transferred to a newly-created
trust independent of both Cable
Bahamas and the Government
of the Bahamas".
"The purpose of this decla-
ration is to maintain the per-
centage equity ownership inter-
est in Cable Bahamas held by
the Government of the
Bahamas below 25 per cent,
thereby enabling the pending
applications of Caribbean
Crossings and Trinity to quali-
fy for streamlined processing
under the Commission's rules,"
Caribbean Crossings said.
"As a result of the proposed
transfer of control, the Gov-
ernment of the Bahamas would
increase its ownership interest
[in Cable Bahamas] from 20.5
per cent to 29.2 per cent. The
Government of the Bahamas
owns and controls the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC), the dominant carrier in
the Bahamas.
"Under the FCC's rules, the
transfer of control applications
of the company are not enti-
tled to streamlined processing,


shareholder


since the ownership by the
Government of the Bahamas
of a greater than 25 per cent
equity stake in Cable Bahamas
would transform Cable
Bahamas and its subsidiaries
into a foreign carrier affiliate
of BTC, the dominant telecom-
munications carrier in the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas,
and because the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas is not a
World Trade Organisation
member country."
Had the stock repurchased
from Columbus Communica-
tions been retired into Trea-
sury, the Government's stake
would have hit 29.2 per cent,
hence the need to keep it on
the market and available for
sale.Caribbean Crossings' FCC
submission added: "The trust
will terminate 14 days after the
occurrence of the first to occur
of the following:
* "The sale by BTC of more
than 50 per cent of its capital
shares to a third party other
than the Government of the
Bahamas or an instrumentality
thereof."
* "The admission of the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas to the World Trade
Organisation."
* "The dilution of the inter-
est in Cable Bahamas held by
the Government of the
Bahamas to a level that, if the
trust shares were transferred to
Cable Bahamas, the combined
equity and voting interest of
the Government of the
Bahamas in Cable Bahamas
would be 25 per cent or less."
* "The dissolution or liqui-
dation of Cable Bahamas."
And the Caribbean Cross-
ings filing added: "As a result of


the formation of the trust, the
percentage equity ownership in
Cable Bahamas to be held by
the Government of the
Bahamas will be 21.39 per cent,
below the 25 per cent thresh-
old for foreign carrier affilia-
tion, thereby qualifying the
companies' pending transfer of
control applications for stream-
lined processing."
A December 3, 2009, letter
sent to the FCC by Cable
Bahamas' attorneys, Holland
& Knight, said that the Gov-
ernment's 21.39 per cent own-
ership would be split between
the National Insurance Board
(NIB), which would hold 16.23
per cent, and the Public Trea-
sury, owning the remaining 5.16
per cent. If the trust had not
been created, a June 4, 2009,
letter to the FCC by Holland
& Knight showed that NIB
would hold a 22.14 per cent
stake, and the Public Treasury
7.04 per cent. No other investor,
institutional or retail, would
have held a 5 per cent interest.


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T1~7


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visit our webste at www.cob.ed&f.


NOTICE FROM

THE OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS


The deadline for Fall (September) 2010 appli-
cations is Friday, February 5th 2010.


Please ensure that your application and all
supporting documents are submitted by that
deadline.


For more information,
call The Office of Admissions at
302-4499/302-4394 or
c-mail admissions@cob.edu.bs.


BUSINESS


P�r�,'







+>


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


FROM page 1B

2004 via ABDAB's Bethell-
Robertson affiliate.
"Look at the Solomon's
business and you can see why
there is a need for a deal of
this nature," one source said,
adding that the Finlaysons
were likely to need cash to
repay the $30 million-plus
debt financing taken on to
purchase the retail chain,
hence the need to liquidate
their ABDAB stake.
While Solomon's Mines has
undergone substantial restruc-
turing and downsizing, with
numerous store closures and
staff redundancies, one source
close to the deal described as
"totally inaccurate" any
attempt to associate the
chain's woes with the
Heineken deal.
The source, pointing out
that Sir Garet was 72 years-


