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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01422
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: September 12, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01422

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TRY OUR a
DOUBLE JJ.
FILET-0-FISH " '"'"'

HIGH 88F
LOW 79F

: SRUN WITH
SSTORMS


The


Tribune


BAHAMAS EDITION


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up.all.night
Mcionld~r'sTdoRwntown

drvethuis ~nowoe


www.tribune242.com
Volume: 105 No.242 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2009 PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)


U


I


Slaying near


school is year's


59th homicide


* By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net


Focus on

DNA at

Bishop's

retrial


I


6 - 6 a p o e p a m e e t n IS


* By NATARIO
MCKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

THE retrial of Bishop
Earl Randolph Fraser con-
tinued in Magistrate's Court
yesterday with a DNA
expert presenting evidence
for the prosecution.
Fraser, who is the head
pastor of Pilgrim Baptist
Temple, St James Road, is
accused of having a sexual
SEE page 7


A YOUNG man is dead
after he was riddled with bul-
lets by a drive-by gunman
who left him lying in a pool of
his own blood outside a home
in the Sunshine Park area, a
few blocks away from the
Carmichael Primary School.
His death pushed the
nation's homicide count to 59.
Police said it was just after
10am when 22-year-old
Degario Knowles and anoth-
er man were sitting on a wall


shots at Knowles who was
reportedly shot in the hip, leg
and back.
Knowles staggered several
feet into a neighboring yard,
managed to hop a backyard
fence before collapsing -
leaving a large trail of blood
behind him.
The gunman escaped in the
green vehicle.
Police have launched an
intensive investigation into
the shooting and yesterday


ABAO t meeting aboutw.
powe plan thtBE s b idingo h *iln


of a house on Winward Isles
Road when occupants of a
green Honda Inspire drove
up and opened fire on the vic-
tim.
As Knowles made a mad
dash to escape the attack, the
gunman - described as a
light skinned male with a low
hair cut - emerged from the
backseat of the car and con-
tinued shooting.
Residents of the area said
the brazen gunman then
stood in the middle of the
street and fired around eight


appealed for persons with
information on the incident
to come forward.
"Sometime around 10.45
am we got a call of gunshots
heard in the Sunshine Park
area, police officers respond-
ed to investigate. Once they
got there they found Degario
Knowles suffering gun shot
wounds to the body. He was
taken to hospital by ambu-
lance and later pronounced
dead," said head of the homi-
SEE page 7


* By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

NEARLY 1,000 Abaco res-
idents concerned about the
Bunker C fuel power plant
going up in Wilson City
attended a public meeting in
Marsh Harbour to put their
concerns to government min-
isters and Bahamas Electrici-
ty Corporation (BEC) execu-
tives.
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham was among the
packed audience at New
Visions Ministry Church on
Thursday as BEC chairman
Fred Gottlieb, BEC general
manager Kevin Basden, Min-
ister of State in the Ministry
of the Environment Phenton
Neymour and Minister of the
Environment Earl Deveaux
stated their case for the $150
million, 48 megawatt power
plant in South Abaco.
Residents from the Aba-
cos concerned about the envi-
ronmental impact Bunker C
could have on their health
criticised officials for not
informing them about the
plant before they began con-
struction last month.
Lawyer Fred Smith, rep-


resenting residents of Abaco
opposing the development,
questioned officials about
whether all the legitimate per-
mits had been obtained
before construction began.
Local group Friends of the
Environment organised the
meeting to encourage dia-
logue between residents and
the Government as contro-
versy stirred in the commu-
nity.
A video exploring the
potentially damaging impact
of the heavy oil Bunker C
(HFO) power plant was
released on an internet video
sharing site this week and had
been viewed more than 9,000
times at the time of the meet-
ing.
An internet petition to stop
the development had also
been signed by more than 900
people yesterday.
Mr Gottlieb, a prominent
lawyer in Marsh Harbour,
denounced the video as "pro-
paganda" deliberately feed-
ing people misinformation
and took strides to refute the
accusations made.
He said: "I do not have
any problem with those who
have legitimate concerns with
regard to the plant that's to
be built at Wilson City, but I
have a problem with individ-


uals and groups who dissemi-
nate and circulate images
designed to provoke an emo-
tional response and create
fear, anxiety, anger and hys-
teria.
"I personally take offence
to the video that has been cir-
culated and its misleading
statements."
Mr Gottlieb said that as a
resident of Abaco and a
father, it is in his interest to
choose the right investment
for the area and continued
development of the country's
third largest, and fastest-grow-
ing, economy depends on a
constant and reliable source
of electricity.
Stopping the development
would only be "an economic
disaster for Abaco," he said.
A number Abaconians
attending the meeting said
they supported Mr Gottlieb
in the decision to build a new
power plant.
Officials maintain there is
not enough room to expand
the 27 megawatt facility in
Marsh Harbour, and renew-
able energy sources such as
solar, wind, waste or hydro-
kinetic power are not yet
advanced enough to imple-
SEE page 2


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


Embassy

clarifies

'warning

on crime'
By Ava Turnquest
US Embassy officials
believe The Nassau
Guardian exaggerated the
importance of a statement
placed on its local website,
blowing a routine notice
out of proportion.
The Guardian led its
Friday edition with the
headline: "US Embassy
issues crime warning", but
according to a senior
embassy official, this head-
line might have given a
misleading impression.
Jeff Dubel, Political
Economic Public Diplo-
macy Chief, said the
embassy is disappointed
that The Nassau Guardian
did not contact the
Embassy before printing
the story - as much could
have been explained.

SEE page 7


v


dl





PAGE 2, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


BEC chair hits



at protest video


FROM page one

ment in Abaco.
Information presented by
the Bahamas Environment
Science and Technology
(BEST) Commission showed
how wind in Abaco has an
average of seven knots, too
weak to power a wind energy
farm. It also blows south east,
meaning any gases emitted by
the plant will go away from
residential areas.
However, wind turbine
design engineer and Abaco
resident David Pitcairn said
his research has achieved dif-
ferent results.
"I don't know where the
wind data you have comes
from but historical wind data
shows 60 per cent of wind is
blowing towards the west and
northwest, and 16 per cent
towards Marsh Harbour. So
I found the slide you showed
with the wind blowing to the
south west misleading," he
said.
"Also the average wind
velocity is 18 mph, or 16
knots, which is considered
class six in a scale of one to
seven, not seven knots, which
would be class two according


to your data."
Mr Pitcairn said he
believes wind power is a
viable option for Abaco and
ought to be explored further.
Mr Neymour said BEC is
investing in renewable energy
research, but is not yet able
to consider using renewable
energy to power Abaco.
He said: "The Government
is committed to financing and
implementing a national alter-
native energy supply.
"These initiatives look not
only at the short-term, but the
long-term benefits for present
and future generations, and
they will not be seen
overnight.
"In the interim conven-
tional methods must be used
with a view to mitigate impact
on the environment and citi-
zens. "
Measures to prevent envi-
ronmental destruction will be
taken by ensuring regular
maintenance of the plant and
three mile pipeline to the
tanker port, providing staff
with proper training and sup-
port, and by appointing an
environmental officer to over-
see all such concerns.
Mr Deveaux assured Aba-


conians BEC and the Gov-
ernment will "ensure the
highest standard of environ-
mental stewardship for the
plant."
Those behind the project
said they were surprised by
the enormous turn-out
because plans for a power
plant had been in the pipeline
since the previous, PLP, gov-
ernment was in power.
The original location at
Snake Cay, north of Wilson
City, was thrown out when
concerns were raised about
the sensitivity of the sur-
rounding environment, a
complex creek system on
Abaco's east coast.
But environmentalists say
the present site at Wilson
City, in the Bight of Old
Robinson, is intrinsically
linked to the area of Snake
Cay by a network of blue
holes and could be just as
damaging to the pristine area
near the Pelican Cays Land
and Sea Park.
They said the public should
have been consulted about
the relocation and given an
opportunity to express their
concerns in an open dialogue
before construction began.
Abaco resident John Hed-
don, a diesel mechanic, said:
"This dialogue that's taking
place tonight should have
started two years ago. I agree
100 per cent that there is a lot
of misinformation floating
around in the community
right now over this very issue
and if you had opened the
dialogue at the very begin-
ning you could have avoided
all of this."


EOICA
EXTEMINTOR
PEST CONTL,,ROL


.. . , . . ...


FO L * It . Mlh







Kelso Laboratory helps


effort to 'Breathe Easy'


THE Bahamas' Kelso Med-
ical Laboratory donated
$1,000 to the 'Breathe Easy'
campaign which has been
launched to raise $300,000 for
ventilators to benefit critical-
ly ill newborns at the Princess
Margaret Hospital's Neona-
tal Intensive Care Unit.
To date, the campaign has
raised $88,300.
Persons interested in mak-
ing a donation towards the
campaign should contact Tile
King, The Tribune Media
Group, Doctors Hospital, or
the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal Foundation.
Cheques can be made
payable to the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital Foundation.



INSIGHT

For the sto-
ries behind

the news,
read Insight


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


I BC gnerl m naer evi Bade (rght taesquetios fomAbao rsidnt


MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News........................P1,2,3,5,6,7,12
Editorial/Letters............................... ........ P4
C om ics.....................................................P 8
Sports...................................... .... P9,10
W eather................................................. P11

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES


^,ENT o,



%




The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the following position:


BODY GUARD

The incumbent serves as Executive Bodyguard for the Chief of Mission, to protect the
Chief of Mission (COM) port-to-portal from the threat of terrorism or other acts of
violence. While with the COM, the bodyguard will take extraordinary and/or special
security precautions to insure the personal safety of the COM. The bodyguard will assist
in the selection of safe routes and remain alert for danger of the COM.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

Completion of secondary school. Royal Bahamas Police Force College or
Royal Bahamas Defense Force Training is required.
Ten (10) years of experience in Police, Defense Force law enforcement, or
specialized security is required.
Must be familiar with the city of Nassau, Freeport and the Out Islands in the
Bahamas. Must also have knowledge of historical and current events that
could affect the security of the protected.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Must have the ability to be trained in the use of various firearms..
Must be flexible and able to adjust to rapid and unexpected schedule changes.
Must be able to work independently with minimum supervision and have
good problem solving skills.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package including
performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life insurance, pension
and opportunities for training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible for employment
under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms can be found on the Embassy's website nassau.usembassy.gov. under
Key Embassy Links and employment opportunities. Completed applications should be

returned to the Embassy via email to feranderra(@state.gov and poitierra@state.gov or
faxed to (242)328-8251, addressed to the Human Resources Office no later than
September 17th 2009.


