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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01465
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: December 9, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
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Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Holding Location: University of Florida
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Volume: 106 No.16


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


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Judge overturns

pastor appointment

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
A JUDGE yesterday overturned the appointment of
Rev Diana Francis as pastor-elect of First Baptist Church.
Rev Francis, host of the show "U Gat Issues", had
been installed in the position in December 2007 by her
father, the Rev Earle Francis, head pastor of First Bap-
tist Church, Market Street South. Rev Harold Bodie, a
founding member of the church which now reportedly has
some 400 members, opposed the appointment. Rev Bod-
ie, who was backed by some members of the church,
had sought a Supreme Court declaration that Rev Diana
SEE page seven


* Man has fingers cut off

* Teenagers are stabbed

* Gunman shoots pair


A PETROL station work-
er had his fingers cut off with a
chainsaw, two teenagers were
stabbed, and two men were
shot as violence surged across
New Providence.
The Texaco service station
employee had his fingers sev-
ered with a chainsaw when he
got into an argument with a
man installing security bars at
the service station in Shirley
Street just after noon on Mon-
day.
His middle and right finger
were cut off and he was rushed
to hospital while police were
called. The suspect fled the


area and is still being hunted
by police.
The incident was just two
hours after armed robbers
held up an Outback Steak-
house employee outside the
East Bay Street restaurant.
The employee was carry-
ing a business deposit bag out
of the back door when four
men pulled up in a black car.
Two men armed with shotguns
jumped out and ordered him
to lie on the ground.
They took the deposit bag
containing an undetermined
SEE page 12


Immigration Dept gives court warning
for those who 'refuse or fail' to pay
By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
HAVING upped the ante in 2009 on collecting monies owed
to it, the Immigration Department warned yesterday that it is
now set to take companies and individuals who continue to
"refuse or fail" to pay-up to court.
Despite focused attention on the recovery of $1,746,140
which should have been paid to the government for Immigra-
tion-related services, officials yesterday revealed that $1,354,074
SEE page seven





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By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net
WEARY travellers
returning to Nassau on
the Bahamas Celebra-
tion cruise ship were
forced to wait all day for
an understaffed Cus-
toms department to
inspect thousands of
bags belonging to
returning Bahamians
yesterday.
An angry passenger
on the ship from Fort
Lauderdale to Nassau
reported chaotic scenes
at Prince George Wharf
in downtown Nassau as
more than 200 locals
were forced to wait on
the dock while five
Bahamas Customs offi-
cers searched more than
2,000 bags.
The Bahamian cruise
passenger was one of
SEE page 12


Court set to decide on bid to Social workers


wind-up NIB over cash claim


By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
THE COURT of Appeal
is expected to decide by
next week on an appeal by a
man seeking to wind-up the
National Insurance Board
over a multi-billion dollar
claim.


Anthony Wright, 58,
claims that NIB never prop-
erly paid him for an on the
job injury he suffered
almost 30 years ago in
Grand Bahama. Mr Wright,
who represented himself in
the appellate court yester-
day, has appealed a ruling
SEE page seven


Police Constable in
court accused of rape
A POLICE Constable accused of rape was arraigned in Magis-
trate's Court yesterday.
Daniel Paul Smith, 21, of Hawthorne Road, Oakes Field, appeared
before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court 1, Bank Lane, yes-
terday charged with the rape of a 19-year-old girl. According to court
dockets, Smith is accused of committing the offence on Monday, Sep-
tember 28. Twelve witnesses are listed on court dockets.
Smith, who was not required to enter a plea to the charge, was
granted $10,000 bail and ordered to report to the Southern Police
Station every Saturday before 6pm. The case was adjourned to
December 15 and transferred to Court 10, Nassau Street.


stage sick-out
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - About 40
disgruntled social workers at
the Department of Social
Services staged a sick-out on
Tuesday.
Although the action was
unauthorised by the union,
John Curtis, area vice presi-
dent of the Bahamas Public
Services Union, said that
there are a number of press-
ing issues affecting social
workers in Freeport.
"This (the sick-out) was
not orchestrated by the
union, but we are very sup-
portive of the staff because
their concerns have not been
addressed by the relevant
government officials," he
said.
There are some 45 social
SEE page 12


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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Rise in complaints



over marriages



of 'convenience' L


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
THE number of com-
plaints of Bahamians getting
married to foreigners for
"convenience" is on the rise,
warned Immigration Direc-
tor Jack Thompson.
Immigration officials have
issued a stern warning that
such behaviour is "very seri-
ous" and must stop.
"I wish to state for the
record that wherever we find
marriages of convenience
happening and if it can be
proven we shall to the full
extent of the law have the


matter dealt with," said
Immigration Director Jack
Thompson.
The Immigration chief said
he has received some "trou-
bling" information relating
to individuals soliciting
Bahamians to marry them or
their foreign relatives so that
they can get "status" bene-
fits, such as a spousal work
permit giving them the right
to be employed in this coun-
try.
Meanwhile, the depart-
ment is seeing more and
more marriages of people
who have "met on the Inter-
net or for the first time at a
social occasion."


"We've received lots of
complaints. Something is def-
initely up," said Mr Thomp-
son, noting a case recently
brought to his attention of a
foreign mother residing in
The Bahamas who is "look-
ing for a Bahamian to marry
her daughter."
Providing further evidence
of such unions, Senior
Deputy Director Roderick
Bowe revealed that the
Department of Immigration
has "a file" of letters from
individuals who claimed they
were not paid the amount
they were promised for
agreeing to marry a foreign-
er for "convenience", in
which they subsequently
implored the government to
take away or deny that per-
son the status they were
seeking to achieve.
Mr Thompson expressed
further concern that there
may be an organised effort
under way to facilitate such
marriages.
"Suffice it to say that if this
is a business going on I pray
to God that it comes to a
screeching halt," said the
Director, who added that
people must remember that
jnul d1lgc is sacred" and
should be entered into "for
love."
He said that while it is
"difficult to pio o ' if mar-

TROP~kl' ICA


DIRECTOR OF IMMIGRATION Jack Thompson and head of Family Island administration Donald Clarke


address the media yesterday.

riages are valid, the depart-
ment wants the public to
know that they are keeping a
keen eye out for such
unions.
"We want the public to
know that we are up on it,
we are aware of it, and those
persons will be dealt with."
Under Bahamian law, a
foreign individual who mar-
ries a Bahamian has the right
to get a spousal work permit,
and can later apply for per-
manent residency and citi-
zenship.
When such applications
for spousal status are made,
an official from the Depart-
ment of Immigration will go
to the couple's house to
ascertain if the relationship is
genuine.
Officials will seek to deter-
mine if the pair are in fact
living together, and they and
other family members and
friends will also undergo an
interview where they will be
asked certain questions by
which the official would seek
to ascertain whether the cou-
ple really kniii ' each other.


1,750 feer peopl

reatitegta g20


ALTHOUGH 1,750
fewer people have been
repatriated by the Immi-
gration Department so far
this year than were sent
home by the end of 2008,
officers there say the
Bahamas must be ready in
case of a surge in illegal
immigrants around the new
year.
According to Senior
Deputy Director Roderick
Bowe, 5,254 people have
been repatriated from the
Bahamas this year at a cost
of $2,987,316.34.
By the end of 2008, 7,000
people were sent back to
their home countries.
Given that many of
those came to the Bahamas
around the end of last year,
Mr Bowe said an influx
could again be on its way.
In the two week period
leading up to January 7,
2009, more than 670
Haitians were detained.


Officials cited favourable
wind conditions and the
harsh aftermath of four
hurricanes ravaging the
island during the 2008 hur-
ricane season as possible
catalysts for the surge.
"We're not sure (if it
will happen again), so
we're going to be vigilant
in that regard," said the
deputy director yesterday.
Of those who were sent
home in 2009 so far, 4,692
were returned to Haiti and
348 to Jamaica.
Smaller groups were
sent back to other coun-
tries.
Today, a further 115
people are scheduled to fly
back to Haiti onboard a
Bahamasair flight courtesy
of the Department of
Immigration, bringing the
number of people being
housed at the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre
down to 150.


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MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News........................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,12
Editorial/Letters .................................... P4
Sports........................................ P9,10,11
BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION
Business.................................... P1,2,3,4,5
A dvts ................................................. P6,7
C om ics.................................................. P8
Taste...................................................... P9,1 0
A rts..................................................... P 11,12

BAHAMAS INT'L FILMS 4 PAGES

CLASSIFIED SECTION 28 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES


TO DICS TREINTI AELGO OWWTIUE4.O


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+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3


Illegal immigrants moving out of 7


shanty towns as Bahamians move in? >4

z tDirector of Immigration believes

HL. -. warning has led to problematic 'shift'


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
THE director of Immigra-
tion believes his department's
warning that it was set to
tackle unauthorised shanty
towns has caused some ille-
gal immigrants to move out
of such areas - while some
Bahamians are moving in.
Jack Thompson said the
department has seen a prob-
lematic "shift" in this regard.
"We've made it known that
we intend to deal with it and
obviously some have got the
message. Our information is
that some of them have
moved from unauthorised
communities into other loca-
tions," said Mr Thompson.
The growing numbers of
Bahamians taking up resi-
dence in these "shanty" or
"slum" communities repre-
sents another "twist" to the
state of affairs with which the
department is forced to grap-
ple.
"There are lots of Bahami-
ans living with people who
are living illegally in this
country," added the director.
Meanwhile, new unautho-
rised communities such as
those that have plagued the
country for years continue to
be created.
"On a daily basis there are
complaints here and in the
Family Islands of towns pop-
ping up. There are people
constructing houses, huts,
whatever you want to call
them. They don't own the
land, they don't have building
permits, they are not sanitary,


there are health issues.
"They are breaking every
law in the book. What we
also have is lots of people
here illegally working and
residing in these communi-
ties."
While emphatically
describing this state of affairs
as "unacceptable" Mr
Thompson admitted that thus
far an inter-agency committee
spearheaded by the depart-
ment - with representatives
from Immigration, the Min-
istries of Housing and Works,
the Department of Lands and
Surveys and shortly, the
police and Attorney Gener-
al's Office - has not had
many concrete achievements
in reducing the number of
these communities since its
formation earlier this year.
"We've not met as many
times as I would have liked.
It's hard to get all of those
senior people together," he
said.
However, the director
intends that the committee
will now "zone in" on the
problem.
"These communities are
unacceptable in the Bahamas
we believe we need to deal
with it head on - if not there
will be more problems down
the road."
Mr Thompson was provid-
ing an update on the Immi-
gration Department's efforts
towards fulfilling its mandate
this year.


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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


EIOI AULETE S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and AI c, tiinmn') 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


A Commissioner who enforced the law


RETIRED Police Commissioner Regi-
nald Ferguson is not ashamed to admit
that he is a law enforcement officer who
has no problem with enforcing the law.
One would have thought the nation
would have embraced such a man, espe-
cially when unity is needed now more than
ever before to get a growing criminal ele-
ment under control.
But not so. Certainly, not in the opinion
of the Opposition PLP, which since 2002
has used every stratagem to sideline Mr
Ferguson.
But why? Is it because there are politi-
cians who believe they should be able to
influence the Commissioner of Police? If
so, we can see why Mr Ferguson would
be an embarrassing inconvenience. Here is
a man who has the nerve and the will to
follow an investigation wherever it leads
him, regardless of who might be involved.
"That's the very thing they are afraid of,"
said someone close to the manoeuvring.
We recall the PLP days of the late Sir
Lynden Pindling. One only has to read
the 1984 Commission of Inquiry report
into drug peddling to know what was hap-
pening within the force in those days. We
recall Magistrate Wilton Hercules (1968-
'77), a no nonsense magistrate, who on his
retirement ran into Tribune publisher, the
late Sir Etienne Dupuch, on Cayman
Islands' Five Mile Beach early one morn-
ing. The former magistrate talked freely of
the political interference he had to endure
during his magistracy in the Bahamas in
the Pindling years. Magistrate Hercules
was no pushover. And so, like Mr Fergu-
son, he was not welcome. They were men
who did what justice required - friendship
was not allowed to cloud their vision.
In The Tribune on Tuesday, PLP chair-
man Bradley Roberts, denied that his
apparent animosity for now retired Com-
missioner Ferguson had anything to do
with an investigation into rape allegations
against him several years ago. The allega-
tions were later dropped.
During the Christie administration Mr
Ferguson, as deputy, was next in line on
the retirement of Commissioner Paul Far-
quharson, now Bahamas High Commis-
sioner to the UK.
However, during those years Mr Fer-
guson had several delicate cases to inves-
tigate, to which, it was claimed, the gov-
erning PLP would have preferred to have
turned a blind eye. But not Mr Ferguson.
He was in charge of investigations and he


intended to leave no clue unexamined.
One of the cases - a murder case-
was indeed delicate. There was debate at
the time as to whether two men would be
charged together. In the end it was decid-
ed that one would be charged first. When
his case was completed, he would be used
as a witness against the second person,
who in the end was never charged. How-
ever, the first man, found guilty, appealed
his case. This suspended all further action
that might have been considered against
the second man. In the meantime, the first
man was released from prison pending his
appeal. But death intervened. His body
was found with a fatal bullet wound. As far
as we recall his attacker was never found.
The proposed case against the second man
went to the grave with the first man. There
were other cases better left unnoticed. But
Mr Ferguson refused to leave them.
Before the Christie government was
voted out of office in 2007 it flooded the
police force with 10 additional assistant
commissioners - later cut in half by the
Ingraham administration. Deputy Com-
missioner Ferguson was sidelined to the
Police Training College to perform a job,
which according to Prime Minister Ingra-
ham, was usually assigned to a superin-
tendent. This removed him from promo-
tion to commissioner of police.
However, Deputy Commissioner Fer-
guson out-foxed the schemers. Instead of
going to the College, he went on leave.
This removed him from the political scene
during the 2007 election. He returned to
duty after the election. Mr Ingraham was
now Prime Minister, Police Commissioner
Farquharson retired, and Deputy Com-
missioner Ferguson took his place.
It was claimed at the time that the PLP
did not want Mr Ferguson to have the top
job because his brother, Johnley Fergu-
son, was chairman of the FNM.
But those of us with some knowledge of
what was going on behind the scenes did
not buy into that explanation.
You see, Mr Ferguson's main failing
was that he was not a political animal. He
was just a law enforcement officer, who
had no problem enforcing the law.
However, if crime is to be turned
around in this country this is the type of
man who must replace him. The new Com-
missioner will only be respected and can
only be effective if he treats all persons
- regardless of political party, or social
position - as equal before the law.


