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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01409
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: October 9, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01409

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BAHAMAS EDITION
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Eid enceI 'uln Blocking leadership

EviduDece uureu challenger 'will destroy


by Bridgewater'


Jury hears former Senator admitted getting

rid of 'refusal to transport' document


By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
FORMER PLP Senator Pleas-
ant Bridgewater told police she
burned a copy of the "refusal to
transport" document and flushed
the ashes down a toilet, jurors in
the attempted extortion trial
heard yesterday.
Bridgewater and former
ambulance driver Tarino Light-
bourne are accused of attempting
to extort $25 million from Amer-
ican actor John Travolta, 55, after
his 16-year-old son Jett died from
a seizure in Grand Bahama in
January. The refusal to transport
document is at the centre of the
attempted extortion plot. The
prosecution closed its case yes-
terday after seeking leave of the
court to do so without calling
ASP Ricardo Taylor who was the
lead investigator in the case. Mr


Taylor, who suffered a stroke, is
still ill.
Detective Sergeant 2329 Deb-
orah Thompson testified yester-
SEE page eight


Govt considers limits on
cases sent to Privy Council
By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
GOVERNMENT is considering amending the Court of
Appeal Act to restrict which cases are sent to the UK's Privy
Council, Attorney General Brent Symonette confirmed.
The move would limit the cases sent to the Privy Council -
which is the final court of appeal for the Bahamas and many
other Caribbean countries which were former British colonies
- based on the severity of each case or the financial value
attached to the matters.
The Attorney General's office is also contemplating placing
a stipulation in the Court of Appeal Act which would require
appellants to get permission from the Court of Appeal before
SEE page eight


** .1


PLP election chance'


By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
IF THE PLP goes ahead
and blocks the nomination
of the only challenger for
the leadership of the party
to date, it runs the risk of
destroying any possibility it
has of winning the next gen-


Aw;o


eral election, a senior party
supporter told The Tribune
yesterday.
With the National Gen-
eral Council of the party
holding a meeting last night
to decided whether or not a
none sitting Member of Par-
liament should be allowed
to run against the leader of
the party, former MP and


~FORMER MP li


Ron We my '' *,I

M~i:ie B irE '~le[i
Thiei. diiw

-SEE PAGE 12


IAfed kidnpperin o,*c cuso06


A MAN who was brutally attacked
by a group of cutlass wielding vigilantes
for allegedly kidnapping a teenage girl
and holding her against her will in a
dilapidated home is back in police cus-
tody.
The man, a Lewis Street resident,
escaped from the Princess Margaret
Hospital hours after being admitted for
treatment for injuries suffered in the
Wednesday morning attack.
According to a news report, Assistant
Commissioner Raymond Gibson con-
firmed that the man was back in police
custody and that the alleged victim's


family had made a formal complaint
against him.
A relative of the girl reportedly found
her in the tiny home, bound with tape,
residents of Lewis Street told The Tri-
bune. Around 3 am Wednesday, angry
friends and relatives of the girl accosted
the man and "chapped" him about the
body, residents said.
Police were later called to the scene,
eyewitnesses said, and took the man to
the hospital.
Up to press time it was unclear if any-
one was arrested in connection with the
attack.


party Chairman Philip
Galanis said that this move
if passed could possibly be
the worst mistake the party
could make.
"It will blow us out of the
water.
"We would have fewer
seats than what we did in
SEE page 12


Mother on the verge
of suicide over union
and judicial issues
By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
UNION strife and judicial delays have left
a woman on the verge of suicide with only a
few hundred dollars to sustain her and her 11-
year-old daughter for the foreseeable future.
Krystal Barry, 29, claims she is owed
around $26,000 by her former employer, the
Airport Airline and Allied Workers Union
(AAAWU), but court wrangling has left her
unable to access her money and the depressed
economy has prevented her getting another
job.
In the meantime, she and her daughter's
standard of living has plunged.
And in desperation Ms Barry yesterday
appealed to the public to assist her daughter
- a junior tennis champion who recently won
gold at a Caribbean tournament, despite her
mother not being able to accompany her for
lack of funds - to continue to live a healthy
life and follow her dream.
SEE page two

Lawyer accused of using
clients' money to pay
gambling debt in Freeport
By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
A FLORIDA lawyer is facing three
charges in the US over allegations that he
used clients' money to pay off an $80,000
gambling debt at Freeport's Isle of Capri
casino.
The casino, which is located in the Our
Lucaya hotel, assisted US police in their
investigation into Mark Brady.
The lawyer was released on $8,500 bail
after pleading not guilty to two felony counts
- misappropriation of escrow accounts and
forgery - and one misdemeanor count of
lying to a law enforcement officer.
Brevard County Sheriff's Office claims
SEE page eight


INSIDE

POLICE PROBE NINTH
GRAND BAHAMA MURDER
* SEEPAGETWO


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


The Big Red

Machine shut
out Comets

SEE PAGE ELEVEN


I


>











Police probe ninth Grand Bahama murder


Body of man discovered on

dirt road off Pioneer's Way


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmavcock@tribunemedia.net


FREEPORT - Grand Bahama
Police are investigating its ninth homi-
cide here on the island after the body
of a man was discovered on a dirt road
off Pioneer's Way on Thursday.
Asst Supt Loretta Mackey reported
that the 25-year-old victim had sus-
tained an apparent gunshot injury to
the body. Police are withholding his
identity until next of kin have been
notified.
Ms Mackey said police received
information sometime around 10.50am
and went to the location east of Pio-
neer's Way East, where officers
observed a Buick Century vehicle in
the bushes.
She said the body of a black male
was in the driver's seat with an appar-
ent gun shot wound in his upper back.
Police believe that the incident may
be connected to a shooting incident
that occurred on Wednesday evening


when a man was taken to the hospital
with a gunshot injury.
According to Ms Mackey, sometime
around 7.05pm police received infor-
mation that a 27-year-old man was at
the hospital suffering from a gunshot
wound to the left shoulder.
The man told police that he was with
another male in the Coral Reef Estates
area in a vehicle when a man, he
knows by a nick-name, shot him.
He said he ran to the main road and
flagged down a car which took him to
the Rand Memorial Hospital.
Ms Mackey said sometime around
10.37pm on Wednesday evening, a
man turned himself in at Eight Mile
Rock Police Station.
The man was arrested after certain
information was received.
Ms Mackey said police have not yet
determined the motive for the shoot-
ing.
She is urging members of public who
may have been in the area and can
assist them with their investigations
to call 350-3107/8, 352-9774/5 or 911.


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GRIM DISCOVERY: A man's body was found off Pioneer's Way. The victim had sustained an apparent gunshot injury.
GRIM DISCOVERY: A man's body was found off Pioneer's Way. The victim had sustained an apparent gunshot injury.


Mother on the verge of suicide over union and judicial issues


FROM page one

"If anyone can help, I real-
ly just want to help my daugh-
ter," said Ms Barry. "I don't
want it to be that she falls by
the wayside because her
mother is struggling."
Ms Barry, 29, explained
how she had for five years
worked a full time job as an
office manager with the
union.
However, she claims she
and her daughter's lives began
unravelling when Secretary
General of the union, Antho-
ny Bain, and his supporters
changed the locks at their
headquarters and declared
himself President of the
organisation in January, 2009.
When she and several oth-
ers turned up for work that
day, she alleges she found


herself unable to get into the
building.
The following day, her job
had been given to someone
else and a week later, a ter-
mination letter arrived.
Believing she has been the
victim of a personal vendetta
as a result of her allegiance
to former union President
Nelerene Harding, Ms Barry
has since agitated to get what
she claims she is owed by the
union but the Department of
Labour said it cannot move
ahead until it confirms who
the real president is.
"There is an issue as to who
is the official head of the
union and both parties saying
the other person does not
have the authority to attend
any meetings on behalf of the
union."

Petitioning
"We don't know who to
summon over this," Director
of Labour, Harcourt Brown
said yesterday.
Despite petitioning from
"hundreds" of AAAWU
members who want a poll to
go ahead to select a president,
according to Mr Brown, Mr
Bain and his attorney Obie
Ferguson won an injunction
against a scheduled June 2009
election, further delaying a
determination of who should


KRYSTEL BARRY'S daughter
Rayven. Ms Barry said, "If any-
one can help, I really just want to
help my daughter."

hold the top post. Mr Bain
told The Tribune yesterday
he is seeking to alter the
union's constitution - a
move which Mr Brown
should really leave up to the
membership to approve.
In the meantime, Mr Bain
claims the union owes nothing
to Ms Barry, who, he alleges,
was dismissed due to "poor
behaviour."
"We did everything that
was proper in their separation
and their letters that were giv-
en to them would reflect
that," he claimed.
Mr Brown yesterday
described Ms Barry's situa-
tion as "unfortunate", calling
her an "innocent bystander"
caught up in the middle of
union infighting.
"The ironic thing is the
union is supposed to be about
protection of the rights of
workers and here it is, the
internal squabbles of the
union have left a worker of


"There is an
issue as to who is
the official head
of the union and
both parties
saying the other
person does not
have the
authority to
attend any
meetings on
behalf of the
union."

the union not getting paid,"
he said. He could not confirm
the amount that Mrs Barry is
owed, but said it "could well
be" the amount she has
alleged.
Yesterday, Ms Barry
described her despair at the
situation, which saw her life
turned upside down in a mat-
ter of months.
Despite sending her resume
"all over Nassau", Ms Barry
said she has been unable to
find a new job, apart from a
few weeks of work here and
there.
Ms Barry said she feels like
there is "no justice" in The
Bahamas.
It appears, she said, that the
average Bahamian has
nowhere to turn when their
rights are trampled.
Anyone who wishes to help
Ms Barry and her daughter,
Rayven, can contact Alison
Lowe at The Tribune on 502
2365 or alowe@tribuneme-
dia.net


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


I


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9,2009


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3


W PHILIP GALANIS SPEAKS AFTER OPPOSITION LEADER'S WARNING TO POTENTIAL CHALLENGERS




liii Christie's ZNS performance was




dis nnninfin _- fnmnir PIP MP


A JET-SKI operator made
the gruesome discovery when
he came upon the body of a
caucasian woman floating in
waters near the Carefree
apartment complex on West
Bay Street.
Up to press time yesterday,
police were still trying to
determine the identity of the
woman.
Police were also investigat-
ing whether the female
drowned or was murdered.

Lifeless

"Around 9.30 yesterday
morning, police got a call that
there was a body floating in
the water just at the rear of
the Carefree apartments.
Officers came and with the
assistance of some persons
who were already on the
beach, pulled the lifeless
body of the female out of the
waters.
"And the information is
that a jet ski operator was
passing and he saw the body
floating in the water. As a
result he pulled the body to
shore and thereby called the
police," RBPF Superinten-
dent Cleophus Cooper said.
An autopsy will be sched-
uled to determine an official
cause of death.

In-depth study

expected to help

lower food prices

FOREIGN experts are con-
ducting an in-depth study
which is expected to help low-
er food prices and make the
Bahamas more self-sufficient.
A team of Food and Agri-
culture Organisation (FAO)
specialists have begun a three-
month assessment of the
Bahamas' agricultural and
fisheries sectors at the request
of the Ministry of Agriculture
and Marine Resources.
The team is led by Dr Dun-
stan Campbell, FAO repre-
sentative for the Bahamas,
Jamaica and Beliz.
The process of collecting
primary data began on Sun-
day and is expected to take a
week.
Dr Campbell said the
intended outcome is a five-
year development plan for the
Bahamas' agricultural sector.
"This exercise is long in com-
ing and much needed," said
Ministry of Agriculture
under-secretary Philip Miller.
"It has been difficult to move
forward in agriculture without
a plan."
Dr Campbell's team
includes technical experts in
livestock, land, water and
extension services.


Technical

"We have also brought
onboard some local technical
people," he added.
"And of course we are
using the resources of the
Ministry of Agriculture
because these the people
on the ground and who live
with the challenges."
He pointed to the global
trend of rising food and fuel
prices, and the detrimental
impact this has had on house-
holds.
"The government of the
Bahamas has responded," he
said, "and is looking forward
to strengthening the agricul-
tural sector.
"But before doing that we
need an understanding of
what the situation on the
ground is and what are the
potentials."
The programme will be
"very intensive" with visits to
the islands and sessions with
farmers, agro-processors, indi-
viduals in marketing, suppli-
ers, traders, and trade policy-
makers.
"We want to have a com-
prehensive picture of the agri-
cultural situation here in the
Bahamas," said Dr Campbell.
Under-secretary Miller
emphasised the impact the
study would have on the Min-
istry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources' budget
preparations.
"We need to know exactly
what the needs of the agricul-
tural sector are so we can cre-
ate programmes that would
meet those needs," he said.
"We need that information to
assist us with the budget so we
can have real programmes to
assist the farmers."


By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net


FORMER PLP MP Philip
Galanis said that he was disap-
pointed at Perry Christie's per-
formance on ZNS on Wednes-
day night, when the party
leader warned parliamentary
colleagues that there would be
consequences for any of them
who dares to challenge him at
the party's convention on Octo-
ber 21.
During the interview, con-
ducted by ZNS anchor Jerome
Sawyer at Mr Christie's home,
the party leader said he would
question the loyalty of any col-
league who tries to replace him.
Mr Christie went on to say
he is not sure whether he could
place any confidence in such an
individual in the future.
However, Mr Galanis said


that if the PLP is seeking to
represent itself as a democratic
organisation, demonstrations of
freedom by Mr Christie's par-
liamentary colleagues should
be welcomed.
"I think that if he were to
have said it objectively and if


persons looked at it objectively
it would appear that he (Mr
Christie) didn't have the level
of security that he is purporting
to have. And I don't know why
that is.
"He is the leader. He ought


to be secure in his position. He
has been in politics for a very
long time. He has appointed
numerous stalwart councillors.
He has lead the party and I
think has done a fairly good job
and so there really is no reason
for him to be insecure.
"What he ought to do in my
opinion is invite as many and
whoever wishes to oppose him
to do so and if he is confident in
himself then he will win," Mr
Galanis said.
Falling short of calling Mr
Christie "scared", Mr Galanis
admitted that this may be the


view of some in the party, but
said he believes the leader sim-
ply wishes to serve another
term and does not want any-
thing to get in the way of that.
"If he does the kind of things
that they are suggesting is being
done tonight (see story, page
1), this will not inure him to
PLPs and certainly it will not
endure him to those undecided
voters who are thinking of com-
ing in.
"We need to be a welcom-
ing party, not a party that is
fighting within itself," he said.


* PROTECTING LIMITED MARINE RESOURCES


Ministry angling for possible


snapper and conch season


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net


THE Ministry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources is still contemplat-
ing implementing a snapper and conch
season to protect these limited resources
from over-fishing, Agriculture Minister
Larry Cartwright said.
His ministry is also trying to deter-
mine the country's snapper and conch
population before deciding when they
can be harvested.
"The Ministry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources is looking at conser-
vation and we may be in the very near
future looking at the possibility of a
snapper and conch season," said Mr
Cartwright.
"I wouldn't want to put a time-line on
it but we are looking at it right now to


try to determine what the fish stocks
are like."
The need to place conservation mea-
sures on the country's snapper resources
was put to Mr Cartwright after a video
- which appears to show commercial
fishermen from Spanish Wells hauling in
an extremely large load of the fish -
was forwarded to The Tribune.
Mr Cartwright said he had seen the
video, which was posted on the video
sharing website Youtube, adding that
he had been shocked by the large haul.
"It was the first time I'd ever seen so
many fish in one spot," he said. "I'm
not too experienced with what these
guys (typically) haul, but from talking to
fishermen I do not think this was a nor-
mal haul".
Environmental activist Sam Dun-
combe, who forwarded the video to The
Tribune, expressed concern at the vol-


ume of fish caught on the expedition.
She called on government to implement
a snapper season, similar to the one in
place to protect groupers.
"I am not suggesting that fishermen
be put out of business, however fish are
a public resource, a global resource, as
such they must be managed and their
numbers respected accordingly. Addi-
tionally fish play a vital role in the
oceans' ecosystems.


