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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01466
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: December 10, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01466

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MA
F $3.79 I'm ,lovin',ir

HIGH 86F
LOW 73F

SSUNNY WARM
AND HUMID


The


Tribune


BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


Volume: 106. No.17


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009


PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

II



!SEPGEIE


PIP on aleor over






MP 'resi' cl aim


MP 'quitting seat' bID

for senior court

post say reports


By PAUL G
TURNOUEST
Tribune Staftf
Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net


PLP MP Mal-
colm Adderley
refused last night
to deny reports
that he will Be
resigning from his
seat in the House
of Assembly and taking up a
post as a new Supreme
Court Justice early in the
new year.
When contacted by The
Tribune yesterday, Mr
Adderley seemed more con-
cerned with the source of
the information.


"I want to know
where that started
from," he said.
"When I get to the
bottom of it, I will
call you."
However, this
response did not go
over well with
many within his
party.
One former MP
exclaimed: "Why is
he waffling? Why
doesn't he have a definitive
answer!"
As the PLP's representa-
tive f6r the constituency of
Elizabeth, Mr Adderley's
allegiance with the party was
first called into question
SEE page 14


Students taken to hospital
after school disturbance
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - Several students were injured and' taken
to hospital following a disturbance at St Georges High
School on Wednesday.
About five students were rushed by ambulance to the
Rand Memorial Hospital, where they were seen and treat-
SEE page 13


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@
tribunemedia.net
PRESIDENT of the
College of Bahamas
Janyne Hodder is to
retire from her post
effective June 2010,
leaving the College to
begin a search for a
new leader after three
arid a half years.
Mrs Hodder, who
has led the charge
towaids the College
obtaining university
status, said she wants
to spend more time
with her family, in par-
ticular her two-year-
old grandson, and
"enter a new stage" in
her life with her hus-
band.
"This has not been
an easy decision to
make. I have been torn
between a sense of
duty and knowledge of
the great debt I owe
this country for having
welcomed me 40 years
SEE page 20


Man in custody in


connection with 18


tou i ts robbery


isi w.jantedi f
querso-g


Campaign launched to find
missing young Bahamian
AN ONLINE campaign has been
launched in an effort to help find a well
known young Bahamian who went miss-
ing several weeks ago.
Police say they have no leads in their
investigation into the bizarre' disappear-
ance of Francis Farrington, but his
friends are using Facebook to spread
' SEE page 12

Man in court charged with the
murder of Bahamasair pilot


By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
A 31-YEAR-OLD man
charged with the murder of
Bahamasair pilot Lionel
McQueen was arraigned in a
Magistrate's Court yester-
day.
Marvin Coleby, of
Kennedy Subdivision is
accused of the September
20th murder of McQueen


and the attempted murder
of McQueen's cousin and
roommate Montez Saun-
ders. McQueen was found
dead in his Golden Palms
Estates home, near
Kennedy subdivision, short-
ly after 4am on Sunday, Sep-
tember 20. He was shot sev-
eral times. McQueen was
engaged to be married in
February next year.
SEE page 12


HE police have have con-
firmed that a 21-year-old
Chippingham man %%as
taken into custod\ in con-
nection tilh the robbery
of the 18 visitors at Earth
Village.
Police say the man is
expected to appear in
qourt today at 11am.
Meanwhile, a second
man, Frederick Green
Neely', 27, is wanted for
questioning in connection
withe matter. His last
known address was Oasis
Apartments on St Albans
Drive.
In a statement issued
yesterday, the police said
they are grateful tothe
public for providing infor-
mation in connection with
the investigation. "It cer-
tainly shows that Bahami-
ans understand the
importance of tourism
and the effects ithas on
our economy."
In other crime news, a
man was arrested on
Wednesday morning in
connection with a stolen
goods investigation.
Just after 5am, police
received information that
some men were stripping
a vehicle on the comer of
Moore Avenue and Wulff
Road.
Officers responded to
the call and when they
arrived in the area, saw
the door of the Shoe
Land store swinging,
open.
They questioned a man
in the area, who took
them to an unattended
vehicle.
"A check was made of
the vehicle and an assort-
ment of clothing believed
to be the property of
Shoe Land Store was dis-.
covered in the trunk.
Police arrested a 21-year-
old male resident of Sea
Breeze. He is expected to
appear in Court in' con-
nection with this matter,"
said a police spokesper-
son.
Police also confiscated
a firearm this week.
Some time around 8am
on Tuesday, officers act-
ing on a tip, discovered a
Beretta pistol in a
garbage bin at a home in
the McKinney Drive area.
"Once again the police
would like to commend
the Bahamian people for
continuing to provide
information on suspicious
activities, suspicious per-
sons, and suspicious vehi-
cles. It is this kind of part-
nership between the
police and the community
that assists in combating
crime," the police said in
a statement.


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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCL nW


Survey voters want vendors

moved away from Montagu


-IJ
MINISTER o
Social Dev
and MP for
Loretta Butl


FOR 3 IN I LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control
Tpopical Extepminatops
322-2157


offal into the water
while families swim
metres away. Vendors
are not able to get
business licenses for
their trade which
operates at four levels
from the fisherman to
the fish seller, fish
cleaner, and vendor
selling related items.
The indiscriminate
commerce has been
Df State for found to be a'direct
elopment cause of traffic con-
Montagu gestion in East Bay
er-Turner Street as drivers stop
to purchase fish and
conch from the ramp.
And 'the abandoned lot
where the Montagu hotel once
stood is being used as a dump-
ing ground and urinal for ven-
dors and visitors to Montagu
Foreshore.
The committee report is
intended to inspire government
to renovate Montagu Fore-
shore at an expected to cost of
over $2 million to make it clean
and safe for an estimated
15,000 users while decreasing
the mounting traffic.
A constituency meeting held
in September led the commit-
tee to produce a preliminary
report, and a town meeting was
then held in October. Surveys
were given to attendees and
made available online.
Of the 124 respondents, 110
voted in favour of moving ven-
dors away from Montagu Fore-
shore and 13 possible reloca-
tion sites have been identified
in the report.
The survey responses differ
wildly from a Tribune poll in
which 75 of 137 readers voted
to keep vendors in Montagu
with better facilities, while just
33 said commercial activity
should be' removed from the
area.
The committee plans include
immediate provision of toilets
and running water for vendors,
and improved food preparation
facilities subject to health
inspection.
Traffic would access the
ramp via a new separate road
to prevent congestion in East
Bay Street and a police officer
at the site would direct traffic
at peak times and'enforce noise
pollution and litter laws.
The committee also seeks
government's full support in
regenerating the beach and
installing breakers in the sea
to prevent further beach ero-
, sion, while developing the park
and repairing the ramp.
Now the report has been
completed, government will
decide on the way forward.
Mrs Butler-Turner said:
"This is not something that will
be determined by the commit-
tee.
"The committee has been
formed by myself, and I am just
one agent in the government
and I will present the govern-
ment with the findings.
"Commerce has to be pre-
served because there are num-
ber of families who make their
livelihood through the market,
"We will have to look at how
the land use is divvied up with-
in Montagu Park, free the boat
ramp for recreational boaters.
and ensure those individuals
who make a living at Montagu
are not thrown to the side with-
out any viable options."


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009, PAGE 3


COURT OF APPEAL: Lemuel Stephen Smith


Entertainer 'Stevie S' resentenced



to five years for sex with girl, 13


By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
THE COURT of Appeal
yesterday resentenced Bahami-
an entertainer Lemuel Stephen
Smith - better known as 'Stevie
S' - to five years in prison after
ruling that his one year sen-
tence for having sex with a 13-
year-old girl was "unduly
lenient."
The sentence, which will take
effect from April 30, the date of
his conviction, was handed
down yesterday by Justice Stan-
ley John.
The Attorney General had
appealed the original decision
of Supreme Court Justice Vera
Watkins, who in June sen-
tenced Smith, 48, to a year in
prison and ordered that he be
placed on three years proba-
tion after his release.
Smith, a Bimini native, was
accused of committing the
offence on January 12, 2004, in
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Following the testimony of
the complainant, Smith pleaded
guilty to the offence which car-
ries a maximum sentence of
seven years imprisonment.
Prosecutors stated that Smith
lured his victim, a student at
Jack Hayward High School at
the time, into his car and took


BAHAMIAN ENTERTAINER Lemuel Stephen Smith commonly known as Ste-
vie S outside the Court of Appeal on Charlotte Street yesterday. Smith was giv-
en a five year prison sentence for having unlawful sexual intercourse with a
13-year-old girl.


her to an unknown location on
Farm Road, where he had sex


with her against her will. Attor-
ney Jilian Williams, who


appeared for the Crown, sub-
mitted that given the circum-
stances of the case, perhaps a
five year sentence would have
been appropriate. She said the
judge ought not to have taken
into consideration the medical
condition of the accused, as the
injury from which he continues
to suffer occurred before he
committed the offence.

Injury
According to Smith's attor-
ney Murrio Ducille, Smith sus-
tained a spinal cord injury
which left him barely able to
walk. He was injured in 2001.
Mr Ducille told the court yes-
terday that Smith had been on
the verge of being totally paral-
ysed and that his case was not a
normal one. In giving the deci-
sion of the appellate court, Jus-
tice John said, "Offences of this
kind cannot be condoned and
must never be condoned.
"We all know that the scars
left on these young girls stay
with them for a very long time."
"As much as the court feels
for his medical challenges, they
are of his own doing.
"The court has a duty to pro-
tect the young girls or flowers
of the nation," Justice John
said.


Let Him know
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Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
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Telephone: (242) 323-8240 * Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassaucom


A POLICE Sergeant and another man ac i m..I, I i q
ing a 28-year-old woman last month were d11 i..I i. i
Magistrate's Court yesterday.
Sergeant Sean Gibson, 38, of Sanford D: i d.. R d..I
Andrew Bethel, 44, of Winston Estates we .11 i.i.i ..d
before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in (C i I i! 1 k
Lane yesterday. It is alleged that the two me, I . ,,-
cerned together on Sunday, November 15, 2', ' I 'i ... ,
28-year-old woman.
Neither man was required to enter a plea -i, ,. I l, I.
Smith, who was represented by attorney\ \\ . lli.i
Olander, and Bethel, a former City Mark..il m , ._.I
who was represented by attorney Lilith Smith, were each
granted $10,000 bail.
The case was adjourned to December 14 and trans-
ferred to Court 6, Parliament Street.
On Monday police Constable Daniel Paul Smith, 21, of
Oakes Field, was arraigned in Magistrate's Court on a sep-
arate rape charge.


Correction
IN yesterday's Tribune, it
was incorrectly reported that
a stabbing took place on
Thompson Boulevard out-
side the Starbucks attached
to the Chapter One Book
Shop.
The incident did take
place outside the book shop, a
however the Starbucks in
question closed two months . ,
ago.
The Tribune apologises a
for any inconvenience this 1
may have caused.



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PHOTOS: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff


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PAGE 4, THURSDAYDECEBER10,2009THETRIBUNEEEDITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUSIURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dognuas of No Master

LEON E. H. I UPUCII, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCII, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(lIon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Edlo. 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCII CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-32,07, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.contm - updated daily at 2pmr


New Police Commissioner must be impartial


IT IS being said that PLP chairman
Bradley Roberts' congratulatory remarks on
Elliston Greenslade's appointment as acting
commissioner of police coupled with his
mean-spirited remarks about retiring Police
Commissioner Reginald Ferguson, is the "kiss
of death" for Mr Greenslade's career.
During the last days of the Christie admin-
istration when plans were afoot to sideline Mr
Ferguson so that he could not become Com-
missioner of Police on the retirement of Com-
missioner Paul Farquharson, a rumour start-
ed to make the rounds. According to the sip-
sip the PLP had their eyes on Elliston
Greenslade, an officer with a promising
career in the Royal Bahamas Police Force.
He was earmarked as "their man." He was to
be their new commissioner of police. "If that
happens, they feel they will le running the
show again!" commented one cynic.
There was much unease about this state-
ment, because no police officer of whatever
rank should be anybody's "man" - or
"woman."
We knew that political interference in the
police force was a heavy burden carried by
Commissioner Farquharson in his last years
on the Force. For example, one morning
Commissioner Farquharson picked up his
newspaper to learn that he had just acquired
two newly appointed assistant commissioners.
The announcement was made by govern-
ment. He-was never consulted.
We also knew that as deputy commis-
sioner in charge of investigations Mr Fergu-
son, behind the'scenes, was facing certain
roadblocks.
The politicians soon took the measure of
the man when he refused to back-down to
subtle suggestions. They- certainly did not
want him as commissioner. He was nobody's
man - he was just a flat-footed policeman
who did his job. Political favours and reward
by promotion meant nothing to him. Obvi-
ously, he was no man for any political party
that believed it could influence a police com-
missioner.
Mr Robert's statement about the new
appointment and the background against
which it was made is certainly unfortunate. It
appears to give credence to the rumours. No
young man should have to.face such a chal-
lenging job with such a perception hung like
an unwanted albatross around his neck. It
just means that he will have to work doubly
hard to win the public's trust.
Assistant Commissioner Marvin-Dames
was the second man considered for the top
job. He has been named to act as deputy
commissioner of police until the final decision
is made. We do not know Mr Dames. How-


ever, we have heard nothing but good about
him. A solid police officer, with excellent
training, good judgment, and nobody's man.
However, we do know Mr Greenslade
and must admit that we have been impressed.
He too is a good policeman. Therefore, we
are most distressed at the perception that
* some people have of him - and which he will
have to shed quickly if he is to be effective in
his new role.
Several years ago, we looked up from our
desk to see a frightened young man standing
in front of us. It was important, he said, that
he see us privately. We took him to our pri-
vate office. He was being hunted by the police
for kidnapping and attempted murder. He
was also a gang leader, who was trying to
get out of the gang and lead a decent life.
However, he was caught in the middle of a
gang war, and was being shot at by a rival
gang. It was just a question of which bullet
would silence him - the gang or the police.
And so he threw himself on our mercy and
asked us to turn him in.
We called the Commissioner of Police
who sent Mr Greenslade to our office. The
police officer and the young man sat and
talked. Mr Greenslade showed tremendous
compassion and understanding. We were
most impressed with the young police officer
as he left our office, his arm around the shoul-
ders of the wayward, but contrite young man,
who only wanted another chance at life. Mr
Greenslade guided him through the courts.
The young man was convicted and served
his time. However, when he left prison he
was a new man. He got a good job and is
now a deacon in his church.
Last month anoh!icr young man on the
run from the po.i-e contacted a friend, who
contacted us. He wanted us to arrange for
him to be taken in by M l ..cens!ade. But Mr
Greenslade was out of town. He decided to
stay in hiding until Mr Greeiislade returned.
He then turned himself in.-And so we have
nothing but praise for Mr Greenslade and
hdpe he will not permit any political party to
taint his image.
In 2007 Prime Minister Ingraham sent
both Mr Greenslade and Mr Dames for fur-
ther training to the Royal Canadian Police
Force. Mr Ingraham said the reason for
chasing the RCPF was because Royal
Bahamas Police Force officers sometimes
exhibited a "reluctance" to pursue allega-
tions against public officials. The RCPF had
no such difficulty, he said.
We'hope that these two young officers
have learned this lesson well, and that as a
team the Bahamas will have a good, strong
and impartial police force.


