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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01442
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: October 28, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01442

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TINGS TOUGH (
McDOUBLE J J]
FOR $3.79 ' lIvi'w

HIGH 86F
LOW 76F

SUN WITH
ST-STORM


The


Tribune


BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


Volume: 105 No.280_______





1111- 6 q111
oill !C


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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009


PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)


Rdic t play

atInvttoa


r


reckless out urst


Three accused of armed

Pobbery of eight tourists

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
TWO men and a woman have been accused of rob-
bing eight tourists in downtown Nassau.
Ruben Johnson, 18, of Eneas Jumper Corner, and
Johnny Guerrier, 19, of Soldier Road, each face eight
armed robbery charges. They are also accused of being
armed with a handgun as they robbed eight men and
women of cash and jewellery while concerned with
others.
SEE page eight


MP apologises


for Travolta

case mistrial


By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net
THE MP who
brought about the
mistrial in the John
Travolta $25million
attempted extortion
case yesterday
issued a public apol-


SENIOR JUSTICE
Anita Allen


the time she said
Forbes's announce-
ment "leaves the
impression that
there may have
been a communica-
tion from the jury
room".
At a media gath-
ering yesterday, a
contrite Forbes said:
"My statements
concerning the
acquittal of Ms


ogy.
South Andros MP
Picewell Forbes described
his outburst at the PLP con-
vention as "reckless" as he
said sorry to Senior Justice
Anita Allen, the judiciary,
and the country at large.
Forbes admitted he did
not verify the information
which was given to him
regarding the alleged acquit-
tal of former PLP Senator
Pleasant Bridgewater before
he repeated it to the nation
via radio and television.
As a consequence Senior
Justice Allen said she was
forced to call a mistrial and
discharge the jury who had
yet to return a verdict. At


Pleasant Bridgewater were
not true as the jury was still
in deliberations.
"My statements were
reckless and interfered with
the course of justice in that
case and were further capa-
ble of bringing into disre-
pute the whole administra-
tion of justice."
As a result, the often
colourful and rambunctious
MP said he took sole
responsibility for his actions.
"I hereby unequivocally
and without qualifications
offer my apology to
Madame Senior Justice Ani-
ta Allen in particular, and
SEE page seven


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Expert says tourism won't
rebound for another year


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
HARDWARE giant
John S George president,
Andrew Wilson, appeared
in Magistrates Court yester-
day accused of failure to pay
more than $100,000 in
National Insurance Board
contributions.
The company president
was one of two employers
arraigned in Court 11, Nas-
sau Street, to be ordered to
pay the National Insurance
Board (NIB) a total of
$185,893.14 in missed con-
tributions yesterday.
In the same court on
Monday, 12 employers were
ordered to pay a total of
$86,632.97 in outstanding


contributions.
John S George president
Wilson was charged with
failure to pay $113,412.79 to
the NIB between February
2007 and June 2008, and
again between August 2008
and January 2009, on behalf
of Rose Colby and other
employees.
He was ordered to return
to the court on November
9 for settlement.
Brian Adderley, manag-
ing director of Hyvac
Bahamas Limited, was
charged yesterday with fail-
ure to pay NIB contirbu-
tions amounting to
$72,480.35 between Febru-
ary 2003 and October 2008,
on behalf of Daniel Stubbs
SEE page seven


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
WHILE hotel performance
for September and October
appears to be "slightly bet-
ter" than the same period last
year, a tourism expert does
not expect the industry to ful-
ly rebound from the grips of
the economic downturn for at
least another year.
Frank Comito, executive
vice-president of the Bahamas
Hotel Association, said
despite what he expects to be
a modest boost in perfor-
mance over the last two
months, the sector should
remain braced for a rough
ride lasting until late 2010,
early 2011.
He said: "We have a very
difficult several months that
we are going through right
now. We anticipated that this


would be one of the most dif-
ficult periods we would face
but we're hopeful our busi-
ness activity will hold its own
over these couple of months
or be slightly better than last
year at this time.
"Our indicators said that
our activity for September
and October is slightly better
over last year. We don't antic-
ipate coming out of this eco-
nomic difficult time without
any robust activity for at least
the next year but we're hop-
ing we will continue to see
some slow steady improve-
ment as confidence is restored
globally and there are many
signs indicating that."
Mr Comito spoke to The
Tribune on the sidelines of a
press conference to announce
an upcoming energy confer-
ence and business trade show
SEE page eight


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I I






PAGE^ ^ ^ ^TTHLOCAL 2,WS WENSDYIOTBE 8,209TE R BU


BTC optimistic

that fiscal year will

show improvement


THE Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company says
it is "cautiously optimistic"
that the 2009 fiscal year
will show a marked
improvement in profit per-
formance despite the ongo-
ing recession.
This comes after it was
revealed that BTC earned
$20 million less last year
than the year before.
Acting president and
CEO Kirk Griffin said:
"The truth of the matter is
that BTC - like companies
all through the Bahamas
and all over the world -
faced a difficult 2008 due
to the severe downturn in
the global and national
economy."
"As people travelled less,
it meant that there were
less tourists making calls in
the Bahamas. This trans-
lated into a sizable fall-off
in our roaming revenue. As
businesses contracted and
laid staff off, it meant that
there was less money in the
economy for persons to
spend on phone cards, new
cell phones and the like. It
really is that simple," he
said.
BTC added that it has
not been standing idle in
the face of a sluggish econ-


omy, but has been adjust-
ing accordingly to improve
its revenue prospects.
"The board and man-
agement of BTC took deci-
sive actions to bolster
exposure of promising
product lines within the
marketplace, while at the
same time, the company
took aggressive action to
reduce and contain costs
without eliminating any of
its product offerings," Mr
Griffin said.
"Because of steps that
were taken beginning late
last year, at the end of Sep-
tember our operating
expenses are tracking at $8
million below the approved
2009 budget due to
enhanced cost-cutting
activities.
"At the same time, our
revenue is up by some $8
million above budget due
to targeted and sustained
marketing and promotion-
al activities.
"So even as the econo-
my has yet to rebound out
of the most severe reces-
sion since the Great
Depression, we are track-
ing for profitability that
would be substantially
higher than the $21 million
earned in 2008," he said.


Ardastra Gardens launches


educational workshops


'All About...'
events designed
for children
between
five and 12

ARDASTRA Gardens,
Zoo and Conservation Cen-
tre bustled with activity over
the weekend as the first ever
"All About...." workshop
was launched.
"All About...." is series
educational workshops and
seminars designed specifi-
cally for children between
the ages of 5 and 12 years
old.
The first workshop was
entitled, "All About Enrich-
ment". Kelly Hobbs, cura-
tor of Ardastra Gardens and
Zoo, told participants that
animals, like humans, can
sometimes get bored.
To alleviate that boredom,
she said, animals need out-
lets through which they can
"learn and discover new
things, new smells, and even
new objects - that's where
enrichment comes in".
Ms Hobbs talked about
specific types of enrichment
for various species residing
at Ardastra.
She and the children made
treats which they gave to the
animals and the attendees
were able to witness some
animal enrichment first
hand. This was the highlight
of the seminar, according to
11-year-old Jazmin Ageeb,
who attended the workshop
with her brother and cousin.
Michael Jimenez, director


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I I


MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News..........................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8
Editorial/Letters..................................... P4
Sports........................................... P9,10,11
A dvt.................. ................................P 12
BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION
Business................................... P1,2,3,4,5,6
A dvt............................................... . ....... P7
C om ics.................................................. P8
Taste.................................................. P9,10
A rts.................................................... P 11,12

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28,2009


THE TRIBUNE






+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3


Five accused of defrauding


the Royal Bank of Canada


Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynoIds@tribunemedia.net


FRAUD charges were
brought against four men and
one woman arraigned in Magis-
trate's Court yesterday accused
of defrauding the Royal Bank
of Canada and other establish-
ments earlier this year.
The five working profession-
als, some of whom faced sever-
al charges, entered not guilty
pleas to all charges against them.
Christoff Hanna, 46, a driver
who lives in Adelaide Gardens,
New Providence, faced four
counts of fraud by false pre-
tenses. He is accused of obtain-
ing $991.04 from Nassau branch-
es of the Royal Bank of Canada
(RBC) by means of false pre-
tenses.
The four counts against Han-
na allege that he obtained
$247.76 from RBC in Bay Street
on May 8; $247.76 from RBC in
Mackey Street on May 19;
$247.76 from RBC in Mackey
Street on June 3; and $247.76
from RBC in Bay Street on
June 16.
Magistrate Guillimina Archer
granted him $3,000 bail with
sureties.
Businesswoman Bloneva
Mackey, 51, of Adderley and
Dorsette Street, faced five
counts of fraud by false pre-
tenses. Four counts allege intent
to defraud RBC of a total of
$1,180. She is accused of obtain-
ing $295 in cash from RBC in
Prince Charles Drive on May 5;
another $295 from RBC in
Prince Charles Drive on June
2; $295 from RBC in
Carmichael Road on June 15;
and $295 from RBC in Prince
Charles Drive on June 29.
Mackey is also accused of
obtaining $295 in goods and
cash from Milo B Butler and
Sons Limited in Peach Street on
May 22.
Mackey pleaded not guilty to
the charges and was granted


$4,000 bail with sureties.
Security officer Travarus Bar-
row, 35, of Alexandria Boule-
vard, Nassau Village, faced
fraud charges on two counts.
Barrow is accused of obtaining
$147.36 from RBC in Prince
Charles drive by means of false
pretenses on May 19, and he is
further accused of intent to
defraud the same bank in Prince
Charles Drive of $146.36 by
means of false pretenses on June
2.
Barrow pleaded not guilty to
the charges and was granted
$1,000 bail with sureties.
Electrician Lamarison Rolle,
24, of Davis and Bain Street,
faced one count of fraud by false
pretenses as he is alleged to
have obtained $195.60 in goods
and cash from Super Value food
store in Nassau Street on June
19 by means of false pretenses.
Rolle plead not guilty to the
charge and was granted $800
bail with sureties.
Surveyor Frank Moxey, 27,
of Isles Way off Soldier Road,
faced one count of fraud by false
pretenses as he is accused of
intent to defraud RBC in Prince


Charles Drive of $363.30 by
means of false pretenses on June
3.
Moxey pleaded not guilty to
the charge and was granted $800
bail with sureties.
All of the accused opted to
have their cases heard in the
Magistrates Court. They are due


to return to Court Ten in Nas-
sau Street on March 1, 2010.
A further six people are
expected to be summoned to
court to face similar charges.


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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


EIOI AULETE S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, c, tiinn') 322-1986
Ad c, iiving Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


Nordic countries top gender gap index again


NEW YORK (AP) - Women
remain far behind men in economic and
political power, but the Nordic coun-
tries come closest to closing the gender
gap, according to a survey of 134 nations
released Tuesday.
The four Nordic countries - Finland,
Iceland, Norway and Sweden - have
topped the Global Gender Gap Index
since it was first released in 2006 by the
Geneva-based World Economic Forum.
They did so again this year, but Ice-
land replaced Norway at the top of the
list with a score of 82.8 percent, meaning
it came closest to 100 percent gender
equality.
Two African countries - South
Africa and Lesotho - entered the list of
the top 10 countries for the first time
while four others remained, New
Zealand, Denmark, Ireland and the
Philippines.
At the bottom of the list were Qatar,
Egypt, Mali, Iran, Turkey, Saudi Arabia,
Benin, Pakistan, Chad and Yemen in
last place with a score of 46.1 percent.
Several countries near the bottom,
including Egypt, Saudi Arabia, India,
Bahrain, Ethiopia and Morocco, made
gains from the 2008 rankings.
While many nations have made some
progress toward gender equality, no
country has closed the gap when it
comes to economic participation and
opportunity, educational attainment,
political empowerment, and health and
survival.
"Girls and women make up one half
of the world's population," the forum's
founder and executive chairman, Klaus
Schwab, said in a statement, "and with-
out their engagement, empowerment
and contribution, we cannot hope to
achieve a rapid economic recovery nor
effectively tackle global challenges such
as climate change, food security and
conflict."
Saadia Zahidi, head of the forum's
Women Leaders and Gender Parity
Program, told a news conference launch-
ing the survey that of the 115 countries


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in the original index four years ago, 99
have made progress in closing their gaps
- but 16 haven't "and have actually
deteriorated."
The survey shows that on health, "the
world is doing fairly well," closing over
96 percent of the gap in resources
between women and men, Zahidi said.
On education, about 93 percent of the
gap has been closed but on economic
participation and opportunity only 60
percent has been closed and on political
empowerment only 17 percent.
"So basically what we're saying is that
across the world, in general, women are
starting to be almost as healthy and
almost as educated as men - obvious-
ly with major exceptions - but those
resources are not being used efficiently
in terms of economic participation and
certainly not in terms of political deci-
sion-making," Zahidi said.
Melanne Verveer, the U.S. ambas-
sador for global women's issues, said
the index "underscores that gender
equality is critical to a country's eco-
nomic prosperity and competitiveness."
"It remains a simple fact that no coun-
try could prosper if half its people are
left behind," she said. "Yet, women are
still largely under-represented also in
parliament and legislatures of nearly
every country, and I might add so too in
the boardrooms of corporations."
In the latest survey, the United States
dropped from 27th place to 31st place in
the rankings as a result of minor drops
in the participation of women in the
economy and improvements in the
scores of previously lower-ranked coun-
tries, according to the survey.
Verveer noted that the first bill Pres-
ident Barack Obama signed into law
was the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act
making it easier for workers to sue for
pay discrimination, but she stressed:
"We have a long road to go no matter
where we live."
(This article is by Edith M Lederer
of the Associated Press)


Last Bil


The banking




market in




the Bahamas


EDITOR, The Tribune.
PLEASE allow me to pref-
ace this missive with a short
overview of what has hap-
pened in this country.
First of all, clearly there are
negative manifestations that
have presented itself into our
environment. The ill-paved
roads, filthy sidewalks and
residences hosting derelict
vehicles which is common-
place in New Providence is
by no means an overnight
occurrence.
Secondly, the disparity
between the wealthy and the
poor has grown so dramati-
cally over the past few years
that it has significantly con-
tributed to the weakening of
our social fabric.
Third, ethnic self-hatred
has ingrained itself so deeply
into our society that it has
become almost palpable and
is reflected in the blatant dis-
regard that we have for each
other. Therefore as we pre-
pare ourselves to embrace
globalisation, a move which
is perhaps a decade too late
but nevertheless one that we
must still undertake, we clear-
ly need to redesign the way
we empower the citizens of
our country.
The Honourable Prime
Minister has made such a pro-
found statement that perhaps
it will be enshrined as his
legacy. Mr Ingraham
expressed concerns as to the
way banks operate in this
country.
Mr Ingraham is quoted as
saying: "I find it very dis-
tasteful, and I am very
annoyed by it quite frankly,
angered would be a better
word, that some of the banks
in The Bahamas are able to
repatriate huge profits from
The Bahamas and pay minus-
cule sums".
This is the first time in
recent memory that, even as
oblique as this statement is,
a Bahamian leader has shown
that he has grasped the
inequities being meted out on
the citizen by our selfsame
social and financial policies.
It is important that the
underlying meaning of the
Prime Minister's statement
become a part of a frame-
work to assist the citizen as
we embrace globalisation.
Would it be fair to read into
this statement that perhaps
Mr Ingraham would like to


see a change in the way large
institutions contribute to this
country? Could we read into
this statement that the spon-
soring of sporting events and
junkanoo is no longer suffi-
cient in this newly structured
global economy? Can we
read into this statement that
the time has now arrived
whereby a leader of this coun-
try are prepared to assist the
citizen in accessing venture
or risk capital from foreign
institutions, a la, relaxing our
exchange control policies?
Clearly capitalism demands
that apart from, but not lim-
ited to, taxes, due diligence
or employment policies being
imposed on a financial insti-
tution, little should stand in
the way of that institution's
growth. Therefore local banks
should not be forced to lend


funds if they choose not to.
However; it is comforting to
know that a new day has
dawned which further
demands that the citizen be
given business friendly poli-
cies such as being allowed to
access foreign capital for
investments. Admittedly this
exists in our present banking
system, but only in a very
restrictive form.
So in embracing globalisa-
tion there is hope that future
leaders of this nation will see
the wisdom in making sure
that local banks will not be
our only way to secure fund-
ing for business projects. Per-
haps it is time to encourage
outside competition in our
local banking market, seeing
that the present funds are
being exported anyway. Or
did I misread the Prime Min-
ister's statement?
DWAYNE
J HANNA
Nassau,
October 2009.