HEALTH MINISTER SPEAKS TO ROTARY CLUB


Plans for public hospital to replace


run-down PMH are moving forward

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter -.
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net "


PLANS to build a new public
hospital and replace run-down
facilities at Princess Margaret
Hospital are moving forward,
Minister of Health Dr Hubert
Minnis said yesterday.
Speaking at a meeting of the
Nassau Sunrise Rotary Club,
Dr Minnis reiterated govern-
ment's commitment to build-
ing a 21st century facility to
serve the needs of a growing
population for at least the next
30 years.
Complaints about the condi-
tion of the Princess Margaret
Hospital over the years have
extended from mouldy walls
and ceilings to unclean bath-
rooms and an unhygienic envi-
ronment allowing for the
spread of MRSA.
Talk of a new hospital has
persisted throughout successive
governments and in 2005 a
report on the development of
hospitals was produced.
But it was not until last year
that plans began in earnest, Dr
Minnis said.
The Public Hospitals
Authority (PHA) established
two committees to develop a
master plan for the new hospi-
tal, and the firm Kurt Salmon
Associates (KSA) was con-
tracted to guide construction
plans.
Potential sites were identi-
fied, including the current PMH
site in Shirley Street, but gov-
ernment has not yet decided on
a location.
And financial setbacks
brought on by the global eco-
nomic crisis have further
delayed plans.
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham had committed 51
per cent of the profits from the
potential sale of the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC) to build the new hospi-
tal, before the recession meant
the money would instead be
required to pay off government
debts.
However financial setbacks
have not caused government to
shy away from its commitment
to providing a better public hos-


PRINCESS Margaret Hospital.


"Construction
of a new facility

provides an
opportunity for
better patient
management..."

Dr Hubert Minnis

pital, Dr Minnis said.
He told the Rotary club
meeting at the British Colonial
Hilton: "Construction of a new
hospital requires considerable
planning and effort, as well as
capital.
"The world economic crisis
has delayed major projects
worldwide and the Bahamas is
no exception.
"Governments as well as
people are sensitive to the
vagaries of the economy."

Upgrades

As preparations continue
there will be upgrades at the
current hospital including the
development of three new
operating theatres, improved
associated support services, a
new central sterile supplies
department and medical surgi-
cal supplies department, and a
renovated geriatric hospital.
And as plans crystallise com-
mittees are taking into consid-


eration the population's health-
care needs and how the new
facility could be developed in
phases.
Dr Minnis said: "It is not the
government's objective mere-
ly to replace PMH.
"The new hospital needs to
be planned in the context of the
projected health needs of the
population for at least the next
30 years.
"Planning activities for the
new hospital have to address
the potential impact of an invig-
orated primary health care sys-
tem inclusive of community
mental health services, an effec-
tive wellness programme, an
aggressive advocacy and com-
munity participation pro-
gramme and the examination
of options for building partner-
ships with other providers.
"Construction of a new facil-
ity provides an opportunity for
better patient management and
for raising the new hospital to a
facility of first choice rather
than that of last resort."
Also under consideration is
whether the facility will have
two or four beds in a room, pro-
visions for renal care, parking,
cost for laboratory services,
consideration of services pro-
vided by allied health profes-
sionals, MRI and intervention-
al radiology services, and non-
invasive procedures such as
imaging technologies.
Dr Minnis said there will be a
focus on preventative and pri-
mary health care as well as pae-
diatrics and obstetrics.


"We are calling on the Bahamas gov-
ernment to conduct a comprehensive
fish population study to determine quo-
tas for each species of commercial fish
before it is too late," said Ms Dun-
combe, director of the group reEarth.
Mr Cartwright added that his min-
istry is currently canvassing fisherman
for their opinions on the proposed sea-
sons, which he said would be imple-
mented "whenever the time is right".


ITDISCUS TOIESONTHS PGELO0ONTOWW.TIBUE22CO0


- LXYLiIR1'J .1L L JUL iLE.


"We need to be a welcoming

party, not a party that is

fighting within itself."


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PAGE 4, FRIDAAY, CTBESR 9, 2009ETHEDTRIBUNE


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, c, tiinn') 322-1986
Ad c,' iiing Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


The Lion King in winter


REPUBLICANS in the House of Rep-
resentatives attempted to remove Charles
Rangel as chairman of the Ways and Means
Committee on Wednesday, arguing that
Rangel's current ethics controversy has "held
the House up to public ridicule."
In my capacity as a person who has held
the House up to public ridicule on numerous
occasions, I would like to go on record as
saying I do not need any 79-year-old com-
mittee chairman to help me do it. Really,
it's a breeze. Although perhaps slightly hard-
er than before Tom DeLay dropped out of
"Dancing With the Stars."
The Republicans are, however, completely
right about Rangel. Whenever a powerful
committee chairman has so many problems
that you need a timeline to keep all the alle-
gations straight, he is a liability. When those
problems revolve around things like failure
to pay taxes, it is not a good plan to have him
be in charge of tax policy.
I say this with great sadness because
Rangel is my congressman. My neighbours
and I have heard about the totally ludicrous
benefits that are showered upon the con-
stituents of a powerful committee chair. Ever
since he took control of the Ways and Means
Committee, we have been waiting for our
ship to come in. Perhaps bearing a special
subsidy for families who live near a large
number of pigeons. Or an extra lane on the
West Side Highway that only residents of
the 15th Congressional District are allowed
to use.
Despite my great stake in keeping Rangel
in his current post of power, I'm not pre-
pared to argue that you can have a chairman
of the tax-writing committee who failed to
declare $75,000 in rental income on a
Caribbean villa on his tax returns. Or one
who seems to think you can turn yourself
into a resident of two different cities if it
gets you cheaper housing - and that the
House only requires its members to list their
financial assets beginning with the letters F
through M.
The Democrats made no attempt what-
soever to defend Rangel when the Republi-
can resolution came up in the House. They
just swiftly and sullenly referred it to the
ethics committee, which is currently
embarked on Year Two of its Charles
Rangel investigation.
Speaker Nancy Pelosi claims the current
Congress is the most ethical and open one in
history. And given what's gone before, who
knows? Pelosi actually has instituted some
reforms, and punished some bad apples, or at
least nudged them out of critical posts.
But this is a test of whether the Democrats
will follow through when it's really, really


hard. We already know that Pelosi will not
fail to act if one of her members gets caught
with $90,000 in marked bills hidden inside his
freezer. We don't know whether she'll be
as firm if a popular guy who also happens to
be the co-founder of the Congressional
Black Caucus gets caught doing a laundry list
of things that are totally outrageous but not
necessarily grounds for a major criminal
indictment.
Rangel is certainly not going to step down
without a push because he doesn't seem to
feel as if he has done anything all that wrong.
He did apologise for the failure to pay taxes
and settled up with the IRS. But when a
man who represents a district that is about 50
per cent Hispanic says he was unable to fig-
ure out whether he had rental income
because his agent in the Dominican Repub-
lic kept speaking in Spanish, you can pre-
sume he is not exactly bowed down with
grief and shame.
Rangel's friends say he was just sloppy,
but it's more likely that he just feels he's
too important to be bothered with the rules.
He's treated like a king in New York, where
he does not mind being referred to as "the
Lion of Lenox Avenue." And, of course, in
Washington, the chairman of the Ways and
Means Committee practically gets carried
down the street in a litter.
Here's a Rangel story: During the Demo-
cratic convention in Denver in 2008, city
police got carried away and unleashed pep-
per spray at some demonstrators and every
innocent bystander in the vicinity. The
refugees poured into a hotel lobby, coughing
and teary. Some middle-aged women were in
particularly bad shape, and their friends
wondered whether to call 911 as they bent
over, hacking and gasping.
Suddenly, in breezed Rangel. It was a
moment in which an important politician
could have scored a lot of points just by
being slightly solicitous. The Lion took in the
scene and boomed: "I'm outta here! I'll send
you cigarettes!"
There are tons of people in Congress who
have huge egos and an impatience with the
minor irritations of life. If the Democrats
made Rangel step down, it would be a
reminder that holding public office means
you have to be more conservative about
drawing the line between proper and
improper behaviour than your humblest con-
stituent.
It would be worth it even if my neigh-
bourhood never does get a bridge to
nowhere.

(This article was written by Gail Collins -
c.2009 New York Times News Service).


The man


W


.0o would


be prince


EDITOR, The Tribune.

Watching with keen inter-
est as candidates step forward
in the run up to the PLP con-
vention, one cannot stop and
wonder about persons offer-
ing for deputy leader. Jerome
Fitzgerald's speech and Philip
Davies theme are the most
captivating of all. Mr Fitzger-
ald says "... I am a product of
43 years of your collective
work. You produced me. You
prepared me for leadership."
Mr Davis on the other hand
wants his party to "Be Brave"
and vote for him as the next
deputy leader.
What is so striking about
wanting second place? Who
prepares for 43 years for sec-
ond place and what is so
brave about being runner up?
When Debbie Ferguson pre-
pares for four years to per-
form in the Olympics she is
not training for second place,
she wants gold!
It's a poorly kept secret that
the entire slate of candidates
in the race for deputy really
wants to be leader, but party
politics dictates that they "tow
the line until it's their time."
Our political system has yet
to come of age with the
understanding that to chal-
lenge leadership does not
mean opposing party princi-
ples. It is still a system built
around absolute party loyalty
and compliance as its core
rather than the dynamics of
competitive ideas and ideals
competing for the attention
of a captive voter.
Given the current system,


the question that needs to be
resolved for the winner of this
farce is how are you going to
take the wheels of power
from a "leader for life"?
Many scenarios exist, but the
one which is most compelling
is taken directly from the
playbook of Julius Caesar: a
political coup (minus the stab-
bing) by forming a band of
persons who are of like mind.
One can see that scenario
being played out based on
who you see in the crowd for
each candidate.
In truth the position of
deputy leader should be a
post that is handpicked by
whoever is successful as
leader, for two main reasons:
these two persons need to
work in concert so there
needs to be a level of comfort
and familiarity. These traits
are better guaranteed through
a selection process rather than
election of a deputy. The sec-
ond reason has to do with
vision. The vision and over-
all tone of a party comes from
the leader which is supposed
to be executed by his team,
inclusive of the deputy. One
needs to be very sceptical
when someone who is run-
ning for deputy starts articu-
lating visions, goals and poli-
cies. You run the risk of major
conflict as a result of clashing
visions should the deputy
choose not to agree to the


terms set out by the leader.
Whatever your views on
the candidates, the second
place prize is not something to
train, sacrifice and aspire
towards. It is another example
of an exercise in mediocrity
and disingenuous intentions
that we the people have been
made to be subjected to for
decades when it comes to
choosing a leader. Dial the
clock back over a decade
when Bernard Nottage and
Perry Christie were made "co-
deputy" leaders so as not to
offend the other. How pathet-
ic was that display! In more
recent times another example
of botched transitional lead-
ership occurred at the
expense of the delegates at
the FNM convention in 2005
when Hubert Ingraham
decided to play the cat and
mouse game with delegates -
well he or won't he nominate
for the leadership post again?
Of course we all know the
outcome; he nominated at the
eleventh hour, avoided the
rigours of a leadership cam-
paign and the rest is history.
These are examples of
moments in history where
power was accommodated,
not won. And now it comes
full circle with the ascension
of the man who would be
king, but decided to settle for
the position of prince (or co-
prince, if history repeats) until
the king decides to leave. Stay
tuned...

ERIC B STRACHAN
Nassau,
October 5, 2009.


No Privy Council - so where do we go now?


EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Privy Council - it was coming for years
but we thought it wouldn't.
It has been obvious that the British would
eventually remove the facility of the last pre-
colonial institution other than the governor
general years ago. Wasn't it under the PLP's
last administration that we ended up facilitat-
ing hearings here for a cost of over $1.6 million
and subsequently again since 2007?
So no Privy Council where do we go now?
We have to be very careful I suggest as we
cannot as a jurisdiction make the wrong deci-
sion which could very seriously impact Finan-
cial Services and Ship Registry and any possi-
bility of Aircraft Registration as a serious con-
sideration in these sectors was that The
Bahamas' final court was the Privy Council.
We are subscribing to the Caribbean Court
of Appeal without using it and that does not
seem to be on too solid ground without any
unanimous support from the members of
CSME or even CARICOM.
To me ideally we, as a sovereign indepen-


dent country, should by this time have enough
institutional structure to support our own
Supreme Court of Appeal as the final Court of
Appeal. But can it hold its own? Sadly I don't
think we can throw the risk behind that, but
this is one of the two alternatives.
Then there is the political issue the Privy
Council is entrenched in the Constitution so
any changes will have to go to a referendum
and we all know Mr Ingraham's view of them
and any mid-term Referendum could at this
time be worse than the result of the last refer-
endum and a prologue to the potential results
at the next general election - it seems the
gods have placed Mr Ingraham and the FNM
in a difficult political situation where there is
no win-win, in fact it spells political disaster.
I would prefer a local sovereign final
Supreme Court of Appeals, but second best is
going to have to be the Caribbean Court of
Appeal and really it is a weak second best.

ABRAHAM MOSS
Nassau,
October 6, 2009.


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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9,2009


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2009, PAGEEW5


Education officials hit




out over teacher sit-out


TEACHERS at Carlton E
Francis Primary School held a
sit-out for the second day in a
row yesterday to protest staff
shortages and infrastructural
problems.
In response, the Ministry of
Education issued a statement
calling the disruption a situa-
tion which would normally have
been dealt with by the school
administrators, but which
became "inflated" by the behav-
iour of the Bahamas Union of
Teachers.
The statement said that in
recent times, "it seems as if


minor incidents have escalated
into major crises and have inter-
rupted the normal operation in
our schools due to teachers
withholding their services.
"It seems as if the Teachers
Union is deliberately interfer-
ing with the course of educa-
tion and encouraging teachers
to withhold their services.
According to General Order
1047 this is not a course of
action that should be taken, and
teachers should return to their
classrooms to perform their
duties.
"Additionally, the Industrial


Agreement provides for the
Ministry of Education to be giv-
en collectively 30 days to resolve
any issue after a grievance has
been filed before any industrial
action is undertaken," the min-
istry said.
The teachers at Carlton Fran-
cis are complaining of a short-
age of teachers, no soap in the
bathrooms and a problem with
the septic tank in the pre-school
unit.
The ministry said it would
like the public to know "that
these matters have already been
addressed and that subject co-


ordinators are mandated to fill
any shortfall in the teaching
staff.
"Secondly, the septic tank
was repaired as of Wednesday,
October 7. As for the lack of
soap in the bathroom, schools
are provided with funds through
their school boards to provide
supplies and additionally each
district has a physical plant offi-
cer at the ministry to address
any concerns that the schools
have.
"Finally, the ministry is aware
that a teacher at the school will
be going on maternity leave in


January 2010 and is already
seeking to have her class
assigned to a supply or substi-
tute teacher."
The ministry called on teach-
ers to be "mindful of their pri-
ority, which is to teach and
ensure the provision of educa-
tion to the students in their
care". It also called on parents
to become more involved in the
operation of schools, to ensure
that their children are not "dis-
advantaged because of minor
incidents that can be resolved"
by discussions between all con-
cerned parties.


Vital reading programme under threat


By AVA TURNQUEST
WHAT started as a small
after school homework sup-
port project in the Engler-
ston community has blos-
somed into an aggressive and
successful campaign against
illiteracy - but this effort is
now under threat because of
a lack of support.
The project was launched
by Englerston Urban
Renewal staff and a group
of community volunteers,
who quickly found that it
had to be expanded and
developed as the extent of
child illiteracy became
apparent.
They have had some very
encouraging success, but the
programme is now desper-
ately in need of help, and
they are urging more
Bahamians to volunteer their
time and resources.
Project co-ordinator
Calieel Amahad said:
"Through my volunteer
work I discovered that the
level of literacy among the
wider cross section of chil-
dren is low. It's not that they
are incapable of succeeding -
it's just time. No one is read-


ing to these kids. teachers on his lunch break to read skills ot the students he
can't do it alone, parents along with students for 30 to works with.
need to spend time with their 45 minutes. "The feedback is incredi-
kids." He said that over the last ble, these kids want some-
In addition to the after couple of weeks, he has one to take time with them.
school programme, Mr Ama- noticed a significant It's like, 'Someone cares oth-
had also visits public schools improvement in the reading er than my parents'."


However, he said, the
response from the commu-
nity has been discouraging.
So far, the programme has
received only one corporate
donation - from Royal Bank
of Canada.
"We need to come togeth-
er," said Mr Amahad, "we
as Bahamians must realise
that these children hold our
future. We can't remain iso-
lated. It's a flow. If we
neglect the children, when
they grow up and assimilate
into society, their illiteracy
will directly effect the pro-
gression of this country."
The programme is in dire
need of books, computers
and volunteers. With these
tools, Mr Amahad is confi-
dent that at the end of this
school term, his students will
have raised their reading
abilities a full grade level.
He said: "We as Bahami-
ans must volunteer at least
one hour a week to secure a
better future for our
Bahamas. If you can't donate
your time, donate money,
donate computers, donate
books - get involved
Bahamas. Every effort
counts."


