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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01494
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: January 28, 2010
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01494

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GIVEA

HANDTO
HAITI RELIEF
HIGH 78F
LOW 68F

SSUNNY AND
PLEASANT


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BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


Volume: 106 No.55


THURSDAY. JANUARY 28. 2010


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Boy, 3, and

father both

shot in face

A THREE-YEAR-OLD BOY and his father were
each shot in the face by a ruthless gunman who opened
fire from a passing car.
The father had his son by his side as he was driving a
silver coloured Nissan Pulsar in Pitt Road, off Nassau
Street, when shots were fired from a gold-coloured
Honda.
Police say the gunman was one of three people in the
Honda and he fired several shots at the Nissan just after
SEE page 15


Millions of dollars worth

of cocaine and marijuana

discovered on freighter


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
DRUG Enforcement Offi-
cers swooped on a 44ft Hait-
ian freighter packed with mil-
lions of dollars worth of
cocaine and marijuana off the
coast of Great Inagua yester-
day.
The Royal Bahamas Police
Force officers stormed the
ship at around 10am in a joint
operation with the United
States Coast Guard and the
American Drug Enforcement
Administration (DEA), and
brought the haul into Nassau
last night citing it as one of
the most significant in the
region.
Police arrested five Haitian
citizens in connection with the
haul and escorted the foreign
suspects to Nassau by airplane
yesterday.
Further investigations will


determine the exact quantity
of cocaine and marijuana
loaded inside the Haitian ship.
The drug seizure was one
of three in the country yes-
terday as Long Island police
found a large quantity of mar-
ijuana hidden in a bushy area
in southern Long Island yes-
terday morning.
And Drugs Enforcement
Unit (DEU) officers in Nas-
sau uncovered 16 lbs of mari-
juana in a Marshall Road
apartment when executing a
search warrant at around
8am. A 36-year-old man has
been arrested in connection
with the New Providence find
and investigations have been
launched into all incidents.
The largest of the three is
thought to be the load found
on board the Haitian ship
raided as some have stirred a
climate of fear over an influx
SEE page 13


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IA I


BISHOP LAISH BOYD, head of the Angli-
can Dioceses of the Bahamas and the
Turks and Caicos, delivers a sermon to
members of Parliament yesterday, with
PLP leader Perry Christie and Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham looking on. Bishop
Boyd urged legislators across the politi-
cal divide to put aside differences and
come together in unity to create a better
Bahamas. His remarks came at the annu-
al Parliamentary Church Service at St
George's Anglican Church. Members of
the House of Assembly and the Senate
attended yesterday's service at which
several members of the religious com-
munity spoke.


Haiti telethon
raises $250,000
By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
THE Bahamian public donated a total
of $250,000 to relief efforts in a two-day
national telethon to 'Help Us Help Haiti'.
A concert starring Bahamian music leg-
end Ronnie Butler, local popstar TaDa,
and popular rake and scrape groups drew a
crowd to Arawak Cay for the second night
of the telethon on Tuesday while calls were
taken by high profile Bahamians at the
British Colonial Hilton and raised around
SEE page 14


1-elipd ivajarr Irioune staff


By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
THE RETRIAL of former PLP-
senator Pleasant Bridgewater and an
ex-ambulance driver accused of
attempting to extort $25 million from
Hollywood actor John Travolta is
expected to begin on September 6 in
Nassau.
The date was set yesterday during a
fixture hearing before Senior Justice
SEE page 19


Threatened action by airport
security staff could temporarily
close US pre-clearance
By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net
SECURITY staff at the Airport Author-
ity are threatening to withdraw their ser-
vices over a dispute with management that
could result in the temporary closure of the
US pre-clearance department at the Lyn-
den Pindling International Airport.
Dissatisfied with the results achieved by
following standard protocols, they are
appealing to Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and Minister of Tourism and Aviation
SEE page 15


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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


Establishment of Exuma *


Cays Land and Sea Park


By LARRY SMITH


ONE of the pioneering under-
water photographers who
worked in the Bahamas before
the Second World War was Ilia
Tolstoy, a colourful grandson of
the great 19th century Russian
writer, Leo Tolstoy.
He had been a cavalry officer
before emigrating to the US in
1924. He later became associat-
ed with the New York Museum
of Natural History and the
Explorers Club, taking part in
several film ventures and expe-
ditions around the world.
After the Second World War,
Tolstoy was a frequent visitor to
the Bahamas and became
increasingly concerned about
environmental degradation. In
1953 he began leveraging his
international contacts to push
the idea of setting aside some
Bahamian islands as protected
areas.
At about the same time, a
Columbia University graduate
student named Carleton Ray
was working on a photo book
about marine life (with a fellow
student named Elgin Ciampi).
Like others before them, they


had decided that the Bahamas
was the place for underwater
photography.
In his book, The Underwater
Guide to Marine Life, Ray also
called for the protection of
marine areas in the same way
that land areas were protected.
These "undersea wilderness
areas" would serve as replenish-
ment zones for marine life to
repopulate surrounding areas,
while preserving the beauty of
coral gardens as valuable tourist
attractions and natural labora-
tories.
Meanwhile, Tolstoy had pre-
sented his idea to the Bahamian
government, which had agreed
to temporarily set aside a 22-
mile stretch of the Exuma Cays
providing that some group
would explore the possibility fur-
ther and make concrete recom-
mendations.
Tolstoy and Ray joined forces
and by January 1958 they had
organised their Exuma expedi-


tion. A collection of big-name
conservationists like Donald
Squires of the American Muse-
um of Natural History, along
with Bahamian experts like Oris
Russell and Herbert McKinney,
spent a week travelling by boat
from Norman's Cay to Conch
Cut.
They concluded that the area
had "essentially unspoiled nat-
ural conditions with unmodified
associations of plants, animals,
earth processes, and those intan-
gible elements that combine to
give an area its outstanding char-
acter.
"The Exuma Cays park under
consideration should be regard-
ed as only the beginning of a
conservation movement that is
vital to the Bahamas as a whole.
It will also be a beginning of a
new concept, integrated land-
and-sea conservation, in which
the Bahamas will take the lead
and show the way to other
nations throughout the world,"
their report said.
The survey team called for an
organisation modelled on the
British National Trust to acquire
lands and manage protected
areas throughout the Bahamas.
This organisation - which was
created by parliament in 1959 -
would be the government's advi-
sor on conservation matters and
seek to educate Bahamians on
the value of their natural her-
itage.
The government adopted the
team's recommendations whole-
sale and the 176-square-mile
Exuma Cays Land and Sea Park,
the first of its kind in the world,
was officially established. Par-
liament passed the Bahamas
National Trust Act in 1959, cre-
ating an independent statutory
organisation charged with con-
servation and preservation. The
BNTs governing council includ-
ed government, private sector
and scientific representatives.
The Exuma park incorporated
the following land areas: Little
Wax Cay, Shroud Cay, Little
Pigeon Cay (private), Hawksbill
Cay, Little Hawksbill Cay, Cis-
tern Cay (private), Long Cay,
Warderick Wells (park head-
quarters), Halls Pond Cay, Little
White Bay Cay, South Halls
Pond Cay (private) Soldier Cay


I - - -
- re 'I'C j~- ~
~- a~ ~
- - ~ .


THE PARK HEADQUARTERS at Warderick Wells (above left) and an iguana at the park.


(private), O'Brien's/Pasture
Cays, Bell Island (private), Little
Bell Island (private) and Rocky
Dundas.
In addition to overseeing the
Exuma Cays Land and Sea Park,
the newly created Bahamas
National Trust also took over
responsibility for thousands of
endangered flamingos on
Inagua. This effort had previ-
ously been handled by an ad hoc
group spearheaded by the US
National Audubon Society,
which paid the salaries of
Bahamian wardens Sam and Jim
Nixon.
In 1986 the BNT concluded
that commercial pressures on
Bahamian marine resources
were becoming unsustainable
and declared the Exuma park a
no-take zone, making it the first
marine fisheries reserve in the
wider Caribbean. Subsequent
research has shown that the park
is acting as a fisheries replenish-
ment area - as was originally pro-


jected by the 1958 survey team.
Scientists have found that the
concentration of conch inside
the park is many times higher
than outside the park, helping
to bolster conch populations
available for fishermen to har-
vest. Crawfish tagged in the park
have been found near Cat
Island, over 70 miles away. And
a large proportion of the grouper
in the northern Exuma region
originate in the park.
According to marine biologist
Dr Dan Brumbaugh of the
American Museum of Natural
History, the Exuma park is
doing exactly what it was created
to do: "There are more and big-
ger fish in the park than in other
areas, and there are good size
fish just outside the park bound-
aries too. It is distinctly differ-
ent from what you see around
New Providence, for example,
and the reefs are healthier with
more parrot fish present."
The documented success of


the Exuma park in terms of fish-
eries replenishment has led the
government to adopt a policy of
setting aside 20 per cent of the
Bahamian marine environment
as a network of protected areas.
The extraordinary benefits to
fisheries that are expected to
result from these no-take zones
are coupled with equally signifi-
cant benefits for tourism and
education.
* Written by Larry Smith,
Media Enterprises Ltd for the
Bahamas National Trust. For
more information call 393-1317
or visit www.bnt.bs.


- ROCL
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SOISCU S STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' W .TIBUE22.O


MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News............... P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,12
Local News..........P13,14,15,19,21,23,26,27
Editorial/Letters ..................................... P4
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OBITUARIES/RELIGION 32 PAGES

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+


THE TRIBUNE


IIELEUTHERA CONTROVERSY


piEducation chiefs seek legal


advice over child sex scandal
By ALISON LOWE W.E return of the Principal, who
Tribune Staff Reporter I joined the school in September
alowe@tribu ne media. net I I 2009. and was primarily responT-


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

NEW by-election regula-
tions imposed by the Utilities
Regulation and Communica-
tions Authority have been
panned by broadcasters and
politicians as an attempt to
censor the electronic media
with "archaic" rules.
Observers contend that the
guidelines, set out in URCA's
Interim Code of Practice for
Political Broadcasts (ICP),
appear to be a hasty after-
thought following the recent
resignation of former Eliza-
beth MP, Malcolm Adderley.
It is also argued that the
regulations are recycled from
the former Pindling adminis-
tration and do not apply to
the present broadcast arena,
populated with numerous pri-
vately owned television and
radio stations.
The rules limit political
commercials to six 30 second
spots a day for major political
parties; two ads for indepen-
dent candidates and none on
Sunday or election day. Cov-
erage of political rallies and
other purchased air time is
also limited under the rules,
which can be seen on
URCA's website.
One veteran broadcaster
sees the ICP as a step back-
wards for broadcasting free-
dom.
"I do have concerns but I
don't want any acrimonious
relationship with URCA over
this matter because I believe
(it) has not been thought out
properly and I think it clearly
is a regressive step."
The broadcaster added:
"You cannot open the air-
waves, and the government is
credited for opening the air-
waves, and now put a padlock
on it with these regulations.
It's regressive and in my opin-
ion it is nothing but censor-
ship."
Another broadcaster fears
the rules will affect her rev-
enue from lucrative political
ads and purchased air time.
"All radio stations are con-
cerned, this is a part of our
bread and butter," said Cypri-
anna McWeeney, co-chairman
of Bartlett-McWeeney Com-
munications which runs the
GEMS radio network.
Despite her reservations,
Ms McWeeney declined to
comment extensively on the
issue until today, presumably
after a reported meeting
between broadcasters and
URCA. scheduled for today.
The regulations have also
caused a stir in the political
arena. Opposition leader Per-
ry Christie has called for an
immediate repeal of the ICP,
claiming the rules "breach the
Communications Act and the
Constitution."
In a letter addressed to
URCA's executive director
Michael Symonette, Mr
Christie said it appears that
the body "does not have the
authority to issue an interim
code. Based on the same, the
ICP is ultra vires", or exceed-
ing its powers.
Mr Christie also hit out at
URCA for its resurrection of
outdated rules which he feels
outgrew their relevance with
the emergence of multiple
television and radio stations.
URCA was established
under the Communications
Act, 2009 which repealed the
Broadcasting Act and the
Broadcasting Rules of 1992
and 1993.
The new rules place heavy
restrictions on independents
and fledgling political parties,
like the National Develop-
ment Party, and NDP chair-
man Dr Andre Rollins sees
this as muzzling of free
speech.
"We are not living in Com-
munist China or North Korea.
We are in the Bahamas at the
doorstep of the United States
and any act which seeks to
oppress freedom of speech
must be soundly repudiated,"
he said.
However, a senior member
of the FNM said the rules are
needed so that parties with
heavy funding do not flood
the airwaves and television.
"You cannot have a free-
for-all in terms of advertising.
There has always been a
restraint on ads as a matter of
policy. At the end of the day
while people should be able to
express themselves in terms of
ads, there ought to be limited
space for it."
Messages left for Mr
Symonette at URCA were not
returned up to press time.


THE Ministry of Education
is seeking legal advice over the
Eleuthera child sex scandal, it
was confirmed last night.
As education chiefs contin-
ue their investigations into the
affair, a file has been forwarded
to the AG's office to see what
action should be taken.
"I've asked the Attorney
General to review a number of
issues arising out of this mat-
ter and to make such decisions
as he, in his discretion, thinks
are appropriate," said Minister
Desmond Bannister yesterday.
Mr Bannister made his com-
ments a day after it was
revealed that the Ministry of
Education is deeply concerned
about widespread child sex
abuse allegations and a sudden
rise in suicide attempts among
school-age children in
Eleuthera over the last six
months.
On Monday, the Minister
confirmed that to date there
have been nine such attempts
since September 2009 on the
island, with three in January
alone.
Meanwhile, compounding
the seriousness of the situation,
The Tribune understands that
numerous allegations of "intim-
idation" and "interference"
with, and of, children on the
island who may have spoken
out about abuse are also a
major focus of government offi-
cials.
As the ministry continues to
probe and respond to these
issues, parents at North
Eleuthera High School also
pushed on yesterday with their
protest against the Ministry's
decision to transfers the
school's Principal on Monday.
She was moved in order to
fill a gap left by another senior
administrator at the Preston


lip.


dW


*M.
DESMOND BANNISTER
Albury High School who was
asked to step in to take the
place of the District Superin-
tendent for Eleuthera's educa-
tion system after he was sent
on extended leave at the start
of the week.

Responsibilities
It was claimed that District
Superintendent, Rudolph
Smith, had not lived up to his
responsibilities as the chief edu-
cational administrator in the
district when allegations of
abuse of children surfaced.
Even as Mr Bannister said
yesterday morning that he had
been assured by his Ministry's
representatives on the island
that discussions with parents
had resulted in a commitment
that the more than 200 students
who attended the school would
have returned yesterday, a call
to the school revealed that still
only "about nine or ten" chil-
dren were in class that day as
the parents continued to seek
ways to express their opposi-
tion.
The Parent Teachers Asso-
ciation (PTA) of North
Eleuthera has headed angry
calls from local parents for the


. 7 . J 1
sible for preparing the children
for their BGCSE and BJC
exams. Only a handful of stu-
dents have attended school
each day since Monday, The
Tribune understands.
PTA executives have said
that they do not see how it is in
the best interest of the children
to move the Principal at this
time. They have responded
angrily to suggestions that their
community is suffering from
any of the social problems the
Ministry is concerned about in
Eleuthera.
Mr Bannister said yesterday
morning: "My officers were
down there yesterday and they
left with a clear understanding
that today children would be in
school. Keeping children out of
school is against the law, but
we fully expect children will be
in school today."
Mr Bannister told The Tri-
bune that he plans to visit
Eleuthera to speak with par-
ents next Wednesday. Howev-
er, he had earlier said he would
only do so if all children
returned to school.
On Tuesday Bahamas Union
of Teachers President Belinda
Wilson accused the ministry of
disrespectfully effecting the
massive shake-up of the
Eleuthera education system
without properly consulting or
even informing the union after
the fact of its plans or the basis
of the move.
Yesterday the Education
Minister said he would not be
drawn into an "antagonistic"
public debate with Ms Wilson
over the matter.
"You'll never hear me
responding to Ms Wilson. I
don't believe (it's the Ministry
of) Education's policy to get
involved in public discussions
between myself and the Presi-
dent of the union. It's impor-
tant for things to happen the
proper way," he said.
However, he did assert the
Ministry's right and responsi-
bility to reassign any of its
employees.


S




















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THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010, PAGE 3



nine in iyle wi/b

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by Kim Seybert
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Bayparl Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145
Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6527, Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
email:info@colesofnassau.com


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Police continue car dump fire probe

POLICE are still investigating the cause of Tuesday's fire at
the car dump in Marshall Road.
Fire Services reported they were alerted to the fire at
around 11.15am and found a number of derelict vehicles
ablaze.
The massive blaze led to huge clouds of smoke filling the
skies above the area, but no one was injured in the fire and
the flames did not spread to any nearby properties.
While the site is near the Anatol Rodgers High School, no
one on the campus was affected as the winds were blowing
the smoke south of the school at the time.


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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


EIOI AULETE S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


Deficit-cutting vows not matched by acts


WASHINGTON - President Barack
Obama and Congress want to have it both
ways.
Obama is signaling budget cutting will be
a major priority, yet he's putting most spend-
ing off-limits. Congress talks belt-tighten-
ing, too, but its votes tell a different story.
Obama is proposing a partial three-year
spending freeze. It's a relatively modest ges-
ture intended to show he's serious about
deficit reduction. It comes partly in response
to rising public fury over fiscal irresponsi-
bility in Washington, anger that was reflect-
ed in last week's costly Democratic loss in a
special Massachusetts Senate election.
Since then, nearly all politicians in Wash-
ington, especially those up for re-election
this year, are sounding like deficit hawks.
Even though they talk the talk at the
White House and in Congress, there is no
sign of strong action anytime soon to begin
seriously filling the government's $12 tril-
lion-plus fiscal hole.
Two wars, a deep recession that has
depressed tax revenues, and federal bailout
and stimulus spending have resulted in a
debt that is mushrooming well past $1 trillion
a year. The debt is equivalent to nearly
$40,000 a year for each man, woman and
child in America.
And while other major economies, from
Japan and Britain to Italy have even bigger
proportionate debts and manage to muddle
through, the deficits can't be ignored. At
some point, worries about inflation or pos-
sible default will push up interest rates.
Meeting interest payments on the national
debt will squeeze out other government
spending, sap business confidence and leave
trillions of dollars in unpaid bills to future
generations of Americans.
On Capitol Hill, despite emotional calls
for spending restraint from both parties, the
Senate on Tuesday rejected a White House-
backed plan for a bipartisan commission
that would send Congress a package of rec-
ommendations on combined spending cuts
and possible tax increases. The deficit-cutting
recommendations were to have been voted
on after this fall's mid-term elections.
Lining up in opposition was an unusual
coalition of liberals and conservatives - the
liberals arguing that the group's recommen-
dations could lead to cuts in Social Security
and Medicare benefits, and the Republicans
complaining that they would mean higher
taxes.
"You can get locked into these positions
that guarantee gridlock and a rising deficit,"
said Robert Bixby, executive director of The
Concord Coalition, a bipartisan fiscal watch-
dog group. "Everybody's looking for some
magic solution that isn't there."
After the vote, the Senate returned to
considering a proposal that would increase
the government's borrowing authority by


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an additional $1.9 trillion. "We have to pay
the bills for what we've already spent,"
White House spokesman Robert Gibbs said
in seeking to explain how the president could
be for both reducing the deficit and increas-
ing the debt limit.
Members of both parties agree the pre-
sent course is unsustainable.
The late Herbert Stein, who was chairman
of the Council of Economic Advisers under
Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford,
liked to say that "unsustainable trends tend
to come to an end." Nobody can say when
and how the present unsustainable spending
spree will end.
As if to drive home the bleak math, the
nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office
on Tuesday said this year's budget deficit
would be $1.35 trillion, down only slightly
from last year's record $1.4 trillion short-
fall. The accumulation of annual budget
deficits adds up to $12.1 trillion, the nation's
national debt. The CBO later said in a sep-
arate report that last year's $787 billion eco-
nomic stimulus bill actually is costing $75
billion more.
The CBO numbers underscored what
many deficit-minded economists and law-
makers have been saying for some time:
Without action by the White House and
Congress to alter its course, the river of red
ink will continue to flow even after the econ-
omy recovers and stimulus spending to prop
it up ends.
"For the first time in our nation's history,
we risk undermining U.S. economic and mil-
itary strength, and becoming a second-rate
power," said former Sen. Pete Domenici, a
Republican who once chaired the Senate
Budget Committee.
Domenici dismisses efforts by the White
House to blame much of today's govern-
ment debt on the previous administration
as well as Republican attempts to blame
Obama and his congressional Democrats.
"We don't know how much of the debt is
Republican or how much is Democratic, and
it doesn't matter," Domenici said.
Part of the problem of finding a bipartisan
solution is that there's a scarcity of senators
like Domenici, able to reach effectively
across party lines, said Ross Baker, a politi-
cal science professor at Rutgers University.
"People are just frozen in their positions
and just reacting to the loudest noises that
they're getting from the base of both par-
ties. "
He said a fuller economic recovery, and
the return of job creation, will help some.
"In the long run, things are going to get
better," Baker said. "But as Franklin Roo-
sevelt once noted, we don't eat in the long
run."
(This article was written by Tom Raum,
AP economics and political writer).