Cabinet speculation
EDITOR, The Tribune.
YOUR speculation that Minister Neko Grant, previously
appointed to the all important Ministry of Tourism and then to
Public Works & Transport, is going to be appointed Ministerial
"over-lord" for Grand Bahama simply indicates that, with respect,
the Hon Minister, who I call "Mr Sauve", probably the best
dresser in Parliament, has not met the mark as an administrator.
Surely this post should be a Minister-of-State and no higher?
If the Prime Minister wants action in Grand Bahama I suggest
he takes this on and resigns some of the other long list of respon-
sibilities, then Grand Bahama will have the all-important eco-
nomic focus.
Sidney Collie returning to Cabinet is a further speculation
although this most honourable gentleman who followed to the 'T'
correct parliamentary practice, something which you don't see too
often these days, I suggest will remain outside of Cabinet. The
recent defeat of the sitting Greek Government and the immedi-
ate resignation of the previous PM on losing further, adds cre-
dence as to what defeated Prime Ministers are required to do
when defeated; some should note.
The choice of the Prime Minister to be AG will be between
Hon Desmond Bannister and Hon Carl Bethel with more support
to Mr Bethel as clearly he has a better understanding of law, but
then who to Education - the monster problem Ministry?
Will we see a resignation from the Senate and an appoint-
ment from there to the Ministry of Education or more than like-
ly to the position of Attorney General which for the latter is an
obvious serious probability?
W THOMPSON
Nassau,
October 8, 2009.

Fuealapagmet
fori S

Roger D'arrI


will be held at
St. Francis Cathedral
on
West Street
at 3pm
on
Saturday, October 31

Instead of flowers those who wish may make
donations in his memory to either the Breathe
Easy campaign or St. Martin's Convent. For
the Breathe Easy campaign cheques may be
sent to Ms Michelle Rassin (tel. 302-4707),
Doctors Hospital, P.O. Box N972. Or donations
can be sent to St. Martin's Convent,
Nassau Street, P.O. Box 940.


Week


of


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Rcm5etta St.


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7Th


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5


* CALNEWS


Kerzner employee charged with stealing


$10,000 by reason of employment


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
A KERZNER International employ-
ee was charged with stealing $10,000 from
the company by reason of employment
in Magistrate's Court yesterday.
Lithera Knowles, 28, of Rocky Pine
Road, Nassau, appeared in court ten, Nas-


sau Street, dressed in white linen trousers
and a white button down shirt and stood
as Magistrate Guillimina Archer read the
charges. Knowles is charged on one count
of stealing by reason of employment on
Monday, October 19, in New Providence.
The charge alleges Knowles stole
$10,000 cash from Kerzner International
on Paradise Island, to which she had cus-
tody by reason of her employment.


Private sector to

host alternative

energy conference


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
AS the business community
strains under the weight of ris-
ing power costs, the private sec-
tor is hosting a conference to
push for alternative energy poli-
cies.
In addition to being an ener-
gy conference and business
trade show, the event will also
showcase practical energy sav-
ing solutions which can be
implemented immediately to
provide relief to the commer-
cial sector.
The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce, the Bahamas Hotel
Association and the US
Embassy will host the event,
which kicks off on November
12.
Event organizers said partic-
ipants can expect an update on
government's National Energy
Policy at the conference while
the trade show will provide a
platform for vendors to show-
case their goods and services -
which will include solar heaters
and generators and other ener-
gy saving devices.
So far 25 exhibitors are lined
up for the trade show however
organizers expect to match last
year's number with around 70


exhibitors as more persons sign
up to showcase their wares.
"The issue of energy effi-
ciency is an issue that's glaring
in the minds of many businesses
particularly right now as we're
starting to see a creep of the oil
prices again. . . We know that
the cost of energy will continue
to be a challenge for all of us
over the coming years and the
move toward looking at renew-
able sources of energy that we
can tap into is ever more impor-
tant," said BHA executive vice-
president Frank Comito.
He explained that the trade
show is not just limited to those
specialising in energy efficient
goods but is open to persons in
the tourism industry, market-
ing, food and beverage supplies
and information technology, as
well as representatives of the
international business commu-
nity that offer goods and ser-
vices to the Caribbean.
"It is an opportunity to bring
together buyers and sellers of
goods and services to promote
new business opportunities and
reinforce existing relationships,"
said Mr Comito, who added
that last year's trade show
attracted around 10,000 visitors.
US Embassy spokesman Jeff
Dubell said the American gov-
ernment supports alternative


Knowles, represented by attorney Ian
Cargill, pleaded not guilty to the charge
and opted for her case to be heard in the
Magistrate's Court rather than by a jury in
the Supreme Court.
Ms Archer ordered Knowles to return
to Court Ten in Nassau Street on Febru-
ary 22 of next year.
She was granted $15,000 bail with two
sureties.


4 %*


SW


Iwllfu s a a e d e s r n


energy initiatives adding that
over 80 per cent of future green-
house gas emissions is expected
to come from developing coun-
tries. He hopes the dialogue on
alternative energy will be con-
tinued on a regional level during
a similar conference in fall 2010.
"We look at the Bahamas as
a perfect test-bed to test some
of these new technologies - it
is an archipelago, you must pro-
vide all these services to the
islands, each island must by self-
sustaining.
"You can work with US com-
panies, develop those new tech-
nologies, build new companies
that maybe you can export to
Latin America and the rest of


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the Caribbean," he said.
The conference will feature
local and international speak-
ers and panelists, including
Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux, his junior minister
Phenton Neymour and repre-
sentatives from the BEST Com-
mission, the Inter-American
Development Bank, EMERA
and Star Island Resort.
The conference will be held
on November 12 at the Shera-
ton and the trade show is sched-
uled for two days - November
13 and 14.


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Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


CREDITSUISSE

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch
Shared Services

is presently considering applications for an

Accountant

The Financial Accounting Department is accepting applications for an
Accountant:

Requirements:

* 2 - 3 years Accounting & Banking experience
* Associate or Bachelors Degree in Accounting, Banking & Finance
* Excellent oral and written communication skills
* Proficient in Microsoft Office applications
* Strong mathematical capabilities
* Able to multitask
* A team player with the ability to work in a fast paced environment
* Possess excellent planning, organization and implementation skills
* Excellent interpersonal skills
* A commitment to service excellence

Duties will include:

* Management of Service Level Agreements (SLA) and inter-company/
divisional expense allocation process
* Responsible for accounts payable
* Responsible for maintenance, analyzing, reconciliation and reporting of
expense
* Assist with the booking of monthly accruals
* Reconciliation of all general ledger accounts at the appropriate level of
frequency
* Respond to queries relating to clients' and internal expenses
* Responsible for International Reporting
* Assist Cashier


Benefits provided include:

* Competitive salary and benefits

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum
requirements need not apply. Telephone calls will not be accepted.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:
NOVEMBER 6, 2009


W. .1


%F







+>


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


UNDER THE DiSTiNCUaSHED PArnoNACE OfTIi i .c~


A 7rh~i41ap af *kjjr1-
CATHoUjc Bo.4jw op- Ebt.
) VV IrI '.imW If.'a UL J


CELEBRATING



OF CrH 0LI C EDUCATION IN THE Bm AM ~A5


SALTURD;Ay, NCATh(MIR 7ni, 2009


Call for Bahamas to back


Cuba's embargo opposition


UN General Assembly to

vote on draft resolution


mI


CuK AILsT ~I. v


i t'AIUU~�L~.~


I,


FIL �kt ii.


By AVA TURNQUEST

THE United Nations
General Assembly meets
today to vote on the draft
resolution submitted by
Cuba requesting an end to
the 50 year US embargo
against the island nation.
On the eve of the vote,
Ambassador of the Repub-
lic of Cuba Jose Luis Ponce
sat down with The Tribune
to emphasise the urgency of
the matter and raise aware-
ness of Cuba's suffering.
The ambassador
described the US policy
towards his country as a
monumental violation of
human rights, as it discour-
ages other countries from
interacting with Cuba -
essentially "asphyxiating the
Cuban population."
"I think it's important for
the international communi-
ty to know, for the Bahami-
an community to know, that
despite their expectations
of the ascension of a new
US government, nothing
has changed," Mr Ponce
said.
For the past 17 years,
Cuba has submitted the
draft resolution "Necessity
of ending the economic,
commercial and financial
embargo imposed by the
United States of America
against Cuba" for consider-
ation by the United Nations
General Assembly
(UNGA).
The draft, which will be
presented again today,
reads: "The economic, com-
mercial and financial
embargo imposed by the
United States against Cuba
50 years ago is the most ele-
vated expression of a cruel


and inhuman policy, lack-
ing in legality and legitima-
cy and deliberately designed
to create hunger, illnesses
and desperation within the
Cuban populace. Nothing
has changed through 10 suc-
cessive US governments
other than a tightening of
this policy. Nothing essen-
tial has changed either since
the new US government
was inaugurated in January
2009."
As a direct consequence
of the embargo, Cuba has
calculated that as of Decem-
ber 2008, the country has
sustained a total of $96 bil-
lion worth of economic
damage.
Last year, an overwhelm-
ing 185 member states,
including the Bahamas, vot-
ed in favour of the resolu-
tion - a near unanimous
demonstration of the inter-
national community's rejec-
tion of the US government's
policy against Cuba. How-
ever nothing has changed.
"Although these mea-
sures are a positive step,
they are also extremely
insufficient and limited. The
complex framework of laws
and administrative provi-
sions which make up the
legal basis of the policy of
blockade, designed to
destroy the Cuban econo-
my, remain in place," the
ambassador said.
This year's version of the
draft resolution highlights
US Vice President Joseph
Biden's remark that the US
will maintain the blockade
as "a tool to apply pressure"
on Cuba.
It adds: "Since the acces-
sion of Barrack Obama to
the Presidency of the Unit-


US VICE PRESIDENT Joseph
Biden's said the US will main-
tain the blockade as 'a tool to
apply pressure' on Cuba. (AP)
ed States more than 50 per
cent of the funds collected
by the Office for Foreign
Assets Control, according
to figures of the Treasury
itself, come from the sanc-
tions applied to enterprises
and entities for alleged vio-
lations of the blockade
against Cuba."
Ambassador Ponce asked
the Bahamas, and all coun-
tries "committed to the
defence of international
law" to once again support
its resolution at the UN.
During the 64th session
of the UNGA earlier this
year, the Bahamas submit-
ted a statement that read:
"The Bahamas enjoys nor-
mal diplomatic and trade
relations with Cuba. The
Bahamas has not promul-
gated or applied laws or
measures against Cuba that
would prohibit economic,
commercial or financial
relations between the
Bahamas and Cuba."


An entrepreneurial spirit, original thinking, and a passion to succeed.
If you have it, we want you.

We are growing!
Fidelity Bank invites applications for the position of:


- SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR -


PROFILE:
* BS degree in Computer Science, Information systems, or related specialty or equivalent
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* 2+ years experience in application support in a financial institution
* Must have an understanding of general business principles, and how to translate business needs
into quality technical solutions
* A genuine focus on internal customer satisfaction and a positive, friendly demeanor is required.
* Functional experience with databases, SQL scripting, or other programming experience
* Knowledge of IIS configuration and management
* Experience with ASP, HTML, and .NET applications preferred
* Experience with AS/400 applications an advantage
* Strong organization and prioritization skills
* Strong customer service experience preferred
* Must be able to work both independently and as a valued member of a team
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* Reviews, analyzes, evaluates and applies solutions to end-user support requests for the Banks's
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* Troubleshoot applications to resolve technical related issues including application and data
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* Develops, maintains, and executes testing plans for applications including initial
implementations, enhancements, or upgrades.
* Administer support requests and participates in developing, supporting, and meeting
department Service Level Agreements (SLA).
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administer security
* Document processes and help design improvements
* Communicate clearly and professionally with internal customers including technical and
non-technical staff, management, and vendors


HUMAN RESOURCES


PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE
October 31st, 2009 to:
Only persons shortlisted
will be contacted


Re: System Administrator, 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 | Nassau I F: 328.1108
careers@fidelitybahamas.com


ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS


A competitive compensation package will be commensurate
with relevant experience and qualification.


