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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01423
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: September 14, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01423

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HIGH 90F
LOW 79F

CLOUDS, SUN,
^ T-STORM


The


Tribune


BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


Volume: 105 No.243 MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)


MUM'S AGONY AS DISABLED SON DIES IN FIRE





'i left him in bed asleep,





it was the last time I





would see my boy alive'


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
A TEN-YEAR-OLD dis-
abled boy died after being
trapped in his bedroom as
flames ripped through his
family's home.
Wheelchair-bound Jer-
maine Mackey was sleeping
in a bedroom while his moth-
er Anastacia Hepburn dashed
out to a nearby food store for
groceries shortly around 8.30
am yesterday morning.
When she returned to their
tiny apartment in Colony Vil-
lage about half an hour later,
she came face-to-face with
every mother's worst night-
mare - a fire-engine parked
outside her smoking home
and the news that her oldest
boy was dead.
"I left him in the bed sleep-
ing not knowing that was the
last time I would ever see
him," Ms Hepburn, 34, told
The Tribune before breaking
down into tears outside the
charred remains of her home
yesterday.
Boyfriend Rodney Minnis,
37, was at home with Jer-
maine and the couple's four-
year-old child when the
tragedy struck.
He said he nodded off in
the living room sofa with the
four-year-old next to him
watching television as Jer-
maine slept in the bedroom.
Mr Minnis said seemed like
minutes later when the
youngest boy woke him with
screams of 'Daddy! Fire!'
He said his first instinct was
to rescue the four-year-old
and said when he returned for
Jermaine the small home was
engulfed with sickening, black
smoke and huge orange
flames "galloping" along the
ceiling.


Unable to get into the bed-
room, he left to find a neigh-
bour to help - but the thick
smoke and hot flames barred
their entry.
"I can't believe this happen
- I standing' here - but I can't
believe this happen," Mr Min-
SEE page 10


Govt presses
ahead with
controversial
$150 million
power plant
By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
THE Government is to press
ahead building the controver-
sial $150million Wilson City
power plant on Abaco as con-
cerns linger about its affect on
the environment.
State Minister of Environ-
ment Phenton Neymour says
he is confident the Government
has laid to rest nearly all the
fears on the issue after officials
met with concerned citizens at a
packed town meeting on the
island.
Mr Neymour told The Tri-
SEE page nine


LOCAL educators
should replay the speech
US President Barack Oba-
ma gave last week on edu-
cation to inspire Bahamian
students, Tribune colum-
nist Sir Ronald Sanders
has urged.
Mr Obama's speech -
broadcast in American
schools last Tuesday -
encouraged students to
strive for their best in the
classroom and to take
responsibility for their
educational careers.
"We can have the most
dedicated teachers, the
most supportive parents,
and the best schools in the
world and none of it will
matter unless all of you
SEE page 10


KNOWLES AND BHUPATHI
LOSE IN US OPEN FINAL
MARK KNOWLES and
doubles partner Mahesh Bhu-
pathi had to settle for runners-
up spot at the US Open in
Flushing Meadows, New York
yesterday.
The pair fell to Lukas
Dlouhy and Leander Paes who
won the final 3-6, 6-3, 6-2.
* SEE SPORTS
ON PAGE 12 FOR
FULL STORY


Inmate

dies after

prison

cell fight

By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net
AN INMATE has
died following a fight
in a cell at Her
Majesty's Prison.
Police are investi-
gating the "suspicious"
death of 55-year-old
Lloyd Allan Albury
who died in hospital
less than a week after
being imprisoned on a
vagrancy charge.
According to a brief
statement released by
the Ministry of Nation-
al Security, Albury was
involved "in an inci-
dent with other
inmates in a cell" at
Her Majesty's Prison
on Fox Hill Road.
Police yesterday
could not provide
details into Albury's
injuries and said his
death would remain
classified as "suspi-
cious" until an autopsy
could be performed.
"We launched an
investigation on Friday
and a team of investi-
gators went to the
prison to uncover the
circumstance of his
injuries. We are going
to do a lot more work
tomorrow, and we are
going to request an
autopsy," said head of
the homicide squad
SEE page nine

Police set to
make decision on
teacher accused
of sex assault
POLICE officials could
decide today on how to pro-
ceed against a male teacher
accused of sexually assaulting a
16-year-old student.
While remaining tightlipped
on the investigation, ASP Leon
Bethel said yesterday he
expects to speak with the
Attorney General's office
about the matter.
The teacher was taken into
custody late last month for
questioning pending further
investigations by police.
It is alleged that in late
August, he drugged and later
assaulted a male student who
attends the senior high insti-
tution.
The student reportedly com-
plained to another teacher
about the matter, which caused
the school to contact the
police.
This latest case of molesta-
tion is just the latest in a trou-
bling trend that has spread
across the Bahamas.
The Ministry of Education,
through its minister Carl
Bethel, has vowed to protect
children at all schools, pledging
to bring any sexual perpetra-
tors to justice.


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Man dies after scooter


crashes into parked car


A MAN believed to be in his twenties
died Friday night after his scooter crashed
into a parked car.
The man was riding a XY-150 scooter
north on West Street, near the Greek Ortho-
dox Church, when he lost control and
crashed into a parked Honda Civic.


The accident happened at about 9pm on
Friday.
EMS personnel pronounced the man dead
at the scene. The victim was wearing short
beige trousers, a white T-shirt and white
tennis shoes . Heis described as 6ft 2ins tall.
Police are investigating.


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PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 3


LOCALNEWS


Officers come

under fire

after chase
POLICE officers came
under heavy gunfire early Sun-
day morning following a brief
chase in the Fox Hill area.
According to reports,
mobile division officers were
on patrol through Step Street,
Fox Hill, when they saw two
men in a red Nissan Sentra act-
ing suspiciously. The vehicle
sped off as police approached,
resulting in a brief chase which
ended through a dead end cor-
ner just off Step Street.
The occupants of the car
exited the vehicle, firing shots
at the officers as they fled.
None of the officers were
injured but the police car sus-
tained damages from gunshots.

Man in custody

after loaded

handgun found
A MAN was taken into
police custody after police
discovered a loaded 9mm
handgun in his truck.
Drug Enforcement Unit
officers were on Tonique
Williams Darling Highway at
about 7pm on Friday when
they stopped the driver of a
black 1998 Chevy truck. The
vehicle was searched and offi-
cers discovered a .9mm hand-
gun with five live e rounds of
ammunition inside.
The driver of the truck, a
37-year-old of Prince Charles
Drive, was arrested and taken
into custody. He could
appear in court today to face
weapons charges.

The National

Workers

Group meeting
THE National Workers
group will host a town meet-
ing on Thursday to assist peo-
ple with financial challenges.
Don Saunders, of law firm
Graham Thompson & Co,
radio personality Orthland
Bodie Jr, and Sonia Hamil-
ton, chairman of National
Workers Board of Directors,
are slated to give remarks.
The meeting, to be held at
Workers House, on Tonique
Williams Darling Highway,
will begin at 7pm under the
theme "How do you stop
financial institutions from
harassing you".
The event is free.

Huge pythons

captured in two

Florida cities
* APOPKA, Fla.
WILDLIFE officials are
putting the squeeze on giant
pythons in Florida, according to
Associated Press.
Friday, officials seized
Delilah, an 18-foot-long, 400
pound python who fed on rab-
bits in an Apopka-area back-
yard. Concerns about Delilah's
size and whether the chain-link
cage she was in was secure
enough to contain her prompt-
ed the visit from the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission.
Delilah was removed and
brought to a caregiver with a
permit to handle large snakes.
Officials are trying to deter-
mine whether the owner has
the proper permit. Earlier in
the week in Lakeland, officials
uncovered two large pythons,
an 11-foot-long male and its
female companion, a 17-footer
weighing more than 150
pounds.


Miss Grand Bahama 'was stripped


of her title and responsibilities'


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
THE Miss Grand Bahama
beauty pageant organisation has
announced that Garrelle Hud-
son was stripped of her title and
responsibilities.
Miss Hudson, 19, told the
media last week that she relin-
quished her title over what she
described as "management
issues."
She also claims she has not
received any of her prizes.
But according to a press
release issued by the organisa-
tion, a new queen was appoint-
ed on Friday to replace Miss
Hudson.
First runner-up Nikki Severe
has now assumed the title of
Miss Grand Bahama 2009/10.
According to the organiza-
tion, Miss Hudson "failed to
cooperate with the organiza-
tion".
It went on: "The Miss Grand
Bahama beauty pageant organ-
isation places great emphasis on
total cooperation and the abid-
ing of all pageant rules and reg-
ulations.
"We were very disappointed
that Miss Hudson failed to
cooperate with the organisation
and refused to abide by/with the
organizations rules, regulations
and expectations. As a beauty
queen, our representatives are


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role models for all women,
young and old, alike and are
held at higher standard during
their 12-month reign.
"We do understand the pres-
sures that are associated with
the higher standards of being
Miss Grand Bahama, but that is
why all of our contestants are
vetted and during the six-month
training and preparation for the
pageant they are made fully
aware of what is expected of
the Queen."
The organisation further stat-
ed that the title of Miss Grand
Bahama and the Miss Grand
Bahama crown and sash are the
property of the Miss Grand
Bahama organisation.
"No queen by being crowned
acquires any rights to retain the
crown or use the title Miss
Grand Bahama or any promo-
tional material as photos,
videos, publicity material etc,
in any endeavours, public or pri-
vate, without the written per-
mission of the president at his
sole discretion.


"We are saddened that we
were forced to dethrone Miss
Hudson, however, we would
have preferred in our tradition-
ally fashion to have a graceful
changing of the guards.
"Miss Hudson is instructed
to immediately cease all refer-
ence to and the further use of
the title of Miss Grand Bahama
2009, in all forms of media
including press conferences,
Facebook and Myspace web-
sites. We wish Miss Hudson, the
best in her future endeavours."
The organisation said Miss
Severe will complete the
2009/2010 reign and represent
the island in China at the Miss
Friendship International
Pageant in October.
She will also travel to Colom-
bia in January 2010, to repre-
sent the Bahamas in the Miss
Coffee International Pageant.
Miss Severe inherits, among a
whole list of prizes, a full schol-
arship to attain an associate
degree in any discipline of her
choice from Terreve College.


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PAGE4,MONDAYImAnSEPTE MBE 14 THE ITO 112009nTHEnTR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama


WEBSITE


www. tribune242. corn


updated daily at 2pm


Unity of national purpose needed


WHEN A BOAT is sinking the crew will
put aside their differences in the common
interest of survival and, shoulder-to-shoul-
der, bail until they reach safe harbour.
Today the world community is that boat
and only those countries will recover whose
citizens understand that their only hope is in
unity of national purpose. This is when oppo-
sition parties have to realise that a "loyal"
opposition only opposes that which it sin-
cerely believes is not in the best interest of
the country. It becomes a major part of the
problem when it opposes just for the sake of
opposing. When its politicians believe that
the end justifies the means and those means
can include unfair character assassination
and lies.
Again to return to our sinking ship, it's
like having the crew bailing to save the ship,
while one or two of their mates are in the
stern, busily drilling more holes to sink her.
This is the type of politics we see in the
Bahamas, and even more alarmingly so in
the United States since the election of Pres-
ident Barack Obama. We say alarming,
because it is of great concern to the
Bahamas, whose future prosperity depends
upon America's recovery from a world reces-
sion triggered by the uncontrolled financial
greed of Wall Street - a street that history
will record in ignominy.
America is looked up to as the leader of
the free world. However, as we see the spec-
tacle of its "loyal" opposition, putting its
politics before the country, those nations
that depend upon America's rapid recov-
ery have much to fear. Before us we see a
spectacle of political dishonesty, scare mon-
gering and partisanship to an extent that
threatens America's position as a world
leader.
Meanwhile, Americans are losing their
jobs, their homes and their security. So are
Bahamians, and for the same reason - a
world recession. Yet we have an opposition
politician in our midst who well knows why
businesses are belt tightening, and citizens
are jobless, yet will say, with his irritatingly
smug smile, that this country's unemploy-
ment figures add to the "mounting evidence
of the fundamental failure of the Right Hon
Hubert Ingraham as Prime Minister of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas." According
to him, Mr Ingraham is better at winning
elections than governing the country.
Would he say the same about President
Obama whose country's unemployment fig-
ures continue to climb? And if not, why not?
Can you imagine a Southern Republican
Senator in a fight over health care saying
that "if we're able to stop Obama on this, it
will be his Waterloo. It will break him"?
The nation is at economic risk, but instead
of concentrating on the real problems, they
are busy trying to break a new president
before he is even given a chance to govern.
The Republicans complain about big gov-


ernment and heavy debt, forgetting that it
was their party that bequeathed to the new
administration a $1.3 trillion deficit, the
largest in the nation's history.
But the fight, and lies told by politicians to
block President Obama's inspiring speech
for delivery to school children last week,
was the most shocking of all. His speech was
designed to encourage young people to stay
in school, take responsibility for their learn-
ing "and put in the hard work it takes to
succeed."
Many schools refused to air his speech, a
speech that all children should have heard.
Many parents kept their children from
school, because the opposition spread the
false alarm that it was "fascist," "Hitler
indoctrination," and "socialist" among many
other things. The political viciousness con-
tinued and was swallowed hook, line and
sinker by the nation's gullible and ignorant.
Really it was a frightening spectacle.
But most disconcerting of all was the views
of the Florida GOP chairman who did not
want his children to hear the "vision" of
their president. In other words he wanted to
control what they saw and what they heard.
It seems that his children missed a wonder-
ful civics lesson, and he, as a parent, passed
up a golden opportunity to have a discussion
with them on the parts of the speech with
which he disagreed. That is how children
learn.
But if America's youth are to go through
life with blinkers attached by their parents to
shield them from another man's point of
view, then indeed, if America is to retain its
position as world leader, the world is in a lot
of trouble. No wonder on BBC's HardTalk
Thursday evening President George Bush's
former national security advisor, in dis-
cussing what went wrong in the Iraq war,
had to admit to Stephen Sackur that the
Americans had "to confront an enemy" they
did not understand. And they probably did-
n't understand Iraq, because, despite Amer-
ica's strength and wealth, its people on the
whole remain insular, nursing only their own
point of view, and many stupidly shielding
their children from even exploring another
man's ideas, opinions and culture.
And today many Americans are afraid of
the views of their new President because he
is an international man. He has lived among
and listened to the points of view of many
other nationalities. He listens, he reasons
and he understands. That is why other
nations show far more appreciation for him
than do his fellow Americans. Unlike the
majority of his countrymen his mind encom-
passes broader horizons. In fact he is a
breath of fresh air. We are certain if he were
before the BBC's Stephen Sackur Thursday
night he could never have made the embar-
rassing admission that he took his country to
war against an adversary he did not under-
stand.


Number of clerics



who oppose death



penalty is worrying


EDITOR, The Tribune. ...


The growing number of
"men of the cloth" advocating
elimination of the death penal-
ty is worrying. They seemingly
do so more from a humanistic
rather than a biblical perspec-
tive.
Progressive thinking, human-
istic, liberal clerics have steered
the church far from biblical
teaching. It is because of such
progressive, humanistic, liberal
thinking that an openly gay
Anglican priest, living in
"union" with his male mate, has
risen to the high office of bish-
op of the church. Moreover, the
fact that notwithstanding his
lifestyle, the bishop was elected
by other bishops of the church
speaks volumes to the perva-
sive extent to which depravity
engulfs the church today.
In an article on the subject
of the death penalty which I
wrote sometime ago, I noted
words with import similar to
the following: "Those opposed
to the death penalty generally
argue that capital punishment
does not deter or prevent an
individual intent on committing
murder from doing so. I pre-
sume they argue from the
standpoint of various studies
on the subject, studies albeit
carried out in someone else's
jurisdiction rather than ours no
doubt. I don't intend to argue
otherwise, at least not just yet.
In my earlier article I had
noted that those who focus on
the issue of deterrence surely
miss the point.
The primary purpose of cap-
ital punishment is not to pre-
vent murder any more than the
principal reason of a fine or
incarceration is to prevent any
other form of criminal behav-
iour.
Retribution, recompense if
you will, extracting from an
offender pay-back similar in
degree to the individual's trans-
gression, is the genesis, the
foundation forming the basis
for imposition of a sentence.
The punishment must fit the
crime."
The death penalty is the ulti-


mate punishment. It fits the
most egregious of crimes, snuff-
ing out of another's life.
In my article I also commu-
nicated that proponents and
opponents of capital punish-
ment are so firmly entrenched
in their positions that what I
had to say likely would not
have had much bearing on their
views.
I nevertheless offered a per-
spective which I pronounced to
be somewhat unique and, to a
degree, erudite. I noted that
both the Old Testament and
the New Testament spoke in
clarion clear terms to the issue
of the punishment fitting the
crime. The ultimate punish-
ment, the surrendering of one's
life, clearly fits the ultimate
crime, the wilful, deliberate,
premeditated taking of anoth-
er's life.
Laws of the Old Testament
characterize appropriate pun-
ishment as an "eye for an eye,
a tooth for a tooth." In the New
Testament Jesus described it
thusly: "With which measure
ye mete it shall be measured to
you."
Liberalist, modernistic, so-
called progressive thinking New
Testament scholars seek to lim-
it Jesus' words of "giving back
in equal measure", to the dis-
pensing of rewards only. I
regard such limitation as being
reflective of intellectual deprav-
ity for surely the dispensing of
punishment (by the appropri-
ate authority), is inherent in the
words uttered.
The second argument
advanced by opponents of the
death penalty, is the possibility
of someone being wrongly con-
victed and punished.
Why limit discourse to the
death penalty? The wrongful
conviction and punishment of
anyone for any crime is abhor-
rent. Do we therefore have the
courts dispense with the impo-
sition of all penalties? God for-


bid. While wrongful convic-
tions can and no doubt do
occur, though with significant
infrequency, I doubt anyone
has the gumption to suggest
courts should discharge every
case that comes before them
because such a risk exists.
Moreover, capital cases by their
very nature receive far more
review than other cases. Hence,
the risk of erroneous judgment
is minimized.
As to the finality of imposi-
tion of the death sentence, I
previously offered the following
perspective from a good rev-
erend gentleman: "Death is a
phase not finality. It is temporal
rather than terminal."
In closing out my previous
note on this subject I opined
that I subscribe to the view that
lawlessness begets lawlessness.
I also noted that lawlessness
may arise from acts of commis-
sion as well as acts of omission
and that the state's failure to
carry out the capital punish-
ment statute on our law books
might be considered an act of
lawlessness thus begetting the
lawlessness which has become
so prevalent, so rampant in our
once quaint, God-fearing
nation.
Earlier, I suggested that I
did not intend to immediately
argue the merits or otherwise of
the efficacy of capital punish-
ment serving as a deterrent to
murder.
The opportunity is now pre-
sented to study the subject in
a local context.
Murder statistics over the
past seven to eight years that
capital punishment has been
pending is a given. The oppor-
tunity now presents itself for
similar statistics to be looked
at once capital punishment is
resumed.
The opportunity exists. It
ought to be embraced without
delay. "Carpe diem."

