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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01461
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: December 4, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01461

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TINGS TOUGH
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The


Tribune


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


4MUSA70D
BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


WAKE UP..1
To A Cwq Of
Prvmitun Roast Coffi.


Volume: 106 No.12


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2009


PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)


o restoration
or non-paying
International
Business
Companies
SEE BUSINESS FRONT
i OTIII0


$7.1m contract

'to revive family

island's fortunes'


s


Isla


II


Man at centre of lewd

emails investigation

'leaves with family'


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
IT is feared another male
teacher might have fled Grand
Bahama following police inves-
tigations into accusations
involving a female student.
Tribune sources alleged that
the teacher, who has been
employed at a private school
on Clive Avenue, has left with
his family.
According to reports, the
teacher allegedly sent emails



A MAN was found
dead in bushes near the
Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal yesterday, police
reported.
Foul play is not suspect-
ed in the death of the
unidentified man, who is
believed to be in his late
forties or early fifties.
According to police, his
body was found shortly
after 4.00pm in the area of
SEE page two


with a photo of male genitalia
to a female student. The emails
date back as far as 2007. The
student was graduated in June
of this year.
In October, Senior Assistant
Commissioner of Police Mar-
vin Dames reported in a local
newspaper that police investi-
gations surrounding a teacher
at St Paul's Methodist College
were not of a sexual nature.
At the time, he noted that an
anonymous person had sent
sheets of paper to the police of
the image, but that there was
no official complaint.
The alleged documents with
the image were also circulated
around the school's campus, to
SEE page two

Police officer
shot in Fox Hill
POLICE confirmed last
night that a traffic police
officer was shot in the area
of Fox Hill sometime
around 8pm.
Up to press time, police
were still responding to the
SEE page two


A CONTRIBUTION to ,-re
Bay Street yesterday.
By AVA TURNQUEST
THE Salvation Army
raised its annual Christm
while in Grand Bahama
secure donations or volt
The Kettle Drive, which
launched on November
7 and Grand Bahama, and
- Eve.
In New Providence, i
E than $5,000 has been co
~i Marsha Kanady, the
opment associate for Ne
dent this year's Kettle E
$50,000 more than last y
The money raised in Ni
SEE page seve


y's New Providence branch has
as fundraiser to $150,000, mean-
a, the organisation is unable to
unteers.
ch is more than 30 years old, was
21 and 27 in New Providence
d will continue until Christmas
t is estimated that so far more
elected in kettle donations.
community relations and devel-
w Providence, said she is confi-
)rive will meet its goal, which is
'ear.
New Providence will assist much
en


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
RESIDENTS of the
southern island of Acklins
are expecting that a $7.1 mil-
lion contract for the rehabil-
itation of their main thor-
oughfare will be the catalyst
for a major revival of the
island's fortunes.
For over a decade, more
than 30 miles of the Queen's
Highway - the only road


connecting many of the far-
flung island's tiny commu-
nities - has been in a condi-
tion which many who are
used to properly maintained
thoroughfares would con-
sider impassable.
From paving pockmarked
with potholes so deep that
to fall in one would mean
certain mechanical failure,
to treacherous rocky stretch-
es without surfacing of any
SEE page seven


gi Attempt to
steal tourist's
purse foiled
HAVE-A-GO heroes
foiled a would-be thief from
snatching a tourist's purse.
The woman and her male
companion - who were guests
at the Harbour Club, near the
Harbour Bay Shopping Cen-
tre on East Bay Street -
were walking to a nearby
restaurant shortly after 8pm
Wednesday when the attack-
er struck.
As they neared the Par-
adise Island bridge, a young
,. dark-skinned thug wearing a
SEE page seven
_* World-wide news video
now on Tribune website
A M THE TRIBUNE website
TRIBUNE242 recently launched
a stand alone video player sup-
ported by the Associated Press
on its home page, where broad-
casts of local events can be
viewed.
While more work is being
done to fine tune the develop-
ment of multi-media projects,
iThe Tribune is proud to bring a
E t e snew level of news gathering to
. The Bahamas and to the world
via World Wide Web.
As news breaks, world-wide
video and audio broadcasts are
becoming more of an essential
-- part of the whole story, and our
move to the web has enabled us
to make use of that media.
Our very first packaged
report, on the state of Christmas
,.f .-7J. tree sales in New Providence, is
ready for you to view. Simply
I log on to www.tribune242.com
Three students with
swine flu 'doing well'
THE three students of St Andrew's School
who contracted the H1N1 virus are doing well
- with one of them already back in school, said L >
Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis.
The students bring the number of confirmed
H1N1 virus cases in the country to 44, howev-
er due to the virus's low mortality rate - com-
pared with the more deadly regular influenza
SEE page two


I I


I 1 7;







+


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2009, PAGE 3


S CALN


0 In brief

Three-year

jail sentence

for cocaine

possession
A 45-year-old man was
sentenced to serve three
years in prison after he was
convicted on a cocaine pos-
session charge on Tuesday.
Leonard Fleurena of
Cowpen Road was charged
with possession of cocaine
with intent to supply.
Fleurena was found in pos-
session of the drugs on
October 9, 2005.
According to police,
around 9am that day, two
police officers from the
Arawak Cay Police Station
observed two men loading
three crocus sacks into the
rear of a red Isuzu Rodeo
jeep.

Suspicious

The officers became suspi-
cious and approached the
men who sped off in the
jeep. They crashed, howev-
er, in the area of West Bay
Street and Perpall Tract.
Police were able to appre-
hend Fleurena and found
that two of the crocus sacks
contained cocaine while
another contained coal. The
drugs had a weight of 60 and
half pounds.
Fleurena was found
guilty of the offence, con-
victed and sentenced to
three years in prison. He
was also fined $5,000.
Failure to pay the fine will
result in an additional term
of one year imprisonment.

Man awaiting
new sentence
for murder
A MAN convicted of
murder who spent the past
12 years in prison will have
to wait two more weeks to
learn what his new sen-
tence will be.
Senior Justice Anita
Allen yesterday deferred
her decision on the resen-
tencing of Lindy Sheldon
Cartwright, 32, until
December 18.
Cartwright, who was sen-
tenced to death in May
2000 for the December
1997 shooting death of
Deton Forbes, was expect-
ed to be resentenced yes-
terday, however Senior
Justice Allen indicated that
she wanted to hear the
legal arguments in a similar
matter before making her
decision.
Cartwright's death sen-
tence was quashed by the
Privy Council in July 2006.
He is represented by
attorney Dorsey McPhee.
Attorney Anthony
Delaney is representing
the Crown.

BUT set to host 50
delegates attending
Caribbean meeting
THE Bahamas Union of
Teachers will host 50 dele-
gates attending the
Caribbean Union of
Teachers (CUT) Executive
Committee meeting sched-
uled from December 4-5 at
the union's Walkers Hall,
on Bethel Avenue.
Delegates have started
to arrive from 21
Caribbean nations stretch-
ing from Bermuda in the
north to Guyana in the
south.
The CUT rotates the
venue of its Executive
Committee meetings
between the member coun-
tries and this will be the
second time that the BUT
is hosting this prestigious
meeting in 10 years.
The items set to be dis-
cussed on the agenda
include: Disaster Prepared-
ness and Mitigation Work-
shop, collective bargaining


and ICT Workshops, assis-
tance to Haiti, Les Harris
Cricket Competition and
many others.
"The Bahamas Union of
Teachers has planned and
prepared to treat our spe-
cial guests to a great
Bahamian experience
before they leave on Sun-
day," secretary general
Stephen McPhee said.


Two in hospital after




separate shootings


Police also probing armed robbery in West Street area


POLICE are investigating
two separate shootings in the
capital which left two men in
hospital.
Officers are also probing the
armed robbery of a business in
the West Street area.
In one of the incidents, two
determined gunmen shot an
employee of MAC Consultants
on Carmichael Road twice after
he refused to let them in the
store.
The employee told police he
was ambushed by two dark men
wearing dark clothes as he
closed up shop for the night at
around 11pm on Wednesday.
According to the employee,
the men tried to force him back
inside the store.
The employee said he put up
a fight and was shot once in the
left foot. As the two culprits fled
the scene, one of them shot at


him again, hitting him in the left
leg a second time.
The man was taken to hospi-
tal by ambulance where he is
said to be in stable condition.
Earlier that night, a man
claimed he had been beaten and
shot by three men who attacked
him near a water depot on
Meadow Street.

Approached
Police were notified about
the incident at around 10.30pm.
The 29-year-old victim told
officers that he was approached
and attacked by three men as
he stood near the depot.
One of the men, who was
allegedly armed with a gun, shot
the victim in the right leg, he
said. The victim was taken to
hospital where he is listed in


stable condition. Sergeant
Chrislyn Skippings said police
are following significant leads
in this matter.
Earlier that day, at around
10am, police received reports
of an armed robbery at Millen-
nium Communications on West
Street.
Sgt Skippings said: "Police
responded and spoke with an
employee of the establishment
who informed them that a
masked male allegedly armed
with a handgun entered the
store and demanded cash."
She said the culprit ordered
the employee to the ground
before robbing the store of an
undetermined amount of cash
and cell phones.
An 18-year-old male has
been detained and is assisting
the police with their investiga-
tion.


-uiu hep -- ops 'petI EasyF


, , ,
. 1


PICTURED LEFT TO RIGHT: Bianca Butler, PMH; Leslie TuLin-
quest, Rubins; Sandra Olander, PMH; Maria Gatis, Ruti': Di
Gwendolyn McDeigan, Neonatologist; Patrice Solomon PF/IH
Michele Rassin, Doctors Hospital; Jenny Pinder, The Tuiitinei
Juanika Knowles, Rubins; Tonya Davis, Rubins.

Rubins is the latest sponsor to present a cheque to the "Breathe
Easy" campaign in memory of the late Roger Carron.
This donation has brought the campaign to a total of $210,575
raised for ventilators to benefit critically ill newborns at the
Princess Margaret Hospital's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.
"The management and staff of Rubins wish to extend our con-
dolences to Mrs Carron and her son for the loss of their husband
and father," said a spokesperson for the company.

Remembered
"Mr Carron will always be remembered by the ladies of Rubins
and they will surely miss his periodic visits to our store, when he
invariably would engage us in conversation on all manner of sub-
jects. His gentle and kindly way of speaking have entranced many
of us and touched our lives in many ways. He was truly a gentleman
who will be remembered and missed by many."
Persons interested in making a donation to the nation-wide
fund-raising campaign should contact: the Tile King, The Tribune
Media Group, Doctors Hospital, or the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal Foundation. Please make cheques payable to the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital Foundation. For more information call 302-4707.

Fund-paiser fop indigent retired police officers
THE RBPF Retired Police Officers Association will host a
fundraising concert on Christmas night to aid indigent retired
officers with medical costs and other needs.
Entertainment will be provided by Slinger "The Mighty Spar-
row" Francisco and his band, the Trinidad and Tobago Trouba-
dours. The Police Pop Band and other local artists will also per-
form. Proceeds from the function will also go towards repairs to the
homes of indigent retired officers and help with the Police Depen-
dents' Trust, which was created to assist the families of offices who
died while on duty.
The event - which will be held at the Sheraton Nassau Beach
Resort at 8 pm - is under the patronage of Sir Orville Turnquest,
former governor general, his wife Lady Turnquest and under the
auspices of the Commissioner of Police and the RBPF.
Ticket information can be obtained from the Secretariat at
RBPF headquarters or by calling 302-8044.



