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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01457
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: November 30, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01457

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claims dismissed


Police say allegations

made by man found on

side of road are not true


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
DRAMATIC allegations by an
American visitor that he was
abducted, robbed and left for dead
by four Bahamian men were dis-
missed by police last night as not
true.
Assistant Commissioner of
Police, Hulan Hanna explained
that officers came to this conclu-
sion after both police and medical
personnel noted that the man was
found to have barely any injuries
except a "minor swelling to the
right cheek" and that all of the
items the man had alleged were
stolen during the attack were
accounted for in a police search of
his hotel room.
The 47-year-old Philadelphia
man, who was staying at the
Breezes resort on Cable Beach,
made his allegations after he was
found collapsed on the side of
Eastern Road at the junction with
High Vista at around 11.30 Satur-
day morning.
In an interview with this news-
paper prior to the police's latest
update, he alleged he had been
taking cash out of an ATM "some-
where downtown" sometime after
2.30am when he felt a sharp object
pushed into his back by two men
who had approached him and was
then forced to get into a dark
SUV-type vehicle.
The 47 year old said he recalled
four men inside the car, where he
was robbed of jewellery, his watch
and the $500 in cash that he had


just extracted from the ATM.
He described the man who took
his valuables as a clean shaven
black male in his early thirties,
armed with a handgun. The dri-
ver, he said, had dreadlocks.
According to the visitor, who
said he arrived in The Bahamas
on Thursday for a short visit with
his 38-year-old fiancee, the men
then drove for around five min-
utes before opening the door and
telling him to get out.
However, before this happened,
the Philadelphia man claimed he
was punched in the face, and then
as he lay on the floor outside the
vehicle, "smacked" over the head
with an unidentified object.
The tourist said the next thing
he was aware of was o, ,km.- up
behind a bush" in an unknown
location the following morning
sometime after 10am.
"I got up and came out of there
and there was an intersection. I
walked down to the next block,
and there was the ocean.
"I remembered them telling us
when we arrived that police sta-
tions were a certain colour, so I
started walking figuring that I'd
see one at some point.
"At that point I was happy
because I had thought I was going
to be dead," said the man, who
added that he is trying to come to
terms with the incident.
"I gotta find a way to deal with
it. Situations like this you don't
really have a choice."
In a police report issued early
SEE page eight


Police officer


shot at mall
By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
VIOLENCE surged across New Providence this week-
end with attacks leaving seven people in hospital, includ-
ing an off-duty police officer shot outside the Towne
Centre Mall.
Police have not yet identified the officer, but The Tri-
bune understands he is Corporal Andrews of the Internal
Security division.
Andrews is in stable condition following the shooting
in the Mall car park at 8.15pm on Saturday.
SEE page nine


Tourists taken into
custody after
alleged stabbing in
Atlantis' nightclub
By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
TWO tourists - a man and a
woman - were taken into custody
Sunday morning after a Bahamian
man and his friend were allegedly
stabbed with an unidentified object
after accidentally "bumping into"
the couple in Atlantis' upscale
Aura nightclub.
In an unusual twist to the recent
turn of events that have seen an
increase in the number of crimes
committed by Bahamians targeting
tourists, a Bahamian man said he
and an expatriate friend were
enjoying themselves at the high-
end venue when what initially
seemed like a forgettable
encounter with some American
visitors turned into a fight.
The 48-year-old man, who
wished to remain anonymous, said
he was stabbed in the hand when
he attempted to help his 43-year-
old friend who had been attacked
by an American couple after acci-
dentally knocking into them as he
walked past the bar located behind
the club's DJ booth at around lam.
On their way up to a backroom
where they were escorted by staff
at the club after the argument was
broken up, the younger local man,
who was wearing a black shirt,
realized that he was bleeding from
the stomach, having apparently
been stabbed.
While the wound was not life-
threatening, the expatriate resi-
dent had to receive "four or five
stitches" to patch it while his
Bahamian friend needed two
stitches to his hand, he told The
Tribune.
Now the Bahamian man is call-
ing for Atlantis to "beef up" secu-
rity at the popular nightclub.
"I'm sitting here thinking I
thank my lucky stars. I went out
last night to have something to eat
and go to a club. I didn't expect
to be rolling around on the floor
with some guy stabbing me."
"What's scary is that it hap-
pened in Aura, which is the exclu-
sive upmarket club where people
pay $12 a drink to avoid that kind
of thing. It's one of those things
that you don't expect to happen,"
said the Bahamian professional,
who works in the wholesale busi-
ness.
In a statement issued yesterday,
Ed Fields, Senior Vice President of
SEE page 15


PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham shakes hands with British Prime Minister Gordon
Brown at the 2009 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) held in Port of
Spain, Trinidad.


THE Prime Minister will personally trav-
el to a highly anticipated climate change
conference in Copenhagen to help push for
a legally binding global agreement towards
reducing global warming.
Hubert Ingraham and Environment Min-
ister Earl Deveaux will attend the United
Nations Climate Change Conference in
Copenhagen, Denmark, next month.
His decision to travel to the December 7
- 18th meeting comes after he told dele-
gates at a United Nations High Level Event
on Climate Change held in New York in
September of this year that climate change
poses "a serious threat to (The Bahamas')
economic viability, our social development
and our territorial integrity."
The Bahamas has consistently been iden-
tified as one of the countries considered
most vulnerable to the effects of climate
change, in particular more catastrophic hur-
ricanes and rising sea levels, which could
flood significant parts of our low-lying
islands.
By deciding to personally represent The


Bahamas at the climate conference, Mr
Ingraham is following in the footsteps of
world leaders such as President Barack Oba-
ma and British Prime Minister Gordon
Brown who have pledged to attend in order
to bring extra weight to the negotiations.
In September, Mr Brown expressed his
concern that a legally binding deal to cut
carbon emissions may be in "grave danger",
and called on world leaders to weigh in at
the conference to help escape this outcome.
Mr Ingraham revealed his intention to
travel to Copenhagen while in Trinidad this
weekend, where he and other leaders of
Commonwealth countries met in Special
Session on Climate Change in advance of
this year's Commonwealth Heads of Gov-
ernment Meeting (CHOGM).
Non-Commonwealth Heads, President of
France Nicolas Sarkozy and Prime Minister
of Denmark Lars Loekke Rasmussen also
attended the Special Session, as did UN
Secretary General Ban Ki-moon; a move
SEE page 10


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PAGE 2, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Ministry hits back over Bahamas



initiative for British filmmakers


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
THE Ministry of Tourism
has hit out at critics of their ini-
tiative inviting 14 amateur
British filmmakers to produce
films about 14 Bahama islands.
Bahamian filmmaker Celi
Moss, founder and director of
the Bahamas Film Festival, crit-
icised the Ministry of Tourism
for only inviting British film-
makers to take part in the 14
Islands Films Challenge.
Mr Moss said Bahamians
should have a chance to show


the unique character and beau-
ty of each of the 14 islands to
brand them for a worldwide
market, rather than bringing
foreigners in to make the films
instead.
And as local talent is exclud-
ed from the competition they
will miss out on the chance to
win the �14,000, state-of-the-
art camera equipment and a
premiere at the prestigious
British Association of Film and
Television Arts (BAFTA)
awards in March next year.
But the Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation argue the initia-
tive launched as one of the


department's major events to
create a significant buzz about
the Bahamas would not have
the same international impact if
Bahamians were making the
films.
The competition was intend-
ed to be a step up from the
hugely successful Australian
tourism promotion which
advertised a position for the
"best job in the world" as a
caretaker for an island in
Queensland, Australia.
And by asking 14 British
filmmakers to show the islands
of the Bahamas through their
eyes, the promotion would be


Minister branches
out for police tree
lighting ceremony
MINISTER of National
Security Tommy Turn-
quest (left) with Com-
missioner of Police
Reginald Ferguson,
turns on the Christmas
tree during the Royal
Bahamas Police Force
9th annual Carol Service
& Tree Lighting Cere-
mony recently.


14 times bigger.
Interested candidates were
invited to produce short films
about a local hero in their com-
munity for the chance to win
14 days making movies in the
Bahamas, thereby allowing the
initiative to gain strength on a
local level in Britain.
And a film from the foreign
perspective is likely to be more
credible than films by Bahami-
ans about their own country,
the Ministry maintains.
Ministry of Tourism and Avi-
ation spokesman Basil Smith
said: "We are surprised of the
criticism that has been directed
at this promotion.
"The critics of this promo-
tion have not taken an objective
view of the promotion and the
strategy that it has applied to
stimulating interest among
Britain's population.
"We would no more expect
an uproar from Bahamian pho-
tographers if we invited people
who had visited the Bahamas
to submit photographs of their
vacation."
By using British filmmakers
the islands can be shown at the
BAFTA's exclusively for
British films, and potentially
screened in theatres across the
UK. It has also attracted major
British sponsorship.
Mr Smith added: "We must
remember that the 14 Island
Challenge is a UK based pro-
motion designed to create buzz
in the UK among UK citizens
and residents and inspire them
to visit the Bahamas.
"In the process, the Bahamas
will obtain high quality content
for our websites at a relatively
modest cost.
"Clearly, our use of Bahami-
an filmmakers for this chal-
lenge would not have achieved
the requisite level of interest
or excitement in the UK as is
the case with the use of the
British filmmakers, who will
through their eyes focus on
those intriguing aspects of our
islands that present well on
film, and which by extension
will create the level of interest
and engagement we are seek-
ing from the UK consumers,
ultimately driving their vaca-
tion purchase decisions and,
hence, create jobs for many
Bahamians."


By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
mreynolds@,
tribunemedia.net

GROSS incom- -.
petence demon-
strated by govern-
ment in the
takeover of Morton
Salt's power plant l
in Inagua incurred
millions of dollars in losses
for BEC, PLP chairman
Bradley Roberts claims.
The Progressive Liberal
Party (PLP) chairman said
Minister for the Environ-
ment Earl Deveaux and
Minister of State Phenton
Neymour's mishandling of
the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation's (BEC)
takeover of the plant has
added millions to the corpo-
ration's escalating losses as
bills have not been issued to
Inagua residents for nearly a
year.
Electricity meters updat-
ed in the wake of Hurri-
cane Ike in September last
year could not be read by
the Morton Salt company
until now, Mr Roberts said,
and therefore Inagua resi-
dents have not received
BEC bills since the meters
were replaced in Decem-
ber 2008.
PLP MP for MICAL
(Mayaguana, Inagua,
Crooked Island, Acklins and
Long Cay), V Alfred Gray,
told Parliament in June that
Inagua customers had not
received BEC bills since
December, but Mr Neymour
simply retaliated by calling
on Mr Gray to stop playing
"petty politics," Mr Roberts
said.
The PLP chairman has
now criticised the Minister
of State and Minister for fail-
ing to address the issue.
He said: "Today con-
sumers in Inagua have not
been billed for almost a year
and the estimated billings
are said to be over a million
dollars.
"How can the government


i


logically expect the
good people of
Inagua to pay elec-
- tricity bills that are
in arrears more
than a year?
"And failing
that, do they expect
the Morton Salt
company to absorb
the massive loss
due entirely to the
failure of an arro-
gant and incompe-
tent FNM government?"
Mr Roberts argues Inagua
residents have already suf-
fered under the current gov-
ernment as the FNM has
failed to complete and open
a new health clinic and doc-
tor's residence built nearly
three years ago.
He said Mr Neymour
informed Parliament gov-
ernment was taking over the
Morton Salt power plant
more than two years ago,
and started upgrading the
facilities in September last
year.
But Morton Salt contin-
ued to supply fuel and main-
tain the plant at the compa-
ny's expense, Mr Roberts
said.
Although the final agree-
ment was executed by BEC
in September, and BEC has
engaged services in Inagua
for some time, the corpora-
tion has yet to take over
operations, Mr Roberts
understands.
Minister of State Phenton
Neymour did not return calls
from The Tribune to
respond to claims before
press time last night, and
Minister for the Environ-
ment Earl Deveaux is cur-
rently attending the Com-
monwealth Heads of Gov-
ernment meeting in
Trinidad.


TOICAL

EKTEINMR
FO PETPOLM


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


to


Mr. Zach Moses


For his outstanding perform

2009 Speedo Winter ,1ham hit

in Plantati-n9-11ida

Zach swam n ind ual e and made the finals in 8 events with great
times..Armongt his vai us medals, Zach won silver in the boys 11-12
500yd freestyle with a time 5:20.05. Teams from all over Florida.
Pennsylvania, Jamaica, Trinidad and the Bahamas participated.


Zach is the son of Mr. Timothy Moss the General Manager
at, Sanpin Motors Ltd. Pre-Owned Bahamas Ltd, Elite
Motors Ltd & Friendly Ford Motors Ltd,


From the Directors, Management
& Staff of
Sanpin Motor's. Elite Motors
Pre-Owned Bahamas, & Friendly Ford Motors







+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009, PAGE 3


LOCALN


Constituency

office theft:

police say no

major leads

POLICE have yet to
figure out who was
responsible for the dis-
appearance of two tele-
visions and two comput-
ers from the constituen-
cy office of the Minister
of National Security last
week.
According to Superin-
tendent in charge of the
police's Criminal Inves-
tigation Department,
Elsworth Moss, no one
has been taken into cus-
tody in connection with
the theft and there are
no major leads.
It was Wednesday
morning when a female
employee of Tommy
Turnquest's Mount
Moriah constituency
office, located on
Thompson Boulevard
opposite the Caribbean
Bottling Company,
alerted Mr Turnquest to
the disappearance of the
electrical items.

Incident

Mr Turnquest told
The Tribune on
Wednesday that he had
not reported the inci-
dent as a crime.
"I had a robbery, but
there was no forced
entry. It was not a
break-in," said the Min-
ister, who has recently
come under intense
scrutiny in light of esca-
lating violence and rob-
beries.
The MP said he had
nonetheless directed
police to process the
scene, dusting for fin-
gerprints that could
reveal the identity of the
thief.
"I'm not reporting it
as a crime until police
tell me what they
know," added the Min-
ister that day, when
asked whether police
had any leads as yet.

Robbery

Commenting on the
robbery at www.tri-
bune242.com, reader
"Joe Blow" said: "It
sucks for anyone to be
victimised by these
thugs running around
the country, but you
have to admit there's a
beautiful irony when it
happens to the man
everyone's calling on to
quit because he can't get
this crime problem
under control!"
Meanwhile, reader
"Bill" said: "Tommy
Turnquest can't even
protect his own office,
let alone a nation!"
But "Drained
Bahamian" retorted
that he believes the
crime may have a politi-
cal slant.
"There are vicious,
desperate people out
there, who still cannot
get over the fact they
lost the elections!
Enough said! This is
serious, what is our
island coming to?"


