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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01476
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: December 23, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01476

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Volume: 106 No.28 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009 PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

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0


PLP committee

resorts to writing to

Malcolm Adderley


By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
AFTER failing to meet
with him at his office or
reaching him by telephone,
the PLP's "olive branch"
committee has resorted to
writing to its Elizabeth MP
Malcolm Adderley to
ascertain whether the MP
will be leaving the party in
the coming year.
The committee, which is


High-powered assault

rifle may have been used

in drive-by shooting


chaired by PLP Deputy
Leader Philip "Brave"
Davis, includes other
notable party names such
as the PLP's Leader of
Opposition Business Obie
Wilchcombe and former
Senator Sean McWeeney.
When it was formed last
week, the committee was
given the task of meeting
and speaking with Mr
Adderley over the Christ-
mas holidays to determine
SEE page 11


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
POLICE have expressed
"huge concern" after it was
revealed that a high-powered
AK-47 assault rifle could have
been used in a drive-by shoot-
ing.
Fears are rising that there
may be more of these
"extremely dangerous"
weapons in the hands of local
gangs.
And officers stressed that
ridding the streets of this
emerging menace is a major
priority of new Acting Com-
missioner Ellison Greenslade.
"We want to get all guns off
the streets, but we're especially
worried about assault rifles,"
said Supt Elsworth Moss of the
Central Detective Unit.
"We have identified those
who possess them and we will
continue to go after them until
we get those weapons off the
streets and put those who have
them behind bars."
Meanwhile, residents in Bain
and Grants Town are still in
shock after the drive-by shoot-
ing of three of their young men.
Witnesses on Martin Street,
off Market Street, reported


hearing a rapid stream of gun-
fire on Sunday night before
finding that Shamaro Brennen,
in his mid-twenties, Trevon
Simmons, 16, and his 17-year-
old cousin, Bradley (surname
unknown), had each been hit
multiple times.
The three were among a
small crowd of more than 10
people socialising at the Martin
Street basketball court when a
car pulled up on the nearby
street and the occupants began
firing indiscriminately. They are
now recovering in hospital.
Paul Thompson, retired for-
mer assistant commissioner of
Police, said a "mandatory five-
year prison sentence" should
be imposed for anyone found in
possession of an assault rifle if
its use is to be deterred.
He also suggested that a
campaign could be launched by
which members of the public
offer money for information
leading to the seizure of such
guns.
"These are the kind of guns
used by terrorists and in war.
We do not want these on our
streets. They have the capacity
to kill a lot of people in a mat-
ter of minutes."
SEE page 15


WesternAi
mlgtEoHat
E rs Elad I


A WESTERN Air flight
to Haiti was forced to
make a crash landing at
Cap Haitien airport with
19 passengers on board
when the landing gear
failed to drop.
Flight Standards Inspec-
torate accident investiga-
tor Delvin Major said pilot
Darryl Bartlett reported
technical difficulties on the
flight from New Provi-
dence to northwest Haiti
SEE page 11


SEE page 11


Symonette defends Bahamas' human
rights record, criticises US Ambassador
By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
MINISTER of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette defended
the country's "enviable" human rights record and criticised
US Ambassador Nicole Avant for what he termed as "mis-
representation" of the Bahamas' position on human rights
issues.
SEE page 11


POLICE recorded the
country's 84th homicide
this year when a man was
found shot dead in a car
crashed in the Fox Hill
area on Monday.
The victim, who has not
yet been identified by
police, was found slumped
over the wheel in the dri-
ver's side of a light grey
coloured Jeep Cherokee
which had crashed into a
wall in Hanna Road West
at around 8pm.
He had been shot in the
right side of his head and
SEE page three


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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


A PRISON officer and an
inmate already serving time in
prison for fraud were among
four people arraigned in a
Magistrate's Court yesterday
on a long list of fraud charges.
Police say that Shane Mack-
ey, 28, who is currently incar-
cerated for fraud, was the mas-
termind behind a car scam that
swindled at least a dozen peo-
ple.
Mackey was arraigned with
his alleged girlfriend Tamanica
Bethel, 38; Alfie Hanna, 40;
and prison officer Freeman
Basden, 41.


Drs4ansfo


$35


The accused were arraigned
together on charges of con-
spiracy to commit fraud.
Mackey was also arraigned
on charges of fraud by false
pretences, while Bethel and
Hanna and Basden were
arraigned on charges of abet-
ment to fraud.
It is alleged that Mackey,
under false pretences, obtained
nearly $20,000 from 12 people.
Police alleged that Mackey
had someone place an adver-
tisement in the newspapers for
the sale of a vehicle and
received inquiries about the
vehicle on a cellular phone in
his cell.
Police further alleged that
Mackey directed others to col-
lect the cash for the vehicle
that was purportedly for sale,
but no vehicle was ever
exchanged.
The accused all pleaded not
guilty to some two dozen fraud
charges during their arraign-
ment before Magistrate Car-
olita Bethel.
Bethel, Hanna and Basden
were granted $20,000 bail and
ordered to surrender their
travel documents.
The case was adjourned to
June 16.
A warrant of arrest was
issued by the magistrate for
Alexander Carey who was also
scheduled to appear yesterday
to answer related charges.


SService station robbed


tor second time this week


Gunman and accomplice storm store


THE Texaco service sta-
tion in Carmichael Road
was hit by armed robbers
for the second time this
week when a gunman and
his accomplice stormed the
store on Monday after-
noon.
Police say six men
pulled into the service sta-
tion in a white Nissan Sen-
tra and two of the men,
one armed with a handgun,
entered the service station
shop demanding cash at
2.40pm on Monday.
The pair took an unde-
termined amount of cash
and fled the area in the
white car, driving east
along Carmichael Road.
Cash was stolen from the
same service station when
a man armed with a hand-
gun stormed the store at
1pm on Friday, and got
away on a bicycle.
And an armed robber
threatened a woman work-


ing at the service station at
gunpoint at around 11am
on November 13, stealing
an undetermined amount
of cash and Bahamas
Telecommunication Cor-
poration (BTC) pre-pay
cellular phone cards before
he got away.

Businesses

Carmichael Business
League member Ethric
Bowe fears Bahamian busi-
nesses will crumble under
the pressure as armed rob-
beries have become
increasingly frequent in the
run-up to Christmas.
Police recovered two
firearms on Monday
including an AK-47 .223
assault rifle, and 24 live
rounds of .223 ammunition,
found on a boat in Potters
Cay Dock. The discovery
was made by Northeastern


Division police officers as
they executed a search
warrant on board the
motor vessel Sharise M
docked in Potter's Cay at
around 7.30am. A 28-year-
old Nassau Village man has
been arrested in connec-
tion with the find and is
assisting police with their
investigations.
A .9mm firearm and 15
rounds of ammunition
were found by police offi-
cers from the same division
when they stopped a man
acting suspiciously in the
Brougham Street area at
around 10am.
They followed the man
into a home in Brougham
Street and searched the
residence, recovering the
firearm.
Three people, including a
juvenile, have been taken
into custody to be ques-
tioned in connection with
the incident.


Police have also report-
ed how a woman was
stabbed in the face with a
plastic rat-tail comb by
another woman while visit-
ing a man in the Malcolm
Road area at around
2.30pm on Monday.

Stabbed

The victim was stabbed
on the left side of her face.
She was treated at the
Fleming Street Clinic, and
later discharged.
Police are investigating
all these incidents and are
appealing to the public for
assistance.
Anyone with any infor-
mation that may assist
these investigations should
call the police emergency
line on 911 or 919, or call
Crime Stoppers anony-
mously on 328-TIPS
(8477).


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By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

INSTEAD of toys, money
or a Christmas tree, lunch spot
"Le Petit Gourmet" opted to
donate a huge pot of soup to t
the needy this Christmas.
For two weeks, customers
donated ingredients for the
soup, which will be distributed
to feeding centres across the
island.
Yesterday, Chef Julie-
Andree Knowles turned more
than 20 pounds of beans, a
braised pork shoulder, ..
caramelised onions, mixed
vegetables and a ham donated
by Super Value Supermarkets
into a the massive pot of soup
"Since I was a young
teenager I always got involved
in making Christmas a special
time for caring and sharing. I
had a dream of collectivity,
where we as a team work
together to make the world a better place.
"If everyone picks up one stone from a mountain we
could easily lift it up. We are just one stone away for love to
pour in our world. Let us move mountains starting today for
a better tomorrow now," said Mrs Knowles.
Food rescue organisation, Hands for Hunger, will col-
lect the packages of soup while on their regular pick-up
route and distribute them to feeding centres across the
island for Christmas.

I


GLINTON I SWEETI.NG | GQBRIEN

COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW

will have the following Office hours
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Eve - Office closed


Christmas Day Holiday


Monday December 28th Boxing Day Holiday observed
Thursday December 31st New Years Eve - Office closed at 1:00pm


Friday January 1st 2010


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Thursday December25
Friday December 25th


New Years Day Holiday


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+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 3


LOCALNW


Police tight-lipped about


investigation of officer


AN OFFICER with the
Bimini District police com-
mand is being investigated in
connection with a drug relat-
ed crime, The Tribune learned
yesterday.
Assistant Commissioner of
Police, Hulan Hanna, con-
firmed that an inquiry is
underway concerning the
matter.
Mr Hanna said he was
unwilling to comment further,
other than to say that no
arrests have been made in


relation to the case.
Chief Inspector Kevin Mor-
timer, officer in charge of the
Bimini District, was unavail-
able for comment. Officers at
the station said he was off the
island on official police busi-
ness.
Second in command,
Sergeant Gregory Lockhart,
could not confirm any details
related to the investigation,
and said the Bimini command
was not concerned about
reports implicating any officer.


FROM page one
the two passenger doors on the right side of
the car were open as if people had escaped
from the vehicle.
Local residents said they saw a man run-
ning in the area around the time of the crash.


"Nothing out of the ordi-
nary is going on.
"It is just business as usu-
al," said Sergeant Lock-
hart.
Superintendent Tony Fer-
guson, Commander of the
Drug Enforcement Unit, said
no officer from the Bimini
District is being detained in
connection with an investiga-
tion, despite reports to the
contrary.
He was unwilling to com-
ment further.


Police found the car registration number
on the licence plate was not compatible with
the number listed on the licence disc.
Anyone who can help police with their
investigation is asked to phone 911/919 or
call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-
TIPS (8477).


Dry cleaners is targeted in

morning armed robbery


A MASKED gunman
robbed a local dry cleaner's
yesterday morning and
escaped with an undeter-
mined amount of cash due to
be deposited in the bank.
The brazen gunman fled
the scene in a company van
which he stole after the rob-
bery.
Although the van was later
recovered the suspect -
described as a tall, dark man
- was still at large at last
report.
The harrowing incident
took place around 10am yes-
terday at New Oriental Laun-
dry and Cleaners on East
Street south and Palmetto
Avenue.
Press Liaison Officer
Sergeant Chrislyn Skippings
said police got wind of the
robbery just after 10am.
Responding officers were
told that a handgun carrying
robber accosted an employee
as he collected the store's
bank deposit.
Police said it was too early
to tell if the robbery was an
inside job.
The gunman, who was
wearing a cap outfitted with a
mask, fled the scene heading
north on East Street.
"Moments later police
recovered the van in the Exu-
ma Street area, with a .9mm
clip containing a number of
live .9mm rounds," said Sgt
Skippings.
Despite the robbery the
store remained open yester-
day, however an employee
who answered the phone
declined to comment.
Messages left for the man-
agement were not returned
up to press time.
The robbery is the latest in
a spate of attacks on busi-


FOR IN UWNSERICE


nesses by armed thugs look-
ing for quick cash. Police
attribute the trend to the hol-
iday season and the recession
which has left many jobless.
On Monday, Assistant
Commissioner Hulan Hanna
warned the public and busi-
ness owners to be vigilant.


He suggested that vulnera-
ble business owners contact
their neighbourhood station
for a police detail when mak-
ing company bank deposits
- or if needed, petition the
commissioner of police for a
more permanent police pres-
ence.


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Telephone: (242) 362-6527, Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
email:info@colesofnassau.com


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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


IEIOI AULETE S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, I ,tihinmn') 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


Hard reality as US pushes Pakistan


ISLAMABAD - Pakistan will not go as
far as Washington wants, and there's nothing
the U.S. can do about it: That's the sobering
reality as the U.S. tries to persuade a hesitant
Pakistan to finish off the fight against ter-
rorists.
Expand the current assault against the
Taliban? Pakistan has made clear that will
happen only on its own terms. U.S. officials
acknowledge that so far they haven't won
the argument that militants who target Amer-
ica are enemies of Pakistan, too.
The U.S. has offered Pakistan $7.5 billion
in nonmilitary aid plus more to help Pak-
istan go after terrorists. The assistance is
intended to help Pakistan speed up its fight
not only against internal militants, but also
against al-Qaida and Taliban leaders hiding
near the border with Afghanistan.
Pakistanis are deeply suspicious of Amer-
ica's power and motives, making it difficult
for their leaders to accede to Washington's
pressure in public, lest they look like U.S.
puppets. U.S. officials say that while Pak-
istani officials cooperate more in private,
there are definite limits. The U.S. wanted
Pakistan to move forces deeper into the trib-
al belt before winter. It didn't happen, and
might not at all. A senior U.S. diplomat hint-
ed at a separate agreement that would allow
the U.S. itself to take on some of the hidden
war against Pakistan's militants.
Speaking on condition of anonymity to
discuss sensitive talks with Pakistan, the
diplomat said last week that more U.S. action
is expected against the Haqqani network, led
by longtime resistance fighter and former
U.S. ally Jalaluddin Haqqani. His network,
based in the Waziristan tribal area in north-
west Pakistan, reportedly has strong ties with
al-Qaida and targets U.S. forces in eastern
Afghanistan from across the border.
The diplomat said the stepped-up U.S.
action would come with Pakistani support,
but would not elaborate on the potential
cooperation. Pakistani officials claim they
have targeted the Haqqani leadership, albeit
unsuccessfully, and will go after the network
when the time is right. Some U.S. officials
believe that, others don't.
Military officials say the Haqqani problem
illustrates how the United States sometimes
needs Pakistan more than the other way
around. The U.S. military now counts the
Haqqani network as the single gravest threat
to U.S. forces fighting over the border in
Afghanistan, and badly wants Pakistan to
push the militants from their border refuges.
But the Pakistani answer seems to be that
unless and until the Haqqanis threaten Pak-
istan, they won't be a priority.
Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the U.S.
Joint Chiefs of Staff, was the latest U.S. offi-
cial to make the case in a visit to Pakistan's


capital last week. More than most U.S. offi-
cials, Mullen has cordial, long-standing rela-
tionships with Pakistan's generals, the
strongest power base inside the country.
Despite those ties, Mullen's quiet effort met
with a polite noncommittal from his hosts.
Mullen advises patience and humility in
dealing with Pakistan, a view not shared by
some leading Republicans in Congress.
Mullen said Pakistan doesn't get enough
credit for the push since spring against mili-
tants in the Swat valley and South Waziristan.
"Too many people eagerly and easily crit-
icise Pakistan for what they have not done,"
Mullen said Sunday, days after Pakistan's
military leaders took Mullen on a tour of a
reclaimed Swat.
"When I go to Swat, and look at what
they did there on the military I think it's
pretty extraordinary."
Most of the groups aligned against the
U.S. are in North Waziristan, a tribal area not
pressed hard by Pakistan's army. The only
firepower directed at militants there comes
from American missile-loaded drones.
Mullen told students at Pakistan's Nation-
al Defence University that the U.S. is con-
cerned about what it sees as a growing coor-
dination among terrorist networks in and
around Pakistan.
"I do not, certainly, claim that they are
great friends, but they are collaborating in
ways that quite frankly, scare me quite a bit,"
Mullen said last week. He did not come out
and say Pakistan needs to expand the fight
against militants. But his point was clear.
In an exchange of letters over recent
weeks, Obama asked for more cooperation
and Pakistan's president, Asif Ali Zardari,
pledged some additional help, U.S. officials
said. The officials spoke on condition of
anonymity to describe private correspon-
dence.
Zardari, reflecting the views of Pakistan's
powerful military, said his government will
move against militants that attack U.S. forces
when it is able to do so, the officials said.
That leaves ample room for Pakistan's
civilian leaders to pursue their own agenda -
and on their own schedule.
Without additional pressure from inside
Pakistan, the only other option is for the U.S.
to finish the fight against terrorists on its
own. But Pakistan doesn't allow outright
U.S. military action on its soil.
Mullen seemed to recognize that when he
told the military students that he knows the
U.S. is perceived as acting in its own interests
almost at any cost, so it can hardly ask others
not to put their own needs first.
"Sometimes that gets lost on us," he said.
(This article was written by Anne Gearan,
AP National Security Writer).


Comprehensive


economic


an


needs to be




articulated


EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank you for providing
this space in your column.
It is clear that The Bahamas
is in a difficult situation in
its quest of determining its
present and future econom-
ic pathway.
Seeing that the topic of
crime has now become the
chosen political football, the
focus as to where this coun-
try is heading economically,
has been relegated to the
backburner.
The angst presently with
this writer is that a compre-
hensive economic plan is not
being articulated by the
leaders or potential leaders
of this country.
In short, this lovely nation
should not be subjected to
another cycle of political
rhetoric especially during
such a severe economic cri-
sis.
We are all aware of the
issues that are plaguing the
country; however the prof-
fering of solutions is, if any-
thing, non-existent at lead-
ership level.
Economic policies or the
lack thereof:
Regarding the Central
Bank, one can state that
they are handling this crisis
with more than competent
dexterity, even with the
archaic policies that they
have to work with.
Yet, it is quite disturbing
that creative policies for this
monolith, which is the cata-
lyst of our progress, is not
being addressed due to dis-
tracted finger-pointing pub-
lic officials who are adding
nothing to the social and
economic protection of the
citizen or the solution to
crime debate.
Bahamians do not deserve
this; therefore each citizen
should be vigilant in asking
each political party for a
substantive report of their
economic plans.
Thus, somewhere, some-
how, sometime, we as a
country have to articulate a
firm position as to whether
The Bahamas will go the
way of Value Added Tax,
Income Tax or some form
of hybrid taxation system.
Somewhere, somehow,
sometime we have to decide
to implement codified immi-


gration laws. Somewhere,
somehow, sometime we
have to create legislation
that encourages entrepre-
neurship.
Somewhere, somehow,
sometime, we have to cre-
ate legislation that encour-
ages access to foreign ven-
ture capital; or legislation
that encourages partnership
with foreign investors. And
the list goes on.
Further, and at the risk of
being considered a heretic,
every government, save for
the attempts that was made
in the 1960's, has failed the
citizen miserably by not pro-
viding a comprehensive pro-
tectionist economic plan for
this country. It is under-
standable that there must be
some form of treaty with
other countries to some
extent; however this con-
stant capitulation by our
governments to comply with
every whim of the OECD's
mandates is, not only mad-
ness, but also quite danger-
ous. Thus, Minister Laing's
assertion that: "While we
can wrestle with the moral
arguments about this exer-
cise by the world's most
developed countries, keep-
ing it real, I should simply
wish to point out that there
is not a jurisdiction in the
world that is not moving
aggressively to meet the
standard set by them."
(From a Tribune article
written by Lindsay Thomp-
son regarding The Bahamas'
complying with OECD
mandates), is being erro-
neously applied as a reason
to implement policies, most
of which will adversely affect
this nation for decades to
come.
The point is; this belief
that embracing free trade,
multinationalism or com-
plying with OECD stan-
dards, when we have not yet
prepared the citizen to effec-
tively compete in a global-
ized world is, conservatively
speaking, bestowing perma-
nent economic oppression
on Bahamians. And
assuredly, the excuse which


FIT I'J


Please be advised that Executive Motors Ltd. and
Quality Auto Sales Ltd. will be closed as follows
during the Christmas Holidays:
Thursday, December 24, 2009 -
Christmas Eve - Closed at 1:00 p.m.