Ingraham should




cancel overseas




trip and sort out




public finances

EDITOR, The Tribune. .------. Ministers come high. They can


Revelations in leaked e-mail
exchanges call into question the
integrity of climate scientists at
the University of East Anglia's
Climate Research Unit (CDU).
More revelations are likely
to unfold as "Climategate"
casts doubt on IPCC.
It is the current hot topic stir-
ring up the hallowed halls of
science gathering momentum
and tumbling The House of
Gore.
So-called "settled science"
on Global Warming is now a,
matter of unsettled scientists."
The cat is out of the bag, and
what has been described as the
"greatest scam in history' by


John Coleman, founder of the
Weather Channel is being
turned on its head.
In spite of the recent revela-
tions Prime Minister Ingraham
is quoted by The Tribune on
December 1st: "There is no
longer any credible debate
about the reality of global
warming." Really?
Our concern is not the tem-
perature or the science. It is the
public finances.
Travel expenses for Prime


not stay in Bed and Breakfasts,
nor can they join the plebs
down at the wharf to sample
the local fish.
In view of the revelations it
would be reassuring if the
Prime Minister cancelled his
expensive trip and focused on
getting the country's finances
under control.
There is not a whit he can do
about the Fahrenheit and the
trip to Copenhagen is now like-
ly to be a waste of-his time and
the tax payer's money.
THE NASSAU
-INSTITUTE
Nassau,
December 3, 2009.


Crime is everyone's problem, Mr Roberts


EDITOR, The tribunee .
Thank yo- fo. permitting me the opportunity
to express mystdf on this subject. I've been real-
ly pained recently when reading reports of
Bradley Roberts' public ranting about the Min-
ister of National Security, OAT "Tommy" Turn-
quest'and the terrible escalation of crime in this
country.
It seems to me like Bradley Roberts' sole mis-
sion is to prove that he came in and made a BIG
BANG as the new chairman of the Progressive '
Liberal Party - attacking everything and every-
one in'his path, even when it makes absolutely no
sense. Don't get me wrong, I consider myself A-
political for some time now, so this has absolute-
ly nothing to do with politics on my part.
Crime, as I see it, is not the fault of the Min-
ister of National Security and he should not be
ostracized daily in the press for it and especially
by a fellow politician who knows better. Of
course Mr. Roberts has a job to do in keeping his
FNM opponents on their toes. however, it should
not be at the expense of the Member for Mount
Moriah.
Mr. Roberts I say this to you, and I am-sure
you already know it, crime is everybody's prob-
lem. Criminals are at the point of attacking our
tourists now.
Crime is the fault of the parents who know
that their children are involved in the criminal
element.of this country, but do not consult law
enforcement.
Crime is the fault of the grandmother who
allows her grandson to hide drugs in her house
because he gives her a "little something" on the
side.
Crime is the fault of the mother who accepts
stolen goods and drug money from her children.
Crime is the fault of the father who refuses to


mentor his son because he doesn't feel like being
bothered.
Crime is the fault of neighbours who observe
their neighbourhood being violated but choose
not to call law enforcement because they do not
"want to get involved."
Crime is the fault of rogue police officers who
choose to take the "pay off" rather than do their
jobs.
I can go on with this forever, but I am sure my
point is made. Mr. Roberts, the Minister of
National Security cannot guard every house and
store and chastise every young man in this coun-
try for doing wrong. Please recognize that he is
working very hard, along with the Commission-
er of Police (outgoing and incoming), to put our
criminal problem under control.'
The most dangerous part of Mr. Roberts'
attacks on Mr. Turnquest, is the fact that political
pundits are not the only ones reading and view-
ing the negative media reports.
Not all members of the criminal element are
illiterate. They read and totally enjoy the fact
that instead of politicians putting their heads
together to stamp them out, the politicians, or in
this case POLITICIAN, chooses to rip out the
proverbial throat of the Minister of National
Security, pointing unfair fingers, accusing him
of something he is trying all avenues to curtail.
Mr. Roberts, please stop - concentrate on
making our country better. We know that you are
"Big Bad Brad!" We know that you have a loud
mouth and can put the strongest person in fear.
Crime is everyone's problem, let's work togeth-
er to get rid of it.
TANYA CARTWRIGHT
Nassau,
December 9, 2009.


On what planet is Tommy Turnquest living?


EDITOR, The Tribune.


In your page 1 headline arti-
cle of today's date (Dec. 8),
"Minister speaks out on mur-
der," the national security min-
ister seeks to Water dqwn what
will be a record murder rate in,
2009.
On what Planet is. Tommy
Turnquest living? ",


Under the page 3 headline,
"Police Initiative will tackle ille-
gal weapons," Mr. Turnquest
makes the astute observation
that greater emphasis on gun
control is the key to fighting
crime.
This is certainly one of a
myriad of measures' that need
to be taken. And it took how
many years for the government


to arrive at this conclusion?
An island 21 by seven miles
and weapons flow in as freely as
the tide. Does that tell you any-
thing?
Knock, knock. Is there any-
body in there?
ATHENA DAMIANOS
Nassau,
December 8, 2009


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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009


1-


THE TRIBUNE







+


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009, PAGE 5


Loophole allowing Bahamians to


manipulate spousal permit system


BY NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net
A JAMAICAN diplomat
says that he is concerned that
some Bahamians are using the
Immigration Department as a
"domestic court" to settle griev-
ances or take revenge against
their foreign born spouses.
While he does not deny
there are those who arrange
marriages to acquire legal work
status for foreigners, Jamaican
Honorary Consul, Patrick Han-
lan, said there is another ongo-
ing problem that needs to be
addressed.
He said when relationships
between Bahamians and for-
eign spouses fail some Bahami-
ans try to use the Department
as a "domestic court."
This is a problem he previ-
ously brought to the attention
of immigration officials. In his
experience, it particularly
affects non-Bahamian women.
"If you have two Bahamians
in a marriage and there is a
problem, they go to counsellors
in the social services, pastors,
family members or the courts.
Only the court has the legal
right to dissolve a marriage,"
said Mr Hanlan.
In the case of some mixed
marriages, he said, Bahamian
spouses refuse to assist in the
renewal process for a spousal
permit.
"They take revenge on their
spouses and sometimes the for-
eign spouse ends up in the
Detention Centre. To me,
something is wrong with that. If
the problem is not addressed,
Bahamians will believe they can
always go to the Department
of Immigration to settle their
grievances," he said.
Meanwhile, the Immigration
Department is concerned about
marriages that are arranged
solely to obtain legal work sta-
tus for a foreign national.
According to Director of Immi-
gration, Jack Thompson, there
has been a general rise in com-
plaints over what he calls "mar-
riages of convenience". Some
of the recent complaints came
from Bahamians who accepted
deposits of up to $1,500 from
their non-Bahamian spouses.
In these cases, the complainants
were aggrieved because their


JETTA BAPTISTE: "What is a
marriage of convenience?"
balance of payment was with-
held. Not all cases were report-
ed to include cash transactions.
One immigration official
described a few situations in
which Bahamian spouses
realized they "get swing", or
that they were not in love with
the person, and asked the
department to cancel the per-
mit.
Once the Department of
Immigration approves a spousal
permit, the Bahamian spouse
cannot request that the permit
be revoked unless the courts
have ruled on a divorce. How-
ever, once a permit has expired,
or if an application is in the
middle of being processed, a
Bahamian spouse can refuse to
apply for a renewal or cancel
the application. Even though
immigration officials said they
do not get involved in domestic
disputes, this loophole allows
Bahamians to manipulate the
system.
The problem is heightened
because the process of approval
is often lengthy. In one
instance, a Jamaican woman
married to a Bahamian man
said her permanent residency
took over a year to process.
Between the time her five-year
spousal permit expired and the
approval of her residency, she
had to visit the Department
every three months to obtain a


status letter to present to her
employers. Some applicants
have to apply for a one-year
work permit at a total cost of
$1,100. Immigration officials
said it is important for appli-
cants to submit their forms for
permanent residency at least
six months before their spousal
permits expire, because the
process can take a long time.
Despite the expressed con-
cern, the Department of Immi-
gration has no definition of
"marriage of convenience" in
its internal policies. There is
also no published criteria that
speaks specifically to marriages
of convenience.
This has immigration lawyer
Jetta Baptiste concerned about
how the Department adjudi-
cates in these matters.
"What is a marriage of con-
venience? If someone has a
shotgun wedding, is that a mar-
riage of convenience? If some-
one gets pregnant and their par-
ents force them to get married,
is that a marriage of conve-
nience?" she asked.





FREEPORT - A con-
tainer with a large quantity
of cash was discovered on
Wednesday at the Freeport
Container Port.
According to sources, the
container was removed and
taken into custody by police
some time yesterday morn-
ing.
There have been several
major drug seizures at the
container port this year. It is
not known whether the cash
is drug-related.
When contacted by The
Tribune, Asst Supt Loretta
Mackey said she was not
aware of any large cash
seizure at the container
port.


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+


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS I


"Merrick"
Available in black and cognac
$79.95


T g.R Sweetin's








Holiday Opening Hours
Shoe Village Madeira Shopping Plaza 328-0703
Mon-Sat 9:30am-5:30pm
Shoe Village RND Plaza, Freeport 242-351-3274
Mon-Sat 9:30am-5:30pm
Shoe Village Marathon Mall 393-6113
Mon-Fri 10am-8pm. Sat 10am-9pm
Clarks: Marathon Mall 393-4155
Mon-Fri 10am-8pm. Sat 10am-9pm
All Shoe Village stores and Clarks
will be open on Saturday December 26th
and closed on Monday December 28th.


BTC privatization



plans 'progressing'


But still no announcement on date of sale


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
PLANS to privatise the
Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company are reported-
ly progressing but the gov-
ernment remains tight-lipped
about the anticipated date of
sale.
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has said the gov-
ernment hopes to privatise
BTC by the end of the year,
but Minister of Finance
Zhivargo Laing was unable
to confirm yesterday whether
this deadline will be met.
He said: "The process is still
moving forward, and I can
only tell you that the process
is moving forward."
The sale will be of a 51 per
cent stake in BTC while gov-
ernment will retain the
remaining 49 per cent.
An assessment of prospec-
tive buyers by the BTC pri-
vatisation committee found
UK based communications
firm Vodafone and One Equi-


ty Partners (OEP) have the
highest combined score in
financial and technical ability.
Assets
OEP is JP Morgan Chase's
private equity arm and man-
ages more than $8 billion in
assets and Vodafone is the
world's largest cellular oper-
ator in terms of turnover.
UK media reports con-


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firmed in November that
Vodafone was considering
whether to participate in a
consortium being put togeth-
er by JP Morgan Partners, in
which it would effectively be
the operating partner for a
privatised BTC and provide
the management/technical
expertise should the group
ultimately succeed in clinch-
ing a deal with the Bahamas
government.
In return in was suggested
Vodafone would receive an
equity stake in BTC.
Other bidders said to have
received the nod from the pri-
vatisation committee are Dig-
icel Limited, Atlantic Tele-
Network Incorporated and
Trilogy International Part-
ners.
It is unclear what purchase
price the government expects
to realise from the sale,
although some close to the
situation have suggested a fig-
ure of around $200 million.
However it is not known
whether that figure includes
a $30 million dividend the
government plans to take
from BTC prior to privatisa-
tion.
The new owner would gain
operational control over the
company which currently pro-
vides services to more than
334,000 cellular customers,
132,000 landline customers
and 18,500 broadband cus-
tomers throughout the
Bahamas.
The corporation also has
190 roaming agreements in
place, serving over four mil-
lion tourists visiting the
Bahamas each year.
A series of seminars have
been held for BTC staff in
recent weeks to keep them
abreast of the progress of the
sale and offer practical advice
on the process.







