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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: September 18, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00084249:01427

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www.tribune242.com


Volume: 105 No.247


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009


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By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net


FOUR people, including a baby
girl, burned to death after suspect-
ed arsonists trapped them inside
their home and set fire to the build-
ing.
The bodies of Theresa Brown,
51, a civilian who was employed
with the Royal Bahamas Police
Force, her daughter Kayshala Bod-
ie, 18, grand-daughter, one-year-
old Telair Johnson and neighbour
Savanna Stuart, 18, were found by
investigators.
According to police it appeared
as though the women had attempt-
ed to escape .
Neighbours told The Tribune
they believed the windows and
doors to the house had been nailed
shut by whoever torched the build-
ing.
The tragedy occurred at the small
community of Wilson Tract short-
ly after 7am yesterday.


ONE-YEAR-OLD Telair Johnson
was a victim of the suspected arson
fire. Theresa Brown, 51, Kayshala
Bodie, 18, and Savanna Stuart, 13.
also died. Neighbours told The
Tribune they believed the window.
and doors to the house had beer
nailed shut by whoever torched trUe
building.


Third fire-related
tragedy this week


At the scene, fire investigators
found the flames already extin-
guished and then made the grim
discovery.
Crowds of shocked and tearful
onlookers assembled as news of
the tragedy spread. Relatives of
the deceased rushed to the scene
screaming and sobbing in disbelief.
Mrs Brown's mint green con-
crete was badly damaged inside,
however only the smell of smoke
and a cracked front window hinted
to the horror inside.
Police spokesman ASP Walter
Evans said the blaze and the deaths
are being treated as suspicious.
"It is possible the victims died as
a result of smoke inhalation," he


said. "At this stage this matter is
being treated as suspicious."
Investigators are not certain
what started the fire but it is
believed to have started in the front
portion of the house.
Meanwhile family and friends of
the dead told The Tribune of their
anger and grief.
William Brown Jr, the brother
of Theresa Brown, said he taking
his children to school when he
received the news.
"I believe someone did it but we
can't say. The Lord will give us the
answer, we leave that person to
God," said Mr Brown.
SEE page 12


POLICE gather evidence from the scene yesterday.


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THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009, PAGEEW3


US and Cuba talk

about restarting

direct mail service
HAVANA
CUBA and the United
States sat down for rare talks
aimed at re-establishing direct
mail service Thursday, a mod-
est step toward cooperation
that caps a bitter week of
recriminations over the exten-
sion of Washington's trade
embargo against the commu-
nist-run island, according to
Associated Press.
The Cuban government
said the two countries dis-
cussed technical obstacles to
restart the service - sus-
pended in 1963 - like how
mail would be transported,
methods of payment and
postal security.
"We are satisfied with
developments in this first
meeting," said Josefina Vidal
Ferreiro, director of the For-
eign Ministry's North Ameri-
can Department, who led
Cuba's delegation. She
described the talks as "wide-
ranging and useful."
The government said both
sides agreed on the need to
hold more discussions in com-
ing months, but did not give
any details on where or when
such talks would be held.
The U.S. delegation was led
by Bisa Williams, the deputy
assistant secretary of state for
Western Hemisphere affairs.
It was the first time State
Department officials have
traveled to Cuba for talks
since late 2002, Gloria Berbe-
na, a spokeswoman for the
U.S. Interests Section, which
Washington maintains here
instead of an embassy, told
The Associated Press.
Representatives of the U.S.
and Cuban postal services
were also present.
Direct mail service between
the United States and Cuba
was suspended in August
1963, the year after Washing-
ton imposed its embargo. Let-
ters sent currently between
the two nations will arrive -
eventually, and with a bit of
luck - but must pass through
a third country first.
The U.S. first suggested
restarting direct service back
in 1999, then repeated the
offer in 2000, 2002 and 2008.
Cuba accepted in May, and
formalized its offer to host the
talks when representatives of
the two nations met on the
sidelines of bilateral migration
talks held in New York in
July.
Berbena said the talks
would take all day and be lim-
ited to mail service. She said
President Barack Obama's
administration sees the nego-
tiations "as a potential avenue
to improve communication
between our countries' peo-
ples."
Those were rare positive
sentiments in a week of snubs
that have dimmed hopes for
a comprehensive break-
through in relations anytime
soon.
On Monday, Obama signed
a measure formally extending
the 47-year-old embargo for
one year. The move was sym-
bolic, since it would take an
act of Congress to legally end
the sanctions.
But some had hoped the
president would withhold his
signature - which would have
been a powerful sign that it
was time for a new debate on
bilateral relations.
Two days later, Foreign

do away with the embargo
without waiting for anything
in return, saying his country
would not make any political
or policy concessions - no
matter how small - even in
the unlikely event the U.S.
were to meet those demands
and ends sanctions.
U.S. officials have said for
months that they would like
to see the single-party, com-
munist state accept some
political, economic or social
changes, but Rodriguez said
his country was under no
obligation to appease Wash-
ington.
The embargo "is unilateral
and should be lifted unilater-
ally," he said.
The sour rhetoric has been
a disappointment to those
who thought Obama's diplo-
macy of small steps - of
which the direct mail talks are
a part - would push Havana
to make similar concessions,
or that Obama would take a


big political risk and signal a
willingness to end the embar-
go.
Robert Pastor, a longtime
foreign policy adviser on
hemispheric affairs and pro-
fessor at American University
in Washington, said Obama
has too much on his plate
domestically and internation-
ally to expend political capital
on Cuba.
And the island is still con-


Teachers stage sick-out over





alleged mould infestation


COMPLAINING of
upper respiratory problems
and other medical condi-
tions, teachers at Uriah
McPhee Primary staged a
massive sick-out yesterday
which resulted in all stu-
dents being sent home.
Claiming there is a
severe mould infestation at
the school on Kemp Road,
teachers said they will not
be returning to the class-
rooms until the situation
has been rectified or an
alternate site has been
secured for them.
"I have never had a sinus
problem or chest problems,
but with this mould I now
always have chest problems
and sinus problems," com-
plained one teacher.
Another remarked that
she constantly suffers from
migraine headaches while
at the school, a symptom
normally associated with
common mould infesta-
tions such as cladosporium


"Our biggest concern is

that a number of persons

are complaining of

receiving certain types

of illnesses.


President of the Bahamas Public
Service Union John Pinder


and penicillium.
Among other possible
symptoms are asthma,
sinus infections, coughing,
and throat and eye infec-
tions.
Other more dangerous
moulds such as stachy-
botrys, memnoniella, and
aspergillus versicolor can
produce mycotoxins, or air-
borne toxins, which can
cause chronic fatigue, loss


of balance and memory,
irritability, and even diffi-
culty in speaking.
And according to infor-
mation from a host of
online medical websites,
children are reportedly
more susceptible to mould
related illnesses due to the
fact that their lungs and
organs are still developing.
With this in mind, Per-
manent Secretary in the


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97


Ministry of Education
Elma Garraway said that
the claims of a mould infes-
tation at Uriah McPhee
need to be addressed
"immediately."
"We're aware of the sta-
tus of the matter. We will
try to fast pace as best we
can once we find areas


where we can relocate
those staff members that
are really experiencing dif-
ficulties, especially in the
upper respiratory system,"
she said.
President of the
Bahamas Public Service
Union John Pinder also
commented on the matter:
"Our biggest concern is
that a number of persons
are complaining of receiv-
ing certain types of illness-
es. We need to remind
them and assure them that
those who are experienc-
ing any type of respirato-
ry illnesses are to make it
known to the ministry so
they can be removed form
this building and trans-
ferred elsewhere to a safer
environment."
Earlier this week, staff at
the Ministry of Education
on Thompson Boulevard
also complained of suffer-
ing from mould related
symptoms.


Former paramedic claiming wrongful


dismissal: saving lives was my passion


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - Former para-
medic Marcus Garvey, who claims
that he was wrongfully dismissed,
says saving lives was more than
his job - it was his passion.
"I never considered my work
as just a job; I took it to heart and
many people here on Grand
Bahama know this.
"I care about people and that is
the only thing I really know; I
loved my job," said the former
hospital employee of 30 years.
Mr Garvey is one of two para-
medics terminated earlier this year
following the death of 16-year-old
Jett Travolta on Grand Bahama
on January 2. The other, Tarino


Lightbourne, has been charged
along with former senator Pleas-
ant Bridgewater with attempted
extortion and conspiracy to extort
$25 million from Jett's father, Hol-
lywood star John Travolta.
Jett suffered a seizure at his
parents' home at Old Bahama
Bay in West End. He was trans-
ported by ambulance to the hos-
pital, but was pronounced dead
by doctors.
Health Minister Hubert Min-
nis said he was very concerned
about television interviews given
by hospital employees following
the incident and said he would
deal with any breaches of the hos-
pital's policy regarding patient
confidentiality.
But Mr Garvey feels that the
minister acted out of haste in fir-


ing him.
In his termination letter, dated
February 10, the Public Hospitals
Authority made reference to com-
ments by Mr Garvey in a January
4 online report by Radar Maga-
zine (www.radaronline.com).
Mr Garvey admits he appears
in clip, but claims he was secretly
recorded.
"I never denied that it wasn't
me they saw, but the media have
ways of fixing up things and some
of the voice was not mine," he
claimed.
The paramedic wants his name
cleared and would also like to be
reinstated or given the four per
cent gratuity he says he is owed
for his years of work.
"My character has been
destroyed and it has been hard


finding a job. My wife is now the
sole provider for my family," he
said.
Mr Garvey noted that he has
spent many years saving lives in
the Grand Bahama community.
"It is hurtful to know that no
one from the Grand Bahama
Health Services management
team stood up for me. They know
that I was one of the most versa-
tile employees there," he said.
"During the two hurricanes I
was out in the storm saving lives
and rescuing people in West
Grand Bahama. I was in water up
to my neck and helped saved 15
children from a house that was
underwater.


"I have plaques of the many
accomplishments and I would
have loved to retire graciously and
I think it is unfair to have been
disgraced and wrongfully dis-
missed," he said.
Mr Garvey claims he tried to
seek assistance from Labour
Department, only to be turned
away.





Pes Cotro


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sides is an ongoing problem in New Providence with several areas affected.


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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 4, FRIDAYSEPTEMBIAERS 18, 2009 THEDTRIBUN
F *A- MME6


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama


WEBSITE


www. tribune242. corn


updated daily at 2pm


Obama's new missile shield


WASHINGTON - The new plan that
President Barack Obama laid out for a mis-
sile shield against Iran on Thursday turns
Ronald Reagan's vision of a Stars Wars sys-
tem on its head: Rather than focusing first on
protecting the continental United States, it
shifts the immediate effort to defending
Europe and the Middle East.
It is a long way from the impermeable
shield that Reagan described in glowing
terms in 1983, an announcement that turned
into a diplomatic triumph even while it was
a technological flop. Ever since, missile
defense has always been more about inter-
national politics than about new military
technology.
In the last years of the Cold War, it helped
nudge the Soviets toward agreements that
sharply reduced nuclear arsenals, a process
that Obama hopes to revive at the end of the
year. In the George W. Bush years, it was
about expanding NATO and, under the cov-
er of building anti-missile bases to protect
against North Korean attack, a subtle warn-
ing to China that its power in the Pacific
would not go unchecked.
In the age of Obama, the vision has
descended from the stars to sea level. A
president who was still in college during
Reagan's famous missile defense speech has
turned a scaled-back version of the technol-
ogy, which would first be based on ships, to
a new mission: Convincing Israel and the
Arab world that Washington is moving
quickly to counter Iran's influence, even as
it opens direct negotiations with Tehran for
the first time in 30 years.
For Obama, it is a step fraught with some
risk. Within hours of his announcement,
charges were flying that in his first major
confrontation with the Russians, he had
backed down, giving in to Moscow's oppo-
sition to the Bush plan to place missile
defenses in Poland and the Czech Republic.
"The politics of this was driving him in
the other direction, against appearing to
back down," said William Perry, who served
as defense secretary in the Clinton adminis-
tration. "But he went with where the tech-
nology is today - and where the threat is
today."
During last year's presidential campaign,
missile defense was tricky territory for Oba-
ma. His liberal base was allergic to the very
words. Obama, eager to show that he was
neither a neophyte nor soft on defense,
talked about embracing those technologies
that were "proven and cost-effective."
Nine months into his presidency, Obama
has begun to describe what that means. He is
not abandoning the two anti-missile bases
built on U.S. soil in the Bush years, one in
Alaska and one in California. But his aides
- led by the one veteran of the Cold War in
his Cabinet, Defense Secretary Robert M.
Gates - argued Thursday that Iran and
North Korea were taking far longer to devel-


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op intercontinental missiles than many
feared a decade ago.
The urgency, they argued, lies in address-
ing a more imminent threat: Iran's short-
and medium-range missiles.
First among those weapons is the Shahab
III, the missile that can reach Israel and
parts of Europe. It is also the missile that
U.S., Israeli and European intelligence ser-
vices have charged that Iran hopes to fit
with a nuclear warhead. Iran denies that but
has refused to answer questions from inter-
national inspectors about documents that
appear to link the missile program to its
nuclear efforts.
That standoff has fed the conviction inside
the White House that the Iranian threat
needs to be countered. But officials argued
Thursday that the faster, and surer, way to
accomplish that goal was to scrap Bush's
plan, which would have based anti-missile
batteries too far from Iran to be useful
against short- and medium-range missiles,
and put them closer to Tehran.
"One of the realities of life is the enemy
gets a vote," said Gen. James E. Cartwright,
vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
But Obama's critics argue that while Iran
is rightly a major focus of missile defense, it
is not the only one, and that in dismantling
the Bush plan, the new president is under-
cutting U.S. allies.
"I fear the administration's decision will
do just that," Sen. John McCain, Obama's
Republican rival in last year's presidential
election, said Thursday, adding that the deci-
sion came "at a time when Eastern Euro-
pean nations are increasingly wary of
renewed Russian adventurism."
But Obama is betting that over time he
can assuage bruised feelings in Europe. And
he is betting that his credibility will rise in the
Middle East, where he can now argue that
the U.S. missile shield will defend both Israel
and the Arab states, notably Saudi Arabia
and Egypt. There are signs that all of them
may be interested in nuclear capabilities of
their own - especially if they believe the
United States will not stand up to Iran.
But Obama may also be vulnerable to
charges that he could be leaving parts of the
continental United States defenseless if Iran
makes bigger strides with long-range mis-
siles. His critics point to Iran's launching of
a satellite into space in February. The craft
orbited the Earth for nearly three months,
passing repeatedly over the United States.
"Iran has already demonstrated it has the
capability to develop long-range missiles,"
said Robert Joseph, one of the architects of
Bush's missile defense strategy, who was
highly critical of Obama's decision. "They
have both the capability and intention to
move forward."
(This article is by DAVID E.
SANGER and WILLIAM J. BROAD
c.2009 New York Times News Service)


Town meeting



poorly planned,



poorly executed


EDITOR, The Tribune. .


