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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: October 5, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01405

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TINGS TOUGH
McDOUBLE J J1
FOR $3.79 ""m ,.,
HIGH 87F
LOW 78F
.. PARTLY SUNNY,
T-STORM POSSIBLE


The


Tribune


BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


Volume: 105 No.262 MON


OBER 5, 2009 PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



I_.
Esat BLO

E SECIONISD SEIAEEEE


i


'Draconian response'

needed islandwide to

combat crime, says

pastor Simeon Hall
By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net


IN order to curb the "may-
hem" on the country's streets
Bahamians should impose an
11 pm curfew on themselves
and their children, Bishop
Simeon Hall suggested.
The senior pastor of New
Covenant Baptist Church said
the rising incidents of shoot-
ings and stabbings in the coun-
try demand a "draconian pub-
lic response" instead of relying
on a solution from govern-
ment.
"The Bahamian public must
lead the cause for change, as
politicians, worried about get-
ting re-elected, are not
inclined to take unusual steps
to confront this national night-
mare," said Mr Hall, in a
statement. "Parents with
teenagers should see that they
are at home before 11 pm
rather than waiting until after


BISHOP SIMEON HALL


a tragedy to sing the chorus,
'My good son'.
"An 11 pm self-imposed
curfew is imperative because
it is clear that those with guns
are intent on wreaking havoc
SEE page nine


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Teen shot after


police standoff

AN early morning standoff between police
and a teenager left the 17-year-old boy in
critical condition after being shot in the stom-
ach yesterday.
Police said the scene unfolded around 1.30
am Sunday in the Victoria Avenue area when
the officer was confronted by the gun-toting
teen.
"A police officer was in the area of Victo-
ria Avenue when he heard the report of gun-
shots and saw several persons running. He
was then confronted by a male who was
SEE page nine


Felipe Major THESE THREE YOUNGSTERS hold hands during this year's annual Youth March yesterday. Hundreds of youngsters from youth organ-
/Tribune staff isations marched from Fort Charlotte through the streets of Nassau and back to the fort. MORE PHOTOS: Pages 2 and 16


JURORS in the
attempted extortion trial
of ex-PLP Senator Pleas-
ant Bridgewater and for-
mer ambulance driver
Tarino Lightbourne are
today expected to watch
videotaped meetings
between the accused and
an attorney for Holly-
wood celebrity John Tra-
volta.
On Friday, Senior Jus-
tice Allen decided that


SEE page ten


MYSTERY DEATH: Murder or an accident?
Preston Ferguson family:
'No new developments'


By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
THE family of Preston Fer-
guson claims that despite
assurances that further inves-
tigations will be launched into
his death they have been not
been informed of any new
developments.
When contacted two weeks
ago, Commissioner of Police
Reginald Ferguson told The
Tribune that investigations
are continuing and that
". \p !1 i ' were going to con-
duct a re-enactment of the


alleged accident. However,
the Ferguson family told The
Tribune yesterday that still no
SEE page ten


Cynthia Pratt
endorses Philip
'Brave' Davis
DEPUTY Leader of the
Progressive Liberal Party
Cynthia "Mother" Pratt offi-
cially endorsed Philip 'Brave'
Davis, one of three candidates
vying to replace her when she
steps down at the party's con-
vention.
"We are at a crossroad in
our lives and at a crossroad
in this country. People are
dying, crime is escalating,
respect has gone out the door
long time ago where people
have no concern about lives
anymore and that's why the
SEE page nine


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


I I


CUI




PAGE^ ^HLOCAL 2,WS MONAYIOTOER5,209 HETRB


YOUTH


MAR


C


H


* MORE PHOTOS ON PAGE 16


HAVING A BLAST: With every youth march there is a good marching band.


BOYS BRIGADE horn player.


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HUNDREDS OF YOUNG PEOPLE took part in the youth march.


SUN ATHLETIC TRACK CLUB put on an exciting dance display.


Friie, Fugiid,
Pet onro


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


PHOTOS:
Felipe Major
/Tribune staff


� I


PAGE 2, MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2009, PAGEEW3


0 In brief



Masked


thugs rob


and shoot


man in leg

A JOAN'S Heights resi-
dent was shot in the leg and
robbed by masked gunmen
Sunday morning, according to
police.
According to Superinten-
dent Elsworth Moss, who
heads the Central Detective
Unit, around 5.50 am a 25-
year-old resident of Joan's
Heights was attending a party
at West Street when he was
held up by two masked men
armed with handguns.
The gunmen robbed the
man of cash and personal
property before they shot him
in his leg. According to Super-
intendent Moss the man's
injuries are not serious.

Treated
The victim has been treated
and discharged from hospital.
In other crime news, police
quickly arrested an armed
gunman who held up the
owner of a local clothing store
on Friday. According to Supt
Moss around 12.45 pm Friday
a gunman entered the Y
Cares Fashion Store on
Bahama Avenue, held up the
owner and robbed him of
cash and cellular phones.
"As he was exiting the store
he was approached by offi-
cers of the mobile division
who were able to arrest him
and retrieve a .380 pistol from
him and eight live rounds of
ammunition. Also, the items
that were taken were recov-
ered," Supt Moss said.
The gunman is a resident
of Crooked Island Street,
according to Supt Moss.

Construction

worker falls

to his death

A CONSTRUCTION
worker fell to his death Sat-
urday, according to police.
Superintendent Elsworth
Moss told The Tribune that
around 5.45 pm Saturday,
the 48-year-old man of Fire
Trail Road, whose identity
has not yet been released,
was working at a two-story
building in South West
Ridge when he fell from the
roof. According to Supt
Moss, the man died at that
scene.

Green Parrot
offers reward
after TVs theft
GREEN Parrot is offering
a $1,000 reward for informa-
tion leading to the arrest of
persons who stole three flat
screen televisions from the
popular restaurant.
The reward also applies to
the return of the stolen prop-
erty. Three 42" flat screen
televisions were stolen from
the eatery last week.
Anyone with any informa-
tion about the theft should
call police urgently on 911,
919 or call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477).


Call to end corporal





punishment in schools


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
CORPORAL punishment,
unless administered with a psy-
chological component, is use-
less and should be eliminated
from the school system, a local
family therapist said.
Barrington Brennen, a minis-
ter and nationally certified psy-
chologist in the United States,
said that often those persons
administering corporal punish-
ment are taking the easy way
out by not sitting down and
explaining to young people
what they have done wrong.
"From a research prospective
we know that corporal punish-
ment may have a positive effect
on a person but the punishment
must also involve a psychologi-
cal aspect or emotional involve-
ment. I don't believe that cor-
poral punishment is necessary
and secondly corporal punish-
ment is never effective in the


long term
without men-
tal punish-
ment. In the
. . old days, par-
ents sat down
with their
children and
explained the
wrong that
CARL they did and
BETHEL the children
sometimes had
to apologise before they were
physically punished.
"Thirdly, if you are physical-
ly punishing a child at the age of
16 for the same thing that you
are doing (for a child) at age 9
you have failed - that's includ-
ing the school system. Physical
punishment should end by the
time the child starts the teen
years and (a disciplinarian)
should by then have included
techniques that are more pow-
erful," Mr Brennen told The
Tribune. He added that those
who subscribe to the Christian


ideology of "spare the rod spoil
the child" often don't realise
that effective discipline involves
more than just spanking a child.
"In the Bible the word obey
is used over 1,100 times, over
900 times the Hebrew transla-
tion of obey is to hear - mean-
ing that it implies that obedi-
ence involves teaching and
instruction.
"It's hearing and transferring
what you hear into workable
models of life," he said, adding
that whenever physical punish-
ment left behind bruises visible
a day later it crossed the line
into abuse.

Violence
He also added that many
people believe that violence in
the public school system esca-
lated when government took
away teacher's rights of admin-
istering physical punishment in
the classrooms.
"But that is not the problem,


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the problem is the government
didn't teach the teachers how
to provide effective discipline
without corporal punishment,"
said Mr Brennen. "Teachers felt
disarmed, they felt like some-
thing was taken from them
because they had no other skill
to provide punishment.
"When a teacher physically
punishes a disobedient child,
you have to ask is that child
coming from a disciplined envi-
ronment?
"What is that child going to
learn from this, can he reason
effectively, can he use this inci-
dent as a teaching moment and
not a reactionary moment?
"Too many of our children
are blamed and ashamed in the


I


BARRINGTON BRENNEN


community so when they get hit
in the class, it's only reinforc-
ing that anger with them."
According to the Ministry of
Education, corporal punishment
is a legal form of disciple in pub-
lic schools but only when car-
ried out by a senior mistress,
senior master, principal or vice-
principal.
About two weeks ago, a 15-
year-old C I Gibson student
claimed she was hit by a school
official with a metal rod
wrapped in black tape and left
with black and blue bruises on
her right arm and buttocks.
Education Minister Carl Bethel
said his ministry was investigat-
ing the claim.


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I


MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 4,MONDAYOCTOBER5,2009 TTHTTRISTBUNETOE


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, c, tii,,n'v) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


Dangers of irresponsible slogans


IN THIS column on Thursday we pub-
lished Thomas Friedman's New York Times
article that stirred up a heated debate in the
US because it equated the atmosphere of
hate being built up around President Obama
by his right wing opponents with the bitter
atmosphere created by extreme right wing
settlers and politicians against Israeli Prime
Minister Yitzhak Rabin that ended in his
assassination in 1995.
Friedman, an authority on the Middle
East, who at the time of Rabin's assassina-
tion was in Israel interviewing him, warned
of the dangers now being fomented in the
United States by irresponsible smear cam-
paigns being spread by politicians, chat show
hosts, blogs and the ill-informed - all under
the guise of freedom of speech.
Some brainless American wag protested
that Americans can talk the violent talk, but
would never commit the unthinkable sin -
they weren't like the firebrands in the Mid-
dle East, or so he claimed. He forgets that
Man -no matter his colour or culture -
will, under certain conditions, commit the
unthinkable. What makes Americans so dif-
ferent? Don't they live in a country that in
the course of its relatively short history assas-
sinated four presidents and made unsuc-
cessful attempts on 11 others?
In Israel in the early nineties Prime Min-
ister Rabin faced the same vicious taunts
from the extreme right when he made his-
tory by starting the first official Israeli nego-
tiations with the PLO.
The incitement started with the politicians
in parliament calling Rabin a "friend of ter-
rorists." It was picked up in the streets and
mushroomed into images of Rabin, a Jew, in
Arab dress, and in Nazi uniform.
Now let's turn to the US. During the
presidential campaign Sarah Palin, for exam-
ple, called Obama a "pal of terrorists." And
what's wrong with that? What is wrong is
that not only is it not true, but as America is
now waging a global war on terrorists, any-
one who is a friend of a terrorist is a traitor
to his country, and should be eliminated. In
our country such an accusation would be
defamation - an accusation that exposes a
man to hatred, ridicule or contempt by his
peers.
But Americans, many of whom in our
opinion don't know the difference between
freedom and licence, cannot see the dan-
gers in what they are doing. They say they
are protected by their First Amendment -
freedom of speech. Unfortunately, too many
of them have not yet learned how to use
this freedom responsibly.
Early last month an elderly American of
Armenian background was arrested because
he tried to grab and destroy a flier being


passed out by supporters of a politician that
likened Obama's health care proposals to
the Nazi extermination of the Jews and oth-
er "undesirables."
Those handing out the fliers called police,
accused the old man of assault, and had him
arrested. He explained that his was an emo-
tional reaction on seeing the fliers to what he
and his family had suffered under the Nazis.
As a child in Armenia he had witnessed the
horrors of Nazi Germany - two of his
uncles killed, his father wounded and his
brother starved to death. And so when he
saw these Nazi posters of the president he
admits that his reaction was "personal and
emotional."
He complained of being taken to court
because of an attempt by "an old man who
says that you cannot insult the president
with this outrageous campaign."
These posters are being displayed every-
where - whether sensible Americans like
them or not - they show Obama as Hitler
with the Fuehrer's silly little moustache
painted under his nose. It is indeed offensive.
As the Armenian said: "I saw Hitler's
soldiers. I saw swastikas every day. To call
Obama stupid, even criminal - okay, that's
politics. But Hitler? It's hurting to anyone no
matter who is president."
Here in the Bahamas anyone whose pro-
paganda would stir up such anger and hatred
that violence would erupt would be locked
up in Fox Hill prison accused of incitement
to riot or violence.
But not so in America - they abuse their
First Amendment right and get away with it.
If they are against President Obama's
health care plan, then bring sensible and
constructive arguments to the table, but to
try to defeat a plan that they do not like or
understand by lies and propaganda illus-
trates the depth of their ignorance.
We often thought that if we lived in the
US we would be a Republican, but the irre-
sponsible behaviour now on display with so-
called responsible Republicans sitting in the
background with smirky smiles instead of
condemning the behaviour of their support-
ers, leaves us with nothing but contempt for
the lot of them.
In the meantime, while Americans are
scrapping among themselves, the Chinese
put on a magnificent display on Wednesday
to celebrate the strides they have made in
their 60 years as a Communist nation.
This is a country that has achieved much
through hard work, determination and dis-
cipline.
Meanwhile, Americans should stop their
petty bickering, consider what is happening
in the world and give their future in that
world some serious thought.


