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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01468
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: December 14, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01468

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History made as first

B 0t complete lobotomy

performed in Bahamas

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net
DOCTORS have performed the first complete lobot-
omy in the Bahamas in a successful procedure to remove
a tumour from a boy's brain.
On his 12th birthday last month, Kenneth Farrington
underwent a risky brain operation at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital.
The stakes were high as Dr Magnus Ekedede and his
team of neurosurgeons performed the procedure to
remove a vascular tumour from the right frontal lobe of
Kenneth's brain.
eaV SEE page 19


80th homicide makes

record total for the year


THE record of 79 homicides
in a year was broken this week-
end when a man who was
attempting to rob a popular
East Street South store at gun
point was shot dead by one of
the establishment's employees.
Police reported that some-
time around 7pm on Saturday
two men armed with handguns
entered the Island Wide Pro-
duce and Meat Mart in the
Carey Plaza.
The two men approached
the store's cashiers, demand-


ing cash and threatening to kill
them if they did not hand over
the money.
"It is reported that the men
continued with the threats to
the cashiers stating, 'I will kill
you, I will kill you'," press offi-
cer Sergeant Chrislyn Skip-
pings said.
At this point, one of the
employees of the store pro-
duced a licensed shotgun and
fired shots in the direction of
SEE page 12


$105m power plant expected
to be up and running by April
By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
BAHAMAS Electricity Corporation officials expect to have
their $105 million power plant at Wilson City, Abaco, up and run-
ning by April next year.
During a tour of the facility over the weekend, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham tried to ease the fears of residents on the island
who had specific concerns about the project.
While he could not assure them that BEC would not be using
the cheaper Bunker C fuel to power the plant, Mr Ingraham did
explain that it does not make sense to put such a new facility in
Abaco to burn this type of fuel.
Echoing this sentiment, the chairman of BEC Fred Gottlieb
said he, like the Prime Minister, would not be doing anything that
SEE page 12


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Christmas ","
Decorations

Kelly
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ACTOR JOHNNY DEPP.
right, i- io.-1 i o -ll':ue ter
after .:,e rn , .i0, , \.,il,
the Biuiim -: Filmi Fe.-i-
val's, Cii' ee Ai: Iiie'eienr
Award last nigrlt. At lelf
is fellow actor Sir Sean
Connery and at centre
Leslie Vanderpool,
Bahamas International
Film Festival founder.

INTERNATION-
ALLY acclaimed actor
Johnny Depp last night
accepted the Bahamas
International Film Fes-
tival's (BIFF) Career
Achievement award at
a special presentation
held at the Balmoral
Club in Nassau.
Fellow thespian Sir
Sean Connery, a regu-
lar patron of BIFF who
Mr Depp called one of
the most "elegant"
actors of our time, pre-
sented the award to the
Hollywood mega star.
Following the award
presentation, which was
sponsored by the pri-
SEE page 12


BEC 'lost more than

$16 million in 2008'


By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
THE Bahamas Electricity
Corporation lost more than
$16 million in 2008, State
Minister for the Environment
Phenton Neymour said over
the weekend.
Mr Neymour said that the
islands of Abaco and
Eleuthera were the main cul-
prits where BEC has seen
tremendous losses.
"BEC lost approximately
$8 million last year on the
Abaco operation. With the
Abaco operation, a huge com-
ponent of it is fuel and one of
the avenues we were looking
at in terms of reducing
expenses was reducing the
fuel cost and that is why the


Bunker C was one of the
items we were looking at in
terms of saving costs for the
Abaco operation.
"What is critical is that the
fuel cost for Abaco is also
included in your fuel sur-
charge around the Bahamas.
So if we can lower the fuel
cost in Abaco it affects the
entire Bahamas," he said.
Likewise, on the island of
Eleuthera, BEC experienced
losses of more than $7.5 mil-
lion.
"So when you look at Aba-
co and Eleuthera alone they
almost account for the entire
loss of BEC last year," Mr
Neymour said.
As such, the government is
currently conducting a review
SEE page 12


Lawyer's son
dies in fall

from balcony
IN A tragic incident that
has reportedly left family
and friends "deeply dis-
turbed", the son of lawyer
Elliot Lockhart has died
after falling from a dormi-
tory balcony in Florida this
weekend.
Adel Lockhart, who was
graduated from Queen's
College in 2006, was report-
edly visiting a friend's dor-
mitory room at Barry Uni-
versity in Miami Shores,
which they both attended,
when the incident occurred.
According to reports from
friends and former class-
mates, Adel fell to his death
from a dorm's balcony
SEE page 19


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+


PAGE 2, MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS I


L


OF CHICAGO


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INTERMEZZO
TRIO OF LIMON
SHOT OF CHILLED ULIMONCELLO & LEMON SORBET ON
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M[^3 -3


'Breathe Easy'


campaign boost

Contributions from Family Guardian Staff Charity
Fund and Lucky Food Store and Lucky Restaurant


I[
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AROIMA
EKERINUR


Every year, the employ-
ees at Family Guardian put
aside money for a charity to
be given during the holiday
season. This year, the Fam-
ily Guardian Staff Charity
Fund chose the "Breathe
Easy" campaign as its bene-
ficiary because of the last-


fantastic fall sale!


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PAINT
THINNER

*10"


LUCKY FOOD
STORE & LUCKY
RESTAURANT
CONTRIBUTE
$2,000 TO
"BREATHE EASY": Pictured
from left to right are Bianca
Butler, PMH; Jenny Pinder, The
Tribune; Michele Rassin, Doc-
tors Hospital; Nurse Sandy
Olander, PMH NICU; Dr. F
Montero, Registrar, PMH NICU;
Joe Mei, Lucky Restaurant;
Patrice Solomon, PMH NICU;
James Chu, Lucky Food Store;
Rose Chu, Lucky Restaurant &
Food Store; Chen Yue Lan
Lucky Restaurant & Food
Store; Garwai Mui Lucky
Restaurant and Food Store.
ing difference the Neonatal
Intensive Care Unit (NICU)
continues to make in the
lives of infants, and the fact
that the campaign is raising
money to help improve that
service.
Lucky Food Store and
Lucky Restaurant also made
a contribution to "Breathe
Easy" as they continue to
live up to a commitment to
service within the Bahamian
community.
Goal
The "Breathe Easy"
nationwide fund-raising
campaign's goal is to raise
$300,000 for much needed
ventilators to benefit criti-
cally ill newborns at the
Princess Margaret Hospital's
Neonatal Intensive Care
Unit.
The Family Guardian and
Lucky Food Store and
Restaurant donations to the
"Breathe Easy" campaign
has brought the campaign's
funds up to a total of
$219,625.
Persons interested in mak-
ing a donation to the cam-
paign should contact Tile
King, The Tribune Media
Group, Doctors Hospital,
the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital Foundation, or call 302-
4707.


rth stoies
behndth nws


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


PICTURED FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Bianca Butler, PMH; Tanya Sturrup, Family Guardian Charity Fund
Contributor; Michele Rassin, Doctors Hospital; Nurse Patsy Morris, PMH NICU; Stuart Kelly, Family
Guardian; Dr. Gwendolyn McDeigan, Neonatologist, PMH NICU; Ikysha Beneby, Family Guardian
Charity Fund Contributor; Nurse Patrice Solomon, PMH NICU; Jenny Pinder, The Tribune.


I


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I







7Th


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 3


* CALNEWS


Three stabbings

at weekend,

two in popular

nightclubs
POLICE reported
three stabbings over the
weekend, with two of
them taking place in pop-
ular nightclubs.
In the first instance,
occurring sometime
around 3am on Saturday,
police responded to the
scene at Cocktails and
Dreams where they
received information that
a 24-year-old man had
been stabbed in the neck
with a knife.
According to the
police, the male had been
involved in an argument
with another man when
the stabbing occurred.
The victim was taken to
hospital in a private vehi-
cle. The police are ques-
tioning a 20-year-old
male in connection with
this matter.
The second incident
occurred nearly three
hours later around 6am
at Waterloo on East Bay
Street. According to
police press officer
Chrislyn Skippings,
police responded to
information that a 20-
year-old male while leav-
ing the nightclub, got
into an argument with a
group of men in the
parking lot, which result-
ed in him being stabbed
in his upper chest.
The man was taken to
hospital by Emergency
Medical Services. His
condition is unknown at
this time. Police investi-
gations into this matter
are continuing.
The final incident
occurred sometime
around 9.30pm on Satur-
day in the Farrington
Road area.
According to officer
Skippings, an anonymous
caller contacted the
police and reported that
a man had been stabbed
on Farrington Road.
"Police responded and
information received
from the victim, while
walking on Farrington
Road in the area of Kiki
Street he got into an
altercation with another
male which resulted in
him being stabbed to the
head with an unknown
object," she said.
The man was taken to
hospital. Police are con-
tinuing their investiga-
tion into this latest mat-
ter.



Man dies in

Berry Islands

plane crash

A RESIDENT of Bony-
ton Beach, Florida died in
a plane crash in the Berry
Islands on Saturday morn-
ing.
The 60-year-old pilot,
who was identified as
Lawrence Littlefield was
reportedly piloting a single
engine Aztec airplane,
registration number
N93HE, when the aircraft
crashed into waters near
the Chub Cay airport.
At this time it is uncer-
tain where the flight had
originated, but police on
the island have confirmed
that Mr Littlefield was the
only person onboard the
aircraft.
A team of officers from
the Central Detective Unit
in New Providence is
presently in Chub Cay
assisting their colleagues
with this investigation.


Fears that skeletal remains



could be those of missing man


FRANCIS
FARRINGTON


FRIENDS of the missing Fran-
cis Farrington are concerned that
skeletal remains found by police
last Thursday could be those of
the missing 28-year-old man.
However, press officer Sergeant
Chrislyn Skippings told The Tri-
bune yesterday that the body that
was found behind Addington
House, the Anglican Church's
head office on Sands Road, was
badly decomposed and has not yet
been positively identified.
The family of Mr Farrington


Bahamian
By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A BAHAMIAN film telling
the story of a gay man's strug-
gle in a fiercely homophobic
society opened the Bahamas
International Film Festival on
Friday.
About 200 Bahamians and
international filmmakers
attended the world premiere of
Children of God at the Atlantis
theatre, the first feature film
written and directed by
Bahamian filmmaker Kareem
Mortimer.
Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette and Director
of Tourism Vernice Walkine
opened the sixth annual
Bahamas International Film
Festival (BIFF) and praised Mr
Mortimer's work as an
admirable achievement and an
art that will reveal the Bahamas
to the world.
Captivating images of
Eleuthera's dramatic landscape
filled the screen as the audi-
ence followed white Bahamian
art student Jonny on a journey
to the Family Island where he
learns to embrace his homo-
sexual nature and be true to
himself despite being damned
by others.
His story is intertwined with
that of Christian wife and moth-
er Lena as she drives a cam-
paign to "Save the Bahamas"
from homosexuality.
But as her crumbling mar-
riage reveals, accepting oneself
and acting on your true feel-
ings is the only way for her, and
Jonny, to find peace and live a
happy life.
Their stories and their strug-
gles are portrayed in the rich
colours of stunning cinematog-
raphy that gives the overall film
an inspiring and optimistic hue.
Mr Mortimer said he had
the idea for the film following
the murders of a number of
prominent gay men in Nassau
as the gay community felt
threatened by a serial killer and
had no protection.
He received support from
the BIFF residency programme


also said that they have not been
informed about any new develop-
ments in the case.
An online campaign was
launched last week in an effort to
help find the missing St Andrews
School graduate.
While rumours spread over the
weekend that the remains found
behind Addington House were in
fact those of the former Securities
Commission employee, there is at
this time no official evidence to
support this belief.