Allow authentically



Bahamian vendors on


Bay Street on
EDITOR, The Tribune. * - R I


Please allow me a few
moments to voice a concern.
On Sunday past, I attended the
Authentically Bahamian Craft
Show held at the Wyndham
Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace
Casino. The displays as well as
the array and quality of prod-
ucts far exceeded my expecta-
tions.
There were items on every
booth that I could have easily
purchased had I a big enough
bag or sufficient funds on me
to do so. Everything from
beautifully handmade ladies
bags made out of burlap bear-
ing personally designed stamps,
an assortment of straw craft
items, paintings by local artists,
finely crafted handmade jew-
ellery made from semi-precious
stones, souvenir items made out
of coconut husk and conch
shells, and of course an assort-
ment of jams, jellies, cakes and
candies. I am sure I missed
something. Needless to say, I
have never seen such beautiful
workmanship on display by
local vendors, some hailing
from our Out Islands.
My concern of course are
based on several conversations
that I had with the various ven-
dors, some from the Out
Islands while walking around
the show. While doing a little
shopping of my own, I began
asking myself several questions:
How can these folks vend more
of these items - especially the
ones traveling from the Out
Islands?
Why aren't more locals and
tourists out here making Christ-
mas purchases? Are the vari-
ous products being bundled and
offered online to the World?
and on and on I mused. I then
made inquiries from the ven-
dors themselves, some of whom
are my friends, as to whether
the Ministry of Tourism and
Aviation (Show Organisers)
intended on transporting the
entire show somewhere close
to the Cruise Port this coming
Friday for the arrival of the
World's largest cruise ship, the
Oasis. I got a resounding NO
from everyone I spoke to,
including Ministry officials. I
asked if there was a plan in
place to offer to these vendors
another opportunity to vend
their products. What I was told
left me very confused, stunned
and asking myself, are we (the
Government or those responsi-
ble for this particular decision)
really serious about Bahamians
and their collective abilities
when it comes to showcasing
talents?
I was told that once again,
the Cultural and Heritage Site
at Arawak Cay has been cho-
sen as the site to house the ven-
dors. Keep in mind this was the
site chosen when the second
largest cruise ship - The
Dream called on our ports a
few weeks ago. If you had the
opportunity to visit the Culture
and Heritage Site at Arawak
Cay, you would have been very
disappointed. If one hundred


I


tourists passed through, it
would have been plenty. Ven-
dors were not patronized by
cruise passengers or locals at
an appreciable level.
Many were reported to have
lamented that the location was
just too far removed from the
point where they disembarked.
Additionally, they would have
had to take a taxi to that loca-
tion, that's money, then spend
additional funds on craft and
other souvenir items, take a taxi
back to the docks - more
money. In short, I am thinking
that the money spent on vari-
ous local bands, etc, could have
been money put to better use
particularly since there was no
return on the investment by vis-
itor spending. When the ports
have officially been relocated,
this particular venue will
become a mute point. But until
then, let's stop throwing good
money behind bad ideas.
Here is my suggestion, and
one that is supported by every-
one I conversed with. Why not
recreate the setting used dur-
ing the Junkanoo Summer Fes-
tivals held this past summer,
where the western end of
Prince George Wharf was
blocked off to vehicular traf-
fic? Erect temporary booths
along with staging. Allow the
Authentically Bahamian Craft
Artisans and Bahamian Musi-
cians to vend their products to
the 8,500 or potential 10,000 (if
the employees were to disem-
bark as well) visitors cruising
in on the largest cruise ship in
the World, the Oasis, this com-
ing Friday.
The benefits are many. We
are talking about a once-in-a-
lifetime opportunity for all
involved. Visitors get an oppor-
tunity to purchase Authentic
Bahamian products made using
the highest quality, and the ven-
dors get an opportunity to
make some money. (Many of
them did not do so well this
past weekend at the hotel). Vis-
itors are also treated to live
Bahamian entertainment. Nat-
urally, Bahamians can also ben-
efit from the wonderful display
of superior product offerings.
There is also the question of
offering to cruise owners and
passengers, tighter security
because of the insular sur-
roundings. More Police Offi-
cers can be deployed in this
smaller area. Perhaps, we can
do a small You Tube video of
this setting on upload to the
internet as a means of counter-
ing the recent negative publici-
ty associated with cruise pas-
sengers.
Some have asked what will
become of the taxi drivers, sur-
rey drivers, and shops on Bay
Street, the Straw (big joke)
Market, the local excursionists,
and others. A coupon or vouch-
er system can be developed and
offered to visitors (one per fam-


Friday
ily) at the point where they dis-
embark. This coupon or vouch-
er offers a modest $5 off the
regular taxi or surrey fare if
used to take an island tour or a
scenic ride of Historic Nassau,
or even a visit to a local restau-
rant - perhaps on Arawak
Cay. Participating drivers
should be allowed to redeem
the vouchers for their dollar
value as early as next week
from the Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation or the Ministry
of Finance. As far as shops on
Bay Street, this observation is
superfluous (without need of
explanation). There are over
50 retail shops on the Oasis.
Why would visitors purchase
on Bay Street? But if they wish
to, nothing, not even the Ven-
dor's Festival on Prince George
Wharf will stop them. As for
the Replica (counterfeit, forged,
some straw, sham) of a Mar-
ket, I remain mum. I will share
my personal thoughts on this
planned redevelopment at
another time. But honestly, is
vending cheap t-shirts with
"Hey Mon" and souvenirs
made anywhere else but The
Bahamas, what we ought to be
displaying to our guests? This
question is rhetorical. As for
the local excursionists, I could
hardly see how they would be
put out by having the visitors
concentrated in an area where
they normally do business.
Finally, lest I forget, the ven-
dors in Festival Place can relo-
cate for this one day event.
My recommendations seem
to be a win, win solution for all
involved.
Have I missed something? If
so, would someone from the
Ministry of Tourism and Avia-
tion please help me to under-
stand? Thanks.
Dr. Sophia Rolle
Nassau,
December, 2009.




EDITOR, The Tribune.
Very well-written article
Tribune Bahamas (Editorial,
Monday, December 7)! I
couldn't have said it better
myself. You hit the nail on
the head with the hammer. I
surely can't blame Mr. Ingra-
ham for all of the wrongdo-
ing and conditions with the
economy, but the corruption
of greed amongst public offi-
cials must stop. The Bahami-
an economy does depend
greatly on foreign affairs;
currently, this issue must be
resolved internally by the
United States. Things will
get better for everyone.
Overall, I enjoyed the article
and agree totally with your
valued point of view. Well
done!
KEITH THOMPSON
Nassau,
December 7, 2009


NOTICE is hereby given that APPLYS ALBERTA of
Wellington Road #29, P.O. BOX N-356, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 2thday of December, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




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THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 5


LOCALN


Fire investigators

seeking cause

of prison blaze
FIRE investigators were
still on the scene at Her
Majesty's Prison, Fox Hill
yesterday trying to deter-
mine what started a blaze in
the D Block of the institu-
tion that resulted in "exten-
sive damage" to a laundry
room.
While no lives were
threatened by the fire, the
interior of the
bathroom/laundry area, in
particular the ceiling, sus-
tained significant damage,
according to Director of Fire
Services Jeffrey Deleveaux.
It was around 5.30pm on
Monday when the blaze
broke out in the prison's
Female Correctional Centre
and four fire trucks rushed to
the scene through the after-
noon traffic.
Inmates were "immediate-
ly and safely evacuated and
secured," a release from
Prison Superintendent Ellis-
ton Rahming said.
Mr Deleveaux was unable
to say when investigators
may be closer to knowing
the cause of the blaze.


Turnquest: Tribune headlines



focusing too much on crime


By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
MINISTER of National
Security Tommy Turnquest
has criticised The Tribune
over its headlines - which
he claims focus too much on
the rise in crime.
"I find that every single
day in The Tribune, with the
exception of one day last
week when you carried the
story about the elimination
of greenhouse gases in 15
years, that there is an 'action
word' in your headline -
whether it is 'crash', whether
it's 'kill'; whether it is 'steal',
whether it is 'rob', whether it
is 'smash'." Mr Turnquest
said in an exclusive inter-
view.
"And I have been watch-
ing it, and for a leading


national newspaper it does-
n't do much for the psyche
of our country," he said.
"I am always very reticent
about raising the topic,
because every time I raise
the topic the tables are


turned on me as if I am try-
ing to suppress the level of
crime in our country. I am
not trying to do that. I have
said over and repeatedly
that the level of crime in our
country is at an unaccept-
able level and I have given
reasons for it and I have giv-
en reasons for what I think
we ought to do in dealing
with it," he said.
Mr Turnquest added that
he has been by far the most
open and accommodating
minister of national security
in recent history in terms of
releasing statistics and infor-
mation to the press.
"Last week (The Tribune)
ran a story about armed rob-
beries being increased and
you used old statistics.
"Mind you, the more
recent statistics would have
made the matter more


grave. But the point I want
to raise is that you should
feel free to ask for what you
need.
"Sometimes in terms of
quarterly or more frequent
updates I will provide the
media with information. But
the one thing we don't want
to do in the Bahamas is
withhold information.
"What I would hope that
the national media would do
is report it in such a way that
it doesn't affect our
lifeblood of tourism.
"And by that I mean, if
everyday you have a sex and
violence story above the
fold, that will get into the
psyche of our people, and
now that you are on the
Internet and it goes around
the world, it is very difficult
to change," he said.
Noting that some coun-


tries around the world and
in the Caribbean suppress
crime statistics in the
"national interest", Mr
Turnquest said that the
Bahamas government on
the other hand provides sta-
tistics to the press "as we get
them."
"We don't massage the
numbers.
"What it is, it is. Because I
am trying as well to educate
the public so that they are
sensitised to these things so
that they can realise that all
of us together need to work
to get things back on track.
"The major aspect of it
from my point of view are
the parents. I have seen
young, 13, 14 and 15 year
olds roaming the streets at
night and I oftentimes ask
myself, where are their par-
ents?"


Engineers challenged to help country

mitigate the effects of climate change


ENVIRONMENT Minister Earl
Deveaux challenged Bahamian engineers
to come up with ways to help the country
mitigate the effects of climate change,
dwindling energy supplies, and the chang-
ing demographics of the world's popula-
tion.
These three factors will greatly impact
the country for a long time to come, he
said during the Bahamas Society of Engi-
neers 2009 Officers Installation Awards
Ceremony on Friday.
"In my view, engineers and their inter-
action with the design of buildings,
bridges and roads, and the location of
subdivisions, and the development of
subdivisions, can assist immeasurably in
how the Bahamas, which is one of the
lowest lying states and one of the most
vulnerable in the world, will mitigate and
manage the effect of climate change."
It has been clearly established that
the world's energy supply is finite and


the resources are dwindling, he stressed.
"We import close to 100 per cent of
our energy supplies and use fossil fuel
and our country has one of the largest
carbon footprints in the history of the
Caribbean.
"Yet, in the Bahamas, we have access
to an abundance of wind, wave, and solar
energy."
-J







energy.''


Dr Deveaux said it is his quest to
inspire Bahamian engineers to design
buildings, appliances, and facilities that
will accommodate this abundance of
energy.
"Around the year 2050, the world's
population is estimated to stop growing
at approximately nine and a half billion."
China recently became a nation whose
number of individual cars exceeded the
number in America, he noted.
"Can our world continue to use auto-
mobiles at that rate?
"Can we live in a greener, cleaner
world? Can our lifestyle be accommo-
dated with sustainable energy? I think it
can," Dr Deveaux said.
"Even though I am not one of you, I
believe the smartest people in the world
have an obligation to help us achieve a
state where we are greener."


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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


1 Bank of The Bahamas
INTERNATIONAL


GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED
ADVANCED
EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME


In ctllaboraliun with Thi Education Guaranteed Fund Loan
Program of the Ministry of Education, the Bank of The
Bahamas Limited is pleased to advise that the cheque
dishurnement for ALL students in the Loan Program will take
place at Holy Trinity Activity Centre, Stapledon Gardens,
New Providence, beginning Monday, December 7 to Friday,
December 11, 2009 from 9:00 a.m. to 300 p.m. as follows:



ALL STUDENTS



A-C Monday, December 7, 2009
D-I Tuesday, December 8, 2009
J-M Wednesday, December 9, 2009
N-Smith Thursday, December 10,2009
Spence-Z Friday, December 11,2009


TIME: 9:iX) a.n, - 3:iX) p.m.
PLACE: Holy Trinity Activity Centre
Stapledon Gardens

* All Students and/or Guarantors should be present
and must bring relevant identification, (valid Passport
and National Insurance Card).



* All accounts must be current and all necessary
documentation completed before cheques are
released.

DISBURSEMENTS MADE AT
THE BANK WILL INCUR A PENALTY FEE!


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TAXI drivers are vowing
to fighting for the right to
remain on Bay Street in defi-
ance of what they believe is
an ongoing conspiracy by
tourism stakeholders to
remove them from the busy
downtown area.
The Bahamas Taxi Cab
Union is calling on taxi dri-
vers to unite in response to
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham's suggestion that they
park on Bay Street all day
without doing anything.
The union argues taxi dri-
vers are forced to hustle in
the centre of Nassau because
of the drop in business owing
to the global recession.
If removed from down-
town, their business would
wither up completely, union
president Leon Griffin main-
tains. He believes the prime
minister's attitude confirms
an ongoing conspiracy to
ensure stakeholders in the
tourism industry get the bulk
of the visitor transport busi-
ness and eventually remove
taxi drivers from Bay Street.
This strategy is reminiscent
of the Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation's 1991 attempt to
impose an endorsement poli-
cy and fee on those provid-
ing products and services to
its members, he said.
An uprising by Majestic
Tours operator William Saun-
ders, Dupuch Publications'
Pierre Dupuch, former
Tourism Minister Obie Wilch-
combe and others halted the
move.
Now, some elements within
the National Tourism Devel-
opment Board (NTDB) is
attempting to exclude
unfavourablee" members
such as taxi drivers and straw
vendors from the new Nassau


S-

4-w


B Busin ess
Improve-
ment District
(NBID), Mr
claimed.
He fears
Hubert the NBID's
Ingraham proposal to
sign a con-
tract with the government will
pave the way for a board of
directors predominated by
private sector property and
business owners who can
charge fees to other service
providers who operate down-
town, such as taxi drivers.
Mr Griffin said: "The
NBID was organised without
the knowledge or sanction of
the NTDB and comprises
only certain members of the
NTDB and the government.
"Taxi drivers, straw ven-
dors, independent operators
and others are not represent-
ed on the NBID and are not
privy to decisions made by
them."

Downtown
He fears the NBID will
control downtown Nassau as
suggested in a document pre-
sented to Cabinet, but not
shown to NTDB members
upon request. "This covers
the whole matter in a shroud
of conspiracy and mistrust
and demonstrates a lack of
transparency and account-
ability," the union president
added.
"It is absolutely amazing, a
project for the redevelopment


of Nassau could be hijacked
by a few special interest per-
sons, supported by the elected
government, to the exclusion
and detriment of others, push-
ing once again a programme
to impose taxes or fees on
those who wish to provide
products and services in the
City of Nassau; a clear throw-
back to the 1991 BHA
endorsement policy."
Taxi cab union members
and straw vendors were fur-
ther excluded from a meeting
about the downtown redevel-
opment and port relocation
chaired by Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symonette in
July 2007, Mr Griffin said.
This meant they could not
contribute to discussions
about parking downtown and
the revitalisation of Bay
Street. Mr Griffin said: "This
ongoing pre-occupation and
conspiracy to remove hard-
working business persons
from Bay Street - just so
another set of hardworking
business persons can have all
the economic pie - must stop.
"Like the straw vendors
who stood up for their rights
when threatened to be
removed from Bay Street, we
taxi drivers will also stand up
for our rights. We are a part
of the historical development
of this country and the cul-
tural makeup of the down-
town experience. We will not
be moved by those who con-
tinually seek more for them-
selves to the exclusion of
those who in many cases are
struggling to make ends
meet."


