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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: September 17, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01426

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TRY OUR //
DOUBLE J J
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LOW 79F

CLOUDS, SUN,
S, T-STORM


The


Tribune


BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17. 2009


PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)


I IN ij IBU E


Andrew Tynes


pleads not guilty


FORMER Olympian and
celebrated Bahamian ath-
lete Andrew Tynes has been
charged with indecently
assaulting a 16-year-old boy.
Tynes appeared at Magis-
trates Court yesterday and
pled not guilty to the charge
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez.
It is alleged that Tynes
assaulted the boy between
August 1 and August 27,
2009, during his capacity as
a physical education teacher
at the C C Sweeting Senior
High School.
Tynes, of West Bay


Street, appeared visibly
upset as he was led out of
the courtroom. He was
granted $6,000 bail with one
surety.
He was also ordered to
stay away from the com-
plainant and witnesses in
the case.
The 37-year-old track star
is a former national 200
metres record holder and
has represented the coun-
try at the Carifta games,
CAC Championships, Pan
Am Games, World Cham-
SEE page eight


Chinese planning large
scale farming in Abaco
A CHINESE concern is planning to carry out large scale farm-
ing in Abaco.
Edison Key, executive chairman of the Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation (BAIC), hailed the move as a "tremen-
dous boost" for the agricultural sector.
Mr Key took Yiqing Sun, director of the Shandong High-speed
Quila Construction Group, National Stadium Project, and inter-
preter Baoquo Xing on an exploratory tour of what is being
offered in Abaco.
The team also included BAIC general manager Benjamin Rah-
ming, and assistant general manager (agriculture) Arnold Dorsett.
"We enjoyed our visit and we are very satisfied with the land con-
ditions for agricultural development," said Mr Xing. "You have
SEE page 10


Prsi 0et a i ncue B a sm


PRESIDENT Barack
Obama has included the
Bahamas and three other
Caribbean countries in a
major narcotics list present-
ed to the United States
Congress.
Jamaica, Haiti and the
Dominican Republic were
also named on the 2009 list,
along with 16 other coun-
tries around the world
determined to be major pro-
ducers of illicit drugs or key
transit points for the sub-
stances.


Fox Hill gang

I 'wars'prompt

town meeting


WITH the people of
Fox Hill caught in the
middle of warring gang
factions, a town meet-
ing was held last night
at St Paul's Baptist
Church by MP Fred
Mitchell to address this
sharp rise in shootings
in the community.
With people having
been shot, stabbed, and
homes fired upon in
recent weeks, the police
along with other com-
munity leaders were
called upon to address
the audience.
According to police
Inspector Marlon Ful-
ford the majority of
these incidents are tak-
ing place in and around
Johnson, Adderley, and
Reeve's streets with the
majority of the reports
he said being blamed
on an ongoing feud
SEE page eight


Rigby: Christie
should demand
Wilchcombe steps
down as chair of
PLP convention
FORMER PLP Chair-
man Raynard Rigby has
called on Opposition
leader Perry Christie to
demand that Obie Wil-
chombe step down as chair
of the party's upcoming
convention.
Mr Rigby challenged Mr
Christie to live up to recent
statements he made about
the "consequences" peo-
ple would face if they oper-
ated beyond the rules of
the organisation.
He added that as long as
Mr Christie allowed Mr
Wilchcombe to retain his
position, while running for
the deputy leadership post,
the party would remain
divided.
"I must assume that the
rules which he refers,
whether written or by cus-
tom, address the issue of
transparency, accountabil-
ity and fairness in the elec-
toral process," Mr Rigby
said in a statement yester-
day, referencing comments
Mr Christie made earlier
this week on a radio talk
show.
"He (Mr Christie) must
also assume, rightly, that
those members of the Par-
ty that do not support the
candidacy of Obie Wilch-
combe for deputy leader
SEE page eight


The Bahamas is recog-
nised as being a major drug-
transit country because of
its location between drug-
producing nations in South
America and the United
States, and was also includ-
ed in the major narcotics
report last year.
A spokesman for the US
Embassy in Nassau said the
Bahamas government has
also been commended in the
report for its efforts to crack
SEE page eight


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Should the prime minister of the Bahamas be a married man? [F A 1


LESLIE FRENCH (1)
"In the Bahamas today,
many problems start from the
home with the family structure.
If you want to lead a country,
you should lead by example.
The prime minister, in my
opinion should be married
because he needs to send the
right message."
COLMAN DARVILLE,
BROKER (2)
"Yes, I believe that the
prime minister should be mar-
ried. How can he lead our
country without any family
experience?"
KIKI, 52 (3)
"I think anyone running for
TR :OPICA:Ln
EXTERMINATORSl~


the top office of prime minister
should be married, it makes
them look more responsible
and they'd be sensitive to fam-
ily issues. A perfect example
would be to look at all the
scandals surrounding our
unmarried politicians. We need
someone who has a family and
can respond to the needs and
understand what's going on in
the family."
CARSON HEPBURN, 51,
SOLOMON'S MINES (4)
"As a married man the
prime minister would com-
mand more respect from soci-
ety. You have people depend-
ing on you and a greater sense
of responsibility. It makes you
more striving and stronger,
especially if you have children.
This will give you a deeper love
of people and society. An
unmarried man might be think-
ing 'Who cares? Its just me'."
WILLIAMS, 60, TAYLOR
INDUSTRIES (5)
"I agree because the prime


minister should present the
image of a stern, firm family
man."
SHAWN BUCHANAN, 25
(6)
"I wouldn't say it's necessary
but it looks better for the com-
munity that he's a married man
and has a family."
ISAAC LEON ROKER, 56
(7)
"It would show me that he
has a sense of responsibility,
that he has a family. I think
that should be one of the
requirements."


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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


50


FF











Government responds to



complaints over new school


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net


GOVERNMENT is working on
addressing a litany of complaints from
parents, teachers and staff about the less
than stellar state of the newly-construct-
ed Anatol Rodgers High School.
The school's parking lot is dotted with
large muddy puddles and pot holes, and
contractors are busy installing drainage
wells - creating an eyesore for both stu-
dents and teachers.
Minister of Education Carl Bethel said
he understands why people are frustrat-
ed over the school's external appearance
but added that government has faced
with circumstances beyond its control.
Mr Bethel said the construction work
was complicated by a discrepancy
between the estimated contract price and
the actual cost of building the school to
fit certain necessary design changes,
which led to cost overruns.
He explained that the additional funds
needed to carry out the repairs had to be
approved by Cabinet before they could
be released.
"At the end of the day it's all been
reviewed by Cabinet which has approved
the extra funding... That was one of the
reasons that caused some delay," said
Mr Bethel.
He also explained that the site of the
school - which had already been chosen
when he assumed office in 2007 - is a
low lying plot in southwestern New Prov-
idence prone to flooding.
"Now that the final parameters have
been set, there are some difficulties
because the land, which we met chosen,
is low lying," he told The Tribune yes-
terday.
Contractors have been drilling on the
site to install new drainage wells. Their
work, coupled with recent rainy weather,
has created the muddy puddles lining
the school's parking lot.
He added that contractors have drilled
eight of the 12 wells needed at the school.
He said this process has been hampered
because contractors can only drill on the
weekends, when students are not in
school.
The other four wells will be drilled
over the next several weeks and out-
standing jobs - including pipe and park-
ing lot light installation, and construc-


tion of the school's sports facility - are
expected to be completed by January,
2010.
Mr Bethel explained that the school
opened on time this fall semester, in spite
of outstanding aesthetic challenges, to
accommodate the influx of nearly 3,000
new students into the public school sys-
tem.
He also said students of the school -


which first opened its doors in Septem-
ber, 2008 - have performed at above-
average levels.
The cost to build the school was orig-
inally pegged at $8.5 million but design
changes and additional work has pushed
the price-tag to an estimated $14 mil-
lion, Mr Bethel told the media at a press
conference at the school's campus yes-
terday.


IN ADDITION to being showcased to
millions of people around the world in the
booklet of Mariah Carey's upcoming
album, the Bahamas is also being promot-
ed in the popular fashion magazine Elle.
In the October 2009 edition, the maga-
zine reproduced some of the pages of the
CD's booklet in the form of a special insert
for its readers.
An entire page in the publication is ded-
icated to promoting a competition to win a
trip to Eleuthera, where the superstar
singer celebrated her wedding to televi-
sion presenter Nick Cannon in May last
year.
In the ad, Eleuthera is named Mariah
Carey's favourite island in the Bahamas. It
is described as an unspoiled vacation par-
adise with breath-taking beaches and crys-
tal clear turquoise waters.
Elle readers are asked to go to
www.Bahamas.com/Mariah to enter a com-


Jamaican men

get 30 months

for drug charges
TWO Jamaican men were
sentenced to 30 months in
prison after pleading guilty to
charges stemming from the
seizure of nearly half a mil-
lion dollars worth of marijua-
na.
Curtis Marsden, 33, and
Delroy Brown, 44, both of
Jamaica, pleaded guilty on
Monday to charges of con-
spiracy to posses, conspiracy
to import, possession with the
intent to supply and importa-
tion of 488 pounds of mari-
juana.
The drugs were contained
in sacks, packages and buck-
ets found in bushes not far
from the sea in Scrub Hill,
Long Island, on May 5, 2008.
Following investigations,
Marsden and Brown were
arrested in Simms, Long
Island.
The two men had initially
pleaded not guilty to the
charges and stood trial. On
Tuesday, before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel delivered her
ruling in the matter, both men
pleaded guilty to the charges.
Marsden and Brown were
sentenced to 30 month impris-
onment each.


petition to win a five-day trip for two to the
Cove hotel in Eleuthera.
The booklet for the album, titled "Mem-
oirs of an Imperfect Angel", is a co-pro-
duction with Elle Magazine that will fea-
ture advertisements for the Bahamas, Eliz-
abeth Arden and Le M6tier De Beaut6
cosmetics, Angel pink champagne and Car-
men Steffens shoes from Brazil.
At a cost of $35,000, this new way of
promoting the Bahamas has been hailed as
a "great idea" by former Minister of
Tourism Obie Wilchcombe. The West End
and Bimini MP said he believes the return
on the investment could be significant.
Mariah Carey's last album sold over
430,000 copies in the first week, and Elle
Magazine said its American edition reach-
es 5.1 million readers.
The magazine's October edition is on
newsstands now, while the album will be
released on September 29.


THE TRIBUNE


Bayparl Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145
Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6527, Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
email:info@colesofnassau.com



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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009, PAGE 3


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P
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PAGE^^R 4, THRD SEPTEMBERORs 17,200 TH TRBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


Have a nice day


Applied Materials is one of the most
important U.S. companies you've probably
never heard of. It makes the machines that
make the microchips that go inside your
computer. The chip business, though, is
volatile, so in 2004 Mike Splinter, Applied
Materials' CEO, decided to add a new busi-
ness line to take advantage of the company's
nanotechnology capabilities - making the
machines that make solar panels. The other
day, Splinter gave me a tour of the compa-
ny's Silicon Valley facility, culminating with
a visit to its "war room," where Applied
maintains a real-time global interaction with
all 14 solar panel factories it's built around
the world in the last two years. I could only
laugh because crying would have been too
embarrassing.
Not a single one is in America.
Let's see: Five are in Germany, four are in
China, one is in Spain, one is in India, one is
in Italy, one is in Taiwan and one is even in
Abu Dhabi. I suggested a new company
motto for Applied Materials' solar business:
"Invented here, sold there."
The reason that all these other countries
are building solar-panel industries today is
because most of their governments have put
in place the three perquisites for growing a
renewable energy industry: 1) any business
or homeowner can generate solar energy;
2) if they decide to do so, the power utility
has to connect them to the grid; and 3) the
utility has to buy the power for a predictable
period at a price that is a no-brainer good
deal for the family or business putting the
solar panels on their rooftop.
Regulatory, price and connectivity cer-
tainty, that is what Germany put in place,
and that explains why Germany now gener-
ates almost half the solar power in the world
today and, as a byproduct, is making itself
the world-center for solar research, engi-
neering, manufacturing and installation.
With more than 50,000 new jobs, the renew-
able energy industry in Germany is now sec-
ond only to its auto industry. One thing that
has never existed in America - with our
fragmented, stop-start solar subsidies - is
certainty of price, connectivity and regulation
on a national basis.
That is why, although consumer demand
for solar power has incrementally increased
here, it has not been enough for anyone to
have Applied Materials - the world's
biggest solar equipment manufacturer -
build them a new factory in America yet.
So, right now, our federal and state subsidies
for installing solar systems are largely paying
for the cost of importing solar panels made
in China, by Chinese workers, using hi-tech
manufacturing equipment invented in Amer-
ica.
Have a nice day.
"About 95 percent of our solar business is


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outside the U.S.," said Splinter. "Our biggest
U.S. customer is a German-owned company
in Oregon. We sell them pieces of equip-
ment."
If you read some of the anti-green com-
mentary today, you'll often see sneering ref-
erences to "green jobs." The phrase is usu-
ally in quotation marks as if it is some kind of
liberal fantasy or closet welfare program
(and as if coal, oil and nuclear don't get all
kinds of subsidies). Nonsense. In 2008, more
silicon was consumed globally making solar
panels than microchips, said Splinter.
"We are seeing the industrialization of
the solar business," he added. "In the last 12
months, it has brought us $1.3 billion in rev-
enues. It is hard to build a billion-dollar
business."
Applied sells its solar-panel factories for
$200 million each. Solar panels can be made
from many different semiconductors, includ-
ing thin film coated onto glass with nan-
otechnology and from crystalline silicon. At
Applied, making these complex machines
requires America's best, high-paid talent -
people who can work at the intersection of
chemistry, physics and nanotechnology.
If we want to launch a solar industry here,
big-time, we need to offer the kind of long-
term certainty that Germany does or impose
the national requirement on our utilities to
generate solar power as China does or have
the government build giant solar farms, the
way it built the Hoover Dam, and sell the
electricity.
OK, so you don't believe global warming
is real. I do, but let's assume it's not. Here is
what is indisputable: The world is on track to
add another 2.5 billion people by 2050, and
many will be aspiring to live American-like,
high-energy lifestyles. In such a world,
renewable energy - where the variable cost
of your fuel, sun or wind, is zero - will be in
huge demand.
China now understands that. It no longer
believes it can pollute its way to prosperity
because it would choke to death. That is the
most important shift in the world in the last
18 months.
China has decided that clean-tech is going
to be the next great global industry and is
now creating a massive domestic market for
solar and wind, which will give it a great
export platform.
In October, Applied will be opening the
world's largest solar research center - in
Xian, China.
Gotta go where the customers are. So, if
you like importing oil from Saudi Arabia,
you're going to love importing solar panels
from China.

(This article appears courtesy of THOMAS
L. FRIEDMAN
c.2009 New York Times News Service)


EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow us some space in
your most valuable column to
share on a meaningful, enlight-
ening and true story that took
place in Fox Hill just a few days
ago.
We really don't know who
Karen White was singing to
when she denied being some-
one's super woman, but we
here in the Fox Hill community
can truly say that Senator Dr
Jacinta Higgs is our "Super
Woman".
It all started before now, the
president of the New Breed
Sporting Club went out in
search of sponsors for the Fox
Hill summer youth programme.
The response came quickly
from the Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell that there was no mon-
ey to support any programme
of this sort in Fox Hill.
At this time we did not
receive any word from Senator
Higgs only that she was deal-
ing with some historical pro-
ject.
The children were made to
believe that this government
don't care about them in Fox
Hill and that if they wanted to
be a part of the government
summer programmes they
needed to find their way down
to the sports centre or some
other facility, despite the other
programmes being sponsored
by government as satellite pro-
grammes all over the Bahamas
on a annual basis.
Not being one to give up on
our children and being denied a
sty pin by the ministry of sports
this year, using his club as a
satellite programme for the
people of Fox Hill to have a
sporting venue, Coach Davis
then targeted the private busi-
ness's in the community. Feel-
ing disappointed in both lead-
ing political party representa-
tives and with a few minor sup-
port and his own finances, his
annual six week programme
started on schedule.
Just when it looked like the
club would have to close early,
the children from the New
Breed Sports Club received a
surprise visit from Mrs Claus
in the person of Senator Jacin-
ta Higgs who paid for the entire
summer programme, including
summer books, club team shirts


and $700 cash to assist with oth-
er bills that were already accu-
mulated at this time. The chil-
dren were able to have the best
programme in its 12 years of
existence and have yet to
receive any sort of sponsorship
from the MP Minister Fred
Mitchell in cash or otherwise
showing interest in our young
boys in Fox Hill, not even with
an ice cooler for the children
to have cold water.
We have no one to blame but
ourselves.
We voted these strangers in
thinking they would understand
our plight and do well for our
children's future and turned our
back on our own, may God
help us.
Our Summer programme
came to a successful end and
just when we were about to
part, we got a call from Senator
Higgs who included us to par-
ticipate in the cleaning up of
three of the historical sites (the
ocean/blue holes, Judge Sandi-
lands and Pa Bey home sites) of
the Fox Hill Heritage Tour that
was to be launched on Fox Hill
day in a joint effort with Mrs
Portia Sands of the Fox Hill
Urban Renewal Centre and the
Ministry of Tourism. We gladly
accepted the contract, wow a
chance to be a part of Fox Hill's
history while making some
money for school supplies. Sen-
ator Higgs you are the best.
To be brief, just before
school opened Senator Higgs
assisted one of Nassau's top
three basketball guards, a
young Fox Hill boy, live out his
childhood dream in sending
him off to school in the United
States.
This boy is the first person
in his family to go off to any
school in the United States and
in the words of Senator Higgs
she can identify with his excite-
ment seeing that she too was
the first person in her family to
go off to college.
She reminded him that he
will not only be an ambassador
for Fox Hill, but for the
Bahamas and that no matter
what he was to always hold his


head up high with pride.
Sentiments that can only
come from a Senator, Member
of Parliament or Prime Minister
that has walked this path before
identifying with the pain, joy
and accomplishments of a peo-
ple they truly live amongst and
desire to be a servant too.
We don't know if our MP
Minister Mitchell has to give
an account to the Prime Minis-
ter, but the New Breed Sports
Club placed bleachers on Fox
Hill Park and the bleachers
need a proper roof over it for
shelter from the elements when
hosting outdoor events.
Like other communities, Fox
Hill children deserve some love
from the government as well.
While Senator Higgs can be
seen assisting us Fox Hill con-
stituents even with little back
to school supplies with seem-
ingly little or no help from any
government, our MP is said to
be collecting but neglecting
what is really needed in Fox
Hill.
We have scrapped to make
one of our dreams, the Fox Hill
community Heritage Tour, a
success and hope that both gov-
ernments and Mr Mitchell will
get on board and the Ministry
of Tourism would keep its word
in rendering the necessary sup-
port and assistance as promised.
In closing, on behalf of the
New Breed Sports, all Fox
Hillian's and proud Bahamians
everywhere we say, thank you
Senator Jacinta Higgs, for all
the love you have given and we
also thank your family, for gen-
erously loaning you to us for
such a time as this, especially
your husband, Mr Higgs.
We hope that the Govern-
ment would see that they have
a gem in you and realise that
we in Fox Hill are daily learn-
ing to appreciate our own and
hope we can some day see they
do as well.
Continue on your steady
course, because He who has
begun a good work in you is
faithful to complete it.
Jacinta, all promotions come
from Jehovah God, have a bless
week.

MINISTER S DAVIS
Nassau,
September, 2009.


It's wonderful to read The Tribune online


EDITOR, The Tribune.

Hi,
Just like to say how happy


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online. The pictures are
wonderful and the articles
are great.
I live in Florida and really
appreciate being able to
read The Tribune online.
When I lived home I pur-
chased the Tribune daily.
It is great that readers are
given the opportunity to
comment on articles. Way


to go! Thanks.

LONEICE
Florida, USA
September, 2009.

Trust in the Lord with all
your heart and lean not on
your own understanding. In
all your ways acknowledge
him and he shall direct your
path (Proverbs: 3:5-6).