Speaking with The Tribune yes-
terday, Mr Farrington's sister,
Christine Ferguson, said they are
still waiting and hoping for good
news.
Police said they have no leads
in their investigation into the
bizarre disappearance of Mr Far-
rington, but his friends are using
the social networking site Face-
book to spread the word in an
effort to find out what happened
to the 28-year-old.
According to reports, the St


Andrews School graduate van-
ished without a trace on Novem-
ber 25, after telling his sister he
was stepping out for a few min-
utes.
His brother, Chance Farring-
ton, said: "He just left the house
and never came back. We don't
know what to think."
Anyone with information
regarding Mr Farrington's where-
abouts is encouraged to call 328-
TIPS anonymously, or contact
their nearest police station.


film focussing on homophobia opens festival
you realise you are all humans ly see it because it opens your
and the only thing we are here mind and at the end of the day
for is simply to just love one we are all humans, and should
another." not be judgmental.
........... That was the message "I don't think it's going to
accepted by an audience of have a negative impact on the
..over 200 people who went on to Bahamas at all, it will open peo-
Senjoy an opening night recep- ple's minds and show them to
. " tion cocktail party in the not be so critical of other peo-
SAtlantis Royal Towers Great ple."
Hall of Water with entertain- Nassau resident David
ment by acclaimed Bahamian Wilkins said: "I didn't care to
= singer/songwriter Ithalia John- see gays kissing and romancing
son. together, but the whole film
Rose Ferguson, 57, a trust had a lot of artistic merit andI
banking professional, was didn't realise there were sc
impressed with the film. many good actors in the
She said: "It was really good Bahamas."
to see the way the whole story Mr. Richard Herring, rep
was depicted. resentative before his retire
last year and went on to make sion that being afraid of it is "The story line just based ment of the Inter-American
Children of God within 12 exactly why I should do it, and on how things are happening Development Bank in the
months. I think it was a terrific growing in the Bahamas. Bahamas, and now a member
The film took precedence at experience for me, pushing past "He looked at things that of BIFF's Board of Directors
BIFF just three years after the that barrier. Sexuality is a pret- are happening to gay people thought that Child of God was
Bahamian Plays and Films ty dense topic." and building a story around "delicately and beautifully
Control Board banned cinema Bahamian actor and US res- that. I think people should real- done."
s....c ;-iii"igs-; ;'a 'ast V-i-wiiiiiiiig,


rcs cenings of Oscar winning
Brokeback Mountain, because
of the "extreme homosexuality,
nudity and profanity" shown in
the gay love story.
But BIFF founder and exec-
utive director Leslie Vander-
pool does not require permis-
sion from the films control
board to show nearly 100 films
from all over the world and
uses her privilege to push
boundaries.
Mr Mortimer said: "We nev-
er thought we would be able to
do a movie about this topic and
find support, and I am just hap-
py that people find the value
in telling that story."
Members of the cast said
working with Kareem in idyllic
Eleuthera was a wonderful
experience.
The role of Jonny was chal-
lenging for New York actor
Johnny Ferro, who initially had
reservations about making his
first feature film role as a gay
man in a Bahamian Brokeback
Mountain.
He said: "I was afraid a bit.
My first reaction about playing
a gay character was, 'Do I want
to start my career off that way?
What does that mean?'
"But I came to the conclu-


ii Van Broluw who plays LIIthe
compassionate Eleutheran Rev-
erend Ritchie in the film com-
mended Children of God for
addressing the need for issues
to be discussed in the open.
He said: "Growing up in the
Bahamas you do everything not
to be gay or not to feel those
feelings, but as you grow up


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PAGE 4, MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


EDITO RIA U LETTER S TO THE EDITOR6I


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, c, tiinn') 322-1986
Ad c, iiving Manager - (242) 502-2352
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WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


What future for College of Bahamas?


ON LEARNING of the unexpected
retirement of College of the Bahamas pres-
ident Janyne Hodder, a former college board
chairman commented that COB will be
"hard pressed" to replace her. What an
understatement!
In fact she was the shot of adrenal that the
lethargic College needed, and the first reason
to hope that one day it could in fact reach
university status. The College will certainly
be "hard pressed" to find a new president,
but whoever that president might be, he or
she will not be a Janyne Hodder. Mrs Hod-
der cannot be replaced.
A few days ago a member of her faculty,
wishing to pour scorn on her achievements,
complained that "for the past few years that
Janyne Hodder has been here, she has been
given a honeymoon by the media and the
images that you are getting about what is
going on at the college is absolutely false."
The images to which he referred were
images that she had inherited and did not
have the funds to remedy overnight.
For members of the press, Janyne Hodder
was a breath of fresh air. She had a dream,
she had the credentials to realise that dream.
She had a solid background of the Bahami-
an experience having started her teaching
career here almost a lifetime ago. She had
tremendous confidence in what she was try-
ing to achieve and inspired others to buy
into her dreams and help her realise her
long-term goals. Above all she had a capac-
ity for hard work - and work for the college
she did. She dared to dream of the day when
she could inspire Bahamians to shed their
slothful mediocrity. She set the bar of
achievement high.
Arawak Homes CEO Franklyn Wilson,
the former College board chairman who
hired Mrs Hodder for the post in 2006, said
he was satisfied she had shown COB and
the people of the Bahamas what a "real"
college president is capable of doing.
"Joe Public now has a clearer sense of
what that job entails," he said, "and not just
maintenance, but development and growth."
In handing in her resignation, which
shocked the community, Mrs Hodder told
current COB board chairman Baswell Don-
aldson that she was torn between a sense of
duty to a country that had given her her
start, and taught her all her skills to build her
career, and the desire to grow tomatoes full-
time and walk her two-year-old grandson
in the park in her Canadian homeland. The
grandson, the tomatoes and Canada won
the day.
We can fully understand her decision
after so many years of The Tribune covering


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the college and hearing the many petty pro-
fessional jealousies among faculty, and all the
other nonsense that professionals get up to,
especially those not under contract, but with
the guarantee of a lifetime chair - perfor-
mance or no performance.
Years ago we recall a Tribune reporter
putting down the telephone and turning to us
with the wry comment: "Double, double toil
and trouble; Fire burn and cauldron bub-
ble." It was a quote from Shakespeare's
Macbeth, the scene where the witches stir
their brew of mischief. We knew the reporter
was referring to more trouble brewing at
the College of the Bahamas - usually the
blood-letting was over some petty personal-
ity conflict. And we knew exactly who was
involved.
Mrs Hodder, a vice-principal at Canada's
prestigious McGill University, did not get a
good start at the College. In fact her nomi-
nation was met with protest from the union
with faculty staging a walkout, and the stu-
dent union joining in.
As a result she withdrew her nomination.
She was reported to have told her supporters
that she could not contemplate taking the job
without the full backing of the faculty.
Although we have not been told what went
on behind the scenes last week, we are sat-
isfied that these same sentiments - although
she denied them to the press - tipped the
scales that led to her early retirement. As a
matter of fact the Union of Tertiary Educa-
tion, which represents the faculty, said Thurs-
day that she was in some way personally to
blame for their failure to get a new industrial
contract.
Mr Donaldson said that early in the new
year he will be looking for Mrs Hodder's
replacement. "We want the best, and we'll
find the best where we can find the best. If
we can't find the best (in the Bahamas) then
we will be going elsewhere," he said.
Under an Act of Parliament the College
Council is given complete authority to gov-
ern the college, including the appointment of
faculty.
We understand that over the years the
faculty has arrogated much of these powers
to themselves.
We suggest that Mr Donaldson as chair-
man discovers what these powers are and, if
what we hear is true, repossess and enforce
them on behalf of the Council.
Failing this, we suggest the only way the
college will ever become a university is if it is
closed down and reopened having been
properly set up under an experienced board
of governors and with a faculty that is under
contract.


The Nassau




Institute is dead


wrong -


EDITOR, The Tribune.
Not that they had much of it,
but whatever little credibility
the Nassau Institute (NI) did
have left certainly evaporated
when they jumped on the cuck-
oo bandwagon of climate
change deniers.
These local counterparts of
Glen Beck and Sarah Palin with
glee seized on the story of the
stolen emails from the Univer-
sity of East Anglia's Climate
Research Unit to support their
delusional idea that climate
change is a global conspiracy
by the vast majority of the
world's scientists, environmen-
talists and political leaders.
According to the NI in a let-
ter to your newspaper on
Thursday, December 10, what
has been described as the
"greatest scam in history" is
being turned on its head.
But, as British Climate
Change Secretary Ed Milliband
says, "This is scientific consen-
sus from around the world. It's
as universal a view as you can
get. One chain of emails does
not undo scientific consensus."
Mr. Milliband used words like
"dangerous ... irresponsible ...
saboteurs" to describe the cli-
mate change deniers in his own
country.
The evidence is overwhelm-
ing and incontrovertible that
the earth is warming and that
human activity is the main
cause of it.
Yet the NI people are in
denial like the flat earthers of
old and some extraordinarily
ignorant people of today who


EDITOR, The Tribune.
We read with great interest
articles published in yesterday
and today's Tribune (Dec. 10,
11) about the developer in
Coral Harbour.
The residents of this com-
munity were called to a Town
Meeting a couple of months
ago in the Noni Way Cafe
where two MP's, namely Mr.
Wright and Mr. Maynard, were
present.
Mr Tony Joudi gave a pre-
sentation along with plans for
his development in Coral Har-
bour. He spoke about his inten-
tions saying that his presenta-
tion was "a courtesy to the
existing residents" and made a
promise that "if he did not have
100 per cent support from the
residents of Coral Harbour, he
would pack up and leave"!
On mentioning his plans to
remove the walls from the
north side of the roundabout
so his proposed new gas station
and strip mall "would have


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still believe the sun revolves
around the earth, man has yet
to set foot on the moon and cig-
arettes are not dangerous to
your health.
The NI and similar so-called
think tanks slavishly peddle day
after day the line of the corpo-
rate interests who want noth-
ing to get in the way of their
unconscionable profiteering.
It is those same corporate
interests whose callous greed is
doing the most damage to the
environment of this planet, just
as their fraudulent market
forces con game has brought
the global economy to the edge
of collapse.
Most intelligent people do
not have to be accomplished
scientists to understand that
you can't go on pumping mil-
lions of tons of greenhouse gas-
es into the atmosphere and the
oceans every day without dev-
astating consequences for life
on this planet.
NI's snide suggestion that
Prime Minister Ingraham
should not attend the Copen-
hagen conference but should
stay home and sort out public
finances is typical of their arro-
gant attitude.
Fortunately for our country,
Mr. Ingraham's thinking is not
narrowly confined to the ideo-
logical box in which the NI peo-
ple are pathetic prisoners.


He is capable of managing
our government and applying
his mind and his energies to dif-
ferent things in the course of a
day and he is masterfully man-
aging the economic crisis thrust
on the Bahamas by external
forces.
Mr. Ingraham would have
been grossly irresponsible had
he not decided to go to Copen-
hagen to add the voice of the
Bahamas to that of other vul-
nerable states that are at grave
risk from rising sea levels, of
which the Bahamas is the fifth
most vulnerable.
He and the other national
leaders meeting in Copenhagen
do not have the luxury of talk-
ing fool like the NI and waiting
until all our coral and marine
resources are destroyed by
acidification, and 80 per cent
of the Bahamas is under water.
Mr. Ingraham and his dele-
gation need to be there to help
press the case of developing
countries like the Bahamas to
slow down the degradation of
the planet and to seek funds to
mitigate the effects of climate
change which can wreak hav-
oc on our environment, our
economy and our public
finances - not to mention our
viability as a state.
He goes to Copenhagen
with the prayers and best wish-
es of intelligent, level-headed
and patriotic Bahamians with
him.
GALILEO
Nassau,
December 12, 2009


desired exposure", the meeting
became quite heated. Residents
mentioned that a small portion
of an old existing wall in the
Humminway Plaza had been
grandfathered in to protect it
after residents stood ground for
its preservation, yet a far more
significant structure was in the
sights of demolition and
approval by Town Planning?
Residents were asking if the
developer and his architect
could not have at least consid-
ered the preservation of the
long standing Bahamian Land-
mark, that all long time resi-
dents of New Providence had
come to know for over 50 years,
be preserved and landscaped
to enhance both his develop-
ment and the well renowned
entrance to the neighbourhood.
Mr. Wright reiterated that he
too had an emotional tie to the
well known structure since his
early years.
There appears to be no com-
promise from this developer.
One only needs to look at his
attempt to produce a gated
community further down the
road to see that his method is to
bulldoze everything first and
then re-plant with juvenile trees
which will take decades to
mature. The outside wall may
present "a development in
progress" but the other side
shows a barren patch of natur-
al wetland being filled with
some graded ground which con-
tradicts the recent policies 'to
protect wetlands'? Hardly what
The Tribune quoted as "roads
had already been put in, and
the subdivision of lots in to land
proceeding at pace"! There
may be cause here to challenge
the claim that 40 per cent of
the First Phase as being sold?
Coral Harbour residents are
asking Mr. Earl Deveaux to
take an immediate considera-
tion of their requests and the
proposed plans of any new
development here that may
include a Gay Strip Club that
we certainly do NOT want in
the proximity of our communi-
ty. If Government is touting


"transparency of process" then
the residents of Coral Harbour
needed to be included.
The Tribune quoted Mr.
Joudi saying "that a small num-
ber of people stirring up trou-
ble". Mr. Joudi needs to be cor-
rected on his assumption. The
residents of Coral Harbour
have in fact had meetings that
involve representatives of ALL
the sectors of their community,
including Coral Harbour East,
West, South and Coral Lakes
to discuss the developer's inten-
tions. It has been concluded
that Mr. Joudi has decided to
proceed in his submissions for
Town Planning approvals with-
out the involvement of the
Committees of the neighbour-
hoods concerned. Could per-
haps those very few siding with
Mr. Joudi have ulterior
motives?
The representatives were
dismayed at the thought of the
pine barrens north of the
roundabout being flattened to
accommodate "a seven screen
cinema complex" and yet
another gas station. We already
have a gas station, the liveli-
hood of which will be threat-
ened by another being con-
structed a quarter mile away
along with the ecological threat
to the existing well-fields this
area is valued for? In this day
and age of Cable Bahamas and
satellite technology in almost
every home, one has to doubt
the success rate or even need
of "seven cinemas" being con-
structed? It is but a 15-20
minute drive to RND Theatres.
The architectural choices of this
new development have no
regard for the existing struc-
tures and hold little or no
Bahamian flavour. Most resi-
dents do not share the desire
to become "a city." We live
here to escape the very
thought!
PAUL HARDING,
Coral Harbour South Steering
Committee,
December 11, 2009.