Farming groups




must help solve


Haitian

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In response to your editorial,
"Haitian Problem Need Solu-
tion" you lay the blame at the
foot of successive governments
who in my view have turned a the people
blind eye to this very seething employed
and vexing dilemma. and white
However, unlike the United is the resp
States, the Bahamas did not put Who is re
forth a clarion call to "bring us inflicted su
your poor, your huddled mass- are being r
es." Clearly, the farming con- those who
glomerates who brought in the Continu
labourers and the second home grant need
owners who continue to employ his/her po
these illegals have a fiduciary thing in o
responsibility to assist the gov- country. If
ernment in solving this prob- before ind
lem. It is unconscionable to a book at
think that special interest where evei
groups can bring in undocu- Bahamian
mented immigrants and not book in or
expect their spouses and chil- izenship.
dren to follow them. believed ii
Then these companies fold they did n
up, leaving the people bereft of signed wer
everything. In steps the gov- Now, I a
ernment to initiate a roundup. cessive gc
The government is under pres- hook com
sure. It has a country of 350,000 been slack
and is expected to bear the bur- gals to do
den of a country of 11,000,000 with imp
- in other words a country that water and
is 37 times the population of ernment, b
the Bahamas. Whenever there on public
is a roundup people rush to the have minis
US media and the Human justices of
Rights groups and bad mouth fraudulent
the Bahamas. No one says that


I
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diaspora

In other words John Marquis
writings are fulfilled before our
very eyes here on Abaco.
People who have been
granted citizenship should not
be allowed to live in the Mudd.
re here illegally and They should move out; other-
y both Bahamians wise they are perpetuating what
migrants. Where needs to be uprooted.

visible relatedness? Residents of Marsh Harbour
ponsible for the who are 50 plus and were born
ring of those who here know that behind the
indup? Should not SDA church that area was an
re be charged? enormous blue hole with a gut-
g, the illegal immi- ter running to the sea. This was
to do everything in filled in when Sir Roland
er to do the right Symonette filled it in when the

ler to stay in the first dock was built. The sea
ou remember, just always reclaims its own and its
endence there was only a matter of time before
government House this reclamation occurs. Just
one who was not a one of the reasons why the
as asked to sign the Mudd and the Peas need to be
r to be granted cit- vacated.
,ery few people No one can underestimate
he government so the contribution of the bona
Sign in. All who fide Haitian worker. The prob-
given citizenship. lem now is the growing num-
not letting the suc- ber of the undocumented ones
ernments off the who are coming but with not
etely. They have the same agenda as those of the
id allowed the ille- 60s and 70s.
atever they wished The farming conglomerates
nity. They leech and the employers of the cays
ectricity from gov- must help to solve the Haitian
ld without permits diaspora here in Abaco.
nd private lands,
-rs of religion and A CONCERNED
he peace prepare ABACONIAN
documents for them. Abaco,
September 10, 2009.


EDITOR, The Tribune.

I want to address a matter that was brought up
in a recent letter to the editor in which the writer
attempted to portray Dr Bernard Nottage as a
traitor for the sin of proposing to challenge for
the leadership of the PLP. There is a perception
by some PLPs that a challenge to one of the
leadership positions, especially the position of
Leader of the party is some sort of betrayal; that
you are not a loyal PLP if you challenge the lead-
ership. I am disgusted and repulsed by this
myopic and narrow-minded attitude.
The main point attempted by the letter writer
creatively named Abraham Moss was that Dr
Bernard Nottage is a traitor for indicating that he
may consider a run for the leadership of the PLP.
People like Mr Moss seem to feel that only a
traitor would consider a challenge for the lead-
ership of his party. They conveniently forget that
Mr Christie himself was estranged from the PLP
for six years, he ran against the PLP in 1987 with
the help of the FNM yet he emerged later as
leader of the party. I wonder if people like Mr
Moss know how Mr Christie was accepted back
into the PLP? Do they realise who brokered the
deal for him to meet with Sir Lynden? I suggest
that Mr Moss and all those who now laud Mr
Christie and attempt to condemn Dr Nottage
should go and check the history. A selfish sense
of entitlement is destroying the PLP.
I would think that PLPs would welcome new
blood. After several years of uninspired leader-
ship and a party machinery that has become dys-
functional, the party is in critical need of an over-
haul. The same way an engine is recharged by a
comprehensive service job a political party should
be rejuvenated and invigorated by the election of
new leadership. Why those with a vested interest
in maintaining the status quo and a weakened
party should be allowed to continue to run the


party in a downward spiral is a mystery to me. It
is obvious that these persons have no intention of
bowing out gracefully or with dignity so they
must be rooted out.
If I were Mr Moss my time and energies would
be more directed at addressing the machinery
of the organisation which under this present
Chairman and leader is crumbling. I would be
more interested in resuscitating the finances of
the party which are nearly nonexistent and is
unable to get credit almost anywhere. If I were
Mr Moss and people of his ilk I would be very
worried about the party's ability to attract qual-
ified persons of integrity to offer as candidates for
the next election. If I were Mr Moss I would
worry about the public's view that the PLP is a
party of corruption and one that is undemocrat-
ic. This view is only strengthened and reinforced
by the leader's refusal to demand that Mr Wilch-
combe resign as convention chairman while run-
ning for deputy leader of the party. The fact that
Mr Wilchcombe who frequently talks of the
importance of doing what's right sees nothing
wrong in perpetuating this perception speaks
volumes in my opinion of his suitability for high-
er office within the party.
Clean and fair elections in the PLP during this
convention will do wonders for the image of the
PLP. No padding of delegates, no last minute
addition to the already ridiculous numbers of
stalwart councillors and no political intrigue. So
let's go Fred, let's go BJ, let's go Paul, let's go
Brave, let's go Shane, let's go Jerome, let's go
Bradley, let's go Glenys and let's go Obie but first
end the obvious and divisive conflict of interest
that you know is not good for the party.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2009, PAGE 5


LOCALN


Pledge to restore fire-hit



St Francis Xavier Cathedral

CATHOLIC Archbishop Patrick Pinder s
says the archdiocese is "fully committed" to
the restoration of the original St Francis
Xavier Cathedral that was ravaged by fire
last month.
In a statement read in all Catholic
churches yesterday Archbishop Pinder said,
"As Archbishop, I wish to assure Roman
Catholics and all interested Bahamians that
the archdiocese is fully committed to the
restoration of the church and to do it with
all due care and attention."
The interior of the original St Francis
Xavier Cathedral, the oldest Roman t
Catholic church in the Bahamas, was exten-
sively damaged by fire on Friday, Septem-
ber 25. An electrical short-circuit reportedly
sparked the blaze.
"To us the old St Francis building is more
than just timber, stone and mortar and
more than the appointments that adorned
it. It represents a victory over prejudices I
Roman Catholics first experienced in estab-
lishing the faith in these islands; it repre- cis Xavier was officially dedicated on Feb- Archbishop Pinder stated.
sents the devotion and generosity of the ruary 1887 under the auspices of Arch- Archbishop Pinder said that "because
Catholics who contributed to the building bishop Michael A Corrigan of New York. of its age and what it stands for, it should be
fund and construction and the church's "While charring soot and twisted metal considered invaluable part of the historic,
development and maintenance for a period were disturbing; we found evidence of a religious and social patrimony of the
that bridges three centuries. It represents wonderful miracle in what was preserved," Bahamas."
122 years of precious worship of sacra- the Archbishop stated. "At first assessment "We are absolutely committed to the
ments," Archbishop Pinder stated. we believe that all the religious icons and restoration of this sacred space which
The cornerstone of the original St Fran- objects and objects of faith can be rescued, means so much to so many of us both here
cis Xavier Cathedral was laid on August 25, although the exercise is likely to be costly. at home and abroad. With the Lord's guid-
1885 and the first mass was said there on The old paintings are covered in soot and ance and help we will complete it in good
November 7 of the following year. St Fran- will not doubt require expert intervention," order."

SELECT COMMITTEE: Crown land


Ex-director of Department of Lands


and Surveys expected to testify today


FORMER Director of the
Department of Lands and
Surveys Tex Turnquest is
expected to testify at a public
hearing before the Select
Committee on Crown land
this morning.
Mr Turnquest resigned
from the department in May
amidst controversy stemming
from allegations of nepotism
within the department. The
move came after a series of
articles in The Tribune report-
ed that relatives of the former
director - including his moth-
er-in-law - were granted
prime beach-front Crown land
in Exuma for less than $2,500
between 2001 and 2003.
During the committee's first
session last week, it was stated
that Mr Turnquest was asked
to resign because he could not
reasonably explain how sev-
eral beach-front parcels of
Crown land granted to his rel-
atives were fast-tracked
through the backlogged sys-
tem.
Mr Turnquest also could
not reasonably explain to
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, the minister responsible


for lands, why the applicants
in question all used the same
lawyer and realtor for the
transactions, the committee
was told.
This was revealed by David
Davis, permanent secretary in
the Office of the Prime Min-
ister and the Ministry of Land
and Local Government.
Earlier this year, The Tri-
bune also reported that sev-
eral other officials in the
Department of Lands and
Surveys - current Undersec-
retary in the Ministry of Lands
and Surveys Audley Greaves
and the Chief Housing Offi-
cer Christopher Russell - were
being questioned by Ministry
officials about Crown land
granted their wives and other
relatives.
According to documenta-
tion obtained by this newspa-
per, Mr Greaves' wife and son
were both granted lots on the
island of Abaco in 2003 and
2004 respectively.
Mr Greaves' son, received a
15,625 square foot lot on
Wood Cay, Abaco for
$1,786.25 while his wife
received an 18,343 square foot


lot in a subdivision south of
Treasure Cay for $2,201.16.
On the other hand Mr Rus-
sell's wife, sister-in-law, and
the husband of the former
Director's secretary each
bought an acre of Crown land
in the area of Blackwood Vil-
lage, Abaco, for $4,356.
Today's hearing will be held
in the Paul Farquharson
Building at the RBPF head-
quarters at 10.30 am and is
open to the public. George
Smith, retired Member of Par-
liament for Exuma, is also
expected to testify at this
morning's session.


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New direction needed in tackling



crime, says Philip 'Brave' Davis


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
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THE country needs new
direction to curtail rising inci-
dents of "inhumane" crimes
and soaring unemployment
rates, said Opposition MP
Philip "Brave" Davis.
Speaking before a group of
PLP stalwart councillors over
the weekend, the deputy
leader candidate said the cur-
rent government lacks direc-
tion with Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham "bankrupt"
of solutions to the myriad of
problems affecting the nation.
"Today, the Bahamas is in a
fight for its very
existence. Crime has gotten to
a point where our murder rate
is more than four times higher
than that of the United
States! Everyday there are
reports of heinous, brazen
murders - every murder
seemingly more inhumane
and colder than the one
before. Our people are get-
ting killed as they try to live
their lives as best as they can,
our Bahamas is slipping
away! Innocent men and
women who have so much
more to contribute, so much
more to achieve, so many
more years to live, taken
away!
Mr Davis added that the
policing of the country's bor-
ders need to be strengthened
in order to decrease the flow
of illegal guns into the
Bahamas. With an economy
that "is going down the tube"
and unemployment pegged at
around 17 per cent, Mr Davis
questioned the effectiveness
of the government's policies.
"How could a country
decide to spend $6 million
according to them, to host a
pageant (Miss Universe), bor-
row $160 million to pave
roads using only two compa-
nies? And yet they can't sign a
piece of paper that would
have made it possible for our


children to go to college! Do
you know how many thou-
sands of college students had
their plans in place to go to
school? We must right the
wrongs and put this country
back on the path of growth!"
said Mr Davis, referring to the
recent suspension of the guar-
anteed educational loan
scheme.

Challenged

Just a few weeks shy of the
Progressive Liberal Party's
convention, Mr Davis chal-
lenged members of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party to unite
and bring change to the party
and the country. He recalled
the old days of the PLP when
members "operated as a fam-
ily" and fought for a better
Bahamas. He said it was time
to put aside inflated egos and
urged the party to return to
its core mandate of creating
a better country for the
nation's children.
"There was a time when the
camaraderie amongst us was
unbreakable and undeniable.
We were united and strong
and it showed. There was
nothing that we could not
achieve together. Together,
there was no obstacle that was
too great. Those were the days
when the struggles for this
country captured our full
focus and we would sacrifice
anything to advance the
movement of change through-
out the Bahamas," Mr Davis
said, during a breakfast meet-
ing at the Sheraton Resort on
Cable Beach.
"We need those days once
again! We need to remember
that our work, right now, in
this moment is not to feed our
oversized egos but to fix the
problems of this country so
that my children, your chil-
dren and their children can
achieve more, go farther and
have happier more peaceful
lives than ours - this is what
we should be about!"


THE National Development Party (NDP) again called
on government to instal closed circuit cameras through-
out local courts, an initiative recently adopted by the
United Kingdom's new Supreme Court.
The initiative is outlined in point 22 of the NDP's 37-
point national development plan that calls for the tele-
vising of select local criminal and civil court matters
through a local court channel, complete with legal cor-
respondents, to educate viewers on the nature of perti-
nent Bahamian law. According to the NDP, this will
deter delinquency on the part of lawyers who chronical-
ly delay judicial proceedings that contribute to the legal
backlog; serve as a deterrent to persons who would not
wish to suffer the embarrassment that is associated with
being charged before the courts with violating the law;
and promote transparency and accountability within the
context of the judicial system.

Technology

The party also suggested that government invest in
technology to provide secure storage of all public court
files and documents using close circuit television (CCTV)
to continuously monitor activities in the file storage sec-
tion of the Attorney General's Office; place bar-codes on
all files for tracking purposes; and require all files to be
signed out by authorised personnel only, who would
assume legal responsibility for their safekeeping.
Said the NDP, in a statement released yesterday: "We,
the NDP, believe that both our system of justice and
the Bahamian people would be served equally well by
bringing such transparency to the judicial process via
the use of technological innovation. The failings of our
justice system can only be corrected if the legal fraterni-
ty is made more accountable as a result of a system that
is more transparent. Any effort which trains the public
eye on the workings of the courts will stimulate such
accountability and thereby promote the necessary judi-
cial reforms."
In an historical move last week, Britain's highest court
was taken over by its first Supreme Court. The switch was
also marked by the implementation of closed-circuit
cameras in the courts. The British press reported that as
a result for the first time, cases will be broadcast live.
When contacted by The Tribune for comment on the
issue, local lawyer Sean McWeeney, a partner in the law
firm of Graham, Thompson and Co, said this was to
shake the shroud of secrecy associated with closed hear-
ings. He said the trend could possibly catch on in local
courts. However, cost would be a deterring factor, he said.
The NDP disagreed with Mr McWeeney's assertion
that the cost of such technological upgrades would be a
deterrent. "If we can allocate $160 million for road
improvements, it cannot be argued that it is not possible
to allocate a fraction of this amount to an institution as
vital as our justice system," said the party spokesman.