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T1~7


PAGE 4, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


EIOI AULETE S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


How the Baha Mar project collapsed


PRIME MINISTER Ingraham's expressed
doubts on March 5 last year when moving a
Resolution in the House of Assembly to
authorise the Treasurer to transfer certain
lands and buildings to Baha Mar Cable Beach
Resorts, was like manna falling from heaven.
It was the excuse Harrah's Entertain-
ment's new owners were looking for to cov-
er the fact that they were manoeuvring
behind the scenes to pull out of the $2.6 bil-
lion Cable Beach deal, while smiling coyly
and announcing to the public that all sta-
tions were "go."
At first Opposition leader Perry Christie
had agreed with Mr Ingraham's questioning
of Harrah's commitment to the deal. "It
seems to me," said Mr Christie at the time,
"that Harrah's were looking for a way out
and they used the speech and the words of
the Prime Minister as an excuse, or part
excuse for the way out."
However, Mr Christie suddenly changed
his tune. Did he realise that if he let Mr
Ingraham off the hook, the spotlight of blame
would be on him and his government for the
inordinate delays in signing the Baha Mar
agreement? It didn't take Mr Christie long to
rewrite his script. He urged Mr Ingraham to
accept the blame and "responsibility" for
setting back, "if not killing the proposal."
Mr Christie, while admitting that other fac-
tors contributed to Harrah's walk out, con-
tinued to put full blame on Mr Ingraham's
"intemperate language" and injecting the
fear that the land conveyances for the project
were in doubt. This, said Mr Christie, were
the "straws that broke the camel's back."
While accusing fingers were still being
pointed at Mr Ingraham, later that year a
drama was being played out in a court room
in New York, when the deceit of Harrah's
new owners was unmasked. It was revealed
that three days before signing the Heads of
Agreement with the Ingraham government
and making a public announcement of its
intention to go ahead with the project, Har-
rah's new owners were plotting to pull out of
the deal. This meeting took place in January.
Mr Ingraham did not speak in the House
until March.
Tribune Business reported allegations that
the move to withdraw from the Baha Mar
joint venture was directly linked to the
takeover of Harrah's by two US private equi-
ty giants, Apollo Management and Texas
Pacific, which purchased the gaming giant
for $27.8 billion, and assumed $10.7 billion in
debt, on January 28, 2008 - three days
before the supplemental heads of agreement
were signed between Baha Mar and Gov-
ernment. Caesars Bahamas consented to the
deal.
In the court case, Baha Mar alleged that
Harrah's and its new owners decided to with-
draw from the project to aid the former's
balance sheet position, but instead of notify-
ing its partners it looked for an excuse to


withdraw. This was in January, 2008. Mr
Ingraham made his remarks in the House
two months later - March 5, 2008.
And so we are left with the first part of
Caesar Bahamas Investment Companies'
printed complaint to its intended joint partner
- Baha Mar Joint Venture Holdings - that
"the long delays in reaching agreement with
the government and completing the assem-
blage of the relevant land rights have con-
tributed to considerable doubt about whether
the project can be financed at all given the
continuously deteriorating debt markets.
These delays also raise grave concerns about
increased costs and risk and create appre-
hension about your ability to execute in a
timely manner."
Baha Mar was unable to execute in a time-
ly manner because, as Sarkis Izmirlian told
prime minister Christie in a letter on January
25, 2006: "You had given me your personal
assurance that you would ensure that the
Government would move to expeditiously
accomplish the above (which Mr Izmirlian
listed) by the New Year. Yet this did not
happen." And he concluded: "If we cannot
achieve the early February timeframe for
accomplishing the above, I will have to
inform Harrah's and Starwood that, despite
my best efforts these past three odd years, the
Government of The Commonwealth of the
Bahamas has failed me. I certainly do not
want to be known as the developer (and I'm
certain you don't want to be known as the
Prime Minister) that lost Caesars and Star-
wood. Today, more than before, I need your
unambiguous support, Mr Prime Minister."
This letter was dated January 26, 2006. Har-
rah's new owners did not come on the scene
until two years later - January 28, 2008.
As Bahamas Business pointed out, if the
supplemental Heads of Agreement had been
concluded with the PLP government by
March 1, 2007 as they should have been, "the
Bahamas, Cable Beach and Baha Mar would
not be in the mess they are now in." The deal
would have been airtight before Mr Ingraham
won the government and Mr Christie would
have been assured of his own legacy.
If the contracts had been concluded in
March, 2007, "then Harrah's would likely
have been locked into the Baha Mar deal
and the project would have been well under-
way." But they were not concluded on time.
A year later new buyers were in the picture
and had taken over the gambling giant, the
global economic situation started to look
grim, and what was once a "hot" deal had
turned "cold."
A major development project had col-
lapsed, because, according to Mr Izmirlian,
the Christie government had not met the
promised deadlines, and as a result had lost
Caesars and Starwood. The Bahamas was
out in the cold, and the jobs that both gov-
ernments had depended on to keep the econ-
omy moving were no more.


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PPMAYIK.R


Power Prayer Sessions
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Starting Monday 301h November, 2009
t2 niin un t I p.m.

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J~am bMrid FNlMM ha~iim


National debt




and the FNM




spin merchant


EDITOR, The Tribune.


Thank you for your valuable
space. The FNM government
has increased the National debt
of the Bahamian people to the
point where each citizen will
soon owe ten thousand dollars
due to government's borrow-
ing. This is in addition to any
personal debt that he may have
at a commercial bank through
credit card or personal loan.
It is not fair to us that the
Minister of State Mr Laing
seeks to conceal this alarming
fact by only naming the foreign
debt and ignoring the local
component of the huge debt,
as reported in the November
23rd, daily papers.
Bahamians have a right to
know the full extent of our debt
problem, not some cherry
picked section of this
humungous debt. Foreign or
local, this debt has to be ser-
viced on time, using money tak-
en out of the nation's earnings,
or by tax on us. In short, we all
have to pay our part of the
debt, not only the foreign com-
ponent of it. This significantly
reduces money to pay things
like civil service salaries, and
you can see that downsizing of
that section of the workforce is
highly likely in the near future.
Once upon a time it was con-
sidered wise to balance a bud-
get, it was considered wise to
save, but such common sense
wisdom has been forsaken for
the new and slick trick of living
off credit. The housing collapse
in the United States has shown
the world the result of living
off these slick tricks.., .ultimate-
ly the trick fails and you have to
pay up or hit the road of no
housing.
When will so-called leaders
learn that common sense is the
best guide, and that slick spin
tricks only erode? How can we
have confidence in a financial
adviser who conceals the true
nature of the nation's huge
debt, the reality of how close
we are to a ruinous devalua-
tion, the full extent of the huge
gamble that we have been
forced to accept as financial
policy under successive PLP
and FNM governments?
Take careful note that now
as our reward for trusting these
financial advisers we are sad-
dled with an increasing and
record high National Debt that
we and our children will strug-
gle for decades to pay. The
FNM financial gurus will soon
place on your back a new tax
and call it a sales or VAT
tax... later to be followed by a
pay as you earn income tax.
Add to this the National Health
Insurance tax, and your own
personal debt and you will see
that you are stuck fast in the
debt trap. Who do you have to
thank for this, and how will you
get out?
It is a constant surprise to me
that your FNM Government
has deliberately decided not to


encourage the commercial
banks to lower interest rates on
mortgages, credit cards and per-
sonal loans. They have inten-
tionally left these interest rates
high to discourage you from
borrowing they say. If the min-
ister of finance encouraged
these banks to reduce their
exorbitantly high interest rates
you would be able to meet your
commitments easier. Do you
recall that it was not long ago
the financial gurus were urging
you to spend, spend, spend,
since they claimed that this
would stimulate the economy?
Did this advice help you?
The commercial banks don't
mind high interest rates, since
these guarantee that they stay
in a win win situation, unless
there is a devaluation! We are
the closest we have ever been
to a devaluation, and I chal-
lenge the minister of finance to
deny that fact! We are even
closer to a debt burden that will
force government to drastically
slash its spending, the size of
its work force, and increase
your taxes. Times will definite-
ly become much harder for
many!
But you can take comfort in
the fact that it is only "a matter
of trust." You can be comforted
by the fact that the minister
says only 10 per cent of your
huge national debt is foreign
owned. I did not know that the
local banks had written off the
rest of the debt. Perhaps I
missed where this was stated in
the print media. Can the Prime
Minister confirm that the total
debt is only 10 per cent of
GDP? These are serious times,
perhaps the most serious in our
history. This is certainly no time
for the junior minister of
finance to engage in double talk
and cherry picking as regards
the facts. We need to know
what the courts ask for, "the


truth, the whole truth, and
nothing but the truth!"
Tell the truth, Minister
Laing, let the people know that
right now we are headed for a
dollar devaluation as sure as
the sun rises. We are up to our
elbows in debt, and sinking
deeper every day. Tell the
truth, and shame the devil! Do
not hide the real facts... let the
Bahamian people know what
the true position is... you were
elected on the promise of trans-
parency, not spin.
We are tired of heads of
agreement that are hidden, fis-
cal policies that are only partly
revealed, lack of transparency
in financial forecasts, and no
freedom of information act in
practice. Now you seek to con-
fuse the people with double talk
concerning our debt predica-
ment. Come clean and admit
that you are worried about the
huge debt... as all well thinking
Bahamians are. Will you wait
until each of us owes over ten
thousand dollars of public debt
before you confess? Your men-
tor's regime as Prime Minister
was obtained as a "matter of
trust" you know. Was that only
an empty election slogan, and
in reality we have no right to
ask you to justify to us why you
only talk about the 10 per cent
foreign debt? Isn't it true that
the full indebtedness is almost
five times as much as this for-
eign component? I suggest that
it is at the end of the day far
better for you to keep the peo-
ple fully informed now, and not
spring any surprise devaluation
on them... heads have rolled for
less in other countries in the
bad old days, and we would not
wish to see that happen here! A
word to the wise is sufficient,
tell the people the whole truth!
Justify the trust that has been
placed in you.

DR DEXTER
R JOHNSON
Assistant
Law Professor,
Nassau,
November 25, 2009.


EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have read with interest the editor's contribution this morn-
ing. It would be taken seriously if it were not so one sided. How-
ever, the brief point I wish to make is this: Who brought politics
into Urban Renewal?
I have heard over the past year that the Urban Renewal
programme would be a success if you took politics out of it. This
point has been made most forcefully and often by those in the
governing party since their convention.
The only politician in Urban Renewal then and now, to my
recollection, is Ms Lewis. I do not recall the PLP appointing a
candidate or prospective candidate or past candidate to the
post of director of Urban Renewal. My opinion is that if Ms
Lewis is removed from the post of Director the matter of pol-
itics in Urban Renewal should, and would, be hard to prove.

A CONCERNED
BAHAMIAN
Nassau,
November, 2009.


Common
"A" Preference
"B'" Preference
"C" Preference
"D" Prefarence
"E" Preference
"F" Preference
"G" Prelerence
"H'" Preference
"I" Preference


+>


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TO ALL SHAREHOLDERS

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Declared a Quarterly Dividend for Common, "A", "B', 'C", "D",
"E', "F', G", "H" and "I" Preference Shares, to all shareholders
of record at December 15, 2009., as follows:-


5c per share
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% per annum paysble quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% per annum payabMe quarterly
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Golinra FInarloaI AdvimorsLimited. the IRegIstrar & Trarisler
Agni. in the usual manri~r.


Charlene A. Bosfield
Corporate Secretary







+


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2009, PAGE 5


Murder victims' families to


stage pro-hanging march

Call for persons held on murder charges to be denied bail


CONTINUING to demand
that all convicted murderers be
hanged promptly, the families
of murder victims will march
from RM Bailey Park through
the streets of New Providence
on Saturday, December 12 at
9am.
Workers Party leader and
victims' rights activist Rodney
Moncur announced yesterday
that the marchers will also
demand that all persons being
held on murder charges be
denied bail. According to Mr
Moncur, in failing to hang per-
sons on Death Row, politicians
are "playing games with human
suffering".
He added that "too many
children go to bed crying, in
loneliness and fear every night
because their fathers or moth-
ers have been murdered by
known persons, who continue
to walk up and down the neigh-
bourhood streets."


BRASS & Leather has
recognized the outstanding
teacher and student in the
Southeastern District as part
of the company's Excellence
in Education awards pro-
gramme.
On Friday, November 27 at
Brass & Leather's Mall-at-
Marathon store, the compa-
ny's management met with
the award recipients - teacher
Ms Jasmine Bodie and stu-
dent Ms Jerell Rahming, both
of RM Bailey Senior High
School which is headed by
Principal Julian Anderson.
Ms Bodie is a hospitality
and tourism studies instruc-
tor and has been employed
with the Ministry of Educa-
tion for the past six years. She
was noted for being on the
cutting edge of information
and technology in her lesson
planning and delivery.
Ms Bodie was also recog-
nised for being one of the first
teachers to enroll in the
Promethean Active Board
Training scheme and the
Bahamas Education I Now
Training (STI) course,
enabling her to become the
resource person for both pro-
grammes at RM Bailey.
The dynamic teacher is a
recent graduate of the
Bahamahost Programme and
has passed level three of the
American Hotel and Lodging
Association qualifications,


Mr Moncur said the prime
minister deserves most of the
blame for the fact that no con-
vict has been hanged in almost
a decade, but added that
despite leader of the opposi-
tion Perry Christie's recent pro-
nouncement that he is a sup-
porter of capital punishment,
the record shows that not one
person was hanged during his
five year term in office.