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 5


Senator calls for AG to take


bold steps in crime fight


CALLING on new Attor-
ney General John Delaney to
take some bold steps to fight
high crime levels, PLP Sena-
tor Allyson Maynard-Gibson
said she hopes he will support
making information public
about persons out on bail.
Welcoming Mr Delaney to
the Senate last Friday, Mrs
Maynard-Gibson also called
for immediate trials for per-
sons attacking police officers
or judges.
"Anyone who shoots a
policeman, threatens a police-
man, attacks a judge or threat-
ens a judge should be tried
immediately. They should go
to the top of the queue and
that matter be set down for
immediate trial," she said.
The former Attorney Gen-
eral further called for the elim-
ination of bail for persons on
murder charges.
S'Ei.,N,1 a website which
citizens can easily access for
the purpose of finding out who
is out on bail. People are
charged in public and given
bail in public. This is public
information. It should be easy
for members of the public to
find out who is out on bail.


'S





~1


Right now policemen who are
responsible for the arrest of
criminals are being approached
by those criminals when they
are released on bail, she said.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
she knows of a policeman who
was recently at the cinema with
his wife and children when he
was approached by a man he
had arrested.
"One of the persons that he
had arrested approached him
in a threatening manner and
told him that he is now out on
bail. This should never hap-


PLP 'does not support' Reginald Ferguson
as director of Financial Intelligence Unit
THE Opposition PLP has announced that it does not support the
appointment of former commissioner of police Reginald Ferguson
to be director of the Financial Intelligence Unit.
In a party statement, the PLP claimed that Mr Ferguson was crit-
icised in the report of the 2004 Commission of Inquiry into the mv
Lorequin when drugs disappeared in a sting operation conducted
by the US Drug Enforcement Agency.
"Mr Ferguson," said the PLP statement, "was also criticised by
Senior Justice Jon Isaacs in the case of R v Sean Bruey and War-
ren Ellis."
In that case, said the PLP, the judge "accepted the sworn evi-
dence of the witness who said that she was forced to give evi-
dence by Mr Ferguson and that the evidence that she gave under
duress was untrue."
The party claimed that Mr Ferguson was given four separate
chances to refute her sworn testimony, but did not.
"The failure to refute her evidence was deemed to be an admis-
sion by the Crown of the truth of her sworn evidence. An appeal
was filed, but was withdrawn," the party said.
Because of these incidents, the party did not think that Mr
Ferguson should be appointed director of the Financial Intelligence
Unit (FIU).
"The FNM through its inept management of financial services,
including the 'stop, review and cancel' treatment given to the
Ministry of Financial Services was in large measure responsible for
the lay-offs of scores of young Bahamians from Bank of Butterfield,
Ansbacher Trust Company, Royal Bank of Canada, First
Caribbean Bank and other banks, trust companies, insurance com-
panies and other financial services institutions," said the state-
ment.
"The PLP believes that there are many suitably qualified young
persons in the Bahamas who are more than able to fill the post of
the Director of the FIU. The PLP does not believe that someone
aged 63 on pension of 60 per cent of $67,086 together with other
benefits received by former commissioners of police ought to pre-
vent young Bahamians from holding that post. The PLP is obliged
to remind the public that senior police officers younger than Mr
Ferguson were sent home without the offer of any other posi-
tions; many of them are still unemployed," said the party statement.


pen," she said.
The PLP senator said she
also hopes that Mr Delaney
will encourage people to stop
blaming judges for the prob-
lems in the administration of
justice.
"Judges are ready to sit. It is
not their fault that the system is
broken. Government is largely
responsible for the broken sys-
tem. The government must
provide the resources for the
effective administration of jus-
tice," she said.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
she also hopes that with Mr
Delaney coming to the post of
Attorney General and Minister
of Legal Affairs as someone
who is knowledgeable about
financial services, "he will
utilise his considerable knowl-
edge to try to rebuild what has
been destroyed over the past
two years" of "stop, cancel and
review."
"We hope that having been
a managing partner in an inter-
national law firm, he will utilise
this knowledge to continue the
attempt to bring the Attorney
General's chambers to the
position of the country's pre-
mier chambers, as it ought to
be.
"We also hope that he will
be given the resources to
achieve this goal. It is the peo-
ple's law firm. It is the firm that
advises about our internation-
al obligations and ensures that
we are compliant with them,"
she said.


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+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 7


15th Annual Festival Noel W 7


begins

As the holidays draw near,
Grand Bahamians had their
official kickoff event for the
season. The 15th annual Festi-
val Noel was held on Friday,
December 4, and although the
weather report called for rain,
the evening gave way to clear
skies and a true night to
remember surrounded by the
beautiful gardens at the Rand
Nature Centre.
Guests enjoyed art, wine pro-
vided by Bristol Wines and
Spirits, music and the delightful
culinary competition: Chef
Noel. "Festival Noel is the
major fundraiser for The Grand
Bahama Branch of The
Bahamas National Trust. We
are truly appreciative to all of
our attendees who supported
us this year and thanks to our
sponsors all of the proceeds
raised on Friday night stays
right here on Grand Bahama
and will further assist us in
restoring the wildlife pond at
The Rand Nature Centre," said
Karin Sanchez, Grand Bahama
Branch Chairman.
With a variety of more than
32 different wines, Bristol
Wines and Spirits truly stepped
it up a notch and offered
patrons a wine sampling like no
other. Offering wines from
regions such as Argentina,
Chile, Italy and France guests
were blown away by the wide
selection and variety. Bristol
Wines and Spirits Key
Accounts Manager, Jevon But-
ler said "We were highly
thrilled with the success of the
event and are so pleased to sup-
port The Bahamas National
Trust on its 50th year, we are
already looking forward to next
year's event!"
Festival Noel, which is
undoubtedly an Art and Wine
focused event, promised some-
thing for all beverage connois-
seurs. The Bahamian Brewery
and Beverage Company
offered Sands, Sands Light,
Strong Back and its newest pre-
mium brew, High Rock. For
those who prefer the bubbly,
the Festival Noel committee
this year featured a champagne
table where guests could pur-
chase Moet & Chandon either
by the glass or by the bottle.
As the wine flowed, guests
enjoyed strolls through the
park, mingled with others and
viewed magnificent artwork by
Bahamian artists such as Alisa
Streather Robinson, Janice
Cockery, Ken Heslop, Del Fox-
ton, Sandra Bonnefil, Rupert
Watkins, Caroline Anderson
and The Grand Bahamas Artist
Association. This year's guest
artist, Anthony Morley, known
as Big Mo, displayed over 50
pieces of artwork.
"Festival Noel was simply
magnificent," said the artist. "It
was well organised and dis-
played a unique Bahamian
flavour. I encourage the spon-
sors, artists, restaurants and
most importantly the commu-
nity of Grand Bahama to con-
tinue to support Festival Noel
and The Bahamas National
Trust." Thanks to Big Mo's
sponsors, his travels, room and
shipping were covered. The
generous artist gave a percent-
age of his art sales to the Trust
event. The night's musical acts
included Susan Jensen Sweet-
ing and her son, Jens Peder
Sweeting, who opened the
evening and performed a vari-
ety of enchanting songs. Erik
Russell followed. Russell is a
well-known soloist, who per-
formed a medley of festive
songs, which got the crowd into
the holiday spirit. A first for
Festival Noel was when The
Good Ole Boys hit the stage
with their jazzy island sounds
and had the crowd dancing
until the end.
With all of the community
involvement, local restaurants
and caterers wowed visitors
with their culinary delights and
competed to be crowned the
next Chef Noel.
Participating restaurants
included Shenanigans, Lucianos
& Le Med, Social Butterfly
Catering Services, Livity Vege-
tarian Take-Out and Juice Bar,
Grand Bahama Catholic High
Catering, Island Java and Joe
Ret - Pig Roasting. The restau-
rants offered samplings rang-
ing from Chicken Pot Pies,
Roast Pig, Conch and Plantain
Fritters to delicious cakes. The
competition was strong for
Chef Noel, which is voted on
by those attending, the Festi-
val committee will be announc-
ing the winner later in the
month. Festival Noel promised
to be something for all. Even
for the die-hard shoppers.


Sponsors Colombian Emeralds
International, Parfum de Paris
& Furniture Plus displayed
their items for sale and helped
patrons get a jump start on
their holiday shopping. The
Festival Noel committee was
also pleased to wear the joyful
Santa hats that were provided


the holiday festivities


CAN WE HAVE SOME MORE? Thanks to the largest number of
restaurants this year there were lots of chances for seconds and
thirds from all the restaurants. This year the Festival committee
asked the students of the culinary school to assist the local restaurants.
Organised by Chef Maycock and Barbara Stollery the students gained
invaluable experience and were able to support their local trust.


SOCIAL BUTTERFLY CATERING ,a,- a ne, entri il,:, Fetlival
Noel's Chef Noel ,:o:'iil:e'l ilt :ii i E ' ii'le-Elatii lani , l :'''ate e ri'- ye l
was also given -: Jo uCLIIIIinay [IlidleIl[', L 0 to Ii K u tilli [lleim i rilielping
with the food preparation and service. Other restaurants partici-
pating were Shenanigans, Island Java, Joe Ret - Pig Roasting,
Lucianos and Le Med, Catholic High School Catering and Livity Veg-
etarian restaurant and juice bar. Chef Noel will be announced
later this month as well as the top students who assisted.


THIS YEAR there was lots of wine at Festival Noel 2009, 32 varieties
to be exact. Thanks to the event's main sponsor Bristol Wines and
Sprits the wine flowed all night at this year's event. "We were very
pleased to be able to feature so many wines this year," said Rusty
Scates, of Bristol Wines Sprits, "and to also make our attendees
very happy." Pictured are two long time Trust supporters (left to
right) Judith Dawkins and Leigh Termath, sampling wine on the
night.
by Hush Intimate Apparel. said Cecilia Bodie, Rand
"We were really pleased with Nature Centre Administrator.
the turnout on Friday night and "Our natural habitat, which
appreciate all who came out in gave way to a beautiful evening
supporting this wonderful and setting will be the true
event, recipients of Festival Noel's
The music, art, wine and success. It is thanks to the com-
food were all the right ingredi- munity's support that our parks
ents to make for a really enjoy- will continue to be maintained
able night on Grand Bahama," as pristine as ever," she said.


Apple ompuNTErs

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+n


PAGE 8, MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS I


Obama's


Wars and Peace


BY SIR RONALD
SANDERS
(The writer is a consultant
and former Caribbean diplo-
mat)

n accepting the Nobel
Peace Prize and talk-
ing about the wars in
which his nation is
involved and the conditions
under which he would approve
America warring again, the
world learned much about
Barack Obama's view of war
and peace.
He indicated that he does
not expect wars to end anytime
soon.
"We must begin," he said,
"by acknowledging the hard
truth that we will not eradicate
violent conflict in our lifetimes.
There will be times when
nations - acting individually
or in concert - will find the
use of force not only necessary
but morally justified."
And like every US President
before him, Obama did not rule
out ignoring international opin-
ion and acting unilaterally if he
considered US interests to be
threatened.
He declared: "I - like any
head of state - reserve the right
to act unilaterally if necessary
to defend my nation."
Unilateral action, if neces-
sary, is the first emerging strand
of an Obama doctrine on war
and peace.


