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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01474
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: December 21, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01474

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SEE PAGE 16


i h


I 0


Man killed,

woman stabbed

in brutal attack
By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
EYEWITNESSES last night described how a man and
a woman were brutally beaten and stabbed in the street.
The male victim died at the scene, his attacker dodging
police bullets to flee in a car. It was one of two violent
killings this weekend.
The man, who has not yet been identified by police, was
beaten to death in Palm Beach Street, off Wulff Road,
Nassau.
SEE page 14


open state-of-the-art CONSTABLE KEVA MAJO

centre modelled on J --

Bahamas facilities


R -:r1'.: ,:e:[:'tenj,. l iii. , ln: , iie' Anniu l
9 R.


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
A CANCER clinic mod-
elled on existing healthcare
facilities for Bahamians will
be built in Antigua for
600,000 residents of the East-
ern Caribbean.
The Cancer Centre East-
ern Caribbean (CCEC) will
be developed for the Organi-
sation of Eastern Caribbean
States (OECS) by Dr
Conville Brown, of Global
Health Partners Ltd, based
on the model of the Medical
Pavillion Bahamas and can-
cer centre in Centreville, Nas-
sau.
Dr Brown, chairman, pres-
ident and CEO of Medical
Pavilion Bahamas, signed a
memorandum of agreement
on November 19, the day
after it was signed by Antigua
and Barbuda Health Minister
Willmoth Daniel, and devel-
opments have since taken off.
The Global Health Part-


ners Ltd CEO has since
addressed the OECS heads
of government regarding the
CCEC in Anguilla and con-
ducted a video conference
with the health ministers of
the nine OECS member
countries on Wednesday and
said all countries pledged
their support.
Dr Brown said: "People in
the eastern Caribbean will
soon have access to a state of
the art cancer centre without
having to travel to north,
south or Latin America and
it's in their own territory.
"Additionally each of the
governments will be invited
to participate in the equity of
the company."
He said Antigua and Bar-
buda Prime Minister Baldwin
Spencer was impressed by the
model presented by Dr
Brown at a meeting during
the CARICOM Services Cen-
tre Symposium in July and Mr
Spencer asked him to develop
SEE page two


9 mor
&rll~a




F~ owe ; *'

& P.'4,:k


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
WINDY weather ripped
through Hope Town tear-
ing shutters off windows and
blowing outdoor furniture
away in what locals believe
was a waterspout.
The winds picked up just
before 6pm on Friday, and
Hope Town resident Matt
McCoy said the windows
shook and the pressure in
the house changed as the
storm passed over his beach
house in the Queen's High-
way, Elbow Cay.
A crop of banana trees
were uprooted outside
another resident's home and
shutters were torn off the
windows at a number of
Hope Town houses.
Mr McCoy said: "It got
really windy for about 10
SEE page 14


Three injured in

triple shooting


THREE people were tak-
en to hospital last night fol-
lowing a triple shooting on
Martin Street, off Market
Street.
The incident took place just
after 7pm on Martin Street,
near Market Street, Nassau.
At press time, Police


Sergeant Chrisyln Skippings
said: "Details are still sketchy
but we can confirm that there
was a triple shooting.
"All of the people were
taken to hospital by Emer-
gency Medical Services."
"We don't know their con-
dition right now."


Armed robbers target residents
pulling up to their homes
ARMED robbers held up residents as they pulled into the
driveways of their homes in two separate incidents in eastern
New Providence this weekend.
A home in Minnie Street was raided by thugs armed with
shotguns, and Carmichael Road businesses were stormed by
armed robbers as high incidences of crime continue in the
week before Christmas.
A resident of Montagu Avenue, off Village Road, was held
up by a masked gunman as he pulled his car into the driveway


SEE page 14


Unemployment
rises, but rate
now slowing
By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
UNEMPLOYMENT
continues to rise in The
Bahamas but the rate at
which it is growing has
slowed significantly com-
pared with earlier this year,
new figures have revealed.
As of November 2009,
19,200 people were looking
for work in New Provi-
dence, where there is a total
potential labour force of
131,900 people, and in
Grand Bahama 5,120 peo-
ple out of a labour force of
28,360 were job hunting.
According to the results
of the Department of Sta-
tistic's Interim Labour Sur-
SEE page 14


ISJEINSIGHT SEC


Local specialist to


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I * I H IS I BETRERA


... ....






+


PAGE 2, MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


*OCAL NEWS I


- -- O.k.a.~a ___ - S A s&S~awr


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Clinic hope for



cancer patients


FROM page one
something similar in Antigua
and Barbuda.
The Medical Pavilion
Bahamas is the only cancer
treatment centre outside of
North America accredited
by the American College of
Radiation and Oncology
(ACRO) and has just
received the highest level of
accreditation, for three years
from January 2010, at the
end of its initial three year
accreditation. It is run by
Global Health Partners Ltd
headed by Dr Brown and
Managing Director the Hon-
ourable Professor Dr Arthur
Porter, a Privy Council
member for Canada and
CEO of McGill University
healthcare system.
The world-standard mul-
ti-specialism facility includes
The Bahamas Heart Centre
founded in 1993, The Cancer
Centre added in 2002, as well
as The Chest Centre, The
Breast Centre and the Imag-
ing Centre.
In addition to the state of
the art healthcare model, Dr
Brown said a key element
for the Antigua and Barbuda
Prime Minister was the part-
nered care model utilised in
the Bahamas. This allows
governments to take 30 per
cent of shares, while 10 per
cent is available to private
investors, while Global
Health Partners Limited,
headed by Dr Brown and Dr
Porter, retains 60 per cent
and will be the professional
owners of the CCEC. The
30 per cent as split has 10
per cent for Antigua through
Mount St John's and the oth-
er 20 per cent can be pur-
chased by the other eight
governments.
Core benefits for coun-
tries and territories that opt
in are guaranteed access to
discounts for government
patients and self-paying indi-
viduals, the payment of div-
idends as return on invest-
ment and the opportunity to


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venture in the niche market
of medical tourism.
The discounts have not
been fixed but the idea is for
insured patients to pay the
full price of treatment, a 25
per cent discount for self-
paying individuals and 50 per
cent discount for persons
under government schemes.
Governments that cannot
front their investment are
being offered a deal where
they pay 75 per cent of the
patient's care. Fifty per cent
would be the discount and
the other 25 per cent would
be payment towards their
investment.
Staffing is still under
review, but initial estimates
are for two medical oncolo-
gists, two radiation oncolo-
gists and one paediatric
oncologist. Nurses and tech-
nicians will also be needed
for the facility.
Dr Brown expects the
CCEC will receive the same
ACRO accreditation as Dr
Porter will take on the chal-
lenge of staffing and manag-
ing the facility.
Dr Brown said: "We are
very proud. We think it's
very flattering when we have
established a model and the
model is seen and appreci-
ated by others as a mecha-
nism for ensuring access to
state of the art healthcare by
all.
"The government of
Antigua has offered the land
for the cancer centre at the
front of their main hospital
in Mount St John's, it's a
beautiful site."
A feasibility study of the
$10 million project is being
done by PriceWaterhouse-
Coopers, commissioned by
Global Health Partners Ltd,
and Dr Brown expects it will
be completed in January or
February.
Architectural plans will
then be completed and the
bidding process will begin so
construction can start in
June and the new centre will
be completed and ready to
take its first patients in the
first quarter of 2011.
The OECS includes
Antigua and Barbuda, Com-
monwealth of Dominica,
Grenada, Montserrat, St
Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia and
St Vincent and the
Grenadines. Anguilla and
the British Virgin Islands are
associate members of the
OECS.


S.pcl xeinlp


i


IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I







+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 3


LOCALNEWS


Robber shoots

himself in leg

during escape
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
A DIMWITTED conch
stall robber thwarted his own
escape by shooting himself in
the leg.
The incident happened in
the early hours of yesterday
morning when a masked gun-
man attacked Doc's Conch
Stand, on Explorers Way, at
Freeport.
According to police, the
stall holder was sitting in his
truck when a man wearing a
Halloween mask banged on
the window and demanded
cash.
The terrified owner hand-
ed over some money to the
gunman, who then demand-
ed more. After giving up the
extra cash, the robber then
ran in the direction of the
laundry shop across the street
where a gunshot was heard.
Asst Supt Loretta Mack-
ey said officers began a search
and found the gunman sitting
on the ground on the north-
ern side of Explorers Way,
approximately 100ft from Doc
Conch Stand. He was suffer-
ing from an apparent gunshot
wound to the left thigh.
Police also found a tan-
coloured Halloween mask, a
spent .45 ammunition casing,
a black Desert Eagle .45 pistol
with nine rounds of .45
ammunitions, and cash.
The man was arrested and
taken into custody. He was
then transported to the Rand
Memorial Hospital by ambu-
lance for treatment.
ASP Mackey said the sus-
pect, who is in a serious but
stable condition, was expected
to be airlifted to New Provi-
dence for further medical
attention.

New service

from New York

to Grand Bahama

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - A new air
service to Grand Bahama
has commenced with the
return of Delta Airlines'
Comair, which is providing
four flights weekly from
New York.
Comair arrived with
some 50 passengers at
Grand Bahama Interna-
tional Airport. It now joins
another Delta affiliate,
Atlantic Southeast, which
began two weekly flights
between Grand Bahama
and Atlantic on December
12.
Airport officials were
pleased to welcome the
return of Delta to the island
and its services from
Atlanta and New York.
Comair departs JFK Air-
port at 11am and arrives at
2.20pm in Grand Bahama.
It leaves Grand Bahama
around 3pm, arriving
6.35pm in New York.









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Police revoke 'a number




of gun licences' in 2009


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net


POLICE have been forced to
revoke "quite a number" of gun
licenses this year, as owners were
found to be using the weapons
for illegitimate purposes, accord-
ing to Assistant Commissioner
of Police Raymond Gibson.
While declining to identify the
number of revocations, Mr Gib-
son said the police are concerned
that people who have been
issued gun licenses may in fact
end up using them for criminal
ends.
"Revocations have been hap-
pening from time to time if
someone's issued with a license
and found to be involved in
criminal activities or any matter
that warrants us to revoke their
licenses," said ACP Gibson.
He said there have been sev-
eral recent cases which have war-
ranted revocations, but would
not go into details other than to
say that such cases often involve
the permit holder using their
weapon to "make threats of
harm" against someone else.
Reports reaching The Tribune
last week were that the Govern-
ment may have shifted its policy


ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER
of Police Raymond Gibson
on the issuing of new rifle and
shotgun licenses, for which per-
mits are only given on the con-
dition that they are used solely
for hunting or other similar
sporting activities.
However, Mr Gibson denied
there has been any change in the
policy.
"On behalf of the Commis-
sioner I can categorically state
that the police are still issuing
licenses. There is no moratori-
um," he said.
"Once the application is made


and once we are satisfied and
confident that they are making it
for the right reasons then the
permit is issued."
Mr Gibson said police have
issued "quite a bit" of licenses
this year.
A spotlight was focused on
the issuance of permits for guns
last week after the fatal shooting
of an armed robber by an East
Street south proprietor, who
used his shotgun.
Police are investigating the
shooting in which one of the two
armed robbers died on the scene
at Island Wide Produce and
Meat Mart. Police say the shoot-
ing was lawful, despite permits
for such weapons being issued
solely for hunting purposes.
Last week several business
owners issued a plea for the
Government to loosen its restric-
tions on the issuance of hand-
gun licenses, which are consid-
ered the ultimate form of pro-
tection against crime for many.
Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest said the Gov-
ernment's current and long-
standing policy is not to provide
licenses for shotguns, except in
exceptional circumstances and
based on the approval of the
Prime Minister.


MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News.............P..P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11
Local News.............P12,13,14,19,20,21,22
Local News..........P23,24,25,26,27,29,30,31
Local News.............................P32,33,35,36
Editorial/Letters...................................... P4
Advts..................................P15,28,37,38,39
Sports........... ........................... P16,17,18
C om ics................................................... P34
Advts........ ...................... P40,41,42,43,44
BUSINESS SECTION
Business........................P1,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10
A dvts............................................. P2,11,12
INSIGHT SECTION
Insight............................. P1,2,3,5,6,7,8
A dvt................................................. ....... P 4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 20 PAGES

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


EDITO RIA U LETTER S TO THE EDITOR6I


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, cI tiimn'v) 322-1986
Ad c,' iing Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


Climate accord a small step in long process


COPENHAGEN - A furious final two
days of climate diplomacy and presidential
brinkmanship produced 2 1/2 thin pages called
the Copenhagen Accord, a deal vague at times
in meaning, rejected by some, lacking any
teeth.
"This particular text falls far short of our
expectations," the European Commission
president, Jose Manuel Barroso, said of the
political declaration produced in talks Friday
between President Barack Obama and big
developing countries at the U.N. climate con-
ference. Others were harsher in their criti-
cism.
Ill-starred though it seemed at its birth,
the 11th-hour deal may ultimately be seen as
another halting step in the slow, painful evo-
lution of the global fight against climate
change - the two-decade-old effort to nego-
tiate coordinated cuts internationally in carbon
dioxide and other industrial, transport and
agricultural emissions blamed for global warm-
ing.
The conflicts of many interests have
marked those talks from the beginning: the
division between rich and poor nations, the
rivalry between the U.S. and Europe, the
developing world's cleavage between poor
and middle-class countries, the interests of
the oil states, the concerns of island states
endangered by global warming's rising seas.
All those interests and more played out in
the two-week U.N. meeting, which ended with
an unprecedentedly large working summit on
climate, involving more than 110 presidents
and premiers. The spotlight fell mainly on
two of them, leaders of the two biggest pol-
luters, China's Premier Wen Jiabao and
America's Obama.
In two meetings on Friday, the pair seem to
have worked through chronic mistrust
between their countries, reached agreement
on a summit declaration and brought other big
developing states (Brazil, India and South
Africa) into the deal. Sponsors later claimed
much broader support among the 193 con-
ference nations.
A final session of climate conference dele-
gates that lasted through the night cast doubt,
however, as several countries, including
Bolivia, Venezuela and Sudan said the docu-
ment is unacceptable because it lacks targets
for reducing carbon emissions.
The declaration touched on major ele-
ments of the climate story, sometimes with
scant detail, always with no legal obligation
attached:


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* Nations agreed to cooperate in reducing
emissions, "with a view" to scientists' warnings
to keep temperatures from rising more than 2
degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees F) above prein-
dustrial levels, that is, 1.3 degrees C (2.3
degrees F) above today's average tempera-
tures.
* Developing nations will report every two
years on their voluntary actions to reduce
emissions. Those reports would be subject to
"international consultations and analysis" -
a concession by China to the U.S.
* Richer nations will finance a $10 billion-
a-year, three-year programme to fund poorer
nations' projects to deal with drought and
other climate-change impacts, and to develop
clean energy.
* They also set a "goal" of mobilizing $100
billion-a-year by 2020 for the same adaptation
and mitigation purposes.
In a U.S. concession to China and other
developing nations, text was dropped from
the declaration that would have set a goal of
reducing global emissions by 50 per cent by
2050. Developing nations thought that would
hamper efforts to raise their people from
poverty.
In the full U.N. climate conference, where
the Copenhagen Accord was discussed, some
developing nations complained bitterly about
the "top-down" imposition of the declaration,
and the conference's failure to set ambitious
targets for cutting emissions.
But even if the core declaration itself lacked
broad support, two simple side documents
will set the stage for continuing climate talks.
Those documents extend the mandates of
two key negotiating groups under the U.N. cli-
mate treaty. They guarantee continued pur-
suit, as early as next year, of a treaty or other
major agreement reducing global emissions
more sharply.
In the weeks leading up to the Copen-
hagen conference, few expected it to produce
dramatic results - the climate negotiations
process seldom has. They're long-haul, step-
by-step talks.
"I know this accord is far from what we
expected and what the world needs," said one
summit participant, Mexican President Felipe
Calderon. Now, he said, "we must launch the
negotiations immediately."
(This article was written by Charles J.
Hanley, AP Special Correspondent, who has
covered climate for The Associated Press
since 1997).