Jacinta Higgs




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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009


THE TRIBUNE










Mitchell still prepared to run for PLP leader


By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
OPTING not to outright
declare that he is throwing his
hat in the ring for the party's top
post at this time, Fox Hill MP
Fred Mitchell maintains he is still
prepared to run for the leader-
ship of the Progressive Liberal
Party (PLP) at the upcoming con-
vention in October.
Noting that there is still "a lot
of time" between now and nom-
ination day, Mr Mitchell told The
Tribune yesterday in an exclu-
sive interview that he wants the
delegates and the public to know
that his running is still very much
a "live issue."
"Obviously you can't choose
yourself. You need to know what
kind of support there is for it,
and what direction the party will
take. The leader has made some
statements, so I am examining
those statements to see what the
forward movement of the party
will be," Mr Mitchell said.
To date, only one candidate,
Paul Moss, has officially launched
his campaign to challenge cur-
rent leader Perry Christie.
While acknowledging that he
fully appreciates the enthusiasm
that Mr Moss brings to the con-
test, Mr Mitchell said that this


bid is not a realistic
one and cannot be
seen as anything
more than a
"protest."
"My view is that
someone who is not
in the parliamentary
group can't realisti-
cally be leader of the
PLP, because he
can't under the Con-
stitution be leader of
the Opposition. So
what you would see there can
only be a protest of candidacy.
And while I appreciate the enthu-
siasm which he brings to it, I
don't think there is a realistic pos-
sibility of anything more than a
protest. So it has to be someone
in the parliamentary group in my
view," he said.
Mr Mitchell said there are any
number of persons within the
party's parliamentary group who
could be leader. However, with a
party which does not welcome
the idea of change, Mr Mitchell
said he hopes that if there is a
leadership battle it will be over
the different ideas and visions for
the Bahamas' future.
"The other important point is
that given the way the world has
evolved, the country is looking
at the PLP to see how it conducts
these elections, because how we


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - The basket-
ball facility at the YMCA has
been fully restored and will
soon be used as the venue for
major basketball tournaments
on Grand Bahama.
The Grand Bahama Port
Authority partnered with Bas- _.---
ketball Travellers of the United
States in restoring the basketball
gymnasium, which was severely
damaged by the hurricanes in
2004.
Ian Rolle, GBPA president,
NeilHoldenofBasketballTrav- GINGER MOXEY, p
ellers and Karen Pinder-John- Group Limited, holds
son, executive director of the
YMCA, brought brief remarks at a press conference
yesterday.
Mr Rolle said he hopes that the facility will once
again be the venue of choice for basketball tourna-
ments as well as other community events here on the
island.
"We all are aware that the storms of 2004 com-
pletely destroyed the basketball facility at the Y, and
during the month of April we partnered with Bas-
ketball Travellers to bring life back into this facility,"


co


conduct these elections
will determine what
our image is for the
future in people's eyes.
"We have to con-
nect with indepen-
dents. We lost inde-
pendents by 12 per-
centage points in the
last campaign and that
is the target group in
addition to our target
base that we have to
win over when the next
election takes place. So there is
going to be a very skillful set of
ideas and programmes have to
be put together to be able to
attract the independents and to
keep the base. And it has to be a
very skillful campaign and it has
to be well-funded and focused,"
he said.
There is essentially only little
over a month for a leadership
candidate to launch their cam-
paign and to speak with delegates
around the country. But Mr
Mitchell questioned whether or
not it is even necessary to "cam-
paign", as all of the prospective
candidates are already "known
quantities" within the party.
"The point is everyone knows
everyone and it is just the com-
peting visions that have to be put
(forward) and there is a long pub-
lic record of what has been said


he said.
"As you look around today you
can see the benefits of this partner-
ship. We thank Mr Holden and Sean
McShane of Basketball Travellers
because without their efforts and
commitment this would have not
been possible."
The gymnasium has received new
basketball flooring, rims, scoreboards
and bleachers. This year, Basketball
Travellers will bring 12 American
teams to Grand Bahama to compete
in a major basketball tournament.
The company has been bringing
teams to the Bahamas for many
years. This is its seventh year in
Grand Bahama.
sident of Port Mr Holding said Basketball Trav-
urt in the YMCA ellers was founded 24 years ago and
has been organising tours to the
Bahamas for the past 10 years. They have brought
20 to 30 teams to New Providence.
The organisation started doing tours to Grand
Bahama after a visit to the island seven years ago.
Since then, the company has been partnering with
the Ministry of Tourism to promote the Junkanoo
Jam tournaments abroad.
"We came here and loved what we saw and we
have been having the tournaments here," said Mr
Holding.


over the last year, and I think
that message can go forth. It is
just that the internal democracy
has to be organised in a way
where everybody believes it is
fair - and that applies to every
office," he said.
When asked if there is a possi-


ability of the party losing funding
or support if Mr Christie is
returned as party leader during
the convention, Mr Mitchell said
that it is his view that whoever
the leads the PLP, the party will
be "well organised and well fund-
ed."


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009, PAGE 5


lllr � I ALL S LES AR FINAL







PAGELOCAL 6,WS THURSDAYISEPTEMBER17,2009THE B


Two tourist swimmers drown at Florida Beach


PENSACOLA, Fla.
PERDIDO Key firefighters say
two Louisiana tourists drowned at
Perdido Key beach and 11 swim-
mers were rescued off Pensacola
Beach, according to Associated
Press.
Authorities say they received a
call Tuesday afternoon of swim-
mers tangled in the beach's strong


riptides. Firefighters found a 46-
year-old man on the shore, but
CPR couldn't revive the man.
Meanwhile, Escambia Fire-Res-
cue Lt. Daniel Akerman says a 62-
year-old man was found dead and
floating in the Gulf.
Lifeguards rescued 11 other
swimmers from the rough surf.
Reports say the swimmers were
not injured.


Organisation seeks support in



bid to rehabilitate ex-convicts


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cially launched under the patronage
of National Security Minister Tommy
Turnquest.
The institute aims to serve as a
half-way home with programmes for
post prison/correctional facility
inmates.
Founder Troy Clarke, who has an
Associate's degree in Law and a
Bachelor's degree in Criminal Jus-
tice, said the institute works on the
premise that everyone deserves a second chance
to correct past mistakes and must be assisted
when the will to reform is present.
"One of the most vexing problems in Bahami-
an society is our inability to effectively re-inte-
grate and re-socialise those who have paid their
debt to society through the penal system. This sad
reality leads to the additional suffering of men
and women who in many cases have sufficiently


suffered in the confines of an over-
crowded, and under-resourced cor-
rectional facility," Mr Clarke said.
"It is also no secret that ex-convicts
are ostracised because of the stigma
attached to having been imprisoned.
As a result of these problems, many
are disillusioned, angry and embit-
tered. The end product then is that
many become repeat offenders, mis-
takenly believing that it may be better
in prison than in a society that has no
place for them. As proof of this, Her
Majesty's Prison here in Nassau boasts
of having one of the highest rates of
repeat offenders in the Caribbean."
The National LEAD Institute, Mr
Clarke said, is requesting prayers,
financial donations, technical support and any
assistance that members of the public can pro-
vide.
"It is our belief that all men fall sooner or lat-
er, but the good ones and the great ones will
always get back up," he said.
Well-known church leader and best-selling
author Dr Myles Munroe has also declared his
support for the institute.


EVERYONE involved managed
to avoid injury after this three
car pile-up which took place
yesterday. The accident hap-
pened at around 4.15pm on
Eastern Road.


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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009, PAGE 7


CALa


Claims of viol



by Immigrati



officers spa]



online deba


CLAIMS of violence and
intimidation on the part of
Immigration officers during a
detention exercise in Abaco
sparked a heated debate on
tribune242.com, with several
foreigners expressing outrage
and vowing to never return to
the Bahamas.
The visitors' angry com-
ments were posted in response
to a story in Tuesday's Tribune
in which it was claimed that
officers carried cutlasses,
threatened children with guns
and used violence as they
detained at least 165 Haitians
of all ages and separated them
from their families at around
4am on July 30.
Sources told how children
were left behind as their par-
ents were sent to Haiti, and
Bahamians born of Haitian
parents were forced to bid
farewell to relatives and
friends, some of whom had
lived in the Bahamas for
decades.
"Graham Russell" wrote: "I
will not take my holiday in the
Bahamas ever again! The way
you treat people is disgusting
and you will never see any of
my tourist money again. I'm
boycotting the Bahamas and
encouraging my friends and
family to do the same based
on your treatment of Haitians.
You people are terrible."
A Bahamian calling herself
"Rosemerie" responded, com-
menting that the Immigration
Department has to do "some-
thing about the Haitians".
She wrote: "These Haitians
have invaded our country and
are taking over. Their vast
numbers will easily outnum-
ber Bahamians in just a few
years. Bahamians better stand
up now for our country or we
severely regret it later on.
"I am tired of seeing
Haitians everywhere you turn
and hearing that Creole all
over the place. This is the
Bahamas, for Bahamians, not
Haiti!!!
"They need to be sent a
clear message: Stay away,
don't come here! Good job
Immigration! And there is no
such thing as Bahamians born
of Haitian parents. You are
what your parents are, no mat-
ter where you born; check the
laws. Bahamians should have
Bahamian blood, not Haitian
running through there veins.
Haitians do not love our coun-
try and are only using it for
there financial gain."
Her comments sparked a
long response from a com-
mentator who described him-
self as "Esai Ambo, Superior
Court Ambassador".
Under the title, "Modern
Civilization. We are all human
beings," he wrote: "Rose-
merie, whatever planet you
are from, you need help. I vis-
ited the Bahamas at least four
times a year; the last time I
was there would be the last
time you'll see my tourist dol-
lar.
"I understand that the laws
of your country need to be
respected, but human rights
and human dignity are at risk
here. The United Nations and
Geneva Convention on
Human Rights need to inves-
tigate the inhuman and cruel
treatment against Haitians in
the Bahamas. The Bahamian
government should be investi-
gated for crimes against
humanity and gross violations
against human rights."
He said that all democratic
nations must respect the UN
Universal Declaration of
Human Rights, and quoted
several Articles including:
Article 3 - Everyone has the
right to life, liberty and secu-
rity of person.
Article 5 - No one shall be
subjected to torture or to cru-
el, inhuman or degrading
treatment or punishment.
Article 9 - No one shall be
subjected to arbitrary arrest,
detention or exile.
Article 14 - Everyone has
the right to seek and to enjoy
in other countries asylum from
persecution.
Article 15 - Everyone has
the right to a nationality. No
one shall be arbitrarily
deprived of his nationality nor
denied the right to change his
nationality.
He also noted that the
Bahamas Constitution states
that a person born in this
country after July 9, 1973 of
foreign parents is entitled to
apply for citizenship after his
or her 18th birthday.
Another commentator


wrote: "The Bahamas is the
most cultureless country in the
West Indies / Caribbean.
Haitians / Jamaicans are an
asset to the Bahamas. When-
ever I come to the Bahamas
for business, the Bahamians
are crass, rude, and you get
this sense that they feel they
are owed something . . . for
what? Haitians and Jamaicans
are pleasant, approachable,
WORKING, ethical and have
a rich history.
"Rosemarie, without
Haitians and Jamaicans the
Bahamas would be an over-
priced bush. God forbid that
a Bahamian would have to do
yard work. I mean ... with the
average student getting Ds
they should all be entitled to
jobs in high finance and man-
agement, right?"
In a tribune242.com poll yes-
terday, readers were asked if
Bahamian authorities should
treat people better during raids
and detention exercises.
More than 100 people
responded, 65 agreeing that,
"Yes, all people deserve
respect", while 36 said "No,
they shouldn't be here in the
first place".
Conchy Joe said: "No Doubt
about it, everybody should be
shown respect. The question
is, how much respect was
shown to the officers by these
Haitians as they were being
rounded up? I speak from
experience, Haitians show
great disrespect to Bahamians
in Abaco. If indeed the offi-
cers were inhumane, were they
reacting to the actions of the
people they were trying to cap-
ture? You can't just accept as
fact what Haitians say hap-
pened. They may be trying to
gain sympathy by claiming
abuse.
"My question to Bahamians
is, do you realise what is going
on in our country? There has
been an invasion underway for
decades. The first wave of
Haitians were mild mannered,
hard working people, for the
most part. Those that were
able to stay here have had chil-
dren. Haitians believe in edu-
cation, they make sure their
children get as good an educa-
tion as is possible. By compar-
ison most Bahamian "parents"
don't demand the best from
their children's schoolwork
because they themselves place
little worth it a good educa-
tion. So we have a situation
where immigrants are quickly
surpassing Bahamians in edu-
cation / employability. The day
is soon coming, if not already
here, when Haitian-Bahami-
ans will be rising to the top
while Bahamians will be forced
to do the very jobs (manual
labour) their forefathers were
allowed to stay here to do."
Tanya warned that Bahami-
ans "better wake up before we
turn in Haiti".
"It does not matter to me
what any foreigner says about
we treating Haitians inhu-
manely, this is my Bahamas! I
live here and I see my coun-
try being invaded and taken
over by Haitians. I don't even
recognize this country any-
more. America doesn't want
Haitians over there, so why
should we put up with them
here? Haitians hate Bahami-
ans and want to take over this
country, they will say anything
to make us look bad. Bahami-
ans you better ignore these lib-
eral, bleeding hearts and stand
up for your country, before we
become Little Haiti! How
would you like a Haitian prime
minister? You better watch
out, its coming! It ain't long
now! Think about that, and
how are they going to treat
Bahamians then."
Robert P, responded, say-
ing: "I imagine they would
treat us just as bad as we treat
them - and we would deserve
it. This is not about whether
we should let all illegals stay
or whether we should get rid of
them, but HOW we go about
getting rid of them . . . If we
treat them inhumanely we are
no better than animals and as
such, have no right to claim a
country for ourselves. Humans
populate countries, not cruel
beasts."
Leo also responded to
Tanya, asking: "What is 'Your
Bahamas'? This desperate
search for national identity
when your land is made up of
former loyalists, former slaves,
and immigrants from countries
as diverse as Haiti, Jamaica,
Canada, the UK, and sundry
other countries. There are no


ence /Te i



ion s



rk l,



te a

Arawaks left
anymore, last time " --
I checked, so let's be clear -
nobody has a claim to "own"
this land TO THE EXCLU- THE COMMENTS appeared on
SION OF ALL OTHERS. The Tribune website - which can
Tanya, for "Haitian" why don't be found at tribune242.com
you try a history lesson and
insert 'former slave'?"


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PAGELOCAL 8,WS THURSDAYISEPTEMBER17,2009THET B


Fox Hill gang 'wars' prompt town meeting


FROM page one
between two "warring" fac-
tions.
Among the concerns are
reports that individuals are
randomly firing gunshots in
the air, frightening the law-
abiding people people who
live in the area.
Since these initial reports,
the police are now searching
for a man who many be the
catalyst for much of the


shootings in and around the
area. He is described as being
slim built, clean cut, around
6ft tall, and in his late 20s to
early 30s.
This suspect, whose name
is not being released, is
reportedly well known to the
police and was recently
released from Her Majesty's
Prison.
The public is advised to
not approach the suspect as
he is said to be armed and
dangerous.


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FROM page one
down on drug-trafficking by
working with the US govern-
ment and Haitian authorities.
Under the Foreign Rela-
tions Authorisation Act, the
President is required to noti-
fy Congress of countries he
determines to be major illic-
it drug-producing countries
or major drug-transit coun-
tries on an annual basis.
Bolivia, Brazil, Burma,
Colombia, Ecuador,
Guatemala, India, Laos,
Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan,
Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and
Venezuela are also listed.
Of the 20 nations, Presi-
dent Obama said Bolivia,
Burma and Venezuala,
"failed demonstrably" over
the last 12 months, to adhere
to international counter-nar-
cotic agreements and take
counter-narcotic measures
set forth in US law.
However, the Department
of State also pointed out that,
"a country's presence on the
list does not necessarily


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Dr. Brian Humblestone


Breast Cancer
Dr. Theodore Turnquest



Diabetes
Dr. Judson Eneas



Stress
Dr. lan Kelly


HOSPITAL
Heal/, For Ll/f


President Obama includes the
Bahamas among Caribbean
countries in major narcotics list


reflect its counternarcotics
efforts nor does it reflect its
cooperation with the United
States."
The designation can
reflect a combination of geo-
graphic, commercial, and
economic factors that allow
drugs to be produced and/or
trafficked through a country
despite its own best efforts.
When a country does not
live up to its obligations
under international coun-
ternarcotics agreements and
conventions, the President
determines that the country
has, "failed demonstrably."
Such a designation can lead
to sanctions.
In compiling the list, the
President may also execute


a waiver for listed countries if
he determines that continued
assistance from the United
States is in the national inter-
est of the US.
President Obama issued a
national interest waiver for
Bolivia and Venezuela so the
United States may continue
to support civil society pro-
grams and small community
development programs in
Venezuela, and agricultural
development, exchange pro-
grams, small enterprise
development and police
training programs among
others in Bolivia.
Even without such a waiv-
er, humanitarian assistance
and counter-narcotics assis-
tance may continue.


Olympics star charged with assault on boy
FROM page one
pionships and the Olympics.
He also co-holds the Bahamian record in the 4x100
metres relay, achieved with teammates Renward Wells,
Dominic Demeritte and Iram Lewis.
After the hearing, Tynes' attorney Ramona Farquharson
said he intends to aggressively fight the charges against
him.
"He's asked me to convey to the entire Bahamian com-
munity, in particular his family and friends, his former stu-
dents and their parents that he is absolutely innocent of
these charges," Ms Farquharson told the media outside
the courtroom.
"He's asking for them to continue to keep him in their
prayers and I have been instructed to vigorously defend this
matter.
"He takes very seriously his position and standing in the
community. His role as a role model, he does not take that
lightly.
"He is quite moved and distressed by these charges but
again he is confident that he is going to be victorious," Ms
Farquharson added.
Tynes, who is on administrative leave, will return to
court on September 21 to fix a trial date.



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Rigby: Christie
should demand
Wilchcombe
steps down as
chair of PLP
convention

FROM page one

will recognize the possi-
ble advantages (whether
real or fanciful) that may
accrue to him as long as
he continues as Conven-
tion Chair and they will
thereby become hard-
ened in their view that
the electoral process was
clothed in unfairness and
favouristism.
"Given these percep-
tions and Mr Christie's
sentiments, he must
recognize that as leader
he must be seen as the
unifierr' and therefore
should not either engage
in or be a party to any act
which sends a perception
that he favours one can-
didate to the disadvan-
tage of the others. Or,
that one candidate can
consistently break the
rules of the organisation
without fear of penalty.
"The same 'rules' of
the organisation that Mr
Christie speaks, demand
that the leader address
the obvious conflict that
exists with the serving
convention chair also
running in the election
for the post of deputy
leader."
Mr Rigby stressed that
he was not attacking Mr
Wilchombe's integrity
but added that the issue
created "the appearance
of a conflict of interest".
"This appearance of
conflict between duty and
self interest in the posi-
tion of Convention Chair
will undermine public
confidence in the Party
as a fair and democratic
organisation, as well as
reinforce the political
propaganda that the PLP
is a corrupt organisation,"
said Mr Rigby.
"It is always my view
and belief that leaders
should act at the highest
level of accountability
and should always
demand transparency
and maturity in their
political organizations,
and this must equally
apply when it comes to
the election of party
offices.
"The public must be
assured that the PLP is
prepared to do what is
right. On this occasion we
have thus far failed.
"I trust that the leader
would now do what he
knows is the right thing
and demand for Mr
Wilchcombe to relinquish
the post of Convention
Chair.
"This is the right, hon-
ourable and decent
course that must be tak-
en," said Mr Rigby.