/ Friday, December 25, 2009
Christmas Day-Closed

)Monday, December 28, 2009 -


/
-"I.


]o-\ing Day Observed- CLOSED

Thursday, December 31, 2009 -
\ei\ \e-ir's Eve - Closed at 1:00 p.m.

Friday, january 1,2010-
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is being used that external
pressures forces developing
countries to comply with ill-
fitting policies become
absurd when one gets the
revelation that visionless
policymakers are treaso-
nously playing with our
future.
This is why the citizen
must stay focused on mak-
ing certain that the persons
we allow to be at the helm in
Parliament are serious about
making decisions that are
devoid of political cronyism
and are more focused on
people empowerment and
to a certain extent industry
protectionism.
Perhaps our leaders need
to review Ha-Joon Chang's
"Kicking Away the Ladder"
- Development Strategy in
Historical Perspective.
In short, I implore the cit-
izens of this country to shift
their attention from the
political babbling and
demand that our leaders
present structurally sound
socio-economic policies that
can strengthen each
Bahamian's worth over the
coming decades.
Voter apathy is not the
way to go.

DWAYNE J HANNA
Nassau,
November 26 2009.













EDITOR, The Tribune.

Two particular articles
have caught my eye in
the past week.
The first, in the USA
Today section, described
how cities in the United
States are combating
traffic congestion and
pollution by encouraging
the use of motor scoot-
ers. Interestingly, scooter
sales jumped over 40 per
cent in 2008 as gas prices
rose, and city managers
have developed cash
incentive programmes
and scooter friendly traf-
fic and parking schemes
to keep that momentum
going in the interests of
people movement and
the environment.
The second article told
of our own government's
scheme for the environ-
ment that will include
enforcement of vehicle
emission standards. Giv-
en that scooters emit less
greenhouse gases than
cars, it seems that there is
some synergy here where
scooter friendly policies
could mesh with the gov-
ernment's plans and pro-
vide benefits similar to
those targeted by US
cities.
I am led to believe
that the current practice
with regard to scooters is
for import duty to be
levied at 75 per cent,
more than the duty
levied on a car of similar
value, and that road traf-
fic licensing is no less for
a scooter than a car. In
light of changing world
circumstances with
respect to the environ-
ment, one suspects that a
review of these practices,
with the goal of creating
incentives for scooter
ownership, would carry
the dual benefit of reduc-
ing both our carbon foot-
print and our legendary
traffic congestion.

PAUL HUTTON
Nassau,
December 15, 2009


+>


^ \ ^






+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 5


Police searching for man in

connection with armed robbery


POLICE are searching
for a man who was charged
in a 2006 murder and is
facing three charges in
connection with another
murder in 2007.
Anyone who knows the
whereabouts of Stephen
"Die" Stubbs is asked to
contact the police immedi-
ately.
According to Press Liai-
son Officer Chrislyn Skip-
pings, he should be con-
sidered armed and danger-
ous.
Police did not say if
Stubbs is currently on bail.
Stubbs was charged with
murder, attempted murder
and conspiracy to commit
murder in December 2007,
in connection with the exe-
cution style killing of
Samuel "Moochea"
McKenzie and the shoot-
ing of Keith Woodside the
previous month.
He had previously been
charged with the murder
of Marcian Scott, the for-
mer police officer shot to
death in Pinewood Gar-
dens in 2006.
Stubbs is now wanted by
the Central Detective Unit
(CDU) in connection with
allegations of armed rob-
bery and possession of a
high powered weapon.
Police said Stubbs' last
known address was in
Ridgeland Park, Nassau,
and have described him as
5ft lOins, 1801bs, of medi-
um brown complexion and
a heavy build.
Also wanted by CDU in
connection with allegations


ElOP'ICA

EXER IATR


of armed robbery and pos-
session of a high powered
weapon is Timothy Cole,


38, also known as Timoth-
ee Gooding, whose last
known address was in
Dames Alley, Nassau.
Cole is described as 6ft
4ins, weighing 1801bs, of
medium build and medium
brown complexion.
Police consider Cole to
be armed and dangerous,
and warn he must be
approached with extreme
caution.
If you have any informa-
tion on the whereabouts of
Stubbs or Cole inform offi-
cers at your nearest police
station or contact Police
Emergency on 919 or 911.
You can also contact the
police control room on
322-3333, CDU on 502-
9930 or 502-9991, or you
can call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477).


Man questioned in connection

with confiscation of firearm
POLICE are questioning a 24-year-old Key West Street
man in connection with the confiscation of a firearm yesterday.
Press Liaison Officer Sergeant Chrislyn Skippings said offi-
cers were on patrol in the area of East Street and Cordeaux
Avenue at around 11am yesterday when they observed a dark
man with a pink scarf tied around his neck acting suspiciously.
"Officers stopped and began to approached the male, who
fled on foot. Officers gave chase and were able to recover a
black Beretta pistol with 10 live rounds of .9mm ammunition,"
she said.

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VACANCY


Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking the services of a Relationship Manager, Scotia Private
Client Group. This position will appeal to dynamic private banking professionals with
demonstrated ability to achieve strong results via profitable management of a private banking
portfolio.
Position Summary
The position is responsible for ensuring profitable portfolio growth and revenue generation
for the entire Scotia Private Client Group (SPCG). This will be achieved through aggressive
marketing and business development efforts, and the development of solid "Relationship
Banking" including the sound administration of each relationship and the delivery of premium
levels of service. The Relationship Manager is also responsible for developing quality
referrals from potential clients identified as being able to benefit from other products and
services offered through SPCG. The incumbent is also responsible for personal loan adjudication
and risk management within designated limits in order to contribute to profitable loan growth.
In addition, the incumbent is responsible for straightforward and knowledgeable service
through daily interactions to foster a relationship of mutual trust and confidence with our
clients and other employees.

Key Accountabilities for This Role. The ideal candidate must have the following competencies:
* Thorough knowledge of retail lending, investment, deposit and transaction services
* Thorough knowledge of conventional commercial support platform tools and systems,
products polices and procedures
* Thorough knowledge of interviewing, solicitation and negotiating skills
* Thorough knowledge of risk analysis techniques and credit adjudication policies and
processes as they apply to retail and conventional lending products
* Thorough knowledge of business development techniques
* Thorough knowledge of International Private Banking Market & Clientele
* Effective communication skills
* Knowledge of investment products and services, particularly as they relate to the High
Net Worth clients; this includes features, benefits, pricing policies and profitability levers
* Knowledge of the legal, regulatory, compliance, and audit requirements
* Knowledge of client life cycle needs/client segmentation/market analysis/current economic
and political events
* Excellent computer skills - Microsoft Office Word and Excel.

QUALIFICATIONS:
* University undergraduate and/or equivalent degree/experience preferred.
OTHER INFORMATION:
* May require some travel
* Scotiabank offers a highly competitive compensation and benefits package with tremendous
opportunities for personal and professional development.
Qualified candidates only should submit applications no later than January 15,2010 to:
Manager, Manpower & Succession Planning, Scotiaannk (Bahamas) Ltd., Rawson Square,
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas or e-mail ionie.diggiss@scotiabank.com
"Trademark of The Bank of Nova Scotia, used under license (where applicable). Scotia
Private Client Group is composed of the Scotiabank group of companies that provide private
client services, including Scotia Capital Inc., a Member CIPF.


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+


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNWI


A great gift

for everyone!

Perfect for family members,

colleagues, investors,

students and clients.


BAHAMAS HANDBOOK
AVAILABLE AT BOOKSTORES & NEWSSTANDS


What Bahamians want for the New Year


F STREET


TALK
LEO KNOWLES (right)
"What I would like for the New Year
is for crime to slow down a lot - a whole
lot. And just a lot more jobs. I wish
that Hubert Ingraham would set his
foot down and just bring back hanging
and electrocuting people, because once
you make one example out of two or
three people by hanging them or what-
ever, I think it will stop. Basically what
they are doing is taking guys in jail,
feeding them, clothing them, letting
them get their dentist, taking them to
the hospital, and whatever.
"That's what is bringing down the
government, because the government is
saying they don't have any money,
because they spending all the money
on the jail birds. If we could just do
what China does, hang people, sell
body organs, once you make an exam-
ple out of one, everything will start
slowing down. That is what I have to
say for the next year."
KAREN KEMP, food vendor
(top right)
"What I think about the New Year:
Well I notice most Bahamians are shop-
ping and shopping and shopping, and
they are not concerned about the New


Year. Christmas is only one day and
when you look at it, they are only
preparing themselves for one day, espe-
cially the monthly people.
"They are only preparing themselves
for one day and then they have six to
seven weeks to wait on a next pay
cheque. And then they will try to go
borrow money and say to other people
they don't have nothing. That's what I
think."
PRINCESS SAUNDERS (right)
"What I would like to see in the New
Year is an education system whereby if
children are rude or whatever, and not
co-operating with the teachers, you put
them somewhere else to be taught,
where they can graduate and get some
kind of degree, not just cast them out of
school to the streets, because there are
a lot of children I know out on the
streets who never graduated and they
are smoking dope, stealing and rob-
bing right where I live in the area.


These things are going on because the
people in the school system, the prin-
cipals, teachers, they don't care, they
don't take up time with these children,
and I think it is not fair. They are hol-
lering about how many children drop
out of school - it's because of them.
"If you take up time with these chil-
dren, they are looking for love. If you
take up time with them, trust me, this
same country would be a better place.
We wouldn't have as much crime as
we have right now in this country."


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MARKET STREET * P.O. BOX GT-2097 * TEL: 323-5782
FUNRA SRVCEFO


MOTHER DILLIS
BUTLER, 84


B a resident of Wilson Tract, who
died on 15th December, 2009,
H . will be held at Mission Baptist
Church, Hay Street, on
Thursday at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Dr. R. E.
Cooper Jr., assisted by Pastoral
Associates of The Mission
Baptist Church. Interment
follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive.
Left to carry out her legacy are: 1 brother: Bertram "Pepe"
Thurston; 3 sons: Crestwill Wilson, Charles Colebrooke II,
Alfred Lockhart; 2 daughters: Petrona Powell and Valerie
Cooper; 1 son-in -law: Chief Inspector Cleophas Cooper; 3
daughters-in-law: Marilyn Colebrooke, Geraldine Lockhart and
Eleanor Wilson; 15 grandchildren: Shawn Lightfoot, Sydney
Rolle, Anthon Powell, Ceotti, Canaz, and Cleovandra Cooper,
Charles III, Cordero, and Phelisha Colebrooke, Kyhiel and Kyra
Lockhart, Symone Wilson, Anya Major, Shanique and Angie;
2 adopted sons: Marcellinus Rolle and Samuel Berry; 8 nieces:
Charlesetta, Helena, Kayshila, Brittany, Cassie, Joyan, Norma
and Christie; 4 nephews: William "Waiese" Brown, Francisco
and Bertram Thurston II and III; 9 grand nieces: Patricka Russell,
Cutell Higgs, Chavale Hepburn, Chantell Saunders, Cansharah
Saunders, Sarya-ray Smith, Erica Cooke, Albertine Davis, and
Vakate; 6 grand nephews: Charles Saunders Jr., Wyberg, Walden,
Waiese Jr., Akiel Brown and Doddridge Davis. Other friends
and relatives including: Kenneth "K.K."Knowles, John Rosevere,
Anamae and Samuel Strachan, The Mission Baptist Church
family, Rev. Dr. R.E. Cooper and Dr. Daphne Cooper and
family, Rev. Irene Coakley and family, Dr. RubyAnn Darling
and family, Nazel Johnson and Family, Shirley Pratt and family,
Mother Harriet Darling, Ruthmae Rose, Shirley McDuffy and
family, Katie and Geraldine Washington, Sonny Dean, Nick
and Rev. Dedrie Lightbourne, Leonard Dames, Dr. Raleigh
Butler, Dr. Delton Farquharson, Dr. Holiday, Dr. Spencer-
Prince, Ruthmae Rose, Ingrid Bethune, Michelle Dames, Mildred
Bostfield, Dr. Fran, Beverley Douglas, Gladys Lightfoot, James
and Ivy Murry, Shelia McSweeney and family, Mt. Olive Chapter
No. 791, Love and Charity Chapter No. 12, Mizpah Tertullien,
Karen Russell, Eloise Sands, Vernice Paul and many others too
numerous to mention.
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. on Wednesday & on
Thursday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.


I


Re
i







+>


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


The aromas of Christmas -





in Guyana and the Bahamas


GEN ROUS










77HELPINGS



This holiday season, we're asking you

to reach into your heart and your

pocket and make a contribution to,

THE CANCER SOCIETY OF THE

BAHAMAS.

For the month of December, when

you purchase a 5 gallon bottle of

AQUAPURE water at a special price

of $4.75, SUPER VALUE and

AQUAPURE will DONATE 400 on

every purchase to:

The Cancer Society of The Bahamas.

Sponsored by: .o4



4j " U SUPER VALUE FOOD STORES LTD.

k-& S



AOQUAPURE
PURIFIED DRINKING WAFEL

AQUAPURE - YOU CAN DRINK WITH CONFIDENCE


Peasonalise

Your childs name in song!

Imagine the delight on your little
one's face when they hear his


or her name being sung by
Barney or Disney Princesses!
Stop by the Christian Book
Shop today and produce
your own on-the-spot CD
with Disney Princess or
d Barney songs. They will
actually sing your child's
- name in the lyrics. You will
even receive a CD and case
with your child's name!
What a great Christmas present
for the special child in your life.


For mor inomto cal 32.36,
or com in an produc you ow CD
at th str on Roet Stee today


The Christian Book Shop
*a ,Vhf adte Li Ihe G - The Bah ama


TO UGH CALL


By LARRY SMITH
MY HOUSE reeks of garlic
and vinegar.
It always does at this time of
year. That's because the wife
has an almost religious compul-
sion to make Carne de Vinagre
e Alhos, a traditional Por-
tuguese Christmas dish.
Not that she's Portuguese, I
hasten to add. Actually she's
from Guyana - and mostly
Amerindian, with admixtures of
African, Dutch and Welsh.
In Guyana, Carne de Vina-
gre e Alhos is better known as
garlic pork. It involves pickling
for several days a few pounds
of chops in vinegar spiced with
salt, hot peppers, garlic and
thyme, and then frying the meat
on Christmas morning. Served
with pink gin it's better than
bacon, I have to say.
The Guyanese think and talk
about food even more than
Bahamians do. But they have
infinitely more variety to choose
from. In fact, the country likes to
refer to itself as the land of six
peoples - meaning East Indi-
ans, Africans, Amerindians, Chi-
nese, Portuguese and other
Europeans.
As one transplanted
Guyanese told me: "You have
to realize that with our mixed
population we are known to
have bastardized just about all
the food dishes from each cul-
ture and made them Guyanese."
Garlic pork is still a popular
dish in Guyana, although there
are not many Portuguese left in
the country.
They arrived in 1835 from
the island of Madeira, and
became successful merchants
(much as the Greeks did here).
They were a voice of modera-
tion during the 1960s under the
leadership of Peter D'Aguiar.
His middle class United Force
hung precariously for a time
between the East Indian Peo-
ple's Progressive Party led by
Cheddi Jagan and the African
People's National Congress led
by Forbes Burnham.
The original inhabitants of
Guyana were Arawak tribes, the
same people who migrated up
the Caribbean to settle the
Bahamas. In European terms,
Guyana was initially a Dutch
trading post and later became a
British colony. Enslaved
Africans were brought to work
the plantations, and after aboli-
tion they were replaced by
indentured labourers from
India.
In 1953 the first free elec-
tions in British Guiana (as
Guyana was then known) pro-
duced a convincing win for
Jagan's PPP (the country's first
political party) with Burnham


Guiana politicians are forever
looking for excuses why they
cannot do something; it is the
only country he knew in which a
plausible excuse for inaction was
an acceptable substitute for
action," the State Department
memo said.
Of course, that was before
Sir Ralph had been appointed
governor of the Bahamas, where
he probably gained a better
appreciation of the term "inac-
tion".
In 1964 the British and
Americans engineered Burn-
ham's takeover through elec-
tions based on proportional rep-
resentation. That led to decades
of racial conflict, repression,
emigration and rigged elections,
so that Guyana is now the poor-
est of the former British West
Indian territories. Burnham
remained in power until his
death in 1985. The 1992 elec-
tions were then won by Jagan
(who also died in office), and
the PPP has been in power ever
since. What a monumental
waste of time.
When Tough Call was a
yoot-man, the intelligentsia
regarded Burnham's so-called
Co-operative Republic of
Guyana as the most politically
advanced society in the region.
But eventually, that facade
crumbled to the point where
cans of sardines became the
unofficial currency.
As you can imagine, all of
this produced hundreds of thou-
sands of well-educated and
mixed-up Guyanese refugees
who fled to better lives in Cana-
da, Britain, the US and the
Bahamas. Even the Chinese
grocers left. And that's why we
are making garlic pork on
Christmas day at my house.
Isn't it wonderful how the
aromas of seasonal cooking can
conjure up such fond memories?
What do you think?
Send comments to
larrv@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com


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as a top lieutenant. But within a
few months the British sus-
pended the constitution to pre-
vent "extremists" from setting
up a one-party state allied to the
Soviet bloc. An emergency was
declared and Guyana returned
to crown colony status backed
by British troops.
The context of the time is
instructive. The Soviet dictator
Josef Stalin had only just died -
after sponsoring a bloody three-
year war in Korea. Rebellions
in Eastern Europe were being
crushed by Soviet tanks, and the
American spies who had given
nuclear secrets to the Russians
were executed. The two oppos-
ing blocs faced each other with
atomic weapons in an armed
truce. And throughout the
1950s, the Third World was an
increasingly important arena of
Cold War competition.
Burnham went on to form
the PNC in 1955, but Jagan was
re-elected in 1957 and 1961. By
this time the British were ready
to grant the colony indepen-
dence under Jagan's leadership,
but the Americans were so flus-
tered about the prospect of
"Castroism" in the region -
since Fidel had recently taken
over in Cuba and become a
Soviet client - that they gave
Guyana a lot more attention
than it deserved.
According to a declassified
memo from then Secretary of
State Dean Rusk: "We are not
inclined to give people like
Jagan the same benefit of the
doubt which was given two or
three years ago to Castro."
The British, in their haste to
decolonise, took a more san-
guine view. In a 1961 meeting
with a US State Department
representative, the governor of
British Guiana discounted the
view that Jagan was a Soviet
puppet. According to Sir Ralph
Grey, Jagan's greatest weakness
was hs s lack of appreciation of
the responsibility of public
office:
"Sir Ralph said that in British