Krystin Anne-Marie McPhee

Lots of love Baby!!

From your parents- Leonard & Elva McPhee, Brothers- L.J &
Christopher, Grandparents- Edward & Mary Pratt, Esther McPhee
and Rudolph Gray, Aunts andUncles, Cousins and Godparents
especially Godfrey, Keith, Julia, Leesa,
Diane, Tanya, Nashann, Edna and Miracle.







THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2009, PAGEW3


Miss Grand Bahama




relinquishes crown


New queen to be chosen

by the end of week


at the Garden of the Groves, where
Nikki Severe assumed the title of Miss
Grand Bahama.
Ms Hudson claimed that "insur-
mountable circumstances" led to her
resignation - among them the "lack of
professionalism" exhibited by some
of the pageant's managers.
The former beauty queen also
claimed that she did not receive any of
her prizes.
"The reasons for my withdrawal
are many and varied and are by no


means due to the lack of interest or
commitment to my community and
country," she said. "I was committed
and compared to the previous queen
who did 28 appearances during her
12-month reign, I have completed 32
appearances in just six months, and so
I have done a lot of positive things
involving the youth."
Ms Hudson said she is presently
enrolled at the College of the
Bahamas and is pursuing a Bache-
lor's degree in biology with a minor in


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Six months into her
reign, beauty queen Garrell Hudson
has relinquished her Miss Grand
Bahama 2009/2010 crown over what
she described as "management
issues."
Ms Hudson, 19, won the title on
March 29, and has made more than 30
public appearances throughout Grand
Bahama and Nassau promoting her
platform of youth empowerment.
Glen Davis, CEO and pageant
director, issued a press statement on
Tuesday, announcing that the organ-
isation will crown a new queen at the
end of the week.
The crowning took place yesterday


chemistry.
She said that her bad experience
has not discouraged her from pro-
moting her platform or entering oth-
er beauty pageants in the future.
Ms Hudson said she has received
confirmation that she has a spot
reserved in the Miss Galaxy competi-
tion, to be held early next year in Ger-
many.
She is now seeking sponsors and is
expected to be in Germany from Feb-
ruary 24 to March 2.
In the meantime, Ms Hudson said
she will continue to promote youth
empowerment.
She has already established a youth
programme at St Paul's Methodist
College, and hopes to launch other
programmes at other high schools on
Grand Bahama.


Ministry of Tourism

to host swine flu

work shop
THE Ministry of
Tourism in conjunction
with the United Nations
World Tourism Organisa-
tion (UNWTO) will hold a
special two-day workshop
and preparation exercise
in response to the world-
wide H1N1 pandemic.
The exercise's goal is to
evaluate possible scenar-
ios and to ensure that
organizations are pre-
pared for possible devel-
opments, especially in
regards to travel and
tourism.
All sessions will take
place on September 16
and 17 at the Sheraton
Nassau Beach Resort.






24-year-old man

charged with

drug possession

A MAGISTRATE yes-
terday opted to impose a
fine rather than a custodi-
al sentence on a 24-year-
old man who admitted he
intended to sell drugs to
help his seriously ill son.
Rashard Macintosh
pleaded guilty to the
charge of possession of
marijuana with the intent
to supply to another.
According to the prose-
cutor Inspector Ercell
Dorsette, police found
Macintosh in possession
of 13 foil wraps of mari-
juana weighing 40
grammes.
Macintosh admitted
that he had been found in
possession of the drugs
and told the court that he
was simply trying to earn
money to help his son who
was born with lung prob-
lems and is in hospital in
the United States. He told
the court that ever since
he lost his construction
job he had to resort to
selling drugs. McIntosh
said he has been sleeping
in cars, having moved out
of his mother's home. His
attorney, Christopher
Plakaris, also pleaded for
leniency, claiming that his
client had made a bad
choice.
Deputy Chief Magis-
trate Carolita Bethel
decided not to impose a
custodial sentence on
Macintosh and instead
fined him $1,500, half of
which he was ordered to
pay by 4pm yesterday.
Magistrate Bethel
informed Macintosh that
he would have to pay the
balance by September 30.


Container port workers sent to hospital


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A dozen
container port workers were
sent to hospital on Thursday
evening after becoming ill as a
result of exposure to chemical
fumes from a docked cargo
vessel.
The affected workers expe-
rienced symptoms of light-
headedness, skin and eye irri-
tations and chest pains. They
were taken to the Rand
Memorial Hospital for treat-
ment.
Hospital administrator
Sharon Williams confirmed
that 12 workers were treated
for chemical inhalation.
She said the workers came
to hospital around 9pm and
were discharged by 10pm.
According to reports, sev-
eral straddle carriers became
ill while removing containers
that had been off-loaded from
the MSC Turchita.
The vessel arrived at the


container port around 5am on
Thursday. Containers were
off-loaded from the ship by
crane and were being
removed by straddle carriers
to a designated stacking area
when some workers fell ill as
a result of strong fumes from
the ship.
One worker said he was
very concerned that proper
safety protocols were not fol-
lowed at the container port
in regards to the incident.
"We were not hosed off
before being sent to the hos-
pital, and when we arrived
there for treatment the nurses
and doctors told us that they
could smell the fumes on our
clothing," the worker said.
"We were told to go out-
side the hospital because
there were concerns that we
would contaminate the hos-
pital, and we could not go
home for a change of cloth-
ing."
He said some persons
arrived at the hospital
between 5pm and 6pm, and
another group arrived later at


PICTURED from left to right, back row, behind the TG Glover Pri-
mary School students: Joanne Smith, president elect, Rotary Club
of East Nassau; Brian Moodie, past president, Rotary Club of East
Nassau; Kelly Ann Smith committee member, Rotary Club of East
Nassau; Michele Rassin, president, Rotary Club of East Nassau;
Cassandra Forbes, principle, TG Glover Primary School; Eileen
Turner, vice-principle, TG Glover Primary School.


TG Glover Primary

School welcomes

school supply donation

from The Rotary Club

of East Nassau

REPRESENTATIVES of the Rotary Club of East Nassau
visited TG Glover Primary School bearing gifts of school sup-
plies and back packs for the children.
The supplies included 12 cases of back to school material for
writing and craft supplies. The supplies will be used to stimulate
students' creativity and enhance their learning environment.
The Rotary Club of East Nassau is also donating an assort-
ment of literacy books to help the students with the develop-
ment of their cognitive, listening and reading skills.


around 9pm.
The worker said they were
given medication and two
days off from work.
He also complained that
they were not initially accom-
panied to the hospital by the
company's safety or human
resources representative, who
arrived a couple hours later.
The Tribune attempted to
reach container port official
Godfrey Smith, Chief Oper-
ating Officer, but he was
unavailable for comment.
Corporate affairs officer
Sherry Rodgers was also
unavailable.


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Warm up your throwing arm for our Quarterback Challenge
on September 12, 19 & 26 where you can win NFL SUNDAY TICKET
for the ENTIRE SEASON!


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


Share your ne

The Tribune wants to hear from people
who are making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps you are
raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your
story.


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2009, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


5*R r
-~u-~







PAGE 4, SATURDAYSEPTAEMBERS 12, 2009 THETOR TRI


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, , ctiin, ') 322-1986
Ad, c;, iing Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm




Beyond all expectations


THOUSANDS upon thousands of col-
lege students returned to classes in
Boston this week. None of them has a
story like Taisha Sturdivant's.
She never knew her dad. When she
was 6, her mother married a preacher's
son. The preacher's son gave her mother
many things, including HIV.
Taisha Sturdivant grew up around
Four Corners, in Boston's Dorchester
neighbourhood, on a dead end called
Harvard Park that looked nothing like a
park and was home to no one who went
to Harvard. The gangsters sold their
drugs and fired their guns and Taisha
winced at the pop-pop-pop and kept her
head down.
Her brother started running with a
gang, and then one day he wasn't running
anymore: He was standing, in a court-
room, in front of a judge, because he
sold drugs.
"First time I was in a courtroom, I was
12. It was to show support for my broth-
er," she said. "He's still incarcerated."
The next time she was in a courtroom,
she was 15. She had received one of the
fellowships named after the late federal
judge David Nelson. The chief federal
judge, Mark Wolf, was going around the
courtroom at orientation, asking all the
city youth how many of their friends had
been murdered, and when he got to
Taisha Sturdivant, she said, "Eighteen."
She keeps the list in her head. She
remembers their names, their faces,
where they fell.
She was 15 years old and her mother
had just died of AIDS. She was on her
own and treading water in the open
ocean that was Four Corners.
"I could have gone either way when I
was 15," she said. "I had a lot of behav-
ioural problems in school. I used to get in
fights."
She was at English High and didn't
want to leave her friends. She didn't want
to go to college; she didn't think she
could get into college. But her mother
wanted her to go to an alternative high
school, Another Course to College, and
when her mother died, she knew she had
to go.
"It's something I did for her," she said.


NOTICE is hereby given that SEAN WRIGHT of WEST
BAY STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 12th day of September, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-
7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE is hereby given that AUGUSTIN PHILIPPE of
EAST ST. SOUTH, THE BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12th day of September, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, The Bahamas.