Heineken to buy out Finlaysons


old, described the potential
ABDAB purchase as "noth-
ing more than prudent estate
planning", with the business-
man wanting to leave his fam-
ily with a multi-million cash
pile rather than stock and
equity ownership in Burns
House and Commonwealth
Brewery.
"It is not imprudent and
unreasonable for a 72 year-
old man to look at his estate.
This is nothing more than
prudent estate planning," the
source said.
The same source also dis-
missed as "completely wrong"
claims that Citibank, which
sources said had refinanced
the original Solomon's Mines


loans, had exercised a 'put'
option over the Finlaysons'
ABDAB stake as collateral
for the loan, and was dictating
the sale to Heineken.
Hinting that a company
such as Heineken did not
issue such a press statement
unless it was confident an
agreement might be close, the
source said of the potential
purchase: "It would most cer-
tainly be nine-figure money. I
think it's nine-figure money,
making it one of the biggest
deals ever seen here."
ABDAB currently own 47
per cent of Commonwealth
Brewery, giving Heineken the
majority 53 per cent equity
stake. However, the position


is reversed at Burns House,
where ABDAB holds a 78.8
per cent stake.
Heineken, though, has
Board and management con-
trol at Burns House, which
became the largest liquor dis-
tributor and wholesaler in the
Bahamas via the 2000 pur-
chase of Burns House. The
Board and management
arrangement, concluded in
2004, provided the Finlaysons
with the financing needed to
complete the Solomon's
Mines purchase.
Apart from the Finlaysons,
ABDAB's third largest share-
holder is understood to be
PLP chairman Bradley
Roberts. Its second largest


shareholder is Sir David Gib-
bons, owner of the Colonial
Group, which owns the
Bahamas-based Atlantic
Medical and Security & Gen-
eral insurance companies.
Market observers, though,
yesterday raised concerns
about a vertically-integrated
brewery, liquor distribution
and retail operation passing
into foreign-owned hands if
the Heineken deal went
through.
"One could make the case
that a very significant chunk
of that vertically-integrated
company ought to be owned
by Bahamians in a Bahami-
an company," one source said.
However, Tribune Business


understands that Heineken
and ABDAB have informed
the Government about what
is being negotiated, as the
Investments Board/National
Economic Council will have
to give its approval.
Heineken recently captured
the world's fourth largest beer
profit pool with its acquisition
of Fomento Economico Mex-
icano, a Mexican brewery.
According to Heineken's
website, this acquisition posi-
tions it to also expand itself
into the world's second largest
beer profit pool, Brazil.
"The acquisition delivers
compelling strategic benefits
globally and transforms
Heineken's presence in the
Americas," said the Heineken
site. "In particular it... offers
significant scope to acceler-
ate the growth of the
Heineken brand in the pre-
mium segment in both Mexi-
co and Brazil...."


Legal Notice
NOTICE
FUTURE STREET CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
BAHIA NIGHTHAWK LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
STAGE PASS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
OXNARD INVESTMENTS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
NITOR GALAXIES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
OCELETE GRAND INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
SEDGE WREN HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
GOLDEN-BILLED SALTATOR LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
ROCAS ATOLL INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
BRIGHT WINGS HOLDING LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
PEARLS CREST VALLEY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
STARBRIGHT HORIZONS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


BUSINESS I







+


FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010, PAGE 5B


The Bahamas told to




throw off protectionism


FROM page 1B

the Bahamian private sector
to participate in international
trade agreements, Khaalis
Rolle told Tribune Business
that three separate initiatives
designed to bolster this effort
would cost between $200,000-
$250,000 to implement.
Mr Rolle said Aaron Brice,
a Chamber director and head
of Epic Battery, had been
asked to head up a small busi-
ness development initiative,
while other plans involved the
Chamber Institute, designed
to provide small businesses
with the technical support
they needed, and its educa-
tion initiative.
"All of these initiatives I
want to do," Mr Rolle told
Tribune Business. "That's
always an issue for us. We
have these great ideas, but
how to fund them? For a non-
profit organisation, that's not
an easy question to answer.
"For us to get these things
done efficiently and effec-
tively, you're looking at any-
where from $200,000-$250,000
for the Institute, the educa-
tion initiative and the small
business development initia-
tives - all these are very cost-
ly."
Mr Rolle said the signing
of the Bahamas' EPA services
offer with the European
Union (EU) allowed the
Chamber and private sector


