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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01469
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: December 15, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01469

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Police warning
for public
frustrated with
armed robberies
By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net
A SENIOR police chief has
warned the public about taking
matters into their own hands out
of frustration with the current spate
of armed robberies.
Speaking out after the fatal
shooting of an armed robber over
the weekend, Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Hulan Hanna
promised that anyone who breaks
SEE page two


Lawyer alleges

FNM blocked his


bid to become MP L


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net


A PROMINENT lawyer elect-
ed by the FNM's local association
in Pine Ridge Grand Bahama as
their preferred candidate to run in
the 2007 general election alleges
he was told by the party's deci-
sion-makers to drop a controver-
sial lawsuit against a foreign devel-
oper or see his political aspira-
tions denied.
Fred Smith, QC, senior part-
ner with law firm Callender's and
Co. in Freeport, claims in an affi-
davit filed on December 7 that he
was informed by the FNM's Can-
didates Committee that he would
not be endorsed by them for the
Pine Ridge seat - despite hav-


I


N ..


ing the support of the Pine Ridge
Constituency Association -
unless he either pulled out of rep-
SEE page six


Customs officers abandon posts in protest
By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
CUSTOMS officers abandoned their airport posts during peak
hours on Sunday night and during part of yesterday in protest of an
allegedly unsatisfactory salary offer made by the government in the
SEE page 10


PRIME MINISTER Hilbtl
Inijhjiri, d ipjE" Ci,' Iirr-n-
h:iqg n. D Ernirimiil I,: h lh.rni-
Ed ij n:.' ri ' 1- ' h CIllim lE
h l, ,'A.i:, .- E i:E :il:d I,:, Ihi iqhrhl
by Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette, Acting Com-
missioner Elliston Greenslade,
and Permanent Secretary Ani-
ta Bernard.
By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net
PRIME Minister
Hubert Ingraham warned
yesterday that if sea lev-
els were to rise by 1.5
feet, nearly 80 per cent
of the Bahamas' land
mass will be underwater.
Mr Ingraham left Nas-
sau yesterday to attend
the United Nation's 15th
Climate Change Confer-
ence in Copenhagen,
SEE page 11


Govt aims to enforce
emission standards
throughout nation
By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
THE Government of the Bahamas is
expecting to pass new legislation next year to
create emission standards that will be
enforced throughout the country, Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham said yesterday.
Speaking before his departure for Copen-
hagen, Denmark, for the United Nation's
15th Climate Change Conference, Mr Ingra-
ham said this new legislation will also deal
with other standards, including the age of
vehicles that can be imported and the dis-
posal of large household items such as fridges
SEE page 10


- Iliii L IM O I IJLUIIInr "�W l
Teen found dead in
cell 'said he would
commit suicide'
By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
RECALLING the final moments of 15-year-
old Michael Knowles' life, a witness told a Coro-
ner's Court yesterday how the youngster said
he was going to commit suicide.
Desirae Chisholm struggled to maintain her
composure as she tearfully recalled the final
moments of the teenager's life.
Michael was found hanging in a holding cell at
the East Street South Police Station on May 31.
According to previous testimony, he had been
arrested on suspicion of committing house-
breaking.
Ms Chisholm told the hearing that earlier that
SEE page six


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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Armed robbers storm liquor store


A GROUP of armed men
stormed a liquor store in broad
daylight yesterday and escaped
with an undetermined amount of
cash, police reported.
The brazen robbery occurred at
around 1pm when three men, all
armed with handguns, reportedly
burst into Janet Kemp Liquor
Store on Robinson Road and
demanded money.


Men make off with cash in daylight raid
........................................................................ .............................................


According to Press Liaison Offi-
cer Sergeant Chrislyn Skippings,
an employee of the store told
police the men took a black bag
containing an undetermined
amount of cash.
The bandits then escaped in a


dark coloured Nissan Camry,
licence plate number 108552, Sgt
Skippings said. The incident is the
latest in a string of armed robberies
of businesses.
According to statistics, up to
November 24, armed robberies and


robberies have jumped by 17 and
25 per cent respectively, compared
to the same period in 2008.
Considering the bold nature of
yesterday's robbery, Sgt Skippings
warned business owners to be on
the lookout for suspicious activity


near their companies, no matter
the time. "Once the opportunity
presents itself people will definite-
ly try to take advantage of the sit-
uation and that's why we try to ask
business persons to be vigilant and
pay attention to their environment.
If you notice someone passing up
and down the store it's time to get
in touch with your neighbourhood
police," she said.


POLICE are still investigat-
ing an incident on the weekend
in which a licensed firearm
owner shot and killed a would-
be armed robber but have not
ruled it a criminal matter.
Assistant Commissioner of
Police Hulan Hanna confirmed
this yesterday afternoon, adding
that such shootings are rare.
"While there are numerous
incidences where citizens are
involved in stopping crime,
where they abort a robbery or
detain individuals until the
police arrive, in my most recent
memory, the incidences are few
and far between where the inci-
dent ends with a fatal result,"
said Mr Hanna, who added that
he has not noticed any changes
in the number of firearm appli-
cations.
Police reported that around
7pm on Saturday a male
employee of Island Wide Pro-
duce and Meat Mart, a popular
store on East Street South, used
his licensed shotgun to abort a
robbery. One of the armed men


involved in the robbery was marshal the evidence or con-
pronounced dead on the scene. vene a Coroner's Court to
At his side, police found a .38 determine the justification for
revolver with six live rounds of the homicide," Mr Hanna said.
ammunition and a full money While the constitution allows
till. Officers are still searching for people to defend them-
for the second suspect. selves, Mr Hanna said the
"In cases like this, the pro- actions of licensed firearm hold-
cedure is to collect the evidence ers must be measured against
and forward the case file to the what the law says, and there
Coroner's Office. They will should not be an "open-sea-


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FROM page one

the law will be prosecuted.
But other than stating his
warning, he was cautious
about specifically defining vig-
ilantism, saying people would
seek to use his definition as
an interpretation of the law.
"The police have no
authority to define vigilan-
tism. The laws of the
Bahamas determine what is
considered vigilantism. What
I can say is that when some-
one believes a crime has been
committed against them, they
are obligated to report the
matter to the police. Anyone
who breaks the law is subject
to prosecution under the law,"
he said.
Business owners are not
perturbed by the cautioning
against vigilantism. They
understand the concern, but
they feel it should not be con-
fused with the actions of busi-
ness owners to defend them-
selves. Some business owners
believe the question of
whether or not to be armed is
becoming easier to answer,
because they say business
owners are a target and seri-
ously disadvantaged when
they are unarmed.
"I feel businesses should be
armed because the criminals
are armed. The criminals have
illegal weapons whether we
like it or not. When you are
armed it is a deterrent for the
criminals because they know
their lives are also in danger,
and no one wants to die, not
even the criminals," said
Atwell Ferguson, manager
and part owner of Fergie's
Meat Mart, located in South
Beach.
"The criminals know we
are armed, but periodically
they take chances for what-
ever reason. I guess they feel
you are relaxed when they see
you haven't been robbed in a


son," where anything is
allowed.
"The police will never advo-
cate people to resist robbery
attempts. Once you take that
step there are many implica-
tions that may be far-reaching.
Whatever a person decides to
do, their actions will be scruti-
nised by the court," said Mr
Hanna.


Police warning

for the public
little while, so they take a
chance," he said.
Fergie's Meat Mart is one
in a group of companies
owned by the Ferguson fami-
ly. Island Wide Produce and
Meat Mart, which was the
scene of the fatal shooting
over the weekend, is owned
by Atwell's brother Preston
Ferguson. Police reported
that two armed robbers
entered the popular store in
East Street south demanding
money from the cashiers and
threatening their lives. One
of the two suspects in the rob-
bery was shot by a licensed
firearm holder. He died on
the scene as a result.
Wesley Willie, owner and
manager of Quality Conve-
nience Store, said: "I don't
support the idea of vigilan-
tism, but at some point we
have to ask, 'how much more
are people going to take?' As
a business owner, my duty is
not just to collect money from
my customers. When they
walk through my four walls
they should feel safe and it is
incumbent upon me to defend
their lives. At any given time
I have three to five staff mem-
bers, and I should have their
interest at heart as far as safe-
ty is concerned.
"I guarantee you it is
inevitable (that people will
rise up) if something is not
done about the crime in this
country. Talk to 10 people
about the shooting (at Island
Wide Produce and Meat
Mart) about whether they feel
any remorse or sympathy for
the robber who was killed. I
bet you 10 out of 10 people
would support the store own-
er in his actions. That shows
you the mood of the people,"
said Mr Willie, who served as
a police officer for 10 years
before his venture into entre-
preneurship.
While armed robbery is not
as frequent for some propri-
etors as petty theft or break-
ins, it is a constant security
threat. In the past 10 years,
Willie said he has experienced
one armed robbery and about
four break-ins. He said rob-
bery was a crime of opportu-
nity, and owners are respon-
sible for minimising opportu-
nities as best they can. He also
believes people should be
armed even in their homes.
Mr Ferguson agreed that
proprietors have to be ready
at all times, because it is
impossible to predict when
criminals will act. About three
years ago, Fergie's was
robbed by an armed assailant.
That incident ended in a
shooting, although not fatal.
The assailant was captured
and convicted several months
ago.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


I.ox
*" i " �"







+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 3


Bishop Hall: Illegal immigrants



'becoming factor' in crime issue


By AVA TURNQUEST


CONCERNED about rising
crime and what he feels may be
one of its major sources, for-
mer National Crime Advisory
Panel chairman Bishop Simeon
Hall is urging the authorities to
be more forthcoming about the
"massive challenge of illegal
immigrants in our country".
"It would be wrong to blame
the Bahamas' crime problems
on foreign persons," said Bish-
op Hall in a statement issued
yesterday, "but it is clear and
blatantly obvious that the : .
involvement of these persons in
crime is fast becoming a major factor."
The former Christian Council president
and long-time social activist noted that
the most recent National Crime Advisory


Panel was unable to address
the involvement of foreign
nationals in crime due to a lack
of relevant statistical data.
However, if the numbers
were ever compiled and pub-
lished, Bishop Hall said he is
sure they would reflect that for-
eigners are responsible for a
significant percentage of the
crimes being committed today.
Of particular concern,
according to Bishop Hall, is the
case of those born in the
Bahamas of Haitian parentage,
who due to the laws of these
two countries, are effectively
"stateless".
The Bahamas does not automatically
confer nationality to those born within
its borders, relying instead on the nation-
ality of the father, while Haiti does not


automatically recognize those born out-
side its borders as Haitian.
Haitian-Bahamians born here do have
the right to apply for citizenship, but the
process is often slow and some have had
no response from the government for
years.
Bishop Hall said such persons are not
legally - and therefore not socially or psy-
chologically - attached to any community.
"A stateless person is the most diffi-
cult person to be socialised and amalga-
mated into the fabric of the Bahamas," he
said.
According to the bishop, those who are
not accepted by any nationality are essen-
tially "trapped" and without legal pro-
tection of any kind.
"I believe it is our moral duty to regu-
larise any person who has a legitimate
claim to status, and those without should
be sent back home."


Senator: crime could threaten financial sector


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
THE crime crisis gripping
the country could damage the
Bahamas' reputation overseas
and threaten the financial ser-
vices sector, Senator Allyson
Maynard-Gibson said.
In light of the record-break-
ing 80 homicides for the year
so far, and the recent armed
robbery of 18 cruise ship pas-
sengers who were on an
onshore tour, Mrs Maynard-
Gibson stressed that prospec-
tive investors may soon
become weary of the
Bahamas.
In an effort to help stem ris-
ing crime, Ms Maynard-Gib-
son proposed that anyone who
shoots or threatens an officer
of the law or is accused of
committing murder while on
bail for another offence,
should be tried before the
courts immediately.
She also stressed that the
introduction of electronic
monitoring for persons on bail
charged with violent crimes
needs to be fast-tracked and
accused the government of
dragging its feet.


She added that a website
listing all persons released on
bail should be created so the
public can be aware of possi-
ble "menaces" to society.
"The most significant deter-
rent to those evaluating the
Bahamas will be crime," the
former attorney general said
while contributing to the
debate on a pair of arbitration
bills which were later passed
in the Upper Chamber yes-
terday (see page 8).
"We are headed to almost
100 murders for the year, that


is almost two murders per
week. People are being
attacked in their cars, in their
homes, their cars are being
attacked while they are on the
streets and while they are at
stop signs.
"Property owners, as we
would have seen in the papers
recently, have resorted to vig-
ilante justice and people com-
ing on cruise ships are being
warned by cruise directors not
to stray far from the port
when they come to Nassau.
"By any yardstick we are in
crisis. This is a national prob-
lem, a problem that does not
have a political complexion.
We all need to participate in
the process and demonstrate
enough is enough."
She continued: "The entire
judicial process is conducted in
public - the charge is in public,
the granting of bail is in public
and it should be easy for citi-
zens to access a website to find
out who is on bail. We know
that victims of rape for exam-
ple, when they are at the food-
store they are encountering
the person who raped them.
We know that policemen are
being approached ... by the
people they arrested. This is


shocking situation that we are
in and it's a situation that does
not promote an international
arbitration centre."


A 32-YEAR-OLD Eleuthera man charged
with the murder of a 22-year-old man who
died last week after being stabbed in the neck
was arraigned in Magistrate's court yester-
day.
Simon Mark Mackey of Water Ford,
Eleuthera, appeared before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court 1, Bank Lane, charged
with the murder of Noel Pratt.
Pratt was reportedly stabbed in the neck
with a sharp object at around 8am last Friday
during a violent altercation with another man
at the exclusive Cape Eleuthera Resort and
Marina.


The victim was rushed to the Rock Sound
clinic where he died of his injuries.
Pratt was the country's 79th homicide victim
for the year.
Mackey, who was not represented by a
lawyer, was not required to enter a plea to
the charge. He was remanded to Her
Majesty's Prison.
A preliminary inquiry will be held to deter-
mine whether there is sufficient evidence
against him to have him stand trial in the
Supreme Court.
The inquiry is set to commence on January
28, 2010 in Eleuthera.


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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


EDITO RIA U LETTER S TO THE EDITOR6I


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama


WEBSITE


www. tribune242. corn


updated daily at 2pm


A year on, Iran, North Korea threats worsen


VIENNA - Another year has passed in
the world's standoff with Iran and North
Korea over nuclear weapons, and the situation
has only got worse.
Both countries have pressed ahead with
their programmes, while the U.N. has stuck to
sanctions that seem to have little if any effect,
and a slew of other countries are now seen as
candidates for the nuclear club.
"The world is worse off than a year ago,"
says Gao Shangtao, a professor of interna-
tional relations at China Foreign Affairs Uni-
versity in Beijing, when asked about Iran and
North Korea's defiance.
"They will not give up."
Tensions were already high a year ago.
Back then, as the Obama administration was
preparing to take office, it heard a chilling
assessment from William Perry, President Bill
Clinton's defence secretary when the North
Korea crisis first blew up in the early 1990s.
"If North Korea and Iran cannot be con-
tained, we face the real danger of a cascade of
proliferation of nuclear-armed states," he told
a conference on the challenges facing the
incoming White House team. "Indeed, I
believe that today we are clearly at the tipping
point of nuclear proliferation."
Under Barack Obama, Washington has
sought to talk directly with both Tehran and
Pyongyang - tactics shunned by the Bush
administration. The U.N. Security Council
has approved a second package of sanctions in
response to the North's nuclear defiance and
could agree on a fourth set for Iran within
months. But both countries seem impervi-
ous. A year ago, North Korea's negotiations
with the U.S., Russia, China, South Korea
and Japan were stalled - but the North had
at least mothballed its nuclear weapons pro-
gramme and was still discussing dismantling it.
Since then, it has expelled International
Atomic Energy Agency inspectors, restarted
its atomic facilities, test-fired ballistic mis-
siles, quit the six-party talks and conducted its
second nuclear test.
U.S. envoy Stephen Bosworth was in North
Korea this week, trying to salvage the talks.
He reported no commitments, just "a com-
mon understanding" that talks should resume.
Iran, meanwhile, has moved closer to being
able to develop nuclear weapons, even while
insisting that its atomic programme is meant
solely to generate energy.
Its thousands of centrifuges have produced
enough enriched uranium to produce two
nuclear weapons, compared with one a year
ago - even though Tehran maintains the
stockpile will only be used for nuclear fuel
and not for weapons-grade material.
Iran only belatedly revealed that it is build-
ing a second enrichment site and stonewalled
an IAEA probe of allegations that it had
experimented with making nuclear weapons.
Tehran has threatened to expand its
enrichment programme tenfold, even while


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rejecting an IAEA-brokered plan to supply
fuel for its research reactor if Iran exports
most of its enriched stockpile.
On Saturday, Iran's foreign minister said
his country was ready for a swap of enriched
uranium for nuclear fuel - the key demand
of a U.N.-sponsored initiative to defuse glob-
al fears over its nuclear programme.
In what is almost certain to be a deal
breaker, however, Manouchehr Mottaki
spoke of exchanging the material in phases
rather than all at once as is called for in the
U.N. plan. Such a staggered swap would
leave Iran in control of enough uranium to
make a bomb. The U.S. administration has
signaled willingness to hold off on further
sanctions and wait out the year for Iran to
signal readiness to negotiate. Russia has indi-
cated it may support extra sanctions, despite
its strategic and economic interests in Iran.
China, which previously opposed new sanc-
tions, usually follows the Kremlin's lead on
Iran. In June, after the second North Kore-
an nuclear test, the U.N. strengthened its
arms embargo and authorised searches of
North Korean ships on the high seas. But
Pyongyang shows no sign of buckling.
The Obama administration has not moved
away from the Bush administration's posi-
tion that every option remains on the table to
prevent Iran from going nuclear. But such
threats come primarily from Israel, which has
the Mideast's most formidable military arse-
nal, including submarines capable of carry-
ing nuclear-tipped missiles.
The fear of a nuclear-armed Iran and
North Korea propelling regional arms races is
also growing. Japan's advanced civilian
nuclear programme can easily be retooled to
produce weapons, should it lose faith in the
U.S. nuclear umbrella. South Korea could
follow suit.
"Already, North Korea's nuclear advances
have triggered reflections in Seoul, Tokyo,
and other regional capitals about options that
were previously considered taboo," writes
nonproliferation expert Graham Alison, direc-
tor of the Belfer Centre for Science and Inter-
national Affairs at Harvard University.
"Japan has a ready stockpile of nearly
2,000 kilograms (over 4,000 pounds) of high-
ly enriched uranium and a well-developed
missile programme.... It could adopt a serious
nuclear weapons posture virtually overnight,"
he writes in the January-February issue of
Foreign Affairs. Iran's neighbours to the
west also are unlikely to tolerate the Islamic
republic going nuclear.
"Saudi Arabia, for example, has insisted
that it will not accept a future in which Iran ...
has nuclear weapons and it does not," writes
Alison. "Egypt and Turkey could also follow
in Iran's nuclear footsteps."
(This article was written by George Jahn,
Associated Press Writer).


An open letter to



the Prime Minister



Hubert Ingraham


EDITOR, The Tribune.