,,.Dec. 6th- Cnristmas Family Affaii Servico i;-^
lDec. 3th: Sunday School Christmas Production.
,.,Dec. 20h: Candlelight Service -.
Dec. 27tri: Adult Choir Christmas Production
...Sunday Evenings 6:30 p.rn.





SUNDAY SERVICES
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Cabbies fear move to drive them from downtown area


." i .,i . /







+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 7


LOCALN


FROM page one

by Senior Justice John
Lyons. In a ruling handed
down on February 19,
Senior Justice Lyons had
dismissed his petition on the
grounds that it was "frivo-
lous and vexatious" stating
that the amounts Mr Wright
claimed "bear no semblance
of reality." Senior Justice
Lyons also found that NIB
could only be dissolved by
parliament.
Mr Wright, who filed the
"wind-up" petition in March
of last year, contends that
NIB owes him billions of
dollars in back-pay, medical
bills and settlement money
after a 1982 accident on the
premises of his former job
with the now dissolved
Franklin Chemicals in
Grand Bahama. Mr Wright
claimed that he suffered a
fall that left him with a rup-
tured disc and damage to
the soft tissue of his back.
Mr Wright told the court
yesterday that NIB owed a
debt of more than $70 bil-
lion. Mr Wright contended
that despite the order dis-
missing his petition, the
judge had previously found
that he was entitled to the
wind-up order and that the
sum was undisputed. Wright
claimed that he had paid for
a copy of the courts tran-


Court set to decide on bid to wind-up NIB


scripts but had been unsuc-
cessful in getting them.
Attorney Deidre May-
cock-Clarke, who appeared
with attorney Heather May-
nard for NIB, said that the


claims against NIB were not
valid and that there was no
debt outstanding to Mr
Wright. Mr Wright con-
tended, however, that he
never received medical care


under NIB until 14 years
after the accident and also
noted that he had even been
on welfare.
"I didn't want it to come
to this," Mr Wright told the


court. Dame Joan said told
him that the court under-
stood his complaint against
NIB and its failure to hon-
our its commitment. Dame
Joan said that the court


would take the matter
under advisement and
would make the matter a
priority. She said that the
court would seek to give its
decision by December 18.


mmu[II DEDING WORK InAH EAD OFCRUISEARIA


'-3

A
4


/7


, �


WITH JUST two days before the
world's largest cruise ship, the Oasis
of the Seas, arrives in the Bahamas,
(ied(Iinl(Ig WVoN k Conlintled inl Nassau
Hairbou, eseida,.











. .Bga~H^j^ g


I,.


Immigration Dept gives court warning

for those who 'refuse or fail' to pay

FROM page one

remains outstanding in New Providence and Grand Bahama.
While some $353,003 has been recouped in New Providence
from 49 companies, the remaining 43 of 92 companies in New
Providence so far found to have been in debt to the department
still have not paid the amounts owed, leaving a total of $944,964
outstanding for this island alone.
In Grand Bahama, 140 companies were determined to be
owing $448,173, and up to November 27, 2009, just $39,063 had
been paid and collected by Immigration's Grand Bahama
enforcement unit - a figure with which Immigration Director
Jack Thompson said he was disappointed.
Mr Thompson said: "We're going to vigorously pursue the
money. It's a high priority of the department and we're pre-
pared to go to the next level."
He claims the department is prepared to "do what it has to
do", including taking the companies to court, after going
through the "proper procedure" in its attempt to recover the
funds. "We gave first and second notices," said Thompson.
Meanwhile, noting that a significant proportion of the debt
incurred arose from incidences where companies received let-
ters informing them that their application for approval to
employ a foreign worker was successful, but then failed to
make the necessary follow-up payment, Mr Thompson added
the Department intends to adjust the way it deals with appli-
cations to ensure this does not happen.
"We're going to have to change the way we do business,"
said the department chief. "Early next year we are going to
implement a new system to close the loophole," said Mr
Thompson.
He added that all companies that have yet to pay the funds
have been placed on a "delinquent list" identifying them as
organizations that can make no applications to the Department
until they are in full compliance.
It was at the time when the new management team headed
by Mr Thompson, Senior Deputy Director Roderick Bowe and
others was installed at the Department of Immigration last year
that audits were initiated to get a grip on the thousands of dol-
lars in funds owed to the government agency by companies that
had utilised its services.
Mr Thompson said it is "not fair" that certain companies
should have been allowed to get away with not paying the
funds they owe for work permits and other services while
other individuals find themselves forced to pay up.
At present, a further "forty to fifty" companies are being
scrutinised by the Department's delinquent unit to find out
what they may owe.


Judge overturns

pastor appointment


FROM page one
Francis' installation as pastor-
elect and co-pastor of the
church was null and void and
a contravention of article 16
of the association's memo-
randum. Rev Bodie had also
sought a declaration that all
positions of the church's exec-
utive board presently consti-
tuted by the appointment of
the pastor be null and void
and that all financial records
be turned over to him.
In her ruling yesterday Jus-
tice Cheryl Albury noted that
she had asked all the parties
involved to attempt to bring
about a resolution to the dis-
pute. Justice Albury ruled
that Rev Francis' installation
as pastor-elect was null and
void as it was in contraven-
tion of the association's mem-
orandum. Justice Albury,
however, upheld Rev Fran-
cis' appointment as co-pastor
as well as the executive board
appointments by Rev Earle
Francis as they predated the
amendments made after the
court action was initiated. Jus-
tice Albury also ruled against
turning over all financial
records of the church to Rev


Bodie. Rev Bodie and some
of the members as she point-
ed out, had expressed concern
over the lack of transparen-
cy of the church's financial
records. The judge said that
she had found nothing in the
evidence before her to sug-
gest that the demand would
be in conformity with the
church's memorandum and in
the interest of justice.
None of the parties wished
to comment after the ruling
yesterday, however, Rev Bod-
ie's lawyer, Romona Far-
quharson, said: "It has been a
long battle for Rev Bodie and
some of the other members
of the church. This is just the
first step."
Ms Farquharson said she
believes that there will be
another proposal for Rev
Diana Francis to be made
pastor.
"I don't see this being the
end," she said. Ms Farquhar-
son said she will advise her
client to ask the Bahamas
Baptist Union of Churches to
step in and ensure that the
process is properly done.
Rev Francis and her father
were represented by lawyer
Sharon Wilson.


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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Preventing catastrophic climate


PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham and Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux fly to
Denmark next week for a land-
mark world conference aimed
at tackling what some have
called "the most complex col-
lective challenge humanity has
ever confronted."
It's not about the war on ter-
ror or the global recession. The
challenge is to prevent cata-
strophic climate change by "de-
carbonising" economic growth.
In other words, cutting our
almost total reliance on the
burning of fossil fuels (oil gas
and coal), which is pumping
greenhouse gases into the
atmosphere at an alarming rate.
There are significant - and
manageable - costs involved
in this effort. But the good thing
about action to address climate


change is that it presents
unprecedented opportunities for
the world in terms of energy
security, pollution control, tech-
nology innovation and sustain-
able development.
Ingraham and Deveaux will
join more than 100 government
leaders (including US President
Barack Obama) and 15,000 oth-
er attendees from around the
world at the United Nations
summit in Copenhagen, which
got underway this past weekend
and closes on December 18.


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been struck off the Register.




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BAYSIDE GROUP

INVESTMENTS LTD.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of BAYSIDE GROUP IN-
VESTMENT LTD. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Their goal is to strike a major
political deal that will control
the world's carbon emissions for
the next decade.
Bahamian interests are being
pursued through CARICOM,
which strongly backs a compre-
hensive agreement at Copen-
hagen; and the Alliance of Small
Island States (AOSIS), a group
of 39 countries that are espe-
cially vulnerable to sea level rise.
All but three CARICOM coun-
tries are small island states and
can be expected to benefit from
significant international funding
aimed at mitigating the impacts
of climate change.
A technical team from the
Bahamas, led by BEST Com-
mission chief Philip Weech, is
already in Copenhagen. He is
joined by Tiska Francis of the
Bahamas Mission to the UN;
Arthur Rolle of the Met Office
in Nassau; and Frank Davis of
the Bahamas High Commission
in London. Teresa Butler, a
senior policy advisor to the gov-
ernment, will accompany the
prime minister and environment
minister to the high-level talks
on December 15.
The aim is to have the new
land planning bill - which
addresses coastal protection
issues - passed by the House of
Assembly before the prime min-
ister leaves for Copenhagen,
where he will press the case
relating to the effects of global
warming on the Bahamas. These
impacts include more destruc-
tive weather patterns, coral
bleaching, and rising sea levels,
which threaten the survival of
low-lying island nations through-
out the Caribbean and Pacific
regions.
"I will share with the inter-
national community in Copen-
hagen the efforts The Bahamas
has already taken at home, as
well as the broader environ-
mental strategy the administra-
tions I have been privileged to
lead have vigorously pursued
over three non-consecutive
terms," the prime minister told
me earlier this week.
"While Copenhagen is a sig-
nificant event, the considerable
efforts needed to address cli-
mate change must, and will, con-
tinue beyond that summit," he
said. "The media here at home
can play an important role in
informing and educating the
Bahamian people on this issue
of extraordinary global and
national challenges. My govern-
ment proposes to do the same
over the course of the months
and years ahead."
A little background is in
order here. Experts say that
without immediate action the
world may lose its ability to con-


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tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
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tion has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register.




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IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


tain atmospheric warming to
below 2 degrees Celsius. Any-
thing beyond that, scientists
say, will present a severe
danger to human society.
Droughts, floods, stronger I
storms and sea level rise ,
would impact millions of
people, damage ecosys-
tems and spur massive
migrations, with all the
conflicts that would imply.
The Bahamas and
CARICOM are calling foi
even stronger action L- o
keep the average global tem-
perature rise to under 1.5
degrees Celsius and set a more
aggressive emissions reduction
timeline. For example, AOSIS
has proposed that the global
deal to replace the Kyoto Pro-
tocol in 2012 should close in
2017, enabling a post-2017
agreement to respond directly
to the next report of the Inter-
governmental Panel on Climate
Change - due in early 2014.
In 2005, world emissions
from fuel combustion were 27.1
Gigatons and are projected to
rise by almost 60 per cent to 42
Gigatons in 2030 if policies don't
change. To prevent greenhouse
gases from rising to levels that
pass the point of no return, we
need to cut emissions by at least
17 Gigatons below projections
within a decade. Recent
research by McKinsey & Co
concludes that this is achievable
through energy efficiency mea-
sures, low-carbon energy tech-
nologies, and forest preserva-
tion - but the window of
opportunity is closing fast.
There is no scientific debate
any more about the key facts of
climate change. But critics argue
that the effects are overstated
and the cost to achieve carbon
reductions is too high. Others
think there should be no limits
to economic growth and reject
the notion that an expanding
carbon economy has negative
consequences. And then there
are the extremists who believe
that the whole issue has been
cooked up by scientists and
politicians seeking to establish
an oppressive world govern-
ment.
But the weight of evidence
makes it clear that the question
is not whether we can afford to
act, but whether we can afford
not to. The International Ener-
gy Agency - a monitoring body
set up by 28 industrial countries
following the 1973 Arab oil
embargo - has identified the
prospect of rising oil demand
and higher prices from a busi-
ness as usual approach as a seri-
ous threat to the world econo-
my, just as it is beginning to
recover. Unless we reduce our
reliance on fossil fuels, that is
just one of the risks we face.
According to the IEA the
world needs to spend an extra
$500 billion on clean energy
every year from now until 2030
to keep atmospheric greenhouse
gases within safe limits and
avoid an oil supply crunch. But


-M..


changee

According to IEA Deputy
E \Eecutive Director Richard
I> nes, "It requires only about
1.5 per cent of world GDP
in additional investment
over more than 20 years.
We are trying to break
the connection between
economic growth and fos-
sil fuel demand by invest-
ment in new technology,
but you need everything
- all the oil and gas and
new technologies you can
c m'ne up with."
The key, most experts say, is
i I u,,e a combination of cap-and-
trade systems, taxes and regu-
lation to curb demand for fossil
fuels and reward the develop-
ment of clean energy technolo-
gies. A recent report from
Bruegel, a Brussels-based think
tank, says we should do much
more to encourage innovation
and investment in green
research and development -
by setting a price on carbon and
using the receipts to subsidise
clean tech development.
Electricity and transporta-
tion are the two core sectors of
the economy, accounting for 40
per cent and 25 per cent respec-
tively of global energy-related
emissions. The IEA says the
issue of power-related emissions
is especially pressing in devel-
oping countries like the
Bahamas, where demand
growth is high (about 3 per cent
growth a year in our case).
That's because investments in
new conventional generating
capacity will lock in carbon pro-
duction as plants are used over
several decades.
A clear example of this prob-
lem is our recent decision to
spend $100 million on a new
conventional power plant in
Abaco that will burn the lowest
grade of fossil fuel available and
will supply the island's electric-
ity needs for the next 30 years.
BEC is also contemplating a
$300 million expansion of the
fuel oil power plant at Clifton
on New Providence, which has
been a pollution nightmare over
its 50-year lifespan.
"Any global strategy to fight
climate change must make the
electricity sector a priority for
action, with developed countries
taking a strategic role in helping
developing countries establish
new, more effective approaches
to emission mitigation," the IEA
says.
The good news is that there
are IDB-funded projects under-
way that could lead to a trans-
formation of our energy sector if
the necessary political backing is
available. A report on BEC's
operations and finances will be
submitted to government later
this month by German consul-
tants. And a legislative/regula-
tory review of what is needed
to promote the widespread
adoption of energy efficiency
measures and renewable energy

SEE page 12


this
cost can
be largely offset by economic,
health and energy-security ben-
efits. Efficiency measures can
play the biggest role, followed
by renewable energy technolo-
gies - including nuclear power.
What do they mean by effi-
ciency? Chiefly low-energy
buildings, mandatory energy use
standards for appliances and
equipment, and fuel standards
for vehicles, and other simple
things like changing your light
bulbs. These measures are con-
sidered the low-hanging fruit of
carbon reduction efforts. For
example, if incandescent light
bulbs were phased out global-
ly, by 2012 the electricity sav-
ings would equal the output of
80 nuclear power plants.
Deveaux's Environment
Ministry is already pursuing pro-
jects that will move us closer to
a low-carbon world. They are
part of a $3.8 million sustain-
able energy programme for the
Bahamas financed by the UN's
Global Environment Facility
and the Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank. The pilot projects
will show how electricity bills
can be cut by installing compact
fluorescent lightbulbs, solar
water heaters and solar power
panels in public housing. Equip-
ment is being procured this
month to begin some two dozen
trial installations.
Meanwhile, consultants are
completing detailed energy
audits of some 50 homes, hotels
and public buildings (including
the homes of the prime minister
and environment minister). This
information will be used to
design incentive policies and rec-
ommend changes to the building
code to promote energy effi-
ciency in the construction sec-
tor.
What will a low-carbon world
look like? The IEA says we will
have to generate about 60 per
cent of global electricity from
renewables (37 per cent),
nuclear (18 per cent) and plants
fitted with carbon capture and
storage (5 per cent) by 2030. It
also projects a dramatic shift in
car sales, with hybrids and pure
electric vehicles accounting for
almost 60 per cent of sales in
2030, from around 1 per cent
today.
While this is a tall order, it is
expected to have a negligible
impact on economic growth.