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insight

WORLD VIEW -


It appears to be a doctrine
that, far from eschewing war,
recognizes it as a necessary part
of defence. He said; "I face the
world as it is, and cannot stand
idle in the face of threats to the
American people.
"For make no mistake: evil


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does exist in the world. A non-
violent movement could not
have halted Hitler's armies.
Negotiations cannot convince
al Qaeda's leaders to lay down
their arms.
"To say that force is some-
times necessary is not a call to
cynicism - it is a recognition of
history; the imperfections of
man and the limits of reason."
What seems to be a second
strand in the Obama doctrine is
an acceptance that war may be
the only means to crush evil,
and if war is judged to be
required, then war it will be.
Yet, while advancing the
notion that war may be the only
effective means of ending evil,
Obama argued for rules to
guide such conflict.
"I believe that force can be
justified on humanitarian
grounds, as it was in the Balka-
ns, or in other places that have
been scarred by war.
"Inaction tears at our con-
science and can lead to more
costly intervention later.
"That is why all responsible
nations must embrace the role
that militaries with a clear man-
date can play to keep the
peace."
Another strand in Obama's
emerging doctrine on war and
peace is his judgment of the
countries that will be the source
of such wars in the future and
how they should be treated.
Apparently rejecting the pos-
sibility of a nuclear war among
the old superpowers, the US
and Russia, and with a pointed
reference to Iran and North
Korea, both of whom are sus-
pected of wishing to develop
nuclear weapons, he said: "The
world may no longer shudder at
the prospect of war between
two nuclear superpowers, but
proliferation may increase the
risk of catastrophe.

Terrorism
"Terrorism has long been a
tactic, but modern technology
allows a few small men with
outsized rage to murder inno-
cents on a horrific scale."
Obama wanted the stiffest
sanctions against offending
countries by the international
community.
"Those regimes that break
the rules must be held account-
able. Sanctions must exact a
real price. Intransigence must
be met with increased pressure
- and such pressure exists only
when the world stands together
as one."
The same applied to "those
who violate international law
by brutalizing their own peo-
ple. When there is genocide in
Darfur; systematic rape in Con-
go; or repression in Burma -
there must be consequences."
It was also clear that while
he saw the US continuing to
play a role in ending conflicts
where US interests were not
necessarily threatened, he did
not see the US retaining the
role of the world's policeman
alone.
"That is why we must
strengthen UN and regional
peacekeeping, and not leave
the task to a few countries," he
said.
Human rights are also a
strong element of this emerging
Obama doctrine on war and
peace.
"In some countries, the fail-
ure to uphold human rights is
excused by the false suggestion
that these are Western princi-
ples, foreign to local cultures
or stages of a nation's develop-
ment... I believe that peace is
unstable where citizens are
denied the right to speak freely
or worship as they please;
choose their own leaders or
assemble without fear. Pent up
grievances fester and the sup-
pression of tribal and religious
identity can lead to violence."
He left the door open for
countries, such as Cuba and
China. "The promotion of
human rights cannot be about
exhortation alone.
"At times, it must be coupled
with painstaking diplomacy. I
know that engagement with
repressive regimes lacks the sat-
isfying purity of indignation.
But I also know that sanctions
without outreach - and con-
demnation without discussion
- can carry forward a crippling
status quo.
"No repressive regime can
move down a new path unless it
has the choice of an open
door."

SEE page nine


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 9


LOCALNEWS
By SIR RONALD SAUNDERS
INSIGHT em WORLD VIEW Cons ant/For Caribbeandilo


Obama's Wars and Peace


"There will be times when nations - acting individually
or in concert - will find the use of force not only neces-
sary but morally justified."
PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA


Lise Aserui, Scanpix/AP Photo
FIRST LADY MICHELLE OBAMA and US President Barack Obama at a banquet in Obama's honour in Oslo,
Thursday, Dec. 10, 2009.


FROM page eight
All this suggests that the ele-
ments in Obama's doctrine on
war and peace are: peace is
desirable but war may be nec-
essary and when it is war there
will be; to protect America's
interest, war may be unilateral-
ly declared regardless of inter-
national opinion; America will
continue to play a role in end-
ing conflicts within nations and
between nations but it will
expect other countries to carry
some of the burden and to this
end both regional and UN
peacekeeping must be strength-
ened; and for peace to be
achieved, it is vital that nations
respect human rights and
America is prepared to help
them to do so, or intervene with
others to stop atrocities.
Obama is often cast as an
idealist, but the principles he
set down are both realist and
realistic. America is not about
to relinquish its status as a
super power with the military
might to defend its interests and
to intervene to end conflicts
elsewhere.
Responses and previous
commentaries: www.sirronald-
sanders.com


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PAGE 10, MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


NATIONAL WOMEN'S ADVISORY COUNCIL LAUNCHES CAMPAIGN IN RESPONSE TO INCREASING VIOLENCE




Encouraging healthy relationships


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A CAMPAIGN encourag-
ing Bahamians to foster
healthy relationships has been
launched by the National


Women's Advisory Council
in response to rising incidents
of violence.
A series of Public Service
Announcements (PSA's)
released by the National
Women's Advisory Council
(NWAC) for radio play, and
soon television, advocate the


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importance of trust, honesty,
respect, forgiveness, and
empathy in relationships.
The campaign has gained
the full support of Minister of
State for Social Development
Loretta-Butler Turner as vio-
lent crime soars across the
country and the annual mur-


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der rate threatens to break
national records with 79
homicides recorded this year.
Minister of National Secu-
rity Tommy Turnquest said
28 of 78 murders this year
were as a result of arguments,
conflicts or retaliation while
nine arose out of domestic
violence, meaning police have
little opportunity to interfere.
But the NWAC and Social
Services hope to mitigate this
by addressing the problem of
domestic violence at its heart.
The council believes nega-
tive cultural behaviour can be
changed if people take
responsibility for their actions,
refrain from destructive
behaviour and retain their
moral principles. The PSA
hopes to inspire people to
improve their communication
skills and foster healthy rela-
tionships.

Stable
NWAC chairwoman Gwen
Knowles said: "We believe
healthy relationships in our
homes schools, the workplace,
churches, organizations,
junkanoo groups and on the
basketball courts and soccer
fields make for a stable soci-
ety.
"We have to hope we can
start from the very beginning
to help young people develop
conflict resolution skills with-
out resorting to violence.
"We really want to dwell
on the positive parts of having
healthy relationships and hav-
ing high self-esteem because if


MINISTER OF STATE FOR
SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT Loretta
Butler-Turner, who supports the
NWAC campaign.
that's there from the very
beginning then this violence
doesn't exist."
The announcements fea-
ture former president of the
Cancer Society Terrance
Fountain, former president of
the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce Dionisio
D'Aguilar and BAM-BAM
Junior Achievement Compa-
ny president Mikka Carter.
Mrs Butler-Turner added:
"A number of social ills
prevalent in our society are
as a result of unhealthy rela-
tionships. Whether between
family members, business
partners or friends, unhealthy
relationships are a breeding
ground for abuse, which often
results in violent actions.
"Regardless of the nature
of violence, be it physical, psy-
chological or sexual, it is unac-
ceptable.
"The intent of these mes-
sages is to bring about the


awareness of the various
aspects of unhealthy relation-
ships and to create a shift in
behaviour, where violence
does exist."
The Minister of State over-
saw the enactment of the
Domestic Violence Protection
Orders Act in December last
year and said this has yet to
be fully utilised in society.
She has also moved an
amendment to the Sexual
Offences and Domestic Vio-
lence Act which would out-
law rape within marriage, a
move which stirred a heated
national debate as it was
rejected by the Bahamas
Christian Council.
Mrs Butler-Turner said:
"Domestic violence affects all
family members and people
need to know what their
rights are within the legisla-
tion and know there are pro-
visions within the law to
ensure their safety.
"There are safe houses and
even if separated from the
breadwinner, finances are in
place to let you live on with-
out having the rug pulled
from under your feet.
"But people are probably
not fully acquainted with all
of the aspects of the law and
it's very important that we
ensure we get the message out
there and have people advo-
cating what the purpose of
that legislation is."
To find out more about
domestic violence laws log on
to www.bahamas.gov.bs or
call the Bahamas Crisis Cen-
tre on 328-0922.


Worl WarTwo etras

receive foodhmpersl


?'


CHRISTMAS arrived
early for World War II vet-
erans of the Nassau Branch
of the British Legion who
were recently given food
hampers thanks to the mem-
bers of the Royal Society of
St George.
For the past eight years,
this has been one of the
highlights of the Society's
many donations.
Seen packing the hampers
are Gerry Hillier, welfare
officer, and Judy Ansell-
Grindrod, president.
Not pictured, but also
responsible for the hampers,
is Beryl King, a committee
member and also photogra-
pher.
At the presentation are
Rev Matthias Munroe, exec-
utive secretary and treasurer
of the British Legion. Join-
ing him are Maceo Coakley,
vice-chairman and Percy
Strachan, assistant treasurer.





INSIGHT
For the stories
behin d then0ws,
read I^nsight^''^


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


I







+


PAGE 12, MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS I


FROM page one

of the present legislation and has hired a
private firm FICHTNER to look at the exist-
ing laws and regulations in order to amend
them to open up the energy sector to allow
private citizens and private entities to begin
the production of energy.
This way, Mr Neymour said, there will no
longer be a monopoly from the supply side of
BEC.
"In fact, that entire FICHTNER technical
grant covers numerous areas. Energy audits,
it covers energy efficiency, it addresses the
types of renewable energies that are applic-
able to each geographical location in the
Bahamas," he said.
The government is expected to receive a
report from FICHTNER sometime in the


BEC 'lost more than

$16 million in 2008'
new year as to what legislative amendments
need to be made.
"First of all there is sufficient growth from
the energy sector within the Bahamas where
if others were to begin to contribute it can
assist BEC and it can assist BEC because
BEC would no longer, or may not have the
need to seek those capital funds to develop
their facilities like this (pointing at the $105
million plant in Wilson City) if others can
come up with that funding and can produce
a power plant then we can purchase the ener-
gy directly from them," he said.


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Armed robber
FROM page one
the two suspects.
One of the men was fatally struck.
Emergency medical personnel arriving
on the scene and pronounced the would-
be robber dead at the scene.
A .38 revolver with six live rounds of
ammunition were recovered from the
scene. A money till containing funds,
believed to be the property of Island
WidPeProdue and Meat Mart, was found
at the side of the deceased.
A second suspect is being sought in
connection with this matter. Investiga-
tions continue. -
The armed robber is the country's 80th
homicide victim for the year.

FROM page one

would harm the island of Abaco.
"I think that I sometimes must say that I am a
little surprised by the
vehemence of some of those opposed to the
plant, and I have to sometimes question why
some of that concern was not directed at the
existing plant. The existing plant is a very pol-
luting plant and it is right next to a residential
area," he said.
The new Wilson City plant is some eight miles
from the nearest community and is located on a
100 acre plot that has been transferred to BEC.
The site also will house a docking facility where
oil tankers will hook up and pump their fuel into
the plant's 2.5 million gallon holding tanks.
With these 2.5 million gallons, officials at BEC
said that the Wilson City plant can operate for 60
days without being refueled.
"This plant is well removed from any residen-
tial area," Mr Gottlieb said. "It is a state-of-the-
art plant, and whatever fuel we decide to use


FROM page one

vate bank Lombard Odier
among others, Bahamians got
a chance to gain some insight
into the humble actor's begin-
nings and career choices dur-
ing a 30-minute question and
answer session.
Speaking about his experi-
ence in the Bahamas, Mr
Depp said he still cannot
believe that he's found a slice
of paradise on this Earth.
The actor, who owns a pri-
vate island in the Exumas, said
it is here where he can have
the rare experience of total
anonymity.
Mr Depp also described the
Bahamas and its people as
"wonderful", and said he tried
to spend as much time here


$105m power plant
the fuel will be of the best quality."
Addressing the group of Abaconians who had
gathered to speak to the Prime Minister and oth-
er Cabinet ministers on the issue, Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux said the government is
also well in advance of considering renewable
energy options for the island.
"If any of you here have a wind turbine, a
solar panel, wave energy technology, or anything
you believe is feasible you are free to make a
presentation and a proposal to BEC for a portion
of this land or the surrounding land that we could
integrate into the grid.
"Whether we put it here or elsewhere it has to
be transmitted to the homes and the businesses
through the line so it has to enter the grid. The
plant will have to be here as a standby option or
as a permanent option, whichever decision we
make with respect to the source of energy," he


Johnny Depp
as possible during the shooting
of the successful Pirates of the
Caribbean movies.
Receiving the Career
Achievement Award from
BIFF, Mr Depp said, was
unexpected.
"Whenever anybody says
they are going to give me
some kind of award, I'm
always a little stupefied by the
notion. The first thing I say is
'why?'" he told reporters
before the award presentation.
However, putting it into
perspective, Mr Depp said
with BIFF being an emerging
film festival his receiving this
award gives him the opportu-
nity to help build the event.


