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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01417
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: September 7, 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01417

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The


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BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


Volume: 105 No.237 MOND,


TEMBER 7, 2009 PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)
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Police warn
public after
stabbing
death
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Staff Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Police have warned
the public to be on the look
out for an "extremely dan-
gerous" 23-year-old man
wanted for questioning in
connection with the island's
eighth homicide.
Ashley Joel Smith, 22, of
South Bahamia, was stabbed
Friday evening in the
Freeport area. He was taken
to the Rand Memorial Hos-
pital, where he later died of
his injuries.
Police have issued an all
points bulletin for Godfrey
Virgil Jr, alias 'Dollar Mur-
der' of Bass Lane.
Virgil has two distinctive
tattoos - one bearing the
SEE page 10


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or


" PM is set to
an I announce 500

lan1 Is temporary jobs


ling


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham
announced that government
will soon make an announce-
ment of a temporary jobs pro-
gramme for some 500 or more
unemployed people on Grand
Bahama.
While in Grand Bahama on
Sunday, Mr Ingraham told the
media that government is doing
a number of things to assist
Grand Bahama during this dif-


alias 'Dollar Murder'


ASHLEY JOEL SMITH died of
his injuries


30x60 Desk 36x72
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$800.oo 50.00


A L


WU BANGGUO, Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress of The People's Republic of China presented a model of the
national stadium - which is currently under construction -to the Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette. Desmond Bannister, Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture, Thomas A Robinson and Tommy Turnquest, Minister of National Security look on.


Man shot
in armed
robbery
attempt
By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
A BRAZEN attempted
armed robbery of a hardware
store in daylight has left a
young man in hospital in seri-
ous condition after being shot
twice.
The 23-year-old employee
of the store, identified by his
family as Alexander Dean,
was shot in the abdomen and
back after a dreadlocked gun-
man and his accomplice
entered Dean's Building Sup-
SEE page nine


A �a Q 1


A 65-YEAR-OLD man
was found dead in the water
near the shoreline at Good-
mans Bay on Friday
evening.
The man, whose identity
has not yet been confirmed
by police, was found at
around 6pm on Friday.
A doctor in the area
attempted to provide med-
ical assistance but was
unsuccessful.
The man, believed to be
from McKinney Drive, Nas-
sau, was pronounced dead
at the scene.
Police suspect the man
drowned.
An autopsy will be per-
formed to determine the
cause of death.
Foul play is not suspect-


S TROOPS ES* ON PAGES ELEVEN AND TWELVE
PM disappointed over inefficiency
of Grand Bahama Power Company


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - The Govern-
ment is concerned that the
Grand Bahama Power Compa-
ny may have sought to max-
imise profits at the expense of
its distribution and generation
system, according to Prime


Minister Hubert Ingraham.
Expressing his disappoint-
ment over the inefficiency in
power generation on Grand
Bahama, Mr Ingraham said
government is considering
whether to have the Grand
Bahama Power Company reg-
SEE page 10


Police in high speed chase shootout
By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
A HIGH speed chase raced through the streets of southern
New Providence on Friday night as police dodged bullets
and fired back while in pursuit of two men in a silver coloured
Honda accord.
The officers were on patrol in Pinewood Gardens when


SEE page nine


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PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUE TO THE
LABOUR DAY HOLIDAY IN THE UNITED
STATES, THERE WILL BE NO USA TODAY
SECTION IN TODAY'S TRIBUNE







PAGE^ ^ ^ ^HLOCAL 2,WS MODAI ETEBE 7 00 TE RB


BHS ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
THE Bahamas Humane
Society will hold its annual
General Meeting for 2009
tomorrow.
All Humane Society mem-
bers are invited to attend the
event, which will be held at
the Sheraton Nassau Beach
hotel on Cable Beach. The
meeting will begin at 6.30pm.




TROICA


Govt hails 'historic' Chairman Wu visit


BAHAMIAN government
officials hailed the visit of Wu
Bangguo, Chairman of the
Standing Committee of the
National People's Congress of
The People's Republic of Chi-
na, as an "historic" one that will
prove beneficial to the country.
Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette led a group
of high-ranking officials from
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
on Thursday in welcoming
Chairman Wu and a 120-plus
delegation, including 19 jour-


WU BANGGUO, Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National Peo-
ple's Congress of The People's Republic of China sits with Prime Minis-
ter the Rt. Hon. Hubert Ingraham at the head table during the Official Din-
ner hosted by the Prime Minister in honour of Chairman Wu at Atlantis on
Friday, September 4. Sitting in the middle is Interpreter, He Rulong.


nalists, on a four-day visit to
the Bahamas.
Joining Mr Symonette in
greeting the visitors were Dr
Patricia Rodgers, Permanent
Secretary; Elma Campbell, Res-
ident Ambassador of the
Bahamas to the People's
Republic of China; Joshua
Sears, Director General of the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
Despite overcast skies, the
visiting delegation received a


Bahamian cultural display when
they landed at Lynden Pindling
International Airport in a two-
storey jumbo 747-jet. As they
disembarked the plane, they
were greeted by two receiving
lines and the rhythmic sounds
and smooth gyrations of a
"mixed" junkanoo group that
performed in bright coloured
costumes.
The receiving lines included
Hu Dingxian, Ambassador of


the People's Republic of China
to the Bahamas, the diplomatic
staff of the Embassy of the Peo-
ple's Republic of China, and
members of the Chinese com-
munity.
Solange Allen, a student of
Xavier's Lower School, and
Davanna Collie of St Thomas
More Catholic School present-
ed Chairman Wu, and Li Jian-
guo, Vice-Chairman of the
National People's Congress,
with floral bouquets.
In a written press release,
Chairman Wu said: "China
attaches great importance to
developing relations with the
Bahamas, which it views as a
key partner of cooperation in
the Caribbean.
"Since establishing diplo-
matic ties, our two countries
have made good progress in the
bilateral relationship, increas-
ing political mutual trust,
expanding economic coopera-
tion and trade, forging rich and
diverse cultural and people-to-


people ties, and maintaining
close coordination and cooper-
ation in international affairs.
"This proves that the friend-
ly relationship between China
and the Bahamas serves the
fundamental interests of our
two countries and two peoples.
By paying this visit I hope to
further promote the compre-
hensive in-depth growth of our
friendly ties and cooperation."
Chairman Wu said during his
visit he would have "in-depth"
exchange of views with
Bahamian leaders with a view
to "enhancing political mutual
trust, expanding mutually ben-
eficial cooperation and other
issues of shared interest."
"I believe that with the host's
thoughtful arrangements, this
shared visit will be a complete
success," he added.
The delegation was whisked
away in an official convoy to
the Royal Towers, Atlantis
Resort, where they are resid-
ing.


Story of tennis player's wife's 'Bahamas

nightmare' sparks defence of the country


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net


DOZENS of Bahamians online jumped to
the defence of their country over the week-
end after an Australian magazine published
a story about the "Bahamas Nightmare" of
the wife of an international tennis champion
living in New Providence.
"Women's Day" magazine ran a front
page story about the "hellish" experience of
Bec Hewitt, the 26-year-old wife of Aus-
tralian tennis champ Lleyton Hewitt, who
recently moved to the gated-community of
Old Fort Bay out west.
The story, which tells of the crime fears
and loneliness of Mrs Hewitt in her Bahamas
home, was also reproduced online at
http://womansday.ninemsn.com.au/
celebrity/inthemag/855245/becs-bahamas-
nightmare
While some Bahamian readers felt the
characterisation of The Bahamas as a whole
as a poverty-stricken and crime-ridden place
was unfair, what raised their ire most were
the photographs illustrating the story, which
claimed to show the average lives of Bahami-
ans with images said to represent "typical
Bahamian housing", "impoverished locals",
"unkempt streets" and "barred windows."
In a bit of bad international publicity for
The Bahamas, the pictures, far from being
"typical", showed what appear to be the
worst of the worst that Nassau has to offer -


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"Just 25 minutes drive away, locals live in
abject poverty in the slums of Nassau, and
Bec's neighbours warn that it is a dangerous
place blighted by crime, poverty and high
unemployment. Armed robberies are com-
monplace, and last week a 34-year-old moth-
er of three became the country's 53rd murder
victim this year when she was gunned down
metres from a church. A few days later two
more people were killed."
Now the former soap opera star is "want-
ing out" of The Bahamas, continued the
piece.
While some Australians sympathised with
Mrs Hewitt's plight - "My advice to Bec is
get the hell out of there. How dare (Lleyton
Hewitt) put his wife and child in such a lone-
ly and dangerous place for his own selfish
desires," wrote one. Some Bahamians who
saw the piece let it be known that they felt it
was not an accurate portrayal of their home-
land.
"Richard," said: "Have any of you even
visited the Bahamas before? We're not
impoverished gun toting drug addicts. If
they're so miserable they should get out of
our country! No one is forcing them to stay."
Meanwhile, "Maura" in Nassau, wrote,
"I wondered if she has ever been to NYC,
Chicago or any other big city where you can
live in a great neighbourhood that's not gat-
ed but a few blocks away it's crime central."
However, others said they felt the arti-
cle's representation "may not be far from
the truth" about Nassau.


I ODSUS STOIE ON THI 0AG 0LG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


including a shanty-type house boarded up
with plywood, a miserable and dirty looking
man sitting shoeless on a sidewalk and a
derelict building surrounded by rubbish.
The story, published in the August 31 edi-
tion of the publication, read: "The look of
fear on Bec Hewitt's face when she leaves the
high-security Bahamas mansion she and
Lleyton call home is warranted, Annette
Witheridge discovers.
"When her tennis ace husband Lleyton
Hewitt announced they were moving to the
Bahamas, Bec probably expected to find a
sizzling new social life among the rich and
famous. If so, she must be sorely disap-
pointed.
"To outsiders, the high-security gated com-
munity of Old Fort Bay looks like an idyllic
place to bring up children. But in reality, the
197-hectare 'village' is a gilded cage, sur-
rounded by spiked fences and barbed wire.


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PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 3


LOCALNEWS


Man has throat

slit in the Kemp

Road area
A STABBING in the
Kemp Road area alarmed
residents when a man's
throat was slit early Satur-
day morning.
A 28-year-old resident of
Elizabeth Street said the
man was attacked outside
her front gate, which is near
the junction with Kemp
Road.
However, no record of the
stabbing was filed in the
weekend police report and
police press liaison officer
Walter Evans failed to
respond to inquiries from
The Tribune before press
time yesterday.
Kemp Road residents
want to know the condition
of the injured man and cir-
cumstances of the attack.


Weapons and

ammunition

found after tip
A LARGE stash of
weapons and ammunition
are off the streets today
after a tip from a member
of the public.
According to police, three
handguns - a .44mm, a 22
mm and a .38 mm - and
168 live bullets were dis-
covered in a plastic bag in
an area off Kemp Road at
around 11am Saturday.
No arrests have been
made in connection with the
find, but police investiga-
tions are continuing.

Bahamians asked to

observe Caribbean
Wellness Day
BAHAMIANS are being
challenged to improve their
health and to observe
"Caribbean Wellness Day" next
Saturday as part of the effort to
eradicate non-communicable
chronic diseases in the region.
Caribbean Heads of Govern-
ment, including Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, in response
to the heavy burden of non-com-
municable diseases on the citi-
zens of the region, issued the
Port of Spain Declaration in Sep-
tember 2007, "Uniting to Stop
the Epidemic of Chronic Non-
Communicable Diseases" and
declared that the second Satur-
day in September should be cel-
ebrated each year as Caribbean
Wellness Day.
The Ministry of Health invites
all Bahamians to attend an "All
Day Mega Health Extravagan-
za" on September 12 on the
grounds of the ministry's com-
plex at the juncture of Augusta,
Delancy and Meeting Streets.
For the adults attending there
will be a range of free health
screenings, including blood cho-
lesterol, blood pressure, blood
sugar and weight screening;
healthy food demonstrations; the
showcase of a range of activities
in which to engage in daily to
maintain a moderate level of
physical activity. For the children
there will be a fully supervised
bouncing castle, and in the late
afternoon everyone will be able
to get their "bodies in motion" to
the rhythmic beat of the One
Family junkanoo rush out.
There also will be booths
organized by various gyms, spas
and wholesalers featuring spe-
cial give-aways throughout the
day; a punchboardd" where
patrons, for a minimum dona-
tion, will be eligible to try for a
variety of prizes; as well as ven-
dors with healthy Bahamian
foods for sale.


Another region-wide power cut in Abaco


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
ABACO residents suffered
the second region-wide power
cut in a week on Saturday night
as controversy heats up over
plans for a Bunker C Fuel pow-
er plant in Wilson City.
Homes across Abaco were
plunged into darkness as elec-
tricity failed across the islands
at around 8.30 on Saturday
night and was not restored for
abut three hours.
The powercut was the sec-
ond Abaco-wide shortage in a
week, and the third power out-
age in Green Turtle Cay, resi-
dents say.
They are calling on the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) to explain why the
power fails on a weekly, or dai-
ly basis during the summer
months, while they continue to
pay high electricity bills.
An Abaco resident wrote on
t h e w e b s i t e
Bahamasissues.com: "It is bad
enough that it goes out so much
- on Wednesday it went off
from 4am until 10am, then it
went off again from 1pm until
2.30pm, only to go off again
from 4.30pm until 5.30pm -
but it goes down to maybe 40 or
50 volts and just stays there for
several minutes.
"We are lucky that every-


thing we have is not burnt up."
BEC and government offi-
cials intend to address power
supply issues by constructing a
48 mega-watt Bunker C Fuel
power plant in Wilson City, on
the Bight of Old Robinson,
South Abaco, to be operational
by March 2010.
But environmentalists are
concerned the power plant, like
the one in Clifton Pier, New
Providence, will be hugely
detrimental to the environment.
Although the fuel type is
cheaper than diesel, they say it
will not cut electricity prices for
residents, and it will lead to
potential oil spills, toxic air
emissions, acid rain, and car-
bon emissions in a pristine
tourist area just three miles
from the protected Pelican
Land and Sea National Park.
Hope Town resident Matt
McCoy, 30, said: "If properly
maintained and run the plant
will be about as toxic as an
equivalent diesel plant, but it
will require tons of mainte-
nance and operations manage-
ment. Can BEC handle this? I
don't think so. And an accident
with this stuff will be much,
much worse than diesel."
Mr McCoy understands five
out of 15 generators at the cur-
rent Marsh Harbour power
plant are broken, in addition to
power lines going to the cays.
He said: "The current Marsh


MINISTER of the Environment Earl
Deveaux (left) and Phenton Ney-
mour, Minister of State for the
Environment with responsibility for
utilities, will hear Abaco residents'
concerns in a public meeting.
Harbour power plant generates
around 16 megawatts of power
which is adequate in the win-
ter, but not summer. However,
if all of the diesel generators
were working, they would have
around 24 megawatts of power,
enough to supply all of Abaco
all year round.
"But they want 48 megawatts
at Wilson City! Why double the
power?
"Instead of bringing in more
complicated equipment that
requires diligent maintenance,
why not fix what is already here
and broken?"
Elbow Cay resident Attila


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Feszt said: "More power is
needed, but the plant they are
planning on building could
damage the whole area.
"Bunker C fuel is the cheap-
est stuff they can get and it will
possibly cause pollution of the
water. It's a short term fix."
Mr Feszt, Mr McCoy and
other concerned Abaco resi-
dents are calling on govern-
ment to explore alternative fuel
or energy sources and identify
a site that will have less impact
on the environment and
tourism.
Minister of the Environment
Earl Deveaux and Phenton
Neymour, Minister of State for
the Environment with respon-
sibility for utilities, will hear
their concerns in a public meet-
ing at New Visions Ministries,
in Jerusalem Drive, Marsh
Harbour, at 7pm on Thursday.
A statement released by
BEC in relation to power cuts
across the Bahamas maintains
the corporation is confronting
and resolving inconsistencies
in power supply as a priority.
A spokesman for the Cor-
poration said specialists have


been brought in from the Unit-
ed States to review operations
and make recommendations
for improvements, and $150
million is being invested in a
number of capital projects to
upgrade electricity supplies in
the Family Islands.
The BEC spokesman said:
"Furthermore, the Corpora-
tion remains committed to
implementing a renewable
energy programme on a utility
scale.
"The Corporation is taking
the proper steps to ensure that
such a programme can address
the unique energy needs and
the protection of the fragile
ecosystems of the Bahamas.
"Consumers should also
note that the BEC claims
department stands ready to
investigate and process claims
of damage to electrical appli-
ances. Further information
regarding the Corporation's
claims services is available at
www.my-bec.com or by tele-
phoning the department during
regular business hours."
BEC can be contacted at
302-1000.


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PAGE4,MONDAYSEPTEMBER7,200T9THETSTO TRTORI IB


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama


WEBSITE


www. tribune242. corn


updated daily at 2pm


Married women need protection


THERE ARE those religious ministers
- presumably the unidentified voices behind
the Bahamas Christian Council's objection
to government's extending the offence of
rape to the marital bed -who fear there
would be "far reaching consequences" to
the institution of marriage if a man were
answerable before the law for raping his
wife.
Some of these pastors predict a complete
breakdown in society if sexual violence by a
man against his wife were classified as rape.
The ministers fear that a rejected, vio-
lent man would lose faith in marriage and
start to roam outside the home in search of
new comfort if he could not use his wife as
his sexual chattel. In the Bahamas culture of
the "macho" man, this is rather a ridiculous
fear.
There are many fine, upstanding and
faithful husbands in this society. However,
there are too many "macho" men, who have
loving wives, but who roam anyway and
proudly boast of the number of children
they have "outside." In their own rough cir-
cle this is the way they prove their manhood
- it's the game of one upmanship over their
equally crude peers.
We have had many embarrassing
moments at The Tribune when a legitimate
family has placed a death notice for their
dearly beloved father in the newspaper only
to have the "outsides" call to berate the edi-
tor for leaving them out of the list of sur-
vivors.
We distinctly remember when this first
happened to us in our early days at The Tri-
bune. A gentleman, who held a good posi-
tion in this town, died. His family brought in
his death notice and it was published. It was
just another routine death notice. Nothing
seemed out of the ordinary until we got a
telephone call the following day. The male
voice at the other end of the telephone was
frothing with anger - he was so angry that
we could hardly understand what he was
saying. He was also well known in the com-
munity. He maintained that this was his
father and that we had left his name and
the names of his many brothers, and possibly
sisters, out of the list of survivors.
We tried desperately to extricate our-
selves from his father's extra marital aber-
ration, but he would have none of it. He
was holding our feet to the fire and blaming
The Tribune for disrespecting his position in
the family circle.
The only way around the dilemma was to
allow the "outside" family to pay for a sec-
ond notice announcing the father's death
and listing them as his sole survivors. And so
this elderly gentleman, who while he lived
held his head high in the community, was
sent to his grave with two death notices -
one by his inside family, ignoring the "out-
side" and a second by his "outside" ignoring
the "in." In this case the "outside" far out-


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numbered the "inside". We later learned
that there were many more, but these other
outsiders decided to let him rest in peace
and keep their secret to themselves.
We often laughed at our American moth-
er who encountered this unusual social phe-
nomenon in her first weeks of marriage. Our
father, who was then the representative in
the House of Assembly, for the island of
Inagua, was starting his honeymoon when an
election was called. He took his bride cam-
paigning with him in Inagua. A young school
teacher, completely out of her element, she
tried her best to be sociable. That evening
she confronted her husband: "Etienne," she
said, "every man that I asked today about
how many children he had gave me a certain
number of 'inside' and another number of
'outside.' What's this outside-inside thing
all about?" That little schoolteacher had a lot
to learn in her almost 80 years in the
Bahamas. Some of it she never understood
and would dismiss with a shrug of the shoul-
der.
And so for Bahamian men to be encour-
aged to wander if they were to be punished
for sexually violating their wives is to mock
history - that type man wanders anyway,
and has always done so, with or without the
rape law. In his ignorance he thinks he's
smart.
However, we can see how, if this law
were not passed, it could indeed undermine
marriage and further breakdown the family
and consequently society.
There has been so much debate over this
amendment that many women have proba-
bly learned for the first time that if they are
sexually abused when not married the law
will protect them against the violence, but as
soon as they marry they forfeit that protec-
tion. They might well opt to have an open
relationship without marriage to ensure that
they can turn to the law for protection should
their common law mate violate them.
Christian Council, those of you who are
so fearful of this law destroying marriage,
just think of how much more damage it
could do if it is not passed. The woman could
shun the marriage contract.
And when we talk of violence in the bed-
room - and remember the law follows
crime wherever it is committed, even to the
bedroom - read the letter that will be pub-
lished in the letters column on this page
tomorrow.
This letter writer has had the courage -
on reading the Christian Council's state-
ment over the weekend - to break her
silence about the violence that her own
mother suffered.
We thank her for her sense of duty in an
attempt to help women who are caught in
this terrible web of physical violence against
their person. These are the women who need
protection - they are the women who need
the amendment.


Bewildered by



Bahamas Christian



Council statement


EDITOR, The Tribune.


IE!MMMMPF-R~cl4


pers some Neanderthal state-
ments by some churchmen who


I read with dismay, the state- 0M WWoppose this progressive and
ment in opposition to the pro- necessary amendment to the
posed out-lawing of rape Sexual Offences Act. At a time
against a spouse by the Presi- when a disproportionate per-
dent of the Christian Council positions of support for the centage of assaults, and indeed
in this morning's paper which amendment taken by those four homicides, in our country
he purported to issue on behalf Church Heads, as a position of involve family members, the
of the Bahamas Christian the Council. Christian Church must speak
Council. t C I understand that in some uniformly against violence
I thought the Christian denominations, each Church Rape is always accompanied by
Council represented all Christ- operates as an independent violence or the threat of vio-
ian denominations in The body and each sends a repre lence!
Bahamas. The Heads of four tentative to the Christian Coun- Any suggestion that forcibk
major Christian denominations cil even if their individual sexual relations is ever "non-
in our country: the Seventh- church has only a very small violent" and ever "not rape" i
Day Adventists, the Methodist, number of members. In this incredulous, unbefitting and
the Roman Catholic and the way, these denominations have inappropriate for any person
Anglicans, have all indicated been permitted to dominate the who claimsto preach thegospe
publicly their support for the Christian Council for decades, of Jesus Christ.
amendment of the law. to the detriment of the Council
I am bewildered then, that in many instances, as in this INCREDULOUS
the Rev. Patrick Paul issued his ca I believe Nassau,
statement, which is diametri- case, I believe newspa- September 5, 2009.
cally opposite to the thoughtful

Who and what is the Christian Council?


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I think it is totally wrong for the Bahamas
Christian Council to send out a message in its
name to confuse the public. Whenever the Chris-
tian Council makes a statement, the public
assumes that the statement is from all this coun-
try's Christian churches speaking in unison. Obvi-
ously this is not the case as in the recent rape
amendment controversy the four leading Chris-
tian denominations supported the amendment.
Therefore, we are to assume that they are not
included in the Christian Council's statement,
which is against the amendment. If this is so, is the
Christian Council deliberately trying to mislead
the country?
We would now like to know: Who and what is
the Christian Council. If its membership does


-g
EDITOR, The Tribune.
To: The President, BCMC
Congratulations for giving
support to the proposed
amendment to the Sexual
Offences Act. You make me
proud to be a Methodist. Kind
personal regards and best wish-
es for the new church year.
PATRICK BETHEL
Nassau,
September 3, 2009.
Predictable response
EDITOR, The Tribune
The Bahamas Christian
Counsel's response to the gov-
ernment's proposed marital
rape law was predictable and
regrettably highlights the inse-
curities of far too many
Bahamian men.
These worthy stalwarts are
still living in an era when the
worth of the Bahamian woman
was measured by her ability to
fry fish and give comfort.
Small wonder our illegiti-
macy rate is so incredibly high
when our young women are still
led to believe, by the clergy no
less, that they are nothing more
than mere chattels.