+


TRIBUNE SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 9


Rodgers throws 3 TDs as




Packers beat Ravens 27-14


By COLIN FLY
AP Sports Writer


GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) - Ray
Lewis believes that the Ravens will
make a run to the playoffs.
However, there is a big caveat.
"I feel more than confident any
time you tell me I'm going to get a
Terrell Suggs and an Ed Reed back,"
Lewis said. "You never stop fighting,
that's the beauty of this team, but
we have to stop the things that are
getting us in trouble real early,
whether it's the penalties or it's the
turnovers."
In Baltimore's 27-14 loss to the
Green Bay Packers on Monday
night, it was both in an ugly, flag-
filled contest that saw the teams
combine for 310 penalty yards, tied
for second-most in NFL history.
"The penalties were unbelievable
for both sides," said Packers coach
Mike McCarthy, whose team won
its fourth in a row to improve to 8-4
and now sits in a position of strength
for an NFC wild-card spot. "The
adversity that we overcame through-
out the football game is something
that we will definitely carry forward
with us."
Aaron Rodgers threw three touch-
down passes, two to Jermichael Fin-
ley, as the Ravens (6-6) struggled in
coverage without their star safety,
Reed, who sat out with hip and
ankle injuries. Suggs (knee) has been
out since Nov. 16.
The result was five pass interfer-
ence flags, the most on one team in
the NFL since 2001. Green Bay was
flagged for pass interference four
times and there were 23 total penal-
ties in the game.
"You can't come in nobody's
house and have that many penalties
and on third downs, you're off the
field and then you turn around and
look and there's a flag laying on the
ground," Lewis said. "That's some of
the things you've got to cut out."
Rodgers finished 26 of 40 for 263
yards with two interceptions, only
his sixth and seventh of the season.
Reed's replacement, Tom Zbikows-


--.~-- 4


0
.-w .~- -
- - -


F..
.'.~.-, ,~-


GREEN BAY PACKERS' Jermichael Finley (88) gets past Baltimore Ravens' Ray Lewis and Tom Zbikowski (28) for a touchdown
during the second half of a game Monday in Green Bay, Wis. (AP Photo)


ki, had one of the interceptions but
also allowed Finley to make a catch
over him for the Packers' first TD
that made it 10-0.
"Before I left the huddle
(Rodgers) said, 'Time your jump,
it's coming,'" said Finley, who fin-
ished with seven catches for 79 yards.
"I just had to make a play on the
ball."
Green Bay extended the lead to
17-0 just before halftime on Donald
Driver's 8-yard TD reception, but
the Packers found themselves in a
suddenly tight game when the
Ravens scored twice in 30 seconds
after Rodgers' second interception.
Baltimore's Joe Flacco was 15 of
36 for 137 yards with a touchdown
and three interceptions. The Packers
sacked him three times, but the
Ravens were able to close it to 17-14
on Kelley Washington's 12-yard TD
catch and a 1-yard TD by Willis
McGahee after a 41-yard pass inter-
ference penalty on Tramon
Williams.
"I've got a short-term memory,"
Williams said. "That's one of my
advantages."
He also came up big late. With
Baltimore trailing 24-14 and at the
Packers 3 with 9 minutes left,
Williams intercepted a pass in the
end zone that effectively sealed it.
"I saw Flacco's eyes turn this way
and I was like, 'Man, it looks like
he's going to throw it.' He threw it
and I was there," Williams said. "I
can't lie to you, it felt great."
Less than a month ago, Green Bay
was 4-4 and reeling from a loss to
Tampa Bay, which still has only one
victory this season. But, the offense
has done a better job of protecting
Rodgers and the Packers' 3-4 defen-
sive scheme installed this offseason
by new defensive coordinator Dom
Capers is ranked No. 1 in the league
for fewest yards allowed.
"With a new year and a new sys-
tem, 12 games in, we really feel like
as a defense things are clicking,"
linebacker Clay Matthews III said.
"We're up there in overall defense,
and we're real proud of that."


Olympic softballer and crew to

conduct clinic in Bahamas


FROM page 11

In the future, Dorsett said
Oslinker intends to spread the
clinic to a tournament where
they will be bringing down a
number of players to partici-
pate in an organised tourna-
ment with local teams.
As for next year's initial


trip, Dorsett said he feels the
local players will get a good
opportunity to see one of the
top female players in the
game today in Abbott when
she comes with the group.
Abbott has been a repre-
sentative on the US national
team since 2002. During that
time, she helped the US to
win the gold medal at the


2007 Pan American, two
World Cup titles in 2006-2007,
the World title in 2006 and
the silver medal at the 2008
Olympic Games.
The 2008 graduate of the
University of Tennessee was
also the winner of the 2007
Women's Sports foundation's
'Team Sport Athlete of the
Year' award.


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+


PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Blazers F


Fernandez has


procedure


on back


By ANNE M PETERSON
AP Sports Writer


PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) - Portland
Trail Blazers forward Rudy Fernandez
underwent a procedure to alleviate nerve
pressure in his back that was causing leg
pain, and he is expected to miss up to six
weeks.
It is the latest injury to befall the Blaz-
ers, who are down to just nine available
players.
The team said Fernandez had a
microdiscectomy on Tuesday to relieve
pressure on a nerve in his back. The
pressure on his nerve was causing him
pain in his right leg.
The Blazers put the timetable for his
return at anywhere from four to six
weeks.
"The procedure was successful and
we can now turn our attention to get-
ting Rudy healthy and back on the
court," Portland general manager Kevin
Pritchard said in a statement. "He's been
under a lot of pain and we look forward
to Rudy returning healthier than ever."
Fernandez, a second-year player from
Spain, was averaging 8.6 points, 2.2
assists and 2.7 rebounds in 23.3 minutes
a game this season. He missed two
games with the injury before having
surgery.
What are left of the Blazers are on a
four game-road trip, which started with
a 93-84 loss Monday night to the New
York Knicks.
On Saturday, center Greg Oden frac-
tured his kneecap during a game at home
against the Houston Rockets. Portland's
7-foot No. 1 draft pick had surgery on
Sunday and is out for the season.
Forward Nicolas Batum required
shoulder surgery just before the start of
the season, while forward Travis Out-
law broke his foot in mid-November and
required surgery.
Rookies Patty Mills (right foot) and
Jeff Pendergraph (left hip) have both
started the season on the injured list
after surgeries.
Even coach Nate McMillan had
surgery on Monday to repair a ruptured
Achilles' tendon. McMillan injured his
right Achilles while practicing with the
Blazers - because the team was so
short-handed.
Assistant Dean Demopoulos is filling
in for McMillan on the Blazers' current
four-game road trip. Portland visits the
Indiana Pacers on Wednesday.
The Blazers, considered at the start
of the season to be talented and deep
enough to challenge the Lakers in the
West, are suddenly struggling. While
Portland is 13-9, the team has lost four of
its last five games.
"It's not normal," Demopoulos said.
"But life throws you curveballs some-
times and if you can't hit a curveball,
you don't belong here.
"We're lacking some really fine bas-
ketball players that are injured right
now."


BAYERN MUNICH players celebrate after winning a match between Juventus and Bayern Munich at Olympic stadium in Italy. Bayern won 4-1.


(AP Photo)


Madrid, Milan,




Bayern advance in




Champions League


By STUART CONDIE
AP Sports Writer


LONDON (AP) - Real Madrid, AC
Milan and Bayern Munich clinched places
in the next round of the Champions League
on Tuesday.
The trio, European champions a total of 20
times, advanced alongside CSKA Moscow
after their final group matches.
Cristiano Ronaldo scored twice to help
nine-time European champion Madrid win 3-
1 at Marseille and take Group C from Milan,
which needed a penalty by Ronaldinho for a
1-1 draw at FC Zurich.
Bayern advanced behind already-qualified
Bordeaux in Group A with a 4-1 win at
Juventus that eliminated the Italian side while
CSKA Moscow won 2-1 at Besiktas.
Michael Owen had a hat trick to give Man-
chester United a 3-1 win at Wolfsburg to
take first place in Group B from CSKA and
knock out its opponent. But CSKA's place
may be in doubt after UEFA said two of the
Russian team's players failed doping tests
after a 3-3 draw against Manchester United
last month.
UEFA will announce the result of its inves-
tigation on Dec. 17, the day before the draw
for the next stage.
Ronaldo put Madrid ahead in the fifth
minute with a 30-yard free kick before Mar-
seille playmaker Lucho Gonzalez leveled
from close range in the 11th.
Madrid defender Raul Albiol scored in
the 60th and Ronaldo rounded off the scoring
10 minutes before the end following a mis-
take by Marseille goalkeeper Steve Man-


JUVENTUS forward David Trezeguet, of France,
reacts after missing a chance to score during a
Champions League, group A, soccer match
between Juventus and Bayern Munich at the
Olympic stadium in Turin, Italy. Juventus lost 4-1.
(AP Photo)
danda.
Madrid finished with 13 points, four more
than Milan, which trailed until the 64th
minute in Switzerland.
Zurich dominated much of the first half
and led through Milan Gajic's 29th-minute
free kick from 25 yards.
Milan was in real danger of missing out
on the next round but Zurich defender Alain
Rochat was sent off for a foul on Marco Bor-
riello and Ronaldinho scored the resulting


penalty.
Juventus looked to be on course for the
next round when David Trezeguet put the
Italian side ahead in the 19th, but Bayern
got back in the match with a 30th-minute
penalty by Joerg Butt - the goalkeeper's
third in the Champions League.
Ivica Olic put Bayern ahead six minutes
after halftime. Mario Gomez and substitute
Anatoliy Tymoshchuk scored in the last sev-
en minutes.
Bordeaux, which won 1-0 at Maccabi
Haifa, won Group A with 16 points. Bayern
was next with 10 points, while Juventus will
play in the Europa League after finishing
third with eight.
Maccabi Haifa became the first team to
be eliminated from the Champions League
without winning a point or scoring a goal.
Owen's hat trick for United in Group B is
likely to reignite the debate in British news-
papers over whether England coach Fabio
Capello should take the veteran striker to
next year's World Cup.
"Me getting three goals will probably grab
the headlines, but it was a great team per-
formance," Owen said.
Group D had already been settled before
Tuesday.
First-place Chelsea conceded an 87th-
minute equalizer to draw 2-2 with APOEL
Nicosia, losing midfielder Michael Essien in
the process to what appeared to be a ham-
string injury.
"We were not concentrating," Drogba said.
"We thought, maybe, it was going to be an
easy game but in the Champions League
there are no easy games."


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Mackey to square off

with 'The Technician'


FROM page 11

going to Trinidad and com-
ing back with the title."
Looking back at the fight
against Stevenson, which the
Bahamas Boxing Commission
blasted Minus Jr for taking
what they considered an "ill-
advised fight," Minus Jr said
as far as he's concerned, it
was still the right decision.
"It was an excellent deci-
sion to take the fight. He's a
fighter, who has been trained
to take on a fight whenever
the opportunity presents
itself," Minus Jr said.
"If an opportunity comes
his way, he can take a shot at
it. Losing the Commonwealth
title was unfortunate, but the
Commonwealth is a title that
has been almost like a pres-
sure thing where you are basi-
cally tied down."
Minus Jr, a former British
Commonwealth ban-
tamweight and lightweight
champion, said when other
opportunities come up, a
Commonwealth champion
can't take it because they are
committed only to the Com-
monwealth.


"We felt that it was a spite-
ful act being put down on us
by the Commonwealth Com-
mission taking the Common-
wealth title," Minus Jr said.
"He fought for it, he didn't
lose it in a fight and he should
have been given the oppor-
tunity to fight for it. He
already had a promoter who
was willing to promote the
Commonwealth title
defence."
But Minus Jr said the Com-
monwealth Commission
decided to strip him. "Every-
thing would have still been
running smooth because right
now the Commonwealth title
is on dry dock. Nobody has
it," Minus Jr said.
"There are a number of
other weight classes that don't
have any champions. So right
now it's been poorly man-
aged. It's a business and you
have to work with the athletes
as they try to move forward."
Having lost the bid to
defend his Commonwealth
title, Minus Jr said Mackey
will head to Trinidad & Toba-
go this weekend and make
the best of the opportunity to
fight for the WBA Fede-
Caribe title again.


To avtiseiieTfifi

th #1 nesaepi hcuain


ITDISCUS TOIESONTHS PGELO0ONTOWW.TIBUE22CO0







+


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 1 1


\\EI)NEI)DAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


� 'A -10* Iteratinalspors ew


ackey to square off


BASKETBALL
NPBA ACTION


THE New Providence
Basketball Association
played one game on Mon-
day night with the Coca-
Cola Explorers knocking
off the Police Crimestop-
pers 98-90.
Lamar Watkins, playing
32 minutes, scored 21
points on 5-of-13 from the
field and 10-of-13 from the
free throw line and he
pulled down six rebounds,
dished out three assists
and had three steals in the
win.
Dannon Carter, in 36
minutes, also had 21 points
on 8-of-16 from the field
and 3-for-6 from the foul
line and he ended up with
a game high 11 rebounds.
Amhad Bootle helped
out with 20 points, six
rebounds and two steals,
Cody Pinder had 15 points
with three rebounds and
Lorenzo Carter added 10
points with four rebounds
for the Explorers.
In a losing effort for the
Crimestoppers, Valentino
Richardson had a game
high 24 points on 8-of-18
from the field and 6-for-
10 from the line in 36 min-
utes.
Cecil Mackey, also play-
ing 36 minutes, had 22
points on 7-of-18 from the
field and 4-for-5 from the
line. Vernon Stubbs
chipped in with 17 points
and eight rebounds and
Freddie Lightbourne had
17 points, six rebounds,
three assists and two
steals. The NPBA is
expected to be back in
action tonight.
BASKETBALL
CATHOLIC
PRIMARY
PLAYOFFS

THE sudden death
playoff is scheduled to get
underway Friday at Loy-
ola Hall.
Although the playoff
picture has been set, the
final regular season game
is set for 3:15pm today
when the defending cham-
pions St Bede's Crushers
will host the St Francis
Joseph Shockers.
The Crushers head into
their final regular season
game with an 8-1 win-loss
record. No matter the out-
come, they will finish in
second place in the stand-
ings.
On Friday when the
playoff gets underway, St
Bede's is slated to play
third place St Thomas
More Sparks in the first
game at 3:30pm. It's a
rematch of last year's final.
The Sparks finished fourth
at 4-6.
The feature game in the
playoff set for 5pm will be
between the league lead-
ing St Cecilia's Strikers,
who ended up with a 9-1
record against the third
place Our Lady's Blue
Flames, who were 6-4.