Critical habitat

for sea turtles

considered in US
US FEDERAL fisheries
managers have agreed to con-
sider designating critical habi-
tat for endangered leatherback
sea turtles in the Pacific ocean
off Oregon and California,
according to Associated Press.
NOAA Fisheries officials
said Thursday they will make a
decision whether to go forward
by Dec. 4 under terms of a set-
tlement of a lawsuit brought
by conservation groups.
The groups had sued the
government for failing to fol-
low through on their petition
to designate critical habitat.
Pacific leatherbacks migrate
each year from nesting areas
in Indonesia to feed on jellyfish
in the California current
between Lincoln City, Ore.,
and Point Conception, Calif.
Conservation groups have
proposed designating that
broad swath of ocean as critical
habitat to encompass feeding
areas as well as migration
routes, said Ben Enticknap of
the group Oceana.
If critical habitat is desig-
nated, it would require federal
agencies to consult with
NOAA Fisheries before going
ahead with projects or actions
in the area that might harm
the turtles.
Issues to be considered
include development of off-
shore wind and wave energy,
coastal power plants, and pol-
lution from agricultural runoff,
said David Cottingham, chief
of sea turtle conservation for
NOAA Fisheries.
Because leatherbacks were
listed before the 1988 amend-
ments to the Endangered
Species Act requiring critical
habitat designations, the
agency was under no legal
obligation to designate it, as it
must with other species, said
Barbara Schroeder, national
sea turtle coordinator for
NOAA Fisheries.


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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9,2009, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE









LONG GONE IS THE TIME WHEN BAHAMIAN POLITICIANS PUT LOYALTY TO COUNTRY FIRST





The age of political knuckleheads


By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com
In our time, political speech and
writing are largely the defence
of the indefensible... Thus, polit-
ical language has to consist
largely of euphemism, question-
begging, and sheer cloudy
vagueness... Political language
(is) designed to make lies sound
truthful and murder respectful.
George Orwell in 'Politics and
the English Language', 1945

N many cases, politi-
cians are known to do
questionable things of
dubious value. As it
relates to Bahamian politicians,
as is illustrated of late, some of
them are only mouthing plati-
tudes about rooting out corrup-
tion, cracking down on crime
and revamping education and
the public service. Moreover,
most local politicians are politi-
cally immature and tetchy about
criticism.
Bahamian politics appears,
in many instances, to be a
"fiercely guarded monopoly"
(Bert Rand) that is hardly based
upon personal merits.
Today, there is an assortment
of political incumbents who
should be dropped from nomi-
nation lists, for both parties,
during the 2012 general election
cycle. Frankly, when it comes
to making the crucial decisions
that may have far reaching
social and economic conse-
quences, a number of local
politicians lack the political will
and, in the context as used by
California Governor Arnold
Schwarzenegger a few years
ago, can therefore be referred to
as "girlie men."
The political culture is dark-
ened and polluted by political
tribalists in both of the major
political organizations, a quan-
tity of whom, in my opinion, are
no more than political pick-
pockets, absolute idiots,
fiendish, and outright jokers
who are seen as political busy-
bodies prepared to say anything
to be elected.
I am personally aware of
insensitive politicians who are


simply position seekers and
bootlickers who-for voters-
are easily accessible and quite
approachable before elections
but, after securing their seat,
become invisible. What's worst
is that if some elected officials
belong to the governing party
and are appointed "minister",
nearly all of them seem to adopt
an air of superiority and appear
to completely forget that they
are there to serve-we must
begin to name and shame them.
Quite honestly, it appears that
many of these pompous minis-
ters use their position to dis-
tance themselves from the mass-
es-that is, until they need their
votes again.
Over the past summer, I per-
sonally interacted with a few
politicians who I have come to
see as out-and-out political mis-
fits and blowhards who present
facades for the public, pretend-
ing to care, all in an effort to
fool the Bahamian people.
Quite frankly, both of the major
political parties contain certain
politicos who qualify as absolute
knuckleheads who, using polit-
ical theatrics, yak about prob-
lems and issues from which they
are completely detached and
can propose no solution. Most
of the current crop of politicians
have no real empathy with com-
mon citizens, and also lack a
sense of social, historic and
political purpose.
As my learned barber sug-
gested to me this week, a good
deal of the local political estab-
lishment are intolerant ideo-
logues and "demagoons" (Mau-
reen Dowd) who have no
morals, fanatically seek self-
aggrandisement, make false
promises and merely see poli-
tics as a tactical game.
Long gone is the political cli-
mate of the 1950s and 1960s


when political frontrunners such
as Sir Milo Butler, Sir Etienne
Dupuch, Sir Roland Symonette,
Carlton Francis, Sir Randol
Fawkes, Dr Claudius R Walker
and several others, did not just
apathetically pay lip service to
pressing events, but also saw
their loyalty to their country as
superseding any party loyalty
and/or selfish political impulse
- as a matter of fact Sir Eti-
enne belonged to no political
party.
The late Prime Minister Indi-
ra Gandhi, daughter of the late
prime minister Jawaharlal
Nehru, once said :
"My grandfather once told
me that there are two kinds of
people: Those who do the work
and those who take the credit.
He told me to be in the first
group; there is less competition
there."
Just a few weeks ago, we had
a minister in a high profile min-
istry passing the political buck
and blaming the former gov-
ernment for choosing a flood
prone, low lying site for an edu-
cational institution instead of
focusing solely upon seeking a
speedy solution. However, I
wonder whether he would have
heaped praise upon that gov-
ernment or kept it all for him-
self if that same school had pro-
duced the best national exam
results?
Generally, it appears that
there are quite a number of
braggarts in local politics that, as
suggested by Mrs Gandhi, do
not work but would willingly
take all credit in their zeal to
win an election. We can all look
forward to the virtuous-sound-
ing claptrap and claims that will
be hammered into our psyche-
from political platforms-dur-
ing the next election cycle. Fur-
thermore, like the Republicans


SIR MILO BUTLER


are hijacking the policy-making
process in the United States,
there are local politicians who
are completely obsessed with
politics and personality rather
than policy, some of them seem-
ing intellectually paralyzed and
appearing to take on a com-
pletely obstructionist approach.
Moreover, as the conven-
tions roll around, the public/del-
egates should become more
cynical and questioning of the
persons offering for top offices.
In electing and re-electing politi-
cians, good administrative skills
should be a major criterion.
Even more, Bahamian politi-
cians must seek to foster trans-
parent negotiations and public
consultation to bring about and
execute policy for the better-
ment of the Bahamas.
As it stands, both parties, in
my opinion, are home to sever-
al politicians who have long
worn out their welcome, but
who continue to hang around
like uncollected garbage. It can
also be said that although one
political party may promise to
expose the corruption of anoth-
er during an election campaign,
consecutive governments have
failed to verifiably carry out an
expose of those corrupt politi-
cians. I have long suggested the
implementation of term limits,
electoral recall and jail time to
weed out the political miscre-
ants and showmen and foster
greater accountability!
The younger generations of
Bahamians are looking for role


SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH


models in the political class.
Furthermore, Bahamian voters
must move beyond their politi-
cal orientation to reserving their
votes for the election of those
committed (through their
actions) individuals who show
a dedication to public service
and adhere to the late US Pres-
ident John F Kennedy's princi-
ple of "ask not what your coun-
try can do for you but what you
can do for your country..." It
is only through the adoption of
these ideals that true national
development-on all fronts-
will occur.
Where is the change that we
can believe in?
The intentional
transmittance of HIV

adly, this week it was
once again announced
that cases of HIV in the
Bahamas are likely to increase.
However, shortly after reading
that report, I watched a video
(posted on a friend's facebook
profile) where a disguised and
obviously demented person was
casually discussing how he had
intentionally infected persons
with the HIV.
While publicly announcing
that they may have contracted
the HIV/AIDS, persons infect-
ed by the virus due to the non-
disclosure of a sex
partner/spouse can seek legal
recourse in the Bahamian courts
under the Sexual Offences Act,


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"Fuelling Growth For People"


Chapter 99, section 8, subsec-
tion 2.
This portion of the Act
reads:
"Any person who knows
that he is infected with a virus
causing, or known to cause,
acquired immune deficiency
syndrome (commonly known as
"AIDS") and who has sexual
intercourse with any other per-
son, with the consent of that
other person but without dis-
closing the fact of the infection
to that other person, is guilty of
an offence and liable to be
detained for a term of five years
in such a place and under such
conditions as may be specified
by the court before which he
was convicted; and while so
detained, he shall be deemed in
legal custody."
Ever since the passage of this
Act in 1991, no one has mount-
ed any legal action, presumably
for fear of being ostracized.
Frankly, it appears that there
are thousands of non-disclosure
cases by persons who have
caught HIV/AIDS from some-
one who knowingly and wilfully
spread it.
It is obvious that situations
exist in the Bahamas where
wives/husbands, persons in rela-
tionships and/or those merely
involved as sex partners have
contracted HIV from a cheat-
ing spouse/partner. However,
in order to encourage persons to
come forward in prosecuting
such matters, the Attorney Gen-
eral's office and the Judicial
establishment should institute
means by which these sensitive
matters are handled carefully-
that is, possibly having victims
giving video recorded evidence
and the court using its discre-
tion by using letters to refer to
the names and addresses of per-
sons involved in a case, similar
to what is done when minors
are brought before the courts.
Finally, in this age of ram-
pant violent crime, I encourage
Bahamians to join social activist
Rodney Moncur's noble march
in support of the death penalty
this Discovery Day holiday
which, I'm told, starts at
Arawak Cay at 9am.


PAGE 6, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9,2009


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2009, PAGEI7


STRAW VE


DORS SP


OUT


The following statement is a response to a let-
ter printed in The Tribune last week, which called
for the government to abandon its plan to rebuild
the Straw Market on Bay Street and claimed
tourists are tricked and sold drugs and counter-
feit goods at the market. The letter, which was
signed, "The business operators who have dealt
with this for far too long", suggested that the
market be moved to a location where it can be
better monitored by the authorities.


WE WERE
appalled
when we
read the
lengthy article printed in The
Tribune on October 1, 2009 by
Bay Street business operators
and those on Woodes Rogers
Walk.
The long article was
extremely vicious, evil, hate-
ful, malicious, and displayed
the "black crab syndrome men-
tality." The article first
addressed the issue of the
nature of vendors' wares. Also,
those who are not vendors who
greet and rip off tourists by
welcoming them to the
Bahamas with free gifts. When
the tourists refuse to pay,
unfortunately, the free gifts are
taken back.
Question: What does the
ware of legitimate straw ven-
dors have to do with rebuilding
the Straw Market? Vendors,
like most Bahamians, are very
industrious individuals. We pay
our dues just like any other
Bahamian business. For
instance, we pay taxes such as
National Insurance and busi-
ness licenses just as any other
businesses do, contrary to what
others believe.
At one time, gas stations
sold only gas and now today
they sell everything else, com-
peting with grocery stores.
When the gas station owners
were questioned by the pub-
lic, they came on national TV
explaining why they had to
start selling food items which
was to off-set their low gas
profit. Similarly, straw baskets,
bags, and hats are no different,
contrary to the general pub-
lic's belief or perception.
If vendors were to sell exclu-
sively straw products, it would
seriously hurt our business. It's
more profitable to have a
diverse selection of products -
thus the different variations.
Also, the tourist can have more
alternatives from which to
choose. If we sell our fake
bags, fake whatever, we buy
and sell them like any other
commodity and it's called "free
enterprise".
We have a right to make an
honest living like everyone
else. We live in what we
thought was a democratic soci-
ety so therefore we have a right
to sell whatever we chose
(within reason). However, it
would appear that downtown
business owners would prefer
us to be a burden on our fami-
ly and community rather than
make an honest living. But like
the gas stations, we must
evolve in order to survive. It
appears that your group could
care less how we live as straw
vendors just as long as it does
not affect your business or
pocket.
One of our vendors went
into a plumbing store off Sol-


dier Road to inquire about a
plumbing fixture some time
ago but to their surprise, the
plumbing store was selling
watches - whoever thought
that a plumbing store would
sell watches! (Perhaps they
may even be "fake" like our
"designer" bags.)
Another vendor had to do
some blood work and when
she went to the lab they were
selling nuts and other food
products - who would think
that a blood lab, when \% ,, , -'
to have your blood Iv. .I
would be selling food p .'. I.
The point is that as I iini-
ans and licensed straw A i- ,..l i.
we are not begging, s, i,,.-_
nor are we ripping >ul Ii,
tourist, who chooses t-' 'I' I
their money in our cot i,\ A.
a matter of fact we eiii
welcome, and encoura,!. h111
to come back to our shoe. I,.
become friends so whi , il I\
do come back they can I -q ,k i,.
up, contrary to your rei , Ii
Taxes
If and when a straw i ..l
does not pay their N ilu, iI
Insurance or annual biimi.
licence, we are eithi i Ii
before the courts or t -i. i.-
istry will not give us a 1,' ,i
of our straw vendor's .. ,i-,.
cation card
and licence.
We are
processed like
any other
Bahamian. As
a matter of S M-O
fact, there was
recently a well
known busi-
ness owner
who made the
newspaper for
non-payment
of their com-
pany's NIB
contributions
and it was
shocking the
amount the company owed to
National Insurance; but did
Bay Street business owners or
anyone else write a long article
stating their displeasure or dis-
gust at the situation?
It's blatantly obvious that
some of the Bay Street and
Woods Rogers operators are
envious, jealous and malicious
and clearly have the black crab
syndrome regarding straw ven-
dors and their letter seems like
an attempt to discredit and cast
negative, evil, and hateful
thinking in every effort to
undermine the straw vendors;
making horrific statements
such as "rats running through
the city" in reference to hard
working straw vendors.
There is a popular saying:
"Out all my mother's children
I love myself the best and when
I get my belly full, the hell with
all the rest". That is definitely
descriptive of what your group
represents. In other words, you
want the straw market dislo-
cated from downtown so we


BUSINESS must be good in the straw market as tourists look for gifts.


A BOY enjoys a toy bought from the straw market.


Scan starve and
be dependent
on the country
and our gov-
S la w ernment. Well,
our response is
"hell to the
NO". We
refuse to take
io the back seat,
those days are
long gone and
over with.
The "rats" who your group
referred to have produced
MPs, lawyers, doctors, preach-
ers, teachers, nurses, and busi-
ness professionals just to name
a few. Do you think we are
going to play dumb, stupid, and
ignorant like you all want to
think we are? Well, there are
vendors who sit right in this
market who have degrees and
a whole lot of "professional"
experience, who have worked
in corporate Bahamas, and
some in corporate America,
who choose to be where they
are and that's our prerogative.
So I dare you or anyone else to
belittle us when all we aim to
do is to live honestly,
respectably, and decently like
the majority of Bahamians
aspire to do.
There are many businesses
who owe BEC thousands of
dollars but that has not been
publicised. There are people
who have left our country
owing our government thou-
sands of dollars but did you as


Ripping off tourists and
problems in Straw Market
The fake cigars, drug selling
and giving tourist gifts as men-
tioned in the letter is a serious
problem and a growing con-
cern. You stated that these per-
sons are not straw vendors but
persons who hang around the
straw market ripping off
tourists. These individuals are
present on a daily basis cast-
ing a negative image on legiti-
mate straw vendors who actu-
ally disapprove of their behav-
iour.
May I remind your group
and the public that the Min-
istry of Works which is present-
ly headed by Minister Neko
Grant and his team are man-
agers of the Straw Market.
Straw vendors are not law
enforcers nor do we manage
the straw market. We are there


as merchants trying to make a
living and if stealing, drug deal-
ing, infractions, violations, rip-
ping off tourists are being com-
mitted, then the laws of the
Bahamas should be enforced
and these persons charged with
applicable crimes.
The Ministry of Works team
which has been assigned to
manage the straw market, has
displayed a willingness to over-
see the vendors however this
team needs more training, per-
sonnel, and a stronger leader-
ship in order to effectively car-
ry out their duties.
As persons in the communi-
ty, we are to report crimes to
our law enforcers who are to
carry out their job. You may
not have noticed but the police
have been doing an excellent
job in eradicating the problem
regarding the sale of beads at
the rear of the downtown straw
market. Like in any company
or organisation in the Bahamas
and in any other part of the
world, there are unsavoury,
rude, obnoxious, persons and
there must and should be ways
to address these concerns.
However, your suggestion is
that the way to deal with the
Straw Market problems or con-
cerns is to place the market on
Arawak Cay so that the prob-
lem would appear to be out of
sight. Has your group serious-
ly considered the tourist's safe-
ty and convenience? Based on
your ridiculous proposal, obvi-


ously not; the only thing you
have considered is your busi-
ness, your pocket, your invest-
ments. Well consider this -we
have considered our invest-
ments, our pockets, our family
and the community at large.
What many Bahamians and
your group may not have
realized is that the tourists pur-
posely come looking for The
World Famous Straw Market
regardless of your group or the
public's beliefs. They come
from near and far because they
were told about us either from
friends, family, or other
sources. Many times they say
to us as vendors we wish we
had come sooner just to have
more time to shop. They are
not asking for this shop or that
shop they are looking for
World Famous Straw Market.
They like the bargains and the
whole atmosphere of the mar-
ket. Do you realise that when
they spend with us the money
stays in the country and bene-
fits all? Sometimes the stores
are closed and tourists come
to do their last minute shop-
ping but if we are far out of
reach, that dollar will go back
to the ship and we all lose. We
will remain in the heart of
downtown for the convenience
of our tourists. So take your
selfish attitude and learn to
embrace all Bahamians regard-
less of who they are and stop
displaying the "black crab syn-
drome" mentality.


