The Tribune
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01437
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: October 15, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01437

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009


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Former PLP Senator,

ex-ambulance driver

open their defence

in John Travolta case


By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
nmckenzie@
hotmail.com
FORMER PLP
Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and ex-
ambulance driver
Tarino Lightbourne
proclaimed their
innocence in unsworn
statements to the jury
yesterday as the
attempted extortion PLEA
trial continued. BRIDGE
Bridgewater and
Lightbourne are
accused of attempting to extort
$25 million from American actor
John Travolta.
The pair chose to make
unsworn statements from where
they stood outside the prisoner's
dock. Lightbourne also called
one witness in his defence, while
Bridgewater said she did not
intend to call any witnesses.
"I too have been shocked over
some of the evidence that has
come from this case," Bridgewa-
ter said. "January 22 is a day I
will not forget. It was a day when
my fairly structured and organ-
ised life became a life of decep-
tion and a horrible dream," she
said.


"I have been
ridiculed and
ostracised. I have seen
my business gone rock
bottom," she told the
jury. "Since January I
have not seen a salary."
Bridgewater told the
jury the ordeal has tak-
en an emotional and
financial toll on her.
She said she has not
been able to work, and
because of a downturn
in her business she has
had to lay off some
ANT staff.
VATER "As far as I am con-
cerned I thought I was
doing what was right as
a citizen of the Bahamas and a
professional," she said.
Bridgewater said she had
known Lightbourne for 10 years
and they also worked in close
proximity of each other. She
recalled that Lightbourne had
come to her seeking legal advice
after being terminated from his
job. She said he had told her that
since he had given an interview
regarding the death of Jett Tra-
volta, reporters had been calling
him constantly.
Bridgewater said he told her
he had a document they were
SEE page 14


I .icul


E . i. i U ,( >. i,,(i h l (i !I I.
was laid to rest.
Hundreds of hushed spec-
tators waited on each side of
the downtown stretch to wit-
ness the state funeral service
that commanded the respect
of all present.
Residents and visitors
stood side by side with the
tension only to be broken by
the first rap from the Royal
Bahamas Police Force Band,
sending a visible ripple
through the crowds as they
marched.
Police Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson said:
"Despite the sadness, we are
more than pleased to show
up in large numbers to
SEE page six


Fury over

Mitchell

SI bid for PLP

leadership

B TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net
WHAT was intended
to be a general foreign
affairs update at PLP
headquarters exploded
into an all-out attack on
Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell after he con-
that he intends to chal-
lenge leader Perry
Christie at the party's
national convention.
Addressing what is
being labeled as a
"group of young PLP
pseudo intellectuals",
sources within the party
said Mr Mitchell was
confronted on what his
, SEE page 12

Dr Nottage to
announce PLP
leadership bid
this morning
By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net


Minister of State denies access
to reports on Detention Centre


MINISTER of State for
Immigration Branville
McCartney is denying access
to a fact-finding team's reports
into the controversial
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre.
Mr McCartney said he
would not give in to The Tri-
bune's requests for publica-
tion because he disagrees with
this newspaper's series of arti-
cles into allegations of abuse
and mistreatment at the facil-
ity.
For months, Mr McCartney
- whose 2007 party manifesto
pledges greater transparency


and ensuring media access to
information - has not followed
through with assurances he
would release the reports to
The Tribune or grant a tour
of the site.
In June, the junior immi-
gration minister said he could
not release the documents
until he had discussed the mat-
ter with his Cabinet col-
leagues. Back in March he
said he had no problems
releasing the reports once he
had the "opportunity to pass it
by Cabinet".
SEE page six


DR BERNARD Nottage will
formally announce his bid for the
leadership of the Progressive Lib-
eral Party at 11am today from
his Bain and Grant's Town con-
stituency office.
Duplicating the dramatic
showdown which took place at
the party's 1997 convention, both
Dr Nottage and former Prime
Minister Perry Christie will vie
once again for the leadership of
the party.
Joining them in this battle will
SEE page 12



ANGLICAN Archdea-
con Ivan Ranfurly Brown
was acquitted of an assault
charge yesterday.
Father Brown, rector of
St Agnes Anglican
Church, was accused of
choking and slapping a 14-
year-old girl at a church
picnic on Nirvana Beach,
on October 13, 2008.
Magistrate Ancella
Williams acquitted Father
Brown on the grounds that
the charge sheet was not
properly signed as his
attorney Wayne Munroe
had contended.


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By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
A DESPAIRING mother
who has been out of work for
more than nine months follow-
ing union in-fighting has been
"overwhelmed" by the public
response to her plight.
In a story which appeared in
The Tribune, 29-year-old Krys-
tal Barry told of how she and
her daughter's standard of liv-
ing plunged in the months since
she was locked out of her job at
the Airport Airline and Allied
Workers Union. Director of
Labour Harcourt Brown last
week called her an "innocent

I TRO ICAL


DONATION: "Rayven Barry (second from right) and her mother
Krystal (second from left) receive a donation towards Rayven's
travel to the FOCOL tennis tournament in Freeport later this month
from Simone Beneby (standing far left) and Wayde Watson (stand-
ing on right), Treasurer and President of the Cybots Basketball
Club yesterday at The Tribune.


bystander" who has been
caught up in the middle of
union squabbles, which in Jan-
uary 2009 saw former secretary
general of the union, Anthony
Bain, declare himself president
of the AAAWU instead of
elected president Nelerene
Harding. Ms Barry appealed to
the public for help for her ten-
nis champion daughter Rayven,
11, after she revealed she only
has a few hundred dollars to
sustain them for the foresee-
able future. But on the same
day, The Tribune received
numerous calls and emails
expressing interest in Ms Bar-
ry's plight and offers of assis-
tance for she and Rayven.
While some came to nothing,
several generous individuals fol-
lowed through on their promis-
es to help the young family, and
yesterday Ms Barry and her
daughter came in to collect
donations made on their behalf.
The included seven full bags
of groceries from a woman who
wished to remain anonymous, a
$100 donation from another
unknown individual, and anoth-
er small donation from Wayde
Watson and Simone Beneby of
Cybots Basketball Club
towards Rayven's future sport-
ing endeavours.
Yesterday Ms Barry
expressed her gratitude for the
donations, telling The Tribune
she was "overwhelmed" and
"eternally grateful to those indi-
viduals who searched their


hearts to assist" but still "dis-
tressed" by the whole episode.
"It's like you have to put
your personal trials and tribu-
lations on the front of the paper
just to get help, and it's hard to
realise that you have fallen so
far that you have to reach out
to the community for dona-
tions," she said. Rayven
thanked those who "have given
me and my mother food to
eat."
"I feel really good about it
because my mother will not
have to go in her wallet and
take money out bit by bit,"
Rayven told The Tribune.
"She isn't working and she's
having sad times, and whenev-
er she cried I cried," she said.
Ms Barry, who claims she has
been denied more than $26,000
in severance payment for her
five years of service at the
union, said that while those
who have refused to pay out
her funds "can be as evil as they
like to her" her greatest fear is
that her academically and ath-
letically inclined daughter will
suffer. Mr Bain has refuted her
claims, saying the union owes
her "nothing" and she was dis-
missed for "poor behaviour."
Meanwhile, The Department
of Labour says it can't help her
until it figures out who the real
President of the union is - a
development which has been
stymied by an injunction
obtained by Mr Bain against a
June election going ahead.


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Jobless mother affected by


union squabbles overwhelmed


by public response to plight


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009, PAGE 3


LOCALN


FOLLOWING a front page
story in Monday's Tribune
detailing our exclusive look
inside the government dog
pound, the Ministry of Agricul-
ture and Fisheries released a
statement about the facility yes-
terday.
Several months ago, when a
student who visited the facility
made allegations of animal cru-
elty and poor conditions, the
ministry said a statement had
been prepared and promised to
issue it shortly, however this
never materialised.
A ,I,. - .l1, it was not con-
firmed by the ministry, the state-
ment released yesterday appears
to be the very one prepared
months ago but never released,
as it addresses the allegations
made by the student, but not
concerns raised in the Tribune's
recent article; specifically that
there is a severe lack of
resources at the pound, that staff
morale is very low, and condi-
tions are sometimes inhumane.
In addition, certain claims in
the ministry's statement - for
example that the Humane Soci-
ety routinely visits the pound to
identify dogs suitable for adop-
tion - contradict the content of
our interviews with staff.


Creswell G Sturrup
PERMANENT SECRETARY

ANIMAL Control Unit staff
members reported that an
unidentified gentleman accom-
panied by four preadolescent
males visited the Animal Con-
trol Unit approximately 8.30am
- 9am on July 16, 2009 and pur-
porting to be from the
Bahamas Humane Society and
requesting to be allowed to vis-
it the kennels area of the Ani-
mal Control Unit.
The matter as reported was
investigated and the following
are the results of visit to the
Animal Control Unit and
enquiries of the staff.
Short term storage of animal
carcasses by freezing was
adopted by Animal Control
Unit due to the interval
between refuse collection and
the uncertainty of when sick or
injured animals may expire.
Scheduled euthanasia, by con-
trast, may be undertaken to
coincide with scheduled refuse
removal.
The Animal Control Unit is
intended to provide a place for
the temporary holding of dan-
gerous or savage stray dogs, or
ferocious dogs, or other ani-
mals seized under the Penal
Code or the Dog Licence Act.
Such seized animals are kept
under the conditions and for
the duration as set out in both
governing acts. It is the job of
the veterinary officer attached
to the Animal Control Unit to
determine the health status of
the seized animal and routine-
ly examine detained animals.
In co-operation with the
Animal Control Unit the staff
of the Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety routinely visits the Animal
Control Unit to determine if
any detained animals are well
enough or of suitable tempera-
ment for rescue and subse-
quent adoption. Such animals
are routinely surrendered to
the Bahamas Humane Society.
Animals that are determined
by a veterinary officer to be
too ill or otherwise unsuited
are euthanised after the speci-
fied holding period of 72 hours.
The only exceptions to this
routine are either when the
rightful owner claims the cap-
tured animal or the animal is
identified as an animal consid-
ered by the courts or by a
peace officer as being material
to a matter intended for prose-
cution or a matter before the
courts; in these instances the
duration of custody may be
extended until the decision is
taken to proceed with prose-
cution or not, or until the mat-
ter(s) before the courts are
concluded.
The controlled area may at
any time house seriously ill or
dangerous dogs. The area is not
opened for unauthorised
access.
Animals die; sick or aban-
doned animals are more likely
to die sooner than later. The


presence of a dead animal with-
in the containment area may
occur at any time and is not
necessarily as a result of abuse
or neglect.
The staff of the Animal Con-
trol Unit consists of persons
who are professional and expe-
rienced.
The Ministry of Agriculture
and Marine Resources is con-
fident that the staff perform
their tasks competently and
professional.


Readers' views invited on




conditions at dog pound


Exclusive Tribune reports lead to changes at facility


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

READERS are invited to
voice their concerns about
abhorrent conditions at the
government dog pound and
compile a list of improvements
to be monitored by The Tri-
bune.
During the first ever media
visit to the Canine Control Unit
enclosure in the Botanical Gar-
dens, Chippingham, last week,
veterinarian Godfrey Springer
invited The Tribune to compile
a list of readers' most pressing
concerns to present to his supe-
riors at the Department of
Agriculture and Fisheries.
Provided that ministry boss-
es agree to the plan, The Tri-
bune will oversee the progress
towards these goals on month-
ly visits to the pound.
However, Bahamas Humane
Society president Kim Aranha
said improvements began as
soon as the gates were opened
to Tribune reporters on Friday.
In a meeting with Humane
Society staff, Dr Springer
agreed to allow the Humane
Society free access to the pound
to select healthy animals fit
enough for adoption and relo-
cate them to the non-profit
organisation next door.
Animals collected by the
Canine Control Unit are usual-
ly euthanised within days of
being captured, often regard-
less of the state of their health,
to keep stray animals off the
streets.
Dr Springer said: "Our duty
is to do the right thing, so we
are going to try to see how best
we can do this.
"We want to work in collab-
oration with The Tribune so the
public can come up with five
or six issues to put to the direc-
tor.
"It is our duty to inform, con-
sult and give information, and it
is their duty is to supply the
resources.
"If we can work to improve
the organisation and report it to
the permanent secretary and
director we can look at a way
forward."
The nine staff working at the
pound require more support,
training and education, Dr
Springer asserted.
And dog pound supervisor
Kirkland Glinton said he would
like an additional 15 or 20 staff
to help run the unit.
They also require more
equipment, ranging from vehi-
cles and traps to animal food,
cleaning agents and syringes
used on a daily basis, Dr
Springer said.
There are building repairs
that need to be done, and ani-
mals should be tested for dis-
eases to separate the healthy
from the ill and fuel research.
But all of this would require
funding restricted by the

0fl~"

Frilie, ugiie


is created by irresponsible dog
owners in this country.
"Half of the dogs picked up
belong to people who can't be
bothered to care for them prop-
erly, so we are also going to try


to educate people on the
importance of responsible ani-
mal ownership.
"We are going to try to work

SEE page 12


I -IS UUU would nave Deen put down Dy staff at me government
pound, but was rescued by Humane Society staff.


department's budget, Dr
Springer said.
In the meantime he said the
greatest help to the Canine
Control Unit would be more


responsible animal ownership
in the community which could
be enforced by new legislation.
The Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety president said: "Their job


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The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, c, tiinn') 322-1986
Ad c,' iiing Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


UN: Record one billion go hungry


NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) - Parents in some
of Africa's poorest countries are cutting back
on school, clothes and basic medical care just
to give their children a meal once a day,
experts say. Still, it is not enough.
A record 1 billion people worldwide are
hungry and a new report says the number will
increase if governments do not spend more
on agriculture.
According to the U.N. food agency, which
issued the report, 30 countries now require
emergency aid, including 20 in Africa.
The trend continues despite a goal set by
world leaders nine years ago to cut the number
of hungry people in half by 2015.
"It's actually a world emergency that calls
for action from both developing and devel-
oped countries," said Otive Igbuzor, the head
of international campaigns for ActionAid
International.
"We know a child dies every six seconds of
malnutrition," he said.
Spiraling food prices have added to hard-
ships, especially in the world's most desperate
countries where the poor could barely afford a
single daily meal to begin with.
The inflated prices - which caused riots
across the globe last year - have stabilized but
remain comparatively high, especially in the
developing world, Jacques Diouf, director gen-
eral of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Orga-
nization, told AP Television News.
In Somalia, ravaged by violence and anarchy
for almost two decades, the monthly expendi-
ture for food and other basic needs for a fam-
ily of six has risen 85 percent in the past two
years, said Grainne Moloney of the Somalia
Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit.
On average, such a family spent $171 in
September this year, compared with $92 for the
same amount of food and other needs in
March 2007, said Moloney, a nutrition expert
for the Horn of Africa nation.
"Families are cutting out the school, cut-
ting out the clothes. A lot of them are going for
cheaper cereals," said Moloney, adding that
despite those desperate measures, one in five
children in Somalia is acutely malnourished.
Igbuzor said the trend can be seen in impov-
erished countries across Africa.
In Kenya, herders have seen scores of their
animals die and crops have withered because
of drought. Today, 3.8 million people in Kenya
need food aid, up from 2.5 million earlier in the
year.
After worldwide gains in the fight against
hunger in the 1980s and early 1990s, the num-
ber of undernourished people started climbing
in 1995, reaching 1.02 billion this year amid
escalating food prices and the global financial


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meltdown, the FAO said in its Wednesday
report.
The long-term trend is due largely to
reduced aid and private investments ear-
marked for agriculture since the mid 1980s,
the Rome-based agency said in its State of
Food Insecurity report for 2009.
In 1980, 17 percent of aid contributed by
donor countries went to agriculture.
That share was down to 3.8 percent in 2006
and only slightly improved in the last three
years, Diouf said.
"In the fight against hunger the focus should
be on increasing food production," Diouf said.
"It's common sense ... that agriculture would
be given the priority, but the opposite has hap-
pened."
The decline may have been caused by low
food prices that discouraged private invest-
ment in agriculture and competition for public
funds from other aid fields, including emer-
gency relief, said FAO economist David Dawe.
Governments and investors may also have
chosen to put their money into other economic
sectors because agriculture's share of the econ-
omy in some developing countries dropped
as people moved to cities and found work in
industry.
But agriculture still needs sustained invest-
ment to feed people in developing countries,
Dawe said.
The world's most populous region, Asia and
the Pacific, has the largest number of hungry
people - 642 million - followed by Sub-
Saharan Africa with 265 million.
Diouf said world leaders are starting to
understand that investment in agriculture must
be increased.
He cited the goal set by the Group of Eight
summit in L'Aquila, Italy, in July to raise $20
billion to help farmers in poor countries pro-
duce more - a shift from previous emphasis
on delivering food aid.
However, more investments will be needed
to fulfill pledges like the U.N. Millennium
Development Goals, which aim to halve the
number of those living in hunger and poverty
by 2015, the report said.
The FAO says global food output will have
to increase by 70 percent to feed a projected
population of 9.1 billion in 2050.
To achieve that, poor countries will need
$44 billion in annual agricultural aid, com-
pared with the current $7.9 billion, to increase
access to irrigation systems and modern
machinery as well as build roads and train
farmers.
(This article is by Tom Maliti and Ariel
David of the Associated Press)


Detention Centre:



The truth will



always come out

EDITOR, The Tribune. brothers. It was a lifetime
experience for me as I too
My question is, can the thought it was bogus when
public handle the truth? claims of abuse were being
Every allegation that has said about some officers at
been said about the abuse the detention centre. I wit-
at the Detention Centre has doctor comes in rarely but nessed a couple of incidents
been denied by the Govern- his orders are not to pre- where detainees were
ment. scribe any medicinal prod- abused. The golden rule is
Bahamians believe the ucts. A play ground is avail- do unto others as you'd have
tales that the director and able, children are not per- them do unto you. I surely
minister of state for immi- mitted to play there, and the hope Bahamians really
gration has put forward to detainees are fed three times believe in the Lord as they
cover abusive officers and daily. What is given can claim to be a Christian
inhumane conditions in barely fill a child, so imagine nation, but to me they have
which detainees have to an adult. Visitation is grant- proven that they are not.
abide during their time at ed which occurs twice every I never took anyone for
the centre, week, during that time the
According to Christiane food and clothes brought in granted unless theywo gaveme
Amanpour "objectivity are searched twice before a reason to. Every word that
doesn't mean treating all reaching the detainee. some one speaks is not
sides equally. It means giv- After visitation a search is always true, but the Lord
ing, each side a hearing." All held, by defence force offi- will take serious action
I ask is to be heard! cers. During this search they toward a liar because he
After all that has been go in the dorms and turn hates those who lie.
said, many people reply by everything upside down. It is for that reason I stay
saying the detainees are just During that same time a full true to myself and others as
looking for sympathy and body cavity search is drawn I too want one day to enjoy
that is good for them on the detainees; where eternal life with the
because they need to go both male and female in Almighty God.
back home. I want to bring their respective dorms are Haitians are treated terri-
transparency to this ordeal. asked to take every thing bly in this country only
For a matter of fact, the off, including under wear. because we are too many
detainees are beaten, sexu- How do I know all this here, which is true. Also
ally abused and harassed at you ask? I am an eighteen- because we do not have a
the detention centre on a year-old Haitian male, born serious Ambassador who
regular basis. and raised in the Bahamas. will stand up for us in the
They are forced to endure My mother, sister, broth- midst of our problems. I
inhumane conditions that ers and me where captured have given my side, immi-
can cause serious medical and detained by immigra- gration has to been heard,
problems. The medical facil- tion a month before I had now they can object to what
ity said, to be at the deten- to sit BGCSE. has been said.
tion centre is true, but it is I was released three weeks
used to store papers and later and my sister after four LOVENCE LOUIMA
other garbage instead of it weeks and my mother was Nassau,
being used for its purpose. A deported along with my two October, 2009.

Branville McCartney, a rising star

EDITOR, The Tribune. best, past and present, and and Branville McCartney
surpasses the majority of is at the top of that list!
A newcomer on the polit- politicians, past and present. * I may be a little biased,
ical landscape by the name * His outstanding perfor- because his father, William
Branville McCartney, threw mance to date, as Minister "Wilmac" McCartney is one
his hat into the political are- of State responsible for of the finest men I have had
na as the FNM candidate for Immigration; takes Ministe- the honour and privilege to
the Bamboo Town con- rial personal involvement in call friend: Like Father; like
stituency in the general elec- their portfolios' day-to-day Son!


tion of May 2007, which he
won hands down. This was
no surprise to those of us
who followed his service to
the Bamboo Town Commu-
nity before and since being
elected as their representa-
tive.
Branville McCartney hit
the ground running, and for
those who have been
observing we saw a neo-
phyte politician and MP,
blossom into a "Statesman"
practically overnight.
* He has taken represen-
tation of a constituency and
its constituents to a level
that I dare say equals the


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Minister calibre,


A A McKINNEY MD,
"AMRA MD"
Nassau,
October, 2009.


EDITOR, The Tribune.
Re: Bahamas listed in top half of the best countries to
live. - Tribune, October 7, 2009.
We are only ranked at 52nd in the Human Development
Report, 2009. Haven't they heard that it's better in The
Bahamas?
KEN W
KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,
October 7, 2009.


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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15,2009


.te"Bi"-
.WL.
IFUMINK


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009, PAGEEW5


Wisdom warns
against PLP
complacency
FORMER PLP cabinet
minister Neville Wisdom has
warned his party that it should
guard against complacency. Mr
Wisdom said the fact that the
contract between the FNM and
the public is breaking down
does not mean the PLP will
automatically inherit the trust
and support of Bahamians.
"That support and trust
must be earned," said the for-
mer housing minister, who
gained notoriety after mistak-
enly recording himself plotting
to block The Tribune from air-
ing public housing records.
"The PLP must, in clear and
concise language and action,
demonstrate that we are once
again worthy of their confi-
dence and trust."
Mr Wisdom noted that
crime, unemployment and ille-
gal immigration are growing,
while the health care system is
collapsing, and said Bahami-
ans are "almost begging the
PLP to give them good reason
to once again support and vote
for our party." He said PLPs
must "offer our egos to the
alter of sacrifice and demon-
strate our commitment
towards the greater good for
all Bahamians."
The former minister urged
the PLP not to allow its
upcoming convention to turn
into a mere "election of offi-
cers", saying it should rather
be treated as an opportunity
to display the party's vision and
platform for the future devel-
opment of the country.


American Embassy monitoring


robbery of tourists investigation


^. ^^f.^ --- ----


THE 11 TOURISTS were robbed
at the 66 steps (above) a popular
historical landmark in Nassau.