EDITOR, The Tribune.

On January 12, 2010 there
was a massive 7.0 earthquake
that devastated the lives and
country of Haiti. Due to this
the Bahamas was under a
tsunami watch that left me
and my family wondering
what do we do?
My seven-year-old daugh-
ter said to me: "Mom, what
will happen to us and what is
an earthquake?" I then
responded to her by telling
her an earthquake is when the
earth moves under you and
things begin to shake and
sometimes cause damage (to
simplify it remember this is a
seven year old).
In response to her ques-
tion I reassured her that we
will be okay and that we
needed to pray! She then
proceeded to say: "You mean
the earthquake is like when
we feel the blasting that
makes me so afraid?" I said to
her: "Yes, you are entirely
correct, darling."
There's an old saying only
he that feels it knows it; I say
this because no matter what
the reports tell you about how
minimal the blasting is at
Bahama Rock, unless you
experience the vibrations you
will never know what the res-
idents of Eight Mile Rock,
especially Harbour West, are
faced with on a daily basis (a
nightmare!). It is amazing to
see how a seven year old can
think to give an analogy of


the earthquake and sum it up
to the shaking and vibrations
that we feel on a daily basis
from (BR). Wow, how sad!
This is simple, the blasting
at Bahama Rock needs to
cease. It has been one year
and two months now since the
members of the Grand
Bahama Committee for Con-
cerned Residents heard or got
any response from the
Bahamas Government on the
latest development in regards
to the expansion and devel-
opment at (BR). This in itself
is disheartening, ludicrous,
deplorable and shameful. As I
write this letter I am bitter
and very angry. It is sad to
see a public statement was
made by the Minister of Envi-
ronment assuring Grand
Bahamians that he would
meet with them to discuss the
ongoing battle that the
Bahamians face in regards to
the effects of the project at
(BR). To date nothing has
been done, no meetings, no
letters, no e-mails, no phone
calls. That in itself is embar-
rassing due to the fact that a
promise was made and the
Bahamian people have been
let down.
There obviously is no clear
representation from the local
government or the represen-


tative for the area. I say this
with disgust because both
entities are aware of the ongo-
ing saga. I see work going on
across the (WJL) highway but
yet nothing is being said to
establish what sort of permis-
sion or approval was given to
(MM/BR).
However, there is an easy
solution to this problem.
Rather than have the
Bahamian people left to won-
der, come to the forefront and
establish the real deal as to
what the plans are for (BR)
and its intent with regards to
approval to cross the (WJL)
highway. There needs to be
some form of accountability
for the actions displayed by
the government towards its
people.
Please, we need to work
together in order to build this
nation. Wow, if a seven year
old can see the light of day as
to the traumatic effects of the
blasting what other evidence
is needed?
Please give the Bahamian
people their respect and live
up to your responsibility of
dealing with the concerns that
affect all of us!
Carolyn Maria
Nortelus-McIntosh
A concerned citizen,
mother, entrepreneur
and taxpayer.
Eight Mile Rock,
Grand Bahama,
January 22, 2010


Allegations are irrelevant to our school


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I am writing concerning the
problems at the North
Eleuthera High School that by
now you should be aware of.
The problem with these allega-
tions is that they are all irrele-
vant to our school. These prob-
lems occurred at various dif-
ferent schools on the island, not
at our school.
Apparently, they did not do
a detailed research on these sit-
uations or they would have
found out that the alleged pros-
titution ring and the attempt-
ed suicides both happened at a
different school which isn't
located in North Eleuthera.
The allegations of eight boys
being molested occurred in the


settlement of Hatchet Bay, not
even in a school and the case is
now in the hands of the courts.
Our Principal and Senior
Mistress have done nothing
wrong except providing disci-
pline to children that were
headed in the wrong direction
and needed to be disciplined
accordingly. Therefore we as a
PTA see no reason for removal
of such fine ladies who are
doing great things in our school.
I am a concerned parent that
is very frustrated at the way
that Government officials are


"Lose Yourself In Styl


handling this situation, they are
refusing to meet with us to clar-
ify all statements made by
themselves until the middle of
next week; if they are as con-
cerned as they say they are
don't you think this should be
top priority?
AUDRA NEELY
Proud Parent of a Student of
North Eleuthera High
Eleuthera,
Bahamas,
January 26, 2010.


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+


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010, PAGE 5


LOCALN


'Too early to say' if Toyota



concerns will affect Bahamas


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE exclusive distributor
for Toyota cars in the
Bahamas says it is "too early
to say" conclusively to what
extent Bahamian car owners
may be affected by safety
fears that prompted the recall
of millions of popular Toy-
ota cars in North America
earlier this week.
Frederick Albury, presi-
dent of Executive Motors on
Shirley Street, is awaiting fur-
ther information from Toy-
ota's Miami office before he
can advise whether the vast
majority of cars his dealer-
ship sells - which are import-
ed from Japan - are subject
to the same concerns which
led to the US recall, but
added that it seems unlikely
based on what he has been
told at this stage.
Mr Albury said however
that there are a "minority"
of vehicles the company has
sold in recent years that "will
probably be affected" by the
recall, based on the fact that
they are US-made.
His comments come in the
wake of international media
reports that car maker Toy-
ota announced it was recall-
ing 2.3 million cars - from a
total of eight different mod-
els from particular years -
after finding that some were


A CUSTOMER walks past a new 2010 Toyota Camry at a dealership on
Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2010 in Nashville, Tenn. Toyota Motor Corp.
announced late Tuesday it would halt sales of some of its top-selling mod-
els to fix gas pedals that could stick and cause unintended acceleration.


affected by a fault which
causes the accelerator pedal
to "stick". The fault "does
not come overnight", said the
company, but has been found
to manifest itself after some
wear and tear.
Following the January 21,
2010 recall, the company
ordered that all US dealer-
ships stop selling all the mod-
els in question.
The models which have
been recalled are: the 2009-
10 RAV4; 2009-10 Corolla;
2009-10 Matrix; 2005-10
Avalon; 2007-10 Camry; 2010


Road closures for


military funeral
POLICE are advising the public that certain roads will be
closed tomorrow morning for the military funeral of Royal
Bahamas Police Force Inspector Shannon Colebrooke.
The funeral will be held at the Kemp Road Union Baptist
Church on Kemp Road at 11am, and the portion of Kemp
Road between Wulff Road and Parkgate Road will be closed
from 10am.
Traffic will be diverted through side streets during the road
closure and there will be parking restrictions in streets from
Kemp Road to John F Kennedy Drive from 11am onwards for
the funeral procession.
Parking will not be allowed until after the procession has
passed in the following roads:
* Kemp Road, between Wulff Road and Parkgate Road;
* Wulff Road, between Kemp Road and Baillou Hill Road;
* Poinciana Avenue, between Baillou Hill Road and Thomp-
son Boulevard;
* Thompson Boulevard, between Poinciana Avenue and
Bethel Avenue;
* John F Kennedy Drive, between Bethel Avenue and Glad-
stone Road;
* Theodore Lane, between John F Kennedy Drive and
Tonique Darling-Williams Highway;
* Tonique Darling-Williams Highway between John F
Kennedy Drive and Theodore Lane.


Highlander; 2007-10 Tundra
and the 2008-10 Sequoia.
Mr Albury said: "So far
(Executive Motors) has not
been informed of any effect
on models we sell that are
imported directly from
Japan. I've been onto the
Toyota office in Miami this
morning. They told us that
with the models we import
the parts affected are sup-
plied by a different supplier
to those parts being used in
the US.
"So what they're saying is
it seems like we're not affect-
ed yet but they're doing more
tests."
He added that his compa-
ny has imported a relatively
small number of US-made
Toyotas in recent years, and
these "will probably be
affected" by the recall.
Mr Albury estimated that
his dealership may have
imported and sold around
"30 to 40" US-made vehicles
in the "last few years" -
mainly certain Avalon and
Camry models. Exactly how
many may have been import-
ed privately is unclear.
"We've had calls from peo-
ple who imported directly
themselves. They're advised
to contact those who they
bought the car from to
acquire the necessary parts


once they're available and we
would do the installation,"
said Mr Albury. "We're just
waiting on what the remedy
will be. We presume it will
involve changing some accel-
erator parts. We can't say
conclusively until we hear
from Toyota's head office."
He said he hopes to hear
something definitive from the
car company within the week
so he can speak more defini-
tively on the Japanese-made
models.
One local Toyota driver
told The Tribune yesterday
that she was "horrified" upon
hearing about the potential
fault with her 2009 Toyota
Corolla.
Having been very happy
with her previous car, a Toy-
ota Tercell, the woman, who
wished to remain anony-
mous, said she was already
disappointed that her new car
did not appear to be of the
same quality as her previous
car and this latest announce-
ment has left her feeling very
anxious.
She criticised Executive
Motors for failing to issue a
public statement on the
recall, suggesting that even
if they were not able to say
for sure whether the cars
they had sold were affected,
this should have been made
known to drivers and an
update given when it became
available.


By D'ARCY RAHMING
GO AND tell your young men these
things. A policeman's job consist of 99 per "*
cent mundane stuff like walking, driving,
watching and writing reports. The other one - -
per cent is terror. That is, chasing after some
bad guy, breaking up fights, or making a
forceful arrest.
It is during this one per cent terror period * . .
that you, innocent or guilty, are most at risk
of violence. The officer's fear induced heart rate goes from
resting to a high level necessary for he or her to survive while try-
ing to do his/her job.
The officer does not have the luxury of walking away from
potentially violent situations as you and I do. Young people have
to be made to understand that the officer's job is to bring a prob-
lem under control and if you are perceived as the problem,
that means YOU! Therefore, always follow the rule of "Com-
ply Now and Complain Later."
Always remember, we outnumber the Bad Guys.
D'Arcy Rahming is a violent crime researcher and Adjunct
Faculty Member at the College of the Bahamas. He holds
Black Belts in several martial arts and is an internationally
renowned seminar leader for corporations, private groups and
police and security groups. You can follow him on his blog at
www.stoplivinginfear.org.





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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


'Machine malfunction'


puts hold on financial


assistance coupons


By REUBEN SHEARER
HUNGRY and down-
trodden Bahamians were
distraught to find out yes-
terday that for the second
day in a row, they would not
have access to financial
assistance coupons.
Social Service officers
posted a sign early Tuesday
morning which read: "Come
back on Wednesday for reg-
ular coupons. Sorry for the
inconvenience."' The sign
remained in place all day
Wednesday.
The Tribune learned from
Eugena Cartwright, head of
the Treasury Department,
that the Social Services


"I have two children, and
my fiancee has a child. She's
hungry, and I don't know
where to go from here."

A welfare beneficiary


Department has been
unable to issue welfare
coupons because of a
machine malfunction. She
assured the public that a
shortage of money was not
the issue.
"This machine malfunc-
tion caused a big glitch, and


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we were unable to sign the
statements for welfare recip-
ients," she explained.
Social workers remained
tight-lipped about the situa-
tion, wishing not to com-
ment other than to reassure
the public that coupons will
be issued today.
One senior official added:
"Persons who were in more
of a dire need got assistance
today, and the rest will
receive their coupons by
Thursday."
After being turned away
on Tuesday and again yes-
terday, one welfare benefi-
ciary said he heard rumours
that the government was
struggling to find the funds
to continue to help people
such as himself.
He said: "It's not fair
because we are the poorest
people, and we rely on that
food assistance."
"I have two children, and
my fiancee has a child. She's
hungry, and I don't know
where to go from here,"
another said.
The Social Services
Department is charged with
the huge task of aiding a
large group of ill and indi-
gent persons who receive
welfare on a monthly basis.
Those who are unemployed
get assistance every three
months.


*--i* rI* L.
0,0 " 0


FOCOL HOLDINGS CO. LTD
CU'N(OLIDA'EC BALANCE bHEET IALOITE-f.)
I? .X:C)


Ocl:tber 31 2006
$ '2Y.2.'.


Asset
I kj.i e-e:.
10oli snorel'-ilders' ecriJit


July 31 20
$ 3.'.U61


"A.551 51.07


$ 129 2.5


T "I7,


CONSOtLDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME (AUINTED)
!B fA.IH.-1


Sfii,* K&c!rni.
uC~rirOr F.a1eE


M i k -lir'g. dc irrriir'ilr rrve crini I clit-i ,M l
Dep'ec alion
rinorce czct
OlhC e iri c:r:n , i ' ci xp.- 'lv,
Noc Ir-ornme
Preft rernce: ot.i r. 'ivikkr'<
Net income aIlable tc cor-r-pn
',t r.1'(ch Id r.r. .

Bu5ir; c,

[ivk:.r'<:',. F: ,l ,tx're


0 C.l1(1her31 ~ X01 O.Inhr ! ;l7
S Ii~..~5I $ ~C679


14;


IC.9ia5

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I 561
I 3831
I 71
31-141


S 17.31 I .41

$ 0.1' $ 0. 11


, n.cA $ n.oni


C.oe.. 01. I r...ll ri'e .jiti-oudjir.ed r rin' ir.icjl Sritfr'te rr h 'l CL '--i .te r: ined-l rfor- . leh n Arji. l ley.e
(saddere ,!.c>ol.ccrl. at the .reep-ort Ccrr'crnv iccated cn 'ueen3 n qhway Freeport
GinI cl IB ]'ILlriL MiriiiJla y d l liii:<..X i FTiLinyI hrcilii fl 8 ."9.'" AM I .' .5:C0 PM


IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I


CHAIRMAN'S REPORT

For The Quartpr Ended Octoher 3.1, 2081


- 0Depi-e 0 slow. economy' FOCOL has
continued 'c produce strong Finnc cal
results. Nei income for the quarter
ended October 31. 2C03 was 54.123
million. compared to $3.841 million in
20D37. This represents c 7.3% increase.

We are continuing to rrake sieady
improvements in our operation that
cre reselling n cost savings onc greater
effic encV We expe-c- that the
irnpouvernerls we Ore rTiokirg will helu
us to maintain our profitability over the
expected diilicjlt times ahead. The
decrease in net-oleum prices has had a
positive effect on our business by
decreoasirg the anL..rrt of moneV we
hove invested in Averonries.

Our Board at Direclors. rr-nagernent
ard sta" rerreain committee. to the
developrrenr 1 ol Oui puns to rnuke
FOCOL more e"icient and oro'ilable.











Sir AIhril .J. MdllI r. Kr '.M
C,'hal ';i n ;Ilill I ,i ,.lilhivir


F L 0 R S H E I M


C ro:.' p.aril






7Th


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010, PAGE 7


Mitchell warns govt: don't make


up policy by seat of your pants


PLP spokesman on for-
eign affairs Fred Mitchell
has warned the government
"not to make up policy by
the seat of its pants" after
two ministers offered
apparently conflicting state-
ments on how the govern-
ment intended to deal with
a group of Haitian immi-
grants apprehended on
Monday.
Meanwhile, Mr Mitchell
accused Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham of having
been "proven wrong once
again" in the face of reports
from Immigration officials
that most of the 51 immi-
grants picked up after their
sloop ran aground near
Adelaide said they had set

GB police

officers

promoted
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - Three senior
police officers were promoted
on Grand Bahama to the ranks
of Superintendent and Assistant
Superintendent.
ASP Welbourne Bootle was
promoted to the rank of Super-
intendent. Mr Bootle currently
heads the Police Traffic Division.
Inspector Wendell Clarke, an
attorney at law, and Inspector
Wendell Smith were promoted
to the rank of Assistant Superin-
tendent.
Clarke will continue to head
the Police Prosecutions Depart-
ment in Freeport. Smith will
serve as the officer in charge of
the Mobile Patrol Division on
February 8.
These are the second round
of promotions in the Royal
Bahamas Police Force in
Freeport this year.
Asst Supt Loretta Mackey said
the promotions became effective


off from the Haitian capi-
tal, Port au Prince.
"The only man who did
not expect this incursion
must have been the Right
Honourable Prime Minis-
ter. He predicted that since
Haitians normally come to
the country from the north
that the country would not
likely suffer these incur-
sions because the earth-
quake occurred in the south
of that country. He has
been proven wrong once
again," said Mr Mitchell,
MP for Fox Hill and former
foreign affairs minister.
Port-au-Prince and near-
by areas was left devastated
and hundreds of thousands
were killed and injured


on Monday, January 25.
The first round of promotions
was announced early in the New
Year. ASP Edmund Rahming,
officer in charged of the Central
Detective Unit, and ASP Noel
Curry, who now heads Abaco
District, were promoted as super-
intendents.
Chief Inspector Hector Del-
va, officer in charge of the
Police Training College, and
Inspector Floyd Bastion, offi-
cer in charge of Fire Division,
were promoted to assistant
superintendents.


after a 7.1 magnitude earth-
quake struck on January 12.
The deadly disaster led to
some concerns of an
"influx" of Haitian migrants
to the Bahamas, but Mr
Ingraham stated shortly
afterwards that he did not
foresee this happening.
On Tuesday 49 of the
Haitians were charged with
illegal landing before the
courts, and sentenced to six
months detention.
Earlier that morning,
Immigration Minister Brent
Symonette and Minister of
State for Immigration
Branville McCartney had
made divergent statements
on what was likely to hap-
pen to the immigrants, with


Mr Symonette stating that
they would be reviewed on
a case-by-case basis but
likely released, and Mr
McCartney suggesting they
would probably be charged
before the courts.
"The government cannot
seem to get the facts
straight about what the sit-
uation is and what it pro-
poses to do in the face of
this incursion. It appears
that in talking with the
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, the Minister of
State for Immigration
Branville McCartney and
the Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette who is
also the Minister of Foreign
Affairs, there are three dif-


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on this issue.
"This is a matter of grave
concern for our people and
the government must not
make up policy by the seat
of its pants.
"The government must
address this with dispatch
and with a seriousness com-
mensurate with the gravity
of the problem which faces
us," said Mr Mitchell.