IT was incorrectly stated
in Monday's Tribune that
Olympic sprinter Adrian
Griffith and hurdler
Christopher 'Nipples'
Bethel were preparing for
the wedding of basketball
player/triple jumper Anto-
nio Saunders when Bethel
was tragically killed in an
accident Saturday morn-
ing.
It was not Antonio
Saunders who was getting
married. The Tribune
apologises to Saunders for
the error.


with 'The


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
After losing his
bid for the
World Box-
ing Council's
International
super middleweight title - a
fight that eventually caused
him to get stripped of his
British Commonwealth title
- Jermaine 'Choo Choo'
Mackey has gotten a chance
at another title.
The 29-year-old Bahamian
will be leaving town today
with his manager/trainer Ray
Minus Jr for Trinidad &
Tobago where he is scheduled
to take on Kirk 'the Techni-
cian' Sinnette - again - for the
World Boxing Association's
FedeLatin title.
The 12-round main event
bout is set for Saturday night.
"I'm excited, I'm ready and
I'm just waiting on the time,"
said a confident Mackey, who
is making his return to the
ring after he was stopped in
the fifth round by Adonis
Stevenson at the Bell Centre
in Montreal, Canada, for the
WBC International title on
September 25.
Southpaw Mackey, who
was to have defended his
British Commonwealth title
in October but was stripped
of it as a result of his lost to
Stevenson, stopped Sinnette


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
TALENTED American
Olympic softball player Mon-
ica Abbott is expected to
head a delegation coming to
town from the United States
and Canada next year.
Abbott, the six-foot, three-
inch left hander from Salinas,
California, will be among
more than 160 persons who
are slated to be coming on the
cruise ship MSC Poesia on
February 19.
While in town, the group
known as the Softball Cruise
Clinic will conduct a female
fast-pitch clinic at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex. They
will be here with Smooth Sail-
ing Cruises, headed by travel
consultant Reece Oslinker.
"We will have about a
dozen states represented, any-
where from Pennsylvania,
Missouri and from Canada,"
Oslinker said. "The guy who
helped me promote the cruise
is from Canada, so he has
been able to get a lot of peo-
ple from there."
Oslinker said they are
working with the Bahamas
Softball Federation to get
some of the local high school
players involved in the clinic
that is designed for ages 9-18
years.
"It's an educational clinic
and at the same time we hope
to build up the female fast
pitch league," Oslinker said.
"It's not really part of any
particular educational group.
It's just a fun type event."
With a number of parents,
family members and friends
committed to coming with the
players, Oslinker said they are


hoping to make it a semi-
annual clinic and eventually
they will be able to organise
some games for the visiting
players against the local play-
ers.
BSF president Burkett
Dorsett said they welcome the
visitors and they are looking
forward to the excitement
that they will bring to the
game.
"We are going to direct it
through the presidents of both
the government and the inde-
pendent school associations,"
Burkett said. "But it will be
held under the sanctioning of
the federation."
From talking to Oslinker,
whom he and immediate past
president Rommel Knowles
met with and spoke to a cou-
ple weeks ago, Dorsett said
they have been advised that
there will be about a two-hour
clinic.
Additionally, the group will
be bringing down some soft-
ball equipment that will be
presented to the participating
schools as well as use in the
federation's junior develop-
ment programme.
"This is supposed to be the
start of a continued pro-
gramme from the youth all
the way up to the adults,"
Dorsett said. "But this is
something that we feel will be
very beneficial to us.
"This will be the starting
ground of the development
of our own plans for fast pitch
softball in the Bahamas. The
basic mechanism that is used
for softball continue to
change and so we need to
keep abreast of what is going
on."

SEE page 9


Technician



Trinidad bout for the

SWBA's FedeLatin title


JERMAINE 'CHOO CHOO' MACKEY has a chance at another title...


CABOFE, said although he
was disappointed that he did-
n't win his last fight, he was
glad that he still has another
opportunity to fight for anoth-
er title.
"The challenges will come
in my way and sometimes will
not go your way, so it's just a
matter of picking yourself up
and moving on," he said. "I'm
prepared to do that 100 per
cent."
But despite the fact that he
stayed in the gym training
after losing to Stevenson,
Mackey said he knows it's not
going to be as easy as their
initial encounter, fighting this
time in Sinnette's backyard.
"I know he's going to give it
his all because he's got the
home base, he's got family
and friends and so I have to
overcome that and win," he


said. "I'm feeling great and
I'm confident that I can do
it."
Not resting on his laurels,
Mackey said he knows it
won't be easy going to
Trinidad, but he's prepared
for the challenge ahead of
him.
Minus Jr said his prot6g6 is
definitely in great shape, hav-
ing already trimmed down to
his fighting weight. "He's real-
ly excited and looking for-
ward to it," Minus Jr stressed.
"He received a cut over his
eye in his last fight, but has
been healed up.
"He saw the doctor and the
doctor declared that he's 100
per cent okay to fight. So he's
really looking forward to

SEE page 10


in the second round at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium on
June 22, 2007, for both the
WBC Caribbean Boxing Fed-
eration (CABOFE) and
WBA FedeCaribe titles.
Mackey, who has since
relinquished the FedeCaribe
title but still holds onto the


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


Olympic softballer


and crew to conduct


clinic in Bahamas







+


T RI B U N E






WEDNESDAY,


SS


DECEMBER 9, 2009


IFCIO obsiescrbueedane


NASSAU
(242) 356-9801
FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010
MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

roalielt.co.


$60m solar/wind Judge blasts trustees

power proposal .


targets 3 islands of Hilton joint owner


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ONE of the six renewable
energy bidders shortlisted by
the Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration (BEC) yesterday
said its solar/wind power pro-
ject would require a $60 mil-
lion investment and generate
50-60 construction jobs, col-
lectively generating 24
megawatts (MW) of power
per day - equivalent to one of
the gas turbines the Corpora-
tion currently employs.
Thomas Schneider, the
Bahamas Renewable Energy
Corporation's chairman, said
the company had targeted
projects on three separate
islands where BEC's power
needs were greatest - New
Providence, Abaco and
Eleuthera/Harbour Island.
The company, if selected to
go ahead with its project by


* Shortlisted bidder says
plan to supply 24MW over
three Bahamian islands to
generate 50-60 construction
jobs, and 10-15 full-time jobs

BEC, would seek to generate
4MW of power per day for
Harbour Island and
Eleuthera, and 10MW per
day for Abaco and New Prov-
idence, using a combination
of wind and solar technology.
"The total 24MW is going
to be about a total $60 mil-
lion investment. That's equiv-
alent to getting one of those
gas turbines off the grid - our
combined generating capacity
is equivalent to one of those,"
Mr Schneider told Tribune
Business.
"During the construction
SEE page 2B


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


judge has found the
Board of Trustees for
one of the British Colo-
nial Hilton's owners
"failed in their duty" to
supervise investments in that property
and their other Bahamian holding, the
South Ocean resort, with members of its
investments committee also guilty of
breaching regulatory guidelines.
Canadian Supreme Court Justice Bev-
erly Brown, in a December 7 judgment,
found three members of the Canadian
Commercial Workers Industry Pension
Plan's (CCWIPP) investment commit-
tee - Bernard Christophe, Gordy Can-
nady and Clifford Evans - guilty of
breaching "the 10 per cent quantitative
limits" rule that limited the amount of
plan funds they could invest in one asset
- namely the British Colonial Hilton and
South Ocean.
The three were also members of the
plan's Board of Trustees, who were all


A VIEW of the British Colonial Hilton...

found guilty of "failing in their duty to
supervise the members of the investment
committee as was prudent and reason-
able" as it related to the investment lim-
its established in the Canadian Pension
Benefits Act and its regulations.
Detailing the case brought against the
CCWIPP trustees by the Canadian state,
Judge Brown said two counts brought
against the trustees "relate t the invest-
ments by the plan in the British Colo-
nial property in the Bahamas, which is a


* Canadian pension fund had
$92m exposure to Hilton
and South Ocean at time of
takeover from Ron Kelly
* Almost $20m pumped in
during 2003 to keep
Bahamian resorts afloat
* Judge finds plan trustees
guilty of failing to supervise
investment committee, and
latter of breaching regulations
on investment limits

hotel and commercial complex". A fur-
ther two counts related to the South
Ocean Resort, the other New Provi-

SEE page 2B


Realtors: 'Not acceptable' for

Government to ignore reforms


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas Real Estate
Association's (BREA) presi-
dent yesterday said it was
"not acceptable" for the Gov-
ernment to effectively reject
all the recommendations it
had submitted for inclusion
in the Planning and Subdivi-
sions Bill, saying it made "no
sense" not to include "the
meat" of the legislation in the
shape of a Land Use Plan.
After reviewing the pro-
posed amendments to the
Bill, which will be introduced
to and debated in the House
of Assembly tomorrow,
William Wong told Tribune
Business: "It appears that
they've used none of the rec-
ommendations we sent to
them. Not one of them. We're
very disappointed.
"After all we've done, all


Say it 'makes no sense' for
administration to accept
'none' of its Planning
and Subdivision Bill
recommendations
and ignore the Land
Use Plan 'meat'
the public discussion and get-
ting all our members to put
input in, to totally disregard it
is pretty awful. We're sup-
posed to be the body for real
estate in this country, we sub-
mitted our recommendations,
and for not one of them to be
accepted is unacceptable."
Mr Wong added: "The
whole meat of this Bill is the
Land Use Plan, but there's
none. It makes no sense. It's
disappointing that after we've
put all this time into making
SEE page 5B


BEC likely to beat renewable energy 10% goal


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ONE of the six remaining
bidders in the race to supply
the Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration (BEC) with renew-
able energy yesterday said
that with wind and solar pow-
er also in the mix, it was like-
ly that the Government would
exceed its initial target of gen-
erating 10 per cent of this
nation's power supply from
sustainable sources.
Len Enriquez, of Miami-
based Cambridge Project
Development, which is part
of the NP Renewables $140
million waste-to-energy facil-
ity project, said he was "glad
to see" solar and energy
providers were part of the
mix, with two such proposals
among those shortlisted
among BEC's final six candi-
dates.
"We're looking forward to
moving ahead," Mr Enriquez


Bidder praises shortlisted final six 'mix' for including
solar and wind, as well as four waste-to-energy players


told Tribune Business. "I'm
glad to see there's some wind
and solar options in there. I
think the mix of energies,
wind and solar, is probably
attractive, and we're looking
forward to meeting with BEC
and responding to any addi-
tional information they'd like
to know with regard to our
project.
"I think the original goal
was to replace 10 per cent of
power with renewable
sources. Our project is 9-10
per cent alone, but I think
everyone will be pleased that
the 10 per cent goal is likely to
be exceeded, if you add wind
and solar options on top."
Waste-to-energy is the most
competitive sector in BEC's
search for renewable energy
suppliers, with four of the six


proposed projects in this area.
Apart from the NP Renew-
ables Group, which includes
BISX-listed Bahamas Waste,
this field also includes
Bahamas Renewable Energy
Resources, a group led by
Ginny McKinney's Waste
Not; Smart Power and Cana-
dian-based Plasco Energy
Group.
All four are proposing pro-
jects on New Providence, giv-
en that this is the only
Bahamian island that gener-
ates enough municipal waste
to make such projects work.
Apart from the four waste-
to-energy bidders, the final
two are Bahamas Renewable
Energy Corporation, which is
proposing wind/solar projects
on New Providence, Abaco
and Eleuthera, and Protocol


Energy. The latter is eyeing
exclusively solar projects on
a number of Family Islands,
including Andros, Exuma,
Cat Island, San Salvador,
Long Island and Crooked
Island.
Describing waste-to-ener-
gy as "a little different" from
solar and wind power solu-
tions, Mr Enriquez told Tri-
bune Business that it effec-
tively generated "baseline
power".
"It provides electricity as
reliably, if not more reliably,
than old fossil fuel plants," he
said. "You can expect waste-
to-energy to generate power
85-90 per cent of the time.
"It's really part of the base
load, and will save them
SEE page 3B


Bahamas breaches global

health rules over airport waste


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas is breaching
Pan American Health Organ-
isation (PAHO) guidelines on
preventing the spread of ani-
mal diseases by mixing local
and internationally-generat-
ed waste from airline passen-
gers, an Environmental
Impact Assessment (EIA)
having also revealed the pres-
ence of asbestos on the roof
of Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport's (LPIA) Inter-
national Terminal.
The EIA for LPIA's $409.5
million redevelopment, which
has underscored Tribune
Business's June 2009 revela-
tions that the airport was a
potential 'environmental
timebomb', due to poor prac-
tices prior to Nassau Airport


* EIA says asbestos present
on roof sealants of one
terminal building
* 145,500 cubic yards of
fill needed for $409.5m
expansion project,
with 63,000 set to be
excavated for new
building foundations

Development Company's
(NAD) takeover, said waste
collection and storage systems
would be designed to sepa-
rate domestic and interna-
tional waste.
Acknowledging that better
data was required on the
source and types of waste
being generated at LPIA, a
process that would involve
dumpster audits, the EIA said
all domestic and international
waste generated at the airport
was currently being mixed
there and disposed of in the
Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway landfill.
"However, this is in con-
travention of the Pan-Ameri-
can Health Organisation
(PAHO) guidelines to pre-
vent the spread of animal dis-
eases," the EIA added.
"International waste is sup-
posed to be segregated at the
source, transported separate-
ly to the landfill, and disposed
of within a designated area
per instructions from the
Department of Environmen-
tal Health Services."
The report suggested there
might be work in this particu-
SEE page 4B


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+


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


II HITO, rm. 1B


dence-based property in
which CCWIPP is still invest-


NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF PHILLIP
EMERSON BRAID aJ~.a PIIILLIP
E. BRAID domiciled and late of 15
Gervin Crestent, Ottaw a, Ontario,
Canada K2G OJ6 dccased

NOTICE is hereby given th all persons having
any claim or demand against or interest in the
above F.~1aic .hnUtld send xErrI e duly certified in
writing to the undersigned on or before 21st
January, 2010 after which date hle Fxecutrix
will proceed to distribute the assets of the Estate
having regard only to the claims, demands or
intcrcsts of which she shall then have had notice
AND all persons indebted to the above Estate
are asked (1o etle swI; ih LIdeb on or be'or 21 st
January. 2010.

FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB & CO.
Attorneys for the Executrix
P.O. Box AB-20405
Bay Street, Marsh Harbour
Ahaco, The Raharmans


ed.
The judgment recalled how
CCWIPP, through its PRK
Holdings vehicle, was forced
to take over the British Colo-
nial Hilton and South Ocean
after former owner Ron Kel-
ly, and his RHK Capital vehi-
cle, defaulted on their debt
repayments to the pension
plan, forcing a restructuring.
"Various loans were made
to resort and hotel properties
in the Caribbean prior to the
offence period," Justice
Brown wrote. "Additional
funds were advanced during
the offence period for British
Colonial [Hilton], in the
Bahamas, which is a hotel and
commercial complex, and for
the South Ocean property in
the Bahamas, which is a golf
and beach resort.
"The total outstanding
loans at the time of the



phase we will probably cre-
ate 50-60 jobs, and in the next
20 years we're probably look-
ing at about 10-15 full-time
employees."
The permanent jobs would
be for maintenance on all
three islands, plus accounting
and back-office functions, Mr
Schneider said, adding that
the Bahamas Renewable
Energy Corporation's goal
was to develop sustainable
energy projects that matched
both a community's power
needs and its environmental
footprint.


restructuring in December
2000 was in excess of $92 mil-
lion." CCWIPP's PRK Hold-
ings took over ownership of
both South Ocean and the
British Colonial Hilton.
CCWIPP was forced, as a
result of its exposures and the
multi-million dollar losses
being suffered by its two
Bahamian resort properties,
to seek potential purchasers
or joint venture partners for
them. It also had to support
the two hotels' operations and
"provide ongoing funding".
"Further advances were
made in April 2002 in the
amount of $4.7 million, Janu-
ary of 2003 for $2 million, in
March 2003 for $24,000 and
a retainer of $25,000 for Price-
waterhouseCoopers to act as
brokers and investment
bankers to facilitate the sale
of the Caribbean properties,"
the judgment recorded.
Explaining that the compa-
ny's proposal would not only
reduce BEC's financial losses,
especially on the Family
Islands, Mr Schneider told
Tribune Business: "We're
designing the right size that
fits the community's popula-
tion density and the power
demand. We're developing
the concept of low impact,
small scale projects.
"We will not build massive
solar and wind farms, and
then push the electricity
where it needs to go. It will
have a low impact on the
environment, but provide all
the electricity the community
needs.
"We do low impact pro-
jects. By doing low impact
conservation engineering, and
making sure we build it right,
we reduce the impact on the
nation. It works well in the
Bahamas, because it's main
selling points are the location,
the beaches, the beauty of it
all. We want to have a pro-
ject that fits right in with that,
and most people do not know
it's there."
Mr Schneider said a wind
farm established by his com-
pany, Schneider Power (a
major investor in the
Bahamas Renewable Energy
Corporation), on a remote
Canadian island with a popu-
lation of 3,000 persons, had
proven something of an


"Additional funding was
approved in April 2003 for
slightly above $4 million. In
September 2003, the invest-
ment committee approved
funding of $3.45 million.
Finally, in December of 2003,
an additional loan in excess
of $5.6 million was approved."
This meant that almost $20
million - some $19.554 million
- was pumped into the British
Colonial Hilton and South
Ocean over a one-year peri-
od, both to keep them afloat
and find a solution to its
predicament. Ultimately,
some $16.42 million was
received due to delays in pay-
ing advances.
Indeed, some might say
CCWIPP has never found a
solution to its Bahamian over-
exposure, as it is now mired in
disputes over both the British
Colonial Hilton and South
Ocean, unable to exit because
attraction for the 30,000
tourists that visited annually.
"I think the Bahamas is on
the right track," Mr Schnei-
der said of the Government
and BEC's renewable energy
plans, adding: "We have a
project that works for both
BEC and the community at
large, and we're very sup-
portive of BEC in its task in
getting renewable energies


THE CENTRAL BANK

OF THE BAHAMAS

B$ COUNTERFEIT
BANKNOTE DETECTION &
INTRODUCTION TO CRISP SERIES SEMINAR


Place:


When:


Contact:


Apply By:


Session 1 is open to the General Public. Session 2
is open to Bankers and Law Enforcement Agents.


Persons wishing to participate should apply as soon
as possible as space is limited.


ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


it cannot recoup the full value
of its investments - something
sure to attract regulatory
attention back in Canada.
At the former resort,
CCWIPP has initiated arbi-
tration proceedings against its
joint venture partner Aduri-
on, to whom it sold a control-
ling 71 per cent interest less
than three years ago.
CCWIPP is attempting to pre-
vent Adurion from calling in,
or refinancing, a $22 million
loan on the grounds that the
British Colonial Hilton is
unable to repay it.
And at South Ocean, where
it has a $75 million first mort-
gage debenture on the prop-
erty, CCWIPP's attempt to
foreclose and bring an early
end to the dispute between
its partners, RHS Ventures
and Plainfield, was thwarted
on a technical point in the
Bahamian Supreme Court.
online.
"With BEC having all the
financial issues, which are
mostly derived from the Gov-
ernment subsidising electrici-
ty in the Family Islands, by
bringing this and other pro-
jects online, at least they will
be getting on the right track
to solving some of the energy
and financial problems in the
Bahamas."


MEMORY HOLDINGS LIMITED
(Company number 118214B)

An International Business Company
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Pursuant to Section 137(4) of the International Business
Companies Act, 2000 notice is hereby given that the
voluntary winding-up and dissolution of the Company
commenced on the 7th day of December, 2009 and
that Pine Limited of Devonshire House, Queen Street,
P.O. Box N-8176 Nassau, Bahamas has been appointed
Liquidator.


Dated this 7th day of December, 2009

Pine Limited
Liquidator


CREDIT SUISSE

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

Private Banking

is presently accepting applications for a


Securities Executor

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:
Qualifications:
University Degree or equivalent

Experience:
* Sound international banking background with at least 5 years banking experience in
back-office securities operations, trading and securities market
* Strong understanding of Private Banking Business and Financial Sector
* Working knowledge and experience with Globus Banking System is advantageous
* Working knowledge and experience with MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Bloomberg
applications

Personal Qualities:
* Strong analytical skills
* Excellent organizational skills
* Strong written, oral, and interpersonal skills
* Work independently with strong accountability within a team environment
* Enthusiastic team spirit with the ability to effectively collaborate across teams and
cultures
* Highly motivated and committed to service excellence
* Confident with good leadership skills

Key Duties & Responsibilities:
* Oversee, input and approve securities trade, delivery and corporate action
settlements for worldwide markets
* Liaising with brokers and agents
* Monitoring custodian reports
* Investigating failed trades and instructing depositories
* Serve as an Operations subject matter expert for new requirements
impacting settlement processing
* Participate in User Acceptance Testing prior to project or product
implementation for developments impacting securities operations
* Contribute to and participate in special project initiatives impacting the Bank

Benefits provided include:
* Competitive salary and performance bonus
* Pension Plan
* Health and Life Insurance
* Ongoing internal and external career development/training program
APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING.
ONLY PERSONS MEETING THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS NEED APPLY
Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:
DECEMBER 16, 2009


The Central Bank of The Bahamas

Training Room, Market Street and

Trinity Place Entrance



Thursday December 17, 2009



* Session One 10:00am - 11:00 am

* Session Two 12:00 noon - 1:00 pm


302-2734

302-2629


Tuesday December 15, 2009


BUSINESS I







+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3B


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A SMALL Florida airline is
beginning weekly service to
the Bahamas this month, with
chartered flights to these
islands making up 80 per cent
of its itinerary, its director of










FROM page 1B

[BEC] from loading up on the
fossil fuels. We hope to
replace roughly 10 per cent
of the imports of fossil fuels,
and suppress the fires that
occur at the landfill. It will
serve two major goals - elim-
inating the waste and some of
the implosions at the landfill."
Given that BEC imported
some $376 million worth of
fuel in 2008, the NP Renew-
ables proposal could effec-
tively have saved the Corpo-
ration some $37.6 million that
year.
"We're hoping that we can
move ahead expeditiously,
and think we can really make
a significant impact on that
renewable goal that they
have," Mr Enriquez said.
Tribune Business previous-
ly reported that the NP
Renewables project would
create 500 construction and
35 permanent jobs, supplying
16 mega watts (MW) of pow-
er to BEC, an amount equiv-
alent to 9-10 per cent of the
Bahamas' daily energy needs.
The plant, which would be
located at the Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway
landfill, would use some
200,000 tonnes of waste being
deposited their annually as a
renewable fuel source,
"replacing over 185,000 bar-
rels per annum of non-renew-
able fossil fuel oil now being
imported at a cost of approx-
imately $15 million at today's
relatively low oil pricing)".
Apart from serving as a
potential hedge against the
exploding oil prices experi-
enced in 2008, the NP Renew-
ables Waste-to-Energy group
said its Mass Burn Thermal
Treatment technology would
help prevent landfill fires, plus
the odour from the current
landfill site.
Their project, the group
said, would generate clean
power production from the 89
per cent biomass content in
the waste now being land-
filled, providing carbon cred-
it revenues to BEC. It would
also have a recycling compo-
nent for the 6,000 tonnes per
annum of ferrous metals cur-
rently being landfilled.
Elsewhere, Plasco Energy
Group said its proposed
Bahamian facility was capa-
ble of generating 400 to 800
tonnes of municipal solid
waste per day, and would be
located in the same place as
NP Renewables proposed
development.
BEC has now reduced the
shortlisted bidders to six from
13, having culled the latter
number from an initial 28 pro-
posals. Engineering consul-
tants will now be engaged to
help the company choose,
assess and implement a
process to select its renewable
energy supplierss.


operations said yesterday.
Danny Krachun told Tri-
bune Business that after 16
years of servicing passengers
in the areas between major
hubs, Fort Lauderdale Inter-
national and Orlando Inter-
national Airport, the airline
has decided to make the
Bahamas a scheduled trip
three days per week.
Starting on January 15,
Treasure Coast Airlines will
fly to Marsh Harbour on
Monday, Wednesday and Fri-
day.
According to Mr Krachun,
there has been an over-
whelming response to the
announcement of weekly
flights to the Bahamas, with
more than 300 calls in only a
few days despite minimal pub-
licity.
He said most of the pas-
sengers Treasure Coast
receives are individuals with
second homes in the Abacos.
And with weekly flights
aboard the company's Navajo


Cheiftans aircraft, the $285
ticket price is on par with that
of other airlines that frequent
the island.
Mr Krachun said the com-
pany hopes to turn the flights
around and have Bahamians
use the service to commute
to Stuart in St Lucie County,
where the airline's base is.

Passengers

He added that passengers
from across the country use
Treasure Coast as the final
leg of their flight to the
Bahamas, preferring its rela-
tive privacy over larger com-
mercial flights, such as Amer-
ican Eagle.
However, the allure for Stu-
art residents and St Lucie
County residents in genera, is
avoiding the almost two-hour
drive to Fort Lauderdale Air-
port in order to commute to
Marsh Harbour. And, accord-
ing to Mr Krachun, they have
been extremely receptive to


the new flights schedule.
Treasure Coast traditional-
ly runs only charter flights to
the islands, which became a
popular destination for the
airline over its 16-year history.

According to Mr Krachun,
they hope to expand their
flight offering into Treasure
Cay in the near future.
The Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation has attempted
to encourage more private
airlines to fly to the Bahamas,
and has successfully drawn
several new carriers to this
nation this year alone.
The Government has
promised to deliver more air-
lift to this country, but the
shrunken global economy,
which is responsible for wear-
ing down the tourism sector,
is not expected to return until
2012, and therefore the num-
ber of stopover visitors
enjoyed pre-recession not
expected to recover until
then.


800% of airline's






flights coming






to the Bahamas


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COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division


2009
CLE/qui/No. 01483


IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising 5,515
square feet and situate on the Northern side of Lewis Street East, in the City
of Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas, and at a distance of 137 feet from
Comfort Street, and bounding Northerly by land said to be the property of
Howard Pinder and running thereon Fifty-seven and Nineteen hundredths
(57.19') feet and bounding Easterly by land said to be the property of Gertrude
Fowler and running thereon One Hundred and Three hundredths (100.03') feet
and bounding Southerly by Lewis Street and running thereon Fifty-three and
Ninety-seven hundredths (53.97') feet and bounding Westerly by land said
to be the property of Mary Cartwright and running thereon Ninety-eight and
Sixty-five hundredths (98.65') feet.

AND
IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act of 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of
Lesley Anne Stubbs and Leverne Palacious

NOTICE OF PETITION
Pursuant to an Order of The Supreme Court dated the 15th day of October,
A.D. 2009.
The Petition of Lesley Anne Stubbs and Leverne Palacious, both of Lewis Street
East, in the City of Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas, showeth in respect of:

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising 5,515 square feet and situate
on the Northern side of Lewis Street East, in the city of Nassau, New Providence,
Bahamas, and bounded on the North by land said to be the property of Howard
Pinder and running thereon Fifty-seven and Nineteen hundredths (57.19') feet
and on the East by land said to be the property of Gertrude Fowler and running
thereon One Hundred and Three hundredths (100.03') feet and on the South
by Lewis Street and running thereon Fifty-three and Ninety-seven hundredths
(53.97') feet and on the West by land said to be the property of Mary Cartwright
and running thereon Ninety-eight and Sixty-five hundredths (98.65') feet.
The Petitioners, Lesley Anne Stubbs and Leverne Palacious, herein claim to
be the owners in fee simple in possession of the said tract of land and have
made application to The Supreme Court Of The Commonwealth Of The
Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have their title to the
said tract of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate Of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of that Act.
Copies of the Plan showing the position boundaries shape marks and dimen-
sions of the said tract of land may be inspected during normal office hours at
the following places:
(a) The Registry of The Supreme Court, East Street North,
Nassau, Bahamas.
(b) The Chambers of Joseph C. Ledee, Suite No. 6,
Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having Dower or right to Dower
or an Adverse Claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the
expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these presents file at
the Registry of The Supreme Court in the City of Nassau, Bahamas, and serve
on the Petitioners or on the undersigned an Adverse Claim in the prescribed
form verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve an Adverse Claim on or before the
expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these presents shall
operate as a bar to such claim.
DATED THIS 15TH DAY OF OCTOBER, A.D. 2009.
JOSEPH C. LEDEE, ESQ.
Chambers
Suite No. 6, Grosvenor Close
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioners
Dec 9th, Dec 19th and Dec 29th


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BRISTOL

WINES & SPIRITS

Field Marketing Assistant Vacancy

PURPOSE OF THIS JOB: To establish a local face of a globally recognized brand
The primary responsibility of the position is to administer the Consumer
Collection and Marketing programs of a leading beverage brand, including
Sports & Culture projects and related Communications initiatives. The Field
Marketing Assistant supports the Marketing Manager in every aspect of business
operations to activate product consumption in the Bahamas including owning
projects, building up relationships and networks with key stake holders and
administrative support to the team.

KEY DELIVERABLES (WHAT DOES SUCCESS LOOK LIKE)

1. Perfect execution of the Consumer Collecting & Marketing Programs
2. Perfect implementation of defined sports & culture & communications
projects.
3. Effective working relationships with Trade Team and excellent delivery of
defined projects.

QUALIFICATIONS & EXPERIENCE
1. University-educated - Bachelor's Degree preferred.
2. The candidate should have experience of at least one (1) year in the
Marketing of Fast Moving Consumer Goods
3. Age group18-25 yrs

KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS
1. Strong understanding of youth culture in sports & culture.
2. Exceptional organization skills, timeliness and appreciation of deadlines
3. Excellent communication skills, including presenting and training abilities.
4. Strong planning and project management competencies.
5. Ability to cultivate team environment.
6. Must be proficient in standard Microsoft office applications and common
IT tools.
7. Must be energized, driven, creative and passionate about marketing.
8. Must have a Driver's license and a reliable vehicle is highly preferred.

Interested applicants are asked to submit their application letters and CVs on or
before December 10th 2009 to the following:




Email: hr@bristolbahamas.com

Post: ATTN: Field Marketing Manager Vacancy

Bristol Group of Companies

Gladstone Road, PO Box N-131


BUSINESS


I







+>


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Bahamas breaches global health rules over airport waste


FROM page 1B


lar area for BISX-listed
Bahamas Waste, as a result


I ; rnunTii
Rel stt


NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF PATRICK VAN
WAINWRIGIIT BITHIIEL aL.
WAINWRIGHT PATRICK BETHEL
a.k.a. PATRICK BETHEL late of and
domiciled of Ea.iwooId Fstatws, EastLrn
Distinct. New Providcnce, The Bahamas,
deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against or interest in the
uaivwe Enic should Isend same duly certified in
writing to the undersigned on or before 21st
January, 2010 after which date the Executrix
will prnxced Lo di'Wributc IC, uscik of the Eslaie
having regard only to the claims, demands or
interests of which she shall then have had notice
AND all persons indtcbled to the abtwve Estate
are asked to settle such debts on or before 21 st
January, 2010.