MICHAEL R. MOSS
Freeport,
Bahamas,
June 29, 2008.


What could Bahamas government be thinking?


EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Bahamas is facing its
worst recession in many years
with businesses having to
down size and families hav-
ing to cut back wherever pos-
sible to make ends meet.
Rumour has it that cash
flow is hard to come by for
the government, leading to
cut backs in some interesting
places, yet the country opens
a consulate office in Atlanta,
Georgia.
According to the Bahamas
Information Services, the fan-
fare was wonderful. It appears
that no expense was spared.


Politicos were flown in along
with The Grand Bahama
Youth Choir and the Royal
Bahamas Police Force Bands
(Pop and Marching) to enter-
tain the crowd.
I'm sorry, but I'd be will-
ing to bet dollars to donuts
that this expenditure cannot
be justified, particularly dur-
ing these tough economic
times.
The former government in
its ultimate wisdom opened
an Embassy in Cuba, at
tremendous expense, at a
time when they had already
strained relations with our
largest trading partner, and
now this government opens a
representative office, at sig-
nificant expense, when the
country is suffering under the
toughest economic times in
decades.


I realise that governments
think not raising a budget for
expenditure is saving money,
but what could the Bahamas
Government be thinking?
The government at least
owes the Bahamian people a
detailed report of their rea-
sons for this office, along with
an accounting of how they
spent taxpayer money.

RICK LOWE
Nassau,
August, 2009.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE










Woman questioned over the



drive-by shooting of man, 22
^~~~~~w 1 TAW^ PAPfn^ R^^^fI^^I^^


By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
POLICE are questioning a
woman over the drive-by shoot-
ing of a 22-year-old man in Sun-
shine Park.
ASP Leon Bethel said the
woman, who he described as
middle-aged, was taken into
police custody on Saturday
morning.
"We have interviewed a
number of persons and we have
in our custody a woman who
we are questioning," ASP
Bethel said.
According to initial police


reports, it was just after 10am
on Friday when 22-year-old
Degario Knowles and another
man were sitting on a wall of a
house on Winward Isles Road
when a green Honda Inspire
drove up and its occupants
opened fire.
As Mr Knowles made a dash
to escape the attack, a gunman
emerged from the back seat of
the car and continued shooting.
Mr Knowles reportedly stag-
gered several feet into a neigh-
bouring yard, managed to hop a
backyard fence before collaps-
ing - leaving a large trail of
blood behind him. The death
pushed the nation's murder


count to 59.
Meanwhile, just hours after
the Sunshine Park murder,
police were called to the scene
of another incident in the
neighbourhood.
At around 1.30am on Satur-
day, police received reports that
a man was firing shots and had
threatened a woman friend.
Police searched a house in
Garden Hills and found a hand-
gun and ammunition . A 24-
year-old man was taken into
custody.
ASP Leon Bethel said police
are certain the incident was not
connected to the murder of Mr
Knowles.


AMBASSADOR-DESIGNATE Nicole Avant (right) is pictured with Rhoda Jackson, Charge D'Affaires, the
Bahamas' Embassy in Washington.


THE United States' ambassador-designate to
the Bahamas Nicole Avant plans to promote lit-
eracy in children as well as continuing the fight
against illegal drug and weapons trafficking dur-
ing her tenure in this country.
During a courtesy call on Rhoda Jackson,
Charge D'Affaires, at the Bahamas' Embassy in
Washington, DC,
Ms Avant said she was "deeply honoured" to
be the first African-American woman ambas-


sador to the Bahamas.
She added that she was passionate about men-
toring local schoolchildren, and wants to pro-
mote 'Read To Lead', a literacy program in
Bahamian public schools which grew out of an ini-
tiative started in 2005 by former US Ambassador
to the Bahamas John Rood.
Ms Avant, who is expected to arrive in Nassau
early October, also expressed a keen interest in
humanitarian assistance programmes.


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 5


ALSLSAEFN










Funeral services



for the daughter of



Minister Neko Grant


FUNERAL services were
held on Saturday for the daugh-
ter of Works Minister Neko
Grant who died in hospital in
Florida after losing a battle with
pneumonia last week.
Nekcarla Grant, 36, died on
September 6 - the day after Mr
Grant buried his mother, Reva
Grant and only months after
the death of his father.
Nekcarla, an attorney who


worked for the Grand Bahama
Port Authority's legal depart-
ment, was admitted to Doctor's
Hospital for treatment before
being transferred to the inten-
sive care unit of the Cleveland
Clinic in Florida, where she lat-
er died.
Ms Grant, a mother-of-one,
was graduated from St Mary's
University in the United States
with a bachelors degree in his-


tory before studying law at the
University of Leeds, where she
was graduated with honours in
2000.
In early 2001 she was called
to the English Bar and in Sep-
tember of that year she was
called to the Bahamas Bar.
The funeral was held at
Freeport Bible Church in Grand
Bahama.


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ABOVE: Minister of Public
Works and Transport Neko
Grant guides the casket of his
daughter Nekcarla Grant, 36,
during the processional of her
funeral service held Saturday,
September 12, 2009 at Freeport
Bible Church.
LEFT: Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham encourages Minister
of Public Works and Transport
the Neko Grant at the close of
the funeral service for Minis-
ter Grant's late daughter Nek-
carla Grant held Saturday, Sep-
tember 12, 2009 at Freeport
Bible Church.

Sharon Turner/BIS


MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS and Transport Neko Grant (right)
is pictured holding his grandson Daniel, son of his late daughter
Nekcarla Grant at her funeral service held Saturday, September
12, 2009 at Freeport Bible Church. Also pictured is Mrs Barbara
Grant and Mr Grant's son Neko Grant II.


JOHNSTON&MURPHY

THE COMFORTS


Thel Communications Act 2009 IComms Act), which gives Utilities Regulation &
Competition Authority (URCA) full power of regulation and of oversight of the
electronic communications sector in The Bahamas, came into force on 1 September
2009.

This date sinals the start of the transition to a new regulatory regime, Greater
competition will be introduced in the electronic communications sector, to the benefit
of the economy and of all persons in The Bahamas.

To facilitate as smooth a transition to the new licensing regime a possible, a number of
new documents were published on 1 Setember 2009 and are avalIabe at URCAIs
wbsltel wwwaurcabahamasLbI, . ihese include
SPrelimrirary Dr.er minnarin covering sverral Class Operating and Spertrum
licences, Exemptions, and Types of Fees
* Individual Operating and Spectrum licences
* Draft Class Opifating and Spectrum licences
* Licensing Guidelines
* Fe schedule
* Radio Spectrum Statement [Existing Allocation and Asign ment)
* Variou forms - Full Details Form and Notice of Obection Form fort the transtin,
and an Application Form for a licence.

Until new URKA regulatory reasurres are adopted, all eNirin regulatory meawres
adopted by the Publie Utilihei Commission and the Television RegulateMy Authority
continue in force to the extent that they do not conflict with provision of the Comms
Act, the Utilibes Regulation & Competition Authority Act 2009; the Utilities Tribunal
Act, 2009 and any new regulatory measures adopted under these Acts.

The new regime encourages participation by all - the website will also give you an
opportunity to learn more about the new regime with updates on Competition Policy,
Con ulation results and determinations and latest news of the regrnme This new regime
and the Comms Act coming into force for the electronic communications sector is the
beginning of a new day far all persons in The Bahamas.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 7


Writing your own


destiny:


Barack


Obama's universal


message for youth


insight

WORLD VIEW -


By RONALD SANDERS
(The writer is Consultant and
former Caribbean Diplomat)

E EVERYONE knows
good sense when they
hear it, and Barack Obama's
back-to-school address on Sep-
tember 8 to students from
kindergarten to 12th grade in
the United States was perfect
good sense.
It was as applicable to stu-
dents in the tiny Caribbean
Island of Montserrat, in the
overcrowded urban centres of
Brazil, in the leafy suburbs of
France as it was to students in
the United States. And, it was
delivered with an authenticity
that could only come from
someone who had experienced
serious challenges and over-
come them.
The message, broadcast to
schools throughout America,
was compelling: "Where you
are right now doesn't have to
determine where you'll end up.
No one's written your destiny
for you... you write your own
destiny."
Obama's observation would
strike a visceral chord in at least
two generations of Caribbean
people who climbed out of
deprivation by absorbing edu-
cation to write a destiny very
different from the future to
which their circumstances
pointed.
When he described his moth-
er giving him extra tuition at
4.30 in the morning because she
couldn't afford to send him to
the school other American kids
attended in Indonesia where
they lived at the time, men and
women in developing countries
the world over could identify
with the problem and the deter-
mination.
In the Caribbean, waking up
with sun's rise to study was a
norm for many students in rur-
al areas whose homes had no
electricity and whose parents
could not afford private schools
or extra lessons. In some cases,
study in the light of the early
morning sun preceded work in
the field before setting-off for
school.
Many of the professionals in
Caribbean life today reached
the pinnacles they have by
recognizing then what Obama,
from his own similar experi-
ence, could say today: "Each
of you has a responsibility for
your education, (It is) a respon-
sibility you have to yourself."
And, Obama's message was
not patronizing.
His was not the voice of a
privileged guy for whom talk is
cheap.
The students saw the Presi-
dent of the United States, but
the voice they heard was that of
a successful man who had once
been a fatherless child, brought
up in tough circumstances by a
single mother. The lesson was
clear.
As he said, "My father left
my family when I was two years
old, and I was raised by a single
mother who struggled at times
to pay the bills and wasn't
always able to give us things
the other kids had. There were
times when I missed having a
father in my life. There were
times when I was lonely and
felt like I didn't fit in. So I was-
n't always as focused as I
should have been. I did some
things I'm not proud of, and
got in more trouble than I
should have. And my life could
have easily taken a turn for the
worse."
All over the Caribbean
today, there are children aban-
doned by fathers and being
brought-up by struggling single
mothers. The extent to which
this has a deleterious effect on
the children is a matter that
sociologists and others are
studying, but already there is
evidence that many children in
such circumstances find little
motivation in schools and in
formal education.
But, the problem of turning
away from education is not
restricted to children of single
mothers alone. It is particularly
manifest - and worrying - in
Caribbean universities which
today graduate more women


than men because fewer men
than women are seeking higher
education.
There appears to be a dis-
connection between many
young people in the Caribbean
and the formal education sys-
tem. Obviously, given the fact
that President Obama chose to
talk to students throughout the
United States in their first week
back at school, the problem
exists there as well.
He could not be more pas-
sionate in his call to students
to seize education for the good
it will do them. "You can't drop
out of school and just drop into
a good job. You've got to work
for it and train for it and learn
for it", he said.
In a passage that appealed to
the students to do good not
only for themselves, but for
their country, Obama declared:
"You'll need the knowledge
and problem-solving skills you
learn in science and math to
cure diseases like cancer and
AIDS, and to develop new
energy technologies and pro-
tect our environment. You'll
need the insights and critical
thinking skills you gain in his-
tory and social studies to fight
poverty and homelessness,
crime and discrimination, and
make our nation more fair and
more free. You'll need the cre-
ativity and ingenuity you devel-
op in all your classes to build
new companies that will create
new jobs and boost our econo-
my."
All that he said to Ameri-
can students, holds true for stu-
dents in the Caribbean, but
even more so. For the
Caribbean needs skills and
knowledge much more than
countries, such as the United
States, in the developed world.
In this regard, the resource that
the Caribbean most needs to
develop is its human resource.
Businesses and governments in
the region require people with
capacity in a range of skills that
include engineering, manage-
ment, accountancy and audit-
ing, marketing and negotiating.
The region's need for such
skills is worsened, of course, by
their migration out of its bor-
ders into places such as the US,
Canada and the United King-
dom. The fact that over 60 per
cent of tertiary educated people
from the Caribbean have left
(in the case of Jamaica and
Guyana, the figure is over 80
per cent) speaks powerfully to
the importance of educating
even more of the region's
young people in the skill areas
that are needed.
But to get more young peo-
ple into tertiary education, the
Caribbean has to get them suc-
cessfully through secondary
education.
This is why Obama's power-
ful message, directed at young
people in America, should be
cheered by every serious busi-
ness entity in the Caribbean.


For Caribbean youth who
may have missed it, Chambers
of Commerce should join with
schools in arranging for it to be
broadcast in schools in the
region, and discussed by stu-
dents, their teachers and poten-
tial employers. There is a des-
tiny to be written.
(Responses to and previous
commentaries at
www.sirronaldsanders.corn)


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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE






PAGELOCAL 8,WS MONDAYISEPTEMBER14,2009THE B


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-C i--


Tribune242 website

is growing daily


TRIBUNE242, the online
edition of the nation's lead-
ing daily newspaper, is fast
becoming an internet sensa-
tion.
The latest figures released
today show how Tribune242
is growing daily as informa-
tion-hungry surfers log on to
get the latest news, features
and sports reports.
But that's not all they're
logging on for, our readers
are also enjoying is one of the
many unique features of Tri-
bune242 ... the opportunity to
comment INSTANTLY on
ANY story they read.
Other websites may lay
claim to having "millions" of
readers, but the figures they
use are based on the number
of "hits" - the amount of traf-
fic a site gets.
For a number of reasons,
these figures do not give an
accurate picture of how many
people are viewing the site.
We at Tribune242 look at
the number of "unique visi-
tors" - the number of NEW
readers - who are logging on


daily ... and this is what really
counts.
On launch day, Monday,
August 10, we recorded 1,926
unique visitors. Since then the
number of new readers has
grown daily, standing at 2,168
on September 7.
And by pure coincidence,
if you subtract our launch day
figure from that of Septem-
ber 7, we have the incredible
number 242.
Tribune Managing Editor
John Fleet said: "To the unin-
formed, these figures may not
look impressive since they
tend to think in terms of hits.
"But in reality, they give us
the bragging rights to being
the best read interactive news
website in the Bahamas, quite
possibly even the Caribbean.
"And this is just the begin-
ning.
"We have many exciting
plans in the pipeline for Tri-
bune242."
To join The Tribune's
growing family of online read-
ers, simply log on to www.tri-
bune242.com


iming the Good News through Mission & Ministry

Matthew 28:19-20


Guest Preachers:


Pastor T.G. Morrison

Pastor, Zion BaptisI Church

Topic: Tranfob ming Lves .hrmfll Mission & Ministrv


Pastor Cedric B. Moss

Pascor, Kingdom ife Church

Topic: Equipping the Saints to Proc'aim teC Good News


The Revd Fr. Mark L. Fox

Rcttor, St, Peter's Parish, Long Island

Topic: Living Yrnr Fll Pjtenitl within the Body of Chrie by Proclaimir.g be Goid News


Dates: Wednesday, September 16 thru Friday, September 18, 2009


- Come Experince.
Anointed Praise & W'rship Ministry

)Dynamic reaching & Biblical Expositio

PrMl',r & CounsCing Minirtry




HOLYCROSS ANGICAN CHURCH
Rector TheRev'd F. Norman D. ligtbourne
Asiant Priest:The Rev'd fr Ethan PJ Ferguson
HihuPark & Sodi Rid. Nassa, N. I,The Bah


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Email: simon@cavesheights.com





M&AE .Ummlt



Machinery & Energy Limited (M & E
Limited), the authorized Caterpillar dealer
in The Bahamas, is looking for Trainee
Technician Candidates 20 to 30 years
old for enrollment in their local Caterpillar
Training Institute.Candidates should be a
graduate of BTVI or an equivalent institution.
Practical experience in repairing diesel
engines and/or electrical equipment is a
plus. Successful candidates will be trained in
M & E's local training institute by experienced
mechanics and electricians. The training
will be done in Nassau with opportunities
to relocate to M & E's Freeport or Abaco
branches upon completion.

Please address all resumes to:

The Service Manager
P. 0. Box N-3238
Nassau, Bahamas.