On the evening of August
6, 2009 with great apprecia-
tion and anticipation I
respectfully attended the
Government of The
Bahamas' Town Meeting to
address the following:
Part 1: Nassau Harbour
Port improvement project and
New Providence road
improvement project.
Part 2: Container Port relo-
cation/ EIA impacts/mitiga-
tion.
Part 3: New Providence
downtown redevelopment
project.
It was evident from the
onset that the town meeting
was poorly planned and poor-
ly executed.
Many of the presentations
were totally irrelevant to the
sentiments being expressed in
the local media and daily
Bahamian dialogue and dis-
cussions.
The size of the room was
very inappropriate and it only
infuriated the already scepti-
cal audience who were barely
able to squeeze themselves
into the little "hot" room.
Was it intentional, poor
planning, or a tactical blun-
der? In any event, it gave the
impression that it was pur-
posely done that way to limit
the public's attendance and
participation.
Based on observation, and
listening to many comment-
ing in the ebullient audience,
it appears as if the seats were
filled early with government
officials, their supporters,
media personnel, and numer-
ous presenters with no sup-
port to the main critical con-
tentious issue that the public
came seeking information on
principally Part 2. The Con-
tainer Port relocation.
It was also observed by
those attending the meeting
that to ensure the time was
meticulously exhausted and
very limited, some of the irrel-
evant presenters were dis-
combobulated by the heck-
ling as they muddled over
their presentations on issues
that the public already have
accepted and appreciated,
that would be Part 3 and
some of Part 2.
It is not the Nassau Har-
bour Port Improvement Pro-
ject that the public has an
issue with, Bahamians know
that this dredging must be
done as it is required for this
country not only to compete,
but also to protect our cruise
ship superiority and keep in
sync with the changes in the
industry. No disrespect
intended but the Minister of
Tourism and the present
Director General of Tourism
and Aviation along with a few
others should not have been


on this programme, but at a
separate Town Meeting for
themselves.
Their valuable expensive
time, which the Bahamian
people pay them extremely
well for, could have been
spent on more productive
matters like ensuring all of
the Bahamian people's mon-
ey that is being spent on Ms
Universe Pageant, brings back
some return as a future invest-
ment for the country as well
as getting more tourists back
into this country, a job which
they have mastered in selling
to the politicians, but not to
the tourists.
Unfortunately, they did
nothing but "window
dressed" their presentation
and "killed precious time" off
the clock in order to divert
attention from the real pur-
pose which the majority of the
Bahamian people came to the
so-called "Town Meeting"
for.
The Director of BEST, who
knows better and is well
aware that the Bahamian peo-
ple know that it takes longer
than five to ten minutes to
present an Environmental
Impact Assessment (EIA)
especially one that appears to
have a subterfuge motive and
is under so much public scruti-
ny. Having some degree of
understanding in Project plan-
ning, appraisal, and manage-
ment it is and remains in my
humble opinion that the pre-
sentation of Part 2: Container
Port Relocation/ EIA Impacts
/Mitigation should have been
the only item on this Town
meeting's agenda.
One such project model,
developed by Goodman and
Love (1979) called The Inte-
grated Project Planning and
Management Cycle illustrated
that a model has four distinct
phases and showed feedback
flows of information and
authority, and policy connec-
tions. The introduction of
feedback was a very impor-
tant contribution because it
introduced the idea that the
process of project planning
could go backward (to
redesign the project if neces-
sary) as well as forward.
But at this stage of this pro-
ject which equates to Project
Implementation (Project
Cycle- Baum 1970) it is truly
criminal to come to the public
at this stage now that the peo-
ple's resistance accelerated
due to lack of information
and present a story created
through an EIA when mobil-
isation is already completed,
and project execution is in
progress.
Any sensible thinking
Bahamian can only conclude
that they were not considered
a stakeholder in this venture.
If the Bahamian people


were given any respectable
consideration and had the
opportunity to address many
concerns in the public forum,
this project would have been
met with far less resistance
and a lot of questions would
have been appropriately
addressed.
An initial Stakeholder
Analysis, Problem Tree
Analysis or a Logical Frame-
work would have aided in
guiding the initiators of this
project to include one of the
most important components,
the Stakeholders who are the
Bahamian public and not the
identified chosen few.
The activists have a right to
demonstrate and voice their
concerns even though there
are preferred ways to remain
respectful while accomplish-
ing your purpose without
politicising the issue.
The Government has
already showed its hand and
the project is moving forward.
The voices of the many
Bahamians are not being
respected, and our questions
are not being addressed as it
appears to be a political agen-
da with a crafty motive, and
one of appeasement or pay-
back rather than substantive
dialogue to reveal the truth
and do what is in the best
interest of all and not just a
few. Unfortunately and sad
to say it appears that we can-
not leave politics out of any-
thing in this country because
our politicians seem to
become "the experts" once
elected and ignore the real
experts that tell them where
development should take
place, and how to proceed to
mitigate any negative impacts.
The only thing that can
change the direction of the
Container Port Relocation
and some parts of the New
Providence Road Improve-
ment Project that totally dis-
respected some of our citizens
is the people of the Bahamas.
We do not need anymore
"Clown" meetings, lame duck
speeches, waffling politicians
both in Government and
Opposition.
If the Government can pro-
ceed with these projects in
such a manner, it is then evi-
dently clear that the jitneys
can be moved immediately off
Bay Street, the Straw Market
should be finished, the edu-
cational system in our country
could be improved, medicine
should be in the hospital, and
every street light should be
working. If the people of the
Bahamas don't want these
projects, many shining human
examples exist from around
the world that stopped major
projects for the satisfaction of
a few, just take one example
and any sensible Bahamian
would know exactly what to
do!

ANTHONY U
BOSTWICK
Nassau,
August, 2009.


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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009, PAGEEW5


'Agenda for change' within




the PLP set to step up efforts


THE million dollar "mis-
sion fund" spearheaded by
Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell
is set to host a 200 person
reception at the Balmoral
Club on October 5, The
Tribune has learned.
The invitation-only
reception is being put on
by some friends of the MP,
who hope to collect dona-
tions for the fund which is
designed to further the
interests of the L indi for
change" within the PLP.
Mr Mitchell has said the


Million Dollar 'mission fund' to

host reception for 200 people


plan is to adopt a multi-
faceted approach to
fundraising, in an effort to
not only assist his cam-
paign but also that of oth-
er PLP hopefuls.
"I really want to be in a
position to assist others


CO suent asit nreducing
,bclgo -aspr rdciS


STUDENTS of the College
of the Bahamas applied their
knowledge in computer sci-
ence and related disciplines to
help the Passport Office
reduce the backlog of appli-
cations for the new electronic
passports, or e-passports, dur-
ing the summer.
"We thank the College of
the Bahamas students for the
tremendous effort they made
in assisting the data entry unit
during their summer break in
processing some 8,000 files,"
said Donald Cash, undersec-
retary at the Passport Office.
"This effort has reduced the
backlog and has put us in
good standing of achieving the
14 days objective," he said.
During the summer period
the Passport Office initiated
a shift system, mainly in the
data entry unit, where around
20 students from COB were
hired to process the backlog of
files, under the supervision of
permanent staff.
Employees worked from
7am to 3pm and the COB stu-
dents from 3pm to 10pm.
COB faculty recommended
the students based on their
qualifications.
Traditionally, May to
August is the peak travel peri-
od for Bahamians, whether
they are going on vacations,
off to the college, sporting
events, or travelling for med-
ical reasons. Flight attendants
and pilots also request services
from the Passport Office.
Head of Passport Officer
Franklyn Dames said the head
office usually takes on addi-
tional manpower to assist in
dealing with the heavy volume
during the summer time.
"The COB students did a
tremendous job. They are very
intelligent and were able to
carry out the task set before
them. This shows us the cali-
bre of students we have at
COB," Mr Dames said.
COB student Paul Rolle, a


THE PASSPORT OFFICE praised the work of COB students during the
summer, resulting in the reduction of a backlog of e-passport applications.
Pictured are COB students Nikera Cartwright, Alyssia Moss, Indera Gib-
son; Franklyn Dames, head of the Passport Office; Mavis Vanderpool,
supervisor; Paul Rolle, COB student, and Donald Cash, undersecretary at
the Passport Office.


computer information systems
major, said it was a "tremen-
dous eye-opening experience"
to have worked at the Pass-
port Office.
He entered information
from the application forms
into the database, such as
name, birth date, nationality,
and other relevant facts as
part of his job description.
Alyssia Moss, also a com-
puter information systems
major, said she saw first hand
the frustration the public
experiences when applying for
an e-passport.
However, she noted that
many times the applicant did
not submit the correct infor-
mation and had to be contact-
ed for verification.
Nikera Cartwright, who is
pursuing a degree in sec-
ondary education, said
although her studies differ
from those of her college
mates, the experience will
assist her in her research.
Indera Gibson said the
experience using the comput-
er will assist in her career in


who want to run for the
PLP. As I said, I found
that the major problem
(during the last election)
was funding and it is
important for us to get on
top of that issue.
"We have political oppo-
nents who area able to
throw hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars at each of
us during these campaigns,
and we have to be able to
meet that and so I think a
part of the way that we
have to reorganise our-
selves is getting funding
under control," he said.
As the head of the fund,
the responsibility of decid-
ing which candidates
receive help will ultimate-
ly fall to Mr Mitchell.
According to the MP,
these individuals will be
PLP candidates who sup-
port a "generational
change" and share his
vision for the Bahamas in
2020.
"The PLP is a conserva-
tive organisation and
someone has to put the
case for change and of
course change to what.
"It has to be specific and
directed and people have


TROP/;ICALvHi
EKTER:MlINl :]


accounting. She said the stu-
dents developed a competi-
tion amongst themselves to
ensure they got the job done
in a timely manner.
"Ninety per cent of us
took on the challenge that no
matter what, when we left
here, everything would be
up-to-date," she said, adding
that they were given more
responsibilities to get the
Freeport applicants
processed.
Supervisor Mavis Vander-
pool, who commended the
COB students on their per-
formance said: "When they
came in I explained the
importance of the work to
them and that the govern-
ment and the public were
depending on them.
"I handed them the ball,
they took it and did an excel-
lent job. They came to work
on time," she said.
The students said they
gained an "appreciation" for
the process of producing an
e-passport, having had to
apply for one themselves.


to see that it is in their
interest to evolve to be
successful and that is all
we are trying," he said.
At this time, Mr Mitchell
said, every PLP candidate
for the House of Assem-
bly is worthy of assistance
through the fund.
"My whole point is that
fund raising is an issue and
we need to start and we
must start early and I am
trying to do my bit with
that.
"And I have said, here
are some ideas I think the
party ought to adopt to go
forward into the future.
"And that is the basis
upon which I am hoping to
raise the money and
advance the funding," he
said.
After the reception at
the Balmoral Club, Mr
Mitchell said, there will be
a series of private dinners
to raise additional funds
on an ongoing basis until
the next general election,
set for 2012.


Local casting call

for aspiring male

and female models
ASPIRING female
and male models are
invited to take part in
a local casting call by
Mode Iles, producers
of the Islands of the
World Fashion Week.
The casting call will
be held at the Shera-
ton Grand Hotel in
Nassau from 9am to
4pm on Saturday.
Prospective models
attending the event
are required to bring a
photo portfolio, a
passport or driver's
licence photo ID and
two changes of cloth-
ing - one casual and
one swimwear.
This year's Island's
of the World Fashion
Week showcase is
scheduled for Novem-
ber 4 - 8.
As part of the even-
t's grand finale, Mode
Iles in conjunction
with Models242 Inter-
national is sponsoring
the Muse Model
Search Competition.
The competition is
expected to draw
potential models from
all over the
Caribbean.
The two winners will
each walk away with
$10,000 and other
prizes, and title of
Female and Male
Muse of the Year.


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--A


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009, PAGE 5


."4�
SMIFT-ihosmiy1tutaim


THE TRIBUNE







PAGEOA 6,WS FRIDAISETETMBR1,RB


Bahamas Diabetic
Association set to
hold monthly meeting
THE Bahamas Diabetic
Association is having its
monthly meeting at the Nurses
Training College, Grosvenor
Close on Shirley Street at
2.30pm on Saturday.
All interested persons and
members are invited. The
guest speaker will be Dr
Wel'Milya Francis. Light
refreshments will be served.
Two people injured in
Florida seaplane crash
WINTER HAVEN, Fla.
AUTHORITIES say two peo-
ple have been hospitalized after
the small seaplane they were rid-
ing in crashed into a central Flori-
da lake, according to Associated
Press.
Winter Haven Fire Depart-
ment Deputy Chief Shannon
Duncan says two adult men were
transported to Lakeland Region-
al Medical Center with what
appear to be critical injuries
Thursday morning.
Initial reports indicate the plane
may have stalled and overturned
after the front of the plane hit the
water. Authorities were alerted
to the accident at Lake Otis at
about 10:30 a.m.
Shannon says rescuers had to
enter the water and retrieve the
men from the plane. The names of
the men have not been released.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division


High bills prompt the GBPC to




look at alternative fuel options


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Until an
alternate fuel source is
utilised, Grand Bahamians
will continue to pay high
electricity bills, said the
Grand Bahama Power
Company (GBPC) which
spent $4.5 million in fuel
costs last month alone.
The GBPC, which nor-
mally spends an average of
$4 million per month on fuel
to supply power to con-
sumers here on the island,
has recently come under fire
over reliability issues, and
among other things, the high
cost of electricity for its cus-
tomers.
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, who visited
Grand Bahama last week,
expressed concerns that the
company may have sought
to maximise profits at the


2009
CLE/qui/No.00289


IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act of 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER OF ALL THOSE Three (3) parcels
of land totalling 162.177 acres being Grant C-39and and a
portion of Grant C-3 in an area known as Fort Pasture situate
immediately Eastward of Forbes Hill Settlement and about 5
miles West of Williams Town on the island of Little Exuma,
one of the Islands of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas.
AND
IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Trevor Andrew Cooper
NOTICE OF PETITION
Pursuant to an Order of The Supreme Court dated the 2nd day
of September, A.D. 2009.
The Petition of Trevor Andrew Cooper, of Forbes Hill
Settlement on the Island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of
The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas, showeth in respect of:
ALL THOSE Three (3) parcels of land totalling 162.177
acres being Grant C-39 and a portion of Grant C-3 in an
area known as Fort Pasture situate immediately Eastward of
Forbes Hill Settlement and about 5 miles West of Williams
Town on the Island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth Of The Bahamas
The Petitioner, Trevor Andrew Cooper, herein claims to
be the owner in fee simple in possession of the said tracts
of land and has made application to The Supreme Court Of
The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas under Section 3 of
the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said
tracts of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate Of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of that Act.
Copies of the Plan showing the position boundaries shape
marks and dimensions of the said tracts of land may be
inspected during normal office hours at the following places:
(a) The Registry of The Supreme Court, East Street North,
Nassau, Bahamas.
(b) The Chambers of Charles Mackey & Co., BSB House,
West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
(c) The Administrator's office at George Town, Exuma.
Notice is hereby given that any person having Dower
or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the final publication of these presents file at the Registry
of The Supreme Court in the City of Nassau, Bahamas, and
serve on the Petitioner or on his Attorney an Adverse Claim in
the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve an
Adverse Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the final publication of these presents shall operate as a
bar to such claim.
DATED THIS 9th DAY OF SEPTEMBER, A.D. 2009
CHARLES MACKEY & CO.
Chambers BSB House
West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioner
(S. 18, 0. 1, 16)


Grand Bahama Power Company

spent $4.5m in fuel costs last month


expense of its distribution
and generation system.
He said he is concerned
that the GBPC has not
"reinvested adequate sums
of money into its generation
and distribution system, and
the company has over the
years taken its profits out in
cash rather than reinvesting
it in its operation."
He also expressed disap-
pointment over the ineffi-
ciency in power generation
on the island and said that
government is considering
whether to have the power
company regulated by the
Utilities Regulation and
Competition Authority
(URCA).
Speaking at a recent town
mcC lini2. GBPC CEO Excell
Ferrell said the company is
working diligently to
improve reliability of the
system and making efforts
to keep costs low.
However, he said that the
power company incurs sig-
nificant fuel costs which
must be paid to its vendor
within 15 days after deliv-
ery. He pointed out that the
customer will not pay until
35 days later.
"Fuel cost has gone down


in 2009, and our fuel cost
was $4.5 million in August,"
said Mr Ferrell. He noted
that fuels costs make up
about 50 to 60 per cent of
the total price of electricity.
Mr Ferrell said the GBPC
is now looking at alternate
fuel options.
The company, he said, has
commenced with a wind
study to determine if there is
sufficient wind strength on
the island to justify installing
turbines.
He said there are test sites
at five locations from East
Grand Bahama to Dover
Sound and Eight Mile Rock.
"We are also working
with the (Grand Bahama)
Port Authority and Sanita-
tion Services, which owns
the landfill, to burn methane
gas which is created in the
landfills.
"I think the real change
that is going to come to elec-
tricity on this island is by
getting a new fuel source,"
he said.
"Oswald Brown (Freeport
News Editor) wrote an edi-
torial about the need to
bring LNG (liquefied natur-
al gas) to the island. I know
residents are frustrated and


26' BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE
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I know it is difficult, but
Grand Bahama needs to
become what it can be and
we have to get another fuel
source," said Mr Ferrell.
Local community activist
Troy Garvey criticised the
power company for con-
ducting disconnection exer-
cises on Fridays and leaving
residents without power
over the weekend.