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THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 7


LOCALN


Picewell sorry for



'reckless' outburst


FROM page one


to the entire judiciary of the Com- '
monwealth of the Bahamas. I
"I further offer my unqualified
apology to the Bahamian people,"
he said.
Forbes is to appear before
Senior Justice Allen again tomor- !
row to answer as to why he "
should not be held in contempt
of court.
While the judge noted that she
did not think the complaint
required an investigation into PLE
whether the discharge of the jury BRIDG
was proper, Forbes's announce-
ment posed a real risk of prejudice to the
administration of justice.
Representing Forbes are attorneys Wayne
Munroe, Anthony McKinney and Alfred
Sears.
The date for the retrial of Bridgewater
and former ambulance driver Torino Light-
bourne has yet to be set.
The nine-member jury were discharged
at 10.54pm on Wednesday, last week,


despite the fact they had yet to
reach a verdict.
Around 9.30 pm that same
night, Forbes took to the conven-
tion stage and told delegates that
Bridgewater had been acquitted.
He exclaimed: Pljlanti is a free
woman PLPs! God is good PLPs!
Pleasant is a free woman! God still
"' reigns PLPs!"
At that time however the jury
was still deliberating, and had
been so for more than eight hours.
No verdict had been reached
3ANT although convention members cel-
WATER ebrated Bridgewater's supposed
vindication by singing and dancing
to "Oh Happy Day".
The session chairman had to mount the
podium after Mr Forbes' speech and apolo-
gise for whatever confusion the MP's pro-
nouncement may have caused.
Bridgewater and Lightbourne are accused
of attempting to extort $25million from
American actor John Travolta between Jan-
uary 2 and 20 by means of a threat. They
both have denied the charges.


j I1


From the earliest days of the
organization, Rotarians were
concerned with promoting high
ethical standards in their
professional lives. One of the
world's most widely printed and
quoted statements of business
ethics is The Four-Way Test,
which was created in 1932 by
Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor. This
24-word Test has been
translated into more than a
hundred languages and
published in thousands of ways.
It asks the following four
questions:


The Four-Way Test
"Of the things we think,
say or do
1. Is it the truth?
2. Is it fair to all
concerned?
3. Will it build goodwill
and better friendships?
4. Will it be beneficial to
all concerned?"


John S (

FROM page one

and other employees.
Adderley has an in-house
application with NIB he is
now paying.
A warrant was issued for
the arrest of Bernard
Dorsett, of Porky's Texaco
Service Centre, New Provi-
dence, as he failed to appear
in court yesterday.
Dorsett is charged with
failure to pay $48,781.86 to
NIB between August 2005
and October 2007, on behalf
of Shirley Storr and other
employees.
The 12 employers charged
on Monday were ordered to
pay sums to NIB ranging
from around $2,000 to more
than $27,000 in missed pay-
ments.
Desmond Thompson, of
Bahamas Embroidery, was
charged with failure to pay
NIB $27,306.70 between
January 2000 and April
2006, and April and July
2007. He was ordered to pay
the court $10,923 on Mon-
day and $400 per month to
the court until the full
amount has been covered.
Self-employed Samuel
Smith was charged with fail-
ure to pay $20,184.53 to NIB
between January 2003 and
April 2008 and was ordered
to pay $8,000 to the court
on Monday and $350 per
month thereafter.
Self-employed doctor
Walter Gibson, charged
with failure to pay
$12,865.75 between October
1998 and August 2004, did
not appear in court on Mon-
day and a warrant was
issued for the arrest.
Self-employed chiroprac-
tor Philip Huyler was
charged with failure to pay
$5,551.51 to NIB before
December 2003, and was
ordered to pay the amount
in full by December 31.
Bruno Minnis, of Bruno's,
was charged with failure to
pay $5,081.13 in NIB pay-
ments between January 2003
and March 2009, and Octo-
ber 2008 and March 2009.
He was ordered to pay the


George president


court $1,200 on Monday and
$400 per month thereafter
until his contributions have
been covered.
Bridgette Scavella, of Flo-
ral Fiesta, was charged with
failure to pay $4,969.40 in
NIB contributions between
December 1999 and August
2003, and was ordered to
pay the amount in full by
the end of December this
year.
Domestic employer
Melanie Bridgewater was
charged with failure to pay
$4,630.80 between January
1997 and December 2002.
She paid $1,800 to the court
on Monday and was ordered


to pay $100 per month to
the court.
Linda Taylor, self-
employed, was charged with
failure to pay $3,562.38 to
NIB between October 1997
and April 2006, and was
ordered to pay $500 to the
court on Monday, and $250
per month to the court
thereafter.
Jacqueline Lotmore, of
Three V's Beauty Supplies,
charged with failure to pay
$2,480.77 in NIB contribu-
tions over various periods
between December 1999
and April 2008, will appear
in Court 11 on November 2
for sentencing.


ChdfistmaN M[ura~iu, 20'X)VTeIiL S.5m.0u~, 5 Tem Split A)C Limit
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SPECIAL RETURN ENGAGEMENT
CATALY N & CURRY'S

"GUANAHANI"
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The Allegro Slirije
The Noocesan Chorale

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A -P.1'm H. Cuiry I & James J. Catallyn


Rules:
1. Children ages 10-16 may enter. Judging will be in two
age categories: 10-13 years and 14-16 years for a first
and second place winner in each category.
2. Write a essay answering the following subject:
"What does the Four-Way Test mean to me." Explain
your understanding of the 4-Way Test as it relates to
your life, experiences, and/or society in general."
Your essay must include the four principles.
3. The body ofthe essay must not exceed 1,000words.
Adults may assist the child in filling out the entry form,
but not in writing the letter.
4. Limit one essay per child. All entries must be received by
the Rotary Club of East Nassau before Nov 30, 2009.
5. Only essays accompanied by original entry forms clipped
from the newspaper will be accepted. Photocopy, fax,
carbon or other copies will not be accepted.
6. One winner will be chosen from each age category. The
decision of the judges is final.
7. Winner must agree to a photo presentation which will
be published in the newspaper.
8. Mail essay and completed newspaper clipping to
The Four-Way Test Essay Competition,
Attn: Michele Rassin, The Rotary Club of East Nassau,
P.O. Box SS-6320, Nassau, Bahamas

The Tribune
f~y ,iy^! M-


, DOCTORS HOSPITAL
rr" fhirhh Arrbf
WIN
FREE MAMMOGRAMS
For Life?
Enter to WAV F It Ifiram"09Mi tWvL J%.by u'LoipleIu'W
this enirv fDrn before NKienmber I st 20C19 and mail ia
R.O.Box N301 8Nassau~, Baiarmai
N am e,



TeL
MOW$


IN .cnwirwfr' . a PW Ci Z J* al .a~.j


OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM


Child's Name:


School:


Address:
P.O. Box:
Email Address:


Parent's Name:


Parent's Signature:
Telephone contact: (H) (W)
All entries become property of the Rotary Club of East Nassau and can be used
and reproduced for any purpose without compensation.

Romarv Chib v
EAST
NASSAU -
UM.l.Hld


Treat


Cill w make


4 fI


British Ame rican Financial Breast Ca ncer Ti p

Brem t mcer ]a the fear of every soinm u Oe ofdn Me " to tbeaftiig lV&dlww s wbto d&teatbreat m emtr hin It
earliest Ikn~s of de-viopmneut. A .awcuafial way of doing this Is lo ruegmarly perform hlimt exams an youwself. Every
woman should start sl ma exams when they renol Ienitweiy rea of ar'. Self exaImshsould be pedormed ewery
mouilh. Mark your ealendar In red Ink to irnihi you: dtisis k a rentinder to he~loyouerself and possibly awP your owin


Yo w uvvbreast Wfcunce. Bu tJIJdeecdn thII rhFU&I P ~reWubr4'cist e-evims anWd (r P'dqtldd!prttoy'mm f niarmlognnl
and physicid e-rms -are crucicd sieps that every wjomun should ernplodq


SB ritish

"tlAmerican


Beryl Wallace


.1


ITDISCUS TOIESONTHS PGELO0ONTOWW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


S,.A


-AS
3EV







+>


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Three accused of armed robbery of tourists


FROM page one

Angie Moss, 37, of Colony
Club, St Albans Drive, was
arraigned in court on Friday
for the same armed rob-
beries and has been remand-
ed in custody.
Magistrate Guillimina
Archer read the charges as
the two men, dressed in
jeans, T-shirts, and sneak-
ers, stood before the bench.


They are accused of being
concerned together and with
others, armed with an offen-
sive weapon, namely a
handgun, to rob Joan
Walins of $200 on Sunday,
October 11.
The men are also accused
of stealing $60 from Phyllis
Compeau, a gold rope chain
from John Tomillinson, $70
from Gloria Tomillinson,
two rings valued at $40 and


$65 in cash from Kelly
Greer, $106 from Ashley
Greer, $60 from Deborah
Greer, and $5 from Frank
Romeo.
Magistrate Archer
quizzed Johnson about a
doctor's visit as she held
medical documents stating
he had seen a doctor on
Monday.
But Johnson said he had
seen a doctor on Sunday and


Ms Archer said she hoped
he was not lying to the court
but did not clarify when he
had seen the doctor.
Guerrier appeared to have
had some medical attention
as he had a bandage on the
inside of his right elbow
what looked like a medical
bracelet on his left wrist.
Ms Archer said there was
another charge before her
which she could not make
sense of and asked the pros-
ecuter to review it before
bringing the men back
before the court.
Johnson and Guerrier
were not required to enter
a plea for any of the charges
as there will be a premlimi-
nary inquiry into the mat-
ters.
The case was adjourned
until February 12.
Until then all three of the
accused will be remanded in
custody, and have the option
of making a bail application
to the Supreme Court.
Guerrier and Johnson
asked for copies of the dock-
ets and charges, and Ms
Archer said the statements
would be provided.


.... ... ..


of


RUBEN JOHNSON and Johnny Guerrier at court yesterday.
Angie Moss was arraigned in court on Friday for the same armed
robberies and has been remanded in custody.


FROM page one

hosted by BHA, the Chamber of Commerce
and the US State Department.
"But it's still going to be a tough road par-
ticularly over the next two months and next
season. It's just too early to really predict
where we're going to be at," he added.
Mr Comito stressed that despite the dismal
market, now is the time for companies to
"buck the trend" and invest in aggressive mar-
keting.
"Both the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism as
well as the industry have marketed themselves
much more aggressively realising that the pie
is smaller and to retain some level of propor-
tionality of market share in the pie we have to
be much more aggressive "
Mr Comito's assessment is in line with the
International Monetary Fund's recent report
on the state of the region's tourism product.
According to previous reports, the IMF list-
ed the Bahamas among the Caribbean nations
that suffered the highest declines in tourist
arrivals during 2009. The IMF also predicted
that a turnaround in the sector is not expected
before 2011.
For the year up to May tourism arrivals to


Expert on tourism

the Bahamas were down by 14.1 per cent,
compared to a 3.4 per cent increase for
Jamaica and falls of just 2.4 per cent and 9.4
per cent for the Dominican Republic and St
Lucia respectively, said the IMF's assessment
of the Caribbean's tourism outlook.
Also making out slightly better than the
Bahamas were Barbados and Antigua & Bar-
buda, whose tourist arrivals to July 2009 were
down by 10.7 per cent and 12.8 per cent respec-
tively.
According to the report, the only Caribbean
nations dealing with a tougher situation than
the Bahamas were St Vincent & the
Grenadines and St Kitts and Nevis, who were
off by 17.4 per cent and 27 per cent respec-
tively for the year to June 2009.
Meantime, hotel occupancy rates for the
month of September are expected to be
released within "the next couple of days", Mr
Comito said.
"They don't appear to be, on the whole,
worse than September of last year but we'll
have the results shortly on that," he told The
Tribune.


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 9


Conchman Triathlon



set for next month



on Grand Bahama


IN just under two weeks,
the Bahamas' premier multi-
faceted sporting event is slat-
ed to begin in the nation's sec-
ond city, featuring swimmers,
bikers and runners from
around the world.
The 23rd annual Conchman
Triathlon to be staged in
Lucaya, Grand Bahama, is
scheduled for November 7
amidst wide boulevard streets
and crystal waters in a tropical
setting.
Possiple competitors can
register online at www.conch-
man.com
The adult race features a
1K swim, 25K bike, and a 5K
run, beginning 8am at Taino
Beach.
The Iron Kids, which
begins at noon, features a
200m swim, a two-mile bike
ride and a half-mile run.
Groups for Iron Kids com-
petition begin at six and
under, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12 and 13
and over.
"The event is free courtesy
of the sponsors - Fred Smith
and Sun Alliance Insurance.
The first 100 to finish will
receive T-shirts, medals and
awards," Smith said in a
release.
And presentations will be
made to the first three finish-
ers in each group (boys and
girls). "All primary and sec-


ondary school students are eli-
gible to participate," he said.
The Conchman Triathlon
has been a staple of sports
tourism since its inception
almost 23 years ago.
In 1986, the principal
organizers and founders,
Ambrose Gouthro, Bert Bell
and Craig Stewart, saw the
potential of having a Bahami-
an triathlon and decided to
launch it after seeing the suc-
cess of the Iron Man
triathlons in Hawaii and
Bermuda.
Presidents
"Mr Gouthro and Mr Stew-
art, then presidents of the
Rotary Club of Lucaya and
Rotary Club of Freeport,
respectively, aimed to create a
positive community event that
would contribute to charita-
ble organizations, which still
stands in effect today,"
according to the event's web-
site.
Organisers feel the Conch-
man provides an activity
where Grand Bahama resi-
dents and visitors could come
together to compete, build
and maintain a healthy body
and raise funds for Grand
Bahama Rotary Club pro-
jects, BASRA and Freeport
Aquatics Club.


At the time, Mr Gouthro
says the proceeds of the event
also went to the Polio Plus
Organisation, which was, and
still is, dedicated to eradicat-
ing polio in the world.
The first race was held at
Xanadu Beach and consisted
of the present distances, 1000
metre (half a mile) swim,
25km (15 miles) bike ride and
a 5km (3 miles) run.
According to Mr Stewart,
166 persons participated with
a fair number of entries from
North America and Canada.
There were 30 individual
entries and 44 team entries
that participated but of course
only one winner in each cate-
gory.
Over the next few years,
the Conchman moved from
Xanadu Beach to the former
Holiday Inn, now Our Lucaya
and then to its present loca-
tion at Taino Beach, where it
has garnered a lot of support
and participation.
The upcoming Conchman
promises to be an exciting,
challenging and fun race for
persons of all ages to enjoy.
With the "potential to be big-
ger and better", the Conch-
man has come a long way in
becoming one of The
Bahamas' most respected and
well-liked sports, hopefully
for many years to come.


ST Bede's Crushers Donald Cash attempts a
dunk yesterday. The Crushers won 54-19...


