The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PDF VIEWER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01467
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: December 11, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01467

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text



+


TINGS TOUGH
McDOUBLE J1
FOR $3.79 "' o,, ,!
HIGH 84F
LOW 73F

SUN WITH
,, SHOWER


The


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


Volume: 106 No.18 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2009 PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)




SHOPPING

GIFT IDEAS, SHOPPING TIPS AND
MUCH MORE INSIDE h


10 S



Once prosper(

middle income(

families now

facing hardship


Man charged with

robbery of tourists

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
A 21-YEAR-OLD man,
charged with the armed rob-
bery of two groups of cruise
ship passengers last month,
was arraigned in court yes-
terday.
Dekota Von Lockhart, of
Church Hill Avenue, Chip- W
pingham, appeared in Magis-
trate's Court charged with 16-
counts of armed robbery, five
counts of receiving, as well
as a firearm possession and
conspiracy charge.
Lockhart, who was not DEKOTA VON LOCKHART
outside of court yesterday.
SEE page 16 Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

11A1,Malcolm
Adderley
reviewing
.his options'
S By PAUL G TURNQUEST
STribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net


By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net
BAHAMIAN families, pre-
viously middle income, are pop-
ping up in homeless shelters
and feeding centres across New
Providence as a result of eco-
nomic hardship.
Minalee Hanchell, Director
of Great Commission Min-
istries International (GCMI), a
non-governmental organisation,
says this alarming trend
emerged as a result of wide-
spread job loss. CGMI provides
shelter and daily meals for the


poor and elderly, as well as self-
development programmes and
counselling.
The human cost of the job
drought is painted on the faces
of men, women and children
standing in lines waiting to be
fed. For some, there is a sense
of desperation as they shovel
food into their mouths at lunch
time; for others, there is a sense
of deep satisfaction as they
peacefully savour each bite.
"When I first came here, we
had a saying, if we saw a well
dressed person come around
SEE page 16


Govt withdraws Planning
and Subdivisions Bill
THE Government yesterday withdrew the Planning and
Subdivisions Bill citing a late influx of comments, recom-
mendations and concerns about the proposed legislation.
Leader of Government Business in the House Tommy
Turnquest suggested that the public should seek to submit
SEE page 11


................ ......... ... .

. . _J Z il ,


I i



CLARIDGE PRIMARY SCHOOL'S brass section in action last night at the Junior Junkanoo Parade. The par-
ticipants braved heavy rain, which caused a delay in the proceedings, to keep the crowd entertained on Bay
Street last night.
* SEE PAGE TWO

Bahamasair hits back at

industrial action threat


THE management of
Bahamasair expressed disap-
pointment yesterday with
comments from Airport, Air-
line & Allied Workers Union
(AAAWU) President
Nelerene Harding over pos-
sible industrial action, saying
they contained inaccuracies
and misleading information.
Ms Harding had given the
company seven days to
respond to the alleged non-
payment of money and said
the union was willing to take


industrial action.
But in a statement yester-
day, which referred to Ms
Harding as a former
AAAWU executive,
Bahamasair Managing Direc-
tor Henry L. Woods said:
"The Industrial Agreement
with the AAAWU expired on
30th June 2009 and discus-
sions have been held with Mr.
Anthony Bain, the Court
appointed Acting President
of the AAAWU, on the mat-
ter of the increments due to


Bahamasair employees. Mr.
Woods reaffirmed Bahama-
sair's commitment to observ-
ing all rights of the employees
as specified in the now
expired industrial agreement.
"In fact he further noted
'this position flies in the face
of the practises adopted in the
private sector where in many
instances downsizing of the
workforce is necessary due to
the economic downturn in the
SEE page 10


PLP MP Malcolm Adder-
ley has reportedly advised his
family that he is "openly
reviewing his options" as to
either staying with the PLP
or accepting an offer from the
FNM to take up the post of a
Supreme Court Justice in Jan-
uary next year.
According to well-placed
sources, Mr Adderley was
said to be pondering all of his
options as he is fully aware
that he might not get another
nomination from the PLP
come 2012.
SEE page 10





PARLIAMENT will be
prorogued early next year
to allow Government to
start a new and repriori-
tised legislative session, the
Prime Minister announced
yesterday.
The prorogation -
which will see Parliament
suspended for a brief peri-
od of time - gives the
Government a chance to
assess what it has achieved
over the last two and a half
years of its term, and what
it would like to set out to
do before the next general
election.
All parliamentary busi-
ness such as legislation cur-
rently on the Governmen-
t's agenda would fall away
SEE page 11


Tribune


IB W DRIVE THRU LUMBER YARD


TloPS AND SUPER STORE
*STREET NOW OPEN
LUMBER & PLUMBING NoW OPEN
WILTON STREET


cost Of


j







+


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Workers Academy 7I I!


Junkanoo Babies delight

in first ever parade


By ARTHIA NIXON


MORE than 300 tiny tots
with their eyes all aglow
kicked off the holiday season
with the Junior Junkanoo
Babies on Parade on Wednes-
day.
The participating students
are all part of the Workers
Academy and Childcare Cen-
tre junkanoo programme.
Several fun themes were
displayed such as China,
Sesame Street, educational
characters, and the living
things made by God.
According to principal of
the institution, Dale Davis,
the parade was an immense
success - mainly due to the
school's Parent Teacher Asso-
ciation and parent involve-
ment.
She especially acknowl-
edged the crowd of spectators
that stayed strong from 10am
until 2.30pm.
"We held the parade in the
middle of the day and parents
took time from their jobs to
see their children participate,"
she said. "We've had parents
come and decorate the cribs


of those who are too little to
make the rush and we had
parents stay late into the
evening or come in extremely
early to make certain that
their children's classes were
ready."
Principal Davis says that
based on what she saw, the
main objective of the parade -
educating the children about
their culture - was achieved.
"We sought to educate our
students about their culture
in a direct hands-on
approach," she said. "We
wanted to give them all
aspects from learning, to
colouring, to making cos-
tumes and to rush and based
on the parent feedback that
we've been getting, who
knows, we might consider
looking into joining the major
parade next year."
Workers Academy and
Childcare Centre, which
caters to three-month olds to
sixth graders, is the education
arm of the Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Workers
Union and is attached to
Workers House in New Prov-
idence.


Three convicted in connection with
murder to be sentenced next year


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - Three young
men who were convicted in the
Supreme Court last week in
connection with the murder of
Philip Gaitor Jr will learn their
fate next year when they appear
for a sentence hearing in New
Providence.
Renaldo Armbrister, 22, and
Renaldo Bonaby, 22, were
found guilty of kidnapping and
murder and attempted extor-
tion. Although Kevin Harvey,
23, was not found guilty of mur-
der, he was found guilty of kid-
napping and extortion.
Justice Neville Adderley
presided over the trial in
Freeport.
Gaitor's badly burned body
was found inside his 2006 Nissan
Cifero, which was discovered at
Barbary Beach in December,
2006. His remains were discov-
ered in the back seat of the
burnt-out shell of the vehicle.
Gaitor, 19, was reported
missing on December 7, 2006.


In addition to murder and
kidnapping, the men were
charged with attempting to
extort $100,000 from Gaitor's
father.
The men gave unsworn
statements in their defence. In
his statement to the jury, Har-
vey said Gaitor was beaten by
Bonaby and Armbrister. He
said Bonaby poured gasoline
over the vehicle and set it on
fire with Gaitor inside scream-
ing.
However, Bonaby and Arm-
brister denied kidnapping and
killing Gaitor.
The jury delivered unani-
mously guilty verdicts against
the three men on all counts,
coincidentally on the anniver-
sary of Gaitor's murder on
December 7.
The prosecution intends to
seek the maximum penalty.
Donna Major represented
Harvey, Carlson Shurland rep-
resented Bonaby, and Murrio
Ducille represented Armbris-
ter.
Sentencing is set down for
January 27, 2010.


Nine Customs Officers to be

dismissed for misconduct
NINE Customs Officers will be dismissed from the Public Ser-
vice in January for misconduct.
The Public Service Commission made the ruling after the Min-
istry of Finance recommended that 16 Customs Officers be fired.
An additional four officers are to be retired in the public inter-
est at the same time.
Two officers are to be redeployed in the Public service.
The matter concerning one additional officer has been deferred
by the Public Service Commission as the officer is currently under
investigation.


Teacher, student


allegations expected


to be handed over


to the AG's Office


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - Police inves-
tigations into allegations con-
cerning a male teacher and a
female student are expected to
be handed over soon to the
Attorney General's Office for
a decision.
Asst Supt Emrick Seymour
said police are wrapping up their
investigations into the matter.
"We expect to hand over our
investigations very soon to the
Attorney General's Office," he
told The Tribune on Wednes-
day.
The teacher, who was also a
police reservist, is accused of
being involved in a two-year sex-
ual relationship with a female
student at St Paul's Methodist
College.
The relationship allegedly
began while the student was in
the 10th grade. She was gradu-
ated in June of this year.
Last week, the victim's aunt
criticised police, accusing them
of dragging their feet in the mat-
ter. She was concerned that
information given to police
might have been leaked to the
teacher, who has left the island.
It was feared that the teacher,
who is an American, might have
fled the country with his family.


However, police reported that
the teacher was back in Grand
Bahama after spending several
days in the United States.
The issue of sexual molesta-
tion in schools first surfaced in
January on Grand Bahama.
Since then, about 10 teachers
have been removed from
schools in the country.
Four teachers on Grand
Bahama have been removed
from the public school system -
three from the Eight Mile Rock
High School and one from Jack
Hayward High School.
Grand Bahama Christian
Council president Bishop Sobig
Kemp, said there seems to be a
deviation in protocols involving
teachers and students.
"I think it is good for teachers
to have a relationship with their
students, however there are
guidelines and limitations, and
there are ethics and proto-
cols... and many of these bound-
aries have been disregarded,"
he said.
"It is a big issue that has
come to the fore and I think that
persons who would have disre-
garded ethics in this regards
have to pay the price.
"The problem in our country
is that too many people get off
scott free.
"There is no retribution or
punishment." he said.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


will, $I kiiiiii







+


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2009, PAGE 3


II COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS



* i COB will be 'hard pressed



to replace Janyne Hodder'

- 1 T l 1 - -- 11 1 1.. . .