PRIME MINISTER Hubert
Ingraham, who visited Grand
Bahama last week, expressed
concerns that the company
may have sought to max-
imise profits at the expense
of its distribution and genera-
tion system.


25 utrate In geai m1 nitionl FuII I'uided ovirr utP i A! , Fish fiqeafCW-i piter(cP5,
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He called the company's
action "insensitive and
unconscionable."
The company has now
promised that it will cease
from conducting disconnec-
tions on Friday.
Accounts are disconnect-
ed for past due amounts in
excess of $200 or more.
Although accounts become
past due 21 days after the
billing period, the power
company conducts physical
disconnections 30 days after
that date.
The GBPC said it will
soon implement an interac-
tive voice response system
so that residents can call in
for account and billing infor-
mation.
Residents will be able to
access their last payment,
the disconnect date, their
meter reading and power
usage. The system will also
contact residents two days
before they are due for dis-
connections.
The GBPC may also con-
sider making payment
arrangements for persons on
a case-by-case basis, the
company said.


Space station crew

grabs new cargo

ship from orbit

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.
A BRAND new Japanese
space station cargo ship arrived at
its destination Thursday, expertly
plucked from orbit by an astro-
naut who toasted the big event
with her crewmates, according to
Associated Press.
Space station resident Nicole
Stott used the robot arm at the
orbiting complex to grab the 18-
ton supply ship as it hovered 30
feet away. The vessel - the first
of its kind - was launched a
week ago from Japan.
It was the first time an
unmanned ship was grabbed from
orbit like this. The older-style
Russian ships actually dock at the
space station. So do Europe's
freighters.
Mission Control erupted in
applause when the robotic snares
tightened on the vessel 225 miles
above the planet. Stott gave a
double thumbs-up.
"It's a real example of inter-
national cooperation, with a
Japanese vehicle captured by a
Canadian arm with American and
European astronauts, with a safe-
ty guy from Canada, under the
command of a Russian," said Bel-
gian astronaut Frank De Winne.
The six space station occupants
celebrated by raising specially
decorated foil drink bags with
straws and sipping the water
inside.
"We are so, so happy to have
this beautiful vehicle here with
us now," Stott told Mission Con-
trol. She said the crew was look-
ing forward to finding all the sur-
prises tucked among the 5 tons
of contents, after opening the
hatch on Friday. First, the astro-
nauts had to anchor the ship onto
the space station early Thursday
evening.
The craft is loaded with food,
laptop computers, atmospheric
studies and a robotic hand. The
hand will supplement the larger
Japanese robot arm that's already
there.
Japan spent $680 million on
the delivery trip.


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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Otilmnea Equipmemt







THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009, PAGEEW7


The strengthening


of Port Surveillance


'has been key in fight


against A H1N1 virus'


By MATT MAURA
THE further strengthening
of the country's Port Surveil-
lance Programme has
increased the Bahamas'
national capacity to respond
to the Influenza A H1N1
virus, Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis said Wednes-
day.
Addressing a United
Nations World Tourism
Organisation (UNWTO)
Review and Preparation Exer-
cise on Travel and Tourism
under Pandemic Conditions
Workshop, Dr Minnis said the
surveillance programme is
being supported locally by lab-
oratory capacity through the
Public Hospitals Authority
(PHA), and internationally,
through the Public Health
Agency of Canada, and the
Centre for Disease Control
and Prevention (CDC) in the
United States.
The Public Health Agency
of Canada and the CDC has
provided the Bahamas with
"much useful information"
about the characteristics of the


novel virus," he said.
UNWTO is a specialised
agency of the United Nations
and serves as a global forum
for tourism policy issues.
It plays a central and deci-
sive role in promoting the
development of responsible,
sustainable and universally
accessible tourism, paying par-
ticular attention to the inter-
ests of developing countries.
Its membership includes 161
countries and territories and
more than 390 affiliate mem-
bers representing the private
sector, educational institutions,
tourism associations and local
tourism authorities.

Professionals
Dr Minnis said the partner-
ships between the Department
of Public Health, the Public
Hospitals Authority, the
PHAC and the CDC, have led
to healthcare professionals
within the Bahamas - port
Surveillance personnel includ-
ed - being able to identify risks
associated with Influenza A


H1N1 early on, which has had
a positive impact on preven-
tion and control activities.
"The capacity to identify
risks early on and to imple-
ment prevention and control
activities at the community
level, (has further been) rein-
forced by the relationship that
has also been developed with a
broad range of agencies with-
in the nation," Dr Minnis said.
"These relationships include
the travel industry, persons at
international airports and sea-
ports and also those within the
cruise line industry.
"As a result of the strength-
ened guidelines, regionally
agreed guidelines have been
established for the manage-
ment of Influenza H1N1 in
cruise ships which is a vital
component of our tourism
industry," Dr Minnis added.
The Health Minister said
the ability to respond with
"evidence-based practices" to
the pandemic has further led
to the well-ordered imple-
mentation of a Pandemic
Response Plan within the
Bahamas.


DOCTORS HOSPITAL DR MEYER RASSIN FOUNDATION

PRESENTS OVER $100,000 WORTH OF SCHOLARSHIPS


PICTURED L-R, FRONT ROW: Paul Haven, DHDMRF director; Lisa Humes, DHDMRF director; Dr Keva
Bethel (centre), DHDMRF president; Michele Rassin, (third from right), vice-president of operations at
Doctors Hospital and DHDMRF secretary; Barry Rassin (second from right) president of Doctors Hospi-
tal and DHDMRF director; Charles Sealy, CEO of Doctors Hospital and DHDMRF director; with Doctors
Hospital Dr Meyer Rassin Foundation Scholarship recipients and their representatives.


THE Doctors Hospital Dr Meyer Rassin Foun-
dation recently made scholarship cheque pre-
sentations to 56 students to assist with their
tuition and fees. The scholarships are valued at
more than $100,000.
"With a global economic recession, many
promising Bahamian students are having diffi-
culty realising their dreams of a higher education;
it has become increasingly harder for parents to
meet their financial commitments of providing a
good college education for their children. How-
ever, at a time when education is recognized as
the key to changed lives and a better society,
access for all students should remain a top pri-
ority. And, it has - with the assistance of bene-
factor, the Doctors Hospital Dr Meyer Rassin
Foundation," Doctors Hospital said in a state-
ment.
Michele Rassin, secretary and director for the
Foundation said: "The gifts and donations
received from Doctors Hospital and the 'Dol-
lars for Scholars' Fashion Show event proved to
be an investment in the future health of the coun-
try. Each of our recipients holds the distinction of
maintaining the 3.0 GPA requirement of the
Foundation. They are already at the top of their
classes which will guarantee them a spot at the
top of their chosen health related fields. Thanks
to the generosity of donations received, these
bright minds will be able to realise their dreams
and maximize their potential."
Created in 1999, in honour of the late Dr Mey-


er Rassin, the Foundation is a philanthropic
mechanism through which individuals, trusts,
foundations, estates, businesses and other organ-
isations may invest in healthcare in the Bahamas.
The Foundation exists to provide scholarships
and financial assistance to persons pursuing edu-
cation in all areas of healthcare. The goal of the
Foundation is to encourage and assist qualified
healthcare workers to realise their dreams.
The following are the most recent Doctors
Hospital Dr Meyer Rassin Foundation Award
recipients: Kristin Albury; Randall Albury;
Lakeisha Albury; Dayna Archer; Athena Bain;
Miquela Bethel; Latoya Bowe; Myrez Bosfield;
Japheth Butler-Miller; Alexandra Carey; Nadia
Cumberbatch; Samana Charlton; Teran Clarke;
Craig Cambridge; Tristen Cartwright; Teisha
Deveaux; Ketanna Finlayson; Gerrianne Dorsett;
Lakera Duncombe; Ima Ebong; Martindell Flow-
ers; Michael AC Foulkes; Garry L Greenslade, Jr;
Celeste Gray; Nikita Hamilton; Lakeisha Hep-
burn; Byron Knowles; Sean Knowles; Paige Kel-
ly; Kevin Kemp; Shelby Knowles; Teykia Lewis;
Margo R Lowe; Tamara Mackey; Krista Major;
Delthia McKinney; Scottia Miller; Latoya
Munroe; Amanda Musgrove; Shovon Moss;
Menarvia Nixon; Eudene Noel; Jamia Newbold;
Myrlande Pierre; Amanda Rahming; Kelli Rolle;
Pharez Rolle; Laurel Smith; Melissa L A Sawyer;
Leslie Sealy; Jade-Evette Strachan; Earl Thomp-
son; Andrew Taylor; Lindsey Turnquest, and
Vincina Sweeting.


MINISTER OF HEALTH Dr Huberi Minnir ri,:1 poduimn
delivered the keynote address during hi: -opiEning o irh
United Nations World Tourism Org:ini.-,l,:rni lUIIWTO1
Review and Preparation Exercise orn Ti:rI . nd ToIL -Ilnl
Under Pandemic Conditions Workshl-p :nr VVidnesd', in
New Providence. Pictured to the mini-io'- II: Eoi ci Di DII[
Glaesser; head of the Risk and Crisis M[r:qnE rI Sec Ilr
in the World Tourism Organisation, and '. 'ri,:iIlc Vin,:rni
Vanderpool-Wallace, Minister of Toi.,i, "r, ' nd A4 ij[ii:in


i~t"I


He said the "interface"
between the National Emer-
gency Management Agency
(NEMA), its Emergency
Operations Centre (EOC) and
the Ministry of Health's Emer-
gency Operations Centre has
allowed for a coordinated
response among those agen-
cies.
"Representation of key
stakeholders such as tourism
and the NEMA EOC has
increased our ability to main-
tain communication about the


\


VI


events as they were unfold-
ing," Dr Minnis said.
"This coordinated response
among governmental and non-
governmental agencies has
reinforced our ability to
respond in a timely manner.

Cooperation
"Through the continued
cooperation between the min-
istries of Tourism and Health,
travel and tourism can contin-


ue to flourish even in the face
of a pandemic," he said.
Dr Minnis said his ministry
continues to monitor the local,
regional and global situation
with regards to Influenza A
H1N1.
He said their ability to do
so has been strengthened
through adherence to the
International Health Regula-
tions 2005, which came into
effect in June 2007.
"They have helped tremen-
dously," Dr Minnis said.


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,. ._..U


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE







PAGEOA 8,WS FRIDAISETEMTBE800RB


PAMELA
SEARS-
BROWN,
disaster
manager for
the Bahamas
Red Cross,
explains the
functions of the
organisation
during the
monthly Bain
and Grants
Town Urban
Renewal
seniors'
meeting on
Tuesday,
September 15,
at St Agnes
Parish Hall.


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CHRYSTAL GLINTON, first assistant secretary at NEMA, speaks to senior citizens of the Bain and
Grants Town Urban Renewal Centre about the Bahamas Preparedness and Response Plan. The meet-
ing took place on Tuesday, September 15, at St Agnes Parish Hall.


By LINDSAY THOMPSON
THE National Emer-
gency Management
Agency (NEMA) has tak-
en its message of pre-
paredness to Urban
Renewal Centres around
New Providence, advising
the elderly in particular to
be prepared in the event a
disaster strikes.
Dianna Bullard, centre
manager for the Bain and
Grants Town Urban
Renewal Centre, said that
it was decided to inform
seniors during their month-
ly meeting about the
importance of readiness
during the hurricane sea-
son, which runs from June
1 to November 30.
She said NEMA and its
partners were invited to
inform the seniors at the
various locations of the
shelters around the island
and who to contact once a
storm or hurricane is
approaching.
Chrystal Glinton, first
assistant secretary at
NEMA, said the purpose
of the presentation is to
provide a brief overview of
the Bahamas Preparedness
and Response Plan.
Once a storm is
approaching, NEMA gal-
vanises its emergency sup-
port function groups 72
hours from impact.
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force ships are on standby
and ready to deploy impact
teams to the areas the
Meteorology Office pre-
dicts will be in the storm's
path, she said.
The seniors were also
advised that should they be
evacuated or relocated to
a shelter, to take their med-
ication, enough food and
water for about two days


arises with building mate-
rials, temporary facilities,
and complete reconstruc-
tion of destroyed homes
following a hurricane.
Pamela Sears-Brown, dis-
aster manager for the
Bahamas Red Cross, urged
the seniors to identify their
needs, which will enable
them to receive assistance
from the organisation.


She said that the purpose
of the Red Cross, which has
an estimated 119 million
volunteers worldwide, is to
relieve human suffering in
any form.
Mrs Sears-Brown added
that the Red Cross works
closely with and follows the
directive of NEMA once a
threat of a hurricane is
imminent.


I ELEUTHIEIRIAI .IE.IIH .It.RA TSY IIHM AKIISIEM


THE Deep Creek Mid-
dle School (DCMS) in
Eleuthera announced that
the 2009 Bahamas Junior
Certificate (BJC) scores
for its grade nine students
met or exceeded the best
scores in the school's his-
tory.
BJC highlights include
47 out of 50 total tests tak-
en by ninth grade students
received a passing grade;
62 per cent of all tests tak-
en received either A or B
grades; students received
the highest percentage of
A grades in the school's
history, and
70 per cent of social
studies scores were an A.
There were no fails
recorded in the five sub-
jects and none of grade
nine students were dis-
couraged from taking any
of exams, the school said.
"I'm extremely proud of
what our students have
been able to accomplish
and the academic growth
that they have demon-
strated during their time
at DCMS," said Dr Joan-


na Paul, the school's prin-
cipal.
"We use real world
experiences to teach our
students.
"As a result, they are
able to think critically and
communicate effectively
so that they can use what
they have learned in a
variety of situations. We
don't want students to just
learn the material; we


want our students to learn
how to keep learning."
Deep Creek Middle
School is an independent
school for seventh to ninth
graders in Eleuthera that
follows the Bahamian
Ministry of Education cur-
riculum.
The school works col-
laboratively with the
Island School and the
Cape Eleuthera Institute.


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ITDISCS SOIESO TIS PAG *O ON TO WWTIBUE4.O I


NEMA takes disaster


preparedness message to


Urban Renewal Centres


and other necessary items
with them.
Ms Glinton explained
that many seniors do not
evacuate their homes main-
ly because they value their
privacy and the need to feel
secure in familiar sur-
roundings.
She said that NEMA and
its partners are ready to
assist whenever the need


Funneral/Announcements










Robert Douglas Cuny
.wfika rixi hy.M At rli&.kM fri t Af .'anaw
-sdWi j� Stpteativr *Sy al.6 is-o

Robert ADcnkrs Cuarry w k tm NwmB 26t, jio min Ade,
(fhntn;, I. . Mr coy s of I n wtiytjV Curry (it tiwJthrmkrf
uflhrMA4yn .N. TT, di Rfi&wa Cwry, frowr4y of Grte#t Tfrdle
COA..tln. I ThaiWrn . . Sptf'M&', io, aoo'v, fing&l puki@
rfVa& .m a iwll hi t hf kir t r.w, 4vftamt# ren.w nb
le stde. 1tt to {t ish bb M i e ries ,are lisx rmi: Beani r 6
t\gi isa C4rry. "'jrkITAr tism Im W9tftrr Curry. Ir.'ic
Carry af J. . naizse ,euL dby aM :Cl'tiff rreCr Wi/Tir
C('Xry, Eme CMry, Rwtti Rokirt &. I diwrd Wr. Aurr.
Jn Lang Yww~ C .7xw ' Crxr, I.. C GOr7 1& Ikirjr.y.
'l' l.- -~d'hawts:lMtk Osa:k tifiiMad Car. Roahidjl
CWT, Gt CIy &7 f� � rgi m S Taffifrsn .mwaim
Cr7 sBak t1 ithe �fIhrqm Chrht o TMhe '.ir is hfi
w~ft.