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A Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) is a nursing professional who is trained to perform a
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I ODSUS STOIE ON THI 0AG 0LG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009, PAGEW9


The Bahamas set to take part in


International Coastal Cleanup Day


VOLUNTEERS through-
out the Bahamas are prepar-
ing to take part in the Ocean
Conservancy's 24th Annual
International Coastal Clean-
up Day this Saturday.
International Coastal
Cleanup Day is the world's
largest one-day volunteer
event aimed at stemming pol-
lution of the marine environ-
ment. Last year, nearly
400,000 volunteers from 100
countries cleared 6.8 million
pounds of trash from oceans
and waterways and recorded
every piece of trash collected.
The initiative started as a
local programme in Texas
and gradually expanded to
include every major body of
water in the world. As such,
it not only makes a powerful
statement about global con-
cern for the environment, it
also empowers local commu-
nities to do something about
pollution.
"Last year record numbers
of volunteers came out to
clean up shorelines and
waterways in the Bahamas
on International Coastal
Clean-up Day," said Tanya
Moss, education assistant for
Dolphin Encounters on Blue
Lagoon Island and national
coordinator of the initiative
in the Bahamas.
"Volunteers collected
14,431 debris items in New
Providence alone and that is
a tremendous achievement.
This year we have chosen
Bonefish Pond National Park
as the inland waterway to be
cleaned in New Providence.
It is the Bahamas National
Trust's 50th Anniversary
year and in honour of their
commitment to our environ-
ment our focus will be to
removing debris from one of
the National Parks entrust-
ed to their care."
Janeen Bullard, parks
planner and community offi-
cer of the BNT, said: "The
Bahamas National Trust has
always supported and partic-
ipated in International Clean-
up Day in the Bahamas.


"We are pleased that
Bonefish Pond National Park
has been chosen as the site
for New Providence. It is an
important marine nursery
area for the island, provid-
ing a protective, nutrient rich
habitat for juvenile stocks of
fish, crawfish, and conch.
This area also supports a
wide variety of waterfowl and
an important variety of
Bahamian flora. The wetland
itself provides critical pro-
tection for storm surges to
communities along New
Providence's southern
shore."
International Coastal
Clean-up Day will also take
place on other islands.
In Nassau:
Dolphin Encounters - Pro-
ject BEACH will host Inter-
national Coastal Cleanup
Day on Saturday, September
19, from 9am to 2pm at
Bonefish Pond National Park
- off Cowpen Road.
The public is invited to vol-
unteer and attend. Please
wear closed in shoes, sun-
screen and gardening gloves.
Project BEACH will also
be hosting month-long Beach
Buddies and Project Green
programmes with local stu-
dents.
In Abaco:
Friends of the Environ-
ment, the International


Coastal Clean-up coordina-
tors for Abaco, together with
the Ministry of Tourism
Office in Abaco, have organ-
ised events including beach
clean-ups.
In Grand Bahama:
On Saturday, under the
theme "Keep Grand Bahama
Beautiful", volunteers will
clean up 12 beaches and
shorelines from 8am to 1pm.
Ministry of Tourism, Sunny
Isles Water and Juice,
Caribbean Bottling Company
(Bahamas) Ltd, and local
government councils are
sponsoring the refreshments
for the volunteers. The Min-
istry of Tourism Office in
Grand Bahama serves as the
Grand Bahama coordinator
for International Coastal
Clean-up.
All Other Islands
Contact Tanya Moss at
Dolphin Encounters for
information packets on form-
ing your own clean-ups for
International Clean-up Day.
The Caribbean Bottling
Company which produces
Coca-Cola in the Bahamas is
the major sponsor of the
event providing refreshments
for volunteers both in Nas-
sau and Grand Bahama.
Coke is the global sponsor
for International Coastal
Clean-up Day.


LAST YEAR hundreds of volun-
teers gathered on several islands in
the Bahamas to take part in Inter-
national Coastal Clean-up Day. All
trash collected was sorted and filed
by type. The data was sent to the
Ocean Conservancy which tracks
global marine debris.


Registration is now in progress for the following subjects:
* College Math
* Human Resources Management
*Associate Degree (LLB)
* Quickbooks
* BGCSE - Math/English
Courses approved by Ministry of Education and Department of Public Service
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were emblazoned on their windshields.
But there is an alternative. The refined
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE






PAGE^ ^ ^ ^TTHLOCAL 10,S THRDASPTMER1,209THIRBU


he said.
The delegation was shown
10,000 acres of the old sugar
plantation properties south of
the New Spring City, and
3,000 acres of the former Key
and Sawyer/Bahama Star farm
in North Abaco.
Mr Key said: "They have
asked for certain information


Full and part time positions available - all shifts.
If you are a punctual, inspiring person with a great
voice who loves music, and enjoys interacting
with people, then this job is for you.

While not required, experience is an asset.
Competitive salary plus benefits.
Email resume (and demo) to
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Only those short listed will be contacted.


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Invies Iappbiction for the following positions:

Applicants should satisfy the following minimum
requirements:

CHIEF ENGINEER

* Have a Bachelors D[cgrc in Mcchanical
E nginccnng firo a recognized CollgccLUnivicrsit5
* At least minimum 5 years in a similar or closely
related field
* Musti be cnmpLutcr literatC
* Be proactive, self motivated and be ready to work
long hours
* Be able to lead a team of Engineers and technicians
with varied Irades

LIVE IN MAID

* Fully cxpcricnced in domestic household chores
and culinary duties
* Three years in a similar position would be an asset
* Applicant must be willing to live on island

Applications should send e-mail to:
cmajor~@igrp.sandals.ron


relating to the climate and
rainfall which we will supply.
By October they will send in a
team of experts to do a study
of the land and assess the pos-
sibilities."
This coincides with a BAIC
food production initiative in
Abaco which, he said, has
attracted "a huge interest by
the young people".
BAIC has already subdi-
vided thousands of acres into
five and ten-acre plots which
are leased out to Bahamians
for farming.
"We are moving in the right
direction because the Chinese
have the technology and they
have the expertise," said Mr
Key. "I see this as a very pos-
itive step in the right direc-
tion."
Mr Key also said he is look-
ing forward to this project
being the impetus for the con-
struction of canneries and fac-
tories in the islands "where
we can start processing food
and put the product of The
Bahamas on the shelves. This
is the beginning".
He said Mr Sun was
impressed with the available
acreage and the quality of the
soil.
"This would create a
tremendous employment
opportunities for Bahamians."
he said. "We would also be
able to produce a lot of the
food products we import."


Chinese planning



to do large scale



farming in Abaco


,1

kk


.- . -. %



A.
�-, ~ , A


TOP: Chinese officials, Yiqing Sun (right) and Baoquo Xing, of the
Shandong High-speed Quila Construction Group look at available
acreage in Abaco for agriculture.
ABOVE: Yiqing Sun, Director, Technical Team (left) and Baoquo
Xing (right), examine the soil with BAIC's Assistant General Man-
ager Arnold Dorsett
Gladstone Thurston/BIS


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.






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*41* .�


FROM page one
plenty of farmland and you
have plenty of water."
A further study of the con-
ditions in Abaco by agricul-
ture experts is scheduled for
next month after which an
agreement is to be prepared,


*I -



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Date: September stli - Nov~uriir anl 200

Prices - $O0 for the full course.
Time - 7-8:00p.m. - Every Tuesday.
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email: taichibahamas@gmail.com
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Machinery & Energy Limited (M & E
Limited), the authorized Caterpillar dealer
in The Bahamas, is looking for Trainee
Technician Candidates 20 to 30 years
old for enrollment in their local Caterpillar
Training Institute.Candidates should be a
graduate of BTVI or an equivalent institution.
Practical experience in repairing diesel
engines and/or electrical equipment is a
plus. Successful candidates will be trained in
M & E's local training institute by experienced
mechanics and electricians. The training
will be done in Nassau with opportunities
to relocate to M & E's Freeport or Abaco
branches upon completion.

Please address all resumes to:

The Service Manager
P. 0. Box N-3238
Nassau, Bahamas.

Resumes can also be dropped off
at the receptionist desk at M & E's
main office in Oakes Field. Resumes
must be received no later than Friday,
September 18th, 2009. Only persons
being interviewed for this training will
be contacted.


The Bahamas Electridty Corporation


Tender

Assessment of Capital Projects
Administration Process
The Bahamas Electricity Corporatlon
invites Tenders for the above named services,
Bidders are required to collect bid packages from
the Corpora long's Administration Office, Blue Hill &
Tucker Roads by contacting
Mrs. Derllta Seymour, Trelphone
N., 302-1158.

Tenders are to be delivered on or before 4:00 p.m.
on September 25, ZD0g,
and addressed as follows:

Mr. KeiM IBasdei
Geinral Manager
Bihimia Elctriclty Cerporatlon
flue Hill Ticker Reads
NAIlia, BDnahaas

Marked: Tender Ma. 707t19
Asissinent of Capital Projects
Administration PrFii

The Corporation serves the right to accept or
reject the whole or such part of any Tender the
Corporation deems necessary,


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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


, ~. . i




PAGE 12, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Darling undergoes successful surgery

by RENALDO DORSETT ful surgery yesterday to repair a Seahawks. With the severity of recover from," Darling said in a to come into his own this year, He caught 18 passes for 326
Sports Reporter torn Anterior Cruciate Liga- the injury the Chiefs placed press release following the and had the confidence of the yards, including a nationally
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net ment which left him sidelined Darling on injured reserve list injury, "I will undergo surgery new coaching staff behind him, televised breakout performance
for the 2009-10 season. shortly thereafter on Septem- to repair the damage and take evident in his three consecutive against the Cleveland Browns
National Football League The fifth year wideout for ber 1st. the necessary steps towards a postseason starts. when he recorded a career high
wide receiver Devard Darling the Kansas City Chiefs sus- "It saddens me to say my sea- full recovery. I am confident I After playing sparingly in his four receptions for 107 yards
took the first step towards a tained the injury, August 29th, son has officially come to an will be able to return next sea- rookie and sophomore seasons and one touchdown.
long recovery yesterday. in the second quarter of a pre- end. A torn ACL is a serious son with the same speed and with the Baltimore Ravens, Darling thanked his supporters
Darling underwent success- season game against the Seattle injury, but not one I can't explosiveness you have seen Darling's play in his third year and well wishes for their sup-


from me in the past.
The fifth year vet was expected


sparked interest from franchis-
es around the league.


port in the roughest segment
of his career thus far.


CII 96s I 1


Above: Eric Ward (1), Cool 96 Morning show co-host,
presents Monique Harris (r) with her cheque.


Cool 96 listener Monique Harris won
$800 in the OnePhone Ring that Pays.
During the Eric 'n' Ed show on Cool
96 yesterday, September 16, Harris
was the 10th caller, accurately naming
the last 5 songs in the sequence of play.
Harris, who had been trying to win
since the start of the promotion, was
ecstatic, "trembling" as she recalled
the songs from her OnePhone Ring that
Pays book. The mother of three had not
walked her daughter to class from the
promotion started. Her 7th grade son
would write the names of the songs in
the book during their morning commute.
She plans to celebrate with her father,
Francis Bain, at his 75th birthday party
in Freeport this weekend. Thanks to
OnePhone and Cool 96 she will be able
to attend after all.
The OnePhone Ring that Pays continues
daily on Cool 96 through to October 2.
Listeners win instant cash when they
correctly name the last five songs
played and their artists in sequence.


MANUFACTURING
COMPANY LIMITED


Golfing duo get prepared

FROM page 15


period, featuring "Best Ball"
and "Alternate Shot" formats.
The pair emerged from a
field of nine golfers who fin-
ished in the top two positions at
a qualifying event hosted by
Lyford Cay Golf Club last this
summer. Turnquest shot a com-
bined score of 151 to lead the
group, while Gorospe shot 154.
Since the qualification more
than two months ago, Turn-
quest and Gorospe have
worked diligently towards the
Nations Cup a qualifier for the
Omega Mission Hills
The event, hosted Septem-
ber 21-25 at the Caracas Coun-
try Club, with spots for the
Omega Mission Hills World
Cup on the line.
Turnquest is a former
Bahamas Professional Golfers
Association National Champi-
on, and has a resume which
includes being a multi junior
national champion, represent-
ing The Bahamas at previous
World Cup event, former mem-
ber of the Hoerman Cup team
and playing on the collegiate
scene for five years.
Goropse is also a former
junior national champion,
Hoerman Cup team member,
former junior college champion
in North Carolina and he has
played for years on the pro cir-
cuit. Both golfers will be mak-
ing their third trip to the World
Cup Qualifying event, and have
previously teamed up in 2007.
Gorospe qualified for the
tournament in 2008 with BPGA
President Chris Lewis.
Turnquest said his third tour-
nament qualification looks to
be the most effective thus far
because of the extended prepa-
ration time the team has head-
ed into the event.
"It was a very good feeling. I
think we have a strong team
this year and for one of the first
times we have time and an
opportunity to practice and ful-
ly prepare ourselves for com-
petition and the preparation
was vital for us ," he said, "In
the past we have never really
had time to work together
which if crucial because it is a
team event. We get to work on
our games together, develop a
team chemistry, work on how
we compliment each other. One
person can not win and it obvi-
ously has to be a team effort so


with this time we have to work
together and work on our
weaknesses I think it will make
all the differences in year's
past."
The "Best Ball" format will
record the lowest score from
either team member while the
"Alternate Shot" format will
feature members taking alter-
nate shots with the same ball
until the ball is holed up.
Gorospe who plays on sev-
eral global tours, said the tour-
nament's format is one that
lends itself to a lengthy prepa-
ration process.
"With this format you need
to get used to playing with the
person you are partnered with,"
he said, "The format is so dif-
ferent we do not play this for-
mat regularly. The alternate
shot is something different he
has to get used to the way I play
the course and I have to do the
same with him so its a benefit
we prepared well in advance. "
Lewis, President of the
Bahamas Professional Golfers'
Association, said the team will
field the best possible team for
the event.
"These guys are well pre-
pared for this event. Both of


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them have a wealth of experi-
ence so it is not like they are
going into uncharted territory,
they know what to expect and I
think they should perform pret-
ty well," he said, "Should they
advance to the World Cup it
would be a great accomplish-
ment, they would compete all
of the top countries in the
world at this event."
Both players gave special
recognition to the team's spon-
sors for the event, J.S. Johnson,
FML Group of Companies and
FT Consultants/Chartered
Accountants.

Volleyball tournament

to open school

sporting year
by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net
With school sports set to
begin in a few weeks, volley-
ball will be the first discipline to
be featured with a highly antic-
ipated pre-season tournament.
The 2nd Annual Tom "The
Bird" Grant High School Invi-
tational Preseason Volleyball
Tournament will open the
school sporting year, scheduled
for September 24-26 at the Sir
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.
With the tournament open-
ing during active school days,
play on the Thursday the 24th
and Friday the 25th will begin
at 3:30pm while the final day
will begin at 9am.
The tournament will feature
a total of 10 teams including,
the C.I Gibson Rattlers, Dame
Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins,
R.M Bailey Pacers, Govern-
ment High School Magic, C.V
Bethel Stingrays, and C.C
Sweeting Cobras from the pub-
lic sector and Mt.Carmel Cava-
liers, Teleos Cherubims, St.
John's Giants and Prince
William Falcons from the pri-
vate sector.
Tournament organizer, Tom
Grant Jr, said the tournament
should feature a high level of
play with teams gearing up for
the regular season.
"This year we are focusing
on the senior division," he said,
"We are expecting a lot of
progress and we expect to see
alot of exciting and spirited
play. That following Monday is
the start of the volleyball season
in the GSSSA so this would
give teams a good headstart."
Grant said the tournament
looks to expand in the near
future featuring a greater num-
ber of teams, including those
from the family islands.
"It will have a regular sea-
son and playoff atmosphere
while giving coaches an oppor-
tunity to see what they have
and fine tune anything they
need to for the upcoming sea-
son ahead," he said, "We would
like to see more schools get
involved, especially more pri-
vate schools and hopefully we
would like to expand to the
family islands so we would have
a better selection of teams to
play."
The Technical meeting for
the tournament will take place
Tuesday, September 22nd at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


MIN


"


i.:V 1 elok






TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009, PAGER13


Mark Knowles


By BRENT STUBBS


HEN
American
author and
humorist
Mark Twain penned these
words: "Age is an issue of
mind over matter. If you don't
mind, it doesn't matter," he
must have had his namesake
Mark Knowles in mind.
Knowles, who turned 38 on
September 4, is still playing
as if he's still in the prime of
his illustrious 20-plus year
rather than going into his twi-
light.
After more than two
decades on the international
scene, the 6-foot-3 right-han-
der seemed to be like the
energizer bunny: He keeps
going and going and going.
When the St. Andrew's
graduate decided to abandon
a promising collegiate career
with the Bruins at the Uni-
versity of Los Angels at Cali-
fornia (UCLA), he also made
one of the smartest move that
has prolonged his longevity
in the sport.
He decided to concentrate
more on the then less publi-
cized doubles competition
rather than the vigorous sin-
gles competition, which may
not have allowed him to enjoy
the success for as long as he
has.
Today, that move has
enabled him to amass an
incredible resume that stands


STUB


OPINI


out just as much as
Here's a snap previ
he has achieved:
* Five-time
Games appearance
in Barcelona, Spa
in Beijing, China.
* A 14-year spai
in Davis Cup comp
the Bahamas from
with a total team
win-loss record, ii
23-25 in singles a


- he keeps


doubles as well as the best
S team record of 9-5 with Roger
Smith.
* Hosted the Mark
Knowles Celebrity Invita-
tional at Atlantis on Paradise
Island from 2001.
* 2002 Australian Open
Grand Slam title with Daniel
Nestor from Canada.
* ATP Player Council
Member from 2002-2004.
S2004 US Open Grand
slam title with Daniel Nestor
from Canada.
* 2007 French Open Grand
Slam title with Daniel Nestor
from Canada.
S *2007 Tennis Masters Cup
doubles title with Daniel
Nestor from Canada.
* 2009 Wimbledon Grand
S slam mixed doubles title with
S Ann-Lena Groenefeld from
Germany.
, * A career singles win-loss
record of 42-77.
O N f * Highest singles ranking
of No.96 on June 24, 1996.
r * A career doubles record
of 687-328.
* Highest doubles raking of
No.1 on June 24, 2002.
Shis figure. * Career doubles titles - 52.
ew of what * Current career prize mon-
ey - $6,546,740.00.
Olympic * Married to the former
From 1992 Dawn Davison and the proud
in to 2008 father of two sons, Graham
and Brody.
n in 29 ties The only thing missing from
petition for Knowles' list of achievement
1989-2008 was an individual recognition
high 41-32 from the Bahamas Govern-
nclusive of ment.
nd 18-7 in Add the Mark Knowles
Week from September 13-19,
as proclaimed by Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham on
Monday night, along with a
citation from Governor Gen-
eral Arthur D. Hanna at Gov-
ernment House.
All things considered,
whenever Knowles decides
that age does matter over
mind and he calls it quits,
there should be more recog-
nition coming his way.
How about his name on a
monument of national stadi-
um or maybe even a highway
like West Bay Street. If
Tonique Williams-Darling can
get a highway for winning
Lback-to-back Olympic and
World Championships titles,
Knowles surely could get one
for his achievement.
How about a honor from
the Queen. Sir Mark Knowles
A surely sounds good.
Just some food for thought
as we celebrate Mark
Knowles Week.


KUDOS TO BROWN
AND SANDS
I was thrilled to see how
Chris 'Fireman' Brown and
Leevan 'Superman' Sands
stuck it out and turned things


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around at the IAF/VTB Bank
World Athletics Final over
the weekend.
Almost a month after their
dreams of winning medals in
their respective events at the
12th IAAF World Champi-
onships in Athletics in Berlin,
Germany in August was
crashed, both Brown and
Sands produced second place
finishes in the year-ending
meet.
In Thessaloniki, Greece,
Brown trailed only world
champion LaShawn Merritt
from the United States in the
men's 400 metres to collect a
final paycheck of $20,000.
And on the same day,
Sands soared to a second
behind Cuban Arnie David
Girat in the men's triple jump
to also pick up $20.000.
Both Brown and Sands
could have easily folded up
and retreated to their train-
ing camps in the United
States after missing out on a
spot on the medal podium in
Berlin.
But neither of them wanted
it to end that way. They
regrouped and regained their
composure and were able to
turn things around in Thessa-
loniki. And both have indi-
cated that it has given them
the incentive to go into train-
ing camp with renewed vigor
for the 2010 season that will
include the Commonwealth
Games in India a year from
now.
Hats off as well to veteran
sprinters Chandra Sturrup
and Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie, who continued to
prove that is age is only a
number,' a quote that was
coined by author Lexi Star-
ling. At age 38 and 33 respec-
tively, Sturrup and Ferguson-
McKenzie withstood the chal-
lenge from their younger foes
and they performed excep-
tionally well again this year.
It was definitely a year for
all of them to remember.