NOTICE is hereby given that CHARLES PAGE BEALL
of OLD FORT BAY, THE BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12th day of September, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, The Bahamas.


A teacher, Jerry Howland, took a shine
to her and started acting as if the only
question was where Taisha Sturdivant
would go to college.
She kept returning to the federal cour-
thouse every summer, and the judges
put her to work. She worked for Wolf
and Nancy Gertner and Patti Sarris. And
she worked for Reggie Lindsay, who
knew what it was like to grow up poor
and black and being expected to know
your place.
By the time Taisha Sturdivant enrolled
at Brandeis, many of the young people
she grew up with were dead, in prison, or,
like her sister, single parents living in
the projects.
"No one I grew up with went to col-
lege," she said. "No one."
She doesn't think she's anything spe-
cial.
"I got lucky," she said, sitting in
Shapiro Campus Centre, where she
works as a building manager when she
isn't studying.
"I got some opportunities that others
didn't. I met people who took an interest
in me, who told me I could do anything
despite everything in my background.
"I don't want to let these people down.
I feel this pressure to succeed, for them
as much as for me. It's not a negative
pressure. It's more a motivator.
"I'm one mistake away from ending
up like everybody I grew up with. That's
enough motivation for me."
She is 20 years old, going on 40. She's
a junior at Brandeis and she's been on
the dean's list every semester. She writes
poetry and knows a lot about the world.
She spent last summer on the Mexican
border, working with immigrants. She's
going to Ghana in January, for six
months, to put into practice some of her
ideas on education.
She's going to finish up at Brandeis
next year, go to law school, and then
Taisha Sturdivant is going to change the
world.
Believe it.

(This article was written by Kevin
Cullen, a Globe columnist - c. 2009 The
Boston Globe).


Pitbull an





'ideal dog'





f cared for


EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am writing about the arti-
cle in the paper, asking for
the ban of these "Vicious
Dogs."
I have heard this term
being used about pitbulls for
so long now and thought that
I would say something.
My brothers and I have
dealt with and owned pitbulls
from a very young age. What
many people fail to realise is
that these dogs are some of
the most loving, playful, and
loyal dogs anyone can own.
What people must also realise
is that, all dogs, no matter
what breed, have a natural
killer instinct. People can do
research for themselves on
other dogs and they will see.
Rottweilers, Chow Chows, all
terriers, even the world
renown faithful German
Shepherd all have had
instances where they have
attacked or mauled people.
We as humans are a part of
the animal kingdom. Animals
are something like us when
you look at it. They have feel-
ings and they have character
and personality.
You have to look at a dogs
background too as to why
they would attack a person.
How are they trained? How


are they kept?
I have seen instances where
guys have teased and beaten
these dogs, they say, "To
make them bad." But in real-
ity, pitbulls don't need any
aggravating to be "Bad."
They have that natural killer
instinct, that when aggravat-
ed, it will kick in.
If a dog is being used as a
guard at an establishment,
trust me, they know the dif-
ference between work and
home. They know when they
need to get out of their com-
fort zone and be alert. They
just know.
The comment about chains
that you can put on a horse is
just ridiculous. Those guys
who use those huge chains
most of the time are for an
aggressive look. I have seen a
programme on Animal Planet
called animal cops where
there was an illegal dog fight-
ing racket. These guys had
chains...literally boat chains
weighing 601bs on a dog that
was maybe between 80 and
1001bs. Apparently these
chains are what fighters use


so that the dog's stance can
be strengthened when they
fight.
To say, ban the pitbulls, is a
bit extreme. What would
probably be best is to check
out those homes where pit-
bulls are being kept. Check
out the environment around
them and how they are treat-
ed.
It seems as though the
licensing laws for dogs isn't
even used anymore.
Start fining people who
don't have their dogs licensed.
Create stricter laws for ani-
mal owners.
I will be honest. I don't
have a dog right now. I have
been searching for a different
breed of dog for the past few
months because I just wanted
the experience of a new breed
but I have yet to find one that
lives up to a pitbull's standard.
The pitbulls is the ideal dog.
No huge health complications
and they are just truly loving
dogs who you know at the
end of the day will protect
and serve you until they
die...That's just my opinion.

PATRICK T ROBINSON
II
Nassau,
September, 2009.


EDITOR, The Tribune.

While the Bahamas' Min-
ister of Tourism and his FNM
government are groping
about the country's Tourism
industry which has, essential-
ly, hit the bottom of the barrel
and which has, indeed, col-
lapsed for the most part, their
Jamaican counterparts are in
the news, recently, boasting
about 70,000 brand new air
seats, which they have secured
for that country's upcoming
winter season.
In Saturday's (September
5th) Freeport News, Jamaica's
deputy director of tourism,
Mr David Shields, was seen
in a photo, at a press confer-
ence, briefing the media on
that country's good fortune
in securing commitments
from airline and tour opera-
tors to bring an additional
70,000 passengers from a
number of European capitals
to Jamaica this coming win-
ter season. They accom-
plished this feat (and it is a
feat) last month, during the


NOTICE is hereby given that MARIA ELAINE LEE of #46
ST. CROIX, P.O. Box N 1665, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 5th day of September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-831, Nassau, Bahamas.






















#350.00e
Em i-ako lel4@ht aiB o


world championships, held in
Berlin Germany where
Jamaica's athletic team picked
up 13 medals, including seven
gold, four silver and two
bronzes. While the athletic
team was performing on the
field, winning medals in
sports, the country's tourism
team was in the boardrooms
of airlines and tour operators
winning medals in their
tourism promotion.
I had high hopes for Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace-albeit
not very high I must admit,
but hopes nonetheless being
able to pull our tourism indus-
try out of the hole which
Neko Grant left it in, but it
seems to me that Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace, himself, has
climbed down into that hole,
from which he hasn't been
able to climb out of, since he
took the job, succeeding
Grant. On a recent vacation
cruise up the eastern seaboard
of the United States and
Canada, every port on the
ship's itinerary was bustling
with tourists. In Baltimore
they were boasting of enter-
taining around 85 cruise ships
for the season and in Boston,
they claimed that 165 ships
were scheduled to call at that
port. It should be noted that
the cruise season in these
ports of call, is not year-


round, like ours, but proba-
bly only three to four months
out of the year. We should be
ashamed of ourselves.
We, who led the Caribbean
in year-round tourism, have
faltered and done so very
badly. Our competitors, like
Jamaica, have not wasted
time in taking over where we
have fallen on our faces and I
say to them, well done. We
have chosen, instead, to waste
precious financial resources
to purchase a three-story
mansion in Atlanta. A Con-
sulate in Atlanta is not such a
bad idea, but did we have to
do it right now when Ameri-
cans are not taking vacations
because they have more
important things to worry
about? Especially from that
particular part of the USA
where the ethnic make-up of
the population are of those
who traditionally travel less
anyway? Who makes these
asinine decisions anyway?
Don't tell me, I know.
Watching this FNM crew
govern is like watching a baby
learn to walk; he falls down
every two steps.

FORRESTER J
CARROLL
Freeport,
Grand Bahama,
September, 2009.


NOTICE is hereby given that SARKIS IZMIRLIAN of
LYFORD CAY DRIVE, NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 12th day of September, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.








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If you are a punctual, inspiring person with a great
voice who loves music, and enjoys interacting
with people, then this job is for you.

While not required, experience is an asset.
Competitive salary plus benefits.
Email resume (and demo) to
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Only those short listed will be contacted.


Bahamas falters on



year-round tourism


I


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2009


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2009, PAGEW5


WhyyoSu


"I'm vexed with the Post
Office Department. Our
bills come late which makes
paying late and we are
penalised. I've been waiting
for a letter mailed from
New York two weeks ago. I
guess it is in the bag in one
corner until someone feels
up to sorting. I say change
the staff to an efficient one,
it has never been great but
it is worse than ever now. I
think the
A / C
break- 6
down is Ci
partly to
blame."
- Dis-
gusted,
Nassau

I t
behooves
me. I visit
a section L
of the ( a
govern-
ment
ministry)
very '
often.
While
certain
people
are inside
busting
their
backsides trying to help
people with their individual
concerns, there are people
outside under the tree hav-
ing cocktails, possibly under
the influence of alcohol
because of the way they car-
ry on.
"And to make the situa-
tion worse, if a supervisor
asks them to help you do a
little favour, they want to
be rewarded monetarily to
purchase more alcohol. I
commend those few persons
for doing such a commend-
able job (but) can't some-
thing be done about the
rest?"
- Concerned individual

"I is vex since the gov-
ernment and most of the
churches wants to legislate a
crime to raping my wife.
This will cause hardship to
me 'cause I won't be able
to go out 'sweetheart' with
other women and come
home playing innocent an'
clean an still 'get some'. I
can't make illegitimate chil-
dren on the side an' come


home an' play the proper
Christian slick husband to
my wife even though she
suspect but can't do noth-
ing to deter me.
"I can't come home
drunk an 'play fool', don't
give my wife an' kids little
or no money an' still
'get/take some'. I can't also
continue to mentally abuse
an' still rape my wife an' not
be charged, an' still go to
church
without
anyone
finding
out from
St h e
police.
SMan this
law done
causing
trouble,
but I is
ver y
thankful
for some
churches
an' other
men who
knows
about
m e n
problems
and fight-
ing this
}discrimi-
natory
law."
- Lover boy, Nassau

"I happy because after
two weeks of trying my
hardest to wash myself with
a lil' trickle of water, Water
and Sewage finally get their
act together and give me
something to bathe with and
wash my dishes. I wake up
the other day and almost
pass out with joy because I
was able to brush my teeth
in less than 10 minutes
because I ain' had to wait
forever for the water to fill
my cup up.
"So my hats off to WSC
for finally putting water in
their paying customers'
pumps, but Lord knows I
shouldn't smile too much
because when I go home
today I might have a dry
pipe."
- Happy in Monastery
Park

Are you vex? Send your
complaints to 'whyyou-
vex@tribunemedia.net' or
fax them to 328-2398.