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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


Bahamians focus on food sustainability


DID YOU KNOW?


The Bahamas Automated Clearing House (BACH) will launch in early
2010, replacing the manual exchange of cheques between banks with
confidential electronic settlement solutions via a central clearing house.

When making B$ Cheque deposits: BACH will reduce the cheque
clearing time from five days (or more in the Family Islands) to the
second business day after making your deposit. This gives you quicker
access to your funds, no matter which bank or branch the cheque is
drawn on.There will be no additional charge to the consumer for the
reduced cheque clearing time.

When paying by Cheque: You must ensure that funds are immediately
available to cover cheques you write in order to avoid your cheques
being returned and penalties being assessed on the account. Speedier
clearance eliminates cheque float, (the time from the cheque being
deposited at a bank until It is paid by your bank).



?BACH
BAHAMAS AUTOMATED
CLEARING HOUSE
Participating banks include:
Btdnk of The BjdharTds Limiled - Citibdnk N.A.
Commonwealth Bank Ltd. * Fidelity Bank IBaharnma) Ltd.
FirstCaribbean International Bank IBahamas) Ltd.
RBC Huy.l Banik urCliada i 5csuliabdnk IBaha rrias) Ltd.


By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net
AGRICULTURALIST
Godfrey Eneas and cultural
activist Khalil Khalfani
have joined forces to lead
a partnership between the
Bahamas and the Republic
of Senegal.
They are collaborating to
establish a non-profit
organisation, the Bahamas
Sub-Sahara Foundation, to
implement strategies for
food sustainability in West
Africa.
"There are others like me
in the Diaspora who believe
we owe something to
Africa. There is a moral
responsibility here, so we
feel that since we have this
expertise we should find a
way to assist our brothers
and sisters in Africa by
helping them to become
more food secure," said Mr
Eneas, the former director
of Agriculture and
Bahamas Ambassador to
the Food and Agriculture
Organisation of the United
Nations.
"Sub-Sahara Africa is the
poorest region in the world
and food security is a major
issue. Khalfani is in the
process of moving back to
Senegal and we thought
that one of the ways that
we could be of benefit and
assist him is to try and
address the issue of food
security," he said.
Mr Khalfani is the
founder and proprietor of
Ashanti Oils and the
Ashanti Bazaar and Beauty


use his marketing and busi-
ness expertise to coordinate
experts and efforts on the
ground.
Senegal is a former
French colony that became
independent in 1960. It sits
on the western most tip of
Africa. With approximately
10 million people, Senegal
suffers from widespread
poverty.
The initial plan for the
non-profit organisation is
to supply farmers with sim-
ple agricultural inputs, like
seeds, fertilizer, machetes
and other small farmer
implements badly needed
in the region to achieve
food sustainability.
"Sub-Saharan Africa is a
food deficit region, in
essence the region does not
grow or produce enough
food to feed itself. It
depends on external
sources to meet its food
supply. There are a number
of reasons for that and
many of the reasons are
very much akin to the situ-
ation in the Bahamas, Haiti
and the rest of the
Caribbean. The Caribbean
itself is a food deficit
region," said Mr Eneas,
who is also the author of
the book "Agriculture In
the Bahamas (1492-1992)".
Mr Eneas said globalisa-
tion and poor government
policies have had negative
impacts on agricultural sec-
tors in the Caribbean West
Africa. Pointing to the fact
that the Bahamas imports
90 per cent of its food, Mr
SEE page nine


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Centre at Ross Corner. The
stores carry Senegal-based
products. Plans are under-
way for Mr Khalfani to
relocate to Senegal next
year with his Senegalese
wife. He has been trading
and travelling between the
two countries for about 20
years and plans for this to
be his retirement stop.

Expertise
"The idea is not to give
them (the Senegalese)
things like food items, but
to educate them in a way
using expertise so that they
can sustain their own food
production using our net-
work internationally. Once
we can get this model in
operation we will be in a
position to duplicate that
example elsewhere in other
parts of Senegal and West
Africa," said Mr Khalfani,
who has no particular agri-
cultural skills, but plans to


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010, PAGE 9


strategies in Africa


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SEE page eight
Eneas said only Cuba, out
of the rest of the Caribbean,
is relatively self-sufficient.
"Africa, like the
Caribbean is in this position
because of bad policies at
the national level. The news
media is just as responsible
for the state of food inse-
curity in the world. They
always tell you it is cheaper
to import. That is garbage.
Bad policies have put the
sector in decline," said Mr
Eneas.
He also pointed to the
fact that in 2000 the
Bahamas produced $17.8
million in chicken meat
while importing $11.7 mil-
lion worth of the product.
"Just eight years later, the
situation was reverse. We
are importing more chicken
because the policy environ-
ment does not encourage
investment in the sector,"
he said. According to Mr
Eneas' research, agricultur-
al production accounted for
five per cent of the
Bahamas' gross domestic
product (GDP) in 2000,
while in 2009 it accounted
for less than one per cent.
He said the Bahamas is an
example of a trend preva-
lent throughout the
Caribbean and Sub-Saha-
ran Africa.
In light of the fact that
Senegal is an economically
impoverished country, with
food shortages and massive
budget deficits to contend
with, Mr Khalfani said it
was "absolute madness"
that President Abdoulaye
Wade of Senegal offered
Haitians parcels of land and
voluntary repatriation to
the West African nation fol-
lowing the earthquake on
January 12.
"President Wade is over
80 years old. People basi-
cally think he was having a
senior moment. Politically,
if an election was held he
would probably lose
because there are a whole
lot of issues concerning his
leadership. He is not a dic-
tator per se, he is an inter-
nationally respected leader,
but people are feeling it is
time for him to go because
Senegal is slipping econom-


ically backwards," he said.
Mr Khalfani also had con-
cerns about Senegal deal-
ing with an influx of Chris-
tian Haitians as it is a 90
per cent Muslim country.
"He should be congratu-
lated for the offer, but it
should not be taken seri-
ously. If President Wade
would offer repatriation, I
am supposed to be com-
pleting my house next year
so I can migrate after retir-
ing. If he wants to take care
of someone and give some-
one some land, he can give
me," he said.
In light of the 7.0 magni-
tude earthquake that dev-


stated Haiti, Mr Eneas
said the Foundation would
likely shift some of its
efforts to food sustainabili-
ty in Haiti. He said the food
supply needs of Haiti are
the same as West Africa.
"When you look at the
situation with the earth-
quake, it has exacerbated a
situation which the world
knew existed in Haiti
before.
"It was nothing new to
the world that Haiti could
not feed itself and Haiti's
agriculture was in decline.
This earthquake has only
exacerbated the problem,"
said Mr Eneas.


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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


*OCAL NEWS I


AVON Products Inc.

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leading to overbilling'


FREEPORT - Random
testing of electricity metres
has not revealed any mal-
functions that could result
in overbilling, the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
reported.
In response to concerns
raised by Freeport residents
who are customers of the
Grand Bahama Power
Company Limited (GBPC),
GBPA commissioned
ITRON Inc to carry out
testing on electricity metres
which were randomly select-
ed throughout Freeport and
outlying settlements.
"No metres were found to
be functioning in a way that
would suggest 'overbilling',"
said Arthur Jones, vice-
president of building and
development services for
GBPA.
ITRON Inc randomly
tested 115 residential and
commercial customers.
Three meters failed the
ANSI limits (the limits of
the American National


Standard Institute deter-
mine the acceptable effi-
ciency within which metres
should operate. ANSI C12.1
- 2008, 5.1.2).
"These three meters failed
'slow' - meaning they would
have been recording less
energy consumed than what
was actually used," Mr
Jones explained.
"It was also observed that
each of these three metres
had their seals broken, sug-
gesting illegal tampering."
A team of observers who
witnessed the testing proce-
dure and compiled the
report, was comprised of an
electronics engineer, two
electrical engineers, a
Freeport businessman, and
representatives from GBPA,
the Freeport City Council,
and the Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce.
According to Mr Jones,
after the observers con-
firmed no malfunctioning
electrical metres, their atten-
tion shifted elsewhere.
The group recommended
that a regulatory committee
be put in place to monitor
the billing process by
GBPC.
"The exercise in this
metre testing led the team
of observers to suggest that
a neutral party should be


retained to verify that the
recorded consumption of
electrical energy matches
the billing as determined by
GBPC," Mr Jones said.
In a statement released to
GBPA following the results
of the random meter test-
ing, the power company
advised that they have
already engaged in a one-
year process to:
"Stabilise the metering
system currently in place
with industrial, commercial
and residential customers,
ensuring that metres are
accurate, sealed, correctly
wired and safe.
Ensure that GBPC's sys-
tems are correctly billing
customers for the amount of
power that they use.
Ensure that appropriate
'metering-to-billing' proce-
dures are in place to keep
the process accurate going
forward."
GBPA awaits the results
of this project, which accord-
ing to the power company, is
due to be completed by late
April 2010.
"In the interim, GBPA
supports the recommenda-
tion for the formation of a
standing group of observers
to monitor GBPC's proce-
dures between metering and
billing," Mr Jones said.


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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


[ ^ New court complex expected to be ready mid-year


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - The new
magistrate's court complex
and a second coroner's court
are expected to come on
stream by mid-year in New
Providence, according to
Attorney General and Minis-
ter of Legal Affairs John
Delaney.
He said the magistrate's
complex at South and Nassau


Streets is a modern state-of-
the-art facility that will con-
solidate all the magistrate's
courts, with the exception of
the coroner's court.
"I am very pleased to say
that the facility will be finished
by mid-year," Mr Delaney said
while in Grand Bahama last
week.
"We will be also commenc-
ing construction of a second
coroner's court at Victoria
Gardens within the first quar-
ter of this year."


Mr Delaney said that plans
are also well underway to
completely renovate the
Supreme Court buildings on
Parliament Street and Bank
Lane.
That project, he said, will
take all of this year and the
next.
Mr Delaney said that
"greater efficiency" in the
management of criminal and
civil cases is a priority for the
Office of the Attorney Gen-
eral.


He noted that the issue of
bail is one that has been hotly
debated in the community,
and that the Attorney Gener-
al's Office will be looking at
reviewing the Bail Act.
"I heard the Chief Justice
(Sir Michael Barnett) say that
a person has a right to a fair
trial within a reasonable peri-
od of time, and if that cannot
be delivered then the question
of bail comes up.
"And so I would say the
issue is far more complex than


simply saying should we look
at the Bail Act and try to
extend the period of time that
might be unreasonable before
granting bail.
"The Bail Act will be
looked at, but I can tell you
that the priority of the Office
of the Attorney General is to
seek greater efficiency in man-
agement of our cases, both on
the criminal and civil side,"
said Mr Delaney.
When asked for a comment
regarding police officers serv-
ing as prosecutors, Mr
Delaney said that historically
the magistrate's courts were
called police courts.
"Bearing in mind that our
system evolved from the Eng-
lish, historically going back a
couple of centuries the mag-
istrate's court summary juris-
diction were called police
courts because police did the
prosecution of those courts.
"And so the fact that today
the Bahamas and many coun-
tries still have police involved
in summary jurisdiction is not
remarkable. It is the way it has
been for a very long time," he
said.
Chief Justice Michael Bar-
nett said that more attorneys
are needed to be prosecutors
in the magistrate's court so
that police officers can do
police work.
Mr Delaney noted that
there are a good number of
police officers who are quali-
fied lawyers.
He said that in their efforts
to achieve a more efficient
criminal justice system they
should make sure that those
prosecuting are better trained.
"If police prosecutors are
not as sufficiently skilled then
we should make sure they are
skilled and utilise those offi-
cers," he said.
"We have an energetic
Commissioner of Police and I
am optimistic that he will
make sure the best arrange-
ment is made in respect to
criminal prosecution in the
magistrate's court.
"I don't want to suggest that
I have interest only from a dis-
tance. I am very much inter-
ested to ensure that prosecu-
tion happens efficiently there
because what happens there
may end up coming to the
Supreme Court level," said Mr
Delaney.


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010, PAGE 13


LOCALNW


FROM page one

of Haitian migrants and sub-
sequent rise in crime as those
whose lives have been devas-
tated by the magnitude-7.0
earthquake attempt to flee
the country.
A 35-45 ft wooden sloop
landed near Adelaide on
Monday and 56 Haitians were
apprehended by Immigration
officers. A total of 49 were
charged in Magistrate's with
illegal landing and sentenced
to six months in prison.
There have also been
unconfirmed sightings of five
Haitian sloops off the coast
of Inagua, just 70 miles from
Haiti, and two in waters south
of New Providence.
Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell
called on the government to
explain the reported incursion
of illegal Haitian migrants
yesterday claiming reports
suggest the number of immi-
grants arriving in New Provi-
dence is larger than authori-
ties have confirmed.
Such fears have been exac-
erbated by reports of chaos
and looting in the streets of
Port-au-Prince and of 4,000
Haitian prisoners unaccount-
ed for since the jail collapsed
in the earthquake.
Tribune reader Stanley
Jackson Sr, and others, have
blamed the Haitian commu-
nity for the country's eco-
nomic and social challenges,
as he stated: "Haiti could
flood the Bahamas with hun-
dreds of thousands of
Haitians overnight; then
what? Who will protect us
from these violent people?
The Free National Move-
ment?"
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham was criticised by
some in the local community
when he granted temporary
status to the 102 illegal Hait-
ian detainees being held in
Nassau and had them
released from the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre after
the earthquake. However oth-
er Haitian illegals are being
dealt with according to the
usual Immigration laws and
policy.
He cried shame on his crit-
ics for not showing compas-
sion to their neighbour in a
time of such desperate need.
Haitian Bahamian Society


Drug bust
president Jetta Baptiste said
fears of rising crime are
unfounded and yesterday's
drug haul is unlikely to be
connected to the earthquake.
She said: "There's always
crime and violence - before
the earthquake and after the
earthquake.
"I don't honestly believe
there will be more crime now
because people in the Hait-
ian community are concerned
about the well-being of their
families, about reaching their
loved ones. People are crying
in mourning, crime is the last
thing on their mind.
"This drug find is an isolat-
ed incident and I don't see
the earthquake as being any-
thing to do with it at all."
Ms Baptiste called on the
US government to attack the
drug trade at its source in the
countries where cocaine and
marijuana are produced, and
to also hold consumers
responsible.
She added: "Those who


PRIME MINISTER Hubert
Ingraham cried shame on his
critics for not showing com-
passion to their neighbour.
were criminals before the
earthquake are still criminals,
and I know the US has the
resources to deal with these
drug problems,
"But you can't blame the
whole Haitian community for
an isolated incident, just as
you can't blame every
Bahamian for all the drug
dealing going on in Nassau."


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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


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Telethon
FROM page one
$170,000.
The simultaneous events
were broadcast live on ZNS,
the Jones Communication Net-
work (JCN) and Cable 12, and
aired live on the radio, as they
had been on Monday night, in
one of the country's first suc-
cessful media collaborations for
a charitable cause.
'Help Us Help Haiti' was
organised by the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce (BCC)
after a magnitude-7.0 earth-
quake devastated the Haitian
capital of Port-au-Prince and
surrounding areas on January
12, claiming up to 200,000 lives
according to some estimations,
and leaving many more home-
less and in critical need of med-
ical care.
All funds raised throughout
the two-day telethon will go
directly to Rotary for the pur-
chase of medication and med-
ical equipment at wholesale
prices to be distributed in Haiti.
Rotary was one of the first
organizations to purchase and
deliver goods in the country in
the aftermath of the earthquake
and has orchestrated dozens of
deliveries in cooperation with
the Bahamas Conference of
Methodist Churches, and with
the support of Bahamian busi-
nesses and individuals.
And charitable Bahamians
continued to show their sup-
port for Rotary's relief efforts
as they called to pledge dona-
tions ranging from $1 to
$100,000, as donated by FML
CEO Craig Flowers on Tues-
day night.
Progressive Liberal Party
(PLP) leader Perry Christie was
one of the many well-known


BAHAMIAN ARTISTS and performers took to the stage at Arawak Cay
to help raise money for Haiti during the live telethon.


national figures answering
phone calls at the British Colo-
nial Hilton on Bay Street on
Tuesday night, along with Bish-
op Neil Ellis, College of the
Bahamas (COB) president
Janyne Hodder and Haitian
ambassador to the Bahamas
Louis Harold Joseph.
BCC executive director
Philip Simon praised the suc-
cess of the event on all levels.
He said: "Beyond fundrais-
ing we did something very spe-
cial, as here we have Bahami-
ans not only raising funds, but
raising a level of consciousness
to the humanity of Haitians and
the inhumanity of suffering.
"Other groups or individu-
als may have raised or donated
more money, but when you
bring the media into it in the
way that we were able to, it
raises a level of consciousness
to keep Haiti right in our sight."
The event's success also sets
a template for future national
efforts, and has had a positive
impact on the local Haitian
community, Mr Simon said.


He added: "I think they were
very proud to see the way
Bahamians responded and have
been responding to them,
because a lot of times we run
into vilification. And I think we
went a long way to show the
care, because you can never
underestimate the human
heart."
Haitian Bahamian Society
president Jetta Baptiste was
overwhelmed by the show of
support as she watched the
telethon from Grand Bahama.
"I felt so blessed," she said.
"I was truly touched, because
we are seeing a cross-section of
the community trying to help
and respond. We want to con-
tinue to support the cause and
preach peace, love, unity and
respect."
If you did not make a dona-
tion during the telethon and
you want to contribute, contact
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce on Collins Avenue, Nas-
sau, or deposit funds into the
Bank of the Bahamas account
number 5510032762.


