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MINISTER of Education Carl Bethel refuted reports c laiming his ministry appeared to have "lost track" of several Department of Education employees under investigation in connection with claims of sexual misconduct with students. The claims appeared in the lead story of The Nassau Guardian on Monday under the headline School Sex Claims Uncovered. W hile explaining that he had not seen the article in question, Mr Bethel said it seemed to refer to "old information which no longer reflects the current situation. The article stated that the Ministry of Education seemed to have lost track of several of the nearly 20 public school employees who have been interd icted, reassigned, fired, or forced to resign due to allegations of sexual misconduct towards students. The article said "in at least three matters, the ministry seemed to have no idea of the status of the cases of employees charged with sex crimes". B ut Mr Bethel said for an extended period of time, the Ministry of Education has been collecting information to update files on all employees accused of sexual impropriety with students. "I do know that for the last several months we have e ngaged in a process of determining the situation of all outstanding matters so they can be dealt with according to due process, the minister said. He added that his ministry has to rely on several independent agencies who have their own schedules including the A ttorney General's Office, the police force, the Public Service Commission and the Departm ent of Public Service in order to collect this information. "We for our part are in the process of doing everything in our power to move those cases forward," said Mr Bethel. "Due process means that the most that can happen is that t hey are (detained receive a reduction of their salary pending a resolution of the matter. Where it has been concluded by police that there is no ability to prosecute the matter, then the Department of Public Service's hands are tied to the e xtent that they are kept on and they have to be paid". He added that it is a vexing problem to have "persons who remain on government payroll when there is no requirement for their services". For months the ministry has been at the centre of a firestorm a s numerous accusations of stu dent sexual abuse at the hands of education employees, includi ng several teachers, have surfaced. Last week the officials at the US Embassy said they believed The Nassau Guardian exaggerated the importance of a statement placed on its local website, blowing a routine notice out of proportion. T he Guardian led its Friday edition with the headline: US Embassy issues crime warning, but according to a senior embassy official, this headline might have given a misleading impression. Jeff Dubel, Political Economic Public Diplomacy Chief, s aid the embassy is disappointed that The Nassau Guardian did not contact the Embassy before printing the story as much could have been explained. He said the notice was merely the posting of a tip to be on the lookout for possible criminal activity in western New Provid ence. Harbour said Immigration and R oyal Bahamas Defence Force (RBDF lasses, threatened children with guns and used violence as they detained at least 165 Haitians of all ages and separated them from their families at around 4am on July 30. Sources in the Mud, home to t housands of Haitians and Hait ian Bahamians, told The Tri bune how children were left behind as their parents were detained and then sent to Haiti, and Bahamians born of Haitian parents were forced to bid farewell to relatives and friends, some of whom had lived in the Bahamas for decades. Anxiety and a solemn mood has since taken hold of the community which can only hope for better treatment in future. A 30-year-old Haitian man who moved to the Bahamas 15 years ago, and lives in the Mud, said officers threatened children as young as five at gun point and ordered them to divulge their parents whereabouts. They knocked down doors and commanded men and women to come out of their homes without allowing them to dress before they were detained, he said. And the man, who asked to remain anonymous, said he knows of a two-year-old child and an eight-year-old boy whose parents were sent to Haiti while they remain in the care of relatives or friends in the Mud. He said: Little kids were left here while their parents were sent back home. There is boy, eight or nine, who is staying with a friend of mine, and a little baby, two years old, whose parents were taken during the raid. They were very hard this time. They beat people, hitting them in the face so they are bleeding. They took money, so if they had $1,000 in their pock et they would maybe give them $50 and keep the rest. If they found food or drink in their homes they took it. They took everything. There was one man who came out in his boxer shorts and they didnt let him take anything, they just took him like that. Haitian Bahamians, born in the Bahamas to Haitian parents, are angry about the way their parents, relatives and friends were treated in the raids at Sand Banks, near Treasure Cay, and the Mud and Pigeon Peas in Marsh Harbour. They were among the crowd which swarmed the Immigra tion Department, across the street from the Mud, to take food and documents to those who were about to be sent back to Haiti on the morning after the raid, while employers lined up to present work permits to Immigration authorities. The Tribunes source, who was taken to Nassau from Portde-Paix, north west Haiti, at just 15, said he has held ten work permits since moving to the Bahamas. But in order to obtain a new work permit he would need to return to Haiti to obtain a doctors certificate and police cer tificate for the Immigration Department. He said: People who have their Bahamian passports or work permits feel they can sleep at night, but otherwise you are always glancing over your shoulder to see whats going on. The raids are becoming more frequent, and more vio lent. I dont like how they treat the people, the way they break down your door they dont even wait for you to answer. I dont feel good there. An Abaco employer who spoke to The Tribune on the condition of anonymity, criti cised the application process for Haitian migrants he wants to hire. The employer submitted a work permit application for a 35-year-old man who returned to Haiti in April, and is still waiting for his medical and police records to be approved by the Immigration Department so he can return to Marsh Harbour and start work. He said: Every time they switch jobs they have to go back to Haiti, but they only need to fulfill the same criteria they needed for the previous work permit. The government needs to have a clear guideline that tells you how eligible (an applicant may be, taking into considera tion whether they have had a work permit before or not. Its ridiculous that we are doing the right thing by apply ing for the permit for this guy, and he is down there starving. Director of Immigration Jack Thompson said the Department is looking into ways of speeding up the application process, but must also ensure applicants are in good health and are not a threat to commu nity safety before they allow them to live and work in the Bahamas. He said the raids always provoke reaction and while they are appreciated by some, they are condemned by others. Mr Thompson maintains the raid was carried out properly and the allegation of officers wielding cutlasses is absurd. He added: Children should not be left behind and if that happened I dont know how it happened. I know there is a degree of anger, pain and disgust out there, but that should not happen. Thats against everything we stand for. When we go in we deal with the whole family and work with them as a group. It makes no sense to take the mother and father and leave a child, I dont know whats happened but the people involved should step forward. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Reports that ministry has lost track of investigated employees are refuted CARLBETHEL FROM page one Haitian-Bahamians D a v i d R a l p h / T h e A b a c o n i a n AN AERIAL view of the Mud community in Abaco.

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POLICE are still trying to determine the cause of a blaze which consumed a tiny apartment and killed the disabled 10-year-old boy trapped inside. "At this time our investigations are still in the preliminary stage and we cannot say what caused it ," said director of Fire Services Superintendent Jeffrey Deleveaux. He added that investigators were still interviewing persons who were in the tri-plex when the fire start-ed in an effort to glean more information. When asked if police were treating the case as a possible arson or an accident, Mr Deleveaux said it was too early to say. "We really don't know that at this time," he said. The fire tore through the middle unit of a tri-plex in Colony Village at around 9am Sunday morning. Wheel-chair bound Jermaine Mackey was sleeping in a bedroom while his mother's boyfriend slept on a sofa and his fouryear-old brother watchedTV in the living room. Rodney Minnis, 37, said he nodded off for what seemed like a few minutes and was awoken by his son's screams of "Daddy! Fire!" He said when he awoke the apartment was filled with thick smoke and shooting flames. His first instinct was to rescue the youngest boy, he said. When he returned to the apartment he said he heard Jermaine's screams for help but added that the hotf lames barred him and a neighbour from gaining access to the bedroom. Jermaine, who could not move on his own, was said to be burnt beyond recog nition. His distraught mother Anastacia Hepburn saids he left Jermaine home in the care of her boyfriend while she dashed to the food store "for a few things" at around 8.30 am. The displaced family, who lost all their belong ings in the fire, told The Tribune they would be s taying with relatives for the time being. Man gets 30 years in prison for attempting to kill police officer FOLLOWING the demolition of Canaan Baptist Church by Arawak Homes and the resulting uproar last week, the Bahamas Christian Council called on all religious leaders to ensure that they have proper title when buying land. The Bahamas Christian Council (BCC the loss of the building previously occupied by the congregation of Canaan Baptist Church and we call upon the Christian community to pray for the pastor and in particular the members of the church and by all means to lend support to the CBC family. The BCC accepts that the courts are the highest civil authority in the country and that decisions of the courts, having heard all sides, must be respected. Such respect for the law is a fundamental basis for good order and a civil soci ety, the statement read. While the Christian Council said it accepts this fact, it also expressed sadness that Arawak Homes and Canaan Baptist Church could not come together and resolve the matter by means other than the destruction of the church. Every possible effort must be made to avoid any reoccurrence of this most unfortunate event. In this regard the BCC calls upon all pastors and congregations to ensure that in the purchase of any land they take all equitable and reasonable steps to ensure thatt hey secure proper title, obey the laws of the country; and that no pastor or congregation is in breach of any order from any court. Similarly we call upon all land owners to show maximum restraint and Christian grace and brotherly love in the exercise of their legal rights. The BCC makes due note of recurring allegations that the laws of the Bahamas in respect of land are open to manipulation and abuse by dishonest, fraudulent and mendacious lawyers and that such abuses are taking place often at such considerable adverse financial consequences to individuals without the means to protect their legitimate rights, the statement said. Arawak Homes CEO Franklyn Wilson said he was pleased the Christian Council and former BCC president Simeon Hall expressed views which are very much in conformity with his thinking on the matter. And our prayer is that their voices will be heard not only by pastors and congregations but also individuals who are occupying land which they do not own. Over the past seven years, Arawak Homes claims, it has spent well over $1 million to establish its rights to the property on which the Canaan Church had been built. After the court ruled in the companys favour, the church edifice was demolished as members of the congregation including pastors looked on. SEE STREET TALK ON PAGESIX C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Police are investigating an armed robbery that occurred at the Boulevard Service Station on Sunday evening. Asst Supt Loretta Mackey said police received a report of an armed robbery at about 10.44pm. An employee contacted the police control room to report that the establishment was being robbed by a lone gunman. According to reports, the culprit, armed with a chrome handgun, jumped over the counter and stole an undetermined amount of money before fleeing the scene on foot. The gunman was wearing a cloth-like mask covering his face, according to eyewitnesses. He is described as being about six feet tall and of slim built. The suspect was wearing a dark hooded jacket, short blue jeans trousers, and blue tennis shoes at the time of the robbery. Ms Mackey said officers of the Central Detective Unit are continuing their investigations into the matter. Anyone with information that can assist police with their investigation is asked to call 350-3107/8, 352-9774/5 or 911. Police probe armed robbery A MAN yesterday received a 30-year prison sentence for the attempted murder of a police officer last year. Ferron Scavella, alias Kevin Woodside, was convicted last month of the attempted murder of Constable 2844 Nathaniel Lloyd, who along with Constable 1895 Leroy Rolle, was responding to a burglary complaint off Bellot Road last August when the incident occurred. Scavella had been placed under arrest and handcuffed, but was able to free one of his hands. He got a hold of the constables service weapon and shot Mr Lloyd in his right leg and face. Constable Rolle was also shot at when he went to assist his partner. Last month, Scavella was also convicted on burglary and firearm possession charges. Senior Justice Jon Isaacs sentenced Scavella to 30 years imprisonment on the attempted murder charge, 20 years on the burglary charge, five years on two counts of firearm possession and six months imprisonment for resisting arrest. The sentences are to take effect as of August 25 and are to run concurrently. Eucal Bonaby appeared for the prosecution. Investigators are trying to determine the cause of blaze Christian Council calls on r eligious leaders to ensure they have proper title when buying land By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT PLP MP Obie Wilchcombe says he has earned the opportunity to run for the post of deputy leader of the party a race he has been preparing for since the death of Sir Lynden Pindling. Mr Wilchcombe paid tribune to Sir Lynden by officially launching his candidacy on the anniversary of the burial of the former party leader and prime minister. I announced my candidacy to the media on the day he died, and today (September 4 was a day he was buried, and I wanted to pay tribute to him because I owe him so much. He told me that one day I would be doing this, and I am just happy to be at this stage right now, he said. Mr Wilchcombe launched his campaign in style in the grand ball room of the Our Lucaya Resort. Photos streamed on two giant projector screens showcasing a political career which spans more than a decade. Mr Wilch combe also acknowl edged his mother, whom he described as his strongest supporter. He said he was very pleased about the support he has been shown by so many people both the young and old. Andros MP Picewell Forbes and Melissa Sears of Grand Bahama, who represent the younger generation of PLPs, have thrown their support behind Mr Wilchcombe. I feel very good and I believe it is a good start because when you look around, you see the delegates out, and thats what it was intended to do. We have about 170 stalwart councillors and I think a large major ity was here tonight. Grand Bahama will take about 400 delegates to New Providence and so I hope we can get their support, said Mr Wilchcombe. The MP for West End and Bimini expects to travel to Bimini and Abaco to garner support for his candidacy. I have the experience, and I have earned the opportunity to run for deputy leader of the party, said Mr Wilchcombe. I am not only seeking to hold a position. I wanted people to know that I am not seeking power; I am seeking to empower the Bahamian people. I wanted to share my thoughts and ideas, and I wanted to make sure they knew that this process started a long time ago and that we are able to now bring it to this point, he said. The question is where the PLP go from here. We have a strong foundation and we have young people who are ready to lead and who have the experience. I happen to be the last man who stood at Sir Lyndens feet and also the new man of the new generation. I think that I have been prepared for this. I think this is my season, he said. W ilchcombe says he has ear ned opportunity to run for deputy PLP leader WILCHCOMBE FRANKLYN WILSON

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EDITOR, The Tribune. For the edification of Christian Council president Patrick Paul, the Webster dictionary defines rape as follows: The crime of having sexual intercourse with a woman or girl forcibly and without her consent. There are no exclusions. Im not sure what age Rev Paul is living in, but someone should remind him its 2009. We live in a democracy, not in Afghanistan. In our society, women are free and civilized men do not force them to submit against their will. Could you imagine Jesus saying its ok to rape your wife? ATHENA DAMIANOS Nassau, September 10, 2009 E DITOR, The Tribune. I am a physician who has p ractised medicine in Marsh Harbour for twenty-five years. I wish to add my voice to those expressing concern regarding the proposed BEC power plant at the Wilson City site. It is my u nderstanding that BEC plans to use a Bunker C (No 6 Fuel Oil) fired generator. I have con-c erns regarding the use of this fuel, the proposed site of the generator, and commitment to use of fossil fuels into the fores eeable future. As a medical doctor, I worry about the effects of burning this f uel in regard to the health of this community. While it shares characteristics with otherh ydrocarbon fuels, Bunker C contains high levels of hydro gen sulphide, which is extremel y toxic. The United States National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health( NIOSH) rates TWA (Time Weighted Averages, or expos ure for workers over an eight h our shift) as toxic at only 1 0ppm, and IDLH (Immediately Dangerous to Life and H ealth) at 100ppm. Bunker C also contains toxic heavy metals, including vanadium, cadm ium, lead, and nickel, polycyclic aromatics hydrocarbons (PAHs t hat have been identified as suspected carcinogens in animals. Repeated or prolonged exposure may be dangerous for BEC workers and the popula tion at large, due to its carcinog enic effects. Few scientific s tudies have investigated this fuel and its effects on mammals. However, one such study suggests detrimental immune system effects on humans, marine mammals, and other sea life. I recognise the need and plan for smokestack scrubbers. However, this technology is subject to perpetual maintenance, and will not be effective w ithout attention to continuing servicing of this equipment. The distribution of emissions is subject to the vagaries of wind and weather despite the proposedh eight of the smokestacks. However, perhaps a more immediate concern is the location of the new power plant. The Wilson City site requiresa docking station for transfer of fuel from tankers to a pipeline to the site. I have been fortunate to own a small cottage on Lynyard C ay, which is just east of the p roposed site, for 32 years. I have explored the creeks south of Snake Cay to Wilson Citya nd the Bight of Old Robinson e xtensively. I recognise the i ncredible unspoiled beauty and diversity of the creeks, man groves, and Blue Holes, that exists in few other places in the world. I also realise the impor t ance of this area as a nursery to the reefs and Sea of Abaco, which in turn, is essential to f ishing and tourism. I have seen the proposed site of the docking station exposed to direct oceans wells for much of the year, which undoubtedly will make transfer of fuel precarious and subject to oil spills, despite the best of precautions. Such a spill will be devastati ng to the sea life, and subsequently, to the beauty and economic well-being of our com-m unity. In addition, the placement of the docking site, plant and the necessary towering smokestacks, will be readily visi ble from the south Abaco Sea, which is extensively travelled by locals and tourists, and will d estroy the aesthetics of the area. Finally, the cost and magnit ude of this project suggests commitment to this oil-fired power production for the fore-s eeable future. In this time of economic slow down, concern for the environ-m ent, rapid development of alternative energy, and the u npredictable cost and supply o f petroleum products, this plan s eems regressive and unsustainable. I call for immediate cessation of construction of this plant, deliberation and examin ation of the concerns of the citizens of Abaco, and consideration of alternative location a nd source of power production. FRANK BOYCE MD Marsh Harbour, Abaco,S eptember 2, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm LEAVING CHURCH Saturday evening a gentleman from Freeport, who we had not seen for some time, remarked at how upseta nd disgusted he was with the constant bick ering of local politicians in the midst of a c ollapsing country. We told him we had just completed an article on the same subject for this column on Monday. Here in the Bahamas most of our politicians have lost all credibility theyh ave yammered too long and fooled the people even longer. W hile President Obama in his speech to the nations schoolchildren last week encouraged them to be responsible, stay in school, and work hard for a good education, the PLP in the early days of its first administrat ion took great delight in celebrating ignorance at the University of Wulff Road. Itw as often said that Papa Doc Duvalier of Haiti believed the only way to rule was to keep em ignorant. It was also claimed at the time that on a visit to Haiti Papa Doc recommended this policy to the late prime minister Sir Lynden Pindling. Knowing the unreliability of political prop aganda, we never knew if such advice was ever given so we cannot vouch for its a ccuracy. Suffice it to say that from political platforms PLP supporters were encouraged t o cease thinking for themselves and to put their future completely in the hands of the Chief. We are accustomed to political lying in the Bahamas, but in the United States r ecently it has been stretched to incredible extremes. W e still have not recovered from the shock at the lies that supposedly responsible l egislators spread to encourage Americans to close their ears to a presidential speech that advocated responsibility and hard work. And what is even more astounding is that many schools refused to let their students hear the speech and some parents kept their children at home to make certain that they couldnth ear it. Without knowing what President Obama intended to talk about, Florida Republi can chairman Jim Greer was appalled that t axpayer dollars were being spent to spread the Presidents socialist ideology. Greer c laimed without a shred of justification that schoolchildren would be forced to watch the President justify his plans for government-run health care, banks and auto m obile companies, increasing taxes on those who create jobs, and taking up more debtt han any other President. Greer found such a presidential ploy not only infuriating, but ( it) goes against beliefs of the majority of American parents through an invasive abuse of power. Not one word of what Greer said was true. Nowhere in his speech did the Presidentr efer to any subject that Greer said he would talk about. To have such people in respon s ible positions in the American political sys tem is scary and even more scary when it is claimed that Greer is seen as one of the more sensible, mainstream Republicans. President Obamas speech to students w as the first by a sitting president since President George Bush spoke to the nationsc hildren in 1991 and President Ronald Reagan talked politics to them in 1988. It must b e noted that both these presidents were Republicans. President Obama is a Democrat. Much of todays noise is coming from the conservative Republican camp. But a shout of You lie! from a South C arolina congressman challenging a president during a speech to Congress was too m uch. You lie directed at their head of state rang sour in the ears of many Ameri c ans. The reaction was instant. Rep Joe Wilson must have been shaken to learn that his 2010 Democratic opponent was benefitting from his crass indiscretion. Rob Miller, an Iraq war veteran who was b eaten by Wilson in 2008, is planning a come back. I n July his campaign funds were reported at just under $50,000 to Wilsons $211,000. A s a result of Wilsons outburst 5,000 individual grassroots contributions have brought Rob Millers campaign funds to more than $200,000. Looks as though Wilsons big mouth and disrespect of the presidential office could cost him his election. This opposition and dishonest opposit ion at that just for the sake of opposition will soon come back to haunt the Republican party. There is nothing wrong with honest opposition, its necessary, in politics itsh ealthy. However, unless the opposition smartens u p and shows more responsibility it will soon exhaust the patience of a fair-minded people and become irrelevant. A doctor raises concerns about BECs proposed power plant LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Political lying changing the system EDITOR, The Tribune. Your headline Saturday, August 29, yet again brings false hope and a sense of unrealistic thinking as the facts speak for themselves. Look at the Heads of Agreement one Hubert A Ingraham signed back in 1994 with Kerzner International and you will see that Kerzner was o bligated to bring events like Miss Universe to Paradise Island well folks it took even Kerzner 15 years to comply with that requirement of his Heads of Agreement. You see events like Miss Universe only have a possessiveness when the market is down as for events you have to discount everything. Mr Fields mentions that 98 pr cent of the tickets were sold interesting to find out how much of that 98 per cent were Bahamians and how much were foreign visitors? A resort does not push events when business is good that is why Atlantis has not had many major events between 1994 and 2009 of course at the beginning I recall the much loved powerboat event, but havent heard too much more as busi ness was good between those years. We have to thank Mr Obama for his policy of disallowing US based corporations with sub s tantial executive incentive programmes for killing the well negotiated concession we got f rom the US when we signed the Tax Information Exchange Agreement and why Kerzner built his large Convention facility but Mr Obama has torpedoed that to the bottom of the tongue of the ocean off Andros. Large meeting planning and reserving is a pri or to two-year business so what you can book in 2009 you will not see until 2011 what do we do in the meantime? Your headline brings false hopes. W THOMPSON Nassau, August 29,2009. Headline brings false hope Could you imagine Jesus saying it s OK to rape your wife?

