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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01463
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: December 7, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01463

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FOR$3.79 "n lovl, ,

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The


Tribune


BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


WAKEU,
To A e lOf
Premium Rout Coffe


Volume: 106 No.14 MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009 PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)


MEET THE


FIRST


t it4 SEE PAGE THREE


SIe


Supreme Court

judge robbed

at gunpoint

A SUPREME Court judge was held up and
robbed at gunpoint in broad daylight over the
weekend, highlighting a recent spate of daring
robberies throughout the capital.
Supreme Court judge Rhonda Bain was
robbed at gunpoint Saturday morning, accord-
ing to police. Justice Bain, 57, was appointed
a Supreme Court judge in August. Police say
that they received reports of an armed robbery
in the parking lot of Scotia Bank, East Bay
Street, around 10 am Saturday.
Police press liaison officer Sgt Chrislyn
Skippings told The Tribune, "Police spoke
with the judge who stated that while getting
SEE page eight


THE Bahamian track and
field community and the
wider public are mourning
the death of a "vibrant, out-
going and brotherly" young
athlete who died in a traffic
accident in the early hours
of Saturday morning.
According to police, hur-
dler Christopher Bethel was
a passenger in a vehicle with
Bahamian Olympian sprint-
er Adrian Griffith travelling
east on West Bay Street
near the Breezes Hotel
when a grey coloured taxi,
licence plate 1040, is said to
have reversed from the hotel
ramp on to the main West
Bay Street road.
Mr Griffith, who was the
driver of the vehicle with
Christopher as the passen-
ger, told police he avoided
the taxi, but lost control of
the vehicle and hit a tree.
He received minor injuries
to his hand and knee.
However, 25-year-old
Christopher, a member of
the Bahamas national team,


Foir Her:


*A&s,-fAwmiv

For Him *o M
FAPNimr
AM 00:
'A N 4#NONI *
Rd a� - MH P


was pronounced dead at the
scene.
Police spokesman Sgt
Chrislyn Skippings said the
taxi did not remain at the
scene of the accident.
"We are appealing to
members of the public who
have any information of the
vehicle or the owner of the
vehicle to contact the police
at 919 or 328-TIPS," she
said.
Christopher, a 2003 grad-
uate of St Augustine's Col-
lege and a 2008 graduate of
Illinois-based McKendree
University, was in the
process of readying himself
for the 2010 track season
when he hoped to qualify
for the Bahamas' Common-
wealth Games team.
The night before Christo-
pher Bethel was killed in a
traffic accident, his name
was mentioned in a
Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations' meet-


SEE page nine


Police investigation into student's alleged
relationship with teacher is criticised


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
THE aunt of a female stu-
dent, who was allegedly
involved in a sexual relation-
ship with a male teacher, has
criticised the police investiga-
tion into the matter.
She spoke out after learning
that the teacher might have
fled the country with his fam-
ily, although police, she claims,
have evidence and a com-
plaint from her niece regard-
ing the alleged affair.
The teacher, who was also a
reserve police officer at the
time, is said to have had sexu-
al relations with the student


GMildron
* k
:00



AAW


while she was in the 10th
grade at St Paul's Methodist
College.
The aunt learned of the
alleged affair in October after
a local newspaper reported
that a photo of male genitalia
was sent by emails to a female
student. The emails were cir-
culated to the police, school
board officials and a school
psychologist.
According to the aunt,
someone got access to her
niece's emails, copied and cir-
culated them.
She said her niece, who was
graduated in June, later admit-
ted she and her teacher were
SEE page nine


ACTING
Deputy Commis-
sioner of Police
Elliston Greenslade
has been appointed f
to act as Commis-
sioner of Police as
incumbent Com-
missioner Reginald
Ferguson began
pre-retirement
leave on Friday.
Mr Greenslade
had previously held ELLI
the post of Acting GREEI
Deputy Commis-
sioner of Police. Senior
Assistant Commissioner
Marvin Dames has been
appointed to act as Deputy
Commissioner of Police, the
cabinet has also confirmed.
Incumbent Commissioner
Ferguson will retire on Jan-
uary 4 of next year, as he
will be beyond the retire-


IST
NS


ment age of 60
mandated by the
new Police Service
o . Act.
A new Commis-
sioner of Police and
a new Deputy Com-
missioner will be
substantively
appointed with
effect from that
date. In accordance
with the Constitu-
ON tion and the Police
LADE Act, the formal
appointments will
be made by Governor Gen-
eral Arthur Hanna acting
on the advice of Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham after
consultation with Leader of
the Opposition Perry
Christie.
The Progressive Liberal
SEE page eight


Christmas "'S"
Decorations

Kelly
To- S-


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


Hurdler Christopher

Bethel, 25, killed in

Cable Beach accident


0 - - Grenlad toac
aPoice onui0 0ne


-JLqL
VA





+>


PAGE 2, MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


^ _ANNUAL AUTHENTICALLY
r e1* B CHRISTMAS (RAFT AND SOUVENIR SHOW


THE BAHAMAS Ministry of
Tourism and the Bahamas
Hotels Association held the
annual Authentically Bahamian
Christmas Craft and Souvenir
Show at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort and Crystal Palace Casi-
no Cable Beach at the week-
end. Paintings, jewellery and
other goods were on display.


3ojn


iJutl


can be yours this Chrismas. Shop Jon Bul tis hodday
ason for t opportunity to take home the ultimate
Christmas gift, valued at over $14,000. Ask your sales


associate for details.


. i . . I ,


.I Now tlroiuot


December 31st, redeem your Christmas cash eaings
at any bhn Bull owned store. p iona ds ,m be
as ~1 Dn an w Si n atWl dWo or pnonooU )


Fetlie, Fung
PetCoto


A HOST of vibrant straw
goods on display at this stall at
the Authentically Bahamian
Christmas Craft and Souvenir
S Show.


E


Felip6 Major/Tribune staff


IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I








+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 3


Marvin Gibson 'is a



man of the people'

By AVA TURNQUEST
turnquest.ava@gmail.com i A B


THE Tribune's first Unsung
Hero has a seemingly inex-
haustable passion for the acad-
emic and social development of
the people of South Andros
Marvin R. Z. Gibson was
nominated by a very grateful
Xavier Bowe.
Mr Bowe remarked: "This is
a person who will give his last to
help others, he is a person of
the people and for the people."
It was in 1985 when Mr Gib-
son fell in love with South
Andros. He was seven years old
when his mother Elqueena Bas-
tian relocated to the island with
his step-father. Before their
move, Mr Gibson recalls spend-
ing his childhood in the Straw
Market where his mother was a
vendor.
There, young Mr Gibson
would sing for the tourists and
entertain vendors with a tire-
less rendition of "I'm Bound for
that City".
Twenty-four years later, Mr
Gibson continues to funnel the
same positive energy into his
capacity as an administrative
assistant at the local govern-
ment office in South Andros.
His goal, to broadcast and
develop the youth and their tal-
ents on a national platform.
"One of the things that has
fueled my passion," admitted
Mr Gibson, "is my desire to see
South Andros go forward, to
see South Andros do better and
our people advance. I believe
that there is no office in this
country that the young people
of South Andros can't hold, no
task they can't get done.
"But not just young people,
South Andros in its entirety.
We have senior citizens here
that have done exceptionally
well in propelling the island to
where it is today. A lot of peo-
ple don't remember or take the
time to appreciate these people
for the things they have done."
His passion for music trans-
lated into the establishment and
management of a music and
drama club, currently suspend-
ed, that served as a positive out-
let for the youth at South
Andros High School.
Through the club, Mr Gib-
son challenged students to car-
ry themselves with discipline,
explaining that this trait is
invaluable to the successful indi-
vidual.
Mr Gibson touts the club's
most memorable achievement
as their participation at the Sir
Lynden Pindling Airport
renaming ceremony. He
recalled how they received the
request for them to sing at the
event just days before, but he
and the students were able to
compose an original song and
deliver an exceptional perfor-
mance.
"We put on several shows
which were very well attend-
ed," added Mr Gibson. "Even
the MP was surprised because
he didn't realise there was that
much talent here."
Largely due to his persistent
agitation, Androsians in this
southern district now enjoy a
community computer lab where











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EVEN IF you do not
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PRIDE OF T

students are afforded global
exposure within a structured
environment. At the lab, Mr
Gibson allows students his time
and any personal resources to
assist them with homework,
projects or life struggles.
"The computer lab and the
music and drama club, are two
achievements that mean a lot
to me," admitted Mr Gibson.
"The club was started under
the administration of Principal
Moss, he called on me to get
involved with an initiative he


HEROES
HE BAHAMAS

had to get kids involved."
Mr Gibson also wears
another hat as a police reserve
officer, a position he has held
for six years. As a reserve, he
targets children on mandatory
community service from the
courts, managing clean-up pro-
grammes and like sentences.
He maintains that he utilizes
this forum as an opportunity
to positively influence strug-
gling young adults, showing
them a better way.
The 31-year-old accredits his


unwavering optimism and sta-
mina to a strong support base
of family, friends and co-work-
ers. He boasts a healthy rela-
tionship with both parents,
communicating daily, even
though his father Eric Gibson
lives in New Providence.
"Trust in almighty God has
kept me," added Mr Gibson.
"Also church and South
Andros High School have had
a great impact on who I am
today."
In all things, Mr Gibson con-
tinues to give thanks, and one
day aspires to be a Family
Island Administrator so that
he can continue to bring a
greater focus to the family
islands.
His motto: "Whatever you
do, live to live again."


'TIS THE SEASON TO SAVE


242.328.3040
56 MADEIRA TREE-, PALMOALE - WWW.MICRONET.BS


MARVIN and South Andros High School students perform an origi-
nal song called 'Lost Boys' at a Music & Drama Show.


MARVIN AND SOUTH ANDROS HIGH SCHOOL students perform
an original song called 'Lost Boys' at a Music & Drama Show.


TO NOMINATE YOUR UNSUNG HERO, EITHER WRITE, OR EMAIL,
SAY WHY HE OR SHE IS DESERVING OF PRAISE. IN YOUR
NOMINATION PUT YOUR NAME AND CONTACT TELEPHONE
NUMBER, AND ALSO THE CONTACT DETAILS OF YOUR HERO.
MARK YOUR ENVELOPE "UNSUNG HEROES" AND DROP IT IN
AT THE TRIBUNE RECEPTION DESK, OR EMAIL YOUR DETAILS TO
TRIBUNE@TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET


CARPET, FURNITURE. MARBLE & TILE CARE
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T1~7


PAGE 4, MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


EIOI AULETE S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, c, tiinn') 322-1986
Ad c,' iiing Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


Each Bahamian is responsible for country


THERE ARE those - mainly politicians
- who blame the Ingraham administration
for waiting for President Barack Obama to
solve the Bahamas' economic woes by turn-
ing the US economy around. They claim
that Mr Ingraham is doing nothing to relieve
the pain that the global credit crunch has
inflicted on the Bahamas, and as a result on
the earning power of its people.
If Bahamians objectively consider the
basis of the Bahamas' economy - tourism
and financial services - they will readily
understand that the Prime Minister is limit-
ed to what he can do. Both props to our
economy have been hit and hit badly.
We depend on tourists to support the
employment of hotel staff from laundry ser-
vices to front desk management. We need
tourists to keep taxis and their drivers on
the road. We need tourists to shop in our
shops, from the petty shops to the high end
boutiques. If any of these areas fail then all
those support groups that supply services to
these various enterprises and maintain the
country's infrastructure will feel the pinch.
There is no area of the nation - extending
as far as our Family Island farmers - that
will not feel the impact of the common-
wealth's commercial slowdown. This will
result in the loss of jobs and high unem-
ployment - bills to pay, and more bills to
pay and nothing with which to pay them
coming in either the front or back door. It is
a desperate state to be in.
The only way to solve the problem is to
get tourist numbers up, and how would Mr
Ingraham increase visitor numbers if those
visitors themselves are in the same position
as we are - no jobs, loss of homes, no mon-
ey, no travel. It is not as though the people
on whom we depend to keep our economy
moving are Bahamians. These are foreigners
- mainly Americans - and if they can't
pay their mortgage, have lost their homes
and their jobs, then there is nothing that Mr
Ingraham can do about it. Indeed he has to
do what he can with the limited resources of
a small country, and pray that President
Obama's policies will help jump-start the
American economy. And even the Presi-
dent is not in full control of what happens
next - it all depends on market forces.
And so Mr Ingraham has no choice but to
look to the north and hope that stability will
return to the United States and that the flow
of visitors to these islands will resume.
However, this is not all up to Mr Ingra-
ham.
It would be good for Bahamians to enter
cyberspace and read online what is being
said about this country, its services, its grub-
by look, and its crime - mainly its crime. It


is up to each and every Bahamian to
improve and protect this country. It is the
way the outside world sees us as to whether
foreigners will want to spend any time here.
And, if because of our carelessness, for-
eigners, whose dollars are desperately need-
ed, cross the Bahamas off their list of desir-
able destinations, then it is your job, your
business and your family that suffers. So
don't look to Mr Ingraham and the govern-
ment for everything. The ball is mainly in the
court of each and every Bahamian.
It is in the best interest of every Bahami-
an to assist the police in removing gun-toting
criminals, vagrants and prostitutes from our
streets. And it is the duty of each police offi-
cer to aggressively pursue criminals, whether
they be friend or family. It is also the duty of
the courts to keep criminals with guns behind
bars.
Unless we all work together to clean up
this country, there is no point in looking to
either Prime Minister Ingraham or Presi-
dent Obama. Neither can help us. Today
the travelling public has too many choices of
places to spend their time and money, and if
the Bahamas is not one of them, then it is
our fault, and our loss.
The same goes for the investor on whom
our financial services depends. Today the
global money market is so tight that an
investor finds it difficult - if not impossible
- to get enough credit, either to complete
projects or start new ones.
The nurses with their insurance, and oth-
er civil servants who claimed they were owed
money by government, should now under-
stand and appreciate the importance of the
foreign investor. Earlier this year govern-
ment told nurses that it had to defer payment
of their health insurance until later because
of the projected revenue shortfall. The short-
fall was expected to exceed $200 million.
The nurses should also understand the
difference an investor can make. When
South Riding Point Holdings' storage facil-
ity in Grand Bahama was purchased by Sta-
toil Hydro, overnight the Treasury was made
$66.6 million richer. This meant that gov-
ernment could fulfil its financial obligations
to the nurses and other civil servants.
But Mr Ingraham is captain of a ship with
limited resources. Unless, he can manage
spending with wise judgment and wait for the
markets from which we get our revenue to
improve, he will be presiding over a major
financial shipwreck.
So don't listen to the ill-informed chatter
in the market place. It will take all of us
working together - including the foot-drag-
ging Opposition - to get the Bahamas and
its people back on track.


Many crimes go




unpunished in the




Bahamas asylum


EDITOR, The Tribune.

