The Tribune
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01435
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: October 13, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01435

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TINGS TOUGH
McDOUBLE J J1
FOR$3.79 "m lIvk'w
HIGH 90F
LOW 78F

SUNNY AND
- 'BREEZY


The


The Tribune continues to buck the
trend, with the latest circulation fig-
ures proving we are the Number
One source for real news in the
Bahamas.
With September street sales up
3.9 PER CENT compared to the
same period last year, our daily
circulation hit 21,897 copies.
This is our SEVENTH consec-
utive yearly rise.


new crx-Mi






new cPown I


Allegations over


Tribune


5ATODWY4
BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


to AOw O
Peium oat ofee


reading The Tribune.
All this is during an economic reces-
sion which is hitting the spending pow-
ers of every Bahamian, and also at a
time when newspapers all over the
world are losing sales.
Circulation consultant Jeff Kohler
said: "I am absolutely and positively
certain that NO newspaper in the Unit-
ed States can boast seven consecutive
years of circulation increases."


chi
C I


15 acres


requested by son and brother
of former Lands and Surveys
Permanent Secretary


By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter
pturnquest@tribune-
media.net


THE former Per- 1 M
manent Secretary
in the Ministry of
Lands and Surveys,
Ronald Thompson,
has denied claims
of nepotism after his son and
brother requested more
than 15 acres of crown land
in Deep Creek, Eleuthera.
While The Tribune under-
stands that the lease for the
land has yet to be granted,
sources within the depart-
ment suggest the property
was already occupied and
worked on since July of
2005.
In fact, in a survey plan
obtained by The Tribune of
the property, the area
encompasses some 30.697
acres, and not the 15 Mr
Thompson has defended.
When questioned yester-
day as the discrepancy in the
proportions of the proper-
ties, Mr Thompson said he


was not aware of
the 30 acres of land.
Mr Thompson
said: "There is a
lease in the name of
my son and my
brother down there
for 15 acres of
land."
Reporter: "Is that
included in this 30
acres?"
Mr Thompson:
"Which 30 are you talking
about?"
Reporter: "Well there is
one for 17.602 acres, one for
10 acres, and one for 3.095
acres. The 10 acres has a
farming build on it..."
Mr Thompson: "There is
a lease for 15 acres of land.
My brother is living in
Eleuthera. He's a farmer.
It's in his name and my son's
name.
"I am not aware of a grant
for 30 acres. Ralph (Bren-
nen, the former Surveyor
General in the Department
of Lands and Surveys) sur-
veyed some land but the
actual grant is for 15 acres of


SEE page nine


Fleet said: "The recession is hitting
the newspaper business in a bad way
worldwide. Falling sales are crippling
publishing companies in the USA
and the UK. Yet here in Nassau,
Tribune circulation continues to
rise.
"We are certainly bucking the
trend and will continue to do so by /
providing the very best in news,
features and sport coverage."


in
In


HUNDREDS OF SUPPORTERS of capital punishment flooded the streets on Discovery Day yesterday in
a "pro-hanging" march. Marching for two-and-a-half hours, starting at Arawak Cay, the supporters
called on government to get tough with criminals and, by resuming the hanging of those on death row,
send a clear message to the criminally-minded in the country.

Husband of Tribune publisher suffers heart attack


ROGER Carron, hus-
band of Tribune publisher
Eileen Carron, is recovering
in Doctors Hospital after
suffering a heart attack Sat-
urday.
Under the care of Dr
Conville Brown and his
team, Mr Carron underwent
an emergency angioplasty to
open a blocked artery.
He came through the pro-
cedure with flying colours.
Mr Carron is now resting


comfortably in ICU and is
currently not allowed visi-
tors.
The evening masses in all
Catholic churches in North
Florida yesterday evening
were dedicated to Mr Car-
ron, and prayers were said
for his speedy recovery.
Mike Ossi, lead counsel in
the John Travolta case, who
has known Mr Carron for
about 15 years, told his
father, John Ossi, who was


81 yesterday, of Mr Carron's
illness. In commemoration
of Mr John Ossi's birthday,
North Florida Catholic
churches had planned to
dedicate their evening mass-
es to him. However, on
learning of Mr Carron's ill-
ness, Mr Ossi requested that
the masses should be dedi-
cated to Mr Carron instead.
"Roger Carron," said
Mike Ossi, "is a wonderful
SEE page two


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Volume: 105 No.2' TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009 PRICE - 750 (Abaco an Grandl Bahama $1.25)



ii�~ a DESPITE the troubled economy And more than 80.000 Deo le are Tribunte Manaizini Editor John


Man is

rammed

by car,

beaten

to death
A MAN was
viciously murdered
after being rammed by
a car, pinned to a wall
and then beaten to a
pulp by a group of
thugs.
The victim, who is
believed to be in his
mid-20s and whose
name has not been
released, was with a
friend when they got
into a row with a
group of men in front
of a take-away shop
on Baillou Hill Road
sometime after 3am
on Saturday.
After the two
friends received their
food they walked
along Baillou Hill
Road.
But when they
neared the Zanzibar
nightclub, eyewitness-
es said a silver
coloured Hyundai
Accent came bar-
relling down the road.
The car then
rammed into the two
friends, pinning one of
SEE page 10

Nottage set to
announce PLP
leadership bid
DR BERNARD Nottage
is expected to formally
announce his bid for the lead-
ership of the PLP this week as
the battle for the party's top
post heats up.
According to well-placed
sources within the PLP, Dr
Nottage has been courted for
some time by supporters and
some of his fellow colleagues
in the party's Parliamentary
caucus to challenge the
leader, Perry Christie, for the
top post.
While former Prime Min-
ister Christie still holds a
tremendous amount of sup-
port within the hierarchy of
the party, there is a growing
movement within the organi-
zation to replace him as the
country continues to cry out
for change.
Hearing this call, Dr Not-
tage, and other challengers
such as Paul Moss and Fox
Hill MP Fred Mitchell are
expected to contest the lead-
ership of the party at the
SEE page 10


row




PAGE 2, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


1i HUNDREDS TAKE PART IN
h
SI a a d 'PRO-HANGING' MARCH
FROMl page one
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Church 1in S I L SlIcci hi 11211h1 CJId ldl_ Iu hi[ IIlInld N �
return I, 21,idli hItI h I
RONALD ZUPANCIC mcn ci' h.
cicc1,; 1::] 3 :10(1 h ~"d 1,i J',IHiI TIcv'I- ,1.
S.-, i cr1 R/lii:,iel EE. W,. le ,:,:,t,,.el ,r
mie Tiw;olcr in [lie e-[i tLon :ca- e.
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TrMie Serimen p'omded in pahefalp ith



DaTng Octobferf 29t, 2009


Visit your Neighbohood Sherwin filliams Paidt SIre Today!
Pr'Fl ime Charle rWr-.n2-u5rve'f 147


SUPPORTERS of capital punishment take to the streets of Nassau
yesterday in a "pro-hanging" march. Starting at Arawak Cay, the
supporters called on government to get tough with criminals.


Photos: Felipd Major/Tribune staff


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THETRIBUNETUESD


OIn brief


Firearms found

in police search
ACTING on a tip-off,
officers of the Drug Enforce-
ment Unit on Saturday, at
9.30pm, searched a bushy
area off Pit Road.
Their search turned up a
.40 pistol and a 12-gauge
shotgun. Investigations into
discovery of the firearms
continue.
* OFFICERS of the
North Eastern Division on
Sunday at 5.10pm stopped a
man who they thought was
acting suspiciously on the
corner of Shirley Street and
Balls Alley.
They searched him and
found a .380 calibre hand-
gun and several rounds of
ammunition in his posses-
sion. He was taken into
police custody.

Woman and

children rescued

from suspected

arson attack
FIREFIGHTERS had
to rescue a woman and
her children from their
blazing apartment after a
suspected arson attack.
Emergency services
received calls of a domes-
tic dispute at the unit on
Father Calnan Road, off
Baillou Hill Road, just
behind the St Barnabas
Anglican Church, at about
9.25pm on Saturday.
Police arrived on the
scene first and apprehend-
ed a 34-year-old man.
When fire services
reached the apartment,
the woman and her chil-
dren were still inside the
building.
Neighbours said they
believe there were more
than three children inside.
According to eyewit-
nesses, the woman could
not leave the apartment
by herself, but needed the
assistance of fire fighters
to exit the building.
One witness said she
was shouting for police to
release the man whom
they had taken into cus-
tody.
Elsworth Moss, head of
the Central Detective
Unit, said none of the
apartment's inhabitants
were injured in the fire.
It is understood the
blaze was mostly con-
tained to the apartment's
interior and did not
spread to surrounding
buildings.
Mr Moss said a man is
assisting the police with
their investigations.


Former Cabinet Minister backs

Davis for PLP Deputy Leader


ANOTHER former PLP Cabi-
net Minister, George Smith, has
formally endorsed Philip 'Brave'
Davis as the party's best choice for
Deputy Leader.
"I have concluded that the [PLP]
Leader would greatly benefit from
Philip Davis as his Deputy. Davis is
intelligent and trustworthy. He is
strong in his conviction. He is a
unifier and a hard worker.
"Importantly, he is a man who
makes careful and intelligent decisions. In
fact, one of his most outstanding traits is


that he is firm and decisive once
he is convinced the course is right.
His word is his bond.
"I believe Brave Davis repre-
sents that important difference,
change, and direction," Mr Smith
said.
Former Deputy Prime Minister
and former Minister of National
Security in the Christie adminis-
*I tration, Cynthia 'Mother' Pratt
along with former Trade Minister
Leslie Miller have also endorsed Davis for
the Deputy Leadership position.


MA II[E Y'ITO SURVIVE! LJET312WEN


I



k


THE MAN is brought ashore after the accident in Goodman's Bay
A MAN was lucky to sur- fell into the water, a groups
vive after almost drowning people who were also ridii
when he fell off a jetski in nearby immediately came
Goodman's Bay. the rescue.
The man was riding the They were able to pull tl
machine with two young boys man and the boys onshore.
at around 5.43pm on Sunday Supt Elsworth Moss, of tl
when the accident occurred. Central Detective Unit, sa
After the man and children the man was in a "semi-co
scious" state and had to I
taken to the Princess Ma
M a n sh ot garet Hospital.
His condition is non-lif
threatening.
One of the boys was al


A MAN was shot and
injured while attending a
party in Nassau Village.
The 32-year-old was
standing outside a house
with a group of people
when shots were fired at
about 2.30am on Sunday.
The man told police he
did not immediately
realise that he had been
shot. He said he heard the
shots ring out and then felt
pain in his left arm.
Neither the victim or
bystanders could identify
the shooter.
Police are appealing to
the public to assist them
with their investigation.
Anyone with any informa-
tion is asked to call 328-
TIPS or contact the near-
est police station.


2 'IR4 m-


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MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News...............P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,15
Local News............P..P17,18,19,20,21,23,24
Editorial/Letters...................................... P4
Sports..................................... P11,12,13,14
A dvt....................................................... P 16
C om ics.................................................. P22
BUSINESSWOMAN SECTION
Business.........................P1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9,10
A dvt.........................................................P5
W om an................................... P11,12,13,14

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USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES


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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE






1I 1 n- Imn1o, 1o uuwsa I 611 llInn^o]-'


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, cI tiinn') 322-1986
Ad c,' iiing Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm



Afghan problem - lack of police


THE PROBLEM in Afghanistan isn't the
number of American troops, but the lack of
Afghan police to serve and protect the people.
The key to winning an insurgency is gaining
the support of the population for the indige-
nous government. This is accepted counter-
insurgency doctrine learned in Vietnam and
codified by Gen. David Petraeus and Gen.
James Amos, in the 2006 U.S. Army/U.S.
Marine Corps Counter-insurgency Field Man-
ual.
Foreign military forces can suppress insur-
gent operations, but they can't bring legiti-
macy to local governments. Since military
force almost inevitably produces collateral
damage to civilians, counterinsurgency oper-
ations may alienate populations from their
government and its allies.
Local people also know that foreign troops
eventually go home. If the Afghan govern-
ment does not provide security and essential
services in an effective, honest and even-
handed way, American soldiers cannot win
the war.
Following U.S. military operations to clear
territory of insurgents, the Afghan govern-
ment must immediately provide basic ser-
vices -law, safety, justice and development.
The key are Afghan police who can hold the
ground and provide the level of security nec-
essary for political reconciliation and eco-
nomic development.
Although the United States has spent more
than $6 billion training the Afghan police
since 2001, they remain unreliable, corrupt
and thin on the ground. In opinion polls,
Afghans have characterized the police as a
greater threat to their security than the Tal-
iban.
One reason is that Afghan police are
trained by the U.S. military as "little soldiers"
and used as cannon fodder in the fight against
insurgents. Inadequately equipped, poorly
led and deployed without adequate support,
the police had combat losses in 2008 that
were three times larger than those of the
Afghan army. From January 2007 to March
2009, 3,400 Afghan police were killed, com-
pared to nearly 600 American soldiers since
2001.
In Afghanistan, U.S. efforts have not been
based on a clear division of labour between
the American and Afghan military and the
Afghan police. The role of troops is to protect
cops; the role of cops is to win people to the
government. Within territory cleared and


B obcat ci-
ahamas
I * Prf-dML~il-!fl
(�rw*~rwiJ~l-U~kn F id


held by the military against insurgent attacks,
police prevent crime, arrest law-breakers,
mediate disputes, regulate traffic, enforce
ordinances and respond to calls for assistance.
To develop a police force that is considered
legitimate by the Afghan people, the United
States must begin by reforming the justice
infrastructure, starting with the Afghan Min-
istry of the Interior.
This should be done by carefully prepared
American advisors drawn primarily from state
and local police, rather than the current U.S.
practice of using military officers or untrained
commercial contractors. Providing this capac-
ity will require shifting responsibility for police
training within the U.S. government from the
Defence Department to the Justice Depart-
ment.
The curriculum and the number of civilian
police and military advisors must be rebal-
anced to emphasize law enforcement, civilian
police skills and establishing relationships
between the police and their communities.
In all countries, police are the face of gov-
ernment.
If the police provide protection and ser-
vices, the people will reciprocate by providing
information on the presence of those who
threaten the community.
This basic relationship between the police
and the community has historically been an
essential component of all successful counter-
insurgency efforts. It's critical to reversing
the tide of battle of Afghanistan.
Military and civil activity should be under-
taken incrementally. It shouldn't be done
everywhere at once, but only where it can
succeed and be sustained. This requires few-
er American troops, because gains made are
consolidated by civil development and
defended by the Afghan army.
Carrying the fight into the sanctuary of
Pakistan becomes less important than holding
the Taliban at bay long enough for
Afghanistan to implant effective and humane
government. This will require further mili-
tary action on our part, but on the firm basis
of defending a population that recognizes it
has something tangible, in the form of security
and good governance, to lose if its own gov-
ernment is defeated.
(This article was written by David H. Bay-
ley, distinguished professor and former dean of
the University at Albany's School of Criminal
Justice-c.2009 Albany Times Union).


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The Privy





Council and





the Bahamas


EDITOR, The Tribune.

AS ASSISTANT Profes-
sor of Law at the College of
the Bahamas I have taught
constitutional law for the past
ten years. In 'An Introduc-
tion to the Law and Legal
System of the Bahamas' one
of the two books that I have
authored on Bahamian law, I
set out the pros and cons of
the issue of the Privy Council
as our final court. I discuss
the arguments advanced by
the several schools of
thought, and I end with the
following conclusion:
"The Bahamas should
remain with the Privy Coun-
cil until it has put in place the
necessary machinery to fully
repatriate its final court to its
own shores. Certainly the
Bahamian National Party will
continue to push for extreme
caution in any further region-
al entanglements. Caribbean
countries will be happy to see
the Bahamas pay a dispro-
portionate share of the Bill
for the operation of such a
regional court. The Bahamas
will not have even a guaran-
tee that a single Bahamian
Judge will sit on this Region-
al Court. It will be as foreign
as the Present Privy Council,
and infected with the viru-
lent anti-Bahamian attitude
pervasive in the Common-
wealth Caribbean.
There are those who con-
sider that the CCJ is an
indigenous court. This is the
view of Mr Justice Telford
Georges and others. But the
Bahamas is not a part of the
Caribbean, and we share pre-
cious little with that region,
aside from prior overlordship
by Britain.
Independence in 1973 was
never intended to lead to sub-
jugation to some other for-
eign dominated, regional
Caribbean state and its court!
Mr Telford George's actual
words regarding an "indige-
nous court" were these
"Starkly put, it appears to
me that an independent coun-
try should assume the respon-
sibility for providing a court
of its own choosing for the
final determination of legal
disputes arising for decision
in the country."
This is a compelling argu-
ment for a final Bahamian
court, not a final Caribbean
court. It is my view that no
Bahamian government will


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be allowed to submit
Bahamians to any regional
court. Bahamians alone can
determine this, since the con-
stitution requires that Parlia-
ment in its widest sense,
including the people in a ref-
erendum, is needed in order
to make such a change legal
and binding.
It is my view that true
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Caribbean nationals. That is
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Court of Justice will impose
permanently on us. We had
no choice in the imposition
of the Privy Council on us,
since our present constitution
was a necessary condition of
being granted Independence.
But today we have control
of our own destiny, and if we
can govern ourselves we can
also judge ourselves. Certain
safeguards, checks and bal-
ances are needed, however
these are matters of detail
and not insurmountable bar-
riers. The next logical step is
that total jurisdiction must be
vested in our own Court of


Appeal. It is instructive to
note that there is no question
that this court is not capable
of being our final court since
it is already the final court of
the Bahamas for all matters
not under the very narrow
area which the Privy Council
retains final jurisdiction over.
This fact disposes of those
who continue to say that we
cannot judge ourselves. It is
time for such psychological
colonialism to be totally erad-
icated. I will never support
any view that other persons
from other countries can do
things that we cannot also do.
We do not need the CCJ, or
the Privy Council, and it is
time that our so-called lead-
ers stop being a part of the
agenda of those who contin-
ue to do their utmost to keep
us in, mental slavery.

DR DEXTER
JOHNSON
Assistant,
Professor of Law,
MBBS, FRCS
(Edin) CLE,
LLB (Hons)
(UWI) LLM
(UKC)
Nassau,
October 7, 2009.


We are awaiting


hangman's day

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PRIME Minister, sir, the time has come when the people of
the Bahamas are now crying out to you or whoever is respon-
sible to set aside a hangman's day.
There is absolutely too much killing in our land; we are now
having murders in threes in less than 24 hours isn't that a
shame. We can no longer stand by and watch innocent lives
being taken away, even if it means we all march around par-
liament and shut Bay Street down until our cries are heard.
We no longer want to hear its inhumane, sir, we now want life
for life - just the other day a young mother of two was nurs-
ing her three months old baby when a nasty gunman came by
and her life was brutally taken away -is this inhumane, sir? A
young mother of three working ever so hard to support her chil-
dren when suddenly she was shot in the face by some nasty
thugs. Sir is this inhumane? We are living behind bars just
how the prisoners are kept at Her Majesty Prison, if a fire
should ever break out God help us all because there is absolute-
ly no escape. Sir, the people of this country are crying out to you
for help have mercy, Mr Prime Minister, and let the country
know when you are going to set aside a day only for hangman's
day, don't wait until it reaches your doorstep, sir, do something
right now before it is too late.
Sir, I can truly say the people of this country is waiting for
that day because the laws are on the books or do we have to get
consent from the Privy Council, are we fully independent or
not?
Sir, we are awaiting hangman's day we are sick and tired of
hearing empty voices, we need action and we need it right
now.


ANGRY AND VERY IRATE CITIZEN
Nassau,
2009.


Pre-ChrstmsSale-


PAGE 4, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009


THE TRIBUNE











A tribute to Sir Clement Maynard


By SIR ARTHUR FOULKES
Memorial Service
BFM Diplomatic Centre
October, 10, 2009
"IF there is no struggle there


is no progress. There are those
who profess to favour freedom
and yet deprecate agitation.
They want crops without plow-
ing up the ground. They want
rain without thunder and light-


ning. They want the ocean with-
out the awful roar of its many
waters."
We have come to mourn the
loss of Clement Trevelyan May-
nard but also to celebrate his


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life and service as one of the
founders of our modern, sta-
ble, fully emancipated and
democratic Commonwealth of
The Bahamas.
He served his country for
three decades in the highest
echelons of our Government
and contributed mightily to our
economic, social, political and
constitutional development.
I join with all Bahamians in
expressing our gratitude for his
long and excellent service to
our country in the many minis-
terial portfolios he held with
distinction over these years,
including that of Minister of
Tourism and Deputy Prime
Minister.
But in my humble contribu-
tion to his memorialisation, I
have chosen to say a few inad-
equate words about a friend, a
brother and a comrade in the
struggle for the second eman-
cipation of the Bahamian peo-
ple, the struggle that culminat-
ed in the dramatic and historic
events of January 1967.
That is why I chose to begin
with those wonderful words
from Frederick Douglass, the
brilliant American orator and
abolitionist. They were among
the words, ideas and example of
other enlightened men and
women, freedom lovers and
emancipators that inspired
Clement Maynard and his com-
rades in the Fifties and Sixties.
They were words that were
acutely relevant to the unfin-
ished struggle for complete


equality for all Bahamians, not
just white Bahamians or near-
white Bahamians, but all
Bahamians, black and white.
There are some things in life
that lend themselves well to
compromise; indeed, some
things cry out for compromise.
But there are some things that
cannot, should not, be compro-
mised.
Men and women of integrity
cannot compromise their right
to equality. Equality cannot be
measured by a light meter, nor
can it be administered one tea-
spoonful at a time.
So it was an uncompromis-
ing struggle for the full equality
of all Bahamians regardless of
race, colour, gender or ethnic
origin. And it was an uncom-
promising struggle for the fun-
damental and unfettered right
of the Bahamian people to
choose their own leaders from
among themselves.
It needs to be said as bluntly
as that because there are always
those who will attempt to mis-
represent history, either out of
ignorance, which is forgivable,
or to suit some special agenda,
which is not so easily tolerat-
ed.


