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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01433
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: October 2, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01433

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TINGS TOUGH m
McDOUBLE J J]
FOR $3.79 'm i'W
HIGH 86F
LOW 77F
S. MOSTLY SUNNY,
;-- STRAY T-STORM


The


Tribune


5ATODWY4
BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


Volume: 105 No.260


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009


SE I S


0 'I


Legal experts speak

out as Britain dumps

the Privy Council
By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
WITH Britain formally abandoning the Privy Council as its
final court of appeal local legal experts again argued the need
for the Bahamas to seek a regional alternative to the council
within the next decade.
In an historical move, Britain's highest court was taken over
by its first Supreme Court after 11 justices were sworn in at a
London ceremony yesterday.
SEE page six

High drama in court
By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net


THERE were tense
moments in the high profile
attempted extortion trial of ex-
PLP senator Pleasant Bridge-
water and former ambulance
driver Tarino Lightbourne yes-
terday during cross-examina-
tion of a key prosecution wit-
ness.
The courtroom drama cli-
maxed yesterday afternoon
when a visibly displeased
Senior Justice Anita Allen rose
from the bench for several min-


utes after attorney Murrio
Ducille questioned: "Am I
going to be muzzled in my
cross-examination?"
US attorney Michael
McDermott, who represents
actor John Travolta, 55, was the
SEE page eight


VINCENT LLOYD FERGUSON'S widow Mary Ferguson is comforted by her son, Alex Ferguson (right). Behind is her daughter Anne Marie. The
funeral took place yesterday at St Francis Xavier Cathedral in West Hill Street. Mr Ferguson, a Bahamian sporting icon and school principal,
died on September 23 aged 71. MORE PHOTOS ON PAGE 2. SEE ALSO FRONT OF SPORTS SECTION


Murder trial suspended as accused I Claims Govt is failing


A LAWSUIT
has been filed in
the Supreme
Court accusing
talk show host
Steve McKinney (pictured)
and GEMS Radio of slan-
der.
The writ was filed by Tri-
bune columnist and public
school teacher Adrian Gib-
son, with whom Mr McK-
inney had engaged in a
SEE page eight


receives psychiatric tests in hospital
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - Officers who went to collect Wilfred McPhee
Jr from his holding cell before court yesterday morning were in
for a big surprise.
The murder trial in the Supreme Court had to be suspended
and McPhee taken to hospital for psychiatric evaluation after
he smeared faeces on the walls of his cell and claimed he was
crazy.
An ambulance and fire truck were summoned to the Garnet
Levarity Justice Centre just before court proceedings were
scheduled to begin at 10am.
McPhee, 26, was restrained and taken out on a stretcher by
SEE page six


to pay bills are denied
FNM Chairman Johnley
Ferguson denied claims that
Government is failing to pay
its contractors and suppliers
"on a timely basis."
Bradley Roberts, a former
PLP MP and party chairman,
told a meeting of the Rotary
Club of West Nassau yester-
day that he has been informed
that Government is "strug-
gling to meet its obligations."
He told Rotarians: "Con-
tractors and suppliers are not
SEE page six


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


I WAKE UP

Big Breakfast Sandwich


'Ich


0


Ju
U

U


ce s


Policeman charged

with under age sex
A POLICE officer charged
with having intercourse with ., .
under aged girl was arraigned,
in Magistrate's Court yester-
day.
Constable Dwight
Williamson, 33, of Nassau \ -
lage was arraigned before ( I ,
Magistrate Roger Gomez in
Court 1, Bank Lane on the
charge of having sexual inte! -


DWIGHT WILLIAMSON
leaving court yesterday.


SEE page six











Christian Council calls for more religious education


THE Bahamas Christian Council is calling for
a national re-examination of the church's Chris-
tian education efforts.
According to the BCC, the number of reli-
gious education programmes existing in the coun-
try is diminishing - and where they do exist,
teachers are often "ill-prepared."
This "lack of formal teaching of Bible doc-
trine" to children can be linked to rising crime, the
breakdown of the traditional family structure,
and general social unrest, claims the council.
"This is a time for the church to stand up and
bring some level of resolution to the national cri-
sis in the Bahamas."
"As Bahamians, our social lives in particular
have been modified, reduced, and changed over
the past 10 to 20 years and as a result we have wit-


nessed a significant change, both in the spiritual
and social life in our country.
"Consequently, over the last two years, our
lives have been drastically altered," the BCC said
in a statement.

Transforming
The BCC said the Bahamas needs a "spiritual
overhaul", and pastors must be empowered to
"revolutionise" their membership, with the ulti-
mate effect of transforming society.
The council lamented that over the "last 10 to
20 years, 20 per cent of our traditional churches'
Sunday schools and Christian education pro-
grammes have grown weak" while 50 per cent


of churches do not have a formal or systematic
teaching of Bible doctrine.
"Over the last 20 or so years, 40 per cent of our
local churches find it difficult to recruit commit-
ted persons to teach Sunday schools.
"The necessary vitality and substance that are
needed to bring a level of stability to our nation's
youth are missing in the spiritual development of
the next generation.
"If the truth be told, there is a lack of inspira-
tion from the pulpit that inspires members of the
congregation to live a life of self-sacrifice and
highlight the importance of integrity; how to love
your neighbour as yourself, and the eternal values
and destiny of man. All this and more should be
passed to the emerging generation," said the
BCC.


The council suggested that 65 per cent of all
Bahamians "do not know nor do they under-
stand the need for theology."
Meanwhile, 40 per cent of modern churches in
the Bahamas built their facilities with "no con-
sideration for Christian education or Sunday
schools", said the council.
"Can all of this contribute to the National Child
Council's report in 2008 which indicated that
there were 721 cases of child abuse reported in
our country?"
The BCC said that as the "church is restored
the nation will experience a level of social and
economic comfort."
The church "was, is, and will continue to be the
spiritual, moral and ethical strength of all soci-
eties," it added.


PHOTOS: Felipe Major TribuOe ',lilt


THE ST FRANCIS XAVIER CATHEDRAL is packed for the funeral service
of Vincent Lloyd Ferguson


POLITICIANS walk past the
coffin as they pay their last
respects to Vincent Lloyd Fer-
guson.



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D}VI.I.OPED) MY


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


-.4












Police in A


$400,000





drug bust


And last week CEO of
French banking giant BNP
Paribas, Baudouin Prot,
announced the bank will pull
out of Nassau by year end. It is
speculated the bank bowed to
political pressure under French
President Nikolas Sarkozy, and
the fear is other international
banks will follow.
This amendment is only one
of many steps to ensure bank-
ing in the Bahamas is compliant
with international standards.
Minister of Finance Zhivargo
Laing called the move by BNP
Paribas "regrettable" and said
he has been working feverishly
to meet the standards set by the
OECD, including the minimum
requirement to sign 12 Tax
Information Exchange Agree-
ments (TIEA) with other coun-
tries. Former Minister of State
for Finance James Smith said
the Bill to "remove the caveat
on the types of offences for
which assistance can be given,
so that a request which relates
to fiscal offences is no longer
excluded and can be enter-


0 In brief


Police car

chase victims

identified

THE two men who died in a
horrific crash following a high-
speed police chase on Wednes-
day have been identified as 20-
year-old Daehn Bowe of
Hawthorne Road and 21-year-
old Dario Bain of Mount Pleas-
ant Village.
The men died at the scene
on John F Kennedy Drive
around 3am after their car, a
grey 2003 Nissan Sentra,
crashed into a utility pole near
Lake Cunningham, "cutting the
vehicle in half," police said.
Police first became suspicious
of the Nissan on Fire Trail
Road because the car did not
have the necessary inspection
certificates. Attempts were
made to stop the car, which
police believed may have been
stolen. The vehicle with its
occupants sped off at a high
speed. There was a chase which
ended on John F Kennedy Dri-
ve when the driver of the Nis-
san lost control and hit a utility
pole on the side of the road.
Both men were thrown from
the mangled car and were pro-
nounced dead an the scene by
emergency medical personnel.


Lii


r *


WORK CONTINUES at Arawak Cay, where the gc
ernment has decided to relocate the container pc
There is also a harbour dredging project in progre
, ...^fll ^ '^ ^^ , S


ROUTINE tests have revealed
that the work around Arawak Cay
has not disturbed the sea floor
enough to create a threat to the
environment, the government
claims.
According to the Environmen-
tal Monitoring and Risk Assess-
ment Division (EMRAD) of the
Department of Environmental
Health Services, the level of tur-
bidity at Arawak Cay and the sur-
rounding areas is well below the
recommended limit of 29 neph-
elometric turbidity units (ntu).
-" ' EMRAD said its tests were
based on samples collected from
Orange Hill, The Caves, Dela-
porte, Sandyport, Cable Beach,
Goodman's Bay, Go Slow Bend,
Saunders' Beach and Arawak
*. . Cay. The government is currently
.' . dredging the harbour to facilitate
*. \,o access to the world's largest cruise
~- " ships. Meanwhile, work is contin-
uing at Arawak Cay, where the
container port is to be relocated.
Turbidity refers to how murky
S water is. High turbidity levels can
-- reduce the amount of light reach-
oV- ing lower depths and thereby
)rt. inhibit the development of marine
SS. life, particularly shellfish.
EMRAD's statement noted


that it is important to remember
that turbidity occurs as a result of
both natural and man-made caus-
es. "In open water, phytoplankton
is a major source of turbidity, but
closer to shore, suspended parti-
cles may be the result of shore-
line erosion, re-suspension of bot-
tom sediments and wastewater dis-
charges," the statement said.
"Weather patterns also contribute
to the turbidity experienced in
near-shore waters. With heavy
rain, soil and other sediment may
run off into coastal areas, and with
ocean swells bottom sediments are
easily re-suspended in the water
column."
The statement said it is to be
expected that the ongoing harbour
dredging project would contribute
to the turbidity in surrounding
areas. However, it said, turbidity
levels at all sampled sites were
only slightly higher than in previ-
ous months when there was no
dredging activities going on.
"EMRAD has been conducting
coastal and marine monitoring
since 1991, and thus has a com-
prehensive history of coastal con-
ditions which it draws upon for
comparison and analysis," the
statement said.


UK filmmakers given chance to shoot Family Island film in Bahamas


POLICE apprehended four cover site. Officers also found
men after seizing almost a .45 handgun with seven live
$400,000 worth of marijuana in rounds of ammunition.
a major drug bust on Exuma. Not long after the drug
Acting on a tip, Exuma seizure, police apprehended
police, along with officers of three men on a go-fast boat at
the Drug Enforcement Unit the eastern end of New Provi-
(DEU), went to Williams Town dence. It is believed that these
at 11am on Wednesday where men may have been involved
they discovered 100 crocus in the Exuma operation.
sacks containing marijuana near The drugs weighed 3,935
the shoreline. pounds and have a local street
A 55-year-old Eleuthera value of just under $400,000.
man was arrested near the dis- Investigations continue.


Banking transparency


move wins backing
By MEGAN REYNOLDS tained under the act," will allow
Tribune Staff Reporter for freer information exchange
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net between countries when there
is no TIEA in place.
A MOVE towards more Mr Smith said: "The OECD
transparency in international is serious about what they're
banking has been welcomed by doing so they're calling the
the financial services sector as it shots, and if we want to stay in
should help mitigate tax haven the game we have got to com-
concerns leading large banks to ply with their rules.
pull out of the Bahamas. "The whole idea is to put the
An Amendment to the Crim- Bahamas back on an equal
inal Justice International Co- footing with the other jurisdic-
operation Act tabled in parlia- tions in terms of its regime for
ment on Wednesday will information exchange and
remove restrictions on the types transparency, and ultimately,
of offences for which fiscal to be placed on the list of coun-
information can be shared. tries that are totally compliant
And local banking bosses are with international rules."
pleased by the move towards Bank of the Bahamas man-
greater transparency in inter- aging director Paul McWeeney
national banking as it will dispel also welcomes the move, but
the fears of the wealthy G20 said the government must be
countries that the Bahamas is careful to rise to regulatory
hiding tax-evaders, standards while still retaining
In April of this year, the a degree of confidentiality.
Bahamas was included on the He said: "Anything to do
Organisation for Economic Co- with transparency within the
operation and Development's financial sector is always viewed
(OECD) grey list of countries positively internationally, and
that do not fully comply with I imagine these pieces of legis-
their international regulations. lation are intended to improve
the standards of the financial
Pressure services sector so we conform
to the new world order."


at a prestigious
at the British
Academy of
Film and Tele-
vision Arts
r(BAFTA) in
Bharat March 2010.
Nalluri To partici-
pate in the chal-
lenge, Britain's
rising directors are required to
submit a 500 word treatment
on an inspirational person from
their local community and


explain why they should be
chosen.
Judges will then select
around 40 candidates to submit
a short film based on their
treatment, and 14 finalists will
be selected. All entries will be
available for viewing on the
challenge website:
(www.14islandsfilmchal-
lenge.co.uk).
The short-listed filmmakers
will take inspiration from the
warmth of the Bahamian peo-
ple to tell inspiring stories
through their films.


They will be encouraged to
show the islands in their own
way and demonstrate their cre-
ativity and individuality through
their final cut.


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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 3


TALENTED British film-
makers have been invited to
apply for the once-in-a-lifetime
opportunity to spend two weeks
in the Bahamas shooting a
short film about one of 14 Fam-
ily Islands.
The 14 Island Films Chal-
lenge was launched by leading
British director Bharat Nalluri
yesterday to start a six month
search for 14 aspiring and pro-
fessional film-makers in the UK
to visit 14 Bahama Islands for
14 days, and produce 14 short
films.
There also will be the chance
to win a grand prize of �14,000
and state-of-the-art camera
equipment.
The Bahamas Tourist Office,
supporting the campaign, will
use the films to promote the
Bahamas.
Mr Nalluri and a panel of
judges, including deputy direc-
tor general of the Bahamas
Tourist Office Tommy Thomp-
son, will select the 14 lucky win-
ners who will work with the
finest producers in the indus-
try, and have their work aired


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THE TRIBUNE






PAGEn4,RIIDoAYOTBETR2,2T0S09TOTE TTRI u TORBE


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, c, tiinn') 322-1986
Ad tc iing Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm



China zooms ahead in 60th celebrations


NEW YORK - This week, the Peo-
ple's Republic of China celebrated its 60th
anniversary with a huge display of pomp
and precision in the capital city of Bei-
jing. The road that the world's most pop-
ulous nation has travelled since Mao
Zedong's revolution in 1949 is nothing
short of remarkable - from an isolated,
impoverished country to the planet's sec-
ond-largest economy with corresponding
international power.
If one seeks a measure of the transfor-
mation that China has achieved in just a
lifetime, one need only witness the mixture
of hope and apprehension that attends its
present and future moves on the world
stage.
The long march from then to now has
not been smooth or steady. When your
reporter first visited China in 1972, as part
of the White House press corps covering
President Richard Nixon's historic visit,
life in the country's rural areas seemed
- aside from the trains that ran through
them - not much removed from the Mid-
dle Ages. And China in the early 1970s
was mostly rural.
Chairman Mao's Cultural Revolution,
along with other of his totalitarian policies
and edicts, was disastrous for his country
and exacted a terrible price on China's
people. Years later, the Tiananmen
Square protests and their brutal repression
represented another national trauma that
threatened the existence and future of
China as we know it.
It is important, as with all nations where
the citizens do not have a say, to differ-
entiate China, the state, from its people.
From Tiananmen, from the protests of
mothers and fathers grieving over the loss
of their children in schoolhouse collapses
during last year's Sichuan earthquake,
from the protests of Uighurs and Tibetans
and any number of other attempts to
break free of government suppression and
censorship - it is apparent that the Chi-
nese people desire a greater share of free-
dom and self-expression than their gov-
ernment allows them.
But a case could be made that the Chi-
nese government's ability to act without


regard to political factions or popular sup-
port is precisely what has given and con-
tinues to give the Chinese state an inter-
national edge in this era of more compe-
tent Chinese leadership. This is a nation
that can, by fiat, enact sweeping changes of
policy - as it has, recently, in aggressive-
ly pursuing the development of green tech-
nologies such as solar power and electric
cars. These are technologies that could
well position China to further develop
and augment its manufacturing and eco-
nomic strength in the century ahead.
The same autocratic approach has
enabled China to pursue economic and
fiscal policies that give it a position of seri-
ous leverage in regard to other nations,
including the U.S., given its holdings in
U.S. currency and treasury debt. At the
same time, China has thoroughly mod-
ernized a military that has never lacked
sheer manpower.
How the Chinese state will exercise its
economic and military muscle remains
one of the biggest and most important
questions in international relations.
In the midst of a conscious effort to
increase its international standing, Chi-
na's positions on everything from Iran's
nuclear programme to global climate
change figure to be crucial to how these
crises turn out.
Meanwhile, China continues to aggres-
sively pursue natural resources to drive
its economy, with an apparent disregard
for the regimes with which it does business
in places such as Africa and South Amer-
ica.
Sixty years on, the state founded by
Mao is strong beyond the imaginings of
those who witnessed its early years.
The Chinese people still yearn for basic
civil liberties. While some grow very
wealthy, the gulf between rich and poor
widens.
And the U.S. and its allies find the
future ever more dependent on the Chi-
nese state acting like a responsible global
citizen.