IAN MABON
Nassau,
September 5, 2009


not include all the major denominations, please
let us know, and consider doing us an even bigger
favour by changing the Council's name -
because it doesn't say much for a christian body
that would attempt to mislead a community.
If this was not a unanimous statement by each
member of the Council, then the Council is duty
bound to tell the public who made the statement.
A list of all the signatories to that statement
would be much appreciated. Be men enough to
stand up for what you believe in and not hide
behind others whose denominational reputation
carries more weight in this community.
CONFUSED AND OFFENDED
Nassau,
September 5, 2009


Whom does Christian Council speak for?
EDITOR, The Tribune.
Clearly the Bahamas Christian Council has by its release and
opinion as to the proposals on the table to amend the legal position
of rape within a marriage has parted from at least one of the
largest denominations which now raises a long standing question
as to who does the Bahamas Christian Council speak for?
Some years ago I obtained a true copy of the Constitution of the
BCC and was surprised that for example any faith/denomination
which was administrated or controlled by an external source could
not be a member of the BCC. Clearly therefore the Roman
Catholics, The Greek Orthodox, Lutherans, Southern Baptists
possibly even some of the Pentecostals were in fact denied mem-
bership. Further it is an Article of the BCC Constitution that
whenever there is a dissenting view the Council in any release is
required by the Constitution to identify the difference and name the
faith that dissented. We certainly have never seen that from the
BCC, ever and not today on this controversial matter.
Watching television last evening a thought came to me which I
think will bring some sense to the matter - when you are young
and in love there is absolutely no way that either the male or
female look at each other in any manner of way of nothing more
than being one and equal so why are we making all this noise?
I agree the time period of two-years as I understand that either
party can bring or allege rape is far too long as this complicates the
issue if the parties reconcile and forget to rescind the charge or
report - either party may hold this over each other.
The question of common-law arrangements - of consenting
homosexuals residing together be they males or females and, of
course, the sweetheart position to me this amendment does not cov-
er those relationships although as they are not statutorily married
I presume you can bring rape charges under the Penal Code.
It is sad that the Christian Council could not discuss and debate
the issue internally before issuing this statement as obviously now
they have created a controversy.
ABRAHAM MOSS
Nassau,
September, 2009.




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PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009


1
d





e
.
r-
d


ly


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGEEW5


Lands Committee
extends deadline
for public to
submit concerns
AFTER meeting on
Friday, the House Com-
mittee on publicly held
lands has agreed to
extend the deadline for
concerned members of
the public to make sub-
missions or requests to
the investigative group-
ing.
Having issued a prior
notice to the public solic-
iting information on
their concerns about
publicly-owned lands,
the parliamentary com-
mittee's meeting on Fri-
day saw them consider
that information before
deciding that the final
deadline for the public to
provide such input would
be extended to this Fri-
day, September 18.
"Accordingly all peo-
ple who are interested in
making submissions
before the committee
and or appearing before
the committee should
write the clerk of the
House of Assembly with
their submissions or
requests.
"The committee has
agreed to respond to all
those who have written
letters and made submis-
sions and to draw up a
schedule of witnesses for
those who wish to appear
before the Committee,"
said Committee chair-
man, MP for Fox Hill,
Fred Mitchell.
The Committee
adjourned to Monday,
September 21, at 10 a.m.
Any submissions or
requests should be sent
to the Chief Clerk,
House of Assembly
at PO Box N 3003, Nas-
sau, Bahamas or by fax
no 322-1118 or at the e-
mail address: houseo-
fassembly@bahamas.gov.
bs, or by hand to the
House of Assembly, Bay
Street, Nassau.


Davis welcomes Wilchcombe



to PLP deputy leadership race


PHILIP "Brave" Davis, contender for
the deputy leadership of the PLP, yesterday
issued a statement "welcoming" MP for
West End and Bimini Obie Wilchcombe
to the race for the post.
The statement comes two days after Mr
Wilchcombe officially launched his bid for
the deputy leadership in Grand Bahama
on Friday, becoming the second to
announce such intentions.
MP for Rum Cay, Cat Island and San
Salvador, Mr Davis said the declaration by
Mr Wilchcombe is "another sign of democ-
racy at work in the PLP" and, signalling
that more bids will soon be launched, he
said that the "various candidates, whether announced or unan-
nouced, all have the best interest of the party and country at heart."
Mr Davis reiterated that the fundamental issues forming the basis
of his campaign are education, crime and the judiciary; and "the
creation of a new economic model compatible with the changing
needs of the country."
Speaking on Friday Mr Wilchcombe said that if elected as Deputy
Leader he would address crime, employment, enhancing the tourism
product, improving the education system and re-energising Grand
Bahama's flagging economy.
* SEE PAGE SIX

Agro-Tourism Symposium being

held at College of the Bahamas


LINKING Bahamian farm-
ers with those in the tourism
sector is the aim of an "Agro-
Tourism Symposium" being
held at the College of the
Bahamas this Thursday.
Organised by the Bahamas
Agricultural Producers Associ-
ation in partnership with the
Inter-American Institution for
Cooperation on Agriculture,
Ministry of Tourism and Avia-
tion and The Bahamas Hotel
Association the forum will offer
a chance for producers to net-
work with chefs and food and
beverage directors who might
be interested in purchasing
their produce.
Speaking at the event, held
under the title "Linking Hotels
and Local Farmers", will be Ms
Ena Harvey, a hemispheric spe-
cialist in agro tourism from Bar-
bados, Edison Key, MP for
South Abaco and Chairman of
BAIC, Robert Sands, President
of the Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion as well as Chef Keshlah


Smith and Leslie Minnis, senior
marketing officer, Department
of Agriculture.
Registration is $25 per per-
son including meals and sym-
posium material. The venue is
Choices Restaurant, The Culi-
nary and Hospitality Manage-
ment Institute, College of the
Bahamas, Thompson Boule-
vard. Call 502 4234 to register
or for more information.


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THE TRIBUNE


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Astronauts pack trash, surplus gear for ride home
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. tons of space station supplies
and equipment. It will come
THE astronauts aboard the back filled with a ton of trash
linked space shuttle and space and surplus gear. The astronauts
station are almost finished pack- will place the van back aboard
ing up a moving van for return Discovery on Monday night, just
to Earth this week, according to in time for Tuesday's shuttle
Associated Press. undocking. The shuttle astro-
The Italian-built van- essen- nauts said Sunday that they're
tially a giant cylinder - flew up ready to wrap up their mission
aboard Discovery with seven and come home.


f Jra4t


WILCHCOMBE LAUNCHES CANDIDACY
OBIE WILCHCOMBE officially announced his candidacy for the
deputy leadership of the PLP party on Friday at the Our Lucaya
Resort. Mr Wilchcombe, who came on stage in crutches after
injuring his ankle, thanked his beloved mother, supporters, and
II len .'l o [" .'I: I 1e .:'u 1 ' l'l ' .ii 11 lli'ii' n .1 1 ' I r'i : *uppo lld
lli1 Ci'ei [l\ie Ci 'l^ Eiii n'i IlE prlli i l E AG Ei F.VE
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PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE











Guyana: Economic prospects


By RONP


an

ALD SANDERS


(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)
DESPITE uncertainties
that mar the Guyana politi-
cal scene, the country's eco-
nomic prospects appear to
be brighter than they have
been in three decades. Sev-
eral developments account
for this and they bring hope
to a country that has been
blighted by political turmoil
and economic setbacks.
Amongst the develop-
ments is the considerable
reduction in the ratio of debt
to gross domestic product.
Guyana has moved from
being one of the world's
highly indebted poor coun-
tries to a situation in which
the Government is manag-
ing its debt and has more
breathing space in which to
take policy decisions of
social and economic benefit
to the Guyanese people. It is
an accomplishment for
which Guyana's President
Bharrat Jagdeo deserves full
credit.
Epitomizing the new eco-
nomic optimism for Guyana
is the formal opening, sched-
uled for September 14, of a
bridge over the Takutu Riv-
er, the narrowest point at
which Guyana and its
sprawling neighbour, Brazil,
connect. Both Guyana's
President and Brazil's Pres-
ident lancio Lula Da Silva
will be part of the opening
ceremony.
The Brazilian govern-
ment, with the full agree-
ment of the Guyanese gov-
ernment, has built the bridge
capable of carrying heavy
vehicles to transport con-
tainers with a wide variety
of commodities as well as
people. The bridge is the
first step in infrastructure
that would allow business-
men from Brazil's Northern-
most State of Roaraima to
truck commodities through
Guyana to a port on
Guyana's Atlantic coast and
then to markets in North
America and Europe.
What has to follow is a
dry-weather road from the
bridge on the Guyana side
to the town of Linden which
is already connected by a
highway to Guyana's capi-
tal, Georgetown, on the
Atlantic Coast. Then a deep
water harbour has to be con-
structed. But even without
the harbour immediately,
the bridge and road would
give Roraima businesses the
access to the Atlantic they
now need. The system
would be considerably
cheaper for businesses that
now have to transport goods
across the vastness of Brazil
to its far-away ports. The
Brazilians have a vested
interest in financing the
building of the harbour.
Guyanese businesses
would also be able to use
the bridge for transporting
goods for sale in Brazil pro-
vided they are able to estab-
lish markets. At the
moment, while Brazilian
goods are increasing in the
Guyana market, largely due


I political uncertainties




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"It is estimated
that there are
about 3,000
Brazilians now
operating gold
mines in
Guyana and
making a good
living from
it while
contributing to
the economy."

to the influx of Brazilians
into Guyana, Guyanese
exports have been limited
to wood, wood products and
bauxite. But, there is every
reason to believe that
exports of rice in particular
would be possible.
It is estimated that there
are about 3,000 Brazilians
now operating gold mines in
Guyana and making a good
living from it while con-
tributing to the economy.
They have brought in new
technology and are getting
higher production yields.
Consequently, the govern-
ment is getting more taxes,
and the Guyana Gold Board
which purchases the pro-
duction is selling it on the
international market at a
profit.
Once traffic starts
between Roraima and
Georgetown, several forms
of new economic activity
will spring from it, includ-
ing new villages in areas that
are now sparsely populated.
The road points the way not
only for a cheaper outlet for
Northern Brazil to the
Atlantic and therefore to
Europe and North Ameri-
ca, but for a considerable
boost to the economy of
Guyana.
The construction of the
road and the harbour will
increase employment and
production in the Guyanese
economy in the near term.
Given the sustained eco-
nomic activity that they will
generate, new and lasting
employment will also be cre-
ated.
Aligned to the business
links to Brazil is the Guyana
government's decision to
designate Ogle, an area on
the Atlantic Coast of
Guyana, as a second Inter-
national Airport. The
arrangements for this are
almost complete. Ogle will
accommodate flights on air-
craft such as those operat-
ed in the Caribbean by


LIAT and Caribbean Air-
ways as well as the Brazil-
ian airline, Mehta. Ogle is
15 minutes from George-
town and less than 10 min-
utes from the Secretariat of
the Caribbean Community
and Common Market
(CARICOM).
President Jagdeo is also
working feverishly to put
together the means to build
a hydro-electric power sta-
tion in Guyana. With its
many rivers and waterfalls,
Guyana lends itself to
hydro-power. Once hydro-
power is established, ener-
gy costs - now one of the
big expenses of doing busi-
ness and accounting for as
much as 20 per cent of GDP
- would drop significantly
opening the distinct possi-
bility for less expensive pro-
duction of sugar and bauxite
and reduced costs in the
mining and timber sectors.
Then, there is oil explo-
ration off shore in an area
where the maritime bound-
ary with Suriname is now
legally settled. The Canadi-
an company, CGX, which
has been exploring the area,
made some hopeful state-
ments in August. Amongst
them was that "the cost esti-
mate to drill the Eagle Deep
Well has been reduced sig-
nificantly to below $70 mil-
lion from US$90 million"
and they were encouraged
by the seismic data
processed during the first
half of 2009. If this leads to
the renewal of drilling next
year, it would be a further
boost to the Guyana econo-
my.
However, the prospects
for economic improvement
are dimmed by political
uncertainties. President
Jagdeo's term of office ends
in 2011, and his Peoples Pro-
gressive Party (PPP) will
have to choose a Presiden-
tial candidate next year.
That candidate will have to
be someone in whom the
electorate, beyond the tra-
ditional PPP support, has
confidence both to manage
the economy and lead a
multi-racial nation.
A recent convention of
the main opposition, Peo-
ples National Congress
(PNC), to elect its leader
and other officers turned out
to be a fractious affair.
While Robert Corbin was
re-elected leader, the PNC is
now split into many parts
with its middle class support
severely disenchanted. The
main beneficiary of the
PNC's internal confusion
appears to be a third party,
the Alliance for Change,
which promotes itself vigor-
ously as a non-racial group-


ing dedicated to a one-
nation Guyana.
But, the telling political
battles will be fought next
year - first within the two
main parties and then at the
national level.
Within sight of all the
parties is the prospect of real
economic opportunities for
Guyana if the politics can
be managed with maturity.
Responses and previous
commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com


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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 8, MONDAYNATSEPTEEMBRW72S009 THEITRIBUNE


US-German rift emerges



over Afghan deaths case


KABUL


AN AIRSTRIKE by U.S.
fighter jets that appears to have
killed Afghan civilians could
turn into a major dispute for
NATO allies Germany and the
United States, as tensions began
rising between them Sunday
over Germany's role in ordering
the attack, according to Associ-
ated Press.
Afghan officials say up to 70
people were killed in the early
morning airstrike Friday in the
northern province of Kunduz
after Taliban militants stole two


tanker trucks of fuel and vil-
lagers gathered to siphon off
gas.
Afghan and NATO investi-
gations are just beginning, but
both German and U.S. officials
already appeared to be trying
to deflect blame.
German Defense Minister
Franz Josef Jung said the Tal-
iban's possession of the two
tankers "posed an acute threat
to our soldiers." German offi-
cials have said the tankers might
have been used as suicide
bombs.
"If there were civilian casu-


alties or injuries, of course we
deeply regret that. At the same
time, it was clear that our sol-
diers were in danger," Jung said
in comments to German broad-
casters. "Consequently, I stand
clearly behind our commander's
decision" to order the air strike.
Meanwhile, Rear Adm. Gre-
gory J. Smith, the top U.S. and
NATO spokesman in the coun-
try, said German troops let too
many hours pass before visiting
the site of the bombing Friday.
He explained that it's impor-
tant to hold the ground after a
strike and determine what hap-


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opened before the enemy comes
out with its own version of
events.
The top U.S. and NATO
commander in Afghanistan,
U.S. Gen. Stanley McChrystal,
visited the site Saturday where
two charred trucks and yellow
gas cans sat on a riverbed. He
asked a top commander in
Regional Command North
about the response time.
"Why didn't RC-North come
here quicker?" McChrystal
asked Col. Georg Klein, the
commander of the German base
in Kunduz.
"I can honestly say it was a
mistake," Klein answered, in a
discussion witnessed by an Asso-
ciated Press reporter.
On Sunday, Smith said that
in McChrystal's judgment the
response time "was probably
longer than it should have
been."
German troops in
Afghanistan have long been crit-
icized for avoiding combat oper-
ations, even as militants have
increasingly infiltrated northern
Afghanistan the last year, desta-
bilizing the once-peaceful
region.
Taliban militants stole two
fuel tankers late Friday that
became stuck on a riverbed out-
side Kunduz. Villagers - either
forced by the militants or
enticed by offers of free fuel -
gathered near the trucks, even
as U.S. jets patrolled overhead.
German commanders watch-
ing images from the U.S. air-
craft could see about 120 people,
McChrystal said Saturday. The
commanders decided that the
people were militants and
ordered the airstrikes, Smith
said, even though images pro-
vided by the U.S. aircraft would
have been grainy and difficult
to see.
Whether the German com-
manders or the U.S. pilot are at


fault for any civilian casualties
may turn into an inner-NATO
tussle.
Smith said the ground force
commander "is the decision
maker for close air support.
That's doctrine." But he also
conceded that a pilot can refuse
an order to drop a bomb.
Klein, in an interview with
The Associated Press on Sun-
day, declined to say whether
images provided by the U.S. jets
had been clear enough for
weapons to be seen among
Afghans on the ground, citing
the ongoing investigation.
A German Joint Terminal
Air Controller, or JTAC, who
spoke on condition that his
name not be used because he
wasn't authorized to speak pub-
licly, said the rules for ordering
an attack clearly state that the
ultimate decision rests with the
ground commander.
But rules also require that
both the pilot and the JTAC get
a good positive identification of
the target before the comman-
der can order a weapon
deployed, the JTAC said.
"Only when both are sure
that what we see is a target, only
then will the pilot drop the
bomb," the JTAC said.
The German Defense Min-
istry, meanwhile, pushed back
against a story published in the
Washington Post that German
officials said painted their com-
mander in a poor light and
played up the U.S. version of
events. The ministry said the
article "will definitely influence
at least the preliminary investi-
gation by the various bodies."
"The Defense Ministry is very
surprised about the unusual pro-
cedure of using a journalist as
a source to reveal initial investi-
gation results," the ministry said.
Kris Coratti, director of com-
munications for the Washing-
ton Post, said in an e-mail: "The


GERMAN COLONEL Georg Klein is
pictured at the German base in Kun-
duz, Afghanistan, Sunday, Sept. 6,
2009. An airstrike ordered by a Ger-
man commander Klein and carried
out by U.S. fighter jets that appears
to have killed Afghan civilians could
turn into a major dispute between
the two NATO allies, as tensions
began rising Sunday over Germany's
role in the attack. Afghan officials
say up to 70 people were killed in the
early morning airstrike Friday in the
northern province of Kunduz after
Taliban militants stole two tanker
trucks of fuel and villagers gathered
to siphon off gas.

story speaks for itself."
Smith said a trip to Kunduz
by military officials from Kabul
was not an official investigation
but a fact-finding trip.
"And I think it's much, much
better for people to understand
the facts," he said of the decision
to allow a journalist to witness
the discussion among military
officials.
No NATO officials will yet
say how many civilians they
think may have died. Smith on
Saturday said the preliminary
overall death toll was believed
to be 56. Afghan officials say
it's in the low 70s.
Smith said he hopes a U.S.-
German rift does not develop
over the strike. "I hope every-
one allows the investigation to
proceed and we'll determine
what we know more precisely
and move on from there," Smith
said.
The director of an Afghan
human rights group criticized
NATO's International Security
Assistance Force for the deaths.
"It was carelessness in terms of
ISAF using force without doing
enough to investigate whether
this is a civilian location," Ajmal
Samadi of Afghan Rights Mon-
itor said.
German troops have long
been criticized for restrictions
that limit the battle their troops
see. A U.S. based military ana-
lyst, Anthony Cordesman, said
German troops don't have "the
situational and combat experi-
ence" to confront Taliban on
the ground.
"They're as oriented toward
staying in their armored vehi-
cles as any group I've met,"
Cordesman said. "They're not
active enough to present much
of a threat to the Taliban most
of the time."
Klein rejected the claim that
his troops lacked combat expe-
rience.


The Communications Act 2009 4Comms Act), which gives Utilities Regulation &
Competition Authority (URCA) full powers of regulation and of oversight of the
electronic communications sector in The Bahamas, came into force on 1 September
2009.

This date signals the start of the transition to a new regulatory regime, Greater
competition will be introduced in the electronic communications sector, to the benefit
of the econornv and of all persons in The Bahamas.

To facilitate as smooth a transition to the new licensing regime as possible, a number of
new documents were published on 1 September 1009 and are available at URCA's
wbelte (www.urcabahamas.bs). hese include:
* PrelimiFrry Dreer mi nation covrin g evral Class Opera ling and Spectrum
licences, Exemptions, and Types of Fees
* Individual Operatingand Spectrum licences
* Draft Class Operating, and Spectrum licenses
* Licensang Guidelines
* Fe schedule
* Radio Spectrum State meant {Existing Allocation and Assignment)
* Various forms - Full Details Form and Notice of Objection Form for the transition,
and an Application Form for a licence.

Until new URCA regulator measures are adopted, all cKiscing5 rtgul;tiory measures
adopted by the Public L Utilihes Commission and the Television Regulatory Authority
continue in force to tie extent that they do not conflict with provisions of the Comms
Act, the Utilties Regulation & Competition Authority Act, 2009; the Utilities tribunal
Act, 2009 and any new regulatory measures adopted under these Acts,

The new regime encourages participation by all the website will also give you an
opportunity to learn more about the new regime with updates on Competition Policy,
Consultation results and determinations and latest news of the regime. 1his new regime
and the Comms Act coming into force for the electronic communications sector is the
beginning of a new day for all persons in The Bahamas.

AT URCA WE WILL BE DOING OUR BEST TO MINIMISE DISRUPTIONS.

UTILITIES REGULATION A COMPETITION AUTMOIITT
II* r .K. C;l A. P.O. B . N�.A hi... . f. \ T ).)123 ).1?.1 7 | X f R 44?." .7f
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IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I


PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE






THE RIBUE MODAYSEPTMBER7, 209, AGEc


Man shot

in armed

robbery


attempt

FROM page one
plies on Parkgate Road and
demanded cash, police said.
The incident occurred at
around 3pm on Saturday. The
two men fled the scene on
foot.
Alexander's brother and
son of the store's owner, Mar-
cus Dean Jnr, said the family
have been told to expect
Alexander to pull through,
but doctors have warned that
he may be left crippled.
"He was shot in the back
and he's going into spinal
surgery tonight. They say
they're going to take the oth-
er bullet out this Friday
because they want him to
recover from the surgery
tonight," said Mr Dean Jnr.
Police had warned his fam-
ily about crime in the area
when they opened the store
and therefore he felt in many
ways that such an attack was
"only a matter of time," but
nonetheless, Alexander's
brother said the incident left
him feeling "helpless."
"I'm just praying for him.
I'm glad he's alive but I'm
hoping he isn't left crippled."
Mr Dean Jnr also called for
anyone who can to donate
blood at Doctor's Hospital as
they are in "dire need."
Police hunting the two
criminals are also calling for
the public's help in connec-
tion with the incident.
"We are seeking the help
of residents in the area or
anyone who may have been
passing the Park Gate Road
area noticing two men run-
ning, to contact us at tele-
phone numbers 919, 502-9991,
322-3816, or 328- TIPS," said
Police Press Liaison Officer
Walter Evans.
According to Assistant
Superintendent Evans, the
dreadlocked gunman was
wearing a white shirt and blue
jeans. No description of the
second man was provided.
The potentially deadly
shooting came a little over
two weeks after mother of
three Wendy Bullard was bru-
tally gunned down in front of
her place of work.
Ms Bullard, 34, was shot in
the face when two masked
men held up 21st Century
Steel Welding Limited off
Royal Palm Street, just sev-
eral yards south of St
George's Anglican Church.


Police in high
Kia Sephia car and a Dodge
FROM page one Ram truck in Croton and
Buttonwood Streets.
they pulled up next to the The passenger escaped
car in Breadfruit Street from the vehicle and ran off
where it was blocking traf- while police arrested the dri-
fic sometime after 9pm. ver.
As they approached the He had a gunshot injury
32-year-old driver sped off in the back of his neck and
and the officers pursued. As police believe he may have
shots were fired from the been hit in the gunfire
car, police returned fire, exchange.
while driving at high speed Emergency Medical Ser-
across southern New Provi- vices took the victim to hos-
dence. pital where he is in stable
The chase ended when condition.
the Honda crashed into a Police are appealing for








SHIRLEY STREET
VILLAGE ROAD TO
FREDRICK STREET

DUE TO

WATER & SEWER
REPLACEMENT WORKS
31st August to 1st December 2009

In an effort to upgrade existing
Water & Sewer Services the
Water & Sewerage Corporation
have contracted Bahamas Hot Mix
Company Ltd to replace existing
service connections at the above
location. As a consequent traffic
management involving road
closures and temporary traffic
diversions may be in operation
during the following times:

* Daily between 7:00 pm
to 6:00 am


Local diversions will


be sign


posted in due course and further
information will be provided
through the local media.


speed (
information to lead to the
arrest of the passenger in the
Honda Accord as an investi-
gation into the shooting con-
tinues.


:hase shootout


Anyone with any infor-
mation that might assist
investigations should call
police on 911,919, or call the
Criminal Detective Unit on


352-2015. To submit infor-
mation under total anonymi-
ty call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477).