I respectfully request you
to print the following open
letter to The Prime Minister
of The Bahamas.
Dear Mr. Prime Minister:
It seems more and more
apparent as each day goes by
and crime escalates, our
tourism market affected dra-
matically, Bahamians black
and white, PLP and FNM are
terrified to venture out, the
international community are
in a writing frenzy about our
crime, international property
owners here are buzzing with
disappointment, and you, our
Prime Minister, appear to be
sitting, watching and speech-
less; quietness is deafening us
and I feel, and I think your
party supporters feel helpless,
lost disgusted, fed-up, had
enough.
Tommy T has got to go,
sick and tired of his mouth
talk, no action. Whatever
agreement you and the hier-
archy made, whatever you
promised, whatever is hold-
ing you back, you better let
it go and deliver us from the
crime stricken era. Because
your party members, your
supporters have had enough.
I am afraid you are going


to wait for the public at large
to start taking matters into
their own hands. Private,
small businesses have had it,
the economy was bad enough,
but watching our Prime Min-
ister do absolutely nothing is
pitiful, disheartening, dis-
couraging.
I do not mean to be disre-
spectful, Mr. Prime Minister,
but Bahamians have had
enough. Crime is everybody's
problem and everybody needs
to help fix it but the govern-
ment needs to fix the Judicial,
the Judiciary system, the
Attorney General's office,
Police. The prison, corporal
punishment needs to be
addressed now not later.
If you cannot handle it, sir,
you need to step aside. I am a
long time FNM and I have
had it with crime and the dis-
cussion surrounding Tommy
T.
IF Big Bad Brad was smart
he would ride this crime thing
right straight through. Crime
has everybody ticked off. Big
Bad Brad, I am FNM, a white


Bahamian, start a campaign
to get a serious "non-politi-
cal" parade to march to the
Prime Minister's house to ask
for action. You start it and I
will be the first person to call
and say "I will be there."
To "My Prime Minister"
we as Bahamians have had
enough, had enough of Tom-
my T. If you can't handle him,
we will fix it for you next elec-
tion. Tired of talk, Police do a
good job, lousy leadership, I
think police need a tempo-
rary fix with an extra 1,000
officers from perhaps USA.
By the way, you are hard
pressed to find a policeman, I
wouldn't speak of a police car,
not to mention a bike cop.
Where are they? Seriously,
you drive around tourist
spots, Fort Charlotte, Fort
Fincastle, Perpall Tract, Bay
Street, don't even try 6 a.m. in
the mornings when some
tourists are jogging Paradise
Bridge, downtown, West Bay
Street. It would be nice to see
a cop every two or three
miles.


A FED-UP
GOVERNMENT
SUPPORTER,
Nassau,
December 8, 2009.


EDITOR, The Tribune.

Possibly being it is the Season, Madam Edi-
tor is celebrating early, but your Editorial on
the re-paving of Shirley Street, as if it was a
new wonder of the world draws a lot of laugh-
ter.
I have driven up Shirley Street since the
"magical surface" was laid and I suggest in
any reasonable jurisdiction where there would
be a Quality Control Engineer, the finished
surface would not pass and time will tell
whether the scouring/milling of the old sur-
face will have cracked the water mains and
very soon we will see water leaks.
I have not seen whether, like the repaving of
West Bay to Lynden Pindling Airport, we now
have a special feature of ponding to the side of
the road and absolutely nothing has been done


to remediate this which in some cases ponds
over half of the road and is exceptionally dan-
gerous driving at night.
Was the resurfacing of Shirley Street such an
important national event to merit a full Edi-
torial?
Not unless you really have lost the perspec-
tive of logical thinking and all norms.
If you have not driven up Shirley Street and
experienced the bumps and dishevel then I
invite you...Ministry of Public Works should
require remediation before paying them and
only then possibly the paving deserves the
Editorial you wrote.

J. MOORE,
Nassau,
December 8, 2009.


Christmas - an extraordinary and transcendental season


EDITOR, The Tribune.
A short time ago we began
the Advent season that leads
to Christmas. Christmas is a
season of universal festivity.
Even non-believers perceive
something extraordinary and
transcendental about the
Christmas season.
However, under the drive of
a hedonist consumerism,
Christmas runs the risk of los-
ing its spiritual meaning,
reduced to a mere commercial


NOTICE is hereby given that LUCKSON PAUL of BURIAL GROUND
CORNER, P.O. BOX N-7070, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 8th day of December, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


HAPPY BIRTHDAY


B-RAD


occasion to buy and exchange
gifts. The world's current eco-
nomic difficulties might serve
as a stimulus for rediscovering
the warmth of the simplicity,
friendship, and solidarity that
are the typical values of Christ-
mas.
As we turn our eyes toward
the infant Jesus in the manger,
all peoples should be grateful
for that gift of love and be
ready to welcome it every-
where, and that welcome
should take the form of caring
for those in need. Indeed, the
almighty God reveals Himself
to us as a poor infant in order
to conquer our pride. In the
Baby Jesus we see the defense-
lessness of God's love: God
comes to us unarmed, because
he does not intend to conquer
externally, but rather to win us
over and transform us internal-
ly - to lead us to our true


selves. The cave stall, where the
Baby lay, was not inhabited by
refined persons.
Are we very far from that
stall precisely because we are
too refined and intelligent?
Don't we perhaps live too much
closed in on ourselves, in our
self-sufficiency, our fear of per-
secution, such that we are no
longer able to perceive in the
night the voices of angels so
that we may join them in ador-
ing Him?
When we place the figurines
in our Christmas creche, we
should pray to God to grant to
our hearts that simplicity that
recognizes the Lord in the
Baby.
PAUL KOKOSKI
Hamilton,
Ontario, Canada,
December 11, 2009


+u


Was the repaving of Shirley Street


really a new wonder of the world?


A great gift


for everyone!

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THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 5


LOS AL NEWS I


'Miracle water' story gets



the big screen treatment


Tentative date is
set for funeral of
local lawyer's son
THE funeral of Adel Lock-
hart, 21, who died on Friday
after he apparently fell from a
balcony in Florida, has tenta-
tively been set for next Sunday,
December 20.
The family of Adel, son of
local lawyer Elliot Lockhart,
issued a statement yesterday
advising of the funeral date and
noting that the matter is still
under investigation.
"By the account of the Lock-
hart and Heastie family's rep-
resentatives and investigators,
Adel's death was caused by
trauma, resulting from a fall,
the means of which has yet to
be established or otherwise
determined and remains under
investigation by law enforce-
ment authorities," the state-
ment read.
It did not say where the
funeral would take place, but
did note that interment would
follow at Woodlawn Gardens.
Adel was studying as a sec-
ond year student at Barry Uni-
versity in Miami, Florida, after
having studied two years at the
College of the Bahamas.
He is survived by his par-
ents, four sisters and a brother.
The statement said Adel's fam-
ily and representatives will
make further information avail-
able regarding his death as they
uncover it.
Meanwhile Barry University
issued a statement yesterday
stating that contrary to initial
reports, the balcony which
Adel appears to have fallen
from was not on campus prop-
erty.
"Our student, Adel Lock-
hart, lost his life at an off-cam-
pus apartment complex in
Aventura, Florida," a
spokesperson said.
He went on to note that the
Barry University community
"indeed, is feeling his loss."


FOUR years ago a popular
pastor ignited a firestorm of
controversy when he began
peddling "miracle water"
that his supporters claimed
could cure terminal illness-
es, heal the blind and reverse
paralysis.
The story grabbed nation-
al headlines, stirred a local
religious debate back in 2005
and forced many to question
whether Bishop Lawrence
Rolle was simply "doing the
Lord's work" or misleading
impressionable parishioners.
The issue is the subject of
a new documentary, The
Bishop, The Scientist & The
Miracle Water, being
screened tonight at the
Bahamas International Film
Festival.
Expatriate filmmakers
David Lee and Simon Frank
- who were both holding
down teaching jobs at a local
high school at the time -
spent three sweaty weeks
during the summer of 2005
with the bishop, attempting
to understand what drew the
hordes of miracle seekers
who poured into "the singing
prophet's" church.

Blessed
They filmed Bishop Rolle
as he blessed the water -
which was sold in 12 fl oz
and five gallon bottles for $1
and $5 respectively - and
later took the liquid to inde-
pendent scientist Alfred
Thompson, who tested the
water's properties.
The film itself questions
the substance of miracles
along with the powers of
faith and unwavering belief.
"There's so much talk of
miracles that the word
becomes commonplace -
what is a miracle? Can it be
proven? Is it enough to
believe in it for it to be real?


=W- , .4
A SCENE FROM The Bishop, The Scientist & The Miracle Water
which is showing at the Bahamas International Film Festival.


(I think) that the word is rel-
ative and probably used too
lightly but we all, even sci-
entists cannot help but want
to believe. We are all human
after all," director David Lee
told The Tribune when asked
about the motivation for the
film.
The two UK natives said
they approached the subject
without prejudice and
allowed Bishop Rolle, his
followers and the scientist to
weave their own stories
about the unbelievable tale.
They said they were wel-
comed with open arms into
the Voice of Deliverance
church as they quietly
observed the frenzy; after
news broke of Mr Rolle's
blessed water hundreds of
persons reportedly swarmed
Bishop Rolle's services
where they shelled out cash
for the "holy" water.
"The movie is as much
about the journey as it is
about the result, so we went
with no preconceived ideas,"
said Mr Frank, adding that


the documentary is a gritty
look at a part of paradise left
unseen in tourist ads.
Whether or not Bishop
Rolle's "miracle water" had
any healing properties -
real or imagined - is left up
to the audience to decide.
"We came away believing
in his ability to make people
believe," said Mr Lee.
Bishop Rolle has previ-
ously said that he made no
profit from the water sales,
adding that the $50,000 gen-
erated in sales was all donat-
ed to the poor.
The Bishop, The Scientist
& The Miracle Water plays
tonight at 7 pm at Galleria
Cinemas JFK.
* SEE PAGE SEVEN


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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS I


case would turn off "powerful
financial backers" of the FNM.
Another Grand Bahama attor-
ney, Kwasi Thompson, was offi-
cially nominated for the Pine
Ridge seat, which he went on to
win for the party.
Mr Smith represented the Save
Guana Cay Reef Association in a
four-year-long legal battle waged
against the $500 million Baker's
Bay development - a bid that


Legal Notice
NOTICE
ASYMMETRIC LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

TEMPRANILLO

HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

TOOLLAVAN
INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


was recently rejected by the Privy
Council.
The Association, which includ-
ed Bahamians and non-Bahamian
residents of Abaco, are against
the development on the grounds
that locals were not adequately
consulted before central govern-
ment gave approval to the devel-
opers of the project, which they
considered unsustainable and a
threat to the local environment.


The affidavit was filed in con-
nection with the argument over
who should pay the legal costs in
the unsuccessful appeal to the
Privy Council launched by Mr
Smith on behalf of the SGCRA
seeking to have the initial ruling
that gave the development the go-
ahead in the face of the SGCRA's
concerns overturned.
In the affidavit he stated: "My
political aspirations and the wish-
es of the voters in the Pine Ridge
Constituency Association were
dashed as a result of this case."


Legal Notice
NOTICE
HUDDERSFIELD
INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

RIESLING HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

COLLEY PLANES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


FROM page one 'Drop lawsuit or forget politics'


resenting litigants against the Bak-
er's Bay resort development in
Guana Cay, Abaco or convinced
them to drop their case.
The attorney alleges that finan-
cial concerns trumped democracy
in the selection of who would run
under the FNM banner in the
Grand Bahama constituency in
2007, with the committee express-
ing concern that his continued
representation in the Guana Cay


Teen found dead in cell
FROM page one
day; she had been picked up by police over a domestic dispute. She
testified that after being processed at the East Street South Police
Station, she was placed in the second of two holding cells.
She told the court she saw a young boy who she believed was
between 15 and 17 years old inside the first cell. According to Ms
Chisholm, a mother of two, the boy appeared to be in good spirits
at the time and was singing to himself.
The witness recalled that at some point that afternoon, police
came and took him out of the cell. She said that 30 minutes later,
the boy returned to his cell crying and screaming very loud.
Ms Chisholm further stated that the boy called out to her and
asked her to give his mother a message. She said he told her he was
going to hang himself and that his name was Michael. Struggling to
keep her composure at this point, Chisholm was asked to take a
seat in the witness box as Mr Knowles' mother Donna Knowles
looked on tearfully.
"I heard a struggle in the cell. I called out to Michael saying
'Michael! Michael!' I heard loud breathing and gasping," Ms
Chisholm said.
She further testified that after getting no response from Michael,
she banged the bars of her cell and nearby door in an effort to get
the attention of police at the station. She told the court that some
25 minutes later, Corporal Leon Strachan who was the station
orderly at the time, visited the cell block. She told the court that
Cpll Strachan alerted another officer of the incident and she was
subsequently taken out of her cell.
She said she left the police station after EMS personnel arrived.
During questioning by attorney Keod Smith who represents
Knowles' family, Chisholm described Michael's screams as pas-
sionate and recalled the boy saying he could not take it anymore.
Detective Constable Jamal Hamilton, a crime scene technician,
also took the witness stand yesterday. He told the court that
around 9.45pm on May 31, he and woman detective Corporal
Devia Johnson visited the East Street South Police Station where
they were directed to the station's cell block which was north of the
charge room.
Constable Hamilton said he observed a young male clad in a
black T-shirt, red and blue trousers, suspended from a blue cord
which was tied to a horizontal bar in the first cell. Constable
Hamilton said that he photographed the scene while Corporal
Johnson collected the evidence. Constable Hamilton further tes-
tified that the photos he took were compiled into photo albums
which were submitted into evidence. The jury was also shown the
photos of the scene.
Detective Corporal Devia Johnson told the court that the hor-
izontal bar which the string found around Michael's neck was sus-
pended from, was approximately seven and a half feet from the
floor. Michael was reportedly five feet five inches tall. Corporal
Johnson told the court that she collected a pair of slippers, two
white T-shirts and two brown blankets from the cell.
Attorney Smith questioned why she had not collected the clothes
that Michael was wearing at the time he was found dead. Corpo-
ral Johnson said that another crime scene officer collected those
items at the morgue. Mr Smith requested that two bottles which
were in the cell, as well as their contents be examined. Corporal
Johnson said that she was told that the two bottles had belonged
to someone else. Coroner Campbell ordered that the items be
examined.
The inquest into his death continues before Coroner William
Campbell and a seven-member jury yesterday.


&eve


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IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


"I was elected by the members
of the (Pine Ridge Constituency)
Association, prior to the last gen-
eral election in 2007, to be the
FNM candidate for the Pine
Ridge Constituency."
"The next stage was for the
FNM party candidates' committee
to nominate me as the FNM par-
ty candidate for the election.
"Despite overwhelming local
support I was told at one of the
meetings with the committee
members that unless I dropped
the Guana Cay case, or unless I
persuaded my clients to drop the
case, I would not be chosen by
the committee as the candidate
for the next general election."
Mr Smith said that among the
reasons give were that the candi-
dates committee believed his
"association with the case would
deter powerful financial backers
(who were involved in real estate,
construction, etc) which the FNM
party needed support from
because this case was considered
anti-business and development."
Meanwhile, a further concern
noted was that "the country need-
ed foreign investment and the
case was seen as being against for-
eign investment," although Mr
Smith goes on to add that his
clients "were all fully for foreign
investment, but at a steady, pro-
portionate and non environmen-
tally destructive pace in Guana
Cay."
"Another issue which they con-
sidered militated against choos-


KWASI THOMPSON, was officially
nominated for the Pine Ridge seat,
which he went on to win for the party.
ing me was that I would be
labelled as 'Haitian'," added the
attorney, whose family --father a
Bahamian and mother of
Lebanese descent - spent many
years in Haiti. The father, from
an old Bahamian family, estab-
lished a business in Haiti and
lived there for many years before
returning home to his Bahamian
roots.
Mr Smith said it was suggested
by the committee that if he with-
drew as the Association's elected
potential candidate and settled
the Guana Cay case to make
room for another person to be
chosen instead, he could "consid-
er an offer to be appointed" as
an FNM senator.
"I declined to abandon my
clients. Consequently I was not
selected to be the FNM party's
'Torch Bearer' in the elections,"
said Mr Smith.


N

aim


SI


AIP






7Th


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 7


* CALNEWS


Govt plans


centre for


film, music


and the arts


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
FILM, music and the arts
will be supported and
encouraged at a new cultur-
al resource centre envi-
sioned for an abandoned
building in western New
Providence, Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Charles Maynard said yes-
terday.
The Morrow Castle in
Deans Lane, off West Bay
Street, is being examined by
architects from the Antiqui-
ties, Monuments & Muse-
ums department with the
hope it can be restored and
transformed into a cultural
centre for the community.
And the newly appointed
minister expects to learn
within a matter of weeks
whether the derelict build-
ing, near Fort Charlotte, will
be fit to support the govern-
ment's vision for a film and
music centre providing
research material and equip-
ment to develop the arts.
He hopes the new cultural
arts centre will be estab-
lished at the historic building
and opened by the end of
the FNM government's term
in 2012.
His announcement came
one day after esteemed
actor and patron of the
Bahamas International Film
Festival (BIFF) Sir Sean
Connery called on the gov-
ernment and the private sec-
tor to do more to support
the festival and cultural
industries throughout the
year.
Sir Sean, a resident of
Lyford Cay, said: "I think


what it needs is the govern-
ment and the business side
to take a building that's
pretty run down, aban-
doned, in Shirley Street or
somewhere, and get these
guys and girls who are in
town and make it their
place, build it up, clean it
up, and make it a meeting
place.
"It wouldn't need to be
anything super-elite, but it
would be theirs and you
could build from there."

Archive
Sir Sean suggested build-
ing up an archive of
Bahamian film and provid-
ing equipment to help young
people develop filmmaking
and acting skills before pre-
senting the BIFF Career
Achievement Award to
actor Johnny Depp at the
Balmoral on Sunday night.
And it seems Mr Maynard
somewhat shares his vision.
He said: "We want to do a
cultural resource centre with
files of Bahamian music and
film, the whole nine yards; a
station where if you are
doing a project you will be
able to research what you
need to, and go to be cre-
ative and to learn."
However, a resource cen-
tre exclusively for BIFF
would have to be spear-
headed by the organisation
before government chooses
to lend support, Mr May-
nard said.
He added: "If they identi-
fy a building we would try
to assist them any way we
can. It's an excellent event
and they have shown that
consistently over the years."


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Eckland Anderson Dean, 61
' -.-..- of Roses, Long Island,
The Bahamas will be
held at St. Michael
SAnglican Church,
Roses, Long Island, on
Thursday December
17th , 2009 at 10:00
a.m. Officiating will be
Rev'd Fr. Ernest Pratt
& Rev'd Paulette
Cartwright and
interment will follow in
the Church Cemetery,
Roses, Long Island.

He is survived by, four brothers, Roger (Vivian),
Leslie, Colin, Edward Dean; five Sisters, Jacqueline
Burrows, Joyce Riviere, Valderene Major, Eurydice
Dean-Wallace and Sandy Dean-Kincaid; nieces &
nephews, Kenyetta, Morelle and Leslie Dean, Varian,
Melonie and Ricardo Dean, Brian, Eureka and Baruch
Burrows, Tarah Curry, Italia Robinson and Krista
Major, Lavardo Dean, Kenneth Wallace, Eurydice
Rolle, Vernard, Greer and Dionne Coleby, Chet
Kincaid, Starniecia, CoShanna, Coshanker, Alyssa
and Colinia Dean; brothers-in-laws, Euric Burrows,
George Riviere, Holland (Hollie) Major & Robert
Kincaid; sisters-in-laws, Julie Dean, Antoniette Dean
and Theola Dean; five uncles, Lincoln Major, Joshua,
Harry, Roy and Freeman Dean; nine aunts, Lorinda
Smith, Jessie Darville, Helen, Monicha, Vivian and
Clara Dean, Frankie (Tampa, Fl.), Feleice Major
(Orlando, Fl.); numerous cousins including, Elkanah
& Elgin Major, Rev. Paulette Cartwright, Ceolah
Turnquest, Juliana Bullard, Carmelita Treco, Toinette
Major, Kevin, Ashwood, Lester, Kennon Darville,
Gail & Wanda Darville, Wendy Smith, Junior Darville,
Quincy Fisher, Kay Darville, DebbieAnn Darville,
Candice Williams, Nicholas & Narissa Dean, Dorothy
Smith & Hazel Dean; other family and friends
including, George Heastie, the community of Roses,
Long Island, friends and colleagues throughout New
Providence, members and parishiners of St Matthews
Church, Nassau Bahamas,Archdeacon James Palacious
and Rev. Angela Palacious, The Deans, Majors,
Darvilles, Pratt, Cartwright and Carroll families.