+


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009, PAGE 7


LOCALNEWS


Move to tighten legal profession regulations
By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter Bar Council seeks to increase powers to discipline attorneys
alowe@tribunemedia.net


Troubling experiences with
lawyers refusing to abide by
disciplinary rulings and con-
tinuing to practice despite
criminal convictions have
inspired the Bahamas Bar
Council to seek to tighten reg-
ulations governing the pro-
fession and increase its pow-
ers to discipline attorneys.
And in an effort to build
the publics' trust in the effec-
tiveness of the Bahamas Bar
Council (BBC) as a regulato-
ry body and the reputation of
the profession as a whole the
BBC intends to start making
public the outcome of its
hearings into complaints
lodged against attorneys.
The association's ethics
committee has been directed
by President Ruth Bowe
Darville to compile a "disci-
plinary index" detailing all
complaints lodged against
attorneys and the results of
inquiries into those com-
plaints by this Committee and
its Disciplinary Tribunals.
"People need to know that
the tribunals are working
because many people don't
think we take complaints seri-
ously," said Mrs Bowe
Darville.
The president revealed that
there have been growing
numbers of queries about the
integrity of attorneys by cau-
tious members of the public
seeking legal assistance.
At present, only disbar-
ments of attorneys are publi-
cised - such as that of Andrew
Thompson, Jan Ward and
Michael Smith in the last year
and a half - while confiden-
tiality has shrouded the find-
ings in cases where other out-
comes are reached, such as
the dismissal of the complaint
or some lesser punishment
being meted out.
In such instances, penalties


can include an attorney being
temporarily suspended from
practicing, being ordered to
re-pay misappropriated funds
or being ordered to pay the
costs of their former client
and complainant.

Condemns
"Sometimes the tribunal
condemns the lawyers in costs
and they don't ever pay the
costs so we have to find a way
to enforce that," said Mrs
Bowe Darville.
Earlier this year, former
BBC president Wayne
Munroe said he had been
pushing for stricter regula-
tions governing the legal pro-
fession for almost a decade,
adding that the changes are a
"no brainer."
In late 2008 he said the
council was reviewing amend-
ments and would likely for-
ward them to the government
for a decision on whether to
move forward by the end of
that year. He said he was con-
cerned complaints against
lawyers were taking too long
to adjudicate and that there
was a backlog of cases to be
heard by the Tribunals.


"Sometimes
the tribunal
condemns the
lawyers in costs
and they don't
ever pay the
costs so we have
to find a way to
enforce that."
Ruth Bowe Darville


We extend a Merry Christmas, a safe and prosper-
ous New Year to all our valued clientele and we
Thnk 'You for your Lortinued palr.rmage.
God Bess Youl


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Yesterday, Ms Bowe
Darville said that a slate of
regulatory amendments to the
Legal Professions Act were
forwarded to the government
as a result, but were ultimate-


ly rejected by Cabinet "due
to the inclusion of a provision
relating to a legal practice cer-
tificate."
According to Ms Bowe
Darville, it was the inclusion


of this clause which would
require all attorneys to under-
go annual continuing educa-
tion in order to be eligible to
practice that did not sit well
with Cabinet ministers.


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TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS CO-OPERATIVE
CREDIT UNION LIMITED


NOTICE TO
OUR VALUED SHAREHOLDERS


Please be advised that Interest/Dividend payments for the year 2008 will be
distributed effective Monday November 2, 2009 during the hours of 11:00
a.m. - 4:00 p.m. as follows:


Dates Account Dates Account
Numbers Numbers

November 2 001-700 November 26 7501-7800
November 3 701-1200 November 27 7801-8100
November 4 1201-1800 November 30 8101-8400
November 5 1801-2400 December 1 8401-8700
November 6 2401-3000 December 2 8701-9000
November 9 3001-3600 December 3 9001-9500
November 10 3601-4200 December 4 9501-10000
November 11 4201-4500 December 7 10001-10500.
November 12 4501-4800 December 8 10501-11300
November 13 4801-5100 December 9 11301-12100
November 16 5101-5400 December 10 12101-13000
November 17 .5401-5700 December 11 13001-14000
November 18 5701-6000 December 14 14001-15000
November 19 6001-6300 December 15 15001-10000
November 20 6301-6600 December 16 16001-17000
November 23 6601-6900 December 17 17001-18500
November 24 6901-7200 December 18 18501 on
November 25 7201-7500





St Andrew's School
Home of the "Hurricanes"


ThSlhomekmwiofMlHS&A*sa
FOUNDED 1M�3


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009


LOCAL NEWS


SANTA AND MRS CLAUS give toys to the children who attended the tree lighting. and carol sign-
ing at the Shirlea Park on Saturday night.


Shirlea Park hosts


tree listing ceremony
ro


BETTE COLE, along with the residents
of Sears Road and Sweeting Lane, replaced
ant area of garbage with a beautiful park for
the residents. Every year they have a carol


and tree lighting ceremony at the park. Peo-'
ple from as far off as Spanish Wells, Abaco
and Eleuthera come for the special occa-
sion.


We welcome applicants at all levels (Pre-School through Year 13).
Early registration of students is advisable.
* We offer your child a world-class education featuring the highly respected Interna-
tional Baccalaureate Organisation Programmes, including the Primary Years Pro-
gramme (Pre-School through Year 6) and the Diploma Programme (Years 12 & 13) and
international accreditation by the Council of International Schools and the New England
Association of Schools and Colleges. Our campus features an ultra modem Library,
Research, and Information Technology Centre, purpose-built Early Learning Centre,
and state-of-the-art Science facilities.
* Our students achieve. We offer an accelerated BGCSE timeline with examinations
taken at the end of Year 11 and had an 81% A-C BGCSE pass rate in 2009. Also, St
Andrew's students were awarded with The All Merit Scholarship for 5 of the last 8
years, as well as The Tomlinson Scholarship in 2009.
* We believe In well-rounded students and have a highly competitive sports pro-
gramme with 14 championships and 7 finals in the last 32 BAISS tournaments. We
also offer outstanding extracurricular activities as well as community service projects at
home and abroad.
* We place an emphasis on maintaining an environment where children are physically
and psychologically safe and in fostering unity in diversity so that our students value
tolerance and respect

To arrange an appointment to tour our campus, or for more Information, please contact:
Mrs. Sally Varani-Jones
Admissions Officer
T: (242) 677-7835
F: (242)677-7848
E: sally.varani.iones@st-andrews.com

To learn more about the school and to download an application, please visit our website:
www.st-andrews.com


I


TODSUSSOISO HSPGELGO OWWTIUE4.O


THE TRIBUNE


J,7fl
k rI-q






+


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009, PAGE 9


Senior police officers


discuss holiday safety


tips with businesses


CHIEF INSPECTOR MAXINE LEARY, Inspector Philip Rolle and reserve Assistant Superintendent Darville of the
Southeastern Division give personal holiday safety tips to business owners in the Prince Charles shopping centre.


EMPLOYEES at the
Medi-Clinic in the Prince
Charles Shopping Centre are
extremely grateful that local
police officers took the time
to discuss holiday safety tips
with them.
The visit by senior officers
was part of a wider effort by
the Southeastern Division to
visit businesses in the area to
discuss how best to avoid
becoming a victim of crime.
Tess, a medical assistant at
the clinic, said she and her fel-
low employees are very con-
cerned about the recent spate
of armed robberies.
She said: "We are extreme-
ly aware of it every day, not
just during the holidays -
especially so now, as crime is
on the increase and a lot of
people have lost their jobs."
Tess said the officers


responsible for policing Prince
Charles Drive have always
been very good about
patrolling the shopping cen-
tre and making sure a police
presence is felt in the area.
She said the visit by senior
officers was "very useful" and
it was good to see them out
and about.
"They left their contacts,
gave us suggestions, talked to
us about how to be obser-
vant," she said.
Walkabout
The holiday walkabout is
just one of several initiatives
by the Southeastern Division
of the Royal Bahamas Police
Force to foster better rela-
tions between officers and the
community.
Officer in charge of the


division, Supt Stephen Dean,
believes this is the key to
fighting crime effectively.
Last month, Supt Dean
and his team presented gro-
ceries to the four homes for
the elderly in his division.
In past years, the division
would get the occupants of
the homes together for a
thanksgiving dinner.
Mr Dean said this year,
they wanted the old folks to
have more than one dinner,
so the police decided to
donate enough food and
drinks for several meals.
In October the Southeast-
ern Division hosted a domes-
tic violence workshop in con-
junction with community
leaders in an effort to increase
awareness about domestic
violence and combat this
growing problem.


NOTICE

To Our Valued Clients



Our Nassau Offices

WILL BE CLOSING AT

12:30 P.M.

th

Friday, I I December, 2009


Our Freeport, Abaco &
Exuma Branches
will be CLOSED on that day




Regular office hours for ALL Branches
will resume

Monday, 14th DECEMBER, 2009



We apologize for any inconvenience caused








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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


l mECAL NEWS


p ce setters
VELOPING A DISCIPLINED CHARACTER THROUGH MUSIC


December 3rd


Time: 4:30pm - 6:30pm


Extended Hours Til 7pm


By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net
"STAND at ease. Attention!
Parade by the left. Slow march,
right turn, left turn, quick
march, toop treep" commands
Travonne Knowles, a sergeant
in the making who executes
police marching drills to a
group of 23 children that makes
up the Eastern Division Pace-
setters Community Youth Club
and Marching Band.
Less than half of the students
showed up today, a drastic slip
from the 80-plus boys and girls
who are registered in the pro-
gramme from communities
across New Providence. Many
of them took part in a Christ-
mas production at Thelma Gib-
son the night before, and were
understandingly tired from the
performance.
Every week since Novem-
ber, Travonne and the many
children who make up the
Eastern Division Pacesetters
travel from all ends of New
Providence each Friday and
Saturday to develop a disci-
plined character through music.
The programme is funded by
the Eastern Community Asso-
ciation. It's the brainchild of
Constable Carlton Smith, who
was tapped by Supt David
Deveaux of the Eastern Divi-
sion Police Station to bring his
proven programme to New
Providence. Constable Smith
has already brought it on-
stream in the islands of Exu-
ma, Ragged Island, Crooked


I CNTBECrtnSi thcahsTaon nwe ntecai ne


Island, Acklins and New Prov-
idence.
Just down the road from the
Eastern Division Police Station
in Elizabeth Estates, Consta-
ble Smith and Inspector Donna
Barr lead the Eastern Paceset-
ters at Thelma Gibson Primary
School. Every Friday at "the
pavement" - an area at Thelma
Gibson Primary school shaded
by towering trees - they are
taught music theory, and
instructed on how to march.
On Saturday, they sing and
practice drills. It takes a lot of
concentration, and it's all in
preparation for their debut per-
formance tomorrow, at the
Eastern Community Associa-
tion's tree lighting ceremony.
Constable Smith takes the
children, who range in age
from nine to 16 years, to a bas-


I COSAL MT ead s t e bn noamrhn r ie.* u .


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ketball court to practice their
marching drills. The sun's rays
burn their bodies, and it just
takes one youngster to say she
needs to use the bathroom for
everyone to tell the same tale.
Constable Smith knows it's
an excuse to escape the assign-
ment. So when "sergeant" in-
training Knowles returns with
the message that there will be
no time to potty, the weary
Pacesetters return to their
starting positions.
Soon they are summoned
back to "the pavement," for
their well-deserved "cool off,"
and run like the wind back into
the shaded spot they call "the
pavement."
"I'm very good at march-
ing," says a fidgety robust sev-
en-year-old. "I'm an exercise
person, so if you ask me to sit
down, I'm gonna get up and
move."
Trashea Davis is a bright
young girl who is very excited
about learning to play the clar-
inet. "I have to break it in,
because it's very new," she
said.
Trashea, like most of these
youngsters, lives in the East-
ern area and hails from Thelma
Gibson, H.O. Nash, CV Bethel
and Doris Johnson high
schools. Some of the other chil-
dren catch the bus on a Satur-
day morning all the way from
Pinewood Gardens and in
western parts of town to Thel-
ma Gibson each weekend.
Fortunately for her, Trashea
is dropped off and picked up
by her mother who is very
involved in her goal of grasping
music well.
"Repetition counts," Con-
stable Smith says as trombonist
Jerrano Adderley plays his ren-
dition of Silent Night on a
bench by "the pavement." Jer-
rano will perform a Christmas
carol at the Eastern Commu-
nity's Tree Lighting Ceremo-
ny, and Constable Smith
demands the best from him.