HOSPITAL.


WE


WILL


MARK KNOWLES,
of the Bahamas,
returns a ball to
Lukas Dlouhy, of
the Czech Repub-
lic, and Leander
Paes, of India.
Watching is his
partner Mahesh
Bhupathi. of
India.


UNDERGO


Princess Margaret Hospital

ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT




PUBLIC


NOTICE!


IN AN EFFORT TO IMPROVE OUR PATIENT

SERVICES AT THE PRINCESS MARGARET


RENOVATIONS TO THE ENTRANCE AND

TRIAGE AREA OF THE ACCIDENT &

EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT.v


WE ASK THAT PERSONS VISITING THE


ENTER THROUGH


PHARMACY DEPARTMENT ENTRANCE AND

CONTINUE ONWARD THROUGH THE

ENTRANCE OF THE ORTHOPEDIC CLINIC.


MANAGEMENT APOLOGIZES FOR ANY

INCONVENIENCE CAUSED AND ASK THAT

THE PUBLIC COOPERATE WITH US DURING

THIS TIME.



SIGNED: MANAGEMENT


DEPARTMENT


THE


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the Corporation's Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads,
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telueplone 302-1158

Tendrs are Io be addressed to;
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporatlon
Blue H111l & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

DEadline for dllTEry to IEC
9th Otaher 209 *e later than 4:01 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009, PAGE 13


TRIBUNE SPORTS


...�:= q : . ................. . ........................ ..
..................... = .= ..............
............ ..........'




PAGE 14, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Sixteen-year-old Geno Bullard Jr is Canada-bound


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia,net

WHEN Geno Bullard Jr.
completed his successful reign
with the Sparks at St. Thomas


More as multiple primary
school athlete in 2005, he was
projected to emerge into a high
school superstar.
Four years later, Bullard Jr.
has certainly lived up to those
expectations and even more,


holding his own as a Giant for
two years at St. John's College
before he ended up as a Diplo-
mat the past two years at West-
minster College.
Today, at age 16, Bullard Jr.
will be take a step further in his


The All New Face Of


Srag m Alis


career as he travels all the way
to Canada to join Ripley Col-
lege where he is expected to
continue his athletic pursuits,
particularly basketball.
"When I went from primary
school to high school, I noticed
that the game was quite differ-
ent," Bullard Jr. pointed out.
"In primary school, it was more
fun. When we reached to high
school, we had to step it up
because everybody was coming
for you.
"So you had to play hard
every game because whatever
competition you put out, that
was the competition that was
coming back at you."
Throughout his tenure in
high school, Bullard Jr. has
been able to excel as a forward
on the junior national team and
he also competed in the long
jump at the BAAA's Nation-
als.
But what stood out the most
was his achievement in basket-
ball where he was able to
secure a spot on the junior
national team this past summer.
An injury, however, pre-
vented him from making the
kind of impact that he had
anticipated. But Bullard Jr. said
he was quite pleased with his
accomplishments.
"I knew the level was going
to be higher, but when I got
into grade seven, the guys were
able to push me further,"
Bullard Jr. said. "So I think that
was what helped me to get bet-
ter and better each year."
As he look ahead to the tran-
sition from high school to col-
lege in Canada, Bullard Jr. said
he know that it's going to get
even more challenging for him.
But he feels as though he's
ready to "make my country
proud and my country proud.
It's a big prestigious school in
Canada and they have high
expectations for me, so I will
do my best when I go there."
Although he's not ruling out
a professional basketball career
or even possibly a chance to
represent the Bahamas at the
Olympic Games in track and
field, Bullard Jr. said he would
really like to become a Sport-
caster or a Pastry Chef.
Looking back at his career,
Bullard Jr. has credited his
father, Geno Bullard Sr. as the
driving force.


"My father pushes me every
day and he keep telling me nev-
er to give up in practice,"
Bullard Jr. said. "He keeps
reminding me that if I work
hard, I can be the best athlete
that I can be."
Bullard Sr. said this is a day
that he longed awaited and now
it's finally here.
"I know this day was going to
come, so I've been preparing
myself," said Bullard, who had
the opportunity to coach his
son during the last two years.
"Sixteen years I have been
preparing myself. I know this
day was going to come. He now
have to spread his wings and
try to soar to another level."
Although he will be leaving
one year ahead of graduating
from high school, Bullard Sr
said his son has accomplished
all of the goals that he had set
out as a youngster playing bas-
ketball, soccer and track and
field.
After trying for three years,
Bullard Jr. finally added the
one missing piece to his script, a


Bahamas Association of Inde-
pendent Secondary Schools'
basketball title.
That came last year when he
and his father made history at
Westminster by winning the
BAISS senior boys title.
As he get set to climb the
ladder in a new horizon in col-
lege, Bullard Sr. said he's con-
fident that his son will succeed.
"The thing is, he won't be
new to the environment
because he's already been to
the school on our college tour,
so he's familiar with the school,
the administration, the coaching
staff and even the players,"
Bullard Sr. noted.
"So he should feel right at
home. This a brand new situa-
tion for him and he will have
to take his time getting adjusted
to it, but as far as his athletics is
concerned, I'm confident that
the sky is the limit for him."
Like he did here at St.
Thomas More, St. John's and
Westminster, Bullard Sr. said
he's just looking forward to his
son excelling at Ripley College.


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009


i_


NATION'S UP, VENEZUELA: September 19-26
NATION'S CUP, VENEZUELA: September 19-26


ad


to


come


out Swinging !
Bahamian duo Keno Turnquest, Lemon
Gorospe vie for World Cup berths C
i ~ ~~ I" k^^^^^*^&.---" 1P


by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net
Just days of preparation
remain before a duo of
Bahamian golf pros represent
the country in international
competition, vie for a World
Cup berth.
Keno Turnquest and Lemon
Gorospe will compete in the


Nation's Cup, September 19-26
in Caracas, Venezuela.
The Nation's Cup will fea-
ture 19, two-member teams,
vying for three vacant spots in
the World Cup of Golf,
November 27-30 in Mission
Hills, China.
The tournament will feature
72 holes of golf over a four day
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'Love My Body'


DEPUTY Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette and Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis (far right) view local produce at one of the booths erected at the Ministry of Health, Meet-
ing Street. Also shown is Camille Johnson (far left), permanent secretary in the Ministry of Health...
Photos by Kris Ingraham/BIS)


Bahamas marks




Caribbean




Wellness Day


By LINDSAY THOMPSON
THE Bahamas joined the
rest of the Caribbean this past
Saturday in celebrating
Caribbean Wellness Day
under the theme "Love My
Body".
Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette officially
opened a wellness fair at the
Ministry of Health, encourag-
ing Bahamians to reduce the
rate of non-communicable dis-
eases through healthy living.
Caribbean Heads of Gov-
ernment, in response to the
"heavy burden" of non-com-
municable diseases on its citi-
zens, issued the Port of Spain
Declaration in September
2007, "Uniting to Stop the
Epidemic of Chronic Non-
Communicable D ,.,1 ' and
declared that the second Sat-
urday in September be cele-
brated each year as Caribbean
Wellness Day.
Illnesses such as heart dis-
ease, stroke, cancer and dia-
betes are said to be the leading
causes of premature death
amongst Caribbean people.
Health statistics show that
obesity remains a challenge in
the 31 to 60 year old age
group, where more than 30 per
cent of the population is obese.
"However, measurable
achievements are being made
as well. One only has to look
at the number of people that
are out exercising in the morn-
ings and evenings. Walking is
becoming more common as a
form also by you as individu-
als. You must also remain
committed to reversing these
trends within our nation," Mr
Symonette said.
The Bahamas and the
region have made progress in
the fight against chronic non-
communicable diseases. More
than 100 Healthy Dozen Clubs
have been formed since the


A NUMBER of people, including Deputy Prime Minister and Minister
of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette and Minister of Health Dr Hubert
Minnis (far left) check out one of the booths...


inception of the Healthy
Lifestyles Secretariat in 2005,
he said.
Health fairs are being
offered more frequently by
employers and churches and
other non-governmental agen-
cies.
"We actively seek to
improve the health status of
the population," Mr Symon-
ette said.
Moreover, in 2001, the
South Beach Health Care
Centre opened and holds a
weekly nutrition clinic for at-
risk obese school children.
The deputy prime minister
encouraged Bahamians to
incorporate some form of
healthy living into their daily
routines by exercising, park-
ing a distance and walking to
their office, cutting back on
unhealthy foods, drinking alco-
hol in moderation, eating
smaller portions and consum-
ing more vegetables and fruits.
The Port of Spain Declara-
tion reinforces the gains made
by the Caribbean Commission
on Health and Development
and the Caribbean Coopera-
tion in Health, the minister
said.
"The Bahamas has forged


strong partnerships to assist in
its fight against chronic non-
communicable diseases. The
Pan American Health Organ-
isation has continued to part-
ner with us in this battle, pro-
viding financial and technical
assistance along the way," he
said.
Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis also encour-
aged Bahamians to live
healthy lifestyles.
"Many of these diseases
share common risk factors;
combined with uncontrolled
blood pressure, raised blood
sugar and elevated cholesterol,
(they) pose a major threat to
the well-being of our citizens,
resulting in loss of life and dis-
ability during the most pro-
ductive years of life. With
changes in lifestyle, 40 to 80
per cent of these diseases can
be prevented," he said.
Scores of Bahamians came
in support of the event at the
Ministry of Health on Meet-
ing Street. They were given
first-hand information of
healthy living through the var-
ious booths and sporting drills.
The Royal Bahamas Police
Force Pop Band led the enter-
tainment segment.


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009, PAGE 23


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNE





)US.1,


SS


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009


Harbour Dred e 'more


$27.5m


Money Safe,
Money Fast.


MoneyGwn.


1 Bank of The Bahaman
I r I. "i % r % r i N , r
OuInriMAr M
lConcelmauni ovne



Concern over


judgment gJJt"R rJ "l LJ1 '. treatment of

bid against than one-third complete' restructured

marina khI, Yi


owner is

rejected


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A FINANCIER has lost its
bid to obtain a $27.5 million
summary judgment against
the owner of the Port Lucaya
Marina and Grand Bahama
Yacht Club, plus their princi-
pal investor, the Supreme
Court finding yesterday that
the issues raised required a
single trial before a judge.
Justice Estelle Gray-Evans,
ruling on T. G. Investments'
application for summary judg-
ment against New Hope
Holdings and Danish investor,
Preben Olesen, said the evi-
dence before here "lends sup-
port" to the defendants' argu-
ment "that there is more to
the matter than simply the
promissory notes" that the
plaintiff had based its appli-
cation on.
Setting out the case, Justice
Gray-Evans recalled how T.
G. Investments, the invest-
ment vehicle for US investor
Tom Gonzalez, had demand-
ed via its September 30, 2008,
statement of claim some
$22.375 million in damages,
plus $2.544 million in interest
on that sum.
Special damages of $2.65
million and interest on that
sum were also being sought
by T. G. Investments, along
with a Supreme Court order
requiring New Hope Hold-
ings to deliver it a first charge
debenture, including a mort-
gage, over its properties and
assets - the two marinas and
Grand Bahama Yacht Club,
plus associated parcels of land
in the area of Freeport known
as the Bell Channel.
T. G. Investments had sued,
Justice Gray-Evans said, on
the basis that it held two
promissory notes issued to it

SEE page 4B


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


sau Harbour's dredging
has been completed to
date, a government min-
ister yesterday confirmed to Tribune
Business, adding that the company con-
tracted for the project has "given no indi-
cation that they will not meet" the
November 14, 2009, completion date.
Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of the envi-
ronment, said of the work being per-
formed by Dutch-based Boskalis Inter-
national: "Based on what is coming to
me, they are going extremely well. They
have completed more than one-third of
the actual dredging to date.
"They have experienced some delays
in respect to the volume of debris in the
harbour, and have had to send divers
down to remove tyres, steel. That has
led to some delays, and they have lost
eight hours, but beyond that, though,
they are extremely well organised.
"They can readily make up those eight
hours when working 24 hours a day.
They're moving at full capacity, and are
very efficient."


As an example of
this, Dr Deveaux
said Boskalis had
completed dredging
an area in front of
the British Colonial
Hilton's beach,
where it had to
move much debris
from the ocean
floor. Having accom-
plished this, it then
moved its pipes and
excavation equip- EARL DEVEAUX
ment to the area and
dredged it overnight, thus ensuring the
operation did not disrupt incoming cruise
ships and mail boats.
The minister added that Boskalis was
scheduled to "be completed on or around
November 14, and they've given no indi-
cation that they will not meet that".
The Nassau Harbour dredging project
was commenced to widen the turning
basin, so that the port could accommo-
date the world's largest cruise ship class,
which is just being brought into service by
RoyalCaribbean.
Dr Deveaux added that there was
"nothing to so far indicate we won't be


ready" when the Genesis class cruise
ship, the Oasis of the Seas, makes its first
call on Nassau on December 15, 2009.
Boskalis is having to remove some
10,000 cubic yards of fill per day to meet
its completion target, with the excavated
material being taken by pipeline to
Arawak Cay. Some 1.4 million cubic
yards will be used to extend Arawak Cay
1,000 feet to the west, where the new
container shipping terminal will be locat-
ed, with 600,000 cubic yards of fill stored
on the cay itself.
Current arrangements for the Arawak
Cay port will see it owned 40 per cent by
the Government and 40 per cent by the
private sector, with 20 per cent in public
hands via an initial public offering (IPO).
It is understood, though, that the Gov-
ernment and shipping companies - chiefly
the 19 investors that comprise the
Arawak Cay Port Development Com-
pany - have yet to finalise the details of
their Memorandum of Understanding.
Dr Deveaux told Tribune Business
that talks between the shipping compa-
nies and the Government were being
handled by the Prime Minister's Office,

SEE page 4B


Developer sells 60% of phase one condos


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
CAVES Heights revealed
yesterday that it have sold 60
per cent of the units in the
first phase one building for
its condominium develop-
ment atop the caves on West
Bay Street.
Simon Chappell, the pro-
ject's vice-president, said
interest in the property had
been high, with a balanced
group of Bahamian and for-
eign investors purchasing the
ocean and lake-view condos.
"Agents have been coming
around," said Mr Chappell.
"There has been a lot of pos-
itive feedback."
Caves Height has been one
of the few developments in
the Bahamas to moved ahead


unfettered, despite the down-
turn in the economy. Mr
Chappell said the poor eco-
nomic conditions caused the
project to slow late last year.
However, he added that
since that period, the project
has moved full steam ahead.
Phase one is expected to be
finished by May 2010, but Mr
Chappell said the developers
will not begin phase two
development before there is
more buyer interest in the
property. He suggested, how-
ever, that it could begin by
year-end 2010.
Caves Heights' first build-
ing number has only three of
its Capri -tyle condos left for
sale, and five Monaco-style
out of a total 20 units in that
building.
The Capri is a "two bed-
room, two-and-a-half bath-


room condominium offering
1,855 square feet of living
space with a grand master
bedroom suite, an additional
bedroom and large living/din-
ing area with a deep balcony
offering superior views,"
according to the company's
website.
And the Monaco is a
"three bedroom, three-and-
a-half bathroom ocean view
condominium with 2,439
square feet of luxury living
space, including a panoramic,
43 foot balcony overlooking
the ocean".
Mr Chappell said the pool
decks have already been put
in, and the asphalt for the dri-
ves and parking areas will be
poured in four weeks.
According to him, they are
still awaiting final proposals
form landscaping firms and


are preparing to surface their
tennis courts.
There has been minimal
protest about the property,
which has been built above
what some consider one of
the more unique natural
attractions in New Provi-
dence.
The natural caves were
formed centuries ago, accord-
ing to geologists, with visitors
and locals alike exploring
them regularly.
Resident became con-
cerned last week when rain
water run off from the devel-
opment created a plume of
milk water in the ocean across
the road from the develop-
ment.
Despite the dissent, Mr
Chappell said the property
has seen an upswing and
increase in foot traffic.


Central Bank said to want
restructured loans treated
as non-performing for six
months, raising concerns
on bank balance sheet
and earnings impact

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Central Bank of the
Bahamas has been pushing to
standardise how Bahamian
commercial banks treat
restructured loans, wanting
them placed into the non-per-
forming category for six
months, a development
sources said has caused some
concern in the industry.
Tribune Business under-
stands that while no directive,
stipulating that Bahamian
commercial banks 'must' treat
restructured loans as non-per-
forming for six months, has
been issued by the Central
Bank, its guidelines do prod
them to adopt such a treat-
ment.
However, informed sources
have told Tribune Business
that the Bahamian commer-
cial banks privately harbour
several concerns regarding
such a move, as it would
impact both their balance
sheets and income statements
- potentially reducing profits
and increasing losses. As a
result, there are fears that it
would act as a disincentive to
restructure loans made to
troubled borrowers.
Currently, industry sources
said the banks were all using
"different criteria" when it
came to the accounting clas-
sification applied to restruc-
tured loans, meaning those
loans and credit advances
whose terms had been rewrit-
ten to enable borrowers -
struggling with unemploy-
ment and reduced incomes as

SEE page 9B


Recovery ability 'diminished'

by excessive costs


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE high cost burden
imposed upon the Bahamian
economy by public sector cor-
porations, and the failure to
align wages with productivi-
ty, will prevent this nation
from rebounding from the
recession as rapidly as others,
a senior accountant told Tri-
bune Business yesterday, as
well as harming long-term
competitiveness.
Raymond Winder, manag-
ing partner at Deloitte &
Touche (Bahamas), said the
Bahamian economy's ability
to recover rapidly from the
current recession, and com-
pete for foreign direct invest-
ment and tourism, was being
"diminished" daily by a cost
structure that was out of line


* Failure to align wages
with productivity, and
public sector cost burden,
means Bahamas'
recovery and long-term
competitiveness will be
much reduced in
comparison to others
* But nation lacks union
and political leadership
to address the issue

with productivity.
The Bahamian economy
was going through a period
similar to the early 1990s
when the world was also
embroiled in recession, and
Mr Winder recalled how he
and other members of the
Government's Council of
Economic Advisers prepared
a report on the strategies
needed to enhance this
nation's competitiveness.
"We haven't done a whole
lot of following through on
some of the strategies that
were recommended," Mr
Winder told Tribune Busi-
ness, "and we never really
moved to align salaries and
wages with productivity and
efficiency. That was the key
one. That is one of the hall-
marks of a competitive econ-
omy.......
"To get this thing back in
line, we have to hold the line
on wages and salaries, and
become more productive."
Pointing to the difference
between the Bahamas and US
inflation rates, the latter
SEE page 8B


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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE


M-*F %I " rsJI s AL EIr I I.


$695,000.00
U'tON IAlT'I"
(C'IRISANNI' ASrroN
242-352-9391 d
IBUIl.I)lN(i IS I (K'ATI')l) IN FKR.IF)R1' T, HAl MAS ANI)
IS N EAR. 3Y THUI[ S P)W)I TO I liIIVLiLOPI.I I'PROPIRTY
)OF R F15 I 1 V F I )lOP - - IA R 'OL'RT rFV .)I OPMFNTS
PRICE- INLLUI)~ S ALL ()tjl L 1:N A NNI R1''LI'C.A
]FRNISI I[INuS. T I GkROULND l FLOOUIR C IONSISTS Of
IJ-4 SQ F-T WITH AN ANPROXIMATI1-: To(TAL ARIEtA
)1- I'II: .1 ILtXH)RN I-S ]iNG LJI,9I S I-F T.