to move on to the education
phase of the process, "mak-
ing sure our members under-
stand what that means, what
the opportunities are, what
the benefits are and what the
challenges will be.
"That's the phase we're
going to go through now, and
it's important that we do not
lose any ground through that
process. We don't have the
luxury of losing time and
wasting time."
Acknowledging that there
was "lots or work" to be done
by the private sector, the
Chamber president added:
"We've operated in some-
what of a protectionist soci-
ety for a very long time, and
we've operated at a standard
that is fully and totally unac-
ceptable.
"I think now that we need
to work just a little harder to
get people to the level where
they will benefit from these
agreements."
Mr Rolle, who is the Trade
Commission's co-chair, said
the Bahamas' EPA imple-
mentation schedule was "cer-
tainly something that will be
discussed at the next Trade
Commission meeting",
although implementing this
nation's obligations would not
be "extremely onerous".
The Chamber president
said the Bahamas' commit-
ments under the EPA mir-
rored to a large extent the
National Investment Policy,


Legal Notice
NOTICE
AXXEUS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
PRIME NOBILIS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
BANDED COTINGA LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


meaning they should not be
difficult to enact.
"Most of the structural
adjustments will take place as
a result of obligations under
the World Trade Organisa-
tion," he added.
On small business develop-
ment, Mr Rolle said the
Chamber wanted to translate
the macroeconomic issues fac-
ing the sector down to the
'micro' level, to determine
what the priorities, issues and
challenges facing the individ-


ual businessman were. To this
end, a survey was likely to be
conducted to discover what
individual businesses needed
to stay in business, and the
type of technical support that
was required.
While access to capital was
known to be an issue for most
small businesses, Mr Rolle
questioned what that, and
terms such as 'technical sup-
port', meant for Bahamian
businessmen at the ground
level.


Legal Notice
NOTICE
SAN ENRIQUE COMPANY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
CHESTNUT TRADING
CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
NORTH ANTHUS HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
CACHOLOTE CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
BRAGANCA MOUNTAIN LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
AMAZON VENTURES OVERSEAS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
EVERTHRIVE
INVESTMENTS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
PANTANAL MAPLE
GROVES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

EBER INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


THE TRIBUNE


T1~7


is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)







+


PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


Minister: No Senate change to Planning Bill likely


end of a period of one year
from the date of its grant
unless development is sub-
stantially commenced with-
in this period."
In response, Dr Deveaux
said the key word was "sub-


Legal Notice
NOTICE
THE LOBSTER HUT
INVESTMENTS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

BLUE SAVARY INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

CRYSTAL PINK WAVES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)




Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


FROM page 1B

(2), states: "Approval of an
application, including site
plan approval or subdivision
approval, shall lapse at the


"The Bahamas is one of the fortunate
countries in the world where much of
its available real estate is held in public
hands, and the majority of real estate is
undeveloped."


Dr Earl Deveaux


stantial". He questioned
whether a developer would
go through the expense and
time associated with the
approvals and planning
process, the marking out of
lots, definition of roads and
lodging of performance
bonds, only to then allow his
approval to lapse.
Pointing out that devel-
opers first required govern-
ment approval to begin sell-
ing lots, Dr Deveaux said
that failing to act on full sub-
division approval "signifi-
cantly" within a year might
suggest the developer lacked
the wherewithal to make
good on his promises.
Mr Wong and Ms Smith
had also expressed concerns
about provisions in section
57, which prevent vertical
construction in a subdivision
until all lost were connected
to the required utilities.
This, they suggested,
would prevent the owner of
'lot one' from building until
'lot 99' was connected to
utilities. Dr Deveaux,
though, said he had "never
seen" such a situation arise.
He explained that devel-


Legal Notice
NOTICE

GRANVISION

INVESTMENTS CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

WUPPERTAL CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Deveaux referred to section
3 (2), which said: "This Act
shall receive such purposive
and liberal construction and
interpretation as best
ensures the attainment of its
objects and purposes."
"If the minister acts in the
context of that - it could be
any minister - it's pretty
clear what the intent of the
law is to guide the minister's
authority and instructions,"
Dr Deveaux said, adding
that this would prevent any
misuse of the legislation.
"We're seeking to define a
process that can help all the
parties in their endeavours,
and I think we've reached a
fair accommodation in that,"
Dr Deveaux told Tribune
Business.