* SEE INSIGHT SECTION

He also told audience mem-
bers that he would be willing
to support the budding
Bahamian film industry if he
can.
Sir Sean Connery suggested
that government take one of
its derelict buildings and
restore it to create a perma-
nent year-round headquarters
for BIFF.
The James Bond icon also
said that hosting last night's
award presentation at the Bal-
moral Club made for a "more
Bahamian" setting than Par-
adise Island has been in pre-
vious years.
The official part of the
event ended with a local artist
unexpectedly presenting Mr
Depp with a portrait he had
painted of the actor.
* SEE PAGE THREE


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IODSCUS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


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PAGE 14, MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009






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WESTWARD -
THE WALK OF A
BAHAMIAN DOCTOR
by Dr. Harold A. Munnings Jr.
(2009)
By RICHARD COULSON
LAST Friday evening nearly
a hundred lovers of Bahamian
memoirs thronged the spacious
Chapter One bookstore opposite
The College of The Bahamas to
celebrate the launch of Dr.
Munnings' vivid story of his life.
He was introduced by Dr. Timo-
thy Barrett, President of The
Bahamas Medical Association,
and the guests included his father,
the well-known civil servant,
artist, and one-time athlete
Harold Munnings Senior, his
godfather Sir Orville (and Lady)
Turnquest, and Janyne Hodder,
President of the College.
It is the first biography pub-
lished by a Bahamian-born physi-
cian, and after light-hearted read-
ings by Dr. Munnings the hand-
somely bound copies on display
were eagerly snapped up and
signed with a personal inscrip-
tion by the author.
The book's title Westward,
together with the cover photo-
graph, illustrate not only his phys-
ical migration from his early
home in Danottage Estates to
the beautiful Old Fort Bay com-
munity, but also his success in
the medical profession. Early on,
he emphasizes that his life was
not a "noble tale of rags to rich-
es". His meticulous renderings
of his forebears show that he was
born into a family structure
boasting all the solid values of
thrift, hard work, thirst for edu-
cation (with funds to pursue it),
and service to the nation. A pho-
to taken by his father in 1963,
when the family was living in
England and a constitutional del-
egation visited from Nassau,
depicts the diminutive Harold,
aged 2, at the knees of hand-
some young Orville Turnquest
standing shoulder-to-shoulder
with Paul Adderley, Arthur Han-
na and Lynden Pindling. Clearly,
young Harold grew up in the
midst of Nassau's new "estab-
lishment", with all the intangible
advantages that conveyed.
But even for a fortunate young
man, the long path to becoming a
licensed M.D. and respected spe-
cialist is never free of struggle,
and Harold was no exception.
We learn of his first fainting spell
as he intrudes on an autopsy and
sees a scalp peeled back, his
efforts to pass pre-med physics
and chemistry requirements at
McGill University, the vicious
i ILL_.i, ' by older students at
University of West Indies where
he takes his degree, and the 100-
hour work weeks after he starts
his career as a young intern at
Princess Margaret Hospital in
1985. Although discouraged by
the lack of crucial modern equip-
ment, he was inspired to seek fur-
ther training in gastroenterology


by
its sole local practi-
tioner, Dr. Leslie Nembhard.
That meant post-graduate
experience which he took in Eng-
lish hospitals, first at the Bristol
Royal Infirmary where he stud-
ied successfully for the nerve-
wracking exams to become
licensed by the Royal College of
Physicians, requiring him to give
first-impression diagnoses of bed-
ridden patients. After a brief,
unsettling spell back in Nassau,
he returned to England for an
advanced course at the John
Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford. As
he considered staying in the UK
like several of his colleagues, he
received "the wisest counsel of
my career" from the medical staff
coordinator at PMH: "You could
be the pioneer...we need you
now if you are trained. But come
home only if you have the train-
ing."
So young Dr. Munnings came
back to Nassau and soon found
professional satisfaction "as col-
leagues sought my input and
received useful advice." He found
himself becoming de facto head
of a hospital service department,
and had to learn the new skills
of management, diplomacy, and
lobbying for space, staff and facil-
ities. He took the bold step of
borrowing from his father to buy
the latest video-endoscopy equip-
ment. As a brash newcomer he
offended higher bureaucracy by
holding a press conference
around the bedside of a young
patient who needed funds for
treatment in Florida. The boxer
Evander Holyfield happened to
be in Nassau and soon provided
the funds, but Dr. Munnings
received frosty letters pointing
out all the procedures he had vio-
lated - which he happily admit-
ted.
His contacts at PMH led to
him being invited by a senior sur-
geon to consult at the indepen-
dent St. Luke's Medical Centre.
This was at first a disappoint-
ment, as he often sat twiddling
his thumbs with no patient list.
At this low point, "a whole new
chapter in my life was about to
begin": at a computer training
centre he met Moneira, the brisk,
independent lady who was to
become his wife and mother of
their two children. The training


Mshe
avidly pursued in pri-
vate banking and accountancy
gave him support in the pro-
found career step in 1996 of cre-
ating a gastroenterology centre in
his own clinic in Grosvenor
Close, where he practices to this
day.
He agonized about the loan
he needed to construct the build-
ing, and the computer system he
had to install, but he was encour-
aged by the late Franklin Butler,
a giant of Bahamian commerce,
who counseled him his best pol-
icy was "Stick with your core
business." The only near-crisis
in his new quarters was a patient
abruptly suffering a cardiac
arrest. Wisely, although the heart
was not his specialty, Dr.
Munnings kept an electrocar-
diograph and defibrillator, which
were quickly deployed and
spared him the imagined head-
line "Patient Dies in Dr.
Munnings' Office."
His medical commitments
have not eliminated other pur-
suits for this energetic man.
Against his father's - and no
doubt his wife's - wishes, in his
younger years he was a motor-
cycle enthusiast, once covering
England, Ireland and Wales on
his Kawasaki. Later, his com-
puter expertise revived his child-
hood interest in chess with a new
obsession of playing on-line and
following famous matches, to
Moneira's frustration - " it was a
wonder she did not fling my
chess pieces to the turtles." His
principal fascination has always
been music.
His mother forced him into
piano lessons, but he soon aban-
doned that instrument in favour
of the guitar, on which he has
achieved semi-professional abil-
ity and produced a beguiling CD;
he keeps his DeVoe Classical in
his office to soothe nervous
patients.
One will not find dramas of
political conflict in Westward, or
acts of heroic derring-do of a
retired general, but it gives the
reader a unique insight into the
life of a hard-working profes-
sional in our society. Few will
begrudge the material success of
any Bahamian doctor who, in the
words of the modern Hippocrat-
ic Oath, is "respected while I
live, and remembered with affec-
tion thereafter."
lugLEARPR�um


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


THE TRIBUNE


__j






+


MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009


|Bahamian floored in rematch against Kirk 'the Technician' Sinnette


BASKETBALL
CATHOLIC PRIMARY
SCHOOLS


THE Catholic Diocesan Pri-
mary Schools will open its best-
of-three championship series
today at 3:30 p.m. at Loyola
Hall on Galdstone Road.
The match-up will be
between the defending cham-
pions St. Bede's Crushers and
the surprising third place fin-
ishers Our Lady's Blue Flames.
The Crushers, coached by
Donnie Culmer and Ricardo
Freemantle, is led by Kyle
'Flash' Turnquest, while the
Blue Flames, coached by
Rohan Parkes, feature Dean-
gelo Mackey.
During their two meetings
during the regular season, St.
Bede's beat Our Lady's. St.
Bede's ended the regular sea-
son tied at 9-1 with the St.
Cecilia's Strikers, while Our
Lady's ended up third at 6-4.
The Strikers advanced to the
final by beating St. Thomas
More Sparks 41-17 in a rematch
of last year's final in their sud-
den death playoff on Friday.
The Blue Flames, on the oth-
er hand, earned their berth to
the final for the first time in a
long time by stunning the Strik-
ers 36-24 in the other half of
the playoffs.
BASKETBALL
FR MARCIAN CHAMPIONS
THE 25th Father Marcian
Peters Invitational High School
Basketball Tournament came
to a close on Saturday with the
champions being crowned in all
six divisions.
In the primary girls division,
the Temple Christian Acade-
my Suns repeated as champi-
ons with a 10-9 decision over
Freedom Baptist.
Also repeating as champions
was the St. Bede's Crushers
with a 34-24 decision over the
Our Lady's Blue Flames in a
prelude to their Catholic Dioce-
san Primary Schools champi-
onship that starts today at Loy-
SEE page 17


'Choo Choo' Macke]






battered to defeat


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

K IRK 'the
Technician'
Sin nette
avenged a sec-
ond round defeat at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
two years ago by stopping Jer-
maine 'Choo Choo' Mackey
in Trinidad & Tobago on Sat-
urday night.
In the rematch of their first
encounter on June 22, 2007,
Sinnette went 11 rounds
before he stopped Mackey for
the World Boxing Associa-
tion's FedeLatin super mid-
dleweight title.
According to reports from
CMC out of Trinidad where
the fight was held at the
Woodbrook Indoor Facility
in St. James, Sinnette con-
nected with a barrage of
punches that floored Mackey
forcing referee Tommie
Thomas to stop the contest at
one minute and 37 seconds in
the 11th round.
When they first met in
2007, Mackey handed Sin-
nette's his only loss by win-
ning the unified WBC
Caribbean Boxing Federation
(CABOFE) and WBA Fede-
Caribe super middleweight
titles. However, Sinnette took
advantage of his home court
to improve his record to 19-1
with 15 knockouts. Mackey,
on the other hand, dropped
to 18-5 with 14 KOs. All of
his losses have come on the
road.
"I feel great. I think I have


redeemed myself," Sinnette
told CMC Sport after the con-
test. "I always knew that I was
the better fighter."
Mackey, according to the
CMC report, looked as he
was prepared to pull off the
upset in Trinidad and break
the road jinx early in the
scheduled 12 round main
event.
But 34-year-old Sinnette
used an effective jab to set up
combinations and he threw a
number of telling right shots
that resulted in 29-year-old
Mackey receiving facial cuts.

Hook
The Trinidadian reportedly
hurt Mackey with a right
hook and the follow-up
punches floored the Bahami-
an and former Common-
wealth champion in the llth.
Although Mackey was able
to get up before the eight
count was completed, he
appeared too unsteady as ref-
eree Thomas stopped the con-
test, awarding the victory to
Sinnette. While neither Mack-
ey nor his manager/trainer
Ray Minus Jr. was available
for comments yesterday, Sin-
nette said he felt the referee
made a good decision to stop
the fight because he was going
to go right back at Mackey to
finish his off.
Mackey was coming off a
fifth round TKO loss to Cana-
dian-Haitian Adonis Steven-
son on August 25 at the Bell
Centre in Montreal, Quebec,
Canada.
He had taken what the
Bahamas Boxing Commission


called an "ill-advised" fight
as he was preparing to defend
his Commonwealth title in
November.
Mackey, who had defeated
Nigerian Michael Gbenga on
points at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium on July 19, 2008,
relinquished the WBA Fede-
Caribe title, but he is still
holding onto the CABOFE
title.


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PAGE 16, MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


THE NEW PROVIDENCE BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION TITLE



Giants rout Wreckers to stay undefeated

By BRENT STUBBS Saturday night as the action split their back-to-back double one week after handing the
Senior Sports Reporter switched over to the Kendal header and dropped their Cybots their first loss in their
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net Isaacs Gymnasium, the Giants record to 2-2. rematch from last year's final,
routed the Y-Cares Wreckers Also on Saturday, the Out- Commonwealth Bank got a
THE Commonwealth Bank 102-83 to remain the only unde- door Lighting Falcons held off game high 37 points from Mark


(Giants, in their bid to regain
the New Providence Basketball
Association title they relin-
quished to the Electro Telecom
Cybots, are off to a fast start
this season.


heated team at 4-0.
The Wreckers, coming off a
103-89 decision over the Police
Crimestoppers on Friday night,
didn't have anything left in the
tank down the stretch as they


the Johnson's truckers 86-84.
On Friday, the College of the
Bahama Caribs celebrated with
their first victory as they edged
out the Stars 71-70.
In Saturday's feature contest,


r ome in the colour

Ia his Christma.