THE Committee for the Privatisation of the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company Ltd announced that the process continues
to progress with significant interest from prospective parties.
Upon review of the pre-qualification packages submitted in
August, the government said it has narrowed down the list of
interested parties and has invited a select group of potential buy-
ers to participate in the due diligence phase of the privatization
process.
This phase will provide potential buyers with the opportunity to
review business, financial and legal information, as well as meet
with key executives prior to submitting an economic bid.
Due diligence will be conducted over the next several weeks and
the deadline for bids is currently expected to be the end of Novem-
ber, the committee said in a statement.
"Those who have been invited to this phase were selected by the
government based on information submitted evidencing their suit-
ability in accordance with the required pre-qualification criteria. To
comply with non-disclosure agreements, the identity of parties
invited to participate in the due diligence phase cannot be disclosed
prior to the close of the transaction," it said.


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
THE American Embassy is
monitoring the investigation
into the armed robbery of 11
tourists who were terrorised by
two masked gunmen while
touring the historical 66 steps.
An official at the embassy
said it is routine for the
embassy to be notified by local
authorities whenever an Amer-
ican citizen is involved in a
crime while in foreign territory.
However, because the inci-
dent appears to be isolated -
and not part of a series of
attacks on tourists - the official
does not think it will negatively
affect the country's crime sta-
tus.
"As a matter of practice. . .
When an incident involves
American citizens, in most cas-
es the police notifies the
embassy the next day if they
can unless the American citi-
zen notifies the embassy for
assistance.
"I know that our American
Citizen Services is in contact
with the police trying to find
out the details and I know it's
still being investigated," said
Jeff Dubell, the embassy's polit-
ical, economic and public diplo-
macy chief.
"We monitor crime and that
goes into our decision as to
whether an area should or
should not be placed in a dif-
ferent crime status. But we do
monitor all incidents because
we have a responsibility to US
citizens abroad so they can
make an educated choice," he
said.
On Sunday, the group
arrived in Nassau on a cruise
ship and were on a taxi cab tour


of the capital's historic sites.
Their trip became a nightmare
when two masked men
approached the group on foot
as they viewed the 66 steps.


One of the thugs threatened
the group with a handgun while
the other stole cash and per-
sonal items from the visitors at
around 11am.


Head of the Central Detec-
tive Unit Superintendent
Elsworth Moss said police were
still searching for the two sus-
pects who fled the area on foot.


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


V a a 2 &MA r�0 Down

Payment................

for









Sir Clement is laid to rest THE COFFIN carrying the body of Sir Clement Maynard
Sipl e i sI laid tol P s Iis carried on Bay Street yesterday.


FROM page one

demonstrate in a real way our
respect for the highest offices
that are held in our country."
The tall wooden ceilings and
low hanging lights of the his-
toric Christ Church Cathedral
were offset by minimal white
floral decorations. This sim-
plicity was central to Sir May-
nard's memory and was
reflected also in the pro-
gramme, featuring only two
pictures.








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The service highlighted Sir
Clement's social and political
achievements, with tributes
from his family as well as
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and Leader of the Oppo-
sition Perry Christie. It was
officiated by eight clergymen,
with Rev Stephen Davies as
the chief celebrant, and the
Right Rev Laish Boyd giving
the sermon.
Senator Allyson Maynard-
Gibson spoke reverently of
childhood memories, as did
her brother Dr Peter May-
nard, referring to the late
leader as "Daddy" and sharing
anecdotes that ultimately
shaped their lives and that of
all their siblings and grand-
children. They each shared at
length about the constant envi-
ronment of love, support and
inclusion that saturated their
lives.
The music was led by organ-
ist Dr Sparkman Ferguson
with a special duet from Sir
Clement's son David and
granddaughter Tatyanna.
Mr Ingraham gave an offi-
cial tribute on behalf of the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas, honoring Sir May-
nard as a 'fallen champion'
and detailed his political
career highlighting specific
campaigns "It's Better in The
Bahamas", The Bahamas Host
Training Programme, The
People-to-People Programme,
Goombay Summer and
National Tourism Achieve-
ment Awards.
"Sir Clement saw to it that
the vast advances derived from
the economic and social bene-
fits of tourism would endure
through the training and
opportunities which were pro-
vided under his leadership for
many Bahamians within the
Ministry of Tourism as well as
the private sector," said Prime
Minister Ingraham. "It is on
the shoulders of men like Sir
Clement that we stand today."
Mr Christie said: "Sir
Clement Maynard was one of
the iconic personalities that
graced parliament. He in a
great sense set a standard for
members of parliament in how
they deal with constituents and
what they provide for con-
stituents by using his con-


stituents to establish facilities
for the great benefit of the
people he represented.
"He was just one of those
extraordinary impactful per-
sonalities as a Member of Par-
liament. He then had the priv-
eledge of becoming a Minis-
ter of Tourism at a time when
it was necessary for tourism to
become the principal employ-
er for Bahamians, and he
superintended that industry to
a point where thousands of
Bahamians were employed in
relatively lucrative jobs in the
industry.
"He had many firsts in that
industry because he brought
about the recognition that
workers must be trained and
that people who were work-
ing in subsidiary sectors to the
toursim industry should also
be trained. He was able to
take that Ministry of Tourism
and so demonstrate its impor-
tance to the economy of the
Bahamas that it became a
model for other Caribbean
countries to follow.
"So you can see therefore
this lasting and permanent
impact he had. He was extra-
ordinarily loyal to the leader-
ship of his party and he
became the deputy leader and
the deputy prime minister as a
crowning result of his long


tenure to our country. He was After the service, the local- placed into the official hearse
a tremendous patriot who ly-made pine casket carrying by a colour party of Police and
believed in the Bahamas and Sir Clement was carried out Defence Force officers for
who believed in Bahamians." by official pallbearers and then interment.


MiiserofSategenis a es

to rport onetenionCnr


FROM page one
"I have no difficulties in releasing them I just
want to do it the proper way," he told The
Tribune on March, 17 adding that this should
happen within the "next week".
Mr McCartney has maintained that the
reports prepared by the group did not vali-
date the allegations made by the detainees,
and previously stated that such claims were
"completely blown out of proportion".
A diluted report based on the group's find-
ings was presented to the media - who were
denied access to the original documents - in a
press conference held at the Immigration
Department earlier this year. At that time
Immigration officials refuted the claims out-
lined in The Tribune but did not allow access
into the facility for an independent review.
The team - made up of psychologist David
Allen, Social Services Director Melony Zoni-
cle, Archdeacon James Palacious, Royal
Bahamas Defence Force Senior Lieutenant
Frederick Brown and Immigration Director
Jack Thompson - toured the holding facility on
March, 6 and interviewed the detainees housed


there.
Their reports contain their opinions on the
conditions at the facility and recommenda-
tions for possible improvements, The Tribune
understands.
Their tour came after a series of Tribune
articles exposed alleged abuse, beatings, inhu-
mane conditions and employee misconduct at
the Detention Centre.
The detainees who complained of "concen-
tration camp" conditions in February, told
The Tribune there were several aesthetic
improvements to the site since the allegations
were published. Dirty old mattresses were
replaced with new ones, grimy walls were
repainted, blocked toilets were repaired, and
washing machines and dryers were installed for
detainees to wash their clothes, the detainees
claimed.
They also claimed cable televisions have
been set up in the men's and women's dorms.
Less than two days after the first allegations
surfaced in The Tribune, Immigration officials
denied the claims. They continue to maintain
that detainees have not been mistreated or
beaten.


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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009, PAGEEW7


PASSERS-BY ASSAULT OFFICER WHO STOPPED AT SITE OF ACCIDENT, SAYS POLICE SOURCE



'Policeman attacked at crash scene




was helping his trapped colleague'


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net


A POLICE officer attacked by
passers-by at the scene of a car crash
was helping his colleague Alexis Bain,
who was trapped in the wreckage, a
police source said.
Contrary to police reports claiming
WPC Bain was beaten up as she alleged-
ly tried to stop looters from stealing
shopping strewn across the road follow-
ing the accident, The Tribune has
learned WPC Bain was injured in the
crash and Police Constable Jermaine
Knowles was attacked as he tried to help
her.
PC Knowles heard the crash while
driving through the area with his fiancee
and three children, and stopped to offer
assistance.
WPC Bain's green Honda Accord had
collided with a Honda Domani and a


GMC Envoy around 200 yards from the
junction with Sea Breeze Road at
9.40pm on Monday.
The policewoman, understood to
work for the Central Detective Unit,
was trapped in the wreckage, her body
lying in the road, her head wedged in the
back door.

Conscious
And PC Knowles tried to keep WPC
Bain conscious and still while waiting
for Emergency Medical Services to
attend to her as four men who appeared
to know WPC Bain pulled up in a white
Toyota Windom and accused PC
Knowles of causing the collision.
A source said: "They pulled up and
just started to attack him. One of them
picked up a bumper which came off the
car and hit him in the head with it. They
hit him in the head with bottles and
rocks, and knocked him unconscious."


PC Knowles's fiancee and three chil-
dren, aged six, three and two, watched in
horror as the Canine Unit officer
dragged himself under WPC Bain's car
to avoid further battering of his bruised
and bloodied face.
He was losing consciousness as
observers held back one of the men who
lunged at PC Knowles with two large
rocks, and pinned down two of the men
who were later arrested, according to a
police source.
WPC Bain was removed from the
mangled wreckage of her car using the
'jaws of life' and taken to Doctor's Hos-
pital by ambulance for treatment, along
with PC Knowles who was treated for
lacerations and bruises on his head and
arms, and two broken toes. He was
released from the hospital on Tuesday.
A family of four believed to have
been travelling in the Honda Domani
were also injured in the wreckage. A
young boy broke his hand, his father's


leg was broken and the mother was cov-
ered in blood, a witness said.
Another two men injured in the
smash were lying in the grass on the
roadside, and were taken to Princess
Margaret Hospital (PMH) with the fam-
ily in a fleet of ambulances.
One of the injured is in critical condi-
tion and being treated in the Intensive
Care Unit at PMH.
An eye-witness at the scene of the
crash told The Tribune: "I can't believe
what happened. I've never seen any-
thing like that with so many people
around and everybody involved trans-
ported to the hospital.
"But the really horrific part is that
you don't know if you can stop to help
somebody without getting injured and
it's sad.
"You render some assistance and
might end up losing your life as well.
That man was beaten in front of his chil-
dren. It was horrific."


ALVIN Albert Burnett,
85, formerly of St Andrew,
Jamaica, died at his home in
Westridge Estates on Satur-
day, October 10.
Mr Burnett came to the
Bahamas in 2002, to retire
following a distinguished
career in the civil service of
Jamaica as an economist,
chief planner and consultant.
Educated at Munro Col-
lege, Jamaica, and McGill
University, Canada, Mr Bur-
nett began his career in
1965, in the Ministry of
Finance as an Assistant Sec-
retary.
He served many years as
an economist in the Ministry
of Finance and was rapidly
promoted to the post of
senior economist and then
became chief planner for the
social and sectoral planning
division.
This unit became the
National Planning Agency
in the Office of the Prime
Minister in 1972.
Mr Burnett later became
director for Agricultural
Planning in the National


* Retirement in Bahamas followed

career in Jamaica civil service as an

economist, chief planner, consultant


Planning Agency, and
played a pivotal role in the
preparation of the sector
plan as a member of a team
led by noted economist Sr
Arthur Lewis.

Consultant

Following his retirement,
Mr Burnett became a con-
sultant, and his extensive
knowledge was used to
ensure the efficient man-
agement of the Sugar Indus-
try Authority.
Mr Burnett was an elder
and treasurer in the Hope
United Presbyterian Church
in St Andrew.
Additionally, as a Rotari-
an and Free Mason he gave
generously of his time and
resources to the National
Literacy Campaign which


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He is survived by his wife
of 45 years, Elfriede
Hanikel-Burnett; one
daughter, Dr Caroline Bur-
nett-Garraway of Nassau;
and three sons, William of
Abu Dhabi, Frederic of
Jamaica and Michael of
Canada.


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Murder trial jurors

expected to hear

summations today
BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - The mur-
der trial of Edwin Bauld Jr
and Wilfred McPhee Jr is
winding down in the
Supreme Court, with jurors
expected to hear summa-
tions by Acting Justice
Jethro Miller today.
Justice Miller, who is pre-
siding over the trial, dis-
missed jurors on Friday after
closing arguments were sub-
mitted by the prosecution
and defence teams.
He instructed them to
return to court today when
he will give his summing up
of the case. The matter will
then be turned over to the
jury of six men and six
women for deliberation.
Bauld, 26, the son of a
police officer, and McPhee,
26, the son of an immigra-
tion officer, are accused of
the kidnapping, robbery,
and murder of Corporal
Eddison Bain.
Mr Bain's body was dis-
covered in a shallow ditch
near the Casuarina Bridge
on October 22, 2007. A large
stone was resting on the side
of his face. He was also
bound at the hands and feet.
Pathologist Dr Cornelius
Kachali testified the cause of
death was the result of blunt
forcetrauma to the head.
The prosecution alleges
that Bauld, the cousin of the
deceased, came up with the
plan to use his girlfriend,
Gahnise Campbell, to lure
Mr Bain to Island Seas
Beach, where he and
McPhee accosted and
robbed him of his vehicle
and ATM bank card.
Bauld and McPhee are
accused of stealing Mr
Bain's 1999 Honda car and
$4,500 from his Common-
wealth Bank account.
Campbell, the ex-girl-
friend of Bauld,who who was ini-
tially charged along Bauld
and McPhee, was a key wit-
ness for the prosecution and
charges against her were
dropped. Police Sergeant
Darrell Rolle, the lead
police investigator, testified
that McPhee and Bauld gave
a police statement, accusing
the other of killing Mr Bain.
Taking the stand in his
defence, McPhee claimed he
never gave a police state-
ment. However, he admitted
he was in on the plan to rob
MrBain, but he did not kill
him. Mr Bain was still alive
when he and Bauld left him
in the hole, he claimed.
He also claimed that
police abused and threat-
ened him while in custody
and denied him the right to
speak with an attorney.
Unlike McPhee, Bauld
chose to remain silent by not
taking the stand in his
defence. Lawyer Mario
Gray represents McPhee,
and K Brian Hanna repre-
sents Bauld. Vernal Collie,
assisted by Erica Kemp, of
the Attorney General's
Office, are the prosecutors.
The parents of Corporal
Bain have been present in
court since the trial started
about three weeks ago.


___j


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


Nil-





PAGE 8, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNWI


In 2006 government officials reported 39 squatter villages
throughout New Providence. As many as 300 people - both
Bahamians and immigrants - were said to be living in just one
of these, with no sanitary facilities or police presence whatsoever.
What is being done to address these issues?


of the Potters
Cay area by
the Ministry of
Labour and Social Develop-
ment recently provided a snap-
shot of homelessness in Nas-
sau, focusing renewed attention
on this issue.
More than 50 homeless peo-
ple live in this area, which
extends to Okra Hill and St
Matthew's graveyard. They are
mostly men over 25 years of
age, who are mentally ill, drug
addicts or repeat offenders.
Many have been released from
Fox Hill Prison or Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre, and
some are homeless by choice.
They are attracted to Pot-
ters Cay, the report says, by the
availability of gambling, drugs
and prostitution, as well as the


opportunity to earn money
from begging and casual labour.


NOii~ MITLE~


...... ...I






v1"1 *1,( '� IV '1(


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Another attraction for this loca-
tion - considered the nexus of
homelessness on New Provi-
dence - is the number of
sleeping options.
These range from the tombs
at nearby cemeteries, to derelict
buildings, vendors' stalls, trail-
ers and boats. But the hub of
activity for the homeless is the
former fish processing plant on
Potters Cay, which was built by
the government in 1982 at a
cost of $3.6 million and has
been derelict for years. It has
become an unmanaged shelter
for the underclass.
"The old building appears
to be the main area for sleep-
ing, storage and sexual activi-
ty," the report says, adding that
the surveyors were unable to
complete their assessment
"because of the faeces, urine,
garbage, old furniture, rodents
and clothing everywhere. The
odour made breathing very dif-
ficult."
The police station on Pot-
ters Cay closes at midnight so
there is no security. And the
public toilets are locked at 6
pm, the report says, so they
cannot be used by the home-
less." Hence the surrounding
water is contaminated and
there are no facilities for
bathing...If this is not properly
handled the repercussions will


be devastating for the entire
population."
Of course, this is not a
uniquely Bahamian problem.
Homelessness has been a long-
standing problem even in rich
countries with fully developed
and well-funded social safety
nets. But it is a relatively finite
problem on New Providence
compared to North America,
where there are hundreds of
thousands of homeless people.
The homeless have not
always been the object of char-
ity. In the 16th century, British
laws punished vagrants with
two years of servitude for the
first offence, and death for the
second. That was one way to
solve the problem. Later, more
enlightened lawmakers set up
workhouses for those unable to
support themselves.

Workhouses
The earliest first hand
account of homelessness in
England was published by Jack
London in 1903. In The People
of the Abyss he described con-
ditions for those living in the
workhouses and streets of the
capital of the British Empire,
who were estimated to number
half a million at the time. They
lived in "a chronic condition of
misery which is never wiped


NOTICE


out," London wrote.
As in the Bahamas, Britain's
street people today are mostly
men over 25 with alcohol and
drug addictions, or with mental
health problems. And over the
years the British government
has spent hundreds of millions
to keep people off the street
through outreach and resettle-
ment work, as well as the pro-
vision of shelters and perma-
nent housing.
Although some 120,000 peo-
ple are classified as being legal-
ly homeless in the UK, officials
estimate that less than 500 peo-
ple are sleeping rough on any
given night - out of a popula-
tion of over 61 million. And the
goal is to drive street sleeping
down to zero by 2012. So how
do the British do it?
"The success was largely due
to a very focused and targeted
approach with high-profile cen-
tral leadership, assertive out-
reach to get people in, and
investment in accommodation,
specifically for former rough
sleepers," one report said. "The
Department of Health was
effective in helping to target
the most entrenched people
with severe mental illness."
In America, the most effec-
tive programme operates just
across the water in Miami-Dade
County. The Community Part-
nership for the Homeless was
set up in 1993 funded by a one
per cent tax on food and bev-
erage sales. It also relies on a
"holistic approach" to help peo-
ple get off the streets. Public
and private sector investment
in this programme has exceed-
ed $300 million over 15 years.
"Help" includes meals,
clothing and temporary hous-
ing, as well as training, case
management, healthcare, drug
treatment and permanent hous-
ing assistance. And the num-
ber of people living on the
streets of Miami has been cut
from 8,000 in 1993 to under a
thousand today. The pro-
gramme has been so successful
that it is now being applied in
cities across the United States.
Meanwhile, here at home
the Ministry of Labour and
Social Development recently
joined with private sector
groups to work out approaches
to homelessness in Nassau.
Those attending the initial
meeting last month included
the president of the Christian
Council, the Commissioner of
Police, the Defence Force
Commodore, representatives of
civic organizations, and public
officers.
"Homelessness is a problem
that our society needs to tackle
urgently before it becomes
unmanageable," State Minister
for Social Development Loret-
ta Butler-Turner told the meet-
ing. "We want your commit-
ment to work with the govern-
ment to address homelessness.
It is a matter which requires the
attention of all of us."
Currently, services for the
homeless include soup kitchens
operated by churches and char-
ities, and government food sub-
sidies. Recommendations to
deal with the problem include
determining the number of
homeless people on the island,
better coordination of food ser-
vices, provision of temporary
shelters, expansion of low-
income housing, and job train-
ing. Providing accommodation
and food are probably not
insurmountable issues. Health-
care is the biggest challenge. In
a paper for the Organisation of
American States produced last
year, well-known psychiatrist
Dr David Allen offered a
Bahamian perspective on the
contribution of drug abuse to
homelessness and HIV/AIDS
infection.
He traced the problem to a
national epidemic of crack
cocaine unleashed in the 1980s,
associated with already high
levels of alcohol consumption.
That was the period when
Colombian drug lords took
over several islands in the
Bahamas to transship cocaine
to the United States, while our
government looked the other


What do you think? Send com-
ments to larrv@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com



IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


way. "As the acute crack
cocaine epidemic started to
wane," Dr Allen wrote, "push-
ers preyed on mentally ill
patients, creating bizarre syn-
dromes involving vagrancy,
homelessness and sometimes
violence. Many addicts had a
severe psychiatric illness such
as schizophrenia. These are best
treated in an inpatient setting."
Although drug treatment is
provided by groups like Teen
Challenge, The Haven,
Bahamas Association for Social
Health and the Deanery, "the
missing pieces in the consor-
tium of services are compre-
hensive programmes for the
chronically addicted woman
(the broken woman) and tran-
sitional community residences
to enhance re-entry into soci-
ety," according to Dr Allen.
"There are increasing num-
bers of chronic cocaine users
who also use marijuana and
alcohol. Cognitively impaired,
they tend to be unemployed
and go in and out of prison. A
major concern is that marijuana
has permeated junior and
senior high schools, which has
serious implications for educa-
tion and career development,"
he said.
Drug trafficking has pro-
duced a gun culture that is
directly responsible for the rise
in violent crime we are experi-
encing today: "The drug prob-
lem has a devastating effect on
our value system," Dr Allen
said. "The already challenged
inner city family and commu-
nity has been impacted severe-
ly by violent crime, stealing and
the despair that accompanies
chronic drug use. Children lack
nurture and support...This
destruction is tragic."
He called for an interna-
tional drug policy think tank to
share technical expertise and
promote a coordinated
approach to the problem. He
also pointed to the need for
better communication between
key players like social workers,
teachers, law enforcement offi-
cers, politicians, medical pro-
fessionals and drug counselors,
as well as the development of
training and work skills during
treatment. You might not know
it, but there already is a nation-
al drug plan that seeks to deal
with these critical issues. In the
early 2000s, the authors of this
plan noted that more than 60
per cent of inmates at Fox Hill
Prison were there for drug-
related offences and a high per-
centage were infected with
HIV/AIDS. Statistics also
showed that 75 per cent of
women with HIV had a history
of drug or alcohol abuse.
A five-year anti-drug plan
was formulated in 2004 with the
help of international agencies
and called for a $3 million bud-
get. It is now being updated by
Captain Godfrey Rolle, the
plan's coordinator at the Min-
istry of National Security. The
goals include development of
complex interdiction, preven-
tion, treatment and rehabilita-
tion services. It is surely a
daunting task.
Perhaps the most frightening
data relating to the homeless
involves the prevalence of
HIV/AIDS infection.
A recent Caribbean study
confirmed that homeless drug
users are at high risk for HIV
infection.
And crack cocaine use and
risky sexual behaviours, both
associated with increased risk
of medical and psychiatric com-
plications, have been described
as common behaviours among
the homeless.
So resettlement support
alone will not be enough to
help these people back into
mainstream society. We need
to find cost-effective ways to
rehabilitate those suffering
from mental illness, drug or
alcohol problems. Then we
need to develop their basic life
skills, and help them reconnect
with social networks away from
the streets. These are difficult,
long-term and costly approach-
es. That's why many experts
believe prevention is the best
means of ensuring a lasting and
sustainable end to the problem
of homelessness. But in the
Bahamas, we also have to con-
sider that the problem is not
strictly confined to the rela-
tively small world of crazy
street people like those living at
Potters Cay.
In 2006 government officials
reported 39 squatter villages
throughout New Providence.
As many as 300 people - both
Bahamians and immigrants -
were said to be living in just
one of these, with no sanitary
facilities or police presence
whatsoever. What is being done
to address these issues?


