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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01421
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: September 11, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01421

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TRY OUR /
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LOW 79F

S.- CLOUDY,
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hip bi


Challenge will 'make

or break' St Cecilia

nomination hopeful's

political career
By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
IN WHAT will be the make or break
moment of his political career, The Tribune
has confirmed that PLP leadership contender
Paul Moss will officially launch his campaign
for leader of the party on September 22.
Having canvassed stalwart councillors
throughout Grand Bahama, and New Provi-
dence, sources close to Mr Moss claim that
the St Cecilia nomination hopeful has been
SEE page 12 *

Anglican Archdeacon 'told police
girl in assault case slapped him'


ANGLICAN Archdeacon
Ivan Ranfurly Brown told
police that the female com-
plainant in his assault case
slapped him while at a church
picnic last October.
Inspector Craig Stubbs told
the court yesterday that
Father Brown had declined
to give a written statement,
but gave an oral statement of
his account of what took place
at the church picnic.
Father Brown, the rector


of St Agnes Anglican Church,
is accused of physically
assaulting a 14-year-old girl
on October 13, 2008 while at a
church picnic on Nirvana
Beach.
Inspector Stubbs told the
court that Father Brown said
that there were a number of
male outsiders on the beach
that day and he had to physi-
cally remove one of them
SEE page 12


A WOMAN is fighting for her life after
an early morning blaze destroyed her home.
The 36-year-old victim has second and
third degree burns on 80 per cent of her
body, say medics.
Last night her condition was described
as "critical."
Emergency services were alerted to the


More job layoffs
on Grand Bahama
By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
A HOTELIER on Grand
Bahama chalked up the most
recent round of layoffs on that
island after government reject-
ed a proposal that he claimed
would have kept people in
their jobs.
When contacted for com-
ment yesterday, Tourism Min-
ister Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace was sorry about the
lay-offs but explained that
government was not in a posi-
tion to bail-out every company
experiencing financial chal-
lenges.
Andrew Barnett, vice presi-
dent and general manager of
the Best Western Castaways
Resort in Freeport, said the
property was forced to let go
about one third of its employ-
ees - effective September, 20
- as it struggles with shrink-
SEE page eight


blaze in Canaan Lane, off Shirley Street, at
around lam.
Neighbours drove the woman to Princess
Margaret Hospital where she is being treat-
ed in the Intensive Care Unit.
Police, who are trying to find the cause of
the fire, have not yet released any further
information.
It's not known if the woman was home
alone at the time of the fire, but there are
reports that her fiance helped her escape
the flames.


ENVIRONMENTAL-
ISTS are concerned that
the run-off from the Caves
Point development during
hard rain could be harm-
ing the marine environ-
ment.
A worried citizen for-
warded photos of a "river
of mud" flowing from the
high-end residential devel-


opment on West Bay Street
down to the beach oppo-
site. From there, it drained
out into the sea and spread,
forming a thick cloud on
the surface of the water.
The source said: "This
happens every time we
have heavy rain and
SEE page two


The


Tribune


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


Hi^Knowles and


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Bishop

Fraser

retrial

resumes
By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@
tribunemedia.net
SEMEN was found on
the carpet of the church
office of Bishop Earl
Randy Fraser several
prosecution witnesses tes-
tified yesterday.
Fraser, who is on
$10,000 bail, is accused of
having a sexual relation-
ship with a 16-year-old
girl between July 2005
and February 2006. The
retrial resumed yesterday
before Magistrate Car-
olita Bethel in Court 8,
Bank Lane.
When the matter
SEE page 12

School security officer
accused of indecent
assault of students
By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
TEN prosecution witnesses
testified in the trial of a high
school security officer accused
of indecent assault of eight stu-
dents at the North Eleuthera
High School yesterday.
School administrators and
several alleged victims
appeared in magistrate's court
on Harbour Island and testi-
fied against Adrian White, 39,
of Airport Road, Eleuthera,
according to Sergeant God-
frey Brennen who prosecuted
the case.
The matter, heard before
SEE page 12

Universal Distributors
'operations never stopped'
during eviction attempt
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - The man-
agement of Universal Distrib-
utors said that its operations
never stopped as the eviction
attempt by the landlords was
quickly resolved.
Robert Lewis, general man-
ager, issued a statement on
Thursday in reference to the
lock-out of Universal Distribu-
tors employees on Wednesday.
He advised the general pub-
lic that the company's opera-
tions continue as usual.
"Yesterday morning, Sep-
tember 9, business operations
SEE page 12


PLP leatle











Infrastructural



projects to create



almost 400 jobs


ALMOST 400 new jobs are expected to be
created in Abaco and Grand Bahama with
the construction of new government com-
plexes.
Government in conjunction with the
National Insurance Board (NIB) has initiated
the pre-qualification process for construction
of new complexes on those islands.
Approximately 200 construction jobs are
pegged for the Grand Bahama complex, with
approximately 180 construction jobs ear-
marked for Abaco.

Construction

Funded by the NIB, the construction of
the government complexes complements oth-
er major infrastructural projects throughout
the country, including the redevelopment of
the Lynden Pindling International Airport
and the New Providence Road Improvement
Project.
Pre-qualification requests to contractors
were advertised on Wednesday for bidding
on the Grand Bahama complex and in late
August for the Marsh Harbour, Abaco facili-
ty.
The $17 million, approximately 65,000 sq ft


Freeport complex, designed by Donald Dean
of the Architects Incorporated, will house the
Customs and Immigration Departments, Edu-
cation, the Passport Office and Data Process-
ing.
The $19 million, approximately 50,000 sq ft
Marsh Harbour complex, designed by Bruce
Lafleur of Bruce Lafleur and Associates, will
house major government offices and depart-
ments, including the Prime Minister's Office,
the Ministry of Finance and the Public Trea-
sury, Business Licence and Real Property Tax,
the National Insurance Board, Tourism, Cus-
toms and Immigration, Magistrate's Courts,
and the Post Office.
Contractors wishing to bid on the Marsh
Harbour complex were to collect pre-qualifi-
cation documents from NIB's Clifford Darling
Complex, Baillou Hill Road in Nassau by
Wednesday, and submit the signed and sealed
documents to the NIB office on or before 12
noon on Tuesday, September 15.
Documents for bidding on the Freeport
complex can be collected from the Nassau
office or NIB's Freeport Office, Mall Drive,
until September 16, and should be returned to
the respective offices on or before 12 noon on
Wednesday, September 23.


nobody seems to be aware or interested." I l "nvIn ur iVluu iU IOIwi rg m t e iign-enu
After seeing the photos, Bahamas Reef residential development.
Environment Educational Foundation
(BREEF) executive director Casuarina ing only, rather than clearing the entire lot
McKinney said this kind of run-off is "very and enforcing these mandates.
damaging" to the marine environment, par- "BREEF is certainly very concerned aboul
ticularly to sensitive ecosystems such sea- the amount of land-clearing along the coast.'
grass beds and coral reefs. ReEarth president Sam Duncombe saic
"Coral reefs in particular are dependent all developers of coastline projects should be
on clear water to thrive and support fish- made to build retaining walls and pave roads
series, tourism and the reef's function as a before work starts.
barrier to protect islands from storm surges," Mrs Duncombe said she knows of several
I . I _-. ^ �1 - ^ W + P -. Qt,. t -.1^ tl. c + 1.. *�


she said.
"Buffers of native plants along the coast-
line serve to protect land from the sea during
storm events, and they also help block the
run-off of sediment into the sea. In many
places, this vegetative buffer has been
removed to make way for roads and build-
ings. The impact beyond the scope of the
actual development is often not visible until
we experience the sort of heavy rains that we
have had in the past few days.
"There is a clear need for better land use
practices that will restrict clear-cutting of
trees on land. This can be done by limiting
the clear-cutting to the footprint of the build-


arca as along West Bay sLICCL WIICIC LthIs ilL-
ing" is occurring every time it rains.
"This is directly affecting the seven-mile
barrier reef which runs along the western
coastline. Silt smothers the reefs communi-
ties off shore, destroys the reefs, which pro-
tect the shoreline from storm surges affect-
ing the coastline, and in this case the roads
adjacent to the shoreline."
The Tribune contacted Caves Point Devel-
opment in connection with the matter a few
minutes before 5pm yesterday. An employ-
ee said the only person able to speak on the
matter had left for the day, but could be
contacted for comment today.


Doctors Hospital specialist


to give Swine Flu update


DR SHEENA ANTONIO,
internal medicine specialist and
a clinical director at Doctors
Hospital with responsibility for
the Medical Surgical Unit, will
update Bahamians on H1N1,
commonly known as swine flu,
during the Bank of the
Bahamas (BOB) Medline
Health Expo on Saturday at the
Sheraton, Cable Beach.
"With schools recently
resuming, the concern about
H1N1 swine flu has skyrocket-
ed. With that in mind, we want-
ed to add a presentation to our
extensive programme on health
matters and we are very grateful
to Doctors Hospital for answer-
ing the call and inviting Dr
Antonio, who is well-informed
and well-respected within the
medical community where she
practices both privately and rep-
resents the hospital to update
the public," said Vaughn
Delaney, deputy managing
director of BOB.
The bank, which recently
introduced the medical payment
solution, BOB Medline Visa, is
sponsoring the event, bringing
together leading physicians, sur-
geons and medical experts from
the Bahamas and South Florida.



Ul


The talk on the H1N1 virus is
expected to be a hot topic,
according to Mr Delaney.
"Officials at the Centres for
Disease Control (CDC) in the
US have predicted that up to
half the population of the US
could contract the swine flu in
the coming year and somewhere
between 30,000 and 90,000 per-
sons are expected to die from
it," said Mr Delaney.
"Those are very alarming fig-
ures. We feel it is very impor-
tant that we make as many
Bahamians as possible aware of
what they can do to protect
themselves and their families,
and people also want the latest
information on when a vaccine
is likely to be available in the
Bahamas."
The presentation on swine
flu will take place in the Shera-
ton's Independence Ballroom
at 10.30am.
Other presentations include
Dr Daniel Shedid of the Cleve-
land Clinic Florida speaking on
spinal stenosis, diagnosis and
minimally invasive treatment at
11.15am.
At the same time, in a dif-
ferent room, Dr Judith Hurley
of the University of Miami
Health Systems will address
breast cancer in the Bahamas.
At 12.15pm, there are pre-
sentations by Dr Barry Russell
of the Bahamas Orthodontic
Centre, who will discuss the new
Damon system that is revolu-
tionising orthodontics, and by
Dr Juan Bolivar of the Miami
Children's Hospital, discussing
cardiology.


"There is also very keen
interest in the new Da Vinci
Robotic Surgery technique, so
we are extremely pleased that
we have three experts from
Broward General Medical Cen-
tre presenting on that topic at
1.45pm," said Mr Delaney.
At the same time, in another
private area, local expert Dr
Robin Roberts, a leading figure
in the fight against prostate can-
cer, will speak on men's health.
At 2.45pm, there will be pre-
sentations by Dr Conville
Brown, founder of the Medical
Pavilion, home of the Heart
Centre and the Cancer Centre
Bahamas, will address the topic
of the healthy heart, and Mr
Michael Thorpe of the South
Florida-based CMI South will
address magnetic imaging
(MRI).
The last presentation of the
day titled "It is important to
know your numbers" will be
conducted by Dr Teresa Iribar-
ren of Baptist Health South
Florida.
More than 40 booths will
offer health and wellness infor-
mation, "literally on subjects
from head to toe," said Mr
Delaney.
There also will be free blood
pressure, cholesterol and BMI
(body mass index) screenings,
a blood drive and numerous
giveaways, including two free
weekend stays at the luxurious
Opera Suites and Marina on
Biscayne Bay in Miami. The
Expo is open to the public with-
out charge from 10am to
4.30pm.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


FUNERAL SERVICE FOR


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FrLendds may pay their latl repectl at Lori Chappell FLdneral Homue GPL,
1500 Garner Rd, Suite A, Ralcigh, NC, 27610.


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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


t
it
11
d
1
11


THE TRIBUNE






THETRIBUNERIDAY, ST E 0 I
. S A P


Attempted armed


Infant discovered


robbery victim's r .

family appeal for alone in locked van

blood donations ______ I


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE family of the man
shot in an attempted armed
robbery of Dean's Building
Supplies on Saturday after-
noon are appealing to any-
one who can donate blood
to visit Doctors Hospital as
he is in "dire need" of fresh
supplies.
Alexander Dean, 23, was
shot in the abdomen and the
back when a dread-locked
gunman and an accomplice
burst into Mr Dean's family-
run hardware store on Park-
gate Road and demanded
cash.
The men fled the store on
foot after the shooting at
around 3pm.
Mr Dean had to undergo
spinal surgery as a result of
the wound in his back.
While he is now in stable
condition, doctors warned
that he could be crippled.
The bullet in his abdomen
is scheduled to be removed
today.
Police are hunting the two
criminals and calling for
assistance from the public.
Police press liaison offi-
cer Walter Evans said: "We
are seeking the help of resi-
dents in the area or anyone
who may have been passing
the Parkgate Road area and
noticed two men running, to
contact us at telephone
numbers 919,502-9991, 322-
3816, or call Crime Stoppers
on 328-TIPS (8477)."
Assistant Superintendent
Evans said the dreadlocked
gunman was wearing a
white shirt and blue jeans.
No description of the sec-
ond man was provided.
The shooting came a little
over two weeks after moth-
er of three Wendy Bullard
was brutally gunned down
in front of her place of work.
Ms Bullard, 34, was shot
in the face when two
masked men held up 21st
Century Steel Welding Lim-
ited off Royal Palm Street,
just several yards south of
St George's Anglican
Church.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


S By AVA TURNQUEST


A CROWD gathered yester-
day afternoon when a security
guard discovered an infant alone
in a locked van in the parking
lot of the Town Centre Mall's
Cost Rite entrance.
Top Class chief of security
Darren Stubbs said that he was
horrified when he discovered a
young baby dangling out of a
rear-facing car seat in the pas-
senger seat of what he described
as a gray Astro van.
He was making his rounds
when he noticed that the vehicle
was on, but appeared to be emp-
ty. Upon closer inspection, he
noticed what appeared to be a
baby boy screaming inside.
"The car seat was in an awk- TOP CLASS chief of security
ward position," Mr Stubbs said, Darren Stubbs explains to a
"the baby was strapped in but Tribune reporter how he dealt with
his lower body was hanging out the situation yesterday.
to the side with his upper body
still secured in the seat."
Mr Stubbs immediately radioed his control to leave the sc
centre, which asked the information desk to make He said sh
an announcement over the PA based on infor- arrived on the
mation gathered from the vehicle's registration Mr Stubbs s
sticker, about the incic
Mr Stubbs said he did not remember to get van was left ot
the plate number, however, because he was so "Many won
focused on rescuing the baby. or their doors
The control centre made an emergency call to are a lot of va
the police, while Mr Stubbs worked frantically to wait and search
find a way inside the van. "Luckily I v
"All doors were locked except for the back it's so sad to t
hatch; I climbed in through there and unlocked had I not disco
the doors. After I took the baby out I gave him to Mr Stubbs s
a woman that had been assisting me." ment in relate
Mr Stubbs and concerned customers then wait- him they woul


0a
"-s
3
t--



?i


By AVA TURNQUEST


THE New Covenant Bap-
tist Church yesterday
unveiled to the press its new-
ly constructed memorial wall
for the country's murder vic-
tims.
Bishop Simeon Hall,
senior pastor of the church,
said the wall and its promi-
nent location - facing Inde-
pendence Drive - will serve
as a physical reminder to the
public of those killed through
acts of violence, "forcing
everyone to acknowledge,
appreciate, and most of all
respect, the sanctity of life
and the permanence of
death."
"By posting the names of
murdered persons we will
hopefully achieve three
things; we'd like to commis-
erate with their families,
underscore the precious gift
of life, and we pray that the
wall will impose on viewers,
possibly deterring someone
from committing murder,"
he said.
Construction of the wall
cost around $1,500 - money
the church considers well
spent.
The seven sq ft concrete
wall will be able to hold the
names of 100 victims on each
side along with the dates of
their deaths.
Bishop Hall said he is con-
fident that the wall will play a
significant part in highlight-
ing the tragedy of murder in
the Bahamas.
"It can be said that for


BISHOP SIMEON HALL of the
New Covenant Baptist Church
stands at the wall.
every murder there can be
up to 150 affected persons,"
he said.
Bishop Hall said his time
spent chairing the National
Advisory Council on Crime
was a huge influence on his
fervor for this project.
He said he laments the fact
that Bahamians have become
desensitised to murder and
often disassociate themselves
from the victims and persons
affected.
The New Covenant Bap-
tist Church invites the public
to attend the official unveil-
ing of the wall on Sunday,
September 27, at 1.15pm
after their morning service.
At that time the church will
have affixed the current list
of victims and constructed a
sign that will sit atop the wall.
Families of murder victims
are encouraged to send in the
names of their loved one so
that they can be added to the
wall at no cost to them, space
permitting.
The murder count cur-
rently stands at 57 for the
year.