Resumes can also be dropped off
at the receptionist desk at M & E's
main office in Oakes Field. Resumes
must be received no later than Friday,
September 18th, 2009. Only persons
being interviewed for this training will
be contacted.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


en~r~


PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 9


LOCALNEWS


Govt presses ahead with controversial 8150m power plant


FROM page one
bune yesterday: "In the time
we had available, I am of the
view a number of individuals
who originally may have had
some issues with the plant due
to the misinformation and pro-
paganda being spread have now
left that meeting with a posi-
tive view of BEC and the
plant."
He said he only wished the
Government had more time to
clearly demonstrate how
Bunker C fuel is used world-
wide.
"First of all, we only had one
town meeting to disseminate all
of the information that we had
available to us. If we had more
time it could have been seen
even more clearly that the pow-
er plant is one that is placed
throughout the Caribbean,
North and Central America.
"If we had more time we
could have illustrated the num-
ber locations (that are in)
Bermuda, Brazil, Chile,
Venezuela, Mexico, the Unit-
ed States such as South Flori-
da," said Mr Neymour.
Concerns about the possible
environmental and health
impacts of the power plant hit
fever pitch in recent weeks.
A video claiming the poten-
tially damaging impact of the
heavy oil Bunker C (HFO)
power plant was released on an
Internet video sharing site this
week. An Internet petition to
stop the development had also
been signed by hundreds of
concerned supporters.
The Government has said
that measures to prevent envi-
ronmental destruction will be
taken by ensuring regular main-
tenance of the plant and three
mile pipeline to the tanker port,
providing staff with proper
training and support, and by
appointing an environmental
officer to oversee all such con-
cerns.
Some Abaconians have also
criticized The Government for
not informing them about the
plant before they began con-
struction last month.
But Mr Neymour explained
that the plant had been in the
pipeline under the former PLP-
led administration. He added
that during the FNM's current
term, plans for the plant had
been discussed by the Prime


Minister and during Mr Ney-
mour's budget debate in Par-
liament.
According to Mr Neymour,
Government was not made
aware of any opposition to the
project until recently and
added that the plant was des-
perately needed to supply Aba-
co's growing demand for pow-
er.
"I did not receive significant
concerns about it. BEC, after
selecting a suitable site, began
construction because Abaco
has been impacted by the con-
ditions of the current power
plant. There is a peak demand
of 24-megawatts and the cur-
rent facility currently supplies
27-megawatts.
"So if a generator goes


down, normally it leads to a
position where load shedding
occurs. So they felt it was criti-
cal that we begin to meet the
growing needs of Abaco. We,
the Government, are con-
cerned about the development
of Abaco and also concerned
that there may be a few indi-
viduals who may not, or appear
to not, like Abaco to develop
further," he said.
Mr Neymour said now that
the Government has met with
residents of Abaco in an
attempt to dissuade their fears:
"We will continue with the con-
struction of the power facility -
we don't see a reason to stop".
He added that he is open to
meeting with the environmen-
talists concerned about the Wil-


son City plant on the country's
national energy policy.
"One of the things that we
would like to do is to have a
meeting with some of the envi-
ronmentalists on a national
energy policy . I am open to a
discussion with them if they are
willing to discuss the energy
policy," said Mr Neymour.


'V.OUR VIEW'
To have your say on
this or any other issue,
email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or
deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207


5omumer-Douglass Coollee

a Certificate Course for
" Licensed Practical Nurse

A 3-semester program of study designed to produce Licensed Practical Nurses with the
technical knowledge and practical skills required to assist the Registered Nurse or Physician in
providing safe and competent nursing care to clients in a variety of healthcare settings

A Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) is a nursing professional who is trained to perform a
wide variety of tasks under the supervision of a Registered Nurse (RN) or a Physician.

In The Bahamas, the LPN is known as the Trained Clinical Nurse (TCN)

LPNs work in a variety of healthcare settings such as hospitals, clinics, nursing homes,
residential care facilities, schools, laboratories, birthing centers and insurance
companies.

Entry Requirement:
High school graduate with 2.5. GPA
Current Health Certificate
SProgram Length: 12 months (3 semesters)
Total Credits Required: 45

SStudents will be trained to practice within The
0 Bahamas and to write the NCLEX-PN exam for
minimum U.S. certification
1 College-level courses transferable to degree programs
" Affordable fees, payment plan available
* Convenient evening class times, ideal for working people
iI S
Register today!
Space is limited!! Contact us at 242-394-8570


Colinalmperial


The following individuals are asked to contact
Ms. Arnette Rahming (356-8328) or Ms. Shamara
Farquharson (356-8456) at Colinalmperial Insurance Ltd:


ALBERTHA MILLER
Pinder's Point Freeport, GB

ANITA L BURROWS
Matthew Town, Inagua

ANTONIA LESBOTT
P. O. Box SS-5481
New Bight Cat Island

BRENDA ADDERLEY

CLAUDE LESBOTT
P. O. Box SS-5481
New Bight Cat Island

CYRIL WILLIAMS I
Yellow Elder Gardens 2

CYRIL WILLIAMS II
Yellow Elder Gardens 2

DWAYNE DORSETTE

EDNA DEAN
P. O. Box N-4912

IAN TRECO
P. O. Box N-3693

JASON SAUNDERS
Prince Charles Drive

JENNIFER TRECO
P. O. Box N-3693

KEVA FAWKES
Matthew Town, Inagua

KOVAN SMITH
P. O. Box CB-11825


LEANDRA PINDER
Matthew Town, Inagua

MERVIN SMITH
P. O. Box CB-11825

MIRIAM NAOMI INGRAHAM
P. O. Box N-7905

NASHLAWN CURTIS

NESHA JASMINE L CULMER
P. O. Box SS-5818

NIKITA CURTIS

OLIVIA GAITOR
P. O. Box N-5359

PHILIPPA, INGRAHAM
P. O. Box N-7905

RENDAL COLEBY
P. O. Box N-8672

SANSCHIA CULMER
P. O. Box SS-5818

STAFFORD MILLER
Pinder's Point Freeport, GB

STEPHEN FAWKES
Matthew Town, Inagua

VICTORIA SAUNDERS
Prince Charles Drive

WELLINGTON DORSETTE

WILFRED GAITOR
P. O. Box N-5359


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ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


Inmate dies after


prison cell fight

FROM page one

Assistant Superintendent Leon Bethel.
"From our information he was sent to prison for
vagrancy and he was placed in a cell. While in the cell he
received injuries and that's what we're looking into right
now. He was in prison for less than a week."
Mr Bethel could not say exactly how many inmates
were in the cell at the time of the attack.
He explained that investigators were informed of the
incident late Friday and therefore were still gathering
information on the details surrounding Albury's death.
Albury was taken to hospital for treatment on Sep-
tember, 8 but died two days later, added the ministry's
statement.


P~zV4 F",4- fwA R0040f"vw.

Invites application for the following positions:

Applicants should atlsfy tihe following minimum
requirements:


CHIEF ENGINEER

* Have a Bachelors Dgee in Mechanical
Engineering from a recognized Collcge~IJnivcrity
* At [cast minimum 5 ycevr in a similar or closely
related ficld
* Must be computler litcrale
* Be proacivre, selfnmotivated and be ready to work
long hours
* Be able to lead a team of Engineef and technicians
with varied trades


LIVE IN MAID

SFully exierienced in dlomntLic mIstu.ehul[ti chore
and cLilinary duties
SThree years in a similar position would be an asset
SApplicant mus be willing to live on island

Applications should send mail t;:
emaj ori'grp.salndls.com


1ad4*ilt


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FROM page one
fulfill your responsibilities,"
said Mr Obama speaking
from the Wakefield High
School in Arlington, Virginia.
"Unless you show up to
those schools; pay attention
to those teachers; listen to
your parents, grandparents
and other adults; and put in
the hard work it takes to
succeed. And that's what I
want to focus on today: The
responsibility each of you
has for your education. I
want to start with the
responsibility you have to
yourself."
Mr Obama also stressed
that it was the civic duty of
each student to discover his
or her hidden talents and to
hone those skills.
"We need every single
one of you to develop your
talents, skills and intellect
so you can help solve our
most difficult problems. If
you don't do that, if you quit
on school, you're not just
quitting on yourself, you're
quitting on your country."
He also warned students
that the road to success is
not as glamorous and easily
attained as portrayed on
television shows, adding that
hard work and determina-
tion are the keys to success.
"Whatever you resolve to
do, I want you to commit to
it. I want you to really work
at it. . .The truth is, being
successful is hard.
"You won't love every
subject you study. You
won't click with every
teacher. Not every home-
work assignment will seem
completely relevant to your
life right this minute. And
you won't necessarily suc-


mentary from right-wing
conservative pundits, some
of whom accused the presi-
dent of trying to drum up
support for his proposed
health care reform, which
has met much resistance
from opponents.
* SIR RONALD
SANDERS: PAGE 7


ceed at everything the first
time you try.
"That's OK. Some of the
most successful people in
the world are the ones
who've had the most fail-
ures," he said.
For those branded as
problem students, Mr Oba-
ma encouraged them to plod
on despite thier frustration
and not to accept negative
perceptions of themselves.
"If you get in trouble, that
doesn't mean you're a trou-
blemaker, it means you
need to try harder to
behave. If you get a bad
grade, that doesn't mean
you're stupid, it just means
you need to spend more
time studying. No one's
born being good at things,
you become good at things
through hard work.
.You've got to practice.
"Don't be afraid to ask
questions. Don't be afraid
to ask for help when you
need it. I do that every day.
Asking for help isn't a sign
of weakness, it's a sign of
strength. It shows you have
the courage to admit when
you don't know something,
and to learn something new.
"Don't ever give up on
yourself, And even when
you're struggling, even when
you're discouraged, and you
feel like other people have
given up on you - don't ever
give up on yourself. Because
when you give up on your-
self, you give up on your
country," the president said.
For days leading up to the
speech the president was
demonised by his detractors
for attempting to indoctri-
nate American children into
his so-called "socialist"
agenda.
There was harsh com-


AS


SON DIES IN FIRE
FROM page one
nis cried as he looked upon the burnt remains of his home in
disbelief.
Mr Minnis said he can still hear Jermaine's screams for help
and is overcome with grief because he could not help him.
"He was very quiet, he was disabled, he can't do anything for
himself. I feed him, I do everything for him. He would go to
school and if he ain' see me all day he would hug me and
squeeze me tight - he's just that sweet loving," said Ms Hepburn,
a mother-of-three.
ASP Walter Evans said police responded to the fire at the
middle unit of a triplex around 9am. He said firefighters met the
home in flames but quickly extinguished the fire.
The cause of the blaze is under investigation.
A neighbour complained that firefighters took nearly half an
hour to respond to the call and said other neighbours tried to
douse the flames with water.
But an officer at the Elizabeth Estates fire station said they
received the call at 9am and responded at 9.05.
Remarkably, the two adjoining units of the tri-plex were
not damaged by the fire.




Roal Bahamian Rcsort & Offshore island

Invites application for ihe position of:

GROUNDS MANAGER

The successful candidate should have the
following qualifications

* Supervise the day to day maintenance of the
grounds
* Work directly with landscape contractor
* Report to General Manager & Hotel Manager
* Knowledge ofplants, insects, disease,
irrigation pesticides and fertilizers
* Minimum of 3 years experience

Send resume and 3 references to:
m rca m pbel Ig i rp.sa ndas.com



Bahamas Bus & Truck Co,, Ltd.
Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 , Fax: 326.7452


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IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


Obama speech 'should be used

to inspire Bahamian students'


MUM'S AGONY


TEACHING POSITIONS AT
KINGSWAY ACADEMY

Elementary School

A Temporary Computer Studies Teacher
is needed for students in Kindergarten
through grades 6. A trained Elementary
Classroom Teacher is preferred. The
position could be available for several
months.

High School

A Trained Music Teacher is needed for
students in grades 7 through 12. The
successful candidate must be qualified
and able to prepared students for the
various External Music Examinations.

Applications can be collected from the
Human Resources Department at the
Business Office telephone number
324-6269.
Only Born Again Christians should
apply.

The Deadline for applications is
Tuesday, September 15, 2009.


PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE







'It's great to
have the Tank
back in action'
- Sherman
Williams'
manager


MN(ONI)AY SEPTEMBER 14, 2009


I PAE'14ISeML I -lboxuing S -


2009 US OPEN DOUBLES FINAL






Knowles and Bhupathi lose thriller


-I,'. *


ABOVE:
MAHESH BHUPATHI, of India,
top right, serves over his partner
Mark Knowles, of the Bahamas,
against Lukas Dlouhy, of the
Czech Republic, and Leander
Paes, of India, during the men's
doubles finals match.

RIGHT:
MAHESH BHUPATHI, right, of
India, watches as his partner
Mark Knowles, of the Bahamas,
returns a ball to Lukas Dlouhy, of
the Czech Republic, and Lean-
der Paes, of India.


PHOTOS:
Elise Amendola/
Associated Press


CA~l


:4l


i-u


MARK KNOWLES, of the Bahamas, and Mahesh Bhupathi, right, of
India hold their second place trophy for the men's doubles finals with
Knowles' son Graham at the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York,
Sunday, Sept. 13, 2009. Leander Paes, right, of India, and his partner
Lukas Dlouhy, of the Czech Republic, won the championship.


I'm 'super disappointed',

says Bahamian tennis ace


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
MARK Knowles said he's
"super disappointed" that he
and Mahesh Bhupathi "did-
n't get the job done" and had
to settle for the runners-up
title in their second appear-
ance this year at a Grand
Slam final.
The Bahamian-Indian num-
ber three seeds were unable


to withstand the come-from-
behind efforts of No.4 seeds
Lukas Dlouhy and Leander
Paes in the two-day rain
delayed men's doubles final
at the US Open yesterday.
But the Czech-Indian duo,
who had upset the top seeds
and defending champions
Americans Bob and Mike
Bryans in the semifinal on
Wednesday, rallied for a 3-6,
6-3, 6-2 win as the rain finally
subsided in Flushing Mead-
ows, New York.
"It's extremely disappoint-
ing because we let the guys
back into the match and the
match turned around a little
bit in their favour," said
Knowles, who was nursing an
injury to his right ring finger
from an elevator accident at
the Tennis Center prior to the
start of the tournament.
The match was originally
scheduled for Friday, but had
to be cancelled because of the
rain. Organisers tried again
on Saturday, but it was the
same result.
"We didn't play as well as
we should have, having to
wait for three days to play the
final," he pointed out. "We
had good momentum going,
but at the end of the day, we
didn't play the way we are
capable of playing. We just
didn't get the job done."
Yesterday, Knowles and
Bhupathi seemed headed for
the victory when they took
the first set after they had got
a break for a 4-2 lead and
they never looked back.
"It's going to be tough (to
absorb the loss) because we
were playing so well in the
tournament. I think my serve
let us down. My serve really
let them back into the match,"
Knowles pointed out. "So it's
disappointing. It's going to
take a while for me to get
over this one."
But in the second set,
Dlouhy and Paes rallied to
return the favor for a break at
4-2 and they got another one
at 5-3 to secure the win to
even the score.
In the critical tie-breaker,
Dlouhy and Paes got the ini-
tial break for a 2-1 lead and
then at 5-2, they went up with
another before they held
serve for the win. It was their
second Grand Slam for the
SEE page 14


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


v� 1Ii


* �* L )


The Bahamas Electridty Corporation


Tender

Assessment of Capital Projects
Administration Process
The Bahamas Electricity Corporatlon
invites Tenders for the above named services.
Bidders are required to collect bid packages from
the Corporatlon's Administration Office, Blue Hill &
Tucker Roads by contacting
Mrs. Dalmeta Seymour, Telephone
No, 302-1158.

Tenders are to be delivered on or before 4:00 p.m.
on September 25, 2009,
and addressed as follows:

Mr. Keli Basdeln
Geinral Manager
Bihimas Elctriclty Cerpirtlon
Blue H1111 Ticker Roadi
Ha lei, lBhamas

Marked: Tender e. 707/19
As;NSImatn of Capital Prejocts
Administration Process

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or
reject the whole or such part of any Tender the
Corporation deems necessary.






I1111111111111 I', .I N ( FIio] 11 11] 11.1 i1 I i ii i ii I i I i ii.li, iriii
TIBUNESPOTS MONDAYOSEPTEMBER 14, 2009,,PAGE 13
hi *h * * I ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


(AP Photo/Thannasis Stavrakis)
CARMELITA JETER from the U.S.A., far right, wins the Women's 100 meters during an IAAF World Athletics Final at Thessaloniki's Kaftanzoglio stadium, Greece, Sunday, Sept. 13, 2009. While Chandra Sturrup
(far left) took fourth in 11.17 for $7,000, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie (second from left) could do no better than 11.24 for sixth and $4,000.


Redemption for



Brown and Sands

Bahamian duo clinch second place finishes


WI


-


U.S. ATHLETE LaShawn Merritt, centre, runs to win the men's 400-meters ahead of Chris Brown of
Bahamas, left, and David Gillick of Ireland, right during an IAAF World Athletics Final at Thessaloniki's
Kaftanzoglio stadium, Greece, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009.


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
IT was redemption time for
both Chris 'Fireman' Brown
and Leevan 'Superman' Sands
at the IAAF/VTB Bank World
Athletics Final in Thessaloni-
ki, Greece on Saturday.
Both Brown and Sands
clinched second place finish in
their respective events after
they missed out on an opportu-
nity to capture a medal at the
12th IAAF World Champi-
onship in Athletics last month.
Brown, who watched as his
first individual medal at the
championships slipped away
from him in Berlin, Germany
when he had to settle for fifth in
the men's 400 metres, stormed
to a second place in Greece.
His time of 45.49 seconds
trailed only American LaShawn
Merritt, the back-to-back
Olympic Games and World
Championships gold medalist,
who easily won in 44.93.
Brown, however, would get
revenge on American David
Neville, who dove across the
finish line at last year's
Olympics in Beijing, China.
Neville followed in third in
45.60.
Both American Jeremy
Wariner and Trinidad &
Tobago's Renny Qwon, the
World Championships' silver
and bronze medalists respec-


tive, opted not to compete in
the grand finale.
While Merritt collected
$30,000 for his victory, Brown
was awarded $20,000 for sec-
ond. Neville earned $15,000 for
third. Like Brown, Sands also
picked up $20,000 after he fin-
ished second as well in the
men's triple jump with his best
leap of 17.19 metres or 56-feet,
4 3/4-inches on the third of his
four attempts.
Cuban Arnie David Girat,
the 2002 World junior champi-
on, took the title with his win-
ning leap of 17.45m or 57-3 on
his second attempt. Bulgarian
Momchil Karailiev was third
with 17.18m or 56-4 1/2.
The only medallist from
Berlin to compete was gold
medalist Phillips Idowu of
Great Britain, who was fourth.
He only took two jumps with
his best being 17.03m or 55-10
1/2 on his second attempt.
Both silver medalist Nelson
Evora of Portugal and bronze
medalist Alexis Copello from
Cuba, didn't compete.
Sands was sitting in the
bronze medal spot until the
final round when Copello came
from behind to drop him to
fourth.
Also on Saturday, Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie had to set-
tle for fourth place in the wom-
en's 200 metres. The World
Championships' bronze medal-
ist clocked 22.45. She received






C/)


- C
711 i


U.S. ATHLETE LaShawn Merritt, right, crosses the finish line to win
the men's 400-meter ahead of Chris Brown of Bahamas, during an
IAAF World Athletics Final at Thessaloniki's Kaftanzoglio stadium,
Greece, on Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009.