Mohs Surgerv in Nassau
DR. JOHN STRASSWIMMER, MOHS SURGEON
will be visiting The Skin Centre on Friday
October 23rd, 2009. Dr Strasswimmer trained
at Harvard and Yale and is Board Certified
'and a Fellow of the Mohs College.

Mohs Micrographic Surgery is an advanced
treatment process for skin cancer- which iS
now offered at The Skin Centre, It offers the
highest possible cure rate for many skin
cancers and simultaneously minimizes the
sacrifice Of normal tissue- This cutting-edge
Itreatmen t requires highly specialized
physicians that serve as surgeon, pathologIst
and reconstructive surgeon,

Our visiting Mohs Surgeon has extensive
experience In the Mohs Micrographic
Procedure. The technique is used to remove
the two most common forms of skin cancer;
basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell
Carcinoma.

For more information, please contact:
The Skin Cent, Harbour Bay Plaza,
East Bay Street Tel. 393-7546.


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009, PAGE 9


Online poll: Tighter control


of jet-ski rentals is needed


Tribune242.com
readers want
laws enforced
READERS of our website
tribune.242.com are over-
whelmingly in favour of
stricter enforcement of the
laws governing the use and
rental of jet-skis.
Less than 10 per cent of
those who took yesterday's
online poll said they are satis-
fied with the way the water
sports industry is currently
regulated.
Of the 92 readers who vot-
ed, 61 said the laws need to
be better enforced, 23 said jet
skis should be banned on
Bahamian beaches altogeth-
er, while only eight were hap-
py with the status quo.
The question was posed fol-
lowing a dangerous jet ski
accident on Goodman's Bay,
from which one man was
lucky to escape with his life. It
was only the latest of many
water sports accidents in
recent years, which have lead
to serious injury and even
death for locals and tourists
alike.
Commenting on the web-
site, Derek Dean said: "Typi-
cal of the Bahamas. Laws are
likely only the books but nev-


er enforced, unless something
happens to 'somebody' but
almost always when it's too
late - one more life unneces-
sarily taken.

Complain
"We all complain but do
nothing about it as an 'undis-
ciplined' people who do what
we want, except when we go
to South Florida and are
afraid to even cross the road
for fear of getting a ticket for
J-walking."
Another commentator, who
identified himself as only
"Morons as Jet Ski Opera-
tors", wrote: "I used to be a


-.

. --
)rought ashore after the acci-

tourist to the Bahamas and I
am now a resident.
"I have seen the morons
who are either hopped on
booze or drugs roaring around
on our local beaches, in addi-
tion to behaving like pimps
towards the women that they
attempt to entice onto their
jet-skis.
"I would place an age
restriction on the jet-ski oper-
ators. Adult men or women
aged between 40 and 45 peri-
od. Some of these young
Bahamian are morons who
drive like idiots in traffic and
it's no different for them
either riding on a wave or on
hot asphalt."


NDP opposes the unlicensed sale of real estate


THE National Development Party is sup-
porting the Bahamas Real Estate Associa-
tion in its position that only licensed mem-
bers of BREA should be allowed to sell real
estate.
However, the party said it is also very
concerned about unscrupulous Bahamian
real estate agents and lawyers who know-
ingly provide clients with invalid or fraudu-
lent land titles. "An NDP government, when
elected, will solve this problem once and
for all on behalf of the Bahamian people,"
said the party in a statement.
In addition, the party said, the acute
shortage of land surveyors has been allowed


to stagnate the development of land, espe-
cially the granting of crown land to Bahami-
ans.
The party also noted that there are "many
Bahamians who have yet to be paid for land
that was compulsorily acquired by successive
governments of the Bahamas over the years.
All of these accounts will be settled with
the election of an NDP government. We
intend to repeal all colonial legislation gov-
erning land in the Bahamas along with the
much abused Quieting Titles Act of 1959,
replacing them with legislation reflecting a
21st century independent and sovereign
Bahamas."


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THE TRIBUNE


PU,'



1


.4z


AbAM







PAGE^ ^ ^ ^TTHLOCAL 10,S THRSAICTBR 5 209TE R BU


Ministry continues search for mould-free offices
THE Ministry of Education, Public Service Union John Pin- -r e location. will be able to put them in a
Youth and Sports is pressing der said the ministry may move Mould infesta- different tower, and Dr Hubert
on with the search for mould- to another Wyndham tower tion at the min- Minnis, who was the acting
free offices after their intended now that the potentially dan- istry's current Minister of Education in Carl
relocation to the Wyndham gerous fungus has been discov- offices on Bethel's absence, indicated that
Nassau Resort was stalled by ered growing throughout the Thompson they would now look at a dif-
the discovery of mould in one sixth floor and on part of the Bo u 1 e v ard ferent tower.
of the towers. fourth floor in the tower which JOHN PINDER sparked nego- "Until they get that tower
President of the Bahamas had been considered for the tiations with I'm pushing for them to put


Baha Mar over the feasability
of moving staff to one of the
disused towers for health rea-
sons.
But Mr Pinder, who said he
toured the Cable Beach tower
with inspectors last week, said
staff should not be relocated to
another hazardous working
environment.
And until a safe site has been
identified, he said, they should
work in shifts to avoid long
hours of exposure to mould in
the Thompson Boulevard
building.
Mr Pinder the fungus started
growing in the Wyndham tow-
er during the three months it
was closed, and may be related
to a leak under repair.
He said: "I have asked if they


people on flexi-time because I
don't want them working for
long hours in the present con-
ditions at their office in Thomp-
son Boulevard."
Some types of mould can lead
to a variety of health problems.
If present in large quantities,
mould can be extremely haz-
ardous to humans, causing
allergic reactions and respira-
tory problems.
When contacted about the
matter a few weeks ago, vice
president of external affairs at
Baha Mar, Robert Sands, told
The Tribune he was unaware
of the mould claims and said
government and the resort were
only at the "exploratory stages"
in their discussions about a pos-
sible rental agreement.


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PORTIA SWEETING, BNT director of education


Small island states, the effects of climate change, and envi-
ronmental protection are the focus of the 2009 essay contest
organised by the Inter-American Developmental Bank and
the Bahamas National Trust.
All students are asked to celebrate the 50th anniversary of
both organizations by writing an essay about the impact of cli-
mate change on the environment and the economy.
The theme is 'Environmental sustainability and conservation
in the Bahamas: A Vision for the future.'
With the support of the Ministry of Education, the contest
runs to November 20. "As we are both celebrating our 50th
anniversary this year, we have joined forces given the nature of
our work in sustainability and natural resource conservation,"
said Roscoe Spencer, IDB representative for the Bahamas.

Parks
The BNT operates 25 national parks throughout the
Bahamas, four of which are in New Providence. It also offers
educational programmes about ecosystems.
"Our national parks are the subject of many educational
programmes," said Portia Sweeting, BNT director of education.
"National park visitations and school presentations deliver the
conservation message to 1,000 young people each year.
"We are consulting with the Ministry of Education and they
are revising their curriculum to include information and activ-
ities surrounding the effects of climate change on small island
states."
By convincing all students from primary school to senior
high to make protecting the environment a priority now, the
Department of Education hopes to embed in them an awareness
they will take seriously as adults.
"The Ministry of Education supports the BNT and IDB
essay competition because through it the high school students
will develop a more heightened awareness of the importance of
the environment," said Lionel Sands, director of education.
"Environmental studies are a part of the curriculum now.
"Then they will understand how to protect the environment
and how to use it so we don't lose it."
Junior high winners will receive a laptop computer and
iPODs. Senior high winners will receive a Mac computer and
iPODs. A desk-top computer is in store for the winning school.


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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009


t
t
1
t

t"
t


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE^ ^ ^ ^TTHLOCAL 12,S THRSAI CTBR 5 209TE R BU


FROM page one
together."
An activist group demanding better condi-
tions at the pound was formed after The Tribune
reported deplorable conditions witnessed by a
14-year-old visitor. The group now has nearly
600 members.
A public meeting will be held at the Bahamas
Humane Society in Chippingham tonight to dis-
cuss concerns about the government dog pound.
Ms Aranha said: "Our immediate concern is
that the animals in there are treated humanely.
We will be making sure they have adequate
food water and shade.
"We now have permission to go in there every
single day to check on the situation and I con-


Readers' views
sider that a very positive step.
"We can also go in there and actively weed
out the dogs we can find homes for and be much
more proactive.
"But this is not just something that is just for
the Humane Society, this is the people's project,
and there are a lot of people who care and they
should be a part of this change."
Ms Aranha encouraged anyone interested in
standards at the dog pound to attend the meet-
ing at 6pm tonight. And all readers should send
their concerns and priorities for the pound to
The Tribune, or email mreynolds@tribuneme-
dia.net or pnunez@tribunemedia.net.


WORKPLACE


CONFLICT...

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SOORNRDOGAS] miCOLLii I114t~� EGE ~~


FROM page one

intentions would be at the October
21 convention.
According to a PLP insider, when
Mr Mitchell said he was going to run
for the leadership of the party, a seg-
ment of those in attendance almost
"took his head off".
Shouting out "how dare you" chal-
lenge Mr Christie and going as far as
questioning the MP's loyalty to the
party, it is claimed Mr Mitchell hit
back by stating that he wasn't "born
yesterday".
"He gave as good as he got," said a
source who witnessed Tuesday night's proceed-
ings.
"He told them that anyone who attacked him
would be attacked likewise, just as hard."
While the heated exchange of words never
escalated into any physical altercation, it is
believed this incident is a telling sign of what is yet
to come in the party as the battle over the lead-


FROM page one

be PLP newcomer Paul Moss
who was the first to announce
his intentions to challenge Mr
Christie back in September of
this year.
It is also believed the MP for
Fox Hill Fred Mitchell will like-
wise join Mr Moss and Dr Not-
tage and run against Mr Christie
at the party's October 21 con-
vention.
During the party's 1997 con-
vention, Mr Christie was able to
secure a victory over Dr Nottage
with the assistance of the third
candidate, Philip Galanis, who
at that time threw his support
behind Mr Christie.
However, with this upcoming
convention it appears the three
candidates who are seeking the
post that Mr Christie currently
holds have one mission in mind -
the removal of the leader. And
with less than a week to go
before the convention, candi-
dates are already fearful of the
transparency of the elections.
In a letter issued to the chair-
man of the convention, PLP MP
for West End and Bimini Obie
Wilchcombe on October 1, Mr
Moss outlined that he has written
to members of the election com-
mittee requesting a number of
measures be put in place to
ensure the credibility and trans-
parency of the upcoming elec-
tions.
"The fact that you, as conven-
tion chairman, are yourself a can-
didate in those elections has been
cause for protest from your
opponents already," Mr Moss
said, "so, in my opinion, this
places on you a heavy responsi-


Fred Mitchell
ership and deputy leadership positions
heats up.
"At the end of the day there were a
group who raised hell, but there also
were other persons in the room who had
to tell them that it was his (Mr Mitchell's)
right to run.
"If the PLP is a democracy then it has
to act like a democracy. But some in
there were really nasty, saying that If he
ran it was a signal of no confidence in Mr
Christie and all kind of foolishness," the
source added.
In the race with Mr Mitchell for the
party's top post will be PLP MP for Bain and
Grants Town Dr Bernard Nottage, PLP newcom-
er Paul Moss, and Mr Christie. In the race for the
deputy leadership post there is the PLP MP for
West End and Bimini Obie Wilchcombe, PLP MP
for Cat Island, San Salvador and Rum Cay Philip
'Brave' Davis, and PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald.


Dr Nottage to announce PLP

leadership bid this morning


ability and obligation to do all you
can to 'shun the very appearance
of evil' in the election process.
"Though oversight for the
elections is outside your formal
sphere of influence, I share my
requests with you in the hope
that you will advance and sup-
port them should the occasion
present itself.
"I requested as follows, that
the complete list of
delegates/Stalwart Counselors be
given to each candidate in
advance of Elections, but cer-
tainly no later than October 15
(today); that each candidate be
allowed two agents in the voting
room at any given time; that the
election for Leader be held sep-
arately from the election for oth-
er positions; that voters be
required to show photo identifi-
cation before being allowed to
cast their ballots; that one agent
for each candidate signs or ini-
tials the blank ballots before they
are given to voters; and that a
reputable accounting firm be
used to count the ballots after
voting ends," Mr Moss said.
In addition to these requests,
Mr Moss also requested that he
be allowed an opportunity to
address stalwarts on the first day
of the convention if only for five
minutes.
While the former Prime Min-
ister Christie still holds a tremen-
dous amount of support within
the hierarchy of the party, there
is a growing movement within
the organization to replace him


as the country continues to cry
out for change. Hearing this call,
Dr Nottage, and other chal-
lengers such as Mr Moss and Mr
Mitchell have put themselves for-
ward as alternatives to the status
quo in an attempt to "take the
party forward".
However, unlike Mr Moss and
Mr Mitchell, there is a growing
criticism of Dr Nottage even
though the MP has yet to for-
mally announce.
According to supporters of the
incumbent leader, it would be a
grave injustice if Dr Nottage
were to challenge Mr Christie as
it was the leader of the party who
recently welcomed the Bain and
Grant's Town MP back into the
fold after "years in the wilder-
ness" as the head of the Coalition
for Democratic Reform (CDR).
However, strong supporters
of the doctor counter with claims
that it was in fact Dr Nottage
who encouraged former PLP
leader Sir Lynden Pindling into
allowing Mr Christie to rejoin
the party after he was dismissed
from the PLP Cabinet in 1984
along with Hubert Ingraham
who now sits as the current
Prime Minister.
Running as an independent in
1987 Mr Christie won his seat
again and was invited back into
the PLP in 1990. Serving under
Sir Lynden's leadership since
then, Mr Christie won the lead-
ership of the party in 1997 and
has remained leader of the PLP
ever since.


Just Drag It Herel

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IODSUSI STOIE ON THI 0AG 0LG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15,2009


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009, PAGE 13S


Former Cabinet Minister Loftus


Roker backs Davis for PLP deputy


FORMER cabinet minister
Loftus Roker has thrown his
support behind PLP deputy
leadership candidate Philip
"Brave" Davis.
Mr Roker, who served in the
Pindling administration as min-
ister of immigration and became
notorious for his no-nonsense
stance on illegal immigration,
praised Mr Davis as the bridge
to the future for the Progressive
Liberal Party.
He said: "I support Brave
Davis because he has a long


association with the PLP from a
young man and I believe his
election as deputy leader would
give the party another chance to
return to its roots and give hope
to the Bahamian people."
Mr Roker, who is still hugely
popular with the public, joins
deputy prime minister and for-
mer Minister of National Secu-
rity in the Christie administra-
tion, Cynthia 'Mother' Pratt,
who also endorsed Mr Davis for
the deputy leadership position.
Mr Davis has made recon-


necting with the public a cor-
nerstone of his campaign and
has told party members they
cannot continue to focus on the
history of the PLP if they intend
to succeed in the future.
So far, Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald and former minister of
tourism and current MP for
West End and Bimini Obie
Wilchcombe have announced
that they will vie for the post
along with Mr Davis at the PLP
national convention on October


FORMER
cabinet min-
ister Loftus
Roker with
PLP deputy
leadership
candidate
Philip 'Brave'
Davis.


Bain and Grants Town MP
Bernard Nottage is expected to
announce that he will challenge
party leader Perry Christie for
the reigns of the PLP today.


MANUFACTURING
COMPANY LIMITED


Cal foIprgrame o hghlgh
Chl rtcto c eglcags


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunmedia.net


TWO weeks after the government announced it
had brought into force the Child Protection Act,
which provides for increased safeguarding of chil-
dren's rights, the opposition has called for a public
education programme to highlight the legal changes
this entails.
PLP spokesperson on Social Services and former
minister of Social Services Melanie Griffin MP
called the Act a "significant piece of social legisla-
tion" that is "long overdue" and suggested that
Minister of State for Social Development, Loretta
Butler-Turner, has not done enough to raise aware-
ness of the Act's provisions.
The Act was brought into force on October 1,
2009.
Some of the important aspects of the legislation
include: increased penalties for those who are found
guilty of child abuse; mandatory reporting of all
forms of abuse of children; a provision for fathers of
children born out of wedlock to pursue access to or
custody of those children and a provision for moth-
ers of children born out of wedlock to pursue main-
tenance for those children up to the age of 18.
By ushering in new protection for children, the
legislation, which was passed in parliament in 2007
under the former PLP administration, harmonizes
Bahamian domestic law as it exists with the provi-
sions of the United Nations Convention on the
Rights of the Child while also bringing under one
umbrella several pieces of legislation pertaining to
children's rights. The Bahamas ratified the UN
convention in 1991.
Mrs Griffin said: "The enforcement of this sig-
nificant piece of social legislation is long overdue
and the government ought to be condemned for
failing to see the importance of it to the care and
protection of our children and the development
and strengthening of families, particularly in view of
the level of social decay all around us today.
"After two and a half years of stop-and-review,


the Child Protection Act, 2007 has been brought
into force in its entirety, (with) absolutely no
amendments as (the government had suggested
there would be).
"It is clear that national and international pres-
sure have forced the government's hand in bringing
this Act into force, but 13 days after the 'by the way'
announcement in Parliament (by Mrs Butler-Turn-
er, of its coming enforcement on October 1, 2009),
no substantive announcement has been made giv-
ing this matter the kind of attention it deserves."
The former minister, in noting that the Act was
brought into force "in its entirety, with no amend-
ments" was referring to comments previously made
by Minister Butler Turner when she was asked
why the nearly three year old legislation had not
been brought into force by the current govern-
ment.
Mrs Butler Turner had answered that among
other hindrances to the Act's enforcement - includ-
ing the fact that the PLP administration did not
draft regulations necessary to effectively administer
the Act - the government would need significant
funding and human resources to effectively enact
the law and therefore may need to amend it or
"phase it in", given economic challenges.
In this regard, Mrs Griffin called on the govern-
ment to reveal "what has been done at the Depart-
ment of Social Services to provide the structure,
manpower and the resources needed to effectively
enforce the provisions of the CPA."
The former minister noted that the Act was the
culmination of 12 years of work by governmental
and non-governmental organizations, who she com-
mended for their involvement.
She also paid tribute to children's rights activist
and long-standing campaigner for the implemen-
tation of the Act, founder of Bahamian Fathers
for Children Everywhere, Clever Duncombe.
Messages left for Mrs Butler-Turner and the
director of Social Services were not returned yes-
terday.
Both were said to be attending the funeral of
Sir Clement Maynard.


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15,2009, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NgWS I


ael Sf ra idia


FROM page one
interested in ai.I ih I r_
about getting I,, H'i \ IIiii ih1.
media for it.
She said shi. li. I.,.1 Lli.l-
bourne he shouldn't speak to the
media and admonished him to
think about what it would look
like for the Bahamas.
Bridgewater said Light-
bourne told her he was not trying
to hurt the Travoltas but he had
a mortgage to pay and a family to
take care of.
"He never asked me to speak
with Mr Travolta or ask him for
any money. He had the phone
number, he didn't even have to
come to me," Bridgewater said.
Bridgewater also told the jury
she had been reluctant to speak
with Michael McDermott, an
attorney for Mr Travolta. She
recalled he had inquired about
the document and asked her to e-
mail a copy but Lightbourne had
instructed her not to do so. She
also recalled that Senator
Allyson Maynard-Gibson subse-
quently called her saying that she
wanted to speak with her regard-
ing a matter concerning Mr
McDermott.
"I said to her from the outset,
Allyson if there is anything I am
doing illegal I don't want to be a
part of it. I only want to assist
the Travoltas," she said.
According to Bridgewater,
when she had met her former
senate colleague, Mrs Maynard
-Gibson had told her there was
nothing criminal at that stage and
that she knew she was a person
of integrity.
Bridgewater told the jury she
gave Mrs Maynard-Gibson a
copy of the document despite
her client's instructions because
she trusted her.
Although Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son had testified that she had
told Bridgewater that what she
was doing was wrong, Bridge-
water told the jury that that was
not true.
Bridgewater said she consid-
ered Mrs Maynard-Gibson to be
a trusted friend and parliamen-
tary colleague. She said she did
not think she would have had
police recording their conversa-
tions.
"I trusted her. I thought she


I~ I?_linI,


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I �OR Seatr fleasat Brdgeater


Fil ip . I i \ .! l1 I),,l . , l l il, !

clients, police came and arrested
her. She told the jury that con-
trary to the evidence of Sergeant
Deborah Thompson, she did not
tell police she had burned the
refusal of transport document
because she thought the situa-
tion was going to explode.
"I never said that I burned
the document because I thought
the situation was going to
explode. I never thought I would
have been arrested," she said.
Bridgewater said she had blurted
to police that she had burned the
document because of they had
vigorously interrogated and dis-
respected her and her parents in
their home.
"I never attempted to extort
anything from anybody. All my
life I have tried to help people,"
she said. "I'll be the first to say I
am no saint but I'm no devil."
"I came from humble begin-
nings," she said, "All I have I
have worked for." Bridgewater
credited God, her family and
friends with helping her cope
with the ordeal.
"But for the grace of God, I
could have been in Sandilands
or probably worse," she said.
"All I was trying to do is what I
thought was right for my country
and to steer Mr Lightbourne in
the right direction," she said. "I
maintain my 100 per cent inno-
cence. What Allyson, McDer-
mott and the others did to me, I
leave that to God," Bridgewater
said.
Following her address to the
jury, Bridgewater began to cry
and was embraced by Light-
bourne as she took her seat.
Facing the jury, Lightbourne
said: "On January 2, 2009,1 Inev-
er questioned God before but I
questioned and asked why I had
to work that morning."
Lightbourne went on to recall
that he and EMT Derrex Rolle
went to Old Bahama Bay that
morning where they found Jett
Travolta lying on a bathroom
floor with a brown towel around
his waist. Lightbourne said he
smelled alcohol in air and noticed