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invariably find them digging up roads without permission, and it can be as simple as that or as complicated as the construction of a school. But when its done by a private person thats not the case. The project will now stop until the permits are in place. The $105 million project has stirred controversy in the Abaco community and nearly 1,000 Abaco residents concerned about the development attendeda public meeting with government ministers and BEC executives at New Vision Ministries in Marsh Harbour on Thursday. Many are opposed to the plant as they fear the use of heavy oil fuel Bunker C (HFO could permanently damage the surrounding environment near the Bight of Old Robinson and Pelican Cays Land and Sea Park. But others fed-up with frequent power cuts across the Abacos expressed their support for the development. Minister of State for the Environment with responsibility for utilities Phenton Neymour, Minister of the Environment Earl Deveaux, BEC chairman Fred Gottlieb and BEC general manager Kevin Basdon discussed plans with the public, and resi dents were invited to ask questions. Attorney Fred Smith, repre senting a group of Abaco resid ents, told the panel he would take action to stop the development if the correct permits have not been approved by local and central government. Mr Deveaux said: Following the meeting we asked BEC to confirm whether all the permits required were in place, and if they are not in place, to halt the work in order to be in full compliance with the law. Plans for the 48 megawatt power plant, three mile pipeline, container port and road must be approved by various government departments including the Ministry of Works, Department of Environmental Health and Town Planning before construction can continue. Permits for the foundation and floor plans of the building site were reviewed by local government in South Abaco yesterday. South Abaco administrator Benjamin Pinder said the plans had already been viewed by the Ministry of Works and Ministry of the Environment, and would be sent on to Nassau for final approval from central government before the work, which has already started, can be con tinued. An application for the dock site has already been reviewed by local government and sent on to central government in Nassau for approval, Mr Pinder said. The Minister of the Environment said: Following the meeting we can get foundation and floor plans approval, which will b ring BEC in compliance for what they are doing so they can continue that work while engineers complete drawings for other things. All the documents are in place and when they have filled in the prescribed forms it will be expedited. G overnment must be satisfied the power plant will have proper disposal units and the capacity to contain an oil spill if it occurs, Mr Deveaux added. BEC made the decision to build a new power plant in Aba co over two years ago owing to the inadequacy of the 30-year-o ld 27 megawatt facility in Marsh Harbour. However residents said they were not aware the plant was going to go up in Wilson City until construction began. Local organisation Friends of the Environment requested a public meeting to give residents the opportunity to put their concerns to government and the event attracted an enormous turnout. When BEC and government executives were questioned about where funding for the development was coming from t hey said the $105 million development is being paid for with local funds. However they did not pro vide any further details about where the money came from, in light of the fact that BEC suffered a net loss of $16 million in 2008. M r Gottlieb said BEC made an $11 million profit in New Providence last year and lost $27 million in the Family Islands, $8 million of which were losses from Abaco. A new power plant is essential for Abaco, Mr Gottlieb said. In Saturdays and Mond ays Tribune, we reported that the cost of the Wilson City power plant would be $150million. The correct figure should have been $105million. We apolo gise for any inconvenience caused. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ,167,787()%86,1(66$1'&200(5&( under the pseudonym Perry Leader which pundits explain was designed to make Mr Christie appear as a self-serving narcissistic individual. In fact, party chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin outright denounced the e-mail and called on those persons who wish to run for office in the party to do so in a mature and honest fashion. That e-mail did not eminate from the official party structure, nor would the party engage in this sort of self destructive denouncements that are contained in that e-mail as it relates to our party, the chairman told The Tribune yesterday. Currently, she said, the party is conducting an internal invest igation into the matter, and will take all the necessary steps that are required. The truth is, those persons who wish to express themselves ought not to hide behind e-mail addresses. They must do what they want to do, but our focus is on the convention and to look at the platform and bring our troops together and strengthen our resolve to become the next government of the Bahamas. And despite the numerous d istractions that manifest themselves in the media, including that e-mail, it does not distract us from our purpose which is to go into the convention and prepare ourselves for the next election, she said. area residents convened behind yellow police tape as they watched undertakers place Mr Moss's body into a waiting hearse. Long-time friend and former co-worker Gregory Lloyd Smith said he was passing the area and slowed down when he saw the crowd. He was shocked to learn the friend he had lost touch with was dead. "It surprised me when I passed and saw it was him laying down there," said Mr Smith, who affectionally referred to Mr Moss by the nickname John Claw. "He was a good worker. He was a nice person and had a good attitude. He was friendly, someone you could ask to do something for you he didn't have no problem with it, he would smile and do it for you," he added. Avenue, Coconut Grove, last Wednesday. It is alleged that Rolle robbed Mr Goodman of $200, the property of Berthas Go-Go Ribs. Mr Goodman, 44, a resident of P inewood Gardens and an employee of the popular takeout restaurant, was gunned down shortly before midnight last Wednesday. According to initial police reports, he was approached by several people just before gunshots were heard. Rolle is also charged with the attempted murder of Alexander Dean and the attempted armed robbery of Deans Build-i ng Supply situated on Parkgate Road. Mr Dean, 23, was shot in the abdomen and back after a gunman and his accomplice entered the hardware store and demanded cash around 3pm last Saturday. It is also alleged that Rolle robbed the Esquire Liquor Store of $1,275, Adiesco Enterprise of $1,175, a John Chea store of $2,000, Super Wash of $346, Subway restaurant on Baillou Hill Road of $550 and Healthy Living Pharmacy of $250. Rolle who was arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane, yesterday was not required to enter a plea to the charges. Rolle accused the police of lying, saying they had charged him with offences he knew nothing about. He also complained of a broken rib and leg. Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered that Rolle be taken to see a doctor. Rolle was remanded to Her Majestys Prison and is expected to appear in Court 5, Bank Lane, today for a fixture hearing. at Khodee with a knife, stabbing him in the chest. The wound proved to be fatal. Franciss attorney, Michael Hanna, told the court his client will have to live with the burden of guilt and he was deeply remorseful and repentant. Mr Hanna asked Senior Justice Jon Isaacs to have mercy on Francis. I didnt mean for this to happen and I am truly sorry this ever happened, Francis told the court. Justice Isaacs noted there was a rivalry between young men in the Step Street community and those on Fox Hill Road. He also said that Franciss claim he had been acting in self defence was at variance with the evidence of the case. Justice Isaacs sentenced Francis to 25 years imprisonment. The sentence is to take effect as of June 1, 2009. FROM page one Fake email fear for PLP leaders Power plant F ROM page one FROM page one Man charged 25 year sentence F ROM page one Well-known security officer dies suddenly FROM page one PERRY CHRISTIE

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THE Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC hundreds of acres of prime agriculture land in South Andros. A three-mile long road from Duncombe Coppice, outside of Congo Town, into the pine forest on western Andros will open that area for the first time in living memory. BAIC is requesting that government transfer several hundred acres of Crown land, which in turn will be subdivided and leased to Bahamians interested in food production a practice already underway in North Andros and Abaco. We hope to make a big difference for the people of South Andros, said Edison Key, BAIC's executive chairman. This is just the first phase of hopefully creating an industry in food production in South Andros, he said. Once the road is completed we will move into high gear. This could open a new world for South Androsians as far as food production is concerned. A high-level delegation including South Andros MP Picewell Forbes; BAIC general manager Benjamin Rahming; assistant general manager of Agriculture Arnold Dorsett; assistant general manager of Handicraft Donnalee Bowe, and executive secretary Lovelee McQueen accompanied Mr Key to South Andros last weekend to inspect the project. For Mr Forbes, the BAIC project came as very good news. Administrator Francita Neely and chief councillor Zebedee Rolle agreed. This opens the door for new opportunities and allows for the people of South Andros to engage in a higher quality of agriculture as is done in North Andros and Abaco, said Mr Forbes. He envisioned the possibility of a new residential community being created as a result of vast areas being opened. I am very excited about this, he said. It is a new day dawning in South Andros after much talk. I am very hopeful that this is going to happen here. South Androsians, he said, are very excited about the project. They have been waiting for it for a long time. During a well-attended community meeting, the new road got enthusiastic support. Mr Key noted that BAIC has made tremendous progress working with farmers in North Andros during the last two years. He said he wanted to do the same in the south He urged South Andros farmers to form an association. BAIC is willing to provide technical and financial assistance, he said. There are a lot of possibilities once the people here are prepared to work, said Mr Key, the Member of Parliament for South Abaco. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ALBERTHA MILLER Pinders Point Freeport, GB ANITA L BURROWS Matthew Town, Inagua ANTONIA LESBOTT P. O. Box SS-5481 New Bight Cat Island BRENDA ADDERLEY CLAUDE LESBOTT P. O. Box SS-5481 New Bight Cat Island CYRIL WILLIAMS I Yellow Elder Gardens 2 CYRIL WILLIAMS II Yellow Elder Gardens 2 DWAYNE DORSETTE EDNA DEAN P. O. Box N-4912 IAN TRECO P. O. Box N-3693 JASON SAUNDERS Prince Charles Drive JENNIFER TRECO P. O. Box N-3693 KEVA FAWKES Matthew Town, Inagua KOVAN SMITH P. O. Box CB-11825The following individuals are asked tocontact Ms. Arnette Rahming (356-8328or Ms. Shamara Farquharson (356-8456LEANDRA PINDER Matthew Town, Inagua MERVIN SMITH P. O. Box CB-11825 MIRIAM NAOMI INGRAHAM P. O. Box N-7905 NASHLAWN CURTIS NESHA JASMINE L CULMER P. O. Box SS-5818 NIKITA CURTIS OLIVIA GAITOR P. O. Box N-5359 PHILIPPA, INGRAHAM P. O. Box N-7905 RENDAL COLEBY P. O. Box N-8672 SANSCHIA CULMER P. O. Box SS-5818 STAFFORD MILLER Pinders Point Freeport, GB STEPHEN FAWKES Matthew Town, Inagua VICTORIA SAUNDERS Prince Charles Drive WELLINGTON DORSETTE WILFRED GAITOR P. O. Box N-5359 Three-mile farm road for South Andros A THREE-MILE FARM ROAD is being constructed for South Andros. Pictured from left during inspection of the project last weekend are operator Gary Francis; contractor Wayde Forbes; chief councilor Zebedee Rolle; South Andros MP Picewell Forbes; BAIC executive chairman Edison Key; assistant general managerA rnold Dorsett, and general manager Benjamin Rahming. G l a d s t o n e T h u r s t o n / B I S Red Cross donates first aid kits By LLONELLA GILBERT T HE Bahamas Red Cross last week p resented the nine Urban Renewal Centres in New Providence with 10 first-aid kits. C entre managers, team members and other community members also received training from the Bahamas Red Cross ine mergency care. Kim Sawyer, director general of the Bahamas Red Cross, made the presentation to Ella Lewis, the coordinator of the Urban Renewal Programme in New P rovidence, the day before World First Aid Day. Students, adults and seniors frequent our nine centres daily and from time to time there are emergencies, Ms Sawyer said. We work hand-in-hand with the Bahamas Red Cross and these kits are a vital part of what we will use in the event t here is a need. A key component of the work of the Red Cross is to train per sons to be prepared for disasters. T he Red Cross also demonstrated e mergency care to patrons in the Mall at Marathon on Saturday. BAHAMAS RED CROSS presented the Urban Renewal Programme with First Aid Kits on Friday, September 11, 2009 at, Bahamas Law Enforcement Credit Union, Collins Avenue. Making the presentation was President, Kim Sawyer, fore ground at right (purple and black R esponding on behalf of Urban Renewal is Co-Ordanator, Ella Lewis foreground at left. Also pictured from left are Manager of Fox Hill Urban Renewal (UR a nd Grants Town UR, Dianna Bullard; Manager of Pinewood UR, Sherly Knowles; Manger of S t. Cecelia UR, Roberta Rolle; Desaster Manager, Pamela Brown; Manger of Ft. Charlotte UR, Patricia Walker; and Facilitator of Pinewood UR, Diana Forbes. Raymond A. Bethel /BIS

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B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net A LL things concerned, Chris Fireman Brown said it was good to close out his long and gruelling season as the runnerup at the IAAF/VTB Bank World Athletics Final in Thes saloniki, Greece. O n Saturday, Brown clocked 45.49 seconds to trail American Olympic and World cham pion LaShawn Merritt, who t ook the one-lapper in 44.93. After the World Champi o nships, I was just ready to come home, said Brown, who was considered a bronze medal list, but slipped all the way to fifth in Berlin, Germany, in August. But with the support of my family, especially my wife, I decided to hang in there and ride the storm out. Im not a quitter. So I wanted to make sure that I went right to the end. Earning a purse of $20,000 on Saturday compared to the $10,000 he collected in Berlin for fifth, Brown said he was pleased that he was able to rebound at the World Athletic Final. A lot of people wouldnt be able to relate to what Im saying because they have never been in that situation, said Brown, who for the third time, failed to win a medal at the World Championships. So for me, it was a new experience, knowing that I was supposed to go out there and win a medal, but I didnt execute my race and I paid the price for it. Throughout the remainder of the championships, Brown said a lot of his Bahamian team-mates, as well as other athletes from around the world, made it known that he didnt run his race. They were like, what happened to you. You didnt exe cute your race, said Brown, who was actually sitting in third behind Merritt and Jeremy Wariner up to the last 50 metres of the race. I guess they strive of that because Ive been going for so long. But the Lord is in charge of my career and I put it all in his hands. Man can say what they want, but I know what he has in store for me. Admitting that the race was set up perfectly for him as he was in lane four, sandwiched by Wariner in three and Merritt in five, Brown said he couldnt complain. I just didnt execute my own race, said Brown, who watched as Trinidad & Tobagos Renny Quow ascended the medal podium with Merritt and Wariner instead of him. With the completion of the World Athletics Final over the weekend, Brown brought the curtain down on his 2009 and 10th overall season on the international scene. Decade Ive been going for the last decade, but a lot of these guys that I ran against, they just came on the scene over the last 4-5 years, said Brown, who at one point challenged world record holder American Michael Johnson. A lot of the guys who ran in my era are either struggling or have retired. So for me, my body just needs a vacation. So Im just going to rest up. Im glad that the Lord has blessedme with a great season. I started out strong and I finished strong. I did what a lot of peo ple couldnt do. Brown, who turns 31 on October 15, was referring to the fact that there were some Olympic and world champions who didnt get to duplicate their feats either by injury or failing to make it to the final. I know it was disappointing for me, but there were a lot of people who were out there in worse shape than I was, he declared. But I was able to pull myself together and finish off strong. After chasing Johnson, Brown found himself going after Wariner. Now its Mer ritt, who at one point Brown had achieved a great deal of success against. Ive beaten LaShawn in the past, but thats the past, Brown pointed out. He stepped his game up over the last two years to win both the Olympics and the World Championships. All it has taught me is that if this guy can step his game up in one season and improve to the level that he is at right now, then it lets me know that I need to be doing more in my train ing. I need to train harder. I need to be more mentally and physically prepared. I just have to be ready to go out there and execute my race. Next season or leading up to the 2012 Olympics in London, England, Brown said he will definitely have to focus more on himself if he intends to finally get the medal that has been missing from his rsum. F ir st I also want to be the first Caribbean runner to do what has never been done before and that is to run under 44 sec onds, said Brown, who holds the national record of 44.40 and had a seasons best of 44.81. The All-time best mark post ed by a Caribbean athlete is 44.21 that was ran by Ian Mor ris of Trinidad & Tobago. Im just going to go out there and perform my best, said Brown, who will be looking forward to competing in March at the World Indoor Championships in Doha, Qatar, where he is two-time bronze medallist before he heads to the Com monwealth Games in India in September. Brown hopes to be home on October 3 for the celebrations for the World Championship team. Then he will go back to the drawing board to have another successful season in 2010. Im excited about next y ear and the years to come because the Lord doesnt give y ou more than you can han dle, he charged. I think what I ve been going through was a testimony because even thoughI havent been getting the big prize, I havent been giving up either. So I want to encour a ge other athletes and even those who are not athletes that e ven though you dont always get what you want, dont give u p. Im enjoying my career and Im having fun doing it. That is w hat I did at the World Final and it paid off in the end. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Chris Fireman Brown r ebounds for $20,000 purse But with the support of my family, especially my wife, I decided to hang in there and ride the storm out. Im not a quitter So I wanted to make sure that I went right to the end. Chris Brown EXPLOSIVE: Chris Fireman Brown by RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter r dorsett@tribunemedia.net G od watches movies. With week one of the 2009 NFL season in the books, this has easily been the most definitive storyline thus far. In fact God likes good movies so much hes in the first act of writing his best project since 2007. How else would you explain what is about to happen in Philadelphia rightnow? This script has undergone its third metabasis and our star, the hero, turned villain, has a chance to become a hero once more. When Michael Vick was released from prison on May 20th, we all (well we few Vick fans outside of Philly) held a faint belief that he would get to play again...starting was almost out of the question, we just wanted him to play. Its easy to hate Vick because of all the wrong hes been accused of and charged and again easy to acknowledge that the whole sordid affair was were horrendous. Not saying I agree with any of it, but if youre on that side of the argument, I can acknowledge how its easy to hate him. The bottomline is, what he did was illegal, he served his time, and now he has the c hance to move on. For the purpose of the epic masterpiece being woven together by the All Mighty Author, we have to do two things, recognize Vick the hero (pre dog-fighting that there are no infallible heroes anymore. Michael Jordan spent his Hall of Fame induction speech bashing anyone he found fault with during the course of his career, Hulk Hogan joined the NWO at one point, Ted Kennedy had Chappaquiddick, Kobe was on trial for rape, Jimmy McNulty was too selfish and underhanded to be apart of the Major Crimes unit, Allen Iverson became the posterchild for apathy when he shrugged off going to practice, even Han Solo was initially a self centered brute with no interest in helping the Rebels fight the Empire, K anye West will never be h appy someone else won an award...Absolutely none of our heroes are infallible (Barack Obama, Brandon Roy, Bill Stackhouse and Michael Lee from the The Wire are granted exemption). Pre dog fighting Michael Vick came from humble beginnings in the Ridley Circle Homes, a public housingp roject in Newport News, Virginia, best described as a f inancially depressed and crime-ridden neighborhood. A gainst the odds he used football as a way out of an adverse situation and wowed NFL scouts, coaches, and critics for two years at Virginia Tech leading them to an undefeated regular season and National Championship appearance in his sophomore year. With his family was still living in their three bedroom apartment in the Ridley Circle Homes projects, Vick left school early for the NFL stated that he was going to buy his mother "a home and a car." ESPN later reported that Michael used some of his NFL and endorsement earnings to buy his mother a brand-new house in an upscale section o Three Pro-Bowls, four playoff appearances, quarterback rushing records, His contract along with his endorsements had Vick ranked 33 among Forbes' Top 100 Celebrities in 2005. He was our hero. Then it rained all over that parade, there was a monsoon, followed by mass flooding all over the Vick Parade. Vick pleaded guilty to federal charges in the Bad Newz Kennels dog fighting investig ation under a plea agreem ent which outlined gruesome details regarding treatment of the dogs, the NFL suspended him indefinitely without pay. He lost it all, convicted of Felony conspiracy in interstate commerce/aid of unlawful animal fighting venture and Felony dogfighting. He was sentenced to 23 months in prison and threey ears probation following release. H e became the villain. Released from prison, and a fter an absence from a pro football field for about two years, Vick signed a one year contract with the Philadelphia Eagles in August. Now the villain would have to play behind Donovan McNabb, a perennial Pro Bowler, the face of the Eagles franchise and one of the best quarterbacks of his generation. The time of the hero from Virginia Tech, and the Atlanta Falcons was sure to be over. Then the All Mighty Author threw another hitch in the script. and if youve ever watched a sports movie, you knew this was coming. A s sure as Adrian Peterson and Usain Bolt are look down upon the rest of us as mere mortals, I was positive McNabb was going to get injured at some point during this season Vick would take the reigns...you just knew it. W eek one rolls around and McNabb is forced to leave the game after a series of hits which left him with a fractured rib, ironically doing what Vick did best, scrambling for a touchdown. There is still no word on h ow long McNabb will be sidelined, but Vick will be eligible for a return to the field in week three, with Kevin Kolb the only thing standingb etween him and the perfect story. Our hero returns. This has the makings to be Gods best script since David Tyree caught a ball against his helmet to lead the Giants to the biggest upset of ourg eneration in SuperBowl XLII If Vick, returns to the playmaker we fondly remember, leads the Eagles deep into the playoffs and makes a legitimate run at the SuperBowl...this film has a chance to spawn an epic sequel, maybe even a trilogy. Usually in this space Id deliver some witty one liner to bring it all full circle, but I wouldnt want to guess what happens next...theres still too much of this story left to be told. (By the way we can all com pletely disregard this entire column if Kevin Kolb throws for 250 yards and three touchdowns next week against the Saints.) An epic masterpiece woven by the All Mighty Author RENALDOSRAMBLINGS EAGLES QUARTERBACK Michael Vick speaks to students at Nueva Esperanza Academy in Philadelphia on Tuesday Sept. 8, 2009, making his first anti-dogfighting appearance. A P P h o t o / J o s e p h K a c z m a r e k

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T HE young Bahamian FootS cholars have started to make their mark as the US college soccer season gets into full swing. K yle Williams got an assist on the opening goal as his University of T ampa team won their first match 20 over Florida Memorial University. Two days later, they continued the win streak with a 1-0 victory over Clayton State, and ended the week end with a 3-1 over North Georgia College. Michael Bethel got his first goal of the year in the 3-1 victory. Williams and Bethel are starters on the school team that is currently ranked Number 1 in the NCAA Division II Soc cer Polls. Cameron Hepple scored the open i ng goal in his Bowling Green State U niversity's 2-0 win over Marshall University. Hepple's tally came from a free kick on the edge of the penalty a rea, which he dutifully buried into the top corner of the goal. H epple is the team's active career leader in assists (824 Bowling Green then lost their next two matches, 3-0 to Louisville and 41 to the University of Kentucky to start their season at 1-2. Lamar Cancino's University of Charleston (West Virginia off to a good start, winning their first and third matches, 7-1 over Bluefield and 4-1 over Alderson-Broaddus, but losing in between to Cal, PA 3-2. Defender Dana Veth's University of Minnesota-Morris team lost a t ough match in over-time to Augs b urg, 1-0. The fact that their opponents are ranked 17th in the nation did not make the loss any more bear a ble, especially since the winning goal was an own goal of a Minnesot a-Morris defender. However the team rebounded in their second match to defeat Hamline 1-0. Veth and his defensive cohorts held Hamline to only five shots on goal for the match. Min nesota-Morris' third match held the same scoreline as the second match, 1-0, but this time they were on the losing end to St. John's. The team currently sits at 1-2 on the season. Bahamas Women's International Kelly Simon got her first taste on the collegiate scene, but it was a bitter o ne as her North Carolina Wesleyan C ollege team lost 3-1 to St. Andrews, then 7-1 to Randolph-Macon. Simons was productive, however, l eading the team with 6 shots in the games, but was unable to score thus f ar. A pair of Bahamian Women's Internationals lead Southern University's women's soccer team. Goalkeeper D'nae Capron leads the con ference with 30 saves, but has seen a lot of shots in the team's four match es, all of which resulted in loses. Her teammate, Nakesha Rolle, is one of the team's leaders. Senior International Talitha Wood's South Carolina State Uni versity team has a 1-2 record, winning their home opener 3-0 over S outhern Virginia, and losing 4-2 to T he Citadel and 2-0 to Campbell University in their second and third matches respectively. Wood, who has switched from midfield to defense, has played in all of the team's match es. Denarika Bostwick's Southwest Baptist University team is off to a very good start, winning their first two matches. In the opener, the team defeated Quincy, Ill 2-1 and in the second defeated Missouri S & T 1-0. Their third match, against Abilene Texas, was cancelled due to weather and the team then drew their fourth match 2-2 against Dallas Baptist. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM CRICKET BCAS UPDATE ON Saturday at Windsor Park, the Police Cricket team was bowled out by Scotiabank Paradise for a mere 77 runs. Police top scorers were Orlando Stewart with 23 runs and ODain Tucker with 20 runs. Brent Fullerton of Scotiabank Paradise took five wickets and Kester Duncan had two wickets. Scotiabank Paradise at bat found the going tough and they lost five wickets in their winning score of 81 runs. Andrew Nash had 28 runs and Aeon Lewin had 27 runs. Bowling for the Police, Greg Taylor Jr took three wickets. Police lost the match by five wickets. Sundays match was abandoned due to the rain. RBDF TRACK MEET THE Annual Royal Bahamas Defence Force Track and Field meet is scheduled to take place 6pm September 18 at the Thomas Robinson Track Stadium. Minister of National Security Tommy Turn quest and other govern ment officials are expected to attend. The meet, which includes all disciplines of track and field, comprises of all the officers and marines, who will be com peting in four houses Alpha, Bravo, Charlie and Delta. Delta House is the defending champion. The meet is free to the general public. There willb e special races for the c hildren. B y BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net N ow that the track and field season is over, the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA hold its annual general meeting and election of officers for the next three years. Already, Curt Hollingsworth, who took over as president when Mike Sands was forced out of office in a vote of no confidence, has made it clear that he intends to run for the top post. There are some indications that Sands is expected to return to run again for president. He is expected to have, as his running mate, Sherwin Stuart as vice president. When contacted today, Hollingsworth said he expects that there will be some challengers, but he and the persons who have indicated that they will work along with him are confident that they will prevail at the elections on November 21. This is my first time running for the position, so Im offering myself for the position of president, Hollingsworth said. So its going toq uite interesting for me. I know its going to be a challenge. I dont know who the other people are who are vying for the other posi tions, but Im sure that they will make themselves known to the public in the upcoming weeks, if they haventa lready done so. T he former first vice president said hes not concerned about all of the noise in the market because hes focused on the vision that he has for the BAAA. Now its time to put your shoulders to the wheel and sell yourself to your membership and say this is what Ive been able to do and I would now like to have the opportunity to do a three-year term that would allow me to really go out there and do the things that I feel is required to technically run the BAAA, he insisted. Along with Hollingsworth, former BAAA and Bahamas Olympic Association secretary Livingstone Bostwick is either going to seek a position as a vice president or council mem ber. The other vice president spot is expected to be filled by Grand Bahamian Anita Doherty. Meanwhile, treasurer Rosie Carey is expected to move over and run for he post of secretary making way for mens quarter-miler Tim Munnings, who has been invited to run as the new treasurer. Julie Wilson is vying once again as the assistant secretary with Debbie Smith seeking the assistant treasurer post. Frank Pancho Rahming is expected to run again as the technical direc-t or with coach Dianne Woodside comi ng on board for the post of statisti cian. Prior to the BAAA AGM, the first official elections for the newly formed New Providence Amateur Athletic Associations is scheduled to take place on October 31. Ray Hepburn serves as the interim president. In between that time and the BAAA AGM, Hollingsworth said they hope to have the elections for the Masters Track and Field Associa tion. An interim committee headed by Foster Dorsett is currently in charge of the association. If elected, Hollingsworth said his focus will be on strengthening theF amily Island programmes, which he feels will be able to greatly benefit the BAAA because of the amount of hidden talents available. One of our mandate is to further develop talents that would allow us to have this continuation of athletesa nd start to be more than one dimen sional, he said. We concentrate on the sprints, but we need to develop our long distance programme. At one time we had a long distance programme when we competed at Carifta. We need to put more emphasis on those events. Additionally, Hollingsworth said if the Bahamas can concentrate more on the technical events, the country c an have more athletes competing in the hurdles, as well as the throwing events shot, discus and javelin. We also need to continue to provide more training for our coaches, he pointed out. The more coaching that they receive, hopefully the better for them to provide better training for our athletes. And when you look at the national programme, we have some good potential in the pipelines that is being groomed. So we need to ensure that the programme is developed so that they will get better as well. Based on what he has seen this year, Hollingsworth said if the national teams can get the opportunity to travel together and compete in more training camps, hes convinced that the team should be able to perform at a higher standard on the international scene. A prime example was the womens 4 x 400 metre relay team, which competed for the first time at the 12th IAAF World Championships in Ath letics in Berlin, Germany, with two teenage high school sensations. The team, however, got disqualified in the preliminaries. I believe more young ladies will be inclined to compete in the 400 metres because they know that they can get the opportunity to compete on the 4 x 4 team, Hollingsworth stressed. Hollingsworth said the major thrust for the BAAA immediately after the elections is to start working on securing the necessary funding through its partnership with the local community to make sure that the team gets ready for the road to the 2012 Olympic Games in London, England. Hollingsworth intends to run for top BAAA post Foot-Scholars making mark on US college soccer SPORTS IN BRIEF CURT HOLLINGSWORTH MIKE SANDS Honouring a tennis icon three Grand Slam finals this year, only to win one, Knowles said he still felt that he had a fantastic year. And looking back at his illustrious career as he was basically the only one carrying the flag, Knowles said the greatest experience hes had was representing the country at Davis Cup, more specifi cally 1992 when the Bahamas played against the United States in North Carolina. Knowles, however, had to assure everybody in the ballroom that his career is no where near completion after he was serenaded by young Jercon Mackey with the song: My Way. In response, Knowles said: I dont feel my age. Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister read a list of Knowles achievements and said last night was a good time for the Bahamian people to show their gratitude to Knowles. But Master of Ceremonies, Arnie Nairn may have best summed it up when he said that Knowles deportment on the international scene is one that should be emulated because of the graceful man ner in which he conducted himself. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham presented Knowles with a proclamation that proclaimed Mark Knowles Week beginning Sunday, September 13th and ending Saturday, September 19th. Knowles was also presented with a citation from Gover nor General Arthur Hanna. Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association president Stephen Turnquest welcomed the audience that included Knowles proud parents Vicki and Sammy Knowles; his wife, Dawn and former world No.1 singles player Lleyton Hewitt. Among the government officials present were Minister of National Security, Tommy Turnquest; Minister of Housing Kenneth Russell and Minister of Environment, Earl Deveaux. Emile Knowles, who grew up playing with Knowles as a youngster; Knowles former Davis Cup partner Sean Cartwright; his Davis Cup captain John Antonas and other dignitaries sporting bod ies including Bahamas Olympic Association presi dent Wellington Miller was also present. Note: More on the ceremonies with reactions from some of those in attendance will be published on Wednes day. FROM page 11 BAHAMIAN TENNIS ACE Mark Knowles and his son, Graham, are flanked by Minister of State for Culture Charles Maynard (far leftfar right arrival at Lynden Pindling International Airport yesterday. Knowles wife, Dawn (green top in the background as an unidentified woman pushes a stroller with their second son, Brody... P h o t o b y P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S