GlobeComm executives me
IPSI consultant; Jonathan F
ident of IPSI.


et with IP Solutions International's president and chief executive, Edison Sumner. Pictured L to R: Mike Cothill,
:eldman, Globecomm; Mr Sumner; and Richard Beckley, Globecomm. Not pictured: Gary Hutchens, vice-pres-




Start-up enjoys


' successful


meet


with suppliers


IP Solutions International
(IPSI), the Nassau-based
company aiming to deliver a
'multiple-play' bundle of ser-
vices via the Internet, has
described a recent round of
meetings with supply-side
partners in New York as
"very successful and highly
productive".
"We met with industry pio-
neers in what is rapidly
becoming the new Internet
platform protocol, the tech-
nology driving how we get our
news and entertainment, and
how we conduct our personal
and our business affairs," said
Edison Sumner, IPSI's presi-
dent and chief executive.
"Those meetings were
extremely successful and high-
ly productive."


The meetings related to the
architecture and construction
of IPSI's triple-play infra-
structure.
"What was especially inter-
esting was to see how enthu-
siastic such major players
were about joining forces with
IPSI, because they could see
the potential immediately of
our becoming a regional
provider and even beyond,"
Mr Sumner added.
IPSI unveiled its board of
directors, headed by former
Governor-General Sir Orville
Turnquest, earlier this month.
That announcement followed
the introduction of legislation
that will open up the Bahami-
an telecoms and communica-
tions sector to competition.
Days later, directors left for


meetings to solidify infra-
structural design and con-
struction.
Tomorrow, IPSI will unveil
its platform to prospective
investors and businesses at an
exclusive invitation-only
meeting at the British Colo-
nial Hilton.
In addition to Sir Orville
and Mr Sumner, directors of
the Nassau-based company
include Virginia Damianos,
Fritz Stubbs, Gary Hutchens,
Brian Quinn and Owen
Bethel.
The Nassau-based company
is set to bundle a total net-
work of telephone, television,
entertainment, gaming, Inter-
net and closed circuit TV ser-
vices via an Internet protocol
platform.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


PICWATRHOUSE(PERS I

. Ukinsg
A Corpoxrate Serwvic Snupexrir


Appliants should e Bahaian and have at esi three (3) years prctcal exrience in
the following are=

* Company Incorporations
F Fo lion of Foudatioms
SCompany Continations
* Voluary Lqudatiions
* MergersiCoilSolidaions
* Dafing und veling CIonlrisa and Agrcmcn
* BusiLess Lioene Applicatnions in uding uircientis of tlh GTid Bahaiaa Port
Au1hraity Limited

Eligible candidates should alo be familiar with the Financial and Corprate Sesvice
Provdc:s Aci and hold either an LLB or a Bachelors Der in h iness Adminisation
and or Financ, Compensation and benefits to be paid commensurate ith experience.

Rc s along with copies of your deatials should be scn to P.O. Box N - 3910,
Nassau, The Bahamas. Attenioni Corp tert Swrvi Leader no laWT than Friday,
SIpemwer 25,2009.


I UI NESSI [,'


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009


THE TRIBUNE





THE TIBUN THURDAYSEPTEBER 7, 209,IPGES3


Planning Bill




set for October




House debate


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government's Plan-
ning and Subdivisions Bill,
which aims to reform the
planning and development
processes in the Bahamas, will
be debated in Parliament next
month, the minister respon-
sible said yesterday, adding
that the legislation's provi-
sions would not be made
retroactive.
Dr Earl Deveaux, minister
of the environment, said his
ministry and the Government
had received "very little"
feedback from professionals
who might be impacted by the
new legislation, such as con-
tractors, realtors, attorneys,
architects and engineers.
The Ministry of the Envi-
ronment, he added, was plan-
ning a final "call around" dur-
ing the last week of Septem-


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story


To advertise,
call 502-2371


ber to architect and engineer-
ing firms in a bid to obtain
last-minute feedback and see
whether it could be incorpo-
rated in the legislation.
"We received something
from two architect and two
law firms, which we have
been able to address, but very
little has come in in the way of
comment and postings to the
website," Dr Deveaux told
Tribune Business."
The Government was due
to meet with one major
Bahamian law firm on the Bill
this week, he said, adding that
the concerns voiced by attor-
neys to date were "primarily
concerned with the effect of
this Bill on Justice Lyons's
ruling".
That ruling, connected to
the Oceania Heights subdivi-
sion in Exuma, found that
under the existing 1965 law it
was illegal to sell land in a


subdivision without full gov-
ernment approval.
The new legislation appears
to be codifying this, but Dr
Deveaux said the Govern-
ment had reassured these law
firms that the Bill's provisions
applied only to new subdivi-
sions proposed after it was
passed into statute, not to
existing ones. Existing subdi-
visions were provided for.
"The requirements laid
down in the Bill ensure any-
thing after it takes effect must
be in compliance to have legal
standing," Dr Deveaux said.
"Those existing subdivisions
will be considered non-con-
forming legal entities."
With the Bill having been
tabled in Parliament just after
the Budget debate, Dr
Deveaux said: "It is scheduled
for debate as soon as we com-
plete the Prescription Drug
Bill, which is to be the first


part of October.
"The Prime Minister gave
notice to Parliament that the
Planning and Subdivisions Bill
will be done in October, and
that's what I'm preparing
for."







on Mnday


LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.
CF^ot~aa ^oWy CWVit/v ciwt^ aactv

FOR SALE
Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
-- Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at TS-$1 5 million
Sel) Listing # 83"


Tel.242-o---8251 Cell. 35---013
info@mariocareyrealty.com
www. mariocareyreafty.com


NOTICE OF

SPECIAL CALLED MEETING










ALL MEMBERS of

Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos

Cooperative Credit Union (BIRCCCU) Limited

Are Urged To Attend The

Special Called Meeting



Date:

Saturday, September 19,2009

Location:

Grounds Of The Credit Union

Time:

10:00 A.M.

Purpose of The Meeting:

To Discuss & Vote On The Proposed Opening

Up Of Our Bond To Allow Your Family To

Become Members Of BIRCCCU Ltd.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


Accountant


o Recording of journal enties
* Handling accounts payable functions
* PreparIng submission for franchisers
* Preparation of bank reconciliations
a Preparing financial statements
* Establiising & rrInitoing internal controls

Qualifications:
Applicants should possess Bachelors degree In
Accounting, at least 5 years experience, knowledge
of rtailfood accounting, be prficient in Ouickaooks,
Excel and other MS Office applications. Must be able
to multi-task, work with minimum supervision and
possess a h l level of integrity and professionalism.

Fax applicationfresume to 394-49
Deadline for applications: Sept 25,2009


WHY PAY MORE?

---


SNASSAU-FRESH CREEK
.$79.99
NASSAU - MANGROVE CAY
'79.99
'-1SA U. CONGO TOWN

" llMrlcgii ipfly
For "1ketis n'd Addlgl nvIJnfQ rmr liaon
Plase CntilM Perfonnrmpn Air
at 332-1608 1 2-2302
Or rpt UtAt .
wrww, perfbrM inalr 4 M
iF.w m ri arniE m . Imrll gH ll.eari .-


C

, " . ., ..., ......, et'stla .


Career


Opportunity


SENIOR TRUST MANAGER

J. P Morgan is currently seeking applications for a Senior Trust Manager.

The successful candidate will work with Trust and related partners to
ensure that fiduciary services are delivered in a manner consistent with all
legal, regulatory and internal requirements. The candidate will also serve
as a technical resource to wealth advisors, investors and relationship
managers. The Senior Trust Manager will be expected to develop direct
relationships with clients and have the flexibility to travel.

Prospective applicants should have 6+ years of trust experience, with 3+
years in mentoring others. A bachelor'sdegree or a professional qualification
ideally in law with strong analytical skills; knowledge of investment product
services, fiduciary and trust regulatory requirements and onshore and
offshore jurisdictions; excellent written/verbal communication and creative
problem solving skills; and the ability to assess risk in fiduciary and trust
matters.

J.P. Morgan Private Bank offers competitive compensation and
benefits packages. Interest applicants should submit their resume/
curriculum vitae marked "Private and Confidential" to the Human
Resources Manager, J.P. Morgan Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited,
P.O. Box N-4899, Nassau, Bahamas.


J.P. Morgan Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009, PAGE 3B


AkLcB
Nw-^^^


(W





PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE


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A i roa~ d s -r�l4f c Drc : . *ii 3:.rj Di i Llh L (
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i41St(-,~ f, r -te Fnt ' nrl i


FROM page 1B
by New Hope Holdings, plus
a debenture charge that was
assigned to it by First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas). The two promis-
sory notes were designed to
secure the $22.375 million
advanced by T. G. Invest-
ments to New Hope.
However, T.G. Investments
alleged that New Hope had
defaulted on the principal and
interest payments under the
two notes, and demanded
payment in a letter sent to the
latter and Mr Oelsen on
August 29, 2008. It also
claimed that it had been
forced to protect its interest
by paying $2 million to First-
Caribbean to cover New
Hope's $1 million overdrawn
credit facility, in order to pre-
vent the bank from seizing the


Grand Bahama-based assets.
T.G Investments further
alleged that Mr Oelsen
induced it to advance a fur-
ther $580,000 in working cap-
ital to fund the business oper-
ations of the Grand Bahama
Yacht Club and Port Lucaya
Marina, and that it was "con-
tinually pressed by creditors'
demands for payments of
[New Hope's] debts, which
demands it has endeavoured
to meet in the effort to stave
off action by the said credi-
tors".
However, arguing that the
affair was more complex than
T. G. Investments had let on,
Mr Oelsen and New Hope
countered by arguing that the
notes were part of two sepa-
rate agreements entered into
by Ocean Resort Group, New
Hope's parent company. They


argued that the notes did not
fall under the Bills of
Exchange Act, and were
"conditional/contingent" on
their face.
In addition, they alleged
that Mr Gonzalez "had
agreed that repayment of the
loans secured by the notes
would be postponed while he
and his companies, including
[T.G. Investments], had not
procured funding in the sum
of $12 million, which Mr Gon-
zalez had agreed to provide"
to fund New Hope's opera-
tions.
New Hope and Mr Oelsen
also alleged that Mr Gonzalez
had promised not to make a
demand, or place Ocean
Resort Group into default, for
lack of payment.
"The defendants [New
Hope and Mr Oelsen] con-
tend that the notes form part
of a series of transactions
involving business partners,"
the Supreme Court judgment
said. "They say that this case
is not merely about the notes
but that a vital part involves
an oral agreement, the out-
line of which is embodied in a
letter of understanding,
between Mr Gonzalez,


[Duane] Crithfield and [Mr
Oelsen, whereby Mr Gonza-
lez would use his balance
sheet to secure financing in
the sum of $12 million to fund
New Hope's operations and
development."
The judgment recorded
that the oral agreement was
intended to bind the three
parties and the companies
they controlled, and "that it
was the failure of Mr Gonza-
lez and/or his companies,
including T. G. Investments,
to provide the $12 million as
promised that resulted in the
first defendant not being able
to make the payments under
the notes."
Justice Gray-Evans agreed
that New Hope may have an
arguable defence on the issue
of the promissory note, given
that since there was a dispute
over whether it or Ocean
Resort Group should have
made the notes, there were
questions of whether it could
be enforced against New
Hope.
This was the same conclu-
sion that she reached on many
other aspects of the case, lead-
ing her to reject the applica-
tion for summary judgment.


Harbour Dredge 'more

than one-third complete'

but his understanding was that the share structure and size of
the port's acreage had been agreed - although he had seen
nothing in writing.
A Traffic Study, Economic and Social Impact Study and
Environmental Impact Study have yet to be completed, with
proposals by architects Lambert Knowles giving life to what
engineering consultants, Halcro, had proposed in relation to the
port's size and engineering aspects.
"I don't think there is any major impediment to be over-
come," Dr Deveaux said.


NAD
Nassau Airport
Development Company


Nassau Airport Development Company Limited (NAD] is seeking a Proponent or
Proponents individual, consortium or joint venture that must include an experienced
newsstand opertor)to finance, design, develop, operate and managethree newsstand,
bookstore and convenience shop locations in the new U.S. DeparturesTerminal currently
under construction at the Lynden Pindling International Airport. These stores will be
world class in operation, design and appearance with a dstinctive'sense of place'and
will offer a broad selection of newspapers, magazines, books, sundry & convenience
items and miscellaneous gifts at competitive prices.


1 (a) NEWSSTANDIBOOKSTORE/GIFTS In the U.S.Departures ounge
Sb) NEWSSTAND KIOSKICOFFEE BRARAR in the US, Departures concourse

2 NEWSSTAND/CONVENIENCE STORECOFFEE BAR in US. Checkin.

Locations 1a) and 1 (b must be bid together. NAD will consider individual proposals for
1ia)i'(b' and 2 above or combined proposals forall locations.

Mandatory qualifications
i. Proponents must be Bahamian and incorporated in The Bahamas,
ii. Proponents must have operated a similar newsstandbooks'giftsfacility within
the last three [3) years.

NAD'S goals and objectives are to:
(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service;
(b) offer a mix of concepts that will help to enhance the image of LPIA as a world
class airport;
(c) offer retail and food & beverage choices to passengers at fair prices
(d) offer a mix of local, regional and national and international brand-name
companies;
(e) develop and design retail facilities that complement the qualities of the new
terminal while recognizing the distinctive spirit, character and'sense of place'
ofThe Bahamas; and
(f) optimize revenueto MAD.


REQUEST FOR





PROPOSAL




NEWSSTANDS BOOKS, GIFTS AND

CONVENIENCE SHOPS


Qualified and interested parties may pick-up the Request for Proposal package at NAD's
offices at the reception desk on the second floor Domestic/lnternational Terminal at
Lynden Pindling International Airport between the hours of 90am and 4:00pm,from
September 15th to September 20th, 2009, A mandatory pre-proposal briefing for
those who have picked up packageswill be herd in the Arawak Lounge at the Airport on
Wednesday, September 30th at 10:0Oam.


fTODSCUS STOIS ON THI PAGE LOG ONT WRBUE4.O


$27.5m judgment


bid against marina


owner rejected


Be first, only 20 American

Certification Exam

Application available.


Register low for October Session

Call Hepson at:

356-4860


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009


THE TRIBUNE





THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009, PAGE 5B


BUSINESS


SHOWN (1-r): Reece Chipman, president of BICA; Gari Chrisie, BICA's student education committee
member; Remelda Moxey, chair, School of Business at COB; Zelma Wilson, chairperson, BICA's student
education committee; and Margaret Smith, BICA's student education committee member.


Accountants




visit COB




school chair

THE Bahamas Institute
of Chartered Accountants
(BICA) president, Reece lA
Chipman, along with K

tion's student educationlieve N ot
committee, have moved
to enhance the exposure
and knowledge of student
accountants at the Col- .
lege of the Bahamas
(COB).
They met with Remelda
Moxey, COB's School of
Business chair, on Mon- Montht UNLIMITED Travel $1,600.00
day to discuss ways in , '
which both organizations
can work together to a Mniitfi UNLIMItED Travel $3,000.0(
achieve this goal.
BICA members dis- .
cussed the quality of the
Accounting programme 1 Year UNLIMITED Traver $5,000.00
offered at the College of Lifetime UNLIMITED Travel
the Bahamas, the creation
of BICA's young accoun- PLEASE CALL
tants club, and BICA ,Wpi.n-,~o
assisting in the curriculum For Tnkerts and Addltlanml Inform.bban
review, as well as students
participating in Accoun- Please Conlat PIrformanoa Air at3 82-1608 Qi 812.
tants Week this Novem- Or Visit Ui At
ber and becoming part of �,w.purl�rminIlr.*. � w.
the Technical Updates in e-m,, Ertro._i ..rmmI, htmcol=r
the accounting and audit- M iA rem an F I74
ing professional
BICA also encouraged
the College of the
Bahamas and its account-
ing students with regards
to research and ethics,
and to become think-
tanks in the world of stan-
dard setting for the
accounting and reporting
of financial information. RP TLand and Strurtnre.


I I

I' IIIY!

II
INSIGHT


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


New


Step Street & Fox Hill Road
















ly Constructed Two Units Commercial Build

Unit One comprises one office,
customer service section, and one bathroom.

Unit Two is a retail store with an open
floor plan and one bathroom.

Potential Income
Unit One $1,800.00 per month
Unit Two $800.00 per month.


For conditions of sale and any other
information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas


Interested persons should submit
offer in writing addressed to
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
P. O. Box N-7518 Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before October 9th, 2009


ling


1. Va~cntmlat64
[(10'il OlfJoan's Height
SubdlMsIon
2. Lots a3 & *4. li 47
(50\l0DO'1 w,'dulidex
(1.532sq. Pf.-FurbceSt
Nassau Village
[Apiraised ,Value
S120.Imn.m
3, UarAinnIlnt14t
(1i.5575q.. it.)linn ini
Dr&RoyWer Ln
Southern HihtsSub
(Appraised VaLue

4. Lot 1,171 acr w/auto
repailriho & officl
2.79nq .k& va caA
huiLdin9..Z2LD0q It.
5. Laot 39(2,500sq. F.)
w/hse 1 0sq I. ilk
#35 h* 064-LincTn
ial (A prPIs d ValM
$57,78eM1)

w,'building 19?12sq fL-
DEivuux 51 (Appraised
ValMe SIg9,Ojh.011
7. Lft 90 11&3
[Frxll BlY),h ik $7
/tulldinfig 1,10s it-
Matihew St. Nasau
VigE (AppraMed
Valme t4sI5,OA OJ

8. ltlot W rrw/;sw (6)]
but~llncs-Pot i;* aT
BeMing PuiniAndr~ s
9. VacalotI 2, parrtl'
3D,613sq. ft.- ain's
PNrt, MangrnvE Cy
Andres (Appramed
Value $125,sW0o )
10. Parcelofland(1,493
xres) w 6 bulldig
[Heillln Muel)-Pindemr
Mangrove Cay, Andros
(Appraised Vaue

11. Bachfrontk lot 9.000sq,
Ftr w/builLng 2 .100sq,
L.-Pindenrs Mdngre
Cay An.drus (Apprabed

1Z. Lot 41344U . ft. wdiiplex
1.1l4lq fT-FreshCreet
And os (Appralsed
Value S94644.M)]
GranftLhabm
13. l r t l7.15~a .ft)
w/hse 21OO~ , ft
Blke.5 c Al-Sea Gull
Dr, Bahama ReefYacht
& LCintry Club Suh
Grand PR na
(Apprised Value
$z ,0aou .l
14, Vlanilrl IIt 39. EBlk 9
(14397sq. ft]-
Yorkshire Dr, Bahanha
West Replat Grand
BLhama (Appraised
VaLuce $25,0. iJ]


1. Vacant lot tM Blk 012
Llnt it.1 [11,250sq. t.)-
He*r Ay e ferby Suib
Grand Bahiama
(AlppraindValu
565MSN.00)
16 Lot *43 B (t10xtl')
ibidling-Nelwn Rd
Pilnrina(a .rdenn
Crand Bitama
(Appraised Vali

17, LjXN37(5D'kl15Y)
w/sixpkiA 2-s"tan
apartment building &
Church S.40fiq Ift
Matlrt Town. Killii .ub
Eir MilWe RLnk Ghoid
Bahama {Appr~~i*d
Value $211.M.00)
1& Lotw/ltlronm hotel
!S�sq. it on 4,1q
a o4 0tberh front-
Hip -RoCk Grand
Hahama (ApJraitd

19. V-ant Ic4 013, BIk a59,
lnn C1 t(i2, t)5;�q�fc
45' NDgenhamn Ecle &
Ingr8 Dr Emeraid Bay
Sub Grand Baama
(Apprad Value
Site,aaoeo]
241. LoX tl 5;, flk 1q5 IJnli
#3 ( Yxl25j-Derby
sub Grand Baham
I(ppniaed Value
Z23,AMMlI)
21. Vacant Ilc4 25, Blk st]
(17 II.q L ]�.
Cutwater Ila artion
Country Club Sub Grand
Bahama {Apiraitsd
Value $I38,MoM)
7t. iWt*2 ([2n,0.snlq. a.)
w.,bulldinE- romp*?s&
Lundromat-Queens
Highway met Rdi
Cummunange Grand
aharna (Appraised
VaSlue $1 Sl,WD)
AMtM
23, Lot 25 (1 7755q.1f t
wn/Jfe80o1aq ft-#47
Quem Ellireth Dr
Marih HarbturjAhac:
(App rased Valem
$212,756kI)
24. Vacant lot h6 i( acresj-
Fox Town Abco
(Appralied Valme