(This article was written by Dan Rather
- c.2009 Hearst Newspapers).


EDITOR


COn

1, The Tribune.


I have been following this
passionate debate on the
removal of the casuarina trees
for the last couple of months.
While I have a problem with
the destruction of any living
tree the sad reality is that they
are invasive and are taking over
many of our islands, displacing
natural vegetation which pro-
vides food and shelter for our
wildlife to survive.
The fact that the govern-
ment chose to take out these
30 trees without recognizing
and dealing with the impact of
the rest of the population of
casuarinas, in my mind was and
is a ridiculous move and one
which has served only to
inflame the public. Had the
government announced that
they would begin a systematic
regiment of their removal
across the Bahamas, and
explain why they had to go, I
don't think there would have
been such an uproar. Instead
we had a bush whacking exer-
cise a few months ago where
armies of men and machines
indiscriminately hacked away
at anything and everything,
often leaving the casuarinas in
place.
I have to wonder if this issue
has inflamed so many because
it is a development which is "in
your face", as many people
have to drive by and actually
see first hand what is going on.


EDITOR, The Tribune.

Why doesn't the Govern-
ment care about us?
$5.8 million was spent on
Miss Universe, but how much
is being spent to catch the
criminals running carefree on
New Providence? Unless
crime gets under control it
will not matter how much we
spend on attracting people to
The Bahamas, they will not
come!
A dark green Honda with
two occupants: one with
dreadlocks, one with short
hair, both slim build, number
plate (the number has been
given to the Commissioner of
Police) has been terrorising
the residents out East for the
last month that I know of.
The police cannot be serious
about catching them! There


NOTICE is hereby given that GLORIA WILLIAMS of SOLDIER
ROAD, P.O. BOX N-1055, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25th day
of September, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


itroversy

have written about this, your
passion is desperately needed
elsewhere - lack of transparen-
cy, the need for an energy pol-
icy, destruction of our water
tables, destruction of coral


This and much, much worse is
going on right now in New
Providence and all over our
Family Islands, but it is out of
sight and out of mind.
I find it unbelievable that
those calling for the protection
of the casuarina have not
uttered a word for the acres and
acres of native trees which are
destroyed daily and land left
completely white with not a
blade of grass on it.
Take a ride out west along
the coast and have a look at the
bare white land that exists in
our "business as usual
approach" to development. The
removal of trees on the coast
leads to silt runoff which ends
up in our oceans smothering
coral reefs which protect the
coastline.
Or, go further south and
have a look at the at least 200
plus acres of biodiversity lost
to the Albany golf course and
the Albany/Maillis marinas. Or
you can drive along the south-
ern side of the Airport Indus-
trial Park and see another cou-
ple of hundred acres flattened
and white for a shopping cen-
tre.
While I am encouraged by
the numbers of people who


reefs, dredging for marinas
everywhere you turn, overfish-
ing, animal abuse, lack of plan-
ning, lack of a clear policy for
the environment, no freedom
of information act, no laws to
guide the Ministry of the Envi-
ronment, no National Devel-
opment Plan- just to name a
few.
As for the views to the sea
issue, and that the Orange Hill
Beach area's replanting exer-
cise has left no view to the sea,
the reality is that in a natural
setting you would have to go
through the bush to see the sea.
The fact that roads were built
right next to the coastline have
afforded us these delightful but
"unnatural" views to the sea.
The beach dunes and vegeta-
tion are there to keep the sand
and build the beach. The
removal of the plants along the
beach would mean the sand
would disappear with every
storm, and then the beach
would become rock. So what is
it that we want? To drive by
and see the sea, or to have a
beach to enjoy?
SAM DUNCOMBE
reEarth,
Nassau,
September, 2009.


is currently a movement in
the community to put a boun-
ty on their heads just to get
these two menaces off the
street! What do we have to
do to get action?
Why aren't the police and
politicians scared? Because
many of them have personal
protection.
Well, sirs and madams of
the government, I pay for that
protection and I want mine
too!
NYC was a city embalmed
in crime and it was not safe to
walk the streets only a decade


ago. How did they beat the
criminals? Why don't we
accept help from those who
are more knowledgeable than
us because of experience?
Many Bahamians and resi-
dents with a choice will leave
if this continues...crying all the
way that I cannot live safely in
my own country! Help us
before it is too late to save
both tourism and your own
people!

CRIME
Nassau,
September, 2009.


NETWORK WISDOM INSTITUTE
Octoberr 2009 -June 2010 InCl


Ing Progratnmve For Y..uing W�-onim Age's 15 -19"'


I MXUJN
NI

*To facllltale young women in dicovenng tner puJrpoise- nd specific assignment on the e~artth.
*To tim.in, young women flonl LVI-(rde~~ldv e3WFgtnoiruene~j,
"To Prepxre young" wcrnerlo 1 rr.~leaders in every sp)re 01 inflk.e-oce,
" To vrwjble Younig VWITlelIJIV) W rihe Ih uniquee g:ir' arnd ktIob.mA
" To eq~uip yourIQ w&'run wrilh skils nerdcdtidtorbuild hecd1hy reIolionsh*Isi
" To assist young women in ihe a'chievement of their Vijon an--d gools for -h-eir lives.
" To c~iciot-e hIdder' poier-ial Iir young wamert.
*To assist young women in developing and maintaining a po~dve ielf-imoge.
TO helf I~~YCL.�ng women fbuid sreffCnfdenc' Onoldhealthyi~e~ereen
NCI 1 r. i!S I'Wir TCL41 r I- ., e: i t r. i n by ,,L- r wr I ( , f-I j.S-7


Coritacl '242) 376-3q22
ww w. ir on n etwo r k inc -or g


Govt actions




have inflamed


0


casuarinas


$5.8 million on Miss Universe - but

how much on catching criminals?


Montagu walkers left in the dark

EDITOR, The Tribune.

As of Tuesday, September 22, 2009 the area around the
Montagu which is used every morning by Bahamians who
are trying to keep fit, is in darkness due to all the street lights
in the area being out.
This seems to have happened when BEC was seen digging
a hole by the traffic light on the corner of the Montagu and
Village Road turn off. Today, Thursday, September 24,
2009 the hole was filled in and the lights were still out. All
of us who use this area during the early morning hours to
keep fit would appreciate all effects on the part of the
authorities to restore the lights.

JULIE PINDER
Nassau,
September 24s, 2009.


NOTICE


LYNDEN PINDLING INTERNATIONAL
AIRPORT
IMPOSTION/VARIATION OF FEES
AND CHARGES


Itis hereby notifiedpursuant to regulation 4(10)
(b) of the Airport Authority (Amendment)
Regulations, 2009 that the Airport
Authority at a meeting on the 30th day of
September, 2009 imposed and or varied
fees and charges at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport as follows:


Aeronautical Fees
a) Landing Fees increase 23.6%
b) Terminal Fees increase 6.1%
c) Aircraft Loading Bridge Fees increase 6.1%
d) Aircraft Parking Fees increase 6.1%


It is further notified that the said
imposition and or variation of Fees and
Charges shall take effect at the Lynden
Pindling International Airport ninety days
from the date of first publication of this notice.


PAGE 4, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


kkT






THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGEEW5


"It's the responsibility of the government and the Bahamian people have put the government there
to serve on their behalf that the Bahamian people have knowledge of what their government is doing."
Ryan Pinder


Top tax attorney supports push



for Freedom of Information Act


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
A PROMINENT tax attor-
ney threw his support behind
the efforts of Opposition
members who are pushing
government to introduce a
Freedom of Information Act.
Ryan Pinder, the Bahamas-
based attorney and represen-
tative for US law firm, Becker
Poliakoff, said it was the gov-
ernment's obligation to pro-
vide to its citizens the right to
see and understand the pro-
cedures of the administration.
He said that most of the
recent public uproar over gov-
ernment projects - the
dredging of Nassau Harbour,
the extension of Arawak Cay
and the proposed power plant
in Abaco - could have been
avoided if such legislation was
already in place.
"It's the responsibility of the
government and the Bahami-
an people have put the gov-
ernment there to serve on
their behalf that the Bahamian
people have knowledge of
what their government is
doing.
"Knowledge of the proce-
dures and whatever decisions
are made by the government,
how that affects them, I think
it is of utmost importance,"
Mr Pinder told The Tribune
at the sidelines of a press con-
ference at which PLP deputy
chairman Ken Dorsett
announced his bid for chair-
man.
"Especially in these times
when we've seen the govern-
ment undertaking certain pro-
jects where there's questions
to whether the government
has followed the proper pro-
cedures and there's questions
to whether certain environ-
mental disclosures were
there."
Mr Pinder said he support-


* Ryan Pinder backs PLP members' call for legislation

* Claims law could have stopped govt projects uproar


OUTCRY: People protest about the proposed Wilson City power plant. Inset: the site of the plant.


4.


RYAN PINDER


ed Mr Dorsett and Opposi-
tion Senator Jerome Fitzger-
ald in their call to have gov-
ernment implement a Free-
dom of Information Act
(FOIA).
Recently, Mr Fitzgerald told
The Tribune he soon plans to


bring his own draft FOIA leg-
islation before the Senate in
an effort to speed up the cre-
ation of the "sunshine" law.
Although he did not partic-
ipate in the crafting of the
draft legislation, Mr Pinder
will be part of the committee
that will review the document.
He said his experience in prac-
tising law in Florida - which
has a thorough FOIA - will
assist him greatly in fine-tun-
ing a Bahamian version.

Draft
He added that he hopes
government will accept the
draft and not view it as a PLP
political tool.
"It was a component to
their platform when they (the


FNM) ran so I would hope
there would be no objections
to it.
"This is an Act for the
Bahamian people, it's not a
partisan Act by any means, so
it should be put in place fairly
quickly.
Mr Pinder said the chal-
lenges of this type of legisla-
tion lie in carrying out its
guidelines: "(In terms of) what
agency is administrating the
act and having access to doc-
uments, providing it to the
public - that type of process
is the challenging part of it."
In June, the government
said it was taking steps
towards preparing the public
service for the implementa-
tion of a FOIA and for
departments to "open access
to their records."


THE Bahamas Technical
and Vocational Institute
(BTVI) is offering high school
students the chance to jump
start their technical and voca-
tional careers by offering dual
enrollment.
Over 45 students are par-
ticipating in the programme
at BTVI this Fall.
Dual enrollment allows stu-
dents to take college courses
and earn post-secondary cred-
it while completing high
school graduation require-
ments.
To enroll in dual enroll-
ment courses, which count for
technical and vocational cred-
it, high school students must
be in grade 12, have a 'C' or
above average on their BJC
transcripts in math and Eng-
lish, have been granted
approval by principal and
guidance counsellor, and meet
all the entrance requirements
of BTVI.

Assessment
All courses require 'C' or
above scores on assessment
exams.
"We have a great partner-
ship with the high schools,
and this new programme will
provide a wonderful oppor-
tunity for students interested
in furthering their education
in technical areas of study,"
said Sean Adderley, public
relations and dual enrollment
coordinator. This partnership
comes at a time when enroll-
ment in technical programmes
is "through the roof," Mr
Adderley said.
"There's a level of excite-
ment in our programmes that
is contagious - it results from
innovative approaches by
BTVI management."
"The dual enrollment pro-
gramme gives the institution
an opportunity to showcase
our great faculty, and current
students in a way that is so
interactive.
"We in turn get to offer ser-


BTVI offering dual enrollment

courses for high school youths


vice to our students to help
them start their technical and
vocational education," he
said.
"We feel this programme
helps us to build relationships
with the high schools as well
as the students.
"BTVI's education system
is about the future.
"It is about preparing our
young people for their lives
and careers in the 21st centu-
ry.
"Through dual enrollment
we will give our students an
important advantage that will
benefit them throughout their
careers.
"This investment in our
young people will help to
ensure the Bahamas has a
highly educated and skilled
workforce to face the chal-
lenges and opportunities
ahead."
BTVI offers a variety of
courses appropriate for high
school students, such as elec-
trical installation; heating,
ventilation, and air-condi-
tioning (HVAC); carpentry;
office administration, and
computer repair.
"This programme provides
a challenge for the students
who are academically strong
and motivated," Mr Adder-
ley said.
"It can reduce the time to
complete a technical and
vocational certificate."






rea In ight
on Mo'nday


"We have a great
partnership with
the high schools,
and this new
programme will
provide a
wonderful
opportunity for
students interest-
ed in furthering
their education
in technical areas
of study,"


Sean Adderley


U


* ACTING WORKSHOP, THE HUB


American actor


Wayne Legette


to pass on tips


to Bahamians


By JEFFARAH GIBSON


WAYNE LEGETTE


ASPIRING Bahamian actors will have the opportunity to
gain valuable tools of the trade from prominent American
actor Wayne Legette during a 12 week workshop to take
place at The Hub.
Hosted by Ordain Moss, the workshop serves as a vehicle
to allow aspiring actors to unleash and reach their highest
artistic abilities. Mr Legette is known for his roles in "The
Guiding Light", "Sins of the City", "Westside Story",
"Rags", "Romeo & Juliet" (the stage play), "The Big Bang",
"Proposal", "The Boys Next Door" "The Woman In Black",
"The Wild Party", and "November."
During his time in the Bahamas, Mr Legette will give
classes in stage presence, public speaking, dramatisation,
auditioning, monologue performance, and proper breathing.
Ms Moss recently told Tribune Features she believes the
Bahamas is filled with many talented people who will great-
ly benefit from this type of opportunity.
"I have a passion for performing,
and I love modeling, singing, and
acting. I always wanted to learn how "He is really
to become an actor and the skills
necessary to be good at it. So I start- good at what he
ed the Acting Workshop because I does and what I
feel that there is so much talent in learnt at the
this country that just needs to be rivatele ons
unlocked," she said. private lessons
After taking private lessons with with Mr Legette
Mr Legette, she recognized a has made me so
greater improvement in her skills, much better."
and felt her encounter is a needed
experience for actors in the
Bahamas.
"I went for a few private lessons with Mr Legette and I
enjoyed it. He is really good at what he does and what I
learnt at the private lessons with Mr Legette has made me so
much better. I then realized that I had to share this with my
fellow Bahamians," she said.
Not only will the workshop unlock the talents of actors,
but it will also expose them to a window of opportunities in
the acting field.
"Because we have so much talent, I want Bahamian actors
to be recognized. I want to show Bahamian actors that they
are not limited to the Bahamas because there are so many
roles out there. I want us to see other places and other
places to see just how good we are," she said. "We want to
see the young talent of this nation so the workshop starts
from age 17 and up," she said.
At the end of the workshop, participants will be awarded
a certificate of completion.
The workshop is set to begin on October 3 at 11am -3 pm,
with lessons taking place every other Saturday.