Believes
"So, we know that what he
believes and what he actually
does are as far apart as east is
from west, and are as distinct as
night is from day.
"Moreover, it is not a ques-
tion of whether or not the
prime minister or the leader of
the opposition or a judge of the
court or a policeman believes in
capital punishment. The issue


which will ultimately lead to
her becoming a Certified Hos-
pitality Instructor. In addition
to excelling in the classroom,
Ms Bodie serves on almost
every committee at her school
including of the Social Com-
mittee, Interact Club and the
Special Programmes Com-
mittee.

Ambitious
Jerell Rahming, a 12th
grade student, was described
as a humble, ambitious and
generous individual. Among
her peers, she is known to be
a motivator and a peace mak-
er.
The aspiring music teacher
lives by the motto, "Do unto
others as you would have
them do unto you".
Jerell, a senior prefect,
holds many leadership posi-
tions at school including on
the Praise and Worship Team,
the Girls' Ensemble and the
track and field team. She is a
leader of the school band and
head vocalist in the choir.
Her involvement in church
includes membership in the
Southwest Cathedral Youth


is that the law of the land, that
clearly mandates that persons
convicted of murder should be
hanged, must be carried out,"
he said. Mr Moncur added:
"We, who call for the prompt
hanging of all convicted mur-
derers and who call for all per-
sons who have been charged
with or convicted of murder to
be denied bail, have never said
that hanging will stop murders.
This argument has been
coughed up by the gangster
philosophers and intellectuals,
who use it as a decoy to dis-
tract people from the real issue,
which is that hanging is just,
proper and legal punishment
for murder.
"We, who are calling for jus-
tice, know this basic truth: that
a hanged murderer will be for-
ever deterred from carrying out
another act of cruel, inhumane
and unusual violence against
human life."


Choir, the Girls' Club, Mili-
tant Invaders, the drama
team, the church band and
the dance group.
She visits different church-
es to perform and spread the
word of God to others. The
versatile student maintains a
3.30 grade point average in
addition to mentoring young
girls at her school and at
church.
Brass & Leather, the popu-
lar leather goods company,
has partnered with the Min-
istry of Education to highlight
the achievements of teachers
and students in the public
educational system. The first
awards were presented to
Northwestern District teacher
Doreen Thompson and stu-
dent Julian Desir of TG
Glover Primary School.
Managing director Peter
Phillips said the objective of
the programme is to recog-
nise the achievements of
teachers and students in pub-
lic schools, and for Brass &
Leather to say thank you to
these outstanding individuals.
The awardees were pre-
sented with gifts from the
Brass & Leather Shop.


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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Parliament approves transfer of land to 14 homeowners in Eight Mile Rock



Grand Bahama land dispute closer to resolution


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net


Bringing resolution to a long-stand-
ing Grand Bahama land dispute closer
than ever, parliament yesterday
approved the transfer of land by the
government to 14 homeowners living
in the Eight Mile Rock constituency.
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
said that the homes were built on land
the title to which was later claimed by
another person, and after the home-
owners were threatened with paying
up or facing eviction, the government
stepped in and purchased the site for
$170,000.
Those with homes on the 6.8 acres
of land were then given the chance to
enter into payment plans to buy the
land from the government for the price
it paid, Mr Ingraham said.


SYesterday the
government suc-
S cessfully moved a
resolution that
5 'MPs approve the
transfer of the title
for the land to
those individuals
who have now
entirely paid up,
and to proactively
approve the trans-
fer of title for the land to the rest of
those who are currently paying for
their lots once they hand over the full
sum.
The move, which now only has to
receive the go-ahead from the Senate,
was welcomed by Eight Mile Rock
MP, Verna Grant, as one which will
ensure "closure" to those in the com-
munity.
"We realise that land is one of the


biggest investments one can make. It is
empowering - it can be left in wills for
children, used for collateral opportu-
nities, and it increases in value."
"I encourage those in Pinedale to
continue making their payments and
you too will get our conveyance if you
did not this time," said the MP.

Resolution
The resolution was one of four
moved by Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, also minister with respon-
sibility for lands, in parliament yester-
day, asking for MP's approval to trans-
fer the title for certain pieces of land
owned by the government to other
entities or individuals.
Among the three other parcels of
land the government got parliamen-
tary approval to transfer the title to


was a one acre piece of property which
has been leased to David Romer in
Andros since 1982.
Mr Romer, whose most recent lease
on the property expired in 1997, was
operating a gas station on the site
which was a much-used refuelling site
for Androsians and visitors for many
miles around.
Mr Romer died in 1995 but his fam-
ily maintained the gas service station
on the land after he left it to them in
his will. Yesterday the government
agreed to sell the once acre property to
the family for $3,049.20.
Vincent Peet, MP for North Andros
said he "fully supports" the title trans-
fer, noting that Mr Romer and his fam-
ily have provided a "service to the
community."
The two other resolutions call for
title for land on which buildings stand
that were built using NIB funds but


are presently occupied by the govern-
ment to be transferred from the trea-
sury to the National Insurance Board.
Mr Ingraham said that in doing so
the government is seeking to "tidy up
the books" at NIB, allowing the prop-
erties to be officially recorded as assets.
"The arrangement is that the title
will be transferred to the National
Insurance Board and the government
will then make payments to them over
a period of 15 or so years at the end of
which the building ownership will go
back to the government.
"The government pays what is in
effect rent and/or income to the
National Insurance Board to repay the
principal sum in that 15 year period
of time and also in effect to ensure
that it receives interest on that sum of
not less than what their average yield
would be if they invested the money
elsewhere," said Mr Ingraham.


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UNCONVENTIONAL AND
GRITTY: Playwright Rupert
Missick Jr's third play will
be staged at The Hub and
run for three nights.

FALLEN Trees, the third
play staged by local play-
wright and filmmaker
Rupert Missick Jr, will
debut at The Hub on
December 11 and run for
three nights.
The off-beat play centres
around five people who are
grieving for their dead
friends Percy and Nicky.
Each character is frustrated
over the couple's death
which leads them to exam-
ine their faith - or lack
thereof.
The unconventional, gritty
play was inspired by a liter-
ary classic and Missick's own
experiences in Catholic
mass.
"I was inspired by the
footnote to Allen Ginsberg's
Howl - in it there is a repeti-
tion of the word 'holy' which
reminded me of the imagery
and ritual of some parts of
the Catholic mass. In the
poem Ginsberg declares
holy some things that ordi-
narily persons may see as
profane, and to me, human
life, or the human spirit is
just that, profane and holy.
It is holy in spite of the fact
that it can tend to be
wretched and imperfect,"
Mr Missick said. The play
also examines the difference
between hope and faith and
which of the two individuals
rely on to get them through
tough situations, said the 27-
year-old writer.

Cynical
"I was looking at both and
the usefulness of both from
an extremely cynical point
of view. I wanted to explore
which - hope or faith - a
group of people facing the
possibility of their own
death would rely on."
The young writer - who
wrapped shooting on his
first short-film The Kindly
Ones in November - has
plans to adapt Fallen Trees
into film as well.
The play is being pro-
duced by Missick's 'The
Imagination Workshop' -
which he founded along with
artistic director Taneka
Thompson.
Fallen Trees stars Leah
Eneas, Taneka Thompson,
Tara 'Tecca' Woodside,
Juanita Kelly, Chrystall
Bethel and Chester
Robards. The one-act play
runs for three nights,
December 11 to 13 at The
Hub, and starts at 8pm.
Ticket orders can be filled
out on the order page at
www.theimaginationwork-
shop.net.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


mmmmm�


Durell Shearer


-M






7Th


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2009, PAGE 7


FROM page one $7.1 m contract 'to revive family island's fortunes' s' * ' '1W


kind at all, the road has been
blamed for an exodus of locals
to New Providence and for scar-
ing off potential investors who
could bring much needed
employment opportunities.
Young and old alike among
the island's 500 plus residents
have complained of having to
endure torturous daily journeys
along the Queen's Highway,
their cars sustaining such jolts
and shudders that repairs are a
constant concern - and often
not a quick fix in an island locat-
ed hundreds of miles from New
Providence.
School children complain of
turning up to their morning
classes with churned stomaches
and dusty uniforms.
So it was not surprising that
dozens of Acklin Islanders gath-
ered at the Administrator's
office in Mason's Bay, Acklins,
to gleefully witness the govern-
ment sign off on a multi-million
dollar contract to fix the road -
a turn of events their adminis-
trator said they have been
"dreaming of for a long time."
Minister of Works, Neko
Grant, along with other gov-
ernment officials and represen-
tative of Bethell's Heavy Truck-
ing and Equipment, which won
the bidding for the project, were
in Acklins to execute the con-
tract.
Happy residents, most of
whom sustain themselves from
jobs in government, fishing,
bonefish tourism or the under-
developed trade in Cascarilla
bark, have great expectations
of what the improved infra-
structure will mean for their
island.
Summing up the outlook of
many The Tribune spoke with,


Salvation Army

fundraising target

FROM page one

needed funding for the School
for the Blind and the various
community outreach centres.
Meanwhile in Grand
Bahama, Captain Cheryl
Compton explained the dri-
ve's late start and limited vol-
unteer resources contributed
to their poor reception so far.
"We don't have enough
volunteers," said Capt Comp-
ton. "So we can't get enough
kettles out there and keep
them at the stores consis-
tently."
Capt Compton said that
though donations have been
slow, they have received more
than 400 applications for food
assistance.
In New Providence, the
kettles are manned by church
volunteers throughout the
week and various civic organ-
isations on Saturdays at 29
stores. There is no ringing on
Sunday.
"We are always in need of
volunteers," added Ms
Kanady.
"The number of kettles is
constantly growing as more
stores allow us space."

Attempt to
steal tourist's
purse foiled

FROM page one

white shirt and jeans ran up to
the woman from behind and
attempted to snatch her purse.
The pair struggled as the
thug tried to take her purse.
Meanwhile, a passing
motorist alerted by the wom-
an's screams saw her on the
ground with the thug over
her. The motorist stopped his
car and jumped out to assist
the tourist.
Realising he had drawn
attention, the thug backed
away empty-handed and ran
over to two dark-skinned
males who all fled the scene
on foot heading in the Kemp
Road area.
The motorist, with another
passersby who stopped to
help, gave chase but did not
catch the culprits.
Police were alerted. Their
investigations continue.