25. Lot St (tlSWOsiq. ft]
wb'uildigNM urphy
TniI Abha
(Apiprmed value
$102,420,001


2, forthonoflItW
.15IUsq. ft I-Fr'nn R
Murphly Town Abace
(Apprased Value

27. Loir55i(6.900Dq ft)
wlbujkllng-Mu.rphy
Tnwn Ahacrn
(APpralWW Value

28, Lot#045 (60'l 1I)
w/14 tooftml mtel
3,900q. rI.-S .Jn Pint
Abaco (Afprmied
vialve S8M60,00)
9. la H?,12l'Oq. Fi. /4
coans & I iradge
buildlh mtkgr
4,L86&q. RI-S&j. B nlkI
Treasure Cy Abaco
(A prTid lue


3A, V'tdnfcporrion of1lot 47
(50)i lo)'-Westa ames
Cistern Eleuthera
(Appraisd Value

31. vwant:lirr)sof WfA
ltaipn ColebroIk
Street Duinmore Town
(HIarbur Island)
Eleutfbe'a

32. Varant h arnr11
al-Arthusi Town. fCa
Island
33. LWt wl12 romn m~ece
1.39arts-Arthu's
Town Cat ] land
(Appraised Value
1630,00LDD)

34.Vacant lt t# (6520osq.
ft.)-Moss Town ECur n
(Appraised Value
$110,188.00)
35,Vaant lot 95
(SWxIzrZp CMtnodire
Rd Elizabeth Harbnur
Est. Eurna (Appraised
Value $45A00000)
36.Lo 134 (75x85')
wvtwi storey building
George Town, Exuma
(Appraised Value
546,000.00)
sLaogaoo d]

37 Yacan lot 100'x00'-
Boarncde alrea Westr of
Clanence Town Long
Island [SAppraised
Value 30,0efl.OO1


cmm


aWS IM Iu ik


T * 6 mmAki k ui
TKfc


2w k [iY4| S-imak'u Vmd
w/j44 |l4P Vlinah& uib.rd jl


air." lngiln f/Tpra*w ;V� l
Vcvmr (frmt Drm) B.m lir.-.s
CEpil , V rigfnmm EnqTir


Other Vessels - Phltoti NnDAvIlzleab
* ' Custom Steel Aull Veel (Mis Krlsv)
S22' Ssk Screw Steel Iull 11960) IV Lim III,
vessel has a new empm reqwuring Installatso. And
cam be view at Bradford Marine. Grand Bahama


TIM puhile ii Iwld o lubni mli aad hblg martld "T1ad4i" ti Bahamas Davipnmani BinklE . P Ba NBo -334,
Hassau, ariaK atttemUllm IFnc F i.S Cmuo r, e ted blad will not be uoaepted ir reep t ne 327-57811 br
aditianl Infnrmat on. Plea. Rese that al bds arn the a~trementioned propertits and asBes should be received
by or oa September 22. 2109. The Iahama Delopment nak reserves rae TiRht it riel n any or all offers A
assets are mo as.


ITDISCUS TOIESONTHS PGELO0ONTOWW.TIBUE22CO0


102
-aa4


BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK



P.O.Box N-30

Naslu. Bahamas

Tel:(242 327-57327-5793-6

Fax:12421 327.547, 327-125

lwwi.bhamasdevelopmenIbank.com



Properties


THE TRIBUNE


M ii..i.rus, * r m s J r. le


I3" I 31VM Spelt WVhill Ivtrinr
43"3w.']i.K Mrm Gmi-Hrimrl4Am





THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009, PAGE 7B


S iiii .ii
r 't 1 b


Banque Privee staffer



passes Series 7 exam


A staff accountant at
S. A. T. PREPARATION Banque Privee Edmond
.A. T. PR EP AR AT de Rothschild, Michelle
CLASS ES E. Reckley, has passed
the Series 7 exam in the
AT KINGSWAY ACADEMY US after studying with the
Nassau-based Securities
Training Institute (STI).
Beginning Saturday September 26 through Saturday Ms Albury, STI's
course administrator,
December 5, 2009, Kingsway Academy will hold said: "We are committed
to the development of the
S.A.T. Preparation Classes from 9:00 a.m. to Bahamian capital mar-
kets, in advancing the
12:00 noon culminating in the writing of the S. A. T. Securities Training Insti-
Examination in January. The cost is $250.00 per tute as a vital force in fos-
tering the education of
person and includes all materials. Bahamian financial pro-
fessionals, promoting eth-
ical standards of conduct,
and in establishing pro-
Interested persons are asked to contact the grammes to encourage
grammes to encourage
Business Office at telephone 324-6887 / 324-6269 continuing professional
development."
or the Guidance Conselor at 324-8811 or 324-3409.


[ML-f


POSITION: Commercial Supervisor
JOB FAMILY: Accounting
RCS CODE: L10005
REPORTS TO: Finance Manager
LOCATION: Country Finance Department or Cluster Office

OVERALL PURPOSE:
Position is responsible for managing the Commercial Finance activities for a country or group oF
countries within the Cluster. Manages Revenue leakage, establishes credit limits and reviews ship-
ments to profile. Supervises the following staff; Billing Analyst, Duties and Vendor Analyst, Ac-
counts Receivable Analyst.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:
* Manage the Accounting Commercial activities for a country or group of
countries within the Cluster.
* Supervise Billing, Duties, Accounts Receivable and Vendor Analysts.
* Prepare and analyze statistics and KPIs for the country/cluster.
* Manage customer profiles.
* Establish AR Credit limits.
* Principal contact for Commercial controller.
* Assist with preparation of Customer profitability analysis.
* Handle Billing queries from Billing Center.
* 1st level of approval for Credit notes.
* Special projects and ad hoc reports as required.
* Provide customers analyses, and review customer data base in term of
discount, and credit
* Performs other assignments as required.
* Ability to supervise the accounting staff at local station

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
* High school diploma and/or minimal of 5 years applicable experience
* Minimum of 4 years of commercial and accounting experience is required.
* Minimum of 2 years supervisory or management experience leading an
accounting department.
* A background in commercial credit and accounting required.
* Experience with a major Enterprise Reporting Package (ERP)
* Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.
* Ability to read and interpret data reports. Ability to understand and per
form data analysis.
* PC skills should include the basic suite of MS products, Excel, Access,
Word, Office
* Excellent communication skills both written and verbal, this function does
a lot of interfacing with internal and external customers and the Shared
Service Center

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:
* Bachelor's degree in Accounting/Finance, a related field or equivalent
education
Please email resume to;
Romell K. Knowles I
Country Manager
bahamaboiii@hotmail.com

Resumes can be dropped off to DHL Bahamas corporate office - East Bay Street,
Island Traders Building, Nassau Bahamas.
Please be advised only those applicants whose resumes are taken into
consideration will be contacted. No phone calls will be accepted.


BUSINESS I


IB JOB DESCRIPTION


THE TRIBUNE






PAGEBSIES IB HRDY ETMER1,20 H RBN


Recovery


'diminished' by excessive costs


to "hold the line" on wage
increases, and enhanced pro-
ductivity, "we're going along
as if no adjustments need to
be made".
With salaries and labour
force productivity out of line,
Mr Winder said the Bahami-
an private sector was "in a
really weak position" when it
came to not only combating
the recession, but also prepar-


Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) HALLET LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on September 16, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar
General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.
(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 15th day of October 2009 to send their names and addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or,
in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.
SEPTEMBER 17, 2009
LAKEISHA COLLIE
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY


LEGALNOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
THE SCEPTRE UK FUND LIMITED (registration number
137,117 B) is in dissolution. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator
and can be contacted at The Winterbotham Trust Company
limited, Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets,
PO. Box N-3026, Nassau Bahamas. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator before the 17th October, 2009.







Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) TABOR MANAGEMENT LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on September 16, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar
General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.
(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 15th day of October 2009 to send their names and addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or,
in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.
SEPTEMBER 17, 2009
LAKEISHA COLLIE
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY









KING'S
REAL ESTATE





Real Estate Agents


Applicants must have:
* Outstanding personality
SCurrent BREA licen e
* Minimum 2-ycars experience
* Proven sales record


Apply to bahamas@kingsrealty.com
Deadline: September 30, 2009
Information; 394-4397


ing for the eventual recovery
and pulling this nation out of
trouble. And this was exacer-
bated by the excessive cost
burden imposed on the busi-
ness sector by the public cor-
porations and utilities.
"We're not only suffering
from the recession, but are
also suffering from the fact
that our productivity, the lev-
el we're getting for each dol-
lar put out, is not putting us in
good standing to attract for-
eign direct investment and
tourists once the hotels open
back up," the Deloitte &
Touche managing partner
said.
The gap between produc-
tivity and wages, and the


impact this had on business
revenues, profits and plan-
ning, meant it would "take
the Bahamas longer to catch
up" with other economies in
the medium and long-term,
as well as in a short-term
recovery.
"Our competitiveness as a
nation, to compete, to attract
foreign direct investment, is
being diminished," Mr
Winder told Tribune Busi-
ness.
"On a short-term basis we
really have some challenges,
especially when you think that
most of the public sector is
going to be agitating for wage
increases during this period."
The Bahamas' inability to


The Public is hereby advised that l, ANGELO BRADELL
BURROWS, inland to change my name toa AGELO
BRADELL ROLLE If there are any objections to Ihis
change of namre by Ded Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.ox N-742,
Nassau Bahamas no laier than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.




NOTICE is hereby given that KENOL LOUIS PIERRE of P.O.
Box AB-20541, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 17th day of September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE MARTHE BELLOT
of P.O. Box AB-20554, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 17th day of September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE is hereby given that WILSON AUSTRALof TREASURE
CAY, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 17th day of September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-
7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

---------------


SRoad TrfficDepartment
Road Safet4y Ciompetiien


A


V


F'm Ioirf if


0a


'm


1wF


I.


TELEPIIOML


14ifT , JX-. j-r P.thLti
' yT*Tt. I id: I 1." - " ' i .rf - ,.' Ay '. m.. ..!.11.
* Irr- r" r"' irw "e *. l"**' I rY i ..r1ir= " v i.l An, . r'i*" r m'a ll'vl s rtw,
*i . r h , , ' ', i rV I r'J. . ' 4 L. '


tackle the cost competitive-
ness/productivity issue result-
ed, Mr Winder said, from a
lack of interest and under-
standing among the general
Bahamian population, plus a
lack of political leadership
and will to address the issue.
In addition, the Bahamas
did not have the private and
public sector trade union
leaders who could "demand
that kind of sacrifice" from
their members, when it came
to accepting reduced wages
and lower labour costs in
return for higher productivity.
Mr Winder contrasted the
Bahamas' trade union model
with that of Singapore's,
where unions exercised their


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division


influence in co-operation with
that island nation's govern-
ment, supporting wage
restraint and selling econom-
ic policies to their members
when necessary, as opposed
to strikes and militancy.
And with 90 per cent of the
income generated by Bahami-
an per annum gross domestic
product (GDP) consisting of
wages and salaries, it is not
hard to understand why the
workforce has been hit so
hard by redundancies and lay-
offs. Labour is the major cost
component for most busi-
nesses, and with productivity
out of line with salaries, it was
not hard for companies to go
this route.


2009
CLE/qui/No.00289


IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act of 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THOSE Three (3) parcels
of land totalling 162.177 acres being Grant C-39 and a
portion of Grant C-3 in an area known as Fort Pasture situate
immediately Eastward of Forbes Hill Settlement and about 5
miles West of Williams Town on the island of Little Exuma,
one of the Islands of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas.
AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Trevor Andrew Cooper
NOTICE OF PETITION
Pursuant to an Order of The Supreme Court dated the 2nd day
of September, A.D. 2009.
The Petition of Trevor Andrew Cooper, of Forbes Hill
Settlement on the Island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of
The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas, showeth in respect of:
ALL THOSE Three (3) parcels of land totalling 162.177
acres being Grant C-39 and a portion of Grant C-3 in an
area known as Fort Pasture situate immediately Eastward of
Forbes Hill Settlement and about 5 miles West of Williams
Town on the Island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth Of The Bahamas
The Petitioner, Trevor Andrew Cooper, herein claims to
be the owner in fee simple in possession of the said tracts
of land and has made application to The Supreme Court Of
The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas under Section 3 of
the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said
tracts of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate Of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of that Act.
Copies of the Plan showing the position boundaries shape
marks and dimensions of the said tracts of land may be
inspected during normal office hours at the following places:

(a) The Registry of The Supreme Court, East Street North,
Nassau, Bahamas.
(b) The Chambers of Charles Mackey & Co., BSB House,
West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
(c) The Administrator's office at George Town, Exuma.

Notice is hereby given that any person having Dower
or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the final publication of these presents file at the Registry
of The Supreme Court in the City of Nassau, Bahamas, and
serve on the Petitioner or on his Attorney an Adverse Claim in
the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve an
Adverse Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the final publication of these presents shall operate as a
bar to such claim.

DATED THIS 9th DAY OF SEPTEMBER, A.D. 2009
CHARLES MACKEY & CO.
Chambers BSB House
West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioner





I II


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


FROM page 1B

standing at virtually zero with
this nation's at around 4 per
cent over the last 12 months,
Mr Winder said that in the
Bahamian case "the entire
increase in inflation has been
primarily caused by wages
and salaries".
While the US had managed


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PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


'Alt v � tt , A,-.' [, L . I,.l' dn i [ ,� r


;AT -.i. 1-r i(J1 .I - *1-J ro-l.





THE TRIBUNE


FROM page 1B

a result of the recession - to
meet lower repayments and
lesser obligations.
One banking industry
source, speaking to Tribune
Business on condition of
anonymity, said that while no
directive had been issued by
the Central Bank, the banking
industry regulator had been
"looking at standardising"
how restructured loans were
treated.
"It's something that's been
brought forward," one bank-
ing industry source told Tri-
bune Business of the six
month non-performing treat-
ment proposal.
"Some of the banks are
doing exactly what the Cen-
tral Bank is looking for, and
even if loans are restructured
they are not brought current,
being treated as non-per-
forming for six months.
"It's a more conservative
approach. You'd several
months of experience, that
these people are meeting the
new terms and conditions,
and have the ability to pay."
Wendy Craigg, the Central
Bank's governor, could not
be contacted for comment
despite numerous Tribune
Business calls to her office
yesterday. However, she told
this newspaper in a recent
interview that the banking
sector regulator was keeping a
close eye on restructured
loans, and was in regular con-
tact with the banks on the
issue.
However, 'setting in stone'
how the banks treat restruc-


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009, PAGE 9B


tured loans could, according
to one source, "have a phe-
nomenal effect" on banking
balance sheets by increasing
the level of non-performing
loans.
This, in turn, would require
Bahamian commercial banks
to keep an increased level of
capital reserves set aside to
cover potential loan losses,
and increase loss provision
levels - something that will
impact earnings levels.
Such developments, some
have told Tribune Business,
would act as a disincentive for
banks to restructure their bor-
rowers' existing loans. These
sources also argued that it was
unnecessary to have a pre-
scriptive approach to the
issue, given that Bahamian
commercial banks generally
treated all restructured loans
as non-performing for a peri-
od, until they became confi-
dent that borrowers could
meet their new obligations.
Total non-performing loans
made by Bahamian banks to
the private sector breached
the $500 million mark in July
2009, with the increasing
strain the recession is placing
on businesses and households
exposed by the fact that the
only consumer lending cate-
gory showing growth was debt
consolidation - an almost-$38
million increase since the New
Year.
The Central Bank, in its
monthly economic and finan-
cial developments report for
July, showed a combination
of slumping credit demand
and defaults on existing loans,
as the contracting economy


and rising unemployment
continue to exact a toll, with
$902.5 million commercial
bank loans in arrears.
A further $64.7 million
worth of loans fell into arrears
during July 2009, marking a
7.7 per cent increase in the
number that were past due.
Total loans in arrears, in rela-
tion to the total number of
loans outstanding, increased
by 0.8 per cent to 14.5 per
cent.
Non-performing loans,
those which are more than 90
days past due and regarded
as more critical by the com-
mercial banks, as they have
stopped accruing interest, rose
by $31.3 million or 6.7 per
cent in July. Non-performing
loans now account for 8.1 per
cent of all loans issued by the
Bahamian commercial bank-
ing system.
Meanwhile, loans in the
delinquent category - that is,
31-90 days past due, also
increased by $33.4 million in
July to $401.4 million, taking
those loans to 6.5 per cent of
all credit issued to the private
sector by commercial banks.
The Central Bank said the
July arrears increase was gen-
erated by a $30 million, or 8.2
per cent, hike in mortgage
delinquencies to $396.1 mil-
lion, while commercial loans
in default grew by $28.5 mil-
lion or 14.5 per cent to $224.4
million - likely putting this
over 20 per cent, meaning that
more than one in every five
business loans is in default.
Consumer loans in arrears
increased by$6.3 million, or
2.3 per cent, to $282 million.


Concern over




treatment of




restructured




bank loans


AUDITOR'S REPORT ON THE
CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL
STATEMENTS


TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS
STATE BANK OF INDIA
1. We have examined the attached Consolidated
Balance Sheet of State Bank of India (the Bank),
its subsidiaries, associates and joint ventures (the
Group) as at 31st March 2009, and the Consolidated
Profit and Loss Account and the Consolidated
Cash Flow Statement for the year then ended in
which are incorporated the:
i. Audited accounts of the Bank audited by
14 Joint Auditors including us,
ii. Audited accounts of 1 (one) subsidiary audited
by us,
iii. Audited accounts of 25 (twenty five)
subsidiaries, 27 (twenty seven) Associates
and 1 [one) joint venture audited by
other auditors,
iv. Accounts of 1 (one) subsidiary for the period
01st April 2008 to 13th August 2008 (the date
of merger of this subsidiary with the Bank)
audited by another auditor,
v. Unaudited accounts of 2 (two) subsidiaries,
1 [one) associate and 1 (one) Joint venture,
These Consolidated financial statements are the
responsibility of the Bank's management and have
been prepared by the management on the basis of
separate financial statements and other financial
information of the different entities in the Group.
Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these
financial statements based on our audit.
2. We conducted our audit in accordance with
generally accepted auditing standards in India.
These Standards require that we plan and perform
the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether
the financial statements are prepared, in all

material aspects in accordance with identified
reporting framework and free of material
misstatements. An audit includes, examining on
a test basis, evidences supporting the amounts
and disclosures in the financial statements. An
audit also includes assessing the accounting
principles used and significant estimates made by
management, as well as evaluating the overall
financial statements. We believe that our audit
provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

3. We have jointly audited the financial statements
of the Bank along with 13 other joint auditors,
whose financial statements reflect total assets of
US $190148.26 million as at 31st March 2009, and


STATE BANK OF INDIA (CONSOLIDATED) BALANCE SHEET AS ON 31st MARCH 2009

(OOs omitted)
CAPITAL AND LIABILITIES Schedule As on 31.3.2009 As on 31,3.2008
No. (Current Year) (Previous Year)
US $ US $
Capital 1 125,174 157,395
Reserves & Surplus 2 14,147,380 15,105,910
Minority Interest 2A 439,328 505,515
Deposits 3 199,524,512 193,523,559
Borrowings 4 12,734,946 16,456,423
Other Liabilities and Provisions 5 30,289,255 30,300,430

TOTAL 257,260,595 256,049,232

ASSETS Schedule As on 31,3.2009 As on 31.3.2008
No. (Current Year) (Previous Year)
US $ US $
Cash and Balances with Reserve Bank of India 6 14,621,661 18,648,369
Balance with banks and money at call & short notice 7 10,075,045 3,542,164
Investments 8 73,389,481 68,255,664
Advances 9 147,942,111 150,354,422
Fixed Assets 10 1,029,865 1,162,210
Other Assets 11 10,202,432 14,086,403

TOTAL 257,260,595 256,049,232
Contingent Liabilities 12 169,693,628 235,735,346
Bills for Collection 9,845,890 6,287,614

PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST MARCH, 2009
(000s omitted)
Schedule Year ended Year ended
No. 31.3.2009 31.3.2008
US $ US $
I. INCOME
Interest earned 13 18,073,150 17,820,493
Other Income 14 4,224,386 4,666,748

TOTAL 22,297,536 22,487,241
II. EXPENDITURE
Interest expended 15 12,347,489 11,950,160
Operating expenses 16 5,238,904 5,967,904
Provisions and Contingencies - 2,508,251 2,272,857

TOTAL 20,094,644 20,190,921
III. PROFIT
Net profit for the year 2,202,892 2,296,320
Less: Minority Interest 42,938 62,868
Group Profit 2,159,954 2,233,452
Add: Brought forward profit
attributable to the group 17,299 29,666
Add: Transfer from General Reserve - 23

TOTAL 2,177,253 2,263,141
APPROPRIATIONS
Transfer to Statutory Reserves 1,180,392 1,389,192
Transfer to Other Reserves 530,220 455,920
Transfer to Proposed Dividend 363,003 338,400
Corporate Tax on Dividend 61,052 57,759
Balance carried over to Balance Sheet 42,586 21,870

TOTAL 2,177,253 2,263,141
Basic earnings per share 3 4
Diluted earning per share 3 4

Interested parties may obtain a complete copy of the Consolidated Financial Statements from the local office of
the Entity at State Bank Of India, Saffrey Square, Suite 201, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.