0off


storewid
rewl e *


Hanna.
Hanna, in 39 minutes of play,
went 16-for-26 from the field, 3-
for-8 from the three-point arch
and 2-for-7 from the free throw
line. He also yanked down 11
rebounds.
Michael 'Ferley' Bain Jr. shot
9-of-14 from the field and 6-
for-13 from the foul line, for
124 points with six rebounds
and three assists in 37 minutes.
Adrian Miller contributed 11
points with four steals, three
rebounds and two assists and
Dencil Edgecombe added nine.
Giants' coach Perry Thomp-
son said it's always good when
they can get off to this kind of
start in the regular season.
"From year to year, our mot-
to has always been to take one
game at a time," Thompson
said. "Again, it so happens that
the guys have been playing
well.
"We're been talking a whole
lot more as a team and one
thing we realize that we need to
im prove on is defense. I think
that can be attributed to the
success we've had so far for the
short season."
Against the Wreckers,
Thompson said he was delight-
ed to watch as his players
played very well on the interior
and even though they had one
or two players in foul trouble
early, they were still able to
dominate the game down the
stretch.
After taking a 31-19 lead at
the end of the first quarter, the
Giants found themselves trail-
ing 45-40 at the half after they
got out-scored 26-29 in the sec-
ond period.
Y-Cares went on to post a
71-65 margin at the end of the
third.
But in the fourth, Common-
wealth Bank was just a little
too much to handle as Hanna
started hitting the outside shots
and Bain was penetrating on
the inside.
The Wreckers had five play-
SEE page 17


Photo by Felipe Major/Tribune staff
THE COMMONWEALTH BANK GIANTS' guard Michael Bain Jr dunks
the ball.


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TODSCUS STOIS ON THI PAGE LOG ONTWRIUE4.O







+


TRIBUNE SPORTS


MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 17


THE BAPTIST SPORTS COUNCIL'S 2009 OLYMPIA MORRIS-EVANS SOFTBALL CLASSIC'S BEST-OF-THREE DIVISIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES



Crunch time for Softball Classic series


WHILE two of the Baptist
Sports Council's 2009 Olympia
Morris-Evans Softball Classic's
best-of-three divisional cham-
pionship series were set on Sat-
urday at the Baillou Hills Sport-
ing Complex, the third and final
one could be determined on
Tuesday night.
In one half of the co-ed divi-
sion, St. Paul's Baptist have a 1-
0 advantage over St. John 's
Native after taking game one
7-1. Game two of the series will
be played at 8 pm. If necessary,
the third and final game will be
played on Thursday.
The other half of the co-ed
series will get started on Tues-
day with Golden Gates and
Salem playing a double header
at 7 and 9 p.m. If necessary,
their third game will also be
played on Thursday.
However, if there is a sweep
in both series, then the two win-
ners will clash in game one of
the championship on Thursday.
The remainder of the series will
be completed on Saturday.
FROM page 16
ers in double figures, led by
Breston 'Horsey' Rolle with 18
points on 7-of-16 from the field
and just 4-for-14 from the foul
line in 32 points. Rolle laos had
a game high 14 rebounds.
Ian 'Wire' Pinder followed
with 14 points on 6-of-14 from
the field and 2-of-4 from the
foul line in 34 minutes with nine
rebounds, while Travis Roker
had 12 and Alvin Bullard and
Mario Pickstock both netted
11.
Y-Care's coach Donnie Cul-
mer admitted that playing back-
to-back took its toll.
"We fell apart coming back
in the second game, especially
in the fourth quarter when we
ran out of gas," Culmer insist-
ed. "You can't play two tough
games with the calibre of play-
ers here two nights back-to-
back. You can't do it. It ain't
going to work."
Culmer, however, felt that
his players were pounded by
the Giants more than the ref-
erees gave them credit and that
also played a factor in their
effort down the stretch.
Falcons 86, Truckers 84:
Although they blew as much as
a 20-point lead, the Outdoor
Lighting still managed to hold
on for the win with four players
in double figures.
Kevin Davis and Jackson
Jacob both scored 14, while
Jude Rolle and Giovano Bethel
had 13 apiece. Darren Rolle
and Kenzzide Munnings helped
out with eight each.
Improving their record to 2-
1, Falcons' coach Alphonso
'Chicken' Albury said he was
"really pleased with the per-
formance of my team tonight.
"I felt as though the guys
were really hungry. We estab-
lished an early lead, but the
Jumpers came back really
strong hitting the three point-
ers, But my guys were really
poised and determined not to
lose tonight."




FROM page 15

ola Hall. Another repeat cham-
pion was the HO Nash Lions,
who clinched the junior girls
title with a 34-19 victory over
the surprising Westminster
Diplomats.
At last one of the titles will
travel on the road as Harbour
Island took the junior boys
crown to Eleuthera with a close
31-29 win over HO Nash.
Westminster eventually won
the intermediate boys title 49-
37 over the RM Bailey Pacers.
And the University School
shocked the St. John's Giants
44-41 to cart off the senior girls
crown.
BASKETBALL
NPWBA ACTION
THE New Providence Wom-
en's Basketball Association will
be back in action on Tuesday
night after they played a triple
header on Saturday at the DW
Davis Gymnasium.
In Tuesday's opener, the
Electro Telecom Cybots Lady
Queens blasted the hapless
Junior Nationals 55-15 as Chris-
tine Sinclair had 10 points to
lead the attack.
Britinique Harrison led the
Jr. Nationals with eight.
The Bommer G Lady Angels
knocked off the College of the
Bahamas Lady Caribs 57-53 as
Shanae Armbrister led the way
with 14. Rashanda Kelly had
14 as well in a losing effort.
And in the feature contest,


the defending champions John-
son's Lady Truckers handed
the Four J's Enterprises Lady
Cheetahs their first loss, 71-63
as Shantelle Rolle exploded for
a game high 17 points.


* Also on Thursday will be
the start of both the men and
the 17-and-under championship
series.
The men will feature the sur-
prising Macedonia Baptist
behind the perennial champi-
ons Transfiguration, while the
17-and-under will be a rematch
of last year's finals with Mace-
donia taking on Temple Fel-
lowship.
Macedonia stunned pennant
winning Golden Gates in taking
the series 2-1, winning the
clincher 12-8, to reach the
men's final. Golden Gates had
to go an extra inning to pull off
a 21-20 nail-biter in the opener
on Thursday night, but they lost
game two by default.
Transfiguration, on the other
hand, swept Temple Fellowship
in two straight games. After
winning game one 9-8 on Tues-
day, Transfiguration was
awarded game two by forfei-
ture on Saturday.
In the 17-and-under division,
Macedonia swept Transfigura-


The Truckers, who remained
winless at 0-3, fell behind 16-
13 after the first quarter and
41-21 at the half. But they went
on a 36-21 spurt in the third to
trim the deficit to 62-57 after
the third.
It was a keenly contested bat-
tle throughout the fourth as the
Falcons held on for the win.
The Truckers got a game
high 27 from Tyrell Griffith,
who hit 4-of-9 three-pointers
and was 10-for-18 from the field
and 3-for-5 from the four line in
31 minutes.
Tresant Strachan scored 24
on 10-for-15 from the field and
3-for-4 from the foul line and
Raynard Minns added 17 on 8-
of-11 from the field.
Trucker's coach Courtney
Stubbs said the loss was an indi-
cation of what happen when
you don't show up for practice.


tion in two straight over Trans-
figuration, winning the opener
17-4 and the clincher 14-4 to
secure their berth in the final.
Temple Fellowship got a sweep
as well, winning the opener
over Golden Gates by default
and they took game two 14-2.
* Here's a summary of the
games played:
Under-17
Macedonia 8, Transfigura-
tion 4: Jermaine Adderley went
2-for-3 with a RBI, scoring a
run to lead Macedonia. Cardon
Wallace was the winning pitch-
er and the losing pitcher was
Marvin Josey. Miguel Hanna
went 2-for-3 with a run scored
for Transfiguration.
Macedonia 14, Transfigura-
tion 4: Winning pitcher Cardin
Wallace went 2-for-3 with three
RBI and two runs scored. Los-
ing pitcher was Alexander
Bain. Kenton Bowe went 1-for-
2 with two RBI and a run
scored.
Temple Fellowship 14, Gold-
en Gates 2: Weston Saunders


"We made some small mis-
takes because the guys didn't
practice," Stubbs said.
Wreckers 103, Crimestoppers
89: Anthony Whylly scored 22
points with 12 rebounds, Tavars
Roker had 21 points, Mario
Pickstock 18 and Breston Rolle
16 in the win for Y-Cares on
Friday.
Valentino Richardson scored
22, Freddie Lightbourne 18,
Cecil Mackey and Daron
Knowles both with 14 and Ver-
non Stubbs 13 in the loss.
Caribs 71, Stars 70: Khari
Thompson scored 22 points,
Garvin Lightbourn had 20
points and Theron Butler
chipped in with 11 as the Col-
lege of the Bahamas celebrated
its first win for the season.
Floyd Armbrister had a
game high 27 in the loss.


was 2-for-4 with two RBI and
two runs scored and DeShawn
White was also 2-for-4 with a
RBI and two runs scored for
Temple Fellowship.
Zach Hillary got the win on
the mound over Kyle Curry.
Curry had a RBI sacrifice fly
to knock in Raymond Bastian
with one of the two runs for
Golden Gates. Winston Han-
na scored the other run.
Men Division
Macedonia 12, Golden Gates
8: Jordon Gibson went 2-for-4
with runs scored; the Rev. Del-
ton Ellis was 2-for-4 with two
runs scored; Sean Roker was
2-for-3 with a RBI, scoring a
run; Zhvargo Archer was 2-for-
3 with a RBI, scoring a run and
Patrizio Adderley went 2-for-
4 with a RBI, scoring a run for
Macedonia.
The winning pitcher was
Burlington Moss and the loser
was Junior Moss.
For Golden Gates, Cardinal
Gilbert was 2-for-3 with a RBI,
scoring a run.


Co-Ed
St. Paul's 7, St. John's 1: Kel-
ly Smith went 2-for-3 with two
run scored and Debbie
McClure went 2-for-2 with a
run scored.


The winning pitcher was
Harold Fritzgerald and the los-
er was Vernie Curry.
For St. John's, Carlton Neely
was 1-for-2 with a run scored.


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+


PAGE 18, MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


LOALAND3ITERATIOALSOT
ENGLI^iSH *6 ROUNDUP


Arsenal beat Liverpool 2-1 t(


STUART CONDIE,
AP Sports Writer
LONDON


Arsenal scored twice in
the second half Sunday to
win 2-1 at Liverpool and
keep the pressure on


Chelsea and Manchester
United at the top of the Pre-
mier League.
The Gunners trailed to a
41st-minute goal by Dirk
Kuyt but Liverpool defend-
er Glen Johnson leveled the
scores five minutes into the


second half with an own
goal and Andrei Arshavin
hit the winner eight minutes
later with a shot from the
edge of the area that left
goalkeeper Pepe Reina
stranded.
Victory lifted Arsenal to


UT


Home of ) PITTSBURG


Miniwax * Ladders
Pressure Washers


) keep pressure
31 points, three fewer than
defending champion Unit- ..
ed and six fewer than leader t |
ChcIlwI But the top two -
sides have played one game .
more.
Liverpool, last season's
runner-up, remained strand-
ed in seventh place with 24
points and six losses in 16
matches. ..
But Liverpool could easi- (
ly have led by more than a
single goal after dominating 3
the first half, with Fernan- -
do Torres shooting weakly
at goalkeeper Manuel * _
Almunia when he was
unmarked in front of goal. LIVERPOOL'S ALBERT
Arsenal captain Cesc Fab- Arsenal's Andrey Arsha
regas said coach Arsene cer match at Anfield St
Wenger had been appalled 2009.
at his team's first-half per-


formance.


Screamed
"The boss screamed at us
like never before," Fabre-
gas said. "He said we did not
deserve to wear the Arsenal
shirt if we played like that."
Defender Thomas Ver-
maelen said Wenger's tirade
had roused the team from
its stupor.
"I've never seen him
before like that and we just
reacted very well," Vermae-
len said. "We put some pres-
sure on them and you see
the result.
"It was important for us
because we closed the gap
a little bit now and we're
back in the race again."
It was a mistake by Almu-
nia that led to Kuyt's first
goal at Anfield in three
months.
Almunia punched weak-
ly at a long-range free kick
by Fabio Aurelio and the
ball fell straight to Kuyt in
the area. The Netherlands
forward had time to control
the ball with his chest and
prod it into the net.
But Arsenal started play-
ing more narrowly in the
second period and pressured
the home midfield, resulting
in possession being split
more evenly.
The equalizer arrived
after Arsenal captain Cesc
Fabregas played a pass to
Samir Nasri out on the right.
Jamie Carragher failed to
clear the Frenchman's cross
and the ball took a slight
deflection off him before hit-
ting Johnson and rolling into
the back of the net.
Arshavin, who scored four
goals at Anfield last season


on Chelsea


(AP Photo/Tim Hales)
O AQUILANI, centre, fights for the ball with
yvin during their English Premier League soc-
tadium, Liverpool, England, Sunday Dec. 13,


ARSENAL'S ANDREY ARSHAVIN scores against Liverpool during
their English Premier League soccer match at Anfield Stadium, Liv-
erpool, England, Sunday Dec. 13, 2009.


to earn his team a 4-4 draw,
then collected the ball on
the edge of the area.
A defender shielded him
closely and seemingly
blocked his way to goal, but
the Russia international
took one touch, turned and
hit a shot between his oppo-
nent's legs. Reina did not
even have time to move his
feet as the ball flew past him
and into the net, off his
right-hand post.
Arsenal's win was espe-
cially valuable after second-
place Manchester United
lost 1-0 at home to Aston
Villa on Saturday, when
leader Chelsea was held to a
3-3 draw by Everton.
The Gunners have a real
chance of winning the title


for the first time since 2004,
although Arshavin limped
off in injury time and may
join fellow forwards Robin
van Persie and Nicklas
Bendnter injured on the
sidelines.
Also Sunday, Cardiff
boosted its chances of
returning to the topflight for
the first time since 1929 with
a 1-0 win at League Cham-
pionship promotion rival
Middlesbrough.
Chris Burke's 61st-minute
goal pushed Cardiff up to
third place, 10 points behind
leader Newcastle. Newcas-
tle drew 2-2 at Barnsley on
Saturday, while second-
place West Bromwich
Albion hosts Queens Park
Rangers on Monday.