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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


ed for what he estimates to be
about 30 to 45 minutes before a
woman who appeared to be in
her early 40s, assisted by a pack-
ing employee, came out of the
mall carrying groceries.
"She went to the vehicle, then
after noticing the baby wasn't
there, she immediately started
back toward the store. It was at
this time that the lady holding
the baby and I were approach-
ing her."
The lady explained that she
had just run into the store for
some mayonnaise, Mr Stubbs
said, adding however that he
noticed she had more than a few
groceries with her.
When questioned further, the
woman reportedly stated that
there was no one who could
mind the child for her.
Mr Stubbs said that he began
to lecture the woman sternly
about the dangers of leaving a
baby in a vehicle, but she wanted
ene as quickly as possible.
e left shortly before the police
scene.
said that what disturbed him most
lent was that the back hatch of the
pen.
ien leave their handbags in the car
open in this parking lot, and there
grants and undesirables that just
h cars or even break in," he warned.
was making my rounds at the time;
think what would have happened
covered the child."
aid he gave police officers a state-
on to the matter, and they assured
d investigate further.






PAGEIAU ST 4, TRIA SEPTEMBEROR 11,200THTRBUN
V *A -M SI6


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, c, tiinm ') 322-1986
Ad, c,' iig Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm



Bitter opposition faces Obama


ATLANTA - You could learn near-
ly as much about the health care reform
situation in Congress by just watching
President Obama's speech to the com-
bined House and Senate as by listening
to it.
Not that the president fell short. He
clearly lined out what is in and what is
not in the proposals supported by the
administration - separating the wheat
from the summer's accumulation of
chaff, the wild lies, Internet rumours
and manufactured misinformation.
He made a strong case not only for
the economic necessity for reform but
also for the moral imperative to pro-
vide decent health coverage for all
Americans and to protect consumers
from insurance company abuses and the
bankruptcy that too often results from
serious illness.
Obama continued as well to hold the
way open to compromise if proposals
put forward in its name would accom-
plish the broad reforms that are essential
if America's overly costly, underper-
forming health system is to be put aright
for the long run and not just patched
up a bit here and there to keep it from
immediate collapse.
But the TV cameras showed what the
president is up against - a Congress
not just deeply sundered along party
lines but an opposition so bitter that
one of its members heckled Obama as if
the president were a lounge act in a low-
rent nightclub.
We are accustomed from watching
State of the Union addresses to seeing
the members of a president's party often
cheer while members of the other party
sit mute. OK. That goes with a two-par-
ty system.
But even Obama's call for repairs that
many Republicans themselves have
called for - making health insurance
available to persons now disqualified
by actually needing it, protecting policy
holders from being dumped by their
insurers for daring to fall seriously ill


- drew no GOP recognition. Cameras
panning the Republican muster caught
frequent sneers and forlorn headshakes.
At moments when the president's
address seemed strongest, House Minor-
ity Leader John Boehner of Ohio
looked like a soured hangman whose
victim had been snatched away by
reprieve.
Republicans cheered only when Oba-
ma said he would carry out his prede-
cessor's plan to let selected states test
various schemes for holding down mal-
practice lawsuits and arguably exces-
sive awards. Tort reform has long been
a GOP enthusiasm, not because the
costs are a major cause of rising health
costs - they aren't, though they can be
killers for individual physicians - but as
a step toward broadly shielding corpo-
rations from liability awards.
It has been plain for weeks that the
Republican leadership decided early on
that their party's prospects would be
best served by strangling the Obama
presidency in its infancy and to do that
by promoting misinformation and incit-
ing confusion to prevent health care
reform.
The GOP's poor-me lamentations of
bipartisanship tendered and rejected
are belied by the party's abandonment
even of proposals from its own members
- sensible end-of-life planning between
patients and their doctors, health care
co-ops instead of a public plan - once
Democrats accept them or even show
interest.
Perhaps President Obama will have
inspired a few Republicans to give the
plain national interest a second thought.
We'll see. If not, hope he at least
retrieved enough of a wavering public
from its capture by hysterics shouting
"socialism" and scaring Medicare
patients with lies so that Democrats will
be stiffened to do the job on their own.
.......................................................................
(This article was written by Tom
Teepen of Cox Newspapers - c.2009).


Business as




usual? Not so


EDITOR, The Tribune.
Business is advised to
"brace" for an increase of 2 per
cent on the payroll tax (aka
income tax). The tax rate in
2010 is slated to rise to 10.8 per
cent. The wage ceiling rises
from $400 to $600.
An example of the effect of
the increases on a small com-
pany with three employees fol-
lows:
At the current tax rate of
8.8 per cent on wages with the
cap at $400 per week the tax is
$5,500 per annum. When the
wage ceiling is raised from $400
to $600 and the tax rate
increased to 10.8 per cent the
annual combined payment to
NIB becomes $10,100 per
annum; an 84 per cent
increase!
Such an increase will have
unintended harmful conse-
quences. Most Bahamian busi-
nesses have already been lay-
ing-off employees in line with
falling income. The growing
numbers of unemployed will
join the line-up for Unemploy-
ment Insurance, the pro-
gramme government enacted
earlier this year in a fit of unsus-
tainable altruism.


E

I
n
f
d
e
t
c
n
f
i:
t
i:


The tax increase coupled
with the Unemployment Bene-
fits programme sets in motion a
vicious cycle of tax increases to
support the newly unemployed
whose numbers increase as a
consequence of the previous
tax increase.
Does this make sense? Well
yes, if a welfare state is a
desired end, and government
expansion the means to the
end. The unemployed are non-
contributors. Increasing unem-
ployment results in a decrease
in contributions to NIB. There-
fore a tax increase that leads to
job loss undermines the objec-
tive of the increase intended to
guarantee the viability of the
Fund in the future.
To increase taxes in a slow-
ing economy takes resources
from producers when they are
needed most. In the best of
times taxes are disincentives for
economic expansion, in the
worst of times they are destruc-
tive to businesses struggling to
survive.


The NIB Fund as a ready
source for government bor-
rowing is a kind of candy store
to indulge the government's
sweet tooth for spending. Per-
haps the "ready" money
explains ridiculous amounts
spent on projects like the
$36,000 for each of 6 round-
abouts for the Beauty Pageant
- if the numbers reported in the
press are correct.
Out of debt out of danger is
an old proverb that says it all. It
applies to personal debt as well
as to the liabilities of business
and government. The danger
to the value of the Bahamian
Dollar by the growing debt
affects everyone and cannot be
ignored. Tax rates and policies
that increase costs undermine
businesses the major source of
income needed to reduce the
debt. Business is advised to
"brace" itself for tax increases
yet government exempts itself
from responsible actions that
would have made a tax increase
unnecessary. There is some-
thing tragically wrong with that.
THE NASSAU
INSTITUTE
Nassau,
September 9, 2009.


It's time to honour cultural icon Kayla

Lockhart-Edwards in a meaningful way
EDITOR, The Tribune. oured in a significant way. How come nothing has
been discussed yet towards this end?
What are we waiting for? Kayla Lockhart- I believe that the singular honour should be to
Edwards, a cultural icon has passed for a while rename the Centre For the performing Arts, The
low and many still have sadness in their hearts Kayla Lockhart-Edwards Centre for the Per-
or the great loss experienced. We have lost a forming Arts. This is the least that could be done
magnificent human being. What are we going to for a lady who has given her life toward making
lo to celebrate this beautiful, extraordinarily tal- the Bahamas a better place through her perfor-
nted lady who always spoke positive things and mances as a TV producer, conductor, song writer,
vho was the epitome of a professional enter- soloist, performer, ambassador, international
ainer par excellence. artist, mentor and friend to many. Who else can
It is no secret that Kayla has made invaluable lay claim to so many achievements in one life-
ontributions to the Bahamas locally and inter- time. Kayla was a national treasure.
nationally. She has distinguished herself in the We usually drag our feet with everything, but
ield of culture that will be hard to surpass. She egos aside, bureaucracy aside, let us do the right
influenced many to enter the field of music and thing. This needs no consultation. There should
theatre who have also gone on to become giants be an overwhelming groundswell of support for
n their own right. this idea. At least it should clear our consciences.


Kayla was a class act and has set the bar so high
that it would be hard for anyone to equal her
performance in musicals and many onstage per-
formances. She has done sufficient to be hon-


IVOINE W INGRAHAM
Nassau,
September, 2009.


Rising food prices are a serious concern


EDITOR, The Tribune.
Food prices are rising a lot
faster than what the Depart-
ment of Statistics seems to be
able to report and it certainly
has to be a serious concern as in
the US their food prices are
declining.
I shop around - simply the
highest priced group of stores is
City Meat - next is Solomon's
Super Centre then Robin Hood
and the cheapest on average is
Super Value Food Stores.
Both City Meat and Super
Value give stamps so there is a
balancing to an extent there but
City Meat is streets more
expensive.
Why is bread going up and
up? Why is aluminum foil going
up and up? Why is there such a


difference on meat prices and
bananas, as common as
bananas?
All prices should have come
down as BEC is far from as
high as last summer but that
does not show in the prices?
It seems no longer retailers
need to price items or that
seems to what is allowed at the
scanning stores so if you don't
check the prices carefully you
can be over-charged. I did not
hear that Consumer Affairs has
dropped this requirement?
Remember the lowest price is
the only price you can be
charged.
I read today in The Tribune
about City Meat and their
financing; I must sigh here as
it really has been going on for a
long time. When is this charade


seemingly going to stop and
stop finally with full disclosure?
Why does the Board of Direc-
tors refuse to publish their
annual reports? What has their
external auditors got to do with
them finding new equity financ-
ing?
The 20 per cent that you
report surely that is simply the
required input from their exist-
ing shareholders and the other
80 per cent is still unresolved
but they are asking RBC to
provide? RBC has either said
yes or refused as it is too risky it
is as simple as that - why is
City Meat not being transpar-
ent?
SHEPARD SMITH
Nassau,
August 24, 2009.


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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


I





THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009, PAGE 5


praisiIeBa Activists call on government to

0 - - - - - AA - - -- A i A i


NEWLY sworn-in United
States Ambassador to the
Bahamas Nicole Avant
praised the country for the
role it plays in helping the US
protect its "third border."
"In the area of regional
security, the Bahamas plays a
critical role in working togeth-
er with us to monitor and pro-
tect our third border. There is
no better example of multi-
agency, multi-national coop-
eration than the success of
Operation Bahamas Turks and
Caicos - OPBAT - which has
for 25 years significantly
reduced the deadly flow of ille-
gal drugs through the
Bahamas and ultimately to our
children in the United States,"
she said.
Ms Avant was sworn in as
the 13th US Ambassador to
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas by US Secretary of
State Hillary Clinton in Wash-
ington, DC, on Wednesday.
Ms Avant is expected to
present her letters of credence
to Governor General Arthur
Hanna in October.

Confidence
In her swearing in remarks,
Ms Avant thanked President
Barack Obama for his contin-
ued faith and confidence in
her. She said that she is hon-
oured to have the opportunity
to serve in the Bahamas and
advance the existing close and
mutually beneficial partner-
ship.
Ms Avant noted that
beyond the geographic prox-
imity, the US and the
Bahamas share a commitment
to democratic ideals, the rule
of law and strategic interests
that span issues of regional
security, economic and social
progress, energy security and
stewardship of the environ-
ment.
She said that this strong
relationship has been
described by the leaders of
both nations as "excellent."
Her mission, she said, is to
keep it that way.
Ms Avant said that from an
early age she has benefitted
from the wonderful influence
of her parents, entertainment
industry legend Clarence
Avant and philanthropist,


Jacqueline Avant. Their pas-
sion for philanthropy, politics
and culture left an indelible
mark upon her.
Her parents, she said, have
instilled in her and her broth-
er, Alex, the importance of
using their talents to learn, to
mentor, to uplift and to serve -
in any way possible.
She said that she has strived
to follow in their footsteps and
eagerly awaits the opportunity
to apply the lessons she has
learned; service to ideals and
principles; service on behalf of
the economically disadvan-
taged and children in need.
Ms Avant has worked tire-
lessly to mobilise and engage
the younger generation
towards greater charitable and
political involvement. She said
she is committed to and pas-
sionate about children and
ensuring that the less fortu-
nate and disabled are given
every opportunity for educa-
tion and equal access to mean-
ingful employment.
Most recently, Ms Avant
served as vice-president of
Interior Music Publishing and
Avant Garde Music Publish-
ing (1998-2009) and was the
Southern California Finance
Co-Chairwoman of the Barack
Obama Presidential Cam-
paign.
In her professional capacity,
Ms Avant served as an acade-
mic counsellor at the Neigh-
borhood Academic Initiative,
a University of Southern Cali-
fornia mentorship programme
for high school students that
provided full academic schol-
arships as well as daily guid-
ance and direction in social
behavior and responsibility.
For a number of years, Ms
Avant actively served as a
board member for the follow-
ing organizations: Best Bud-
dies International, a global vol-
unteer movement that creates
opportunities for one-to-one
friendships, integrated employ-
ment and leadership develop-
ment for people with intellec-
tual and developmental dis-
abilities; The Bogart Pediatric
Research Programme, which
raises vital funds to support
early stage pediatric cancer
research at the Bogart labora-
tories located at Children's
Hospital Los Angeles.


improve aog pouna conditions


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ANIMAL rights activists are
calling on the government to
improve "horrific" conditions
at the dog pound and invest in
canine control services.
Former president of Animals
Require Kindness (ARK) Jane
Mather told The Tribune how
ARK worked with the pound
to train staff in compassionate
care and euthanising of animals,
but the standard of practices
declined when ARK backed
out.
Ms Mather, current president
of Advocates for Animal
Rights, said: "When I first went
in there it was such a horrific
situation that I contacted the
government and asked if we
could get these guys trained.
"There was a dog there with
half its face blown off, which
they left until Friday to
euthanise.
"They would put puppies to
sleep in front of their mother,
and then put her to sleep on top
of them. They were euthanis-
ing one puppy they left the nee-
dle in the heart, while it was
alive, to answer the phone.
"And then they would load
all the dead dogs into the back
of a truck on Fridays and dump
them at the government land-
fill."
ARK provided traps, med-
ication, staff uniforms and more
to help improve the state of the
pound, and Ms Mather went
with a group of staff from the
Canine Control Unit to a similar
unit in Broward County, Flori-
da, where they learned how to
catch, handle and euthanise ani-
mals in a humane way.
When a consultant from
Broward County visited the
pound in Nassau in 1993 he said
he was "shocked and truly dis-
turbed" by the conditions there,
and ranked it as the "\\-l! ' he
had seen in the 18 years he had
worked in the field.
Ms Mather said: "When I was
there it was okay, but as soon as
somebody stopped going the


place reverted back to its old
ways, and they wouldn't let me
in anymore.
"They don't catch the dogs
that really need to be caught,
it's other people that do that.
These are the ones that are easy
to catch so it's no big deal.
"It really needs to be dealt
with."
Poor conditions at the pound
were highlighted by a young vis-
itor to the site last month.
14-year-old Kirsh Duncombe
was so horrified by the way ani-
mals are treated at the pound,
he wrote to The Tribune to
make public the horror of see-
ing a dead dog locked in a cage
with a live one, animals starved
of food and water and unsani-
tary conditions.
Tribune staff then visited the
pound in the Botanical Gar-
dens, Chippingham Road, but
were refused entry, and the
Department of Agriculture and
Marine Resources has still not


given Tribune staff permission
to tour the pound.
Agriculture Minister Larry
Cartwright said: "It's normally
off limits because they bring in
dogs from the streets who could


have all sorts of diseases."
He maintains the 14-year-old
schoolboy and his group had
"hi-.i- , i." their way in "under
false pretenses" as they said
they were working for the
Bahamas Humane Society next
door.
A statement was due to be
released by the Department last
week, but had still not been
received before press time yes-
terday.
Mr Cartwright said: "Once
the statement has been issued I
am sure the understanding pub-
lic will realise that it's not a
tourist attraction, it's not a place
where you can take anybody.
"It's cleaned on a daily basis
but it needs some minor repairs
and cleaning up, and I think it
would be naive of us to say that
everything is in tip-top shape
because it's not, we are human
beings working there... need I
say more?"
Mr Cartwright said he would
inquire about allowing Tribune
staff permission to tour the
pound.