I',-, 'II'I- 1I ili .. h I ,', . I i i ih l

, , , . ,,. .i i I. L,. i , I , . . i i



Fernandez told him that he knew
that but they should just take the
boy to the hospital.
Lightbourne said he told the
doctor he did not want to be a
part of 'any cover up' and he
overheard a man say 'do we have
an agreement.' He said the man
also tapped him on the shoulder
and asked him if he agreed.
Lightbourne said there was a
discussion about whether to take
Jett to the hospital or the air-
port.
He said that he spoke to Mr
Travolta and told them it was
their policy that once they were
in custody of a patient they had
to take them to the hospital.
Lightbourne said Mr Rolle told
him to get a refusal form which
Mr Travolta signed.
Lightbourne told the jury he
later made a copy of the docu-
ment and put the original on file
at the Rand Memorial Hospital.
He said he kept the document
with his collection of celebrity
signatures.
Lightbourne recalled being
approached at the Rand by two
Inside Edition reporters about
doing an interview while at the
hospital on January 4. He told
the jury he contacted his union
representative John Curtis to
inquire on whether he could do
the interview. He said Mr Curtis
called BPSU president John Pin-
der on the matter. Lightbourne
said the men wanted to know
how much he was being paid and
instructed him not to make the
hospital look bad.
He also told the jury that he
had been contacted by a man
claiming to be a representative of
Mr Travolta who said that he
was willing to pay a substantial
sum of money for the document
that the media had been inquir-
ing about.
He said that he informed the
man that he was going to do an
interview with Inside Edition.
He added that the man told him
to make Mr Travolta look good.
"I was surprised when Ms
Bridgewater got locked up


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"I didn't feel comfortable. So
I asked him, 'Are you recording
me?' He said 'No, I don't do
things like that'," Lightbourne
said.
He said Mr McDermott kept
insisting he did not want anyone
to know about their meeting.
"I realized the questions he
was saying to me, he was setting
me up. So I say if he going to
play crazy I going to play crazy,
so I told him what he wanted to
hear," Lightbourne said.
"I didn't know what extortion
was until I came to this court. As
far as I know I was selling them a
paper with Mr Travolta's signa-
ture on it," he said. "In your
deliberations find Ms Bridgewa-
ter not guilty and find me not
guilty," Lightbourne said.
Lightbourne also told the jury
that health officials had promised
his former co-worker Derrex
Rolle a promotion and a pay
increase if he re-wrote his report
regarding Jett's death. Light-
bourne said Mr Rolle came to
his home and told him so a week
before the start of the trial.
"Send me and Ms Bridgewa-
ter home to be with our family
and friends," Lightbourne said.
Both attorney Murrio Ducille
who is representing Bridgewa-
ter, and Carlson Shurland, who is
representing Lightbourne, made
their opening addresses to the
jury yesterday.
"I am using a microscope. I
am still looking for a case but I
don't see it," Mr Ducille said.
He told the jury: "You are the
judges of the facts. Her ladyship
is the judge of the law. No one
can tell you how to decide in this
case.
"This case has been well pub-
licised all over the world, not
withstanding that, you deal with
the evidence which you have
heard."
Mr Ducille told the jury his
client had nothing to prove but
that it was the prosecution who
has to prove her guilt.
"The catalyst of this whole
case is Mr McDermott. Ms


said.
Marcus Garvey, manager of
the Bahamas Ambulance Ser-
vices company was called yes-
terday as a witness for Light-
bourne.
He recalled that on January
2, he and EMS Selvin Strachan
while in the area of Eight Mile
Rock intercepted the ambu-
lance that had been dispatched
to Old Bahama Bay that morn-
ing. Mr Garvey said he switched
places with Lightbourne who
had been driving the ambulance
carrying Jett's body. He told the
court that Jett's body was cold,
his pupils were fully dilated and
lividity had set in. He said Jett
was taken to the Rand Memor-
ial Hospital.
Mr Garvey also told the court
that on January 2, he received a
telephone call and told the man
he was not the person who had
access to the refusal of trans-
port form.
"I told him Mr Tarino Light-
bourne was responsible for that
document and I gave him his
telephone contacts," Mr Gar-
vey said. He also testified that
reporters from CNN, The New
York Times and Star magazine
had also called him that day.
During cross examination
by lead prosecutor and Director
of Public Prosecutions Bernard
Turner, Mr Garvey was asked
whether he had given an inter-
view to Radaronline.com.
He told the court he had nev-
er given an interview to anyone
regarding that matter, which is
presently before the Public
Health Tribunal.


Bridgewater has always led an
exemplary life. Her reputation
has been seriously damaged and
I hope to God she is able to
restore it.
"A good reputation is so hard
to build and so easy to destroy.
"This lady's liberty, her
career, her entire life is in your
hands. We are not here judging
morals, we are dealing with the
law and whether there has been
a breach in the law."
He noted that Allyson May-
nard-Gibson had testified that
Bridgewater had told her that
her client wanted to give Mr
Travolta the first option to pur-
chase the document he had.
"Where is the threat?" Mr
Ducille asked. "It is clear to see
she has been intorted. She is no
extortionist. Mr McDermott is
the intortioner." Mr Ducille
said.
Mr Shurland tried to hold
back tears as he made his open-
ing address.
"I sat here and cried tears
for Pleasant. I have known her
for a long time," he said. Mr
Shurland told the jury that is
client was not an extortionist.
"He might be an opportunist
but he sure isn't an extortionist.
What's wrong with Bahamians
seeing opportunities and taking
opportunities?" he asked.
"You seen Mr Travolta he
came here said what he had to
say and hit the road, Jack. At
the end of the day this had noth-
ing to do with extorting money
from John Travolta.
"This is strictly about deceit
and distractions," Mr Shurland


799199


NIX E T RUN 11
F;;�. .. I.SiLdShi-Whi







THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009, PAGE 15S


Fourteen-island promotional



strategy unveiled by Ministry


PLANS TO HIGHLIGHT THE FAMILY ISLANDS


THE Ministry of Tourism
has unveiled plans on for a
14-island multi-level pro-
motional strategy that will
highlight the Family Islands.
Through its London-
based office, the ministry is
recruiting 42 filmmakers to
produce a short film featur-
ing life on the Family
Islands.
Fourteen will be chosen
to travel to the Bahamas to
produce the short film,
which will be distributed to
audiences around the world.
The islands are: Abaco,
Andros, Eleuthera, Har-
bour Island, San Salvador,
Exuma, Crooked Island,
Inagua, Mayaguana, Long
Island, Cat Island, Bimini,
Grand Bahama and New
Providence.
"The Ministry of Tourism
is always seeking to use
effective media to advance
the reputation of our coun-
try and enhance our profile
as a vacation destination of
choice," said director gen-
eral, Ministry of Tourism,
Vernice Walkine.
It is expected that these
objectives will be met
through this promotion, she
said.
The challenge is designed
to build "greater aware-


UInEnc l n U EcienL -L, ivilllniis y
of Tourism, Vernice Walkine
ness" of the Bahamas and
appreciation of the coun-
try's beauty, particularly in
the United Kingdom.
She noted that there is a
"significant" onshore com-
ponent and that the project
"cannot be successful with-
out the full participation of
Bahamians as consummate
hosts and great information
sources to the filmmakers."
"Here is our chance, as
Bahamians, to help UK
filmmakers make the best
possible film about the
islands on which we live,


showing the people of the
UK why they should visit
our islands," said Ms
Walkine.
The price tag for this pro-
ject will be "modest"
according to district sales
manager for the ministry's
UK office, Giovanni Grant.
"This project will cost the
ministry $250,000 to
$300,000, most of which will
be used for travel and
accommodations for the
filmmakers," he said. "It's
a small price to pay for the
potential benefits that we
will reap."
The movies' idyllic shots
of the islands will reside
online at the Bahamas' UK
website which functions as a
24-hour tourist office to give
information and visual
images of the Bahamas to
Internet users.
"The overall goal of the
initiative is to drive traffic
to the bahamas.co.uk web-
site, and ultimately to cause
prospective travellers to
consider one of our islands
for their next holiday
retreat," said Ms Walkine.
This initiative lines up
with the ministry's goal of
attracting UK travellers to
the Bahamas in 2009 and
2010, she said.


Mitchell: A stable Haiti


vital for the Bahamas


THE long-term stabilisation of Haiti has been
and continues to be of crucial interest to the
Bahamas, former minister of foreign affairs Fred
Mitchell said.
He expressed the hope that CARICOM will
soon "endeavour to bring to bear on Haiti a pol-
icy and physical presence that nurtures the envi-
ronmental, economic and social stability that
would create the political capital necessary to
sustain national growth and deeper regional inte-
gration".
Mr Mitchell was speaking after 11 United
Nations peacekeepers were killed last week Fri-
day when their surveillance plane crashed into a
mountainside in Haiti during a routine patrol.
Reports confirmed that no-one survived the crash.
Local officials said the plane went down in a
remote area near the village of Pays-Pourri in
the district of Ganthier, a farming region area
east of Port-au-Prince, the capital. The people
on board were Uruguayans and Jordanians.
"At this time I extend condolences on behalf of
the opposition PLP in the Bahamas and myself to
the UN peacekeeping fraternity; to the native
countries of the deceased peace keepers; to their
families; and to their comrades in the field," Mr
Mitchell said.


.01IN1




F44I531


e - 0H
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SPEAKER:
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Hematology/Oncology


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RSVP* Seating is Limited * 302-4603

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series of the most relevant health issues
affecting society today.


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Breast Canicer
Dr. Tiec'dOre Tunicquest


Diabetes Nlellitiis
Dr. Jiudsoii Eieas


Stress
Dr. Ian Kelli


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Lectture Sp)OlISOl-ed bN:


A PEACEKEEPER inspects the wreckage of the
UN plane that crashed in a remote mountain area
known as Pays Pouri, near Haiti's border with the
Dominican Republic. (AP)


DOCTORS HOSPITAL
Health For Life


ITDISCUS TOIESONTHS PGELO0ONTOWW.TIBUE22CO0


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15,2009, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE PAGE 16


Campbell-Brown
named UNESCO
Champion
for Sport...
Seepage 18


THIRllI)_\Y OCTOBER 15. 2009


PAGE0 18 *-inernatinal spots new


Wildcats






sweep the





Swingers


After the latest
pair of games
on the New
Providence
Softball Association
(NPSA) schedule, the men's
championship series is all set
while half of the women's
series has been decided.
The Pineapple Air Wild-
cats completed a three-game
sweep over the Bommer
George Swingers with their
third consecutive shutout
last night, winning 13-0 in
the women's division of the
NPSA.
The Wildcats await the
winner of the Proper Care
Pool Lady Sharks and Sigma
Brackettes semifinal
matchup. The Lady Sharks
lead the series two games to
one.
And in the men's division,
the Commando Security
Truckers also completed a


Truckers roll

over Stingrays,

advance to

face Dorsey

Park Boyz in

best-of-seven

champ series

three game sweep of the
Price Waterhouse Stingrays
with an 11-4 victory Tuesday
night at the Blue Hills
Sporting Complex.
The Truckers will advance
to face the Heavylift Dorsey
Park Boyz in the champi-
onship series.


PINEAPPLE AIR WILDCATS' Marvelle Miller in action...


Vincerest condolences to the family and friends of the late

Sir Clement Maynard. Our prayers are with you at this time.


Frm
The Priem 4a t Hospital Foundation Board of ncton
TN Exuutivi Hliuqment ConmMtt
A Ow P lc MMai t H" ptal Family


PMH Foundt Estobshed in Mty 2002



Em&noi as o LaboratoqTechnkian at PMH


Senior league officials

attend FIFA referee

training course


ABOUT 12 officials who
call games in the senior soc-
cer league here in New Prov-
idence attended an intensive,
four-day referee training
course.
The FIFA Member Asso-
ciation Referee Course was
conducted September 17-21
as part of the development
programme of the Bahamas
Football Association (BFA).
FIFA referee assistance
programme development
officer Ramesh Ramdhan of
Trinidad and Tobago, FIFA
referee instructor Peter Pren-
dergast of Jamaica and FIFA
referee fitness instructor
Merere Gonzalez of Trinidad
and Tobago joined local
instructor Stan Darville for
the presentation of the course
material.
In attendance at the open-
ing of the course programme
at the Hilton resort were
Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Desmond Bannister,
Anton Sealey, president of
the Bahamas Football Asso-
ciation, Fred Lunn, executive
vice president of the BFA,
Lionel Haven, general secre-


DESMOND BANNISTER


tary of the BFA and Pierre
Lafleur, vice president of the
BFA.
Bannister confirmed his
pleasure at the leadership and
direction of the BFA, and
commended the association
for their attention to the men-
toring of referees for the
game.
He commented on the

SEE page 17


Lady Technicians

defeat COB Caribs

Defenders get victory over Crimestoppers

IT took the Lady Technicians five sets to defeat the COB
Caribs 25-21, 25-17, 19-25, 18-25 and 15-7 in New Providence
Volleyball Association (NPVA) action at the D W Davis gym.
Sharon Whylly led the Lady Techs with seven kills followed
by Sonia Hinsey with five kills.
In a losing effort, Kenisha Thompson led all scorers with 11
kills.
On the men's side, the Scotiabank Defenders also won over
the Crimestoppers in five tough sets 23-25, 26-24, 25-16, 20-25
and 16-14.
Ian "Wire" Pinder and Shedrick Forbes led the Defenders
with 16 and 11 kills respectively.
Leonardo Dean and Carl Rolle led the Crimestoppers with
17 and 13 kills.
League play continued with two games Wednesday night
(Scottsdale Vixens vs The Cougars at 7:30pm and The Saints vs
The Intruders at 8:30pm) but those results were not available
up to press time.


Reflecting

on the '09

Hall of

Famers

THE Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture has
announced its Class of 2009
Hall of Fame inductees.
And scanning the list,
there's a good cross section
of 15 players and adminis-
trators from a number of
sporting disciplines who are
going to be enshrined into
the National Hall of Fame
on Saturday, October 31.
While all of them are
expected to be properly
honoured and recognized
for their respective achieve-
ments during the banquet,
let me take this opportunity
to mention some of them as
we take a brief look back at
their careers.
There's former prime
minister Perry Christie,
who prides himself on
remembering everybody
whenever he gets the
opportunity to remind that
he was one of the best
triple jumpers in the
Bahamas, having secured
the islands' first interna-
tional medal in that event.
A member of the Valley
Boys junkanoo group,
Christie was one of the
founding members of the
Pioneers Sporting Club. As
a track and field athlete, he
made two successful trips to
Kingston, Jamaica, for the
West Indies Federation
Games in 1960 and the
Central American and
Caribbean Games in 1962
where he captured a bronze
in the triple jump.
How about Bradley
Cooper, the strongman who
has had some intense bat-
tles with former Cuban
world record holder Luis
Delis, who dominated the
Caribbean before he chose
to retire in 1990 after he
tested positive for banned
substances.
In softball, the late Leon
"Apache" Knowles will
receive his honour posthu-
mously. He was the first
Bahamian to have been
inducted into the Interna-
tional Softball Federation's
Hall of Fame back in 1987.
He managed the
Bahamas' first men's
national team that placed
second in the Central
American and Caribbean
Confederation Tourna-
ment.
Knowles will be joined by
Richard "The Lion-Heart"
Johnson, who two decades
later in 2007 was also
inducted into the ISF's Hall
of Fame. Johnson was the
premier pitcher in the
country for at least two
decades.
Dr Timothy Barrett is
probably best known for his
medical expertise, but he
was also remembered for
his athletic prowess as one
of the premier volleyball
players in the country. He
also was regarded as one of
the top coaches during his
era.
Bobby Issacs was one of
those vintage all-around
players who made a
tremendous impact in just
about every sport he partic-
ipated in, but more specifi-
cally soccer, lawn tennis,
cricket and rugby just to
name a few.
And from one of those
talented brothers clan, the
late Wentworth "Wenty"
Ford will also be honoured
posthumously.
Ford was one of four
Bahamians who played in
Major League Baseball,
having suited up with the
Atlanta Braves as pitcher in
1973 before he was killed in
an automobile accident
SEE page 18


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THE TRIBUE THURDAOCTOBEORT15i,209,PAG1


SEVENTY two custom-
made Sunfish boats have
arrived in Nassau ahead of
the International Junior Sun-
fish Championships and the
2009 Sunfish World Champi-
onships which are expected
to kick off on Friday and
Monday respectively.
The boats feature a brilliant
sail boasting the colours of
the Bahamian flag, incorpo-
rating the Bahamas tourism
logo.
On Friday and Saturday,
the world's top junior sailors
will take to Montagu Harbour
for two days of intense rac-
ing.
The week-long World
Championship sailing is slated
to start 10am Monday with
72 of the Bahamian-inspired
Sunfish boats lined up across
the water.
"It's just a win-win, this
kind of event. For us, it's pro-
moting sailing and that's what
we're all about here, but from
an economic perspective, wel-
coming this many people who
are all bringing value into the
economy is tremendous. We
calculate that these regattas
probably bring about half a
million dollars worth of value
to the economy, which is great
in these challenged economic
times," said Paul Hutton,
chairman of the regatta.
The events are being hosted


by the Nassau Yacht Club
with tremendous logistical
and financial support from the
ministries of tourism and
youth, sports and culture, and
platinum corporate sponsor
Pictet Bank and Trust and
others.
"Having the Sunfish World
Championships come here
exposes so many of our
Bahamian sailors to a differ-
ent side of regatta sailing
because it gives them the
opportunity to sail amongst
the who's who of Sunfish sail-
ing in the world.
"It also will enable our
junior sailors to better their
skills and prepare them to sail
on a larger scale," said
Michelle McPhee, regatta
officer in the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture.
Eldece Clarke, sports
tourism manager in the Min-
istry of Tourism, said there
will be "residual marketing"
for the Bahamas.
"We at tourism are so excit-
ed to see the design and to
have been a part of it. Not
only will it look awesome
when all those boats are out
on the water this weekend
and next week, but we see
that there will be residual
marketing for the Bahamas
as these boats with our
colours and logo end up all
over the world."


SU.s




b ot ...... .................0........




custo


SHOWN (1-r) are Jeremy Stuby, vice president of Pictet Bank and Trust, Paul Hutton, Michelle
McPhee, Eldece Clarke, sports tourism manager in the Ministry of Tourism and Brent Burrows,
commodore of the Nassau Yacht Club.


Scotiabank

Paradise win

Vincent D'Aguilar

Memorial 20/20

tournament

BAHAMAS Cricket
Association executives said
the Vincent D'Aguilar
Memorial 20/20 tourney was
a successful and well-attend-
ed event.
Two of the top teams, the
Dynasty Stars and the Dock-
endale Titans, who were
favourites to capture the
title suffered upsets much
earlier than expected.
The Stars fell to Castrol
Commonwealth, while the
Titans fell to Scotiabank
Paradise.
The two underdog squads
eventually advanced to the
tournament final with Sco-
tiabank winning the tourna-
ment and the cash prize. The
Stars finished in third posi-
tion.
The tournament was
sponsored by Dionisio
D'Aguilar, whose father
Vincent played cricket with
the St Albans and Westerns
cricket teams during the
1950s and 1960s.
The D'Aguilar family
attended Monday's matches
and were on hand for the
presentation of the prizes.
Omni Money Transfers
and Payments and Burger
King Restaurants provided
prizes for individual perfor-
mances.
Gregory Taylor, president
of the Bahamas Cricket
Association, presented
International Cricket Coun-
cil medals to Phillip Smith,
Irving Taylor, Sidney
Deveaux, Edmund Lewis,
Paul Thompson, and
Theophilus Fritz, for their
outstanding contribution to
cricket over the past
decades.
BCA league play contin-
ues at Windsor Park and
Haynes Oval on Saturday,
October 17.


Jamaica national



soccer team player



stabbed to death


By HOWARD CAMPBELL
Associated Press Writer


KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) - Jamaica
defender Orane Simpson was fatally
stabbed in the violence-wracked Kingston
slum where he was raised, police said
Wednesday.
A brief police statement said the 26-
year-old player, a Jamaica international
since 2005, was killed in Tivoli Gardens, a
sprawling neighbourhood that was the
country's first government housing pro-
ject.
Simpson was attacked late Tuesday.
There have been no arrests, and police did
not disclose specifics of the stabbing.
Howard Bell, an administrator with the
Jamaican Football Federation, said the
right back had recently been sidelined with
an injury. He did not provide more details.
Team officials did not immediately
return calls Wednesday.
Simpson also played with the Tivoli Gar-
dens team in the Caribbean island's


Drug and extortion

gangs are blamed for 90

per cent of the homicides

in Jamaica - 1,611 last

year, about 10 times the

rate in the United States,

relative to population


National Premier League.
He was first called up to the Reggae
Boyz in 2005 for a match against Australia.
Drug and extortion gangs are blamed
for 90 per cent of the homicides in Jamaica
-1,611 last year, about 10 times the rate in
the United States, relative to population.


FIFA, from page 16

BFA youth programme and
the valuable service that the
programme provides to the
community at large.
Bannister said the devel-
opment of referees is critical
for the overall development
of the game and encouraged
the referees to press on,
regardless of whether or not
they are liked, but more
importantly because they
ensure the integrity of the
game.
He then issued a challenge
to all of the participants to
continue their education and
learning in their craft and fur-
ther to assist the overall
development of the game by
taking the time to pass on the
information received, not
only in New Providence but
especially in the Family
Islands.
Anton Sealey, president of
the BFA, welcomed the visit-


ing instructors to the
Bahamas and thanked them
for assisting in the delivery of
the message.
FIFA RAP development
officer Ramesh Ramdhan
advised that the conduction
of the MA referees course
programme was designed to
change the environment that
exists.
He reiterated the impor-
tant role that officials play in
the development of the game
in any country and charged
the participants to assist in
the recruitment of new offi-
cials by suggesting "each one
bring one."
The course ran for four
days with practical sessions
conducted at the BFA
National Centre for Football
Development and theory ses-
sions conducted at the Hilton.
Sessions covered the laws
of the game, application of
the laws of the game, man-


management during the
match, fitness for the referee
and a host of other subjects.
The majority of the lectures
were given by Stan Darville,
chairman of the BFA referees
committee, who has attend-
ed FIFA Futuro III Courses
for Referee Instructors in the
region for the past three
years.
FIFA referee fitness
instructor Merere Gonzalez
conducted the fitness train-
ing segment of the pro-
gramme and fitness testing
for all of the officials.
The course concluded Sep-
tember 20 with brief remarks
from BFA general secretary
Lionel Haven and the course
instructors, followed by a pre-
sentation of certificates to all
those who attended.
The referees are expected
to continue their preparation
until the start of the senior
league later this month.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


A1t


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15,2009, PAGE 17


%?a


THE TRIBUNE






PAGE~INERAIOA 18,RT THRDYICOE 5,20 H RBN


Campbell-Brown

named as UNESCO

Champion for Sport

Jamaica's 200 meters double
Olympic champion Veronica
Campbell-Brown, receives an
award at the 35th Session of the
General Conference of UNESCO
in Paris on Tuesday. Veronica
Campbell-Brown has been
named as UNESCO Champion
for Sport and will join the ranks
of Formula One driver German
Michael Schumacher, Judoka
French David Douillet, ice hockey
player Russian Vyacheslav Feti-
sov and Belgian tennis player
Justin Henin.
(AP Photo: Michel Euler)


Del Potro retires


with right wrist


tendinitis


SHANGHAI (AP) -
US Open champion Juan
Martin del Potro retired
because of right wrist ten-
dinitis while trailing Jurgen
Melzer of Austria 7-5, 2-1
Wednesday at the Shanghai
Masters.
The third-seeded Argen-
tine, who was shaking his
right hand before packing
up his rackets, said that he
had similar wrist tendinitis
this year.
"I'm a little sorry," Del
Potro said. "It's a big tour-
nament here in Shanghai,
very important for me. But
if I want to have a good fin-
ish this season, I have to
recover, go home to be in
good shape for the last tour-


naments."
Del Potro has already
qualified for next month's
season-ending ATP tourna-
ment in London.
Top-seeded Rafael Nadal
and second-seeded Novak
Djokovic also advanced.
Nadal defeated James Blake
6-2, 6-7 (4), 6-4 - the sec-
ond straight week in which
the Spaniard needed three
sets to defeat the American.
"Every match is impor-
tant for me now," Nadal
said. "I had the match under
control, set and a break,
playing really well, that's
true. I think I deserve to win
the match, because most of
the time, I think I played
better than James."