What in this Bahamas of
ours is being considered crime
- being shot or being stabbed?
This I must say is just a bit too
late.
Thousands of crimes being
committed in this Bahamian
community go without being
addressed - without the per-
petrators being confronted.
This failure to confront these
infractions is the crime which
needs seriously to be confront-
ed.
We are all to be indicted,
Government, police, church
leaders, school teachers and
administrators, parents and
adults everywhere.
We need to insist that every
infraction is addressed and is
not to be tolerated. I wish to
draw attention to these areas
of offence: profanity, littering,
disturbing the peace with motor
bikes and music booming in
vehicles going by and making
our streets a circus on motor-
bikes.
Thousands and thousands of
such infractions are gotten
away with every day - are
committed every day without
a word being said, without
resulting in the response of No!
No! No!
Is this not how the best of us
were trained? Was it not always
made clear when the right
action was taken and when the
wrong action was taken? There
is not much difference between
how we train our pets - I think
of dogs and dolphins - and
how we train children.
We cannot let the citizen
get away with a million tiny
infractions and wait until they
have murdered or maimed
someone to hand cuff them.
I see too much littering; I
hear too much profanity from
children passing my house in
uniforms. I hear noises vehicles
make and music in them, ampli-
fied often times until earth and
heaven shake, and all of these it
seems, in this travesty of a
country are just all right.
What is this atmosphere of
mayhem about? Is it cover-up
or a convenient decoy for those
in authority in our country to
themselves do and get away
with criminal and unacceptable
acts? Why are we not insisting
that this little country with its
tiny population be run like the
best homes are run?
Why are we not insisting
upon discipline? This dog asso-
ciation is haunting me while I
write. What are insisting upon
being included in this debate
are police dogs. How are they
trained? Are they not rewarded
when what is desirable is per-
formed? Are they not shouted
at, "No!" when undesirable acts
are performed?
I have had occasion to shout
at young people recently - fel-
low residents of Kemp Road.
Yesterday, disgusted, I shouted


at a girl about 15 who emptied
a cellophane bag of what must
have been salty, smothered in
hot sauce, and found it conve-
nient to dump her filth at her
feet beside the road.
Shortly after, I found myself,
unable to hold back, con-
fronting half-a-dozen high
school, female students, await-
ing the bus before my house,
aggressively conversing, using
the most extreme profanity.
Twice in the last couple
months, around 3 a.m., hearing
a disturbance, I opened my
door only to discover a pack of
boys, with stones, smashing the
street lamp in front of my
house. I spontaneously shouted,
"No! Don't!" only to have
them, both times, direct their
stones at me, at my upstairs
porch.
Walking along Kemp Road
recently, south to Shirley Street,
I noticed street lights all along
the road with their shades
smashed and in pieces on the
ground. This I must say sick-
ened me. Destruction sickens
me. Is this not our own coun-
try? Is this not our very own
property that these young peo-
ple are destroying?
Are these not our very own
tax dollars which are being
squandered? Why therefore
this self-destruction? What sick-
ness is this needing to be imme-
diately addressed?
Why though, with all of
these signs that the train has
jumped the track that the car
is off the road, are we waiting


until someone is maimed or
killed before we act?
I say again, this is CRIMI-
NAL. To refuse to discipline
our children is criminal.
Not to reprimand them every
time they go astray or leave the
path, the straight and narrow, is
to have neglected them.
They need pruning just as
trees and plants do if they are
to flower and to fruit as they
should. Insufficient is done to
model the Bahamian citizen.
Too little is done too late. What
I must bear at this moment and
often, I clench my teeth, I ball
my fist in response. I find it
unbelievable the motorbike
noises, the noise of music from
vehicles, amplified to an entire-
ly unbearable pitch and the per-
petrators are allowed to feel
that these choices or their
behaviour is entirely accept-
able.
I am seething with contempt
- contempt for these criminals
but also for who has the man-
date to govern and those
employed to uphold laws but
do nothing or say nothing and
act always too late - act only
when someone is maimed or
killed.
What, I say again in conclu-
sion, of the thousands of crimes
which are committed and got-
ten away with ever day, and
what of the thousands every-
day, who commit and get away
with them?
Living in this country - in
what is considered normalcy, is
like living in an asylum

OBEDIAH
MICHAEL SMITH,
8:58 a.m.,
Kemp Road,
November 2, 2009.


EDITOR, The Tribune.

I would be grateful if you could include the following
sentiments in one of your pages, either in the Business Sec-
tion, the Fed Up/Vex section or plain letters if approved:
Would all merchants or owners of businesses please train
your staff in elementary manners how to address your cus-
tomers who enter your respective establishments to purchase
your products. Addressing women as "Mother" is inappro-
priate and rude. How did this nonsense begin? It is certain
that the lady customer did not give prior permission to be
called "Mother" by your staff. In most cases, the lady is not
even a mother, and certainly does not wish your employee
to be her child.
What if she responded by addressing your employee as
"boy" or "girl"/"gal". They would not like that!
In a tourist country such as The Bahamas, it seems that
Bahamians have a lot to learn to compete adequately. Even
the temporary salespeople now in Nassau for a limited peri-
od address lady patrons as "lady". Is it any wonder that
Bahamians, whenever possible, prefer to shop abroad rather
than be annoyed/insulted at home?

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7Th


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 5


* CALNEWS


Woman struck
on the head at
Junkanoo festival
POLICE are investigating
an incident in which a woman
was struck on the forehead
while attending a Junkanoo
festival.
At about 12.20am Saturday,
an anonymous caller contacted
police to say a woman had
been stabbed at the Joe Billy
Junkanoo festival.
When police arrived at the
scene they spoke to a 33-year-
old woman who said she was
struck on the left side of her
forehead with an unknown
object. The woman was taken
to hospital for treatment.
* A TOURIST had his sun-
glasses stolen while window
shopping in the downtown
area on Saturday.
The 19-year-old visitor, from
Florida, was near the Perfume
Bar, Bay Street, when he was
accosted by a man who
snatched his Oakley shades.
The tourist was uninjured,
and a man is helping police
with their inquiries.

Hugo Chavez says
drought threatens
hydroelectric am
CARCAS, Venezuela
PRESIDENT Hugo Chavez
said water levels are still falling
at dams that supply most of
Venezuela's electricity, warn-
ing on Sunday that drought pos-
es a serious threat to energy
production, according to Asso-
ciated Press.
Chavez made the comment
while thanking Cuba for its help
in a cloud-seeding effort that
the government hoped would
ease a severe drought that has
put hydroelectric reservoirs at
their lowest levels in decades
and is aggravating electricity
outages plaguing the country.
"All the reservoirs, with
some exceptions, continue
falling," Chavez said during his
weekly radio and television pro-
gram.
Hydroelectric dams produce
about 70 percent of Venezue-
la's energy needs, and Chavez
warned that with the rainy sea-
son ending this month, signifi-
cant rainfall isn't likely to return
until May or June.


BEC fuel surcharges drop




by almost three cents


CUSTOMERS OF the
Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration will be receiving a
much-needed break this
holiday season as fuel sur-
charges dropped by almost
three cents for the month
of December.
BEC announced this
weekend that the Fuel Sur-
charge for December 2009


But corporation encourages energy efficient practices


is 9.38 cents per unit as com-
pared to 12.24 cents per unit
for November 2009 - down
by 2.86 cents per unit.
The fuel surcharge is
some 62 per cent lower than
the all time peak of 24.7


cents per unit experienced
last summer.
However, the corporation
once again encourages all
customers to continue to
implement energy efficient
practices in their homes and


businesses, as conservation
is key.
With many home owners
expected to deck their
abodes with lights in the
upcoming month, the cor-
poration is also reminding


customers to ensure that
Christmas lights and other
electrical equipment are
installed and used in a safe
and responsible manner
during the Christmas sea-
son.


Student, 17, is stabbed in

shoulder on school campus


A 17-YEAR-OLD male student
has been stabbed in the shoulder,
the latest in a series of violent inci-
dents on school campuses across
the country.
Police say that around 3.19pm
on Friday they received a report of
an altercation at the C.I. Gibson
Junior High School on Marathon
Estates.


Officers responded to the scene
and spoke with a 17-year-old who
claimed he was attacked by two
male students both armed with
knives.
The victim was stabbed in his low-
er left arm.
He was taken to hospital where
he was treated and allowed to go
home.


DEPUTY PRIME MINIS-
TER and Minister of For-
eign Affairs Brent Symon-
ette, seated left, signs The
Bahamas' Tax Information
Exchange Agreement
(TIEA) with The Nether-
lands on Friday, December
4, 2009 in The Hague,
Netherlands. It is the
eighth TIEA signed by The
Bahamas. State Secretary
for Finance Jan Kees de
Jager, signed on behalf of
the Netherlands.


THE spate of armed robberies hit-
ting New Providence continued over
the weekend.
Sometime around 7.45 pm on Fri-
day, the police received information
of an armed robbery at Kings Auto,
Sunlight Cottage off East Street.


A dark man in dark clothing
allegedly armed with a handgun
entered the store demanding cash.
The culprit was given an undeter-
mined amount of cash and fled the
area on foot in an easterly direction.
Police are investigating.


J t
-,


as v
r t . -w
'V


Jamaican official calls on islanders
to cut their water consumption


KINGSTON, Jamaica
JAMAICA'S top water offi-
cial is urging islanders to drasti-
cally cut their water consump-
tion because of a severe drought
that has plagued the Caribbean
country for months, according
to Associated Press.
Minister of Water Horace
Chang says water restrictions
are urgent due to the persistent
dry conditions. The hardest hit
area is the capital of Kingston,


where water service is often cut
for hours each day.
The water level at the Mona
reservoir serving Kingston is
growing dangerously low. In a
Sunday statement, Chang said
the reservoir could run dry
before the major rainy season
next October next year unless
water conservation is embraced
by the public.
It was not immediately clear
how much the drought has cost
the country in crop losses.


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PAGE 6, MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Strong talk is too


late


for the Caribbean


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By SIR RONALD SANDERS
(The writer is a Consultant and
former Caribbean diplomat)
THERE is now some strong
talk by Caribbean governments
and the Secretariat of the
Caribbean Community and
Common Market (CARICOM)
about relations with the Euro-
pean Union (EU) and Latin
American countries.
But, it is strong talk that has
come too late to help Caribbean
banana-producing countries that
will suffer under a new deal
struck between the European
Commission (EC) and Latin
American countries.
The leverage that Caribbean
countries had in protecting their
banana interests resided in the
negotiations for an Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA)
between individual Caribbean
countries and the EC signed last
year. But, it was lost, when
Caribbean governments signed
an unequal treaty with the EC
that is to the detriment of the
region as a whole, and particu-
larly those countries that export
very little to Europe.
Caribbean governments have
agreed to remove tariffs on EU
goods entering their countries,
albeit on a phased basis, and to
open their economies to Euro-
pean companies to compete on
an equal footing with national
firms, but there are few benefits
they will get in return. The
notion that reciprocity opens the
EU market to goods and ser-
vices from Caribbean countries is
already proving to be a fallacy -
national restrictions in individ-
ual European nations on move-
ment of people and rights of
establishment have exposed the
emptiness of this undertaking in
the EPA.
When the EPA was being
negotiated the Caribbean should
have held out for iron-clad guar-
antees on bananas and sugar.


40 BT&



IS1^UdttueItf[*X2IUe'


insight

WORLD VIEW -


They did not. Instead they suc-
cumbed to the EC threat to
apply GSP to their exports and
they accepted an undertaking
that they would not be excluded
from the EU banana market.
Before, during and after the
negotiations on the EPA, the
EU proclaimed the principle of
"partnership". But there was no
evidence of "partnership" when
the EC barred the African,
Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)
countries from their negotiations
with the Latin American banana
producing countries.
At a press conference in
Geneva, Caribbean countries
complained that they had not
received the full text of the
agreement between the EU and
Latin American countries. Yet,
EU representatives said that
they expect the ACP countries
to endorse the agreement on Fri-
day, December 4th.
Since this commentary is
being written on December 3rd,
it is not known whether the ACP
countries endorsed the agree-
ment or not. But one lesson that
has come out of this so far is the
strength that determined unity
of the ACP can bring to its mem-
ber countries. If the ACP had
not been tough with the Euro-
pean Commission, the deal with
the Latins would have been
sealed already.
Regrettably, the ACP has not
been consistently unified and
tough.
Reports from Geneva indi-
cate that the deal struck between
the EU and the Latin American
banana producers is as follows:
the EU will cut its current most-
favoured-nation tariff from 176
Euros (US$262) to 148 Euros
per tonne, and, over the next
seven years, the tariff would be
further reduced to 114 Euros
(US$ 170) per tonne. In
exchange, the Latin American
producers will drop all out-
standing World Trade Organi-
sation (WTO) arbitrations on
the matter.
This arrangement would kill
exports of Caribbean bananas
to the EU market since the
reduced tariff on Latin Ameri-
can bananas would allow them
to land bananas in Europe at a
price that would squeeze out
Caribbean banana producers.
This development is particularly
unfair because the Latin Amer-
icans have already cornered 80
per cent of the European mar-
ket; the paltry 18 per cent
enjoyed by all the ACP coun-
tries poses little threat to them.
In return for accepting this
deal, the EU is offering all ACP
banana producing countries 190
million Euros (US$283.6 million)
for restructuring and adjustment.
However, the ACP countries are
holding-out for an increase in


the compensatory sum. They are
arguing for 250 million Euros
(US$373.2 million) to ensure
that there is adequate compen-
sation to each of the banana pro-
ducing countries. I suspect that
an increase in the sum of money
is all they will get.
But if the EU has been less
than a genuine "partner" with
the Caribbean countries than
they pledged in the EPA, there
is also evidence of insincere
behaviour toward the Caribbean
from Latin American countries.
CARICOM Secretary-Gen-
eral Edwin Carrington pointed
out the Latins were continuing to
push the Caribbean out of the
EU market even as they were
attesting to desire for a closer
relationship with the Caribbean.
Carrington is quoted by the
Caribbean Media Corporation
as saying: "It does really raise
some serious questions in my
mind as to how we are going to
reconcile those two positions.
We, in Jamaica on the sixth of
November, agreed to a meeting
in Mexico in February at the lev-
el of heads to bring about coor-
dination and harmonization
between the Rio Group of
Countries and CARICOM. We
are to be moving into a united
way. All I have to say is: we can
only unite; can all accommodate
each other if we provide scope
for one another to survive. That
to me is a fundamental issue that
has to be put frankly on the
table."
What all of this underscores is
that in international relations -
and especially in economic inter-
national relations - national
interest comes first.
The Caribbean cannot


depend on Europe to be a gra-
tuitous "partner", nor can it rely
on Latin American countries to
be concerned with Caribbean
interests.
Essentially the treatment of
CARICOM countries in inter-
national trade has to be resolved
in the WTO, and not by the
whims and fancies of other coun-
tries and regions. And the
achievement of this boils down
to winning acceptance in the
WTO that CARICOM coun-
tries (and especially the small
members of the Organisation of
Eastern Caribbean States)
should be entitled to special and
differential treatment because
of their remoteness, their small
populations, their limited
resources, their openness and
their vulnerabilities both to nat-
ural disasters and deleterious
events in the bigger countries
with which they trade.
To achieve it, CARICOM
countries have to become serious
about investing assets and intel-
lectual rigour into persistently
and convincingly arguing for a
change in the WTO rules that
accords them special and differ-
ential treatment.
Responses and previous
commentaries:
www.sirronaldsanders.com


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7Th


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 7


* CALNEWS


BYTE - The Bahamas Yearly
Technology Expo took place at
the Sheraton in Cable Beach at
the weekend.
The event was an opportuni-
ty to see the latest in computer
software and hardware as well
as energy saving devices for
the home and office.
Felipd Major/
Tribune staff

Cuba-US immigration
talks in Havana delayed
HAVANA
HIGHLY anticipated immi-
gration negotiations between
Cuba and the United States in
Havana have been pushed back
from this month to February at
the communist island's request
because of scheduling concerns,
a State Department official said
Friday, according to Associated
Press.
The official, who spoke on
condition of anonymity because
he was not authorized to speak
to the press on the issue, told
The Associated Press that both
sides intend to continue holding
periodic negotiations on immi-
gration issues twice a year, but
that bureaucratic concerns
derailed talks that had been
scheduled for early December.
"At the Cuban government's
request, the talks have been
rescheduled for February," he
said.
Regularly scheduled discus-
sions between the U.S. and Cuba
were limited to immigration
issues from 1994 until they were
canceled under President George
W. Bush in 2003. Both sides met
to discuss the issue in New York
in July and called that session
positive.
Cuba and the United States
have also revived talks to restore
direct mail service between both
countries since President Barack
Obama took office, and in Sep-
tember, Bisa Williams, the U.S.
deputy assistant secretary of state
for Western Hemisphere affairs,
traveled to Havana for those dis-
cussions.
She then stayed an extra six
days and even met with Cuban
Deputy Foreign Minister Dagob-
erto Rodriguez, however, rais-
ing hopes for a thaw in nearly a
half century of ice-cold relations.
But the postponement of
immigration discussions is the
latest in a series of small signs
neither side may be quite ready
for reconciliation after so much
discord for so long.