Judo tournament


award in memory of


Humphrey Jackman


THE Bahamas Judo
Federation held its Fall
Classic Judo tournament on
October 24. There were
more than 70 athletes and
200 spectators in atten-
dance.
A team from Abaco as
well as the Special
Olympics Team competed
in regular divisions of the
tournament. There were
several standout perfor-
mances as both male and
female athletes ranging
from ages eight to adult
participated.
"We were delighted with
the level of judo," said
David Rahming, coach of
the Fox Hill Club and Spe-
cial Olympics.
"You are seeing more
dynamic and complex tech-
niques that are seen on the
international stage. We are
definitely leaps and bounds


Humphrey Jackman


above where we were even
a year ago."
The following awards
have been decided based
on the results of the tour-
nament.
* The Competitors
Award- Tajaro Hudson
* Best Ippon (Submis-


sion) Award - Cynthia
Rahming
* The Humphrey "Trod"
Jackman Special Olympics
Award - Zecumba Major
"We are proud to give
this award in memory of
my friend Trod, who died
tragically this year. He was
a Special Olympian and he
should not be forgotten,"
said D'Arcy Rahming,
president of the Bahamas
Judo Federation.
"This tournament was
very important for the
Abaco kids to participate
in and we were delighted
with their performance,"
said Abaco coach Regina
Parotti Kennedy.
Anyone interested in
assisting the Bahamas Judo
Federation can contact the
Federation at 364-6773 or
via e-mail at
daishihan@gmail.com


THE SPECIAL OLYMPICS TEAM competed in regular divisions of the tournament...
Photo by Woodley Carroll


Crushers 'light

up' Sparks

the lower rims, but he noted
that his players didn't play up
to par.
"My boys had to adjust,
especially with defense on
them. They had to throw the
ball up harder," he said. "We
haven't had a chance to play
in rims this low, so we had to
get used to it."
With Turnquest and Coop-
er (who contributed 10) lead-
ing the offensive attack, the
Crushers also got some solid
defense from Adrian Mack-
ey, Christopher Oliver, Steve-
jay Whylly and Antoine Gib-
son as they staved off the
Sparks' attack.
D'Chaz Butler paced St
Thomas More with six, Cairo
Curry had five, Randy Forbes
chipped in with three and
both Rohan Kerr and Jeffer-
son Thomas added two.


Andy Roddick all set to play in

Mark Knowles Charity Invitational


FROM page 11

has always wanted to come to
the Bahamas and participate
in the tournament, according
to Knowles.
Paying together in Beijing
solidified this year's appear-
ance for the No.1 ranked
American player, who won
the 2003 US Open and was a
three-time Wimbledon final-
ist.
"We got a little closer and I
found out that he such a nice
guy," Knowles said. "He has
his own foundation like the
Andy Roddick Charitable
Organisation, so he under-
stands what it is I'm doing,"
Knowles said.
"With him coming, I think
it's going to be one of the
greatest ever. To have some-
body like Andy Roddick in
the Bahamas is going to be so
exciting."
This year, Knowles and his
organizers have switched the
professional tennis exhibition
from Atlantis on Paradise
Island to the National Tennis
Centre, Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre, 3pm Saturday,
December 5.
While adults will be
charged an admission fee,
Vicki Knowles-Andrews,
Knowles' mother, has indi-
cated that they will be allow-
ing children to be admitted
free so as to give as many of
them as possible the oppor-
tunity to meet Roddick up
close and personal.
Tickets will be available
from November 10 at the


National Tennis Centre,
Atlantis Tennis Centre, Vil-
lage Squash Club, H G
Christie Ltd and Lyford Cay
School.
Call 359-2542 for further
information.
The major sponsors to date
include Atlantis Resort &
Casino, Lombard Odier Dari-
er Hentsch Private Bank &
Trust, Pictet Bank & Trust
Ltd, Serenity Point, Abaco,
The Balmoral, The Bahamas
Ministry of Tourism, Ameri-
can Airlines, The Bank of the
Bahamas, Everkey Global
Fund, Templeton Global
Advisors, Odyssey Aviation,
H30 and The Ministry of
Youth Sports & Culture.
There are a few sponsor-
ship opportunities still avail-
able and interested parties
should contact Vicky
Andrews at vickyk@batel-
net.bs or cell: 357-9670.
The proceeds of the event
will go to aid local children's
charities. To date, over
$400,000 has been distributed
to various charities.
While the tournament
draws near, Knowles will be
returning to the pro circuit on
Sunday to play in Valencia,
Spain, where he is expected
to team up with Michael Llo-
dra at the Valencia Open 500.
Bhupathi has decided to
take another break, but will
rejoin Knowles in Paris,
France, for the BNP Paribas
Masters from November 11
before they head to the Bar-
clays ATP World Tour Finals
in London, England, starting
on November 22.


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


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BOA congratulates Knowles COBCaribs
9 defeat the


on ISF vice president post


THE Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion (BOA) congratulates its secre-
tary general Romell Knowles on his
election to the international post of
vice president of the International
Softball Federation (ISF).
Knowles has been elected as the
ISF's first-ever vice president for the
non-Hispanic Caribbean region.
Said BOA president Wellington
Miller: "I know that I speak for all
our colleagues in the Olympic move-
ment in The Bahamas when I say that
as a Bahamian to be the first to hold
this exciting position is an honour
that you well deserve."


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Miller said Knowles' election is "an
important milestone in the continuing
excellence of Bahamians in the
administration of international sport
and a shining example of good stew-
ardship in the sporting arena."
"Your success is our success," he
said. "We are sure that you will make
the most of your new position to the
benefit of all softball playing athletes
in the non-Hispanic Caribbean
region.
"The Bahamas is sure to benefit in
many ways from Mr Knowles' pres-
ence at such a high level in the Inter-
national Softball Federation."


Iv


ROMELL KNOWLES


Titans defeat Police by four wickets

as cricket league action heats up


THE local cricket commu-
nity has experienced a busy
schedule in recent weeks.
League play has intensified
with visiting teams from the
region taking part.
The Dynasty Stars recent-
ly hosted the Lucaya Cricket
Club of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, to a series of exhi-
bition matches over the
weekend.
In the opening match,
Lucaya CC batted first and
scored 182 all out.
The team's top scorers
included Kenneth Seeram
with 48 runs and Harold Stu-
art with 23.


Both Dynasty bowlers,
Venris Bennett and Lee
Melville, took three wickets
apiece.
In their turn at bat, the
Stars topped by scoring 184
runs for the loss of seven
wickets, to win the match by
three wickets.
Ryan Tappin scored 58
runs while Howard Roye
added 30 runs.
Bowling for Lucaya, Keith
Worrell took four wickets.
In the second match of the
series, Lucaya CC rebound-
ed to defeat the Stars by 54
runs. Lucaya scored 149 runs
all out in their turn at bat.


Titans defeated the Police by
four wickets.
The Police opened the
match with 139 runs.
Mark Taylor and Wayne
Patrick led the effort with 25
runs apiece. Calvin Neita
was the lead bowler for the
Titans and took seven wick-
ets.
Dockendale scored 161
runs for the loss of six wick-
ets for the win. Gargand
Ganpat scored 39 runs and
Narendra Ekanayake added
36 as the top scorers for the
Titans.
Odain Tucker took two
wickets for the Police.


Worrell scored 46 runs,
Brian Kumar added 28 and
Trevor Bourne chipped in
with 21 runs.
Bowling for the Stars,
Alvin Peters and Alex Her-
nandez took three wickets
each. The Stars failed to
duplicate Saturday's feat and
fell short with just 95 runs.
Gregory Irvin was the top
scorer with 20.
Bowling for Lucaya CC,
Harold Stuart and Worrell
took three and two wickets
respectively.
In local league play, con-
tinuing Sunday at Haynes
Oval, The Dockendale


Cougars

Intruders beat
Technicians

THE New Providence Vol-
leyball Association continued
its 2009 regular season with
another double header Mon-
day night at the DW Davis
Gymnasium.
In the women's match, the
COB Caribs defeated the
Cougars in straight sets 25-19,
25-24 and 25-16. Keneisha
Thompson led all scorers for
the win with 19 points. For
the youthful Cougars, Irina
Key led with five points.
In the men's match, it was a
battle between the Techni-
cians and National Fence
Intruders, each with one loss
for the season.
However, in the end, the
Intruders endured a 23-25, 26-
24, 23-25, 25-16 and 16-14 win
in five tough sets. Glen Rolle
led the charge with 17 kills,
one block and an ace for the
win.
In a losing effort, Renaldo
Knowles scored 19 kills, one
block and an ace.
Games are slated to con-
tinue tonight at the DW Davis
Gymnasium with another
double header on tap.

The Bahamas Cricket
Association will continue its
efforts to gain exposure
against regional competition.
The league is slated to host
the Cayman Islands' over 40
Masters team November 7-8.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 1 1


( )( TO I E 1< 2 N


Judo award

in memory of

Humphrey

Jackman...

Saee juge 9


I II II 1 )


VAG 9 Cnhan rathln ex-mnt


Roddick set to play in Mark



Knowles Charity Invitational


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net


ANDY RODDICK (right) teamed up with Mark Knowles at Beijing
Open where they reached doubles final...


AFTER teaming up to play together
for the first time in doubles in China a
couple weeks ago, Bahamian tennis ace
Mark Knowles and top ranked American
Andy Roddick will be reunited here.
Roddick, the former No.1 singles play-
er in the world, has agreed to participate
in the 9th Mark Knowles Charity Invita-


tional December 3-5 in an exhibition at
the National Tennis Center.
"It's extremely exciting to have a for-
mer world number one and grand slam
champion and someone as popular as
Andy coming to the event," said Knowles
yesterday in an interview with The Tri-
bune from his home in Dallas, Texas.
"It's really a huge boost and it has
added a lot of excitement. We are just
waiting on his arrival because he has said
he will be willing to participate in any


event that we have on the schedule.
That's the type of person he is."
Knowles and Roddick partnered at the
Beijing Open where they reached the
doubles final when Knowles' regular
partner Mahesh Bhupathi took a break
to recuperate from a groin injury he sus-
tained playing Davis Cup for India.
Roddick, who has been ranked No.1 in
the world and is currently ranked No.7,

SEE page 9


Cobras dig up Mystic Marlins

By RENALDO DORSETT Rattlers beat Pacers
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net
15-6. The Cobras' Jaynell Cox led all scorers

position late in the GSSSA
volleyball season, a pair of C I Gibson Rattlers over
senior girls teams helped R M Bailey Pacers 19-12, 19-8
their cause with wins yes- In the second matchup of the evening,
terday at the D W Davis Gymnasium... the Pacers did little in a losing effort as the
Rattlers eased their way to a two-set sweep.
C C Sweeting Cobras over D J Mystic After a 2-2 tie to begin the opening set,
Marlins 19-11, 12-19, 15-6 the Pacers failed to gain momentum and
The Cobras dominated the opening set found themselves behind 10-4 due to a series
as they raced out to an early 8-1 advantage of unforced errors.
and held on to breeze through the opening The Rattlers maintained a seven point
set. advantage for the remainder of the set to
The Mystic Marlins rebounded in the sec- win 19-12.
ond set with renewed determination to get Quicker to the ball and returning serves,
out to an early lead of their own. C I Gibson opened the second set on a 9-0
Christia Taylor's adept play around the run.
net led the charge for the Mystic Marlins Silverni Augustin served for each of the
who went on to separate themselves from an nine scores, building a lead too big for the
8-8 tie. Pacers to overcome.
Taylor scored three consecutive kills to After an unforced error put R M Bailey
propel her team's 5-0 run as they held on to on the scoreboard for the first time in the
take the set, 19-12. set, they rallied to come within six points, 12-
In the third, the Cobras reasserted their 6.
first-set dominance. A timely C I Gibson time-out corrected
The Mystic Marlins opened with a 4-2 the brief lapse in execution as they pressed
lead, however the Cobras responded with six on to take the set and match, 19-8.
consecutive scores. League play for seniors is scheduled to
The Cobras led 8-3 when the teams continue at the D W Davis Gymnasium on
switched sides and went on to win the set, Thursday.



Crushers 'light


up' Sparks 54-19


C I GIBSON Rattlers' Silverni Augustin digs the ball yesterday...


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
ALTHOUGH they had to
make an adjustment to the
legal six-foot rim height for
mini basketball, the unde-
feated St Bede's Crushers still
managed to rout the St
Thomas More Sparks.
In a rematch of last year's
Catholic Diocesan Primary
Schools championship series,
the defending champions
Crushers got a game-high 34
points from Kyle 'Flash'
Turnquest in their 54-19
pounding of the Sparks at St
Thomas More.
While St Bede's went on to
post their second straight vic-
tory for the season, there was
a lot of suspense as to who
would have been able to put
down a thunderous slam dunk
in the shortened rims.
With the game already out
of reach for St Thomas More,
Turnquest was the first to
come close to achieving the
feat when his attempt on a
two-handed dunk was put
into the rim for a 13-2 lead.
St Bede's, who held a 6-1
margin at the end of the first
quarter, used an effective trap
defense that enabled Turn-
quest and Gregory Cooper to
go after a few other dunk
attempts as they went on to
post a 19-4 half-time advan-
tage.
"I just decided to go for the
lay-ups because I didn't want
to miss the dunks," said Turn-
quest, who eventually
bogeyed another attempt in
the fourth quarter.
Turnquest said it certainly
feels good playing in the
shorter rims.
St Thomas More, who got a
couple dunk attempts from
their center Randy Forbes, is
the first school to play with


ST Bede's Crushers' Kyle 'Flash'
Turnquest attempts a dunk...
Photo by Felip6 Major

the rims at the regulation
height.
Coach N'Komo Ferguson
said the goal is to make sure
that their players get the
opportunity to play the game
the right way.
But coach Ferguson said it
wasn't a well played game on
both sides of the court.
"They didn't look 50 per
cent the way they did in their
first game against Xaviers and
we played 50 per cent better
than we did in our first game
against Our Lady's," Fergu-
son stressed.
"But we're still getting
there. We're still building. We
will see them again in the sec-
ond half because we are play-
ing each other twice this year.
So we hope to be better by
then."
St Bede's coach Donnie
Culmer agreed that it was
good for the players to play in

SEE page 9


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Power plant opponents

'challenge all permits'


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
OPPONENTS of the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion's (BEC) proposed $105
million Wilson City power plant
yesterday instructed their attor-
ney "to challenge the issuance
of any permits" for its con-
struction on the basis that they
had been unable to voice their
concerns to the authorities that
granted them.
Fred Smith, the Callender's
& Co attorney and partner, in
an October 27, 2009, letter sent
to Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham and numerous other
ministers and agencies respon-
sible for various aspects of the
Abaco-based power plant's
construction, effectively con-
firmed Tribune Business's
exclusive story on Monday,