The struggle was to fling
wide open the doors that were
then either tightly shut or bare-
ly ajar for a chosen few to pass
through.
The struggle that Sir Clement
and his comrades joined was
against an economic system to
which black Bahamians had
only limited access, and then
only by the sufferance of the
entrenched powers of the day.
It was a system in which the
law provided that Bahamian
children were entitled to be
educated in public schools only
up to the age of 14. And only a
few were able to go beyond
that. That is if they could afford
to go to a private school and if
the colour of their skin was not
so dark as to deny them admis-
sion.
Or if they were fortunate
enough to qualify for the Gov-
ernment High School, an insti-
tution that had been grudging-
ly created in 1925 as the first
secondary school open to black
Bahamians. Fewer yet could
dare to dream about tertiary
education in the great institu-
tions of Europe or North
America.
The colonial approach to the
education of blacks in The
Bahamas had for generations
constituted a grave injustice as
described by Bahamian histori-
an Gail Saunders:
"In general, Bahamian edu-
cation was designed to provide
minimal literacy and sound
moral training rather than
social mobility or even useful
skills."
In other words, black
Bahamians were expected to
be good, to be obedient and,
above all, to stay in their place.
This policy was underlined
by overt discrimination against
black Bahamians in public
places including restaurants,
theatres and hotels. That odious
practice crumbled in the face
of a dramatic assault by Sir Eti-

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


L






THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009, PAGE 7


Who's listening when


the Caribbean speaks?


insight

WORLD VIEW -


By RONALD SANDERS
(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean diplo-
mat)
IN Turkey, where meetings
of the IMF and the World
Bank were held during the
week of October 4th,
Caribbean Finance Ministers
raised with the First Deputy
Managing Director of the
International Monetary Fund,
John Lipsky, their concerns
about "the need for better
representation and participa-
tion of small, developing coun-
tries in key meetings and fora
such as the G20, where deci-
sions that can significantly
impact these small economies
are frequently made."
But, Caribbean represen-
tation in the already over-
crowded G20 will not happen
without a strong case being
made and accepted by gov-
ernments currently at the
table.
Similarly, much needed
reform of the IMF and World
Bank to benefit the Caribbean
appears remote.
At the Bank/Fund meet-
ings, the President of Guyana,
Bharat Jagdeo, as current
Chairman of CARICOM, led
a team of Prime Ministers
from the Bahamas, Barbados
and St Lucia to make a case to
the President of the World
Bank, Robert Zoellick, that
special attention should be
paid to relieving and restruc-
turing the debt of the highly
indebted, vulnerable, middle
income countries of the
region.
And, Barbados Prime Min-
ister, David Thompson, speak-
ing at the formal meeting was
emphatic that "limited access
to World Bank funding has
forced many middle income
Caribbean countries to bor-
row in the private capital mar-
kets at substantially higher
rates and shorter repayment
terms." Mr Thompson rec-
ommended that "further con-
sideration be given to this
issue of access by middle
income countries to financing
from the multilateral financial
institutions."
All of this is right. The
entire Caribbean region is fac-
ing a serious reversal of its
economic and social progress
arising from a number of fac-
tors. It is true that one of the
significant factors is poor eco-
nomic management and deci-
sion-making by some of their
governments, and this is a con-
cern that Caribbean countries
must themselves address.
The external factors are also
real. Not least among them is
the point raised by both
Jagdeo and Thompson that
the classification of Caribbean
states as middle-income coun-
tries disqualifies them from
concessionary financing from
the international financial
institutions and forces them
into the commercial market
for borrowing.
But, is anyone really lis-
tening? The moment for
effective reform of interna-
tional institutions is fast reced-
ing. Those industrialized
nations that pledged them-
selves to reform in the wake of
last year's financial crisis are


quickly retreating from their
pledges as their economies
begin to pick-up. The creation
of the G20 and the provision
of some additional resources
to the IMF appear now to be
the most they will do.
The new resources for the
IMF are insufficient and, in
any case, are not targeted to
middle income countries such
as those in the Caribbean;
they are focused on low
income countries and on big-
ger countries such as those in
Europe and Mexico.
A so-called Flexible Credit
Line has been introduced by
the IMF "for countries with
very strong fundamentals,
policies, and track records of
policy implementation."
Caribbean countries will not
qualify for among the criteria
are: a track record of steady
sovereign access to interna-
tional capital markets at
favourable terms, and sound
public finances, including a
sustainable public debt posi-
tion.
Why these criteria should
be relevant instead of ones
that recognize the need to
stimulate stagnant economies
and provide support for social
welfare programmes speaks
to the anachronistic role of
the IMF which still operates as
an agency of the victors of
World War II, despite all the
rhetoric.
As for the World Bank, the
Turkey meeting deferred any
increase in its capital until next
year. Therefore, the Bank is
faced with a limited lending
capacity, and in this scenario,
countries such as those in the
Caribbean that are designated
middle-income are not a pri-
ority.
Caribbean Heads of Gov-
ernment and Finance Minis-
ters raising their concerns with
Heads of the International
Financial Institutions and in
the formal sessions of the
Bank/Fund meetings was
absolutely right. They do not
get much chance to do so,


Caribbean countries have no
seat of their own on the
Boards of these bodies where
they are represented by Cana-
da. And, while Canada may
be a sympathetic ally, there is
no substitute for authentic
argument from high repre-
sentatives of Caribbean coun-
tries themselves.
In this connection, the
prospect of any reform of the
international financial institu-
tions that would benefit the
Caribbean in terms both of
representation at the highest
levels and change in IMF con-
ditionalities and World Bank
criteria for concessionary
financing, does not appear to
be on the cards anytime soon.
This is why Caribbean
countries should adopt a col-
lective and cohesive approach
to this issue devoting
resources to a joint and con-
tinuous diplomatic effort to
put their case forcefully to the
international community at
every opportunity.
It is well within the region's
capacity to establish a task
force of public sector and pri-
vate sector professionals,
under the umbrella of a spe-
cial unit of the CARICOM
Secretariat, to undertake this
task. The task force could be
mandated to produce docu-
mentation with all the neces-
sary rigour for presentation to
the Boards of the Interna-
tional Financial Institutions
and to influential govern-
ments. Much of this work has
already been done by a group
established last year under
SEE page eight


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ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE







PAGELOCA 8,WS TEDOT R13TOBR1,RB


FROM page eight
Caribbean Development Bank President,
Compton Bourne.
In turn, high regional representatives led
by one or other of available Heads of Gov-
ernment could be appointed to engage the
international community in an intense cam-
paign on the basis of a well-debated and
agreed CARICOM strategy.
The Commonwealth Heads of Govern-
ment Conference in Trinidad in November
presents a unique opportunity to make the
Caribbean case to five Heads of Government
of G20 countries - Australia, Britain, Canada,
India and South Africa. They may not get far


Who's listening?
with Australia and Britain, but India and
South Africa with whom they have close links,
and Canada with whom they share a com-
mon neighbourhood should listen.
The Commonwealth Secretariat has itself
done a great deal of work on small states and
reform of International Financial Institutions.
The November Commonwealth Summit,
therefore, is an excellent forum for the
Caribbean to advance a cohesive campaign.

* Responses and previous commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.corn


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A tribute to Sir Clement Maynard


FROM page six
enne Dupuch in 1956.
So if a reasonably bright
future was to be attained
through education, then the
vast majority of Bahamians
could only look forward to
rather bleak prospects.
We look back now so we
might understand the nature of
the grand enterprise to which
Sir Clement Maynard and his
comrades had committed them-
selves.
We look back so that we
might understand what moti-
vated this great Bahamian
throughout his long years of
public service.
And we look back not in
anger over past injustices but
in a spirit of joy and pride and
thanksgiving that Sir Clement
and his comrades were in the
end victorious.
It was a difficult and
demanding enterprise because,
as Frederick Douglass had
warned, "Power concedes noth-
ing without a demand. It never
did and it never will."
Sir Clement was among
those who boldly demanded
equality and he was in the
trenches with those who fought
for the rights of the Bahamian
people. He was not afraid to
struggle, to plow, to agitate, to
endure the thunder and light-
ning, and the awful roar of the
ocean.
The struggle was against an
unyielding and entrenched oli-
garchy, against a mighty colo-
nial power, against an electoral
system that had only a nodding
acquaintance with the princi-
ples of democracy, and, alas,
against the residual psycholog-
ical effects of a dehumanizing
slavery.
The scarring effects of gen-
erations of pernicious brain-
washing and distorted history
had to be confronted. The
greater challenge was, as Sir
Lynden Pindling once put it,
not the shackles on our feet,
but the shackles our minds.
In the face of such odds Sir
Clement and his comrades had
to make many sacrifices, endure
years of disappointment, and
spend countless days and nights
of arduous toil.
At the same time they had
to prepare themselves for the
day when some of them would
be called upon to represent
their people.


They educated themselves
and read everything remotely
related to their quest. And they
read some things they were not
supposed to read.
In those days Lady Maynard
was a very successful travel pro-
fessional with British Overseas
Airways Corporation so Sir
Clement had more opportuni-
ties to travel than the rest of
us. And whenever he did he
took our shopping list of books
that could not be found in The
Bahamas but were readily
available in the bookstores of
London.
It had obviously been decid-
ed that it would be too danger-
ous to allow the natives to read
certain books -- the same posi-
tion taken with regard to Sid-
ney Poitier's movie No Way
Out.
Among these were books
written by brilliant West Indian
intellectuals and revolutionaries
who were shaking the founda-
tions of the imperial powers;
among them were C. L. R.
James, Frantz Fanon and
George Padmore.
I believe that Lady Maynard
may be a relative of George
Padmore, who became an
adviser of President Kwame
Nkrumah of Ghana and chief
architect of his Pan African
Movement.
The struggle was, and again I
borrow from Frederick Dou-
glass, "exciting, agitating, all-
absorbing, and for the time
being, putting all other tumults
to silence. It must do this or it
does nothing."
Clement Trevelyan Maynard
was never one to do nothing.
He was a freedom fighter and a
passionate crusader for the
political, social and economic
emancipation of the Bahamian
people.
My Dear Friends:
Bear with me a few more
moments and forgive me for
the personal references I am
about to make.
Politics, that most noble of
professions, can sometimes,
unfortunately, descend into
something approaching sav-
agery. And it seems that there
is no greater fury in the political
arena as when colleagues turn
on each other.
So it was when some of us
who had been in the trenches
together in the struggle for the
second emancipation decided
that we could better serve our


country in a different political
organization.
It was then that Sir Clement
and I found ourselves on oppo-
site sides of the political divide.
But although we were no
longer political colleagues, we
remained good friends through-
out the years.
I believe Sir Clement was as
pleased as I am to see his
daughter, Allyson, and my son,
Dion, face each other across
the table in the Senate, but still
carrying on our families' tradi-
tion of friendship.
Sir Clement did not give in to
the temptation to punish and
ostracize his former comrades
for exercising the democratic
rights for which he and they
had fought so hard and sacri-
ficed so much.
Indeed, on more than one
occasion he demonstrated his
concern for the welfare and
professional advancement of
members of my family.
Sir Clement was also capa-
ble of a gesture that is seldom
seen in our political arena. I
remember when he invited me
to attend an event in connec-
tion with the development of
Bahamasair. Having regard to
the political climate in those
days, just extending that invi-
tation was notable enough.
But Sir Clement stunned the
mostly civil service and parti-
san crowd in the room when he
announced that he was follow-
ing on with the dream that his
friend Arthur Foulkes had ear-
lier pursued about the devel-
opment of a national airline.
Such political generosity is rare
indeed.
Now, as the curtain draws
across the stage of our living
memory and as those of us who
were privileged to take part in
the great drama disappear from
the scene, one by one, we must
leave the rest to history and,
we hope, as a goodly inheri-
tance for future generations of
Bahamians.
Lady Maynard, I believe you
know the depth of our sincerity
when I tell you that Joan and I,
and every member of my fami-
ly, share in your loss and extend
to you and all your family our
heartfelt condolences.
My friend Clement
Trevelyan Maynard was a free-
dom fighter, an accomplished
parliamentarian, a nation
builder and a great human
being. May he rest in peace.


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ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


lat it






THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009, PAGEEW9


- J- -I '
IN A survey plan obtained by The Tribune of the property, the
area encompasses some 30.697 acres.


Ex-Ministry chief in



new crown land row


FROM page one
land," he said.
The property to which
Mr Thompson's relatives
currently occupy is bor-
dered by two develop-
ments, namely Powell
Point Properties Limited,
and GAC Eleuthera Lim-
ited.
As a former PS in this
department, Mr Thomp-
son said he felt there was
no issue surrounding the
fact his relatives had


applied for a lease for the
15 acres and gave little
reasoning why the prop-
erties were applied for in
his brother and son's
names.
"No there is no concern
in my eyes. My brother
has been farming in Deep
Creek, Eleuthera, for a
number of years and he
applied for some land to
do some farming. It is not
a grant, it is a lease of
land. And anybody can
apply for leases of land,"


Mr Thompson said.
With the issue of crown
land sparking such an
uproar and debate
throughout the country,
the House of Assembly
has appointed a Select
Committee which will be
meeting again on Monday,
October 26, to investigate
all issues relating to the
disposition of crown land.
The committee has
heard from the former
director of Lands, Tex
Turnquest, who was


forced to resign from his
post after he failed to give
a sufficient answer to the
Prime Minister as to why
his relatives were able to
secure four beachfront
parcels in Exuma which
were later resold for hun-
dreds of thousands of dol-
lars in profit - each.
When the committee
reconvenes it will be hear-
ing from the relatives of
Mr Turnquest who
received these parcels of
crown land in Exuma.


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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


.^*%


f! '.7 i-


a^- i-~






PAGEOA 10,S TUESDYIOTOTBE 300RB


Nottage set to announce



bid for PLP leadership


Man ~~isrme


by caran


bete to death


FROM page one
October 21 National Con-
vention.
However, unlike Mr Moss
and Mr Mitchell, there is
already a growing criticism
of Dr Nottage even though
the MP has yet to formally
announce.
According to supporters
of the incumbent leader, it
would be a grave injustice
if Dr Nottage were to chal-
lenge Mr Christie as it was
the leader of the party who
recently welcomed the Bain
and Grant's Town MP back
into the fold of the party
after "years in the wilder-
ness" as the head of the
Coalition for Democratic
Reform (CDR).
However, strong support-
ers of the doctor counter
with claims that it was in
fact Dr Nottage who


encouraged former PLP
leader Sir Lynden Pindling
into allowing Mr Christie to
rejoin the party after he was
dismissed from the party in
1984.
Running as an indepen-


dent in 1987, Mr Christie
won his seat again and was
invited back into the party
three years later in 1990.
"When people criticise Dr
Nottage they like to refer-
ence that he left the party,


but people need to remem-
ber, so did Perry Christie.
"But what delegates need
to focus on more than who
has more history with the
party over the next is what
has Perry Christie done for
them lately - I won't even
ask what he did for them
while he was in office.
"I spoke to a taxi driver
the other day who said that
for the five years the PLP
were in he couldn't even get
one plate. Is that we are
going back to? So that is
why we are begging dele-
gates to not only vote for
themselves, but to vote with
their children in mind and
pick the best candidate who
they feel can provide a bet-
ter Bahamas for them," a
source said.
Attempts to reach Dr
Nottage for an official com-
ment were unsuccessful up
to press time last night.


FROM page one
them against a wall. The
Hyundai's occupants - a
group of men - jumped
out of car and attacked
the defenceless man,
beating him viciously, a
witness told The Tri-
bune.
It is believed the
Hyundai's passengers
were the same men the
two friends were arguing
with in front of the
eatery.
Police received a
report about a distur-
bance on Baillou Hill
Road at abut 3.30am.
Arriving on the scene,
officers found the man
who had been rammed
and beaten.
He was pronounced


dead on the scene by
medical emergency per-
sonnel.
His friend sustained a
slight injury to his hand
and has since been treat-
ed and discharged from
hospital.
Police have a man
from Hatchet Bay,
Eleuthera, helping them
with their inquiries.
Supt Elsworth Moss,
head of the Central
Detective Unit, said try-
ing to kill someone by
intentionally running
them over is an usual
murder method, but one
that he has seen "once
or twice" during his
career.
Saturday's murder
brings the homicide
count up to 69 for the
year so far.


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ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009


THE TRIBUNE






THE


TIiEI)DAY OCTOBER 13, 2009


S12& 4*ntratonlsp


Knowles and Roddick


Bahamas


to host


the CASI


lose to Bryan brothers baqu


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

The first-time connection
of Mark Knowles and
Andy Roddick played
pretty good together at
the China Open, but
they were simply no match for the
Bryan brothers in the men's doubles
final.
The American identical twins easi-
ly defeated the Bahamian-American
combo 6-4, 6-2 on Sunday in Beijing,
China, to capture their sixth tour-lev-
el title for the year.
"It was a little bit disappointing to
lose the final, but I think the Bryans
played great match. I think this was
probably the best match they played in
a couple of years," said Knowles in
an interview with The Tribune yes-
terday from Shanghai, China.
"We had some chances early. We
had a few break points on Bob's
serves, but they got up a break. We
had about two break points in that set
and wasn't able to get any and they
got back on top and they started to
play even better."
Just to show you how well they
played, the Bryans saved all three
break points and they converted on
the three they created as they went
on to post their first victory on Asian
soil in just 50 minutes.
"We were ready for a dog fight.
When you're got one of the best sin-
gles players of our era playing with


MARK KNOWLES ANDY RODDICK


one of the best doubles players of our
era, it's going to make a great match-
up," said Bob Bryan on the tourna-
ment's website.
"Mike and I came out focused and
played one of the best matches we've
played in a long time. I think we were
playing the best tennis we've played in
the past couple of years. We're look-
ing forward to Shanghai."


So is Knowles, who will get to be
reunited with his regular partner
Mahesh Bhupathi as they compete in
the Shanghai ATP Masters 1000 Tour-
nament.
Bhupathi is back after sitting out
the China Open to recover from a
groin injury he sustained while playing
in the Davis Cup for India last month.
"Even though it was disappointing


to have lost the final last week, it was
one of the more fun weeks I've had,"
Knowles reflected. "I had a chance to
play doubles with Andy Roddick, who
is one of the best players of our
decade.
"He gave me a lot of confidence,
so I'm really looking forward to play-
ing very well here in Shanghai. I think
Mahesh and I could do very well."
Knowles and Bhupathi are the No.3
seeds in Shanghai. They got a bye in
the first round and won't play until
Wednesday against the winner of the
match-up between Americans James
Blake and John Isner against Ameri-
can Travis Parrott and Filip Polasek.
"We're excited to pick up where we
left off," said Knowles, who last played
with Bhupathi at the US Open in
Flushing Meadows, New York, where
they lost in the final.
"Obviously Mahesh is healthy,
which is always a concern for him. But
I'm playing great tennis and so hope-
fully we can pull that together as a
team."
The top seeds in the tournament
are Knowles' former long-time partner
Daniel Nestor and his new partner
Nenad Zimonjic of Serbia. The Bryans
are the No.2 seeds.
Going into the tournament, the win-
ners will share $252,250 and earn 1,000
ATP computer points. The runners-up
will split $105,100 and collect 600. For
making the semifinals, the players will
divide $4,750 and receive 360 points
and for the quarter-final, they will get
$8,800 and 180 points.


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

A NUMBER of famous
people are expected to attend
the 2nd Caribbean Awards
Sports Icon (CASI) Founda-
tion awards banquet here next
month.
The gala event, to honour
some of the top sportsmen
and women in the Caribbean,
is set for November 15-20.
There will also be some
regional competition in a cou-
ple of sporting disciplines.
CASI regional director
Fred Sturrup announced
today that Jamaican Brigitte
Foster-Hylton has confirmed
her attendance at the ban-
quet, scheduled for Super-
Club Breezes on Friday,
November 20, as she is also
being nominated in the
female category.
Foster-Hylton was the gold
medallist in the women's
100m hurdles in August dur-
ing the 12th IAAF World
Championships in Athletics
in Berlin, Germany. She also
went on to win the same
event in the IAAF/VTB Bank
World Athletics Final in
Thessaloniki, Greece.
"I have contacted Bruce
James, who is the president
of the MVP Club and he
expressed thanks on behalf of
Foster-Hylton over the nom-
ination in the CASI Female
Athletes Category," Sturrup
said.
Sturrup, a journalist at the
Nassau Guardian, said Fos-
ter-Hylton's appearance at
the event will definitely make
it an even more special occa-
sion.
"I see Foster-Hylton as one
of the beacons of Caribbean
sports," Sturrup pointed out.
"Her world championship
effort at 34 stamps her as a
truly special athlete. I am
proud of her and would be

SEE page 12


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SHERMAN 'The Tank'
Williams knew he needed a
knockout to win his co-main
event against Manuel 'Dia-
mond Boy' Charr Saturday
night in Rostock, Germany.
He could have used some
help from the judges as well.
Charr, 25, stayed unbeaten
at the Stadhalle with a ten
round unanimous decision by
the scores of 98-94, 99-91 and
97-93 to improve to 13-0 with
six knockouts.
Williams, 37, dropped his
record to 34-11-2 with 19
knockouts, but he felt that the
decision should have gone the
other way because he "beat
him (Charr) to the pieces" in
the first five rounds.
During the fight, Williams
said he had Charr hanging on
for his life on the ropes on
three separate occasions, but
he just couldn't deliver the
big knockout punch that
could have floored the 6-foot,
3 1/2 native of Beirut,
Lebanon, who resides in
Hamburg.
"The results was a lot of
foolishness. Two judges gave
me four rounds and one judge
gave me one round," said
Williams in an interview with
The Tribune yesterday on his
return home.
"I'm just waiting for a copy
of the fight from the German
television station because I
know that everything that my
trainer taught me, I went out
there and did it."
Williams said he took the
fight to Charr and "beat him
to the body and threw the left
over-hand hook" as he main-
tained the aggressiveness in
every round.
"In the first five rounds, I
felt overly confident because
it felt so easy," he insisted. "I
rocked him in the second


SHERMAN WILLIAMS

round and I had him hurt, but
he was saved by the bell.
"In the third round, my cor-
ner just told me to stick to
what I've been doing and
midway in the third I caught
him with overhand right and a
left hook that buckled him.
He spoke some profanity in
English as I started to break
him down."
By the fourth round,
Williams said Charr started
to fight, but he never hurt
him. And by the sixth round,
Williams said he kept the
pressure on Charr and he was
in total control, so he was
really surprised at how the
judges scored the fight.
"I knew within my heart
that I had the fight won by
the seventh round," Williams
reflected. "In between rounds,
I told my corner that I had
the fight won.
"But they told me that I
have to remember that I'm in
Germany and so I had to con-
tinue to stick on the guy and
do to him what I did in the
first seven rounds and not let
up on him."
Once they got to the final
round, Williams said Charr
just simply went on the "bicy-
cle" as he ran away from him
and even though he managed


to cut off the ring ropes, he
was still able to get in some
more shots.
At the end of the fight,
Williams said he and Charr
had already taken off their
gloves and tape and had to
wait for at least 10-12 minutes
before the final announce-
ment was made.
Once they declared Charr
the winner, Williams said the
German was booed by his
own people because they all
felt that Williams should have
been declared the winner.
Williams' manager Si Stern
said he was pleased with the
way Williams fought, but they
were not too pleased with the
judges' decision.
"I hate to say it, but when
you're in someone's backyard
in Germany like that, you
either are going to knock the
guy out or you're not going
to get the decision," Stern
said.
"He lost the decision, but
he fought very well. He really
did."
As a result of his perfor-
mance, Stern said he's confi-
dent that he will be getting a
lot of calls for Williams to
fight again within the next two
months.
"I would love for him to
fight in the Bahamas, but I
think we should be getting
him a fight in the United
States," Stern said. "That way,
we won't have to worry about
him getting a decision."
Within 60 days, Stern said
Williams could be fighting
again because he wasn't hurt
at all in the fight. He said if he
can't get a fight by Decem-
ber, he should definitely be
on the next show his company
will be promoting in Key
West, Florida, in January.
Williams, the Grand
Bahamian native fighting out
of Vero Beach, Florida, said
he would definitely like a
rematch against Charr.