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PAGE 8, MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


*OCAL NEWS I


FROMpageone
t cao te dalsneerGn otsillE


Party yesterday extended con-
gratulations to Mr Greenslade
on his appointment as Acting
Commissioner of Police.
"Mr Greenslade, whose
career on the Police Force
began in 1979 after leaving
the Government High School.
has always been recognized
for performing his duties with
a standard of excellence, and
for going beyond the call of
duty in achieving the goals of
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force.
"From the very beginning,
he was awarded the coveted
Baton of Honour for gradu-
ating top of his class at the
Bahamas Police Academy,"
PLP Chairman Bradley
Roberts said in a statement
yesterday.
"This certainly set the tone
for what has been a very dis-
tinguished and successful


as Police Commissioner


career for Mr Greenslade thus
far," Mr Roberts said.
According to the PLP
Chairman, the party remains
disappointed over "the initial
'political' appointment of out-
going Commissioner of Police
Reginald Ferguson."
"This was a human exam-
ple of the FNM's policy of
'stop cancel and review'; in
what would have been the
most appropriate appoint-
ment of Mr Greenslade. This
decision, we feel, contributed
to the disintegration of trust
on the Royal Bahamas Police
Force as well as very regres-
sive crime fighting strategies
during one of the most social-
ly chaotic periods in the his-


tory of our country," Mr
Roberts said in the statement.
"Mr Greenslade in our
opinion is therefore forced to
begin his new post at a grave
disadvantage with murder
and armed robbery statistics
higher than any other time in
the life of our once peaceful
nation.
"We feel that our country
will now receive the innova-
tion and attention it so badly
needs through a recommitted
police force.
"We have no doubt that
under his able and non parti-
san leadership; we are in the
right hands during such a
time as this," the statement
read.


Supreme


Court judge


is robbed


at gunpoint


FROM page one

into her vehicle she was
accosted by a man with
dreadlocks, wearing a dark
shirt and black pants and a
tam on his head.
"The male, who was
armed with a handgun,
pushed the judge to the
ground while robbing her of
her handbag containing an
undetermined amount of
cash and personal effects."
Police say that the gun-
man fled the area in a black
two-door Honda accord
license plate 210013 with its
rear bumper missing. Police
Superintendent Ellsworth
Moss said yesterday that
there are no new develop-
ments in the investigation at
this time, but police are
actively investigating the
matter.
Police statistics reveal
that there have been 532
reported armed robberies in
the Bahamas this year. That
figure is just the number of
incidents between January
and August. Since then, the
number of armed robberies
has increased dramatically
although police have been


unable to release statistics
for the third quarter. The
Tribune's archived reports
indicate that over the past
four weeks there have been
more than 50 reported
armed robberies in the cap-
ital alone. Last Thursday
night a police officer was
shot in the buttocks when
two armed and masked gun-
men robbed a convenience
store in Fox Hill. Last
month, 18 tourists were
robbed at gunpoint while on
a Segway tour of BASH's
Earth Village.
Calls to National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest
were not returned up to
press time yesterday. PLP
Chairman Bradley Roberts
in a statement yesterday on
the appointment of Deputy
Commissioner of Police
Elliston Greenslade to the
post of Acting Commission-
er of Police noted, "Mr
Greenslade in our opinion
is therefore forced to begin
his new post at a grave dis-
advantage with murder and
armed robbery statistics
higher than any other time
in the life of our once peace-
ful nation."


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+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 9


FROM page one " "

1 0lt8gliSIVRI


involved in a two-year rela-
tionship.
The aunt said her niece filed
a complaint with police on
October 16. They also turned
over a computer to the police
and gave them statements to
assist them in their investiga-
tion.
She claims the police were
dragging their feet in the mat-
ter. She also believes there
were leaks regarding the
police investigations.
"From the start of investi-
gation it was never confiden-
tial because this man (the
teacher) knew our every move
during the whole ordeal. He
knew whenever every word I
told investigators," she claims.
"It is a betrayal of trust and it
frightens me to know that
there is no secrecy within the
(police) system ... and they
want citizens to confide in
them."
The aunt said the teacher
and his wife were close family
friends. She said they visited
their home and even baby sat
their children.
The teacher was initially
questioned by police, but later
released. He was suspended
by school board officials at St
Paul's Methodist College.
Community activist Troy
Garvey said this is the second
time a teacher facing claims
of sexual molestation has fled
the country following police
investigations.
"It is unfortunate that this
has happened again where
authorities have allowed
another teacher to get away,"
he said.
Mr Garvey was also con-
cerned about accusations that
confidential information
regarding the investigation
was being leaked from within
the police system.
"We know that the teacher
was a reserve police officer,
and so it could very well be
true that someone was in fact
giving this teacher informa-
tion," said Mr Garvey.
"This matter was brought
to me in March, but when I
went to the school principal I
was informed that it was just a
rumour going around and I
chose not to pursue it until I
was contacted by the aunt for
assistance," he said.


Mr Garvey said the issue of
sexual molestation in the
school system is a serious mat-
ter.
He noted that it is not just a
problem in the public school
system, but also in the private
sector as well. And he believes
Government and the authori-
ties have fallen down on the
job.
"It seems as if every time
something happens people
have a tendency not to be
believe children," he said.
Mr Garvey believes the
establishment of a student
task force should be imple-
mented in all schools, similar
to a student council with
responsibility of monitoring
teacher/student relationships.


LOCALN


There have been some 10
teachers removed from
schools in the country, four of
whom are in Grand Bahama.
The issue was highlighted
in January when teacher
Andre Birbal was removed
from the Eight Mile Rock
High School. He is accused of
molesting two former male
students.
Birbal, 46, resigned and fled
the country in February after
police investigations were
launched into the complaints.
He is wanted for questioning
in connection with a complaint
of unnatural sexual inter-
course.
He was arrested in May in
New York, and is awaiting
extradition to the Bahamas to
face charges.
Despite repeated requests,
there was no comment from
police on the latest allegations.


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Track star dies

in horror crash
FROM page one
ing with the coaches on the selection process for the
2010 season.
In addition to track and field while attending St
Augustine's College he was on the softball team.
Over the weekend Christopher's friends paid
tribute to him on his facebook page posting pictures
of themselves and the young athlete and many
referring to him as their "brother".
* For more on Christopher on Page 13 of Today's
sports section.


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THE


S I I I Q)


VOLLEYBALL
NPVA ACTION
Two games were played Friday night in he New Providence
Volleyball Association at the D W Davis gymnasium.
In the first game, the Johnson Lady Truckers defeated the
BTC Blackberries 25-10, 25-9 and 25-13. Kelsie Johnson led
all scorers with 17 points for the win.
Terae Sweeting scored 9 for BTC.
In the second match, the Technicians was led by Jamaal Fer-
guson's 13 points as they overcame the Saints in straight sets
25-13, 25-15 and 25-7.
Gabi Laurent scored 5 for the Saints.

BASKETBALL
CATHOLIC PRIMARY SCHOOLS
THE Catholic Diocesan Prim ary Schools will complete
their 2009 basketball regular season this week with the sud-
den death playoff scheduled for Friday at Loyola Hall, Glad-
stone Road.
Today, starting at 3:15 p.m., last year's runners-up St.
Thomas More Sparks will take to play the St. Cecilia's Strik-
ers and defending champions St. Bede's will head to
Xavier's.
Then on Wednesday, the final regular season game will be
played at St. Bede's as the Crushers host the St,. Francis
Joseph Shockers.

TENNIS
BAHAMIANS AT EDDIE HERR
GRAND Bahamian Rodney Carey Jr. was the last of the
Bahamian contingent to compete at the 2009 Eddie Herr
International Championships at the IMG Bollettieri Tennis
Academy in Bradenton, Florida.
Playing in the boys' 18 doubles quarter-final on Friday,
Carey and his Canadian partner Nikolai Haessig lost 6-4, 6-4
to the team of S. Barry of Ireland and S. McLachian of New
Zealand.
In the girls 14 doubles quarter-final, Simone Pratt and Vic-
toria Rodriquez of Mexico lost to M. King and J. Kuhlman of
the United States.
A number of Bahamians participated in the tournament
before they were ousted.


KNOWLES' ANNUAL CELEBRITY TENNIS INVITATIONAL


Knowles serves







up tennis tPreat



By BRENT STUBBS jI
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net


A R K
Knowles and
his German
mixed dou-
bles partner Anna-Lena
Groenefled showed why they
won the Wimbledon title. Then
he and Martin Damm looked
like they have the potential to
be a good doubles combo if
they ever team up.
Knowles, who has split after
two years with Indian Mahesh
Bhupathi and will be teaming
up with American Mardy Fish
in 2010, played with Damm to
pull off a 5-2 win over Ameri-
cans Dan Johnson and Jared
Palmer.
The men's doubles match
completed Knowles' annual
Celebrity Tennis Invitational
on Saturday at the National
Tennis Center. The event got
started with Knowles and
Groenefeld holding off Damm
and Ukraine's Olga Savchuk in
mixed doubles play.


In between two those match-
es, the combination of Ger-
many's Benjamin Becker and
Bahamian Davis Cupper Mar-
vin Rolle won the singles over
American Robert Kendrick
and Damm.
"It was great. I had a great
turnout, especially to have so
many kids down here. That was
the most important thing,"
Knowles pointed out.
"The weather has been fan-
tastic and the sponsors have
also been fantastic, who without
them it wouldn't have been
possible. And to the pros, if it
wasn't for them, it would not
have been a success."
While playing in Shanghai,


China, American Andy Rod-
dick suffered a knee injury and
although he had committed to
coming to joining the pros,
Knowles said he had to with-
drew as he continue his recu-
peration for next year.
But in his absence, Knowles
said he was thrilled with the
players who came to town. He
noted that they all performed
exceptionally well and the
crowd loved their perfor-
mances.
"I thought we had a great
mix right off the bat. It was nice
for the public to see me and
Anna play after winning Wim-
bledon," he said. "She's a fan-
tastic player. I think the crowd


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really loved the mixed.
"The men's singles was of a
high caliber with Kendrick and
Becker, who are in the top 50 in
the world. So that was a high
level of tennis that you nor-
mally won't see outside of
Davis Cup."
But Knowles said the men's
doubles was really a treat
because the fans got to see
three players who were once
ranked number one in the
world and the fourth one who
was in the top five.
"I thought it was a high level
of tennis. It was quite enter-
taining for the fans," said
Knowles, who will now take a
week off to relax with his fam-
ily here before he return to the
United States to get ready for
next year.
Groenefeld, the 5-foot-11
right hander who is ranked at
67 in women's singles and 25
in doubles, said she really
enjoyed playing with Knowles
and after he invited her here,
she couldn't turn down the
offer.
"It's fun, just watching the
crowd. They really enjoyed our
game. So it was good to play in
front of them," said Groene-
feld, who hope that she and
Knowles can duplicate their
championship win at the Aus-
tralian Open in January.
Damm, who teamed up with
Indian Leander Paes to win the
2006 US Open doubles title,
said he couldn't have imagined
a better place to be right now.
"The crowd had a good time,
so it was really nice to come
here to the National Tennis
Center to play here," said
Damm, who played in a num-
ber of matches against Knowles
with his former partners Daniel
Nestor and Bhupathi.
SEE page 14


Felipd Major/Tribune staff
BENJAMIN Becker hits a volley on
Saturday at the National Tennis Cen-
ter.


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+


TRIBUNE SPORTS


MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 13


Remembering an athlete who loved to have fun


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
BAHAMAS Association of
Athletic Associations' president
Mike Sands said Christopher
Bethel will be remembered as a
"jovial athlete," whom he
remembered as the "life of the
party."
But Sands said there was the
competitive side of Bethel,
whom he really got to know last
year when Bethel competed at
the Central American and
Caribbean Championships in
Cali, Colombia.
Bethel, better known as
'Nipples,' was a former base-
ball and softball player, who
ran the 110 metres hurdles. The
employee of Arawak Homes
was killed in a car accident on
Saturday morning.
Bethel, aged 25, was in the
passenger seat of the Red Hon-
da Civic being driven by
Olympic sprinter Adrian Grif-
fith. According to reports, Grif-
fith tried to avoid hitting a taxi
reversing out of the SuperClub
Breezes ramp when he collided


into a tree. The duo were
reportedly heading from a par-
ty.
They were scheduled to
attend the wedding of basket-
ball/triple jumper Antonio
Saunders later that day.
Griffith, who made it
through to the second round of
the men's 100 metres at his first
appearance at the IAAF World
Championships in Berlin, Ger-
many, had returned from Flori-
da where he was training to
stand as a groomsman in Saun-
ders' wedding.
Sands said just Friday night
at a meeting with the coaches,
he had mentioned Bethel's
name because he remembered
how he had to console Bethel
after he failed to win a medal.
"He was really upset that he
didn't win a medal, but I told
him not to worry because he
had just done a personal best
time," Sands said. "At first he
didn't realize that he did the
PR. So when he realized that
he did, he was real excited."
When he got the news Sat-
urday morning, Sands said he
was quite stunned because "we


had just discussed his name in
our meeting. The last time I
saw him was on Wednesday
when we had a press confer-
ence at Arawak Homes.
"He was still in that jovial
mood and told me that he was
definitely working out and was
getting ready for next year
because he wanted to make the
Commonwealth Games team."
Although he visited Bethel's
family on Saturday, Sands pub-
licly offered condolences on


behalf of his family and the
BAAA.

Energetic
Bethel was the local arch-
rival for national record holder
Shamar Sands, who was actual-
ly former classmates at SAC
and competed numerous times.
"Chris was just an enegetic
person who loved to have fun.
He was always hyper, always
trying to find a joke. He was


always fun to be around," said
Sands from his home in
Auburn.
On the track, Sands said it
was fun because "every race he
used to tell me he's going to
beat me this time, so I always
used to push him so he could
qualify for the meets. It wasn't
really competitive because we
were friends. We just went out
to do our best against each oth-
er."
Sands sent his condolences
to Bethel's family.
As a 2003 graduate of St.
Augustine's College, Bethel
was a star pitcher with the
junior boys softball team before
he started taking track serious-
ly in his intermediate year and
eventually secured a scholar-
ship at McKendree University
in Lebanon, Illinois, graduat-
ing in 2008.
SAC's head of physical edu-
cation department John Todd
said he saw Bethel on a consis-
tent basis because he contin-
ued to use the weight room and
ran the cross country course at
SAC in his training.
But Todd said they devel-


oped a very good bond during
his attendance at SAC as he
was his ace pitcher on the
junior boys softball team and
he was also an excellent javelin
thrower.
"He will really be missed
because we still continued to
socialize," Todd said. "Every
time that he came to SAC to
train, he would stop in my
office and we talked."
During his tenure at McK-
endree University, Bethel was a
multiple conference champion
in the 110 hurdles and he was a
National Association of Inter-
collegiate Athletic Champi-
onship finalist. He earned sev-
eral All-American honours as
well.
Bethel also represented the
Bahamas at the 2003 Carifta
Games, 2005 Central Ameri-
can and Caribbean Champi-
onships, 2006 North America,
Central Americ and Caribbean
Under 23 Championships, 2006
CAC Games and the 2007 Pan
America Games.
He was currently being
trained by Fritz Grant, who too
wasn't available for comments.


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ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


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PAGE 14, MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


SPECIAL OLYMPICS INVITATIONAL BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT



Grand Bahama prove the 'cream of the crop'


A PLAYER from Grand Bahama drives to the basket as he
tries to beat off a player from New Providence.


FROM the day the two-
day tournament got started
on Friday, Grand Bahama
established their presence as
the "cream of the crop." On
Saturday, they cemented that
claim as the best teams com-
peted in the Special
Olympics Invitational Bas-
ketball Tournament.
Grand Bahama, coached
by Terry Wildgoose, clinched
the Division One title by
beating New Providence.
The visiting Guadeloupe
team had to settle for the
bronze.
Grand Bahama also
secured the Division II title
after they defeated the visit-
ing Cayman Islands. New
Providence ended up with
the bronze.
The team teams made up
this year's field, but they
were split in two divisions
based on their competitive
level.