I


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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


-\


~LAin


i







TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009, PAGERT9


I'P IN'M O c e ti hs f


$


FROM page 11
in -A i ' ,l , ! i i i n h .Ii ! !i ! l, 1im [ s.k -
|tn l -_I . l un! I (I I I 1 I - I I - I !! I .
"N. ' I ki '. i 11,.,I i I h. h l ,11 k i
going to just started," he said. "It's just
going to get harder and harder as I move
a step higher and higher."
Major, who turns 28 on October 28,
said he felt he outright won the fight
against Clark, who was unable to con-
tinue fighting with two minutes and 14
seconds into the round.
Apparently Clark was first caught with
a blow to the back of his head that
dropped him to his knees. After he was
given a few minutes to recuperate, he
got back up to fight. But a few seconds
later, he and Major tangled and when
the referee advised them to break, Major


I.I I,, I . >, I . _ i Il iiI II .I Ih I i - I II I.
k, k 1v l 1. 1 !, k > 1 '11, I . i .k Il1n lh . I . 1 �. i i

I' u I ,.. I k I ni . 1 -l I Ih 1 11 I' II

MajOl COllil, - l, ludIli Lialaliliali
trainer Nat Knowles, protested to the
New York Boxing Commission.
"I never worried about it because it
was situation that I had no control over,"
Major said. "But everything has worked
out for the best."
In a couple of weeks, Major said he
will be returning to Hollywood, Florida
to resume his training with American
trainer Anthony 'Chills' Wilson in prepa-
ration for the November 6 bout.
"I'm always excited because after all of
the hard work, you get a chance to dis-
play your skills," Major said. "So I want


F !I 1 N luln I I i -,I I .l . ,n \ [ -l , . Ih sli .1 ,

Other than his professional pursuits,
Major said his aim is to give back to the
amateur ranks by working with more of
the younger boxers.
He currently work with Valentino
Knowles, who became the first Bahami-
an to win a bout at the AIBA World
Boxing Championships that was held in
Mlian, Italy earlier this month.
"However, we will be able to get ama-
teur boxing going in all of the Family
Islands," Major said. "That is why I'm
working with the Pan American Sports
Association."


Rommel Knowles



seeking prestigious



international post


['0.e0


FROM page 11

will head the delegation that
will also include vice presi-
dent.
More than 100 countries
are expected to participate in
the BSF's Congress.
"Actually, I thought I
would have retired and gone
into the sunset," Knowles
quipped.
"But obviously that isn't the
case.
"So I am looking forward
to the challenge.
"I look forward to sitting
around with the movers and
shakers of softball on the
international scene and look
out for the best interest of our
country and the Caribbean
for that matter."
Through his election to
office, Knowles said he will
be looking forward to mak-
ing sure that the entire
Caribbean feel the effect of
being apart of the Interna-
tional Softball Federation and
not just a member.

Significant
"It's quite a significant
event for any Bahamian to sit
on an international body," he
said.
"So it's a proud moment to
have a Bahamian sitting at
that level, if I'm successful.
"My driving force, if elect-
ed, will be to bring recogni-
tion to the Caribbean and
give us a chance to really
work with the North Ameri-
can region and the American
Softball Association."
Knowles said he has
already consulted with the
ASA in providing some assis-
tance to the Bahamas in terms
of facilities as well as technical
arena.
The upcoming CAST Tour-
nament that will be held at
the Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex from October 29 to
November 1 will provide the
Bahamas the opportunity to
be able to showcase its talent
here.
The BSF is expected to
field two men and one wom-
an's team to participate in the
tournament, which is expect-
ed to include at least 6-7 vis-
iting countries, including
Israel and England.
In preparation for the tour-
nament, Knowles said he's
appealing to the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture to
ensure that the necessary cos-
metic work that is needed to
the stadium will be done in a
timely fashion.


"The bleachers are in dire
need of repair and the have
been that way for quite some
time," Knowles pointed out..
"They are not conducive to a
safe environment, so I'm very
concerned about.

Facilities

"Obviously the facilities
need some work, but when
you are hosting an interna-
tional tournament, you hope
that they are in an environ-
ment that is second to none."
Knowles said having the
stadium properly prepared
will definitely go a long way in
ensuring that the visitors have
the best facility possible to
play in.
"I really think it needs to
be looked at," said Knowles,
who noted that he's hoping
that the lighting fixtures at the
stadium will also be corrected
because they are not ideal for
the participation of softball at
night."
In that same vain, Knowles
said he's also hoping that the
Bahamas Government will


begin construction of both the
new national softball and
baseball stadiums, which were
to coincident with the con-
struction of the new national
track and field stadium.
"I speak personally from
the Knowles family that since
the destruction of the
Churchill Tener Knowles Sta-
dium, we have heard nothing
about the reconstruction of
the stadium," he said.
"I would like to hear some-
thing positive about when the
new stadium will be built,
where and what is the time
frame to have it completed."
Although he doesn't speak
for those in baseball, Knowles
said he's concern that the
same sentiments exist for the
reconstruction of the Andre
Rodgers Baseball Stadium.
"I just want to remind peo-
ple that although there's a lot
of excitement about the con-
struction of the new national
stadium, the softball and base-
ball stadiums were also in the
package and they should
remember us as well," he
insisted.


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ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


TRIBUNE SPORTS


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009, PAGE 9


Yo 'l o d e o w y u v r o a o g i h o tit















Getting softball into shape


U Federation receive assurances about renovation of

Banker's Field at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex



i October 29-November 1 CAST Tournament to feature

at least 6-7 visiting teams, including England and Israel


BAHAMAS SOFTBALL FEDERATION'S Jeffery Beef' Henfield, assistant treasurer; Janeen White, special assistant; Dorothy Miller, assistant
secretary; Burkett Dorsett, president and Ali Culmer, treasurer.


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HERE IS A CLOSER look at the
state of the bleachers.

S We've had a
meeting with
6 6 the Ministry
of Youth,
Sports and
Culture and
they have
assured us
that they will have the
renovations to the
bleachers, update the
bathroom facilities and
build a two-story scor-
er's booth.
Burkett
Dorsett


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH the hosting
of the CAST
Tournament on the horizon,
the Bahamas Softball Feder-
ation is hoping that the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and
Culture will have the
Banker's Field at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex reno-
vated.
At a press conference yes-
terday at the Banker's Field at
the Baillou Hills Sports Com-
plex, newly elected president
Burkett Dorsett outlined their
agenda for the remainder of
the year, including the CAST
Tournament that will run
from October 29 to Novem-
ber 1.
"We've had a meeting with
the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture and they have
assured us that they will have
the renovations to the bleach-
ers, update the bathroom
facilities and build a two-sto-
ry scorer's booth," Dorsett
said.
BSF treasurer Ali Culmer
said the tournament is not too
far away, so they're hoping
that the Ministry would make
sure that the renovations are
done in time.

Tournament
The tournament is expected
to feature at least 6-7 visiting
teams, including Israel and
England. The Bahamas will
be represented by two men
and one female team.
Other countries confirmed
are the Turks & Cacios, the
Cayman Islands, Puerto Rico,
Bermuda, Jamaica.
In addition to the CAST
Tournament, the BSF is also
planning to host the annual
Austin Knowles Invitational
High School Tournament as
well as the National Round
Robin Tournament between
October and November.
Having had a chance to vis-
it all of their affiliated Family
Island Associations, Dorsett
said every one with the excep-
tion of Exuma, is currently
playing softball.
"Exuma's challenge is that
they took their fence down
for repairs and they have not
been able to have it replace as
yet," he said.
"But they intend to have a
mini series to determine who
will be coming to the national
round robin."
The Nationals is scheduled
for November 5-8 at Baillou
Hills.
While Dorsett will be in
Venezuela for the Interna-
tional Softball Federation
Congress where immediate
past president Rommel
Knowles will be seeking a vice
president position on the
Americas region, the Knowles
Invitational Tournament for
High Schools will take place.
Kelly Smith and Leroy
Thompson will be in charge
of coordinating the tourna-
ment, which will be celebrat-
ing its 10th year of existence
for former Eleuthera native
Austin Knowles, better
known as the Godfather of
the sport in the country.
"We expect a record num-
ber of schools to participate,"
Dorsett projected.
The BSF will then culmi-
nate the year by hosting an


Awards Banquet where they
will present awards for man-
ager, coach, administrator,
player and even fan of the
year.
"Overall, we are looking
forward to a busy year end-
ing," Dorsett said.
"But we are hoping to go
full speed in our plans for the
future as we seek the assis-
tance of the veterans to come
forth and help us with the
junior players."
Over the next four years in
office, Dorsett said they
intend to engage in a vigor-
ous junior programme that
they intend to strengthen and
improve their overall perfor-
mances on the international
scene.
But in the main thing,
Dorsett said the BSF will host
the CAST Tournament here
at the Banker's Field and the
four other fields at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex.

Mandatory
By next year, Dorsett said
the BSF will make it manda-
tory that only those persons
who are certified will be
allowed to serve as managers
and coaches at the association
level.
To that end, he revealed
that the BSF will be conduct-
ing training sessions for all
coaches and they will also put
on clinics for umpires and
coaches.
"We will make it available
for anybody who is interested,
but in order for them to coach
or manage in the various
leagues in the associations,
they will have to be certified,"
he declared.
The clinics, according to
Dorsett, will also be extended
to the high school system.
"We have been in contact
with the ISF, who will be
sending their technical peo-
ple down to assist us with our
certified coaches here," he
pointed out.
Godfred 'Gully' Burnside,
Sidney 'Bobby Baylor' Fer-
nander, Martin 'Pork' Bur-
rows and Yvonne 'Sir Locks'
Lockhart from Grand
Bahama will be utilizing the
expertise they all gained from
the advanced coaching clin-
ics they attended in the past.
"We purpose to do the
same thing for administration
to make sure that the leagues
are also ran properly,"
Dorsett stated.
"So we want to make sure
that everybody step up their
game."
While softball will not be
included in the 2012 Olympic
Games in London, England,
Dorsett said he was happy to
hear United States president
Brack Obama declare the
Chicago will bid for the host-
ing of the 2016 Olympics.
If the US are successful,
Dorsett said he's confident
that they will ensure that both
softball and baseball is put
back on the agenda of sport-
ing disciplines contested.
"I think one of the reasons
the two sports have been
excluded from 2012 because
they say it's too costly to orga-
nize," Dorsett said.
"They even want to drop
the roster from 15 to 12 and
that just won't work.
"It's almost impossible to
have 12 players for a game."


T -,

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I,,






'F,






I


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


PAGE 10, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


I


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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11


FFRII)DAY SEPTEMBER 18, 2009

INSIDEeG gsoa inos-


SOFTBALL

Rommel Knowles

seeking prestigious

international post


i!Fr"


BOXING


Major holds onto





lightweight crown

M Bahamian awarded NABA title
on appeal after 'no contest' ruling

* Promoter says title defence has
been lined up for November 6 O


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

TEACHER
'Pain'
Major was
ecstatic
when he was informed by his
promoter Nick Garone that
he will finally get to hold onto
the NABA lightweight title.
On June 19 at the Conven-
tion Center in Buffalo, New
York, Major's bid for the
vacant title was stopped
abruptly in the first round
after his opponent American
Michael Clark was unable to
continue fighting because of


an "accidental foul."
The fight was ruled a no
contest at the time.
Yesterday, Garone
informed The Tribune that
after an appeal, Major was
awarded the title, but he will
defend it on November 6
when his X-Cel Worldwide
Promotions stage their next
professional show.
However, Garone said he
will not release any further
details about the fight for
Major until he has the con-
tract signed from the NABA,
who have elevated Major
from number 15 to No.14 in
their latest rankings.
SEE page nine


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
INSTEAD of riding off in the sunset, former
Bahamas Softball Federation Rommel Knowles will
be seeking another prestigious post, this time on
the international front.
BSF's president Burkett Dorsett announced yes-
terday that they have decided to nominate Knowles
for the post of vice president of the Americas, a
region under the BSF that will comprise of the
Caribbean and the United States.
"I've also been in contact with my collegiate
around the North American region and they support
my nomination," Knowles stressed.
"So we will see what happens, but it's always a
proud moment when you get a chance to represent
your country on the international level."
Knowles will travel with the BSF's delegation to
Venezuela over the period of October 21-26. Dorsett
SEE page nine


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' "idi nhi ',1 herv-g
'Nailed' in their home .. .

and burned to death k P .. rIF ;. ..'r -


FROM page one

"It's a big loss, all at one
time. It's shocking. They were
all trying to get out but for
some reason they couldn't get
out. We're going to overcome
it but that's pretty hard right
now."
Another relative who chose
only to be identified as Win-
ston recalled how he made
the horrific discovery around
7am yesterday.
"I came to drop my daugh-
ter off so that she could get
ready for school and I saw the
window black like fire was
there.
"I saw the car outside and I
know if the place was burn
from last night they would
have carried the car. I went
around the back to the win-
dow and I hear music coming


from that way. Then the guy
who lives in the back there,
he came out and I asked him
if he see anybody from there,
he said no. We push the back
door open and I saw three of
them on the floor in the
kitchen. I told him to call 911.
I didn't look like anyone
knew the place was on fire,"
he said.
This is the third fire related
tragedy in New Providence
this week.
On Sunday, a fire at an
apartment complex claimed
the life of disabled 10-year-
old Jermaine Mackey. The
youngster died after fire dam-
aged their flat on Colony
Close at about 9 am Sunday.
Also at 9pm Sunday, a
woman who had been hospi-
talised since last week for
severe burns has died after a
house fire at Canaan Lane.


@i WORAD*NAS3I N BRIEF ASSOCIATED PRESS


U.S. CANCELS PLANS FOR MISSILE
SHIELD IN EUROPE
President Obama scrapped his predeces-
sor's proposed anti-ballistic missile shield in
Eastern Europe on Thursday and ordered
instead the deployment of a reconfigured sys-
tem aimed at shooting down short- and medi-
um-range Iranian missiles.
In one of the biggest national security rever-
sals of his young presidency, Obama canceled
former President Bush's plans to station a
radar facility in the Czech Republic and 10
ground-based interceptors in Poland. Instead,
he plans to deploy smaller interceptors by
2011, first aboard ships and later in Europe,
possibly even in Poland or the Czech Repub-
lic.

ITALY MOVES TOWARD AFGHAN EXIT
A powerful suicide bomb that killed six Ital-
ian soldiers in Kabul on Thursday prompted
Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi of Italy to
declare that his nation had begun planning to
"bring our young men home as soon as possi-
ble."
Berlusconi was careful to say that Italy
would not unilaterally withdraw its 3,100
troops from Afghanistan, though he said he
wanted the withdrawal to happen "as quickly
as possible." But it seemed the strongest
expression yet from a European leader of the
rising doubts about the Afghan mission among
America's allies.


A top commander for al-Qaida has been
killed in Pakistan by a U.S. missile fired from
a drone, Pakistani intelligence officials said
Thursday.
The officials said the Qaida commander,
Ilyas Kashmiri, was killed in a drone strike 10
days earlier in the border area of North
Waziristan.
Kashmiri was considered by some intelli-
gence officials to be one of the 10 most want-
ed militants in Pakistan.
Although they said his body had not been
found, agents were sent to his home village,
Bahawalpur, to verify his death.



Somali insurgents mounted a brazen sui-
cide attack against top Somali and African
Union officials meeting on Thursday to plan
a major offensive in Mogadishu, driving two
explosives-laden trucks marked "U.N." deep
into a fortified base near an airport and det-
onating at a fuel depot and the office of an
American logistics company.
The attack, which suggested that the
insurgents had deeply infiltrated Somali
security forces, killed the second in com-
mand of the AU peacekeeping force and
seriously wounded several other comman-
ders.


INDONESIAN POLICE SAY TERRORIST
MASTERMIND IS DEAD
Indonesian commandos raided a suspected
terrorist hideout in central Java, killing
Noordin Muhammad Top, the most-wanted
terrorism suspect in Southeast Asia, security
officials said Thursday.
In recent years, Noordin, an Islamist mili-
tant, had become an almost mythical figure
among both those who sheltered him on the
run and those who pursued him and finally
killed him in a six-hour shootout. While sus-
pected of orchestrating major bombing attacks,
Noordin had repeatedly slipped away from
capture.

YEMEN AIRSTRIKE SAID TO KILL AT
LEAST 80
More than 80 people, including a large num-
ber of civilian refugees, were killed in a gov-
ernment airstrike in northern Yemen on
Wednesday as they sought shelter from a
month-long conflict between the military and
rebel forces, provincial tribal leaders said. The
attack appeared to be the deadliest single
episode in a worsening war between govern-
ment forces and Houthi.
The airstrike occurred in Adi, outside the
rebel-controlled town of Harf Sufyan, where
refugees from the conflict had gathered,
according to tribal figures.
Dozens of people were also wounded in the
attack, they said.