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MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURITY Tommy Turnquest (third from left) at the presentation of a fire


engine for Bimini. He is also pictured below.
ADOPTING a proactive approach to fire
safety and community service, Bimini Bay
Resort and Marina developer, RAV
Bahamas, partnered with the government to
donate a new fire engine to the Bimini com-
munity. An official ceremony was held at
the Administrator's Complex on the island
that is known as "the big game fishing capital
of the Bahamas." Many community mem-
bers, including students, were present to
applaud the handing over of the keys to the
vehicle.
Tommy Turnquest, Minister of National
Security, said that the donation of the fire
engine was the best way to culminate Fire
Safety Awareness Week.
He expressed gratitude to Bimini Bay for
their contribution and commended local gov-
ernment officials for the initiative they have
taken in receiving the fire engine from the
development company, and following the
required government procedures to have it
cleared so that it could be properly handed
over.

Donation

Rafael Reyes, president of RAV
Bahamas, said: "Our donation of the fire
truck signifies our interest in the health and
safety and well-being of all who reside and
visit the shores of Bimini. We see this as a
small but very important contribution to the
community, and I hope that very quickly we
can have local Biminites trained to use the
equipment so that it may serve its purpose."
Mr Reyes said that Bimini Bay is also
working to build bridges between the com-
pany and the community.
"We are integrating ourselves with the
community. When we market ourselves, we
not only market Bimini Bay, but we market
this entire community as well. So we are try-
ing to help auxiliary businesses in the com-
munity thrive and we are trying to build our
relationships."


The community-building initiatives include
putting capable residents in managerial posi-
tions in the numerous retail stores and oper-
ations within the Bimini Bay project, Mr
Reyes said. "All administrative positions
are also given to Bahamians as well. We are
happy to have this opportunity to be here,
but also to have an integral part in building
the community and helping the Bahamian
economy as a whole," he said.
At the ceremony Police Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson said: "Biminites, we know
what type of devastation fire can bring to
the community, but we have taken some pos-
itive steps to action. We have gone beyond
talking and we are doing something positive
in trying to be prepared. We do not wish to
have to use the fire engine, but we want to be
prepared if we need to."
Mr Ferguson also said that the major role
the police will be playing is to train the vol-
unteers on how to properly operate the unit.
"We want to get the community involved
in what we are doing so that you can take
ownership and be a part of the development
of your community regarding law enforce-
ment and order and safety."
Juliette Dean, executive officer of Bimini's
Administrator's office said: "Indeed this is a
red letter day for residents of our island as we
know that fire can be devastating based on
our past experiences where we lost many
homes. However, this gift today is a blessing
to our island in that we would be prepared if
there is a fire, and tragedy will be minimised.
I also think that residents are thankful that
we are now with tools to combat whatever we
may be faced with in the future."


ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


BIKINI GETS FIRE ENGINE I


PAGE 6, MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009


THE TRIBUNE










Immigration Dept's



Zelma Moss receives *



prestigious award hmonl


AN employee with more
than 40 years of service
received the Bahamas Immi-
gration Department Lifetime
Achievement Award.
Zelma Moss received the
honour during a ceremony at
Government House.
The Minister's Award went
to Donnalee King-Burrows
for more than 30 years of ser-
vice, and the Director's
Award went to C Lloyd Pin-
der who has put in more than
40 years of service in the pub-
lic sector.
The October 1 event was
part of the Bahamas Immi-
gration Department's 70th
anniversary celebrations.
Governor-general Arthur
Hanna underscored the
importance of honouring
employees who are dedicat-
ed to their profession. "Recip-
ients, you must feel elated
that your hard work has not
gone unnoticed," he said.
"The fact that you are being
awarded is testimony to your
continuous good service in
assisting the Department to
meet its goals and objectives."
Mr Hanna advised them to
be ready to deal with migrat-
ing practices that will be con-
tinuing as people seek a better
way of life.
Cultural
"Furthermore, there is also
the cultural aspect which the
movement of people will gen-
erate which brings into sharp
perspective the importance of
the role your Department
plays in this country," he said.
"True diligence in this time
of constant change is key."
He also commended the
department for doing "a very
good job" of regularly inform-
ing the public of the work
being done, as it seeks to car-
ry out its mandate.
"Your leaders and staff
have an onerous assignment
as you are given the responsi-
bility of overseeing and con-
trolling the movement of non-
residents, persons who are not
citizens or have permanent
resident status in this (archi-
pelago)," he said. "Your job
of oversight and control is not
an easy task."
The Bahamas Immigration
Department was established
by an Act of Parliament on
January 1, 1939. Its purpose is
"to regulate the movement of
people across the borders of
the Bahamas so as to ensure
the security, facilitate eco-
nomic advancement and pro-
mote the harmonious social
development of the Bahamas
through collaborative efforts
of responsible government
and non-government agencies
both national and interna-
tionally."
Amendments were made to
the Act for the establishment
of the Detention Centre,
which serves as a transitory
holding facility until repatria-
tion arrangements are secured
for detainees.
Brent Symonette, deputy
prime minister and minister
of foreign affairs, attorney
general and minister of legal
affairs, said that the number
of years served by those hon-
oured speaks to the continuity
of staff with the Department


ZELMA MOSS won the Lifetime Achievement Award for more than 40
years of service. She is pictured (right) receiving the award from
Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs, Brent Symon-
ette. At left is Director of Immigration Jack Thompson.


DONNALEE KING-BURROWS, took the Minister's Award for over 30
years of service. She is pictured at right receiving the award from
Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symon-
ette. Pictured at left is Director of Immigration Jack Thompson.


and institutional knowledge
that exists.
When institutional knowl-
edge is combined with the
vision of the directorate, this
should translate into a win-
ning formula for success, said
Mr Symonette, who also has
ministerial responsibility for


the Immigration Department.
"I am pleased to express
sincere thanks and apprecia-
tion to each of you for the sac-
rifices you have made, and
continue to make toward the
pursuit of the development of
The Bahamas," Mr Symon-
ette said.


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MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


rlomlo�





PAGE 8, MONDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Can the Caribbean rely on the G20?


BY RONALD SANDERS
(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)
It's now official. The G20
group of countries has
replaced the G8 as "the pre-
mier forum for international
economic cooperation." In
other words, the countries in
the G20 will now make the
rules for managing the global
economy instead of the G8 -
what used to be the world's
richest nations.
So said the Leaders State-
ment of the G20 countries
(plus others) after a meeting
in Pittsburgh on September
24 and 25 chaired by US Pres-
ident Barack Obama.
Among the other things the
Leaders said is that when they


met in April this year in Lon-
don they "agreed to do every-
thing necessary to ensure


-- U

Insight

WORLD VIEW -


recovery, to repair our finan-
cial systems and to maintain
the global flow of capital."
And, they declared: "It
worked." The response to
which must be: "Really?"
If it worked, it's not very
obvious in Caribbean
economies many of which are
in severe recession with little
prospect of recovery before
the end of 2011.
Little surprise, therefore,
that the Assistant Secretary-
General of the Caribbean
Community and Common
Market (CARICOM) Secre-
tariat, Colin Granderson, is
reported to have said that
CARICOM countries are
concerned about not having
a presence in the G20. As he
emphasised, "It is believed
that the views of vulnerable
states with peculiarities such
as ours need to be heard."
The Caribbean and the
Pacific are the only areas of
the world that are left out of
the G20. In fact, Europe is
over represented as is obvi-
ous from the membership and
special guests of the G20.
So, who are the members
of the G20? They comprise
the G8 - the United States,
the United Kingdom, Cana-
da, France, Germany, Italy,
Japan and Russia - and the
ten large developing countries
they could no longer ignore.
These are: Argentina, Brazil,
China, India, Indonesia, Mex-
ico, Saudi Arabia, South
Africa, South Korea, and
Turkey. And, for some curi-
ous reason Australia is a
member as is the European
Union (represented by its
rotating President and the
European Central Bank),
making for 21 members.
Then, there are special guests


as well - the leaders of Spain
and the Netherlands. Alto-
gether, six European Union
countries plus the EU Presi-
dency.
Voiceless in all this are the
small regions of the
Caribbean, Central America
and the Pacific, though the
argument could be made that
Mexico is a Central Ameri-
can country and Australia
represents the Pacific. Even if
the latter shaky argument is
made, and accepted by the
Central American and Pacific
countries, no such argument
can be made for the
Caribbean.
Of course, representation
in the G20 is a consequence of
the deficit of democracy in
the international system. The
G8 would have remained long
in control of the world's econ-
omy if the expanded
economies of Brazil, India,
China and South Africa had
not forced the G8 to recog-
nize them.
Membership of the G20
has little to do with fair rep-
resentation and much to do
with self interest. Together,
the G20 countries cover more
than eighty-five per cent of
world economic activity. They
can afford to ignore, or at
least pay lip service to, the
other nations who account for
the remaining fifteen per cent
of global economic activity,
even as Ban-ki-Moon, the UN
Secretary-General, reminds
that eighty-five per cent of the
world's countries are not rep-
resented at the G20. In the
end it is power that matters,
and power in this instance is
purchasing capacity and mar-
ket size.
How exactly the G20 will
conduct its work is not yet


clear. The Leaders at the
Pittsburgh meeting instruct-
ed their officials "to report
back at the next meeting with
recommendations on how to
maximize the effectiveness of
our cooperation." But, if the
'green room' process at the
World Trade Organization is
anything to go by, decisions
will be agreed by a handful
of the more powerful coun-
tries with others being co-opt-
ed into the deals either by
coercion or trade-offs. There-
after, the thinking of "eighty-
five per cent of the world's
countries not represented at
the G20" will be of little con-
sequence.
In reality, what the G20
may have done is provide a
blind behind which a new
power-group may emerge: the
US and China for sure, maybe
a combined EU (but certain-
ly not the full gamut of Euro-
pean countries that now hold
on to a place because of past
dispensations), Russia, India
and Brazil. Undoubtedly,
deals made between the US
and China will hold sway, and
it is their interest to work out
mutually beneficial arrange-
ments.
It is significant that in the
Pittsburgh Leaders' state-
ment, the developing coun-
tries in the G20 appear to
have adopted the agenda of


ing power in both organiza-
tions has to be settled by the
G20. It will mean easing out
some European countries that
now sit on the Executive
Boards to make room for
countries such as China and
Saudi Arabia. It will definite-
ly mean an end to the practice
of the US and Europe holding
on to the headship of the two
organizations.
But, even those changes
should not be enough. What
is required is a new vision of
the role of the organizations
in financing development
needs.
The vision should include a
policy that "no nation shall
be left behind" and it should
be backed by pledged and
callable resources that depart
from the unrealistic norms
that have become part of the
IMF and World Bank ideolo-
gy. Whether the developing
countries in the G20 will
prove to be more sympathet-
ic to the "peculiarities" of
small "vulnerable" states is
left to be seen. But, one thing
is for sure the Caribbean is
right to ask for a seat at the
G20 table.
(Responses to, and previous
commentaries at, www.sir-
ronaldsanders. corn
m/>)


TENiDER NOTICE 01/09


EXTERNAL AuDrrT AND ADVSOR SERVICES



Ilie Senirities Coimmssion of The I3Ialtas (Che Comnission') is a stautry body estbished
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regulm&ate hecfi~es of the Iii'slm*4funds, mds as d ptaI m~kets, T11wCommi~ion,
havin been appoiinted Inspwtor of Fienca I sand Cixporate Servkc~ Prov~iders Jesian y 1, MO.
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Ilie Comms01oni iviw pops alsfor he iprovision of e ex"01 auditso Mi~s inirqw~ of its
[iu~~ a e~ispe~rdIn a mcx w~~ith oi jtrational FiRwMaIReportng Swtardds for
tityeu endd 1Dewnba31, 209.

Caitict the Cuouuin.,m for suppieuetal ~in.foriationa eimZ

Tel: 24-1-354.1291,1
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Addres tendersto
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Y4 f kor CharIove How~
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Nadfim efor deElry tothe UIiss i~mi is bon or beforeOctober 15; 2M)

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'Curfew needed for all Bahamians'


FROM page one
on the rest of us. Draconian
measures by the public and
swift and harsh treatment of
hardened criminals by the
state must be implemented,"
said the bishop, who recently
unveiled a memorial wall for
murder victims at his church.
The implementation of cur-
fews set up to reduce juvenile
crime is nothing new.
In the summer of 2008,
police in Britain asked par-
ents in Redruth, west Corn-
wall, to have their children off
the streets by 9pm for a vol-
untary curfew during the
school summer break.
The British press reported


that the move was geared
towards reducing problems
with children at night.
British
In July, 2008 British law-
makers proposed a curfew for
teenagers under the age of 16
with the view of stemming ris-
ing stabbings and muggings
at knife-point in crime
hotspots, according to the
Mail Online.
Mr Hall's appeal for a self-
imposed curfew came on the
same day that a 17-year-old
boy was shot in the stomach
during a standoff with police.
The boy, a resident of Fox
Hill, was shot around 1.30 am
Sunday in the area of Victoria


Teen shot after


police standoff

FROM page one
armed with a handgun," Superintendent Elsworth Moss, head
of the Central Detective Unit, told The Tribune.
According to Supt Moss, the on-duty officer identified him-
self to the young man and ordered that he drop his firearm.
"The male pointed the gun towards him. He fired a shot
hitting the male in the stomach. The male fell to the ground and
the officer retrieved a .380 pistol that had three lives rounds in
it," Supt Moss said.
The young man - a resident of Fox Hill - was taken to hos-
pital where he is listed in critical condition.
The shooting happened the same day pastor of New
Covenant Baptist Church, Bishop Simeon Hall, called for the
nation to adopt a self-imposed curfew of llpm.
Bishop Hall said that parents of teenagers should ensure
that their children are home before that time to help curb the
"mayhem" occurring on the city's streets after dark.
"An 11 pm self-imposed curfew is imperative because it is
clear that those with guns are intent on wreaking havoc on the
rest of us. Draconian measures by the public and swift and
harsh treatment of hardened criminals by the state must be
implemented," said the bishop, who recently unveiled a memo-
rial wall for murder victims at his church.


Avenue. He remained in crit-
ical condition at last report.
There have also been sev-
eral brutal killings recently,
some of them occurring in
broad daylight at public
places.
On September 22, 35-year-
old Randy Williams was
stabbed several times at the
Seagrape Shopping Centre on
Prince Charles Drive when an
argument with another man
escalated into violence at
around 5pm.
Days earlier, Rashad Mor-
ris, 21, a manager at Burger
King was beaten and stabbed
to death outside the Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway
restaurant at around 1.30am
on Sunday. Just hours later


that same day, Bahamasair
pilot Lionel Lewis McQueen,
29, was shot dead at his home
in Golden Palm Estates, near
the Kennedy Subdivision.
And a fire that killed four
people about two weeks ago
- including a toddler - was
officially classified as homi-
cides, bumping the murder
count to 67 for the year.