$7,000. There was a photo finish
at the line with three-time
World champion Allyson Felix
of the United States holding off
400 champion Sanya Richards.
SEE page 14


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 13


.I,
Ib c, ,,


ii�i
i.




PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS


Knwe an


*� I'
*^flT aw


r
I<




LEANDER PAES, right, of India, and his partner Lukas Dlouhy,
of the Czech Republic, hold the championship trophy after
winning the men's doubles finals match over Mahesh Bhu-
pathi, of India, and Mark Knowles, of the Bahamas, at the U.S.
Open tennis tournament in New York, Sunday, Sept. 13,
2009. In the center is Dlouhy's wife Rhea Pillai and their
three-year-old daughter Aiyana.

FROM page 12

year, adding to the French Open at Roland Garros.
Had they won, they would have celebrated with a prize
purse of $210,000 each. Instead, they will earn $105,000
apiece as the runners-up.
Knowles and Bhupathi were also the runners-up at the
Australian Open in January, losing to the Bryans. Their
only victory this year came at the Rogers Cup in Montreal
at the ATP World Tour Masters 1000 Tournament.
Despite losing, Knowles and Bhupathi joined Dlouhy
and Paes in qualifying for the prestigious Barclays ATP
World Tour Finals in London in November.
Already qualified prior to the US Open are the Bryans
and Wimbledon champions Daniel Nestor and Nenad
Zimonjic.
After taking a couple weeks off to recuperate, Knowles
and Bhupathi will get back together on October 5 to play in
the China Open in Beijing, China, followed by the Shanghai
ATP Masters in Shanghai, China, starting on October 12.
From there, they will play in the Grand Prix de Tennis de
Lyon from October 26 before they go to London.
But he admitted that it's going to be a little difficult to
digest their loss in the US final yesterday.
In 2004, Knowles and his former long-time partner Nestor
won the US Open. Also former partners, Bhupathi and
Paes were runners-up in Flushing Meadows in 1999. But
Bhupathi teamed up with Max Mirnyi to win the title in 2002.
Knowles, along with his family, should be back home
around 11:30 am today in time to attend a luncheon at 1 pm
at Government House.
The event is being organized by the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture for his stellar 20-plus career, including his
Wimbledon Grand Slam mixed doubles title with German
Anna-Lena Groenefeld in July in London, England.


Redemption for Brown and 'Superman' Sands
FROM page 13
Both were timed in 22.29, a season's best for Felix. Jamaican Ker-
ron Stewart came through in third in her season's best of 22.42.
Then on Sunday, Ferguson-McKenzie came back to contest the
100 with Chandra Sturrup. While Sturrup took fourth in 11.17
for $7,000, Ferguson-McKenzie could do no better than 11.24 for
sixth and $4,000.
Jamaican Sherone Simpson slipped in between the pair in 11.20
for fifth and $5,000 and the three medalists from the World Cham-
pionships finished in the top three spots, but in different order.
American bronze medallist Camelita Jeter won in a champi-
onship record of 10.67, Jamaican gold medalist Shelly-Ann Fras-
er was second in 10.89 and Stewart, the silver medallist, was third
in 10.90.


'It's great to have the





Tank back in action'


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SI STERN said he's
delighted to have Sherman
'the Tank' Williams back in
action.
Stern, the American man-
ager of the Grand Bahamian
heavyweight, said he had
some big plans for Williams,
including the possibility of
fighting here at home, once
he finish his commitment in
Germany next month.
Williams is lined up to fight
German Emmanuel 'Dia-
mond Boy' Charro in a live
television show in the 10-
round co-main event on Sat-
urday, October 10 in Warsaw,
East Germany.
It will be Williams' first
appearance in the ring for the
year as he makes his return
after a hand injury he sus-
tained in January just before
he was to have fought in Key
West, Florida.
"I think he's going to win
and after he wins, Sherman
will have a lot of very good
fights over there," Stern said.
"That's where the money is
in the heavyweight division,
so he just need to go over
there and take care of busi-
ness."
Although he's not had a
fight for the year, Stern said
he doesn't think it will have
any effect because Williams
has been active in the gym
training as he recovered from
the injury.
"He's done things like
going over to Germany to
spar, so he's familiar with the
territory, he's familiar with
the area," Stern stressed.
"That's one of the reason
he's fighting this fight over
there because they saw him


Sherman Williams' American manager has

big plans for Grand Bahamian heavyweight
past couple of years, but he
..should be in first class shape
H by the time he's done."
Once he return from Ger-
many successful, Stern said
. they intend to have a cele-
W WI*s _ bration before Williams get
Prepared for a return to Key
West, Florida on January 16.
"If he wins, I don't see any-
thing but positive moves up
for him," Stern said. "I think
that the promoter in Ger-
J many, who is one of the pre-
mier promoters in Europe,
"1 will also want to talk to us
about his next fight in Ger-
many."
Although he's been fight-
ing in South Florida and
Europe, Stern said the next
Sbig move is to bring a show to
the Bahamas for Williams to
, showcase his skills.
"I really think it's time for
us to sit down with the people
in the Bahamas because here
we have a guy like Sherman,
who could be one of the best
heavyweights in the world,"
he said.
"I don't see why when we
do our show in January that
we can't get ESPN to put
some focus on the Bahamas
with the view of him coming
back home to fight."
spar over there. He's kept in in the world. "We brought Stern said the Bahamas is
shape going into the gym." them in on purpose so they definitely the ideal place for
Over the next three weeks, could spar with Sherman," boxing to come and once
Stern said he's lined up a Stern pointed out. Williams live up to his end of
series of sparring sessions with "So I anticipate he will be the bargain by winning in
a number of competitors, in the best shape he's been in East Germany, they will defi-
including two Russians. He for many years. nitely be looking at the possi-
will be working out with "His body hasn't taken its ability of him fighting here
David Jackson, who is con- toll yet because he haven't either in December or early
sidered one of the top trainers had that many fights over the January.


SPORTSNOTES


TENNIS
KNOWLES CELEBRATIONS
MARK Knowles is due to return home
today around 11:30 am at the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport.
He is expected to be greeted by members
of the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture in a "welcome reception" in the VIP
lounge where a brief ceremony will take
place.
Then it's off to Government House
where a luncheon will take place at 1 pm.
The Ministry is honoring Knowles for his
stellar 20-plus year career on the interna-
tional scene.


Knowles and his mixed doubles partner
Anna-Lena Groenefled won the Wimble-
don title in July in London, England. How-
ever, after two days of rain delay, Knowles
and Mahesh Bhupathi lost in the final of the
US Open in the men's final yesterday in
Flushing Meadows, New York.
BASKETBALL
BGDBA FINAL
THE Bahamas Government Depart-
mental Basketball Association will begin
their best-of-five championship series
tonight at 7 pm at the DW Davis Gymna-
sium.


The match-up will showcase the Electro
Telecom Cybots against the Police
Crimestoppers.
SOFTBALL
NPSA ACTION
THE New Providence Softball Associa-
tion hosted a double header on Saturday
night at the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex.
In the ladies' opener, the Pineapple Air
Wildcats blasted the Mystical Queens in
three innings, while in the feature game,
the Thompson Heavy Lift Outlaws
knocked off the Mighty Mits.


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CONT ACT

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IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I


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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 15


National Training Programme
registration and orientation today
HUNDREDS of job seek- 2009-2010 Budget allocated courses divided into three 10
ers are expected to crowd the $250,000 for the programme week semesters, taking
Kendal GL Gymnasium which is also being conducted around 333 trainees per term.
today as registration and ori- in Grand Bahama. Courses Training courses will be
entation for the governmen- will be conducted at The available in accounting, com-
t's National Training Pro- Bahamas Technical Institute. puter applications, engine
gramme takes place. A total of 1,000 applicants repair, landscaping, as well
The programme is one of have been selected for the as straw and shell craft.
several initiatives taken by
the government in response
to the current economic A Foods Limitd announces new die
downturn, aiming to improve
job skills and the unem- AML Foods Limited has announced the appointment of Vaughn
job sklls ances of fthe unem-ding Roberts as the company's new director.
played's chances of finding Mr Roberts assumed the post on September 1.
work. "With the evolution and changes in the company, the board of
This latest venture was cre- directors felt it necessary to expand the knowledge base and skill
ated in conjunction with and set of the board. Mr Robert's background and experience fulfilled
consultation from the the criteria that the nominating committee was looking for in a
Bahamas Christian Council, potential director," said Gavin Watchorn, AML's president and
The Bahamas Chamber of CEO.
Commerce, The Bahamas Mr Roberts is the director of the Downtown Nassau Partnership
Employers Confederation, (DNP).
Trade Unions, The College "I am excited to join the board of AML Foods Limited as it con-
of the Bahamas and the tinues to strengthen the core brands; Solomon's, Cost Right and our
Bahamas Technical and franchise Domino's," said Mr Roberts. "I accept the responsibili-
Vocational Training Institute. ties of directorship and will draw on my expertise to help guide the
The government in its company."


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2009


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE





-... ...SUPER VALUE.
SUPER VALUE


_ LL
1_


L
L.


PAGE 16, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009


*OALEWTSHI'1


HEALTH


MINISTER OF HEALTH Hubert Minnis and Minis-
ter of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette are shown
some supplements by a staff member from Ballys
Gym. The Ministry of Health fair took place in
Meeting Street.


THE MINISTER
of Foreign
Affairs Brent
Symonette
looks at fresh
vegetables at
the Health Fair
on Saturday at
the Ministry of
Health grounds
in Meeting
Street.


PHOTOS: Felipe Major Tiini'ie sitff


IN-- -C gauaieSos 1


RBC Royal Bank of Canada and
Congratulate


RBC FINCO


Vice President and Country Head
RBC Royal Bank of Canada, Bahamas and 'Trks & Caicos Islands
on being awarded the
(.,'/,; ',t. C PT&/,o/Y/j/ 17//,ul

and the
G�7'$rtr/ci J0 Z&//o(a>
for his contribUtions in support of educatiound opportunities
and training for all employees in The Bahamas financial services industry,
Presented By:
The Bahamas Institute of Financial Services
August 2009


IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I


THE TRIBUNE


F









THE TRIBUNE




)US1


SS


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009


ColinaImperial.



Cofdec Fo0Lf


IFCIO obsiescrbueedane


a -


'ear

faear Ex-PM: 'Don't let


factoror resort diis

subsiding anchor resort die'


a bit'

* Principal behind $100m
project says Budget
incentives and financing
package, offering closing
cost savings of $30,000-
plus, drive 40% of sales
to first-time buyers
* 'Turbulent' few months
show signs of ending, as
some confidence returns
* 27 of 30 first phase units
sold, with construction
worker numbers set to
double in next week
* Yet 'buying window
shortening', with project
requiring all 'four Ps'
to be in place

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A $100 million Bahamian
real estate development
believes the 2009-2010 Bud-
get incentives helped to
ensure 40 per cent of first
phase sales were to first-time
home buyers, its principal
telling Tribune Business that
demand has shown signs of
increasing as "the fear factor"
in the market eases.
Jason Kinsale, head of the
43-acre Balmoral Develop-
ment on Prospect Ridge, said
that while "the last few
months have been turbulent
and there has been a lot fear
in the market", the developer
had seen "a significant
increase in traffic and people
bringing in deposit cheques
in the last few days".
Mr Kinsale said the
increased buyer interest was
likely to have been helped by
the previous week's agree-
ments between the Chinese
and Baha Mar, indicating the
$2.6 billion Cable Beach rede-
velopment may ultimately
proceed, plus the sight of
actual construction taking
place at Balmoral - always a
sight to inspire confidence in
potential purchasers.
However, he added that
"the fear factor is subsiding a
bit". As an example, Mr Kin-
sale cited two Balmoral pur-
chases that took place last
week, one client being a Baha
Mar employee, the other a
financial services industry
worker.
"There were a lot of people
SEE page 8B


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
F former
Prime
Minister
Perry
Christie has warned
that substandard
infrastructure in
Exuma led to the
demise of the Four
Seasons Emerald
Bay Resort, and
urged the present
Government not toCHST
allow the property
to suffer a similar
fate under Sandals' ownership..
Mr Christie, speaking at the op.
of HVS (Bahamas), said Exuma
port and roads were unsuited tc
vide the service required by a fiv
rated development such as Em
Bay, indicating that the situation
not changed.
Directing his comments toy
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, n
ter of tourism and aviation, the fc
prime minister asked that the I
ham government understand th(
parity between its financial reso


Stock

Market

to turn in

'six-eight

months'

Market index only down
5.4% for 2009, compared to
13.2% fall in 2008, as ana-
lysts scent 'excellent oppor-
tunity to pick up some
undervalued, quality stocks'

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamian stock mar-
ket is likely to "turn the cor-
ner in the next six to eight
months", senior investment
analysts have told Tribune
Business, with the drop in
many price/earnings (P/E)
ratios indicating there are
"excellent opportunities" for
buyers to acquire underval-
ued stocks.
Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors' chief executive, told
Tribune Business that
SEE page 9B


* Christie warns that Sandals faced by infrastructure disparity
in seeking to make Emerald Bay resort investment work
* Says his government reduced Atlantis Phase III
incentives to 20% of $lbn investment, compared
to 45% and 38% thresholds for previous phases


and the private sector's, and the abili-
ty to get things done with existing rev-
enues and capital.
Alluding to the need for massive
public sector capital works improve-
ments in Exuma as an incentive for
Sandals' development of its recently-
acquired Emerald Bay Property, Mr
Christie digressed in his speech to sug-
gest HVS was the type of company
that could assist with those improve-
ments.
The former prime minister recalled
how HVS had been hired by his gov-
ernment to conduct a study that would
help determine the level of investment
incentives - as a percentage of the total
investment - that were ultimately grant-
ed to Kerzner International for its $1
billion Phase III expansion at Atlantis.
Mr Christie said the issue of Kerzn-


er International's investment incen-
tives had become increasingly con-
tentious, especially in the political are-
na.
"We determined, having discussed
this matter extensively, that we as a
country ought not to risk the con-
frontation that was developing over
that issue, and we negotiated and asked
questions about whether we should
give concessions," Mr Christie said.
"Using the expertise of HVS, we
moved from the phase one 45 per cent
concession and phase two 38 per cent
concession to a phase three 20 per cent.
"HVS sent their team in and gave
us great insight into the workings of
the private sector, into the workings
of Kerzner, which was truly the suc-
cess story in the Bahamas, and the
organization that helped us to rede-


fine the Bahamas and redefine tourism
in the Bahamas.
"HVS steered us to the conclusion
that you did not have to give a dollar in
concessions insofar as your country is
concerned and they justified that the
investment was so profitable that the
country could arrive at such a conclu-
sion."
HVS is a global services and con-
sulting organisation focused on the
hotel, restaurant, shared ownership,
gaming, and leisure industries. The
Bahamas office is its first in the
Caribbean.
Managing Director of HVS's
Caribbean operations, Parris Jordan,
told Tribune Business that HVS was
not new to the Bahamas, having pre-
viously done studies for the Bahamas
government, Baha Mar and Atlantis.


Use Parliament to curb NIB spending


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government must be
forced to go to Parliament
and obtain approval for any
increase in the National Insur-
ance Board's (NIB) adminis-
trative/overhead spending
above already-stated thresh-
olds, a former Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce pres-
ident has urged, citing this as
critical to stopping the social
security programme's "abuse
by politicians".
Dionisio D'Aguilar, who is
also Superwash's president,
told Tribune Business that


* Ex-Chamber chief urges mandating that any increase in
social security scheme's administrative spending threshold
by approved by Parliament to prevent 'abuse by politicians'
* Increase in NIB rates a 23% jump, and 50% insurable
wage ceiling hike, resulting in 84% total increase
* Spending limits urged expanded to all public corporations


with the private sector set to
finance the lion's share of the
expected 2 per cent increase
in NIB contribution rates in
2010, there should be some
additional safeguards on how
this extra revenue was spent
to prevent wastefulness and
abuse.


The likely rise in the NIB
contribution rate from 8.8 per
cent to 10 per cent, something
the Government believes will
be necessary to finance its
unemployment benefit pro-
gramme and national pre-

SEE page 7B


Finishing Strong



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ROYAL FIDEITYiMARKET WRAP


By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

LAST week, Bahamian
investors traded in 11 out of
the 24 listed securities, of
which two advanced, seven
declined and two remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET
A total of 177,611 shares
changed hands, representing
an increase of 143,611 shares
compared to the previous
week's trading volume of
34,000 shares.
Cable Bahamas (CAB) was
the volume leader, seeing
53,000 shares trade as its stock
declined by $0.75 to end the
week at a new 52-week low
of $10.
Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) led the advancers, its
share price increasing by $0.44
on a volume of 40,859 shares
to close the week at $5.94.
Bahamas Property Fund
(BPF) was the lead decline,
falling by $1.10 to a new 52-
week low of $9.90, on a vol-
ume of 1,000 shares.

BOND MARKET
There were 235 Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) 15 Series D
notes traded in the Bahamian
market last week, with a value
of $235,000.