TRIBUNE readers are
uncertain whether the new
leadership of the police force
will make a difference in the
rising crime level.
Inspired by the recent pro-
motion of Elliston Greenslade
and Marvin Dames to acting
commissioner and deputy com-
missioner respectively, the poll
provided readers with an
opportunity to voice their opin-
ions. Though 61 per cent of par-
ticipants voted 'yes' when asked
if the pair will make a differ-
ence, readers commenting on
the poll were unconvinced that
a change in leadership will be
enough to affect crime.
Most felt that although both
officers are deserving, the cur-
rent police infrastructure and
"archaic" judicial system will
make their efforts futile.
Chester Brown explained:
"The RBPF (Royal Bahamas
Police Force) has a structural
problem which starts at the
recruit constable training stage
and is exacerbated by corrupt,
inefficient practices in the sta-
tions. The public have absolute-
ly no confidence in RBPF. The
changes at the top will not save
the organisation or reduce
crime as, these corrupt (offi-
cers) will fight and sabotage
every initiative to reform the
police."
Readers suggested possible
improvements to the fight
against crime and the adminis-
tration of the force, such as a
heavier police presence in key
areas and an increased effort
to prevent former criminals
joining the force through inside
help.
MaxB wrote: "Changing the
leadership of the Bahamas
Police Force will do nothing to
curb run-away crime in this
country. Only a complete over-
haul of the entire police force
and system here will do any-
thing. The Bahamian police are,
overall, pretty useless. They are
cloaked in an outdated colonial
mire of mediocrity. They are
under-manned, under-equipped
and can't enforce the most basic
laws. I've had interaction with
them on a few occasions relat-
ing to criminal activity and, as
tourists pointed out during the
two most recent attacks on
tourists, they don't seem to
know what they are doing, or
don't care. What the Bahamas
needs is hard, tough, aggres-
sive, American-style policing.
Bahamian officers would do
well to watch "Cops" on Amer-
ican television to see how to be
serious and tough. As Dr David
Allen has said numerous times
in the past, foreign police are
needed."
Concerned added: "Bahami-
ans need to face the facts and
stop saying that we are a Chris-
tian Nation, we're not!! We
hide the truth, crime is out of
control, and people rob, steal,
rape and kill without conse-
quence at all. We should use
the US system, three strikes
and you're in for life! Crimi-
nals will start thinking before
they act. On top of that, we
have no respect for the RBPF,
there is so much corruption and
lying - clean it up new chief
and maybe we will start believ-
ing you."


Arawak Homes CEO hails College presidents legacy


MEET THE PRESS: T. Baswell Donaldson, Chairman of the Board at the College, along with outgoing Pres-
ident Janyne Hodder at a conference at The President's Office, COB.


ARAWAK Homes CEO
Franklyn Wilson said yester-
day that the College of the
Bahamas will be hard pressed
to find someone capable of
filling the shoes of outgoing
president Janyne Hodder.
Having been the chairman
of the board at COB respon-
sible for hiring Mrs Hodder
in the first place, Mr Wilson
said that he is satisfied that
she has displayed to COB and
the people of the Bahamas
what a "real" college presi-
dent is capable of doing.
Mr Wilson added that part
of Mrs Hodder's legacy will
be that she created a better
understanding of what it takes
to run a university.
"I think that will augur well
to the long term success of
the university, and not just
the people within the college,
but also the Bahamian com-
munity has expectations that
are much clearer.
" Joe Public now has a
clearer sense of what that job
entails, and not just mainte-
nance, but development and
growth," he said.
On Wednesday, Mrs Hod-
der announced that she will
be retiring from her post
effective June 2010, leaving
the college to begin a search
for a new leader after three
and a half years.
Mrs Hodder, who has led
the charge towards the col-
lege obtaining university sta-
tus, said she wants to spend
more time with her family, in
particular her two-year-old
grandson, and "enter a new
stage" in her life with her hus-
band.
"This has not been an easy
decision to make. I have been
torn between a sense of duty
and knowledge of the great
debt I owe this country for
having welcomed me 40 years


ARAWAK Homes
CEO Franklyn Wilson


ago and taught me all the
skills I have later used to build
a career, and the desire to
grow tomatoes full-time and
walk my grandson in the
park," said Mrs Hodder, a
Canadian citizen who started
her career in education in
1971 as a teacher in a Bahami-
an school.

Contract

The college president's ini-
tial three-year contract
expired July 1 of this year. At
that time she entered into a
further two-year extension
contract - but on the basis
that she had the option to
choose to retire at any time
if six-months' notice was giv-
en.
Her move comes on the

FertilzerFuic*ide,


Decorative Rod Sets _
3 sizes, 6 dyles from
2200 'Vertical Blinds
sie, While & Aluhsler frm -- -
$4875
Roller Shades
4sizs,whPefm PVC Rollup Blinds AA
$750 Sslzes.,Whle& f ooldtonem .hgymi
B5mbo ii I
Brb Wood Pole
S~i Nie U.Nat Blin d frnd sets with rings l

$1800 $11&up i

We Won't Be Undersold! CuomOrdeem, Gat Prices,
SnFast Delivery, call for a Quote!







No e Fbic
Madi r t[4]35-23@1b .so Rd [4 2 32 -3 0


heels of allegations by the
Union of Tertiary Educators
of the Bahamas (UTEB),
which represents faculty
members at the College,
including the majority of its
academic staff, that she is in
some way personally to blame
for their failure to come to an
agreement on a new industri-
al agreement.
At the end of November,
its members voted in favour
of strike action, although this
has yet to occur.
However, Mrs Hodder
brushed off suggestions that
the tribulations she has expe-
rienced with the faculty over
the last year, peaking in
recent months, contributed to
her decision to step aside at
this time.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


I LMNEw 110 K'A 4107 10 pvia 1110


M"7--oMMISF1H( 6 110 125rNA 101251141
THise m c II M 15 WMA ~10 Im] i15
THE1U3CTMA p 110 IJJ MA 610 Im 11.40

TH M SM T 1 A X)l1.))P&A 6 M P19 414


ACIUJE1SCARML A~A -" FA A n ~



THIE PIUNCESIB FROG NEW 1953:40 NHA 6 I0! A 10 h'
AWEDc 1915 2Ils .A.61.A 15 1 [.~:M
MEJAARSUSSIN 0C1I10 NIA MA RN'A 201 [,I~:41
(1309LI5DDSB PIA 3:20 4A PN.'* NiA k'
THE TIMLAIM A r pT pN A NIA A pj'A 41A I f-Ai
KJH[)SME MB PiA NIA 4A 7.I1IE, iA It-:I0

38'0-FL IX
Use your e-card to rawrvefi~cke~s t 380-354-9 or wisn1 us el
ww~bueihiraki~cal~com


24/ ellf chpi'sT!M45


-~Pe /cis/eVS9,.

















Starbng at S245


Christmas Hours for December , aNo-sum.
Sunday 13th 1 2Noon - 5PMI .- -
Monday 14th � Saturday 1 9h 10AAM � -PM I
Sunday 20h 10AM � 5PM i
Monday 21 st - Thursday 241h 10AM - 6PM -
Closed Saturday 2Blh lor Junkanoo
CharIotte Sireelt 322-4862 -. '--, . -
sales@colnrealm.net, www.coinrealm.nel - .


elf ovs- /






T1~7


PAGE 4, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11,2009


THE TRIBUNE


EIOI AULETE S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, c, tiinn') 322-1986
Ad c, iiving Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


Is Immigration really owed for work permits?


LIKE BAHAMAS Employers Confed-
eration President Brian Nutt we find it dif-
ficult to believe that any employer would
owe the Immigration Department any fees
for work permits - that is if all the rules by
which The Tribune has had to conform are
the same for everyone. We have no reason to
believe that they are not. This is why we
cannot understand how any money is owed
by anyone.
Mr Nutt has his own explanation. He said
that in his experience owed permit fees were
often calculated by Immigration and
enforced for employers who were never able
to employ the applicant because of the
length of time the Immigration Department
took to process the application.
He said he had been involved in a situa-
tion in which the Immigration Department
took nine months to approve a work permit,
during which time the foreign employee
chose not to stay in the Bahamas without the
necessary papers.
He also had a situation in which he had a
renewal application in for an employee and,
after three months and no response from
Immigration, the employee left.
We have never made the mistake of hav-
ing a prospective employee in the Bahamas
without a permit - a renewal is a different
case. In this situation the employee would
still be here and on the job. However, we can
understand how employers who have found
and desperately need a good employee
would risk bringing him to the Bahamas
because of the difficulty of getting a prompt
answer from Immigration.
Even today we have on our files letters
written years ago to Immigration to which
neither an answer nor an acknowledgment
has been received.
No person who accepts a job is going to
wait an indefinite time for a government
department to permit him to conclude an
employment contract. And so for fear of
losing the employee, his future employer
takes the chance of engaging him, bringing
him to Nassau and playing a waiting game
with Immigration for his work permit.
The Tribune has never done this, and as
a consequence has missed many opportuni-
ties over the years of being able to employ a
talented foreigner for our staff.
When a prospective candidate accepts
our offer of employment, we always make it
conditional on the Immigration permit. We
also insist that he not give notice to his cur-
rent employers until we actually have the
approved and paid for permit in our pos-
session.
Of course, The Tribune has often been


short-changed when our candidate has had
to give three months notice to his employers
before he can pack his bags and leave for the
Bahamas.
This means that The Tribune has paid for
a staff member to work for a year when in
fact, because of our policy of presuming
nothing with Immigration, the new employ-
ee is only on the job for nine months before
we have to reapply for another year's permit.
This is something that Immigration should
take into consideration when demanding
fees.
When we get an approval letter from
Immigration, the approval is "subject to the
payment of a fee of $----- for the work permit
... The permit will be issued upon receipt of
the fee (cash or certified cheque only). This
approval is granted on condition that it is
accepted within 30 days from the date of
this letter or the offer may be withdrawn."
When we receive such a letter from Immi-
gration, a cheque is hand delivered to the
department the same day. We then wait a
few days before calling Immigration to find
out if the permit is ready to be collected.
If this is the procedure and, if it is fol-
lowed, how can anybody owe Immigration
anything? Because under this procedure, no
permit is issued until it is paid for.
However, we did get an unwelcome shock
on April 8th this year when a letter arrived
from the Finance & Planning Unit of the
Immigration Department, informing us that
a recently completed audit showed that our
"company is indebted to the Bahamas Gov-
ernment in the amount of $11,371.15." Four
applicants were listed whose permits the
department claimed had not been paid. We
knew that this was impossible. When our
accountant checked our books not only were
these permits paid for, but they were
stamped by the Immigration department as
having been received and cleared from our
account by the bank.
Of course, it was a mistake and we
received an apology.
Immigration claims that it is owed $1.746
million in unpaid permit fees. However, if
what happened to The Tribune is any indi-
cation of what goes on at Immigration, we
would suggest that in the end Immigration
might find that it is owed nothing.
Mr Jack Thompson, the new head of
Immigration is a fine gentleman, intent on
doing a good job.
However, the more he digs into his depart-
ment's past, and the more Cassandra boxes
he opens, the day will come when he will
wish he didn't have to get out of bed in the
morning to face the Immigration muddle.