Clara Sweeting, a resident of
the community of Hard Hill,
said she feels "wonderful"
about the government's deci-
sion to finally address the road.
"It's no good for my vehicle
and it's no good for me. It
makes you feel sick," she said of
the experience of driving on the
treacherous stretch.
"All of my vehicles have been
left in disarray, they've literally
been shaken apart."
Peter Hanna, a 17-year-old
headboy at Acklins Central
High, told The Tribune he is
"really excited" about the new
road.
"The state that the road is in,
it's really rough. I have to trav-
el along it twice every day to go
to school. It hurts your back."
Stephen Sands, acting prin-
cipal at the school believes
"everything will change" for
Acklins once a proper roadway


is installed.
"The residents can look for-
ward to the development of the
island now, people coming in
and spending money, and even
more money flowing between
persons and businesses on the
island."
"The road has discouraged
even the islanders, it's caused
many of them to leave, as well
as investors."
"Now things will change.
Everything will change for us,"
said Mr Sands, who said he has
been "waiting" for the signing
for the seven years he has been
posted to the island.
Providing some support for
Mr Sands view, senior adminis-
trator for the island, Charles
Moss, claimed that as news of
the impending contract signing
spread in recent months his
office has been "inundated with
calls" from former residents as
well as other Bahamians and as
many as five foreigners in the
last month expressing interest
in investing in Acklins.
"If even one or two of those
come when this road is com-
pleted, it will be a great bene-
fit," said Mr Moss.
A 36 mile stretch of road
from the island's airport at
Spring Point, to Chester Bay
and Lovely Bay will be rehabil-
itated under the contract, which
was won by the Nassau-based
Bethell's Trucking and Heavy
Equipment company.
The company have agreed in
it to ensure a "substantial
amount" of the labour for the
project is drawn from the local
population.
"The benefits of this arrang-
ment include the provision of
local employment opportuni-


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ties as well as the transfer of
skills from the experienced
main contractor to resident
workers," said Minister Neko
Grant, who travelled to the
island for the signing along with
other works officials.
Stanley Bethell, owner of
Bethell's Trucking and Heavy
Equipment, suggested an esti-
mated "twenty to thirty" local
people could expect to be hired.
Starting after Christmas and
with a twelve month comple-
tion deadline, the undertaking
will see the total reconstruction
of three miles of the Queen's
Highway, and resurfacing and
patching of a further 33 miles.
$3.675 million of the $7.1 mil-
lion needed for the road reha-
bilitation will come from the
Ninth European Union Devel-
opment fund, while the balance
will be put up by the Bahamian
government.
Mr Grant said: "The recon-
structed roads will enhance
movement between settle-
ments by the reduction of trav-
el time and the cost of vehicle
maintenance and repair. Addi-
tionally, improved access to
the airport and seaports will
accelerate commercial activity
through more efficient
processes inthe export of fish-
ery products and the import
of goods to the island.
"We therefore look forward
to the successful completion
of this project that will con-
tribute to the further overall
development of the island of
Acklins."
Weston Saunders, who
spoke on behalf of Bethell's
Trucking and Heavy Equip-
ment at the signing, said that
the company is committed to


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providing a "high quality ser-
vice" in this regard.
He invited Acklin islanders
to "come and see Mr
Bethell..and enjoy some of the
labour and hard work" that will
be on offer.
The contract signing was the
fourth major public works con-
tract signed this week.
On Monday, numerous gov-
ernment ministers travelled to
Ragged Island, where three


contracts - for road re-paving,
construction of a dock and the
re-surfacing of the Duncan's
Town airport - were signed at a
total value of $14 million, of
which almost $9.5 million will
be provided by the government
and $4.8 million by the EU.
With around sixty people
currently living on the island,
that much-heralded investment
equated to around $233,333 per
person.


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HOLLAND nee BUTLER

November 22nd, 1924 - December St, 1999

"Who can find a virtuous woman?
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We were blessed to have her as
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+


PAGE 10, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Key to crime reduction in urban areas is


By EWI WATKINS


TUESDAY, November
24, 2009 Tribune headline -
"Police Chief slams Urban
Renewal 'lie'" - was
impelling to say the least,
but the editorial on page 4 -
"Policing before Farm
Road"- was not only fan-
tastic, but stunningly reveal-
ing. I am of the view that
law enforcement officials,
especially those that are in
command positions, should
at all costs avoid becoming
embroiled in feuds between
two political entities.
After perusing the byline
"No evidence to suggest
changes to initiative behind


crime surge," says Commis-
sioner, I, as usual, read all
items on the front page,
then turned to page eight
for the conclusion of those
stories. I then returned to
the editorial, it was a mas-
terpiece, superbly written.
Its revelation should be like
gasoline to a dying engine
for the powers that be in the
Police Force and those in
The Ministry of National
Security.
What is really amazing


Legal Notice
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Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 2nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

PIERFRAN BUSINESS CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 2nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

BENARI RIVER INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 2nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

GOLDEN BOREALIS VERA S.A.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 2nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


about the editorial is that
the writer, knowingly or
unknowingly, gave not only
the Police Force and the
Government the answer to
our crime situation, for
which we have been search-
ing these many years; but
educating John Q. Public as
to what their role in the
process should be.
To think our Police Force
was and still is blessed with
the presence of Mr. Shan-
nondor Evans, and that no
one, and I mean no one


Police chief slams




Urban Renewal 'lie'


THE TRIBUNdence headlines on November 24.

THE TRIBUNE front page headline on November 24.


Commissioner of Police
recognized or paid attention
to his (Evans') initiative in


Legal Notice
NOTICE

WHITE LILY HOLDINGS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 2nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidalor)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

EUROSCAN PROMOTIONS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 2nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

DON PEPE BUSINESS CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 2nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

TALLIN LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 2nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


the Eastern Division of New
Providence, is really incred-
ible. For years I have been
calling for Community polic-
ing, bicycle and foot patrol
in urban and commerical
areas. Occasionally one
would see bicycle patrols
around Bay Street, but nev-
er in urban areas. I was,
until now, unaware of Mr.
Evans' initiative in the East-
ern area of New Providence
and I am disappointed to
learn that such an important
programme with such huge
community support, was dis-
continued by Mr Evans' suc-
cessor. I would have thought
that any Division Comman-
der having been given a
command with a ready-
made crime-reducing initia-
tive, such as the one initiat-
ed and nurtured to such a
successful degree by Mr
Evans, would have contin-
ued to take it to greater
heights. I am now of the
opinion that the Urban
Renewal plan by the PLP
was derived from the Eliza-


New Attoer
General vo
make crim
matters a pr
By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Re
mreynolds@
tribune edianet
ATTORNEY
al JohnDelaney

yesterday afteo
The formnerS
whoboay22y
Lbome mcrem
But m a cna
D--rTr-


beth Estates Community
Policing initiative.
Whereas I agree that the
programme was a good one,
I disagree with not only the
manner in which it was
implemented, but with per-
sons (politicians) who spear-
headed its implementation. I
am of the view that the
politicians saw, or had been
informed of the progress of
this effort by Mr. Evans,
envisioned the prospect of
kudos and political mileage
in such a programme and
with the machinery of gov-
ernment at hand probably
politicized it to such an
extent that possible law-
breakers could have been
operating under the badge
of authority provided by the
wearing of a police uniform,
all for the gain of a few
more votes. Instead of
becoming physically
involved, The Ministry of
National Security should
have supplied the force with
SEE page 11


Legal Notice
NOTICE

HAPDANK INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 2nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidalor)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

COSPILLOT BUSINESS CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 2nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

NURA MANAGEMENT LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 2nd day of December 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


- EEIGNPA O


YOUR SAY
Ml� 11


NOW-







+


THE TRIBUNE


A l1


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2009, PAGE 11


community policing


FROM page 10

the extra equipment and
finances, and left the rest up
to the Commissioner of
Police.
Police patrols around the
perimeter of schools is vital
for the following reasons: (I)
availability if needed (II) to
keep drug peddlers from the
area (III) to discourage
child sex predators who prey
on students, male and
female away from school
areas. The concept of having
a police presence on school
premises was not only
wrong, but ill advised. There
is an old adage in policing
that says "There is no sub-
stitute for the beat police-
man (foot patrol)." This is
true.
The robbery of tourists at
places of interest that they
paid good bucks to visit is
unforgivable, the officer in
charge of the police facility
in that area should not only
be transferred, but demot-
ed. Why aren't uniformed
officers stationed at the top
and bottom of the Queen's
Staircase. Water Tower, the
Forts, Ardastra Gardens
and indeed all tour destina-
tions. I strongly recommend
that the powers that be in
the police force create an
anti-crime directorate with-
in the force under Mr.
Evans' command, who will
be responsible for the fol-
lowing: (I) implementation
of Community Policing in
every division by Divisional


Commanders. (II) Forma-
tions of flying patrols in and
around business houses,
banks and busy areas like
Bay Street and malls to deal
with drug peddlers who
openly ply their trade in
areas frequented by tourists,
prostitutes, uncontrolled
students who roam malls
and shopping areas after
school in groups uniformed
foot and cycle patrols in
urban areas 24/7.
Inspectors and indeed
area commanders should
carry out routine and sur-
prise visitations throughout
their area regularly. Disci-
pline needs to be enforced;
this is the job of non com-
missioned officers. Senior
officers should set examples
by not sitting around bars
and clubs drinking in uni-
form. Supervision of con-
stables on foot and cycle
patrols is of paramount
importance.
There is absolutely no
need for the government,
any government to look to
men of the cloth to come up
with crime solutions,
because they do not have


the slightest clue to begin
with. Community Policing is
the answer, the system
should be implemented
without delay. The stretch-
ing of a few necks that are
eligible for the gallows will
go a long way to discourage
many of those who have lost
their respect for human life.
These are tough times;
we are not looking for more
talk. We've had enough of
that, and it would appear
that we had the solution
looking at us for a long time,
people power in the form of
Community Policing.
The Commissioner of
Police should without delay
send a letter of "Thank you"
to the editorial writer of the
November 24 editorial.
Remember that the best
things in life are free and so
is that editorial. The ball
now, Mr. Commissioner, is
in your court, let us see if
you can catch it and make
a "Touch Down", even a
"First Down" will be an
improvement over what we
now have. Time is of the
essence, our bread and but-
ter is at stake.


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S I I II )


Magic beat Mystic I


Marlins in 29-


By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net
THE Government High School
Magic have become one of the hottest
teams in the GSSSA senior girls divi-
sion, with their most impressive defen-
sive effort leading to their fourth con-
secutive win.
The Magic held the Dame Doris
Johnson Mystic Marlins without a field
goal in a 29-1 rout last night at the
D.W. Davis Gymnasium.
Marcelene St. Jean was the lone
player in double figures with a game
high 13 points to lead the Magic.
Chiquita Ferguson was 4-6 from the
field in the second half and chipped in
with nine points, Crystal Cox finished
with three and Lashantah Deveaux
added two.


1 rout


St. Jean only player in double

figures, GHS wins four in a row


The Magic got out to an early 8-0
lead in the opening half before a free
throw by Natalie Brown stopped the
run and gave the Mystic Marlins their
lone score of the game.
GHS led 10-1 at the half.
Ferguson began the second half for
the Magic with a jumper through mid-
lane traffic to give her team their first
double digit lead of the game.
The Magic run continued as a full
court trap rendered the Mystic Mar-
lins defenseless with a lack of ballhan-
dlers, and created easy baskets with
St. Jean becoming the beneficiary.
She scored eight consecutive points,


the last of her took the Magic lead
beyond the 20 point plateau, 22-1.
Ferguson ended the game the way
the half began, with her streaky shoot-
ing finding the mark.
She nailed another jumpshot in the
lane and a three pointer on the next
possession with just 32 seconds remain-
ing to give the game's final score.
After an opening day loss to the C.R
Walker Knights, the Magic have scored
wins over the C.C. Sweeting Cobras,
R.M Bailey Pacers, C.I Gibson Rat-
tlers and the Mystic Marlins.
The Magic improved to 4-1 while
the Mystic Marlins remain winless.