Bradley Roberts'




speech exposed


EDITOR, The Tribune.
BRADLEY ROBERTS'
initial speech at the recent
PLP convention exposed
just how desperate they real-
ly are. They reached in the
past and returned with a
"damaged political has
been" hoping that he could
rally their base. He wasted
no time talking the regular
PLP stuff that was carefully
designed to strike fear in the
electorate. But what they
did not bargain for was that
they are beginning to turn
off their own base.
Many sensible PLPs have
had enough of the old bul-
lying tactics that worked in
the past. No one was
impressed with the crude
utterances. We have long
moved past silliness. Most
of us have raised our level of
debate and discussions to a
more matured civilised level.
Nobody is impressed, not
even the less informed, less
educated or less interested.
The strategy employed by
the recycled chairman was
to complain about every-
thing and oppose everything
and continue to complain
about the same things ad
nauseam. It is not only sick-
ening to watch Mr Roberts
wallow like that, but to twist
the truth and spin while
using the worst kind of pro-
paganda and rhetoric, most
of which is not gaining
ground.
There was propaganda of
"stop, cancel and 1 \ i \\ of
the Straw Market. Nothing
was mentioned that some-
one must have been plan-
ning to benefit from the
windfall of thirteen million.
This figure was arrived at by
the admission of former can-
did Minister of Works at the
time Mr Leslie Miller who
said that the figures he saw
were ten million. The PLP
later said the same market
would be twenty-three mil-
lion. A kindergarten student
could easily conclude that
the balance of thirteen mil-
lion must have been going
somewhere else.
But just Tuesday, Minis-
ter of Works Neko Grant in
the Hubert Ingraham led
government, signed the con-
tract to build the Straw Mar-
ket. The news was so
refreshing that it caused
straw vendors who have
openly supported the PLP
to sing the praises of Mr
Hubert Ingraham. One ven-


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ierate' PLP

Shelves to be made fools of,
subscribing to the cheap
brand of politics used by the
PLP. The cheap name call-
ing and getting personal will
not help to attract new sup-
dor said that in five years porters, because no one will
the PLP, who claimed that want to be a part of a party
didthey loved the time t so muchild whose plan is to pit families
did not find the time to build a st each other just for
that straw market. She was against each other just for
embarrassed by that. "There political gain.
was just too much talk and Finally, if the PLP is to
was just too much talk and survive these next few weeks
no action, talk really is and months ahead, they
cheap," she said. Mr would help themselves if
Roberts must have taken a would help themselves if
day off, since he has exerted hey focus on repairing their
day off, since he has exerted severely damaged rudder,
himself a whole lot recently. severely damaged rudder,
I am not surprised though because without that, they
I amnot surprised though would continue to head
that as much as Mr Roberts nowhere. The Bahamian
has to say, I didn't hear one people's memory is still
crack from him congratulat- fresh as to how aimlessly
eing the government for they were going in the last
dredging the harbour that PLP government.
accommodated the largest A mechanic once said, if
ship in the world, Oasis of you have a blown head gas-
the Sea. I certainly didn't ket, it is foolish to keep
and do not expect him to say putting oil, expecting the
one single word about the damage to be repaired auto-
Straw Market either. If he magically. The best thing to
does he would be dissing his do, he said, is to change the
own PLP supporters who g e amount of
have honestly congratulat- gaskets. No amount of
ed the government on their ignoring or talking about the
oed the government on their severity of the damage will
own. help. A word to the wise is
This just goes to show all sufficient
and sundry, especially the
sensible PLPs who don't IVOINE
repeat what Mr Roberts INGRAHAM
says because they know bet- Nassau,
ter, will not allow them- December 17,
December 17, 2009.



Poor selection of


Junkanoo themes
EDITOR, The Tribune.
FROM the time I was a boy up until the point where my chil-
dren did not require the company of parents I have witnessed
the splendour of our perennial Junkanoo parades. Without
question, the practitioners of this art have been endowed with
a sort of genius which I hold in high regard.
I am equally as unimpressed, however, particularly in recent
times, with the poor judgment which is being employed in the
selection of themes which clearly do not reflect any aspect of
Bahamian cultural history.
This abhorrent practice which is being perpetrated by the old-
est and most celebrated of the senior groups has also permeated
the ranks of Junior Junkanoo.
This is a tragedy, an abomination and in my opinion may be
easily regarded as cultural treason.
I therefore call upon the new minister to immediately take
corrective measures.
This may involve withholding financial support from any
and all organizations who fail to honour the culture of the
Bahamas and the reconfiguration of the judging in future
Junkanoo parades to send a clear message to these groups
and individuals that we have no further tolerance for this
behaviour.
It is my further suggestion that the New Year's Day Parade
may be used to facilitate experimentation with regional, inter-
national or global presentations.
The Boxing Day Parade (whose name should also be
changed) must be strictly reserved for the preservation and
explosion of "only things Bahamian" (and on this point I dis-
courage the presentation of opposing points of view).
MICHAEL
E NOTTAGE
Nassau,
December 16,2009.


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 5


Island FM to end


newscasts with


Cable Bahamas


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
CARTER Broadcasting has
announced it is ending its rela-
tionship with Cable Bahamas
and the Island FM Newsbreak
nightly newscast will soon be
no more.
In a statement released yes-
terday which supports a report
which appeared in The Tribune
on Friday that Cable Bahamas
would soon no longer be pro-
ducing its newscasts with
Island FM, CEO of Carter
Broadcasting Charles Carter
said it was Carter Broadcasting
which initiated the break,
which takes effect December
31, 2009.
"Newsbreak was and is an
exciting work in progress and


Carter Broadcasting enjoyed
the relationship and challenge
of creating a quality TV news-
cast nightly.
"Newsbreak, however,
needs more resources to make
it competitive and self sustain-
ing and Carter Broadcasting
felt it was in its own best inter-
est to concentrate on its core
product, Island 102.9FM," said
Mr Carter.
Mr Carter said Carter
Broadcasting gave notice by
letter to Cable Bahamas on
November 25 that it would be
exiting the five year-long news-
break arrangement. He said
both companies continue to
enjoy a good relationship.
"There was no pressure
from either party terminate the
agreement and it is, with a
great deal of sadness, that


102.9FM concluded that it
could no longer accommodate
the arrangement."
The Tribune understands
that Cable Bahamas may now
be looking to join forces with
The Nassau Guardian and Star
106.9FM, adding television
news to their radio and print
media platforms.
Keith Wisdom, Director of
Public Affairs at Cable
Bahamas said the company
"has no comment on that"
when it was put to him on
Thursady that Cable Bahamas
would be breaking with Island
FM and joining the other
media organisation.
Nassau Guardian Managing
Editor Erica Wells directed
this newspaper to speak with
the Nassau Guardian's pub-
lisher, who is currently abroad.


THERE WAS a host of Bahamian arts and crafts on sale in Downtown Nassau at the weekend. Visitors
and Christmas shoppers got an opportunity to check out bags, jewellery and paintings on display on
Bay Street.

Search for missing

boaters is caled off


THE US Coast Guard has
called off a search for two
missing boaters who were
believed to have set off from
Florida to The Bahamas on
a fishing expedition.
Richard Alicea and Edwin
Pritchard, both residents of


Miami, were reported by a
family member to have left
for Bimini last Saturday
but have not been seen
since.
Mr Pritchard was reported
to have family ties to The
Bahamas.


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 7


LOS AL NEWS I


Climate Summit



deal 'falls short of



what's required to



avoid catastrophe'


CARICOM Chairman Bharrat Jagdeo speaks out


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
THE critical two-week long
UN Climate Summit in
Copenhagen ended on Friday
without a legally-binding deal
being reached on efforts to
curb global carbon emissions
and no set future date by
which attempts would be
made to achieve such an
agreement.
Chairman of CARICOM,
President of Guyana, Bharrat
Jagdeo, told The Tribune yes-
terday that the deal reached
between a number of coun-
tries at the summit "has some
positive elements but falls
short of what is required to
avoid catastrophic climate
change".
The so-called Copenhagen
Accord brokered between the
US, China, Brazil, South
Africa and India involves "sig-
nificant departures from
CARICOM's position" on
what the Summit needed to
achieve for the benefit of its
members and the world in the
fight against global climate
change, added the President.
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham was one of three
CARICOM leaders including
Mr Jagdeo who, along with
dozens of world leaders, decid-
ed to personally attended the
UN Climate Summit last week
in the hope of helping to
ensure a meaningful outcome
would be reached.
While at the Summit, Mr
Ingraham made a speech in
which he reiterated his warn-
ing that the Bahamas "will suf-
fer catastrophic results if emis-
sions are not stabilized and
reduced".
"A temperature rise of two
degrees Celsius will result in
sea level rise of two metres
and will submerge 80 per cent
of our territory," stated Mr
Ingraham.
Yesterday Mr Jagdeo not-
ed that the Accord announced
late Friday night by US Presi-
dent Barack Obama "seeks to
limit temperature increases to
2 degrees above pre-industrial
levels (but) the commitments
listed (by individual countries
on cutting carbon emissions)
in its appendices would lead
to an increase of over 3
degrees".
CARICOM and the
Alliance of Small Island
States, of which The Bahamas
is a part, had both called for
countries to commit at Copen-
hagen to doing what is neces-
sary to limit temperature
increases to 1.5 celsius above
pre-industrial levels if its mem-
bers and other countries are
"to stay alive".
Speaking at the close of the
Summit, United Nations Sec-
retary General Ban Ki Moon
called the deal "an essential
beginning" but cautioned that
serious work lies ahead to turn
it into a legally binding treaty.
Nonetheless he praised the
fact that "all countries have
agreed to work towards a com-
mon long-term goal to limit
the global temperature rise to
below 2 degrees Celsius; many
governments have made
important commitments to
reduce or limit emissions;
countries have achieved sig-
nificant progress on preserv-
ing forests; and countries have
agreed to provide comprehen-
sive support to the most vul-
nerable to cope with climate
change".
President Obama called the
Accord an "important break-
through that lays the founda-
tion for international action in
the years to come" but also
admitted that it leaves the
world with "much further to
go" to get the legally binding
agreement that is agreed to be
necessary to avert the most
devastating potential impacts
of climate change.
And besides the question of
turning the Accord into an
agreement with legal teeth, the
criticism remains that while it
recognizess" the scientific case
for keeping global tempera-
ture rises to no more than two
degrees celsius in total it does
not contain the kind of com-
mitments by countries to
reductions in emissions that


PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham speaks at the UN
Climate Summit.


would achieve that goal.
Meanwhile, it is not yet
known whether all 192 coun-
tries outside of the small group
who ultimately negotiated the
Accord will adopt it.
Yesterday Mr Jagdeo, who
has been a strong advocate for
action on climate change, said


that based on what transpired
at Copenhagen, he does not
think the type of agreement
which climate experts say is
necessary to save small island
and low lying states like The
Bahamas and Guyana can
now be reached by the end of
2010.

--


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Some of hotel's former staff

demand full compensation


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net


SEVERAL former employees of the
Xanadu Beach Hotel have demonstrated
demanding full compensation from hotel own-
er Mario Donato.
The workers were laid off in June when the
hotel closed due to a downturn in business
because of the recession.
When the property reopened in October,
some workers were returned to their jobs but
more than a dozen have not been called back
to work. Community activist Troy Garvey
and a small group of disgruntled workers held
a demonstration at the property around 9am.
Mr Garvey said none of the former workers
have been compensated by the hotel since
being laid off in June.
"These people are still waiting to be paid
their monies since October. They are frus-
trated and want what is rightfully theirs," he
said.
"I have met with Mr Donato and he has
told me that he does not have the money to
pay these people."
Mr Donato could not be reached for com-
ment.
Mr Garvey is calling on the Labour Board


ELIT

- i.,i\


to enforce labour laws against employers who
are in violation of the Labour Act.
"There is too much labour unrest in Grand
Bahama, and workers are not being treated
fairly by employers," he said.

Struggling
Mr Garvey said Mr Donato owns multiple
businesses in Grand Bahama. He said the for-
mer workers are unemployed and struggling to
make ends meet.
He said that the workers were only given
one week retroactive pay for the week worked
prior to the hotel's closure in June. Some also
received vacation pay, he said.
"They are willing to accept half now and
half later, but to refuse to pay them anything
is unacceptable, especially during this time of
the year when Christmas is upon us.
"I have also learned that Mr Donato has
brought some employees from another one
of his closed hotel property in Freeport to
work at the Xanadu Hotel," he said.
Workers are requesting a meeting today
with Mr Donato.
Mr Garvey said if Mr Donato does not meet
with the workers they will go ahead and seek
legal action against him.