Qualities






of a good






candidate


EDITOR, The Tribune.

The people of The
Bahamas deserve the best
government the country can
provide and to this end the
Progressive Liberal Party
must, without fear or favour,
select a slate of candidates
who are capable of solving
the complex problems fac-
ing The Bahamas. The Par-
ty must carefully choose
men and women who are
not only capable, but of
good character.
The candidates should not
only be members of the Par-
ty in good standing, but a
prerequisite should also be
that they are active in the
Party. They ought to have
knowledge of the history of
the Party and have an
understanding of and value
for, the principles of the Par-
ty.
In the great mix which
should guide the process,
those who should emerge as
candidates should possess
the following attributes:
* They should have a good
quality and multifaceted
education, formal or other-
wise.
* He or she should possess
and display good and sound
judgment and common
sense.
* He or she must have a rep-
utation for honesty and
integrity in their community


and professional activities.
* They must exhibit endear-
ing traits when dealing with
people, especially if a can-
didate is not well known in a
particular constituency.
* The candidates must have
humility in social contacts.
* The candidates must have
a personality which clearly
indicates that he or she is
personable.
* The candidates must pos-
sess a clear vision of the way
forward and the ability to
articulate this vision so that
people comfortably buy into
it.
* Necessary is a familiarity
and affinity with the area
which would bring about the
required leadership in the
community.
* Candidates should have
the inspirational skills to
cause people to pursue
noble objectives.
* Candidates should possess
the wisdom and the interest
to bridge differences in gen-
erations, gender, ethnicity
or social standing.
* Also vital is the willing-
ness to demonstrate rever-
ence for those of our citi-
zenry who are in their senior
years.


* Ideal candidates must be
able to inspire the young to
dream great dreams and to
meet the future boldly.
* A sterling virtue would be
a heart capable of under-
standing and sympathising
with the least among us.
* A great asset would be
reasonable knowledge of
regional and world affairs,
along with understanding
The Bahamas and the
capacity to discuss current
matters with all.
* Of great value would be
the good sense to avoid
being the cause of heartache
or unnecessary disappoint-
ment to voters.
* Most treasured would be
the desire and ability to treat
all people the way they
would like to be treated.
* Finally, the ideal slate of
candidates would be upright
men and women committed
to and willing to, at all time
stay the course.
Commitment is perhaps
the most important quality.
They must be willing to
expose themselves to scorn,
abuse and betrayal and still
stay in the arena, because
they are committed to fight
for a cause greater than
themselves.
For a Majestic Bahamas!

GEORGE A. SMITH
Nassau,
December 3, 2009


Disappointed with increasing


secularization of Christmas


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I wish to express my disappointment with
the increasing secularization of Christmas and
the lack of public nativity scenes.
At Christmas we pause to contemplate the
nativity in the crib.
There we find the Virgin Mother offering
the baby Jesus - the One who stripped him-
self of divine glory in order to become poor,
driven by love for mankind.
The beautiful initiative of the nativity is
meant to reawaken in all Christians the desires
to witness to the values of life, love and peace
of which the solemnity of Christ's birth
reminds us.
Commemorating the crib means passing
on the history of popular piety and religiosity.
It means rediscovering joy and the solidarity of
friendship which we must preserve in con-


temporary society, where the consumeristic
rush and the search for material goods alone
sometimes seem to prevail.
Christmas is a Christian feast and its symbol,
the crib, hands down in time the true meaning
of Christmas!
The Creator of the universe, in making him-
self a Child, came among us to share in our
human journey; he made himself little to enter
the human heart and thereby to renew it with
the almightiness of his love.
Let us therefore prepare to welcome him
with faith, enlivened by firm hope. In advance-
ment of faith, family and fraternity may we
all strive to keep Christ in Christmas!
Paul Kokoski
Hamilton, Ontario,
Canada,
December 2, 2009.


ARCHER'S NURSERY

P.O. BOX-313
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TEL :( 242) 325-1769 or (242) 323-5904
FAX :( 242) 356-6691


ORDER FORM


POINSETTIAS


QUANTITY POT SIZE PRICE
Red(R) Pink (P) White 4Wi


-(R) __ ()__WI

[IRJ -P) -ml


r" 112' toi"IV ImWOOh

Hanging Basket


$ 9.00

$19.00

$20.00


Company Name: _ Contact Person:


Telephone No:


Fax No: P.O.Box:


Street Address:_______


FREE DEUVERY FOR TWENTY PLANTS OR MORE
House garden and landscaping plarrt-svMdling, landscaping
Intorioracaping yard maintenance service


+>


chic living

Think outside the living room

















Luxurious casual living fu rniture custom-covered
in fade-resistant Sunbrella�.

Special holiday showings Friday 5 - 8 pm, Saturday 9 - 4
Orders placed by December 14 available for Christmas.

Dozens of colours to choose from.

Located at Phillips Sailmakers & Awning Manufacturers,
East Shirley Street, 393-4498





K/M


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2009, PAGE 5


* CALNEWS


CORAL HARBOUR RESIDENTS TAKE A




'Don't destroy




iconic walls'


Residents of Coral Harbour
made a stand on Wednesday
against a private developer who
they say is seeking to destroy
the iconic walls that have
guarded the entrance to the
community for more than 50
years.
Bordering the Coral Harbour
roundabout to the east, west,
south, and north, the walls form
a perfectly symmetrical circle
when seen from the air.
However, the wall to the
north is in jeopardy as a pri-
vate developer is seeking to
demolish it to provide better
visibility and the expansion of a
shopping plaza.
While representatives from
the association spoke out on
the issue, Larry Adams, who
claims to be one of the owners
of the property in question,
claims that he has all the nec-
essary governmental approvals
to remove the wall.
However, one of the com-

Junior

Junkanoo

'going to dogs

under FNM'

BY AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net
FORMER Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Neville Wisdom has criti-
cised the FNM govern-
ment, stating that under
their charge Junior
Junkanoo is "going to the
dogs."
Outraged by what he
feels to be a far lower level
of participation in this
year's parade, Mr Wisdom
said that perhaps the
absence of more New Prov-
idence high schools is due
to a lack of planning by the
government. He said this
despite reports from senior
schools crediting their
absence to academic priori-
ties and financial con-
straints.
Mr Wisdom's critique of
the government for lack of
involvement in junkanoo
seems at odds with the
position he took during his
tenure as minister.
In 2004, after the forma-
tion of the stakeholder led
Junkanoo Corporation, Mr
Wisdom said the govern-
ment was moving to lessen
its involvement in junkanoo
and allow for wider partici-
pation from the communi-
ty.

Substantive
However Mr Wisdom
maintained: "While the
prime minister promotes
the former junior minister
of culture (Charles May-
nard), whose record in
office has been poor, and
transfers his senior minis-
ter, Desmond Bannister,
the reality is that neither of
them has demonstrated an
ability to do anything sub-
stantive relating to the
Ministry Of Youth, Sports,
and Culture."
The former minister
charged that programmes
created by the former PLP
government to assist in the
development of the youth
have been "destroyed" and
linked the cancellation of
several of these pro-
grammes and other cultural
events to the rise in student
violence. "The National
Youth Service Programme
in Andros has been can-
celled! CARIFESTA has
been cancelled! The CAC
Youth Games was a disas-
ter; the live broadcast of
Junior Junkanoo has been
cancelled and ticket sales, I
am advised, are very poor!
In the meanwhile, our chil-
dren are fighting and hack-
ing each other on and off
school grounds."


mittee members, Sonia Alvino,
said that the walls hold an enor-
mous emotional importance to
the residents of the area, who
fear that property values might
be affected by its removal as
there would be no buffer
between the commercial and
residential sectors.
"The walls provide an attrac-


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
HUNDREDS of Bahamian
cruise ship passengers return-
ing to Prince George Wharf
with thousands of bags are
being dealt with efficiently,
Customs Comptroller Glenn
Gomez said.
Cruise ship passengers com-
plained there was chaos on the
dock as a back-up at Bahamas
Customs clearance kept them
waiting for hours after the
Bahamas Celebration cruise
ship arrived in Nassau at the
end of an overnight cruise from
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on
Tuesday morning.
More than 200 Bahamians
on the boat returned to Nassau
with up to 10 bags per cabin,
leaving just five customs offi-
cers to examine over 2,000 bags.
Mr Gomez maintains that
staff worked as quickly and
thoroughly as possible under
the strain of understaffing as
some officers were off work
that day.
But when they are fully
staffed there are still less than
10 officers on duty at the dock
and they have had to learn to
cope with an increasing num-
ber of Bahamians returning
from US shopping trips on the
bargain cruise, Bahamas Cele-
bration.
Since the cruise ship was
launched in July with the policy
allowing passengers to check in
10 bags per cabin without

n Tar


tive and affluent perception of
Coral Harbour that is unique
in Nassau and separates it from
other subdivisions. The removal
of the walls will absolutely
change the visual landscape of
the area as you exit the Coral
Harbour road and therefore
change the perception of the
area and the property values as


charge there has been an
increase in Bahamians travel-
ling to the US by boat and this
number has risen sharply in the
busy Christmas period.
Mr Gomez said: "At first
they were bringing in around
35 Bahamian passengers, but
now there are more and more.
"They allow 10 pieces of lug-
gage per cabin and that creates
almost a logistical nightmare
out there.
"We have limited dock space
and at first we had a space
problem in our office so we
found it nearly impossible, but
now we have a new space to do
Customs clearance.
"We haven't got any more
space to expand as we are shar-
ing the building with the Min-
istry of Culture, so when we
saw the passenger numbers
going up into the 70s and 80s,
we worked out with the ship a
way to stagger the off-loading.
Then they come inside to be
processed as normal."
The cruise ship issues pas-
sengers numbered tickets upon
arrival and they wait on the
dock or on the ship for their
number to be called before
entering the Customs hall to
have their bags cleared.
The process keeps some peo-
ple waiting on the dock from
around 9am until after 5pm.
But given the circumstances,
Mr Gomez believes his officers
performed well despite reports
of chaos and long waits on the
dock.
He said: "We didn't seem to

i Monique Handbags
The perfect gift for every orason


Q -
o- /


4fr


& other tereslr

www,TeriMonique.corn


STAND AGAINST PRIVATE


ABOVE
LARRY ADAMS (right) speaks to
Wade Thompson, president of the
Coral Harbour Heights West Associ-
ation.
LEFT
THE WALL the residents want to pre-
serve.
a result," she said. The com-
mittee is also questioning the
area of the land Mr Adams
claims to own, as they say there
is supposed to be a 50-foot
easement on all roads in the
area by law.
As such they are calling on
their MP, Kendal Wright, and
Minister of the Environment
Earl Deveaux to intervene.


have a problem like they were
talking about.
"But for some reason the
passengers came in expecting
to be whisked through the
process as it may have been
when they had one or two bags
each and we had seven to nine
officers.
"I would advise people to
prepare their Customs declara-
tion documents before going
before the officer to quicken
the process and to be patient.
"You cannot expect to come
on a vessel with over 200 pas-
sengers and almost 2,000 bags
and expect to get through by
10am. I think the turnaround
time we have is commendable."