David Benjamin, the
Director of Sports & Train-
ing for Special Olympics
Caribbean, said he was very
happy with the outcome of
the tournament.
"I was very happy with the
level of the competition,
especially in Division II," he
said. "The Cayman Islands
have really improved. Last
year, they were third, but this
year they came in second.
"And in the Division One,
we realized that with the
absence of Barbados, Grand
Bahama didn't have much of
a fight this year. They liter-
ally ran way with the com-
petition. Guateloupe teamn
was a young team and they
showed their inexperience."
Benjamin said the idea for
the tournament is to give as
many of the countries the
exposure to the game, but he
noted that unfortunately this
year, some of the teams


couldn't travel because of the
economics.
But he noted that next
year, they hope to get more
Caribbean teams involved
like Barbados, Jamaica and
Trinidad & Tobago, who all
have excellent basketball
teams.
Basil Christie, the Direc-
tor of Special Olympics
Bahamas said they were
pleased to continue to host
the tournament and they
hope that in the future, the
competition will only continue
to get better.
"I thought the tournament
was tremendously success-
fully," Christie said. "I was
disappointed more teams
could'nt come.
"But anytime you can get
athletes like this to compete,
it's just a great thing for us.
We had close to 100 athletes
competing. So it was a very
successful weekend."


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T I


Knowles serves up tennis treat
FROM page 12

And Dan Johnson, who has won a total of 23 doubles titles, said
he has always been invited by Knowles to come here, but he and
his family have finally been able to make it.
"It's all for charity, so we tried to make it an entertaining for
everybody and I think we were able to do that," Johnson said. "It
was a lot of fun."
During their men's doubles play, Johnson and Knowles both
teamed up with one of the ball boys as Palmer and Damm took a
break for a game.
Kevin Newry, one of the ball boys who got a chance to play, said
it was a "surprise for me, but it was also exciting because I learnt
a lot of things."
Shaken at the start, Newry admitted that he was nervous because
he really didn't expect the opportunity to come. But he said as the
game went on, he got more into the flow of things.
Nobody was more excited about having the tournament at the
National Tennis Center than Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association's
president Steve Turnquest.
"This means a lot for our junior programme and tennis in gen-
eral in the Bahamas," he stated. "This has brought the NTC into
more prominence because there are many people who never came
here before.
"The visiting pros also said they enjoy being at the venue, so I
really want to thank Mark Knowles for bringing them here. It
was great for tennis, especially junior tennis in the Bahamas."
lesha Shepherd, one of the top young players, said it was really
exciting for her to play as a number of the junior players got a
chance to hit with the pros.
"It was really exciting for me because I never got a chance to hit
with a celebrity before," said Shepherd, a fifth grade student at
Temple Christian Academy.
Shepherd said she learnt a valuable lesson and that was "never
to give up on the ball."


' I . I







AT least one divisional
championship series is set
so far in the Baptist Sports
Council's 2009 Olympia
Morris-Evans Softball
Classic.
On Saturday at the
Banker's Field at the Bail-
lou Hills Sporting Com-
plex, Transfiguration and
Temple Fellowship have
advanced to the men's
presidential best-of-three
playoff series.
Defending champions
Transfiguration completed
a two-game sweep over St.
Mark's in their first round
best-of-three playoffs with
a forfeiture on Saturday.
They won the opener 23-6
on Tuesday.
Meanwhile, Temple
Fellowship, last year's run-
ners-up, eliminated Cal-
vary Bible 20-9 to com-
plete their sweep. Temple
Fellowship won their
opener 23-13 on Tuesday
as well.
Game one of the Trans-
figuration vs Temple Fel-
lowship rematch will take
place on Tuesday at 9p.m.
Also on Tuesday, the
other first round playoff
series will continue.
At 7 p.m., Salem and
Macedonia will play game
two of their co-ed game; at
8 p.m., Calvary Deliver-
ance will face Golden
Gates men and at 9 p.m.,
it's Transfiguration vs
Temple Fellowship.
While Transfiguration
and Temple Fellowship
will contest the men's
president divisional crown,
Macedonia earned their
berth in the vice president
final and will wait the win-
ner between Calvary
Deliverance and Golden
Gates.
Macedonia completed
the sweep of their series
with a defaulted win on
Saturday. They had to
hold off St. Paul's 25-21 on
Tuesday.
Golden Gates, on the
other hand, won the open-
er 18-8 on Thursday night.
In the co-ed division,
Salem will take a 1-0 lead
over Macedonia in game
two of their president's
series. Salem took game
one 12-1 on Saturday.
The winner will
advance to the divisional
final to play Golden Gates,
who advanced by sweeping
Ebenezer Baptist in two
games. Golden Gates
closed it out Saturday with
a 14-1 win after taking the
opener 14-3.
In the co-ed vice presi-
dent division, St. Paul's
won by default over Faith
United and they will take
on the winner between
Temple Fellowship and St.
John's. Temple Fellowship
went up 1-0 over St. John's
with their 9-6 win on Sat-
urday.
* This coming Saturday,
the 17-and-under will
begin their playoff series.
Tuesday's schedule - 7
p.m. Macedonia vs Salem
(Co-ed); 8 p.m. Calvary
Deliverance vs Golden
Gates (M); 9 p.m. Trans-
figuration vs Temple Fel-
lowship (M).
Thursday's schedule - 7
p.m. St. John's vs Temple
Fellowship (Co-ed); 8 p.m.
Calvary Deliverance vs
Golden Gates (M) or win-
ner vs Macedonia.


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+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 15


LOCALNW01


TEXACO WINNER: An elated Davargo Saunders receives the keys to his brand new, red 2010 Kia
Sportage SUV from Ryan Bain, Country Manager for Chevron Bahamas Ltd. and Andrew Jones,
Sales and Marketing Manager, Sanpin Motors Ltd.



Texaco put winner



in the driving seat


THE Texaco Unbeatable
Promotion is proof for
Davargo Saunders that
prayers are answered and
dreams do come true.
But it almost didn't hap-
pen this way.
Although Davargo had
purchased fuel from Texa-
co and received a number
of coupons he was just leav-
ing them on his dashboard
without entering the pro-
motion.
They were actually start-
ing to blow out of his car
window until a friend urged
him to enter the codes
before they blew away. He
immediately used his cell
phone to enter the promo-
tion by text message and the
rest is history!
Davargo, a 29-year-old
resident of Nassau, recently
became the first person to
win a 2010 Kia Sportage,
one of six prize vehicles
offered as the grand prizes
in Texaco's Unbeatable Pro-
motion, now in progress at
15 Texaco Service Stations
and Star Marts in Nassau
and two stations in Abaco
and Eletuthera.
When Davargo received
a call informing him that his
code had been selected to
win the car he didn't believe
it at first.
He thought someone was
playing a joke on him and
kept asking "You're joking
right? This isn't serious? Are
you serious?" and then
when he realized it was true
he almost couldn't breathe.
He had to hand his cell
phone to a co-worker so she
could take down the rest of
the details.
Now Davargo says he can
still hardly believe it
although he now has the
keys to a shiny new red
SUV. "I'm not going to put
any tints on this because I
want people to see me com-


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


fantastic fall sale!

ZINS5ER
I a R RIr GIARiD'sWall Guard 1-2-3Prinw
dMH IiW P O � Dryvall/"ianry prlmer- -
.Vi nyl kri Seai-aa l5r S-t



"^ s. . .......^ ^^.-c n r E m


RKHARD'S Se-al-lex
Acrylia Elastomerk c M M NAPS eaI Pt
F'PatchkNgComnpound InterIdiot~detWbdWiMegI
$396 Fomer
"0 $141 W


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


I






+>


PAGE 16, MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNWI


Private post office box rental fees due


THE Postmaster General
wishes to remind the public that
rental fees for private post office
boxes are due and should be paid
on or before January 31, 2010.
Those who rent post office
boxes are advised that during the
period February 1 to March 31,
2010, they may be allowed to
retain their boxes only after pay-


ment of a penalty charge of
$10.00 in addition to the rental
fee. Failure to comply within the
specified period, will result in the
closure of the post office box
which will immediately be
assigned to other applicants due
to the limited availability of post
office boxes.
The annual rental fees for post


before January 31
office boxes are as follows: Small
boxes - $30.00, Medium boxes -
$50.00 and Large boxes - $80.00.
All box rental fees with the
exception of Grants Town Post
Office should be paid at the office
where the box is located.
Grants Town Post Office Box
Rental should be paid at the Gen-
eral Post Office, East Hill Street.


Fox Hill honours elder at

tree lighting ceremony


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ENTREE
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I


THE FOX HILL COMMUNITY met to
honour one of its elders on Saturday.
The annual Christmas Tree lighting took
place on the Fox Hill Parade. The tree is
named annually after an elder of the com-
munity or some figure from Fox Hill who
has made a significant contribution during
the year to the development of the commu-
nity.
Previously the tree has been named after


former MP Frank Edgecombe and former
Director of the Red Cross Lottie Tynes.
This year the tree was named after Rev
Dr David Johnson, the Pastor of Macedo-
nia Baptist Church.
Rev Johnson was described by MP Fred
Mitchell as an exemplary leader and one of
the elders of the community. Dr. Johnson
(white jacket) and his family are at the tree
lighting ceremony.


JUNA@0 LGENS*ONORE


#I " fj NgIFj\- 1


THE MINISTRY OF YOUTH, SPORTS AND CULTURE and the National Junkanoo Committee (NJC)
held a national Junkanoo legends circle Official induction ceremony at Government House. Pic-
tured at the ceremony from left: James Lockhart; Louise Southerland; Ashwood Ferguson;
Charles Maynard, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture; Michael Curtis; Arthur D Hanna, Gover-
nor General; Winston Sherman and Phil Cooper, chairman, NJC.
Raymond A. Bethel/BIS


Early Christmas gift

for primary school
THE United Estates Primary School got an early Christ-
mas present when a Club Med representative presented a
cheque for $1,075 to the principal Paul Turnquest.
In an effort to keep the Bahamas Green Clean and Pris-
tine, Club Med has partnered with Green Globe.
The programme established is that Club Med will provide
for sale to their guests green bags from each sale one dollar
will be given to the Primary School in San Salvador.
Mr Turnquest said that his school was grateful to both
Club Med and Green Globe for their kind gesture.
"We assure them that these funds will be used to further
provide modern technology to keep our students informed
of what is happening in our country and around the world,"
Mr Turnquest said.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


I


i


I T Mg�j I Q. � 5) 1







+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 17


LOCALNW


Kasey and Rolex


jump to first place

ABOVE: Kasey Knowles
guides her horse, Rolex,
over a jump to grab first
place in her division at the
Eastern Equestrian Soci-
ety's horse show held at the
Camperdown stables recent-
ly. Kasey took the coveted
position to ride in the
0American Marshall Sterling
event in the U.S later this
year.
She is the daughter of
Tracey and Karen Knowles,
has ridden at Camperdown
for the last ten years and
will now pursue studies at
Rollins University in
August. Since the Universi-
ty has an Equestrian pro-
gramme she will continue
riding there.
LEFT: Kasey shows off
her horse Rolex with his
Blue Ribbon after the show
at Camperdown Nov. 7th.
Kasey has been an honour
roll student at St. Andrews
for the past five years and
is spending her last year
there before going to
Rollins University.


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T1~7






+


PAGE 18, MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


40Minnie meets

with students
MINNIE MOUSE meets with students from Stapledon
1PSchool on Friday. Minnie and her cartoon friends Chip
'n' Dale brought the students DVDs and posters to mark
the festive season.


"- Guard: No-go zone set

up for cruise's USVI visit


CHARLOTTE AMALIE,
U.S. Virgin Islands
THE U.S. Coast Guard
says it will set up a special
safety zone around St.
Thomas harbor for a port
call by the world's biggest
cruise ship, according to
Associated Press.
Royal Caribbean's 16-
deck, 225,000-ton
(204,100-metric-ton) Oasis
of the Seas will steam into
St. Thomas on Tuesday
morning after traveling


from the company's pri-
vate Labadee port in
northern Haiti on its
maiden voyage.
Coast Guard Capt.
Eduardo Pino said Sun-
day that other boats will
be bnnd ro tavlig r
ncorngwihi te o-o on wil
themassive cruiser is
entering and exiting the
port.
Pino says the safety
zone is necessary "to pro-
vide for the safety of spec-
tators and other vessels."


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+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 19


GBPA spreads


Christmas cheer


through toy drive


THE Grand Bahama
Port Authority Limited
(GBPA), spread holiday
cheer to hundreds of excit-
ed youngsters, distributing
gifts as part of the compa-
ny's annual toy drive.
After visiting eastern
Grand Bahama last year,
GBPA executives and staff
members went to the west
on Friday, bearing brightly
packaged presents for stu-
dents of West End, and
Holmes Rock Primary
Schools.
Mr. Hannes Babak,
Chairman-GBPA, Mr. Ian
Rolle, President-GBPA,
Mrs. Ginger Moxey, Vice
President-GBPA, and the
full contingent of GBPA
departmental employees of
the year, showered the kids
with song, treats, and sur-
prises.
As Mr. Babak brought
brief remarks to the tiny
tots gathered in the Eight
Mile Rock high school
gymnasium, their eyes
filled with wonderment.
Gifts
"Christmas is a time of
giving. Kids, you worked
hard this school year. We
are sharing these gifts with
you today, to remind you
that we are watching you
as you make the right
choices and stay on the
path as good boys and girls.
These gifts are just a little
reminder from us to you,
as you stay focus and
remain on the right track."
Mr. Rolle commended
the many GBPA employ-
ees whose gracious mone-
tary donations helped
make the annual event a
success.
After a fun-filled morn-
ing, a surprise announce-
ment of complimentary
Kentucky Fried Chicken
lunches courtesy of GBPA,


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Thanksgiving & Junkanoo

Season Sales Event


Sales Event ends December 31st.


"Rush on Down during

this Holiday Season"


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TRIBUNE ,D






MONDAY,


ss


DECEMBER 7, 2009


PETINB usnestrbneedane


City Markets net loss


'less than 50%'


Colinalmperial








Countering the

'dumbing down'


of '08 of theBahamas
* Ministry planning to
exploit social media


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
City Markets' net loss for
its 2009 financial year
was "less than 50 per
cent" of the $13.429 mil-
lion incurred in 2008, its
outgoing chief executive has revealed,
with a 20 per cent reduction in oper-
ating/administrative expenses helping
to offset an 18 per cent sales drop.
Pledging that holding company
Bahamas Supermarkets was "well
positioned to relaunch City Markets as
the number one food retailer in the
Bahamas", Sunil Chatrani told its
annual general meeting (AGM) that
"the real problem" for the grocery
store chain was that "the message has
not got out there yet" that many of
its previous problems had been fixed.
Mr Chatrani, who is due to step
down as chief executive in late
December/early January 2010, hand-
ing over to Derek Winford, an expe-


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas must escape
becoming "Mediocristan" and
"gain a lot of ground" by
embracing technology
throughout numerous aspects
of financial life, a Bahamian
company's chief technology
officer has urged, overcom-
ing fears of job losses by real-
ising that future wealth
depends on "monetising"
information.
Ken Bodnar, Transfer Solu-
tions Providers' chief tech-
nology officer, told the BYTE
Technology Conference that
the Bahamas needed to take
its "first step" in escaping
Mediocristan - an author's
hypothetical country and
technology backwater - imme-
diately.
He said: "In this brave new
world, the wealth of nations
depends on how well they can
monetise wild information.
Information is the raw mater-
ial of knowledge, and knowl-
edge is technology. It is the
knowledge workers who
make information into tech-
nology, and technology into
money. The wealth of nations


rienced Neal & Massy retail execu-
tive, said that improved customer
communications would be a key fea-
ture of plans to "regain valuable mar-
ket share" and ensure "City Markets
becomes the household name once
again".
With the $10 million refinancing of
Bahamas Supermarkets, by the
investors in 78 per cent majority share-
holder BSL Holdings, now behind it,


tomorrow, depends on how
many knowledge workers
they can create today.
"Let me repeat that in
another way. The wealth of
nations now and in the future
depends on how well they
process information. And the
key to that activity is having a
wide range and a deep bench
of knowledge workers. There
is another term for that. It is
called human capital."
Mr Bodnar used a recent
presentation by Janyne Hod-
der, the College of the
Bahamas (COB) president, to
draw attention to this nation's
shortcomings in that area. She
pointed out that just 14 per
cent of Bahamians aged 18-
24 continued into tertiary
education, a level that only
placed the Bahamas ahead of
some of the poorest countries
in sub-Saharan Africa and
south and west Asia.
"So we as a developing
nation have to gain a lot of
ground, and technology will
a big determinant as to
whether we stay on the back
roads of the information
superhighway, or if we find
SEE page 7B


Neal & Massy takes

control at 'hot spot'


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
TRINIDADIAN conglom-
erate Neal & Massy has taken
effective control at Bahamas
Supermarkets' majority share-
holder through acquiring 51
per cent of the voting rights,
Tribune Business has con-
firmed, having invested "in
excess of" $10 million in the
grocery chain.