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PAGE 8, MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Jump starting the economy:


R Si - --
LD VIEns ght

WORLD VIEW -


By SIR RONALD
SANDERS


(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean diplo-
mat)
UNLESS there is an
environment in all


Caribbean Community and
Common Market (CARI-
COM) countries to help
make businesses fully pro-
ductive, they will not jump
start their economies that
now wallow in economic
stagnation.
Barbados is about to


. . . .... ... . ..


take a big step forward in
improving the climate for
the establishment and
growth of businesses.
It is a step other
Caribbean countries should
emulate, particularly as the
productivity of a country
ultimately depends on the
productivity of its busi-
nesses.
The economic model
being pursued by President
Hugo Chavez in Venezuela
of nationalizing banks, oil
companies and other pro-
ductive enterprises may
work for him for a time.
Certainly, it will last while
his government has access
to the cheque book of the
state-owned oil company,
PDVSA, and oil prices
remain elevated.
But, it will not work for
many CARICOM coun-
tries whose debt to GDP
ratio is so high that the
obligation to repay debt
prohibits them from spend-
ing to grow their
economies.
The ratio of debt to
GDP in several Caribbean
countries is serious: St
Kitts-Nevis 178 per cent,
Jamaica 128 per cent,
Antigua and Barbuda 107
per cent, Barbados 106 per
cent, Grenada 87 per cent,
Dominica 86 per cent,
Belize 80 per cent, St Lucia
70 per cent, and St Vincent
and the Grenadines 67 per
cent.
When the global finan-
cial crisis slammed the
Caribbean early this year,
government revenues
declined and they were
unable to borrow money
on commercial terms to
finance development pro-
jects. At that time, some of
us called for focus to be
placed on the private sec-
tor to keep the economies
stimulated and maintain
employment.
At least two interna-
tional financial institutions


- the International Finance
Corporation and the Inter-
American Development
Bank (IDB) - indicated
then that they had funding
available for the private
sector.
It would have been ben-
eficial if governments and
private sector institutions
had met to determine what
businesses could be pur-
sued on a national and
regional basis; what fund-
ing would be required; and
what financial institutions
could be tapped for such
funding. It didn't happen,
and many Caribbean
economies have deterio-
rated.
Dominica, Grenada, St
Lucia, St Vincent and the
Grenadines and St Kitts-
Nevis have all had to apply
to the International Mone-
tary Fund (IMF) for help
through one or other of its
windows for soft-lending.
In the case of Antigua and
Barbuda, the government
has sought a full Stand-by
programme, the terms of
which are still being nego-
tiated.
If Jamaica's current
experience with the IMF is
anything to go by, it will be
sometime before the terms
SEE page nine


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+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 9


Lessons from Barbados


FROM page eight

of an Antigua programme
are settled. Jamaica
applied months before
Antigua and Barbuda but
the terms are not yet
finalised. From current
indications, Jamaica will
face new and higher taxa-
tion - a development about
which the private sector
has already voiced concern.
Now, the example being
set by Barbados. The gov-
ernment has secured a soft
loan from the IDB for
US$10 million and is
putting-up US$1.8 million
of its own resources to sup-
port the expansion of pri-
vate sector participation in
the economy, and to make
government more effective
and efficient as a facilita-
tor of businesses.
The loan is for a 25-year
term, with a 4-year grace
and disbursement period at
a LIBOR-based interest
rate.
The Barbados govern-
ment as well as local and
foreign investors had
expressed the need for
improvement in some busi-
ness climate factors. Specif-
ically, they had identified
the long period of time
needed to start a business,
delays in cross-border
transactions and insuffi-
cient access to finance.
These are not conditions
unique to Barbados, but
since the island was rated
46th of 133 nations by the
World Economic Forum's
most recent global index of
competitive nations, it is
obvious that the climate for
business in other
Caribbean countries is very
much worse. Trinidad and
Tobago was second at 86
and Jamaica third at 91.
A recent Barbados Cen-
tral Bank study estimates
the time required to start
a domestic incorporated


"The Barbados
government has
recognized that for
unemployment and
economic growth to
be tackled, business
must play a bigger
role in the economy."

business ranges from 281
to 480 days while interna-
tional business can range
from 24 to 187 days. No
banking institution in the
world would earmark mil-
lions of dollars for financ-
ing a project and keep such
a large sum on ice while
government bureaucracy
grinds through a laborious
process leading to the start-
up of a business. Little
wonder therefore that
many domestic businesses
have to opt to invest their
money on the international
market, and foreign
investors shy away from
the Caribbean.
Like every other
Caribbean country, private
sector development in Bar-
bados is currently faced
with serious challenges
including eroding trade
preferences for its main
agricultural export, sugar;
higher costs of compliance
with new OECD and G20
requirements for its finan-
cial services sector; increas-


ing trade liberalization
which is reducing govern-
ment revenues from import
duties; declining tourism
earnings; and limited scope
for export diversification.
The Barbados govern-
ment has recognized that
for unemployment and
economic growth to be
tackled, business must play
a bigger role in the econo-
my, and it is against that
background that it
approached the IDB for a
loan to finance the greater
participation of business in
the economy, and to make
them more competitive in
regional and international
trade.
Financing from the IDB
will allow the government
to pursue four crucial
objectives: rationalizing
government regulations to
support business develop-
ment including a review of
the impact of some taxes
on businesses; strengthen-
ing the private sector
through cooperation by
businesses including shar-
ing costs of common ser-
vices; improving the
machinery to facilitate
trade including improving
and modernizing customs
procedures; and lowering
the cost of moving goods
and people through the
development of a National
Transport Policy and Mas-
ter Plan.
Barbados, unlike many
other Caribbean countries,


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already has a strong pub-
lic-private dialogue involv-
ing government, trade
unions and the private sec-
tor.
This programme will
require that the dialogue
be moved up to a higher
level focusing on competi-
tiveness and private sector
development.


If the public-private
partnership gets it right,
international financial insti-
tutions have resources to
support viable private sec-
tor projects, and some of
the strain of keeping the
economy stimulated,
expanding export earnings
and creating sustainable
employment could be


shared by the private sec-
tor.
Caribbean countries
should seriously consider
following this Barbados
approach.

Responses and previous
commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com


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PAGE 10, MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS I


Senator responds to criticism



of Clifton Heritage Authority


By AVA TURNQUEST

CHAIRMAN of the
Clifton Heritage Authority
Senator Dr Jacinta Higgs
revealed several plans for
the heritage park after
scathing critique from a
columnist portraying the
Government as ineffective
and "wasting the govern-
ment's money."
Richard Coulson suggest-
ed the site was not being
successfully exploited under
the CHA, and in a letter to
The Tribune he noted that
"the park is far from fulfill-
ing its function of bringing
local history, culture and
ecology to Bahamians and tourists" after
more than two years in operation.
Senator Higgs said though she had
been unable to speak with Mr Coulson
at length, she expected that he at least
refer to or research her previous com-
ments and statement towards Clifton.
"I welcome the suggestions of all
Bahamians to the development of the
Clifton Heritage National Park, as well
as scrutiny of the CHA's work," said
Senator Higgs.
"The CHA is well aware of all of the
challenges of developing Clifton from
physical infrastructure to financial sus-
tainability.


"Some of these plans have
| had to go through various
vetting processes, including
board approval, and could
only be communicated to the
general public at an appro-
&MA private time."
Senator Higgs warned
that Clifton must not be
developed in an "ad hoc,
scattered manner", referring
to criticism by Coulson
. | towards the site's current
development.
In her response, she
revealed several of the
broader plans for Clifton
such as developing a signifi-
AIG cant heritage tourism pro-
gramme and tour with the
Ministries of Tourism and Youth, Sports
and Culture, and an updated and revised
interactive website.
To combat financial challenges,
which the senator admits have impeded
some plans, the CHA will announce a
Blue Ribbon panel to solicit and raise
private funds for larger capital projects.
The park is currently receiving an
annual subvention from Government,
and has also been given the authority to
impose certain user and other fees which
Senator Higgs said, will come on stream
next year.
"I will continue to inform the
Bahamian people on the funds raised


to develop Clifton, which is primarily a
heritage park and not a nature preserve
such as what the Bahamas National
Trust may operate," said Senator Higgs,
referring to Mr Coulson's suggestion of
merging Clifton with the BNT.
The CHA is currently in coopera-
tion with a local design firm, to memo-
rialise the experience of the descendents
of the African diaspora, allowing for an
"enjoyable, enriching and educational
visitor experience.
Senator Higgs maintained that
although these plans have not been
streamlined as yet, Clifton boasts innu-
merous school visits.
"Had Mr Coulson strolled the park
during those occasions he may have had
a more informed impression," she said.
"Further, Mr Coulson missed the thou-
sands of Bahamians who flock to
Clifton's beaches during summer
months, the months when Bahamians
usually go to the beach."
"Though Clifton has its challenges,"
admitted Senator Higgs, "it has an extra-
ordinary future, and as plans unfold
many of the frustrations and concerns by
some will be addressed.
"I am very thankful to the hundreds
of Bahamians and visitors alike who
continually send letters and expressions
of thanks and gratitude to CHA Board
and our staff for their great experiences
visiting the park and for the transform-
ing development of the space."


Appeal seeking to


wind-up NIB dismissed


By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
THE Court of Appeal has
dismissed the appeal of a man
seeking to wind-up the Nation-
al Insurance Board over a mul-
ti-billion claim.
Anthony Wright, 58, claimed
the NIB never properly paid
him for an on-the-job injury he
suffered almost 30 years ago in
Grand Bahama.
Mr Wright, who filed the
"wind-up" petition in March of
last year, contended that the
NIB owed him billions of dol-
lars in back-pay, medical bills
and settlement money after a
1982 accident on the premises
of his former job with the now
dissolved Franklin Chemicals
in Grand Bahama.
Mr Wright claimed he suf-
fered a fall that left him with a
ruptured disc and damage to
the soft tissue of his back. He
contended that he never
received medical care under
NIB until some 12 years after
the accident.
Mr Wright, who claimed that
NIB was indebted to him for
more than $70 billion, had
appealed a decision handed
down by Senior Justice John
Lyons on February 19.
Senior Justice Lyons had dis-
missed Mr Wright's appeal on
the grounds that it was "frivo-
lous and vexatious."
The judge also found that
NIB could only be dissolved by
Parliament.
Mr Wright contended that
despite the order dismissing his
petition, the judge had previ-
ously found that he was enti-
tled to the wind-up order and


that the sum was undisputed.
The Court of Appeal found
that Senior Justice Lyons had
not erred in his decision and
dismissed the appeal.
A decision by Court of
Appeal President Dame Joan
Sawyer, which was agreed by
Justice Hartman Longley, stat-
ed: "It appears that the appel-
lant has a real sense of griev-
ance against the respondent-
perhaps understandably so-
since the respondent appears
to have adopted a somewhat
casual approach to his claim
rather than the seriousness
which he, and every other tax-
payer is entitled to expect from
such a public body."
They also found that NIB is
not a company incorporated
under the present Companies
Act. Section 187 of the Com-
panies Act provides that a com-
pany under the act may be
wound up by the court in vari-
ous circumstances, including,
but not limited to when it is
unable to pay its debts.
The judges found that in light
of the provisions of the Com-
panies Act and the National
Insurance Act, "however much
one may sympathize with the
appellant, it is not possible to
say that Justice Lyons erred in
any manner when he dismissed
the appellant's petition for the
winding up order, even if he
concluded that for any other
reason the appellant was owed
vast sums of money by the
respondent."
Justice Christopher Black-
man in a separate decision also
dismissed Wright's appeal, find-
ing that, "there was no merit
whatsoever in the appeal and
it must be dismissed."


FBI raining
SSI' ' S. *


THE United States Fed-
eral Bureau of Investigation
shared their new investiga-
tive techniques with
Bahamian police inspector
Kimroy Ferguson on an 11-
week course in Virginia.
Royal Bahamas Police
Force (RBPF) Inspector
Ferguson was one of 267
law enforcement executives
from across the United
States and around the world
who were trained in the
FBI's latest strategies and
developments in policing
and investigative techniques
at the FBI National Acade-
my in Quantico, Virgnia.
Participants were also
trained in an intense physi-
cal regime during the
course.
For Inspector Ferguson
the course was also an
opportunity to share infor-
mation and form bonds with
law enforcement agencies
around the world.
He has been in the RBPF
officer for 17 years and
worked in both uniform and
plain clothes divisions of the
force. Inspector Ferguson is
currently a staff officer of


the Commissioner of Police.
He has a Masters degree
in business administration
from the Nova Southeast-
ern University in Florida, a
Bachelor of Arts degree in
administration and man-
agement from the Sojourner
Douglass College, and an
Associate of Science degree
in public administration
from Success Training Col-
lege in Bernard Road, Nas-
sau.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


D AVID YURMAN













































































David Vrman Boutique, Bay Stre&t, Nammu (242) 302-2979
Cryst"I Court at Atlantis * Marina Villagc, Paradisc Island
Marsh Harbour, Ab * Habour Island
Our Luaya, Freeport, Gand Bahama * Bimini Bay, Bimini







+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 11


Mitchell slams PM



over comments on ,



customs ofcers


AN OPPOSITION MP has
criticised Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham for his
"reprehensible" comments
over the dismissal of nine cus-
toms officers.
PLP MP for Fox Hill Fred
Mitchell said it appears the
nation's chief is interfering
with the work of the Public
Service Commission - a
group responsible for hiring,
disciplining and firing civil
servants - and not allowing
the system to work as
designed.
"The Prime Minister does
not allow the system to work
but has instead engaged in
conduct that would seem to
interfere with the work of the
Public Service Commission
and the Public Service Board
of Appeal," said Mr Mitchell.
On Tuesday, Mr Ingraham
was quoted as saying he met
with the Bahamas Public Ser-
vices Union (BPSU) last
week and agreed to accept
the resignations of several
officers who wanted to resign
as opposed to being dis-
missed.

Meeting
Mr Ingraham is quoted say-
ing: "I had a meeting with the
(Bahamas Public Services)
union on Saturday and they
said that there were a few of
the customs officers who
were being dismissed by the
public service who may wish
to resign and whether or not
if they resign by the effective
date of their termination, if
that is something the govern-
ment would consider. And I
said yes we would because
the dismissal takes effect on
January 4, 2010."
He continued: "It is the
four who are being retired in
the public interest whose pen-
sions and gratuities are being
cut in half. No request has
been made of me in respect
of those four. If they choose
to resign as opposed to leave,
then I wouldn't have a par-
ticular difficulty with that."
Mr Mitchell said the offi-
cers who have been let go
from the public service are
entitled to their gratuities
while those who are retired
in the public interest are to
get half their normal gratu-
ity and half their normal pen-
sion.
"In the case of the customs
officers dismissed, the Public
Service Commission has
allowed them their gratuity
so resignation would not
make a material difference to
them, save that their files


would not reflect a dismissal,"
he continued.
Mr Mitchell claimed the
Prime Minister knows that by
law, if an officer is retired in
the public interest, he is not
entitled to gratuity or pen-
sion.
"If these officers then retire
before 1st January when their
dismissal becomes effective,
what will prevent the Public
Service Commission from
denying them their full gra-
tuity and pension? Is the
Prime Minister now saying
that he controls what the
Public Service Commission
does; and can he guarantee
them their full pension and
gratuity if they resign?
"If he can guarantee that,
then it is clear that he inter-
feres with the Public Service
Commission, which is sup-
posed to be an independent
body.
"It is always wise for a min-
ister to stay out of the delib-
erations that are the purview
of what are supposed to be
independent constitutional
bodies, instead of making
statements which appear to


interfere and sully the
process."
Earlier last week Govern-
ment confirmed through a
press release that the Public
Service Commission decided
that effective January 2, 2010
nine of the 16 customs offi-
cers interdicted for miscon-
duct last July will be let go
from the public service.