FRED SMITH


October 26, 2009, that the
momentum towards commenc-

SEE page 5B


Car dealers eye 'bottom,



after 30% Q3 sales drop


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
B ahamian new car dealers
yesterday told Tribune Busi-
ness they were hopeful that
the industry had "seen the
bottom", after sector-wide sales for the
2009 third quarter and September came
in almost one-third down on 2008 com-
paratives.
Figures released to Tribune Business
by the Bahamas Motor Dealers Associ-
ation (BMDA) yesterday revealed that
new vehicle sales were down by about
29.89 per cent for the 2009 third quarter
year-over-year, with September's sales
31.8 per cent behind 2008 comparatives.
Collectively, the Bahamian new car
industry had suffered nine successive


months of sales declines.
Fred Albury, president of Executive
Motors and vice-president of Quality
Auto, told Tribune Business: "My gut
feeling, and I speak on behalf of Execu-
tive and Quality, is that we've seen the
bottom and will see a bit of a bump up in
demand" in the 2010 New Year.
He added: "July was a reasonable
month for us, August was so/so, Sep-
tember was not bad and this month is
really flat. Every quarter has had at least
one reasonable month to keep us afloat.
We're keeping our fingers crossed that
things will show signs of recovery in the
first part of next year."
Mr Albury said Executive and Quali-
ty had benefited from the fact they tend-
ed to "dominate" in the public trans-
portation and taxi cab/van market, and


the companies were "pre-sold up to
somewhere early in the New Year" in
this segment.
"What is of great concern is that the $
is so weak, especially against the euro
and the yen, so that prices are going to
be right up there," Mr Albury told Tri-
bune Business.
However, compensating for this was
the relative strength of the US dollar
against the South Korean currency, the
country that produced the Kia and Qual-
ity's Hyundai models. Mr Albury said
new Hyundai models were due to arrive
in the Bahamas next year.
He added that another current prob-
lem was the relatively low inventory lev-
els that Executive and Quality were car-

SEE page 2B


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BUSINESS executives yesterday said they were hoping to match
last year's total of 70 exhibitors at the two-day trade show attached
to the upcoming 2009 Energy Conference, with some 25 companies
already confirmed.
Frank Comito, the Bahamas Hotel Association's (BHA) exec-
utive vice-president, at a press conference to unveil the November
13-14 trade show, emphasised that it was not just designed as a plat-
form for firms in the renewable energy/energy efficient industry,
with manufacturers, marketing and public relations firms, food and
beverage suppliers, IT firms, financial services providers and
tourism-related companies among the 25 already signed-up.
Pointing out that 10,000 persons attended last year's trade show,
Mr Comito said: "We hope we can reach the amount last year of
having 70 booth exhibitors. It's a great opportunity for companies
to showcase their latest product and services, and build strategic
alliances with local and international companies."
Among those scheduled to attend this year's event is the US-
based Lowe's, Mr Comito adding that the Trade Show provided
Bahamian firms with an opportunity to interact with key executives
and purchasers/buyers from this nation's resort and other industries,
establishing new relationships and building on previous ones.
The BHA executive argued that the Trade Show would also pro-
vide an important marketing platform for Bahamian companies,
something they needed to do more than ever in a recession.
"In tough economic times,
industry tends to retrench," Mr SEE page 6B


Taxi Union fears BTC 'hopeful'


Atlantis 'hard blow'

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas Taxi Union
is bracing for what would
potentially be a "hard blow" if
Kerzner International's Atlantis
resort makes good on the
notice it gave to terminate its
contract for the ground trans-
portation/bussing of the resort's
employees, Tribune Business
can reveal.
Leon Griffin, the Bahamas
Taxi Union's president, last
night confirmed that the Par-
adise Island-based resort and
its owner had "given notice"
that they planned to terminate
the ground transportation con-

SEE page 2B


of return to

$40m profits

THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC) last
night said it hoped to end its
2009 financial year with net
income back in the $40 million
range, with revenues and oper-
ating expenses as at end-Sep-
tember both running $8 million
better than the budgeted tar-
get.
The state-owned incumbent,
which is in the middle of a pri-
vatisation exercise, said it was
"cautiously optimistic" that its
financial performance for 2009
would show a marked improve-
ment over 2008, when it suf-
fered a 50.7 per cent profit fall
to $21.1 million, compared to
$42.8 million in 2008
Kirk Griffin, BTC's acting
president and chief executive,
said: "The truth of the matter is
that BTC - like companies all
through the Bahamas and all
over the world - faced a diffi-
cult 2008 due to the severe
downturn in the global and
national economy.
"As people travelled less, it
meant that there were less
tourists making calls in the
Bahamas. This translated into a
sizeable fall-off in our roaming
revenue. As businesses con-
tracted and laid staff off, it
meant that there was less mon-
ey in the economy for persons
to spend on phone cards, new
cell phones and the like. It real-
ly is that simple."
Tribune Business yesterday
identified the decline in tourism
as being the major factor in
BTC's reduced roaming rev-


Government urged: 'Move faster' over renewable energies


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas needs "to
move faster" on renewable
energy initiatives and pro-
grammes designed to reduce
electricity costs, business lead-
ers said yesterday, arguing that
import duty exemptions to
facilitate efficiency in the sector
were not having the desired
effect because complementary
equipment was still being heav-
ily taxed.
Frank Comito, the Bahamas
Hotel Association's (BHA)
executive vice-president, said
one such case was CFL or ener-
gy efficient light bulbs, upon
which the Government had
eliminated all import duties in
the last Budget.


* Business executives say duty exemptions on energy-efficient technology not
having desired effect because complementary products still heavily taxed
* Absence of net metering deterring developers from incorporating renewable
energy, as unable to gain investment return from selling back to BEC grid


However, these bulbs were
now incorporated as part of
energy efficient fixtures, he
explained, and since these fix-
tures were still subject to rela-
tively high import/customs duty
rates, the value of the exemp-
tions for the bulbs was being
eliminated.
And, in turn, businesses and
residential users were being dis-
couraged from purchasing ener-
gy efficient technology because
of the cost involved, and
importers turned away from


bringing the products in.
"We'd like it to move faster
than it has. We wish they were
moving faster," Mr Comito said
of the Government's efforts to
reduce energy costs and
enhance efficiency, which have
involved a search a for renew-
able energy suppliers and the
drafting of an initial National
Energy Policy.
"Last July, with the passage
of the Budget in June, there
was a recommendation enacted
that we in the BHA had been


making for years, to make CFL
(fluorescent light bulbs), energy
efficient light bulbs, duty free,"
Mr Comito explained.
But while this was welcome,
the Government failed to adjust
or eliminate the import duty
rates on "energy efficient fix-
tures", and "many bulbs are
now part of the fixture". This,
the BHA executive vice-presi-
dent suggested, showed the
need for a more comprehen-
SEE page 4B


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+


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Car dealers eye 'bottom' after 30% Q3 sales drop


FROM page 1B
trying, with some 60 days of
stock - as opposed to the nor-
mal 180 day levels - currently
held.
Explaining that the compa-
nies had moved to align inven-
tory with the much lower levels
of consumer demand experi-
enced during summer 2009, Mr
Albury said: "We fell on the
side of caution this particular
summer and now inventory lev-
els are extremely low, to the
point where we now have 60
days in stock, when we nor-


mally have 180 days in stock.
My inventories should build in
December."
Increasing inventory orders,
as dealers moved to import new
models and replenish stock,
should also boost the Govern-
ment's tax revenues, Mr Albury
added, as some of the highest
tax rates were imposed on new
car imports.
He said neither Executive,
nor Quality, had laid-off staff
during the recession, instead
opting not to replace those who
left voluntarily.


"I know one or two BMDA
members who are having a real-
ly rough time of it, and have
had to cut back considerably,"
Mr Albury said. "We're just
trying to watch expenses as
much as we can. We've taken
the opportunity while things are
slow to introduce a new com-
puter system and get trained up
on it. We're looking at other
avenues to tighten up on. My
gut feeling is that there will be
some recovery in the first half
of 2010."
Mr Albury's sentiments were
echoed by Andrew Barr, sales
manager and a director at


Friendly Ford, who told Tri-
bune Business it was "not unex-
pected" that new car sales
would be down 30-40 per cent,
given the depth of the reces-
sion.
He, too, was cautiously opti-
mistic that sales would rebound
to "a satisfactory level" in the
2010 New Year, but warned
that a return to pre-recession
levels, might "take a lot longer
than people might anticipate.
Even getting back to that level
might be a difficult task".
While Friendly Ford had
been able to avoid any lay-offs
among its 35 staff, Mr Barr,


drawing parallels with a US
economy that overbinged on
credit, said: "I think we were
living in paradise where every-
thing was seen as coming easy
at that time."
Yet, with new car sales being
sensitive to credit availability,
the lack of confidence on the
part of both banks and con-
sumers was impacting the
industry. "I don't think there's
a quick fix to it," Mr Barr said.
"It's not something where you
will see, in one to three months,
things going great." He
explained that with sales down
40-50 per cent year-over-year,


even a 5-10 per cent improve-
ment every quarter would
mean it takes a full year to get
back to pre-recession levels.
Meanwhile, Rick Lowe, Nas-
sau Motor Company's (NMC)
operations manager, said cus-
tomer floor traffic was down 50
per cent from "where it used
to be", agreeing with Mr
Albury that October was slow.
Walk-in traffic was down, he
added, arguing that a major fac-
tor in reduced demand was the
difficulty - and a lack of confi-
dence - consumers were having
in obtaining debt financing
from the commercial banks.


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All Spaces are exclusive of utilities

All Inquires Call 326-4222


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BLACK


Taxi Union fears Atlantis 'hard blow'


FROM page 1B

tract for ferrying Atlantis
employees to and from the


island.
However, he said the
Bahamas Taxi Union was still
in talks with Atlantis executives


The Public is hereby advised that I, ERNEST HYLER Treasure
Cay, Abaco 022217 of Treasure Cay, Abaco, one of the islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,intend to change my name to
RALPH ERNEST. If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.




NOTICE is hereby given that KATY JEAN of RUSSELL TOWN,
EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 26th day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



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on the issue, and the contract
termination was not a 'done
deal'.
Reluctant to comment due
to the fact that there was a pos-
sibility that the Bahamas Taxi
Union might retain its contract
with Atlantis, Mr Griffin told
Tribune Business: "We are still
talking about it with Atlantis,
even though they have given
notice about it."
Although he did not confirm
the November 1, 2009, termi-
nation date that Tribune Busi-
ness had been given, Mr Griffin
added: "They [Kerzner Inter-
national] did give notice about
it. I can't go any further
because there's still hope, and
we're still talking about the con-
tract."
The Bahamas Taxi Union


president said he was awaiting
the outcome of a meeting
between Atlantis executives
that was scheduled for yester-
day morning, and indicated he
might be able to comment fur-
ther today when more infor-
mation was available.
Although not commenting
on the reasons given by Atlantis
for its move to terminate the
ground transportation contract,
Mr Griffin did tell Tribune
Business the likely impact on
the Bahamas Taxi Union if
such a development came to
pass.
He said: "It would not be
devastating, but it would be a
very hard blow, and we would
have to do some readjustments
and all kinds of things."
Mr Griffin, though, said
reports reaching Tribune Busi-
ness that Atlantis had also can-
celled all Bahamas Taxi Union
tours were not true.
Several sources had suggest-
ed to Tribune Business that
Atlantis was looking to give the
employee ground transporta-
tion contract to Bahamas Expe-
rience, the company that pro-
vides guest transportation ser-
vices and tours to many of the
resort's visitors.


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+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3B


Internet body hosts renowned speaker


THE Bahamas Internet
Organisation, a newly formed
body, is teaming up with part-
ners in this nation's e-com-
merce sector to host an inter-
nationally-acclaimed entre-
preneur, author and success
trainer.
Bruce Muzik, the founder
of Designer Life, will stage a
one-day luncheon workshop
hosted by the Bahamas Inter-
net Organisation, during
which he will speak on the
topic, Eight ways to grow your
On-Line business or career.
The event is scheduled for
Thursday, October 29, at
12.30 pm at East Villa Restau-
rant on East Bay Street.
Damien Forsythe, organis-
er of the Bahamas Internet


Organisation, said both e-
commerce and 'bricks and
mortar' businesses in the
Bahamas stood to benefit
from the workshop, which is
tailored to meet the needs of
business owners, Internet
marketers, web/graphic
designers and programmers,
marketing managers and any-
one seeking to enter the e-
commerce industry.
Mr Forsythe added: "Over
the years, the Bahamas has
seen a dramatic increase in
the number of Internet-based
businesses, as well as the
number of companies that use
the web for marketing, as the
Internet has proven to be a
very powerful and resourceful
business tool.


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), EL PACIFICO INC., is in dissolution. Continental
Liquidators Inc. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
60 Market Square, P.O. Box 1906, Belize City, Belize. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are
required to send their names, addresses and particulars of their
debts or claims to the Liquidator before November 26, 2009.

.-



I4'* C,'>il.aJi IDmuJ . h-






INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45
of 2000), CALISTA INC., is in dissolution. Continental
Liquidators Inc. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
60 Market Square, P.O. Box 1906, Belize City, Belize. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are
required to send their names, addresses and particulars of their
debts or claims to the Liquidator before November 26, 2009.

.:



oyi


BRUCE MUZIK


"Through this luncheon
workshop we hope to assist
all business owners by inform-
ing them of how they can use
the Internet as well as their
own skills to boost their busi-
nesses. In addition, we hope
to create a more united e-
commerce sector in the
Bahamas."
He said: "The more that we
can all be on the web and all
be interconnected and make a
more user-friendly presence,
great payment and marketing
systems that work, the possi-
bilities are endless for the e-
commerce sector here in the
Bahamas."
Mr Forsythe said realtors
have the Bahamas Real
Estate Association; attorneys,
the Bahamas Bar Association;
and businesses, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, so it
would be ideal for e-com-
merce practitioners to have
one unified organisation.
"Local business owners
stand to benefit tremendous-
ly from attending this event.
Mr Muzik's unique blend of
philosophy and science, com-
bined with his infectious
enthusiasm, have had him on
television, the front cover of
newspapers, and propelled
him to the top of his game as
a sought-after speaker and
teacher worldwide," Mr
Forsythe said.
Mr Muzik said the work-
shop will focus on assisting
persons in finding their nat-
ural path to creating wealth.
"If you study wealthy peo-
ple throughout history, you
will find that they all created
their wealth in one of only
eight different ways. Research
shows that each one of us is
naturally suited to wealth in
one of these eight ways more
than the other. So, based on
our personality types we will
find it easier to make money
if we create wealth in a way
that's naturally suited to our
personally type," Mr Muzik
said.
"I think one of the biggest
things people struggle with in


O~ ~2ee


A'li .�tri��.I d. we prde od or . Liqri~p ' c diciphi~ nc d pred n-ei1
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Su"AItrild hukifh ~osa"aI Umwild

iiJ I ndh i -ii riirp. r f--r(rakwe o-%i


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life is that they go about want-
ing to make money and they
start a business, and what
ends up happening is that
they work hard their whole
life, not really finding the kind
of success that entrepreneurs
have and not knowing why,
and it's usually because they
have taken the wrong path to
wealth. They are following a
strategy that is not natural for
them."
Registration for the work-
shop is $10 and the lunch, a
three-course meal is $20 (paid
direct to East Villa). Busi-
nesspersons can RSVP by
con t a c t i n g
Damien@BahamasInterne-
tAssociation.org or by calling
434-6900.