Gervase Warner, Neal &
Massy's acting group chief
executive, told this newspa-
per in an exclusive interview
that Bahamas Supermarkets,
and its 11-store City Markets
chain, were a "hot spot" for
the billion dollar-plus con-
glomerate, with its Bahamas
investment "receiving a whole
lot of attention" as it bids to
return to profitability.
Mr Warner confirmed to
this newspaper that in addi-
tion to taking Board control
at Bahamas Supermarkets,
with five out of the nine direc-
tors seats being filled by Neal
& Massy representatives, the
Trinidadian firm had also
gained control at 78 per cent
majority shareholder BSL
Holdings.
"We put more money in for
some preference shares.
Those shares have not con-
verted [into equity]. We need
the permission of the Central
Bank," Mr Warner told Tri-
bune Business. "We do have
voting rights that give us 51
per cent of the vote at BSL
Holdings."
This newspaper had been
told previously by informed
sources that Neal & Massy
had gained control at BSL


SEE page 8B


Mr Chatrani said that offering new
services, such as in-store pharmacies,
in-store bakeries and yacht services,
would be essential to "fast track
growth". Second brand options, exclu-
sive to City Markets and "offering
remarkable value for money", were
also set for introduction.
The chief executive added that the
vendor power-buy programme, the
meat department and produce depart-


ment would be further channels tar-
geted for growth by City Markets, with
a design team set to visit Nassau next
week "to commence a major re-brand-
ing initiative" for its 11 stores. That
exercise, he added, would be com-
pleted by the 2010 first quarter.
"We must have the confidence of
the consumer. We have fixed many

SEE page 4B


Loan arrears now over $ lbn


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
SOME $1.032 billion worth
of Bahamian private sector
loans, more than one in every
six, was in arrears as of Octo-
ber 2009, the Central Bank of
the Bahamas has confirmed,
with the Government's first
quarter fiscal deficit having
widened by 67.1 per cent to
$101 million.
The data, contained in the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
report on monthly economic
and financial developments
for October 2009, highlights
the continuing weakness of
the Bahamian economy and
the Government's fiscal posi-
tion, the latter's deficit hav-
ing increased by $40.6 million
- up from $60.4 million - for
the first quarter of its 2009-
2010 Budget year.
For the three months to
end-September 2009, the


* Central Bank report shows more than one in
every six loans in default, although hope comes
from decline in non-performing category
* Fiscal deficit increases by 67% to $101m


Government's revenues
dropped by 14.8 per cent to
$267.8 million, largely due to
a 15.7 per cent reduction in
tax receipts induced by the
global recession. Import
duties, though, were only
down 1.31 per cent at $140.1
million, compared to $141.9
million the year before.
Non-tax revenues also fell
by 4.8 per cent, due to lower
collections of fines, forfeitures
and administrative fees. On
the Government's expendi-
ture front, capital spending
increased by 31.5 per cent to
$37.5 million year-over-year
as a result of the Ingraham
administration's decision to
prime the spending pump as


much as possible, in a bid to
mop up some of the rising
unemployment.
The Central Bank data
showed that the Government
had enjoyed some success in
curbing spending on its fixed
costs, which are dominated by
rents and salaries, as recur-
rent expenditure fell by 3.5
per cent to $320 million, com-
pared to $331.5 million the
year before. As a result, the
Government's total spending
fell by 1.6 per cent to $368.7
million.
On the monetary front, pri-
vate sector loan arrears (busi-
ness and mortgage/personal

SEE page 5B


explosion to brand/
differentiate islands
of the Bahamas
* Says best way to counter
negatives, such as tourist
armed robbery, is to 'get
visitor experience right'

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
MINISTRY
of Tourism
and Aviation
is planning to
exploit the
explosion of
social media
to counter the
"dumbing
down" of the
Bahamas, and WALLACE
when it comes
to countering
negative publicity via this
mechanism "there is no sub-
stitute for getting the visitor
experience right".
Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace, minister of tourism and
aviation, acknowledged that
there was a "sea change"
occurring in how tourism des-
tinations were being promot-
ed and discussed as result of
the emergence of Twitter and
Facebook, leading his Min-
istry to set up its own Face-
book page and dedicate per-
sonnel to monitor what was
being said about the
Bahamas.
He explained, though, that
the Ministry of Tourism and
Aviation planned to exploit
the growth of social media for
this nation's benefit, having
identified it as a tool that can
be used to differentiate and
brand each individual island
in the Bahamas - a long-
standing policy goal.
Despite having "more
islands than the rest of the
Caribbean", and "more vari-
ety in the islands of the
SEE page 6B


Finishing Strong


'TO


II ,


II ~. I I


.. .: I . . I


,I I .


Kf


* Outgoing CEO says 18% sales decline for '09
offset by 20% drop in operating/admin expenses
* Company eyeing in-store pharmacies
and bakeries for 'fast track growth'
* Neal & Massy executive to replace Chatrani in New Year,
with design team arriving in Nassau to re-brand stores
* Profit margins up 4%, but profitability will not return in 2010


Bahamas must 'gain

ground' in technology


9 02 71jrC'l


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+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 3B


Just 60%o of health


spend


is capital


INSIGH
Fo MeI ope
he in thI e s
PeladIRY


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
CAPITAL spending has
averaged "only about 6 per
cent" of the Government's
more than $600 million outlay
on healthcare in the past
three years, an Inter-Ameri-
can Development Bank
(IDB) report has revealed,
with the current Budget leav-
ing no room for increased
funding.
An IDB paper on a
$640,000 project to support
the Government's National
Health Services Strategic
Plan for the period 2010-2020,
said that apart from bud-
getary constraints, a "dra-


matic rise in the cost of
healthcare" was also chal-
lenging the Government's
objectives in the sector.
While the Bahamas' health
indicators compared
favourably to other CARI-
COM countries, and "good
progress" had been made in
meeting the nation's Millen-
nium Development Goals
(MDG), the IDB paper said:
"Several important challenges
lie ahead.
"The cost of health care in
the Bahamas has risen dra-
matically in recent years as a
result of changing epidemio-
logical profile, rising costs of
pharmaceuticals, advances in
specialist care and increased


access to newer technologies.
"Public sector health
expenditure is estimated at 3
per cent of GDP or 14 per
cent of total public sector
expenditure and, with the
central government overall
deficit averaging 2.7 per cent
over the last five years, there
is relatively little scope for
expansion within the current
fiscal framework.
"The expenditure pattern
is heavily skewed towards
current expenditure, with
capital expenditure averag-
ing only about 6 per cent of
the total public sector outlay
on health over the last three
years. Management of the
country's health system is fur-


Bahamas signs



Netherlands



tax agreement


their complicated by the need
to deliver health care to a rel-
atively small, widely dis-
persed population of 330,000
people."
With the Government's
long-term goal being "a social
health insurance pro-
gramme", of which the first
phase is the National Drug
Plan, the IDB project is
designed to strengthen the
health system's institutional
capacity and readiness to
meet the 2010-2220 strategic
plan.
The project will also
emphasise the use of infor-
mation and communications
technology in the delivery of
healthcare services.


To advertise
in The Tribune,
just call 502-
2371 today!


Com fo


rt Sites Paradise Island

Fall// special Ony $51*
perperson double occpancy.


~�~i


THE Bahamas has signed its eighth Tax
Information Exchange Agreement (TIEA)
with the Netherlands, leaving it just four short
of the target 12 that was demanded by the G-
20/OECD.
The deputy prime minister and minister of


foreign affairs, Brent Symonette, seated left,
signs the TIEA with the Netherlands in The
Hague. State secretary for finance, Jan Kees de
Jager, signed on behalf of the Netherlands.
(Photo courtesy of the
Netherlands Government)


$299 .... y........... ...



\ . " .1 ,1*;-;1;1'5 . .I .T.,



Full se of all Alantis facilities. Plus:
* Complimentary continental breakfast daily
* junior Siltes with Kinq-size or two double beds
* Cable TV, refrlerator, in-room safe,
coffee maker, hair dryer
* Kids 15 and under, free
* Pool wih swim-up bar


Limited-time offer! Reserve today !
Call 242-363-3680
*$59 per person, per night, dbl occupancy Sun. thru Wed. Rates effective Nov. 2 thru Dec. 18. Add
$20 pp for Thurs. thru Sat. stays. 3rd and 4th additional adults add $40 each per night. Maximum 4
persons per room. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities
and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and subject to availability.
Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a .... 1.1 .11 .11 . I


E .
PARADISE ISlAND
BAHAMS


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


TEAK FUENWURE

*NEW SELECTION*
Christmas
$10 Discount Specials
Gifts, Handicrafts & Batik Clothing
OPEN 10am - 5pm

KURA KURA
26 Virginia St., Tel: 325 - 1389
1 blk west of Hillon hotel enlranoe, in large w storey
tiuquoise building. none way westbound street


A6I M


'Al
LJ
T
- I
'iIMMNA 5T.


* --.-~ - - _ -. - - -


THErCOLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Vbu& our websitt at wwwcob.edj~bs

STAFF VACANCY
Applic~alions are hi inilcd from suitably qualified periwon- for the f~ollowing~
Position:
Prti-time Coor'dinator, Abaco. responsible tor assistng the Office of
Outreach with the operations of the AbanCcn"rtrc: conitriuting to th%�
development of str~ategies to attract new interest group-, br enrollment and
colkcting demographic information on prospecir~c Land formerw clients 10
dacrmniki education and training needs.
Specific duties and reisponsibi lities include assisting with the planning. de%-ci-
opmen. marketing and implementation of courw.c' programme. Ouift'crings in
North aindCecntral Abaco; responding to cniquines regarding programmnes.
courses, '.n~iin.M. arid ixork-ho~pi; liaising with the~ Planning Office to cnn-
duct public surveys to ascertain interest and needs for of teringsanid assistin2
with the recruitmeant ofstudents.
Applic~ants should possess a Bachelor's Dcv~cg r c .qluiralcnix AND at hkait
five (5) years pom-clua1Wfication work experiences at the AS-] level. 1or a
detailed job descriptions, visit w-ww,cob,ed u.bs'Ii rappl. I m eresricd and idato
should submit a dctailed resume and cover letter of interest no later than
Fridav, December IlPh, ,)(KI9 to; Associate \'ice President. H.R.Humnan
Rcsourccs Department, The College ofl'I he Baihamasi or mail:


BUSINESS






+


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


NOTICE
International Business Companies Act
(No. 46 of 2000)
EXCLUSIVE RESORTS OR- V, LTD.
Registration Number: 130,100B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
Notice is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 138 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act (No. 46 or 2000) EXCLUSIVE
RESORTS OR-V, LTD. is in Dissolution.
Any person having any claim against
EXCLUSIVE RESORTS OR-V, LTD. is required
on or before the 23rd day of December, 2009 to
send their name, address and particulars of the
debt or claim to the Liquidator of the company, or
in default thereof they may have excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such claim is
approved.
GSO Corporate Services Ltd., of 303 Shirley
Street, Nassau, The Bahamas is the Liquidator of
EXCLUSIVE RESORTS OR-V, LTD.


GSO Corporate Services Ltd.
Liquidator


City Markets net




loss 'less than


50%'


FROM page 1B

of the problems of the past,
and have improved opera-
tions. The goal now is to get
the message out that we are
back and ready to serve you,"
Mr Chatrani said. "A lot of
effort has been put into
rebuilding this business over
the last 12 months."
However, Bahamas Super-
markets executives, and its
Board of Directors, were less
certain about when the chain
would return to profitability,
casting doubt on whether this
would happen in its current
financial year that closes at
end-June 2010.
Basil Sands, Bahamas
Supermarkets' chairman, said:
"The job in hand is to return
the company to a state of
profitability. It's not going to
be 2010, we know that."


As for the resumption of
dividend payments to the
company's long-suffering
minority investors, who col-
lectively hold 22 per cent, Mr
Sands said the company
would "hopefully be in a posi-
tion" to resume payments "in
two to three years", citing
2011 or 2012.
Recapping the 2009 finan-
cial year, Mr Chatrani said
the recession, combined with
the decision to close the non-
performing Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway
store, resulted in sales falling
by 18 per cent for the year to
end-June 2009.
"Shopping transaction sizes
declined and consumers
became much more price sen-
sitive," Mr Chatrani said. "It
is no secret that the supply
chain relationships between
our suppliers and City Mar-
kets were not the best during
the first quarter of the finan-
cial year 2009.
"We received consistent
feedback on customers'
inability to fulfill all of their
shopping requirements at City
Markets, due to limited prod-
uct selection."


of '08


Better news came from a
"significant increase" in gross
profit margins, which had fall-
en to a low of 17.2 per cent
the previous year, down from
23.4 per cent in 2007, due to
better product pricing and
costing, plus inventory man-
agement. Mr Chatrani said
gross profits for the 2009
financial year had actually
increased by 4 per cent.
Figures
Stating that it would be
"inappropriate" to disclose
unaudited financial figures,
which was why percentages
were being released, Mr Cha-
trani said the non-recurrence
of one-off expenses, such as
the exercise to bring City
Markets' financial reporting
systems and processes up to
date, had helped reduce oper-
ating expenses by some 20 per
cent.
Still, the percentages can be
used to determine roughly
where some of Bahamas
Supermarkets' key indicators
for the 2009 financial year
ended up. Based on sales of
$144.355 million the year


before, it seems likely that the
2009 top-line was around
$118.27 million, while taking
$38.148 million of operat-
ing/administrative expenses
for the previous year leaves
the company at roughly
$30.518 million. On the net
loss side, the only thing cer-
tain is that it is around $6.7
million or less.
Among the "immediate
improvements" required to
return Bahamas Supermar-
kets to profitability were,
apart from improved cus-
tomer communications and
shopper price perceptions,
better deli service levels, a
more consistent product vari-
ety, internal and external
branding, and enhanced pric-
ing systems.
While the restart of City
Markets' direct bulk purchas-
ing programme would tackle
product pricing and variety,
to better understand con-
sumer concerns and needs,
Mr Chatrani said The Coun-
sellors would be conducting
eight consumer focus groups
in January 2010. The results
are to be presented the fol-
lowing month.
The Bahamas Supermar-
kets chief executive said oth-
er planned improvements
were Point of Sale (POS) sys-
tems that reinforced City
Markets' weekly specials, and
the use of bulk displays, or a
'Wall of Specials', that show-
case brand awareness and
'strong call to action' mes-
sages.
Returning to a past that
Bahamas Supermarkets and
its shareholders want to put
behind them, Mr Chatrani
recalled how the company's
retained earnings had fallen
from $12.9 million at year-end
2007 to an accumulated deficit
of $3.3 million 12 months lat-
er.
He said this position was
exacerbated by a $2.7 million
dividend paid during the 2008
financial year, adding that the
Board decided to pay this
after receiving inaccurate
information that the company
was still profitable.
Elsewhere, Bahamas
Supermarkets' balance sheet
for end-2008 showed a $9 mil-
lion decline in cash and cash
equivalents, with supplier
credit increased by a further
$4 million and inventory lev-
els reduced by $2.3 million.