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Fax: (242) 352-9823


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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


I V





PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS I


FROM page one

ficult time.
He said that a new $17 million gov-
ernment office complex will be built
for Customs and Immigration here on
the island.
According to the prime minister,
the project, which involves the con-
struction of a 60,000 sq ft building
complex, will provide many construc-
tion jobs in Freeport.
Mr Ingraham said the announce-
ment for pre-qualification for con-
tractors will be made on Tuesday of
this week.
"Contractors who are interested in
bidding on the job who are qualified
to bid are urged to pick up the pack-
ages and to seek to become pre-qual-
ified to bid on the job," he said.
The unemployment situation, the
closure of hotel properties, and the
decline in tourism on Grand Bahama
are pressing concerns for residents.
Mr Ingraham stated that the gov-
ernment intends to create a major
cruise port in Freeport at the Williams
Town site.
"We have taken steps to acquire a
total of 55 acres of land. That process
is going to take several months to be
completed.
"Those who own the land will have
the opportunity to come forward and


FROM page one

ulated by the Utilities Regu-
lation and Competition
Authority (URCA).
Mr Ingraham said Govern-
ment is concerned that the
GBPC has not "reinvested
adequate sums of money into
its generation and distribution
system, and the company has
over the years taken its profits
out in cash rather than rein-
vesting it in its operation."
The Power Company here
has recently come under fire
over reliability issues, among
other things, including the high
cost of electricity.
Local community activists
Troy Garvey and Joseph
Darville, vice president of the
Grand Bahama Human Rights


provide evidence of their ownership.
The land would be assessed in terms
of its value and government will cause
to be paid the assessed value," he said.
Prime Minister Ingraham said per-
sons who are dissatisfied with the
assessment will be able to take action
in the Supreme Court.
"We will abide by whatever deci-
sions is made by such a process. In
the meantime, we propose to conclude
an acquisition and cause a cruise port
at Williams Town which will have sig-
nificant economic benefits for Grand
Bahama," he stated.
Mr Ingraham also noted that gov-
ernment is paying the cost for contin-
ued operation of the casino at Our
Lucaya Resort.
Treasure Bay is taking over opera-
tion of the casino after the Isle of
Capri closed its operation.
"The government is paying the cost
for the continued operation of the
casino in Our Lucaya. It is not a deci-
sion I am not comfortable with.
"I am not comfortable with the
Bahamas government having to take
money from the Treasury to run a


casino, but these are unusual times
and we are taking some usual deci-
sions to support Freeport, and the
employment of 200-plus people who
are employed there," he said.
"We would like to have at Our
Lucaya not just a new casino opera-
tor...but we will continue to try to do
what we think the best is," said Mr
Ingraham.
Prime Minister said government is
grateful to Hutchison, which owns
Our Lucaya Resort, for what it is
doing in terms of supporting and sus-
taining the number of jobs for
Bahamians at the hotel property.
However, he believes that there are
some other things that could be done
with the assistance of the government.
"We are prepared to offer support
from the government to Hutchison to
cause some additional things to be
done to enhance Grand Bahama as a
tourist destination," Mr Ingraham
said.
Government is expected to meet
with the ownership of Hutchison in
London sometime in early October
to further discuss this.


PM disappointed over inefficiency

of Grand Bahama Power Company


Association, said that the GB
Power has a monopoly on
power and should be regulated
by government.
They feel that rates and fuel
surcharge are too high.
The Prime Minister stated
that in so far as the fuel cost is
concerned, Grand Bahama
Power is able to access fuel
costs at a lower rate than BEC.
"They did not pay any cus-
toms duties or the rest of it;
they are able to service their
suppliers outside the area in
bonded vehicles and so that
ought to account for something
in terms of electricity cost here
in Grand Bahama," he said.


' Bethel Brothers Morticians
Telephone : 322-443, 326-7030
Nmau Sreet. PRO.Box M-102M






Former Member
of Parliament tih lIsle
H()N. CIAUDIUS
LEADER MINNIS.
OLE., 1P., 71
l .. of Faith Avenue South, off
Cnrmichael Ro nd fw"l nirly eof
Calabash Bay. Andi.,. will 1
S held WednmerdH% W\. I1:00
. a.m. at St. B1arn~bas Anglican
Church_, Baillou llil] & Wull'
[l. i Rcmads. Fr- Michaiel Maragh,
n".Ead by acher -r iriklermcafthe
j ....i .Diocse will onicM)n" I1nermIt
*Ai follow in Lakexw Meiial
-s-derni, Johin F. Kinnety Dniw.

L.el to cherish the mernii are his: Wife oF55 yeas, Mildred. Sam:
H44niA ni. RierS, fidwawt Do. ipl. Anid C7wil Minmi:; IBs ughtt!:
Laven Sv.ab.y, Claudia Almmar, Vernia Minitis, and S . Denise
R sell: Exleaded hAdrea. Ediul, Groital , Grniard, hil MnEdgar
anid JackiL RuscLI , G.rndchildren: (-inn Minnis. Darren Claud.
Raihad Mnuisk, Ncw Minnis, Cordmen Minni.C. Cecil Minnis Jr.,
Artnnio AlianTari , Roger Mimnis Jr., 1.cn Swaby, Naren MiMnii.
Rev Minnis. md R i zL i Spflwx t. 3ifri N wn. D'Rw. Rhca. A t4k.
Cotilly, Julittce, Luchkcs Ruliya. and Ctline Minnis, \fich'llc and
Makiahl S uaby. Tunysli. Adia. and Anaiyu RuseIll, Lamich Carty.
Samanithu Martin, J'iniu und' mika Birn.ChU Lhee King, and AdnauoD
Burrovw; Ezte aled gruadchildren: Lamar, Nikia., j ndan, Indira.
Gin, Gorge, .F.v, Fn , Swayd , Joyn, Clmktiq, Jxwii, ric. Fthan,
Viewria, nd a 1'nlyn; GCreti-gMkhlidre: Asbef.TylTfr. .onarhan.
Lndeoha, Jaiinbtee, Oliia. and Lyric; Brothers: [lan and Dudrice
NMinnis, SIste Cmaimi R Itllof FrepwaOtGrand Bahama; Browtm-
indaw: William M-ajar and RiAirt Bkmett, Sr., Sistern.sli-lw:
Kathleen and MirAlda Mumis.. Ma Ward-Prm& , Sylvia Ward, aind
MareH Manin..iSemli--liiw: Michil Swnby, Mar~ Almanns, *d
AItibo'nm Russll. r Rull. ll. Daughters-ln-laI: Latonia sand
Jatffli . Dal,, r,,,. (Cal., aind Elk'ca Miiiii. NutiM$ s tif e$
aid nephews Incl-udin; Lwon, Gary, arid Nalhan Martn, Floyd
Ingrhanm PresulL M1iriLsJaca., Jmniual n Ld.ric. and SLepwi Rollk.
Gerald Knrw'es, RIobrt Harnest Jr., Adrian, Ihinc, Shirwim, and
Eric Prani, Lois McCoy. Elimb.th C.rey, Kim Minnis-Colli�i
Kend1rlyn Minnii-Thi:o-philus. -\d.m Mi.fni M'ehe, Miriam
M.L, C.'lrri d a 1, S1hnii- RullC. Pa4ric6ia D-uJIi.Md TOLIic Roll..
Canrr'l Arm=brILT,UJLyL- Icita, Latriinic knewli. h lain.: "wquhtlm..
Minerva I tcan. A-Iaylu BlnnLlt, Jean and Ani Iarmett, Valarne
Dariille. Rmrig Mninin-Fmnlaimn, Marilyn Mnrtin-Situbs and r$ h L Mitchell; Otther relatives anmod frkids linkluimig: His E 1f)(lency
Sir Cliffird Darliri.aiid ffmil. i. Henry F f 1iorr ad Fa-liily. KenntAh
Bn.ih-n.' anid funnly. Blrlni Prall and rinily. Ruwea FLtuiLu. I uid
famiL. LI..-ter Kerr and taimly. Ranaukipb -M nnLs a nd ianuly: Cyril
Boxer"' M inris ard larrniy, Virginia MnrtiTmer Baod flnily, Burk
Fdgci rinbc a nmd fnily, Ftfie Wiilkc,, ( nrle, A nwao, =4d Maxwell
CHrik lck riJ fuiinly, Dr, Patrik Ck r ill aind fnmi ly. oIu iCiargill.
Dr Hiibcn Minnii a"d faniil'..ih Tumor family. Sicrin Minni-s and
family, the Curlis frvon Curtlnt sHaidware. J-a.icLiiaB. Bastian and
mrnily, Nmcni PNirdlr, tan]yiv icth:L Jr. and family. M ax Julian and
iimily, Beryl, Cora arAI DI)glaLiro 1mm Tamurac, Flnrida. Barbara
liannit. Julie .nunders, Angela Ward, Victoin Andrvws, Melanic
Lyenp. Devcan Pver Rnhming and family. Cnmn Bnsi; Tynes and
family . St. Banmbas Ainglican Chunchi family. IhIIie Setr.enh Day
Adil. nli.-. LhurLh family, i'u.slur Jrcinmahb JLuunibL amd family,
RoscLc Dainn and m-ly, NLa. Mct.'lla and Irruly, Chudrlir Stuart.L
]emtmae Simnmi., e1ryl Minnir, Mici Swahy, Dr. Kevni Mss, I'ra
ond Mnallin Fcrpi-in. hl-is Frcellenicy' Sir Arthir D FHBrainandi fily,
hw Hoi Perry iCriatic and fWmily, it Hon. n ra. [ Davis nrd family,
dhe Hon. Paul L. AddeIy and family. ~h Hon. Gk~yI Haina-
Martin. tih Righl Hron. Hue A A. Ingraham, the Rom. D tosend
1Harnisger, StLwaIrt Couictlefr and the number oe f thir ProgresaAw
Liberal Party and a phot of 0thT relatives und friends..

The body will ie in state in the Foyer ofil Hoev o ofAs~snbly on
Tuesday, Sepenembtr b ih, I lam to bp

There wil be Rno vileig a t I Ih eirht.


Speaking in Grand Bahama
on Sunday, where he met with
the press at the Government
Office Complex to take ques-
tions on various pressing
issues, the Prime Minister
revealed that Government is
"disappointed in the Japanese
company, Marubeni" which,
until very recently, owned the
majority stake in the GBPC.
"We expected that they
would have brought greater
efficiency to Grand Bahama's
electrical generating supply
and that has not happened,"
he said.
Mr Ingraham explained that
the original intent to have
Freeport was that the Grand
Bahama Port Authority would
regulate the electrical supply,
water, and telephone opera-
tors in Freeport.
He noted that the GBPC is
now supplying electricity, out-
side of Freeport, to the entire
island of Grand Bahama.
Mr Ingraham emphasised
that private sector enterprises
should be operating more effi-
ciently than public/government
enterprises.
"We are disappointed that
the number of power outages
that you have here in Grand
Bahama is far in excess of
government enterprises, and
as we all know government
enterprise is supposed to be
less efficient than the private
sector.
"And so the GBPC is not


PM is set to announce


500 temporary jobs


giving us confidence that pri-
vate sector by itself is the
answer, so we will have dis-
cussions with them about the
various issues that have been
raised by the people of Grand
Bahama," said Mr Ingraham.
With Grand Bahama's econ-
omy in recession, residents
here have complained that the
Power Company has been
insensitive to how it enforces
its policies with disconnections
at this difficult time when so
many are unemployed, and
especially when power cuts are
so frequent.
Meanwhile, last week Greg
Ebelhar, head of Polymers
International's Freeport oper-
ations, told Tribune Business
that the electricity tariffs
charged by Grand Bahama
Power Company are "a huge
issue" for his company and
other manufacturers, as the
relatively high prices were tak-
ing a huge chunk out of their
bottom line and making their
prices/operations uncompeti-
tive compared to their global
rivals.
Mr Ebelhar suggested that
Freeport "absolutely cannot"
remain a viable, competitive
manufacturing base in the
medium to long term with such
relatively high power costs.
Mr Ingraham said: "We are
giving consideration to
whether or not the power com-
pany in Freeport, like BEC,
ought not to be regulated by
the new regulatory authority
which the government has
established called URCA (the
Utilities Regulation and Com-
petition Authority), and its
regulatory commission author-


KEMPS FLORAL HOME LIMITED
22 PainyMle Avnucn, Plimdulc
Nvsmu, N.P.. The Bahmna




MRS. ETHELYN
VIRGINIA

PINDER. 75 /

oMf WinlonA Meadows, Nassau, - " ' .=.
The Bahamas. will be held at
St. Anne's Anglican Churvh.
Fox Hill Road, Nassau, on 'S '
Tuesday, h S ptcmnhr, c 09 2
at 4:LDp.rn.

Reverend Fialkhi Crosley N. .
Walkine will officiate and
internmnt will he in St. Anne's (Ccmetcry, Fax Hill Rnad,
Nassau.

Mrs. inder is predeceased by her parents, Alexander C.
Knowles Sr , and Agnes L, Knowles and her hro1ber, James
F. Knowles. She i suvivedby hbe husband. JCeff'ern William
Pinder- two sons, William Craig Pinder of Ely. England and
Richard Perry Pinder of Nassau; a gTunddaughter. Alice
John,on; lbrolhers, Ale., ETnetick, Pairick. Geiflfrvy aid
Charlton K nwles; sisters, Ruby Collins, Doris Anderson,
Yvonne Knowles. Deborah Knowles and Juliaiua Gr ;en,
uncle, Hilbert U. Pinder; broLthcrb-n-law. Richard Anderson
Sr., Jnirs Gireen and David Pinderd sIsat-l-la,. Joun Pitder,
Shirley, Amarylis, Brenda, Rosa and Linda Knowles, other
relatives and friends including Ruth Mcmnshahbck, Mike and
Marsha Stewart, Robert and Linda Erown, Claire Burwn.
Johnny Brown and Mary Knowles, Julia and Steve Maul.
Joanne and Thirey .iLainir, Ray and Flora Claridge, Mary
Lou and Cedric Saunders, Doren Kemp, Loci Dawson, Joan
Albuy, Cora and Morton Carey, Patou Regent. many nephews
and niece and other relatives and fLiends too many to mention-

With sp~ial tihanI to Shirley Knowles, A nrylis Kniowles.
1Dlores Rolle, Welliringln King and Cynthia Taylor who
assisted so much during her illness.

Also, a special thanks to Dr. John Lunn and his entire staff
and 1to 1he Nurses at Doctors Hoepital, Na�,[i.

In lieu ot" Ilowers donations may be made to the Cancer
Society uofThe Bahama, P.O. Box S.S. 6539. Nu~ Lor to
SI. Anne's Aiglican Church, P.O. Box N. 1569. Na w iti
memory of Mrs. Ethelyn Virginia "Jean' Pindcr.

Ammngements, by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.


ity which came into effect on
September 1, under the Com-
munication Act," he said.
Mr Ingraham suggested
that there are standard profits
that utility companies are
expected to make that are
determined by regulatory
authorities, as well as stan-
dard sums of money that
ought to be kept for reinvest-
ment in upgrade of plant and
distribution systems, and this


According to Mr Ingraham, Har-
court, the owners of the Royal Oasis
property, has not yet indicated their
ability to proceed with plans for recon-
struction and opening of the resort in
Freeport.
When asked about the Ginn pro-
ject at West End, he said the devel-
opers of Ginn have informed the gov-
ernment that it has adequate sums of
money to continue at some point next
year.
"They are seeking to access addi-
tional funding and they are hopeful, in
the meantime they have several hun-
dred people working at Ginn as far
as I know," he said.
The government, he said, is also
providing support and substantial
sums of money to the Ministry of
Tourism to promote Grand Bahama.
"We are advertising Grand Bahama
on television in a way its never been
before.
"You can turn to almost any of the
cable channels and see Grand Bahama
in advertisements as a place for people
to come," he said.
According to Mr Ingraham, the
industrial sector has not been signifi-
cantly impacted on the island.
He noted that government is in dis-
cussion over the sale of the old Burma
terminal facility at East Grand
Bahama and expects to have a possi-
ble decision before end of the month.


could be addressed by URCA
if it were to regulate the
GBPC.
A town meeting was held
by a group of local communi-
ty activists on Friday evening
at Workers House so that the
Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany could address the con-
cerns of residents.
Excell Ferrell, CEO and
president of GBPC, attended
the meeting.


FROM page one

word "MOB" on his left arm, along with a marijuana leaf,
and another of a tear drop under his left eye.
Asst Supt Loretta Mackey said the police are seeking
the assistance of the public in locating Virgil.
According to reports, sometime around 9.10pm police
responded to a call at Les Fountain Building No 2 on East
Sunrise Highway.
On arrival police discovered a male lying on the floor of
a business at the complex. The victim was suffering from
apparent stab wounds to the body.
The victim, later identified as Smith, was taken to the hos-
pital where he was pronounced dead around 10pm.
Curious onlookers remained in the area as police
processed the crime scene. A bystander who knew the vic-
tim believes that the altercation was over a girl.
However, police have not confirmed a motive for the
stabbing and are continuing their investigations.
They believe that the attack occurred in another location
and the victim ran to Les Fountain Building No 2 where he
collapsed in a store.
ASP Mackey is appealing to anyone with information
concerning the matter and the whereabouts of Virgil to
contact police at 352-9774/5, 350-3107/8 or 911.
Virgil is considered armed and extremely dangerous.
Around 5' 9" tall and 135 pounds, he has a dark brown
complexion and dark brown eyes.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


"VOPAK is continuing on its
expansion and the container port con-
tinues to provide good jobs," said Mr
Ingraham.
Mr Ingraham said the NIB Unem-
ployment Programme has provided
assistance to 2,230 residents of Grand
Bahama, in addition to assistance from
Social Services.


TEACHING POSITIONS AT
KINGSWAY ACADEMY


Elementary School

A Temporary Computer Studies Teacher
is needed for students in Kindergarten
through grades 6. A trained Elementary
Classroom Teacher is preferred. The
position could be available for several
months.


High School


A Trained Music Teacher is needed for
students in grades 7 through 12. The
successful candidate must be qualified
and able to prepared students for the
various External Music Examinations.


Applications can be collected from the
Human Resources Department at the
Business Office telephone number
324-6269.
Only Born Again Christians should
apply.


The Deadline for applications is
Tuesday, September 15, 2009.







Pain in ...
belly for Rafa,
Page 14


M () N ) A Y E P T E NM 1 E R - 2- 1 1


'SUPERMAN' IS BACK


Leevan Sands soars to big victory in Italy


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net


ITH the heartbreak-
ing performance of
the 12th IAAF World
Championships in


Athletics behind him, Leevan 'Super-
man' Sands came back to soar to a big
victory yesterday as he prepares for the
IAAF World Athletic Final this week-
end.
Competing along with Shamar Sands
at a meet in Rieti, Italy, Sands cleared
16.77 metres or 55-feet, 01/4-inches to
snatch first place in the men's triple jump.


His winning leap came on the second
of his four attempts. He opened with
16.12 or 52-10 3/4 that placed him in sec-
ond behind Cuba's Arnie David Girat.
But after taking the lead, Sands went
on to post 16.52 or 54-2 1/2 in the third
round and 16.60 or 54-5 1/2 in the last
SEE page 13


BOXING
ALTHOUGH they have
both been eliminated from
further competition at the
AIBA World Champi-
onships in Milan, Italy, the
two-man team of Valenti-
no Knowles and Carl Hield
will remain until the end.
The duo, along with
coach Andre Seymour, will
not be back home until
Sunday.
Knowles, who made his-
tory when he became the
first Bahamian to win a
first round match before he
lost in the second round,
said he intends to take
advantage of the opportu-
nity to continue to train.
"This is going to be my
training ground until I
return home," he said.
"I've already got a taste of
what it's like to make his-
tory and I know there's a
lot more to come."
The goal, he said, is to
get ready for the 2012
Olympic Games in Lon-
don, England.
Knowles said he and
Hield, who lost in the first
round, have been going out
and watching the other
competition going on when
they are not training.
BOXING

Mackey

back home


AFTER spending about
three weeks in a training
camp in Berlin, Germany,
Bahamas super mid-
dleweight champion Jer-
maine 'Choo Choo' Mack-
ey is back home.
Mackey, who is prepar-
ing to defend his British
Commonwealth title in
October, was training with
world champion Mikkel
Kessler.
However, the sparring
sessions didn't go as Mack-
ey had anticipated as
Kessler was not available
every day.


LEGEND THOMAS ROBINSON along with H.E Mr WU Bangguo unveils the new cornerstone to be
placed at the entrance of the new stadium. His Excellency Wu Bangguo, Chairman of the Standing
Committee of the National People's Congress of the People's Republic of China presented a mod-
el of the national stadium to the Deputy prime Minister Brent Symonette along with Desmond Ban-
nister, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture and Thomas A Robinson and Tommy Turnquest,
Minister of National Security. SEE PAGE 12

TENNIS: US OPEN 2009


Knowles wins first encounter


with rising star Ryan Sweeting


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
SOONER or later, Mark
Knowles knew that he would
have to face rising young star
Ryan Sweeting.
That opportunity came
sooner than later as the two
were on opposite side of the
court in the second round of
the men's doubles at the US
Open in Flushing Meadows,
New York on Saturday.
Knowles and his Indian
partner Mahesh Bhupathi,
seeded number three, took
advantage of the less experi-
enced team of Sweeting and
his American partner Jesse
Levine for a 7-5, 6-2 win.
Playing through the pain
he's experiencing after his
right ring finger was cut in an
elevator at the Tennis Center
last Tuesday requiring some
nine stitches, Knowles said he
was quite contented in win-
ning a couple of matches so
far, including his first head-
to-head encounter with
Sweeting.

Tough
"It was interesting playing
Ryan," said Knowles of the
former Bahamian Davis Cup
player, now an American cit-
izen. "It was a tough match.
"He's a good player with a
big serve.
"He hits the ball very well
and he's a very good doubles
player. I think he's being
doing well lately and he
should have a bright future."
While Knowles and Bhu-
pathi had a 81-64 winning per-
centage edge on 1st serve and
62-32 on 2nd serve, Sweeting
and Levine got the better on
winners (including service) as
they finished 12-10.
However, Knowles and
Bhupathi dominated on
receiving points won 45-27%
and break point conversion
4-of-8 for a 50-33 % (1-of-3)
to accumulate an advantage
of 65-47 total points won.
"We're playing very well.
Obviously, I have a little bit of


It was interesting
playing Ryan. It was
a tough match


US OPEN: See Page 14

adversity, we've played well
so far in the two matches we
have played," said Knowles,
after they won their first
round match 6-3, 6-4 over
American James Cerretani
and Lovro Zovko from Croa-
tia.
"Our draw is pretty easy.
But we obviously feel great
about the way we're playing
and we felt great coming into
the event. So it's just a matter
of trying to get better and bet-
ter each day and getting fit."
Knowles and Bhupathi are
scheduled to play their third
round match today against the
team of Yen-Hsun Lu of
Taipei and Dudi Sela of
Israel.
Yesterday, Knowles had
mixed doubles duties. He and
his German partner, Anna-
Lena Groenefeld, the No.4
seeds, faced Knowles' former
partner Zi Yan from China
and Mariusz Fyrstenberg
from Poland.
However, Yan and Fyrsten-
berg got the best of the
match-up with identical set
scores of 6-3, 6-3 over
Knowles and Groenefeld, the
winners of the Wimbledon
title in July.


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sports






Boxing duo

training in

Italy despite

elimination


The Bahamas Electridty Corporation


Tender

Assessment of Capital Projects
Administration Process
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services.

Bidders are required to collect bid packages from
the Corporation's Administration Office. Blue Hill &
Tucker Roads by contacting
Mrs. Dellmeta Seymour, Telephone
No. 302-1158,

Tenders are to be delivered on or before 4:00 p.m.
on September 25, 200,
and addressed as follows:

o r. El-I Basden
General Manaigr
Bihaiml ElIKtlclty7 Crp@rition
lue H111il Tlcker Roads
NasisA, Bahilas

Marked: Tender Me. 707/19
Asissnimnt of Capital Preject;
Administration Prcess

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or
reject the whole or such part of any Tender the
Corporation deems necessary.


*HIFT.III orai r,: t g**jWO
L,







mtmeiW J umnral 3mxt

BAHAMAS'OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET * RO. BOX GT-2097 * TEL: 323-5782




Byron Lynden Pearce, 37

a resident of Collins Avenue, will be held at Calvary Bible
Church, Collins Ave, on Friday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will
4- be Pastor Frederick Arnett, assisted by Pastor Thomas Albury.
Interment follows in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard
Roads.

Left to cherish his memories are his mother Eloise Pearce & a host of other
relatives & friends.


I,


Henry Adam Reckley 83

a resident of Father Callan Lane, will be held at St. John's
Native Baptist Cathedral, Meeting Street, on Saturday at
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Michael E. Symonette & Rev. Dr.
Hermis Bain. Interment follows in the Church's Cemetery.


Left to cherish his memories are his wife: Claudiemae Reckley; 1 son: Daniel
Reckley; 2 daughters: Louise Albertha Sherman & Judy Reckley; 2 sisters: Venis
Reckley & Sarah Fisher; 1 brother: Rev. Hermix Reckley.


S Rosina Delores Simmons, 95

S ," *|a resident of Palm Avenue & formerly of Lorimors, Turks
- V Island will be held at Zion Baptist Church, East & Shirley
Street, on Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Officiating will be Pastor T.
G. Morrison. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens,
JFK Drive.

Left to cherish her memories are her daughters: Carol Bonamy, Marion Williams
& Laverne Bani-Hani; 1 stepson: George Simmons; 11 grandchildren: Antionette,
Edward, Gaetano & Gillianno Bonamy, Deon Munroe, Danobury & Trenton
Williams, Kristi Thompson & Nakia Williams.