REQUEST FOR


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TENDER


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US Departures Termi'nat

L(rr> ' ie. jii i r1L Iricr. to L~miUinn irpl~itsl OfSQr~xI ofV* I PLA Fxj:.vw-�n
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P A.m~amw Pkru�g
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deemed q*aiffled uiII beco dered. Qualffckrons will be based coni he k~ "criteria:
a A demionse-aidan iiinamcial captit'rt


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BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY
HALLO WEE N
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NASSA LJ'S III G4EI:'K (GARAG EI SAl I~.E.!1
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Pet cotause cm~ .npiidamgu trusat Kom~
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+>


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LEGAL NOTICE

NJORD HOLDINGS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby


given that in


accordance with Section 238 of The
Companies Act No. 18 of 1992, a resolution
has been passed on the 26th day of October,
2009 requiring NJORD HOLDINGS
LIMITED to be wound up voluntarily. The
voluntary winding up commenced at the time
of passing of the resolution authorizing such
winding up.


S Maverne Nixon
LIQUIDATOR


Government urged: 'Move faster' over renewable energies


FROM page 1B
sive, considered tax policy to
ensure that renewable, sustain-
able energy - plus energy effi-
ciency and conservation - were
encouraged in the Bahamas.
"Our sense is that there
needs to be a 'roll up the
sleeves' approach to policy at a
different level," Mr Comito said
yesterday. "There are a num-
ber of categories of equipment
that could be considered for
duty exemptions that are not
going into the mix. It should be
part of the overall National
Energy Policy that is under con-
sideration."
The BHA executive vice-
president, speaking yesterday
at a conference to unveil the
2009 Energy Conference and
Business Trade Show, an ini-
tiative it is staging in partner-
ship with the Chamber of Com-
merce and the US Embassy in


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Nassau, also pushed for public
policy changes that would allow
net metering in the Bahamas.
Mr Comito explained that
this would allow businesses and
residential users "to create
excess energy from their own
[renewable] systems, and the
excess energy would go back
to the [BEC] power grid".
Those who sold excess ener-
gy to BEC would then receive a
credit on their energy bills,
reducing their utility costs. Mr
Comito said US states, such as
California, had used net meter-
ing very successfully to produce
"a real impact" on energy costs,
usage and the development of
sustainable, renewable energy.
Jeff Dubel, the US Embas-
say's political/economic chief,
said the absence of net meter-
ing in the Bahamas was also
suffocating efforts by develop-
ers to incorporate renewable
energy and associated tech-
nologies in their projects.
He explained that many
developers spoken to by the US
Embassy wanted to embrace
sustainable energy technologies


in their businesses, but in the
absence of net metering in the
Bahamas - where they could
sell excess electricity back to
the BEC grid - they were
unable to earn a return on this
investment. Without net meter-
ing, the initial costs incurred in
installing renewable energies
was just too prohibitive.
Arguing that the Govern-
ment "urgently" needed to
remove legislative and technical
impediments to Bahamas-based
businesses implementing
renewable energy technologies
and their own power sources,
Yvette Sands, head of the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce's energy and environ-
ment committee, said electrici-
ty costs were at a point where
they "impeded" business.
"I think we're at the point
now where it's becoming an
impediment to doing business,
not allowing businesses to
implement renewable energy
offerings," she said. "Business-
es are willing, but policy does
not allow it."
Referring to the fact that


Legal Notice
NOTICE
DIMARI HOLDINGS LIMITED




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DIMARI HOLDINGS LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice
NOTICE
ENFIRE HILLS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


existing legislation does not
permit companies and home-
owners to use alternative ener-
gy in areas where BEC's elec-
tricity supply is present, Ms
Sands added: "Policy needs to
open the gate to allow this to
happen. We need to have leg-
islative relief for the improve-
ments to occur.
"Businesses are primed and
ready, but the environment
does not allow for it. The pace
needs to quicken on getting rid
of impediments, either legisla-
tive or mechanical. There are
some technical issues that need
to be solved. We do want to see
it go a little bit faster."
Ms Sands acknowledged that
"all is not lost", with the Gov-
ernment working on numerous
energy-related initiatives with
the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank (IDB), including
the importation of 100,000 CFL
light bulbs for low and middle
income families, plus 30 pilot
programmes featuring solar PV
technology and net metering,
plus 70 pilot solar water heater
installations.
However, she added that the
process of gathering data, writ-
ing reports, discussing them and
then taking action could take
between three to five, even 10
years, a process that needed to
be drastically shortened.
Addressing the press confer-
ence, Ms Sands said: "We need
cleaner energy at stable prices.
It is urgent. The time is now.
"The outcry of the business
community is loud and it con-
tinues to ring in our ears. The
cost of electricity is too high to
be sustained, the law does not
allow for any significant private
generation of power to relieve
the burden, there is no room
for a fast-paced response by
businesses to reduce their ener-
gy bill.
"Bearing such a bill has been
tough to most and devastating
to others - the electricity bill is
one of the most burdensome
costs a business will bear. For
some, passing it on to con-
sumers is the only option short
of shuttering their business. The
result - the cost of living goes up
and up, because of the fluctu-
ating world fuel price."
Ms Sands said the Bahamas
needed to reduce its depen-
dency on fossil fuels to lower
its carbon footprint and envi-
ronmental impact, and inte-
grate renewable energy into the
mix while also reducing con-
sumption and power demand.
"Businesses need to take a
hard look at their consumption,
and some of the things they can
do to reduce consumption short
of self-generation of power,"
Ms Sands added. "Look at the
tools that are available, and find
ways to reduce consumption to
mitigate against prices going
up." She warned that renew-
able energy forms might not
always be "the panacea" for
every situation.
Mr Comito added that it was
not enough to demand that
policies and institutions be in
place on the Government side.
"Not enough businesses are
aware of the opportunities that
present themselves," he added.
"We can't be knocking the pub-
lic sector if businesses are not
taking advantage of the oppor-
tunities."


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


CPN-940


GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF NATIONAL SECURITY
PARLIAMENTARY REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT

NOTICE OF R FS1_1 -T OF CONTITED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Exiiuma Copmcnicy Puing bi.DIisionai 1 & 14
GmirpteT~wu, Juliv HaIll, Dathata Sourid,
Cottage & Master Harke~r
In tihe E.w iuaimm Tiww ArEm
OF th~e Esurda OIAtiilI

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THlE POLL

M) ~I WE i 1,71 t~i.-ihat on 'he :.ki'j.g of ih.w Poll im ihe ahme rxiiinod cIr.,djefl



ieurmumv ,Ini feeand addrvns



AN 1) ~ is hb-4 iw n LhVai the mm!htts oe Lbei igow5 w f or 1hc 4 � cra
canukJwsk iiin hu sW, lucwIt wriv as . Jllokhs~-

4JoldteNihibr' S*mtIl r'Gs
%rartIn fall Fu)kd

.STRAC IIAN ClittorJ O'Brian 92






Sip: IvnF'rgupoci
RETURNING OFFICER


BUSINESS I






+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5B


BISX continues its investor education


THE Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange
(BISX) has continued its
investor education pro-
gramme at an October 8,
2009, meeting with Grade 12
Economics and Commerce
students at Queen's College.
Keith Davies, BISX's chief
executive, said: "From BISX's
standpoint we believe that
educating current and future
investors is a fundamental
and essential role of our
exchange. Our visit to
Queen's College was reward-
ing in so many ways, and it
gives us a chance to hear, first
hand, the questions and con-
cerns that students have
regarding stocks, investing
and the stock market.
"Over the last two years,
we have had an opportunity
to speak to a number of dif-
ferent age groups at several
different schools. I always
find it gratifying when a
teacher contacts us request-
ing the opportunity to have
us speak to their students, as
this is a clear indication of an
interested teacher.
"I was especially gratified


KEITH DAVIES, BISX's chief executive and listings manager, with grade 12 Queen's College students who
are studying economics and commerce...


by the number of students
who were considering a
career in some aspect of busi-
ness. These students seemed
especially focused on under-
standing the operations of the
stock exchange, and I look
forward to reading about the


accomplishments of all of the
students in the future."
Coinciding with BISX's
10th anniversary, Mr Davies
gave a presentation on the
importance of the stock
exchange and the role played
by BISX in the Bahamian


economy.
He added that such efforts
were designed to create
future generations of
informed investors, able to
use and take advantage of the
products and services facili-
tated by BISX.


Power plant opponents


'challenge all permits'


FROM page 1B

ing Judicial Review proceedings was build-
ing.
"Please be advised that we are instructed
to challenge the issuance of any permits
on the basis that, inter alia, that our clients'
concerns have not been considered or tak-
en into account by the relevant decision-
makers," Mr Smith warned in the letter.
He then asked the Government agen-
cies to confirm "the nature of the permits
issued" for construction work on the Wilson
City plant to proceed, and to who the per-
mits were issued.
Also requested by Mr Smith and his
clients were the names of government


departments/agencies responsible for issu-
ing the permits, when the permits were
issued, and details of any further approvals
being considered by the authorities. Copies
of the permits approved to date are also
being sought.
"We would be remiss if we did not
express our clients' extreme disappoint-
ment at the Government's continued uni-
lateral actions in this matter, despite its
knowledge of our clients' legitimate con-
cerns," Mr Smith wrote.
Referring to an October 8 letter sent to
himself and his clients by Benjamin Pin-
der, the assistant administrator of the south
Abaco local government district, in which
he indicated that "the appropriate author-
ities" would respond to all their questions,
Mr Smith said he and his clients were


"shocked" to learn that a government min-
ister had said all necessary permits had
been obtained by the administration.
The Callender's & Co partner added that
he and his clients understood that con-
struction work on the Wilson City plant
had resumed.
Referring to the announcement by Phen-
ton Neymour, minister of state for the envi-
ronment, Mr Smith had told Tribune Busi-
ness on Monday: ""In the face of this
announcement, my clients have no alter-
native but to launch Judicial Review pro-
ceedings, which they will be doing shortly,"
Mr Smith told Tribune Business.
"Regrettably, Judicial Review proceed-
ings will be launched very shortly. It will
take some time to get all the documents
together, but they will be drafted."


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ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


T1~7


NOTICE

ESTWICK INVESTMENTS LIMITED
(in Vuluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hercby given that the dissolution oif the
abae-nnamed Ccmnpany iommenced on the Ifih
day of October, 2009. The Liquidator is John M.
Lawrence of P.O. Box CR.56766, Suite 1000,
Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF WlIE JANEMTEALIURY


NO1CICFis heMrgv en tIW 9M m l lsousvirvg

r{ieqsued to send fLhe amt duly oiufu t o fieundpr-dged
on mbef .0Ncwemkrr2009

AND NOTICE hm 1w xbaom $4ot het1
expirdfio.n 4 the Iinv menfwi iLd lbae f a&&of the Iat
ELSIE JANM rE AU RY will be distributed among ite




GRHAMKTHOM1'SON*01
Attkm-Y sfcc theEkem1iur
An~: A tccm S. Saith

Shikrkyat't &- VwhxiA Ara


10r~


wwfonumec~c
Emnail: MwW*@4t~h~oom


BUSINESS


m"


I OL-luebeemol







+


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


BTC 'hopeful' of return to $40m profits


FROM page 1B

enue.
In BTC's 2008 annual report, Mr
Griffin revealed that the state-owned
incumbent's net income had fallen to
$21.1 million from $42.8 million the
year before, "resulting principally from
a 1 per cent or $3.5 million decline in
revenues and a 6 per cent or $18.7 mil-
lion increase in operating expenses".
On the revenue front, Mr Griffin
attributed the drop from $356.915 mil-
lion in 2007 to $353.369 million to an
18 per cent or $9.9 million drop in net
roaming revenues.


"We didn't stand idly by as we
watched the economy deteriorate. The
Board and management of BTC took
decisive actions to bolster exposure of
promising product lines within the
marketplace, while at the same time,
the company took aggressive action
to reduce and contain costs without
eliminating any of its product offer-
ings," Mr Griffin said in a statement
issued last night.
"Because of steps that were taken
beginning late last year, at the end of
September our operating expenses are
tracking at $8 million below the
approved 2009 budget due to
enhanced cost-cutting activities.


"At the same time, our revenue is
up by some $8 million above budget
due to targeted and sustained market-
ing and promotional activities. So
even as the economy has yet to
rebound out of the most severe reces-
sion since the Great Depression, we
are tracking for profitability that would
be substantially higher than the $21
million earned in 2008."
Reason
He added: "The reason that we tem-
per our optimism with caution is
because we recognize that the months
of September through November are


traditionally challenging months for
cellular revenue due to low tourism
arrivals and seasonally adjusted
employment in the industry.
"Thus, while we feel good as to
where we are, we are mindful that the
economy is still stressed and we cannot
say with absolute confidence how the
year will end up. Yet, with continued
creative leadership and continued vig-
ilance on our expenditure, I am hope-
ful that we will be able to end the year
with profits approaching the $40 mil-
lion range - more in line with the prof-
its earned in 2006 and 2007"
In December 2008, BTC dropped
its fees on mobile caller ID, call wait-


ing and voicemail, giving back to its
customers some $6 million in project-
ed revenue for 2009. The company
cut its SMS [texting] rate from $0.10 to
$0.05 and increased the bucket of min-
utes in its post-paid packages, effec-
tively reducing the overage fees it
would otherwise earn from customers.
Mr Griffin added: "So even while
we are cutting costs and seeking to
shore up revenues, we recognize that
persons are having a difficult time in
this economy. Thus, even with no man-
date or competitive pressure to do so,
we have searched hard to find ways
to ease the burden where possible for
our customers. "


Trade Show targets 70 exhibitors


FROM page 1B
Comito said. "In the hotel sec-
tor, we've realized that we've
got to market more aggressive-
ly. Both the Ministry of
Tourism and the private sector


realise the pie is smaller, and
to retain our proportionate
share of the pie we have to
market more aggressively.
"Now is more important than
ever for businesses to promote


NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF GEORGE LEONARD
ADDERLEYlate of BunimGroundin Tm he 1s1andof
Long Il~anid oum of fthe IsbLmds in th
Cmimonweplh of The Rau.imi, dised.

NOTICE isllheib1� gien that all persm ha lgn
claims5 or demands against the above-named Late are
w412stL(I tosemi ilthesamepduly ceftfifld to the undersignLA'
on or bMore JO'�November W,

AND NOTCE erebyf 46 given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned abomwte, dEsseits of the late
GEORGE tEONARD ADDERLEY will be distiibuted
among the persons entitled ther'tm having regard only to
the daims o which~ the Ewutor of the Esbte shall the,
have hM Notict,,


CRAHAI4 TWWWSN & Ca
Atfin~flrmy fxth~rie Enturs
Am �MAthnS, Sm~ith
.Chler Coom&.~~wArw
Fn- Box N-2 n.