BACF improves junior training system


THE Bahamas Amateur
Cycling Federation seeks to
garner interest from newcom-
ers to the sport, while devel-
oping a feeder system for the
senior circuit in the country
and throughout the region.
Roy Colebrook, federation


President, said the programme
has been modified, upgraded
and made more efficient so
junior cyclists can get the best
possible training environment.
These changes include
improvements in training,
competition, coaching and
financial support, which could


propel them to reach the level
of other elite international
junior cyclists around the
world.
The programme began in
New Providence, but by Feb-
ruary 2010 it will spread to var-
ious family islands which hosts
cycling associations or clubs


and will run until December
of 2012.
In New Providence the pro-
gramme begins Saturday,
December 5th at the National
Cycling Track located at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Cen-
ter.
Featuring male and females


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ages 12-17, the programme
will feature registration and tri-
al periods over the next two
weekends and follows with
sessions December 19 and
20th.
According to federation
executives, the programme
will focus on channeling the
enthusiasm and youthful inter-
est of the sport in a positive
direction which would impact
lives and the community at
large.
"We intend to use sports as
a vehicle," Colbrook said.
"During this time one of the
goals is to eventually cultivate
a pool of young and elite
junior cyclists, fully equipped
and knowledgeable in the
sport of cycling and to ulti-
mately represent the Bahamas
at various international events
such as the Youth World
Games, Junior Pan Am Cham-
pionships, Caribbean Junior
Championships and the
Olympic Games."
According to a press release
issued by the federation, the
programs goals and objectives
include:
i. to instill discipline, team work
and values in the participants
ii. to curb deviant behaviour
iii. to channel energy in a
positive way
iv. to establish scholarship
opportunities for the participants
Directors and trainers of the
programme includes Barron
"Turbo" Musgrove, Jeff
Major, and Sam Brown


Marathon

Bahamas


2010

set for

February

IN JUST over two
months, the Bahamas will
venture into previously
uncharted waters, staging its
first international road race
of this magnitude, one which
organizers hope will bridge
the gap between business
and sports.
Marathon Bahamas 2010,
sponsored by the Sunshine
Group of Companies and
set for February 14th next
year, will take place in New
Providence featuring hun-
dreds of local and interna-
tional runners.
While the country has
hosted a number of road
races in the past, this is the
first Marathon staged in the
capital since 1985.
The 26.2 mile course will
begin at 6am, leaving Fort
Montague, travel west over
both Paradise Island
Bridges, along the shoreline,
will turn at Old Fort Bay
and end at Arawak Cay.
The race will feature three
categories which includes
the full marathon (26.2
miles), half marathon (13.1
miles), and relay marathon
(a six member team)
At a press conference held
by major sponsors of the
event, Sunshine Insurance
Agents and Brokers, Mem-
bers of the Marathon 2010
Board of Directors were
joined by Executives of the
Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations to

SEE page 13





The NPVA continued action
Wednesday evening over at the D
W Davis gym.
In the first match, the youthful
BTC Blackberries took the Cham-
pions Club to 5 sets 24-26, 25-9,
25-20, 24-6 and 15-11. Manish-
ka Rollins led all scorers with
with 16 points for the win. In a
losing effort, Tarae Sweeting
scored 13 points.
In the feature match, the
National Fence Intruders led by
Glen Rolle's 20 points won an
exciting marathon match against
the Police Crimestoppers 25-12,
25-21, 20-25, 23-25 and 15-8.
Leonardo Dean finished with 18
points for the Crimestoppers.
Games will continue today
with make up games:
* 7:30pm Johnson Lady Truck-
ers vs BTC Blackberries
* 8:30pm Saints vs Techni-
cians


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


I I








+


TRIBUNE SPORTS


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2009, PAGE 13


LIA Bahamas hosts Chinese martial arts championship


Gay scores 22 to

lead SDSU over USD
BASKETBALL
SAN DIEGO
Associated Press

SAN DIEGO State held
onto local bragging rights for
another year, thanks to D.J.
Gay.
The junior guard scored
seven of his game-high 22
points in overtime to lead San
Diego State to a 69-62 win
over San Diego on Wednes-
day night.
"Going in, I knew that if I
needed to take over offen-
sively, I could," Gay said.
"We have so many weapons.
But I saw the opportunities
and I took advantage of
them."
It was the fourth straight
win in the crosstown rivalry
for the Aztecs (5-2), and their
eighth straight overtime win
overall.
"This was a big test for us
to beat a team like that in
their building," SDSU coach
Steve Fisher said.
Brandon Johnson scored 21
points for San Diego (4-3)
and almost single-handedly
brought the Toreros back
from a 40-28 deficit in the sec-
ond half.
Both teams went cold in the
final two minutes of regula-
tion, which ended with a 52-52
tie.
SDSU played for the final
shot, but Johnson stole the
ball and turned it back over
with four-tenths of a second
left. SDSU's long inbounds
pass was knocked down by
Matt Dorr.
SDSU scored the first eight
points of overtime, including a
jumper by Gay, for a 60-52
lead with 2:02 remaining.
Billy White stole the ball
and drove in for slam dunk
to give the Aztecs a 66-57
cushion.


THE Exposure of Martial
Arts in the Bahamas will nev-
er be the same as the sport's
local community prepares for
an international showcase.
On December 4 - 6, 2009,
Mr. Nick Scrima and Mr. Kent
Bazard will be co-hosting the
inaugural International Chi-
nese Martial Arts Circuit
World Championships, which
will be held at the magnificent
Atlantis Resort on Paradise
Island. The opening ceremo-
ny will take place December 5
at 10:00 am in the Imperial
Ballroom.
This event will showcase the
local talents of the local Kung
Fu and Karate Arena. These
arts will be complemented by
the showcasing of the talents
in the local Boxing federation.
One of the main aim of this
event is to demonstrate to our


young people that they can
channel their energies into
something positive that will
not only grow them as well
rounded individuals but also
gives them an opportunity to
become ambassadors to the
Bahmas and also encourage
Tourism.
The International Chinese
Martial Arts Circuit
(ICMAC) is a group of tour-
naments hosted around the
world by Master Scrima.
Competitors earn points at
every event on the circuit, and
based on their performance,
become eligible to compete at
the ICMAC World Champi-
onship at the end of each year
here in the Bahamas. This
event marks the official launch
of the circuit, and in Decem-
ber of 2010, the first undis-
puted world champions will


be crowned.
This world class event will
be the first of its kind in the
Bahamas - an all Chinese
Martial Arts Competition -
and will be host to local and
international competitors. We
are expecting over 500 com-
petitors and spectators from
over 6 countries (namely the
US, Bermuda, Jamaica,
Trinidad, Ajabazan, Portori-
co and our home grown fight-
ers), to be present at this
inaugural Grand Champi-
onship, and for that number
to triple in 2010. There will
be a Master's demonstration,
seminars, feature performance
show, and over 250 tradition-
al and contemporary Kung Fu
divisions for weapons, open
hand forms, push hands, spar-
ring, light contact continuous
fighting, grappling, and for the


1st time in the Bahamas, San-
da (Chinese Full Contact
Kickboxing). The finals for
the Sanda competition as well
a few expedition boxing
matches (put on by the infa-
mous 1st Class Promotions -
Ray and Michelle Minus) will
be held Saturday December
5 at 7 pm, at the Atlantis
Imperial Ballroom.
As part of the commitment
to local social development,
each tournament held in the
Bahamas donates part of its
proceeds to a local charity.
The Adisa Children's Foun-
dation is the chosen charity
for this year's event.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:
Friday December 4:
2:00 pm Registration opens for
Seminars & competition
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Training of


Volunteers
5:00pm -8:00pm Medical
Screening and Weigh-in for San-
da Fighters
8:00Pm Officials' Meeting
Saturday December 5
9:30Am ICMAC World Champi-
onship opening Ceremonies
10:00Am Masters' Demonstra-
tion
10:30Am Competition begins (All
forms divisions and Advanced
Sanda Fighting)
5:30PM Competition ends for the
day
7:30Pm Sanda Finals (Full Con-
tact Super Fights)

Sunday December 6
10:00am Competition resumes
for the day (All Beginning Sanda,
Continuous Fighting, Push Hands
& Other Reaction Skills)
4:00pm ICMAC World Champi-
onship Closing Ceremonies


Marathon

Bahamas

2010

set for

February

FROM page 12

announce plans on the pro-
gression of the event.
Franklyn Wilson, Chair-
man of the Sunshine Group,
congratulated newly elect-
ed BAAAs executives, and
outlined the wide scope of
influence the marathon can
have on the economy of the
Bahamas.
Wilson said the event
should prove to be a major
boost to sports tourism and
the Bahamas in general, in
particular, granting an
opportunity for entrepre-
neurship for Bahamian busi-
nesses.


AND SO MUCH MORE


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TRIBUNE I Y,






FRIDAY,


DECEMBER 4, 2009S S
DECEMBER 4, 2009


IFCTO Bobuiesctiunmdi et:


42% of small


hotels lacking


own website


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
SMALL BAHAMIAN
HOTELS must embrace
technology in order to stay
competitive throughout this
nation and in the region, the
Ministry of Tourism's direc-
tor-general said yesterday,
while the Bahamas' 1-800-
BAHAMAS call centre is
scheduled to move back home
sometime in 2010.
Vernice Walkine said 42
per cent of small hotels in the
Bahamas did not have a web-
site, while on the consumer
side 40 per cent of vacation
purchases were made online.
Ms Walkine said the Min-
istry has made a concerted
effort through Bahamas.com
and its various marketing
affiliates to highlight those
hotels on the Family Islands
which may not get exposure
via the Internet.


BAHAMAS Call Centre
to move home in 2010


VERNICE WALKINE


"We are in a technological
age," she said. "The Internet
affords everyone a perfectly
level playing field."

SEE page 6B


No restoration for



non-paying IBCs


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ASupreme Court judge
has stayed for four
months his ruling that
the Registrar General
cannot, under existing
legislation restore International Busi-
ness Companies (IBCS) previously
struck-off for non-payment of fees,
due to its impact on the financial ser-
vices industry and business communi-
ty.
Justice Neville Adderley explained
that he was staying his ruling for four
months to give the Government, and
Parliament, time "to take such action"
with respect to the Registrar's ability to
restore IBCs in such a position.
His ruling effectively means that all
IBCs reinstated since the IBCs Act
2000 was passed, after being struck off
for non-payment of fees, should not
now be incorporated. Given that such
restorations have been going on for
nine years, Justice Adderley's findings
could cause potential chaos for the


* Judge stays ruling for four months because of
impact on financial services industry/business
community, after finding Act does not allow
restoration of IBCs struck-off for non-payment
* Ruling could impact nine years of restorations
* Finding comes in case where claim against
Clifford Culmer, Michael Scott and BDO Mann
Judd, plus $209k default judgment, thrown out


financial services industry and its
clients.
He reached his decision in ruling
that a writ and statement of claim filed
against BDO Mann Judd, its senior
partner and accountant Clifford Cul-
mer, and Callender's & Co attorney
and partner, Michael Scott, be struck
out. A $208,850 default judgment
against Mr Culmer and BDO Mann
Judd was also set aside.
The action had been brought by the
Tenesheles trust and the Hawthorne


Sterling Family of Funds, the former
having owned the latter, which was a
group of 35 underlying mutual funds.
"The primary claim is that the defen-
dants wrongfully induced the Securities
Commission of the Bahamas to place
the underlying 35 companies which
comprise the Hawthorne Sterling Fam-
ily of Funds into a 'protective liquida-
tion'," Justice Adderley recalled.
"This liquidation, according to the
SEE page 6B


'Serious damage' from

Quieting Titles deficiency


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


* Attorney suggests
reforms to legislation


DEFICIENCIES in the seen as 'licence to steal
Quieting Titles Act have the land' ad exploited by
potential to do "serious dam- lan an te
age" to the Bahamas' interna- 'cadre of land sharks'
tional investment reputation, a * Warns of major impact
Bahamian attorney warned
yesterday, as it was "open to to Bahamas' international
abuse by a cadre of land investment reputation
sharks" who used it to effec-
tively steal other people's land.
Richard Lightbourn, attor-
ney and partner at McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes, told the
Rotary Club of West Nassau that while the Act was "regarded
as a licence to steal land" by some, with the correct amendments
and the adoption of a Land Registration system in the Bahamas,
it could still be a mechanism to resolve land disputes.
However, Mr Lightbourn warned that there were "serious
consequences" due to the defi-
ciencies in the current Act, SEE page 6B


Hotel room inventory

expansion is 'critical'


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation's (BHA) president
yesterday said it was "criti-
cal" for the sector to grow its
room inventory and absorb
this nation's ever-expanding
labour force, arguing that this
had helped Jamaica and the
Dominican Republic to
increase US stopover arrivals
at the same time as this nation
experienced a 14 per cent
decline.
Data supplied by the
Caribbean Tourism Organi-
sation (CTO), and obtained
by Tribune Business, showed
that for the first eight months
of 2009, Jamaica had seen
year-over-year growth in US
stopover arrivals of 2.1 per
cent, compared to 2008.