Drive for Bahamian




food on hotel menus


By Llonella Gilbert

THE Bahamas Agricultur-
al and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) has plans for more
local produce to appear on
menus of hotels, restaurants
and other tourism-related
businesses, Deputy General
Manager Don Major said.
And, in facilitating that,
BAIC is leasing farm land "at
a low cost" to Bahamians
interested in pursuing food
production, he told the
Bahamas Agro-Tourism Sym-
posium on Thursday.
The symposium was put on
by the Bahamas Agricultural
Producers Association
(BAPA) along with the Inter-
American Institute for Coop-
eration on Agriculture, the
Ministry of Tourism and Avi-
ation, and the Bahamas Hotel
Association (BHA).
The government, through
BAIC, has leased land for
food production in North
Andros, Abaco, Eleuthera
and South Andros, said Mr
Major, head of the Business
Advisory Services Depart-
ment.
BHA president Robert
Sands said he is satisfied that
Bahamians are now produc-
ing high quality agricultural
products.
"A number of producers
have demonstrated success
already in linking agriculture
with tourism," he said.
"There are already some
hotels and tourism-oriented
restaurants which are pur-
chasing whatever they can
through local producers," Mr
Sands said.
Mr Major said that BAIC
has started working with part-
ners to increase production


II cei a BAI C . 'S po/D Smit


by training farmers in best
practices, and new techniques
and technologies.
Through the formation and
development of farmers asso-
ciations, he said, consistency
in quality, supply and deliv-
ery schedules can be main-
tained.
BAIC is increasing market
access by bringing buyers and


Lightning cuts power

A lightning strike was to but repair crews were sent o0
blame for Thursday's power immediately.
outage in the commercial area The GBPC crews work
of Queen's Highway on "diligently" to resolve th
Grand Bahama. problem and power was full
The Grand Bahama Power restored to all affected area
Company said lightning within two hours, the compa
struck their distribution sys- ny said in a statement.
tem which shut down services, The CRPC nnlnoised f.


ut

ed
he
ly
as
a-

-r


sellers together, developing a
national database of crop
inventory, and working with
the Bahamas Sustainable
Tourism Entrepreneurial
Management and Marketing
Project and farmers associa-
tions, he said.
Mr Major said BAIC is
encouraging "agri-business"
by leasing land at a low cost


"There are

already some
hotels and
tourism

oriented
restaurants

which are

purchasing
whatever
they can

through local
producers."


for factories and processing
operations.
In conjunction with the
Ministry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources, BAIC is
also conducting courses in
food processing.
Under the chairmanship of
Edison Key, MP for South
Abaco, BAIC has trained
hundreds of Bahamians on all
the major islands in the art of
souvenir production using
ingredients indigenous to the
Bahamas.
"Tourists have made it
known in no uncertain terms
that they prefer Bahamian-
made souvenirs when they
come here," said Mr Major.


The BBOAI(Baham:sBoat Owner Sai *lor'Aci

S. *Sepe br1 t7~ .frte *seletin foa s .frNot
E5leuthra. Regata.llbatonroS s/ memberlareaskedt

attend .aS


any inconvenience caused.


RUSTY

While it is hard to believe
that there could be a cat as
handsome as this beautiful
ginger tabby, prospective
owners will be happy to learn
that Rusty has a lot more to
offer than mere good-looks.
Indeed, his sweet nature
and charm are more than one
can ask for. He just loves to
cuddle and play and has nev-
er so much as thought of giv-
ing another cat a dirty look.
He was surrendered to the
Bahamas Humane Society
when the business he called
home closed down and it is
apparent that he sorely miss-
es the companionship he used
to enjoy with his former own-
ers.
Please consider taking him
in and making him the newest
member of your family.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


PETFTIHEIaWEE


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2009, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 6, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Hodder: 'COB ready for university status'


BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Col-
lege of the Bahamas is
already functioning at uni-
versity level and is only now
waiting on legislation that has
been promised by the gov-
ernment, according to COB
president Janyne Hodder.
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, however, said that
there is more than legislation
standing in the way of COB
attaining university status.
"We are committed to a
University of the Bahamas,
but there are many things
that must be done before that
can happen, including legis-
lation," he said early this
week while on Grand
Bahama.
Mr Ingraham did not wish
to elaborate on what the still
missing preparations were,


but did say that money is one
of the issues.
Ms Hodder, who was in
Grand Bahama recently, told
reporters that the institution is
ready and has done what it
needs to do to be recognized
as a university.
She said that the college is
internationally recognized by
universities all over the world.
"We are members of the
International Association of
Universities. We are about to
become a member of the
Association of Common-
wealth Universities, and I
actually stood on the board
of the International Associa-
tion of Universities.
"A number of students are
going to study abroad for
grants recognized by univer-
sities all over the world, and
our degrees are recognized
with full credit," she said.
She also noted that there
are by far more students in
university degree programmes


than in associate degree pro-
grammes at the college.
According to Ms Hodder,
the college has also expanded
its research activities.
"So as far as I am con-
cerned we actually walk and
talk university and that is the
business we have been in, and
that's what we have been
doing," she said.
"We increased our quality
assurance, we are members
recognized internationally
and what needs to happen
now is we need to have legis-
lation that recognizes the
changes we have made."
Ms Hodder said she was
very pleased when the gov-
ernment made a commitment
to creating legislation to
move the college to univer-
sity status.
"We are not in control of
the timing of that legislation.
You will remember the prime
minister made a commitment
to the creation and adoption


of that legislation in its bud-
get speech and we were very
happy to hear that.
"We heard further com-
mitment in the House, so
right now we are waiting to
see what is the government
standing on the adoption of
legislation.
"But we are ready and we
have done everything we
need to do. We have been
diligent; we are building facil-
ities, we're changing, we're
doing best practice for uni-
versities, we have new a net-
work, a new building here (on
Grand Bahama), and we
have gone into international
recognition for what we do,
so I think we are there," she
said.
While in Grand Bahama,
the prime minister also
responded to claims concern-
ing Ross University's status
in the United States.
Ross University is in its
third semester here on Grand


Bahama since opening its
new campus in January. In
May, the first and second
year medical students start-
ed their training at both the
Rand Hospital and the Eight
Mile Rock Clinic.
However, reports have
recently surfaced that the
medical institution was not
recognized by the California
Medical Board in the United
States.
When asked for comments
concerning the reports, Mr
Ingraham stated that he had
met with the principals of
Ross University in Atlanta a
few weeks ago.
"There is not an issue that
is not solvable as far as I am
aware, he said. I would expect
that whatever the issue was
would be dealt with in a mat-
ter of weeks."
Mr Ingraham said he is sat-
isfied that Ross will continue
to be an expanding presence
in Grand Bahama.


Bahamas Faith Ministries hosts financial seminar


TO address the global economic tur-
moil and its effect on the country, organ-
isers at Bahamas Faith Ministries Inter-
national (BFMI) hosted a two-day finan-
cial seminar.
Around 200 members of BFMI and per-
sons from the community attended the
event held at the Diplomat Centre.
Financial consultant and co-coordina-
tor of the BFMI financial seminar Carl
Albury underscored the importance of
managing finances in difficult economic
times like these. He added that the semi-
nar comes at a time when persons must re-
evaluate their financial situations.
"The purpose of the seminar was to
ensure that our membership were organ-
ised in their financial management, to help
those who were not to restructure their
finances as best as possible according to
their circumstances and at the same time
make sure kingdom citizens are aware of
their requirements of being good stew-
ards of what has been entrusted to them,"
said Mr. Albury.
The main topics of interest and discus-
sion for the participants were budgeting
and debt management.
Mr Albury said that many persons going
through financial struggles today in the
Bahamas are in great debt and need to
find solutions and make plans to dig them-
selves out.
"We also had lots of questions on real
estate, whether to buy whether to sell.
One of the things we wanted to insist (on
was for) people to work toward not
exceeding 35-40 per cent of income service
ratio. We consider that moving into a risky
environment. People must try and con-
tain debt, inclusive credit cards," he said.
Seminar participants gave their feed-
back on the seminar.
"It was very informative. The speakers
did an excellent job of explaining the
basics and answering questions and while
I've been to other seminars on finance,
this one really opened my eyes and now I
have a better understanding," said BFM


E CHARLENE Storr outlines the importance of planning
pensions and retirement.


SOME 200 BFMI members and persons
from the community attended the two-day
financial seminar at the Diplomat Centre.

member Olivia Kelly.
Another member, Candera Gilbert,
said: "It was so on target, the seminar gave
us so much information and it was under-
standable. On top of that there were free
individual consultations with financial
firms who were present."
Topics at the seminar included budget-
ing and obligations management; the ben-
efits of cash to assets for crisis manage-
ment; savings, pensions, retirement plan-
ning and common mistakes and planning
for life stages; credit and debt manage-
ment; insurance; real estate portfolio; rev-
enue development, and net worth financial
management.
Participating corporate firms at BFMI's
financial seminar were Family Guardian
and Royal Bank of Canada.


FINANCIAL Consultant Carl Albury speaks
on the power and importance of financial
planning.


Abaco businessmen donate to All-Age School


MAKING a presentation of books and
school supplies to the students of the
Moore's Island All-Age School, Osbourne
Stuart - a native of Abaco, former teacher
and school principal prior to his entrepre-
neurial endeavours - brought motivational
and encouraging words in keeping with the
assembly's theme: "Achieving Our Dreams
Through Education in Literacy."
Highlighting the importance of an edu-
cational preparation, Mr Stuart said that
developing a respectful attitude for par-
ents, teaches and oneself is also a funda-
mental requirement for achieving success in
life.
"I am a son of this soil and while I
encourage you to succeed I believe that it is
also very important to give back to the
community that nurtured you," he said.
Demonstrating their interest in assisting


the next generation of Abaco leaders in
realising their educational objectives, Mr
Stuart and Perry Thomas, Adler Realty
president and manager of Adler's Marsh
Harbour office, both made the gift presen-
tations on the grounds of the Moore's
Island All-Age School and committed
themselves to continuing assistance to the


S:-, LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past&
iGeared To The Future


Worship time: llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:
The Madeira
Shopping Center


is- 1


Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles


ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
E AIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs


school.