DEVELOPER


ulit- furnished and equipped apartments
by the da week or month in



Miami


r - -


ClothingFor all Ages From Bih to Teen
Specialize in husky size
Mon.Fri.
0Oam - 7pm
Saturday
8am-5:30Opm
6th Terrace next to Centerville Bakery
Tel. 242-356-7970


A AVA

Bahamas


Handbook


50th Anniversary

Collector's Edition


SPECIAL PRICE
IN THE BAHAMAS


/GREAT

GIFT
FOR EVERYONE
ON YOUR
LIST


ALL THE BAHAMAS IN ONE BOOK! 738 pages!
Features * History * Culture * Family Islands
Freeport * Business * Finance * Government
"Blue Pages" A-Z Information Section


O/c BAHAMAS HANDBOOK
51 Hawthorne Road, Oakes Field

Dupei Tel: (242) 323-5665










BAHAMAS HANDBOOK, DUPUCH PUBLICATIONS and the "D" device are registered trademarks of Etienne Dupuch Jr Publications Limited


I ODSUSSOISO HSIPAGE LG ON5T WWW.TIBUE22CO5


+


Murphyvilla, 2nd Right freom Sear Read.

AIOdeom Gnor weplan tN riMWMe yrCrhrw!!



-VineeMirana lasseswilhoLoodi ofChrisln'sAdt.
Vin eosso 055 ome som o koeL
-Enaoidered Clhrisliaos cloths wilh nikIlns round a oblfi.
*Vilnti een b'ocodedo$t d6 e ineoboon.
-Viagje quake Ioaeqrfm cl(I* ds oblong,
- W ied dionem pins f1 doti, also lite
roundAcd raeclooular cLhes,
*-WhitenopoinsondIsogreeonaljd,
-Yi Ie round ohinhXKsputermswldi ri^6irNoinm
anotri doth round withIrine 68 inches nes argoe

-Men's hamnd iefl dsobcidonn s.erchfs
-Ladies haokerdt1,s,
-*eintged illebedspe ,ds
casual l party dresses for pre-teens,


Returning cruise passengers

being dealt with 'efficiently'







+


PAGE 6, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


'The assaults on ami ain
women cannot be
blamed on a few
Thels o Campaign against
tors. Rather, these a a
diverse forms of vio-
lence stem from the


of wostmenandgirls gender-based violence
around the world.'


& Corporate Partners



rab out .f the dioMIt b89

I sr an extr diUflnt


BY US AMBASSADOR
NICOLE A AVANT

O n September 28, the
world awoke to
fresh reports of unspeakable
violence against women. In
Guinea, the "berets rouges,"
the presidential guard, raped
women of all ages - in groups,
with weapons, and with such
brutality that many who
weren't immediately killed
died soon afterwards of their
injuries.
Neither the scale nor the
scope of this violence is new.
For the past 10 years, in the
Democratic Republic of Con-
go, soldiers have been raping
and mutilating women as part
of a deliberate and co-ordi-
nated strategy to destroy civil-
ian communities.
And gender-based violence
is not limited to war zones or
regions in conflict. Girls and
women are targeted because
of their sex at every point in
their lives, from female feti-
cide, to inadequate healthcare
and nutrition given to girls,
to child marriage, trafficking,
so-called "honour" killings,
dowry-related murder, and
the neglect and ostracism of
widows - and this is not an
exhaustive list.
Violence against women
touches The Bahamas just as
it does every other nation.
This violence is a global
pandemic. It cuts across eth-
nicity, race, class, religion,
educational level, and inter-
national borders: the only
common element is that the
victims are selected because
they are women.
Since 1991, the world has
set aside the 16 days that link
November 25, the Interna-
tional Day for the Elimina-
tion of Violence Against
Women, with December 10,
International Human Rights
Day, to underscore the idea
that violence committed
against women because of
their sex is a fundamental vio-
lation of human rights. This
violence is not "cultural"; it
is criminal. It is every nation's
problem, and it needs a
response that is commensu-
rate with the seriousness of
these crimes.
The assaults on women
cannot be blamed on a few
aberrant perpetrators.
Rather, these diverse forms
of violence stem from the
entrenched and enduring low
status of women and girls
around the world. Ending the
violence - treating the causes
as well as the symptoms -
requires not only that we
increase prosecutions of per-
petrators but also that we
work towards women's com-
plete equality in every sphere
of life.
Gender-based violence is


SECRETARY OF STATE
HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON
not solely a women's issue; it
is a global challenge to human
rights and security. As an
international problem, it
requires international solu-
tions. And the United States
is committed to working with
governments, multilateral
institutions, and a wide range
of private partners - from
activists and advocates, to sur-
vivors and civil society leaders
- to end impunity for those
who perpetrate these crimes,
and to ensure that laws that
recognize women's equality
and right to be free from vio-
lence are implemented fully.
We're working to promote
men's engagement in ending
the violence.

Religious
We're asking religious lead-
ers to incorporate these mes-
sages, so consistent with all
faiths, into their activities and
outreach.
And we're helping to
ensure that boys and girls in
all nations have safe and
equal access to high-quality
education that teaches the
intrinsic worth of each per-
son.
Secretary Clinton has made
this issue a top priority for
American foreign policy.
And the Obama Adminis-
tration is also committed to
ending violence against
women in the United States,
where too many women are
still mistreated and abused.
The Bahamas has recently
proposed important legisla-
tion, the amendment to the
Sexual Offences Act to pro-
hibit marital rape, which is a
significant step in helping to
protect women.
Women are the key to
progress and prosperity in the
21st century. When they are
marginalised and mistreated,
humanity cannot progress.
When they are accorded their
rights and afforded equal
opportunities in education,
health care, employment, and
political participation, they lift
up their families, their com-
munities, and their nations.
It is time that ending vio-
lence against women became
a priority for us all.


I ODSCUS SOIS ON THI PAGE LOG ONT WRBUE4.O


BVLGARI
(y44' /'/ /-


WA GO N


CHR01NOCAA.PH WITHM PECHANCAL McOYEMlENT. AUTOMATIC WINDING AND DATE.
STEEL AND RfUBBER 'All. ANTI-REFLECTIYE SAPPHiKE CkYtTAL.
DIAL WIT14 EMBOSSED TREATMENT. RUISSERAND STEElL I&.ACEIT.


rARADO~t ISLAND - CRYSTAL COURT AT ATLANTIS, 24324.~3 5I42
NA;54LJ I Q14N *ILLk. 04 PAY jTUREFT 147197 79


A WP0/ WA


mAw20, l&


lldsldda�


11/4,17Y


'Crl







+


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2009, PAGE 7


LOCALN


4.
I I * ~

I I ' I A
'V
I I
F
* h"...~
-III,...
*


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Bahami-
an Brewery and Beverage
Company's owner, James
Sands, announced that the
controversial lighthouse
image on the label of his
newly launched beer will
be withdrawn and replaced
with a new symbol.
When Mr Sands pro-
duced and released a sec-
ond beer called "High
Rock" at his brewery in
Freeport, he never expect-
ed it would cause a stir
among some residents
there.
The lighthouse in High
Rock, which was built by
a local pastor, was used as
a symbol by the brewery
in its label design.
Two weeks ago, Rev
Cecil Kemp, pastor of the
Lighthouse Chapel in High
Rock, and his lawyer Con-
stance McDonald,
demanded a public apolo-
gy from the brewery for
using the image of the
lighthouse without his per-
mission.
Rev Kemp stated that
the lighthouse was built as
a symbol of a spiritual
inspiration in the High
Rock community.
Mrs McDonald sent a
letter to the brewery indi-
cating her client's concerns
that the lighthouse symbol
on the beer was damaging
to the reputation of Rev
Kemp and the chapel,
which was dedicated to
God.
During a press confer-
ence held at the Brewery
on Wednesday, Mr Sands,
accompanied his lawyer
Fred Smith, apologised to
Mr Kemp.
"When we produced
High Rock I never
dreamed I would cause any
ruckus in the community.
Regrettably it has... and I
truly apologise to Mr
Kemp for putting the light-
house on the label of the
High Rock beer."
"I want to let everyone
know it was not my inten-
tion of offending anyone
in doing so, but we always
thought the lighthouse was
a landmark of High Rock,"
he explained.
Constance McDonald
accepted Mr Sands' apolo-
gy on behalf of her client.
Mr Smith said that Mr
Sands felt it was the right
thing do. He noted that
there was no monetary set-
tlement involved in the


matter.
"The brewery was pre-
pared to defend this
because we did not consid-
er it was libel.
"We are a brewing beer
industry in the communi-
ty and it is Mr Sands'
desire to work with the
community, and we really
did not wish to cause
offence, and since it is not
that much big of a deal to
us, it was a big deal for Mr
Kemp and he is part of the
community so a decision
was made to withdraw the
symbol - that's the story,"
he said.
"No damages were
involved, an apology was
requested and I think it is
fair. We are right now
looking at what the new
label should be," said Mr
Smith.
"I believe we will find
something nautical or
island-like that will contin-
ue to represent the beer
produced from pure
Bahamian spring water of
Grand Bahama."
He also indicated the
High Rock beer with the
lighthouse label could be
considered a collector's
item.
Mr Sands reported that
sales for the new beer are
doing well.
"It is a fine quality beer
and it is doing very well
considering it is only sold
in Grand Bahama," he
said.
"I would be lying if I
said I was not disappoint-
ed, but we will adjust and
move on," said the brew-
ery owner.
The Bahamian Brewery
and Beverage Company,
$15 million investment,
opened in December 2007
when it released its first
beer, "Sands."
The company launched
"A Name that Beer" com-
petition to get residents
involved. Sands was the
winning name for the first
of two beers.
In June 2006, the name
"High Rock" beer was the
second winning name
selected. Ethel Bethel and
Garnell Frith shared the
cash prize $3,000 for com-
ing up with the winning
name.