Retired
Four more will be retired
"in the public interest" with
effect on the same date, while
the matter concerning anoth-
er officer - who is currently
under investigation - has
been deferred by the Public
Service Commission, the
statement said.
The two remaining officers
are to be redeployed in the
public service.
The Department of Cus-
toms has long been at the
centre of corruption allega-
tions and the move is said to
be linked to Government's
attempts to clean up the rev-
enue collecting agency.


What do you get her after

the perfect dinner?



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The perfect desserrt

(7wels

^ea

Treasurt the moment.
I ,,. 11. ' ' .nilL " r'': J^.i. "M mL 1 r ' .I J'.'.'i :.' k'nni al '(L . *Il
.. JI .11. i .-i- ' J- : "t," � ",.'i..] i-.,, II.[IL *,r' ,ii. .:',**. "i'.l.'. .n.|.L. I"


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Don' Foirge To W*e
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Al MULTIMI SUPER PARTY CENTRE
for ll of your ChrIlubu Paery Suplim

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Ph : 3US-702M


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will have the following Office hours





















Thursday re- kice kc d
Friday D.cnmer .25th1 Chriasma Day Holiday
MonijayDK mlerm2lr Bgiing Day Holiday Obrv d
Thurindy Dacambar 31fl NewY"" Eva - DfieC dosad al 1. :O
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+I


PAGE 12, MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS I


ROYAL BAHAMAS POLICE FORCE CHRISTMAS



BEAT
HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE EVENT IN RAWSON SQUARE YESTERDAY
Felipd Major/Tribune staff


% I


SERGEANT 977 Audley Dean salutes Governor General Arthur Hanna yesterday at the Royal Bahamas Police
Force beat retreat.


I


Murphyvdlla, I 2nd Right. from i S*r Road.
Tainphion 322-aA403


INDOORR AllD IOIIOR IIl.
IN, o il to liMiIf lk 2011
In Ll stLire and ouI!idu tw slnira,
we will be Ih ieii a 15' g I 2,5)'.i di C..in
Further discouniLs of 50') will] be cn Jiiiidui (hL- kirf.'.

SwL will be dicou tuing antique and vmirtage btk,,.
doll4. SleilT teddy btflr, vintage dolls akn& carried<,.
Xmas cloths and Mnpkins.
FIibkldoili. Ilidri. bearix pdutt, and I etcid iaculs
rt,-. ;iler pieces. nntique anr vintage rmurbles. ? ; curlains, IIower
FPut. antique rena Ks. clkcese dishes, qdilas. i nIid-A
khrnillc spreads, and lots more useFul nd iniTr.I6in-
items.
S

A Message from BGIA

The public is advised that the following member companies
I will be closed on
Thursday, December 24, 2009
Closed half day
Friday 25 and Monday 28, December, 2009
Closed all day
Thursday, December 31, 2009
Closed half day
Friday, I January, 2010
Closed all day

Agents, brokers and companies who are members of the Bahamas General Insurance Association:
CLAIMS ADJUSTERS Security & General Insurance Co. Ltd. Star General Insurance Agents & Brokers Ltd.
Algoma Adjusters (Bah.) Ltd. Summit Insurance Co. Ltd. Sunshine Insurance (Agents & Brokers) Ltd.
Caribbean International Loss Adjusters Ltd.


Cunningham Lindsey International
Adjusters
INSURANCE COMPANIES
Bahamas First General Insurance Co. Ltd.
Insurance Company of the Bahamas Ltd.
Insurance Company of the West Indies Ltd.
RoyalStar Assurance Ltd.


BROKERS AND AGENTS
Colina General Insurance Agency Ltd.
General Brokers & Agents Ltd.
Insurance Management (Bahamas) Ltd.
J. S. Johnson & Co. Ltd.
Nassau Underwriters Agency Ltd.
OrryJ. Sands &Co. Ltd.
Professional Insurance Consultants Ltd.


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS
(Life and Health Insurers)
Atlantic Medical Insurance Co. Ltd.
British American Financial
Colina Insurance Ltd.
Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd.
General Worldwide Insurance Company Ltd.


#8 Royal Palm Plaza, Mackey Street I P.O. Box N-860 I Telephone (242) 394-6625 I Fax (242) 394-6626
www.bahamasinsurance.org


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


I


..& t


mg J





+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 13


LOS AL NEWS I


3o~n


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+I


PAGE 14, MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS I


A BLOOD STAIN on the ground where a man and woman were
attacked on Palm Beach Street.


Hope Town hit by storm
FROM page one

minutes, and it was so windy the windows started breathing in
and out and the pressure was changing in the house, but it
was pitch black so we couldn't see anything.
"The shutters got ripped off, we lost a Bimini Top, and one
of our lawn chairs ended up on the other side of the house next
door."
The storm seemed to have torn down a power line too as
Hope Town residents had no electricity from 6pm on Friday
until around noon on Saturday.
Locals say it was a tornado or a waterspout, but the Meteo-
rological Office was unable to confirm this last night.
Forecaster Pat Butler said his office at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport in New Providence issued weather warn-
ings on Friday as they expected 20 to 25 knot winds and six to
nine foot sea swells.
He said: "We predicted adverse conditions for the northwest
Bahamas on Friday as a deepening low pressure system in the
Gulf moved northeast over Florida, bringing a cold front over
the Bahamas.
"We had showers and thunderstorms mostly in Grand
Bahama, but also in Abaco.
"The front is now exiting the southeast Bahamas so high
pressure system is building behind it causing windy conditions
which should last until Friday."
While strong winds blew across the Bahama islands, it seems
Hope Town experienced some of the most dramatic weather
this weekend.
Mr McCoy said: "Some people thought it may have been a
tornado, but now we think it was a waterspout that came
ashore and must have come up this way."



KEY'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED
22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmndal
Nassau, N.P, The Bahamas




JOSEPH DEWYIT
"JAY"
- ALBURY, III
Joseph DewitL "Jay"
S , ' Albury, III, lost his life
~" | '" ' doing what hc enjoyed thc
most. An avid motorhikc

hA on December 16ih. 2000)
on Rock Plant Road,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Jay loved his country of birth, The Bahamas,. and this
love led him to the sea. Jay wilL be remembered for
his work in Eiltmography. Some of the major filmrs were
"Pirales of the Carihhean", "Into the Blue , and the
James Bond movies which were filmed in The
Bahamas-. His professional life, in addition to
filmography, was filled with work that ensured he
could be on the sea or in the sea. He held a boat
captain master lcense; he was a commercial fisherman;
certified scuba instructor; boat and motorcycle
mechanic; underwater construction, dredging, and
ialvage expert, and all-round handyman. AlthouhLL
retired, he was always willing to help out those in


Jay~ friends describe him as beinp knowledgeable" .
"dependable", -'gentle", and "huimuuruu,". He loved
do.gs. particularly stray dogs that he could rescue and
treat to a good meal.

Pre-&tLeaecd by his mother, DuorthYv Dede" Albury
and his father. Joseph Dewitt "Jay bee" Albury, Jr.,
he is survived by his beolved sister Susan "Honey"
RohcrIlsn, his hrothc-in-law John Robertgonr his
nephew Jason Robertson, his nieces Chrystonui and
Joanne Robertson, and a host of family and friends.

A service oF celebration will be held al the Bahamas
National Trust, Village Rand. on Wednesday,
December 23rd. 2009 at 3:00p.m.

Paslor Clint Kemp will official.

In lieu of flowers, donations may bc made to BA ARK,
P.O. N-242, Nassau, Bahamas or Scotia Bank (East
Bay Street) AJC#50385-3202371, in JayT, memory.

Arringemeals by Kemp's FIaeral Home Limited


FROM page one


Local residents say his
attacker used a sharp-tipped
tyre wrench. They heard the
blood-curdling screams from
the man, and then the
woman, as they were Felip I
attacked in front of a house
and a barbershop near
Cartwright Building Supplies.
A Palm Beach Street resi-
dent came out of his house
to find the man had already
been beaten to death, and
the woman was being
attacked as police pulled up .
and fired shots at the
assailant.
The resident said: "We
were asleep and we heard the -
man screaming. Then after
he dropped dead the woman
kept screaming 'Help me!
Help me!' and that's when MARIO F
we came out and people Brand B
called the police.
"When I started walking
towards them the police Policc
pulled up. death h
"They shot at him to stop about t
him and he jumped in the car killing b
and drove off, the police fol- ple knev
lowed. were st
"They found out that this and the
guy had died and told the severe
neighbours to back off while accord
they put the yellow tape up." report.
Although the crime scene Emer
tape had been removed yes- vices too
terday, the place where the pital wh
man lost his life was made treatmei
obvious by a pool of blood nouncec
on the side of the street. He wa
A resident said: "I saw it be kille,
was a young guy who died. I weekend
can't understand it. I couldn't A 29
kill a man over a woman." gunned

FROM page one

vey the unemployment rate in New
Providence now stands at 14.6 per cent,
compared with 14.2 per cent in May of
this year, while in Grand Bahama 18.1
per cent of the labour force is now
unemployed, compared with 17.4 per
cent in May.
In 2008, 8.7 per cent of the labour
force were unemployed in New Provi-
dence and nine per cent in Grand
Bahama. The rise, which was registered
in February of this year, took the unem-
ployment rate to its highest level in 15
years.
The Department of Statistics said:
"Between February and May of this

FROM page one A

in front of his home at 6.15pm
on Friday. The gunman, wear- He told
ing a ski mask and dark cloth- ened hi
ing, threatened the terrified stole
resident with a handgun and amount
demanded money. He stole fled the
cash and fled the area on foot. unknown
The incident was the sec- A ho
ond armed robbery of a resi- central
dent in his driveway that day. by four [
A man was robbed by two with sh
men armed with handguns 5.40am
while in the driveway of his armed
Yamacraw Beach Road home property
at around 3.50am on Friday. getting


Tropical


Exterminators


Man killed, woman


abbed in brutal attack


PETERSON, 29, (pictured right at age 17) was gunned down in a drive-by shooting near the
Tyre Shop in Milton Street (above).


e investigating the
ave not speculated
the reason for the
but believe the cou-
w their attacker. They
abbed many times,
e man received a
blow to the head,
ing to the police
agency Medical Ser-
)k the woman to hos-
Lere she is receiving
nt. The man was pro-
d dead at the scene.
us the second man to
d in the capital this
d.
)-year-old man was
down in a drive-by


shooting near the Brand B
Tyre Shop in Milton Street
just before 6pm on Saturday.
Mario Peterson, known as
"Pearl Eye", was standing
with a group of people near
the tyre shop at around
5.45pm when a black Honda
Accord pulled up and shots
were fired. Mr Peterson was
shot in the pelvis and left leg.
He was taken to hospital in a
private vehicle and later died
of the injuries.
Relatives of Mr Peterson
said his name was Narrio,
rather than Mario as police
reported, and said he lived
in Fox Hill.
They maintain he was


standing in front of his moth-
er's house in Milton Street
while she and his girlfriend
carried shopping goods to the
back of the house when gun-
shots rang out and Mr Peter-
son collapsed.
The car then sped off and
continued to fire shots from
the car, residents claim.
Police are investigating all
incidents. A man has been
arrested in connection with
the stabbing death.
Anyone with any informa-
tion relating to the deaths
should call police urgently on
919 or call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477).


year, the number of unemployed per-
sons increased by 12.6 per cent in New
Providence and 17.4 per cent in Grand
Bahama. Between May and November
this growth was substantially lower, 4.5
per cent in New Providence and 3.9 per
cent in Grand Bahama."
In Grand Bahama, with a 20.7 per cent
jobless rate, women were much more
likely to be unemployed than men, at
15.6 per cent. In New Providence unem-
ployment is more evenly affecting the
sexes, with 14 per cent of men and 15.1
per cent of women looking for jobs.
The department also notes that there
was "minimum growth in the labour


rmed robbed


police the men threat-
m at gunpoint and
an undetermined
of cash before they
area on foot, in an
n direction.
me in Minnie Street,
Nassau, was stormed
burglars, three armed
otguns, at around
on Saturday. The
men searched the
and stole cash before
iway.


Businesses in Car
Road were hit by t
beries this weekend.
ing the daylight rob
Texaco service sta
lunchtime on Friday.
A man armed with
gun entered the gas
store in Carmichael
around 1pm and stc
before he got away oi
cle.
Then a masked
robbed a woman ope


Limited,


wishes to advise the public that we
will be closed for business from the
period of:

24th December, 2009
Through
3rd January, 2010
Re-Open
4th January, 2010


On behalf of the Management & Staff
of Tropical Exterminators Limited,

We wish you a very
Merry Christmas and a Happy and
prosperous New Year.

For emergencies contact
Gary Sweeting #422-1427 or
Mrs. Jean Ann Holm #364-4545


force" of only one per cent since the last
survey was conducted.
The Government announced in
November that it has budgeted $14 mil-
lion to spend on a temporary jobs pro-
gramme - now under way - which will
provide work for six months for 2,500
people throughout the public service.
Prior to this the Government had
accelerated numerous public works pro-
jects with the intention of creating work
for some of those who had become job-
less through a lack of activity in the pri-
vate sector.
Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes was
not available for comment yesterday.

phone card booth in
rs Carmichael Road. The gun-
man who had covered his face
rmichael with a scarf threatened her
wo rob- with a handgun, demanding
includ- she hand over cash and cell-
ibery of phone cards, at around
ition at 7.50pm on Saturday.
The gunman drove off in a
a hand- Honda.
station Police are investigating all
Road at incidents and are appealing
ole cash for witness to come forward.
n a bicy- Anyone with any infor-
mation should call police on
gunman 919 or Crime Stoppers anony-
erating a mously on 328-TIPS (8477).


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


Unemployment rises, but rate now slowing


TOOIURV LUST


Bahamas Bus & Truck Co,, Ltd,
Montrose Avenue
Phone:322.1722 Fax: 326-7452



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I Ii Io
EAA~A A '~~ -~ - -.A


BLTA RESULTS
Here's a look at the final results of the Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association's 2009 December Invitational Tennis Tournament
held over the weekend at the National Tennis Center.
Men's Division
Final - Devin Mullings def. Timothy Neilly 6-2, 7-5.
Consolation third place - Marvin Rolle def. Jamal Adderley 6-3,
2-0 retired.
Fifth place - Justin Lunn def. Rodney Carey 2-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Seventh place - Jason Rolle def. H'Cone Thompson W/O.
Saturday's semifinals - Devin Mullings def. Jamal Adderley 6-
1, 6-1; Timothy Neilly def. Marvin Rolle 6-3, 6-3; Rodney Carey
def. Jason Rolle 6-4, 6-3 and Justin Lunn def. H'Cone Thomp-
son 7-6, 7-6.
Pool Play
Pool A
Marvin Rolle def. Jason Rolle 6-2, 6-1.
Marvin Rolle def. KC Strachan 6-1, 6-1.
Jason Rolle def. KC Strachan 6-3, 4-6, 7-5.
Pool B
Jamal Adderley def. Ceron Rolle 6-1, 7-6.
Jamal Adderley def. Justin Lunn 7-6, 6-1.
Justin Lunn def. Ceron Rolle 6-2, 6-4.
Pool C
Devin Mullings def. Rodey Carey 6-1, 6-1.
Devin Mullings def. Desmond Perigord 6-0, 6-0.
Devin Mullings def. Robert Lightbourn 6-0, 6-1.
Rodney Carey def. Desmond Perigord 6-0, 6-3.
Rodney Carey def. Robert Lightbourn 6-1, 6-1.
Robert Lightbourn def. Desmond Perigord 6-3, 6-1.
Ladies' Division
Final - Kerrie Cartwright def. Elanqua Griffin 6-0, 6-1.
Consolation third place - Gabriel Moxey def. Tershelle Bur-
rows W/O.
Saturday's semifinals - Kerrie Cartwrght def. Tershelle Burrows
6-0, 6-0 and Elanqua Griffin def. Gabriel Moxey 6-3, 6-2.
Pool A
Kerri Cartwright def. Gabriel Moxey 6-1, 6-1.
Pool B
Elanqua Griffin def. Nikkita Fountain 6-0, 6-0 W/O.
Elanqua Griffin def. Tershelle Burrows 6-0, 6-2.
Tershelle Burrows def. Nikkita Fountain 6-0, 6-0 W/O.