* Sector chief says room
growth key reason why
Jamaica and Dominican
Republic have seen US
stopover growth in 2009,
whereas Bahamas
declined by 14%
* Capacity increase needed
to 'absorb' expanding
workforce

And the Dominican
Republic, another major com-
petitor to the Bahamas, saw
US stopover arrivals for the
nine months to end-Septem-
ber 2009 increase by 2.6 per
cent to 912,068. In contrast,
for the first seven months of
2009, the Bahamas saw US
stopover arrivals decline by
14 per cent to 716,084.
Robert Sands, the BHA's
president, when contacted by
Tribune Business on why sev-
eral key competitors
appeared to be heading in the
opposite direction to the
Bahamas, said both Jamaica
and the Dominican Republic
had benefited from a major
increase in hotel room inven-
tory in recent months.
The new, fresh product had
given both destinations a 'shot
in the arm' from a marketing
perspective, creating some
excitement they could lever-
age to entice potential tourists
to their islands.
And Mr Sands pointed out
that both Jamaica and the
Dominican Republic had a


Go-ahead for Judicial Review of $ 105m plant


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
OPPONENTS of the
Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration's (BEC) $105 million
Wilson City power plant yes-
terday won the Supreme
Court's permission to launch
Judicial Review proceedings
in a bid to prevent its con-
struction, although an appli-
cation for an injunction to
stay further building work
before the case is heard was
refused.
The Supreme Court also
refused to grant Responsible
Development for Abaco
(RDA), a company formed
to represent the interests of
Abaco landowners and resi-
dents who oppose the BEC
plant, an interim discovery
order that would give them


But Supreme Court denies applications for injunction
to halt construction and document discovery


access to government docu-
ments, reports and studies on
the proposed Wilson City
plant.
That decision, as well as the
one on the injunction, will be
appealed to the Court of
Appeal, Tribune Business
understands.
In his submissions to sup-
port RDA's application for
Judicial Review, Fred Smith
QC, the Callenders & Co
attorney and partner, said his
two clients - Abaco resident
Matthew McCoy was named
as the second applicant -
would be "substantially affect-
ed by the power plant, eco-
nomically and in terms of


FAMILY G
INSURANCE COA


call us today at


their health and immediate
environment".
"The power plant threatens
to have a very substantial
impact on all these persons,"
Mr Smith alleged. "The appli-
cants claim that the power
plant will be damaging to
their health and to the envi-
ronment through water and
air pollution.
"The potential for cata-
strophic damage to the envi-
ronment is also non-negligi-
ble, especially given BEC's
poor record in maintaining
and supplying oil-fired power
plants.
"These environmental
impacts will in turn have eco-


nomic impacts. Tourism, Aba-
co's principal economic dri-
ver, is likely to be adversely
affected, which will directly
and financially affect the
applicants. Further the impact
of the power plant in con-
tributing to global warming
and rising sea levels, and dam-
aging the reputation of the
Government of the Bahamas
and its ability to lobby other
countries to adopt green pow-
er-generating technologies,
will in the long-term affect all
residents of low-lying islands
such as the Bahamas."
Mr Smith alleged that his
SEE page 5B


UARDIAN "ABES ,
MPANY LIMITED -'









retirement planning


heaolded in the right direction?

, ,, invest in an annuity
S a stable income stream post-retirement
S guaranteed investment returns
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V iall of the above












A SUBSIDIARY OF
61 FAMGUARD
396- 1355 CORPORATION LIMITED


SALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com


7Th


FAMILY GUARDIAN
INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED


SEE page 4B






+


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


SHOWN are members from the
Sister Sister Support Group,
as well as lan Thompson, busi-
ness manager, retail credit;
Michael Basden, business
manager financial solutions;
and Dania Ferguson, marketing
coordinator from Bank of the
Bahamas.


Bank


hands


'joins


'with


Sister Sister


Support


group


BANK of the Bahamas
International staff joined
hands with the Sister Sister
Support group to give a pre-
sentation on its new BOB
MEDLINE Visa card at the
organisation's recent
monthly meeting.
The Sister Sister group
helps and encourages those
diagnosed with cancer, as
well as cancer survivors.
At the end of the presen-
tation, the bank donated
BOB MEDLINE stress


I


We anticipate your fresh ideas and creativity!


* First Place: $1,000.00 and an Apple i-Pod
* Second Place: $800.00 * Third Place: $500.00


ULr llIIiilUUllta


* A ll II lcic [CIt p l[iii|' iIC, ,CIC ILILICId I0' ilb-
Illml .1 \\nli'tplllCl itjrph cxp l.nn \\h\ llhc\
IonLIld bc chJ'cn io pjPIllCipiiLt in lik pccchl
competition.
* The paragraph should be titled "Be-Smart
Speech Competition" and should be emailed
to pr@btcbahamas.com. Participants can also
send us a private message on the BTC facebook
page. All entries must be received by 5:00pm
on December 7th.
* Only 40 persons will be chosen to participate.
The list of chosen contestants will be posted on
or F.iccil'ok i opi.c on Dc.minlicr 11 hll.


* AI I 1\ hiLh 1 h1 Ik It',LlcniL ' \\ ill bc cI IiN blc ti,


* Contestants must bring valid identification
and must be accompanied by a parent or guard-
ian. Parents and guardians will be required to
sign a consent form on the night of competi-
tion.
* The judges' decision is final. There will be no
appeal process.
The competition will take place on January
14th and 15th at 6:00 pm at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel. #1 Bav Street.


balls to the Sister Sister
Support group to help with
their post-therapy treat-
ments.
Bank of the Bahamas
International introduced the
MEDLINE Visa card as an
alternative payment solu-
tion for healthcare, in a bid
to assist members in the
business community who
are without medical insur-
ance, those opting for elec-
tive surgery and those with
pre-existing conditions.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


I ae


Empgloyment Opportunit

CR EW N EI�EDIEID FO R
Mc DONALD'S RESTAURANTS
REQL'/REMEN%7S,-
0 MUJST BE A 1HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE
a ML's] BE LUS'IUNIU& SERVICE DRIVEN%
4MUST RIF A IBOIT PEUFORMFR
-PMUST HAVE EXCELLENT ORAL &
WRITTEN COMMIUNICATION SKILLS
diLMUST' BE ABLE TO0 WORK F LE XIBLE.
HOURS, INCLUDING LATE NIGHTS,
WEEKENDS~ AND HOLIDAYS

McDonald's ioffem exeellext henefitk!
UeMPt~r1itMe NY.
TrwaimNg!
Career Dipdapmenrn
Momtk& yInemeJVwi!
Oppmairkhtws 6w 'wirdtfij bift-l

Applications avaiablt~ealiall Lhruc rnsta"6rant~nd
Mcflonald's[lead OIffioc on kMarkct SO= NnNlrth


BUSINESS I


It







+


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2009, PAGE 3B


Marine manufacturer





expands into furniture


A NASSAU-based busi-
ness that started out more
than 20 years ago as a one-
man operation repairing sails,
and grew into a full marine
canvas and awning manufac-
turing company, is now
expanding on shore through
high-end casual furniture.
"Opening Oasis, Chic Liv-
ing is a natural outgrowth of
what we have learned over
more than two decades of
working with materials in the
marine industry," said Larry
Phillips, president of Phillips
Sailmakers & Awning Man-
ufacturers, and the new entity,
Oasis.
"The hot, humid climate
that makes the Bahamas a
haven for visitors wreaks hav-
oc on outdoor furniture and
upholstery, yet yachts know
how to deal with it because
fabrics we use in the marine
trade are built to withstand
the ultra-violet rays of the sun.
"They are also mildew and
water-resistant. We've been
working with those fabrics for
years. Now we are able to
combine our financial incen-
tives as a licensed manufac-
turer with our marine grade
treatments to offer what we
firmly believe is the best in
high quality casual furniture
in Nassau."
Mr Phillips said while he
had often wondered about the
wisdom of the way outdoor
furniture was being covered,
even very expensive furniture,
two things inspired him to put
his knowledge to work and
expand.
"The first suggestion came
from a supplier who said with
the quality of work he saw us
produce, we were foolish not


sive governments have made
this possible and I hope we
have helped to demonstrate
the value of the legislation
and policy."


EMPLOYEES of the new Oasis, Chic Living


to be applying that knowledge
and experience to an indus-
try that was growing so fast,"
said the sailmaker-turned-
entrepreneur.
The second motivation hit
closer to home. "My wife and
I bought fairly high-priced
outdoor furniture last year as
a Christmas present to each
other, and in less than three
months, a red chaise lounge
cushion had faded so much it
was almost pink."
The store that supplied the
cushion, along with the other
teak furniture, frequently
refers clients to Phillips Sail-
makers for re-covering when
customers return because
cushions or umbrellas have


DAMIANOS Sotheby's International Realty has won The Best Real
Estate Agency- Caribbean at the International Residential Property
Awards 2009.


Bahamian firm


wins top award


for Caribbean


DAMIANOS Sotheby's
International Realty has won
The Best Real Estate Agency -
Caribbean at the Internation-
al Residential Property
Awards 2009.
Having gained this recom-
mendation at the ceremony,
which was held in association
with CNBC in San Diego last
month, Damianos Sotheby's
International Realty is enti-
tled to display the Americas
Property Awards' logo.
Entries were judged by a
panel of 52 independent pro-
fessionals. This year's judges
include Ben Wood, industry
head property markets of
Google UK; Peter Bolton
King, group chief executive
of the National Federation of
Property Professionals; Imtiaz
Farookhi, chief executive of
the National House Building
Council; Christopher Hall,
president elect of FIABCI;
Wilhelm Harnish, Master


Builders of Australia (MBA);
Thijs Stoffer, International
Consortium of Real Estate
Agents Association
(ICREA); Helen Shield, edi-
tor-in-chief of International
Homes magazine; and Gillian
Farr, head of design of Laura
Ashley Home.
All in all, there were 36 dif-
ferent categories and only the
top scoring winners from 100
countries were nominated to
represent the finest property
companies from across globe.
Virginia Damianos, vice-
president of Damianos Sothe-
by's International Realty, said
of winning the award: "In this
increasingly competitive prop-
erty market we are proud to
be the recipient of this presti-
gious award. It reaffirms our
company's dedication to
being nothing short of the
best. It's a very exciting hon-
our after 65 years of hard
work."


faded, and Mr Phillips hopes
the store will consider Oasis
complementary.
Industry
"All we are doing is taking
what has been working for the
yachting industry, where the
demands on cloth and sewing
treatments are rigorous, and
applying it to the outdoor liv-
ing market in the Bahamas,"
he said.
As for launching a new
business during tough eco-
nomic times, Mr Phillips said
those challenges could work
in the company's favour.
"Challenging times mean peo-
ple who are spending are


doing so wisely," he added.
"These times have made us
less of a throwaway society.
It is no longer acceptable to
pay good money for some-
thing that lasts a year when
there is an option close by to
pay less for something that
lasts many, many years."
Oasis, Chic Living opened
at Phillips Sailmakers plant
on East Shirley Street this
week and will host a soft
opening on Saturday from 8
am to 3 pm.
"We could not have done
this without our status as a
licensed duty-free manufac-
turer," said Mr Phillips "and
now there is more work for
about 14 employees. Succes-


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Requirements: -
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* Multi-tasker

Deadline for Applications:
11 December 2009
Send Resumes to:
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Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-323-1865
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Sivoe al C,3bl Beach & Easl Uy St
S~Ies. 39 -hoD rvict. 3si-G "15


ITDISCUS TOIESONTHS PGELO0ONTOWW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


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your

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from people who are
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award.
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and share your story.


BUSINESS







+


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Hotel room inventory expansion is 'critical'


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


FROM page 1B

more diversified tourism base,
having made greater inroads
into the European market for
the Bahamas, while both des-
tinations had relatively cheap-
er input costs, aided by the
fact they produced more
goods domestically for con-
sumption in the hotel indus-
tries.
"I think Jamaica and the
Dominican Republic are
totally different from us," Mr
Sands told Tribune Business.
"They've actually had growth
in hotel room inventory in
recent times, in particular the
last 18 months, and that has
given them greater marketing
opportunities."
The increase in room inven-
tory, making both Jamaica
and the Dominican Republic
more accessible to US and
other visitors, made year-
over-year arrivals compar-
isons with the Bahamas some-


Jj It I 4,'T^-,] i I d -tTI














trucks mandatory . Experience repairing









International, Mack, and Cummins
Extensive experience on machine shop




repairs to diesel engine parts mandatory.
Top wages. Uniforms furnished after



probationary period.