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C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15. 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 10 Hollingsworth intends to run for top BAAA post... TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Fireman rebounds for $20,000p urse... See page 9 By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net MARK Knowles Week got started with the Bahamian touring professional stating that last nights celebration at Government House certain-ly made up for his crashing defeat in the mens doubles final at the US Open. Knowles, who turned 38 on September 4, was due to arrive home on Sunday and feted to lunch, but the celebrations were delayed until last night because the final was postponed from Friday to Sunday because of the rainin Flushing Meadows, New York. Seeded number three, Knowles and his Indian partner Mahesh Bhupathi fell vic tim to the number four seed ed team of Lukas Dlouhy and Leander Paes as they fell short in their second Grand Slam for the year. But the Bahamas Govern ment honored Knowles for his stellar performance since turning pro more than two decades ago, including his tri umph with German AnnaLena Groenefeld in the mixed doubles final at Wimbledon in July. When you get treated like this, you forget about the US Open final last night, said Knowles, in his acceptance speech, who admitted that I love to compete. I love to win. Although he played in Honouring a tennis icon Government House celebration mak es up for US Open doubles final loss, says MarkKnowles SEE page 10 GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur D Hanna presents a citation to Bahamian tennis star Mark Knowles last night at Government House. TheGovernment honoured Knowles for his performance since turning pro. PHOTO: Patrick Hanna /BIS

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B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN food stores h ave been dropping prices quite considerably in recent months, supermarket execu tives told Tribune Business yesterday, with staple products s uch as bananas now cheaper in this nation than Florida d espite the reluctance of many US-based suppliers to lower w holesale prices in line with the reduction in energy/transBy CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net T he B ahamas is the m ost underperforming[ tourism] destination in this entire r egion, the Minister of Tourism and Aviation has argued, although the 18.9 per cent decline ini ts hotel industrys revenue per avail-a ble room (RevPAR f or the seven months to end-July 2009 was better than the Caribbean average and only marginally worse than the US. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, speaking during the opening of HVSs C aribbean office in the Bahamas, said this nation has so far only developedN assau and Paradise Island, underscoring the need to focus more on the F amily Islands. When you look at the gap between w hat the potential of the Bahamas is and what we actually do, there is noq uestion that we are underperforming, he said. We all know that in Jamaica you have all these other destinations that are being developed. In Cuba, all these other destinations are being developed, in Mexico all these other desti-n ations are being developed, in the Dominican Republic all these otherd estinations are being developed. We have focused on and develo ped essentially only on Nassau/Paradise Island, and if we find ourselves in t he situation where we begin to pro vide the kind of infrastructure thats necessary for us to make certain that we grow the rest of the Bahamas, the success is going to be extraordinary. M r Vanderpool-Wallace suggested that low cost airlift was the key to the d evelopment of the wider Bahamas, and lauded efforts made by his mini stry in conjunction with the Bahamas Hotel Association to get airlines in. T he minister said it was more expensive to travel from New York to Lond on, Paris or Rome than it was to travel to the islands of the Bahamas, excluding New Providence. We have been insane for a long period of time, and we are just begin-n ing to get our bearings, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said. Only last month itw as revealed that AirTran, one of the largest low-cost airlines in the US, will b egin direct service to Nassau by yearend. H owever, with airlift to the Bahamas slowly coming on stream, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace suggested infrastructure development was the next big hurdle in developing the Fami ly Islands. Meanwhile, HVS revealed that yearo ver-year, the Bahamas decline in RevPar for the first seven months of 2 009 was less than the Caribbeans, which had slipped 22.3 per cent, whilet he Bahamas' 18.9 per cent fall was only marginally worse than the US d ecline of 18.2 per cent. And Nassaus 18.9 per cent RevPaR fall was better than the 28 per cent fall suffered in Alberta; 20.5 per cent decline in Boston; 30.6 per cent drop inB uenos Aires; 27.2 per cent drop in Chicago; 22.5 per cent fall in LosA ngeles; 23.5 per cent decline in Miami; and 32.5 per cent drop in New Y ork. Former Prime Minister Perry C hristie said during the HVS opening that the Government must consider infrastructure improvements in Exuma, in order to assist Sandals in mak ing the old Four Seasons Emerald BayR esort property viable. Mr Christie suggested that a subs tandard airport and pitted roads assisted in the demise of Four Seas ons product in Exuma. He insisted that government use H VS, a global services and consulting organisation focused on the hotel, r estaurant, shared ownership, gaming, and leisure industries, to assist it in assessing the capital works improvements needed to bolster Sandals investment. M r Vanderpool-Wallace agreed that government has to commit itself tom ore capital works improvements in the Family Islands. We have to be a part of putting the infrastructure in place, he said. H e added that because the Caribbean was the most tourism dependent area in this region, it makes a great deal of business sense for HVS to operate here. People are not afraid about the opening of Cuba, said Mr Vanderp ool-Wallace. They are afraid about the opening of the Bahamas. C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the d aily report. $4.25 $4.16 $4.26 '%, ,$1t ,'/& '-+/!, **&'.,!'&+&-%'-+-(*$1('+!,!/!, & ,,'&"'1$$&,$''&.!/+.+!-&!,/!, +$!.!+-(*/!,' $'*/ !*+1+, -**!+ -,,+,!-*&!+ !&+ **(+-'(!&#*&-*&+!,-*-$ By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE percentage of Bahami a n tourism earnings spent on oil imports increased from 16.6 p er cent to 26.7 per cent over a seven-year period, the Nationa l Energy Policy Committees first report has revealed, with this nations current regulatory framework acting as a barrier to energy competition, efficiency a nd conservation. The report, which was r ecently released for public consumption, showed that the Bahamas was having to spend ever-increasing quantities of foreign exchange generated by t ourist spending on oil imports, especially during the surge gene rated by global oil price rises during 2007-2008. A comparison of the Central Bank oil imports for local consumption, and the estimated t ourism expenditures between 2001 and 2007, reveals that the 27% of tourism earnings lost to energy imports P er centa g e of tourist spend recycled and lost to oil impor ts increases from 16.6% to 26.7% in seven-year period, with further expansion in Energy sectors regulatory framework creates monopolies, acts as disincentiv e f or pr iv ate sector and r enewable energy development S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B Bahamas 19% RevPAR fall better than region By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net BAHAMIAN security firms and a firearms dealer have all seen an increase in inquiries for home and business protection, Tribune Business was told yesterday, confirming that the recession and corresponding rise in crime has been good for one industry at least. Though the dealer, who deals in shotguns that are legal for private citizens to own, could not say how much firearm sales have risen year-over-year, he admitted inquiries have been substan tial. You need one, too, he said Gun dealer sees demand grow as security fears rise Some foods cheaper than Florida prices But minister says Bahamas the most underperforming destination in this entire region, due to having only developed Nassau/Paradise Island Says nation insane for a long time and just starting to get our bearings on destination development Nassau RevPAR fall less than likes of Miami and New York, and just marginally worse than average US decline V -WALLACE Supermarkets dropping prices quite considerably due to increased competitiona nd spending power decline, even though inflation at 8.1% US wholesalers controlling Bahamian food prices, though, and not brought costs down in line with fuel price reduction SuperValue chief targets sales/profits performance that equals or betters 2008 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B

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percentage of funds repatriated to purchase oil for local consumption grew from 16.6 per c ent to 26.7 per cent over the p eriod, the committees report said. The value of oil imports grew from $273.3 million to$ 802.2 million over the sevenyear period. And, in line with the reports fears, the Bahamas spent $ 1.147 billion on oil imports during 2008 when global oil p rices peaked, further illustrating the energy security and eco-n omics issues the country faces. For spiking global oil prices d rain this nations foreign exchange reserves, something that could place the Bahamian monetary system under immense strain, especially if p rices rise again at a time when tourist spending and foreign direct investment are much reduced, down anywhere between 20-33 per cent. A s the committees report noted: Access to energy from imported fossil fuels in the Bahamas is directly linked to t he ability of the country to access the international oil market and the availability of foreign reserves to pay for the supp lies needed. Local shortages of supplies h ave occurred as a result of one private sector oil retailer in a F amily Island having gone out of business recently. T he Bahamas vulnerability to global energy price increases i s deepened by the fact it is almost 100 per cent dependent o n imported fossil fuels for its energy needs, which amount to the consumption of 26,000 barrels of oil per day, mainly to meet electricity and trans-p ortation needs. As a result, the Government, private sector and wider Bahamian society are now l ooking, belatedly perhaps, at developing alternative, renewable energy sources to reduce foreign exchange leakages and t his nations dependence on imported fuels. Y et one major obstacle to this plan is the Bahamas exist i ng legislative and regulatory framework for the energy sec-t or, which is governed largely by the Electricity Act, the Out I sland Electricity Act and the Out Island Utilities Act. A cknowledging that the Electricity Act does not promote the exploration and development of renewable energies, the National EnergyP olicy Committees first report said the legislation gives exclusive rights for the generation and sale of electricity to BEC o r a franchiser, thus prohibiting self-generation and interconnection to BECs grid. In addition, there was no r equirement for BEC to generate a certain percentage of its e lectricity supply from alternative, renewable energies, anoth e r handicapping to developing such an industry. H owever, the committees report hinted that BEC could, a rguably, be in breach of the Electricity Act, which requires it to supply electricity at reasonable prices. Some might argue this requirement wasb reached, especially in the summer and early autumn of 2008,w hen oil prices spiked. Elsewhere, the Out Island Electricity Act provides an opportunity to supply electricity, and create/operate utility c ompanies in the Family Islands, if this can be shown tob e in the Bahamas best interests. Meeting this, though, has b een difficult for the private sector, with BEC still supplying most of the Family Islands due to the fact these locations l ack a critical mass to make the supply of power profitable. Fred Gottlieb, BECs chairman, said last week that the state-owned utility suffered a$ 16 million net loss in its financial year to September 30, 2008, largely due to its unprofitable Family Island operations. While B EC made an $11 million net profit in New Providence that year, its lost $27 million in the Family Islands, including an $8 m illion loss in Abaco. With the Hawksbill Creek A greement also creating a franchise holder for Freeport, and G rand Bahama Power now the sole energy supplier on GrandB ahama, the committees report concluded: This [regul atory] framework has created a near monopoly on electricity production and distribution in the Bahamas. It presents challenges in fos t ering an environment of competition, efficiency and conser-v ation that will maintain rea sonable prices for reliable electricity supplies, particularly in a global environment of volatile oil prices. As such, the legal and regulatory framework of the energys ector and fiscal incentives will need to be reviewed and a mended before any invest ments for commercial applications. The present regulatory f ramework serves as a disincentive to private-public partnerships in the expansion or development of the Commonwealths energy infrastructure. T he committees report suggested that waste-to-energy conversion was the more immediate actionable initiative t o increase power supplies in the short-term, whilst at the same time improving air quality, reducing pollution and illeg al burning of wastes and fires on the public landfills. O ther benefits from wasteto-energy conversion were a r eduction in the use of top soil to cover waste, the recovery ofr ecyclable materials and a reduction in the seepage of poll utants into the ground. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC potential for the Bahamas. As the Bahama Banks are charac t erised by steep drop-offs, most of the major islands have al ocation where OTEC technol ogy would be feasible, the committees report added. However, this technology is at the experimental stage. Seaw ater district cooling could also be used in these locations, butt here are few with appreciable demands for it. Deep-well r everse thermal conversion may also be an exploitable source of energy. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T T O O U U R R I I S S M M , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants (BICA s aid yesterday that the organisation was preparing to re-submit its recom-m endations for reforming the Public Accountants Act 1991 to the Governm ent before the end of this month if necessary, since allowing accountants to practice with limited liability was a big thing. Reece Chipman told Tribune Busin ess that BICAs suggested amendments to the Act had been presented to the Attorney Generals Office and D upuch Law School under his predecessor, the main features being allowi ng Bahamian accounting firms and partnerships to practice with limited liability, and permitting BICA to register and licence firms as well as individuals. With the Government having yet to respond to the initial submissions, Mr C hipman said BICA intends to submit the documents again before the e nd of this month, if that is what is required. The submission will also go to the Ministry of Finance. These reforms are very, very important for us, and hopefully we will g et them into their [the Governments] hands by the end of the month. Hopef ully, they will get some traction from there, he added. Mr Chipman said that without the ability to register and licence firms, as well as individual accountants, BICA lacked the ability to fully self-regulate the Bahamian accounting profession. H e added: It is a key focus for us. We have signed on to a Practice Moni toring Programme, and want to be monitoring firms. If we do not have legislation that includes firms, it will be difficult to set the stage for Practice Monitoring in that regard. I n turn, Mr Chipman said the registration/licensing reforms, coupled with t he Monitoring Programme, would pave the way for higher standards in the Bahamian accounting profession. He pointed out that, currently, the existing Act set no minimum standards when it came to professional indemnity insurance and capital requirements. With these new reforms, we hope to increase the requirements to be l icensed by BICA and increase standards in the industry, the BICA president said. Mr Chipman also told Tribune Business that the Bahamas was probably o ne of the few countries where accountants and accounting firms were still p racticing without the benefit of limited liability, meaning that partners were potentially exposed to huge personal liabilities if major damages claims were submitted against them. In the absence of limited liability, Mr Chipman said: It means the partn ers could be personally liable. It is a very big thing for me, because it i mpacts the standards in the profession with regard to certain criteria. Liability could extend as far as it could go. Accountants prepare to re-submit Act amendments

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B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net T HE OWNER of Sure Alarms, who took his business off BECs grid bar the air conditioning, through the i nstallation of solar power, y esterday said he was shutting his system down until the Government's position on alternative energy usage wasc lear. Graham Weatherford said the Governments policy on alternative energy and the l anguage of the Bahamas E lectricity Act are too ambiguous to risk the $3,000 fine that could be imposed on him for generating hiso wn "clean" power. H e said his solar power system could have allowed him to pass his energy savings on to his customers he had already begun to adver-t ise the discounts but he now has to renege on thosed eals. You would think the G overnment would encourage clean energy, said Mr Weatherford. Responding to Tribune Business article on the sys-t em last week, Phenton Neymour, minister of state fort he environment, had warned Bahamians to stay within the l aw on alternative energy supply. Mr Weatherford said h e felt the article spoke directly to him. Mr Neymour did mention that the government has been exploring clean energy develo pment such as solar power, and had advocated the instal-l ation of solar water heaters throughout the Bahamas. A ccording to Mr Weath erford, the Government, through Mr Neymour, should have touted his solar power generating facility as the way forward for energy production. I nstead, he lamented, they felt it more necessary to send out warnings. Mr Neymour suggested in t he article that one concern coming out of BEC was the destruction of their assets if alternative energy peripherals were not properly inte-g rated into home or office systems. Mr Weatherford insists that his solar power plant is in no way affecting BEC's operations. The Bahamas Electricity Act says: Except with the a pproval of the Minister and in conformity with any conditions to which any such approval may be made sub-j ect, no person other than the C orporation shall install or operate in New Providence any generating station with a generating capacity exceedi ng 250 kilowatts. This was provided that the prohibition imposed by this section shall not apply toa ny standby generating plant w hich is used only for the supply of energy in case of t he failure of the energy sup ply by the Corporation or o ther emergency. The Minister shall not refuse his approval under this section for the installation or opera tion of any generating stationb y any person in any case in which the energy required by s uch person cannot be sup plied or cannot be supplied w ithin a reasonable time by the Corporation. Any person who installs or operates or permits the operation of any generating station in contravention oft he provisions of this section shall be guilty of an offense and shall be liable on summary conviction to a fine of $ 3,000 and, in the case of a continuing offense, to a further penalty of one $150 for each day that the offense continues. T he Government continues to work on its national energy policy, which will include some exploratory alternative energy initiatives. It has been determined thus far that waste to energy could b e the best option for renewable energy. Options for solar and wind energy are also beinge xplored for implementation i n the Family Islands. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfb r f r !%* '!$() ))!*&*#tffn""bnff !$ %#&!*&*# !%** THE Bahamas director ofp ublic health will next week appeal to the business comm unity to partner with the Government in creating a healthierB ahamian workforce. Dr Pearl McMillan will a ddress the topic Public Health Challenges and Initiativesin Abaco during the sixth annual Abaco Business Outlook Seminar, which is sched-u led for September 23, 2009, at the New Vision Ministries Centre in Marsh Harbour, Abaco. Dr McMillan will ask the priv ate sector to become partners with the Department of Public Health in creating a healthier work force. This public/private partnership, s he hopes, will host events, prov ide resources and implement healthy lifestyle campaigns to cre a te healthier communities throughout Abaco. D r McMillan was born in New Providence. S he received her early educat ion at Bahamas Academy and obtained a Bachelor of Medicine a nd a Bachelor of Surgery degree from University of the West I ndies. She also has a Masters degree in Public Health from theU niversity of Maryland. As the director of public h ealth, she is responsible for public health and primary health care services in the Bahamas. T he seminars keynote speaker is Senator Vincent Vanderpool-W allace, minister of tourism and aviation. Other speakers include E ric Carey, executive director, Bahamas National Trust; Algernon Cargill, director, National Insurance Board; Isaac Collie, lawyer and economist; I. Chester C ooper, president and chief executive, British American Finan c ial; Rev Lennie Etienne, president of Abaco Farmers Cooper a tive Society; and Anne Albury, Vision Speaker. Partnership sought for healthy workers McMILLAN 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW -$621'250(86 RI&$50,&+($/52$'52&.<1$66$8 %$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU 1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ DVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKR NQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOG QRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQW RIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH W K GD\RI 6HSWHPEHU WRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\ DQG&LWL]HQVKLS 127,&( Business owner takes solar energy system off-line Fears fine, and wants clarity from government