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010, PAGE 15


* SALNEWS


FROM page one
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace to
intervene in the dispute, and
investigate the Authority.
"There is a big problem about
to brew and break open. We
were trying to get it done quiet-
ly, but they are victimising us.
Management is avoiding our
questions, victimising us by
pulling us into the office one by
one and pulling out files on us.
We are about to close down the
airport. We want help," said a
screening officer at the airport.
The complaints against man-
agement reported to The Tri-
bune are extensive, ranging from
allegations of obscene language,
sexual harassment, abuse of
authority, poor vetting of
employees, lack of adequate
training for employees, lack of
sensitivity towards health haz-
ards, nepotism, untimely salary
payments, withholding overtime
payments and other salary-relat-
ed issues. This, along with alle-
gations of other unverifiable
"internal scandals", have some
staff members on the brink of
revolt.
When the pre-clearance divi-
sion was launched in 2007, secu-
rity staff said they worked up to
18-hour shifts for two consecu-
tive weeks. They said payment
for this is still outstanding. They
said security employed on the
Christmas Day, Boxing Day and
New Year's Day holidays were
not paid for those days.
In one instance, a worker
claimed she felt insulted when
she inquired about not being
paid in a timely fashion, and was
told by a manager, "you better
be glad you have a job."
Acting General Manager, Jer-
ry Hutchinson, said the salary
related matters were currently
being worked on. He said he
would investigate the new issues
brought to his attention. The
Bahamas Public Service Union,
which represents workers at the
Authority, said he met with the
general manager on Tuesday to
address the salary issues.
Mr Hutchinson said some
managers were disciplined with
respect to procedural breaches,
but no sexual harassment alle-
gations were being investigated.
The Human Resources (HR)
department recently had a


Airport security

shakeup with the transfer of HR
Manager Charles Albury late in
2009. Workers say the HR
department is poorly represent-
ing their concerns.
"I find those comments very
troubling, because I personally
keep an open door policy. That
is known throughout the airport
authority. I have been at the air-
port now almost 10 years. I left
the security department as the
deputy director. I left with the
reputation of being totally
approachable. If they feel they
are going to be victimised, I
encourage them to come and
see me," Mr Hutchinson said.
Minister Vanderpool-Wallace
said he received no communi-
cation on the matter from work-
ers, although one worker
claimed an e-mail was sent.
When informed by The Tribune
of worker complaints, he said:
"We have complaints in organi-
sations all the time, so I am not
surprised there may be com-
plaints, but all of this is news to
me." He said he would investi-
gate the matter.
The security division is man-
aged by Director Osbourne Fer-
guson. Workers are calling for
his resignation, as well as the
resignation of Assistant Human
Resources Manager Roselda
Stubbs.
"There is no way that (vic-
timisation) could ever happen
down at the airport. We want
workers to speak, they work for
us so we have to look out for
them. As for those (complaints),
I guess they have their personal
agenda and at the end of the
day the truth prevails over lies,"
said Mr Ferguson.
"I don't know why they want
to remain faceless. If you have
the issues come and show your
face. All I can do is try to do
my job to the best of my ability,"
he said.
Mr Ferguson said workers are
not being truthful about condi-
tions at the Airport Authority.
He said he was concerned about
his character being called into
question, and would consult
with his lawyers to ensure fair
treatment.
"For every action there is a


FROM page one

9.30pm on Tuesday.
Police were called, and the toddler and his
father were rushed to hospital by an Emer-
gency Medical Services (EMS) ambulance.
The boy is said to be in "', i i ' condition
and his father is "'i.,Nk '.


reaction so that is all I can say at
this time. Above all discipline
must be maintained. As to
being oppressive, I don't know
anything about that," he said.
Ms Stubbs said she was
unable to comment on any of
the matters brought to her
attention by The Tribune. She
said the general manager would
have to address the issues.
"Since all of this now staff
are lax. They are not being that
vigilant with the people they
have to profile and on the
machines. Morale is low and
there is a high level of absen-
teeism. I really don't think there
is any other way for this to be
resolved except with the resig-
nation of these people," said a
security worker.
Speaking on the matter of
allies in management, one secu-
rity worker said she was aware
of Mr Hutchinson's open door
policy, but at this point, "we
don't trust anyone." Workers
lack confidence in management
respecting confidentiality and
fear being victimised.
Union president, John Pin-
der, said he is aware of the
problems at the Airport
Authority, as many issues are
long-standing. He said he for-
merly lodged complaints with
the chairman about the man-
agerial style of the director. He
spoke with the general manag-
er, who said he was doing his
best.
"They are going to the
extreme to try to intimidate
them," Mr Pinder claimed,
alleging that "every little minor
infraction" is being used to build
cases to the extent that claims
are being falsified when there
is no evidence.
"I certainly have my chal-
lenges in that regard," Mr Pin-
der added. He said he had two
disputes before the industrial
tribunal.
"They do not take directives
and listen to the General Man-
ager. I think it has to do with
the familiarity of the chairman.
They are circumventing the sys-
tem. The chairman is too much
involved with matters that
should be worked out between
management," he said.
"The problem is the Airport
Authority is operating like a
police force. They hire a lot of


Boy and father shot

Officers investigating the incident are
appealing for witnesses to call either 911/919,
the Criminal Detective Unit on 502-9997 or
Crimestoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477).


retired police officers and peo-
ple from the force, mostly in
management. All they know is
policing. I don't like what is


going on at all."
Despite the challenges, Mr
Pinder said he believes the
issues can be resolved without


industrial action, although he is
prepared to advise workers on
the proper protocol should they
demand such action.


7 -7'r -
OF THE BAHAMAS
FORGET WHAT YOU R STONE USE TO LOOK LIKE?


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AT THE 38TH ANNUAL
RED CRC)SS BALL




Lady Darling, former president of the Bahamas Red
Cross Society, will receive a lifetime award for her
long and dedicated service to the national disaster and relief
agency on January 30, 2010 at the Society's annual ball at the
Nassau Wyndham Resort and Crystal Palace Casino.
Lady Darling's work with the Red Cross began when she
lived in the United States, and continued when she returned
to the Bahamas while living in Long Island. "I was a volunteer
at a member group of the national society, and at the time,
Long Island had a Fair to raise funds to assist national efforts
for Red Cross in the Bahamas. One of the ways I contributed
at the time was through needle work; I made handcrafted dolls
to sell at these Fairs," Lady Darling said.
After moving to New Providence, Lady Darling was just as
enthralled with the work of the Bahamas Red Cross Society,
serving in the capacity of volunteer, and later Deputy Presi-
dent, from 1982 -1986; as Joint Patron, from 1992 -1995 with
her husband, former governor general, Sir Clifford Darling;
and as president, from 1995 - 2001.
Marina Glinton, former director general of the Society,
and a past honoree of the Red Cross Society for her work,
remembers Lady Darling's contribution to the Society. "Lady
Darling was a dedicated, goal oriented leader, and an exem-
plary volunteer. She gave unselfishly of herself so that vul-
nerable people throughout the Bahamas received the aid
they needed. During her tenure as president, Lady Darling
was particularly interested in the construction of a building to
house disaster preparedness supplies and donations to the
Society. She was actively involved in fundraising activities
that led to the completion of the Henri Dunant Center. I
applaud the Red Cross Society for honouring her, it is long
overdue."
As the Society's president, Lady Darling made the bold dec-


- -1 I







laration of not wanting to end a fiscal year in deficit during her
tenure. By all accounts, she tried hard to achieve this goal.
Beverly Wallace-Whitfield, former colleague of Lady Darling
at the Bahamas Red Cross recalls her tireless work ethic,
"Lady Darling had a way about how she approached work;
she was very keen on getting things done and was excellent at
identifying people and the talents they could contribute to our
work. She was also great at giving you room and the avenue
to work, these characteristics, coupled with her warmth and
outgoing nature contributed to the increase in the amount of
volunteers we recruited during her presidency. I am delight-
ed that she is being recognized for the quality of service she
gave to the Bahamas Red Cross Society. Lady Darling is
only short in height, but great in stature," she said.
Lady Darling remembers her decision to become presi-
dent of the Bahamas Red Cross Society after attending a
regional conference in Barbados in 1995, "I saw the Bahamas
in a global context, with the same problems facing societies
everywhere, mainly surviving in today's global challenging
world... that equals to competing with other worthy organi-
zations and causes for limited resources," she said at the
time. Upon learning that she was being recognized for her
work with the Society, Lady Darling spoke of her joy in
being honoured, "I was part of the group that determined that
the Society should recognize those who have greatly assisted
in its work, so to get this award is an added plus, and a fitting
culmination to my work with the Bahamas Red Cross. It is
such a wonderful gesture. Sometimes one wonders whether
ones contribution is unnoticed or overlooked."
Join the Bahamas Red Cross Society for an unforgettable
night of celebration and entertainment at its 38th Annual
Ball. Cocktails start at 7:00 pm, dinner will be served at
8:00pm. The world famous Chi-Lites will provide special
entertainment. Dress is Black Tie.


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2 11 1 ii


Abbott set to host softball clinic I


By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net
TALENTED American
Olympic softball player Mon-
ica Abbott is expected to
head a delegation from the
United States and Canada to
host a clinic to aid local play-
ers.
The clinic takes place Feb-
ruary 19th at the Blue Hills
Sporting Complex from
12pm-2pm and will address
theoretical and practical
issues.
The Bahamas Softball Fed-
eration will host the clinic and
all primary and high school
female students interested in
the game between the ages of
9-18 are urged to attend.
Schools are encouraged to
field their entire teams or a
few representatives to
become a part of this educa-
tional experience.
Reece Oslinker, clinic
organiser, has confirmed that


She is expected to head
delegation from US, Canada


55 softball enthusiasts and
their families will take part in
the event.
Abbott was the ace pitcher
for the University of Ten-
nessee Lady Volunteers soft-
ball team from during her
four year tenure in Knoxville.
She is currently under con-
tract with National Following
a successful collegiate career
she signed on with Pro Fast-
pitch's Washington Glory,
however, sat out the 2008 sea-
son to represent team USA
in the Beijing Olympics.
Abbott set several NCAA
marks while at Tennessee.
She set the record for the
most strikeouts in a Division I
softball in a single season and
became the NCAA Division I
Softball all-time leader in
career wins, strikeouts,


shutouts, innings pitched,
games started and games
pitched.
Among her many acco-
lades, Abbott received the
2007 Honda Sports Award for
the Top Collegiate Softball
Player in the country and was
named the 2007 USA Softball
Collegiate Player of the Year.
She was also named the
2007 Women's Sports Foun-
dation Sportswoman of the
Year.
Abbott announced her
signing with Toyota Motor
Corporation on a six-month
contract to play professional
softball in Japan in February
of 2009.
Federation president, Bur-
ket Dorsett, said the event
was a "continuous effort of
the Bahamas Softball Feder-
ation to afford the opportu-


nity to softball players, man-
agers, coaches, game officials
and administrators to take
advantage of the opportuni-
ty to expand their knowledge
and skill of the game. It is
expected that of that clinics
of this nature is to be extend-
ed to the Family Islands as
well."
"It is a privelige to have a
player of this calibre come to
the Bahamas and share her
experiences and talents with
an up and coming generation
of Bahamian softball players,"
he said. "We hope she can
give the young players here
an example of just how far
the game of softball can take
you throughout the world if
you give it the type of dedica-
tion it warrants whether at the
high school, collegiate,
olympic or professional lev-
el."
Interested schools or
groups may contact the BSF
Secretary general, Dianne
Miller at 356-8217 or Dorsett
at 565-5095.


I hIi








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SWIFT Swimming started
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ing the way with five qualifi-
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100m, 50 Freestyle, and 200m
Breaststroke.
Simone Sturrup had two
qualifications in the 50m and
100m Free, Anibal Hernandez
Valdes had two - 100m and
200m Free, and Doran Reed
had one - 100m Free.
There were many top swims,
especially in the younger age


groups as Peter Morley and
Kacey Kemp lead the way with
numerous first place finishes
and personal bests.
Other Swift swimmers lead-
ing the way with first place
finishes were Abigail Lowe,
Donovan Higgs, Alexa
Strommer, Shaunte Moss,
Luke-Kennedy Thompson,
and Percy Knowles.
Swift Swimming is very
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TRIBUNE SPORTS


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010, PAGE 17


Swiss star Federer


shows timing


is everything


TENNIS
MELBOURNE, Australia
Associated Press
THE only three men to beat
Roger Federer in the last 19
majors were already out of the
Australian Open, leaving the
Swiss star with a new threat
to face.
Nikolay Davydenko's 13-
match winning streak was the
hottest on the tour and includ-
ed two wins over Federer dur-
ing title runs at the season-
ending ATP championships in
November and the season-
opening event at Doha this
month.
The Russian unloaded
everything he had on Federer
for a set and a half on
Wednesday and was suddenly
in uncharted territory at a
Grand Slam tournament.
That's when a bit of games-
manship and a lot of big-match
experience helped Federer
switch gears and win 13
straight games en route to a
2-6, 6-3, 6-0, 7-5 victory that
sent Davydenko packing to
join Federer's former Grand
Slam conquerors: No. 2-
ranked Rafael Nadal, No. 3-
ranked Novak Djokovic, and
No. 4-ranked Juan Martin del
Potro.
"Winning that many games
in a row against a player that's
been on fire like this, it's a
great sign," Federer said.
The win stretched his record
to a 23rd consecutive Grand
Slam semifinal appearance,
something he rated as "defi-
nitely one of the most incred-
ible things I have in my
resume."
Before Federer, Ivan Lendl
and Rod Laver shared the
record at 10.
"It's incredible looking back
on how many years that is
now, you know, I'm able to


Mark Baker/AP Photo
ROGER Federer of Switzerland waves to the crowd after beating
Nikolay Davydenko of Russia to win their Men's singles quar-
terfinal match at the Australian Open tennis championship in
Melbourne, Australia, Wednesday Jan. 27, 2010.


deliver at Grand Slam play,
especially this year," he said.
"Looking at the draw with
(former No. 1-ranked Lleyton)
Hewitt in the fourth round and
Davydenko in the quarters,
who has been on fire the last
weeks and even today, you
know, we saw big signs of it.
"So for some reason I was
just a bit worried I was not
going to make it this time in


the semis. Now obviously that
it's safe again and I've been
able to add one. It's amazing."
Besides his incredible run
of Grand Slam semifinals that
began at Wimbledon in 2004,
Federer boasts three Aus-
tralian Open wins among his
record 15 major titles and 50
wins or more at three of the
four biggest tournaments in
tennis.


TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF BEC

GENERAL INSURANCES


The Bahamas Electricity
Corporation invites tenders from
any Bidder who is authorized to
do business in The Bahamas;
who satisfies all eligibility and
qualification requirements of the
CORPORATION and is registered
with and licensed by the Registrar
of Insurance to issue insurances for
the services described below.

Bidders are required to collect packages from
the Corporation's Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Phone No. 302-1158
Bids are to be hand delivered on or before
5th March, 2010 by 4:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour


Submissions should
be marked as follows:
Tender No.: 715/10
All Risks General
Insurance
A. Commercial Property
Insurance (Buildings,
Plant, Content)
B. Computers,
IT Infrastructure,
(Mobile & Electronic
Equipment)
Tender No.: 716/10
Motor Insurance
Commercial & Private
Motor Vehicle
Tender No.: 717/10
Accident Insurance
Money & Fidelity

Tender No.: 718/10
Liability Insurance
Personal & Public
Tender No.: 719/10
Indemnity (Directors &
Officers Liability)
Tender No.: 720/10
Marine Cargo


For all enquiries regarding the Tenders, contact Mrs. Cecile Greene at
telephone 302-1159 or email: cbgreene@bahamaselectricity.com.
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals.


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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Donovan scores first



Premier League goal


IS � - a.A ,- S S R A m a
EVERTON'S Landon Donovan, second right, celebrates with team mates after scoring a goal
against Sunderland during their English Premier League soccer match at Goodison Park, Liverpool,
England, Wednesday Jan. 27, 2010.


SOCCER
LIVERPOOL, England
Associated Press
U.S. midfielder Landon
Donovan scored his first Pre-
mier League goal, helping
Everton defeat Sunderland
2-0 on Wednesday night.
Donovan, on a 10-week
loan from Major League


Soccer's Los Angeles
Galaxy, scored in the 19th
minute at Goodison Park
with a left-footed shot off a
headed pass from Tim Cahill.
Cahill put Everton ahead
with a sixth-minute header
as the Toffees (7-7-8)
climbed to ninth in the
standings.
Donovan has signed a new


Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport)* Queens Hwy, 352-6122 * Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916


contract with the Galaxy
through 2013 and is sched-
uled to rejoin the team for
its March 27 league opener,
but a MLS work stoppage
could start next week and
prompt Donovan to try to
extend the loan.
"The games he started
were Arsenal and Manches-
ter City, two of the better
teams in the country, and I
thought he played really well
in those games," Everton
manager David Moyes said.
"He has not had many
chances in those games but
tonight he got his first one
and he was a bit unlucky not
to get a second with it
cleared off the line. If he can
add us a goal or two, that
will be great."
Also Wednesday, defend-
ing champion Manchester
United overcame archrival
Manchester City to reach the
League Cup final, but was
overtaken by Chelsea for the
Premier League lead.
Wayne Rooney scored his
21st goal of the season in
stoppage time at Old Traf-
ford to prevent the Man-
chester derby going into
overtime. Paul Scholes and
Michael Carrick also scored
as Manchester United won
3-1 and advanced on 4-3
aggregate to the Feb. 28 final
against Aston Villa. Carlos
Tevez got City's goal.
In London, Florent Mal-
ouda got the first goal and
Frank Lampard scored twice
as Chelsea (16-3-3) cruised
3-0 over eighth-place Birm-
ingham (9-7-6) to move one
point ahead of Manchester
United (16-5-2).
Arsenal (15-4-4) is two
points behind Chelsea after
a 0-0 tie at seventh-place Vil-
la (10-5-7-).


IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I


SPORTS I


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+


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010, PAGE 21


HPH staff members receive long service awards
T0HE HR Department of the Hutchi-
son Port Holdings (HPH) Group
of companies in the Bahamas recog-
nised 81 employees for their many years of
service at a special luncheon at the Freeport
Harbour Convention Centre on 16 Janu-
ary. In total, 57 employees of Freeport Con-
tainer Port (FCP), six staff members of
Freeport Harbour Company (FHC), and 18
employees of Grand Bahama Airport Com-
pany (GBA) were given awards for service
periods of 10, 15, 20, 25, and over 30 years.
At the event, FCP CEO Gary Gilbert
said that it was an honour for him to recog-
nise these team members for their contri-
butions.
",.,o Ipower, like experience, cannot be
a taught," he said. "You are quality employees
who live by our core values of commitment,
loyalty, honesty, integrity, discipline and
respect."
FHC Port Director Orlando Forbes also
praised the employees. "Your long and hard
hours of labour have been invaluable. You
- have set examples for many more employees
to share in your dedication and commit-
ment and to follow in your footsteps," he
S said.
- Airport Director Philip Carey said in turn,
"Over the years, you have been committed
to our goals here at Grand Bahama Air-
i -port Company. Your loyalty and excellent
- service will not be forgotten"
. The employees received special motiva-
- tion from Donald McCartney, Deputy Per-
* manent Secretary in the Bahamas' Depart-
.. -* ment of Public Service, who shared with the
-attendees several tips for success.
McCartney also pointed out that it is
. . "absolutely astounding" that 1,272 years of
L. A-". -service had been accumulated by the
S" 11-M.,"- " .employees. He advised them to find a way to
- ..". ..-. . � . 4 - record and codify their experiences in order
" . .... ..to better contribute to the success of future
employees.



COB president shares green thumb secrets with students


LET THE TOMATO
GROWING BEGIN! -
President of the College of
the Bahamas Janyne Hod-
der enthusiastically shared
with students of the Oakes
Field Primary School her
secrets to growing flavourful
tomatoes recently while giv-
ing the school over two
dozen tomato plants from
her own garden. Blessed
with a green thumb, Presi-
dent Hodder has grown over
30 different tomato speci-
mens including the luscious
Arkansas Traveller, Beau-
ty, Thessaloniki and Valen-
ciano.
School principal Beryl


Gray was grateful for the
donation and said, "This was
such a nice gesture from
President Hodder. We are
trying to get our students
interested in learning about
gardening. The College's
donation helps with the
learning process."
The donation was espe-
cially welcome since the
Ministry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources has
launched an initiative to
encourage more citizens and
schools to grow their own
fruits and vegetables to
encourage healthy eating
habits and increase efforts
towards self-sufficiency for


the Bahamas. From left:
Mia Rodgers, Vice Presi-
dent of the Discovery Sci-
ence Club at Oakes Field
Primary; Mrs. Beryl Gray,
Principal; Janyne M. Hod-
der, College of the Bahamas
president; Sophia Hughes,
Discovery Club Advisor;
Crystal McCoy, College of
the Bahamas Presidential
Scholar; Marlon Johnson,
Discovery Club member;
Sharonne King, Head Girl
and President of the Dis-
covery Club; Aquindo John-
son, Treasurer, Discovery
Club; and Joan Knowles-
Turnquest, Discovery Club
Advisor.