Viewing will held at the church from 5:00p.m
Wednesday until service time on Thursday.

Arrangements by Mt. Olive Funeral Chapel, Long
Island.


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Water Sports Manager
Dive Instructors (Exunma/Nssau)
Certified Lifegnards (ExumafNassau)
Reeaiving Supervisor
Entertainment Coardilators
FM4d & Beverage Management
Front Offic Manager
Environmental Coordinator

Applicant must have at least five years experience
in the I hospitality industry in the above mentioned
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Ct~oing date December 18. 2009.







+>


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


AG: new legislation will mordernise I ]


system
By TANEKA THOMPSON attra
Tribune Staff Reporter "('
tthompson@tribunemedia.net a ro


THE Senate passed a pair of
arbitration Bills yesterday
which government hopes will
pave the way for the country
to become an international
arbitration centre.
Newly appointed Attorney
General John Delaney, who led
the debate on the two Bills yes-
terday, said the legislation will
modernise the system currently
in place for the settling of civil
disputes.
The new laws, which were
passed in the Upper Chamber
yesterday, will also put the
country in a better position to


ct
T
bi


modern
in the
told th
Arb
impar
resolve
contra
or par
as an a
it gen
and ex
The
other
fundai
tratiol
tution
arbitra
of cou


dealing with
t international business. Mr Delaney explained that
his legislation) provides the legislation allows for arbi-
ust, comprehensive and tration matters to remain strict-
rn regime for arbitration ly confidential - in contrast with
Bahamas," Mr Delaney matters which are heard before
ie Senate. the courts. He said is an attrac-
Ditration is the use of an tive feature for international
tial third party to fairly businesses considering places
e disputes arising out of to invest.
acts between individuals The attorney general assured
ties. It is often preferred the Senate that feedback from
alternative to the courts as the relevant stakeholders was
rally involves less delay considered during the crafting
expense. of the legislation, adding that
Bills deal with, among additional suggestions may be
things, establishing the taken into account before the
mental of a proper arbi- laws are brought into force.
n agreement; the consti- Senator Anthony Musgrove,
and jurisdiction of an who seconded the legislation,
al tribunal and the extent said the Bills come at a time
rt intervention, when the Bahamas' economy


civil
is pegged to become
integrated with the g
munity.
He said the pass
two Bills will so]
Bahamas' position i
global trade and cor
During her contr
the debate, Opposi
tor Allyson Mayna
said although the a
Bills have a few "dc
legislation is a step i
direction.
She questioned if
lation has all the
components and ash
compares to similar 1
er jurisdictions.
Mrs Maynard-Gib
that establishing ai


disputes
even more tional arbitration centre in the
global com- Bahamas would create a large
number of sustainable jobs for
ing of the secretaries, court reporters,
lidify the translators and lawyers, along
n terms of with indirect jobs in the tourism
nmerce. and hotel sector.
ribution to The Senate also passed the
tion Sena- United Stated of America and
rd-Gibson the Bahamas Pre-clearance
arbitration Agreement Act. The law allows
defects" the persons travelling from the
n the right Bahamas on private planes to
undergo US pre-clearance in
the legis- the Bahamas.
necessary Five resolutions relating to
ked how it the transfer of land to a number
aws in oth- of Bahamian families and to
the National Insurance Board
Dson added were also passed in yesterday's
n interna- session.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

YAZOO INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

CARTHUSIAN HOLDINGS

INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

BILSCOOMB

INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

SALMO INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

PYXIS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

RALLFONSTON LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

SILVESTRO

TWENTY-EIGHT

INVESTMENT LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

NEW CENTURY GROUP

LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

GUNA VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

MASSIVE OCEAN INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

KINSELLA INVESTMENTS

PTE. LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

XERFELLTON HOLDINGS

LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O






7Th


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 9


*OCALNW


Native show targets


locals and tourists


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
A NATIVE show explor-
ing the history of Bahami-
an music and culture will be
launched at Da Tambrin
Tree to attract tourists and
locals alike.
Cruise ship passengers on
all boats docking at Prince
George Wharf will be invit-
ed to see the show on three
days and evenings a week
from January.

Innovative
Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Charles May-
nard praised the new native
show in Harrold Road as an
innovative initiative
strengthening both the cul-
ture and tourism industries,
and he encouraged others
to follow.
The show will provide
jobs for 25 singers, dancers
and musicians, during a time
when there are limited
employment opportunities


in the arts.
A $6,000 grant has been
provided by the Ministry of
Culture to cover pre-pro-
duction costs and the Min-
istry of Tourism has shown
its support for the show by
promoting it to visiting
cruise ships.
Mr Maynard said: "We
hope this will be able to sus-
tain itself and others in the
community can follow so we
can have a number of these
types of initiatives in our
country."
Da Tambrin Tree owners
Fred Ferguson and Ronald
Simms said they wanted to
provide classic Bahamian
entertainment to tourists
and open their eyes to
Bahamian culture.
Choreographer Lekeisha
Bostwick, who has experi-
ence working with the
National Dance School and
National Youth Choir, said
the show will take specta-
tors on a journey through
Bahamian music from the
early 1950s to the popular
music of today.
And the show, directed by


Philip Burrows, producer
and director of Shakespeare
in Paradise, will also include
limbo and fire dances.
Newly appointed director
of tourism Linda Moxey-
Brown said: "This is a
Bahamian thing and that
means all of us must be in
this together.
"Culture is our backbone,
without it we are nothing,
and we want to show the
world that we have some-
thing great to offer."

Support
Assistant director of Cul-
ture Eddie Dames encour-
aged those in the hotel sec-
tor to also support it by
encouraging their guests to
visit and called on business-
es and financial institutions
to support the arts.
Mr Dames added: "It's no
wonder the Bahamas is lack-
ing in these kind of activi-
ties because we lack the sup-
port from various sectors in
the country and in the econ-
omy."


IT Helpdesk Support Specialist

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We are seeking a talented, computer savvy individual to aid
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Minimum Requirements:
* Recent college graduate with IT skills or individual with
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* Experience in PC Repair at home, school,. business or civic
organization is desirable
* A fast learner with good interpersonal skills looking at
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Interested persons should email an updated copy of their resume
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+


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS I


FROM page one Customs officers abandon posts in protest FROM page one


wake of its decision to repeal
overtime opportunities for the
officers and implement a shift
system.
According to Bahamas Pub-
lic Service Union President
John Pinder, only three cus-
toms officers showed up to
work on Sunday night, while
the rest "called in sick." Mean-
while, Monday saw a "skele-
ton crew" of only around forty
per cent of the officers at their
posts.
Their action came after the
Government made a salary
increase offer to them on Sat-
urday with which they were
displeased, feeling it did not
adequately compensate them
for the money they will lose
when the overtime system is
replaced.
Customs and Immigration
officers have traditionally been
able to make thousands of dol-


lars in overtime to supplement
their base salaries, however
early next year the Govern-
ment is to introduce a shift sys-
tem that would eliminate the
need for overtime and there-
fore much of the money they
have until now been able to
collect. BPSU Vice President
for the northern region John
Curtis recently said this can
amount to as much as double
their base salary, bringing their
yearly take to somewhere in
the region of $40,000 to
$50,000 a year.
The shift system the gov-
ernment will implement, which
comes in on January 1, 2010 is
intended to reduce costs for
the government as well as for
airlines and cruise ships com-
ing to The Bahamas that at
present find the price of land-
ing in The Bahamas increased
by the fact that they have to


Legal Notice
NOTICE

EVERLEY HILL

INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

KELLETT ALPS INC.





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of KELLETT ALPS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice

NOTICE

MAYWOOD VALLEY INC.





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of MAYWOOD VALLEY INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice

NOTICE

ANWAR CITY LIMITED


- 6-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ANWAR CITY LIMITED has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


contribute to the overtime pay-
ments made to customs and
immigration officers who work
when they arrive in off-peak
hours. By lowering these costs,
the government hopes it can
incentivise travel to The
Bahamas for airline and cruise
operators.
Late last night Mr Pinder
said he had just come out of a
meeting with the officers in
which he said they had agreed
to accept a revised proposal by
the Government which would
amount to them being provid-
ed with base salary increases
of somewhere between $4,000
and $6,000 each.
"They're still losing much
more than that, but we know
that's the best the country can
do at this time," said Pinder,
adding that he expects the
issue will be "revisited" next
year if the economy recovers.


and stoves.
"There will be a charge
that will be tacked on to
these items so that when they
are imported or sold the $50
or $100 that it is going to cost
to dispose of them will go
into this fund, and that at the
end of the day when it is time
to dispose of them we will
have the means to do so.
"So everybody who buys a
car will pay something into
that environmental fund
because we know that the car
will eventually be put down.
And as it is now the Govern-
ment has the responsibility
of the locating of it, and dis-
posing of it, etc," he said.
With the Bahamas being
one of the first signatories to
the Kyoto Protocol on Cli-
mate Change in 1999, Mr
Ingraham said his govern-


Legal Notice
NOTICE

TRIMPDALE LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

CRIOLLO VENTURES S.A.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

LAPIN KULTA

MANAGEMENT LTD.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LAPIN KULTA MANAGEMENT LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

ACOMA VALLEY CORP.





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ACOMA VALLEY CORP. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Emission standards


ment over three non-con-
secutive terms has pursued
a comprehensive environ-
mental strategy "in an
urgent and deliberative
effort to protect and pre-
serve our natural environ-
ment."
"That strategy includes
the creation of the Bahamas
Environment Science and
Technology Commission
(BEST) in 1994, the imple-
mentation of an Environ-
mental Impact Assessment
(EIA) process, becoming a
signatory to the Convention
on Biological Diversity, the
Ramsar Convention on Wet-
lands, and in 1999 becoming
the eighth country in the
world to sign the Kyoto Pro-
tocol to the United Nations
Framework Convention on


Climate Change.
"Over three terms in
office the FNM has more
than doubled the national
park system, bringing to
700,000 acres the amount of
marine and terrestrial areas
protected. This is approxi-
mately two acres for every
Bahamian citizen.
"During this term we are
committed to further
increasing land and marine
areas to this national patri-
mony and to working with
the Bahamas National Trust
and the Nature Conservancy
to implement the ecological
gap assessment which iden-
tifies those areas that are
critical to maintaining the
integrity of the naturally
productive ecosystems of the
Bahamas," he said.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

VIRGINICA

CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

WEST DOWNES LIMITED



-'0-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WEST DOWNES LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

CROSS-GLEN TRADING INC.





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CROSS-GLEN TRADING INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice

NOTICE

CLAVELLINA CORPORATION





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of CLAVELLINA CORPORATION has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O







+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 11


LOCALNEWS


PM outlines climate


change threat to Bahamas


FROM page one

Denmark.
While in Copenhagen he is
expected to be joined by oth-
er CARICOM and world
leaders to forge a consensus
on global warming.
Before boarding his flight,
the PM said: "I am able to
see in my hometown of
Cooper's Town, Abaco what
the effects of rising sea level
is. What it used to be when I
was a boy, what it was 10
years ago, and what it was
just a few years ago. And how
high the water comes in rela-
tion to the roadway along the
main street of that commu-
nity. And that is only an
example of what rising sea
level is doing to us and for
us."
Therefore, Mr Ingraham
said, it is very important for
the Bahamas to have a voice
at this conference in Copen-
hagen to make a case that in
the distribution of funding
that the developed world will
offer in relation to this cli-
mate challenge, the Bahamas'
per-capita income must not
be unduly taken account of.
"Our special circumstance,
and our special vulnerability
ought to put us in a position
to compete on an even keel


with others for funding to
sure up our sea defences (sea
walls, etc) and do something
about the emissions from all
of the Bunker C stations in
the Bahamas, and to put in
place appropriate rules about
building too near the coast
and a whole host of things.
"And so that will be my
focus. And take for instance
the generators - we have
bought these from the devel-
oped world and their compa-
nies made the monies. And
if we are now going to com-
mit ourselves to mitigation
and adaptation then we think
it is appropriate for them to
assist us in changing the tech-
nology for things that they
helped to put in for us," he
said.
While matters of national
security, including crime and
immigration, are at the fore-
front of the national agenda
Mr Ingraham said that his
government is vigorously
responding to the dangers
posed by global warming and
its related effects on The
Bahamas.
"Over the course of my
administrations I have been
determined to demonstrate
clear and consistent leader-
ship on one of the greatest
issues of our time - what the
Port of Spain Climate Change


Consensus calls the 'predom-
inant global challenge'.
"Because we share a single
vulnerable planet, that lead-
ership must not only be local
or here at home. It must also
be regional and global. This is
why I have joined with my
fellow CARICOM and Com-
monwealth heads of govern-
ment to help forge a consen-
sus on effective responses to
climate change, including vig-
orous mitigation strategies for
more vulnerable states such
as ours.
"And this is why I will join
leaders from throughout the
world, in Copenhagen, to
press for 'a comprehensive,
substantial and operational-
ly binding agreement - lead-
ing towards a fully legally
binding outcome no later
than 2010' to reduce carbon
emissions and other green-
house gases," he said.
Such an agreement Mr
Ingraham said would provide
for "the legitimate develop-
ment aspirations of develop-
ing countries" as the world's
leaders also negotiate the
financing and other mecha-
nisms "needed by developing
countries to engage in reduc-
ing their emissions and adapt-
ing to the impacts of climate
change."
"The Bahamas heads to


PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingra-
hlin3iri/eif' questions from
inieiiiLel o i: te niedia yesterday
,d lhie VIP Lo:uii;ie of the Lynden
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Copenhagen with an enviable
and clear environmental
record and determined envi-
ronmental leadership by your
Government and various
domestic environmental
organizations. We will state
our case from a position of
strength, both ethically and
because of our considerable
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"I take with me to Copen-
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needs and successes of the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas, I also take the
hopes and aspirations of all
Bahamians for a meaningful
agreement that will preserve
our way of life and our
nationhood. Upon my return
I will report to the nation on
the results of the meetings in
Copenhagen," he said.
Joining the Prime Minister
at the conference will be Min-
ister for the Environment
Earl Deveaux.






+^


CRUSHERS
BEAT BLUE
FLAMES


PG 13


E TiTEN1)AY DECEMBER 15, 2009

� � � i I I rs eiS.


1r:sFEMALE pro play-
ers Georgette
Rolle and Raqual
Riley sandwich
Minister of
Sports, Charles
Maynard. At right
is Yvonne Shaw.




m ....









Georgette Rolle Junior Golf



Camp tees off on Wednesday


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubb@tribunemedia.net
MORE than 70 participants
have already signed up for the
second Georgette Rolle Junior
Golf Camp that will tee off on
Wednesday morning at the
Bahamas Golf Federation's
Training Facilities at the Bail-
lou Hills Sporting complex.
Newly appointed Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Charles Maynard was on hand
to endorse the camp that will
run through Friday between
the hours of 9 a.m. and 1 p.m.


for participants between the
ages of 6 and 18 years.
Rolle, one of two Bahamian
players currently playing on the
Ladies Professional Golf Asso-
ciation's Futures Tour, said the
camp is designed to give back
to the BGF's Junior Golf Asso-
ciation, which helped her to get
to where she is today.
"This is the second year of
the camp, which affords myself
and some of the other instruc-
tors who grew up in the junior
programme, to help the
upcoming youths and expose
them to the game," said Rolle,
a graduate of St. Augustine's


College and Texas Southern
University.
"So we want to try to teach
them the game and the social
skills as well, like meeting and
greeting each other. So we
hope the kids will enjoy the
camp."
From the money raised from
the camp, Rolle said she
intended to provide a number
of scholarship opportunities for
some of the deserving campers
in the BGF's Junior Pro-
gramme.
Maynard, who recently took
over as the Minister of Sports
from Desmond Bannister, con-


gratulated Rolle in taking the
initiative as a premier athlete,
to come back and give back to
the sport she participated in.
"We're happy to support you
in this event and we want to
encourage people to come out
and support you in this ven-
ture," he said.
Maynard also took the time
out to congratulate Rolle and
Raquel Riley, who also came
home from participating on the
Futures Tour, to assist in the
camp.
"Usually, as a country, we
only recognize our track and
field athletes when they attain


this level of international
achievement, but I think that it
is important for us to pay equal
attention to other disciplines,"
he said.
"Golf being one of those
sports where most countries in
the world participate, the fact
that we have two Bahamians
now playing and competing at
this level, is even more com-
mendable. We look forward to
their success and we want them
to know that the Bahamas
Government is behind them
SEE page 14


Abaco athlete wins
judo gold at Pregional
touPnament
A FOUR athlete team fin-
ished off the competitive year
for the Bahamas Judo Feder-
ation (BJF) with an impres-
sive performance at the 9th
Annual International Barba-
dos Tournament. The team
won four medals a gold, a sil-
ver and two bronze. The tour-
nament is an important
regional event in which over
135 athletes from six coun-
tries participated. The stand-
out of the tournament was
Ashton Forbes from Abaco
who won all of his matches
by knockouts. In Judo a
knockout occurs when an
opponent is thrown flat to his
back with force and control.
"The BJF is developing the
sport of Judo in the Family
Islands and Ashton Forbes
has represented us very well"
said Head Coach David Rah-
ming." We have never won a
gold medal at this tournament
before and the competition
was even harder this year."
The team consisted of 18
year old Malcolm Rahming
(Bronze), 15 year old Ashton
Forbes (Gold), 13 year old
Matthew Rahming (Bronze)
and 12 year old Tajaro Hud-
son (Silver). "The additional
strength and conditioning
workouts over the past sev-
eral weeks really paid off,"
said Coach Rahming who
accompanied the team with
Coach Albert Lill from Aba-
co and Federation President
D'Arcy Rahming. Persons
interested in contacting the
Bahamas Judo Federation
should do so at telephone
364-6773 or at the website:
www.bahamasjudo.com.