Call NIBA on677A-6422
Whpy orfrouinsura

^^^^^^^^^^^*
3 ^^^ m eams *sSi aSE^^


I Bank of The Bahamas
INTERNATIONAL


GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED
ADVANCED
EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME

In collaboration with The Education Guaranteed Fund Loan
Program of the Ministry of Education, the Bank of The
Bahamas Limited is pleased to advise that the cheque
disbursement for AJLL students in the Loan Program will take
place at Holy Trinity Activity Centre, Stapledon Gardens,
New Providence, beginning Monday, December 7 to Friday,
December 11, 2009 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. as follows:



ALL STUDENTS


A-C Monday, December 7, 2009
D-1 Tuesday. December 8, 2009
J-M Wednesday, December 9, 2009
N-Smith Thursday, December 10, 2009
Spence-Z Friday, December 11,2009


TIME: 9:00 am. - 3:0) p.m.
PIACE: Holy Trinity Activity Centre
Stapledon Gardens

* All Students and/or Guarantors should be present
and must bring relevant identification, (valid Passport
and National Insurance Card),



* All accounts must be current and all necessary
documentation completed before cheques are
released.

DISBURSEMENTS MADE AT
THE BANK WILL INCUR A PENALTY FEE!


t i b CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

FirstCaribbean airF4s

Are you seeking an exciting career opportunity? t


SALES TEAM LEADER
The Sales Team Leader proactively promotes and sells all core retail banking
products and services, and has strong, specialized knowledge and skill in the sale of
deposits and transactional products, cards, consumer and home finance products.
Application expiry date: 11th December, 2009.


For further information on this and
other available positions, please visit
our website:

www.firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm


,i'


4 FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK
GET THERE. TOGETHER.


F7TIICS TRE NTI AELGO OWWTIUE4.O


NOTICE
International Business Companies Act
(No. 46 of 2000)
EXCLUSIVE RESORTS OR- II, LTD.
Registration Number: 130,103B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
Notice is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 138 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act (No. 46 or 2000) EXCLUSIVE
RESORTS OR-II, LTD. is in Dissolution.
Any person having any claim against
EXCLUSIVE RESORTS OR-II, LTD. is required
on or before the 23rd day of December, 2009 to
send their name, address and particulars of the
debt or claim to the Liquidator of the company, or
in default thereof they may have excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such claim is
approved.
GSO Corporate Services Ltd., of 303 Shirley
Street, Nassau, The Bahamas is the Liquidator of
EXCLUSIVE RESORTS OR-II, LTD.


GSO Corporate Services Ltd.
Liquidator


NASSAU INSURANCE
BROKERS & AGENTS
NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS CO. LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, P.O. Box N-7764 Nassau Tel. 677-6422
A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life


BUSINESS I








+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 5B


Life insurer drops






'Imoerial' brand


Colinalmperial Insurance Ltd, the
life and health insurance subsidiary
of BISX-listed Colina Holdings
(Bahamas), has announced that it
has retired the name 'Imperial' and
will now be known as Colina Insur-
ance Ltd. The name change has been
accompanied by a corporate


rebranding initiative, including a new
logo, which heralds the company
brand as simply 'Colina'.
The company believes the new
name will create better brand recog-
nition, and capitalise on the syner-
gies of the entities in the Colina
group as they continue to evolve.


Thrust


"The main thrust of the rebrand-
ing exercise is to simplify the Colina
brand and demonstrate that we are
responsive to the needs of our cus-
tomers, as well as innovative in our


thinking for the future," said execu-
tive vice-chairman Emanuel Alex-
iou.
"The decision to retire 'Imperial'
was not one that was taken lightly.
We recognized that there was more
than a century of brand equity stored
in the name, and it also represented


a significant juncture in company
history and staff experience.
"However, the decision was deter-
mined by the clear strategy to unify
ourselves and our various product
offerings under a brand which
already resonated with our clients
and the public."


Loan arrears


now over $1 bn

FROM page 1B

borrowings) increased by 4.3
per cent or $42.8 million in
October 2009 to breach the
$1 billion barrier, reaching
$1.032 billion. That means
16.98 per cent, or more than
one in every six loans extend-
ed in the Bahamas, is either in
arrears or the non-perform-
ing category.
One comforting factor for
the Central Bank and the
commercial banking industry,
though, is that most of the
growth was in the 31-90 days
past due category, which
increased by $51.6 million or
11.3 per cent to hit $507.5 mil-
lion at end-October 2009.
In contrast, the non-per-
forming loans - those 90 days
past due and upon which the
banks stop accruing interest
- actually declined by $8.7
million or 1.6 per cent to
$524.5 million. As a percent-
age of total loans, the non-
performing category actually
contracted by 13 basis points
to 8.6 per cent.
This indicates that the com-
mercial banks have enjoyed
some success in either restruc-
turing loans or getting clients
back into the 'performing' cat-
egory, and the key will now
be whether they can success-
fully manage the increase in
the 31-90 day arrears group -
preventing them from falling
into non-performing.
Consumer loan arrears saw
the greatest percentage
growth, increasing by 5.4 per
cent or $15.9 million to $309.4
million in October as a result,
largely, of growth in the 31-90
days past due category.
Mortgage loan arrears
expanded by $15.7 million or
3.4 per cent to $480.1 million,
again due to an increase in
the 31-90 days past due cate-
gory. To the banking sector's
encouragement, there was a
reduction in the level of mort-
gage loans that were non-per-
forming.
However, commercial loans
in default increased by $11.3
million or 4.9 per cent to
$242.6 million, as more
migrated into the non-per-
forming category. Overall,
commercial bank provision-
ing for bad debt fell by 1.5 per
cent or $3.2 million to $207.5
million, resulting in the ratio
of provisions to arrears falling
by 1.2 percentage points to
20.1 per cent.
However, reflecting an
increase in loan write-offs by
Bahamian commercial banks,
the ratio of provisions to non-
performing loans moved high-
er by five basis points to 39.6
per cent.
The Central Bank acknowl-
edged that despite indicators
that the global economy was
picking up, the Bahamian
economy had remained
trapped in the doldrums in
2009, due to anaemicc con-
sumer spending and sustained
weakness in tourism output
and foreign investment-led
construction activity".
The monetary policy regu-
lator added that for the
Bahamian economy, "signs of
improvement are not antici-
pated until the latter half of
2010".
On the positive front, bank-
ing sector liquidity and the
foreign reserves remain in rel-
atively good health. The
external reserves stood at
$683.84 million as at end-
October 2009, compared to
$626.22 million in 2008,
although their rate of growth
declined to $121.11 million
year-to-date compared to
$171.42 million growth in
2008.
Meanwhile, excess liquid
assets in the commercial
banking system were just shy
of $400 million, compared to
$322 million a year ago.


ls PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE
Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.

H 0 11S ES/APARTN1 FNTSCUMN1FRCIA1,R1J11.) NIGS


: 4M:! Pnperry - ;IimwM dIn .iiAhzioJ




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Id. 242-32 T-WOJ77
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SPANISH WELLS
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ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7







+


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


GET A WEBSITE + TWO BONUSES!

Net Profit Result's (NPR) sale includes:
1) Domain name registration + hosting (1st year)
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Countering the





'dumbing down'





of the Bahamas


FROM page 1B

Bahamas than other coun-


Bahamas Business
solutionss Ltd.
* e. s nn ie linJU c.jiLJ~hj~


Nassau: Collins Ave & ?71 Terrace
Tel; (242) 302-9250


tries", Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said: "We have dumbed
down the islands of the
Bahamas to one island - Nas-
sau/Paradise Island."
This had ignored the
numerous other inhabited
Bahamian islands, all with
their own rich cultures, histo-
ries and different experiences,
and the Ministry of Tourism is
eyeing social media - and the
posting of tourist/resident
experiences - as one mecha-
nism to get the desired mes-
sage out.
"We're going to use this
space to do some of the things
that we think are very impor-
tant to us," Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace said. "We have as
part of our mission at the
Ministry of Tourism to differ-
entiate the islands of the
Bahamas. We believe these
tools are some of the best
ways to do that. You will see
us really move in that direc-
tion to help us get there.
"Nobody sells your coun-
try as well as someone who
brought property there," Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace said,
adding that the Ministry was
looking for foreign home-


owners and Bahamians to
play their part by posting
favourable experiences on
line "and telling the world the
Bahamas is more than Nas-
sau/Paradise Island".
When it came to the nega-
tive impacts of social media's
growth, Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace pointed to the recent
armed robbery of 18 cruise
ship passengers while they
were on an eco-tour in Nas-
sau, and the subsequent Face-
book and other online post-
ings by the victims detailing
their harrowing experiences.
The minister admitted
there was little that could be
done to control or combat
this, explaining that in some
instances a mass response by
the Ministry of Tourism could
create more problems than it
solved, by drawing attention
to an issue and bringing it
before an online audience
who previously had no inter-
est in the matter.
"If you look at the kind of
detailed information that an
individual who was part of
that group sent out to the rest
of the world, you begin to
understand the change in our


lives," Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said. "We know that busi-
ness will never be the same
again.
"We know the world has
changed dramatically, and the
degree of information shared
we have no control over. The
genie is out of the bottle, and
there's no putting it back.
Close to five million visitors
that come to the Bahamas
have the ability to put infor-
mation about their experi-
ences out there. That's why
we want to take full advan-
tage of our capabilities and
make them useful.
"There's absolutely no sub-
stitute for the business of
tourism that we're in than get-
ting the visitor experience
right. That is a fundamental
thing that I keep saying to
people in the Bahamas: Get
the experience right. That's
the solution. If we get the
experience right, what people
are going to be blogging
about, what people are going
to be twittering about, is
something that's very posi-
tive."
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
added that his ministry's
tourism apprenticeship pro-
gramme, which was seeking
some 110 recruits, was tied to
the plans to exploit social
media. Some 697 persons had
applied in less than a week,
the ultimate goal being to
marry young people, who
were Internet, technology and
social media savvy, with vet-
eran personnel from the Min-
istry who had vast knowledge
about the Bahamas and how
to promote the country.
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said those who did not believe
in the social media changes
were "living in La La Land",
and that old-style marketing
campaigns and blanket press
release issues would not have
the impact of old.

Forthestoie
bein henes


GrfrncJ BohnMc:(
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Queen's Highwny
352-7022


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COMMERCIAL BUILDING

Lot #1, Block 'BB' Civic Industrial Area
Keats Street & Queens Highway
Freeport, Grand Bahama



:- '" ',. . ' ...


DESCRIPTION:
The building comprises a Retail Store with a large Meat Section at the rear of the store.
Other accommodation includes Male and Female Rest Rooms, a Trash Room,
a Manager's Office and a Kitchenette.
For conditions of sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas
Interested persons should submit offer in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before November 9, 2009.


NOTICE

Pursuant to Section 228 of the Companies Act, 1992
notice is given that:-

(a) Farrem Investments Limited is in dissolution.

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution is the
9th day of November, A.D. 2009.

(c) The name of the Liquidator is Ch6 Toussaint Erad
Campbell Chase of Campbell Chase Law, Rosetta Street
and Mount Royal Avenue, P.O. Box N-4447, Nassau,
Bahamas.


Liquidator


NOTICE



PROPOSALSFOR


GROUP LIFE & MEDICAL INSURANCE

The National Insurance Board invites proposals from eligible insurance
companies and/or brokers for the coverage of its Life and Medical Insurance
Plan for the active and retired employees of the National Insurance Board.
This group will also include the active and retired employees of the Bahamas
Mortgage Corporation.

The new policy will be for a two year period commencing on February 1,
2010, through January 31, 2012, following the selection of the successful
tender.

Parties interested in submitting a proposal may collect an information package
from the Human Resources Department located at the National Insurance
Board Headquarters, Clifford Darling Complex, Baillou Hill Road.

All proposals should be sealed, marked "Proposals for Life and Medical
Insurance," and must be delivered no later than 4:30 p.m., on Wednesday,
December 30, 2009, to:
The Director
THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD
Clifford Darling Complex
Baillou Hill Road
P.O. Box N7508
Nassau, Bahamas


BUSINESS I







+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 7B


FirstCaribbean


wins


fourth award in row


FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas) has
won its fourth consecutive
Bank of the Year award from
the magazine, The Banker,
which is published by the
Financial Times of London.
FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas) has
won this coveted award since
2006, and The Banker said:
"The recognition of being
named 'Bank of the Year
2009' by the world's longest
running international bank-
ing title is testament to the
strong management and pru-
dent risk approach that First-
Caribbean International .-..
Bank has made this year."
Chairman
Deputy chairman and
managing director for the
Bahamas, Sharon E. Brown,
said: "Our success continues
to be due to our adherence to
the strategic goals and vision
this bank has set. With our
customers and employees
firmly backing us, we intend"
to deliver on our long term
vision."
Ms Brown is retiring as
managing director at year- .. "..
end after almost 23 years
with the bank. She will con-
tinue in her role as deputy
chairman of the Board of
Directors at FirstCaribbean, MANAGING Director of FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas), Sharon Brown, (seated at right), is pictured with, left, senior manager in the managing director's office, Tere-
post year-end. sa Williams. Standing (1-r) are Anne Ferguson, Lakeisha Moss, Sherwin Hilton, Tonya Davis-Gibbs, and Thecla Grant-Lord...





Bahamas must 'gain ground' in technology


FROM page 1B

an on ramp to get us in the
collector lanes of rapid devel-
opment," Mr Bodnar told the
BYTE conference. "The
choice is really ours, and the
choice has to be made now.
We have a large hill to climb
when it comes to education.
Taking a Caribbean exam-
ple, Mr Bodnar said Jamaica
had moved to escape medi-
ocrity by placing a $0.03 toll
on incoming cellular calls,
using the proceeds to build a
technology park in both
Kingston and Montego Bay.
"The technology parks hold
call centers that actually took
business away from India," he
added. "People preferred the
Caribbean/Jamaican accent to
those from India. The tech-
nology parks are full, and they
generate 6 Billion Jamaican
dollars, or $73 million for the
Jamaican economy. These
kinds of projects create high
paying jobs, and the spin-offs
and potential spin-offs. For
instance, a technology busi-
ness has already sprung out


of the need to service the
computers of the call centre
service agents."
The Bahamas was "doing a
lot of navel gazing" about its
crime problem, Mr Bodnar
said, but could apply technol-
ogy and the lessons from New
York and elsewhere, espe-
cially Jamaica, which found
at one point that it had 80,000
outstanding traffic tickets and
$30 million in lost revenue.
"Governments are always
starved for money," Mr Bod-
nar said. "Tapping this type
of revenue would be wel-
come, and it could be effected
inexpensively. For example,
we have Bahamian-built cell
phone technology that would
allow the police to check to
see if a license plate has out-
standing tickets. Right now,
the police do not know who
has outstanding traffic fines.
The current police system is
essentially a manual paper-
based system.
"A business opportunity
exists for a technology com-
pany (such as the one that I
work for) to undertake the


digitisation of all outstanding
tickets. Then a policeman
could automatically query a
database with his or her cell-
phone, with no human inter-
vention, and determine imme-
diately if a driver owes fine
money to the Government.
"Why would a private com-
pany put the resources into
helping the police? Because
of revenue sharing, maintain-
ing law and order could be a
profitable business in a pub-
lic/private sector partnership.
"By applying a judicious bit
of technology here and there,


police would be given a pow-
erful tool in processing the
vast amount of offender infor-
mation that they possess but
cannot currently use."
Suggesting that the Gov-
ernment appoint a chief infor-
mation officer and giving
him/her a budget to prioritise
information streams that
could generate revenue for
this nation, Mr Bodnar said:
"The Bahamas would
progress immeasurably if
every child had access to a
computer in the classroom.
"Naysayers would immedi-


LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES
ACT (No.45 of 2000)
Aquasense Eleuthera Marketing & Sales Limited
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
Aquasense Eleuthera Marketing & Sales Limited is in
dissolution. David Rounce is the Liquidator and canbe contacted
at 132, Yorkshire Street, Westward Villas, N.P., Bahamas. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are
required to send their names, addresses and particulars of their
debts or claims to the Liquidator before 24th December, 2009

David J. Rounce
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES
ACT (No.45 of 2000)

Ocean Floors Holdings Inc.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
Ocean Floors Holdings Inc. is in dissolution. David Rounce
is the Liquidator and can be contacted at 132, Yorkshire Street,
Westward Villas, N.P, Bahamas. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator before 24th December, 2009.