Weekend sees five reported armed



robberies in New Providence


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
A HIGH rate of armed rob-
beries continued to soar this
weekend with five reported
robberies across New Provi-
dence on Friday and Saturday.
In one incident a woman was
robbed by two men while walk-
ing alone on Shirley Street, and
in another a man was robbed
of his tennis shoes.
A 26-year-old man was held
up by a masked man armed
with a handgun while sitting in
his 2006 Nissan Maxima in
Winton Heights at 10.20pm on
Friday. He was ordered to hand


over the keys to his car, and
when he did so the gunman
drove off in a westerly direc-
tion.
At around the same time a
man was robbed of cash and
his sneakers when a gunman
approached him in the area of
Comfort and Lewis Streets,
Nassau.
The robber armed with a
handgun left his victim bare-
foot and penniless as he fled on
foot in a northerly direction.
Another armed robbery
occurred in the same area just
before 1.30am on Saturday,
when two men sitting in Market
and Lewis Streets were
approached by a man armed


with a handgun who robbed
them of a cellular telephone
and fled on foot.
An armed robber then
stormed Budget Meats in Coral
Harbour at 8.15 Saturday
morning.
The man threatened the
foodstore employee with a
handgun and demanded mon-
ey. He then stole an undeter-
mined amount of cash and fled
the area in a grey Honda, reg-
istration number 180071.
A woman was threatened by
two armed men while walking
on Shirley Street, near the junc-
tion with Collins Avenue, at
8.10pm on Saturday.
The men robbed her of an


undetermined amount of cash
and fled the area on foot.
Police are investigating all
incidents and urge the public
to assist by providing informa-
tion in relation to the crimes.


Anyone with any informa-
tion that may assist investiga-
tions should call police urgent-
ly on 919, or call Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477).


AVAYI ALUMINUM
- d Si2 - v--


MEDICAL Tourism opportunities in the
Bahamas were promoted for the world during a
three-day international medical tourism con-
vention in Los Angeles, California.
Grand Bahama Port Authority business devel-
opment manager Derek Newbold joined dele-
gates from more than 60 countries at the second
annual World Medical Tourism and Global
Health Congress to show why Grand Bahama
is best suited to accommodate a medical tourism
hospital.
He showcased the island's existing opportu-
nities for medical tourism development as it
scores highly on the list for those wishing to trav-
el for medical needs and are concerned with cost,
accessibility, availability, the destination expe-
rience and confidentiality.
More than 120 exhibitors and sponsors were
featured at the event, as well as more than 160
speakers and 1,500 public and private sector rep-
resentatives, including governments, facilitators
and medical insurance professionals.
Mr Newbold said: "The Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) has a strong interest in mak-
ing Grand Bahama a medical tourist destination
as we seek to attract recession proof industries.
"We feel there are many benefits to the local
community and economy by becoming a com-
peting destination in this growing tourism sector."
Harvard University's Regina Herzlinger's
2008 study on medical travel estimates $16 to
$32 billion of US-based procedures could travel
over the next three to five years, and Mr Newbold
is keen to bring some of this business to the
Bahamas.
He said: "Obviously, being able to attract just
a small percentage of this business warrants a
closer look by any serious investor.
"Despite the obvious reasons for investing in
Freeport, like tax exemptions, free trade zone,
and a deep water harbour, Grand Bahama is one
of only four islands with a US pre-clearance facil-
ity, and it lies within a three to four hour flight of
nearly 200 million Americans."
GBPA group chairman Hannes Babak was
instrumental in sealing the deal for Ross Uni-
versity to become operational in Grand Bahama,
and the group is actively working to bring more
medical campuses to Grand Bahama.
It is also promoting peripheral business oppor-
tunities to be created from a first-class medical
tourism industry in Grand Bahama such as med-
ical retail, community care and support, health-


MINISTRY OF TOURISM director general Vernice
Walkine and GBPA group business development man-
ager Derek Newbold at the second annual World Med-
ical Tourism and Global Health Congress in Los Ange-
les, California.
care education, training, and retirement com-
munity healthcare services.
A research and development resource on the
medical centre campus would also attract North
American and European pharmaceutical and
medical device companies to relocate to Grand
Bahama to conduct research and product devel-
opment, Mr Newbold said.
During the three-day conference which ended
on Saturday, Mr Newbold said he received a
positive response.
"We have a tremendous product to market,"
he said. "And we are beginning to experience a
significant amount of positive feedback from
potential investors, who, for the first time, are
being introduced to the benefits of conducting
business in Freeport, Grand Bahama."


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PAGE 4, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


IEIOI AULETE S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


What happened under Perry Christie's watch?


MR BRADLEY Roberts takes every
opportunity - that is when he is not weep-
ing over the PLP's Urban Renewal pro-
gramme - to remind Bahamians that if it
were not for the FNM government's policy
of "stop, review and cancel" of "capital
works projects and foreign investment pro-
jects," the Bahamas would have been "cush-
ioned" from the devastating blow of the US
recession.
Mr Roberts said that the Ingraham gov-
ernment's decision on taking over the admin-
istration from the defeated Christie govern-
ment caused unemployment to increase and
the construction industry to contract. He
said the FNM cannot totally blame the glob-
al credit crunch on the Bahamas' present
economic downturn. In fact, he said, it was
the Ingraham policy of "stop, review and
cancel" that did us in.
Now let's agree that the Ingraham admin-
istration did stop certain capital works -
all government projects - for review,
because it was believed that several of them
were wasting the people's taxes. In fact, the
Treasury was saved an appreciable sum by
the reviews.
But let's look at the investor projects
from another point of view. These were not
stopped for any review, they just never got
off the ground probably because the Christie
government was too slow in approving them.
So much bragging about the many millions
of dollars being attracted from overseas,
sparked debate at the time that there would
not be enough Bahamians to fill all the jobs
expected to come on stream. However, no
one needed to have worried. Projects were
announced, but never materialised -such
projects as Crystal Mount in Cat Island,
Montana Holdings in Rum Cay; Royal
Island, near Spanish Wells; Gold Rock
Creek in Grand Bahama; Pittown Point
Landings in Crooked Island; Crab Cay in
the Exumas to name but a few. Why didn't
these materialise?
To make an impression on Bahamians,
did the Christie government announce pro-
jects prematurely or did it fail to process
them for construction in a timely manner?
What can be said is that if all the projects
that were announced had been signed off
in time by the Christie government, the
Bahamas would have been in the middle of
a building boom when the credit squeeze
struck. Construction would have been under-
way and well out of the reach of any review
by the Ingraham government. The projects
announced would have either been com-
pleted or too far on to turn back.
Baha Mar is an interesting case in point
and probably gives the answer to what went
wrong with all the other investments.
Not to be outdone by Mr Ingraham under
whose administration Atlantis was created,
it was said that Mr Christie saw Baha Mar as


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EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM
* WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.


his grand legacy.
Because of his apparent enthusiasm for
this project, no one can understand why
there were so many delays in getting it off
the ground. Promised government deadlines
were not met. The undertaking dragged on
for so long that the prized Harrah's and
Starwood, the world's largest gaming com-
pany and hotel company, were lost. In the
interim Harrah's was bought by a new com-
pany, the credit squeeze was on, and the
delays - apparently no fault of the Baha
Mar principals - were given as an excuse to
squeeze out of the deal. The year was 2008.
The future of Baha Mar still hangs in limbo.
On January 25, 2006 a worried Mr Izmir-
lian, the Baha Mar developer, wrote a per-
sonal letter to Mr Christie reminding him
of certain unfulfilled undertakings by his
government.
He reminded Mr Christie that since the
beginning of his (Mr Izmirlian's) involve-
ment with the Baha Mar project he had
"delivered on each and every pledge" that he
had made to the prime minister. Mr Izmir-
lian then listed what he had accomplished,
adding: "Perhaps most important, I pledged
to you that I would bring world class partners
to this project, and I proceeded to deliver
Harrah's and Starwood ..."
However, wrote Mr Izmirlian, they were
at a crossroads. Before Harrah's and Star-
wood would sign the joint venture agree-
ment with Baha Mar they needed certain
assurances from the Bahamas government.
These assurances were listed.
"You had given me your personal assur-
ance that you would ensure that the Gov-
ernment would move to expeditiously
accomplish the above by the New Year. Yet
this did not happen..." Mr Izmirlian told
Mr Christie.
Mr Izmirlian's three page letter - dated
January 25, 2006, two years before Harrah
and Starwood pulled out - concluded:
"If we cannot achieve the early February
timeframe for accomplishing the above, I
will have to inform Harrah's and Starwood
that, despite my best efforts these past three
odd years, the Government of The Com-
monwealth of The Bahamas has failed me. I
certainly do not want to be known as the
developer (and I'm certain you don't want to
be known as the Prime Minister) that lost
Caesars and Starwood. Today, more than
ever before, I need your unambiguous sup-
port, Mr Prime Minister."
If this contract had been concluded in a
timely manner, would Baha Mar have been
well on its way to being a going concern
before the government changed in 2007?
And wouldn't we have had enough con-
struction jobs filled to cushion the econom-
ic blow that was to come eight months later?
Maybe Mr Bradley Roberts can answer this
one.


Commercial




businesses and




residential areas


EDITOR, The Tribune.

I WAS very pleased hear-
ing the recent statement
from the Minister of The
Environment that the pro-
posed new Subdivision leg-
islation would stop in its
tracks the possibility of
commercial business estab-
lishing themselves suddenly
in residential areas - this is
progression, very positive
progression from the past.
I hear officials of govern-
ment are continuing, how-
ever, to hype seemingly the
inevitable decision to build
the container break-down
facility on Gladstone Road
and simply cause the move-
ment of heavy tractor con-
tainer rigs to move from
Arawak Cay through Vista
Marina, Saunders Beach
and onward down Glad-
stone Road and obviously
after the containers have
been processed a daily and
nightly heavy flow of heavy
vehicles onward to their
final destination.
Surely this is putting com-
mercial where there is
established residential
development and it was
explained to us from the
floor of the House of
Assembly that it is the pol-
icy of the Ingraham/FNM
government not to permit
this but Government -
Cabinet is driving this pro-
posal.
Do we believe therefore
what the government is say-
ing about their Subdivision
Act?
All will accept that 30 per
cent of all current freight
traffic lands at Arawak Cay
but in the future 100 per
cent will and not like today
it will travel close to the res-
idents of Vista Marina -
down Bethel Avenue and
down Gladstone Road,
presently living in an
acceptable level of tran-
quility will now be faced
with living in constant noise
- air pollution and a con-
siderable increase in 24/7
traffic.
The Prime Minister said a
few months back that the
proposers of this project
have to have a Traffic Man-
agement and Impact Study
and an Environment
Impact Study completed -
I wish to know is this still
the requirement of govern-
ment and are these studies
being carried out and by


whom and when will they
be completed? Will the
public be given the right to
read the studies and
respond?
Because 30 per cent of
the current freight lands at
Arawak Cay does not mean
there will be no negative
impact between Arawak
Cay and Gladstone Road
- to suggest there will be
no negative impact is gross-
ly irresponsible and lacks


understanding of safe-
guarding the Environment
and the rights of established
residential sub-divisions
which the new Subdivision
Act is said to establish so
positively.
Double talk and ques-
tionably lacking forward
thinking - I never did sup-
port 'Port Christie-Clifton
Point' but feel there are
alternatives if the politicians
wish to find an alternative
which might even cost less.

D RAHMING
Nassau,
November 22, 2009.


Director of Education post

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE post of Director of Education was established statu-
torily by Section 5 of the Statute Law of The Bahamas,
Chapter 36 (Education Amended Act 1996) which states:
"There shall be established a Department of Education
which shall comprise a Director of Education, Deputy
Directors, Assistant Directors, District Superintendents
and such other officers as may from time to time be autho-
rised by Parliament."
Further, the "Duties of the Director" are defined in Sec-
tion 6 of that Act.
In August 2004, the appointment of a Director of Higher
Education and Lifelong Learning was announced through
the media. For the edification of the public and, in order that
we may understand the functions of this post and its rela-
tionship to the post of Director of Education, will someone
in authority (the Minister of Education, the Cabinet of The
Bahamas, etc.), please provide responses to the following
questions:
1) Is there a Higher Education Act and Regulations? If so,
how can the public obtain copies?
2) In view of Section 5 quoted above, does the post of
Director of Higher Education and Lifelong Learning report
to the Director of Education?
3) What are the duties and responsibilities (including
authority) of the Director of Higher Education and Lifelong
Learning? For the sake of transparency, a job description for
this post should be published (now, possibly on the Ministry
of Education's website) as was done for the President of the
College of The Bahamas.
4) How many persons have attained literacy through the
'National Literacy Programme' for the following periods:
(a) September 2002 - August 2003
(b) September 2003 - August 2004
(c) September 2004 - August 2005
and for each year thereafter through to August 2009?
Thank you so much for your kindness in publishing this
letter.

BERNADETTE A GARDINER
Concerned
Bahamian
taxpayer
Nassau,
November, 2009.


+>


NOTICE



Mohs Surgery in Nassau


DR. JOHN STRASSWIMMER, MOHS SURGEON
will be visiting The Skin Centre on Friday
December 4th, 2009. Dr Strasswimmer
trained at Harvard and Yale and is Board
Certified and a Fellow of the Mohs College.

Mohs Micrographic Surgery is an advanced
treatment process for skin cancer which is now
offered at The Skin Centre. It offers the highest
possible cure rate for many skin cancers and
simultaneously minimizes the sacrifice of
normal tissue. This cutting-edge treatment
requires highly specialized physicians that serve
as surgeon, pathologist and reconstructive
surgeon.

Our visiting Mohs Surgeon has extensive
experience in the Mohs Micrographic Procedure.
The technique is used to remove the two most
common forms of skin cancer: basal cell
carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

For more information, please contact:
The Skin Centre, Harbour Bay Plaza,
East Bay Street Tel. 393-7546.