is accepting applications for an

ORTHOPEDIC & HAND

SURGEON
Contact: (242) 356-5827
Email: omaura@mednetholdings.com
or Postal Address: CB-11145
Nassau, The Bahamas


High costs block some Bahamians


from cancer prevention treatment


I By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net


A NEW prevention strate-
gy for breast cancer could
keep many Bahamian women
in good health. With a stan-
dard genetic test, women can
find out if they have a mutat-
ed gene that predisposes them
to breast cancer. For the time
being though, it may put them
out $4000.
The cost of genetic screen-
ing at a private lab is current-
ly prohibitive for the average
Bahamian, but the Bahamas
Breast Cancer Initiative
Foundation (BBCIF) is work-
ing hard to change that. New
research on breast cancer has
driven them to act.
Dr John Lunn, Medical
Director of the BBCIF, is also
a lead researcher on the com-
bined Bahamian and Ameri-
can research team studying a
hereditary bad gene that is
highly prevalent in Bahami-
an women. Their work will be
presented Saturday at the
Annual San Antonio Breast
Cancer Symposium in Texas.
For 31 years, the sympo-
sium has assembled interna-


Genetic screening

could cost $4000


tional physicians and
researchers from academic
institutions and private organ-
isations to share cutting edge
breast cancer research.
The Bahamian/American
team's research will be dis-
played in a session on 'Risk,
Epidemiology and Preven-
tion: Familial Breast Cancer -
Genetic Testing', with the
work of 10 other internation-
al researchers.
Dr Lunn says the genetic
research has provided new
insight, which has peaked the
interest of the international
medical community.
Aggressive strains of breast
cancer appear in Bahamian
women at an unusually early
age. According to published
reports, only 12 per cent of
American women under 44
years old are diagnosed with
breast cancer, while 34 per-
cent of Bahamian women are
diagnosed at that age or


younger.
The high prevalence rate of
one of five BRCA1 muta-
tions, which are breast cancer
susceptible genes, means the
Bahamas is an abnormally
high risk population. Accord-
ing to Dr Steven Narod of
Toronto University, who col-
laborates on the study, the
global average is five to six
per cent: 20 per cent of the
Bahamian sample tested pos-
itive for the abnormal gene.
The main goal of the
researchers is to assist with
prevention efforts: genetic
testing is an essential compo-
nent, according to Dr Lunn.
The team supports the use of
standard diagnostics, such as
mammograms, but insists the
high risk nature of the
Bahamian population neces-
sitates other approaches.
The cost of annual mam-
mograms, on average $100, is
currently covered by many


health insurers in the
Bahamas for women over 40,
and in some cases younger.
Insurers have yet to be
approached about financing
the cost of genetic tests.
Questions remain about
whether health insurers would
consider women with the
abnormal gene higher risk. Dr
Lunn says it is important that
the genetic data remains con-
fidential and out of the hands
of health insurers.
One health insurance agent
said the research is unlikely
to impact premiums unless it
is backed by an increase or
abnormally high rate of claim
in the Bahamas for women
with breast cancer.
At this point, the standard
is for insurance underwriters
to form their own conclusions
about risk based on their loss
experience in particular ter-
ritories, and not necessarily
on medical research.
Dr Lunn said it is safe to
say, unless the costs of genet-
ic screening comes in line with
the costs of standard diagnos-
tics, that insurers would not
be on board and the tests
would remain inaccessible to
the average person.


CARTIER BOUTIQUES:
Nassau: 284 Bay Street - Tel.: (242) 302 2872
Paradise Island: Crystal Court, Atlantis* Tel,: (242] 363 5808
cartier.corn


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


Shop NOW for Christmas


Double Drapes
Lotto Prints

Doube Sheers
0 Triple Shers n
Wood Poles (warm oak,rahogany, cherry) r
Drapery Rods up to 312'
Drapery Pins

Rod Slides

Tre: 323-6110 Mon-Fri.. 9am-6pm ,
,/ ** 'K.,1^ :






+


PAGE 10, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNWI


of Deadman's Cay,
Long Island, will be
held on Saturday
December 12th, 2009
at 11:00 a.m.. at
Cartwrights Gospel
\ _- _ r___ _ .Chapel, Cartwrights,
Long [land. Officiating
will be Elder Doddridge Hunt assisted by Brothers
Allan Knowles and Ivan Cartwright., Interment will
follow in Christian Burial Ground, Buckley's, IALng
Island.
Joinnie i. survived by: hi� mother: F.rnic Cartwrigh4L
one daughter: Sheranne Cartwright. two sisters:
Jeanette Cartwright and Violet MartinborougLh, three
brothers: Jcrome, Lunsford and Billy Cartwright.
two nieces: Melissa Martinborough and Krystal
Cartwright, two nephews: Neil Mrlinbirbough and
Jeremy Cartwright, three aunts: Etltc, Rosalind and
Alma Cartwright, one grant aunt: Frcdcrica
Cartwright, one uncle: O.ceola Cartwright, one
sister-in-law: Janette Cartwright. one brother-la-
law: Cornelius "Combrcad" Martinborough other
relatives and friends including: Annie, Chantelle
and T.J. Sands, Miriam Ciilhnmer, Paul Knowles, Alice,
Carlyle, Kevin, Spence and Asanath Cartwnight, Joy
d' Arvillc, Winston and Violet Cartwright. Paulo,
Mario, f.mnie, Vincent, Carmermn, ddie, Greg and
Jackie Cartwright, Rosemarie and Merrill Rogers.
Ronnie Burrows. Chrissie, "Doc", Henry and Johnny
Cartwright.

Funeral arrangements are being handled by
Butlers' Funeral Homes and Crematorium. Ernest
and York Streets.



4 Bethel Brothers Morticians
Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026



GARNET KNOWLES, 91

of Long Bay Cay, Andros will be
held on Saturday, December 12th,
11am at Zion Yamacraw Baptist
Church, Yamacraw Road. Bishop
Samuel R Greene assisted by other
ministers of the Gospel will
officiate. Interment will follow in
the Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier
Road.
Cherished and fond memories of
a good husband, a kind father and
a trusted friend will always he held
by his loving wife of 71 years,
Pastor Glendina Knowles; 5
children, Ross & Tracy Knowles, Almonica Williamson of
Nassau, Vernetta Baldwin & PaulaMae Lee of Port St. Lucie,
Florida; 3 sons-in-law, Evengless Williamson of Nassau, Pastor
Eldrew Baldwin & Elvis Adderley of Port St. Lucie, Florida; 2
daughters-in-law, Minister Ruth Knowles & Joan Knowles;
grandchildren, Dr. Mitchell McKinney of Marietta, Georgia,
Kenneth & Jennifer McKinney, Dellareece & Jamuel Ferguson,
Derek Dwight, Foster, Raquel, Germaine, Garniata, Tracy Jr.,
Crystal and Shonnel Knowles, Tandrea Baldwin, Melissa Lee
& Brian Adderley of Port St. Lucie, Florida, Valento Armbrister
of Tallahassee, Florida, Mavis & Gary Dsecas, Shameca Todd,
Desmond, Dr. Toshie Williamson and Demetrius, Mario and
Lucretia Knowles; nieces & nephews, Levingston, Mae, Walton,
Eldon & Ruth Rolle, Virginia, Estella, Loretta & Amos Williams,
Vera & John Farrington, Felix, Lean, Evelyn, James, Francis,
Kenneth, Shirley, Ezra, Sharlene, Claudias, Lawna, Alfred,
Sandra, Nathaniel & Ann Knowles, Marry & Walter Capron,
great grandchildren, Shavunka, Jessica, Kovan, Amari & Kennis
McKinney, Donya & Dondree Pinder, Gary Jr., Justin, Andika,
Derrique Knowles, Valento Armbrister Jr., Antionne Jr. &
Antionae Todd, Jason, Jasmine & Justin Ferguson; numerous
relatives & friends including, Lula Bain & family, Vera Bethel
& family, Ilford Forbes & family, Hazel Johnson & family,
Pharas Rolle & family, Althea, Judy, Vangie, Relia Bevans &
family, Dorraine Forbes & family, Pastor Theo Neely & family,
Pastor Harry Davis, Cynthia King & family, Ella Mae Bain &
family, Idie Davis & family, Rodnell Forbes & family, Katherine
Roker and family, Josephine Hepburn, Marie Brown & family;
godchildren, Marge Barton, Edmond Bain, Junior McCartney
& family, Annabelle Knowles & family, Mary Pratt & family,
Nancy & Beulah Stewart & family, Emily Rahming & family,
Orthnel Kemp, Margarette Russell & family, the entire Kemp
family of Long Bay Cays, Andros, Commissioner Francitta
Neely & family, the entire South Andros Community, Deaeoness
Shirley & Charles Johnson, Stacy Adderley, Delores & Charles
Johnson, Anna Johnson & family, Myrtle Thompson & family,
Erma Clarke & family and Mildred Ash & family. As there are
numerous friends and family members please forgive us if your
name was not mentioned.
Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers
Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on Friday from 11am to 6pm
and on Saturday at the church from 10am until service time.