TODSUSI STOIES O TIS PGE OS N0TWWTIBUE22.O


total revenue of US $15078.67 million and net cash
flows amounting to US $ 6491.52 million for the
year then ended.

4. We have also audited the financial statements of
one of the subsidiary whose financial statements
reflect total assets of US $ 143.93 million as at
31st March 2009, total revenue of US $ 11.24
million and net cash flows amounting to
US $ 6.70 million for the year then ended.

5. We did not audit the financial statements of its
Subsidiaries, Associates and Joint Ventures
whose financial statements reflect total assets of
US $ 65334.98 million as at 31st March 2009, and
total revenue of US $ 7175.67 million and net cash
flows amounting to US $ 455.64 million for the
year then ended. These financial statements have
been audited by other auditors whose reports
have been furnished to us, and our opinion,
insofar as it relates to the amounts included in
respect of other entities, are based solely on the
report of the other auditors.

6. We have also relied on the un-audited financial
statements of 2 (two) subsidiaries, 1 (one) associate
and 1 (one) joint venture, whose financial
statements reflect total assets of US $ 633.48
million as at 31st March 2009, total revenue of
US $ 31.94 million and net cash flows amounting
to US $ 73.54 million for the year then ended.

7. We report that the consolidated financial statements
have been prepared by the Bank's management in
accordance with the requirement of Accounting
Standard 21-Consolidated Financial Statements,
Accounting Standard 23-Accounting for investment
in Associates in Consolidated Financial Statements
and Accounting Standard 27-Financial Reporting
of Interest in Joint Ventures prescribed by the
Institute of Chartered Accountants of India and the
requirements of Reserve Bank of India.

8. Based on our audit and consideration of report of
other auditors on separate financial statements and
on consideration of the unaudited financial
statements and on the other financial information of
the components, and to the best of our information
and explanations given to us we are of the opinion
that the attached Consolidated Financial Statements,
give a true and fair view in conformity with the
accounting principles generally accepted in India:
a. in the case of the Consolidated Balance Sheet
on the state of affairs of the Group as at
31st March 2009;
b. in the case of the Consolidated Profit and
Loss account of the consolidated profit of the
Group for the year ended on that date; and
c. in the case of the Consolidated Cash Flow
Statement of the Cash Flows of the Group
for the year ended on that date,


MAD
Nassau Airport
Drvlopmeni1 Cn ortny




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Nassau Ai rpJt Deviepmsnt Company
Lyrin Fidling lemrtbnal Airport
Pht (242) 3T7-008 I Fa: (242) 377-0294
P.O. Box AP59229, Nassau, Bahani
Email; feedbadnas.lbe


I






PAGEBSIES IOTUSASPEBR1,20 H RBN


^^*J---- tVll--tl


1Bilish CoIonial Hilon Hot I


Clearance SALE
Everything is $20
We offer Sinnging Services, Repairs, Knolting,
Wiring, Driling and The Snack Fix System and
The Myslery Clasps

Pearls and Beads Strands Wholesale and Retail
P.O.Box EE-1527
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-323-1865
Email; gems-pe rls@ho4tmail.com

Jewerlv makin cases starts
September ign up now









Re: Lot # 12, Block # 86, Richmond Park
Subdivision, Unit 3R Freeport, Grand Bahama












Recently Constructed Six-Plex


Five Units:
One bedroom one bathroom, living and dining
area, kitchen and laundry area.

One Unit:
Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, a powder room,
living and dining room, family room, kitchen,
office and laundry room and arctic area.

Potential Income:
One bedroom units $3,250.00 per month
Four bedrooms unit $1,400.00 per month.

For conditions of sale and any
other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas


Interested persons should
submit offer in writing addressed to
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
P. O. Box N-7518 Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before October 9th, 2009




GN-916







MINISTRY OF NATIONAL SECURITY

NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (RFP)
For
ELECTRONIC MONITORING (EM) SOLUTION
(REVISED)


The Government of The Bahamas is seeking
proposals from Vendors/Implementers to provide an
Electronic Monitoring (EM) Solution, as a service to the
Ministry of National Security and it Key Stakeholders, for
the purpose of monitoring and tracking offenders.

Interested Vendors/Implementers should collect a copy of
the RFP, inclusive of the technical requirements, from the
Ministry of National Security, 3rd Floor Churchill
Building Rawson Square, Nassau, The Bahamas.

Proposals should be delivered on or before Friday 25
September, 2009 by 3 p.m. In a sealed envelope
addressed to:

Chairman
Tenders Board Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Labelled: RFP- Her Majesty's Prisons Electronic Monitoring
Solution


SGN-917




MINISTRY OF TOURISM & AVIATION DEPARTMENT
OF CIVIL AVIATION

PUBLICATION BY THE MINISTRY OF
TRANSPORT & AVIATION DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL
AVIATION PARTICULARS OF AN APPLICATION TO
OPERATE SCHEDULED AIR SERVICES

In accordance with the provisions of Regulation
9 of the Civil Aviation (Licensing of Air Services)
Regulations 1976, the Minister responsible for
Aviation hereby publishes the following particulars
of the under-mentioned applicant to operate
scheduled air services to and from The Bahamas.

PARTICULARS OF APPLICATION

1. Application: LEAIR CHARTER SERVICE LTD.

2. Date of first publication: 17th September, 2009

3. Routes: BETWEEN NASSAU ON THE ONE
HAND AND ANDROS TOWN ON THE OTHER.
4. Purpose of services: Passenger, mail and freight.


5. Provisional time table:
NASSAU/ANDROS TOWN

ANDROS TOWNINASSAU


Local Times
0630/0645 Daily
1530/1545"
0700/0715"
1600/1615"


6. Frequency of flights: See above time-table.

7. Type of Aircraft: EMBRAER-110, CESSNA 402-C &
PIPER AZTECS

Any representation regarding or objection thereto in
accordance with Regulation 10 must be received by the
Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Tourism & Aviation & the
Department of Civil Aviation within fourteen (14) days after
the date of first publication of this Notice.

Signed
HYACINTH PRATT
PERMANENT SECRETARY


Career


Opportunity



AN ENERGY-SAVING CAREER


Are you passionate about saving energy? DO

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If you are interested in a career in this exciting

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the passion. We'll supply the rest.


ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


The Public is hereby advised that I, NAWAKO KIKI ROLLE of
STAPLEDON GARDENS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, intend
to change the name to MAWAKO KIKI ROLLE. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objectionstotheChief PassportOfficer, P.O. Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/01038
COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION
BETWEEN

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate
in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence containing
8,194 square feet situate on the Southern Side of Kelly Lane, 395 feet
West of Johnson Road and bounded NORTHWARDLY by Kelly
Lane and running thereon Seventy and Twenty-six (70.26) feet and
EASTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of Albertha
Pratt and running thereon One Hundred and Twenty and Twelve
hundredths (120.12) feet SOUTHWARDLY by land now or formerly
the property of Inez Munroe and running thereon Sixty-seven and
Ninety-two hundredths (67.92) feet and WESTWARDLY by land
now or formerly the property of Ida Ferguson and running thereon
One Hundred and Eighteen and Forty-seven hundredths (118.47) feet
which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape marks
boundaries and dimensions more particularly described by and
delineated on the said diagram or plan and thereon coloured YELLOW
AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF
GENEVIEVE STRACHAN


NOTICE
The Quieting Titles Act, 1959
The Petition of Genevieve Strachan of Johnson Estates in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of all that piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence
containing 8,194 square feet situate on the Southern Side of Kelly
Lane, 395 feet West of Johnson Road and bounded NORTHWARDLY
by Kelly Lane and running thereon Seventy and Twenty-six (70.26)
feet and EASTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of
Albertha Pratt and running thereon One Hundred and Twenty and
Twelve hundredths (120.12) feet SOUTHWARDLY by land now or
formerly the property of Inez Munroe and running thereon Sixty-
seven and Ninety-two hundredths (67.92) feet and WESTWARDLY
by land now or formerly the property of Ida Ferguson and running
thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and Forty-seven hundredths
(118.47) feet which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position
shape marks boundaries and dimensions more particularly described
by and delineated on the said diagram or plan and thereon coloured
YELLOW

Genevieve Strachan claims to be the owner of the fee simple estate
in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore described free from
encumbrances and the Petitioner has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under section 3 of the
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have her title to the said tract of land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared
in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons having Dower or
a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in
the Petition shall on or before the 4th November, A.D. 2009 file in
the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit
to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his claim on or before the 4th November, AD. 2009 will
operate as a bar to such claim.
Copies of the filed Plan may be inspected at:
1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building, East
Street North, Nassau, Bahamas;
2. The Chambers of Hope Strachan & Co., attorneys for the
Petitioner, Equity House, Mount Royal Avenue North (Hawkins
Hill), Nassau, Bahamas
Dated this 31st day of August, AD. 2009
HOPE STRACHAN & CO.
Chambers
Equity House
Mt. Royal Avenue North
(Hawkins Hill)
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner


ROYAL FFI DELi TG CAPITAL MARKETS
SMirae at Wrk ck
C F A L' (-:;) I()� N IA -
E I. LI TC LL TF -i-_LLL LC _ Ci-F ICLz - .I
TUESDAY 15 SEPTEi. BEPR L-((i
F IL DE L I~, -L- E -. -- I .I'TD -- -. .- - -
WWW.BISXBAMAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 I FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
81 1 15 AML Foods Limited 1 15 1 15 000 0127 0000 91 000%
11 80 9 90 Bahamas Property Fund 990 990 000 0 992 0200 100 202%
930 6 25 Bank of Bahamas 6 25 6 25 0 00 0 244 0 260 256 416%
0 89 0 63 Benchmark 0 63 0 63 0 00 -0 877 0 000 N/M 000%
349 315 Bahamas Waste 315 3 15 000 0 078 0 090 404 286%
237 2 14 Fidelity Bank 2 37 237 0 00 0 055 0 040 43 1 169%
14 10 1000 Cable Bahamas 10 00 10 0 00 1 406 0 250 71 250%
2 88 2 74 Collna Holdings 2 74 2 74 0 00 0 249 0 040 110 146%
7 50 5 26 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 5 92 5 92 0 00 0 419 0 300 141 5 07%
3 85 1 27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3 69 374 0 05 0111 0 052 337 139%
285 132 Doctor's Hospital 2 05 205 0 00 0 382 0 080 54 390%
8 20 6 60 Famguard 6 60 6 60 0 00 0 420 0 240 157 364%
12 50 8 80 Fnco 8 80 8 80 0 00 0 322 0 520 27 3 591
11 71 1029 FlrstCarbbean Bank 10 29 10 29 0 00 0 794 0 350 130 340%
553 495 Focol (S) 4 99 4 99 0 00 0 332 0 150 150 301%
1 00 1 00 Focol Class B Preference 1 00 1 00 0 00 0 000 0 000 N/M 000%
0 45 0 30 Freeport Concrete 0 30 0 30 0 00 0 035 0 000 86 000%
902 5 49 ICD Utllltles 5 50 5 50 0 00 206 0 407 0 500 135 909%
1200 1009 J S Johnson 1009 1009 000 0952 0640 106 634%
LI = II_. T L,_ I TL . II I I ILT . iI- .'. - *- ',-, - ,-,,-, -, P .-.- -.-, -,..- P.. -..-., r -- - - ,
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol Interest Maturity
1000 00 100000 Fdelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100 00 0 00 7% 19 October 2017
1000 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 10000 00 Prime + 1 75% 19 October 2022
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 1000 0 000 7% 30 May 2013
1000 00 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 1000 0 00 Prime + 1 75% 29 May 2015
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
14 60 7 92 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 92 842 14 00 -2 246 0 000 N/M 000%
S00 6 00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2 00 6 25 4 00 0 000 0 480 N/M 780%
, - i - .TI,-, -. -, I,[. - l lt "
55 0 40 RND Holdings 0 45 0 55 0 55 0 002 0000 261 90 000%
C 1Xi . L. "I i ' i, , , -,i i-, ,,, 1
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield % NAV Date
1 4038 1 3344 CFAL Bond Fund 1 4038 3 72 5 20 31-Aug-09
3 0350 2 8952 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2 8990 -1 39 -4 16 31-Aug-09
1 4867 1 4105 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 4880 3 79 549 4-Sep-09
36090 30941 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3 0941 -8 61 -13 59 31-Aug-09
130484 123870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13 1136 393 587 31-Aug-09
101 6693 100 0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101 6693 1 10 1 67 30-Jun-09
00 9600 93 1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96 7398 035 -418 30-Jun-09
1 0000 1 0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1 0000 0 00 0 00 31-Dec-07
94075 9 0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9 3399 2 69 -1 41 31-Jul-09
1 0707 1 0000 FG Financal Preferred Income Fund 1 0707 338 514 31-Aug-09
1 0364 1 0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1 0319 -0 11 2 05 31-Aug-09
1 0673 1 0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1 0673 2 89 4 93 31-Aug-09
I I-F. CT TCFr I_
BISXALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 1000 00 YIELD last 12 mount dividends divided by closing pce
52k-HI- Highest closing p e in last 52 week Bid $ Buying pce of Colna and Fidelty
Previous Close Previous days weg ted pe for daly volum Lat Pe Last traded overtcounter p
Today's Close Cument day's weighted pnce for daily volume Weekly Vol Trading volume of the pnorweek
Change Change In closing price fro- day to day EPS $ A cortpany's reported earnngs per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol- Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per sare paid In th.e last 12 monts N/M Not M...eaningful
P/E -Closing pnce divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX -The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1, 1994 = 100
(S) 4 for 1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) 3for1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL.= COLINA 242-502-7010 I ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 I FG CAPITAL NIARKET 242-396-4000 COLONIAL 242-502-7525


All submissions will be opened at 10:00 am on
Tuesday 6th October, 2009 at the Tenders Board
meeting, 3rd Floor Conference Room, Ministry of
Finance, Cable Beach.

The Government reserves the right to reject any or
all tenders


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


























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PG 26 Thursday, September 17, 2009


RELIGION


The Tribune


Pastors of Prayer call


church demolition



"Darkest Day"


By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

THE demolishment of
Canaan Baptist Church last
week is being labeled as an
event that marked the "dark-
est day" in the history of the
church in the Bahamas.
Ian Brathwaite, president of the
Pastors Of Prayer-a unit of 15 pastors
from 6 denominations that unite via
teleconferencing to pray for each
other- questions why individuals
"would even fathom to demolish a
house of worship."
Pastors of Prayer was founded and
organised in 1998 by Bishop Ian
Brathwaite, Pastor of Holy Dove
Baptist Church. The fellowship was
inspired to bring together a group of
pastors who wanted to live holy and
who firmly believed in the uncompro-
mising word of God."
"By the moral fiber of our nation,
you shouldn't destroy the church under
any terms," Mr Brathwaite said. "The
church is known as a place of rescue,
and a safe haven. Something else
could've been worked out. We are not
speaking as lawmakers but as the spir-
itual conscience of the Christian nation
were are built on.
The tearing down of the church in
Sir Lynden Pindling Estates came
unexpectedly to his good colleague
Eugene Bastian, pastor of Canaan
Baptist Church, who was phoned dur-
ing the ordeal by a concerned member
that the church was being destroyed,
he said at a recent press conference.
Mr Brathwaite told Tribune Religion
that he has stayed in contact with Mr
Bastian since the incident, and
describes Mr Bastian's personal
account the morning when he discov-
ered that his church was being reduced
to rubble:
"On the morning of the demolition,
Pastor Bastian said he had just passed
the church at 9.30 that morning. It was
the first time that he had pulled on the
side of the church, and really took in
what God had done through his min-
istry.
"When he got home around 10am,


he received information through a
phone call that somebody came with a
bulldozer and tore down his church.
He was in shock, and drove to the site.
When he got there, he said he started
rubbing his eyes in disbelief--he
thought it was a dream."
Members of the church and commu-
nity were said to be visibly confused,
disturbed and angered by the move to
destroy their place of worship as they
gathered at the site that afternoon.
It is alleged that the pastor under-
stood the court order but didn't expect
them to tear it down so quickly.
According to Mr Brathwaite, Mr
Bastian is in good spirits now, and is
"leaving the situation in God's hands."
The decision to demolish the church
came out of a ruling by Justice Cheryl
Albury, who found Arawak Homes
Limited to be the rightful owner of lots
on Charles Saunders Highway on
which the church was built in June
2006.
The court found that church pastor
Eugene Bastian had been served with
a writ in August 2006 after Arawak
Homes Ltd took action. But Mr
Bastian told the court he had bought
the land from Jorol Limited before
commencing construction of the
church.
However, Justice Albury found the
defence put forward by Mr Bastian
and members of the church to be
"without merit and unsustainable" in
light of the decisions in Supreme Court
actions that displaced any claim of title
to the church's purported predecessor.
Justice Albury ordered the defen-
dants to cease construction of any
buildings on the lots in Sir Lynden
Pindling Estates.
She further ordered for the build-
ings to be demolished and removed,
for the defendants to be restrained
from entering the lots, to pay the costs
incurred to Arawak Homes Ltd, and
pay damages for trespass in respect of
the lots. Arawak Homes was given
possession of the land with immediate
effect.
For the meantime, members of
Canaan Baptist Church have relocated
above the Great Commission Ministry
on Wulff Road, at Bishop Walter
Hanchell's invitation.


BISHOP lan Brathwaite, president/founder of the group 'Pastors of Prayer'.