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+


PAGE 6, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Are ACP countries being

sidelined by Europe again?




insWORLD VIEWght
WORLD VIEWo


Maimia Slwgpp4 Pim 32M-703
EsMhAOM E 0il
RNO Pluk Fmpo 31 51W4Z


By SIR RONALD SANDERS
(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)
THE European Union (EU)
has not included in the Lisbon
Treaty a crucial article that was
a feature of treaties between
the EU and African Caribbean
and Pacific (ACP) states. The
Lisbon Treaty is the new "con-
stitution" of the EU and it will
replace the previous treaties
that guided the policies of the
EU and the work of the Euro-
pean Commission (EC).
Representatives of EC have
offered reasons for this omis-
sion which might have had a
ring of credibility had the
Caribbean not been put
through the threats and
demands that characterized the
negotiations leading to individ-
ual Caribbean countries sign-
ing up to an unequal Econom-
ic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) with the EU.
It is difficult for sceptics to
take the EC at its word. Indeed,
since the EC unilaterally
denounced the Sugar Protocol
leaving Caribbean sugar pro-
ducers without a market that
the Protocol had guaranteed,
and since the EC further uni-
laterally amended the prefer-
ential terms under which
Caribbean-produced bananas
entered the EU market leav-
ing banana farmers in dire cir-
cumstances, there is every rea-
son to be ultra-cautious of
actions by the EU and its Com-
mission.
What is not clear is why the
ACP countries have not
protested at the omission of the


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article which they were entitled
to do, and which they were
urged to do by at least one
activist lawyer in Brussels
where both the EC and ACP
secretariats are located.
It has to be assumed that the
ACP representatives had good
reason for not howling publicly
in protest and that, at some
point, they will let their publics
know why they did not. On the
other hand, it may very well be
that they did protest but were
rebuffed by the EC, and, again,
they chose not to let their
publics know that, once again,
raw power trumped moral
obligation. Then, it could be
that the ACP representatives
chose to do nothing at all on
the basis that since the EC has
unilaterally denounced what
the ACP thought were other
legally binding agreements,
there was no point in even rais-
ing the issue, since the EU, at
some point in the future, might
abrogate an article in their own
treaty if it did not suit them.
And, the ACP would be able to
do nothing about it just as they
did not make a legal challenge
to the denunciation of the Sug-
ar Protocol.
To be fair to the EU and the
EC, my previous paragraph is
pure speculation. It may very
well be that no representation
was made by the ACP to the
EU/EC by representatives of
the ACP and therefore, the
EU/EC had no reason for
regarding any omission of the
ACP relationship as an issue.
As background to all this, it
should be pointed out that an
activist lawyer in Brussels,
Joyce van Genderen-Naar,
wrote in March 2004 pointing
out that the Article which
"makes reference to the ACP
countries in the previous
EC/EU Treaties had been
omitted from the text of the
proposed Lisbon Treaty that
replaces them."
She said, paragraph 3 of
Article 179 of the provisions
for Development Cooperation
in the current EC Treaty states
that: "The provisions of this
Article shall not affect cooper-
ation with the African,
Caribbean and Pacific countries
in the framework of the ACP-
EC Convention."
Van Genderen-Naar went on
to argue that "Articlel79, para-
graph 3, refers to the special
relationship between the
EC/EU and the ACP-countries,
which is the oldest and largest
form of cooperation between
Europe and countries from the
South." She contended that
historical bonds "between
Europe and the ACP-countries
give Europe a special responsi-
bility for these countries, which
should not be forgotten and
should be a part of the next
Constitution for Europe. This
responsibility is even more
urgent, because after 37 years
of cooperation 40 of the 79
ACP-countries still belong to
the poorest countries in the
world. Out of the 48 poorest
countries in the world 40 are
ACP-countries."
(The full text of her presen-
tation can be read at:


http://www.normangirvan.info/n
aar-acp-disappearance-from-lis-
bon/).
Very few in the ACP coun-
tries would seriously argue with
van Genderen-Naar's con-
tention.
She advised the ACP "to
make an official request to the
European Commission and
Members of the Convention
(representatives of the Euro-
pean Parliament and Member
States) to insert a provision con-
cerning the ACP-EC-Cooper-
ation in the new Constitution
in view of the special relation-
ship between the EU and the
ACP, historical bonds, respon-
sibilities and mutual interest, as
agreed by EC and ACP in Arti-
cle 55 of the Cotonou Agree-
ment" which says: "The objec-
tives of development finance
cooperation shall be, through
the provision of adequate finan-
cial resources and appropriate
technical assistance, to support
and promote the efforts of the
ACP States to achieve the
objectives set out in this Agree-
ment on the basis of mutual
interest and in a spirit of inter-
dependence."
The EU is redefining itself.
They are describing the Lisbon
Treaty as more than a Charter;
they say it is the EU Constitu-
tion. Further, they have
appointed a President of the
EU and a common Foreign
Minister. Beyond this deepen-
ing of their relationship, it is
clear that the majority of the
27 nations in the EU feel no
responsibility for the former
colonies of a handful; many of
them believe that the EU's
obligations are to the develop-
ment and prosperity of its own
member states.
If there is no reference in the
Lisbon Treaty to the ACP
countries, the shift in Europe's
attitude to them - evident in
the unilateral denunciation of
contracts and in the tactics of
threat used in the EPA negoti-
ations - will be confirmed. So,
too, will be the timidity of the
ACP in exercising power that
can come from joint action.
The ACP must find the
strength to speak with one
voice again; to resist divide and
rule tactics; to eschew empty
promises of aid; and to fund its
own institutions particularly
those which interact with the
EU.
If the ACP countries remain
mere supplicants without
demonstrating a readiness to
stand up together for them-
selves, then they will be omitted
to their detriment from more
than the EU's new arrange-
ments.
Responses and previous
commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com


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+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009, PAGE 7


Arrival of swine flu vaccinations in Bahamas delayed


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
THE anticipated arrival of
hundreds of thousands of vac-
cinations that could help pro-
tect Bahamians from the swine
flu virus has been delayed, the
Minister of Health said.
Dr Hubert Minnis said gov-
ernment was informed that the
companies producing the HIN1
vaccine have "decreased their
production by over fifty per
cent", leading to expectations
that The Bahamas would
receive its allocation by the end
of November having to be
reassessed.
On October 25, Dr Minnis
told The Tribune that the Min-
istry of Health had been told it
could get enough doses of the
vaccine against the potentially
deadly swine flu to protect
250,000 people.
Despite changes in the pro-
duction schedule, Dr Minnis
said yesterday that the govern-
ment is expecting to receive the
same quantity of doses but the
likely date of arrival has now
been delayed to "possibly Jan-
uary."
In the United States, local
health authorities have spoken
of supplies of the HIN1 vac-
cine "trickling in" due to pro-
duction delays. Reports have
focused on the need for the
"antiquated" production sys-
tem, which relies on millions of
chicken eggs in which the viral
material is grown using tradi-
tional methods.
Health Minister Dr Minnis
said the number of cases detect-
ed in The Bahamas has
remained at 41 for some time
now.
Workshops conducted by the
Ministry of Health with the
Ministry of Education in New
Providence and the Family
Islands have been credited with
helping to keep the virus under
control in The Bahamas.
"Schools have been very
proactive in dealing with any
flu like symptoms," said Dr
Minnis.
He added: "We'll be com-
municating with Pan-American
Health Organisation (PAHO)
and the World Health Organi-
sation (WHO) regularly to
determine exactly how produc-
tion is coming along and where
we and other countries stand


(in terms of receiving the vac-
cines."
"In the meantime we will
continue our surveillance
processes."
The health minister also rec-
ommended that people protect
themselves by getting the regu-
lar anti-flu vaccine, which can
help boost immunity generally
as well as protecting against
seasonal flu.


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LET US GIVE THANKS and PRAISE UNTO THE LORD..


Jerome L. Knowles

Cordially invites you and all persons who prayed
for me and with me and all my well wishers,
through my several operations during April to
Aug ust 2009, to join with my family and friends in
a Service of Thanksgiving for the marvelous
works of the Lord!


St. George's Anglican Church
Montrose Avenue
December 2nd, 2009 at 7:00 pm
"Wax.), EiBn


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+


PAGE 8, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


FROM page one Visitor's claims


Sunday the incident was listed as
an "abduction".
"Sometime around 11.33 a.m.
on Saturday, 28th November 2009,
an off duty police officer discov-
ered a male lying in the street on
the Eastern Road and High Vista.
"The male, an American tourist,
informed that he was allegedly
abducted by four males in a black
SUV as he left an ATM machine.
The male informed them that he
was beaten and robbed of an unde-
termined amount of cash and jew-
ellery. "
"Although investigations are
ongoing the police have not been
able to verify the allegations. Inves-
tigations continue," said the
police's first statement.
However, in the update report,


police said that having accounted
for the items alleged to have been
stolen - jewelleryy, credit cards,
wallet and other personal effects"
- during a search of the com-
plainant's room and noting the
absence of injuries sustained dur-
ing the alleged assault, police "are
satisfied that based on the these
findings and other information,
these allegations are not as report-
ed."
Police are continuing their
investigations but warned that
"persons are not allowed to manip-
ulate the police in order to satisfy
their own agendas."
"The Royal Bahamas Police
Force wishes to assure the Bahami-
an public and visitors to our shores
that we take seriously any and all


LOCALNWI


allegations made to the police;
however, it is the responsibility of
the police to ensure that com-
plaints are authentic," the state-
ment, issued by Assistant Com-
missioner of police, Hulan Han-
na, read.
Prior to this development, an
eyewitness who was on the scene
when the American was discov-
ered by the off-duty officer
described how he saw the man
lying by the side of the road, and
when he approached him, found
him to be shaken and incoherent.
"When we were driving towards
him and saw the police car next to
him and the man standing over his
body we assumed he'd been hit by
the car.
"As we went over we realized
that the man was in fact a police
officer. The American then slowly
came to. He sat up and he seemed


very dazed. He said he was dizzy,
had blurred vision and his hands
were shaking uncontrollably.
"He kept saying he couldn't
believe this had happened."
"The police officer was joined
shortly after by a motorcycle cop
and they then asked him questions.
He seemed disoriented the entire
time and said he thought he had
probably been struck over the
head, but at that time he said he
wasn't sure.
"He seemed like he was strug-
gling to be coherent and wasn't
quite sure where he was.
"Eventually he told the officers
that he had woken up two miles
west down the road and had stum-
bled down the street until the end
of High Vista where he collapsed
in grass. He said he'd awakened
there about an hour before after
being kidnapped on Bay Street.


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"He said he had taken a taxi to
Bay Street and was dropped at the
ATM machine where he took out
$500 in cash. He said as he left the
ATM the attackers approached
him. He did not say what hap-
pened to the taxi and he was not
sure what ATM machine he was
taken to. He said he was going to
take a taxi from the waterfront to
go back to his Cable Beach hotel."
From the description the man
gave the police officer, the eyewit-
ness thought he might have been at
Scotia Bank's ATM in Rawson
Square. The eyewitness also won-
dered why the tourist did not go to
the ATM machine just across the
street from Breezes, rather than
uptown to Bay Street.
The 47 year old told this news-
paper that his girlfriend was back
at their Breezes hotel room when
the mugging took place.
"She was worried sick about
what had happened to me," said
the tourist.
After being discovered on the
side of the street, he was taken by
ambulance to the hospital where
he underwent a CT scan to ascer-


trained the extent of his injuries.
"The scan went fine. The only
thing was that my face was
swollen," the man told The Tri-
bune.
The tourist said he was accom-
panied the entire time he was in
hospital by an official from the
Ministry of Tourism, who was
"fantastic."
Asked whether he would
return to Nassau, where he says
he has visited with his company
about five times, the tourist at
first said he "doubts it" but is a
"strong believer in overcoming
things.
"I'll probably will come back
just to prove that I can," he said.
The man who witnessed the
discovery of the tourist by police
said while "this spate of attacks
on tourists is unfortunate it will
hopefully be a wake up call to
the authorities."
"In a way it's a shame that it
takes this sort of thing to happen
to visitors for people to sit up and
notice when Bahamians go
through this sort of thing every-
day."


Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.
Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 Fax: 326-7452



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EXTRA,
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of
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The caidi-dii re w~f'wok ak'n9side the senior minag rerirm
team otow'iead office, assisting inla var~ery of aweo5 stxb
as pvbd1'iC and cumrmer ret~aiun: ma*etirrg, advrrsi5rng.
HR ba s'cfjorikke JxIping.ad v rou jcJrri~irijtri~,v~verfuiv
�uh s ring -nd rurnwizu riori. Much 6 f thecrbrive wn'ii '
office and cornpuder-based.

The candidate should haw the following ikills.-
Gen~rB~ ~m . tor skills iM ic rosaft XP, intLre,5~8
n~etw~rki nq web i itp's,..)
Strong knowvledge of Microsoft Office (Word. Excel,

FarmiliL rity w-ith basic bookkeeping concepts
(particularly Accounts Payable anrd Pe~eivable:

Experiemt-.
The candidate should have experience of office
adminisItratiom. 5pecific ret iI1. wh ol-ac,1c IR or
lbcx.okkempiriq riot hnsn ti a but benlefidalI. Arid itiUridilly�
the candidate must I W vll-pokfLr ,hiqghly qrgaIi5ed
and prorp�iotnM aand Iavea current driver's Iicen~e and
their own transportation.

Applicati-ons are to inclu de: RteLEnt poli L record,
p,,5spoI't phioI, two references. resme, coveringcj ttFl-r
stating wkef elhow specific experience was gained in
11) Microsoft Office (Word, Excel) (10) Any b~ookkeeping
con~eaprt sI i) other saftwwa re progr a you at
experienced /famnilijar with.



2 -I'343C


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


-I







+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009, PAGE 9


LOCALN


Police officer
shot at mall
FROM page one
The officer was standing
with another man near their
vehicle when a car
approached and a man dis-
guised in a ski mask and dark
clothing got out of the car and
opened fire. The police officer
was shot in his right leg, left
knee and right arm while his
friend was shot in his left foot.
The gunman then fled in a
2004 Nissan Maxima with an
accomplice and the injured
men were taken to hospital
in a private vehicle. The
police officer is in hospital in
stable condition while the
other man has been dis-
charged.
Another shooting in the
Kemp Road area occurred
at 4am on Saturday when a
man was shot in his side and
buttocks by two men who
approached in a grey Nissan
Sentra while he was standing
in Periwinkle Lane. The
injured man was taken to
Princess Margaret Hospital
in a private vehicle.
Two teenagers were beat-
en and stabbed by a group
of men in a brazen daylight
attack in Fox Hill and Joe
Farrington Road on Satur-
day. The teenage boys were
approached by the group of
thugs at 1.10pm and after
the stabbing rushed to hos-
pital where they are said to
be in stable condition.
Another brutal daylight
attack took place in Lincoln
Boulevard, Balfour Avenue,
just before noon on Satur-
day when a group of men
attacked a 35-year-old man
with a cutlass.
The thugs reportedly
chopped him in the head
with the weapon and left
him bleeding heavily from
the head wound. He was
taken to hospital by ambu-
lance and is said to be in sta-
ble condition.
The seventh victim of vio-
lence this weekend is in seri-
ous condition after he was
struck in the head with a
pipe by a man known to
him, police say.
Officers on patrol in Sol-
dier Road east found the
man lying in the street with
a head wound at 1.20am on
Saturday. The man was tak-
en to Princess Margaret
Hospital by ambulance
where he is said to be in
serious but stable condition.
Police are appealing for
assistance from the public in
relation to all matters.
Anyone with any informa-
tion which may assist inves-
tigations should call police
urgently on 919 or call
Crime Stoppers anonymous-
ly on 328-TIPS (8477).


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+>


PAGE 10, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009




50th Anniversary Bahamas


Handbook is now in stores


THE TRIBUNE


4ft l

a' .

for the late - �


%Ll



ETHELYN VIRGIMff

"Jean"" PINDER
The famimls of Jcuiin PindCr would Iikc to thank all who
N lift], ricifd OS in Lhr Itiime fuf lurriNi' Itb 1 Ii ~I1ighiEthI�
wonderful cards sent, Ickepkonnccalls. hawsc Vi~ii� and
praivers ofrercd.
,I hi ink.11uk. a u lstoal of Iyo who -cme frth *it h such
deicstration of Ihuman kindncsi be it througOi ilc deliver

Thanks to all those who mande donatiann to both the
Cancer Soxicty ofT1Ke Bahamas and, CGSt. Anne'sAnglican
Church,
L.u'inp. the Mai~riajch of an all mallc family' has been
particularly painful for us, that tenider balance now gomc
p'innrulk m~ik~c�-vn .' risethaL .(mnijhw ihrrig% wll1 never
qUitt lle thlSfiC ~reWitIhUt OUt dear Wife .]Ld mother.
MAY SHE HR:SY IN JPEACE
Dearly miwed biy William, Cr* a nd Perry.


A FRANK and revealing
interview with Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, a sad tale
of murder from the days of
slavery, and the discovery
that the Lucayans were not
the peaceful people we
always thought they were:
these are just a few of the
highlights in the new
Bahamas Handbook for
2010, now in bookstores and
newsstands.
This special collector's edi-
tion begins with a 100-page

PRIME MINISTER Hubert
Ingraham is interviewed in the
new Handbook.


- 1Bethel Brothers Morticians
Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026



HENRY CHARLES WILFRED
McCARTNEY, 66

of #34 Park Avenue,
Gleniston Gardens will
be held on Wednesday,
December 2nd, 10am at
St Barnabas Anglican
t - Church, Wulff &
Baillou Hill Roads. The
Rt Rev'd Laish Boyd,
Rev Fr Enrique
McCartney and Rev
Canon Basil Tynes
assisted by other clergy will officiate.
Interment will follow in St Barnabas Church's
cemetery, Moore Avenue.