FROM page one
With this in mind, the
Elizabeth MP was said to
be "not waiting" to allow
the PLP to "dictate his
political future."
"He will be 64 before the
end of this year. If he takes
the appointment and
becomes a Supreme Court
judge he will ensure that he
collects his pension from
the House of Assembly,
and whenever he retires
from the bench, either in
one year, or three years if
the PM decides to extend
his stay, he will collect a
handsome pension from the
judiciary as well.
"Now what more could
the man ask for? Under the


Bangle Culf
Seven Huart Set



Bunttel Pedan

llinland Martini Naddam

Diamond Ship Wheel NK
Doubic Hiow ,Earr
Earrr polished
Blue Topaz Set
Pendlart MuId
RueTopaz Nrq
/(~rn Bx*
PEARLS
Earrki Two PW sell
:arnriino



Neddace & bracmet w


ITwo StNrdNk � Brac Sot
DpEnda~'t Heart


Malcolm Adderley

'reviewing his options'


p3utter's Iunrraf iim se

& (Crimatariutm
Telophman: 393-2822, York A Ernest St&.
P.O. Box N-7 12, Nassau, Bahanin
MEMOIALSRIC O


Bahamasair hits back at
industrial action threat
FROM page one

country'."
Mr Woods added, "The threat of industrial action is totally
irresponsible and if acted upon could lead to serious and
adverse consequences upon those who may follow the call to
action. Employees should be reminded that illegal withdrawal
of labour violates the Industrial Agreement between AAAWU
and Bahamasair.
"I believe that our employees have pride in Bahamasair and
that the stability in the airlines' operations is critical to high
quality service during this busy season."


PLP and Perry Christie,
nothing was ever done for
him. So you really can't
blame him for looking else-
where. He was promised
certain things when the par-
ty won in 2002 and like with
so many other instances
Christie didn't deliver. And
we all know why they call
Mr Ingraham the delivery
boy," the source quipped.
Yesterday, the PLP's
leader said that neither he,
nor any of his members
were appraised of any plans
by Mr Adderley to resign
from the PLP.


242797 $110 $44 Pwmanr DouhI6 I)p1in
259977 $100 W10 Poidnt fpm
2 19926 $50 $20 Pendant CWINi
234931 $120 49 Eafring DEW Iia vn


252~Iea $20(i


234614 $100

234619 $100
249182 $120
249191 $30
211382 $120
252859 $200
231614 $200


SKU#


$120
WAS


$81
$49
NOW


24275 $X3 $1
230972 $15$0
230971 $100 "
231970 S60 $27
2447?9 $150 $61


Pexnt Dophin
Earrings Small ~Om
Wings Stud
Earrings DealHoop
EaTungs CLDfEd HLugg
EfINgS Twist Huggie
HENS
Cuffinks wih Giid 5cems
BracEM 1wnh Gold crews


"No, I've had no discus-
sions with Mr Adderley and
no-one on my side has indi-
cated to me any discussions
that they might have had
that would suggest Mr
Adderley has been offered
a job and has accepted a
job. Like everything else
you would expect that with
the code that exists on our
side that notice would be
given and information
exchanged, and we have not
had any such notice."
However, Mr Christie did
admit that he would be sur-
prised if Mr Adderley opted
to leave the party and
resign from his seat in Eliz-
abeth.
"Yes, on the basis of what
I know of Mr Adderley I
would be considerably sur-
prised because he is the
kind of person who would
speak upfront to any issue
that impacts him. And I
think he is always con-
cerned about his reputation
and people's understanding
of his integrity."
While it is commonly
known that there are a
handful of potential candi-
dates who are already cam-
paigning in the Elizabeth


SKU# WAS NOW
233170 $10D $40
233178 $100 S40
233049 $160 $57
23�1I6 $60 $27
224824 $60 $27
233117 $60 5-7I


233112 $60
251917 $160
251909 $160


251913
SKU#
238545
238543


$160
WAS
$80
$120


Bai* Sted Vh'fth Crass & i8kt 2508 $100
Ome Sted Rubber & 18Kt 233506 $100
Pendant Dog Tag 244573 $140
Mmr wIot GMI Screws 25801 $100
WATCHES -ALL AT 10%- 50% OFF


MWEsM W M


231305 $200 M$815 C'szNo
2S9255 $200~ $81 Ladie Guess
227D6~5 $80 $R32 n' Gum


$27
$65
$65
$65
NOW
$32
$48
S0
540
$57
$40


40719 $135 Si
40720 $135 $B1
31022 $150 W~
217683 $55 $5


248965 $100


TEL: 322-2214


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


area despite the fact that
the PLP still has a sitting
Member of Parliament for
this constituency, Mr
Christie said that the party
has to "from time to time"
remind persons of this fact.
"We have a Member of
Parliament and from time
to time we have to remind
them that there is a sitting
Member of Parliament in
Elizabeth because people,
as you approach the gener-
al election, apply for seats
and until such times as we
know Mr Adderley's posi-
tion we want to be able to
respect it sufficiently," he
said.


MR. OSCAR
JOHN
CARTWRIGHT,
43


UNDER $100 CHRISTMAS GIFT SALE !!


PEARLS * SILVER * GOLD

50% + 10% + 10% Off All JEWELRY

10% to 50% Off All WATCHES


STERLING SILVER SKU# WAS NOW 14kt GOLD


h Ot4 DAY ONLY;






8am-8pm


BAY & MARKET STREET


I


... ... .... ... ..... ... .....

..... ..... ... ..
000,







+


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2009, PAGE 11


LOCALN


FROM page one Parliament


and have to be re-introduced
when the new session, which
will begin with a Speech from
the Throne read by the Gov-
ernor General.
Other proposed Bills may
be added to the legislative
agenda.
FNM Chairman Carl Bethel
said: "It enables the Govern-
ment to restart Parliament, to
reprioritise its goals. We're at
a convenient halfway point to
make a judgment, to look at all
we've achieved, and to think of
what we can possibly achieve
in the time before it becomes
necessary to dissolve Parlia-
ment for the next election.
"It's also good way for min-
isters to really focus their
thinking on what is achievable,
what their overarching vision
for the development of their
different ministries and port-
folio and on what they would
hope to achieve for benefit of
people in next two and a half
years."
Prorogation also signals the
"death" of all parliamentary
select committees - such as
those appointed to look into
matters relating to crime, pub-
licly-held lands and the alle-
gations of sexual abuse at
Eight Mile Rock High School,
Grand Bahama.
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham took the opportuni-
ty during yesterday's parlia-
mentary sitting to encourage
all of those committees to pro-
duce their final reports before
the end of January 2010,
paving the way for the proro-
gation to follow.
Prorogation does not have
the same significance as the
dissolution of Parliament,
which occurs prior to a gener-
al election.
It is a common feature of all
parliamentary democracies,


which in years past when
transportation and communi-
cation technology were not as
advanced as they are today,
allowed time for MPs to return
to their constituencies to
engage in local matters.
Traditionally, it can happen
as often as six times between
two elections. The last proro-
gation occurred on January 31,
2006, and was the first during
the Christie administration's
five-year term that ended four
months later. During the pre-
vious FNM administration,
Parliament was prorogued
every two years.
Speaking after Mr Ingraham
yesterday, Opposition leader
Perry Christie said he is
"mindful that prorogations are
major events in the House of
Assembly in which the Gov-
ernment determines to put
forth its agenda, and an agen-
da that will take it into the next
general election" adding that
in this regard "it could be an
eventful session and we are
looking forward to it."
He said the PLP are "ready
and prepared for all eventual-
ities."
Mr Christie also suggested
that the Government may take
the opportunity of the proro-
gation to "make some impor-
tant constitutional changes"
hinting perhaps at the possi-
bility that a new Governor
General may be appointed.
However, speaking after the
end of yesterday's sitting Mr
Christie said he has received
no comment from the Prime
Minister or the Governor
General that this may happen.
Mr Bethel said he does not
"think we should read too
much into" the Prime Minis-
ter's decision to prorogue,
beyond "what the nature of
the act warrants."


Legal Notice
NOTICE


ELFINN MOUNTAIN LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


E-NEWS ASSETS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


ENRICHSTAR PACIFIC LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


FROM page one


their comments or recommendations
as to amendments to proposed leg-
islation prior to when it reaches the
final stages of being approved.
The Planning and Subdivision Bill
is one that has attracted criticism
from the Bahamas Real Estate Asso-
ciation as being likely to "suffocate
an already struggling economy and
make the acquisition of real estate
more difficult and expensive for
Bahamians."
However, the Government con-
tends it will bring order and clarity to
planning and subdivision develop-
ment, among other things, improving
beach access, providing for environ-
mental impact assessments to be
included as part of the planning
process, more effectively regulating
the subdivision of land, facilitating
greater involvement by the public in
the approval process, and ensuring


Planning and

Subdivisions Bill
that there are real consequences for
failure to comply with the require-
ments of the law.
Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux said yesterday that another
version of the Bill will be reintro-
duced on January 6, 2010, which will
include all of the agreed proposed
alterations to the Bill that was ini-
tially presented on October 30.
Further amendments may yet be
made after the legislation is reintro-
duced.
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
said the Government does not "want
to have a bureaucratic bill that
impinges on development," but one
that creates a system that is "simple
and straightforward". Substantive
debate on the Bill will begin January
20.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

NURA MANAGEMENT LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 2nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


TAU LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


E-NEWS HOLDINGS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


DTJ LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Meanwhile, par-
liamentarians did
succeed in passing
two bills relating to
arbitration yester-
day, with a few
amendments,
updating the archa-
ic laws governing
this area.
Minister of State
for Finance Zhivar-
go Laing previous-
ly told Parliament
that the Govern- INGHUBERAAM
ment hopes that INGRAHAM
through modernising and adding to
the laws it can create an arbitration
industry in The Bahamas that will
bring along with it wealth and job
opportunities.
Mr Ingraham said that the Arbi-
tration Act would not be likely to
be put into effect until the second
quarter of 2010.


Legal Notice
NOTICE


SUI GU GROUP INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


THATCH VALLEY HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


EVERGREEN GROUP ASSETS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

SOCRATES CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7






+


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12


EMBER 11, 2009


SaturdayS


AS THE 25th Annual Father
Marcian Peters Basketball Classic
winds down, teams began to posi-
tion themselves for championship
Saturday as more and more con-
tenders rise to the top of the field.
JUNIOR BOYS
A.F Adderley Tigers - 33
Harbour Island Panthers - 31
Following the most lopsided win
of the tournament in their opening
game, the Panthers were brought
down to earth by much tougher com-
petition and fell just short of a come
from behind rally.
Rio Saunders nearly singlehand-
edly brought the Panthers back from
a 10 point second half deficit, how-
ever his top of the key jumper with a
chance to tie bounced off right iron as
the Tigers held on.
The Tigers opened the game on
an 8-0 run, led by as much as 10 ear-
ly and finished the first quarter with a
12-5 lead.
Alveno Miller scored nearly at will
for the Tigers, and his six point streak,
capped with a tip in, gave the Tigers
a 22-10 lead.
A.F Adderley led 22-14 at the half.
In the third, Sauders led the Pan-
thers charge back to contention with
a series of successful drives to the


basket, often finishing in traffic
amongst defenders.
Saunders scored eight in the the
third and had an answer for every
possible Tigers' run to keep the Pan-
thers within striking distance as they
trailed 30-26 at the end of the third
quarter.
The Panthers opened the final
quarter on a 5-0 run, capped by Saun-
ders' pair of free throws, which
brought the Panthers within one, 30-
29, with 1:03 left to play.
Miller took matter into his hands,
dribbling coast to coast through the
Panthers defence with the help of a
nifty behind the back dribble, and
dished an assist to Lavardo Mesidor
to put the Tigers up three.
The Panthers'Edwar Davis had an
opportunity to tie at the line, but
made just one of two free throws.
Miller led the Tigers with 15 points,
while Teneas Mackey added seven.
Saunders finished with a game high
17 points, while Davis added six.
St. John's Giants - 29
D.W Davis Pitbulls - 26
The BAISS contenders stunned
the defending tournament champs
in thrilling fashion with a phenomenal
individual performance from Anwar
SEE page 13


TIGERS' guard Alveno Miller drives the lane for two of his team high 15 points in his team's 33-31 win yesterday over the Har-
bor Island Panthers.