'YOUR VIE
To have your say on this or any
other issue, e-mail The Tribune
at: letters@tribunemedia.net or
deliver your letter to The Tri-
bune on Shirley Street, P.O.
Box N-3207


FROM page one
country needs people like you," Mrs Pratt said at a PLP stalwart
meeting over the weekend.
Recently, Mrs Pratt announced that she would not offer for
re-election, leaving an opening for the coveted post. Previ-
ously she had stated that she had a candidate in mind for her
replacement although she would not name the person at that
time.
Now, Mr Davis - who is said to have been a tremendous
help to the former deputy prime minister during her late hus-
band's illness - has received the nod that could place him
heads and shoulders above his other opponents.
Aside from Mr Davis, only PLP MP for West End and Bimi-
ni Obie Wilchcombe and PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald have
publicly said they would run for the deputy leader post.
* (See story on page six).


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ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


Z


MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


0�0






PAGE^LOCAL 0,S IONDAOCTOBER5,2009THETRIB


I\


PLEASANT BRIDGEWATER


FROM page one
rather than fragment the
evidence by playing a taped
telephone conversation
between Bridgewater and
attorney Michael McDer-
mott on Friday, it would be
better if the jurors heard
that recording and saw the
two videotaped meetings
today.

Consented
Mr McDermott, who is an
attorney for Mr Travolta, 55,
has testified that he consent-
ed to local police tapping his
telephone, placing recording
devices in his hotel room as
well as outfitting him with a
body wire. Mr McDermott
has testified that he met
with Lightbourne and also
Bridgewater in his hotel
room at the Sheraton, Cable
Beach in January.
Bridgewater and Light-
bourne are accused of
attempting to extort $25 mil-
lion from the actor shortly
after the death of his 16-
year-old son Jett at their


condominium in Grand
Bahama on January 2.
Bridgewater is also charged
with abetment to extort. On
Friday defence attorney
Murrio Ducille suggested to
Mr McDermott that his sole
purpose for coming to the
Bahamas was to "set up" Ms
Bridgewater. Mr McDer-
mott claimed, however, that
the accused were not set up
at his request.
Director of Public Prose-
cutions Bernard Turner,
Neil Brathwaite and Garvin
Gaskin are prosecuting the
case. Ms Bridgewater is rep-
resented by attorneys Mur-
rio Ducille and Krysta
Smith. Mr Lightbourne is
represented by attorney
Carlson Shurland and Mary
Bain.

ATTORNEY Michael McDermott
who represents Hollywood
celebrity John Travolta Mr
McDermott has testified that he
consented to local police tapping
his telephone, placing recording
devices in his hotel room as well
as outfitting him with a body
wire.


MYSTERY DEATH: Murder or an accident?


Preston Ferguson family: There



have been no new developments


Rt. Hon. Hubert A. Ingraham


PROCLAMATION


WHEREAS, our nation's youth
the hopes, dreams and aspirations of


collectively represent
the Bahamian people;


AND WHEREAS, the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture
joins with youth leaders and youth organizations throughout The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, in a national commitment to
the pursuit of religious, educational, social, economic, physical
and cultural ideals of a free and independent Bahamian nation;


AND WHEREAS, the many positive contributions of the
youth of our nation continue to be a source of national pride;


AND WHEREAS, The Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture has set aside a month to show appreciation to these
many young nation builders;


NOW THEREFORE, I Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister
of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim
the month of October, 2009 as "NATIONAL YOUTH MONTH".






IN WITNESS WHEREOF,
I have hereunto set my
Hand and Seal this 11th.
day of September, 2009



HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER


FROM page one
one has informed them as to if
and when that re-enactment
will take place.
Mr Ferguson, a resident
of Exuma and father of one,
was found dead in a truck on
the side of the road in the
area of Ocean Addition East,
near the Forest, Exuma, on
the morning of August 2.
Police initially suspected that
he had run off the road and
hit a utility pole, however, his
family believe the accident
P O Gwas "staged." Mr Ferguson,
I


who was employed at Grand
Isle Villas as a Landscaping
Supervisor, was the youngest
of 12 children.
"We don't know that any-
one has gone up there to do
anything yet.
"We were hoping by now
that someone would have
called us. Nobody is saying
anything, everyone saying I'll
get back to you," a member of
the Ferguson family said yes-
terday.

Demonstration
Members of the Ferguson
family participated in a peace-
ful demonstration in Rawson
Square on Monday with sev-
eral other families who lost
loved ones to violence. They
say they will continue to seek
justice in Mr Ferguson's
death. After meeting with
National Security Minister the
family claims that they were
told that someone else would
"get back to them", but they
have heard nothing on the
matter since. The Ferguson
family say that Preston was
well liked and that there are
persons willing to assist police
in their investigation into his
death.
Police Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson did not
return phone calls up to press
time yesterday, however, a
senior police officer said that
the matter has been turned
over to the Police Road Traf-
fic division.


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


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*SALE
10-50% OFF
GiMs, Hmdlcrafl & BMak Clothbig
Sept. 26th - 24th Oct.
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Tender
CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
The Bahamas Electricity Corporatilon
invites Tenders for the above named services,
Bidders are required to collect bid packages from
the Corporation's Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads.
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Baharnas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

eiadllne for delivery to IEC:
9th October 2019 nai later than 4400 pm.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No.711 /09
CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

The Corporation rtesrvws the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals,


Travolta trial jurors expected



to watch videotaped meetings

_____ _ I I i -- 2 ,I I ,I


.-9


PAGE 10, MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009


THE TRIBUNE


do 1






T H E T R I l Ii N E P A (, E 1 1


1O ; E R II II


a 2* nwes odiktemupa hiaOen-


Bahamas surrenders bodybuilding title


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
THE Bahamas' 12-member
team will be returning home
from St George's, Grenada,
without the coveted 37th Cen-
tral American and Caribbean
Bodybuilding and Fitness
Championships title.
After dominating the cham-
pionships for the past three
years, the Bahamas relin-
quished the title twice on Sat-


SOFTBALL
NPSA PLAYOFFS


THE New Providence
Softball Association is
scheduled to begin its first
round best-of-five playoff
series tonight on the
Banker's Field at the Bail-
lou Hills Sporting Com-
plex.
Here's a look at the fix-
ture:
Tonight's schedule
7pm - Proper Care Pool
Lady Sharks (3rd) vs
defending champions Sig-
ma Brackets (2nd) ladies
division
8:30pm - Robin Hood
Hitmen (4th) vs Heavy
Equipment Dorsey Park
Boyz (pennant winners)
men
Tuesday's schedule
7pm - Boomer G
Swingers (4th) vs Pineap-
ple Air Wildcats (pennant
winners) ladies
8:30pm - Cammando
Security Truckers (3rd,
defending champions)vs
Pricewaterhouse Stingrays
(2nd) men


urday night to Barbados, who
carted off the overall title with
208 points.
Barbados had a double
dose of celebrations as they
were also awarded the 2008
title over the Bahamas and
Venezuela, who was second.
A statistical error reversed
the overall decision from the
2008 championships that was
held here when the Bahamas
was crowned the champions
for the third straight year.
At this year's champi-
onships over the weekend, the
Bahamas ended up in third
place with 115 behind
Trinidad & Tobago, who
accumulated 137.
Bahamas Bodybuilding and
Fitness Federation president
Danny Sumner, team manag-
er Derrick Bullard, nor coach
Wellington 'Cat' Sears could
be reached for comments up
to press time last night.
James 'Jay' Darling, the
national champion, turned in
the best performance for the
Bahamas as he clinched the
team's only two gold medals.
He struck twice in the men's
masters and the middleweight
divisions.
The overall male champi-
on was Martinus Durrant of
Barbados, who earned his
professional card in the
process.
The female winner was
Candice Carr-Archer of
Trinidad & Tobago. She cap-
tured the masters category.
Barbados also celebrated
as Renee Cobham was
crowned the Miss Fitness
CAC champion. Her compa-
triot Nicole Carter finished
second.
And both Jamilia Sokunbi
and Ramona Morgan took
the women's fitness titles.
In winning this year's title
by 50 points, Barbados took
six divisional titles, five sec-
ond places and four third
places.
Other divisional winners
were bantamweight Hemradj
Mulai of Aruba, lightweight
Diego Salinas of El Salvador,
lightweight Ross Caeser of
Bermuda; heavyweight Juan
Carlos Bega of Puerto Rico


JAMES DARLING, the national champion, turned in the best perfor-
mance for the Bahamas as he clinched the team's only two gold
medals. He struck twice in the men's masters and the middleweight
divisions...


and super heavyweight Philip
Clahar of Jamaica.
This year's championships
attracted about 250 body-
builders from 19 countries.
Grenada's Vaughn Francis,
who won the CAC title two


years ago along with Dennis
James, a fourth place finisher
in the prestigious Mr Olympia
competition, were guest
posers.
The 2010 championships
will be held in Aruba.


Barbados wins Central American
Caribbean Bodybuilding and
Fitness Championship



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Knowles, Roddick team





up at the China Open


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
BY the time you would have read
this, Bahamian tennis ace Mark
Knowles and American Andy Rod-
dick would have already played their
first round of the men's doubles in
the China Open.
Yes, that's not a misprint -
Knowles and Roddick teaming up.
Roddick, the former world No.1
player who is currently ranked at
No.9, is stepping in to team up with
Knowles after his Indian partner
Mahesh Bhupathi suffered a groin
injury while playing in the Davis Cup
two weeks ago.
Bhupathi, however, is expected to
be reunited with Knowles when they
both travel to Japan next week.
In the meantime, Knowles and
Roddick were scheduled to start play
together for the first time today.
Their first round match was against
Hsin-Han Lee and Tsung-Hua Yang
of Taipei.
Knowles was unavailable for com-
ments up to press time last night, but
his mother/manager Vicki Knowles-
Andrews said her son is quite pleased
that his long-time friend Roddick
was available.
"They're friends, so obviously
when your partner becomes injured,
you have to search around to see
who is available," Knowles-Andrews
said.
"He asked Roddick and he said
he would love to play with him."
Knowles and Roddick are unseed-
ed and their opponents, Lee and
Yang, are wild card winners. If that's
any consolation, Knowles and Rod-
dick should be able to get through to
the second round.
If they are successful today, they
could get a chance to meet the top
seeded team of Knowles' former
partner Daniel Nestor of Canada and
Serbian Nenad Zimonjic.
Nestor and Zimonjic are due to
meet the team of Jose Acasuso of


Mahsh hupth sufer grininjry n Dvi


I Cu bu exectd6t reurnnet ee


500 points. The runners-up will split
$83,000 and get 300 points.
For making the semifinal, the
teams will clinch $33,350 and 180
points. For the quarter-final, they
will get $18,100 and 90 points. For
the round, they will only share
$10,000.
Following the China Open, the
focus will swift to Shanghai, China,
for the Shanghai ATP Masters 1000
that is scheduled to begin on October
11. That is when Knowles and Bhu-
pathi will reunite as they march
towards the Barclays ATP World
Tour Finals in London, England,
starting on November 22.


RODDICK is stepping in to team up with Knowles after his Indian partner Mahesh Bhu-
pathi suffered a groin injury while playing in the Davis Cup two weeks ago...


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


PAGE 12, MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS






TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2009, PAGEOR13


wine IanK" vs




'Diamond Boy




draws near


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribnemedia.net
SHERMAN 'The Tank'
Williams is heading off to
Germany to make sure that
he gets properly acclimatized
before he steps into the ring
on Saturday night.
The Grand Bahamian
heavyweight, fighting out of
Florida, left the United States
yesterday and should have
arrived in Hamburg for his
first fight for the year.
On Saturday night at the
Stadthalle, Rostiock, Meck-
lenburg-Vorpommern,
Williams is scheduled to fight
undefeated German Manuel
'Diamond Boy' Charr in the
10-round co-main event.
"Everything went well,"
said Williams in an interview
from New Jersey yesterday
before he boarded the non-
stop flight to Germany.
"My preparation was good.
We had a great camp. My
sparring was great. We had
two Russians and a local
fighter from Miami and
another heavyweight, so I had
some good sparring."
Williams, 37, said his entire
management team headed by
American Si Stern have been
impressed with what they saw
in his training sessions.
"We had a couple of things
we wanted to work on like
the body attack," Williams
said. "We also worked on the
throwing the hooks and the
right."
Based on his training,


Williams said he feels as if
he's in perfect condition. But
once he gets into Hamburg,
he will go through a light
workout, then take a nap
before he heads back into the
gym for a full-fledge work-
out.
"The first two days are
going to be pivotal to me get-
ting adjusted to the climate,"
Williams reflected. "But I am
experienced having traveled
to Europe and Germany a
number of times to train."
Williams, who sports a 34-
10-2 win-loss-draw record
with 19 knockouts, is making
his second appearance in Ger-
many to fight. His debut was
on March 26, 2005, when he
lost on points to Russian Cha-
gaev at the Erdgas Arena,
Riesa, Sachsen.
However, Williams has not
fought since December when
he won on points over Amer-
ican Andrew Greeley at the
Bourbon Street Station in
Jacksonville.
In January, Williams was
to have fought in Key West,
Florida, but that fight was
called off after he injured his
right hand in training.
"It's been nine months
since I last fought," Williams
said. "I did my therapy, my
hand is feeling good and now
I'm ready to fight again," he
said.
"I love to fight, I'm always
excited to go to the gym and
work out and spar. In any giv-
en day, my trainer will tell
you, I could spar every day.
I'm a born fighter and I like


what I do."
When he steps into the ring
on Saturday night, Williams
said for the first time his
entire entourage will be
draped in the colours of the
Bahamian national flag.
As for his opponent, the
Beirut, Lebanon Charr, who
turns 25 on fight night, is
undefeated at 12-0. What's
also interesting is that Charr,
who is coming off a third
round knockout on June 6,
stands at 6-foot-3 1/2.
Williams, who is listed at 5-
11, said his handlers have
assured him that if he is suc-
cessful in winning the fight,
he can secure a top 10 ranking
in the World Boxing Organi-
sation, which is controlled by
the European promoters.
"If I can get into the top
10, hopefully we can maneu-
ver a mandatory title shot or
get to fight somebody else as
an eliminator to a title fight,"
Williams projected.
"But I'm excited about it.
I'm looking forward to it in a
big way. At the same time,
I'm going in with no pressure
on myself.
"I trained hard and I intend
to knock this guy out because
I don't want the same thing to
happen to me when I lost my
last fight there on points,
although I beat my opponent
from pillar to post."
While he has watched his
opponent on video, Williams
said he knows he will have his
hands full, but he's prepared
for whatever Charr throws at
him on Saturday night.