He is survived by his loving wife, Norma
Sawyer McCartney; three children, Fr
Enrique and Juan McCartney and Erica
McCartney-Murphy; special daughter, Tanya
McCartney; one daughter-in-law, Brenda
McCartney; one son-in-law, Milton Murphy;
three grandchildren, Milan and Kai Murphy
and Daly McCartney; three sisters, Rosemary
McCartney, Patricia Goz and Pauline
Saunders; four brothers, Dr John McCartney,
Dr James McCartney, Reginald and Wilfred
McCartney; numerous nieces and nephews,
and a host of other relatives and friends
too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel
Brothers Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on
Tuesday from 10am to 6pm and on
Wednesday at the church from 9am until
service time.


rel, - -
s i, l h, l
the 51i
yC 1i1t II1,11
ha\ .c cinic
and M1k cInlCc
E11nn-111 DiiupuIch
Jr Ptubllic llilns
launclhcd ith Hind-
bookk in t 1n1l The
seci 111n 111 iC s h1-11
dc s lolpminm iol The
B.jllinll\, ci li h',s Il\c
dec cidc, J"Ji1n11i hi ckdi, ip
of some ot the most dramat-
ic events of the past half-cen-
tury.
Filled with choice excerpts
and stunning photographs
from 50 years of publishing,
this 100-page section shows
how the Bahamas trans-
formed itself from a backwa-
ter colony in the British
Empire to a proudly inde-
pendent nation, a premier
tourist destination and a glob-
al financial centre.
Prime Minister Ingraham
talks candidly about his life,
from his strict upbringing in
Abaco to the highest post in
the land. He recounts that
then Prime Minister Sir Lyn-
den Pindling promoted him
to Cabinet rank only to
abruptly fire him in the midst
of a massive drug and cor-
ruption scandal in the 1980s.
Readers are introduced to
"Poor Black Kate," a slave
girl whose wrongful death in
1826 sent her owners to
prison in Nassau and added
powerfully to the abolition-
ist movement in England.
Another feature concerns
the late Amos Ferguson, the
Bahamas' famous intuitive
artist, who says he became a
painter only after God chided
him for not using the talent
he had been given.
This year's 738 page Hand-
book is a delight for the curi-
ous. Find out why archeolo-
gists now believe the
Lucayans, formerly thought
to be non-violent, actually
performed human sacrifices.
Environmental concern
provides the back story for
several of the Handbook's
offerings this year. One arti-
cle explores how ground-
breaking technology could
convert the islands' garbage,
sunlight, winds and ocean
currents into clean, abundant
energy. Nature lovers will
enjoy a feature on the variety
of bizarre plants and animals
that thrive in ecosystems just
behind the beaches of Grand
Bahama.
On another tack, The
Handbook asked leaders in
banking, tourism and educa-
tion to predict what The
Bahamas might look like in
the years ahead. Among oth-
er things, they believe today's
demands for environmental
responsibility and sector-spe-
cific tourism will grow; that
coins and paper currency
may disappear completely;
and that The Family Islands


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED
22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas





Flight Lieutenant
GEOFFREY FRANCIS
ANTHONY SADLER, M.B.E.

Founder and Vice
Patron of the
Royal Society of
R St. George,
,Nassau, Bahamas
who died in
Nassau, Bahamas
, on Saturday, 7th
November, 2009
(Armistice Day
8th November,
2009 1:00 a.m.
GMT), will be
held in Nassau at
St. Francis Xavier
Cathedral, West
Street, Nassau on Thursday, 3rd December, 2009
at 3:00 p.m.

Rev. Kendrick Forbes will officiate and interment
will follow in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John
F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau.

He is survived by his wife, Chieko Sadler, their
daughter Gloria and their granddaughters Monique
Thomson and Tanya Webber.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the
Police Dependent Fund, P.O. Box N.458, Nassau
or The Bahamas Cricket Association, P.O. Box
N.16101, Nassau


IN MEMORY OF


FLT. LT. GEOFFREY FRANCIS
ANTHONY SADLER, M.B.E.


SLAVE GIRL Kate, whose wrong-
ful death in 1826 sent her owners
to prison in Nassau.

may become vibrant business
hubs interconnected by high-
speed ferries. Still another
examines what The Bahamas
is doing to prepare for the
impact on tourism when the
United States ends its embar-
go of Cuba.
All this and much more
await readers within the
pages of this special 50th
anniversary issue of The
Bahamas Handbook.
For more information, con-
tact Etienne Dupuch Jr Pub-
lications Ltd at 242-323-5665.







FROM page one
signaling the conclave's
significance.
In their Declaration fol-
lowing the Session, Com-
monwealth Heads said,
"Climate change is the
predominant global chal-
lenge. We convened a Spe-
cial Session on Climate
Change in Port of Spain to
discuss our profound con-
cern about the undisputed
threat that climate change
poses to the security, pros-
perity, economic and
social development of our
people."
Commonwealth Heads
affirmed their recognition
of "the unprecedented
opportunity of their meet-
ing" just ahead of the 15th
Conference of the Parties
to the UN Framework
Convention on Climate
Change in Copenhagen.
"We approach Copen-
hagen with ambition, opti-
mism and determination,"
they stated.
"The needs of the most
vulnerable must be
addressed. Their voice
must be heard and capaci-
ty to engage strength-
ened. Many of us from
small island states, low-
lying coastal states and
least developed countries
face the greatest chal-
lenges, yet have con-
tributed least to the prob-
lem of climate change."
Regarding the Copen-
hagen Conference, Com-
monwealth Heads stressed
their belief that the forging
of an internationally legal-
ly binding agreement "is
essential".
"We pledge our contin-
ued support to the lead-
ers-driven process guided
by the Danish Prime Min-
ister and his efforts to
deliver a comprehensive,
substantial and opera-
tionally binding agreement
in Copenhagen leading
towards a full legally bind-
ing outcome no later than
2010," they said.
Prime Minister Ingra-
ham and his delegation
returned to Nassau from
Trinidad on Sunday night.


A/fwflyf


Cecelia Ane


0,Grmt

March 29, 1930- November 29, 20U7




TI",k you God fur blebng us with a metbe that is bily lovely.
WaidS Can I" &W de i~the pain, the grid,.the joy we, fiMe
Oh Mommwyit is h soreal. two years[M y It's stillso hard
Wntoci have you here, in eveiy wany.
BuA you're still here with tus ach day
For in. our heart5you will always s~tay.
So mommy take your rest,
vm do Iknow, we amtruly bkessd.
Thank you Jesus
Thank 'iou eu
Thank you Jesus
Cliildr~rfl. Vrnia, Artrea, Austin. Rvb-ri. Kihlft~n (Kuv) anid Joy
gxandhildrrn. family and frkicns.


Yff w 11
4000y,







+


pA Swift

12-medal

haul...
Seepage 12


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009


14*Tasigrto aestotte


MAHESH BHUPATHI
(right) and Mark Knowles
play Bob and Mike Bryan of
the United States during
their ATP World Tour Finals
doubles match at the 02
Arena in London Saturday...
(AP Photo: Sang Tan)








Knowles and


BASKETBALL
BSA ACTION


THE Bahamas Scholastic
Association is slated to con-
tinue its basketball regular
season today at the Tom 'The
Bird' Grant Sports Complex
with the following games on
tap, starting at 3:30 pm:
Teleos vs Mt Carmel
(junior boys); Teleos vs
Cherub (senior boys); Her-
itage Christian vs Mt Carmel
(junior and senior boys) and
Galilee vs Lyford Cay (senior
boys)
BASKETBALL
GSAAA ACTION
Government secondary
schools are set to continue
their regular season action
today at 4 pm. The senior girls
and boys are set to play at
the D W Davis Gymnasium
and the junior girls and boys
at the C I Gibson Gymnasi-
um.
BASKETBALL
BAISS ACTION
THE Bahamas Association
of Independent Secondary
Schools is slated to continue
their regular season action
today at 4 pm on the various
high school courts with the
junior girls and senior boys.


unupaini spit


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
After roaming
the ATP
Tennis Tour
as the third
best team in
the world this year, Mark
Knowles and his Indian dou-
bles partner Mahesh Bhu-
pathi have abandoned their
two-year partnership.
The break-up came at the
conclusion of the Barclays
ATP World Tour Doubles
Championship in London,
England, where they were
unable to surpass their rank-
ings and seeding.
They did, however, advance
to the semifinal at the 02 Sta-
dium where they got elimi-
nated by American identical
twin brothers Bob and Mike
Bryan, who went on to win
the title and eventually over-
take Daniel Nestor and
Nenad Zimonjic for their fifth
year-ending No.1 ATP rank-
ing.
"Obviously we had a great
start to the match, got an ear-
ly break, but unfortunately
Mahesh was sick in bed for
the past two days with the


KNOWLES AND BHUPATHI (AP)
flu," said Knowles.
"They were able to win the
first set, but after we had
some chances in the second
set, they broke Mahesh again
in the last game. So they
played a good solid game. We
just didn't get over the hump.
We were hit with a curve ball
due to Mahesh's health. But
they are a great team."
Although they felt they too
had a great partnership,
Knowles and Bhupathi, who
only won one tournament this
year but were in the final of
both the Australian and the
US Open where they lost to
SEE NEXT page


m


Destroyers rout Warriors 40-0


By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net
IN a rematch of week one's
blowout, the Defence Force
Destroyers repeated the feat
yesterday to keep the Tripoint
Kingdom Warriors winless on
the year.
The Destroyers moved to
2-2 on the season with a 40-0
win over the Warriors yester-
day at the D W Davis field in


CAFL play.
The Destroyers took the
first meeting between the two
teams 38-0 and seemed just
as unstoppable in the out-
come.
With little ball movement
on either side of the field in
the opening half, the Destroy-
ers strung together two suc-
cessful drives to take a 14-0
lead at the half.
In the third quarter, the
Defence Force picked up the


scoring intensity with four
touchdowns.
Quarterback Brian Ander-
son tossed a pair of touch-
downs and the Defence Force
added a pair of rushing touch-
downs to put the game out of
reach.
The Warriors failed to
move the ball on the first pos-
session and after a turnover
on downs, the Destroyers
SEE page 14


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PAGE 12, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Knowles and Bhupathi split | -


FROM page 11
the Bryans and the team of
Lukas Dlouhy and Leander
Paes respectively, are calling it
quits.
And Knowles noted that
just as painful as the loss was,
it's even more disappointing
that they have to sever their
tie together.
"After we lost at the US
Open, we decided that we had
a great year, but it will prob-
ably be better for us to move
on and play with somebody
else," Knowles said.
"We had a relatively good
two years, but we fell short of
our goals. After losing the US
Open final, we just felt that
at this stage in our career, we
should move on if we're not
going to be able to win the
Grand Slams."
While Knowles, 38, will
now team up with American
Mardy Fish, who he won
Regions Morgan Keegan


Championship title in Mem-
phis, Tennessee, in February,
Bhupathi will pair up with
Max Mirnyi next year.
"I think it's going to be a
good upside because he's a
great singles player who wants
to make his mark in doubles,"
Knowles said. "So I think it's
going to be a really great
future. I'm looking forward
to it."
Injury
Fish, still nursing a slight
injury, is expected to play his
first match with Knowles in a
new partnership starting on
January 11 when they travel
to Sidney, Australia, to com-
pete in the Medibank Inter-
national.
The tournament is a pre-
lude to the Australian Open,
the first Grand Slam of the
year. Knowles won the title
there in 2002 with Daniel
Nestor, whom he broke up


more than an 11-year part-
nership in 2007.
"His biggest concern is his
health and getting back to 100
per cent," Knowles pointed
out. "Hopefully he's fit,
health-wise, to play when we
get started next year. That's
our biggest concern right
now."
Knowles is expected to
arrive home today as he con-
tinues his preparation for the
hosting of his ninth annual
Celebrity Invitational this
weekend at the National Ten-
nis Centre.
"Now it's time to put the
rackets down and look for-
ward to the charity event
where I'm making a differ-
ence in the community," he
stated.
"We have a great event
planned for this year and so
I'm really excited about it. I'm
excited about coming home
and second of all, I'm really
excited about the event."


MEMBERS of the SWIFT swimming club...


A Swift 12-medal haul


TEN members of SWIFT
swimming club racked up 12
medals at the Winter Swim-
ming Championships in Plan-
tation, Florida.
With medals being awarded
for the top 10 places, 1,295
swimmers and 59 teams,
SWIFT made its presence
known.
The 10 swimmers repre-
senting the club were Zack
Moses, Laura Morley, Simone
Sturrup, Albury Higgs, Crys-
tal Rahming, Abigail Lowe,
Doran Reed, Kaitlyn Kemp,
Peter Morley and Alec Sands.
The swimmer of the meet


for Swift was Zack Moses
with five medals. He was 2nd
in 500 free - 5:20.05, 3rd in
200 free - 2:02.42, 3rd in 200
IM - 2:18.53, 4th in 50 Breast
- 33.77, 4th in 100 Breast -
1:13.33. Zack also qualified
3rd in the 100IM- 1:05.66, and
7th in the 100 Free- 57.96 but
did not swim the finals in
those two events.
Laura Morley won three
medals with a 4th place fin-
ish in the 100 Breast in
1:11.64, 4th in the 200 Breast -
2:34.75,and 7th in the 50
Breast - 33.36.
Simone Sturrup got 5th in


the 50 free- 26.89, and 7th in
the 50 Fly - 29.91.
SWIFT also had 4 relays in
the 11-12 old girls division.
The relay was made up of
Simone Sturrup, Crystal Rah-
ming, Doran Reed, and Kait-
lyn Kemp who finished in the
top 10 in the 4x50 free relay
with an 8th place finish.
Approximately 90 per cent
of the swims were PBs (per-
sonal bests).
The next focus for many of
the swimmers will be repre-
senting the Bahamas at the
Carifta Games in Jamaica
during April, 2010.


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+


TRIBUNE SPORTS


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009, PAGE 13


l Outstanding Roadrunners awarded at annual banquet


BASKETBALL
COOPER WINS MVP

GRAND Bahamian
Leon Cooper pumped in
a game high 28 points to
lead the Sunrise Christ-
ian Academy to a 48-41
win over Mansfield Tim-
berview in the Boys Divi-
sion 1 championship
game at the 29th Fantasy
of Lights Basketball
Tournament.
The tournament was
played in Wichita Falls,
Texas.
Cooper, a former play-
er with the St George's
Jaguars coached by Dar-
rell Sears, was named the
most valuable player and
he joined Raphael Akpe-
jiori and Janis Matulis on
the All-Tournament
team. Akpejori is a 6-9
signee with the Miami
Hurricanes.
Sunrise, from BelAire,
Kansas, improved to 4-0,
while Timberview,
ranked No 10 in Class 4A
and a state tournament
team a year ago, dropped
to 5-1.


BASKETBALL
CATHOLIC
PRIMARY
SCHOOLS

CATHOLIC primary
schools are scheduled to
continue their regular sea-
son action today with a
double header on tap
starting at 3:15 pm.
Defending champions
St Bede's Sparks are set
to take their undefeated
record on the road to face
the St Cecilia's Strikers
and Our Lady's Blue
Flames are also expected
to travel to play the
Xavier's Giants.