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ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


'Diamond Boy' Charr wins



by unanimous decision


m




PAGE 12, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS








consernoe 5-0 Denver Broncos keep
concerned


about


Manning's


left knee


By MICHAEL MAROT
AP Sports Writer

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) -
Peyton Manning's left knee
may be sore, but it doesn't
appear to be a serious prob-
lem for the undefeated Colts.
One day after Manning led
Indianapolis to a 31-9 victory
at Tennessee, coach Jim
Caldwell said he had not
received a doctor's report
regarding the knee, some-
thing he would have expected
had there been concerns.
"We have doctors that are
there all the time. They cer-
tainly have taken a look at
it," Caldwell said Monday.
Manning said he hurt the
knee when Titans defensive
end Kyle Vanden Bosch hit
him late in the first half. Van-
den Bosch was called for
roughing the passer, a penal-
ty that helped Indy (5-0) get
out from its own 7-yard line
as the Colts marched 93 yards
for a touchdown to score with
17 seconds left in the half.
The Titans (0-5) were
called twice for roughing the
passer on that series and
afterward, Manning was
asked if he had enticed the
officials to make those calls.
Manning denied it and said
he actually had been hurt.
"The first one, I've had that
hit before to the knee," Man-
ning said.
"I don't know if that vali-
dates it or not but I've got to
see the doctor after this and
get treatment, if that makes it
more valid, I guess. Obvious-
ly, when you plant that left
leg, it's in a vulnerable posi-
tion. I wear that brace for that
reason alone, for protecting
me there."
It's the same knee Manning
needed two surgeries on last
summer to remove infections.
He has since acknowledged
that missing all of training
camp and the preseason led
to a slower-than-usual start
in 2008.
The pain didn't appear to
inhibit Manning's perfor-
mance at Tennessee. He
returned in the second half,
finished 36 of 44 for 309 yards
with three touchdowns, one
interception and extended his
streak of consecutive 300-
yard games to five.
The NFL record, shared by
Steve Young, Kurt Warner
and Rich Gannon, is six.


showing they're for real


By EDDIE PELLS
AP National Writer


ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) -
Unlike the coach he learned from,
Josh McDaniels of the Broncos does-
n't shy from showing a little emotion.
His special teams assistant, Mike
Priefer, surely knows about it after
being on the wrong side of a pro-
tracted rant from the rookie coach.
Denver fans found out about it, too,
when McDaniels ran to the corner of
the stadium and started pumping his
fists and hugging it out with players to
celebrate Denver's latest surprise - a
20-17 overtime win over New Eng-
land.
"We work too hard not to enjoy
the wins," McDaniels said Monday.
"We work too hard to try to minimize
any success we might have on the
weekend."
Success is all McDaniels has
enjoyed so far this season, in leading
the Broncos to the NFL's most sur-
prising start.
The latest win, over his more stoic
mentor, Bill Belichick, gave the Bron-
cos a 5-0 record and McDaniels
responded by giving the Broncos
Monday off for the first time this sea-
son.
They'll be back in the film room
come Wednesday, and McDaniels
insisted he'll prove to the Broncos
that undefeated is not the same as
perfect. He'll break down all the mis-
takes from their latest win.
"We can coach better and play bet-
ter and they'll see that on film. I don't
have to create that," McDaniels said.
"No coach has to create it either.
They'll see it on the film, and that's
just the truth."
The brunt of the criticism will come
over Denver's special teams effort. A
missed field goal. A decision to run a
kickoff out from 6 yards deep in the
end zone. Two crucial penalties -
offsides and running into the punter


- both on fourth-and-short to keep a
New England drive alive. Kyle
Orton's tying, fourth-quarter, 98-yard
touchdown drive wouldn't have been
that long if not for those two penalties.
After Darrell Reid ran into the
punter, the TV cameras panned -
then held - on McDaniels and the
extended shout-down he was laying
on Priefer. Easy to laugh at the
episode now, because the Broncos
won.
"Sometimes on game day, it's better
to listen to what you're saying, than
how you're saying it," McDaniels said.
"And that would be my message to
the staff."
Errors and tantrums aside, Denver
is in rarified air. Only three other
teams have 5-0 records - and the
other four times the Broncos have
started this well, they've ended up in
the Super Bowl.
Nearly a third of the way into the
season, it is too late to attribute the
Broncos success to them sneaking up
on people, or a slate of games against
bad opponents. Yes, there were wins
over Cleveland and Oakland. But also
over New England and Dallas. Even
the season-opening Cincinnati win is
looking a lot better: The Bengals (4-1)
haven't lost since.
The Broncos have given up a grand
total of 43 points, four touchdowns
fewer than any team that's played five
games. They are ranked second in
yards allowed and have given up only
seven points in the second half -
none against the Pats.
"It's a lot of things," defensive coor-
dinator Mike Nolan said. "Sometimes
you go out in the second half, and the
offense plays so well, you're not on
the field."
The offense controlled the ball for
nearly 18 minutes in the third and
fourth quarters. Orton threw for 330
yards and two scores against New
England. He improved to 26-12 as an
NFL starter.


DENVER BRONCOS wide receiver Brandon Marshall breaks up a possible interception
by New England Patriots' Shawn Springs (29) in overtime in a game Sunday in Denver.
The Broncos won 20-17.
(AP Photo: Chris Schneider)


In the preseason, Orton threw a
left-handed interception against Seat-
tle that had Broncos fans on edge,
wondering if they were getting anoth-
er Jake Plummer, or worse. Since
then, though, Orton's story has mir-
rored his team's - one of steady
improvement. How many games does
he need to win before people start
recognizing him as legit?
"He tries to get better," McDaniels
said. "He knows he's not where he
could be if he continues to improve
and he sees there are plenty of things
he can fix and get better at."
Of course, five wins doesn't get any-
one into the playoffs and there are
plenty of roadblocks ahead. Teams
now have more film to look at to


break down McDaniels' tendencies.
And the schedule remains brutal.
Denver still has the Giants and Indi-
anapolis (both 5-0), Pittsburgh and
Baltimore (3-2), Philadelphia (3-1)
and a pair starting next week with the
Chargers (2-2), who were an odds-on
pick to win the AFC West.
One big difference between now
and when that schedule came out:
None of those teams can look at Den-
ver as a sure 'W' anymore.
Which is something else for
McDaniels to get excited about.
"I'm letting my hair down," he said
of his postgame celebration. "It's
more fun when you win. And when
you do, it's everything any coach
would want it to be."


Titans in nosedive at 0-5 with no end in sight


By TERESA M WALKER
AP Sports Writer

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP)
- The Tennessee Titans have
gone from a 10-0 start and the
NFL's best record to becom-
ing one of the league's last
winless teams.
The Titans (0-5) have
matched the winless start of
2006 and have the franchise-
worst 0-10 start by the 1984
Houston Oilers within sight. It
may only get worse with a
road trip to New England (3-
2) next Sunday.
This season sounds like a


broken record. Another
game, another loss. The same
words.
The Titans insist they need
to make a few plays, win a
game. Coach Jeff Fisher
insisted again Monday he's
sticking with Kerry Collins
because the veteran quarter-
back isn't the problem even
though he inserted backup
Vince Young late in Sunday
night's 31-9 loss to Indi-
anapolis.
His advice to those waiting
for a switch to Young as the
starter? Wait and see.
In the meantime, the


approach that has resulted in
seven straight losses since last
season remains the same.
Fisher told his Titans on Mon-
day they will win a lot of
games if they prepare and
practice just like last week.
"As far as a quick fix is con-
cerned, it's not there," Fisher
said. "You keep doing what
you're doing. You can go
back, you look at the games.
You correct them. You move
forward. They're profession-
als. They expect to do the
things we expect them to do.
Fine-tune some areas, one in
particular the run game. Get


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some people back healthy on
defense, and we'll be OK."
His Titans keep singing in
tune with Fisher - for now.
Linebacker Keith Bulluck
said after the Colts' loss that
they need a win immediate-
ly. Receiver Nate Washing-
ton thinks sticking together
and making plays are key.
Linebacker David Thorn-
ton couldn't have been more
optimistic Monday.
"Even though this start isn't
the script that we wrote out,
we're not going to lose faith.
This doesn't define us as a
players or as an organization.
We know we're winners.
We've just got to continue to
improve. Work hard and
hope things get better for us,"
Thornton said.
Well, the Titans are 3-9
since that 10-0 start.
They've all taken turns con-
tributing to losses through
turnovers, a defense ranked
next to last in yards passing
allowed, receivers dropping
passes and now Fisher said
the run game needs improv-
ing. Chris Johnson went into
the Colts game as the NFL's
leading rusher and was held
to just 34 yards on nine car-
ries.
They have rushed for only
four touchdowns this season
and have only one over the
past 10 quarters. That was
Collins' run in the fourth
quarter of a 37-17 loss at Jack-
sonville on Oct. 4. They had
to settle for three field goals


after failing to get closer than
the Colts 25.
"This is a collective effort.
We need to run the football
better. I would start there. We
run the football better, then
all those other things happen
down the field," Fisher said.
Fisher's biggest roster move
this season came Sunday night
with defensive end Jevon
Kearse a healthy scratch.
Kearse left the stadium, and
Fisher said he would not be
fined. A move may be needed
with the top three defensive
backs all hurt and Nick Harp-
er and Vincent Fuller both
out with broken right arms.
During the 0-5 start in 2005,
Young was made the starting
quarterback over Collins for a
team that rallied to finish 8-8.
Fisher was asked if he will
switch to Young once the
team is mathematically elimi-
nated. The coach said he did
not say he would make a
switch.
But a third straight playoff
berth, which has never hap-
pened under Fisher, isn't like-
ly.
Now more fans wore paper
bags to this latest loss, some-
thing not seen until now with
this franchise in Tennessee.
"They have every reason to
be frustrated as we are. This is
the National Football League.
We were a 13-3 team last
year. We had high expecta-
tions, and we've yet to win a
game," he said. "I understand
their frustrations."


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most delighted to see her in the banquet hall on November 20."
According to Sturrup, James has indicated that he's meeting
with Foster-Hylton about her schedule for the rest of the year
and her appearance in Nassau for the CASI awards banquet.
Foster-Hylton rebounded with her best season this year
after finishing sixth at the XXIX Olympic Games in Beijing,
China, and fifth in the World Athletics Final in Stuttgart, Ger-
many, last year.
During the banquet, CASI will also honour Sir Durward
'Sea Wolf' Knowles for his tremendous contribution to sailing.
Knowles has participated in a record Olympic Games, having
won a gold medal with Sloan Farrington in 1956 in Melbourne,
Australia, and a bronze with Cecil Cook in Tokyo, Japan, in
1964.
Also as part of the week of celebrations, CASI will also
stage games in softball, basketball and boxing against athletes
from throughout the Caribbean.
Last year, the CASI event was staged in Kingston, Jamaica,
where Sturrup was the guest speaker.


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TRIBNE PORT TUSDAY OCOBER13,2009PPAET1


Cross country athlete having


Dorsey Park

Boyz advance


stellar year for Park University o"echamp


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
ROMONA Nicolls is having a stel-
lar year for the Park University Pirates
Athletics.
For the second week, the senior
picked up a victory in Cross Country
with her latest feat coming on Satur-
day at the Haskell Invitational.
Nicolls, 21, clocked six minutes and
five seconds to win the race in
Lawrence, Kansas. The performance
came a week after she took the Park
University Invitational in 19:29.5 at
home in Platte City, Missouri.
In the process over the weekend,
Nicolls helped Park University to win
the team title over Benedictine Col-
lege, Peru State and Haskell.
Pirates' head coach Brian Renshaw
said he has been quite impressed with
the way Nicolls has been performing
all season long.
"I'm really impressed with where
she's at right now," he said. "She's
better than where she was in the past,
which was one of our goals, to
improve every year.


THE defending men's
champions Transfiguration
wasted very little time in win-
ning their second game in the
Baptist Sports Council's 2009
Olympia Morris-Evans Soft-
ball Classic.
Last Saturday at the Bail-
lou Hills Sports Complex,
Transfiguration stopped
Temple Fellowship 13-3 via
the ten-run rule.
It was a double dose of vic-
tory for Transfiguration, who
out-slugged Temple Fellow-
ship 8-3 in the 17-and-under
game.
Temple Fellowship, how-
ever, came back and took
their frustration out on
Ebenezer as they won their
co-ed game 9-4 in the final
match played.
Also, Golden Gates pulled
off a triple header over
Macedonia, including a
rematch of last year's co-ed
division.
Golden Gates avenged last
year's loss with an impres-
sive 14-0 rout over defend-
ing champions Macedonia in
the co-ed game.
Golden Gates men went
on to secure a 7-5 win over
Macedonia in the men's
game and in the 17-and-
under game, Golden Gates
nipped Macedonia 3-2.
In other games played,
Calvary Bible men's routed
St Mark's 15-5, Salem Union
men held off Mt Carey 8-7
and Salem also won 7-4 over
St Paul's co-ed.
Here's a brief summary of
the games played:
Transfiguration 13,
Temple Fellowship 3
Kirk Johnson had a per-
fect 3-for-3 day with two RBI


I


-e -


"Again, she is well ahead of where I
expected her to be."
Nicolls, the former track star for the
Jordan Prince Williams Falcons, will
be back in action next weekend when
Park University heads to Lamoni,
Iowa, to compete in the Graceland
Invite.
Renshaw said the event will be a
great opportunity for Nicolls to pre-
pare herself for the AMC Champi-
onships that is slated for November 7
in St Louis, Missouri.
"In the past, we didn't get a chance
to compete in this meet that we are
going into," Renshaw said. "We're in
a new conference, so we're just going
to have to wait and see how well she
can compete here."
From the conference champi-
onships, Nicolls will close out her cross
country season at the NAIA Champi-
onships that is scheduled to take place
on November 21 in Vancouver, Wash-
ington.
"She's done real well with every-
thing we've asked her to do," Ren-
shaw said. "She's stronger than she
was last year and in some of the races
she's ran, she done better times that


and two runs scored and Ed
Knowles was 3-for-4 with
three runs scored for Trans-
figuration.
Nelson Farrington got the
win over Alfred Munnings.
Golden Gates 14,
Macedonia 0 (Co-ed)
Vandette Smith was a per-
fect 3-for-3 day with a RBI,
scoring three runs and Renee
Davis was 2-for-3 with four
RBI, scoring twice for Gold-
en Gates.
Cardinal Gilbert got the
win over Ray Johnson.
Golden Gates 3,
Macedonia 2 (17-under)
Samuel Mullings and
Kayle Carey had back-to-
back RBI walk and single in
the bottom of the fifth as
Golden Gates came back to
secure the win.
Carey also got the win
over Michael Ingraham.
Quintin Williams had a
triple, scoring a run to lead
Macedonia.
Salem 8, Mt Carey 7
(Men)
Michael Armbrister had a
two-run homer and Cardwell
Taylor came up with a two-
run double to help Salem
come back from a 5-4 deficit
to pull off the win in the bot-
tom of the fourth.
Rodger Demeritte was the
winning pitcher and Bacchus
Rolle suffered the loss. Rolle
was also 2-for-3 with three
runs scored for Mt. Carey.
Salem 7, St Paul's 4
(Co-ed)
Rodger Demeritte and
Loliuna Bowleg were both
2-for-2, with a RBI, scoring
two runs and Denise Sears


Rea Est]aterlF


ROMONA NICOLLS


she's ever done before."
Renshaw said Park University has


as 2-for-3with a RBI and a
run scored for Salem.
Demeritte got the win over
Alex Taylor. Anthoniko Car-
roll was 2-for-3 with two RBI
and two runs scored for St
Paul's.
Temple Fellowship 9,
Ebenezer 4 (Co-ed)
Adrian Major went 2-for-4
with two RBI and two runs
scored and Angelo Butler
had one hit, scoring two runs
to lead Temple Fellowship.
Wayde Bain was the win-
ning pitcher and Frankie
White suffered the loss.
Patrick Pennerman had a
solo home run and
Johnathan McKenzie added
a two-run shot for the losers.
Transfiguration 8, Temple
Fellowship 3 (17-Under)
Kenton Bowe was 2-for-2
with two RBI and two runs
scored and Lamont Bullard
was 2-for-3 with a RBI and
two runs scored for Trans-
figuration.
Aaron Cash got the win
over Zach Rahming. Brad-
shaw White was 2-for-3 with
a RBI for Temple Fellow-
ship.
Golden Gates 7,
Macedonia 5 (Men)
Ramon Johnson was 2-for-
3 with two RBI; Ken Wood
Jr. 3-for-3 with two runs and
Eugene Pratt 2-for-3 with a
RBI and two runs for Gold-
en Gates.
Cardinal Gilbert got the
win over Burlington Moss.
Moss was 2-for-3 with two
runs and Jatero Rahming
was 2-for-2 with a run for
Macedonia.
Calvary Bible 15, St.
Mark's 5 (Men): Trevere
Saunders had a pair of hits
with as many RBI and runs
scored, while Harcourt
McCoy scored four times
and Shawn Moree came
home three times to lead
Calvary Bible.
Basil Miller got the win
over Robert Moss. Sean
Greenslade was 2-for-3 with
three RBI and a run scored
for St Mark's.
* The BSC is scheduled to
continue its season on Sat-
urday at the Baillou Hills
Sports Complex with the fol-
lowing games on tap:
- Field One - 10 am: Gold-
en Gates vs Temple Fellow-
ship (17); 11 am: Temple Fel-
lowship vs St. Paul's (Co-ed);
Noon: Calvary Deliverance
vs Mt. Carey (M); 1 pm: Cal-
vary Bible vs Temple Fel-
lowship (M); 2 pm: Mt.
Carey vs St. Paul's (M).
- Field Two - 10 am: Mace-


donia vs Salem (Co-ed); 11
am: Golden Gates vs St.
Mark's (Co-ed); Noon:
Salem vs Macedonia (M); 1
pm St. Paul's vs Golden
Gates (M); 2 pm: Calvary
Deliverance vs Salem (M).
- Field Three - 10 am:


been very pleased with Nicolls' per-
formances over the years. And as she
prepares to graduate next year, he
said the Pirates' athletic team will cer-
tainly miss her presence.
"She's been a good girl to have on
the team," he said.
Nicolls, who was unavailable for
comment, is one four Bahamians who
are on athletic scholarships with the
Pirates' track team at Park University.
The others gearing up for the track
and field season are Kanisha Murray
and Alexionette Robinson, sopho-
more sprinters and middle distance
runners from Jordan Prince Williams
and Lexi Wilson, a sophomore dis-
tance runners from Westminister Col-
lege.
Park University, however, doesn't
have any male athletes on scholarship
as yet and Renshaw said they will def-
initely be looking at acquiring a few in
the future.
"If they're anything like Romona
or the other athletes that we have
here, we will be happy to enroll them,"
Renshaw said. "We have been very
pleased with all of the athletes we
have gotten from the Bahamas."


Transfiguration vs Faith
United (17); 11 am: Faith
United vs Ebenezer (Co-ed);
Noon Transfiguration vs
Faith United (M); 1 pm
Macedonia vs Faith United
(17); 2 pm St. Mark's vs
Transfiguration (M)


AFTER taking a break
for the Discovery Day holi-
day weekend, the New
Providence Softball Associ-
ation is scheduled to
resume its best-of-five play-
off series tonight on the
Banker's Field at the Bail-
lou Hills Sporting Complex.
In the women's opener at
7pm, the Pineapple Air
Wildcats will be out to
close out their series
against the Boomer G
Swingers.
The Wildcats lead that
series 2-0. If necessary, the
fourth game will be played
on Thursday.
Feature
And in the men's feature
contest at 8:30pm, the
defending champions Com-
mando Security Truckers
will also be out to complete
their series against the
Pricewaterhouse Stingrays.
The Truckers are up 2-0.
Then on Wednesday, last
year's runners-up Proper
Care Pool Lady Sharks will
play game four of their
series against the defending
champions Sigma Brack-
ettes.
The Lady Sharks hold a
2-1 advantage in the series.
Meanwhile, in the other
hal f the men's Brack-
ettes, the pennant winning
Heavy Lift Dorsey Park
Boyz have swept past the
Robin Hood Hitmen in
three straight games.
The Dorsey Park Boyz
have advanced to the
NPSA best-of-seven cham-
pionship series and are now
waiting for the winner of
the match-up between the
Truckers and the Stingrays.