NOTICE

IN Till ESTAnh Of GARTH MINARD
THOMPSON late of 443 Ridgeway Ddov, Easte~rn
Distrct New Pwvkdenre, Baluma 5. deceased,

NOTICE is hte* y en that al]l piowns having
laiMS or demands agaW# tlw a4w-iwmwd Estate are
requested tisnd tuitIsarne duly crtifiedI to the undersigned
on or becre .10", November 2W9.

AND NOTIE is lwrebv also given that at the
expirafion offlwthe t ime ntioned a.b te. ass ets of the late
GARTH MJNARD THOMPSON will be disftriuted amixtg
the persons ertfitled theff~to having regard onlyto the claims
cd wlikhthe FE-utioflithe 11w taw s.hall then have had
Notie


C1AHAMjRQMM~N ~kM
Aft orwp iort &E eiukv
Atix A~many &Sm ~ilh

5ihirk,%- %w & Vbiiwa Aymma
ROL 5M W4-72
Nafm BehMY



NOTICE

14IN TEESTATEOF UVINCSTON SINCLAI[R
MARSH{ALL, SL lte of he SLttmerofGevrg
Town in the Island of Great Extor ama ~ie the
Island Of the Umcainwealtibof The IBIiainas,


'YOTCE is hiereby given that all per~m, 5 having
dl~or or demandsai a~nvi the aov-i'rndFste a*
"wiisted to iend the sam U e r 4 iz edid to the uod~edim
rm or lvfwe 301h 'Nu.vwiTb&'r 2009

AND NOTICE iherebyr alo given that at the
expiration Df the fime mentined abmE, the assets cif the late
LIVNG5TN SINLAIR MARSHALL, 51L will be
dislribiiied anmJig the pefwm en'~titled thweret having
regard only lo the daIrnm of which, ihe Executor of the Estite



GRAHALK TIIOWSOI & M
AuwI�%f~f 1h# . fWihmP~u

r5mwwu4Ne


themselves more aggressively
and make buyers aware of what
they offer, and how it makes a
difference."
Mr Comito said fees for
booth exhibitors would increase
by $200 this year, as organizers
looked to cover their costs after
subsidising exhibitors last year.
While the economic down-
turn was a factor, the Trade
Show having signed up five


more exhibitors this time last
year, Mr Comito emphasised
the event's value. He said one
start-up, which exhibited after
just obtaining its Business
Licence last year, obtained its
first customer at the show and
was still in business. Another
company used the Trade Show
to introduce another product
line every year, and one sale of
that product was regarded as a


I


NOTICE is hereby given that PHANUEL LOUIMA of
Pinewood Gardens, P.O. BOX GT-2914 NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21 stday of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF PETER ANDERSON
SWETING ate of the Eastern District of theI Mad
of New Providenzce, Baharnas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given Iht al persons having
claims or demands aains the aboe-rmed Estate ae
requested to send thesawe duly cetifiy d t thet uiersigned
on or bfoe NoW v er 2009.

AND NOTICE is hereby also givei that at the
expiration of tIe frii mention d above, the assets of the late
PETER ANDERSON SWEATING will be disHtrbuled
among the peronm entitled iereto having regard only to
the aims of which the Emtrix of the Estate shall then
have had NoIke.


GRAHAM, THOMPSON & COT
Atfinrw n fir lhe Exwulx"e
AtMt: Attorney 5. Smith

Shixfry Streer & Vktoria Avenue
P.O. Bo N-272




NOTICE

IN THE EI ATE OF CALVIN IERNtLL
SAWYER a a. CALVIN BURNAL SAWYER late
of New Plynmoiiih, GI(es Tiirtle Cay, Bahamak
deeased

NOTICE is heeby given that all pesTm hsv Ving
da or demands agamst ihe abomamed Estat are
requested to sm d the same duly certified ta thrundersigned
ion or bfre 30* November 29.

AN D NOICE B herby also pvm ih at at the
%pi aiioi of ihe time menticmed abott, tie ases of The lte
CALVIN BERNEl SAWYER a.ka. CALVIN BURNA1
SAWYER wil be dributed arrimg the p~cs entitled
theo having regard ly to thed claims of which the
Extitrrd fl tatak shall thim ha,' 1ad Note.



Alieome,' fcr l6c E&Nulor


yiii1f' !5jiw & Yktti Awm
1P IKAN-7 2
N &Mii Dhuina .


successful show.
On the energy conserva-
tion/efficiency front, with the
conference scheduled for
November 12,2009, Mr Comito
added: "The issue of energy
efficiency is glaring in the minds
of businesses, particularly now
we're starting to see a creep up
in oil prices.
"We know the cost of energy
is a challenge for all of us in the
coming years, and it's ever
more important that we look
at renewable sources of ener-
gy."
Mr Comito added that there


needed to be a "greater under-
standing" of how the retro-
fitting of companies/homes, and
the importation of renewable
energy equipment, could be
financed.
Jeff Dubel, the US
Embassy's political/economic
chief, said the Bahamas was
"the perfect test bed to test
these new" renewable energy
technologies, given its geogra-
phy and climate. He pointed
out that 80 per cent of future
greenhouse gas emissions
would come from developing
states.


I~h Trbn


NOTICE

1N ~ THlE ESTATE OF JOKE MU.SAWYM Liii
JOYCE SAWYER late Qf Trmure Cav, Abow.
Bahamias, kerW.e

NKlCE , heretry givn Ithat al l rmIg hin-ii

Teqieslltod ITJ thie aww July ceniiid to the un~rgnpd
on mbpicre VNn eniherT 200,

AND !NOTICE is hereb~y abo g'-n it at t he
expiration of theilime rnentim kwner tv, he aMetof the late
JOYCE Ht. SAWM & Aiu JOYCE SAWYER w~lI be

rep~d ouily to$the claimr .of whieb the Executor of the Estae
shall ien hve had Ntfiice.


GRAMMAMTHOMMON & Ct.
Aiiun far the LuCUku



P.O. kt N-Z'




NOTICE

IN THFE ESTATE OF SHEVOLYN TAN[QUE
ARM[BRISTER late Of Jeuinie SLIPe~t in 1he 5Southei
Nfio f he Tbdof New P ziee owe of the
Islans in t1w OmmoftwiweAth of The Moliainw%
deeftsed.

NOTI1CE is heieby given that aU person having
claims or denunds against ffhe a we-named Estate are
req~uegeitodI sendi the sina duMy cetified to the und~migniai
on or befm 309 MovNem~r M.

AND NOMIE is hereby also ivi that at the
exp~iratlion cof the lime moioinned above, the assetu of dhe late
SHEVOLYN TANJQUI ARMMBRSrEK will be distributed
among the persc entitled ffiemet having regard cnly to
Ow~ clairris of which the Administratrix of the Esaite slull
ih*1 have h~d No0i0e,







P (). DowNM~


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


k







+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 9B


COCO Palm's most popular buy, the
Italian pizza, which comes in different
flavors, topped with green peppers.
mozzarella, and fresh tomatoes.


The Bahamas meets Italy at the Coco Palm Cafe


By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

WALK into the Coco
Palm Cafe and Takeaway
on Bernard Road and you
will experience an inclu-
sive and unique Bahami-
an-Italian dining experi-
ence.
Whatever is happening in the
kitchen, the aroma from the food,
the heat from the stove, and the
conversation from the cooks - you're
not excluded from any of it.
There's no food passing through a
window; instead you have an open
view of the kitchen, seeing your dish
being made from start to finish.
Tribune Taste first featured the
Coco Palm Caf6 this summer, and
since then the restaurant has creat-
ed quite a buzz for itself in the east-
ern part of New Providence.
Adding a twist to the ordinary,
this establishment offers the best in
Bahamian cuisine fused with Ital-
ian flavours and spices.
Mango and raspberry barbecue
wings; coconut curry; chicken fet-
tucinni, and citrus pork are just a
few of the amazing dishes you will
find at the Coco Palm.
Chef Paul Coakley, owner of the
restaurant, claims they have the best
chicken fettuccini on the island, and
it's made using his personal top-
secret recipe.
Continuing in the Italian vein, thin
crust pizzas are also on the menu.
They are served by the slice or by
the box and finished with fresh
herbs. The pizzas are a bestseller at
the restaurant, and are often
requested by businesses like Audio
Plus who frequently order up to two
boxes a day, Chef Coakley said.
What's Coco Palm's secret recipe
that keeps them coming back? Chef
Coakley says the pizza is simply of a
different calibre. And from what we
tast-


ed, it is certainly different from
'those other guys.'
If you want to try a pizza that is
lighter on the pallet, with less oil,
check out Coco Palm's cheese, veg-
etarian or 'meat amor' pizzas, all of
which are topped with peppers, pep-
peroni, sausage, sliced tomatoes and
mushrooms.
Fresh vegetables, mozzarella
cheese, pepperoni, Italian sausage,
and herbs like garlic and thyme are
also used to finish the restaurant's
pizzas.
With prices in the $5 to $15 range,
you definitely get your money's
worth.
Chef Coakley said he believes
that "the average person should be
able to get quality food that is avail-
able at upscale restaurants."
And the restaurant lives up to his
motto.
If you peruse Coco Palm's menu,
you'll see tantalising dishes like rasp-
berry snapper, penne pasta (which
has already been an overnight suc-
cess), and even sausage fettuccini
alfredo.
If you're feeling a bit adventur-
ous, the chef suggests you try their
raspberry snapper. It may not be
your first choice, but it's a top notch
dish with a sauce created with an
Asian cooking technique.
The citrus pork is delicious, but
may be more of an acquired taste.
First, Chef Coakley sears the pork
cutlets in a pan with a little oil, then
bastes them with a smooth sauce
made from mangos, oranges, rasp-
berries and grapes. The dish is then
served with vegetable rice and
coleslaw.
When it comes to the coconut cur-
ry served at Coco Palm's, Chef
Coakley says it is healthier than
your normal Bahamian curry
because it incorporates lemon grass
and thyme flavours. Indian wet and
dry curry are blended together for
this dish.
Each meal at the Coco Palm Cafe6
is served with home-made bread of
your choice of garlic,
coconut, focaccia, white,
Nol Ob, - 11 NI.uld


CHICKEN fettuccini and citrus pork are on the fire as Chef Paul Coakley whips up unique Bahamian-Italian dishes.


LW kr


CITRUS porl. vegetable rice. gcarniThed with fresh coleTl'iv.


SOMIETHINGS Different Novelty
Cookies and Cakes donated a 4.15
lbs. triple chocolate cake \\ith
three layers of chocolate ganache
for a raffle at the W\'ine and Art
Festival held at the Bahamas
National Trust's Retreat on Satur-
day.
The lutcky winner of this dream
in chocolate was Leah Kinomles.

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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009


*Caipirinha Explosion Party at
Churrascaria Humidor
This Friday, 8pm to mid-
night: Graycliff's Churrascaria
at the Humidor is "bringing
back the good ole daz" with a
Caipirinha Explosion Party fea-
turing the sounds of the 70s
and 80s.
Admission is $25 a person,
and the first Caipirinha - Brazil's
national cocktail - is free.
There are also complimen-
tary finger foods and a dinner
option is available at a special
price for attending.
RSVP at: 302-9150 or email
deanne@graycliff.com

* Rhythms of Drums
This Friday and Saturday -
Back by popular demand, Mitzi
Chipman presents "Rhythms
of Drums" - a Broadway style
show at the Rainforest Theatre
in the Wyndham Resort and
Crystal Palace Casino. Per-
formers include Tony Seymour
Jr, Ronnie Butler, Veronica
Bishop, and dancers Metellus
Chipman and Fontella Chip-
man-Rolle.
General admission is $40;
VIP Gold tickets are $75.
Doors open at 6.30pm and
show time is 8.30pm.
For more information con-
tact the Rainforest Theatre Box
Office; the Bahamas Musicians
and Entertainers Union or the
Junkanoo n' Things kiosk in
the Marina Village, Atlantis.

* Parish Fair of the Anglican
Church of the Epiphany
This Saturday, 12noon to
6pm, Prince Charles Drive, near
Colony Village - The Anglican
Church of the Epiphany invites
Bahamians to enjoy a day of
family fun, culminating with a
fireworks display.
Prior to the fair, there is a
patio sale, plant sale and thrift
shop, starting at 6am.
The fair will offer an array of
delicious food and entertain-
ment for young and old. Kids
can enjoy a bouncy castle, face-
painting, a merry-go-round and
loads of other fun activities.

* BAIC's 12th Annual
BahamArts Festival
This Friday through Sunday,
10am to 11 pm at Arawak Cay -
The Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC)
presents the BahamArts Festi-
val 2009 under the theme "Tra-
dition Made Modern", promot-
ing Bahamian made arts, crafts
and souvenirs.
Entertainment will be pro-
vided by the Bahamas Defence
Force Band, Gospel Groups, the
Falcon Band and the Pathfind-
ers Marching Band. For more
information contact Le-Var
Miller, Sharae Collie or Pamela
Deveaux at 322-3740/3.

* Free Career Development
Workshop
This Saturday, 10am to
12noon, College of the
Bahamas -Organizational Soul
invites persons seeking a job
or promotion to attend a free
career workshop which aims
to teach people how to empha-
sise their strengths and chart a
course to improve their earning
potential.
The workshop is sponsored
by Corporate Education Solu-
tions (Bahamas and Caribbean)
and Rotary Club Nassau Sun-
rise, and is hosted by Yvette
Bethel, regional director of CES
Bahamas and Caribbean. For
more information contact 424-
7166. Space is limited so reg-
ister early at info@orgsoul.com.

* First All Ceramic Exhibition
For those who missed the
opening night of this must-see
event hosted by Jessica's Tile-
works Studio, come on out this
week to see the incredible sub-
missions from local cerami-
cists and potters.
The exhibition is being held
at Popopstudios located on
Dunmore Avenue in Chipping-
ham until November 13. Tele-
phone number: 322-7834
Gallery viewing hours are
Wednesday through Satur-
days from 1pm to 5pm, or by
appointment with Jessica Cole-
brooke, contact 324-3533.


THE TRIBUNE


Get ready for your closeup


The Hub hosts a

six-week acting

course with

American actor

Wayne Legette


By REUBEN SHEARER "
Tribune Features Reporter


ERHAPS one of the
most common com-
plaints of Bahamians is
that there's not much to do on
this 21 by seven mile island.
You can only go to the
movies, hit up the mall or frol-
ick on the beach so many
times before it gets old. Even
if you are a regular on the
party scene, you can still feel
that your recreational options
are extremely limited.
It was the self-appointed task of Tri-
bune Entertainment to discover new
and exciting activities that you would
normally be reluctant to try. We found
that if you actively search for things
to do, you'll discover that there not
that many limitations to what this
island has to offer.
For instance, we hear there's a salsa
dance class happening every week at
The Caves out west. Bahamians from
all walks of life are taking advantage of
it, and there's a dinner afterwards -
you can't beat that! Maybe that's the
reason why it's become so popular.
But we'll get you the scoop on that
for an upcoming edition of Tribune
Entertainment. Today, we concentrate
on a special workshop that is current-
ly underway at The Hub on Bay Street.