On the eve of an annual rally in honor of
Palestinians, Iran's Revolutionary Guard
issued a stern warning Thursday that it would
"fiercely confront" anyone who tried to turn
the occasion into a protest against Iran's dis-
puted presidential election. The warning ele-
vated tensions surrounding the upcoming ral-
ly, known as Qods Day, after days of clashing
rhetoric from Iran's opposed political camps.
Opposition supporters have called for a mas-
sive turnout on Friday, saying the traditional
Qods Day message of resistance to injustice is
consonant with their own demands. Conserv-
atives have made clear they will not tolerate
anyone "politicizing" an event meant to hon-
or Palestinian suffering.

SWINE FLU DEATH IN CANADA
Health authorities in British Columbia said
Thursday that a person from Vancouver Island
has died from the swine flu virus. The
announcement came as the Canadian Med-
ical Association Journal reported that the sea-
son's first pandemic outbreak of swine flu in
Canada is occurring at several remote aborig-
inal communities on Vancouver Island.
The journal did not offer specific numbers
for the outbreak but quoted a physician in
Tofino, B.C., who said that he has treated
"dozens" of people who mainly displayed mild
symptoms.


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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


4 -Ali









TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009


Bahamas told: 'Cease

flagrant flaunting' of

global copyright laws

* US government 1..... .. i
rights . l.ii.. mi , under trade treaty
* But Cable Bahamas has been 'highly
successful' in ii,.....ii in,. commercial
agreements
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE BAHAMAS "must
cease this flagrant flaunting" of
international copyright laws
and its US trade treaty obliga-
tions through its compulsory
cable TV licensing regime, an
intellectual property rights
watchdog has warned, although
Tribune Business was told that
much progress had been made
in tackling the issue.
The International Intellectu-
al Property Alliance (IIPA), an
umbrella group that represents
organizations such as the
Motion Picture Association of
America (MPAA), plus the
music and TV industries, has
again urged the US government
to crack down on the Bahamas
on the grounds that it has not
fulfilled its obligations under
the Caribbean Basin Economic
Recovery Act.
That is the Act that under-
pins the one-way trade prefer-
ences regime that permits some
$100 million worth of Bahami-
an crawfish and plastics exports
to enter the US duty-free under
the Caribbean Basin Initiative
(CBI), and the US Trade Rep-
resentative's Office already has
the Bahamas under scrutiny.
The IIPA said the US Trade
Representative's Office was
"examining protection and
enforcement in the Bahamas"
of intellectual property
rights/copyright protection, in
the context of this nation's com-
pliance with its CBI obligations.
A key feature of this review
would be the extent to which the
Bahamas prevented the re-
broadcast and transmission of
US copyright materials without
SEE page four











Nassau Motor Company spends over
$500,000 to date on expansion, with
'a little more to go'
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
NASSAU MOTOR Compa-
ny (NMC) yesterday said it
expected to complete its new
customer reception office with-
in the next three weeks, hav-
ing spent just over $500,000 to-
date on as expansion designed
to make it more efficient and
"the place of choice" for Honda
and General Motors-manufac-
tured cars.
Rick Lowe, the company's
operations manager, told Tri-
bune Business that it was
"probably three weeks away"
from opening its new customer
service area, once the furniture
was installed and the front door
put on.
He added that rather than
knocking down the current
client reception area, and con-
verting it into two additional
service bays, Mr Lowe said
Nassau Motor Company had
SEE page four


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE BAHAMAS' unem-
ployment rate is likely to have
hit "in the 17 per cent range",
a leading businessman said
yesterday, predicting that the
economy was likely to con-
tract by more than the Inter-
national Monetary Fund's
(IMF) 4-4.5 per cent negative
growth projection for 2009.
Franklyn Wilson, chairman
of Arawak Homes and Sun-
shine Holdings, told Tribune
Business that a fall in living
standards and over-borrowed
consumers meant this reces-
sion was hurting Bahamians
more than past ones, with the
66 per cent increase in aver-
age per capital income since
mid-1990 overshadowed by
rising living costs and infla-
tion.
Mr Wilson said that while


* Leading businessman says Bahamian economy likely to contract by more than 4.5% IMF
projection, and warns that expanding fsical deficit could be 'dangerous'
* Current recession 'more challenging' and painful, due to living standards drop despite 66%
income rise since mid-1990
* Consumers unable to lead Bahamas out of recession because 'too leveraged' on consumer
debt
* Warns politicians not to lead electorate into believing Bahamian recovery 'inevitable' once
global economy turns around


the current recession was sim-
ilar to the one that impacted
the Bahamas in the early
1990s around the time of the
Gulf War, a period that was
"very, very bad for the coun-
try", he added that "this one
is probably a little more chal-
lenging for a variety of rea-
sons".
He explained: "I believe the
country's overall standard of
living has been in decline,
notwithstanding that we've a
few good years. Look at the
time from mid-1990 to now,


and the standard of living has
been on a steady decline.
"The basic thing, from then
to now, is that while the aver-
age citizen's per capital income
has gone up by 66 per cent,
during that time the cost of
things that matter to people
has increased by as much
higher percentage.
"It's in that regard that the
average person is worse off. If
you look at housing, the cost
of housing has gone up by
more than 66 per cent
between mid-1990 to now.


BEC 'back pedals' on



power plant approvals


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE BAHAMAS Electrici-
ty Corporation (BEC) and the
Government "appear to be
attempting to back pedal" and
seek retroactive approval for
construction work already car-
ried out on the Wilson City
power plant, an attorney telling
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham that his clients want the
decision to proceed with the
project "rescinded".
Fred Smith, the Callender's
& Co partner representing
numerous Bahamian and for-
eign homeowners on Abaco,
said in a September 16, 2009,
letter to the Prime Minister, oth-
er Cabinet ministers and agen-
cies dealing with the new BEC
power plant, asked for confir-
mation that construction work
would halt immediately.
He warned that, as Tribune
Business revealed on Wednes-
day, his clients wanted to deter-
mine whether they would chal-
lenge the 'decision' to proceed
with BEC's Wilson City power
plant via Judicial Review in the
Supreme Court.
Mr Smith added that it was
apparent from the September
10, 2009, Town Hall meeting on
the power plant that an
"omnibus 'decision'" to proceed
with the development had been
taken, although his clients did
not know by whom or under
which statutory authority.
"I am instructed that cur-
rently the power plant is under
construction. I am further
instructed that electrical poles,
utility poles and a very broad
highway is being constructed
from the Abaco Highway to the
power plant," Mr Smith wrote.
"I have personally visited the
site, and can confirm the ongo-
ing construction aforesaid. My
clients have confirmed that up
to today, construction contin-
ues.........
"In addition, at the Town
Meeting I specifically requested
Frederick Gottlieb, the chair-
man of BEC, to state on the
record that the construction was
proceeding on the basis that all
necessary and lawfully required
statutory permits had been
properly applied for, considered
and issued.
"This he was unable to con-
firm, going only so far as to say
'that to the best of his knowl-
edge' all such permits had been
issued. This equivocal response
was not satisfactory to my
clients."
Mr Smith then referred to
comments by Dr Earl Deveaux,
minister of the environment, in
The Tribune on September 15,
20o9, in which he said con-
struction on the Wilson City
project had been halted while
BEC waited for the necessary
permits to be approved.
Mr Smith said his clients were
"shocked" by Dr Deveaux's


remark that it was not uncom-
mon for government depart-
ments to proceed on construc-
tion projects without having all
the required permits.
Also of concern was the


* Attorney says clients want
'decision' to proceed with
Abaco project rescinded

report that south Abaco's local
government met to approve
'retrospective' applications for
the power plant's foundation
and floor plans, which were sub-
mitted after work began last
month.
"As it stands now, it appears
that BEC, or the minister,
appear to be attempting to back
pedal and, as stated, retrospec-
tively seeking approval for what
has already occurred," Mr
Smith wrote, warning that his
clients regarded proceeding
without permits - and obtain-
ing approvals retrospectively -
SEE page five


Healthcare has gone up by
more between then and now,
the cost of education has gone
up by more than that between
then and now."
Mr Wilson also warned that
Bahamian consumers were
unable to lead the economy
out of recession through con-
sumption spending, as many
were too highly leveraged -
meaning that their ratio of
debt repayments to income is
too high.
Arguing that the average
Bahamian citizen was spend-


ing more than 10 per cent of
his/her income to service
existing consumer loans, Mr
SEE page two


Downtown Nassau plans

may be ready by year-end
By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
RENDERINGS depicting what the city of Nassau could
look like after its revitalisation, and draft legislation and
legal outlines for the creation of a Business Improvement
District (BID), could be ready to present to Parliament
by year-end, the Downtown Nassau Partnership's (DNP)
managing director said yesterday.
Vaughn Roberts, during a luncheon hosted by his organ-
isation, said that by early December a draft of the docu-
ments that would move government to create the BID, an
organisation designed to oversee the day-to-day workings
of downtown Nassau, could be ready for scrutinising by
politicians and private sector partners.
Meanwhile, urban management consultant, Brad Segal,
suggested that the city of Nassau would have to follow
global trends in order to become a successful business and
tourism centre.
According to him, some global trends relevant to the
success of Nassau's revitalisation are the reduction of vehic-
ular traffic through the city centre, the creation of parking
downtown, the urbanisation of the area and the enticement of
more entrepreneurial investment.
Mr Segal argued that the city of Nassau has vast potential
to be engineered into something exciting, as the best practices
SEE page five


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Wilson: Unemployment




now 'in the 17% range'






PAGEBSIES 2BIRDY ETME 1,20 H RBN


Wilson: Unemployment


fPCPWATERHOUsECPERS I

Is Seeking
A Corporate Services Supervisor


Applicants should be Bahamian and have at least three (3) years practical experience in
the following areas:

* Company Incorporations
* Formation of Foundations
* Company Continuations
* Voluntary Liquidations
* Mergers/Consolidations
* Drafting and vetting Contracts and Agreements
* Business License Applications including requirements of the Grand Bahama Port
Authority Limited

Eligible candidates should also be familiar with the Financial and Corporate Service
Providers Act and hold either an LLB or a Bachelors Degree in Business Administration
and or Finance. Compensation and benefits to be paid commensurate with experience.

Resumes along with copies of your credentials should be sent to P.O. Box N - 3910,
Nassau, The Bahamas. Attention: Corporate Services Leader no later than Friday,
September 25, 2009.


now 'in

FROM page one
Wilson implied that Bahamian
consumers were 'maxed out'
just like their US counterparts,
especially in an economy where
unemployment was rising and
incomes falling.
"Consumers are more lever-
aged than in 1990," Mr Wilson
told Tribune Business. "In my
view, the average consumer is
significantly worse off because
they are more leveraged - too
highly leveraged through these
consumer loans.
"They've been borrowing,
borrowing, borrowing, and this
has gone on for a long period
of time." Many Bahamians
have feasted on cheap credit
for a long time, Mr Wilson
implied, but with banks tight-
ening their lending criteria the
days of easy money have long
evaporated.
Much consumer spending
was fuelled by debt, and in its
absence this critical spending
component of the Bahamian
economy has been sharply
reduced.
Mr Wilson pointed out that
the reduction in consumer
spending had numerous knock-
on effects, such as reduced
retail sales and imports, which
translated into lower govern-
ment revenues.
Warning that the Govern-
ment's increased spending, at a
time when revenues were
sharply reduced, could be
"dangerous" for the Bahamas
and propel it into an unsus-
tainable national debt/fiscal
deficit position, Mr Wilson cau-
tioned that global economic
recovery would not necessarily
translate into a Bahamian one.


the 17%

"Our problems go far
beyond global economic
forces," he told Tribune Busi-
ness. "I would discourage polit-
ical leaders from continuing to
convey a sense that the
Bahamas' economic recovery
is automatic or inevitable as
soon as the global economy
turns around. There's a slight
disconnect between the two."
As evidence of this, he point-
ed to the fact that the index
measuring the weighted value
of shares on the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange (BISX) had fallen
by 11 per cent for 2009 to-date,
whereas other global stock
markets had risen, the Dow
Jones Industrial Average
increasing by 10 per cent and
the UK's FTSE up 13 per cent.
While Mr Wilson's analysis
may have omitted BISX's spe-
cific problems, he told Tribune
Business that he was "particu-
larly concerned by our declin-
ing social capital".
This referred not only to the
Bahamas' physical infrastruc-
ture, but the social interactions
between people and institu-
tions. Implying that increasing
social discord threatened to
undermine the economy, Mr
Wilson said: "What this reces-
sion is driving home is that sep-
arating the economy from the
social reality and institutions
of this country is a huge mis-
take.
"We can't isolate economic
recovery from major and
increasing concerns about
crime and deterioration in fam-
ily life. We will not solve our
economic problems without
solving the problem of social
capital. Our social capital is in
decline, and it has not just start-


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


range

ed. It has been in decline for
many years now."
Mr Wilson added that the
Bahamian judicial system was
also in urgent need of reform,
bemoaning "the terrible state
of our judiciary", and its seem-
ing inability to rapidly process
cases and deliver justice in an
appropriate timeframe.
"It's a humungous problem,
for both criminal and civil mat-
ters," he added.
And with the Bahamian
economy still contracting, the
Arawak Homes chairman said
he "would not be ,iiipi i '. if
the negative growth was more
than the IMF's 4-4.5 per cent
projection for 2009.
As for unemployment, Mr
Wilson said: "Whatever they
said it was in May. I'm almost
positive you could add several
points to that now. If it was 14
per cent in May, I would say
that it's in the 17 per cent range
now."
He recalled a Council of
Economic Advisers report in
1990-1991, which advised the
Government of the day to rein
in a fsiacl deficit that was
expanding then. The Council,
chaired by John Kenning, and
which included Sir William
Allen, recommended increas-
ing taxes by 10 per cent and
reducing government spending
by a similar percentage.
Mr Wilson said the Coun-
cil's conclusions were as rele-
vant now as they were then,
yet no one was offering this
advice at a time when the Gov-
ernment was borrowing $373
million to cover the 2008-2009
fiscal deficit.
"Today, we're talking about
the Government spending
more, and that could be dan-
gerous," Mr Wilson said.
While Arawak Homes had
seen a "significant" fall in
demand for new homes, he
added that the company was
"developing new and different
strategies to weather the
storm", and it had been aided
by the decision of some poten-
tial buyers to move on deals
based on the fact that prices
would not fall as low as they
have now.


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


NOTICE OF

SPECIAL CALLED MEETING













ALL MEMBERS of

Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos

Cooperative Credit Union (BIRCCCU) Limited

Are Urged To Attend The

Special Called Meeting




Date:

Saturday, September 19, 2009

Location:

Grounds Of The Credit Union

Time:

10:00 A.M.

Purpose of The Meeting:

To Discuss & Vote On The Proposed Opening

Up Of Our Bond To Allow Your Family To

Become Members Of BIRCCCU Ltd.


Book Signing Announcement for:


"A Matter of Keeping"

Gabrielle E Culmer's New Novel,
published by Vantage Press, Inc.


On Saturday, September 19th, 2009 at Logos, Harbour Bay.

Time: 11:00 a.m. - 3:00p.m.

Special Promotion: One FREE copy of previous poetry collection
for the first TEN shoppers.

A Matter f Keeping is "engaging, incisive and moving a.w o
families ch ose to deal with the problems that confront them.


The book emphizes culture histon alhnd bus l ,s (acumIen, and
provides an interesting setting upon ic creativity aind
progression evolve.


The New Novel is also available at:
Logos, Harbour Bay,
Odessa Gardens, Palmdale,
322 8493, and Vantage Press Inc. 1 800 882 3273.