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Transfiguration stops Temple



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TRIBUNE SPORTS


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009, PAGE 13


' jt"ijhm~e e





IPAGEN14,TTUESRDAOCOEO]1,L 20STIORUESPOT


UNDER POURING RAIN, Argentina's Lionel Messi (left) fights for the ball with Peru's Walter Vilchez and Reiner Torres (8) during a 2010 World Cup qualifying
soccer match in Buenos Aires, Saturday, October 10, 2009. Argentina won 2-1.
(AP Photo: Eduardo Di Baia)




Three teams fighting for


By STEPHEN WADE
AP Sports Writer


BUENOS AIRES,
Argentina (AP) - Three
South American teams have
already earned berths in next
year's World Cup in South
Africa, and three more will
have their shot at making the
two remaining spots in the
final round of qualifying
Wednesday.
Brazil, Paraguay and Chile
have qualified for the World
Cup, leaving Argentina,
Uruguay and Ecuador to
decide which team finishes
fourth - the last automatic


qualifying spot from the
region. The fifth-place finish-
er earns a playoff with the No.
4 team from North and Cen-
tral America and the
Caribbean for another berth.
The opponent will be either
Costa Rica or Honduras.
Going into Wednesday,
Argentina has 25 points,
Uruguay 24 and Ecuador 23.
Argentina plays at Uruguay
and Ecuador plays at Chile.
In three other matches that
have no bearing on World
Cup berths, it's Peru vs.
Bolivia, Brazil vs. Venezuela
and Paraguay vs. Colombia.
Argentina is in the best


WCup berths


position, thanks to Saturday's
2-1 victory over Peru in which
Martin Palermo scored in the
third minute of injury time -
in a driving rainstorm - to
give the underperforming
regional powerhouse victory
at River Plate's Monumental
stadium.
Worst
The worst team in South
America, Peru has won only
two of 17 qualifiers.
Palermo, who entered as a
second-half substitute, may
have saved Argentina from
missing its first World Cup


since 1970.
"A Miracle Named Paler-
mo," read the headline in
Sunday's La Nacion newspa-
per.
Palermo celebrated the
goal by pulling off his shirt
and raising his arms skyward
in the downpour. At the same
moment, embattled Argenti-
na coach Diego Maradona
dived headfirst into the soak-
ing wet pitch - as if he'd just
scored the goal.
"This lets us go to Montev-
ideo at bit more relaxed," said
Barcelona striker Lionel Mes-
si.
But Palermo warned
against any complacency.
"I have faith. We've strug-
gled right to the end, and we
still have another step to
take," Palermo said. "We
can't relax. We have to give
our fellow Argentines the
happiness of going to the
World Cup."
If Argentina beats Uruguay
at Montevideo on Wednes-
day, the two-time champions
advance to the World Cup.
The same for Uruguay. A vic-
tory and it goes to South
Africa.
For Argentina, a draw
might be enough to finish


fourth, and it can even lose
and still have a shot at the
playoff spot.
For Uruguay, a draw would
only be enough for a possible
finish in fifth place - and a
playoff in November.
Uruguay might even reach
the playoff with a loss.
Ecuador is the wild card.
If Ecuador beats Chile, it
will finish at least fifth and
earn a playoff. Ecuador could
also get the automatic spot.
For that to happen, Argentina
and Uruguay have to draw
and Ecuador has to beat Chile
by at least five goals.
The playoff is set for Nov.
14 and 18. The first leg will
be in Central America with
the second leg in South
America.
"We know it will be diffi-
cult," Ecuador captain Ivan
Hurtado said. "But it's not
impossible. We'll be facing a
team (Chile) that's already
qualified and they won't give
us a thing. But it all depends
on us."
Added goalkeeper Marcelo
Elizaga, who was born in
Argentina but is a national-
ized Ecuadorian: "Everyone
has to be united in the match
against Chile."


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MLS

explores

playing

indoors

to shift

schedule

By ROB HARRIS
AP Sports Writer
LONDON (AP) - Major
League Soccer is exploring
how to align itself closer to
the sport's international cal-
endar to show it is listening
to FIFA president Sepp Blat-
ter as the United States bids
to host the World Cup.
Blatter has expressed con-
cern about the inability of the
MLS to rival the top Euro-
pean league since its incep-
tion in 1996, two years after
the Americans last hosted the
World Cup.
The U.S. is bidding to win
the right to host either the
2018 or '22 World Cup at the
vote in December 2010.
While accepting that stan-
dards are rising in the MLS,
Blatter has stated regularly
that it needs to switch to
Europe's August-May sched-
ule, rather than its current
March-October to entice top
players.
"We have to manage our
league in a way so that we can
continue this careful growth,
but at the same time satisfy
the requests and - in many
cases - the requirements of
the world governing body,"
MLS commissioner Don Gar-
ber told The Associated
Press. "FIFA's goal is to work
with us to turn this country
into valuable soccer nation
and a passionate one. In order
to do that our league does
need to be closer to the sport
internationally."
Key to achieving that will
be building more stadiums
with roofs to protect against
the worst of the American
winter, Garber said.
"We play across a continent
of 300 million people, across
three time zones and weather
that varies from zero to 30
degrees (celsius) at any giv-
en point," Garber said. "It's
impossible to think we can be
playing games in December
outdoor in Toronto or Boston
or New York or Denver
where it can be well below
freezing with a foot of snow
on the ground. So we have to
evolve to get closer to that
calendar.
"Perhaps we have to start
thinking about roofed stadi-
ums at some point. But do we
have to have a fan base that is
developed enough to be
immune to the weather, like
they do for American foot-
ball where they will come out
to watch a game regardless of
the climate? We are not at
that point yet, but we hope
to achieve that at some
point."
The current schedule does
help the league's top player:
David Beckham. The Los
Angeles midfielder was able
to negotiate a loan move to
AC Milan from January to
May, with the return to a top
European club keeping him
in coach Fabio Capello's Eng-
land plans.
Capello has stated that if
Beckham does not secure
another European loan in
January ahead of the World
Cup - and he is negotiating
with Milan at the moment -
then the former England cap-
tain would not go to South
Africa in June.


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story


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PAGE 14, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS






THECA TRIBUN TUSDY OCOEI3 09AE1


BAIC's Domestic Investment
Officer for Exuma, former
Administrator Everette Hart
(right) addresses the North
Andros farmers/buyers meet-
ing. Pictured from left are
North Andros Administrator
Dr Huntley Christie, BAIC
Executive Chairman Edison
M Key, and Assistant Gener-


I T al Manager Arnold Dorsett.

EFFORTS TO ONCE AGAIN MAKE EXUMA
THE 'ONION CAPITAL OF THE BAHAMAS'


EXUMA will one day pro-
duce top quality onions in suffi-
cient quantities, vowed Everette
Hart, the island's new domestic
investment officer for the
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation.
"I have taken on this position
because I want to help," said
retired senior administrator Mr
Hart. "And the chairman (Edi-
son Key) and his team are seri-
ous about agriculture."
Mr Hart and a delegation
from the Exuma Farmers Asso-
ciation toured North Andros
farm facilities and participated in
a lively farmers meeting with
leading Nassau buyers last
weekend in Nicholls Town.
The team included the asso-
ciation's president Althea Fer-
guson, vice president Dorcas
Shuttleworth, treasurer Levi
Rolle, and member Alvin
Clarke.
"I know Mr Key very well
and I know of his interest in
agriculture," said Mr Hart. "He
is really trying to inspire the
nation toward food security and
I want to see him succeed. In
whatever way I can contribute
to this success then I will do
that."
He explained that for years
the assistance coming from of
the Ministry of Agriculture "has
not been what was expected.
"I think what it did, as
opposed to encouraging people,
it has been discouraging people.
The only evidence of any assis-
tance in agriculture right now
looks like it is coming from
BAIC, thanks to Mr Key."
Farmers on Exuma, once the
onion capital of the Bahamas,
have been reduced to small-
scale growing of mainly house-
hold staples.
"That is so for a number of
reasons," said Mr Hart. "Let's
take land clearing. We need a
lot of that and the amount of
money that is sent down for land
clearing is very small, and you
cannot do very much with it."


land in Exuma now is in the cen-
tre of the land," said Mr Hart.
"But those who want to farm
cannot get to it. We need farm
roads."
Exuma's L N Coakley High
School was recently given basic
greenhouse equipment through
the Food and Agriculture
Organisation's Initiative on
Soaring Food Prices.


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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE




TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009, PAGE 17


Ministry supports junior golf camp
The Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture has
endorsed the 2009 Geor-
gette Rolle Junior Golf
Mentoring Camp.
Slated for December 16-
18 at the Baillou Hills
Sports Complex, it is free
of charge and offers golfers
6-18 years the opportunity
to be introduced to the
sport.
Interested persons may
call 361-6841 or contact the
Bahamas Golf Federation PICTURED ABOVE, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannis-
at the driving range at the ter speaks at the press conference announcing the event. Also pictured is
Complex. Bahamian woman pro golfer Georgette Rolle who hosts the event.


Name: Fill in the blanks: Hunt's are the Tomato
EX E TS
Address: Circle the three items on your store receipts) dated after
October 5,2009. Fill out entry form and attach store receipt and
Phone: drop into entry boxes in participating stores or at The d'Albenas
Agency in Palmdale. Contest ends November 13, 2009


FUEL SURCHARGE 2006


-2009


CONSERVATION PAYS -Lower consumption means lower bills.

The Fuel Surcharge for October 2009 is 1 2,51 cents per unit as compared to 11,~24 cents per unit for September 2009,





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JUN JUL


AUG SEPT OCT NOV


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


DEC


THE TRIBUNE









SReport: North


Korea fires five

short-range

missiles
SEOUL, South Korea
NORTH KOREA test-
launched five short-range
missiles Monday, reports
said, in what analysts said
was an attempt to improve
its bargaining position
ahead of possible talks with
the United States, accord-
ing to Associated Press.
North Korea has recently
reached out to the U.S. and
South Korea following
months of tension over its
nuclear and missile tests
earlier this year. Leader
Kim Jong Il told visiting
Chinese Premier Wen
Jiabao last week that his
government might return to
stalled six-nation negotia-
tions on its nuclear program
depending on the outcome
of direct talks it seeks with
the United States.
Washington has said it is
considering holding talks
with North Korea as part of
efforts to restart the six-par-
ty negotiations.
The missile launches off
North Korea's east coast
were the first by the com-
munist nation since it test-
fired seven missiles in early
July, South Korea's Yon-
hap news agency reported.
Yonhap, citing a South
Korean official it did not
identify, said the KN-02
surface-to-surface missiles
were fired from mobile
launch pads and had a
range of up to 75 miles (120
kilometers). It said North
Korea launched two mis-
siles in the morning and
three more in the after-
noon.
South Korea's Defense
Ministry and National Intel-
ligence Service - the coun-
try's main spy agency -
said they could not confirm
the reports.
U.S. Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton
said in Belfast on Monday
that American efforts to
resume the nuclear talks
with North Korea will pro-
ceed despite the new tests.


DIRECTOR GENERAL of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Ambassador Joshua Sears participated in a Commonwealth human rights seminar held September 29 to 30,
in Lilongwe, Malawi. Mr. Sears is pictured in the middle row, fifth from left, with other participants.




DG Sears at Commonwealth




Human Rights seminar


DIRECTOR General of
the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs Ambassador Joshua
Sears was invited by the
Commonwealth Secretari-
at Human Rights Unit, as
one of the presenters at the
Commonwealth Seminar
on Universal Periodic
Review of Human Rights,
held September 29 to 30, at
Lilongwe, Malawi.
The seminar was held for
all Commonwealth coun-
tries reporting to the
Human Rights Council in
2010 - Grenada, Malawi,
Kenya, Lesotho, Gambia,
Maldives and Kiribati.
The Bahamas was among
the first set of Common-
wealth countries to be
reviewed by the Human
Rights Council and the
Commonwealth Secretari-
at thought that its experi-
ence would be useful to
other countries as they pre-


pare for their review.
Ambassador Sears was
invited to share The
Bahamas' experience with
the states schedule to
report, the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs said.
He was a member of The
Bahamas delegation to the
Third Session of the Uni-
versal Periodic Review
Working Group in Decem-
ber 2008, during which The
Bahamas Human Rights
Record was reviewed.

Delegation

He also led The Bahamas
delegation to the Tenth
Session of the Human
Rights Council in March
this year, when the Report
of The Bahamas was for-
mally adopted.
The Universal Periodic
Review is a unique process


which involves a review of
the Human Rights record
of all 192 United Nations
Member-States, once every
four years and is based on
the concept of equal treat-
ment for all countries.
The process provided an
opportunity for all states to
declare what actions they
have taken to improve the
human rights situations in
their countries and to over-
come challenges to the
enjoyment of human rights.
The objectives of the
seminar were to:
Share technical knowl-
edge about the procedure
and modalities of the Uni-
versal Periodic Review
process;


Build the capacity and
confidence of states to
engage and maximise the
outcomes of their engage-
ment in the process;
Build stakeholder partic-
ipation in the process; and

Review

Learn lessons from states
and stakeholders that have
undergone the review in
Geneva.
The Commonwealth
comprises 53 countries.
Its members are united
on the beliefs of democra-
cy, freedom, peace, the rule
of law and the opportunity
for all.


LONDON ___ __


IN THE latest blow to Gordon
Brown's beleaguered leadership,
the British prime minister is being
forced to repay over 12,000 pounds
($19,000) in disputed claims follow-
ing an audit into how British law-
makers spent public money,
according to Associated Press.
Dozens of lawmakers received
letters Monday from Thomas Legg
- who Brown appointed to audit
expense claims - asking them to
repay the money or offer further
explanations for why they claimed


Legg was chosen to rewrite the n
spending rules in an effort to quell
public outrage over lawmakers' Gjojn jjIw(
greed for taxpayer funds.
Brown's office confirmed Monday that he will pay back some
money claimed for a maid and for decorating, but said Legg had
told Brown he had not broken any rules.
"Mr. Brown will pay in full," his office said.
Brown has urged all lawmakers to repay the excessive claims
identified by Legg.
Details of legislators' claims, which were leaked to a newspa-
per earlier this year and later released publicly, revealed how
scores of politicians made inappropriate demands or manipulat-
ed housing allowance rules.
Some used public funds to renovate homes that were later
sold for substantial profits or bought items that included porno-
graphic movies, horse manure and an ornamental duck house.
Legg has proposed that lawmakers claim no more than 2,000
pounds ($3,155) per year for cleaning, or 1,000 pounds ($1,580)
for gardening.
He has also suggested that lawmakers repay expenses that
previously exceeded those limits - even though they had not
broken any laws in making those claims.
Those new guidelines put Brown's expenses 12,415 pounds
($19,597) over the limit.
The prime minister suggested that repaying the money was an
important step.
"We have got to clean up politics, we have got to consign the
old discredited system to the dustbin of history, so this is part of
the process," Brown told GMTV television.
About 175 legislators have already repaid about 300,000
pounds ($475,000) since the details of their expense claims were
made public.
But some legislators have suggested they could refuse, or
challenge the audit in Britain's courts.
Former Home Secretary Jacqui Smith on Monday made a
personal apology to the House of Commons over her excessive
claims, after a report into her conduct - the first inquiry to be
completed into an individual lawmaker's claim - found she had
breached rules.
Smith became the most high-profile casualty of the expenses
scandal when she quit in June. Leaked documents exposed that
she'd inadvertently included two pornographic movies ordered
by her husband in an expenses claim.
Dozens of lawmakers have already resigned in the scandal.
One study suggested that up to 300 of parliament's 646 lawmak-
ers could lose their jobs in the next election - although some of
that could be attributed to the widely expected rout of Brown's
ruling Labour Party by the opposition Conservatives.


WIFE" a * a







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Company:

Telephone # Home:___

Fox A


first Name:_______

Title:

Work:

P.O.Box:


Exact Street Address:


House # _House Name:


House Colour:


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SUBS RIET IiVERY OF THE TRIBUNE AND WAKE UP TO THE BEST NEWSPAPER FOR YOU!!


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNE




)US1


SS


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009


IFCIO obsiescrbueedane


NASSAU
(242) 356-9801
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Arawak port beats Clifton




on environmental impact


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


Arawak Cay was
ranked next-to-bot-
tom out of seven
potential sites for
New Providence's
new commercial shipping port by a
previously undisclosed 2005 report,
yet the main factor behind the down-
grade was that the location did not
fit into the then-Christie govern-
ment's master planning vision for
the island.
The Environmental Impact
Assessment (EIA) study for the pro-


* 2005 report that ranked Ingraham administration's preferred Nassau
commercial shipping facilities site next-to-bottom needs placing in context
* Rating came due to Arawak Cay port not fitting in with Christie government's master plan vision
* 440% 'explosive growth' projected for cruise passenger arrivals over 15 years to 2015
* 'Ideal port facility' consists of 607,000 square metres or 150 acres, says EIA evaluators


posed new commercial shipping
facilities, conducted by Coastal Sys-
tems International yet never pub-
lished by the former PLP govern-
ment, actually ranked Arawak Cay


ahead of the Christie administra-
tion's preferred southwestern port
site when it came to minimising envi-
ronmental impact.
Based on the criteria employed


by Coastal Systems' assessment
team, Arawak Cay scored 12 points,
compared to the southwestern port
site's 10 points, on environmental
impact. Where Arawak Cay rated


especially high was on the minimal
impact to the terrestrial environment
and water quality.
SEE page 8B


Liquidator's Clearing House

'long, drawn wait leaves firms

out fee battle' in 'prehistoric' era


* Liquidator of collapsed
$25m broker/dealer took
11% cut after objections to
size of bills, with attorneys
getting 20.83% discount
* Claims time would have
been better spent returning
90% of client assets to them
* Clients object to $43,000
coming out of security
account to cover attorney
appearance fees

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE liquidator of a former
Bahamas-based broker/dealer
has alleged that he became
involved in "a long, drawn-
out battle" over his costs that
resulted in him and his attor-
neys taking an 11 per cent and
20.83 per cent fee cut respec-
tively, after an attorney rep-
resenting several of the com-
pany's clients objected to the
payments being claimed.
Anthony Kikivarakis, the
Deloitte & Touche
(Bahamas) partner and
accountant overseeing the
court-supervised liquidation
of Caledonia Corporate Man-
agement, alleged in his third
report to the Supreme Court
that the time taken to resolve
payment of his fees and
expenses could have been bet-
ter spent on returning assets
to the broker/dealer's clients.
The report also detailed
how Caledonia clients, and
the committee representing
their interests, objected to the
SEE page 7B


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE failure to implement
an Automated Clearing
House (ACH) to-date has
made "doing business in this
country so prehistoric", a for-
mer Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce president has
argued, the nation's payments
and settlements system run-
ning exactly "like it was 100
years ago".
Criticising the Bahamian
commercial banking sector
for its failure to so far deliver
an electronic payments sys-
tem in the shape of an ACH,
Dionisio D'Aguilar, who is
also Superwash's president,
said this was effectively hold-
ing up the rest of the business
community, especially when
it came to rolling out a wide-


spread e-commerce platform.
"It's good for every single
business," Mr D'Aguilar said
of the ACH. "Putting in place
an ACH is the first step to a

SEE page 6B


Central Bank keeps


BEC power
niont nnnnnanto


pil ll UpII puIII
loan loss treatment shock' at official
. ...... shocl' at official


in IFRS line


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Central Bank of the
Bahamas is requiring its
financial institution
licensees to flow any differ-
ence between its 1 per cent
loan loss provision require-
ment and those of Interna-
tional Accounting Standard
(IAS) 39 through the bal-
ance sheet, not the income
statement, to maintain com-
pliance with International
Financial Reporting Stan-
dards (IFRS).
In its latest quarterly mes-
sage to the heads of
Bahamas-based financial
institutions, the Central
Bank moved to "reiterate"
its provisioning policy
stance, where it wanted
banks to maintain general
provisions of 1 per cent
against their on and off-bal-
ance sheet credit and loan


p. . l . I
However, the banking
industry regulator acknowl-
edged that maintaining loan
loss provisions as a per-
centage of a bank's total
outstanding credit portfolio
would not be consistent
with IFRS, and not neces-
sarily in-line with IAS 39.
"Where firms are com-
pelled to comply with a pro-
visioning policy at variance
with IFRS, firms will be
required to appropriate the
difference between the loan
loss provisions calculated in
accordance with IAS 39 and
our 1 per cent general pro-
visions requirement into a
restricted reserve; any dis-
tribution from this reserve
will be subject to the Cen-
tral Bank's prior approval,"
the regulator said.

SEE page 2B


'silence'

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
OPPONENTS of BEC's
$105 million Wilson City pow-
er plant are "shocked that this
government in the sunshine
is mute and silent" on the per-
mits/approvals already issued
for the project, the group's
attorney has told Tribune
Business, adding that they
were setting up a non-gov-
ernmental organisation
(NGO) to formalise their
protest.
Fred Smith, the Callenders
& Co attorney and partner,
who said the group he is rep-
resenting now numbers more
than the previously reported
17, told Tribune Business
that the only reply received
to date from the numerous
government ministries and

SEE page 4B


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Bahamas urged: 'Take clear stand' over tax evasion


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


A LEADING global accounting
body has urged the Bahamas and
other international financial centres
to "take a clear public stand" against
all forms of tax evasion and adhere
to the highest regulatory and trans-
parency standards, in return for the
G-20/OECD accepting their right to
exist and participate in the global
economy.
The Association of Chartered Cer-
tified Accountants (ACCA), in its
policy paper entitled Reassessing
Tax in a Global Environment, urged
international financial centres to fol-
low the Channel Islands' lead and,
either individually or collectively,
"take a clear public stand against


tax evasion in all its forms".
Pointing out that tax evasion was a
crime that could not be justified,
ACCA added: "Perceptions are all-
important, and any suggestion that
low-tax jurisdictions are indifferent
to tax evasion will be a red rag to the
G-20 bulls.
"Havens should avoid this charge
by demonstrating transparent self-
policing so that all can see that they
adhere to the highest standards. A
system of self-assessing their
regimes, and proactively seeking to
root out any institutions and indi-
viduals who are using their jurisdic-
tion to avoid tax in another jurisdic-
tion would be a step in the right
direction."
When it came to Tax Information
Exchange, ACCA said the Bahamas


and other international financial cen-
tres "need to volunteer as much
information as possible to head off
the threat of a prescriptive approach
being taken by" the G-20/OECD in
demanding information on their tax-
payers they suspect may be hiding
money in these countries.

Economy

"But in return for this openness
and self-policing, the rest of the glob-
al economy needs fully to accept
these jurisdictions and not act out
of pique at efficient low-tax
economies," ACCA warned.
"There is a strong suspicion that
the attack by leading nations on tax
havens )most of which are smaller,
developing nations) is driven by dis-


like of the downward pressure on
tax rates that they engender."
And ACCA said that while "some
offshore centres have not helped
themselves by pursuing the letter,
rather than the spirit of internation-
ally-agreed rules aiming to increase
transparency", these nations could
also point to the credit crisis having
origins in regulatory mishaps in off-
shore centres.
This problem, ACCA added, had
become more acute as tax yields and
bases crumbles under the weight of
the global recession. However, tax
competition created by the likes of
the Bahamas "puts an onus on gov-
ernments to be disciplined and not to
indulge in wasteful public spending".
The Bahamas, having signed its
first TIEA with the US in January


2002, concluded its second and third
with fellow international financial
centres San Marino and Monaco,
thus leaving it requiring nine more
before year-end to meet G-
20/OECD requirements.
The Government previously stat-
ed it had started negotiations on tax
information exchange agreements
with Canada, the United Kingdom,
Australia, Spain, Germany, France,
Turkey and the Nordic countries
(Norway, Sweden, Finland, Den-
mark, Iceland, Greenland the Faroe
Islands).
The Bahamas added that it had
also initiated discussions on tax
information exchange agreements
with China, and proposed to do the
same with Brazil, Mexico, Japan,
Ireland, South Africa and India.


Central Bank keeps loan loss treatment in IFRS line


FROM page 1B

"An appropriate note in the
firm's financial statement to
the effect that the 1 per cent
general provision is a require-
ment set by the Central Bank
may also be included to
explain the variance with
IFRS."
Translating, Raymond
Winder, managing partner at
Deloitte & Touche
(Bahamas), said IFRS and
IAS 39 had "certain provi-


sions" that dictated the
accounting treatment of loan
loss provisions for a bank's
credit portfolio.
In this instance, he said the
Central Bank was requiring a
1 per cent loan loss provision
"across-the-board", regard-
less of the status of a bank's
credit portfolio. Some banks,
he explained, because their
loans were fully secured col-
lateral, did not need a 1 per
cent provision.