V. M. LIGHTBOURN & CO.
Attorneys for the Executrix
P.O. Box AB-20365
Bay Street, Marsh Harbour
Ahaco. The Bahamas


Employment Opportunity:
Full-Time Manaoers

REQUIREMENTS:

* MUST BE A HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE
* MUST HAVE A DEGREE IN MANAGEMENT
OR MANAGEMENTISUPERVISORY
EXPERIENCE
* MUST BE CUSTOMER SERVICE DRIVEN
* MUST BE RESULTS-ORIENTED &
ARTICULATE
* MUST HAVE EXCELLENT INTER-PERSONAL
SKILLS
* MUST HAVE EXCELLENT ORAL & WRITTEN
COMMUNICATION SKILLS
* PROFESSIONALISM REQUIRED
* EXPERIENCE IN RESTAURANT
MANAGEMENT WOULD BE A PLUS

JOB SWUMARY:
To assist the restaurant Manager i ma&ntaintg the
McDonadks formula for success - offering to the
customer high QUALITY, modw ely priced food,
Fast, courteous SERVICE in rniatcuateiy
CLEAN surroundings; and to assist in ft
attainment of Restaurnt Goafs.

eced the customer's expeclalians.
Modonald's success is dependant upon providing
services and products that meel and exceed each
customer's expectations. Therefore, the goal of
each McDonald's employee is Total Cuslomer
Satisfacton. Each employee's success will be
based upon his/her contribution to this goal

McDonald's offers excellent benefits!

Please subrrit Resume to:
Human Resources Department
McDonald's Head Office on Market St. North
P, 0, Box 5S-5925
Telephone: 325-4444
Nassau, Bahamas


of its existing medical waste
treatment facility at its nearby
Gladstone Road headquar-
ters.
"This technology is accept-
able for the treatment of
international waste," the EIA
said of Bahamas Waste's facil-
ity. "The waste is heated to
1,600 degrees Fahrenheit, and
the unit has a 1,000 pound
capacity per cycle. Any alter-
native to land filling will be
evaluated and approved by
the DEHS."
The need for upgraded
environmental and health
practices at LPIA in the area
of waste disposal was further
driven home by the EIA,
which found that the amount
of per capital waste being gen-
erated at LPIA was relatively
high for international airports.
"Solid waste generation per
passenger is estimated at
0.6729 pounds per passenger,"
the EIA said. "Based on this
estimation, waste volumes will
grow from 2.018 million
pounds for one year (2006-
2007) to an estimated 3.075
million pounds in 2015, and
an estimated 3.556 million


pounds in 2020.... This per
passenger estimate is high for
international airports."
Meanwhile, the EIA dis-
closed that the $409.5 million
redevelopment of LPIA
would require 145,500 cubic
yards of fill that would have
to be imported to the con-
struction site from both local
and international sources.
Cubic
And some 63,000 cubic
yards of material will be exca-
vated for the foundations of
the new LPIA terminal build-
ings, with plans for this "to
be reused within the con-
struction project or in the air-
port in pre-approved loca-
tions".
Yet demolition waste from
remodelling the existing US
departures building, and flat-
tening the Customs/Immigra-
tion Hall and International
Terminal would need to be
"carefully sorted by waste
type", especially given that
"some risks" had been identi-
fied with respect to materials
in those buildings.


NOTICE is hereby given that MARC ARTHUR PIERRE of P.O.
BOX GT-2627, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 9th day of December, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE is hereby given that DAVID HUGHES, P.O. BOX N-7777,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 2nd day of December, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE is hereby given that RICHIE ELYSEE of BLUE
HILL ROAD, P.O. BOX GT-2557, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9th day of December, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


The EIA disclosed that a
Hazardous Building Materi-
al Assessment, undertaken by
Parks Environmental in
August 2007, had found "non-
friable" asbestos in the roof
caulk/sealants on the Inter-
national Terminal's metal
roof panel.
The assessment also detect-
ed paint on the outside
canopy of the International
Terminal that "may have ele-
vated lead levels", while
NAD was also advised that
items such as plastics, fabrics,
light bulbs, and electronic
devices needed to be segre-
gated from the other demoli-
tion debris. "Areas contain-
ing asbestos (currently only
in roofing materials) will be
well marked on drawings, and
noted in maintenance proce-
dures," the EIA said.
Parks Environmental's
assessment had also identified
areas of mould and mildew,
leading to the EIA promising
that NAD's maintenance
team would tackle this
through cleaning impacted
areas, in addition to cleaning
air conditioning units and fil-
ters.
"The new terminal build-
ings, following the completion


of the expansion project,
should have fewer leaks that
lead to mould and mildew,"
the EIA promised.
With some 5,000 persons
employed at LPIA in various
capacities by NAD and its
tenants and other users, the
EIA noted, to no one's great
surprise, that the airport was
"a vital piece of the country's
economic infrastructure".
Some 98 per cent of all
stopover visitors to New Prov-
idence, the hub of the
Bahamian tourism industry,
arrived and departed via
LPIA, hence the need for the
airport to form a good first
and last impression of the
Bahamas.
"In a 2005 survey carried
out by the Ministry of
Tourism, a very high number
(42 per cent) of the passen-
gers had one or more com-
plaints about the airport," the
EIA said
"Dissatisfaction at these
levels very likely indicates
travel decisions are now being
negatively affected, especially
among potential return visi-
tors whose last impression of
the Bahamas is created at
their departure through the
airport."


F S iV *llDe. Lqi *a'tl 3iPM















Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

















ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Legal Notice
NOTICE
KOPENHAGEN LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 28th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORR INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I


I


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+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 5B


Realtors: 'Not acceptable' for Government to ignore reforms


FROM page 1B

these suggestions, they've dis-
regarded them."
A copy of the proposed
Planning and Subdivision Bill
amendments, which has been
obtained by Tribune Business,
appear largely designed to
clarify the language in the leg-
islation, in addition to tidying
it up and numbering it cor-
rectly. No substantive amend-
ments appear to have been
made.
Tribune Business revealed
last week how BREA's main
concern over the Planning
and Subdivisions Bill had
been that there "is no com-
mitment to ever draft the cen-
tral part", the Land Use Plan
for each Bahamian island/.
The organisation added
that this should be the "cor-
nerstone of a national eco-
nomic development plan",
and also urged the Govern-
ment to adopt a "phased"
approach to subdivision
approval, since full approval
also gave developers permis-
sion to start selling lots.
BREA also called for the
Government to mandate that
developers first obtain a Busi-
ness Licence, and that they


also be mandated to have a
Developer's Licence, which it
issued, prior to obtaining final
approval for lot sales.
Among the other recom-
mendations submitted by
BREA, which have been seen
by Tribune Business, were
that district council chairmen
in the Family Islands be
allowed to assume the author-
ity of the Department of
Physical Planning's director
when it came to dealing with
planning applications.

Questions

Posing questions about the
experience, knowledge and
transparency required if dis-
trict council chairmen were to
oversee planning in their
areas, plus the skills and qual-
ifications required, BREA
urged that the Planning and
Subdivisions Bill's processes
be "transparent and efficient".
To ensure this, BREA
urged the Government to cre-
ate a 'Planning Guideline
Manual', with clear definitions
and procedures to govern the
submission of plans and appli-
cations. It also suggested that
a Public Land Registry be cre-


Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) VENEZIANA OVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on December 8, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 20th day of January, 2010 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

DECEMBER 9, 2009

ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY




Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) DUNA MANAGEMENT LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on December 8, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 20th day of January, 2010 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

DECEMBER 9, 2009

ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY








NOTICE


IN THE ESTATE OF GUISEPPE
CAMPI domiciled and late of Podere
(Grillana,. Trequanda (S 1), Italy, and
Madrid, Spain, deceased


NOTICE is herby given thi all pirsons having
any claim or demand against or interest in the
above Estate should send same duly certified in
writing to the undersigned on or before 21st
January, 2010 after which date the Executrix
wilt proceed to distribute the sets of the Estate
having regard only to the claims, demands or
interess of which she shall then have had nolic.e
AND all persons, indebted to the axhve Estate
arc askcd to sietle such debts on or before 21 st
January. 2010.


FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB & CO.
Attorneys for the Executrix
P.O. Box AB-20405
Bay Street, Marsh Harbour
Aliwci The Bahamas


ated to enhance transparen-
cy, and "'. i p. ". i communi-
ties and agencies to monitor
land use more accurately and
effectively".
On the Bill's proposed
development charges by law,
BREA said: "Such a clause
leaves everyone vulnerable to
any charge the Government
may decide to levy.
"This is basically a new,
undetermined tax on real
estate and creates uncertainty
with purchasers, developers
and lending institutions.
Again, the Association's rec-
ommendation is that such pol-
icy be reconsidered and
redrafted."
When it came to the Bill's
section 24 on subdivision
approval, BREA said that
while dividing land gave
Bahamians opportunities to
become real estate owners,
this clause "could potentially
make land ownership more
restrictive".
"Related to subdivision
approval, BREA recom-
mends that the proposed
number of lots should be
carefully reviewed, with con-
sideration given to dimensions


and logistics," the organisa-
tion said. "Further, BREA
recommends that subdivision
approval must be obtained,
and that all items under
[approvals required for devel-
opment] must also be
obtained when dividing a
piece of property into three
lots."
BREA also urged the
Town Planning Committee to
issue notices of its decisions
to affected parties within sev-
en days of them being taken,
adding that the current com-
munications process was
"slow and bureaucratic".
And it also warned that the
Bill's provisions to compen-
sate landowners for any addi-
tional improvements or
investments, if approvals were
modified or revoked, could
be ",iijc.Il to misuse and may
aid corruption and abuse".
It added: "For example, a
local government official may
give an approval to his/her
uncle, which may threaten an
important mangrove system.
The local government offi-
cial's uncle may have secured
financing from a bank, and
commenced making improve-


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is herby advised that I, JEFFERY LAURENT
of Nassau Village of the Southern District of the Island of
New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas intend to change my name to JEFFERY
LORON. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O. Box N-742, Nassau Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.





NOTICE is hereby given that DUROSIER WILBERT of ST.
JAMES ROAD, P.O. BOX N-720, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9th day of December, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) FIRST CLASS OVERSEAS LTD. is in dissolution under the provisions
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on December 8, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 20th day of January, 2010 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

DECEMBER 9, 2009

ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY


ments to the land. If the cen-
tral government intervenes
and revokes the approval, the
Government may be required
to compensate the individual
a huge amount of money."
BREA said that given the
Government's inability to


maintain public parks, it was
doubtful that it would "be
able to effectively manage
land in private communities
and commercial/ industrial
zones as well". This under-
taking was also said to be
expensive.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


NOTICE


IN TH"F1 ESTATE OF HANS OrFTO
ERICH R[ITTER domiciled and late of
Hessisch, Lichtenau, Germany, decea-ed


NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against or interest in the
above Estate should send same duly certified in
writing to the undersigned on or before 21st
January, N310 after which date the Adrinistratrix
will proceed to distribute the assets of the Estate
having regard only to the claims, demands or
interests of which she shall then have had notice
AND all persons indebted to the above Estate
arc asked to settle such debts on or before 21st
January, 2010.


FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB & CO.
Attorneys for the Adrninistratrix
P.O. Box AB-20405
Bay Street, Marsh Harbour
Abaco, The Bahamias


Employment Opportunit

CREW NEEDED )i:I)FOR
MeDONAL D'S RESTAURANTS

REQUIREMIEN7~

" MISTF HE~ A HIGH SCOL (UL(RADIJA'II
" M1UST BE CUSTOMER SERVICE DRI%9N
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" ML STHAVE 1EX(kL Lk N ORAL A
WRITTEN COMMUNICATION MUILLS
" MUS~T BE ABL.E TO WORK FL.EXIBL[E~
I{C'LRS, INCLUDING LATE NIGHTS,,
WEEKENDS AND HOLIDAYS


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Trginwijg!
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Opporhmifies for Lpwu"rd Mobilk&!

Applicatimom available at all three restaurants and
Micflona.ad's He~ad Offi~e on Mairkct Strwc North


FA _G CAPITAL MARKETS
ROYAL1FIDELITY 0 BKAG & Is--S

C F A L- c;: i. cL ? I rA i
E _- * LiTED .' T,:-C',E I_-E. _, ITIE _ -- ,_
TUESD.A'Y 3 DECEIT' BER 2:09
EIl.' LL -i rE INCDE'. -LOL E 1 I -* I I '. --- I I i-"-. - ..* IV T - 1 - YT|V D 1 -.-
FINCE L*,_ E ,, ,,, ,I- | Y TCE . . .. I- 'I- -1 C.1
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM I TELEPHOIONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk Hi 52wk-Low Secu..t y Pre...vous Close... Today Close Change DaIy Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
1 71 1 03 AML Foods Limnted 1 17 1 17 000 0 127 0000 92 0 00%
11 80 990 Bahamas Property Fund 1075 1075 000 0992 0200 108 1 86%
9 30 590 Bank of Bahaas 590 590 000 0244 0260 242 441%
0 89 063 Benchmark 063 063 000 0 877 0000 N/M 000%
3 49 315 Bahamas Waste 315 315 000 0125 0090 252 286%
237 2 14 Fidelity Bank 237 237 000 0055 0040 431 1 69%
14 04 992 Cable Bahalas 1000 1000 000 1 406 0250 71 250%
2 88 2 72 Colna Holdings 2 72 272 0 00 0 249 0 040 109 1 47%
719 5 26 Commonwealth Bank (Sl) 573 573 0 00 0 419 0 300 13 7 524%
3 85 1 27 Consolidated Water BDRs 263 258 0 05 0111 0052 232 202%
2 85 1 32 Doctor's Hospital 2 55 255 0 00 0 625 0 080 41 314%
8 20 628 Falguard 649 649 000 0420 0240 155 370%
11 87 8 80 Finrco 929 929 000 0322 0520 289 560%
11 71 9 86 FirstCanbbean Bank 986 986 000 0631 0350 156 355%
553 411 Focol (S) 475 475 000 0326 0150 146 316%
1 00 1 00 Focol Class B Preference 1 00 1 0 0 000 0000 0000 N/M 000%
0 45 0 27 Freeport Concrete O 27 0 27 0 00 0 035 0 000 77 0 00%
902 549 ICD UtItioes 559 559 000 0407 0500 137 894%
12 00 9 95 J S Johnson 9 95 9 95 0 00 0 952 0 640 105 6 43%
- LI TI C .: , i I TIE .: - . -. . ,, - - , . ... iP
52wk -H 52wk-Low Security Symlbol Last Sale Change Dally Vol Interest Maturity
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100 00 0 00 7% 19 October 2017
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100 00 0 00 Prime + 1 75% 19 October 2022
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 00 0 00 7% 30 May 2013
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100 00 0 00 Prime + 1 75% 29 May 2015
14 60 7 92 Bahamas Supermarkets 10 06 11 06 1400 -2 246 0 000 N/M 0 00%
8 00 6 00 Carbbean Crossngs (Pref) 2 00 6 25 400 0 000 0 480 N/M 7 80%