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+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 13


Crushers edge out





Blue Flames 53-51


By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net
KYLE TURNQUEST
generally grabs the headlines
for the St Bede's Crushers,
but in game one of the
Catholic Primary School
Championship series, Adrian
Mackey carried the defend-
ing champions to a nail-bit-
ing win in game.
Mackey scored a game high
27 points to lead the Crushers
to a 53-51 win over the Our
Lady's Blue Flames yester-
day at Loyola Hall to place
his team one win away from
back to back championships.
The versatile forward
scored, nine points in the all
important fourth quarter to
ward off a late surge from the
Blue Fames and high scoring
tandem D'Angelo Mackey
and Charles Cooper.
With less than one minute
remaining, the Crushers' lead
expanded to two possessions
when Malik Jones beat the
Blue Flames full court press
on his own and finished with a
layup to give his team a 53-48
lead with just over 40 seconds
left to play.
D. Mackey responded with
one two at the line and after
he forced a turnover a fast-
break layup to bring the Blue
Flames within two, 53-51 with
28.6 seconds left to play.
The Blue Flames missed
four shot opportunities to tie
on their final possession and
Gregory Cooper came up
with a timely rebound to seal
the win for the Crushers.
The Blue Flames opened
the game on a 6-0 run before
A. Mackey broke the drought
for the Crushers with a free
throw, which sparked a 9-0
run.
Mackey scored seven of his
teams nine in the quarter
while Jones added the other
two.
C. Cooper broke the scor-
ing drought for the Blue
Flames with a pair of free
throws early in the second.
One of the smallest play-
ers, on the floor, Cooper did
most of his damage in the
paint on the offensive boards
and at the free throw line en
route to 21 points.
Turnquest gave the Crush-
ers a 13-9 lead, but C. Cooper
ended the half on a 5-1 run.
His pair of free throws with
no time left on the clock tied
the game at 14 headed into
the half.
As the Crushers looked to


Adrian Mackey scores


game high


make a run in the third quar-
ter, with their regular starters
on he floor together for the
first time, D. Mackey refused
to let the defending champs
pull away.
His buzzer beating three
pointer by Mackey at the end
of the third quarter gave the
Blue Flames a 26-25 lead
headed into the fourth quar-
ter.
Penetrating through the
Crushers' defence at will all
afternoon, Mackey finished
with a team high 23 points,
including 11 in the third.
The Blue Flames took their
biggest lead of the second half
early in the fourth when Tori
Ingraham sank one of two
free throws to give his team a
29-25 advantage.
D. Mackey's running layup
gave the Blue Flames a 33-30
lead, however Turnquest
responded on the very next
possession with a three point
play to tie the game.
A. Mackey gave the Crush-
ers their first lead of the
fourth, when he stole the
inbound pass on the next
possession to take a 35-33
lead.
A. Mackey and C.Cooper
traded baskets for the next
four possessions before St.
Bede's took a two possession
advantage.
Turnquest gave the Crush-
ers a 41-37 lead with a layup
and regained a four point
lead for his team with a base-
line jumper to take a 45-41
lead. D.Mackey and C.Coop-
er responded with a pair of
baskets to tie the game at 45
with 2:51 remaining.
Tied again at 46, the
Crushers went ahead five
after Turnquest made one of
two at the line, scored on a
layup, and G.Cooper capped
the run with an offensive
rebound and putback.
Turnquest finished with 15
points, while G. Cooper
added five and Jones finished
with four.
A. Mackey said his team
looks to play even better in
game two to close out the
series.
"We were just happy to
win, it was close and I feel
we can play much better next
time. We just have to
rebound the ball better and


27 points


play better defensive, espe-
cially in the fourth quarter,"
he said, "It is important for
me and Malik to start the
game off on a good note, but
with 'Flash' (Kyle Turnquest)
out of the game we had to
finish it off today."
Crushers Head Coach
Donnie Culmer was dis-
pleased with his team's per-
formance but felt the game
should serve as a wake up
call.
"We played lousy today.
We beat this team a couple
times this year and we did not
play like that today," he said,
"If we play our game we will
have two straight easily but
if this was not a wake up call
for my guys to get their act
together and come out hard-
er next game, I do not know
what else would do it."
D. Mackey said for the
Blue Flames to rebound his
team will have to play better
defensively and spread the
ball around.
"It is disappointing, but
the game was close and I feel
like we can play better
defence and win next time,"
he said.
Game two is set for
Wednesday, December 16th
at Loyola Hall at 4pm.

GAMENOTES:
* Neither team led by more
than six points
* the high scoring pairs domi-
nated the stat for each team
with Mackey/Turnquest
accounting for 79% of their
team's total points with 42
and Mackey/ Cooper netted
82% of their team's points
with 44
* The supporting cast made
the major difference as the
Crushers placed in scorers in
the scorebook
* Crushers center Gregory
Cooper played the entire
fourth passively with four
fouls but came up with a
huge block and outlet pass
which led to a fastbreak and a
two possession lead late in
the game
* Turnquest fouled out of the
game with 2:09 remaining,
but the Blue Flames only
outscored the Crushers by
one in the final minutes.


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PAGE 14, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


BAAA to host honorary luncheon


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

INSTEAD of having a din-
ner, the Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations will host
a luncheon to honour the most
outstanding athletes, coaches,
officials and sponsors this year.
Mike Sands, who was
returned to office as president
last month, said although they
have only had a short time to
pull off the event, they are com-
mitted to showing their appreci-
ation to the athletes.
"So this is why we are asking
all of our stake holders and inter-
ested parties and persons who
understand what we are trying to


do to come on board and assist
us," Sands said.
"We know it's a challenge, but
we don't want people to wait
until all is said and done. Now is
the time to show your interest
and make things happen."
The awards luncheon will be
held at 3 p.m. at the Wyndham
Nassau Resort and Crystal
Palace Casino under the theme:
"Celebrating Our Athletes, Part-
ners and Stakeholders."
Sands said he and his "Vision-
ary Team" have also changed
the format of the awards pre-
sentation in that more focus will
be placed on the athletes during
the event.
Sherman Stuart, first vice
president, said the objective is


to broaden the recognition of
athletes in other areas particu-
larly in the field events and to
promote increased participation
by our athletes in all events now
and in the future," he said.
"We want to recognize the
youth, junior, collegiate and
cross country athletes highlight-
ing their performances and to
show them they are equally as
important top the programme
as the senior and elite athletes."
To that end, the BAAA's
awards will be extended to the
most outstanding male and field
performers on the track and the
field and the Athlete of the Year
in both the junior and college
divisions, the cross country most
outstanding male and female


performers, the youth's most
outstanding male and female
and the most improved athlete
of the year.
But as usual, the BAAA will
name the Roderick Simms Offi-
cial of the Year, the Henry
Crawford Coach of the Year,
the Male and Female Athlete of
the Year and the Charlie Major
Sr. Athlete of the Year.
Additionally, Sands said the
BAAA will honour three of the
pioneers of the sport in Leonard
Dames, Minky Isaacs and Cyril
Johnson, having being the first to
represent the Bahamas at an
international competition.
Public relations officer
Alpheus 'Hawk' Finlayson went
back to July 1954 when history


was made for track and field in
the Bahamas when the three
men, accompanied by the then
president of the BAAA, Cyril
Richardson, competed in the
British Empire and Common-
wealth Games in Vancouver,
Canada.
"These men travelled long
and had difficulties arriving in
Vancouver, but they did their
best," he said. "Two of the men.
Cyril Johnson and Leonard
Dames, are now in the BAAA's
Hall of Fame," he said.
"We look forward in recog-
nising these men for all that they
have done for the sport in the
Bahamas. We look forward to
having their families and friends
attend the luncheon."


Special Projects member Lin-
da Thompson said they are very
excited about the luncheon
because of the very elite and
upcoming athletes whom they
will be honouring.
Tickets are priced at $35.00
for the athletes and $50 for gen-
eral admission. They are cur-
rently on sale at the Colony
Club, the Prescription Parlor and
the BAAA's office or from any
BAAA's executive member.
"We have a lot of talent in this
country and we want to expose
that talent to you the public,"
she said. "So come out and cele-
brate with us as we celebrate
them."
Interested businesses wishing
to assist the BAAA in the event
can come on board as a plat-
inum, gold, silver or bronze part-
nership, which will give them
various levels of incentives.
Again, those persons are
urged to contact the BAAA's
office or any executive member.


Georgette Rolle Junior Golf Camp tees off this week


FROM page 12

100 percent in whatever they
do."
Riley, a native of Grand
Bahama, said she's really fortu-
nate to give back to the camp
and she's even more elated
because of the accomplishment
made by Rolle.
"This is something that I
believe is very important, so it
didn't take me very long to say
yes I will come and help her
with a venture like this," stressed
Riley, who intends to duplicate
a camp in Grand Bahama in the
future.
"When I was a junior, there
was a whole league of young
kids playing and it's so sad to
see those numbers going down.
But people are getting older and
getting out of the sport, so we
need more youngsters to replace
them."


Riley, however, said it's so
important that Rolle has decid-
ed to implement the rules of life
skills because if she wasn't
taught them, she probably
would not have been able to suc-
ceed as far as she has in the
sport.
BGF's president Glenn
Archer said he's privileged and
humbled to once again assist
Rolle in her second camp, as he
also invited Riley back home to
serve as an instructor.
"The whole issue of golf I
would like to address because
this is just the beginning of the
contribution that the sport will
be making to the community at
large," said Archer, noting that
they intend to provide some
after-school activities for the
school student-athletes.
Yvonne Shaw, Chairman of
the Ladies Central Division of
the BGF, said as the adminis-
trator of the Training Complex,


said her role is primarily to
make sure that everything will
be in place for the camp.
"It is important to note that
now that golf is an Olympic
sport, the country has to move
forward on helping golf in the
Bahamas in more ways than
one," she said.
But Shaw said she's just
delighted that the Bahamas
have two women playing on the
Future's Tour and the BGF will
be doing all it can to assist them
financially in order to make the
break through on the LPGA.
Also present was Davis Har-
ris, the executive director of the
First Tee Golf Programme in
Houston, Texas. He was
delighted to be in the Bahamas
and helping Rolle out with the
camp.
"I think me being from
America, this type of opportu-
nity reflect how important golf


is and how important the
Bahamas Golf Federation has
been in her life," Harris said.
"I look forward to the week.
I look forward to this being a
success."
As a foreigner, Harris said
both Rolle and Riley are mak-
ing big steps to making it on the
LPGA Tour.
"I think we African-Ameri-
cans or ladies of colour on the
tour," he said. "We currently
don't have any that I know
about, so I think they are mak-
ing the right steps."
Among the instructors are
Annamae Adderley, Eugenie
Adderley, Ricardo Davis Jr.,
Cheiwah Ferguson, Nadario
Ferguson, Rashad Ferguson,
Kristian McSweeney, Marcus
Pritchard, Devaughn Robinson
and Keno Turnquest.
Sponsors for the event include
Bahamas Waste Ltd, Budget
Food Stores, Chef Boy Cater-
ing, Eagle Electrical Supplies,
FML Webshop, Galleria Cine-
mas, Gilfstream Airlines, Impact


Images, Jiffy Cleaners/Emerald
Isles, Kerzner International,
Knowles Construction, Le Bleu,
Lucayan Tropical, Marcia Burn-
side, Quencom Communica-
tions, R&T Imports & Sales,
Super Value Food Stores, Tall


Pines Nursery, BGF, The First
Tee Houston/FM Law Park,
Ministry of Tourism, Ministry
of Youth, Sports and Culture,
The Synturions, Tyrone Sawyer,
Weight Watchers, Wendy's
Restaurants and Yvonne Shaw.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

CLOUDY RESOURCES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

BIKENHEAD COMPANY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

WATKINSON COMPANY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

DEEP BLACK HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

SAMCOLE CONCEPT LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

KAMBINGLEY INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

KRAMBILL TEES HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

GADUS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^SPORTS In^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^






+


TRIBUNE Te



USII
TU SDY
TUESDAY,


SS


DECEMBER 15, 2009


54CTO Bo uinestibueei~e


NASSAU
(242) 356-9801
FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010
MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135
0 * *id lit 0o


* BISX-listed insurer says
annuity sales almost double
2008 levels
* Major increase in health
claims responsible for
76.3% profits drop in Q3,
but 2010 likely to be better
* Company to launch 'in
next few weeks' new health
product targeting those
previously unable to
purchase health insurance
* 2010 first quarter targeted
for general agency launch
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
FAMGUARD Corpora-
tion yesterday said it was
"optimistic of ending the year
on a higher note" with better
numbers than the 2009 third
quarter, telling Tribune Busi-
ness the new business growth
in its ordinary life and health
insurance segments was 10
per cent ahead of 2008 levels.
Patricia Hermanns, Fam-
Guard's president and chief
executive, said that while the
negative impact from the dra-
SEE page 2B


Port chair: $ 100m



project in jeopardy

* Babak says LNG plans, which could reduce power costs in
Freeport by 40%, and 25-30% in Abaco/Nassau, in danger if
work permit not renewed
* Says all conditions set by Prime Minister have been met
* Confirms move to Cayman to run Port from there is possible


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Plans for investors to build
a $100 million hospital in
Freeport and kick-start med-
ical tourism for the city, and
the revival of liquefied nat-
ural gas (LNG), could be
jeopardised if his work per-
mit is not renewed by the
Government, the Grand
Bahama Port
Authority/Port Group Ltd's
chairman said yesterday.
Expressing "surprise and
disappointment" that Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
had announced that the
Government would not be
renewing his work permit
when it expired at year-end,
Hannes Babak said he had
"fulfilled all the conditions"
that Mr Ingraham had set


Developers deny

'persuasion' claim

* Baker's Bay attorney rebuts allegations
developers offered jobs, business opportunities
in return for dropping opposition to project
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Legal representatives of the $500 million Baker's Bay Golf &
Ocean Club project yesterday vehemently denied that the devel-
opers had attempted to persuade Guana Cay residents to drop their
opposition by offering jobs and business opportunities to them.
Robert Adams, a Freeport-based partner at Graham, Thompson
& Co, who is the lead Bahamian attorney for Discovery Land
Company, said the developers behind the Great Guana Cay devel-
opment were more interested in looking forward and "building pos-
itive relations" with the local community, rather than re-opening
old wounds from a legal dispute already adjudicated on.
Mr Adams was responding to allegations made by the Save
Guana Cay Reef Association's attorney, Fred Smith QC, who
had claimed in legal documents that Discovery Land Company rep-
resentatives had made financial offers to himself, Association
president Troy Albury and other residents in a bid to settle the case
or have the action dropped.
"I'm certainly unaware of any such contacts by the developers as
described by Fred," Mr Adams told Tribune Business. "I can say
categorically I don't know anything about it. We are in the process
of taking some instructions as regards those allegations, but I do not
know them to be true."
Discovery Land Company, the Baker's Bay developer, is under-
stood to have been both annoyed and surprised at the timing of Mr
Smith's allegations, which were made in an affidavit submitted to
the Privy Council as part of the parties' submissions on who should
pay legal costs in relation to the long-running court battle.
The surprise is that the allegations have been made at this stage,
SEE page 6B


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Recently renovated 2,500-square-foot 4 bed 3 bath family home in a quiet
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for its renewal when they
last met.
Before he departed for
the UN Climate Change
conference, Mr Ingraham
said of the Government's
intentions towards the Port:
"We have no plans that I
want to tell you about today.
All I can tell you is that the
Government's decided that
Mr Hannes Babak's work
permit, who is the chairman
of the Port, will not be
renewed at the end of this
month when it expires."
Mr Babak expressed con-
cern about what his depar-
ture would do for "the con-
tinuity of Fi cclp, I and the
numerous projects he was
working on.
"I'm already negotiating
with two individual US com-
panies who want to build a


sso$4.13 I


S$4.25

, - i Tr. . . ., i , r. 4,1",


$100 million first phase hos-
pital in Grand Bahama next
year," Mr Babak told Tri-
bune Business. "I have
already begun getting
together the companies
required for LNG and pro-
duce power here. That
would have the effect of
reducing power costs in
Grand Bahama by 40 per
cent, and in Abaco and Nas-
sau by 25-30 per cent.
"That means every house-
hold has a lower power bill,
and it is a good project for
the Bahamas and Freeport."
Mr Babak also told Tri-
bune Business that if his
proposed LNG project took
root, it could save the
Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
SEE page 4B


Hutchison's

'bloody awful'

tourism job

Sir Jack in new broadside
against GBPA's main partner
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Sir Jack Hayward yesterday launched another attack
on the Grand Bahama Port Authority's (GBPA) main
business partner, accusing Hutchison Whampoa of having
done a "bloody awful" job in promoting its Our Lucaya
hotel, and pursuing a 'land banking' policy in Freeport.
In what some observers are likely to consider an aston-
ishing broadside against Port Group Ltd's 50/50 joint ven-
ture partner in Freeport's most critical assets, Sir Jack
reiterated to Tribune Business his determination not to
sell his GBPA stake to the Hong Kong conglomerate.
Speaking in the wake of Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham's public confirmation that the Government will not
renew the work permit of Hannes Babak, the GBPA/Port
Group Ltd chairman, when it expires at year-end, Sir Jack
told Tribune Business that if this happened Freeport would
not move forward.
"If that's the case, we won't be going forward. If that's
the case, there's no forward progress," Sir Jack said, when
told by Tribune Business of the Prime Minister's remarks.
Informed that the comments had been made by the
Prime Minister as he prepared to depart for the United
Nations' summit on climate change in Copenhagen, Den-
mark, Sir Jack added: "All I can say is that there's no
progress in Freeport, and it will be very hot here.
"There will be no progress in Freeport without Hannes
Babak, who's doing a tremendous job."
Tribune Business revealed earlier this year that the Gov-
ernment would not renew Mr Babak's work permit once it
expired at year-end, part of Mr Ingraham's efforts to split
him from Sir Jack and force the latter to settle the GBPA
SEE page 6B


Foreign reserves to end

2009 'significantly up'


* Reserves currently standing
at $840m, boosted by reduced
credit demand and government
foreign currency borrowing
* Central Bank governor
acknowledges the current
17 per cent loan default rate
'not something we are
accustomed to'


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas' foreign
exchange reserves, currently
standing at around $840 million,
will end 2009 "significantly above
where they ended last year", the
Central Bank governor said yes-
terday, although the level of loan
arrears in the commercial bank-
ing system was "not something
we are accustomed to".
SEE page 5B


WENDY CRAIG


7Th


RO-A.aFIDE.I.Y













()0/




Avrae nnalReurs.vegeAnua Rtun
A, a Octber31, 009 S 7-1 .00 6. r 3, 209 3 9







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Nassau: B 242.356.9801HuX^^^B^^i^^^^^^^^
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royalfidelBM~intBBom Moneyffati Work







+


pCOLINA


Dear Valued Clients,

Please be advised of our operating

hours during this holiday season.



Friday, December 18, 2009
Closed at 12pm


Thursday, December 24, 2009
Christmas Eve
Closed at 12:30pm


Friday, December 25, 2009
Christmas Day
CLOSED


Monday, December 28, 2009
Boxing Day (observed)
CLOSED


Thursday, December 31, 2009
New Year's Eve
Closed at 1pm


Friday, January 1, 2010
New Year's Day
CLOSED


Confidence for Life


+COLINA

LIFE I HEALTH I MORTGAGE I INVESTMENTS I RETIREMENT
Call: 356-8300 I www.colina.com


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Exuma resort names


Bahamian


Grand Isle Resort & Spa
this week announced the
appointment of Bahamian
Shervin Penn as Resort
Manager of its $100 million,
luxurious 78 condo villa
resort at the peak of Emer-
ald Bay on Great Exuma.
"We are pleased to
announce the promotion of
assistantmanager Shervin
Penn to the post of resort
manager," said James
Clabaugh, president of EGI
Ltd, developers of the luxu-
ry property.
"We know that a new era
is dawning for Exuma, and
we believe that Shervin's
appreciation of how impor-
tant a superior visitor expe-
rience is will help Grand Isle
retain its standing among
repeat discerning guests and
the many new visitors that
Sandals will be bringing to
Exuma."
Mr Penn, who now holds
one of the highest positions
in the hospitality industry in
the Bahamas, trained with
the Hilton brand before
being lured to Exuma in
2007.
Since then, he has trained
under Tracy Stoltz, who ear-
lier this month accepted a
job in Hawaii after several
years with Grand Isle. It was


GRAND ISLE RES(
has appointed Bahar
Penn as resort manm
Stoltz who reco
Mr Penn, a choice
opers supported.


Qualifi


"For any devel
ing a qualified Ba
fill a post is the i
tion and we have
mitted to that
beginning, even d
struction," sa
Clabaugh.
EGI Ltd search
Family Islands
Providence for th
penters, electricia


manager
ers and other skilled labour-
ers and artisans. A plaque
naming all the Bahamian
sub-contractors who con-
tributed to the project
hangs in the reception area.
Nestled atop the highest
ridge of Emerald Bay, the
12-acre resort with newly-
constructed full service spa
has been a good respite,
earning accolades from visi-
tors, lifestyle publications
and travel writers.
"I am excited to be given
the opportunity to showcase
ORT & SPA my expertise at the helm of
nian Shervin a magnificent resort such as
ager. Grand Isle," said Mr Penn.
"The staff is always willing
mmended to make the effort to con-
the devel- tinually raise the level of ser-
vice we offer our guests, and
it has been a pleasure being
ed a part of such a dynamic
e team.
"Knowing that the princi-
oper, find- pals of the resort realized
ihamian to my potential is indeed hum-
deal situa- bling and, for that, I am
been com- appreciative for the oppor-
from the tunity."
luring con- Prior to his time at Grand
id Mr Isle, Mr Penn spent seven
years at the British Colonial
ied various Hilton in Nassau and, before
and New that, he pursued a marketing
ie best car- degree, working briefly in
ns, tile lay- that field.