COMPANY NEWS
Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FIN) released its
unaudited financial results for
the quarter ending July 31,
2009. For the quarter, FIN
reported net income of $3.4
million, compared to $5.4 mil-
lion in the 2008 third quarter,
a decline of $2.1 million or 38
per cent.
Net interest income of $7.2
million increased slightly by
$87,000, quarter-over-quarter,
while the provision for credit



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If so, call us on 322-1986
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The Bahamian Stock Market


BISX CLOSING
SYMBOL PRICE


AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FBB
FCC
FCL
FCLB
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE


$1.15
$0.63
$6.25
$9.90
$10.06
$3.15
$10.00
$5.94
$2.74
$10.29
$3.65
$2.05
$6.60
$2.37
$0.30
$4.99
$1.00
$8.80
$5.50
$10.09
$10.00


CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE


$-0.05
$-
$-
$-1.10
$-
$-
$-0.75
$0.44
$-
$-0.01
$-0.04
$0.02
$-
$-
$-
$-0.13
$-
$-0.70
$-
$-
$-


losses of $1.7 million
increased by $2.5 million in
comparison to the prior year.
Non-interest expenses of
$3.1 million remained consis-
tent with the same quarter in
the prior year. Total assets
and liabilities at the end of
the 2009 third quarter were
$870 million and $786 million
respectively.
Management indicated that
while the bank continues to
experience good mortgage
growth, adverse economic
conditions are expected to
result in non-accrual loans
remaining high for the bal-
ance of the year.

Doctors Hospital Health
Systems (DHS) released its
unaudited financial results for
the six month period ending
July 31, 2009. DHS reported
net profits of $4 million
($0.41cents per share) for the
period compared to $1.6 mil-
lion ($0.16 cents per share)
during the same period in the
previous year.
Patient service revenue of
$24 million increased by $3.8
million, which management
attributes to a trend of
increased business volumes
that continued into the sec-
ond quarter of the year, cou-
pled with increases in ICU
patients days of 47 per cent.
All other business sectors
showed positive growth year-
to-date.
Total expenses increased by
$1.5 million over the same six-
month period in the prior
year, primarily due to higher


1,000
0
0
1,000
0
0
53,000
40,859
0
25,000
20,000
1,700
0
0
0
21,182
0
2,750
10,000
0
0


-29.82%
-4.55%
-18.19%
-16.10%
-1.28%
0.00%
-28.72%
-15.14%
-3.18%
-1.53%
62.22%
-19.61%
-15.38%
0.00%
0.00%
-3.48%
0.00%
-25.86%
-10.28%
-9.10%
0.00%


salaries and benefits and med-
ical supplies and services.
Total assets and liabilities
of DHS stood at $32.5 million
and $5.9 million respectively
at the end of the quarter.

Dividend Notes
* FINCO (FIN) has
declared a dividend of $0.13
per share, payable on Sep-
tember 15, 2009, to all ordi-
nary shareholders of record
date September 9, 2009.

* Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.05 per share,
payable on September 30,
2009, to all ordinary share-
holders of record date Sep-
tember 15, 2009.

* Doctor's Hospital
Healthcare Systems (DHS)
has declared a dividend of
$0.02 per share, payable on
September 30, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of
record date September 17,
2009.

* Cable Bahamas (CAB)
has declared a dividend of
$0.07 per share, payable on
September 30, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of
record date September 15,
2009.

* Consolidated Water
BDRs has declared a divi-
dend of $0.015 per share,
payable on November 6, 2009,
to all ordinary shareholders
of record date October 1,
2009.


Bahamas Business

Solutions Ltd.
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IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE











Bahamian airlines in 'holding



pattern' over fee increases


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMIAN private air-
lines are "in a holding pattern"
waiting to see whether the Gov-
ernment adopts their recom-
mendations regarding proposed
fee increases, the minister
responsible confirming to Tri-
bune Business that the changes
- scheduled to take effect on
September 10, 2009 - have been
postponed to allow time for
more consultation with the
industry.
Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace, minister of tourism and
aviation, said the proposed Civ-
il Aviation Department (CAD)
fee increases had not been
implemented as scheduled
because the process required
the Government to complete
consultation with the private
sector first - something that had
not yet been finished.
"We have another round of
consultations to go, and we
have promised that until that
was completed, we would not
put them [the changes] into
effect," Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace told tribune Business.
"The process required con-
sultation with the International
Civil Aviation Organisation
(ICAO) and local operators,
and some pieces of that are not
complete. There are a couple
of pieces to put in place.
"The existing regulations
remain in place for the moment
until the final round of consul-
tation is completed with the
industry."
The minister, though, said
the fee schedule changes would
be implemented "in very short
order" once the consultation
process was concluded.
"There wouldn't be very
much delay between now and
when we complete that, and we
will make a decision on what
to do afterwards," Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said, when asked
by Tribune Business about the
deadline for completing con-
sultations.
And when asked by this


newspaper about the feedback
the Government and CAD had
received from Bahamian pri-
vate airline operators, the min-
ister replied: "I've never met
anyone who has welcomed any
increase in taxes or fees, but
the discussions have gone very
well, we understand their con-
cerns and we will address
them."
Kevin Turnquest, president
of the Bahamas Association of
Air Transport Operators, told
Tribune Business that after the
organisation sent in its response
to the Government on the fee
changes, its concerns were
being reviewed and further
amendments to the proposal
were being contemplated.
"The consultation process
has not been completed, and
the impression clearly given to
us was that needed to contin-
ue," Mr Turnquest said. "We've
not had a formal response from
them, but my understanding is
they may have been contem-
plating a further period of con-
sultation.
"We're in a holding pattern


waiting for a response to the
information we sent in, but our
understanding is that the Gov-
ernment has taken on board
those ideas."
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace con-
firmed to Tribune Business that
the revenues raised by the fee
increases would go into the
Government's Consolidated
Fund, and be used to finance
CAD's operations, rather than
improvements to Family Island
airports.
The sums raised from the fee
increases, he said, would not be
sufficient to meet capital expen-
diture costs in the Family
Islands.
Tribune Business broke the
story of the planned fee increas-
es earlier this year, having been
told that the operator of a five-
seater aircraft flying 50 hours
per month could expect to see a
$13,000 per annum fee rise.
This newspaper was told that
the fee increases include a
tripling or 200 per cent rise in
landing fees at Family Island
airports, the rates jumping from
a current $18.56 per landing to


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$56 per landing for a 19-seat
aircraft.
Other fee increases divulged
to Tribune Business are as fol-
lows:
* * Monitoring charge: From
a current $0 to $1,000, a 1,000
per cent increase
* * Fleet charge: For a five
seater Aztec aircraft, this will
go from $0 to $7,000 - a 7,000
per cent increase. For a Beech
19 seater aircraft, the fee will
rise from $0 to $10,000, a 10,000
per cent increase
* * Charge to lease a foreign
aircraft: Current: $0. Proposed:
$4,000, a 4,000 per cent increase
* * Charter permit renewal:
Current: $500 per annum. Pro-
posed: $1,200, a 240 per cent
increase
* * Renewal of scheduled
permits: Current: $500 per
annum. Proposed: $1,200, a 240
per cent increase. Both large
foreign airlines and Bahamian
operators, including small char-
ter companies, will pay the
same rate
* * Pilot licences: From $0 to
$250 for a six-month Air Trans-


port US licence. From $0 to
$200 for a one-year US com-
mercial pilots licence.
* * Fuel suppliers to Bahami-
an airlines in the Family Islands


will have to pay a tax equiva-
lent to $0.07 per gallon to the
Civil Aviation Department, on
top of existing government tax-
es


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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


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your goals


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
ABACONIANS are
"extremely comfortable" with
what BEC has proposed for its
new Wilson City power plant,
which is expected to open in
the 2010 first quarter in central
Abaco, according to the minis-
ter of state for the environment.
Phenton Neymour said he,
along with BEC general man-
ager Kevin Basden, sought to
dispel inaccurate concerns that
Bunker C fuel was highly toxic
and could produce acid rain.
According to him, the major-
ity of Abaco residents who
attended the Town Hall meet-
ing for the construction of the
new power generating plant
thought the plan was good.
"There was a group of indi-
viduals who would oppose the
construction of the plant, but I
think that with a lot of the
incorrect information they had


circulated, Abaconians realise
[the truth]," said Mr Neymour.
"It [the meeting] was very
good. They were extremely
comfortable with what BEC
had proposed."
A group of concerned Aba-
conians had produced a short
documentary about the con-
struction of the power plant and
its possible environmental
impact, which they have circu-
lated on thelnternet.
According to them, the fuel
will produce far denser carbon
emissions that other fuels, while
increasing the chance of acid
rain over the islands of the
Bahamas.
They also suggested that oil
spills in this area could affect a
propose marine park nearby,
as well as affect the local sub-
terranean aquifer.
However, Mr Neymour
assured that the aquifer, which
is purportedly directly beneath
the new plant, will be strin-
gently monitored.


Mr Neymour also asserted
that BEC has always used
Bunker C fuel oil in New Prov-
idence, and insisted that the
Wilson City plant will adopt the
most stringent environmental
practices.
"This is a new plant in which
environmental procedures and
processes will be put in place,"
he said. "I am extremely disap-
pointed that these individuals
would have taken the approach
that they have."
Mr Neymour also said pre-
cautions such as double sealed
oil pipelines, to reduce the the
likelihood of a spill, and double
hulled tankers for the trans-
portation of the Bunker C fuel
oil, will make the plant much
more secure than others
throughout the Bahamas.
He said that, when complete,
the Wilson City Plant will pro-
duce 48 megawatts of power,
twice the demand on the island,
as a contingency for expansion.


Pione sget r w ard


MBA - University of Bradford,
University of Sunderland,
University of Wales
MSc in Public Administration &
Development - University of
Birmingham
MSc Marketing & Management
- University of Bradford
MSc Finance, Accounting &
Management - University of
Bradford
MSc Information Technology -
University of Teesside
MSc Telecommunications -
Birmingham City University
MSc International Hospitality
Management - Sheffield
Hallam University
Diploma in Management -
University of Wales
(pre-MBA for non-degree
holders)
Certificate in Management -
University of Wales


to their employees, and are
outstanding corporate citizens
of their respective nations.
And they do this under chal-
lenging conditions-- never ask-
ing the government for
favours, often beginning with-
out specialised infrastructure
or sufficient skills and abilities,
but always with an eye to the
future and their own self-deter-
mination," said Michael Fair-
banks, co-founder and co-
director of the Social Equity
Venture Fund.
The Pioneers of Prosperity
Awards Programme is a glob-
al programme made-up of
regional competitions spanning
the Caribbean, Africa and
Central America.
Seven countries participat-
ed in the inaugural Caribbean
competition: Bahamas, Barba-
dos, Belize, Guyana, Haiti,
Jamaica, and Trinidad and
Tobago. The programme will
launch in Central America on
September 14, 2009.


The Pioneers of Prosperity
Programme seeks to inspire a
new generation of entrepre-
neurs in emerging economies
by identifying, rewarding and
promoting outstanding small
to medium size businesses,
who will serve as role models
to their peers.
The Programme is spon-
sored by the Multilateral
Investment Fund of the Inter-
American Development Bank,
the John Templeton Founda-
tion, and the Social Equity
Venture Fund (S.E.VEN
Fund), and was conceived and
initiated by Michael Fairbanks,
a recognized entrepreneur and
author in the area of enterprise
solutions to poverty.
Michael Fairbanks is a co-
founder of S.E.VEN Fund.
The programme has also built
a network of over 35 local part-
ners throughout the
Caribbean. Jamaica Trade and
Invest co-hosted the Final
Awards Ceremony.


SPEAKER:
Dr. Brian Humblestone
Psychiatry


Purpose:
To educat te te public about
the important h health issues.
presented by distinguished
physicians.

Screenings:
(.iet \ LoLr Free IHlood
PlcIsurc.Cholk.stcol, and
(.iluioCsLt k'stinll bh [\\ ell
5pim & 6p"in


RSVP:
To ensure a ailable seating
Phone: 302-4603


THIS MONTHS TOPIC:

Obesity in Children

LECTURE DATE

Thursday, Sept 17th'09 @ 6PM
Doctors Hospital Conference Room
RSVP * Seating is Limited * 302-4603

Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues
affecting society today.


LECTURE SERIES


Obesity in Children
Dr. Brian Humblestone


13reast Cancer
Dr. Theodore Turnqllest



Diabetes
Dr. Judson Eneas



Stress
Dr. lan Kell\


DOCTORS HOSPITAL
Health For L/fi


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


'Extremely comfortable'


with BEC plant proposal


THE 2009 Pioneers of Pros-
perity Caribbean program ihas
selected Bulkan Timber Works
of Guyana for its grand prize.
Alternative Insurance Com-
pany of Haiti and Totally Male
Ltd of Jamaica were also rec-
ognized.
From a highly competitive
pool of 580 applications, ten
Pioneers of Prosperity
emerged representing some of
the most innovative, dynamic
businesses in the region. Each
one of the finalists has already
won a grant from the Multilat-
eral Investment Fund of the
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) of US $40,000 and
will be connected to a global
network of technical expertise,
potential investors, and other
cutting-edge entrepreneurs.
"These 10 entrepreneurs are
role models for all of us. They
built new distribution systems,
found new and attractive mar-
kets, pay high and rising wages


;="i '.. I: 1.1 v '. T 0 Y, N
: =. , ,;






THE DOWNTOWN NASSAU PARTNERSHIP



Invites you lo atliend a luncheon n Discussion


Topic:

Global Trends Affecting Downtowns



Special Guest Speaker.


Brad Segal

President, Progressive Urban Management Associates


Thursday, September 17, 2009

12 noon

British Colonial Hilton
Cost. $35


Discussion wi include Iopis such as:
The croa class
Tourism
Environmentalism and Sustainabty
Technology
Demographic and ifstyse changes


Please RSVP
Tel, 326-0992
Fax. 323-2998
Email: ntdb@batelne.tbs

Website; wwwdowntownnassauorg


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE










Government doing 'host of things' to aid ease of business


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government is doing "a
host of things" to improve the
ease of doing business in the
Bahamas, a minister has told Tri-
bune Business, citing a proposed
National Investment Act and
planned amendments to the Busi-
ness Licensing Act - including the
amalgamation of four processes
into one - as examples of the
reforms being contemplated.
Responding to the Doing Busi-
ness 2010 survey by the World
Bank, which ranked the Bahamas
68th out of 183 countries surveyed
when it came to red tape and
bureaucracy obstacles facing the
private sector, Zhivargo Laing,
minister of state for finance, said
the Government was moving
"with a view to optimizing the
ease with which people conduct
business in the Bahamas".
Stating that he was unsure
whether the World Bank, and its
International Finance Corpora-
tion (IFC) arm that conducted
the survey, were aware of the
Government's planned reforms,
Mr Laing said he had asked Min-
istry of Finance staff to "fully
evaluate" the criteria used by the
report and then benchmark this
nation against other jurisdictions
to see if and where improvements
were necessary.
Stating that the Bahamas
should use such reports as "a
springboard for improvement",
Mr Laing told Tribune Business:
"I think what is important for us
to be focused on is what needs to
be done to make doing business
in the Bahamas as efficient as pos-
sible. We're already doing things
to make the conduct of business
in the Bahamas easier."
Apart from the proposed Busi-
ness Licence reforms, Mr Laing
said the Government was also
reviewing its tax policies with
respect to business. It was also
"revamping" its online network
to further facilitate e-government,
enabling businesses to fill out
applications and required paper-
work online, and pay the neces-
sary fees, too.
As part of the need to place
policy in statute, to conform with
the trade agreements the
Bahamas will be entering, Mr
Laing said the Ministry of Finance
was also crafting a National
Investment Act with the goal of
"modernising and reforming the
way we do business".
This Act was described as "a
work in progress", with no
timescale given for its arrival in


Parliament or details on what
would be included in it. Mr Laing,
though, said some "significant
preliminary" work had been done
on the Bill, including bench-
marking.
The Bahamas slipped from
59th to 68th in the World Bank's
annual survey, ranking especially
low when it came to dealing with
construction permits (ranked
100th); registering property
(149th); protecting investors
(109th); and enforcing contracts
(120th). The latter two areas are
especially concerning for a nation
that relies heavily on foreign
direct investment to drive its
economy and monetary system,
something noted by Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce president,
Khaalis Rolle.
"There are some noteworthy
areas of concern, particularly for
the investor protection," Mr Rolle
told Tribune Business. "In an
economy such as ours, investor
confidence is one of the signifi-
cant areas we would try and
encourage and secure. We are
slipping in that areas, and work
needs to be done there. It's an
obvious area for improvement."
Arguing that the Bahamas
needed to ensure "a high degree
of confidence" among its
investors, Mr Rolle said this
applied equally to the Bahamian
and foreign variety.
"The transaction costs associ-
ated with domestic investment


need to come down, and domestic
investors need to be confident
that they're assets and invest-
ments will certainly be protect-
ed," Mr Rolle said.
"For businesses in property
deals, we want to have costs asso-
ciated with that minimised as
much as possible. For want of a
better expression, it's a sunk
horse. You write it off immedi-
ately. It's non-productive at the
end of the day, and goes with the
deal.
"We need to keep property
transaction costs to a minimum.
The cost of doing business has to
be reduced, and anything we can
do bodes well for investment."
While some of the Bahamas'
permitting systems needed work,
Mr Rolle told Tribune Business
that the Government had already
foreshadowed several much-need-
ed amendments in its 2009-2010
Budget, in addition to its previ-
ously-announced civil service
reforms.
Mr Laing also pointed to the
modernisation of the Business
Licence Act, and the amalgama-
tion of the previous Shop Licence,
Liquor Licence and Music and
Dance Licence into just one Busi-
ness Licence process.
All these licence processes had
been separate, requiring a busi-
ness to appear before different
authorities, and the reforms were
designed to save businessmen "a
lot of time and bureaucracy".