Harbour bay









I WO
Sak~!


ITDISCUS TOIESONTHS PGELO0ONTOWW.TIBUE22CO0


THE BAHAMAS TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE


Students have chance to jump


start their technical careers


BIG








SALE


3 DAYS ONLY
Oct 1st, 2nd, & 3rd
30% off All Clothing
20% off Shoes, Christening, under clothes, socks,
accessories & boys linen suits


Montrose Avenue and Oxford Street (2 doors North of Multi-Discount)
P.O. Box N-1552
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 323-3460
Monday - Friday - 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM, Saturday - 9AM - 5PM


&eve











Regular Priced



SClothing


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 5






PAGE 6, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009 THE TRI^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^BUN


The ?Muli, You've' Ieen Wailinj |"'




Clearance




SALE




p to 650% oN


Storewiule


* BAGS


* SHOES


Sale Stir~ffW'uB~i
*Nor Eehlahie *N41 Rc~uuds +A1I Sak'~ F'inal


'- Al L~mthLiItL'flt L.. ~ TLa~i.


jfLJUIiY, ~d l C 5, W J4I It FI -~~�


OpoJ Fuserej Service
Jar
Mr. Kenneth John
Mcrhee Sr., 79
i~I Soliber Road ~M and kwrn~rty c~
~ HIlL' E-.~uriiii wil I h~ h~Id r~
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J~~~ph M~dI.whiic *i Ill ~'I1 icr 11


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ill ~iw~i~ ~ Ln ch~' .hi,:,ri~ ~'f h~s


l4Ifr i.t Ni ai~d7..iniii.
rwo SamE K.~wmftIi Jr. and Anihany NkPhe~ Sr.:
Nk~ I)ni~1~1tti.~ HIriiIL4. PjuIi.~ Ann ~w~I Ch~rnu~n~ ~L Pt~r. I-Jib
R.ilLeAlamin SIu~irILarmin~ Lundy. Ruth Jahn~ni imd IC.iIhk~n I\iv~.
Tw~m1~ CMiI I3~ru~ ~av Ilurreib mbd i~ph AiI~i1i~ I1~n Kenr*ih
Ifl.K~niw. Ki~nrMrd~.Kam~1LArLhuny Jr. and AnLh ~kftit, Ra',ird
on~ Tiw~ Xa~wk~, Th~ww Snrnrt, An~I~ ijrid (~i~io I.ur~dy. J~unai
iL'rP~ RIIII~2fP.1CJ~L*.I fl~i~ Sr.;
1'wemty F ir(~r~1d DaI~IWtrI4 Ri.m.h~-Ik i~d Aii~ku Rilk IJurIcie.
Varied~ Mud 5k~ni~i kn~wIe,., Tin~.u L.Ic~:kL~. ~;iniri II .ind ~1;LLdj Siu.in,
Mc~ee, S~ipbi~. Cucdeiiia ~md ShEre~e L~ni1;. Aniancia ~znd Am~iJii
Furty GmiGrund (biichui: Dv.':n. DarIi~iu. I)~r'~ku. Th~nic~ii. EhunJr~
I~~tshm. I )IiW~ Jr iIqiTAfl I~, ILr I)ii~r. I~.i..an Nmj~n~i. Irni~h.a ~
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FIj~IIL-Th1k~T.R~ Bi*b~ dliii RIA.k~ Jikn.~'ii. [1.lTPIrlus.C.m.ijwr
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Cj~iI~uiii I1'~.caI. N3Wr Ccdrk. Airitir~t~ aiud ~hawri Bullard:

K~ir~n, Sundra PazI~r~an. Linda Jc&in,~un, Jes~i~Line. .Izii~]e'r~.ue and
Bri~~tapr~. r Fl' ''Iii Xiinii I. Piiidm i~.i . ~ XIi~-rr~ I~ii~.i k.drr,,I.I
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Cliun:h F~iniiIv, Si B~d~ Ch~arch FamiI~. Th~ Kr~n~i R*~id ~nd ~i4J,~r

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v~Ii otar ~ ~ view vidj'
trtbutei, ~igu guest beau, semd mudoIe.~e, iiympntby. uhar~
ubeffiDries mm~ make I~,umi


IN a commitment to the welfare of
both customers and fellow staff, a num-
ber of Kelly's Home Centre employees
recently completed the American Heart
Association (AHA) training in how to
perform cardio-pulmonary resuscitation
(CPR) and how to apply an automated
external defibrillator (AED).
Twelve staff members are now certi-
fied under the AHA
Heartsaver programme through Doc-
tors Hospital. Training was conducted
by Kelly's learning and development
manager Ron Guest, who is a certified
AHA instructor.
The courses are the first in a series
that will certify additional employees
and which form part of a comprehensive


FROM page one

medical personnel. He was put in an ambu-
lance and taken to the Diah Ward at the Rand
Memorial Hospital.
McPhee and Edwin Bauld Jr, 26, are on tri-
al for the murder, kidnapping and robbery of
Corporal Eddison Bain on October 22, 2007.
The trial is in its second week.
Sergeant Darrell Rolle, lead police investi-
gator, was scheduled to testify again on Thurs-
day.
According to reports, firemen were called to
the courthouse to hose out the holding cell
where McPhee was being kept.
Reports are that McPhee had defecated in
his clothing and spread faeces on himself and


approach to staff training at Kelly's.
To give support to the training
received and to provide a safer envi-


on the walls of the holding cell.
Many persons had gathered in the area.
McPhee, who proclaimed that he was crazy,
was restrained on a gurney.
As he was being wheeled off, he shouted
out that he was God.
He said that the devil was after him and
muttered something about forgiveness.
Acting Justice Jethro Miller suspended trial
proceedings for the morning pending the out-
come of an evaluation report.
Medical officials at the hospital have deter-
mined that McPhee is not crazy and is fit to
appear for trial.
Lawyer Mario Gray represents McPhee. K
Brian Hanna represents Edwin Bauld Jr.
Vernal Collie and Erica Kemp of the Attor-
ney General's Office are prosecuting the case.


Bahamas Property Fund Limited

Consolidated Income Statement
For The Quarter Ended 30 June 2009
(Unaudited)


Three Months
Ended
30 June 2009


Six Months
Ended
30 June 2009
$


Six Months
Ended
30 June 2008
$


INCOME


Rental revenues
Other income


972,456
8,800


1,952,026
16,430


981,256 1,968,456


1,981,894
9,600

1,991,494


OPERATING EXPENSES


Bank Interest
Other expenses


225,096 448,294 568,135
174,985 365,495 497,135

400,081 813,789 1,065,270


FUNDS FROM OPERATIONS (FFO)

Amortisation of deferred expenses
Bad debt expense


NET INCOME


FFO PER SHARE


EARNINGS PER SHARE


NET ASSET VALUE PER SHARE


581,175 1,154,667


(27,809)


926,224


(55,618) (56,488)
(33,752) _______


553,367 1,065,297 869,736


$0.24

$0.23

$14.39


$0.48

$0.44

$14.39


$0.38

$0.36

$13.21


PICTURED ARE:
(left to right)
S Successful
. "students Petrona
a - r. Adderley,
Terrance Paul,
. Shirley Paul,
Andrew
Ganteaume,
J Rochelle Hudson,
. Ethelyn Wong
-o, * and instructor
Ron Guest.

ronment for customers and staff, Kelly's
have also placed a new AED unit in
the store at Marathon Mall.


rime to 'change' justice system


FROM page one

According to the BBC News, the new
court will be the final appellate court for
all United Kingdom civil cases and crim-
inal cases from England, Wales and
Northern Ireland. The court replaces the
Privy Council, which served as the last
court of appeal for most Caribbean coun-
tries.
While many suspect the move will have
some impact on the region it is unclear
what, if, any it will have on the Bahamas.
The move comes after Privy Council
president, Lord Nicholas Phillips, recent-
ly complained that the council's Law
Lords spent too much time hearing cases
from former colonies -which are most-
ly in the Caribbean.
Sean McWeeney, a partner in the
Graham, Thompson and Co law firm,
believes the switch will have little impact
on the cases that emanate from the
Caribbean to the Privy Council.
Lord Phillps' comments, not the UK's
move towards the Supreme Court as its
final court of appeal, are what should be
of concern for the Bahamian judiciary,
said Mr McWeeney.
"Basically he was saying 'Go find your
own final court, leave us alone'. That has
already drawn quite a bit of notice from
legal scholars and lawyers in the region


and will spur a new round of debate at
the national and regional level of the
need to accelerate new arrangements,"
Mr McWeeney told The Tribune yester-
day.
He believes that the framers of the
Bahamas' constitution anticipated that
this change would one day be necessary,
adding that the provisions that refer to
the Privy Council are not firmly estab-
lished.
"The provisions of the Bahamian con-
stitution, which established the Privy
Council as the ultimate court of appeal,
those provisions are not entrenched, they
explicitly contain the possibility that some
new arrangement may be made to
replace the Privy Council," he said.
Currently the Caribbean Court of Jus-
tice (CCJ) is an alternative to the Privy
Council but is not widely used in the
region; it only adjudicates cases from
Guyana and Barbados.
Mr McWeeney lamented over this fact
but believes "a new regional court will
emerge within the next decade."
"Here in the Bahamas there is still a lot
of resistance to it (the CCJ). Now that the
English Law Lords are becoming increas-
ingly vocal, you're going to find that there
will be increased movement towards hav-
ing the Privy Council replaced by a
regional court."
Sir Geoffrey Johnstone, retired partner


now consultant to the Higgs and Johnson
law firm, said it would only make sense
for the Bahamas to join a regional court
if it were comprised of former British
colonies - which share British common
law.
"I think if we're going to (have a
regional appellate court) I would rather
not be going to a Caribbean court which
has inherited the laws of a lot of counties
that are quite alien to us," Sir Geoffrey
told The Tribune.
Britain's move to a Supreme Court
was also marked by the implementation
of closed-circuit cameras in the courts.
The British press reported that for the
first time, cases will be broadcast live.
Mr McWeeney said this was to shake
the shroud of secrecy associated with
closed hearings.
He said the trend could possibly catch
on in local courts. However, cost would
be a deterring factor, he said.
"Given the current budgetary
restraints that probably is the last thing
on their minds," he said.
The UK's Supreme Court is the result
of the Constitutional Reform Act of
2005, focused on removing the highest
appeal court from the upper house of
Parliament, and remove Britain's Law
Lords from the legislature, according to
the British press.


FROM page one

course with a person
between the ages of 14 and
16. It is alleged that the on
August 11, Williamson had
intercourse with a girl under
the age of 16. The teen was
reportedly being held at the
Central Police Station after
her parents had brought her
in as uncontrollable.
Williamson was not
required to enter a plea to
the sex charge and was
granted $8,000 bail with one
surety. He was ordered to
stay away from the com-
plainant. The case was trans-
ferred to Court 10, Nassau
Street.

Claims Govt is failing

to pay bills are denied

FROM page one

being paid on a timely basis,
and when payments are made
it's in drip and drabs.
"Imagine the pressure con-
tractors and suppliers are
being placed with their
bankers."
This week Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham admitted
that it is only through bor-
rowing that Government is
able to pay its bills at the
moment. He said the Gov-
ernment has close to half of
the $309,724,300 it got parlia-
mentary approval to borrow
in June of this year.
However, Mr Ferguson yes-
terday said it is "not (his)
information or public knowl-
edge" that Government has
failed to pay any of its bills, as
Mr Roberts claimed.
"There's nobody out there
who I know who worked for
government who complained
that they're not getting paid
on a timely basis," he said.




*;I - S3;~ -


SI S S S S 0''' '1 S


Murder trial suspended as accused


receives psychiatric tests in hospital


PAGE 6, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


I











Tensions mount in attempted extortion trial


FROM page one
only witness to testify yester-
day.
"I am going to rise now, I
am tired of it," Senior Justice
Allen said. After several min-
utes, the judge returned to the
bench and asked Mr Ducille to
withdraw the comment. She
reminded him of directions she
had given to counsel, noting
that after the tape recordings
are played certain witnesses will
be recalled.
Mr Ducille withdrew the
comment stating, "My lady if I
said so, I said it in justice and
fair play."
During his examination-in-
chief, Mr McDermott told the
court that he spoke to Bridge-
water for the first time on Jan-
uary 12 at 6.27 pm. He said that
during a telephone conversa-
tion, she identified herself as an
attorney from the Bahamas
who was representing a man
who chose to remain anony-
mous. Mr McDermott said that
Bridgewater told him that her
client was the first on the scene
at Old Bahama Bay on Janu-
ary 2 and was in possession of a
release document signed by Mr
Travolta. According to Mr
McDermott, Bridgewater
explained that the document
was a release form used in the
event that someone refused
medical treatment or trans-
portation to a hospital. Mr
McDermott said that Bridge-
water assured him that no one
else was aware of the document
and that her client had the orig-
inal, while she was in posses-
sion of the only copy.
Mr McDermott said that
Bridgewater told him that the
document was not on file in the
official records of the Rand
Memorial Hospital because her
client had taken it home as it
was not necessary to file it and
also because it had a celebrity's


Mr McDer-
mott told the
court that he
Questioned
Bridgewater as
to the signifi-
Pleasant chance of the
Bridgewater document. He
said that
Bridgewater told him that it was
her client's contention that the
document was very incriminat-
ing of Mr Travolta as it could
show that he either intentional-
ly killed his son Jett, was negli-
gent in the supervision of his
son, or that he had tried to flee
the jurisdiction with his dead
son. Mr McDermott said that
Bridgewater told him that her
client had been contacted by
several foreign media entities,
including Inside Edition, Ger-
aldo Rivera, Greta Van Sus-
teren and someone from the
UK regarding the document.
According to Mr McDermott,
Bridgewater also told him that
her client had been contacted
by someone in the media who
had told him that the document
could be worth a substantial
sum of money if it showed that
Mr Travolta had deprived his
son of medical care.
Mr McDermott testified
that Bridgewater told him that
the reason she was calling was
to determine whether Mr Tra-
volta would be interested in
acquiring the document. Mr
McDermott told the court that
he asked Bridgewater what her
client was seeking and whether
he wanted to be reinstated at
his job since she mentioned that
he had been suspended for 30
days for speaking to the media.
Mr McDermott said that
Bridgewater told him that her
client wanted money, but at that
time had not set a price.
Mr McDermott told the
court that he said to Bridgewa-


Legal Notice

NOTICE

HIGH GLOW VISION LTD.