"I am personally enor-
mously satisfied with what
we've been able to accom-
plish in arriving at a piece
of legislation that sets a clear
path to the development of
land going forward."
Public education was key
going forward, Dr Deveaux
added, saying: "The provi-
sions of this Bill will make
for better community devel-
opment and a more harmo-
nious lifestyle" between var-
ious competing needs, such
as commercial/industrial and
transportation.
"The Bahamas is one of
the fortunate countries in
the world where much of its
available real estate is held
in public hands, and the
majority of real estate is
undeveloped," Dr Deveaux
added.
The Bill's provisions, he
said, would not only shape
future development on
islands such as Andros,
Abaco and Exuma, but
could also be used to
"retroactively refit New
Providence" if the interest
and will was there.


The Public is hereby advised that I, JEAN MARC
JOSEPH of the Farm Road & Centerville Constituency, of
the Island of New Providence intend to change my name
to JEAN MARC ETIENNE. If there are any objections to
this change in name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P. 0. Box N-792,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of the publication of this notice.






The Public is hereby advised that I, GHANNEN O'BRYAN
ALBURY of Settlement of Marsh Harbour, the Island
of Abaco intend to change my name to GHANNEN
O'BRYAN LOWE. If there are any objections to this
change in name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P. 0. Box
N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of the publication of this notice.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2010 Cle/qui/
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF all that piece parcel or lot of land
being Lot Number Thirteen (13) in Block Number ninety-
one (91) on a plan of Grants Town being Map Number
03-50 and running on the WEST seventy (70) feet on
the SOUTH running thereon ninety (90) on the EAST
running thereon eighty-five (85) feet on the public road
and on the NORTH Eighty (80) situate in the Island of
New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas
AND
IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Anna Veronica
Colebrooke Hutcheson Lewis under the Quieting Titles
Act, 1959
NOTICE

The Quieting Titles Act 1959
The Petition of Anna Veronica Colebrooke Hutcheson
Lewis of the Western District of the Island of New
Providence aforesaid in respect of

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot Number
Thirteen (13) in Block Number ninety-one (91) on a plan of
Grants Town being Map Number 03-50 and running on the
WEST seventy (70) feet on the SOUTH running thereon
ninety (90) on the EAST running thereon eighty-five (85)
feet on the public road and on the NORTH Eighty (80)
situate in the Island of New Providence one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas

Anna Veronica Colebrooke Hutcheson Lewis claims to
be the owner in fee simple in possession of the said land
free from encumbrances and has made an application to
the Supreme Court in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas
under section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have
her title to the said land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of
Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said Act.

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
officer hours in the following places:-
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the said
City of Nassau in the Island of New Providence
(b) The Chambers of Raquel L. Wilson, Counsel &
Attorney-at-Law, Attorney for the Petitioner

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having an
Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition
shall on or before the 17th day of March, A.D. 2010 file in
the undersigned a statement of her claim in the prescribed
form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure
of any such person to file and serve a statement of his claim
on or before the said 17th day of March, A.D. 2010 will
operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 25th day of January, A.D. 2010

RAQUEL L. WILSON
Counsel & Attorney-at-Law
Attorney for the Petitioner
Chambers
3 Cable Beach Court
West Bay Street
P.O. Box CB-11233
Nassau, The Bahamas


ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


opers of substantial real
estate tracts, such as Ginn,
Arawak Homes and the
King's Realty/Martin
Solomon project, Serenity,
sought subdivision approval
for different phases, devel-
oping a block at a time.
Each block was connected
to utilities at the same time.
"It is intended to help the
developer manage their
resources and ensure com-
pliance with the rules," Dr
Deveaux told Tribune Busi-
ness of the way subdivision
approval was granted in
'block phases'.
As for concerns that that
various sections in the Bill
gave the responsible minis-
ter, in some instances,
unchallenged powers, Dr