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ANITA L BURROWS
Matthew Town, Inagua

ANTONIA LESBOTT
P. O. Box SS-5481
New Bight Cat Island

BRENDA ADDERLEY

CLAUDE LESBOTT
P. O. Box SS-5481
New Bight Cat Island

CYRIL WILLIAMS I
Yellow Elder Gardens 2

CYRIL WILLIAMS II
Yellow Elder Gardens 2

DWAYNE DORSETTE

EDNA DEAN
P. O. Box N-4912

IAN TRECO
P. O. Box N-3693

JASON SAUNDERS
Prince Charles Drive

JENNIFER TRECO
P. O. Box N-3693

KEVA FAWKES
Matthew Town, Inagua

KOVAN SMITH
P. O. Box CB-11825


LEANDRA PINDER
Matthew Town, Inagua

MERVIN SMITH
P. O. Box CB-11825

MIRIAM NAOMI INGRAHAM
P. O. Box N-7905


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NESHA JASMINE L CULMER
P. O. Box SS-5818

NIKITA CURTIS

OLIVIA GAITOR
P. O. Box N-5359

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P. O. Box N-7905

RENDAL COLEBY
P. O. Box N-8672

SANSCHIA CULMER
P. O. Box SS-5818

STAFFORD MILLER
Pinder's Point Freeport, GB

STEPHEN FAWKES
Matthew Town, Inagua

VICTORIA SAUNDERS
Prince Charles Drive

WELLINGTON DORSETTE

WILFRED GAITOR
P. O. Box N-5359


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By KATHRYN CAMPBELL
FORMER Parliamentarian
Claudius Leander Minnis,
hailed as "an outstanding no-
nonsense son of the Bahamian
soil" who loved his family, God
and church, was laid to rest on
Wednesday.
The three-hour state-recog-
nised funeral services at St
Barnabas Anglican Church,
conducted by Fathers Michael
Maragh and Carlton Turner,
drew hundreds of mourners
from across the social and polit-
ical spectrum.
The service reflected on the
life of Mr Minnis in special trib-
utes, music led by St Barnabas
Senior Choir, prayers and scrip-
ture readings.
Governor General Arthur
Hanna said, "all of us of what-
ever political persuasion know
of the valuable contribution of
Mr Leander Minnis to our peo-
ple and our homeland and are
particularly saddened by his
passing."
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham described Mr Minnis
as a "good and decent man."
He said Mr Minnis was
among those crusaders who
made a "significant contribu-
tion to the movement for
Majority Rule in the Bahamas"
and who served his constituents


General Mabmotr
Hotel Manar
Operatorse Manae
Food & Beqe rgeiorewtors
Chefs
Sous Ctief
Speciaty Rstwjrarnt Cooks
Firynriial CornllIdJW
Acooutlents
Co d Contrllera
Ino"n Auditor
Chl Off Sweurity
Sales Menager


THE CASKET bearing the body of former Parliamentarian Leader Minnis is taken by official pallbearers to
Lakeview Memorial Gardens.


S. A. T. PREPARATION

CLASSES
AT KINGSWAY ACADEMY


Beginning Saturday September 26 through Saturday
December 5, 2009, Kingsway Academy will hold
S.A.T. Preparation Classes from 9:00 a.m. to
12:00 noon culminating in the writing of the S. A. T.
Examination in January. The cost is $250.00 per
person and includes all materials.


Interested persons are asked to contact the
Business Office at telephone 324-6887 / 324-6269
or the Guidance Conselor at 324-8811 or 324-3409.


Bamboo Town constituency
and served for two consecutive
terms.
He was a founding member


of the Bahamas Trade Union
Congress and a member of the
Stalwart Council of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party.


and country well.
"He also contributed signifi-
cantly to his political party in
and out of season and gained
the respect of his colleagues as
well as those on the other side
of the political divide.
"A successful businessman
who entered the political arena,
Mr Minnis earned a reputation
for trustworthiness and was
made a trustee of the Progres-
sive Liberal Party," Mr Ingra-
ham said.
Following the service, offi-
cial pallbearers and a colour
party of Police and Defence
Forces officers placed the cas-
ket bearing Mr Minnis' body
into the official hearse and pro-
ceeded to Lakeview Memorial
Gardens Mausoleum for inter-
ment.
Mr Minnis was appointed to
the Senate in October 1973 and
made chairman of the Town
Planning Committee.
In 1977, he was elected
Member of Parliament for the


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PI!oled Manager
InfonnatlOn Syster Manager
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Laundry Manager
Landscaping & IkigetKo
Syttirmn Mgna;jv
Dlrectco R.D and Sewrwage
Treatments Plants
Chief Engineer
Enbtarvirm Diectow
Executive HouseQaepfer


Applicants should satisfy the following minimum
requirements
*Hav a dage rom a econied Callege. U erarIyory aIulvaerl
on te ob epexen and training
*AI least iwo years xplrie~ in til Hosptaify Induiry or a
clusely related field
*Wil be riquied to ride on tli island
*MuSI beoorsputbeitertrte
8Be pronace se n mo a ed aBnd wlllng to woUr long Iwhur
*Be able to sl he Irend for limely and quality work parfrrmance
*Must be abe to prepare budget and ae up stoc cont

O*Slong oommLMrcatlon skis, oral and fTlrten is eencia
*Have sntrng organzationa and leadesilp sIls
Comre'the Compensaton package C nrmeneurst with reIean
experience and qualitratim
Fax or &mai resuanrn with roof qr qua&Nictirs ald &Wperiente
to:
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L' C I I il )NN( - T ,S �I" U� - 3 R I5 H 0


PTolomlrial IvMlerO lt
#�.............


�c rnuntin I (12 Weekst)
I-1I '' . : ~< - piII
Accounting II (12 Weeks)
I'l- I 0 '.. i.1'-' i P
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Quick Boks (12 eiks)
FTi. ' L S. f- I.Iptn 350


A+ RK iew'CertifrcatioI Exam (12 Wetks)
Fri. INs. 6i-t0inl S.i"


Rak Blur Print RLadiogI &
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Sat. 9 19, QamlJp~im 350
Basi Blue Prlnt Readin &
Estiimaiing II Commercial I10 Weeks)
1 ri 1I l, ipmn-I pm 5,75
* Hil.'ri.l Singki PlIu"1 (12 \% tvko)
Sat.Si.19,9ainl-]Ipol S623


CahIkO l aLiiiRj (14)0 iVL'k)

HIlnMk I .LkvinlT (TO INL-k%)
_ :I- ItI l _ .rl ._ iiin


$3C4)


I----------------------I- -. I


*"Mirkre-ip Artistry (10 Weeks)
Thur . +I I 7. f- ; pn


"*Mala ge Therapy (1 year)
Mirn thnru ThIi i 11 I -lDpnm CIDrIII
*EtheticKian I .1 ctes)
Mhr. Ihru Ad-d. X31, 6-%pnim 5910
*Barhrrinl (12 sem-ters)
Mon. tlru Wed. K-31, - pin I I
*Nail TIrliniiloI-0 (2 scenwsterm)
Mo. ,I&


Wiadow Treatmenti -Draperr & Van k nc
I0 tWeeks)
SmWlan . 9I. 14 , ;im-l pm
[ .-cA. Itrlurs.915, - -K1)pt $350
SNeing II (100 Wceks.
Thur . n. I 17. pm- Iilpri m -SiM
I phnl ler.I II
Vehicle Refurbishmnnlt (I OWriks
rMon. W~,i I-1. I- II'p-ii S3JHI
Straw Craft 1 (10 Wceks)
Mlmn. Wed. 9, I ,. ;im. Ipin ' 1i

ML- .Wl. 9,1;4. 6-lOpmin 5350


rMan. Wud. ,A14. hpmn-4II pm
I l.u Y. ' .'J. I" pnii - I 1f , I


Small Engine Repair ( l cL'k c
S I . i I"r. 9 3prm n 350
r CLASS SC7Ih-Il LE |
I W WEEK PIRORAMME |

"l..l ll'.'-k-i II- L h " nf b 5, .11'i Ig
1 EMESTERTV F PR RiAMMPW |
| 1 -\-- 1 3 I-Ii i -I T.II I I


ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


Memorial for Bahamian-born,

British radio personality
By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
A SPECIAL memorial for James
Klass, a Bahamian-born, well-
known British radio personality,
will be held today at 6.30pm at the
Holy Cross Anglican Church in
Nassau.
Mr Klass, who spent most of his
youth in New Providence, died at
the age of 44 at the Royal Hospital '
in Liverpool on July 12.
The radio host and DJ, who
friends say was devoted to his wife
Kelly and their six children, was
best known for presenting the show
Upfront' which aired on BBC 1
Merseyside Radio.
Hundreds of mourners gathered at Liverpool's Anglican
Cathedral to say goodbye to the radio presenter at a funer-
al service on July 17.
"James has been gone so long, and sometimes people
lose track of those they know," said Carlotta Klass, the
deceased's mother.
"We want his friends and family to know of his passing
and to come out and honour him (today)."
Mr Klass completed his primary and secondary education
at St John's College in Nassau.
In 1981, as a teenager, he returned to England, to be
with his parents Carlotta and George Klass (now deceased).
There, he completed his studies in journalism and media.
He was an accomplished MC and DJ, performing through-
out England and Ireland.
His European performances under the name of 'MC Jam'
took him to places such as Russia, Germany, Holland and
Lithuania.
This October marks Black History month in England,
where Mr Klass will posthumously be given an award named
in his honour.
He also won a Black Achievers' Award and the neigh-
borhood community award.


Coastal clean-up efforts in

Nassau, Abaco, Grand Bahama
INTERNATIONAL Coastal Clean-Up Day will be held
next Saturday, September 19, in Nassau, Abaco and Grand
Bahama.
The Bahamas National Trust (BNT) is encouraging those
who can to come out and support this global effort in the
Bahamas.
Bonefish Pond National Park was chosen in New Provi-
dence as the location to support the national parks and in
honour of the BNT's 50th anniversary.
"We ask all those who are coming out to please wear
enclosed shoes, use sunscreen and bring gardening gloves,"
the BNT said.


EIt44E if'Te Fo 4 o Rosi
Invites Applicationsr For The Foldkowing Poshllons


For More Inlormation Comact:
502-6338/9
Office Hours,
Monday-Friiny - gam-5pm
BTVI res-urves the right to cancel
cour!ses- if a minimLim nurnbor of
%,Itjdfnt& have r�ol rnqi$tf�rpd.
Students will recetwe a full refund
if cla!ises aie cam�elled b� the
institution.

BTVI re.!seryes Oic right to r-hange,
TLAUL)ri, Ft"!-%, CULAF %4� C im tutil ,
C a u r--;L- Ci if I V. .3"d C DLJrN r
ma I I! r i a I & �

Early registration helps eliminate
the disappointment of cour-se
cancellations.

NorlwBahaml.an% ata orequirod to
pay an addiltbanal fee-


Um


PAGE 6, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


si.(c)


S 1. ; l












SC McPherson: a bright





light on a hill of despair


By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com
Champions do not become
champions when they win the
event, but in the hours, weeks,
months and years they spend
preparing for it. The victorious
performance itself is merely the
demonstration of their champi-
onship character.
- T. Alan Armstrong-an
excerpt from last week's edi-
tion of SC McPherson newslet-
ter to teachers "From the prin-
cipal's desk."

LAST Friday, I bid farewell
to my comrades at the SC
McPherson Junior High school
as I departed the school and my
beloved students to pursue my
law studies. Today, with all of
the issues facing the educational
system, SC McPherson contin-
ues to stand out as a bright light
on a hill of despair.
It is unambiguous to state
that the pursuit of a tertiary edu-
cation is not only a path to fur-
ther enlightenment, but also to
advanced qualifications and a
greater sense of self and aware-
ness about our societies.
Growing up as a youngster in
the Bahamas (Long Island), I
took a keen interest in the law,


deciding at a tender age that
practising law would ultimately
be my career path, particularly as
the intricacies of the law, its val-
ue to organized and democratic
societies and the importance of
the law and the administration
of justice to settling disputes, con-
fronting the criminal element and
ensuring the integrity of business
and society at large. Beyond
these elements, the practice of
law also has other benefits, such
as producing prosperous citizens,
who may venture into businesses
and create jobs during these
tough economic times and who
may also positively contribute to
the political, social and judicial
strengthening of a developing
nation such as the Bahamas.
That being said, I have hardly
slept since Monday, as the study
of law is an extremely arduous,
sleepless undertaking that has a
heavy workload and requires
extensive research and reading.
I had a truly heralding expe-
rience in my years in education,
particularly at SC McPherson


044&4
Royal Bahamian Resort & OfTshore Island

Invites application for the position of:


GROUNDS MANAGER


The successful candidate should have the
following qualificatihns


* Supervise the day to day maintenance of the
grounds
* Work directly with landscape contractor
* Rpor to (Gncral Manager & Hotel Maner
* Knowledge of plants, insects, disease,
irrigation pesticides and fertilizers
* Minimum of 3 years experience


Send resume and 3 references to:
humnan.resourcesl(grp.sandals.com


where I spent most of my time
and where, like all teachers at all
other schools throughout the
country, I was confronted with
the everyday struggles that edu-
cators face, the task of courting
certain students who regularly
fail to complete homework to
embrace their after school assign-
ments, and the encumbrance of
some parents who refuse to
invest a minute in their children's
advancement.
In 2005, I began my journey in
education by completing my
teaching practice and certifica-
tion at SC McPherson. Upon
being hired as a public servant, I
was posted to the LW Young
Junior High school. Although I
made lifelong friends at LW
Young and had fulfilling experi-
ences, I requested a transfer to
SC McPherson, as I was relocat-
ing to western New Providence
and had desired to continue
under the tutelage of Mrs
Antoinette Storr (then principal)
with whom I had developed a
good relationship. Mrs Storr,
then the school's very progres-
sive principal had also requested
my return, and was foremost in
ensuring that I attained the coop-
eration and reassurance that I
would need to pass teaching
practice with flying colours. I did
just that-earning an A! While
completing my teaching practice
exercise at SC, Mrs Storr and her
administration and staff went
above and beyond to ensure that
I was not hampered and that I
had all the supplies and neces-
sary paraphernalia needed to
excel.
Upon my return to SC as a
member of staff, I realized that
the hardworking teachers had
cultivated a positive school cli-
mate, and that the institution was
a pilot school for much of the
Ministry of Education's (MOE)


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ADRAN GI SO


Full and part time positions available - all shifts.
If you are a punctual, inspiring person with a great
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with people, then this job is for you.