David J. Rounce
Liquidator


ately say that it is too expen-
sive, or the capital outlay
would be too great. They are
unaware that countries like
Canada have warehouses full


of refurbished computers that
are rescued from the e-waste
or electronic waste stream,
and recycled for schools
around the world."


2009
E/QUI/01549


NOTICE
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF
RAYMOND MEADOWS

TO

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
totaling some 175.287 Acres and situate in
Salt Bluff and between the Settlements of
Savannah Sound and Tarpum Bay on the
Island of Eleuthera one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Raymond Meadows claims to be the owner in
fee simple in possession of the parcel of land
hereinbefore described and the Petitioner has
made application to the Supreme Court of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to
have his title to the said land investigated.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected
during normal business hours at:-
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court
(b) The Office of the Administrator situate at
Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera
(c) The Chambers of the undersigned.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person
having dower or right to dower or an adverse
claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition
shall before the 24th day of January, A.D.,
2010 file in the Supreme Court and serve the
Petition r or the undersigned a statement of
his claim on or before the 24th day of January,
A.D., 2010 will operate as a bar to such claim.

TIMOTHY SERRETTE & CO.,
Attorneys for the Petitioner,
Chancery House
No. 21 Dowdeswell Street
Nassau, N.R, The Bahamas


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT No. CLE
Equity Side


ITDISCUS TOIESONTHS PGELO0ONTOWW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


NOTICE
IN THE ESTATE OF CARRIE MAE
SANDS-JAMES, late of Fresh Creek Settlement, on the
island ofAndros, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that all persons having
any claims against the above-named Estate are
required on or before the 8th day of January, 2010,
to send their names, addresses and particulars of
their debts or claims, to the undersigned, and if so
required by notice in writing from the undersigned
to come in and prove such debts or claims, or
in default thereof they will be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution AND NOTICE is hereby
also given that all persons indebted to the said
Estate are requested to make full settlement
on or before the date herein before mentioned
AND NOTICE is hereby given that at the expiration
of the date hereinbefore mentioned, the assets of
the Estate of the said late CARRIE MAE SANDS-
JAMES, deceased, will be distributed among the
persons entitled thereto having regard only to the
claims of which the Personal Representative shall
then have had notice.

Dated this 26th day of November, A.D., 2009

Joseph James
Personal Representative
c/o DENNIS GOMEZ & CO.
Chambers
The Sanctuary
Lake View Road
Off East Shirley Street
Nassau, N .P., Bahamas


BUSINESS








+>


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


NOTICE

FEROLUX LIMITED


NOT I C E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) FEROLUX LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 3rd December, 2009 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is CST
Administration (Bahamas) Limited, The Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets,
Nassau, Bahamas


Dated this 7th day of December, A. D. 2009


CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator



NOTICE


PARCONORD LIMITED

N 0 T I C E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) PARCONORD LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 3rd December, 2009 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is CST
Administration (Bahamas) Limited, The Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets,
Nassau, Bahamas

Dated this 7th day of December, A. D. 2009



CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)


In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
ELEUTHERA FUND LTD. is in dissolution. Alrena Moxey
is the Liquidator and can be contacted at Winterbotham Place,
Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons
having claims against the above-named company are required
to send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts or
claims to the Liquidator before 4 January, 2009.




Alrena Moxey
Liquidator


Neal & Massy takes control at 'hot spot'


FROM page 1B

Holdings through the voting
rights, as opposed to increas-
ing its equity stake beyond
the 40 per cent it inherited
from Barbados Shipping &
Trading. Neal & Massy
acquired the Barbadian firm
in 2008.
Several sources have sug-
gested that the voting rights
have been used as a way to
circumvent the need for Neal
& Massy to obtain govern-
ment/Central Bank approval
for an increase in its equity
stake, adding that Barbados
Shipping & Trading won
approval for its investment -
as a foreign-owned entity -
on the condition that its BSL
Holdings shareholding was


not to grow beyond 40 per
cent. None of this, though, has
been confirmed.
However, Mr Warner pre-
viously told shareholders
attending Bahamas Super-
markets annual general meet-
ing (AGM) that Neal &
Massy needed to have a
Board majority at the publicly
listed Bahamian entity to
reflect the fact it had taken
operational control of the
retail chain in August 2009.
In addition, the Trinidad
conglomerate had led the way
among BSL Holdings'
investors in injecting addi-
tional capital to keep
Bahamas Supermarkets afloat
financially, Mr Warner
explaining that Neal & Massy
needed to safeguard its invest-


Legal Notice



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

BERALV BAHAMAS CORPORATION
In Voluntary liquidation

"Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
BERALV BAHAMAS CORPORATION is in Dissolu-
tion."

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 3rd day of
December, 2009.


ALVARO ALVES SOBRINHO
Colonia 993
3rd Floor
Montevideo, Uruguay
Liquidator


Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MERCURIO OVERSEAS INVESTMENTS INC. is in dissolution
under the provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on December 3, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Zakrit Services Ltd. of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 15th day of January, 2010 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

DECEMBER 4, 2009

ZAKRIT SERVICES LTD.

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY


ment.
The acting group chief
executive told Tribune Busi-
ness that Neal & Massy had
injected "at least a couple of
trenches of $5 million" into
Bahamas Supermarkets and
City Markets, but added: "I
think it's in excess of that for
sure."
As for Neal & Massy's
plans for Bahamas Super-
markets going forward, Mr
Warner told this newspaper:
"It gets a lot of attention,
that's for sure. While it may
not be the largest operation
we have, it's an operation in
need of help. It gets a lot of
management, executive and
Board attention."
Neal & Massy also planned
"to send a finance director
over for three months" to
help new Bahamas Super-
markets chief executive
Derek Winford, and Mr
Warner added: "We'll have
in the vicinity of 10-12 peo-
ple coming in and out to
help."
The Neal & Massy chief
executive said Bahamas
Supermarkets "doesn't stand
out as one of the most difficult
situations we acquired",
adding: "We have a fair
amount of confidence we'll
be able to turn it around, but
we're operating in a bad econ-
omy and with a shifting set of
competitive dynamics, so it
may take a bit longer. It's a
situation akin to many of the
acquisitions we've done in the
past. We're optimistic of
returning the company to a
strong financial position, gen-
erating returns for sharehold-
ers."
Mr Warner acknowledged
that it was "very hard to pro-
ject" when Bahamas Super-
markets would return to prof-
itability, although Neal &
Massy and fellow BSL Hold-
ings investors wanted to "do it
as fast as possible".
"Within two to three years,
we should be well on our
way," Mr Warner said. Asked
what he would say to con-
sumers who had previously
deserted City Markets, he
said: "Come shop with us.
We've made huge improve-
ments and would like you to
give us a chance to show you.
"We've got our listening
ears on. We want to be your
preferred grocer. We look for-
ward to getting more input
and satisfying your grocery
needs."
Earlier, Mr Warner had
told Bahamas Supermarkets
shareholders that the
Bahamas was a "hot spot" for
Neal & Massy, and he
acknowledged: "There are a
number of shoppers out there
who have had a terrible expe-
rience and are not shopping
with us anymore."
The Neal & Massy chief
also empathized with the 22
per cent minority shareholder
bloc in Bahamas Supermar-
kets, acknowledging their
"disappointment and upset"
with the company's 2007 and
2008 heavy net losses and the
end - for the moment - to
dividend payments.
Outlining Neal & Massy's
plans for Bahamas Super-
markets, Mr Warner said the
conglomerate, which has $1.3
billion in assets and doubled
its earnings twice in 10 years,
planned to leverage its
Caribbean-wide presence in
food retailing and distribution
to the advantage of the
Bahamian company.
Citing opportunities to
increase Bahamas Supermar-
kets' gross profit margins, Mr
Warner said Neal & Massy's
food retail/distribution divi-
sion generated $670 million,
or 50 per cent, of revenues
during 2008. Describing the
company as "the biggest food
retailer in the Caribbean",
Neal & Massy's food division
is present in 15 countries,
15,000 food distribution deliv-
ery points and has 5,000
employees.
Pointing to the "huge syn-
ergies" between Neal &
Massy's food distribution and
retailing interests, would
could be used to leverage bet-


ter terms, discounts, exclusive
products and marketing sup-
port from suppliers, and cut
logistics-related costs, Mr
Warner said: "We intend to
use this strength to improve
Bahamas Supermarkets'
operations.
"We intend to use this
strength to bring best prac-
tices to the operations of
Bahamas Supermarkets, and
are already doing so. We are
convinced there is an oppor-
tunity for us to get more prof-
it margin for Bahamas Super-
markets by working through
established relationships Neal
& Massy has with a number
of vendors to buy better.
"We've started to do that,
but are scratching the tip of
the iceberg. This last round
of purchasing, the last four
weeks, where we've built up
for Christmas, is the start of it,
but there's a lot more to
come."
Going forward, Mr Warner
said: "We think the variety is
there, the service is there and
the pricing are right. We are
competitive on price. We
need more shoppers to come
and test us on that. We need
to win back a lot more of the
transactions than we're cur-
rently experiencing. It's start-
ing to improve.
"We feel we're there, we're
getting better and that it's cer-
tainly a marked difference
from the complaints of the
past."
Following the March 2008
acquisition of Barbados Ship-
ping & Trading, Mr Warner
said: "We came to understand
the very grave financial situa-
tion that had arisen at
Bahamas Supermarkets.
"As shareholders, I can
understand the disappoint-
ment, the upset that you, fel-
low shareholders, must have
felt over the losses at
Bahamas Supermarkets.
However, we, too, are really
disappointed, really unhappy,
at how Bahamas Supermar-
kets has performed."
Mr Warner said that fol-
lowing the acquisition, it took
time to grasp all the different
elements of Barbados Ship-
ping & Trading's business.
Due to Bahamas Supermar-
kets' "call for cash", as a
result of its liquidity problems,
Neal & Massy "'i pp1, up
very early and lend $5 million
in August 2008.
"We didn't know very
much at this time," Mr Warn-
er said. "Thereafter, it became
more apparent, as we really
paid attention to Bahamas
Supermarkets, that we had a
problem. We have, in Neal &
Massy parlance, hot spots,
and that's where businesses
are experiencing trouble, be it
financial, resources, crisis of
leadership.
"In September 2008, the
Bahamas became a hot spot,
and we began to understand
what was going on. In August
2009, there was a proposal for
further investment. At Neal
& Massy, we put money in,
and other shareholders also
put more money into it. We
did what we had to do to
invest more capital.
"Neal & Massy did spend
more time thinking long and
hard about whether to put
more money into Bahamas
Supermarkets," Mr Warner
said. "We thought, after long
study, that we were really
committed to this. This is not
a fickle decision by Neal &
Massy on this issue. We had a
lot of push back from the
Board of Directors about
investing further.
"We became increasingly
convinced that the right thing
to do was to invest. Not to
invest blindly, but step for-
ward."
Explaining the need for
Neal & Massy to have more
control at both Bahamas
Supermarkets and BSL Hold-
ings, Mr Warner said: "A very
important part of this for us
was, if we put more money
into this, we have to have a
lot more involvement. A con-
dition of our investment was
that we put in resources, and
really took control of operat-
ing the supermarket, so that
we at least get this thing
turned around."
Responding to a question
from Kenwood Kerr, Provi-
dence Advisors' chief execu-
tive, about the Board's com-
position in favour of Neal &
Massy, Mr Warner said: "For


Neal & Massy to make this
investment, we had to know,
if it came down to a vote, that
we would be able to execute
the business strategy for the
success of this business. It was
a condition for separating us
from our money."


ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


PFG CAPITAL MARKETS

f E ROYAL FI DELITY

C gF A L Co 0. ON I A I.
E I?. LIiTED _. TF L-_C.l lD lFiTiEl - ,
FRIDAY 4 DECE,,1BER 2()00C
BIS;. ALL SH-REF INDE;: C LOSE 1 -I'_1_ C CIC -IHC- - 0' 11 - '.i TO -1C -1 'I''TD -2 .,
F IP DE_ . CLO SE iL '': I I-' I ','TD I'' 1: I - '- - 1_-' .-"
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM I TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
1 71 1 03 AML Foods Limited 1 17 1 17 000 0127 0000 92 000%
11 80 990 Bahamas Property Fund 1075 1075 000 0992 0200 108 186%
930 590 Bank of Bahamas 590 590 000 100 0244 0260 242 441%
089 063 Benchmark 063 063 000 -0877 0000 N/M 000%
349 315 Bahamas Waste 315 315 000 0125 0090 252 286%
2 37 214 Fidelity Bank 2 37 2 37 0 00 0 055 0 040 43 1 1 69%
1404 992 Cable Bahamas 1000 1000 000 1 406 0250 71 250%
288 272 Colina Holdings 272 272 000 0249 0040 109 147%
719 526 Commonwealth Bank (Sl) 573 573 000 0419 0300 137 5 24%
385 1 27 Consolidated Water BDRs 261 263 002 0111 0052 237 1 98%
285 132 Doctor's Hospital 255 255 000 1,500 0625 0080 41 314%
820 628 Famguard 649 649 000 0420 0240 155 370%
11 87 8 80 Finco 9 29 9 29 0 00 400 0 322 0 520 28 9 5 60%
11 71 986 FirstCaribbean Bank 986 986 000 0631 0350 156 355%
553 411 Focol (S) 475 475 000 0326 0150 146 316%
1 00 1 00 Focol Class B Preference 1 00 1 00 0 00 51,000 0 000 0 000 N/M 0 00%
0 45 0 27 Freeport Concrete 0 27 0 27 0 00 0 035 0 000 77 0 00%
902 549 ICD Utilities 559 559 000 672 0407 0500 137 894%
12 00 9 95 J S Johnson 9 95 9 95 0 00 0 952 0 640 105 6 43%
1000 1000 Premier Real Estate 1000 1000 000 0156 0000 641 0 00%
EI .'. LI- TED DE BT E- ECUL ' TIE - iEB. ...J : r-.J.- .n 2. F-r.:-r-t...-- F ..:.r.-4 L. :a- I
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol Interest Maturity
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100 00 0 00 96 7% 19 October 2017
100000 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 10000 000 219 Prime + 1 75% 19 October 2022
100000 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 10000 000 5 7% 30 May 2013
100000 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 10000 000 254 Prime + 1 75% 29 May 2015
, _ * i , __., ,i ______ ; -,_______. * _____ .i ** ____ , ,.. _: * CI. .-. Th_
1460 7 92 Bahamas Supermarkets 1006 11 06 1400 -2246 0000 N/M 000%
800 6 00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2 00 6 25 4 00 0 000 0 480 N/M 7 80%
054 0 20 RND Holdings 035 040 035 0001 0000 2566 000%
4100 29 00 ABDAB 30 13 31 59 29 00 4540 0000 903 000%
055 040 RND Holdings 045 055 055 0002 0000 261 90 0 00%
Eli.'. L-i ,.J r.lutu-al FLuI.J:
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield % NAV Date
1 4160 1 3419 CFAL Bond Fund 1 4160 462 553 31-Oct-09
30351 28266 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 28552 -2 88 -3 92 30-Nov-09
1 5033 1 4258 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 5033 4 85 5 24 27-Nov-09
35399 29343 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 29343 -1333 -1711 31-Oct-09
132400 123870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 132400 4 93 5 90 31-Oct-09
103 0956 100 0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 103 0956 3 10 252 30-Sep-09
1000000 994177 CFAL Global Equity Fund 994177 312 276 30-Sep-09
10 5884 94740 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9 4740 4 17 4 18 31 -Oct-09
1 0804 1 0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1 0804 4 32 5 26 31-Oct-09
1 0364 1 0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1 0269 -059 -0 19 31-Oct-09
1 0742 1 0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1 0742 3 56 442 31-Oct-09
10 6301 10 0000 Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund 10 6301 6 30 6 30 31 -Oct-09
Pnncipal Protected TIGRS, Series 2
74613 48105 Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund 74613 3540 2964 31 -Oct-09
(.1l.- .ET TEFr 1i
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000 00 YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing pnce
52wk-Hi - Highest closing pnce in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling pnce of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted pnce for dally volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter pnce
Today's Close - Current day's weighted pnce for dally volume Weekly Vol - Trading volume of the pnorweek
Change - Change in closing pnce from day to day EPS $ - A company reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1, 1994 = 100
(S) -4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242 502.7010 I ROYALFIDELITY 242 356.7764 I FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242 396-4000 I COLONIAL 242.502 7525