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Mr Laing added that the Gov-
ernment would also be "mod-
ernising the taxing aspects of the
[Business Licence] Act to take
into account the reality business-
es face. The effort is to take into
account some of the realities peo-
ple face; every business's gross
revenues are not the same".
The minister also pointed out
that the World Bank survey
ranked the Bahamas seventh out
of all small island, developing
states. "You could argue whether
the glass is half-full or half-empty,
but you can always improve and
that's what we're striving to do,"


Mr Laing said.
Meanwhile, the Bahamas was
ranked 53rd out of 141 countries
in the Economic Freedom of the
World report released yesterday
by the Canada-based Fraser Insti-
tute and its Bahamian partner,
the Nassau Institute.
The Bahamas scored in key
components of economic freedom
(from 1 to 10, where a higher val-
ue indicates a higher level of eco-
nomic freedom): The ratings in
the five components of the Index
are
* Size of government: changed


to 8.2 from 7.85 in last year's
report
* Legal structures and security
of property rights: changed to 7.1
from 8.47
* Access to sound money:
changed to 6.7 from 7.04
* Freedom to trade interna-
tionally: changed to 5.1 from 4.12
* Regulation of credit, labour
and business: changed to 8.3 from
8.17
However, in the critical areas
of Legal Structure and Sound
Money, the Bahamas was found
to be losing ground.


FOUR


I'S


ENTERPRISE


sli "1 . .

w� SL r
..
IlL .-- '


iMtsamx


mlitetMWO]


IMPORTANT NOTICE

We wish to inform the general public that BATCO


WHOLESALE and Mr. GARY FORBES


arc Ne ('


authorized wholesalers, sellers or vendors for any of the

above items.

Please note that Four Js Enterprise is a company that

stands for truth, integrity, genuine and quality products

along with great value.

We cannot guarantee that any company, agency or

individual who's not authorized and listed by Four Js

Enterprise to sell our line of products will deliver goods

and service at the standards outlined.
We would also like to take this opportunity to thank you our loyal customers and retailers for
your support in making lFour Js Enterprise's vision mCreating A Healthier and
Wealthier Bahamas" a success and we look forward to a continued amicable
relationship as we move FORWARD, UPWARD, ONWARD & rTOGTHER.


Please direct any questions or queries to the President

FOUR J'S ENTERPRISE


of Four J's Enterprise.

* 242-394-8626 *


Email: fourfsenterpr/se yahoo-com
;GET YOlRS TODAY


I TODSUSSOISO HSPG LGO OWWTIUE4.O


Book Signing Announcement for:



qA Matter of Keeping"

Gabriele Culmer's New Newel,
published by Vanrtgea Pss, Inc.



Ont Saturday, September 19th, 2009 at Logos, Harbour Bay

Time: 11:00 a.m. - 3:00p.nm.

Special Promotion: One FREE copy of previous poery collection
for thefirNt TEN shopper

A Matter Keeping is "engaging incisive andmoving as-
famtais c e fto deal with the problems that cronrt them.


The book emph s -ultue, huistoygnd bu f acumen, and
pmids an interesting setting upon witch creativity and
rgrefssMion evolve.



The New Novel is also available at:
Logos, Harbour Bay,
Odessa Gardens, Palmdale,
322 8493, and Vantage Press Inc. 1 800 882 3273.


I


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


S3P rO- :l s i-E I -' I A

kr=-^ ^3 IL- U � .- -












Use Parliament to curb NIB spending


FROM page 1B

scription drug plan, effective-
ly represents a 22.7 per cent
rate increase.
In addition, the proposed
reforms to NIB also include a
50 per cent increase in the
insurable wage ceiling, from
$400 to $600, Mr D'Aguilar
said.
While acknowledging that
he understood why the rates
were being increased, the for-
mer Chamber president told
Tribune Business: "We have
to put in place safeguards to
ensure politicians do not
abuse the money when they
get it in.
"We should put NIB
through the same process as it
goes through to increase the
rates and the insurable wage
ceiling when it comes to
increasing the amount spent
on administration and over-
heads. The minister respon-
sible for NIB should be
responsible for that ceiling,
and he would have to go to
Parliament and ask for an
increase in that ceiling."
Mr D'Aguilar recommend-
ed setting an annual thresh-
old for NIB's administrative
expenses, as a percentage of
forecast contribution income,
and any increase in this had to
be approved by Parliament.
"It's a real, meaningful
change, and gives us an assur-
ance that money will not be
squandered by politicians
who, in many instances, have
no idea how to run a busi-
ness," the former Chamber
president said of his proposal.
"There must be a balance. I
totally agree that rates have to
go up, the insurable wage has
to go up, but the Government
has to ensure strong measures
are put in place to ensure the
party of the day does not
abuse NIB."
By making the process of
obtaining an increase in NIB's
administrative expenses as
"airtight as possible", Mr
D'Aguilar said the system
would be "less subject to
abuse than it has been in the
past."
He added: "The employers
pay the greater proportion of
it [NIB contributions], and if
they're coming to the busi-
ness community for more,
then responsible government
is to ensure it is not abused
by the Government of the
day. Everyone knows NIB is
flush with money and subject
to abuse by governments."





INSIH- T
For th. tre


The Nassau Institute, the
Bahamian economic think-
tank, said it had calculated
that, for a small firm with
three employees, the planned
increase in NIB contribution
rates and the insurable wage
ceiling would increase its
annual payments to the social
security scheme by 84 per
cent - from $5,500 to $10,100.
Such an increase, it said,
would provide businesses with
a further incentive to lay-off
workers amid an economic
recession, while eroding the
real income and 'take home
pay' of Bahamian workers.
The Nassau Institute added
that the increases would also
spur more employers and the
self-employed to seek new
ways to evade NIB payments.
The eighth actuarial report
on NIB again reiterated that
the social security scheme was
"plagued with high adminis-
trative costs", averaging 21
per cent of contribution
income per year between
2002 and 2006. Operating
costs over that period grew
by 6.7 per cent per annum,
compared to an average 2 per
cent rise in inflation.
These costs were described
as "excessive', and largely
caused by "significant over-
staffing" that was in no small
way driven by political con-
siderations.
While a 2003 report had
suggested that NIB's staffing
levels could be cut by 25 per
cent - from 465 to 350 - with-
out any undue loss of service
quality, this strategy was then
undermined by the then-PLP
government in the run-up to
the 2007 general election, via
the hiring of people who were
likely to have been con-
stituents, friends, relatives and
party members in a bid to but-
tress votes and support.
The eighth actuarial report
revealed that while the Vol-
untary Early Retirement Pro-
gramme reduced staffing lev-
els at NIB by 89, "extensive
hiring in the first half of 2007
has eliminated most of the
savings that would otherwise
have been realized from the
VERP, as in July 2007 the


staff count stood at 496".
This was higher than when
the 2003 review recommend-
ed a 25 per cent cut, again
showing how political inter-
ference was limiting NIB's
effectiveness.
The eighth actuarial report
also recommended limiting
the directions a minister can
give to NIB's Board to policy
only, although there is no
indication yet that this issue
has been taken up, and high-
lighted that "poor governance
practices" had affected many
aspects of NIB's performance
during its 36-year history.
The report said: "For many
of NIB's 33 years, practices
that were not in conformance
with the National Insurance
Act and general public expec-
tations have led to sub-par
outcomes in many areas."
The report listed, as exam-
ples of this, NIB's relatively
low compliance rates and
"excessive administrative
costs"; the fact the insurable
wage ceiling had only been
increased twice in 36 years;
and that "pension increases
and mass employee hiring
that coincides with general
elections".
Poor governance, the
report said, had also resulted
in some 75 per cent of NIB's
investments being made in
government, and government
agency, securities, while NIB
funds had been used "for pur-
poses other than prescribed
in legislation".
Mr D'Aguilar, meanwhile,
expanded his analysis to the
rest of the public sector,
telling Tribune Business that
the reason many government-
owned corporations made a
loss was due to a lack of cost
controls and the inability of
political decisionmakers to
stop spending, combined with
government fears about the
impact rate rises would have
on the voters.
"No one has put in place
any safeguards to stop expen-
diture, so most public corpo-
rations run at a loss," Mr
D'Aguilar said. "They hate to
increase revenues and rates,
but love to increase expendi-


ture.
"It's a recipe for disaster.
If you allow corporations to
increase expenditure willy nil-
ly, but limit their ability to
raise revenues, every single
one will run into problems
because they're operating at a
loss.
"They should set a thresh-


old and set a mandate. We're
got to tackle seriously this
whole issue of cost control
and cost containment. If they
put limits on revenues, put
limits on spending. Make it
as difficult to do one as the
other. We've got to address
the imbalance in these corpo-
rations."


Without such spending
safeguards, Mr D'Aguilar said
politicians would have a
"blank cheque to increase
expenditure, and when the
election gets close they get
crazy. Everybody loses money
because they're not allowed
to increase rates, but they're
told to increase hiring".


Proftemn l Bilmlopita
�� '~T"- 7rT='


AccountiEng 1 (12 cks I
Fri- " :S 6-qpm
A.\uanrin IlI (12 rrt'lkil
Fri 9 , 6-9prnpm
Sal. '19," ;imll- 1 21 l
Quick Inrki( 11 2 W ks)
Fri *' Ix r-1(r-']


A+ Ke ife.'( erlifnrutiiuv I am (I I2 1ekL'
Fri. '1 I 0. -I iri S3 i



Baski Blue Print Reading &
E.timatInR I Rlld-fntlal (1I4)aekt )
Sil. 9]u . ,ai-Jl pin S35l
Basic Blue Print Reading &
E rnilnIih- II Cotmmnitriul (10 werek~r
I] . 'i 1I .. aip In-IPm % .;75
' K.kl'uiarlNal lmitil Plllrri 12 Nt.t-kL)
Sa.I 'I I'J. a -l pm IInS 25


Cabimet MNakin l 410 Weeks)
IIl ',' ".o '0.'.In - l L prn
imk I -al ayli! ( II o r�.IkV %)
Sal. (). 1','9am2m


~S

S ~


*Make-up Artistry (10 W)eeks)
Thur~.. ] 7. 6-A-yrn


53. I I


passagee Therapy (I year)
Mon- Iltu Ilihur. N311, 0-1 opm $2LRIX
^':Eshfilician (2 sfenisNers)
Mon tIinl Vi ic 4 .l,]. i -9pin 11
'Jlltrir-ring (2 winc 'lh'rs)
.1 hnihr Wu d L.!. 6-9pm i I.d Ill
*Nail Technology (2 scrrmitrs)
'd s-. Ihi i . l l. ' -94 pni .Sp(C-iaQl P1


...m........... ... ....-


Window Treatment -Draperv & Valence
1 L0 Weeks)
Mon. k.,i 0,'l4. Qain-lMi
TwM. ThurS.91 I s. - Iprnm 5150
Sewing II (10 Weeks)
Thlre-. F-ri , J i 1-.6 r li-Ol S3(1)
Upholstery II
Vehicle Refuruishment I I (A tLksL
lMn. Wed. ' 14, 6- H-lpm i 3l)
Stiras rallyl I (11 3'WekS)
Mu . W'ctd. 9A'4, I. 9a- In 3itXJ
S ra C'ra lf *l IInrll II 41(lli l\% km,)
Mon.Wed. il-I lO-10jpt S350
Shell Souveflr ,t an IuI rin ( 110 M ks)
Mun.W. Wd. W 14..9.rn:-1 pin
Mon. iWcid 9 14, 6prn-l Opni
Thurs -J. l. ip 350


Small Engine KRpair (tO "Weik)
SaL. 9 19, 9an-3p ' . 1i
CLASS SCHEDULE I
| 10 M I k PKO(LKAMUIE
kptemrber 14- NoI'. t%"- .21 2.' i
I 12 %Ek . F K VROCAkAWIE|
Sepic-ber I S- Decemnber 5,200) I
: .;S-rIFsT.FRS PmI(;H %%MS I
| ,\,iin' t.^ i' * IK-.' l.'n r dl iloI


II


For More lidermsfion ConlaCt:

502-6338/9

Office Hours:
.Wonday-Friday - 9ami-5pin
HIVI rt�satvp-s 1ho r1rght to cancrfl
courses if a minimum nue-tber of
students have not registered.
Students will re--eive a full refund
if classes are canceilled by t4e
institLiti On.

H I VI reA-f-rvr!.5 mo. f 14 h t to c li�ari qP
luitlon, Fees, Course Cantent,
C,010SE SOU'dL110 .311d CbUrqO
Materials.

Early re�gistration helps eliminate
tNu dirappointrrivril ul' z;ovrse,
ca n,--c Hall ions

Norl-B.-Illarrikin" aw I(c(quirnd to
pay artad'ditiona.1 fee.


U


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Nassau Airport
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Lyndn Pndlig international Arport
Pt (242) 377-20 Fax: (242) 377-0
PO. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bah s
Enail; feedb~d@nasi.b


STHE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
I'wiR our vki at w wIIPakn tF


NOTICE

Town Meeting for Master of Education in
School and Guidailce Counselling Degree
Programme in collaboration with
Kent State University
Saturday, 19th September, 2009,
Executive Roardroomn,
Michael Eldon Complex, 3rd Floor
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 pm.


mommommomo


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


f Fqt IH 'IN "P F 'IN 1 -*4


s ; ill




, , ' I.11






PAGEBSIES IB ODY ETME 1,20 H RBN


* A ,

















0 . - .



lMariborih S, 5hop #1
Ever thJing for $20








Wiring. Drilirig and The Snack Fix System anr
#30.0per weekT g



























Email: gems-pearls@hotmai corn
itish CAnoaL H3lLun Htol

Clearance SALE
Everything Must Go
Everything for $20
Free d parking at the Hilton

We offer Stringiig Senloes, Repairs. Knotting,
Wiring, Driling and The Snack Fix System and
The Mystery ClaW
Pearls and Bread $trantds Wholesale and Retail
P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel. 242-323-1865
Email; gems-peards@hotmail corn

Jewe=y making classes starts
S mber sg up now


KING'S
REAL ESTATE

*: *


Real Estate Agents


Applicants must have:
* Outstanding permunality
* Current BREA license
* Minimum 2-years experience
* Proven sales record


Apply to bahamasC@kingsrealty.com
Deadline: September 30, 2009
Information: . 4397



CAREER OPPORTUNITY
A medical supply company which provides a wide rang of
premium health care products seeks a qualified candidate
f the fiOlwing position:

SALES MANAGER
Primagv Dubam indu8e:
SSpeartheading the growth of current baerndproducts, and
irnlroMucing nerw irem to he h�ll hcare orrimuily, remile;l.
and te general public in Nassau and the Farrmly Islards
* Suparvising and training a small tam of sales prisons.
* Working with merchandisers Io tain i s� al and prolimote
products.
* Monitoring and tracking sales by category, on a monthly

* Paring and instituing product forecasts
* Planning and organizing promoions and events for Ihe
products.
Succ~atful candidate must poess the following
qualtflcationa:
* At least three (3) year experience i sirlar position,
* The ability to muet th high standards t Ol tby the
company and manufacturer.
* Be self-mativated with the ability to work independently.
SPossess good leadership and interpsonal skills,
* Computer lil-racy Wll-ersd with Windows, Woid
Pixcessing preferatby MS Word, Spreadsheets (prlferably
ExcelJ. Desktop Publshing, and Data Manage~enl.
Competitive salary, .onwnural wttt qualifcations,
wyth saI Incantives, pmitW vto ll owwnc.
MItereted cUicates may submit resumes wrt
(Ihree () releences to:
aceareyt~unmedicalorompaers. cm


'Fear factor is





subsiding a bit'


FROM page 1B

that were really sitting on the
fence," he explained. "A cou-
ple of sales that transacted
last week first came in nine
months ago, but they were
afraid of losing their jobs.
They're now feeling better,
more secure and they want-
ed to do it.
"For me to sit here and say
the recession has not affected
us would be a lie. But the
reality is that all these people
have to have somewhere to
live. I think the money is sit-
ting in their bank accounts.
It's a willingness to part with
it. They've not necessarily
seen their incomes erode, but
they're very cautious about
spending it. They're thinking
twice."
Out of the 30 units placed
on the market for Balmoral's
first phase, some 27 have been
sold, with just two Grand
Homes and one Royal Town
Home still available. Mr Kin-
sale confirmed to Tribune
Business that town home con-
struction has started, while
the development's show
home was "substantially com-
plete", its roof just being put
on with the windows and
doors set to be installed this
coming week.
Some 35-40 construction


personnel were currently
working at Balmoral, Mr Kin-
sale telling Tribune Business
this number was set to
increase to 70-80 "in the next
week". All the project's roads
were in place, and the club-
house had been completed.
He added that properties
in the second phase of the
Balmoral development, which
when fully built-out will con-
sist of 70 single family lots and
200 town homes and con-
struction, were likely to be
placed on the market "maybe
in about another month or
so", once phase one con-
struction had proceeded to an
appropriate point.
"We're not in any rush,"
Mr Kinsale added. "We're
well-capitalised, we bought
the land for cash, and the only
debt is for construction, so
we're not in a rush to make
decisions we don't have to
make. If it takes some time
to capitalise on it, that's what
we'll do."
Some 40 per cent of Bal-
moral's current first phase
sales had been to first-time
home buyers, something Mr
Kinsale said had been driven
by the 2009-2010 Budget
incentives, which exempted
this purchaser category from
paying Stamp Tax on all real
estate buys valued at up to


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
WILLIAM HILL ADVISERS LIMITED is in dissolution.
Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nas-
sau Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
25th September, 2009.







Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) SYMPOSIUM FUND LIMITED (SAC) is in dissolution under the provi-
sions of the International Business Companies Act 2000 s.137 and section 45
of the Segregated Accounts Companies Act, Chapter 396C.
(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on September 11, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar
General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.
(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 9th day of October 2009 to send their names and addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or,
in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.
SEPTEMBER 14, 2009
LAKEISHA COLLIE
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



S. A. T. PREPARATION

CLASSES
AT KINGSWAY ACADEMY


Beginning Saturday September 26 through Saturday
December 5, 2009, Kingsway Academy will hold
S.A.T. Preparation Classes from 9:00 a.m. to
12:00 noon culminating in the writing of the S. A. T.
Examination in January. The cost is $250.00 per
person and includes all materials.


Interested persons are asked to contact the
Business Office at telephone 324-6887 / 324-6269
or the Guidance Conselor at 324-8811 or 324-3409.