British American Financial Breast Cancer Tip

Many women worry about the effect their breast cancer will have on their children. If you have children and received a
diagnosis of breast cancer, talk with them. Consider their age and tailor your message so that they understand what the
disease and treatment of it %ill entail, Dont exclude them, as children will likely sense that something is happening in tLlie
fa nmily. Children can be a great source of support and esLurnagement during breast Carr-ei ULatment.


You can survive breast cancer. Early detection through regular breast eyf-examrs and a regular program of
mammogram and physical exams are crucial steps that every u onian should employ.


Simone Bain-Outten


B British

-American


Date of Diagnosis: June 16,2009


I ODSUSSOISO HSIPAGE LG ON5T WWW.TIBUE22CO5


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9,2009, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 8, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNWI


Laye acuedof uin ciets mne
to ay ambingdeb inFrepor


FROM page one

Brady - who reportedly owned a
$2 million home at Merritt Island,
Florida, an oceanfront condomini-
um in Cape Canaveral, two com-
panies, BMWs, a Hummer and var-
ious powerboats, prior to his arrest
- travelled to The Bahamas in
August 2008.
While in Freeport, he wrote five
cheques totalling $45,000 to pay
off his gambling "IOUs" to the Isle
of Capri casino, according to the
Florida Today newspaper.
But law enforcement authorities
alleged the money came from an
escrow account in the US contain-
ing funds that belonged to other
people - clients of his who had
put it there as deposits for pur-
chases of homes or mortgage mon-
ey released to pay home sellers.
It is alleged that upon returning
to Florida, Brady filed a police
report claiming that someone else
had forged his signature on the five
cheques drawn on the escrow
account.
However, it was information
from his bank and from the
Freeport casino which the Sheriff's
office used to determine what they
claim really happened.
The Isle of Capri made available
to authorities a copy of the credit
application on which Brady
allegedly listed one of his escrow


accounts along with three other
accounts to establish a line of cred-
it.
As further evidence of his
alleged culpability, the casino also
provided copies of the five mark-
ers, or "IOUs" requested by Brady
while playing blackjack. Casino
employees confirmed their trans-
actions with the lawyer and his
approval of the use of the escrow
account "per his very unique sig-
nature," according to the Sheriff's
office.
According to the Florida Today
newspaper, Brady alleged the
drawing of the funds was a misun-
derstanding that was corrected.
"It all happened the same day,"
he allegedly said. "They took it out
of the wrong account and we put it
back the same day."
The newspaper claims Brady has
since moved to another state and
opened a law practice.
That move has spurred another
investigation, this time by the Col-
orado Supreme Court, which has
exclusive jurisdiction over lawyers
in that state.
John Gleason, chief regulations
counsel for the Colorado Supreme
Court, said the court is worried
about the fact that the lawyer has
been charged with a crime involv-
ing honesty and who has a large
gambling debt - allegedly totalling
$500,000, according to a Septem-
ber bankruptcy filing.


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Govt considers limits on



cases sent to Privy Council


FROM page one

a case is forwarded to the UK for
final appeal.
"The potential amendment
would be restricting the right of
appeal to certain cases either with
leave of the Court of Appeal
which will decide if it's a serious
enough case to go to the Privy
Council. Or we might want to
consider placing a monetary value
(stipulation) or (it would depend)
on the severity of the case -
those are mainly the alternatives
at the moment," Mr Symonette
told The Tribune yesterday.
He added that he intends to
raise the issue with Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham when Mr Ingra-
ham returns from a World Bank
meeting in Turkey next week.
Earlier this week, Mr Symon-
ette told The Tribune the Gov-
ernment is considering limiting
the number of appeal cases sent
from the Bahamas to the Privy
Council in response to comments
made by Lord Nicholas Phillips,
president of the UK's new
Supreme Court.
Speaking to the Financial Times
newspaper recently, Lord Phillips
said he is looking for ways to


FROM page one
day that at about 8 am on Janu-
ary 2, she accompanied ASP Tay-
lor, Inspector Sean Saunders and
Sergeant Dale Strachan to the
Sheraton Hotel, Cable Beach,
where they saw and spoke to Mr
Travolta's US attorney Michael
McDermott who consented to
wearing a body wire and to hav-
ing recording devices set up in
his room (328).
Sergeant Thompson said that
around 9 o'clock that morning,
Mr McDermott left his room
returning a short time later with a
male she later identified as Tari-
no Lightbourne. Sergeant
Thompson said that prior to the
completion of the meeting
between Mr McDermott and
Lightbourne she went down to
the lobby of the hotel. She said
that when she was returning to
room 326, which police were
using as a monitoring station, she
saw Lightbourne who was wear-
ing blue trousers, a blue shirt and
a black hat.
She again saw Lightbourne
on January 23 at the Central
Detective Unit Freeport. At that
time he was accompanied by his
attorney Carlson Shurland. She
said that on that day, Light-
bourne was charged in relation
with the extortion attempt.
Detective Thompson also told
the court that on January 22, she
and ASP Taylor travelled to
Grand Bahama and around 4.30
pm went to Universal Distribu-
tors where they arrested Bridge-
water. Sergeant Thompson said
that half an hour later, she and
other police officers took Bridge-
water to her law office, Bridge-
water and Co, where they exe-
cuted a search warrant. She said
that while conducting the search
Bridgewater said that she only
had a copy of the document they
were looking for and that after
she noticed that the incident was
going to explode she burned up
the original document with a can-
dle at her home and flushed it
down a toilet.
Sergeant Thompson told the
court that police went to Bridge-
water's home in Bevan's Town,
Freeport where Bridgewater
pointed out a candle in a glass.
Sergeant Thompson told the
court that a Western Air ticket
stub dated January 19, a jacket
and a CPU were taken from the
home.
Sergeant Thompson also tes-
tified yesterday that at about
10.50 am she was present at the
Central station in Grand Bahama
when Asp Taylor interviewed
Bridgewater in the presence of
attorney Carlson Shurland who
represented her at the time. She
told the court that Bridgewater
refused to answer most of the


reduce the "disproportionate"
amount of time judges who staff
the Privy Council also spend on
cases coming from outside the
UK, mostly on cases from former
colonies.
He also questioned whether
some Privy Council cases, which
have ranged from Jamaican death
row appeals to fights over press
freedom in Bermuda, needed to


Bridgewater
questions put to her under the
advice of her attorney. Sergeant
Thompson said that it was sug-
gested to Bridgewater that on
Sunday, January 18, she had spo-
ken to McDermott and demand-
ed $25 million and him that
refusal of the demand would lead
to her and her client releasing
the content of a refusal to trans-
port document to the media.
Sergeant Thompson told the
court that Bridgewater denied
the suggestion, claiming that it
was a fabrication. According to
Sergeant Thompson, it was also
suggested to Bridgewater that on
Monday, January 19, she had met
with Mr McDermott in room 328
at the Sheraton hotel, demanded
$25 million stating that if the
demand was not met she and her
client would go to the media the
following day. Sergeant Thomp-
son said that Bridgewater also
denied that suggestion.
The officer also told the court
that Bridgewater was asked why
as a Senator, she had not
opposed facilitating the com-
mission of an offence. Sergeant
Thompson said that Bridgewa-
ter responded by saying that she
did not wish to answer the ques-
tion.
"Where did you get this piece
about the meeting on the 19th?"
attorney Murrio Ducille asked
during cross-examination.
"Mr McDermott," Sergeant
Thompson replied. She said that
police also had information from
PLP Senator Allyson Maynard-
Gibson and West End and Bimi-
ni MP Obie Wilchcombe among
other persons.
"Was Mr McDermott work-
ing along with the police?" Mr
Ducille asked.
"He was assisting us," Sergeant
Thompson replied.
Mr Ducille then asked, "Who
made the report to the police?"
Sergeant Thompson said that
Mrs Maynard Gibson, Mr
McDermott and Mr Travolta had
made complaints to the police.
According to Sergeant
Thompson, Mr Travolta had
faxed an affidavit to police out-
lining his complaint on January
19.
"You receive reports in that
form?" Mr Ducille asked.
"We do," Sergeant Thompson
replied, stating that it is police
procedure that if for logistical
reasons a person is unable to
come to the police to make a
statement, a statement would be
accepted in that form. She also
told the court that on February
25, she and ASP Taylor went to
Ocala, Florida, to take a state-
ment from Mr Travolta. Sergeant
Thompson said that on May 26,


e heard by a panel of five of
ritain's most senior judges.
Lord Phillips' comments sent
rockwaves throughout the region
nd were seen by legal experts as
warning that Britain might take
eps to shake off the colonial
hangover the institution repre-
ents, leaving countries like the
ahamas to find or create anoth-
r final court of appeal.
ASP Taylor suffered a stroke.
She said he is still in recovery
and on that basis lead prosecutor
and Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner asked the
court to be allowed to close its
case without calling him as a wit-
ness.
Inspector Sean Saunders, who
was involved in the taping of the
meetings between Mr McDer-
mott, Lightbourne and Bridge-
water, was also back on the wit-
ness stand yesterday. The jury
questioned whether there were
tapes of the conversations
between Mr McDermott, Bridge-
water and Lightbourne in the lob-
by of the Sheraton. Inspector
Saunders told the court that the
tapes did exist. The jury also
questioned why they were not
played in court. Inspector Saun-
ders said that those tapes were
from the body wire on Mr
McDermott and that the main
content was of the discussion in
the hotel room. He also
explained that the audio in the
hotel room had been better. The
jury also questioned whether he
had asked Mr McDermott to
record his conversations or
whether the request came from
McDermott himself.
"I asked him," Inspector Saun-
ders said. The conversations cap-
tured on Mr McDermott's body
wire in the lobby of the Shera-
ton on January 19 and 20 were
played in court. Little could be
deciphered from either tape
because of the overwhelming
background noise picked up by
the wire.
On the tape of January 19, Mr
McDermott is heard asking
Bridgewater, "Who told the
Press?"
Bridgewater replied, Obie
called me last night and told me
The Tribune called him....."
"Why did they call Obie?..."
Mr McDermott asked.
"I'm really concerned, did
Tarino tell more to the press...."
"I was hoping we would have
met under different circum-
stances," Mr McDermott is heard
telling Bridgewater.
"This is freaking me out
lady...." Mr McDermott is also
heard telling Bridgewater.
"You could imagine me....."
Bridgewater replied.
On the tape of January 20, Mr
McDermott is heard telling
Lightbourne, "It's been a diffi-
cult couple of weeks. I under-
stand you got suspended from
your job...."
"Yeah..." Lightbourne
replied. Lightbourne is also heard
saying, "I want her to be here...."
The trial was adjourned to
Tuesday at 10 am. Attorneys are
expected to make legal submis-
sions in the absence of the jury
today.


..._TOYOTA tn0ving forward


When a car becomes more.
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safp[j. A -murH ccrnfarlbIE cat in oIIErs superior desig.1
arr�2n I ip, ne'ecjs legroomrand a b ggr trunk. And
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I mpg I' iF h:vtA- ' -rati~i. y '.. ihl 1:?upil ~ninc lude
V-6 HniH and i gIi ar 10 a 0c .


CAMRY


V Y U1f^I IT 11 ..14"*Nl a1" 'lw *' " **'-^ .t-
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jj AL.TlORI'SED TOYOTA DrALEFR Parti umd wrnke gplunm l kaff


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O













Fantasy League faceoff


By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net
There's nothing better to a
sports fan, well a fan of any-
thing for that matter, than
feeling as if you have a vested interest
in the outcome of a game or whatev-
er you believe in. This is why gam-
bling is so popular (you win you get
money), political parties get such sup-
port (you win you're on the positive
side of victimization), people go to
church (you choose the right religion
and you're promised salvation), and
movies continue to make gazillions of
dollars (didn't it feel like you were
right there with Leonidas and the 300
fighting the Persian army?). For those


of us that will never play a snap in the
NFL, Fantasy Football provides an
opportunity for the athletic, unin-
spired, and unwilling to get up off
the couch layperson like myself to
become involved and to realize the
ultimate dream...the ability to con-
trol a professional football team.
Fantasy football allows this dream
to become a (virtual) reality. For
those of you that have lived under a
rock for the past few years or have
been paying attention to trivial things
like eating, sleeping and having a
job...let's backtrack and explain exact-
ly what fantasy football.
In fantasy football you're basically
in charge of managing a team and
selecting the players that will pro-
duce the most possible points.


You're given a team and have to
choose the best players from the NFL
to fill the spots based on the position
they play. In most leagues the stan-
dard format is one quarterback, two
running backs, two wide receivers,
one tight end, one defense/special
teams, one kicker and a flex spot that
can be filled with either a running
back or a wide receiver. Each week
you trade/add players to your team
depending on how other players do
and who the players team is playing.
Each team in a fantasy league does
this and according to how each indi-
vidual player does, he get's points for
how they've performed (eg, Touch-
down 6pts, rushing 100 yards 10
pts...etc etc). Some people gamble
on it some don't, but most of us play


it for the thrill and satisfaction of
being able to tell a friend or co-work-
er "I'm better than you."
Fantasy football has been known
ruin friendships, cause mental break-
downs, end relationships, spawn sit-
coms, begin wars, end wars, occupy
an entire week (Tuesday through Sat-
urday tinkering with a lineup and
Sunday and Monday monitoring how
well your team does), cure the com-
mon cold, prevent Swine Flu...it can
basically do anything but make
"House of Payne" watchable.
To my female readers...yes it is that
serious.
Legend has it that the Israeli-Pales-
tinian conflict didn't really get this
violent until the British mandate for
Palestine included that the Palestini-


ans would also have to give up the
first pick in the UN fantasy football
draft, which everyone knew would
be Steve Van Buren. Do you see
what happens when you make some-
one lose a record setting point pro-
ducer? This is like if the UN held a
fantasy draft today, split the Bahamas
down the middle and forced the east-
ern side to fore go Adrian Peterson.
I would go to war over this for at
least 50 years.
To succeed in fantasy football, you
need the business savvy of a general
manager, the knowledge of a pro
scout, and the strategy of a head
coach...and to see if anyone I know
possesses these skills, this year we'll
monitor our Tribune league in the
Ramblings.


the players


League Name: THE ARISTOCRATS
Format: Head to Head
Top Prize: No Idea...willing to take suggestions

) JONAH BROWN
Key Players: Adrian Peterson, Clinton Portis,
Brett Farve, Dallas Clark
Record: 3-1
Interesting Draft Note: Jonah had the first
pick in the draft and after shouting into the phone
for about 17 actual minutes (which is a really long
time to hear someone shout)...he said "Do I still
have to put the put the rest of my team together
or Can I just pick Adrian Peterson twice?"
Season Highlight: Opening with an overall
135 point effort in a week one win led by a week
high 40 from Peterson.

)) PHILLIP
Key Players: Tom Brady, Terrell Owens, Steve
Smith (Giants), Vernon Davis
Record: 3-1
Interesting Draft Note: The best part of draft
night, Phillip taking Darren McFadden in the
fourth round just so Dale (a Raiders fan) would-
n't get him. The beauty of fantasy football in a
nutshell.
Season Highlight: Survived a week where he
got zero points from Terrell Owens and still man-
aged to beat Dale.

)) BEEF
Key Players: Larry Fitzgerald, Calvin John-
son, Ben Roethlisberger, Willis McGahee


Record: 1-3
Interesting Draft Note: A graduate of the Isiah
Thomas school of general management, Beef
didn't take a running back until the fifth round.
Season Highlight: See aforementioned state-
ment...and still managed to beat Dale.

)) DAKARAI
Key Players: Andre Johnson, Greg Jennings,
Matt Forte, Joe Flacco
Record: 3-1
Interesting Draft Note: Had a ridiculously con-
sistent draft for the first five rounds with none of
the picks turning up a bust so far...although
Ryan Grant is getting dangerously close.
Season Highlight: Broke the 100 point barri-
er for the first time this season in a defeat
of...Dale.