"The Central Bank is say-
ing that if you do not need a 1
per cent provision based on
IAS, those added provisions
do not have to go through the
income statement," Mr
Winder explained. "To be in-
line with IFRS and the Cen-
tral Bank, don't take it
through the income statement
but the balance sheet.
"The Central Bank is try-
ing to standardise what they
require of all the financial


institutions, taking into con-
sideration all the factors going
on. Those requirements by
the regulators don't always
match up with international
standards for accounting pur-
poses."
In its message to Bahamas-
based bank and trust compa-
nies, the Central Bank said:
"We expect firms to adopt a
forward-looking posture and
maintain general provisions,
based on their historical loss


experience and their assess-
ment of future economic
trends in the markets in which
they operate, and increase
specific provisions when inci-
dences of impairment become
evident.
"As such, specific provi-
sions must reflect the expect-
ed loss on any loan facility,
while the general provision
account is expected to
increase to reflect portfolio
growth and/or evidence of


deterioration in credit quality
through the economic cycle.
"Given the current difficult
economic environment, the
appropriate level may very
well exceed the 1 per cent of a
firm's on and off-balance
sheet credit portfolio."
The Central Bank added
that it was "mandated to issue
prudential requirements to
respond to risks and unex-
pected challenges facing the
financial sector".


Everyano8ne's
Fbavorile



Bahamas
SLCruiseu " I

.. - . . . is Fuen

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** * .' - .- .. -- - . .. � -* r :.. .*.** .- *...... .'* ' -* ^ . * � ^, ;= ., .=. 4 .. _.;.: ..


IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I


iELITIII UIL@ill 1 4411A N S 1P TIlM ihIMllbIT


JOB OPPORTUNITY

SENIOR CASE OFFICER


The lUtliLties KRgulaliin and Competitionn Aulbhoriiy I(.RCA) is Msregithcning is.
capacity in regulatory economic and financial analysis and is seeking to clmploy
a suitably quIlified liility regulatory and financial economist with drive an
ambition to the position of SENIOR CASE OFFICER.

Reporting to the Director tf Plicky and Reuulatkin at URCA, the .ucce.mful
cundiditW will Ibe rquird to pmrvide spciul advkc. led prox, an d CuseS
on the cmnoandc and financial pcdrformancc in regulaitcd u ilid6ti. The cndidMae
ill also nsur effccti ver.ighlt of the devclnpmn1n f vwriws Xpolicy p0Mitions
for .IJRC'A supported by activities including but not limited to industry and
international regulatory policies and practices, and economic analysis. The
candidate must also have a good sustainabcxternal relationship with the rcguluad
industry as well as international bodies.

The successful appUcant mst have:
* A Master's DeLre in Economics or Ecoommics and Finance from an
accredtited univcrsity.'cOfllcgC.
* A Mmnimum ofmight (f) ycars work experience in the telecommunimication
indiutry, ennstiling or regulation: although carulid ates with more than ten
(10) years relevant regulatory experience will bave an advantage.
* Experience in Ibc regulation of a compet.ilive comunicatior market,
incd ling required knowIodge of one or more forms of retail price amirol.
"ACss a;n d intrcronnetion rEulatiULin, and the dJ.ign and int rnprlliOtn
of regultiuon financial siaiemmets and related reports.
* P-rven tract-record tf working irindcpnndnitly am major prorjci,. leading
mulli-discipliifary teams and managing xternul advisorS.
* Good communication and inter-pcrional skills, and the right attitude to be
part of thc winning earn,

URCA offers a competilive aid almractic remuneration and benefits Ixick;tg in
ddilion 10 the i.(lc.ppiI%,rniIy for further I1ining. Furier information about URCA
can be obtained from the website: www.urcah anmcom

Interested applicants mia ddlivr resumes to:
C(hi Lf" Exutiive Officer, tiWiiC.s Regulation & Cump-tition Authorily
4th Terrace Eat, Centerville. Collins Avenue
Fax Nn. (2421 312.-72"8
E-mail; in o@'uraha hamasls

Applicants should be received on or before Ociober 23, 209. Only applicants
who have been shrt-lised will be conntaciHd.


PAG E 2B, TU ESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009


THE TRIBUNE






THE TIBUN TUEDAYOCTOER 1, 209,IPGES3


Chirstmas 'true test'


of whether


economy has 'hit bottom'


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE upcoming Christmas
shopping season will "be the
best indicator" of where the
Bahamian economy and con-
sumer confidence are, the
Chamber of Commerce pres-
ident believes, and " I ii, ii i
we truly are at the bottom".
Khaalis Rolle, who is also
marketing director for
Bahamas Ferries, told Tri-
bune Business that Christmas
would provide the best gauge


of the position the Bahamian
economy had reached during
the current recessionary eco-
nomic cycle, as data and indi-
cators from the key US econ-
omy were giving off mixed
signals - especially when it
came to consumer confidence.
"What we're looking at
now is somewhere close to
hitting the bottom, and then
we'll begin to see signs of
recovery. The confidence lev-
el is still a bit shaky," Mr
Rolle said.
"I think the actual hard


ili;lbue

Rea EsaI


numbers are beginning to
hold firm a bit, and hopefully
going into Christmas will be
the best indicator of where
we are. We will begin to see
whether we truly are at the
bottom, a and whether confi-
dence is coming back.
"The true test of where we
are will be the numbers com-
ing from the Thanksgiving
holiday and the Christmas
shopping period."
Christmas, though, is
unlikely to bring too much
comfort. With tourism output
contracting due to weak
stopover performance, the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
warned in its monthly eco-
nomic and financial develop-
ments report for August that
"the prospects for the
Bahamian economy will
remain subdued for the bal-
ance of 2009 and into first half
2010", with the fiscal deficit
and government debt-to-GDP
ratios projected to further
widen.
The Central Bank revealed
that consumer credit had
actually contracted by $27.51
million for the first eight
months of 2009, a sign that
banks are shying away from
risky consumer loans and that
credit has dried up.
For the first seven months
in 2009, Bahamian consumers
were repaying more than they
were borrowing when it came
to consumer loans, a sign that
they are attempting to
deleverage and reduce debts.
There were $20.7 million in
credit card net repayments;
$17.9 million in net car loan
repayments; $8.7 million in
travel loan repayments; and
$5.6 million in net home
improvement loan repay-
ments. The only consumer
lending category showing
growth was, again, debt con-


KHAALIS ROLLE


solidation loans, which
expanded by $43.6 million - a
slower pace than in 2008.
In comparison, mortgage
lending for the year to August
2009 grew by $82.96 million, a
sharp drop from the $143.19
million expansion that took
place during the first eight
months of 2008.
Elsewhere, the Central
Bank said there was a $60.6


million, or 6.7 per cent,
increase in loans falling into
default for the month, taking
the total to $963.1 million or
15.9 per cent of all outstand-
ing loans in the Bahamas.
The Central Bank
described "a sustained drift
of loans into the short-term
and non-performing cate-
gories", with loans 31-90 days
delinquent increasing by $26.2
million or 6.5 per cent in
August to hit $427.6 million.
The latter figure amounted to
7 per cent of all outstanding
private sector loans in the
Bahamas, a 0.49 per cent
increase during that month.
As for non-performing
loans, the more critical cate-
gory, because these are 90
days past due and stop accru-
ing interest, the Central Bank
said these increased by $34.5
million or 6.9 per cent to
$535.5 million. The latter fig-
ure accounted for 8.8 per cent
of total loans, a 0.54 per cent
rise in August.
"The most significant
growth in delinquencies was


noted in the mortgage cate-
gory, registering an advance
of $40.3 million (10.2 per
cent) to $436.4 million, and
reflecting gains in the 31-90
day and non-performing seg-
ments, of $28.9 million and
$11.4 million respectively,"
the Central Bank said.
"Consumer delinquencies
expanded by $14.2 million (5
per cent), comprising accre-
tions in the short-term arrears
($10.5 million) and non-per-
forming ($3.7 million) cate-
gories.
"Commercial arrears
expanded by $6.2 million.
However, as the average age
of delinquencies increased,
the non-performing portion
moved higher by $19.4 mil-
lion, overshadowing the $13.2
million decline in the 31-90
day component."
Meanwhile, Mr Rolle said
the Chamber's own member-
ship was "holding up" and
had not been heavily impact-
ed by the recession, with com-
panies still seeing value in the
service.


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ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


PARADISE0 0SA
BAAMS


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


-zmdd&-.






PAGEBSIES 4BIUSAOTBR1,20 H RBN


Legal Notice

Notice
ITALIAN OPPORTUNITIES
FUND LTD.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000 the Dis-
solution of ITALIAN OPPORTUNITIES FUND LTD. has
been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register of
Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was 23rd September
2009.
/







_ -- -M !�� -n i^ _
I P - 1 ,- ,



Mirlvirmugh '4., Ri'IC 1 0
Clearance SALE
Everything is $20
We offer Siringing Services, Repairs, Knotting,
Wiring, Driling and The Snack Fix System and
The Mystery Clasps
Pearls and Beads Strands Wholesale
and Retail
P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-323-1865
Email: gems-pearls@hotmail.com
Free parking at The Hilton


BEC power




plant opponents


'shock'


at official


'silence'


FROM page 1B

agencies he had requested
permitting details from had
come from the south Abaco
local government district's
administrator.
"The group of residents are
shocked that, to date, the only
response which has been
received from any central or
local government agency, or
BEC, is a short note from the
administrator of the South
Abaco local government dis-
trict that, in due course, our
letter will be responded to,"
Mr Smith said.
"Again, this is a matter of
critical importance to the
future growth and develop-
ment of Abaco, and impacts
the environment dramatically,
as well as having a very prej-
udicial effect on several prop-
erty owners, especially owners
around the proposed plant
site."
Partner
The Callenders & Co part-
ner added: "Having regard to
the Town Meeting earlier, it is
very surprising that this gov-
ernment in the sunshine,
which has prided itself on dis-
closing everything to the pub-
lic, remains mute and silent.
"We have asked for a lot
of information, none of which
has been forthcoming. We
understand that activities con-


tinue at the construction site,
despite statements that the
project has been put on hold.
Despite requests for permit-
ting applications, none have
been provided.
Silence
"The more they continue
to hide behind this wall of
silence, the more they are
going to alienate the residents
and citizens of Abaco, and the
more they will be exposed to
Judicial Review," he said.
"I give them warning not
to proceed to hurriedly rub-
ber stamp the approval
process, because that in and
of itself is subject to Judicial
Review."
In his September 16, 2009,
letter to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, numerous
other Cabinet ministers and
other government agencies,
Mr Smith requested that the
Government provide copies
of all permit applications
made, and copies of those
which may have been issued
to date. He warned that a
Judicial Review application
may be made to quash those
already given.
Mr Smith also requested
copies of the Environmental
Impact Assessments (EIAs)
and Environmental Manage-
ment Plan prepared for the
Wilson City power plant, plus
copies of Crown Grants and


related agreements.
He added that it was appar-
ent from the September 10,
2009, Town Hall meeting on
the power plant that an
"omnibus 'decision'" to pro-
ceed with the development
had been taken, although his
clients did not know by whom
or under which statutory
authority.
And, in the same letter, Mr
Smith concluded: "In my
clients' view, this is the single
greatest expenditure on pub-
lic works in the history of the
Abacos, which will have a
great and long-lasting impact
on the economy, on tourism,
on the environment, on prop-
erty owners, on energy bills,
on health and safety issues
and, generally, the future of
the Abacos.
Clients
"My clients consider that
before embarking on this pro-
ject there ought to have been
widespread consultation con-
ducted in a transparent,
accountable and democratic
manner.
"Not only should there
have been informative town
meetings, but any and all
applications should have been
made with adequate and
meaningful opportunities pro-
vided in the permitting
processes for interested par-
ties to make their contribu-


tion to the extent that any of
their interests may have been
affected.
"Although the project has
been commenced, it is only at
its very infancy, and my
clients consider that the
opportunity still remains to
begin the process afresh by
rescinding the 'decision'."
Meanwhile, Mr Smith told
Tribune Business on Friday
that the Prime Minister's
speech to a United Nations
summit, where he described
climate change as a major
threat to nations such as the
Bahamas, contrasted sharply
with the Government's
approach to the Wilson City
power plant.
"I am very surprised that
in committing the Bahamas
to being a green nation and
to protecting the environment
that, first, [the Government]
keeps its citizens in the dark,
and then moves with haste to
create more carbon emissions
from the worst of the worst,
Bunker C," Mr Smith said.
He suggested that this
showed the comments on
environmental protection and
reducing carbon emissions
were nothing more than
"political rhetoric", and added
that the Wilson City power
plant opponents were now
creating their own NGO and
website to continue circulat-
ing their petition against the
project.


THE BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
IN ASSOCIATION WITH

TOM MY: HILFIGER

ANNOUNCES ITS

5TH ANNUAL
BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
GOLF TOURNAMENT

Location: Ocean Club Golf Course, Paradise Island
Tournament Format: 2 Man Scramble
Date: Saturday, 17th October, 2009
Time: 12:30 pm - 6:00 pm (Awards Dinner to Follow)

Registration: $200 per player (Awards Dinner included)

Prizes include:
* Tudor Watches by Rolex
* 2 Hole In One Prizes by Land Rover & Jaguar
* Bahamas Fast Ferries Tickets
* Round TripTickets on Bahamasair
* Round Trip tickets to Miami
* Blackberry Phones
* Cigars by Graycliff and more!!!


Registration is limited to 100 golfers... so don't delay
REGISTER TODAY!!!


The Annual Golf Tournament is a major fundraiser for the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce and proceeds aid in funding the Top Business
Student Scholarship. This tournament has been sanctioned by the
Bahamas Golf Federation. t

_____

JAGUAR


I


J�OI29�2009


E Tel: (242) 322-2145 | Fax: (242) 322-4649
Email: info@thebahamaschamber.com | Website: www.thebahamaschamber.com


~j.


The Anglican Central Education Authority


,qyT V


2009 Graduates of Anglican Schools
won scholarships totaling nearly
$2,000,000!

Anglican Schools have a renowned tradition in The Bahamas
of providing opportunities for a private and quality Education to
All Bahamians. Since the formalization of our Flagship School,
St. Johns College in 1947, Anglican Schools have continued
to trail blaze a path of excellence in Education in The Bahamas.

Our mission is to provide quality Education in a Chrisitian
environment by developing the whole child; spiritually,
academically, physically, and socially thus preparing the child
for life.

Anglican Schools offer rigorous Academic Programmes in a
plethora of disciplines ranging from Mathematics and Physics to
Language Arts and Literature - from Modern Languages and the
Humanities to Music and Art We believe that students should
have deep exposure to a vareity of academic disciplines which
enables greater choices upon graduation.

Anglican Schools operate with
the belief that all children can learn!
Through our Accelerated Track
Programme, students in Grade 8
continue to successfully complete
the Bahamas Junior Certificate ,
Examinations (BJC), with A-B :
grades, and students at Grade 11
continue to succeed at the
Bahamas General Certificate of
Secondary Education examinations
(BGCSE), with A-B grades!

Anglican Education... building Global
Citizens - prepared far life!


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


-111--Wwmmmm�


PAG E 4B, TU ESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


VMS












Clearing House wait leaves


firms in


era


FROM page 1B


cashless society. It's got to be
cheaper than the process now
of clearing cheques and han-
dling tonnes of cash. It just
makes the fact of doing busi-
ness in this country so prehis-
toric."
The former Chamber pres-
ident recalled a conversation
with Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, in which the politi-


cian told him that when he
wanted to transfer funds
between two different banks
in Abaco, the quickest way
was to get a cheque from one
institution and then walk
across the street to the other.
"This is 2009," Mr
D'Aguilar said. It should be
able to be done electronically.
If I want to pay people elec-
tronically, I should be able to.
It just continually delays the
ability of business to operate
in a cashless society.


NAD

Nassau Airport


PRICE INQUIRY




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The lkope of Work include.:

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Major firm
applicants


"It would save companies
an enormous amount of mon-
ey if they did not have to hold
on to such tremendous
amounts of cash, and as such
reduce the amount of cash
they have to horde. By not
allowing an ACH, you're still
operating a system where it
takes too long for cheques to
clear and everything is done
manually, like it was 100 years
ago.",
Implementing an ACH
would enable consumers and
businesses to settle transac-
tions in real-time, creating
more certainty and confi-
dence by cutting down on the
quantity of 'bounced cheques'
and buyer defaults, thus
improving commercial sector
cash flow. Taking cash out of
the system would also lessen
the attractiveness of compa-
nies as armed robbery targets.
The ACH's implementa-
tion had been promised from
as far back as five years ago,
yet since then several dead-
lines for its going on-line have
been missed. Despite the cre-
ation of the Bahamas Auto-
mated Clearing House
(BACH) as a formal compa-
ny to own and operate the
system, and system testing
between different commercial
banks having commenced
more than a year ago, going
live seems as far away as ever.
Paul McWeeney, Bank of
the Bahamas International's
managing director and head
of the Clearing Banks Asso-
ciation's committee responsi-
ble for the ACH, did not
return a Tribune Business
voicemail seeking comment
before yesterday's holiday. It
is understood he may have
been off the island.
However, Mr D'Aguilar
told Tribune Business his
understanding was that not
all the Bahamian commercial
banks had "bought into" the
ACH, and some were dissat-
isfied with the choice of ven-
dor and the system purchased.
Based on information he
had received, Mr D'Aguilar
said the banks wanted to
"make sure everything
worked perfectly and seam-
lessly, and right now they
can't guarantee that, so they


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for the function of:


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Reply in confidence to: vacancy50@gmail.com


have not signed up. They
have bought a system, and not
all are happy with it.
"There's a bit of dissension
in the banks about the sys-
tem. There's never been a full
buy-in by the banks to the sys-
tem, so they've not accepted
the system they've paid for."
Questioning why the Cen-
tral Bank had not done more
to push the commercial banks
to implement an ACH, Mr
D'Aguilar said that despite
being the most profitable
industry in the Bahamas, the
banks appeared to have no
incentives to get on with it.
He also expressed previ-
ously-raised concerns that the
commercial banks were
proposing to run debit cards
off the existing Master-
Card/Visa platform, with
charges of $2-$3 per transac-
tion, rather than implement
a new platform with charges
in line with the developed
world - of around $0.10-$0.20
per transaction.
The fear here is that
Bahamians would be discour-
aged via the transaction costs
from using debit cards, which
would allow them to pay for
goods and services via an elec-
tronic transfer of cash from
their bank account to that of
the vendor's.
"Anything that drives cash
out of the economy, anything
that reduces the amount of
cash businesses hold by 10 per
cent, 20 per cent, 30 per cent,
that's good," Mr D'Aguilar
said. "It also leads into
Bahamian companies selling
on-line, and we don't have
that platform in place. We
need an update [from the
banks]; is there any hope and
help on the way, is it going to
happen, or are they hoping it
will all go away quietly?"
The ACH was intended to
replace the current manual
system for settling cheque
transactions, where cheques
drawn on one bank but due to
be deposited at another have
to be taken by armoured car
to a central location where
they are settled by represen-
tatives of the various institu-
tions.
Apart from allowing inter-
bank cheques to be processed
electronically rather than
manually at a cheque clear-
ing facility, the ACH system
would allow direct debits and
credits from accounts, debit
cards and a shared Automat-
ic Teller Machine (ATM) net-


work.
The latter would allow
Bahamians to use their cash
cards at any bank branch. It
would also reduce the time
persons spent in line waiting
to cash and deposit pay
cheques, as they could be
deposited to their account.
Bahamian consumers
would also be able to use
direct debits from their bank
accounts to pay bills such as
cable television and electrici-
ty.
The ACH could ultimate-
ly lead to the creation of just
one back office system for the
entire Bahamas. It may also
help develop SWITCH prod-
ucts, where Bahamians could
use their cash cards at any


bank's ATM machine.
A further potential bonus
from the ACH will be the
opening up a whole range of
electronic banking services in
the Bahamas, including its use
in the online purchase of gov-
ernment goods and services.
Ultimately, through mod-
ernising the Bahamian pay-
ments system through elec-
tronic means, the ACH will
provide buyers and sellers
with more certainty and con-
fidence, especially when it
comes to settling their trans-
actions.
It will also enhance eco-
nomic and business efficiency
by settling transactions quick-
er, boosting business cash
flows.


ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

NOTICE

BSE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
WEDNESDAY. 21st OCTOBER. 200. 6:30 PM

MedicalAsacitgmt of lft BalHm.tMAB h iar Ho


The Bahamas Society of Erginee's will hoi is Annual General
kMee'g a 6 30 pon Wednesday, Oclobew 21. 21'9a M AS.
tOuse, Sixth Tmraa, Cenrelile (wpposibt Centerville Fod
Store)

AGENM

1. REVIEW OF MINUTES OF THE LASTAGM
II PRESENTATION OF THE ANNUAL REPORT
III. PRESENTATION OF THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL
IV ELECTION OF NEW OFFICERS (ALL
POSITIONS:,
V. ANY OTHER BUSINESS

MEMBERS ARE REQUESTED TO BE PRESENT AND ARE
REMINDED TO ENSURE THAT THEIR FEES ARE CURRENT
IF THEY INTEND TO PARTICIPATE IN THE ELECTIONS

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED IMMEDIATELY
FOLLOWING THE MEETING.


Fcr additnal details pase contact Mrs. Gram Sharma at
456-8408 r 364-2459. the President at 302-1215, or any iher
inemterofte Execuliwe


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PAG E 6B, TU ESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009


THE TRIBUNE











Liquidator's 'long, drawn out fee battle'


FROM page 1B

payment of some $43,000,
shared between three attor-
neys, to cover their appear-
ance costs in hearings to
determine Mr Kikivarakis's
fees, and those of his attor-
neys.
The $43,000 came out of
the Caledonia Clients Secu-
rity Account, into which all
the Bahamian broker/dealer's
clients had been required by
the Supreme Court to pay a
sum equivalent to 2 per cent
of their assets to cover the liq-
uidator's costs.
Mr Kikivarakis alleged in
his report that his objections
to the collective $43,000 pay-
ment, authorised by the
Deputy Registrar, and those
of Caledonia's clients and
client committee stemmed
from the fact that, according
to former Senior Justice
Lyons's order, funds paid into
the Security Account were
only to be used to pay the fees
claimed by the liquidator, his
attorneys and agents.