US OPEN champion Juan Martin Del Potro of Argentina returns to Edouard Roger-Vasselin of
France during their first round match at the Japan Open Championships in Tokyo.
(AP Photo: Itsuo Inouye)


Last week, Nadal beat
Blake 7-5, 6-7 (4), 6-3 in the
second round of the China
Open.
Djokovic reached the
third round by beating
Fabio Fognini of Italy 6-3, 6-
1.
"First matches are always
the ones which are trickiest,


especially if you're playing
against a lower-ranked play-
er who has basically noth-
ing to lose," said Djokovic,
who is coming off a win in
Beijing last week.
Besides Del Potro, 15th-
seeded Tommy Haas of
Germany also retired from
his match. Haas lost the first


set to German qualifier
Rainer Schuettler 6-4 and
retired with a right shoul-
der injury.
On Tuesday, fourth-seed-
ed Andy Roddick retired
from his match against
Stanislas Wawrinka of
Switzerland with a left knee
injury.


Soccer: More countries Howard looking to find Magic free throw touch


qualify for World Cup


By STUART CONDIE
AP Sports Writer


Switzerland and Slovakia
earned Europe's last two
automatic berths for next
year's World Cup on Wednes-
day night, while Argentina
tried to beat out Uruguay and
Ecuador for South America's
last certain spot in the 32-
nation field.
Costa Rica played at the
already clinched United
States, hoping to stay ahead
of Honduras and gain the
final automatic berth from
North and Central America
and the Caribbean.
Portugal, Greece, Slovenia
and Ukraine finished second
in their groups and joined
Bosnia-Herzegovina, France,
Ireland and Russia in the


European playoffs.
Portugal won its third
straight World Cup qualifier
and advanced to the Euro-
pean playoffs, beating Malta
4-0 Wednesday night as Nani
scored one goal and assisted
on another.
Simao Sabrosa, Miguel
Veloso and Edinho also
scored for Portugal (5-1-4),
which finished second in
Group One with 19 points,
two behind Denmark (6-1-3).
The Danes clinched the auto-
matic berth last weekend.
The eight playoff teams will
be drawn into four pairs on
Monday, and the four win-
ners of home-and-home,
total-goals matches on Nov.
14 and 18 will qualify for next
year's 32-nation tournament
in South Africa.


By ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Associated Press Writer


ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) - Orlando
assistant coach Patrick Ewing stood
underneath the hoop, took the ball after
it swished through the net and passed it
back to Dwight Howard standing at the
free throw line.
"Twenty," Ewing said, passing the ball
back. The next shot finally clanked. Then
came a grimace and a grunt. "Restart the
count," Howard called out. This scene
plays out daily for the Magic big man.
The All-Star center has surprisingly
hit as many as 28 straight free throws in
practice during Orlando's training camp.
The work is all part of his goal to rid his
free-throw woes after missing a costly
pair in the waning seconds in Game 4 of
the NBA finals, a blown opportunity that
still haunts Howard.
"It's not gone yet. Every day I wake up
and I think about what happened,"
Howard said. "Every day I get a
reminder when I turn on the TV ... first


thing I see is Kobe (Bryant) putting up
the championship sign. You think about
it, and I haven't stopped thinking about it
since we lost. I put some of the moments
away, but losing something when you're
so close, it hurts. So you don't want to go
through that experience again."
Howard is a dominant presence in the
paint and he attempted more free throws
(849) than any other player last year.
That's why he has gone to great lengths
trying to solve his problems at the stripe.
Howard spends nights at the Magic's
practice facility, even inviting friends to
blast music and distract him during shots.
There are days he takes more than 300
free throws and he's usually the last play-
er to leave the court. "He's dedicated to
make himself a good free throw shooter,"
point guard Jameer Nelson said.
Practice has never been Howard's
problem. The games are where it hurts.
He's a 60 percent career free throw
shooter, a big reason why the Magic often
turned elsewhere for offense in the final
seconds in the playoffs last season. The


finals are where it really stung.
In Game 4, Howard set a finals record
with nine blocked shots, had 16 points
and 21 rebounds. He was putting on a
performance for the ages, then he was
fouled with 11.1 seconds remaining in
the fourth quarter and Orlando ahead
87-84. All he needed was to make one
and the game would likely have been
sealed and the series tied.
He clanked them both. The Lakers ral-
lied. The Magic were eventually elimi-
nated.
"I'm going to be better this season,"
Howard said. "We're going to be better.
We fell short last season. We just want to
win a championship now."
Howard isn't the first All-Star center to
struggle at the line. Shaquille O'Neal and
Wilt Chamberlain stand out the most, a
pair of dominant big men who have six
NBA titles between them, but never
could solve their free-throw stroke.
O'Neal (52 percent) and Chamberlain
(51 percent) rank as some of the worst
free throw shooters in league history.


The Director of Production will plan, organize and direct all production activities,
Inclusive of reducing wastage and Increasing productivity. The Director will also
be responsible for implementing a formal training and development program for
the Production Department.






* Direct Oe dally activities of the Production Department in accordance with
accepted industry standards.
� Set dally schedule to ensure that the staffing meets the requirement of
receiving the daily production In a most efficient manner.
* Ensure that production costs are In accordance with the standards expected
by the Industry.
* Plan and put In place a career path for all key employees of the Production
Department
* Ensure that the Production Department complies with the budget cost
approved by the Board of Directors.







M- minimum of 10 years experience of overseeing a manufacturing facility.
* Must hold a recognized professional certification in the manufacturing field
- Must provide proof of ability to increase man/ hour efficiency while reducing
wastage,






NassIa , *i al


iI


Reflecting on the '09 Hall of Famers


FROM page 16

here at home.
Another being honoured
posthumously is Anthony
Carroll. Many will remem-
ber the gentle giant who
paraded down Bay Street
as a one-man show during
the junkanoo celebrations.
But Carroll was a dual
legend in bodybuilding,
going all the way to the top
where he excelled as Mr
World, following in the
footsteps of fellow inductee
Kingsley Poitier. And he
also shined under the inter-
national bright lights as an
actor, having starred in a
number of plays and
movies.
And then who could for-
get Errol Bodie, a quiet
individual who developed
the respect and reputation
as being one of the top
track and field coaches in
the country. As a resident
of Grand Bahama, Bodie,
in my opinion, he never
really got the recognition
and opportunity to display
his skills internationally
like his New Providence
counterparts.
Talking about matching
up to their counterparts,
there's Florence "Flo"
Rolle, who grew up playing
multiple sporting events.
She was so versatile that
she played in softball, vol-
leyball, basketball, track
and field and netball and
she made at least one
national team in just about
every sport.
All of the above, along
with Cliff Wilson, Doyle
Burrows, Glen Wells, Ed
Smith and the late Edwin
"Sir D" Davies should all
been commended for the
recognition they will
receive. There are others
who could have also been
considered, but all of the
above deserve to be induct-
ed in the Class of 2009.
What's interesting to
note is that during the cele-
brations dubbed National
Sports Heritage Week, the
ministry also intends to
honour members of the
national team that compet-
ed in August this year at
the 12th IAAF World


STUB


OPINI


Championships ii
in Berlin, Germai
The team conti
rich legacy of the
on the international
with Debbie Ferg
McKenzie clinchi
bronze medal in t
en's 200m and sha
silver with team-r
Sheniqua "Q" Fe
Chandra Sturrup
Christine Amertil
1 relay.
No specific deta
celebrations have
released at yet, bi
good that they ar
recognized with s
forerunners who
pace. It should be
week for sports.

SAY A PRAY
ME FOR MR C
Normally I wou
something like th
ask you to join m
ing prayers for M
Carron, husband
Tribune's publish
Carron and my fo
boss.
When I joined t
a budding young
Mr Carron took r
his wings as he sa
desk as the sports
Mr C, as he was
tionately called, v
astute about the p


BS tion of your story and he
))BJ S also taught me a valuable
rule in journalism, particu-
larly sports, and that is to
always get both sides of an
argument so that you can
present a balanced report
on the situation.
Even after he left the
desk and up to the time of
his latest illness that result-

, go an emergency angioplas-
ty to open a blocked artery
as a result of a heart attack
. he suffered on Saturday, he
would always come into the
office and offer his wise
comments on a story or a
\ ' sporting event that caught
his attention.
Mr C didn't just offer his
criticism like so many peo-
O N^ ple are quick to do, but he
always provided a solution.
His aim was to get the best
- out of your presentation.
I remember one of his
n Athletics latest inspections came just
ny. before the 12th World Ath-
nued the letics Championships as
Bahamas veteran sprinters Debbie
nal scene Ferguson-McKenzie and
uson- Chandra Sturrup were per-
ng the forming as if they were still
he wom- in their prime.
caring the Mr C came over to my
mates desk one day and said
rguson, 'Brent, don't forget to keep
and interjecting the ages of
l in the 4 x those girls. People need to
know how fantastic their
ails on the performances are com-
been pared to the other girls.'
ut it's Over the years, I've
e being learnt quite a bit from Mr
ome of the C. I certainly cherish the
set the opportunity I have to work
a grand with him and would like to
take this opportunity to say
a special thank you for your
ER WITH role as my mentor and
motivator.


ildn't do
is, but I
e in offer-
r Roger
of The
er Eileen
irmer

the staff as
reporter,
me under
t on the
editor.
s affec-
vas very
)resenta-


INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Monday


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15,2009


THE TRIBUNE




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Former PLP Senator,

ex-ambulance driver

open their defence

in John Travolta case


By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
nmckenzie@
hotmail.com
FORMER PLP
Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and ex-
ambulance driver
Tarino Lightbourne
proclaimed their
innocence in unsworn
statements to the jury
yesterday as the
attempted extortion PLEA
trial continued. BRIDGE
Bridgewater and
Lightbourne are
accused of attempting to extort
$25 million from American actor
John Travolta.
The pair chose to make
unsworn statements from where
they stood outside the prisoner's
dock. Lightbourne also called
one witness in his defence, while
Bridgewater said she did not
intend to call any witnesses.
"I too have been shocked over
some of the evidence that has
come from this case," Bridgewa-
ter said. "January 22 is a day I
will not forget. It was a day when
my fairly structured and organ-
ised life became a life of decep-
tion and a horrible dream," she
said.


ISANT


"I have been
ridiculed and
ostracised. I have seen
my business gone rock
bottom," she told the
jury. "Since January I
have not seen a salary."
Bridgewater told the
jury the ordeal has tak-
en an emotional and
financial toll on her.
She said she has not
been able to work, and
because of a downturn
in her business she has
had to lay off some
staff.


MATER "As far as I am con-
lATER cerned I thought I was
doing what was right as
a citizen of the Bahamas and a
professional," she said.
Bridgewater said she had
known Lightbourne for 10 years
and they also worked in close
proximity of each other. She
recalled that Lightbourne had
come to her seeking legal advice
after being terminated from his
job. She said he had told her that
since he had given an interview
regarding the death of Jett Tra-
volta, reporters had been calling
him constantly.
Bridgewater said he told her
he had a document they were
SEE page 14


'iUicul


ii iii Hoi'i. i ( hii ( ui i ch
( l, I l. I L ii 'l n il l. Ih IL'.
E.ih. in ( 0 0 i.!0 1'. \'. !> ih!
was laid to rest.
Hundreds of hushed spec-
tators waited on each side of
the downtown stretch to wit-
ness the state funeral service
that commanded the respect
of all present.
Residents and visitors
stood side by side with the
tension only to be broken by
the first rap from the Royal
Bahamas Police Force Band,
sending a visible ripple
through the crowds as they
marched.
Police Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson said:
"Despite the sadness, we are
more than pleased to show
up in large numbers to
SEE page six


Fury over

Mitchell

SI bid for PLP

leadership

B TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net
WHAT was intended
to be a general foreign
affairs update at PLP
headquarters exploded
into an all-out attack on
Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell after he con-
firmed to the gathering
that he intends to chal-
lenge leader Perry
Christie at the party's
national convention.
Addressing what is
being labeled as a
"group of young PLP
pseudo intellectuals",
sources within the party
said Mr Mitchell was
confronted on what his
rr SEE page 12

Dr Nottage to
announce PLP
leadership bid
this morning
By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net


Minister of State denies access
to reports on Detention Centre


MINISTER of State for
Immigration Branville
McCartney is denying access
to a fact-finding team's reports
into the controversial
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre.
Mr McCartney said he
would not give in to The Tri-
bune's requests for publica-
tion because he disagrees with
this newspaper's series of arti-
cles into allegations of abuse
and mistreatment at the facil-
ity.
For months, Mr McCartney
- whose 2007 party manifesto
pledges greater transparency


and ensuring media access to
information - has not followed
through with assurances he
would release the reports to
The Tribune or grant a tour
of the site.
In June, the junior immi-
gration minister said he could
not release the documents
until he had discussed the mat-
ter with his Cabinet col-
leagues. Back in March he
said he had no problems
releasing the reports once he
had the "opportunity to pass it
by Cabinet".
SEE page six


DR BERNARD Nottage will
formally announce his bid for the
leadership of the Progressive Lib-
eral Party at 11am today from
his Bain and Grant's Town con-
stituency office.
Duplicating the dramatic
showdown which took place at
the party's 1997 convention, both
Dr Nottage and former Prime
Minister Perry Christie will vie
once again for the leadership of
the party.
Joining them in this battle will
SEE page 12



ANGLICAN Archdea-
con Ivan Ranfurly Brown
was acquitted of an assault
charge yesterday.
Father Brown, rector of
St Agnes Anglican
Church, was accused of
choking and slapping a 14-
year-old girl at a church
picnic on Nirvana Beach,
on October 13, 2008.
Magistrate Ancella
Williams acquitted Father
Brown on the grounds that
the charge sheet was not
properly signed as his
attorney Wayne Munroe
had contended.


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Attorney Cheryl Grant-Bethell
appointed new General Counsel


FREEPORT,
Grand Bahama - The
Grand Bahama Port
Authority has
announced the
appointment of Attor-
ney Cheryl Grant-
Bethell as its new gen-
eral counsel, effective
November 2.
Called to the Bar of
England and Wales in
July 1988, and the
Bahamas Bar in Sep-
tember 1988, Mrs ..
Grant-Bethell has -
more than 20 years of
experience in the judicial field.
"We are more than pleased
to have someone of the profes-
sional calibre as attorney
Grant-Bethell. Her judicial
background is impeccable and a
perfect fit for our multi-faceted
organisation," said Hannes
Babak, chairman of the GBPA
Group.
A seasoned lawyer, she
received her LLB with honours


from Buckingham
University in the UK
in 1986, and LLM in
commercial and cor-
porate law from the
University of London,
Kings College, in
1990.
She is thoroughly
experienced in court
room advocacy with
particular specialty in
criminal capital pros-
ecutions, in addition
to providing effective
-Be l representation and
advice to the govern-
ment in the negotiation of
important bilateral and multi-
lateral treaties.
She has received numerous
appointments during her tenure
in the public sector, including
serving as acting director of the
Financial Intelligence Unit, and
representing the Bahamas at a
seminar on money-laundering,
asset forfeiture and the pro-
ceeds of crime in 2005.


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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15,2009


THE TRIBUNE


IF 0









THE TRIBUNE Te




)US1


Mexican

firm eyes

BTC bid

* 'More than one or two'
bidders interested in BTC,
as due diligence phase
of privatization starts,
with offers expected
by end-November

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A MEXICAN-headquar-
tered telecoms conglomerate
is among the potential bid-
ders interested in acquiring a
51 per cent stake in the
Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company (BTC),
sources told Tribune Business
yesterday, with "a select
group of potential buyers"
now invited to commence due
diligence on the company.
Telmex, the company head-
ed by billionaire Carlos Slim,
which has operations in Mex-
ico, Brazil, Argentina and
other Latin American coun-
tries, was said by sources
familiar with the situation to
have had a team of executive
in the Bahamas as far back as

SEE page 10B


SS


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009


Key FOCOL investor



denies Port claims


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


The largest shareholder in
BISX-listed FOCOL
Holdings yesterday said
the company's Board of
Directors would not have
sold land to the Christie administra-
tion's proposed southwestern New
Providence port unless it was acquired
by the Government through compul-
sory acquisition.
Franklyn Wilson, responding to
claims that the Christie administra-
tion's port location decision was based
partly on rewarding PLP supporters
who owned land in the area, said
FOCOL's Board had never discussed
selling the land required for that pro-
ject.
Describing the claims as "a gross
misrepresentation of anything that's
true", Mr Wilson also questioned how
FOCOL, as a publicly-traded compa-
ny, could be perceived as "politically
partisan". Apart from having hundreds
of Bahamian retail investors as share-
holders, he pointed out that the com-
pany's main shareholders included
both FNM and PLP supporters.
The 2005 Environmental Impact
Assessment (EIA) for the new port
site, produced by Coastal Systems


International, said that among the
property owners who land had to be
acquired from were New Providence
Development Company and Shell.
FOCOL, through its Sun Oil sub-
sidiary, acquired the assets and oper-
ations of Shell Bahamas in a deal that
closed in early 2006.
"The majority of land is owned by
New Providence Development Com-
pany," the EIA report said. "The
Bahamas Electricity Corporation also
owns a portion of the land. An addi-
tional small parcel exists on site, for
which ownership has not yet been
determined.
"At the centre of the proposed
entrance corridor, the Shell oil com-
pany is a major landowner, possess-
ing approximately 121,400 square
metres/30 acres.
"Initial discussions with the New
Providence Development Company
and Shell Oil Company have resulted
in positive feedback relative to the
acquisition of this land."
A source familiar with discussions at
the time on the Christie government's
planned new port, proposed for a site
between BEC's Clifton Pier plan and
Commonwealth Brewery, said of the
Shell holdings: "That parcel of land
was critical to the port entrance. We
couldn't get through to the port with-


out that acreage of land."
The source suggested that, after
acquiring Shell, FOCOL could have
either sold the land to the port to part-
pay for the acquisition, or done a land-
for-equity swap to gain a stake itself in
the project.
This is likely to have been where
claims regarding the port location
being designed to benefit PLP sup-
porters have originated from. Apart
from Mr Wilson, FOCOL's main
shareholders also include the trust of
former PLP MP, minister and chair-
man, Bradley Roberts.
However, Mr Wilson emphatically
denied such claims yesterday. "Our
directors have never had discussions
about selling the land, and I cannot
imagine that is something the Board
would have done without a compul-
sory acquisition by the Government,"
he told Tribune Business.
"We would have no motivation to
do it. Whatever it is, I can say that.
The directors have never ever dis-
cussed any matter about selling that
property, and I cannot imagine we
would be interested in doing it without
a compulsory acquisition by the Gov-
ernment."
He added: "There is absolutely no
SEE page 5B


Money Safe,
Money Fast.


John eyS George.


IBy NEIL HARTNELL





















A well-known Bahamian
Retailer is

'struggling

to survive'

John S George
moves to close
Harbour Bay store

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A well-known Bahamian
retailer is continuing to down-
size with the closure of its
Harbour Bay store, its owner
telling Tribune Business yes-
terday that the company was
"really struggling to survive"
amid the ongoing recession.
Andrew Wilson confirmed
that John S George was in the
process of closing its Harbour
Bay operation, although he
was unable to give an exact
date for the closing as the
store was still clearing/selling
off its remaining inventory.
Responding to Tribune
Business's inquiries, after this
newspaper received several
calls informing it of the clo-
sure, Mr Wilson said: "That's
right; Harbour Bay is closing
down. I can confirm that.
We're just really struggling to
survive."