While not required, experience is an asset.
Competitive salary plus benefits.
Email resume (and demo) to
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initiatives. Furthermore, the prin-
cipal and teaching staff had insti-
tuted a summer and after-school
programme to attend to the
remedial needs of slower stu-
dents.
Although Mrs Storr has now
retired from the public service
and moved on to become a vice-
principal at St John's College and
proprietor of a state-of-the-art
pre-school in Pinewood
(Shalom), what enticed me to SC
was what I've come to appreciate
as "Storr's policy." As a stern
disciplinarian, she constantly
patrolled the campus (with a
cane) and consistently encour-
aged students to succeed. I also
came to admire her hard-line
approach to fostering parental
involvement in instances such as
those when parents did not col-
lect their children's report cards
and were nudged to do so as she
refused to permit students to
attend classes unless the report
cards were collected-and that
approach quickly yielded results.
SC McPherson's new princi-
pal, Mrs Dorothy Kemp, has also
brought an innovative, technol-
ogy savvy approach to conduct-
ing school affairs and keeping
teachers informed of school
activities, MOE promotional
exercises and so on.
Although SC is today faced
with having to accommodate
throngs of students-some 1400,
particularly in these rough eco-
nomic times when many parents
are withdrawing their children
from private institutions-SC
McPherson's teachers continue
to aspire to offer first-class edu-
cation that has become synony-
mous with the institution.
Frankly, everyone seems to want
to send their child to SC these
days!
It must also be noted that sev-
eral of the brightest students pro-
duced by SC McPherson have
been lured away from the public
school system-upon complet-
ing grade nine-by scholarships
offered by private schools such as
St Andrews. Credit for much of
the top grades at schools such as
St Andrews in next year's nation-
al exams must be given to SC


McPherson's hardworking fac-
ulty, who nurtured and laid the
foundation for these students and
also exposed them to effective
teaching and reading method-
ologies.
Today, the administration and
teachers at this outstanding
school continue to dig in their
shallow pockets and make per-
sonal sacrifices to ensure that
their students have lunch and/or
the basic resources to function
in a classroom.
In the wake of my traffic acci-
dent and subsequent eye surgery
earlier this year, many of SC
McPherson's teachers and stu-
dents rendered unfaltering sup-
port, whether by diligently and
caringly visiting me as I recuper-
ated, writing wonderful get-well
notes, sending gifts and fruit bas-
kets and/or tirelessly substitut-
ing for me in my absence. I thank
you all!
In most schools, the school
population is divided into various
groupings known as houses.
When I left for law school, I was
the year head/house coordinator
for "Wahoo House"-for whom
I will keep my fingers crossed in
hopes that they win most of the
school's events this year. And, I
will always be rooting for SC
McPherson from the sidelines.
Moreover, most importantly,
I would like to thank and bid
farewell to the best, most out-
spoken and driven department
at SC McPherson-the social


More job layoffs on Grand Bahama
FROM page one
ing occupancy rates and tries to reduce
losses.
He also claimed that the hotel -
which he said is 100 per cent Bahamian
owned - was denied government assis-
tance that would have allowed the prop-
erty to maintain staffing levels.
Now, 20 more hospitality workers are
set to join the growing unemployment
line, dealing another blow to Grand
Bahama's already weakened economy.
"We put a proposal before the gov-
ernment, as they had assisted many of
the foreign owned hotels and they chose
not to assist us and we have to do what
we have to do," Mr Barnett told The Tri-
bune during a telephone interview from his office in Grand
Bahama yesterday.
He claimed that the hotel's proposal would save the govern-
ment more money than it would have to give out in unemploy-
ment assistance to the 20 persons who were laid off.
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said that while government was not
able to accept the hotel's proposal, it had assisted the Best
Western hotel in the past.
"A large number of people make proposals to government
when they have these circumstances and unfortunately it's
impossible for government to provide assistance to everybody to
the degree that they ask (but) Mr Barnett certainly knows that
we have assisted him in the past, in a whole number of areas,"
said the minister.
Grand Bahama's tourism sector has limped through several
hurricanes in the last few years, but has been crippled by the
worldwide financial crisis, which struck last year.
Said Mr Barnett: "This (the current situation) is extreme
compared to previous years. We saw declines ever since the
three hurricanes came our way, but when the economy in the
United States began to fail we felt the domino effect of that.
"This is the slowest it's been. For the 30 years I've been here
we've never had to lay of employees - of course we had to make
adjustments in schedules - but we never had to lay off employ-
ees for economic reasons," said Mr Barnett.
He explained that the 118-room property in downtown
Freeport - which caters mostly to business travellers - was
dealing with a significant fall off as many international compa-
nies cut back on unnecessary expenditure.
"People just don't have the funds to travel, we're a downtown
hotel so we do more corporate business and so they are saying
instead of travelling we're going to do conference calls."
The resort is also grappling with dwindling domestic tourism
numbers, a cornerstone of its market.
"We used to get a lot of people coming from Abaco on stay-
overs to go to the Discovery Cruise - all of that has been drop-
ping off. People just are not working, so it's these things they
have to cut back on."
Best Western currently employs 60 persons. This number will
be reduced to 40 on September 20.
The Department of Statistics recently noted that unemploy-
ment in the Bahamas jumped from 8.7 per cent last year to 14.2
per cent this year, the highest rate recorded since the early
1990s.


30% to


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HARBOUR BAY



75% OFF law


On regular priced Clothing


STOREWIDE


Sale ends the 30th of September


Extra 5% for


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TODISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ONTOW


studies department, of which I
was a part. Special note must be
made of the members of this very
industrious department-wise
and assiduous Ms Ceyola Coak-
ley, diligent Ms Paula Clarke,
well organised Ms Brickell
Brown, tenacious and unswerv-
ing Ms Kayren Belle, determined
Ms Valerie Henriquez and viva-
cious Ms Andrea Wilson-Pierre.
Special thanks must also be
extended to hardworking Ms Vil-
liane Deal, who left the depart-
ment during the summer to join
the staff at LW Young.
As an educator, I hope that I
have left a positive indelible
mark and served as a facilitator
in assisting my students with their
interpretation of the processes
of change in our society as well as
other societies around the globe.
It is my belief that I have
helped my wonderful students
to define themselves as dutiful
citizens who are capable of con-
tributing to the development of
their society over time.
Teaching has furnished me
with an abundance of great
memories and thought-provok-
ing experiences, and I hope to
continue to give back and teach
our nation's youth. SC McPher-
son's school song proclaims "SC
school we love you, we'll always
love you", and no doubt, I will
always love and treasure the
time-the minor struggles and
the many highpoints-I experi-
enced in shark (mascot) territory.


PAGE 8, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


THE TRIBUNE






TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009, PAGERT9


BSF Fall calendar
FROM page 10

Christine Edmonds NP
Marvell Miller NP
Candice Smith NP
Latoya Johnson EX (Exuma)
Treke Bowleg AND (Andros
Vesna Laing GB
Pitching Coach - Spurgeon
Johnson
Trainer - Lenny Newton
MEN'S NATIONAL TEAM
Workout Squad 2009
Bahamas Parrots
Head of Delegation - Baylor
Fernander
Head Coach - Aaron Adderley
Coaches - Delano Cartwright
/Anthony Huyler
Ken Wood NP (New Provi-
dence)
Alcott Forbes NP
Eugene Pratt NP
Lynden Richardson GB
(Grand Bahama)
Darren Stevens NP
Thomas Davis NP
Ricardo Rolle GB
Aneko Knowles GB
Alec Rolle NP
Geron Sands NP
Desmond Rolle GB
Godfrey Burnside Jr. NP
Rickey Rolle GB
Sherman Ferguson NP
Lamar Waktins NP
Michale Thompson NP
Greg Burrows Jr. NP
Hosea Hilton ELEU
(Eleuthera)
James Clarke NP
Martin Burrows Jr. NP
Horation Green NP
Cardinal Gilbert NP
Byron Ferguson NP
Charles Carroll LI (Long
Island)
Raynaldo Russell GB
Carlos Pratt LI
Andrea Bethell ELEU
Tod Thompson AB(Abaco)
Pitching Coach - Brian Neeley
Trainer - Alphonso Pratt
MEN'S NATIONAL TEAM
Workout Squad 2009
Bahama Marlins
Head of Delegation - Andy
Deal
Head Coach - Perry Seymour
(Manager)
Coaches - Martin Burrows
Sr. / Neville "Hammer"
Cartwirght
Freddie Conish NP (New
Providence)
Edney Bethel NP
Pedro Marcello LI (Long
Island)
Philip Culmer NP
Van Johnson NP
Dwayne Mackey NP
Marvin Wood NP
Angelo Dillette NP
Teran Wood NP
William Rutherford AB (Abaco)
Mario Ford NP
Lamount Charlow NP
Renaldo Rolle GB (Grand
Bahama)
Prescott Wilson GB
Jamico Sands GB
Larry Russell Jr. GB
Greg Gardiner EX (Exuma)
Jamal Johnson NP
Ramon Storr NP
Jamal Ferguson NP
Garfield Bethel NP
Desmond Dean GB
Christopher Russell AND
(Andros)
Julian Pratt LI
Lester Wallace ELEU
(Eleuthera)
Kenny Rolle AB
Orlando McPhee NP

Pitching Coach - Leroy
Thompson
Trainer - Alphonso "Chick-
en" Albury


NEW YORK Yankees'
Derek Jeter hits a single
during the seventh
inning of a baseball
game against the Tam-
pa Bay Rays on
Wednesday, Sept. 9,
2009, at Yankee Stadi-
um in New York. The
hit tied Jeter with Lou
Gehrig for most hits by
a Yankee.


SoI











Jeter ties




Gehrig for




Yankees




hit record


NEW YORK
Associated Press


DEREK JETER peeked
down at third base and saw
a huge patch of green grass.
There it is, he thought, a per-
fect opportunity to break out
of that slump.
So, he took advantage of
it. Jeter began the night with
a surprising bunt single -
and didn't stop hitting until
he tied Lou Gehrig.
With three hits on Wednes-
day, Jeter matched the New
York Yankees record of
2,721, a mark Gehrig held by
himself for more than 70
years.
"It's just kind of mind-bog-
gling to have my name next
to his," Jeter said on the field
during a postgame television
interview pumped over the
Yankee Stadium public
address system.
New York rallied past the
Tampa Bay Rays 4-2 on a
three-run homer by pinch-hit-
ter Jorge Posada in the eighth
inning. The comeback victory
made it easier for Jeter to
enjoy his accomplishment -
he tied Gehrig with a sev-
enth-inning single off rookie
starter Jeff Niemann.
"I'm happy that I was able
to do it here at home," Jeter
said. "We had so many spe-
cial moments across the
street. Hopefully this is the
first of many memorable
moments here at the new sta-
dium."
Moments after Posada's
homer, Jeter received a
booming ovation as he
stepped to the plate in the
eighth with a chance to break


the record. He walked
against reliever Grant Bal-
four, bringing a loud chorus
of boos from the crowd.
The Yankees are off
Thursday. Jeter gets his next
chance to set the mark Friday
night at home against Balti-
more.
"I wish we were playing
tomorrow," he said.
Shut down by Niemann
most of the night, the Yan-
kees finished a four-game
sweep and sent the AL
champion Rays to their
eighth consecutive loss. It's
their longest skid since drop-
ping eight straight in July
2007.
Already on their feet in
anticipation, fans at Yankee
Stadium let loose with a roar
when Jeter's sharp grounder
inside the first-base line got
by a diving Chris Richard in
the seventh.
Jeter's parents, watching
from an upstairs box between
home plate and first base,
raised their arms and
exclaimed in excitement. The
ball was saved for Jeter as a
souvenir.
"I felt proud. I got goose
bumps," said Posada, one of
Jeter's best buddies. "It was a
perfect moment."
Jeter took off his helmet
and twice waved it to the
crowd of 45,848 during an
ovation that lasted about 2
minutes. Rays players and
coaches clapped as Jeter
stood at first base.
"I'm very happy for him,"
Tampa Bay manager Joe
Maddon said. "He carries
himself in a manner that's
worthy of passing Gehrig."


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009, PAGE 9


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PAGESPORTS 10,IFRIDAYSEPTEMBER11,2009TRIBUNESPOR


BSF prepares for


the


By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net


THE Bahamas Softball Federation looks to
begin implementation of its short term and
long term goals to benefit the future of the
local game and strengthen its profile on the
international stage.
The BSF is preparing for the fall section of
its calendar year in what federation execu-
tives call the "busy season."
The most pressing matter on the upcoming
calendar is the selection of both Men's and
Ladies' National teams to represent the coun-
try at the upcoming CAST tournament, sched-
uled for October 29th to November 1st here in
the capital.
The Federation will hold a special meeting
tonight for workout squad participants with
regards to the selection process and also plans
for the further development of the tourna-
ment.
Burket Dorsett, BSF President, outlined the
highlights of the upcoming calendar for the
Federation which features several local and
regional tournaments and concludes with an
appearance at the International Softball Fed-
eration Congress.
"The BSF will be experiencing a very busy
season in the upcoming months and it is an
exciting time for the players, fans and we in the
administration. We begin with the National
Slow Pitch Championships set for Grand
Bahama either the first weekend in October or
for the Discovery Day weekend for those
islands that play slow pitch in various cate-
gories men's, ladies and co-eds. The next event
on the calendar will be the Austin "Kingsnake"
Knowles tournament for senior boys and girls


r season'


during the mid term brak for local schools," he
said, "This tournament is of the utmost impor-
tance to the BSF because it highlights the
future talent of the country in a competitive
format and assist the overall development of
the game while providing an opportunity for
young athletes to showcase their talents. Long
Island has been a dominant factor in these
championships over the last few years, how-
ever, Eleuthera made their presence felt win-
ning both titles last year and promises to return
to defend their titles. The following weekend,
October 29th- Nov will be the CAST tourna-
ment, an international venture for the BSF. We
already have confirmation from the Cayman
Islands, Belize, Jamaica, Turks and Caicos,
Bermuda, USVI and have also began talks
with teams from Israel and England which
have expressed interest. Following that will
be the National Round Robin Championship
where champions of member associations will
descend upon New Providence vying for a
national crown."
Dorsett said the year will conclude with an
appearance at the ISF Congress which should
have a direct impact on the Bahamas and its
stake in regional softball.
"We will then take part in the ISF Congress.
This edition will be held in Venezuela with
more than 110 countries taking place. This is an
election year for the ISF and in addition an
additional VP post will be added for the Eng-
lish speaking Caribbean," he said. "The ISF
has stated they will realign and the Bahamas
will be placed in the Americas region, thus
creating the necessity for the post. The IFS
has also confirmed that the CAC Games will
be held in Puerto Rico in July of 2010. The
men's national team will have at least two
trips of very important tournaments we need to
take part in."


IBFllCALliENDR


(1) Austin Knowles High School Tournament
(for senior boys and girls) October 22nd - 24th

(2) CAST Tournament
(for men and ladies) Oct. 29th - Nov. 1st
Jamaica, Cayman Island, Turks Island,
Belize, Israel, England, Bahamas,
Bermuda (host in Nassau Bahamas)

(3) IFS Congress
(host in Venezuela) October 21st - 26th

(4) 2009 Round Robin Tournament
(host in Nassau, Bahamas)
Men and Ladies November 5th - 8th
Abaco, Andros, Eleuthera, Exuma,
Long Island, Bimini, Grand Bahama,
New Providence.

LADIES NATIONAL TEAM
Workout Squad 2009
Bahamas Flamingos
Head of Delegation - Jenny Dotson
Head Coach - Stephen Beneby
Coaches - Gary Johnson / Yvonne Lockhart


Mary Sweeting NP (New Providence)
Thena Johnson NP
Sharneel Symonette NP
Deserie Coakley NP
Alexandria Taylor NP
Lona Maxis GB (Grand Bahama)
Shavette Taylor NP
Tara Evans GB
Tasheena Pinder GB
Jeanean Wallace NP
Debbie McClure NP
Alverne Hall GB
Neressa Seymour NP
Christine Hanna GB
Antonia Simmons NP
Kesha Pratt NP
Dawn Forbes NP
Zella Syminette NP
Nerissa Lockhard GB
Latoya Brown GB
Brendina Mcphee LI (Long Island)
Avis Bethel ELEU. (Eleuthera)


SEE page nine


Noon showdown for Knowles and Bhupathi


FROM page 11
still recovering from an injured right ring
finger that he got jammed in an elevator
at the Tennis Center and required nine
stitches.
But he admitted that with the title on
the line, there's no need to worry about
the pain he's experiencing.
"It's a little bit awkward, but it's not
bothering me at all," Knowles said. "It's
still wrapped up in a cushion, but I'm
felling great out there.
"I'm not feeling much pain, so at this
stage, it's not a factor. I'm not worried
about it. I'm just trying to concentrate
on going out there and getting the job
done."
If they are successful in winning, it
would be the second time that Knowles
has captured the US Open. He did it in
2004 with his former long-time partner
Daniel Nestor.
For 35-year-old Bhupathi, this will be
his third appearance in the US Open
Final. In 1999, he and Paes were the run-
ners-up and in 2002, he and Mirnyi
secured the title.


While there's been a lot said about the
two former Indian partners (Bhupathi
and Paes) playing on the opposite side
of the court, Knowles said it's not really a
big issue because they are now playing
Davis Cup together.
"A lot of that (dissension between the
two of them), are in the past," Knowles
said. "It's obviously a big match for both
teams and we both want to win the Grand
Slam."
As far as Knowles is concerned, it was-
n't as bad a bitter break-up like the one he
and Nestor had in 2007 just before he
and Bhupathi formed their new partner-
ship.
Win or lose, Knowles will be return-
ing home with his family on Sunday and
will be honoured by the Bahamas gov-
ernment for teaming up with Anna-Lena
Groenefeld from Germany to win the
mixed doubles Grand Slam title at Wim-
bledon in July.
No doubt, Knowles would like to add
this US Open title to the celebrations
when he goes to Government House on
Monday for a luncheon at 1 pm.


Bahamas Supply Agencies back Darling


FROM page 11

ing the Bahamas at the World Men Bodybuilding
Championships in Doha, Qatar from November
2-5.
"The federation does not have the funding to
get the whole team to the CAC Championships
this year, for whatever reason. It was not made
clear to us," Darling said.
"So thanks to Prolab, I will be able to go to the
CAC and the World Championships in Novem-
ber. Every year, for ten years, I do the CAC try-
ing to get my pro card and this year is no differ-
ence. Now that I have the backing from Prolab, I
will try my hardest."
Going into the championships, Darling said
he feel like he's in the right frame of mind and
condition to be able to compete for the overall
title.
But his only wish is that the organizers of the
championships will once again administer the
mandatory drug testing, which they've failed to do
so over the last three years.
"The last drug testing was done in 2007 in
Bermuda. There was no drug testing last year,"
said Darling, of the championships that was held


here.
"I bring that up to say that if an overall cham-
pion is chosen and he is tested positive, the run-
ner-up does not automatically get the pro card."
However, Darling said he will be lobbying for
the runner-up to step up and receive the pro
card, if the eventual champion is tested positive.
"I'm training hard, I'm very disciplined with my
diet and this year, I really feel that this is going to
be my year," Darling projected. "So I'm going to
go out there and give it my best shot."
Like Darling, reportedly five other athletes
have indicated that they too are in the process of
securing their own personal sponsorship in order
for them to compete.
Darling, a fitness instructor at the Royal
Bahamas Defense Force, trains at Bally Total
Fitness Center. The Center's assistant manager
Yolanda Barr said they are very pleased to have
the champion as a member of their club.
"It's also good for the members to interact
with someone of his status," Barr said.
As for his sponsorship by Prolab and Natrol,
Barr said it's another plus because they supply the
products in their shop and with Darling using
them, it will only encourage the members to do so
as well.