FamGuard seeks higherp note' via 10% growth in new business


FROM page 1B

matic rise in health claims and
benefits would "take a little
time" to work through the
company's system, the BISX-
listed company had bucked
the recession by exceeding
year-over-year and budgeted
targets for new business
growth.
Ms Hermanns added that
FamGuard and its wholly-
owned subsidiary, Family


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Guardian, were also planning
to launch their general insur-
ance agency during the 2010
first quarter "for sure", some-
thing that would enable the
company to effectively
become a 'one-stop shop' for
all their clients' insurance
needs.
A 20.7 per cent or $4.9 mil-
lion year-over-year increase
in total benefits and expenses,
rising from $19.568 million to
$23.613 million, had been the
main factor behind Fam-
Guard's 2009 third quarter
net income dropping by 76.3
per cent to $360,706, com-
pared to $1.525 million last
year.
The benefits/expenses
increase was largely driven by
substantial growth in health
insurance claims made upon
Family Guardian, something
experienced by all Bahamas-
based health insurers this
year.

Optimism
Expressing optimism that
the 2010 health claims expe-
rience would be better, Ms
Hermanns told Tribune Busi-
ness: "The issues relating to
the impact of our claims expe-
rience are going to take a little
while to roll-out.
"The impact of that will
carry through to the end of
the year. We've seen a grad-
ual improvement in our prof-
its. At end-September they
were $990,439, which was an
improvement over the previ-
ous quarter, and we will con-
tinue that improvement as we
go through the final quarter.
"We're optimistic about
ending the year on a higher
note than we did in the third
quarter, certainly.
"We're very confident that
we should be able to show
numbers that will be better
than the third quarter."
Despite the
benefits/expenses increases
more than cancelling out the
$2.9 million or 13.7 per cent
increase in Family Guardian's
total revenues for the 2009
third quarter, Ms Hermanns
said: "We're very pleased with
the growth we've shown on
life and health sales, and in
both instances we're ahead of
budget and ahead of the prior
year. Our annuity sales have
shown significant improve-
ment over the prior year; it
has almost doubled over the
prior year.
"On ordinary life we are
ahead of budget and certainly
ahead of last year.
"We set some aggressive
targets for growth this year,
and are essentially beating
them on the life and health
side, notwithstanding the eco-
nomic conditions.
"On the new business side
for ordinary life, we are prob-
ably looking to be somewhere
in the vicinity of 10 per cent
better than the prior year."
And Ms Hermanns added:
"In 2008, new sales on health
were phenomenal.
"We budgeted a lower
amount for 2009, because we


knew we could not match that
pace of growth, but we've
exceeded budget by about 10
per cent on new business.
"Notwithstanding the eco-
nomic conditions, we've
shown our ability to hold our
own in the marketplace.
We've been able to produce
significant volumes that com-
pare very favourably with
what else is out there."
Ms Hermanns said Family
Guardian was also assessing
whether its health policy pre-
miums were correctly priced
to reflect the claims experi-
ence, along with the benefits
packages offered.
In addition, the BISX-listed
insurer was also set to launch
a new health policy, The
Essential 300, "in the next
couple of weeks".
This product, Ms Her-
manns explained, was "tai-
lored to cost containment"
and "targeted at people who
want health insurance with-
out all the bells and whistles".
She added that its launch
would enable Family
Guardian to cover the entire
Bahamian health insurance
market, with The Essential
300 focused on those who had
previously been unable to
afford healthcare cover.
For the nine months to Sep-
tember 30, 2009, Family
Guardian had been able to
keep operating expenses
some $0.5 million below 2008
levels through cost contain-
ment without reducing staff
levels, and despite the growth
in new business.
Ms Hermanns confirmed to
Tribune Business that Family
Guardian planned to employ
its existing branch network to
launch its general insurance
agency, adding: "We certain-
ly intend to launch in early
2010. That's very much on the
drawing board right now. I
would say the first quarter for
sure. Sometimes there may be
delays, but we think that's
very achievable."
Family Guardian would not
be hiring large number of staff
to run its insurance agency
initially, Ms Hermanns added,
with the company planning to
use its existing sales force.
She pointed out that while
the launch would be taking
place in the midst of a steep
recession, it was arguable that
the demand for risk coverage
in the shape of insurance had
increased, especially given the
rise in crime.
Ms Hermanns said Family
Guardian expected 2010 to be
another "challenging year",
but the company would again
be setting itself aggressive
sales targets given its perfor-
mance in 2009.
"We are expecting to see
downward trends in our
claims experience in 2010,"
Ms Hermanns said.
"It's very hard to make
definitive predictions on
claims, because these things
are out of our control - when
people go to the hospital or
seek healthcare. But we will
see continued improvements
in the claims experience
throughout 2010."


SOSO







+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 3B


Bahamas cannot



wait for renewable



energy sources


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
THE PRIME Minister said
yesterday that Abaco and oth-
er islands cannot wait for the
implementation of renewable
energy sources to expand
their power distribution.
Three new fossil fuel-burning
power plants are scheduled
to come on stream within a
few months in Abaco,
Eleuthera and Bimini.
Hubert Ingraham told
reporters shortly before his
flight to Copenhagen for the
United Nations Climate
Change Conference that
those new power stations,
which may burn a controver-
sial fuel called 'Bunker C', are
necessary for the population
in those areas.
The erection of the three
new fossil fuel-burning power
plants come while the
Bahamas is taking a stand
against global warming at the
year's meeting on climate
change.
The Caribbean, the
Bahamas and other low-lying
areas in this region are most
at risk from rising sea levels,
as the warming of the planet
melts land-locked ice at an
alarming rate, according to
scientists.
Mr Ingraham said CARI-
COM leaders will come
together in Copenhagen to
forge a case for global climate
change initiatives, especially
when it comes to matters that
affect the Bahamas and
Caribbean.
"My Government also has


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the urgent task of responding
to the multiple challenges,
short and long term, posed by
global warming," he said
"Climate change is also a
national security issue. It pos-
es a direct and potentially
devastating threat to our way
of life, our territorial integrity,
our economic well-being and
our survival. It draws limited
resources away from other
national priorities, including
resources which should be
directed towards education,
health care, housing and
social assistance."
Environmentally-conscious
residents of Abaco have lam-
basted the Government for
their lack of consultation on
the new Wilson City power
plant, which government said
might burn the heavy oil
Bunker C.

Wetlands
According to them, the
plant is located near extreme-
ly sensitive wetlands which
are only a few thousand feet
from the plant. And despite
claims that the plant is two
miles from the coast, the real-
ity is that the heated pipeline
that will disperse the oil from
the tanker to the plant is 2.5
miles away.
From the air, it is apparent
that the plant lies within thou-
sands of feet from the coast
within dense pine growth. It
also lies within a few miles of
acres of farm land and the
fuel dock only feet from the
boundary of a national park,
residents say.


Residents who live within
two miles say they felt slight-
ed by the Government's
claims that there are no com-
munities within seven miles
of the Wilson City site.
Though their communities are
small they contend that they
still stand to be affected by
the emissions from burning
the Bunker C fuel oil.
The Government's retort
to all these claims is that many
other plants throughout the
Bahamas now burn the cheap
Bunker C oil, and that if the
more expensive diesel oil is
burned fuel surcharges will
have to be increased across
the island.
At the moment, residents
in New Providence subsidise
power production on the
Family Islands because of the
costs associated with shipping
to the islands.
The Prime Minister con-
tends that the new power
plant will have pollutant mit-
igating measures attached to it
so as to minimise the imme-
diate impact to the Abaco
environment. The Govern-
ment's case for immediate
fossil fuel power stands on the
frequent power failures on the
island of Abaco.
"I suppose in the case of
Abaco we could have contin-
ued with the power cuts we
had and the outages, and we
could continue to pollute the
environment as we are doing
now at the station in Marsh
Harbour, and we could con-
tinue to have all that smoke
and what not blow into the
community," said Mr Ingra-
ham.


citi



OPERATIONS DEPARTMENT HEAD

ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES
Reporting to our Country Operatons md Technoy Head the
position is respwnsibe fr providing Operations supwrt to or
lbcal and gTbal Trus Cmmipes as welI as other tocal business
unils. Key resporrsibiliie include ersight For three operatims
leams Indluding RecoolerneeY, Sptea Servees and Global Fee
Biling.

KMOWLEOGE SKILLS REQUIRED
Thu ideal candidate wll possess an MBA ro related pos-graduae
degree logler wit a mhrimun of 7+ ys o relay perencie
preyeab in financial sericas. An BeAlimt Operatims
marogmeniit backroundcoupel wth a song
accmLntingfinandal backgnund is reqUired. Sold knowm dge of
Tnist Adminisiralon fund~tnerIa is an asset Aditonally,
excllent analyiical skii speoior cmmrmnication skills, and
sound iijdgrenldecisior -making skills are also neessry,

Challenge
yourself to a career like no other


U


� world school


St Andrew's School, The International School of The Bahamas, an authorized International
Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites applications from qualified and experienced
Bahamian candidates for the following teaching vacancies, with effect from August 2010.
Full information regarding the school may be found at its website: www.st-andrews.com.
Candidates should be qualified teachers who possess the necessary academic qualifications
for the positions) for which they apply, including a teaching qualification and a bachelor's
degree, and normally need to have a minimum of two years successful school-based
experience. Desirable qualifications, in addition to those specified for individual posts, are
that teachers have successful experience in an independent and/or international school and
an advanced degree. Applications from candidates able to coach team sports or advise
school clubs and activities are particularly welcomed. Secondary (i.e. middle and upper)
school teachers will be expected to undertake the responsibility of a homeroom.
Please note that applications received from non-Bahamian candidates will not be considered
at this time, although permanent residents with the right to work are invited to submit their
papers for future consideration. Applications from candidates living outside The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas will not be acknowledged or considered at this stage of
the recruiting process. If the school is unable to recruit any position locally, it will advertise
internationally in January.
PRIMARY SCHOOL
The school is authorized to teach the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the International
Baccalaureate Organization. Candidates for all posts in the primary school should be
committed to the principles of, and preferably trained in, the PYP.
Homeroom teachers: Class sizes range between 15 and 20.
Primary school Spanish (Part time post): Candidates should be familiar with ACTFL
standards and be able to work as a contributing member of a school-wide team.
SECONDARY SCHOOL
The school offers its own middle years programme in years seven through nine and the
BGCSE in years 10 and 11 (grades 9 and 10). The school is authorized to teach the Diploma
Programme (DP) of the International Baccalaureate Organization in years 12 and 13 (grades
11 and 12).
Spanish and French: Candidates should be familiar with the ACTFL standards and able
to work as a contributing member of a school-wide team. They must be qualified to teach
to pre-university level and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate
diploma programme.
Science:
Biology: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach biology to pre-university
level and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma
programme. Candidates should also be able to offer either chemistry or physics at
BGCSE/IGCSE level.

Chemistry: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach chemistry to pre-university
level and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma
programme. Candidates should also be able to offer either biology or physics to
BGCSE/IGCSE level.
Physics: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach physics to pre-university
level and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma
programme. Candidates should also be able to offer either biology or chemistry to
BGCSE/IGCSE level.
English: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach to pre-university level and be
familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme. Successful
BGCSE/IGCSE and SAT 1/SAT II experience is also essential.
Mathematics: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach to pre-university level
and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme.
Successful experience in teaching calculus to AP and/or IB level is preferred for this post.
Successful BGCSE/IGCSE and SAT l/SAT II experience is also desirable.
Drama: Candidates should be able and willing to teach up to IB theatre arts level and
coordinate musical and drama productions throughout the secondary school.
Middle school home room and core teachers: Middle level educational qualifications,
experience working with early adolescents and a familiarity with the philosophy of middle
schools are required from applicants for these posts. Applicants may also be required to
teach BGCSE courses up to year 11.
At least one of the successful applicants will have documented successful experience in
teaching English in years 7 to 9 and will be able to offer English and one of the following
EPSE; IT & Social Studies; art; drama E possibly to BGCSE level.
Mathematics and special needs (part time post): Candidates must have successful
experience in teaching in both areas.
NB: One successful candidate from all the posts offered will be able to offer the teaching
of the Theory of Knowledge course at IB diploma level.
Interested candidates should apply to the school's principal, Mrs Sharon E Wilson, by letter,
email or fax as soon as possible. All applications MUST include the following:
* letter of application
* a personal statement detailing the candidate's educational philosophy
* a full curriculum vitae,
* either the names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and email numbers of three people
who may be approached for confidential professional references or the name and address
of the recruiting agency from which the candidate's confidential dossiers may be obtained.
Information on the teaching posts offered may be obtained from the heads of the schools
by email or fax only.
Frank Coyle, Head of the secondary school:
Email: Frank.Coyle@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1242) 677 7847
Allison Collie, Head of the primary school:
Email: Allison.Collie@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1242) 677 7846
Sharon E Wilson
Principal
St Andrew's School
PO Box EE 17340
Nassau
Email: Sharon.Wilson@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1242) 677 7802 or (1 242) 324 0816
The closing date for applications is 8th January 2010. Applications from unqualified


candidates, applications arriving without the full information requested, applications
from outside The Commonwealth of The Bahamas or applications received after this
date will not be considered.


K


SCHOOL T


E1Bik AUitlo & Omin CiipalUhn Utority N









Our office will be closed on the following

days during this Holiday Season


Dec.16, 2009 - Closed at 12:00 pm

Dec.24, 2009 - All day

Dec. 31, 2009 - Half Day

M ei e aje e'aaw cmteWace.







+


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


MN ea iPort chair: O om


A: project in jeopardy
I OT :.....


Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) BELLONA LTD. is in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on December 14,
2009 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered
by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the day of January 25, 2010 to send their names
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator
of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

December 15, 2009
ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY


Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ZONTA LTD. is in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on December 14,
2009 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered
by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the day of January 25, 2010 to send their names
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator
of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

December 15, 2009
ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY


.iI 0 Bahmas Business
Solutions Ltd.



Nassau: Collins Ave & 7th Terrace
Tel: (242) 302-9250
,rin-Il 8 h mrno Qu qn's. H gh*1"..
Tel: (242) 352-7022


http://www. bbsl. o rn

LCD Tn I ACCESS POINTS I KETBOARDO I WlHELSIS ADAPTEIS
GAME CQNTOILIRN I i I LAIPrOP I nmflmTIIs IriS~EIAN
AIGiTAt CAMERA I KIHMK CD 9 D Di I CAMCOQRDE
UlP I LMM, K IM | U PHQ$I?,l I $AM I |1MIrARDS


A
I
I,
J
/


FROM page 1B

ration (BEC) some $250
million in planned capital
expenditure to improve its
own infrastructure.
"Any reduction in energy
costs will have a huge effect
on Grand Bahama," Mr
Babak said. "A reduction in
power costs for industry will
be a reason for industry to
come to Freeport, not a
problem to come to
Freeport. The power costs
have always been a down-
side to industry coming, but
without that the sky's the
limit."
Mr Babak said there were
several other projects that
he would like to see come
to fruition, and told Tribune
Business that the manage-
ment team and structure at
the GBPA/Port Group Ltd
was working well.
Commenting on the
Prime Minister's announce-
ment that his work permit
would not be renewed, Mr
Babak said: "I'm very sur-
prised and very disappointed
about that, because I under-
stood from the last meeting
with the Prime Minister that
he had certain conditions. I


"A reduction in power costs for
industry will be a reason for industry to
come to Freeport, not a problem to
come to Freeport. The power costs
have always been a downside to indus-
try coming, but without that the sky's
the limit."


fulfilled all of them before
time. I know I fulfilled every
single one of them."

Conditions
Declining to reveal what
those conditions were, Mr
Babak said he wanted to
know the reasons for the
Government's decision on
his work permit.
"Maybe it's a misunder-
standing," he added. "I
think it's not good for
Freeport and the continuity
of Freeport. I have a lot of
major projects that I am
working on, and would like
time for them to be com-
pleted."
Mr Babak, though, con-
firmed to Tribune Business


Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) GOLE OVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on December 14, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.
(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 26th day of January, 2010 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.
DECEMBER 15, 2009
ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY





Techician






We are looking for a young, technically
inclined, computer savvy, technician for on
the job training to operate sophisticated
machinery. Excellent opportunity for
advancement.

Apply in writing to
P.O. Box N-1818

Include resume and
educational qualifications



Legal Notice

NOTICE


REFORMATION LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 REFORMATION LTD.
is in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of Dissolution was 9th December 2009.
David Thain of Arnmer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., Building 2 Caves Village,
P.O.Box N3917 is Liquidator of REFORMATION LTD. All persons
having claims against the above-named company are required to send
their address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the
9th January 2010.
7/


that he had been asked to
go to the Cayman Islands,
where the GBPA/Port
Group Ltd's holding com-
pany, Intercontinental
Diversified Corporation
(IDC), was based, and run
the Bahamian operations
from there.
"I was asked if I would
think about it," he said. "It
will be more difficult to run
it from there than here."
Sir Jack Hayward, one of
the GBPA/Port Group Ltd's
owners, also did not rule out
the idea of Mr Babak mov-


ing to Cayman given that
IDC was based there.
Fred Smith QC, the Cal-
lenders & Co partner and
attorney for the late Edward
St George's estate, which is
disputing the GBPA own-
ership with Sir Jack, said it
was pleased that Mr Babak's
work permit was not being
renewed because it did not
believe he had a contract to
run the companies in the
first place.
Mr Smith accused Sir Jack
and Mr Babak of "putting
roadblocks in the way of a
resolution to the dispute"
with the St Georges, and
added: "Perhaps this should
be a sign to Sir Jack and Mr
Babak to lay down the
sword and consider more
peaceful negotiations to set-
tle this matter".
Mr Smith said Mr Babak's
potential move to Cayman
would add "insult to injury",
adding: The Port should be
run from Freeport, not the
Cayman Islands."


Persons that currently have items
stored at Tropical Brokerage
Services Limited, Solider Road are
asked to contact the Liquidator at
424-9036 immediately to arrange
for the settlement of their accounts
and the removal of the said items.


Items not paid for and collected
within two (2) weeks will be sold to
defray costs.


Signed
The Liquidator


Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) MEGAFONO OVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on December 14, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.
(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 26th day of January, 2010 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.
DECEMBER 15, 2009
ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



Legal Notice

NOTICE


HABAKKUK INVESTMENT LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 HABAKKUK
INVESTMENT LTD. is in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of Dissolution was 9th December 2009.
David Thain ofAmer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., Building 2 Caves Village,
P.OBox N3917 is Liquidator of HABAKKUK INVESTMENT LTD.
All persons having claims against the above-named company are
required to send their address and particulars of their debts to the
Liquidator before the 9th January 2010.



Ji


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O







+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 5B


Foreign reserves to end 2009


FROM page 1B
Wendy Craigg told Tribune
Business that the banking sec-
tor regulator was "very close-
ly watching" the level of non-
performing loans and loan
arrears in the Bahamian
banking sector, given that
almost 17 per cent - more
than one in every six loans to
the private sector and con-
sumers - was in default at end-
October 2009.
Expressing hope that the
Bahamas was likely to seed
"some bottoming out of the
recession", and its impact on
loan arrears and unemploy-
ment, in 2010, Ms Craigg told
Tribune Business: "We are in
discussions with the banks
about the programmes they
have in place, and ensuring
they have sufficient provisions
and the capital to sustain
them through this period of
weakness in economic activi-
ty."
The non-performing/loan
arrears situation was "some-
thing we continue to monitor
very closely", and the Central
Bank had implemented


enhanced reporting proce-
dures for the commercial
banks.
"We require more granu-
lar information on remedia-
tion measures," Ms Craigg
said, explaining that this was
designed to pick up when, for
example, a commercial bank
moved a loan from the non-
performing category back to
performing, enabling the reg-
ulator to monitor credit
trends.
"Certainly, it reflects the
severity of the economic
downturn. It's not a level we
are accustomed to," Ms
Craigg said of the loan default
rate.
"In terms of non-perform-
ing, it was usually just shy of 5
per cent [of total loans].
"The situation has deterio-
rated, and it definitely reflects
what is happening in the
economy with employment
conditions.
"When people lost their
jobs or were working reduced
hours, they had to make
reduced payments.
"The extent to which we
see improvement in that area
depends on the process of


economic recovery, and we
know next year will be very
mild for us as well, although
not as severe as this year.
"We may see some bot-
toming out of the weakness,
but don't expect to see any
major improvement in the
employment situation."