OSBOURNE Stuart, president of Adler Real-
ty and Investment, and Perry Thomas,
Adler's Abaco office manager, making a
presentation of gifts to the students of the
Moore's Island All-Age School during their
prefects' assembly.


CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS * Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 13TH, 2009.
11:30 AM Speaker

PASTOR MARCEL LIGHTBOURNE

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. * Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
SCommunity Outreach: 11:30 a.m. * Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
S Sisters' Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)


BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL


'Sunday School: 10am
Preaching 11am & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm


FUNDAMENTAL
EVANGELISTIC

Pastor:H. Mills


"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are"
Pastor: H. Mills * Phone: 393-0563 * Box N-3622


WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Selective Bible Teaching
Royal Parngers, (B:'Ys Club) 4-16 yrs.
Missionettes (Girls Club) 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth '..1,ni,-r . M-eerirg

RADIO MINISTRY
Sunday at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE
Assembly Of God







i-ranit's iTotun Wselt'p 4lirtlhohsit lourdl
IBaiiicu m-ll j :r.apil lree.rl PO Bo. CB-.1i - 1 .'
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 13TH, 2009.
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Alice Woodside
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Youth (B)
7:00 p.m. Bro. Ernest Miller/Board of Children, Youth & Young Adults

KThm:"BtA s *ffl olir dt f MyfosholdWWllSrtLd"


ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


OPOTUIIE O


SUNDAY SERVICES
Morning Worship Service .......
Sunday School for all ages...
Adull Education ....................
Worship Service ...................
Spanish Service ...,....... .......
Evening Worship Service ........


8.30 a.m.
9.45 a.m.
9.45 a.m.
11.00 a.m.
8.00 a.m.
6.30 p.m.





THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2009, PAGE 7


LOCALNEWS


Embassy explains


website warning


FROM page one

He said the notice was merely the posting of a tip to be on
the lookout for possible criminal activity in western New Prov-
idence.
Under law, the US Embassy is required to pass on credible
information to the public. The notice was not intended as a trav-
el advisory nor did it allude to the level of crime in the Bahamas,
Mr Dubel said.
"We have a 'no double standard' policy. This means that if
we are privy to any information that might benefit our staff and
Americans we must share this with the public as well. We
were simply relaying information we received and encouraging
the community to practice safer habits."
The notice warned residents of confirmed suspicious activ-
ity in the Cable Beach/Sandyport areas as reported and also
included a general personal safety reminder urging all per-
sons to maintain a constant awareness of their surroundings.
"Our website is local to the Bahamas and the notice was not
circulated on a global scale. This is not an official statement
intended to warn Americans against travelling to Nassau, trav-
el advisories are a serious matter and completely different.
This was just a simple tip for the community on information that
we received."
The embassy accredits Bahamian police as their information
source for the notice, which led to the Guardian's confusing arti-
cle as the police have since denied supplying the embassy with
any information furthering their crime notice.
Though Assistant Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna
told The Nassau Guardian that the police had no knowledge of
the attempted muggings, the article also includes information
from unnamed police sources that confirms the existence of sim-
ilar incidents of that nature and in that area.
It is this conflict of information, the embassy assumes, that
led Cable Beach residents also quoted in the article to label the
police's response as a "cover-up."
The Cable Beach Police Station does not investigate rob-
beries and reports made at the station are then forwarded to the
Central Detective Unit.
Commissioner Reginald Ferguson suggests that this is prob-
ably where the embassy obtained information for its notice. He
reinforces statements made by Asst. Comm. Hanna as there was
no official notification to American officials, however he allows
that it is likely through independent research the embassy
could have received details of the incidents from police sources.
He advises that in situations like this it is imperative to for-
mally contact the police, so that information gathered can be
officially credited.
"We receive information from a wide pool of sources," said
Mr Dubel, "the reference to the Bahamian police simply clar-
ified that these incidents have been reported and they shared
a consistent variable. The Nassau Guardian may have taken
advantage of this situation to some extent and blew this out of
proportion."
The notice can be seen on the US embassy's official Nassau
website http://nassau.usembassy.gov
Interested Cable Beach residents or those with helpful
information are welcomed to contact the Cable Beach Crime
Association.










FROM page one

cide squad ASP Leon Bethel.
"An intensive investigation has been launched into this mat-
ter - we are inviting persons in the area who might have been
around to tell us something," he added.
ASP Bethel said it was too early to speculate on a possible
motive but friends of the victim believe Knowles was followed
to the area and may have been targeted in an act of retaliation.
One resident, who did not want to be named, said if it were
not for intermittent rain yesterday morning innocent by-
standers might have been struck during the shooting.
"The lil' children or one of us could have been here and got
shot, only because rain came down no one was out here - usu-
ally we would been playing' dominoes," said the resident.
The other man was not hurt in the attack.



INS IGH


For th soi s be in th6n ws


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0


DNA expert testifies




in Bishop's retrial


FROM page one

relationship with a 16-year-
old girl between July 2005 and
February 2006. According to
witness testimony, Fraser had
offered to counsel the girl. He
remains on $10,000 bail.
Kevin Noppinger, direc-
tor of the Florida-based DNA
labs International, testified
yesterday that the DNA pro-
file obtained from two carpet
samples matched the DNA
profile found on a cup from
which Fraser reportedly
drank.
Detective Inspector
Matthew Edgecombe had tes-
tified that he collected the cup
following an interview at the
Central Detective Unit on
April 13, 2006.
Evidence so far has
revealed that on April 12,
2006, during the execution of
a search warrant at Fraser's
church office, pieces of car-


pet with suspected semen on
them were removed by police.
Mr Noppinger told the
court that Bahamian police
had handed over pieces of
carpet, a blood-stained card
and a plastic cup for DNA
analysis.
He said he cut fibres from
the carpet and used the dif-
ferential extraction method
to identify the donor of the
sperm cells.
Mr Noppinger said he was
only able to obtain a DNA
profile from two of the pieces
of carpet and first concluded
it was not that of the virtual
complainant.
Mr Noppinger said he
swabbed the mouth of the cup
for skin cells and found that
the DNA profile matched
that found on the carpet
pieces. He said all fifteen loca-
tions in the DNA profile
found on the carpet fibres
matched the one found on the
cup.


During cross-examination
by Fraser's attorney Wayne
Munroe, Mr Noppinger
admitted that the packages in
which he had received the
items had not been re-sealed
until May 29, 2006.
Kristen Noppinger, presi-
dent of DNA Labs interna-
tional, told the court yester-
day that on May 11, 2006, she
received an envelope from
Detective Corporal Sheria
King and put her signature on


the envelope.
Prosecutors say they have
eight more witnesses left to
testify. The trial was
adjourned to December 21
and 22.
Deputy Director of Public
Prosecutions Franklyn
Williams, Darnell Dorsette
and Basil Cumberbatch are
prosecuting the case, which is
being heard before Deputy
Chief Magistrate Carolita
Bethel.


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Previous Close Previous day's weighted pnce for daily volume Last Prce- Last traded overthecounter pnrce
Today Close Current day's weighted pnce for daily volume Weekly Vol Trading volume of the pnor week
Change IChange in closing pnce from dayto day EPS $ A company reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
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P/E Closing prce divided by the last 12 month eamings FINDEX -The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1, 1994 = 100
) 4fo1 Stock Split Efeive Date 8/8/2007
TO TRADE CALL COLINA 242-502 7010 n ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 1 FO CAPITAL MARKETS 242 396-4000 1 COLONIAL 242 502 7525






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 9


Athletes

in IAAF

World

Final...
Seepage 10


ATI RI) 1 )Y SEPTEMBER 12, 2009


U' - a10oInternatiSprs news -


Forwww. th be pin 2a.



www.tri bunle 242. CIW Aun I 4tKI


'The



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net


majority of the past
year recovering from a
hand injury, Sherman
'The Tank' Williams is going back
into the ring to fight again.
His return, however, will be in
Warsaw, East Germany, on Octo-
ber 10 when he is scheduled to fight
in the 10-round co-main event
against German Emmanuel 'Dia-
mond Boy' Charro in a live televi-
sion show.
Charro, listed at 255 pounds and 6-
feet, 4-inches, currently sports a 12-
0 win-loss record with seven knock-
outs. He's one of the top fighters
from the Universal Boxing camp
with an impressive amateur Olympic
background.
"His size is not going to intimi-
date me," said Williams, who once
again will come in as the shorter of
the two fighters at 5-11.
"I'm always like David fighting
Goliath. But my plan, as usual, is to


Tank' will fight again


take the fight to him on the inside
and try to beat his big body and use
my signature overhand right and left
hook."
Having had an extensive Olympic
experience, Williams said it should
mean that Charro will have a lot of
wear and tear on him and he intends
to exploit that.
"I think it's going to be a good
matchup," Williams projected.
In preparation for the fight,
Williams and his entourage will trav-
el to Hamburg, Germany, on Octo-
ber 4 where they will go into a train-
ing camp and do some promotional
events before fight night.
Williams, 37, has not fought for
the year. He was originally sched-
uled to fight in January in Key West,
Florida, but that fight had to be can-
celed because of the hand injury.
Since then, Williams has been tak-
ing it easy, making sure that the
injury was properly healed. Howev-
er, the last 6-8 weeks, he said he was-
n't experiencing any pain.
"Since June, I've been hitting the
heavy bags and I've had some very
hard training," he said. "I feel good


SHERMAN 'THE TANK' WILLIAMS

and when they contacted me for the
fight, I accepted it without hesita-
tion.