I


.-j


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009


THE TRIBUNE












Tax evasion threat is 'grant standing'


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

DEMANDS that interna-
tional financial centres and their
institutions be barred from
accessing the US and interna-
tional financial systems if they
'fail' to aid the fight against tax
evasion, while currently "polit-
ical grand standing", is an issue
that the Bahamas will have to
guard against because it may
become the reality in five to
seven years time.
Michael Paton, a former
Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB) chairman, told
Tribune Business that while the
likes of Carl Levin, the Demo-
cratic Senator who chairs the
permanent investigations sub-
committee, were pushing for
such enforcement action, there
was not enough international
support to make that happen
in the short-term.
Mr Levin this week argued
that Tax Information Exchange
Agreements (TIEAs), of the
nature the Bahamas signed with
the US in 2002 and will sign


with Monaco today, were inef-
fective in the fight against tax
evasion because they only man-
dated states to hand over infor-
mation if a specific taxpayer
was identified.
Instead, Mr Levin appears to
be pushing President Barack
Obama and his administration
to widen TIEAs into an all-
encompassing 'fishing expedi-
tion' net, demanding details on
all US clients from internation-
al financial centres and their
institutions. He seems to have
been encouraged by the deal
reached with UBS and the
Swiss government, whereby the
bank has agreed to hand over
to the Internal Revenue Ser-
vice (IRS) details on 5,000 US
account holders.
However, Mr Paton said of
Mr Levin's plans: "I don't see
how you can do that to a coun-
try that the US has a TIEA
with", meaning the Bahamas.
The Lennox Paton partner
added: "At this point, I think
it's political grandstanding. As
long as we're seen to implement
requests that come in, there


I'. .,,.: i - . I . .I I. _-_


Tel.242-o---8251 Cel. 35---013
info@mariocareyrealty.com
www.mariocareyrealty.com


shouldn't be a problem. How
we implement and administer
TIEAs is how we're going to
be judged."
While Mr Levin and his con-
temporaries were looking to
raise tension and create anxi-
ety by moving to "criminalise
tax evasion", Mr Paton said the
concept had yet to win univer-
sal acceptance, with most focus
currently on agreeing the
OECD's model for tax infor-
mation exchange.
"It might happen in five to
seven years' time, but it's just
being floated," Mr Paton told
Tribune Business of Mr Lev-
in's plans. "It's always going to
be an issue, and we're going to
have to watch it, since people
are suggesting it will be the way
to go."
However, Paul Moss, the
recently-announced PLP lead-
ership candidate who runs his
own financial services business,
Dominion Management, told
Tribune Business that the
Bahamas had "not yet learnt
what the rules are" that the G-
20/OECD are seeking to


C


V. �. et's'ta&


impose.
Again urging that the
Bahamas look to negotiate
double taxation agreements
with European, North Ameri-
can and Latin American states,
and impose a minimal 2-4 per
cent tax on its financial sector
clients, Mr Moss added: "We


have to realise they are not
going to let up. The Bahamas
has to look in a different direc-
tion.
"The rules have changed and
we have to understand that we
can sign as many TIEAs as we
want, but they will not stop. We
have to really get our heads out


of the sand, be forward thinking
and get ahead of the curve.
"If the Bahamas is seen to
be ahead of the curve, we will
be the beneficiaries of major
business coming to our shores.
What clients don't want is to
be in a jurisdiction facing scruti-
ny and high tax rates."


SANTANDER BANK & TRUST LTD

has an immediate vacancy for a

CREDIT RISK MANAGER


Applicants must hold the following:

- Bachelors in Business Administration or related degree
- Minimum of 10 years experience in Private Banking with 5 years directly in the area
of Credit Risk.

Applicants should also be capable of the following:

1. Management and servicing of loan portfolios involving Spanish lending officers
and clients, liaison with other group units.
2. Good organizational and planning skills.
3. Effective management and supervision of Credit Risk Department.
4. Excellent communications skills in both English and Spanish essential.
5. Be proficient in all Microsoft Office applications.

Applications in writing with details of education and experience should be addressed
to the Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas not later than
October 9, 2009.


W IND N i B AV
AT3 A( 0. B A H A(VIA


Multi-Unit General Manager


Position Summary
The "Multi-Unit General Manager" function is the primary strategic business
leader of seven (7) business entities spread between two locations in Jupiter,
Florida AND Abaco, Bahamas.

Position oversees the development and implementation of club strategies
and ensures implementation of the brand service strategy and brand initiatives.
The position ensures that the clubs' operations meet the brand's target
customer needs, maximizes associate satisfaction and focuses on growing
revenues and the overall financial performance of all departments. As the
leader of both properties' Guidance Teams, M-UGM develops and implements
Club-wide strategies that deliver products and services to meet or exceed
the needs and expectations of the brand's target customer and associates and
provides a return on investment to the owners and the Company.

Expected Contributions
* Energizes the Gold Standards of the Company and ensures brand
initiatives are implemented to meet or exceed member, employee and
financial expectations. Continuously challenges the team to improve
operations, and ensures compliance with brand standards to protect
brand integrity.
* Leverages synergies among both properties to maximize market
penetration, operational excellence, and overall business performance.
* Selects, develops and retains a diverse leadership team capable of
delivering the expected performance contributions and with growth
potential, and holds others accountable for doing the same. Leads the
guidance team and leverages additional corporate and regional resources
to develop and implement destination club-wide strategies that are
aligned with the company's Key Success Factors. Facilitates talent
development and leverages opportunities to share and maximize talent
among the Areas Clubs and Residences.
* Focuses the team on delivering services and products to meet or exceed
owner expectations, create owner loyalty, and grow market share. Builds
relationships with key customers.

Qualifications
* 4-year bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Hotel and Restaurant
Management, or related major
* 15+ years of progressive experience in private club industry with
exposure to multiple disciplines
* Prior General Manager or equivalent experience in a luxury market
environment
* Property Management certifications required by the State of Florida
* Prior multi-property oversight preferred

Skills & Knowledge
* Leadership - Visible, proactive, personally involved leader with excellent
organizational skills, capable of providing focused leadership and
contributing to establish the club and residences prominent position
within the market. A well-developed capability for strategic decision-
making and a track record of proven results in the areas of customer
satisfaction, operational excellence, employee satisfaction, revenue and
profit.
* Financial Acumen - Business savvy leader with demonstrated financial
acumen, capable of providing strong P&L results oriented financial
leadership.
* Operations - Excellent sense of product and service quality, a passion
for excellence and an understanding of the sophisticated needs of the
luxury customer. Creative and innovative operations leadership, capable
of delivering products and services that will differentiate the clubs and
residences in the region's luxury residential market.
* Governance - Property Management designations or certifications
required by the State of Florida are required. Responsible for Rules
and Enforcement, Property Maintenance, Services Communications,
Finances, Administration, Asset Protection and assistance with Policy
Development all in accordance with local and state statutes.

Director of Operations
Position Summary
Functions as the strategic business leader of food and beverage/culinary
operations and acts as General Manager in his/her absence. Areas of


Job Vacancies


responsibility include: Front Office, Business Centre, Recreation/Fitness
Department, Retail/Gift Shops, Housekeeping, Food and Beverage/Culinary
and Event Management. Position oversees the development and
implementation of departmental strategies and ensures implementation of
the brand service strategy and brand initiatives. The position ensures that
food and beverage/culinary operations meet the brand's target customer
needs, maximizes associate satisfaction, focuses on growing revenues and
the overall financial performance of the departments. As a member of the
Guidance Team, develops and implements hotel-wide strategies that deliver
products and services to meet or exceed the needs and expectations of the
brand's target customer and associates and provides a return on investment
to the owners and Ritz-Carlton.

Responsibilities

* Demonstrating Leadership
* Achieving Goals
* Exceeding Customer Expectations
* Improving Profit
* Maintaining Balance Between Profit and Service Satisfaction
* Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates
* Destination Club and Residential Management

Qualifications
* 4-year bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Hotel and Restaurant
Management, or related major
* 5 years experience in executive management position in a five star
resort
* Ritz-Carlton Hotel or Destination Club experience preferred

Skills & Knowledge
* Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes
for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer
needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and daily
evaluation of existing customer satisfaction measurement processes.
* Management of Financial Resources - Determining how money will
be spent and available resources utilized to get the work done and daily
accounting for these expenditures.
* Analytical/Critical Thinking - The ability to gather and organize
information using a logical and systematic process; recognize patterns
and relationships in complex data; examine data to identify implications,
problems and draw appropriate conclusions; generate alternative solutions
to problems; evaluate strengths, weaknesses and consequences of
alternative solutions and approaches to solving problems.
* Applied Business Knowledge - Understanding market dynamics involved
in running a private membership club under development, enterprise
level objectives and important aspects of ultra-luxury club / resort
business to accurately diagnose strengths and weaknesses, anticipate
opportunities and risks, identify issues, and develop strategies and plans.
Aligning individual and team actions with strategies and plans to drive
business results.


Pastry Chef
Position Summary
Create and maintain a positive work environment through coaching and leading
staff while establishing creative and exciting menu products, both appetizing and
visually appealing. Work and maintain good working relationships with other
work areas. Meet with meeting planners and social catering event coordinators
to develop personalized dessert products. Direct, train and monitor performance
of Pastry staff. Maintain organization, cleanliness and sanitation of work areas
and equipment.

Essential Job Functions
* Train, coach, lead and hold Pastry team accountable to the job functions
listed below. Meet daily to review assignments, schedules, anticipated
business levels, employee performance issues and other information
pertinent to job performance.
* Maintain and strictly abide by sanitation/health regulations and the
hotel's food safety program requirements. Ensure all Pastry employees
maintain food handlers' certification.
* Meet with Executive Chef to review assignments, anticipated business
levels, changes and other information pertinent to the job performance


a Gm

W NI N (, BAY
A BA C , BAHAM MA'


on a daily basis.
* Prepare and assign production and prep work for Pastry staff to complete;
review priorities.
* Communicate additions or changes to the assignments as they arise
throughout the shift. Identify situations, which compromise the
department's standards and delegate these tasks.
* Prepare amenity orders for room service in accordance with specified
requirements and hotel standards.
* Prepare all dishes following recipes and yield guides, according to Ritz-
Carlton standards.
* Monitor performance of Pastry staff and ensure all procedures are
completed to the department standards
* Assist Pastry staff wherever required to ensure excellent service to
guests.
* Ensure all Pastry staff assignments are completed before they leave
work area.
* Review status of work and follow-up actions required with the Executive
Chef before leaving.

Qualifications, Skills & Knowledge
* Certification of culinary training or apprenticeship.
* 5 years experience in F&B leadership position at a luxury club, hotel
or restaurant.
* Knowledge of food and beverage cost controls.
* Ability to plan and develop menus and recipes.


Director of Sales
Position Summary
Designing, implementing and continuously evaluating all sales processes;
Maintaining content and direction on Training and Motivation of Sales
Leadership and Field Sales Force; Developing and maintaining visibility
over Sales Standards and Accountability Measures; Providing related sales
input to New Site Feasibility and Business Planning Processes
Essential Job Functions
* Monitor and evaluate sales processes while maintaining visibility over
daily sales progress against budgets
* Create and implement specific sales and marketing field operations
best practices, policies and guidelines
* Create and implement structured sales presentation training and sales
executive evaluation
* Develop sales management training programs as well as create system
succession strategy to identify/groom key sales professionals
* Insure performance management is implemented and maintained
consistently across the system
* Review all sales related assumptions in the feasibility process, ensuring
strategic and operational reasonableness, comparability among PEPS,
budgets, forecasts and LRP
* Provide Brand with product and business development recommendations.
Relate information regarding competitive tactics and products.

Qualifictions, Skills & Knowledge
* College degree
* Minimum of ten years in the vacation ownership industry
* Minimum of five years ownership sales and sales management experience
* Strong verbal and written communications skills; ability to communicate
effectively with senior management
* Experience in designing products, processes, policies and training
manuals
* Ritz Carlton Club experience preferred
Please send resume to the attention of:
Director of Human Resources
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB-20571
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Bahamas
OR
Email: Freddie.Muiings@ritzcarlton.com
Deadline for applications is Friday, September 25,2009


LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.

c&afU9/ eat C Wua lwa0 9&4t"

FOR SALE
Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US-$1 5 million
\\eb Listing # 83""


TO DICS TREUNTI AELGO OWWTIUE4.O


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


FROM page one

permission.
The IIPA said: "For almost a
decade, the Bahamas has main-
tained, both in law and in prac-
tice, a Berne-incompatible com-
pulsory licence in its 1998 Copy-
right Act that it has applied to
premium pay television pro-
gramming."
While amendments had been


Copyright

passed to the Act in 2004 to deal
with this issue, the IIPA said
they had never come into force,
its reference to Berne meaning
the World Intellectual Property
Organisation (WIPO).
In a clear reference to Cable
Bahamas, the IIPA said: "As a
result, local cable operators


NOTICE


SHAMBALLA MANAGEMENT LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, SHAMBALLA MANAGEMENT LIMITED
is in dissolution as of September 14, 2009.


International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is
the Liquidator.



LIQUIDATOR


retransmit premium US pay tele-
vision programming, without
authorisation, causing harm to
US companies in this sector.
"This flagrant flaunting of
both international rules (Berne)
and its bilateral intellectual prop-
erty rights obligations (CBI)
must cease immediately. This
activity also violates the WIPO
Trade Related Intellectual Prop-
erty Rights (TRIPS) agreement,
although the Bahamas is one of
the very few countries that is not
yet a WTO member.
"Its WTO accession process
has been moving very slowly
and, at last report, a working
party has not yet been formed."
As ever, the situation is more
complex than the IIPA is letting
on. Anthony Butler, Cable
Bahamas' president, yesterday
said that while the BISX-listed
firm had been "highly success-
ful" in reaching commercial
agreements with some pro-
gramme rights holders, the issue
dated back some 30 years - to
when the US satellite footprint
for English-speaking countries
first came over the Bahamas.
Mr Butler said Cable
Bahamas had first raised the
issue when it won its then-exclu-
sive 15-year cable TV franchise,
as "for 30 years the satellite foot-
print has been over the
Bahamas, and Bahamians have
been watching US programming.
The Bahamas receives via satel-
lite the footprint of US pro-
gramming, and we have been for
30 years".
Explaining that the issue pre-
dated Cable Bahamas' existence,
Mr Butler said the company
needed to be able to show these
programmes to provide a com-
petitive, attractive package for


Bahamian consumers.
The company has been
working with the Registrar
General's Department, the
Bahamian Embassy in Wash-
ington and the US Embassy in
Nassau - the latter providing a
route into the US Trade Rep-
resentative's Office - in a bid to
achieve commercial agree-
ments with the copyright and
programming rights holders.
Under a 2000 agreement, the
US Trade Representative's
Office was supposed to encour-
age the MPAA and the likes
of its individual members to
enter into commercial agree-
ments with Cable Bahamas, in
return for this nation amending
its compulsory licensing regime
via the 2004 Act amendment.
Yet while the Bahamas
believes it has fulfilled its side
of the bargain, it privately
believes the US has to hold up
its end.
The crux of the problem is
that the Bahamas and rest of
the English-speaking
Caribbean are seen as too small
a market by many of the pro-
gramming rights holders, mak-
ing them disinclined to nego-
tiate commercial arrangements
with Cable Bahamas.
Their distribution and roy-
alty rights do not allow them
to broadcast outside the US,
and the legal fees and other
costs required to change these
agreements would exceed the
revenues gained from a small
market such as this nation.
Yet Tribune Business under-
stands that Cable Bahamas has
enjoyed some success to date,
the main holdouts being the
likes of HBO and the premi-
um movie channels.


Motor dealer

FROM page one

decided to place its transmission room and staff lunch area in the
existing structure.
"We're moving them to where the existing reception office is,"
Mr Lowe said of the two facilities. "Instead of knocking it down and
making two more bays, we will move them temporarily until we
decide whether we're going ahead with Phase III."
He added that Nassau Motor Company could also potentially
leave the transmission room and lunch area there, rather than
proceed with the initial plans, "killing two birds with one stone".
With the firm having spent just over $500,000 to date on its
expansion, and "a little more to go", Mr Lowe acknowledged that
investing during a recession was always risky.
"It sure is," he added, "but you've got to remain hopeful things
will turn around. Customers have to service vehicles, and hopefully
we will be the place of choice for Honda, Chevrolet and Cadillac
owners."
He told Tribune Business that Nassau Motor Company had
experienced no fall-off in demand for vehicle servicing as a result
of the recession, the only recent decline having resulted from the
company's expansion project, with customers placed on a three-
week as opposed to one-week wait.
"I think it will be a bit more convenient for our customers," Mr
Lowe told Tribune Business of the new customer service centre.
"Rather than having to traipse through cars running back and
forth, there will be a nice area for them to sit in. It will be a little
more convenient.
"We're getting on with the paving, the levelling off of the
ground. I think our customers will like it. When they come in, it will
be more customer friendly."
He added that Nassau Motor Company hoped to initiate a pro-
gramme where clients in a hurry could have their vehicles serviced
in a short period of time, "getting them in and out as fast as pos-
sible. It's something General Motors and Honda continually
stress".
As for the six bays with hydraulic lifts that Nassau Motor Com-
pany had installed some five months to go as part of the first
phase expansion, Mr Lowe said: "They've been wonderful. It
makes the technicians' lives a lot easier. They don't have to jack the
car up by hand or put a jack stand under each corner."