BUSINESS I


11101%jil I

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Monday I










MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009


+


a a Xrn mmn


The stories behind the news


By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor


Two weeks of unwel-
come media attention
for the Bahamas has
culminated in the most
dreaded of online
debates - whether safety fears
should prompt cruise lines to drop
Nassau as a destination.
As our tourism product takes a
public beating on the world stage,
those with a stake in an already
capricious industry are quickly
learning that in cyberspace, con-
tainment of bad publicity is impos-
sible.
From the moment 18 cruise pas-
sengers were held up at gunpoint
in broad daylight on November 20,
the second such attack in less than a
month, concerned Bahamians have
taken it upon themselves to try and
moderate the fallout, issuing online
apologies wherever the story
popped up.
And still it spread, from news arti-
cles to blogs to chat rooms. Min-
istry of Tourism employees say they
are now spending hours a day
online explaining that visitor safety
is a top priority for the Bahamas
and that the two hold-ups were
merely isolated incidents.
But those whose livelihoods are
affixed to the fate of the cruise ship
industry are not so sure. One Bay
Street merchant told Insight he is
"extremely worried" that we are
witnessing the beginnings of a wave
of crime against tourists.
"As I see it, it's only a matter of
time before a tourist is killed in an
armed robbery and all major cruise
lines cancel calls to Nassau. Our
number one industry can be
destroyed overnight if this continues
and we could easily spiral into a
similar situation as Haiti. A simple
Google search will show that these
robberies are already taking a toll
on people's decisions whether or
not to visit Nassau."
The source said that far from
being the result of the desperate
circumstances recently visited upon
some sectors of society, the attacks
are a symptom of a culture that has
been growing for quite some time.
"At first it was drug dealers and it
got out of hand before police
cleaned it up. Then it was peddlers
and vagrants. Again it got out of
control before it was cleaned up.
Now the crimes are much more seri-
ous; it's sad but it looks like it will
take a tourist getting shot before
police crack down on these crimi-
nals and I'm afraid it will be too
late then.
"We all know that bad news
spreads much faster than good
news. One tourist being murdered
would be all over CNN, Fox, the
BBC, and we have seen it happen to
Aruba."
One of the websites he men-
tioned, USA Today's cruise log, fea-
tures a blog entitled: "Should cruise
lines pull out of Nassau in wake of
attacks on tourists?"
To paraphrase just a few of the
most common reader responses:
* I would not feel safe with my
family visiting Nassau. The govern-
ment in Nassau must not care


1 tour







shotgun








his 'grave

concern'


lists in


tePP


HEADLINES on the front page of November 21 edition of The Tribune, the Bahamas' leading newspaper, paint a negative image
of the island-chain. Eighteen cruise passengers were held up at gunpoint in broad daylight on November 20, 2009, the second
such attack in less than a month...


enough to ensure the safety of visi-
tors. We should stop all ships car-
rying Americans to the port until
proper measures are put into place
to deter crime.
* When I am on vacation, I don't
want to worry about being mugged
or robbed at gunpoint. If Nassau
fails to protect its tourists, I will not
step off the ship. I do feel sorry for
the honest citizens who depend on
the revenue from the ships, but I
would not sacrifice my well-being,
or spend hard earned money on a
vacation just to support a country.
There are plenty of other beautiful
islands to visit that don't include a
fear factor.
* Isn't it unfortunate that it takes
publicised crime reporting, blog-
ging, twittering, and terrifying
encounters before the government
or cruise lines start the considera-
tion process to address a crime
wave?
In the wake of the attacks, many
tourism stakeholders have made the
very same point as this last example,
while some have adopted the curi-
ous strategy of blaming the press
for highlighting the hold-ups.
According to our Bay Street
source, an open discussion is vital if
there is to be any hope of reversing
the trend.
"I believe 100 per cent that the
more you report crimes, the more
the police will feel urgency to cap-
ture the culprits," he said. "If the
crimes were not committed then
you would not have to report them.
In the meantime, I think the crimes
committed should be publicised as
they are a matter of national secu-
rity.


"I also think we as the public
have to put more pressure on the
police to curb the problem before it
gets worse."
He admitted that police are doing
a better job patrolling downtown
Nassau than they have in previous
years, but said there is much room
for improvement as criminals "are
always studying new ways and tech-
niques to evade police and commit
these crimes - and obviously they
are succeeding.
"There is a strong police pres-
ence in the area and I do give them
some credit in some areas such as
curbing the problem with the ped-
dlers that used to rip off hundreds
of tourists a day by giving them a
"free bracelet" then trying to charge
them for it, or even grabbing their
money and running away.
"However, in my opinion, there is
a lack of management. For example,
on any given day on the south cor-
ner of Frederick and Bay Streets
you will see six to eight officers.
What is the point of having eight
police on one intersection? Chances
are, on the north side of Frederick
Street there are drug dealers look-
ing to make a quick sale.
"They should buy more bicycles
for the police so they can cover
more ground and I would also sug-
gest they change their walking
patrol times and routes as almost
any drug dealer and peddler can
tell you what time an officer is going
to be coming around the corner.
Why not have one officer on every
square city block?
"Lastly, on some days it seems as
if protecting tourists and Bahamians
is not on the agenda for the police


downtown as they are preoccupied
on booking or towing 'certain peo-
ple on certain days'. Why is it that
only certain cars are towed while
others are allowed to remain in
'loading zones' for hours? Does the
law change for certain people on
certain days? More energy could
be directed to protecting the tourists
and making them feel it is safe to
shop and sight-see all day."
According to Mr Paul Thomp-
son, a former Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police with 25 years expe-
rience in CID, although the public
may not see evidence of it, the
police are actually doing a "remark-
able job" in the face of a growing
illegal gun problem - averaging five
firearm possession arrests a week.
"Guns have become a major
problem in our country," he said.
"We have not been able to establish
how the guns are getting in the
country, but we know they are
being smuggled. We also know
these guns are of various types;
including assault weapons, such as
the Russian made AK-47, machine
guns, machine pistols and other
types of dangerous weapons."
Another problem, he said, is the
manner is which firearm possession
cases are handled by the courts.
"Very often the persons charged
with the possession of firearms
plead not guilty and the case is post-
poned for several months.
"I am very familiar with such pos-
session cases. With two police offi-
cers testifying for about 15 minutes
each and the police firearms expert
testifying just to identify the
weapon, a case could be completed
in about 30 minutes. In these cases,


quick justice would have a massive
effect on gun possession crimes in
our country.
"There was a time when magis-
trates, notably, Messrs Maxwell
Thompson and Wilton Hercules
would stand such cases down until
the afternoon for trial and advise
the defendants to go get their attor-
neys. It is my opinion that gun pos-
session cases should be heard with-
in two weeks of the arrest.
"Some time ago, I cannot remem-
ber when or which government, leg-
islation was passed and a manda-
tory sentence of two years was
introduced for persons convicted of
possession of firearms. Some time
later politicians changed the law by
removing the mandatory sentence.
It is my opinion that the mandatory
sentence should be re-enacted...
The penalty for assault weapons
should be a mandatory five years
and two years for handguns, shot-
guns and rifles."
Mr Thompson suggested the
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
and corporate citizens should con-
sider developing a fund for reward-
ing citizens who give information
to police leading to the arrest of
persons with illegal firearms.
"The police force should offer
rewards as incentives to police offi-
cers making arrests and recovering
guns," he added.
These and all other suggestions
should be carefully considered, but
we must not lose sight of the fact
that the trend of tourist attacks -
which, incidentally, is showing no
signs of abating (we received word
of a tourist being robbed on Prince
George Wharf as this article was
being written) - is but a minor
symptom of a much more deep-
rooted problem.
Anyone who doubts this should
take the time to read some of the
online discussions dedicated to the
denigration of our capital. One
repeat cruise passenger said she
"never felt safe" in Nassau. "It is
not as bad as Jamaica but it is get-
ting worse all the time."
Another described Nassau as
"one of my least favourite ports of
any that I have been to on more
than 14 cruises."
He added: "If you didn't go over
to Atlantis you had nothing to do
but shop in some overpriced dock-
side shops. The people were so rude
to many of us waiting in the rain to
board our little buses that I was
fearful that some of our tour folks
were going to break out in fights...
The only way that I would ever go
back to Nassau would be if the
cruise ship docked at the Atlantis
and I could stay there till it left that
night. Nassau is not a good port of
call."
Other commentators referred to
Nassau as "dirty" and "a dump",
describing it as an unwelcoming
place populated by drug dealers and
prostitutes.
One visitor who has been com-
ing to Nassau, which he refers to as
"Nausea", since the 1940s, said it
has never been a "haven."
"The main problem in Nausea
and the rest of the Bahama islands

SEE page 10


2009 COROLLA


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.Aaealsnskamaasorukne3ulau'onitqIsSe *eoa imS lHt2 rixUI UMmdOtl SwB .iIaI


I







+


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009

Legal Notice
NOTICE

SECURE EMBRACE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 3rd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

WATHERINGTON

INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 3rd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

OSTERBUG

INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 3rd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

BODEN PLANES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 3rd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

PAGODA ASSET

MANAGEMENT LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


THE TRIBUNE





Readers have their say...


Legal Notice
NOTICE

MOOR POINTE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 3rd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

BALUCHI VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 3rd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Alison,
There certainly is a story in
the "sunshine" government's
failure to account for the
expenditure of public funds. It
is lack of accountability that
has led to the Bahamas' sad
state of affairs. It's why cor-
ruption is endemic and the
country is on the threshold of
anarchy - everyone can do
their own thing without being
held accountable.
If our leaders don't under-
stand, what hope is there for
the country?
The media's job is to act as
public watchdog and to hold
the government accountable.
Keep up the good work.
- Athena Damianos
Hi Alison,
Your article is so timely.
Government has to be
ACCOUNTABLE! We need
a Freedom of Information
Act sooner than later!
When are government
employees and Parliamentar-
ians ever going to realise who
is paying their salaries and
that they are accountable to
the people not themselves!
Who is Zhivargo Laing to
decide whether there is a sto-
ry or no story? Is it that he
doesn't have the information
or the facts? Is it that the
information is too embarrass-
ing to reveal or that the funds
have not been spent as they
should have? It is OUR mon-
ey not his! We would like to
know where our money is
being spent so we can make
better judgments about who
we want to vote for in 2012.
Perhaps it would help the par-
ty leaders to make better deci-
sions about who is doing a
good job or not!
Please don't let this story
die, keep up the perseverance
and let us know the results!
One only has to look at the
inquiry into the Crown Land
Grants to know why we need
accountability and a Freedom
of Information Act! This is a
direct result of great inves-
tigative research and report-
ing by The Tribune! Keep up
the great work!
- Peter


insight
FEEDBACK

Dear Alison,
Great story! We need
more journalists like you that
are fearless and hold truth to
pen. I am certain that it's
nothing personal and that
you're just doing your job.
We must raise the bar to an
acceptable level, and keep the
standards of our so-
called leaders where it out to
be. It dropped a very long
time ago. Honesty and integri-
ty should be found in that
place in which they congre-
gate. If the report wasn't
ready, then just say.
They must be put on notice
that if they do not seemingly
respect the people which they
serve or the office in which
they hold, then please do not
run for office. If they now
realise that it is "over their
heads", then resign as an hon-
ourable man/woman would
do. That is conveyed to
whether they are FNM, PLP,
ZZP, or XYZ. I just want
proper service and account-
ability for the suggested ser-
vice rendered. Is this too
much to ask?
It is a new day and it starts
with us. Keep up the good
work. Your pen happens to
be the voice of many that are
silenced. In that regard, your
article was not in vain.
Best regards,
Ryan


A WAKE UP CALL

FROM page 12

has been that since they
became independent from
the British Crown their
once-healthy regard for
law and order took a
nosedive from which it
has yet to recover."
Another said: "I dread
having Nassau on an itin-
erary and try my best to
avoid it."
These commentators
made it clear that the
recent robberies merely
added to an already dis-
mal tourism product.
Obviously many of
these comments must be
taken with a grain of salt,
as there is no quality con-
trol mechanism attached
to online discussion
boards. This is what has
most frustrated concerned
Bahamians, who note that
there is nothing to prevent
reckless, exaggerated
statements from defining
the debate.
However, for all the
harm to the country's
lifeblood this potentially
gives rise to, international
exposure of this kind may
actually be something of a
blessing in disguise.
As a Mall at Marathon
shopkeeper told Insight,
"Bahamians have to
accept that the internet is
like a mirror, and if they
don't like what they see,
that's their problem."
That the mirror is often
warped is not the point -
this is the world we live
in and we had better learn
to deal with it.
In any case, quibbling
over the details is coun-
terproductive. There is no
question that this is a
deeply troubled society,
driven by greed and cor-
ruption, existing upon a
foundation of deceit and
violence. We must come
to terms with these facts if
we ever hope to find a
lasting solution to the
criminality threatening
our tourism industry.
This mirror is being
held up to the Bahamas
as we find ourselves at a
crossroads. Tourism is
already facing one of its
biggest challenges in our
recent history as the
world's economic fortunes
continue to suffer. The
much anticipated rede-
velopment of downtown
Nassau is very much a
make or break issue. Our
efforts to keep the econo-
my afloat will mean little
if we do not come to


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


CREDIT SUISSE

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

Private Banking

is presently accepting applications for a


Securities Executor

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:
Qualifications:
University Degree or equivalent

Experience:
* Sound international banking background with at least 5 years banking experience in
back-office securities operations, trading and securities market
* Strong understanding of Private Banking Business and Financial Sector
* Working knowledge and experience with Globus Banking System is advantageous
* Working knowledge and experience with MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Bloomberg
applications

Personal Qualities:
* Strong analytical skills
* Excellent organizational skills
* Strong written, oral, and interpersonal skills
* Work independently with strong accountability within a team environment
* Enthusiastic team spirit with the ability to effectively collaborate across teams and
cultures
* Highly motivated and committed to service excellence
* Confident with good leadership skills

Key Duties & Responsibilities:
* Oversee, input and approve securities trade, delivery and corporate action
settlements for worldwide markets
* Liaising with brokers and agents
* Monitoring custodian reports
* Investigating failed trades and instructing depositories
* Serve as an Operations subject matter expert for new requirements
impacting settlement processing
* Participate in User Acceptance Testing prior to project or product
implementation for developments impacting securities operations
* Contribute to and participate in special project initiatives impacting the Bank

Benefits provided include:
* Competitive salary and performance bonus
* Pension Plan
* Health and Life Insurance
* Ongoing internal and external career development/training program
APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING.
ONLY PERSONS MEETING THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS NEED APPLY
Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:
DECEMBER 16, 2009


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 3rd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


terms with the underlying
dysfunction that charac-
terises our society.
What do you think?
Email: pnunez@tribune-
media.net




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