) AVERY
Key Players: Michael Turner, Frank Gore,
Steve Smith (Panthers), Antonio Gates
Record: 2-2
Interesting Draft Note: Total beneficiary of
ESPN's autopick option.
Season Highlight:130 points in week two led
by that ridiculous 200 yard game from Frank
Gore.

) ANDREW
Key Players: Jay Cutler, Reggie Wayne, Chad
Ochocinco, Maurice Jones-Drew
Record: 3-1
Interesting Draft Note: Took four running


backs in the first four rounds with the league's
shortest (MJD) and the league's tallest (Brandon
Jacobs) back to back.
Season Highlight: Finding a double breasted
vest and wearing it at Mansion and all around
South Beach before I had a chance to.

0) DALE
Key Players: Drew Brees, Ronnie Brown, Bran-
don Marshall, Brian Westbrook
Record: 1-3
Interesting Draft Note: Another beneficiary of
ESPN's autopick, wound up with Drew Brees
and Peyton Manning.
Season Highlight: None.

0) RENALDO
Key Players: Peyton Manning, Steve Slaton,
Marques Colston, LaDanian Tomlinson
Record: 2-2
Interesting Draft Note: Worst first pick
EVER...LaDanian Tomlinson who's averaging
about three points per game this season.
Season Highlight: Overcame the terrible LT
pick by trading for Peyton Manning AND Dean-
gelo Williams. I'm going to love this league.

)) TIM
Key Players: Steve Jackson, Chris Johnson,
Roddy White, Tony Gonzalez
Record: 1-3
Interesting Draft Note: Autopick player.
Season Highlight: Added Godfrey as a second
owner this week to rescue his pretty good team


d O


.9


talent wise from his awful management skills.

0) NATARIO
Key Players: Carson Palmer, DeSean Jack-
son, Randy Moss, Eli Manning
Record: 1-3
Interesting Draft Note: I was more afraid of
this team coming out of the gate than anyone
else, Randy Moss, Deangelo Williams, Jason
Witten and Donovan McNabb seemed like a great
foursome until they were all derailed by an out of
sync offense, splitting carries with a backup,
Tony Romo's inefficiency and a busted rib.
Season Highlight: Injuries and Tom Brady
not throwing the ball to Randy Moss are killing
this team.


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Robert Myers
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HElary Deveaux,
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Would like to say THANK YOU to the
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TRIBUNE SPORTS


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9,2009, PAGE 9




PAGE 10, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


'On your marks' for 5k ocean race


SWIFT swimming club's 5k
(about three miles) open
water race at Old Fort Bay,
New Providence, is scheduled
for Saturday, October 17.
The event - a triangular
course along the beach - is
sponsored by Holowesko


Partners Limited, orthaheel
and Lyford Cay Real Estate.
According to a press state-
ment, the goal of the race is to
"re-ignite the interest in open
water swimming that existed
some 30 to 40 years ago and
to raise the level of competi-


tiveness and exposure in the
sport."
"Some swimmers enjoy
competing against the ele-
ments and not having to
watch a black line on the bot-
tom of a pool for four hours a
day.


-1


VACANCY




POSITION SUMMARY
Functions as the Strategic Business Leader of the Golf department with overall responsibility for golf
operations including guest and employee satisfaction, sales and revenue management and the financial
performance of the department. As a member of the Guidance Team, develops hotel-wide goals and
strategies that deliver products and services to meet or exceed the needs and expectations of guests and
employees and provide a return on investment to the owners and the Company. Supports and upholds
The Companyis Gold Standards, and luxury tier standards of operation.
RESPONSIBILITIES
* Operations: Directs the daily activities of the golf department according to Company operating
standards to maintain brand equity. Oversees the operation of the golf shop, the maintenance of the
golf course, and all associated retail services (e.g., snack carts, beverage service).
* Guest Satisfaction: Ensures products and services delivered by the golf department meet or exceed
guest expectations, create customer loyalty, and lead to increased market share.
* Human Resources: Attracts, selects and retains a diverse hourly and management workforce to
deliver excellent service and effective leadership in the Golf department. Creates and sustains a
work environment that focuses on fair and equitable treatment and employee satisfaction to enable
business success.
* Sales and Revenue Management: Focuses on building the units top line revenue by working with
the Director of Sales and Marketing to develop the Golf departments sales and marketing strategy.
Concentrates on both the rate per round of golf and number of rounds played per day to maximize
Revenue per available round or 'REVPAR'. In addition, manages other revenue sources such as the
Pro Shop, Food and Beverage sales, and if applicable membership enrollment to generate increased
revenue.
* Financial Management: Develops and manages the Golf departments annual operating budget
to achieve or exceed budget expectations. Ensures successful performance by increasing profitability
and providing a return on investment for the owners and the Club.
* Owner Relations: Develops a trusting and respectful business partnership with property owners by
meeting or exceeding expectations in operations management, asset protection, and financial
performance
QUALIFICATIONS
* 4-year bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Hotel and Restaurant Management, or related
major
* 5 years experience in executive management position in a five star resort
* Ritz-Carlton Leadership Training or similar formalized corporate exposure preferred
* Membership in PGA and/or LPGA is required.
SKILLS & KNOWLEDGE
* Proficient at the game of golf
* Knowledge of turf lawn care and maintenance procedures with an emphasis on golf turf grass varieties
* Retail merchandising skills
* Instructional teaching skills - if required to deliver golf lessons
* Knowledge of golf and grounds equipment and routine maintenance needs
* Financial management skills e.g. ability to analyze P&L statements, develop operating budgets,
forecasting and capital expenditure planning
* Strong communication, strategic planning, analytical and customer and employee relations skills


Please send resume to the attention of:


Deadline for applications is Wednesday, October 14, 2009


Director of Human Resources
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB-20571
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Bahamas
OR
Email: Freddie.Munnings@ritzcarlton.com


"With the open water
event being held here in New
Providence it means that
there are now open water
races on three different
islands, Grand Bahama, Aba-
co, and New Providence,"
said the release.
The Old Fort Bay race will
cover three age groups in the
male and female divisions -
12 and under, 13 to 17, and 18
and over.
There will also be relays in
these age groups. The awards
include trophies for first, sec-
ond, and third individual
male and female per age
group. And there will be tro-
phies for first, second and


third relay team per age
group, a crystal vase for over-
all male and female winners
and a crystal vase for the
youngest and oldest individ-
ual competitors.
With about 10 local swim
clubs in the Bahamas taking
part, the competition is
expected to be at a high level.
Forms for the event can be
printed from the Internet
page: http://www.swim-
swift.com.
All forms are to be turned
in at the school office of St
Andrews School, St Anne's
School or Lyford Cay School
before the entry deadline of
Wednesday, October 14.


Lady Techs defeat


COB Caribs

THE New Providence Volleyball Association (NPVA) con-
tinued its regular season action Wednesday night at the D W
Davis Gymnasium with a double header.
In the women's opener, it took the Lady Techs five sets to
defeat the College of the Bahamas Caribs 25-21, 25-17, 19-25,
18-25 and 15-7.
Sharon Whylly led the Lady Techs with seven kills followed
by Sonia Hinsey with five kills. In a losing effort, Kenisha
Thompson led all scorers with 11 kills.
In the men's action, the Scotiabank Defenders won over
the Crimestoppers in five tough sets 23-25, 26-24, 25-16, 20-25
and 16-14.
Ian 'Wire' Pinder and Shedrick Forbes led the Defenders with
16 and 11 kills respectively. Leonardo Dean and Carl Rolle led
the Crimestoppers with 17 and 13 kills.
Another double header is on tap for 7:30pm Friday.


'Turbo'

re-elected

as NPCA

president

BARRON 'Turbo' Mus-
grove has been re-elected as
president of the New Provi-
dence Cycling Association for
the next three years.
On October 3, at the meet-
ing held in the office of the
Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion, Musgrove was elected to
serve with the following offi-
cers:
Amanda Graham and
Wayne Price as vice presi-
dents
Eugene Hatie as general
secretary
Henry Kline as assistant
secretary
Robert Butler as treasurer
Robert Bethell as assistant
treasurer
Sylvia Russell was appoint-
ed as the operational manag-
er of the management board,
which will deal with the day-
to-day running of the associa-
tion. She will also be respon-
sible for all communications
to and from the association.
Musgrove indicated that his
executives will work harder
to create interest, excitement
and encourage more involve-
ment by the public in bicycle
riding/racing on New Provi-
dence and the Bahamas.
Therefore, Musgrove said
they intend to look forward
to more good things like fam-
ily rides, community rides and
more persons riding bicycles.


Big Red Machine shut out Comets


FROM page 11
But it was in the fourth that
the Big Red Machine really
put the game out of reach as
they produced six more runs
as they batted around the
clock.
Christie would lead off the
charge with a single and after
third baseman Lucius Fox
had a run-producing single,
Isaacs Jr ripped a shot up to
right centerfield for a three-
run in-the-parker.
Before they were finished,
SAC scored three more runs,
sparked by Christie's RBI
single.
"I think this was the most
competitive team we've
played so far," said SAC's
coach John Todd. "This is the
first time that we saw the fast
pitch in a long time and so
the guys were just hungry.
"But I don't think they
played as well as they are
capable of playing. We know
that we will meet them again.
But whenever we do, we will
be ready."
In each of their four
innings at bat, Queen's Col-


QUEEN'S
COLLEGE
Comets'
pitcher
Ramero Pin-
dling pitches
to St.
Augustine's
College.


lege got a runner in scoring
position, but they were never
able to bring anybody home.
Comets' second baseman
Jonathan Neymour got the
first opportunity in the bot-
tom of the first when he
reached safely on an error,
advanced to second on a wild
pitch and got to third on a
sacrifice fly.
But he was left stranded.
In the second inning with
two out, Queen's College Tre
Spears walked and reached
second on an error.
But he too was left strand-
ed.
In the third, the Comets
had their best scoring poten-
tial after Ashmeid Allie got
out trying to reach third, and
Jonathan Neymour and Ger-
rio Rahming made it to third
and second respectively.
On a fly ball that got Ken-
neth Bethel out, Neymour
tried to score, but ran into


the tag from Byron Murray
standing up in front of the
plate.
Rahming was then left
stranded.
And in the fourth, with one
out, Ramero Cartwright and
Tre Spears were sitting on
third and second.
But they too were left
stranded after pinch hitter
Roberto Smith struck out and
Antoine Ferguson grounded
out to end the abbreviated
game.
"Our hitting was a little
poor today and we made
some little mistakes on the
infield," coach Markham
stressed. "These things we
were doing right, but they all
came together and hurt us.
"Our defense was poor.
We just didn't turn up today.
But we are a good little ball
club. We were just beaten on
the day by a more superior
team."


Brig)ht(@Effecive


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Q" 1


Fantasy
Football
faceoff
PAGE 9


Big Red



Machine



shut out



Comets

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
THE ST AUGUSTINE'S College Big Red Machine
ran their unblemished junior boys record to 5-0 yesterday
with an 11-0 whitewashing of the Queen's College Comets.
Also at Queen's College in a Bahamas Association of
Independent Secondary Schools' (BAISS) double header,
the Comets clobbered the visiting Bahamas Academy 31-
3 in their senior girls encounter.
The junior boys game was a battle of the undefeated, but
Queen's College was simply out-classed by SAC as they
suffered their first loss in three games.
To make matters worse, Queen's College batters had a
difficult time getting a hit off St Augustine's College
starter Blair Seymour, who fired a no-hitter with just two
strike outs.
"We were beaten by a good team today," said Comets'
coach Gary Markham. "We didn't help ourselves because
we made a lot of basic infield errors. You might have
called it nervousness.
"You might say they were just fundamentally sound. But
we have a good little ball team and we will see them in the
playoffs."
Although the playoffs is still a little ways off, SAC did-
n't waste any time in staking their claim for another title
when it's all said and done.
Center fielder Todd Isaacs Jr started the 11-hit parade
for SAC off QC's pitcher Ramero Cartwright in the top of
the first inning when he had a one-run single and eventu-
ally scored on a double steal after shortstop Anfernee
Seymour singled.
That was followed by catcher Byron Murray, who came
up with a shot deep into left field for a two-run in-the-park
home run that plated Seymour.
SAC would peak away with an unearned run in the
second from left fielder Kentwood Christie and another
from Murray in the third after they both singled.
SEE page 10


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1







PAGELOCAL 2,S FRIDAYIOCTOBER9,2009THETRB


FORMER MP RON PINDER GETS MARRIED


FORMER MARATHON MP and Min-
ister of State for the Environment Ron
Pinder tied the knot yesterday with Mar-
got Burrows at the British Colonial Hilton.
Mr Pinder was the youngest candidate
fielded by the PLP in the 2002 general


election. He became a favourite with the
public as a junior Minster for his hands
on approach in managing his department.
He lost his seat to current Marathon
MP Earl Deveaux in the 2007 general elec-
tion.


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FROM page one

1997. Because people would
recognize that the PLP is not
a party that invites young
persons in; it does not invite
new persons in, it only seems
to be positioning itself to
cater to those who have been
well ensconced in the party,
who have a tremendous
track record with the party,
and it would be a complete
turn off to young voters," he
said.
To date, the only official
challenger to the party's
leader Perry Christie is PLP
newcomer Paul Moss.
Still without a seat in the
House of Assembly, Mr
Moss has campaigned in the
St Cecilia constituency for at
least two years, hoping to get
the party's nomination to
run in the area.
While there has been spec-
ulation that there will be oth-
er contenders who would
join Mr Moss in challenging
Mr Christie, Mr Moss at this
time remains the only chal-
lenger to what otherwise
would be an uncontested run
by Mr Christie at the Octo-
ber 21 convention.
With sources in the party
suggesting that this conven-
tion would be the last one
that the PLP will hold before
the next election, any


changes to its leadership at
the chairman, deputy leader,
or leadership positions will
have to be made at this time.
And it is with this in mind
that political pundits believe
that supporters in Mr
Christie's camp will do all
that they can to ensure that
the seasoned leader is
returned to power in his bid
to once again become Prime
Minister of the Bahamas.

Meeting
It is this desire sources
claim at "maintaining con-
trol" that fueled last night's
meeting where the party's
NGC was expected to vote
on three amendments -
firstly that anyone who seeks
the leadership of the party
should first be a Member of
Parliament or at least a
Member of the Senate.
Secondly, the NGC was
expected to vote on a reso-
lution that is being proposed
to block the nomination of
any PLP MP who does not
declare his intentions before
the start of the National
Convention.
And finally, the third
amendment sought was the
creation of a co-deputy posi-
tion.
However Mr Galanis
again expressed his displea-


sure with even the possibili-
ties of these resolutions
being carried out.
Outlining how the consti-
tution of the party clearly
states that any amendments,
additions, or alterations to it
can only be made by resolu-
tion and carried by a major-
ity vote at the National Con-
vention, Mr Galanis said that
any vote carried out last
night can only be put for-
ward to the convention at
some future date.
"But I think that would
also be ill-advised," the for-
mer MP said.
"Because the whole idea
is for the PLP to be all inclu-
sive and really encourage
people to come into the par-
ty and not discourage peo-
ple. There are in fact right
now persons who are more
qualified to be leader in my
opinion outside of Parlia-
ment than many of the per-
sons who sit inside.
"And so the party I think
if they wish to get the best
and the brightest, can not be
xenophobic, and confining
and close ended. It has to
expand the realm of possi-
bility and cast a broad net to
capture as many persons as it
can," Mr Galanis said.
CHRISTIE'S ZNS PERFORMANCE WAS
DISAPPOINTING - FORMER PLP MP
* SEE PAGE THREE


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


PAGE 12, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9,2009


THE TRIBUNE


49









THE TRIBUNE





)US1


SS


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2009


PETINB usnestrbneedane


Act sparks

investment

concerns

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
S O M E
ATTORNEYS
are concerned
that the Govern-
ment's proposed
Planning and
Subdivision bill
will curtail for-
eign direct
investment in
the Bahamas,
the Minister of EARL DEVEAUX
the Environ-
ment said yesterday.
Earl Deveaux said the new
Bill will prevent unscrupulous
developers from cheating the
land allotment process by
demanding a much more trans-
parent and stringent process for
development approvals.
He said the Bill was specifi-
cally intended to aid in the
proper development of subdi-
visions across the Bahamas, and
the preservation of land.
"This Bll codifies the Prime
Minister's vision to seek to
make developmental decisions
environmentally friendly, more
transparent, national in scope
and empowered by local con-
ditions," said Dr Deveaux.
"The Subdivision Bill that we
talk about is the culmination of
decades of development, and
the heightened level of envi-
ronmental awareness which res-
onates in the Bahamas today
kind of echoes the names of the
places we live today."
The minister said the Bill will
move to promote much more
accountability on the part of
developers who acquire Crown
Land near wetlands and coastal
areas.
"Protecting the natural
resources of the Bahamas, and
protecting the wetland, is prob-
ably the single greatest legacy
this generation of Bahamian
planners and developers will
establish," he said.
The new Bill will also curb
the misuse of Crown Land that
led to the development of a
parliamentary select commit-
tee to investigate alleged prob-
lems within the Department of
Land and Surveys that led to
the resignation of its director,
Tex Turnquest.
Mr Deveaux said the


Venture fund 'reassesses'



after its 50% success rate


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


The Government-sponsored
venture capital fund has
slowed its investments in
Bahamian start-ups as it
"reassesses its lending
practices" and concentrates on its exist-
ing portfolio, Tribune Business was told
yesterday, with just 50 per cent of the 50
firms it has aided "performing up to
expectations".
Jerome Gomez, the Baker Tilly
Gomez accountant who acts as the
fund's administrator, said the reassess-
ment would last until year-end, the
recession having forced it into ensuring
its existing $4.5 million start-up portfo-
lio survives.
"We are reassessing our portfolio and
our lending practices," Mr Gomez con-
firmed to Tribune Business. "Our exist-
ing businesses are having their chal-
lenges. We have had to put greater
effort into helping those, and that has


* Fund examining lending and portfolio practices,
having slowed lending to aid existing firms
* $4.5m of $5m financing disbursed, through 11 equity
and 39 debt financing arrangements for start-ups
* Likely to seek private investment from 2011
* Main challenges come from entrepreneurs looking
to invest funds in new business activities


made us hold back on new investments.
"We have done some, but not as
many as in the past. In these economic
times, we have to be prudent with the
type of business we invest in. We want to
invest in businesses with good quality
potential."
The Bahamas Entrepreneurial Ven-
ture Fund, to give the Government-
sponsored venture capital fund its full
name, has made equity investments in
just two Bahamian start-ups to date for
2009, Mr Gomez confirmed.