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009, PAGE 13










Jackie Edwards recovering from surgery


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribnemedia.net


AFTER missing her 10th appear-
ance at the 12th IAAF World Cham-
pionships because of an injury, long
jumper Jackie Edwards is now recu-
perating from surgery for her final
appearance at the Commonwealth
Games next year.
On Thursday afternoon, Edwards
successfully went through surgery to
repair her torn Achilles tendon that
she re-aggravated in April, keeping
her out of qualifying for what would
have been her final appearance at
the World Championships in Berlin,
Germany.
Now she's home in California
walking on crutches and waiting to
start her preparation for the 2010
season and her fifth appearance at
the Commonwealth Games in Delhi,
India, slated for October 3-14.
"It was okay. I personally have
not seen the doctor after the surgery
because when I woke up, he was
already gone," Edwards said.
"But he told my parents and my
brother that it went well. There was
no complications and I need to go
back to see him in two weeks to get
a proper cast placed on my leg."
Over the next six weeks, Edwards
will have to wear a cast. Once it has
been removed, she said she will then
concentrate on her last appearance
next year.
"I plan to compete, but whether or
not my legs will cooperate, we shall
see," she pointed out. "My plan is to
make 2010 my last track season.
That's my goal."
Edwards, 38, said she will not real-
ly start training until January and
because the season is expected to
be a long one, she won't start com-
peting until it's close to the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associations
(BAAA) trials in June.
With the Commonwealth Games
set for October, Edwards said it
would be a good opportunity for her
to pace herself so that she can finish
off her career in grand style.
The co-national long jump record
holder, who has represented the
Bahamas at just about every major
international meet, including the
Olympic Games four times since tak-
ing over from Shonel Ferguson, said
she has been very proud of her track
career.
The 1987 Queen's College gradu-
ate completed her sting at Stanford
University in 1992 where she was an
All-American having won the
NCAA Division 1 Indoor and Out-
door Championships in her initial
year.
A bronze medallist at the Pan
American Games in 1995, Edwards
enjoyed her best success at the Com-
monwealth Games where she was
fourth in her debut in 1994 in Victo-
ria, Canada, before she came back
and took the silver in 1998 in Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia.
After finishing seventh in the 2000
Olympics in Sydney, Australia,
Edwards matched that feat at the
2002 Commonwealth Games in
Manchester, England.
In her last appearance in 2006 in


Has legs set on

final appearance

at Commonwealth

Games next year


JACKIE EDWARDS


Melbourne, Australia, she was
eighth.
Coming to reality with the season-
ending injury in April, Edwards said
she's not going to put any pressure
on herself to go out and get ready for
2010.
"I'm going to do everything to
make sure that I don't have the
injury again," she aid. "When you
have surgery, everything is supposed
to be really good as far as not having
a recurring o the injury.
"I didn't have surgery in April
when I reaggravated it, so I just took
care of it. I think if I did, I would
have been ready by now to start
preparing for next year."
But Edwards said while she's dis-
appointed that she didn't get to qual-
ify for her 10th Worlds, she will be
contented with nine, having made
the final three times.
"I would have loved to have been
there competing with the rest of the
team," she insisted. "Whether any-
body believed me, I don't care.
"I know my training was going
really well this year and I would have
competed at a very high level. So I
was very satisfied with that. I wasn't
just fooling around and trying to
hang onto the team for dear life."
Next year, Edwards said she
intends to go out with a bang.
In the meantime, she has been
working with a Health and Wellness
Group and submitted a proposal to
the Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture called 'Ladies' First,' to
work with the young girls in high
school.
If accepted, Edwards said she
intends to come home. Already she
has lined up a number of persons,
including a long-time traveling room-
mate Lavern Eve, to assist her. She
said she's just waiting on the min-
istry's approval.


EDWARDS successfully went through surgery to repair her torn Achilles tendon that she re-aggravated in April, keeping her out
of qualifying for what would have been her final appearance at the World Championships in Berlin, Germany...


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PAGE 14, MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS








S* THE LEASE has been
Agro-industrial sealed for 23 acres on
Agroind r , which to construct an
park to be1 " agro-industrial park in
SNorth Andros. Pictured
establishedfrom left are BAIC General
rsalihd nManager Benjamin Rah-
ming, Executive Chairman
North Andros Edison Key, Minister of
Agriculture and Marine
.4~ ~ ~ ~ 134-PzirzI L~ip


THE Bahamas Agricul-
tural and Industrial Corpo-
ration (BAIC) has entered
into a 21-year lease with
the Ministry of Agriculture
and Marine Resources to
establish an agro-industrial
park in North Andros.
The lease covers 23 acres
of land on which to con-
struct the park. The land
will be divided into two-
acre plots and made avail-
able to Bahamians inter-
ested in pursuing food pro-
duction.







THE products of six
Bahamians will be showcased
at the prestigious Maison et
Objet Trade Show in Paris,
France, BAIC Executive
Chairman Edison Key con-
firmed.
The lucky artists are Lovely
Reckley (Abaco), Christine
Curtis (South Andros), Emily
Munnings (Eleuthera),
Dorothy Miller (Long Island),
Patricia Hamilton (New Prov-
idence) and Admiral Forbes
(New Providence).
Maison et Objet Show,
which opens in January, is an
international home decora-
tion, giftware and tableware
exhibition featuring thou-
sands products from well-
known designers.
Mr Key also confirmed that
a week of activities beginning
October 26 has been set aside
to honour Bahamian artisans
"in a special way" at the
Arawak Cay Culture Centre.
A proclamation from Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
will declare that week
"National Craft Week" under
the theme "Tradition made
modern".
The internationally
acclaimed BahamArts Festi-
val, which showcases the artis-
tic side of Bahamian culture,
opens October 30 with Mr
Ingraham delivering the
keynote address. There will
be special features from the
Family Islands.
Celebrating its 12th year,
this event is hosted by the
Handicraft Development and
Marketing Department of
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation
(BAIC), headed by Assistant
General Manager Donnalee
Bowe.
"We are laying out the red
carpet in celebrating Bahami-
an artisans like never before,"
said Mr Key, the Member of
Parliament for South Abaco.
During services at Zion
Baptist Church, East and
Shirley Streets, on October
18, the oldest straw vendor,
Mrs Doris Strachan will be
honoured.
Mr Key hailed the tradi-
tional straw vendors as "the
backbone of the Bahamian
souvenir industry."
The fourth annual general
meeting of the Bahamas
National Craft Association
takes place October 28 and 29
at SuperClub Breezes, Cable
Beach. The Arawak Cay Cul-
ture Centre will be decorated
with some 80 main booths fea-
turing the choicest art and
craft items from throughout
the islands. That Saturday, the
popular "Victory of the High
School Bands" competition
will feature a 60-person con-
tingent from Exuma's L N
Coakley High School.
An array of Bahamian arti-
sans are scheduled to give
demonstrations and work-
shops throughout the week.
They include Gertrude Gib-
son of Red Bays, Andros on
the art of weaving baskets
from silver top palms using
sail needle; Emily Munnings
of Eleuthera on making hand-
icrafts from coconut shells,
and coconut boat making by
Nassau's Admiral Forbes.
Customarily, on that Satur-
day, ladies show off their lat-
est fashions at the Gala
Bahamian Tea Party.
It is held this year in con-
junction with the Ministry of
Agriculture and Marine
Resources and the Women's
Desk, Ministry of Foreign
Affairs. Entertainment will
include the Falcon Band with
Ancient Man and Anita Ellis,
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force Band, and the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force
Band. "The invitation goes
out to all to attend this family
affair and appreciate the


beauty of things Bahamian,"
said Mr Key.


PICTURED during the signing are from left, BAIC General Manager
Benjamin Rahming, Executive Chairman Edison Key, Ministry of
Agriculture Assistant Director Fern Bowleg, Agriculture and Marine
Resources Manager Lawrence Cartwright, and Permanent Secre-
tary Cresswell Sturrup.


Deep Water Dolphin
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THE TRIBUNE


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PAGELOCAL 6,S MONDAYIOCTOBER5,2009THETRB


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MINISTER FOR STATE FOR CULTURE Charles Maynard along with Permanent
Secretary for Sports Archie Narin and Minister of Youth Sports and Culture
Desmand Bannister take to the streets.
I PHOTOS: Felipd Major/Tribune staff


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


40,


PAGE 16, MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009


THE TRIBUNE









Jr :



TOUR- 1-= J' J.',
i AL
COALHABOR AS


RBDF PHOTOS: PETTY OFFICER JONATHAN ROLLE

TOMMY Turnquest, Minister of National Security
with responsibility for the Defence Force, recently
visited HMBS Coral Harbour Base, where he toured
the military facility. Accompanied by the Permanent
Secretary for the Ministry of National Security A Mis-
souri Sherman-Peters and Commander of the Defence
Force, Commodore Clifford Scavella, the minister
was given a thorough walk-through of the base.
Following the tour, Mr Turnquest was introduced to
the Commodore's command team and his officers.
He was then hosted to a luncheon in the Officers'
Wardroom.


p....


MINISTER of National Security Tommy Turnquest being briefed by Commander of the Defence Force, Commodore Clifford Scav-
ella, during his official tour of the Coral Harbour Base. At far left is Captain Clyde Sawyer, captain of Coral Harbour, and also
taking part in the tour is Permanent Secretary for the Ministry of National Security A Missouri Sherman-Peters.


1i


MINISTER of National Security Tommy Turnquest greets the Defence Force officers during his tour of HMBS
Coral Harbour. Greeting the minister is Senior Lieutenant Whitfied Neely, Base 1st Lieutenant, RBDF.


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MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE





PAGELOCAL 8,S MONDAYIOCTOBER5,2009THETRB


Kiwanis Club of Cable

Beach raises funds for

the College of Bahamas


PICTURED:
C Carey, student
affairs chair, is
pictured receiving a
cheque. On the
right is immediate
past president
Stephen Brennen.


S. ".K.
',..


PICTURED (left to right): KIWANIS Cable Beach Club president Don
Aranham, Janet Brown and immediate past president Stephen Bren-
nen.


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THE Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach recently raised funds
through its annual antique auto show and steak-out which it
donated to the College of the Bahamas.
The cheque was received by C Carey, student affairs chair.
The club also presented a cash donation to the patron the of
Bilney Lane Home for Children, Janet Brown, for the insti-
tution's upkeep.


. . .. ...


Adlb�. AdlbL AdlbL Adlbk

ZEKM


PAGE 18, MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009


THE TRIBUNE


all










Ross University Bahamas ,Hste



welcomes Dr Anthony Munroe



as new Executive Administrator , -


GRAND BAHAMA -
Ross University welcomed
Anthony Munroe as their
new executive administra-
tor for their Bahamas edu-
cational site.
Prior to his appointment,
Dr Munroe lived in Chicago
and successfully served as
president of Advocate Trin-
ity Hospital and was named
one of the Top 25 minority
healthcare executives in the
United States by Modern
Healthcare Magazine.
He has served as president
of St John Detroit
Riverview Hospital in
Detroit, Michigan, and as
president and chief execu-
tive officer of the Economic
Opportunity Family Health
Centre in Miami, Florida.
"We are pleased to wel-
come this well-respected
executive to our academic
community of the
Bahamas," said Dr Thomas
Shepherd, president of Ross
University.
"His skills are ideally suit-
ed to build on the achieve-
ments of Ross University.
In addition to being nation-
ally recognized for his exper-
tise in healthcare leadership,
strategy, cultural competen-
cy and diversity in health-
care, Dr Anthony Munroe
brings an impressive track
record of success in world-
class healthcare organisa-
tions. We are pleased to
have him with Ross," Dr
Shepherd said.
Dr Munroe grew up in the
Bronx, New York. He
Munroe completed his doc-
toral studies with a focus on
health systems earning an
Ed D in Health Education
at Columbia University,


DR ANTHONY MUNROE, recently appointed executive administrator


for Ross University Bahamas.
Teachers College in New
York and he holds a Mas-
ters of Business Adminis-
tration from Northwestern
University's Kellogg Grad-
uate School of Management,
as well as a Master's of Pub-
lic Health from Columbia
University.
He is a life member of the
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity.


Dr Munroe has served on
the Board of Directors of
Health Choice Network, has
been an advisor to the Mia-
mi Fellows Programme, and
served on the Community
Advisory Board of the
Brooklyn Medical Centre of
the New York University.
He is a Fulbright Senior
Specialist with the Council


for International Scholar
Exchange
"It is an honour to join the
Ross University leadership
team and I look forward to
working with the wonderful
people of the Bahamas, our
faculty, students and staff as
we educate future physi-
cians," said Dr Munroe
when asked about his
appointment.
Dr Munroe is one of the
first ten Kellogg Foundation
and Congressional Black
Caucus Foundation's nation-
al Public Health Fellows. He
is also a board certified
health care executive of the
American College of
Healthcare Executives
(ACHE).
The Mayor and Board of
Commissioners for Miami-
Dade County with a Procla-
mation designating 'Antho-
ny E Munroe Day' have also
recognized Dr Munroe for
his service and expertise. He
has also received a presti-
gious Congressional Certifi-
cate for his work in health-
care.
Dr Munroe is married to
Michelle Marie Francis of
St Croix, Virgin Islands, and
they enjoy sports, travelling
and spending quality time
with family and friends.
Ross University was
founded in 1978 and is a
provider of medical and vet-
erinary education offering
doctor of medicine and doc-
tor of veterinary medicine
degree programs. The
School of Medicine is locat-
ed in Dominica, West
Indies, and the Freeport,
Grand Bahama campus
recently opened in January
2009.