+


PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Records of Bishop Fraser's cell


phone calls submitted as evidence & /


By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net


PHONE records documenting calls
from Bishop Earl Randy Fraser's cel-
lular phone to the virtual com-
plainant's phone were submitted into
evidence by prosecutors yesterday as
Fraser's retrial on charges of unlawful
sex continued before Magistrate Car-
olita Bethel.
Fraser, who is on $10,000 bail, is
accused of having a sexual relation-
ship with a 16-year-old girl between
July 2005 and February 2006.
Frederick Marsh, a business ana-
lyst in BTC's IT section, presented


phone records from November 8,
2005 to February 8, 2006 for a cellular
subscriber registered under the name:
Pilgrim Baptist Church.
According to the records he pre-
sented to the court, during that peri-
od there were 18 calls made from the
cellular phone registered to Pilgrim
Baptist Church to the virtual com-
plainant's cellular phone, usually
between the hours of 7am and 9pm.
Also taking the stand again yester-
day was woman Detective Inspector
Marcell Hamilton-Sands, who was
further cross-examined by the
defence.
She said she recalled that she had
spoken to an aunt of the complainant


some time in April 2006 and recorded
a statement from her.
She also told the court that she had
obtained a copy of a CD which con-
tained explicit voice-mail messages
which had been left on the com-
plainant's cellular phone.
Fraser's defence attorney then
asked why the officer had not taken
the cellular phone itself as evidence.
Inspector Sands said she asked for it,
but that the woman said she did not
have it at the time.
Inspector Sands admitted that she
could not speak to the integrity of
what was on the CD.
The case has been adjourned to
March 25 and 26, 2010.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

ATTAP VIEW

INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

LUSTANO HOLDINGS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
TEWKESBURY VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 21st day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

KLEE BUSINESS CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

CLEDO ASSETS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

MASHAM INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

WALSHE INVESTMENTS

PTE. LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

EQUUS HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 21st day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Man accused of sex with
girl, 14, appears in court
A 37-YEAR-OLD Union Village man accused of having
sex with a 14-year-old girl was arraigned in a Magistrate's
Court yesterday.
Dwayne John Brice is accused of committing the offence
on November 22.
He was not required to enter a plea to the charge during
his arraignment before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez and
was granted $15,000.
Brice was ordered to report to the nearest police station
every Saturday and Wednesday before 6pm.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

JEPPER HOLDINGS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
HIKALI MANAGEMENT

GROUP LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

DILLS PAISLER

HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


I ODSUS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O







+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 11


LOCALN


Brent Symonette defends the




Bahamas' human rights record


FROM page one

In a four-page press release outlin-
ing the Government's reasons for
abstaining on a recent United Nation's
vote on three human rights resolu-
tions regarding the actions of Iran,
Burma and North Korea, Mr Symon-
ette said the Bahamas chose not to
vote because of "factual errors" in the
resolutions, which were highlighted
by the ambassador of Iran.
Additionally, there were no rebut-
tals to these criticisms from the co-
sponsors of the resolution when the
matter was before the UN's Commit-
tee for consideration, he said.
"Furthermore there were no pro-
posals from the co-sponsors of the res-
olution to request a separate vote on
each of the substantive paragraphs of
the resolution, which would have
allowed countries to express their posi-
tions on 'controversial' sections," said
Mr Symonette's statement, which
accompanied the full text of the
Bahamas' statement to the UN during
consideration of the resolutions and


the UN member state
voting record. 4
"When the matter was 4'
considered in the Ple-
nary on December 18,
2009, the Bahamas
abstained, as it did in the
Third Committee, along
with 59 member states.
Forty-nine member
states voted against and
74 voted in favour," he
continued, stressing that
the Bahamas did not
vote against the resolu-
tions.
Mr Symonette, the
country's deputy prime
minister, said the
Bahamas has complied
with important sanctions
against Iran and the Democratic Peo-
ple's Republic of Korea under the UN
Security Council Resolution, adding
that the Bahamas is sharp-eyed in
their implementation.
His statements came in the wake of
stinging criticism from Ms Avant who
last week issued a public statement


'I.


faulting the Govern-
ment for its decision.
In her remarks, Ms
Avant noted that for-
merly, the Bahamas
was consistently one of
the "brave souls" in the
region that stood up for
human rights. She said
it is the "fervent hope"
of the United States
that the Bahamas and
other Caribbean coun-
tries that abstained or
voted against the reso-
lutions will reconsider.
She also chided the
Bahamas' explanation
for abstaining and its
statement that the
issues raised in the res-


solutions should be addressed during
the Human Rights Council's (HRC)
Universal Periodic Review (UPR),
which each country submits to every
four years.
"The problem with this argument
is that Iran has not facilitated the vis-
it of a single rapporteur or indepen-


dent expert of the Human Rights
Council to its country in over four
years.. .Iran's review is February 2010,
Burma in 2011, and DPRK at the end
of 2009. If we were to do what the
Bahamas suggests and wait for the
UPR, this would mean the interna-
tional community would say nothing
about these situations in the mean-
time," Ms Avant wrote, in part.
According to Mr Symonette, Korea
underwent its UPR on December 7
adding that Iran will be subject to the
same on February 15, 2010.
"Consequently these countries are
about to be exposed to the full glare of
the intense spotlight of this dedicated
organ of the United Nations for the
Protection of Human Rights and Fun-
damental Freedoms," he said, adding
that a number of the co-sponsors of
the relevant resolutions are members
of the HRN and can ensure intense
scrutiny on the three countries in ques-
tion.
* The full text of the Bahamas' posi-
tion on the matter as relayed to the
UN will be printed in tomorrow's Tri-
bune.


Jamaican man


charged with

murder over


stabbing death

FROM page one

According to reports,
Mr Rolle and Ms Cole-
brooke were brutally
beaten and stabbed in
the area of Palm Beach
Street off Wulff Road.
Residents told The Tri-
bune that a sharp-
tipped tyre wrench was
used.
Scott, of Miami, Flori-
da, was not required to
enter a plea to the
charges during his
arraignment before
Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in court 1, Bank
Lane.
He was remanded to
Her Majesty's Prison.
The case was adjourned
to January 19 for men-
tion in Court 10, Parlia-
ment Street.


PLP committee resorts to

writing to Malcom Adderley


FROM page one

whether or not the MP was
indeed staying with the party
or taking up a post as a
Supreme Court Justice in
2010.
However, after numerous
attempts by members, it is
understood that Mr Davis has
now had to formally write to
the PLP MP who up to this
time was allegedly "hard" to
catch up with.
While this came as news to
some within Mr Adderley's
camp, a source close to the
MP said he was quite sur-
prised their efforts had failed
as the MP was quite "easy to
access."
"Mr Adderley is downtown
almost every day so I find it
hard to believe that they can-
not find him. But I guess it is
like the old people say, a hog
knows just where to rub," he
said.
As it is well known within in
the PLP, Mr Adderley has
been very vocal about the
"mistreatment" he claims he
endured under the party's
leader Perry Christie. At the
time, it was reported that Mr
Adderley had been promised
the post of Attorney General
prior to the PLP's 2002 elec-
tion. However, upon gaining
the government, Mr Adder-
ley was reportedly called into
the then PM's office and
offered the post of Speaker of
the House of Assembly. After
an exchange of "heated"
words, it is alleged that Mr
Adderley was then offered the
post of Chairman of the
Water and Sewerage Board -
a position he again turned


down.
Therefore, it came as no
surprise to many that the Eliz-
abeth MP was essentially
"black balled" by the party
and offered no assistance in
the upkeep of his constituency
in terms of jobs or road work
improvements.
Mr Christie has gone on
record to state that he has had
no communication with Mr
Adderley in recent months,
and emphasized that he would
expect out of courtesy to be
informed by the MP of any
plans that he may have that
pertain to his political future.
Following the PLP's loss at
the polls in 2007, Mr Adderley
took up the post of Chairman
of the Gaming Board, a posi-
tion that he continues to hold
to this day much to the cha-
grin of everyday PLPs.
With this post reportedly
having been offered by Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham,
PLPs have questioned Mr
Adderley's loyalty to the par-
ty even more-so now that
fresh rumours are circulating
that the MP has again been
offered a new post to take up
the seat that Supreme Court
Justice Cheryl Albury will be
vacating early next year.
If Mr Adderley were to
take the job he would ulti-
mately have to resign from his
seat in the House of Assembly
and force a by-election in the
Elizabeth constituency. Many
within the political realm have
speculated that this could be a
pre-emptive strike by the
Prime Minister to "test the
waters" of the electorate on
his chances of winning a snap
election, if one were to be
called.


Western Air flight to Haiti crash lands

FROM page one
and was forced to land with the landing gear up on Sunday
morning.
The 19 passengers are all Haitian citizens. No one was injured
in the crash.
Haitian officials are investigating the Metroliner SA 227 air-
craft and the cause of the crash, while Inspector Major under-
takes an independent study of the Western Air fleet.
Bahamian authorities will assist the Haitian investigation if
called to, but their help has not yet been requested, Inspector
Major said.
He added: "Our investigation is about prevention; to see if
the problem reported by the pilot is isolated or if it could be a
trend with the other aircraft.
"If we find it is a trend we have to notify all the operators, the
manufacturer of the aircraft, the Federal Aviation Associa-
tion, and the National Transportation Safety Board."
Western Air has a fleet of around eight aircraft, including four
Metroliners SA 227's and four Saab SF 340's.
Inspector Major was in Inagua until Monday, where he was
investigating the plane crash that killed two pilots on Thursday.
The Falcon Air jet operated by the Florida Aviation Group
was seen hurtling to the ground engulfed in flames and crashed
in a remote area of eastern Inagua at around 7.30pm, sending
shock waves across the island to the small settlement of Math-
ew Town.
The pilot has been identified as Harold Roy Mangels, 69, of
Beaumont, Texas, and his first officer as Freddie Castro, 55, an
American citizen born in Venezuela who lived in Pembroke
Pines, Florida.
Inspector Major said the men were moving the aircraft from
Aruba to Fort Lauderdale and had stopped at the Joaquin
Balaguer International Airport in Santo Domingo, Dominican
Republic, before setting off for Fort Lauderdale when they
crashed.
The aircraft owned by North American company Wells Far-
go and operated by Florida Aviation Group was completely
destroyed in the crash, and the pilot and first officer were
identified by pilot's licences preserved in their wallets.
Evidence taken from the scene will be examined to help
determined the cause of the crash.


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IINSIE Lca3sors ew


Jimoh in town to





train with Tonique


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
HOUSTON native Funmi
Jimoh is having the time of
her life training here in the
Bahamas with Olympic and
World Champion Tonique
Williams-Darling.
Here since Sunday, Jimoh
will continue her training
through January 6, one day
after she competes in the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations' Odd dis-
tance Meet on January 5 at
the Thomas A. Robinson
Track and Field Stadium.
"Tonique told me that the
Bahamas is a nice place to be,
so I was anxious to come,"
said Jimoh before she went
through a workout session
yesterday at the College of the
Bahamas' Wellness Center.
"The weather here is just
that much better than it is at
home, so this is a nice escape
for me to focus on, but also
to train and to have some fun
as well."
Jimoh, the 5-foot-8 long
jump specialist who graduated
from Rice University, said
training for her 2010 indoor
debut on January 15 in Hous-
ton.
"It's a chance for me to get
stronger and to focus on my
training before I get back to
the track," she said. "It's only
going forward for me, no turn-
ing back."
Although she's only been
on the pro circuit for the past
two years, Jimoh said she met
Williams-Darling when she
was training at the University
of Texas and they became
friends.
"She's just such a nice per-
son with a lot of energy,"
Jimoh said. "So that's the kind
of people that I like to being
around. She's just a lot of fun
to be with."
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AMERICAN long jumper Funmi Jimoh gets the medicine ball from
World and Olympic champion Tonique Williams-Darling during a
workout session yesterday at COB's Wellness Center.


Williams-Darling Track Club,
Williams-Darling said she feel
like "Christmas," having
Jimoh in town.
"I like when my friends
come here to visit," said
Williams-Darling, who took
Jimoh to the Straw Market
yesterday before practice. "It's
her first visit here, so I really
want her to have a good time.
"Before she started her pro-
fessional career, she has never
travelled outside of the United
States. So other than the
meets she competed in
Europe, this is her first trip to
the Caribbean."
Of course, one of the sites
that Williams-Darling said she
couldn't avoid taking Jimoh
too was the Tonique Williams-
Darling Highway.
Jimoh's visit came on the
heels of Jamaican quarter-mil-
er Novleen Williams-Mills, a
former rival of Williams-Dar-
ling. Williams-Mills was here
earlier this month.
"Even now that I'm retired,
it's really good to see the
many athletes who are coming
here to visit and train," said
Williams-Darling, who enter-
tained some others when they
came from the recent wedding


of Michael Mathieu.
COB's Assistant Athletic
Director and Track coach
Bradley Cooper said it's just a
wonderful opportunity for
them to showcase their Well-
ness facility.
"It's a wonderful opportu-
nity for the College of the
Bahamas to host the athletes
at the Wellness Center," he
said. "It's something that
shows the class of centre that
we have because they can see
how good the place is. The
environment is really great for
them to train."
Since graduating from col-
lege, the 25-year-old 2002
USA Youth and Junior high
jump champion is still look-
ing for her breakthrough as a
medallist at one of the major
international meets.
Having finished third at the
US Olympic trials in 2008,
Jimoh went to Beijing, China
where she posted a 12th place
in her Olympic Games debut.
In August at the 12th IAAF
world Championships in Ath-
letics in Berlin, Germany,
Jimoh was 21st overall after
she her llth place in Group

SEE page 13


AMERICAN long jumper Funmi Jimoh strutxs her stuff as she lifts
some weights yesterday at COB's Wellness Center.


I ODSUSSOISO HSIPAGE LG ON5T WWW.TIBUE22CO5







+


TRIBUNE SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 13


Stuart home


with teammates





for the holidays


BAHAMIAN long jumper Bianca 'BB' Stuart share a moment with her SUI team-mates from left:
Malaikah Love, Judeka Adams and Gwendolyn Berry on their initial visit to the Bahamas.


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
BIANCA Stuart's long
jump athletic eligibility at
Southern Illinois University
might be over, but her con-
nection to the Saluki Athletics
Programme is not done.
The Saluki's most out-
standing female long jumper
ever, having left her mark in
the record books both indoors
and outdoors, is spending the
Christmas holiday with three
of her team-mates.
Arriving in town yesterday
to train here for the next two
weeks are triple jumpers
Judeka Adams and Malaikah
Love and multiple events
competitor Gwendolyn Berry.
Yesterday at the College of
the Bahamas' Wellness Cen-
ter, only Berry began her first
day of training, while Adams
and Love were busy getting
adjusted to the environment.
"They came down for a
vacation from that cold
weather in Illinois," said Stu-
art, who is hosting the three
athletes until January 5.
"They will be training, sight-
seeing, swimming, chilling and
going to junkanoo."
Although her eligibility is
done, Stuart said she still feels
a part of the Saluki's athletic
team and so she still considers
the three athletes as her team-
mates.
The trio are gearing up for
their indoor opener on Janu-
ary 16, while Stuart is expect-
ed to compete in her first
meet in March. However, she
intends to return to SIU in
January where she will con-
tinue to train.
Adams, 19, said she's
known Stuart for over a year
and so when she got the
chance to come here to spend
Christmas with her, she could-
n't pass it up.
"Just flying over the
turquoise water was amaz-
ing," said Adams, who is mak-
ing her first trip out of the
United States. "Everything is
so relaxing, even the traffic.
"I think the first thing that
got to me when I came


Jimoh in town to

train with Tonique

FROM page 12
A. Even though she haven't
had a top 10 finish yet, Jimoh
said the past two experiences
have been a learning experi-
ence.
"Now I know that it's a lot
of hard work," she insisted.
"So I'm trying to keep it
going."
Jimoh, the current No.2
ranked jumper in the United
States, is hoping that her
training here will help to
prepare her for 13th IAAF
World Indoor Champi-
onships in Doha, Qatar in
March.
As for her trip here so far,
Jimoh said it's been more
than she anticipated.
"I love it here so far. It's
so relaxing and comfortable
here," she stated.
While she's still a relative-
ly young competitor on the
international scene, Jimoh
said so far she's only had one
opportunity to compete
against a Bahamian.
That was Jackie Edwards
in a meet they participated in
last year in England in the
Five nation meet.
Hopefully, with Edwards
making a return after an
injury and Bianca 'BB' Stuart
getting ready to launch her
pro career, Jimoh said she's
looking forward to future
encounters with the Bahami-
ans starting in Doha.
In the meantime, Jimoh
said she she intends to eat as
much Bahamian food as pos-
sible, including macaroni and
conch, before she rushes out
to junkanoo on Boxing Day.


through the airport was to see
a poster of two black women.
That threw me off. Being
from the United States, every-
thing is so commercial. So it
was like wow."
While here, Adams said she
intends to take in every bit of
the Bahamian culture, includ-
ing the food, the beach, fish
fry and the junkanoo.
As for her relationship with
Stuart, Adams said she has
definitely been a role model
for her.
"As a jumper at SIU, she
has really had an awesome
career," said Adams, a long
and triple jumper. "I really
look up to her."
For the past three years,
Love and Stuart were room-
mates at SIU. But although
she's heard so much about the
Bahamas from Stuart, Love
said it's been more than she
ever dreamt.
"It's been a culture shock,"
she pointed out. "It's really
colourful and people are just
hanging out everywhere. It's
just not like the States or
where I come here."
One of the things that has
fascinated the 21-year-old
Love so far is the many stray
dogs that she's seen running
around the island.
But Love said she expects
to have a really good time
here because she's been real-
ly looking forward to her first
trip out of the United States
and sharing it with her room-
mate.
"It's been fun. It's kind of
different to see how people
from so far apart are so alike
in so many ways," Love said.