Bahamas Bodybuilding Federation hit by economic woes


FROM page 11

to seek their own sponsorship
in the event that the federa-
tion doesn't secure the neces-
sary funding in time.
"We've never had any prob-
lems with the Ministry. They
have been very good to us in
the past," Sumner said. "But
unfortunately this year, they
said to us that the funds are
not available right now.
"They told us that the funds
won't be available until next
month. But we are supposed
to go away this month. So
that's the dilemma that we are
faced with right now."
The Bahamas have captured
the championship title for the
past three years and Sumner
said it would really be a shame
if they are not in a position to
go to Grenada and defend the
title.
Among those named to the


team from New Providence
are national male and female
champions James 'Jay' Darling
and Donna Williams, Ray-
mond Tucker, Faye Rolle, Paul
'Mighty Mouse' Wilson, Teddy
Gray and Keshelle Mackey.
And from Grand Bahama,
those named are the husband
and wife combo of Desmond
and Charnice Bain, Timica
Stubbs and Petra Brice.
Dereck Bullard is the man-
ager and the coaches are
Wellington 'Cat' Sears and
Trevor Bethel from Grand
Bahama.
"I've been in constant con-
versation with the Ministry's
Permanent Secretary, Archie
Nairn, and he is working to try
and get something resolved by
now and September 18."
So far, Darling has publicly
announced that he has secured
a sponsorship from Prolab and
Natrol through the Bahamas


Supply Limited.
Sumner said they are
encouraging all athletes to go
ahead and secure their own
sponsorship if they can because
although they have never been
in this predicament before, he's
confident that they will get
something worked out.
Over the summer, the
Bahamas Volleyball Federa-
tion had to wait until the
eleventh hour before their men
and women national teams
were able to travel to the qual-
ifying rounds of the 2010 FIVA
World Cup because of a lack
of funds.
However, in both instances,
the Ministry of Sports and
BTC stepped up and assured
that the teams were able to
travel.
Sumner said he was hoping
that corporate Bahamas would
step up and assist the federa-
tion before it was too late.


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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS






THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009

INSIDE *International sportsnews


Noon showdown today for Knowles, Bhupathi


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net


Team makes second doubles

Grand Slam appearance for the year


MARK Knowles and Mahesh
Bhupathi are back in familiar waters,
playing together in their second
Grand Slam men's doubles final for
the year.
The number three seeded
Bahamian-Indian combo will pair
up against the fourth seeded tam of
Lukas Dloughy of the Czech Repub-
lic and Leander Paes of India.
The match is scheduled for noon
today and Knowles indicated that
they are hoping not to let the title
slip away from them like it did in
January when they fell short against
the American identical twin brothers


Bob and Mike Bryan.
"We lost a tough one in Australia,
but right now we're playing great
tennis," said Knowles after they
swept the No.5 team of Max Mirnyi
of Belarus and Andy Ram from
Israel 6-4, 6-2 in Wednesday's semi-
final.
"I think we played our best match
in the tournament (in the semifinal)
and we know that we have to play
even better in the final (today). But
we're looking forward to it. We
know it's a lot of fun to be in a
Grand Slam final."


The winning team will split
$420,000, while the losing team will
share $210,000, but Knowles said
they don't want to be in the same
position they ended up in Australia.
"This is what you play the game
for," said the 38-year-old Knowles.
"It's a really exciting opportunity,
one that we're really looking for-
ward too and I have a good feeling
that we will go out there and give it
our best shot."
Going into the match, Knowles is
SEE page 10


Bahamas


Supply Agencies


back Darling


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WHILE the Bahamas Body-
building and Fitness Federation
is scrapping to raise funds,
men's national champion James
'Jay' Darling has sealed a sig-
nificant sponsorship deal.
On Wednesday, Darling
signed a deal with Bahamas
Supply Agencies Limited for a
sponsorship under the joint
banner of Prolab and Natrol
that will ensure that he travels
to the Central American and
Caribbean Championships at
the end of the month.
The federation was hoping
to send a full team to defend
its title at the championships
on September 30, but most of
the competitors are being
forced to come up with their
own funding to be able to com-
pete.
Yesterday, Bahamas Supply
Agencies Ltd general manag-
er Simon Cooper said they
were so pleased with the per-
formances of Darling that they
have decided for the first time
to throw their support behind
him.
"We got a favourable
response," said Cooper, about
Darling's resume that was sent
to their international company


for consideration.
"So that in mind, we were
able to go ahead and provide
the necessary sponsorship,
which will enable him to go on
to compete in the international
events and hopefully this time
he will be able to get his pro
card."
Cooper, who attended the
press conference with Wendell
Gardiner, Bahamas Supply
Agencies Ltd sales manager,
said they developed a chem-
istry with Darling from the
break and that was the main
reason why they sponsored
him.
For Darling, who has repre-
sented the country for the past
20 years, the sponsorship came
just in the nick of time, consid-
ering the economic climate that
the federation is experiencing
right now.
"I will definitely represent
them with all good intentions
and to the best of my ability,"
he said. "Being one of the first
athletes being given this oppor-
tunity, I want to be the best
example for other athletes to
follow in the future."
While the CAC Champi-
onships is immediate on Dar-
ling's agenda, the dominant
middleweight champion also
has his sights set on represent-

SEE page 10


Bahamas Bodybuilding Federation

hit by economic woes


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Bodybuild-
ing and Fitness Federation is
the latest national federation
to get hit by the economic bug.
Federation president Dan-
ny Sumner said they are hard
pressed to come up with some
$19,500 by September 18 to
send an 11-member team off
to defend their title at the Cen-
tral American and Caribbean
Bodybuilding Championships.
The championships is sched-
uled for September 30 in St.
George's. Grenada, but Sum-
ner said September 18 is the
actual deadline for them to


complete all of their travel
arrangements.
"The situation is right now
we haven't received any grant
from the Ministry (Youth,
Sports and Culture)," Sumner
said yesterday. "But the team
is still intact. We just need the
funds.
"Once we can get that, we
will be able to take the team.
Hopefully sometime will work
out for them, so I want to them
to stay together."
Sumner said they are also
appealing to the general public
to come forth and assist in their
financial vows. He said he's
also encouraging the athletes

SEE page 10


SIMON
COOPER,
general
manager of
Bahamas
Supply
Agencies Ltd.,
bodybuilder
James Darling,
Yolanda Barr,
assistant
manager at
Bally Fitness
Center and
Wendell Gar-
diner, sales
manager at
Bahamas
Supply
Agencies Ltd.


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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11,2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS I


Bishop Fraser retrial resumes


FROM page one

began yesterday, however,
Fraser was without an attor-
ney and told the court that he
had been informed that his
lawyer Wayne Munroe was
engaged in the trial of Father
Ranfurly Brown. Magistrate
Bethel, however, proceeded
with the matter, recalling Cor-
poral Sheria King.
Fraser was asked whether
he wished to cross-exam the
witness and replied that he pre-
ferred that his attorney did so.
The prosecution then called
Detective Sergeant Mark Bar-
rett who told the court that on
April 12, 2006, he was at the
Central Detective Unit when
Fraser in the presence of his
attorney was placed under
arrest and informed that he
was suspected of having unlaw-
ful intercourse with a female
minor. He further testified that
around 7.40pm, he and a team
of officers went with Fraser to
Pilgrim Baptist Temple, St
James Road. There, he said, a
search was conducted and a
number of suspected semen
stains were found.
"They were pointed out to
Bishop Fraser who appeared
to be very shocked," Sergeant
Barrett said. He told the court
that at the scene he later col-
lected a cellular phone, Com-
paq laptop, a CPU and assort-
ed discs. Sergeant Barrett tes-
tified that sometime around
10.20 that night, he and the
other officers went to Fraser's
home. He said that while there,


a search was conducted of
Fraser's bedroom and two
VHS tapes with pornography
were seized. Attempting to
cross-exam the witness, Fras-
er said that he had been
informed by police that what
had been pointed out to him
in his office was bodily fluid.
Sergeant Barrett said that to
his recollection Fraser was told
that it was semen. Fraser then
asked the magistrate what
options he had in terms of legal
representation. Magistrate
Bethel informed him that if he
felt that his lawyer had aban-
doned him and he wished to
seek other counsel the court
would grant him leave to do
so.
Following a brief adjourn-
ment, Fraser informed the
court that Mr Munroe was
seeking to have the matter
stood down for half an hour.
An aunt of the complainant
told the court yesterday that
on Palm Sunday 2006, while at
home getting ready for church,
she received a phone call from
her two sisters. She said that
as a result, she went to Pilgrim
Baptist Temple but was not
immediately allowed entry
because she was informed by
the attendants that there was a
confrontation going on. She
said that eventually she was
allowed inside the church and
met members of her family in
Fraser's office.
She told the court that
Fraser's wife asked her not to
take the matter any further
saying that they would do any-
thing to get the matter


Lightning strikes causes

Queen's Highway outage
AS A result of a lightning strike on the distribution system,
the Grand Bahama Power Company experienced an outage in
the commercial area of Queen's Highway yesterday.
The company announced that Grand Bahama Power crews
immediately addressed the issue and worked diligently to
resolve the problem. Power was fully restored to all affected
areas within two hours.
"The Grand Bahama Power Company remains committed
to providing reliable and dependable electric service to our val-
ued customers and apologises for any inconvenience caused,"
said a company statement.


resolved. The woman told the
court that her sister - the com-
plainant's mother - slapped
Fraser several times, asking
him why he had done what he
had done to her daughter. The
woman told the court that the
voice-mail messages that Fras-
er allegedly sent her niece were
played for everyone in the
office to hear. She told the
court that Fraser's wife agreed
that it was her husband's voice
in the messages.
The witness told the court
that she recalled Fraser saying
that he wanted to perform oral
sex on her niece.
Lead prosecutor Franklyn
Williams told the court that the
Crown does not have the cel-
lular phone on which the voice
messages were stored. He said
every effort had been made to
track it down.
The witness under cross-
examination by Mr Munroe
told the court that her sister
had kept the cellular phone but
the messages were recorded on
a tape, which had been handed
over to CDU. She also claimed
under cross-examination that
Fraser did call her niece by
name in messages pertaining
to meeting her at places like
the mall or going out.
Detective Corporal Shavon
Dames told the court that she
went as an observer with a
team of officers who searched
Fraser's office at Pilgrim Bap-
tist Temple and his home. She
told the court that luminol was
used at Fraser's church office
and a number of semen stains
were found. She said that those
pieces of carpet were cut out.
She also told the court that
she videotaped an interview
with Fraser at CDU that lasted
from 10.45 am to 6pm on April
13. She told the court that
Wellington Olander -Fraser's
attorney at the time - and
Reverend Dr William Thomp-
son were also present. Detec-
tive Inspector Matthew Edge-
combe told the court he was
present when Fraser was inter-
viewed. Inspector Edgecombe
also told the court that he was
present when search warrants
were executed on Fraser's
church office and his home.


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Moss sets date for PLP leadership bid


FROM page one

emboldened by the growing dissent amongst
PLPs to see a "real change" in the direction of
the party.
"The country wants change. And not just
change for change sake, but a generational
change. The group that was there before had
their time and did nothing with it.
PLP's can ill afford another term
in Opposition, and that is the dri-
ving force behind Mr Moss' cam-
paign," the source said.
Having it be known that he will
win the party's leadership once
again at its upcoming national con-
vention on October 18, former
Prime Minister Perry Christie said
that anyone who seeks to chal-
lenge him would be engaging in
an exercise in "futility."
Additionally, sources within the
PLP have also claimed that there
is a movement within the party to
"politically destroy" anyone who
would seek to challenge the PLP LEP
leader. This they claim would be Perry Ch
carried out by denying persons
nominations to run in their various con-
stituencies, or by placing political pressure on
a member by denying them a posting if and
when the party were to become the govern-
ment.
While this warning may discourage some
from entering the fray, Mr Moss has reportedly
paid little attention to it and has already held
"private and unofficial" discussions with a
number of "high profile" PLPs who also seek
a change in the party's leadership.


FROM page one

Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez, was adjourned to
November, 5 when more pros-
ecution witnesses are expected
to be called.
The defendant, who was
said to be emotional during
parts of the witnesses' testi-
mony, was represented by
legal counsel.
White was arraigned on
related charges before Chief
Magistrate Gomez in June and
pleaded not guilty to the
charges.
Prosecutors allege that


k,


our 'resicnrffion for C7-ia[


Additionally, it is also believed that Mr
Moss' singular campaign has given "courage"
to a number of PLP parliamentarians who
would also seek to challenge Mr Christie for
the leadership of the party. These names, it is
reported, could include, but are not limited
to PLP MP for Bain and Grants Town Dr
Bernard Nottage, Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell,
Fort Charlotte MP Alfred Sears,
and former chairman Raynard
Rigby.
Mr Moss' announcement comes
after a very contentious meeting
at PLP headquarters on Wednes-
day night when the party decided
to continue with deputy-leader
hopeful Obie Wilchcombe as chair-
man of its national convention.
Initially concerns were raised by
members within the party, includ-
ing former chairman Raynard Rig-
by who challenged Mr Wilch-
combe to step down from chairing
the convention as he plans to run
for a party post.
ADER Mr Rigby claimed that the West
Aristie End and Bimini MP clearly "does
not understand the principles of
conflict of interests and fairness and trans-
parency."
"He appears not to recognize the percep-
tions that are created by continuing to serve in
the capacity of convention chair." He said that
in his opinion "these are matters that go to
the issue of one's fitness to serve and character.
"Even though Mr Wilchcombe may not be
able to define what a conflict is, I know one
when I see one and so does the public. The
present facts surely satisfy the test," he said.


School security officer


White inappropriately touched
two 14-year-old girls in Janu-
ary and that he committed the
same offence against a 16-
year-old girl the following
month.
Additionally another 16-
year-old girl accused White of
indecently assaulting her in
April.
While in May, a 14-year-old
girl accused White of the same
offence.
Prosecutors also alleged that


White indecently assaulted a
16-year-old girl from Novem-
ber 2008 until May 2009.
White is also accused of
indecently assaulting a 17-
year-old girl from January
until May and the indecent
assault of a 15-year-old in Jan-
uary and May.
The defendant has been
placed on administrative leave
by the Department of Educa-
tion pending the outcome of
the trial.


Anglican Archdeacon

FROM page one
from the beach because he had found a condom wrapper. He
told the court that Father Brown said that he told a group of
girls to leave the area and go to where the other church mem-
bers were. All left except one.
According to Inspector Stubbs, Father Brown said that he
touched the girl's shoulder and told her to leave. Father Brown
told Inspector Stubbs that that was when the young girl turned
around and slapped him. While trying to prevent her from
fighting him they both fell to the ground and other church
members had to come and separate them Inspector Stubbs
told the court.
Father Brown's lawyer Wayne Munroe submitted to the
court that the complaint filed was not valid. Mr Munroe said
that there was no signature by the Commissioner of Police or
the Officer who took the complaint.
The case was adjourned to October 1. The trial is being
heard before Magistrate Ancella Williams in court 6, Parliament
Street.


FROM page one
were briefly interrupted due to
an eviction attempt by the land-
lord, International Distributors
Limited/Dupuch & Turnquest
Law firm which proved to be
premature and was quickly
resolved," said Mr Lewis.
"Universal Distributors
(UD) never stopped opera-
tions, the doors were never
locked and we continued to
serve our customers through-
out the day as usual."
Mr Lewis said that UD, as
with any other new company,
has its share of challenges,
especially in these difficult eco-
nomic times.
He said they must structure
and restructure the operations
to survive, but they are com-
mitted to ensuring the success
of the business.
According to reports, West
End and Bimini MP Obie
Wilchcombe and former sena-
tor Pleasant Bridgewater, who
are business partners in the
joint venture, were said to be
struggling to avoid being locked
out for allegedly failing to pay
the rent for at least two
months.