SEE page 8B


CLICO liquidated $10m

deposit to cover expenses


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
CLICO (Bahamas) liqui-
dated a $10 million bank
deposit to generate cash and
help cover $12 million in
operating expenses in the two
months immediately prior to
it being placed under
Supreme Court supervision,
its liquidator has confirmed,
"a further indication that the
company was insolvent".
Craig A. 'Tony' Gomez, in
his first report to the Supreme
Court as the insurer's liq-
uidator, said that while the
Bahamas-based term deposit
initially appeared to have
been liquidated to settle poli-
cy surrenders, in reality the
funds were used to meet oper-
ating expenses during its last
two months in operation.
"My review of the compa-
ny's general ledger for the
period from December 31,
2008, to February 24, 2009,
revealed that the funds were
used to cover daily operating
expenses, commissions paid
to agents and bonuses paid to
agents," Mr Gomez alleged
in his report.
"The above was a further
indication that the company
was insolvent and not able to
meet recurring expenses, and


* Move to pay $12m costs
'a further indication that the
company was insolvent'

had to resort to invested
assets to enable it to fund its
operations."
Of the $12.018 million paid
out over the period, Mr
Gomez alleged that CLICO
(Bahamas) general ledger
showed some $6.037 million
went to cover operating
expenses. A further $4.415
million went on agent com-
missions, and $1.567 million
on agent bonuses.
As of the July 7, 2009, date
of his report, Mr Gomez said
he had retained some 16 of
CLICO (Bahamas) former
141 staff members to assist
the liquidation, the rest hav-
ing been released on April 15
and given their redundancy
letters.
"At the time of their
release, and to the date of this
report, the company was not
in position to pay severance
amounts," Mr Gomez
warned. As a result, 18 for-
mer CLICO (Bahamas)
employees had filed trade dis-
putes with the Labour Board

SEE page 4B


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Clearing House needs key law amendments


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMIAN commercial
banks are "making progress"
towards the full launch/imple-
mentation of an Automated
Clearing House (ACH),
senior industry executives told
Tribune Business yesterday,
although key legislative
changes are needed to ensure
the system takes its "true
form".
While there was "guarded
optimism" that all the tech-
nical issues affecting the ACH
were being worked through,
banking industry sources have
told this newspaper that criti-


* Banks 'making progress' on ACH electronic
payments system, and 'guarded optimism'
technical issues close to being resolved
* But sources say laws need amending to
ensure electronic cheque images can
be accepted as legal tender
* Operational issues also outstanding


cal operational and legal
issues still needed to be
addressed, especially when it
came to ensuring electronic
images of cheques could be
accepted as legal tender.
To enable this to happen,
banking industry sources, who


requested anonymity, said the
Bill of Exchange Act, which
regulates how cheques are
handled and cashed, needed
to be amended by Parliament.
Needless to say, such
SEE page 12B


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Ceruti (chief executive, BSI Trust Corporation (Bahamas), Tony Schweitzer (partner of Fraser, Milner Cas-
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A leading Canadian attor-
ney has given members of the
Society of Trust and Estate
Practitioners (STEP)
Bahamas an update on cur-
rent issues affecting that


INIG H


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nation's trust laws.
Tony Schweitzer, of Fraser
Milner Casgrain LLP in
Toronto, gave a presentation
that included an overview of
recent decisions of the Tax
Court of Canada on the taxa-
tion of trusts.
The presentation also
included a summary of other
developments in Canada in
respect of the taxation of
trusts. The luncheon was
sponsored by BSI Trust Cor-
poration (Bahamas).
STEP (Bahamas) also
awarded a scholarship for one
module of the STEP Diplo-
ma programme in Interna-
tional Trust Management to
Ricardo Taylor at the lun-
cheon.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15,2009


THE TRIBUNE











Bahamas needs




new tax system


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
THE BAHAMAS must
implement a new tax system,
such as Value Added Tax
(VAT), as the country moves
towards full membership in
the World Trade Organisation
(WTO), the Bahamas Insti-
tute of Chartered Accountants
(BICA) president said yester-
day.
Reece Chipman insisted
that the Bahamas will have to
wean itself off its dependency
on Customs revenues, as new
rules-based trading regimes
evolve and require the elimi-


nation of import-based tariffs
in line with WTO rules.
"The Bahamas should be
looking at some alternate
forms of revenue because we
can't depend on customs rev-
enues as we have been," he
said.
Legal
Ethlyn Norton-Coke,
UTECH Jamaica's legal coun-
sel and compliance officer,
told BICA members about
the benefits and disadvantages
of implementing a VAT sys-
tem, as opposed to an income
tax system.
She maintained that com-


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pliance is of the utmost impor-
tance in any tax system, as
well as proper regulation by
government.
Ms Norton-Coke said a tax
at the point of sale was a far
more manageable system than
an income tax or Customs
duties in terms of the per-
centage of compliant tax pay-
ers.
She said the evasion of Cus-
toms-related taxes plagues not
just Jamaica but many
Caribbean countries that rely
on them
"We really have a compli-
ance problem, but the best
compliance is with VAT," said
Ms Norton-Coke.
The IMF recently touted
the Bahamas' fiscal stability,
but suggested that it broaden
its revenue base in order to
decrease its national debt.
In his 2009-2010 budget
contribution, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham suggested
that if the Bahamas were to
implement another source of
revenue collection it would be
a VAT.
"It may also be the case that
the revenue base is simply too
narrow, as is repeatedly men-
tioned in IMF reports," he
said.
"If it is necessary to widen
the revenue base, the change
will come by implementing
some form of sales tax to cov-
er deficiencies. For example, a
Value Added tax has been
adopted by over 140 countries
around the world and would
represent a prime candidate
for the Bahamas."
However, Ms Norton-Coke
revealed that VAT was usual-
ly a much more successful tax-
ation method in countries with
large manufacturing, whole-
sale and retail sectors. In those
cases, the VAT is "favoured
over the traditional sales tax
because it is charged at each
tier of the consumption
p l i '.',, '.


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


She said that in countries
such as India, with a sizable
manufacturing sector, VAT is
a key source of revenue.
While the system it is not
devoid of corruption, Ms Nor-
ton-Coke argued that it was
the most efficient method of
assuring that the Treasury
receives the majority of public
funds due.
"VAT is a broadbased tax
that is conceptually superior
in design," she said.
Nations
Ms Norton-Coke said that
as the Bahamas and other
nations enter into the WTO,
revenue from customs duties
will decrease. And Mr Ingra-
ham, in his budget contribu-
tion, said: "Compliance is low
and more vigorous enforce-
ment is vital."
However, he suggested this
country fix the current rev-
enue streams before consid-
ering the implementation of
VAT.


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15,2009, PAGE 3B


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gratuities


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For conditions of sale and any other information, please contact:
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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


CLICO liquidated $10m




deposit to cover expenses


FROM page 1B

against him, "contesting the
omission of 'Notice Pay' from
their redundancy letters".
The matter, though, has
"been dispensed with" after
Mr Gomez's attorneys told
Department of Labour offi-
cials at a June 17, 2009, con-
ciliation meeting that the mat-
ter should be deferred
because CLICO (Bahamas)
was in court-supervised liqui-
dation.
"Former staff members of
the company continue to call
me on a regular basis inquir-
ing as to when they would
receive their severance pack-
ages," Mr Gomez said.
"Some staff members also


met with me on the same mat-
ter. I also received numerous
phone calls and correspon-
dence from attorneys making
representation on behalf of
employees inquiring about
severance packages."
Mr Gomez said the
Supreme Court had also given
its approval to settle a
$180,000 debt owed by CLI-
CO (Bahamas) to its Trinidad
affiliate, the latter having pro-
vided IT support, accounting
and policy management ser-
vices to the Bahamian com-
pany.
These services had been
rendered under a service
agreement that started in
2008, having previously been
available free, and payments
were outstanding from Janu-


Complete Comfort
From repairs to installations and everything in between, we carry a complete
line of Westinghouse whole-home comfort solutions to balance temperature
levels, clean the air, control humidity and more.

LARGE SHIPMENT JUST ARRIVED
We now stock plastic and metal case condensers

SPLIT SYSTEMS - METAL UNITS
MINI SPLIT UNITS 1 TON...................... ......................$49500
MINI SPLIT UNITS 1.5 TON....................................... 70000
MINI SPLIT UNITS 2 TON...................................................$96100

SPLIT SYSTEMS - PLASTIC UNITS
MINI SPLIT UNITS 1 TON.......................................... $68500
MINI SPLIT UNITS 1.5 TON................................................. $93500
MINI SPLIT UNITS 2 TON........................................ $1,09000

Miller Window/Wall Units
18,000 BTU NRX1-018 KCMR.............................................$63500
24,000 BTU NRX1-024 KCMR.....................................83500


ary 2008, Mr Gomez alleged.
He added that the bill
needed to be paid so that the
liquidation team could obtain
current accounting and policy
administration information,
as CLICO Trinidad was
preparing to discontinue these
services.
"Failure to have access to
essential information, such as
accounting and policy details,
has hindered the progress of
the liquidation," Mr Gomez
said. "However, since settle-
ment of the outstanding debt
to CLICO Trinidad, we have
had unhindered access to the
system, but challenges remain.
"While the system gener-
ates financial statements and
policy details, we have had to
spend a tremendous amount


of time attempting to organise
and reconcile both the
accounting and policy portfo-
lio records."
Mr Gomez said he was in
the process of returning 317
policy contracts amended pri-
or to the liquidation, with
some 27 handed back already.
He still had to track down the
other 290 policyholders.
Meanwhile, CLICO
(Bahamas) liquidator has
placed a $360,786 demand let-
ter from FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas),
requesting immediate repay-
ment of outstanding loans to
the company, on his list of
creditors "in the order of its
ranking".
The bank, Mr Gomez
added, was concerned that


NOW OFFERING
SALARY DEDUCTION
To all Civil Servants and Government
Corporation Employees
Certain Restrictions Apply .


HIs. ROYAL FIDELITY i


C FFA L'" C: 0 [. 0 N I A L
El:.,, LI-TEE, & TF-CEE, .EL.-IFITIE . - :. OF
THURSDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1.534.771 CHG -0.471 %CHG -0.03 i YTD -177.59 I YTD O% -10.37
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 I YTD -5.40-o I 2008 -12.31'c.
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM |I TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
181 1 15 AML Foods Limited 1 15 1 15 000 0127 0000 91 000%
1180 990 Bahamas Property Fund 1075 1075 000 0992 0200 108 186%
930 618 Bank of Bahamas 6 18 618 000 400 0244 0260 253 421%
089 0 63 Benchmark 0 63 0 63 0 00 -0 877 0 000 N/M 0 00%
349 315 Bahamas Waste 315 315 000 0078 0090 404 286%
237 214 Fidelity Bank 237 237 000 0055 0040 431 1 69%
1420 1000 Cable Bahamas 1000 1000 000 900 1406 0250 71 250%
288 274 Colina Holdings 274 274 000 0249 0040 110 146%
750 526 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 592 592 000 0419 0300 141 507%
385 1 27 Consolidated Water BDRs 374 373 -001 0111 0052 336 1 39%
2 85 1 32 Doctor's Hospital 2 05 2 05 0 00 0 382 0 080 54 3 90%
820 660 Famguard 660 660 000 0420 0240 157 364%
1250 880 Finco 930 930 000 350 0322 0520 289 559%
1171 1029 FirstCaribbean Bank 1029 1029 000 15,650 0794 0350 130 340%
553 495 Focol (S) 499 499 000 2,000 0332 0150 150 301%
1 00 1 00 Focol Class B Preference 1 00 1 00 0 00 0 000 0 000 N/M 0 00%
045 0 30 Freeport Concrete 0 30 0 30 0 00 0 035 0 000 86 0 00%
902 549 ICD Utilities 550 550 000 19,879 0407 0500 135 909%
1200 998 J S Johnson 1009 998 -011 3,253 0952 0640 105 641%
1000 1000 Premier Real Estate 1000 1000 000 0180 0000 556 000%
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change DailyVol. Interest Maturity
1000 00 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 10000 0 00 7% 19 October 2017
100000 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 10000 0 00 Prime + 1 75% 19 October 2022
100000 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 10000 0 00 7% 30 May 2013
100000 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 10000 0 00 Prime + 1 75% 29 May 2015
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
1460 7 92 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 92 842 1400 -2246 0000 N/M 000%
8 00 6 00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2 00 6 25 4 00 0 000 0 480 N/M 7 80%
054 0 20 RND Holdings 0 35 0 40 0 55 0 001 0 000 256 6 0 00%
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
4100 2900ABDAB 3013 31v59 2900 4540 0000 903 000%
055 0 40 RND Holdings 0 45 0 55 0 55 0 002 0 000 261 90 0 00%
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield % NAV Date
1 4038 1 3344 CFAL Bond Fund 1 4038 372 5 20 31-Aug-09
30350 28952 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 28990 -1 39 -4 16 31-Aug-09
1 4892 1 4119 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 4892 3 87 5 47 11-Sep-09
36090 30941 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 30941 -861 -1359 31-Aug-09
130484 123870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 131136 3 93 5 87 31-Aug-09
101 6693 100 0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101 6693 1 10 1 67 30-Jun-09
100 9600 93 1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 967398 035 -4 18 30-Jun-09
1 0000 1 0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1 0000 000 0 00 31-Dec-07
94075 9 0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9 3399 2 69 -1 41 31-Jul-09
1 0707 1 0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1 0707 338 5 14 31-Aug-09
1 0364 1 0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1 0319 -011 205 31-Aug-09
1 0673 1 0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1 0673 2 89 4 93 31-Aug-09
MARKET TERMS
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX -19 Dec 02 = 1,000 00 YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ -A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NM - Not Meaningful
PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1, 1994= 100
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(SI) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 I ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 I FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 I COLONIAL 242-502-7525


some $35 million worth of its
mortgages were secured by
life insurance policies issued
by CLICO (Bahamas).
Elsewhere, the liquidator
said he was investigating the
$34 million and $15.5 million
claims submitted by CLICO
Guyana and CLICO Suri-
name respectively.
"My preliminary review of
the documentation suggests
that the policies were not
issued by the company," Mr
Gomez alleged. "Moreover,
the premiums received by
Guyana and Suriname were
never paid to the company.
"It appears that the funds
were directly remitted to bank
accounts in the US. Notwith-
standing this, the premium
proceeds are reflected in the
records as an inter-company
loan."
Mr Gomez said his team
was also investigating the ben-
eficial ownership of CLICO
Enterprises, the CLICO
(Bahamas) affiliate through
which the majority of the lat-
ter's investments were made.
A search of CLICO Enter-
prises' corporate records, he
alleged, had produced annual
returns - filed in September
2007 with the Companies
Registry - showing its share-
holders as Mayco Holdings
and Nardco Holdings. Each
held one share.
A further search of these
entities' records, the liquida-
tor alleged, found their share-


holders to be Ellen Serville,
Vanria Greene and Nadia
Richardson. All three were
employees of Serville & Co,
and were acting as nominees,
Mr Gomez claimed.
Some 179 policies, with
paid premiums of $46,038,
were due to be refunded by
CLICO Bahamas because
due diligence on the prospec-
tive policyholders had not
been completed at the liqui-
dation date.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Legal Notice
NOTICE
SHUNFU CLOSE INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
ALPHA DELTA INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
PINTABIAN HOLDINGS CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


W sigho s Yo can be sure...i t' etigos


io% i






THE TIBUN THUSDAY DOCTOR 1, 209,IPGES5


Key FOCOL investor



denies Port claims


FROM page 1B
reason for FOCOL to be seen
in any partisan political con-
text. It is a public company,
and among its largest share-
holders are very high profile
supporters of both parties.
"There is absolutely no log-
ic in seeing FOCOL as a par-
tisan political company. It has
never been, and never will be.
Sun Oil never has been, and
never can be seen as a parti-
san political company. Look
at the Board, look at the num-
bers, look at every aspect of
it."
Facility
Arguing that the "ideal port
facility" would consist of
607,000 square metres or 150
acres of port infrastructure
and harbour, Coastal Systems
said that based upon previous


reports, international cargo is
processed at five locations on
New Providence - three on
Bay Street, and two at
Arawak Cay.
Ideal
To create "an ideal port
structure capable of serving
all cargo needs for New Prov-
idence", Coastal Systems said
in its report that the south-
western port would need a
360-metre diameter turning
basin; 100 metre-wide
entrance corridor; 3,000 lin-
ear feet of cargo vessel moor-
ing space; water depth of up
to 10 metres; and upland facil-
ities for bulk, break bulk, con-
tainer cargo and a petroleum
cargo offloading terminal.
Coastal Systems conclud-
ed: "Based on the growth pro-
jections for the tourism indus-


try and the island's popula-
tion, it is apparent that com-
mercial shipping operations
will likely need to increase
capacity in order to accom-
modate increased numbers of
visitors/inhabitants on New
Providence.
"Increased commercial
shipping operations will
require more capacity from


New Providence's ports in
order to efficiently process
both inbound and outbound
cargo.
"Spread over approximate-
ly 50 acres in downtown Nas-
sau and Arawak Cay, the
existing port facilities in Nas-
sau are at or near capacity,
with only marginal room for
expansion."


NOTICE is hereby given that VENA SEYMOUR of MARKET
STREET, P.O. BOX N-720, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 15th day of October,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




BAHAMAS AGRIBUSINESS
COOPERATIVE SOCIETY LIMITED
(VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 105 of the Cooperative Societies Act,
2005 the voluntary liquidation of Bahamas
Agribusiness Cooperative Society Limited has
commenced. All claims against the aforementioned
Cooperative must be submitted to and received by
THE LIQUIDATOR before October 31, 2009 at PO
Box SS 6462, Nassau, Bahamas.

Cliff Pinder & Associates Limited
Liquidator


The Gymnastics Federation

Of The Bahamas
invites
All Interested Gymnastics/Dance/Cheerleading
Or Similar Sporting Groups To A Meeting

Wednesday, October 21st - 6:00pm
at the Kendal Isaacs National Gymnasium
Federation members as well as non-members are
welcome to attend this informative session
Topics of discussion will include:
* The role of the Federation in promoting and supporting
gymnastics in the Bahamas
* Application and requirements for GFB members
For more information email:
gymfedbah@coralwave.com



TEAK FURNIrURE


*SALE*
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Gift, Haeidcrafs & Batk aothtig
Sept. 26th - 24th Oct.
OPEN 10am - 5pm

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1 bik west of Hiton hotel entrance, in large two storey
turquose building, on one way westbound street
%il 0RA




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Business (top up) - specialisms in
Marketing, Finance, Banking
University of Sunderland - BA (Hons)
Business & Management (top
up), BA (Hons) Accountancy &
Financial Management (top up)
University of Derby - BSc (Hons)
Psychology
University of Teesside - LLB, BSc
(Hons) Business Comnputing (top


MBA - University of Bradford,
University of Sunderland,
University of Wales
MSc in Public Administration &
Development - University of
Birmingham
MSc Marketing & Management
- University of Bradford
MSc Finance, Accounting &
Management - University of
Bradford
MSc Information Technology -
University of Teesside
MSc Telecommunications -
Birmingham City University
MSc International Hospitality
Management - Sheffield
Hallam University
Diploma in Management -
University of Wales
(pre-MBA for non-degree
holders)
Certificate in Management -
University of Wales


up)
Sheffield Hallam University - BSc
(Hons) International Hospitality &[
Tourism (top up)



RDI (Regional Office)
27499 Riverview Center Boulevard Suite 111 Bonita Springs Florida 34134 USA, Tel 1 239 444 1730
- emall info@rdicaribbean cornm i


I ODSUSSOISO HSPGELGO OWWTIUE4.O


i -.' .A . oi l



Clearance SALE
Everything is $20
We offfr SiringIng Servicas, Repairs, Knotling,
Wiring, Ddriingand The Snack Fix System and
he Myslery Clasps
Peadrs and Beads Strands Wholesale
and Retail
P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-323-1865
Emall: gems-pearis@hotmail.oom
Free parking at The Hilton


your goals


U


ATLANTIS




Is seeki ng a pplica nts fo r

DIRECTOR OF LANDSCAPE & HORTICULTURE

The Directr of Landscape Wn Horticuhure will pion, orgnize mid direct
Iaindscaping actribes, Including special polect~, for AtIlaniii Paradise Island
pfoperfim ensuringg lW 811 stdards are fmet The Director ONill Io be
respwsi ble fVadvandicNrthe know~ede4eWI in UIhe deperi and deve loping
staff lpotentiaI through lrainiiig and other strategic liniitialives-

MAIN DUTIES AND RESPONSIBIfLiEIS.

*Perform hrquentfl hspe~ins of iinterioi' and edetior areas to wmure proper
Wircuiture pracbces are edhued to wiil special errqsias on pruning
1ecniiues.

�Develop and admi'rnister effeive aand thuoriugh PeW M~anagemenit programs~
Ibr turf, shrubs and p8Irrn using the IPM arWd BNP principles as well as
deve4o and akinistr an effectie irr~ation maiilnenanw and mnlnitoring
p"oram.

*Review and update as-bulds,6 druwings. bWeprint, speIions, technical
manuak and warwk~is for all landscapirg-rellaed development and
-eqnt.

REQUIREMENTS.

SMini!mum of a bachelor's degree iin horticu~ureand a rmi~niuim of 1 D year
ox~erince In a, luxury resod1 or siiiia envirorimeti

Minimum of 5 years leadership experineInr the fieIeld of hortliciAture and
lndarpc~.

*Must hold FNGLA CHP, CMT and CLT.


hIterested ipplicanshshiould e-mail resume5 to:
sIman qaasim-goff~ke7Jnsr~com


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15,2009, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009, PAGE 7B


Bureau needed



for more trust


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
THE creation of a
Bahamas-based Better Busi-
ness Bureau (BBB) would
increase consumer confidence
in the business community
and cause companies to act
in the best interests of their
employees and clients, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce's executive director
said yesterday.
Philip Simon said the
Bahamas lacks the structure
to establish an institution such
as a Better Business Bureau,
which exists in the US and
Canada. He added that the
Chamber of Commerce acts
as a Bureau of sorts, but its
reach extends only to its
membership.
In the US and Canada, he
explained that only approved
companies are eligible to
become partners with the Bet-
ter Business Bureau, and are
held to stringent best prac-
tices and standards of trust.
Trust is an essential part of
a Better Business Bureau's
mission, Mr Simon said, in
addition to creating a com-
munity of trustworthy busi-
nesses, setting standards for
marketplace trust, encourag-
ing and supporting best prac-
tices, celebrating role models
and denouncing substandard
market behaviour.
"Better Business Bureaus
work effectively in the US
because of tax structures and
credible information," said
Mr Simon. "You can't get
that in the Bahamas, as you
have to trust the membership
and trust the organisation."
Mr Simon said there was a
lack of trust in the wider busi-
ness community, and a com-
merce system not conducive
to information sharing and
gathering. "So when com-
plaints are made, you can't
corroborate that without
being able to verify it," said


Mr Simon. "You don't want
to end up in a scandalous,
libellous type of situation."
While the question of what
could be done for Solomon's
Mines employees, some of
whom have allegedly not
received pay for more than
five months, prompted the
discussion of Better Business
Bureau's with Mr Simon, he
said their plight WAS the
responsibility of the Labour
Board.
Mr Simon said the Cham-
ber may mediate a labour dis-
pute with one of its members
if a complaint reaches its
doorstep, but the organisation
can only impose peer pres-
sure. It has no legal or leg-
islative authority to act on


behalf of the employees or
the company.
"We contact those compa-
nies' chief executives or man-
agers and let them know what
is happening in their busi-
nesses," said Mr Simon.
"What usually happens, par-
ticularly in our membership, is
they are not aware of the par-
ticular complaint. We act as a
Better Business Bureau."
He said that in order to
establish a viable Better Busi-
ness Bureau in the Bahamas,
private sector associations,
such as small and medium-
sized business associations,
and the Government must
come together to introduce a
culture of trust and informa-
tion sharing.


Believe It Or Not


A. I

po.




NA'SWU' FRE5H CREEK



NASSAU * CONGOr-'TOWN,


$39.99



$69.99


'" ' "^.1 ,m It.*""""'

NASSAU. MANGROVE. CAY. $69.99
S, . . ..*' . f
, f r A/.-.
," I] J * ' � , . , .. ,
' o !i, 'h, ,,. \
J.,. / ! .*


Round Trip Airfare-
Restrictions Apply -.