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ABIAH Missick and Jenero
Knowles were once again
awarded the Dominique Hig-
gins Awards as the most out-
standing student-athletes at the
Roadrunners Track Club's 10th
annual awards and presenta-
tion banquet.
The awards were among
more than 60 presented Satur-
day night at the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort & Crystal Palace
Casino as the track club hon-
oured the athletes for their per-
formances during the past track
and field season.
But there was no greater
reward that night than the acco-
lades heaped upon club presi-
dent and head coach Dexter
Bodie by Grand Bahamian
businessman Basil Neymour.
Neymour gave his remarks
just before Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture Desmond
Bannister presented the
keynote address. The only thing
Neymour felt short of doing in
his remarks was naming Bodie
as the coach of the year.
"The real heroes in this coun-
try are people like Dexter who
work for nothing to make sure
that young boys and girls
become decent citizens of this
country," he said.
Neymour, whose parents
died when he was at an early
age, said the children in the
club are very fortunate to have
their parents and a coach like
Bodie, whose parents were in
attendance to support him.
"When you have a young
man like Dexter come along,
please hold his hand," said Ney-
mour, who made a number of
Biblical comparisons to Bodie
and the role he's playing in the
club.
Neymour said Bodie is the
real Bahamian hero and he
encouraged the youngsters,
rather than looking up to
Michael Jordan and Tiger
Woods, to take a real good look
at Bodie as one who has and is
demonstrating his commitment
and dedication to the growth
and development of many peo-
ple.
Turning to Bannister, whom
he spent the past three days
attending two other functions
in Grand Bahama and Andros,


Jenero Knowles


Neymour said when the gov-
ernment looks for people to
honour, Bodie should be put
on the list for consideration.
Bannister said he has made it
a point to be a part of the annu-
al awards presentation because
it's the only club in the
Bahamas to take the time out
to recognize its athletes the way
the Roadrunners do. "You are
doing a wonderful job with all
of them," Bannister said. "The
results, you may not see for
many years, but you are helping
them to become productive cit-
izens in this country."
And he also commended
Bodie for the vision that he has
because more than ever, the
country needs "more Dexters,
who are not looking out for
himself, but looking out for the
development of our children."
The top awards of the night
were presented by Higgins'
father, David. It was an award
presented to the student-ath-
letes with the highest grade
point award.
Higgins was an exceptional
student-athlete who is now in
medical school in the US.
Knowles, a 3.87 GPA grade
nine student, regained the title
he won two years ago.
"It feels good to know that I
have done it again, but I'm
going to try and do it every
year," said Knowles, who com-
petes in the 100 to the 400
metres. "But I'm very excited
to win it again this year."
Missick, a 3.97 student at
Faith Temple, said he knew
that he would win it again. "I
feel good," said the 11-year-old
seventh grader who runs the
sprints as well.
Among the other awards
presented were the Athletes of
the Year.


Abiah Missick


They went to the following:
Girls - Carliyah Sanders
(Under-9); Carnesha Nixon
(Under-11); Felicity Dorsett
(Under-13); Sara Mackey
(under-17) and Krysten Black
(open).
Boys - Stephon Bowe
(under-9); Branson Rolle
(Under-11); Malik Francis and
Recarno Nixon (under-13);
Xavier Coakley and Jenero
Knowles (under-15); Ojay Fer-
guson (under-17) and Phillip
Stubbs (open).


* Most outstanding athletes
Girls - Alexicia Williams (U-
9); Ashley Williams and
Shakara Whymms (U-11); Phil-
iane Sargent (U-13); Charlize
Dean (U-15); Edvania Missick
(U-17) and Stephanie Stubbs
(open).
Boys - Miguel Bethel (U-11);
Dominic Nairn and Ulrick
McIntosh (U-13); Rayford Rig-
by, Bennett Hall and Demitir
Forbes (U-15); Javon Rolle (U-
17) and Derick Ferguson and
Navante Lamm (open).


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PAGE 14, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Destroyers rout Warriors 40-0 r
responded with an 80-yard touch- touchdown for the final score. Ra S f g u a t
down drive, all on the ground. The Destroyers lost at the hands
After a successful conversion, they of the V8 Fusion Stingrays in week


led zu-u.
Anderson tossed his second
touchdown pass of the day and his
team took a 26-0 lead.
The veteran quarterback's third
touchdown pass of the day and con-
version resulted in a 34-0 lead and
the Destroyers added a late rushing


three and the Orry J Sands Pros in
week five, while the Warriors await
their first win of the season coming
of an historic playoff berth in the
2008-09 season.
The Destroyers are scheduled to
face the Stingrays next week while
the Warriors will enjoy a bye.


takes two titles


TRANSFIGURATION
won the final two pennant
titles Saturday and the rest of
the playoff picture was com-
pleted as the Baptist Sports
Council gets set for the start
of the best-of-three series on
Tuesday night at the Banker's
Field at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex.
Transfiguration, the
defending men's champions,
knocked off St Mark's 9-2 to
complete the president divi-
sion with a perfect 4-0 record
and is scheduled to play the
same team 7pm Tuesday in
the first of three games. St
Mark's finished fourth at 1-3.
Transfiguration also


SOFTBALL

wrapped up the 17-and-under
pennant with a 17-1 rout over
St John's. They ended the sea-
son at 4-1 and are set to play
fourth place Macedonia, who
were 3-2.
The other half of the series
will pit defending champions
Temple Fellowship second at
4-1 against third place Golden
Gates, who were 3-2.
The 17-and-under playoffs,
however, will not be contest-
ed until December 12.
Transfiguration joined
Golden Gates, who won both


the men's vice president and
co-ed president pennants and
St Paul's, winners of the co-ed
vice president pennant.
Both the men and co-ed
have two rounds of the play-
offs to complete, starting
Tuesday night.
Results of the other games
played on Saturday are as fol-
lows:
Temple Fellowship def.
Faith United 19-7 (17-and-
under); Temple Fellowship
def. Faith United 13-3 (Men);
St John's def. Faith United
40-16 (Co-ed); St Paul's def.
Calvary Deliverance 8-3
(Men) and Golden Gates def.
Salem 15-2 (Men)


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to creatively develop and implement sales building programs.

Candidates should:

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St. Paul's
Temple Fellowship
St. John's
Faith United
Tuesday night: 7 pm - Men's
President - Transfiguration
(pennant winners) vs St. Mark's
(fourth place 1-3); 8 p.m. Co-Ed
President - Golden Gates (pen-
nant winners 3-0 vs Ebenezer
(fourth place 1-2); 9 p.m. Men's
President - Temple Fellowship
(second 3-1) vs Calvary Bible
(third place 2-2)
Thursday night: 7 p.m. Co-
Ed Vice President - St. Paul's
(pennant winners 2-1) vs Faith
United (fourth place 1-2); 8
p.m. Men's Vice President -
Golden Gates (pennant win-


W L Pct. GB


1,000
.750
.500
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.333

1,000
.600
.600
.400
.400
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.80
.600
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1,000
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.333


2 1
2 1
1 2
1 2
ners 5-0) vs Calvary Deliver-
ance (fourth place 2-3); 9 p.m.
Men's Vice President - St.
Paul's (3-2) vs Macedonia
(third place 3-2).
Saturday afternoon: 3 p.m.
Co-Ed President - Salem (sec-
ond place 1-2) vs Macedonia
(thrd place 1-2); 4 p.m. Co-Ed
Vice President - Temple Fel-
lowship (second place 2-1) vs
St. John's (1-2).


.666
.666
.333 1
.333 1
5 p.m. Men's President - Cal-
vary Bible (third place 2-2) vs
Temple Fellowship (second
place 3-1); 6 p.m. Men's Vice
President - Macedonia (third
place 3-2) vs St. Paul's (second
place 3-2); 7 p.m Co-Ed Presi-
dent - Ebenezer (fourth place 1-
2) vs Golden Gates (pennant
winners 3-0); 8 p.m. Men's Pres-
ident - St. Mark's (1-3) vs
Transfiguration (pennant win-
ners 4-0).


ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


Teams
Men's President Division
Transfiguration
Temple Fellowship
Calvary Bible
St Mark's
Faith United
Men's Vice President Division
Golden Gates
St Paul's
Macedonia
Calvary Deliverance
Salem
Mt. Carey
17-And-Under Division
Transfiguration
Temple Fellowship
Golden Gates
Macedonia
Faith United
St. John's
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Salem
Macedonia
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7Th


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009, PAGE 15


* CALNEWS


FROM page one

Public Affairs for Atlantis said:
"An altercation occurred in Aura
late Saturday evening between
three Bahamian patrons and a
person or persons reported to be
guests of Harborside.
"Two of the Bahamian patrons
received injuries. Based on initial
reports, they were treated and
released."
Mr Fields said Atlantis security
"brought the matter under con-
trol immediately, and other Aura
patrons enjoyed the remainder of
the evening without any further


Tourists taken
into custody
incident."
Atlantis are "working with
police who are investigating the
matter," he
A police report on the incident
said that officers received an
anonymous call at around 12.57am
informing them of a stabbing at
the Atlantis hotel.
"Police responded and spoke
with a 43-year-old male who
reported that while at the night
club in Atlantis, he got into an
altercation with another male who
stabbed him in the abdomen. The


male was taken to hospital where
he is listed in stable condition."
The statement said that police
are investigating the incident.
Recounting the evening's
events, the local man told The Tri-
bune that he and his friend arrived
at the club shortly after midnight.
He said that it was around 45
minutes to an hour later that his
friend bumped into the Ameri-
cans as he moved through the
nightclub.
"There was a scuffle and I went
to (his friend's) assistance because
(he and the tourist) were sort of
getting ready to trade blows. I got
the guy off him and wrestled him


to the ground and then security
sort of broke us up, but I felt this
pain in my hand, which turned out
to be a stab wound.
"The staff took us into a med-
ical room at Aura and my friend
was all covered in blood. The girl
asked where did all that blood
come from and my friend lifted
up his shirt and he'd been stabbed
as well."
Apart from receiving stitches,
the expatriate underwent tests in
hospital to ensure that there was
no organ damage. The sharp
object had penetrated him "just
above the stomach," said his
friend.


The Bahamian man speculated
that the offending object may have
been a "nail file or something like
a boxcutter."
He thinks the assailant in the
incident could have been the
female tourist, who was "very
aggressive" while her boyfriend
was fighting with the two men.
The two locals were taken by
security into a room where they
were asked to identify the Amer-
ican man who they alleged had
initiated the fight.
However, although the man still
had his hair in a distinguishing
Mohawkk" style, other aspects of
his appearance had changed some-


what, leading the men to question
whether it was the right person.
No weapon was found on his per-
son.
"Later, the Aura manager
called and said they'd looked at
the cameras and that's definitely
the guy," said the Bahamian.
The injured man said he
believes incidents such as the
attack on him and his friend will
become more common as
Bahamian hotels lower their prices
to attract bookings.
"They've dropped their prices
so much they're getting the old
riff-raff, the low-life, the trailer
trash," said the man.


Ma king award presentations to the honourees were Tanya McCartney, Managing
Director, RBC FINCO and Nathanlel Beneby, Jr., Vice President and Country Head, RBC.


Seated t-r: Camille Johnson, Margueite Iohnson, Midlean Basden, Margaret Carroil,
Blondell Ferguson and Judy Lockhart. Standing:Tanya McCartney and Nathaniel Beneby, r.


Seated 1-r: Patrice Iones, ulie Cooper, Caroline Turnq uest. Sylvie Carey,
LaVerne Major, and Sarah Wlliamson.
Standing: Tanya McCartney, Origin Deleveaux, Kathy Langley and Nathaniel
Beneby, Jr.


Seated I-r: Tanya McCartney, Ruby Stracan, lanice Curry. Margaret Hield
and Nathaniel Beneby, Jr.


Seated 1-r; Jete (umberbatch, Tracey Gray, Charmaine McPhee, Mary
Christie and Natasha Rolle.
Standing Tanya McCartreyand Nalhaniel Beneby, Jr.


Seated t-r: Kimberley Bain, Jacqueline Brown, Melrn Cooper, Gertrude
Neely, Janet Dorsett, Patrice Ritchie, Miriam Bain and Patrenda Whylly,
Standing: Tanya McCartney and Nathaniel Beneby, Jr.


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009, PAGE 17


LOCALN


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PAGE 18, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNWI


FR. JUDE EDOMWONYI, President San Salvador Christian Council in a group photo with the contes-
tants, judges and chairperson.


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WINNERS of the junior category, senior category and Fr. Jude Edomwonyi, President San Salvador
Christian Council.


Students get public


speaking experience

Competition topic was 'No Place for Gambling in My Community'


In an endeavour to make
available an opportunity for
high school students to gain
public speaking competition
experience and to provide
interesting educational and
social programmes for the
general public, The San Sal-
vador Christian Council
hosted their second annual
public speaking competition
at Saint Augustine's Angli-
can Church, San Salvador
on Saturday, November 21,
2009.
The topic of the competi-
tion was 'No Place for Gam-
bling in My Community.'


The competition was offi-
cially declared open by the
President of the San Sal-
vador Christian Council, the
Reverend Father Jude
Edomwonyi. The Chief
Judge for the event, Dr.
Thomas A. Rothfus, of the
College of the Bahamas, was
pleased with the level of
intellectual creativity
demonstrated by the con-
testants.
In her remarks, Mrs. Ter-
rece Bootle-Bethel, Admin-
istrator for Rum Cay and
San Salvador District Coun-
cil encouraged members of


the San Salvador Christian
Council to continue in the
trend of making construc-
tive contribution in the com-
munity. The proud sponsors
of the competition are
Bahamasair Holdings and
Cat Island Air Ltd.
The winners at the junior
category are Wenzlea
Dorsett (1st place), Alexis
Knowles (2nd place) and
Brittany Lundy (3rd place).
The winners at the senior
category are Brethel Light-
foot(lst place), Nachea
Smith (2nd place) and Ken-
rea Whitfield (3rd place).


FR. JUDE EDOMWONYI, President San Salvador Christian Council and Brethel Lightfoot, 1st place
winner of the Senior category.


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009, PAGE 19


NASSAU, BAHAMAS -- Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest welcomes
Ambassador of the United States of America Her Excellency Nicole Avant during a cour-
tesy call at Cabinet Office, Monday, October 26.

OVERSEAS NEWS

Haiti electoral council bans prominent

party from 2010 legislative elections
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti formed around President disqualified its candidates o


Haiti's electoral council has
banned the influential party
of exiled former President
Jean-Bertrand Aristide from
next year's legislative elec-
tions, according to Associat-
ed Press.
The Fanmi Lavalas party,
which remains a major party
with support from the capi-
tal's urban poor, is among 17
groups barred from Febru-
ary's elections because they
submitted improper docu-
ments. The list includes the
Lespwa movement that


Rene Preval when he ran for
president in 2004. Aristide,
who has been living in exile in
South Africa after he was
overthrown during a 2004
rebellion, called the decision
to eliminate Lavalas "an elec-
toral coup d'etat."
He spoke in an interview
late Wednesday with Radio
Solidarite.
Lespwa officials did not
answer phone calls seeking
comment on Thursday.
The Lavalas party boy-
cotted Senate run-off elec-
tions in June after the council


a technicality, and was barred
from 2006 presidential elec-
tions. Lavalas executive coun-
cil head Maryse Narcisse told
The Associated Press on
Thursday she did not under-
stand why the party was
rejected.
The council approved 53
parties to run in the elections.
The vote is now scheduled for
Feb. 28, but might be post-
poned to coincide with presi-
dential elections later in the
year.
Rejected parties can
appeal.