Sherman Williams set to


square off with German


"I really just want to get back into
the ring. This guy is undefeated and
although I've been on a brief lay-
off because of the injury, I managed
to still train and stay motivated."
Not having a fight since December
12, 2008, when he won a sixth round
unanimous decision over American
Andrew Greeley at the Bourbon
Street Station in Jacksonville, Flori-
da, Williams said he doesn't expect
the inactivity to interfere with his
performance next month.
"So far, I feel good. I know I'm
not 100 per cent, but once I get back
into the ring, I should be able to
brush off the ring rust right away,"
Williams said.
On March 26, 2005, Williams
fought in Germany for the first time.
He went the distance, securing an


unanimous eight round decision over
Ruslan Chagaev at the Erdgas Are-
na in Riesa, Sachsen.
But since then, Williams has spent
considerable time in Germany train-
ing. In fact, he spent the entire
month of June in Hamburg doing
some promotional work.
"Germany is no strange place to
me," he said.
This time when he goes back,
Williams said he intends to outfit his
entire entourage in Bahamian
colours as he makes his way into the
ring. "It's going to be a Bahamian
night in Germany on October 10,"
he promised.
On Monday, Williams' manager
Si Stern will outline his plans for
Williams in the aftermath of the trip
to Germany next month.


Former distance



runner to take



part in Olympic



coaching course


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
AFTER retiring from
active competition in 1995,
former distance runner Floyd
Armbrister went into coach-
ing and that same year he
achieved his Level One Cer-
tification.
On Sunday, Armbrister will
be heading to Jalisco, Mexico,
to participate in a week-long
Olympic Solidarity Coaching
Course where the focus will
be his speciality - distance
running.
"I feel great. I'm excited
about it because this is some-
thing that I've been long for a
long time," said Armbrister,
who was nominated for the
course by the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Athletic Associa-
tions.
"That's why I went into
track and field as a coach. I
wanted to specialise in mid-
dle distance running. It has
been 18 years now and after I
got my level one certificate in
1995, I'm going on my second
course to specialise in my
events. So it's a great oppor-
tunity and I wouldn't miss it
for the world."
While on the course, spon-
sored by the Bahamas
Olympic Association, Arm-
brister will be learning the
new techniques being imple-
mented for the 400 metres up
to the last long distance race,
including the marathon.
"I'm going to go through
an intense practice, theory
and scientific training," Arm-
brister stressed.
During his tenure at CR
Walker, Armbrister has been
instrumental coaching a num-
ber of outstanding athletes,
including Ramon Miller, who


ti i
-:I ,

.I~ .


ARMBRISTER

went to the 12th IAAF World
Championships in Berlin,
Germany, last month and
made it to the semifinal, run-
ning a personal best of 44.99
seconds in the men's 400
metres.
On the female side, Arm-
brister has coached such ath-
letes as Santisha Martin, who
went to the Senior Central
American and Caribbean
Championships as a junior
athlete. After graduating from
college, Martin is back home
and is employed with Scotia-
bank.
By participating in the
course, Armbrister is hoping
to gain some knowledge that
he can bring back home and
impart with the local coaches
and athletes in a bid to help
close the gap that the rest of
the Caribbean has opened on
the Bahamas in distance run-
ning.
"My main goal is to try and
take some of these sprinters
and convert them into their
real areas of middle distance
racing," Armbrister said.
"Everybody believes that
once they are running 56 or 54


in the 400 metres that they
are sprinters. But we need to
get some of them to move up
and compete in the longer dis-
tance events."
Whether it's through CR
Walker or the club system,
Armbrister said his ultimate
goal is to be able to see a local
athlete run some of the world
class times that will enable
him or her to be able to qual-
ify for the World Champi-
onships or the Olympic
Games.
And with the new stadium
expected to be completed by
2011, Armbrister said he's
hoping that someone will be
inspired enough to try and
achieve that feat for the 2012
Olympics in London, Eng-
land.
When he returns home,
Armbrister is hoping that he
will also help CR Walker to
increase their BAAA nation-
al cross country championship
streak to 16 straight.
As for the track, Armbris-
ter said his Knights will be
going after their seventh
straight and 13th overall Gov-
ernment Secondary Schools
Sports Association title.
To his credit, Armbrister
has also helped CR Walker
to cart off four BAAA
National titles before they
stopped giving out the overall
team trophy.
On the national level, Arm-
brister said he made a vow to
the BAAA that when he
returns home he will share his
expertise with whoever wants
to improve on long distance
running.
He thanked the BOA, the
BAAA and the CR Walker
family for allowing him to
take advantage of this course.
"I won't let them down," he
said. "Knowledge is power."


, t..- L a










*, .







MARK KNOWLES AND MAHESH BHUPATHI



'We're ready to play'


MARK Knowles and his Indian partner
Mahesh Bhupathi will have to wait anoth-
er day to see if their second time around at
a Grand Slam title will come through.
Knowles and Bhupathi, the number three
seeds, were scheduled to play in the final of
the US Open in Flushing Meadows, New
York, yesterday.
But because of the heavy rains, their
match against No.4 seeds Lukas Dlouhy of
the Czech Republic and Leander Paes from
India were among those canceled yesterday.
Their match will now be played today,
weather permitting.
For Knowles, who along with Bhupathi
played in the final of the Australian Open
in January where they lost to American
identical twin brothers Bob and Mike
Bryan, it was long hard day waiting to play.
"It won't have any effect. We're ready to
play," said Knowles when contacted by The
Tribune yesterday.
"It's been a long hard day just sitting
around waiting to play, but we managed
to hit around indoors, so we will be ready to
go."
Knowles, 38, who will be honoured by
the Bahamas Government on Monday at
Government House, will be going for his
second US Open title, having won the


men's doubles with former partner Daniel
Nestor in 2004.
Bhupathi, 35, is also seeking his second
US Open title in his third appearance in
the final. He and Paes were runners-up in
1999, but in 2002, he and Max Mirnyi won
the title.
KNOWLES TO BE
HONOURED
THE Ministry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture has announced that touring tennis pro
Mark Knowles will be honoured on Mon-
day for teaming up with German Anna-
Lena Groenefeld for winning the Wimble-
don mixed doubles grand slam title in July
in England.
Knowles and his family are expected to
arrive home on Monday at 3 pm at the
Lynden Pindling International Airport
where he will be greeted by government
officials and sporting dignitaries in a "wel-
come home" reception in the VIP Lounge.
Then on Monday at 1 pm, Knowles will
be treated to a luncheon at Government
House when Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham is expected to issue a National Procla-
mation and he will be presented with a spe-
cial citation by Governor General Arthur
Hanna.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


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IAAF World Athletic Final gets underway


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THREE of the four
Bahamian athletes who quali-
fied will be in action today in
Thessaloniki, Greece, as the
IAAF World Athletic Final
gets underway.
Chris 'Fireman' Brown will
be out to redeem himself after
he slipped to fifth in the men's
400 metres at the 12th IAAF
World Championships in
Berlin, Germany, where he
ran out of lane five in the
men's 400. His main rival will
be back-to-back Olympic
Games and World Champi-
onships champion LaShawn
Merritt of the United States
in lane four.
American World silver
medallist Jeremy Warier and
Trinidad & Tobago's bronze


FERGUSON-McKENZIE CHRIS BROWN CHANDRA STURRUP


medallist are not entered. But
David Neville, who dove
across the finish line to snatch
the bronze from Brown in an
American sweep in Beijing,
China, will be in lane seven.
Olympic bronze medallist
Leevan 'Superman' Sands,
who just missed a medal in
Berlin with a fourth place fin-
ish, will be the second com-
petitor on the runway in the
men's triple jump.
The only other medallist
from both the Olympics and
World Championships entered
is Phillips Idowu of Great
Britain. He won the Olympic
silver and came back to take
the World title in Berlin.
And in the women's 200
metres, fresh off her bronze
medal performance in Berlin,
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie
will run out of lane six.
Included in the field is


defending champion Sanya
Richards from the United
States in lane seven and three-
time World champion Allyson
Felix, also of the US, in lane
five.
Then on Sunday, Ferguson-
McKenzie and veteran Chan-
dra Sturrup will both compete
in the 100 in lane seven and
eight respectively.
All three medallists from
Berlin are entered with
Jamaican champion Shelly-
Ann Fraser in five, silver
medallist Kerron Stewart, also
from Jamaica, in six and
bronze medallist Carmelita
Jeter of the United States, in
four.
Only the top eight athletes
in the series of meets held dur-
ing the year qualified for the
championships, which is offer-
ing considerable prize money
for all the competitors.


NEWYORK (AP)- Kim ( !isule i .II %!.iI >.i IH,. iii.
of a couch in the players lount-. F! l.i\ i.ilkin !.* I I, n
Her semifinal against Sere:-., \\ ili.i , .I iiii I i, ( )>> h \ .1,
delayed by a persistent rainsto! i I.i i ni N i . YI . !k I !e. 1, .i,
stuck waiting out the weather - m,, ! Ie ihli. [I! 1i1- t--. i.m! ll ills
parts of the sport she has retli !.i i., IIns \I..i! \\ !ii i I uni!!i
success.
"That's tennis. That's life," ( hIisl is .il Ii s nlii I it.\\
I'd rather be waiting here than mlIn-, .,ii h- I~.
Tournament officials briefl\h I ill ..! .ii i.i dli\ I!i.. ot! Ii i1
Arthur Ashe Stadium, but thie i..is ..in i ..I ii.' ' !.1 i. '! iii,
that rolled into New York late IIii,,1. _It .I .\.\ , p ! i i.|MiI . i1
enough to make those efforts 111111 kI ,
Still, contingency plans we! I't it _.,- i..k
No. 3 Rafael Nadal and N, I I F.! in..'! l. ( .in/.ilk/ ill
had to complete their quarter!i.. l i! m.I i |Ich i p. , i pi. l !! I i ii l. \
night with Nadal up a set and leading 3-2 iin ltc sccond-sct
tiebreaker. Yanina Wickmayer and No. 9 Carolina Wozniac-
ki were on the schedule for the second women's semifinal.
Aware that they had to take advantage of any possible
break in the weather, lest the schedule be disrupted even
more, tournament organizers decided to hold all three match-
es simultaneously.
The conclusion of Nadal-Gonzalez was moved to Arm-
strong Stadium, with the Wickmayer-Wozniacki match relo-
cated to the Grandstand.
Clijsters' surprising run to the semifinals came in her return
to the US Open for the first time since 2005, when she won the
tournament. She is coming back from a two-year break to
have a baby, and brought her 18-month-old daughter, Jada, to
Flushing Meadows for the Open.
Clijsters is 1-7 against Williams over her career, with all the
matches coming before her retirement. This will be their first
meeting since 2003.
Not much to scout for Williams, seeded second and looking
for her 12th Grand Slam singles championship. Not that it
matters much.