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HIGH GLOW VISION LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice

NOTICE

KTLA FINES INC.





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KTLA FINES INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-
pany has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice

NOTICE

PREVONLOUP LTD.





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PREVONLOUP LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


ter, "Do you realise that what
you are doing constitutes a
criminal offence in the United
States, specifically extortion? If
I go to the authorities you and
the ambulance driver will be in
trouble."
Mr McDermott said he told
her that no expenses would be
spared to ensure that the entire
Bahamas knew what her client
had done.
According to Mr McDer-
mott, Bridgewater responded
by saying that she had discussed
that with her client and that he
did not care. Mr McDermott
further testified that he asked
Bridgewater to forward him a
copy of the document and that
11 minutes later, Bridgewater
sent him an e-mail stating that
her client did not want her to
forward the document. Accord-
ing to Mr McDermott, Bridge-
water stated in the e-mail that
her client did not want to deal
with it that way as the docu-
ment was too sensitive. He also
told the court that on January
13, he spoke to Ronald Zupan-
cic by telephone and told him
everything Bridgewater had
told him.
He further testified that on
January 16, he spoke to Mr
Zupancic again, then spoke to
Mr Travolta. He told the court
that on Saturday, January 17,
he flew to Nassau, and checked
in to the Sheraton Hotel, Cable
Beach. He also told the court
that there was a meeting
between several lawyers as well
as Senior Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Marvin Dames
and ASP Ricardo Taylor at the
Gibson and Co law firm, Shirley
Street. He said that it was at
that time that he brought the
matter to the attention of police
and gave them permission to
instal hidden cameras in his
hotel room and place a wiretap
on him.
Mr McDermott told the


court that later that day he
spoke to Bridgewater and that
that conversation was record-
ed by police. He went on to tes-
tify that the following morning
he met with Bridgewater in his
hotel room around 10.25 am.
Mr McDermott recalled that he
met her in the lobby of the
Sheraton. He said he told her
that he would rather meet in a
more secure location. She
agreed stating that she too did
not want to remain in the lobby
as she was recognizable. He told
the court that he spoke to
Bridgewater again at 3.30pm
over the telephone. He said that
Bridgewater had phoned him
to inform him that her client
had dropped his demand to $15
million and that she was will-
ing to receive the funds. Mr
McDermott said that he told
Bridgewater that he would
speak to his clients and get back
to her as soon as possible. He
also told the court that he later
spoke to her again at 8.15 pm
and told her that Mr Travolta
and his wife were taking the
matter under advisement. He
further testified that at 10.15pm
he spoke to Bridgewater again
and told her that Mr Travolta
had agreed to pay the sum of
$10 million in instalments of
$2.5 million. According to Mr
McDermott, Bridgewater indi-
cated to him that her client was
willing to meet with him per-
sonally. Mr McDermott said
that on January 20, police
returned and set up recording
devices in his room for a meet-
ing with Lightbourne. He said
he spoke with Lightbourne in
his hotel room for about 45
minutes during which time he
also spoke to Bridgewater on a
speaker phone. He said that lat-
er that day he received trans-
fer instructions by e-mail from
Bridgewater.
During Mr Ducille's cross-
examination, Senior Justice


Legal Notice

NOTICE

CIRCUITPOINT INC.





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CIRCUITPOINT INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

BIALEX VISTA LIMITED

- 4-



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BIALEX VISTA LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice

NOTICE

HAPPY MAXIM LTD.

- i-



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HAPPY MAXIM LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Allen warned Mr Ducille about
making comments on the ques-
tions he asked Mr McDermott
and admonished Mr McDer-
mott repeatedly not to engage
in any commentary. Mr McDer-
mott at times appeared dis-
pleased with the manner in
which the questions were being
asked, and requested the court
to direct Mr Ducille to correct-
ly pronounce his name as
"McDermott" and not "Mac-
dermott." Attorney Carlson
Shurland also rose on several
occasions, accusing Mr McDer-
mott of giving the court instruc-
tions. Mr Ducille also claimed
that Mr McDermott was being
defensive and accused him of
starting the spat.
Mr Ducille asked Mr
McDermott whether he had
called Bridgewater first. Mr
McDermott said that he had
called Obie Wilchcombe and
then spoke to Bridgewater, pro-
moting Mr Ducille to ask that
he answer his questions specif-
ically. Mr Ducille went on to
question why he had said that
Bridgewater had told him dur-
ing a telephone conversation
on January 12 that "the rea-


son she was calling was to deter-
mine whether Mr Travolte
would be interested in acquiring
the document" when he hac
stated that he had made the
call. Replied Mr McDermott
"That's what she said." He sug-
gested that Bridgewater music
have been nervous, remarking
that "maybe it was her firsi
extortion." This prompted L
stern admonition from the
judge. Mr Ducille further askec
whether his client had made L
demand for money. Mr McDer-
mott explained that Bridgewa-
ter had made a demand for ar
unspecified amount. Mi
Ducille suggested to Mi
McDermott that he was ar
untruthful witness and that he
was the Sergeant Major anc
leader of the orchestra in the
whole ordeal. Mr McDermoti
firmly denied this suggestion
Mr Ducille also suggested that ii
was McDermott who had callec
and suggested to make an offer
To this Mr McDermott replied
"Absolutely not."
The case resumes at 1(
o'clock this morning when Mi
McDermott is expected to be
recalled.


FROM page one
heated exchange over the newly formed Bahamas National
Press Club, of which Mr McKinney is an officer.
Mr Gibson is seeking damages in connection with the
claim that Mr McKinney, as the host of the talk show 'Hard
Copy' which airs on GEMS Radio, "falsely and maliciously"
spoke words which implied that Mr Gibson "was a man
who led an alternative lifestyle."
The writ claims Mr McKinney also suggested that Mr
Gibson "had to be transferred from one school to another
because he habitually molested children."
Mr McKinney and Bartlett-McSweeny Communications
Limited, the parent company of Gems Radio 105.9FM, have
been ordered to respond within 14 days of being served
with the writ.


Legal Notice

NOTICE

AUTREMENT INC.

- 0-



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of AUTREMENT INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

UNITED BILTMORE FOREST LTD.





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of UNITED BILTMORE FOREST LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice

NOTICE

INIGO HOLDINGS LTD.





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of INIGO HOLDINGS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


I ODSUS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


PAGE 8, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009


THE TRIBUNE









I t WIRadcliffe to defend NYC Marathon title


NEW YORK (AP) - World-record hold-
er Paula Radcliffe will defend her title at the
New York City Marathon next month.
The New York Road Runners announced
Thursday that Radcliffe will attempt to win
her fourth NYC Marathon title overall.
The British runner won the New York City
Half-Marathon in August, but skipped the
world championships in Berlin because she


needed more time to recover from foot
surgery in March. She says her right foot is
"feeling good" and "the pull of New York
was always very strong. I still feel the New
York course is a bit of a challenge for me."
Other top female contenders in the field
include past champion Ludmila Petrova of
Russia. The 40th running of the NYC
Marathon is November 1.


Defending champ


Tsonga advances


to the quarters


BANGKOK
(AP) - Defending
champion Jo-Wil-
fried Tsonga won a
three-tiebreaker
match against
Ernests Gulbis 6-7
(3), 7-6 (4), 7-6 (2)
Thursday to advance
to the quarterfinals
of the Thailand
Open.
Gulbis, ranked
99th, staved off a set
point at 4-5 to take
the opener and had TSONGA
5-4 and 6-5 leads in
the second set. But the
Frenchman held on to force
the tiebreaker.
In the third set, players held
serve to set up another
tiebreaker, when Tsonga
forced Gulbis into errors.
"It was very tough, but I
fought all along," said Tsonga,
ranked No. 7. "Finally, I won
and I'm happy to win. It's
important for me to defend
my title."
John Isner of the United
States also advanced to the
quarterfinals by defeating
Mischa Zverev of Germany


7-6 (5), 6-4. The
48th-ranked Isner
will face fourth-
seeded Viktor
Troicki of Serbia.
"He hits the ball
really big," said the
6-foot-9 Isner. "So
do I. It will be a
good match. He has
won a lot of matches
this year. That's why
he's 32nd in the
world."
American Kevin
Kim lost to Gilles
Simon of France 6-2,
6-2. The second-seeded
Simon, who retired with a
knee injury during the U.S.
Open, dominated play with
his baseline game.
Andreas Beck of Germany
also cruised with a 6-1, 6-7 (3),
6-4 victory over Donald
Young of the United States.
Beck will play Jurgen Melzer
of Austria.
In other second round
matches, American Robby
Ginepri lost to Evgeny
Korolev 6-1, 6-1 and Marat
Safin lost to Marco Chi-
udinelli 6-3, 7-6 (4).


Nike: No 'contractual


relationship' with Vick


e~e~rAndre Flet': he'
Scii c u ri ng thIei r iTIlianip~innsl
Trnphy, nutch 31 Ilie Waniderer,;
,;tj~iuni in JinIlialllf-bLurcl. SCItilli
Alric3. cnn Wedneswy..

(AP Photo: Themba Hadebe)


Kobe's


jersey


top seller


in Europe

NEW YORK (AP) -
Kobe Bryant's jersey is
still more popular in
Europe than those belong-
ing to the NBA's Euro-
pean players.
Bryant's Los Angeles
Lakers jersey was the top-
seller in Europe for the
second consecutive year,
the NBA said Thursday.
The list was based on
sales from retail locations
across the continent during
the 2008-09 season.
Bryant, who also is atop
the lists in the United
States and China, is fol-
lowed again by Boston's
Kevin Garnett. Spain's
Pau Gasol, Bryant's NBA
teammate, is third, with
LeBron James fourth and
Dwyane Wade moving up
three spots to round out
the top five.
No. 6 Tony Parker
(France), No. 8 Andrea
Bargnani (Italy) and No. 9
Jose Calderon (Spain) are
the other Europeans in the
top 10.


The Bahamas Hotel Association

11 'Annual Golf Tournament
AT
Cable Beach Golf Course
Sunday, Octnber 4, 209
Regist atinm 7:15 a.m. & Tee off Time 7:45am


VA
fq
ti

CARIR
FIC
NABS


kcizner



SParadise Island














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Nould like to say THANK YOU to the
bIlowing Sponsors & Prize Donors for
,heir ge n rouse d on ati ons
MAJOR SPON4SORS
BAHAMAS FOOD SERYIVES
RBEA14 BOT~TLINQ O CIBAP, AMASS i LTD
IDELITY BANK IB94AMABI LIMITED
KERZNJEA NrINmJ4ATIOPIAL
'�IAWOPARADIIIE ISLAND PRGNDTION
RBC ROYAL BANK Of CANADA
SCO7IABAN~K IGAHAWAS[ LTD RK" Ia~
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SILV~ER SPONSORS
Ajftri4-Coulb Internsbjauml
Iwtterf1id alilBanka8himem Ltd.
li~ppof Group (Mcnagamrit) Ltd.
COMPOFlt SAfI M PuIuE10llaid
Nnina.Meter Cb"&ny Ltd.
W.A. Irisiraries AgenteA I Uok*Fs
Fraybdimne AidInmrs
Proi4.rwe Tot;hngoi~gV. Gr'pu
R'TA ConsdimiLatjLIU.
~ig Rubber Stamp &~IFir iwArillCa. Ltd.


NEW YORK (AP) -
Nike said Thursday it does
not have a "contractual rela-
tionship" with Michael Vick, a
day after the quarterback's
agent announced a deal with
the manufacturer.
In a statement released
Thursday morning, Nike said
it has "agreed to supply prod-
uct to Michael Vick as we do
a number of athletes who are
not under contract with
Nike."
On Wednesday, Michael
Principe, the managing direc-
tor of BEST, the agency that
represents Vick, announced
the Philadelphia Eagles play-
er had a new deal with Nike
during a panel discussion at
the Sports Sponsorship Sym-
posium.
"He actually just became a


Nike client," Principe said
Wednesday. "He has a new
deal with Nike that we're all
very pleased about."
Principe declined comment
Thursday.
Vick's agent, Joel Segal,
said later Wednesday that
Vick looked forward to con-
tinuing his relationship with
Nike, adding that the player
and company had agreed not
to release terms of the deal.
Segal did not immediately
return a call for comment
Thursday.
Nike had initially declined
comment Wednesday night.
Nike, which signed Vick as
a rookie in 2001, terminated
his contract in August 2007
after he filed a plea agree-
ment admitting his involve-
ment in a dogfighting ring.


SANPIN MOTORS 0




r Pre-Discovery Day SALE

Saturday October 3rd * 8 am until 3pm


ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


Ik


4JiIRml BAT rW13vAT.LAW


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CW'4IACF 3224301-4


Econnority dowin,
but fans pony up
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lic~kctts, looplb:all fan~s. cortimjkue
lco alttend 4jafE~s T-hroij-ry-, the
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I


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 9


TRIBUNE SPORTS


CM--.w, 6w


OL I - --






PAGEPORT 10,IFIDAYOCTBER,200TRIUNEPO


BOXING
BBC STATEMENT ON MACKEY
THE Bahamas Boxing Commission (BBC),
after meeting on Tuesday night, released a press
statement to inform the general public of its
position regarding the former Commonwealth
Boxing Council super middleweight champion
Jermaine "Choo Choo" Mackey.
The commissioners decided unanimously to
act on the recommendation of the medical com-
mittee, chaired by Dr Munir Rashad, as to when
Mackey should be sanctioned to fight again.
A medical team was scheduled to examine
the boxer yesterday. Dr Rashad will then report
the findings to the BBC and a decision will be
made as to how long Mackey will be mandated to
refrain from engaging in a boxing match.
It was also emphasized that while the com-
mission's secretary, Fred Sturrup, is also presi-
dent of the Commonwealth Boxing Council, the
BBC has absolutely no jurisdiction over the
Commonwealth title picture and acts only on
matters related to the local professional boxing
scene.
BASKETBALL
NPBA REGISTRATION
All NPBA teams/clubs and interested
teams/clubs are reminded that entrance fees and
rosters are due by October 16. The preseason is
scheduled to begin on October 23.
All interested teams are urged to contact
NPBA president Keith Smith or vice president
Alsworth Pickstock for additional information.