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By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
DEVIN Mullings once
again dominated the Bahamas
Lawn Tennis Association's
December Invitational to
establish himself as the top
ranked male singles player in
the country.
The Grand Bahamian pro-
fessional player went through
the three-day tournament at
the National Tennis Center
undefeated and was joined by
Kerrie Cartwright, who also
untouchable with the top rank-
ing on the ladies' side.
The invitational, according
to tournament director Mickey
Williams, was designed to pro-
vide an avenue for the colle-
giate and pro players to com-
pete to earn some type of
national rankings and is not
the official Davis Cup or Fed
Cup team trials.
Mullings, who is also the top
seeded player on the
Bahamas' Davis Cup team,
said it was a good opportunity
for him to keep his winning
streak intact, taking out fellow
Grand Bahamian and Davis
Cup team-mate Timothy Neil-
ly 6-2, 7-5 in the final match
yesterday.
"I played well. I think he
played some good points, but
his attitude was poor,"
Mullings said. "No matter
what he feels, I called the lines
as best as I could fairly and
squarely and I haven't lost a
match out here since I was 16
years old."
Mullings, 24, was referring
to the fact that he and Neilly
got into some heated argu-
ments throughout the match
and had to be advised by tour-
nament director Mickey
Williams to calm down.
At one point in the match
with Mullings taking a 4-2 on a
break, the two players got into
each other's face at the net on
a disputed call that Neilly felt
was in and Mullings called it
out.
After settling for the call in
his favour, Mullings regrouped
and kept the momentum as he
held serve, then broke Neilly
again to take the first set.
In the second set, both play-
ers got a break to force a 3-3
tie. It was close the rest of the
way, tied at 4-4 and 5-5 until
Mullings pulled away when he
held and broke Neilly to end
the game.
Neilly refused to shake hand
with Mullings, despite
Mullings' persistence. He also
declined an interview as he left
the stadium.
Third place in the Invita-
tional went to Marvin Rolle,
another member of the Davis
Cup team. He took the first
set 6-3 and was leading 2-0 in
the second when Grand
Bahamian Jamal Adderley
was forced to retire with a
right shoulder injury.
On his match, Rolle said "It
was good. In the first set, I
served well, placing a lot of
balls on the court. In the sec-
ond set, his arm was hurting
and he couldn't finish.
"I came third in the tourna-
ment, so it's not bad. I just
have to get ready for next
year."
The most impressive per-
formance in the tournament
came from Justin Lunn, who
came from behind 5-1 to beat
former Davis Cupper H'Cone
Thompson 7-6 in the second
set on Saturday.
SEE page 18


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 17


Olympia Morris-



Evans Softball Classic




comes to a close


THE Baptist Sports Council
completed its 2009 Olympia
Morris-Evans Softball Classic
on Saturday at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex with
two defending champions
repeating and a new champion
crowned in the three divisions.
Transfiguration had to go
the full three games in the
best-of-three series before
they prevailed with a 2-1 deci-
sion over Macedonia to pull
off their third straight cham-
pionship title. They dedicat-
ed it to their ailing pitcher
Alexander 'Zander' Bain, who
is still recuperating from a
serious traffic accident.
Infielder Dennis Johnson
was named the Most Valuable
Player.
In the co-ed division, Gold-
en Gates needed just two
games to repeat as champi-
ons, knocking off patron Mor-
ris-Evans' St. Paul's team.
Versatile Candice Smith
was named the MVP.
And in the 17-and-under
division, Macedonia avenged
last year's defeat by turning
the tables on Temple Fellow-
ship in three games.
Catcher Sean Roker was
named the MVP.
In addition to the team
awards, the BSC also pre-
sented some individual
awards to the deserving recip-
ients.
In the men's division,
Stephen Sands of Transfigu-
ration was named the Man-
ager of the Year. The best
pitcher was Nelson Farring-
ton, also of Transfiguration,
with a 4-0 win-loss record and
the batting champion was
Geon Campbell from Temple
Fellowship with a .800 batting
average.


Transfiguration and

Golden Gates retain

championship titles


The co-ed manager of the
year was Renee Davis of
Golden Gates. She was also
the repeat batting champion
with a .500 average. The best
pitcher was Cardinal Gilbert
of Golden Gates with a 3-0
record.
And in the 17-and-under
division, Geno Campbell of
Temple Fellowship was the
manager of the year. The best
pitcher was Cardon Wallace
of Macedonia with a 3-0
record and the batting cham-
pion was Tervin Symonette
of Golden Gates with a .615
average.
Steve 'Bishop' Beneby,
who served as the chief


umpire, along with Carlton
Ingraham and Arthur 'Yo-
Yo' Pritchard and chief scor-
er Sherry Beneby were all
awarded. Joann 'Mother'
Webb was also recognized for
the role she played as the dis-
ciplinarian and her contribu-
tion to the league.
And Olympia Morris-
Evans was honoured as the
patron for the Classic and her
role as the long-time treasur-
er.
The BSC will now prepare
for its election of officers and
the annual Family Fun
Run/Walk race in January.
Basketball is expected to
begin in February.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^SPORTS In^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^







+>


PAGE 18, MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Pre-schoolers and primary students



complete Learn-to-Swim programme


SOME 1400 Bahamian pre-
schoolers and primary students
recently completed an innovative
Learn-to-Swim programme, with
more than half successfully com-
pleting the requirements to survive
an accident in ocean waters.
Sponsored by the Grand Bahama
YMCA and private donors, the pro-
gramme is designed to teach as
many children as possible, in the
least amount of time and at mini-
mum cost, the basic skills needed
to survive in the water.
Children as young as three years
old took part in the programme,
which was specially designed, and
is administered, by Coach Iva Dreke
Russell, the YMCA's aquatic direc-
tor who is a former assistant coach
for the Bahamas National Swim
Team.
Russell also coached the Cuban


National Swim Team and is a for-
mer national record holder in the
400 and 800 metre freestyle. She has
a graduate degree in physical edu-
cation and culture from Havana's
Manuel Piti Fajardo Institute and
designed a low-cost training pro-
gramme that relies on experienced
swimmers as instructors.
This "factory" programme can
teach large numbers of children to
swim in a short time frame, and is
believed to be the only one of its
kind in the world. The Grand
Bahama training sessions ran from
September to December as a pilot
project in order to demonstrate the
methodology and cost-effectiveness
of the programme.
It is not known how many schools
on Grand Bahama will participate
for the next two terms. If there is
no official support then it will


depend on the priorities of the PE
programmes of the schools and
transportation costs. Potentially,
more than half of the school popu-
lation on Grand Bahama could
acquire basic swimming skills by
next June. The organizers may then
turn their attention to other islands,
and are calling on government to
consider making the training a part
of the national school curriculum.
"Swimming is the second leading
cause of accidental death for chil-
dren worldwide, and the Bahamas
has a high rate of drowning per capi-
ta," said Coach Iva. "Enhanced
water safety should be a top priori-
ty for schools and communities
around the country, and we have
managed to keep the cost per child
to under $20 for an average of 6.5
lessons."
This programme will also prepare


interested children for entry into
more competitive swimming, elimi-
nating some of the cost and risk of
initial basic training at local swim
clubs. And a secondary goal of the
sponsors is to teach children to
respect the ocean and the living
things within it.
The programme was made possi-
ble by a special grant provided by
two concerned Nassau residents,
Louis Bacon and Kris Lehmkuhl.
They are dismayed by the lack of
swimming skills among Bahamians,
concerns which were magnified by
the drowning of two children at
Adelaide and of a Bahamian
employee at Nygard Cay earlier this
year.
"Bahamian kids are islanders and
it is axiomatic that they should know
how to swim," Lehmkuhl said. "So
we worked with a highly respected


certified swim coach to develop this
special high-volume programme,
which is unique in that it is geared
towards teaching survival skills as
well as respect for the ocean. It is
also very cost-effective."
The introductory level teaches
children how to save themselves if
they fall into a pool. Level two stu-
dents are trained to jump into open
ocean, tread water for 15 seconds,
and then swim to a nearby boat.
Level three students can jump into
open ocean, and swim 75 feet using
the breast stroke.
"As far as we are aware this is
the first time that a programme of
this magnitude has been targeted at
survival in the water," said Karon
Johnson, Executive Director for the
YMCA. "It is very popular among
the kids, and the results have been
encouraging."


Mullings dominates



December Invitational


FROM page 16
Yesterday, lightning struck twice
for Lunn as he did the same thing to
Grand Bahamian Rodney Carey,
coming from a 4-1 deficit in the third
to pull off the clincher 6-4.
After losing the first set 2-6, Lunn
rallied to take the second 6-3.
"It was really good. At the begin-
ning I was really tight and frustrat-
ed," he said. "But with my family on
the side pumping me up and getting
me back into the game, I came back
and won it.
"I'm really proud of myself. I'm
playing very good."
Also playing at a high level in the
tournament was 17-year-old Kerrie
Cartwright. She wasted very little time
in establishing herself on the ladies'
side.
"I played really good, confident
and positive going into the match, so


I hoped for the best and I got the
best," said Cartwright after her 6-0, 6-
1 triumph over collegian Elanqua
Griffin in yesterday's final.
"I expected to play my best and I
think I did that. I would have liked to
play against Larikah (Russell) and
Nikkita (Fountain) because they are
much older and they have more expe-
rience. But they didn't show up."
As for 18-year-old Griffin who
attends Missouri Valley College, she
didn't want to give any excuse but
she noted that not having a chance
to play in quite a while made a dif-
ference in the outcome.
"I think my forehand was a little bit
consistent, but she hit some big shots.
She won all the major points," Griffin
said. "I tried, but she just played much
better."
Gabriel Moxey was awarded the
consolation third place with a
walk/over against Tershelle Burrows.


m
J4

rib Fl


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


I


Al O'l E N'S K K






7Th


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 19


Fab Finds Gift Shop opens its newest location

FAB Finds Gift Shop
opened its newest
location in Nassau at
the Harbour Bay
Shopping Centre just
in time for the festive
season. .
To commemorate the open-
ing, a small cocktail was held
recently where guests could
peruse the shop's gift items. ...
Elizabeth Covington, the pro-
prietor of Fab Finds Gift Shop " ...
and an experienced retailer of
almost 20 years, said, "I
opened this new location
because it was an expansion" .
of an already successful gift .
shop that I had opened under
new management in the . ". . .
Lyford Cay Shopping Centre .
during the late summer of . -
2006. That first location, on :
the western end of the island, ," .
proved to be successful. I.
decided that if a gift shop like A. . V
this could do well out west, it .-. '
would do well out east." aw.i. ..
The gift shop carries a wide ,l.a - 4


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PAGE 20, MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


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TRIBUNE


uSII
MONDAY,


$100m project's

45-60 day goal

on second phase

* Events and dinners
real 'saving grace' for
Balmoral project with
2,000 people visiting in
December
* May/June 2010
occupancy target for
26-unit first phase
* Foreign buyer interest
rekindled for 43-acre
site, which has 25%
green space

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A $100 million Bahamian
real estate project is aiming to
break ground on its 20-unit
second phase within the "next
45 to 60 days" once the
required level of pre-sales has
been achieved, telling Tribune
Business that interest from
foreign buyers appears to have
been rekindled.
Jason Kinsale, principal of
The Balmoral Development,
located on Prospect Ridge
near the US Ambassador's
residence, told this newspaper
that some 100-150 construc-
tion workers were currently
employed on site, with the
"sold-out" first phase target-
ing a May/June 2010 occu-
pancy date.
"We have some units up to
roof level, and infrastructure is
being installed for those units
as well," Mr Kinsale told Tri-
bune Business. "We're using
Bahamas Hot Mix for those
utilities, and the tennis courts
are 90 per cent complete. The
new clubhouse for the tennis
courts is almost done as well.
It's looking like something
now, not just a plan."
He added that construction
remained on schedule, and
might even complete slightly
ahead of deadline. "There's a
lot of construction work going
on right now," Mr Kinsale
said.
"We plan to have occupancy
SEE page 6B








By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
TWO MAJOR, politically-
connected real estate devel-
opers have become embroiled
in a legal dispute relating to
the accidental dumping of
more than 2,000 loads of soil
on one party's property.
The Court of Appeal, in
reinstating an injunction ini-
tially obtained by Arawak
Homes, owned by well-known
businessman Franklyn Wilson,
detailed how a dispute had
broken out between the devel-
oper and Bethell's Trucking
& Heavy Equipment Service,
which had been contracted to
work on the Destini Lakes
project.
That latter development is
part-owned by PLP MP, and
former Cabinet minister,
Shane Gibson, who was also
named as a respondent in
Arawak Homes' appeal.
In its judgment, the Court
of Appeal noted that Bethell's
Trucking & Heavy Equipment
had "deposited over 2,000
loads of soil and fill on prop-
erty belonging to Harmony
Homes Ltd', an Arawak
Homes subsidiary.
"After discovering that they
had in fact deposited the mate-
rials on the wrong property,
the respondents proceeded to
remove the materials and were
alleged to have caused perma-
nent damage to the property,"
the Court of Appeal noted.
It added that there "were
some unfruitful discussions
between" Arawak Homes and
Stanley Bethell, owner of
Bethell's Trucking & Heavy
Equipment Service, in a bid


DECEMBER 2 1, 2009


Ginn's 'critical' win




for $4.9bn project


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


GINN has won a "very critical" legal
battle over a challenge to its ownership
of 179 acres vital to its $4.9 billion
Bahamian resort project, the Court of
Appeal finding that a rival claim to the
property was "without merit".
Wilbert Bootle and his family had
challenged the Certificate of Title grant-
ed to Ginn for the site in Grand
Bahama's West End. The land in ques-
tion is located at the heart of the com-
pany's mixed-use Ginn sur mer project,
and Mr Bootle alleged he and his fam-
ily had a better ownership claim to the
179 acres via adverse possession.
However, the Court of Appeal found
Mr Bootle's appeal against the origi-
nal Supreme Court decision to be
"clearly without merit", dismissing his
action and removing any doubt as to
the validity of Ginn's ownership.
One source familiar with the land sit-
uation, speaking to Tribune Business
on condition of anonymity, said the 179
acres in question was situated at the
heart of the Ginn sur mer project. Had


* Appeal Court finds rival claim to 179
acres of land 'without merit'

* Ruling the other way could have

'derailed' development

* Disputed land at heart of project;

includes runway and canal entrance


the Bootle challenge succeeded, and a
Certificate of Title been issued instead
to him, the impact on the proposed
development could have been disas-
trous.
Besides sitting in the middle of the
two major chunks of real estate - one a
600-acre parcel, the other 1,200-1,400
acres - that Ginn acquired from the old
Sammons estate to facilitate its project,
the 179 acres incorporates part of the
development's airport runway and the
entrance to its canal system.