PAST PRESIDENT & Director of International Service - Harry
Kemp, Nikita Smith - Administrative Assistant and Past Presi-
dent & Director of Public Relations-Pat Strachan

On Monday, September 28, the Rotary Club of West Nassau
made a donation to the Bahamas Children's Emergency Hostel
to help defray the costs of managing the hostel.
The Bahamas Children's Emergency Hostel was established
in 1962 by the Bahamas Christian Council. Its founders were the
late Dean William Granger, Mr and Mrs Hedden, Thomas
Brooks, and Pastor William Nairn.
The purpose was to provide emergency and temporary shel-
ter for abandoned, neglected and abused children aged six
weeks to eleven years. The initial site was in Oakes Field.
In May 1968, the Hostel was closed due to financial difficul-
ties. However, under the new leadership of the Kiwanis Club of
Nassau, it reopened in January 1969 on its present site on McK-
inney Drive. The Department of Social Services later became a
partner and now provides an annual grant and employs 13 of the
25 staff members.
The Hostel provides a very critical service to the community.
One would agree that when children have been abandoned,
neglected or abused by their caregivers, they should be pro-
tected. Yet, it is never a pleasant task to remove them from their
homes or to determine that they should live in an institution.
However, when circumstances dictate that this is the best course
of action, it is important that they are given a comfortable, nur-
turing and attractive environment where their ability to thrive is
not severely affected. The Bahamas Children's Emergency
Hostel continually seeks to provide such an environment.
The Hostel can comfortably accommodate 32 children, ages
1 to 11 years. Residents who have not been returned to their rel-
atives, fostered or adopted by age 12 are transferred to Homes
for older children, where they will reside until age 18.
The average length of residency at the Hostel is one year. The
children attend worship services each Sunday and all school-age
children attend public schools. Pre-schoolers receive scholar-
ships from community pre-schools.
Although a recipient of an annual grant from the Department
of Social Services, the Hostel relies heavily on the benevolence
of community-minded citizens and organizations to support its
work through donations of finances and time. A continuous
challenge is securing funds to operate and maintain the facility
which houses a nursery, boys and girls dorms, kitchen, dining
area, storage areas and administrative offices.


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I ODSUSSOISO HSIPAGE LG ON0T WWW.TIBUE22CO0


I I


MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009, PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE





PAGEI 20,MONAYOCTBER5,of_20inn9ITHETRIB

RealMen all n Gvernr-Geera

-ml 711 [~I1 S~ rirn~ 11A


Club Grand


Bahama


promotes


tourism


THE Club Grand Bahama Training programme,
which is mandatory for all vendors participating
in the Club Grand Bahama campaign, aims to
ensure excellence in service delivery, and skills for
managing difficult situations.
Certificates
More than 100 persons who participated in this
training exercise were presented with their certifi-
cates of successful completion at the first graduation
event for the Club Grand Bahama campaign.
Among those pictured above with some of the
Club Grand Bahama graduates are Denise Adder-
ley, Director of Marketing, Grand Bahama
Tourism; Sandra P Russell, Director of Operation,
Ministry of Tourism; Pauline Wells, Executive of
Training, Ministry of Tourism; and Karenda Swain,
Superior Vendors and Quality Control, Ministry of
Tourism. (BIS photo: Vandyke Hepburn)


e0*+


Youll ondr hw yu eer otalong wI ithu t


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


THE BOARD of Direc-
tors of Real Men Min-
istry International
paid a courtesy call
on Governor-General
Arthur Hanna on
Wednesday, Septem-
ber 30, at Govern-
ment House. Pictured
from left are Ethan
Moss, Odley Aritis,
David Knowles, Gov-
ernor-General Hanna,
Dr Kendal Major,
Julian Smith (presi-
dent), Brent Lloyd,
and Wayne Rolle.


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
ZiaVisit orwehw bieat wwwcob.edrbN

EX PRESSIONS OF INTEREST (EOI
FOR PREQUALIFICATION FOR
DESIGN, SUPPLY AND I INSTALLATION OF
EXTERNAL LANDSCAPING. LIGHTING & IRRIGAT[ON'SV.STENIS
The~ Col1kgir ofThe Rahanmws ':CU~i is eking E~p ~iuNkmsf Intriev-tIrom qualilis~U
firms to pmvide services and prod~ucts for the .i~n , supplyand installation of thec xLer-
n~l laind'~capuwg. Ii.h1iiag ard ivIi~ v-0 1AystLm fol.~
(ii athe, hurry Moan! Library andId lfamtw~aionCentre presently under construction at
(ii) (k nhe Lw Nurberllr Balkattmab Ci~rrpu:, of nho Culllvg�:prieLernIIy' under construction~
in Freepwir Grand Biahauma
interestd PAsnat~~my kib'n further informatiionand a cop'y of 11w Expte-sions (if hIntcist
PrequaI i ic~inioi'iAppliclatlionfurmnfrom:
The Meorrc f the Vice President Fbnace
Colleg of The Rahamas'
Na-msau, Mah~mas
Td.- 24-2.302-Vt1 V;16
Or
The Office of the Awidale 'ihcrPredidcnf
Ninflhem iCampus
Fnrt'purI4 Grand DBahama
Tell, 242-352-9761
An inf'omaii~on meti ng wi I[ bc held i n Nassau, on Tuesday, 29th 'piCRWrnhe-. 21 KYJ and an
Wi~Ic'wtay. 30th Sqptemh'er, 2009 in Fivxpon:al aI ime and venuc Io bk annouinxcd.
EOI'si arx! to besubmitted to thek oaiion� -) indkicatd in the E01 Prcquali licatio~n Form in
a scalIed cnvcl1opc pproprintl v ared


CoIIEWor The Bahamas~
EXPRE:SsIONOF INWE R FST - FEF -
ijasert name tit app~ikabhe ratillity

Mrinms ma~ submit a separate E01 for each Ifacibl. All FHC1Is are to k %Libmittedby ]1141,
pin ;iii i d-d1~vuy onFiida, 91h a-K iixih, N,


INSIGHT
For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Monday


PAGE 20, MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009


THE TRIBUNE













AMI Fun Walk _



proves bumper ...........



fundraiser


Atlantic Medical Insurance
Company's (AMI) eleventh
annual Fun Walk in April
2009 fostered a spirit of unity
among Bahamians, as thou-
sands 'walked for the cause' in
New Providence, and in
Grand Bahama.
With the mission to, "wait-
ing on mission statement from
AMI," AMI recently made a
monetary presentation of
funds raised during the Fun
Walk to representatives of
The Bahamas Diabetic Asso-
ciation and The Cancer Cen-
tre of The Bahamas.
The Fun Walk is an annual
initiative organized by AMI
that encourages Bahamians
to combat diseases like cancer
and diabetes through consis-
tent exercise and healthy liv-


ing. Lynda Gibson, Executive
Vice President, AMI, said,
"We are very appreciative to
our corporate partners and
the public for supporting us
year after year.
" The main objectives of
the walk include highlighting
wellness in the community
and encouraging the Bahami-
an public at large that main-
taining a healthy body is
important to having a healthy
lifestyle." Gibson added that
the funds contributed to The
Diabetic Association and The
Cancer Society of The
Bahamas are inclusive of
funds collected from the Fun
Walk in New Providence and
in Freeport.
Darren Bastian, Manager,
Business Development, AMI,


BTI mssge

studets gve bck t

copoat sonor


I i


Massage students from The Bahamas Technical &
Vocational Institute (BTVI) Cosmetology Department
provided complimentary services to Royal Bank. As
part of the course students will complete 64 practicum
therapy hours. BTVI Massage students must meet the
standards set forth by industry and apply their expert
knowledge. It is imperative that massage students prac-
tice their skills for many hours so they are prepared to
administer techniques that are refined to perfection and
keep their client's best health interest in mind.
"BTVI Massage Programme allowed Royal Bank
employees the opportunity to experience massage ther-
apy, and most important, was able to give our students
real-life experience," said Mrs. Beneby Taylor, Cosme-
tology Coordinator.

Wellness

"Today's growing trend is total wellness, said Mrs.
Taylor. Whether they are using massage therapy to
improve a medical condition or for stress relief and relax-
ation, massage is for everyone."
"The students represented BTVI in a professional
manner and showed confidence and skill in their massage
services," said Raquel Bethel, Office Manager at BTVI."
Thirteen massage students participated. They were
Nadia Beneby, Shelly Rolle, Jazz Cyril, Donita Collie,
Danisha Fowler, Dave Horton, Shuntelle Hurston, Kath-
leen Jaques, Michelle Lockhart, Miesha Rolle, Pam
Rolle, Noralee Newbold and Priya Russel.
The students who participated found it to be a reward-
ing experience and a great way to utilize their skill while
helping others. Mrs. Taylor felt it was a beneficial event
for all involved.Mrs. Taylor said the event was a great
learning opportunity and she was hopeful that BTVI
would continue to encourage real-life experience to
broaden their education outside the classroom.


A,



Nr


noted, " It's a pleasure to pre-
sent The Cancer Centre of
The Bahamas and the Dia-
betic Association with the
funds from our annual Fun
Walk. This is a part of our
ongoing commitment. The
services and care they provide
is vital to maintain the health
of those who have been
inflicted."
Furthermore, Bastian said
that the contribution is only
made possible by the partici-
pants and organizers who sup-
port the event. "Once again
we thank you, Bahamas," he
added.
Referring to AMI as "a
gem in many ways," Bradley
Cooper, President, The
Bahamas Diabetic Associa-
tion, expressed his gratitude
for the consistent support
AMI, its partners and the
Bahamian public offer each
year. He said that the mone-
tary donation will assist the
association in achieving a
number of short term and
long term goals. Cooper


explained that during Octo-
ber 17- 23, 2009, representa-
tives of the association will
participate and make presen-
tations at the Tri-Annual
Congress of International
Diabetes Federation, in Mon-
treal, Canada.

Machinery

Furthermore, the funds pre-
sented will also aid in the pur-
chase of additional glucome-
ters, testing strips and other
necessary machinery to help
diabetics throughout The
Bahamas, according to Coop-
er.
One of the goals of the
Bahamas Diabetic Associa-
tion is to build awareness by
educating and informing indi-
viduals about the importance
of maintaining a healthy diet
in an effort to prevent one
from becoming a diabetic.
Additionally, Cooper said,
"Most insurance companies
in The Bahamas do not pro-


vide funding for prevention.
Atlantic Medical however,
has stepped in to the forefront
and greatly helped the hurting
in our country.
"We cannot express how
thankful we are to them and
to their supporters for their
generous and consistent con-
tributions over the past 11
years," said Cooper.
Equally as grateful for the
consistent financial support
from AMI, Gloria Hanna,
Supervisor, The Cancer Soci-
ety of The Bahamas, said,
"We are truly appreciative for
this donation as it will help us
to continue to help our cancer
patients while educating and
bringing awareness to The
Bahamian public at large."
The funds donated to the
Cancer Society will aid the
continuation of hosting local
and Family Island patients
free of charge at the Cancer
Centre, and dispatching doc-
tors and assistants to the var-
ious clinics throughout Nas-
sau and on the Family Islands.


AMI recently
made a
monetary
presentation of
funds raised
during the Fun
Walk to
representatives
of The Bahamas
Diabetic
Association and
The Cancer
Centre of The
Bahamas.


Hanna added, "The
patients consider the centre
as a home away from home.
They are so very grateful to
have a place to come and stay
because most of them do not
have family in Nassau." Fur-
thermore, she noted, "We
encourage AMI to continue
being a positive corporate cit-
izen, raising funds to benefit
cancer patients, because most
people really cannot afford
their radiation or chemother-
apy treatments." Hanna
emphasized, "We try to ease
this burden for them by offer-
ing a place for them to stay
and receive what they need
at no cost to them."
This, Hanna noted, is why it
is crucial for Atlantic Medical
to continue in its efforts to
help those in need.
"As a non-profit organiza-
tion, we rely heavily on cor-
porate sponsorship and dona-
tions from companies like
AMI," said Hanna.


a

/


S
-Pr 19

a a a a a
I U I I p


Last Name:________


First Name:_______

Title:


Company:


Telephone # Home:

Foxt #___.

Exad Street Address:


Work:


P.O.Box:


House # _House Name:


House Colour:


Type of Fence/Wall:


Requested Start Date:
.



N r- int . .erii vur9-hducis


IL
--


..,
S TLIVERY OF THE TRIBUNE AND WAKE UP TO THE BEST NEWSPAPER FOR YOU!!


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MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE







PAGELOCAL 24,S MONDAYIOCTOBER5,2009THET B


Bimini greets Brave




and the Change Team


Nassau, Bahamas: Front-
runner in the PLP Deputy
Leadership race, Cat Island,
Rum Cay and San Salvador
MP Philip 'Brave' Davis, vis-
ited North Bimini this past
Monday and Tuesday.
During his visit, Davis
entertained private meetings
with Party Stalwarts, as he
seeks their support ahead of
the upcoming convention,
advising them his plans for
the Party.While on Bimini,
the candidate also engaged a
number of young people and
youth groups as he made his
trek across the community, as
a means of garnering their
views on matters of national
interest and offer his own
vision for their input. "The
greatest challenge we (the
PLP) have is the involvement
of more young people" he
said. Turning to is own cam-
paign Brave noted "That is
why I recruited young people
to work in my campaign. The
people running my campaign
are young -this is the direc-
tion where we as a Party must
go."
Listening to the concerns
of residents on the level of
crime, Davis responded by
outlining his plans to strength-
en the administration of the
judiciary. This effort he
added, will reduce the time
for cases to be heard and to
intervene in the lives of at-
risk youth.
Residents on the island
were also keen to express
their concerns about the
destruction of the mangroves
on that island as a result of a
major development. The PLP
Deputy Leader hopeful
assured of his plans to follow-
up the environmental con-
cerns of Biminites with the
B.E.S.T. Commission and
other such agencies.
Since launching on August
4th, Davis has traveled


/ '


IBM ".M. M


throughout the country seek- door stops with PLP Stal-
ing meetings and door-to- warts, Delegates and sup-


TRAFFIC SIGN DONATION


THE GRAND BAHAMA PORT AUTHORITY (GBPA) is reaching out to
the community and recently donated traffic signs to the High Rock
area._Pictured here are (1-r) Rev Lawrence Laing, chief councillor of
High Rock and a member of High Rock Township; Valentine Knowles,
senior supervisor of the Road Traffic Department; Arthur Jones,
vice-president of building and development services with the GBPA;
Bradley Armbrister, district administrator of East Grand Bahama;
Geneva Rutherford, director of community relations at the GBPA; Basil
Rahming, deputy controller of the Road Traffic Department; Troy
McIntosh, city maintenance manager with the GBPA, and Corporal
1693 Steven Moss of the High Rock Police Station.


porters ahead of the PLP
Convention this October.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


PAGE 24, MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009


THE TRIBUNE


UGGIES









THE TRIBUNE





)US1


SS


MONDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2009


ColinaImperial.