Out of $5 million worth of taxpayers'
money invested in the fund to-date
since, inception, the Baker Tilly Gomez
accountant said some $4.5 million had
been invested in 50 companies.
"Half of the companies are perform-
ing up to expectations," he added.
"We're just holding our own."
Out of these, some 11 had received
equity investments, the remaining 39
receiving debt financing. Currently, the
SEE page 2B


Labour investigators sent into retail giant


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
THE Director of Labour yes-
terday confirmed that the
department's investigators have
been sent into Solomon's Mines
to investigate employees claims
of salaries being up to five
months past due, although staff
told Tribune Business they
have not seen them on the
premises.
Harcourt Brown said his
department had also begun
conciliatory processes for for-
mer employees whose sever-
ance payments have not been
met, but current staff who claim
to be waiting for outstanding
salaries have been hesitant to
bring their cases to the Labour
Board for fear of retribution by
their employer.
Mr Brown said the Depart-
ment of Labour has been aware
of the unpaid staff's claims since
early this year, but added that
his team has revisited the alle-
gations.
"We have a number of meet-


ings already underway with
lawyers and management at
Solomon's Mines," he said.
"The ones that come in - atten-
tion is firstly directed toward
those employees, and as far as
any other employees are con-
cerned... inspectors have gone
down to speak to manage-
ment."
Mr Brown said his depart-
ment has done a good job at
addressing the cases, as "a good
percentage of them" have been
looked at.
He said many of those cases
centre around the luxury goods
retailer's alleged failure to meet
payroll obligations, and insisted
the company has been extreme-
ly cooperative with the Depart-
ment of Labour.
However, employees at the
Bay Street-headquartered
retailer say they continue to
work week-on-week without
payment.
Mr Brown said he could not
say how long a company is
allowed to carry on with busi-
ness without paying its staff,
and suggested it was evaluated


on a case-by-case basis.
Meanwhile, Tribune Busi-
ness was yesterday told of a
Solomon's Mines staff member
who was one late rent payment
shy of being evicted from the
apartment where she resides.
With a barren job market
just outside Solomon's Mines'
door, employees say they can-
not consider leaving without
first securing another job.
Mr Brown said he sees a
group of employees "prepared
to stick with the company. That
speaks volumes to their com-
mitment and dedication," he
said. "The company has the
best interest of the workers at
mind, and it is only fair now
that their welfare be taken into
account.
"It could be a tedious
process, and the company has
stated publicly that they are
financially challenged."
According to sources close
to the Finlaysons, the family
will be taking their yacht, the
Maratani-X, to Harbour Island
for the annual North Eleuthera
Regatta.


Employees have been con-
cerned that personal trips by
their president, Mark Fin-
layson, have taken precedence
over his financial obligations to
them.
One employee lamented:
"Another holiday weekend and
some of us cannot even buy
groceries. We haven't seen a
dollar and they are off."
Solomon's Mines' attorney,
PLP Senator Jerome Fitzger-
ald, said he could not comment
publicly on the conciliation
efforts being made by the com-
pany.
However, Mr Fitzgerald, who
recently launched his campaign
to become deputy leader of the
PLP, said things were moving
ahead.
"There are a number of
things we are sorting out and
we are making provisions to
pay them off," he said.
Mr Brown insisted:
"Whether trying to sell its assets
or salvage what it can", that at
the end of the day the workers
will be given what is owed them
by the company.


Small business

hit by 7-8 month

'credit crunch'

* Sector 'stagnating now
that the bottom has
already dropped out',
with surviving firms
not hiring and no new
start-ups emerging
* October 27 meeting with
association presidents
designed to kick-start
Small Business
Act crafting

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMIAN small busi-
nesses and entrepreneurs have
been hit by this nation's own
version of a 'credit crunch' for
the past seven to eight months,
Tribune Business was told yes-
terday, with the sector "stag-
nating now that the bottom has
already dropped out".
Speaking as business associ-
ation president prepare to meet
at the Bahamas Development
Bank (BDB) on October 27 to
start the process of crafting a
Small Business Act, Mark A.
Turnquest, of Mark Turnquest
Consulting, said that while the
rate of business failures seemed
to have slowed, "no new busi-
nesses are opening now" and
those that have survived the
recession are not hiring.
"I feel that at the moment
the banks have almost stopped
lending money to businesses,"
Mr Turnquest, a consultant and
adviser to the small business
sector, told Tribune Business.
"For new businesses, it's
almost impossible to get loans
now. The Bahamas Entrepre-
neurial Venture Fund has com-
pletely changes its lending poli-
cies. They are now re-organis-
ing and re-focusing, and it's
almost impossible for new busi-
nesses to access money easily
now.
"Commercial institutions are
now completely ignoring entre-
preneurs. The ones that have
good standing with the banks
are not being taken care of. For
the past seven to eight months

SEE page 7B


SEE page 6B



Regulators act over


agency closure worry


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
REGULATORS have
"required" the owner of a
recently-closed insurance
agency to publish a newspaper
advertisement informing his
clients of where they can con-
tact him, after receiving numer-
ous complaints from Bahami-
ans concerned over whether
they still had coverage.
Lennox McCartney, the
Insurance Commissioner, con-
firmed to Tribune Business late
yesterday afternoon that the
regulator had asked Robert de
Swanton to publish his new
contact details following the
closure of his Palmdale,
Madeira Street-based Rodes
Global Insurance Agency with-


out warning or explanation to
his clients.
"We have received a num-
ber of complaints," Mr McCart-
ney confirmed to Tribune Busi-
ness. "A couple of persons have
contacted us. We are aware of
their concerns.
"Mr de Swanton, who did
close his business, is required
to set up an arrangement where
he can be contacted and the
outstanding matters be
addressed."
Tribune Business contacted
Mr McCartney after numerous
insurance industry sources told
this newspaper that clients of
Rodes (which stands for Robert
de Swanton) were complaining
about the agency's closure,
being especially concerned
about whether they still had
insurance coverage after just
paying their premiums.
The number for Rodes'
Palmdale office was said to no
longer be in service when Tri-
bune Business called yesterday,
and calls to Mr de Swanton's
cell phone were not answered
before press time. It was said
that the phone could not take
voice mail messages.
"Anyone who has complaints
or concerns can contact us," Mr
MrCartney said yesterday,
adding that Mr de Swanton
should have already published
advertisements with his contact
details.
"There will be a contact
number for persons who wish
to contact him, and with any
unresolved matters persons can
contact us. We are in contact
with him, so that he can resolve
these matters. We want to
make sure everything is
addressed."


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PAGEBUINS IB RDY COE ,20 H RBN


Venture fund 'reassesses' after its 50% success rate


Iea Ini t

on Monay


more control and say over how
the firm/entrepreneur runs the
business and uses its invest-
ment.
"One of the bigger chal-
lenges has just been the lack of
focus by owners," Mr Gomez
said of the Bahamas Entrepre-
neurial Venture Fund's portfo-
lio.
"What we've seen is that per-
sons want to invest in addition-
al activities outside the busi-
ness. As soon as they receive


money from it, they look at oth-
er opportunities outside that
business, and the business suf-
fers because cash flow is taken
out of it.
"The business is only two to
three years old, but instead of
waiting for the five-year mark,
even up to 10 years, they take
profits out rather than go slow
and steady. They just rush into
doing everything else."
However, the fact that the
Bahamas Entrepreneurial Ven-
ture Fund is enjoying a 50 per
cent success rate with its invest-
ment portfolio is no bad thing,
as the venture capital industry's
success rate is usually between
10-15 per cent - meaning that
between eight to nine start-ups
out of every 10 invested in usu-


ally fails.
Instead, venture capitalists
and their funds aim to gener-
ate their returns from one
investment that turns into a
major success story, Mr Gomez
adding yesterday: "We're still
looking for that one big win."
It was this lack of under-
standing of the venture capital
industry that Mr Gomez said
might have contributed to peo-
ple believing the Bahamas
Entrepreneurial Venture Fund
had "underperformed".
"I think overall it might have
underperformed expectations,
but that is simply because many
people have not studied how a
venture fund should function,"
he explained. "We've been slow
getting the message out to per-


FROM page 1B

Bahamas Entrepreneurial Ven-
ture Fund can invest a maxi-
mum $200,000 in equity into a
start-up, with a $100,000 limit in
the debt financing it can
advance.
Currently, equity investments
seem to be more in vogue for
the fund, possibly because this
allows it to appoint directors to
a start-up's Board, giving it


LAND DEVELOPMENT CHIEF ENGINEER

Land development company is looking for a Chief Engineer to assist with an increasing
development portfolio in the Bahamas and abroad.

Main Responsibilities

* Oversee all aspects of detailed engineering design, permitting and construction for residential,
commercial and industrial projects
* Establish and maintain construction budgets and timelines
* Prepare and administer design and construction contracts
* Provide expertise and supervision on both horizontal and vertical construction
* Coordinate with government, regulating authorities, contractors and clients

Qualifications & Experience

* Bachelors Degree in Civil Engineering
* Minimum 10-15 years experience in the land development industry
* Proven management & leadership skills with at least 5 years experience in a senior management
position
* Aptitude for writing proposals and preparing and managing financial schedules
* Experience in green development or LEED certification would be an asset
* Sound understanding of local and international building codes and construction practices
* Excellent communication skills - verbal and written
* Computer proficiency - including AutoCAD, Excel, Word, etc.
* Must have international experience and professional registration in the US or Canada

Remuneration

Salary and benefits will be based upon experience and qualifications.

Interested persons should submit their resume by email to
careeropportunity-09@hotmail.com
on or before Thursday,October 16, 2009.


SOISCU S STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NT WTIUE4.O


sons in the past that we're not a
bank, and we're hoping for one
or two big successes in the
investment portfolio.
"It's more based on the busi-
ness idea and the entrepreneur,
rather than the collateral. It's
a different type of lending that
calls for different skills and spe-
cialties."
Mr Gomez pointed out that
had it not been for the
Bahamas Entrepreneurial Ven-
ture Fund, some 120 persons
working for the businesses it
had financed might now be
unemployed.
"It's training a whole new
crew of entrepreneurs in dif-
ferent disciplines - record keep-
ing, organising Board meet-
ings," Mr Gomez said. "We're
unlike many banks, who only
take an interest when payments
stop coming in."
The fund administrator
added that its Board had taken
no decision on when to seek
private capital investment into
the Bahamas Entrepreneurial
Venture Fund.
"We're still in the process of
tidying up our portfolio, making
tough decisions, which busi-
nesses we want to stay in, and
which we want to exit. At the
end of a five-year period, we
will be in a position to decide
whether to involve private
investment."
That five-year point, he
added, would be reached in
2011.


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Share your news

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hear from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
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for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2009


THE TRIBUNE










ILO visit seeking to make training 'model' permanent


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
AN International Labour
Organisation (ILO) mission will
visit the Bahamas this month
to discuss how the National
Training Programme can best
be transformed into a long-term
initiative, Tribune Business was
told yesterday, the body view-
ing it as "a model for crisis
response by government".
Khaalis Rolle, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce's pres-
ident and National Training
Programme chair, said the ILO
was offering to provide techni-
cal assistance to construct a
microfinancing programme and
evaluation mechanism for the
initiative.
"We actually had a confer-
ence call with them [the ILO]
today to talk to them about the
next step," Mr Rolle told Tri-
bune Business. "They're offer-
ing technical assistance in the
construction of an evaluation
mechanism for the programme,
and the construction of the
microfinancing part of the pro-
ject."
The microfinancing element,
Mr Rolle explained, was related
to the National Training Pro-
gramme's self-starters element,
with the Government currently
planning to provide $5,000 in
seed capital to recruits who
wanted to become entrepre-
neurs and start their own busi-
nesses.
"In a nutshell, they're look-
ing to offer technical assistance
to ensure the viability of the
programme long-term," Mr
Rolle told Tribune Business.
"The programme, as it is con-
ceived now, is designed to pro-
vide some measure of relief.
People are hurting, and the
Government saw fit to assist
them through a number of ini-
tiatives. This is just one of
those."
Mr Rolle added of the ILO:
"They're looking at it [the
National Training Programme]
as a model for crisis response
by governments. They're going
to do a mission to the Bahamas
on 26-30 October, and that's
when we're going to sit down
with them."
Between then and now, Mr
Rolle said the ILO would pro-
vide them with the necessary
information "on best practices",


KHAALIS ROLLE


so that at the meetings they
could determine which would
work best in the Bahamas, and
how to implement them.
The ILO, he added, was
"going to provide the technical
expertise which we need more
so than anything else.
"Financing for it is equally
important, but having the pro-
ject properly structured and
executed is the main focus. The
ILO will not provide the financ-
ing. We will try and go out and
secure additional funding for
it."
Some 800 laid-off Bahami-
ans are now enrolled in its
National Training Programme,
Dion Foulkes, minister of
labour and social services, hav-
ing told Tribune Business ear-
lier this week that the Govern-
ment was "extremely pleased
with the progress" of the ini-
tiative. Some 300 Bahamians in
Grand Bahama and a further
500 in New Providence enrolled
at classes at the Bahamas Tech-
nical and Vocational Institute
(BTVI) and the College of the
Bahamas (COB).
Although not designed to
eliminate unemployment, since


it was designed for up to a
1,000-strong intake at any one
time, the National Training
Programme still aims to re-train
and equip with new skills those
terminated from their jobs due
to the recession.
Its classes last for between
10-15 weeks, Mr Foulkes said,
covering subjects such as com-
puting, accountancy and more
vocational careers, such as car-
pentry, welding and plumbing.
The "highest concentration" of
entrants was for computer-ori-
entated courses.
"We are very pleased with
the quality of the persons who
have come forward," Mr
Foulkes said. "We are now
preparing for the next phase,
which is to identify persons who
wish to start their own business
as a result of the training they
are receiving."
The minister foreshadowed
a strong link between the
National Training Programme
and the Government's Self-
Starters Initiative in this
respect, adding: "We will make
available $5,000 per person as
start-up capital for those per-
sons. We asked all the appli-


cants to indicate whether they
had an interest in going into
their own business, and several
hundred persons responded
yes.
"Whether all qualify is anoth-


er matter, because a different
interview and screening process
will be required."
Mr Foulkes said the positive
progress made by the National
Training Programme to date


would stand it in good stead for
whenever the Government
made a decision on whether to
transform it into a permanent,
as opposed to temporary, ini-
tiative.