Please come by and fill out an application,
and give us your resume at:

Bahamas Mack Truck Sales
Jrotoay td.
Rock Crusher Road

. 1 I l I I I 0 l I i i 1 i
blllm n iumII !t D Iin Iuiai


Employment Opportunity:
Full-Time Manaaers

REQUIREMENTS:

* MUST BE A uHGH SCHOOL GRADUATE
* MUST HAVE A DEGREE IN MANAGEMENT
OR MANAGEMENTISUPERVISORY
EXPERIENCE
* MUST BE CUSTOMER SERVICE DRIVEN
* MUST BE RESULTS-ORIENTED &
ARTICULATE
* MUST HAVE EXCELLENT INTER-PERSONiAL
SKILLS
* MUST HAVE EXCELLENT ORAL & WRITTEN
COMMUNICATION SKILLS
* PROFESSIONALISM REQUIRED
* EXPERIENCE IN RESTAURANT
MANAGEMENT WOULD BE A PLUS

JOB SWMARY
To assist the restaurant Manager n maintaining the
McDonalds form Ut fr success - offers to the
customer high OUAULTY, mod wtey priced food,
Fast, courteouss SERVWCEin fimactuateiy
CLEAN surroundings; and to assist inf t
attainment of Restaurt Goa&s.


Teced the customer'S expeclalians.
Modonald's success is dependant upon providing
services and products hat mneel and exceed each
cuslormr's expectations. Therefore, the goal of
each McDonald's employee is Total Cuslomrer
Satisfacton. Each employee's success will be
based upon hislher contribution to ttis goal

McDonald's offers excellent benefits!

Please submit Resume to:
Human Resources Departmnnt
McDonald's Head Office on Market St. North
P, 0, Box 55-5925
Telephone: 325-4444
Nassau, Bahamas


what misleading, Mr Sands
added, given that this desti-
nation had not experienced
similar growth.
He said the collective occu-
pancy levels being achieved
by Bahamian, Jamaican and
Dominican Republic hotels
would provide a more mean-
ingful comparison of their rel-
ative performance, adding:
"Whenever you see new
inventory in any destination,
it realises a spike in the num-
ber of arrivals at the front
end, notwithstanding the cur-
rent economic condition we
find ourselves in."
However, Mr Sands
acknowledged that it was
"critical" for the Bahamas to
grow its own hotel industry
room inventory, given that
this has seen minimal growth
since the mid-1980s - despite
the arrival of high-end prod-
ucts such as Atlantis, Sandals
and Superclubs Breezes.
Although Atlantis's arrival
in the 1990s produced some
room inventory growth, what
expansion there has been has
largely been negated by other
hotels, or a portion of them,
being taken off-line.


"I think that we've seen
some growth in that area, and
seen some additional rooms
come on line two years ago,
although we have lost
ground," Mr Sands told Tri-
bune Business.
"We're projecting to see
some additional growth in the
next two to three years, if
everything goes according to
plan."
That is likely to be a refer-
ence to Baha Mar's proposed
$2.6 billion Cable Beach rede-
velopment, whose progress
appears to hinge on the suc-
cessful completion of negoti-
ations with the two Chinese
state-owned entities, China
State Construction and Chi-
na Export-Import Bank.
Mr Sands did not go into
heavy detail about the status
of the talks between the two
and Baha Mar, although the
latter was "certainly" work-
ing to complete negotiations
by 2009 year-end.
On the need for the
Bahamas to expand its hotel
room inventory, Mr Sands
said: "I think it's critical. It's
the only way we're going to
see real growth and viability


"..... private & confidential acquisition of
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Symon-Petr Commodities Ltd.
Ph# (242) 424-5857, VOIP (305) 897-3070
E-mail" principal@symonpetr.com




NOTICE

In the Estate of ZBIGNIEW EMILIAN MAZUREK late of
437 Golden Isle Drive, Hallendale, Florida, United States of
America, deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claims
or demands against the above Estate are required to send the
same duly certified in writing to the undersigned on or before
the 1st January A.D. 2010, after which date the Executor will
proceed to distribute the assets of the Estate among the persons
entitled thereto, having regard only to those claims of which the
Executor shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
Estate are required to make full settlement of the same on or
before the date aforesaid.

DUPUCH & TURNQUEST & CO.,
AIIliK N, for the Executor
Chambers,
Chancery House,
The Mall,
P.O. Box F-42578
Freeport, Grand Bahama


NOTICE OF ANNUAL
GENERAL MEETING


To all Ordinary Shaehod4cir t'oABDAB

Please be advised that a rmieting of the Sh~aehoilder of
rhe abovw company will be held on Wdnesday.
I ),--ni her i6th, 22009 ar 4,:0 PMM at rhe offire-; -r
Hurnm Hr'.,e, 16 John F Kennedy r3rivi., Nahan.,
BanhamnS-

Xlemirner may appaint a prmxy mn arrtnd aid vmei in
lliur steaid, Lthim proxyI us io t e be a um erinbtr.


Bariy Newiman
Company -crrciary
Noembr 24th, 2009



NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No 46 of 2000)

GLOBAL EQUIPMENT LEASING CORPORATION
IBC No 135,648 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 of the Inter-
national Business Companies Act No. 46 of 2000, GLOBAL EQUIPMENT
LEASING CORPORATION is in Dissolution.

Any person having a Claim against the GLOBAL EQUIPMENT LEASING
CORPORATION is required on or before January 31, 2010 to send their
name, address and particulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator of the
Company, or in default thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution made before such claim is approved.

Sovereign Directors Limited of Suite 205, Saffrey Square, Bank Lane & Bay
Street, P.O. Box N-4244, Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of GLOBAL
EQUIPMENT LEASING CORPORATION.

xQ 1_-


to absorb labour.
"We need labour-intensive
industries to absorb the large
amounts of people looking for
work at this point in time. The
reality is that if the economic
situation gets better, and the
anticipated number of rooms
comes on line, the timing
could not be better."
Successive Bahamian gov-
ernments had been keen to
ensure continued economic
expansion, especially if the
country is to continue absorb-
ing the annual 5,000 school
leavers - some 3,000 (a per-
haps conservative estimate)
join the workforce.
"I can't say it's held us
back," Mr Sands said of the
relative lack of growth in the
Bahamian hotel industry's
room inventory. "It's caused a
narrowing of our market
share pie over the years."
While the Bahamas empha-
sised both stopover and cruise
tourism, Jamaica and the
Dominican Republic both
had a different market mix,
and benefited significantly


from returning friends and
family who lived abroad.
"I would say that both of
those destinations have a high
level of all-inclusive packages,
and in this environment that
tends to be a better choice for
consumers. Hotels can price
the product at very attractive
rates," Mr Sands told Tribune
Business.
Jamaica and the Domini-
can Republic also held "very
distinct advantages over
places like the Bahamas, as
they have cheaper costs, like
labour, much less than the
Bahamas.
"They are also able to
utilise more of what they pro-
duce in their tourism infra-
structure as well. These are
all mitigating factors that have
to be viewed when analysing
these particular points.
"But the Bahamas remains
very competitive, and will
continue to be competitive.
There are issues we will con-
tinue to work on to help us
maintain market share going
forward."


HANDYMAN NEEDED
A vacancy exists for an experienced handyman. Must be able to
speak Creole fluently.

Must have seven or more years experience as handyman/
houseman in a upscale five star resort... Must be able to work
long hours on evenings, weekends and holidays as needed.

Email resume to larrywil87@live.com on or before December
7th, 2009.





NOTICE is hereby given that ANELUS EXANCIA of QUINTINE
ALLEY, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 4th day of December, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE is hereby given that EVELYN AUGUSTIN of
WILLIAM STREET, P.O. BOX N-1453, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4th day of
December, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE is hereby given that Nixon Orelhomme, of Garden
Hills, P.O. BOX N-10326, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 4th day of December, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE is hereby given that PHILOMENA DESAMOURS
SAUNDERS of YELLOW ELDER, P.O. BOX N-805, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 4thday of December, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)
AMBROSE HOLDINGS LIMITED
IBC No 128346B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with Section 131 (2)(a) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000), AM-
BROSE HOLDINGS LIMITED is in Dissolution

Any person having a Claim against the AMBROSE HOLDINGS
LIMITED is required on or before 19th January 2010 to send their
name, address and particulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator
of the Company, or in default thereof they may be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such claim is approved

Mr. Nathan Santos of Suite 2B Mansion House 143 Main Street Gi-
braltar is the Liquidator of AMBROSE HOLDINGS LIMITED.



iquidator


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


5


ABI






7Th


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2009, PAGE 5B


Go-ahead for


Judicial


review of $105m


plant


FROM page 1B

clients had a "legitimate
expectation of full and proper
consultation" on the Wilson
City project and its impacts,
but the Government, BEC
and other relevant agencies
failed to do this.
"In this case, the health and
economic well-being of the
inhabitants of Abaco are at
stake," he argued in his sub-
missions to the Supreme
Court. "Their rights and inter-
ests are affected, and they
should have had the oppor-
tunity to make representa-
tions.
"The Prime Minister him-
self admitted on 30 October,
2009, that consultation should
have taken place at an earlier
stage. Further, such consulta-
tion as there was inadequate
and ineffective, as the EIA
had not been made publicly
available to enable the appli-
cants to make representations
based on a full appreciation
of the relevant facts. By with-
holding the EIA and failing
to take proper consultative
steps, the Government has
not acted in a procedurally


fair manner but has preju-
diced the rights and interests
of the applicants."
Mr Smith alleged that by
the time the Government first
consulted Abaco residents on
the project at the September
10, 2009, Town Meeting, con-
struction at Wilson City had
already begun.
"At that meeting it was
made plain that: the current
power plants could not be
'patched up'; it was too late
to look for green alternatives;
and it was too late to look for
alternative sites, or even the
use of an alternative fuel. This
was not consultation but an
attempt to force the residents
of Abaco to become resigned
to a decision which had long
since been taken," Mr Smith
alleged.
"Work on the site had even
started as early as September
2008, when part of the site
was cleared. The fact that
work started prior to the EIA
even being produced (in
October 2008) demonstrates
that the EIA, too, was win-
dow dressing - it was clearly
intended that the plant would
be built at Wilson City regard-


less of its environmental
impact."
Alleging that BEC had
been granted "retroactive"
permits for work already
started, Mr Smith argued:
"The damage to the reputa-
tion of the Bahamas, and the
consequent economic conse-
quences if the Government is
permitted to ignore the rule of
law and obtain relevant per-
missions wrongly and retro-
spectively without penalty,
will deter financial investment
in the Bahamian economy
and deter second home own-
ers from buying property in,
and contributing to the econ-
omy of, the Bahamas."
As a result, in citing his
grounds for a Judicial Review
he alleged that the decision
to go ahead with Wilson City
was "irrational on any proper
consideration of the environ-
mental, economic and public
health impacts", and some
decisions were "not in the
best interests of the
Bahamas".
Returning to the argument
that construction permits
required were BEC were
granted retroactively, after


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visis our websie at www.cb.edu.b

STAFF VACANCY

Appllicatilons are invited from suilably qualified ].rs ,ons fur ihe following
position:

Parl-time Coordimalor, Ahaco, responsible for assisting the Office of
Outreach with the operations of the Abaco Centre: contributing to the
development of strattegius to attract new interest groups for enrollment anid
collecting dcinographic information on prospective and former clicals to
determine education and training needs.

Specific dutics and responsibilities include assisting with the planning, devel-
opment. marketing and implementation of courseiprogrammc offerings in
Norih and Central Abaco; responding to enquiries regarding programme,.
courses, seminarr, and workshops liaiMing with the Planning Office Io con-
dudl public Murves to aserlain inluresl annd neeIds fIor ufcring antl assiisling
with the recruitment of sludenis.

Applicants should i r)suss a BRachulr's Degrcc or equivalent AND at least
Five (5) years post-qualification work experience at the AS-2 'lvcel. For a
detailed job description. visit www.cob.edu .btarupy. InterLsied candidate es
should submit a detailed resume and cover lkter of interest no later than
Friday, December I lth. 2009 to: Associate Vice ]President, H.R. Human
Resources Department. The College of The Baihalias or enmii]:
hrapply@cob.cdu.bs.