4f Give a gift tis Holiday

that will bring smiles all yeafl :

Make yourso donation to

Proud Paws

at a ny of the follIow ing Iocat i ons

& receive aFREE

'1~ Pet of the Month CGlendar2ozo!1



Pamqwdale e: I i


Zip X - Vili e R -OWd
9 Hr. Photo -Palr'dak



* A~'imHa~imr Bv & Irp-


* ~Dermail CI-nic- Smdypomt *

Headdinei Hoffer Pla


Ba~hamaRepubki
0 . II' KunGitGzmo

* Si~om* Wtt




a* nd our De lasr~om Programwhere kids lemn owto be
% safe nuod n"ts& Ihe nu ke of ~esp~nsibe pet ownership! iv
SMake a better Bahamas �


* forpets&people!


Absolutely


Features: * Engine - 3.7L (242 hp)
* Airbags - driver & passenger,
with Passenger Sensing System
* Brakes - 4 Wheel Anti Lock
* Trailer Hitch Equipped
* Interior Mirror, Auto-Dimming with compass
and outside temperature
* Tire pressure monitoring system
* Theft deterrent system


COMMONWEALTH BANK
On-the-spot financing and insurance.
24-month/24,000-mile factory warranty. f. ioR �


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


Shirley Street * 302-0130 * Fax: 323-7272
info@nassaumotor.com * www.chevroletbahamas.com


COLRAO FR LL IF'S OD I w -








+


TRIBUNE SPORTS


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2009, PAGE 13


Teams position themselves for Saturday's championship


FROM page 12

Neely in crunch time.
Neely made several key
plays down the stretch and
sank both free throws at the
line with to break a 26 all tie
and give the Giants the lead
for good with just seconds
remaining.
The lead guard scored eight
of his game high 17 points in
the fourth quarter to lead the
Giants to the win after a back
and forth struggle in the mar-
quee game of the afternoon.
The Giants came out the
game on fire, building early
momentum and a 9-1 lead at
the end of the first quarter.
The second quarter featured
a complete turnaround as the
Pitbulls opened on an 8-2 run
to to pull within two, 11-9.
Neely stopped the bleeding
for the Giants with a running
jumper bank off the window
to give St. John's a 13-9 lead at
the half.
The third began much like
the second quarter, with the
Pitbulls full court trap leading
the way to an 8-0 run and their
first lead of the game.
Shakwon Lewis gave the Pit-
bulls their biggest lead on a
jumper which put them ahead
17-13 and capped the run.
Neely again rescued the
Giants when he drove the full
length of the floor and finished
at the rim to stop the run, how-
ever, Pitbulls led 19-17 heading
into the fourth quarter.
With the Giants trailing 23-
20 with just 1:15 left to play,
Aaron Campbell filled the cor-
ing void as the Pitbulls'defence
keyed in on Neely.
Campbell successfully con-
verted a three point play, then
stole the inbound pass and
scored to give the Giants their
first lead since the early third
quarter mark, 25-23.
Lewis would go the line and
make one of two free throws
for the Pitbulls, however they
would pull no closer.
Campbell chipped in with
eight for the Giants while
Kevon Francis led the Pitbulls
with 11.

S.C Bootle Dolphins -38


Teleos Cherubims - 32

S.C Bootle's second win of
the afternoon was not in deci-
sive fashion as the opener, but
a late scoring spurt from their
dynamic backcourt was
enough for the win.
Dontae Thompson scored
10 of his game high 20 points
in the fourth quarter to key
the Doplhins late surge.

S.C Bootle Dolphins - 23
North Eleuthera Lions-10

In their first outing of the
day, the Crusaders broke a
one point halftime lead wide
open to advance.

INTERMEDIATE BOYS

Cl Gibson Rattlers - 24
San Salvador - 18

Another all around perfor-
mance from Alcott Fox, who
led the Cobras in points, steals
and assists, kept the Cobras
tournament hopes alive with a
victory over a gritty San Sal-
vador squad.
Fox finished with a game
high 15 points, four assists and
five steals to lead the Cobras,
who ended the game on a 7-1
fourth quarter run.
The Cobras led 5-2 after
the first quarter, but San Sal-
vador rallied to take a 9-7
lead in the second on a fast-
break layup from Corey Storr.
Fox made one of two at the
line to regain the lead for the
Rattlers as they took a 11-10
advantage at the half.
Lester Williams tied the
game for San Salvador on a
tip, however Fox again ended
the quarter at the line to give
the Rattlers a 14-12 lead
headed into the final period.
The Rattlers defence held
San Salvador to just two field
goals in the fourth as they
expanded the lead late in the
game.
Along with Fox, Prince
Boodle added seven for the
CObras while Avens Valcin
finished with four.
Storr finished with six for
San Salvador while Williams
added four points, four


rebounds, four steals, three
assists and three blocks.

CR Walker Knights - 25
University School - 23

The Knights withstood a
frantic fourth quarter run by
University School to cling to
advance with a two point win.
Trailing 24-14 with 2:56 left
to play in the fourth quarter,
University went on a 7-0 run
as the Kights appeared to
buckle under pressure late in
the game.
Jeffrey Williams'l ayup
trimmed the deficit to just
three, 24-21 with 32 seconds
remaining.
After their defense forced a
turnover, Univeristy had an
opportunity to pull even clos-
er, but Knights' centre Tavari
Dorsett stole an inbound pass
beneath the basket to end the
possible threat.
The Knights' Michael
Reckley was fouled on a
jumpshot and made one of
two at the line to give the
Knights a two possession lead
with ten seconds remaining.
The Knights led 8-4 at the
end of the first quarter and
11-8 at the half.
Aftier going 5-6 from the
line in the third, the Knights
took a 16-12 lead into the
final period.
A layup by Dorsett gave
their Knights their biggest
lead of the game midway
through the period, 24-14.
Van Hutcheson led C.R
Walker with seven, Dorsett
added six and Reckley fin-
ished with five.
Williams led University
School with seven.

SENIOR GIRLS

RMB-11
GHS-6

In typical GSSSA league
play fashion, the Magic con-
tinued its dominance over the
Pacers in the lowest scoring
game of the afternoon.
Marcelene St. Jean equalled
the entire Pacers offensive
output with six points to lead
the Magic to the win.


PANTHERS guard Rio Saunders is fouled on his way to the basket. Saunders finished with a game high
17 points in his team's 33-31 lost to the A.F Adderley Tigers.


ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O







+


PAGE 14, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Brees and Manning enjoying each other's success


FOOTBALL
METAIRIE, La.
Associated Press


DREW Brees was a
senior quarterback at Pur-
due, still riding the emo-


tional high from one of the
biggest victories of his col-
lege career, when he
received a phone message
that he remembers fondly to
this day.
"After we beat Ohio State
- we came back in the end


to beat them - and all of a
sudden on my voice mail
after the game I have a call
from Peyton Manning that
said, 'Hey man, I watched
the game, congratulations,'"
Brees recalled. "I became a
Peyton Manning fan ever
since based on that he called
a young college guy like me
to tell me congratulations."
Nearly a decade after the
win that helped put Purdue
in the Rose Bowl, Brees and
Manning are two of the top
three quarterbacks in the
NFL in both yards passing
and touchdown passes.
They've also combined to
make NFL history by lead-
ing the only two teams to go
undefeated through 12
games in the same season.
There's even a possibility
their parallel pursuits of per-
fection could collide in a
first-ever Super Bowl


between undefeated teams.
"I would love for that to
happen," Brees said. "It
would be great."
With Purdue's campus in
West Lafayette, Ind., Brees
said he had a few chances
during his college years to
go to Indianapolis to watch
Manning play for the Colts.
Their ties only grew when
Brees signed as a free agent
with the Saints in 2006, mov-
ing to Manning's hometown
and stepping into the role
Manning's father, Archie,
held for 11 seasons.
It did not take long before
Archie Manning and Brees
became friends, with the
patriarch of New Orleans'
first family of football show-
ing Brees around the his-
toric Uptown neighborhood
where the Mannings live
and where Brees eventually
bought a century-old fixer-


upper.
Early on, Brees would
lean on Archie for advice
on everything from where
to go out to eat to where to
get his hair cut. He also
became friends with Archie
Manning's oldest son, Coop-
er, who lives in New
Orleans, and their wives are
all friends as well.
Archie Manning and
Brees regularly exchange
text messages during the
season.
Peyton Manning, mean-
while, said he has enjoyed
watching Brees' success
from afar this year, know-
ing that the long suffering
fans in his hometown finally
have an elite team playing
in the Louisiana Super-
dome.
"Drew and I are friends,"
Peyton Manning said this
week. "My family's gotten


to know him, and he's a
great guy. He's had a great
year, playing at a high level
this year, and I've been fol-
lowing him for a long time."
Last week, Brees passed
Archie Manning for second
in touchdown passes for the
Saints. Brees now has 117
to the elder Manning's 115.
With four more TD tosses,
Brees will pass franchise
leader Aaron Brooks.
Archie Manning didn't
even entertain a debate of
who is the best Saints quar-
terback of all time, calling
Brees "the best quarterback
they've ever had, period."
Although the elder Man-
ning has one son playing for
Indianapolis and another,
Eli, playing for the New
York Giants, he said he
probably enjoys football
most while watching the
Saints.








.0








0.