Lessons
Jerrano, unlike the others,
has been taking private music
lessons. His family transferred
him from Crooked Island to
Nassau for better educational
opportunities. Notably at a
higher level musically, the chil-
dren stand captivated by his
winsome playing. Jerrano is
eager to learn, even going back
to Constable Smith for tutoring
in his music booklet.
Jerrano hesitantly echoes a
similar belief about Mr Smith's
teaching style; calling it a little
"unorthodox," but he says that
frequent practice "will pay off
in the end."
Constable Smith demands
that the children report to him
before he counts to 10. They
run at his beck and call. After
forming two lines, he's calling
off directions, and for some
he's in their faces.
When they mess up, he gets
loud. To him, every single
detail matters. T's are always
crossed. I's must be dotted.
They must be fluid in their
movements. But it's a particu-
lar boon for these at-risk stu-
dents to be immersed in an
environment with high
demands.
That's the only way we get
better if we work hard," one
of the students explains. While
Constable Smith's tone is
described by all of the students
as a little "rowdy", they see the
method to his madness. "Mr
Smith knows a lot about our
instruments," he said.
And that's an understate-
ment. The no-nonsense "band
master" has self taught all of
the instruments he plays: the
trumpet, trombone, clarinet,
saxophone, snare drum; and
the far from usual violin.
"How many people does it
take to mess up a drill team?"
asks Constable Smith. The
group unanimously reports:
"One!" The tone of their voic-
es sounds restless, and so he

SEE page 11


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O






7Th


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009, PAGE 11


*OCALNW


FROM page 10 1


asks again.
All the while, they are
attentive. Nothing stops the
show. Not even the impetuous
vomitting of a student in the
front of the drill line. The boy,
who didn't eat breakfast was
relieved by Constable Smith
who pats him on the back, and
Inspector Barr further assists
him.
The children are unper-
turbed, and serious. They look
like officers performing at the
Independence day event on
Clifford park. No giggles or
snickers can be heard. They
know better.
If they mess up, some form
of punishment awaits. Like
running around the building a
few times, or picking up 10
leaves, and reporting back to
the group with a request to
Constable Smith for re-entry
into the march line.
The no-nonsense officer
directs the 24 children with a
didactic approach. He's giving
them a review of what they
learned under Travonne
Knowles' instructions. But the
children aren't put off, they
hold him in high esteem. He
says he balances the serious-
ness and lightens up quite
often to foster respect and
appreciation.
Constable Smith coaches
them in their speech and helps
with a "dramatic" Christmas
reading. He encourages them
to speak with more clarity,
"Ya'll young people you
know, don't drag it along," he
tells them.
"We want these children to
develop effective communica-
tion and speaking properly,"
says Constable Smith. He
notices this deficiency in his
working with Bahamian youth.
Besides the benefits that effec-
tive communication offers, he
thinks it will benefit them in
their future careers.
Running just off donations,
and a low budget, the Eastern
Pacesetters programme is
booming. A well- known busi-
nessman in Palmdale has
already sponsored the band
after seeing them perform on
Bahamas at Sunrise.
The generous gift will go
towards the funding of band
uniforms, music stands, valve
oils, and other necessities to
keep the band up to standard.
On February 13, the East-
ern Pacesetters will host their
first solo pre-Valentine con-
cert. They hope to get full
financial support for this ini-
tiative to ensure good perfor-
mances. Constable Smith sets
high standards for the Eastern
Pacesetters to perform with
excellence, so that they will
always be ready for sponsor-
ship when opportunities pre-
sent themselves.
"We're trying to teach them
music as a skill," Constable
Smith explains. Every Friday
the children take a music test
to see where they're at with
music theory. Each week, the
highest scorers take the grade
one Royal Music Exam, which
was developed in Britain.
Recently, 25 budding musi-
cians got scores of 90 and
above. At one sitting last year,
30 youngsters took the exam,
and 16 passed grades 1 and 2.
Constable Smith explains
that they know the pro-
gramme can't help everyone,
but he wants each child to
have something to fall back on
just in case.
"The things we've caught a
few of these children doing,
like ducking school, we don't
put them in the criminal sys-
tem for," said Inspector Don-
na Barr. "That will follow
them forever, and we don't
want them to have a police
record at this age."
The officers have found in
particular that many of the
senior high students have
problems with conflict resolu-
tion and anger management.
"Some of them don't need
to go to Boy's Industrial
School or Girl's Industrial
School," said Constable Smith.
"They just need some love and
attention instead of society
writing them off."
Both officers lament that


a'.






~.IL


BAND MEMBERS go over
the script for their Friday
performance.

school administrators are
"intolerant" in bestowing little
graces for minor truancies, and
instead issue "suspensions and
expulsions."
They believe that these
grievances should be further
evaluated, by school officials,
and other forms of punishment
should be looked at. For
instance, "bring them to
school and let them clean up
the yard and paint" says
Inspector Barr.
To Smith and Barr, typical
action of expulsion and sus-
pension from schools is noth-
ing but a slap on the wrist;
leaving an open door for stu-
dents to be involved in further
criminality during the down-
time. Furthermore, it leaves
the problem unsolved for
some who have more serious
problems at home.
"I see the information we
get from these kids, if the
guidance counsellors at these
schools would only question
them, they would find out
what's going on. And most of
the times, these kids aren't
lying."

Behaviour
The officers believe many
of the children come from bro-
ken homes, where abuse and
other unfortunate activity hap-
pens. It's the underlying prob-
lem of some of their acting out
and participating in destruc-
tive behaviour, says Inspector
Donna Barr.
Some senior administrators
at local schools are just now
recommending their trouble-
some students to the Eastern
Pacesetters programme. At
the moment, a number of high
schoolers with bad records
have been directed to the pro-
gramme as part of community
service.
"When these children come
here, they open up to us," said
Inspector Barr. "These kids
are not forced to come here,
they never miss a week. They
are good children too, they are
just looking for attention.
They come right here, and fall
in line."
One student, who's on com-
munity service didn't show up
this week. Constable Smith is
concerned, and will personally
visit his house later in the day
to find out why he wasn't
there. The boy's parents sent
him to the programme to be
helped.
Constable Smith caught the
young man in the back of his
school smoking marijuana
with his friends weeks ago.
Many lives have been
changed through Constable
Smith's formula of tough love,
discipline and high expecta-
tions.
"No one can tell me the
programme can't work," he
said. "People say we're just
wasting time, but in five or six
years when they come out of
school these kids won't be a
problem to society."
He has seen success
already, as a number of the
children who have been
brought up under his pro-
gramme are now actively
involved in society.
Their well-earned reward
is a place at the College of the
Bahamas ... a golden opportu-
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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009


LOA0 N W


DAVID
























S.0
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YURMAN


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Our Lucaya, Freeport, Grand Bahama * Bimini Bay, Bimini


MURDER ACCUSED Marvin Coleby, 31, being escorted to court yesterday.


Man in court


charged with


the murder of


Bahamasair pilot


FROM page one
Saunders was also shot
multiple times.
Coleby, who was report-
edly taken into police cus-
tody last Friday, is charged
with Genear McKenzie, 20,
and Rhonda Knowles, 19, in
the murder of McQueen and
the attempted murder of
Saunders. McKenzie and
Knowles have already been
arraigned on the charges.
Coleby was not required
to enter a plea to the
charges and the matter was
adjourned to March 3, 2010
for the start of a preliminary
inquiry.
Coleby is also accused of
conspiring to rob Enan Han-
na and of robbing him of a
$260 Motorola cellular
phone, and $150 cash. He is
also accused of robbing a
cashier of the Pitt restau-
rant, Augusta Street, of $300


on November 10, and rob-
bing Lishanda Moore of a
white 1999 Honda Accord
valued at $5,000. He was not
required to enter a plea to
the charges' and the cases
were adjourned to March
24, 2010..
* Coleby is also accused of
possession of a handgun
with intent to endanger the
life of detective Sergeant
Michaelet Meronard. He
was not required to enter a
plea to the charge during his
arraignment in Court 8
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel. Coleby was convict-
ed yesterday on weapons
and ammunitions charges
and sentenced to 40 months
in prison. Police say that last
Friday, while searching
Coleby's home, they found
him hiding.in a closet.
They also found two guns
as well as ammunition under
a bed.


Campaign launched

to find missing

young Bahamian

FROM page one
the word in an effort to find out what happened to the 28-
year-old.
Details remained sketchy last night, but according to
reports, the St Andrews School graduate vanished without
a trace on November 25, after telling his sister he was step-
ping out for a few minutes.
His brother, Chance Farrington, said: "He just left the
house and never came back. We don't know what to think."
The Tribune attempted to learn more about the matter
from police, however senior officers were not available for
comment up to press time last night.
Anyone with information regarding Mr Farrington's
whereabouts is encouraged to call 328-TIPS anonymously,
or contact their nearest police station.


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps /
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
* If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


I TODISUSTOI S5ONTHISP EO N'W .I E4C


THE TRIBUNE







TH TRBUETHRCALEEME 1,E09,PGE1


FROM page one


ed by doctors. It is not known
whether any of the students was
detained overnight.
The incident occurred some-
time after 1pm during lunch
hour on the school campus.
Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said police received a report
,around 1.20pm of a disturbance


Students taken to hospital
after school disturbance
at the school.
She said several uniformed
officers were dispatched to
investigate the matter.
Community activist Troy Gar-
vey was contacted by some con-
cerned parents, who rushed to
the hospital after learning news


of the incident.
School violence is a serious
issue in the country. There have
been stabbing incidents this year
at schools in Grand Bahama,
New Providence, and Abaco.
On DeLumber, 3, a student
was attacked a'id stabbed by
another student at Government
High School.
The victim, a 17-year-old boy,


was taken to hospital where his
injuries were treated.
In November, 2009, a male
student was stabbed in the leg
when he intercepted an argu-
ment between two school girls
at SC McPherson Junior High
School.
A 13-year-old girl and 12-
year-old girl were arguing on the
school campus in Baillou Hill


Road: when they started attack-
ing each other.
Two.students at. the CV
Bethel High School, were
stabbed in November after an
arguihent broke out over the
alleged theft of his girlfriend's
cell phone.
Both students were seriously
injured and hospitalized at the
Princess Margaret Hospital.


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009, PAGE 13


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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009


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FRKOM page one
after he accepted the
appointment of chairman
of the Gaming.Board from
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham on the FNM's
victory in 2007.
When this latest news
broke, leaders within the
PLP were on high alert,
manning phones all over
the country to ascertain
whether or not the reports
of Mr Adderley's ultimate
departure from the party
were in fact true. In fact,
when contacted by The Tri-
bune yesterday, many of
the party's MPs and
prospective candidates all
asked "what the latest


report" had been.
Apart from his possible
departure, the PLP is
reportedly trying to ascer-
tain what the repercussions
would be for the con-
stituency of Elizabeth as
Mr Adderley's resignation
would force a by-election
for that seat.
As such, many within the
party believe that former
Ambassador Joshua Sears
is the man tipped by the
Prime Minister to lead the
FNM's banner in that seat
against the PLP's Ryan
Pinder who is reported to
be the front runner for that
nomination in 2012.
SIf these reports are true,
sources within the PLP sug-


claim
gest that the PM may be
using this opportunity of a
by-election in Elizabeth to
gauge the FNM's support
on the ground which would
determine whether or not
an early election is called.
"If the PLP loses Eliza-
beth, we will lose the gen-
eral election," a PLP MP
said. "I don't see how we
could afford to relax and
let what we are seeing tak-
ing place here to happen
right under our noses.
"We have to get on the
ground and ensure that we
retain that seat no matter
what. It will send the wrong
message if the FNM is able
to capture Elizabeth," he
said.


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THE TRIBUNE


4 .R,








Judo athlete
to represent
Bahamas at
Singapore
youth camp...
Seepage 17


SDAY, DECEMBER li), 2009


'" . "' W, IN,


Fr Marcian Peters highlights


By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net
F family Island
schools highlight-
ed play yesterday
in the 25th Father
Marcian Peters,.
Basketball Classic, while a bat-
tle between Catholic schools
opened the day in the primary
division.
Junior Boys
Harbour Island Panthers - 48
North Andros Seminoles - 6
The Panthers scored from
the opening tip and staked their
claim as a possible contender
for the junior boys title with the
most lopsided win of the tour-
nament thus far.
With two players in double
figures and another trio just a
basket away from reaching dou-
ble figures in scoring, the Pan-
thers' balanced scoring attack
easily topped the Seminoles.
More aggressive from the
opening tip, Harbour Island
adjusted to their new sur-


vtl


HARBOUR ISLAND Panthers' Deon Roberts drives...
Photo by Felip6 Major/Tribune staff


roundings quickly with an 8-2


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lead after the first quarter.
In the second, the Panthers'
lead reached double figures, 12-
2, for the first time on a layup
from pivot man Torin Sweet-
ner with 4:34 left to play in the
half.
An overmatched Seminoles
team struggled to advance the
ball beyond halfcourt against
an airtight full court trap which
forced a series of consecutive.
turnovers.
The Panthers' lead reached
20,.22-2, on running jumper
SEE next page


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THE











25TH ANNUAL Father Marcian Peters Baskethall Tournament highlights


from Rio Saunders and Har-
bour Island led 24-2 at the half.
The lead continued to grow
in the third, highlighted by an
alley hoop from Lashan Higgs -
the only female player in the
junior division filled with all
male teams - to Sweetner who
was fouled on an acrobatic
layup and converted at Ihe line
for a three point play.
In the third, the lead bal-
looned to 30 on an Alvin
Sweetner layup, assisted by
Torin Sweetner, one of his
many adept passes from the
post position for a 32-2 lead.
The Panthers led 36-4 heading


into the fourth quarter.
A virtual layup drill for Har-
bour Island, the lead reached
40 on a fastbreak layup from
Edwar Davis, which made the
score 46-6. Saunders and Torin
Sweetner finished with ten
points apiece, while Higgs,
Alvin Sweetner, and Davis each
finished with eight. Philip
Major led the Seminoles with
six points.
Primary Boys
St Johns Ghiants 11
TCSuns 21
The Suns led 10-4 at the half
and withstood a late Giants ral-


ly to come avway with the win.
In the foirli quarter, St
John's hiimmed tlie lead to
four, 10-1I1 bull Ie h SLIs pulledI
away late for the double figure
willn,
Julius Notlage, who finished
with a game high eight points,
ended tlie game in thrilling
fashion when he made a half
court heave at the buzzer which
sent he' Temple ('hristian faith-
ful into a frenzy.
For the Suns, Andrcas Sey-
mour added four while Diargo
smith finished with eight.
Joshua Brennen led the Giants
with five points.


'--~' )


r)
J^


I - o.