A leading jewelry retailer is seeking applications for the position of



SALES REPRESENTATIVE

A BRAND NEW OPPORTUNITY IN SALES AWAITS YOU!

If you are a self-motivated sales professional, this is the
opportunity for you. We have a proven training program and an
excellent insurance package which includes: life, medical, dental
and vision.

QUALIFICATIONS

*At least 1 year experience with a track record of closing sales
*At least 21 years of age or older
* The ability to work independently
* Basic computer skills
* Ability to work flexible schedules (nights, weekends and
holidays)
* Proven reliability and personal integrity


Interested persons should submit your resume to:
The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-623
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax (242) 322-6607
E-Mail - hr@luxuryretailimited.com


construction on Wilson City
had begun, Mr Smith alleged
that the Ministry of the Envi-
ronment had "conflicting
portfolios" - relations with
BEC and the petroleum
industry on one hand, and the
environment on the other.
To support his arguments
for Judicial Review, Mr Smith
alleged that the Environmen-
tal Impact Assessment (EIA)
for the Wilson City power
plant, completed in October
2008 by Florida-based KES
Environmental Services, was
only made public on Novem-


ber 6, 2009, following public
pressure. And he claimed that
the separate EIA for the
three-mile pipeline between
the plant and the Sea of Aba-
co was only published in
recent days.
Mr Smith also alleged that
the EIA failed to identify res-
idential areas close to the pro-
posed power plant, such as
Little Harbour only three
miles away. And the plans for
a new National Park in east-
ern Abaco also appeared not
to have been taken into
account.


IN H T -
bein .h nws

SedInih


HELP WANTED
pm pl


w


w


I ODSUSSOISO HSIPAGE LG ON5T WWW.TIBUE22CO5


+


Has opening's in the following areas:


Warehouse Management
Warehouse Supervisors
Truck Drivers/Helpers
Stockmen
Salesmen
Merchandisers


Salaries are commensurate with ability and
experience, and are WELL above industry
standards for exemplary personnel.


Application forms are available at the Receptionist
desk, you may also send resumes (where
applicable) to the following postal, or email
address:


The Manager Lightbourn Trading Co. Ltd.
P.O. Box N-7124
#118 Mackey Street
Nassau


Employment@lightbourntrading.com


BUSINESS







+


PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


42% of small hotels

lacking own website


Ms Walkine said visitor testi-
mony has branded Bahamas.com
a successful destination site. And
she cited rich media, such as
video, pictures and audio, as the
dynamic experience that visitors
are looking for in a virtual visit.
These things, she argued, were
necessities in the ultimate deci-
sion made by online vacation des-
tination shoppers.
"However, Bahamas.com can-
not be all things to all people,"
said Ms Walkine.
She said online credit card
bookings were becoming an
essential part of any hotel's book-
ing platform, and insisted that
Bahamian small hotels take
advantage of the opportunities
opening up on the Internet.
While the development of vir-
tual media was a top priority for
the Ministry of Tourism, its high-
ly-regarded toll free call centre,
located in the US, is moving back
to the Bahamas next year.
According to Ms Walkine, the
placement of local Bahamians in
the call centre will enhance the
authenticity of the experience for
guests.
She said because of the
Bahamas' online presence and
open communication links to the
outside world, this is one of rela-
tively few countries that consis-
tently knows what its visitors are
saying about it.
And she said that while the
Bahamas may have a geographic
advantage compared to the rest
of the islands in this region, it can
not always be assumed that it will
always be the advantage.
Many have been concerned
that when Cuban dictator Fidel
Castro dies, Cuba will become a
tourism mecca and absorb the
Bahamas' market substantially.
Ms Walkine alluded to the
diversification of Bahamian
tourism through the development
of niche products, such as sports
tourism and medical tourism.
She added that placing much
more emphasis on connecting
with the customer and delivering
a high quality of service, as well
as increasing airlift to the Family
Islands, will assist in increasing
small hotel occupancies and over-
all success.


Bahamians own 30oo


of room inven


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net


THE PRESIDENT of the
Bahamas Hotel Association (BHA)
said yesterday that Bahamians own
30 per cent of this country's aggre-
gate room inventory in the form of
small hotels, contrary to popular
belief.
Robert Sands, who is also Baha
Mar's vice-president of external
affairs, said small hotels, which are
defined as 74 or fewer rooms, rep-
resent 4,957 of the 15,552 aggre-
gate rooms in the Bahamas.
According to Mr Sands, more
than 80 per cent of the small hotels
in the Bahamas are owned by
Bahamians.
"This has become a national
development initiative of great sig-
nificance," he said. "We knew that
there were special small properties
throughout our islands. We didn't


ROBERT SANDS


know the extent to which owners
and operators were throughout the
country."
Mr Sands said the BHA, along
with the Bahamas Sustainable
Tourism Entrepreneurial Manage-
ment & Marketing (STEMM) Pro-
ject and the Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank, have been under-
taking an initiative to develop a
sustainability plan for small hotels
in the Bahamas, and have them-
selves learned lessons about the
operations of the properties in the
pursuit of the information.
"It became apparent to us that
we were not just undertaking a
tourism development project, but a
national development project," he
said.
Mr Sands added that during the
project, the extent of the challenges
faced by small hotels across the
Bahamas became apparent.
"We took a deliberate approach
to get to know you," said Mr Sands.


Since the BHA began the task
of discovering and assisting small
hotels, it has "catalogued and
digested" vast findings. And they
have sought to develop a plan to
assist those hotels in being success-
ful.
According to Mr Sands, there are
281 licensed hotels in the Bahamas,
241 of which are small hotels.
"It's a significant sector," he said.
"Too often we hear that Bahamians
do not own a piece of the tourism
pie, but it's time to speak out and
say that we do own a slice of that
pie."
Mr Sands said the BHA, the
Ministry of Tourism and the vari-
ous promotions boards are in their
fourth year of a development pro-
ject for small hotels.
"We are trying to organise and
engage the small hotels," he said.
"We created a support programme
based on what you've told us and
what we need."


No restoration for non-paying IBCs


FROM page 1B

plaintiffs, was carried out by the
defendants in such a way that it
stripped the Fund Companies of their
monetary assets, which primarily
went by way of payment fees to the
defendants, their servants and
agents."
The Hawthorne Sterling group has
a much more interesting history than
Justice Neville Adderley recorded in
his judgment, its mastermind, Ian
Renert, having seen the Securities &
Exchange Commission (SEC) obtain
a 2004 default judgment against him.


The US regulator had accused
Renert of using Hawthorne Sterling
and its funds to conduct a "fraudu-
lent" $22 million offering of shares in
the fund entities.
Justice Adderley noted that the
Hawthorne Sterling Family of Funds
was struck off the IBCs register for
non-payment of fees on August 31,
2002. The company commenced its
action on April 7, 2004, three months
before it was returned to the register
on June 7, 2004.
"However, the IBC Act 2000 con-
tained no express provision, nor does
it contain one now, for the Registrar
to restore a company to the register if


struck-off for non-payment of fees,"
Justice Adderley recalled.

Parliament

While agreeing that Parliament
had amended several "absurdities"
in the IBC Act 2000 over the years,
Justice Adderley said there was noth-
ing "implied" in that legislation that
allowed the Registrar General, acting
as the Registrar of Companies, to
restore an IBC after it was struck-
off for non-payment of fees.
The Supreme Court's job, Justice
Adderley added, was to ascertain
Parliament's intention in passing a


law based on the words in the statute,
"not substitute its will for that of the
legislation"
As a result, Justice Adderley said
Hawthorne Sterling's restoration was
"a nullity", as the Registrar had no
power to do so. This meant
Hawthorne Sterling had no power to
sue or bring the action.
"I find that since the repeal of the
1989 IBC Act, the Registrar ceased to
have the power to restore a company
that had been struck-off the Register
for non-payment of prescribed fees
and any such purported restorations
by him are null and void," Justice
Adderley ruled.


"Mtlag ;he ntbe wls of dver~ri~r
andJ flde- nu m" 11~'' t o NL~11do
ah pciU job. Thu. Tribul iai s
xliv mW&papr

ESTIR BARRY
PRDOUCTION MANAICER
TiiE TRBUNE



The "Tribune


'Serious damage' from


Quieting Titles deficiency


FROM page 1B

and as a result "serious damage is done to
the Bahamas".
He explained: "Investors become reluctant
to invest in a country with an inadequate
system of land ownership."
Mr Lightbourn recalled one such case on
Rum Cay, where a developer had sold the
entire parcel of land he had obtained to
unsuspecting international buyers for around
$2 million, who were "going to get nothing
from it".
"You only have to look at the Internet to
see the number of people criticising the
Bahamas for" the problems with land own-
ership, he added.
Security of land ownership/tenure is one of
the most critical means of economic empow-
erment, and Quieting Titles actions have,
over the years, negatively impacted hun-
dreds of Bahamians and families who felt
they had security of property ownership
only for their world to seemingly fall apart.
Tracing the Act's history, Mr Lightbourn
said the Quieting Titles Act, which was mod-
elled on Canadian law, had been enacted
to allow petitioners to acquire land through
adverse possession, meaning that they had
lived on it or used it for a minimum of 20
years. The Act was also designed to allow
landowners to perfect gaps in the docu-
mentary chain of title where a particular set
of deeds was missing.
Mr Lightbourn said the Act had been
especially designed to deal with the large
tracts of land granted by the Crown to set-
tlers who had emigrated elsewhere, leaving
no heirs or will behind. It had been thus
designed as a tool to free up these lands for
economic activity once again.
"To some, it's regarded as a licence to
steal land," Mr Lightbourn said, although
"The Act was established with a legitimate
purpose in mind..... It is open to abuse, and
a cadre of land sharks are especially adept at
using the system, assisted by some attor-
neys."
The main complaints, Mr Lightbourn said,
had come when persons petitioned the
courts for Certificate of Title, under the Act,
but provided only "flimsy" evidence to show
they had been in adverse possession for 20
years or more.
He cited one case where a woman had
managed to acquire a Certificate of Title to
1,000 acres on a Family Island, adding: "How
can one old lady claim 1,000 acres via
adverse possession by farming when every-
one knows it's not possible? She could nev-


er have enclosed those 1,000 acres. Never-
theless, a judge gave her a Certificate of
Title."
Mr Lightbourn said some of the deficien-
cies in the Quieting Titles Act could be cured
by bringing into law the 1969 amendments,
which never received assent. Some suspect-
ed this never happened because the Depart-
ment of Lands and Surveys did not have
the adequate resources to map the entire
Bahamas.
Among the most critical amendments in
the 1969 reforms was Section 8, Mr Light-
bourn added, where a surveyor or other
qualified professional would inspect the land
subject to a Quieting Titles petition and file
an affidavit dealing with how the land had
been used, and whether there was evidence
to support an adverse possession claim.
"This, in my view, would be a major help
to the court and prevent many abuses," Mr
Lightbourn said. "Many judges are reluc-
tant to inspect land, because they then
become witnesses. A surveyor would be able
to discover such evidence when inspecting
the land, including the presence of others."
If the Bahamas moved to a land registra-
tion system, Mr Lightbourn said the UK's
Land Registration Act 2002 would be "the
one the Bahamas has to look towards when
changing our laws". And, he argued, a prop-
erly reformed Quieting Titles Act could be
the mechanism for resolving disputes under
this legislation.
Apart from the use of a surveyor, Mr
Lightbourn said all Quieting Titles Act peti-
tions should reference current land features
and names, as descriptions that were vague
or used old names had often been used to
disguise the land subject to these actions.
He recalled seeing one petition for an
area described as Milburn Tract, thinking
nothing of it, only to then be tipped by a
contact that the land in q question was
Yamacraw Beach Estates, and had been
known as that for 50 years.
"It's frightening when someone can do
that," Mr Lightbourn said, adding that a
similar situation had arisen when a petition
used an old name to describe land that the
Eleuthera Island Club subdivision was sitting
on in Eleuthera.
The McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes part-
ner urged that another reform should be
the issuance of a Notice informing persons
who had an ownership claim to land sub-
ject to a Quieting Titles petition that they
had to perform certain things within a time-
frame or else their claim would be struck
out.


To [id'ver]p trMe, call 502-2371 today!]I


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


BUSINESS I




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