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portation costs. G avin Watchorn, president and chief executive of BISXlisted AML Foods (the former Abaco Markets), told this newspaper that the companyh ad been dropping prices across the board in recognition of intensifying competitionas well as the reduced purchasi ng power many Bahamian consumers have. Its become a very competitive environment in the last couple of weeks, Mr Watchorns aid. Theres a couple of new competitors that have come into the market, and theres a new competitor in Freeport. Weve seen some tighteni ng up in consumer spending, a nd because its become more c ompetitive you have to fight for the scarce dollar. From our perspective, weve been dropping prices quite considerably f or the last couple of months. Prices have decreased and it is across the board. Bananas are cheaper here than in Florida at the moment, as an exam-p le. The marketplace for us has become more competitive, weve got to pass on price savings to the customer, and were d oing that. The Central Bank of the Bahamas latest monthly report showed that food and beverage price inflation was running at8 .1 per cent year-over-year for the 12 months to July 31, 2009, with many consumers in recent days having complained to Trib une Business that their food bills still seem relatively high. T his, though, was disputed b y both Mr Watchorn and R upert Roberts, SuperValues president and owner, the latter telling Tribune Business that grocery prices had stabilised i n comparison to 2008, when food bills soared as a result of increased transportation and operating costs caused by soaring fuel prices, plus supplys hortages when it came to certain staples. Mr Watchorn indicated that the prices charged by many fore ign wholesale suppliers of Bahamian food stores, especially those in the US, were sticky, meaning they had not come down in line with ther educed transportation and energy costs produced by lower oil prices. We cant control the food p rices coming out of the US, and a lot of US wholesalers h ave not adjusted their price l evels down to match the drop i n oil prices, the AML Foods president said. Prices have not b een reduced by entities passing goods along for export. The c onsumer needs to realise the pricing is largely out of our con-t rol. When asked whether this, combined with the consumer price decreases, had impacted AML Foods margins, Mr W atchorn responded: Margins have improved, but for a lot of reasons. There has been an improvement in shrinkage, and weve moved from purchasingo ut of Florida. Purchasing Weve moved quite a bit of our purchasing away from south Florida in the last six to 12 months because of pricing. Were sourcing quite a fewt hings out of south Florida right now. Were moving more and more, and continue to look at avenues to move more purc hasing out of there. There are lots of other countries and s tates in the US. A lthough Mr Watchorn did n ot cite them by name, it appears as if Robin Hoods m ove into the food and beverage market, plus signs that City M arkets is now getting its act together after its recapitalisa-t ion started, have increased competition in the food business. The AML Foods president said that as a result, margins a re not going up, and he predicted a tough couple of months lay ahead because, due to reduced disposable incomes, consumers were sim-p ly not shopping as they had in the past. Sunil Chatrani, City Markets chief executive, had previously t old Tribune Business that the food chain was cutting some 500 product prices per week, having decreased some 2,000 prices to date. M eanwhile, SuperValues Mr Roberts said food prices had both reduced and stabilised in comparison to 2008, when apart f rom soaring fuel prices they were also impacted by shorta ges of staples such as corn, w hich was being used to manuf acture ethanol. Yet despite the recession, he s aid the 11-store supermarket chain hoped to beat or match i ts 2008 sales and profits performance. Im hoping to bes lightly ahead, Mr Roberts told Tribune Business. We knew what was happening in the economy and what our customers were exper iencing. Were hoping to be ahead of last year. 2008 wasnt the best year, but were hoping to equal or even beat that. Were fighting harder for thec onsumer. I can tell you that the economy has dragged, but weve been fighting hard to keep a breast of last year, and have made some progress in that direction. Were not falling behind. The better you serve the p ublic, the more they will support you, and were doing the best we can to feed them bargains, values and specials. W ere staying afloat. Mr Roberts added that S uperValue had felt no press ure on pricing for its customer b ase, explaining: When prices went sky high, we mitigated m ost of it by forward buying. Prices went up and came down, a nd we did not have to pay high prices as we bought large quan-t ities of stock before they went up. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.15AML Foods Limited1.151.150.000.1270.0009.10.00% 11.809.90Bahamas Property Fund9.909.900.009250.9920.20010.02.02% 9.306.25Bank of Bahamas6.256.250.000.2440.26025.64.16% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.00Cable Bahamas10.0010.000.001.4060.2507.12.50% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.26Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.945.92-0.0212,3030.4190.30014.15.07% 3 .851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.653.690.040.1110.05233.21.41% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital2.052.050.000.3820.0805.43.90% 8 .206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.508.80Finco8.808.800.000.3220.52027.35.91% 11.7110.29FirstCaribbean Bank10.2910.290.000.7940.35013.03.40% 5.534.95Focol (S)4.994.990.000.3320.15015.03.01% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.49ICD Utilities5.505.500.002500.4070.50013.59.09% 12.0010.09J. S. Johnson10.0910.090.000.9520.64010.66.34% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelitBkNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 M ONDAY, 14 SEPTEMBER 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,527.75| CHG -0.97| %CHG -0.06 | YTD -184.61 | YTD % -10.78BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7 % Prime + 1.75% 7% BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestFINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 00 0 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.0015 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.607.92Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.00-2.2460.000N/M0.00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40381.3344CFAL Bond Fund1.40383.725.20 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8990-1.39-4.16 1.48671.4105CFAL Money Market Fund1.48803.795.49 3.60903.0941Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.0941-8.61-13.59 13.048412.3870Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.11363.935.87 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.40759.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.33992.69-1.41 1.07071.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.07073.385.14 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0319-0.112.05 1.06731.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.06732.894.93 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Aug-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 31-Aug-09 30-Jun-09 31-Aug-09 NAV Date 31-Aug-09Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Aug-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 31-Jul-09 31-Aug-09 4-Sep-09 31-Aug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un dealer sees demand grow as security fears rise when Tribune Business asked if people were now increasingly seeking this type of protection. Meamwhile, vice-president of business development and security services at ICS Security Concepts, Gary Greenslade, said the f irm had seen more persons come to them inquiring about manned guard services for businesses, plus mobile patrol units. A ccording to him, home owners as well as business owners have become more vigilant and proactive in securing their prop e rties. Everyone understands that the police's hands are full, and therefore thats our reason for being a part of this industry to assist the police in deterring criminals from carrying out their criminal acts, said Mr Greenslade. O ther security firms say they have also seen an increase in inquiries. G ail Martin, of Trace Security, said people have come in for quotes on different types of services, but were often dissuaded by t he cost. Jonique Reckley, of Unique Security, said the company had seen a daily increase in inquiries for basic services such as night guards. However, she said not many of those inquiries translate into contracts for service for the two-year-old business. S uper Value's president, Rupert Roberts, recently told Tribune Business that he would have to spend between $50,000-$55,000 to a cquire new camera equipment for four stores, as spiralling crime levels hit business costs and further reduce shriveling bottom l ines. He said that as a result of a customer being robbed of her hand bag in the parking lot of Super Values Cable Beach store last weekend, the 11-store supermarket chain had ordered more cam era equipment to monitor the outside of the store, in addition to hiring extra security guards to secure the parking lot. Khaalis Rolle, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerces presid ent, told this newspaper that he was very concerned about the impact rising crime levels was having on the business community, especially the seeming surge in armed robberies of companies in recent weeks. H e added that it was no secret that a bad economy frequently led to rising crime levels, and said: Its having a lot of impact. People a re afraid, they're cautious, and this now calls for a rise in operating costs. You have to hire additional security. You have to do far more than in the past to ensure your business, your people, are secure. People are having to invest in security systems. Some foods cheaper than Florida prices F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 74F/23C Low: 76F/24C Low: 75F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 75 F/24 C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 90F/32C High: 89F/32C High: 89 F/32 C High: 87 F/31 C High: 89F/32C High: 89 F/32C High: 89F/32C Low: 79F/26C High: 90F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 75F/24C High: 88 F/31 C Low: 77F/25C High: 91 F/33 Low: 74F/23C High: 88F/31C Low: 76 F/24C High: 88F/31C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 89F/32C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 89F/32C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 88F/31C Low: 79F/26C High: 89 F/32 C Low: 75F/24C High: 91F/33C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 TH 2009, PAGE 9B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Mostly sunny, a t-storm in spots. Partly cloudy.Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 89 Low: 75 High: 89 High: 87 High: 88 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. High: 88 Low: 75 Low: 75 Low: 74 AccuWeather RealFeel 101F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 80F 97-80F 92-78F 93-80F 96-76F Low: 74 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................86F/30C Low ....................................................79F/26C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 77 F/25C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.34" Year to date ................................................29.34" Normal year to date ....................................34.62" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU New First Full Last Sep. 18 Sep. 26Oct. 4Oct. 11 Sunrise . . . 6:56 a.m. Sunset . . . 7:14 p.m. Moonrise . . 3:26 a.m. Moonset . . 5:01 p.m. Today Wednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 4:06 a.m.2.910:18 a.m.0.4 4:41 p.m.3.511:07 p.m.0.6 5:07 a.m.3.211:20 a.m.0.3 5:36 p.m.3.611:58 p.m.0.3 6:02 a.m.3.412:17 p.m.0.1 6:27 p.m.3.6----6:53 a.m.3.612:45 a.m.0.0 7:15 p.m.3.51:10 p.m.0.0 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco90/3277/25t90/3277/25pc Amsterdam63/1752/11c66/1854/12pc Ankara, Turkey72/2246/7r73/2245/7pc Athens82/2768/20s81/2768/20pc Auckland66/1853/11pc60/1549/9s Bangkok89/3178/25t89/3178/25sh Barbados86/3077/25t86/3078/25sh Barcelona73/2255/12c71/2159/15pc Beijing86/3059/15s82/2762/16pc Beirut79/2675/23s81/2776/24s Belgrade82/2761/16pc84/2861/16pc Berlin63/1752/11sh68/2054/12s Bermuda86/3078/25sh88/3175/23c Bogota66/1847/8r66/1846/7r Brussels63/1752/11pc66/1854/12pc Budapest83/2858/14sh83/2859/15pc Buenos Aires73/2255/12s70/2152/11pc Cairo96/3574/23s96/3571/21s Calcutta97/3685/29pc94/3482/27c Calgary80/2646/7s82/2748/8pc Cancun93/3377/25s92/3376/24s Caracas84/2872/22t83/2873/22t Casablanca75/2362/16sh77/2559/15pc Copenhagen64/1750/10s65/1852/11s Dublin61/1646/7pc59/1545/7pc Frankfurt66/1854/12c72/2257/13pc Geneva 62/16 51/10 c 62/1656/13sh Halifax 64/17 43/6 sh 61/16 42/5 pc Havana 90/32 73/22 t 89/31 72/22 sh Helsinki 63/17 48/8s61/1645/7sh Hong Kong 85/29 81/27 r 90/32 81/27sh Islamabad 103/39 74/23 s 103/39 74/23 s Istanbul76/2467/19pc77/2564/17s Jerusalem 81/27 63/17s81/2762/16s Johannesburg 82/2754/12pc84/2853/11s Kingston 86/3075/23t87/3079/26r Lima70/2157/13s70/2158/14s London68/2054/12sh66/1852/11sh Madrid77/2548/8pc72/2250/10sh Manila88/3177/25t89/3177/25r Mexico City73/2255/12t73/2255/12t Monterrey95/3573/22s97/3673/22s Montreal64/1745/7pc64/1745/7s Moscow68/2046/7sh70/2148/8pc Munich75/2348/8sh74/2352/11pc Nairobi89/3155/12s88/3156/13s New Delhi 90/3277/25s93/3379/26s Oslo63/1745/7s59/1545/7pc Paris63/1750/10sh68/2055/12c Prague 73/22 52/11 sh 77/25 50/10 c Rio de Janeiro74/2363/17sh74/2364/17c Riyadh106/4182/27s104/4081/27s Rome 75/23 63/17 t 77/25 64/17 t St. Thomas88/3178/25pc87/3079/26sh San Juan80/2649/9s62/1650/10r San Salvador 90/32 70/21 t 86/30 73/22 t Santiago 61/1643/6pc66/1848/8s Santo Domingo90/3273/22pc86/3072/22sh Sao Paulo 70/21 56/13 sh 71/21 57/13c Seoul79/2657/13s81/2759/15pc Stockholm 64/17 50/10 pc 64/17 48/8 pc Sydney 75/23 55/12 pc77/2553/11s Taipei89/3180/26t91/3281/27pc T okyo 77/25 66/18 pc 79/26 64/17 pc T oronto 72/2254/12s66/1856/13s Trinidad95/3573/22s99/3773/22pc V ancouver 73/22 57/13 pc 70/2157/13r Vienna 73/2261/16sh75/2362/16c W arsaw 72/22 54/12 s 74/23 56/13 pc Winnipeg 79/26 57/13 s 75/2357/13c H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:NNW at 7-14 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles86F Wednesday:ESE at 4-8 Knots1-2 Feet10 Miles86F Today:NNE at 7-14 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles87F Wednesday:ENE at 7-14 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles87F Today:NE at 8-16 Knots3-6 Feet10 Miles85F Wednesday:ENE at 7-14 Knots3-5 Feet10 Miles85F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque82/2761/16pc77/2556/13t Anchorage60/1545/7s61/1647/8c Atlanta79/2667/19t81/2769/20t Atlantic City85/2962/16s72/2260/15r Baltimore85/2963/17s73/2261/16r Boston74/2356/13s60/1551/10pc Buffalo74/2354/12pc71/2154/12s Charleston, SC88/3168/20pc87/3073/22t Chicago80/2660/15pc75/2354/12s Cleveland77/2559/15pc71/2159/15s Dallas84/2866/18c81/2764/17pc Denver83/2852/11pc79/2650/10t Detroit80/2656/13s76/2456/13s Honolulu89/3175/23s89/3175/23s Houston88/3171/21pc90/3272/22t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday TodayWednesdayTodayWednesday Indianapolis82/2761/16pc77/2559/15pc Jacksonville85/2970/21pc88/3174/23t Kansas City82/2762/16pc80/2656/13c Las Vegas94/3467/19s97/3674/23s Little Rock83/2864/17r79/2663/17r Los Angeles78/2562/16pc82/2762/16pc Louisville82/2766/18r79/2665/18r Memphis81/2767/19r78/2565/18r Miami89/3178/25pc91/3278/25t Minneapolis84/2859/15s81/2754/12s Nashville79/2667/19r79/2665/18r New Orleans87/3072/22t89/3171/21t New York82/2764/17s68/2058/14r Oklahoma City81/2763/17c79/2660/15pc Orlando90/3274/23pc90/3275/23t Philadelphia85/2964/17s72/2261/16r Phoenix 99/37 76/24 pc 99/3777/25s Pittsburgh80/2657/13pc72/2256/13pc Portland, OR 83/2858/14s76/2458/14pc Raleigh-Durham 88/31 64/17 s 79/26 62/16 c St. Louis80/2665/18r79/2661/16c Salt Lake City 76/24 56/13 t 80/2658/14pc San Antonio 90/32 70/21 pc 88/31 69/20 s San Diego75/2366/18pc75/2365/18pc San Francisco 72/22 58/14 s 73/2258/14s Seattle77/2557/13pc74/2356/13pc T allahassee 88/3172/22t85/2972/22t T ampa 89/31 76/24 t 88/31 75/23t Tucson94/3471/21s94/3467/19s W ashington, DC 88/31 67/19s77/2564/17r UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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By REUBEN SHEARER Tribune Features Reporter HUNDREDS of Bahamians took part in a wellness revolution on the grounds of t he Ministry of Healths complex at the juncture of A ugusta, Delancy and Mee ting Streets last Saturda y. The activities were part of a Mega Health Extravaganza, to observe Caribbean Wellness Daya day marked by Caricom Heads of Government in 2007. The eventwas planned in response to a recognised need for definitive action in the fight against chronic diseases, under the theme "Love My Body. In a statement at the opening ceremony, Health Minister, Dr Hubert Minnis said: "risk factors combined with uncontrolled blood pressure, a rise in blood sugar, and elevated cholesterol, may result in loss of life and disability during what should be the most productive years for people. He estimated that 40 to 80 per cent of non-communicable diseases can be prevented, by equipping the public with knowledge to change their diets, and adopt healthy, active lifestyles which was the purpose of the all-day event. Dr Minnis encouraged those who supported the fair to translate the knowledge gained into behaviour change that is sustainable; with wellness becoming a daily pursuit. If this is done, Dr Minnis believes that the ministry would have accomplished their mission. Summing things up, he told Tribune Features that he was very pleased with the days activities, and will continue to champion for a better Bahamas. Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette also spoke and made a commitment to "ensure that citizens are provided with resources to maintain healthy balanced lifestyles particularly by providing safe places in which to engage in wholesome wellness activities." Hundreds of people stopped by throughout the day to take part inan array of activities. Ten thousand dollars in prizes was given away to lucky winners, including pedicures, home alarm systems, gym member ships, full body massages, and karate lessons. Various gyms, spas and whole salers were present, and had special giveaways throughout the day. Persons were able to try their hands at a punchboard" and sample a variety of foods including roasted corn, native boils, and fruit platters. For those that werent strictly counting the calories, conch fritters were available at a booth sponsored by the Methodist Womens Group. Natural juices were made on the spot at the Public Hospital Authoritys booth. Carrots, apples, bananas, papayas, and celery were juiced and samples were given out. The Bahamas Cancer Society, National Insurance Board, and Royal Bank of Canada were amoung the organisations taking part. T he health fair included activities such as basketball shoot-outs fea turing pastors vs politicians (won by Dr Mininis and parliamentarian Shane Gibson) and government vs non government organisations; egg and spoon races, and a karate demonstration and a show stopping obstacle course demonstration coordinated by Natasha Brown, a fitness guru and owner of Kingdom Fitness and Wellness International. Attendees were also treated to lively performances from the Royal Bahamas Defence Force and Crusaders bands and a Junkanoo rush out. Tribune Features spoke to a number of persons who were especially interested in information on new exercise programmes. Travis Bowe who signed up for a Bally Total Fitness program said he wanted to be sure he is around for his two-year-old daughter, Telia Bowe. "There's a lot of informa tion out here that is good for my own upkeep," Mr Bowe explained. "I got my blood sugar tested, and got some information on diabetes. Elisia Outten, an educator, spoke to Tribune Features with a V8 splash sample in-hand from the D'Albenas booth. She was particularly excited to visit the 'Slimmin Up' program to inquire about their services. "I'm expecting to see what they have going on for heart rate, cardio and to increase my metabolism, she said. This was her third time supporting a health event, adding "it's a good thing for persons in the com munity to come out here and see what's available. Other countries in the region held activities on Saturday and throughout the week. Bermuda, Barbados, Jamaica, British Virgin Islands, St Kitts and Nevis, held basketball games, walks and rides on the different islands. Additional activities were planned during the week leading up to Saturday. HUNDREDS EMB ARK IN WELLNESS REV OL UTION OVER THE WEEKEND C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM health B ODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e T HE term degenerative disc disease is very misleading. All of us experience some level of deterioration; however it's the cases ofe xcessive breakdown that actually lead to pain and other symptoms. Another source of confusion is probably created by the term disease, which is actually a misnomer. D egenerative disc disease is actually not a disease at all, but rather a degenerative condition that at times can produce pain from a damaged disc. Degenerative disc disease is quite vari able in its nature and severi ty. With age all people will exhibit changes in their discs consistent with degeneration. However, not all p eople will develop symptoms. Degeneration of a disc is a breakdown and wearing a way of the disc, which serves as a cushion between the vertebrae of the spine Discs are a gel like substance, comprised of over 90 per cent water and normally strong and durable, but when placed under uneven pressure and compression for years they can easily give way. T he condition generally starts with a torsion (twisting) injury to the disc. The injury weakens the disc and cannot hold the vertebral segments together as well as it used to. The inflammatory proteins inside the disc become exposed and irri tate the local area, produc ing low back pain. Unlike the muscles in the back, the disc does not have a blood supply and therefore can not heal itself and the painful symptoms of degen erative disc disease can become chronic. It is common for individ uals who have had painful disc degeneration condi t ions as a young and middle-aged person to have no pain when they age. The reason for this is that a fully degenerated disc no longer has any inflammatory proteins that can cause pain and usually collapses into a stable position. For most people, degenerative disc disease can be successfully treated with conservative care that consist of regular chiropractic adjustments, muscle reeducation treatments, daily stretching and low impact aerobic exercise. Practicing these suggestions will help stabilise and stop pain from the condition of degenerative disc disease. For more information contact Dr. Susan Donald at Life Chiropractic Centre, 393-2774. Degenerative disc diseases By SUSAN DONALD DC Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y PHA employee Antoine Archer whips up a batch of papaya and apple juice for attendees. TWO -year-old Telia Bowe is taken up with Indira the clown. MARGO Hillhouse and Katrina Rolle showcase products available at The Wellness Center on Thompson Blvd. THE CANCER Society and US TOO spread the word on breast and prostate cancer. R e u b e n S h e a r e r / T r i b u n e S t a f f R e u b e n S h e a r e r / T r i b u n e S t a f f F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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DOGS were originally domesticated to take advantage of their hunting abilities. Our ancestors redirected the natural instinct of the dogs ability to hunt in packs benefiting from its tracking skills and speed in pursuit of common prey. Thousands of years of selected breeding have produced a lot of different breeds. The Bloodhound was developed for its sense of smell, the Saluki and Borzoi for their keen eyesight, Labradors for hunting birds, Coonhounds for hunting rac coons and Rhodesian Ridgebacks for lions. With the exception of lions, most cats are solitary hunters that hunt alone and primarily at night. Predatory behaviour in cats is both instinctual and learned. Kittens, in the form of play, practice hunting techniques. Some house cats with out prior experience instinctively react to prey animals that cross their path. Dog breeds were developed to hunt certain animalsthe Irish Wolfhound and the foxhound to hunt wolves and foxes. Some breeds were developed to protect other animals. The Border collie and Elkhound to protect small ruminants, daschunds and terrier breeds were bred to pursue ground prey. The English Bulldog and American Pitbull Terrier were originally bred for uninhibited predatory and dominant social aggression for their owners entertainment such as dog fights. The Saint Bernard and German Shepherds were both developed for more humanitarian application, such as the search and rescue talents that we see today. Undesirable predatory behaviour is relatively common in dogs. Most pets are genetically predisposed towards some form of predatory behaviour. This type of behaviour is a problem, because the dog can cause injury, can be injured itself or be exposed to contagious diseases. Owners may be horrified when their cat presents them with a half eaten mouse or bird. This is not a gift to the owner for its gratitude for the owners care and hospitality,but is a maternal instinct when the cat brings back prey to its home for their young ones. The queen will normally bring dead prey even regurgitating half digested food for their newborn litter. As the kittens grow, she will return with live prey to teach the kittens how to prey. A cats instinct may be to carry its prey to a sheltered area but not to consume it. Some cat owners proclaim that its cruel to restrict a cats natural instinct to hunt. The most obvious disadvantage of predatory behaviour by dogs is the unnecessary injury or death of other animals including wildlife and other pets that appear to be offensive and unnecessary. It can also take a more sinister form when directed against family members, particularly if these are children and infants. Predatory instinct is most likely to be redirected towards children when an infant begins to crawl and walk. The dog may not display any interest in an immobile newborn, but may show some interest in this same newborn when he begins crawling around your home. So never leave a child (toddler ed with even the most trusted pet. How to prevent predatory behav iour in dogs and cats In dogs there are two simple approaches: 1. Deny your dog the opportunity to hunt. Prevent opportunities to roam unsupervised outdoors. Insure that your home is fenced or walled in if hunting occurs beyond your property. 2. Minimise your dogs desire to roam and hunt by providing other activities, discourage wild and undisciplined behaviour, walk your dog on a leash and practice obedience skills daily. In cats, the only practical way to resolve undesirable predatory behaviour is to prevent it. The instinct to hunt can be so strong that it last a lifetime. The clinics cat Sneaky hunts everyday and will bring a dead mouse to us most times. Of course, we like it because it is a means of rodent control. Hunting is a part of a cats outdoor activities regardless of how he is fed. It may help to attach bells to a collar to warn unsuspecting targets. Remember that your pet can be injured in its attempt to capture prey and is susceptible to the health risks associated with roam ing outdoors. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM LOVE'Sgreatest challenge has to be forgiveness. The older we get the greater the chance of having been faced with a deep hurt. Wouldn't life be easier if we did not have to deal with forgiving people? These people may or may not be in our lives. They may be our parent, friend or love partners. We may feel them thrashing through our lives causing mayhem and destruction. All too often we feel as if the offender calmly walks away saying, 'sorry and please forgive me', and yet we are the ones left bruised and bleeding. Are we made to feel that forgiving is just a way to put up with wrongs that we just do not deserve? Do we have to forgive everybody? Aren't there some people and the wrongs they do just off the radar concerning forgiveness? There are some people who exemplify the word forgiveness. They forgive everyone across the board and treat all hurts the same. They do not hold a grudge and things just seem to wash of their backs. They bounce back quickly and easily. They start each day with a new and refreshed attitude. You may know such a person, marvel at their disposition and wish you could be like them. On the other hand you may have questioned their sincerity and perhaps even their motives. It is true that forgiveness comes more easily to some but for most of us it is a struggle. Not being able to forgive is viewed as a weakn ess; consequently we do not like a cknowledging our battle within. C ynics amongst us, or realists as they like to be called, would say that the world is full of unfairness. They are the first to say, Everyone gets hurt at one time or another. -So get used to it. Opening ourselves to any type of relationship makes us vulnerable to another's betrayal and disloyalty. We may pull back as we nurse ourselves but we soon realise that living life does not mean cutting ourselves off from people. As children we class all unfairness together but as we mature we are able to decipher the things that are really small disappointments or slights compared with true deep hurts. The person feeling the pain can only measure this. What one person looking on may consider a huge injustice, the person who is directly involved may view differently. Our hearts tell us when it is a deep pain. We start wondering how to get past the pain and if it will ever end. We come to understand that it is only by forgiving that we can start to heal. But how can forgiveness be right when it feels so natural to let the offender get their punishment? It is this very unnatural feeling that makes forgiveness such an uphill struggle. The mountain climb is arduous and filled with an array of emotions. First we have to feel the hurt only to find the accompanying pain immobilises us. It is these helpless and overwhelming feelings that consume us. Not being in control of our pain pushes us to find the power by blaming the other. Getting attention and sympathy from those around us is a much happier state to be in and so we continue to blame. Many people live in this state for years without recognising that it prevents them from healing and moving on. How often have you not been able to look, talk or interact with that person, let alone contemplate forgiving them? Then we may even find ourselves hating them. We can not move from these terrible feelings and perhaps even wish them harm. How could we possibly deserve a friend betraying, a parent abusing, or a partner leaving us out in the cold? Some people get stuck at this stage. Like getting stuck in the mud. Their feet are deeply implanted. They want to move but as hard as they try they just can not get anywhere. Sometimes it is just a matter of time or perhaps it is with a lot of introspection. Years of being stuck and not being able to move forward will usually require professional help. Seeing things with new eyes and from a new perspective often releases the feet to walk forward. They stop blaming and punishing and come to understand why it happened. The pain changes direction and for some even dissipates. Hearts feel freer and forgiveness moves in. The climb up the mountaintop has been worthwhile and a new stronger person emerges. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist. Call for an appointmentRelate Bahamas at 3647230, oremail relatebahamas@yahoo.com or www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She is also available for speaking engagements. Why should we forgive? By MAGGIE BAIN L OVING RELATIONSHIPS Do you have flat feet? THISweek our back to school series concludes with a discus sion about 'flat feet'. Flat feet is either acquired or inherited. Iti s one of the most common foot deformities also known as 'pes planus', and is characterised byt he flattening of the arch on the medial (inside S ometimes, flat feet occur because your arches don't devel op during childhood, or in other i nstances, flat feet may occur naturally as you age. F latfoot a normal flatfoot is seen as 'congenital' and is believed to be inherited. Normalf latfeet are functionally healthy and usually cause no discomfort, however they can sometimes cause shoe fitting problems because as the foot sits in thes hoe it occupies more space in the mid-foot area of the shoe. This fitting presents more direct pressure on the shank area. Acquired flat feet on the other h and can present more serious problems. Severe Pronation (outward rotation and a pronounced out swing of the forefoot is a major concernb ecause it affects ones natural balance. The causes of acquired flat feet are many, but in older age groups, it commonly results from decreased exercise and increased weight, which in turn, add to the mechanical distur bances of the foot. This can further lead to a severe breakdown of the arch. The foot becomes misshapen, with an extremely depressed arch, and a rolling-in and down at the inner ankle. How important is the arch? The arch of the foot distributes weight evenly across the feet and up the legs, and can affect walking. A well developed arch is balanced between rigidity (for stability) and flexibility (for adapting to surfaces). While 'acquired flatfeet' can be given relief by the use of orthotics, they are among the hardest-to-fit feet. Ordinary shoes on these feet quickly go out of shape, and hence special orthopedic footwear, plus highly skilled and experienced fitting ability is required for such feet. If you have been experiencing pain in the arch area of the foot, I urge that you seek professional help because your arches may be falling and could be saved by way of proper arch supports Orthortics. Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified & licensed Pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a health and wellness franchise that focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit, located in the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau. Please direct any questions or comments to nas sau@footsolutions.com or 327FEET (3338 "The views expressed are those of the author and does not necessarily represent those of Foot Solu tions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies. By BERNADETTE GIBSON Predatory behaviour in dogs and cats By DR BASIL SANDS THE MOST obvious disadvantage of predatory behaviour by dogs is the unnecessary injury or death of other animals including wildlife and other pets that appear to be offensive and unnecessary.