Wrap your home in the colo

"of 'i dreams th s Christ ,


irs,


Primary Boys
St (' cilin Stril,' c i L 1
()nr I ladyv's Itucn lVhum's - 9
.Free tlirows ulliiiilmely decid-
ed the winner in a duel between
two Cal holic.school power-
houses in a defensive l- i i.'le.
A slow start offensively lor
both teams witll each making
just one field goal.
Blue Flames had an advan-
tage at the line which led to 4-2
lead at thlie half. Tied at four on
Steven lumes free thows with
four minutes remaining in third.
Took 5-4 lead when Humcs
again went to line and made
one of two and Strikers kept
the 5-4 lead heading into fourth.
Both teams reached game
high scoring marks in, the final
quarter with free throws as the
deciding factor down the
stretch. D'Angelo. Murphy
regained the lead for the Blue


Flames on first free throw and
missed the second, however
Charles Cooper grabbed the
rebound to keep possession
four Our Lady's and scored on
a jump hook to take a 7-5 lead
with 4:10 left to play.
Humes tied game at 7 with
a layup, Cooper gave the Blue
Flames a one point lead at the
line with 1:20 remaining, but
the Strikers scored on very next
trip upcourt to take a 9-8 lead.
Our Lady's forward Eddie
Dormeus split a pair at the line
to tie game at nine with 40 sec-
onds left, but the game got
away from them defensively as
the Strikers closed the game on
a 3-0 run.
Humes was fouled on his
way to the basket with 28 sees
left and made one for 10-9. The
Strikers trap forced-a turnover
and Ivoine Ingraham scored the


the9



SP��RTS



CENTER


TEMPLE CHRISTIAN Suns Julius
Nottage is fouled as he tries to
pass the ball...
Photo by Felip6 Mijor/
Tribune staff

game clinching basket to give
his team a 12-9 lead with three
� seconds left to play.
Humes finished with six
points while Cooper led the
Blue Flames with five.
And in a recap of Tuesday's
action, Catholic primary schools
continue to dominate at the
25th Father Marcian.Peters bas-
ketball tournament, while Fam-
ily Island teams made their
debut.
Primary Boys
St Cecilia Strikers -19
Mt Carmel Cavs - 10
The Strikers continue to ride
a wave of confidence from a
memorable regular season win
over the St Bede's Crushers.
Mt Carmel took an early 5-1
lead over the Strikers and led 5-
3 at the end of the first quarter.
Lead guard Ivoine Ingraham
stole the inbound pass and
dished an assist to tie the game
at five early in the second. The
Strikers led 9-7 at the half and
11-9 lead at the end of third.
The Cavaliers' only score of
the quarter came with 1:46 left
to play, however a basket by
Ingraham gave the Strikers
their biggest lead of the game
19-10 with 40 seconds remain-
ing.
Senior Girls
R MBailey Pacers - 18
Doris Johnson Mystic Mar-
lins - 3
After a sluggish first half
from both teams, the Pacers
rebounded in the second half
for the blowout win. The Pacers
took a 2-0 lead after the first
quarter and led just 5-2 at the
half.
Tonia Kaye Johnson's
defence keyed a second half
run for her team which broke
the game open. Johnson came
up with three consecutive steals
which led to easy baskets and a
6-0 run for the Pacers.
The Pacers' lead reached
double figures for the first time
with just under two minutes left
to play in the game. Another
steal from Johnson, her eighth
of the game, followed by a fast-
break layup made it 18-3 with
seconds left to play.
Primary Boys
Our Lady's Blue Flames - 24
Exuma Scorpions - 8
The Blue Flames jumped out
to an early 8-0 lead and held
the Scorpions to just one first
half field goal. Our Lady's
placed two players in double
figures led by D'Angelo Mack-
ey with a game high 14 and
Charles Cooper with 12.
The Blue Flames held a 10-2
lead at the end of first quarter
with the benefits of a stifling
fullcourt trap and instant
offence from Cooper. His layup
gave the Blue Flames 12-2 lead
late in the second quarter and
another just before the half
gave Our Lady's a 16-2 lead at
the half.
Mackey picked up the scor-
ing slack in the third to extend
the Blue Flames' advantage to
nearly 20 on a jumpshot which
gave his team a 20-2 lead head-
ing into the fourth quarter.
The Scorpions staged a late
rally with Reno Brown's six
points in the final period, how-
ever came up short in their sec-
ond game of the night.
Intermediate Boys
CR Walker Knights - 25
HO Nash Lions - 9
The knights nearly scored as
many points in the opening
quarter as the Lions managed
all game and cruised to victory.
The Knights began the game
on a 7-0 run lead 7-1 after the
first quarter. The Lions man-
aged just two field goals, no
field goals in the opening half,
and the Knights gained their
first double figure lead, 13-3,
on a Van Hutcheson layup. CR
Walker led 17-5 at halftime.
A turnover prone third peri-
od for both teams limited the
scoring to just one score
between both teams - a runner
by the Knights Matthew Davis.
Hutcheson finished the day
with nine points and seven
rebounds, while Michael Reck-
ley added seven points.
Other scores in Tuesday's
action available up to press
time:
Primary Boys
Exuma Scorpions - 16,
Galilee Miracles - 7


CW Saunders Cougars - 12,
Faith Temple Warriors - 11


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10,2009.


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Harbur ay hoppng entr * he allat Mraton Sanlyprt hoppng laz


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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE


Judo athlete to represent Bahamas at Singapore youth camp


THE Bahamas Olympic
Association (BOA) has
selected 15-year-old judo ath-
lete Cynthia Rahming to rep-
resent the Bahamas at a youth
camp in Singapore.
The camp is a cultural
friendship one where athletes
will be exposed to other ath-
letes from all over the world
and also see the facilities that
will be used at the Youth
Olympic Games to be held in
the summer of 2010.
Athletes will also have a
chance to try another
Olympic sport and participate
,in various cultural activities.
"We are proud of Cynthia
and her accomplishments,"
said BOA president Welling-
ton Miller.
"We gave Cynthia a lot of
information on the history of
the Olympics in the Bahamas
and we are certain that she
will represent us well.


S* V




Cynthia Rahming and her father
Tourism also gave some gifts
so that she will be able to
share them with her new
friends from around the
world."
Cynthia expressed her grat-
itude to Miller and the BOA
executives for having the con-
fidence in her and promised
to represent the country well.
"Cynthia has worked very
hard both as athlete and stu-
dent," said Cynthia's mother


Benita Rahming. "She trains
at 5am every morning and
then again in the evening. We
have seen her grades improve
as well."
The Bahamas Judo Feder-
ation (BJF) is also expected to
travel to its final tournament
of the year - the Barbados
International - which is set
for December 12.
Four athletes will compete
against other Caribbean
nations. For the first time the
national team will have a fam-
ily islander, Ashton Forbes of
Abaco, who began judo earli-
er this year at St Francis De
Sales School in Marsh Har-
bour.
"Ashton has worked hard
and distinguished himself in
competition. He is a strong
addition to our team and this
is his first tournament outside
of the country," said Phil
Kemp, strength and condi-


. 0 r. ,L L Y U
FINE INTRI-R'FT HE ,: ' i HE



T- EL,,
,.], q..l.i-, , , j . .. -.., I -...


tioning coach for the BJF. should contact the Bahamas
Persons interested in judo Judo Federation at 364-6773


to find out the school closest
to their local area.


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'Choo Choo' getting back on track with pro career


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
J.RMAINE 'Choo Choo'
NMackev dese rves another
chance to fighl for a title - any
tille.
After blowing the opportu-
ntil to defend his British Com-
mionwealth title when he look
an ill-advised fight in Canada
in September, the Bahamian
super middleweight champion
is eltting back on track with his
professional career.


He has left for Trinidad &
Tobago where he wilrtake on a
familiar foe in Kirk 'the Tech-
nician' Sinette for the World
Boxing Association's FedeLialin
title on Saturday.
The duo first met here at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium in
21111'7 when Mackey stopped
Sinnette in the second round
for the unified WBC Caribbean
Boxing Federation (CABOFE)
and WBA FedeCaribe titles.
While Mackey still holds
onto the CABOFE crown, he


OPINION

relinquished the FedeCaribe
title when lie fought 12 grueling
rounds with African Michael
Gbenga before he pulled off
the British Commonwealth title
in 2008.
Mackey, 29, will be going
into the fight with a 18-4 win-
loss record. Unfortunately, all
of his losses have come on the
road. So hopefully, being a little





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more hungry to STUBBS
regain the form
that he mar-
veled his oppo-
nents with here
at home, includ-
ing Sinnette,
Mackey would
like nothing bet-
ter than to come
home with
another title OPINION
around his waist. m . -
KNOWLES INV.
ANOTHER
SUCCESSFUL
' SHOWING
Over the weekend, Mark
Knowles held another version
of his tennis celebrity invita-
tional and for the first time, the
venue was changed from
Atlantis on Paradisd Island to
the National Tennis Center at
the Queen Elizabeth Sports
Center.
I'm sure that when Knowles
decided to make the switch, he


knew he had an opportunity to
expose more of the country's
young players to the visiting
professional players. The switch
certainly accomplished that.
The NTC had the type of
crowd that you would normally
see at a Davis Cup event. And
while there was only one other
Bahamian player involved,
Davis Cupper Marvin Rolle, it
was truly an event to remem-
ber.
Knowles should be com-
mended for assembling quite a
field of players, who not only
put on a'high level of competi-
tion, but some very entertaining
performances. We look forward
to next year's event.
UNTIMELY DEATH
BETHEL WILL
BE MISSED
A lot of people are still
stunned at the untimely death
of 110m hurdler Christopher
'Nipples' Bethel.
The St Augustine's College


. . C




12 DAYS"TIL'CHRISAS..
12 DA-YS" TI."H 'HR ISTMIAS


graduate, who went on to McK-
endree State, had a very
promising career as a well-
rounded athlete.
Although he excelled in
baseball as a pitcher for the Big
Red Machine's junior boys dur-
ing his high school days, Bethel
went op to perform as a nation-"
al team athlete in track and
field at the collegiate level.
Bethel, 25, was one of those
athletes who you just enjoyed
being around.
He was really a vibrant and
jovial person, who never hesi-
tated to crack a joke about any
and everything. I know at one
time when I went to interview
him after he competed, he
quipped with a smile: "Why me,
I didn't win the race."
Even when he did the inter-
view, he was very cordial in his
remarks. On behalf of my fam-
ily and The Tribune newspa-
per, I wish to extend my con-
dolences to his family. May his
soul rest in peace.
YEAR-ENDING
AWARDS"GIVE
US YOUR
NOMINATIONS
EVERY year around this
time, we in The Tribune sports
department start to wrap our
Christmas presents to present
to you our readers, the' Most
Outstanding Athletes, Stories
and Coaches of the Year. -
This year, however, we will
be doing something a little dif-
ferent. We want to get your
input on the selection for the
honourees. This is your chance
to make a contribution.
Too many times, myself and
Renaldo Dorsett are bombaid-
ed with calls and e-mails from
the public as to why we selected
this one and why didn't that
one make the list. Well, here's
your chance to participate in a
meaningful way.
The categories are male and
female athlete of the year',
junior male and female athlete
of the year (18-and-under),
coach of the year, executive of
the year, team of the year and
story of the year.
Drop us a line at
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net or
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net or
fax us at 328-2398 with your
nominations. We will accept
them up until Friday, Decem-
ber 18.


- 9


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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009, PAGE 19


Govt to deploy 700 police officers to high-crime areas over holiday


KINGSTON, Jamaica


Jamaica is deploying more than 700 police
officers to high-crime areas over the holiday sea-
son as the island nears a record number of
killings, according to Associated Press.
Assistant Police Chief Glenmore Hinds says
officers will patrol malls, bus stations and other
busy spots across the island's 14 parishes.
He said Wednesday that some officers have
been reassigned from desk duties while others are
recent academy graduates.
Police expect to launch a new anti-gang initia-
tive after recently announcing that nearly 1,600
killings have been reported so far this year, slight-
ly more than all of 2008. A record 1,674 persons
were killed in Jamaica in 2005. The island has one
of the world's highest murder rates.


* SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - One of Puerto
Rico's most-wanted fugitives has been extradited
from New Jersey to face charges that he killed a
leader of a sewer workers union on the U.S.
island.
FBI spokesman Harry Rodriguez says Jose
Juan Viera Morales was flown to Puerto Rico on
Wednesday and jailed at a federal detention cen-
ter. Viera is charged with killing Wallis Rivera
Rodriguez in 2007.
Prosecutors allege that a vacation complex
manager now in prison hired Viera to kill Rivera
because the union leader was going to reveal
financial wrongdoing at the complex.
Viera also has been indicted on charges of
conspiring to distribute drugs in Puerto Rico.
He was arrested in September in New Jersey on
money-laundering charges.


THE TRIBUNE


RO-

B.baiInB rJI Brce T & BevLeage t'MiLipaL' ry ieaunds ;-L' i Jlir LriLkiJilp
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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


SANDALS Resorts executives celebrate at 16th World Travel Awards in London, where the chain won the Bahamas' Leading Resort honour




Sandals moves



to drive tourists



to the Bahamas


THE ROYAL BAHAMAS
POLICE FORCE 4SE
RETIRED OFFICERS ASSOCIATION

'It serve with honor, we remember wi.t pride"
&
The Police Dependants Trust Fund
"If cy died in thec cVcution offduty zI ife sen'itrn our coinitnq
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& The Trinidad Troubadours
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launched a promotion to dri-
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Bahamas, with guests book-
ing a minimum four-night stay
at either Sandals Royal
Bahamian or Sandals Emer-
ald Bay receiving a compli-
mentary airfare for their com-
panion.
The resort chain's Com-
panion Flies Free promotion
thus allows couples to travel
to its two Bahamian resorts
while only paying airfare for
one.
The promotion applies to


Join Cititrust
(Bahamas) Limited,
one of the most
established trust
organizations in the
world.

We invite outstanding
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wanting to build a career in
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weekend getaways more
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In addition to the Compan-
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Sandals said guests who book
a stay at Sandals Royal
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will also receive up to 60 per
cent off regular rack rates for
travel through select dates in
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Guests who book a stay at
Sandals Emerald Bay will
receive up to 50 per cent off
regular rack rates and one
night free, when they book a
seven-night minimum stay.
Tourists travelling to San-
dals Emerald Bay will receive
complimentary airfare for
their companion for travel
from January 22-June 23,
2010. Vacationers travelling
to Sandals Royal Bahamian
receive complimentary airfare
for their companion for trav-
el from January 4-June 23,
2010.
However, blackout dates
and restrictions apply from
March 19-April 18, 2010,
while taxes and fees are not
included, except for guests fly-
ing out of Florida.


citi


OPERATIONS DEPARTMENT HEAD

ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES
Reporting to our Country Operations and Technlok~y Head the
position is responsible for providing Operans support to our
local and global Trust Campaners as well as dher local busrnss
units Key resionibibes include overgh for ihree operalions
teams including Recorcilement Spedal Servires and Global Fee
Milling,
KNOWLEDGE SKILLS REQUIRED
The ideal canddale will psess an MBA or related poslgraduate
degree tQgether with a minimum of 7+ years f relaBJd ewirience
preferably In financial service An excellent operatlns
management backrgrnd ouped w4i a strong
aocounlinTfiancial bflgourd B required, Solid knowledge of
Trnt Adrrinistr-ion fundarnentals is n s sset. Additonally,
excellent analcl sills, sjperir comunlcaMi skills, and
sound judgmenL'decisimn-making skills re tso necessary.