Catholic basketball




tourney will be a




very special one


Senior Sports Repoerter SAC to enter team for first time
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net


DEACON Andrew Burrows has
promised that this year's Catholic
basketball tournament - set for the
holiday weekend of October 9-11 -
will be a very special one.
For the past five years, the
Catholic Archdiocese of the
Bahamas has honoured Deacon
Leviticus 'Uncle Lou' Adderley
and Vincent Ferguson with a bas-
ketball tournament.
Deacon Burrows, organiser of
the event, noted that while Adder-
ley passed away prior to the start of
the tournament, he was joined by
Ferguson, who died last Wednes-
day.
Speaking yesterday after Fergu-
son's funeral service at St Francis
Xavier Cathedral, Burrows said
they are expecting to get every-
body on board this year for the
first time. "I understood that St


AU
TOVFFFl


PUBLIC NOTICE


September Bill Delay

Due to the current upgrade of our billing
system, post-paid cellular customers may find
that their September bills may be delayed in
getting to the post office. Accordingly, cus-
tomers are advised to contact BTC at 225-5282
or visit any of our Multi Service Centers nation-
wide to obtain their outstanding bill in order to
avoid disruption of service.


oTC


All OF51C


Augustine's College is finally going
to put a team in the tournament.
They have never done that
before," Burrows said.
Adderley was the former princi-
pal of St Augustine's College and
while Ferguson was the vice presi-
dent, he was responsible for coin-
ing the school's nickname, 'Big
Red Machine.'
Burrows said they already have
at least 10 senior teams registered
to take part and are anticipating
four to five junior teams to enter.
"We are still discussing how we
are going to honour both of them
this year, especially now that they
are deceased," Burrows said. "But
we are looking at doing something
very special in their honour this
year."
Both Adderley and Ferguson,
according to Burrows, dedicated



MIAMI Dolphins
quarterback Chad
Henne throws against
the San Diego Chargers
in the second half of a
game in San Diego.

(AP Photo: Chris
Carlson)


their lives to the growth and devel-
opment of sports and education in
the country and the Catholic Arch-
diocese will do all it can to keep
their memories alive.
The tournament is expected to
get started October 9 and wrap up
on October 11 with the crowning of
the two champions.
Most Reverend Patrick Pinder,
Archbishop of Nassau, is sched-
uled to officially declare the tour-
nament open. "We are expecting a
very competitive tournament this
year," Burrows said. "I think there
is a lot of excitement in the air and
all of the teams have been working
hard."
The tournament is open only to
men, but Burrows said they intend
to have a number of women on
hand to assist with the organising
and operation of the games.


NP Volleyball
Association
regular season


COB

Caribs

defeat

the Lady

Hornets


In men's match,
Intruders dispose of
Police Crimestoppers

THE New Providence Vol-
leyball Association continued
its regular season with a dou-
ble header at the D W Davis
Gymnasium on Wednesday
night.
In the women's match, the
College of the Bahamas
(COB) Caribs started out on
a positive note, defeating the
Lady Hornets in four sets, 25-
19, 25-11, 21-25 and 25-17.
The Caribs were led by
Kenisha Thompson's 12 kills
and six aces and Vanricka
Rose assisted with eight kills
and eight aces.
The Lady Hornets were led
by Simona Kerr, who finished
with eight kills and two aces.
Over on the men's side, the
Intruders saw their first game
against the Police Crimestop-
pers and disposed of them in
four sets, 25-19, 12-25, 25-12
and 25-23.
Prince Wilson and Glen
Rolle lead all scorers with 17
and 15 points respectively in
the win. John Rolle lead the
Crimestoppers with 10 points
in a losing effort.


Henne faces some challenges,

but gives Dolphins a big arm

By EDGAR THOMPSON
c.2009 Cox Newspapers Porter could miss a game
DAVIE, Florida - Chad
Henne doesn't have Chad career. Joey Porter sat out practice
Pennington's experience or He suffered a season-end- for the second day in a row
track record. But Henne, the ing shoulder injury Sunday at Thursday because of a sore
new quarterback of the 0-3 San Diego. hamstring, and he could miss
Dolphins, does offer some- When Henne makes his a game for only the seventh
thing else. first NFL start Sunday at time in his 11-year career.
"I think arm strength is the home against Buffalo, he will Porter did light exercises on
obvious (thing)," coach Tony have the opportunity to show the side while the team prac-
Sparano said. "Now, arm that he can run the offense, ticed. Coach Tony Sparano
strength in this league doesn't limit mistakes and provide at said Porter's hamstring is
necessarily mean everything." least some of the leadership improving, but it's uncertain
But it's a start, and it is the Pennington offered. whether he'll play Sunday
one thing Pennington -- who And Dolphins linebacker against Buffalo.
had shoulder surgery twice in
2005 -- has lacked much of his


EMMANUEL Adebayor celebrates in front of Arsenal supporters after
scoring against his former club during their English Premier League
soccer match. Teammate and fellow former Arsenal player Kolo
Toure is behind... (AP Photo: Jon Super)


Adebayor escapes ban for

celebrating goal, free to play


By ROBERT MILLWARD
AP Football Writer
LONDON (AP) - Man-
chester City striker
Emmanuel Adebayor
escaped a ban for his extrav-
agant goal celebration against
former club Arsenal and is
free to play again on Monday.
Adebayor, who has just fin-
ished a three-game ban for
another incident in the same
game, ran the length of the
field to rejoice in his goal in
front of the Gunners fans dur-
ing City's 4-2 victory last
month and the incident led to
violent scenes in the crowd.
The Football Association
disciplinary commission fined
the Togo international 25,000
pounds ($40,000; 27,500) on
Thursday after he admitted a
charge of improper conduct.
Although it imposed a two-


game ban, it is suspended
until December 2010.
"In reaching its decision,
the commission took into
account his admission of the
charge, public apology and
the extremely provocative
nature of the abuse he
received," the FA said in a
statement.
"However, the commission
also stated that players have a
responsibility to conduct
themselves in a proper man-
ner, and that such celebra-
tions are unacceptable and
have the potential to cause a
serious public-order incident."
Arsenal fans reacted angri-
ly to Adebayor's celebrations,
hurling objects on to the field
with one steward being
knocked unconscious.
Adebayor is now able to
face Aston Villa in the Pre-
mier League on Monday.


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


A IWM a - h - pw--�






THE


F RII) AY ()( T() l E R 2 2 11 '


I PAGE 9'* International sports news


Rest in peace Vincent Lloyd Ferguson


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Repoerter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
Vincent Lloyd
Ferguson was
remembered
as a stern dis-
ciplinarian
who cared for humanity just
as much as he did his family,
commitment to church and
God and country.
Monsignor Preston Moss
read the homily at the rite of
Christian burial for the late
Ferguson yesterday. He
described Ferguson, better
known as 'Greech,' as the
consummate Bahamian who
put everybody above himself.
Before a large gathering of
family members, politicians,
educators, sportsmen and well
wishers in St Francis Xavier
Cathedral, Moss said Fergu-
son's life was like his (Fergu-
son's) garden where he grew
just about everything you
could think about.
In a lot of ways, Moss said,
Ferguson was able to nurture
and develop the lives of so
many people that he came in
contact with, whether it was in
the classroom, on the court
or field.
And Moss said that even
though Ferguson executed his
duties with a stern hand, he
never held a grudge against
anybody and he also had a
sense of humour and he
would find a way to break out
in a laugh when he faced
some difficult challenges.
Before he took his seat,
Moss said Ferguson certain-
ly "fought a good fight," he
finished the race and he kept
his faith in God, which
enabled him to help as many
Bahamians as he could as he
went along his way.
Ferguson, 71, died last
Wednesday morning at his
home. He left behind to
mourn his wife Mary, daugh-
ter Anne Marie and son and
daughter-in-law Alex and
Danielle and grandchildren
Kylie and Caden.
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture Desmond
Bannister and Minister of
National Security Tommy


PALLBEARERS carry the coffin of Vincent Lloyd Ferguson...
Photo by Felipd Major


Turnquest headed the list of
dignitaries.
Among the list of sporting
dignitaries on hand were Sir
Arlington Butler, former
president of the Bahamas
Olympic Association, under
whom Ferguson served in his
administration as treasurer.
Outside of the church as
Ferguson's body was carried
to the Catholic cemetery for
burial, many persons
expressed their sentiments
about the life of the deceased.
Kimberly Rolle, athletic
director at the College of the
Bahamas, said her fondest
memory came when she
served as president of the
New Providence Women's
Basketball Association.
"We hosted the old-timers
game and he coached one of
our teams, which had Mother
Pratt on it," Rolle said. "It
was so funny because we were
all laughing to hear him
telling those women who are
60 and 70 years old to get
back on defense."
According to Rolle, he was
a perfectionist with regard to
discipline.
Former semi-pro baseball
player Etienne Farquharson,
who flew in from Inagua, said
Ferguson was more like a
father-figure to him when he
attended St Augustine's Col-
lege.
"He used to tell us that you


of the greatest basketball
players to come out of Grand
Bahama, said Ferguson
taught him the basics about
life.
"He was always very firm, a
disciplinarian, who was very
fair," Sands said. "He knew
what he wanted out of life and
he went out there and did
what he had to do."
Fred 'Papa' Smith, who had
a double opportunity to asso-
ciate with Ferguson in bas-
ketball and baseball, said the
deceased was "-',n. thing
else."
"He was a great man. I
remember I was just a junior
player at the age of 15 when
he invited me to try out for
the junior national basketball


team. As a result, I was cho-
sen on that team and that was
my first trip off the island."
Smith, who considered Fer-
guson as his mentor, said Fer-
guson helped to groom him
in baseball and he went on to
play semi-pro baseball.
Larry 'Doc' Davis, the for-
mer secretary general of the
Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion, said it was a very sad day
when he got the news that
Ferguson, whom he worked
with, had passed away.
"He was a great man. He
was great for sports," Davis
said. "He has gone on, but I
think the legacy that he has
left behind will linger in our
hearts for years to come."
And Sister Annie Thomp-


have to learn the basics if you
want to move on," Farquhar-
son said. "He was disciplined,
he was serious and he kept
you on the straight and nar-
row path."
Peter 'Sweet P' Brown, a
former basketball standout
who played under Ferguson's
administration as president of
the Bahamas Basketball Fed-
eration, said Ferguson was a
rare gem.
"A number of us had our
start at the Priory Grounds
and he was the one who
stepped in and helped us to
become the players that we
were," Brown said.
"I think if he was made the
director of sports at the min-
istry, sports would not have
been in the mess that it is
today. I think his discipline
would have really made a big
difference in the way we do
things today."
Former national team play-
er Greg Trotman, who now
resides in Luxingburg, said he
just had to attend the funeral
because of what Ferguson
meant to him.
"He was a stabilizing force
for many of us and without
him, I don't think I would be
where I am today," Trotman
said.
"We were like the last gen-
eration that came under
Greech. I think we've lost
such a great guy, who touched
so many people. He has done
so much for us all. So it's a
sad moment for all of us. He
was one of the great mentors
that we had. There will never
be another Vince Ferguson.
Here's the last of his kind, a
dinosaur."
Ever since he was a little
boy playing basketball, for-
mer veteran basketball coach
Steve 'Bullah' Pinder had a
long-lasting relationship with
Ferguson at St Bernard's
Sporting Club.
"We were one short and he
already had on a short pants,
so we put him on the team,"
Pinder said. "He hit three
shots back-to-back. In those
days in the 1950s, when you
take a six-point lead, you win
the game.
"That's how far back I can
remember him. But up until
today, I was there with him
the day before he died
because we were talking
about trying to get the history
of basketball in the country
together."
Basil 'The Kid' Sands, one


I


son, one of the pioneer female
basketball players, said she
too had a dual role in her
association with Ferguson,
having worked with him in
administration at Aquinas
College.
"You know how he go. We
were pretty much a like. He
told me what he meant and I
told him what I meant,"
Thompson said. "But recent-
ly, we were getting together
with the basketball legends.
"When I told a lot of peo-
ple that I played basketball,
they didn't believe me. But
we were meeting at our con-
vent, so I had another oppor-
tunity to experience and be
with Vince. I know he's going
to be missed."


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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009


I ETONB9buies - ribuemdi.6.


Merger to grow

credit union's

assets to $36m

* National Workers
Co-operative Credit
Union sees 4-6%
increase in loan defaults
as result of economy
* Proposed new head
office building to
cost $1m

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A BAHAMIAN credit
union yesterday said it antici-
pated enjoying a $1-$2 mil-
lion increase in assets to $35-
$36 million if its 6,000 mem-
bers today approve a merger
with a rival, the economic
recession having produced a
4-6 per cent rise in loan
defaults.
Alfred Poitier, chief execu-
tive of the National Workers
Co-operative Credit Union,
told Tribune Business that the
proposed merger with the rel-
atively small Bahamas Utili-
ties Cooperative Credit
Union - which members will
vote on today - would give
the latter's 500-550 members
access to "a lot of the prod-
ucts and services that are the
norm in today's financial ser-
vices industry".
Currently, due to its rela-
tively small size, the Utilities
credit union's members only
had access to basic savings
and loan products, the latter
largely featuring a regulator
consumer loan.
In comparison, Mr Poitier
said the National Workers
Co-operative Credit Union
could offer promotional loans,
revolving loans, consumer
loans and mortgages.
"They've just not been able
to do that for their members
based on their size," he
added.
On the savings side, Mr
Poitier said the National
Workers Co-operative Cred-
it Union offered interest rates
of up to 6.5 per cent on their
term deposits, especially on
products designed to allow
members to save for their
children's education.
"I don't think there's any
comparison in the local mar-
ket, particularly for small
savers who deposit money on
a regular basis," Mr Poitier
said. He added that the
SEE page two


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
FRENCH-headquartered
banks have agreed with
their government that they
will withdraw from all so-
called 'offshore centres' still
on the OECD's 'grey list'
by March 2010, but their
Bahamas-based subsidiaries
yesterday said they were
"very comfortable" this
nation would escape before
that deadline.
If the Bahamas was to
remain on the 'grey list', it
would impact French-
owned institutions such as
Credit Agricole (Suisse)
and SG Hambros Bank &
Trust (Bahamas), the latter
of which has 100 employ-
ees, and a former Bahamas
Financial Services Board
(BFSB) chairman yesterday
said the situation required
this nation to meet its year-
end commitment for sign-
ing the OECD's 'minimum
standard' of 12 Tax Infor-
mation Exchange Agree-
ments (TIEAs).
Arguing that the French,
as head of the OECD
group that will monitor
compliance with the organ-
isation's tax transparency
and information exchange
standards, were "trying to
set the tone" and influence
other G-20 nations to apply


City Markets 'days



from closing' $5m



refinancing deal


IIt NEIL HARTNELL
TribL11iw BL%inc%% EdilioEr


CITY MARKETS' majority
shareholder was yesterday
said to be "just days away
from closing" the supermarket
chain's $5 million refinancing, its
chief executive telling Tribune Busi-
ness that its customer count was
growing by 2-3 per cent every four
weeks.
Sunil Chillani. h, aid oI Bahianim' SupCi -
mlldikcl',. the comipdin thdl trad.ii da-s the
1 1-toic CiI\ Mdlirkcl' chain. ',did ith com-
Ipin\ 's Boaird oI Diicto', lhopcd tII s2in1
oft I tl nthe final 2irIN audilt di tll at a nlcl-
n1112 Ic l \\ ck. \\ li the l 'n -d\\litailcd
annual 2Cncial ill cltinil2 I AGMNI1i ii 2cld
hor nd-(-OciIhbcr - ia daie m,,ml. In month,
allci that linanciadl \-car ended.
The C(-'\ Mhirkcts chicl C\cCIlti\ dClo
conlirmncd i Tiiihuntc BLIiinlc-, ihatl ihe
cImpanl \ had. hi ,dIt. recc icd $1 mil-
lion tl the $5 million in n:\\ cquiil capit al
ib hi injccicd h\ It', 7. pe| r cent millaornIt
shedciolldc-. BSL Ho ldins,. ThI rcimdin-
dcr. hI explained. \\as a\ajilnin, lorh i-n
CachdVllC control appro,\l 1'om IhI (_'Cn-
lial Bank o1 the Bahadmda
" \llc'r Iul, Jai, in\\id\ iliom clotnd2. IT I
hb honsct." ll Chaizlini told Tribuinek
BumniL-,. \\lhcn dikd \clsicid\ diaboui the