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY






PERSPECTIVE

HUMAN RESOURCES CONSULTING



CLIENT ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

ODu client Is an itaerinStinal health management company that assists clients to successfully
navimt an increasingly co'npkx global health care system with case and "enomny,
Thlieir tearn is prtsntly skiing the $ervitt Of 8 O6C t A*Aour ExEc=tivc to provide support
to an expancIng number of clients locally. r e Ideal candidate will work with management
alid clients to find quick resolutdrns and provide pinpoiit focus on custorfer service,
nrhEs tieri uimd overall perfrenwice oftMe (onipany pr*ACts,

The Customer Account Executive wil play a direct role in the overall custome/dlient support
strtcgyi of our dicnt, The job is an 'xc*nt dteveprrlopmt opportunity for A three t five year
profsslonal with a strong background in customer service and support, Carhdidates should
possess excellent conrmunicationr the ability to work( independently and sulerlor problem
solving skills with the broad beSW a ability to think creatively and indepentntlUy to find the best
soton to Client concerns,
Qualifications:

- Minimum 3-5 years of appllcatletransferrable Citonmer Service experience
- Minimum Associates Degree (Bachelor's Degree prefered)i Insuranoce certirkfations are
a plus but not required,
- Aity to provide analysis and develop meaningful, realistic solutions
- EFFTecLiv written and oral conniunitM.uri skills
Excellent cumitoier ervic skills
- Must be extremely detail oriented, possess excellent organiztlonal skill, and practice
proper time-maa.agesent.

Salary Is cormnensurate with experience.

Phase forward resume and salary reMirements by October 14, 2009 to;

Email: perspective.hrl @gmail.com







I PICTET

1805

PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED


Invlts qualified applicant for dk following position-



TRUST OFFICER


REQUIRED SKILLS:-


-Suirig superisory ad or* iaiial skil
-Ability to fiction iniepeduidy but work as MpAofa tnam
-Ability to fiction in a high owlume, high p re environment


EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-


-Minimum of a Law IDe- aMdor STEP Cerificalion.
-Sond knowledge of tsi drafting, reponing and accounting
-Abili y to readand assL late complex ist docnents,
-Failiaility with tk Televan oca legislation, pa iculrly the Trunisee Act, 199 and
[he Financial Trnsactio Reporing Ac, 2000.
-Worting knowledge of ]gislaion in ctimpcling jwidictions.
-Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.
-At Iest seven (1) yes expenierce in a Private Bnkor Tirust Company. at least i o
(2) years of which must be at the TnIt Officer levIel,
-Krniowledge of Frefch or Spanih would 1e an asset

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED. Please send
Resume Bad two(2) referncnes BY OCTOBER 16 209 Io;



The HmBM Resources Manager
Bavside Executive Park
P.O. BoxN-4837
Nasisau Balinas


Offices in
Floiwre, Ffntfrt, CeeN. Ift Kon, Leamnne, LoWdoc, .vmfniwirg, Madrid, MSH, famfre4,


I ODSUSSOISO HSIPAGE LG ON5T WWW.TIBUE22CO5


J3 JOSE CARTELLONE
C dCONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A.



COMPLETION OF NEW

PROVIDENCE ROAD

IMPROVEMENT PROJECT


JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A.
has been awarded by the government of The Bahamas for the
Compilation of the New Providence Road Improvement Project
(International Package).


Please be advised that effective October 5th 2009, Utility
investigation works will commence.


What is the project about?


Road improvement on Robinson Road and Prince Charles
Drive which includes improving the junction of Marathon Road/
Independence Highway & Robinson Road. Asphalt pavement,
an additional lane, new sidewalks and drainage facilities will
also be improved in these vicinities.


What to expect in the next few days?


The public should expect partial road/lane closures on Robinson
Rd. between Marathon Rd and Beatrice Av. and follow the
temporary detour routes. Motorist should avoid this area during
peak hours when possible.


Queries?


Please contact us at (242) 322-8341 / (242) 322-2610 Mondays
to Friday, from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm or email us at bahamasne
ighbors@cartellone.com.ar



We do apologize for any inconvenience caused and we
look forward to the cooperation of the motoring public.


jVAjnu, Pads, Row, siiwpwc. TDkA ThfiN 2rkm"


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9,2009, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE







-WANTED
L. C. Hull & Co.
Counsel & Attorneys

We are seeking to hire a talented Attorney
to join practice in Abaco. Lawyers with 2-4
years experience, a strong record of academic
achievement, excellent writing skills, good
computer skills and experience in real property
transactions.

Please send your resume to:

mpearceIchull@yahoo.com
P.O. Box AB - 20415
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Bahamas



Legal Notice
NOTICE
VISIONARY INVESTMENTS
OFFSHORE LIMITED



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of VISIONARY INVEST-
MENTS OFFSHORE LIMITED has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
BEALTO INVESTMENTS INC.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BEALTO INVESTMENTS INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice
NOTICE

THE GOLDEN NEEDLE

PIN CO. LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

VELLA VIGO S.A.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2009


By JOE McDONALD
AP Business Writer


BEIJING (AP) - The auto-
parts maker Delphi Corpora-
tion is headquartered in Troy,
Michigan, in the heart of the
region that made the United
States the car capital of the
world. It's a place where the
phrase "buy American" is right
at home.
Now the 3,000 employees of
Delphi's brake and suspension
unit are getting a new boss. Bat-
tered by weak sales, Delphi is
selling the unit to investors led
by a company named Shougang
Corp. Shougang is a steel mak-
er owned by the government
of China - a government that


One in a series of stories assessing how last fall's financial


calls itself communist but
espouses a "socialist market
economy" as it marches down
globalization's road toward a
capitalistic future.
"Everyone's so desperate for
cash that the Chinese show up
with a checkbook and people
say, 'Yes, please'", says Arthur
Kroeber, managing director of
Dragonomics, a Beijing
research firm.
Explosive growth in China
and India, coupled with Japan's
clout as the world's No. 2 econ-
omy, has long been expected
to shift economic power from


Legal Notice
NOTICE
RASDANOI CORP.

-J-#


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of RASDANOI CORP. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice
NOTICE
HOLLY GOLIGHTLY
RAINY DAY INC.

- -

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Com-
panies Act 2000, the dissolution of HOLLY
GOLIGHTLY RAINY DAY INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
GREEN TONES & SHADES INC.

- 6-


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GREEN TONES & SHADES INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

MARIAS S.A.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


the US to Asia as this century
progresses. The financial crisis
and resulting Great Recession
are accelerating that process.
"China certainly comes out
of the crisis stronger rather than
weaker, and it's the opposite
for the US," says Stephen
Roach, chairman of Morgan
Stanley Asia.
Some Americans have begun
declaring this the "Chinese cen-
tury" since it began nearly a
decade ago. But while they and
others fear the rise of China in
international relations and the
global economy, the reality is
less dramatic: Beijing is still get-
ting its own sprawling, chaotic
house in order and is in no posi-
tion to supplant the US as glob-
al leader in the near future.
At the same time, Beijing's
power remains undefined: On
an unfamiliar global stage, it is
unsure what role it wants to
play.
For decades, China followed
the dictum of its late supreme
leader, Deng Xiaoping, to keep
its head down abroad and focus
on development at home. But
earlier this decade, emboldened
by success and mindful that
their globalized economy needs
stability, communist leaders
started pressing for a place
among the nations that man-
age world affairs.
These days, Beijing is claim-
ing a bigger voice in global eco-
nomic forums such as the
Group of 20 and is getting more
deference in the United
Nations, which could mean pro-
tection for friends such as Iran
and Myanmar. Its military
spending is the world's second-
highest, behind that of the Unit-


ed States.
"China is very likely to be
the second-most-powerful
country - if it isn't now, then
within a decade," says Kenneth
Lieberthal, director of the
Brookings Institution's John L
Thornton China Center in
Washington.
For the US, it's a mixed
blessing. The American and
Chinese economies are inter-
twined, and the success of one
depends on the health of the
other.
The US is China's biggest
trade partner. Americans
bought Chinese goods worth
$338 billion last year. Beijing is
Washington's biggest creditor,
with more than $800 billion
invested in government debt.
American automakers look to
China's growing market to pro-
pel future sales.
The financial crisis set back
US growth by years and will
add trillions to the federal debt
over the next decade. But Chi-
na avoided the worst of the cri-
sis. Its banks are healthy and,
with the help of a four trillion
yuan ($586 billion) stimulus,
this year's economic growth is
on track to top eight per cent.
Already, demand from China
can affect oil prices, and it is
starting to influence what prod-
ucts are available worldwide.
Western jobs are tied to Chi-
nese spending, from British
auto factories to Australian iron
mines. Chinese money is financ-
ing development of oil fields
from Venezuela to Central
Asia.
And China's role as Wash-

SEE next page


Legal Notice
NOTICE
LOUVRE VENTURES INC.

-t4-


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LOUVRE VENTURES INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
SOLID VAULT INC.

- 0-�

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SOLID VAULT INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice
NOTICE
ORIENT EXPRESSIONS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


China rises amid the


Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2009, PAGE 5B


global economic crisis *


Z-1. A N. U.w %WWWA qwe N N w A& M___ - A &- LA'%w NW A&


meltdown and the Great Recession have changed our lives


US PRESIDENT Barack Obama shakes hands with China's President
Hu Jintao at Winfield House in London...
(AP Photo: Charles Dharapak)


ington's lender-in-chief is alter-
ing the dynamic of the coun-
tries' relationship.
At a meeting in London in
April, President Barack Oba-
ma assured his Chinese coun-
terpart, Hu Jintao, that Wash-
ington would cut its budget
deficit - a promise no Ameri-
can leader ever had to make to
a Soviet leader.
Washington's three-year-old
strategic dialogue with Beijing
has long been dominated by US
trade grievances. But the latest
round in July, overshadowed
by America's need for China
to keep buying its debt, became
a discussion between equals.
China, a major destination
for foreign investment, was
starting to reverse the flow and
invest abroad before the finan-
cial crisis. The crisis accelerated
that and has led to a flurry of
deals. In some cases, Chinese
companies have stepped in to
save Western jobs - a notion
unthinkable a decade ago.
In Britain, China's Nanjing
Automobile Group plans to
reopen the Longbridge factory
idled by the collapse of MG
Rover to make limited-edition
MGTF sports cars. And in Swe-
den, Beijing Automotive is join-


ing a bid to buy Saab from
General Motors, while Geely
Automobile wants to acquire
Ford's Volvo unit.
"It's better to be part of the
race than to watch it from the
stands," says Paul Akerlund, a
union representative at Saab.
"We see advantages in gaining
access to the Chinese market,
which is the fastest-growing
auto market in the world."
In diplomacy, China is only
starting to stake out positions
on a wide array of global issues.
It has used its influence in the
United Nations to help allies
such as Sri Lanka resist West-
ern pressure on human rights.
But Chinese leaders have yet
to decide what overall political
and military role they want
abroad.
"They clearly want to be a
country of some gravitas both
regionally and globally,"
Lieberthal says. "But there are
a lot of aspects of the American
approach - too ready to inter-
fere, to tell others what to do -
that the Chinese criticize as
hegemonicc."'
Even as it is on track to over-
take the American economy in
size as early as 2030, China is
burdened by enormous prob-


lems of corruption, poverty and
pollution. Measured by income
per person, China ranked 130th
out of 210 economies in a
World Bank survey last year,
behind most of Latin America
and parts of Africa.
"China's foreign currency
reserves are huge. But that does
not mean we are a rich coun-
try," says Cho Tak Wong,
chairman of Fuyao Group,
which produces glass for Chi-
nese and global automakers.
"We are about 100 years
behind the US."
China also has become a fast-
growing market, and the finan-
cial crisis has only increased its
importance to global compa-
nies. Chinese demand affects
everything from global steel
prices to the design of con-
sumer goods. Cadillac created
its 2008 CTS with China in
mind, adding a deeper back
seat for Chinese buyers driven
by chauffeurs.
Other countries' urgent need
for cash has created opportu-
nities for Beijing to make deals
for resources to drive its boom-
ing economy. State companies
have struck oil deals in Brazil,
Venezuela, Russia and Africa
and bought stakes in Australian
and Canadian miners.
Delphi turned to Chinese
buyers for its remaining brake
and suspension operations after
it sought bankruptcy court pro-
tection four years ago. The buy-
ers are Shougang and two part-
ners - the Beijing city govern-
ment and an auto-parts maker,
Tempo Group. Delphi says the
$90 million sale should close in
November, seven months after
it was announced.
Contrast that with 2005,
when Chinese oil company
CNOOC Ltd. tried to acquired
Unocal Corp. CNOOC offered
to pay more than a rival Amer-
ican bidder but withdrew after
critics in Washington said the
sale might threaten US energy
security.
Still, the United States has
many strengths that China
lacks. The US remains the
world center for innovation in
many areas and a magnet for
smart, ambitious immigrants.
"Europeans may hope that
the US has been knocked down
a peg or two, but even if that is
so, they could be in for a nasty


surprise," says Howard Wheel-
don, senior strategist at BGC
Partners, a London brokerage.
"Never underestimate the abil-
ity of the American people to
rise to a challenge."
* AP writers Robert Barr in
London and Karl Ritter in
Stockholm contributed to this
report


NOTICE is herebygiventhat MACKINSTEHNORof COLUMBUS
DRIVE 30B, APT #2, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 2nd day of October,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


Deloitte.





Independent Auditors' Report
To the Board of Directors and Stockholders


1-.
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r". 452 E-D,9w
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TI D S R OSLWIB 4


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY








PERSPECTIVE

HUMAN RESOURCES CONSULTING



BILLING AND ENROLLMENT COORDINATOR


Our ~ I ci nt s nintematiom1~ health Ma ie11et cmpany MtUsists Cien ~itsto sw=55ruily
naigatge ain Increasingly comptx global health care s'ysber withi ease and economy-

Thleir teamis� 1$ enCttIy s$ekjflg the$&ie$ 4~of aedRIM@ a~ nd frolinent C)OorCdiflatiyto pr'ioe
support to an expanibing number of cents locally- The Wdeailcandidate will woirk with
management to, ensure accurate. wd prompt Willing, recocniliatk'rtm and payment vetflfak*Iws
as well as any support Ito other urctI~loaI areas of th~e bus~iness (inclusi5ve of biefltSr claims,
business develo~pment and cbent services }

The biliIng arid Enrollmient GoordInato ir w play a direct role in thle overall cuastimner~clesnt
&.upp.~r1 rategy OF Our Clent�. 1EaibiMate should pows, e$$ eir~t 4ctinmuWriiC~ihfl, the flory
to work Inbdependently andl iuperloiproblem Sko~flg skills6 in the broad based ability to think
creatwively ad indepffidiienty to exp~itethe needs of tedill~ing and enrollmenlt functions.

Qua Irficaons:

- Mhlimum 3-5 years of appliable ~administrative 2expeIrieInce n afinancialorI accounting
role,
- Accountingi Financ~ia Repciitirng experience Is a must.
- Mwmmnum HigJh Schavl Diplo~ma or equivalent 'Insurancecertifications are a plus buft
niot required) Associates De~tee preferred.
- Must be extiremety detaII xceriented, possess excellent orga~1izatoniO skill', anid practice
piioqper tiMn~e-Mnafl~t-
- Effective writteni aind DraI communication skills.
- ExceII!Ivt Customeir service skills,

Salary Is commenisurate within expeireunce.

Please forward resumre and salary r jferuifeets by October 14, 2009 to,

Email: perspectfve~hr1~gmaIllcom





PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Legal Notice
NOTICE

GOLDEN SUNSET COVES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

MYLANDER VISTAS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

KARBALA LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

MARISTELLA S.A.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

EMSWORTH LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

CONTINUUM CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Act sparks




investment




concerns


FROM page 1B

Bahamas has 1.6 million acres
of dry Crown Land out of a
total 3.45 million acres on which
to "promote and accommodate
development for the empower-
ment of Bahamians". He added
that there were 900,000 acres
of wetland that should be con-
sidered for preservation.
"The Bill prevents indis-
criminate division and devel-
opment of land, protects and
preserves the natural and cul-
tural heritage of the Bahamas
and provides for a planning
processes that are fair by mak-
ing them open accessible, time-
ly and efficient," he said.
Dr Deveaux said land for
subdivisions will not be
acquired by developers with-
out public approval, via means
of public hearings and scrutiny


by an appointed Town Plan-
ning Committee.
He said some of the prob-
lems commonly associated with
subdivisions are: "Unauthorised
sale of lots, request to sell lots
to pay for infrastructures, build-
ing permits issued in unap-
proved sub-divisions, lack of
utilities and services in subdivi-
sion, subdivision fees, uncom-
pleted subdivisions and family
subdivisions."
Mr Deveaux said a prime
example of an ill-planned sub-
division was Pride Estates off
the Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway, which he insists will
need even more land acquisi-
tion to curb poor traffic condi-
tions.
"The Act is intending to ful-
fill its original purpose and
seeks to build communities,"
he said.


Legal Notice

NOTICE

ORANGE SANDCREST INC.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ORANGE SANDCREST INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice

NOTICE

DEVAUGHN HOLDINGS LTD.