Challenge
yourself to a career like no other


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BUSINESS I


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RELIGION


Thursday, December 10, 2009 e PG 25


'I Am Praying'


By JEFFARAH GIBSON

IN a time when crime is
soaring to new heights and
more and more persons are
without work, many say that
Christians need to get down
on their knees and bow their
heads in prayer.
Taking this stance is a Christian non-
profit organisation which has launched
a new website
www.iampraying.ning.com - where
people can send prayer requests and
they will be prayed for.
Noel Browne, founder of "I Am
Praying", spoke with Tribune Religion,
explaining how the website works.
"Prayer videos are uploaded on the
website, and the videos would show
each person's face who is praying for
the person who requested the prayer,
creating a personal connection," he
said.
"Minutes after the person is prayed
for they can receive the video instead
of having to wait a few days. The per-
son can hear the distinct voice and
emotions of the person praying for
them. They can go back to the site and
replay the prayer videos without fear
of losing them."
Mr Browne said it is his desire to
reach Christians all over the world with
the website, but his immediate goal is
to touch the lives of Bahamians, to get
them to come together and join in
prayer.
"If Christians in this society can
come together and pray, then major
crises can be averted and turned
around for the better. God has the
power to change any situation, if peo-
ple only come together and get on their
knees and pray," he said.
Mr Browne has already reached out
to numerous persons, offering sympa-


thetic prayers for families who have
lost a loved one, those who are sick,
those who are depressed and those
who have been victims of crimes.
During the month of November he
uploaded his first four prayers to the "I
Am Praying" website as well as to his
YouTube channel. The videos included
prayers for the Bahamas, United
States President Barack Obama and
for the end of the global recession.
Additionally, he uploaded a video on
November 29 where he prayed for four
police officers who were killed in
Lakewood, Washington, and the shoot-
er.
To date that video has been viewed
435 times.
"This might not seem much for
YouTube, but consider that this
occurred on a virtually new account
with no subscriber base. The views
came from the United States, the
United Kingdom, Canada, the
Bahamas, Germany, and the
Netherlands," he said.
Mr Browne said that he wants per-
sons to know that there is a support
team praying for their well-being no
matter which country they live in.
"Every day we post topics to pray
about. There are also different sections
on the website where we post featured
prayers. For instance, we took the obit-
uary section out of the papers last week
and we prayed for the family of the
deceased. We also prayed for the fami-
ly of the track star (Christopher
Bethel) that got killed in a car crash.
We pray for the shut-ins and the
depressed," he said.
"It's much better when people can
see that they are being prayed for. It's
different than when a person types a
prayer onto a website as proof that
they have prayed for that person. But
the only unfortunate thing about that is

SEE page 31


I Am Praying


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SEIGIU NOE I


UNDER the patronage of Bishop
Dr Elgarnet B Rahming, Bishop Dr
John Humes and Bishop Robert
McPhee, the Church of God of
Prophecy Bahamas Brass Band will
host an exciting benefit concert
tomorrow night at the Church of
God auditorium.
Proceeds from the concert will be
donated to the Ranfurly Home for
Children, Great Commission


Ministry, and Persis Rodgers Home
for the Aged.
Guest performers include the
Church of God Centennial Mass
Choir, Minister Denzcil Rolle and
High Praise, the Church of God
Band and many others.
Attendees are encouraged to bring
canned good items which will be
donated to each organisation.
Tickets can be purchased at the door.


WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!!
* Did you recently give birth to
the newest little angel on earth?
Have you and your beloved
recently tied the knot? Is your
church planning a special event?
Tribune Religion wants to hear
from you!
We want to know about the spe-
cial things going on in your life, so
go ahead and send in your wed-


ding photographs, birth announce-
ments and church activities sched-
ule to be posted in upcoming
Tribune Religion sections.
This service is free. Send all
information, including (especially)
photographs, to features@tribune-
media.net. Information can be
hand delivered to The Tribune at
Shirley and Deveaux Streets or
call the Religion section @
502.2368.


AnMtla"







PG 26 * Thursday, December 10, 2009


RELIGION


The Tribune


ASSEMBLIES OF BRETHREN TO OPEN




'PREMIER' BIBLE COLLEGE IN 2010


By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net


THERE is a saying that what
you don't know won't hurt
you. But that's not pertinent in
studying the Bible, says one
pastor.
According to scripture, Christians
should "study to shew (show) thyself
(yourself) approved unto God, a work-
man that needeth not to be ashamed,
rightly dividing the word of truth." - 2
Timothy 2:15 (KJV).
But many people do not consider
Christian ministry a field which one has
to go to school for.
Tell someone that you are training to
be a pastor, or "teacher of the Word"
and you may get some raised eyebrows.
But if you believe the Bible, the verse
of 2 Timothy 2:15 becomes crucial when
leading a congregation.
After all, you must know what you
believe in order to practice and incor-


porate it into your life, and to take it
further, in teaching a church.
It is in the spirit of this verse, that the
Assemblies of Brethren in the
Bahamas are spearheading a learning
institution - the Hope College, sched-
uled to open in 2010.
"This is ours. The Baptists, the
Methodists and the Anglicans have
theirs, and I'm sure you want to see that
you have yours," said a spokesperson
for the College.
Today's generation must be articu-
late, while keeping with certain reli-
gious fundamentals, the spokesperson
said.
And to achieve that goal one has to
go off to Bible college.
But not everyone who realises they
have a "calling" to the ministry or has a
desire to study abroad at a seminary has
the means to do so.
For these persons, Hope College
wishes to provide the necessary training.
In a statement, a spokesperson for
Hope College said: "We've been
blessed with the wonderful opportunity
to serve our community in various ways


at such a time as this.
"We expect to become the premier
institution of the region, rooted in
Biblical doctrine, providing a steady
growth of graduates from a broad spec-
trum of programmes and courses.
"Hope College will produce a calibre
of highly trained productive citizens
impacting future generations for the
Kingdom of God."
The college will also offer academic
programmes as aims to foster develop-
ment of the whole person - intellectual-
ly and spiritually.
A spokesperson for Hope College
encouraged members of Brethren
churches across the nation to "embrace
the institution."
Introduction to early childhood edu-
cation; professional caregivers certifica-
tion; introduction to Creole and English
as a second language; sign language;
church administration and pharmacy
technician certification examination
preparation are all offered.
For students who are below college
standards, a preparatory college pro-
gramme to help them make up their


courses will also be available.
The preparatory programme at the
college runs for one year, to allow stu-
dents to complete the required course
work.
The entire programme can be finished
with a Saturday-only schedule or attend-
ing class on weekdays.
Persons can also enroll in the " I.O nl
chance" programme which targets men
and women who are seriously interested
in turning their lives around.
In the first 18 months of the ",.o nl
chance" programme, students take
classes in basic skills, such as entrepre-
neurship, computer literacy, farming
and/or landscaping, and basic invest-
ments.
Students then choose their specialty.
They will participate in a three-month
long internship with partnering agencies
or companies willing to assist them.
The first group of 15 students for this
programme will begin their courses on
March 29, 2010.
Interested persons should sign up at
Hope College as soon as possible to
ensure a seat in the programme.


'Fall into Fashions' .


at St Margret's

Anglican Church

ST Margaret's Anglican
Church Courtyard recently came
alive with a burst of Autumn
colours as the Decorating and
Social Events Committee staged
a tea party and fashion show
under the theme, 'Fall into
Fashions'.
The fashion show showcased
its young and not so young
members in designs for casual,
church and ball wear, complete
with masks.
Guests were entertained with
the appearances of 'Miss Nitty'
(Antoinette Thompson), DJ
Perry Newton and St Margaret's
very own 'MC Extraordinaire',
Cherylee Pinder.


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The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, December 10, 2009 * PG 27


Putting Christ back in your Christmas


THESE are some ways for you to
spiritualise rather than commercialise
your holidays:
1. Go to church every week and focus
on the coming Saviour.
2. Reflect on why you need a person-
al Saviour to come to you at this time.
3. Whenever you decorate your tree
remember the tree that made the cross.
4. Be encouraged by the evergreen
tree that survives even the harshest
winter.
5. Add each ornament prayerfully.
6. Consider having a Crismon tree
with only religious symbols as orna-
ments.
7. Allow your wreath to remind you
of the never ending circle of God's love.
8. Consider what gift you will give to
the Lord, as if you were one of the
magi.
9. Send only Christian Christmas
cards.
10. Invite some lonely people to your
Christmas dinner.


RE\V N(,EL_X
PALA ( .I( )I N


You are always free to add your own
ideas to the list. There is so much that
we miss about the deeper meaning of
Christmas when we remain superficial-
ly connected to the season.
Create some new family traditions if
your old ones seem to have no depth or
significance any more. You may even
decide to forego all personal gifts in the
family (or for those who agree) and buy
something for members of a needy
family instead.
If Christmas is about loving and giv-
ing, then we may begin to consider
more ways in which to make giving a


reality now and well into the New Year.
You may covenant with the Lord that
this will become your way of life
throughout your lifetime.
I am sharing these ideas while you
still have time to incorporate some of
them in this year's plans.
Whatever you do determine is the
best way forward for you and your fam-
ily, be faithful.
Even if you walk down your street
and in your immediate neighbourhood
to sing carols and give out a little party
bag, it will capture the spirit of
Christmas.
Contact Social Services or you near-
est Urban Renewal office to discover
who in the vicinity needs assistance.
You may help anonymously or agree
to journey with the family regularly.
Let the recession be a blessing for us
to adopt more gracious and loving ways
when it comes to those in need.
What you do for the "least person",
you do for Our Lord.


"Create some new
family traditions if
your old ones seem to
have no depth or sig-
nificance any more.
You may even decide
to forego all personal
gifts in the family (or
for those who agree)
and buy something for
members of a needy
family instead."


Rev John Daveys' account of the 1866 Hurricane Part 1


The Baptist Magazine of 1866 con-
tains a letter from the Rev John
Davey as follows:

THE ARRIVAL of the Rev John
Davey enables us to furnish our read-
ers with more particulars of the effects
of the hurricane on the Mission prop-
erty in Nassau. Through the good
providence of God, Mr Davey and his
family reached their destination in
safety, but not without experiencing
very severe weather on the way.

Under date of November 17, he
writes: - "Our voyage across the
Atlantic was a long and dangerous
one, and we were detained in New
York a month, which was a great dis-
appointment both to ourselves and
the people.
The Corsica reached the bar of
Nassau early on the morning of the
7th, but found that the passengers
would not be landed in boats the usual
way on account of the heavy sea that
was running. She gave signals respect-
ing passengers and freight, and then
proceeded in the direction of
Cochrane's anchorage, in the hope


L
..>/ L_(1
L-1WL()14


that schooners would soon he
despatched to us, but no schooner
came alongside till the following
morning.
Though the people were looking
and waiting for us all day, and there
was great uncertainty as to the time
the schooner would arrive on the mor-
row, yet when we got to the landing
about noon, we found the shore lined
with the members of the church, wait-
ing to welcome us.
Their congratulations were very
hearty, and two or three days after we
arrived, we were fully employed in
receiving visitors. But, though it was
pleasant to see the people, it was dis-
tressing to hear their accounts of the
desolating hurricane with which the
colony had been visited.
I asked them in what light it was
generally regarded and some said as a


judgment from God.
One aged African woman said to
me, "Massa, God has punished we this
year, nothing left to pick a copper,"
referring to the destruction of the
crops."
The Mission property has sustained
considerable damage through the hur-
ricane. The portico of our large
chapel, which was put up last year, was
blown down, stripping away the cor-
nice and the gutter, and thus laying the
chapel open to the rams. The chapel
gates were blown down and broken,
and a great quantity of glass destroyed
in the chapel. The roofs of the
Mission-house and out-buildings were
so damaged that they must be shin-
gled immediately.
But the saddest part of the story
remains to be told. Bethel, the original
Baptist chapel in the Bahamas, in
which Mr Burton laid the foundation
of this Mission, after he was driven
from Morant Bay, is levelled with the
ground. This is a great grief to the
poor people, especially the aged, who
have worshipped in it so many years.
It is very desirable that it should be
rebuilt as speedily as possible, as the


bulk of the members live in the neigh-
bourhood of that chapel.
But they cannot possibly rebuild it
themselves in their present distressed
circumstances, and therefore, I hope,
that when the news of this great
calamity reaches England, the friends
of the Mission will kindly help us to
repair our damaged chapel, and
rebuild those that have been blown
down.
The Episcopalians and Wesleyans
have suffered as badly as ourselves,
and therefore, we cannot look to them
for help, who need all the means they
have got to rebuild their own places of
worship.
The hurricane was very severe upon
other islands but I believe that the two
principal chapels of our Society,
beyond New Providence, sustained
but little damage. There was not much
injury done to property in Inagua, and
though there was much private prop-
erty destroyed at Turk's Island, yet the
places of worship were not much dam-
aged. Many of the Out-Island chapels
were destroyed, but as they were not
very costly buildings, I think they may
soon be rebuilt."