* -mm


"So it's just great to be here."
And Berry, the 20-year-old
thrower, said she and Stuart
have been best friends at SIU
and so she too just had to
make the trek here for this
vacation.
"It's been very good. It's
very different from America,
but I love it. I just wish I don't
have to leave," said the native
of St. Louis, who is now in
her junior year as a Sulaki's.
Berry said Stuart has been
like a big sister and she loves
her as a friend. So she's look-
ing forward to spending her
time here with her, especially
going to junkanoo.
Bradley Cooper, the Assis-
tant Athletic Director and
head track coach at COB, had
a chance to help Berry go
through her workout yester-
day at the Wellness Center.
He noted that he hopes to
take advantage of the expe-
rience.
"Having already qualified
for the NCAA Indoor Cham-
pionships, I think it's a plus
to have someone like her
train here," said Cooper of
Berry.
"It gives a chance to look at
what she's doing and hope-
fully I can incorporate that in
the training that I'm doing
here with people like Jenny
Jacques and Julie Duncanson
and hopefully bring them to
the level where they can com-
pete against them in the
future."
Stuart, the national cham-
pion, is one of the candidates
for the BAAA's collegiate
Female Athlete of the Year
at the luncheon on Sunday.


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PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Junior Male Athlete of the Year


By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

i. Wannah Bail - Basket-
ball
This has potential to be
one of the most influential


stories in Bahamian sports,
yet continues to fly beneath
the radar. Bahamians are
about to have a major impact
on the landscape of profes-
sional basketball, and Bail
could lead this charge for a
new generation. The Mychal


Thompson, Cecil Rose,
Osborne Lockhart, Charles
Thompson quartet came
along and dominated high
school basketball in South
Florida almost two decades
before I even knew what a
basketball was, but I've


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that the "Jackson Generals"
changed the face of Bahami-
an basketball forever. We
may be in the midst of wit-
nessing a renaissance.
There's the talent, the hype,
and the production on the
floor, all this current group
(Dwight Miller, Probese Leo,
Bail, Michael Carey Jr, Wal-
tia Rolle) needs is a cool
nickname. We'll work on
that.
In the latest projections of
the ESPNU Class of 2012
prospects, Bail is one of nine
players tied with the top
overall grade of 98. If ESPN
scouts think he's two points
away from being a perfect
player, how do I not make
him the Junior Male Athlete
of the Year!? I don't think
we fully fathom what this
means. In just two years, Bail
has gone from an unknown
from the Bahamas to the top
ranked recruit in the nation.
Had this still been the age of
prep to pros without the
mandatory one year of col-
lege rule, Bail would possi-
bly be a lottery pick for the
2013 NBA Draft if he chose
to declare. Right now Bail is
pegged as a "one and done"
player in the mould of Kevin
Durant, Greg Oden, Demar
DeRozan and others who
spent just a single year in the
NCAAs.
The 6ft 8ins 190 pound for-
ward currently a member of
the Village School, in Bay-
town, Texas also stars for the
Houston Franchise All Stars,
an AAU squad run by Nike
and Reebok.
Am I a little biased
towards basketball? Proba-
bly. Am I overstating how
important high school bas-
ketball is in America?
Absolutely. Then again, let's
revisit this issue in 2013 or
2014 when Bail is a lottery
pick, signs a shoe deal with
Nike and his jersey becomes
the most imported item to
the Bahamas since...well the
most legally imported item
ever. By the way, eighth on
the ESPNU top 100 list for
the Class of 2012, Cecil
Rose's nephew L.J Rose.
Believe me when I say we
will talking about this group
for decades to come.

ii. Raymond Higgs - Track
and Field
Higgs has cemented his
status as one of the most crit-
ically acclaimed junior high
jumpers in the Bahamas with
yet another season atop the
medal stand at the region's
most popular meet. Higgs
took his third consecutive
gold medal in his signature


event at the 2009 Carifta
Games in St. Lucia. His leap
of 2.21m set a new CARIF-
TA record in the Under-20
division, his second division-
al record at the meet after he
cleared 2.13 in the Under-17
division two years ago. Dur-
ing the 2009/8 season, Higgs
also equalled the National
Record in the High Jump,
had the 11th best jump in the
World Leading Junior List,
and was a member of both
the Central American and
Caribbean (CAC) and Pan
American Junior national
teams. By the way, Higgs also
found time to excel on the
hardwood as well. He was
named an Athens Banner
Herald Class A first team
honoree, was named to the
Georgia Sports Writers 1st
Team All State, and named
to the Atlanta Journal Con-
stitution 2nd Team All State.

iii. Elvis Vereance Burrows
- Swimming
Burrows followed up a
standout 2008 where he
earned a berth on the Bei-
jing Olympic team, with a
statistically improved 2009
season. The University of
Kentucky Wildcat senior
Competed for the Bahamas
at the 13th FINA World
Championships where he set
career-best times in all three
events (50 free, 100 free and
100 fly). He set new national
records in four events: 23.74s
in the 50 fly, 53.51s in the 100
fly, 22.39s in the 50 free and
50.88s in the 100free. At
Kentucky, he earned two All-
America honours as a mem-
ber of the 200-freestyle and
200-medley relays at the
NCAA Championships and
set career-best collegiate
times in all three events as a
junior . Burrows set a new
school-record in the 100-but-
terfly at the SEC Champi-
onships and earned a bronze
medal as the third leg of the
200-free relay team.

iv. Warren Fraser - Track
and Field
No athlete embodied the
spirit of the Bahamian team
like Fraser's performance in
the U-20 100m final at the


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


2009 CARIFTA games.
Against a stacked heavily
favoured competition, Fraser
sacrificed it all across the
final 30 meters, stumbling to
the line and injuring his ankle
in the process, but came
away with a silver medal.
Fraser's was the first medal
of the meet for the Bahamas
in the U-20 division. He also
was a finalist at the Pan Am
Junior Championships in his
signature event.

v.Michael Carey Jr - Bas-
ketball
Like Bail, Carey's recruit-
ment stock has continued to
skyrocket in the state of
Texas and has now reached
national acclaim as NCAA
Div I programmes begin
clamouring for his services
two years in the near future.
In the latest ESPNU rank-
ings for the class of 2012,
Carey is listed as the fourth
ranked point guard prospect
in state of Texas and the 17th
ranked point guard in the
nation.

Honourable Mention
Robin LaFrance - Basket-
ball
Hugh Campbell MVP
Honors and two of the
biggest shots down the
stretch of the National
Championship game
returned the floating trophy
to Grand Bahama and gave
Norris Bain his fifth title, all
on the shoulders of his star
guard.

Anfernie Seymour - Soft-
ball
I'm not about to grand-
stand about his performance
in this year's BAISS Junior
Boys Softball Championship,
but it terms of production at
the plate, defense in the field,
leadership, and the overall
aura of "Holy crap he's at
the plate again" that blan-
keted Freedom Farm field
with each plate appearance.
In four playoff games, includ-
ing the championship series,
Seymour went 11-13 for a
batting average of .846 with
four home-runs, 13 RBI and
nine runs to lead SAC to the
title.


Bethel Brothers Morticians

Naemau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNEAL SRVIC FO


ANTHONY'
TREVOR
COOP ER, 51
of MITe Trrace West, Coll1ins
AVU111I.W. will b-chtuld onE
Tbunq4~y. De~cemtber 24Ith.
I r(-0I~m pithe rChumb aciiGod
of rohcy. East Sucet,
Talb=ri~ Bishoip Frainklyni
Furgu~on will officiated.
Inilermrntn will follow ini
Lakeview Meirino ia adens,
JFEK. Dive.


He is 5tirvived tby his wifr, Brenda Cooper: sonl, Dr- KeinG
grandchildreun. iamai Xn gCko arflicd Davis. O0i6ia Johnsonl
Cooper-Ligh~tf.xi. and Mcks Mcenciiybrotheri-in-Iaw.
Ricando Johnsion, UR~hainl I ighirrxil. PaLII McWccny aind
Johnson, Ti~ffan- yJohnson and Angel aCoop'tr (ElI thi~wra :
Ron~s-in-law, Jamal Gai'field Da%-ii and Karem Bc ched;daughici-
in-lau. J ill Iohnwin. nephew%,Jama1 Rolkl. Dominique Johnson,
Antotine PULifd. Raitiad WoxW ,Tai i~;..g1tfwL, tM~rq c
McKenyie. Aurcia and Reio Deal- nieccs. Shak~il Rolle,
I .:quinla C~2ffyt, Rr~IInfi� ML'KenIi,!L, Arina and Caimili"Ii
MeWeeiiy- uncles and aunts Advira and Bishop Brice
I'mPN~m, It)Lwuh4I i~MkChi&l KI-iorn, hIconor (:LhpLur.
Rukdy and Yvonne Cop~, Fred Coo per. Ki npleiy and Linids
Gmirti, Inez I)InL-.n~dln, Friiz Sr, iniL �hi.!ih (;rLni and farmi Iv,
Graiivilk- ad June M~cKenzie- Syhyia McKenzic Royiston and
MR Wu NKcnA . , Lisit aTWPaiirk RtAWk, Shairon Mc~cnzic
�TMN~ MaxuincPaitier: omm~iris, Winston Tharn pon. Dodnrs
Wayne and Linda Thunpson and Familyv. Dr. (N3dkc%. d d
Verneque Thompson and family, Dr- Windy and W6%tioe
Wiliams anud iarnily, Hester NMayri-vl, Dwight Grant, Zila
'RoIfini, .Donnaa -i c~~ve nd lamifiA. FrIuGr..(tantJr. and fwdyi,
Bevrrlv Fux anid amilv. Rhwidu Ill]al and rurnik JiT mothv
Gramrti MakGtant, Kenon lGu'r~ari ad fain It%. Uvevrneana~
Alinrice (3rauit, Lindley Graunt. Tbeo. NardG:, Theadata anid
Almon<~do NPLHLI. Alfredc P0IiILT ind lirnfly, KuiilvII
MrKeftzie and farnih, fdInv Blatc anid family. pciai friends,
Smith Camipbell anid [amilv, %ViIllic, Dr. Amir Sultami, Dr.

Myra Burrow%. i he Bodti-cfamndF, TIMMnY" atlicr rcatiVCS arnd
an~d fainiIly, Ellen Munnal.s and faikiiL6. the M unu~n Ing minh.
Ray and Waydc Smith and hfamily, the IWVrrm family. tt
Batilty, i~.Elaine Mcjia, Athiera Niewhonld. Jcnnis
McKenzkc, Mr and Mrs Derek Davis, Mr and Mr5 Jeanie
Koindtaskikan~d famiily, (PnnsIyvaaia}. staff of AnatheqIolLg%.
doctors and staff ocf maini operating lb atre, saff of Eve Waird.
%EallIONk(11 PMIIH, 11,11-C oVL sod H 1�flIIl ,(AilaIULsi.1
F rwids maypayvih-Lir lat rsptctsat fniLihe II~riier-
Morticianis, 0~44 Na~s.au Screc't on WeLdflesdov fromi 10:00 amm


SPORTS I







+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 15


Police fears over AK-47s 7 i


FROM page one

Yesterday several Martin
Street residents told The Tri-
bune they do not believe the
three well-liked young men
were the intended victims.
Police said they do not know
the motive for the attempted
killings as yet. Up to press time,
no one was in custody in con-
nection with the shooting.
Meanwhile, in a tragic twist
to the night's events, it was the
brother of gunshot victim
Trevon Simmons, 19-year-old
Jeffrey "Jay-Jay" Simmons,
who lost his life as a result of
the attack ... although he was
not shot.
"Jay-Jay" punched a window
in frustration when he discov-
ered his younger brother lying
in a pool of blood. "Jay-Jay"
died of his injuries on Monday
evening, while his brother
Trevon remains in hospital.
The anger expressed by "Jay-
Jay" was reflected yesterday in
the dissatisfaction numerous
residents expressed about the
police response to the shoot-
ing.
Several witnesses claimed
police did not reach the scene
of the attack for over half an
hour while an ambulance took
closer to an hour.
Concerned residents claimed
officers spent little time col-
lecting evidence, leaving bullet
casings scattered throughout
the area.
"They took about an hour to
come, and then everything was
done sloppy. They only care
about certain kinds of areas.
They don't care about pure
ghetto areas," a 51-year-old res-
ident of Martin Street claimed.
Dwayne Basden, 34, who
lives in a house behind the
wooden shack where the boys
were shot, said he feels police
are selective in where they
choose to focus their crime-
fighting energies.
The sense that they neglect
the community has created an
atmosphere in which residents
are less willing to share infor-
mation, he alleged.
"The responding time was so
poor that by the time they came
people were so fed up they did-
n't want to talk to them. What
they could've get they didn't
get because people bummed,"


Y L -:


JEFFREY SIMMONS SENIOR holding one of the bullet casings
from the scene of Sunday's shooting.


added his 51-year-old neigh-
bour.
Yesterday residents exam-
ined in awe the damage caused
to surrounding buildings by
the high-powered weapon
which police have been told
may have been only one of
two guns turned on the com-
munity by the occupants of the
car that night.
Keith Smith, Shamaro's
uncle, said: "I still can't believe
it. It could've been anyone of
us. This is our regular route
that people walk through to
the Junkanoo shack."
Mr Smith, 48, said the shock
of the attack is all the more
profound given that, despite
the reputation for violent
crime that the Bain and
Grants Town area has devel-
oped, Martin Street has always
been fairly sheltered.
"That was the first time
we've experienced something
like that through here, through
this particular corner. These
young guys aren't mixed up in


gangs, sometimes they have a
row on the basketball court,
but they're not in gangs.
"It's terrible. Something
needs to be done.
"Things are out of hand. We
don't uphold crime round
here."
The attempted killing of the
three young men came just
eight streets north and around
24 hours after murder suspect
Nairro Petersen, alias "Pearl
Eye", was shot and killed in a
"drive-by" on Saturday.
Petersen was standing with
a group of people outside the
Brand B Tyre Shop on Milton
Street, off Market Street,
when shots were fired by the
occupants of a passing black
Honda Accord.
Meanwhile, police reported
yesterday that an AK-47 rifle
and 24 live rounds of ammu-
nition were seized Monday
morning from the "Sharise M"
boat docked in Potter's Cay.
A 28-year-old man is in cus-
tody.


I ULT AIGfrmteS unays hotig6t6 hescn.I


Wendy's wi


a Prosperous &Joy-FiL






ll be CLOSED on:


led


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25TH, 2009 - (CHRISTMAS DAY)
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26TH, 2009 - (BOXING DAY)
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1ST, 2010 - (NEW YEAR'S DAY)

On New Year's Eve (Thursday, December 31st, 2009)
our stores will close at 7PM.


A I , I l ' I I IL I l' l s


I "' [ I' I -IA I L ' I



Thank you for your patronage over the past year,


I - 'Amo -.i rI Gk (,t tA W I - -
TDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


NOW UNTIL CHRISTMAS EVE

Don't Forget To Visit
MULTI DISCOUNT HOME &
BRIDAL CENTRE

Also MULTI SUPER PARTY CENTRE
for all of your Christmas Party Suplies

Montrose Avenue Opposite Multi Discount Furniture
Phone: 356-7924/5/6


A- .11,1 -
PRICES k,-,*
EVEN IN M -MI'


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+


TRIBUNE S Y,






WEDNESDAY,


SS


DECEMBER 23, 2009


NASSAU
(242) 356-9801
FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010
MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

roa- - -- *


* Firm's consultants
say 'competition
intensifying' as shown
by BTC's 18.3% price
decrease in less than
year
* Cable using just
25% of capacity in
fibre optic cable
system
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Plans to impose regulatory
obligations on Cable
Bahamas' provision of high-
speed data and international
Internet connectivity have
been slammed by the compa-
ny's consultants as being
"unjustified", given the
"intensifying competitive
pressures" resulting from
bandwidth price cuts of up to
18.3 per cent by the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny (BTC).
Analysys Mason, the Euro-
pean-based consultants hired
by the BISX-listed entity to
review the Utilities Regula-
tion & Competition Authori-
ty's (URCA) remedies to
tackle Cable Bahamas' pre-
sumed Significant Market
Power (SMP) in the Internet
and cable TV businesses,
warned that the proposed reg-
ulatory obligations on the fir-
m's international data trans-
mission services could impact
how it was regulated in the
US.
Focusing on URCA's pro-
posed obligations for Cable
Bahamas, and its wholly-
owned Caribbean Crossings
subsidiary, in the area of high-
speed data and Internet con-
nectivity, Analysys Mason
immediately questioned
URCA's findings on the retail
and wholesale markets for
both national and interna-
tional leased lines.
Cable Bahamas, it argued,
had been designated as having
SMP in these markets "on the
basis that a 'duopoly' between
BTC and Cable
Bahamas/Caribbean Cross-
ings is unlikely to provide
effective long-term competi-
tion.
"This approach is, to say
the least, quite peculiar, since
neither Cable
Bahamas/Caribbean Cross-
ings not BTC are in a joint
dominance situation, and
URCA should have demon-
strated that, or should have
exempted Cable
Bahamas/Caribbean Cross-
ings from the SMP designa-
tion on these specific prod-
ucts."
In addition, Cable
Bahamas' European consul-
tants also cited a "significant
increase of competition" and
SEE page 10B


$2.6bn Baha Mar deal



'90% likely to go ahead'


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Baha Mar's potential agree-
ment with two Chinese state-
owned entities for the financing
and construction of its $2.6 bil-
lion Cable Beach project is "90
per cent likely to go" ahead,
Tribune Business was told yes-
terday, with both sides trying
to now tie down "a few com-
mercial issues".
The resort developer and its
potential partners, China State
Construction and China
Export-Import Bank, were said
to be "close" to concluding an
agreement, Baha Mar having
been hopeful of closing the deal
by year-end.
It is unclear whether that tar-
get will be met, but one source
familiar with the situation told
Tribune Business yesterday:
"Ninety per cent it's going to
go. Now there's a very good
chance it's going to happen. It
looks like there's a willingness
on the part of the Chinese to
do it. I think they're very
close."
It is not known what the out-
standing issues are, although
one negotiating point had been
Baha Mar's desire for China
State Construction and Engi-
neering Group to take a larger
stake than the initially-pro-
posed $99 million, or 2.75 per
cent, equity ownership. It is


thought this has been resolved.
Robert Sands, Baha Mar's
senior vice-president of external
affairs and administration,
declined to comment when con-
tacted by Tribune Business ear-
lier this week. Other Baha Mar
sources were equally tight-
lipped, indicating something
may be happening, the only
detail that could be obtained
being that all sides were "mak-
ing excellent progress".
While the Baha Mar go-
ahead would be a massive boost
for a Bahamian economy that
badly needs a 'shot in the arm'
following an estimated 4 per
cent contraction in 2009, the
deal is not done, and negotia-
tions with Chinese companies -
especially those that are state-
owned - can often be difficult,
with many twists and turns.
In addition, Tribune Busi-
ness understands that the Chi-


nese side is seeking at least
6,500 work permits for their
nationals who will work on the
Cable Beach project, although
only 2,500 maximum will be
required at any one time due
to the sensitive political nature
of the issue for the Govern-
ment. This newspaper had been
told that the work permit issue
was a potential stumbling block
for the deal as far as the Gov-
ernment was concerned, but
this was denied to Tribune
Business by sources close to
Baha Mar. The number of
required work permits was also
disputed.
China State Construction
said in an earlier statement that
under the terms of the deal
being worked out with Baha
Mar, it would acquire a 2.75 per
cent stake in the project with a
$99 million investment. That is
much less than the 43 per cent
equity stake, and $212 million
contribution, Baha Mar's pre-
vious partner, Harrah's Enter-
tainment, was scheduled to
make.
The value of the construc-
tion contract was pegged at $1.9
billion, with CSC saying work
on the 1,000-acre project was
due to start in early 2010, with
an opening in late 2013.
Memorandums of Under-
standing (MoUs) have already
been signed between Baha Mar
and its Chinese counterparts