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010


54CTO Bo uinestibueei~e


* BISX-listed utility
proposes end to product
tying, allowing customers to
order Internet services only
* Move would require major
two-year network upgrade,
and 'may put at risk Cable
Bahamas' network and
business integrity'
* Also consents to continued
price regulation of basic
cable TV offering
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Cable Bahamas has pro-
posed to industry regulators
the decouplingg" of its basic
cable TV package from its
broadband Internet offer-
ing, in a bid to satisfy interim
obligations to be imposed
on Bahamian communica-
tions operators with "Sig-
nificant Market Po\\ ci
(SMP).
Judith Smith, the BISX-
listed company's in-house
attorney, made the proposal
to the Utilities Regulation
& Competition Authority
(URCA) in a January 22,
2010, letter, in which she
offered that Cable Bahamas
would not tie its cable TV
offering to a customer order
seeking its broadband Inter-
net offering only.
The offer was made as
part of a package of propos-
als Cable Bahamas sent to
URCA, in which it submit-
ted potential obligations it
had to comply with as reme-
dies to its perceived SMP in
the cable TV and high speed
data (broadband Internet)
and connectivity markets.
While "substantial com-
petition" already existed in
the broadband Internet mar-
ket as a result of the
Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company (BTC) and
other niche players, Ms
SEE page 11B


'Dead in water'




fears over port

* $60m Arawak Cay project needs to get going this year, as
opposition PLP warn of '100% opposition' to any IPO seeking
Bahamian investor funds
* 'Buyer beware' warning reiterated, as Senator indicates
re-election of opposition would see Arawak Cay abandoned in
favour of southwest port
* Arawak Cay Port Development Company seeking target dates
and financial agreements from government, so financial model


can be completed
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The proposed $60 million
Arawak Cay container ship-
ping port could be "dead in
the water" if its shareholders
and the Government are
unable to conclude a deal and
get construction moving this
year, Tribune Business was
told yesterday, with the two


sides still negotiating their
Memorandum of Under-
standing (MoU) and other
critical details.
Informed sources close to
the negotiations told this
newspaper that the 19 share-
holders in the privately-
owned Arawak Cay Port
Development Company were
SEE page 8B


Economic growth threat from

'severe national handicap'
* Economist says 'high illiteracy' rates among public
high school graduates a Bahamian 'embarrassment'
* Highlights gap between Nassau public and private
schools, with 42% of C R Walker students getting 'F
in 2006 compared to 3% of SAC students
* Almost 50% of Maths graduates 'functionally
illiterate', with increased global competition and
technology progress making life 'even more
daunting' for Bahamas
* 'Country's academic failure preventing it from
achieving fully its welfare objectives for its own citizens


Top food


store up


for sale


* Gourmet Market owner confirms
deal in the works and likely to
close shortly, but not done yet
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Gourmet Market, the high-end specialist food
store located in the Caves Village complex out
west, is close to being sold to a new buyer, Tribune
Business can reveal, with the purchase likely to
close imminently.
Peter Andrews, the Bahamas Waste chairman,
who is also owner of the 3,000 square foot food
store, confirmed to this newspaper that a deal was
in the works, although he declined to go into detail
or identify the purchaser.
Denying reports reaching Tribune Business that
Gourmet Market had been sold, Mr Andrews told
this newspaper: "The deal is not done yet, and no
deal is done until it is done."
He did not elaborate further, but suggested the
SEE page 5B


BTC revenue share

5-25 per cent for

globally leased lines


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC) has
dismissed arguments that
national and international
communications lines should
be regulated, arguing that it
has "less than 25 per cent mar-
ket share by revenue" on the
latter, and just 20-40 per cent
SEE page 10B


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The "high failure and illit-
eracy ij\,s among Bahami-
an public education system
graduates have been brand-
ed "an embarrassment and
severe national handicap"
to sustained economic
growth, a leading Bahamas-
based economist warning
that this weakness will be
exacerbated by increasing
global competition and
changing technology.
Ralph Massey, who did
SEE page 12B


* State-owned incumbent
paying $500k per annum
for cell tower leases on
Crown/government land
* Submits proposal to cut
regulatory audit costs by
25%, with market share
for domestic circuits
down to 10-30%


Fishermen
discouraged

by 50% drop

in pricing
By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
A 50 per cent decline in
the price of crawfish, cou-
pled with rising fuel costs,
has discouraged Bahamian
fishermen, though catches
this year have been better
than in previous years, the
Minster of Agriculture and
Fisheries told Tribune Busi-
SEE page 4B


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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


Keeping publications from being off-colour


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BY DEIDRE M. BASTIAN

Few issues in Desk-
top Publishing
cause as much con-
fusion as colour
management. Publishers need
to understand the difference
between RGB colour and
CMYK colour to ensure that
the document they have created
looks as good in print as it does
on the screen.
RGB refers to the primary
colors of light, red, green and
blue, which are used in moni-
tors, television screens, digital
cameras and scanners, while
CMYK refers to the primary
colours of pigment: cyan,
magenta, yellow and black.
These are the inks used on the
press in "four-colour process
printing", commonly referred
to as "full colour printing".
RGB is what your monitor
uses to send colour to your eye.
In a sense, the two colour
spaces are opposites and com-
bine red, green and blue to cre-
ate a whole range of different
colours. It is sometimes
referred to as an additive colour
process. The combination of
RGB light creates white, while
the combination of CMYK inks
creates black. Therefore, it is
physically impossible for the
printing press to exactly repro-
duce colours as we see them on
our monitors.
Many programs have the
capability to convert the lay-
out/images from the RGB
colour space to the CMYK
colour space. I recommend that
you convert your colours from
RGB to CMYK if your tools
allow you to. By doing it your-
self, you have maximum con-
trol over the results. Be espe-
cially careful to keep back-
grounds light if there is black
or dark coloured text over it,
so that the text remains read-
able.
CMYK is the colour space
used in the world of ink and
paper, and it is sometimes
called a subtractive colour
process. Cyan, magenta and
yellow inks are combined to
create thousands of other
colours. Black ink is added into
the process because, while in
theory it can be created by
combining cyan, magenta and
yellow, in reality the end result
of this combination doesn't give
the effect of pure black.
So what does all this mean
in a practical sense to desktop
publishers and graphic design-
ers? For starters, RGB offers
a much wider range of colours
than CMYK does, and many
RGB colours cannot be dupli-
cated using the CMYK process.
As long as your document is
staying on a computer screen
(as a web page, for example),
these differences are purely the-
oretical. However, the moment
your desktop published docu-
ment makes the the leap from


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DEID EBASI AN


monitor to printing press, the
differences between the two
colour spaces become crucial.
A green that looked Christ-
mas-like on screen can turn into
a dull, khaki colour when your
document is printed. That
charming piece of clip art, fea-
turing Santa's elves in bright
green outfits, suddenly looks
like a picture of elves in Army
uniforms when converted from
RGB to CMYK.
Thus, if you are using a par-
ticular colour, convert it to
CMYK to make sure it will
print the way you want it to.
Note that some software
(including Photoshop Elements
and Microsoft Word) does not
allow users to work in CMYK.
In the old days of desktop
publishing, the prevailing wis-
dom was that all documents
should be converted to CMYK
before sending them to a print-
er or service bureau. This
allows the desktop publisher a
measure of control over colour
appearance, and is a good way
to prevent problems, such as
separations not printing prop-
erly. Nowadays, however, there
are a few printing companies
who actually prefer to receive
files in RGB color mode, even
though they do the conversion
to CMYK themselves. The key
is to consult with your printer
bureau ahead of time to see
what format they prefer for
your document.
So what is the difference
between RGB and CMYK? In
a nutshell, Cyan-Magenta-Yel-
low-Black. CMYK is a colour
model in which all colours are
described as a mixture of four
process colors
http://www.webopedia.com/T
ERM/C/process_colors.htm>
used in offset printing
http://www.webopedia.com/T
ERM/C/offset printing.htm>
for full-colour documents
http://www.webopedia.com/T
ERM/C/document.htm>
Because such printing uses inks


of these four basic colours, it is
often called four-colour print-
ing.
In contrast, display devices
ERM/C/device.htm>
generally use a different
colour model called RGB,
which stands for Red-Green-
Blue. One aspect of desktop
publishing pedia.com/TERM/C/desk-
top_publishing.htm> in colour
is colour matching
ERM/C/color_matching.htm>
For converting,
ERM/C/convert.htm> from
RGB to CMYK, so that the
document looks the same as
what appears on the monitor
TERM/C/monitor.htm>
Remember:
* Scanners, digital cameras
and computer monitors use red,
green and blue (RGB) light to
display color.

* Presses print use Cyan,
Magenta, Yellow and Black
(CMYK) ink instead of RGB
light, and therefore produce a
different range of colours. To
print on a four-colour press, all
RGB files must be converted
into CMYK.
* Many inkjet printers and
desktop colour lasers automat-
ically convert files from RGB.
It should also be noted that
individual monitor settings will
affect your colour accuracy.
What all this boils down to is
that images on your monitor
will always look somewhat dif-
ferent than the final printed
piece. Have fun and stay on top
of your game!
The author can be contact-
ed at deedee2111@hotmail.com


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010, PAGE 3B


Bahamas set



to leverage



shipping lane



oositionin


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
A MARITIME confer-
ence next month is expected
to bring almost 190 dele-
gates into Grand Bahama to
showcase the island's attrac-
tion as an important trans-
shipment point and vessel
maintenance hub, the Min-
istry of Environment's pro-
ject manager said yesterday.
Anya Symonette said
important maritime indus-
try heads from Europe, the
US and Asia will tour much
of Grand Bahama's port
facilities and have network-
ing opportunities, through
plenary sessions and a trade
show at the conference.
This year's Bahamas
International Maritime Con-
ference and Trade Show
(BIMCATS), which is held
bi-annually and will take
place at the Our Lucaya
Resort on February 9, will
focus on the maritime indus-
try's role in the global
debate on climate change.
"The environment is
affected by what happens in
our oceans, shipping being
one of the key factors that
can contribute to the slow-
ing of global warming," said
Ms Symonette.


She added that the topic
of climate change and the
threat of a sea level rise was
of the utmost importance to
the shippers and boaters.
She added that the con-
ference could open up dis-
course on increasing this
Bahamas ship and yacht reg-
istry.
"The world economy is
driven by shipping, and the
Bahamas is in a very strate-
gic position in terms of ship-
ping," said Ms Symonette.
"Because of the current
quality of our registry we
tend to attract other quality
ships. We also know that
with all of the yachts and
mega yachts, the Bahamas
seeks to tap into that area
as well, seeking to establish
legislation to augment the
general yacht registry and
capitalise on the good finan-
cial opportunities."
She said the Bahamas' is
also working to leverage its
position in the middle of a
high traffic transatlantic
shipping lane.
During the conference,
international delegates will
be given tours of the port
facilities, including the
Grand Bahama Ship Yard.
It will also feature Dr
Anne-Marie Warris, one of
the Lloyd's Register


Group's leading environ-
mental and climate change
experts, and the Bahamas'
first native managing direc-
tor of the Bahamas Mar-
itime Authority (BMA),
Commodore Davey Rolle.
The board of the BMA
will also use the conference
to hold a parallel meeting
with committee members.
"That has added a
tremendous benefit to the
conference," said Ms
Symonette.
She said Junior Maritime
cadets, who involve them-
selves in an immersion pro-
gramme at the high school
level, will have the oppor-
tunity for an audience with
the secretary-general of the
International Maritime
Organisation, Efthimios
Mitropoulos.
"In some high schools
there are persons who have
expressed interest in mar-
itime careers, and they are
channeled into courses that
will help them to meet their
goal of getting into a mar-
itime college," said Ms
Symonette.
"This is a once in a life-
time opportunity for those
kids to meet the secretary-
general of the IMO, and he
is eager to meet them."


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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010 THE TRIBUNE


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* Ample Parking C BRE
* Immediate Occupancy CB RICHARD ELLIS
* For more information call 396-0000 NAVIGATNGANEW WORLD


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


Fishermen


discouraged



by 50% drop


in pricing


FROM page 1B
ness yesterday.
Larry Cartwright said the price of crawfish is expected to
return to $12 to $13 per pound by the next crawfish season,
up from its $7 low last year.
"We anticipate the price of crawfish might go up, but the
2009-2010 season hasn't been that lucrative," said Mr
Cartwright.
According to him, fishermen are taking their boats out
simply to "stay alive" despite the large disparity between the
cost of fuel and the price of crawfish on the market.
Chief Councillor for Spanish Wells, Abner Pinder, said the
unfavourable market for crawfish made it a "pretty rough"
year for Bahamian fishermen, who he said are currently
preparing to go back out.
He confirmed that fishermen have reported catches above
last year, but with the market price for crawfish sub-prime
due to the global recession, and fuel costs at the pump
increasing, the extra catch is not translating into extra cash.
"They don't have a problem selling it," said Mr Pinder.
"The buyers will buy, but they can't pay what they were
(before) because they are not getting the price abroad."
Mr Cartwright said fishermen also appealed to the Gov-
ernment last year to extend the grouper season because
sales were on the decline. He said they were not interested
in fishing, but getting rid of surplus stock.
"We are looking forward to better days," he said.
The Government also extended the backyard garden pro-
gramme to Grand Bahama this year, and reinstated it in New
Providence late last year, to entice Bahamians to begin to
sustain themselves.
Mr Cartwright said they received 1200 participants in the
capital last year, and hope to increase that number this
year.













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IMnvingining roam with vaulted wood cellngs, a swimming pool,
pool deck and Iwo separate 1-car garages. The 3bedi3.tbath,
3,424 sq-ft. mille unit has a swrrnming pool, pool deck and a
one-car age. The 2bed(2.5bbh westem unit, is the smlest of
the three with 2,854 sq.ft. and a 1-car garage. Al units have
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Exceient development potential. wwwZaharnasReal 54439,
FOR WM0 INFORMATliON; STUART HALBERT
Tel; 39K-0034 | CA-424454 I SFmil S aBrt@BalhrrsRwltVbs







+


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010, PAGE 5B


T opfood




0tore u




forsal


FROM page 1B

prospective purchaser was
conducting due diligence on
the company, and indicated
the deal was likely to close
imminently. "Hopefully,
within the next 10 days," Mr
Andrews added.
Apart from building up a
loyal clientele of walk-in
lunchtime and breakfast cus-


tomers at its store in the
Caves Village complex, nes-
tled at the junction of Blake
Road and West Bay Street,
Gourmet Market also serves
the private aviation, yacht
and home catering markets
with high-end, premium and
organic foods.
Tribune Business under-
stands that the store's found-
ing shareholders, apart from


Mr Andrews, included Mark
Radcliffe, Richard Ryan, the
former Delta Airlines sta-
tion manager, and Chris
Herrod, one of the Caves
Village developers. Today,
though, Mr Andrews is
understood to be the com-
pany's only shareholder, the
others having been bought
out and exited.


ProBmisoaU iswslsgwnsot
~i: ii~


Fri_ 1-. r'-lopn
AcceuntrnimUi11(12 "Wcrks)
Sii ' I I 2pm
Quick Books (12 1Weeks)
~1-:.r. l . 6- 1 0pi


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CouwaPuteri A ppbliumilmts(10 4N WekL�i

Sal. , 121. 4 - InI lri 11S3 55

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Muri. 2"1I,-1441131~ji

Tues. 2 16, .0i1HOPI-I

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SOLi 2 I13,*.A.i-I u
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S Sa-. 2 1 1, 9a-3~i~rtrn

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SatI 203 .9a~m.3pn) 35

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Monf. Wed I. Z h-'?jy 135
Shiel Sa~uvemir ~Teufiturfog 10IWeks
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Sal 21" 3. ',mn-3pim


S.3 51


CI ( A.SS S CH ED U , E
10 Wi AEEK PROG(RAMI.MES
j Fl MW~IARY 12n]
A ~ PRIL 16~THf 20110l
12 WFEEK PROI R.%MIE~
L 1, 1.111 ARY 12TI11
I ~~TO211


I NOREHAPENNG'!


Fo More Inomlo nat






Moda-Fr-dy 9m-I





UU Si IliI l] U r -nu -uro
,tdi-t hae no egse c.

-td ns wl arc ie a fl

U -l U f lmw-,ar -ac0o


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


AUCTION


U.S. EMBASSY


FRIDAY JANUARY 29T, 2010


SHIPAHOY COMPLEX
(Western Gate)
West Bay Street, Opposite Well's Texaco Service Station


DOORS OPEN FOR INSPECTION & REGISTRATION
9A.M. - 10A.M.




AUCTION
10 A.M.- 3 P.M.


Office Furniture, Cameras, Computer equipment. Vehicles and other
miscellaneous supplies.


Vehicles - successful bidders on vehicles must pay a $300 non-refundable
deposit immediately after wining the vehicle bid. The balance will be due
by 3:00PM on Monday, Februaiy 1, 2010,


Bids for all other items must be paid in full at conclusion of auction.



GENERAL PUBLIC 1S INVITED


The Anglican Central Education Authority
tDiocese of The Bahamas and
Turks and Caicos Islands
Addington House
S-'"' " P.O. Box N656
Sands Road
Nassau, N.P.
The Bahamas
Tel: 242 322 3015
Fax: 242 325 2647


The Anglican Central Education Authority
is pleased to announce its Grade 7 Entrance Examination
The Entrance Examination will occur on
Saturday, 6th February 2010, 8:30 a.m. - 12:00 noon
at each of the following Anglican Schools.

St. John's College, Stapledon Gardens
St. Anne's School, Fox Hill and Eastern Roads
Bishop Michael Eldon School, Freeport, Grand Bahama
St. Andrew's Anglican School, George Town, Exuma

Applications can be collected from any Anglican School
between 8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. but must be returned to the school the
candidate wished to attend.

Applications will be accepted until the registration deadline of 3:00 p.m.
Friday, 29th January 2010.