PG 28 * Thursday, December 10, 2009


RFI II~IflN


The Tribune


Destined for greatness


WHO told you that you had to accept
the hardship that you're facing, or
through ignorance religiously climb the
rough side of the mountain?
Don't you know that you have a choice
in the matter as it pertains to you living
the good life; the God ordained abundant
life (John 10:10)?
As we move into the New Year there
are some changes that we as a people,
both collectively and individually, must
make in order to tap into the reservoir of
greatness that lies within us.
Here are a few those changes:
1. Proverbs 3:5-6 - "Trust in the Lord
with all thine heart; and lean not unto
thine own understanding. In all thy ways
acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy
paths."
2. Stay away from negative, murmuring
and complaining people.
3. Change your words/your speech, and
you will eventually change the world that
you're living in. Proverbs 18:21 - "Death
and life are in the power of the tongue
and they that love it shall eat the fruit
thereof."
And also here's what Mark 11:23 says
about the power of your words.
"For verily I say unto you, that whoso-
ever shall say unto this mountain; Be thou
removed, and be thou cast into the sea;
and shall not doubt in his heart, but shall
believe that those things which he saith
shall come to pass; he shall have whatso-
ever he saith."
It's about time that we rise up and be all
that Yahweh has called and ordained us
to be and do.


As we make the transition into 2010 it
is of the utmost importance that we lay
aside every weight and the sin which so
easily besets us.
Listen, time-out for playing games!
The family structure as we know it is in
trouble and the religious church can't
effectively speak to this issue. Why?
Because 75 per cent of the tithe-paying,
offering-giving church membership are
doing their own will and not God's will,
and no religious leader wants to mess
with the cash flow.
The divorce rate in the church is much
higher than that of the world, but who
cares?
Amidst all the prosperity preaching
and conferences, everybody seems to for-
get that Yahweh is a covenant-keeping
God.
One of the first signs of our nation
heading in the wrong direction is when a
clergyman can put aside or divorce his
wife and take another as a man changes
from one suit to another and fearlessly
ascends the pulpit.
The two categories, the true church
and the family, will forever be in the
enemy's optical device, whose sole pur-
pose is to render the church ineffective


and the family divided and powerless.
Addressing these sorts of issues is all
part of unveiling the greatness that lies
within us, and before we can take author-
ity over any demonic spirits we've got to
call a spade a spade.
The following is for those who've got
the desire manifest greatness in 2010:
As children of God, as a people that
truly knows and has a personal relation-
ship with Yahweh, we shall be strong and
do great exploits (Daniel 11:32), taking
action against every contrary spirit such
as the spirit of sickness and disease, the
spirit of fear, the spirit of violence and
murder, the spirit of strife and confusion,
the spirit of poverty, every unclean sexual
spirit.
If you have taken the time to read thus
far then I'm convinced that this article has
been divinely put together for you.
Despite all that might have gone wrong
in your life this year, it's time for you to
serve an eviction notice on every negative
spirit and force that has been working
against you.
Everything that you need to live the
victorious, abundant life (John 10:10) has
already been deposited within; the day
you've accepted Yeshuwa Messiah as
your Lord and Saviour.
Watch this!
Therefore your victory, your break-
through, your healing, is not in the atten-
dance of another conference or in your
religious leader, but rather it is in the
words that comes out of your mouth.
Are you prepared to go into a brand
new year with the same old complaints of


blaming others for your failure to get up
and try something new?
How much longer are you going to
blame the PLP, the FNM, the Port
Authority, etceteras?
What's your role in trying to make a
better Bahamas?
Please know this, that evil triumphs
when good people say and do nothing.
"Stop allowing where you are, to deter-
mine who you are."
As I've said before, so say I again:
You're not the situation which you might
be in at this time. Remember, I said that a
Bahamian visiting Haiti or China doesn't
make him or her a Haitian or a Chinese;
likewise the bad or unfortunate situation
that you're in is not who you are, for you
are truly the righteousness of Yahweh in
Yeshuwa Messiah.
You are destined for greatness, it's time
for you to look in the mirror and speak
the image that appears, and boldly
declare Isaiah 54:17
"No weapon that is formed against me
shall prosper; and every tongue that shall
rise against me in judgment I shall con-
demn. This is the heritage of the servants
of the Lord, and their righteousness is of
me saith the Lord."


* For questions or comments contact us via
e-mail atpastormallen@yahoo.com or tele-
phone number 1-242-441-2021.
Pastors Matthew and Brendalee Alien
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center
International


St Andrew's Church in Arthur's Town, Cat Island receives massive makeover


THE excitement of the recent
Patronal Festival of St Andrew's in
Arthur's Town, Cat Island will linger in
the hearts and minds of many residents.
But not only the locals were moved,
Assistant Bishop Gilbert Thompson
who visited in an official capacity to
administer the sacrament of
Confirmation was also affected.
This was a grand time for many, and
especially Father Chester Burton, priest
in-charge of the Anglican Churches in
Cat Island.
As it has been Father Burton's custom
since he took up his post at St Saviour's
Parish, he follows the belief that
Patronal Festivals and Feast of Titles are
monumental and memorable occasions
in the life of the parish and should never
be celebrated in a lackluster fashion.
The mammoth task of organising the
celebration was undertaken in a few
short weeks with the complete removal
of termite-infested and weather-corrod-


ed lumber from the existing window
frames and doors of the church.
The parish purchased windows and
mahogany doors from Community
Hardware in New Providence for the
refurbishment work.
Nigel 'Rod' Rolle, property and build-
ing contractor for the Anglican
Churches in North Cat Island, liaised
with Ernest 'Bowes' Sands to commence
with the necessary repairs. Ray Moncur
flew in from Nassau to rebuild the
ancient gothic window frames and Frank
LaFrance was engaged to install stained
glass windows in the towering belfry
which had stood windowless for many
years.
The glass used was generously given
by Father Stephen Grant, rector of St
Mary Magdalene in West End, Grand
Bahama.
After this, the church was electrically
upgraded to accommodate the installa-
SEE page 30


I IF 1 InWInm







The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, December 10, 2009 * PG 29


Is capital punishment mandated,



prohibited or permitted?


PART 2


By CEPHAS FERGUSON


ACCORDING to scripture,
under what conditions may a
state carry out capital pun-
ishment?
The Old Testament law didn't simply
address the "' !i, i!,, i ' of capital pun-
ishment, it also spoke of the "how."
Elaborate technical procedures were
established for admitting evidence,
appealing a verdict and conducting an
execution.
Each of these provisions need not be
literally carried out today for death
penalty statutes to meet biblical stan-
dards. For example, Deuteronomy 17
required the condemning witnesses to
throw the first stones.
This is impossible today because
stoning is not a legal current method of
execution and would certainly be held
to be unconstitutional.
However, there are principles
behind this provision.
It made witnesses responsible for the
consequences of their testimony, thus
encouraging truthfulness.
It also required witnesses to dissoci-
ate themselves from the conduct of the
accused.
What principles then can be drawn
from the procedures established by the
Mosaic Law?
1. PROPORTIONALITY - The
Mosaic Law restricted how much pun-
ishment could be imposed for various
offences: "But if there is a serious
injury, you are to take life for life, eye
for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand,
foot for foot, burn for burn, wound for
wound, bruise for bruise" (Exodus 21
:23-25).
The principle is that punishment
must be proportionate to the offence.
The extreme sanction of death should
be considered only in the most serious
offences.
2. CERTAINTY OF GUILT -
Before a murderer could be executed,
two witnesses had to confirm his or her
guilt (Deuteronomy 17:6; Numbers
35:30).
This meant that capital crimes
required a higher standard of proof
than other offences. Deuteronomy 19
says that two witnesses are needed to
establish any case.


But a party to the dispute such as the
victim could be one of the witnesses.
For example, the Pharisees accused
Christ of blasphemy, challenging His
claim to be sent from God.
Christ said: "In your law it is written
that the testimony of two witnesses is
valid. I testify on my own behalf, and
the Father who sent me testifies on my
behalf" (John 8:17-18).
The purpose of the Deuteronomy 19
provision was to avoid a "swearing
contest" between the victim and the
accused as the only witnesses.
The victim had to support his charge
with at least one other witness in order
to prevail.
But a murder victim cannot testify.
Thus, a murder case required at least
two outside witnesses, instead of just
one.
These witnesses were required to
participate in the execution to under-
score the seriousness of the charge and
encourage truthful testimony.
The Jews apparently observed this
technical requirement because they
considered executing an innocent per-
son a greater offence than letting a
murderer go unpunished.
3. INTENT - Numbers 35: 22-24
exempts from the death penalty those
who kill accidentally.
The law therefore limited the "cre-
ation covenant" of Genesis 9:6 to those
who kill intentionally.
This suggests another principle of
restraint-capital punishment should
not be imposed when the offender did
not act intentionally.
4. DUE PROCESS - Several provi-
sions of the law insured that executions
took place only after appropriate judi-
cial procedure.
For example, Numbers 35 provided
for cities of refuge to which a person
who had caused another's death could
flee.
The victim's family was prohibited
from retaliating until the case was
heard and the accused had presented
his or her defence.
As noted earlier, Numbers 35 also
said two eyewitnesses were required
before the accused could be executed.
And Deuteronomy 17: 8-9 provided
that priests or judges should hear any
difficult case.
Each of these demonstrates that due
process of law was required in all cases.
The accused must be brought to
trial, the trial must be supervised by
persons qualified to do so, and certain-


ty of guilt must be reached by a specif-
ic, technical procedure.
The issue was not simply whether
the accused were guilty, it was also
whether they had a fair chance to
prove their innocence.
5. INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILI-
TY - Deuteronomy 24:16 says people
cannot be held responsible for the
crimes of their parents or children.
This reflects two concepts: That a
person is responsible for one's own
actions and that one is not responsible
for the actions of another.
6. FAIRNESS - Recognising that
wealth or indigence could influence
the outcome of legal proceedings, the
law stipulated that neither the rich nor
the poor should have an advantage
(Exodus 23:3,6). The principle is that
there should be equal justice regard-
less of economic or social status.
7. RELUCTANCE TO EXECUTE -
Although the law sounds bloodthirsty,
it was applied with great restraint.
In Ezekiel 33:11, God laments: "As
surely as I live...I take no pleasure in
the death of the wicked but rather that
they turn from their ways and live.


Turn! Turn from your evil ways!
Why will you die, 0 house of Israel?
The lawgiver Himself was reluctant to
impose the death penalty, preferring
that the wrong-doers repent.
Perhaps this underlies the call for
Christians to forego revenge (Romans
12:19-21).
"Be reluctant to demand satisfac-
tion" is the message.
And, as we have seen earlier, the
Jewish tradition shows great reluc-
tance to impose the death penalty.
Reluctance is not refusal. But it does
imply that execution should be a last
resort, and as Ezekiel 33 suggests,
repentance or contrition could com-
mute the death sentence.
Seven biblical principles then govern
capital punishment: Proportionality,
certainty of guilt, intent, due process,
individual responsibility, fairness and
reluctance to execute.
Those who hold that the Bible man-
dates capital punishment conclude
their analysis here. But those who
believe that capital punishment is per-
mitted must consider the third ques-
tion.







PG 30 * Thursday, December 10, 2009


RELIGION


The Tribune


Bethel Baptist Church celebrates



27th pastoral anniversary


THE members of Bethel
Baptist Church on Meeting
Street in Nassau - the oldest
Baptist church in the
Bahamas and the oldest con-
tinuing Baptist Church in the
Caribbean - celebrated Rev
Timothy Stewart's 27th
anniversary as pastor of the
church last Sunday.
To commemorate this event, a
service of praise and thanksgiving
was held as members, friends and
family came together to demon-
strate their love and appreciation
for Pastor Stewart and his excellent
and faithful service to God over the
many years.
The theme for the occasion was
"God's Will And Good Pleasure At
Work", taken from Philippians 2:5-
16, and the speaker for this com-
bined service wasRev Dr John N T
Rolle, the senior pastor of Bethel
Deliverance Centre in Jones Town,
Grand Bahama.
Special music was performed by
Bethel Baptist's renowned choirs,
and the melodious voices of the
praise team.
Rev Stewart attended Prince
William Baptist High School where
he obtained his secondary educa-
tion.
He matriculated at the American
Baptist College where he obtained a
BA in Bible and Theology with a
minor in History and Social Science.
Rev Stewart went on to further his
education at the Southern Baptist
Theological Seminary for two years
where he pursued a Master of
Divinity Degree in Theology with a
concentration in Preaching, but as a
very young man anointed and
appointed by God, was called home
to be the pastor of Bethel Baptist
before finishing his degree.
He became the pastor of Bethel
Baptist in November 1982.
Under Rev Stewart's leadership,
the church has experienced tremen-
dous growth in its membership, and
he has been able to accomplish
many things including the renova-
tion of the church and the acquisi-
tion of properties in the surrounding


area for further development.
He has been responsible for set-
ting up Bethel's Soup Kitchen which
serves approximately 1,000 meals
weekly to the sick, shut-in and
needy persons in the community; a
clothing ministry; the senior saints
ministry that meets once per week (
on Tuesdays; an outreach ministry
to the schools; a computer lab and
an after-school programme to assist
those that need help academically.
Additionally, a mentoring pro-
gramme was established to target at-
risk children and their families, and
to provide counselling and some sta-
bility in the lives of those that are
being mentored.
There is an Evangelistic pro-
gramme; a vibrant youth and chil-
dren's ministry; a marching band,
and a liturgical dance ministry.
Pastor Stewart is also responsible
for the formation of the first hand
bell ringers group among the Baptist
churches in the Bahamas and a
music ministry that encompasses a
sanctuary choir, a youth choir, a chil-
dren's choir, a gospel choir and a
praise team.
In addition to being the pastor of
Bethel Baptist, Pastor Stewart is the
moderator for the Bethel Baptist
Association made up of 18 churches
in New Providence, Andros,
Eleuthera and Grand Bahama.
He has served as a member of the
Board of Directors of the Bahamas
Development Bank (1988 - 1992);
Assistant Chaplain of the House of
Assembly (1989 - 1993), and as a
member of the Bahamas Juvenile
Panel for many years.
He was the second moderator for
the Bahamas National Baptist
Missionary and Educational
Convention 2002-2006. Pastor
Stewart was appointed an interna-
tional president of the Progressive
National Baptist Convention USA
(2003-2006) with responsibility for
some 3,000 churches in Africa,
Europe, Haiti and Cuba.
He is the son of the late Rev
Henry and Rev Dr Lavania Stewart,
and is married to the former Sharon
Williams.
The couple have three sons,
Timothy II, Henry and Gardner.