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WWW.BISXBAMAIVIAS.COIV I TELEPMHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
1 49 103 AML Foods Limited 1 12 112 0 00 0283 0 000 40 0 00%
1075 990 Bahamas Property Fund 1074 1074 000 0992 0200 108 1 86%
7 00 550 Bank of Bahamas 575 575 0 00 0244 0260 236 452%
0 63 063 Benchmark 063 063 0 00 0 877 0 000 N/M 0 00%
349 315 Bahamas Waste 315 315 000 0168 0 090 188 2 86%
2 15 2 14 Fidelity Bank 2 37 2 37 0 00 0055 0 040 431 1 69%
13 43 9 62 Cable Bahamas 985 13 43 358 5,954,900 1 406 0 250 96 1 86%
2 88 272 Colina Holdings 272 272 0 0 0 249 0 040 109 1 47%
7 00 500 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 699 699 000 0419 0300 167 429%
365 221 Consolidated Water BDRs 258 276 0 18 0111 0052 249 1 88%
2 55 1 32 Doctors Hospital 2 55 2 55 0 0 0 627 0 080 41 3 14%
7 80 5 94 Famguard 6 49 649 0 0 0 420 0 240 155 3 70%
1 1 80 875 Fnco 927 927 0 00 0322 0520 288 561%
10 45 980 FirstCanrbbean Bank 999 999 0 00 0631 0350 158 350%
5 53 375 Focol (S) 477 477 0 00 0326 0 150 146 314%
1 00 1 00 Focol Class B Preference 1 00 1 0 0 00 0 000 0 000 N/M 0 00%
30 0 27 Freeport Concrete 0 27 0 27 0 00 0035 0 000 77 0 00%
559 500 lCD Utilities 559 559 000 0407 0 500 137 894%
1050 995 J S Johnson 995 995 000 0952 0640 105 643%
1000 1000 Premier Real Estate 1000 1000 000 0156 0000 641 0 ooo00%
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b cases)
52wk-Hi 52wk Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol Interest Maturity
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100 O0 0 O0 7% 19 October 2017
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100 O0 0 O0 Prime - 1 75% 19 October 2022
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 O0 0 O0 7% 30 May 2013
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100 O0 0 O0 Prime + 1 75% 29 May 2015
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
52wk-JJ.i 52wk Jow Symbol Bid , Ask , Last Prie Weekly Va. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
14 60 792Bahamas Supermarkets 12006 1612056 1400 -2246 0000 NM 00%
8 00 600 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 200 625 400 0 000 0480 N/M 780%
054 0 20 RND Holdings 0 35 0 40 0 35 0 001 0 000 2566 0 00%

, , ,- . . . ., , . ....
1 4387 1 3535 CFAL Bond Fund 1 4387 6 30 6 30 31-Dec-09
2 8869 2 8266 CFAL MSIPreferred Fund 2 8869 -1 81 -1 81 31Dec 09
1 5101 1 4356 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 5101 017 518 15-Jan-10
3 3201 2 9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3 1168 -7 94 -7 94 31 -Dec-09
13 2400 12 6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13 2400 4 93 5 90 31-Oct-09
103 9873 93 1999 CFAL Global Bond Fund 103 9873 341 341 31 -Dec-09
101 7254 964070 CFAL Global Equity Fund 101 7254 552 552 31-Dec-09
1 0898 1 0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1 0898 5 22 5 22 9-Dec-09
1 0680 1 0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1 0680 3 39 3 39 9-Dec-09
1 0907 1 0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1 0907 515 515 9-Dec-09
9 5795 9 1005 Royal Fidehity Bah Infl investment Fund 9 5795 5 33 5 33 31 Dec-09
Principal Proteted TIGRS, Series 1
11 2361 1 0000 Royal Fdety Bah Inl investment Fund 11 2361 12 36 12 36 31 Dec09
i I E T T E i' 1i
BISX ALLSHARE-INDE 1De2= 100000 YIELD last 2lnthdiidnd diidyd.by .l.s.gp...