Jeffery Oswald Sturrup, 39

a resident of Arundel Street, will be held at St. Georges's
Anglican Church, Montrose Ave., on Friday at 1 :00 p.m.
Officiating will be Fr. Kingsley Knowles. Interment follows
in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish his memories are his mother: Bernice Sturrup; sisters: Delores
Sturrup Carter, Willimae Sturrup, Shirley Travis of Detroit Michigan & Edith
Sturrup; brothers: Charles, Edwin, George, Tyrone & Pedro Sturrup; aunts:
Marietta Storr & Daisy Evans of Miami, FI.


Eliza Josepha Brooks Wilkinson, 76

1 . a resident of Dunmore Street, will be held at St. Mary the Virgin
- ' Anglican Parish, Virginia Street, on Saturday at 10:00 a.m.
Officiating will be The Rev'd Fr. Dwight M. Bowe, Canon
Warren H. Rolle & the Rev'd Dr. Peter Grist. Interment follows
in the church cemetery.

Left to cherish her memories are her 5 children: Elroy (deceased), Sidney Jr.,
Keith, Edward Wilkinson Sr.; 1 daughter: Mrs. Joy Anne Wilkinson Moss; 2 step
children: Karrington Wilkinson & Dora Culmer; 2 brothers: Nathaniel Brooks
Sr. & Mickey Brooks; 2 daughters-in-law: Sherry & Valarie Wilkinson; 14 grand
children; 6 great grandchildren; 1 uncle: Lloyd Quant; 1 aunt: Annie Adams &
a host of other relatives & friends.


DEATH ANNOUNCEMENTS


Jennie Lee Albertha Richardson, 50

a resident of Peter Street West, died at her residence on Thursday
- 3 Sept. 2009.

She is survived by her father: Simeon Richardson; 1 son:
Thurman Knowles; 1 daughter: Cecelia Richardson; 3
grandchildren, 3 sisters, 3 brothers & a host of other relatives
& friends.


Sangster Smith, 42

.. * a resident of Goldern Gates #2 & formelry of Grand Turks,
. died at PMH on 28 August., 2009.
He is survived by his wife: Kaynell Smith; 3 sons: Randy,
Zhivago & Leander; 1 daughter: Celena; 2 brother: Basil Smith
& Gomez Smith; 1 sister: Lorraine Smith.


Ethel Humes, 65

a resident of Burial Ground Comer & formerly of Eneas Jumper
Comer, died on Sunday 30 August, 2009.
She is survived by her 5 sons: Wesley Wallace, Henry Wallace,
SdJunior Mya Sands, Cecil Martin & Lloyd Davis; 4 daughters:
Margaret Huymes, Dena Lorraine Humes, Evangelist Anne
Davis-Joseph, Rose Wallace; 28 grand, 10 great grand; 1 uncle: Bill Simmons;
2 aunts: Marjorie Simmons & Bernice Simmons.


' Steven Alexander Fernander 26

- " - a resident of Dominica Way, Carmichael Road, died at his
residence on 24 August, 2009.
|*'' I He is survived by his mother: Menesha Ingraham; father:
- - - George Fernander; grandparents: Ivalean & Thomas Ingraham,
Velma & Harris Fernander; sisters: Cortrea Cooper & Shanice Fox; brother:
Jeffery Cooper.


PAGE 12, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009


Minister: 'The Chinese


are going incredibly fast'

Ev- 5 - " w , I


LEGENDARY Thomas A. Robinson, whom the new national stadium will be named after, is congratulated by Wu
Bangguo, the Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress of the People's Republic of
China.


Bannister hails

efficiency of

the company

working on new

national stadium

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
MINISTER of Youth, Sports
and Culture Desmond Bannis-
ter said he's really surprised at
the efficiency with which the
Qilu Construction Group Cor-
poration are preparing to have
the new national stadium com-
pleted by 2011.
"The Chinese are going
incredibly fast," said Bannister
after the official tour of the con-
struction site on Saturday with
the 120-plus delegation from
the National People's Congress
of the People's Republic of Chi-
na, headed by Wu Bangguo,
the chairman of the standing
committee.
"I don't think that there's
anybody who work as quickly
as they're working and are as
organized and extremely quiet
as they are.

Pleased
"We are very pleased with
the way they are working."
When completed, the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations is hoping that
they will be able to host the
Carifta Games from April to
coincide with the official open-


CHINESE WORKERS at the sports centre lineo wait for the arrival of
WU Bangguo on Saturday.


ing ceremonies and the naming
of the new 15,000 seat state-of-
the-art Thomas A. Robinson
Track and Field Stadium that
could be expanded to accom-
modate a total of 23,000 seats.
If they are successful in
securing the bid from Grena-
da, who is currently trying to
repair their stadium after they
were hit by hurricane, it will be


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Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ' Fax: 326.7452


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the seventh time that the
Bahamas has hosted the top
junior regional competition.
The last time the Bahamas
hosted Carifta was in 2002
when Bannister served as pres-
ident of the BAAA.
The BAAA, which will go to
the polls in November to select
a new executive board for the
next three years, is currently
headed by Curt 'Mr. H'
Hollingsworth.
Bannister, who on Saturday
spoke about the "economic
benefits" that will derive for
the Bahamas when the stadi-
um is completed, thanked the
Chinese government for "what
they are doing for us and how
they are doing it. I can't wait
until it's finished."
Leading up to the Olympic
Games last year in Beijing, Chi-
na, the Chinese government
created two national stadiums
that have surpassed all con-
structed anywhere else in the
world.

Marvelled
Everybody marvleled as the
'Bird's Nest' national track and
field stadium, which hosted the
opening and closing ceremonies
as well as the track and field
competition at the Olympics
and the 'Blue tube' national
swim complex next to it that
hosted the swimming competi-
tion.
If that's any indication, Ban-
nister said the new stadium at
the Queen Elizabeth Sports
Center, which will sit in
between the current Thomas
A. Robinson Track and Field
(which will become a practice
track) and the Betty Kelly Ken-
ning Aquatic Center, will defi-
nitely be the envy of the
Caribbean.
"This is the biggest stadium
that the Chinese are building
outside of China," Bannister
said.
"They are committed to get-
ting it done. They are a very
dedicated and hardworking
people and I'm sure that there's
some lessons there that we can
all learn."
A number of government
ministers, headed by Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette and including Robinson,
watched as Wu unveiled the
cornerstone for the stadium.
Wu also presented a relica
of the national stadium to
Symonette during the brief cer-
emony.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


TRIBUNE SPORTS







TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGEOR13

VNW .OIDNC SFTALLASSCATINLea


Teams jockeying





for playoff positions


SIGMA BRACKETTES' Mynez Cargill makes the play at the plate to get Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks' Varnette Nairn
out at first base.


WITH the regular season
winding down, teams are now
jockeying for playoff positions
in the New Providence Softball
Association.
Saturday night at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex, a triple
header was played with some
playoff implications as both the
ladies and men's defending
champions stayed in the hunt.
Brackettes 13, Lady Sharks
9: In a rematch of last year's
finals, the defending champi-
ons Sigma Brackettes out-
slugged runners-up Proper
Care Pool Lady Stingrays 13-
9.
Brackettes' veteran Ernes-
tine Butler-Stubbs got the bet-
ter of the pitching dual with
youthful Thela Johnson of
Proper Care Pool as the Brack-
ettes pushed their third place
record to 8-5. The Lqdy Sharks
fell to 10-5 to remain in second
behind idled front-running
Pineapple Air Wildcats, who
are 12-2.
Vandette Smith sparked Sig-
ma's offensive attack with a 2-
for-5 night with two runs batted
in and scoring three times. Zel-
la Symonette was just as
impressive with a 3-for-5 out-
ting, driving in a pair of runs
and scoring as many.
Antonia Simmons helped out
by going 2-for-3 with a RBI,
scoring twice and Cassie Smith
was also 2-for3 with a pair of
runs scored.
For Proper Care Pool,
Keisha Pratt went 2-for-4 with a
RBI and a run scored; Shanelle
Symonette was 2-for-4 with two
RBI and Cleo Symonette went
1-for-3 with a RBI, scoring
twice.
Truckers 12, New Breed 0:
The defending men's champi-
ons Commodo Security Truck-
ers stayed close to the Pricewa-
terhouse Stingrays in third
place as they blanked the rook-
ie New Breed 12-0.
Anton Gibson fired a one-
hitter for the win for the Truck-
ers, who improved to 11-5, 1
1/2 game behind idled Price-
waterhouse Stingrays, who are
14-3 as they both trail front run-
ning Dorcey Park Boyz, who
are 16-1.
Darren Mortimer enjoyed a
2-for-3 night at the plate with
two runs batted in, scoring
twice to lead a balanced offen-
sive attack. Richard Bastian
was 2-for-3 with three RBI,
scoring a run on a solo in-the-
park home run in the bottom
of the second.
Tommy 'Bucker T' Ferguson
was 2-for-3 with a RBI, scoring
twice; Martin Burrows Jr. was a
perfect 2-for-2 with two RBIs
and three runs scored, including
hitting a two-run homer in the
fourth and Julian Taylor was
also a perfect 2-for-2 with two
runs.


PROPER CARE POOL LADY SHARKS' batter Varnetta Nairn squares off to put
down the bunt.


SIGMA BRACKETTES' Renee 'Sunshine' Davis tries to catch the ball before
Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks' Thela Johnson reaches first base.


For Young Breed, who
slipped into a two-way tie for
fifth at 6-10 with the idled Roy-
al Bahamas Defense Force
Commodores, Roberto Larri-
more had the lone hit on a sin-
gle in the third.
Outlaws 11, Hitmen 7: The
Roscoe Thompson Heavy
Equipment gained some
ground with their big victory
over Robin Hood and the loss
to their little brother team New
Breed.
Roscoe Thompson secured


SIGMA BRACKETTES' Thelma Johnson goes to work as she delivers a pitch
to the Sigma Brackettes.
PROPER
.... CARE POOL
LADY
SHARKS'
batter
Varnette
Nairn
avoided
getting hit
by a pitch
caught by
Sigma
. Brackettes'
S..... . .- , .catcher
....... Cassie
" "Smith.


FROM page 11
round to maintain his posi-
tion.
Sands, who celebrated his
28th birthday when he com-
peted in the qualifying round
of the World's in Berlin, Ger-
many last month, just missed
out on the bronze medal
when Cuban Alexis Copello
passed him in the last round.
Sands is the bronze medal-
ist from the Olympic Games
in Beijing, China last year.
Girat, who was fifth in
Berlin, took second place with
his best mark of 16.67 or 54-8
1/4 on his first attempt. Mom-
chil Karailiev of Bulgeria was
third with 16.61 or 54-6.
Sands will now join sprint-
ers Debbie Ferguson-McKen-
zie and Chandra Sturrup
along with quarter-miler Chris
'Fireman' Brown in the
IAAF/VTB Bank World Ath-
letics Final this weekend in
Thessaloniki, Greece.

Ranked

Sands is the second ranked
competitor in the triple jump
behind Girat. Sturrup and
Ferguson-McKenzie are No.4
and 5 respectively in the
women's 100 with Ferguson-
McKenzie topping the list in
the 200. Brown is No.2 in the
men's 400. Also at the meet
yesterday, Shamar Sands had
to settle for a sixth place finish
in the men's 110 hurdles in
13.65 seconds.
Jamaca got a 1-2 sweep
from Dwight Thomas (13.36)
and Maurice Wignall (13.48).
Spain's Jackson Quinonez
was third in 13.49.
Shamar Sands, 24, got
fourth in his heat of the semi-
final and didn't advance to
the final in Berlin.
While Leevan Sands has
qualified for the World Ath-
letic Final, Shamar Sands has
not. Only the top eight
atheltes will compete and
Sands is sitting in the 12th
spot.


the win on the mound over
C a r d i n a 1
Gilbert and he got all the help
he needed offensively to join
New Breed in a two-way tie for
fifth at 6-10.
Bruce Mackey went 2-for-4
with five RBI and a run scored.
He had a two-run double and a
three-run triple. Juliano
Thompson was 2-for-4 with two
RBI and a run scored and Kedo
Johnson was 1-for-2 with three
runs. Shavargo Archer was 2-
for-4 with two runs scored.


PHOTOS: Felip6 Major/Tribune staff


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IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


TRIBUNE SPORTS


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 13













Pain in the ... belly, but




Nadal moves on anyway

AP National Writer
NEW YORK


Rafael Nadal encountered
as much trouble from his own
body as his opponent in a
third-round victory at the U.S.
Open.
The third-seeded Nadal,
who missed Wimbledon with
sore knees, needed a 10-
minute injury break for a
trainer to work on his abdom-
inals early in the third set of
his 7-5, 6-4, 6-4 victory over
No. 32 Nicolas Almagro on
Sunday.
The stomach injury first
cropped up for Nadal last
month at a tournament in
Cincinnati.
While Nadal laid on the
ground to receive treatment,
Almagro was laying down to
get work done on his back.
The Spaniards popped back
up and Nadal finished the
work, staying in the hunt to
complete his career Grand
Slam, though it has yet to be
seen what kind of toll this
match took on him.
"I feel it a little bit now, but
I'll try my best to recover for
the next match," said Nadal,
who has insisted all week that
he's been feeling fine. "I'm
here to work hard and try my
best all the time."
In other early action Sun-
day, llth-seeded Fernando
Gonzalez defeated 17th-seed-
ed Tomas Berdych, 7-5, 6-4, 6-
4, and No. 9 Gilles Simon of
France retired because of a
knee injury while trailing No.
24 Juan Carlos Ferrero 1-6,
6-4, 7-6 (5), 1-0.
"Sometimes, I don't know
why, I just feel a big pain,"
said Simon, who added that
he's had problems with the
knee since the French Open
in May.
In the other early women's
match, No. 18 Li Na of China
ousted No. 26 Francesca Schi-


RAFAEL NADAL of Spain has his abdomen taped by a trainer during a break in his match against Nico-
las Almagro of Spain in the third round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York, yesterday.




NEW YORK


r-7]TIL 4. M


Serena Williams, of the United States, returns to
Daniela Hantuchova, of Slovakia.


avone of Italy, 6-2, 6-3.
No. 3 Venus Williams had
an afternoon match against
unseeded Kim Clijsters, who
is facing, by far, the toughest


match in her first appearance
at the U.S. Open since she
won it in 2005.
Also later, No. 2 Andy
Murray was scheduled to play


195th-ranked Taylor Dent of
Newport Beach, Calif., who
has won two rounds in his
inspirational comeback from
back surgery.


RAFAEL NADAL, of Spain, returns to Nicolas Almagro, also of
Spain, during the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York,
Sunday, Sept. 6, 2009.



MEN
i.in Larli' FIerrer i-,12' '- . pain del -,ille" '-.ii.m n v I'i Fran:ie 1-
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FOURTH ROUND
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(22 1 '-.' .3|h 3 -I.I I'.-2
L ],a I 1 '1 hIn a del I Frarn :e .-:a -.,:h no re 121, I 1 l.. I I ,.-' .I
DOUBLES
MEN
THIRD ROUND
I-.-a r Lliu.li:ii: C : roaiia and Mnhi:hael Ll',dra Frarn:ie del *I.liuan
Il n ,: C hIelaj Areq niinr and F'atI,-, '.i: a . Irin.ii.ai:, 7. -'1r, i .-
WOMEN
THIRD ROUND
I/lajrI hirII-ne.r and Elerna Ve ninrin 1 1:1 I.F: u i. del Alei.a j -,li:h
and Carl,' v -.i.ill: :[on li.nied -Li.ale I. 1i,1 3. i1 .2
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Anatiel Meldina i-.arrialuec and Virginia R: anori F'a.i:u. l i '-'i pain .-
(, ?. i i - ..
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so del Anna-Lenra .-,roerneleld -,eririnv and PF'alln',..:hnr-der d i9
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Ciga ii.' 'r'l,,a BP.elaru. cand Allja h .dr.,.Ile:a R:. i i iI.-A -.
(-1
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CRICKET: ENGLAND vs AUSTRALIA, NATWEST SERIES








� ~-


, iD



E i

AUSTRALIA'S BRETT LEE, right, celebrates after claiming the wick-
et of England's Paul Collingwood during the second one day inter-
national cricket match at Lord's cricket ground, London, Sunday
Sept. 6, 2009.


Second defeat for England
England fell further behind in the NatWest Series after failing to
overhaul a moderate Australia total for the second time in three
days. Andrew Strauss' team lost by 39 runs to go 2-0 down in the
seven-match campaign, having lost their way badly in pursuit of 250
at Lord's, following the last-ball decider on Friday evening. The
Ashes winners appeared on course to the level the series when they
entered the 15th over on 74 without loss but a cluster of wickets,
which mirrored a similar pattern at the same stage of Australia's
innings, altered the outlook. Shane Watson's introduction was
more in desperation than inspiration given that he was the sixth
bowler employed inside the first two sets of powerplays.
But his dismissal of Ravi Bopara, who fatally ambled across
his stumps to be plumb lbw, halted the momentum built up against
the new ball.
Strauss and opening partner Ravi Bopara had England cruising
towards victory at Lord's before losing four wickets for 23 runs and
eventually getting bowled out for 210.
"Having been 70-odd for none we were in a great position to
come home comfortably but we were the architects of our own
downfall to an extent," Strauss said after the 39-run defeat.


SOUTH AFRICA'S Victor Matfield, right, and Australia's James
Horwill jump in the lineout during the Tri-Nations rugby match in
Brisbane, Australia, Saturday Sept. 5, 2009. Satisfied Australia
coach Robbie Deans praised the patience and tenacity shown by
his players after their impressive 21-6 win over South Africa in
Brisbane.The Springboks sit well clear at the top of the table on
17 points ahead of the Kiwis on eight, with the Wallabies a further
point back with one match remaining against New Zealand in
Wellington in a fortnight.


o World Cup

Brazil qualifies
for World Cup;
France struggles
Brazil qualified for its 19th
consecutive World Cup, leav-
ing Argentina to join Portugal
and France with difficult paths
to reach next year's tourna-
ment, according to Associated
Press.
Defending World Cup cham-
pion Italy and European cham-
pion Spain maintained their
leads in Europe, while England
and Germany won exhibition
games ahead of qualifiers on
Wednesday. And in Africa,
Cameroon boosted itself with
its first victory in the final round
of qualifying. The United States
came from behind at home for
the second straight qualifier,
defeating El Salvador 2-1 to
move up one spot into second
place in North and Central
America and the Caribbean.
Luisao put Brazil ahead in
the 24th minute at Rosario,
Argentina, and Luis Fabiano
scored in the 30th and 67th.
Jesus Datolo got a goal in the
65th for Argentina, which will
face pressure to remove coach
Diego Maradona. Brazil (8-1-
6) leads South American qual-
ifying with 30 points, three
ahead of Chile and Paraguay
(both 8-4-3) and eight in front
of Argentina (6-5-4) with three
matches remaining.
The top four teams advance
to next year's tournament,
while the No. 5 nation goes to a
playoff against the No. 4 nation
in North and Central America
and the Caribbean.
Brazil became the seventh
nation to join host South Africa
in next year's 32-nation field,
following Australia, Japan, the
Netherlands, North Korea and
South Korea and the Nether-
lands. Argentina lost a home
qualifier for the first time since
a 5-0 defeat to Colombia in
1993. Cristiano Ronaldo is in
danger of missing the World
Cup after Portugal needed a
last-minute goal by Liedson for
a 1-1 tie against Denmark.
Nicklas Bendtner gave the
Danes the lead in the 41st
minute. Denmark (5-0-2) leads
Group One with 17 points, four
ahead of Hungary (4-2-1),
which lost 2-1 at home to Swe-
den when Zlatan Ibrahimovic
scored in injury time. Sweden
(3-1-3) is third with 12 points,
and Portugal (2-1-4) has 10
heading into Wednesday's
game at Hungary.


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Williams finished with eight aces
and a 27-9 advantage in winners in
Sunday's first match in Arthur Ashe
Stadium.
No. 1 Dinara Safina was upset Sat-
urday night, meaning No. 2 Williams is
the highest-ranked woman left in the
field. Safina will remain atop the rank-
ings, though, even if Williams were to
win a second consecutive U.S. Open
title and fourth overall.
Williams has reached the quarterfi-
nals at 11 of the past 12 major tourna-
ments and won the title at three of the
past four.


I


PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


71


, ''






THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBERIN7,R2009,NPAGEE15


Crews work to hold California wildfire's eastern edge


LOS ANGELES
WITH the massive wildfire
burning north of Los Angeles
more than half contained, hand
crews were working Sunday to
keep the fire's eastern flank from
crossing a rural mountain high-
way, a U.S. Forest Service
spokeswoman said, according to
Associated Press.
The fire, which started Aug.
26, has killed two firefighters,
blackened nearly 246 square
miles of the Angeles National
Forest and destroyed at least 76
homes. Fire agencies so far have
spent $43.5 million fighting the
blaze.
Authorities on Sunday were


trying to determine who set the
deadly fire.
At least a dozen investigators
were working to analyze clues
found at a burnt hillside near
Angeles Crest Highway where
the fire started. But officials, who
say the cause of the fire was
arson, were hesitant to release
any of their findings to the
media.
The fire was 51 percent con-
tained Sunday as crews built new
protective lines near Highway 39
in the San Gabriel Wilderness,
U.S. Forest Service spokes-
woman Jennifer Sanchez said.
No homes were immediately
threatened.
The weekend weather fore-


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cast called for cooler tempera-
tures and slightly higher humid-
ity that could help firefighters
further surround the blaze.
Because of the reduced heat,
about 400 firefighters assigned
to protect structures were dis-
missed Saturday. About 4,800
firefighters remained.
Los Angeles County firefight-
ers Tedmund Hall and Arnaldo
Quinones were killed Aug. 30
while seeking an escape route


for their inmate fire crew after
flames overran their camp on
Mount Gleason. The two died
when their truck plunged 800
feet off a steep mountain road.
Sheriff's detectives opened a
homicide investigation after the
fire was ruled arson earlier this
week, and Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger has offered
$100,000 for information leading
to the arrest and conviction of
the culprit.


A CLOUD of
vapor and
smoke is seen
from Victory
Park near
Pasadena, as
the Station Fire
continues to
burn on the East
side of the the
Angeles Nation-
al Forest.
Damian
Dovarganes/AP


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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE


*- < ro








THE TRIBUNE




)US1


SS


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009


ColinaImperial


Cofdec FoLf


IFECTIONC B o usnesS ibunemedia^net I


30%


public


energy


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


Bahamas
should
target a
30 per cent reduc-
tion in energy usage
by public buildings
by 2010, and
attempt to reduce
New Providence
commute times by
20 per cent by next NEYMOUR
year, the National
Energy Policy Committee's first
report has urged, a government min-
ister telling Tribune Business that
developing an energy policy was
"critical" for this nation's economic
and environmental sustainability.
Phenton Neymour, minister of
state for the environment, told Tri-
bune Business that while some target
dates in the committee's first report
were likely to be adjusted, since the
document was drafted in 2008, the
Government still intended to pro-
duce a National Energy Policy


dro


building





p target


* National Energy Policy formulation still 'critical' for
government, as BEC's last annual bill reaches $376m
* Bahamas among world's five most vulnerable nations to climate change,
but public not recognizing fossil fuel use's impact on 'life and death matter'
* Committee's first report sets short-term targets of 10-20% public
transport use increase, and 20% commute reduction time by 2010
* Renewable energy should be 10-20% of energy supply mix within 10 years,
report says, with 20-30% of households using solar water heater


(NEP) document "at the end of the
day".
Although unable to give a target
deadline for the policy's completion
and publication, due to the fact that
the Government wanted to "max-
imise input" from the Bahamian
public and other stakeholders, Mr
Neymour reiterated that the Ingra-
ham administration saw it as criti-
cal in guiding efforts to reduce this
nation's energy spend and environ-
mental/carbon footprint.