Ambassador of the USA Nicole Avant
pays courtesy call at Cabinet Office


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PAGE 20, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


All Exuma Association honours two 'outstanding



members' at its 20th anniversary celebration


PICTURED FROM LEFT TO RIGHT ARE MEMBERS OF THE INCOMING EXECUTIVE: ( FRONT ROW:) Ivy Charlton chaplain, Inez Smith Asst. Treasurer, Margaret Woodside
Treasurer, Shirley Rolle Secretary, Beth Stewart Asst. Secretary, and Donnalee Bowe director;
(BACK ROW:) Livingstone Barr Director, Clyde Rolle director, Alfred Bullard Incoming President, Danny Strachan director, Randy Curtis Vice President, and Warren L, Rolle
outgoing president.


It was at a gala banquet
held at Workers House on
Saturday 7th November
2009 that the All Exuma
Association paid tribute to
its hard working members
for the past twenty years of
accomplishment.
Cited for special honours
were Mr. Danny Strachan
and Mr. Clyde Rolle.
Both long serving mem-
bers from inception of the
Association Danny and
Clyde as they are affection-
ately known have been
directors of the group for
almost all of that time.

Special
But it was for their spe-
cial work as Commodore
and Vice Commodore
respectively of the National
Family Island Regatta over
the last seventeen (17) years
that they were honoured.
Assuming responsibility for
the production and execu-
tion of the then "Out Island
Regatta" in 1989, the all
Exuma Association over the
last twenty (20) years
through these two directors
gave yeoman's service in the
growth and expansion of not
only this regatta, but regat-
tas around the islands.
The Association eventu-
ally had the name changed
to the "NATIONAL FAM-
ILY ISLAND REGATTA"
which has become the flag-
ship sailing event annually
in the Bahamas and staged
each year in picturesque
Elizabeth Harbour, George
Town, Exuma.
On hand to witness the
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R T OR e . S . $ 3 E l
BUL-NDSW SESwie g* * , hiq IIe rm$ 5 0 CranRsrcin pl


* I I ' I I I I ' 'I .
(Ill II I 'II -, ,,, a . **
G I bc I .Ste, bisque . fo $9 5

E A N - .... .... .. f $89000


GAS COO TOP - 30 & 36' white , SSte , biqu .. fro $7600


* iiISL * IN U T
ig g' II I *
E RA G - I e lectri c ................. . f $ h
WASHERS* .............. .
STACK ^^^^g^^^^ WAHE/RYR -Ia ............ rm$,50
















We acpViaMatradDicvr&Snrde5 DisononCeiCad
TAYLIR INU ST
S~~~MBIW^^ * J


0 Caribbean
briefs

Trinidad PM
defends high
per capital
pollution
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad
Trinidad's prime minister
said that his small industrial
nation does not bear a major
responsibility for the global
buildup of greenhouse gases,
even if it ranks among the top
10 per capital in carbon emis-
sions, according to Associated
Press.
Patrick Manning, whose
country is hosting dozens of
leaders to discuss climate
change, said the government of
Trinidad and Tobago rejects
any environmental analysis
based on per capital production
of carbon dioxide emissions.
The prime minister spoke to
reporters ahead of the Com-
monwealth Heads of Govern-
ment Meeting in Port-of-Spain.
Resource-rich Trinidad, the
most industrialized nation in
the Caribbean, is one of the
world's leading suppliers of nat-
ural gas and petrochemicals
such as ammonia.
But it has a population of just
1.3 million, about 1,000th that
of China. Trinidad plans to
announce voluntary changes
that will reduce its carbon out-
put, the prime minister said.

Voters reject
new constitution
KINGSTOWN, St. Vincent
The queen of England will
still rule - formally at least -
over the eastern Caribbean
nation of St. Vincent and the
Grenadines, according to Asso-
ciated Press. Nearly 56 percent
of voters rejected a referendum
that would have replaced the
British monarch with a presi-
dent chosen by Parliament,
according to preliminary results
released early Thursday by the
elections commission. Both of
the country's parties want to
replace the queen with a presi-
dent as head of state.
But opposition leaders had
urged voters to reject the pro-
posed constitution, arguing it
did not sufficiently reduce the
powers of the prime minister,
who would remain as head of
government. They also said cit-
izens rather than Parliament
should elect the president.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O










I


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009, PAGE 21


1~ / ~


4.


SHOWN POSING WITH THE SPECIAL HONOREES OF THE NIGHT Danny Strachan (left) and Clyde Rolle
(right) is Sir Durward Knowles, sailing icon and patron of the "Durward Knowles National Junior Sailing
Championships."


FROM page 20
honours bestowed was Sir Durward
Knowles, a sailing icon in his own right and
patron of the Junior sailing programme in
the Bahamas, an activity which was itself
founded by Vice Commodore Clyde Rolle,
and now bears the name the "Durward
Knowles National Junior Sailing Champi-


onship."
Outgoing president Warren L. Rolle in
handing over the reins of the Association to
incoming president Alfred Bullard, thanked
all those who had laboured over the years, or
who had made a contribution to the work of
the Association, and wished for another 20
years of productive and useful service to
the Bahamian community.


+


THE TRIBUNE


Af;�gpa (1 M vSL"T 0~t-T~brib .uLdne greRM gnieawas ..TLR
TODSCS SOIESONTISPAELO N OW.TIUNE24.CO


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+>


PAGE 22, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNW


THESpirit OF


COMPASSION


ACTING in the spirit ot compassion and tnanksgiv-
ing, the Southeastern Division of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force in conjunction with the business com-
munity donated grocery items to four homes, Unity
House, A&E Comfort Care, Nurse Naomi Christie Home
and Twilight Home for the Elderly at the South Beach
Police Station.


1 ~iI:p!~7jlip


Last Name:


Company:
Telephone # Homre:______


First Name:
Title:
Work:


P.O..Box:


Exact Street Address:


BISHOP WALTER HANCHELL (above and below) gives food to resi-
dents of the Wulff Road area during the annual Thanksgiving Luncheon
iat Great Commission Ministries International.


House A _______ House Name: ________


House Colour:
Requested Start Date:


Type of Fence/Wall:


I-


I I n* PfE I PT . rr -Lxx I


SUSCRKEl ERY OF THETRIBUNE AND WAKE UP TO THE BEST NEWSPAPER FOR YOU!! Iilu I uu: rnm ularKe/ riDune StaTT
TODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NT W.TIUE4.O


"J I'
j-
w






+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009, PAGE 5B


Car sales decline


gains pace with


48% fall-off


FROM page 1B
mate, given their expense and
they fact they are not a neces-
sity, so any upturn in the sales
figures over several months
will tend to show the worst is
over for the Bahamas.
Mr Lowe said new models
ordered by BMDA members
for 2010 were "dripping in
slowly" because the industry
had adjusted its order pat-
terns and inventory levels to
cope with lower sales.
"If the economy comes
around quickly, we may find
ourselves short of inventory. I
don't think there's going to


be any quick turnaround,
that's for sure," Mr Lowe told
Tribune Business, even
though BMDA members had
expressed some optimism for
2010 despite the increasingly
flat indications.
The relatively somber out-
look for the BMDA and its
members also does not bode
well for the public finances,
given that new car imports
carry some of the highest
import duty rates, and as such
are major contributors to the
Government's revenues. If
demand is down, imports are
down, with the inevitable con-
sequences of a reduction in


duties and taxes for the Public
Treasury.
"Nobody has large quanti-
ties on order," Mr Lowe told
Tribune Business. "It's not a
boost to government taxes or
government revenues for that
reason. There's no point in
ordering if sales quantities
have dropped by on-half or
one-third.
"There's no need to have
10 months' supply on hand.
You want to reduce your sup-
ply. If our sales have dropped
50 per cent, our orders have
dropped 50 per cent. The
objective is to hold 60-90
days' supply in inventory."


Comfort Suites Paradise


C.T.I.m
P&.him iar, A~ C~~dfrne b


B uIIr I i l Ir., ,Li unii , .I,. , i
THANKSGIVING BLOWOUT SALE :


Unlocking & Rip13,rinN
All Coll Phnes
N4ow U~nlocking I-Phoniw.3CT


MotNrUu IN.I-s
14aet11 1200 - Ssan
NOM 610 - WW3
NPm asi B8- hwcO
QA.Ai7 &V


I Phone 30
iAm�A. -i $I $ ~.O.OE
Blikbmiry Pearl
5279 OD
Appie Ipoft �Isriif
f7mmr$240 00
ffinvie Do S
S249 CO
Tomhbdiu D 'CPkyw
s7l 00
rN Pmuimm Dual
starting AT S 130 00
FIlyNlrtion 2
SI9 00X


ay 1 AIs in 2 0 10ri

1 11. 1 2cI i 2c L.r . -1 N i T CI.IT


F"tts e of a A 1a&n E Acisf ities. Ptis:
Camp limenlaqcy inntableaka.f di

Cablr ~ies wTV Kny-size or two dokible he .s
C~d~ iT ref~er~o~in-room safe,
coffee moike, hkaelye


* Kids 15andnder free
* Pool with swim-p, bar

Limited-time offer! Reserve toIay !
Call 242-363-3680
*$59 per person, per night, dbl occupancy Sun. thru Wed. Rates effective Nov. 2 thru Dec. 18. Add
$20 pp for Thurs. thru Sat. stays. 3rd and 4th additional adults add $40 each per night. Maximum 4
persons per room. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities
and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and subject to availability.
Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a l ... 1.1,11 - .- I


E.S
PARADISE ISLAND
BAHAMAS


L__II


REQUEST FOR




PROPOSAL


Nassau Airport Development Company Limited (NAD) is seeking Proponents (individuals,
consortium or joint venture that must include an experienced retail operators to finance,
design, develop operate and manage general Specialty Retail stores in the new US.
Departures Terminal currently under construction at the Lynden Pindling International
Airport These stores will be world class in design and appearance with a distinctive'sense of
place'and will offer products at competitive price&

Two (possibly three) inline stores hae been identified in the new terminal; the categories are
as follows:

1, T-shirts, golf shirts, hats and related souvenirs and products
21 Other specially real

There will be additional Requests for Proposals issued in early 2010 covering retail kiosks and
carts,

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
i. Proponents must be ahamian and incorporated in The Bahamas.
ii, Proponents must have operated a retail facility within the last three 13) years.

NAD'S GOALS AND OBJECTIVES ARETO:
(al achieve high standard of excellence and customer service;
(b) offer a mix of concepts that will help to enhance the image of the Lynden Pindling
International Airport as a world classairport;
(c) offer retail choices to passngersat reasonable prices;
(d) develop and design retail facilities that complement the qualities of the new terminal
while recognizing the distinctive spirit character and'sense of pace' of The Bahamas; and
(e) optimize revenue to NAD.


SPECIALTY RETAIL SHOPS

NEW U.S. DEPARTURES TERMINAL AT LPIA


"0lF


Qualified and interested par~ies mq pick-up the Request for Prop~osal package at NAD's
A~ces at the reception desk on tht wond floor Domesticnte~natibriaIlTerminal at Lynden
Pind ling Intiernatiorial Airport between the hours of 9:0ani amd 400pmn. from kiremher
33rd to December 7th 2M0. A mandatory pre-propoual brie~rg for th ose who *ae
picked up packages willI be held ai the New NvoIden.e Comm~unity Ceiittm Mek Road
on Wedneday, December 9ith at I1O:00am.


I TODSUSSOISO HSPG LGO OWWTIUE4.O


K


Island


Fall Special Ony }5


per person double occupancy.
.iiiuinm 2-u ijit .siv &ialama. r'&i- io cii!\'


..~' /1'


UyEri~wn JM


Cocorul Grove Plaza-CoconutCrowe
TEL: 326-2355
I m


NAD
Nassau Airport
Development Company


. l"







+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009, PAGE 7B


Don't be 'lax' on trade talks


support and funding that
would improve their export
capacity, positioning them to
take advantage of the EPA's
benefits.
Mr Rolle also called on the
Government and private sec-
tor to take a more proactive
approach to future trade
negotiations, the perception
having been that the
Bahamas' involvement in the
EPA discussions and, indeed,
decision to sign on, had been
very much last minute with
minimal preparation.
Apart from the talks with
Canada on a WTO-compliant
replacement for the current
CARIBCAN trade agree-
ment, the Bahamas has
already begun the accession
process for full membership
in the World Trade Organi-
sation (WTO) and will even-
tually have to partake in a
replacement for the
Caribbean Basin Initiative
(CBI) with its largest trading
partner, the US.
"Sometimes we can be very
lax in our approach to it, and
sometimes last minute in our
preparation to put in these


agreements," Mr Rolle said.
"This is evident in the fact we
were not among the first to
participate" in the EPA talks
with the EU.
Looking at the negotiations
with Canada, Mr Rolle added:
"My concern is that we do not
fall victim to the same hard-
ships we faced early on. I'd
like to see us actively involved
in this from the outset, look-
ing at some of the adjust-
ments we have to make and
seeing how we can benefit
from them."
Ratifying
Apart from actually ratify-
ing the EPA via an Act of
Parliament, the Bahamas will
have to introduce numerous
laws, amended laws and reg-
ulatory bodies to comply with
its obligations under the
agreement. For example, this
nation will have to pass a
competition law, and create
a regulator to deal with
antitrust issues, by 2013.
The Government's pro-
posed National Investment
Act is an attempt to codify in


statute what has largely, to
date, been policy, again with
one eye towards EPA imple-
mentation. Other issues that
the Bahamas will also have to
attend to, apart from eventu-
ally reforming its tax struc-
ture with tariffs removed on
86.9 per cent of EU goods
entering this country by 2033,
are areas such as rules of ori-
gin, anti-dumping and phy-
tosanitary regulations.
In short, there is much for
the Government and the pri-
vate sector to do. Zhivargo
Laing, minister of state for
finance, expressed confidence
that this nation would imple-
ment all its EPA obligations
on time.
"Our implementation plan
has been in place from the
time we initially signed," he
told Tribune Business recent-
ly, "and that included struc-
tures of various inter-govern-
mental groups to address spe-
cific aspects of the agreement
and its implementation.
"We've been working
robustly in terms of putting
in place an implementation
plan for the EPA."


Mr Laing said the Govern-
ment would bring to Parlia-
ment "in due course" legisla-
tion to ratify the EPA and its
obligations, adding: "There
are other pieces of legislation
being done for corporate law,
intellectual property rights
and other areas.
"We're working to ensure
we put in place the legal and
administrative structure to
carry through, and follow


through, on the EPA." Tar-
iff liberalization, along with
other EPA obligations, would
take place over a 20-25 year
period, Mr Laing said, while
there was a "three-year win-
dow" following the EPA's
signing in 2008 that allowed
preparations for its imple-
mentation to be made.
As for CARIBCAN, Mr
Laing said the Government
had "participated in the ini-


tial discussions". He added
that talks between CARI-
COM and Canada were at "a
preliminary stage", and said
he was "quite confident the
negotiations will take a similar
line to the EPA".
The Government, added
Mr Laing, would do "what is
necessary to protect Bahami-
an interests" when it entered
into a new trade agreement
with Canada.


M&E Umited


As a privately-owned, mid-sized Bahamian Company
and the authorized Caterpillar dealer in the Bahamas,
we are seeking candidates for the position of Field
Service Technicians, and candidate for the position


of Electrical Technician.
able to support Caterpilla


The individuals must be
)r Tractors, Excavators,


Wheel Loaders, Backhoe Loaders and other machines


in the Bahamas.


experience in diagnosing, troubleshooting, repairing


of Hydraulics,


Engines and Vehicular Electricity.