KING'S
REAL ESTATE






Real Estate Agents


Applicants must have:

* Outstanding personality

* Current BREA license

* Minimum 2-years experience

* Proven sales record


Apply to bahamas@kingsrealty.com

Deadline: September 30, 2009
Information: 394-4397


ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


Extended by Orders dated 19th day of November A.D., 2008 andu29th day of June A.D., 2009
.u..u.. y Order 6, Rule 7, Ru:' : U 1 4 .-- *~,u-': i,.,l' '""
_ C62&OMWEALTH OF E BA' , : /gen/rfwd)(
IN THE SUPREME COUR FE
Common Law and Equit Div iso,:, ypAS
BETWEEN
WILLIAM THOMAS JACKSON
Plaintiff
AND
SIDNEY GEORGE GLINTON
Defendant
ELIZABETH THE SECOND, by the Grace of God, Queen of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas and of her other realms and
territories, Head of the Commonwealth.
SIDNEY GEORGE GLINTON
No. 56 Soldier Road
Nassau, N.P., Bahama.
WE COMMAND YOU that within Fourteen days after service of
this writ on you, inclusive of the day of such service, you
do cause an appearance to be entered for you in an action
at the suit of WILLIAM THOMAS JACKSON of West 302 North 921
Maple Avenue, Waukesha Wisconsin, U.S.A. whose address for
service is Messrs. Halsbury Chambers, Halsbury Commercial
Center, Suite 1, Village Road, North P. c. Box N9-S9,
Nassau, The Bahamas, Attorneys for the Plaintiff.
And take notice that in default of your so doing the
Plaintiff may proceed therein, and Judgment may be given in
your absence.
WITNESS, the Honourable Sir Burton Hall
Our Chief J stice of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas the
Y-day e Tofkt in tne year of Our Lord Two Thousand
and Seven. . _

N.B.- This Writ may not be served more than 12 calendar months
after the above dates unless renewed by Order of the Court.
DIRECTIONS FOR ENTERING APPEARANCE
The Defendant may enter an Appearance personally or by
attorney either by handing in the appropriate forms, duly
completed, at the Registry of the Supreme Court, Public
Square, in the City of Nassau in the Island of New
Providence, or by sending them to that office by post.
If the Defendant enters an Appearance he must also deliver a
Defence to the attorney for the Plaintiff within fourteen (14)
days from the last day of the time limited for entering an
Appearance, unless such time is extended by the Court or a Judge,
otherwise Judgment may be entered against him without notice,
unless he has in the meantime been served with a Summons for
Judgment.

GENERALLY INDORSED WRIT
The Plaintiff's claim is for the following:
(1) Damages for personal injury and loss arising out of
a road traffic accident occurring on the 10th
December, 2004 in the vicinity of Sbarro's
Restaurant on West Bay Street; which said accident
was caused by the negligence of the Defendant;
(2) Interest pursuant to the Civil Procedure (Award of
Interest) Act, 1992;
(3) Costs; and
(4 And such further or other relief as the Court deems
just.

Dated 29th day of January, A.D., 2007

HALSBURY CHAMBERS
Chambers
Suite 1
Village Road North
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Plaintiff


NOTICE is hereby given that RENE TELLE of
187 EMERALD CIRCLE, TREASURE COVE, P.O. BOX
CR-56766 NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 18th day of September, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.






Career


Opportunity



AN ENERGY-SAVING CAREER



Are you passionate about saving energy? DO

you enjoy helping others? We are seeking a

committed leader for our team in a business that

helps consumers reduce their energy use through

good design and alternative systems.



If you are interested in a career in this exciting

industry, please email us with your resume at

theenergydoctor.rx@gmail.com. Be sure to

include current contract information. You supply

the passion. We'll supply the rest.


w


Accountant

Primary Duties:

* Recording of journal entries

* Handling accounts payable functions

* Preparing submission for franchisors

* Preparation of bank reconciliations

* Preparing financial statements

* Establishing & monitoring internal controls


Qualifications:

Applicants should possess Bachelors degree in
Accounting, at least 5 years experience, knowledge
of retail/food accounting, be proficient in Quickbooks,
Excel and other MS Office applications. Must be able
to multi-task, work with minimum supervision and
possess a high level of integrity and professionalism.


Fax application/resume to 394-4938
Deadline for applications: Sept 25, 2009


i ROYAL FIDELITY
JHH/JH IMoney at Work 0
C FA L'" Co :) LONI IAL
LII , II TLL ,-. T L- _ _ '_i_ _ iTL - -
THURSDAY. 17 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1.534 771 CHO -0 4-171 CHG -0 03 I YTD -177.59 I YTD L -10 37
FINDEX" CLOSE 7B9.77 I YTD -5.40 : I 200B -12 31 :
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM I TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 I FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52 k-HI 52 k-Lo S.ecurit P ....us Close Today's Close Change Dall, Vol EPS i DI. P E Yield
1 81 1 15 AML Foods Limited 1 15 1 15 000 0 127 0000 91 0 00%
11 80 990 Bahamas Property Fund 1075 1075 000 0992 0200 108 1 86%
930 618 Bank of Bahamas 618 618 000 400 0244 0260 253 421%
089 063 Benchmark 063 063 000 0877 0000 N/M 000%/
349 315 Bahamas Waste 315 315 000 0078 0090 404 286%
237 214 FideIty Bank 237 2 37 0 00 0 55 0040 43 1 1 69%
1420 1000 Cable Bahamas 1000 1000 000 900 1406 0250 71 250%
288 2 74 Colina Holdings 274 2 74 0 00 0 249 0040 11 0 1 46%
750 5 26 Commonwealth Bank (1) 592 5 92 0 00 0419 0300 141 5 07%
385 1 27 Consoldated Water BDRs 374 373 001 0111 0052 336 1 39%
285 1 32 Doctor's Hospital 2 05 2 05 0 00 0 382 0 080 54 3 90%
820 660 Famguard 660 6 60 0 00 0 420 0 240 157 3 64%
1250 8 80 Fnco 930 930 0 00 350 0322 0520 289 559%
1171 10 29 FirstCaribbean Bank 10 29 10 29 0 00 15,650 0 794 0 350 130 3 40%
553 4 95 Focol (S) 4 99 4 99 0 00 2,000 0 332 0 150 150 3 01%
100 1 00 Focol Class B Preference 1 00 1 00 0 00 0 000 0 000 N/M 000%/
045 030 Freeport Concrete 030 030 000 0035 0000 86 000%
9 02 5 49 ICD Utlities 550 550 000 19,879 0407 0500 135 9 09%
1200 998 J S Johnson 10 09 998 -011 3,253 0952 0640 105 641%
1000 1000 Premier Real Estate 1000 1000 000 0180 0000 556 000%/
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest Maturity
100000 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 10000 0 00 7% 19 October 2017
1000 00 1000 00 Fdelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 10000 000 Prime + 1 75% 19 October 2022
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 10000 000 7% 30 May 2013
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100 00 000 Prime + 1 75% 29 May 2015
Fidelity Over -The-Counter Securities
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
1460 792 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 92 842 1400 -2246 O 000 N/M O 00%
8 00 600 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 200 625 400 0000 0480 N/M 7 80%
054 020 RND Holdings 035 040 055 0001 0000 2566 0 00%
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

BISX Listed mutuall Funds
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Namre NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield % NAV Date
1 4038 1 3344 CFAL Bond Fund 1 4038 372 520 31-Aug-09
30350 2 8952 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2 8990 -1 39 -4 16 31 Aug 09
1 4892 1 4119 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 4892 387 547 11- Sep09
36090 30941 Fldelity Bahamas G & I Fund 30941 861 1359 31 Aug 09
130484 123870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13 1136 393 587 31 Aug 09
101 6693 1000000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101 6693 1 10 1 67 30 Jun- 09
100 9600 93 1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 967398 035 -4 18 30-Jun-09
1 0000 1 0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1 0000 000 0 00 31-Dec-07
94075 90775 Fdelity International Investment Fund 93399 269 -1 41 31-Jul-09
10707 10000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1 0707 338 514 31-Aug-09
1 0364 1 0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1 0319 -0 11 2 05 31-Aug-09
f.IARKET TERfIS
BIsX ALL s-ARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1 000 00 YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colna and Fdelty
52wk-ow - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - ellng price of Cona and fdelty
Previous close - Previous days weighted price for dallyvlume Last Price Last traded over- the-counter price
Today close -Current days weighted price for dallyvlume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day t day EPs $ -A company's repoed earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N - Not Meaningful
PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX -The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1 1994 = 100
(S) - 4-or-1 Stock Split - Effective Date ISS2OO7
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE GALLS GOLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FO CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 I COLONIAL 242-502-7525


BUSINESS I


F Mr t I





FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009, PAGE 5B


Downtown Nassau plans


may be ready by year-end


FROM page one

from working models - mainly
throughout the US - are
infused in the redevelopment
of the city.
He said the city has viable
raw material that retail devel-
opers are looking for to change
Nassau into a suburban shop-
ping centre.
"From an organisational
and infrastructural standpoint,
you're starting from scratch,"
said Mr Segal.
"It seems like they (govern-
ment) are all focused on doing
something downtown that is
enduring, lasting and mean-
ingful. So, you may be behind
the starting line, but you have
the opportunity to move quick-
ly and make some big differ-
ences."
He added that the public
and private partnership
charged with moving the revi-
talisation effort forward had a
golden opportunity to get the
Ingraham administration sign
off on the BID, which will then
have autonomous jurisdiction
over the city's future develop-
ment.
The director-general of
tourism and co-chair of the


DNP, Vernice Walkine, said
the Bahamas has been trying
to change the look and feel of
its capital for over 15 years,
only making a material effort
in the past two to three.
With government attempt-
ing to lure more cruise lines to
Nassau's ports, the revitalisa-
tion of the city centre is cru-
cial to selling the Bahamian
product.
Mr Segal said his travels
throughout the city have con-
vinced him that the present
product is far below its poten-
tial.
"When those people get off
that boat someone has to man-
age that experience. You don't
have a managed experience
today," he said. "People get
off that boat and it's crazy. It's
intimidating, it's not unpleas-
ant. I get offers for 20 taxi rides
to Atlantis."
According to him, the down-
town experience has to be
packaged for all visitors in
order to drive the allure away
from the now more popular
Marina Village on Paradise
Island.
Some merchants who hold
retail space in both downtown
Nassau and Paradise Island
have seen sales growthon Par-


BEC 'back pedals' on


power plant approvals


FROM page one
was unlawful.
"My clients are of the view
that BEC ought to stop any fur-
ther work at the site and on the
highway, and should proceed to
properly make applications to
the relevant statutory and min-
isterial authorities," he said.
And Mr Smith added: "In
my clients' view, this is the sin-
gle greatest expenditure on
public works in the history of
the Abacos, which will have a
great and long-lasting impact
on the economy, on tourism,
on the environment, on prop-
erty owners, on energy bills, on


health and safety issues and,
generally, the future of the
Abacos.
"My clients consider that
before embarking on this pro-
ject there ought to have been
widespread consultation con-
ducted in a transparent,
accountable and democratic
manner.
"Not only should there have
been informative town meet-
ings, but any and all applica-
tions should have been made
with adequate and meaningful
opportunities provided in the
permitting processes for inter-
ested parties to make their con-
tribution to the extent that any


adise Island, while Nassau's
sales remain flat or have
declined.
"You're missing a lot of the
tourism market that you have,
but haven't necessarily pack-
aged," said Mr Segal.
He insisted the city of Nas-
sau create a merchandising
plan for the area in order to
make it more competitive.
While a more pedestrian-
friendly Bay Street was an inte-
gral part of the city's revitali-
sation plan, so was the effort to
move the congested bus ter-
minal and manage parking in
the area.
There has been vast specu-
lation on the timeframe for the
city's improvement. Minister
of the Environment, Earl
Deveaux, suggested it could
take as much as 40 years to
complete.
However, general consensus
suggests cities are an ongoing
project, Ms Walkine stating:
"Everything happens in its
time."
Mr Segal asserted that the
beginning stages of any revi-
talisation project are slow, but
added that the private sector
and government being nearer
to closing a deal on the BID
is a positive sign of progress.


of their interests may have been
affected.
"Although the project has
been commenced, it is only at
its very infancy, and my clients
consider that the opportunity
still remains to begin the
process afresh by rescinding
the 'decision'."
On behalf of his clients, Mr
Smith requested that the Gov-
ernment provide copies of all
permit applications made, and
copies of those which may
have been issued to date. He
warned that a Judicial Review
application may be made to
quash those already given.
Mr Smith also requested
copies of the Environmental
Impact Assessments (ElAs)
and Environmental Manage-
ment Plan prepared for the
Wilson City power plant, plus
copies of Crown Grants and
related agreements.



E00W8FS


Commercial Supervisor
Accounting
L10005
Finance Manager
Country Finance Department or Cluster Office


POSITION:
JOB FAMILY:
RCS CODE:
REPORTS TO:
LOCATION:


OVERALL PURPOSE:
Position is responsible for managing the Commercial Finance activities for a country or group oF
countries within the Cluster. Manages Revenue leakage, establishes credit limits and reviews ship-
ments to profile. Supervises the following staff; Billing Analyst, Duties and Vendor Analyst, Ac-
counts Receivable Analyst.


DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:
* Manage the Accounting Commercial activities for a country or group of
countries within the Cluster.
* Supervise Billing, Duties, Accounts Receivable and Vendor Analysts.
* Prepare and analyze statistics and KPIs for the country/cluster.
* Manage customer profiles.
* Establish AR Credit limits.
* Principal contact for Commercial controller.
* Assist with preparation of Customer profitability analysis.
* Handle Billing queries from Billing Center.
* 1st level of approval for Credit notes.
* Special projects and ad hoc reports as required.
* Provide customers analyses, and review customer data base in term of
discount, and credit
* Performs other assignments as required.
* Ability to supervise the accounting staff at local station


MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
* High school diploma and/or minimal of 5 years applicable experience
* Minimum of 4 years of commercial and accounting experience is required.
* Minimum of 2 years supervisory or management experience leading an
accounting department.
* A background in commercial credit and accounting required.
* Experience with a major Enterprise Reporting Package (ERP)
* Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.
* Ability to read and interpret data reports. Ability to understand and per
form data analysis.
* PC skills should include the basic suite of MS products, Excel, Access,
Word, Office
* Excellent communication skills both written and verbal, this function does
a lot of interfacing with internal and external customers and the Shared
Service Center


PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:
* Bachelor's degree in Accounting/Finance, a related field or equivalent
education
Please email resume to;
Romell K. Knowles I
Country Manager
bahamaboiii@hotmail.com


Resumes can be dropped off to DHL Bahamas corporate office - East Bay Street,
Island Traders Building, Nassau Bahamas.
Please be advised only those applicants whose resumes are taken into
consideration will be contacted. No phone calls will be accepted.


BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK

! /Cable Beach, West Bay Street,

P.O.Box N-3034

* Nassau, Bahamas

Tel:(242) 327-5780/327-5793-6

Fax:(242) 327-5047,327.1258

l* www.bahamasdevelopmentbank.com



Properties


New Providence
1. Vacant lot #64
(5O'xl00')-Joan's Height
Subdivision
2. Lots #3 & #4, Blk #47
(50'xl00') w/duplex
(1,532sq. ft.)-Forbes St,
Nassau Village
(Appraised Value
$120,000.00)
3. Vacant lot #147
(10,557sq. ft.)-Munnings
Dr & Roy West Ln
Southern Heights Sub
(Appraised Value
$90,000.00)
4. Lot 1.171 acres w/auto
repair shop & office
2,790sq. ft. & vacant
building 9,200sq. ft.
5. Lot #39 (2,500sq. ft.)
w/hse 1,104sq. ft. Blk
#35 hse #64-Lincoln
Blvd (Appraised Value
$57,780.00)
6. Lot (50'xlOO')
w/building 1,912sq. ft.-
Deveaux St (Appraised
Value $189,000.00)
7. Lots #29 & #30,
(50'x1OO'), BIk #47
w/building 1,140sq. ft.-
Matthew St, Nassau
Village (Appraised
Value $145,000.00)
Andros
8. Lot 10.08 acres w/six (6)
buildings-Pot Cay off
Behring Point Andros
9. Vacant lot #2, parcel "C"
30,613sq. ft.-Swain's
Point, Mangrove Cay
Andros (Appraised
Value $125,000.00)
10. Parcel of land (1.493
acres) w/6 buildings
(Helens Motel]-Pinders
Mangrove Cay, Andros
(Appraised Value
$275,000.00)
11. Beach front lot 9,000sq.
Ft. w/building 2,100sq.
ft.-Pinders Mangrove
Cay Andros (Appraised
Value $200,000.00)
12. Lot 4,344sq. ft. w/duplex
1,174sq. ft.-Fresh Creek
Andros (Appraised
Value $94,640.00)
Grand Bahama
13. Lot #20 (17,150sq.ft.)
w/hse 2,000sq. ft.
Blk#8, Sec #2-Sea Gull
Dr, Bahama Reef Yacht
& Country Club Sub
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$280,000.00)
14. Vacant lot #39, Blk #9
[14,397sq.ft.)-
Yorkshire Dr, Bahamia
West Replat Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $25,000.00)


15. Vacant Lot #8 Blk #12
Unit #3 (11,250sq. ft.)-
Henny Ave Derby Sub
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$65,000.00)
16. Lot #43 B (100'x150')
building-Nelson Rd
Poinciana Gardens
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$96,000.00)
17. Lot #37 (50'xl50')
w/sixplex 2-storey
apartment building &
Church 5,400sq. ft.-
Martin Town, Kings Sub
Eight Mile Rock Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $211,200.00)
18. Lot w/10 room hotel
5,000sq. ft. on 4.99
acres of beach front-
High Rock Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $1,100,000.00)
19. Vacant lot #13, Blk #59,
Unit #3 (22,752sq. ft.)
45' on canal front-
Dagenham Circle &
Ingrave Dr Emerald Bay
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$110,000.00)
20. Lot #15, Blk #15 Unit
#3 (90'x125')-Derby
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$23,000.00)
21. Vacant lot #25, Blk #15
(17,866sq. ft.)-
Cutwater Ln Shannon
Country Club Sub Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $38,000.00)
22. Lot #2 (20,000sq. ft)
w/building complex &
Laundromat-Queens
Highway Holmes Rock
Commonage Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $178,600.00)
Abaco
23. Lot #25 (17,755sq. ft.)
w/hse 800sq. ft.-#47
Queen Elizabeth Dr
Marsh Harbour Abaco
(Appraised Value
$212,750.00)
24. Vacant lot #6 (2 acres)-
Fox Town Abaco
(Appraised Value
$s0,000.00)
25. Lot #51 (15,000sq. ft.)
w/building-Murphy
Town Abaco
(Appraised Value
$102,420.00)


26. Portion of lot #69
(15,000sq. ft.]-Front St
Murphy Town Abaco
(Appraised Value
$29,250.00)
27. Lot #55 (6,900sq. ft.)
w/building-Murphy
Town Abaco
(Appraised Value
$82,075.00)
28. Lot#45 (60'x160')
w/14 room motel
3,900sq. ft.-Sandy Point
Abaco (Appraised
Value $485,700.00)
29. Lot87,120sq. Ft, w/4
cottages & 1 storage
building totaling
4,186sq. ft.-Sand Banks
Treasure Cay Abaco
(Appraised Value
$880,308.00)
Eleuthera
30. Vacant portion of lot #7
(50'xllO')-West James
Cistern Eleuthera
(Appraised Value
$18,000.00)
31. Vacant 3 acres of land
situated Colebrook
Street Dunmore Town
(Harbour Island)
Eleuthera
Cat Island
32. Vacant 6.5 acres of
land-Arthur's Town, Cat
Island
33. Lot w/12 room motel
1.39 acres-Arthur's
Town Cat Island
(Appraised Value
$630,000.00)
Exuma
34.Vacant lot #8 (65,200sq.
ft.]-Moss Town Exuma
(Appraised Value
$110,188.00)
35.Vacant lot #95
(80'x122') Commodore
Rd Elizabeth Harbour
Est. Exuma (Appraised
Value $45,000.00)
36.Lot #134 (75'x85')
w/two storey building
George Town, Exuma
(Appraised Value
$468,000.00)
Long Island
37.Vacant lot 100'x200'-
Bonacorde area west of
Clarence Town Long
Island ($Appraised
Value $30,000.00)


ASSETS
Vehicles


Trucks


Lu203uoadge Larava
Lame Truck


uck 1982 Double Axle Mack Dump
Truck


Durnp Truck
Small Vssl


19'(1q991) Spanish 'Wells Marine
w'/119HIP Mercury Outboard en~gine


0u C1996) KODOJO Vessel w/ll5
HP Envinrude Outboard engine
Large Vesselfs)




68' 1989)J Longliner, Trraler 40'Vessel
Vessel (Sweet Dreams) Beam 18'."',
Depth 5'.5" Cummins Engine


Other Vessels - Photos Not Available
* 80' Custom Steel Hull Vessel (Miss Kristy)
122' Single Screw Steel Hull (1960) MV Lisa J 1ll,
vessel has a new engine requiring installation. And
can be view at Bradford Marine, Grand Bahama


The public is invited to submit Sealed bids marked "Tender" to Bahamas Development Bank, P.O. Box N-3034,
Nassau, Bahamas attention Financial Controller, faxed bids will not be accepted or telephone 327-5780 for
additional information. Please note that all bids on the aforementioned properties and assets should be received
by or on September 22, 2009. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers. All
assets are sold as is.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


Ii :HL JOB DESCIPTION]


Large Trucks


Hean


THE TRIBUNE











THE WEATHER REPORT


%l .R INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
S" , (BAHAMAS) UMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


Variable clouds with a Partly cloudy. Variably cloudy, Variable clouds, Some sun with a Partly sunny, a t-storm
thunderstorm. t-storms; breezy, t-storms; breezy. t-storm possible. possible.
High: 890 High: 890 High: 890 High: 890
High: 90 Low: 790 Low: 800 Low: 800 Low: 800 Low: 800
99gO F Io 90o F lOO - -6F 9I 883O F I 96o-85o F o95-88oF
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature� is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body-everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.


I. Al , A I V


I AMiArN Ar


" , ORLANDO
High: 900 F/320 C
Low:760F/240 C

TAMPA
High: 900*F/320 C
Low: 76*F/240 C

�.
.. * -


FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 89� F/320C C
Low: 780 F/260 C


MIAMI
High: 900�F/320 C
Low: 79� F/260C


KEY WEST
High: 900 F/32� C
Low: 80� F/270 C
�.


Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


High
F/C
73/22
59/15
80/26
76/24
80/26
76/24
68/20
81/27
76/24
74/23
81/27
82/27
76/24
89/31
88/31


Low
F/C
55/12
46/7
68/20
54/12
58/14
51/10
47/8
70/21
55/12
51/10
66/18
48/8
51/10
76/24
70/21


W High
F/C
t 77/25
pc 56/13
r 83/28
pc 72/22
pc 74/23
pc 67/19
pc 65/18
t 84/28
s 73/22
pc 69/20
c 86/30
pc 82/27
s 71/21
s 88/31
pc 90/32


Saturday
Low
F/C
56/13
46/7
68/20
47/8
51/10
49/9
43/6
70/21
53/11
50/10
66/18
51/10
50/10
75/23
70/21


Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
80/26 57/13
88/31 72/22
80/26 55/12
100/37 73/22
76/24 66/18
86/30 64/17
82/27 65/18
78/25 70/21
90/32 79/26
80/26 59/15
80/26 66/18
86/30 73/22
78/25 61/16
80/26 59/15
90/32 76/24


FREEPORT
High: 890 F/320 C
Low: 77* F/250 C

















ANDROS
High: 920�F/330 C
Low:750�F/240 C


Saturday
W High Low
F/C F/C
pc 76/24 59/15
t 89/31 71/21
s 80/26 58/14
s 100/37 77/25
r 82/27 66/18
pc 90/32 66/18
pc 81/27 65/18
r 83/28 69/20
t 91/32 78/25
s 79/26 58/14
sh 81/27 67/19
t 88/31 74/23
pc 68/20 56/13
pc 78/25 59/15
t 90/32 74/23


Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, OR
Raleigh-Durham
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tucson
Washington, DC


ABACO
High: 89� F/320 C
Low: 78� F/260 C


NASSAU
High: 900 F/320 C
Low: 79� F/260 C


El EIITH


Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature
High ........................... .................. 90� F/32� C
Low .................... ...................... 78� F/260 C
Norm al high ................................... 880 F/31� C
Norm al low ...................................... 750 F/24� C
Last year's high ............................... 890 F/32� C
Last year's low ............................... 770 F/250 C


01112 315 617891
LOW MODERATE HIGH V. HIGH EXT

The higher the AccuWeather UV Index" number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.



High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.)
Today 6:53a.m. 3.6 12:45a.m. 0.0
7:15 p.m. 3.5 1:10 p.m. 0.0
Saturday 7:41 a.m. 3.7 1:31 a.m. 0.0
8:01 p.m. 3.4 2:01 p.m. 0.0
Sunday 8:28 a.m. 3.7 2:15 a.m. 0.0
8:47 p.m. 3.2 2:50 p.m. 0.1
Monday 9:15 a.m. 3.6 2:58 a.m. 0.0
9:32 p.m. 3.0 3:38 p.m. 0.3


Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:57 a.m. Moonrise..... 6:40 a.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .............................. 0.00" Sunset . . . . . . 7:11 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 6:57 p.m.
Year to date .................. .......................... 29.87" New First Full Last
Norm al year to date .................................... 35.33"

AccuWeather.com �f
Forecasts and graphics provided by
onA AccuWeather, Inc. @2009 Sep. 18 Sep. 26 Oct. 4 Oct. 11


LLLU I I ILII
High: 920�F/330 C
Low: 77* F/250 C

."?' ..
' '-


GREATEXUMA
High: 880�F/31� C
Low: 78� F/260C


>2.
\v" .,!'


High
F/C
78/25
100/37
76/24
84/28
79/26
82/27
86/30
88/31
76/24
78/25
75/23
87/30
90/32
91/32
80/26


Today
Low
F/C
59/15
79/26
53/11
61/16
66/18
63/17
62/16
67/19
66/18
57/13
57/13
70/21
76/24
70/21
61/16


Saturday
W High Low
F/C F/C
pc 73/22 53/11
pc 98/36 79/26
pc 74/23 52/11
pc 71/21 51/10
c 79/26 65/18
s 77/25 64/17
s 87/30 61/16
pc 89/31 68/20
pc 78/25 65/18
s 82/27 57/13
pc 67/19 51/10
t 89/31 71/21
t 91/32 75/23
s 92/33 69/20
pc 73/22 54/12


CAT ISLAND
High: 890 F/320 C
Low: 74* F/230 C











LONG ISLAND
High: 90� F/32� C
Low: 75� F/24� C


SAN SALVADOR
High: 90*�F/32* C
Low: 740�F/230 C


H


CROOKED ISLAND/ACKLINS
RAGGED ISLAND High:920F/330 C
Low: 750 F/24� C
High: 91� F/330 C
Low:720F/220C

GREAT INAGUA
High: 91� F/330 C
Low: 750�F/240 C


MAYAGUANA
High: 89� F/320 C
.ow:730F/230C





.''. ,4


- S


-44


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace


WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 7-14 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 850 F
Saturday: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 850 F
FREEPORT Today: E at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 850 F
Saturday: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 850 F
ABACO Today: SE at 4-8 Knots 2-4 Feet 5 Miles 84� F
Saturday: ENE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 84� F


a WEST PALM BEACH
High:90� F/320 C
Low: 78� F/26 C


IWO-


I WRDCTE I


Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston


I ramVINI'losw


U.S. CITIES Ill sll lll1 ll 1 sll sll 11


Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Paris
Prague
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg


High
F/C
93/33
66/18
77/25
85/29
64/17
92/33
86/30
73/22
82/27
79/26
73/22
72/22
86/30
66/18
72/22
75/23
61/16
96/35
91/32
75/23
90/32
82/27
76/24
63/17
63/17
75/23
72/22
66/18
90/32
55/12
93/33
104/40
75/23
79/26
68/20
84/28
73/22
70/21
72/22
87/30
73/22
90/32
61/16
54/12
74/23
88/31
99/37
63/17
75/23
70/21
88/31
103/39
77/25
87/30
77/25
86/30
70/21
88/31
88/31
84/28
61/16
73/22
91/32
77/25
66/18
100/37
73/22
73/22
66/18
80/26


Today
Low W
F/C
79/26 pc
52/11 pc
50/10 s
70/21 s
58/14 s
79/26 pc
78/25 sh
61/16 pc
63/17 pc
72/22 s
61/16 sh
50/10 s
80/26 pc
47/8 t
54/12 pc
54/12 sh
46/7 r
76/24 s
84/28 sh
46/7 s
75/23 t
73/22 t
59/15 s
49/9 pc
48/8 pc
55/12 c
56/13 pc
48/8 pc
73/22 t
46/7 pc
82/27 s
74/23 s
66/18 s
62/16 t
46/7 pc
75/23 t
59/15 pc
55/12 pc
52/11 pc
77/25 t
55/12 t
72/22 t
43/6 sh
37/2 sh
49/9 sh
57/13 pc
81/27 s
46/7 c
57/13 pc
44/6 pc
77/25 pc
75/23 s
59/15 s
78/25 sh
44/6 s
70/21 t
45/7 pc
73/22 t
67/19 pc
63/17 pc
47/8 pc
57/13 pc
80/26 pc
66/18 sh
45/7 pc
70/21 s
57/13 pc
58/14 sh
44/6 s
59/15 s


Saturday
High Low W
F/C F/C
92/33 78/25 pc
70/21 54/12 s
72/22 46/7 r
82/27 68/20 s
65/18 55/12 r
91/32 78/25 s
87/30 77/25 pc
73/22 61/16 s
64/17 52/11 r
78/25 71/21 pc
77/25 55/12 sh
74/23 54/12 s
84/28 76/24 t
67/19 46/7 c
75/23 55/12 s
77/25 52/11 pc
63/17 39/3 pc
93/33 71/21 s
91/32 83/28 t
74/23 39/3 c
90/32 74/23 t
83/28 72/22 t
76/24 59/15 pc
63/17 53/11 s
64/17 48/8 pc
77/25 52/11 pc
70/21 54/12 s
61/16 43/6 pc
88/31 72/22 pc
63/17 48/8 pc
93/33 81/27 s
109/42 73/22 s
71/21 64/17 pc
83/28 63/17 pc
72/22 49/9 s
88/31 79/26 r
71/21 58/14 pc
68/20 54/12 r
70/21 50/10 pc
86/30 77/25 r
73/22 55/12 t
90/32 72/22 t
63/17 43/6 s
52/11 43/6 pc
76/24 55/12 s
88/31 56/13 pc
99/37 81/27 s
61/16 45/7 pc
73/22 55/12 pc
70/21 49/9 s
94/34 74/23 s
103/39 75/23 s
81/27 63/17 t
88/31 78/25 s
76/24 47/8 pc
87/30 73/22 t
75/23 48/8 pc
85/29 73/22 r
85/29 58/14 t
77/25 52/11 s
64/17 47/8 pc
80/26 51/10 s
85/29 76/24 pc
76/24 63/17 c
64/17 44/6 s
79/26 64/17 t
66/18 51/10 r
70/21 57/13 pc
61/16 45/7 s
80/26 59/15 s


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