Universal

Distributors

Mr Wilchcombe and Ms
Bridgewater are said to owe
the landlord, Florida-based
Associated Grocers, close to
$200,000. They have disputed
the sum they owe.
Mr Lewis said that Mr
Wilchcombe and Ms Bridge-
water are shareholders but
have turned over operations to
an extremely capable staff.
"We thank them and our
other shareholders for their
continued support.
"We have a great team run-
ning the business and will do
all they can to offer efficient
and professional service to its
customers, both locally and
internationally," he said.
Universal Distributors is an
import/export wholesale and
retail distribution company. It
also offers services of ware-
housing, ship agent, ship chan-
dler and soon will be in manu-
facturing. Universal Distribu-
tors is open to the Bahamian
and international public.


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Call (242) 396-6010 * www.BankBahamas.com


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THE TRIBUNE




)US1I


SS


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


54ECTIONBo-Iiness^tribunemedi I


on llep !flv
enepgy supply


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
THE MINISTER respon-
sible for the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation (BEC)
yesterday warned that any-
one powering their proper-
ties or businesses through
alternative energy sources
should stay within the law.
Phenton Neymour,
responding to yesterday's
Tribune Business article
entitled Business owner
close to escaping BEC
through $35k solar invest-
ment, said there are regula-
tions in place regarding pri-
vate power generation that
should be adhered to.
According to Mr Ney-
mour, those who retrofit
their home or office power
supply with an alternative
energy source should take
care not to adversely impact
any BEC assets.
He said he had not heard
of Sure Alarm's move to
solar power, but the Gov-
ernment was reviewing the
regulatory framework for
the energy sector "with a
view for allowing indepen-
dent power producers".
Owner of Sure Alarms,
Graham Weatherford, told
Tribune Business that he
was close to being com-
pletely power independent
and off BEC's grid, via the
installation of a
$35,000 solar-powered elec-
tric system currently capa-
ble of running everything in
his store except the air con-
ditioners.
Mr Neymour said he had
mentioned several times that
the Bahamas could move
more towards the use of
solar power, namely the use
of solar water heaters.
The Government had also
sought to encourage the use
of this method of power
generation by allowing the
importation of solar panels
and their peripherals to be
duty free.
However, the Bahamas
Electricity Act
states: "Except with the
approval of the Minister,
and in conformity with any
conditions to which any such
approval may be made sub-
ject, no person other than
the Corporation shall install
or operate in New Provi-
SEE page 4B


I�


* $4.25



sso $4.16


$4.26

Tr. , i. i. r i. .ai- r I1
i' . I ,1 , . j, �- " .I , ,


Retail chain eyes five



figure security spend

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor U Super Value aims to enhance consumer


Super Value's president
and owner yesterday told Tri-
bune Business he would have
to spend between $50,000-
$55,000 to acquire new cam-
era equipment for four stores,
his chain having previously
lost $5 million per year to
theft, as spiralling crime levels
hit business costs and further
reduce shrivelling bottom
lines.
Rupert Roberts said that as
a result of a customer being
robbed of her hand bag in the
parking lot of Super Value's
Cable Beach store last week-
end, the 11-store supermar-
ket chain had ordered more
camera equipment to moni-
tor the outside of the store,
in addition to hiring extra
security guards to secure the
parking lot.
"After this incident, just for
four large stores, the DVR
(digital video recorder) costs
$10,000" before freight and

Bahamas urged to

guard against TIEA

double-cross






V 4.
9: alp
a n


* Senior attorney says
Bahamas must include
provision endorsing this
nation's tax
transparency/information
exchange regime to
prevent 'grey list' vote
* Also calls for Bahamas to
guarantee 'market access'
via agreements

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas must
include a provision in all Tax
Information Exchange
Agreements (TIEAs) that
requires the other party to
endorse this nation's attain-
ment of global transparen-
cy/information exchange
standards, a senior attorney
urged yesterday, in order to
eliminate the possibility of
a 'double-cross'.
Brian Moree, senior part-
ner at McKinney, Bancroft
& Hughes, told a Bahamas
Society of Trust and Estate
Practitioners (STEP) lun-
cheon that such a clause was
essential to prevent a nation
from enjoying the benefits
of a TIEA with the
Bahamas, only to then rec-
ommend that this nation be
'listed' for failing to meet
the G-20/OECD tax trans-
parency and information
standards.
Mr Moree said that while
the Bahamas' commitment
to meeting the G-20/OECD
SEE page 6B


safety and reduce theft losses that
previously stood at $5m per year
M Crime causing 'double whammy'
impact for business costs and bottom line


duty is paid, Mr Roberts told
Tribune Business.
He added that with a cost
of $500 per camera, and 10
needed for each of the four
stores, once duty and freight
were factored in there, the
cost to Super Value of the
additional security cameras
was in the range of $50,000-
$55,000.
To give an idea of the like-
ly increase in security guard
costs, the Super Value presi-
dent added that it cost $275
per shift to hire a security
guard, and there were three
eight-hour shifts in a 24-hour
period.


"It has to come off of the
bottom line, and the bottom
line will get thinner, but we
have to do what we have to
do in this day and age," Mr
Roberts told Tribune Busi-
ness.
"Crime is on the rise.
They're sitting on the blocks,
drinking and smoking. The
break-ins, the theft is really
increasing and it's taking too
much of our time to protect
the business, protect the
assets and chase the thieves. It
is taking up a considerable
SEE page 4B


30 crops to


reduce the


$580m food


import bill

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
The Department of Agriculture's senior marketing
manager yesterday said he has identified 30 crops that
can be sustainably developed by the Bahamas, while
pegging this country's food bill at $580 million.
Leslie Minns told the Bahamas Agro Tourism Sym-
posium that the Bahamas began to lose its agricul-
tural producers back in 1978, and argued that 'beefing
up' the farming industry was the only way to prevent
the loss of substantial foreign exchange reserves on
imported food.
Mr Minns said the Bahamas, per annum, imports 16
million pounds of swine at a cost of $20 million; four
million pounds of mutton at $6.7 million; and 1.3 mil-
lion pounds of beef costing $1.7 million.
Yet Bahamian farmers produce 0.36 million pounds
of pork at a value of $0.8 million; 0.07 million pounds
of mutton valued at $0.1 million; and .01 million
pounds of beef valued at $0.06 million.
SEE page 6B


I0FOCUSONINiTERNATIONAINANIASE IC


Bahamas must 'swim,

not sink' via new clients


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas' internation-
al financial services industry
will have to "swim, not sink"
through targeting and servic-
ing an entirely new client base
from emerging economies in
Asia and Latin America, a
London-based QC argued
yesterday, with the sector's
traditional customer base set
to be squeezed by their home
country governments.
Julian Malins QC, address-
ing a Bahamas Society of
Trust and Estate Practition-
ers (STEP) luncheon yester-
day, on the proposal that the
Bahamian financial services
industry 'faced extinction',


London-based QC
says nation's financial
industry must target
China, Russia, Brazil,
India and emerging
markets, and 'forget'
US and Europe
argued that the world was wit-
nessing "the last days of the
English-speaking or Euro-
pean-centred offshore centres
or low-tax jurisdictions".
He based this notion on the
SEE page 5B


Wealth increase gives Bahamas

'real chance for growth'


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas has "real
opportunities for growth" in its
financial services industry pro-
vided it can meet market needs
through tax-compliant products
and services, a senior attorney
said yesterday, with total assets
controlled by its target client
base forecast to increase by 28.3
per cent between now and
2012-2013.
Brian Moree, senior partner
at McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, addressing a Bahamas
Society of Trust and Estate
Practitioners (STEP) luncheon
yesterday, pointed to the fact
that total assets controlled by
the world's 8.6 million high-net


'The industry we have
10 years from now
will not be the
industry we have today'
worth, and ultra-high net worth,
individuals would increase from
$37.8 trillion to $48.5 trillion
over the next three-four years
to justify his argument that the
Bahamian financial services
industry did not face extinction.
Disputing the argument by
London-based QC, Julian
Malins, that the Bahamian
financial services industry was
threatened with extinction, Mr
Moree said the data showed
SEE page 5B


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PAGEBSIES 2BIRDY ETME 1,20 H RBN


NOTICE

ALEXANDER INVEST & TRADE INC.
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act. 2000
ALEXANDER INVEST & TRADE INC. is in dissolution as
of September 8, 2009.

Demosthenes Mavrellis of 284 Arch. Makarios III Ave., Fortuna
Court, Block B, 3rd Floor, Flat 32, 3105 Limassol, Cyprus is
the Liquidator.


LIQUIDATOR


SEATED, LEFT TO RIGHT: Edison Sumner, former Governor-General Sir Orville A. Turnquest, Virginia Damianos. Standing left to right, Fritz
Stubbs, Gary Hutchens, Brian Quinn and Owen Bethel.


A Bahamas-based compa-
ny planning to offer a 'triple
play' solution featuring news
and entertainment has taken
another step towards its
launch, naming a board of
directors that has a former
Governor-General as its
chairman.
Sir Orville Turnquest has
been named chairman of IP
Solutions International, the
firm aiming to provide a com-
plete bundling of IPTV, com-
munications and entertain-
ment services via an Internet


protocol platform.
The directors include Bri-
an Quinn, immediate past
director-general, Internation-
al Institute of Communica-
tions, London, and former
chief executive of what is now
Reuters TV; Virginia Dami-
anos, vice-president, Dami-
anos Sotheby's International
Realty and a director of the
Bahamas Real Estate Asso-
ciation; Fritz Stubbs, presi-
dent, Orange Creek Devel-
opment Company; Owen
Bethel, president and manag-
ing director, the Montaque
Group,; Edison Sumner,


director and chief operating
officer, Montaque Group; and
Gary Hutchens, who will
serve as vice-president and
chief operating officer of IPSI.
Sir Orville Turnquest said
IP Solutions' services will
enable business to operate
more smoothly and increase
public sector cost-effective-
ness.
"The opportunities for real-
time communications deliv-
ery over the Internet are
almost endless, and the
advantages so tremendous
that they will forever change


how we do business," said the
chairman. "IP Solutions' inno-
vation will range from a sim-
ple phone call to a neighbour
to the ability to participate in
court proceedings from a
remote location, potentially
eliminating the need for per-
sons held on remand to be
bussed through traffic on busy
streets to court, reducing risk,
heightening safety and con-
serving valuable human
resources."
Mr Sumner, who as presi-
dent and chief executive of
IPSI has played an integral
role in the company's two-
year preparation for launch,
echoed Sir Orville's projec-
tions about practical applica-
tions of innovative services.
"We are extremely excited
about the prospects of being
first out of the gate as the
world of how television news,
telephone calls, movies, video
and gaming are brought to
you changes in the Bahamas,"
he said. "The country is on
the brink of nothing short of a
revolution in communications
and we are proud to be lead-
ing that revolution."
Mr Sumner hinted at two
pending significant IPSI con-
tracts, one with a large resort
development and the other
with a major entertainment
entity.
The curtain is expected to
be lifted on the services with a
demonstration at a prospec-
tive investors' meeting Sep-
tember 17. That meeting is by
invitation only.


( INTERNATIONAL





0


Bank of The Bahamas wishes to

advise our valued customers that our

Card Centre numbers have changed

for all Prepaid, Credit and Medline

Card holders.




Please note that the new numbers

are:



Local: 242-396-6010

International: 1-877-204-5110 TollFree

Family Island: 1-242-300-0111 Toll Free




www.BankBahamas.com


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


New media player




names its Board


NOTICE

LANSTER DEVELOPMENT INC.
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, LANSTER DEVELOPMENT INC. is in
dissolution as of July 27, 2009.


International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR


NOTICE

RADIO-REVEIL CORP.
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, RADIO-REVEIL CORP. is in dissolution as of
July 29, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR


PCCWlATFRHOUSO@PERS I

Is Seeking
A Corporate SeLrvices Bupervi-tor


Applicants should be Bahamian and have at l ast three (3) ycn practical experience in
the following areas:

SCompany incorporationn
SIFormation of PFoundaliaIs
* Company Contiflaaions
a VolunLar TLiquidatiuns
* Merger'Cusolidations
SIhafiing and vetirg ConlraclS nid AgrrvmcnLs
* Business License Applicaions including rcquircmcnts ofhe Grand Bahama Port
Aulhurnty Limilcd

Eligible candidates should also be familiar with 'ie Firancil and CrpuIra' Sen.rice
Proiders Act and hold either an LLB or a Bachelors Degr in Business Admini.slTulin
and or Fin iLc. CompcnsiiiLm nd bcnfikls to be paid commensurate with experience

Resurxs along with copies of your credentials should be sent to P.O. Box N - 3910,
Nassau, The Bahamas, Attention: Crporate Services Leader no after than Friday.
Septembr 25. 2009.


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


THE TRIBUNE






THE TIBUN FRIAY, EPTEMER 1, 209,IPGES3


Hotels brand farmer


buying


0


The AIOSA : , ( .B m B O eS ailor' o cia ti o
wil hodavr motn meetingat .M aiey Scho
Eluter Reata A ll bat wne s/mmbrar* s kedto
ae*. U A*, ..S


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
The Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation's (BHA) president
yesterday said it was a
"myth" that this nation's
hotels and tourism-oriented
restaurants were not pur-
chasing whatever locally-
grown produce they can,
although problems abound
in the relationship between
farmers and the industry.
Robert Sands, speaking to
an audience attending the
Bahamas Agro Tourism
Symposium, said all
Bahamian hotels that par-
ticipated in a regional spend-
ing survey in 2006 expressed
a desire to purchase
Bahamian-produced agri-
cultural products.
Mr Sands said the report
outlined factors that imped-
ed direct commerce between
farmers and hotel pur-
chasers, including availabil-
ity of demanded produce,
quality, pricing, packaging,
reliability, logistics, shipping
patterns and convenience.
However, he said a few
small relationships have
been successfully cultivated.
"A number of producers
have demonstrated success
already in linking agricul-
ture with tourism," said Mr
Sands.
"The facts show that there
are already some hotels and
tourism-oriented restaurants
which are purchasing what-
ever they can through local
producers.
"There is no question in
my mind that demand exists
for locally-grown produce,
but we must be cognisant
that there are a myriad of
supply and demand side
challenges which have not
allowed us to realise our
potential."
Mr Sands outlined six
major hurdles to the mass
purchase of locally-grown
goods.
He said consistency in
availability remains a con-
stant concern for hotel pur-
chasers, as the industry
needs to plan in advance,
thereby needing to be kept
abreast of the amount and
quality of produce that will
be available from Bahamian
farmers.
Contingency plans for the
procurement of staple prod-
ucts should be discussed
between hotel and farmer,
so that there will be a "back
up plan to guarantee deliv-
ery from another source"
should there be an unfore-
seen shortage for any rea-
son.
According to Mr Sands,
produce suppliers should
organise themselves without
relying on government for
their coordination, while
also creating a similar bond
with hotel purchasers and
executive chefs.
He said growers should
have consistency in product
quality, as price points for


local produce demand "a
good product". He suggest-
ed farmers then strive to
make their price point more
competitive due to competi-
tion that is able to mass pro-
duce.
Mr Sands argued that
above all, both sectors
should communicate more
effectively.
"As an industry we don't
really know what produce is
available at what time of
year, and for how long," he
said.
Deputy general manager
at the Bahamas Agricultur-
al and Industrial Corpora-
tion (BAIC), Don Major,
said his team has been pro-
moting an increase in the
number of farmers and low
cost land for lease, especial-


NOTICE

LAISA LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, LAISA LTD. is in dissolution as of July 27,
2009.


International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.


LIQUIDATOR




NOTICE

SAVANNE BUISNESS CORP.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138(4)
of the International Business Companies Act. 2000 SAVANNE
BUISNESS CORP. is in dissolution as of September 8,
2009.

Cynthia McBride of 284 Arch. Makarios III Ave., Fortuna
Court, Block B, 3rd Floor, 3105 Limassol, Cyprus is the
Liquidator.


LIQUIDATOR


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FOR SALE
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COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW

3030 SHIRLEY STREET | P 0 BOX N-492
NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE THE BAHAMAS
T 242 328 35(0) 0 f242 328 800)8 www.g~lcyat.com



The Public is hereby notified that our offices will be closed on
Friday, 11" September, 2009 for our Annual StaftTRetreat.
We apologize for an incon enience


C

, ~ . ., &�. 6 etsta


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
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or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


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NOTICE

METPORT PROPERTY S.A.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, METPORT PROPERTY S.A. is in dissolution
as of July 27, 2009.


International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.