Computer skills are also required for this position.
Applicants with formal education in mechanics are
preferred.

Send complete resume with education and work
experience to: M & E Limited, P. 0. Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas, Attention: Human Resources
Department, or email me()me-ltd.com.


Only persons being interviewed for this position
will be contacted.


It-- i I" - " --Y" --"-- "-" -T " - - " - "--Y - " - -- "- " - " -" - "
TDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22.O


T1~7


Applicants must have proven


Call IBA o67-42

Wh py or fr ouis urne.


NASSAU INSURANCE
BROKERS & AGENTS
NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS &AGENTS CO. LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, P.O. Box N-7764 Nassau Tel. 677-6422
A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life




Scotiabank


Caves Village


Retail Sales Center


Our Retail Sales Center facililate all of your
banking needs including:

* Mortgages
* Loans
SCredit Cards
a Drafts and Wire Transfer
SARM Machines for cash transactions
* Friendly Experienced Staff
SPersonalized Banking Experience


-19










MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009


+


a a Xrn mmn


The stories behind the news


I II I



















year, I figured it would be one of the easier
tasks that I had itakenl upon myself as a
l:porI.'l
Tierc C.in'l he anyiiiYnlh It t i Co %L'fl CrsIai
a lboii as finf u it r . pLIil c aICC' I t% ltl ilg I` " [h1tVl
N I I' kII.%L: t 1 'j L I I Lt ISt II% il~JL J I. aII I I I I ) I:IkIIIIC III
I I titr 1 ItiL I? I- t l I 1i t I1 :11 d, t,1tr
'I. hILL pII -I lli L' 111 I lll II LI ll h-' %. 1IliI
I ri till 1a 1 1% ill%. 11- I li, I \prl Id% N I'L \l . hl-
l L ,�- . l l 111 lh i l t 1 iltII icil.I - l -l I ii'liIN


I i~'i ilr I ii tIi. I iii , IL it\, t I I I, L IL4 1%1 Ill ILt ti lil t1% 1
I 11 11 i 1 ,4t I . 1111 11i i Il 1 1 p rILI t . i k IL ll Ii I . 'Ii I-

I 1i. I L : I 1 d , iti 11 i N I Iti .I
.IkII %\Ill Ht : ippr-il.e'l -ll\ ll
|11 i r.t Ii . i t. Itill I. i. 1 11- i ' I l . ilt - I lh ll-l I h .
111l 1l1 t l I il i t.L. .-l IH1 . p l It l
li!Ili l I. IJ \ l. s I i I I I ..I ch MIP l lt . i d I . Lt pp. . 1




li.iil i ll It i l l. ll it . $I
p ild \ll 1". ,, h1.' l l'i\.11 t-11 1
h-l Il h i I ll.1 h-ill . %I d 11. II , 1 l 1 i ls 1 l l !

NI P I , , I I I I L. I L.'II1 I I I I . [Ik I I I I L $ . 1 ; . 1 11 11' !imiijjjjjjjjjjjjjj

A I ct. ,ll I I " III I-L. I I - e 11 11 . I IJ L't .IC
L\ I 1 it . I hl . I - h1 . 111 11 Lil . lllI.I I\hI l IIt 0 ihl I IiIiIiL . I I i



L, It I l I I I L. I I tll i II I I I t I I I I I I I I I 'I i I i . .
SAt. . Il'u . it .I Ig LIL. II| I Io 11 Lu 1 its- 1 h1t1.1 1
I, l lIi, I, I ..\ , l I I I IhI. I i L . I, I .II I .' I -L I










details.H le tn . I, $! III acla p
Butle first, a briefsynopsis ofL thehisteoryc of
Under Calis 1ite pe i11o1 a ini s atio.n\






itheannual budgeI~t providedii for $50,000 toili
be- madH aa ia itbl to M ls ito itwar llds
-11.11 L.ll\ o .iC* I II . liltc .11 I ll lit . .!L \. I, Ills 1 I .iip -
IIi. . \ sIli n d . hlp ! i .111111 . .lli iii i ,1 W lI, 1-!, i



situenc ,e1l. op, en pr ts .lI






The PLP ditlled not povid suchs anallowancesL
dlulr i thl Il Iut Ir!ccn trm I n\ ff.lc c, huw-
Ihv.ie Iw e . b111 et111 g r .ha , s lt et FNML.!
.aI 2i007, s i.H rllst, a ld s1Ic Ilbdg ls1. bl.



proided foillrt $100,000 per yer orMs .t
I, i hl( . I I', d I.' I I i .'t . 1" I _ ll - 1 L.m d !.1 11 _ . 11 1l 1\l









stailtu ies.
!! _ - ,ll it k ll li , al ' l astl _- [.' u!!! I~l . . 11 .1[! l l.



















Inthe 09nu10 budget, whoichd saw cu,00tbck
b crossle oal d in tllhie ateP tofal rev-
.1 1. I. Il l < ! l I I.11 ., 0 11 1[ I l I .1 -
lI.lI,. l L. Ih p .I 1h . 11141 i.ll h, \ I h i.\ ! ...I Ih ll, l'
sa.lt ..\ .d .1 I , L 11 u lh.!u I, , l h a. lil,,.l b itl

l i tll . I ! . kl, \ , ,q h \ I hi . il, u ,Il .\ \\. l,
I .. 11 1.1 1 h t II p ll 1 1 1 .11 1 ..








enuecanldscontinu project u
fullins a honr smq cen s i of gl eo hiecono
ever. wheIn Huber Ingahm' lates.t .N
administrationlt- ok ihe. gove!r.mle, t aganl! i..n




teanabugtprovided for $100,000 prya o ~ to
stituenci eveometpojcs
Ithe 09/0 bi u n pri, wh isch nw alcutwanc



across their board recnt ther fac offalingcev o-
May 2007, and cotirsnud Ioectd re.eue t b-ot
fall aist a coneqefsnopsi of glomyechsonyomi
teanabugtprovided for $100,000 prya o ~ to





conditions, the $4.1 millio hn allocation was
duIS NEnXT ther ---- ret w ic e hw
administhetionrdook the faeovenmn falling ren
enue00, and conirsnud proected reeudetshbort-
provide asaonsequenc0 ero gloyearonomisct
useon ditoscretionaryillionectsocathinhion-wa
In he09/0 ud Et, which pa uacks


Un


The Suzuki APV is perfect
family and aso for the ib
7-sater pasnger-cr
better Wormance, incn
fuel-eficlerncy & all-rounJ
1600 cc engine
A &tomat Traiemlsiglo
4OS ornt
*Jtoy Wheels
a KeyOss Entry (GLS On!
CD Player
* Dual Air Condilioning
* Power Steering
* Power Windows & Dooc


/ The most fuel-efficient passenger bus around!
ct for the
business.
-t -ON-THE-SPOT-F1NANCING II






0.1$O G LS oDEALIR NTHAMAS
* EAST SHIARLE STEEf* 322-775* 325-3079
V_ .s......a..w..uh..I .E......E* u .Sw*.h..n.. 43 .6f
rr LC I G L *rMAb UMatrNdl Dm Mhiay iWd, 3a7-9 16


I


Fmt







+


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


How did MPs spend






the public's money?


NOTICE
RAIDES IN VESTMENTS LTD
Incrrrawd Lrider the Internat~ioal E~i~new Convranies Ad, 21:032
o'f te Commowoolhh cd The Bhanfw
HRelr~rher.Nuirbn 97~361? B
iAcdiuruarr Liquidatiin,�
Nolca:is hereby grnmn Wthe bva-nzihm d Carn~pert Ln
cliwuhon cicminencirg cn, ihe 3151 d~ay aAuqwa, 2009
Ama d Chosr~ak~an h~va been ~duly ragIisnred by1he Rc~psrT~ir
The Liqui~dawr is Dariley Bank &l Trust L',1rie-aSG Harrmbrc'airin 8
rrisied Rhwoee.LitylIsd Buiklirig. Wesq B~ivsra'M. P 0,BoxCS
13319. N:assauThe 1BaI~m~s &F'15 rnanY~arig 2Cl~12Mga9inst lha
abcrue-nwned Cwn~any arereqwtred on ar before the 31 sI c4
E5pieo1Ixi. 20JCO to 'en'd lNw riarresodremz~in ord pnicrutaf of
lhair d~1s or d~lms; to the quhatcUMYcdft Cafnny owIn dofnett
ihereoi Ihew, may be include frown the berieEft cf any diwfnbaipan made





Bairu" EBank itTrust Lwnligd
I-xvdalor
P0 EIv, Bab IL.*MUn
r M~ h Wl~.IOv


. o200o2-200o

........... . . ,,, . . ..... .:.



Cherished memories will always be in the

hearts of your

Mother: Kenya Edwards, father: Elysee Edwards,

sister: Ebony Edwards, grandparents, aunts,

uncles, cousin, other relatives and friends

especially Justin and Jamarlyn and the staff at

One on One Pre-School


You will always remain in our hearts "Dero"


dropped.
Back in better times, MPs
welcomed the funding.
In 2008, Minister of Nation-
al Security, MP for Mount
Moriah, Tommy Turnquest
described it as a "a wonderful
deepening of democracy" that
would give MPs "a real say in
terms of works that can take
place in their constituencies."
MP for Montagu, Loretta
Butler Turner said that while
the money was not enough
for her to fulfil the vision she
has for her constituency, it
would go to good use, and she


0 e1 NO . [SPD- D C* 1 ST


would be "meeting with her
constituents to determine
from them what they deem to
be most necessary and most
critical at this time."
"The money is going to do
a lot of good work in the con-
stituency of Montagu," said
Mrs Butler Turner.
Mrs Melanie Griffin, PLP
MP for Yamacraw, described
the money as a "drop in the
bucket" given the cost of cer-
tain projects, such as a $25,000
price tag on the redevelop-
ment of one of the parks in
her constituency alone.
However, she too admitted
it was a "good idea" on behalf
of the government, and said
she and other MPs would be
likely to have to "sit down
with persons in their commu-
nities and see what the prior-
ities might be and direct the
funds there."
Meanwhile, MP for the
Grand Bahama constituency
of High Rock and Minister of
Housing, Kenneth Russell,
said he would "squeeze blood
out of a stone" and seek to
get "$150,000 or $200,000
worth of work done with that
$100,000.",
In the 2009/2010 budget
debate, some MPs - Neko
Grant, Earl Deveaux, Bren-
sil Rolle spring to mind -
gave a verbal account of how
they had spent their $100,000.
While some simply gave a
list of certain projects the
funds had gone to - com-
puters for schools, fixing pot-
holes, helping community
centres - others gave some
figures, noting certain
amounts were spent on cer-
tain things. However, not all
MPs did, and the details were
far from exhaustive.
In asking for a breakdown
from the Ministry of Finance
of what funds had so far been
disbursed from the treasury
for which projects on behalf
of which MPs, my intention
is that constituency members
would be able to see whether,
in their opinion, the MPs real-
ly did use the money to the
best benefit of their commu-
nities and to "deepen democ-
racy."
Some might say it's a pretty
good litmus test of whether
your representative is in touch
with your area's needs and
perhaps their levels of initia-
tive could be assessed
depending on how soon
they'd got around to using the
funds.
If we are told that a park
was redeveloped, and that it
cost $25,000 from the con-
stituency allowance, con-
stituents would be able to go
to that park and see for them-
selves whether $25,000 worth
of work was done at that park
and whether it was of great
priority.
When I first asked the Min-
ister who I ascertained was
responsible for dealing with
my inquiry, Minister of State
for Finance, Zhivargo Laing,
whether I could find out from
the government how MPs
spent the money, he suggest-
ed I simply ask each of them.
I thought that was a cop-


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


ZHIVARGO LAING

out, that would not provide
the full picture, and so I asked
for more.
Today, after five months,
the fact that I do not have the
information at hand comes
despite my persistence in con-
tacting Mr Laing having
resulted in what those who
were not involved in them
could deem a humorous set
of exchanges whereby I no
longer had to tell the Minister
what it was I was calling about
specifically without him
answering my question. ("Hi
Minister, any chance of get-
ting that information?",
"Very shortly, Alison..." etc).
On at least two of those
occasions I was assured that a
report was in fact ready to be
dispensed.
However, I was later
informed by Mr Laing that I
was never told such a thing,
although a review of my
"sent" box in my e-mail
account reveals that I sent an
e-mail to my editor before I
came into work at midday on
September 9th, telling him to
save space for an article on
the report, after Minister
Laing had promised that
"today's the day" (my words
not his) as well as one to Mr
Laing, informing him that I
would not come into work
until non that day but offering
him our fax number in case
he wished to send the details
prior to my arrival; given that
he had told me the day earlier
to expect this to happen.
On another occasion, the
Minister said the report was at
his office, prepared, but he
was leaving on official duties
abroad. When asked if some-
one else in the Ministry could
send it out on his behalf while
he was gone, he said no, and
promised to deal with it upon
his return.
Casting my memory back
to the earlier days of my ven-
ture, I was assured that the
government was only waiting
for the Ministry of Works to
formally approve certain pro-
jects that MPs had put in
requests to use their funds on.
I was told it was necessary to
wait for this to happen, or else
whatever data I received it
"wouldn't be fair" to the
politicians, as the document
I received would not present a
true and up to date picture of
how they had or had not cho-
sen to spend their funds.
My latest inquiries led me
to be apprised that the cause
for delay is because the data
has been forwarded to the
Prime Minister to review.
Some time before that, I was
told that it must go before
Cabinet.
While some may say the
wait may not signify much,
look at it this way: What I was
really looking for in June was
a document that showed a
time specific snapshot of how
the MPs had spent or not
spent the $100,000 they have
each been allocated.
I can only imagine that
what I am likely to get, if I do
get it, is a document that
includes everything they
would've spent the money on
at that time, plus a number of
other projects they sought
approval for once they knew
that a journalist was seeking
access to that snapshot, and
one that reflects the Prime
Minister's review.
Meanwhile, this five-month
wait is in the hands of the gov-
ernment that prides itself on
"greater accountability and
transparency" than its prede-
cessor administrations. On
many occasions it has been
voluminously forthcoming in
providing important informa-
tion to the public, on others it


INSIGHT I


has not.
The tribulations of this
reporter in seeking to find out
how MP's spent $4.1 million
could be seen to be echoed in
the way in which The Tri-
bune's appeal for the release
of reports on the state of the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre, compiled by psychol-
ogists and social workers in
the wake of alarming reports
of abuse and poor conditions
at the facility, were handled.
In that case, as we have
published several times
before, Minister of State for
Immigration Branville
McCartney promised the
release of the reports in
March of this year and again
in June, stating that they only
had to undergo a "Cabinet
review."
To date, those promised
reports have not been
released and we are simply
assured that improvements
were made at the facility, and
no evidence of abuse was
found, as detainees alleged -
while as recently as Novem-
ber of this year, Jamaican vis-
itor Andrew Dillion wrote to
his government and The Tri-
bune calling for an investiga-
tion into the treatment that
he and others suffered that
month at the "inhumane"
centre where he alleged he
was given little food or water
and left wondering "if anyone
has rights inside these facili-
ties."
I find it unlikely that the
government Mr Laing repre-
sents is seeking to "hide" the
MPs' allowance details in the
truest sense of the word - or
that they would reveal any-
thing scandalous about them-
selves - but right now it cer-
tainly does not appear that
the government places great
priority on releasing them or
much weight on a journalist's
appeal for disclosure, and I
fear that my request has been
or is about to be swept into
the deep, dark vault in which
certain queries made by jour-
nalists in The Bahamas go to
gather dust and die, if you'll
let them.
Recently, Mr Laing, with a
tired look of apparent disdain
on his face, felt it necessary
to tell me there is "no story"
in the fact that I had not got
the information yet.
This assertion on behalf of
the Minister came after I
asked in which regard the
data I was seeking was no
longer "ready", when I had
previously been assured of the
opposite.
(Side note: As a journalist
of a mere 3.5 years standing in
The Bahamas, I can tell you
well enough that the frequen-
cy with which journalists are
asked to accept that what they
were formerly led to believe
was the truth is no longer the
truth would cause less stable
beings to have been confined
to Sandilands in fear that they
had lost their grip on reality
altogether).
What do the words "trans-
parency and accountability"
mean if what we are provided
with is transparency and
accountability on an admin-
istration's own terms, in their
own "sweet" time?
One might consider that in
the United Kingdom, where
Freedom of Information leg-
islation exists to legally
enforce the public's right to
know, public authorities are
given 20 days to respond to
an information request or face
penalties. Such legislation
exists globally in some form in
around 60 countries, but not
yet in The Bahamas.
In light of there being 41
MPs in the Bahamas parlia-
ment, and the fact that we are
dealing with a request that
would require a certain
amount of information gath-
ering from perhaps a number
of agencies of the Bahamas
civil service, 20 days was nev-
er an option in my mind.
However, five months was
certainly not an expectation
either.
Mr Laing says there is "no
story" in the fact The Tribune
has not received the details
of the MP's allowance expen-
ditures. What do you think?