Events
Recounting events, the liq-
uidator's report noted how he
sought leave from the
Supreme Court to pay the
fees and expenses incurred by
himself, his attorney, former
PLP MP Alfred Sears, and his
agents between February 4-
6, 2009. The fees had to be
taxed and approved by the
Supreme Court.
However, Emerick
Knowles, attorney and part-
ner with Alexiou, Knowles &

ff I


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your

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If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Co, who is representing sev-
eral Caledonia clients, chal-
lenged "the notice period and
the taxation process". He also
allegedly challenged the "for-
mat of invoices" submitted by
Mr Kikivarakis and the liq-
uidator's Canadian attorneys,
and requested time to review
Mr Sears' Bill of Costs.
Mr Kikivarakis said he
finally appeared before the
Deputy Registrar on April 30,
2009, on the issue of his fees,
costs and their taxation.
"During this hearing, three
attorneys appeared and Mr
Knowles once again chal-
lenged the fees and expenses
of my agents and I, and my
attorneys," the liquidator's
report alleged.
"He requested me and my
agents, Deloitte & Touche, to
prepare Bill of Costs. In
response to this, I explained
that the invoices submitted by
me and my agents were con-
sistent with the invoices issued
by Deloitte & Touche glob-
ally, and the Registrar stated
that the invoices issued by me
and my agents were consis-
tent with those he had seen
over the years, which he not-
ed, included invoices from
other countries, such as
Switzerland and the United
Kingdom."
The hearing, Mr Kiki-
varakis alleged, was
adjourned to May 27, 2009,
to give the liquidator time to
meet with Mr Knowles to
complete the fee issue. The
meeting, which duly took
place on May 5, 2009, was
described as "fruitless" by Mr
Kikivarakis, with a Bill of
Costs review not completed.


Further appearances before
the Deputy Registrar
occurred on May 27, 2009,
and June 9, 2009, and Mr
Kikivarakis added: "On June
9, 2009, I was finally given
leave to pay myself, my
agents, Deloitte & Touche,
and my attorneys, Sears &
Company, fees after the
Deputy Registrar had dis-
counted the said fees by 11
per cent for Deloitte &
Touche and myself.
Reduction

"I had previously volun-
teered a 10 per cent reduc-
tion to end the process, which
was time consuming and did
not benefit the clients. The
fees of Sears & Company
were discounted by 20.83 per
cent."
The liquidator alleged that
Mr Knowles and Brian
Simms, partner and head of
litigation at Lennox Paton,
were the only he attorneys he
knew of who objected to the
payment of the fees billed by
himself, Deloitte & Touche
and Sears & Co.
The deputy registrar,
alleged Mr Kikivarakis, also
awarded appearance costs of
$18,000 each to Mr Sears and
Mr Knowles, and $7,000 to
Mr Simms, to be paid from
the clients' security account -
something he and the clients
objected to.
"The taxation was chal-
lenging to say the least and
resulted in my agents and I,
and attorneys, spending a sig-
nificant amount of time and
effort to have our fees and
expenses approved for pay-


ment, when such time could
have been spent complying
with the Supreme Court
orders to transfer 90 per cent
of clients' assets to them," Mr
Kikivarakis alleged.
"In my opinion, what
should have been a simple
matter became a long, drawn-
out battle."


INSIGHT S

Frte storesbeindth.nws


LAND DEVELOPMENT CHIEF ENGINEER

Land development company is looking for a Chief Engineer to assist with an increasing
development portfolio in the Bahamas and abroad.

Main Responsibilities

* Oversee all aspects of detailed engineering design, permitting and construction for residential,
commercial and industrial projects
* Establish and maintain construction budgets and timelines
* Prepare and administer design and construction contracts
* Provide expertise and supervision on both horizontal and vertical construction
* Coordinate with government, regulating authorities, contractors and clients

Qualifications & Experience

* Bachelors Degree in Civil Engineering
* Minimum 10-15 years experience in the land development industry
* Proven management & leadership skills with at least 5 years experience in a senior management
position
* Aptitude for writing proposals and preparing and managing financial schedules
* Experience in green development or LEED certification would be an asset
* Sound understanding of local and international building codes and construction practices
* Excellent communication skills - verbal and written
* Computer proficiency - including AutoCAD, Excel, Word, etc.
* Must have international experience and professional registration in the US or Canada

Remuneration

Salary and benefits will be based upon experience and qualifications.

Interested persons should submit their resume by email to
careeropportunity-09 hotmail.com
on or before Thursday,October 16, 2009.












FREEPORT CONTAINER PORT LIMITED



CAREER OPPORTUNITY

INVITES QUALIFIED CANDIDATES TO APPLY FOR THE
POSITION OF


BUSINESS ANALYST


QUALFICATIONS AND EXPblE EC
o &debo Degree in ConputeSxnce
0 *rinrn of te (5) ym xience n 1 SaleMaling wcr Mbi Retlions Fi!d

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABIUTIS:

SKnowledof1Mapp*iab oflehnol Iny n a s ineannromntriln d e re rh and
development ana.
, Sbtrng nalytical, saofware apicaions and prxobeni-(*iig sk
* he ab y to hadlt mulpie function at fl ame nrr* and nrartan good o zaIldol sk
The* hyto prtenldy usa McmAOslfkeSute

ESSENTIAL FUiCTONS IMNUMI:
( t ire nwt Imited to.)
Mntainirg Lm d bLa dat abaseInm in hqw.

� TIrack elld du, e a aticn in ti system.

* s In h urs ch o(,cointtra and man ng data

SUnder Ihe idire o f t Biness DeaopmenCorrrnnerial Maner. CIxducl ape atione
rnews of grou pn es as drectd.

E Denig, dmveip and muinljn the colrpaUrt sniYts kr roupbca n e fs.

1 Assist in the (teign. delvpinent of advertisaig maorial, include of preseriafion data lor use
ethesislng and paental ckisinmens.

* t ini� the p ariai e Ibushess develop proposs, inv n crutiv, wu o


Cani dat d tr atl e ,,dd ns Agloi to:

P. 0, Ik F-42465
Freport, Gr"l Bahama
Or: Oncore(f e~11,l20019


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


NOTICE


F & C SERVICES CORP.
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act. 2000,
F & C SERVICES CORP. is in dissolution as of October 7,
2009.


International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at
35A Regent Street, P. 0. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is
the Liquidator.



LIQUIDATOR


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY






PERSPECTIVE

HUMAN RESOURCES CONSULTrING



BILLING AND ENROLLMENT ( )WRDINATOR

Our navIgaW ami Incre35ingly complex global health care system wkit ease anid ianoriy-

ThIeir tearwlis pre~ently Se~eking tfhe sirmic~ej of a Bdirg and EIarolitnernt r4iflator t% orvde
support to an expandtaq number -of denrts UicaIty Tihe ieail candidate will wwk wifili
managemen t t ensure accurate and prompt bilking, reconciliation~s andi payment verIficaions
as well as any support to other !Iirbctionala areas of the buiness (inclusive of benefltSr diliMs,
busintess development and ckent services-)

The tiliIng arid Enrollment Coordinator wA play a direct role In thre overall customner~diemit
%.uppxart Shb-Oeg OF our c 6e~nt raipdi datbs lo~ild pUSS ess eIeritt *oMrYWjvIiinrtho1e~ alil'ity
to wod lrbteperdently and supweum problem 5DIVwlg skills ini the bro~d based ability to think
creatively andindependenly to expedite~ the needs~ of the boiling and enrollment functIion.

Qua Irficaucns:

- Miafnimuml 3-5 years of applicabh admrinistrativei experience in a f lnulldal or accounting
role.
- AccurntlrgffFranciaI Reportin~g experlence Is a must.
. Milunum High Schbooli Dplomia or eq~uivalent ',insuran c crtlflcathliis are a plus but
notrequnired) Associates LVe~eepreferred.
-Muist be extremely detail oriented, poissess excellent o rg~anizational skill, and practice
pia-lw.r tiMe-Managenlent.
- Effective writteni and oral communications skills.
- ExceIleitt cujstomer service, skills,

Salary Iis cmmensurate wIithexperienice-

Please forward resuimae and salary feq~ifernents by Cictober 14, 2009 to:

Email: perspectfve~hr1~gmall~com


I


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE











Arawak port beats Clifton


FROM page 1B

However, where Arawak
Cay lost out to the Christie
administration's preferred
option, according to the EIA
report, was on "compatibility
with long-term master plan-
ning, scoring only five points
compared to the southwest-
ern port's 15 points.
Indeed, it was this "com-


patibility" issue that dropped
Arawak Cay down the rank-
ings behind four other pro-
posed port sites, leaving it
ahead of only one rival option
- leaving the commercial ship-
ping facilities where they cur-
rently are on Bay Street and
upgrading those locations.
The Coastal Systems report
makes clear that the main
knock against Arawak Cay as


NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 21
TRANSOCEAN INVESTMENT PARTNERS UNITED


Nclce is heeti gef p Iat r acowtianes x it Smc hi 137 df The
Insfinanallonal us Cwrpanifes Ad Nro 45 rd ~ilM, TRANSOCEAN
INVESTMENT PARTNERS LIMITED is rii issduton The dale c
co-niencefrnTel f dEdufon w the 7tht day cf o 0wct 200 OCllon
Dean di Nassau, Baharas t e L U1qWa of TRANSOCEAN
INVESTMENT PARTNERS LIMITED.




DIMbnDun
UOU0ATOR







WHY PAY MORE?





NASSAU-FRESH CREEK

S-.-$79.99
NASSAU - MANGROVE CAY

S$. $79.99
-NAj.t., CONGO TOWN

' " $19.99
* puurkuMw^ Apply
For TlIkets and AddlUen4informatllon
Pl.e.e Contiot Prfmnuance Air
at 362-1608 1 12-2302
Or Vriit UsAt -. .. �
uh. porfv�am.-Ilrp a- �
E.-JiL frfbranin_ nl .Mh anbt.. .cam


a location for New Provi-
dence's port facility was that it
did not fit into the Christie
administration's plans to turn
the area into an upscale
tourist, cultural and residen-
tial centre.
"Two alternatives in the
downtown area, Arawak Cay
and optimisation of the exist-
ing port facilities, were dis-
cussed," the Coastal Systems
report said. "In light of the
proposed plans to develop
Arawak Cay into a high-end
residential community, port
operations were not consis-
tent with the overall master
plan. This solution does not
reduce traffic congestion in
the downtown area.
"Alternatively, options to
optimise existing port facili-
ties were noted to be limited
given the motivation to
improve the functionality and
aesthetic appearance of the
downtown area."
The Coastal Systems report
also argued that Arawak Cay
was not "a viable alternative"
without improvements to its
breakwater system.
The now-opposition PLP
has frequently used the find-


NAD
Nassau Airport
..vllOpnmw#t Cuinipwi


ings of the previously unpub-
lished report, which has been
obtained by Tribune Business,
to attack the Ingraham
administration for its decision
to abandon plans for the
southwestern port - almost
immediately upon taking
office - and instead move Bay
Street's commercial shipping
facilities to Arawak Cay.
Critics
While the critics, led by
PLP Senator and deputy
leader candidate, Jerome
Fitzgerald, have been correct
in their assertions that
Arawak Cay was ranked next-
to-last by Coastal Systems
International, the report's
findings appear not to have
been placed in their true con-
text.
Namely, that Arawak Cay
rated higher when it came to
minimising environmental
impacts, and that the main
reason this site was rejected
by the previous administra-
tion was because it did not fit
into the vision for New Prov-
idence held by the Christie
administration and its


Request for


Proposal

C-292 SecU ty Systems

NaMMi|Ae VT1hWivp iarl'rrfitflIs|d A fd't'Ac1>
I*ru tnw K ;wdU of RIP C2 ? 5 ,r9, S b * FI I
2ardm 3 o&'IL-wle- Fi-d'l-g nrfirml-a Arpci- r[qar.an ti!h
Simp I umniid at tahsle
1he scope of wwrk niddes:
SAces Contird Slem - In oni raiiac iD meas atintfe
apil in arunith d pwornrd
iiii" 4,ji i,.i'id lite ]ipe ;P. I'-rI I ial .m ij .ijl
* Irr-':.-n Ccm '-rictLr se bI,.litaewmwk .o9e
c:rTiiin.n-iw:r - Xl n rnirmilpt cm s Sxi1onTm a p,-"s
T'Pie , -I v', II * li'dVh tv l 1.4 < L 1.t4 r ,o * .-1:1
pipb:*rr-|airii :'i Siaen .i:'Oikdeglirt r, iet R"P as: r-al
m rrmaeum due f cirnnurca lf tl ief epx:d.tr r3id

The C-?Q RP Dcunrtwi t V tgtji,!u ImO pA up tfm
t:01fi, Thursda Ocober is~tl200O Atdem rmeerg
MI be hl at t1:00 an, Fdy Ocloter i. i 20
PMawe wilax Iraa unh "m sw lrft i\ WO PirACi Fc nt


CaW TMD BURNEY
Cmmxam ad Prmvmu lmhiauw
Ph- 12421 ?O-lflM I Fa K $WJ-33.21
RO BDA PE i n ,We. WM wI
EnM tU UIXtAy b


Atlanta-based master plan-
ners, EDAW.
Terms of reference are
always critical for a study such
as the one conducted by
Coastal Systems, and the
company confirmed in its
report that it had been hired
by EDAW to conduct the
EIA. EDAW's vision for
Arawak Cay, as reported by
Tribune Business at the time,
was for the area to become a
tourism and cultural centre,
attracting high-end real estate
development.
The Ingraham government,
while buying into the need to
revitalise Bay Street and
downtown Nassau, has a dif-
ferent vision for and strategy
for how to do so. Arawak Cay
is seen as a relatively cheaper
port option, at least in the
short-term, costs for the port
there having been pegged at
near $60 million compared to
the $235 million previous
studies said would be required
to construct the southwestern
port.
The current government
has argued that when all costs,


such as land acquisitions, are
factored in, the southwestern
port option would require
$400 million in investment.
Such a sum, they believe,
would be prohibitive, espe-
cially at a time when investor
confidence globally is at an
all-time low, due to the cred-
it crunch and worldwide
recession.
And while the Coastal Sys-
tems report said there was
insufficient land space to
accommodate a port at
Arawak Cay, and that its
presence there would still
impact downtown traffic lev-
els, the study did not account
for the extra acreage being
reclaimed by the material
dredged from Nassau Har-
bour to widen the cruise ship
turning basin.
In addition, the Govern-
ment is planning to limit the
hours during which trucks and
trailers can transport cargo
from the Arawak Cay port to
the break-bulk and distribu-
tion terminal planned for

SEE next page


NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

No. 45 of 2M
AURORA INVESTMENT GWH



Ncce is he* vn Dia amccdance wlh SecIon 17e of 'he
Intefimali usiwas Co~m A No 45 O2 dM, AURORA
INVESTI NT GMBHI i dun uion. The ae of commeneefrt of
.iwsotuicrx. wS ".s 71h day o cfOtbw 200D. * Deam D NoassJ
Bahamas II LJ uquidalr o1 AURORA INVESTING GMBH.




Dillon Dian
LIOUIlDTOR



NOTICE


AUTODINS S.A.

N OT I C E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) AUTODINS S.A. is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.
The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
081h October, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.
The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust
Ltd, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis, Case postal 550, Tortola,
BVI

Dated this 7th day of September, A. D. 2009


Credit Suisse Ltd
Liquidator


I ODSUS STOIE ON THI 0AG 0LG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


Caribbean Center For

Child Development
The Caribbean Center for Child Development would like
to invite applications from qualified and experienced candidates
for the following vacancies:
Teaching Specialist for children with Autism: Teacher with
certification in Autism needed for full-time employment.
Teacher is expected to implement the full range of behavioral
and educational programs individually designed for each student.
ABA Therapist for children with Autism: Experienced ABA
or Verbal Behaviour Therapist. Experience working in clinical,
in-home and school settings. Trained in the ABBLS assessment
a plus!
Teaching Specialist in Occupational Therapy: Position duties
include providing OT therapy services to children from birth
to 21 years of age. This individual performs evaluations,
planning, and intervention to a variety of children with
disabilities.
Music Teacher: Experienced Music Teacher to provide music
therapy to children with disabilities.
All interested candidates should apply by email to:
mmajor@caribbeancenter.org with:
* letter of application
* a personal statement
* a full curriculum vitae
For more detailed information on these positions and more,
please visit our website at www.caribbeancenter.org


Attend the

12th Americas

Food & Beverage

Show & Conference



November 9-10, 2009 m
Miami Beach
Convention Center ,



Take Advantage 'I
of $225 Airfares
to Miami! .


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* iouniei rwla.n'aimiWe
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F f More Information Contact:
Omor Gonzalez/CBATO (305-536-53104)
Emy Rodriguez at Tel: 305-871-7910


Is accountancy

a career

for you?


If you are considering a career as a finance professional,
you need to think seriously about a professional qualification.
ACCA (Association of Chartered Certified Accountants) is
pleased to present: ACCA and CAT - Your route to
becoming a professional qualified accountant
Come and participate in an informative and interactive session to
learn more about the ACCA Professional Qualification and the
Certified Accounting Technician (CAT) Qualifications.

Have all your questions answered and start planning your future
as a professional qualified accountant today.


ACCA and CAT - Your route to becoming a professional qualified accountant
Date: Thursday 15 October /5.30pm - 7.00pm
Venue: The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, Collins Ave and Shirley St.
Admission is free although early booking is advisable as places are limited.
To register please contact Terence Bethel on 380-4722 or 328-8734
email info@pcbcentre.com


I


PAG E 8B, TU ESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009


THE TRIBUNE












on environmental impact


Gladstone Road, thereby
relieving traffic congestion.
It would seem, therefore,
that the arguments over the
Arawak Cay site and which
location is best for New Prov-
idence's commercial shipping
facilities are largely rooted in
politics, and differences relat-
ed to policy and philosophy
between the two parties.
Meanwhile, the Coastal
Systems study said the south-
western New Providence port,
which would have been situ-
ated between BEC's Clifton
Pier plant and Common-
wealth Brewery, would have
disturbed "the least amount
of marine acreage out of all
the southwestern project
alternatives", disturbing just
54,600 square metres or 13.5
acres of marine habitat to cre-
ate the port entrance corri-
dor.
The other sites assessed by
Coastal Systems included
South Ocean, Adelaide, Coral
Harbour and Clifton Point.
To create "an ideal port
structure capable of serving


all cargo needs for New Prov-
idence", Coastal Systems said
the southwestern port would
need a 360-metre diameter
turning basin; 100 metre-wide
entrance corridor; 3,000 lin-
ear feet of cargo vessel moor-
ing space; water depth of up
to 10 metres; and upland facil-
ities for bulk, break bulk, con-
tainer cargo and a petroleum
cargo offloading terminal.

Cargo
"Relocating the cargo port
facilities out of downtown
Nassau would provide much-
needed space for downtown
revitalisation, which would
benefit the island's tourism
industry," Coastal Systems
concluded.
"At the same time, consol-
idation of cargo port facilities
would provide the Bahamas
with a modern, deep-draft
port capable of serving New
Providence and the sur-
rounding islands for the
foreseeable future."
Arguing that the "ideal port


facility" would consist of
607,000 square metres or 150
acres of port infrastructure
and harbour, Coastal Systems
said that based upon previous
reports, international cargo is
processed at five locations on
New Providence - three on
Bay Street, and two at
Arawak Cay.
These facilities, the EIA
argued, would ultimately be
unable to service an island
with a growing population
and expanding tourism indus-
try. While population growth
had steadied to an average 6
per cent increase every five
years, New Providence was
set to experience "explosive
growth in cruise tourists cor-
responding to an increase of
440 per cent from 1990 to
2015".
The 1.854 million cruise
ship arrivals in 1990, accord-
ing to Coastal Systems' study,
were projected to expand to
6.337 million in 2010 and
8.151 million in 2015. By the
same token, stopover visitors
were projected to almost dou-


ble between 1990 and 2015,
growing from 1.576 million to
4.432 million. These numbers
appear slightly on the high
side, and it is unclear where
they are coming from.
Nevertheless, Coastal Sys-
tems concluded: "Based on
the growth projections for the
tourism industry and the
island's population, it is
apparent that commercial
shipping operations will like-
ly need to increase capacity
in order to accommodate
increased numbers of visi-
tors/inhabitants on New Prov-
idence.
"Increased commercial
shipping operations will
require more capacity from
New Providence's ports in
order to efficiently process
both inbound and outbound
cargo.
"Spread over approximate-
ly 50 acres in downtown Nas-
sau and Arawak Cay, the
existing port facilities in Nas-
sau are at or near capacity,
with only marginal room for
expansion."


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS



NOTICE

Master of Science in Elkienimry Education Degree
Prograinic in collaboration witlh Wlihcc iK k College.
Applications are available from:
The (jradualt Programmcs Oficec,
The College of The Bnalmas. MIchIel H. Eldon
Complex, Room 306 Thompson Hlivd.
For mour infurmtnlai call: 3972601/2 or
send emails ta: swisdom~Jcb.edu.bs
Application Deadline: 16th Oclober, Z009.











Small Retail Store specializing in girls
accessories is seeking a dynamic,
energetic, and highly motivated Store


Manager (30-40
retail managerial
handle all aspects


years) with prior
experience only to
of store operations.


Please snd resum s b -mailto

I. . a.co6 mai 6o


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

HARSTAD INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sectionl38 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
the dissolution of HARSTAD INVESTMENTS LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the company has therefore been struck off the Regis-
ter. The date of completion of the dissolution was 18th day of
September, 2009.