BUSINESS


I








+


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010, PAGE 7B


Toyota US sales halt deals



blow to image, earnings


DAN STRUMPF,
AP Auto Writer
NEW YORK

Toyota's suspension of U.S.
sales on an unprecedented scale
to fix faulty gas pedals deals a
blow to the automaker's repu-
tation for quality and came
amid intense pressure from the
Obama administration.
Toyota Motor Corp.
announced late Tuesday it
would halt sales of some of its
top-selling models to fix gas
pedals that could stick and
cause unintended acceleration.
Last week, Toyota issued a
recall for the same eight models
affecting 2.3 million vehicles.
Toyota is also suspending
production at six North Amer-
ican car-assembly plants begin-
ning the week of Feb. 1. It gave
no date on when production
could restart.
The Obama administration
said it pressed Toyota to pro-
tect consumers who own vehi-
cles under recall and to stop
building new cars with the
problem.
Transportation Secretary
Ray LaHood told WGN Radio
in Chicago that "the reason
Toyota decided to do the recall
and to stop manufacturing was
because we asked them to."
LaHood said the department
urged the company to act and
credited Toyota for going "a
step above" by stopping pro-
duction.
David Strickland, the admin-
istrator of the National High-
way Traffic Safety Administra-
tion, told reporters in Wash-
ington that the Transportation
Department had been in regu-
lar communication with Toy-


ota about the recall. He said
the company's decision to stop
selling the vehicles was "an
aggressive one and one that is
the legal and morally correct
thing to do."
"Toyota was complying with
the law. They consulted with
the agency. We informed them
of the obligation and they com-
plied," Strickland said. Strick-
land wouldn't address why Toy-
ota failed to stop selling the
vehicles five days earlier when
it announced the recall.
The suspect parts are made
by a U.S. supplier, but they are
also found in its European-
made vehicles, an official with
the automaker said Wednes-
day. Toyota said it hasn't decid-
ed what to do there.
The supplier is CTS Corp.,
based in Elkhart, Ind., and the
problem part was manufactured
at its plant in Ontario, Canada,
according to a report Toyota
handed to the U.S. National
Highway Traffic Safety Admin-
istration last week.
CTS has not replied to a
request for comment sent ear-
lier this week.
Toyota's report says it first
received reports in March 2007,
of gas pedals being slow to
come back in the Tundra pick-
up, and fixed the problem in
February 2008.
Starting in December 2008,
similar problems were reported
in Europe with the Aygo and
Yaris models. Toyota said it
lengthened a part and changed
the material to fix the problem,
starting in August 2009.
The latest problem emerged
in North America, culminating
in the decision for the recall
earlier this month, Toyota said


FOR SALE.0 0
Spaiou0f 0nised omein resur oe
4 beroo , 2bat , 2 rscuiy enrlac
auo atcgeea to, a uledcilngt fmlyrom


in the report.
The timing of the recall and
production suspension could
not be worse for Toyota. Two
years ago, the company beat
out General Motors Co. to
become the world's largest
automaker. Now just weeks
into 2010, it is stopping some
sales in its biggest market, the
U.S., at a time when it desper-
ately needs to sell cars here
after reporting its first-ever
annual loss last year.
The sales and production halt
involves several best-selling
U.S. models, including the
Camry and Corolla sedans and
the RAV 4 crossover, a blend
of an SUV and a car. RAV 4's
sales surged last month.
In addition, the problem
could spread to Europe, where
a similar accelerator part is
being used, said Toyota spokes-
woman Ririko Takeuchi. She
declined to give the number of
vehicles affected. The company
was studying possible respons-
es there, including a recall, she
said.
"For Europe, the number
and models potentially con-
cerned are under evaluation,"
said Philippe Boursereau,
spokesman for Toyota France.
John Wolkonowicz , a long-
time auto analyst with IHS-
Global Insight, said Toyota is
fortunate in that it has a loyal
customer base - primarily
baby booners who have been
buying Toyotas for decades.
That, he said, will help mini-
mize the sales impact in the
short term.
"But it will further impede
their ability to get the younger
buyers that they so dearly want
to get into the Toyota fold,"
Wolconowicz said.
Toyota has said it was
unaware of any accidents or
injuries due to the pedal prob-
lems associated with the recall,
but could not rule them out for
sure.
The sales halt calls into ques-
tion the aggressive growth strat-
egy pursued under former Pres-
ident Katsuaki Watanabe, a
cost-cutting expert, who led the
Japanese automaker to the No.

SEE page 9B


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+b


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


'Dead in water' fears over port


FROM page 1B
seeking specific timelines and
start dates from the Govern-
ment as goals they could work
towards, as well as details that
would allow them to finalise
the port's financial model.
Multiple sources told Tri-
bune Business that one of the
remaining issues to be decid-
ed is how the proposed
Arawak Cay port's revenue
streams are to be divided
between its owners.
Multi-million dollar rev-
enues will be generated from
the likes of dockage,
wharfage, storage and con-
tainer through-put fees, but
this newspaper was told the
Government wanted its
income "off the top", mean-
ing on the gross revenues or
profits, and not on the net.
Tribune Business was told
that until issues relating to
how the port's income
streams were to be obtained
and divided were settled, the
Arawak Cay Port Develop-
ment Company's chief finan-
cial consultant, Simon Tow-
nend, managing director of
KPMG Corporate Finance
(Bahamas), was unable to
finalise the financial model
and projections for the pro-
ject.
This newspaper was
informed that the Arawak
Cay Port Development Com-
pany, chaired by Jimmy
Mosko, last met a week to
two weeks ago, to discuss the
project's update and progress
in negotiations with Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
and his office.
Given that the $44 million
Nassau harbour dredge con-
tract has been completed, and
the western end of Arawak
Cay built up, the Govern-


ment's and private sector's
attention in 2010 is now like-
ly to turn to the proposed
port, and relocating the exist-
ing container shipping facili-
ties to pave the way for down-
town Nassau's revitalisation.
Sources told Tribune Busi-
ness that the Arawak Cay
Port Development Company
was looking for the Prime
Minister and the Government
to "provide some goals to
work towards, definite dates
when things are going to take
place".

Model
"Simon Townend is work-
ing on the financial model,
and there has to be some
adjustments," one source told
Tribune Business. "The Gov-
ernment has to make some
decisions so that Simon could
go back and look at the finan-
cial models. Until all this hap-
pens, nothing much can be
done."
Another source said "most
of the points have been
agreed" for the Memorandum
of Understanding (Mou)
between the Government and
Arawak Cay Port Develop-
ment Company, whose 19
investors include the likes of
Bahamas Ferries, Tropical
Shipping, The Mail Boat
Company and Mediterranean
Shipping Company.
The MoU had been sent to
the Attorney General's Office
where some unexpected
changes were made, Tribune
Business has learnt, but that
situation has now been
resolved.
Still, there area fears that
the Arawak Cay port project
may not happen if the ship-
ping companies and the Gov-
ernment are unable to reach
agreement this year, given


NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No 46 of 2000)
ALDERCO MANAGEMENT LTD.
IBC NO.49,015B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
NOTICE is hereby given that as follows:
(a) That ALDERCO MANAGEMENT LTD. is in Dissolution under the provisions of
The International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The Dissolution if the said Company commenced on the 19th day of Janu-
ary 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the
Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the Company is Sterling (Bahamas) Limited of Suite 205A,
Saffrey Square, Bank Lane and Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
(d) Any person having a Claim against the above name Company are required
on or before the 19th day of February, 2010 to send their name, address and
particulars of the debt or claim to the liquidator of the Company, or in default
thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before
such claim is approved.
Sterling (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator



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that 2011 will bring this nation
close to a general election.
The opposition Progressive
Liberal Party (PLP) has
already given notice it is not
backing the Arawak Cay port,
and indicated it will scrap the
project if returned to govern-
ment, in a bid to deter
investors from injecting capi-
tal into the project.
"If it doesn't happen this
year, the deal will be dead in
the water," the source said. It
is likely that Prime Minister
Ingraham and the private sec-
tor will do everything in their
power to prevent that from
happening.
For Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald, the PLP senator
who has led the Opposition's
objections to the Arawak Cay
port, again reiterated that it
was "buyer beware" and his
party would be "100 per cent
against" any attempt to attract
Bahamian institutional and
retail investors, plus the pub-
lic, to invest in an initial pub-
lic offering (IPO).
Tribune Business under-
stands that the port's business
model still calls for 40 per cent
to be owned by shipping
industry players, with the
Government holding a 40 per
cent stake - via its provision
of the land - and the remain-
ing 20 per cent set to be auc-


tioned via an IPO. A prefer-
ence share issue may also be
contemplated.
Yet Mr Fitzgerald warned:
"One of the things I have said,
and Perry Christie has said in
the House of Assembly, is
that if they go ahead with that
project they do so at their
own risk.

Cultural
"There can be no doubt in
anyone's mind that under the
PLP plan for Arawak Cay it
was to serve as a recreational,
cultural and residential loca-
tion to fit in with the master-
plan for downtown. Where
this port has come from, no
one knows, so owners and
investors invest at their own
risk. We do not agree with it."
Mr Fitzgerald said that if
re-elected to office, the PLP
would proceed with the pre-
vious plan to re-locate down-
town Nassau's shipping facil-
ities to southwestern New
Providence, arguing that the
port there could have been
built by now.
The Ingraham administra-
tion did not agree, believing
that the southwestern option
was too costly, too far from
Nassau and would have taken
too long to build. A study also
showed Arawak Cay would


NOTICE is hereby given that JONEL TELSON of BAHAMA
AVE, P.O.BOX 10326, Nassau, Bahamas, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 21st day of JANUARY, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

Bahamas Supermarkets Limited's
2008 Annual Report is available for
viewing on the City Market web site at
www.dtymarketba hamas.com
Go to:


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have had a lesser environ-
mental impact.
Mr Fitzgerald told Tribune
Business he was aware that
the Arawak Cay Port Devel-
opment Company and its
investors had met within the
last two weeks, adding:
"They're pushing ahead
feverishly, trying to get the
financing, and the people to
agree."
Arguing that a cross-party
consensus should have been
reached on the port reloca-
tion, the Senator added: "If
they want to try and get the


They've not been able to give
no logical reason as to why
the port is going there. They
can't justify it."



mINSIGH

Fo0h tre
bein henes
rea .Inigh


NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No 46 of 2000)
ALDERCO FINANCIAL FUND LTD.
IBC NO.49,015B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
NOTICE is hereby given that as follows:
(a) That ALDERCO FINANCIAL FUND LTD. is in Dissolution under the provisions
of The International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The Dissolution if the said Company commenced on the 19th day of Janu-
ary 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the
Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the Company is Sterling (Bahamas) Limited of Suite 205A,
Saffrey Square, Bank Lane and Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
(d) Any person having a Claim against the above name Company are required
on or before the 19th day of February, 2010 to send their name, address and
particulars of the debt or claim to the liquidator of the Company, or in default
thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before
such claim is approved.
Sterling (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

uhlic involved nd eelc nuh-
NOTICE


Novus Holding Limited

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company
has been dissolved and struck off the Register
pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued
by the Registrar General on the 16th day of
December, 2009.

Dayan Bourne
Liquidator
of
Novus Holding Limited


NOTICE

UNTOLD STORIES LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138(4) of the International Business
Companies Act. 2000, UNTOLD STORIES
LTD. is in dissolution as of January 18, 2010.

International Liquidators Services Inc situated
at 35A Regent Street, P.O.Box 1777 Belize City,
Belize is the Liquidator.


LIQUIDATOR




NOTICE


PADDY INVEST CORP.
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138(4) of the International Business
Companies Act. 2000, PADDY INVEST CORP.
is in dissolution as of January 18, 2010.

International Liquidators Services Inc situated
at 35A Regent Street, P.O.Box 1777 Belize City,
Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


I







+


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010, PAGE 9B


Toyota US sales halt deals blow to image, earnings


FROM page 7B
1 spot in global vehicle sales in
2008, analysts say. Hitting that
milestone coincided with a 437
billion yen ($4.86 billion) loss
during its last fiscal year, mark-
ing the worst performance in
the company's 72-year history.
The automaker said the U.S.
sales suspension includes the
following models: the 2009-2010
RAV4, the 2009-2010 Corolla,
the 2007-2010 Camry, the 2009-
2010 Matrix hatchback, the
2005-2010 Avalon large sedan,
the 2010 Highlander crossover,
the 2007-2010 Tundra pickup
and the 2008-2010 Sequoia
large SUV. "This action is nec-
essary until a remedy is final-
ized," said Bob Carter, Toy-
ota's group vice president and
general manager.
Toyota spokesman Mike
Goss said most workers were
expected to be at their jobs dur-
ing the assembly line shutdown.
Workers will receive additional
training or work on improve-
ments to their assembly
processes. They can also take
vacation or unpaid leave, he
said. About 300 workers who
build V8 engines at a Toyota
plant in Huntsville, Ala., will
be affected, said Stephanie
Deemer, a spokeswoman for
the plant. Goss said the shut-
downs will also affect engine
plants in Georgetown, Ky., and
Buffalo, W.Va. Toyota dealers
said they were concerned the
move would hamper sales.
They hoped parts to fix the
problem could be distributed
quickly. John McEleney, who
owns a Clinton, Iowa, Toyota
dealership, said the sales stop-
page affects about 60 percent
of the inventory on his lot. He
said he was hopeful Toyota
would come up with a fix soon
- especially because the longer
a vehicle stays on a dealer lot,
the more money a dealer pays
in interest fees.
"Short term, it's goign to be
difficult," he said. "It will cer-
tainly set us back, but I think
the impact will be very short
lived." Mamoru Katou, analyst
at Tokai Tokyo Research, said
Toyota was likely reorganizing


production plans, such as
switching suppliers, and ship-
ping in parts from Japan.
"The problem is extremely
serious," said Katou. "The
models are precisely those Toy-
ota had been preparing to sell
in big numbers."
Toyota expects to sell 2.19
million vehicles in North Amer-
ica in 2010, up 11 percent from
2009, according to sales targets
released Tuesday. Globally,
Toyota said it was planning
sales of 8.27 million vehicles
this year, up 6 percent from
2009. But those numbers have
not figured in the U.S. sales
stoppage, Takeuchi said.
The automaker's problems
in the U.S. may be an exten-
sion of the spate of quality
problems that plagued Toyota
several years ago in Japan, its
home market, during the
aggressive growth strategy pur-
sued under Watanabe.
In 2006, the Japanese gov-
ernment launched a criminal
investigation into accidents sus-
pected of being linked to vehi-
cle problems, though nobody


was charged. Watanabe later
acknowledged overzealous
growth was behind the quality
problems. Watanabe was
replaced last year by Akio Toy-
oda, the grandson of Toyota's
founder.
Tuesday's announcement fol-
lows a larger U.S. recall months
earlier of 4.2 million vehicles
because of problems with gas
pedals becoming trapped under
floor mats, causing sudden
acceleration. That problem was
the cause of several crashes,
including some fatalities. About
1.7 million vehicles fall under
both recalls. The auto compa-
ny said the sales suspension
wouldn't affect Lexus or Scion
vehicles. Toyota said the Prius,
Tacoma, Sienna, Venza, Solara,
Yaris, 4Runner, FJ Cruiser,
Land Cruiser and select Camry
models, including all Camry
hybrids, would remain for sale.
Those vehicles contain gas ped-
als produced by a different
North American supplier from
the one whose parts are
involved in the current sales
halt, Toyota has said.


IMPORTANT CUSTOMER INFORMATION
CHEQUING AND SAVINGS ACCOUNT HOLDERS


In preparation for the introduction of The Bahamas
Automated Clearing House (BACH) in early 2010, Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) Limited has revised its Account Operating
Terms and Conditions, effective January 2010.

Copies of the Terms and Conditions brochure will be
made available as follow:


* Downloaded from our website: www.fidelitybahamas.com
* By postal delivery with your Account Statements
* Any of our Fidelity Bank Financial Centres

For any additional information, please call or visit any of our locations:


Nassau:
Freeport:
Marsh Harbour:


t 356.7764
t 352.6676/7
t 367.3135


FREERCKSTEE IWUFFRO D M DERAPLZA I OBN OO


-4 leading jewellery retailer
applications for the position of.


z .s seekinxz


SALES REPRESENTATIVE


A Brand New Opportunity

in Sales Awaits You!

If you are a self-motivated sales professional,
this is THE opportunity for you. We have a
proven training program and an excellent


insurance package which includes:
medical, dental and vision.


QUALIFICATIONS:
* At least 1 year sales experience with a


life,


track record of closing sales
* The ability to work independently.
* Basic computer skills
* Ability to work flexible schedules
(nights, weekends and holidays)
* Proven reliability and personal integrity

Interested persons should submit your resume to:

The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-623
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax (242) 322-6607
E-Mail: hr@(luxuryretaillimited.comn


- 6 Yea6 0/c/SI


Join us at our Early Learning Centre Open House for prospective
Pre School, Pre Reception, and Reception students.
Saturday, 6 February, 2010 from 9-11am
At the St. Andrew's School Early Learning Centre, Yamacraw Rd.

Learn about our inquiry-based. child-centred programmes for 2-5 year olds,
Children and parents welcome!
* Tour classrooms
* Meet teachers, parents, and administrators
* Learn about our curriculum
. *N And discover why our ELC is such a special place!


For more information. contact:
Allison Collie
Head of Primary
allison.collie@Sl-andrews com


Sally Varani Jones
Admissions Officer
"l y.varani.tonei@s(i-andrew5.com =


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


K


STHE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
isot ur website at w% w b.e l



The College of The Bahamas

wishes to engage the services of an

Executive Search firm

to support in the search for a

College President.




Detailed information is available

in a Request for Proposal (RFP) document

which may be obtained by visiting

The College's website,

www.cob.edu.bs,

by mail request at

communication @ cob.edu.bs"

or

by telephoning the office

of External Affairs at 302 4304.


NOTICE
IN THE ESTATE OF EULAH MAE
FRANCIS late of Thompson Court, Oakes Field in
the Western District of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claims or demands against the above-
named Estate are requested to send the same duly
certified to the undersigned on or before
Friday the 26th day of February 2010 after which
the Personal Representatives will proceed to
distribute the assets of the Deceased among the
persons entitled thereto having regard only to the
claims of which the Personal Representatives shall
then have had notice.
AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate are requested
to make full settlement on or before the date
hereinbefore mentioned.
CASH, FOUNTAIN
Attorneys-at-Law
P.O.Box N-476
Armstrong Street
Nassau, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Personal Representatives


-0 *1dn-V xw


SCHOOL







+


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010


THE TRIBUNE


BTC revenue share



5-25 per cent for



globally leased lines


FROM page 1B

of total capacity.
Responding to feedback on
the proposed Significant Mar-
ket Power (SMP) remedies
that should be imposed on
itself and Cable Bahamas,
BTC said in its January 22,
2010, feedback to communi-
cations sector regulator
URCA that competition
between the two companies
had forced it to reduce all its
international lease prices by
30 per cent.
Felicity Johnson, BTC's
vice-president for legal, regu-
latory and interconnection
issues, argued that the 100 per
cent state-owned incumbent
held just a 10-30 per cent
share of the Bahamian tele-
coms connectivity market,
which features national and
international leased lines. She
argued that the remaining
share was held by Cable
Bahamas.
When it came to market
share on international con-
nectivity capacity, Ms John-
son said: "BTC has only 5-25
per cent of market share by
revenue, or 20-40 per cent of
market share by capacity",
according to URCA's infor-
mation.
This was much less than the
market share held by Cable
Bahamas, its 100 per cent-
owned affiliate, Caribbean
Crossings, and the former's
ex-controlling shareholder,
Columbus Communications,
whose buyout by the BISX-
listed utility is now under-
stood to have been complet-
ed.
As for national leased lines,
which provide intra and inter-
island connectivity, Ms John-
son said: "BTC only has a
market share of 10-30 per
cent of circuits, and so pre-
sumably Cable Bahamas has a
market share of 70-90 per
cent on a national basis.
"When considering only


those areas where Cable
Bahamas has a presence, its
market share will be higher
than this. SRG also provides
national leased lines using
wireless technology, although
their market share is not
known to BTC at present."
And BTC also acknowledged
that Cable Bahamas led the
way on broadband Internet
with a 70 per cent market
share.
This means that BTC is
totally reliant on its cellular
monopoly to remain finan-
cially viable, but the state-
owned incumbent said this sit-
uation was a "quid pro quo"
for it to continue providing
universal service throughout
the Bahamas without any
financial assistance from the
Government or other opera-
tors.
Arguing that it had
received no financial conces-
sions from the Government,
apart from when it received
customs duty exemptions for
three years between 1996-
1999 to facilitate its network
build-out, Ms Johnson said
BTC had paid a $4 million
franchise fee to the Treasury
for every year since 1992.
"Indeed, between 2005 and
2008, BTC paid $7.6 million
(2005); $10.3 million (2006);
$12.1 million (2007); and $12.4
million (2008) per annum in
customs duties," Ms Johnson
wrote.
"BTC has also declared in
excess of $150 million in divi-
dends to its shareholder, the
Government, since 2004.
"Additionally, BTC's cell
towers on government and
Crown land are, as of March
1, 2009, the subject of a mas-
ter agreement which attracts a
$500,000 per annum lease
payment."
Still, BTC agreed with SRG
that a regulatory audit of all
licensees not be mandated.
It added that this would
cost BTC $850,000 in the first
year, reducing to $600,000 in


Ready to lead?