- Supermarket Lihdin'- iustornitr L1tint
rkiIng 2-'3''.t vrx enfouir %ee. hitr
- $lnl 4 retinan~ing1 rectki~ed. %il
Ir'n1~ianrig 4S-111 ina"it iigCtnt rall anik
appri -\ al
- Comnpaii-v not %' ditii1g on refiflaLi ing
to o rn plete 2008 Mid it. % itll Boa rd
-,ign ,-' iihptrd ti-r Inext week and AG N1
1)%mnt ,ith-,end

%lilstdL' Iit 11C 'sllfpcnieirk-,lct chin -, I iI-

aind that: j,,$4 inilijim tit C01mC
~Adin. it'-, lu-t papcr\otrk cchop-
picic. Tci nopairliculahi i AjLiii rnint.
buh:ucric onLIfC~ ci cr\ mic's part. But Lilcic
iN iii hipit0cm. l\J1 1oin,: lizNbid' dkxcl i Oii
..It ki i ~i' IIt i liat it ihi i n2! in i t:lLILuLI% \\L:
1n%:cdcd Cc~ivral Baink eippro\ ,il. I'mno[t~
'411c Mi crt. that v,. but '\\c dont fl dtici-
pa I it. l hci%~i an\ it It-uNI Ltikifl2
I11111
C~Liilt iIBeinks pp; m'al is likcIkncc
1hcCIIcaucBSL HA idiiw'&leir~c~i ',heirc-
il~ ~~~~~~~~i Idiv lli iIfcrCiiL tlLifl Ii :prj-
\eilL kcqLut\ con'or~iLun1 1that1 acqLircdI (it\
Nliik+ krt% \\ inn~ ff-DIivc lot$i4 minilIji
in v,11T~.i rinidadli11n C0 11210 m I a Ic Ncal
SEE page two


similar pressure to their
financial institutions,
Michael Paton said: "This
could start a trend, and this
means we have to proceed
to get the required number
of agreements in place by
March.
"I wasn't concerned pro-
vided we met the deadline,
but this underscores that it's
a timeline we need to pull-
off. Hopefully, the Ministry
of Finance can accelerate
the negotiating process, and
I'm sure they are. We have


SEE page five


Sales 'firepower' to ensure

success at Emerald Bay


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
SANDALS believes a sales
and marketing team, which
its chief executive yesterday
described as "the most
sophisticated network of any
hotel group on this side of the
world", will enable it to suc-
ceed where Emerald Bay's
previous ownership failed.
The resort chain also antici-
pates having "enough airlift
support" for the property
based on initial negotiations.
Adam Stewart, Sandals
Resorts International's chief
executive, speaking to Tri-
bune Business from London,
said the resort chain's distri-
bution network throughout
the US, Canada and UK pro-
vided it with the infrastruc-
ture to drive demand for its
newly-acquired Emerald Bay
property, something the pre-
vious ownership group nev-
er had.
Praising the previous own-
ers for "giving it a good shot",
Mr Stewart told Tribune
Business: "You have to have


* Sandals chief believes
marketing and distribution
network will enable chain
to succeed where previous
owners failed
* In talks with airlines,
and believes 'enough
support' for Exuma resort
on airlift

an infrastructure to market
an Out Island destination or
unique property. It's not a lit-
tle boutique hotel.
"Sandals has, as far as I'm
concerned, the most sophisti-
cated marketing and distrib-
ution network of any [hotel]
group on our side of the
world. We're an organisation
that believes in a destination.
We never build or acquire a
hotel if we do not believe in
the destination."
He added: "We have a
dedicated force that repre-
sents us, our sales and mar-
keting team, between the
UK, Canada and the US -
SEE page four


US industry bodies call for Bahamas to lose trade benefits


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
TWO INDUSTRY bodies
representing US program-
ming royalty rights holders
have urged the Obama
administration to take away
trade benefits that allow
Bahamian exports to enter
the US tariff-free, Tribune
Business can reveal, on the
grounds that this nation was
not fulfilling its obligations to
protect intellectual property
rights.
Both the Motion Picture
Association of America


(MPAA) and Television
Association of Programmers
Latin America urged that the
Bahamas lose its trade bene-
fits under the Caribbean
Basin Economic Recovery
Act (CBERA) due to its com-
pulsory licensing regime for
cable television, under which
Cable Bahamas was allegedly
pirating premium program-
ming satellite signals.
In its submission to the US


International Trade Commis-
sion's (USITC) latest report
on the economic impact made
by the CBERA, and its twin
Caribbean Basin Initiative
(CBI) programme, the
MPAA alleged that the com-
pulsory licensing regime had
been used by the Bahamas
"to justify the retransmission
of premium pay television
programming to the detri-
ment of US rights holders.


"This compulsory licence
allows cable operators in the
Bahamas - including the par-
tially government-owned
Cable Bahamas - to essential-
ly steal films and program-
ming from the United States,
thus destroying the economic
viability for US pay television
networks that own the rights
to sell films and programming

SEE page five


j


4k'


call us today at 396-1355


* Allege that Bahamas
cable TV licensing
regime breaching this
nation's copyright
obligations under
Caribbean Basin Initiative

* Cable Bahamas accuses
rights holders of using
US government to
'coerce' it


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March 2010 deadline for

OECD 'grey list' escape


!!
i










City Markets 'days from closing' $5m refinancing deal


& Massey.
Several sources have sug-
gested that Neal & Massey
is likely to increase its BSL
Holdings stake as a result
of the need to refinance
City Markets, possibly tak-
ing a majority holding in the
group.
That would explain the
need for Central Bank
approval, but this has not
been confirmed, and Mr
Chatrani's comment that
"no one has backed out"
appears to imply that all
BSL Holdings investors
have contributed in propor-
tion to their existing hold-
ings, thus ensuring no one
is diluted.
Meanwhile, telling Tri-
bune Business that City
Markets was "making


FROM page one

National Workers Co-opera-
tive Credit Union's interest
rates on regular deposits and
savings accounts stood at 3 per
cent, compared to the 1-1.5


FROM page one

progress on all fronts", Mr
Chatrani said the new capital
was being earmarked to
restart the company's direct
import programme
enabling it to buy high-end
products in bulk from for-
eign suppliers, thus improv-
ing margins and prices.
"Our customers are react-
ing to the prices, noticing the
difference in price," Mr Cha-
trani added. "Our sales are
strong, reflecting that, and
we're seeing more of our
customers coming back to
the stores. Our customer
counts are up, and they're
growing at about 2-3 per
cent ever four-week period."
City Markets, its operat-
ing parent and BSL Hold-



Credit union

per cent offered by many com-
mercial banks, with the inter-
est increasing as a member's
level of savings rose to


ings have come in for heavy
criticism from minority
shareholders who collective-
ly hold 22 per cent of
Bahamas Supermarkets,
investor value having been
massively eroded as a result
of the $13.429 million net
loss projected by manage-
ment accounts for 2008 -
something that plunged the
company into negative equi-
ty.
More than 15 months after
the 2008 year-end, Bahamas
Supermarkets' external audi-
tor, KPMG, has yet to sign
off on the audited accounts,
a timeline well outside the
120-day filing period stipu-
lated for public companies.
Many have argued that this
saga has undermined the
integrity of the Bahamian


"encourage asset building".
Apart from increasing its
asset base from $34 million to
$35-$36 million, Mr Poitier
said the merger with the Util-
ities credit union would fur-
ther diversify the National
Workers Co-operative Credit
Union's membership base,
altering the perception in some
quarters that it was just for
hotel industry workers or
union members.
Pointing out that when
things were bad in the hotel
industry everything "dried
up", Mr Poitier told Tribune
Business that the merger, with
the Utilities credit union's
membership derived from
BTC, BEC, and Water & Sew-
erage, would help to better
'recession-proof' his organisa-


capital markets.
The 2008 audit sign-off
had previously been contin-
gent on City Markets'
receipt of financing from
BSL Holdings, which would
have avoided the accounts
being qualified as a 'going
concern'.
However, Mr Chatrani
said yesterday: "We're rush-
ing to have the audit com-
plete with or without the
financing. It's so old, we
want to get it behind us, with
or without the opinion, so
we can move on to the 2009
audit. We want to get it com-
pleted.
"We had the final [audit]
draft today for review. We
have the opinion in hand,
and should be approving
that some time next week.


tion.
"Over the past five to six
years we've worked diligently
in diversifying our member-
ship base, getting the message
out that we're not owned by
the hotel workers, and that
we're not a labour organisa-
tion," Mr Poitier told Tribune
Business.
He acknowledged that the
National Workers Co-opera-
tive Credit Union had suffered
"some casualties" among its
members as a result of the
recession when it came to
repaying their loan obligations,
having "seen a bout a 4-6 per
cent increase" in loan defaults.
Mr Poitier said the National
Workers Co-operative Credit
Union had come up with "cre-
ative ways" to work with


The Board will approve it,
and we will call the annual
general meeting (AGM)
shortly."
Mr Chatrani said Bahamas
Supermarkets was "aiming
for the end of the month"
for the AGM date, pointing
out that shareholders had to
be given 21 days' notice.
The City Markets chief
executive said the super-
market chain was "perform-
ing better than expected"
against its revised projec-
tions, which had been down-
graded due to the economic
downturn.
He added that the compa-
ny's return to profitability
would "be achieved coming
out of Christmas", and from
there on, "on a period to
period basis we expect to be


members, such as allowing
them to pay interest only until
they went back to work, as in
the case of Wyndham employ-
ees due to the property's two-
month closure.
Those who had been termi-
nated had been given grace
periods to see if they could
find alternative work, or
allowed to make token pay-
ments. However, members
who failed to come in and
address their situation were
being dealt with to protect
"the people's money".
Mr Poitier said the National
Workers Co-operative Credit
Union was being "very aggres-
sive", and while it was "willing
to work with those who are
making a good effort, I hate
to say it, but we're also
exhausting the route of taking
people to court as necessary".
The credit union's members
will also today vote on
whether to acquire a property
for the National Workers Co-
operative Credit Union's new
head office.
While no site had been
selected, Mr Poitier told Tri-
bune Business that "once we
get a good deal on the proper-
ty, we're ready to go, as we
have a part of the funds to pur-
chase the property and start


generally profitable on a
consistent basis".
With sales and customer
counts improving, Mr Cha-
trani said City Markets was
being prepared for its
relaunch "in the next six
weeks", with different
branding, signage and
images. The deli area and
equipment will also be
improved.
Apart from the $5 million
injected into City Markets
as the operating company, a
significant sum will also be
received by BSL Holdings,
Mr Chatrani indicated.
That sum is likely to be
used to meet its debt
repayment obligations to
Royal Bank of Canada,
and refinance existing cred-
it facilities.


construction. We're as far as
we can go without buying a
property".
Draft plans had been drawn
up, and Mr Poitier said the
building itself was likely to cost
$1 million to construct. "As a
financial institution that's been
in existence for 26-27 years,
it's only natural we reside in
our own building," he added,
explaining that it was current-
ly renting property on Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway
from the hotel union.
In addition, the National
Workers Co-operative Credit
Union members will also vote
on whether to close its East
Bay Street branch with effect
from October 31, 2009.
Mr Poitier explained that
the building, across the road
from the Outback Steakhouse,
lacked parking and had seen a
reduction in demand as a
result of Kerzner Internation-
al's lay-offs over the past year.
No lay-offs will result, the
National Workers Co-opera-
tive Credit Union redeploying
affected staff within its opera-
tions. "There is a possibility
that we'll be back in the east
within a relatively short period
of time, but in a bigger way
and more convenient," Mr
Poitier said.


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Duties to include:

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* Daily monitoring of Branch and Subsidiaries Balance Sheets and review
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to:
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HSBC
P.O. Box N-4917
Suite 306, Centre of Commerce
One Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 502-2566/2577



Application Deadline: Friday, 09 October 2009


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


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the Board of Directors has declared an interim

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to be paid on October 20, 2009 to all shareholders

of record as of October 13, 2009.


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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009


THE TRIBUNE











Bahamas 'endures'


^_ ~ ~ fl. _ *a * ^^^^^^^^^^


OCO.l.Hl0l 1111. CA�ltlS




better than many


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE BAHAMAS has "rea-
sonably endured" the global
recession and fared better than
many other nations in doing
so, the minister of state for
finance believes, its "national
sense of perspective" being
one of "the greatest threats" to
its ability to weather econom-
ic contraction.
Zhivargo Laing, in an
address to a seminar organ-
ised by the Higgs & Johnson
law firm, acknowledged that
while many Bahamians may
not share the same sentiments,
he had seen indications from
his travels that the Bahamas
was coping with the downturn
in business activity better than
most.
"I daresay one of the great-
est threats to our ability to
navigate the this current
dilemma is our national sense
of perspective," Mr Laing
said.
"To date, we have reason-
ably endured the current glob-
al crisis, recognizing not all of
us have the same perspective.
It has been my experience to
travel to a number of coun-
tries, and sit in meetings with
minister of finance from coun-
tries around the world, and I
can tell you the great stress,
grief and shock on their faces
suggests to me that even in
our pained circumstances, we
are in a better situation that
many others are facing."
As the minister acknowl-
edged, a significant number
of Bahamians are unlikely to
share his views, especially the
10,000-plus number who were
terminated from their jobs
during the 12 months between
May 2008 and May 2009.
However, his message to
the Higgs & Johnson seminar
was designed to give some
modest hope, explain the
Government's strategy for
guiding the Bahamas through
the current recession - albeit
with a heavy dose of reality,
and provide some perspective
on how this nation was faring
compared to others.
Acknowledging that the
Bahamas, let alone the Gov-
ernment, did not have the
capacity to drag itself out of
recession by itself, Mr Laing
said: 'We didn't give rise to
this economic fallout, and we
do not have the ability to
reverse it. In a real sense we
are in a season; a season of
economic decline.
"We can define the reality
of our economic [condition],
but cannot alter the fact of the
season. We cannot alter the
circumstances or fact of the
season. What we must do is
adapt to see out the season."
Mr Laing called on Bahami-
ans to display "mental forti-
tude", determination and a
sense of perspective to help
weather the economic storm
and emerge into good times
all the better for it, adding:
"We will likely know more
about ourselves, for good or
ill, than we have ever known
before.
"It is on this basis that we
are able to develop a strategy
for forward movement. It has
been our determination as a
government in these circum-
stances that we must promote
economic stability to the
fullest extent possible. Reduc-
ing job losses, business fail-
ures and economic decline
depends on it."
To achieve this, Mr Laing
said the Government had
focused on three areas- main-
taining the financial system's
integrity, "nurturing the econ-
omy during this downturn",
and providing social relief to
those most impacted.
Besides maintaining fiscal
prudence to the maximum
extent possible, keeping the
fiscal deficit and national debt
under some level of control,
and ensuring the foreign
exchange reserves, bank capi-
talisation and banking system
liquidity stayed at reasonable
levels, Mr Laing said the $12
million expansion in social ser-
vices funding over the last two
budget periods had served to
"buffer consumers in a
storm".
The Government had opt-


* Minister acknowledges nation cannot pull
itself out of recession on its own, and that
there are limits on what government can do

* Says 'greatest threat' to weathering the
storm is 'national sense of perspective'


ed to do more foreign curren-
cy borrowing to boost the US
dollar reserves, as opposed to
Bahamian currency borrow-
ing, Mr Laing adding: "All of
these things working together
have been an effort to buffer is
to the fullest extent possible."
Still, the minister effective-
ly admitted there were limits
to what the Government
could do, especially when it
came to preventing the nation-
al debt - something Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham has
admitted could breach the 50
per cent of GDP threshold, or
$3.6-$3.7 billion - getting out


of control.
"I know the best laid plans
run the risk of failure," he
added. "We are not in control
of all the forces and are limit-
ed in our resources, so some
forces are so great that they
overwhelm us.
"When we have done all we
can do, in my view, we stand
and leave the rest to God."
Yet, attempting to strike a
positive note, Mr Laing added:
"We must always maintain
hope. I'm confident we will
come out of this difficult eco-
nomic season and enter a peri-
od of progress and abundance.