For Tickets and Additional Information


Please Contact Performance Air at 362-1608 362-2302


Or Visit Us At
www. performance-ar. corn
E-mail. Performancealr@hotmaiLcam
Civil Aviation Certificate N PFLA-7488


TO DSCUS SORIE ONTHI PAE LO ONTO WW.TIBUE24.CO


NOTICE

WEST WINDS PROPERTY
OWNERS ASSOCIATION LIMITED

Notice of Extraordinary
General Meeting
of
West Winds Property Owners
Association Limited


Please be advised an Extraordinary General
Meeting of West Winds Property Owners
Association Limited (WWPOA) will be held
on Tuesday, October 20th, 2009 at 6:00 p.m.
in the evening at the Pavilion, West Winds.


THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009


Caribbean Bottling Co. (Bahamas) Ltd








Is seeking candidates that are performance- driven to join our
expanding, high volume, dynamic team for the position of

SALES & MARKETING
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT


Responsibilities of the function include but are not limited to:

* Administrative Support to Sales & Marketing Tearn
* Provide Progress Reports On Promotions & Eents
* Responsible For Point of Sale Orders & Inventory Control
* Provide Support To Customers As Needed

Requirements:

* A Bachelor's Degree Preferred, Associates in Marketing or
equivalent to. OR
* Minimum of two years work experience in the related field
* The ability to multi-task, communicate effectively in both
a written and verbal manner and be a team player.
* Computer literate, including fundamental knowledge of
Microsoft Office.

Salary commensurate with experience and qualifications.

If you are interested in a progressive career path, designed to bring
out the best in you. please e-mail or hand deliver a copy of your
Resume on or before October 23rd 2009 to:

Marketing Department
Caribbean BotTling Co. (Bah.) Ltd.
P.O. Box N-1123
Nassau, Bahamas,

or by Fmail to:
chcmarketin g,.chchbahamas.com


GEOFFREY


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*Gas dryers available at extra cost.


a


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Rosetta & Montgomery Streets
322-2188/9
Email: Geofflones@comcast.net


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PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY


VACANCY NOTICE

MANAGER III (HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT)

SANDILANDS REHABILITATION CENTER

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post of
Manager III, Human Resources Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Public
Hospitals Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:
* Bachelors Degree in Business Administration, Management, Public
Administration, Human Resources or equivalent and three (3) years
relevant experience.
* Strong interpersonal, networking and negotiation skills; also high-level
analytical, creative and problem solving skills
* Be computer literate
* Excellent communication skills both oral and written

Job Summary
The Manager III is responsible for assisting with the day to day administration of
human resources transactions and services; to ensure that the Sandilands
rehabilitation Centre human resources policies and procedures, transactions and
services are aligned with the Authority's business objectives.

The duties will include, but not limited to the following:

1. Probationary Appointments
Confirmations in substantive posts
Promotions and reclassification
Benefits under the Authority's policies
Benefits under the law, e.g. Employment Act, Pension Act and National
Insurance Act
Employee transfer and secondment
Employee grievances
Disciplinary actions and penalties
Involuntary and voluntary terminations

2. Liaising with Payrolls Unit with matters relating to salaries adjustments
and financial clearances.

3. Managing the performance appraisal process for staff within assigned
areas of responsibilities, ensuring that evaluations are ongoing and
appraisal forms are prepared, distributed and reviewed.

4. Opportunities will also be given for involvement in human resources
strategic functions such as policies, development, quality improvement
initiatives.

The successful applicant will be responsible to the Department Head.

The salary for the post is in Scale HAAS8 ($28,050 x 700 - $34,350) per annum.
Starting salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Letters of application, resume, documentary evidence of qualification and three
(3) references should be submitted , no later than 30th October, 2009 to the
Human Resources Director, Public Hospitals Authority, P.O. Box N 8200,
Corporate Office, Third terrace Centerville, Nassau Bahamas.


THE TRIBUNE





THE~UINS TRBNIHRDY COE 5 09 AE9


Retailer


'struggling


to survive


FROM page 1B

However, he said no redun-


dancies would result, as the
Harbour Bay store staff -
believed to number around
four or five persons - were


being redeployed within John
S George's remaining busi-
nesses. Mr Wilson declined to
comment further.
John S George now consists
of its flagship Palmdale store,
warehouse and head office,
plus its Cable Beach interests.
In the past two years, it has
also closed outlets in Lyford
Cay and on Independence
Drive.
The retailer appears to be
another example of a busi-
ness, already troubled, which
is now struggling to survive a
deep recession. The blame for
that cannot be laid at Mr
Wilson's door, as John S
George had suffered under
the ill-fated ownership of the
buyout group put together by
Ken Hutton and, in the opin-
ion of many observers, stag-
nated under the ownership
group before that.
Benefit
Without the benefit of
hindsight or a crystal ball, Mr
Wilson's 2007 purchase of the
business from Mr Hutton's
group appears badly timed,
having taken place just before
the economy lurched into a
full-blown downturn - and
after Mr Wilson had invest-
ed some $1 million in upgrad-
ing John S George.
The retail chain's staffing
levels have been cut drasti-
cally as a result of the down-
turn, Mr Wilson earlier this
year describing current retail
trading conditions as "the
most challenging since getting
into" the business.
Apart from John S George,
Mr Wilson also owns Quality
Business Centre (QBC), the
Radioshack franchise and a
host of fashion retail formats.
All those outlets, he told Tri-
bune Business earlier this
year, were weathering the
downturn well.


BUILD YOUR "GREEN"

HOME TODAY














INTRODUCTORY OFFER
$70.00 PER SQ. FT. ON YOUR LOT

PROTECT CONCRETE STRUCTURAL INSULATED
PANEL SYSTEM
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TO CONVENTIONAL BUILDING
INCLUDES:
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ENERGY SAVING LED LIGHT BULBS
FOAM ROOF

HDC DEVELOPMENT CORP.
www.bahamassdg.com
EMAIL: fc.hdcbahamas@gmail.com
TELEPHONE: 364-6551


I I I S I


Major firm in the financial and legal services industry invites
applicants for the function of:



Compliance/Risk Officer


Successful candidate will:

have a responsibility for promoting, advising on and maintaining the firm's
compliance policies to ensure regulatory compliance with applicable
regulatory bodies in each jurisdiction in which the firm operates;

* set policies and standards to cover compliance issues and risks;

* train and educate staff to foster strong compliance culture within the
firm;

* identity potential areas of compliance vulnerability and risk, firm wide
and develop and implement corrective action plans for resolution of
problematic issues;

* safeguard the firm from any possible reputation damage and protect and
enhance the reputation of the firm;

* draft and update the firm's retainer agreements;

Qualifications:

* Minimum 5 years of Compliance experience
* Solid communication, presentation, and interpersonal skills
* Strong computer and database management skills
* Organizational and project management skills with the ability to multi-
task and attention to detail
* Four(4) year college degree required.

Salary commensurate with experience and qualifications
Attractive benefits

Reply in confidence to: vacancy50@gmail.com




The Anglican Central Education Authority








2009 Graduates of Anglican Schools
won scholarships totaling nearly
$2,000,0001

Anglican Schools have a renowned tradition in The Bahamas
of providing opportunities for a private and qualIty Education to
All Bahamians. Since the formalization of our Flagship School,
St. Johns College in 1947, Anglican Schools have continued
to trail blaze a path of excellence in Education in The Bahamas.

Our mission is to provide quality Education in a Chrlsitian
environment by developing the whole child; spiritually,
academically, physically, and socially thus preparing the child
for life.

Anglican Schools offer rigorous Academic Programmes In a
plethora of disciplines ranging from Mathematics and Physics to
Language Arts and Literature - from Modern Languages and the
Humanities to Musick: and Art. We believe that students should
have deep exposure to a vareity of academic disciplines which
enables greater choices upon graduation.

Anglican Schools operate with
the belief that all children can learn!
Through our Accelerated Track
Programme, students In Grade 8 - '
continue to successfully completed t
the Bahamas Junior Certificate ,,.


THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

NOTICE

TENDER FOR PROVISION OF CLEANING SERVICES,
PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITALS

Tenders are invited from qualified contractors to provide
cleaning services for The Princess Margaret Hospital, Public
Hospitals Authority, for a period of one (1) year.

Tender documents, which include instructions to tenderers,
specifications and other relevant information, can be collected
9 am - 5:00 pm Monday to Friday at The Public Hospitals
Authority, Corporate Centre "B", Third Et West Terraces Collins
Avenue.

A tender must be submitted in duplicate in a sealed envelope
or package identified as A TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF
CLEANING SERVICES, PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL@ and
addressed to:

THE CHAIRMAN,
TENDERS COMMITTEE
THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
CORPORATE CENTRE "B"
THIRD AND WEST TERRACES COLLINS AVENUE
P.O. BOX NB8200
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

TENDERS ARE TO ARRIVE AT THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
NO LATER THAN 5:00 P.M. ON November 6th, 2009.

A copy of a current business license and a certificate
verifying up to date National Insurance Contributions should
accompany all proposals.


The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all Tender(s).


Examinations (BIC), with A-B i
grades, and students at Grade 11
continue to succeed at the
Bahamas General Certificate of
Secondary Education examinations
(BGCSE), with A-B gradesI

Anglican Education.., building Global
Citizens - prepared for lfe!


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15,2009, PAGE 9B





PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Mexican firm eyes BTC bid


FROM page 1B

March/April this year, explor-
ing the feasibility of BTC as a
privatization target.
"They've [Telmex] had
bodies on the ground during
this process," said one source
familiar with Telmex's inter-
est. The Mexican-based com-
pany would seemingly be a
good fit for BTC, as it cur-
rently offers fixed-line tele-
coms, Internet, data, hosting
services and Internet Proto-
col (IP) TV - all business lines
that the state-owned incum-
bent is currently in, or seeking
to move into.
The most valuable compo-
nent of BTC is its cellular
monopoly, which according
to the company's 2007 annual
report accounted for 68 per
cent - more than two-thirds -
of its annual revenues that
year.
Telmex has expertise here,
too, having spun-off its cellu-
lar unit in 2000 to create


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW AND EQUITY


America Movil.
Telmex/America Movil's
interest in BTC and the
Bahamas has been long-
standing, the two entities hav-
ing participated in the failed
2003 privatization process by
paying a deposit to enter the
'data room' and conduct due
diligence on the Bahamian
company back then.

Observers

That was felt by many
observers then to have been a
'spying mission', assessing the
Bahamian telecoms market
and how ripe it was for a new
cellular player - the main
interest said to have been
acquiring a cellular licence for
America Movil.
Meanwhile, sources sug-
gested that other players
interested in BTC in included
Digicel (although it is purely a
cellular company to date),
Cable & Wireless and AT&T.
The latter part-owns the


2007
CLE/qui/00109


ALL THOSE piece parcels or lots of land comprising 9,374 square
foot and being Lot Number One (I) and Lot Number Two (2) situate
in Block Number Forty Three (43) in a Subdivision called and known
as "Englerston Subdivision" situated at the South-Eastern Junction of
Homestead Avenue and Podeleo Street in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lots of land are bounded on the
North by a Road Reservation called and known as Homestead Avenue
and running thereon approximately One hundred and Fourteen and
Sixty Eight hundredths (114.68) feet partially on an acre, on the East
by Lots Number 44 and 43 in the said Subdivision and running thereon
Ninety Eight and Twelve Hundredths (98.12) feet and on the West by
a Road Reservation called and known as Podeleo Street and running
thereon Eighty One and Three Hundredths (81.03) feet which said
piece parcels or lots of land have such position, boundaries, shape,
marks and dimensions as are more particularly delineated on the Plan
recorded in the Department of Lands and Surveys as Plan No.3914
N.P.

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles

Act 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of JANE MCPHEE

NOTICE

The Quieting Titles Act, 1959.

The Petition of JANE MCPHEE of Podoleo Street in the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas in respect of:-

ALL THOSE piece parcels or lots of land comprising 9,374 square
feet and being Lot Number One (I) and Lot Number Two (2) situate
in Block Number Forty Three (43) in a Subdivision called and known
as "Englerston Subdivision" situated at the South-Eastern Junction of
Homestead Avenue and Podeleo Street in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lots of land are bounded on
the North by a Road Reservation called and known as Homestead A
venue and running thereon approximately One Hundred and Fourteen
and Sixty Eight Hundredths (114.68) feet partially on an acre, on the
East by Lots Number 44 and 43 in the said Subdivision and running
thereon Ninety Eight and Twelve Hundredths (98.12) feet and on the
West by a Road Reservation called and known as Podeleo Street and
running thereon Eighty One and Three Hundredths (81.03) feet which
said piece parcels or lots of land have such position, boundaries,
shape, marks and dimensions as are more particularly delineated on
the Plan recorded in the Department of Lands and Surveys as Plan
NO.3914 N.P.

Jane Mcphee claims to be the owner of the fee simple estate
in possession of the said pieces or parcels of land free from
encumbrances. And the Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section
3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1999 to have title to the said pieces
parcels or tracts of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the
Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having a Dower or a right to
Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition
shall on before 26th November, A.D., 2009 file in the Supreme Court
and serve on the Petitioners or the undersigned a Statement of his
claim in the prescribed from verified by an Affidavit to be tiled therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of Claim on
or before the 26th November, A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such
claim.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected at:

I. The Registry of the Supreme Court.
2. The Chambers of Messrs ROLLE & ROLLE., Attorneys for the
Petitioner.

Dated the 28th day of September, A.D., 2009.
ROLLE & ROLLE
Chambers Seventh Terrace West, Centerville
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner


Bahamas Cable System with
BTC, which carries the lat-
ter's traffic, and the Bahamas
would be a natural extension
to its existing Florida pres-
ence.
A spokesman for the BTC
privatization committee,
which yesterday announced
that the due diligence phase
of BTC's privatization had
commenced, said of the num-
ber of bidders: "It is a group.
It is not one or two."
He added that Citigroup
Global Markets, the company
playing the 'investment bank-
ing role' of going out to solic-
it bids for BTC on the Gov-
ernment's behalf, did not
want the identity of bidders
or their number revealed for
competitive reasons.
However, the spokesman
said the level of interest
shown in BTC to date had
met the Government and Cit-
igroup's expectations. "The


Government is very pleased
with the level of interest so
far, and the quality of the par-
ties," he said.

Privatization

The BTC privatization
committee said "significant
interest" had been received
so far from potential bidders,
and the Government had
"narrowed down" the list
from the August pre-qualifi-
cation phase to a "select
group" they had invited to
participate in the due dili-
gence phase. The deadline for
bids is expected to be the end
of November 2009.
"As far as we can see, right
now the bids are expected by
the end of November.
There'll be a selection process
after that, and then the clos-
ing," the spokesman said,
adding that he "imagined"
BTC's privatization was like-


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[Lfimmawi, IARC QAA&MI LAMMED4


ANOIO lflG ThOU!


TAM KHW~IGE PmdUw 010*� 01 4, - "'1011IIcIHAW LT* Cwkal&i
a,-" 6* W II? c ft"A 2M izrclWwwriv bli "'iw m
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lift . :.L, L I hfl Qhb,11 mN - *9


ly to be completed in early
2010.
That would accord with the
Government's timescale, since
it is aiming to use the BTC
privatization proceeds to pay
down debt and narrow an
estimated $200-$300 million
fiscal deficit for its 2009-2010
financial year. Completing the
exercise before June 30 next
year is a clear goal.
It is unclear what purchase
price the Government expects
to realise, although some
close to the situation have
suggested a figure of around


$200 million. It is not known,
though, whether that figure
includes a $30 million divi-
dend the Government plans
to take from BTC prior to pri-
vatisation.

Diligence

The due diligence phase
will allow buyers to enter a
'Data Room', where they can
access financial, business and
legal information on BTC.
They will also be able to meet
with key members of BTC
management.


Legal Notice
NOTICE
ROSEWOOD ISLAND LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice
NOTICE
BRIGHT JADE HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice

Notice

GLIDER MANAGEMENT LTD.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000 the Dissolution of GLIDER MANAGEMENT
LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was 25th
September 2009.



.L .




Legal Notice

NOTICE

SAILFAST FX FUND LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the In-
ternational Business Companies Act 2000 SAILFAST FX LTD. is in
dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 13th
October 2009. David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, PO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of
SAILFAST FX FUND LTD. All persons having claims against
the above-named company are required to send their address and
particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 13th
November 2009.

. -. * -"


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O






THE TIBUN THUSDAYOCTOER 1, 200,SPAEESS


Asian stocks up amid




China optimism,




oil above $75


By JEREMIAH MARQUEZ
AP Business Writer

HONG KONG (AP) -
Asian stock markets rose
Wednesday as China's econ-
omy showed more signs of
recovery and oil prices
touched a new high for the
year above $75 a barrel.
Helping lead the region's
advance were shares in
major technology companies
after US chipmaker Intel
Corp. issued a surprisingly
cheery profit forecast for the
rest of the year. The dollar,
meanwhile, resumed its slide
against the yen and the euro.

Investors

Investors were heartened
by news the slump in Chi-
na's exports eased in Sep-
tember, a sign global trade
was improving and aiding the
government's efforts to engi-
neer a stronger turnaround
in the world's third-largest
economy.
Combined with huge
amounts of easy money freed
up by governments to
rebuild their economies and
companies, growth in China


has helped drive Asia's mar-
kets in the last six months.
"The writing is on the wall:
China's economy is recover-
ing," said Henry Chan, Hong
Kong-based head of Asian
equities at Baring Asset
Management, which over-
sees more than $9 billion in
assets. "And when there's so
much liquidity in the system
it will have to go somewhere,
and I think Asia's markets
will go higher."
In mainland China, Shang-
hai's index jumped 62.52
points, or 2.1 per cent, to
2,998.71. Hong Kong's Hang
Seng rose 292.93 points, or
1.4 per cent, to 21,760.29.
Japan's market was the
region's only major loser,
with the Nikkei 225 stock
average shedding 0.2 per
cent to 10,059.76 amid a
stronger yen which hurts
exporters.
Elsewhere, Australia's
market gained 1.1 per cent,
India's benchmark added 1.2
per cent and Taiwan's key
index advanced 1.1 per cent.
Meanwhile, the slumping
dollar sent commodities -
which are largely priced in
dollars and therefore tend to


rise when the US currency
falls - surging once again.
Gold traded near an all-time
high of $1,069.6 an ounce.

Barrel

Oil blew past its previous
2009 high of $75, with a bar-
rel of crude for November
delivery rising 96 cents to
$75.11. The contract added
88 cents overnight.


On Wall Street Tuesday,
the Dow fell 14.74, or 0.2 per
cent, to 9,871.06.
The Standard & Poor's
500 index fell 3.00, or 0.3 per
cent, to 1,073.19, its first loss
after six days of gains. The
Nasdaq rose 0.75, or less
than 0.1 per cent, to 2,139.89.
The dollar tanked to 88.96
yen from 89.69 yen. The euro
climbed to $1.4879 from
$1.4852.


THE WEAINSURANCEMAAGEPORTEMENT

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o1 INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BLAJIMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


Attend The


12th Americas

Food a Beverage

Shoew a Centersence



November 9-109 2009
Miami Beach
Convention Center



Take Advantage
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to Miami!


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15,2009, PAGE 11B


THE TRIBUNE


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Sandals aims to bring 1,500 travel





agents to Bahamas over six weeks


THE Sandals resort chain
is aiming to boost tourism to
the Bahamas by bringing
1,500 travel agents to this
nation over a six-week period
lasting until mid-November,
all spending one night at its
Royal Bahamian Resort &
Spa.
The travel agents are visit-
ing the Bahamas as part of
the resort chain's MEGA
FAM initiative, launched ear-
lier this year and designed to
familiarise that sector with
what Sandals and this nation
have to offer their clients.
There are 10 different
opportunities for agents to
visit the Sandals Royal
Bahamian Resort. As an
added bonus for agents par-
ticipating in one of the 10
scheduled trips this autumn,
they will have an opportunity
to tour Beaches Turks and
Caicos Resort Villages and
Spa, spending one night in
Turks & Caicos and one night
in the Bahamas.
The trips will originate from
the US east coast and mid-
west, and feature a two-night,
three-day MEGA FAM trip
that includes accommodations
in one of the resort's luxuri-
ous rooms and an exclusive
Junkanoo dinner party at San-
dals Royal Bahamian's pri-


vate island, Sandals Cay.
Travel agents will also have
the opportunity to earn Cer-
tified Sandals Specialist (CSS)
certification when they attend
a four-hour training course.
The certification provides
meaningful benefits, includ-
ing marketing tips and tech-
niques; bonus commissions;
and business tools such as co-
branded collateral, websites
and advertising opportunities.
All workshops feature an
in-depth look at the latest
developments across the San-
dals Resorts International
portfolio, including its latest
addition, Sandals Emerald
Bay, and Sandals Resorts'
new partnership with Martha
Stewart Weddings.


Dates for the new MEGA
FAM trip to Sandals Royal
Bahamian include:

October 5- 7, 2009
Airfare from Chicago
October 8 -10, 2009
Airfare from Milwaukee
October 19-21, 2009
Airfare from Detroit
October 22 - 24, 2009
Airfare from New York
October 26 - 28, 2009
Airfare from Atlanta
October29- 31, 2009


THE TRAVEL AGENTS (shown) are visiting the Bahamas as part of the resort chain's MEGA FAM initiative...

Airfare from Pittsburgh Airfare from Phoenix Airfare from Los Angeles from major US and Canadian
November 2- 4, 2009 November 10-12,2009 gateways brought more than
Airfare from Baltimore Airfare from Miami In April, May and June 1,500 travel agents to Sandals
November 6-9, 2009 November 13-16, 2009 2009, nine chartered flights Royal Bahamian Spa Resort.


ACH, from 1B


amendments may be some
time away, given the crowded
legislative agenda before Par-
liament and the Cabinet.
Paul McWeeney, Bank of
the Bahamas International's
managing director, who heads
the Clearing Banks Associa-
tion's ACH committee, told
Tribune Business when con-
tacted by this newspaper:


"Progress is being made."
He added that he was
unable to say much more than
that, but alluded to the nec-
essary legislative changes
needed to support the ACH
and bring it into being.
"We have to address the
legislative framework which
supports it," Mr McWeeney
added. "It's a lot more


involved than the banks."
Another banking industry
source, more forthcoming on
condition that they remained
anonymous, said of the ACH:
"We are making progress.
They've had several days of
[ACH] testing, doing entire
days of transactions and
exchanges of information
between the banks.