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Sturrup and Moses set three

unofficial swimming records
AT the last regular meet for 2009 Simone Sturrup and
Zack Moses swimming for Swift Swimming set three unof-
ficial Bahamian & Open Records.
Sturrup, swimming in the 10 & under age group, set two
new National records, one in the 200 freestyle in two minutes
and 31.85 seconds and one in the 100 butterfly in 1:18.95.
Sturrup now owns five National records in the 9&10 girl's
age group. The two new records were previously owned
by Bria Deveaux.
Moses, on the other hand, set a new National record in the
800 free in 9:50.40 smashing the old record by 9 seconds,
which was previously held by Matthew Lowe.
Mses swims in the 11 & 12 boy's age group.
Sturrup's 100 fly time also made the Carifta standard for
the 11&12 girl's age group, while Moses' time made the
Carifta standards in the 400 and 800 free.
At the meet Moses also made the Carifta times in the 400
IM and 200 Breast. Swift Swimming picks the most out-
standing swimmer for each meet and for this last meet, the
Sea Bees meet on December 5th, both Sturrup and Moses
shared top honors for "swimmer of the meet".
They both received a DVD on stroke drills and skills by
David Marsh.


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 19


LOCALNW


PIIUtURED SIl ING I-OHUM LET-I: Kenneth's mother, Pearl IVlitchell; Kennetlh arrington and Ur IVIagnus
Ekedede, consultant neurosurgeon and head of Division of Neurosurgery, PMH. Standing from left: Dr
Vernard McPhee, SHO neurosurgery, who was on the surgical team and Dr Geoffrey Pennerman, med-
ical chief of staff.


History made as first

complete lobotomy


performed in Bahamas


FROM page one

The surgery involved a
craniotomy in the right frontal
lobe - the removal of half of
the right part of the brain that
contained the growth.
This is the first time that a
complete lobotomy has been
performed in the Bahamas
and to the doctors' credit the
surgery was successful.
Kenneth's health woes
started with him experiencing
headaches and epileptic
seizures. His heart went into
cardiac arrest, and doctors
had to shock him with a defib-
rillator to revive him before
he was airlifted from Freeport
to Nassau last month.
Upon his arrival in the cap-
ital, doctors called for an
immediate CT scan, which
revealed that Kenneth had a
vascular growth in his red
blood cells.
Doctors initially thought
the boy had a highly malig-
nant tumour, but this new
diagnosis was a relief for both
his doctors and family mem-
bers. Once the vascular
tumour was removed, Ken-
neth would be cured.
"At first, we thought it
would be best to excise this
thing en masse, because they
needed to get it all," said Dr
Ekedede, head of Division of
Neurosurgery at PMH.
"We thought he may not
need any radiotherapy at all."
The operation required a
"meticulous technique."
If anything went wrong, it
would mean life-altering con-
sequences for the patient, like
regressing to a vegetative


state, becoming hemiplegiac
(where half of his body could
be paralyzed), the diminish-
ment of the functions of his
normal speech and vision, and
in the worst case scenario,
death.
Kenneth's mother, Pearl
Mitchell, said that although
she was nervous about the
extensive procedure, she
understood it was the only
possible chance for her son
to be cured.
The surgery took five
hours, and Kenneth was dis-
charged from hospital on
November 25, a week after
he had the lobotomy.
He is doing well and his
family is planning a fitting
..% Ic.,m home" for him
when he returns to Freeport.
In six months, Dr Ekedede
will do a review to see how
everything looks inside Ken-
neth's brain.
"We have a lot to be
accomplished, because this
operation is normally done in
Mayo Clinics and Harvard
Clinics."
The doctors are grateful
that the 12 year old has had
no complications. "Kenneth
has no loss of memory, no
weakness, he can see, smell
and everything else," said Dr
Ekedede.
He said that the operation
sends a message that "PMH is
not always as bad as they say.
There are some great things
that happen here."


SEE TUESDAY'S
HEALTH SECTION
FOR FULL STORY


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Lawyer's son dies


in fall from balcony

FROM page one

sometime between Friday night and early Saturday morning.
The Tribune understands that the incident has left his friends
shocked and disturbed.
Those who knew him described Adel as very friendly, very
happy-go-lucky young man.
However, some friends said that Adel had reportedly been
suffering from a bout of depression at the time of his death.
Details were still sketchy up to press time last night. The fam-
ily could not be reached for comment, but Adel's friends on the
weekend had already put up a special memorial page on the
social networking site Facebook. The site, titled "In Remem-
brance of Adel 'Castro' Lockhart" recorded close to 2,000
members last night.
The statement on the memorial site is as follows:
"Gone but never forgotten. I feel like this group should be
different from the usual tribute pages, cause to properly remem-
ber Adel we can't sob or weep, these are the natural reac-
tions, every moment, every memory of Adel is one filled with
mischief and laughter. Everyone who knew Adel could think of
at least seven dumb moments with him, so the wall is for
spreading his awesome memories and keeping everyone smil-
ing thinking about him, that the true essence of what Adel
was, and the best way to preserve his memory. - Class of
2006"
Posting to the site, people remembered Adel as a compas-
sionate and kind person. Most said they could not believe he is
gone.
Adel was the son of Elliot Lockhart, who was sworn in as
Acting Supreme Court Justice in 2008. He remained in that
position for a short time, but is now back in his own law cham-
bers.
Mr Lockhart was formerly a senior partner in the law firm of
Lockhart and Munroe with former president of the Bahamas
Bar Association Wayne Munroe.


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PAGE 20, MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Pro-hanging march

dedicated to country's

78th homicide victim


s.'RS .


31obn


jo~u11


THE WORKER'S PARTY HELD its second pro-hanging march over the
week. According to party leader, Rodney Moncur, the march attract-
ed more than 300 persons, which included members of the party and
citizens who joined them as they marched throughout the streets of
Nassau. This latest march was dedicated to the country's 78th homi-
cide victim, Raul Bullard, who was buried on Saturday.


PHOTOS: Felipd Major/Tribune staff


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O







+>


PAGE 4C, MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


The push for 350:




Contradictions




and carbon levels


COPENHAGEN

AS POLICE cracked down
on climate protesters, church
bells tolled 350 times Sunday
to impress on the U.N. global
warming conference a num-
ber that is gaining a follow-
ing, but is also awash in con-
tradictions, according to Asso-
ciated Press.
Conference negotiators
went behind closed doors in
talks to pin down an elusive
new pact on climate, talks in
which the figure 350 looms as
a goal for true believers, but
one that appears impossible
based on progress so far.
It refers to 350 parts per
million of carbon dioxide in
the atmosphere, the highest
concentration that some lead-
ing scientists say the world
can handle without sparking
dangerous climate effects.
"It's the most important
number in the world," said
Bill McKibben, founder of the
environmental activist group
350.org. "It's the line between
habitability on this planet and
a really, really desolate
future."
Not everyone buys into
that. But an entire environ-
mental group has sprung up
around the number, pushing
350 as a goal, sporting it on
T-shirts and flags waved by


throngs of protesters that
marched to the conference
center over the weekend.
About 100 nations at the U.N.
climate summit have signed
on to the idea of heading for
350.
Actually, the world has
lived with more than 350 for a
while.
The last time the Earth had
350 ppm of carbon dioxide in
the air was a generation ago,
in the fall of 1989. This year
C02 pushed over the 390 lev-
el. When scientists started
measuring carbon dioxide in
1958 it was 315.
Since the atmosphere
passed the 350 level, ice sheets
have been melting and other
dramatic changes have been
happening. Prominent scien-
tists - notably NASA's
James Hansen, one of the ear-
liest to warn about global
warming, and Rajendra
Pachauri, head of the Inter-
governmental Panel on Cli-
mate Change - have said 350
is the only safe level of carbon
dioxide in the air.
Still, many economists,
political leaders, and even
some scientists believe that
the worst effects of global
warming can be avoided even
with less stringent actions.
But there is general agree-
ment among negotiators and


climate scientists that contin-
ued global warming will lead
to dramatic changes that
mean more widespread
drought in some regions,
greater flooding along coast-
lines, stronger storms and the
loss of species.
On Sunday, hundreds of
churches around the world
had signed up to ring bells at
3:50 p.m. in their respective
time zones.
"It was an incredibly pow-
erful moment and to know
that there are bells ringing all
over Europe, up to Green-
land, down into the south
Pacific and every corner of
the planet," McKibben said
moments after the bells
stopped ringing in Copen-
hagen.
As they tolled, more than
40 government environment
chiefs and other high-level
negotiators were meeting at
the Danish Foreign Ministry.
They were trying to bridge
the gap between their posi-
tions in informal talks before
the second and last week of
negotiations gets under way.
The week will end with the
arrival of President Barack
Obama and more than 100
other national leaders for the
final hours of negotiation.
Sharp divisions remain
between rich and poor coun-


A VIDEO projected on a floating cube illustrates projected levels of carbon dioxide (C02) emissions, on
the opening day of the Climate Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, Monday Dec. 7, 2009. The C02 cube
installation represents 1 metric ton of carbon dioxide, the amount an average person in an industrialized
country emits each month. The largest and most important U.N. climate change conference in history
opened Monday, with organizers warning diplomats from 192 nations that this could be the best, last chance
for a deal to protect the world from calamitous global warming.


tries on greenhouse emissions
cuts and financing for devel-
oping nations to deal with cli-
mate change and shift to


POLICE STAND over a small group of protesters some of thousands of people demonstrating on the the street in central Copenhagen, Den-
mark, Saturday, Dec. 12, 2009. Large crowds turned out for a demonstration from the city center to the Bella center, the conference venue
where the largest and most important U.N. climate change conference is underway aiming to secure an agreement on how to protect the world
from calamitous global warming.


cleaner energy.
"I think there was recogni-
tion around the table of the
urgency of what we need to
achieve in the coming days,"
Britain's Climate Change Sec-
retary Ed Miliband said after
Sunday's talks. "I think there
needs to be more movement
from everyone, more imagi-
nation, and I think we will all
be striving for that."
Australia's Climate Change
Minister Penny Wong also
said a lot of work remains to
be done.
"It's going to be tough to
get an agreement by Friday
but that's what we have to
do," she told a news confer-
ence.
According to participants,
the closed-door consultations
focused on about a half-dozen
plans on financing for poor
countries to deal with climate
change. One joint proposal by
Mexico and Norway calls for
a "Green Fund" for climate
financing, starting with $10
billion a year in 2013, and
increasing to $30 billion to $40
billion a year by 2020
Separately, a proposal
aimed at saving the world's
tropical forests suffered a set-
back Sunday, when negotia-
tors ditched plans for faster
action on the problem
because of concerns that rich
countries aren't willing to
finance the plan. A deal on
deforestation - a sizable
global warming factor - is
considered a key component
of the larger pact.
For a second day in a row,


4-


SI ...


if yt~d


p 3a


police cracked down on cli-
mate activists marching
through the Danish capital.
More than 200 were detained
as police stopped an unau-
thorized demonstration head-
ed toward the city's harbor
and carried out a security
check of some of the partici-
pants.
Meanwhile, nearly all of the
1,000 detained on Saturday
- from Europe, Africa, Asia,
and the U.S - were released
without charges. Thirteen of
them were arraigned in court
and faced preliminary charges
of assaulting police or were
let off with a warning for
wearing masks, which are out-
lawed during demonstrations
in Denmark, or carrying box-
cutters or other sharp objects.
Reducing carbon dioxide
levels to 350 would mean
reversing the trend of the past
couple of centuries. Carbon
dioxide stays in the atmos-
phere for as long as 100 years.
And the emissions cuts cur-
rently being pledged by devel-
oped countries, including the
United States and European
nations, are aimed at having
C02 levels peak at around
450, not 350, in coming
decades.
And even that may not be
possible. Some economists say
the world should plan to stop
at 550.
Economist Henry Jacoby,
co-director of MIT's Joint
Program on the Science and
Policy of Global Change, has
said that even 450 is "totally
impossible, there's no way we
can do that."
To get down to 350, civi-
lization has to remove mas-
sive amounts of carbon diox-
ide from the skies, something
talked about but not yet
achieved. Trees and oceans
suck C02 from the atmos-
phere, but that process is
overwhelmed by emissions
from burning coal and oil.
McKibben said it would prob-
ably take 40 years to get down
to 350 even if emissions
stopped today.
"It may be on the edge of
impossible," he said Sunday.
"We could do it. At the
moment, there's no sign that
we are going to do it."
MIT management profes-
sor John Sterman said scien-
tifically 350 makes sense, even
if economically it seem
unreachable.
"We ought to have a goal
of 350 and realize we're
already above that," Sterman
said.