I cannot say when, but I know
it will happen soon - that we
will emerge."
He added that the turn-
around, "combined with wise
choices for the future, will
enable us to seize new oppor-
tunities"


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SERVICE INTERRUPTION





From midnight October 3rd to

5pm October 4th, 2009.



As we continue efforts to improve our service to you, we ask you
to take note that our Electronic Banking System will be
temporarily unavailable during the time listed above while we
conduct routine maintenance. We apologize for the length of
this service interruption, and for any inconvenience this may
cause, but this extended disruption has become necessary due
to the comprehensive nature of the required maintenance.


During this period, the following services will be unavailable:


* ABM

* VISA transaction via ABM

* Internet Banking

* Telephone Banking



Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this necessary

maintenance.






f-


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK
www.firstcaribbeanbank.com GET THERE. TOGETHER.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW AND EQUITY


2007
CLE/qui/00109


ALL THOSE piece parcels or lots of land comprising 9,374 square
foot and being Lot Number One (I) and Lot Number Two (2) situate
in Block Number Forty Three (43) in a Subdivision called and known
as "Englerston Subdivision" situated at the South-Eastern Junction of
Homestead Avenue and Podeleo Street in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lots of land are bounded on the
North by a Road Reservation called and known as Homestead Avenue
and running thereon approximately One hundred and Fourteen and
Sixty Eight hundredths (114.68) feet partially on an acre, on the East
by Lots Number 44 and 43 in the said Subdivision and running thereon
Ninety Eight and Twelve Hundredths (98.12) feet and on the West by
a Road Reservation called and known as Podeleo Street and running
thereon Eighty One and Three Hundredths (81.03) feet which said
piece parcels or lots of land have such position, boundaries, shape,
marks and dimensions as are more particularly delineated on the Plan
recorded in the Department of Lands and Surveys as Plan No.3914
N.P.

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles

Act 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of JANE MCPHEE

NOTICE

The Quieting Titles Act. 1959.

The Petition of JANE MCPHEE of Podoleo Street in the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas in respect of:-

ALL THOSE piece parcels or lots of land comprising 9,374 square
feet and being Lot Number One (I) and Lot Number Two (2) situate
in Block Number Forty Three (43) in a Subdivision called and known
as "Englerston Subdivision" situated at the South-Eastern Junction of
Homestead Avenue and Podeleo Street in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lots of land are bounded on
the North by a Road Reservation called and known as Homestead A
venue and running thereon approximately One Hundred and Fourteen
and Sixty Eight Hundredths (114.68) feet partially on an acre, on the
East by Lots Number 44 and 43 in the said Subdivision and running
thereon Ninety Eight and Twelve Hundredths (98.12) feet and on the
West by a Road Reservation called and known as Podeleo Street and
running thereon Eighty One and Three Hundredths (81.03) feet which
said piece parcels or lots of land have such position, boundaries,
shape, marks and dimensions as are more particularly delineated on
the Plan recorded in the Department of Lands and Surveys as Plan
NO.3914 N.P.

Jane Mcphee claims to be the owner of the fee simple estate
in possession of the said pieces or parcels of land free from
encumbrances. And the Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section
3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1999 to have title to the said pieces
parcels or tracts of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the
Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having a Dower or a right to
Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition
shall on before 26th November, A.D., 2009 file in the Supreme Court
and serve on the Petitioners or the undersigned a Statement of his
claim in the prescribed from verified by an Affidavit to be tiled therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of Claim on
or before the 26th November, A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such
claim.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected at:

I. The Registry of the Supreme Court.
2. The Chambers of Messrs ROLLE & ROLLE., Attorneys for the
Petitioner.

Dated the 28th day of September, A.D., 2009.
ROLLE & ROLLE
Chambers Seventh Terrace West, Centerville
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)
Liquidator s Statement
Pursuant To Section 137(6) Of
The International Business Companies Act


We, Diane E. Fletcher, Liquidator of SHOREWOOD INC.
HEREBY CERTIFY that the winding up and dissolution of
SHOREWOOD INC. has been completed in accordance
with the Articles of Dissolution.

Dated the 1st day of October 2009.


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


. ~






PAGEBSIES 4BIRDY COE ,20 H RBN


FROM page one Emerald Bay


over 300 people. Every day
they're hitting the pavement
to promote the islands and
the destinations we're offer-
ing."
Mr Stewart acknowledged
that airlift to any Family
Island resort was "a major
challenge", not just in terms
of establishing service and
getting visitors there, but also
in altering traveller percep-
tions to ensure they knew the
destination was "just a flight
away" and more accessible
than they thought.
"It's a joint effort on many


fronts to work with the air-
lines to get service. You have
to have firepower on the
ground to let people know it's
just a flight away, and you
can get there very easily," the
Sandals chief executive told
Tribune Business.
He added that the resort
chain had already discussed
airlift to Exuma and Sandals
Emerald Bay with the exist-
ing carriers that served the
island, including Continental
Connection and American
Airlines.


NOTICE is hereby given that STEPHEN G. DAVIES of 8
CAMELOT CT, P.O. BOX F-42766, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.



Mi TiE TAGSLA COUAT
L.e. .iW LAWm fsu;r c.bribCi CUZA.-M4l







AND
IrMmrz. -1 r:.*wm .. -D



Awvomr mIEwr or sermict
Of mOTCE HEAR THE UOUGNATING 31uMoN3
r1IJ41E HIDTMCE k A" 1-� 1- � �*-l lr 1* 4a1un1t. JMt�
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lSpn AnWl sw.s4 a! TC hudes < M ppo��e��� I,* tg" **G St.m


Emad to y-rI eayal 5eto14pa. * n> . Bnn
1aK Ie Fi4jar &U. O
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caw I t"a74 Th bWA Pa


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CQUOAN LAW ADMitU' "


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I TCARIBN EAN INTri lM SMA. WTper~ .HsMa liLa I i5me& i
Frsnkmaae. wrrwui6 mo vwH m�^n wwtaa




NOTICE QOF AD0URNED HEAR

L*:;1,IKm..M1Uv.- 1 e )f L A 4 oA - . & hC TAdU w Cz
V "'"" '" ' *** 1 " * " t'--" .'* � b" b vvlAmd. 4 1 m






NeTI 1 r-F A".mI- E* M5 h-m M


'We've spoken to Air
Canada and took them in the
week we closed on the prop-
erty," Mr Stewart told Tri-
bune Business. "We've had
discussions with other air-
lines, and they're interested
in going there. At this point,
it's safe to say we feel we will
have enough support in terms
of airlift into that destination.
With the airlines, it has to be
good for them to be good for
us."
Mr Stewart pledged that
Sandals would attempt to
give as much business as pos-
sible to Exuma-based suppli-
ers and vendors, in keeping


with its long-standing policy
for all its resorts, but warned
that "in this economic climate
today, you have to be com-
petitive".
Thus the message is that if
you can provide Sandals with
products of the required qual-
ity at a competitive price, and
consistent/reliable supply, the
chain will buy from Exuma-
based suppliers. Its Sandals
Royal Bahamian property
already puts everything out
to tender in Nassau, Mr Stew-
art added.
The Sandals chief execu-
tive said the response of Exu-
mians to Sandals' acquisition


Legal Notice

NOTICE
HEARTLINK DEVELOPMENT INC.





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of HEARTLINK DEVELOPMENT
INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice

NOTICE

SAMBOR INC.





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of SAMBOR INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY






SBARBO - THE HOME OF FBREH F-ALIAN COO1GNG m two [5
?..uLc. Dj = . ciL,..u~nL CENUIAL MANACBAD

1MI poDbo 1 ab IhL Uui d dI , mame, .ociimd aidJ . g o o d pbr'o.
wo bln a ri* &Dur tE ~a cdIkr irlia dnQmabr daumuralm
la nxeoid.The mdin&" muba pe nic codmmio iucdim u lla jud
ir wa cami&r kdrat vMivumI of d a arnmplistanKsit
1Uh Jpplic- ombLMiw paah dm fokkm*

* Ilk/oAin m.lzm d nat m riid. -4aiidan hid ildulidsfilDs.
A A tf.ie wz ei egene ui wL e1inm im m ueprko n a

r ead adbOi~& akUi1Y.m A&W Ji flm k d io lgh i wo LV, i
wanjiqumeniJy.
* 6 aill lzWv wilbnirmnal wpwiu.on wid con
* Ikfmuydiv dil nl dmida ftvgai .m mempHasiniquair
f3dcnaoml, ims anjuad hauliUnLs
* TIm alaDy Ir de L i d mwo ow I r lffwirJi Imniral of
�hair seiwlinijias d difEftrezs.
* Abphbrmtmnuit&ab; undd wa Lto wwzmuinnmmn lft bour wek,1
wtokwrdi wo IbdiM irnludid in uwl k.
* PIUICmIr.hjnk u.iLnpuiMirnu
SauyFii om t vbO S iWmA L od v4ibmi ml b v1 m cal
pN f A I1E( i,,i-Lu,&. [ iu axamdahhia btAxta bam dprady
TWOT cTnpWy and me'i&-d |rrimwns.

'Il me e u a Vidv ium10:

NO TL 'EHONE INTIRHWs huEPM1


I Bec rntvlaE erl a


of Emerald Bay had "been
overwhelming", adding:
"Everyone wants to see us be
successful.
"There's a lot riding on us,
and I've had many phone
calls with people offering to
lend a hand, saying that if
there's anything they can do,
give them a call. It's been
quite amazing, and we will
just do our best to showcase
Great Exuma to the world.
We feel strongly we can do
it.
"We would really love to
see some of the developments
put on hold, the private


homes and the like, given
confidence by Sandals to con-
tinue and people enjoy the
island."
Mr Stewart pledged that
Sandals Emerald Bay would
"be at the higher end of our
line up", describing the resort
as a Family Island property
possessing first world facili-
ties and infrastructure.
"We're starting with a
clean sheet with this hotel,"
he added, describing it as "a
magnificent development"
produced by a "big picture
vision" for Exuma and Emer-
ald Bay itself.


Legal Notice

NOTICE

VIDA DULCE VENTURES LTD.
- -



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of VIDA DULCE VENTURES LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice

NOTICE

BON VIVANT COMPANY INC.





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BON VIVANT COMPANY INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




NOTICE

PARKGATE INVEST & TRADE CORP
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138(4) of the International Business
Companies Act. 2000, PARKGATE INVEST &
TRADE CORP. is in dissolution as of September 28,
2009.

Marion Coukidou Madella of 284 Arch. Makarios
III Ave., Fortuna Court, Block B, 3rd Floor, 3105
Limassol, Cyprus is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR


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F7TIICS TRE NTI AELGO OWWTIUE4.O


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 5B


FROM page one

to the Bahamas."
As a result, the MPAA
argued: "The Bahamas should
not continue to benefit from
preferential access to the US
market while it is simultane-
ously expropriating US rights
holders' property."
Also beating the drum for
trade sanctions against the
Bahamas was the Television
Association of Programmers
Latin America, purporting to
represent more than 30 pay
TV channels from that region,
which also laid into the
Bahamas' compulsory TV
licensing regime for violating
the CBERA's intellectual
property rights provisions.
Describing the Bahamian
regime as "objectionable",
the Association accused Cable


Trade


Bahamas of "resorting to
questionable tactics in expro-
priating certain satellite sig-
nals". It argued that the licens-
ing regime violated the Berne
Convention on intellectual
property rights, and said it
"represents an extremely dan-
gerous precedent, and threat-
ens to erode the foundation
of intellectual property pro-
tection for the US pay televi-
sion programming industry".
The Association said it was
concerned that other
Caribbean nations may fol-
low the Bahamas' example,
arguing that these issues "sig-
nificantly" and "adversely"
impacted its members' ability
to conduct business in the
Bahamas.


Adding to the anti-
Bahamas and Cable Bahamas
offensive, the International
Intellectual Property Alliance
(IIPA) and HBO Latin
America Group backed the
submissions of the other two
groups.
However, in its response to
the US International Trade
Commission, Cable Bahamas
said that "for over five years,
Cable Bahamas has sought a
meeting with Television
Association of Programmers
Latin America and its mem-
bers without success.
"Instead of meeting with
Cable Bahamas, HBO Latin
America and Television
Association of Programmers
Latin America seek to use
the office of the United
States government to coerce
the settlement of their pri-


vate business dispute."
Cable Bahamas also
argued that the Commission
was not the appropriate
forum in which to discuss
the relevant issues, and
asserted that the Bahamas
met CBERA eligibility
requirements, including
those on intellectual prop-
erty rights, the US govern-
ment not having found that
this nation's copyright law
was "inconsistent with inter-
national law".
And in its submission, pro-
vided through its Washing-
ton embassy, the Bahamas
gave assurances that "it will
implement its obligations
with respect to copyright
protection in the Bahamas".
Trade sanctions appear
highly unlikely, although
they could impact some


$141 million worth of
Bahamian exports that cur-
rently enter the US duty-
free every year. This is
because Cable Bahamas has
been working with the
Bahamian Embassy in
Washington, the Registrar
General's Office and the US
Embassy in Nassau to try
and resolve the problem,
and has had some success in
negotiating commercial
arrangements with US pro-
gramming rights holders.
The crux of the problem is
that the Bahamas and rest
of the English-speaking
Caribbean are seen as too
small a market by many of
the programming rights
holders, making them disin-
clined to negotiate commer-
cial arrangements with
Cable Bahamas.