AML Foods in


preference


rescheduling


negotiations

* Company sees 03 net income rise 190% to
$665k, despite 3% sales decline
* Royal Bank pay-out frees $70k monthly; $3.5m
cash position improvement
* Domino's Pizza eyes two more stores and 2010
online launch
* BISX-listed retailer still on target for 2010
dividend resumption, with new revenue streams
set to generate 'a couple of million dollars'


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
AML Foods is in talks with
its preference shareholders to
reschedule debt redemptions,
having freed up $70,000 per
month from clearing its long-
term bank debt in a quarter
where net income increased
by 190 per cent despite a 3
per cent year-over-year sales
decline.
Gavin Watchorn, AML
Foods' president and chief
executive, indicated to Tri-
bune Business that the BISX-
listed retail group wanted to
put the cash flow freed up by
the repayment of all debt
owed to Royal Bank of Cana-
da to better use, such as
investing in the development
of its Solomon's Fresh Market
concept, rather than earmark
it for repaying the preference
shareholders.
AML Foods has three
remaining preference share-
holders, all institutional
SEE page 6B


SEE page 5B


"It's a very critical piece," the source
said of the disputed 179 acres. "The
runway is at the end of that, and it's
where the entrance to the canal system
is. Ginn couldn't ignore it."
And if Mr Bootle's claim had won,
the source said: "It could have derailed
the entire development, because the
land was in the middle of the project.
Ginn didn't take any chances."
Tribune Business was told that when
Ginn was in the process of acquiring
SEE page 4B


'Very optimistic' export prospects


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
A Bahamian developer
of specialist software for the
wealth management indus-
try is "very optimistic"
about export prospects for
2010, having received seri-
ous inquiries from financial
institutions as far afield as
Lebanon.
Bruce Raine, president
of International Private
Banking Systems (IPBS),
which celebrates its 17th
anniversary on January 3rd,
told Tribune Business that
the company's software
solutions could be applied
by financial institutions "in
any tax jurisdiction", with


* Bahamas wealth
management software
developer receives influx
of December inquiries,
including from Lebanon
and Ecuador
* Targeting development
resources at e-banking
platforms
* Urges other Bahamian
IT/knowledge providers to
target high margin, value-
added niches for export
............................
the Internet and e-banking
also set to be a "big growth

SEE page 7B


'I


ColinaImper I



Cofdec Fo [Ile


Major expansion

planned for Shell

retail footprint
* FOCOL eyes up to
three new gas stations
for brand on New
Providence
* Aiming to pay off
remaining $7.2m
long-term debt in
2010

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BISX-listed FOCOL Hold-
ings is planning to expand its
Shell retail network by up to
three new gas stations in 2010,
the company's largest share-
holder telling Tribune Busi-
ness it also hoped to complete
repayment of its outstanding
$7.2 million long-term debt.
Franklyn Wilson, the
Arawak Homes and Sunshine
Holdings chairman, told this
newspaper that FOCOL was
targeting new gas stations on
East Shirley Street, at the
Carmichael Road/Coral Har-
bour roundabout junction, and
at Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport (LPIA) as it
bids to close the gaps in Shell's
service coverage.
"We certainly expect in the
first quarter of next year to
open the Montague site on
east Shirley Street," Mr Wil-
son said. "That's going to be
the start of a substantial pro-
gramme in that regard."
Confirming that FOCOL
also owned the one-acre site
at the Carmichael Road/Coral
Harbour roundabout corner,

SEE page 5B


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 3B


'We need to move on to more constructive things'
................................................................


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE GRAND Bahama
Chamber of Commerce's
president has again called for
an end to the Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) own-
ership dispute and infighting,
telling Tribune Business: "We
simply need to move on to
more constructive things."
K P Turnquest said it was
difficult for the Chamber, or
anyone in Freeport, to have
an informed opinion about Sir
Jack Hayward's announce-
ment over the sale of his 50
per cent GBPA stake to Mid-
Atlantic Projects, as no one
knew who the buyers were or
their plans for Freeport.
"We don't know enough
about the group," Mr Turn-
quest said of Mid-Atlantic
Projects. "We don't know
anything about the group
reported to by purchasing it at


By ROYALFIDELITY
CAPITAL MARKETS
IT WAS a moderate
week of trading in the
Bahamian stock market last
week. Investors traded in
11 out of the 24 listed secu-
rities, of which three
advanced, three declined
and five remain unchanged.
EQUITY MARKET
A total of 129,599 shares
changed hands, represent-
ing an increase of 119,111
shares, compared to the pre-
vious week's trading volume
of 20,488 shares.
Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) was the big
advancer, trading 44,961
shares to see its stock close
the week up by $0.71 at
$6.51.
FOCOL Holdings Ltd.
(FCL) was the volume
leader, trading 53,565
shares, its share price clos-
ing the week unchanged at
$4.75.
BOND MARKET
There was no activity in
the bond market last week.
COMPANY NEWS:
FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
released its audited results
for the year ended July 31,
2009. FCL reported net
income of $15.3 million
compared to $13.3 million
reported in 2008, an
increase of $2.1 million or
15.5 per cent. Net income
available to common share-
holders advanced by
$974,000 or 8.4 per cent to
total $12.6 million, versus
$11.6 million last year.


this stage to say whether it's a
good fit or not.
"We are hopeful that the
whole [ownership] issue will
be resolved shortly, but we
know it can't be a situation
where the new owners and
the Government are at odds
from the start. We have to fol-
low the lead of the Govern-
ment at the moment until we
know who the buyers are and
what their plans are.
"There's just too many ele-
ments right now; too much
intrigue between the Gov-
ernment and the Port Author-
ity, the Babak situation. It's
too confusing. We don't know
what to say because there's
too many parts to this thing."
Indeed, much is likely to
hinge on Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham's reaction
to Sir Jack's announcement
of last week when he returns
from the UN Climate Change
Summit in Copenhagen this
week. Based on comments


Revenues were down by
$106 million to total $272.9
million, while cost of sales
decreased by $108 million
to total $228.3 million.
Gross profit was approxi-
mately $44.6 million for the
year, versus $42.6 million in
the previous year.
Operating expenses
increased by $42,000 for the
year primarily due to higher
marketing, administrative
and general expenses, which
increased by $707,000 or 2.8
per cent over the prior year.
Total assets decreased by
$10.4 million to total $126.6
million, while total liabili-
ties decreased by $23.3 mil-
lion to total $33.9 million
from the previous year.


before his departure, it is
unlikely to be a warm one.
Speculation has been rife
since Sir Jack went public,
with many questioning
whether the deal is for real,
and if it is simply designed to
allow Hannes Babak to
remain as GBPA/Port Group
Ltd chairman. Some have also
suggested that, having an
inkling that Sir Jack was up
to something, the Prime Min-
ister made his announcement
about the non-renewal of Mr
Babak's work permit in a bid
to flush out details of the Mid-
Atlantic sale.
"I would have thought that
if they're coming into a situa-
tion like this, where they're
going to have to work with
and obtain the support of the
business community, that at
least they would have intro-
duced themselves and said
this is what they were going to
do before signing an agree-
ment," Mr Turnquest added


Dividend Notes:
Cable Bahamas (CAB)
has declared a dividend of
$0.07 per share, payable on
December 31, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of
record date December 15,
2009.
Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.05 per share,
payable on December 31,
2009, to all ordinary share-
holders of record date
December 15, 2009.
Doctors Hospital Health
Systems (DHS) has
declared an extraordinary

SEE page four


of Mid-Atlantic Projects.
"I was very hopeful that we
would get this ownership dis-
pute resolved at the end of
the 2010 first quarter or so.
We just need to get this thing
behind us. Whoever sits in the
chair is irrelevant to us, per
se. We simply need the whole
thing done with so we can
move on to more constructive
things."
The Chamber president
added of Mid-Atlantic Pro-
jects: "What is their real moti-
vation for investing? What we
don't need is an investor only
interested in the financial side
or making a profit. We need
an investor to work alongside
us to develop the city and the
community
"So, hopefully, whoever
it is going to be is going to
participate more in the com-
munity, and not just been
an investor interested in
making a return and flip-
ping later on."


* Chamber chief calls for end to Port
Authority battle, and bemoans lack
of information on potential purchaser
................................................................


GIBSON, RIGBY & CO.
Counsels & Attorneys-at-Law
Notaries Public


Holiday Hours
CLOSED - 12:30-3:30 Wed.,Dec.,23rd 2009
Office Christmas Lunch
CLOSED - Thurs., Dec., 24th, 2009
Christmas Eve
CLOSED - Fri., Dec.,25th, 2009
Christmas Day
CLOSED - Monday, Dec., 28th, 2009
Boxing Day
OPEN - Tuesday, Dec., 29th, 2009
Regular Office Hours, 9a.m. - 5p.m.
OPEN - Wed.,Dec., 30th, 2009
Regular Office Hours, 9.a.m. - 5p.m.
CLOSED - 1:00p.m. - Thurs.,Dec., 31st, 2009
New Year's Eve
CLOSED - Friday, Jan., 1st, 2010
New Year's Day
OPEN - Mon., Jan., 4th 2010
Regular Office Hours, 9a.m. - 5p.m.


Chambers
Ki-Malex House
Dowdeswell Street
P.O.Box SS-6836
Nassau, Bahamas


Tel:(242) 302-6100
Fax:(242) 302-6106 or
Fax:(242) 302-6107
Email: lawyers@gibsonrigby.com


I


Vacation in Paradise.


Onki $75*

perperson doable occupancy.
Minimum 2-nkat stay. 8ahamas residents onl.


'U
- -'I


Full ase of all Atlantis facilities. Plus:

* Complimentary continental/breakfast dal

Sjaunior Suites with Kiny-size or two double beds

* Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room saf,
coffee maker, hair dryer

* Kids 15 andunder, free

* Pool with swim-up bar


Limited-time offer! Reserve today !

Call 242-363-3680
*$75 per person, per night dbl occupancy Sun thru Wed. Rates effective Jan. 7 thru Feb. 10, 2010. Add
$15 pp for Thurs. thru Sat. stays. 3rd and 4th additional adults add $40 each per night. Maximum 4
persons per room. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities
and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and subject to availability.
Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a 1-night penalty will apply.


PARADISE ISLAND
tBAHAMAS


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


K


EQUITY MARKET - TRADING STATISTICS
Week ending 18.12.09
BISX CLOSING WKLY PRICE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE CHANGE
AML $1.17 $- 500 -31.58%
BBL $0.63 $- 0 -4.55%
BOB $5.90 $- 0 -22.77%
BPF $10.74 $-0.01 5,000 -8.98%
BSL $10.06 $- 0 -1.28%
BWL $3.15 $- 0 0.00%
CAB $9.98 $-0.02 5,000 -28.87%
CBL $ 6.51 $ 0.71 44,961 -7.00%
CHL $2.72 $- 0 -3.89%
CIB $9.99 $0.13 9,889 -4.40%
CWCB $2.63 $ 0.07 3,000 16.89%
DHS $2.55 $- 2,000 0.00%
FAM $ 6.49 $- 0 -16.79%
FBB $2.37 $- 34 0.00%
FCC $0.27 $- 0 -10.00%
FCL $ 4.75 $- 53,565 -8.12%
FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%
FIN $9.28 $-0.01 5,000 -21.82%
ICD $ 5.59 $- 650 -8.81%
JSJ $ 9.95 $- 0 -10.36%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%


:y to

All Our Customers & Friends

0 from



A0

PREMIER






OMay the Holidays he shared with Loved
SOnes in Peace and Happiness.

WE WILL CLOSE
0 For the Holidays
at 12:00 p.m. Thursday, December 24th
& REOPEN at 7:00 a.m.,
STuesday December 29th, 2009
St ALBANS DR., OFF WEST BAY ST EAST BAY AND MACKEY T,
P.O. BOX N-1065 BRIDGE PLAZA COMMONS BLDG |
STEL, 224 T'EL/FAX: 1242) -.4210
S FA ( [24 323-7745 TOLL FREE 1242 3X00-7035


S^ ^ ^A10


BUSINESS I


* ROYALFIDELITY MARKET WRAP I







+


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009


Ginn's 'critical' win





for $4.9bn project


THE TRIBUNE


FROM page one
its West End real estate from
the Sammons estate, which
owned the former Grand


Bahama Hotel Company, both
parties - and their attorneys -
were unable to establish pos-
sessory title to the 179 acres in
question.


IDtoka biamtm a CmnItothd


Sources said this was due to
a technical problem, namely
that the site's borders did not
match the description con-
tained in legal documents
establishing the chain of title.
To eliminate any uncertainty,
the Grand Bahama Hotel
Company and Ginn moved to
'quiet' the title to that land via
a Quieting Titles Act petition.
Part of this process involves
Ginn/Grand Bahama Hotel
Company publishing notice of
its Quieting Titles Act petition,
so that any rival ownership
claimants can stake their claim
and have it heard by the court.
This, Tribune Business was
told, was what prompted the
Bootle claim.
A Bootle is understood to
have been the original Crown
Land grantee in West End in
the 18th century, but the land
involved is understood to have
gone through hundreds of con-
veyances since, while the Sam-
mons estate enjoyed 40 years
of uninterrupted possession.
In its judgment, the Court
of Appeal recorded how Mr
Bootle was appealing a May
18, 2006, order by retired Jus-
tice Jeanne Thompson, in


nmtifly


Se4w" 9fneeUM9



Our office will be closed on the following

days during this Holiday Season


Dec.16, 2009 - Closed at 12:00 pm

Dec.24, 2009 - All day

Dec. 31, 2009 - Half Day








NOTICE



PROPOSALS FOR


GROUP LIFE & MEDICAL INSURANCE


The National Insurance Board invites proposals from eligible insurance
companies and/or brokers for the coverage of its Life and Medical Insurance
Plan for the active and retired employees of the National Insurance Board.
This group will also include the active and retired employees of the Bahamas
Mortgage Corporation.