"In my view, it's critical," Mr Ney-
mour said of the need for a Bahami-
an National Energy Policy. "For
instance, if you look at BEC alone,
BEC's fuel bill for its last Budget
year was $376 million. That sum
demonstrates the magnitude of gov-
ernment spending for consumption
of petroleum products and energy.
We're trying to minimise it. It affects
significantly our foreign exchange
reserves and our foreign spending."
Apart from the economics, Mr


Neymour said that addressing
Bahamian consumption of petrole-
um products, and the almost-total
dependence on fossil fuels for elec-
trical generation, had important
implications for the environment -
especially given this nation's vul-
nerability to rising sea levels and cli-
mate change.
"The Bahamas is considered one
of the top five countries that are neg-
atively impacted by climate change,"
the minister added, explaining that


the work being done by the Nation-
al Energy Policy Committee in this
area was "critical" to this nation.
"It's a life and death matter for
the Bahamas moving forward. It's a
critical issue," Mr Neymour said of
climate change and global warming,
and the role played by energy con-
sumption patterns.
"It's not taken root with the pub-
lic as it should. We generally look at
energy usage when we get our elec-
tricity bills, but I think Bahamians
should be more concerned with the
environmental impact of an energy
policy."
Figures produced recently showed
that the Bahamas' per capital carbon
dioxide emissions, resulting from
fossil fuel consumption, had
increased by 40 per cent since 1996.
Emissions per capital now stood at
16.48, with the amount of carbon
dioxide emitted by this nation, as
measured in millions of tonnes, hav-
ing increased from 2.2 million in
1992 to 3.5 million in 2000 and 5 mil-
lion in 2006.
SEE page 4B


Government assesses


Bahamian firm allies Governments delay


Film Studios principal with Caribbean player critical NIB reforms


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
THE GOVERNMENT
has been moving slowly in
drafting a new Heads of
Agreement for the Bahamas
Film Studios because it wants
to determine whether its cur-
rent chairman and owner,
who has threatened to close
the project down, is a man it
wants to do business with, the
Permanent Secretary in the
Prime Minister's Office told
Tribune Business.
David Davis said the Gov-


Determining whether to do
business with him, as Heads
redrafting ongoing amid
threats of closure

ernment has been attempting
to draft a new Heads of
Agreement for the Grand
Bahama-based development
for some time, ever since
Nashville-based investment
banker, Ross Fuller, took con-
trol.
Mr Davis said the lease of
SEE page 11B


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net


A PAN-CARIBBEAN project management
and property development consultancy is plan-
ning an alliance with a Bahamian company
offering much the same services, in a bid to
give them increased scale and an ability to bet-
ter compete in bidding for major construction
and engineering projects.
An executive with Construction Cost Engi-
neering (Bahamas), David Lavin, told Tri-
bune Business that their association with
BCQS International will allow them to expand
SEE page 5B


'Enormous social implications' if
pressing amendments not enacted

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


SUCCESSIVE governments have failed for
more than 15 years to implement long-sug-
gested reforms vital to the National Insurance
Board's (NIB) long-term sustainability, two
investment advisers have told Tribune Busi-
ness, adding that the Bahamas faced "enor-
mous social implications" if amendments were
not enacted soon.
SEE page 10B


Gap between rich, poor to widen


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE 'wealth gap' between
rich and poor in the Bahamas
is likely to widen as a result of
the current recession, a for-
mer finance minister has told
Tribune Business, with he and
others believing this nation is
undergoing a "major struc-
tural change" and could face a
relatively 'jobless' recovery.
James Smith, CFAL's
SEE page 8B


* Bahamas facing prospect of
'jobless recovery' and major
structural changes that will be
permanent, with prolonged
high unemployment likely
* 'Painful days' ahead, with next
five years 'unlike previous five
to 10 years of prosperity'
* Bahamian businesses urged to
restructure now and do more
with less, as demand and sales
likely to be in retreat
for some time


C


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-


-I I




PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009


Insurer's



income



declines by



86.4 per cent


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMAS First General
Insurance Company saw its
net income for 2008 slump by
some 86.4 per cent to $1.656
million, largely due to an
almost $12 million swing into
the red on the unrealised loss-
es suffered on its equity
investment portfolio, a devel-
opment that negated an
underwriting performance
improvement.
The insurance carrier,
which has now published its
results separate from those of
its parent, Bahamas First
Holdings, which enjoyed net






I'NSIGHTN


242-461-1000 1 www.babfinancial.com ritish
Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-5601 A i Gmerican
F I N A N C I A L


Bahamas First suffers $11.8m

swing on investment portfolio,

and contributes less than 50%

of parent's 2008 profits


income of $3.465 million for
the 12 months to December
31, 2008, saw its own figures
drop from a $12.209 million
profit in 2007 to just $1.656
million.
Figures
The figures also show that
the carrier contributed just
47.8 per cent of its parent's
net 2008 profit, Bahamas First
Holdings' figures also includ-
ing, for example, the perfor-
mance of its various fully-
owned agencies.
Due to the vast swing in the
value of its Commonwealth
Bank holdings, Bahamas First
Insurance Company saw the
value of its unrealised invest-
ments move from an $8.959
million gain to a $2.922 mil-
lion loss in 2008, the main fac-
tor behind the substantial
drop in net income.
The insurance carrier also
saw outgoing management
fees increase from $956,699
to $2.06 million, a rise of more


than $1 million.
These developments more
than negated a 39.9 per cent
increase in net underwriting
income for the year, which
expanded from $6.106 million
in 2007 to $8.541 million in
2008.
While Bahamas First Insur-
ance Company saw a modest
$1 million decline in gross
written premiums to $103.096
million, a $3 million reversal
on movement in unearned
premiums, coupled with a $2
million increase in commis-
sions earned from reinsurers,
propelled the firm's total
underwriting income to
$54.759 million, compared to
$51.566 million.
This more than compensat-
ed for a $1.4 million increase
in net claims incurred to
$8.592 million, compared to
$7.159 million the previous
year. Total underwriting
expenses remained relatively
flat at $46.218 million, com-
pared to $45.46 million in
2007.


UBS :Fi',arry.)i Ltd o ::ln of the word's Irviirnj financial i&tilut ons in rt-hr (anbbean rhiiu.iij our
Mun 5tr Armri 'i ll, h .Ir ,iIi ij i briril .h'rri lr11nri i Vj 0[ tl I .f %.*r> il1h pri-'.ir i-h ill by :1.:,.,b>in.*ii ri -.ri
wfih rormprhensiw, v~1lueI rihanJin9 Ou Kii ) i-u . :1.1 rnbrin , lroi ng ptrlinIl rflownriips
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r-anagemenlt serAes.

In order to strengthen our team in Nassau, we are looking to till the iolo.'.ing position:



Portfolio Manager


ResponslbSities:
4 Monitor & implement 1.-1-.l inwv~stent templates and systers for v,'aith management clients,
* Execute trades & control procedures ior portfolio rranaged dient base across fed in coine, equi-
ty and FX markets,
SImplenment Portfolo Management policies, procedures from Head Off& U'i 2urch};
* Market Ixjirlu k. Maniagerwi t wer)Kes to piuspet~ie and icuraifi dients,

Quilifications;
4 A mnimrr, of 2 ~ams experience in Portfolio ManagMnerin a private banking context pre-
fered
S -pe r~nce n securities sales mnd fading preferred
* Pay * .r ::.i,' -. iJ it'. r tf I lin f tof I( crioi II, MBA preferred
' Swien 7 licen
SAlternate language skills: German, French or Spantsh a plus

In addition, the candidate must have an n-kepih understanding of finanual rstruments and extensive
knrowldage of MS Offie and related application software products. The ideal candidate rust possess
strong analytical skis, be a highly motivated team player and willing to adapt to a dynamic work envi-
ron ment


Heas send your resume on or before Sptermber 11, 200 o:
hirbah amaist.bs .:or

or

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd., Human RrCuiiLS P.O Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas
It starts with ..u


'A UBS


CONGRATULATIONS


DANIEL AND

ON YOUR


SAMUEL JENNINGS
BGCSE RESULTS


DANIEL JENNINGS SAMUEL JENNINGS
SAT THE EXAMS AT 13 SAT THE EXAMS AT 16


MATHEMATICS
ENGLISH
C. SCIENCE


MATHEMATICS
ENGLISH
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PHYSICS


TO GOD BE THE GLORY
"YOU CAN DO ALL THINGS THROUGH CHRIST
WHO STRENGTHENS YOUR

LOVE FROM YOUR PROUD PARENTS

IAN AND JANET JENNINGS


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


THE TRIBUNE


www.ubs.com/careers You & Us I






THE TIBUN MONAY, EPTEBER , 209,IPGES3


Non-performing loans




breach $500m threshold


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
TOTAL non-performing
loans made by Bahamian
banks to the private sector
breached the $500 million
mark in July 2009, a Central
Bank of the Bahamas report
has revealed, with the increas-
ing strain the recession is
placing on businesses and
households exposed by the
fact that the only consumer
lending category showing
growth is debt consolidation -
an almnost-$38 million increase
since the New Year.
The Central Bank, in its lat-
est monthly economic and
financial developments report
for July, showed a combina-
tion of slumping credit
demand and defaults on exist-
ing loans, as the contracting
economy and rising unem-
ployment continue to exact a
toll, with $902.5 million com-
mercial bank loans now in
arrears.
A further $64.7 million
worth of loans fell into arrears
during July 2009, marking a
7.7 per cent increase in the
number that were past due.
Total loans in arrears, in rela-
tion to the total number of
loans outstanding, increased
by 0.8 per cent to 14.5 per
cent.
Non-performing loans,
those which are more than 90
days past due and regarded
as more critical by the com-
mercial banks, as they have
stopped accruing interest,
rose by $31.3 million or 6.7
per cent in July. Non-per-
forming loans now account
for 8.1 per cent of all loans
issued by the Bahamian com-
mercial banking system.
Meanwhile, loans in the
delinquent category - that is,
31-90 days past due, also
increased by $33.4 million in
July to $401.4 million, taking


'Continued strains in the credit market', with only loan category
showing 2009 growth debt consolidation - at almost $38m


those loans to 6.5 per cent of
all credit issued to the private
sector by commercial banks.
The Central Bank said the
July arrears increase was gen-
erated by a $30 million, or 8.2
per cent, hike in mortgage
delinquencies to $396.1 mil-
lion, while commercial loans
in default grew by $28.5 mil-
lion or 14.5 per cent to $224.4
million - likely putting this
over 20 per cent, meaning
that more than one in every
five business loans is in
default.
Consumer loans in arrears
increased by$6.3 million, or
2.3 per cent, to $282 million.
Meanwhile, the Central
Bank said a breakdown of
consumer lending during the
first six to seven months of
2009 "revealed continued
strains in the credit market,
as the majority of the loan
categories contracted, amid
elevated levels of arrears.
Credit card and private
vehicle lending showed year-
over-year declines of $15.8


million and $15.4 million
respectively, along with
reductions in travel and home
improvement loan growth of
$9.1 million and $5.1 million
respectively. Contractions of
less than $5 million were seen
in most other lending cate-
gories.
But the Central Bank
added: "Accretions to debt
consolidation loans - loans
which have been rewritten -
rose to $37.9 million, slightly
higher than the previous
year's expansion."
Not surprisingly, the Cen-
tral Bank repeated that the
outlook was bleak, with eco-
nomic recovery not anticipat-
ed until the 2010 second half.
Tourism stopover arrivals and
hotel occupancies were pro-
jected to remain weak, along
with foreign direct investment
inflows and construction.
Although public sector
works programmes were
designed to provide a "mod-
est offset" to rising unem-
ployment, the Government's


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
-^ . 1a iVisi OW wfbwr ut W.Oc&udu.k

NOTICE

Town Meeting for Master of Education in
School and Guidance COunitLielling Degree
Programme in collaboration with
Kent State University
Saturday, 19th September, 2009,
Executive Boardroom,
Michael Eldon Complex, 3rd Floor
10:010 a.m. to 12:01) p.m.


fiscal deficit and debt-to-GDP
ratios were still heading
south, and while reduced
import demand was aiding
the current account and for-
eign exchange reserves lev-
els, there was likely to be
some impact in the next few
months as businesses drew
down foreign currency to
replenish inventory levels.
The Government's fiscal
deficit expanded by $139.2
million to $219 million for the
first 11 months of its 2008-
2009 fiscal year, with revenue
collections down by 6.1 per
cent year-over-year at $1.201
billion. Tax revenues were off
25.5 per cent, with taxes on
imports down 13 per cent,
stamp taxes down 22.8 per
cent, departure taxes show-
ing a 15.6 per cent decline,
and motor vehicle taxes drop-
ping 3.8 per cent.
Total spending by govern-
ment, driven by a 5.3 per cent
rise in recurrent outlays,
increased by 4.5 per cent to
$1.42 billion.


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four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory
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prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


iSE ISLAND
IIU~


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


i
PARA]
B









30% public building energy drop target


FROM page 1B

Mr Neymour said several
government agencies and
departments had already
moved to enhance energy effi-


ciency and consumption, cit-
ing the Water & Sewerage
Corporation's decision to pro-
vide energy-efficient pumps
in its products.
The opportunities the
Bahamas has missed to date


to become a renewable ener-
gy leader, and reduce its fossil
fuel consumption and associ-
ated energy costs, were graph-
ically illustrated by two exam-
ples cited in the National
Energy Policy Committee's


report.
The report said: "The pro-
motion of solar water heating
systems in Barbados has been
successful due to an innova-
tive combination of circum-
stances, policy interventions,
tax incentives and awareness
raising efforts on the potential
benefits of solar water heaters
to the economy.
"The solar water heating
industry in Barbados is esti-
mated to have saved about
130,000 barrels of oil annual-
ly. Currently, about 35,000
solar water heaters are
installed in homes, commer-
cial establishments and hotels,
saving about $16 million
(assuming electricity usage at
normal rates to heat the
water) and about 65 million
kWh annually, with a ratepay-
er value of $12.5 million."
The Bahamas, according to
the report, consumes about
26,000 barrels of imported
petroleum products per day
to meet its energy needs.
A further example was
highlighted by Germany's
feed-in tariff system that has
"proven effective in fostering
the rapid and sustained


growth in renewable energy
penetration in its national
energy mix".
The National Energy Policy
Committee Report added: "In
addition to the creation of
214,000 jobs, German
achievements include, since
the start, ion 2006, the avoid-
ance of 97 million tonnes of
carbon dioxide emissions,
penetration of an 11.8 per
cent share of total gross elec-
tricity consumption from
renewable energy sources,
and creation of a 5.3 per cent
share of total primary energy
consumption from renewable
energy. These achievements
were realized at a cost of
approximately $6.50 per
household per month."
Both examples illustrate the
difference between what is
and what could be in the
Bahamas as regards renew-
able energy, the committee's
report stating that this nation
had "potential for diverse
renewable energy sources",
including biomass, ocean,
solar and wind.
Embracing and expanding
the Bahamas' involvement in
renewable energies, the


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report added, held the poten-
tial to create new employment
opportunities in industries
related "to assessing energy
usage and improving efficien-
cy" in all types of building;
production, maintenance and
sale of energy from renew-
able sources, and the expor-
tation of technology and
knowledge to other countries;
and jobs from "retrofitting
buildings and facilities with
more energy efficient tech-
nologies, cooling and heating
systems".
The National Energy Policy
Committee's report suggested
a series of short, medium and
long-term targets for the
Bahamas to aim at. Advocat-
ing an integrated traffic man-
agement system and public
transport system, the com-
mittee urged targeting a 10-
20 per cent increase in use of
public transport by next year,
with energy efficient lighting
systems for public spaces sup-
ported by traffic management.
Other short-term goals,
which the committee suggest-
ed by achieved over a one to
five-year period, were the
phase-out of all incandescent
light bulbs and their replace-
ment by energy-efficient flu-
orescent ones by 2010.
Over the medium-term,
five to 10 years, the National
Energy Policy Committee rec-
ommended increasing renew-
able energy sources' penetra-
tion of the Bahamas' energy
mix to 10-20 per cent of sup-
plies.
It suggested deploying
renewable energy technolo-
gies in small Bahamian com-
munities, and producing 50
per cent of their power needs
from these sources, plus
improving fuel efficiency to
30-35 miles per gallon for 70
per cent of licensed vehicles
through the use of tax incen-
tives to encourage the impor-
tation of more fuel-efficient
cars.
The committee also urged
targeting 20-30 per cent of all
Bahamian households switch-
ing to solar water heaters
within 10 years and, from that
time on, all new water heater
installations to involve solar


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flaxd to Ihe nunter on the appicatlon forn.



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Pir (242) 377-0309 I Fax: (242} 377-0294
P.O. Box AP 9229, Nasu, Baaas
Emai edm


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 5B


Bahamian



firm allies



with



Caribbean



player



FROM page 1B

the scope of their projects
to countries outside the
Bahamas - mainly in the
Caribbean region.
BCQS, which is involved
with major resort projects
throughout the Caribbean,
operates offices in Barba-
dos, the British Virgin
Islands, Cayman Islands,
St. Lucia and the Truks and
Caicos.
"Both companies' core
businesses focus in the area
of project management,
quantity surveying and
property development con-
sultancy, whilst BCQS also
undertakes development
management, appraisal and
real estate investment analy-
sis work, with strong links
to the major lending insti-
tutions throughout the
region," said a Constrcution
Cost Engineering release.
Mr Lavin said the tie-up
will enable the Bahamian
company to offer an
improved strength of ser-
vice, and allow Construction
Cost to specialise across a
larger resource base.

Company

"We are a small company
with a good client list," said
Mr Lavin.
Liam Day, the Cayman-
based managing director of
BCQS, said: "Over the next
several months we will
strategise with CCE and
promote our new alliance,
soas to fully inform our
mutual clientele of the
opportunities that will arise
because of our new associa-
tion".
He added: "Both prac-
tices brought together a
combined history of 62
years of operation in the
region, and the association
mirrored the intent of our
corporate tag line 'Local
Knowledge - Global Expe-
rience' to the fullest extent.
"Though both firms offer
similar services, Construc-
tion Cost has been pursuing
a pan-Caribbean expansion
and contends the associa-
tion will provide that
opportunity, as well as allow
BCQS to pursue the devel-
opment of large resort pro-
jects across the wider
Bahamas.
"The 'marriage' is one
that both companies have
pursued for quite some
time, and the alliance gives
the association the man-
power and resources to
undertake large scale pro-
jects in the Bahamas and
the immediate region, and
provides a broader appeal
to a number of financial and
institutional clients."
Mr Lavin said BCQS had
worked in over 20 countries
in the Caribbean/Atlantic
region, and was the largest
practice of its type in the
region. "Together with our
local knowledge of the
Bahamian market, we feel
going forward that the com-
bined property and devel-
opment advice we can offer
to our clients will be second
to none." he said.


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RU BC

Royal Bank

Sif of Canada



PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each properly.

EC)IISF-',IAP,�RTNTFNTSICOI~lFR IAI ll.FG


(4011 I.ar A 17& % I.4Ar( .:In l klh.r
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man iitiemri i- shimtljm Linm rtid
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ApprairSM 4i1.kre $i200,M
1.90 i Il 'r inL".11 il 1: 1 1. l ai x I 111 nni
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Il:nl'l .1 -% Ill' .1i''..l ...i .'" .- 1 , i, h1 n il, ' A llirll|;
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i.onlain ;i I ; I I oIir"-, Ix dr., 1111 i. ;
k1iuii- rwidvnn�. rtppraimd 'Wue:

(1051 [u ii il liriii in " "I.i.I', I'\ln
w ill 1111 L.I Ii- I;,iii .l ;I liIll "iI I
relttuve. aind 30' 36 ailiuztr hil%;i
TuwnL harlh Bimini.
Apprassed b aue: :21.iluAW
1Xl]l I Iil v8 iln Sandilandi Allm-
ins lun ihe vw iern side uFCroHwirTl
Rnad bwl-vn Sealfire lane and
Z-'.-.i, ;IrcIli'd Ilnchil'i .lII ern Dis ar a
DfifhIlslandalfNew]Pi idencehi - e
.-il:.lll'.H.rli- l-inminll * !. P 111[' ,llr" l
'..arr rni hln'c clinr.priigF iWe ill:rfn
Irng cmirreenlirypmr'rh, lIving rnmmi,
z' . . n, u z �i L I"i 'iJi..l i i ',1 1:1.1
1.111 " I lliiilll ']ll'rm i .ll".l 4hl'.hl~n l ll . i
. 1 nI l-4I, illn -nnl .m l . h1 '1.Il " .i , ni'.i
I.1 lavlil i',ili7i>\ini:ll.'l 3'&1I 4* tw


IJ: I l~ i : e inp~ khilsif4A, I Ii. i7

1. !I U-I.nlnopl' l ,o 1-., .n -
Ifan. I t 1 i Ia I B Ui h I s ..-
lk. Gii.rni ihtm!ftin, I B7.5 MI ft.
prplifaiid Va1:ine: Tti
I1fisi sr-nilnuiln5I-aled ntll~es
Il111 SKbiSYMvAnicde Dhveff iunl B.
Iuck L5. EleutIr a. Bali masinii 9,1
iq:'l...1ppinlalie'dvahlL: F., ..i.'11
4lii2 i.. IB r .iir~ : k..I Aheiri er trv,
iHahami W, m laie,-i Sihdl1itn,

Hng> IIn: I I If
ApptMu1id wdluie: �l1,W

: i" n ;!- .illl h. [II ln.'1 < |11 4%' A . -.'in Ii
Strand l i i. i .j.u4iiriilir',iir II l. ..2'.1
sqfi. .p lraiis valh n : - .11 IIIMI
1i:1 'i: L Call i ii .r: 1. Ip.ih..i-xi - lqfl
iI Inah'd in M an--.' Liil- 1r-'inn ""
IL,,k 1:. 1i I Jrl'ternI IA.1:n111 wlire-,
I h' ii.L .r ipr.. Al d vht1 llVir - S I.1SH

� qlr l : i i , ,1 1 iI - iin i l, ls i .ir . 1i l .' - .
phiyTomit-. uIott
.41pprai wd value: MS L&000
I1l11:i V rnIl S ir-jr41 I a.nr L *S
Ioc31 5 1J li kl . ik-, .n!lirin
.AppniSi d % ainl ..,.IIMIi
|!i'12} .ni Cxi imnrciil Lmn Nor.


COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE
Tel 2--'2-3S.-56.8
lAIHMil Mrs m0liqcCrrwford
I i lh Mr r~ J irti Pinikr
i!12I Mr- Briam Ki~a~te&
SU':I I MI. VindykLiIl a c
IS-l I Mrs, Hpe Sealey
I.1U1i Mrs& ifTanv 5irn.ms O,'bricn
inIIF'l M r! 4 5s. llli!s
If17 I Mr. I rlerl ('i
!lill MrW k . ashtin Clate-Paild
MIDj MID s Lt.aipv GardLner
1.1 Li Ms..' LydIa Gardiner
PAIMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE

242 3.11 W .111
120 LI M1 Nxofg Walket
I212j Mr. fiaben iPanry
12ui51 Mr. Anv'a Majir


I 'a I Iii | 1 -. 1i nn ii : il .11 I1 ' iiIF.Iii. ii


I Il ii l'rii I ii.lmn.i. \-'I. 'liir.l .
Siluvl dtli rmamiraCBas ulicakand
Aurm Repair Shp. Apprased vaue:

' II. I Il f[ lixated I.i.AP All ar-
(-n.I [l , i A ,hIr.: 11 'fL . AI) rinii i i ilier:
i:nllll.:>.a:l
I"1.I 1 i:i. Il lInd r 1-11 Ihr nI-ll, I '"
I .ri I-iiiik r..nilf i- Ib I II bi 'L--iill Thri
trh!Li SubdiviinFl called arxd l kxn
a�S a linaez Isla im Kilualud in the
Ialemn IJiiuri of New PIrv'dence.
I Tc'..rt,.'iinfilrir, Iir'r hir '. r.rio i ri n
I i.,.(l n - li n' . , l . -l, r-,il",ih rh -'7- IHHI

I.k i LLD I I .aii l br.nlb IvI nuniiiher
I In olrck r.niir-'vr III :in . plan rn
1,ill nm ' .l.i:x:i1 IrII n illlip r I-. .lri-,
ii'illhi t aninil tili l in rh l. I ) -iI rl I, ib1
4 11. as. nIn47r 14 NZP a nd

A~ ~1 / - l& a. n 1 h r. i - tW S II 6rw

I In i *ipIrI H I ria (ifIN
iir e i , i [ ,
aFO'il: rik rdI. iinr i, rn:. Iral.i"-id1 Ilir
ni.< n livr i , q) im-l im6li' io, 1

ApprId .i.ipui t .IL B
,-1 IB iliiig ap; n lxi iz2e ; 1311 4.1t1

I Cili r B - 50fix L 1 imietd
(-5th5 nLh h i I olf dal *-5h Roa.
eaim t2 tU hird I i m s id- ir Ieil
c n fi 3 -. i lam 1rn i. il |
rxne halfdu xre:Ir vl preimises.


2 hsiii ?cir r x-nn.i | | irz\ in I'lrin
aia ehnestHa.itrhniurM n ikihri.
,nrnl'il e I a l nt1 iw v li rI 'I ' 1. a1il




c,.llldl I.rll.* l l' it '"ln4 "!' 1 1ljii 1i .
',ill.I'l Lib. k .l: .llF. .11 Lit':l J3 A u. lti.
r.-cic [ali l e [r dnil" i. l 1 r lllla.-.
x-- . ~n;:,d-11117n 1. :-1 -.-3u-C !' 9 L-n.
A.ppra; d :IILR. - I ,*K'.IJ

," l ll ny .r- q'llliv i l.:i I lillarni
'1llln l 1 k'.iI I tkn &i nn Pf .lidens Tre,
-.hana .. Shnne . nur tin 1 . h% r1ahnr.4
(l~. , ;i .i n' r ,i i ;i rer a f IRtdl,'-
� i:n- 4i, In':. 14 811cn ril jii irn.
.'.ipuoiel o i. H ' ;.