Opportunity Knocks
When former Miss Bahamas World
Ordain Moss informed Tribune Enter-
tainment of a six-week acting work-
shop she was hosting on Saturdays,
we thought this would be a great idea.
Of course, Bahamians support any-
thing that seems well-organised and
reputable, and when there is a rep-
utable person behind a cause, people
will show up. In this case that person
was American actor Wayne Legette.
With 20 years experience in the
business, the actor has played roles in
productions like 'Westside Story';
'Rags'; 'Romeo and Juliet' (the stage
play); 'Proposal', 'The Boys Next
Door'; 'The Woman In Black'; 'The
Wild Party', and 'November.'
But he doesn't toot his own horn,
the class speaks for itself.

Workshop Day
First on the schedule were concen-
tration exercises, where participants
were paired up and the task was to
mirror the other person's movements
without using any sounds.
For those of us that were new to
this activity, let's just say that the lack
of experience showed. It was good to
keep in mind that it was all in good
fun.


"Great job guys, good concentra-
tion," Mr Legette would say during
each pair's concentration exercise.
While he made you think you did a
good job, you'd often wonder if he
was just trying to make you feel good,
after all he is an experienced actor.
Concentration was difficult for
some, with some partners making fun-
ny faces and others showing off dance
moves that date back to the 80's. The
goal of each pair was to be in-sync
with each other, creating chemistry,
which is the key to a good perfor-
mance.
Mr Legette attempted to explain
the goal of the exercise:
"The mirror acting exercise is just a
simple concentration exercise using
your partner, getting centered, ignor-
ing everyone else in the room, which is
essential to do when you're perform-
ing."
At the end of the day you're only as
good as the person you're acting with,
Mr Legette said.
"When you're doing any kind of
acting, 99 per cent of the time you're
going to be relying on the person
you'll be acting with. In order to do a
scene well with someone you have to
automatically trust them."
For an actor, this trust must be nur-
tured through activities like improvi-
sation (or improve' ) skits, which have
become quite popular in recent times,
because of their spur-of-the-moment
nature.
The only rule to the improve session
was that none of the actors' could
respond with the word "no," which
would bring the skit to a halt. I had to
learn that the hard way! With no
memorised lines, I was thrown into
the mix with one overarching thought:
"Move with the flow, say whatever
comes to mind."
"You will end up doing better work
if you just let it happen," said Mr Leg-
ette, who paired us up on set to act out
a scene. The characters, location, and


first line of the skit were then decided
on by the class.
Things got interesting as each par-
ticipant morphed into a different char-
acter. In one skit, experienced actor
Onike Archer, who was a cast mem-
ber in the acclaimed Shakespeare in
Paradise production, played opposite
Keisha Johnson.
The setting for their scene was a
train station; their roles, a mother and
daughter, and the first line: "I can't
believe you just did that!"
It was hilarious and the ladies deliv-
ered the best improve skit, in my opin-
ion, out of everyone who performed.

Monologues and Deep Breathing
Naturally reserved, workshop par-
ticipant Jason Cunningham said he
has never acted before, but that was
hard to believe after having seen his
superb performance during the mono-
logue session.
The 24-year-old played the char-
acter of a neurotic man who didn't
have much success with women, vent-
ing his frustrations to his best friend.
The class demanded an encore, and
he did just that, with some minor
adjustments to his delivery, but still
looking like a pro out there.
"At one point in life I used to be shy,
but experiences like these have helped
me better express myself in a crowd,"
he told Tribune Entertainment.
Proper breathing exercises were
next. At the instruction of Mr Leg-
ette, each person lay down on the
floor and deeply inhaled, then
exhaled. Switching things up, we
inhaled and held our breath for a few
seconds.
Then we tuned our voices by giving
off "ha" sounds in different tones
while exhaling. The room began to
sound like a full choir warming up for
performance.
Afterwards, a lunch of your choice
of roast beef, turkey, ham, and veggie
sandwiches, (from Tracey Chea's


kitchen), chips, and iced tea was
served to us. After a downtime, the
last segment of the day's workshop
was a series of monologue perfor-
mances, where each student was given
a piece to perform in front of the class.
All participants were rooted to the
spot as they listened to Ordain Moss'
winsome monologue, in which she
spoke about her lover and their rela-
tionship problems.
No stranger to acting, she took pri-
vate lessons with Mr Legette about
two months ago, in Naples, Florida.
"He is really good at what he does
and what I learnt at the private lessons
with Mr Legette has made me so
much better," she said.

Final Thoughts
Ms Moss described the latest work-
shop session as ".in.m/ii- " and said it
turned out to be much better than she
expected.
"Everyone was outgoing and was
eager to participate," she said.
So far, response to the workshop
has been favourable.
The first workshop started with just
three students on October 3, but num-
bers increased and an additional eight
students joined the sessions at the
second workshop; a few of them
young actors like De-Anthia Johnson,
who will star in an upcoming teenage
drama called 'Dreamer,' which is
shooting in a matter of weeks.
The Wayne Legette Acting work-
shop began on October 3 and will con-
tinue until December 12, taking place
every other Saturday.
The third workshop will be held this
Saturday from 11am to 3pm.
You can contact Ordain Moss at
324-2336 or 425-5266 to reserve your
spot for this week's session. At the
end of the workshop, participants will
be awarded a certificate of comple-
tion.
Interested persons aged 17 and up
are invited to register.


Combatting and Surviving the Recession


The focus of the 9th Annual Home
and Builders Trade Show and Exhibition


EACH year, organizers of the
Bahamas Home and Builders Trade
Show and Exhibition seek to not only
make the show bigger and better, but
also more in sync with what's happen-
ing locally and globally. Therefore, as
the world and the Bahamas battle the
effects of a global recession, the organ-
isers, Special Events Bahamas Limited,
have decided to dedicate this year's
event to theme "Combatting and Sur-
viving the Recession."
The 9th Annual Home and Builders
Show, which will be held this Satur-
day and Sunday in the ballroom of the
Wyndham hotel on Cable Beach from
10am to 6pm, will focus on how per-
sons can ride out the economic down-
turn while preparing for the way for-
ward.
Along with informative educational
seminars and workshops including spe-
cial "DIY- Do It Yourself" sessions,
exhibitors have been invited to show-
case the latest energy and cost saving
technologies.
President of Special Events
Bahamas Limited Nikita Curtis said:
"People need to be prepared for after


this recession is over and attending
this year's show will show them just
how to do that."
As usual, the event - which attracted
approximately 4,000 people last year -
will boast over 50 exhibitors from the
Bahamas, the United States, Canada
and even China.
The general public will also have an
opportunity to win over $50,000 in
prizes and give-aways.
The change of focus of this year's
event will also be reflected in the prizes
that any and everyone can use.
According to Mr Curtis, "The prizes
will be more relevant to the economic
environment."
Examples of the new and improved
timely prizes include $100 vouchers
which can be used to pay various util-
ity bills along with the ever popular
cellular phone cards.
Mr Curtis and his team invite the
entire family to attend the 9th Annual
Home and Builders Show.
"Even if you aren't building, there is
important timely information that will
be dissimulated at this year's show that
anyone can use."


SHOWN here are attendees of last year's Annual Home and Builders Trade Show and
Exhibition.


The Annual Home and Builders
Trade Show and Exhibition has
evolved into a highly anticipated event
which is frequented by persons direct-
ly and indirectly involved in the con-
struction and home industry. Home
owners, potential home owners, busi-
ness owners, contractors, sub-contac-
tors and persons seeking to spruce up
their home and businesses with more
energy saving devices should plan to


attend this year's show.
Admission to this year's event is $3
per person, but attendees can log on to
http://www.bahcon.com and print out
an admission ticket for free, or pick
up a free entry passes at any of the
participating vendor locations. As for
persons who don't mind paying the
minor fee, this donation will be used
towards a scholarship fund for the
Bahamas Society of Engineers.


IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I


TASTE I







+


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 11B


High tea and high fashion in aid of special needs students


MISS Bahamas World 2009 Joanna
Brown, in her role as goodwill
ambassador, is spearheading a
project that is designed to raise money for
children with special learning needs.


Ms Brown, a Grand
Bahama native, is inviting
Bahamians to join her this
Friday for 'high tea' and
high fashion in a major
fundraiser at Government
House on behalf of the Bea-
con School.
The Beacon School was
opened in 1998 for special
needs children.
It was formerly known as
the School for Exceptional
Children. The school pre-
pares its students for life
after school, and in some
cases, its students are
returned to mainstream
education in schools like
Jack Hayward, St Georges,
Eight Mile Rock High and
even in private institutions.
The Beacon School offers
technical and vocational
training in addition to the
core academic subjects like
languages, mathematics and
social sciences.
The technical and voca-
tional curriculum includes
computer enrichment, cos-
metology, home economics,
pottery and agriculture, and
the courses are integral to
the development of daily
and independent living skills
in the school's students. The
school is committed to the
belief that there is some-
thing that every child can
do.
A total of $50,000 is need-
ed to establish an arts and
crafts centre at the school,
which administrators


believe can further help stu-
dents to prepare for pro-
ductive living. A building
just across the street from
the school has been ear-
marked for this centre, how-
ever, it requires some work.
The money raised at the
tea party will go towards
upgrading the building, as
well as providing the sup-
plies for the centre, where
students will be taught to
make commercial jams and
jellies, pottery and other
artworks for sale. A small
shop selling the items cre-
ated by the students will
also be housed in the build-
ing.
"If this project is a suc-
cess it will make a differ-
ence in the lives of the kids
at the Beacon School," said
Miss Bahamas Organisation
president Michelle Mal-
colm.
This is the second consec-
utive year that the Miss
Bahamas Organisation has
partnered with the Ministry
of Tourism to stage a Miss
Bahamas World/People to
People Tea Party and fash-
ion show.
The event will be held on
Friday from 4pm to 6pm at
Government House.
Patrons attending the
fundraiser will be treated to
a Beat Retreat by the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force
Band, and will entertained
by the Royal Bahamas
Police Force Pop Band and


Miss Bahamas World Tal-
ent Winner Devera Pinder.
Also on display will be fab-
ulous Androsia and
Bahama Hand print fash-
ions. Patrons attending the
event will be the first to see
Miss Bahamas World's
wardrobe for her month-
long stay in South Africa at
this year's Miss World com-
petition.
In addition to raising
funds for the Beacon School
through the silent auction,
Miss Bahamas World will
also lead the charge for
another initiative that will
involve retail shoppers.
More information on that
second phase of her
fundraising efforts will be
announced soon.


Tickets can be purchased
at the event, but those plan-
ning on attending are
advised to RSVP to the
Miss Bahamas Organisation
at their e-mail address
info@missbahamas.net in
order reserve seats. Organ-
isers said while they under-
stand that everyone is feel-
ing the pinch in these tough
economic times, they hope
that Bahamians will support
this worthy cause.
Joanna Brown leaves for
the Miss World Pageant on
November 4.
The pageant will be
broadcast live from Johan-
nesburg, South Africa, on
ZNS TV on December 12,
and on the E! Network in
the United States.


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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009


By MARION WRIGHT


T HIS past week after traversing the inner-city streets of central New Provi-
dence I felt moved to tell a story about an aggressive and innovative arti-
san, whose work speaks with total relevance to the current economic cli-
mate and the need for cultural reinforcement.


C-


ULU DAlAMA SLUUr


. .Jr
. is


Renaissance craftsman Troy Nixon,
who also answers to the name 'Straight
Up', captivates through the concept of
transforming what is considered refuse,
materials mostly from coconut trees,
into works of art.
Mr Nixon desires for the craft to be
documented and placed within the cur-
riculum of the country's high schools.
He hopes that getting young, fresh
and creative minds involved in this
genre of expression will, with consistent
effort, usher in a new raw material
trend within the native craft production
industry.
Just consider the role that the straw
plait in its harvested form has played
since the first vendors proudly dis-
played their meticulously hand-crafted
wares for sale.
Today, the straw plait continues to
dominate the craft market scene and
remains an integral part of the tourist
experience.
By his own admission, 'Straight Up'
has only recently broken the surface in
this craft that permits imaginary aero-
bics and creative brazenness.
In 2003, Mr Nixon was the victim of a
terrible automobile accident. Doctors
told him that he would most likely lose
movement in one leg.
Undergoing 12 surgeries, the 38-year-
old artist said the accident and its con-
sequences led him to reinvent himself.
With lots of free time to spare as he
recovered from his ordeal, Mr Nixon
said that he made the crossover from
more traditional art forms to his current
medium.
He said he was helped in this by the
Almighty God.
For the past ten months now,
'Straight Up' said he has been guided
by God towards perfecting his craft. He
explained that he undergoes a religious
rapture at times when he is most pro-
ductive.
In instances such as these, he said, he
cannot focus on anything or anyone
else; it is strictly about releasing the cre-
ativity within for a higher purpose, he
said.
Mr Nixon's works portray a level of
skill and ingenuity that is perhaps
rivalled in detail by only a practitioner


of taxidermy.
When asked about the source of
inspiration for each piece, Mr Nixon
said it becomes difficult to separate the
apparent spirituality that can be seen in
the work and the feeling which comes
from "the belly."
One of Straight Up's pieces, 'Mother
Africa', depicts an African woman in
the last trimester of pregnancy. This
piece, he said, is the most poignant of
his creations.
A few of his subjects depict scenes
from the Bahamas' past, particularly
from his beloved Exuma.
Mr Nixon's mother hails from
Williams Town and his father comes
from Farmer's Cay. Smack boats and
dinghies were the workhorses for those
men who chose to support themselves
and their families from what the sea
provided by means of fishing, sponging,
or cargo delivery.
Wind provided the primary source of
power seconded by the technique of
'sculling' - using oars to propel a boat or
other craft.
'Straight Up' laments the fact that
there are so few authentic Bahamian
souvenirs available to tourists, and it is
his belief that Bahamians will eventual-
ly lose more of our market share as
time progresses.
He said he wants Bahamians to think
in unconventional terms that may not
have factored into past means of pro-
ducing art.
Mr Nixon is also concerned that too
little use of our indigenous materials for
the purpose of producing saleable
goods could furnish others with the
opportunity to discover and develop
production techniques resulting in prof-
it without benefits for Bahamians.
So the next time you catch a glance of
coconut tree webbing, branch stems, or
spent husks, think not only of 'Straight
Up', but rather look around further and
investigate your surroundings for that
next readily available indigenous raw
material that will allow you to display
your inner brilliance.
Those interested in 'Straight Up's'
work can contact him at troystraight-
up@yahoo.com. The artist will be
launching a website later in the year.


qmummmels




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