ChageChageinY ing r EPS $ -A p peha frthe ast 12-ht th
Da.-y V Nuberf . toa hr tdedtoday NaV NetAs
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NM Not Meaningful
P/E Closing pnce divided by the last 12 onth eam ings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahaas stock Index January 1, 1994 = 100
(S) -4 -for Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502 7010 i ROYALFIDELI*TY 242 356 7764 i FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396 4000 i COLONIAL 242-502 7525







+>


PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


Cable accuses SRG of being 'a free rider'


FROM page 1B

BISX-listed utility said Systems
Resource Group's (SRG) pro-
posals were designed to sustain
a 'new' market entrant that
would add little value.
Responding to SRG's sug-
gestions, Cable Bahamas, in a
January 22, 2010, document
sent to URCA, said: "SRG has
proposed a wide-ranging regu-
latory agenda which suggests
that it would prefer to be a 'free
rider' on Cable Bahamas' net-
work rather than a serious com-
petitor in its own right."
Adding that it "vigorously
disagrees" with SRG's propos-
als, Cable Bahamas added:
"More fundamentally, Cable
Bahamas is firmly of the view
that it would be contrary to the


interests of Bahamian con-
sumers and the Bahamian
economy for URCA to impose
a set of obligations on infra-
structure-based providers for
the purpose of sustaining a
'new' entrant, which proposes
to do nothing but resell other
companies' products, with lit-
tle or no value added."
Cable Bahamas said such an
approach had not worked in
other countries, including the
US, arguing that this had led
to "disastrous consequences,
bankruptcies and customer dis-
ruptions in the extreme".
The tone of Cable Bahamas'
response is likely to raise
doubts as to whether it will pur-
sue the option it acquired sev-
eral years ago to purchase
SRG, an option it is still
believed to hold.


In its submission to URCA,
Cable Bahamas argued that
there was no evidence to sup-
port SRG's insistence that
broadband Internet services in
the Bahamas should be price
regulated at the retail (con-
sumer) level.
Instead, the BISX-listed
company said "substantial com-
petition" existed in the broad-
band Internet market, some-
thing that would only intensify
with the roll-out of the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company's (BTC) next gener-
ation network (NGN).
Tracing the Internet market's
history to prove its point, Cable
Bahamas said: "Ten years ago,
BTC had a market share of
approximately 80 per cent of
the Internet access market, and
Cable Bahamas was not in the


market. Since that time, Cable
Bahamas has been able to enter
the market, develop and imple-
ment high-quality broadband
products, and surpass BTC's
share of the Internet market.
This demonstrates the existence
of real competition at work
between two infrastructure-
based operators - competition
that is likely to intensify as
these two players enter one
another's core markets." BTC
itself now suggests Cable
Bahamas has a 70 per cent
Internet market share.
Cable Bahamas also took
SRG to task for its suggestion
that the leasing of international
line connectivity be regulated
at the wholesale and retail lev-
el, on the grounds that the three
fibre optic cables providing
such connectivity were either


effectively controlled by the
Government or Columbus
Communications.
When it came to its BICS
cable, run by its wholly-owned
Caribbean Crossings subsidiary,
Cable Bahamas said neither the
Government nor Columbus
"exercises direct or indirect
control over its operation".
While acknowledging that
Columbus previous held com-
mon ownership in the BICS
and ARCOS-1 fibre optic cable
system, the sale of the 30 per
cent stake it owned in Cable
Bahamas meant this would no
longer be the case.
And the BISX-listed utility
provider added that Columbus
would no longer control Cable
Bahamas through Board
arrangements and management
agreements.


Turning to SRG's use of its
own power point presentation
to investors in 2008, in which
Cable Bahamas had said it
would be difficult for another
company to replicate its sub-
sea infrastructure, the latter
admitted doing so would be
"challenging".
"But it would certainly be
possible to do so, particularly
if other new entrants licensed in
the Bahamas, or potential oper-
ators on the foreign end, were
interested in forming a cable
consortium for that purpose,"
Cable Bahamas added.
"In any event, there is suffi-
cient excess capacity on the
three existing systems, and new
entrants should therefore be in
a position to competitive com-
mercial terms for leasing inter-
national capacity."