14, lHikktt 11 l i .han Sub Iii ai
VI i .:il;iain in :1.11 rs p.ri l -' i -
pjr., ( a.lrl: .Ih.,ll mn:h

IIIH i.,. amii ir' I)I l-nil tI Il i\
I'l, k k- K.il'.1d II:Sr 1II1 S.il".i,,n i , n r
ApIaidn d value 3Io i $.7Xx 71O

: "i' .Ii- l :III :II k i' !L cII II l iP'Ill III n11 "
:li'.' ii , 1' ].'d"3T iIni -,ill" l,,in$ s
prrliaciofLtlAac I a rilpainofLaZi
%. ..A4pprjai dhlue:
s I.IK .-
|.0il %11 rhnr we prcr-l wr tvi inf
!;rey 1 i te !iind ro nl'll.rai-
V1iit l 1 Mahd 1 f (he ,in.nwHi,
1'11111ai 'd * . in.'. I] |

I.AlU. .hal lat piee parp:' ur lut uf
.inn knoin aTai. MI I1I11"[tl1 0li'll
in thr Isla id nftin'al F-una m .s
uinngI III.1 uhfi. Appraisd value

i| i v.h-i..l i il i-ii ,;r i ,li' nl iii .ii ihr'y,
].2.3 i[( fl Utllnl In,'I l. li "il .rl
*1 ' mVr. l i)i'l: Lt. No T'PR.Y.l.k'i l'i..
.'4,1.1i| a] d %.inie '.t.,-L..i ti
'IirL' 'i tnl kint f land cinnining
i aam.silua-lred vaf. nkcnidc'
Irve. apipr aIunIaely 1.421nH. sulh-
_a. rd.o llarr-lad it n due hlww rni


1:. I I 11.,I p i ,-'nI l .'iI li.n1 ir g;PII .
el I3. I�i , V P 4r -I t4 itait dI on ithw
Nil, P " i KiIei l?1. 1 i fi celain-
in I ,ii-ainI'r r.. ':in I lir iy.ih iii
-"tU .llp yi;IL nI :1 ld.ie[rul li.w r
and deeibt shup ipce onw Il second
'kiiir i-.i a lurgi, iir;wl.v irej inll i'
rrIr. J i,;d- .-ll.1,u l1 su f'l.
AppraL:rd %alu $s:lInim O
l'..'I All that piece. parcel or land
hinu'.'lr ;n ilpr:Ir 111i:iiiL ;iriP Ir - I >.1
If" I.Ih'n .i L'io t.iI I l ' l '' I i lt I' ill I.-4
Blue lill fl adabnui T1 fl Nniari rf
fluer Sonw ad nui I r-, ft ilmli rf
I Irtlllrw in ih< Si1irnIn Hlifra d
Nft~ ProrrAnidenc, Ralinirnm frian-.

a \tP led.'f l ie bI t ",1 i nit wl thl Kip.
tn ard 0 'lor on thsiet frk i�.-
Apprantdinkut 5154.(0BX

lusidrit iiLdui oCi~pevn Ikel \ ICKW
Iln 1ri r ilw ii..i lInuf Iui r on ' I
S . u Ii'. ult , ilrl iri D'll triC ,I tiNt 1 Pir -
pLinI 7M 4., I it- ir i Vfio \i; *
2 - , $1'p *:1 I- h lll:l:r- ili]]il :




nlr IJc So l diu l uLn, ILuraiilr ijIa
AtpprJl iiS"'IHk |ix A iJ(OO
!Du It.1.WI dI I,, ."l' l .lih prIllk it fiAl t.


)i'5 ) w land ,ll 02S L'',iewS ub.li-
vision. Ruslu l I Slanid.Spaii iL%',lls.
. ri LT'yr 11 I .5. *. - i I. .d1 . n wi,',L '
.niri. i :or..k n n a .nr m ir.m:i . i :.-n rc d
prfan.aanrnr air g.ar ri a mcvrcd
waer .iIl. .ppra.: r, lnnr 10I911r lHI


M I :I l illi Ih1'.l4 I i 1 . hiI , i 1 lil.I l


.|ipprLa.,li -jluI 5-.lll.t.lI

%L) -Ill. U1 iI:Iir IIli ,.12 Ii tI' CHarT ie
hnil~ing' i' ll 1 hIell I I [r I il ing
-Uii ll , M lcl'.'n -l .1.iilhiK "i;i. ',
-.i pr gi rvrl 'iirl,.i i:.
Apiipr.'-,!d 'jiui' i 1 9.,.'.I'
Ki.L1 PTopenrzanainin t"nndn-rMgB
I inniil.In 1:'I . IIn ni 1 1:11/:i li nlIEg.1 .
l, !" I i. :1 'I 'iinvi-nm, "..li l"'ir1 1i'..
11i. 'q . r1:1111 .1,nnI ],: r.i 'n. . I nr -i ir.in ir"
1. |l .ii.ii ili iil l Ir .lr.iI klm r.i l i

Aliplp .-ib a r I r- r.ln,5 i i
j..j.1 Nin *l e r In-pik% hIL .lki1n.


dis ci cdhew . - :Pn'.uh'lli,, L-nHan .,
.Apn ik~tl vluie: 1S IIl7, o

LUi lA !14n[Iioi In if:ac Frt-
i. l t il . . i iri H.ill:li . k-i illi-"
'll.'-t il I tm7 liil,i "i .rii in l



I5r1 lTeniillllu a llur i anIHu aed
ir-inLT1 dilsii.k iwrni wlu rl 1 i d-








la nd un ti l I.n. i.iL, nf .r L. r:..U Il
siruai:-,d .iabisl:pO2 miles NaTnh.





l'-rci il cr ItrI i sn f a el Ii:l)
".dland Ii4 II.nl-.LI II IareW ln
.iwlild Vaiile:d ffNIN 1HI
0961 0 I %11Ill, Iii'r lpilll,1,' rll , r mij
100I0:M All lI. 1ill| ,i ilr \ i iH'o IV -i i
ila llnd in . li lf.ii in .,i ;1.riM1 LI UI 11i

pa, r parlvil l i lar .l n nlan' is I I.2 4o?
iM.hant CnundlC.1A.I--. IIIto. sft



|l1.1O . .illf i. d | :di i l:i . ..ltl o d
i -I I il r l~ nllt \ in, l L W ii %,'.



I. ,'11., Il ,l: lll-r "-nul: "*..kn ull "\111 . lll ]
I I' 1. (i ric'i . u ..Lni .I . "zi,'r:,|lp.-r .
1],.lInKI s i| fi. ',illl.1 r.l ':l',:'. " ;I-.. .i:.I...


NASSAU MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 212-3,k-b'iiU
0:I1 r 1M. lamrni qirirhin
17012) Mr. Anlinnin I .yina;
1301) MNi.Tlhm Iaohnlin
;3: .i Mrs. Alela'baompsain
MACKEY STREET BRANCH
Tel: 1.'-ij-30 7?
1601) M, ".Ticrelll-Milrinlrimtnlh
JOHN F KENNEIllfRRf. rBRANCHI
Tel: 242-.32'-4711
14(1) NMs. il-:lena'.Valklne
:-1021 Mrs. Chandra GilbeT
PRINCECHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE
Tvt: 242-383-7.;.i1:',-'

1rA) Mr. 1erfll K5I Kii
15.15 Mls.tri~~~1causell
CABLE BEACH BR.LNCH
Tel: 242-:1.' ?-i ;'
14KIf Mn, Winnif ed R2Ibirts
IJA: CA2-5171ONC5 iniTE
Idel: 242-M02-5170i9'5--51 oR


Iw/ I"i M rt;1 i I L r!- I I;tlt , i 4,I
b1 it.i i. i Ii r l i- 1n. 111 1 ii I .r I L-,
I, 111:1 hll0i ''I';II III K C , nilrll ,i lul l
S Il li . lii,'l "ri rl r.II i .' llP. ,11 11,1.
P w I. enr si.i ,' ipnt: I .F1.'l~ IIq f
AplprL - r- l ~- 111.l ini..i:U n
rI'n 'n"I L ri 52 CrI, I i Alla t I- lr i
I luc Ld l'ih..rii I'.n ' . A a'i n' ilm li h
sijrbeiii. . I -%Lni in C ai lnir;ig
n slw .-' * . i t ith. i lil - lh th
(1ancmrtl Dck Ixtructuf
AppraLqIked valu. Szatl.0
&.I All Ilhai pWeo pail or l. iifd
I rini ng I III ml!in if .s: ni dirnt .ill,
i ne . 5ri 1.i .-i 1 I II -, i ijrs . '1 r L a il1ii

.- i - II -. I 1 1.'F.I -lII i1 'll . I l.1 1 1 . lil
3 li..- ' r. i- ili. l r .n lA .,n -,.,i , L -
e"-.ir:-.' -i i. uL Appraised Vu -

%tri LatiklucatedirtbeSubdivi-
nul-"Springtl'.in..wln.iwii . ih sze
biewg Hmni I q t I Im.mignrtga mn
7 "r ly nv ,.-ln -.-iin irn i h amIw wllh
: ih I h alh n f -I r fn l
Aplpracerd walv 5al lfl0I

l.Jr i 1 r.-- ,, . .l s ,i. lI.. i l. n.i ln 1 1
L li iI.l '% ilt iik.' I.inin'.I..m. i. li.1-I .
e, Gin' '2 in. (ie Westl". Dstlrkt.
New fuiikle.Talwo- htdruum.
s-"i llirmcii uiiitli andl mm sii -
bedroumunre-balhbruar uniL IlTe
Fpripr y i7 r: e ul i% T.inhil-r .ih -,l ii
iYihif-. l11.-ilr.--ig,- Q' lI\ hrld ri: l
l yiL. i :. I. i j"., -. I' . li ' ,..' 1 III
A Ip r.L- u Ul i.lliw l5:174.1 i
-u.i Dupk- Lat 02u ' snualed Inn
Faith .i r l. ion .lj r ! .5r1uiiimnm
sur b i 47.: 11.. 1i n-.iilijpl'x
rh0 cn. *t-p|ilr. 11- nr i 1 -1r i ilril1
II ' 'I I Iil I -l IIk i .r.%I I
Ii h3 k ,o 31 Et, h atni.ra MdlItan. &
.ht ilw.i t - k 1.liillin ! i .ii', tei l
>ih .itf r1itt1 ir T ll r rid Ni'miw Nu .s-
IMLd. W 7-0x- I..-lJ\ .' fI"..III'..JjrNF',
Appr.lawd U-jlu i.illHI.J.U
ifo11 Six comkinminiuink u-imi and
i -v pili'lo drv;ni l iu n id ii iiili:d
;sI IIl'e;r n .I M i.v0:4 .I-m l: Ilirhlm :.
saij , Im e r-jf rgil* mIulI iIl%1- . 1 .;NS
dencial LIVndi:niiiurl.':ml[- hariin
vrapmnenc is6siniall dan.42i.acres
ni lan .i'lb nrwinn ini i;. 1rn1ilsrl
.ll~i' '.lrri'iUt :Ill. l-ili rl' iI, I r'h i I 'W
II. r. ri . ll ei f : li [inIprn% ir.-'liiih-l ..I
.n .11 ,i,:h ii, ' iI .111 - inliII 1 ik l .'li.i.
p.lui'tl ;all I" . 111:M:l I''l 1

I5 0 I .l Iall I ,IIlnl .llh.hI l I1 1 'r'l ! i !il


12111 : iill.lu ll- ,k l .. 'i:l 0lo -S.i1rh.
..<.I 1 j , ir. r %1.1i .lan.,i I )11 r 4' .ing .r
tilll.r i:u i: I .Iii .. iii I I S.I -.. SM /I


1.1 12hlw . AAin lu niavd n Ux-kI.,
..Ill. si'i lh r.liin I-, irw a1.r-i.i l illu i.
I II llll i .li'- ., i i llil:l i lnli i lllrir n'-r
I I"l,'i' l I- '-.il I-.ni |ll,|. v1 1 i]p:iln iv.
II.I I.t, n si r .i.i .-,.IiI li.K : -d . I:l| Ih .I
I '. dl * l-'llilaiece ;ii L parcel In. I:t uf
land L'-.J . I4il v i il',L- -."i Illhxk.1
n: il-j uh-' hl" ,i.n "iinii- 'ai J.z,.i rn
k-kilnrmim n iihilhkl'lasnirn Dlmcr
olfitridanir Nrw Prildenfr. P'Pro.


I ibq .'il, '.li.i l|i i",i." iVC 1. 'ur< |il. ll i
I r1 : - It ;I l o e pl r r S'--i vl:l.u |11:|.l int 1..I
.illIdi'. ii ti i uk. , . ix. i...' t ni l ul
isapprC.9455sf.fl.
.4ppeidise rlue $9HXi00.
l.'iH:I .. i:hi i pl arci-iT I Inc lKnf
land I n-ig .jI 'i.. krawi,!l in ihef
s.iibdivistiom known as *.fudei bdgef
land NIrk in.li%:n t he oinremirn
I)inctr lt rhtio- iand ri Nr PrTv.


(10 0 'B . h lu n d L v ki p f ad ^u ti rriv j i l
lindi Lt. 111 . I l..i -ni , I. i- I I Iih' miLn ild ilr
I .xnni.-i n!i'l- -.rn' ll I I,%'V .- I.wnar
Elxurna, hilarns..pp A r.sAd value
3"" I..1;.1


-7:tic' Ms.QLu IL., islier
? 717 Mrs. Nnc %.!atb-
(723) Ms Drifln-IKinp
<7241 Mrs.Riayr I iris
(m'2)w M . M.il,.l-ile ilahntn
(565i Mrs. Caiherine Davis
* 6:-1 Mnr. V s.o'r-'a 5'i ol
NASSAUIT'L AIRPORT
Tel; 242-377-7179
(4. 1) Mr.Su.ze ile I;il'. Mnii
LYFOID !CAY BRANCH
Iel. 212-362-451) or 242-362-4037
IUil-NI Mrs. linds , Pflierson
COCVERNOR'S HARBOUR, ELEUlTHERA
Tel; 242-3312-. 2;',.
(k92 Ms. NirieEvians
HARKBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
IeI:212-33-Z234"
901) Ms-W ldr.-iw La eda
AN [DOS1fWN BRANCH
Tel; 242-36W-2071
<40l: Ms. .,p riann WillimLns
MASli IARBu}l, I [AlAI)


F;5iWf beingAparillnriof(.;Ind ffn
Albie 4) I nI . TiIoq1 Onc iii WAthlI
1 1 i lr i jllI h iL lhi lll ll" l Vll illl IIIlll
-1] I ll . ili l m.| -. il lif r i rt . ila
l it, , ' A.p iriil'dil 2' , .17 .. T71 1.

i,.1 I [ A*141ti7 Hahnma Slnund
i rima I. Ilrorad irmw III mI~ o
Ir niht.Y (;i inr Mrc TWI nii in"n

,ral I I ii mil - l. (i lod 1 '1.r aIbI d
RI ri ,ert l I.i. ii ii t4.'id nh s Ir IL.
W1iRlbn r iiu i ihl It i i|iln.-irr� -- i a.in
Fariwr l d. LThi pplfrlty Liru:IInr
Si" 1. th w i. l-r r 1in w hi i ; I i ll i -i Ivi
.rilr.-irro* Lx L: r LAP u s i llW il 1. E [l

-njinli Ion ning In cr. I :.i-dreon
.-l . i ril t -,0 n.1 Ijll.l. ,lhl I >.-in
[1II4ir :^pIl;isi t 'I..Ijnl |r -4HH,24.II
.30.I All thut p1c1 pared rf lani
nri pimlit l bwing it V fi1i on ith


'r ni-rl Id. e' lnii' i V n Ih*l' ndmii I

!n . I Ih.. 1 I l l .. -i l .i' .I I'.. ni'

M1 I Li*54 j'i lih I ir'i.rlr iin 11 .6ii iin!. i Ii'. i 4 '1r
.-1 1-0 . ilrni-i- i Ill a .1 11 i P 1 .-i1
fi:r r n' ami "-lillli I.lllv t'w iilrhnl ,'
:.j in i.'e .! i!Jl . I.i I'i'.illi II t 'l .i
clised r -rt. amnd erine-r - waTI
wlrri iihing lirinlip-r:.. .p:caiim

.'ai .'1 h.1- Ni ill h,. ill- I MI 11 .-1,it ,
n-" 1.lIll l'T nI Ir A 4of I'nd tbelng
n or a Tac 1of Land ,'nw or 6r-
Inrnri n Ann^"iin Mrimi, hNI:
f lll t:iN 1. tl' ll'i.4f1 l . '.lri ril; . 1 .M ';1
Fj~le rn Dilltivll ,HhvI,-ll"liOI lNllw
li. i c! .l i.. "i in ;I duili . I'"II| '[ ly

ia . Lnic f B lock B situale arn
,1w alf*-t in The L.;in r s, .il:1"il1
c11 �tcian ilug a four bteronam KI
Iq I PFi ..l-n dl,'4 apprim 4,ilI ,q


rf1:arm0ic Mel Rd. Nalunl lh Inmld-
n . a. ' ni: l i4 ill h.i it fir , I. . rilri i.i..r
% ill f.n i'l ,I.-Ill H. "i,'"I; I I l
i56i 1 All that pi4eC paro tor I1 of
IanJ silfuLle 1n IIWe.Eay Sidcork, lMI-
ers lIad and 276t..1 ft SutI ufCar-
.ichri ltRd. beiljo fllcunt1aing a
sq:1 l M A', r' . n. ie I .I,',


11 :ti I'arl i.ill, II i ,r'-]q'i :p.. r,''l ;il
Lml lll - li I l' iml sl , I ll I"ll-" ll' .I- . ,.11
lllicir.:i-i'l 1"1 41 1 n l I i . - I il.ll' | I 'i i l lI
Itn 1i % l In iy of the 1tiile nwro O4f
.Sinjlei: .md''!hw Fm> ri lI-'ii 1..I
xiliti ,er 4O Il I H1iIII: I ilm 11111 :.i1
H. rfllnH~ri- n flarl, itu- IpaiM'

172,.I al t-l- i l .l,.mil.d a l ifr v I ln i.
Wiren1 lisIricl ain Kw PnruridTiLh
.':lnin mipa | uiiii>n.In i'h l. ulivm. 'L
L.InCIILnig Ilj..a.I . |ppraisedralue

I ? .I:nroturanlmKl m:10044
Ii l Ii l . pl p i h lAprlinii I-i1 irc � I- . nIl �
. slim I .'IIlldA N IM r, N l l l',Nri i, '..i i ,pr.
.-I iiii ) |ppl .i mi l I .1ill 1 slilg i- l *
i Nu - l:. m i ill- [;lIin dI nis r ..klv *
,.i.;jiiil Ini, .'in a I :;'mI rin k..r 1 -I
Fire Tr l Rload in Lthe iter! n Uis-
Inrn iit '\rY I TiiMr e'lL I'rcir-n .m'
I Il Ii.4; : 1il
.1p|-i n i.-i :',ahlni' L.'l.:-.lH Ill
.�I1 1 I ,',. a1 il .kll , i h-',ll.l ill., . ',
Inllp.. I i- C :'1 |l 7 4|-ni' ll n, .-ii . . , i AII'i:
L. iilii riin.1m r.,1 . I.ii 'i. lll ii. w ll i
i" 1llnl .i ,,IIil; 1-sl' i|' Fii, P .q: PIl r
t I,- J m: t67, ift :.i I ll*.t jt, i pjis
ailld -1& un . il uiu l .1 S6.2 l ; lilw
back und SaOi ' B5.61 Oi die olultwh.
sile iat5.475 1Sil o hiind sIIaL.
ApVprmiwed value: o.r4lII


el: 242-3b7-2.12
I.11I: Mr. Taurn Holder
I'llYj; M r. " ,l',ilPiilier
(14 101 Miss Cypri;1n1a Williaims
BIMINI BRANCH
IL242-347-3031
(1 1 Mlis. Giuluau Tiiubu
GRAMYS, LONG ISLAND
Te- '42. 337-0101
(10 1i M r Is li-, 'I.11ls
EXWUMA BRANCH
Le.. 22-3j6-3251
iUw: Ms.j locelyii Mackey
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
n- �4-.. 5-3K i, i.*
(10I FI ,{. (Ianuill Frith
(10"21 M&-sIleaiCHIlel
(103! Mr. DainYa Newbold-Carrwntht
I l NI -, M iS. vl..i CHLtv
SPANISH WElS
T-- ?42 :1:- .14 i or
242 :l.ki 41.
(i50 -Mt. Wallet Cares,


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


VA-CANT PROPETTIES


0 FIACL'RS






THE TIBUN MONAY, EPTEBER , 209,IPGES7


It


-ii


Eipjre I C~ELDIMEN EXNVATDR

EOPIPMENT E2CIPTA0t
EOUWt ME MUIlUBE
MMAUiFCTURERk
MODEL MUAlMI
KEMIAL NU R-
DATE PUIRCMH
arruncaIer KO


1 Glirporalm ii rcqoiunr .eal J ]idn i o fw iliokr fak nf r*<
liipy 'quipmcnt. j lILTi Dn'rrc E:xmavur jmd a d 'na DnIwcm
BEki.t. Th Ie ipm'unL M Lu iUm.Ia i ' W '.i om.piund
Buikling ' Minmitr' uf I~ , JI-k LrhTi. m l a'ies' will bi in
wI'r! K. m is" bhiK. The t.oipiin imn mnn(T ih right ito
irc"l m inJd -'ur Al J cndirr,

AN I rAo mi.I m h.whiilt-id 'ir ii- m-f.i 4 t I'rJly .rpicmhlr II,
.]9 aJt bX FM chk O ir .id hlr 4 CGral ManaJUr aj NL i1
Thumptus Buulninl. vn PrArmidrmc, Biahmia in j Pkd
ennlipec marked "I'n&r fnr I[[uI7y EquipmenLt'


&ei d Adven Excastar
WH 1012
Caerpiar
Ca22M5


UNdS.7
itimsef
seM3.7


EwUFFMENT FEA TURES
12V Drect tarim'f20AH S V BlaeriesffI AMP ALTENATORICAT 32 "ENfl35 HP I
20NRfiiNE lM IN IUL WYFuel4S GAL IhYD SYf,521 W dteBuccl &hilkrL 4' A 2'1

�QUIPM7w .NTEJ CWO,
SoE


E!UfIPMWT DESCPTWIO


Fpwm Z DIESEL OR IMKHOE


Wf 1025

FOND 50

4w"1991
z4a"1IM


EOMPUIrrWFEAITUIE

f2V sImSNiMP W 0210W RPM dCfL RL&UW 0Ml 2 M CU MW
VHL TRN �33 POW SWT LFUIL-2S', *F, -f2.


EQUIPME ET ERAL CCOMITIt Fa


Spending and unemployment rise
Analysis are Iryir g 0l pEeccl w"l.mch way 1he naicn's, economy iwill go
meanwhile conswiier ..pe -din :1 accounts for fnore than 70 perceil of
the gross omrne-lic product aid u'a _ -Lp *..rIr'n conrirlues to r-se.
Consuumer spending as a percentage ci GDP 02 2c-.
- Fr .


uGrad LJ t udnb bto
01 I0.2w


110 2:11 p.m
A IwlilAOWt


SAT for
(tmk ii &
ciiro I12
itIrkid*


Iu
Hmr~240
89*01
wmat ZIL


&auiy.
OW0 LJ0 p1.1


Current Grade 10 students from all Current Grade 11 & 12 ntudenti fmm
adialo are Invited to attend. .
all schatels are inilied to atend.,
4l';, SIl 0-iri pMr. n Scp, Cti, 2.0 9 i'�y S20l-fais P.Mu .mp. 19ti, 20419
4Psy chance WSO an Oct. 03,200 9 PIv baliane 19 han OctI Sith, 2109


The National Insurance Board

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas



Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification

The National Insurance Board (NIB) is seeking to pre-qualify contractors to bid on
works to construct a Government Complex at Marsh Harbour, Abaco; the project is
a joint venture of NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors must be in
compliance with the National Insurance Act (social security programme), and in
good standing with the relevant Government agencies.

Pre-qualification documents may be collected from the Security Booth at NIB's
Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from September 3 to September 9, 2009.

Pre-Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and dropped in the pre-
qualification box at the Security Booth, Clifford Darling Complex on or before 12:00
Noon on September 15, 2009.