WORKERS attempt to dry the court after play was suspended because of rain during a match between Spain's Rafael Nadal and Fernando
Gonzalez of Chile at the US Open tennis tournament in New York...


"Two or three opponents here, I knew their game, but oth-
er than that, I haven't seen anyone's game," Williams said.
"That's how I've pretty much played my whole career. I try to
see what they do in warm-up and go from there."
The rain offered a welcome break for Nadal, who took an
injury timeout early in the second set Thursday to have work
done on an abdominal strain that has been bothering him
throughout the tournament.
Nadal, the six-time major winner trying to complete a career
Grand Slam, has been reluctant to talk about the injury. He
doesn't want to let his opponents know his weaknesses. But the
trainer poking and massaging his stomach during the med-
ical timeout told the story.
As did his uncle and coach, Toni Nadal.
"In the first set, it was very, very bad," he said. "Now, it's a
little better. It's difficult. We must win this set."


The rain meant the biggest - and only - winner from
Thursday's singles was Juan Martin del Potro. The sixth-seed-
ed Argentine made his second Grand Slam semifinal by beat-
ing No. 16 Marin Cilic 4-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-1 earlier in the day,
when the wind was blowing hard in front of the rainstorm.
"The weather was bad," Del Potro said. "But it was bad for
both players. I just need to be in focus in the beginning of the
match until the last point and play my game."
Del Potro awaited the winner of the Nadal-Gonzalez match,
while the other men's semifinal is set: No. 1 Roger Federer
against No. 4 Novak Djokovic. Federer beat Djokovic at the
U.S. Open in the 2007 final and 2008 semifinals, part of an over-
all 8-4 lead in the head-to-head series.
But the only time Federer has missed a final in the past 17
Grand Slam tournaments was after a loss to Djokovic, who won
their semifinal en route to the 2008 Australian Open title.


South African runner has female and male organs, reports say


By CHRIS LEHOURITES
AP Sports Writer

LONDON (AP) - South African runner
Caster Semenya's eligibility to compete as a
woman is no clearer - even though reports say
she has female and male organs.
Semenya, who won the women's 800-meter
title at last month's world championship in
Berlin, has had a gender test, and the results
given to track and field's ruling body were
leaked to Australian newspapers.
Former IAAF medical commission chair-
man Arne Ljungqvist would not comment
specifically on the Semenya case, but he cau-
tioned that a person's gender is not always
easy to define.
"There is no simple, single lab test that can
tell if you are a man or a woman. It is not
black and white," Ljungqvist told The Associ-
ated Press by phone Friday from Sweden. "A
person who carries a legal certificate showing
that he is a man or a women, then they are a
man or a woman."
Semenya comes from a poor village in rural
South Africa and first drew attention when
she won the 800 title at the African junior
championships. With her muscular build and
deep voice, more questions were raised at the
world championships.
The International Association of Athletics
Federations confirmed that Semenya was
undergoing a gender test on the day she won
the gold medal in the 800 by a huge margin.
Australian newspapers reported that


Caster Semenya celebrates after winning the gold
medal in the final of the women's 800m at World
Athletics Championships in Berlin... (AP Photo)

Semenya has no ovaries and has internal testes,
which produce testosterone. The IAAF didn't
confirm or deny the reports, saying it was
reviewing the test results and would announce
its findings in November.
"There are many, many other reasons why a
woman looks male," Ljungqvist said. "Proba-
bly the most common has nothing to do with
intersex: production of steroids from the adren-
al gland. Most of the women you see who look
like men are not intersexed. Some men have a
very womanlike body shape."
Another key issue is whether an intersexed
person can make use of the natural male hor-
mones they may be producing.
"High levels of testosterone is not a rele-
vant parameter. It's whether they can make


use of that testosterone," Ljungqvist said.
"Most of them are insensitive to the testos-
terone because they do not have the recep-
tors to use it."
Anne Fausto-Sterling, a professor of biolo-
gy and women's studies at Brown University,
said making use of testosterone to gain a com-
petitive advantage depends on the level of
intersexuality.
"Some give no advantage," Fausto-Sterling
said. "You really have to know the specifics,
and every individual is different."
International Olympic Committee president
Jacques Rogge, speaking a day before the
Semenya test results were leaked, said the
issue surrounding the South African teenager
was a difficult one.
"On one hand there are so many different
forms of normality in the human body and the
human chemistry," said Rogge, a retired ortho-
pedic surgeon. "You have all kinds of possi-
bilities there. And it is very difficult to have the
unanimous advice of various experts. It's not a
clear-cut discussion."
Alice Domurat Dreger, a professor of med-
ical humanities and bioethics at Northwestern
University in Chicago, said it was not uncom-
mon for someone to be raised as a woman
even if they have both sets of sex organs.
"We are raised based on what adults think
our sex is at our births," Dreger said on her
Web site. "Various conditions can lead to a
baby being born with female genitalia (labia,
clitoris, vagina) and internal male sex anatomy
(including testes)."


For people with Androgen insensitivity syn-
drome and 5-alpha reductase Deficiency "the
baby has testes inside, even though she's clear-
ly a girl," Dreger wrote.
Gender testing in sports is not new, but it has
taken on a new twist. In the old days, it was
simply to ensure no one was cheating.
"The gender testing as such is intended to
make sure that men do not compete as
women," said Ljungqvist, who joined the
IAAF medical commission in 1981 and left in
2002 before taking over a similar position with
the IOC.
At the 2006 Asian Games, 800 champion
Santhi Soundarajan of India was stripped of
her medal after failing a gender test. Perhaps
the most famous case is that of Stella Walsh,
also known as Stanislawa Walasiewicz, a Polish
runner who won the 100-meter gold medal at
the 1932 Olympics and was later found to have
ambiguous genitalia.
"Such cases are extremely rare in a grown-up
population," Ljungqvist said. "Usually inter-
sexed people are diagnosed at birth."
Until the 2000 Sydney Games, the IOC test-
ed all female competitors to make sure no one
was cheating, but Ljungqvist fought to change
the way that was done. A panel of experts
remains in place to help resolve questions
about someone's sexuality.
"Screening was based on the identification of
a Y chromosome," Ljungqvist said. "This gen-
der testing by chromosome was completely
unscientific and therefore unethical. It took
nine more years to get away from it."


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


PAGE 10, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS




TH TRIBUNE


THE WEATHER REPORT
I~~~~ hAII ^IA I'


S ORLANDO
High:880F/31�C
Low: 740 F/23 C
QL
TAMPA
High:86�F/30� C
Low:770F/250 C

�.


-7
:.: "

�;L^


Sunny intervals with a A thunderstorm early; Partly sunny with a Clouds and sun, Some sun with a Partly sunny, a t-storm
thunderstorm. mostly cloudy. thunderstorm. t-storms possible. t-storm possible. possible.
High: 880 High: 9o High: 89 High: 890
High: 880 Low: 790 Low:79 : 7: 79 Low: 790 Low: 790

S 114I F I 89o F I F 103o-871 F ] I 98o-89o F 110-86 F -89g F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature� is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body-everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.


I A . .I


IAiLMANAC


WEST PALM BEACH
High:900 F/320 C
Low:740 F/230 C


FT. LAUDERDALE
High:88�F/310C
Low:760 F/240 C


MIAMI
High:900F/320 C
Low:780F/260C


KEYWEST
High:890F/320 C
Low:790 F/260 C
�.


Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston


High
F/C
78/25
59/15
86/30
70/21
73/22
65/18
70/21
88/31
78/25
72/22
80/26
63/17
74/23
89/31
86/30


Low
F/C
58/14
48/8
68/20
59/15
60/15
58/14
54/12
68/20
54/12
52/11
68/20
49/9
55/12
74/23
73/22


W High
F/C
t 80/26
c 58/14
pc 83/28
sh 81/27
pc 82/27
sh 78/25
pc 73/22
pc 86/30
pc 79/26
pc 75/23
t 79/26
t 77/25
pc 78/25
s 88/31
t 89/31


Sunday
Low
F/C
59/15
47/8
70/21
60/15
60/15
60/15
56/13
68/20
58/14
53/11
66/18
53/11
58/14
74/23
74/23


Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
82/27 57/13
85/29 72/22
81/27 61/16
104/40 76/24
78/25 68/20
82/27 64/17
84/28 62/16
82/27 68/20
90/32 78/25
80/26 59/15
86/30 63/17
84/28 76/24
69/20 63/17
78/25 64/17
88/31 74/23


W High
F/C
pc 81/27
t 88/31
c 80/26
pc 99/37
t 75/23
pc 76/24
pc 82/27
t 79/26
t 91/32
t 84/28
pc 82/27
t 88/31
r 78/25
t 77/25
t 88/31


ABACO
High:880F/31� C
. ---- Low: 810 F/27 C



S 1, AIL
FREEPORT ":-.
High:880F/31�C
Low: 790 F/260 C




NASSAU
High:880 F/31� C
.. -- ;Low:790 F/260 C








-%
ANDROS
High:890F/320 C
Low: 780 F/260 C


Sunday
Low
F/C
59/15
71/21
61/16
76/24
67/19
64/17
63/17
70/21
76/24
61/16
65/18
77/25
66/18
59/15
75/23


Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, OR
Raleigh-Durham
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tucson
Washington, DC


High
F/C
70/21
100/37
72/22
94/34
87/30
84/28
82/27
86/30
75/23
71/21
88/31
85/29
86/30
94/34
78/25


Today
Low
F/C
62/16
82/27
52/11
58/14
62/16
65/18
58/14
69/20
67/19
58/14
54/12
72/22
77/25
71/21
64/17


Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature
High ............................ ................. 91� F/33� C
Low .................. .............................. 75� F/24� C
Normal high .................................... 880 F/31� C
Normal low ...................................... 750 F/24� C
Last year's high .................................. 91� F/33� C
Last year's low .................................. 800 F/270 C


,- . h



9 ^.....


oD INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


0 1 12 31415 61 7891011
LOW MODERATE HIGH V HIGH EXT

The higher the AccuWeather UV Index" number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.