* If you wish to comment
on this story, e-mail:
alowe@tribunemedia.net







+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009, PAGE 3C


Iran approves building



10 enrichment sites


By ALI AKBAR DAREINI
Associated Press Writer
TEHRAN, Iran (AP) -
The Iranian government
approved a plan Sunday to
build 10 new uranium enrich-
ment facilities, a dramatic
expansion in defiance of UN
demands it halt the pro-
gramme.
The decision comes only
two days after the UN nuclear
watchdog agency censured
Iran, demanding it immedi-
ately stop building a newly
revealed enrichment facility
near the holy city of Qom and
freeze all uranium enrichment
activities. The rebuke angered
Iran, raising demands from
lawmakers Sunday to cut
back cooperation with the
UN.
The enrichment announce-
ment is likely to stoke already
high tensions between Iran
and the West over its contro-
versial nuclear activities. The
US and its allies have hinted
of new UN sanctions if
Tehran remains defiant.
A Cabinet meeting headed
by President Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad ordered the
Atomic Energy Organisation
of Iran to begin building five
uranium enrichment sites that
have already been studied and
propose five other locations
for future construction within
two months, the state news
agency IRNA reported.
The Cabinet ordered the
new sites to be on the same


IRAN'S PRESIDENT Mahmoud Ahmadinejad gestures during a news
conference at the Itamaraty palace in Brasilia...
(AP Photo)


scale as Iran's only other
industrial-scale enrichment
plant currently in operation,
near the town of Natanz in
central Iran.
About 8,600 centrifuges
have been set up in Natanz,
but only about 4,000 are
actively enriching uranium,
according to the UN's Inter-
national Atomic Energy
Agency. The facility will even-
tually house 54,000 cen-
trifuges.
In Washington, a senior US
officials said that, "if carried
out, this would constitute yet
another violation of Iran's
continuing obligation of sus-
pension of all enrichment-
related activities, including
construction of new plants."


"There remains a fleeting
opportunity for Iran to
engage with the international
community, if only it would
make that choice," said the
official official, speaking on
condition of anonymity
because of the Obama admin-
istration had not yet released
a formal response.
In Vienna, spokeswoman
Gillian Tudor said the UN's
International Atomic Energy
Agency would have no com-
ment on Tehran's announce-
ment.
The newly revealed enrich-
ment site, known as Fordo, is
a smaller scale site that will
house nearly 3,000 cen-
SEE page 7C


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+


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009, PAGE 7C


Iran approves


building 10


enrichment


locations

trifuges. Its discovery earlier
this year brought accusations
that Iran was developing the
site secretly, a claim Tehran
denies.
In the enrichment process,
uranium gas is spun in cen-
trifuges to purify it. Enriched
to a low degree, the result is
fuel for a nuclear reactor -
but highly enriched uranium
can be used to build a war-
head. The United States and
its allies accuse Iran of secret-
ly seeking to develop a bomb,
a claim denied by Iran, which
says it seeks only to generate
electricity.
Iran aims to generate
20,000 megawatts of electric-
ity through nuclear power
plants in the next 20 years.
IRNA said the new plants are
needed to produce enough
fuel for its future reactors.
Ahmadinejad told the Cab-
inet that Iran will need to
install 500,000 centrifuges
throughout the planned
enrichment facilities to pro-
duce between 250 to 300 tons
of fuel annually, IRNA
reported.
The IAEA censure against
Iran on Friday was seen as a
show of international unity in
pressuring Tehran over its
nuclear programme - though
there does not yet appear to
be consensus on imposing
sanctions.
The IAEA resolution criti-
cised Iran for defying a UN
Security Council demand for
a suspension of enrichment
and for secretly building the
Fordo site. It noted that
IAEA chief Mohamed ElBa-
radei cannot confirm that
Tehran's nuclear programme
is exclusively geared toward
peaceful uses, and expressed
"serious concern" that Iran's
stonewalling of an IAEA
probe means "the possibility
of military dimensions to
Iran's nuclear programme"
cannot be excluded.
The rebuke infuriated Iran.
On Saturday, one hard-line
lawmaker warned that parlia-
ment might withdraw the
country from the Nuclear
Non-Proliferation Treaty and
stop all UN inspections - a
move that would sharply esca-
late the standoff with the
West and cut off the UN's
only eyes on Iran's nuclear
programme.
But parliament took a less-
er step on Sunday: 226 of the
290 lawmakers signed a let-
ter urging the government to
prepare a plan to reduce
Tehran's cooperation with the
IAEA in response to its reso-
lution.
The US and its allies
demand Iran accept a UN-
brokered offer that would
delay its ability to make a
nuclear weapon as well as
engage in broader talks with
the ultimate goal of persuad-
ing it to mothball its enrich-
ment programme.
Iran has amassed about
1,500 kilograms (3,300
pounds) of low-enriched ura-
nium at Natanz. The UN offer
aims to convince Iran to hand
over more than 1,200 kilo-
grams (2,600 pounds), more
than the commonly accepted
amount needed to produce
weapons-grade material. But
Iran has balked at the UN
terms for the plan.
* Associated Press writers
George Jahn in Vienna and
Matthew Lee in Washington
contributed to this report.


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UAE to back banks





amid Dubai meltdown


WITH BURJ DUBAI, tile wr ild's
tallest tc'we Li under conitru.lin:1 in
bjcIglroundl, :3nels lIck for their
11101ning lh-1cd in [l e cuilshI iits of
United Aiab Emiirates.
(AP Photo)


.. .......


I.





~



*1


By BARBARA SURK &
TAREK EL-TABLAWY
Associated Press Writers

DUBAI, United Arab Emi-
rates (AP) - The United
Arab Emirates' central bank
said Sunday it would offer
additional liquidity to banks,
signaling a push by the feder-
al government to reassure
investors worried about the
country's banking sector and
its exposure to Dubai's crush-
ing debt.
Global equity markets were
set to reopen Monday, and
investors are worried about a
routing similar to that seen
last week after Dubai's chief
engine for growth, Dubai
World, announced it wanted
more time to pay some of its
roughly $60 billion in debts.
The UAE's official WAM
news agency said the central
bank issued a notice to Emi-
rati banks and foreign banks
with branches in the country
saying it would make avail-
able "a special additional liq-
uidity facility linked to their
current accounts at the cen-
tral bank." The statement said
the facility can be drawn upon
at a rate of 50 basis points -
half a per cent - above the
three-month Emirates inter-
bank offered rate.
International investors
reacted with shock and out-
rage at Dubai World's
announcement Wednesday
that, as part of its restructuring
effort, it would ask creditors to
delay repayment of its debt
and that of its real estate arm,
Nakheel, until at least May.
Nakheel has a $3.5 billion
bond coming due in Decem-
ber.
The company's roughly $60
billion in debt makes up the
brunt of the at least $80 billion
Dubai owes as a result of a
meteoric decade-long growth
boom that saw the tiny city-
state transformed into a Mid-
dle Eastern Las Vegas, New
York and Los Angeles all
wrapped into one. Dubai
World was a key driver of that
growth, with interests ranging
from ports to real estate.
In the days since the
announcement, Dubai officials
have gone to neighboring
Abu Dhabi, the oil-rich home
to the federal government for
a series of meetings. Some
analysts have speculated that
the timing of Dubai World's
announcement - on the eve
of a three-day Islamic holiday
- caught even Abu Dhabi's
rulers by surprise, putting
them under pressure to act
decisively in a bid to shore up
confidence in the country's
banks.
Emirati banks are believed
to be shouldering a large
chunk of Dubai's debts, and
international ratings agencies
have either downgraded the
ratings of some of the coun-
try's banks - or at least
placed them on review for fur-


their downgrades - citing
exposure to Dubai World's
debt.
The central bank's state-
ment was also aimed mitigat-
ing any negative fallout on the
country as a whole, with con-
cerns that Abu Dhabi would
be branded with the same iron
of pessimism and skepticism
that Dubai will likely endure
for years to come.
The UAE's banking system
is "more sound and liquid
than a year ago," the bank
said.
Dubai World's call for more
time is seen by many analysts
as a classic case of over-exten-
sion - a tale of a city-state
whose dreams for develop-
ment propelled it to stardom
with its indoor ski-slopes,
man-made islands and world's
tallest tower.
But that dream was built on
borrowed time and money,
and as the global recession
hammered Dubai, driving
property prices down by 50
per cent in a year, forcing lay-
offs and project delays and
cancellations, the emirate no
longer had access to the easy
credit on which it had pinned
its growth.
It simply couldn't pay.
At the beginning of the
year, it launched a $20 billion
bond programme, of which
$10 billion was snapped up by
the UAE's central bank. The
same day Dubai World issued
its murky statement about a
debt-extension, the emirate's
government said a new $5 bil-
lion bond issuance had been
bought up by two banks
majority owned by Abu
Dhabi.
While the Dubai World
statement made clear that the
bonds were not linked to its
debt woes, it was obvious that
the emirate had little recourse
but to turn to Abu Dhabi,
whose more conservative
growth was fueled by the
same oil that Dubai lacks.
Dubai's debt saga is not
new.
It's been obvious for some
time that the emirate owes
more money than it can repay.
But what remained unclear
was the overall extent of the
debt load and what officials
were doing to avert a panic at
a time when the world was in
the nascent stages of emerging
from its worst recession in
over six decades.
UAE newspaper Al-Itihad
on Sunday quoted an uniden-
tified Dubai World official as
saying the conglomerate, over
the past few months, "totally
rejected the idea of selling
some of its good investment
and real estate assets at low
prices."
The official said that any
asset sale needed to be in a
"commercially fair manner in
order to achieve (Dubai
World's) long-term strategic
objectives, away from ... eco-
nomic pressures."


Turbulence ahead: Senate opens health care debate


By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Associated Press Writer


WASHINGTON (AP) - The 60 votes aren't
there any more.
With the Senate set to begin debate Monday on
health care overhaul, the all-hands-on-deck Demo-
cratic coalition that allowed the bill to advance is
fracturing already. Yet majority Democrats will
need 60 votes again to finish.
Some Democratic senators say they'll jump ship
from the bill without tighter restrictions on abortion
coverage. Others say they'll go unless a govern-
ment plan to compete with private insurance com-
panies gets tossed overboard. Such concessions
would enrage liberals, the heart and soul of the par-
ty.
There's no clear course for Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., to steer legislation
through Congress to President Barack Obama. You
can't make history unless you reach 60 votes, and
don't count on Republicans helping him.
But Reid is determined to avoid being remem-
bered as another Democrat who tried and failed to
make health care access for the middle class a part
of America's social safety net.
"Generation after generation has called on us to
fix this broken system," he said at a recent Capitol
Hill rally. "We're now closer than ever to getting it
done."
His bill includes $848 billion over 10 years to
gradually expand coverage to most of those now
uninsured. It would ban onerous insurance industry
practices such as denying coverage or charging high-
er premiums because of someone's poor health.
Those who now have the hardest time getting cov-
erage - the self-employed and small businesses -
could buy a policy in a new insurance market, with
government subsidies for many. Older people would


get better prescription coverage.
Most people covered by big employers would
gain more protections without major changes. One
exception would be those with high-cost insurance
plans, whose premiums could rise as a result of a tax
on insurers issue the coverage.
The public is ambivalent about the Democrats'
legislation. While 58 per cent want elected officials
to tackle health care now, about half of those sup-
porters say they don't like what they're hearing
about the plans, according to a new Kaiser Family
Foundation poll.
The Senate debate risks alienating more people
because much of the discussion probably will revolve
around divisive issues that preoccupy lawmakers.

Portion

"A large portion of the debate will be spent on
issues that aren't important to the workability of
health reform," said Paul Ginsburg, president of
the Center for Studying Health System Change.
The debate should start off modestly, with each
side offering one amendment. No votes are sched-
uled Monday.
But with more than 40 senators on the two com-
mittees that originated the bill, many more amend-
ments are expected. Some likely subjects are limits
on malpractice lawsuits, consumer choice, afford-
ability, minority health and drug prices.
Reid wants to finish by Christmas; he may not get
to.
He's hoping that Democrats will stick together on
procedural matters, where Senate rules require 60
votes to advance. That would allow for different
views to be heard on the underlying questions. But
such an accommodation might not always be possi-
ble. For example, the National Right to Life to
Committee says unless there are big changes, it will


count the procedural motion to allow a final up-
or-down vote on the legislation as tantamount to a
vote on abortion.
Of the many issues senators have to weigh, abor-
tion funding and the option of a government insur-
ance plan promise to be the most difficult.
On abortion, no compromise seems possible. On
the public plan, a deal may yet be had.
The House adopted strict limits on abortion fund-
ing as the price for the support of anti-abortion
Democrats. Abortion rights supporters are now
backing Reid's approach, which tries to preserve
coverage for abortion while stipulating that federal
dollars may not be used except in cases of rape,
incest or to save the life of the mother. Catholic
bishops say they can't accept that because it would
let federally subsidized plans cover abortion.
It might be easier to find a middle ground on the
issue of a public health plan to compete against pri-
vate insurers, though Sen. Bernie Sanders, a Ver-
mont independent, said Sunday he would be "very
reluctant" to support legislation without "a strong
public option."
Reid's bill would create a national plan, but give
states the choice of opting out. In any event, the
Congressional Budget Office now estimates that
the government would not be the bare-knuckles
competitor insurers had feared, but a relatively
minor player in the market.
Several moderate Democrats have served notice
they can't support Reid's approach. The lone
Republican to vote for the Senate bill in committee,
Olympia Snowe of Maine, has said she could accept
a public plan if insurers are given one last chance to
deliver lower premiums in a competitive market.
Combining Snowe's "trigger" with Reid's "opt-out"
might be the answer.
If that's the case, it still would have to pass a final
test: 60 votes.


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