The new policy will be for a two year period commencing on February 1,
2010, through January 31, 2012, following the selection of the successful
tender.


Parties interested in submitting a proposal may collect an information package
from the Human Resources Department located at the National Insurance
Board Headquarters, Clifford Darling Complex, Baillou Hill Road.


All proposals should be sealed, marked "Proposals for Life and Medical
Insurance," and must be delivered no later than 4:30 p.m., on Wednesday,
December 30, 2009, to:
The Director
THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD
Clifford Darling Complex
Baillou Hill Road
P.O. Box N7508
Nassau, Bahamas


which she ordered that Ginn-
LA West End be issued with a
Certificate of Title to the prop-
erty. She also dismissed Mr
Bootle's adverse possession
claim.
In her ruling, Justice Thomp-
son had found that Mr Bootle's
evidence of adverse possession
"falls woefully short of the nec-
essary proof" to trump
Ginn/Grand Bahama Hotel
Company's documentary title.
The Grand Bahama Hotel
Company had initiated the
Quieting Titles petition and,
via agreements on November
17, 2004, and on March 23,
2005, sold its interest in the 179
acres to Ginn-LA West End,
Ginn's holding company for
the Ginn sur mer project. Giv-
en that Grand Bahama Hotel
Company had sold its interest,
the Certificate of Title was
issued in Ginn's name.
While Mr Bootle's initial
appeal against the verdict was
struck out for failing to 'settle
the record' in the time set by
the Court of Appeal, the latter
recorded: "Some time after this
(it is not certain when) the
appellant learnt that the origi-
nal petitioner in the quieting
action, Grand Bahama Hotel
Company, which was regis-
tered as a foreign company in
the Bahamas in 1963, but at all
material times was a company
incorporated in Delaware in
the United States, was volun-
tarily dissolved on April 28,
2006."
This meant that at the time
Ginn was granted a Certificate


of Title on May 18, 2006, the
entity that had initiated the
Quieting Titles Act petition
was not in existence.
This, the Court of Appeal
said, prompted Mr Bootle to
seek to overturn the order
striking out his original appeal,
and to challenge the Certifi-
cate of Title issued to Ginn.
Apart from alleging that
Grand Bahama Hotel Compa-
ny could not apply to strike out
his appeal because it was a
non-existent entity, Mr Bootle
alleged that Ginn was not a
party to the action. He also
alleged that Grand Bahama
Hotel Company's attorneys did
not disclose that the company
no longer existed when Ginn
was issued its Certificate of
Title.
"The hub of the appellant's
argument, therefore, is his con-
tention that Grand Bahama
Hotel Company could not
have been a petitioner capa-
ble of maintaining an action in
the Supreme Court at the time
of the grant of the Certificate
of Title, and nor could it have
been a party to this appeal
since it was a non-existent enti-
ty from the date it was dis-
solved and struck off the
Delaware register, even though
that fact was not notified to
the Registrar General of the
Bahamas," the Court of
Appeal said.
"In this respect, [Mr Bootle]
has made a serious allegation
of fraud against counsel for
Ginn, who were also counsel
for the [Grand Bahama Hotel


Company], alleging that they
knew, or must have known, of
the fact but did not disclose it
to the court."
Yet the Court of Appeal's
verdict was that Mr Bootle's
appeal was "without merit"
regardless of whether it was
reinstated. The court found
there was "nothing" that would
prompt it to interfere with Jus-
tice Thompson's findings of
fact.
In addition, the Court of
Appeal said the sales agree-
ment that enabled Ginn to
acquire the property was a
Vendor Purchaser summons.
"That meant as a matter of
law, that from the time the
agreement was entered into
Ginn acquired an equitable
interest in the properties and
became, in the eyes of equity,
the beneficial owner of the
property the subject of the
Quieting, which interest pre-
dates the dissolution of the
company," the court found.
As a result, even though the
Grand Bahama Hotel Compa-
ny had ceased to exist on the
date Ginn obtained its Certifi-
cate of Title, the court still had
to consider Ginn's ownership
interest.
"Ginn's equitable interest
was indefensible in the cir-
cumstances, as there was no
one who could make a better
claim to the property," the
Court of Appeal found. It also
ruled that Mr Bootle's com-
plaint about Ginn not being
substituted as the petitioner
was "clearly without merit".


RoyalFidelity Market Wrap


FROM page three
dividend of $0.03 per
share, payable on
December 22, 2009, to
all ordinary sharehold-
ers of record date
December 15, 2009.
Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) (FBB) has
declared an extraordi-
nary dividend of $0.04
per share, payable on
December 30, 2009, to
all ordinary sharehold-
ers of record date
December 22, 2009.





on MonIdays F,&,


INTERNATIONAL MARKETS
................................................................


FOREX Rates
Currency


COMMODITIES
Commodity


Clude Oil
G,:,IL


o Change


Weekly
0.9379
1.6152
1.4343

Weekly
74.45
1.113.40


-0.55
-0.62
-1.91


�o Change


6.43
-0.13


INTERNATIONAL STOCK MARKET INDEXES
Index Weekly


D.JIA
S & F 500
iJASDAO
rjil kei


10.32 3.9
1,102.69
2211.69
10.142.05


2010 NEW) )j s

?IFUTE 'PID


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$69/person + gratuity

Children are irnvted to SaaSidel
$35/child y.I 1-12) + gratuity


CALL. NOW 327-6200


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


STORE OPENING & CLOSING
HOURS FOR THE HOLIDAYS
Saturday December l2tb & 19M
Open lOan - Spam
Deern er 14,h lo 241h - on - Friday
Open 9am 1o 6pin
DeceIber 26111- Closed
December 29th . 31 st CUse For Inventory
Reopen Monday January 4th, 2010
Tel; 242-328-0048
Fax: 242-328-0049
#4 Fation & Rosetta Sts., Palmdale
NaSuiaU, Bihamas
Email: salea@dctpc.com


Dinner at B;at:k Angus
Party Favors
Entry irto 22 Ahove After Party
ONLY $1 19/person
+ gratuity

WYNDHA D A


I-


-- J J JL JL







+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 5B


Major expansion planned for Shell retail footprint


FROM page one
where another gas station is
planned, Mr Wilson added:
"We are also designated by
the Nassau Airport Develop-
ment Company (NAD) as the
flagship station at Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport
(LPIA), so these are all inter-
ests we have in mind.
"Certainly, the NAD one is
likely to start in the first half of
the year. We seek to be disci-
plined in terms of the pace at
which we proceed, but cer-
tainly with the NAD one we
have certain obligations to
them to be in place when the
airport reaches a certain stage.


We will honour those obliga-
tions."
Mr Wilson was unable to
provide figures on the level
of investment FOCOL
planned to make in expanding
its Shell retail network, or the
number of jobs that might be
created, although he con-
firmed that all three stations -
if constructed -would be
leased to operators, rather
than owned/operated by the
company.
"We will act in a manner
that lets the Bahamian public
know Shell is one of the best,
if not the best, names in the
world when it comes to petro-
leum products," Mr Wilson
said. "That has to be reflect-


ed. Quality and Shell go
together all over the world.
Part of our agenda is to make
that abundantly clear to the
Bahamian public."
While Shell currently had
some 13-14 gas stations in
New Providence, Mr Wilson
acknowledged: "We have
some holes left. We're aware
of them, and will address
them shortly." He declined to
provide details on the "holes",
citing competitive concerns.
FOCOL Holdings reduced
its long-term debt from $14.1
million to $7.2 million in the
fiscal year to July 31, 2009,
almost halving it. Mr Wilson
said the company's Board and
management "think we stand


a chance" of eliminating the
balance in fiscal 2010, as part
of a balance sheet strength-
ening exercise.
"We want to strengthen our
balance sheet and keep it very
strong," he added. "We may
go back to what we saw with
oil prices in 2008, so we have
to be in a position if that hap-
pens to respond." FOCOL
also needed to be able to
finance its planned gas station
expansion, Mr Wilson said.
FOCOL's net income avail-
able to common shareholders
increased by 8.4 per cent, ris-
ing from $11.616 million the
year before to $12.59 million
in fiscal 2009. This was despite
the company's sales and rev-


Developers in dispute over 2,000 soil loads


enues falling from $378.861
million the year before to
$272.871 million in 2009.
However, Mr Wilson point-
ed out: "Sales and revenues
mean very little in that busi-
ness." This was because the
Government price controlled
the retail and wholesale mark-
ups on the per gallon price,
meaning that any increase in


FOCOL's margins was
derived from either cost con-
tainment or an increased sales
volume.
"We continue to act in a
manner to sustain the confi-
dence of the stock market,"
Mr Wilson said. "FOCOL
benefits tremendously from
the wise leadership and judg-
ment of Sir Albert Miller."


FROM page one
to resolve the matter.
"It was admitted in the affi-
davit of Mr Stanley Bethell
that the surveyor employed by
Destini Lakes - a company
which had contracted the ser-
vices of Mr Bethell's company
to construct a road - had
wrongly identified the subject
property bordering Destini's
property as that on which the
road was to be constructed,
hence the deposit of the soil
there," the judgment noted.
This prompted Arawak
Homes to apply to the
Supreme Court for an injunc-
tion prohibiting Bethell's
Trucking & Heavy Equipment
Service and Mr Gibson from
removing any more soil and
fill from the property.
The injunction was granted
at a hearing where only
Arawak Homes and its attor-
neys were present, but when
all parties were present Jus-
tice Neville Adderley lifted the
injunction on the grounds
"that there had not been full
and frank disclosure as to the
identity of the owner of the
property".


In removing the injunction,
Justice Adderley ordered that
Bethell's Trucking & Heavy
Equipment Service be allowed
"to continue their trespass on
the property to remove the
materials they had wrongly
deposited there but not to
commit 'waste'". Arawak
Homes also had to supervise
the fill's removal.
The Court of Appeal found


that Bethell's Trucking &
Heavy Equipment Service and
Mr Gibson could not com-
plain about Arawak Homes'
standing in the matter, since
they had admitted trespass-
ing.
In reinstating the injunction,
the Court of Appeal found:
"It seems that in this case, in
light of the admission by Mr
Stanley Bethell, there could


be little or no doubt that the
respondents were trespassers
on the property, and that the
danger which [Arawak
Homes] was seeking to enjoin
may not have been reparable
by the payment of any dam-
ages, and so there was no
'contested' material of fact of
which disclosure had not been
made to the court at the ex-
parte stage."


PUBLIC


AUCTION


Montague Villas Condominium


7 units available


Units 203,206,207,209,403,604,703ADSI


- Gated Property

- Pool

- Laundry Facilities

- Guard House




Bids being accept by

Campbell Chase Law

from

December 8,2009


- -~.-


For more info contact


I





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ilsil


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WANTED

SALES PERSONS

WITH 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE

PLEASE FORWARD RESUME TO:
Taylor Industries Ltd
111 Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 328-0453
Email: generalinfo @ taylor-industries.com


I TODSUSSOISO HSPG LGO OWWTIUE4.O


1 14







+


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


AML Foods in preference rescheduling negotiations


FROM page one
investors, and the first


redemption of their principal
is set for March 2010. Some
$1.3-$1.4 million had been set


Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) COLUMBUS STRATEGIC INVESTMENTS FUND LIMITED is
in dissolution under the provisions of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.
(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on December 18, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.
(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 1st day of February, 2010 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.
DECEMBER 21, 2009
ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

















The Inter-American Development

Bank (IDB) hereby notifies its

clients and the general public that

effective Wednesday, November

25, 2009 our main telephone

number will be #396-7800.



The current telephone number

#393-7159 will remain active until

January 1st, 2010.



The IDB apologizes for any

inconvenience caused.


aside to meet those payments
as at end-October, but Mr
Watchorn told Tribune Busi-
ness: "I can tell you that we've
been talking to them [the
preference shareholders] to
do something.
"We've got this cash we
could use in financing our
new store, and the prefer-
ence shareholders will be
looking to keep an income
stream going." He did no
elaborate on the finer details
of any preference share
rescheduling or restructur-
ing.
However, Mr Watchorn
told this newspaper that
AML Foods' cash position
had improved by some $3.5
million during the first nine
months of its financial year
to October 31, 2009.
And while the company's
third quarter sales had fallen
by 3 per cent or $695,000
year-over-year, Mr
Watchorn said that for the
first nine months, AML
Foods' top-line growth was
showing a 6 per cent or
$4.415 million improvement
over 2008 numbers.
Describing the sales
decline in the three months
to October 31, 2009, as a
"blip" largely induced by the
recession's impact on the
wider economy and Bahami-
an disposable incomes, Mr
Watchorn said AML Foods
was optimistic it would gen-
erate "a couple of million
dollars" from new revenue
streams set to come on line
in 2010.
The group's Domino's Piz-
za franchise was eyeing two
new store locations, with its
online ordering facility set to
launch in January 2010, with
the first orders for Cost
Right's Internet shopping
facility also now being
placed.
"The sales decline was not
unexpected," Mr Watchorn
said of the third quarter,
"but we've got new revenue
streams coming online, and a


few more coming in the first
and second quarters next
year..... We feel confident
that we will add a couple of
million dollars from new rev-
enue streams that will be
launched in 2010."
The AML Foods president
said Domino's Pizza "hasn't
really seen any impact" from
the increased competition
caused by Marco's Pizza's
entrance into the Bahamian
market, adding that the fran-
chise was looking at adding
one potential store in Nas-
sau and another "outside
New Providence".
"We have two new stores
that we've been looking at
for a little while. Hopefully
we will have one new store
next year," Mr Watchorn
told Tribune Business.
"We're pretty close to tak-
ing a decision to move ahead
on one, which has a 90 per
cent chance of happening.
Hopefully, we'll do some-
thing towards the end of the
2010 first quarter.
"We're doing work on the
second store, doing our due
diligence, and its 50-50 as to
whether we go ahead with
that." He also disclosed that
Domino's Pizza was planning
to open another store in the
new Town Centre being con-
structed by New Providence
Development Company for
the western part of the
island, although that would
not happen until the middle
or end of 2011.
Domino's Pizza's online
ordering service was due to
launch in mid-January 2010,
Mr Watchorn confirmed, and
"the first orders on
CostRight.com are coming
in. We haven't launched it
to the public, but we have
20-25 individuals testing it
for us for launch in 2010".
Cost Right's Freeport outlet
had also begun bonded
goods sales, where Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) licensees were able
to purchase large appliances,