Established wholesale company is accepting resumes
for the position of GeneralManager.

Drive and ambition are a must.
Successful candidate should have at least 5 years'
experience in top level management.

Compensation will be commensurate with expeni ence
and tied to performance.

Interested persons should send their resume to
wholesalecareers(�-�,gmail. com


later years. "This represents 4
per cent of net revenues or
an additional $6.40 per fixed
line per year," Ms Johnson
said, arguing that using a
'properly prepared in accor-
dance with' audit opinion
would reduce regulatory audit
costs by 25 per cent.
However, Ms Johnson
urged URCA to "investigate
the ownership details of Cable
Bahamas with regards to its
interest in Systems Resource
Group (SRG) through the
supply of international capac-
ity, and links to Columbus
Communications and
ARCOS-1 via its parent com-
pany".
Columbus Communications
is the majority owner of the
ARCOS fibre optic telecoms
cable that links the US,
Bahamas, Caribbean and
Latin America, but it is no
longer Cable Bahamas' con-
trolling shareholder.
Still, Ms Johnson urged:
"Moreover, URCA should
consider that Cable Bahamas
also owns its own submarine
cable, in addition to the
capacity it owns in ARCOS
1.
"Aggregating internation-
al capacity market share
across all companies with
ownership links may support
a finding of international
dominance on Cable
Bahamas, in which case reme-
dies could be applied to Cable
Bahamas."
The BTC executive
acknowledged that Cable
Bahamas "has a far greater
number of customers for its
international connectivity"
than the incumbent carrier,
with only one rival Internet
Service Provider (ISP) cur-
rently using capacity on its
Bahamas II cable.
While BTC was in discus-
sions with another ISP, Ms
Johnson said the remainder
must either be using the
ARCOS cable or Cable
Bahamas' own Bahamas
Deep Sea Network cable,
SRG, in particular, only leas-
ing bandwidth space on these
cables.
And Ms Johnson added:
"Cable Bahamas' cable is
more modern and has differ-
ent characteristics to BTC's
Bahamas II cable, and is able
to provide services that BTC
is not able to.
"For example, the Bahamas
II cable cannot easily be used
for data traffic, due to diffi-
culties of interconnection with
the US Network Access
Points (NAPs).
"BTC, therefore, is forced
to buy capacity on ARCOS 1
to carry its own international
data and voice traffic."


TENDER FOR


CAFETERIA OPERATION


'Ibe N J'aal hii 1,, ii.v b i :iid II" I i imiil l. q.1i.i id Il.Jir-Ilc'" t.: e'!cndci 1 h I I, (,oniraci
Tn cTrat rh,. caFetrria of rl .ri, N n.. Tnsumrnce B, .ii's I r.,l Orc-..Clifford Dfaiing
Complex, Baillnu Hill Road.

The following REQUIREMENTS must be met:

1. T fih. I.; nut Ix" Ili. 1 ,-1.i hvilh V die pr p r l eiliL1 .11.11 , hiiilC.

2. Tenders must meet Al the r uqiuirLni m, the Mirutrv of Health and other relevant



3. TLid,&' mlusti bL able tO prvid fwd ftir 3' or murc tr.,nss daily.

4. All National Insurance contributions should Ix paid up to date.

lnLTLtrtd persons may collcc a Bid Application from thue Dirccir 'f Offfc'. at the
National Insurance B hard's i lea O)ffik. (:liff lrd Darling Complkx, Baillou I [ill R. id,.
and submit :he siae on or before Februatry 5,2010, at l00 p.m Tenders aru .bkLd rt
submit their bids in a s '.cId cnvcIpe, marked "Bid for Cafeteria" and ad"deIstd r(.:


The ' I.ALt ,rL IN ri'nni'Trcc
THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD
Cliffird Darling ( Cmplex
Hl iill.n ii illtK(Nid
K i* u. jni'f'







+


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010, PAGE 11B


Cable proposes decouplingg' of TV and Internet


FROM page 1B

Smith's letter "concedes"
that one regulatory modifi-
cation proposed by URCA
could "increase competi-
tion...... if a proportionate
solution can be found".
She added: "As a transi-
tional measure, Cable
Bahamas is prepared to
commit to the immediate
decoupling of its Internet
broadband services from its
pay-TV services for any new
installation in which a cus-
tomer orders Internet
broadband only, commenc-
ing no later than two months
following URCA's decision
accepting this proposed
obligation.
"It should be noted that
to comply with this obliga-
tion, Cable Bahamas will be


forced to resort to an inter-
im technical solution (until a
comprehensive network
upgrade could be complet-
ed) that may put at risk
Cable Bahamas' network
and business integrity."
Ms Smith's letter said
Cable Bahamas would offer
to work with URCA on the
"technical details and cost
recovery mechanisms"
appropriate to its
unbundlingg' solution,
adding that the company's
proposal was "in line with
best international practices"
once adjusted for the
Bahamian market.
The letter added that
Cable Bahamas had dis-
cussed "the technical and
commercial challenges" of
such a proposal before with
URCA's predecessor, the
Public Utilities Commission


(PUC), as the decouplingg'
would require major net-
work upgrades likely to take
two years.

Difficult
"In particular, Cable
Bahamas' current network
architecture makes it diffi-
cult to develop a cost-effec-
tive, comprehensive solution
that would, at the same time,
preserve the security and
integrity of Cable Bahamas'
pay TV network and busi-
ness," Ms Smith wrote.
"As a result, these options
were ruled out as a work-
able, system-wide solution.
"A comprehensive solu-
tion allowing for the cost-
effective decoupling of
broadband from Cable
Bahamas' pay-TV services,


while at the same time
ensuring the security and
integrity of Cable Bahamas'
pay TV network and busi-
ness, would require Cable
Bahamas to undertake a
major network upgrade."
In addition, Cable
Bahamas also proposed con-
tinuing price regulation of
its basic cable TV package,
currently priced at $30 per
month, the level it has been
at since the service was
launched in 1994.
Ms Smith described the
price regulation as a "quid
pro quo" for the 15-year
exclusive monopoly that


Cable Bahamas held on the
provision of cable television
in the Bahamas, but the
expiration of that agreement
had allowed new operators -
especially BTC and IP Solu-
tions International - to enter
the IP TV market. New
satellite and subscription
television services were also
expected to emerge.
"Although Cable
Bahamas believes that this
prospective competition
should be sufficient to jus-
tify the removal of price reg-
ulation from Cable
Bahamas' basic package,
this may be an issue that is


more appropriately
addressed in a full market
review," Ms Smith said.
"In the interim, Cable
Bahamas would not oppose
the continued application of
reasonable and proportion-
ate retail price regulation to
its basic package."
The BISX-listed compa-
ny proposed a regulatory
model that would account
for its costs in providing the
service, such as program-
ming costs, associated net-
work, IT, marketing and
sales and general and
administrative expenses.


� THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visit our website at www.cob.edabs


NOTICE FROM

THE OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS


The deadline for Fall (September) 2010 appli-
cations is Friday, February 5th 2010.


Please ensure that your application and all
supporting documents are submitted by that
deadline.


For more information,
call The Office of Admissions at
302-4499/302-4394 or
e-mail admissions@cob.edu.bs.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


K


The following persons are asked to contract
STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU� LIMITED
in connection with items left in ;1oragel:

College of the Bahamas Larraina Humes
c/o Anthony Burrows Dan ag a

Makita S. Depard line rsa'-d


Denie Fr~is.Nelson Mackey

Cyril Greenslade Ksandra Rolle

Camille Hudson Shelton Smith




st r-t- l











IfPICTET
1805
PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

11'vi tes qiiuaifiled appl ivaintsfr. the frIollwl11g fpositItIE-

FINANCIAL CONVTR OLLER
This position reports directly to the Chie~f Financial Officer

MINIMUM REOL1IREMENTSm-
-mitr a oni n iLCgflkf l fIs k~Ikwith a qua I i L.atlion of (i-A, CA or equivalent
-At least Ii"T (5)yearswork 4experience(minimum 3 yeJars vwiLh an AaudiI.
firrri)
Banking experience
- trong nrg.in i%:Llinna I skills wi th a strictured. and reimdcJ icaIwork
alpproachh
-Struri ng~ pr~ni and commum~ca~tioun skills, be it team plaver and
havc thec ability to supc-rvisc and train staff
-Dynamic and proactivc with a positvc attitude
-Verv strorn!acompuJter skillk, including ai high level of proficiency with
NISE well. MS Word and sound practical e xpe rience 111n the preparatice
of MS Powcr~oiflt pmscmclaI ions and reports
-Strong manaytical skills with the ability to solve issues cf ficienily
-Abziiy to work indtf t~jnderi1] and take L'u['L[iaCiSt
Flexibility toi respond to the reprioritisation of tasks

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE;-
-PrL'paralliun of. the Bartk's consolidated financial statements aind work
schedules for staitutory audit porpoes in accordance with accotililine

CAxordinaic tei ht sutciry auditiand Lthe prepmartiitrn.of all supporting

*Preprarion of all regul iiiory re po~i-inj compliance with mandated1 format
arid dcadl i neg (g. Th c~ntrai Ba nk and T1kv SccujirLse Cofimi5sion)
-PreparaL-Kon of a vaieity of reports for group regulatory TepXJItfiL-AFpurpse
-Prepa ralioni of annual ope raling budget and expense coniuo]
-Dcvc1,opmncnt and preparation of internal staflstical and finaricia] rcport
for thc board of directors and cxecutivce managcmcntI
-PrUdd 1011 Of Pnr~feSionaI pr'esentations ini line wi ch the corporate
standard
-Pricpa lal ion of variou client f i n.a nc ial 5tatemicnts and othcr typc% of
customized lieLnt reports-
-RespoiL~ibiily for the FUPo11Lng and a~c-zurLiing activity concerning two
licensed bainking afffiUates,


Terminal Operator


Position Purpose
The purpose of this position is to facilitate the import/export, blending, heating and storage of
petroleum products and the operation of petroleum tankers and barges in a safe and efficient
manner.

Environment
This position exists in an ever-changing environment that requires flexibility and the ability to
embrace frequent change. It requires persons with a strong genuine passion for promoting and
enforcing high operations and safety standards.

Duties:
* Assist the Control Room Operators with the safe coordination of all
vessel,
shore and jetty operations.
* Maintain accurate records of all Terminal Operations movements.
* Prepare work areas and equipment for maintenance work.
* Provide safety watch when required.
* Safe operation and monitoring of all operating equipment.
* Prepare maintenance work requests when required for all equipment in
the operations department.
* Complete fire, safety and equipment checklists as directed.
* General housekeeping of the operating areas.
* Provide both written and oral shift turnover reports.


Experience:
Experience in terminal operations is a good asset, but not mandatory. Training
will be provided in all areas.

Job Requirements:
* High School graduate
* Age 18-30
* Good Verbal and written communication skills (mandatory)
* Good working knowledge computer skills an asset.
* Prepared to work 12 hour shift cycle.
* Good physical condition.
* Passion for excellence and teamwork.



Applications should be submitted to the
Operations Director
Bahamas Oil Refining Company International Limited
Dbs Vopak Terminal Bahamas
P. 0. Box F-42435
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
On or before January 31, 2010








+


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010, PAGE 13B


INERATIOALBSN S


Federal regulators tighten




the rules for money funds


MARCY GORDON,
AP Business Writer
WASHINGTON

Federal regulators on
Wednesday tightened rules
for money-market mutual
funds to require them to hold
some assets that could be eas-
ily converted to cash and to
disclose new information on
fund values.
The Securities and
Exchange Commission voted
4-1 at a public meeting to
adopt the new rules designed
to bolster protection for
investors in money-market
funds, which hold about $3.2
trillion in assets.
The move came in response
to an episode in September
2008, at the height of the
financial crisis, in which a $60
billion money fund "broke the
buck" and exposed investors
to losses.
The value of the Reserve
Primary Fund's assets fell to
97 cents per investor dollar
- below the dollar-for-dol-
lar level needed for full repay-
ment.
SEC Chairman Mary
Schapiro said the new rules
were "just a first step in our
efforts to strengthen" rules
governing money-market
funds.
"I am committed to contin-
uing to move forward with
reforming the money-market
fund industry," Schapiro said
before the vote.
But Commissioner Kath-
leen Casey said the changes
"simply do not go far enough"
and she therefore was voting
against adopting the new


rules. The vote was narrower,
3-2, to issue guidance to pub-
lic companies on how current
SEC disclosure requirements
for them could apply to busi-
ness or legislative events relat-
ed to climate change.
For example, companies
should consider whether spe-
cific laws and regulations
regarding climate change
could have a significant effect
on their financial position and
therefore should be disclosed
to investors, the new guide-
lines say.

Debate

The issue spurred a sharp
debate among the commis-
sioners over climate change
and whether the new guid-
ance was needed. Commis-
sioners Casey and Troy Pare-
des, the panel's two Republi-
cans, insisted that the issue of
global warming hasn't been
scientifically established and
said the SEC was straying
from its mission to protect
investors with the guidelines.
Environmental groups and
major institutional investors,
including the California Pub-
lic Employees Retirement
System, have been pressing
the SEC for such guidance for
several years.
Money-market funds are a
mainstay of financial man-
agement for U.S. families and
companies, holding them-
selves out as safe and easily
accessible investments that
offer returns exceeding those
of conventional savings
accounts. They generally


invest in the safest types of
debt such as Treasury bonds,
while so-called prime money-
market funds seek slightly
higher yields but accept mar-
ginal risk by venturing into
short-term corporate bonds.
The "breaking of the buck"
by the Reserve Primary Fund
- the first U.S. money fund,
established in 1970 - stoked
fears over the safety of the
trillions held in the money
funds. During the week it
happened, investors pulled
out around $300 billion from
prime money funds, repre-
senting 14 percent of the
assets in those funds.
Under the SEC rule
changes, all money funds will
be required to hold at least
10 percent of their assets in
cash, Treasury bonds or other
instruments that could be sold
for cash within a day. There
currently are no such liquidi-
ty requirements; the change
would make it easier for
investors to redeem their
money from the funds amid
a rush of demand. At least 30
percent of funds' assets will
have to be convertible to cash
within a week.
In addition, funds will be
barred from investing more
than 3 percent of their assets
in securities that are other
than the highest grade. That is
stricter than the current limit
of 5 percent.
The maximum average
maturity of bonds in which
money funds can invest will
be shortened to 60 days from
the current 90 days.
The SEC also is mandating
changes in money funds'


operations, such as requiring
that they be able to electron-
ically process investors' pur-
chases and redemptions at a
price other than $1 a share -
to make it easier for investors
to get their money back if a
fund "breaks the buck."
The new rules will take
effect in stages, with some
requirements coming into
force in the spring and others
in the fall.
The SEC has been exam-
ining whether substituting a
floating share price for the $1
for money funds - making
them more akin to invest-
ments like conventional
mutual funds whose value ris-
es and falls - would better
protect investors from runs
on the funds.
The new rules require mon-
ey market funds to disclose
their "shadow" floating share
price: how the market values
what investors would pay per
share to get into the fund and
would receive getting out of it.
The information will have to
be disclosed monthly, with a
60-day lag.
New York-based Reserve
Management, which operat-
ed the fallen Reserve Primary
Fund, said Tuesday night it
will return to shareholders
$3.4 billion - nearly all the
remaining cash it has.
It is the sixth partial pay-
out the fund has made since
its collapse. Reserve Man-
agement said 99 percent of
what the fund held at the
peak of the financial crisis will
have been returned. About
$160 million remains to cover
legal and management costs.


Fe hld rates ~atrcd

low t boot reover


RATE


THE INTEREST rate
decision of the Fed-
eral Reserve
appears on a televi-
sion screen on the
floor of the New
York Stock
Exchange Wednes-
day, Jan. 27, 2010.
The Federal Reserve
has decided to hold
interest rates at a
record low and
pledged to keep
them there for an
"extended period"
to nurture the eco-
nomic recovery.
(AP Photo/
Richard Drew)


JEANNINE AVERSA,
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON


The Federal Reserve has decided to hold interest rates at a
record low and pledged to keep them there for an "extended
period" to nurture the economic recovery and lower unem-
ployment.
One member - Thomas Hoenig, president of the Federal
Reserve Bank of Kansas City - dissented from the Fed's deci-
sion to retain the pledge to hold rates at record lows. He
believes the economy has improved sufficiently to drop the
pledge, which has been in place for nearly a year.
The Fed made no changes to an $1.25 trillion economic sup-
port program aimed at driving down mortgage rates and bolster
housing. Reports on home sales this week pointed to a fragile
housing market. Fed policymakers said economic activity has
continued to "strengthen," the deterioration in the job market
is easing and consumers are spending moderately. But they
warned that high unemployment, lackluster income growth
and tight credit could crimp that spending.
Against that backdrop, the Fed kept its target range for its
bank lending rate at zero to 0.25 percent, where it has stood
since last December. In response, commercial banks' prime
lending rate, used to peg rates on home equity loans, certain
credit cards and other consumer loans, will remain about 3.25
percent. That's its lowest point in decades. Super-low interest
rates are good for borrowers who can get a loan and are willing
to take on more debt. But those same low rates hurt savers.
They are especially hard on people living on fixed incomes
who are earning measly returns on savings accounts and cer-
tificates of deposit.