055 0 40 RND Holdings 0 45 0 55 0 55 0 002 0 000 261 90 0 00%
.L . . .. . I I. i. ., , , , - F .. . J
1 4160 1 3419 CFAL Bond Fund 1 4160 462 553 31 Oct-09
3 0351 28266 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2 8552 -2 88 3 92 30 Nov-09
1 5033 1 4258 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 5033 485 524 27-Nov-09
34931 29343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2 9343 1333 1711 31-Oct-09
13 2400 12 5597 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13 2400 4 93 5 90 31- Oct-09
103 0956 100 0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 103 0956 310 2 52 30-Sep-09
100 0000 99 4177 CFAL Global Equity Fund 99 4177 312 2 76 30Sep-09
1 0804 1 0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1 0804 432 526 31 Oct-09
1 0364 1 0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1 0269 0 59 0 19 31 Oct-09
1 0742 1 0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1 0742 356 442 31-Oct-09
9 4740 90775 Royal Fidelity Bah In Investment Fund 94740 417 418 31 Oct-09
Pnnl pal Potet-d TIGRS, S. .. 1
10 6301 10 0000 Royal Fidelity Bah Int Invesment Fund 106301 630 630 31-Oct-09

BISx ALL SHARE INDEX 19 De 02 = 1,000 00 YIELD -last 12 onth dividends divided by losn pne
---- - ----- -------- -----t- --r i -,-- -T T --l I----
52wk- w H, HLowest losing pe ,n last 52 weeks Bd S B- llng opne of ColIna and FIdelty

Change Change in closing pice from dayto day EPS$ A company poed eaings per share for the last 12 mths
DaIly Vol Number of total shas tded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $- Dividends per sha paid in the last 12 months NM Not Meaningful
P/E Closing pce divided by the last 12 month eaings FINDEX The Fidely Bahamas Stock Index Januay 1, 1994 = 100
(S) 4- -for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S) f 1StO TRSp E F -5 0 -3 776 F M T EftD ON7/11/2007
TO TFKAIE CL: CFAL. 242-502-7010 I ROVA.FIDLlIT- 242-3 5C7764 I FO CAPITAL IWARKmTS 242-396-4000 I COLONIL" 242-502-7525







+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 9B


RECIPE FOR



EGGNOG




Difficulty: MediLum
Serves: 14

Ingredients:
* 1 cup of I)utter
* 1 Cup of shortening
* 3 clips of all-i)urpose flour
, �* 1 Cup) of commercial dairy eggnog
. * 1 cupI) of flaked coconut
3 3 clips of sugar
*6 eggs
* 1 teaspoon of lemon extract
* 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract
..* 1 teaspoon of coconut extract


* A real taste of
junkanoo


By JEFFARAH GIBSON

A multi-
coloured 18-
inch edible
junkanoo doll is the
featured treat of this
year's Christmas sea-
son at the Nassau
bakery Somethings
Different.
Making its debut this Fri-
day, the store's co-owner
Samantha Moree told Tribune
Taste that the junkanoo doll
is already attracting the atten-
tion of a number of pastry con-
noisseurs.
"Already the reception has
been favourable, and we have
had a number of requests for
the junkanoo doll," she said.
Mrs Moree, who owns


Somethings Different Novelty
Cookies and Cakes with her
husband Ian, said they have
created dolls before, but never
have they made an edible doll
that has cultural significance.
"It was just simply our
desire to make something dif-
ferent, something that is
Bahamian, and this was the
reason behind the introduc-
tion of the 18-inch edible
junkanoo doll," Mrs Moree
said.
Last year, edible Christmas
tree ornaments were the most
popular treats at the bakery
on Alexander Street in Palm-
dale.
Outside of holiday specific
treats, one of the bestselling
items is the photo cookie.
Customers can select a pho-
tograph to be printed onto a
cookie, which can then can be
used as a delicious party orna-


ment.
Using vegetable based ink,
sugar sheets, and a special
printer, the image is printed
onto traditional chocolate,
guava, or orange shortbread
cookies. And all of the inks
used are FDA approved.
Mrs Moree said that she
and her husband are artists
who simply prefer using
dough as a canvas.
"We are artists who learned
to bake, and we wanted to
continue art but just with a
different medium. We don't
see it as just food but as a
blank canvas where we can
make our customers' requests
come alive," she said.
And it doesn't matter if you
walk into the store without
anything in mind, the Morees
will help inspire you and
make your wish an edible
reality.


"Some people are limited
by their imagination and we
enjoy the process of taking
our customer's dream and
translating it onto a cake,"
Mrs Moree said.
The pastries, cookies, and
jam platters (the products can
be intermixed to make one
specialty platter) are designed
to order.
Some of the existing gift
package ideas, which can eas-
ily be changed to suit individ-
ual taste, are the assorted
cookie trays, cookie tins,
cookie jars and boxes that
include a variety of goodies.
The Morees have been run-
ning their business for over
five years now, and have
gained a reputation for mak-
ing delicious hand-decorated
pastries.
The moment you step into
the doors of Somethings Dif-
ferent Novelty Cookies and
Cakes the sweet aroma of
freshly baked pastries hits
you, and the cozy setup is
almost an exact replica of a
European-style bakery.
For more information visit
www.somethingsdifferent.biz.


Directions:
Preheat oven to 325'F.
Cream bI)utter and shortening. Gradually adcd sugar.
beating well.
Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each
addition.
Using a Sl)poon, add flour to creamed mixture alter-
iately with eggilog, beginning and ending with
flour.
Stir in coconut and flavorings. Blend well. Pour
batter into well-g reased and floured 10-inch tube
paln.
Bake at 325'F for 1 1.2 hours.1 ol 10 minutes in
pail. Remove. s l


-- ).
U-
* 1'~
- 4 -h -


THE MOREES have been running their business for
over five years now, and have gained a reputation
for making delicious hand-decorated pastries.


,//( )/

,-* -� / a


4V


A CAKE OF ART

HANNAH Alliiry couldn't have been happier
\-ith her art assignment. She and the rest of the
sixth grade art class at St Andrews School were
challenged to find an alternative art form to do
their project on for this semester. Hannah
completed her assignment with flying coloturs
\\ith a little assistance from lan lmoree. one of
the artists at Somethings Different Noveltv
Cookies and Cakes. Her chosen medium? Cake.


Share your news


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[ l I, - IIsilkIM ihI 'l l
101 IIIIP \_Il '\ . 11III I Ih-.

II .0. ..' 11II,\ *I122-I ' ,
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ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


K


TASTE


lff#�w







+


PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


ITRATIOAL E


INTERNATIONAL


TOMORR(
pated off
tion of th<
Film Festival (Bl
Hollywood star
being honourec
acclaimed movie
shown, this yea
be a spectac-
ular event.
Taking place
from December 10-
17, the festival will
showcase 68 films
from 26 countries,
including 38 fea-
tures of which sev-
eral are world or
international pre-
mieres, and nearly
all Bahamian pre-
mieres.
The four compe-
tition categories at
BIFF are Spirit of
Freedom: Narra-
tive; Spirit of Freedc
and Short Film. Spec
Sidebar, World Cin
Spotlight and special
"The 6th Bahamas
ers a wide assortment
that will no doubt en
the week. For anyone
for independent film
val will be a special
pool, founder and ex
Among the films s
drama 'Skin' starring
ing Star; Steven Sode
ence'; Joshua Goldin'
starring Matthew Brc
taries 'Sweet Crude'
just a few.
Bahamian filmma]
indie drama 'Childre
this year's festival a;
while Lee Daniels' c
starring Gabourey
Kravitz, Mo'Nique, S
will bring the week's
closing night film.
Festival patron Sir
ing his full support t]
December 13, interim
ny Depp will be hon
ment Tribute.
Then on Tuesday,
of Photography Gavi
First Bahamian Trib
And on Wednesda
nominee Sophie Ok
will be feted with the
ute. Festival-goers wi
rock icon Lenny Kr
Daniels and a host of
ebrate cinema in par
The full BIFF pro
online at www.bintlf
Booking for the 2(
can be purchased at t
Collins Avenue.


Award-winning short film to raise awareness of war-affe


'ANA'S Playground', the interna-
tional award-winning short film to be
shown at this year's Bahamas Inter-
national Film Festival (BIFF) tack-
les the serious topic of children liv-
ing in armed conflict.
The film has already won awards at
four of the past six film festivals it
was screened at, including most
recently its "Best International Short"
win at the Oscar-qualifying 2009 Foyle
Film Festival in Northern Ireland.
Set in a non-specific, war-torn coun-
try, 'Ana's Playground' is an exami-
nation of children living and dying in
a world of armed combat.
Told through the eyes of 11-year-
old Ana, the story opens on a group
of children playing soccer surrounded
by the signs of war.
When their soccer ball is kicked
into a sniper zone, Ana is sent in to
retrieve it.
Once inside, a dangerous game of
cat and mouse ensues, as Ana


becomes the sniper's target.
Connected through the power of
sport, the characters all listen to the
same professional soccer game which
plays in the background. Viewers will
be kept guessing as to how the story
will reach its ultimate conclusion -
will their games end up in harmony or
tragedy?
" 'Ana's Playground' is an allegory
about the moment a child is forced
to choose
between humanity and ideology,"
said filmmaker Eric Howell. "The
film is not a political statement about
a particular war or conflict, instead it
directly examines the delicate nature
of a child's humanity and how the
world at large is connected to and
responsible for preserving it."
The objective of 'Ana's Playground'
is to raise awareness about how war
and violence affect children by com-
municating with the largest audience
possible.


There's also an opportunity to pro-
vide information about organizations
working to improve the lives of chil-
dren living in violent conditions.
"The film's conclusion will resonate
with viewers leaving behind a power-
ful message audiences will be unable
to forget," said Johann Koss, presi-
dent and CEO of Right to Play.
Raven Bellefleur, the 11-year-old
actress who plays Ana, leads an all-
Minnesotan cast, and producers Mar-
sha Trainer and Jillian Nodland
worked hard to pull together and
organise resources to shoot the film in
one cold November week in the Twin
Cities.
With a background that demon-
strates a balance of studio films and
independents, writer-director Eric
Howell is on a mission to raise aware-
ness for short films, but also the plight
of war-affected children around the
globe.
Early in his career, Howell devel-


ope
a st
feat
Joe
P
con
T
par
dati
spo
fest
aud
affe
hell
F
infc
dre
tiol
htt1
T
on
Gal
aga
5.3(
atr


Music documentary 'Rise Up' takes us into the underground music con


AMONG the many offerings at
this year's Bahamas International
Film Festival (BIFF) is the award-
winning music documentary film
'Rise Up' which showcases Jamaica's
underground music community and
the struggles, dreams, and aspira-
tions of three young artists vying for
their shot at success.
Directed by Argentine Luciano
Blotta, the documentary was the win-
ner of the "Best Music Documen-
tary Award" at the AFI/Discovery
Channel Silverdocs film festival.
'Rise Up' chronicles the experi-
ences of three Jamaican musicians as
they fight for a place in the over-
crowded reggae field.
Inspired by the graphitised walls
of Kingston, exotic countryside of
Clarendon, pristine beaches of Mon-
tego Bay, and remote ghetto dance-
hall parties, the music documentary
captures the stark poverty, inequal-
ity and violence residing among a
talented and proud Jamaican peo-
ple.
Over a four-year period, director
Blotta followed Turbulence, a charis-
matic lyrical master from the ghetto;
Ice, the privileged songwriter from


uptown Kingston, and Kemoy, a shy
angelic songstress from the country.
Blotta captures the raw ambition
of each aspiring artist with an inti-
mate and unique camera style, giving
them their first taste of fame as well
as a vehicle to turn their dreams into
reality.
The documentary also features
veteran music insiders and aims to
offer inspiration and homage
through true spirits of reggae music,
including legendary producers Lee
"Scratch" Perry, Sly Dunbar, and
Robbie Shakespeare.
With compelling footage and high
commercial appeal, the film was
quickly sought after by numerous
broadcasters and film festivals.
Producer Darrin Holender said
that "having the film released by
companies like BBC Storyville is
nothing short of a major achieve-
ment for us."
Following its world premiere at
the International Documentary Film
Festival Amsterdam (IDFA) and its
North American premiere at Hot-
Docs, 'RiseUp' has screened to full
houses and rave reviews and has
gained the attention of many indus-


-JA*


TURBULENCE, a charismatic lyrical master fro
the subjects of the award-winning music docu


try insiders and music lovers.
While 'RiseUp' is Blotta's first
feature documentary film, the direc-
tor has previously worked on major
Hollywood productions, operating
video systems for celebrated direc-
tors such as Ron Howard, Steven
Soderbergh, John Woo and Steven
Spielberg.


tim
6pr
leri
ve;
ber
Kei
day
Art


OW night is the antici-
icial start of the 6th edi- r w *
e Bahamas International
FF). And with big name
s like Johnny Depp
d and critically *,
ies such 'Precious' being
air's festival promises to
















om: Documentary; New Visions;
cial sections include a Caribbean
ema showcase, Hispanic Cinema
I screenings.
s International Film Festival deliv-
It of films from around the world
itertain and enliven the island for ililn
iawho sharetions incere appreciation im 1
s of the highest quality, this festi-
experience," said Leslie Vander-
ecutive director of BIFF. : ''
screening at BIFF this year are the
g Sophie Okonedo, BIFF's Ris- in
erbergh's 'The Girlfriend Experi-
s dark comedy 'Wonderful World'
oderick, and acclaimed documen-
and 'House of Numbers', to name Mi li

ker Kareem Mortimer's acclaimed
n of God' will raise the curtain at
s the official opening night film,
critically lauded drama 'Precious'
Sidibe, Mariah Carey, Lenny .i ffll*
;herri Shepherd and Paula Patton, * *i
festivities to an end as the official ll*.i.li. ..

* Sean Connery will again be lend-
hroughout the week. On Sunday,
nationally acclaimed actor John- il....... I
poured with the Career Achieve- * iif t

December 15, Bahamian Director IR iii .
in McKinney will be awarded the I
ute Award. * *I
y, December 16, Academy Award i * i
onedo ('Hotel Rwanda,' 'Skin')
festival's special Rising Star Trib-
ll also want to keep an eye out for i li i
avitz, celebrated filmmaker Lee * a i
f Hollywood talent in town to cel- *Ii
adise 1 * I iMi I
ogramme is available in print or *i I I *
ilmfest.com.
009 festival is now open. Tickets i mB I
he BIFF Office, 4th Terrace East, *
k*llll I.lll.



cited children *a

-d his directing skills by working as
untman/coordinator on numerous i.
ture films including North Country, ' I.l
Somebody, Fargo and A Simple
Ilan as well as hundreds of TV
nmercials and music videos.
Fhe filmmakers are interested in J'I
tnering with corporations, foun-
ions and individuals who can help *
*nsor 'Ana's Playground' at film
ivals and screening events to help
diences learn more about war-
ected children and organizations ii I i
ping them. ilill l l Iii
7or details on the film or more | l
formation about war-affected chil- *
n, child soldiers and the organisa-
ns that support them, visit: i
p://www.anasplayground.com. *.m
Fhe film will screen twice - once M f l
Sunday, December 13 at llam at i
lleria JFK Cinema Theatre 2 and imi
in on Monday, December 14 at il liml:M liii
0 pm at Galleria JFK Cinema The- i i. . hn . 11
e3. Ii Jiai



nunity in Jamaica . .


m the Jamaican ghetto, is one of Dr EaitIn.
mentary 'RiseUp'. i.lsa ey SfiiB

RiseUp' will be shown three i
les during the film festival: At
n on Friday, December 11 at Gal- TayDcTer17 n
a Cinemas, John F Kennedy Dri- in
at 3.30pm on Sunday, Decem-
13 at Galleria Cinemas, John F
nnedy Drive, and at 9pm on Mon- isi il
y, December 14 at the National
SGallery of the Bahamas.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


TASTE I




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