office supplies and TVs duty-
free for use in their own
businesses.
Mr Watchorn told Tribune
Business that AML Foods'
improving cash flow/liquidi-
ty position had enabled it to
"accelerate over time" the
monthly debt repayments to
Royal Bank of Canada, the
group completing the repay-
ment of all bank debt by
mid-October, ahead of the
scheduled early January
close.
The $70,000 per month
this had released had
enabled AML Foods to
"turn around our current
cash position", both on the
balance sheet and with debt
repayment. "We have
improved cash by $1.6 mil-
lion on the balance sheet, as
well as re-paying $1.8 mil-
lion in bank debt. The total
is about $3.5 million in posi-
tive movement for the first
10 months of 2009 on cash
flow," Mr Watchorn told Tri-
bune Business.
"We're pleased we've
been able to take increased
profitability and use it almost
exclusively to improve the
cash position of the compa-
ny, which was the last step
to take [to complete the
turnaround] - to get into a
strong cash position."
AML Foods more than
offset the negative sales
impact through enhanced
cost containment and savings
measures, which were seen
in the fact that its net income
for the three months to
October 31, 2009, rose by
190 per cent from $229,000
the year before to $665,000
this time around.
For the first nine months,
the BISX-listed retail group's
net income was up 510 per
cent, standing at $2.887 mil-
lion compared to $473,000
for the same period in 2008.
Expenses dropped by 0.25
per cent as a percentage of
sales, while interest costs fell
by $245,000 or 0.5 per cent


due to the debt repayment.
The increased profits
make it likely AML Foods
will finally pay a dividend to
shareholders in 2010, the first
for some six to seven years,
rewarding them for their
patience as the company
underwent a painstaking
turnaround programme.
"We have always said we
will make that final decision
based on the fourth quarter
numbers," Mr Watchorn said
of the dividend. "The plan is
to resume the dividend, and
we all want that.
"I'm not going to say how
much or when, but we're still
on track to do something in
2010. The level and timing
will depend on the fourth
quarter numbers. My Board
are very anxious to give
something back to the share-
holders."
Mr Watchorn said AML
Foods expected to be consis-
tently profitable on a quar-
terly basis, adding: "Our
November numbers are pos-
itive again; we've made some
money again.
"We're pleased with the
bottom line. It's not where
we were in the first two quar-
ters, but the third quarter has
traditionally been a weaker
one for us, and the little blip
in sales was not unexpected
given what we see in the
economy."
Margins "dropped a point"
in the third quarter com-
pared to the first half, some-
thing that Mr Watchorn said
reflected a drop in average
spending per customer trans-
action. Customer counts, he
added, were still "on aver-
age a couple of percentage
points above last year".
Pledging that AML Foods
would not cut any staff to
save on payroll levels in
2010, Mr Watchorn said the
entrance of new players into
the food retailing market,
such as Robin Hood, meant
"everyone is fighting harder
for a shrinking pie".


$100m project's 45-60 day goal on second phase


FROM page one

for the first home owners in
May/June. The 26 units in the
first phase are sold out. We
don't build on spec."
As for Balmoral's second
phase, Mr Kinsale said: "We
plan, I would say, to start con-
struction within the next 45
to 60 days, and are just getting
prepared for that, taking in
additional pre-sales to start
the building.
"That will consist of
approximately 20 units, two


and four-bedroom town
homes, and we're coming up
with a new plan for a three-
bedroom as well. It will prob-
ably take a couple of months
to get pre-sales in place for
the next phase, and we're
starting to take deposits in
escrow."
Mr Kinsale estimated that
Balmoral had received six or
seven deposits on phase two
properties already, and the
developers had the ability to
start construction before it
was sold out.. The 275-unit,


43-acre project, while pitched
at and fuelled by Bahamian
professional purchasers, was
also now starting to gain trac-
tion with overseas purchasers,
he added.
"We're actually starting to
see more interest from for-
eign buyers. We've had a lot
of Canadian buyers come in,
and Americans as well," Mr
Kinsale said. "I think the fear
factor is eroding. People don't
seem to be as scared as they
once were."
He explained that prospec-
tive purchasers, who had
made tentative inquiries
about Balmoral's real estate
options several months ago,
were now returning as they
became more confident that
they were not going to lose
their jobs or current salary
levels due to the recession.
And Balmoral had also
received a further boost from
its hosting of special events.
"That's really been a saving
grace for us - to host a lot of
dinners, events and func-
tions," Mr Kinsale said. "In
December, at last 2,000 peo-
ple have come through the


doors for events. It helps to
sell real estate and keep us in
the public eye. It's been very
beneficial.
"With the development's
build-out as well, that's
helped us. People can see
we're for real. Demand is
steady and we keep improv-
ing the product. Our show
home will be done next
month, so people can see
what we're offering."
Balmoral, when fully con-
structed, will be "very low
density" with some 25 per
cent of the 43 acres green
space. Although it is current-
ly envisioned as a mix of 70
single family home sites, town
homes and condominiums,
Mr Kinsale said the develop-
ers "may change the mix a lit-
tle bit" in the final phase.
Acknowledging that 2010
will be "a bumpy road", he
added that while the devel-
opers would be conservative
in their outlook, Balmoral
had still been :"able to sell in
the worst economy in living
memory", so its sales and
development goals were still
realistic.


*F CAREER OPPORTUNITIES


FirstCaribbean awra I?


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SENIOR MANAGER - PERSONAL CREDIT SERVICES
* The Senior Manager - Personal Credit Services adjudicates Personal
Credit requests. Minimum five years Managerial banking experience;
three of which must be in Credit Risk Management.
Application Expiry date: December 24th 2009


For further information on this and
other available positions, please visit
our website:

www.firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm


4 FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK
GET THERE. TOGETHER.


FTODSCUS STRE ONTISSPG O SN TO' WWTIBUE4.O I


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visd our website at ww .cob.eduJbs




CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE,
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

P.K.MP AI. I,., EJ.ll-WA J A MI ' ( r I HK.'..%- SPRKI % '. I:,ll.N I F. Zi IIII.- II1211 41 .'Icshen Ij
COURSE TUITION &a
SEC CODE BEGINS ENDS DURATION DAYS TIME FEES RM
COO K , �-
Bahamlan Cululrue 1 006 Jan 14 Fet.25 b weea, Tunrday .I 0is n $375 0O MIK
W.UK 05M I
adsirni Cl Irtg I 1 R2. J1an 11 Fea.22 2 R wA.kh MKenn.y . . Pipm i5 FR .0l MK
Cake & Paslty COOK 6 D -
MalUng I I 1 3 Jan.12 Mar. 9 B week's IL.lsday "Jpm $LM 00J PK
rCCOK ' -
Brwad Making I1 fl0r Jan 14 Mar, 11 8 .w'lt Tlxday V pm 52G1) O' LK
WOK 5AI- I
Ctkka [ftai d I 1 RP17 JAn. 11 MIr.B MR vmu . M9:1!.y 9' K11 ,J $325,3 , PK
All Fe are irrleuded in Ihe prk-e quotd abvLe; mew Audenx pay a n-1i ajlpplAic iOr fee oMfS40*I (NO^' REFUI

Applicatan Deadline: December 30, 1209 at 4A00 pan.


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+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 7B


0 In brief


Health Care

bill faces key

Senate test vote

WASHINGTON
SENATE Democrats confi-
dently advanced heath care
legislation Sunday toward a
make-or-break test vote in a
push for Christmas-week pas-
sage. Republicans vowed to
resist what they appeared
unable to stop, according to the
Associated Press.
In the run-up to the vote,
the escalation in rhetoric was
remarkable on both sides of
an issue that has divided the
two political parties for
months.
"This process is not legisla-
tion. This process is corrup-
tion," said Sen. Tom Coburn,
R-Okla., referring to the last-
minute flurry of dealmaking
that enabled Majority Leader
Harry Reid, D-Nev., and the
White House to lock in the 60
votes needed to approve the
legislation.
Democratic Sen. Sheldon
Whitehouse of Rhode Island
responded in near-Biblical
terms. In a speech on the Sen-
ate floor, he said Republicans
are embarked on a "no-holds
barred mission of propaganda,
obstruction and fear.... There
will be a reckoning. There will
come a day of judgment about
who was telling the truth."
Whatever else it was, the
legislation represented the cul-
mination of a year's work for
Democrats, pressed by Presi-
dent Barack Obama to
remake the nation's health
care system.
Under Senate rules,
Democrats needed 60 votes
on three separate occasions to
pass the measure. The first
and most critical test was set
for about 1 a.m. Monday.
Democrats said Nebraska Sen.
Ben Nelson's announcement
Saturday that he would vote
for the bill gave them the sup-
port they needed.


'Very


optimistic'


export prospects


FROM page one

area for us".
"We're in 12 countries,
including the Bahamas, and I
think we have about 30 client
institutions now," Mr Raine
said. "We're hoping it's going
to grow. This year was very,
very flat, and we had very few
inquiries at all.
"But just in December
we've had three or four, and
they're good. It's not people
checking up; they're genuine-
ly looking at implementing
new systems next year. One
inquiry came from Barbados,
there was one in Ecuador,
another in Vancouver and
another in Lebanon. It says
people are feeling more com-
fortable about the world econ-
omy."
IPBS and its 11-strong staff
initially targeted the private
banking and wealth manage-
ment niche for their software
product, but have since adapt-
ed it such that it can be imple-
mented by any financial insti-
tution in the world. The lat-
est client to acquire its product
was Jamaica-based broker,
Stocks and Securities Ltd.
Mr Raine described IPBS's
software as a "labour saver"
and device that increased the
efficiency of financial services
providers, since it automati-
cally updated the relevant
data categories with one but-
ton push when a transaction
took place.
"There may be some quirks
that are unique, depending on
the country and the client, but
we can offer software in any
tax jurisdiction without any
trouble. That's very good for
us," Mr Raine told Tribune
Business, explaining that this
had helped broaden the


attraction of IPBS' products
beyond the wealth manage-
ment sector into the full finan-
cial services industries.
He added that the Stocks
and Securities Ltd deal pro-
vided further evidence of just
how adaptable IPBS' software
solutions were, as it had to be
made client-specific to allow
the Jamaican firm to process
that country's General Con-
sumption Tax (CGT) and
withholding taxes imposed on
clients' incomes.
"We can now go anywhere
really, which can only be
good," Mr Raine said. "The
Internet is going to be a big
growth area for us, and where
we will put a lot of develop-
ment focus.
"That's key to a lot of pri-
vate wealth management - to
give clients direct access to
their information, and allow
them to place transaction
orders electronically. It is
going to be big."
Mr Raine described IPBS's
17 years in business as "a long
haul, but it's paying off". He
told Tribune Business that the
company's success to date had
exceeded initial expectations,
with its name and product
having achieved widespread


credibility and acceptance in
the global financial services
industry.
The knowledge that IPBS
had gained, and its under-
standing of a client's business
and their needs, had been key
factors in their breaking into
the market, Mr Raine added.
He again urged other
Bahamian service providers
and entrepreneurs, especially
those in industries that were
knowledge and technology-
based, to target niche markets
where they could develop a
high margin, value-added
export capability.
"We're a totally Bahamian
company, and I really think
there's a lot more room," Mr
Raine told Tribune Business.
"I don't want to see competi-
tors, but there are so many
industries. Bahamians should
have been in the hotel soft-
ware business.
"There are a lot of avenues
that other people can develop
here and export. All the
Caribbean countries work the
same way. They need to think
about what they can do in the
Information Technology field.
"Bahamians are up to it, no
question. We've got some
smart jacks here. We've tar-


NOTICE Is hebjy reI, nthat MOHAMED AYUBENEZAMUDEEN
of 106A HILLVIEW CL, WESTRIDGE, P.O. BOX CB-11226,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is aWpl-ng to the Mirnis rt' l;,s:tc
fcy Nationalily and Cizenship, for registrationiraturfalizqa .
a citizen of The Bahamas. and that any person who knows any
reason why regnIrahoni'naturalization shouiQ not te grandd,
should send a wiTen and signedsaemenlBrn of he facls within
tweriy-eght days fromn 12'6d*y of Dowivl, 209 to the
Minister responsible for nationally and Ciizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas


geted banking, mainly because
it's a high-priced item. We
could spend time developing
lesser-type applications, but
we want to go for something
that, when we sell or licence it,
it brings in good revenue. We
want to play for a higher level


market in what we do, partic-
ularly in terms of exporting
product."
Mr Raine also urged
Bahamian companies to tar-
get market niches where they
did not face a challenge from
major US and Canadian firms.


".....private & confidential acquisition of
gold and precious metals bullion."


Symon-Petr Commodities Ltd.
Ph# (242) 424-5857, VOIP (305) 897-3070
E-mail" principal@symonpetr.com







ASSOCIATED B-EAWA L'I'irEikJi BREWERS L'IVJIE[i


Ml0TKI Of AMN1AL .E4ERAL MEETING
lo dilQtdrprV Shcrrjhni tAaM
Mi - lu t lr th:r ie.he , FI,, I m.ng iJ ,knb Oove
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WVbrt s rml' T pprrr : pry rc'/1ri hid C1i: t wit in +F nI inEi r. imhe
praiy ri fd nce be a memnter.


Bairy %*mn


VOPAK TERMINAL BAHAMAS

IT SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN

. A vacancy exists within the IT Department for an IT Systems Technician.


SThe successful candidate will be required to:

* Monitor and support infrastructure across the organization's LANs, WANs,
.. and wireless deployments.
4.* Ensure the stable operation and efficient performance of company networks and
. applications, including terminal automation systems.
, * Provide technical support to organization's applications and hardware from end-
users and other members of IT organization via helpdesk system.
* Identify and remedy network performance bottlenecks.
* Configure and troubleshoot servers, including e-mail, print and backup servers
and their associated operating systems and software.
� * Install and configure all network and client hardware and equipment, including
routers, switches, hubs, UPSs, local PCs and so on.
ND
Education:

* College diploma or University degree in the field of computer science and/or 5
S.years equivalent work experience.
* Certifications in Networking or MCSE preferred.

OftA Experience:
* Extensive hands-on technical knowledge of network systems, protocols, and
Standards such as Ethernet, LAN, WAN, xDSL, TCP/IP, TI, 802.11x, and so on.
* Extensive client/server and operating system experience with Microsoft
Operating systems and Lotus Notes.
* Hardware, software, and network connection troubleshooting experience.
* Skilled at installing/configuring hubs, switches, routers, bridges, etc.
* Knowledge of McAfee anti-virus software, Juniper firewalls and other network
security measures.
T * E - e FA. e m ns * Good understanding of the organization's goals and objectives.
* Knowledge of applicable data privacy practices and laws.
Pye * * *hmpo . .ldad al-tMrtoi le* * * Strong written and oral communication skills.
S -* Able to conduct research into networking issues and products as required.
* Highly self motivated and directed.
* Keen attention to detail.
* Ds * Ability to prioritize and execute tasks in a high-pressure environment.
* Strong customer service orientation.
M a ,D I e r 8 Cl se * Experience working in a team-oriented, collaborative environment.

T d. De b 3 e w e r s - Applications should be submitted to the
Human Resources Manager
Bahamas Oil Refining Company International Limited
F y u,,YDlDbs Vopak Terminal Bahamas
P. 0. Box F-42435
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
On or before December 30, 2009


TODSUSSOISO HSIPAGE LG ON0T WWW.TIBUE22.O


K


BUSINESS


---I




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