PAGE 16

G REEN SCENE B y Gardener Jack C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Acne: Version 2.0 Constructive confrontation Confrontation is a four letter word in various business environments and typically, it is avoided at many costs. Here are three scenarios that can happen in any office at any level: Scenario 1 Jenny is a supervisor who took over a new team this year. Jenny inherited Sandra who is quite skilled at disappearing during peak periods of work. Jenny is hesitant about saying anything to Sandra because Sandra is friendly with the CEO and so when Sandra disappears, other members of the team begrudgingly take on the extra work. Over time, the work falls behind and when Jenny addresses the team about their productivity, an aggressive, heated exchange ensues. Scenario 2 James is a good worker and contributes positively to the performance of the team. Whenever he participates in a meeting, he cuts off the person speaking, always seeming to have a logical reason why something cannot be done. Over time, other employees stop offering their ideas, and the meetings become less productive because everyone has disengaged. Scenario 3 Ronnie is a very nice person but she doesn't get her work done. At lunch time she collects lunch from various restaurants for her coworkers, she bakes pastries and brings them to work and she always has uplifting words for her colleagues. She is congenial, but her work misses deadlines, is incomplete or contains errors. No one wants to be the bad guy and tell Ronnie that she is n ot performing. In each of these scenarios, the use of constructive confrontation skills would help to ensure trust levels are not eroded by festering resentment caused by perceived avoidance. Constructive confrontation is an assertive approach to building healthy working relationships that engenders open communication and collaboration. Constructive confrontation is not blaming or biased, it is engaging, fact based and solution driven. In many work environments, employees, supervisors and managers seem to use the word confrontation interchangeably with conflict. This is because they usually delay addressing issues for so long that the confrontation ends up erupting into an exchange laced with anger, disappointment or frustration. In other realities, when confrontation is well timed and used in a constructive way, it can actually build productivity, collaboration and morale. Tips for Making Confrontation Constructive The first tip is to manage the issue as soon as possible. While waiting may be an effective plan in some instances, it is usually ineffective because frustration brews the longer you take to contend with a situation. If you tend to take long to manage an issue, respect for your leadership will erode and employees will view you as someone who is either unfair or afraid to do what is right. Another reason you should not wait too late to deal with conflict is that early on, a situation may be resolved with a coaching session. If you wait too long, it can lead to disciplinary action which could mean termination. Don't assume confrontation has to be negative or unpleasant. Reframe your biases and remember if you stick to the facts and avoid words that label, blame or express a negative opinion, you can create a constructive conversation. Avoid confusing confrontation with conflict. While confrontation can show up as conflict in the form of an angry or aggressive exchange between individuals, it can also present as an open, assertive, coaching dialogue designed to develop conscious, engaged employees. Be clear about what you have to say because constructive confrontation can be derailed by unclear, vague language that tap dances around root causes. Be solution driven and ensure there is a clear understanding at the end of the conversation about expectations and next steps. Make your approach through the language of curiosity. Blame and judgment will attract defensiveness and positioning, not transparence and collaboration. Be open to listening. You are probably contributing to the challenge. Manage your emotions no matter what is being said to you. You can use the performance appraisal process to confront undesirable behaviours in employees. Take note, this should not be the first time they hear about your dissatisfaction but it should help to hold them accountable to sustained changes in their behaviours. Let's go back to the three scenarios. Ask yourself if you have a Jenny, James or Ronnie on your team. Alternatively, think about if you see yourself in any of them. Then ask yourself which combination of these tips can help you to confront the issues constructively. Avoiding these opportunities to confront can lead to lowered employee morale, compromised productivity and a lack of respect for leadership. In the book, The Art of Constructive Confrontation by John Hoover and Roger DiSilvestro they assert that, Constructive confrontation increases accountability and decreases conflict. When things are not confronted early and often, they tend to crash and burn. By then, there's nothing left but conflictual, accusatory, negative, blame-placing, find-a-scapegoat, search-for-the-guilty-and-punish-the-innocent, confrontation. No thanks Confrontation keeps accountability high and conflict low by eliminating confusion, chaos, inconsistent messages, and double standards... Constructive confrontation is the strongest tool available to ensure effective leadership across an entire organisation, at every level. Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational Soul Ltd., an HR Consulting and Training Company. Contact her at info@orgsoul.com or at www.orgsoul.com By YVETTE BETHEL By SARAH BEEK IS acne a prevalent pang of adolescence, or a lifelong skin health challenge? Turns out it can be both. While acne is associat ed with teenage years filled with raging hormones and the struggle for social acceptance, many adults are finding themselves caught in the middle of an acne epidemic. Skin care professionals and dermatologists alikea re also reporting adult acne is on the rise. Clinical studies indicate between 40 and 55 per cent of the adult population in the 20 to 40 age group has been diagnosedw ith low grade, persistent a cne and oily skin, with the primary catalyst iden tified as chronic stress. Balancing personal and professional responsibili ties makes this generation of adults the most timecompressed generation in history, which contributes to chronic stress: the con stant, continued and heightened level of stress that throws our adrenal glands into overdrive, which in turn can boost sebum production, setting the stage for acne devel opment. Once there's a boost in sebum production, the cascade of events leading to breakouts begins: oil spills onto skin's surface and acts as a binder, creating a mixture of oil and cells that blocks oxygen from entering the pores. The lack of oxygen creates the ultimate breeding ground for bacteria, which leads to the swelling, redness, and inflammation around the follicle, resulting in acne. Adult cases of acne are often more persistent and more inflammatory than teenage cases. Adult acne is also often accompanied by skin sensitisation, or a combination of skin condi tions, which makes treatment more challenging. To successfully treat, clear and prevent acne, the cascade of events leading to acne development must be controlled; but don't turn to popular teen-centric treatments that may be too harsh and irritating. MediBac Clearing is Dermalogica's answer to the adult acne epidemic. To learn more about this twenty-four hour treatment system formulated specifically to treat, clear and prevent adult acne, visit your Dermalogica professional skin therapist for your Face Mapping skin analysis and customised product prescription. A VEGETABLEgarden without tomatoes is almost unthinkable. Visitors will look about and ask where you have hidden them. Tomatoes are the king of crops and if you grow only tomatoes you will have a rewarding season. There are several distinct types of tomato that have different uses. Cherry tomatoes are small and can be round, ovoid or pear-shaped. They can also be intensely sweet or interestingly savoury. Regular salad tomatoes can be yellow, pink, orange or red while beefsteak varieties tend to be red and large, ideal for sandwiches where one slice will do the job. Plum or Italian toma toes have a lower liquid content and are ideal for sauces and paste. Most tomato varieties on sale these days are hybrids that are very reliable produc ers. All of the types of tomato I have mentioned are avail able in heirloom form. Heir loom tomatoes are open pollinated but stabilised so that the seeds can be saved and used for subsequent crops. Seeds from hybrid plants cannot be used as fully threequarters of the crop would have undesirable features. The reason heirloom tomatoes exist is due to the fact they are superior in some way usually in taste and have been preserved in many cases for decades. Heirloom tomatoes come to us from all over the world and some of them have shapes and colours that do not exist in the hybrid world. It is generally recognised that Pink Brandywine is the best tasting tomato of all time, though many heirlooms are in the same league. A favourite of mine is Giant Pink Ruffled. Yes, it tastes great but its most notable feature is its scalloped shape. One slice can cover sandwich bread but it seems a shame to eat such a work of art. Tomatoes come in two forms, whether they are hybrids or heirlooms. Determinate tomatoes produce a crop quickly and then the plant dies. Indeterminate varieties continue to grow and give fruit long after the initial crop. I would recom mend using determinate vari eties as the yield is much higher when spread throughout the growing season. Tomatoes are easy to start but generally need some type of support once they bear fruit. Tomato cages are gen erally accepted as being the handiest way to support tomato vines. The most important factor is keeping the fruit off the ground. Fruit touching the ground will almost certainly be attacked by insects. If you allow your tomatoes to sprawl naturally you can use plastic crates to support your tomatoes and keep them away from predation. There are some insects that will climb your vines to attack the fruit, most notably the giant tomato hornworm. Although Dipel can be used on caterpillars the most effective method is to pick them off and step on them. Organic, too. Another enemy of toma toes lives in the soil. If you grow tomatoes (or any other crop) in the same area for more than one season it is highly likely that nematodes will infest the roots. These microscopic worms enter the tissue of the roots and cause them to swell in an ugly way. The ability to absorb water from the soil is blocked and the plant withers, usually when it has half-grown fruit. If your tomato plants suffer from nematodes you must pull them up. For the rest of the season you must plant a totally different crop, such as cabbages or cucumbers. Eggplants, potatoes and peppers belong to the same family as tomatoes so you cannot plant them in the area. Very few garden crops are as rewarding as tomatoes. Keep the crops coming by sowing new seeds once the first ones are a month old, then new seeds again when the second crop is a month old, et cetera. If you do have a glut you can use the excess to make a tomato sauce that you can freeze for future use. j.hardy@coralwave.com Tomatoes King of crops PINK Brandywine is considered by many as the world's tastiest tomato. GIANT Pink Ruffled is an heirloom tomato that is as striking as it is tasty.

PAGE 17

C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009 By Jeffarah Gibson A bsolut el y In viting adds a cont em por ar y twist to traditional invitations with carefully handcrafts invitations to suit any event. Absolutely Inviting After recognising how talented she was, Dameeka Roberts, Owner of Absolutely inviting, began fabri cating invitations for a number of special occasions. "I started making invitations a year ago. I never considered myself a creative person. As I was looking for invitations for my son's baptism, my mother said to me, why don't you make the invitations yourself instead of paying for costly invitations, so I did." With the advice from her mother and her ingenuity, she ventured into a business, that would prove quite rewarding. The companys goal is to ensure that their clients have as much input as possible into invitation designs. Customers select the color scheme for the invitations, and the style. Some of the styles for the invitations include the pocket fold style, the flat panel style, and the petal style with the most popular being the pocket fold. This is what Mrs Roberts says sets Absolutely Inviting apart from other invitation designers. "Invitations set the tone for an event and we allow our customers to have some input. We don't have catalogs so clients don't choose from the already designed invitations. Our attention to detail and excellent craftsmanship places us as a force within the local stationary industry" she said. Mrs Roberts also says that the quality of their work is very important and they try to do their best to incorporate ideas from clients to make sure their designs are creative and unusual. "We use different texture of papers. They include the shimmer paper, the matte paper which is a little rougher than the shimmer paper, and the translucent paper. After our clients choose the type of paper and the color scheme for the invitations, we are allowed creative freedom." Since they are always coming up with new design concepts, one invitation was designed with Androsia cloth. A cardboard at custom size was used and the Androsia print cloth was basked at the back and around the borders of the cardboard. Invitations for all events are creat ed, but the majority of invitation request are for weddings. "Our company provides one of a kind stationery solutions for all of life's occasions and eventualities, catering to weddings, parties, showers, church and corporate functions just to name a few" she said. Handcraft invitations carefully crafted by Absolutely Inviting.


The Tribune
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01424
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: September 15, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
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normalized irregular
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Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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The


Tribune


Volume: 105 No.244


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009


PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)


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'Underhanded' message

attacking Christie sent

from official party address


By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter '
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
SENIOR PLPs fear a sabo-
tage attempt is afoot after a
message attacking party leader
Perry Christie was sent to near--
ly 40,000 supporters from an
official party email address.
Admitting she had no idea
who sent the message out, PLP
chairman Glenys Hanna-Mar-
tin called the move "under-
handed" and stressed it was not
an official party message.
Other sources within the par-
ty think the email is the result
of opponents of Christie hijack-
ing;the "PLP MEDIA" e-mail
address in attempt to destabilise
his position. They fear the
move may have done the leader
a great deal of damage.
The e-mail was sent out Sun-
day night to PLPs in the
Bahamas and around the world,
calling for the removal of Mr
Christie from the leadership of
the party. .
In the e-mail, the message
reads that although it is widely
felt throughout the Bahamas
that the FNM's "ineptness and
visionless response" to the cur-
rent economic recession places


the PLP in a position to win the
next election, "this is being
overshadowed by the fact that
the man at the forefront of the
opposition, the former Prime
Minister Perry Gladstone
Christie is no match for Mr
Ingraham".
"He allowed victory at the
polls in 2007 to slip through his
hands while the local economy
was at its 'peak. It seems that
PLPs are now facing the fact
that Mr Christie's indecisive-
ness and inability to get the job
done is his legacy and one
which.he seems not to be able
to shake," the e-mail reads..
However, the party's website
administrator Andrew Burrows
told The Tribune yesterday that'
this e-mail was not an official e-
mail from the party, as the
account used to send the state-
ment had been hacked by a for-
mer campaign worker who was
with the party during the 2007
general election.
This underhanded attack, Mr
Burrows said, is a part of a
growing trend, in the party
where persons have even
sought to create a false Face-
book page for Mr Christie
SEE page seven


THE FAMILY of 49-year-
old Jonathan Moss stand
by his body yesterday.
A CROWD of
stunned onlookers gath-
ered in shock near the
Audley C Kemp build-
ing on East Street as
police removed the body,
of a well-known m-an
who reportedly died of a
heart attack yesterday
morning. .
Jonathan Moss, 49,
was sitting underneath a'
tree eating breakfast at
the junction of East and
Hay streets when he
keeled over and died..
Mr Moss, a security
officer who lived on
West Street, frequented
the area to hang out with
friends. It is believed he
was recently discharged
from hospital.
His brother Lennix
Moss, 40, said he got the
sad news. around
11.30am. He remem-
bered his older brother.
as "very loving, kind -
someone who always put
family first".
Family, friends and
SEE page seven


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'. ^ - .By NATARIO
_., : ._.. .,, .. ,;, M cKENZIE
*iAffle" fo i . Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@
tribunemedia.net
THE man A ho stabbed
16-year-old Khodee Davis
. ... . -� to death was jailed for 25
.. ears yesterday.
Andy Francis, 22, was
unanimously convicted on
S July 15 of the murder of
16-year-old Davis.
'Khodee, an 11th grade
Temple Christian student,
was stabbed in the chest
during a 01ht between two
groups of young men from
Fox Hill, at Cabbage
Beach, Paradise Island on
May 12, last year.
The evidence suggested
that Khodee had sought to
act as peacemaker when a
fight began to erupt
Between his friends and
another group of young
men.
According to witnesses
at the trial, Francis charged
SEE page seven


Man charged with
murder, multiple
armed robberies
By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net


A 34-YEAR-OLD man charged with
murder, attempted murder and several
counts of armed robbery was arraigned'
in Magistrates Court yesterday.
Da' id Rolle, of Water Street, Big
Pond subdivision, is accused of the mur-
der and armed robbery of Nelson Samuel
Goodman who was gunned down out-
side Bertha's, G-Go Ribs on Poinciana
SEE page seven


DAVID ROLLE outside
of court yesterday.


Haitian Bahamian communities
still reeling after Immigration raid
By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
HAITIAN Bahamian communities in Abaco's overcrowded
shanty towns are still reeling six weeks after the Immigration
Department allegedly used violence as they tore families apart in
,a large-scale apprehension exercise.
Residents of the Mud and Pigeon Peas in the heart of Marsh
SEE page two


Controversial

power plant
construction
is put on hold
By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
CONSTRUCTION of the
controversial power plant in
Wilson City, Abaco, has been
stopped while the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC)
waits for the necessary permits
to be approved by government
departments.
South Abaco's local govern-
ment Abaco met yesterday to
approve retrospective applica-
tions for the power plant's foun-
dation and floor plans submitted
after work began last month.
BEC has also put a hold on
projects throughout the islands
including Bimini, Eleuthera,
Long Island, Cat Island and
Inagua while the proper permits
are obtained.,
Minister of the Environment
Earl Deveaux said it is not
uncommon for government
departments and utilities agen-
cies to cominence developments
before all the necessary permits
are approved, while private
developers are forced to go
through the correct channels.
Mr Deveaux said: "You will
SEE page seven


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ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


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I HE I'RIBUNE


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009


Reports that ministry has 'lost track'


of investigated employees are refuted


MINISTER of Education
Carl Bethel.refuted reports
claiming his ministry appeared
to have "lost track" of several
Department of Education
employees under investigation
in connection with claims of sex-
ual misconduct with students.
The claims appeared in the
lead story of The Nassau
Guardian on Monday under the


headline 'School Sex Claims
Uncovered.'
While explaining that he had
not seen the article in question,
Mr Bethel said it seemed to
refer to "old information" which
no longer reflects the current
situation.
The article stated that the
Ministry of Education seemed
to have lost track of several of


the nearly 20 public school
employees who have been inter-
dicted, reassigned, fired, or
forced to resign due to allega-
tions of sexual misconduct
towards students.
The article said "in at least
three matters, the ministry
seemed to have no idea of. the
status of the cases of employ-
ees charged with sex crimes".
But Mr Bethel said for an
extended period of time, the
Ministry of Education has been
collecting information to update
files on all employees accused of
sexual impropriety with stu-
dents.
"I do know that for the last
several months we, have
engaged in a process of deter-*
mining the situation of all out-
standing matters so they can be
dealt with according to due
process," the minister said.
He added that his ministry
has to rely on several indepen-
dent agencies who have their
own schedules - including the
Attorney General's Office, the


police force, the Public Service
Commission and,the Depart-
ment of Public Service - in
order to collect this informa-
tion.
"We for our part are in the
process of doing everything in
our power to move those cases
forward," said Mr Bethel.
"Due process means that the
most that can happen is that
they are (detained) and they
receive a reduction of their
salary pending a resolution of
the matter.
"Where it has been conclud-
ed by police that there is no
ability to prosecute the matter,
then the Department of Public
Service's hands are tied to the
extent that they are kept on and
they have to be paid".
He added that it is a vexing
problem to have "persons who
remain on government payroll
when there is no requirement
for their services".
For months the ministry has
been at thle centre of a firestorm
as numerous accusations of stu-


dent sexual abuse at the hands
of education employees, includ-
ing several teachers, have sur-
faced.
Last week the officials at the
US Embassy said they believed
The Nassau Guardian exagger-
ated the importance of a state-
ment placed on its local web-
site, blowing a routine notice
out of proportion.
The Guardian led its Friday
edition with the headline: "US
Embassy issues crime warning",
but according to a senior
embassy official, this headline
might have given a misleading
impression.
Jeff Dubel, Political Eco-
nomic Public Diplomacy Chief,
said the embassy is disappointed
that The Nassau Guardian did
not contact the Embassy before
printing the story - as much
could have been explained.
He said the notice was mere-
ly the posting of a tip to be on
the lookout for possible criminal
activity in western New Provi-
dence.


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FROM page one Haitian-Bahamians


Harbour said Immigration and
Royal Bahamas Defence Force
(RBDF) officers carried cut-
lasses, threatened children with
gunseand used violence as they
detained at least 165 Haitians of
all ages and separated them
from their families at around
4am on July 30.
Sources in the Mud, home to
thousands of Haitians and Hait-
ian, Bahamians, told The Tri-
bune how children were left
behind as their parents were
detained and then sent to Haiti,
and Bahamians born ofHait-
ian parents were forced to bid

FO N AN EVC


farewell to relatives and friends,
some of whom had lived in the
Bahamas for decades.
Anxiety and a solemn mood
has since taken hold of .the.,
community which can only,
hope for better treatment in
future.
A 30-year-old Haitian man
who moved to the Bahamas 15
years ago, and lives in the Mud,
said officers threatened chil-
dren as young as five at gun-
point and ordered them to
divulge their parents' where-
abouts..
They knocked down doors
and commanded men and
women to come out of theif
homes without allowing them
to dress before they were
detained, he said.
And the man, who asked to
remain anonymous, said he
knows of a two-year-old child
and an eight-year-old boy
whose parents were sent to
Haiti while they remain in the
care of relatives or friends in
the Mud.
He said: "Little kids were left
here while their parents were
sent back home. There is boy,
eight or nine, who is staying
with a friend of mine, and a lit-
tle baby, two years old, whose
parents were taken during the
iaid.
"They were very hard this
time. They beat people, hitting.
them in the face so they are
bleeding. They took money, so
if they had $1,000 in their pock-
et they would maybe give them
$50 and keet the rest. If they
found food or drink in their
homes they took it. They took
everything.
"There was one man who
came out in his boxer shorts
and they didn't let him take
anything, they just took him
like that."
Haitian Bahamians, born in
the Bahamas to Haitian par-
ents, are angry about the way
their parents, relatives and
friends were treated in the raids
at Sand Banks, near Treasure
Cay, and the Mud and Pigeon
Peas in Marsh Harbour.
They were among the crowd
which swarmed the Immigra-
tion Department, across the
street from the Mud, to take
food and documents to those
who were about to be sent back
to Haiti on the morning after
the raid, while employers lined
up to present work permits to
Immigration authorities.
The Tribtine's source, who
was taken to Nassau from Port-
de-Paix, north west Haiti, at
just 15, said he has held ten
work permits since moving to
the Bahamas.
But in order to obtain a new
work permit he would need to
return to Haiti to obtain a doc-
tor's certificate and police cer-
tificate for the Immigration


Department.
He said: "People who have
their Bahamian passports or
work permits feel they can
sleep at night, but otherwise
you are always glancing over
your shoulder to see what's
going on.
"The raids are becoming
more frequent, and more vio-
lent.
"I don't like how they treat
the people, the way they break
down your door - they don't
even wait for you to answer. I
don't feel good there."
An Abaco employer who
spoke to The Tribune on the
condition of anonymity, criti-
cised the application process
for Haitian migrants he wants
to hire.
The employer submitted a
work permit application for a
35-year-old man who returned
to Haiti in April, and is still
waiting for his medical and
police records to be approved
by the Immigration Depart-
ment so he can return to Marsh
Harbour and start work.
He said: "Every time they
switch jobs they have to go
back to Haiti, but they only
need to fulfill the same criteria
they needed for the previous
work permit.
"The-government needs to
have a clear guideline that tells
you how eligible (an applicant)
may be, taking into considera-
tion whether they have had a
work permit before or not.
"It's ridiculous that we are
doing the right thing by apply-
ing for the permit for this guy,
and he is down there starving"'
Director of Immigration Jack
Thompson said the Depart-
ment is looking into ways of
speeding up the application
process, but must also ensure
applicants are in good health
and are not a threat to commu-
nity safety before they allow
them to live and work in the
Bahamas.
He said the raids always pro-
voke reaction and while they
are appreciated by some, they
are condemned by others.
Mr Thompson maintains the
raid was carried out properly,
and the allegation of officers
wielding cutlasses is "absurd".
He added: "Children should
not be left behind and if that
happened I don't know how it
happened.
"I know there is a degree of
anger, pain and disgust out
there, but that should not hap-
pen. That's against everything
we stand for.
S"When-we go in ve deal with
the whole family an work with
them as a group. I makes no
-sense to take the other and
father and leave a c id, I don't
know what's happe d but the
people involved should step
forward."


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THETRBUE UELAOCEPTMBRN5,209,PAEI


Investigators

are trying to

determine the

cause of blaze
POLICE are still trying
to determine the cause of a
blaze which consumed a
tiny apartment and killed
the disabled 10-year-old
boy trapped inside.
"At this time our investi-
gations are still in the pre-
liminary stage and we can-
not say what caused it ,"
said director of Fire Ser-
vices Superintendent Jef-
frey Deleveaux.
He added that investiga-
tors were still interviewing
persons who were in the
tri-plex when the fire start-
ed in an effort to glean
more information.
When asked if police
were treating the case as a
possible arson or an acci-
dent, Mr Deleveaux said it
was too early to say.
"We really don't know
that at this time," he said.
The fire tore through the
middle unit of a tri-plex in
Colony Village at around
9am Sunday morning.
Wheel-chair bound Jer-
maine Mackey was sleep-
ing in a bedroom while his
mother's boyfriend slept
on a sofa and his four-
year-old brother watched
TV in the living room.
Rodney Minnis, 37, said
he nodded off for what
seemed like a few minutes
and was awoken by his
son's screams of "Daddy!
Fire!"
He said when he awoke
the apartment was filled
with thick smoke and
shooting flames.
His first instinct was to
rescue the youngest boy,
he said.
When he returned to the
apartment he said he heard
Jermaine's screams for
help but added that the hot
flames barred him and a
neighbotirfrom gaining
access to the bedroom.
Jermaine, who could not
move on his own, was said
to be burnt beyond recog-
nition.
His distraught mother
Anastacia Hepburn said ,
she left Jermaine home in
the care of her boyfriend
while she dashed to the
food store "for a few
things" at around 8.30 am.
The displaced family,
who lost all their belong-
ings in the fire, told The
Tribune they would be
staying with relatives for
the time being.