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


F Queen's College

A-! Centre for Further Education
P.O. Bo N7127, N Nsau. Bl dnes
T= J1021 3-W9aU4 IPu; C 2| 39�3W


SAT Sat urday Classes at QC

Planning fr allege?
D o uY want to eam extr cmits bIefrE Enteriig ilege 7
Do u nt to rduc icollp ncut?
Do yu wuit to p qualiy hfor sEiursips?
irade 10. 11 & 12 students, give yourselfthe best advaniag
by preparing for the PSAT and SAT exam with qualified
instructors t QuIn's C. oll g



Pam -C


Unemployment rate . I-


............................. .. ... ... ... ........ ....... ...... .. ..................... ...... ... . ... .......

- - - - - - - - - - - - -


I Email: ci icfDral 5t.cf3lmI


GUEST FOR TENDERS FOR
HEAVY EQUIPMENT


'.47,


The American Embassy is presmtlyv considering applications for the following position:

BODY GUARD

The ncKumbeat serves as Executive Bkdyguard for the Chief of Mission, 10 project the
Ciief oif Missium ICOM) port-tu-portl frwo th t threat of terrorism or their acts oF
violcie,. While with the COM, the bodyguard will take extranrdinary and-'or special
security precautions to iInsue the personal safety of lie COM. The bodyguard will assisi
in the selection of afe routes and remain alert for danger ot'Hie COM.

this position is open o candidates %ith the following qualifications:

Co-Tplctioc of secondary school Royal Rahamas Police Force Collegi or
Royal Bahlamas Detlese Force Training is required.
Ten (101 year, or experience in Police, Defente Forne lau enforcement, or
specialized security is required.
Must be familiar with the city of Nassau. Freeport and the Out Islands in the
Bahamas. Must also have krowlcdg of historical and cuinit events that
codud affect the security of the protectcc.

PERSONAl. ATTRIBLiTFTS:

S Must have ile ability to be trained in the use of various firearmss.
Must bc flexible and able to adjust to rapid and unexpected schedule changes.
Must be able to work independently with minimum supervision and have
good problem solving sills

BENEITfS PROVIDED INCLUDE;

The successful candidate will be offered an excdicnt compensation package including
performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurancc. life insurance, pension
and opportunities for Iraiinng ad developmelL

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or [.S. cizens who are eligible for employment
ukder Bahamian laws and reu]alioios.

Application forms can be found on the Embassy's webs il nassau.usembassy.gov. under
Ke.y Embassy links and cnploymenrt pportunitics. Complutnd applica oils should be

rcturncd to the Embassy via e-mail to f:m.ri.r..isLic i, and T'iiieraastLatT , govy or
famd to (242i328-8251, addesscd to the Humnan Resources Officc no later ihan
September 17ih, 2009.


DESEL DRFEN BACIUOE
EQUiPM EirNUME;t
K*MUPWCTWUREE

SERML NUMElt
DATE PrMCHASE1


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


*I


1 e.c s


- o-,TO


- *:'9Cn


I .: . ..





PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Gap between rich and


FROM page 1B

chairman and a former minis-
ter of state for finance, said
the tourism industry, the
Bahamas' "major engine of
growth", was unlikely to "go
back to pre-recession levels"
for quite some time which, in
turn, would have negative
implications for prolonged
unemployment levels in the
Bahamas.
He warned that Bahamas-
based hotel properties were
unlikely to need workforces
of pre-fall 2008 levels due to


increased productivity levels
among staff who had retained
their jobs, and also the fact
that much hotel room inven-
tory remained off-line. As a
result, economic recovery in
the Bahamas, much like in the
US, could be relatively 'job-
less', as resorts such as
Atlantis, for example, are
unlikely to re-hire the 800
people they laid-off even if
business levels make a full
recovery.
With Bahamian gross
domestic product (GDP)
unlikely to recover to pre-


2008 levels in the short-term,
Mr Smith told Tribune Busi-
ness that this nation would
likely "have to suffer high
unemployment rates" for the
next four to five years.
"It's going to take a struc-
tural change in the economy"
to reduce that more rapidly,"
Mr Smith told Tribune Busi-
ness, arguing that the
Bahamas needed to "go back
to the drawing board" on its
economic planning in the
medium term and see what
changes could be made.
"There's a growing gap


between the rich and the
poor, because wealthy people
are still working and taking
advantage of opportunities,"
Mr Smith said. "I can see a
lot of changes taking place
going forward, and not for the
better. The distribution of
income will be more skewed
to the wealthy, and this may
have implications for crime.
"You do not have resources
to give to law enforcement at
a time when they are needed,
because government revenues
are down, and more people
will put more resources into


private security.
"I'm not by nature a pes-
simist, but I can see the next
few years being a challenge
for the Bahamas unless
unforeseen events occur, like
the discovery of oil offshore."
Bahamian unemployment,
with the national average rate
standing at 14.2 per cent, was
likely to go "a little more"
higher next year, and then
only come down to around 9-
10 per cent, the former
finance minister predicted.
"We've got some painful
days ahead of us," Mr Smith


added of the Bahamian econ-
omy's recession and unem-
ployment woes. "It's becom-
ing structural in nature."
While praising the Govern-
ment for initiating worker re-
training efforts through the
National Training Pro-
gramme, he expressed con-
cerns that those targeted by
the initiative were being re-
trained for areas likely to suf-
fer further lay-offs.
Mr Smith's analysis was
backed by Anwer Sunderji,
SEE next page


FAMILY ISLAND DISTRICTS
SPEECH COMPETITION
TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK
3RD - 10TH OCTOBER, 2009

The Department of Public Service will host a Speech Competition as one of the
activities for the Tenth Annual Public Service Week. The competition is open to
Senior High School Students in the Northern, Southern and Central Bahamas.

Students interested in participating should prepare a five minute speech to be
delivered on the topic: "The Public Service - Striving for Excellence in Customer
Service."

The deadline for the names of students participating should be referred to
the attention of Ms Rose Gibson, Chairperson, Public Service Committee,
Department of Public Service by 4th September, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 computer system will be awarded to the winners. The first
runners-up will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winner will be announced during the Tenth Annual Public Service Week
Awards Ceremony scheduled for Saturday, 10th October, 2009.

Students wishing to participate can obtain further details regarding the requirements
for entry from their Language Arts Teacher of Family Island Administrator, in
their respective district.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


A private island retreat requires the year round services of a General Manager Couple.
This unique position will require a couple who is comfortable in an environment
where living and working together in isolation creates an energy to help us maintain
our properties to exceptional standards and allows us to deliver exceptional service
to our private guests. The General Manager Couple works closely in collaboration
with the owners and the owner's representatives to further the mission. The General
Manager Couple is responsible for all aspects of the daily operations and must have
the following requirements:

* Experience for one or both members of the team in carpentry, painting, minor
renovation and construction projects, and has a good mechanical aptitude as our
location often requires us to repair and refurbish appliances and equipment in
house.
* Oversight of scheduling of island projects and construction, with an emphasis on
the construction.
* Must be able to read blueprints and establish with the construction team deadlines
for each phase of the project in progress.
* Must have a working knowledge of generators and water desalination systems.
* Must know how to maintain and make repairs on both systems.
* Marine experience for one or both members of the team with one person in the
team having knowledge of general and preventative maintenance for small fleet of
vessels.
* One person in the team processing a captain's license for a 50 ton vessel or more.
* Must be certified by the Professional Association of Diving Instructors.
* Must have a background in hospitality and is familiar with five star hotel
housekeeping standards, fine dining restaurant service methods, and is a competent
cook.
* Must be able to create a gourmet menu and compile and order the inventory
necessary to complete that menu.
* Furthering a unique business model and mission with the goal of long-term
sustainability. Knowledge of environmentally friendly systems and putting those
systems into place.
* Setting goals, communicating these goals to the entire team and coordinating the
work necessary to accomplish them.
* Creating and maintaining improvements on all systems and procedures.
* Determining budgets and setting & achieving financial goals.
* Oversight of ordering and maintaining inventory levels within guidelines.
* Oversight of the overall appearance and presentation of the island with particular
emphases on, quality control, safety, health and sanitation regulations and proper
functioning of all equipment.
* Familiar with the immigration and labor laws of the Bahamas.

Must have excellent hospitality and communications skills, team players,
self-motivated, professional appearance and manner, dependable and able to work
flexible hours.

Minimum Qualifications
* 3+ years experience at 5* luxury resort or hotel
* 5+ years experience in a supervisory or management role
* Candidate must be proficient in Microsoft Excel, Word, QuickBooks payrolls,
accounting and inventory.
* Candidate with experience in Data Pro Inventory System and RNS (Rental
Network Systems) rental program is a plus.
Please fax cover letter, resume, references and police records to 242.328.8008.


MINISTRY OF HOUSING

ARDASTRA ESTATES - ROAD CONSTRUCTION


INVITATION TO TENDER

The (vernent of the Commonwealth o the Bahamas th rouh the Minutry of Houing invr~te
qualified contractors to submit iendie for the completion of the road construction in the
Ardasra Estates Sudivioion n the isIand of New Providence in accordance with the design arkd
5peilitatiflls approved by the Minmirt of Works and Transp(ort

Irlerested parts ma nabla in further nfornmton and purchase a copy of the Ilritation to Tmder from:

The Ofice of the Permanent Seretary
Minstry of Houslng
Clughtto House
ySireiyand Charloe$Sts,.
usn' , Mihamas

Tel; 24-322-M6006f

F iIi r vi iablef $S1. The mrethd f p -menit nay be ash or a certied dCqoie made
payai io the Ministly of Housing . The donenri will be ready for (olleton beginning Monday
31', August, aod eniidr Wednsday 9" Sepo er, W etwT the hours of 9 30 ami to 4
pmi. An niformatiOn ITetinfl il 1be id on Wednesday f5etembef, 2009 in the ccyfeence room at
the Mirnutrf of Hithing, Clliaghn tmU( .

Terder are lo be ,ulmiitted i a sepd emvelope marked as indicated i the Tender doanerMD to:


tihTee iors k nd
Minitry of Finaie
SFloor, Ced Walatt W field ullding
West Bay SL
Nawm, lahimnas

Noler than 10:00 am on Tuesdat 15* Saeniiber. Tenders will be putIlhati opened at 10:01 am on
Tuesday 15 ep'S enilf, 2009 m the wnference room a e Tenders Brd Meeting at t e Mininry of
Fiance, T' Fljoo. Cecil Wallace Whitfield IDlkdinr, West lay St, Nasau, Baliamas, The GvwernmeER
tsves the right to reted any or al Tender,.


rffhe'lfffii





THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 9B


Fidelity Bank & Trust Inter-
national's chairman and chief
executive, who told Tribune
Business: "There's no doubt
the next five years are going
to be very different from the
last five years, and indeed the
last 10 years of prosperity."
Mr Sunderji said this was
chiefly because the US con-
sumer, who drove three-quar-
ters of US GDP and 20 per
cent of global economic
growth, based on the US
being responsible for 30 per
cent of global economic
growth, was "simply shopped
out and borrowed out".
Evidence for this came
from the fact that the US con-
sumer savings rate had
jumped to 7 per cent, mean-
ing Americans were saving
$0.07 out of every $1 they
earned, compared to a nega-
tive -2 per cent savings rate
in recent years. The latter
meant that US consumers
were effectively gorging on
cheaper credit, spending more
than they were earning.
Mr Sunderji said these fig-
ures showed a 7-10 per cent
swing in the US consumer
savings rate, and with Amer-
icans deleveraging and cut-
ting spending at a rapid rate,
they were no longer in a posi-
tion to drive global growth.
On the implications for the
Bahamas, Mr Sunderji said
there would be no economic
recovery here until the US
unemployment rate - expect-
ed to peak at 10.5 per cent in
Spring/Summer next year -
came down and robust eco-
nomic growth restarted.


"The prospect of a jobless
recovery is a very real threat,
and we are likely to see the
economic situation deterio-
rate through to 2010," Mr
Sunderji warned.
"Whether it's government
or the private sector, they
need to be re-tooling their
businesses and their compa-
nies so that they can deal with
the new normal, which is low-
er demand for an extended
period of time."

Context

In the Bahamian context,
Mr Sunderji urged: "There is
no option. We have to
address the structural issues.
The cost structure is out of
line with revenue. We will see
a prolonged reduction in the
top line. It's not a short-term
issue. It's longer term. It
depends on US recovery, and
that's going to be problemat-
ic and anemic.
"We should not expect the
Bahamian economy to come
back strongly, unlike the
recessions we have had
before. We need to address
the structural issues caused
by a lower top line."
He added: "Bahamian busi-
nesses will be faced with
declining sales revenues, costs
not in line with sales, and
reduced profitability and cash
flow. To remain in business
they will have to adjust some-
thing to ensure they remain
profitable and have a sustain-
able business model.
"Any time you restructure
a business, you have to con-


LANGUAGES
AND CUL LT HIL S
I N S T T T F.


ILCIi


COURSE OFFERING Benol Sfelomber 144,2M


I I 1 '.tI I . \ l. 1WOLI . I II
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I
4 U] I.1L~\IIlt] I. '.1N. ilH I-V
COXERISATIONAL MANDARIN L 11 & 11
t M"I IN A S 4 oNW It S 'AtGE I
COYWERSTIONAL (,ER.MA.. I

I L.LM EIH 1-.:..tll-4 . M.2-41.4 nr.W-l !l


FRI( S. 2.MulHi per aunt

I Xu' III'L Munlt% Hut
*e"l 41 KIFC acm frnomCOB

.lI.ll i* WeIks

I.-,..III1.: ikl ach slp.b


front some big issues.
Restructuring requires hard
choices. A lot depends on
how well capitalised Bahami-
an businesses were to start
with, and most small busi-
nesses have challenges
because they are not as well-
capitalised and are much
more vulnerable to a drop in
business. Small businesses are
more likely to struggle than
larger businesses, because
larger businesses have scale."
Describing what was hap-
pening as "a permanent shift"
taking place, the Fidelity head
said: "I think the Bahamian
economy faces some very
strong headwinds, and to deal
with these issues we all need
to be reviewing our business
models. That needs to be
done sooner rather than later.
"There's no doubt we're
going to have pressure on
productivity, that needs to be
improved; costs, they need to
be lower; and the Bahamas is
an expensive place to do busi-
ness in."
Mr Sunderji added that he
did not think Bahamian busi-
nesses could "postpone for
too long" the decision on
whether to confront these
issues. "The silver lining is
becoming more efficient and
more competitive. We will
restructure our businesses so
that when the economy recov-


ers, we will be in much better
shape," he said.
Brian Moree, attorney and
senior partner at McKinney,
Bancroft & Hughes, said that
while some economic indica-
tors were showing tentative
signs that a recovery may be
underway, and it was possi-
ble the Bahamas may have
reached or passed the bottom,
it may be 18-24 months before
recovery began in earnest.
"My concern is that it could
be a jobless recovery, here
and elsewhere," he explained.
"We may see the indicators
and the economy recovery,
but some of the jobs may
have been permanently lost.
Some lines of business may
never recover to the same
extent we had them before,
so they may never get back
to the levels they were at
before the global recession.
"There have been some
permanent changes. The par-
adigm has shifted in certain
areas, and economic recovery
does not mean we will be in
the same place as before the
decline occurred.
"We are going to have to
show we can cross-train peo-
ple, and some people may
find they have to re-tool their
skills and seek employment
in alternative areas..... We
have to demonstrate an abili-
ty to embrace change."


poor to widen


Contact MCTTAMDOSHEAD

Ph (2 2 -10- O rW (2437-44
Po BwtP69MQ N81UU.DfHm�


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/01038
COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION
BETWEEN
IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate
in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence containing
8,194 square feet situate on the Southern Side of Kelly Lane, 395 feet
West of Johnson Road and bounded NORTHWARDLY by Kelly
Lane and running thereon Seventy and Twenty-six (70.26) feet and
EASTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of Albertha
Pratt and running thereon One Hundred and Twenty and Twelve
hundredths (120.12) feet SOUTHWARDLY by land now or formerly
the property of Inez Munroe and running thereon Sixty-seven and
Ninety-two hundredths (67.92) feet and WESTWARDLY by land
now or formerly the property of Ida Ferguson and running thereon
One Hundred and Eighteen and Forty-seven hundredths (118.47) feet
which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape marks
boundaries and dimensions more particularly described by and
delineated on the said diagram or plan and thereon coloured YELLOW
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF
GENEVIEVE STRACHAN


NOTICE
The Quieting Titles Act, 1959
The Petition of Genevieve Strachan of Johnson Estates in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of all that piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence
containing 8,194 square feet situate on the Southern Side of Kelly
Lane, 395 feet West of Johnson Road and bounded NORTHWARDLY
by Kelly Lane and running thereon Seventy and Twenty-six (70.26)
feet and EASTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of
Albertha Pratt and running thereon One Hundred and Twenty and
Twelve hundredths (120.12) feet SOUTHWARDLY by land now or
formerly the property of Inez Munroe and running thereon Sixty-
seven and Ninety-two hundredths (67.92) feet and WESTWARDLY
by land now or formerly the property of Ida Ferguson and running
thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and Forty-seven hundredths
(118.47) feet which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position
shape marks boundaries and dimensions more particularly described
by and delineated on the said diagram or plan and thereon coloured
YELLOW
Genevieve Strachan claims to be the owner of the fee simple estate
in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore described free from
encumbrances and the Petitioner has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under section 3 of the
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have her title to the said tract of land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared
in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons having Dower or
a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in
the Petition shall on or before the 4th November, A.D. 2009 file in
the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit
to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his claim on or before the 4th November, AD. 2009 will
operate as a bar to such claim.
Copies of the filed Plan may be inspected at:
1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building, East
Street North, Nassau, Bahamas;
2. The Chambers of Hope Strachan & Co., attorneys for the
Petitioner, Equity House, Mount Royal Avenue North (Hawkins
Hill), Nassau, Bahamas
Dated this 31st day of August, AD. 2009
HOPE STRACHAN & CO.
Chambers
Equity House
Mt. Royal Avenue North
(Hawkins Hill)
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


NAD
Nassau Airport




TENDER

Past ExtmmkIng Serces


Na-a.J Arpar [irmi'npmn' ("piny .NA,| irmnlir
lndersfar pr ain of peat lxtrn ilnahg servicN
ai Lyndei Rndmg i ratoalAIpd.

Mandlaely quaficatonim

.Prmpnnts minci be "MiN .nhaman.-wred A

4 aIhe* a s1i busnesa Dmkre
M.uld dwnrb te heatith y o i fib l W1 rfrtwtwts
s cAm in hAD s oal m lI t r Ppopci
-lual bectrrnirtec i pevudifg ecmalir serve

RFPmdoimwtAMI be avs elk& r p., ur al NADs
mraM ie mu's i r kF DimsnedidikfMal TeMi l a1
Lyndnt Pidg nirmalSiral Arpe i b ntwen IhIr q[
10:00am - 4:00pm, rium September 7th, 200 to
September 11, 200

Deati'e fDr proxal stm irsn& r- September 2 hi.
20M aal&-Dopm


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Contact 326-6121


IG CAPITAL MARKETS

IE* ROYAL FIDELITY BROKERAGE I

y--yO mMony at WAr Ic
C FA L-'" CO 1-0 N I A 1.
EIS, LISTED ;. TRADED SECUFPITIES S OF
FRIDAY, 4 SEPTEMBER 2009
EiS.,. ALL SHARE ItDE\ CLOSE 1 5 1 -1 CHG -22 77 ..CHG -1 -7 I 'D T -10 1 ,, I iTD '.. -10 56
FIrJDE.>, CLOSE 7.9 77 'I TD .5 -: ..I . 20 -12 31 ..
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM I TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
1.81 1.20 Abaco Markets 1.20 1.20 0.00 0.127 0.000 9.4 0.00%
11.80 10.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992 0.200 11.1 1.82%
9.30 6.25 Bank of Bahamas 6.25 6.25 0.00 0.244 0.260 25.6 4.16%
0.89 0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00 -0.877 0.000 N/M 0.00%
3.49 3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.078 0.090 40.4 2.86%
2.37 2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 0.040 43.1 1.69%
14.20 10.18 Cable Bahamas 10.75 10.75 0.00 1.406 0.250 7.6 2.33%
2.88 2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74 2.74 0.00 0.249 0.040 11.0 1.46%
7.50 5.50 Commonwealth Bank (Sl) 5.95 5.50 -0.45 1,500 0.419 0.300 13.1 5.45%
3.85 1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.70 3.69 -0.01 0.111 0.052 33.2 1.41%
2.85 1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.03 2.03 0.00 1,000 0.382 0.080 5.3 3.94%
8.20 6.60 Famguard 6.60 6.60 0.00 0.420 0.240 15.7 3.64%
12.50 9.72 Finco 9.72 9.72 0.00 0.322 0.520 30.2 5.35%
11.71 10.30 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.30 10.30 0.00 0.794 0.350 13.0 3.40%
5.53 4.95 Focol (S) 5.12 5.12 0.00 0.332 0.150 15.4 2.93%
1.00 1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%
0.45 0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.00 0.035 0.000 8.6 0.00%
9.02 5.49 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 0.00 0.407 0.500 13.5 9.09%
12.00 10.09 J. S. Johnson 10.09 10.09 0.00 0.952 0.640 10.6 6.34%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180 0.000 55.6 0.00%
BIS'. LISTED DEE T SECuRITIE - i-,. .r.d35 rr.3 ..,r. 3 Per.:rilta e Pri.:i.ri L. aicil
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest Maturity
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7% 19 October 2017
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7% 30 May 2013
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015
Fi.a l.r, . r-r Tr. -.- .:....ri-r S o.:..r[t -:
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
14.60 7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.00 -2.246 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00 0.000 0.480 N/M 7.80%
L'-:irla O.c r-Tr e-C.'.unteI r is-.uri,-,
41.00 29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540 0.000 9.03 0.00%
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000 261.90 0.00%
BI1 '. L-i tE 3 1.lutual F .ir:.
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield % NAV Date
1.4005 1.3320 CFAL Bond Fund 1.4005 3.48 5.15 31-Jul-09
3.0350 2.8952 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.8990 -1.39 -4.16 31-Aug-09
1.4867 1.4105 CFAL Money Market Fund 1.4867 3.70 5.40 28-Aug-09
3.6090 3.1031 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.1143 -8.01 -12.43 31-Jul-09
13.0484 12.3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.0484 3.41 5.84 31-Jul-09
101.6693 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101.6693 1.10 1.67 30-Jun-09
100.9600 93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.7398 0.35 -4.18 30-Jun-09
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00 31 -Dec-07
9.4075 9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.3399 2.69 -1.41 31-Jul-09
1.0663 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0663 2.59 6.63 31-Jul-09
1.0364 1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0215 -1.11 2.15 31-Jul-09
1.0611 1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0611 2.29 6.11 31-Jul-09
r.1'RI'ET TEPr.15
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX -19 Dec 02 = 1,000 00 YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume WeeklyVol -Trading volume of the priorweek
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1, 1994 = 100
(S) -4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242 502-7010 I ROYALFIDELITY 242 356-7764 I FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242 396-4000 I COLONIAL 242-502 7525


BUSINESS


i












Governments delay


critical NIB


reforms


amendments to the social
security programme's gov-
erning Act and regulations
were being completed, with a
view to tabling them in Par-
liament by year-end.
Mr Kerr told Tribune Busi-
ness: "To be quite frank with
you, the sentiments, the con-
clusions being drawn in the
[eighth actuarial report] are
not a surprise to me.
"As far back as 1993-1994, I
co-authored a paper with
Anthony Ferguson that called
for all the things the actuarial
report is calling for. The single
most important issue back in


STHE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
r is our wehrier a www.catda.kbs

NOTICE
Master of Science in Elementary Education Degree
Programme in collab-ration with Whee ck ColleLe.
Application. are available fromi
The Graduate Prngrammes office,
The Cullkgc of The Bahamas Mkhad , IH Eldon
Comlrplex, Room 3M6 Thompson Blvd,
For more informnlaiim call: 397-2601/2 r
send emails ito swksdom'ib.edu.bs
Application Deadline; 161h October, 20)O9.