"All that has been going
reasonably well. There is
guarded optimism that from a
technical point of view, we
will be able to reach a con-
clusion and launch. It seems
we are getting there."
However, the source point-
ed out that apart from tech-
nical issues, the Bahamian
commercial banks also had to
tackle "operational issues",
such as the ACH's cost and
what the pricing structure
should be.
Confirming Mr
McWeeney's assertion that
the outstanding issues went
beyond the clearing banks,
and into the realm of regula-
tors, government and Parlia-
ment, the source said the key
Act to be amended was the
Bill of Exchange Act.
This regulated how cheques
were handled and cashed, and
with the ACH allowing elec-
tronic images of cheques to
be used, the key is to amend
that Act to allow these images
to be accepted as legal ten-
der, Tribune Business under-
stands.
"Quite a few of these things
need to take place before we
can launch the ACH in its
true form," the banking indus-


try source said.
THE failure to implement
an Automated Clearing
House (ACH) to-date, the
system having promised as far
back as 2003-2004, reared its
head again this week. A for-
mer Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce president argued
that its absence had made
"doing business in this coun-
try so prehistoric", the
nation's payments and settle-
ments system running exactly
"like it was 100 years ago".
Dionisio D'Aguilar, who is
also Superwash's president,
said the failure to deliver tech-
nology to facilitate an elec-
tronic payments system was
effectively holding up the rest
of the business community,
especially when it came to
rolling out a widespread e-
commerce platform.
"It's good for every single
business," Mr D'Aguilar said
of the ACH. "Putting in place
an ACH is the first step to a
cashless society. It's got to be
cheaper than the process now
of clearing cheques and han-
dling tonnes of cash. It just
makes the fact of doing busi-
ness in this country so prehis-
toric.
"This is 2009. It should be


able to be done electronically.
If I want to pay people elec-
tronically, I should be able to.
It just continually delays the
ability of business to operate
in a cashless society.
"It would save companies
an enormous amount of mon-
ey if they did not have to hold
on to such tremendous
amounts of cash, and as such
reduce the amount of cash
they have to horde. By not
allowing an ACH, you're still
operating a system where it
takes too long for cheques to
clear and everything is done
manually, like it was 100 years
ago."
Implementing an ACH
would enable consumers and
businesses to settle transac-
tions in real-time, creating
more certainty and confi-
dence by cutting down on the
quantity of 'bounced cheques'
and buyer defaults, thus
improving commercial sector
cash flow. Taking cash out of
the system would also lessen
the attractiveness of compa-
nies as armed robbery targets.
The ACH was intended to
replace the current manual
system for settling cheque
transactions, where cheques
drawn on one bank but due to
be deposited at another have
to be taken by armoured car
to a central location where
they are settled by represen-
tatives of the various institu-
tions.
Apart from allowing inter-
bank cheques to be processed
electronically rather than
manually at a cheque clear-
ing facility, the ACH system
would allow direct debits and
credits from accounts, debit
cards and a shared Automat-
ic Teller Machine (ATM) net-
work.
The latter would allow
Bahamians to use their cash
cards at any bank branch. It
would also reduce the time
persons spent in line waiting
to cash and deposit pay
cheques, as they could be
deposited to their account.
Bahamian consumers
would also be able to use
direct debits from their bank
accounts to pay bills such as
cable television and electrici-
ty. The ACH could ultimate-
ly lead to the creation of just
one back office system for the
entire Bahamas. It may also
help develop SWITCH prod-
ucts, where Bahamians could
use their cash cards at any
bank's ATM machine.
A further potential bonus
from the ACH will be the
opening up a whole range of
electronic banking services in
the Bahamas, including its use
in the online purchase of gov-
ernment goods and services.
Ultimately, through mod-
ernising the Bahamian pay-
ments system through elec-
tronic means, it will also
enhance economic and busi-
ness efficiency by settling
transactions quicker, boost-
ing business cash flows.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


Caribbean Center For

Child Development

The Caribbean Center for Child Development would like
to invite applications from qualified and experienced candidates
for the following vacancies:

Teaching Specialist for children with Autism: Teacher with
certification in Autism needed for full-time employment.
Teacher is expected to implement the full range of behavioral
and educational programs individually designed for each student.

ABA Theranist for children with Autism: Experienced ABA
or Verbal Behaviour Therapist. Experience working in clinical,
in-home and school settings. Trained in the ABBLS assessment
a plus!

Teaching Specialist in Occupational Therapy: Position duties
include providing OT therapy services to children from birth
to 21 years of age. This individual performs evaluations,
planning, and intervention to a variety of children with
disabilities.

Music Teacher: Experienced Music Teacher to provide music
therapy to children with disabilities.

All interested candidates should apply by email to:
mmajor@caribbeancenter.org with:

* letter of application
* a personal statement
* a full curriculum vitae

For more detailed information on these positions and more,
please visit our website at www.caribbeancenter.org


I


PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15,2009


THE TRIBUNE






























The Tribune
mt ttbliP


Let your light so shine before men. that they
may sue your gmod and urk ii{Il olrily your
F['allic1- in Ilticlvn,

-.1latthew 5:16


101.9


Your ch e f the family






By JEFFARAH GIBSON


* THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009 *


the



Bible
and


AFTER years of heated debates
and controversy concerning
capital punishment in the
Bahamas, the government is now
preparing to read a death warrant and
send someone to the gallows for the first
time in a decade. But what does the
Bible say about capital punishment?
What is the Christian stance on the
issue?
While many Bahamians may be satisfied that justice
is finally being done, Cephas Ferguson, ex-chaplain at
Her Majesty's Prison and Bishop at the Church of God
of Prophecy, told Tribune Religion that people should
not be too hasty in urging the authorities to hang mur-
derers.
As a former prison chaplain, Bishop Ferguson said
he has had several experiences with hangings. In some
of these cases, he said, the persons deserved the capi-
tal punishment, while others in his opinion did not.
And with the most recent pro-hanging march staged
on Sunday, he added that Bahamians must look to the
word of God for the answer concerning the questions
on capital punishment.
"People today must study the word of God to get a
concrete understanding of what the Bible says about
capital punishment. The Bible stipulates what should
happen in various instances of crime. The (people)
cannot be so quick to say 'hang them, hang them',
because this is a very long process and there must be
patience, prayer and dialogue when dealing with cases
like this," he said.
Bishop Ferguson said that the word of God holds
the answers to every question on the death penalty, the
only thing necessary is that those in authority examine
it diligently.
"The law must take its course, but there is a great
need for dialogue, study and prayer," he said.
Bahamians have been criticising and questioning the
judiciary's ability to bring about swift justice, and
although the decision has finally been made to send
someone to the gallows, Bishop Ferguson said that this
will not stop the rising murder rate in the country.
"General deterrence is a common-sense theory with
the misfortune of being virtually impossible to prove.
In fact, every study but one has documented that exe-
cutions do not deter crime. The one exception has
received much publicity, and much criticism, but has
not been successfully replicated by any other
researcher," he said.
Although he said he understands that people in this
country are tired of hearing about gruesome murders
on an almost daily basis, he does not want Bahamians
to demand the death of another human being.
"Christians are even demanding the death of mur-
derers, (but) people must keep in mind that while
these individuals are wrong for what they have done, it
be could their family members next, and I am sure they
would not want for their family member to be killed.
As a matter of fact, they might want pity, too," he said.
Bishop Ferguson said in his opinion not every mur-
der requires the death penalty, and one must keep in
mind that there are many different and complex cir-
cumstances and motivations surrounding each individ-
ual case.
He said his ultimate message is for the people to
allow God to direct and influence their decisions
through prayer, as God should be the final authority in
every situation.
Earlier this week, the Catholic Church in the
Bahamas said that it remains resolute in its opposition
to the death penalty.


What is the Christian stance on
the issue of capital punishment?


7�0 - Wnmmvw







PG 26 * Thursday, October 15, 2009


RELIGION


The Tribune


A stupid praise?


Gymnastics, calisthenics, hysteria,
joyful noises - or even refined chore-
ography not motivated, orchestrated,
instigated, directed and controlled by
the Holy Spirit is an offering to God
with a stench. It is a "Cain Offering."

I Timothy 4:8(a) - "For bodily exercise
profiteth little: but godliness is prof-
itable unto all things.
Romans 8:8 - "So then, they that are
in the flesh cannot please God."

A lady wrote a song about giving
God a "crazy" praise. Worship leaders
are often heard encouraging worship-
pers to "give God a crazy praise," or to
"..il ,. stupid for God". Then, a pastor
opined that if two or three men would
"run around the church" (during the
corporate worship time) then the glory
of the Lord would descend. There
apparently was a point being made that
conservative postures of men (who did
not mimic the extreme emotionalism of


)R _XALEliET N.



female fellow worshippers) actually
hindered the moving of the Holy Spirit,
or perhaps, the worship.
Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary
defines/interprets the word 'stupid' to
mean "slow of mind, given to unintelli-
gent decisions or acts, lacking intelli-
gence or reason"; and the word 'crazy'
to mean "mad, insane, impractical,
erratic, without a design or to an
extreme degree". Persons using these
words in the context of praising God or
along with the word "praise" (which
involves attributing or expressing of
approval or commendation or bestow-
ing honour and admiration) must be
speaking figuratively, because these


two terms together are incompatible,
diametrically opposed, incongruous
and oxymoronic.
Romans 8:8 unapologetically
declares: "So then, they that are in the
flesh cannot please God!" Then,
Romans 8:5 instructs, "For they that
are after the flesh do mind the things of
the flesh; but they that are after the
Spirit the things of the Spirit."
Praise and worship is a "spirit thing"
and a "heart thing" - John 4:24, "God is
(a) Spirit, and they that worship him
must worship him in spirit and in
truth"; Psalm 66:18, "If I regard iniqui-
ty in my heart, the Lord will not hear
me..."
So then, they that are in the flesh
cannot please God. That's the bottom
line. The word to spirit-led worshippers
therefore, is this: Gymnastics, calis-
thenics, hysteria, joyful noises or even
refined choreography not motivated,
orchestrated, instigated, directed and
controlled by the Holy Spirit is an
offering to God with a stench. It is a


"Cain Offering."
Of course, I hate to be the one to
break this news. It's tight, but it's right!
Genesis 4: 4(b), 7: "And the Lord
had respect unto Abel and to his offer-
ing. But unto Cain and to his offering
he had not respect.
Verse 7: If thou doest well, shalt thou
not be accepted? And if thou doest not
well, sin lieth at the door."
So let's be spirit-led and not puppets!
And a word to spirit-led men, based
upon the 'word of wisdom' from the
pastor, which I stated above, men, let's
be ourselves!


* Dr Albert S Ferguson, JP, is an ordained
minister of the gospel for over 30 years. He
is a "born Jumper" from the stock of the
original "holy rollers" and ancestral roots in
the 'Jumper Church' first located on Eneas
Jumper Church Corner, north of Odle
Corner and south of Burial Ground Corner.
Address comments to Dr Ferguson via e-
mail at albertsferguson@gmail.com.


St. Saviour's Parish hosts its Annual Friends and Family Weekend


AS is tradition every Discovery Day
holiday, the Anglicans of Cat Island
welcomed with open arms the members
of the Cat Island Committee based in
Nassau and Freeport who visited dur-
ing the Annual Friends and Family
Weekend to raise much needed funds
for the upkeep of the island's 11
churches.
At this time, only five of these once
glorious edifices are operational and
suitable for Sunday morning worship.
Father Chester Burton, priest in-
charge of the Anglican Churches in Cat
Island, expressed his gratitude for this
collaborative effort initiated some 30
years ago.
He said it is a time held sacred in tra-
dition which gives members and well-
wishers of St Saviour's Parish a "golden
opportunity" to liaise with visiting
Anglicans from Nassau, Freeport and
abroad. Father Burton said that Cat
Island is one of the islands in the
Bahamas that has a dwindling popula-
tion and only a fledging economy.
The efforts of the Cat Island
Association are far reaching and the
Annual Friends and Family Weekend is
seen as the single most important
fundraising event in the parish.
On Friday, October 9, before the
grand event, Father Burton waited at
the Arthur's Town Airport, as commit-
tee members from Nassau and


Freeport trickled in.
Final preparations still had to be
made for the upcoming annual church
fair, but first there was a gospel concert
planned for the auditorium of the
Arthur's Town High School - the alma
mater of many of those attending the
event.
The emcee for this event was Church
of God Pastor Madlyn Campbell, and
the coordinators working with the
youth from the Anglican Church were
vestry members Helen Thurston and
Coral Patrice Burton.
Numerous well-wishers and parish-
ioners from other denominations also
performed selections and skits. The
auditorium was packed to capacity and
all in attendance thoroughly enjoyed
the entertainment.
Then on Saturday, October 10 the
Arthur's Town basketball court was a
beehive of activity as members and vis-
itors made last minute preparations for
the fair which would begin at 12noon.
This year's fair would be like no
other year because during the summer
break St Saviour's Parish acquired
three brand new tents, 75 new folding
chairs and 10 new folding tables. It was
a glorious day as the sun shone down
on fair-goers and the gifts were blessed
by Father Burton.
Persons from all walks of life con-
verged on the fair grounds, trying their


hand at winning one of the coveted
prizes on the hoop la table, while others
enjoyed some of the fine delicacies and
coconut water.
During the evening proceedings,
Bahamian culture icon Edmund Moxey
gave a musical presentation which was
enjoyed by all and proved that Cat
Island was indeed the birthplace for
Rake n' Scrape music in the Bahamas.
On Sunday, October 11, both visitors
and the Anglican Communion from
Cat Island boarded the two church
buses and took a scenic tour to the set-
tlement of Port Howe, congregating at
the Deep South Movement site for the


Holy Eucharistic Celebration and fam-
ily picnic that started at 11am.
Father Edward "Rex" Seymour,
assistant priest, celebrated the
Eucharist and Father Burton preached
the sermon, stating: "With mortals it is
impossible and with God all things are
possible."
Father Burton admonished that we
need to stay committed and connected
to each other in the church.
After the weekend came to a close,
both locals and visitors returned home
with wonderful memories. Many are
already looking forward to next year's
fair.







The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, October 15, 2009 * PG 27


� EITlATON


The beauty of nature


WHEN last have you made the time
to gaze at the clouds, the moon, or a
flowering plant? There is so much of
God's glory for us to discover.
On a recent trip abroad, I had the
opportunity to observe multi-coloured
butterflies at very close range, with one
or two settling on my shoulder. We are
not usually that fortunate when we see
them flying in our gardens, but we can
still marvel at the intricacy of their pat-
terns, the difference in speed and flight
movements, and their flowers of
choice.
At the large botanical garden, I was
able to walk among the rose, herb, cac-
tus, bamboo, fern, vine and other gar-
den areas. The path was almost two
miles long as it wound through each
terrain, with waterfalls, water features,


figurines, benches a
to catch the eye. TI
orchid show put on
clubs with pots of
arranged in sections
In the museum
there were sections
ples of Florida, pre
underwater scenes
points of interest. N
gallery which display


tal exhibits, work by women in a home-
less shelter, and other contemporary
works of art.
RE\V _N( EL_ Sometimes we have to play the
tourist at home to take the time to
pi\ _( .i )I, enjoy our places of historic and artistic
interest.
Have you done any of the following?
If so, how long has it been that you did
nd other attractions the following?
ie highlight was an 1. A horse and carriage ride
by several garden 2. A visit to the Ardastra and
profuse blossoms Botanical Gardens
of one room. 3. A tour of the Educulture Junkanoo
of Natural History, museum, the Pompey Museum,
on indigenous peo- National Art Gallery, Doongalik Studios
-historic specimens, and any of our other art galleries.
and many other 4. A leisurely day at the beach


ext door was the art
ayed intercontinen-


What about the wonder of the


human creation? If you have the
chance to watch people from a polite
distance, marvel at the varied skin
tones, facial features, hair-styles, and
outfits. Discover the magnificence of
the persons created in God's image
who reside in your own home.
Carefully reflect on the distinct differ-
ences between each personality.
Then look at the mirror and see
another masterpiece. You are a work of
art in the making indeed. Do you treat
yourself as such? Do you believe that
God has great dreams for your life,
even if the greatness is never on public
display? Why not spend more time get-
ting to know the dreamer, the creator,
and the source of all life and beauty.
Discover the glory of our God who
made it all.


He is Faithful


2 Timothy 2:13 - If we believe not, yet he
abideth faithful: for he cannot deny himself.

To paraphrase the above scripture
verse, here is what it would sound like:
Even when we're unfaithful to God's
word: He (Yahweh) abideth faithful to
His word for He cannot deny Himself.
Here is what God said to Jeremiah
about Himself and His word in the
book of Jeremiah 1:12b: For I will has-
ten my word to perform it.
As we (the Bahamas) go through
our difficult times of famine and hard-
ship, it is of the utmost importance that
we be mindful of the fact that God is
ever faithful. Over the course of time
we have ignorantly taken our eyes off
God and focused on mankind based
upon the many promises they have
made.
Unlike man, whenever God gives His
word or makes a promise, He faithfully
watches over His word to perform it.
If there was ever a time that we need-
ed to stand upon the word of God, that
time is now.
The revelation or fact that as a nation
we are in a severe spiritual battle has
evaded the religious Christian church;
and its ability to equip the saints to
fight the good fight of faith is lost in the
maze of today's divisive religion.
As I listen, I am hearing the religious
leaders crying just as much or even
more than those who do not profess
Christianity about how bad or tough
things are.
So, if the leaders are crying, what is


expected of their followers?
As church leaders, what about
encouraging and demonstrating for the
nation.
1 Timothy 6:12 - Fighting the good
fight of faith - rather than focusing pri-
marily on the incomplete prosperity
gospel. How about teaching the church
2 Timothy 2:3 - Thou therefore endure
hardness, as a good soldier of Yeshuwa
Messiah?
The country's economic crisis, the
unemployment rate, the murder rate
coupled with an ancient health care sys-
tem and facilities (the Princess
Margaret Hospital and The Rand
Memorial Hospital) along with a
defunct judicial system and a rapidly
deteriorating education system is
enough to cause even a crazy man or
woman to ask 'what's going on?'.
I am constantly reiterating that
"nothing happens on the Earth that will
ever catch God off guard or by sur-
prise", but rather He is constantly look-
ing for a people.
As said in 2 Chronicles 16: 9 - For the
eyes of the Lord run to and fro
throughout the whole earth, to show


himself strong in the behalf of them
whose heart is perfect toward him.
The Bahamas' woes and challenges
are nothing more than opportunities
for Yahweh to show our nation that He
alone is God.
For He is preparing a man that will
make up the hedge to stand in the gap
before Him for the Bahamas (Ezekiel
22:30). This man is definitely not one of
the country's religious leaders who has
financially fattened himself via prosti-
tuting/merchandising the gospel while
the nation deteriorates both spiritually
and morally.
Some years ago, I heard Bishop
Darryl of New Orleans give this
acronym for the word faith - F-For, A-
All, I-I, T- Trust, H-Him.
Remember the opening scripture of
this article: 2 Timothy 2:13, 'If we
believe not, yet he abideth faithful: for
he cannot deny himself.'
I want to assure you that even though
many of us might have been unfaithful
in various areas of our lives that does
not nullify God's faithfulness towards
us, therefore we are without excuse for
not being obedient to God's word.
Religion and religious thinking
would cause a person to make decisions
based upon man's performances or the
lack thereof. Whereas a relationship
with Father Yahweh via
His only begotten Son, Yeshuwa
Messiah, would be that bridge over
troubled waters that even a disciple
faces. However, to the disciples of


Yeshuwa Messiah, be mindful of the
encouraging words of the apostle Paul
to the saint at Ephesus in Ephesians
6:10 - 18.
Keep in mind Ephesians 6: 13 -
Wherefore take unto you the whole
armour of God, that ye may be able to
withstand in the evil day, and having
done all, to stand; and 6: 14 - Stand
therefore, having your loins girt about
with truth, and having on the breast-
plate of righteousness.

* For questions or comments, contact us
via e-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
telephone number 1-242-441-2021.
Pastors Matthew and Brendalee Allen
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center
International


"Unlike man,

whenever God

gives His word

or makes a

promise, He

faithfully watches

over His word

to perform it."







PG 28 0 Thursday, October 15, 2009


ST Christopher's celebrates



ST FRANCIS OF





ASSISI DAY


ST Christopher's
Church in Lyford
Cay was
packed full on
Sunday, October 4, as
Archdeacon Keith
Cartwright preached
to the animals and
their owners in cele-
bration of St Francis of
Assisi Day.
Close to 50 animals were
packed into the small white
church. There were fish, ham-
sters, cats, kittens, dogs, pup-
pies and even a fresh water
turtle (terrapin). And they all
behaved amazingly well,
Bahamas Humane president
Kim Aranha said.
Whilst the congregation
sung "All things bright and
beautiful, all creatures great
and small", the animals in
church all sat peacefully as if
they knew that they were in
the presence of God, she said.
Ms Aranha said that she is
so grateful to Archdeacon
Cartwright for holding this
service every year.
"The first one was three
years ago and six animals were
present, now the word is going
around and people are come
from as far as Fox Hill to have
their beloved pets blessed,"
she said.
"It really makes me feel
good because we have to deal
with so much cruelty and sad-
ness at the Bahamas Humane
Society on a regular basis that
it is a good feeling to see
happy and healthy animals
who are well cared for and
loved." Archdeacon
Cartwright is a keen animal
lover and is on the board of the
Bahamas Humane Society
himself.
"We are delighted how many
people came out to worship
with us," he said.


"The church was full and the
animals were very peaceful."
In her address to the congre-
gation Ms Aranha said: "It is a
wonderful thing that today we
are all here to honour and
bless our animals, but we must
remember that today is just
one day in 365 days of the year.
That we remember animals
today is right, but we must use
today as an example of how we
should act and think towards
animals for the rest of the year.
"God painstakingly created
domesticated and wild animals
from the smallest to the very
largest for us to nurture and
protect. Those that we see in
church today are companion
animals, however, we must not
forget the wild animals in this
country and all over the
world."
In the Bahamas, she said,
there is still so much cruelty
towards animals - "much of it
is through ignorance."
"This is why the Bahamas
Humane Society has a very
strong and active educational
programme lead by Inspector
Percy Grant who is with us
today. We now have an
approved curriculum in all the
government schools and some
of the private ones, teaching
children about animal care and
respect. We find that these
children go home and teach
their parents. Things are get-
ting better but we have a ways
to go," she said.
"Please join me in helping
those outside of here, that per-
haps we cannot even see who
endures so much at the hand of
man, help them to live pain
free lives as God meant them
to."
'A Blessing of the Animals'
was also led by Father Cooper
in Freeport this year in honour
of the patron saint of animals.
The blessing took place in the
Garden of the Groves and was
organised by the Grand
Bahama Humane Society.


RELIGION


The Tribune




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