Legal Notice
NOTICE

SPIX MACAW LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

CHIMBORAZO INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

TOPAZ VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

SANTO MOUNTAIN VIEW LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

OWOSSO INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

BOYETTE INVESTMENTS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

BEAUFORT GLOBAL

INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

GATIK INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolution of GATIK IN-
VESTMENTS LIMITED has been completed, a Cer-
tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Registrar. The date of
completion of the dissolution was 30th day of December,
2009.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)


MALIBU INVESTMENTS LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 140 (3)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
MALIBU INVESTMENTS LTD. has rescinded its intention
to wind up and disslove. The date of rescindment was the 27th
day of January, 2010.


MALIBU INVESTMENTS LTD.
(the "Company)




Legal Notice
NOTICE

CAPE PETREL CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

GAINMORE HOLDINGS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

TAPACULO LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of January 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


."~ ~?I
ri:.
* .4-.-








+>


PAGE 12B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


INERATIOALBSN SI


Ford earns $2.7B in 2009,





first profit in four years


DEE-ANN DURBIN,
AP Auto Writers
TOM KRISHER,
AP Auto Writers
DEARBORN, Michigan

Defying economic conditions
that sent its U.S. rivals into
bankruptcy court, Ford Motor
Co. clawed its way to a $2.7 bil-
lion profit in 2009 and expects
to stay in the black in 2010. It
was the automaker's first annu-
al profit in four years.
Ford's full-year revenue of
$118.3 billion fell 14 percent
from 2008, but the Dearborn-
based automaker benefited
from $5.1 billion in cuts to man-
ufacturing, engineering and
advertising and a $1.3 billion
profit at Ford Credit. It gained
market share in North and
South America and Europe
despite the worst U.S. sales cli-
mate in 30 years. Share in Asia
was flat.
Ford CEO Alan Mulally said
2009 was "pivotal" but Ford has
work to do.
"Ford's transformation
remains a work in progress and
is far from complete," he said in
a conference call with analysts
and media. Back in 2006, Ford
was considered the weakest of
the three domestic automakers.
Ford shares fell 14 cents, or 1
percent, to $11.41 in early after-
noon trading after Ford halted
production of some full-sized
commercial vehicles in China.
The vehicles contain gas pedals
built by the same company
behind the accelerators in Toy-
ota Motor Corp.'s recall. Mulal-
ly said Ford is still determining
if there is a problem.
Ford's 2009 net income was
86 cents per share. It lost a


(AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
IN THIS PHOTO made Nov. 29, 2009, a 2010 Ford Ranger pickup truck
sits at a Ford dealership in Denver. Ford Motor Co. said Thursday, Jan.
28, 2010, it made $2.7 billion in 2009, its first annual profit in four
years.


record $14.6 billion, or $6.50
per share, in 2008. Excluding
special items, Ford's earnings
per share for the year were flat.
Ford made money in three
of the four quarters last year.
In the fourth quarter, it
earned $868 million, or 25 cents
per share, compared with a loss
of $5.9 billion a year earlier.
Quarterly revenue of $35.4 bil-
lion was up 22 percent.
For the quarter, Ford made
43 cents before special items.
That surprised Wall Street,
where analysts expected 26
cents per share.
JPMorgan auto analyst
Himanshu Patel retained his
neutral rating on Ford, saying
fourth-quarter profits were


largely driven by Ford Credit
and could be unsustainable. He
also said tax penalties for Ford's
underfunded pensions are
affecting the shares' value.