Legal Notice


UCKFIELD LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., RO. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice


ZENNOR VILLAS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice


ORMSKIR VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORR INC.
(Liquidator)


1993-1994, as it is today, was
the long-term growth and sus-
tainability of the fund. The
liquidity to meet its obliga-
tions is critical. That, unfor-
tunately, 15-16 years later, is
the issue - the sustainability
of the Fund to meet its oblig-
ations."
Mr Ferguson, meanwhile,
told Tribune Business: "The
report made recommenda-
tions the industry has been
stating since 1994. We're hap-
py to see they're looking at
addressing it, but it's a bit late,
and because it's late it's going
to cost employers and
employees more to meet their
needs.
"The Government needs to
act expeditiously, not only to
implement those, but they
need to reconsider some of
the investment aspects of the
fund. You can have all the
money with custodians, but if
they're not meeting the actu-
ary's targeted investment rate,
NIB will not be making
enough money to cover
costs."
Mr Cargill last week con-
firmed that NIB had termi-
nated investment manage-
ment contracts with CFAL,
Providence Advisors and
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank
& Trust, which had been giv-
en a mandate to manage and
invest up to $20 million of its


assets.
The decision was taken on
the grounds that NIB would
reduce costs by having its
assets managed in-house by
its own recently-hired Certi-
fied Financial Analyst (CFA),
but many believe this flies in
the face of recommendations
for the Fund to diversify its
investments, place a greater
proportion with qualified
investment advisors, and
invest more overseas.
Meanwhile, Mr Kerr point-
ed to NIB's "under invest-
ment", and added: "NIB has a
role to play in the develop-
ment of capital markets local-
ly, and I don't think that's
been sufficiently exploited by
the Fund."
Recalling the recommen-
dations he and Mr Ferguson
made in 1993-1994, Mr Kerr
said they included "curtailing
using NIB as a hiring tool,
strengthening collections so
the benefits paid out are less
than the monies they are col-
lecting, to implement a pru-
dent investment programme".
The duo, he added, also
urged the Government to
increase NIB's contribution
rate and invest its assets glob-
ally through qualified, expe-
rienced money managers.
"Underlying all that was
the need to educate the pop-
ulation on savings and invest-


Legal Notice


ZUCCHINI INVESTMENT LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice


LT LO INTERNATIONAL LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice


WINTER THORPE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


ments, and for NIB pensions
to be seen as an option rather
than see them as a replace-
ment for retirement income,"
Mr Kerr said. "It [an NIB
pension] should be used as a
supplement for retirement
income.
"We have no pensions and
minimal savings, and that cre-
ates more of a burden and
drain on NIB."
Without the Government
making all the necessary
reforms, Mr Kerr said there
was a danger that the Fund
would become insolvent.
"The social implications of
that would be enormous," he
said. "People who have been
contributing have been left
without it, in the absence of
private savings and private
pensions. They would have
nothing to rely on, and with
the changing demographics
the effects will be significant."
Mr Cargill last week said
that among the approved
amendments which will be
included in the legislation and
regulation changes to be pre-
sented to Parliament will be
an increase in NIB's insurable
wage ceiling from the current
$400 to $600 per week, with
future annual increased linked
to inflation via the retail price
index.
Other approved changes,
said Mr Cargill, were an


increase in the 150 weeks or
three years' worth of NIB
contributions to qualify for a
lifetime pension to 500 weeks
or 10 years, plus an increase in
the wage ceiling for pension-
able civil servants that is cur-
rently frozen at $110 per
week.
Mr Cargill added: "What's
important is that we've start-
ed to address some of the
issues identified in the report
- operational efficiency, col-
lection efficiency. This year,
we're achieving contribution
revenues above expectations
and above last year, because
we've been a little more
assertive to ensure people pay
contributions on time.
"We are focusing on the
recommendations to ensure
the Fund remains strong and
sound. If we don't make any
changes by 2025, we will have
challenges. We want to make
changes as quickly as possi-
ble to make the Fund strong
and sound."
NIB's reserve fund, cur-
rently standing at $1.415 bil-
lion, was projected to be
depleted some time between
2029 and 2035 if urgent
reforms to the social security
programme were not enact-
ed. The NIB Fund's outgo-
ings projected to exceed
income by $7.868 billion over
the next 60 years.


Legal Notice


NIPSON GREEN INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORR INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice


ROLLIN STONES COMPANY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


FROM page 1B

Kenwood Kerr, chief exec-
utive of Providence Advisors,
said that the reforms urged in
the NIB's eighth actuarial
report were similar to what
he and CFAL president,
Anthony Ferguson, had urged
back in a paper they wrote in
1993-1994.
Yet it appears that only
now is the Government act-
ing, Algernon Cargill, NIB's
director, telling Tribune Busi-
ness in an exclusive interview
last week that some 25


Legal Notice


STOKOE PLANES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., RO. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP INC.
(Liquidator)


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE






THETRIBUNE BONDAUINESSR 20,PEl











0,us I'
F'O p^3^^^^


FROM page 1B

the 3,500-acre former US Air
Force Missile Base to the
development was the only
interest the Government has
in the project, apart from oth-
er logistical items.
"We have been for the last
couple of months seeking to
conclude a new Heads of
Agreement with the owner of
the studio," said Mr Davis.
"That process has not been
as swift as we would have
liked, but we are still in that
process of trying to review a
draft Heads of Agreement."
When Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham re-took
office, he felt the Christie
administration had allowed
the Bahamas Film Studios to
lease too much Crown Land,


having obtained 3,500 acres
at the former US Air Force
Missile Base site in Grand
Bahama.
The Government had
looked to restrict that to 120
acres, covering the water tank
and existing buildings, and
these talks with Mr Fuller
have been going on for more
than a year.
Mr Davis said the Govern-
ment had been vetting Mr
Fuller to establish whether it
wanted to do business with
him, the investment banker
having take ownership and
control at the Bahamas Film
Studios after two of its three
founding partners died. The
third, Paul Quigley, has also
since passed away.
Mr Davis said: "We want
to see if he [Mr Fuller] is the
proper person with which the


NOTICE is hereby given that ANTHON GUILLAUME of LEWIS
YARD, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
31st day of AUGUST, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.




NOTICE


OSSINA INTERNATIONAL LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, OSSINA INTERNATIONAL LTD. is in
dissolution as of August 28, 2009.


International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P. 0. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.



LIQUIDATOR











We are looking for a recent college graduate who is interested
in working under the supervision of experienced accountants
and has the goal of eventually sitting the CPA Exam. We
are a small, fast growing retail business owned and operated
by young, dynamic entrepreneurs. This is an exciting
opportunity to work directly with the business owners and
learn the practice of accounting as well as the principles of
entrepreneurship.
Qualifications/Experience/Skills
* Bachelors Degree in Accounting (Associates Degree
in Accounting is a minimum requirement)
* Be proficient in all Microsoft Office Applications
* Ability to research technical issues and apply
Accounting Theory
* Ability to continually develop and expand on
technical skills

* Ability to clearly and adequately document work
and maintain an effective audit trail
* Present ideas and facts persuasively and confidently
through verbal and written communication
* A self-starter who demonstrates creativity in looking
for ways to simplify and improve processes
* An effective listener, one who also seeks and accepts
advice and provides feedback
* Able to project a poised and self-confident manner
and be perceived as a leader
* Demonstrates a willingness to take on new
challenges and responsibilities
* Willing to spend time working in the retail operations
serving customers

Interested candidates should submit a
letter of interest and resume to:
accountant.open@gmail.com

No Resumes will be received after September 11, 2009


Government should be doing
business.
"He came into ownership
by default after the original
owners died. He loaned them
some money and was holding
their assets at Gold Rock
Creek Enterprises [the Film
Studios' immediate holding
company]."
Investment
Mr Fuller recently told Tri-
bune Business that a $17 mil-
lion investment will be lost as
a result of his decision to close
the project, a move he blamed
on the Government's alleged
"failure to honour its obliga-
tions" in delivering a new
lease and Heads of Agree-
ment to him.
Amid calls for the Govern-
ment to take "remedial"
action to ensure the Bahamas


Film Studios remained oper-
ational, given the impact the
closure was likely to have on
this nation's attractiveness as
a filming locale for the global
TV/film industry, many
observers were suspicious that
Mr Fuller was using the 'clo-
sure' threat as a negotiating
ploy in an effort to secure or
better a deal with the Ingra-
ham administration.
When Tribune Business put
this to Mr Fuller, that he was
making this announcement as
a tactic to push the Govern-
ment into an agreement, he
answered cryptically in an e-
mail: "You can't push string."
When asked to detail the
obligations the Government
had allegedly failed to live up
to, Mr Fuller replied: "Never
delivering a new lease and
Heads of Agreement. Failure
to approve the original envi-


ronmental study, which pre-
cluded us from moving for-
ward."

Straw
As for the 'final straw' that
pushed him to shut down the
Bahamas Film Studios, Mr
Fuller said: "My 50th call to
the Prime Minister's Office
inquiring if they had the
paperwork that they kept
promising on each of the oth-
er 49 calls." He declined to
comment when asked by Tri-
bune Business about whether
he would initiate legal action
against the Bahamian gov-


ernment.
Mr Fuller added that some
$17 million had been invested
in the Bahamas Film Studios
project, " i!inch will all be lost
subject to any recovery
efforts".
As for the closure's impact
on Grand Bahama and the
wider Bahamas, he said:
"There will never be a film
studio in Grand Bahama.
They will lose about $10 mil-
lion per year in general spend-
ing in the economy, thousands
of room nights in hotels.
Grand Bahama will never be
taken seriously as a site to
film movies."


BAHAMAS FIRST


Balance Sheet as at December 31, 2008


2008


$ 3,061,929
3,671,036
18,342,800
22,617.378
892,963

92,922
6,995.985
1 t,099,148
28,665,499
3,787,991
23,582.108
2.029. -29
2,692.559
$127,532.266


ASSETS
Cash
Term dEposits
I nvesrnments
Trade accounts receivable
Sundry receivables and prepaymenrts
Receivable from reinsurers
Interest receivable
Deferred commission costs
Unpaid claims recoverable from reinsurers
Deferred insurance premiums
Deferred reinsurance cost
R eceivables from related crno pan ies
Prop early and equipment
Intangible asset


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
LIABILITIES.
Payable to reinsurers
Unearned commission income
Unaared premiumsn
Bank overdraft
Payable to agents and brokers
Accrued liabilities
Unpaid claim

EQUITY:
Share capital
Contributed surplus
G en eral rese rve
Revaluation surplus
Retained earnings
Total equity
TOTAL





Approved on behaf of the Brd of Directors. -'a


A fll copy of the Company ' flnancid snatemefs are avaitabie on tie Compamy 's w'bsite www. bahamasfst.com


2007

$ 6,813,378
3,479.529
21,255.D10
20,742.672
748,745
235,213
91,331
7,009,654
10,670,394
26.827,559
4.035.334
23,293,948
2,044,192
2.692,559
$129.949 519


ITDISCUS TOIESONTHS PGELO0ONTOWW.TIBUE22CO0


STHE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
K�) Visa Our Wiwte sa wWW.n rAI


NOTICE

Town Meeting for Master of Law (LLM)
in Marilime Law Degree Prigrainiut in
collaboration with the University of London.
Monday 5th October, 20MI,
Executive Boardrxmm,
Michael Eldon Complex, 3rd Floor
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.


NOTICE

DOFA INVESTMENT LIMITED


N O T I C E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) DOFA INVESTMENT LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 3rd
September, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd.,
Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI


Dated this 7th day of September, A. D. 2009


Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator


$ 3,415,600 $ 14,225,843
6,750,135 5,839,199
42,674,996 42,686,985
4.089,092
8,915 466,983
2,292,066 1,462,020
20,729,176 19,352,292
79,959.980_ 84,033,322

7,500,000 7,500.000
14.100,000 14,100,000
3,500,000 3,500,000
1,269,268 1,269.268
21.203,018 19,546,929
47.572.266 45,916,197
$127,532,256 $129,949,519





Chairman / Director


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 11B


THE TRIBUNE










Customs: 'We're not attempting to stymie business'


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Comptroller of Cus-
toms has pledged that his
department is not there to
"stymie" business, and
appealed to the private sec-
tor and public to assist in
changing stigmas associated
with doing business with it,


following major changes to
the way cargo is imported and
released.
Glenn Gomez did not deny
claims of bad customer ser-
vice and inefficiency at a
meeting with Customs that
was arranged by the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce.
Mr Gomez, along with oth-
er leading officers from the
Customs Department, sought


to clarify misconceptions and
misunderstandings surround-
ing new Customs rules put in
place earlier this year. This
was done, he said, to correct a
system that had been flawed
for quite some time.
The changes, which imme-
diately affected the business
of Bahamian courier services,
came following a major
shake-up of the Customs


Department, which involved
the former acting comptrol-
ler being replaced by Mr
Gomez.
During the meeting, con-
cerned business owners and
freight companies questioned
Mr Gomez and his team
about the new rules and
offered suggestions as to how
the department could become
more customer friendly and


conduct its business more
quickly.
Major concerns were long
lines at the customer depart-
ment because of a single win-
dow for two different proce-
dures, and the long standing
concern of "terrible" cus-
tomer service at various cus-
toms desks throughout Nas-
sau.
Mr Gomez told anyone


receiving below average ser-
vice from any of his officers to
get their names and report
their complaints to the Cus-
toms department.
The department has been
considering the move to an
online system, but its own
website needs an upgrade and
a separation from the Gov-
ernment website in order to
handle the traffic it receives.
A Courier Association
formed since the implemen-
tation of the new rules was
not out to the town meeting in
force, but one courier said he
was please with the earnest
responses of the Customs
department and clarification
of new procedures.
He said because it was the
law, it has to be followed. Mr
Gomez recently told Tribune
Business that claims of delays
and corruption in the depart-
ment made by some business
people were "gross misrepre-
sentations".
He said the new processes
put in place by the Customs
Department since his arrival
have always been the right
procedures, but had not been
enforced over decades.
Mr Gomez admitted that
the new process became a
challenge for courier services
during its initial implementa-
tion, but argued that some
concerns brought to him by
the newly-formed courier
association were dealt with
promptly.
However, he said some oth-
er changes requested by the
association would have
required him to negate the
procedures made to the clear-
ing of imported goods.
According to him, the new
processes were introduced
because government was los-
ing millions in revenue due to
an erroneous system he said
should have not been in place.
"They want a system that
is illegal to operate," Mr
Gomez said. "If you're just
upset because you can't cir-
cumvent the system, I can't
help you with that. We are
there to collect duties, not to
stymie businesses."


HERE IS OUR CONTACT INFORMATION
New Providence; 1-242-322-9183-9
Grand Bahamas 1-242-352-2336-
Family Islands 1-242-300-1997 1 US 1-800-9458254


Viil our Website in Cyberspac* @
www.bahamasypages.com www.bahamasypmobile.com


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


PAGE 12B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009


THE TRIBUNE




TUC TDIJ11R1


THE WEATHER REPORT

I~l ;lpl I IA :::::::::::::::::::I llllllIA


" , ORLANDO
High:880F/31�C
Low: 730 F/230 C
Q.
TAMPA
High: 910 F/330 C
Low: 74�F/230 C
� �"" '" "
,] ** -


-i
:.*'- ' "


Variably cloudy with Cloudy with a shower or Mainly cloudy, t-storms; Clouds and sun, Some sun with a Some sun with a
thunderstorms. t-storm. breezy. t-storms possible. t-storm possible. t-storm possible.
High: 900 High: 890 High: 900 High: 900
High: 900 Low: 79�790 L 79� Low: 79� Low: 780 Low: 790

S 105o F | 1 B3Y F I [ 98o-88o F 98o-85o F I 97o-85o F 1O00o-89o F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature� is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body-everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.


I , ,RMAUA I


I ALMANAC


ABACO
High: 89� F/320 C
Low: 790�F/260 C


a WEST PALM BEACH
High:870�F/310C
Low: 750 F/240 C


FT. LAUDERDALE
High:870F/310C L
Low: 780 F/260 C


MIAMI
High: 880�F/31� C
Low:760F/240C


KEY WEST
High: 89� F/320 C
Low: 780 F/260 C
�.


Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
86/30 62/16
62/16 50/10
84/28 66/18
73/22 62/16
79/26 62/16
72/22 58/14
78/25 59/15
86/30 66/18
78/25 56/13
78/25 61/16
96/35 74/23
89/31 56/13
75/23 61/16
89/31 75/23
91/32 72/22


W High
F/C
pc 86/30
c 59/15
pc 85/29
c 76/24
c 79/26
pc 79/26
t 78/25
r 88/31
pc 78/25
t 79/26
pc 96/35
pc 86/30
t 79/26
pc 88/31
pc 93/33


Tuesday
Low
F/C
62/16
49/9
67/19
63/17
64/17
59/15
59/15
68/20
56/13
60/15
73/22
54/12
62/16
74/23
72/22


Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
80/26 62/16
87/30 69/20
82/27 61/16
99/37 72/22
90/32 69/20
81/27 64/17
83/28 65/18
87/30 68/20
88/31 76/24
82/27 60/15
84/28 62/16
86/30 74/23
74/23 67/19
90/32 68/20
88/31 73/22


FREEPORT
High:880F/31�C
Low: 780 F/260 C






,;* -----
-. -









ANDROS
High: 89� F/320 C
Low: 780 F/260 C


W High
F/C
t 80/26
t 90/32
pc 84/28
s 99/37
pc 90/32
pc 81/27
t 85/29
t 90/32
t 89/31
s 82/27
t 87/30
t 88/31
pc 80/26
s 93/33
t 90/32


Tuesday
Low
F/C
62/16
71/21
63/17
75/23
68/20
64/17
62/16
71/21
78/25
62/16
63/17
73/22
68/20
66/18
73/22


Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, OR
Raleigh-Durham
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tucson
Washington, DC


NASSAU
High: 90� F/320 C
Low: 790�F/260 C





,�A


Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature
High ........................... .................. 93� F/34� C
Low ............................ .... .............. 81� F/270 C
Norm al high ................................... 880 F/31� C
Norm al low ...................................... 750 F/24� C
Last year's high ............................... 900 F/32� C
Last year's low ............................... 74� F/23� C


INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

b (BAHAMAS) I.IMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


O1 12 314175 1 7 819110 1
LOW MODERATE HIGH V HIGH EXT.

The higher the AccuWeather UV Index" number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.



High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.)
Today 10:02 a.m. 3.1 3:46 a.m. 0.2
10:22 p.m. 2.7 4:20 p.m. 0.4
Tuesday 10:42 a.m. 3.1 4:22 a.m. 0.2
11:02 p.m. 2.6 5:03 p.m. 0.4
Wednesday 11:26 a.m. 3.1 5:02 a.m. 0.3
11:47 p.m. 2.5 5:52 p.m. 0.5
Thursday 12:17 p.m. 3.1 5:47 a.m. 0.3
.. ... 6:48 p.m. 0.6
Ip m.


Precipitation Sunrise ...... 6:53 a.m. Moonrise .... 8:58 p.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .. ........................0.24" Sunset....... 7:22 p.m. Moonset ..... 9:26 a.m.
Year to date ........... ....................... 25.30" Last New First Full
Norm al year to date .................................... 32.73"

AccuWeather.com .. .
Forecasts and graphics provided by .,
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. @2009 Sep. 11 Sep. 18 Sep. 26 Oct. 4
High:880F/31�C
Low: 800�F/270 C


CAT ISLAND
High: 860�F/30� C
Low: 760 F/240 C


GREAT EXUMA
High: 880�F/31� C
Low:760F/240C

. -7


High
F/C
78/25
100/37
75/23
70/21
82/27
81/27
87/30
94/34
74/23
72/22
66/18
89/31
91/32
93/33
78/25


Today
Low
F/C
63/17
81/27
58/14
52/11
64/17
67/19
58/14
74/23
66/18
54/12
50/10
68/20
74/23
72/22
66/18


W High
F/C
c 79/26
pc 100/37
t 80/26
pc 78/25
r 83/28
t 85/29
pc 81/27
s 94/34
pc 75/23
pc 75/23
pc 71/21
t 91/32
t 91/32
pc 95/35
c 79/26


Tuesday
Low W
F/C
66/18 r
81/27 pc
58/14 t
54/12 s
64/17 c
65/18 pc
56/13 s
73/22 pc
66/18 pc
57/13 pc
52/11 pc
69/20 t
75/23 t
72/22 t
64/17 c


SAN SALVADOR
High: 90� F/32* C
Low:760F/240C


LONG ISLAND
High: 89� F/320 C
Low: 760 F/240 C


F


MAYAGUANA
High: 91 �F/330 C
.ow: 750�F/240 C



" -'*


CROOKED ISLAND/ACKLINS
RAGGED ISLAND High:920F/330 C
Low: 770 F/25� C
High: 880�F/31C Low C
Low:740F/230C

GREAT INAGUA
High: 930�F/340 C
Low: 770�F/250 C


I WRDCTE I


Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland


High
F/C
88/31
67/19
86/30
82/27
61/16


Today
Low W
F/C
80/26 t
57/13 sh
54/12 s
66/18 t
41/5 s


Tuesday
High Low W
F/C F/C
87/30 79/26 r
76/24 60/15 pc
81/27 54/12 pc
75/23 64/17 pc
61/16 43/6 s


WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 86� F
Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 86� F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 850 F
Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 850 F
ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 81� F
Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 82� F


Bangkok 90/32 79/26 t 91/32 81/27 t
Barbados 86/30 77/25 s 86/30 78/25 s
Barcelona 82/27 62/16 s 74/23 62/16 s
Beijing 68/20 55/12 sh 77/25 54/12 pc
Beirut 88/31 77/25 s 81/27 75/23 s
Belgrade 73/22 51/10 s 71/21 58/14 pc
Berlin 69/20 56/13 s 77/25 61/16 pc
Bermuda 80/26 73/22 sh 80/26 74/23 c
Bogota 70/21 43/6 s 68/20 44/6 sh
Brussels 72/22 56/13 sh 79/26 61/16 pc
Budapest 74/23 48/8 s 79/26 56/13 s
Buenos Aires 62/16 43/6 r 55/12 37/2 pc
Cairo 95/35 75/23 s 97/36 74/23 s
Calcutta 88/31 79/26 r 90/32 79/26 t
Calgary 62/16 43/6 pc 63/17 37/2 s
Cancun 92/33 72/22 sh 91/32 72/22 sh
Caracas 83/28 72/22 t 84/28 72/22 t
Casablanca 90/32 70/21 pc 85/29 74/23 pc
Copenhagen 65/18 56/13 pc 70/21 61/16 c
Dublin 64/17 54/12 pc 66/18 52/11 sh
Frankfurt 73/22 56/13 sh 81/27 61/16 pc
Geneva 75/23 51/10 s 80/26 52/11 s
Halifax 64/17 54/12 s 68/20 50/10 pc
Havana 90/32 71/21 r 87/30 71/21 sh
Helsinki 64/17 54/12 sh 64/17 57/13 pc
Hong Kong 93/33 82/27 s 93/33 82/27 s
Islamabad 100/37 71/21 s 103/39 72/22 s
Istanbul 75/23 68/20 c 75/23 67/19 t
Jerusalem 83/28 64/17 s 82/27 62/16 s
Johannesburg 78/25 51/10 s 76/24 50/10 s
Kingston 88/31 79/26 r 88/31 79/26 r
Lima 72/22 58/14 s 72/22 59/15 s
London 72/22 57/13 sh 81/27 59/15 pc
Madrid 90/32 64/17 pc 90/32 66/18 pc
Manila 82/27 77/25 r 82/27 77/25 r
Mexico City 72/22 54/12 t 72/22 54/12 t
Monterrey 94/34 73/22 t 92/33 73/22 t
Montreal 75/23 57/13 s 79/26 57/13 pc
Moscow 72/22 56/13 sh 70/21 57/13 c
Munich 71/21 49/9 s 73/22 45/7 s
Nairobi 85/29 54/12 c 84/28 55/12 pc
New Delhi 97/36 77/25 s 93/33 77/25 pc
Oslo 61/16 54/12 r 65/18 53/11 r
Paris 76/24 58/14 pc 83/28 65/18 s
Prague 72/22 52/11 s 73/22 49/9 s
Rio de Janeiro 90/32 77/25 c 93/33 76/24 s
Riyadh 108/42 84/28 s 108/42 82/27 s
Rome 74/23 54/12 s 80/26 56/13 s
St. Thomas 90/32 78/25 sh 88/31 78/25 sh
San Juan 60/15 28/-2 r 54/12 35/1 c
San Salvador 87/30 73/22 t 87/30 73/22 t
Santiago 58/14 36/2 pc 59/15 34/1 s
Santo Domingo 87/30 74/23 r 85/29 74/23 sh
Sao Paulo 83/28 68/20 t 85/29 64/17 pc
Seoul 82/27 63/17 pc 81/27 61/16 pc
Stockholm 66/18 54/12 pc 68/20 54/12 pc
Sydney 68/20 52/11 r 68/20 50/10 pc
Taipei 91/32 79/26 s 92/33 79/26 s
Tokyo 82/27 73/22 pc 81/27 72/22 sh
Toronto 75/23 57/13 pc 75/23 57/13 t
Trinidad 100/37 71/21 s 98/36 66/18 c
Vancouver 62/16 53/11 pc 63/17 55/12 pc
Vienna 73/22 55/12 s 73/22 55/12 s
Warsaw 66/18 51/10 pc 70/21 49/9 s
Winnipeg 82/27 63/17 pc 77/25 53/11 t
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace


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