CD
U)


Surtis5 s3morial n'rtuar
N i,
,hipl, Retm y, Eumi-o Tel: 345,0 Robinson i , 51hr Sll
Tel: 326I2122-4969,241 Hour Paging Service 3b 3 61



Bridgette Mayana Bain Munnings, 46
of Buttonwood Avenue,
Pinewood Gardens, will be held
on Saturday at 11:00 am. at New
Covenant Baptist Church,
Independence Highway.
Officiating will be Bishop
Simeon Hall assisted by other
ministers of Religion. Interment
in Southern Cemetery, Spikenard
Road.
She is survived by 3 daughters,
Gaynell, Ebony and Dondra; 1
son Rambo; 6 grandchildren, Garvin Jr., Kevon, Kenrece,
Oral, Oaria, Destiny; 6 sisters; Paula, Beverley and Diane
Bain, June Johnson, Ceily Grant, Margaret Jones; 3
brothers; Godfrey and Goldsen Bain and Fredrick Woods;
numerous nieces and nephews including, Dekeria,
Natasha, Andrea and Vernamae Bain; Erika Robinson,
Denise, Quikele Bain; Damien, Damon, Emmerson,
Benneth Turnquest, Anfrnee, Cornilus, Jaynae, Wesley,
Oniel, Omar, Ebonye, Wilfred, Wilecia Delancy, Carl and
Jamal; 2 sister-in-law; Delores and Mechelle Bain; 1
brother-in-law; Mitchell Huyler; 1 son-in-law; Yoga
Rodriguez and numerous other relative and special
friends including, Vincent Culmer & family; Nurse Denise
Culmer; Mary Nairn & family; Jenniemae Minus; Felincia,
Octavis, Steve McKinney, Rod Johnson, Paulette McIntosh
& family; Donnell Forbes & family, Brenda Burrows,
Nurses and Surgeons of the Female Medical Ward of the
Princess Margaret Hospital, Igallie Miller family, Alfreda
Strachan & family, Joey & Desmond Bailey, Ketson,
Charles, Micheal Ferguson and Valerie Maycock & family.
Service will be held at New Covenant Baptist Church,
Independence Highway on Saturday, December 12th 2009
At 11:00 am. Interment in the Southern Cemetry, Cowpen
& Spikenard Road.


We Take


SUUK


Any Trade-ins


F


- .t~


SWIFT

So you want everything in life.
Why not? It's quite alright to be a bit greedy whei it comes to
the Suzuki Swift. Fun, funky, and yes, practical.All rolled
into one tight package.With its nimble moves and handling.
you'll jump right into a whole new world of exhilaration.
Watch out.you may have friends out the door asking you for
a ride, Or the keys. Suzuki Swift. Just what you need. And want.


Frikm incducd rustproof irg, Iknsing anid inspection to birthiday, f .11 tank of f waI,
24,000 miI.0/4 months warranty and emergency roadside assistance.



U VMIhFL IMITED
#I AU70 DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 6 322-3775 # 325-3079
Vkili ourshowroomat uaity ugItoA I~SaIki(FreeportiLUd for saimi-or dwls, (Quggonit",y 352-0127
or Abaco MQVor Mail, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916


*Customary 10%
discount on charged Items!

you buy the BIGGERRthe Discount
�*^ _


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


IN THIS Sept. 6, 2007, file photo, Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning, right, and New Orleans Saints quarterback
Drew Brees meet after the Colts won 41-10 Colts in an NFL football game in Indianapolis. Brees was playing at Purdue when he
first met Peyton Manning, then in his first couple season with Indianapolis. The two quarterbacks' bond strengthened when
Brees began playing for the Saints in the Manning family's hometown. They've had more than a casual interest in each other's
success since, which has made this season particularly gratifying for them.


UlII


Air.

v A
'Now'In Store...," 75


w4ow - &AO ttwa*







+>


PAGE 16, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNW


MARIE ROLLE runs the Great
Commissions Ministry soup kitchen.


I A OUTERw apsu orsi a pkins


BTC has opened a brand new


Service Centre


in the John's Plaza on


Carmichael Road and McKinney Drive.



Now our southwest customers don't


have to venture too far from home.



You can do it all at our BTC Carmichael Road Service Centre

" Pay your BTC bills

* Sign up for new services including landline, mobile and high-speed internet

* Purchase mobile phones and phone cards


Open Monday - Saturday 10am - 6pm


JOIN US ON FACEBDOOK


for more information

4i www.facebook.com/mybtc


I~hl E DMIWI.OdFa NId F *WdD


Human cost of

FROM page one
we thought they were just com-
ing to see what was going on,
but now we see where it is hap-
pening more on a daily basis so
we know that the face of the
needy is changing. I used to
think if you saw people com-
ing in cars, these people don't
need, but they do," said Ms
Marie Rolle, Feeding Centre
Supervisor and Cook.
In the first six-months of
2009, GCMI catered to more
needy people than in their pre-
vious three years of operation,
and the demand is still grow-
ing, according to Hanchell. Last
month, they fed about 150 peo-
ple daily, compared to last year
when 80 to 100 individuals vis-
ited the centre daily. Every
month they distribute about 800
bags of groceries.
Roger is a regular visitor to
the Feeding Centre. He works
as a night security guard, but
of late jobs have been irregular.
Sometimes he has to hustle
money by cleaning cars or
washing windows.
"Things tough, so when I
don't have it I come here, but
when I can I help out. I don't
just take, I give back. I just
waiting right now, for as the
government say, for this to roll
over and a better year to come
through. More places like this
would make Nassau more bet-
ter though," he said.
Since the Bahamian econo-
my started to shed jobs over
two years ago, many families
faced evictions and emerged
homeless. Walking through the
doors of lunch rooms are peo-
ple once thought of as statis-
tics: laid off Atlantis employ-
ees, Breezes employees,
employees of shops downtown
and in Palmdale. Hanchell said
economic hardship has sur-
passed domestic violence and
alcohol and drug problems as
the number one reason why
people turn for help.
"I feel it is still on the rise.
Whole families are coming in
now, and more people are find-
ing out about us. People need
to be aware of the number of
hurting people there are," said
Hanchell.
Retired civil servant Stephen
Gilbert has been visiting the
Feeding Centre for three years.
He was made homeless after a
fire destroyed his house. He
barely wanted to think about
what life would be like if feed-
ing centres like GCMI did not
exist.
Bertram Wilson, a tile lay-
er, comes for a hot lunch every
day. He knew exactly what he
would do if there were no pro-
grammes like GCMI: "I'd steal
[food]," he said with an
unflinching demeanour. "I'm a
tile layer and there's just no
work to be had right now."


jobs drought
Sharon*, a temporary resi-
dent of the homeless shelter,
said she turned to social ser-
vices because she was evicted
from her apartment. She
arrived home to find her
belongings packed up on the
front doorstep. Even though
she has to leave the centre after
the three-week time limit, the
CGMI shelter is home for her
and her 2-year-old son.
"They make the shelter feel
like a home, but at one point I
used to think, 'God aint look-
ing out for me,'" said Sharon.
During her last job search
Sharon applied to an Ameri-
can fast-food restaurant. It was
a disappointing blow when they
never called back.
"It is hard, especially when
you have a baby in pampers,
and there are no jobs. I don't
have the BGCSE's to prove
I'm smart, but I know how to
work and I teach myself. I can
do just as well as anyone who
has the documents," she said.
"I love to cook and deal with
flowers. I wanted to be a chef
all my life. I am good in the
kitchen."
Life in a shelter is not unfa-
miliar to Sharon. When she was
13 years old, social services
removed her from her home
because of the violence to
which she was exposed. She
returned home only to be
thrown out again at 16 years
old, when she was raped and
thought to have disgraced her
family. She built a modest life
with her husband, who was a
crawfish diver. She operated
the boat engine when they
went out on trips working
together.
Her life spiralled out of con-
trol this year when her husband
was incarcerated in connection
with a house robbery, and she
was left without an income.
"The most cruel people have
been my family. It is like my
relatives are deceased, because
they just look away.
"The people in the shelter
do not care about my clothing,
or how I look. They welcome
you with a warm hug and a
prayer. It might just be a shel-
ter, but if feels like home," she
said.
Sharon said she has over 20
aunts and uncles and several
cousins, many of whom have
stable government jobs in the
police force, defence force, or
with customs. She said they
consistently told her things like,
"I can't help you right now" or
"I looking for help myself," so
she gave up turning to them.
"What this is teaching me is
that when I get a job I ga
appreciate it. When I get a
home, I ga appreciate it. Stop
being lazy, find something and
stick to it. It aint easy, but I am
going to appreciate what I get,"
she said.


Man charged with robbery of tourists
FROM page one
represented by counsel, also appeared on an arrest warrant over a
2008 drug case and sentenced to six-months in prison in relation to
that matter.
According to court dockets, Lockhart conspired to commit
armed robbery on Friday, November 20. He is accused of using a
shotgun to rob Edna Farah, Stacey Connerty, Luke Carter, Carley
Milme, Elizabeth McDonald, Adrioncur Koerr, Paul Coladonato,
Chiang Hock Khan, Ronnie Chieng Chiaw Bang, Ting Sii Yun,
Robert Young, Charlotte Ashfield, Elizabeth Beckett, Ethan
Moseley, Kassandra Pickford and David Laitinen.
Court dockets claim Lockhart and another person robbed the
group of thousands of dollars in cash, cellular phones, cameras, lap-
tops and other personal effects.
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez informed him he was not
required to enter a plea to the charges.
Lockhart, however, pleaded guilty to four counts of receiving.
He admitted to receiving a $700 Sony Digital Camera belonging to
Koerr, a $1,000 white Apple I-Phone and a black credit card hold-
er belonging to Bang.
He also pleaded guilty to receiving a $600 black Apple I-Phone
belonging to Coladonato, but not guilty to receiving $1,100 in
Negara Brunei Darussalam currency belonging to Sii Yun.
Lockhart admitted to possessing a shotgun with intent to endan-
ger the life of Coladonato. The case was adjourned to March 1,
2010.
Magistrate Gomez also informed Lockhart that he had a war-
rant of arrest for him in relation to a marijuana possession charge,
to which he had pleaded guilty last year. He told Lockhart that he
had been ordered to get treatment for his drug problem and return
to court on December 9, 2008. However, he never did.
Lockhart claimed he had started working, which was the reason
he was unable to return to court, however Magistrate Gomez said
it was a poor excuse and sentenced him to six months in prison.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


I STEPHEN GILBERT I




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated May 24, 2011 - Version 3.0.0 - mvs