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* THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010 *


S . E- C



PG 2


Bishop's

legacy
p - - * * - A * *g * - -lA 0


By JEFFARAH GIBSON


ARCHBISHOP Lawrence
Aloysius Burke,SJ, leaves
behind a legacy of humble
social activism and fervent
humanitarianism that will be
hard to match. The first arch-
bishop of the Bahamas, died
in Kingston, Jamaica, at 7pm
Sunday after a long battle
with cancer.
While in the Bahamas the Jamaican-
born archbishop headed a number of
religious, educational, and social pro-
grammes that targeted the personal
needs of the people in the community.
Archbishop Burke established the
Roman Catholic Stewardship pro-
gramme, Forward Together in Faith, an
umbrella programme designed to cre-
ate a higher level of involvement,
enthusiasm, and commitment within
the church through the establishment
of various organizations. He also imple-
mented the Samaritan Ministry - a


resource outlet for HIV/AIDS victims
and their families.
Another programme, Yeast, was an
initiative aimed towards assisting and
rescuing dysfunctional, unskilled,
socially troubled, academically inept
young males between the ages of 16-19
years.
This was his way of mending the bro-
ken hearts and healing the broken fam-
ilies.
Tribune Religion spoke to
Archbishop Patrick Pinder who
described the late Archbishop Burke as
a man with a courage that is rarely seen.
"He came here as a young man,
charged with the task of leadership, he
had a very uncommon gift and restored
the spirits of those who came into con-
tact with him," Archbishop Pinder said.
"He is without a doubt the best sense
of the word 'leader'."
Not only did he impact lives person-
ally, he also made them very comfort-
able. Under his leadership he oversaw
the physical expansion of the church
with many new renovated buildings.
Schools were built and expanded in
SEE page 28


"He is without

a doubt the

best sense of

the word

'leader'."
Archbishop Patrick Pinder


Spirit of Love Organisation


hosts 'Bahamas for God Again'


By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net


ENCOURAGING younger
Bahamians to walk away from con-
flict and embrace the love of God is
the aim of "Bahamas for God Again"
birthed out of the Spirit of Love
Organisation (SOL) which was start-
ed by president of Barak Ministries
International, Devon Rolle in 2003.
The group plans school and park
outreaches with an aim to demon-
strate the love of Christ, and to
encourage individuals to walk away
from conflict rather than solve it
through the means of using a
weapon.
It is a national outreach initiative
aimed at confirming the supremacy
of God and His principles in the


Bahamas.
This Saturday at 4pm, the organisa-
tion will minister to residents on
Englerston Park. Each month they
will go on a different park.
In 2003, the assignment of SOL
was to spiritually and practically
combat the escalating rate of crime
after the country's murder count
reached an all time high of 70.
"We yet again see an unacceptable
surge in the level of murders and
dangerous crimes occurring within
our nation," the statement said.
The coalition believes that the
remedy for criminal activity is for the
nation to return to the Christian val-
ues they claim have been thrown out
by the present day generation.
"Here we stand at the transition
point towards the second decade of
the millennia and our nation,


notwithstanding thousands coming to
salvation through the efforts of the
SOL organisation and other min-
istries," the statement continued.
The Bahamas for God Again team
therefore seeks to be a substantive,
non-demonational agent of spiritual
change in the nation.
"We believe that a strong interven-
tion must be orchestrated now to
positively impact the 18-40 year old
generation of our nation who are
largely responsible for the onslaught
of social decadence that has invaded
the serenity of the modern Bahamas.
"We want to see a reversal in the
drastic amount of murders, violence,
sexual offenses and overall inclina-
tion towards sinful indulgence
presently experienced by our nation.
This campaign is founded upon the
biblical passage, II Chronicles 7:14.







The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, January 28, 2010 * PG 29


A no nonsense leader!


IT WAS only a matter of God's tim-
ing that the Bahamas would begin to
see and experience true leadership.
The appointment of Ellison
Greenslade as the Commissioner of
Police and Marvin Dames as Deputy
Commissioner and the out-of-the box
thinking team of senior officers that
leads the force; will no doubt throw a
monkey wrench in the criminal's agen-
da.
Now, please let me make this
emphatically clear; Mr Greenslade, Mr
Dames and their team of officers don't
have a magic bullet that will prevent
criminal acts from taking place in this
country. But what this new leadership
brings to the Royal Bahamas Police
Force is something that was lacking for
many, many years; and that's visionary
leadership.
There is no need for me to expound
or dissect the word vision to this edu-
cated nation, because everybody from
the out-house, the church-house and
the parliament house has used and
abused this word vision; yet we've all
been groping around blindly like head-
less chickens. While the visionary
criminals understands that our judicial
system is constipated, and filled with
highly paid legal eagles / lawyers
(in most cases) these lawyers are or
the firms are owned / partnered by the
persons that the country dubbed as
honorable.
The high murder rate that this little
Bahamas experienced in 2009, could
be laid at the feet of poor / ineffective
leadership on all of our (Bahamians)
part.
Here again, is another word
(Leadership) that has suffered the
same fate as that of the word vision, in
this educated / ed-u-macated
Bahamas. But be that as it may, let's
move on.


Please know this! Every criminal act
that has and is being committed in this
country is being carried out by one of
our family members. But what do, we
do as a society?
Unless we're one of the victims or
family members of a victim we remain
silent, and close our eyes and ears to
criminal acts. A no nonsense leader-
ship approach to crime begins with us,
firstly in our homes; which will no
doubt spill over into our communities
and then throughout our nation.
It makes absolutely no sense for us
to experience the wrath of crime and
murder as we did last year, when we as
a Christian nation can come together
and send a stern message to the crimi-
nal mind-set stating "Hell no, we won't
go through another year of your fool-
ishness"
The time has come for us (The
Church) to get out of our four walls
and take back our communities. In
stead of having our annual confer-
ences within the four walls, why don't
we go and set-up shop on the parks
and areas where we know the drug
dealers and gangs are? I can assure
you that every church leader and
member knows where an illegal drug
store is located; yet they all stay in the
church buildings praying and sending
God / the Holy Spirit to drive out the
illegal activities from their areas.
Unbeknown to the religious mind-
set; the fact and truth of the matter is
that Yahweh has endowed the church
of His Son, Yahshua Messiah with


CHURCH NOTES
ACM PREPARES FOR

ANNUAL CONFERENCE

* The 38th annual Anglican Church Men(ACM) confer-
ence will be held in North Andros from March 17-21. All
Anglican men are asked to register at their parish or
contact any ACM council member for more information.
Ken Obrien is the conference chairman he can be reach
at kob1150@coralwave.com for more information.


power and authority and sends us to
take dominion.
Can you imagine what it would be
like in our communities, especially
those ones with five and six churches;
if these churches would unite and
have nightly evangelical street meet-
ings on every known drug infested
corner and park for the next nine
months?
If we (Bahamians) pool our
resources and say no to every criminal
act and hold the family of criminals
somewhat accountable for the behav-
ior their members, our communities
would then have a different outlook
on being silent and covering illegal
activities.
Listen, I'm not PLP, FMN, BDM,
BDP or whatever other political fruit
cake parties we've got out there. I am
a Bahamian, and most of all I am a
disciple of Yahshua Messiah and a son
of Yahweh.
With that being said, I would like to
give props to the Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham for making a wise
move in appointing Mr Greenslade


and Mr Dames as commissioner and
deputy of police. Now all the
Bahamian people would ask is "that
for God sake, please keep politics out
of the police force so that these men
and women can work to best of their
abilities."
The no nonsense, skilled and wise
leadership that Mr Greenslade and
Mr Dames bring to the Police Force
should be the very same that is dis-
played throughout every facet of our
government agencies, public and pri-
vate sectors. This sort of action will
put a demand upon us as a nation to
be and do better.
We' re all at fault for our country
falling apart as its doing; but it's not to
late, let's rise up Bahamians and make
the Bahamas beautiful once again.

* For questions and comments contact
us via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com
or
kmfci@live.com or Ph.1-242-441-2021
Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l







PG 30 * Thursday, January 28, 2010


RELIGION


The Tribune


Past and future


When you occasionally think about
the past and look to the future, you
use the present to take stock. Here
are some thoughts to ponder about
2009:

1. Thank God that you survived the year
of challenge
2. Thank God for whatever blessings
you did receive
3. Thank God for whatever lessons you
learnt
4. Thank God for the bills you were able
to pay
5. Thank God for love received and
given
6. Thank God for items acquired
7. Thank God for items shared with others
8. Thank God for health and strength
9. Thank God for prayers answered
10. Thank God for the presence and


r-
I RE\V N(,EL_\

. PALAX(.I I


power of God's grace

We have all witnessed a multiplici-
ty of miracles in different ways.
There are friends that we have com-
forted, counseled, and encouraged.
Those of us in ministry have pre-
pared persons to die in peace.
Members of the medical profession
have used their training, experience
and intuition to attempt the seeming-
ly impossible and watched God bring
people back from the edge of death.


In the coming days there will be more
griefs to bear, burdens to share, and
from time to time, even the shedding
of a tear.
In 2010, we look toward the future
with anticipation:

1. There will new opportunities to
access in the days to come
2. There are unexpected friendships to
be forged as time goes on
3. There are spiritual revelations yet to
be experienced
4. There are more material blessings to
be discovered
5. There are additional educational
accomplishments to be explored

None of these things are definitely
guaranteed but we know that the
Lord God Almighty has wonderful


plans for us all. We have to allow
God to act in our lives.
Something that we can work to
guarantee ourselves is the spirit that
we take into the future as we face the
unknown. We can do the following:

1. Decide to let the past go and forgive
freely if we can
2. Receive counseling if we need help
3. Allow memories to fade if we cannot
forget
4. Reprioritise our lives
5. Develop a personal ethic

May your gratitude overflow, gen-
erosity multiply, joys abound, peace
be unshakable, faith be immovable,
love be contagious, and your smile be
infectious. May you live each day in
the knowledge of God's grace.


Jet diverts to Philly over teen passenger's prayer


PHILADELPHIA


A Jewish teenager trying to pray on a
New York-to-Kentucky flight caused a
scare Thursday when he pulled out a set
of small boxes containing holy scrolls,
leading the captain to divert the flight to
Philadelphia, where the commuter
plane was greeted by police, bomb-sniff-
ing dogs and federal agents, according to
the Associated Press.
The 17-year-old on US Airways
Express Flight 3079 was using tefillin, a
set of small boxes containing biblical
passages that are attached to leather
straps, Philadelphia police Lt. Frank
Vanore said.
When used in prayer, one box is
strapped to the arm while the other box
is placed on the head.
"It's something that the average per-
son is not going to see very often, if
ever," FBI spokesman J.J. Klaver said.
The teen explained the ritual after
being questioned by crew members of
the flight, which had left LaGuardia
Airport around 7:30 a.m. headed for
Louisville and was operated by
Chautauqua Airlines, authorities said.
Officials with the airline, however,
said crew members "did not receive a
clear response" when they talked with
the teen, according to a statement issued
by Republic Airways, which owns
Chautauqua.
"Therefore, in the interest of every-


one's safety, the crew decided to land in
Philadelphia, where a more complete
investigation and follow-up with author-
ities would be possible," the statement
said.
The flight landed in Philadelphia
about 9 a.m. without incident and was
met by police, bomb-sniffing dogs and
officials from the FBI and
Transportation Security
Administration.
Authorities said the plane was
searched and passengers were ques-
tioned. The teen, who is from White
Plains, N.Y., and was traveling with his
16-year-old sister, was very cooperative,
Vanore said.
"They were more alarmed than we
were," Vanore said.
Klaver said the teen and his sister
were never in custody and were cleared
to continue their travels.
The teen's grandmother, who was
waiting for him at Louisville
International Airport, said the early
flight left no time to pray before leaving
New York.
"He hadn't had the opportunity to
pray, so that is why he did it on the
plane," Frances Winchell said.
She said the episode was traumatic for
the boy, whose mother requested that
he not give interviews.
"But in any event," she added, "all's
well that ends well, and maybe some
good will come to the world because of


A DIVERTED plane is escorted by to a terminal at Philadelphia International
Airport in Philadelphia, Thursday, Jan. 21, 2010. A misunderstanding about an
Orthodox Jewish prayer ritual led a US Airways Express captain to divert his
Kentucky-bound plane to Philadelphia on Thursday, authorities said.


it."
The teen, who belongs to the congre-
gation Young Israel of White Plains, is
"a brilliant student" from "the sweetest
family," said Shmuel Greenberg, the
synagogue's rabbi.
The morning prayer ritual is supposed
to take place within a few hours of sun-
rise, so it's understandable that the teen


was doing it on the plane, Greenberg
said.
Binding the boxes of holy scrolls to
the arm and head serves as "a reminder
for the person that their actions during
the day, and what they think about dur-
ing the day, should be on a level of holi-
ness and should inspire them to do pro-
ductive, good things," he said.







The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, January 28, 2010 ' PG 31


Anglicans in Andros


I AM grateful to Father Shazz
Turnquest, a former student of mine
from St John's College, who appears to
be doing great work in South Andros.
He is following in his father's footsteps
as an Anglican priest. I have edited his
website history.
The Anglican involvement in Andros
actually is said to have begun under a
leaf tent on the island of Mangrove Cay
in 1818 by an English priest Rev Joseph
Evans, and a local man Arthur
Sweeting from Harbour Island both
men being former slave traders.
However, the actual church building of
All Saints was not completed until
1891.
In 1865, H.T.S Cassell writes in the
Mission Quarterly Papers of a wonder-
ful fishing holiday spent on Andros
where he, Rev Saunders and Bishop
Venables visit only two stations begin-
ning at Fresh Creek and then heading
North to Nicholl's Town, with no men-
tion of any stations in between.

"Precisely at five we landed at Fresh
Creek, the chief settlement at Andros.
Mr Sweeting, the catechist, met us at
the landing, and took us at once to his
house, which was a model of cleanli-
ness, with its palmetto-thatched roof
and white-washed walls."

William Henry Sweeting was known
as the 'Apostle of Andros', a teacher,
catechist, land owner and eventually
one of the first black indigenous priests
in the Bahamas. According to Bishop
Venables during the consecration of
the original church in Calabash Bay,
Sweeting did much for the church in
Andros, giving the land and even build-
ing some of the churches with his own
hands. He escaped an outbreak of




A bishop's


FROM page 28

Grand Bahama, Abaco, and New
Providence. New churches were built in
Bimini, Abaco, San Salvador,
Eleuthera, and Long Island.
Buildings in Nassau included a new
Chancery building, Emmaus Centre,
Loyola Hall, two renovated and three
new churches and one new church hall.
But his signature mark was the con-
struction of the new St Francis Xavier
Cathedral. Built at a cost of more than


- LO
- L_\\ L()1R


cholera which killed his wife and most
of his children. He died in 1878 but
much of his handiwork remains.
In 1872, the second Bishop of
Nassau, Addington Robert Peel
Venables (1864-1876), mentions nine
different churches built in 1871 on the
island of Andros including the church-
es at Mastic Point and Nicholl's Town.
'We arrived in the evening at Mastic
Point; but, as the whole population was
going to a wake, we could not hold
service until the next day. Here I learnt
for the first time that it is customary at
these wakes to put food outside the
door for the dead person to eat. The
next morning I examined the day-
school in the new church. It appears to
be making good progress.
Leaving the same day (August 8) we
ran down to Nicoll's Town. The church
here was destroyed by the hurricane of
1866. At length, however, the Mission
is apparently recovering. Stones have
been collected for a new church, which
the people wish to build more substan-
tially than the last.
In 1892, the new Rector of all
Andros the Rev Frederick Barrow
Matthews ex San Salvador (Cat Island)
speaks about his first missionary trip
North from Mangrove Cay.
"All of the hard work of Rev W.H.
Sweeting appears to be eroding due to
the burgeoning sponge trade and sub-
sequent lawlessness associated with it.




legacy


$5 million, this edifice stands as a build-
ing of historic proportions. It seats 1,300
parishioners comfortably.
While Archbishop Burke was
responsible for the Mission of Turks
and Caicos Islands, he built the rectory
and the hall that has served as the
church of Our Lady of Divine
Providence in Providenciales as well as
the church of the Holy Cross in Grand
Turk.
"He was a man of rare courage, and
this is a major loss to the Catholic


All of the stations have succumbed to
apathy albeit one or two.
"Leaving Stanyard Creek, saddened
and depressed, I made for the next sta-
tion, Mastic Point...Mastic Point
proved a little oasis in the spiritual
desert. The Catechist evidently loves
his little church, and spoke cheerfully
of his congregation. Here one sees the
good work Father Fisher has done for
the Church in this colony. The
Catechist here was an old choir-boy of
Father Fisher's, and his early training in
St Agnes, Nassau has stood him well.
He has his congregation well in hand,
and a nice little Sunday and day school.
How important good sound teaching is,
was illustrated here.
'I spent a happy Sunday here with
the usual round of services. Here too,
alas! The same decay appears in the
fabric; I never celebrated in a more
nervous state of mind than I did at this
altar.
Nicoll's Town too is a lovely spot with
its coconuts and beautiful beach. Here
all the horrors of our unhappy divisions
burst upon us. In the centre stands the
only decent and well built church in the
parish. On one side some 300 yards off
stands a large Methodist chapel; on the
other side, a little more than a stone's
throw, stands a large Baptist chapel; and
further on, a preaching house for the
Plymouth Brethren; and facing all
stands a huge liquor shop which scents
the street for a long distance and does
more work than all the sects put togeth-
er!...On the whole I was pleased with
the little congregation; they have much
to contend with, three different sects
persuading them that they are all wrong.
The real evil is the liquor shop, for
drunken men and women are every-
where.


Community," Archbishop Pinder said.
Archbishop Burke, 77, died in the
retirement home for Catholic priests in
the Kingston Archdiocese. He had
retired in 2008, four years after being
transferred from the Bahamas to take
over the archdiocese of his native
Kingston.
Archbishop Burke, born in Kingston
on October 27, 1932, entered the Society
of Jesus on August 14, 1951 at Lenox,
Massachusetts and was ordained a priest
on June 16, 1964 at Holy Trinity
Cathedral, Kingston.
He taught at St. George's College,
Jamaica, from 1958 to 1969, when he was
named Rector of the College. In 1973 he
was appointed Regional Superior of the


About 1900, Fr Matthews writes again
in the Mission Quarterly Paper in his
eighth year of service on Andros.
Building work is at a standstill at Fresh
Creek, Calabash Bay, and Stanyard
Creek because all the men are out
sponging. However, at Mastic Point it is
a little brighter - the new chancel was
finished having taken one year and
seven months to do this small amount of
work. Neville Chamberlain has settled
here, and has begun sisal planting on a
vast scale. Last May, near to Mastic
Point, I went ashore to get a few young
casuarina trees (Spanish cedar) which
were growing wild there, evidently
washed up by the Gulf Stream.
This time I fairly gasped in astonish-
ment in looking at the same spot.
Thousands of acres cut down, burnt, and
being planted out with manilla, hemp,
and cotton. Two huge houses nearly fin-
ished, a broad and spacious road right
up from the beach through the clearing
into the pine forest, large shops, bar-
racks, and all over the place little
shanties for the hundreds of work-peo-
ple. Four hundred men, women, and
boys weekly employed, whilst thirty car-
penters from Nassau are working almost
night and day at the various large build-
ings rapidly going up.
A few years later, Revd G.H. Brookes
reported that the Parish of St Margaret
actually stretched from Nicholl's Town
down to Fresh Creek. The priest was
resident in Fresh Creek and it was only
later that the parish of St Stephen was
formed encompassing Behring Point,
Bowen Sound, Fresh Creek, Calabash
Bay and Stanyard Creek.
Father Shazz is researching further
to fill the gaps in the history but he
should be commended for the work so
far.


Jesuits in Jamaica, the first and only
Jamaican to be appointed to that post,
which he held until 1979. He returned to
St George's College in 1980 as Acting
Principal.
He was appointed Bishop of Nassau by
Pope John Paul II on July 17,1981 and on
June 22, 1999, was named the first
Archbishop of the newly erected
Archdiocese of Nassau.
It was under Archbishop Burke that
the new St Francis Xavier's Cathedral was
planned and built.
On February 9, 2004 Archbishop
Burke was appointed the fourth
Archbishop of Kingston and was installed
on May 2, 2004, at the Holy Trinity
Cathedral in Kingston.






PG 32 0 Thursday, January 28, 2010 RELIGION The Tribune








On Sunday January
21, the Anglican
Church Men's Council
worshiped at the 10.30
am Service at St.
Anne's Parish. The
council led by
President Kevin Ryan
paid a visit and cour-
tesy call on the men
and the rector of the
church, Rev'd Crosley
Walkine. At that service
new members of the
branch was installed by
the Council President.










4I


2A




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