Upgrade
The Central Bank was
"continuing to upgrade our
model and data" gleaned
from stress testing the com-
mercial banks' capital ade-
quacy and ability to withstand
the economic downturn, hav-
ing begun this initiative last
year.
Ms Craigg also confirmed
that the Central Bank had
increased "the minimum and
trigger ratios for Tier I capi-
tal" from 8 per cent to 14 per
cent "as a proactive measure
on our part to ensure the sit-
uation remains stable".
She acknowledged, though,
that "all banks are well in
excess of the levels we ele-
vated them to".
The governor also con-
firmed that the Bank Super-


Cal IBA on 67-62

h p y m o c. ?


NASSAU INSURANCE
BROKERS & AGENTS
NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS CO. LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, P.O. Box N-7764 Nassau Tel. 677-6422
A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life


vision Department's Cc
mercial Banking Unit, wh
was established "to focus
systemically import
banks", had performed w(
Elsewhere, Ms Craigg s
the Bahamas' fore
exchange reserves, critical
this country's ability to p
chase imports and maint
the one:one peg with the
dollar, were "holding up qi
well", standing at around $
million.
"We will end this year
nificantly ahead of where
ended last year," Ms Cra
told Tribune Business on
foreign reserves.
"Liquidity is holding up.
long as we have the slowdo


'significantly
)m- in credit and have the inflows
rich from foreign currency bor- "Liquid
on rowing, that has allowed liq-
ant uidity to be maintained at rel- holding
ell. atively robust levels." long as 1
said This means that the
ign Bahamas' self-correcting the sloW
1 to monetary policy mechanism credit a.
ur- has kicked-in, with the reduc-
tain tion in import and credit the inflow
US demand resulting in reduced foreign
quite foreign currency demand/out- borrow
840 flows. borrow
This, in turn, has protected has allo-
sig- the foreign reserves at a time uidity to
we when foreign currency inflows
iigg from tourism and investment tained ai
the have been depressed. ly robus
The Government's foreign
As currency borrowings have
)wn also aided this goal. W/


up'


lity is
up. As
we have
Down in
id have
)ws from
currency
ng, that
wed liq-
) be main-
t relative-
t levels."

'endy Craigg


THE CENTRAL BANK

OF THE BAHAMAS

B$ COUNTERFEIT
BANKNOTE DETECTION &
INTRODUCTION TO CRISP SERIES SEMINAR



lace: The Central Bank of The Bahamas

Training Room, Market Street and

Trinity Place Entrance


Vhen: Thursday December 17, 2009


* Session One 10:00am - 11:00 am

* Session Two 12:00 noon - 1:00 pm


Contact:


Apply By:


302-2734

302-2629



Tuesday December 15, 2009


Session 1 is open to the General Public. Session 2
is open to Bankers and Law Enforcement Agents.


Persons wishing to participate should apply as soon
as possible as space is limited.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


K


The Following persons are asked lo contact
STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED
in connection with items left in storage:

DANNELLA ROLLE NAKIA COOPER

KENDRA ROLLE STEVEN ROLLE

ANDREW ARNETT MARVETTE GAITOR

BEVERLY SMITH CHERYL WELLS

KISHON TURNER JACKLIN BRICE






^^^j~~iSii~ ilj l i-if *~i!^


P


v


VACANCY NOTICE .

Assistant Manager (Pharmacist) - +c
Chronic Disease Prescription Drug Plan (CDPDP)

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the above position of Assistant Manager
(Pharmacist), Chronic Disease Prescription Drug Plan (CDPDP).

JOB SUMMARY
The applicant will be responsible f . i i.. ,.., . . hi!.I'.1' ,!M'- = and managing the Plan's Formulary through
ongoing reviews of pharmaceutical databases, consultations with pharmaceutical companies and health
professionals and audits of pharmacies to ensure quality drugs and cost control in the Plan.

QUALIFICATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS
* Bachelors Degree in Pharmacy and certificate of registration with Pharmacy Council.
* At least 7 to 10 years experience as dispensing or clinical pharmacist at a senior level.
* Working knowledge of formulary development, pharmacy audits and local health legislation.
* Proficient in Microsoft Office Applications including: Word, Excel, and PowerPoint.
* Excellent written and oral communication skills.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Conduct targeted research through database analyses ]' ri rd.1., 1 ..1 r i. '. and discussions with health
professionals for specifying and updating the Formulary in line with Plan's priorities, objectives and
targets;

2. Prepare technical briefs, articles, website material and other documents for timely communication of
specific aspects of the Plan's Formulary to internal and external stakeholders;

3. Prepare quarterly and annual data on dispensing and utilization of Formulary items to facilitate timely
negotiations and procurement of supplies by the Bahamas National Drug Agency (BNDA) for
participating pharmacies;

4. Lead team involving officers from the Drug Plan and the BNDA in reviewing requisitions, conducting
annual and other special audits of dispensing activities of pharmacies to ensure compliance with
Plan's rules and to deter likely fraud and abuse;

5. Lead and/or vet responses to queries, complaints and comments from health professionals, pharmacists,
Plan members and the public in a prompt and satisfactory manner given the Plan's response time
guidelines;

6. Compile annual and other reports as requested for servicing meetings of the Benefits Review Committee
and take charge of follow up actions within defined time-frames as recommended by the Committee;

7. Collate and classify Plan data on .hlI 1. p.. i1..in.. dispensing and utilization to assist public health
officials in defining or intensifying national policies and programs aimed at controlling chronic diseases.

APPLICATION
Interested persons may apply by submitting a completed application form, along with the necessary
proof of qualifications on or before Friday, December 18, 2009, to:

Vice President
Human Resources and Training
The National Insurance Board
Clifford Darling Complex
Nassau, Bahamas


BUSINESS








+


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Sip Jack fires broadside


the Mid-Atlantic Group, said
to feature Mr Babak and Ben
Bell, a Fortune Cay resident
who is a former director of the
Office of National Risk Assess-
ment (ONRA) in the US
Transportation Security
Administration. Mr Bell set up
the Freeport office of Global
Information Group five years


NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

SHANAC SERVICE COMPANY LIMITED
IBC N� 99911B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with Section 131 (2)(a)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000),
SHANAC SERVICE COMPANY LIMITED is in Dissolution.

Any person having a Claim against the SHANAC SERVICE
COMPANY LIMITED is required on or before 7th February 2010
to send their name, address and particulars of the debt or claim to
the Liquidator of the Company, or in default thereof they may be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such
claim is approved

Mr. Nathan Santos of Suite 2B Mansion House 143 Main Street
Gibraltar is the Liquidator of SHANAC SERVICE COMPANY
LIMITED.



iquidator



NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

MIRASOL INVESTMENTS GROUP LIMITED
IBC N� 144099B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with Section 131 (2)(a) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000), MIR-
ASOL INVESTMENTS GROUP LIMITED is in Dissolution.

Any person having a Claim against the MIRASOL INVEST-
MENTS GROUP LIMITED is required on or before 3rd March
2010 to send their name, address and particulars of the debt or claim
to the Liquidator of the Company, or in default thereof they may
be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such
claim is approved

Mr. Nathan Santos of Suite 2B Mansion House 143 Main Street Gi-
braltar is the Liquidator of MIRASOL INVESTMENTS GROUP
LIMITED.


iquidator



NOTICE
EXXONMOBIL KAZAKHSTAN EXPLORATION
NORTH CASPIAN

OFFSHORE LIMITED


N 0 T I C E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) EXXONMOBIL KAZAKHSTAN EXPLORATION
NORTH CASPIAN OFFSHORE LIMITED is
in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company
commenced on the 9th day of December, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Carol G.
Gray of 16825 Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas
77060.

Dated the 10th day of December, 2009.


HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company


FROM page 1B
ownership dispute with the late
Edward St George's estate. The
plan was then that the two sides
would sell their interests to
Hutchison Whampoa. Yet Sir
Jack is showing that he will not
be pushed around, either by the
Prime Minister, the St Georges
or Hutchison. Sources suggest-
ed yesterday that Sir Jack had
signed an agreement to sell his
GBPA/Port Group interest to


ago, yet Sir Jack denied that he
had any desire to sell his GBPA
interest, telling Tribune Busi-
ness: "Without Hannes Babak,
there are no plans at all. I'm
not selling my shares."
When pressed about the
Prime Minister's desire for a
resolution of the ownership dis-
pute, Sir Jack replied: "He'll
get a solution in the next day or
two." When asked what he
meant, Sir Jack said: "Read into
it what you will." He then
returned to a meeting at the
Port offices.
He was less reticent about
Hutchison Whampoa. "I've
said in public that I'm not sell-
ing to Hutchison," he told Tri-
bune Business yesterday. "I
don't think they're the right
people for Freeport, Grand
Bahama or the Bahamas.
"Their land policy of locking
up land for 30,40 years for their
grandchildren should not be the
policy in the Bahamas," he
added, telling Tribune Business
that land in Freeport and
Grand Bahama should be used
as a tool for economic devel-
opment and empowering
Bahamians. "It's certainly off
my agenda," Sir Jack said of
selling his GBPA interest (he
alleges it is 75 per cent, the St
Georges 50 per cent) to Hutchi-
son Whampoa, "regardless of
any price being offered. They
don't have the right land policy,
and have done a bloody awful


NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

ROYMILLION HOLDINGS LIMITED
IBC N� 144101B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with Section 131 (2)(a) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000), ROY-
MILLION HOLDINGS LIMITED is in Dissolution.

Any person having a Claim against the ROYMILLION HOLD-
INGS LIMITED is required on or before 3rd March 2010 to send
their name, address and particulars of the debt or claim to the Liq-
uidator of the Company, or in default thereof they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such claim is ap-
proved

Mr. Nathan Santos of Suite 2B Mansion House 143 Main Street
Gibraltar is the Liquidator of ROYMILLION HOLDINGS LIM-
ITED.



quidator




NOTICE


EXXONMOBIL KAZAKHSTAN EXPLORATION NORTH
CASPIAN
OFFSHORE LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the
above-named Company are required to send particulars
thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau,
Bahamas on or before 4th day of January, A.D., 2010. In
default thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 10th day of December, A.D., 2009.


Carol G. Gray
Liquidator
16825 Northchase Drive
Houston, TEXAS 77060


job of administering the hotel.
One of the problems with
tourism is the lack of promo-
tion of Our Lucaya." Sir Jack
contrasted efforts to promote
Our Lucaya with the numerous
times Kerzner International's
Atlantis resort was featured in
adverts and promotions on US
TV channels. He also argued
that "Pelican Bay, with 250
rooms, is spending more on
promotions than Our Lucaya,
which has 2,500 rooms".
Such an attack on a joint ven-
ture partner, which holds a 50
per cent stake in the Grand
Bahama Development Com-
pany (Devco), Freeport Har-
bour Company and Grand
Bahama International Airport
Company, is considered most
unusual in business circles, and
shows the depths of Sir Jack's
feelings on the issue. Sir Jack
also denied reports reaching
Tribune Business that he had
appointed James Chapman, an
attorney with Cayman-based
Bodden & Bodden, who previ-
ously acted for one of the enti-
ties involved in the GBPA own-
ership dispute, as a protector
for the Hayward Family Trust.
"That's news to me," Sir Jack
said. "I don't know where you
get these things from." Tribune
Business had been told that Mr
Chapman would have the pow-
er to add or remove directors of
the trust's trustee, who include
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas)
bankers Ian Fair and Robert
Lotmore, and do the same with
the trust's beneficiaries.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


Developers deny


'persuasion' claim


FROM page 1B

after the Privy Council, Court of Appeal and Supreme Court all
ruled emphatically in favour of the developers on the substan-
tive elements of the case.
"He does not identify any persons," Mr Adams said of the alle-
gations. "That, in and of itself, makes it difficult to develop a
reply. That is a matter we are taking up with our clients, and
hopefully we will get some instructions shortly."
Mr Smith had alleged that "almost 100 per cent of the commu-
nity" on Great Guana Cay had been behind the legal challenge to
the Government and developers over the project.
"It was only in the later stages of the litigation, when the Gov-
ernment and the developers used their financial strength and
political strength to persuade many of the community members to
try and change their minds that a small number of the communi-
ty began to support the project instead of opposing it," the Cal-
lenders & Co partner had alleged.
"This 'persuasion' occurred, by way of example, by the devel-
opers for instance going to persons such as Mr Troy Albury, the
president of the Save Guana Cay Reef Association, and asking him
to end his challenge in consideration of him being allowed to
open a dive store within the gated community and being promised
business. I am told by my clients that this sort of thing happened
progressively and, in some instances, successfully.
"I was also approached by representatives of the developers on
a number of occasions. They asked me how much my fees were,
and offered to pay them to me to find a way of settling the case."
Unlike the Government, Mr Adams said his clients had no
interest in seeking an Order that the Association's financial back-
ers reveal their identities, or go after them individually. Discovery
Land Company simply wanted the Association to pay the legal
costs it had incurred, given that it had challenged the Heads of
Agreement to which it was one of the two signatories.
"The developers' position is that they are happy this is behind
them, they'd like to get an Order to recoup the costs of the litiga-
tion, and as regards the local community they want to place the
emphasis on building a positive relationship," Mr Adams told
Tribune Business.
"That's where their focus is right now, not on, as Mr Smith put
it, putting salt and vinegar on any wounds. The developers are not
interested in that. They're interested in moving forward and build-
ing a positive relationship with the local community."




Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort
@ Offshore Island.


[nities applications for ihe positions of:


Cost Controller
Water Sports Manager
Dive Instructors (Exunm/Nassau)
Certified Lifeguards (ExunmaNasau)
Receiving Supervisor
Entertainment Coordinators
Food & Beveragc Management
Frunt Office Manager
Enviraonmetal Coordinator


Applicant i usuI have aC lCa.t Fiv years experience
in the IIospitality Itdustir in the above mendlioned
poafltons. exci]llent cotrriunWictuion1, organiLllational
and interpersonal skills, must be able to train and
motliate (canl mllenibcrs. Formal qualifications and
computer skills dcstrabkl must be ablc lo work flexible
and long hours,


Fax or mail mrnC's with proof of qualifications
and experience locmJaionr=p sandals.com Hax 327-
6%1.


Closing date Deculmber I 8. 2(19.




Sandals Emerald Bay Resort
Emerald Bay, Exuma


Inviles applications for the
following positions:-


Butlers
Golf Equipment Tedhnidan
Assitant Chief Engineer
Afr Condition Technlidin
Rergeration Tecdidciuan
Store Porters
Cost Control Clerk
Batenders
Stewards
Servers
Swuity Offieui
Room Atteidmntd
Housemean
Asst. Housekeeping Manager
ShopfT-or Desk Agents
Tour G aides

All applicants would be screened on Frkiday.
December 18th, 2009 at the Sandals Royal


ROYAL FIDELITY

C F A L" ,__ ^c> t. ^ e t )A i_
MONDAY 14 DECEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1.525.20 I CHG 28.83 I . CHG 1.93 I YTD -187 16 I YTD - -10.93
FINDEX* CLOSE 000 00 I YTD 00 00" I 2008 -12 31"
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM I TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 I FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Previous Close Todays Close .. Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
1 71 1 03 AML Foods Limited 1 17 1 17 000 5OO 0127 0000 92 O000%
11 80 990 Bahamas Property Fund 1075 1073 -0 02 2,000 0992 0200 108 1 86%
930 59o Bank of Bahamas 59o 59o 000 0244 0260 242 441 %
o89 063 Benchmark 063 063 000 -0877 0000 N/M 0 OO%
349 315 Bahamas Waste 315 315 000 0 125 OO9O 252 286%
237 214 Fldehlty Bank 237 237 000 34 0 055 0040 43 1 1 69%
14 04 992 Cable Bahamas 1000 1000 000 1 406 0250 71 250%
288 272 Colina Holdings 272 272 000 0249 0040 109 1 47%
7 19 526 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 580 637 057 21,653 0419 0300 152 471%
385 1 27 Consoldated Water BDRs 257 260 0 03 0111 0 052 234 2 00%
285 1 32 Doctor's Hospital 255 255 000 0625 0 080 41 314%
820 628 Famguard 649 649 000 0420 0240 155 370%
1 87 88o Fnco 929 929 000 0322 0520 289 560o%
11 71 986 FirstCarNbbean Bank 986 986 OOO 4,889 0631 0350 156 355%
553 411 Focol (S) 475 475 000 48,565 0326 0150 146 316%
1 00 1 00 Focol Class B Preference 1 00 100 000 000 0 000 N/M 0 OO%
045 027 Freeport Concrete 027 027 000 0035 0000 77 O0 00
9 02 549 ICD Utlhties 559 559 000 0407 05OO 137 894%
1200 995 J 8 Johnson 995 995 000 0952 0640 105 643%
10 0 10 00 Premier Real Estate 1000 1000 000 0156 0000 641 0 OO%
BI8X LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest Maturity
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 10000 000 7% 19 October 2017
100000 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 10000 000 Prime + 1 75% 19 October 2022
100000 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 10000 000 7% 30 May 2013
100000 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 10000 000 Prime + 1 75% 29 May 2015
Fidelity 0er-The-Counter Securities
52 kh-Hi 52 kh-Lo S.mbol Bid Ask Last Pice V.eekl1 . ol EPS i Di. i PE Yield
1460 7 92 Bahamas Supermarkets 10 06 11 06 1400 -2246 0 00 N/M o 00%
8 00 600 Caribbean Crossings (Pret) 200 625 400 0000 0480 N/M 7 80%
Colina C,.er-The-Counter Securities
1 0o 29 oo ABDAB 30 13 31 59 294 540 0 000 9 03 0 00%
BISX Listed MAutual Funds
52 hk.Hi 52 k.Lo Fund 'lame 'A YTD Last 12 . monthh DI. i Yield I'A Date
1 4160 1 3419 CFAL Bond Fund 1 4160 4 62 5 53 31 -Oct-09
3 0351 28266 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 28552 2 88 3 92 30-Nov-09
1 5050 1 4294 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 5050 499 529 4-Dec-09
33856 29343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 29618 -1252 -1521 31 Oct-09
132400 12 5597 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 132400 493 590 31 Oct-09
103 0956 1000000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 103 0956 310 252 30-Sep-09
100 0000 99 4177 CFAL Global Equity Fund 99 4177 3 12 276 30Sep09
1 0804 1 0000 FG Financial Preferred Incoe Fund 1 0804 432 526 31 -ct -09
1 0364 10000 FG Financial Groth Fund 1 0269 059 0 19 31 -ct-09
1 0742 1 0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1 0742 3 56 4 42 31 -ct-09
94740 90775 Royal Fdelty Bah Int' Investent Fund 94740 4 17 418 31-Oct-09
106301 100000 Royal Fdelty Bah Intl investment Fund 106301 630 630 31-Oct-09
r.IARKET TER.IS
BisX ALL SHARE INDEX l D 2 = 1000 00 YiELD It n th dad-nds d..dd by long p
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid - Buying price of Cona and Fidelity
52wk-Low - Low t closing pric e in last 152 m eks ik g SelXl-ng price of C a and fd4 00ty
Previous oe Previous d-ays weighted price for dalyvlume Last Prie Last traded overthe-counter price
Today's close Current day's weighted price for da lydvlume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
_hange -hange in closing price from day to day EP $ -A company reported earnings per share fr the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. -Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value

(81) - 34or-l Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL= CFAL 242-S02-7010 I ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7784 | FO CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


Bahamian Board Room at 9:00am -6:00pm,
Applicants should satisfy the Company with
proof of qualifications in respected area.