The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, September 17, 2009 e PG 27


In the flesh

FOR the past few -
years we have been
inundated with sexual-
ly related controver- - REV \N( N EL_
sies. -
First, there were A PXL( I( )I I
issues in The Church
(which still continue
unabated) about the the-
ological support for homosexual practices, ordained leaders who
engage in them, and revisions to the definition and understand-
ing of marriage and partnership.
We have had serious allegations and convictions of sexual
misconduct of various kinds in the settings of church, school,
after-school civic activities, as well as in the home. All of this
makes the world a very unsafe place for too many little ones of
all ages.
Now we have entered a period of intensely emotional debate
about the concept of spousal rape, and the role that law-makers
should be allowed to play in its prevention. We have yet to see
the outcome of all of these discussions.
There also continues the concerns of Christ in culture and
Christ against culture in the form of disagreements over the
more vigorous sexually related movements by some (not all) of
the Junkanoo dancers, and the place of ring play. The documen-
tary on children engaging in ring play, captured on film some
moves that left little to the imagination.
When I want to determine what my comfort level should be
as a Christian when it comes to any of these discussions, I ask
myself: "What do I think Our Lord and Saviour would have to
say if He were present?" Then prayerfully, I seek to discern
God's will for me as an individual and in my capacity as one
who offers guidance to others.
In order to avoid the temptation of straying too far from our
Great Commission to make disciples for the Lord, The Church
has to remind her people to remain "in the Spirit" as we debate
about things "of the flesh." Every encounter has the potential of
being a pastoral moment. Every statement makes possible the


"In order to avoid
the temptation of
straying too far from
our Great
Commission to
make disciples for
the Lord, The
Church has to
remind her people
to remain "in the
Spirit" as we
debate about things
"of the flesh."


pronouncement of a
prophetic word. Each dis-
cussion can broaden the
minds of our people to
engage together in
prayerful theological
reflection where we pause
for God's guidance rather
than losing our tempers
with one another.
If we use this time as a
time to teach our children
about human rights and
freedoms, about responsi-
bilities and restrictions,
about God's grace and
mercy, forgiveness and
healing, and about prayer
and praise, then they too
will see God in the midst
of all the struggles. It is
for us to seek to be of
one accord, and in situa-
tions when we fail to do
so, let us agree to dis-
agree until God gives us
clarity.


il 'IlilII sI


@PLUMBING *ELECTRICAL

'ROOFING REPAIR *CARPETING

@CABINETS *SPANISH FINISH

*PAINTING *TILING

*MINOR CONSTRUCTION

REQUIREMENTS: JOB LETTER, PASSPORT, NIB, PAY SLIP



Ai I AI


'FAMILY CRUISES *MIAMI


,HONEYMOON GETAWAYS 'DISNEY WORLD


*CHURCH CONVENTIONS ,NEWYORK

*CALIFORNIA


Thursday, September 17, 2009 * PG 27


The Tribune


RELIGION








The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, September 17, 2009 * PG 29


The Real Pageant


ACCORDING to the Webster
Dictionary the word pageant means: An
elaborate spectacle show or procession.
I don't want to take anything away
from the recent Miss Universe or Miss
Bahamas pageants, but I have to won-
der what the vision and monetary full-
fillment of our government is as it
relates to pageants.
If the vision and the monetary fulfill-
ment of these pageants were somehow a
small fraction of the vision of our gov-
ernment to 1) help provide gainful
employment for the hurting Bahamian
families, 2) Send a clarion, zero-toler-
ance message to the criminal mind-set;
via swift justice and punishment, and 3)
provide an urgent expediting of a diver-
sified economy then the slogan "It's
Better in the Bahamas" as it relates to
the small Bahamians, would be true.
What the Bahamas is seeing today
and will continue to see in the coming
years, is what I call "Healthy
Distractions." As good and as promo-
tional as the Miss Universe Beauty
Pageant and the other pageants that will
follow will be for the country, they are
all healthy distractions.
The true beauty of this nation cannot
be found in an event held at the high
priced Atlantis; but rather this beauty is
found within the common people of
whom various governments have failed
miserably.
Do you want to see this government
both (administration and opposition)
tremble in fear and immediately put the
brakes on the country's increasing mur-
der rate and other serious crimes?
Had it been that two or three of these
murders occurred on Paradise Island /
Atlantis where the true leader of both
the present and former government sits,
I can assure you that the prime minister,
the leader of the opposition and the
minister of national security would have
a total different outlook on capital pun-
ishment; and immediately resolve the
judicial mess in the court system.
But then again; for the most part


these murders and other serious crimes
are being committed against the local
Bahamians and not on Paradise Island.
It seems as if prioritising matters of
national importance that will help in
developing and advancing the grass-
roots is of no urgency to the powers that
be. The deterioration of our once highly
educational system is at an all time low,
the ancient PMH and the Rand hospital
in Freeport will be with us until the Lord
comes; as hundreds of thousands of dol-
lars will continue to be wasted on cos-
metic repairs of these dinosaurs.
As a nation, we are proficient at host-
ing events that paint a beautiful external
picture; meanwhile internally the mass-
es are suffering. When it comes to
investing in and developing our people
to become shakers and movers in the
business world both locally and interna-
tionally our leaders show very little
interest.
Comparing the Bahamas today with
that of the Bahamas of 1960's from a
technology development perspective,
we're like an un-opened gift that's left
under the Christmas tree; whereby all of
our present day leaders are afraid of
opening and assisting in the develop-
ment of the gift. On the other hand, the
foreign investors sees the gifts and
immediately invests time and money in
developing the gifts which yields hun-
dreds / thousands-fold return on their
investment. After some ten to twenty
years of exploiting these gifts; the
investors often move onto other areas
leaving the people crying out to their
powerless governments for justice.
Here's what the Bible doesn't say:
"Where there is no vision, the leaders
perish" No, but rather here's what it


says in Prov 29: 18. Where there is no
vision, the people perish:
Listen! The lack of vision by leader-
ship to invest in and help to develop its
people will by far and large always hurt
and be detrimental first to the people.
Every grassroot person in this country is
not as fooled / stupid as our leaders may
think. There's an old saying that says
"You can fool some of the people some-
time, but you can't fool all the people all
the time"
As a people, we may not say much;
but we do know that every foreign
investor that is allowed to invest and
start a new business in the Bahamas
either at the beginning or somewhere
down the line; one way or another had
to render some kind of favour or kick-
back to the powers that be. Therefore
when it comes to governments standing
up and blatantly defending the rights of
exploited employees by foreign
investors; these thugs / government have
to remain silent or speak under their
breath.
Then also there are some foreign
investors of integrity who refused to
give into the demands of our corrupt
leaders and their friends in high places;
many of these investors have taken their
investments to other countries.
This ancient corrupt practice happens
to be the foundation of which many of
our existent establishments and systems
throughout the length and breath of the
Bahamas were built upon.
Think about this! Why is it that no
PLP or FNM government is able to
bring relief to the island of Grand
Bahama / Freeport?

Watch this!
The BEAST of Grand Bahama (The
Grand Bahama Port Authority), from
the time of Sir Lynden to this present
day has financially contaminated the
Bahamas' political, legal and religious
system; thereby gaining full authority
to do as it pleases.
It's a fact that Grand Bahamians
enjoy being swung by eloquent speak-
ing, compromising politicians, lawyers
and weak religious leaders concerning
the true future of Grand Bahama; as
their heritage is being stolen and sold
right in their faces.
But then again, their heritage doesn't
matter to them; for all they really want
is political rhetoric and promises.
(Ain't Long Now, The Storm is Over;
It's a Matter of Trust) yeah right !


* For questions or comments contact us via
E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or Ph.1-
242-441-2021


Plan B


"Therefore I say unto you, Take no thought
for your life, what ye shall eat, or
what ye shall drink; nor yet for your body,
what ye shall put on. Is not the life
more than meat, and the body than rai-
ment?"
MATT 6:25-33

IN an article some months ago, I
shared that we as Christians do not really
"trust" God totally. We put in place,
"Plan B" just in case God doesn't work
out or He takes too long. We have a plan.
So many of us, if we are honest with our-
selves will admit that when we take mat-
ters into our own hands, we mess things
up.
The Bible tells us that, "It is in God
that we live, move and have our being."
How is it that we think that we can do
anything in and of ourselves? We per-
suade ourselves that we can do anything
all by ourselves when in actuality, we can
do all things through Christ who gives us
strength and nothing in of ourselves.
I went to a funeral last month and the
bishop said that he had to use his hand-
gun to scare an intruder off his property.
Now there is something very wrong with
this picture. How is it that a bishop, a man
who is over a number of churches resort-
ing to a hand gun? Didn't God say cast
your cares upon Him because He cares
for us?
The Bible also tells us that our warfare
is not carnal. Why is it then that we are
taking matters into our own hands with
weapons such as guns? What would that
bishop say if he had actually shot the
young man in his yard.
As the church we have to be careful
what we open doors to. Another pastor
said that he travels with a cutlass under
the driver's seat of his car. When he was
asked why, by the person cleaning his car,
he said it is because he was " a man of
God.
What example is that for the world? If
we who call on God don't believe He can
protect us, how can we expect anyone
else to believe God? Simply put we born
again believers have to get rid of our
"Plan B" and just trust God. I know that
can be difficult (trusting God) when you
need things to happen and it seems like
nothing is.
Guess what? God 'gat' you He always
did. He has to do what He says He will
do. God's word can't return to Him void,
it has to do what it was set out to do. He
may not come when you want Him to but
He's always on time.


Share your ne

The Tribune wants to hear from people
who are making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps you are
raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your
story.







PG 30 * Thursday, September 17, 2009


RFLIO~I )N


The Tribune


Communication is the key to passionate lovemaking

A Christian Prospective - PART 1


By REV DR WESLEY L
THOMPSON
Mt Pleasant Green Baptist
Church International


The Law is for the lawless. It is the
responsibility of any civil government to
create and enforce laws for the protection
of its citizens.

1 Timothy 1:9-10 reads, "Knowing
this, that the law is not made for a right-
eous man, but for the lawless and dis-
obedient, for the ungodly and for sin-
ners, for unholy and profane, for mur-
derers of fathers and murderers of
mothers, for manslayers, for whore-
mongers, for them that defile them-
selves with mankind, for men stealers,
for liars, for perjured persons, and if
there be any other thing that is contrary
to sound doctrine;"
Governments are ordained by God.
He sets up and pulls down.
Psalm 75:6-7 reads, "For promotion
cometh neither from the east, nor from
the west, nor from the south. But God
is the judge: He putteth down one, and
sitteth up another."


Romans 13:1-2 reads, "Let every soul
be subject unto the higher powers. For
there is no power but of God: the pow-
ers that be are ordained by God.
Whosoever therefore resisteth the
power, resisteth the ordinance of God:
and they shall receive to themselves
damnation."
Simply put: let every person be loyal-
ly subject to the governing civil authori-
ties. For there is no authority except
from God (by His permission, His sanc-
tion and those that exist do so by God's
appointment).
Therefore, he that resists and sets
himself up against the authorities
resists what God has appointed and
arranged in divine order. And those
who resist will bring down judgment
upon themselves, receiving the penalty
due them.
Proverbs 8:15 reads, "By me kings
reign, and princes decree justice."
I believe the Word of God sanctions
the responsibility of a government to
protect its citizens. Amending The
Sexual Offences Act to outlaw marital
rape will enlighten men who think
archaically about their concept of


woman. They look at their wives as
chattel or property.
This law will support Ephesians 5:21:
husbands and wives be subject to one
another out of reverence for Christ (the
Messiah, the Anointed One).
1 Peter 3:7-8 reads, "Likewise, ye
husbands, dwell with them according to
knowledge, giving honor unto the wife,
as unto the weaker vessel, and as being
heirs together of the grace of life; that
your prayers be not hindered. Finally,
be ye all of one mind, having compas-
sion one of another, love as brethren,
be pitiful, be courteous:"
We must not twist 1 Corinthians 7:1-
5 which gives one the legal right to have
sexual intercourse with one's spouse
with their consent. The husband
should give his wife her conjugal rights,
goodwill, kindness and what is due her
as his wife and likewise the wife to her
husband.
For the wife does not have exclusive
authority and control over her own
body, but the husband has his rights.
Likewise, also the husband does not
have exclusive authority and control
over his body, but the wife has her


rights.
1 Corinthians 7:5 is where the word
'communication' is referred to.
"Defraud ye not one the other, except
it be with consent for a time, that ye
may give yourselves to fasting and
prayer; and come together again, that
Satan tempt you not for your inconti-
nency."
With consent - there are other emer-
gencies that need to be communicated
to your spouse although sexual inter-
course is a marital right.
Forget what you have learned about
sex from locker rooms or association
with friends and relatives. Every cou-
ple should know how to make love in a
way that is honorable and that brings
satisfaction to both the husband and
the wife.
The amendment to The Sexual
Offences Act to outlaw marital rape
calls for communication. The God kind
of love is centered around giving. It
says, I want to please you more than
myself. It is not concerned with its own
selfish interests, motives or agendas.
Love is more concerned with meeting
your spouse's needs than your own.


Torah that survived Holocaust finds home in Miami


MIAMI


RABBI Danny Marmorstein uses the
Yiddish word "bashert" to describe how
a Torah created in 19th-century Eastern
Europe survived the Nazi regime in near-
perfect condition and landed a world
away at his tiny synagogue, according to
the Associated Press.
"It means 'meant to be,'" he said, "and
this was meant for us."
The 131-year-old Torah is being cele-
brated at Congregation Ahavat Olam for
the first time on Rosh Hashanah, offer-
ing a powerful symbol on the endurance
of the Jewish faith.
The sheepskin scroll was believed to
have been completed in 1878, the date of
the inscription on its wooden handle. The
handle also bears the name of the couple
who donated it to their congregation in
Moravske Budejovice, in what is now the
Czech Republic.
It was kept in a warehouse with other
Torahs and Judaica after Hitler came to
power, coming under the Nazis' control.
After the Nazis fell, the cache from the
Central Jewish Museum in Prague was
controlled by communists who eventual-
ly sold the scroll and 1,563 others to a
London synagogue in 1963.
That repository, the Memorial Scrolls


o -
0_


E





Trust, has given the Torahs to congrega-
tions, museums and other groups as sym-
bols of survival of the faith and a connec-
tion to all the Jews lost during the
Holocaust.
"We've sent them all over the world,"
said Evelyn Friedlander, the London-
based curator of the trust, "and they've
come back to life."


The scroll came to Miami after
Marmorstein placed the synagogue's
name on a waiting list several years back.
Like all the trust's scrolls, it remains the
property of the London organization, on
indefinite loan to the temple.
Congregations are chosen, in part, based
on their desire to incorporate the scroll
into their worship.


SIN THIS Aug. 28, 2009
photo, Steve Andrews,
left center, of
Congregation Ahavat
Olam kisses their newly
obtained Torah as he
passes it to Minda
Feldheim, right, during a
procession to the
Synagogue through the
streets of Miami. Rabbi
SDanny Marmorstein uses
the Yiddish word "bash-
ert" to describe how a
Torah created in 19th-
century Eastern Europe
. survived the Nazi regime
in near-perfect condition
and landed a world away
at his tiny synagogue.

At Ahavat Olam, the Torah was wel-
comed last month with a procession from
Marmorstein's house to the Methodist
church about a mile away where the 100-
member congregation has been renting
space for worship. It was to be read for
the first time and be the subject of the
rabbi's sermon when the congregants cel-
ebrate the Jewish new year on Friday.







The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, September 17, 2009 * PG 31


Christian money

S........... guru gets rich

mixing faith, funds

BRENTWOOD, Tenn.

WITH the economy gasping for life
last spring, about 1.3 million people
gathered in 5,600 churches nation-
wide to behold the nation's leading
prophet of personal finance.
Televised live from a church in
Edmond, Okla., Dave Ramsey's
infomercial-style "Town Hall for
Hope" was a masterful mix of inspi-
ration, humor, advice, marketing and
the Bible from a man dressed in
jeans, dark jacket and an open-collar
shirt.
"Hope is a gift of the Holy Spirit,"
Ramsey told a nationwide audience
That included the Fox Business
Network, available in 50 million
homes. Later: "The Bible says the
. ..diligent prosper."
At its core, the 90-minute show was
a millionaire preaching to a strug-
gling flock, and it raised anew the
S" question of whether Ramsey's hugely
profitable, tax-paying business -
which he describes as a ministry -
fits with Jesus' teachings.
It's a question John Hoffman
began asking as he immersed himself
in Ramsey's financial lessons for
months. He listened on the radio,
.,,: bought books, took Ramsey's finan-
cial management course at a church
and paid for a $10-a-month subscrip-
tion to his Web site.
Hoffman came away from it all
- EL L- - .r feeling like Ramsey's intermingling
]A*~ M* r Mof faith and finances was some sort of
... , " AN iLK:CAN ., unholy alliance.
"It's not a ministry. To me, it's an
insult to the word," said Hoffman,
who lives near Logan, Kan. "It would
'. be nice if it got out of the churches
and got into the mainstream."
. ..1 .Ramsey doesn't deny mixing reli-
........ i gion and business, and he doesn't
.... ...... A apologize for getting rich doing it,
' W f & ci' either. Business is a ministry, he says,
and good ones prosper by serving
people the way God wants them to.
........... "Worship is work-ship, so I don't
Separate work from ministry,"
S .. .... Ramsey said recently at his head-
quarters in suburban Nashville,
where he does his syndicated radio
and cable TV shows. Bible verses,
.. ....... .... ... crosses and photos of Ramsey deco-
rate the building.
In the beginning, as now, Ramsey's
refrain was similar to the financial
teachings of John Wesley, who started
the Methodist movement more than
200 years ago: Earn all you can, save
all you can, give away all you can.







PG 32 * Thursday, September 17, 2009


RFLIO~I )N


The Tribune


V *At


THIS June 29, 2009 photo shows Gianni Bisoli during an interview in Verona, Italy. Bisoli has accused Verona's late bishop, Monsignor Giuseppe Carraro, who is being con-
sidered for beatification, of molesting him on five separate occasions while he was a student at Verona's Provolo Institute for the deaf, which he attended from age 9 to 15.


In the Vatican's


VERONA, Italy

IT HAPPENED night after night, the
deaf man said, sometimes in the priest's
bedroom, sometimes in the bathroom,
even in the confessional, according to
the Associated Press.
When he was a young boy at a
Catholic-run institute for the deaf,
Alessandro Vantini said, priests sodom-
ized him so relentlessly he came to feel
"as if I were dead." This year, he and
dozens of other former students did
something highly unusual for Italy:
They went public with claims they were
forced to perform sex acts with priests.
For decades, a culture of silence has
surrounded priest abuse in Italy, where
surveys show the church is considered
one of the country's most respected
institutions. Now, in the Vatican's back-
yard, a movement to air and root out
abusive priests is slowly and fitfully tak-
ing hold.


A yearlong Associated Press tally has
documented 73 cases with allegations of
sexual abuse by priests against minors
over the past decade in Italy, with more
than 235 victims. The tally was com-
piled from local media reports, linked
to by Web sites of victims groups and
blogs. Almost all the cases have come
out in the seven years since the scandal
over Roman Catholic priest abuse
broke in the United States.
The numbers in Italy are still a mere
trickle compared to the hundreds of
cases in the court systems of the United
States and Ireland. And according to
the AP tally, the Italian church has so
far had to pay only a few hundred thou-
sand euros (dollars) in civil damages to
the victims, compared to $2.6 billion in
abuse-related costs for the American
diocese or eurol.1 billion ($1.5 billion)
due to victims in Ireland.
However, the numbers still stand out
in a country where reports of clerical


sex abuse were virtually unknown a
decade ago. They point to an increasing
willingness among the Italian public
and - slowly - within the Vatican
itself to look squarely at a tragedy
where the reported cases may only just
be the tip of the iceberg. The Italian
church will not release the numbers of
cases reported or of court settlements.
The implications of priest abuse loom
large in Italy: with its 50,850 priests in a
nation of 60 million, Italy counts more
priests than all of South America or
Africa. In the United States - where
the Vatican counts 44,700 priests in a
nation of 300 million - more than 4,000
Catholic clergy have been accused of
molesting minors since 1950.
The Italian cases follow much the
same pattern as the U.S. and Irish scan-
dals: Italian prelates often preyed on
poor, physically or mentally disabled,
or drug-addicted youths entrusted to
their care. The deaf students' speech


impairments, for example, made the
priests' admonition "never to tell" all
the more easy to enforce.
In this predominantly Roman
Catholic country, the church enjoys
such an exalted status that the pope's
pronouncements frequently top the
evening news, without any critical com-
mentary. Even those with anti-clerical
views acknowledge the important role
the church plays in education, social
services and caring for the poor.
As a result, few dare to criticize it,
including the mainstream independent
and state-run media. In addition,
there's a certain prudishness in small-
town Italy, where one just doesn't
speak about sex, much less sex between
a priest and a child.
"It's a taboo on top of a taboo," said
Jacqueline Monica Magi, who prose-
cuted several pedophilia cases in Italy
before becoming a judge. "This is the
provincialism of Italy."
Breaking the conspiracy of silence,
67 former students from Verona's
Antonio Provolo institute for the deaf
signed a statement alleging that sexual
abuse, pedophilia and corporal punish-
ment occurred at the school from the
1950s to the 1980s at the hands of
priests and brothers of the
Congregation for the Company of
Mary.


R F I Cm"I Q


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