LIQUIDATOR


I


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


INSIGHT
For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
I on Mondays I











Retail chain eyes five figure security spend


FROM page 1B

amount of our time and ener-
gy. It is really on the increase.
"What we lose used to be
up to $5 million........ As a
result of the incident on Sat-
urday at Cable Beach, we've
already ordered more camera
equipment for the outside.
We've just about covered
every inch of the store inside,
but we're unable to cover
every square inch of the park-
ing lot."
Mr Roberts added: "Any-


thing that's cost effective [in
terms of security], we're just
going to have to do. We have
security in the store, which
every 20 minutes patrols out-
side the store, but it's come
to the point where we have
to have security inside and
outside."
Bahamian businesses are
thus being faced with a vicious
circle, where operating costs
are being increased - and bot-
tom lines further shrunk or
losses expanded - by having
to pay for extra security mea-


sures while stuck in a reces-
sion. Of course, that same
recession is helping to further
fuel crime.
Khaalis Rolle, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce's
president, told Tribune Busi-
ness that he was "very con-
cerned" about the impact ris-
ing crime levels was having
on the business community,
especially the seeming surge
in armed robberies of compa-
nies in recent weeks.
He added that it was no
secret that a bad economy fre-


quently led to rising crime lev-
els, and said: "It's having a lot
of impact. People are afraid,
they're cautious, and this now
calls for a rise in operating
costs.
"You have to hire addi-
tional security. You have to
do far more than in the past
to ensure your business, your
people, are secure. People are
having to invest in security
systems."
Mr Rolle added: "I was
speaking to someone earlier
this morning, and they said


they were having to move
money by armoured car.
Before, they moved deposits
by themselves. Because of the
increase in levels of crime,
they've now invested in
armoured car services.
"They're not moving large
deposits, but people believe
the only way they can demon-
strate a level of security is by
employing armoured car ser-
vices to make people think
twice about robbing them.
But there's a significant cost
associated with the business


now.
"The cost for small busi-
nesses is ridiculous, but these
are the measures people have
to employ. They have to
employ physical security
around the clock, when in the
past they would have done so
for half a day. This is a double
whammy, for lack of a better
expression, and the more you
increase security, the bolder
criminals become, the more
daring they become."


NOTICE is hereby given that REHANA RAMLOCHAN
SINGH of #77 DEFENDER AVENUE, CHESAPEAKE
SUBDIVISION, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 4th day of SEPTEMBER,
2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.






The Public is hereby advised that I, ROLAND FERGUSON
of P.O. Box CR-12833, Nassau, Bahamas intends to
change my name to ROLAND SANDS. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.


Legal Notice
NOTICE
ULTRAFLIGHT CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
AREA MODE LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


FROM page 1B

dence any generating station
with a generating capacity
exceeding 250 kilowatts."
This was "provided that
the prohibition imposed by
this section shall not apply
to any stand-by generating
plant, which is used only for
the supply of energy in case
of the failure of the energy
supply by the Corporation
or other emergency. The
Minister shall not refuse his
approval under this section
for the installation or oper-
ation of any generating sta-
tion by any person in any


case in which the energy
required by such person can-
not be supplied or cannot
be supplied within a reason-
able time by the Corpora-
tion.
"Any person who installs
or operates or permits the
operation of any generating
station in contravention of
the provisions of this section
shall be guilty of an offence
and shall be liable on sum-
mary conviction to a fine of
$3,000 and, in the case of a
continuing offense, to a fur-
ther penalty of $150 for each
day that the offense contin-
ues."


Legal Notice

NOTICE
OHM HOLDINGS LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the In-
ternational Business Companies Act 2000 OHM HOLDINGS LTD.
is in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 9th
September 2009. David Thain ofArner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, PO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of
OHM HOLDINGS LTD. All persons having claims against the
above-named company are required to send their address and
particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 9th
October 2009.


.Z





Legal Notice
NOTICE
LOUVRE VENTURES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 8th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


President and chief exec-
utive of Wind Sun Water
Company, Elton Smith,
argued that this part of the
Act asserts private citizens
can generate their own pow-
er as "the average 2,400
square foot household only
needs approximately 6 to
8kw to operate properly
(including air-conditioning).
The vast majority of
Bahamian homes can do this
today quite legally".
He and other advocates
for alternative energy then
suggest that due to the high
number of power outages
experienced, and damage to


property as a result of
brownouts from the BEC
power interruptions, one can
be completely justified in
choosing to outfit a house
or a business with "clean"
power.







0INSIGH
Fo hesore
0ehndth 0ws


Legal Notice
NOTICE
BALZERS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
ACOMA VALLEY CORP.

- 4-
(a) The name of ACOMA VALLEY CORP. has been restored to the register.
(b) The Certificate of Dissolution dated the 19th February 2009 has been
cancelled.
(c) ACOMA VALLEY CORP. is deemed never to have been struck off the
register.
(d) ACOMA VALLEY CORP. is deemed at all times to have continued in
existence and to have been authorized to conduct business in accordance
with its Memorandum and Articles of Association notwithstanding the
purported dissolution of the company.
(e) The costs of the publications in the Gazette are to be borne and paid by
ACOMA VALLEY CORP.
(f) The Plaintiffs do pay to the Attorney General the costs of this application.

First Directorships Limited
(Director of ACOMA VALLEY CORP.)

Second Directorships Limited
(Director of ACOMA VALLEY CORP.)


Legal Notice Legal Notice
NOTICE NOTICE A
GRATEFUL HEART LTD. ASHDOWN VALLEY INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation) (In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of September 2009. The Liquidator the 10th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau, is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas. Bahamas. i i B






ARGOSA CORP. INC. ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) (Liquidator)


TODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' W .TIBUE22.O


Minister warns: 'Stay within law




on alternative energy supply'


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


THE TRIBUNE




















































FROM page 1B

there was "an enormous mar-
ket" for the services provided
by international financial cen-
tres, one that was growing.
"The financial services indus-
try in the Bahamas is far from
extinction," Mr Moree said.
"There are real opportunities
for growth. We have to address
some issues.... address trends
in the market, and given the
importance of the industry, and
that there will always be heavy
tax burdens [in industrialized
countries] and there will always
be wealthy people, if we can
provide the right product
together with the right service
in a competitive environment,
the industry is secured."
However, Mr Moree
acknowledged that the Bahami-
an financial services industry's
current business model and
client base would look differ-
ent in 10 years' time.
"The industry we have 10
years from now will not be the
industry we have today," the
attorney added. "There is a
very secure future for the indus-
try, but we have to continue to
be innovative, continue to
change and respond to the mar-
ketplace. That will involve the
loss of some of our existing
clients, and the retention of new
clients."
Mr Moree described the
notion that the Bahamas' finan-
cial services centre faced
'extinction' in the face of indus-
trialised countries' determina-
tion to regain lost tax revenue
as a "hyperbolic conclusion",
and said this initiative would
only increase demand for the
products and services provid-
ed by international financial
centres.
The fact that the US and
European countries were
increasing their tax burdens,
rather than reducing them, was
"only going to benefit" the
Bahamas, he explained, pro-
vided this nation could develop
products and structures that
were tax compliant with clients'
home country tax rules.
And Mr Moree described as
"an oxymoron" the notion that
industrialized countries' attacks
on international financial cen-
tres would cost the Bahamas
business, because to believe
"tax driven issues" were their
prime attraction was "to mis-
understand what the financial
services industry is all about".
The Bahamas was not seek-
ing business connected to tax
evasion and tax avoidance, the
senior McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes partner said, its busi-
ness model having changed in
favour of clients looking for tax
deferral or mitigation products,
and to protect assets from polit-
ical turmoil at home.
Mr Moree said he was confi-
dent the Bahamas could adapt
because it had shown the nec-
essary "innovation, creativity
and flexibility" to survive in the
face of OECD and Financial
Action Task Force (FATF) led
attacks before.
And international financial
services centres such as the
Bahamas also played a key role
in supporting jobs in OECD
countries, Mr Moree said, sup-
porting international financial
structures and arrangements
and mitigating/eliminating
political risk associated with
investing in certain countries.
They played a key role in
supporting the global financial
system's liquidity, he said, act-
ing as a "pass through" for
investments made into major


industrialized countries such as
the US. And the Bahamas and
its peers had also played a key
role in backing the global eco-
nomic recovery, Mr Moree said,
helping to clean up problems
caused by securitisations and
taking toxic assets off the bal-
ance sheets of troubled compa-
nies.
International financial cen-
tres thus played a key role in
the allocation of capital, Mr
Moree added, and they had
also helped to spur global tax
competition and a lower of cor-
porate tax rates internationally.
Generally, he said tax rev-
enue-to-GDP ratios had
increased as corporate tax rates
had come down.
"The market will always have
a need for us, and the only lim-
itation on this industry is our-
selves," Mr Moree added.


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11,2009, PAGE 5B


Bahamas must 'swim, not sink' via new clients


FROM page 1B

intensifying assault being mounted on inter-
national financial centres by the US and
European governments, born out of a
desire to maximise tax revenues and meet
public demands for increased public spend-
ing to improve services such as health and
education.
"It is the aim of the US, European and
Canadian governments to make the use of
offshore financial centres and low tax juris-
dictions, by the citizens and corporations of
those countries, so unattractive as to make
use of them non-viable," Mr Malins said.
"This is entirely due to the need to raise
tax income for expenditure in their home
states. I am almost afraid to suggest there is
nothing you can do about this problem."
However, the London-based QC did hint
at a survival strategy for the Bahamas, one
that would involve a shift from its tradi-
tional US, European and Canadian client
base to one heavily reliant on high net and
ultra high net worth individuals and families
based in emerging economies.
Among those he cited were Brazil, Nige-
ria, Russia, India and China, and the
Bahamas would be aided in this by the cur-
rent "global shift in wealth from North
America, the US, Canada and Europe to
the Far East, especially China and India".
With China a "huge potential market",
Mr Malins told the luncheon: "If you can
provide new services to these markets, you
will swim, not sink, but swim with an entire-
ly new client base and prosper in that way."
He explained that the twin trends, of


America and Europe becoming relatively
poorer, and the desire of industrialized
country governments to, as they saw it,
recoup tax revenues being lost to interna-
tional financial centres, in a desperate effort
to plug home Budget deficits and meet tax-
payer demands for more public spending
and improved services, were driving the
assault on nations such as the Bahamas.
The German government, for example, had
estimated that $400 billion was held outside
the country by its citizens.
In a bid to uncover these assets, it had
obtained account details on clients of a
major Liechtenstein-based financial ser-
vices provider, passing on the information
to the US and other tax authorities.
"That is an exact example of the kind
of step that governments will be taking in
the next decade or so," Mr Malins said,
adding that some of the steps governments
and tax authorities were taking would have
been "considered absolutely incredible" 10
years ago.
Then there was the case where UBS, the
bank headquartered in Switzerland, "the
absolute gold standard of banking secrecy",
had been forced to hand over account
details to the US Internal Revenue Ser-
vice.
The Swiss had "succumbed" to pressure,
and were now preparing to abolish their
traditional banking secrecy.
"We're now talking money, and every
weapon available to governments has start-
ed to be deployed to raise money from cit-
izens and corporations that happen to have
assets and money in low tax jurisdictions,"


Mr Malins said. "For the reasons I have
given, it is my suggestion to you that we in
the Bahamas, as in other jurisdictions, face
an absolute onslaught from these govern-
ments."
Resistance from the likes of Switzerland,
Luxembourg and Liechtenstein, he argued,
was likely to ultimately prove futile given
that all were surrounded by European
nations leading the tax revenues drive.
And competitors such as the Cayman
Islands, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands,
Channel Islands and the Isle of Man were
unlikely to cause a fuss, given their status as
British dependencies.
"Here in the Bahamas we are so close to
the US, and so closely tied into the US,
that there is no real prospect of holding
on to secrecy for US citizens and corpora-
tions," Mr Malins said.
"That's a fact of life for the financial ser-
vices industry here.
"The attractiveness goes for the deposi-
tors, settlers and corporations that have
companies in low tax jurisdictions to organ-
ise arrangements for the sale and importa-
tion of goods", minimising their home
country taxes.
Urging the Bahamian financial services
industry to "forget" US and European
clients, Mr Malins added: "The conse-
quences over the next 10 years are that
new business from the US and Europe will
collapse, and existing customers will depart
back to their home states or go to new
financial centres in the Middle East and
Far East."


NOTICE


EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION BAHRAIN
LIMITED
N O T I C E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
BAHRAIN LIMITED in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 8th
day of September, 2009 when its Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Carol G. Gray of
16945 Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060.
Dated the 9th day of September, 2009.


HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY
MANAGEMENT
CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named
Company



NOTICE


EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION BAHRAIN LIMITED



Creditors having debts or claims against the above-
named Company are required to send particulars thereof to
the undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 2nd day of October, A.D., 2009. In default thereof they
will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made by the
Liquidator.
Dated the 9th day of September , A.D., 2009.




Carol G. Gray
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, TEXAS 77060


NOTICE

GREATFUTURE LIMITED

N O T I C E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) GREATFUTURE LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 09th
September 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Mr Paul Evans of
Helvetia Court, South Esplanade, St Peter Port, Guernsey,
GY1 4EE.

Dated this 11th day of September A. D. 2009


Mr Paul Evans
Liquidator


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


THE TRIBUNE


Wealth increase gives Bahamas

'real chance for growth'


NOTICE


IN THE MATTER of the Estate of Franklin
Eugene Knowles late of the Eastern District
in the Island of New Providence, deceased

Pursuant to Section 50 of the Supreme Court Act,
1996 Notice is hereby given that any person having
a claim against the Estate of the late Franklin Eugene
Knowles must deliver the same to the Manager,
ScotiaBank (Bahamas) Limited, Paradise Island,
Nassau on or before the 15th day of October, A.D.
2009.

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys for Jason S. Knowles
the only child of the late
Franklin Eugene Knowles


(S.9,11,14)






ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT - PRIVATE BANKING

Applications are invited from persons for the position
of Assistant Vice-President, Private Banking

Job Summary
The Candidate must have an established international
client base with the proven ability to generate new client
relationships and develop the client base in line with the
Bank's products and services.

Responsibilities
* Develop and introduce new business in line with the
institution's established policies and procedures
* Perform necessary client administrative duties and promote
established products and services
* Have a sound working knowledge of The Bahamas' KYC
and AML requirements
* Assist with communication and translation of foreign
correspondence
* Provide and /or communicate investment services /
mandates to clients
* Travel will be required

Qualifications/Requirements:
* Prior experience in marketing in the financial services
environment for a minimum of eight years is expected.
* Knowledge and experience in the private banking and
investments is required
* Must have established clientele
* Must be fluent in English and French.

Remuneration is commensurate with experience.

Interested persons may apply by submitting
resumes by e-mail to
bsa.resume@gmail.com
reference
"Assistant Vice President Private Banking"
on or before Friday, 18th September, 2009.


NIAD
Nassau Airport
Develaopr erl Comprny




Introducing


BizPark at LPIA




Premium parking for people on the gol


SDo you travel to the Family Islands, U.S. andfor other international
destinations more than once per month?

* Do you normally arrive 'jut in time' for your flight at the airport?

SAre you third of wasting time trying to find a parking place at the
airport?

if you angwrerd yes In any of Ihe abm-e, Ihen 3sPark is for you. Membership indudes:

* Easy, haste free parking and easy access to and Iron the terminals
* GUaraneed parking space in Ihe Shrt Term lo
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S$15 flat rate pw 24 hows when used (versu 30 regular short term rate)

Sigin up today for guaranteed, fast, convenient tIrouble fte airport
parking. Download your appllcanon form at www.nasbs
Click on BizPark. Applications ar also available at NAD's office.

NAD wil be accepting 4plo 100 applications on a fi1 maine basis staring st 9am on
September 14th 2009. Applicatns should be droAtd off a tthe r~eepxin at NAD's
offio, 2nd Floor Dornestic'rmmralrial Terrmnl across om Royal Bank of Canada or
laxed io the numberr on lheapplicahm hxm




fatauipcl DA wptnwt Compan y
Lynden Pindig Irlenational airport
Ph: (242 377-a20 I Fax: 24 2) 7-&4
PO. Box AP 529, N au, Baharnes
BMd


I





PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Legal Notice
NOTICE
RASDANOI CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 8th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
AVALANCHE HILLS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 8th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
GREEN TONES & SHADES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 8th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
DUDLEY PINTO INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
VALERIANA LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on


FROM page 1B
Mr Minns argued that the Bahamas, if it increased the land
available for farming, could produce 30 crops for local con-
sumption and possible export.
He identified onion, Irish potatoes, lettuce, tomato, carrot,
cabbage, sweet pepper, hot pepper, pigeon peas and cooking
thyme as the top 10 crops out of the 30 suggested for farm-
ing.
According to Mr Minns, the Bahamas saw a 58 per cent
decline in the number of farmers from 1978 to 1994, and a
further 46 per cent decline form 1994 to 2006.