$500,000, plus exempted them
from real property tax pay-
ments for the first five years if
the real estate was their pri-
mary residence.
With its condominiums
priced in the $300,000 range,
and town homes at around
$559,000, the former certainly
fit into this category for first-
time buyers.
Added
Yet Mr Kinsale added that
the package Balmoral had put
together with Finance Cor-
poration of the Bahamas
(FINCO), involving the pro-
vision of title insurance for
buyers and a reduction in
attorney fees, had also helped
to spur buyer activity by
reducing closing costs.
The Balmoral Develop-
ment principal suggested that
the title insurance was saving
buyers around $4,000-$5,000
in closing costs per transac-
tion, thus giving them an
enhanced "comfort zone" in
which to make their purchase.
In the absence of Stamp Tax
and real property tax, Mr Kin-
sale suggested that Balmoral
purchasers were collectively
saving "in the area of
$30,000" on transaction costs.
Citing a $365,000 Royal
Town Home, and taking the
incentives offered by the Gov-
ernment and Balmoral, Mr
Kinsale said the savings to
first-time buyers included 5
per cent Stamp Tax, equiva-
lent to $18,250; $4,312.50 in
real property tax savings for
the first five years; $5,000 in


attorney fees' savings; and
$3,280 in mortgage stamp tax
savings. This added up, he
suggested, to $30,843.
Apart from first-time buy-
ers and young Bahamian pro-
fessionals, who accounted for
55 per cent of Balmoral's
existing sales, Mr Kinsale said
the project was also appeal-
ing to families and "empty
nesters" who were looking to
downsize to a condo package.
"You have to have all the
four 'Ps' - price, product,
place and promotion," said
Mr Kinsale on what was
needed to succeed in the cur-
rent Bahamian real estate
market. "In this economy, you
have to really nail it. You
have to have every compo-
nent driven in.
"Our location is excellent,
the price is reasonable and
people are seeing value in it,
the product is great and the
marketing is excellent."
However, Mr Kinsale
warned Bahamian real estate
purchasers that favourable
buying conditions were
unlikely to last much longer,
especially in the western New
Providence and Cable Beach
areas where Balmoral was
located, due to the likelihood
that Baha Mar would pro-
ceed.
"This buying window is not
going to last much longer. It
may be here for six, nine
months, but time flies. But if
this Baha Mar deal comes
through, the window shrinks.
Everyone jumps on the Baha
Mar bandwagon and puts
their prices up."


U THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
'.- a Ki our wEbkir af wwi.cok.dja.bs

NOTICE
Master of Science in Elementary Education Degree
Programme in collaboration with Wheelock College.
Applications are available from:
The Graduale Programmes Offce,
The College of Tuh Bahamas, Mich H, Eldan
Complex, Room 6 Thompson Blvd.
For more infornilion call: 397-26012 or
send emailih : swisdon ob.dlLbs
Application Deadline: 161h October, 2009.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
CAMARGAN INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in dissolution.
Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nas-
sau Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
25th September, 2009.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


NOTICE

IN THE MATTER of the Estate of Franklin
Eugene Knowles late of the Eastern District
in the Island of New Providence, deceased

Pursuant to Section 50 of the Supreme Court Act,
1996 Notice is hereby given that any person having
a claim against the Estate of the late Franklin Eugene
Knowles must deliver the same to the Manager,
ScotiaBank (Bahamas) Limited, Paradise Island,
Nassau on or before the 15th day of October, A.D.
2009.

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys for Jason S. Knowles
the only child of the late
Franklin Eugene Knowles


(S.9,11,14)


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 9B


Stock Market to turn


in 'six-eight months'


FROM page 1B

although it was difficult to
predict when a Bahamian
stock market recovery would
occur, and whether it had yet
reached or passed the bottom
of the current down cycle, the
market would certainly be
through its low point by year-
end/early January 2010.
"I think it's an excellent
opportunity to pick up some
undervalued, quality stocks,"
Mr Kerr said. "There's some
sound performers. AML
Foods, which has come off
eight consecutive quarters of
profitability; Commonwealth
Bank, which has stuck to its
niche; even Colina Holdings
and Doctors Hospital Health
Systems.
"There are a few of them
out there, that with good
management and a focus on


the customer, are doing quite
well."
Mr Kerr added: "I think
we'll probably be through the
bottom by December into
January, really, and then start
to turn the corner definitively
with the stock market in the
next six to eight months.
"Right now, people are def-
initely selling stocks to raise
cash for back-to-school, or if
they're out of work.
"Yet there are pockets of
optimism. While we can't pre-
dict the bottom, I think it's
pretty good."
Mr Kerr's analysis was sup-
ported by Michael Anderson,
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank
& Trust's president, who told
Tribune Business that "the
combination of good prices
and high dividend yields are
normally precursors to a
recovery in equity prices" and


Share your news
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award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Legal Notice

NOTICE

DALI INTERNATIONAL

HOLDINGS LTD.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-

tion 138 (8) of the International Business Compa-

nies Act 2000, the dissolution of DALI INTER-

NATIONAL HOLDINGS LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

BASOTHO VENTURES LTD.





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

dissolution of BASOTHO VENTURES LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

BLUE RANGE

INVESTMENTS LTD.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-

tion 138 (8) of the International Business Compa-

nies Act 2000, the dissolution of BLUE RANGE

INVESTMENTS LTD. has been completed; a

Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


the stock market generally.
RoyalFidelity's FINDEX
index, which measures a
weighted average of stock
price and dividend yields, was
down 5.4 per cent for the year
to September 11, 2009, Mr
Anderson saying equity prices
had risen in July and August,
although not by huge
amounts. All this compared
to the 12.31 per cent decline
suffered by the FINDEX in
2008, thus indicating that the
market deterioration has at
least slowed.

Ratios

Mr Anderson added that
many BISX-listed stocks were
now at extremely attractive
P/E ratios, Doctors Hospital,
for example, with its P/E at
4, implying a 25 per cent
inherent rate of return. AML
Foods, with a P/E of 6, had a
16.7 per cent inherent return,
while the Bahamas Property


Fund was now trading at close
to a 30 per cent discount to
its net asset value (NAV).
"Those are the kinds of
yields you would not normal-
ly see, as you would normally
get a 6-8 per cent equity
yield," Mr Anderson
explained. "Some stocks,
notwithstanding the fact
they're at 52-week lows, have
PEs which are difficult to jus-
tify unless you believe the
economy is likely to improve.
"There's some great value
in those stocks..... Those are
stocks that you cannot justify
where they are. There's a
bunch of stocks out there that
are good value, and that peo-
ple should invest in today and
make a pile of money on
when they recover in a year's
time. There's really good val-
ue if you're selective."
Mr Anderson said large
price movements in some
stocks had resulted from very
few or small trades, driven by


Legal Notice

NOTICE

JJR INVESTMENTS LTD.





Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

dissolution of JJR INVESTMENTS LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

ELSINORE MANAGEMENT

LIMITED

- 1-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-

tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies

Act 2000, the dissolution of ELSINORE MAN-

AGEMENT LIMITED has been completed; a

Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


the needs of some investors
to exit stocks and generate
liquidity and cash to meet cur-
rent obligations.
"A large number of securi-
ties have high dividend yields,
where the earnings are still
supporting good dividend
payments but share prices
have been forced down by
indiscriminate selling," he
added.
Banking stocks, which
account for a major chunk of
BISX's market capitalisation,


had already seen the effects
of the loan portfolio deterio-
ration, and its impact on their
earnings, largely factored into
their share prices, the Royal-
Fidelity Merchant Bank &
Trust president told Tribune
Business.
"The current prices factor
in to a great extent the
depressed earnings of the
stock, so any change in earn-
ings should have an impact
on the stock," Mr Anderson
added.


I \T R iT I 110 11I
L. A(NG IA 5 AC
AND CULTURES

i N CI

IJ IL\


COURSE OFFERINC: Bemirinint September 1411. 241


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roKRAJEr ADWVIUOB SERVICES
B I ROYAL FIDELITY G CAPITAL MARKETS

LI, ',LI ILL, * I --LLLI LI. _l I IIL - i_
FRID,,Y 11 SEPTErlBER 2007'
E I� .. *',LL ' .-' , * i D C E . -. ,L-:.- . 1 P .= ' " | '_ M-H. - I I " -:M - -'- | - 'I T - 1.. - T- I ' | V T " -I I "
FIMID E., CL�L.L.E * ' V'TD - 1. I .. ""... -1 -
WWW.BISXBAAMAS.COM I TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 I FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
181 1 15 AML Foods Limited 1 15 1 15 0 00 0 127 0000 91 000%
11 80 9 90 Bahamas Propery Fund 11 00 990 1 10 1,000 0992 0200 100 202%
930 625 Bank of Bahamas 625 625 000 0244 0260 256 416%
0 89 0 63 Benchmark 0 63 0 63 0 0 0 877 0 000 N/M 000%
349 315 Bahamas Waste 315 315 000 0 078 0 090 404 286%
237 2 14 Fidelity Bank 237 2 37 0 00 0 055 0 040 43 1 1 69%
1420 1000 Cable Bahamas 10 00 100 0 00 1 406 0 250 71 250%
2 88 2 74 Colna Holdings 274 2 74 0 00 0 249 0 040 110 1 46%
750 526 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 594 594 0 00 0419 0 300 142 505%
385 1 27 Consolidated Water BDRs 376 365 0 11 20,000 0111 0052 329 1 42%
285 1 32 Doctors Hospital 203 205 0 02 1,500 0382 0 080 54 390%
820 660 Famguard 660 660 000 0420 0 240 157 364%
1250 8 80 Fnco 8 80 880 000 0322 0520 273 591%
11 71 10 29 FirstCanbbean Bank 10 30 10 29 0 01 25,000 0 794 0 350 130 340%
5 53 4 95 Focol (S) 512 4 99 0 13 20,000 0 332 0 150 150 3 01%
1 00 100 Focol Class B Preference 100 100 0 00 0 000 0 000 N/M 000%
0 45 0 30 Freeport Concrete 0 30 0 30 0 00 0035 0 000 86 00%
902 549 ICD Utlities 5 50 550 000 10,000 0407 0500 135 909%
1200 1009 J S Johnson 1009 1009 000 0952 0 640 106 634%
10 00 10 00 Premier Real Estate 10 00 10 0 0 0 0 180 0 000 55 6 00%
LI.- ILI. LLI L * IL- u., n- I .. . *..' .I I...I
52wk522H wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol Interest Maturity
1000 0 100000 Fdelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 1000 0 00 7% 19 October 2017
1000 1000 00 Fdelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100 00 0 00 Prime + 1 75% 19 October 2022
1000 00 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 1000 0 00 7% 30 May 2013

52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol EPS $ Dv $ P/E Yield
14 60 7 92 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 92 842 14 00 2 246 0 000 N/M 0 00%
800 6 00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2 00 6 25 4 00 0 000 0 480 N/M 780%
054 0 20 RND Holdings 0 35 040 0 55 0 001 0 000 256 6 000%
055 0 40 RND Holdings 045 0 55 0 55 0 002 0000 261 90 000%
LI ' L.-r, 1 r [,.,,.,- i ,.. 1
l_ i - i i - i . r, I I _ I I. , . --i i i , -
1 4038 1 3344 CFAL Bond Fund 1 4038 3 72 5 20 31Aug-09
30350 28952 CFAL MSI PreferredFund 28990 1 39 -416 31Aug-09
1 4867 1 4105 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 4880 3 79 549 4Sep-09
36090 30941 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 30941 8 61 1359 31-Aug-09
13 0484 123870 Fidelity Pme Income Fund 13 1136 3 93 5 87 31-Aug-09
101 6693 100 0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101 6693 1 10 1 67 30 Jun-09
100 9600 93 1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96 7398 0 35 4 18 30-Jun-09
1 0000 1 0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1 0000 00 0 0 0 31-Dec07
9 4075 9 0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9 3399 2 69 1 41 31-Ju109
10707 1 0000 FG Financial Preferred IncomeFund 1 0707 3 38 514 31-Aug-09
1 0364 1 0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1 0319 -011 205 31-Aug09
1 0673 1 0000 FG Financial Dversified Fund 1 0673 289 493 31Aug-09
r I - IL.L iL _ r i
BISXALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000 00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by losing prce
D52k - Highest losing pnce in last 52 wees Bd Buying pnce of Clna and Fidely
52wk-LoW Loa st closing pnce in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling pnce of Collna and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted pnce for daily volume Last Pnce Last traded over the-counter pnce
Change Change In losing pnce from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnngs per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Di.v.dends per share paid I.n the last 12 months N/M -Not Meaningful
P/E Closing pnce divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January , 1994 = 100
(S) - 4for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007
(1) 3for-1 Stock Split Efective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL. COLINA 242-502-7010 I ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 I FO CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 I COLONIAL 242-502-7525






MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009


The stories behind the news


ge qusto *gil Semins.. p


Before we get into the specifics
of this discussion, let us first
accept some hard facts. The
PLP is broke. The coffers are
empty and anyone with com-
mon sense will tell you that PLPs aren't
really lining up to donate any money at
this time.
Secondly, the PLP has long been associ-
ated with scandal and corruption (despite
the best efforts of the many "spin-doctors"
who seek to blame The Tribune or any oth-
er publication for this long held percep-
tion). Even in the early days of the party
Loftus Roker, one of its first MPs, com-
plained on the floor of the House that cor-
ruption was rocking the party to its very
foundations. It seems that despite their
best efforts the party still manages to find
its way into the national headlines even in


FORMER PM PERRY CHRISTIE

opposition. We need not go into details
here of actual cases as we are all well aware
of them.
The PLP (like the FNM) is saddled with
many candidates who, and forgive my
bluntness, are lazy, visionless, and quite
frankly not even qualified to handle scis-
sors. Again, details are not required as this
piece is not meant to embarrass or insult
anyone.
And finally the most damning fact that
must be faced is that the PLP is daily losing
its base - far more rapidly than the FNM.
With the PLP the majority of its support
ranges from 60 years of age and up. As
outlined in the Greenberg Quinlan Ros-
ner Research report commissioned after


the 2007 elections, the PLP won the major-
ity of its votes also in one socioeconomic
group - "those with less than a high school
education."
"The party will have great difficulty win-
ning elections in the future if it cannot
expand its following among younger voters
and those who are better off.
"The PLP's narrow demographic base
of support is worrisome. Depending on
older and lower-class voters is not a recipe
for long-term success as the former die off
and the country and its citizens become
more prosperous. With the passage of time,
fewer people associate with the country's
colonial legacy, the fight for independence,
and the accomplishment of (Sir) Lynden
Pindling. The PLP needs to update its pos-
ture and rhetoric so that it has greater
appeal to younger and more prosperous
voters," the report revealed.
But why dwell on things that we already
know? Because the message has yet to be
received. The PLP still believe that they
can win the next election without taking a
long and hard look at their party - without
changing its message, leader, or appeal to a
wider more enlightened audience.
As one political source plainly outlined,
the strategy now is to essentially point the
finger at the FNM and say, "You are the
ones to blame for the state of the economy.
You are the reason why I am unemployed.
You brought this on us, and therefore you
have to go."
As it is often said, one should never
believe his own propaganda.
This argument being put forward by the
PLP will sadly only be swallowed by those
same persons with less than a high school
diploma who more than likely still believe
that The Tribune (by some miracle) was
able to climb into the Ministry of Housing
and bug the private lines of both the former
Minister Neville Wisdom and his then per-
manent secretary Leila Greene.
But I digress.


The question still remains, what will the
PLP do going forward? How will its lead-
ership, which every Bahamian should be
concerned about, position the party to
mount a formidable campaign against the
governing party? Because at the end of the
day to have good governance, you need a
healthy and vibrant Opposition that will
keep any government on its toes. Because
the worst thing that the Bahamas can have
coming out of 2012 is a sweep by either
party with only a handful of Opposition
members in the House of Assembly.
So let us look at what is before the PLP
at present.
A former prime minister who is fighting
to not only remain pertinent in changing
times, but a parliamentary caucus that lacks
the courage to challenge him.
But fair is fair. Despite his many critics it
was under Prime Minister Perry Christie's
watch that the Bahamas reached econom-
ic heights that others within our region
could only dream of. However, having lost
the 2007 elections, he is now faced with
what Stanley Greenberg, the renowned
polling adviser to Presidents Bill Clinton,
Nelson Mandela, and Prime Minister Tony
Blair described as the worst of political
fates "irrelevance."
And this brings us to the thrust of the
argument going forward. Will the PLP be a
relevant party in 2012?
As many Bahamians will tell you, there
are persons within the party who would
like to be leader, and some say who are
even capable of being leader. But leader-
ship, as with many things in life, can, and
should not be just handed over. There
should be a fight, and the public should
see that fight, and see that someone is will-
ing to risk it all for the chance to lead them.
But for PLPs such as Dr Bernard Not-
tage and Paul Moss, such a venture if

SEE page 2C


T O O T .- [ > | . ^ -ar|..




-ti i5 " 6.," * *.. *e a fl !............


... .4.. .� .






?! 'T1 LTD 3 947 -1 0
AlF O ~ i 4 . 'iri:n .. .p

OW HESOTFIA CIG ; 'wr...


LI The Trbune










What will the PLP do going forward?


FROM page 1C
undertaken and lost will spell
their downfall in the party.