- -


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DEVAUGHN HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

IRAL LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


7 FG CAPITAL MARKETS
9J5El ROYALIFIDELITY U" "-_UE
UMoy at WoCo
C F A L' COLONIAL I
PI.,:-" LIr TEC ,i Ti P- ECD 'E,'; _ PiTIE. -� , :_,F
THURSDAY 8 OCTOBER 2009
BIS. -.LL SH,.-.RE irJDE'. _CL SE 1 -1 -1 . CHG - ': CHG ' ' I TO -'_: I TO :'- -1 CHIT: TO
FIrNDE,. CLO 7E 7i 771I TD -5. 104,, I i00- - 1.1:
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM |I TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 I FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
1 71 1 03 AML Foods Limited 1 15 1 15 000 0127 0000 91 000%
11 80 990 Bahamas Property Fund 1075 1075 000 0992 0200 108 1 86%
9 30 5 90 Bank of Bahamas 590 590 000 0244 0260 24 2 441
0 89 0 63 Benchmark 0 63 0 63 0 00 -0 877 0 000 N/M 0 00%
349 315 Bahamas Waste 315 315 000 0125 0090 252 286%
237 214 Fidelity Bank 237 237 000 0055 0040 431 169%
1420 993 Cable Bahamas 993 993 000 1 406 0250 71 252%
288 272 Colina Holdings 272 272 000 0249 0040 109 1 47%
750 526 Commonwealth Bank (Sl) 554 554 000 0419 0300 132 542%
385 1 27 Consolidated Water BDRs 317 314 -003 0111 0052 283 1 66%
2 85 1 32 Doctor's Hospital 2 05 2 05 0 00 0 625 0 080 33 3 90%
820 660 Famguard 660 660 000 0420 0240 157 364%
1250 880 Finco 930 930 000 0322 0520 289 559%
11 71 1000 FirstCanbbean Bank 1000 1000 000 0631 0350 158 3 50%
553 411 Focol (S) 411 411 000 0332 0150 124 365%
1 00 1 00 Focol Class B Preference 1 00 1 00 000 0 000 0 000 N/M 0 00%
0 45 0 27 Freeport Concrete 0 27 0 27 0 00 0 035 0 000 77 0 00%
902 549 ICD Utilities 559 559 000 0407 0500 137 894%
1200 995 J S Johnson 995 995 000 0952 0640 105 643%
1000 1000 Premier Real Estate 1000 1000 000 0156 0000 641 000%
6Iz':" LI. TEi_4, OE6T ':E,-_z PiTi' - l ,:,r,,_; 3 =.- .:,r, .- p _.- r,ral3. pr,,-,:., E, ? -i_]__
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol Interest Maturity
100000 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 10000 000 7% 19 October 2017
100000 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 10000 000 Prime + 1 75% 19 October 2022
100000 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 10000 000 15 7% 30 May 2013
100000 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 10000 000 230 Prime + 1 75% 29 May 2015
I C,,-_lr, i- i n-_- -_- ,_-, r _ ' .-e, urr.- _ _
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
1460 7 92 Bahamas Supermarkets 792 842 1400 -2246 0000 N/M 0 00%
800 6 00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 200 625 400 0000 0480 N/M 780%
054 0 20 RND Holdinas 035 040 055 0001 0000 2566 000%
41 00 2900 ABDAB 3013 31 59 2900 4540 0000 903 000%
055 040 RND Holdinas 045 055 055 0002 0000 261 90 0000%
El.., L ir_, 3 rIlu -ual Fur..3I
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield % NAV Date
1 4038 1 3344 CFAL Bond Fund 1 4038 372 520 31-Aug-09
3 0350 2 8952 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2 8300 -3 75 -6 75 30-Sep-09
1 4932 1 4146 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 4932 4 15 556 2-Oct-09
36090 30941 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 30941 -861 -1359 31-Aug-09
130484 123870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 131136 393 587 31-Aug-09
101 6693 100 0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101 6693 1 10 1 67 30-Jun-09
100 9600 93 1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 967398 035 -4 18 30-Jun-09
1 0000 1 0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1 0000 000 000 31-Dec-07
94075 9 0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9 3399 2 69 -1 41 31-Jul-09
1 0707 1 0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1 0707 338 5 14 31-Aug-09
1 0364 1 0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1 0319 -011 205 31-Aug-09
r.i.-P'ET T E-Pr.i-.
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX -19 Dec 02 1,000 00 YIELD -last 12 month dividends divided by closing pnce
52wk-Hi - Highest closing pnce in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying pnce of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling pnce of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted pnce for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter pnce
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol - Trading volume of the pnorweek
Change - Change in closing pnce from day to day EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful
P/E - Closing pnce divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1, 1994 = 100
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 I ROYALFIDELITY 242 356.7764 I FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242 396-4000 I COLONIAL 242.502 7525


BUSINESS I





THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2009, PAGE 7B


* BISX-listed firm's chair steps down


JEFFREY PARKER

FROM page 1B


they've been doing that."
However, given that around
20 per cent of all commercial
loans in the Bahamas are in
default, banking sector ner-
vousness in lending to this
nation's small business sector
is somewhat understandable.
Given that outstanding com-
mercial loans are estimated to
have a total $1 billion worth,
the statistics imply that some
$200 million is in default.
And it can also be argued
that it is not the job of a com-
mercial banks to provide debt
financing to start-ups and entre-
preneurs, this being the role
played by venture capital - a
notably absent ingredient in the
Bahamian economy apart from
the Government-sponsored
fund.
Commercial banks, given
their responsibility to repay
depositor liabilities, are unable
to take big risks with other peo-
ple's money - and are also con-
strained by law and regulations
from doing so. Still, there is lit-
tle doubt that many Bahamian
businesses have either failed,
or struggled, to obtain debt
financing and overdraft facili-
ties for items such as inventory
restocking during this recession.
Mr Turnquest yesterday
argued that while several com-


mercial banks had previously
touted the size of their small
business lending facilities, the
reality was that the lion's share
from these went to "only a few
big businesses".
"For small businesses, it's
'no, no'," Mr Turnquest
claimed. "If you ask them to
give you a breakdown of the
size of the loan relative to the
size of the business, it will clear-
ly identify that 10 per cent of
any new loans go to small busi-
ness. The rest goes to the larger
businesses, because they have
the capital, the collateral, the
track record and the cash flow."
Describing conditions in the
Bahamian small business sec-
tor as "steady", Mr Turnquest
added: "The bottom has
already dropped out. The only
thing happening now is stagna-
tion - you'll see a steady stag-
nation underway. The ones in
business now have already
weathered the storm.
"The only challenge now is
that they are not hiring people.
There will never be a dent in
the unemployment rate until
mid-next year at least. I've spo-
ken to many small business
owners, and they are not hir-
ing - period. They have one or
two people employed, and are
doing a lot more work over-


* PHOENIX


Notice of
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
Of the SharclholdL~r~ ad Aenibda
Ntik* It U y Sinver t- AoIur nu* lGewl M dai ng f
SUrmmtokkm of Phomna Four. IncW. li bo Ib onR T- wA,
Nm.wnlhr M~O mit AC Inuurmwa Iiwmaily FProw Inwmung.; Bqtikurn)
luJMd l1 Rut du PedY hKtJ 17. B-1D BniMuls.
RtaLrMo a l e a m a 1at In min ipai.in ara
S11h3 Wsrt Tht I gandaf r1r ff mo.n U Is as Ufllk:
AGES4OA
1 Openkrg Slalinm kIom ttw Chairman
2. BDOiRC ULiUaon UpidMa
3. A Saummery
4. Rlaiw ad 2 IAo Audiwd Fik&nil SftmenM
5E. R.eIw l zto Not Ml Ma Vhlu
]. Cnh P"M"f md Prqition fvr W*nd�301-
7. Bsr# P.ichkMe Offir upiry
7 Conirtg sttelmnt
1Da3d h dwa of Outabar W.







BAHAMAS AGRIBUSINESS
COOPERATIVE SOCIETY LIMITED
(VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED)


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 105 of the Cooperative Societies Act,
2005 the voluntary liquidation of Bahamas
Agribusiness Cooperative Society Limited has
commenced. All claims against the aforementioned
Cooperative must be submitted to and received by
THE LIQUIDATOR before October 31, 2009 at PO
Box SS 6462, Nassau, Bahamas.

Cliff Pinder & Associates Limited
Liquidator



Legal Notice
NOTICE

KLARWELT INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Consolidated Water, the BISX-listed
reverse osmosis supplier, yesterday
announced that Jeffrey M. Parker resigned
as its chairman, and as a member of the
audit and executive committees, with effect
from October 7.
Mr Parker joined the Board in 1980,
and has served continuously as a director
since that time. He has been chairman of
the board since 1982, and also served as
chief executive from 1994 to 2004.
"On behalf of his fellow directors and


the-counter themselves.
They're physically present in
the store."
Aside from existing small
businesses, Mr Turnquest said
the growth of new start-ups in
the Bahamian economy had
"slowed tremendously" as a
result of the recession and its
fall-out.
"There's no new businesses
opening; there are absolutely
no new businesses being
launched in the bricks and mor-
tar type of business model. You
may see some e-commerce-type
models, but people are moving
away from paying rent early."
Against this backdrop, Mr
Turnquest, working with
Bahamas Development Bank
(BDB) executive, Dale
McHardy, is moving to craft a
Small Business Act of the
Bahamas, the October 27 meet-
ing being the first step through
getting association presidents
to identify key issues impact-
ing their sectors.
"We are trying to do things
step by step, and then form a
National Plan [for small busi-
ness]," Mr Turnquest
explained. "It's not going as fast
as I wanted, but I'm optimistic
now. I hope by next year to
have some draft with the Prime
Minister and the Cabinet. We'll


our shareholders, I would like to express
our sincere appreciation to Mr Parker for
his 29 years of service and dedication to
the company, and we wish him all the best
for the future," said Rick McTaggart, Con-
solidated Water's president and chief exec-
utive.

Appoint

Consolidated Water expects to appoint a
new chairman at its upcoming Board of


be looking very good for next
year. It can't be rushed."
The Small Business Act of
Barbados will be one of the
models used as a guide for
drafting the Bahamian legisla-
tion, but Mr Turnquest pledged
that the latter would be "craft-
ed to suit our environment".
He argued that the legisla-
tion would leave the Bahamas
"better positioned" to survive a
recession, one proposal being
that it would exempt small busi-
ness owners who were current
with all their tax payments and
other obligations from paying
their 5.4 per cent of National
Insurance Board (NIB) contri-
butions. Real property tax
exemptions and customs duty
exemptions could also be con-
sidered.
Mr Turnquest, though,
warned that a Small Business
Act would "not be a panacea
to save all businesses during a
recession", focusing on small
businesses with five to 10
employees as opposed to 'Mom
and Pop' stores.
The planned legislation, he
added, was designed to create
an entrepreneurial culture in
the Bahamas, and could also
encourage financial institutions
to be more flexible in their
small business lending practices.


MARCH FOR JUSTICE


/7 ND CRIME!

Monday, October 12,2009
vow. 0- Arawak Cay 9:00a.m.

j " March for justice for
, l BMnton Hector Smith and all other


- �J
S "Vlcllm0s r Murder an Our

S a Jislce ystem In Our



Families of murdered victims should
contracts
www.th-ebrentonfou n dation.org
Tel:426-7001



Legal Notice

Notice

RAMBLING HOLDINGS LTD.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000 the Dissolution of RAMBLING HOLDINGS
LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was 21st
September 2009.
/ME
-





















Legal Notice
NOTICE

GOLDEN EAGLE ASSETS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Directors meeting in November 2009.
Consolidated Water is engaged in the
development and operation of seawater
desalination plants and water distribution
systems in areas of the world where natu-
rally occurring supplies of potable water
are scarce or nonexistent.
Consolidated Water currently operates
water production and/or distribution facil-
ities in the Cayman Islands, the British Vir-
gin Islands, Bermuda, Belize and the
Bahamas.


NOTICE is hereby given that EDLYN PETIT-FRERE
of SOLDIER ROAD, P.O. BOX N-9842, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 9th day
of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE is hereby given that STEPHEN G. DAVIES of 8
CAMELOT CT, P.O. BOX F-42766, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.



INGAABAM't
TE UP SPECIAL SUPPLIES CO. LTD.
-7 0 - A afr
i ~ ~Ak ' ii it r


-4
41M,
amm,






Odes 7itmw"


K-11-Nwftklitki'




Monday-Friday aam-5pm


Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ORCHIDEA FUND LIMITED (SAC) is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000 s.137 and
section 45 of the Segregated Accounts Companies Act, Chapter 396C.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on October 8, 2009 when
its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company is required
on or before the 6th day of November 2009 to send their names and addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or,
in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.

OCTOBER 9, 2009

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY




SITUATION VACANT
MERCHANDISE/PARTS MANAGER


Needed for expanding
Freeport Auto Dealership

Mature applicants must have a thorough understanding of
computerized inventory systems, be able to interpret parts
usage, generate parts orders, supervise AND train parts
personnel.

Knowledge of Japanese and Korean parts is preferred along
with proven dealership experience.

Attractive and competitive remuneration package available
to successful applicant.



Please apply in writing to:
Administrator
P.O. Box F-41060
Freeport


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0







THE TIBUN FRIDY, OTOBER9, 209,IPGESS


Talking, paying, partying


can lift worker morale


By JOYCE M ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer


NEW YORK (AP) - As Bart Cleveland
talks to employees of his ad agency, he sees the
strain.
"We're really keenly aware of what the
economy is doing to people's morale," said
Cleveland, a partner at McKee Wallwork
Cleveland in Albuquerque, NM. "They're
stressed in a way that I've never seen people
stressed."
Economic reports of the last week point to
plenty of reasons for low morale at small com-
panies. A survey by the National Federation of
Independent Business of its members found
that employment in small companies over the
past three months fell on average by almost
one worker per business. That's an improve-
ment over the spring, but it still means busi-
nesses are struggling and that they're cutting
employees rather than hiring new ones.
That inevitably is going to affect morale,
but even at companies that are faring better,
workers are uneasy. So small business owners
need to help keep employees' spirits from sag-
ging.
Cleveland does what many human resources
consultants suggest, talking with staffers and
letting them know how the business is doing.
"We're communicating much more fre-
quently with our employees about things they
may not have been concerned about" in the
past, said Cleveland. He walks around the
office to talk with employees each day.
Cleveland added these walks to his routine
four or five months ago, well into the recession.
He said it was "something I intended to do, but
I'm a worker bee and I can get very focused on
what I'm doing." But he recently recognized
employees' need for more face time with the
boss. "When I realized it had to be more of a
priority, I made it a priority," he said.
Rick Gibbs, a senior human resources spe-
cialist with Administaff, a Houston-based com-
pany that provides HR outsourcing, supports
the idea of owners being up-front with staffers
about the business.
"That's one of the things we think is most
important and keeps employees engaged, even
in a negative time," he said.


"It may not make them happy and glowing
necessarily, but it provides something to think
about even in a tough time and it also creates
a tie between the company and the employee,"
Gibbs said.
Gibbs said his company is finding that small
business clients are more concerned these days
with keeping employee morale up. "It comes
up in our conversation all the time," he said.
There is often a direct cause-and-effect rela-
tionship between how workers feel and how
well they work. Uneasy and uncertain workers
may find it harder to concentrate. That in turn
is going to affect performance, and it's not too
long before the company feels the impact.
A boss being open with employees about
the business can help focus their efforts on
what the company needs to thrive. That can
give them a sense of power that may alleviate
some of feelings of being at the mercy of the
economy. Allowing them to vent a little frus-
tration is probably a good idea as well.
Gibbs suggests including staffers in a dia-
logue about making the business stronger, ask-
ing them: "What are your ideas? What do you
think is most effective with customers?"
He acknowledged, though, that many own-
ers may have never had this kind of openness
with staffers.
"It may be a difficult thing to do and it
requires the leader to really take a look at
how to best help their businesses," he said.
Another approach for keeping employees'
morale up is through incentives and rewards,
such as performance bonuses.
DeAnne Merey, president of D M Public
Relations in New York, developed an incentive
pay programme and calls it "a huge morale
booster."
"We're gaining clients but not at the rate we
would have if the economy was robust," she
said. The incentive pay, which is awarded on a
project-by-project basis, gives employees some-
thing to work toward.
Gibbs noted that there are also incentives
that don't cost anything, such as allowing a
staffer who has done something outstanding to
leave early on a Friday. But he recommended
that owners not give incentives that appear
"programmed" or automatic because "they
lose some of their effectiveness."


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ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0





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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9,2009, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE


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