Diminishing

However, during the period 1978 to 1994, the number of
crops farmed by a diminishing number of farmers rose by 340
per cent, and between 1994 and 2006 by 22.7 per cent.
Mr Minns said he found a discrepancy with the Depart-
ment of Statistics' total food import value, which it placed at
$401 million in 2007. However, he assessed the true number
to be closer to $580 million.
He argued that the Bahamas' only way to eliminate the
loss of such substantial foreign reserves was to beef up its
agricultural sector, which includes the farming of livestock.


Legal Notice
NOTICE
HOLLY GOLIGHTLY RAINY DAY INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
KIRKENES RIVERS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 8th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Bahamas urged to guard



against TIEA double-cross


FROM page 1B

minimum standard of 12 TEIAs by year-end "does not
spell the end of the industry", this nation had to "be smart"
about how it negotiated these agreements and "look for
some sort of reciprocal benefit" from the major industrialized
countries it signed treaties with.
"The mere fact of signing this TIEA should be an endorse-
ment of our transparency regime, and where we have accept-
ed information exchange," Mr Moree said.
"We should not have a situation where countries sign a
TIEA with us, then complain about the lack of transparen-
cy."

Clause

The senior attorney said the provision of a clause in any
TIEA signed by the Bahamas, requiring the other side to
endorse its tax transparency and information exchange
regime as having met global standards, "was an important
issue to address as part of these treaties".
"We can't have a situation where an OECD country signs
a TIEA with us, then votes to put us on a 'grey list' or
'black list'," Mr Moree said.
"Fundamentally, if we're going to have a TIEA, we ought
to have some guarantee that they won't take the benefits of
the TIEA and then say we're not compliant and put us on a
'grey list' or 'black list'."
Mr Moree added that, with all TIEAs it entered, the
Bahamas should also seek "some guarantee of market
access" rights with its partner countries.

Legal Notice
NOTICE
EMMEN BANJO CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
SH INVESTMENT LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


U1 PG CAPITAL MARKETS
ROYAL FIDELITY SEVC
SMonay at W.Wk
C F L > C mC ~I N IA I-
E L . LI TC C '. TF - CCCII C* _-,F ITICE IL :
THLIRSD.- Y 1U SEPTEI.1BER P LILII
BI, ' LL i- ' RE II IDE> CL E I " " " " i- " C- 1 - - " T - 1 4
FIIIDE I L _i _ -,- -- I 'TO -- 4 -.- -
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM I TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 I FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
1 1 1 15 AML Foods Limited 1 15 1 15 0 00 0 127 0 000 91 0 00%
11 80 10 00 Bahamas Property Fund 11 00 11 00 0 00 0 992 0 200 11 1 182%
9 30 6 25 Bank of Bahamas 6 25 6 25 0 00 0 244 0 260 25 6 416%
0 89 0 63 Benchmark 0 63 0 63 0 00 -0 877 0 000 N/M 000%
349 315 Bahamas Waste 315 315 0 00 0 078 0 090 404 286%
237 2 14 Fidelity Bank 237 237 0 00 0 055 0 040 43 1 1 69%
14 20 1000 Cable Bahamas 10 00 1 00 0 00 1 406 0 250 71 250%
2 88 2 74 Colna Holdings 2 74 2 74 0 00 0 249 0 040 110 146%
7 50 5 26 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 542 594 0 52 1,050 0419 0 300 142 505%
385 1 27 Consolidated Water BDRs 375 376 001 0111 0052 339 138%
285 1 32 Doctor's Hospital 203 203 0 00 0 382 0 080 53 3 94%
8 20 6 60 Famguard 6 60 6 60 0 00 0 420 0 240 157 3 64%
1250 8 80 Fnco 8 80 8 80 0 00 0322 0520 273 591%
11 71 1030 FirstCarbbean Bank 10 30 10 30 000 0794 0350 130 340%
553 4 95 Focol (S) 512 512 000 0 332 0150 154 293%
1 00 1 00 Focol Class B Preference 1 00 1 00 0 0 0 000 0 000 N/M 0 00%
0 45 0 30 Freeport Concrete 0 30 0 30 0 00 0 035 0 000 86 000%
902 549 ICD Utllltles 550 550 000 0407 0500 135 909%
1200 1009 J S Johnson 1009 1009 000 0952 0640 106 634%
10 00 10 00 Premier Real Estate10 00 10 0 0 0 0 180 0 000 55 6 000%
i I '., LI _ TCELL. DCic T _ --C ITIC - . -i-,- - - P I- -- -i - I- -- Wi - 1, -, r
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol Interest Maturity
1000 00 1000 0 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 1000 0 00 7% 19 October 2017
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100 00 0 00 Prime + 1 75% 19 October 2022
10000 00 1000 Fdelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 1000 0 00 7% 30 May 2013
1000 00 1000 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 10000 00 Prime + 1 75% 29 May 2015
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
14 60 7 92 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 92 842 14 00 -2 246 0 000 N/M 0 00
8 00 6 00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2 00 6 25 4 00 0 000 0 480 N/M 7 80%
054 0 20 RND Holdings 0 35 0 40 0 55 0 001 0 000 256 6 000%
_,-., .. . . _ . . . . _ . . . . . .
1- ', L ,- - - I 1,,r,,-I -, ,,1- -
1 4038 1 3344 CFAL Bond Fund 1 4038 3 72 5 20 31-Aug-09
3 0350 2 8952 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2 8990 -1 39 -416 31-Aug-09
1 4867 1 4105 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 4880 3 79 5 49 4-Sep-09
36090 30941 Fidelty Bahamas G & I Fund 30941 -861 -1359 31-Aug-09
130484 123870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 131136 393 587 31-Aug-09
101 6693 100 0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101 6693 1 10 1 67 30-Jun-09
100 9600 93 1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96 7398 0 35 -4 18 30-Jun-09
1 0000 1 0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1 0000 0 0 0 00 31-Dec-07
94075 9 0775 Fdelty International Investment Fund 9 3399 2 69 -1 41 31-Jul-09
1 0707 1 0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1 0707 338 514 31-Aug-09
1 0364 1 0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1 0319 -0 11 2 05 31-Aug-09
1 0673 1 0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1 0673 2 89 4 93 31-Aug-09
i i-, T.C TCTi= i I
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX- 19 Dec 02 = 1,000 00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI - Highest closing pnce in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying pnce of Collna and Fidelity
52wkLOW Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling pnce of Collna and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted pnce for daily volume Last Pnce Last traded over-the-counter pnce
Today's Close -Cuent day's weighted pnce for daily volume Weekly Vol -Trading volume of the pnor week
Change Change n closing pnce fro day to day EPS $ A company reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV Dividends per share paid te last 12 months NM Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1, 1994 = 100
S) 4 for1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) 3-for1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COIINA 242-502-7010 I ROYAIFIDELITY 242-356-7764 I FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 I COLON AL 242-502-7525


the 10th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


1"-BUSINESS "











THE WEATHER REPORT

S. .... . ...


,t ORLANDO
High:880F/31�C
Low: 74� F/230 C
Q.
TAMPA
High:880F/31�C
Low:750F/240 C
Q,
,]


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:.: '- '


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Partly cloudy, a heavy Partly cloudy with a Sunny intervals with a Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny with a Times of clouds and
thunderstorm. thunderstorm. thunderstorm. possible. shower possible. sun.
High: 900 High: 880 High: 880 High: 890
Hih: 89 Low: 790 Low:79 : 7: 79 Low: 790 Low: 790

S 108o F | 89o IF | 106o-86o F | 108o-84o F 108o-83 F 8o-86oF
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature� is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body-everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.


I , ,RM A


IAiLMANAC


WEST PALM BEACH
High:880 F/31� C
Low:76�F/240 C


FT. LAUDERDALE
High:870F/310C C
Low:760 F/240 C


MIAMI
High:880F/31� C
Low:780F/260C


KEY WEST
High:880F/31� C
Low: 80� F/270 C
�.


Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston


High
F/C
80/26
63/17
84/28
68/20
70/21
63/17
66/18
86/30
79/26
72/22
88/31
78/25
76/24
89/31
88/31


Low
F/C
59/15
48/8
66/18
61/16
60/15
58/14
54/12
67/19
55/12
55/12
72/22
46/7
54/12
75/23
73/22


W High
F/C
t 78/25
sh 59/15
t 86/30
r 78/25
r 76/24
r 65/18
pc 68/20
pc 86/30
pc 77/25
pc 69/20
t 82/27
pc 65/18
pc 74/23
s 89/31
t 86/30


Saturday
Low
F/C
58/14
47/8
68/20
62/16
62/16
60/15
52/11
70/21
54/12
55/12
68/20
47/8
58/14
74/23
73/22


Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
82/27 57/13
86/30 71/21
84/28 63/17
104/40 75/23
85/29 67/19
89/31 64/17
84/28 61/16
86/30 69/20
88/31 78/25
78/25 59/15
86/30 63/17
83/28 75/23
66/18 60/15
86/30 67/19
88/31 74/23


Saturday
W High Low
F/C F/C
pc 80/26 57/13
pc 88/31 72/22
pc 82/27 63/17
s 103/39 78/25
t 78/25 68/20
s 84/28 64/17
pc 84/28 62/16
t 87/30 72/22
t 91/32 78/25
t 77/25 59/15
pc 87/30 65/18
t 86/30 76/24
r 72/22 65/18
t 82/27 64/17
t 89/31 74/23


ABACO
High: 89� F/320 C
Low: 80�F/27�C





FREEPORT "-,
High:880F/31�C
Low: 800 F/27 C




NASSAU
High: 89� F/320 C
-- Low:79�F/260 C










ANDROS
High:880F/31�C
Low: 790 F/260 C


Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, OR
Raleigh-Durham
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tucson
Washington, DC


High
F/C
69/20
104/40
67/19
94/34
81/27
86/30
89/31
88/31
76/24
82/27
87/30
88/31
88/31
94/34
70/21


Today
Low
F/C
60/15
82/27
54/12
59/15
64/17
65/18
59/15
71/21
68/20
56/13
56/13
71/21
75/23
72/22
63/17


Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature
High ............................ ................. 88� F/31 C
Low .................. .............................. 77� F/250 C
Normal high .................................... 880 F/31� C
Normal low ...................................... 750 F/24� C
Last year's high .................................. 900 F/32� C
Last year's low .................................. 82� F/280 C


-I,- 1.i


O1112 314151 7 8191
LOW MODERATE HIGH V HIGH EXT

The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexT number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.



High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.)
Today 12:20 p.m. 3.2 5:47a.m. 0.7
----- 6:52 p.m. 1.2
Saturday 12:37 a.m. 2.5 6:49 a.m. 0.7
1:25 p.m. 3.2 8:00 p.m. 1.2
Sunday 1:47 a.m. 2.5 7:59 a.m. 0.7
2:34 p.m. 3.3 9:08 p.m. 1.0
Monday 2:59 a.m. 2.7 9:11 a.m. 0.7
3:40 p.m. 3.4 10:11 p.m. 0.9

I III


Precipitation Sunrise......6:54 a.m. Moonrise ........ none
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .................................. 0.01" Sunset ....... 7:18 p.m. Moonset ..... 1:28 p.m.
Year to date ........................... .................. 27.65" Last New First Full
Norm al year to date .................................... 33.68"

AccuWeather.com .. ...
Forecasts and graphics provided by .
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. @2009 Sep. 11 Sep. 18 Sep. 26 Oct. 4
High: 89� F/320 C
Low:800F/270 C



CAT ISLAND
SHigh:860�F/30� C
Low:760 F/240 C


GREATEXUMA
High: 90� F/320 C
Low:800F/270C

*." - "'''


Saturday
W High Low
F/C F/C
r 74/23 62/16
s 102/38 80/26
r 70/21 54/12
s 93/33 58/14
pc 85/29 64/17
pc 86/30 65/18
pc 87/30 60/15
t 88/31 71/21
pc 75/23 67/19
s 71/21 58/14
s 88/31 54/12
t 89/31 72/22
t 88/31 77/25
t 93/33 71/21
r 82/27 64/17


SAN SALVADOR
High:88 F/31�C
Low: 79* F/26�C


LONG ISLAND
High: 90� F/320 C
Low:780 F/260 C


N
H
L


MAYAGUANA
ligh: 90� F/320 C
.ow:77�F/250 C




" ,, ,=


CROOKED ISLAND/ACKLINS
RAGGED ISLAND High: 91F/330 C
Low:79 F/26� C
High: 90� F/320 C
Low:740F/230C

GREAT INAGUA
High:930F/340 C
Low:77�F/250 C


Sflal INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
-," 1 (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


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WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SSW at 10-20 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 86� F
Saturday: SSW at 10-20 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 86� F
FREEPORT Today: SSW at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 86� F
Saturday: SSW at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 86� F
ABACO Today: SW at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 4 Miles 850 F
Saturday: SW at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10 Miles 850 F


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace


I ramVINSLI'los I111111 I


U.S. CITIES Ill sll lll1 ll 1 sll sll 11


Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Paris
Prague
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg


High
F/C
93/33
70/21
75/23
76/24
62/16
93/33
86/30
84/28
86/30
78/25
73/22
73/22
84/28
69/20
72/22
83/28
63/17
97/36
94/34
68/20
90/32
82/27
84/28
68/20
63/17
71/21
75/23
68/20
88/31
63/17
91/32
99/37
73/22
79/26
75/23
88/31
71/21
70/21
91/32
84/28
75/23
88/31
70/21
68/20
71/21
85/29
84/28
63/17
72/22
72/22
80/26
103/39
82/27
88/31
71/21
88/31
72/22
90/32
73/22
72/22
66/18
73/22
92/33
79/26
68/20
81/27
71/21
75/23
74/23
70/21


Today
Low W
F/C
79/26 pc
52/11 pc
56/13 c
66/18 sh
54/12 r
79/26 sh
78/25 sh
63/17 pc
61/16 s
74/23 s
60/15 pc
52/11 pc
78/25 t
40/4 pc
49/9 pc
63/17 c
43/6 s
72/22 s
84/28 sh
44/6 s
75/23 pc
73/22 pc
68/20 pc
53/11 pc
46/7 pc
51/10 pc
53/11 s
54/12 pc
72/22 t
48/8 pc
82/27 pc
68/20 s
66/18 r
63/17 s
46/7 s
79/26 c
60/15 pc
52/11 pc
63/17 pc
77/25 r
55/12 t
72/22 t
59/15 s
48/8 pc
51/10 sh
54/12 pc
72/22 t
46/7 sh
50/10 pc
52/11 pc
71/21 pc
74/23 s
63/17 pc
78/25 sh
39/3 s
70/21 t
45/7 s
74/23 pc
62/16 c
59/15 pc
48/8 pc
55/12 s
79/26 s
68/20 pc
55/12 pc
63/17 pc
57/13 s
58/14 c
58/14 pc
54/12 r


Saturday
High Low W
F/C F/C
90/32 77/25 t
68/20 50/10 pc
70/21 50/10 t
81/27 68/20 pc
61/16 54/12 r
92/33 79/26 r
86/30 77/25 sh
75/23 64/17 s
84/28 57/13 pc
78/25 73/22 pc
82/27 60/15 pc
68/20 50/10 c
84/28 78/25 t
68/20 41/5 pc
63/17 51/10 pc
81/27 57/13 s
66/18 46/7 s
96/35 72/22 s
94/34 85/29 sh
72/22 45/7 s
88/31 77/25 t
84/28 72/22 t
85/29 66/18 pc
64/17 51/10 r
61/16 45/7 s
71/21 52/11 c
72/22 50/10 s
70/21 54/12 c
88/31 73/22 sh
64/17 50/10 sh
91/32 82/27 pc
99/37 71/21 s
70/21 63/17 r
81/27 63/17 s
73/22 50/10 s
89/31 79/26 r
73/22 59/15 pc
68/20 54/12 pc
88/31 61/16 pc
84/28 77/25 r
75/23 55/12 t
90/32 70/21 t
72/22 63/17 pc
66/18 48/8 sh
61/16 47/8 c
86/30 55/12 s
91/32 73/22 pc
61/16 45/7 sh
70/21 49/9 pc
67/19 48/8 pc
83/28 72/22 pc
103/39 75/23 s
78/25 61/16 s
89/31 78/25 sh
79/26 44/6 s
85/29 72/22 t
75/23 48/8 s
86/30 73/22 sh
79/26 62/16 t
80/26 54/12 s
64/17 50/10 pc
81/27 59/15 s
91/32 79/26 pc
73/22 66/18 r
72/22 59/15 pc
84/28 64/17 s
70/21 57/13 s
71/21 56/13 pc
68/20 51/10 c
75/23 55/12 c


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