"No one challenges the
leader in that organisation," a
political adviser told Insight.
"The PLP you must under-


ih WELl EflD W


stand, is a religion. And there
are some things that are
accepted and some that are
out of the question. No sit-


7TH I


I


ting leader has ever been chal-
lenged, and you can appreci-
ate what would happen polit-
ically to that candidate who
plays their hand and loses. So,
like with many things, they
will wait and scheme until an
opportunity presents itself."
A fact that should also be
highlighted is that in 2007 the
Greenberg report stated that
despite Mr Christie's per-
ceived weakness in leader-
ship, PLPs by and large still
wanted him to continue on as
leader. This fact, it is reported
was further substantiated in
the polling study conducted


by PLP deputy leader hopeful
Philip Davis.
Another issue that needs to
be addressed involves the
many persons who are owed
tens of thousands of dollars
by the party after having done
work during the 2007 cam-


Y Crtas


do


paign. These persons, it is
reported were enraged on
hearing that the party leader
had pledged to financially
assist former Senator Pleas-
ant Bridgewater in meeting
her legal expenses after los-
ing the election court chal-
lenge earlier this year. She,
along with former Attorney
General Allyson Maynard
Gibson, failed to recover their
seats in yet another humiliat-
ing defeat for the PLP.
The only former candidate
to escape this "', o un I humil-
iation" was the former Minis-
ter of Trade and Industry
Leslie Miller who opted not
to challenge the results of
Blue Hills in the court, stating
that elections are won on the
ground, "not in the courts."
Another disturbing fact
exposed by the infamous
Greenberg Quinlan Rosner
Research report revealed that
many of the PLP's recent
".,.i!l" programmes geared
at engaging the youth and the
general public to be more
involved in the inner work-
ings of the party were in fact
strategies created and handed
to them by this research com-
pany to rebuild the party's
image.
To those who may have
thought that the PLP was
making a real and meaningful
connection with them, this
revelation must have been a
painful one.
But unfortunately this is the
reality in Bahamian politics.
As I have often said, very lit-
tle is left to chance, and often
the moves that we see taking
place today have long been
decided and sanctioned
months before. This, there-
fore, begs some serious ques-
tions about transparency and
control in this society - a dis-
cussion that I hope we as a
people can one day have in a
mature and educated fashion.
What do you think?
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net
telephone: 502-2361


FoI hesI pe


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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


I 11 C -a l ,hzi fd 6;' . . I .I


SC-^^*l ^EZ-1 Ff-ir^E-- C-I--- ii


I






T IO S B2 P


Readers have




their say...


RE: BACK TO THE
DARK AGE
LAST week's Insight
argued that the Christian
Council's opposition to
government's efforts to
make marital rape an
offence was less about reli-
gious concerns and more
about protecting its own
position.
"The public statements of
Council members over the
past several years have
made it clear they feel
social progress - defined
by most of the western
world as having to do with
rights and democracy -
threatens much of what
they hold dear. After all
many of them have become
exceedingly comfortable in
their roles as the self-
appointed moral arbiters of
the nation," it said.
The article generated a
great deal of response from
the public and became the
story to attract most read-
ers' comments on our web-
site, tribune242.com.
Dear Sir,
I know I am a foreigner
living here by the grace of
the Bahamian Government
and people and perhaps it is
none of my business to
comment. But I felt com-
pelled to write and com-
ment on your article in
Insight.
I read your article in
Insight regarding the Chris-
tian Council with dumb-
founded interest.
The nearest modern
equivalent is to be found in
the extreme forms of Islam.
The extremists of which
seek to take the world back


m m

insight

FEEDBACK


u The-a iTin


INSIGHT
The stories behind the news


BACK TO THE DARK AGES


M


THE Bahamas Christian Council has declared itself opposed to governments efforts to protect
women from being raped by their husbands, arguing that the proposed amendment to the Sexual
Offences and Domestic Violence Act could threaten the institution of marriage. The council paints
a picture of a society beset on all sides by forces seeking to destroy the foundations upon which it
rests. In reality the governments proposed marital rape laws avital component of the enlightened
society we should be aspiring to become, and it is the Christian Council that is attempting to drag
us back into the dense gloom of darker ages. INSIGHT reports.


THE FRONT PAGE of the September 7,2009 edition oF INSIGHT..
THE FRONT PAGE of the September 7, 2009 edition oF INSIGHT...


to the 6th century. They
also believe that any
woman who is not dressed


in traditional clothes, that is
SEE page 4C


STHE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 3C


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7,2009










Readers have their say...


FROM page 3C

Burkhas etcetera, is an infi-
del and such a woman
should expect to be raped
whomever she is. To them,
women are second class cit-
izens to be used and abused
by men, and there is much
evidence to support this.
An ex-girlfriend of mine
in England had been mar-
ried for 28 years and was
divorced when I met her.
She had been the subject of
repeated marital rape to
the extent that she had lost
her libido completely. Her


husband insisted she have
testosterone injections to
boost her libido. All this
did was make her angry
enough to finally throw him
out. Then after her divorce
she found she had a very
active libido with the lovers
she subsequently took. The
message from this is very
obvious, rape is wrong.
The Christian Council
members are living in
another age and it saddens
me that such folk should be
listened to at all.
Your expose of their
arguably pathetic views is


both timely and necessary,
and I sincerely hope the
women of the Bahamas will
seek to put these prehis-
toric monsters in their place
very firmly. No man has the
right to rape a woman.
Any man with an ounce
of intelligence knows that a
woman who is enjoying sex-
ual intercourse is a much
better lover than one who is
not.
Yours Faithfully,
-Expat
It needed to be said. And
you said it. Thank you


Paco. Thank you so much.
- Felicity
Good Insight column.
The BCC is an outmoded
entity.
On top of that, Patrick
Paul doesn't seem to know
what it is that he is talking
about.
- Juan McCartney
Beautifully written!
Every point was solid, well
articulated, and backed up.
The Tribune certainly has
come a long way! As a stu-
dent off to school, it's so
refreshing to get good
reporting and be able to
stay up to date on what's
happening back at home.
Thanks!
- Nickie


It is pleasantly refreshing
to see that there are those
willing to stand up for civil
liberties in the Bahamas.
Stay true to your convic-
tions.
- Marion Johnson
This is by far one of the
best Insight articles ever. It
is so factual, relevant and
articulate. As for the Chris-
tian Council, they have
become a joke to our coun-
try and a disgrace to our
moral fabric. I don't even
care to know who the presi-
dent is anymore. it takes a
gutsy government to make
this call and I am glad my
government did. Women
are abused too much in our
country and I fully endorse
the bill. As for Mr Paul, will
he please stick to important


I, ii1 1 11 I I' I


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matters like gambling [lol].
- Ricardo Wright
I am thoroughly
impressed by your decon-
struction of Rev Paul and
the Christian Council's
positions on marital rape.
You did a masterful job!
That aside I see something
beyond your view that this
resistance by them is pri-
marily a resistance to
change and their need to
maintain their fiefdoms. I
believe it's also due to a
willingness by the majority
in this society to accept the
lowest common denomina-
tor on most issues of
national importance. It has
been happening on almost
every issue and it's simply a
case where the loudest,
generally the least
informed, are leading the
debates and directing the
masses. This begs the ques-
tion of leadership (political
and most importantly oth-
erwise). It reminds me of
the movie Gladiator - THE
mob IS Rome...The mob is
The Bahamas!
- Johnny 5
I read this article today in
the paper and I was so
impressed at how well
thought out and how well
articulated this editorial
was. As a young, single
woman this topic is one that
has struck a chord with me
as I have listened intently
to both sides of the argu-
ment. It is so sad that some
men consistently refuse to
put anything else above
their own sexual gratifica-
tion. The portion of scrip-
ture that says wives must
submit to their husbands
also goes on to say that hus-
bands should love their
wives even as Christ loved
the church, that is the key.
Christ never I1l.ccd ' his
agenda onto anyone, we
were given free will. Even
SEE NEXT page


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Wednesday, September 30th at 10M0am.


SOISCU S STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NT WTIUE4.O


.


PAGE 4C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Briht Efeciv












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though wives were mandat-
ed to submit to the husband
in all things, the husbands
were mandated to love
their wives on a divine level
so that the love would be
upheld whether she submit-
ted (disobeyed) or not. Is
that not what salvation is all
about? No matter what we
do we cannot be separated
from God's love and the
Bible also says that love is
patient and kind, not envi-
ous and not full of pride or
boastful. There is no way
that the Almighty would
sanction us to violate the
dignity of spouses that sim-
ply is not what his love is
about.
- My Point of View
It is shocking that the
Christian Council is able to
distort Scripture. Although
marriage can be seen as a
secular contract, to many of
us, marriage has a religious
significance. Scripture
speaks to love of our fellow
human beings and respect-
ing the dignity of every
human being. Nowhere is
this more true than with
marriage, in which many
intimate moments and acts
are shared. Rape is a vio-
lent crime, used for thou-
sands of years as an act of
war. Rape is not a right of
any person, nor should it be
seen as a sexual act by any-
one who promotes " Christ-
ian values." Christian val-
ues mean respecting every
human being and their
rights. Marital rape under-
mines and destroys the very
basis of good Christian val-
ues.
-L
Nice to see the Christian
Council has moved into the
21st Century - keep it up
guys with attitudes like
yours soon there will be
NO church. Wouldn't it be
a shock if your congrega-
tion sat out on your next
service - or much worse
took back their tithes -
wonder what your tune
would be then? Those who


attend these churches
should show their antiquat-
ed "leaders" the way.
- Xinpa
I wonder.... if it were
physically possible for a
woman to force herself
upon a man, thereby invok-
ing her marital rights as
outlined by all those oppos-
ing the law, would we be
having this same discus-
sion? Unfortunately, (or
fortunately for him... he
can't be forced or raped) if
he's not interested, willing
or able, his penis does not
rise to the occasion, there-
fore making this a non-
issue. Shame women's vagi-
nas don't seal up when
they're not interested, will-
ing or able.
- Sick and tired of this
foolishness
It is all fine and good to
say each of the persons in a
marriage has "conjugal
rights" when only one of
them can "enforce" these
rights. I wonder too, in cas-
es of men who work hard
and are not always at home
to fulfil their partner's
"needs", is it acceptable for
the woman to cheat? How
come the Christian Council
doesn't take a stand against
long office hours for men,
as this may leave his wife
no alternative but to cheat.
The whole thing is hypo-
critical and self serving, but
what do you expect?
- Enough
A wife unjustly forbids
the marital act, quite possi-
bly in an effort to punish
the husband or to exert
control. Which is itself a
violent act. The husband
says if no marital act, then
no allowance, then the wife
can charge rape through
threat (according to Web-
ster). Or should that be
prostitution where the hus-
band is treated as a John?
And that's just as absurd as
supposed "rape" in mar-
riage. There can be no rape

SEE page 8C


I I fm v i -V, %#&= I IRV I


Jennie Lee Albertha Richardson, 50


a resident of Peter Street West, who died on Thursday 3 September 2009,
will be held at on Saturday. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial
Gardens, JFK Drive.

She is survived by her father, Simeon Richardson; 1 son, Thurman
Knowles; 1 daughter, Cecelia Richardson; 3 grandchildren; 3 sisters; 3
brothers & a host of other relatives & friends.


Ethel Humes, 65

a resident of Burial Ground Comer & formerly of Eneas Jumper Comer,
who died on Sunday 30 August, 2009 will be held at East Street Gospel
Chapel, East Street, on Saturday at 1:00 p.m. Officiating will be Pastor
- *" Tom Roberts & Associate Ministers. Interment follows in Old Trail
Cemetery.

. J She is survived by her 5 sons, Wesley Wallace, Henry Wallace, Junior
Mya Sands, Cecil Martin & Lloyd Davis; 4 daughters, Margaret Humes,
Dena Lorraine Humes, Evangelist Anne Davis-Joseph, Rose Wallace; 28 grand; 10 great
grand; 1 uncle; Bill Simmons; 2 aunts; Marjorie Simmons & Bernice Simmons.


Steven Alexander Fernander 26


.-.. P


a resident of Dominica Way, Carmichael Road, who died on 24 August,
2009, will be held at Church of Christ, 8th Street the Grove, on Saturday
at 1:00 p.m. Officiating will be Pastor D.W. Dorsette. Interment follows
in the Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard Roads.

He is survived by his mother, Menesha Ingraham; father, George
Femander; grandparents, Ivalean & Thomas Ingraham, Velma & Harris
Fernander; sisters, Cortrea Cooper & Shanice Fox; brother, Jeffery




Alexander "Junior, Lanton" Wilson, 72

a resident of Fox Hill, who died on Sunday 6 September, 2009, will
be held at St. Anslem Roman Catholic Church, Bernard Road, on Friday
at 4:00 p.m. Officiating will be Monsignor Preston Moss. Interment
follows in the church cemetery.


Cooper.


SLeft to cherish his memories are his wife, Margaret Wilson; 6 sons,
Alexander, Daniel, Alfred, Patrick, Andy & Matthew Wilson; 1 daughter,
Alice Smith; 4 sisters, Angela Ferguson, Louise Daniels, Thelma Stewart
& Betty Edwards; 1 brother, Llewelyn Ferguson.


Stephanie Patricia Woodside, 52

a resident of Windsor Lane West, will be held at the Church of God of
Prophecy, Soldier Road, on Saturday at 12:00 noon. Officiating will
be Pastor Samuel Moss. Interment follows in Old Trail Cemetery, Old
Trail Road.

Left to cherish her memories are her 10 children, Shanette & Shawn
Johnson, Keshee Flowers-Spencer, Steven, Shaneker, Shamarl & Shanaya
Woodside, Ketra, Shian & Shran Flowers; father, Nelson Woodside; 8
grand children, Kevin, Renardo, Cara, Jay, Ryesha, Tamaia, Ashanti & Adrea; sisters,
Stephanie Moxey, Valarie Woodside, Seadrid Ferguson, Violet Bain, Billy Dorsett, Marilyn
McLaunder, Jennis Simmons, Rochelle Woodside & Alva Ritchie; brothers, Charles, Glenn
& Jethro Woodside.

Isadora Archer, 80

a resident of South Beach & formerly of Old Bight, Cat Island, who
died on 28 August, 2009, will be held at Dixie Church of God, Wulff
Road, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Pastor John Davis
Jr. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens.

Left to cherish her memories are her 1 brother, Bishop John T. Archer
of Fort Pearce, Florida; 2 sisters, Maud Rolle & Verdell Johnson & a
host of other relatives & friends.

Leo "Leah" Taylor, 89

a resident of Grenada Cresent & formerly of Que, North Caicos, Turks
Island, who died on 3 September, 2009, will be held at Southland Church
of God, Soldier Road, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be
Bishop Salathiel Rolle. Interment follows in Woodlawn Gardens.

Left to cherish her memories are her 1 daughter, Anamae; 7 grand
children, 15 great grand & 5 great great grand children; 1 sister, Gerita
Lopez & a host of other relatives & friends.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 5C


THE TRIBUNE











Readers have their say...


because the two are One
Flesh. Ephesians 5:28-31 In
every culture marriage is a
unity that this anti-Christ-


ian, anti-Marriage law
denies. ..Obviously the pro-
ponents of this law (who
understand it) are more


concerned with overturning
Judeo-Christian values than
they are in protecting
women against spousal


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insight

FEEDBACK


abuse. They could easily
compromise and get to the
real issue.
-Anthony Taylor
If a man withholds funds
from his wife because she
will not have sex with him, I
think it should give her
grounds for divorce and she
should take him for every-
thing he has.
If she has any sense, she
will leave him.
-Lady
This issue is so political
that its a sham. Women are
the majority in this country
and in the voting demo-
graphics. The economy is in
the gutter, which has been
the single most catalyst for
governmental change dur-
ing recent elections. If, you
propose, then pass a legisla-
tion purporting to advance
the agenda of the majority
voting block you retain
your governmental status
quo. This is a ploy. How
about reading the Sexual
Offences and Domestic
Violence Amended Act
2008.
- Charlton Deveaux

As I read the newspaper
this morning and the
Insight editorial, I was com-
pletely disgusted with the
views that the Christian
Council and Rev Paul share
in regards to the amend-
ment of the marital rape
law. How can they say they
represent Jesus (as Christ is
love) yet are completely
against a woman having the
protection against an abu-
sive husband. It's funny
how you only hear from
these False Prophets when
it comes to homosexuals
and movies, but you never
hear them speak out
amongst their own "broth-
ers" in regards to buying
flashy Bentley cars and
reaping additional tithes
from already cash strapped
church members. Bahami-
ans, it is time to wake up
and realise the real men


and women of God and see
that the "others" have their
own agendas for control
and possible ambitions -
be it political or otherwise.
- Darinique

As far as I am concerned,
the Christian Council, in
taking this position, is the
equivalent of the Taliban in
Afghanistan and Pakistan.
Christian fundamentalism
is as backwards, ignorant
and disrespectful of peo-
ple's rights, in particular
women's rights, as their
Muslim "brothers." Wake
up, Bahamas! Shake off
these false prophets,
shameless scammers and
Bentley driving fools and
think for yourself. Protect
your daughters and moth-
ers and sisters from the evil
men who think that there is
a difference between
Il ic ' and "violence." I
never heard such a foolish
argument in my life. Rape
apologists... the whole lot of
them... and that doesn't
sound too Christian to me.
I hope more people think
for themselves than follow
these "shallow tins." I see
nothing but the very same
Scribes and Pharisees that
Jesus so adroitly put in
their place. Time to do the
same in this country. Say
goodbye to these false
prophets!
- Erasmus Folly

What I want to know is
how does the Christian
Council manage to brain-
wash about 50 per cent of
the Bahamian population?
Religion really must be like


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


crack, or as Karl Marx said
"the opiate of the masses."
It doesn't surprise me that
Rev Paul - or any self-
appointed moral authority
for that matter - sees noth-
ing sinful with a man raping
his wife. However, I refuse
to believe that these
women who agree - rather,
who are forced to agree, for
if not they will go to Hell -
actually believe in their
hearts that it is proper for a
husband to force himself on
his wife. How could they
truly believe that their God
would want this for them? I
guess the fear of being
thrown into the fires of Hell
is powerful enough to let
themselves get raped. Or
worse, powerful enough for
them to defend the act.
Furthermore, it is a proven
fact that marital rape caus-
es emotional trauma to
women. What sort of
women defend this kind of
act? More importantly,
what sort of church leaders
let that happen?
-GP

Quote from article: "As it
turns out, there seems to be
no record of huge changes
in a society, the collapse of
the family unit, or an erup-
tion of widespread false
claims as a result of the
passing of such a law." -
That's cause there's no
family left to destroy. The
family unit collapsed
decades ago with Televi-
sion.
The countries that have
the law are no poster chil-
dren for Utopia.
- Anthony Taylor


PAGE 8C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


?�9G- K




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