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - PLP MP
Obie Wilchcombe says he has
earned the opportunity to run
for the post of deputy leader of
the party - a race he has been
preparing for since the death
of Sir Lynden Pindling.
Mr Wilchcombe paid tribune
to Sir Lynden by officially
launching his candidacy on the
anniversary of the burial of the
former party leader and prime
minister.
"I announced my candidacy
to the media on the day he
died, and today (September 4)
was a day he was buried, and I
wanted to pay tribute to him
because I owe him so much.
"He told me that one day I
would be doing this, and I am
just happy to be at this stage
right now," he said.
Mr Wilchcombe launched his
campaign in style in the grand
ball room of the Our Lucaya
Resort. Photos streamed on
two giant projector screens
showcasing a political career
which spans more than a.


Man gets 30 years in prison for




attempting to kill police officer


A MAN yesterday received a
30-year prison sentence for the
attempted murder of a police
officer last year.
Ferron Scavella, alias Kevin
Woodside, was convicted last
month of the attempted mur-
der of Constable 2844
Nathaniel Lloyd, who along
with Constable 1895 Leroy
Rolle, was responding to a bur-
glary complaint off Bellot Road
last August when the incident


occurred.
Scavella had been placed
under arrest and handcuffed,
but was able to free one of his
hands. He got a hold of the con-.
stable's service weapon and
shot Mr Lloyd in his 'right leg
and face. Constable Rolle was
also shot at when he went to
assist his partner.
Last month, Scavella was also
convicted on burglary and
firearm possession charges.


Senior Justice Jon Isaacs sen-
tenced Scavella to 30 years
imprisonment on the attempted
murder charge, 20 years on the
burglary charge, five years on
two counts of firearm posses-
sion and six months imprison-
ment for resisting arrest.
The sentences are to take
effect as of August 25 and are
to run concurrently. Eucal
Bonaby appeared for the pros-
ecution.


Christian Council calls


on religious leaders to


ensure they have proper


title when buying land.


FOLLOWING the demoli-
tion of Canaan Baptist Church
by Arawak Homes and the
resulting uproar last week, the
Bahamas Christian Council
called on all religious leaders
to ensure that they have prop-
er 'title when buying land.
"The Bahamas Christian
Council (BCC) grieves over
the loss of the building previ-
ously occupied by the congre-
gation of Canaan Baptist
Church and we call upon the
Christian community to pray
for the pastor and in particular
the members of the 'church
and by all means to lend, sup-
port to the CBC family.
"The BCC accepts that the
courts are the highest civil
.authority in the country and
that decisions of the courts,
having heard all sides, must be
respected. Such respect for the
law is a fundamental basis for
good order and a civil soci-
ety," the statement read.
While the Christian Council
said it accepts this fact, it also
expressed sadness that
Arawak Homes and Canaan'
Baptist Church could not
come together and resolve the
matter by means other than
the destruction of the church.
"Every possible effort must-
be made to avoid any re-
occurrence of this most unfor-
tunate event. In this regard the


BCC calls upon all pastors and'
congregations to ensure that
in the purchase-of any land
they take all equitable and rea-
sonable steps to ensure that
they secure proper title, obey
the laws of the country; and
that no pastor or congregation
is in breach of any order from
any court.


Police probe armed robbery


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - Police are
investigating an armed robbery
that occurred at the Boulevard
Service Station on Sunday
evening.
Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said police received a report of
an armed robbery at about
10.44pm.
An employee contacted the


police control room to report
that the establishment was
being robbed by a lone gun-
man.
According to reports, the
culprit, armed with a chrome
handgun, jumped over the
counter and stole an undeter-
mined amount of money
before fleeing the scene on
foot.
The gunman was wearing a
'cloth-like mask' covering his
face, according to eyewitnesses.


He is-described as being about
six feet tall and of slim built.
The'suspect was wearing.a dark
hooded jacket, short blue jeans
trousers, and blue tennis shoes
at the time of the robbery.
Ms Mackey said officers of
the Central Detective Unit are
continuing their investigations
into the matter.
Anyone with information
that can assist police with their
investigation is asked to call
350-3107/8, 352-9774/5 or 911.


"Similarly we call upon all
land owners to show maxi-
mum restraint and Christian
grace and brotherly love in the
exercise of their legal rights.
The BCC makes due note of
recurring allegations that the
laws of the Bahamas in respect
of land are open to manipula-
tion and abuse by dishonest,
fraudulent and mendacious
lawyers and that such abuses
are taking place often at such
considerable adverse financial
consequences to individuals
without the means to protect
their legitimate rights," the
statement said.
Arawak Homes CEO
Franklyn Wilson said he was
pleased the Christian Council
and former BCC president
Simeon Hall expressed views
which are very much in con-
formity with his thinking on
the matter.
"And our prayer is that
their voices will be heard not
only by pastors and congrega-
tions but also individuals who
are occupying land which they
do not own."
Over the 'past seven years,
Arawak Homes claims, it has
spent well over $1 million to
establish its rights to the prop-
erty on which the Canaan
Church had been built.
After the court ruled in the
company's favour, the church
edifice was demolished as
members of the congregation
- including pastors - looked
on.
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decade.
Mr Wilch-
combe also
acknowl-
edged his
m other,,
whom he
described as
his strongest
supporter.
He said
he was very
pleased
about the WILCHCOMBE
support he
has been
shown by so many people -
both the young and old.
Andros MP Picewell Forbes
and Melissa Sears of Grand
Bahama, who represent the
younger generation of PLPs,
have thrown their support
behind Mr Wilchcombe.
"I feel very good and I
believe it is a good start because
when you look around, you see
the delegates out, and that's
what it was intended to do. We
have about 170 stalwart coun-
cillors and I think a large major-
ity was here tonight. Grand
Bahama will take about 400
delegates to New Providence


and so I hope we can get their
support," said Mr Wilchcombe.
The MP for West End and
Bimini expects to travel to
Bimini and Abaco to garner
support for his candidacy.
"I have the experience, and I
have earned the opportunity to
run for deputy leader of the
party, said Mr Wilchcombe. "I
am not only seeking to hold a
position. I wanted people to
know that I am not seeking
power; I am seeking to empow-
er the Bahamian people. -
"I wanted to share my
thoughts and ideas, and I want-,
ed to make sure they knew that
this process started a long time
ago and that we are able to now
bring it to this point," he said.
"The question is where the
PLP go from here. We have a
strong foundation and we have
young people who are ready to
lead and who have the experi-
ence.
"I happen to be the last man
who stood at Sir Lynden's feet
and also the new man of the
new generation. I think that I
have been prepared for this. I
think this is my season," he
said.


TODSUSSOIS ON THIS'AGE5OGON O5WW.RIUNE42CO


Wilchcombe says he has


earned opportunity to run


for deputy PLP leader


DEATH NOTICE

itrcia JaneAstw -Bain







.: ', ,




















died at'he1 e, Fort n e,

Sunday September, 13, 2009 at 2:30p.m..
She was 96 years old. She is survived by her son
Gladstone Charles Thurston; daughter, Anthea Helena Bain;
grandchildren, Denise McKenzie, Arthur Richard
Thurston-Burrows, Stanley Michael Thurston, Patrick
Lennon Thurston and Earl-Anthony Thurston;
daughter-in-law, Naomi

Moss-Thurston and many other relatives and friends


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


I







PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


EITO*kULTTRS O0TE DITR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
* Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
-Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm



Political lying changing the system


LEAVING CHURCH Saturday evening
a gentleman from Freeport, who we had not
seen for some time, remarked at how upset
and disgusted he was with the constant bick-
ering of local politicians in the midst of a
collapsing country.
We told him we had just completed an
article on the same subject for this column on
Monday. Here in the Bahamas most of our
politicians have lost all credibility - they
have yammered too long and fooled the
people even longer.
While President Obama in his speech to
the nation's schoolchildren last week encour-
aged them to be responsible, stay in school,
and work hard for a good education, the
PLP in the early days of its first administra-
tion took great delight in celebrating igno-
rance at the "University of Wulff Road." It
was often said that "Papa Doc" Duvalier of
Haiti believed the only way to rule was to
"keep 'em ignorant." It was also claimed at
the time that on a visit to Haiti "Papa Doc"
recommended this policy to the late prime
minister Sir Lynden Pindling.
Knowing the unreliability of political pro-
paganda, we never knew if such advice was
ever given - so we cannot vouch for its
accuracy. Suffice it to say that from political
platforms PLP supporters were encouraged
to cease thinking for themselves and to put
their future completely in the hands of "the
Chief."
We are accustomed to political lying in
the Bahamas, but in the United States
recently it has been stretched to incredible
extremes.
We still have not recovered from the
shock at the lies that supposedly responsible
legislators spread to encourage Americans to
close their ears to a presidential speech that
advocated responsibility and hard work. And
what is even more astounding is that many
schools refused to let their students hear the
speech and some parents kept their children
at home to make certain that they couldn't
hear it. -
Without knowing what President Oba-
ma intended to talk about, Florida Republi-
can chairman Jim Greer was appalled that
taxpayer dollars were being spent to spread
the President's "socialist ideology." Greer
claimed - without a shred of justification -
that schoolchildren would be "forced to
watch the President justify his plans for gov-


ernment-run health care, banks and auto-
mobile companies, increasing taxes on those
who create jobs, and taking up more debt
than any other President." Greer found such
a presidential ploy not only "infuriating, but
(it) goes against beliefs of the majority of
American parents through an invasive abuse
of power."
Not one word of what Greer said was
true. Nowhere in his speech did the President
refer to any subject that Greer said he would
talk about. To have such people in respon-
sible positions in the American political sys-.
tem is scary - and even more scary when it
is claimed that Greer is seen "as one of the
more sensible, mainstream Republicans."
President Obai i's speech to students
was the first by a sitting president since Pres-
ident George Bush spoke to the nation's
children in 1991 and President Ronald Rea-
gan talked politics to them in 1988. It must
be noted that both these presidents were
Republicans. President Obama is a Democ-
rat. Much of today's noise is coming from the
conservative Republican camp.
But a shout of "You lie!" from a South
Carolina congressman challenging a presi-
dent during a speech to Congress was too
much. "You lie" directed at their head of
state rang sour in the ears of many Ameri-
cans. The reaction was instant. , ' -
Rep Joe Wilson must have been shaken
to learn that his 2010 Democratic opponent
was benefitting from his crass indiscretion.
Rob Miller, an Iraq war veteran who was
beaten by Wilson in 2008, is planning a come.
back.
In July his campaign funds were reported
at just under $50,000 to Wilson's $211,000.
As a result of Wilson's outburst 5,000 indi-
vidual grassroots contributions have brought
Rob Miller's campaign funds to more than
$200,000. Looks as though Wilson's big
mouth and disrespect of the presidential
office could cost him his election.
This opposition - and dishonest opposi-
tion at that - just for the sake of opposition
will soon come back to haunt the Republican
party. There is nothing wrong with honest
opposition, it's necessary, in politics it's
healthy.
However, unless the opposition smartens
up and shows more responsibility it-will soon
exhaust the patience of a fair-minded people
and become irrelevant.


power
EDITOR, The Tribune.


I am a physician who has
practised medicine in Marsh
Harbour for twenty-five years.
I wish to add my voice, to those
expressing concern regarding
the proposed BEC power plant
at the Wilson City site. It is my
understanding that BEC plans
to use a Bunker C (No 6 Fuel
Oil) fired generator. I have con-
cerns regarding the use of this
fuel, the proposed site of the
generator, and commitment to
use of fossil fuels into the fore-
seeable future.
- As a medical doctor, I worry
about the effects of burning this
fuel in regard to the health of
this community. While it shares
characteristics with other
hydrocarbon fuels, Bunker C
contains high levels of hydro-
gen sulphide, which is extreme-
ly toxic. The United States
National Institute for Occupa-
tional Safety and Health
(NIOSH) rates TWA (Time
Weighted Averages, or expo-
sure for workers over an eight
hour shift) as toxic at only
10ppm, and IDLH (Immedi-
ately Dangerous to Life and
Health) at 100ppm. Bunker C
also contains toxic heavy met-
als, including vanadium, cad-.
mium, lead, and nickel, poly-
cyclic aiomatics hydrocarbons
(PAHs) and other components,
that have been identified as sus-
pected carcinogens in animals.
Repeated or prolonged expo-
sure may be dangerous for
BEC workers and the popula-
tion at large, due to its carcino-
genic effects. Few scientific

Headline
; EDITOR, The Tribune.


Your headline Saturday, Augus
brings false hope and a sense of un
ing as the facts speak for themselv
Look at the Heads of Agreemne
A Ingraham signed back in 1994
International and you will see tha
obligated to bring events like Mis
Paradise Island - well folks it too]
er 15 years to comply with that requ
Heads of Agreement.
You see events like Miss Univer
possessiveness when the market i
events you have to discount very
Mr Fields mentions that 98 pr ce
ets were sold - interesting to find
of that 98 per cent were Bahami
much were foreign visitors?
A resort does not push events wl
good that is why Atlantis has not ha


Could you imal
EDITOR, The Tribune
For.the edification of
tian Council president:


studies have investigated this
fuel and its effects on mammals.
However, one such study
suggests detrimental immune
system effects on humans,
giarine mammals, and other sea
,life. I recognize the need and
plan for smokestack scrubbers.
However, this technology is
subject to perpetual mainte-
nance, and will not be effective
without attention to continuing
servicing of this equipment. The
distribution of emissions is sub-
ject to the vagaries of wind and
weather despite the proposed
height of the smokestacks.
However, perhaps a more
immediate concern is the loca-
tion of the new power plant.
The Wilson City site requires
a docking station for transfer
of fuel from tankers to a
pipeline to the site.
I have been fortunate to own -
a small cottage on Lynyard,
Cay, which is just east of the
proposed site, for 32 years. I
have explored the creeks south
of Snake Cay to Wilson City
and the Bight of Old Robinson
extensively. I recognize the
incredible unspoiled beauty and
diversity of the creeks, man-
groves, and Blue Holes, that
exists in few other places in the


fishing and tourism. I have seen
the proposed site of the docking
station exposed to direct ocean
swells for much of the year,
which undoubtedly will make
transfer of fuel precarious and
subject to oil spills, despite thd
best of precautions.
Such a spill will be devastat-
ing to the sea life, and subse-
quently, to the beauty and eco-
nomic well-being of our com-
munity. In addition, the place-
ment of the docking site, plant
and the necessary towering
smokestacks, will be readily vis-
ible from the south Abaco Sea,
which is extensively travelled
by locals and tourists, and will
destroy the aesthetics of the
area.
Finally, the cost and magni-
tude of this project suggests
commitment to this oil-fired
power production for the fore-
seeable future.
In this time of economic' slow
down, concern for the environ-
ment, rapid development of
alternative energy, and the
unpredictable cost and supply
of petroleum products, this plan
seems regressive and unsus-
tainable.
I call for immediate cessa-
tion of construction of this
plant, deliberation and exami-
nation of the concerns of the
citizens of Abaco, and consid-
eration of alternative location
and source of power produc-
tion.


world. I also realise the impor- FRANK BOYCE MD
tance of this area as a nursery Marsh Harbour,
to the reefs and Sea of Abaco, Abaco,
which in turn, is essential to September 2, 2009.

brings false hope
events between 1994 and 2009 of course at the
beginning I recall the much loved powerboat
t 29, yet again event, but haven't heard too much more as busi-
realistic think- ness was good between those years. -
'es. . , We have to thank Mr Obama for.his policy of
nt one Hubert disallowing US based corporations with sub-
with Kerzner stantial executive incentive programmes for
t Kerzner was killing the well negotiated concession we got
ss Universe to from the US when we signed the Tax Information
k even Kerzn- Exchange Agreement and why Kerzner built his
airement of his large Convention facility but Mr Obama has tor-
pedoed that to the bottom of the tongue of the
se only have a ocean off Andros.
s down as for Large meeting planning and reserving is a pri-
thing. or to two-year business so what you can book in
-nt of the tick- 2009 you will not see until 2011 what do we do in
out how much' the meantime? Your headline brings false hopes.


ians and how
hen business is
ad many major


W THOMPSON
Nassau;
August 29,2009.


line Jesus saying it's OK to rape your wife?
. Paul, the Webster dictionary Afghanistan. In our society,
defines rape as follows: women are free and civilized
SChris- "The crime of having sexual men do not force them to sub-
Patrick intercourse with a woman or mit against their will.
7 girl'forcibly and without her Could you imagine Jesus
Consent. There are no exclu-
sent." There are no exclu- saying it's ok to rape your wife?


IEn of ..


Er












agnomon


Full and part time positions available -'all shifts.
If you are a punctual, inspiring person with a great
voice who loves music, and enjoys interacting
with people, then this job is for you.

While not required, experience is an asset.
Competitive salary plus benefits.
Email resume (and demo) to
gospelradiodeejay@gmail.com.

Only those short listed will be contacted.






Customer Service Representatives (CSRs)
and Delivery Drivers for a new pizza chain.


If you possess the following, then thisjob is for you!
* . Bahamian citizenship
* Experience in the pizza industry (a plus).
* The ability to work in a fast-paced environment
* An energetic personality & the ability to be cross-trained
*. The ability to provide superb Customer Service
* Your own transportation to and from work
* The willingness to work weekends, holidays and flexible hours


Interested persons should e-mail a r4sume to
fantasticjobopportunitygmal.com by Monday, September 21st, 2009


Baham Avenue So th ec rnc hre


I'm not sure what age Rev
Paul is living in, but someone
should remind him it's 2009.
We live in a democracy, not in


ATHENA DAMIANOS
Nassau,
September 10, 2009


A doctor raises




concerns about




BEC's proposed


P4rv4 Fam4 Isa ort Ot

Invites application for the following positions:

Applicants should satisfy the following minimum
requirements:


CHIEF ENGINEER

* Have a Bachelors Degree in Mechanical
Engineering from a recognized College/University
* At least minimum 5 years in a similar or closely
related field
* Must be computer literate
* Be proactive, self motivated and be ready to work
long hours
* Be able to lead a team of Engineers and technicians
with varied trades


LIVE IN MAID

* Fully experienced in domestic household chores
and culinary duties
* Three years in a similar position would e an asset
* Applicant must be willing to live on islad

Applications should send email to:\
cmajor@grp.sandals.com


I


I
t


1777 mr-1


qw


/









THE TIBUNETUESDY, SETEMBE 15,C009,NAGES


Local diplomat elected




to UNESCO presidency


Cuban Embassy.

to open Book of

Condolences

after death of

revolution leader
THE Cuban Embassy has
announced that it will open
a Book of Condolences in
commemoration of the death
of Juan Almeida Bosque, a
poor black brick-layer from
Havana who rose to become
one of the central leaders of
the Cuban Revolution.
The book will be placed at
the, embassy of the Republic
of Cuba, at 61 Miller House,
Collins Avenue, from
Wednesday until Friday of
this week from 11am to 4pm.
At the time of his death on
September 11, Commnander
Almeida, as he was widely
known, was a member of the
Politburo of the Communist
Party of Cuba and vice presi-
dent of the State Council.
His funeral will take place
today in Santiago de Cuba,
on the eastern side of the
island.
One of the most decorat-
ed heroes of the Republic of
Cuba, Commander Almeida
was a militant construction
worker when he met Fidel
Castro and joined the move-
ment to overthrow dictator
Fulgencio Batista.
He participated in the
assault to the Moncada Bar-
racks, the landing' of the
Granma yacht and the fight in
the mountains of Sierra
Maestra, where he attained
the then highest,rank - com-
mander of a column of rebels.
A writer and composer, he
left more than 300 hundred
songs and six books, in which
he related his experiences
during the revolution.
"He defended principles of
justice that will be defended
at any time and age while
human beings breathe on
Earth", wrote, Fidel Castro
upon learning of his death.
"As a black man in racially
diverse Cuba, Almeida was
an important visual symbol
of a break with the past, par-
ticularly in 1950s Cuba, where
racism and discrimination
were common.
"His close relationship with
Castro for decades has been a
sign of Afro-Cubans' access
to power and influence in
communist Cuba," said an
AFP news-wire report.
Over the past few days,
thousands of Cubans have
visited Havana's Jose Marti
Memorial, where a large pho-
tograph of the commander
has been erected..
Members of the Politburo
and the Central Committee
of the Cuban Communist
Party and other top leaders
laid wreaths at the cite on
Sunday.
Yesterday, the Bahamas-
Cuba Friendship Society said
it also mourns the passing of
"this great Cuban patriot".
The group said it fully
endorses the sentiments
expressed by Fidel Castro,
who said: "I was privileged to
know that young black mili-
tant worker who-would suc-
cessively be the leader of a
revolutionary group, a com-
batant at the Moncada, a
comrade in prison, a platoon
captain at the time of the
Granma landing, an officer
with the Rebel Army - held
back by a shot to his chest
during the violent combat at
Uvero- the commander of a
column marching on to create
the Third Eastern Front, and
the comrade sharing the lead-
ership of our forces in the last
successful battles to over-
throw the tyranny.
"I was an exceptional wit-
ness to his exemplary conduct
for over half a century of
heroic and victorious resis-
tance in the struggle against
the bandits, during the Giron
counteroffensive, the Missile
Crisis, the internationalist
missions and the resistance to
the imperialist blockade."


IN WHAT is being
'described as. a "proud
inoment" in Bahamian history,
local career diplomat Dr
Davidson Hepburn was yes-
terday elected to the presiden-
cy of the 35th General Con-
ference of UNESCO' (United
Nations Educational, Scientif-
ic and Cultural Organisation).
Minister of Education Carl
Bethel in making the
announcement, said that he is
delighted at the news of Dr
Hepburn's presidency and not-
ed that it is a success story for
the Bahamas.
Mr Bethel said that no gov-
ernment in the Caribbean sub-
region of the Group of Latin
American and Caribbepn
(GRULAC) has ever held
such as a distinguished posi-
tion in UNESCO.
The minister also expressed
gratitude to the supporting
countries, particularly the
CARICOM states.
Nine countries including the
Bahamas vied for the position.
The election was held yes-
terday morning in Paris,
France.
Mr Bethel said he believes
Dr Hepburn will bring innova-
tive ideas to the General Con-
ference and assist in strength-
ening the image of the organi-


MR KOICHIRO MATSUURA, Director-General of UNESCO congratulates Dr. Davidson L. Hepburn on being elected President of the 35th Gen-
eral Conference of UNESCO, Paul Farquharson, QPM, watches on.


station both internationally and,
locally, as well as cause the
Caribbean region to have a
greater participation in the
affairs of UNESCO.
"Dr Hepburn, OBE, is a sea-


soned and decorated individual
of distinguished, public, diplo-
matic and civic service cur-
rently serves as the chair of the
Antiquities, Monuments and
Museum Corporation. He will


be presiding over the General
Conference of UNESCO to be
held in Paris, October 6 -23,
2009. The meeting will be
attended by all member and
associates states of UNESCO,"


Fox Hill MP aims to raise $1m in 'mission fund'


MEMBER of Parliament for
Fox Hill Fred Mitchell aims to raise
$1 million through a political cam-
paign fund to assist potential can-
didates of the Progressive Liberal
Party.
Mr Mitchell has announced the
establishment of the 'mission fund'
aimed at collecting the cash within
.the next six months.
"The fund will facilitate and
assist candidates of the Progressive


LEONNIE
EVELYN

A BURROUGHS,



of Morrisville, Long
Island will. be on
S Thursday, 17th
September, 2009 at
4:00p.m. at Assump-
tion Catholic Church, Dunmore's, Long
Island, The Bahamas. Officiating will be
Deacon Patrick Darville. Interment will
follow in Dunmore's Public Cemetery,
Dunmore's, Long Island, The Bahamas.


She is survived by: 2 sons: Timothy &
Carroll Burroughs; 1 daughter: Romalee
Burroughs; 1 step daughter: Sharon
Wieland of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.; 1 sister:
Una Nottage; I brother: Leonard Saunders;
1 daughter-in-law: Cameron Burroughs; 5
grand daughters: Kali, Kalyn,.Indiya,
Tonique, and Jade Burroughs; 1 grand son:
Kennis Johnson Jr.


A host of other relatives 'and friends
including Mark Major, The Martinborough
Family, The Cartwright Family, The
Saunders Family, and The Major Family.


Viewing will be at the church from 5 pm
Wednesday until service time on Thursday.


Arrangements by Mt. Olive Funeral Chapel,
Long Island.


Liberal Party committed to the
'Agenda For Change' that I out-
lined when I began my campaign
for change within the PLP on Jan-
uary 4, 2009," Mr Mitchell said.
Mr Mitchell said that the fund
would further the interests .of the
'Agenda for Change' within the
hierarchy of the PLP.
Earlier this year, Mr Mitchell
announced the formation of a
fundraising committee to raise


money towards his 2012 election
campaign and those of certain oth-
er PLP candidates who he thinks
are supportive of a "particular set
of ideas, and running the kind of
campaign we, want to run."
Noting that the fund "has
already received several generous
donations as a start to the cam-
paign", he urged support for the
'Agenda For Change', saying it "is
critical to the country's future."


the ministry said in a state-
ment.
The Bahamas has been a
member of UNESCO since
1983, and through the Nation-
al Commission of the Bahamas
for UNESCO, has been active
in promoting the purpose of
the organisation by upholding
human rights and fundamen-
tal freedoms proclaimed in the
United Nations Charter.