High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.)
Today 12:37 a.m. 2.5 6:49 a.m. 0.7
1:25 p.m. 3.2 8:00 p.m. 1.2
Sunday 1:47 a.m. 2.5 7:59 a.m. 0.7
2:34 p.m. 3.3 9:08 p.m. 1.0
Monday 2:59 a.m. 2.7 9:11 a.m. 0.7
3:40 p.m. 3.4 10:11 p.m. 0.9
Tuesday 4:06 a.m. 2.9 10:18 a.m. 0.4
4:41 p.m. 3.5 11:07 p.m. 0.6

I III


Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:55 a.m. Moonrise .... 12:09 a.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .................................. 0.80" Sunset ....... 7:17 p.m. Moonset ..... 2:28 p.m.
Year to date ............................................... 28.45" New First Full Last
Norm al year to date .................................... 33.91"

AccuWeather.com , 3
Forecasts and graphics provided by
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. @2009 Sep. 18 Sep. 26 Oct. 4 Oct. 11
High:890F/320 C
Low:790 F/260 C


_.- CAT ISLAND
7 , High:870F/31�0C
Low:770 F/250 C


GREATEXUMA
High:880F/31� C
Low:770F/250 C


g. .. .


W High
F/C
sh 81/27
pc 100/37
pc 76/24
s 81/27
pc 86/30
pc 82/27
s 85/29
t 87/30
pc 73/22
pc 73/22
s 78/25
t 88/31
t 89/31
s 92/33
pc 82/27


Sunday
Low V
F/C
64/17 s
80/26 s
54/12 s
56/13 s
62/16 s
65/18 pc
64/17 pc
67/19 pc
66/18 pc
58/14 pc
54/12 s
71/21 t
77/25 t
72/22 pc
62/16 s


SAN SALVADOR
High: 89* F/32* C
Low: 78* F/26�C

;''-..-,


LONG ISLAND
High: 900F/320 C
Low:77�F/250 C


N
H
L


CROOKED ISLAND/ACKLINS
RAGGED ISLAND High:930F/340 C
Low:78 F/26� C
High:890F/320 C
Low:740F/230C

GREAT INAGUA
High: 930F/340 C
Low: 760�F/240 C


MAYAGUANA
ligh: 900 F/320 C
.ow:76�F/240 C



. '" ";.


I WRDCTE I


Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland


High
F/C
91/32
64/17
73/22
81/27
61/16


Today
Low W
F/C
79/26 pc
50/10 c
55/12 t
68/20 pc
54/12 r


High
F/C
91/32
64/17
72/22
79/26
66/18


Sunday
Low W
F/C
76/24 pc
48/8 pc
51/10 sh
66/18 s
51/10 sh


Bangkok 92/33 79/26 t 91/32 77/25 sh
Barbados 86/30 77/25 sh 86/30 77/25 sh
Barcelona 75/23 64/17 s 73/22 64/17 sh
Beijing 82/27 55/12 s 82/27 55/12 pc
Beirut 81/27 73/22 s 79/26 73/22 s
Belgrade 82/27 60/15 c 79/26 59/15 c
Berlin 68/20 51/10 s 67/19 48/8 pc
Bermuda 81/27 73/22 r 82/27 73/22 c
Bogota 68/20 41/5 pc 68/20 43/6 pc
Brussels 61/16 48/8 pc 65/18 48/8 s
Budapest 81/27 59/15 c 81/27 54/12 pc
Buenos Aires 68/20 50/10 s 72/22 52/11 s
Cairo 96/35 72/22 s 92/33 72/22 s
Calcutta 94/34 83/28 sh 96/35 84/28 r
Calgary 75/23 45/7 s 68/20 44/6 s
Cancun 90/32 73/22 t 89/31 76/24 pc
Caracas 84/28 72/22 t 84/28 72/22 t
Casablanca 83/28 64/17 s 83/28 65/18 pc
Copenhagen 64/17 51/10 pc 67/19 47/8 pc
Dublin 63/17 45/7 s 64/17 46/7 s
Frankfurt 67/19 50/10 pc 70/21 48/8 s
Geneva 72/22 53/11 c 71/21 48/8 s
Halifax 68/20 55/12 pc 66/18 50/10 pc
Havana 88/31 73/22 sh 90/32 71/21 sh
Helsinki 61/16 46/7 sh 57/13 46/7 c
Hong Kong 91/32 82/27 sh 90/32 82/27 pc
Islamabad 99/37 71/21 s 103/39 73/22 s
Istanbul 75/23 65/18 r 73/22 62/16 pc
Jerusalem 88/31 63/17 s 79/26 60/15 s
Johannesburg 73/22 50/10 s 79/26 54/12 pc
Kingston 89/31 79/26 pc 87/30 78/25 sh
Lima 73/22 59/15 pc 73/22 60/15 pc
London 68/20 52/11 pc 70/21 48/8 pc
Madrid 82/27 63/17 c 82/27 63/17 pc
Manila 82/27 77/25 t 85/29 77/25 r
Mexico City 75/23 57/13 t 75/23 55/12 t
Monterrey 91/32 72/22 t 92/33 71/21 t
Montreal 75/23 55/12 pc 79/26 55/12 pc
Moscow 64/17 45/7 c 61/16 52/11 r
Munich 61/16 47/8 sh 68/20 44/6 pc
Nairobi 86/30 55/12 s 88/31 54/12 pc
New Delhi 77/25 73/22 t 82/27 75/23 s
Oslo 64/17 47/8 pc 63/17 42/5 c
Paris 70/21 51/10 s 72/22 47/8 s
Prague 66/18 47/8 pc 69/20 47/8 s
Rio de Janeiro 83/28 72/22 s 82/27 70/21 pc
Riyadh 103/39 75/23 s 104/40 76/24 s
Rome 81/27 61/16 s 77/25 61/16 s
St. Thomas 89/31 78/25 sh 87/30 78/25 s
San Juan 79/26 44/6 s 84/28 47/8 s
San Salvador 84/28 68/20 t 84/28 73/22 t
Santiago 73/22 46/7 pc 72/22 48/8 pc
Santo Domingo 90/32 73/22 pc 85/29 73/22 sh
Sao Paulo 79/26 62/16 pc 71/21 58/14 r
Seoul 77/25 59/15 sh 79/26 57/13 s
Stockholm 63/17 50/10 pc 59/15 46/7 sh
Sydney 86/30 59/15 s 86/30 61/16 s
Taipei 90/32 81/27 pc 92/33 83/28 pc
Tokyo 73/22 68/20 sh 81/27 66/18 s
Toronto 74/23 57/13 pc 77/25 55/12 s
Trinidad 84/28 64/17 pc 93/33 72/22 s
Vancouver 70/21 57/13 s 68/20 57/13 pc
Vienna 67/19 59/15 pc 68/20 53/11 c
Warsaw 72/22 51/10 pc 66/18 47/8 c
Winnipeg 74/23 57/13 c 79/26 58/14 s
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace


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WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SSE at 3-6 Knots 0-1 Feet 10 Miles 850 F
Sunday: SSW at 3-6 Knots 0-1 Feet 10 Miles 850 F
FREEPORT Today: SSE at 4-8 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 86� F
Sunday: WSW at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 5 Miles 86� F
ABACO Today: SE at 3-6 Knots 3-6 Feet 10 Miles 850 F
Sunday: SW at 4-8 Knots 3-6 Feet 10 Miles 850 F





Seattle
88/54

HOT Billings BREEZY
70/49 Minneapolis
80/59
D New York
COOLER icago 74/5569/63
1 8DenverWashington








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Snow preShown are noon positions of weather systems and Warm
S now precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm
V V Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary

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that yowlhave excellent insu rance
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Nobody does it better.



SMJSURANE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LMlInU. LN SLRA-NCE BRLKUERJ & AGENTs'

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PAGE 12, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


OUT ABOUT

LOCATED AT THE ATLANTIS RESORT on Paradise Island, Aura attracts a crowd
of Bahamian party-goers, tourists, business travellers and international celebrities.
With a stylish interior design, international guest DJs spinning the best of all musical gen-
res, VIP table service and hip patrons, Aura is a real party experience. The upscale club
attracts a fashionable set out to have a fantastic time.
Gabrielle Union, Shakira, Tommy Lee, Jermaine Dupri, Lil Wayne, Sammy Sosa and
Kid Rock are just a few of the celebrities who party at Aura when in the Bahamas. So if
you want to party in style, put on your fab new outfit, have some pre-party drinks at
Nobu and then sashay upstairs into Aura to party until morning.


Tor T q -i n --- . -
I I
The Trbn orronou






* * S . *.O . C


THE SCENE I




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