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
City Markets' majority
shareholder pledged its entire
78 per cent stake in the com-
pany as collateral for a $26
million Royal Bank of Cana-
da loan to finance the $54 mil-
lion buyout from Winn-Dixie,
Tribune Business can reveal,
with one condition being that
at least 75 per cent of the pub-
licly-traded company's prof-
its be paid out as dividends.
Other loan covenants,
which Royal Bank stipulated
BSL Holdings must fulfill,
included the majority share-
holder applying two-thirds or
66.67 per cent of its "excess
cash flow" at year-end to pay-
ing down the $26 million cred-
it facility until only $18 million
was outstanding.
Tribune Business has
obtained a variety of docu-
ments relating to the summer
2006 purchase of the majority
78 per cent stake in Bahamas
Supermarkets, the holding
company for the 11-strong
City Markets chain, by the
BSL Holdings private equity
consortium.
While much is now ancient
history, the Royal Bank of
Canada loan having been
restructured and rewritten
due to City Markets' finan-
cial difficulties, which have
SEE page 8B


'Profound effect' on

GDP growth if no COB

move to university
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
There will be a "profound effect" on Bahamian gross domes-
tic product (GDP) growth and education levels if the College
of the Bahamas (COB) does not move on to university status,
a leading doctor telling Tribune Business yesterday that attain-
ing such a goal will make tertiary education more accessible and
affordable for hundreds of Bahamians.
Dr Jonathan Rodgers, the well-known 'eye doctor', said that
by moving COB to university status, the Government would
ensure that Bahamian families did not have to spend between
$15,00-$50,000 per year on a tertiary education for their children
in the US and Canada.
"With education in the US or Canada, which is where most
Bahamians go for tertiary education, it can be very expen-
SEE page 9B


UBS eyes $22m


sale and lease


back agreement

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Business Reporter
and NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
UBS (Bahamas) is attempting to sell its East
Bay Street headquarters and newly-built property
behind for around $22 million, a leading realtor
confirmed yesterday.
Bahamas Realty's chief executive/president, Lar-
ry Roberts, confirmed the Swiss bank's plan to sell
the property and lease it back from the new owners.
He added that the Utilities Regulation & Com-
petition Authority (URCA) has already leased
portions of the building constructed behind UBS
House, and despite slow interest other potential
tenants are coming in to view it.
"Once the building is sold they will stay there as
tenants," Mr Roberts said of UBS.
"They occupy all of the front building, but
because of the downturn in the economy they have
decided they don't need all the space in the back."
Other sources confirmed to Tribune Business
that UBS planned to take an initial five-year lease
on the property, once it was sold to a new owner.
This had raised concern among some observers as
to whether UBS planned on maintaining a long-
term presence in the Bahamas, who questioned
whether the leading Swiss bank lacked confidence
in this nation's long-term viability as an interna-
tional financial services centre.
However, Tribune Business was told by sources
familiar with the situation that UBS's Swiss Board
of Directors had approved a plan that would see the
bank remain in the Bahamas long-term.


* Documents show original $26m Royal Bank loan

required Bahamas Supermarkets 78% majority

owner to pledge stake as collateral

* Loan since rewritten, but majority owner also

required to use two-thirds of excess cash flow to pay

down debt


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+>


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Upcoming Outlook



conference 'most



important ever'


The Counsellors have
branded the upcoming
Bahamas Business Outlook,
to be held under the theme
2010-2020: A Decade For
Action & Accountability, as
potentially "the most impor-
tant ever" version of the
conference.
The conference, which
will be held on January 14,
2010, at the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, is designed to
bring together annually
experts from a range of aca-
demic disciplines and fields
of business enterprise to
offer up-to-date, accurate
information and views on
the Bahamas economy.
"The upcoming forum is
perhaps the most important
ever, and we are gathering a
team of presenters who are
more than equal to the task
of supporting its pro-
gramme," said Joan Albury,
president of TCL (The
Counsellors) Group, the
organiser of the event.
She added that the agenda
will not only focus on sec-
tors such as tourism and
financial services, but will
also include a presentation
from the National Insurance
Board on initiatives such as
its Chronic Disease Pre-
scription Drug Plan, plus an
outlook for the electronic
communications industry in
the wake of the expected
Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company (BTC) pri-
vatisation.
"At this point, no one
doubts that the greater part
of the world economy is in
recession, and not a few of


'We in the Bahamas need to move into
the 21st century of technology, espe-
cially communications technology. This
is the way ahead and these are the
things that BBO is determined to con-
front each year and present to the pub-
lic for consideration.'

Joan Albury


the economic gurus have
flirted with the idea that we
are on the leading edge of
another great depression,"
Mrs Albury said.
"But we at TCL firmly
believe that what happens,
good or ill, for the local
economy will depend on the
quality of financial and busi-
ness decisions we make now.
Profits
She added: "It's a fact that
some companies have made
healthy profits this year. We
believe that the secret lies
in recognizing trends, ana-
lyzing them for business
opportunities and being will-
ing to change strategy in a
timely fashion. This is the
main reason for our choice
of theme.
"The time is past for
hand-wringing over who or
what is responsible for the
recession. There are great
gains for our country if we
do more informed planning,
be more proactive and,


above all, demand account-
ability of ourselves, our
employees, our government,
colleagues and partners.
"We need current and
accurate data from every
sector at timely intervals.
We in the Bahamas need to
move into the 21st century
of technology, especially
communications technolo-
gy. This is the way ahead
and these are the things that
BBO is determined to con-
front each year and present
to the public for considera-
tion.
"We are proud of the con-
tribution BBO has made to
building our economy over
the past 18-plus years. We
are deeply grateful for the
steady support from our cor-
porate sponsors, distin-
guished speakers and those
who have attended faithful-
ly each year."
Registration for BBO may
be made on-line at
www.tclevents.com, or by
calling Eileen Fielder at 322-
7505, e-mail efielder@the-
counsellorsltd.com


S


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Bu 3 o

moe o


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IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


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+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 3B


Performance-based bonuses on the rise


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net


THE ECONOMIC DOWNTURN has
forced some businesses to do away with
Christmas bonuses, the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce's president said yester-
day, while others who have been able keep
their businesses afloat have simply cut back.
Khaalis Rolle said most businesses who
haven't decreased their bonuses have com-
pletely eliminated them.
"These are extremely challenging times
in business," said Mr Rolle. "What they
are trying to do is keep their doors open."
He said that because bonuses are dis-
cretionary items within the company bud-
get, Bahamian businesses have streamlined
their bottom line by cutting them out. And
some companies have moved to perfor-
mance-based bonuses that would be award-
ed based on the past year's company and
personal performance.
British American Financial's chief exec-
utive, Chester Cooper, said his company
removed automatic year-end bonuses and


Downturn causes firms to

slash Christmas bonuses


replaced them with performance-based
bonuses. According to him, this incentivised
work performance and aligned employee
goals with company goals.

Incentive
"We created this type of incentive
because it encourages staff to see how they
can contribute directly or indirectly," said
Mr Cooper.
Activities such as energy conservation, as
well as driving new business to the firm,
would put an employee in the running for
the consolidated bonus cache. "If they are
a top performer they will share in the pool,"
Mr Cooper said.
Mr Rolle said many businesses in the
Bahamas have also been forced to slash


employee work hours in an attempt to cut
costs, along with slashing the year-end
bonus.
"If the company isn't performing you
would have to eliminate the bonuses by
default," he said.
Mr Cooper argued that many that choose
the option to implement performance-
based bonuses during tough economic
times may consider leaving that system in
place. The owners of New Oriental Clean-
ers told Tribune Business recently that they
were forced to decrease Christmas bonus-
es this year, after a 15 per cent decline in
business.
However, they continued with their
annual employee appreciation party, where
they gave electronics, such as mobile
phones and television, to the year's top
performing and generation employees.


Mixed reaction to NIB



contribution rate rises


Bahamas Business




Nciiiou: Coilm; Avie & 71h Tvrrce
Tel: (242) 3O2-925D
Grand bahoamc 'e Highway
..... .....Tel., (242) 352-7022


http:llwww.bbsi.com

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PIDITAL CAMERAI IBRANK Cgs DY~i I AAMCORDER5
NP A tFAMAEK INKS I CELL MONGESI GAMES 1I SECAJDI


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
THE BUSINESS commu-
nity is at loggerheads over the
National Insurance Board's
(NIB) decision to increase
contributions by 2 per cent
some time next year, while
some companies believe the
impending increases have not
been publicised and explained
properly.
Nassau Institute executive,
Rick Lowe, argued that the
increase in NIB contributions
could substantially impact the
bottom line of many busi-
nesses across the country.
The NIB has proposed a 0.5
per cent increase in contribu-
tions to be paid by both
employee and employer, to
make up 1 per cent, which will
assist in sustaining the new-


ly-implemented unemploy-
ment fund, and another 1 per
cent increase to sustain the
Chronic Disease Drug Plan.
The Nassau Institute
recently contended that the
proposed wage ceiling hike
from $400 to $600, coupled
with the 2 per cent increase
in NIB contribution rates,
would result in an overall 84.1
per cent increase in payments.
While NIB did not dispute
this claim, it did assert that
those calculations were based
on the assumption of a $600
per week and above wage
earning.
According to a release from
NIB posted on their website:
"Contrary to the Nassau Insti-
tute's contention, 60 per cent
of workers will see no change
in their weekly or monthly
deductions. The remaining 40
per cent of workers will be


affected, but in varying
degrees."
However, Mr Lowe insists
that the NIB increases will
hurt the pockets of the small
offices.
Former president of the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce, Dionisio D'Aguilar,
said he saw the increases as
necessary for a nation that
does not save for the future.
According to him, anything
that could get Bahamians to
save would be a good plan to
move forward on.
While it has been said many
Bahamians have less that
$1,000 in savings in their
accounts at any one time,
retirement funds and retire-
ment plans are almost taboo.
The National Insurance
Board is the only plan most
retirees have to depend on
when they reach that age.


Mr D'Aguilar said his only
worry is the mismanagement
of the monies in the fund by
government. He added that
no time is a good time for tax
increases, but "there will be
huge demands for NIB to
meet in the future".
According to him, the pop-
ulation is very young and in
need of the national scheme
for health benefits and public
pensions.
"Anything that forces them
to save is good," said Mr
D'Aguilar.
Mr Lowe said he spoke to
some businesses that were not
aware of the Government's
plan to increase NIB contri-
butions, and one company
told Tribune Business they
were not aware and were not
in a position to even think
about it until it comes to
fruition.


PUBLIC


AUCTION


Montague Villas Condominiums


7 units available

Units 203,206,207,209,403,604,703A,DSI







- Gated Property

- Pool

- - Laundry Facilities

- Guard House




. Bids being accept by
S- - 4 Campbell Chase Law


. ........from

-------MP. December 8,2009


For more info contact


S


- ,.. *1
,,- ~I
.~ 'p
~L~iJ


Marie @ 326-8916 or

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N


I T ICS TRE NTI AELGO OWWTIUE4.O


... .......






+>


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


THE BAHAMAS HOTEL ASSOCIATION


Farrington named as





BHA lifetime director


BKG/410.03

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$71,000,000.00 of 91-Day Treasury Bills
will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank
of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on
Wednesday, December 30, 2009. Successful tenderers, who
will be advised should take up their bills against payment on
Monday, January 4, 2010. These bills will be in minimum
multiples of B$100.00.

Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable from the Central
Bank of The Bahamas or Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked "Tender". The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.



All , I-AtM


Call IA on 67-62

W h y p ay m o r f r y u i s a n. I


NASSAU INSURANCE
BROKERS & AGENTS
NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS CO. LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, P.O. Box N-7764 Nassau Tel. 677-6422
A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life


tion not only here in the
Bahamas but also in the
wider tourism world for his
hard work, integrity and
expertise."
Mr Farrington has served
as the Bahamas Hotel
Employers Association's
president for 22 years, hav-
ing been a member of that
organisation and the BHA
for more than 25 years. He
has served as a member of
the BHA's Board of Direc-
tors during that time.
Starting in 1954 as an
accounts clerk with the Nas-
sau Yacht Haven and Pilot
House Hotel, by 1967 he
had progressed to become
president of that company.


He later joined Resorts
International and served as
senior vice-president of
administration, a position he
continues to hold with
Kerzner International.
"JB's example of service
above self is legendary
amongst hoteliers," Mr
Sands added.
"Further, in the wider
community he given much
of his time and tremendous
talent to a range of causes
and public service.
"He has mentioned,
coached, motivated, trained
and shared many of his life's
lessons with so many of us,
and for this we are grateful."


"He is the con-
summate model
of determina-
tion, ambition
and hard work,
which has led
to his becoming
a true Bahami-
an success sto-
ry,99


Robert Sands


DISS STRS ON TS PG L


The Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation (BHA) has hon-
oured J. Barrie Farrington
as a lifetime director of the
57 year-old organisation.
"Barrie Farrington has led
an exemplary professional
and civic life.
"He is the consummate
model of determination,
ambition and hard work,
which has led to his becom-
ing a true Bahamian success
story," said BHA president
Robert Sands.
"From humble begin-
nings, he has by his own
hard work and single-mind-
edness of pursuit risen to the
top of his profession, and
has built a sterling reputa-


_ is i;fitu)Rt




NEW ARRIVALS
araccletand sings ona Me

45ive ypur boll rio rikliuo 0howklaw O itb hufthpi[ rmom
conra ctor anid ball Inteitonrwetar.
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Purfhases of a $100,00 andup and get a ft" baI with
20%adf con the tabour
Openn or uniy am - 4p.m.
from IDece Mbr14h to 244h. a.m- and 9p.mr. (everydy).
R.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-323-1865
Email: gems-pearIN~hotmraiI.com

SFree parking at The Hilton


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Security
Position Purpose
The purpose of this position is to promote, enforce, and regulate the highest security standards
and practices in the workplace and to investigate and respond to various types of emergencies
as required to ensure a safe and secure work environment.

Environment
This position exists in an ever-changing environment that requires flexibility and the ability to
embrace frequent change. It requires persons with strong, genuine passion for promoting and
enforcing high safety and security standards.

Duties:
* Provide continuous monitoring of entire facility (offshore and onshore) utilizing
CCTV systems.
* Ensure only authorized persons access facility following ISPS protocol.
* Provide written/ verbal Reports of /Security matters to Management.
* Maintain daily turn-over log of all activities on shift, including equipment status,
and any unusual or important happenings.
* Conduct regular patrols throughout Terminal facility
* Investigate and report on all suspicious circumstances and hazardous conditions on
shift.
* Conduct spot checks on Vehicles and personnel at Terminal checkpoints.
* Provide assistance during evacuation exercises.
* Control traffic within the Facility, checking for violations, and enforcing full
compliance of company rules and regulations regarding motorized equipment.
* Receive and transfer incoming calls throughout facility.

Experience:
No prior experience required, training will be provided in all area.

Job Requirements:
* High School graduate
* Age 25-30
* Experience in Security, Safety and Fire-Fighting a good asset but not mandatory.
Training will be provided in all areas.
* Good Verbal and written communication skills (mandatory)
* Good working knowledge computer skills an asset
* Prepared to work 12 hour shift cycle
* Good physical condition
* Passion for excellence and teamwork

Reporting Line:
This position reports to the Safety and Security Superintendent.

Applications should be submitted to the
SHEQ Manager
Bahamas Oil Refining Company International Limited
Dbs Vopak Terminal Bahamas
P. 0. Box F-42435
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
On or before December 31, 2009


BUSINESS I







+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 5B


INERATIOALBSN S


Banking on a lift




from gift cards


By JENN ABELSON
Globe Staff
c. 2009 The Boston Globe
Stores banking on gift-card
credits to bring shoppers back
Call it the gift card giveaway.
L.L. Bean is handing out a
$10 gift card for every $25 that
shoppers spend, a much sweet-
er deal than last year's $10 for
every $50 purchase. Popular
teen merchant Abercrombie &
Fitch, which has long resisted
promotions, is featuring a $25
gift card for every $100 spent.
And upscale Boston hair salon
Mizu offered a $125 gift card
for $62.50 - or half price.
It's a strategy forged in a
tough climate for retailers,
whose profit margins evaporat-
ed amid huge markdowns last
holiday season. Cut-rate cards
offer a double incentive: These
bonus cards bring shoppers into
stores now and give them rea-
son to come back next month.
Gift cards have traditionally
provided a bump in sales for
merchants during the slow win-
ter months. But faced with fore-
casts that store gift-card spend-
ing would drop by 7 percent
this year, merchants are trying
to get them into as many hands
as possible.
"It's all about driving traffic
back into the stores," said Mar-
shal Cohen, the NPD Group's
chief retail analyst. "These gift
cards are an alternative to deep
discounts, and more retailers
are getting on board."
L.L. Bean began offering the
$10 gift card early in October as
a way to attract shoppers with
the option to use the card
before the holiday or hold onto
it until after Christmas, accord-
ing to spokeswoman Carolyn
Beem. The preppy cataloger,
based in Freeport, Maine, but
with several shops in Massa-
chusetts, has seen a significant
uptick in cards given out com-
pared with last year but would
not provide details.
"There is no doubt that this is
a very promotional holiday sea-
son with lots of offers in the
marketplace," Beem said. "It's
more generous than many. It's
been very well received by our
customers."
Shoppers say they are hap-
py to receive these bonus cards
to help stretch their dollars dur-
ing tough economic times. But
some consumers openly
acknowledge the incentives that
got them to shop in the first
place may go unused.
Mike Kelly of Medford
recently earned a $10 L.L. Bean
card after buying a pair of boots
for his girlfriend. He redeemed
that one and scored another
$10 during his shopping trip on
Saturday at the L.L. Bean store
in the Wayside Commons in
Burlington.
"It's a good deal," Kelly said.
"But I'm not sure I'll use it. I'd
say there's a 50/50 chance I'd
use it if I have to go back and
return something."
Retail analysts say roughly


40 percent of gift cards do not
get redeemed, and that is part
of the appeal for merchants,
compared with marking down
merchandise. Shops are also
relying on consumers who do
use the gift cards to spend more
than the incentive offered.
The Oak Room restaurant at
Boston's Fairmont Copley
Plaza is counting on this for a
recent promotion offering $75
worth of steakhouse cuisine for
just $35. The restaurant sold all
2,000 gift cards within hours
through an online discount site,
Groupon. Suzanne Wenz, a
spokeswoman for the Fairmont
Copley Plaza, said only one
card can be used per table and
the restaurant anticipates peo-
ple spending beyond the $75.
Moreover, it's estimated that
about one-third of the certifi-
cates purchased through the
website are never redeemed.
"It provides a great value to
consumers, and for us it will
help to stimulate demand and
trial of the Oak Room in the
traditionally slower winter
months," Wenz said.
But thrifty consumers are
being cautious, so it's unclear
how much of a lift these gift
cards will provide for retailers
after Christmas. Nancy Weir of
Wrentham took the $10 Victo-
ria's Secret card mailed to her
home and used it to get a pair
of underwear for free at a shop


in Foxborough's Patriot Place.
She bought nothing else from
the lingerie chain.
Brian Riley, research director
of TowerGroup in Needham,
said the proliferation of gift-
card giveaways will undoubt-
edly leave many shoppers with
more cards than they know
what to do with. And con-
sumers looking for big sales and
lots of selection are likely to be
disappointed with the post-hol-
iday offers, because merchants
have significantly reduced their
inventory compared with last
year. Lisa O'Neill of Groton
has already collected gift card
giveaways from L.L. Bean and
teen retailer Delia's this holi-
day season, and hopes to make
use of them after Christmas.
But there was one purchase she
didn't want to wait for.
O'Neill had asked her par-
ents to buy a Pottery Barn gift
card for Christmas with Amer-
ican Express points they had
built up. But worried about the
selection and deals after the
holidays, O'Neill asked her par-
ents to open the Pottery Barn
gift card early so she could take
advantage of a free shipping
day and buy the chandelier
she's been holding off on pur-
chasing for more than a year.
"It was an opportunity I
couldn't resist," O'Neill said.
* Jenn Abelson can be reached
at abelson(AT)globe.com.