TI OIC


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TODSUSI STORIS OTISPGELOSNTOWW.TIBUN242CO


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 5


�HE TRIBUNE








P 6U YE B 50H B


Puerto Rico education
chief defends the
banning of five books
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico
PUERTO Rico's top educa-
tion official on Monday defend-
ed his decision to ban five
books from the curriculum at
public high schools across the
U.S. territory because of
"coarse" language, according,
to Associated Press.
The move drew criticism
over the weekend from uni-
versity professors on the
Caribbean island.
Education Secretary Carlos
Chardon told reporters he
decided not to include the five
Spanish-language books in the
11th grade curriculum this year
because their use of slang made
them inappropriate for school-
children, not because they did
not have literary value.
The banned books previ-
ously were read as part of the
11th grade curriculum, but
proofreaders this year alerted
education officials about
"coarse" slang, including ref-
erences to genitalia in "Mejor
te lo cuento: antologia person-
al," by Juan Antonio Ramos.,
To illustrate his reasoning,
Chardon said French works by
the Marquis de Sade, whose
notorious sexual excesses and
erotic writing gave rise,.to the
term "sadism," also have "great
literary value" but they are not
appropriate for youngsters to
read in high school either.


Bahamians have their say



on demolition of church

How do you feel about Arawak Homes
demolishing the Canaan Baptist Church,
which was built without permission on.
the company's property?


By AVA TURNQUEST
Dino Munroe
"If the property didn't
belong to them, they shouldn't
have built the church on it.
And if they don't want to pay
for it, take it off. The church
has to be within the law."
KC Whyms
"The church needs to fol-
low rules and regulations just
like anybody else. If Arawak
Homes owns the property,
then that's the way it is. There
is not one law for the church
and another:for the public; the
court ruled against them so
they have to move."
Alfred RoHe,
air-conditioning technician
"'I think they should have


(


TSiTREET


given the church more time at
least."
Burrows, 46,
Premier Importers
"I think that was pretty bad;
it didn't seem as if they took
the people of the church into
consideration. .
"Not very fair to the
church."
Munroe, 20
"You can't just go to some-


one's property and start build-
ing. You have to get permis-
sion, even if it's a church."
Henry V Smith, 24,
construction worker
"I never thought that they",,
,would ever destroy a church in,
the Bahamas.
'"It's really interesting to see
the shift in perspective. I agree
that the law is the law - no
body should be held above
that."


Ministry of Health,

Royal Eagle team up

to screen children


ing the Good News through Mission & Ministry"

, Matthew 28:19-20


HUNDREDS of primary
and junior-high school chil-
dren have received free
health screenings thanks to a
partnerships between Royal
Eagle Masonic Lodge No I,
the Department of Public
Health, and the Grant's.
Town Urban Renewal Cen-
'tre.
. Organiser said 250 screen-
ings were conducted by offi-
cials of the School Health,
Services 'Division of the.
Department of Public Health
during the first Royal Eagle
Masonic Lodge Back-to-
School Health Fair at the
Lodge's grounds on Baillou
Hill Road.
Children were screened for
symptoms of chronic, non-
communicable diseases, to
determine hemoglobin and
nutritional levels and for any
sight or hearing deficiencies.
The Royal Eagle Masonic


Lodge was responsible for
organizing the Health Fair,
furnishing the facilities for the
screenings, and providing
treats for the children after-
wards.
Officials of the Grant's
Town Urban Renewal Cen-
tre ensured that children from
neighboringg communities-
were present to undergo the
:screenings.'.
The Lodge also provided
students with back-to-school
supplies as part of its ongo-
ing community outreach pro-
gram. Commonwealth Drug
and Medical Supplies and
Echo Water also joined the
partnership to make the fair a
success.
Fifty adults received free
health screenings for chron-
ic, non-communicable dis-
eases including hypertension,
diabetes, obesity and high
cholesterol.


Pastor Cedric B. Moss

Pastor, Kingdom Life Church

Topic: Equipping the Saints to Proclaim the Good News


The Rev'd Fr. Mark L. Fox

Rector, Sr. Peter's Parish, Long Island

'Topic: Living Your Full Potential within the Bodv of Christ hI Proclaiming the Good News


Dates: Wednesday, September 16 thru Friday, September 18,2009

Comet&Experience.


Anointed Praise & WNorship Ministry IT

Dynamic Preaching & Biblical Exposition

Prayer & Counseling Ministry I /



HOLY CROSS ANGLICAN CHURCH ;
Rector: The Rev'd Fr. Norman D. Lightbourne " ' . , , -
Assistant Priest: The Rev'd Fr. Ethan P.J. Ferguson j
Highbury Park & Soldier Rd. Nassau, N.P, The Bahams jj
~ I14


Share your news
The Tribune, wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning .
for improvements in the
area or have won an ,"'
award.
If so,call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Invites Applications For The Following Positions


General Manager
Hotel Manager
Operations Manager
Food & Bevearge Directors
Chefs
Sous Chefs
Specialty Restaurant Cooks
Financial Controller
Accountants
Cost Controll'rs
Income Auditor
Chief Of Security
Sales Manager'


Manager Marina Operations
Project Manager
Information System Manager
Watersports Manager
Director Gulf Operations ,
Laundry .Manager.
Landscaping & Irrigation
Systems Manager
Director R/O and Sewerage
Treatments Plants
Chief Engineer 1 ,
Entertainment Director
Executive Housekeeper


Applicants should satisfy the following minimum
requirements
*Have a degree from a reconzied College /University or equivalent
on the job experience and training
*At least two years experience in the Hospitality Industry or a
closely related field
*Will be required to reside on the Island
*Must be computer literate
*Be proactive self motivated and willing to work long hours
*Be able to set the trend for timely and quality work performance
*Must be able to prepare budget and set up stock control
systems
*Strong communications skills, oral and written is essential
*Have strong organizational and leadership skills
Competitive Compensation package Commensurate witb relevant
experience and qualification \
Fax or email resume with proof of qualifications and exerier.ce
to:
human.resources@grp.sandals.com


TDICSSTREONTI AELGOTOWWTIBUN242CO


S*E RIO 3j


Guest Preachers:


Pastor T.G. Morrison

Pastor, Zion Baptist Church

Tlropi: Ti'ansforming Lives through Mission & Ainistr',


N'4;�


L-


qO MUNROE"


PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 7


FROM page one l0 Ml18 0 .P010S
FROM page one Fake email fear for PLP leaders

under the pseudonym 'Perry
Leader' - which pundits explain engage in this sort of self they want to do, but our focus is
ewas designed to make Mr destructive denouncements that on the convention and to look
' Christie appear as a self serving are contained in that e-mail as it at the platform and bring our
n arcsistic a i i relates to our party," the chair- troops together and strength-d
- " nar, narissistic individual.
Tnarfcs tc nrtvnd chairman man told The Tribune yester- en our resolve to become the


FROM page one
Avenue, Coconut Grove, last Wednes-
day.
It is alleged that Rolle robbed Mr
Goodman of $200, the property of
Bertha's Go-Go Ribs.
Mr Goodman, 44, a resident of
Pinewood Gardens and an employee of
the popular takeout restaurant, was
gunned down shortly before midnight last
Wednesday. According to initial police
reports, he was approached by several
people just before gunshots were heard.
Rolle is also charged with the attempt-
ed murder of Alexander Dean and the
attempted armed robbery of Dean's Build-
ing Supply situated on Parkgate Road.
Mr Dean, 23, was shot in the abdomen
and back after a gunman and his accom-
plice entered the hardware store and
demanded cash around 3pm last Satur-
day.

FROM page one

invariably find them digging up
roads without permission, and the mee
it can be as simple as that or as confirm
complicated as the construction required
of a school. they are
"But when it's done by a pri- work in
vate person that's not the case. pliance
"The project will now stop. Plans
until the permits are in place." power p
The $105 million project has contain
stirred controversy in the Abaco be apprn
community and nearly 1,000 ment de
Abaco residents concerned Ministr
about the development attended of Envi
a public meeting with govern- Town ]
ment ministers and BEC execu- structio.
tives at New Vision Ministries in Perm
Marsh Harbour on Thursday. and flo(
Many are opposed to the site wer
plant as they fear the use of ernmen
heavy oil fuel Bunker C (HFO) terday.
could permanently damage the Soutt
surrounding environment near Benjam
the Bight of Old Robinson and had alre
Pelican Cays Land and Sea Ministr
Park. But others fed-up with fre- of the E
quent power cuts across the be sent
Abacos expressed their support approve
for the development. ment b
Minister of State for the Envi- has alre
ronment with'responsibility for. tinued.
utilities Phenton Neymour Min- An al
ister of the Environment Earl site has
Deveaux, BEC chairman Fred
Gottlieb and BEC general man- *
ager Kevin Basdon discussed
plans with the public, and resi-
dents were invited to ask ques-
tions.
Attorney Fred Smith, repre-
senting a group of Abaco resi-
dents, told the panel he would
Stake action to stop the develop-
ment if the correct permits have
not been approved by local and
central government.
Mr Deveaux said: "Following


Glenys Hanna-Martin outright
denounced the e-mail and
called on those persons who
wish to run for office in the par-
ty to do so in a mature and hon-
est fashion.
"That e-mail did not eminate
from the official party struc-
ture, nor would the party


day.
Currently, she said, the party
is conducting an internal inves-
tigation into the matter, and
will take "all the necessary
steps" that are required.
"The truth is, those persons
who wish to express themselves
ought not to hide behind e-mail
addresses. They must do what


Man charged

It is also alleged that Rolle robbed the
Esquire Liqubr Store of $1,275, Adiesco
Enterprise of $1,175, a John Chea store of
$2,000, Super Wash of $346, Subway
restaurant on Baillou Hill Road of $550
and Healthy Living Pharmacy of $250.
Rolle who was arraigned before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One,
Bank Lane, yesterday was not required
to enter a plea to the charges.
Rolle accused the police of lying, say-
ing they had charged him with offences
he knew nothing about. He also com-
plained of a broken rib and leg. ,
Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered that'
' Rolle be taken to see a doctor. Rolle was
remanded to Her Majesty's Prison and is
expected to appear in Court 5, Bank Lane,
today for a fixture hearing.


wer plant
eting we asked BEC to
whether all the permits
d were in place, and if
not in place, to halt the
order to be in full com-
with the law."
s for the 48 megawatt
lant, three mile pipeline,
er port and road must
oved by various govern-
;partments including the
yof Works, Department
ronmental Health and
Planning before con-
n can continue.
its for the foundation
or plans of the building
e reviewed by local gov-
it in South Abaco yes-

h Abaco administrator
in Pinder said the plans
;ady been viewed by the
y of Works and Ministry
Environment, and would
on to Nassau for final
al from central govern-
efore the work, which
ady started, can be con-

pplication for the dock
already been reviewed


26' BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE
WITH BRAND NEW TRAILER

* Year: 2001
* Price:- $50,000.00
* Hull: Fiberglass
* Engine: Twin Mercury CXL OPIlMAX, 225 HP, 450 Hours


by local government and sent
on to central government in
Nassau for approval, Mr Pinder
said.
The Minister of the Environ-
ment said: "Following the meet-
ing we can get foundation and
floor plans approval, which will
bring BEC in compliance for
what they are doing so they can
continue that work while.engi-
neers complete drawings for
other things.
"All the documents are in
place and when they have filled
in the prescribed forms it will
be expedited."
Government must be satis-'
"fled the power plant will have
proper disposal units and the
capacity to contain an oil spill
if it occurs, Mr Devepux added.
BEC made the decision to
build a new power plant in Aba-
co over two years ago owing to
the inadequacy of the 30-year-
old 27 megawatt facility in
Marsh Harbour.
However residents said they
were not aware the plant was
going to go up in Wilson City
until construction began. Local
organisation Friends of the
Environment requested a public
meeting to give residents the


mat


26 Outrage in great condition! Fully loaded with Auto-pilot, Fish finder, Chart plotter/GPS,
Stereo/CD, Head, Freshwater, Bow cushions. Powered with twin Mercury 225 Optimax and
smart craft gauges.


Standard Equipment


Integral bow pulpit w/anchor roller and chafe plate
Bow anchor storage w/hatch
Port & starboard forward deck storage
Seats w/drainage
Integral swim platform
Port & starboard fish boxes w/drains
Rod holders
Bait prep area
Lockable console storage w/plexi door
Under gunnel rod racks
Vertical rod holders at forward deck seat
Self bailing fiberglass cockpit
S/S steering wheel
S/S console grab rail
Drink Holders
Fiberglass transom door
Livewellat transom w/washdown
Forward coaming bolsters
Hydraulic steering w/tilt


Optional Equipment

Porta potti w/pump out & 0/B discharge
T-top w/top gun outriggers
Leaning post w/cooler
Windlass
Anchor
Full electronics including radar, chart plotter,
auto-pilot, fish finder, VHF, stereo





CONTACT:

Kingsley Edgecombe, Jr.
Ph:. 424-4959
E-mail: kedgecombe@gmail;com


next government ot the
Bahamas.
"And despite the numerous
distractions that manifest them-
selves in the media, including
that e-mail, it does not distract
us from our purpose which is
to go into the convention and
prepare ourselves for the next
election," she said.


25 year sentence

FROM page one
at Khodee with a knife, stabbing hjm in the
chest. The wound proved to be fatal.
Francis's attorney, Michael Hanna, told
the court his client will have to live with the
burden of guilt and he was deeply remorseful
and repentant. Mr Hanna asked Senior Jus-
tice Jon Isaacs to have mercy on Francis.
"I didn't mean for this to happen and I am
truly sorry this ever happened," Francis told
the court. Justice Isaacs noted there was a
rivalry between young men in the Step Street
community and those on Fox Hill Road.
He also said that Francis's claim he had
been acting in self defence was at variance
with the evidence of the case.
Justice Isaacs sentenced Francis to 25 years
imprisonment. The sentence is to take effect
as of June 1, 2009.


opportunity to put their con-
cerns to government and the
event attracted an enormous
turnout.
When BEC and government
executives were questioned
about where funding for the
development was coming from
they said the $105 million devel-
opment is being paid for with
"local" funds.
However they did not pro-
vide any further details about
where the money came from, in
light of the fact that BEC suf-
fered a net loss of $16 million
in 2008.
Mr Gottlieb said BEC made
an $11 million profit in New
Providence last year and lost
$27 million in the Family
Islands, $8 million of which were
losses from Abaco. A new pow-
er plant is essential for Abaco,'
Mr Gottlieb sajd.
* In Saturday's and Mon-
day's Tribune, we reported that
the cost of the Wilson City pow-
er plant would be $150million.
The correct figure.should have
been $105million. We apolo-
gise for any inconvenience
caused


FROM page one

area residents convened behind yellow police tape as they
watched undertakers place Mr Moss's body into a waiting
hearse. -
Long-time friend and former co-worker Gregory Lloyd
Smith said he was passing the area and slowed down when be
saw the crowd.
He was shocked to learn the friend he had lost touch with was
dead.
"It surprised me when I passed and saw it was him laying
down there," said Mr Smith, who affectionally referred to Mr
Moss by the nickname John Claw.
"He was a good worker. He was a nice person and had a good
attitude. He was friendly, someone you could ask to do some-
thing for you he didn't have no problem with it, he would
smile and do it for you," he added.





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RF Broadband Design Engineer.

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and additional subscribers and to provide technical support for the Internet business.
Additionally, this individual would also be responsible for the overall management of the
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Duties and Responsibilities:

* Planning and conducting work requiring judgment in the independent evaluation,
selection and substantial adaptation and modification of standard engineering
techniques, procedures, and criteria.

* Responsible for all technical concepts of cable system design including specification of
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* Conduct and supervise, as required, o n c>ing research and development of assigned
communications projects.

* Design layout for cable communications service
Functional supervision of systems development and implementation by project team
members.

* Propose new technical services and development of new products for use by the system
* Provide technical advice and counsel to the various staff and system operating managers

* Provide technical support and training to internal groups

hKn idedge, Skills and Abilities:
* A university degree in Electrical Engineering or equivalent with RF design experience.

* Preferably 15 years progressive experience either in R&D, product development, or an
engineering discipline.

" Knowledge of Analog and-Digital Modulation techniques and communication theory.

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* Excellent interpersonal as well as written and verbal communication skills.

* Proven project management and leadership skills in a supervisory/project lead role.

* Proficiency with MS Office suite of applications.

* Creative, analytical thinker with a capacity for detail.

* Ability to work well with others and as part of a team.

Resumes must be submitted to the rbadderley@cablebahamas.com.
Director of Human Resources sent via email to: to arrive no later than September 30 2009.


T IS S O OT P L O O I; S


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Three-mile f roa .
for South. Ar n. A dros.. .. ............

for South Andros "* ..'.. *3..


THE Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) is creating access to
hundreds of acres of prime agri-
culture land in South Andros.
A three-mile long road from
Duncombe Coppice, outside of
Congo Town, into the pine for-
est on western Andros will open
that area for the first time in liv-
ing memory.
BAIC is requesting that gov-
,rrnment transfer several hun-
ired acres of Crown land, which
'i turn will be subdivided and
leased to Bahamians interested
in food production - a practice
already underway in North
Andros and Abaco.
"We hope to make a big dif-
ference for the people of South
Andros," said Edison Key,
PAIC's executive chairman.
"This is just the first phase of


hopefully creating an industry
in food production in South
Andros," he said.
"Once the road is completed
we will move into high gear.
"This could open a new world
for South Androsians as far as
food production is concerned."
A high-level delegation
including South Andros MP
Picewell Forbes; BAIC general
manager Benjamin Rahming;
assistant general manager of
Agriculture Arnold Dorsett;
assistant general manager of
Handicraft Donnalee Bowe, and
executive secretary Lovelee
McQueen accompanied Mr Key
to South Andros last weekend
to inspect the project.
For Mr Forbes, the BAIC
project came as "very good
news."
Administrator Francita Neely


and chief councillor Zebedee
Rolle agreed.
"This opens the door for new
opportunities and allows for the
people of South Andros to
engage in a higher quality of
agriculture as is done in North
Andros and Abaco," said Mr
Forbes. He envisioned the pos-
sibility of a new residential com-
munity being created as a result
of vast areas being opened.
"I am very excited about
this," he said.
"It is a new, day dawning in
South Andros after much talk. I
am very hopeful that this is
going to happen here."
South Androsians, he said,
"are very excited about the pro-
ject.
"They have been waiting for it
for a long time."
During a well-attended com-
munity meeting, the new road
got enthusiastic support.
Mr Key noted that BAIC has
made "tremendous progress"


THE Bahamas Red Cross last week
presented the nine Urban Renewal Cen-
tres in New Providence with 10 first-aid
kits.
Centre managers, team members and
other community members also received
training from the Bahamas Red Cross in
emergency care.
Kim Sawyer, director general of the
Bahamas Red Cross, made the presenta-
tion to Ella Lewis, the coordinator of the
Urban Renewal Programme in New
Prdvidence, the day before World First
Aid Day.
"Students, adults and seniors frequent
our nine centres daily and from time to
time there are emergencies," Ms Sawyer
said.
"We work hand-in-hand with the
Bahamas Red Cross and these kits are a
vital part of what we will use in the event
there is a need. A key component of the
work of the Red Cross is to train per-
sons to be prepared for disasters.
The Red Cross also demonstrated
emergency care to patrons in the Mall at
Marathon on Saturday.


------- ------


A THREE-MILE FARM ROAD is being constructed for South Andros. Pictured from left during inspection
of the project last weekend are operator Gary Francis; contractor Wayde Forbes; chief councilor Zebedee
Rolle; South Andros MP Picewell Forbes; BAIC executive chairman Edison Key; assistant general manager
Arnold Dorsett, and general manager Benjamin Rahming.


working with farmers in North
Andros during the last two
years.
He said he wanted to do the
same in the south


He urged South Andros farm-
ers to form an association.
BAIC is willing to provide tech-
nical and financial'assistance, he
said.


"There are a lot of possibili,
ties once thb people here are
prepared to work," said Mr Key,
the Member of Parliament for
South Abaco.


BAHAMAS RED CROSS presented the Urban Renewal Programme with First Aid Kits on Fri-
day, September 11, 2009 at, Bahamas Law Enforcement Credit Union, Collins Avenue. Mak-
ing the presentation was President, Kim Sawyer, fore ground at right (purple and black).
Responding on behalf of Urban Renewal is Co-Ordanator, Ella Lewis foreground at left. Also
. pictured from left are Manager of Fox Hill Urban Renewal (UR) Portia Sands; Manager of Bain
and Grants Town UR, Dianna Bullard; Manager of Pinewood'UR, Sherly Knowles; Manger of
St. Cecelia UR, Roberta Rolle; Desaster Manager, Pamela Brown; Manger of Ft.'Charlotte UR,
Patricia Walker; and Facilitator of Pinewood UR, Diana Forbes.


ColinaImperial.


The following individuals are . asked to contact
Ms. Arnette Rahming (356-8328) or Ms. Shamara
Farquharson (356-8456) at Colinalmperial, Insurance Ltd:


ALBERTHA MILLER
Pinder's Point Freeport, GB

ANITA L BURROWS
Matthew Town, Inagua

ANTONIA LESBOTT
P. 0. Box SS-5481
New Bight Cat Island

BRENDA ADDERLEY

CLAUDE LESBOTT
P. O. Box SS-5481
New Bight Cat Island

CYRIL WILLIAMS I
Yellow Elder Gardens 2

CYRIL WILLIAMS II
Yellow Elder Gardens 2

DWAYNE DORSETTE

EDNA DEAN
P. O. Box N-4912

IAN TRECO
P. 0. Box N-3693

JASON SAUNDERS
Prince Charles Drive

JENNIFER TRECO
P. 0. Box N-3693

KEVA FAWKES
Matthew Town, Inagua

KOVAN SMITH
P. O. Box CB-11825


LEANDRA PINDER
Matthew Town, Inagua

MERVIN SMITH
P. O. Box CB-11825

MIRIAM NAOMI INGRAHAM.
P. 0. Box N-7905

NASHLAWN CURTIS

NIESHA JASMINE L CULMER
P. O. Box SS-5818

NIKITA CURTIS

OLIVIA GAITOR
P. O. Box N-5359

PHILIPPA, INGRAHAM
P. 0. Box N-7905

RENDAL COLEBY
P. 0. Box N-8672

SANSCHIA CULMER
P. O. Box SS-5818

STAFFORD MILLER
Pinder's Point Freeport, GB

. STEPHEN FAWKES
Matthew Town, Inagua

VICTORIA SAUNDERS
Prince Charles Drive

WELLINGTON DORSETTE

WILFRED GAITOR
P. O. Box N-5359


DH OBD-SC*PmO


...... ....


POSITION:
JOB FAMILY:
RCS CODE:
REPORTS TO:
LOCATION:


Commercial Supervisor
Accounting
L10005
Finance Manager
Country Finance Department or Cluster Office


OVERALL PURPOSE:
Position'is responsible-for managing the Commercial Finance activities for a country or group oF
countries within the Cluster. Manages Revenue leakage, establishes credit limits and reviews ship-
ments to profile. Supervises the following staff; Billing Analyst, Duties and Vendor Analyst, Ac-
counts Receivable Analyst.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:
* Manage the Accounting Commercial activities for a country or group of
countries within the Cluster.
* Supervise Billing, Duties, Accounts Receivable and Vendor Analysts.
* Prepare and analyze statistics and KPIs for the country/cluster.
* .Manage customer profiles.
* Establish AR Credit limits.
* Principal contact for Commercial controller.
* Assist with preparation of Customer profitability analysis.
S . Handle Billing queries from Billing Center.
* 1 st level of approval for Credit notes.
* Special projects and ad hoc reports as required.
* Provide customers analyses, and review customer data base in term of
discount, and credit
* Performs other assignments as required.
* Ability to supervise the accounting staff at local station

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
* High school diploma and/or minimal of 5 years applicable experience
* Minimum of 4 years of commercial and accounting experience is required.
* Minimum of 2 years supervisory or management experience leading an
' accounting department.
* A background in commercial credit and accounting required.
* Experience with a major Enterprise Reporting Package (ERP)
* .Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.
* �Ability to read and interpret data reports. Ability to understand and per
form data analysis.
* PC skills should include the basic suite of MS products, Excel, Access,
Word, Office
* Excellent communication skills both written and verbal, this function does
a lot of interfacing with internal and external customers and the Shared
Service Center,

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:
* Bachelor's degree in Accounting/Finance, a related field or equivalent
education
Please email resume to;
Romell K. Knowles I
Country Manager
ba4amaboiii@hotmail.com

Resumes can be dropped off to DHL Bahamas corporate office - East Bay Street,
Island Traders Building, Nassau Bahamas.
Please be advised only those applicants whose resumes are taken into
consideration will be contacted. No phone calls will be accepted.