Resume' should be email to
major@ grp. sandals.counm


Application close December 18, 2()9.


BUSINESS I









+


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 7B


NY transit agency proposes subway, bus cuts


KAREN MATTHEWS
NEW YORK

Facing a nearly $400 million budget gap, tran-
sit officials on Monday proposed cutting subway
lines, dozens of bus routes and free rides for stu-
dents, according to Associated Press.
The recommendations from the Metropolitan
Transportation Authority board's finance com-
mittee will be presented to the full MTA board
when it meets on Wednesday to vote on the 2010


budget. The MTA has pledged not to raise fares
next year. It revived the proposed service cuts
after the state cut aid it had pledged months ago.
The proposed cuts would eliminate two subway
lines, cut several bus routes and mean fewer sub-
ways and buses late at night and on weekends.
The proposals also call for a 10 percent salary cut
to be accomplished by furloughs and temporary
pay cuts. "We're grappling with the loss of near-
ly $400 million virtually overnight," said MTA
Chairman Jay Walder.


May the joy of this holiday season hold the

Promise of a bright future filled with love,

Laughter, happiness and the

Fulfillment of your dreams.



Your Team at Scotiabank (Bahamas) wishes to

Thank You for your business and loyalty.

We wish you and your family

A Joyous Holiday Season

And a

Great New Year!


5 Scotiabank


THE WEATHER REPORT


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THE TRIBUNE


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-t


By JEFFARAH GIBSON


COLOGNE or jew-
ellery, clothes or
electronics?
Shopping for the special
men in your life can be a
tedious task at Christmas,
especially when you don't
have a clue what to pur-
chase, and on top of that
you have to deal with the
holiday rush.
I-! is \ l..i! h ' l.\ . \l II I,.'.1[ !n . ki..
t ill ! i llsll I i . - 1 ll i. l i i l I -














'same ole' cologne, jewellery or cloth-.
11h11. '..i l l i. I ! . . 1 I \ ,''1 1 k l ,1 I 1 .1 - .'1 . -
",. i d [ !\ h i. ,. I. \1l' l . I ! ! i i .l ! i | .'.














ing, I threw him a party. I invited
friends and family over and we had
the time of our lives," she said.
While throwing a party might seem
unusual, this gift meant much more to
her husband than any expensive piece
of jewellery, as "it was validation that
he has a loving family who cares so
much about him, which I can say is
more precious than any pearl found
at the bottom of the ocean," Mrs
Roberts said.
Hosting a Christmas party for that
special someone is a great idea, but if
you have a family member, close.
friend, or significant other that col-
lects certain items, it might be a good
idea to purchase a gift that adds to his
collection.
With a purchase like this you will
show your loved one that you paye
attention to his hobbies and passions.t
Another lady who spoke with Tri-
bune Woman, but wanted to remain
anonymous, said that her special
anonymous, said that her special


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,where you wil l be sure to find a wide








variety of items at a reasonable price.
can purchase in here, " said Bob
l. 1 . . I k . . I . I I I . I I l l . 1 l. . I



















Stevenson, general manager at the
Mall at Marathon.
it 's a necessity. If women are inter-
hIII. I,,t\
















Seated in purchasing clothing for their .
J[ i. [!- 11 111t! II [I | Il s 1 . %!,'. .I l 1 [













men thy can step int, IBunnevill
and Bones or the Tommylil 1 Hilfiger
t. \\ I'l- 11 1l 0.ll H lit l \- I II '.Il I[IH
still head out to the Mail at Marathon
where you will be sure to find a wide
variety of items at a reasonable price.
"There's a lot of great stuff you
can purchase in here," said Bob
Stevenson, general manager at he likes is kthe
Mall at Marathon.
"I can honestly say that youlcan
never go wrong with clothes because
it's a necessity. If women are inter-
ested in purchasing clothing for their
men they can step into Bonneville
and Bones or the Tommy Hilfiger
store for the latest fashion trends,"
he said.
Knowing what kind of guy your
loved one is and what he likes is key.
If he loves electronics then that would
probably be the better choice. If he
enjoys barbequing then buying him a
brand new power grill "will hit the
nail on the head," Mr Stevenson said.
But remember, in the end it doesn't
matter so much what you choose for
a gift, as always it's the thought that
really counts.


Primadona clothing store gives aide to single mothers


By JEFFARAH GIBSON
THANKS to the Primadona
clothing store and the Depart-
ment of Social Services, single
mothers without bank
accounts will have the oppor-
tunity to open one for the first
time this Christmas season.
The store this month
launched a chic gallery-like
outlet named "Pop-Up" which
is a temporary pre-Christmas
showcase of a range of hard-
to-find limited edition apparel
and established designer
brands.


And 10 per cent from first
day sales were donated to fam-
ilies selected by the Depart-
ment of Social Services.
In a time of economic hard-
ship, store owner Tyrina Neely
said they wanted to help give
single mothers the opportuni-
ty to save funds and build a
good credit report.
"Once the Department of
Social Services selects the
women we all meet for a brief
talk, we will all go to a speci-
fied bank together to open
the accounts. It's important
for me to have one- on-one


contact with the ladies as
opposed to just writing a
cheque to the Department. I
want them to know that
someone is on their team and
cheering for their success,"
Ms Neely told Tribune
Woman.
Each bank account will be
opened with $50 as a starting
balance, which will get the
women on the path to saving.
Because it is commonplace
in the Bahamas for women to
be the sole provider of the
family, Ms Neely said she
wanted to extend a hand to


those supporting their chil-
dren by themselves.
"Financial planning is the
most important for single
mothers who are the sole
breadwinners for their fami-
lies. Having a dedicated sav-
ings account whether for col-
lege savings or as a safety net
in case of emergency, it's
important for mothers to be
financially responsible in this
regard," she said.
Ms Neely also said she
hopes by offering this small
incentive it will help the
women develop disciplined


saving habits.
This is not the first time
"Primadona" has displayed
acts of charity, having donat-
ed to various worthy causes
in the past.
"Although this is the first
time 'Primadona' has opened
a 'Pop-Up' shop with dona-
tions from first day sales, we
have been hosting monthly
parties for just over a year,"
she said.
"At those parties we fea-
ture silent auctions where all
proceeds are donated to this
cause. Partners such as BTC,


Baha-Retreat Day Spa, Gray-
cliff Hotel, and TriStar Insur-
ance have donated fabulous
items which women bid on
and all proceeds then go
toward opening bank
accounts for single mothers,"
Ms Neely said.
The Pop-Up store offers a
selection of elegant attire,
handbags, shoes, jewellery,
and much more.
The outlet, located in
Prince George Plaza, upstairs
opposite Lum's Iguana Caf6,
will remain open until
December 24.


+


Discover the goodness





of Ovaltine.

Ovakine's unique recipe includes milk and cocoa powder, 15 essential vitamins
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half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate.

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway * 394-1759







+


PAGE 2C, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


WOMAN I


Miss Andros wins Miss Toastmasters



Bahamas title with her oratory skills


CONTRARY to popular
belief, beauty pageants are
not just about good looks.
Yes, looks along with
finesse and poise play a major
role in winning the coveted
crown, but it's not the decid-
ing factor.
Organisers of traditional
pageants point out that a con-
testant's intelligence, her abil-
ity to maintain composure
and articulately express her
views account for 50 per cent
of the judges' decision in the
final rounds of competition.
After the competition is
over, during their reign,
pageant winners are asked to
appear at public functions and
speak to serious issues, not
wear their swimsuits.
It's often said that contes-
tants aren't properly trained
to answer 'the final question'
in local pageants.
There are few pageants like
Miss Toastmasters Bahamas
that really reward contestants
for their ability to answer a
question eloquently and with
poise.
Last month, eight contes-
tants showed off their oratory


skills in grand style at the Miss
Toastmasters Bahamas
Speech Pageant held at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort and
Crystal Palace Casino.
At this year's competition,
it was Toastmaster Kareen
Sherwood who received the
most awards.
She won in the categories
of Miss Congeniality, Best
Speech, Best Business Attire,
Best Evening Gown, Peoples
Choice, and for the most
number of ads.
But this wasn't a problem
for the winner of the overall
competition, Sashane
McDonald of the Toastmas-
ters Club 7178.
Sashane, 29, told Tribune
Woman that she simply
walked her walk and talked
her talk, wowing the judges
with her poise and confidence,
responding with a well
thought out answer to her
final question.
Activities like 'table topics'
and other segments of a typi-
cal Toastmasters' meetings
proved most beneficial to the
contestants in responding to
off-the-cuff questions.


The competition was stiff,
as the eight contestants par-
ticipated in three pageant seg-
ments in front of a 200 plus
crowd.
In the end, it was Miss
Andros Sashane McDonald
who took home the 2009-2010
Miss Toastmasters Bahamas
title, and almost $250 in cash
and prizes.
The pageant afforded
female members of Toast-
masters Clubs in the Bahamas
the opportunity to demon-
strate their personal growth
in public speaking since being
involved in Toastmasters.
After a business attire seg-
ment and a six-minute speech,
Sashane and four other con-
testants battled it out by
answering the final question
about defining the 'phenom-
enal man.'
Scripts and notes were not
allowed during the contes-
tant's monologue.
Generally, the responses
were that a man has to be
independent, has to be honest
with himself and his family.
Sashane's answer impressed
the judges the most; she spoke


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about a man being true to
himself.
"The answer set her apart
from the other finalists," said
pageant coordinator Damien
Miller.
A lawyer by profession,
Sashane has learned to master
public speaking, but said that
her Toastmasters experience
has helped her understand the
difference between public
speaking and giving speech-
es.
Sashane and runner-up
Christina Chemhuru, who are
both from the Toastmasters
Club 7178 Healing Commu-
nicators - were called to the
front at the end, holding
hands and smiling.
"We were passing com-
ments to each other. We were
actually saying stuff through
our teeth the whole time. We
were saying how tired we
were of smiling all night," said
Christina.
The pageant began as a
club initiative, but over the
years has blossomed into an
event open to the entire New
Providence Branch of Heal-
ing Communicators Toast-
masters Club 3596.
These were the results:
Title winner - Sashane
McDonald; first runner-up -
Christina Chemhuru; second
runner-up - Bruanne Elliot,


By JEFFARAH GIBSON

AFTER the honeymoon
phase passes, couples tend to
get lazy in their efforts to
ensure that their relationship is
thriving and that their signifi-
cant other is sufficiently satis-
fied.
But there is something every
couple can do to keep the fire
ablaze and to build a strong,
loving bond.

Bring back the romance
Speaking with Tribune
Woman, Margaret Bain, an
individual and couples rela-
tionship therapist, said that it is
only natural for the romance
in the relationship to wear off,
and when it does, each person
should make an effort in
restoring the connection.
"Almost everyone gets com-
fortable after a period of time,
and as time progresses the
relationship becomes less ful-
filling and there is a feeling of
emptiness," she said.
What most people forget,
Ms Bain said, is the impor-
tance of romance.
"The romance keeps a rela-
tionship alive and healthy. It's
all about relearning those
things that cause one to
become attracted to their part-
ner and reintroducing them
later on in the relationship,"
she said.
Being romantic does not
only involve making reserva-
tions at the most expensive
restaurants or buying lavish
flower arrangements, it also
means understanding your
partner's interests and redis-
covering them together.

Spend time together
This is probably the most
obvious and important aspect,
since without spending time
together it is difficult to foster
an intimate bond. The adage is
true, couples who don't spend
much time together lose their


SASHANE MCDONALD right after the announcement that she won
the Miss Toastmasters Bahamas title.


and third runner-up - Kareen
Sherwood.
Toastmasters is a leading
global movement devoted to
making effective oral com-


munication a worldwide real-
ity.
Through its clubs, persons
learn the art of speaking, lis-
tening and thinking.


connection. Being in a rela-
tionship requires time and ded-
ication from both partners, Ms
Bain said, and no relationship
can survive without the couple
having fun together.
"If couples want their rela-
tionship to last then they must
create time together without
children," she emphasised.
"People do a lot of family
things together, but they
neglect their relationship, and
some people wonder why after
the kids are all grown up there
is left what is called an 'empti-
ness syndrome' within the rela-
tionship", she said.
Couples should take at least
15 minutes to sit down face-
to-face, and discuss the highs
and lows of their days without
any distractions, which means
no kids, no television, and no
music. If this is not possible
then they can check in with
phone calls every so often.

Get to the talking
Communication is at the
root of almost every relation-
ship dilemma. The inability to
express oneself without being
judged or criticised is very
important to an individual, and
a relationship that is unable to
foster healthy communication
is doomed to fail.
"Communication does not
only require talking to get
one's point across, but they
must also be willing to listen
attentively. Too many times
couples try to communicate
with each other and they are
either interrupted or judged by
their partner. This, then causes
the other mate to shut down
and become unwilling to share
their thoughts," Ms Bain said.
With this in mind, she said,
couples should spend at least
30 to 50 minutes a day talking
to each other. During this time
they should encourage open-
ness and honesty.

The power of touch


Ever notice when a mother
kisses her child after it has hurt
itself and all of a sudden the
child stops crying? In relation-
ships it is similar - each partner
gets confirmation and comfort
from the touch of their mate.
"After couples have been in
a relationship for some time
they forget to touch one anoth-
er. Now this type of touch is
the non-demand for pleasure
kind of touch. This involves
the simple hugging, kissing or
holding hands, this is what
actually encourages and builds
intimacy," she said.
Ms Bain also recommended
that touching should be done
regularly, and although it might
be a little surprising for your
partner in the beginning, it is
worthwhile.
So the next time you see
your significant other, greet
them with hug and a kiss on
the cheek.

Spend time away from each
other
While couples might want
to spend every waking
moment together, it is not
healthy for a relationship. And
although the more time spent
with a partner, the more the
connection strengthens, it can
also cause the quality of the
relationship to diminish slow-
ly.
"What most people seem to
forget is that although they are
in a relationship with a person
they are still individuals. By
wanting to spend every
moment of the day with their
lover the person comes across
as needy and loses all of their
emotional independence," she
said.
It is vital that each partner
engage themselves in activi-
ties without their mate. Not
only does it improve emotion-
al stability and strengthen
one's separate identity, it is
also the beginning of healthy
fulfilling unity.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


Enhancing your



relationship


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+


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 3C


PMH makes Bahamian medical history


Dr Magnus Ekedede performs first lobotomy


By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features
Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

AS Kenneth Farrington
views the pictures of the large
tumour doctors removed from
his brain on his 12th birthday
last month, he seems uneasy.
And it's no wonder, as Ken-
neth has undergone the first
lobotomy ever to be performed
in the Bahamas and in the
region.
The extremely risky proce-
dure was performed at Princess
Margaret Hospital (PMH) by
a team of neurosurgeons in a
five-hour operation on Novem-
ber 25.
Dr Magnus Ekedede, Chief
Neurosurgeon at PMH,
explained to reporters seated
around a boardroom table last
week the reason why it took so
long for them to inform the
public about this amazing feat.
"There have been cases
where the patient didn't fully
recover from the operation and
died," he said. "And in order
to avoid disseminating prema-
ture information we wanted to
wait a few days to be sure that
Kenneth was well."
Kenneth's surgery had a
50/50 chance of success, Dr
Ekedede said.
The operation required a
"meticulous technique" and if
anything had gone wrong it
could have had life-altering
consequences for the patient.
He could have regressed to a
vegetative state; become a
hemiplegiac (where half of the
body is paralysed), or experi-
enced diminishment of speech
functions and vision.
In the worst case scenario
Kenneth could have died from
complications during or after
the operation.
Dr Ekedede explained all of
these possibilities to Kenneth's
mother, Pearl Mitchell, before
the operation.
"They told me surgery was


the only option to save his life,
and I gave them the okay
because he had a lot of
headaches and seizures," Ms
Mitchell explained to Tribune
Health.
"I was afraid, and I started
crying because I didn't know
what the results would be like."
But in the end Ms Mitchell
understood that the surgery was
the only chance for her son to
live a normal, healthy life.
Kenneth's health woes began
in recent months when he start-
ed experiencing headaches in
the front part of his head.
Little did he or his family
know, but a vascular tumour
was the cause for those
headaches, and it was growing
in size.
Kenneth saw a doctor in
Freeport on November 24, after
having just suffered a seizure
for the first time in his young
life.
Doctors in Freeport opted to
do a CT scan to determine if
the seizure could be due to
bleeding in the brain.
The scan showed them a sus-
picious area in Kenneth's right
frontal lobe, leading the
Freeport doctors to immedi-
ately contact a neurosurgeon
who advised them to look into
it further.
According to the Centre for
Neuro Skills (CNS) in the Unit-
ed States, the left frontal lobe is
involved in controlling language
related movement, whereas the
right frontal lobe plays a role
in non-verbal abilities. But the
CNS pointed out that some
researchers emphasise that this
rule is not absolute and that
with many people both lobes
are involved in nearly all behav-
iour.
Kenneth's tumour was con-
fined to the left frontal lobe,
and doctors decided to perform
the surgery the very next day.
The surgery involved a cran-
iotomy in the right frontal lobe
- the removal of half of the right
part of the brain that contained
the growth.


Kenneth was anaesthetised,
and extensive measures were
taken to set up all of the appro-
priate monitors to be certain
that the boy remained stable
throughout the procedure.
The surgery began with an
incision to the scalp.
After that, a plate of bone
was cut and temporarily
removed, this gave the neuro-
surgeons access to the inner
skull which has a protective lay-
er and leads to the brain.
Any bleeding had to be
quickly controlled, or else Ken-
neth would've hemorrhaged.
After removing the entire right
frontal lobe, taking care not to
damage the left lobe in any
way, doctors filled the space
with a sterile solution and
closed the skull back up.
When Kenneth emerged
from the operating theatre after
five hours of surgery Ms
Mitchell said she did not recog-
nise her son.
"I couldn't believe it was my
child," she said, "His eyes were
all swelled up, they had tubes
and other things hooked up to
him."
Kenneth regained con-
sciousness after 24 hours, and
was immediately able to com-
municate that he was fine and
in possession of all of his speech
and motor skills.
Two days after the risky
operation, Kenneth was able to
walk again. All in all, his recov-
ery was uncomplicated.
Kenneth was discharged
from hospital a week after he
underwent the lobotomy.
"It's remarkable that he's
recovered so well," said Dr
Ekedede.
"Kenneth has no loss of
memory, no weakness, he can
see smell and everything else."
The boy's initial symptoms
of headaches and epilepsy are
also gone. If there had been any
complications from the opera-
tion they would have shown up
within three to five days after
surgery, Dr Ekedede said.
Kenneth's family is now


planning a fitting "welcome
home" for when he returns to
Freeport.
His aunt has promised him a
birthday cake to mark his 12th
birthday, which he spent on an
operating table at PMH.
In six months time, Dr Eked-
ede will do a follow-up exami-
nation on Kenneth.
"We have accomplished a
lot, because this operation is
normally done in Mayo Clinics
and Harvard Clinics," Dr Eked-
ede said.
He emphasised that he is
indebted to the contribution of
everybody who made the oper-
ation a success: Dr Ian McDow-
ell, Dr Vernal McPhee, Dr
Coralie Adderley, Dr Marie
Roe, and Dr Geoffrey Penner-
man.
"This is very good news at
this Christmas season," said Dr
Pennerman, Medical Chief of
Staff at PMH.


KENNETH Farrington just before his surgery. In this photo, the med-
ical team has outlined cutting lines on his forehead for the procedure.


The hospital has also given a
monetary gift to Kenneth, "to
allow him to achieve his life's
potential."


Ms Mitchell said Kenneth
may be able to return to school
in January for the Spring
semester.


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PAGE 4C, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


WOMAN


rB BB BBING RELATIONSHIPS I


Does size re


matter?