Profit

Previously, Ford was only
willing to say it would be "solid-
ly profitable" in 2011.
It now predicts a profit -
excluding special items - for
2010 because of signs of eco-
nomic growth, lower costs and
its ability to get higher prices
for its vehicles, Chief Financial
Officer Lewis Booth said. The
2010 Ford Fusion midsize sedan
is selling for $2,000 more than


the 2009 model because Ford
is doing less discounting and
customers are upgrading
options.
Still, Booth said the recov-
ery is tenuous. Ford predicts
U.S. sales of 11.5 to 12.5 mil-
lion vehicles in 2010, down
from 17 million as recently as
2005. Consumer spending
remains weak in the U.S. and
Europe, credit is tight and Ford
expects payback from last
year's Cash for Clunkers
schemes in Europe.
Ford expects to match or
beat last year's U.S. market
share of 15.3 percent, which was
up 1.1 percentage points. It was
Ford's first U.S. market share
increase since 1995.
Mulally said Ford could ben-
efit from safety-related recalls
at Toyota. On Thursday, Ford
pledged to give $1,000 to cur-
rent Toyota, Lexus, Scion,
Honda or Acura drivers who
trade in vehicles or have leases
expiring by June 30. The trades
must be 1995 vehicles or newer.
"With a void right now and
people needing vehicles, there's
going to be even more interest
in Ford," he said.
The automaker finished the
year with $34.3 billion in debt,
up $7.4 billion from Sept. 30.
The company took on $7 bil-
lion in debt it owes a retiree
health care trust fund run by
the United Auto Workers
union. It puts Ford at a disad-
vantage to GM and Chrysler
Group, which were able to shed
debt in bankruptcy court.
Booth said the company has
"an uncompetitive balance
sheet" and will work on cutting
debt this year, but he wouldn't
say what steps it will take.


JEANNINE AVERSA,Associated Press Writers
JIM KUHNHENN,Associated Press Writers
WASHINGTON

Embattled Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke won
confirmation for a second term Thursday, but only by the clos-
est vote ever for the crucial post and after withering criticism
from lawmakers for bailing out Wall Street while other Amer-
icans suffered in recession.
The Senate confirmed Bernanke for a new four-year term by
a 70-30 vote, a seemingly solid majority but 14 votes worse than
the closest previous vote for a Fed chairman.
The Senate battle over Bernanke's confirmation has been a
test of central bank independence, a crucial element if the Fed
is to carry out unpopular but economically essential policies. Its
decisions on interest rates can have immense consequences,
from the success or failure of the largest companies to the typ-
ical home-buyer's ability to get an affordable loan to the price
of cereal at the grocery or gas at the corner station.
Created by Congress in 1913 after a series of bank panics, the
Federal Reserve is an independent agency, supposedly outside
politics, but its chairman is typically assailed by lawmakers
and others when the economy falls and jobless ranks lengthen.
"Bernanke fiddled while our markets burned," huffed
Richard Shelby, of Alabama, the top Republican on the Senate
Banking Committee, during Thursday's debate. "Ben
Bernanke's Federal Reserve played a key role in setting the
stage for the financial crisis."
Shelby and other opponents blame Bernanke for failing to
spot problems leading up to the crisis, for lax bank regulation
and for not cracking down on dubious home mortgage practices.
All those missteps contributed to the recession, they contend.
Supporters see it far differently, crediting him with prevent-
ing the Great Recession from turning into the second Great
Depression.
"The chairmanship of Ben Bernanke has in no small measure
made it possible for this nation to avoid a catastrophe," said
Senate Banking Committee Sen. Christopher Dodd, D-Conn.
Supporter Chuck Schumer, D-N-Y., worried that the bitter
fight over the nomination would send "the message that the
Federal Reserve and its monetary policy decisions are under the
thumb of Congress. Businesses will be faced with the prospect
that the Fed might not be able to do what's necessary for the
economy because of pressure from Congress."
The vote on his confirmation came at nearly the last possible
moment - Bernanke's current term expires Sunday.
The confirmation vote was preceded by a critical preliminary
ballot to block a filibuster by opponents. He needed 60 votes
rather than a simple majority and got 77, to 23 against. The clos-
est previous final confirmation vote for a Fed chairman was 84-
16 for Paul Volcker's second term in 1983 following another
severe recession. After Thursday's vote, Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner said, "The Senate did the right thing. Chair-
man Bernanke will continue to play a vitally important role in
guiding the nation's economy."


THE WEATHER REPORT(BAHAMAS) LIMITED
*T HER WEATHE R REPO INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


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