TODSCS SOIS O TIS AGE LGONTO WW.TIBUE22.O


Red Cross donates first aid kits
By LLONELLA GILBERT I I


Royal Bahamian Resort & Offshore Island

Invites application for the position of:


GROUNDS MANAGER

The successful candidate should have the
following qualifications

* Supervise the day to day maintenance of the
grounds
* Work directly with landscape contractor
* Report to General Manager & Hotel Manager
* Knowledge of plants, insects, disease,
irrigation pesticides and fertilizers
* Minimum of 3 years experience

Send resume and 3 references to:
mrcampbell@grp.sandals.com


Mad


THE TRIBUNE


A GE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009








TRIBNE SORT TUEDAY SEPEMBR 15 209,OPGES


' : : . . . , .. - :. * .. .


by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net


movies. With
week one of
the 2009 NFL
season in the books, this has
easily been the most defini-
tive storyline thus far.
In fact God likes good
movies so much he's in the
first act of writing his best
project since 2007.
How else would you
explain what is about to hap-
pen in Philadelphia right
now?'
This script has undergone
its third metabasis and our
star, the hero, turned villain,
has a chance to become a
hero once more.
When Michael Vick was
released from prison on May
20th, we all (well we few Vick
fans outside of Philly) held a
faint belief that he would get
to play again...starting was
almost out of the question, we
just wanted him to play.
It's easy to hate Vick
because of all the wrong he's
been accused of and charged
and again easy to acknowl-
edge that the whole sordid
affair was were horrendous.
Not saying I agree with any
of it, but if you're on that side
of the argument., I can
acknowledge how its easy to
hate him.
The bottomline is, what he
did was.illegal, he served his
time, and now he has the
chance to move on.
For the purpose of the epic
masterpiece being woven
together by the All Mighty
Author, we have to do two
things, recognize Vick the
hero (pre dog-fighting) and
that there are no infallible
heroes anymore.
Michael Jordan spent his
Hall of, Fame induction
speech bashing anyone he
found fault with during the
course of his career, Hulk


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
ALL things concerned, Chris
'Fireman' Brown said it was
good to close out his long and
gruelling season as the runner-
up at the IAAF/VTB Bank
World Athletics Final in Thes-
saloniki, Greece.
On Saturday, Brown clocked
45.49 seconds to trail Ameri-
can Olympic and World cham-
pion LaShawn Merritt, who
took the one-lapper in 44.93.
"After the World Champi-
onships, I was just ready to
come home," said Brown, who
was considered a bronze medal-
list, but slipped all the way to
fifth in Berlin, Germany, in
August.
"But with the support of my
family, especially my wife, I
decided to hang in there and
ride the storm out. I'm not a
quitter. So I wanted to make
sure that I weht right to the
end."
Earning a purse of $20,000
on Saturday compared to.the
$10,000 he collected in Berlin
for fifth, Brown 'said he was
pleased that he was able to
rebound at the World Athletic
Final.
' "A lot of people wouldn't be
able to relate to what I'm say-
ing because they have never
been in that situation," said
Brown, who for the third time,
failed to win a medal at the
World Championships.
"So for me, it was a new
experience, knowing that I was
supposed to go out there and
win a medal, but I didn't exe-
cute my race and I paid the
price for it."
Throughout the remainder
of the championships, Brown
said a lot of his Bahamian
team-mates, as well as other
athletes from around the world,
made it known that he didn't
run his race.
"They were like, what hap-
pened to you. You didn't exe-
cute your race," said Brown,
who was actually sitting in third
belfind Merritt and Jeremy
Wariner up to the last 50
metres of the race.
"I guess they strive of that
because I've been going for so
long. But the Lord is in charge
of my career and I put it all in
his hands. Man can say what
they want, but I know what he
has in store for me."
Admitting that the race was


Hogan joined the NWO'at
one point, Ted Kennedy had
Chappaquiddick, Kobe was'
on trial for rape, Jimmy
McNulty was too selfish and
underhanded to be apart of
the Major Crimes unit, Allen
Iverson became the poster-
child for apathy when he
shrugged off going to prac-
tice, even Han Solo was ini-
tially a self centered brute
with no interest in helping the
Rebels fight the Empire,'
Kanye West will never be
happy someone else won an
award...Absolutely none of
our heroes are infallible
(Barack Obama, Brandon
Roy, Bill Stackhouse and
Michael Lee from the "The
Wire" are granted exemp-'
tion).
Pre dog fighting Michael
Vick came from humble
beginnings in the Ridley Cir-
cle Homes, a public housing
project in Newport News, Vir-
ginia, best described as a
financially depressed and
crime-ridden neighborhood.
Against the odds he used
football as a way out of an
adverse situation and wowed
NFL scouts, coaches, and crit-
ics for two years at Virginia
Tech leading them to an
undefeated regular season
and National Championship
appearance in his sophomore
year.
With his family was still liv-
ing in their .three bedroom
apartment in the Ridley Cir-
cle Homes projects, Vick left


EAGLES QUARTERBACK Michael Vick speaks to students at Nueva
Esperanza Academy in Philadelphia on Tuesday Sept. 8, 2009, mak-
ing his first anti-dogfighting appearance.


school early for the NFL stat-
ed that he was going to buy
his mother "a home and a
car." ESPN later'reported
that Michael used some of his


NFL and endorsement earn-
ings to buy his mother a
brand-new house in an
upscale section o
Three Pro-Bowls, four play-


"But with the support of my family,

especially my wife, I decided to hang

in there and ride the storm out. I'm

not a quitter. So I wanted to make

sure that I went right to the end."


set up perfectly for him as he .
was in lane four, sandwiched
by Wariner in three and Merritt
in five, Brown said he couldn't
complain.
"I just didn't execute my own
race," said .Brown, who
watched as Trinidad &
Tobago's Renny Quow ascend-
ed the medal podium with Mer-
ritt and Wariner instead of him.
With the completion of the
World Athletics Final over the
weekend, Brown brought the
curtain down on his 2009 and
10th overall season on the inter-
national scene.

Decade
"I've been going for the last
decade, but a lot of these guys
that I ran against, they just
came on the scene over the last
4-5 years," said Brown, who at
one point challenged world
record holder American
Michael Johnson.
"A lot of the guys who ran in
my era are either struggling or
have retired'. So for me, my
body just needs a vacation. So
I'm just going to rest up. I'm
glad that the Lord has blessed
me with a great season. I start-
ed out strong and I finished
strong. I did what a lot of peo-
ple couldn't do."
Brown, who turns 31 on
October 15, was referring to the
fact that there were some
Olympic and world champions
who didn't get to duplicate their
feats either by injury or failing
to make it to the final.
"I know it was disappointing
for me, but there were a lot of
people who were out there in
worse shape than I was," he
declared. "But I was able to
pull myself together and finish
off strong."
After chasing Johnson,
Brown found himself going
after Wariner. Now it's Mer-
ritt, who at one point Brown
had achieved a great deal of


- Chris Brown


success against.
"I've beaten LaShawn in the
past, out that's the past,"
Brown pointed out. "He
stepped his game up over the
last two years to win both the
Olympics and the World Cham-
pionships.
"All it has taught me is that if
this guy can step his game up in
one season and improve to the
level that he is at right now,
then it lets me know that I need
to be doing more in my train-
ing. I need to. train harder, I
need to be more mentally arid
physically prepared: I just have
to be ready to go out there and
execute my race."
Next season or leading up to
the 2012 Olympics in London,
England, Brown said he will
definitely have to focus more
on himself if he intends to final-
ly get the medal that has been
missing from his r6sum6.

First
"I also want to be the first
Caribbean runner to do what
has never been done before and
that is to run under 44 sec-
onds," said Brown, who holds
the national record of 44.40 and
had a season's best of 44.81.
The All-time best mark post-
ed by a Caribbean athlete is
44.21 that was ran by Ian Mor-
ris of Trinidad & Tobago.
"I'm just going to go out
there and perform my best,"
said Brown, who will be looking
forward to competing in March
at the World Indoor Champi-
onships in Doha, Qatar, where
he is two-time bronze medal-
list before he heads to the Com-
monwealth Games in India in
September.
Brown hopes to be home on
October 3 for the celebrations
for the World Championship
team. Then he will go back to
the drawing board to have
another successful season in
2010. "I'm excited about next


year and the years to come
because the Lord doesn't give
you more than you can han-
dle," he charged. "I think what
I've been going through was a
testimony because even though
I haven't been getting the big
prize, I haven't been giving up
either. "So I want to encour-
age other athletes and even
those who are not athletes that
even though you don't always
get what you want, don't give
up. I'm enjoying my career and
I'm having fun doing it. That is
what I did at the World Final
and it paid off in the end."


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off appearances, quarterback
rushing records, His contract
along with his endorsements
had Vick ranked 33 among
Forbes' Top 100 Celebrities
in 2005.
He was our hero.
Then it rained all over that
parade, there was a monsoon,
followed by mass flooding all
over the "Vick Parade."
Vick pleaded guilty to fed-
eral charges in the Bad Newz
Kennels dog fighting investi-
gation under a plea agree-
ment which outlined grue-.
some details regarding treat-
ment of the dogs, the NFL
suspended him indefinitely
without pay.
He lost it all, convicted of
"Felony conspiracy in inter-
state commerce/aid of unlaw-.
ful animal fighting venture"
and "Felony dogfighting."
He was sentenced to 23
months in prison and three
-" yiye �as p-f6bTfion following
release.
.He.became the villain.
Released from prison, and
after an absence from a pro
football field for about two
years, Vick signed a one year
contract with the Philadelphia
Eagles in August.
Now the villain would have
to play behind Donovan
McNabb, a perennial Pro
Bowler, the face of the Eagles
franchise and one of the best
quarterbacks of his genera-
tion.
The time of the hero from
Virginia Tech, and the


An epic masterpiece woven






by the All Mighty Author


~c~Iwrrc~


�Awn


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tachometer, mirrors that have illuminated visors, a defogger at the back
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Atlanta Falcons was sure to
be over.
Then the All Mighty
Author threw another hitch
in the script, and if you've
ever watched a sports movie,
you knew this was coming.
As sure as Adrian Peterson
and Usain Bolt are look down
upon the rest of us as mere
mortals, I was positive McN-
abb was going to get injured
at some point during this sea-
son Vick would take the
reigns...you just knew it.
Week one rolls around and
McNabb is forced to leave the
game after a series of hits
which left him with a frac-
tured rib, ironically doing
what Vick did best, scram-
bling for a touchdown.
There is still no word on
how long McNabb will be
sidelined, but Vick will be eli-
gible for a return to the field
in week three, with Kevin
Kolb the only thing standing
between him and the perfect
Story.
Our hero returns.
This has the makings to be
,God's best script since .David
Tyree caught a ball against
his helmet to lead the Giants
to the biggest upset of our
generation in SuperBowl
XLII If Vick, returns to the
playmaker we fondly remem-
ber, leads the Eagles deep
'into the playoffs and makes
a legitimate run at the Super-
Bowl...this film has a chance
to spawn an epic sequel,
maybe even a trilogy.
Usually-in-this.space I'd
deliver some witty one liner to
bring it all full circle, but I
wouldn't want to guess what
'happens next...there's still too
much of this story left to be
told.
* (By the way we can all com-
pletely disregard this entire col-
umn if Kevin Kolb throws for
250 yards and three touch-
;downs next week against the
Saints.)


Chris 'Fireman' Brown





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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009, PAGE 9


TRIBUNE SPORTS


.L







PAGE 10, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


F*bhuwt


Hollingsworth intends





to run for top BAAA post


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
Now that the track and field
season is over, the Bahamas
Association of Athletic
Associations (BAAA) is preparing to
hold its annual general meeting and
election of officers for the next three
years.
Already, Curt Hollingsworth, who
took over as president when Mike
Sands was forced out of office in a
vote of "no confidence," has made it
clear that he intends to run for the
top post.
There are some indications that
Sands is expected to return to run
again for president. He is expected to
have, as his running mate, Sherwin
Stuart as vice president.
When contacted today,
Hollingsworth said he expects that
there will be some challengers, but he
and the persons who have indicated
that-they will work along-with him are
confident that they will prevail at the
elections on November 21;
"This is my first time running for
the position, so I'm offering myself
for the position of president,"
Hollingsworth said. "So it's going to
quite interesting for me.
"I know it's going to be a challenge.
I don't know who the other people
are who are vying for the other posi-
tions, but I'm sure that they will make
themselves known to the public in the
upcoming weeks, if they haven't
already done so."
The former first vice president said
he's not concerned about all of the
noise in the market 'because he's
focused on the vision that he has for
tUe BAAA.
I "Now it's time to put your shoul-
ders to the wheel and sell yourself to
your membership and say 'this is what
I've been able to do' and I would now
like to have the opportunity to do a
three-year term that would allow me


CURT HOLLINGSWORTH

to really go out there and do the things
that I feel is required to technically
run the BAAA," he insisted.
Along with Hollingsworth, former
BAAA and Bahamas Olympic Asso-
ciation secretary Livingstone Bost-
wick is either going to seek a position
as a vice president or council mem-
ber. The other vice president spot is
expected to be filled by Grand
Bahamian Anita Doherty.
Meanwhile, treasurer Rosie Carey is
expected to move over and run for he
post of secretary making way for
men's quarter-miler Tim Munnings,
who has been invited to run as the
new treasurer.
Julie Wilson is vying once again as
the assistant secretary with Debbie
Smith seeking the assistant treasurer
post.
Frank 'Pancho' Rahming is expect-
ed to run again as the technical direc-
tor with coach Dianne Woodside com-
ing on board for the post of statisti-
cian.


MIKE SANDS

Prior to the BAAA AGM, the first
official elections for the newly formed
New Providence Amateur Athletic
Associations is scheduled to take place
on October 31. Ray Hepburn serves as
the interim president.
In between that time and the
BAAA AGM, Hollingsworth said
they hope to have the elections for
the Masters Track and Field Associa-
tion. An interim committee headed
by Foster Dorsett is currently in
charge of the association.
If elected, Hollingsworth said his
focus will be on strengthening the
Family Island programmes, which he
feels will be able to greatly benefit the
BAAA because of the amount of hid-
den talents available.
"One of our mandate is to further
develop talents that would allow us
to have this continuation of athletes
and start to be more than one dimen-
sional," he said.
"We concentrate on the sprints, but
we need to develop our long distance


programme. At one time we had a
long distance programme when we
competed at Carifta. We need to put
more emphasis on those events."
Additionally, Hollingsworth said if
the Bahamas can concentrate more
on the technical events, the country
can have more athletes competing in
the hurdles, as well as the throwing
events - shot, discus and javelin.
"We also need to continue to pro-
vide more training for our coaches,"
he pointed out. "The more coaching
that they receive, hopefully the better
for them to provide better training for
our athletes.
" "And when you look at the nation-
al programme, we have some good
potential in the pipelines that is being
groomed. So we need to ensure that
the programme is developed so that
they will get better as well."
Based on what he has seen this year,
Hollingsworth said if'the national
teams can get the opportunity to trav-
el together and compete in more train-
ing camps, he's convinced that the
team should be able to perform at a
higher standard on the international
scene.
A prime example was the women's
4 x 400 metre relay team, which com-
peted for the first time at the 12th
IAAF World Championships in Ath-
letics in Berlin, Germany, with two
teenage high school sensations. The
team, however, got disqualified in the
preliminaries.
"I believe more young ladies will
be inclined to compete in the 400
metres because they know that they
can get the opportunity to compete
on the 4 x 4 team," Hollingsworth
stressed.
Hollingsworth said the major thrust
for the BAAA immediately after the
elections is to start working on secur-
ing the necessary funding through its
partnership with the local community
to make sure that the team gets ready
for the road to the 2012 Olympic
Games in London, England.


CRICKET
BCA'S UPDATE
ON Saturday at Wind-
sor Park, the Police Crick-
et team was bowled out by
Scotiabank Paradise for a
mere 77 runs.
Police top scorers were
Orlando Stewart with 23
runs and O'Dain Tucker
with 20 runs.
Brent Fullerton of Sco-
tiabank Paradise took five
wickets and Kester Dun-
can had two wickets.
Scotiabank Paradise at
bat found the going tough
and they lost five wickets
in their winning score of
81 runs.
Andrew Nash had 28
runs and Aeon Lewin had
27 runs. Bowling for the
Police, Greg Taylor Jrt
took three wickets.
Police lost the match by
five wickets.
Sunday's match was
abandoned due to the rain.

RBDF TRACK MEET
THE Annual Royal
Bahamas Defence Force
Track and Field meet is
scheduled to take place
6pm September 18 at the,
Thomas Robinson Track
Stadium.
Minister of National
Security Tommy Turn-
quest and other govern-
ment officials are expected
to attend. The meet, which
includes all disciplines of
track and field, comprises
of all the officers and
marines, who will be com-
peting in four houses -
Alpha, Bravo, Charlie and
Delta.
Delta. House is the
defending champion.
The meet is free to the
general public. There will
be special races for the
children.


Foot-Scholars making mark on US college soccer


THE young Bahamian Foot-
Scholars have started to make their
mark as the US college soccer season
gets into full swing. -
Kyle Williams got an assist on the
opening goal as his University of
Tampa team won their first match 2-
0 over Florida Memorial University.
Two days later, they continued the
win streak with a 1-0 victory over
Clayton State, and ended the week-
end with a 3-1 over North Georgia
College.
Michael Bethel got his first goal of
the year in the 3-1 victory. Williams
and Bethel are starters on the school
team that is currently ranked Num-
ber 1 in the NCAA Division II Soc-
cer Polls.
Cameron Hepple scored the open-


ing goal in his Bowling Green State
University's 2-0 win over Marshall
University. Hepple's tally came from
a free kick oh the edge of the penalty
area, which he dutifully buried into
the top corner of the goal.
Hepple is the team's active career
leader in assists (8) and points (24).
Bowling Green then lost their next
two matches, 3-0 to Louisville and 4-
1 to the University of Kentucky to
start their season at 1-2.
Lamar Cancino's University of
Charleston (West Virginia) team is
off to a good start, winning their first
and third matches, 7-1 over Bluefield
and 4-1 over Alderson-Broaddus,
but losing in between to Cal, PA 3-2.
Defender Dana Veth's University
of Minnesota-Morris team lost a


tough match in over-time to Augs-
burg, 1-0. The fact that their oppo-
nents are ranked 17th in the nation
did not make the loss any more bear-
able, especially since the winning
goal was an own goal of a Minneso-
ta-Morris defender.
However the team rebounded in
their second match to defeat Ham-
line 1-0. Veth and his defensive
cohorts held Hamline to only five
shots on goal for the match. Min-
nesota-Morris' third match held the
same scoreline as the second match,
1-0, but this time they were on the
losing end to St. John's. The team
currently sits at 1-2 on the season.
Bahamas Women's International
Kelly Simon got her first taste on the
collegiate scene, but it was a bitter


one as her North Carolina Wesleyan.
College team lost 3-1 to St. Andrews,
then 7-1 to Randolph-Macon.
Simons was productive, however,
leading the team with 6 shots in the
games, but was unable to score thus
far.
A pair of Bahamian Women's
.Internationals lead Southern Univer-
sity's women's soccer team. Goal-
keeper D'nae Capron leads the con-
ference with 30 saves, but has seen a
lot of shots in the team's four match-
es, all of which resulted in loses.
Her teammate, Nakesha Rolle, is
one of the team's leaders.
Senior International Talitha
Wood's South Carolina State Uni-
versity team has a 1-2 record, win-
ning their home opener 3-0 over


Southern Virginia, and losing 4-2 to
The Citadel and 2-0 to Campbell
University in their second and third
matches respectively. Wood, who has
switched from midfield to defense,
has played in all of the team's match-
es.
Denarika Bostwick's Southwest
Baptist University team is off to a
very good start, winning their first
two matches. In the opener, the team
defeated Quincy, Ill 2-1 and in the
second defeated Missouri S & T 1-0.
Their third match, against Abilene
Texas, was cancelled due to weather
and the team then drew their fourth
* match 2-2 against Dallas Baptist.


Honouping a


tennis icon

FROM page 11

three Grand Slam finals this
year, only to win one,
Knowles said he still felt that
'he had a fantastic year.
And looking back at his
illustrious career as he was
basically the only one carrying
the flag, Knowles said the
greatest experience he's had
Was representing the country
at Davis Cup, more specifi-
cally 1992 when the Bahamas
played against the United
States in North Carolina.
Knowles, however, had to
assure .everybody in the ball-
room that his career is no
where near completion after
he was serenaded by young
Jercon Mackey with the song:
"My Way."
In response, Knowles said:
"I don't feel my age."
Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Desmond Ban-
nister read a list of Knowles'
achievements and said last
night was a good time for the
Bahamian people to show
their gratitude to Knowles.
But Master of Ceremonies,


BAHAMIAN TENNIS ACE Mark Knowles and his son, Graham, are flanked by Minister of State for Culture
Charles Maynard (far left) and Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister (far right) on their
arrival at Lynden Pindling International Airport yesterday. Knowles' wife, Dawn (green top), can be seen
in the background as an unidentified woman pushes a stroller with their second son, Brody...


Arnie Nairn may have best
summed it up when he said
that Knowles' deportment on
the international scene is one
that should be emulated
because of the graceful man-
ner in which he conducted
himself.
'Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham presented Knowles
with a proclamation that pro-
claimed "Mark Knowles
Week" beginning Sunday,
September 13th and ending
Saturday, September 19th.
Knowles was also presented
with a citation from Gover-
nor General Arthur Hanna.
Bahamas Lawn Tennis-
'Association president
Stephen Turnquest welcomed
the audience that included
Knowles' proud parents Vicki
and Sammy Knowles; his
wife, Dawn and former world


$ 9
-.Q
Z




No.1 singles player Lleyton
Hewitt. Among the govern-
ment officials present were
Minister of National Securi-
ty, Tommy Turnquest; Min-
ister of Housing Kenneth
Russell and Minister of Envi-
ronment, Earl Deveaux.
Emile Knowles, who grew
up playing with Knowles as a
youngster; Knowles' former
Davis Cup partner Sean
Cartwright; his Davis Cup
captain John Antonas and
other dignitaries sporting bod-
ies including. Bahamas
Olympic Association presi-
dent-Wellington Miller was
also present.

Note: More on the cere-
monies with reactions from
some of those in attendance
will be published on Wednes-
day.


TODICUSSTOIES OSTISPAE OGONTOWW.TIBNE42CO


KtU


The National insurance Board

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas




Notice to Vendors

The National Insurance Board (NIB) is preparing to make payments to vendors by direct
bank deposits. To facilitate this, the NIB is requesting that vendors provide the necessary
banking information. Forms will be distributed to vendors for completion. If you do nor
receive one, please contact us at one of the following to obtain a copy of the form:

1. APBankinginfo@nib-bahamas.com
2. Telephone No.: (242) 502-1838, or
3. Collect a Form from any New Providence NIB L.ocal Office

'Ihe NIB requests the cooperation of all vendors as we seek to provide more efficient service.
All information will be treated as strictly confidential.


SPORTS








'Fireman'

rebounds
for $20,000
purse...
See page 9


'r -TU - ESDAY, SEPTE- R l.
� TU ESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15. 2009


PAGI


- P GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur D Hanna presents a citation to Bahamian tennis star Mark Knowles last night
at Government House. The Government honoured Knowles for his performance since turning pro.

PHOTO: Patrick Hanna/BIS
" - "" * -* | t||' '. -


Honouring a tennis icon


By BRENT STUBBS
-Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
MARK Knowles' Week
got started with the Bahamian
touring professional stating
that last night's celebration at
Government House certain-
ly made up for his crashing
defeat in the men's doubles
final at the US Open.
Knowles, who turned 38 on
September 4, was due to
arrive home on Sunday and
feted to lunch, but the cele-
brations were delayed until
last night because the final
was postponed from Friday
to Sunday because of the rain
in Flushing Meadows, New


Government House celebration
makes up for US Open doubles
final loss, says Mark Knowles


York. Seeded number three,
Knowles and his Indian part-
ner Mahesh Bhupathi fell vic-
tim to the number four seed-
ed team of Lukas Dlouhy and
Leander Paes as they fell
short in their second Grand
Slam for the year.
But the Bahamas Govern-
ment honored Knowles for
his stellar performance since
turning pro more than two
decades ago, including his tri-
umph with German Anna-


Lena Groenefeld in the mixed
doubles final at Wimbledon
in July.
"When you get treated like
this, you forget about the US
Open final last night," said
Knowles,. in his acceptance
speech, who admitted that "I
love to compete. I love to
win."
Although he played in
SEE page 10


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'� agl'




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