Cental Lquidators IncJ
Ibig ator


VACANCY




POSITION SUMMARY
Functions as the Strategic Business Leader of the Golf department with overall responsibility for golf
operations including guest and employee satisfaction, sales and revenue management and the financial
performance of the department. As a member of the Guidance Team, develops hotel-wide goals and
strategies that deliver products and services to meet or exceed the needs and expectations of guests and
employees and provide a return on investment to the owners and the Company. Supports and upholds
The Companyfs Gold Standards, and luxury tier standards of operation.
RESPONSIBILITIES
* Operations: Directs the daily activities of the golf department according to Company operating
standards to maintain brand equity. Oversees the operation of the golf shop, the maintenance of the
golf course, and all associated retail services (e.g., snack carts, beverage service).
* Guest Satisfaction: Ensures products and services delivered by the golf department meet or exceed
guest expectations, create customer loyalty, and lead to increased market share.
* Human Resources: Attracts, selects and retains a diverse hourly and management workforce to
deliver excellent service and effective leadership in the Golf department. Creates and sustains a
work environment that focuses on fair and equitable treatment and employee satisfaction to enable
business success.
* Sales and Revenue Management: Focuses on building the units top line revenue by working with
the Director of Sales and Marketing to develop the Golf departments sales and marketing strategy.
Concentrates on both the rate per round of golf and number of rounds played per day to maximize
Revenue per available round or 'REVPAR'. In addition, manages other revenue sources such as the
Pro Shop, Food and Beverage sales, and if applicable membership enrollment to generate increased
revenue.
* Financial Management: Develops and manages the Golf departments annual operating budget
to achieve or exceed budget expectations. Ensures successful performance by increasing profitability
and providing a return on investment for the owners and the Club.
* Owner Relations: Develops a trusting and respectful business partnership with property owners by
meeting or exceeding expectations in operations management, asset protection, and financial
performance
QUALIFICATIONS
* 4-year bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Hotel and Restaurant Management, or related
major
* 5 years experience in executive management position in a five star resort
* Ritz-Carlton Leadership Training or similar formalized corporate exposure preferred
* Membership in PGA and/or LPGA is required.
SKILLS & KNOWLEDGE
* Proficient at the game of golf
* Knowledge of turf lawn care and maintenance procedures with an emphasis on golf turf grass varieties
* Retail merchandising skills
* Instructional teaching skills - if required to deliver golf lessons
* Knowledge of golf and grounds equipment and routine maintenance needs
* Financial management skills e.g. ability to analyze P&L statements, develop operating budgets,
forecasting and capital expenditure planning
* Strong communication, strategic planning, analytical and customer and employee relations skills


Director of Human Resources
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB-20571
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Bahamas
OR
Email: Freddie.Munnings@ritzcarlton.com


Deadline for applications is Wednesday, October 14,2009


ATLANTIS





I s seeki ng a pplica nts fa r


DIRECTOR OF LANDSCAPE & HORTICULTURE

The Director of Landscape anid Hortirukure will pion, Drganize md direct
landscaping activities, including special pr~ts, Vo Atlantis Paradise Island
pioperbe, ensuring IWealls~Wdards are rmet The DreefrwAl Aso be
reswsi ble V radvaniN the krnowledge-IeveI in Oe deperment anid deIoping
Mf potential through 1raininig and other stategic iinlitiies-

MAIN DUTIES AND RESPONSIBLITlES:

*Perform Irquentif spec~ns of interiorr and eferior areas to ensure proper
horbcukure practbcmsare edhered 1 th Swil sprinIhqusia on pruning



* Cevekp and adrrnister elfective aind thowugl Pest IManagemenit pfogrrms;
br turf. shrubs and pdrrn' s,~ing the IPM wid BNP principles as well as
dlenveopand adminiiistr anoeftcveirrtaf~n maiitenaince and mnknodring
proram.

*Review and update as-builds, drawings. W~eprkin% 1kr~wfo, technical
rnanuak and warrwks for all Ins capirn-rellatd develloprit and



REQUIREMENTS:

*Mini!mum of a bachebers degree iin horticu~ure and a rnir~irur of 10 ymar
exKea8flo in a, luxury resodI or simiat environmenL

Minimum of 5 years WAdrship experiern In th~efield of horticulture and


*Must hold FNGLA CI-P, CMT and CIT.



kiternsWd appikant should e-mail resumes to:
ulman qaasIm-gofi~kemzier~com


.1


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE


Please send resume to the attention of-





PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Motor dealer 'raring' to go on soft opening


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A LEADING Bahamian
motor dealer will be "raring to


posdag
we awulnuflup
mkcifllo~ftctlllha
WON NuNI
flu S!Iubfl

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go" with this morning's 'soft
opening' of its new customer
reception office, part of a
$500,000-$600,000 designed to
improve efficiency and the


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overall client experience.
Rick Lowe, Nassau Motor
Company's (NMC) opera-
tions manager, told Tribune
Business: "We've a soft open-
ing [today], and we're ready
to rolls. The customers that
have come so far think it's a
great improvement on where
we were. I think that next
week, when people come in
to use it for the first time,
they'll be impressed. We'll be
raring to go."
In terms of the upgrades
made, Mr Lowe said: "When
you drive in, you've got a roof
over your head, so that when
there's inclement weather
clients do not have to get out
in the rain.


"They don't have to cross
where cars are being worked
on, and don't have to be in
contact with the work areas,
unless there's something spe-
cific they need or want to look
at. Customers will operate in
an area that is easy to access
when they drop-off and col-
lect their vehicles."
Mr Lowe added that
NMC's customer reception
area would also be equipped
to provide wireless Internet
access, so that waiting clients
could access e-mails, commu-
nicate with offices and con-
duct business while waiting
for their vehicle to be serviced
or released.
The customer reception


NOTICE


IN THE ESTATE OF SYLVIA ROBERTS late
of Kensington Gardens, Soldier Road in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, De-
ceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claims or demands against the above-
named Estate are requested to send the same duly
certified to the undersigned on or before
Friday the 6th day of November 2009 after which
the Personal Representatives will proceed to
distribute the assets of the Deceased among the
persons entitled thereto having regard only to the
claims of which the Personal Representatives shall
then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate are requested
to make full settlement on or before the date
hereinbefore mentioned.


CASH, FOUNTAIN
Attorneys-at-Law
P.O.Box N-476
Armstrong Street
Nassau, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Personal Representatives


area is the second phase in
what was originally planned
as a three-phase expansion.
The first phase, which
involved the installation of six
service bays with hydraulic
lifts, was completed five
months ago in April 2009.
The deposit for that phase's
construction was paid in June
27, 2008, Mr Lowe said, with
the final payment made on
September 12 last year. The
phase two deposit was paid in
April 2009, with everything
now completed in time for
today's opening.
"We're fairly busy in ser-
vice," Mr Lowe added. "That
certainly hasn't slackened off.
We're grateful for customers


in that regard, and we think
they'll be much more com-
fortable in the new environ-
ment."
NMC now plans to move
its transmission room and staff
lunch area into the old cus-
tomer reception centre, seg-
regating the two from each
other.
The company's plans had
originally called for an entire-
ly new transmission room to
be built, but these have been
put on hold due to the eco-
nomic downturn.
"We'll knock down where
we do Phase three eventually,
and stick with current plans
until things turn around," Mr
Lowe said.


NOTICE



STEINER SPA RESORTS LIMITED


(In Voluntary Liquidation)




Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned at P. O0. Box N-624 on or before the 6th day of
November, A.D., 2009 . In default thereof they will be exclud-
ed from the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 7th day of October, A.D., 2009




ROBERT LAZAR
Liquidator


IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I


NOTICE
MELIOT ENTERPRISES LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, commencing on the 25th day of September,
2009. Articles of Dissolution have been duly registered by
the Registrar. The Joint Liquidators are Paul Andy Gomez
and Kendrick K. Christie, P.O. Box N-8285, Nassau, The
Bahamas.

All persons having Claims against the above-named
Company are required on or before the 24th day of
October, 2009 to send their names and addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Joint
Liquidators of the Company or, in default thereof, they
may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.

Dated this 1st day of October, 2009

PAUL ANDY GOMEZ and KENDRICK K. CHRISTIE
Joint Liquidators


SAINtCRAAML

TME UP AUTO ELECTRICAL

SPECIAL SUPPLIES CO. LTD.


NOTICE


SPA RESOURCES LIMITED



Creditors having debts or claims against the
above-named Company are required to send particulars thereof
to the undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 13th day of November, A.D., 2009. In default thereof
they will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
by the Liquidator.


Dated the 8th day of October, A.D., 2009.




Robert Lazar
Liquidator
770 South Dixie Highway
Coral Gables, FLORDIA 33146





Legal Notice



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)


FORTVIEW LIMITED
In Voluntary liquidation

"Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
FORTVIEW LIMITED. is in Dissolution."

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 8th day of October,
2009.

Mr. Dirk Oppelaar
Chemin Jacques Attenville 27
1218 Grand-Saconnex
Switzerland
Liquidator




NOT ICE

SPA RESOURCES LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) SPA RESOURCES LIMITED is in dissolution under
the provisions of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
7th day of October,2009 when its Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Robert Lazar of
770 South Dixie Highway, Coral Gables, Florida 33146.


Dated the 8th day of October, 2009.


HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT
CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company


NOTICE



STEINER SPA RESORTS LIMITED


(In Voluntary Liquidation)

In accordance with Section 238 of The Companies Act, NOTICE
is hereby given that at an Extraordinary General Meeting of the
Company held on 30th September, A.D., 2009 the following
were confirmed as Special Resolutions:

1. That STEINER SPA RESORTS LIMITED be wound
up voluntarily.

2. That Mr. Robert Lazar be appointed the Liquidator for
the purpose of such winding up.

Dated the 7th day of October, A.D., 2009.



ROBERT LAZAR
Liquidator


WIS SES ROYAL FIDELITY .

C P A L" .: 11- " i.A 1-.
FRIDAY. 9 OCTOBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX' CLOSE 1 478.40 I CHG -0.03 -CHG 0 00 I YTD -233.99 I YTD : -13 66
FINDEX- CLOSE 789 77 I YTD -5 40 . I 2008 -12.31 a
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM I TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52 k-Hi 52 k-Lo.Secur Pie.lousClose Today's Close Change DaIly Vol EPS i Di. PE Yield
171 1 03 AML Foods Limited 1 15 1 15 0 0 0 0127 0 000 91 000%
11 80 9 90 Bahamas Property Fund 10 75 10 75 0 00 0 992 0 200 10 8 1 86%
930 590 Bank of Bahamas 590 590 000 921 0244 0260 242 441%
0 89 0 63 Benchmark 063 063 0 00 0 877 0 000 N/M 000%/
349 315 Bahamas Waste 315 315 000 0125 0 090 252 286%
2 37 2 14 Fidelity Bank 2 37 2 37 0 00 055 0 040 43 1 1 69%
14 20 9 93 Cable Bahamas 993 993 0 00 1 406 0250 7 1 252%
2 88 2 72 Colina Holdings 2 72 2 72 0 00 0 249 0 040 10 9 1 47%
750 5 26 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 5 54 5 54 0 00 2,700 0419 0 300 13 2 542%
385 1 27 Consolidated Water BDRs 314 312 -002 0111 0052 28 1 167%/
2 85 1 32 Doctor's Hospital 2 05 2 05 0 00 0 625 0 080 3 3 390%
820 660 Famguard 660 660 000 0420 0 240 157 364%
12 50o 880 Finco 930 930 0 00 0322 0520 289 559%
1171 10 00 FirstCaribbean Bank 10 00 10 00 0 00 0631 0350 158 350%
553 411 Focol (S) 411 411 000 0332 0150 124 365%
100 100 Focol Class B Preference 100 100 0 00 0 000 0000 N/M 0 00%
o 45 0 27 Freeport Concrete O 27 0 27 0 00 0 035 0 000 77 0 00%
9 02 5 49 ICD Utilities 559 559 0 00 0407 0 500 137 894%
12 00 9 95 J S Johnson 995 995 0 00 0952 0640 105 643%
10 00 10 00 Premier Real Estate 10 00 10 00 0 00 0156 0 000 641 0 00%/
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b-ses)
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest Maturity
100000 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100 00 0 00 7% 19 October 2017
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100 00 0 00 Prime + 1 75% 19 October 2022
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 00 0 00 7% 30 May 2013
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
52 k-HI 52 k-Lo Symbol Bidt i sk i LasI Price V.eekly Vol EPS t Di P E Yield
14 60 7 92 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 92 8 42 1400 -2 246 0 000 N/M 0 00%
8 00 600 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 200 625 400 0000 0480 N/M 7 80%
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
41 00 29 00 ABDAB 30 13 31 59 2900 4540 0 000 9 03 0 00%/
055 0 40 RND Holdings 0 45 0 55 0 55 0 00O2 0 000 261 90 0 00%/
BISX Listed mutual Funds
52 k-.H 5 k.Lo. Fund Name- N-V YTD Last 1 2 r.lonths D, Yield NAV Dale
1 4038 1 3344 CFAL Bond Fund 1 4038 372 520 31-Aug-09
3 0350 2 8952 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2 8300 -3 75 -6 75 30-Sep-09
1 4932 1 4146 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 4932 4 15 556 2-Oct-09
36090 30941 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3 0941 -8 61 13 59 31-Aug-09
13 1751 12 3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13 1751 4 42 5 86 30-Sep-09
101 6693 100 0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101 6693 1 10 1 67 30-Jun -09
100 9600 93 1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96 7398 0 35 -4 18 30-Jun-09
1 0000 1 0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1 0000 0 00 0 00 31-Dec-07
10 5884 9 0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 10 5884 5 88 5 88 30-Sep-09
1 0757 1 0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1 0757 3 86 5 30 30-Sep-09
1 0364 1 0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1 0305 -0 24 0 22 30-Sep-09
1 0709 1 0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1 0709 3 24 4 54 30-Sep-09
MARKET TERMS
52wk-Hi Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid - Buying price of Colna and Fdety
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask S - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close - Current days weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from dayto day EPs $- A company repoed earnings per share for the last 12 mths
DailyVol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM - Not Meanngful
PIE -Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX- The F-dety Bahamas Stock Index January 1 1994= -100
(S) - 4-for-1 Stok Split - Effetive Date B//2007
(81) - 3-for-1 Stok plit - Effective Date 7t11t2007
TO TRADE CALL. COLINA 242.502.700 I RO-YALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 I FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242.-396.4000 D LONIAL 242.502-7525


NOTICE
COOLANEY LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, commencing on the 25th day of November,
2009. Articles of Dissolution have been duly registered by
the Registrar. The Joint Liquidators are Paul Andy Gomez
and Kendrick K. Christie, P.O. Box N-8285, Nassau, The
Bahamas.

All persons having Claims against the above-named
Company are required on or before the 26th day of
October, 2009 to send their names and addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Joint
Liquidators of the Company or, in default thereof, they
may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.

Dated this 1st day of October, 2009

PAUL ANDY GOMEZ and KENDRICK K. CHRISTIE
Joint Liquidators


~I~Vh3~~







T TINT DMO B 1,0,AN


By JEFFARAH GIBSON the cells both good and bad, but or death in women who became
specifically those of the cancerous pregnant after a breast cancer diag-
W HEN you're pregnant tumours, so a woman is in the posi- nosis.
the last thing you prob- tion where she has a fetus in her Pregnancy did not appear to cause
ablywant to be told is womb which will be affected detri- new cancers to develop.
ably mentally by the treatment," he said. Women who were diagnosed with
that you have breast cancer - as if While waiting until the third breast cancer during pregnancy did
carrying a baby isn't overwhelming trimester to treat is a must, he noted as well in the long term as women
enough, the news of breast cancer that this is also a very nerve-wracking with the same type and stage of can-
just adds to the immense emotional situation. cer who were not pregnant when
load and health fears. "We continue to monitor the can- they were diagnosed.
There are some questions you cer, but waiting until the third
should ask, for instance, at what stage trimester can be a scary situation, If breast cancer is in your body
is the cancer? Will it affect the baby? since the cancer was at a curable during pregnancy, can it spread to
If you continue with the pregnancy stage and it could spread to the lungs the baby?
will this pose difficulties for you? or other parts of the body by the No. A barrier between the moth-
Does medication or treatment harm third trimester," he said. er's and the baby's body blocks any
the baby? How long do you have to Even surgeries can sometimes be cancer cells from entering the baby
wait until doctors are able to treat detrimental to the well-being of both or its blood supply.
you? the mother and her baby. Dr Curling
When a woman is diagnosed with said that doctors are often skeptical What about mammograms?
breast cancer during pregnancy the about performing surgeries on preg- Mammography during pregnancy
emotional and physical pressure is nant women because this can also may be considered for women with
considerable and she is asked to harm the baby. signs or symptoms of a possible
make some serious decisions. Breast-feeding during pregnancy breast problem.
Oncologist Duvaughn Curling at is also not recommended by doctors Small studies have found that
the Princess Margaret Hospital told for women undergoing chemothera- mammography poses little to no
Tribune Woman : "Options are dis- py. harm to the fetus during pregnancy if
cussed and if her tumour is very From the website www.breast- a lead shield is placed on the belly to
aggressive and has spread rapidly we cancer.org here are some frequently block any possible radiation scatter.
give her the option to terminate the asked questions and answers about But the accuracy of mammogra-
pregnancy for her well-being," he breast cancer during pregnancy. phy is limited during pregnancy. In
said. three different studies, the percent-
Although breast cancer does not Does pregnancy does lower sur- age of breast cancers in pregnant
affect the baby directly, doctors will vival or increase the risk of recur- women that mammography detected
wait until the third trimester of preg- rence? was between 62 per cent and 78 per
nancy to treat the mother. For women with a personal histo- cent.
(ti ? - - __-j.._j--i_ __j-i_.�.j- i y 01_^ U1__d _5L � Ldr1 1L_ rT.^'^__�4__1, 1, _�+u �+u 5LUU1^^^^^^^^^^H^Hil5 11dV^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


VVe do Inot treat the mother until i
the third trimester because medica-
tion can harm the baby. The thing
about chemotherapy is that it kills


ry ot ULreast cancerllL, stu LLiUes iave
shown that:
There was no apparent long-term
increased risk of cancer recurrence


I i s s lgnilcantllLy o1UWer Lildan Lt1
average 85 per cent detection rate
in non-pregnant women.


WHEN A woman is diagnosed with breast cancer during pregnancy the emotional
and physical pressure is considerable and she is asked to make some serious
decisions.


Is there a silent relationship killer?


Preventing acne

on the body

BLACKHEADS and
whiteheads can appear any-
where on the face, chest,
back, or even lower. Black-
heads occurring on the
body are most common in
those with genetically oily
skin. However, a person
using comedogenic or acne-
genic lotions or body care
products can experience
blackheads on the body.

Here are six tips to help
control and prevent body
acne:

* Wear natural fibres, or
fabrics specifically engi-
neered to wick moisture
away from the skin. This is
especially important if
you're working out.
* Experiencing acne
where you carry a back-
pack or purse? Carry a bag
with your hands instead.
* Shower as soon as pos-
sible after perspiring. If you
can't shower, carry a travel-
friendly product containing
salicylic acid to help purify
and clear skin of excess oils.
* Wash the affected
areas with a cleanser
designed for acne-prone
skin.
* After allowing the skin
to dry, apply a product con-
taining benzoyl peroxide to
the affected areas.
* If you often suffer from
dry skin, moisturise using
a non-comedogenic mois-
turiser. Excessively dry skin
can lead to breakouts.









behin the news,-


HOW many times have
we met people who have
lived or are living with debil-
itating illnesses? How often
have you heard them say
they did everything they
were supposed to do, and
they still got sick? They did
not smoke, lived as stress-
free as possible, exercised
regularly, and even ate an
organic diet. The insidious
disease crept up on them
without them noticing. All
too often we come to the
conclusion that there seems
to be no rhyme or reason to
what we are dished out in
life. Even when we think we
are making clear and deci-
sive choices in life - things
happen.
We may have been given
scientific proof that we have
a disease and a plan is made
on how to treat the prob-
lem. We take medication,
do particular exercises,
change our diet, change our
lifestyle and even detoxify
our bodies of the offending
poisons. If we follow the
rules, we believe we will suc-
ceed and we will be healed.
People who have gone down
the same path before us
emphasise the importance
of 'positive thinking'. A
healthy mind will heal a sick
body. Believers of natural
healing unequivocally
believe this philosophy.
If we can apply these
instructions to heal our bod-
ies why can we not apply the
same thinking to our minds?
Aren't our minds attached
to our bodies? Why do we
treat them separately when
we are well aware that they
need each other to be able
to work?
Our minds can make us
physically ill. Like wise, our
minds and behaviour can
become ill if we ingest the
wrong thing.
As humans we have a del-
icate inner engine that needs
to be well maintained and
looked after to ensure that it
runs smoothly.
Relationship therapy
reveals the intricate work-


ings between two people.
For most people their inti-
mate relationship seems to
require so much hard work.
The mere fact of just hav-
ing to get the 'communica-
tion' right just proves too
frustrating and people give
up. A distancing and dis-
connect takes hold of the
couple and issues seem
unsolvable.
But is it as simplistic as
'active listening' and
'expressing yourself' that
produces positive thoughts
and a loving attitude? Isn't it
really how we view ourselves
and the other person that
determines how the conver-
sation is going to proceed?
All too often we bring
preconceived thoughts, atti-
tudes and perceptions to the
discussion table. Before we
even get started the toxins
are in the air. It is these
worm-like 'toxic thoughts'
that are the silent killer to a
relationship.
Labelling and name call-
ing sets the stage for defen-
sive response and soon the
argument moves away from
the original issues. Things
are brought up from the
past and the blame and guilt
cycle keeps on turning. Sub-
consciously, people may use
this tactic to completely
avoid dealing with the real
issues in front of them. How
easy is it to keep on blaming
the other person instead of
acknowledging you have
contributed in some way?
Toxic thoughts cause toxic
behaviour.
The way to recognize if
you are a toxic thinker is to
listen carefully to your 'self
talk' over any given day.
'Self talk' are those rapid
and constant little conver-
sations you have with your-
self. It is how we reason,
argue and agree with our-
selves. Even for those pre-
dominantly positive thinkers
there will always be
moments when negative
thoughts slip in.
Occasional negative
thoughts are one thing.