DENMARK'S Queen Margrethe
and Prince Henrik, center right,
attend an ecumenical celebration
in the Church of Our Lady in
Copenhagen, Sunday, Dec. 13,
2009. Shortly after the service
Denmark's churches rang their
bells 350 times which was the
central act of a worldwide inter-
national bell ringing initiative.
The bell ringing symbolizes the
350 parts per million that mark
the safe upper limit for carbon
dioxide (C02) in the atmosphere
according to scientists.


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+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 5C


IN THIS PHOTO taken Saturday Nov. 28, 2009 a taxi passes the Gate building, left, of Dubai Internation-
al Financial Center, DIFC, and a billboard of Sheik Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktoum, United Arab Emi-
rates prime minister and ruler of Dubai in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The Dubai ruler enjoyed rock-star
adoration because he led the sand-to-skyscraper transformation of his desert fiefdom, so much that many
world investors believed his claims that glitzy Dubai wouldn't be touched by the global financial storm. After
the eruption of Dubai's debt mess, the looming question ahead of Monday's resumption of world trading
is not only if Sheik Mohammed can regain trust, but survive the anger of his fellow Gulf rulers.





Dubai woes loom




as Gulf leaders




prepare to meet

DUBAI, United Arab to reassess their exposure to Kuwait Finance Minister
Emirates the region's often secretive Mustafa al-Shimali has urged


ONGOING concerns about
Dubai's financial woes could
overshadow efforts to more
closely align Gulf Arab
nations' economies when the
region's leaders meet Monday
in Kuwait, according to Asso-
ciated Press.
The annual gathering of top
officials from the six-member
Gulf Cooperation Council
economic bloc begins on the
same day a closely watched
$3.52 billion pile of Dubai debt
comes due.
Investors are eagerly await-
ing details on how, or indeed
whether, Dubai will cover the
payment, which is seen as a
key test of the indebted city-
state's broader credit worthi-
ness.
"This is not a story that's
going away," said Rachel
Ziemba, a senior analyst at
Roubini Global Economics
who monitors Gulf economies.
"This is the aftershocks, the
reckoning after the credit cri-
sis. "
Dubai's unfolding credit
problems have raised new con-
cerns about a lack of trans-
parency throughout the oil-
rich Gulf's financial system,
which was already rocked once
this year by a rare public dis-
pute over billions of dollars in
debt by two of Saudi Arabia's
most prominent family busi-
nesses.
That family feud, which
spurred lawsuits in the U.S.
and Britain, prompted lenders


companies.
Now some analysts fear
Dubai's debt problems could
spill over to other Gulf states
and make financing harder to
secure throughout the region.
Dubai is one of seven sheik-
doms that make up the United
Arab Emirates.
While worries about Dubai
continue to dominate head-
lines, the GCC's Kuwait hosts
are calling for fresh talks on
plans to forge a Gulf-wide
monetary union that could
pave the way for a common
currency like the euro.
Efforts to create a single
monetary bloc have been
floated for years but have
struggled to gain traction. All
the Gulf states peg their cur-
rencies to the dollar except
Kuwait, which relies on a bas-
ket of currencies.
Talks aimed at a monetary
union faced their most serious
setback in May when the
UAE, the Arab world's sec-
ond biggest economy, abrupt-
ly backed out of the plan.
Oman had earlier said it would
not join the union.
John Sfakianakis, chief
economist at the Riyadh, Sau-
di Arabia-based Banque Sau-
di Fransi-Credit Agricole
Group, said more clarity is
needed on how and when the
process will move ahead.
"They will have to eventu-
ally come out with some kind
of commitment to the union,"
he said. "That will give confi-
dence to the market."


the Emirates and Oman to
reconsider membership in
such a union, even if the cre-
ation of common currency
could take a "number of
years."
"This would strengthen the
region's economies and make
it an economic bloc that would
be taken into account at a
global level," al-Shimali told
Kuwait's news agency KUNA
on Friday.
Kuwaiti officials say other
topics to be discussed include a
common customs policy and
electricity grid, the creation of
a railway authority and region-
al political issues, including
Iran's relations with the GCC
and its nuclear program.
Also likely on the agenda,
according to KUNA, will be
talks aimed at addressing the
deteriorating security situation
in Yemen, where Shiite rebels
have been fighting Yemen's
central government.
Saudi Arabia began striking
back at the rebels last month
following an incursion by the
fighters into the desert king-
dom.
Last year's summit in Oman
was ostensibly aimed at dis-
cussing details of a unified
monetary pact, but leaders
spent much of their time
instead hammering out a con-
demnation of Israel's attacks
on Gaza.
The GCC is made up of
Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman,
Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the
UAE.


AN EGYPTIAN man walks into a foreign exchange shop in Cairo, Egypt Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2009. The
United Arab Emirates' top officials looked Tuesday to allay concern over Dubai World's $60 billion
debt-load, stressing the strength of Dubai and the UAE's economies even as regional markets tumbled
for a second day.


SCHOOL


of w ,wous r L ., -.jirfjfa
1O.HBS 1l4i



World school


St Andrew's School, The International School of The Bahamas, an authorized International
Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites applications from qualified and experienced
Bahamian candidates for the following teaching vacancies, with effect from August 2010.
Full information regarding the school may be found at its website: www.st-andrews.com.

Candidates should be qualified teachers who possess the necessary academic qualifications
for the positions) for which they apply, including a teaching qualification and a bachelor's
degree, and normally need to have a minimum of two years successful school-based
experience. Desirable qualifications, in addition to those specified for individual posts, are
that teachers have successful experience in an independent and/or international school and
an advanced degree. Applications from candidates able to coach team sports or advise
school clubs and activities are particularly welcomed. Secondary (i.e. middle and upper)
school teachers will be expected to undertake the responsibility of a homeroom.

Please note that applications received from non-Bahamian candidates will not be considered
at this time, although permanent residents with the right to work are invited to submit their
papers for future consideration. Applications from candidates living outside The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas will not be acknowledged or considered at this stage of
the recruiting process. If the school is unable to recruit any position locally, it will advertise
internationally in January.

PRIMARY SCHOOL

The school is authorized to teach the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the International
Baccalaureate Organization. Candidates for all posts in the primary school should be
committed to the principles of, and preferably trained in, the PYP.

Homeroom teachers: Class sizes range between 15 and 20.

Primary school Spanish (Part time post): Candidates should be familiar with ACTFL
standards and be able to work as a contributing member of a school-wide team.

SECONDARY SCHOOL

The school offers its own middle years programme in years seven through nine and the
BGCSE in years 10 and 11 (grades 9 and 10). The school is authorized to teach the Diploma
Programme (DP) of the International Baccalaureate Organization in years 12 and 13 (grades
11 and 12).

Spanish and French: Candidates should be familiar with the ACTFL standards and able
to work as a contributing member of a school-wide team. They must be qualified to teach
to pre-university level and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate
diploma programme.

Science:

Biology: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach biology to pre-university
level and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma
programme. Candidates should also be able to offer either chemistry or physics at
BGCSE/IGCSE level.

Chemistry: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach chemistry to pre-university
level and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma
programme. Candidates should also be able to offer either biology or physics to
BGCSE/IGCSE level.

Physics: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach physics to pre-university
level and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma
programme. Candidates should also be able to offer either biology or chemistry to
BGCSE/IGCSE level.

English: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach to pre-university level and be
familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme. Successful
BGCSE/IGCSE and SAT 1/SAT II experience is also essential.

Mathematics: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach to pre-university level
and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme.
Successful experience in teaching calculus to AP and/or IB level is preferred for this post.
Successful BGCSE/IGCSE and SAT l/SAT II experience is also desirable.

Drama: Candidates should be able and willing to teach up to IB theatre arts level and
coordinate musical and drama productions throughout the secondary school.

Middle school home room and core teachers: Middle level educational qualifications,
experience working with early adolescents and a familiarity with the philosophy of middle
schools are required from applicants for these posts. Applicants may also be required to
teach BGCSE courses up to year 11.

At least one of the successful applicants will have documented successful experience in
teaching English in years 7 to 9 and will be able to offer English and one of the following
EPSE; IT & Social Studies; art; drama E possibly to BGCSE level.

Mathematics and special needs (part time post): Candidates must have successful
experience in teaching in both areas.

NB: One successful candidate from all the posts offered will be able to offer the teaching
of the Theory of Knowledge course at IB diploma level.

Interested candidates should apply to the school's principal, Mrs Sharon E Wilson, by letter,
email or fax as soon as possible. All applications MUST include the following:

* letter of application
* a personal statement detailing the candidate's educational philosophy
* a full curriculum vitae,
* either the names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and email numbers of three people
who may be approached for confidential professional references or the name and address
of the recruiting agency from which the candidate's confidential dossiers may be obtained.

Information on the teaching posts offered may be obtained from the heads of the schools
by email or fax only.

Frank Coyle, Head of the secondary school:
Email: Frank.Coyle@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1 242) 677 7847

Allison Collie, Head of the primary school:
Email: Allison.Collie@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1 242) 677 7846

Sharon E Wilson
Principal
St Andrew's School
PO Box EE 17340
Nassau

Email: Sharon.Wilson@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1242) 677 7802 or (1 242) 324 0816

The closing date for applications is 8th January 2010. Applications from unqualified
candidates, applications arriving without the full information requested, applications
from outside The Commonwealth of The Bahamas or applications received after this
date will not be considered.


I ODSUSSORE NTI AE O NT W.TIUE4.O


T1~7


INSIGHT






+>


PAGE 8C, MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Raul Castro: global A



climate summit a



failure before it starts . .' I


HAVANA


PRESIDENT Raul Castro
has declared the global climate
summit a failure before it starts,
according to Associated Press.
Addressing the leftist Boli-
varian Alternative for the
Americas trade group on Sun-
day, Castro said that though
Copenhagen should produce
"concrete, verifiable steps to
confront the effects of climate
change, we already know there
will be no agreement."
He said instead the world,
"can only wait for a political
pronouncement." He says lead-
ers from the nine-country
group gathered in Havana
must devise their own "firm
position on this decisive matter
for the future of the human
species."
Castro also is calling for
regional unity to face the glob-
al economic crisis, saying many
"have declared, with unjusti-
fied optimism, the end of the
recession."


VENEZUELA'S President Hugo
Chavez, left, speaks with Cuba's
President Raul Castro before the
Bolivarian Alternative for the
Americas (ALBA) summit meet-
ing in Havana, Sunday, Dec. 13,
2009. Member nations are
Venezuela, Cuba, Nicaragua,
Honduras, Ecuador, Bolivia,
Antigua and Barbuda, San Vin-
cent and the Grenadines, and
Dominica.

Javier Galeano/AP


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IBAKBRY
,e,- & Mkpherson Sts
3012-3CO


Legal Notice
NOTICE
E-NEWS HOLDING INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator



NOTICE


OF
BAMBOLA MANAGEMENT CORPORATION

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 10th day of December , 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre,
Shirley & Charlotte Streets, PO.Box N-3023, Nassau, The
Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

BOND MANAGEMENT LIMITED

N 0 T I C E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) BOND MANAGEMENT LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
14th December 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Mr Peter Leppard
of 1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393.

Dated this 14th day of December A. D. 2009


Mr Peter Leppard
Liquidator


NOTICE


OF
NURIA HOLDINGS CORPORATION

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 10th day of December, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre,
Shirley & Charlotte Streets, PO.Box N-3023, Nassau, The
Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.


Kraft Foods Inlemami . Inc


The dAlbenas Agency Ltd.
Palmdale, ..-i144


Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator


m




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