MINISTRY OF NATIONAL SECURITY

POLICE DEPARTMENT



IM'TRAkF1C PRESS RCEL4SK NOIqCqE
ANNIAUL 8011%G AY JUNKALNOO PARADE




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STREKI AND NMARLIOVROGH METhU


All Our Customers & Friends

from







/ PREMIER






MaY Me H1olidays be shared with Loved
Ones in Peace and Happines.s.

WE WILL CLOSE
,e For the Holidays I
at 12:00 p.m. Thursday, December 24th
& REOPEN at 7:00 a.m.,
Tuesday December 29th, 2009


Po.O. am M-1085
S TEL, 12421322-OW
SFAXM [2421323-7745


EASIUT BAY ANDPMACKEYIST ~.
WUDGE PLAZA COMMONS BDGQ
TFLIFAX -J42) U3-4.21 0
TOLL FREE: 424) 300-73


5:3 $0 pxm. on Friw, 25 tDecoulm, 2009 'mw Afbff dic madc th t hovf fl~cts
'Will wwod tovvblwftvk]wc;

*BAY STIRfEETrtVVM 4 AVY U0114ROAD AND ELIZAITB
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SM~fI.LEY STRM BWTUN flMWERICK STREET AND COLIMI$
AVENL!E

*PARILAMENT STREET BEWVMON AST NILLSTREET AMDMAy


*FDRDERTCK STREET H!tW'EKN EAST Ri[L SMlI~T AN4D BAY
STRMR.

*CRAFULOMt LSTMLTM BTWWXM WOODS RODGKRS WFIRARI AND


4EABTST FUT DETWWI:ZSEiRLIEY MM RTAND DAY STREET.

* ELZADYFI AVENUE BETWEEN SAY STREET AND SHERLE
STREEL






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Coiling Av�.

Veb=W ~ftf& MCLOaS a~ncT&b=W don Blu HMWOWIVR be will W d vrdwee m~








Signed:
Ellison Greenslade, QPM


ITDISCUS TOIESONTHS PGELO0ONTOWW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


GN-976


NOTICE

IN THILE ESTATE OF HANS OTTO
ERICH R[IT'EER domiciled and late of
Hessisch, Lichtenau, Germany, deceased


NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against or interest in the
aibovL Estate should ,nd satmc duly ccriificd in
writing to 1thc undcrsigncd on or belfrC 21st
January, 2010 after which date the Adrini'stralrix
will proceed to distribute the assets of the Estale
having regard only to the claims, demands or
interests of which she shall then have had notice
AND all persons indebted to the above Estate
arc asked lo settle such debts on or before 21 st
January, 2010.


FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB & CO.
Attorneys for the Administratrix
P.O. Box AB-20405
Bay Street, Marsh Harbour
Abaco. The Bahamas


B0ThSIDE

BOTH SID M


BOTH S~fS


Rolm s1DI


BOTH 8Itc.


BOTH SOhUS




BOTH SUHft



1011 EDSU

R01 SRam5






+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 7B


GN-974 .h.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
24TH DECEMBER, 2009
No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00784
Whereas SHARLENE KNOWLES, the Intended Administratrix, of Millers, Long
Island, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of CARRINGTON HENDERSON KNOWLES,
late of Millers, Long Island, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.
DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION
24TH DECEMBER, 2009
No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00785
IN THE ESTATE OF KAYE A. PEARSON, late and domiciled of the city of 1637
East Lake Drive in the County of Broward in the city of Fort Lauderdale in the
State of Florida, one of the States of the United States of America, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days from the date
hereof, application will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by CEDRIC L. PARKER, of Cedrick L. Parker & Co. Chambers,
Neil's Court, New Providence, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Re-sealing of Letters of Administration with Will Annexed in the above estate
granted to DENNIS D. SMITH, Personal Representative of the Estate, (Single
Personal Representative) In The Circuit Court For Broward County, Florida, one
of the States of the United of America, Probate Division on the 4th day of June,
2009.
DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION
24TH DECEMBER, 2009
No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00786
IN THE ESTATE OF VERA R. NABBIE, late and domiciled of Opa-Locka in
Miami-Dade County in the State of Florida, one of the States of the United States
of America, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days from the date
hereof, application will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by RUSSELL E. FRANKS, of Freeport, Grand Bahama, one
of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the Re-sealing of Letters of
Administration in the above estate granted to RUSSELL E. FRANKS, the Executor
of the Estate, In The Circuit Court Of The 11th Judicial Circuit In and For Dade
County, in the States of Florida, one of the States of the United States of America,
Probate Division on the 23rd day of April, 1998.
DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION
24TH DECEMBER, 2009
No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00787
IN THE ESTATE OF LEWIS R. HOLDING, late and domiciled of 4300 Six
Forks Road Wake County in the State of North Carolin, one of the States of the
United States of America, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days from the date
hereof, application will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by HARRY BRACTON SANDS, of Skyline Drive in the Western
District, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Athorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the Re-sealing of Letters
of Testamentary in the above estate granted to CAROYLN S. HOLDING, the
Executor of the Estate, In The General Court of Justice, Superior Court Division,
Wake County, in the State of North Carolina, one of the States of the United States
of America, Probate Division on the 21st day of September, 2009.
DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
24TH DECEMBER, 2009
No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00788
Whereas JOAN KATHY PEARCE a.k.a. KATHY PEARCE, the Executrix and
MONA M. RUSSELL Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for Agatha Bethel
the other Executrix named in the said Will both of San Souci, Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, have
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of JEANNIE SYLVIA
HARDING a.k.a. JEANNIE SYLVIA DURRANT-HARDING late of Sandy
Port, Western District, New Providence, one of the Island of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.
DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR


I
'<.


NOTICE

SANPIN MOTORS
Holiday Hours

Christmas
Closed: December 24th 1pm
Open : December 29th Bam


New Years
Closed: December 31st 1pm
Open: January 4th8am 2010


THE SHAREHOLDERS & DIRECTORS WISH
OUR CUSTOMERS A MERRY CHRISTMAS
AND HAPPY NEW YEAR


Season's Greetitgs and a

Happy New Year from the 6taff

and Management of Sanpin Motors

Remember He is the Reason for the Season and may
GOD Bless YOU In the New Year


SHI FT 1hq W yu n y ou r I c "


ELITE MOTORS LTD-
$28 9WV" Road
PO. Bdxt"0
1. [242]19 4A" 2 F. 12A 21103 8 2 3


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


BUSINESS


I)


KIA MOTORS
Thig P9ftwwroskLpA5


SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED
Thompson Blvd. Oakes Field
t. 242.326.6377* f. 242.326.6315
e.sanpin@hotnmail.com


VOPAK TERMINAL BAHAMAS
Safety Officer/ Fireman

Position Purpose
The purpose of this position is to promote, enforce, and regulate the highest safety standards and practices
in the workplace and to investigate and respond to various types of emergencies as required to ensure a
safe work environment.
Environment
This position exists in an ever-changing environment that requires flexibility and the ability to embrace
frequent change. It requires persons with strong, genuine passion for promoting and enforcing high safety
standards.


* Provide written/ verbal Reports of Safety/Security matters to Mgmt.
* Maintain daily turn-over log of all activities on shift, including equipment status, and any unusual or impor-
tant happenings.
* Conduct regular patrols throughout Terminal facility
* Investigate and report on all suspicious circumstances and hazardous conditions on shift.
* Provide assistance during evacuation exercises.
* Responding with Fire Trucks to onsite incidents and operate same as directed.
* Perform routine inspection of the firehouse, fire trucks, ambulance, and other ancillary equipment located
in the firehouse.
* Assist in training of shift fire crew as required.
* Monitor job sites on daily basis and take note and correct unsafe acts/ unsafe conditions.
* Ensure emergency response equipment is maintained in a constant state of readiness.
* Control traffic within the Facility, checking for violations, and enforcing full compliance of company rules
and regulations regarding motorized equipment.

Experience:
Experience in Security, Safety and Fire-Fighting a good asset but not mandatory. Training will be provided
in all areas.

Job Requirements:
* High School graduate
* Age 25-35
* Experience in Security, Safety and Fire-Fighting a good asset but not mandatory. Training will be provided
in all areas.
* Good Verbal and written communication skills (mandatory)
* Good working knowledge computer skills an asset
* Prepared to work 12 hour shift cycle
* Good physical condition
* Passion for excellence and teamwork

Reporting Line:
This position reports to the Safety and Security Superintendent.
Applications should be submitted to the
SHEQ Manager
Bahamas Oil Refining Company International Limited
Dbs Vopak Terminal Bahamas
P. O0. Box F-42435
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
On or before December 31, 2009


I I






+>


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Legal Notice

NOTICE

TRIAC INVESTMENTS LTD.
IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 TRIAC INVEST-
MENTS LTD. is in dissolution.
The Date of the Commencement of Dissolution was 21st December 2009.
David Thain of Amer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., Building 2 Caves Village,
PO.Box N 3917 is Liquidator of TRIAC INVESTMENTS LTD. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are required
to send their address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator
before the 21st January 2010.








NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF GUISEPPE
CAMPI domic ited aid late of'Podere
Gfillana, Trequanda (S I), Italy, and
Madrid, Spain, deceased

NOTICE is hereby given ihats all persons havi ng
any claim or demand against or interest in the
above Estate should send same duly certified in
writing to the undersigned on or before 21st
January, 2010 after which date the Executrix
will proceed to distribute the assets of the Estate
having regard only to the claims, demands or
inicnrst% of which she shall then have Ihad noliWc
AND all persi.n,, indcIWed to the al~wve Paei
arc Asked to etile such debis on or before 211 st
January, 2010.

FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB & CO.
Attorneys for the Executrix
P.O. Box AB-20405
Bay Street, Marsh Harbnur
AbacoI The Bahanias


75% City Markets





dividend payout





sought by bank


FROM page 1B
seen almost $20 million in net
losses incurred over the last
three fiscal years, they never-
theless shed some interesting
light on the deal when it hap-
pened.
By far the most important
document is the July 14, 2006,
credit facilities offer sent to


I


BSL Holdings by Royal
Bank, in which it offers to
lend the company $26 million
- some $10 million in Bahami-
an dollars, with the remain-
ing $16 million in US curren-
cy.
BSL Holdings was sup-
posed to make $433,333 in
quarterly principal payments
on the Royal Bank loan,
which was supposed to have


(Th T �:W1%c


been fully repaid by July 31,
2008.
That never happened due
to City Markets' financial
woes, requiring the loan's
restructuring, but the finan-
cial terms and conditions are
likely to interest the compa-
ny's 22 per cent minority
investors, still smarting at
what has happened to their
company and the loss of reg-
ular quarterly and annual div-
idends.
The terms set by Royal
Bank included "ensuring that
Bahamas Supermarkets main-
tains a dividend payout policy
of not less than 75 per cent of
net income after taxes".
Sources close to BSL Hold-
ings yesterday said such a div-
idend payout level was not
above-normal, given that the
company under Winn-Dixie's
stewardship frequently paid
out between 70-80 per cent of
per annum net income in div-
idends.
In the BSL Holdings con-
text, those dividend payments
were crucial, since they were
what the buyout group -
whose Bahamian sharehold-
ers include the hotel industry
pension funds, RoyalFidelity
Merchant Bank & Trust's pri-
vate equity arm, Milo B. But-
ler & Sons and the Symon-
ette Group - was relying on
to finance repayment of the
Royal Bank loan.
In addition, BSL Holdings
could not incur capital expen-
diture or pay dividends on its
common or preference shares


without Royal Bank's con-
sent. Furthermore, Bahamas
Supermarkets' funded debt
and that of its subsidiaries
"shall not at any time exceed
$2.5 million", while the com-
pany's guarantees and con-
tingent liabilities were not to
exceed $750,000 at any one
time. In addition, BSL Hold-
ings was to "ensure that with-
in 90 days of each fiscal year
end, 66.67 per cent of the
excess cash flow [of BSL
Holdings] will be applied as
a permanent reduction of the
credit facility... until such time
as the amount repayable
under this facility is less than
$18 million".
Excess cash flow, accord-
ing to Royal Bank's offer
sheet, was defined as all free
cash flow following the deduc-
tion of BSL Holdings' annual
operating expenses. This
amount was also to exceed
the scheduled principal and
interest payments to Royal
Bank, a "maximum of
$750,000 interest payable on
its subordinated debt, and a
maximum of $400,000 in pre-
ferred share dividends for the
fiscal period".
Royal Bank also required
BSL Holdings to contribute
$20 million in preference
share and equity capital to the
purchase from Winn-Dixie,
and the latter pledged its
shares as collateral for the
loan, along with a $1 million
deposit placed at Royal Bank.


DIS SS S S PAE LO O


A\ N S B C H L R


Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, a specialist in private bank-
ing, fiduciary services and wealth management Is seeking
candidates for the position of:

Senior Relationship Manager/Private Banker

The successful candidate will:

Manage and motivate a team of Relationship Officers
providing guidance, supervision, performance and
personal development

* Develop new business and manage a portfolio of client
relationships

* Market private banking, fiduciary and portfolio
management services

* Cross-sell the Company's products and expand existing
relationships

Qualifications:

* University Degree in Finance, Banking or Business
Administration and/or related professional designation

* At least five year's experience in the private banking sector
and have a thorough knowledge of private banking
products and services

* Established record of new business development

* Strong communication, analytical, interpersonal and
organizational skills

* Proven excellent client relationship service

* Fluency in a foreign language would be an asset

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resource Department
P. O. Box N-7768
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 325-0524
E-mail: vacancies@ansbacher.bs

The deadline for all applications by hand, fax or e-mail Is
huarsday December 31. 200.


L,








+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 9B


'Profound effect' on GDP growth if no COB move to university


FROM pagelB

sive," Dr Rodgers told Tri-
bune Business. "In Canada it
costs $15,000 per year, and in
the US anywhere from
$25,000-$50,000 per year to
pay for someone's education.
"Without financial assis-
tance or a scholarship, that's
beyond the realm of possibil-
ities for most families, espe-
cially if they've got three or
four children."
Based on the per annum
education cost estimates, Dr
Rodgers said it cost Bahamian
families anywhere between
$100,000 to $250,000 in total
to put a child through a four-
year US university degree
course, and $60,000 for the
Canadian equivalent.
"If we had a university here
that would save many people
so much money, and afford
the children an opportunity
to have an education here,"
Dr Rodgers told Tribune
Business.
He was speaking in the
wake of Dr Janyne Hodder's
resignation as COB, in which
she announced she was step-
ping down to spend more
time with her family. Howev-
er, Dr Rodgers, like others,
is concerned that one factor
behind her decision may have
been that the Government
has either slowed down, or
decided not to push ahead for
the moment, with taking
COB towards full university
status.
He cited one of Mrs Hod-
der's recent addresses, in
which she said only about 14-
15 per cent of Bahamian high
school graduates went on to
university/tertiary education,
as an example of the potential
dangers ahead for both this


"This is a critical
problem, because
if less than 15 per
cent of your chil-
dren are going to
university, your
country will nev-
er develop."

Dr. Jonathan Rodgers
nation's economy and society.
Noting that Mrs Hodder
had said this level of progres-
sion to tertiary education was
only above that of sub-Saha-
ran Africa, Dr Rodgers said:
"This is a critical problem,
because if less than 15 per
cent of your children are
going to university, your
country will never develop.
"In the developed world,
on average between 45-60 per
cent go to university/college,
so we have one-half to one-
third of that number going on.
There's a direct correlation
between the GDP of a coun-
try and the level of education
in a country."
Pointing to Ralph Massey's
work on the Bahamian edu-
cation system, Dr Rodgers
said the Trends in Mathemat-
ics and Science Study
(TIMMS) that it employed
showed that countries in Asia,
such as South Korea, Singa-
pore and Hong Kong, had
generated the best educa-
tional results in maths and sci-
ence. And, in turn, all had rel-
atively high GDP levels.
"If we do not move on to
university status in the
Bahamas, it will have a pro-
found effect on education
standards and levels, and the


NOTICE is hereby given that GEORGE A. MILATOS of WEST
BAY STREET, P.O BOX N3579, Nassau, Bahamas is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23th day
of December, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE


OF
SSC GROWTH LIMITED


Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 22nd day of December ,
2009. Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Finan-
cial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The
Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.


Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator






NOTICE


IN THE ESTATE OF PHILLIP
EMERSON BRAID aJ"~. PHILLIP
E. BRAID domiciled and late of 15
Gerv'in Crescent, Ottaw a, Ontario,
Carnada K2G OJ6 dcceased


NOTICE is hereby ivecn that all persons having
any claim or demand against or interest in the
above .Flalc .1htnUld sCndlsae duly ertified in
writing to the undersigned on or before 21st
January, 2010 after which date the E ecutrix
will proceed to distribute the assets of the Estate
having regard only to the claims, demands or
interests of which she shall then have had notice
AND all persons indebted to the above Estate
are asked to etle i;h liebt khon or b'(ire 21 st
January. 2010.


FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB & CO.
Attorneys for the Executrix
P.O. BoxAB-2405
Bay Street, Marsh Harbour
Ahiaco, The Bahamas


level of GDP growth down
the road," Dr Rodgers said.
"There's also a direct corre-
lation between the level of
GDP growth and technology
down the road."
Moving COB to eventual
university status, Dr Rodgers
argued, was "the only way"
to boost Bahamian tertiary
education and economic
growth in this nation long-
term.
"Most of our GDP is
dependent on tourism and
banking, and most of the prof-
its from that are expatriated
every year, mostly to the US
and Canada," Dr Rodgers
added.
The doctor, who has a


financial interest in the Omni
Financial Services money
transfer business and the
Mango card company, said
that while the Government
and financial sector regula-
tors had introduced all kinds
of laws to regulate money
transmission/remittance firms,
payment systems, and to com-
bat money laundering/terror
financing, other "more fun-
damental" legislation had
been ignored.
While the laws that had
been introduced were "good -
it needs to happen", Dr
Rodgers explained: "We still
don't have the two most fun-
damental and basic laws for
a sound economy and fair


play. There's no Truth and
Lending Act, and because of
that the banks do not have to
quote the effective interest
rate/lending rates to us.
"There's no antitrust laws,
which means monopolies are


allowed to exist. We need to
have some of these basic laws.
It's all well and good to enact
these other laws - they're
needed - but we need these
basic laws."


�THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs




CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE,

INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

PEI:K.SNAI. DEVI.L.OPM1.. II UIlL H.S.-- NKI.%l,.1 FI. ' II. 2AJIll- COURSE TUTIm NA
A SEC CCE BEGINS , ENOS DURATION DAYS TIME FEES RM
C�OCK -FWC-
Bahamilan Culerie r 8)6 Jan. 14 Flb 25 6 weeks fhurday O0ump $37?6 Ci MK
cc00 5oo0-
oi.urmtCi hi Ing 1 a;23 Jiri. 11 Fiab 22 F;wAAkA PAm'.day r4 C ,r I SWr.. W MIK
C41h & Panrby coot; e CW -
Making I f1 al Jan. 12 M.w.s 9 breaks "unSdaNy i'm..m 3Ue100 PK
-'C4K fi M. -
iBrewHMakirng _ 1 10 Janr. I Mar 11 8%weekt huraif 9 C(Im 5200CC- LK
GLXXeK eOCI
Cake OD- cmierg I If 917 Jan.. 11 Mart ;" wAAkA, Io..ldAy :WonJ,, _ .2 1 m PK
All Feem ir iludetl id Ith price quwred aifw ; nw tt kr t p.lk-ir upa I mapplki*li feea fe S.M . , (NON REFUIJ?

Application Dcadline: December 30, 209 at 4:00 p.m.


U 1=mG CAPrIAL AAARKET5S
9EROYAL FIDELITY KERAE &ADVISO SERVICES
E FC a A L (o Money [.4K -wk - l
._-" E , E , TF LC',EC',- .- ,T_ 1 -
TUIESDA,Y 22 DECEI'.BER 2',00
EIr :� LL 1-hi I, E INDE: � I LI-) E 1 * ' . 1-1*-** - .1- I ** _ TC 1 '- -1 1 I TC -
FINCIE:A (LO 'E N_******, | TO I _*'*' 1 - 1
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM I TELEPIONE:242-323-2330 I FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
1 71 1 03 AML Foods Limted 1 17 1 17 000 0127 0000 92 000%
11 80 990 Bahamas Property Fund 1074 1074 000 0992 0200 108 1 86%
930 590 Bank of Bahaas 590 590 000 0244 0260 242 441%
089 063 Benchark 063 063 000 0 877 0000 N/M 000%
349 315 Bahaas Waste 315 315 000 0125 0090 252 286%
237 214 Fidehlty Bank 237 237 000 0055 0040 431 1 69%
14 04 9 92 Cable Bahaas 998 998 000 1 406 0250 71 251%
2 88 2 72 Colna Holdings 2 72 2 72 0 00 5,762 0 249 0 040 109 1 47%
719 5 26 Commonwealth Bank (Sl) 6 76 6 76 0 00 0419 0 300 161 4 44%
385 1 27 Consoidated Water BDRs 267 267 000 0111 0052 241 1 95%
285 1 32 Doctors Hospital 2 55 2 55 0 O0 0 625 0080 41 3 14%
820 628 Famguard 6 49 6 49 0 O0 0 420 0240 155 3 70%
1 87 880 Fnco 928 928 000 0322 0520 288 560%
11 71 986 FrstCabbean Bank 999 999 000 0631 0350 158 350%
553 411 Focol(S) 4 75 4 77 002 2,250 0 326 0150 146 3 14%
100 1 00 Focl Class B Preferen 1 00 1 00 000 0000 0000 N/M 000%
045 0 27 Freeport Concrete O 27 0 27 0 00 0 035 0 000 77 0 00%
902 549 ICD Utlities 559 559 000 0407 0500 137 894%
1200 995 J S Johnson 995 995 000 0952 0640 105 643%
1000 10 00 Preer Real Estate 1000 1000 000 0156 0000 641 000%
E- C LI TE ' DEET E, I_. ITIE . .E 1 L.. 1 .. . . , .. ... i
52wk-HI 52wk- Low Security" Symbol Last Sale Change DaIly Vol Interest Maturity
1000 00 1000 O0 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100 00 000 7% 19 October 2017
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 10000 000 Prne + 1 75% 19 October 2022
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 10000 00 00 7% 30 May 2013
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 10000 000 Prne + 1 75% 29 May 2015
14 60 7 92 Bahamas Supermarkets 1006 11 06 1400 -2246 0000 N/M 0 00%
800 6 00 Cabbean Crossings (Pref) 2 00 6 25 400 0 000 0 480 N/M 7 80%

055 0 40 RND Holdings 0 45 0 55 0 55 0 002 0 000 261 90 000%
,i- ' L . ,. , 1 ,.,,. , ,1 .,.. j-
1 4160 1 3419 CFAL Bond Fund 1 4160 462 5 53 31 - Oct-09
30351 28266 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 28552 2 88 3 92 30 Nov-09
1 5050 1 4294 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 5048 4 96 519 11 Dec-09
33856 2 9343 Royal Fidelity Bahaas G & IFund 2 9618 -12 52 -1521 31-Oct-09
13 2400 12 5597 Royal Fidelity Prme Income Fund 13 2400 4 93 5 90 31-Oct 09
103 0956 100 0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 103 0956 310 2 52 30-Sep-09
100 0000 99 4177 CFAL Global EquityFud 99 4177 312 2 76 30Sep09
1 0804 10000 FG Financial Preferred Incoe Fund 10804 432 526 31Oct 09
10364 1 0000 FG Financial Groth Fund 1 0269 0 59 -019 31 Oct 09
10742 1 0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1 0742 356 442 31-Oct 09
94740 90775 Royal Fidelity Bah Infl investment Fund 94740 417 418 31 Oct 09
106301 100000 Royal Fideity Bah Inf Inve1 06301 630 630 31 Oct09
I , , . . , T TE , I -.
BIS ALL SHARE IND 19 02 = 1000 00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by ng pn
52wk Highest Cl losing pnd e in last 52 weeks BId $- BuI ng pne of Codlna and Fidelity
52wkLow Lowest osing pne in last 52 weeks Ask A Sellng pne of ColIna and dely
Previous Close -Previous day's weighted pnce for dally Volume Last Pnce -Last traded over-thecounter pnce
Today's Close .-G.u nt day's weighted pnce for da-ly Volume Weekly Vol -Td1ng Volume of the pnor week
DaIly Vl Number f total sha s tded today NA Net set Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NM Not Meaningful
P/E losing pnce divided by the last 12 month ea ings FINDEX The Fidely Bahamas St k Index Januay 1, 1994 = 100
(S) 4fr1 Stock Split Efe ve Date 8/8/2007
VO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242 502-7010 ROYALFIDELITY 242 356-7764 i FO CAPITAL MARKETS 242 396-4000 . COLONIAL 242 502-7525


I ODSUSSOISO HSIPAGE LG ON0T WWW.TIBUE22CO0


K


NOTICE



ESTATE OF GARRY GONZALEZ
Late of Dunmore Lane in the Eastern
District of the Island of New
Providence

Notice is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the
above Estate are required to send their
names, addresses and particulars of the
debts or claims certified in writing to the
undersigned on or before the 22nd January,
A.D., 2010 required, to prove such debts
or claims, or in default be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made before
such debts or claims are proved; after the
above date the Administrator will distribute
the assets having regard only to the proved
debts or claims of which he shall have had
notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested
to make full settlement on or before 22nd
January, 2010.

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys for the Administrator
Mareva House
4 George Street
Nassau, Bahamas


NOTICE


IN THE ii~s1'AT OF PATR IC K VAN
WAIN WRIGHT BETHEL eak~a.
WAINWRIGHTI ATIIClK BET HEL.
a.k.a.~ PATRICK BETHEL late of ari
domniciled of Eastwood Estates, Eastern
Distnic, New Frovidcrice. The BIl Wrnas.
deceased

NOTICE is Iicruby givcn that all pc")nri having
any clairn or demand against or interest in the
.ibime Estate, should scnd same JtlI�y urrI fled in
writing to the undersigned on or 'before 21st
Jaury. 20 10 a after which datie Lhic Exeizu~ri -
W1Ill procccd to distributed the assets of the Estate
having iegw-d only to the clairris. demands or
interests of whichi she shall theni I1kLe had nol ice
AND all persons indebted to the above Estate
are asked 10 wt1c such dubis oilor before 2 1,st
January, 201().

V. M. LIGHTBOURN & CO.
Attorneys for the Executrix
P.O. 1Box AB-20.365
Bay Street, Mlanh Harbour
Abaco, The Bahamas%








+


PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


FROM page 1B


the ability of other companies to enter the
wholesale international data services trans-
mission market as further reasons why Cable
Bahamas should not be subjected to the pro-
posed SMP obligations.
Apart from Cable Bahamas/Caribbean
Crossings' 1,100 kilometre Bahamas Internet
Cable System (BICS), international data and
Internet connectivity from this nation was also
provided by the 8,600 kilometre ARCOS-1
submarine cable, linking the Bahamas and
other Caribbean islands with the US. Further
connectivity was provided by the BahamasII
cable, built in 1997 and owned by a combina-
tion of BTC, AT&T and Verizon.
Analysys Mason said Cable
Bahamas/Caribbean Crossings used less than
25 per cent of the available capacity on the
BICS system, and provided retail leased lines
and capacity to its Bahamian corporate clients,
other Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and
overseas operators wishing to connect with


Proposed controls on Cable's data entity 'unjustified'


their client subsidiaries.
Pointing out that Cable Bahamas had
already leased a one fibre pair IRU to fellow
Bahamian telecoms operator, Systems
Resource Group (SRG), the consultants said:
"We understand that SRG currently uses a
small portion of its available international
capacity to carry international voice traffic,
and currently interconnects with Sprint and
is collocated at Cable Bahamas/Caribbean
Crossings landing station in Boca Raton, Flori-
da.
"Given that it currently has access to large
capacity, SRG could provide wholesale inter-
national capacity to other Bahamian ISPs at
any time."
With IP Solutions International, which has
been granted a licence as a Triple Play
provider, also finalising an agreement with
Columbus Communications to lease capacity
on the ARCOS network, Analysys Mason


argued there was an abundance of competitive
options available to Bahamian ISPs when it
came to seeking international Internet con-
nectivity. As for pricing, the consultants said
BTC's prices were lower than Caribbean
Crossings' for low-capacity circuits of less than
Megabit per second. Its wholesale prices stood
at $2,131 and $2,776 for 384kpbs and 512 kpbs
of bandwidth respectively, compared to $3,635
and $4,076 for Caribbean Crossings.
"This is the result of a gradual price decline
from BTC over the last two years, from
$6,000/T1 down to $4,900/T1 on the retail mar-
ket in one year," Analysys Mason said.
"At the same time, Cable
Bahamas/Caribbean Crossings had not adjust-
ed its pricing as it was able to provide a better
quality of services than BTC. Cable
Bahamas/Caribbean Crossings was partially
successful due to the fact that BTC did not
use its financial and economic power to com-


pete effectively, whether for strategic or oper-
ational reasons."
While Cable Bahamas had been "able to
retain customers who were prepared to pay a
premium to benefit from this higher quality of
service", Analysys Mason added: "The market
situation is changing quickly, however.
"Combined with its price decline to increase
its market share, BTC is also making an effort
to improve service levels, as shown by an
improvement in its interaction and technical
responses to Caribbean Crossings/Cable
Bahamas. In this context of increased com-
petitive pressure from BTC, we understand
that Cable Bahamas/Caribbean Crossings are
currently working through a marketing/sales
strategy in order to increase, in turn, the attrac-
tiveness of their own international capacity
offers."
The intensifying competition, the consul-
tants added, had brought wholesale prices for
international data transmission capacity down
to "a level comparable with neighboring
islands" in one year.


BAHAMAS WASTE LIMITED


Unaudited Interim Condensed Financial Statements
Nine months ended September 30, 2009

Bahamas Waste Limited

Interim Condensed Balance Sheet (unaudited)


Assets
Current assets
Cash
Accounts receivable, net
Inventory
Prepaid expenses other receivables
Deposits
Total current assets

Non-current assets
Investment in associate
Property, plant and equipment, net
Total non-current assets
Total assets

Liabilities and shareholders' equity
Liabilities
Current liabilities
Bank overdraft
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
Note payable (note 5)
Total current liabilities

Non-current liabilities
Security deposits
Note payable (note 5)
Total non-current liabilities
Total liabilities

Shareholders' equity
Share capital
Contributed surplus
Retained earnings
Total shareholders' equity
Total liabilities and shareholders' equity


September 30 December 31
2009 2008


$ 306,537 $ 160,456
1,597,403 1,496,303
374,243 304,064
98,938 77,835
12,900 12,900
2,390,021 2,051,558


143,248 143,248
7,317,770 7,391,968
7,461,018 7,535,216
$ 9,851,039 $ 9,586,774




$ - $ 17,802
349,179 397,783
111,893 98,384
461,072 513,969


411,030 407,889
128,290 254,940
539,320 662,829
1,000,392 1,176,798


42,000 42,000
2,752,113 2,752,113
6,056,534 5,615,863
8,850,647 8,409,976
$ 9,851,039 $ 9,586,774


See accomDanvine notes to unaudited interim condensed financial statements.

Bahamas Waste Limited

Condensed Interim Statement of Comprehensive Income
and Retained Earnings (unaudited)


Sales and services rendered
Cost of sales and direct expenses
Gross profit

Expenses
Operating
Interest and bank charges
Total operating expenses

Net income from operations

Retained earnings at beginning of period

Dividends
Retained earnings at end of period

Earnings per share


Nine months
ended September 30
2009 2008

$ 5,775,521 $ 5,824,753
3,645,918 4,161,811
2,129,603 1,662,942


1,456,072 1,361,565
22,860 27,295
1,478,932 1,388,860

650,671 274,082

5,615,863 5,287,237
6,266,534 5,561,319
(210,000)
$ 6,056,534 $ 5,561,319

$ 0.15 $ 0.06


See accompanying notes to unaudited interim condensed financial statements.

Bahamas Waste Limited

Condensed Interim Statement of Cash Flows (unaudited)


Cash flows from operating activities
Net income
Adjustments to net income for items not involving use of cash:
Depreciation
Bad debts expense


Change in non-cash working capital items
Increase in accounts receivable
Increase in inventory
Increase in prepaid expenses and other receivables
(Decrease) Increase in accounts payable and accrued
liabilities
Increase in security deposits
Net cash flow provided by operating activities

Cash flows from investing activities
Purchase of property, plant and equipment
Investment in associate
Net cash flow used in investing activities

Cash flows from financing activities
Dividends paid
Proceeds from note payable
Payment of note payable
Net cash flow from financing activities

Net increase in cash
Cash at beginning of the period
Cash at end of the period


Nine months
ended September 30
2009 2008


$ 650,671 $ 274,082

920,059 930,582
31,190 -
1,601,920 1,204,664


(132,290) (292,863)
(70,179) (61,717)
(21,103)

(48,604) 31,647
3,141 29,978
1,332,885 911,709


(845,861) (1,257,810)
(36,603)
(845,861) (1,294,413)


(210,000)
400,000
(113,141) (23,134)
(323,141) 376,866

163,883 (5,838)
142,654 (191,960)
$ 306,537 $ (197,798)


Bahamas Waste Limited

Notes to Unaudited Interim Condensed Financial Statements

September 30, 2009



1. Corporate Information

Bahamas Waste Limited ("BWL" or the "Company") was incorporated under the laws of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas on August 18, 1987 under the name of Bahamas Waste Systems
Limited. On December 7, 1999, the Company changed its name to Bahamas Waste Limited. The
Company is engaged in the business of solid and medical waste collection and disposal, including
the sale, installation, rental and maintenance of waste compactors and containers. The Company
has publicly traded shares which are registered on the Bahamas International Stock Exchange. The
latest audited accounts of the BWL were prepared on December 31, 2008.

The quarter ends of BWL fall on March 31, June 30 and September 30, with the year end of the
Company being December 31.

The condensed interim financial statements for the nine months ended September 30, 2009 were
authorized for issue by the directors on December 18, 2009.


2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of preparation
These condensed interim financial statements for the nine months ended September 30, 3009 have
been prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard 34 Interim Financial
Reporting.

The condensed interim financial statements do not include all of the information and disclosures
required in the annual financial statements, and should be read in conjunction with the December
31, 2008 audited financial statements.

The accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the interim condensed financial statements are
consistent with those followed in the preparation of the Company's annual financial statements for
the year ended December 31, 2008, except for the adoption of certain new standards, interpretations
and amendments to existing standards that have been published that are mandatory for the
Company's accounting periods beginning on or after January 1, 2009 or later periods, noted below.
Adoption of these Standards and Interpretations did not have any effect on the financial position or
performance of the Company.



Basis of preparation (continued)
* IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements (Revised)
* IAS 23 Borrowing Costs (Revised)
* IAS 32 Financial Instruments Presentation (Revised)
* IFRS 2 Share Based Payments (Revised)
* IFRS 7 Amendments, Improving Disclosures about Financial Instruments
* IFRS 8 Operating Segments

Additionally, in May 2008, the International Accounting Standards Board issued
"Improvements to IFRSs", as part of its annual improvements project, and a vehicle for
making non-urgent but necessary amendments to various IFRSs. These amendments
primarily become effective for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2009. The
following table shows the IFRSs and topics addressed by these amendments. Management
believes that the adoption of the amendments do not have significant impact to the financial
statements.
Future changes in accounting policies
* IAS 27 Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements (Revised)
* IAS 28 Investment in Associate (Revised)
* IAS 31 Interest in Joint Ventures (Revised)
* IAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement (Revised)
* IFRS 3 Business Combinations (Revised)
* IFRIC 9/IAS 39 Amendments on Embedded Derivatives
* IFRIC 15 Agreements for the Construction of Real Estate
* IFRIC 16 Hedges of a Net Investment in Foreign Operation
* IFRIC 17 Distributions of Non-Cash Assets to Owners
* IFRIC 18 Transfers of Assets from Customers

In April 2009, the International Accounting Standards Board issued "Improvements to
IFRSs", as part of its annual improvements project, and a vehicle for making non-urgent but
necessary amendments to various IFRSs. These amendments primarily become effective for
annual periods beginning on or after July 1, 2009 and January 1, 2010. The following table
shows the IFRSs and topics addressed by these amendments. Management has decided not
to early adopt the amendments and does not expect their application to have a significant




3. Earnings per Share

Earnings per share were calculated based on the shares outstanding at the end of the period, which
approximated average shares outstanding during the period.