St Andrew's Church gets massive makeover


FROM page 28

tion of two window air-condition units,
and this was handled by Raphath
Seymour whose mother Doramae
Seymour is an ardent Anglican living in
Smith's Bay.
The church was a beehive of activity
and Father Burton feverishly painted the
interior of the edifice from top to bottom
trying to meet the deadline of Sunday,
November 29.
After all the work was done he
breathed a sigh of relief and waited with
bated breath for the arrival of his former
rector who groomed him for the priest-
hood.
Then last Sunday, droves of Anglicans
and well-wishers entered the trans-
formed St Andrew's Church.
Many were awestruck that the day had
finally come when Anglicans in the set-
tlement of Arthur's Town could worship
in air-conditioned comfort.
Bishop Thomspon was amazed to see
the amount of work done in so short a
time.
The bishop in his welcoming remarks
told the members that he expected noth-
ing less from Father Burton.
Bishop Thompson said Father Burton
was an excellent altar server many years
ago, spending many a Saturday at St
Barnabas getting the various altar accou-


trements polished and shined for service.
St Barnabas is where Father Burton's
spiritual navel string is buried so to
speak.
The 22 confirmands were drilled by
the bishop after his warm and charming
welcome remarks. As questions were
asked, the boys and girls answered pre-
cisely as they were taught from the in-
depth literature entitled "Instructions for
Anglicans" written by Bishop Thompson
himself.
The bishop wrote this book so that
Anglicans throughout the archipelagic
diocese would know what makes them
Anglican and separates them from the
Baptist, Pentecostal or even the Catholic
faiths.
The book also teaches that the seven
sacraments are a benchmark in the
Anglican Church, and that the Bible and
Book of Common Prayer are essential
for corporate worship.
Father Burton told the bishop he
wanted the young confirmands to know
the importance of true Anglicanism and
that is why he deterred confirming any-
one until they were observed, taught and
scrutinised.
After the service, members and well-
wishers retreated to the Arthur's Town
High School auditorium for a gala recep-
tion organised by Coral Patrice Burton,
wife of Father Burton, and the parents of
the confirmation candidates.







The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, December 10, 2009 * PG 31


When your pastor becomes




vour "Mannd of God"


THE gift of pastoring is a wonderful
one. God placed this gift in the church
for the purpose of perfecting the church,
as said in Ephesians 4:11-13: "And he
gave some apostles; and some, prophets;
and some, evangelists; and some, pastors
and teachers; For the perfecting of the
saints, for the work of ministry, for the
edifying of the body of Christ: Till we all
come in the unity of the faith, and of the
knowledge of the son of God, unto a per-
fect man, unto the measure of the stature
of the fullness of Christ."
What deserves the greatest attention
is that God gave his church pastors with
a heart (spirit, way of functioning) like
his own. Jeremiah 3: 15 reads as follows:
"I will give you pastors according to
mine heart, which shall feed you with
knowledge and understanding."
A true pastor, with a heart like God's
heart, is a true man of God. The spot-
light of this exhortation is not on true
(Jeremiah 3:15) pastors.
Here, we deal with what quite a num-
ber of Bahamian pastors have now will-
ingly become.

'Mannd of God' - defined,
and explained
The devil and his hosts of professional
theologian-demons seem to have creat-
ed an aberration called "your Mannd of
God", a counterfeit to the divine and
sacred Ephesians 4:11 gift of the pastor-
teacher, a role and image to which many
well-meaning, God-called pastors have
gleefully accepted and substituted for
their real, God-approved and ordained,
pastoral calling.
This has come about from the bas-
tardisation of the story of the Prophet
Elijah and the kind lady of Shunem (2
Kings 4:8ff) by stateside preachers, along
with greed and the almost habitual
desire of some to manipulate the gullible
and unthinking among the people of
God; in addition to the desire to don a



'I Am Praying'

FROM page 25

you don't know if the persons praying
are sincere at all. But with the video
you will see the person's emotion, and
you can witness their sincerity", he said.
Living in the computer age, he said
that he is using the internet in a more


DR ALBERT
FERGUSON, JP



new status of being a prophet.
You will recall that years ago, nation-
ally, Bahamian pastors started to be
"turned on" by being called "Rev",
which went to "Dr" when everybody
went looking for someone to give them a
"Dr" designation; that went to "The
Reverend Doctor", then to "Bishop"-
pastors want to be called "Bishop".
Now, we are in the "prophet" era, so
pastors want to be a prophet, and with
little encouragement from their interna-
tional brethren, many have taken upon
themselves the mantle and have become
people's "Mannd of God."
The enemy of our souls, the arch-
deceiver of Revelations 12:9 has given a
'Mannd of God', according to his heart,
who makes the people of God fearful of
himself, who manipulates the people of
God to unduly enrich him, and who
feeds them sermons with true Biblical
text scriptures but a sermon body which
is full of views, philosophies and inter-
pretations designed to keep the minds of
the people of God in bondage, and obliv-
ious to the freedom which Jesus has
given, according to Galatians 5:1.

'Mannd of God' vs.
'Jeremiah 3;15 Pastors'
The 'Mannd of God' brainwashes
you that he is your "covering" - you
must get his views, stamp of approval
and go-ahead for anything the Lord
places on your heart, or else it will come
to naught and the Lord will not bless
you.
He preaches that once you step out


powerful way, and for a more meaning-
ful purpose.
Mr Browne said "the enemy" has
been using the internet to distract and
deter people from the Holy Spirit.
People often spend more time on
social networking sites than on improv-
ing their spiritual connection with God,
he said.
"I am going to use technology in a
more powerful way by recording my


from under his "covering" you are now
free prey for the devil. Therefore, you
must stay attached, compliant and
robotic to him, and ignorantly and sac-
rificially 'give all of your resources into
his bosom,' because God never joined
you to a church, God joined you to a
person, your 'Mannd of God.'
You cannot leave his church unless he
releases you, or else, God will not bless
anything you put your hands to do.
You must stay "connected" because
"the anointing" flows from the head of
the 'Mannd' of God downwards.
Therefore, you are to sow into the life
of the 'Mannd of God' as 'down pay-
ments,' so that your abundance can
begin.
Try as you might, you cannot find
these teachings in the Holy Bible.
My friends, all I can advise you is to
tell these manipulating demons "no"
whether he/she is in full collar, half col-
lar, mitre or floor-length white dress,
and run for cover to Galatians Chapter
5 and verse one.
Then I see pastors who have become
people's 'Mannd of God' ruling their
dynasties (local church/God's flock)
with a demonic degree of fear.
No one can approach them. People
fear them.
No one can express their ideas, views,
ask questions or ask for church infor-
mation.
To ask a question would require
nerves of steel. No one can follow the
dictates of their conscience if the
'Mannd of God' has issued an edict
against something.
I know a "Mannd of God" who gave
an order to his leaders not to visit or
have fellowship with another church
just because there was 'bad blood'
between himself and that other pastor.
I have heard some 'Mannds of God'
preaching with such fervor and passion
about how church members ought to


prayers and uploading them on my
website so that situations are turned
around," he said.
Mr Browne hopes that the Bahamas
can be steered away from the negative
direction in which it is currently head-
ed.
He said "prayerful Christians" will
weather the storm and come out
stronger than ever.
To emphasise this point, Mr Browne


obey and reverence them (and the
'order' which they say God has estab-
lished in their church) that it would
have made the average 'floor member'
tremble.
That level of reverential fear is
cultish. People don't like that four letter
word "cult" but a lot of behaviours I
see, hear and experience in churches
around me in this Bahamian society are
cultish, as I understand cults.
Hear the God of the Bible who gave
us "p. ,. 1! ," and moreover pastors with
hearts like his heart, saying, in 2
Timothy 1:7, "For God hath not given
us the spirit of fear, but of power, and of
love and of a sound mind," or Romans
8: 15-16, "For we have not received the
spirit of bondage again to fear; but we
have received the spirit of adoption,
whereby we cry, Abba, Father", and
not, I would add, "pastor! Pastor!"

Conclusion
I thank my God for keeping the
promise of Jeremiah 3:15 and giving us
pastors with hearts like His.
I cannot find anywhere in the Bible
where the Sovereign Lord promised
any other ministerial office or gift a
promise like that in Jeremiah 3:15.
Whenever a pastor evolves into a
'Mannd of God', a hireling and a lord
over God's heritage (John 10:13 /1 Peter
5:3), all I can say to my beloved broth-
ers, sisters and friends is this: Try to find
yourself one of those pastors with a
heart like that of Jesus. You'll identify
them 'by their fruit' and not their public
relations.


* For responses, comments and discussion
e-mail Dr Albert S Ferguson at albertsfergu-
son@gmail.com.
Dr Ferguson is also the author of a book
which includes his essays on "Issues in
Religious Life in The Bahamas."


quotes 2 Chronicles 7:14: "If my peo-
ple, which are called by my name, shall
humble themselves, and pray, and seek
my face, and turn from their wicked
ways; then will I hear from heaven, and
will forgive their sin, and will heal their
land."
In essence, Mr Browne is calling for
Christians everywhere to get together
and pray "in one truth, under one body
in Christ."







PG 32 0 Thursday, December 10, 2009


RELIGION


The Tribune


St Saviour's Parish




holds its first ever




Christmas Cantata


ON Friday,
December 4 all
roads led to St
Mark's Anglican Church in
the picturesque settlement of
Port Howe, Cat Island, for its
first ever Christmas Cantata.
The joyous spirit of Christmas was in
the air as members and well-wishers sat
in a festively decorated church to see the
sights and sounds of the holiday season.
The palatial edifice which sits in Port
Howe was refurbished and expanded by
the generous people of Christ the King,
Ridgeland Park, New Providence under
the leadership of Archdeacon I
Ranfurly Brown who was the former
rector of that parish.
The parish and members of Christ the
King gave selflessly to the restoration of
this church in Port Howe, said Father
Chester Burton, priest in-charge of
Anglican Churches in Cat Island.
"This was an historic and Herculean
effort that should be recorded in the
annals and history books of the
Anglican Diocese because something
like this was never done in the history of
the Diocese. So it was only fitting that
the membership of this church show
their appreciation and showcase the first
ever Anglican Christmas Cantata on
the island," he said.
Christmas tree lights adorned the art
work and stained glass windows of the
building and a Christmas tree stood
proud in the church.
The task of organising the Christmas
Cantata was undertaken by worshippers
who assemble every Sunday morning
for the Eucharistic celebration.
"Collectively (they) saw (that is would
be) fitting and honourable in sight of
Almighty God for them to host a con-
cert," Father Burton said.
Catechist Bloneva Hunter and lay
reader Birthell Pratt worked closely
with Mr Errie and Menawattie
Samarroo, Guyana natives and educa-
tors, along with Mr Roy and Lucille
Bowers, United States citizens who
brought property and built a home on


Greenwood Beach in Port Howe.
The other supporting cast members
were Catechists Cedric and Olga
Wilson.
Eunice Pinder conducted the singing
of the various Christmas carols while
Geovano Bowe accompanied them on
the keyboard. After an intense four
weeks of practicing it was now time for
the producer, Father Burton, to say
"lights, camera, and action."
Life-sized animated animals such as a
sheep, cow and donkey were created by
the members of the parish.
On the day of the concert, the church
was packed to capacity and people
reflected on the original stable scene in
Bethlehem where the baby Jesus
was born.
Visitors from Greenwood Resort,
Hawk's Nest Resort and Fernandez Bay
Resort came to experience beautiful
singing and the dramatisation of the
greatest story ever told.
The treat of the night was when three
German tourists sang "Silent Night" in
their native language.
And the audience fell in love with the
parish's own Dynamite Daisymae
Hunter who emceed the grand
Christmas Cantata.
Dynamite Daisy skated around the
church asking people to give generously
for the stellar renditions that were being
performed.
At the conclusion of the concert every
person was presented with a free com-
pact disc loaded with devotional and
meditative Christian Christmas music
generously donated by Edison and
Eunice Pinder whose task it is to take
the message of the gospel to all govern-
ment schools in Cat Island.
The gathering was then invited to the
former teacher's residence owned by the
government in Port Howe which has
been selected to be turned into a hurri-
cane shelter.
"However, the government of the
Bahamas has refused to carry out the
necessary repairs, but this arduous
task has been manfully adopted by the
membership of St Mark's. In an effort to
secure the aesthetic beauty of the pala-
tial edifice, St Mark's members have


MEMBERS of St Mark's Anglican Church in Port Howe, Cat Island, sing Christmas
music.


bravely and conscientiously painted the
interior and exterior walls of the former
teacher's residence so the market value
of the property that St. Mark's sits on
does not depreciate because of the close
proximity of the dilapidated teacher's
lodge," Father Burton said.
He joked that after completing so


many repairs on the teacher's home they
can now rename it the "St Mark's
Anglican Church Parish Hall Facility."
Father Burton thanked his multi-tal-
ented members for all their work.
All members of the congregation are
now eagerly awaiting next year's Second
Annual St Mark's Christmas Cantata.




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