IMAGINE yourself sipping a cup
of coffee, feeling relaxed and your
mind starts to drift to 'people watch-
ing'; all sorts of people, dressed dif-
ferently and interacting with each oth-
er.
Then you notice smiles, endearing
looks, touches, and other not such
friendly body language. Thoughts
about what attracts them to each oth-
er and what sort of relationship they
have becomes a playful pastime.
Attraction is such a fascinating top-
ic and our individual likes and dislikes
are intrinsic to who we are. We know
that there will always be people who
find small or large breasts, hips or legs
their preference, so does size really
matter?
If that is the case then why do we get
so hung up and self critical about parts
of our own body?
For others, it may not be physical
looks but the level of the magnetism
and the size of the wallet that is
attached. For both men and women,
material assets equal security and in
their eyes, add size to the person.


Throw in position and power, and
the person grows to be larger than life.
Wouldn't we all want their self-confi-
dence and sexual attraction? Who says
size doesn't matter?
Picture yourself having it all; enor-
mous personal wealth, position, power,
personal happiness. Decades go by
and you turn your wealth over and
over. The pressure to maintain a cer-
tain image keeps the wheel turning.
Does something change or is it an
inevitable progression of events when
you discover that sharing your wealth
feels so rewarding? To be viewed as a
philanthropist moves you further up
the ladder of 'having it all'.
Now you can be seen as not only


successful but generous with a huge
overflowing heart.
If we know all of this then it still
does not explain why we are so self-
deprecating about parts of our body.
Why do we always want to change
something about ourselves?
Certainly a little 'tweaking' here and
there cannot be a bad thing? Watching
what we eat or exercising more effi-
ciently makes sense, however, abus-
ing our bodies in any way can become
consuming and pull us from focusing
on the world around us.
No matter what we tell ourselves,
or hear from other people, positive
body image and self-acceptance are
hugely important.
It is hard to move forward if we
loathe the size of a part of us. It will
always get in the way of feeling free
and uninhibited if we are engaged in
an intimate relationship.
Women in particular are insecure
about their bodies, but they also
underestimate men's adoration and
worship of the female form.
For some, frequent compliments


and reassurance helps to ease the shy-
ness.
However, others are faced with crit-
icism that only intensifies their desire
to change the defective part. If it does
become hugely important to you then
cosmetic surgery may be the answer.
The long-term consequences of
body modification are far reaching and
a powerful method to gain or regain
lost self esteem.
Low self esteem is not exclusive to
women and many men feel society's
pressure to live up to the ideal image
of a man.
This is reinforced by the full range of
media and marketing products.
Pornography, in particular, plays a
huge role in reinforcing penis envy
and comparisons.
The majority of heterosexual men
have rarely, if ever, seen another man's
erection so this is often the only way
they have to compare.
However, few fail to recognize that
the industry itself searches for the
largest phalluses to enhance the effect.
Put all these expectations together and


it is little wonder that performance
anxiety interferes with satisfaction.
Actually, most women will tell you
that 'bigger is not necessarily better'.
Sexual compatibility starts with shared
values and preferences, but then
moves to reciprocal pleasuring.
Many couples would uncover a new
intimacy if they asked each other how
they could become better lovers. Learn
to perfect the skills in areas that you
bring most pleasure and in this way
any physical shortcomings are min-
imised. If you move to placing more
emphasis on all areas of sensuality and
sexuality then you will learn to give
more with out holding back.


* Margaret Bain is an individual and cou-
ples relationship therapist. She is a reg-
istered nurse and a certified clinical sex
therapist. For appointments call 364-
7230 or e-mail her at
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She
is also available for speaking engage-
ments.


Emotional Hijacki

"The sign of intelligent people is
their ability to control emotions by
the application of reason."
- Marya Mannes

EMOTIONS are something that
we experience everyday; whether neg-
ative or positive, our emotions are an
integral aspect of who we are - how
we think and how we behave.
We have all experienced anger,
hatred, desire, fear, jealousy, disap-
pointment and other such emotions
many times throughout our lives.
But are we appropriately navigating
them?
Often times we justify our emo-
tional reactions by blaming others,
spinning a web of delusion that anoth-
er person's action or behaviour is the
cause for ours and thus they are
responsible for what we do or say.
This in a roundabout way is a symp-
tom of being emotionally out of con-
trol and vulnerable to an emotional
hijacking.

Emotional Hijacking - It Is What It Is!


:Who is navigating your feelings?


To change or modify your feelings
you must first acknowledge and
accept that the feelings exist. This is
sometimes the most difficult step,
especially in a small society where
people are accustomed to suppressing
and or denying what they truly feel.
Beneath the surface these rejected
feelings begin to swell into waves of
toxic emotions that eventually come
crashing ashore.
Emotional Intelligence (EQ) is
"your ability to recognize and under-
stand emotions in yourself and others
and to use this awareness to manage
your behaviour and relationships."
It is an essential ingredient of
human behaviour, different from


intellect.
Healthy EQ therefore means that
you possess the skills necessary to
navigate your emotions and avoid
emotional hijackings.
But at some point we all get
hijacked by our emotions. This occurs
when the emotional part of the brain
takes control and the logical or think-
ing part shuts down, causing your
emotions to control your behaviour,
rather than the other way around.
The untold truth of how you feel
remains in your subconscious mind,
and you may think that because you
have suppressed rather than
expressed it, that it doesn't exist.
But you could not be more wrong.
Your feelings are right there, silently
forming a concentrated part of the
energy you exude.
The point here is you cannot run
from yourself. You either own your
feelings or you are blaming others for
how you feel.
Most adults do not own their feel-
ings, they simply learn to live with
their untruths. This is where the bulk


of emotional hijackings take place,
especially in relationships, whether
romantic or in the workplace.
Most people try to navigate rela-
tionships without first being able to
navigate their own emotions.

Final Thoughts -
Let's Bring It Home
When you disregard your feelings
you adversely affect your emotional
well-being and that of those around
you, especially children who are
unable to understand. Consequent-
ly, they repeat the same ineffective
means of channelling their emotions
based on what they observe.
This sheds light on the notion that
anti-social behaviour is not neces-
sarily about physical violence as
much as it is about the need to effec-
tively understand and navigate emo-
tions.
The challenge here is that most
education models focus primarily on
IQ, paying very little regard for EQ,
even though it considered a funda-
mental component of human poten-
tial development.
Emotions can help or hinder you,
but you have no power over them
until you understand them.
When you know who you are, your


strengths and your breaking points,
you can develop strategies to
improve your emotional well-being.
Remember your emotions are
complex, building healthy emotions
begin when you honour and posi-
tively navigate your feelings. Of
course this is easier said than done,
but to win you must begin by finding
ways to assess your EQ.
More importantly, the best that
you can do is to learn to live your
own truth. One great writer puts it
well - "Everything can be taken from
a man but the last of human free-
doms, which is the ability to choose
one's attitude in a given set of cir-
cumstances, to choose one's way."
(Viktor Frankl)
You have the inner power to nav-
igate your emotions, get up and
make it happen!


* Your questions or comments are wel-
comed. Call 326-3332
or 429-6770 - or send an email to
coach4ward@Yahoo.com.
Michelle M Miller is a certified life coach
and stress management consultant.
She is the principal coach of the Coach-
ing Studio, which located in the Jovan
Plaza, Madeira Street.


IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I





7Th


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 5C


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)w or maintain our hair
ust keep it in its natural
? Not so anymore.
Dmen in Nassau are now
embracing change. No
r do Bahamians show
interest in hair products
make the hair heavy or
or even the forever
us "' I % . . .;".
ake my hat off to those
mian cosmetologists who
now getting on the
hy hair wagon.
d to those who are still a
sitant I say, 'get on with
change is unavoidable
me waits for no man or
[n'.
there you have it, that's
ig buzz about Domini-
osmetology. What's the
with your hair?

nda Contreras was
d at Nacidit International
Dominican Republic and
d cosmetology for three


uRealn.tntru
lif Riw *.lv Fit kw% ApnI liu rmilimf, * B jK1


years.
All inquiries can be to sent to
Ms Contreras at info@bahare-
treat.com, or call 323-6711 or
323-6715.


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PAGE 6C, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


*OMAN I


FLEAS


- A SERIOUS PEST


THIS ectoparasite causes
most pet owners in the
Bahamas more stress than
any other parasite. It
seems because of our
warm climatic conditions
we are bombarded with
this pest year round.

Fleas:
This is the leading cause of itching
and scratching in dogs and cats.
Fleas survive by jumping onto a
host animal, cutting open their skin
and feeding on the blood. In many
dogs, the bites cause only a mild itch
but a heavy infestation in a puppy
or small dog can cause severe anemia
and even death.
Fleas can cause an allergic reac-
tion by a marked hypersensitivity to
the saliva of fleas that result in skin
abrasion, hair loss and secondary
pyodermas.
They can also transmit tapeworms
to your pet.
Flea infestation can be diagnosed
by finding fleas on the dog or by see-
ing black and white (salt and pep-
per) grains in the coat.
These particles are flea faeces (the
pepper) and flea eggs (the salt).
Flea faecal material is made up of
digested blood, and when placed on
a wet paper or towel it turns reddish
brown.
The adult flea is small and has no
wings so cannot fly. However, they
do have powerful back legs and can
jump great distances. Fleas move
through the hair rapidly and are dif-
ficult to catch. To effectively control
fleas one must understand the flea
life cycle.
Fleas need a warm, humid envi-
ronment to flourish and reproduce.
The higher the temperature and
humidity, the more efficient their
reproduction.
This summer has been very hot


and the amount of rainfall has been
the highest in years, thus the high
levels of fleas this summer.
The adult flea can live up to 115
days on a dog, but only one or two
days off the animal.
After a flea takes a blood meal, it
will mate on the skin of the dog.
The female lays eggs within 24 to
48 hours and may produce up to
2,000 eggs in a four-month life span.
The eggs fall off and incubate in your
home beneath furniture and in car-
pets, cracks and bedding. In 10 days
the eggs hatch into larva that feed
on local debris. Larva spin a cocoon
and goes into a pupal stage that last
for days or months. Under ideal tem-
perature and humidity conditions
fleas can emerge rapidly.
After hatching, immature fleas
have two weeks to find a host. At
any given time, about one per cent of
the population is composed of adult
fleas, while 99 per cent remain in the
invisible egg, larval and pupal stages.
An effective flea control pro-
gramme must eliminate this large
reserve.

How to control fleas:
Today, you can go to any food
store, pet store or mom and pop
store and find products that are
labelled as flea killers. I am not
telling you how to spend
your money or where to spend it,
but I am going to recommend what
you should use.
Advantage: This is a once a month
liquid preparation that kills fleas by
direct contact. Fleas don't have to
bite the dog for the preparation to
work. Advantage kills fleas on direct
contact and may reduce hatching


eggs and larvae.
Advantix:
This is a new formulation of
Advantage that works on fleas and
ticks, however, it is very expensive.
Frontline Plus:
This contains the active ingredi-
ent Fipronil which kills fleas on con-
tact within 24 to 48 hours. The fleas
do not need to bite the dog to be
killed. It is a liquid that comes in
tubes and is applied between the
shoulder blades. The
effectiveness of Frontline is not
diminished if the dog becomes wet.
The product has a residual affect
that last up to 90 days in some dogs.
One additional benefit is that it often
kills ticks for up to 30 days. The
Frontline plus has Methoprene,
which kills adult fleas, flea eggs and
larvae. It is also labelled for use on
breeding, pregnant and lactating
bitches.
Revolution:
This is a once a month liquid
preparation used as heartworm pre-
ventative that has flea-controlling
properties. However, it is extremely
expensive and I do not recommend
it.

Topical insecticides
Flea shampoos (usually pyrethrin
based):
Shampoos such as Adams and
Zodiac kill only when they are on
the pet. Once rinsed off, they have
no residual effect. These are used in
mild to moderate flea infestation,
when the environment has also been
thoroughly treated.
Flea powders and dust:
Powders and dusts such as Zodiac
and Seven have more residual killing
activity, but must be worked thor-
oughly through the coat down to the
skin. Dusting must be repeated two
to three times a week or as recom-
mended by the manufacturer.
Sprays and dips:
These have the most effective
killing action and are the best choic-


FLEAS can cause an allergic reaction by a marked hypersensitivity to the saliva of fleas
that result in skin abrasion, hair loss and secondary pyodermas. They can also trans-
mit tapeworms to your pet.


es for severe flea infestation and for
dogs with flea allergy dermatitis. If
you are not using a topical preven-
tive like Frontline, sprays like
Adams or Davis work best on dogs
with short coats. When using a spray,
begin near the back of the dog's
head and work toward the tail.
This prevents fleas on the body
from escaping the treatment by mov-
ing up to the face. Insecticide dips
such as Para Mite applied to the coat
and allowed to dry are extremely
effective in getting rid of fleas.
Dips penetrate the coat and have
the most immediate killing action
and the longest residual activity.
Flea collars:
Flea collars aid in flea control but
do not eradicate all fleas. Most col-


lars contain Dichlorvos, which turns
into a vapour that surrounds the dog.
If the dog sleeps outdoors, the collar
is not as effective. Flea collars lose
their potency over time and must be
changed every two months. Dog flea
collars should never be used on cats.
Treating the environment:
As mentioned earlier, a female
flea may produce up to 2,000 eggs in
four months. Most of these eggs will
incubate in the environment and
become adult fleas. Hence it is wise
to treat the environment with a
product that will kill flea eggs and
larvae. You can ask your veterinar-
ian for a suitable house treatment
and/or a yard treatment that is reli-
able and safe or you can call your
local pest company.


Foot health tips for the holiday season


DURING this festive sea-
son many persons will be on
their feet for extended peri-
ods. In preparation for the
season's celebrations, many


are cooking, baking and dec-
orating.
Then there are the shop-a-
holics who don't realise that
they are in for quite a work-


rI



* I


'p


out, the constant moving from
store to store and standing in
cashier lines for extended peri-
ods. Finally, there are the par-
ty-goers who are more con-
cerned about mixing and min-
gling, rather than their feet.
Most people, and more so
women, don't wear the proper
walking or standing gear for
these activities. Instead of
wearing a supportive sandal
while cooking, baking or dec-
orating, they would opt to go
bare feet or wear flat flip flops
while standing for hours on
tiled or hard floors.
On the other hand, we have
the shop-a-holics who want to
sport the season's latest heels
- which are obviously inap-
propriate for this exercise.
Wearing improper
footwear during the holiday
season will only result in blis-
ters, corns, calluses or worse,
heel pain.
Heel spurs has been recog-
nised as one of the most com-
mon causes of heel pain.
Injury, hard surfaces and
poorly constructed footwear
can account for this condition.
Calluses are often found on
pressure-sensitive parts of the
foot, such as under the ball of
the foot or under the big toe
joint. They can be sore and
even painful, much like hav-
ing a pebble under your foot.
Calluses are sometimes a sign
of foot imbalance or of a
more serious problem con-


cealed inside the foot.
Corns on the other hand
come in two forms, hard corns
and soft corns.
Hard corns usually start as
red skin, followed by a coat-
ing of callus, which develops
into a hard corn. Most hard
corns develop on the side of
the little toe, but are also
found in other places where
there is steady pressure and
abrasion. Hard corns are
almost always caused by shoes
of the wrong size or shape or
fit.
On the other hand, the soft
corn is always found between
the web of the toes, usually
between the fourth and fifth
toes.
A soft corn is white and
damp. It can also be very
painful. It is caused by a con-
stant squeezing together of
the toes as a result of shoes
too short or narrow at the
toes.
I wish to give the following
advice to readers this holiday
season:
A supportive flip flop,
loafer or even running gear
combined with a properly
designed 'foot bed' will put
your foot in its natural posi-
tion for walking and standing
this holiday season.
Party-goers should choose
shoes with a reasonable heel
height of 1.5 to 2 inches.
Look for shoes that provide
ample toe room (beware of


pointed toe styles) having a
back strap or enclosed back.
The same holds true for men
with the exception of heel
height.
If you are having trouble
achieving the appropriate fit
with shoes you already own,
take them to a local specialty
footwear store or pedorthic
facility and they can modify
your shoes to fit your feet.
Purchase a slim arch sup-
port that your shoe can
accommodate. Specialty
footwear stores and pedorth-
ic facilities have options that
will fit almost any shoe.
As this is my final article to
end 2009, I want to wish you
comfort and joy this holiday
season! Remember when
your feet feel good so will the
rest of your body! Until next
year - Happy feet!


* Bernadette D Gibson, a board
certified and licensed pedorthist,
is the proprietor of Foot Solu-
tions, a health and wellness fran-
chise that focuses on foot care
and proper shoe fit, located in
the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau.
The views expressed are those
of the author and do not neces-
sarily represent those of Foot
Solutions Incorporated or any of
its subsidiary and/or affiliated
companies. Please direct any
questions or comments nas-
sau@footsolutions.com or 327-
FEET (3338).


C.T.I.
Cellular & Electronics



! .... I A a .fI IPh ne R3


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+>


PAGE 8C, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


*OMAN


GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack.


Birds on the wing


NOW that I am retired
from teaching I live most
of my waking hours on my
back porch. From there I
can look out over my gar-
den and ponder the mys-
teries of life such as 'why
does grass have to grow
so fast' and 'why does my
pentas look so chlorotic
even though I fertilise it
quite often'.
As is usual with men, I am not as
observant as the gentler sex. Out
on the back porch for just a few
seconds this summer my wife
observed: "Those birds are build-
ing a nest?"
I had been watching a pair of
mockingbirds - obviously a male
and female though I am no
ornithologist and cannot tell the
sexes apart - go through a ritual of
landing on top of the vine trellis
with small twigs in their beaks,
looking around, then swooping low
to the corner of my yard near to
the road.
I had been watching this activity
without putting two and two
together.
"This is the end of July. Don't
birds build nests in spring?"
"Whatever. But those birds are
building a nest," my wife said.
I went to investigate and found
the nest. It was in a clerodendron
shrub that was only about six feet
tall and the nest was at below
shoulder height, perfect for taking
photos. Every day from then on I
checked out the nest and before
July was over there was one egg,
then three, then four, sky blue and
speckled with brown.
I can only surmise that some
birds lay a second clutch if they
lose the first to predators. Or
maybe they are remarkably fecund
and just enjoy adding to the popu-
lation of the avian world.
It was the beginning of August
when the last egg was laid, three
days from the first egg to the last.


Every day I visited the nest and
took photos, often while being
dive-bombed by one of the par-
ents.
The change from fascinatingly
ugly and naked to sizeable fledgling
was far from gradual. Every day I
was able to see substantial devel-
opment. Then one morning the
nest was empty.
I checked around for signs of car-
nage because I have had the expe-
rience of a ravaged nest before, but
there were no signs. The young-
sters had gone from eggs to flying
creatures in the space of three


weeks. Amazing.
The new denizens of the bird
world soon made their presence
known.
You could tell it was the young-
sters from the way they played with
each other, even in flight. They
were noisy and seemed to be play-
ing hide and seek with each other,
one darting off and the others fol-
lowing, all to make clumsy land-
ings in the pigeon pea trees.
There was no sign of the parents.
It is obvious that once the offspring
were out of the nest the parents
had taken off and left the kids to


A summer crop of mockingbird eggs. Three weeks after
this photo was taken the birds had hatched and flown.


their own devices.
After a few weeks the siblings
broke up, first of all into pairs and
then into loners. Their territory
obviously expanded but I know the
only mockingbirds I see in the yard
these days are one of the homes.
Perhaps next spring I will see
one of them and a new mate perch-
ing on the top of the vine trellis
with twigs in their mouths and the


cycle will have started all over
again.
There are many lessons to be
learned from the animal world,
both cautionary and inspirational,
and I gave pause for thought to the
birds' achievement. In a little over
a month they had built a nest, pro-
duced a family and then retired. It
took me over 40 years, and still
counting.


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