They show the grey area in
our thinking where we can
still rationalise things. Life is
full of grey areas because
we are all different, and def-
initely not perfect. But tox-
ic thinking means that we
have slipped down that slip-
pery pole and thoughts
become irrational and unre-
alistic. If we keep on letting
our mind move in this direc-
tion then our thinking
becomes habitual. We start
generalising about someone
or something. "Oh, well I
don't expect him to do that
for me 'cos he's a lying son
of..." or "What is the point
in me trying 'cos I can never
do anything right in her
eyes..."
Occasional toxic thinking


affects everyone, but the
key is not to let it take root
in your thinking. Yes, it is
that baggage we carry
around with us, but surely
we can train ourselves to
leave it somewhere. Toxic
thinking is exhausting,
unproductive and can defi-
nitely make us physically
sick. It is the root cause of
the death in a relationship.
Work together and purge
yourselves of the poisons
with in your relationship.
However, if things have
become calcified, get pro-
fessional help and detoxify
your relationship. It is pos-
sible to heal your mind,
behaviors will change and
your relationships will flour-
ish because of it.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visif wir websPje at wwv.'Cob.edU.bif








-rite CoIkcge ofThe BlI ias
in ironjunrlikn v"ih h e LUiti-d Sht-es Embassy

prcski~ts

a SmalL Island !Sustainiibilift 'town Haill Meetinig

M. Ith 3,pLC iIdI 6U L-L spuJker J0n a h a a To artel lot,
D)iI I vi i ir 0"L11.11 w 'iiuli]h: TLi4JIisflt


\iaLiVIil (Ci lui-ijtiil Tiawnl'kr Nla~gwiMi~i:
'I iic S'uWmj1eI n.h k -telo~ ' I pnivni Pi m ziiiinga

Wiedatsday, October L4, 2009
6 p.m. - 8p.m.
Per-forming Arts Centre
The College of The Bahatmas
Oakes Field Camnpus

'IIle L' uiNI L t IIIi; ILed lo alein~d


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009, PAGE 11B


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE^WOMAN I2BTUESDAYOCTOBER13,2009THETRIBUNE


HELPING CHILDREN DEAL WITH THE



death of a loved one


By JEFFARAH GIBSON


HOW do you tell a
child that a loved
one close to them,
their mother, father or grand-
parent, is gone and is never
coming back?
What words do you use to explain
death to a child? Do you use
euphemisms such as "went to sleep or
"went away"? What sort of atmosphere
do you create to ensure that a child
feels comfortable enough to talk about
the situation?
Losing a loved one is probably the
most painful experience we can go
through at any age. It hurts even more
when you and your loved one had a
very close relationship. In the midst of
death, the anguish and pain children
feel is sometimes overlooked. Some
people think because children don't
understand death, they don't feel pain
over the loss of a loved one in the way
adults do.
When a loved one dies, parents and
guardians should first discuss with the
child what has happened, explain to
them clearly about the loss without
using euphemisms, and then take nec-
essary measures to ensure that their
child copes with grief in a healthy man-
ner.
Angela Ward, a psychologist at the
Renascence Institute International, says
it is very important to consider the age


of the child when discussing the death
of a close relative.
"Parents should keep in mind the
age of a child when speaking to them
about the situation. Children under the
age of four understand differently than
a child who is over the age six," she
said.
A child's capacity to understand, Dr
Ward says, depends on their age. At
ages six to ten a child's view of the
world is very literal, the situation must
be explained in concrete, vivid terms.


"Kids have a harder time under-
standing and they may continue to ask
questions to understand what has hap-
pened. They may ask where the loved
one is and when will the loved one
return," she said.
When this happens, show no frustra-
tion and reiterate the information as
calmly as possible, and as many times as
possible until the child's curiosity is sat-
isfied.
Dr Ward also noted that this could
be a very good time to share beliefs


Uni tecid isaoutfie 0 i
*oush0l ntI ay0 hng lketh
*ovd* ne'go lst *0'wn0awy0

16 4 Ty to xplai in bsictems


These types of explanations should
omit the use of euphemisms, since they
are confusing and do not help with a
child's understanding of death.
"Until the child is about five or six
you should not say things like the loved
one 'got lost' or 'went away'. Try to
explain in basic terms. For instance, if
the loved one was ill or elderly a parent
can say something like 'the loved one's
body stopped working and the doctor
was not able to fix it'," Dr Ward said.
And while you may explain to your
child in clear, concise terms, this may
not inhibit the probing questions that
will follow.


about an afterlife or heaven with a child.
To vent or get through the loss of a
loved one children may not cry, she
said, but express their pain in different
ways.
"A young child might not cry or they
might react by acting out, getting angry,
or becoming hyperactive. Teenagers
may also become more angry and con-
fide in a close friend. When this hap-
pens parents and guardians should not
take this behaviour personal," she said.
Denial, anger, bargaining, depres-
sion, and acceptance are the stages of
grief a child must experience to over-
come the hurt, Dr Ward explained.


"Denial is the phase where the child
rejects the idea that the loved one is no
longer with them. Afterwards the may
vent by getting angry or becoming
hyperactive. The child will begin to say
things like 'if I had been a better child
Daddy would have been here' or 'if I did
all my chores Grandma would still be
alive'. After a period of bargaining the
child may become depressed, thinking
they were the cause of the family mem-
ber's death. However, these reactions to
the death of a love one can happen in
any order," she said.
Eventually after a period of nine
months to two years the child will begin
to accept the loss. But if this does not
happen and you recognize that your
child is not coping with the death fit-
tingly then professional help is needed.
"Children must grieve in a proper
way in order to overcome their hurt
over the loss. When children don't
grieve properly then they hold on to
the pain for many years. Parents should
watch for any signs that their kid needs
help dealing with the situation, and in
the event they do, parents should seek
a child psychologist or a counsellor,"
she said.
If a child has a hard time dealing with
the death it might not be a good idea to
take the child to the memorial or funer-
al service, Dr Ward said, emphasising
that the decision to attend lies solely
in the hands of the child.
"It's really up to the child, if they do
not want to attend then parents should
not force their child to go. If the child
wants to attend then parents should
explain to the child what happens at a
memorial or funeral service ensuring
that they are very open and honest,"
she said.
Do all that you can to extend love to
your child in times of death. Children
are very fragile, and how they cope
with grief now will influence their emo-
tional stability in the future.


CABBAGES are gross feeders and need uninterrupted growth to be
successful.


BROCCOLI
heads should
be cut before
any sign of
yellowing
appears.


* , L 'b '

AS



PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY


VACANCY NOTICE

MANAGER III (HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT)

SANDILANDS REHABILITATION CENTER

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post of
Manager III, Human Resources Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Public
Hospitals Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:

* Bachelors Degree in Business Administration, Management, Public
Administration, Human Resources or equivalent and three (3) years
relevant experience.
* Strong interpersonal, networking and negotiation skills; also high-level
analytical, creative and problem solving skills
* Be computer literate
* Excellent communication skills both oral and written

Job Summary
The Manager III is responsible for assisting with the day to day administration of
human resources transactions and services; to ensure that the Sandilands
rehabilitation Centre human resources policies and procedures, transactions and
services are aligned with the Authority's business objectives.

The duties will include, but not limited to the following:

1. Probationary Appointments
Confirmations in substantive posts
Promotions and reclassification
Benefits under the Authority's policies
Benefits under the law, e.g. Employment Act, Pension Act and National
Insurance Act
Employee transfer and secondment
Employee grievances
Disciplinary actions and penalties
Involuntary and voluntary terminations

2. Liaising with Payrolls Unit with matters relating to salaries adjustments
and financial clearances.

3. Managing the performance appraisal process for staff within assigned
areas of responsibilities, ensuring that evaluations are ongoing and
appraisal forms are prepared, distributed and reviewed.

4. Opportunities will also be given for involvement in human resources
strategic functions such as policies, development, quality improvement
initiatives.

The successful applicant will be responsible to the Department Head.

The salary for the post is in Scale HAAS8 ($28,050 x 700 - $34,350) per annum.
Starting salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Letters of application, resume, documentary evidence of qualification and three
(3) references should be submitted , no later than 30th October, 2009 to the
Human Resources Director, Public Hospitals Authority, P.O. Box N 8200,
Corporate Office, Third terrace Centerville, Nassau Bahamas.


I
I


r


Hou

keep


chiropractic

ps you healthy?


HOW does chiropractic
heal me and keep me
healthy? I'm asked that
question often.
In order to understand
how chiropractic can help
a certain condition it is
important to get a better
understanding of what chi-
ropractic is and how the
body works.
Chiropractic is a branch
of the healing arts which is
based on the premise that
good health depends, in
part, upon a normally func-
tioning nervous system,
especially the spine and the
nerves extending from the
spine to all parts of the
body.
Chiropractic comes from
the Greek word 'chiroprak-
tikos', meaning "effective
treatment by hand."
Chiropractic stresses the
idea that the cause of many
disease processes begins
with the body's inability to
adapt to its environment. It
looks to address these dis-
eases by locating and adjust-
ing a musculoskeletal area
of the body which is func-
tioning improperly.
These musculoskeletal
areas which do not function
properly are what chiro-
practic calls a vertebral sub-
luxation.
A subluxation interferes
with normal nerve function
which results in decreased
ability for the brain to com-
municate properly with the
body. This could eventually
result is some sort of condi-
tion or symptom. When you
suffer from a subluxation,
your natural healing ability
is lessened, your resistance
is lowered and you can get
sick.
The examination of the
spine to evaluate structure
and function is what makes
chiropractic different from
other healthcare proce-
dures. Your spinal column
is a series of movable bones
which begin at the base of
your skull and end in the
centre of your hips. Thirty-
one pairs of spinal nerves
extend down the spine from
the brain and exit through a
series of openings. The
nerves leave the spine and
form a complicated network
which influences every liv-
ing tissue in your body.
Accidents, falls, stress,
tension, overexertion, and
countless other factors can
result in a displacement or
derangements of the spinal
column, causing irritation
to spinal nerve roots. These
irritations (subluxations) are
often what cause malfunc-
tion in the human body. It is
the chiropractors' job to
reduce the interference that
is caused by the subluxa-
tion. This is done by adjust-
ing the spine to return the
normal function to the ner-
vous system so your body
can operate more efficient-
ly and more comfortably.
You cannot be truly
healthy, reach your full
potential or achieve your
greatest healing ability if
you have pressure on your
nervous system.

* For more information con-
tact Dr Susan Donald at Life
Chiropractic Centre on Village
Road, telephone number 393-
2774 or e-mail her at sdon-
ald@coralwave.com


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I


f0a G E CBG-rc


The Cabbage Clan

THERE are two very important aspects of raising members
of the cabbage clan: They should have vigorous, uninterrupted
initial growth and they are gross feeders.
If a cabbage seedling sits still for a while and does not show
daily growth then the outlook is poor. I use Miracle Gro potting
soil for my cabbages even though I may use a cheaper version
for other plants. Daily watering is all part of the initial growth
surge.
Once the individual plants are four or five inches tall and have
lost the colour from the cruciform seed leaves, they are ready
to be transplanted. The soil must be amended with plenty of
compost, commercial cow manure and fertilizer. I have found
that cabbages do not mind rocky soil but whatever soil there is
between the rocks must be rich.
When cabbages have become established they should receive
monthly side dressings of fertilizer, or regular spraying with sol-
uble fertilisers at least once a week. Any surrounding weeds
should be removed so the plants have no competition.
A mature heading cabbage changes its nature and begins to
disdain water. In fact, a heavy downpour may cause a cab-
bage to split. This is not a disaster for the home gardener but
ruins a crop for a commercial farmer. It is in the nature of
home gardeners to sow a good number of cabbages at the
same time. This causes a glut and the cabbages must stay in the
ground for several weeks before heading towards the kitchen.
Splitting can be avoided by cutting away some of the roots
below ground with a long knife. Leave enough roots to main-
tain the plant but cut enough away to avoid a large intake of
water.
Broccoli
Broccoli is a very popular member of the cabbage clan
because of its perceived health-giving properties and its ease
of preparation (sometimes eaten raw). Broccoli, unlike head-
ing cabbage, must be picked as soon as it approaches maturity.
The head should be compact with a bluish-green colour. The
slightest sign of yellowing, caused by the production of flow-
ers, means the broccoli is overripe and inedible.
Once a heading cabbage has been cut the stalk and roots
should be pulled out of the ground and disposed of. With
broccoli, however, there is usually a secondary crop of small
heads called flowerets that can be more productive than the
initial large head. These should be picked every two or three
days before their stalks get elongated. There are some broccoli

SEE page 13


PAGE 12B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2009, PAGE 13B


WOMAN


Communication Catch 22



lips for taking a proactive position in your job


A N old friend
approached me last
week and told me
the following story: An
employee approached him to
speak to an executive about a
matter because the employee
wasn't comfortable speaking
to the executive directly. In
the spirit of helping a fellow
co-worker, my friend
approached the executive on
behalf of the employee and
the executive was subse-
quently preoccupied with why
the employee didn't approach
her directly instead of focusing
on resolving the employee's
concern.
So my friend asked me,
what do you do in a situation
like this? This option was the
most palatable to the employ-
ee because if the employee
decided to do nothing, the
issue would remain unre-
solved. Alternatively, the
employee perceived high risk
in approaching the executive
directly, and lower risk in hav-
ing someone represent the sit-
uation to the executive on her
behalf and it still backfired.
A catch 22 situation is
described as "a contradictory
or self-defeating course of
action or a tricky or disadvan-
tageous condition." (Farlex)
Based on the information
given to me by my friend, the
employee appears to be in a
catch 22 where both inaction
and attempts at resolution
lead to perceived undesirable
results.
In environments like this,
the end result is that the
majority of employees collec-
tively refrain from speaking


up because they prefer to
experience a proliferation of
dysfunction collectively
instead of being singled out
and targeted as the enemy
because they spoke up.
I received a similar call this
week from a fellow consul-
tant in Canada. She said that
she had an important client
with whom she had a long-
standing, positive relationship
who wanted her to perform a
certain task. The task was
something she was not will-
ing to do and when she
refused, her reputation was
attacked and all her contracts
within the organisation were
terminated. She paid the price
for speaking up.
In unhealthy work envi-
ronments, speaking up may
be viewed as harmful to
career progression. In these
types of environments, the
status quo is maintained at all
costs and people in positions
of authority cover up the
issues, distorting the truth
through self-deception, min-
imisation and other types of
camouflage techniques. In
fact, entire systems of reward
like promotion and bonuses
perpetuate this type of cen-
sorship and suppression.
So what do you do if you
are caught in a communica-
tion catch 22? As I men-
tioned previously, based on
anecdotal evidence, the vast
majority decide to say nothing
and just "kiss until they can
kick." I witness this approach
a whole lot, but years later I
often meet the same people
in the same company, some-
times in the same position


saying the same thing and
praying for early retirement.
So here are four tips to help
you to be proactive.

Strategise
In the first example, the
employee deployed a strategy
to ask someone to represent
his case because he felt the
other person could influence a
desired outcome and lower
his exposure to the risk of vic-
timisation. This is a reason-
able strategy in theory, but
always remember to factor in
as many variables as possible.
Give some thought to more
of the dynamics of the situa-
tion which include:
1. The executive's desire to
help versus their need to cov-
er up and perpetuate the sys-
tem of dysfunction. This is
sometimes hard to uncover
because some of us expect
executives to be interested in
the well-being of employees.
2. The executive's value sys-
tem (does the executive value
being liked, approachable and
doing right over being chal-
lenged respectfully). In mak-
ing this evaluation, the
employee should take a look
at what motivates the execu-
tive to further mitigate risk.
3. Is there another way to
get the message across other
without using a direct
approach.
4. Who is the right messen-
ger?
5. Is there a bias against
you?

Work Together
At work we learn that we
have to "look out for number


one" because no-one can be
trusted. One way to start
changing the entire system of
support for dysfunction
(silence is part of the support
system) is to see yourself as
part of a whole and not a sin-
gle unit constantly in self-
preservation mode. While
self- preservation may be
appropriate, think about what
you can do to support your
co-workers.

Connect More Effectively
Hone your communication
skills so that you don't inad-
vertently put the listener on
the defensive. You have no
control over someone else's
ego but you do have control
over the verbal and non-ver-
bal signals you transmit.
Improving your communica-
tion arsenal by improving
your listening skills, emotion-
al intelligence, authenticity,
negotiation skills and opti-
mism can help you to connect
at a deeper level and mitigate
some of the risks of commu-
nication. Authentic connec-
tion can lead to building
healthy, trust-based work
relationships that can give you
the leverage you need to
speak up with lower threat of
victimisation.

Create or Update Your
Career Plan
Everything starts with you,
so think about a proactive
approach designed to help
you develop yourself and start
on a path to finding or creat-
ing the right career and right
working environment. This
may mean you will take the


risk and say things that may
not be palatable or you may
decide to seek another work
environment. It is important
to make a decision regarding
whether you will stay or go
and whatever the decision,
create your plan. "Knee jerk"
responses are not optimal
because they don't equip you
with the skills you need to
successfully navigate similar
situations in the future and
they can create irreparable
damage.

Ideally, the vision for and
commitment to driving posi-
tive cultural change should
start at the top of the organi-
sation and cascade through-
out. If you are not being sup-
ported by an executive vision
for positive change you can
only do what is within your
control. Each of the tips will
take time, commitment and
creativity and they are cen-
tered on what you can do to
improve your circumstances.


* Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organ-
isational Soul, a human
resources consulting and lead-
ership development company. If
you are interested in exploring
how you can create higher per-
forming team leaders, you con-
tact her at www.orgsoul.com.


The Cabbage Clan

FROM page 12

varieties that are produced
solely for their flowerets and
do not produce large heads.

Cauliflower
Cauliflower is botanically
very close to broccoli, but cau-
liflower has a richer, creamier
taste. It is more of a cool
weather crop, but you can buy
tropical varieties that are best
suited for our vegetable sea-
son conditions. Some varieties
claim to be self-blanching, but
this should be ignored and the
long leaves tied together with
twine once the head begins to
form. Untie your cauliflowers
every day and inspect the
head for worms or caterpil-
lars. This only takes a few sec-
onds per plant but saves you
the disappointment of losing a
plant that takes months to
grow and then gets destroyed
in the final few days.
Cauliflower heads should
be cut while the curds are
firm and tight, and the rest
of the plant should be pulled
and disposed of. If you have
too many heads at one time
you must cut them anyway.
They will last a fair time in
the refrigerator but will
flower and become inedible if
left on the plant.

Kohlrabi
Kohlrabi is an under-
utilised member of the cab-
bage clan. It is a cross
between cabbage and turnip
but is far milder than both its
parents. Kohlrabi grows
above ground and reaches
maturity when it is the size
of a baseball. When cooked
in water it retains its crisp-
ness but is best employed
raw. A slaw made from
coarsely grated kohlrabi is far
superior to a cabbage slaw.


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()( TOi ER 1R I


WOMEN TAKING ON 'TRADITIONALLY

MASCULINE ROLES' LEADING TO VIOLENCE?


By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter


W ITH violence in the
S Bahamas on the
rise, people are shocked to see
more and more women in the
country becoming involved in
violent acts that are normally
associated with men.
There is much talk about the coun-
try's young men being 'no good' and
'criminal-minded', but it seems that
times, and women, they are a-chang-
ing.
Are we noticing a new trend where
women are getting involved in crimes
that are usually committed by men?
What would push a woman who is
considered to be a 'nurturer' to vio-
lent behaviour? What factors
involved could have caused this?
Tribune Woman wanted these
questions answered and spoke with
a behavioral expert who broke
down the possibilities.
Psychiatrist Dr Nelson Clarke
said that while no clear-cut con-
clusions can be made, by study-
ing women's backgrounds certain
inferences can be drawn.
He says that it's important to


note that "human behavior is very complex."
"What we think may be happening to cause
somebody to behave in a certain way might
not be the complete answer, there may be oth-
er factors that may be operating to cause a
particular behaviour."
Dr Clarke listed a number of factors that
could have affected women who commit violent
crimes. First, he noted what he calls "a turn in
the tide" of what society expects of women
nowadays.
"Society has changed, the expectations of
what a woman's role is to be. We have very
(defined) ideas of how a woman is to be femi-
nine and ideas of what a man should be.
"I think one of the things that's happening in
the Bahamas is that traditional male behav-
iours are being taken on by females. It's now
being accepted that women can do these things
and still be looked at as being feminine," he
said.
"More and more women are taking on typi-
cal male behaviours like drinking and hanging
out at the bars and are entering historically
male jobs, and it doesn't surprise me that we see
women doing other things that we used to think
were the problems of men, like being engaged
in armed robbery."
Dr Clarke said he believes that society's
desensitisation to these behaviours overtime
has caused women to feel it's okay to act in this
way.
"Years ago you would find that less women
would drink publicly and curse, now it hap-
pens on a regular basis."
He suggests that the current strain on people


caused by the economic slump is also a factor.
"We have women committing crimes of
acquisition to gain money, and they are doing
this because they're feeling the squeeze and
financial pressure with them being the head of
the homes. Many of them are single mothers,"
he said.
Dr Clarke said there is also the possibility
that many female offenders could have been
influenced by men who set them up to carry out
their dirty work, or who persuade them to be
accomplices.
The way women are shown in the media can
also have negative effects, he said.
Movies and shows on television that are tai-
lored to appeal to women often have story-
lines about sex, money and murder, and may be
giving women "ideas," Dr Clarke said.
Some women may revel in "seeing another
woman take the plunge," he explained, and so
they feel that "if she can do it, then I can do it
too."
"I've spoken with women who have had the
impulse to hurt other people because they were
wronged or felt they were hurt. When they feel
their cries have not been heeded they have
thoughts of taking matters in their own hands,
especially when they feel they've been wronged
and there has been no redress."
Dr Clarke said that the "very strict defini-
tions" of what makes a "good woman" don't
really apply anymore, adding that he suspects
that one of the factors leading women down the
path of crime "may be that some of them may
have had experiences where they had to be
tough in order to survive."


A GROUP of professional
women is taking off their high
heels, shedding their lab coats and
putting down their briefcases on
a weekly basis to mentor young
women and teach them to look
beyond themselves.
'Women of Essence' was born
out of an idea Sophia Fisher, pro-
prietor of the Community Phar-
macy, had a few years ago.
She saw too many young girls
walking the streets aimlessly after
school, often getting themselves
into trouble, and not really spend-
ing enough time learning how to
be successful in life.
She figured that they may only
need someone to show them love
and care. And that's exactly what
she did.
In no time, Women of Essence
grew to include her friends and
family members who shared her
vision to improve the quality of
life for Bahamians by helping
impressionable minds to learn the
value of life and to believe in their
talents.
This charitable organisation's
main focus is the mentoring pro-
gramme, which is designed to help


mold young ladies through eti-
quette lessons, personal grooming
and development classes.
But Ms Fisher and the Women
of Essence do a lot more.
They meet every Tuesday at the
Farm Road Urban Renewal Cen-
tre and assist with homework, so
that by the time the children go
home in the afternoon, tired par-
ents can peruse already completed
assignments.

Activities

The group also engages in fun-
filled activities, one of which was
held last month to help the girls
start the new school year in grand
style.
The young women had lunch
with their mentors, gave out
deserving awards, and prayed for a
safe school year.
'Women of Essence' are the
ones who move through Nassau's
inner-city areas, washing the hair
of girls and giving them beautiful
braided hairstyles to go back to
school with. The girls also received
school supplies and encouraging


words for their future achieve-
ments.
Women of Essence have found
themselves in the schools and in
the homes of children they have
come to love.
The mentoring programme first
started several years ago in the
Step Street area, with the help of
Michael Pintard, who helped the
women rally the young girls in the
area.


They then moved into the Clar-
idge Road area with the support of
St Cecilia MP Cynthia "Mother"
Pratt, who served as an inspira-
tion to them.
The group has been in the Farm
Road area for two years now, and
the children of Farm Road don't
seem to be willing to let them
move on to other inner-city areas.
Women of Essence may have to
grow to meet the demand.


Any Christian, professional
woman with a commitment to
making a sacrifice for the better-
ment of the youth can join - and
you can find Ms Fisher at her
Carmichael Road pharmacy - or
stop by the Farm Road Urban
renewal office on a Tuesday after-
noon. Ms Fisher, however, warned
those interested in helping that the
commitment to the organisation is
a true sacrifice.


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