Their distribution and
royalty rights do not allow
them to broadcast outside
the US, and the legal fees
and other costs required to
change these agreements
would exceed the revenues
gained from a small market
such as this nation.
Under a 2000 agreement,
the US Trade Representa-
tive's Office was supposed
to encourage the MPAA
and the likes of its individual
members to enter into com-
mercial agreements with
Cable Bahamas, in return
for this nation amending its
compulsory licensing regime
via the 2004 Act amend-
ment. Yet while the
Bahamas believes it has ful-
filled its side of the bargain,
it privately believes the US
has to hold up its end.


FROM page one

to move forward and turn the page."
French-owned banks currently in
the Bahamas yesterday gave no indi-
cation they had any concerns about
the Government's ability to meet the
March 2010 deadline for escaping the
'grey list', and expected to still be
here.
Ivanhoe Sands, head of Credit Agri-
cole (Suisse), said: "We are very, very
comfortable with that, and this is real-
ly no surprise because that was part of
the G-20 agreement. Members of the
G-20 will be obligated to exit 'tax
havens' still on the 'grey list' by March
2010."
And an e-mail communication from
SG on its official view of offshore cen-
tres, which has been obtained by Tri-
bune Business, said: "Soci6dt
G6n6rale is present in certain coun-
tries which are currently on the grey
list. These countries are in the process


OECD

of signing tax conventions for the
exchange of information according to
the norms set out by the G-20 and it is
expected that they will no longer be
on the list by the end of this year.
"Whatever the country in which we
carry out our activity, we apply the
business ethics rules which are in force
within the Socidtd G6n6rale Group,
in particular with regard to KYC, and
we respect local regulations.
"The business model of SG Private
Banking is based on advising clients
on their wealth by providing concrete
solutions with regard to savings, the
management of their investments and
transmission/inheritance, and is not
based on tax avoidance."
As for the Bahamas specifically, SG
said: "This country is in the process of
signing conventions and intends to be
off the grey list at the end of the year."


NOTICE is hereby given that MICHAEL FANORD of
CHARLES VINCENT ST., NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25th day of September, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



LOT FOR SALE

A sEVIN' THOUAND P.O . Ft.
SCa*flUL1T FAMILY L rTW (CXZN VIEW is KIM
SALE IN GANBIMwrA MUocaMrE CDMAMs
rwNm, TH LroT COM wrTu T sis or
APPROVED ANCHNTHTUAL DRAWCS SHOWED
TWO B NDITONUriA A SINLZ. FAMILY HOME
OWUM HAS CEAB iTr E. AMEINO 7OSI O.G (c1C"s)




Legal Notice

NOTICE

CLEARWATER MANAGEMENT

LIMITED

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 CLEARWATER
MANAGEMENT LIMITED is in dissolution.
The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 30th
September 2009. David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves ' ll i.., P.O. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of
CLEARWATER MANAGEMENT LIMITED. All persons having
claims against the above-named company are required to send their
address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 30th
October 2009.







Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) JELENA OVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on October 1, 2009 when
its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 30th day of October 2009 to send their names and addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or,
in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.

October 2, 2009

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY


I le


The Public is hereby advised that I, KENDAL WAYNE
ALCIDE of NASSAU, BAHAMAS, intend to change
my name to KENDAL WAYNE THOMPSON. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



Legal Notice

NOTICE

MULBERRY SLOPES LTD.

-0-



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MULBERRY SLOPES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


I


I ODSUSSOISO HSIPAGE LG ON5T WWW.TIBUE22CO5


WISE ROYAL.-a FIDELITY
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3 V ~ 2 5 *C1 W St- sz !- 5,50 �C* 1 5w a -qC? 3 5 1 3I~7 1 5
12- M Do -L = .I c4 - PD& sDco U.9,2 r ES41 1-35 aIV
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inwiKLirrUn 0901u-r Mc rIns [OseAm na a a mm n rce. ~wPS*I rMu bmes
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BUSINESS


NOTICE is herebygiventhat MACKINSTEHNORof COLUMBUS
DRIVE 30B, APT #2, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 2nd day of October,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





PNOTfCE








SBARRO- THE HOME OF FRESH ITALIAN AND
BAHAMIAN COOING IN CABLE BEACH,
BAY SIMETAND THE MALL AT MARATHON
WILLBE CLOSED ON
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4" 2009
TO CELEBRATE ITS ANNUAL SVF KFN DAY

WE APOLO DCE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE
CAUSED AS A RESULT OF OUR CLOSING.




Legal Notice

NOTICE

SHINEEY CANAL LTD.

- �-



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SHINEEY CANAL LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


01.19@11w


5











THE WEATHER REPORT


r rflI INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
': L.On (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


T DAY TIG SATAY S


- dw-
S - ORLANDO
High: 860 F/30� C
Low:690F/21�C
Q.
TAMPA
High: 860�F/30� C
Low: 740�F/230 C

.- '""'.


- S


.bh%


Variably cloudy with Mostly cloudy with Variable clouds with Clouds and sun, Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny with a
thunderstorms. thunderstorms. thunderstorms. t-storms possible. possible. shower possible.
High: 890 High: 870 High: 870 High: 880
High:87 Low: 77770 L 77� L: 7 79� Low: 780 Low: 790
.ITIai F.7 ..A.W mmMarMr, WITs mms!MVrmr s� msmIm M mmwrmmrmrs M mUarIff iiMM
I 93oF I I B3Y F I [ 92-82-B F ] I 92-82- IF I 1 95�-B11F I I 95-84-B F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature� is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body-everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.


I. Al R.A l I


I AMiArN Ar


a WEST PALM BEACH
High:870�F/31� C
Low: 740 F/230 C


FT. LAUDERDALE
High:88�F/310C L
Low: 750 F/240 C


MIAMI
High: 880�F/31� C
Low: 770 F/250 C


KEY WEST
High:870F/31�C
Low: 790 F/260 C
�.


Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


High
F/C
71/21
46/7
70/21
72/22
72/22
62/16
58/14
82/27
61/16
64/17
82/27
61/16
62/16
87/30
80/26


W High
F/C
s 75/23
s 48/8
t 77/25
pc 75/23
pc 75/23
pc 69/20
r 65/18
pc 85/29
c 55/12
r 66/18
s 76/24
s 63/17
r 58/14
s 88/31
t 81/27


Saturday
Low
F/C
51/10
37/2
55/12
55/12
56/13
57/13
47/8
61/16
47/8
47/8
66/18
35/1
45/7
75/23
68/20


Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
66/18 46/7
85/29 65/18
62/16 44/6
85/29 57/13
82/27 51/10
88/31 58/14
70/21 53/11
77/25 54/12
88/31 77/25
54/12 40/4
74/23 53/11
81/27 67/19
66/18 62/16
76/24 45/7
86/30 69/20


Saturday
W High Low
F/C F/C
c 61/16 45/7
pc 86/30 68/20
sh 64/17 44/6
s 86/30 66/18
s 80/26 52/11
s 72/22 58/14
t 70/21 47/8
pc 78/25 56/13
t 89/31 77/25
r 53/11 43/6
t 78/25 49/9
t 80/26 69/20
c 73/22 60/15
s 76/24 56/13
s 89/31 69/20


ABACO
High: 850�F/290 C
Low: 76� F/240 C


, 1-

a.
FREEPORT
High: 860�F/30� C
Low: 730 F/230 C




NASSAU
High:870F/31�C
. -- Low: 770�F/250C








-4.
ANDROS
High: 860�F/30� C
Low: 770 F/250 C


Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, OR
Raleigh-Durham
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tucson
Washington, DC


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
71/21 62/16
88/31 68/20
62/16 52/11
63/17 47/8
79/26 62/16
68/20 49/9
63/17 38/3
88/31 70/21
79/26 62/16
69/20 53/11
58/14 43/6
80/26 67/19
86/30 74/23
84/28 59/15
74/23 62/16


Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature
High ........................... .................. 86� F/300 C
Low .................... ...................... 77� F/250 C
Normal high ................................... 860 F/300 C
Norm al low ...................................... 74� F/23� C
Last year's high ............................... 880 F/31� C
Last year's low ............................... 760 F/24� C


0 112 3145 61 7 8 1
LOW MODERATE HIGH V. HIGH EXT

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexm number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.



High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.)
Today 6:06a.m. 3.0 12:00a.m. 0.7
6:22 p.m. 3.0 12:20 p.m. 0.7
Saturday 6:44 a.m. 3.2 12:35a.m. 0.6
6:59 p.m. 3.0 1:01 p.m. 0.6
Sunday 7:22 a.m. 3.3 1:10a.m. 0.4
7:37 p.m. 3.0 1:42 p.m. 0.4
Monday 8:00 a.m. 3.4 1:45a.m. 0.3
8:15 p.m. 2.9 2:23 p.m. 0.4


Precipitation Sunrise ...... 7:02 a.m. Moonrise .... 5:51 p.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .............................. 0.02" Sunset . . . . . . 6:56 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 5:29 a.m.
Year to date .................. .......................... 31.43" Full Last New First
Norm al year to date .................................... 38.65" .

AccuWeather.com ,. . f
Forecasts and graphics provided by
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. @2009 Oct. 4 Oct. 11 Oct. 18 Oct. 25
High: 860 F/30� C
Low: 790�F/260 C


CAT ISLAND
High:840F/290C
Low: 760 F/240 C


GREATEXUMA
High: 850 F/290 C
Low:780F/260C

*.' - "'. .

.


Saturday
W High Low W
F/C F/C
pc 74/23 60/15 t
pc 92/33 73/22 pc
r 68/20 46/7 pc
r 61/16 46/7 pc
pc 84/28 52/11 pc
pc 65/18 46/7 c
s 66/18 40/4 pc
t 84/28 70/21 t
s 70/21 63/17 pc
s 67/19 51/10 pc
r 58/14 45/7 c
pc 85/29 65/18 t
pc 87/30 71/21 t
pc 84/28 68/20 t
pc 79/26 59/15 r


SAN SALVADOR
High: 87*�F/31� C
Low: 77� F/25* C


LONG ISLAND
High:880F/31�C
Low: 780 F/260 C


m
Hi


VIAYAGUANA
ligh:870F/31�C
Low: 75� F/240 C








-., -


CROOKED ISLAND/ACKLINS
RAGGED ISLAND High:890F/320 C
Low: 770 F/25� C
High: 870�F/31C Low C
Low: 76� F/24� C

GREAT INAGUA
High: 91� F/330 C
Low: 76� F/240 C

-A


i' I TIES I


Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland


High
F/C
91/32
57/13
77/25
82/27
63/17


Today
Low W
F/C
77/25 pc
48/8 sh
45/7 s
68/20 pc
53/11 r


Saturday
High Low W
F/C F/C
92/33 79/26 pc
61/16 50/10 c
79/26 46/7 pc
83/28 68/20 pc
59/15 49/9 r


WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 5 Miles 850 F
Saturday: SE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 5 Miles 850 F
FREEPORT Today: VAR at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 86� F
Saturday: SE at 8-16 Knots 2-3 Feet 10 Miles 850 F
ABACO Today: S at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 84� F
Saturday: S at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 5 Miles 84� F


Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston


I ramVINSLI'los I111111 I


U.S. CITIES I


LUCII TT .11.11


MAC02,


-44_


-Ablh- Z,


~"""�~.


Bangkok 90/32 77/25 sh 90/32 78/25 t
Barbados 86/30 77/25 pc 86/30 77/25 s
Barcelona 72/22 59/15 s 71/21 59/15 pc
Beijing 79/26 55/12 s 70/21 50/10 s
Beirut 79/26 71/21 s 80/26 72/22 s
Belgrade 66/18 48/8 sh 63/17 45/7 s
Berlin 54/12 39/3 sh 55/12 43/6 r
Bermuda 81/27 75/23 pc 81/27 73/22 s
Bogota 68/20 43/6 sh 66/18 46/7 sh
Brussels 59/15 46/7 c 64/17 50/10 c
Budapest 66/18 45/7 pc 68/20 45/7 s
Buenos Aires 68/20 48/8 s 72/22 57/13 s
Cairo 90/32 70/21 s 92/33 69/20 s
Calcutta 93/33 81/27 t 90/32 80/26 t
Calgary 54/12 32/0 c 42/5 32/0 r
Cancun 90/32 72/22 pc 89/31 74/23 pc
Caracas 84/28 73/22 t 83/28 74/23 t
Casablanca 78/25 61/16 s 78/25 59/15 s
Copenhagen 52/11 45/7 sh 59/15 54/12 r
Dublin 59/15 46/7 pc 57/13 43/6 sh
Frankfurt 57/13 45/7 c 63/17 48/8 pc
Geneva 66/18 45/7 pc 68/20 45/7 s
Halifax 58/14 46/7 pc 63/17 50/10 s
Havana 90/32 72/22 t 88/31 71/21 sh
Helsinki 48/8 36/2 sh 52/11 36/2 sh
Hong Kong 88/31 79/26 pc 88/31 77/25 pc
Islamabad 104/40 68/20 s 103/39 68/20 s
Istanbul 77/25 64/17 s 79/26 64/17 c
Jerusalem 82/27 62/16 s 83/28 61/16 s
Johannesburg 67/19 51/10 t 74/23 54/12 c
Kingston 89/31 79/26 t 88/31 79/26 sh
Lima 75/23 60/15 s 75/23 60/15 s
London 63/17 50/10 pc 64/17 48/8 sh
Madrid 81/27 52/11 pc 82/27 54/12 pc
Manila 81/27 77/25 sh 85/29 77/25 sh
Mexico City 79/26 54/12 t 77/25 54/12 t
Monterrey 97/36 75/23 t 89/31 71/21 t
Montreal 57/13 50/10 pc 64/17 57/13 r
Moscow 45/7 36/2 r 46/7 34/1 c
Munich 56/13 42/5 r 66/18 41/5 s
Nairobi 85/29 59/15 t 81/27 56/13 r
New Delhi 93/33 77/25 s 95/35 77/25 s
Oslo 48/8 34/1 s 43/6 32/0 r
Paris 64/17 46/7 s 68/20 48/8 s
Prague 54/12 43/6 c 62/16 45/7 c
Rio de Janeiro 83/28 73/22 pc 84/28 72/22 pc
Riyadh 99/37 70/21 s 96/35 69/20 s
Rome 74/23 59/15 sh 73/22 57/13 s
St. Thomas 89/31 79/26 sh 89/31 80/26 sh
San Juan 86/30 51/10 s 88/31 54/12 pc
San Salvador 86/30 73/22 t 87/30 71/21 t
Santiago 75/23 50/10 s 70/21 48/8 pc
Santo Domingo 84/28 73/22 sh 85/29 73/22 sh
Sao Paulo 80/26 62/16 t 76/24 61/16 t
Seoul 75/23 54/12 s 68/20 52/11 s
Stockholm 48/8 34/1 pc 52/11 43/6 sh
Sydney 72/22 59/15 sh 68/20 55/12 r
Taipei 84/28 77/25 sh 84/28 77/25 sh
Tokyo 75/23 70/21 r 77/25 68/20 c
Toronto 59/15 50/10 r 61/16 51/10 sh
Trinidad 90/32 70/21 pc 93/33 72/22 s
Vancouver 57/13 42/5 c 57/13 41/5 pc
Vienna 57/13 43/6 c 60/15 51/10 pc
Warsaw 54/12 37/2 sh 52/11 41/5 c
Winnipeg 54/12 38/3 pc 54/12 40/4 c
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace


I


I


I


I


. . .. ........


,


_s




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