Shares outstanding at September 30


2009
4,200,000


2008
4,200,000


4. Related Party Transactions

During the quarter, BWL entered into transactions with related parties. All transactions were
conducted at arms length and no significant obligations to the related parties at September 30, 2009
have been disclosed.


5. Note Payable

On June 1, 2008, the Company entered in agreement to purchase property adjacent to its existing
location for $500,000. Pursuant to that agreement, the Company has paid the vendor $100,000 and
entered into a $400,000 promissory note agreement with Davandon Holdings Limited. The term of
the note is five years with an interest rate of 7% per annum. The principals of Davandon Holdings
Limited are also the majority shareholders of the Company. As at September 30, 2009, the
outstanding balance amounted to $240,183 (December 31, 2008: $353,324).


6. Commitments and Contingencies

The Company guarantees its compactors for a 60-day period from the date of purchase. The
Company is reimbursed by the manufacturer for any claims paid under such guarantees.


See accompanying notes to unaudited interim condensed financial statements. I


SOISCU S STOIS SN THIS PAG LOSNT W.TIUE4.O


BUSINESS I







+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 11B


US executives



deliver message




to North Korea


(AP Photo/Korean Central News Agency via Korea News Service)
IN THIS PHOTO RELEASED by Korean Central News Agency via Korea News Service in Tokyo, U.S. Pres-
ident Barack Obama's special envoy for North Korea, Stephen Bosworth, is welcomed by an unidentified
North Korean official, right, upon arrival at Pyongyang airport, North Korea, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2009. Bosworth
began a rare trip to North Korea Tuesday for the highest-level talks with the communist nation in more than
a year as a senior U.S. official warned of strong sanctions against Pyongyang unless it rejoins international
nuclear talks.


DESMOND BUTLER,
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON


U.S. business executives say they told North
Korean leaders during a visit to Pyongyang last
week that they must give up their nuclear ambi-
tions if they want foreign investment in the iso-
lated country, according to Associated Press.
The rare unofficial trip by independent U.S.
business leaders came at the invitation of the
North Korean government. The delegation was
led by retired U.S.
Air Force General Charles Boyd, the presi-
dent of Business Executives for National Security.
It included former American International Group
CEO Maurice "Hank" Greenberg and Ross Per-
ot Jr., chairman of Perot Systems Corp. and son
of the former U.S. presidential candidate.
The group met with the head of the North
Korean parliament and other officials.
Boyd said in a conference call Tuesday that
North Korean officials rejected the business del-
egation's message.


"They were not at all pleased that we were
drawing the direct connection between poten-
tial economic engagement with the rest of the
world and the resolution of the nuclear issue," he
said. The Dec. 14-17 visit came as the Obama
administration is trying to step up engagement
with North Korea. The delegation of business
executives arrived just days after a three-day trip
to North Korea by U.S. Special Envoy Stephen
Bosworth. That trip marked the Obama admin-
istration's first high-level talks with North Korea.
Bosworth took a letter from U.S. President
Barack Obama to Pyongyang in an attempt to
bring North Korea back to six-nation talks aimed
at its nuclear disarmament.
Both Washington and Pyongyang agreed dur-
ing Bosworth's trip on the need to resume nego-
tiations, but North Korea made no firm com-
mitment about when it would rejoin them.
The negotiations, which began in late 2003,
also include China, Japan, Russia and South
Korea. They are aimed at getting North Korea to
dismantle its nuclear programs in exchange for
economic aid and political concessions.


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+


St. Andrew

students put

on 'Oliver'

musical
1- See page three


A twist on a

Christmas fi
See page eight


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009


Gif


Local artist
Eric Ellis
offers his
artwork as
alternatives
for Christmas
gifts this year


Lsof


By JEFFARAH GIBSON


FOR the extremely last-
minute Christmas shoppers
who are still searching for
that perfect and unique
gift, artwork may be the
way to go this year.
And with the art studio sale by local
artist Eric Ellis, persons have the oppor-
tunity to purchase a gift that embodies
thoughtfulness and love.
The art sale encompasses work by the
artist spanning a period of over four
years and features a number of expres-
sionist pieces.
Mr Ellis spoke with Tribune Art about
his reason for the art sale.
"I have been wanting to do an exhibi-


art

tion for a while now, but I didn't get the
chance to do one right away. So I decid-
ed to put on a studio sale because I have
tons and tons of paintings I need to get
out of my hands," he said.
His last exhibition took place in
December 2008, and since then he has
been hard at work completing a whole
array of cultural pieces.
Mr Ellis' artwork focuses on a few
main themes and makes use of a lot of
island imagery.
"Its really just a mixture of junkanoo
pieces, some paintings that are religious
in nature, and a variety of island
imagery," he said.
The paintings celebrate Bahamian cul-
ture with overlapping shapes, simplistic
graphic shapes and vibrant colourful
island images.
One of the paintings depicts a Bahami-
an woman with a basket of fruits, which


the artist said makes a strong statement
about the island and its people.
"There are a lot of paintings to choose
from since there are over 30 pieces up for
sale," Mr Ellis said.
Dionne Smith, partner of Mr Ellis',
said that the art sale kicked off last week
and they have already received atten-
tion from a number of persons.
"We started last week and even
though we have not sold any of the paint-
ings as yet, we have been getting calls
from a few persons who seem very inter-
ested in the work," she told Tribune Art.
Persons who are interested in pur-
chasing Mr Ellis' work can do so by set-
ting up a private viewing at the studio
with Mrs Smith.
"They can either give me a call, then
we can set up a time where they can view
the pieces and make purchases," she
said.
And those who prefer to shop from
home can do so via e-mail.
"I can e-mail them pictures of the art-
work and they can make selections from
the comfort of their homes, and the only
thing they have to do is pick up the paint-
ing," she said.


Mrs Smith said art lovers don't have to
worry about the sale ending anytime
soon.
"As long as there are paintings there
will be a sale," she said.
Persons who don't get a chance to pur-
chase a piece of Mr Ellis' art before
Christmas can always do so after the hol-
idays.
The artwork has now also been dis-
counted - paintings are up to 75 per cent
off during the art studio Christmas clear-
ance special.
Mr Ellis has been an artist since he
was in high school, competing in a num-
ber of art shows where he ranked first
and second the majority of times.
His work is on display at the Central
Bank of the Bahamas, Atlantis and at
the National Art Gallery.
Art collectors and artists alike are fans
of his work.
Dionisio D'Aguilar, the late Brent
Malone, Don Davies, Stan and Jackson
Burnside have all been supporters of the
established artist's paintings.
Those interested in viewing or pur-
chasing Mr Ellis' artwork can contact
Dionne Smith at 377-0241.







+>


PAGE 2C, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


ARTS-


St Andrew's students leave the audience wanting more


COMPLIMENTS and
congratulations came
pouring in after St
Andrew's School success-
ful performance of the
musical 'Oliver' by Lionel
Bart earlier this month.
A large cast of approximately
75 talented primary and sec-
ondary students used a combina-
tion of drama, music and dance
to bring the story of the orphan
Oliver Twist to the stage of the
school's auditorium.
The energy, enthusiasm and
confidence of the performers
resulted in a show which garnered
rave reviews from the audience
members.
Head of Secondary School,
Frank Coyle, told the audience
and cast that "schools that invest
time and resources to the creative
arts and productions like 'Oliver'
have improved school morale in
both students and staff.
"I am very pleased and proud of
the magnitude of student and staff
involvement, a school with low
morale would not be able to
muster the enthusiasm, expertise
and good will of staff and students
to put on a major production such


as this," he said.
Apart from the cast, 70 sec-
ondary school students and many
staff members helped behind the
scenes. There was also much sup-
port from the school community
throughout the rehearsal process
and on the nights of the perfor-
mances.
"Sensational work was done by
Mrs Knowles and Ms Peterson, as
well as the production's director,
Ms Leadbetter," the school said.
St Andrew's also wished to
extend thanks to the production's
sponsors who included: Bonnie
Davis; Yolande Donaldson; Lyn-
don Johnson; Elspeth Johnson,
and Greenleaf Design Ltd.
An anonymous year nine stu-
dent has also been motivated by
the success of this production, and
asked that instead of presents at a
recent birthday, that she be given
money which is to be donated to
the St Andrew's School drama
department so that lighting and
sound equipment can be pur-
chased for future productions.
Persons wanting to make simi-
lar donations can contact
Nicole Treco, development offi-
cer of the St. Andrew's School
Foundation.
The St Andrew's School Foun-


dation is a non-profit company district of New Providence. The facilities, generate funds for teach-
set up in 2002 to serve as a major Foundation has set up major ers' professional development,
support vehicle for St Andrew's 'endowment funds', the goals of and provide financial assistance
School, a private internationally- which are to build new facilities, and scholarships for students in
accredited school in the eastern renovate and upgrade existing need.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

LOWER LAKES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

A PRIORI CONCEPTS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

KELLEN SLOPES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

FLORESCENCE NORTHEAST LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

SPRING BLUSH INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

GRAFFIAS INDUSTRIES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

NUFENEN INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

ROCKING CHAIR LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

SCHWANENSEE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


I ODSCUS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO' WWTIBUE4.O I







+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 3C


ARTS


"THE GREAT BAHAMIAN



HURRICANES OF 1926'


By JEFFARAH GIBSON


IN 1926, 'the Great Nassau Hurricane',
and 'the Great Miami Hurricane' killed
over 500 Bahamians and caused extensive
destruction throughout the chain of islands.
A new book, 'The Great Bahamian Hur-
ricanes of 1926', aims to tell the story of
these , ,i ii .," victims and the danger
hurricanes continue to pose to this island
nation.
Written by veteran meteorologist and
international speaker on hurricanes Wayne
Neely, the book gives a detailed account of
the violent hurricanes that took place over
80 years ago.
Through vivid retellings and personal
stories, readers get a true picture of the
actual events.
Mr Neely spoke with Tribune Enter-
tainment, explaining what the book is
about.
" 'The Great Bahamian Hurricane of
1926' provides the perfect introduction
into the complexities and dynamics of hur-
ricanes. It focuses on how they develop,
what causes them to be so powerful, the
history behind them and how the hurri-
canes affect us all," he said.
Because the Bahamas' geographical
location makes it susceptible to hurricanes
it has attracted some of the most devas-
tating storms in past years.
Mr Neely said that his book holds vital
information and acts as reminder of how
dangerous hurricanes are.
"It highlights historical and very devas-
tating Bahamian hurricanes which occurred
in 1926. As a result of the record-breaking
hurricane seasons in the past ten years and
the impact these hurricanes have inflicted
on us here in the Bahamas and the region
as a whole, it is a very timely book," he
said. Information printed about these cat-
astrophes in history books today doesn't
even scrape the surface, Mr Neely said.


"In one day, over 268 persons died from only one of
these storms, but yet Bahamian history books and
society seemed to have forgotten about these storm
victims..."


But what other history books have left
out on the topic of the hurricanes of 1926,
this book makes up for.
"The first hurricane, called 'the Great
Nassau Hurricane' in 1926, struck the
Bahamas on July 25 and caused massive
destruction throughout the islands. The
next powerful hurricane, called 'the Great
Miami Hurricane of 1926', occurred late
September and also did significant damage
to the Bahamas. From July to October
these hurricanes in 1926 were responsible
for well over 500 deaths in this country
alone.
"In one day, over 268 persons died from
only one of these storms, but yet Bahami-
an history books and society seemed to
have forgotten about these storm victims,
and I felt it was my job to see to it that
these victims are remembered for future
generations," he said.
Persons like Sir Clifford Darling who
lost five uncles in the storm, Viola Collie
who lost two sisters, the late Conrad
Knowles, Henry Pratt, and August Van
Ryn, who lost a baby girl, told Mr Neely
their personal experiences of how they
weathered the storm.
The Commissioner of Abaco at the time
also told of his experience, of how he got
caught in the hurricane in Marsh Harbour
and had to cling to tree branches for sur-
vival for the duration of the storm.
In 1926, the sponging industry was the
very "bread and butter" of our nation, Mr
Neely writes.
And when these storms passed through
the Bahamas, the entire economy was


Legal Notice
NOTICE

ST. PREX LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
HICKORY LANE INVESTMENT

HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

MYSTICO MOUNTAIN CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


brought to a standstill, homes were
destroyed and the people were left dev-
astated.
"Over 90 per cent of the houses in Exu-
ma were destroyed and the majority of the
houses on most of the Family Islands by
the end of the 1926 hurricane season were
totally wiped out by these hurricanes," he
said. Mr Neely said he aims to increase
awareness about hurricanes. He also warns
Bahamians not to grow complacent simply
because the Bahamas was not been hit by
a major hurricane in the past few seasons.
"As Bahamians we tend to take things
for granted, and just because we did not
have a hurricane in a while does not mean
that we must not be prepared for when
one comes. Remember hurricanes can
cause grave damage and it's better to be
safe than sorry," Mr Neely said.
This book is Mr Neely's latest project.
He has written three other books on the
topic of storms entitled 'The Great Hurri-
canes of 1929', 'The Major Hurricanes to
Affect the Bahamas' and 'Rediscovering
Hurricanes'.
Each of the books are being used by
public and private schools for research.
"The teachers at the various schools
allow their students to use my book when
they have assignments and projects on hur-
ricanes," he said.
For persons interested in obtaining a
copy of the book, you can visit Island Mer-
chants (any location), Logos Bookstore,
Cole Thompson's Pharmacy downtown,
Bahamian Delights, Bahama Divers, and
the Chapter One Bookstore.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

FAIRVIEW CRESCENT

INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 21st day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice
NOTICE

BASHKIR

VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

PLATINUM SQUARE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE GREAT


BAHAMIAN


HURRICANES


OF 1121

The Story of
Three of the Greatest Hurricanes
to Ever Affect the Bahamas

Legal Notice
NOTICE

PERPETUAL STARLIGHT INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

LUPINE VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

GOSPORT VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

CYBER WIRELESS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


K


Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)






7Th


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 7C


ARTS-


RECIPE FOR FRUITCAKE COOKIES
(submitted to allrecipes.com)
Ingredients
* 1 cup butter
* 2 cups packed light brown sugar
* 4 eggs
* 1 pound golden raisins
* 1 pound raisins
* 1/2 pound red candied cherries
* 1/2 pound red candied pineapple
* 1/2 pound green candied cherries
* 1/2 pound green candied pineapple
* 1 cup bourbon
* 2 tablespoons milk
* 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
* 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
*3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
* 1 pound walnut halves
* 1 pound pecan halves
Directions
1. In a medium bowl, dredge candied fruit and raisins in 1 cup
flour.
2. In a large bowl, cream together brown sugar and butter. Beat in
eggs. Gradually beat in bourbon and milk. Mix in remaining flour
and spices. Stir in fruit and nuts. Refrigerate overnight.
3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Drop dough by
teaspoonfuls, about 2 inches apart, onto ungreased cookie sheets.
4. Bake for approximately 15 minutes. Remove from oven, and
cool on wire racks.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

JENKA VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

FURSTENTUM COMPANY LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

FIELDON PTE. LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


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Legal Notice
NOTICE

TERRANIERE SLOPES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

UTILITY TRACK LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

WESTERN RIDGE GROUP LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

NEU LANDOR VALES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

CEDER OCEAN LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

DEJAVUE HOLDINGS CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)






INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), WILLINGTON CORP., is in dissolution. Continen-
tal Liquidators Inc. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
60 Market Square, P.O. Box 1906, Belize City, Belize. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are
required to send their names, addresses and particulars of their
debts or claims to the Liquidator before December 28th, 2009.






Legal Notice
NOTICE

UBICATION INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


I ODSUSSOISO HSIPAGE LG ON5T WWW.TIBUE22CO5


+








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PAGE 8C, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


ARTS


A twist on a Christmas favourite


By JEFFARAH GIBSON


MADE like the tradi-
tional fruitcake,
with regular
mixed fruit, nuts, and other
delicious ingredients, fruit-
cake cookies put a spin on
the traditional holiday
dessert which can be eaten
to finish off the perfect
Christmas dinner or as a
snack in between.
This is something new to intro-
duce to your family and friends, and
the best thing about the treat is that
it can be made in a matter of min-
utes, Lady Ingrid Darling told Tri-
bune Taste.
Lady Ingrid, a published author
of a book on the culinary delights of
Bahamian culture, explained that
fruitcake cookies are among the
many baked goods she has experi-
mented with.
"I have been experimenting with
fruitcake, I was just substituting one
ingredient for the next because I
wanted to try something a little dif-
ferent and that was what I came out
with," she said.
For some Bahamians Christmas
just isn't Christmas without fruit-
cake. It has long been associated
with the holiday season in Great


Britain. And when the English
introduced the cake to our islands
we made it our own, personalising
it, adding fruits that are indigenous
to the Bahamas.
Like most pastries, fruitcake
cookies can be made in any flavour,
but Lady Ingrid's choice are
bananas.
"I have made the fruitcake cook-
ies with banana, and as everyone
would know fruitcake is pastry that
tastes really good when it is moist.
The banana really helps keep the
cake moist," she said.
She also adds coconut flakes to
the batter which she said gives the
cookies an even richer flavour.
But there are many alternatives
to banana, Lady Ingrid said.
Those who enjoy baking can per-
sonalise their cake by adding their
favourite fruits or fruit juices like
tamarind, papaya or sugar apple to
the mixture, she said.
Even the pulp of any fruit can be
added to the batter.
"Now if you are baking fruitcake
cookies for the kids, like you would
sprinkle rum on the cake (for the
adults) so that it maintains its mois-
ture, you should sprinkle grape juice
over it instead," she said.
Fruitcake cookies are a little dif-
ferent than the cake in that the
cookies have more of a crispy tex-
ture.
Creativity is everything when it


comes to baking holiday pastries.
And for the creative baker mak-
ing your own special brand of fruit-
cake cookies goes beyond adding
new ingredients, it also means craft-
ing your cookies carefully so that
they look appetising and festive.
"When you are done baking the
cookies, give them a chance to cool,
then you can decorate them for the
season. The mixed fruit that you
use in the cake can be used as dec-
orations for the cake. They usually
come in holiday colours like red
and green so you will be able to
decorate your cookies," Lady Ingrid
said.
Years ago, during the post-colo-
nial era, Lady Ingrid said, it was a
tradition for a bride and the groom
to place a fruitcake on top of their
wedding cake. And when the first
year anniversary came the bride and
the groom would eat the fruitcake.
"Fruitcake cookies can last just
as long as fruitcake. The only thing
the home baker has to do is put the
cookies into a container and keep
them in a cool place," she said.
So if you bake more cookies than
expected, you don't have to toss
them, you can save them for almost
up to a year.
Making your cookies look festive
is great, but making sure your cook-
ies have that rich fruity flavour is
the most important thing of all.


THE WEATHER REPORT Bi


INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


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