Cnidec Fo if


IFCIO obsiescrbueedane


Cable hopes $263m deal seeks 30-year lease extension

'long 14-year


road' at end

* Government implements
Copyright Act amendment
to narrow TV compulsory
licensing
* BISX-listed firm hopeful
US Trade Representative's
statement indicates
Washington will now
fulfill its side of bargain,
and force programming
rights holders into
talks with it
* Meeting between Cable
and rights holders set
for next week
* Cable chief hopes moves
will lead to Bahamians
getting VOD, HD
programming they
can't access yet

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
CABLE Bahamas is hop-
ing "the long road we've been
on for the last 14 years" with
respect to negotiating com-
mercial agreements with pro-
gramming rights holders is
nearing an end, after the
Bahamas last week brought
into force the 2004 amend-
ments that narrow the scope
of its compulsory TV licensing
regime.
Anthony Butler, Cable
Bahamas' president/chief
executive, told Tribune Busi-
ness that with the Bahamian
government having fulfilled
its 'side of the bargain' when
it came to protecting intellec-
tual property rights, the
BISX-listed cable TV
provider was "taking encour-
agement" from statements
made by the US Trade Rep-
resentative that Washington
would now move on its oblig-
ations.
The Ingraham administra-
tion, in a little-heralded move
last Thursday, brought into
effect the 2004 amendments
to the Copyright Act that nar-
row the scope of the
Bahamas' compulsory TV
licensing regime. Only copy-
righted works broadcast free
over-the-air will now be com-
pulsorily licensed, whereas the
previous regime allowed all
copyrighted programmes to
be received, transmitted and
re-broadcast.
"The amendments that the
Government tabled in 2004,
they've been brought into
effect on October 1," Mr But-
ler told Tribune Business. "It
means that in relation to the
Copyright Act, the Exchange
of Letters [between the

SEE page 6B


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


ernment
will "short-
ly" decide
whether to approve
the $263 million
acquisition of a
Bahamas-based oil
storage terminal, a
Cabinet minister has
confirmed, telling Tri-
bune Business that
the potential buyer
wants a 30-year exten-


* Minister says government to 'shortly' decide whether to


approve Statoil purchase of South Riding Point
* Buyer and current owner seeking extension after October 1

completion date expires amid wait for government
S . * Lease extension would secure Statoil in Grand Bahama until 2049

* Government does have environmental concerns

StatoilHydro, the Norwegian-head- listed World Point Terminals. A con- a statement issued on Friday that both
CARTWRIGHT quartered oil and gas giant, had sub- edition of the sales agreement between it and Statoil were now in talks tc


sion to the site's existing lease that
would take it through until 2049.
Larry Cartwright, minister of agri-
culture and fisheries, confirmed that


mitted its proposal to acquire Grand
Bahama's South Riding point facility
to the Government, and the issue was
currently before the Cabinet.
However, that may still be too late
for Statoil and the vendor, Toronto-


the two was that the South Riding
deal would close by October 1, 2009, a
deadline that has been missed because
the Government approvals were not
forthcoming in time.
Still, World Point Terminals said in


extend the deal's closing deadline,
indicating that it potentially remains
alive. It is probable that both compa-
nies, if they can reach agreement, will

SEE page 4B


FamGuard suffers 72% profit decline


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
FAMGUARD Corpora-
tion's half-year net income
slumped by 71.6 per cent
year-over-year to $629,733,
the company has revealed to
shareholders, after "further
deterioration" in 2009 second
quarter health claims saw pol-
icyholder benefits increase by
34.28 per cent.
The surge in health claims
more than wiped out 18.6 per
cent top-line growth enjoyed
by the BISX-listed company,
parent of life and health insur-
er Family Guardian, during
the six months to June 30,
2009.
Norbert Boissiere, Fam-
Guard's chairman, in his mes-
sage to shareholders, said:
"We have seen further dete-
rioration in our health claims
experience through June 30,
2009, which has resulted in
policyholder benefits pay-
ments increasing by 34 per
cent over prior year-to-date.
"This has negatively
impacted our net income for
the period, which stood at
$630,000 through June 30,
2009. We are reviewing our
group health portfolio, and
are implementing enhance-
ments to our product in that
division, which we expect will
bring about incremental


BISX-listed insurer sees 34% policyholder benefit
increase, sparked by surging health claims, wipe
out 19% premium growth and $500,000 drop in
operating expenses


improvements as we move
forward."
Policyholder benefits paid
out by Family Guardian dur-
ing the 2009 first half rose
from $19.647 million the pre-
vious year to $26.383 million,
an increase of more than $6.7
million. Even allowing for a
modest increase in reinsur-
ance recoveries, net policy-
holder benefits grew by
almost one-third, too, rising
from $18.435 million to
$24.415 million.
It appears that Family
Guardian's increased health
claims experience during the
2009 first half, something
experienced by all Bahamas-
based health insurers, influ-
enced the company's in-house
actuaries to increase their pro-
visions for future policyhold-
er benefits.
These provisions rose year-
over-year by 48.9 per cent,
from a $4.075 million increase
in the 2008 first half to $6.068
million this time around, a
move likely to have been
induced by the higher than
expected health claims. Death
claims had shown a "marked


improvement" over 2008
comparatives.
As a result, provisions for
future policyholder benefits
- the main liability for all life
and health insurance compa-

SEE page 5B


ss$4.09I


$4.17


I ' I i I I


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
J. S. JOHNSON, the BISX-
listed insurance broker and
agent, has bucked the declin-
ing economy by generating a
21.8 per cent net income
increase to $4.33 million for
the 2009 first half, an improve-
ment driven by rising com-
missions resulting from the
acquisition of new business.
Marvin Bethell, J. S. John-
son's managing director, in his
message to investors, said the
increase in net profits from
the $3.554 million achieved in
the 2008 first half was due to
an 18.6 per cent increase in
net commissions and fees,
which rose from $8.045 mil-
lion to $9.544 million during
the six months to June 30,
2009.
This, despite a 3.3 per cent
fall in net earned premiums
at J. S. Johnson's 40 per cent-
owned affiliate, general insur-
er Insurance Company of the
Bahamas (ICB), fed into an
8.6 per cent rise in total
income. This grew from
$13.339 million in 2008 to
$14.491 million in the 2009
first half.
"Both business segments
performed well in the second
quarter," Mr Bethell said of
J. S. Johnson and ICB. "The
agency and brokerage busi-
ness has begun to see the
effects of some new business
acquisitions as net income is
now up by 12 per cent over
the previous year.
"On the underwriting side,
Insurance Company of the
Bahamas continues to per-
form well due to an increase
in net commission and fees,
and an improvement in insur-
ance expenses."
Broken down into seg-
ments, J. S. Johnson's agency
and brokerage business saw
net income rise by 12.5 per
cent to $2.533 million for the
2009 first half, compared to


*J. S. Johnson sees 19%
commissions and fee
rises, as agency/brokerage
attracts new clients
* ICB also bucks economy
with 38% first half profits
rise, as its commissions
increase more than
three-fold

$2.252 million for the year
before.
Net commissions and fees
rose by 7.1 per cent to $8.388
million, compared to $7.783
million the year before. Total
income rose by 6.8 per cent
to $8.658 million, compared
to $8.109 million in the 2008
first half.
On the expenses side, the
agency and brokerage busi-
ness also experienced a 4.6 per
cent jump in total expenses to
$6.125 million, compared to
$5.857 million in the 2008 first
half.
For the business as whole,
total expenses increased by
3.8 per cent to $10.161 mil-
lion, as opposed to $9.785 mil-

SEE page 8B


Insurer generates

22% profit growth


.a~mi'w~m~uvu


/


* 1.
* 1


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C I ALs5 comprehensive 'x-nion COrn-.iiItirq.se rvices can help youdsign jrd mana~u a

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PAGEBSIES IB ODY COE ,20 H RBN


BTC targets 2011





for network finish


--.- -

lritish Cnlnmial l [itcmI ]lt
arklbftwgh SL. Shop #1
Clearance SALE
Everything is $20
We offer Stringing Services, Repairs, Knotting.
Wiring, Dril ngand The Snack Fix Syslem and
The Mystery Clasps
Pearls and Beads Strands Wholesale
and Retail
P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-323-1865
Email: gems-pearls@holmall.com
Free parking at The Hilton


* First 400 subscribers to migrate to IP platform by month's end
* 73% of all phone connections in Bahamas are now cellular
* Cable estimated to have 60-65% Internet market share


exchanges has commenced,
with the first 400 subscribers
due to be migrated by Octo-
ber 31, 2009. Full implemen-
tation of the IP network is
due for completion by the first
quarter 2011."
The newly-formed sector
regulator, the Utilities Regu-
lation and Competition
Authority (URCA), in its
consultation document setting
out the rationale for why BTC
is considered to have Signifi-
cant Market Power (SMP) in
areas such as cellular and
broadband Internet, said
BTC's planned IP network
would allow it to carry multi-
ple types of traffic, such as
voice telecoms, Internet and


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC)
is targeting the 2011 first quar-
ter for full implementation of
its $50 million-plus Next Gen-
eration Internet Protocol (IP)
network, the company has
revealed, with the first 400
subscribers set to be "migrat-
ed" to this platform by the
end of this month.
In BTC's response to the
Government's consultation
paper on access and intercon-
nection issues in the Bahami-
an electronic communications
sector, Felicity Johnson,
BTC's vice-president of legal,
regulatory and interconnec-
tion, told regulators: "BTC
commenced the implementa-
tion of its Next Generation
IP network in March 2009.
"IP soft switches have now
been installed, and the access
nodes build-out from


services are largely responsi-
ble for the high rate of growth
in mobile subscribership," the
communications sector regu-
lator said in its consultation
paper.
By contrast, the fixed-line
penetrations rate had
increased marginally - from
38 per cent in 2000 to 40 per
cent in 2008. However, about
85 per cent of BTC's cellular
customers - a service in which
the company currently has the
monopoly - are pre-paid cus-
tomers.
"URCA believes that the
quality of service of BTC
mobile is lower than BTC's
fixed voice," the regulator
said in its consultation paper.
"Although URCA has not
conducted a formal survey on
BTC's customer base, anec-
dotal evidence indicates that
customers are dissatisfied with
the level of service quality
received from BTC's mobile
services. For example, in-
building coverage and net-
work congestion are problems
which have been identified."
Meanwhile, URCA said
total estimated Internet sub-
scribers in the Bahamas num-
bered 60,000, with Cable
Bahamas and BTC having 60-
65 per cent and 30-35 per cent
market share respectively.
The remaining 5 per cent
market share was accounted
for by Satellite Bahamas and
other minority Internet Ser-
vice Providers (ISPs).


DI : t, 1 f I Ie 4 pa a 0r




QF " O'~u I S 0~e15''t'Sc '~



N"O. T~in 10% be Pref0iPlopUnrod












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Kids Sail FREE


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


data.
URCA added that not only
would the network theoreti-
cally allow BTC to deliver
"higher speed broadband", it
would also enable IP TV,
allowing the state-owned
incumbent, currently in the
middle of a privatization exer-
cise, to deliver TV and Inter-
net services in the same man-
ner as Cable Bahamas.
Elsewhere, URCA said its
own analysis had shown that
the deep penetration of
BTC's cellular services, esti-
mated to be at 100 per cent of
the Bahamian population,
had resulted in mobile con-
nections now representing
almost 73 per cent of all tele-
phone connections in the
Bahamas. This compared to
22 per cent in 2000.
"URCA believes that
BTC's introduction of prepaid
services and its allocation of
greater resources to mobile


FOR SALE

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uitdti s0 irM JW$ROW & I 2

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� THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visit o ,wme at ww.c,~e a.

NOTICE

Town Meeting for Master of Law (LLM I
in Mariiino Law DCegIrL P1RigrinIne in
collaboration with the Univcrsity of London,
Monday 5th Ocitober, 2i19,.
Executive Boardroom,
Michael Eldon Complex, 3rd Floor
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009


THE TRIBUNE


i! h ,


f , -'


t






THE TIBUN MONDY, OTOBER5, 209,IPGES3


Bahamas tariff-free


us


exports increase 2.7%o


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas in 2008 saw
a 2.7 per cent increase in the
value of its exports admitted
into the US duty-free under
the Caribbean Basin Eco-
nomic Recovery Act
(CBERA), it has been
revealed, with polystyrene
products produced largely by
Polymers International
accounting for 96 per cent of
goods sent to our northern
neighbour.
The US International Trade
Commission, in its newly-
released report on the Act's
impact on both Caribbean
beneficiaries and the US,
found that total Bahamian
exports admitted into the US
under its tariff-free terms
increased in value from $137.4
million in 2007 to $141 mil-
lion last year.
Some $135.5 per cent of
that latter figure was account-
ed for by expandable poly-


styrene exports, which
increased year-over-year in
value by 1.8 per cent, from
$133.2 million to $135.5 mil-
lion, "mainly because of high-
er p!ic, '. The value of
Bahamian polystyrene exports
has increased regularly, and
significantly, over the past
four years, growing from
$107.5 million in 2005 to
$121.5 million in 2006 and
then through to last year's
$135.5 million.
While the Trade Commis-
sion's report said the Bahamas
was "likely to remain in near
term a very small supplier to
the US market", it was the
fifth largest supplier of goods
under the Act in 2008.
"Polystyrene, cup grade
expandable polystyrene pel-
lets, accounted for 96 per cent
of imports from the Bahamas


under the CBERA in 2008,
with imports valued at $135
million in that year," the US
International Trade Commis-
sion's report said.
"Polystyrene has account-
ed for more than 96 per cent
of the value of imports from
the Bahamas under CBERA
since 2005. Other imports
under CBGERA in 2008
included undentured ethyl
alcohol for beverage purposes,
grapefruit, rum, seafood (pri-
marily crab meat) and cigars."
Foreign direct investment
in the Bahamas, though, had
remained strong through 2008
even as the world headed into
a severe recession, rising
slightly from $854 million in
2007 to $886 million last year,
according to the US Interna-
tional Trade Commission's
report.


LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.

ctaq/ueY a&b tWitkA zi wae^ ^eac"

FOR SALE
Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
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\ eb Listing 1 83""


I.,,,.:. - i, .-,i, . - , PI i'. I .H IH H

Tel.242-o77-8251 Cell. 357-7013
info@mariocareyrealty.com
www.mariocareyrealty.com


C

,. .,4..,�.. ,, .... a &l .


Indeed, the report suggest-
ed that foreign direct invest-
ment in the Bahamas took a
major leap between 2005 and
2006, rising from $641 million
to $843 million in 2006 - an
increase of more than $200
million.
On the other side of the
fence, the US International
Trade Commission's report


estimated that US exports to
the Bahamas rose in value by
11.3 per cent in 2008 to $2.697
billion, compared to $2.422
billion in 2007. That, again,
represented a steady increase
from the preceding three
years.
In its submission to the
report, the Bahamian govern-
ment said the CBERA had


the "added value of buttress-
ing, supporting and promot-
ing democratic values, respect
for human rights and funda-
mental freedom, the respect
for the rule of law and recog-
nizing common values and tra-
ditional friendship between
the United States and the
countries of the Caribbean
Basin".


* ii -

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f-LAI S I1'd-ING


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ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


* Polystyrene accounts for 96 per cent of all Bahamas' CBI exports

* US exports to Bahamas grow 11.3 per cent to $2.7bn in 2008


Llewelln o Boy'er-Cartwright
& Associates
Counsel & Attorney-at-Law
Notary Public

Llewellyn Boyer-Cartwright is pleased to announce the opening of his legal
practice under the name and style of Llewellyn Boyer-Cartwright & Associates.

Practice Areas:
Corporate Law Conveyancing
Wills & Estates

Specializing in
Matrimorial & Guardianship counselling

Tel: 327-1164
Fax: 327-0938
email: Ilewellyn@boyercartwright.com

No. 6 Olde Towne
Sandyport
P.O. Box SP - 63858
Nassau, The Bahamas


Island


me.
PARADISE ISLAND
BAHAMS


MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE










$263m deal seeks 30-year lease extension


simply wait out the time taken
for government approvals,
however long it takes.


Apart from National Eco-
nomic Council (NEC) and
Investments Board approval,
both of which fall under the
purview of the Cabinet or a
Cabinet subcommittee, Sta-
toil also needs to win permis-
sion for the lease transfer and
a 30-year extension to its
tenure from South Riding
Point's landlord, the Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial
Corporation (BAIC).
Mr Cartwright, who has
ministerial responsibility for
BAIC, told Tribune Business
that the key approvals
required from government


The following persons are asked Io contact
STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED
in connection with items left in storage:


* RUDOLF K. KING

* MARVETTE GAITOR

* DENICE FRANCIS

*MELISSA EVENS

* RICARDO TROTMAN


* GRAFTON IFILL

* DENNIS MCKENZIE

* MARCO JOHNSON

SPAUL MORTIMER

* DALE THOMPSON-WATSON

* CYRIL GREENSLADE


Al fesm s epi nfl adie srm vdn aertalcoe t,20


FROM page 1B


LOT FOR SALE
ASEV %NTmIXMAND SQ.Fr.
SOSMAs GAMELY LUI CEAN VMIS OR
mLGMIM VAHREXF fAE CEMPA3
PTRM). THE IDTASB WMHMTW 3M3TH OF
AFFEIVEXDABCHTECTnAWMtlGrpHOVING

ovu~a~a= xJEU ITI amf iq~u ao


were the 30-year lease exten-
sion, and approval for its
transfer from World Point
Terminals to Statoil.
"They [Statoil and World
Point] have submitted their
proposal to the Government,
and the Government right
now is looking at it," Mr
Cartwright said. "The Gov-
ernment has not yet made a
final decision on the lease -
the extension of the lease and
permission to transfer the
lease from South Riding Point
to Statoil."
When asked by Tribune
Business what kind of lease
extension Statoil was seeking,
the minister replied: "They
were looking for an extension.
They are asking for a 30-year
extension, which effectively
makes it 40 years - the exist-
ing 10 years, and a further 30
years, to bring it to 40."
World Point Terminals'
current lease on the 763-acre
South Riding Point site, which
includes 155 acres of land, the
rest being the sea bed and off-
shore jetty, expires in 2019. If
Statoil obtains the extension it
is seeking, its tenancy would
be secure until 2049.
Acknowledging that
"everything hinges on the
Government's decision", Mr
Cartwright said it would be
premature to indicate which
way the Ingraham adminis-
tration was leaning.
"Cabinet makes the final
decision, and it would be very
difficult to pre-empt whatever
the decision might be," the
minister told Tribune Busi-
ness. "Statoil has submitted
their proposal to the Govern-
ment, and the Government
has to look at it and get back
to them."
Declining to discuss the
content of Statoil's proposal,
Mr Cartwright confirmed pre-
vious Tribune Business reve-
lations that the Government
had concerns, and was unhap-
py, over the environmental
condition of South Riding
Point.
"There were some concerns
about the pits used for excess


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Ihfarf&A GyxMhnji nA

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tw~sik TU94WUTU~ P~slm Ceete Bdkbs


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I ODSUS STOIE ON THI 0AG 0LG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


oil," he said, "and they're
being addressed with regard
to the new potential [tenant]."
This implies that a condition
of approving Statoil's acqui-
sition, and lease extension,
might be that either itself or
World Point Terminals under-
takes an extensive clean-up
of the site to address and
environmental concerns.
When asked by Tribune
Business how important
South Riding Point was to the
Government's overall eco-
nomic plans, Mr Cartwright
said: "It lends itself to the
employment of Bahamians.
They have to pay taxes to the
Bahamas government, and
the lease agreement they have
with BAIC, all that helps to
advance the economy of the
Bahamas."
Neither Bernard Roy,
World Point Terminals' pres-
ident and chief executive, nor
Statoil could be reached for
comment by Tribune Busi-
ness before press deadline.
However, a Statoil spokes-
woman had told this newspa-
per on July 9, when the $263.2
million deal was announced,
that the Norwegian company
had plans to invest $100-$150
million in upgrading South
Riding Point.
Although declining then to
specify how long a lease
extension Statoil was seeking,
the spokeswoman confirmed
that the company wanted "a
long-term engagement
beyond 2019" with the
Bahamas, and added: "We
need a return on our invest-
ment.
"When we look at this kind
of investment, we're looking
at a timeline of 30-50 years,
just to give a general state-
ment on this type of invest-
ment and the time we look
at."
Statoil, which has leased
space at the oil storage, blend-
ing and transshipment facility
for the past 16 years, sees
South Riding Point's acquisi-
tion as a logical extension to
its long-term growth strategy.
South Riding Point, which


employs 55 Bahamians and
features 10 storage tanks and
two berths, is well-positioned
for the increasing advances
Statoil wants to make into the
US market, and the increasing
volume of oil being shipped
from Brazil. Statoil's lease at
the site was due to end short-
ly, and it seemingly believes
that ownership/control at
South Riding Point would
better aid its cause.
At the time, Jon A Jacob-
sen, Statoil's executive vice-
president for manufacturing
and marketing, said of the
planned purchase: "It will
strengthen StatoilHydro's
marketing and trading posi-
tion in North America by
securing the full terminal
capacity. StatoilHydro's
objective is to upgrade the
terminal to allow for blend-
ing of all types of crude oils,
including heavy oils."
For 2008, South Riding
Point's revenues rose by 25
per cent or $4.432 million
over 2007, with fourth quarter
revenues of $8.469 million up
91 per cent year-over-year.
The Statoil purchase also
includes the 50 per cent stake
World Point Terminals holds
in Freepoint, the Grand
Bahama-based tug boat busi-
ness, which has 42 employees.
In 2008, the company's six
tugs handled 95 per cent of
the traffic at the Freeport
Container Port, its revenues
rising year-over-year by
$350,000 or 14 per cent, with
fourth quarter revenues up 37
per cent or $815,000.
The Statoil would be the
second acquisition of a Grand
Bahama-based oil storage ter-
minal within two years, the
first being the purchase of the
BORCO terminal by First
Reserve and Vopak for
around $900 million in 2008.
The South Riding Point
deal has no connection to Sta-
toil's entrance into the
Bahamas in May 2009, when
it announced its oil explo-
ration joint venture with BPC
Ltd in the southwestern
Bahamas.


60 tonne packaged


Air Conditioning Unit


18yrs old


7'4"width


6'5"height


33'length




Can be viewed at


Carl G. Treco


Construction


120 Mackey Street South




All offers will be


considered!



302-9875


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009


THE TRIBUNE


-,W p-

ower Lunc
with Dr. Tony Evans
SaCurday, Ocl 1 011h
s m

i: 3012--3Opm-2::Mv I


v v -� -





THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2009, PAGE 5B


FamGuard


suffers


72% profit


decline

FROM page 1B

nies - increased from $102.903
million as at June 30, 2008, to
$108.875 million this time
around.
With total benefits increas-
ing by 35.4 per cent to $30.483
million, compared to $22.51
million in 2008, Family
Guardian's top-line growth
and reduced operating
expenses were more than-can-
celled out. As a result, net
income fell by 71.6 to
$629,733, compared to $2.221
million the year-before.
Top-line growth was much
better, with gross premiums
increasing by 18.6 per cent or
$6.6 million to $41.891 mil-
lion, compared to $35.327 mil-
lion the year before. Net pre-
mium income rose by 13.4 per
cent to $37.115 million, com-
pared to $32.727 million for
the six months to June 30,
2008.
Elsewhere, net premium
income and annuity deposits
were up 16.9 per cent at
$40.538 million, with total
income ahead by 18.4 per cent
at $45.912 million, compared
to $38.774 million in the 2008
first half.
Mr Boissiere told share-
holders that gross premium
income had shown "strong
growth", and added that life
insurance sales and annuity
sales were 9 per cent and 11
per cent, respectively, ahead
of 2008 figures for the first
half.
"As a result of a sustained
increase in the sale of new
group accounts, our group life
and health division continues
to lead in premium growth,"
said the FamGuard chairman.
"Our financial services divi-
sion also recorded a very pos-
itive increase in new sales of
life and annuity products
through June 30, 2009, com-
pared to prior year-to-date."
Family Guardian was able
to also keep its key expenses
under control, with operating
expenses falling some 6.6 per
cent to $7.016 million for the
2009 first half, compared to
$7.514 million the year-
before, a savings of some
$500,000.
It seems as it all Fam-
Guard's net income for the
2009 first half was returned
to shareholders as a dividend,
as the $0.06 earnings per
share (EPS) for the period
mirrored exactly the dividend
paid to investors on August
19, 2009.
On the balance sheet side,
there was a slight decline in
shareholders' net equity of
just over $1.5 million, from
$58.818 million as at June 30,
2008, to $57.154 million this
year. While total assets
increased by just under $6
million, from $176.471 million
to $182.316 million, total lia-
bilities rose by $7.5 million,
from $117.653 million to
$125.162 million.
On the investments front,
FamGuard substantially
reduced its asset allocation in
'other bank deposits', reduc-
ing this from $13.79 million
at the balance sheet date in
2008 to $4.257 million this
time around.
Correspondingly, invest-
ment assets held to maturity
rose from $44.255 million to
$57.29 million, implying that
assets were switched from
bank deposits to potentially
higher-yielding investments.


Share

your

news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


SRBC

Fj Royal Bank

U of Canada



PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE
Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.

* .1,1 6 ENS/OMERIA BIDNS


(401) Lots # 17 & #18 Crown Allotments,
Love Hill Settlement, Andros. Contain-
ing a two-storey res. Appraised value:
$100,000
(806) Lots #1 & #2, Block 3 with a par-
cel situated between Lot #1, Block 3,
containing a 4 bedroom condominium
- Sunset View Villas, West Bay Street.
Appraised value: $750,000
(433) Lot #27 ofVillage Allotment #14
in the Eastern District, containing resi-
dence situated on Denver Street off
Parkgate Road in the Ann's Town Con-
stituency, New Providence. Property
size 2,500 sqft Building size 990 sqft.
Appraised value: $50,000
(400) Property situated in Calabash
Bayon the Island ofAndros. 75'x 150'
and containing thereon a small grocery
store 480 sqft. and an incomplete 3
bed 2 bath house 900 sqft. Appraised
value: $65,000
(301) Lot #2 in block #8, Steward Road,
Coral Heights East Subdivision situated
in Western District of New Providence,
approx. size 8,800 sq. ft. with a split level
containing two bed, two bath, living,
dining & family rooms, kitchen and
utility room - approx. size of building
2,658 sqft Appraised value: $322,752
(702) Lot #20 with residential prop-

value $280,000
(902) Lotofland94x94xl 50xl50on
Queens Highway just south of Palmetto
Point with a two storey stone building
containing two apartments. Each unit
has 3 bed/2 1/2 bath, kitchen, living
room and 3 linen closets. Appraised
value: $287,209
(400) Lot #14 situated in the settlement
of Love Hill on the Island of Andros
totalling 20,000 sqft Property contains
a two storey 5 bedroom, 3 bathroom
residence. Appraised value: $185,000
(105) Lot containing 2 storey bldg.
with three bed, two and a half bath
residence, and 30' x 86' situated Bailey
Town, North Bimini. Appraised value:
$235,000
(801) Lot #18 in SandilandsAllotment
on the western side of Crosswind Road
between Seabreeze Lane and Pineyard
Road, Eastern District New Providence-
The Bahamas,containing single storey
private residence comprising the follow-
ing: covered entry porch, living room,
dining room, kitchen, laundry room,
family room, sitting area, 4 bedrooms,
2 bathroom and patio. The total area
oflandis approximately 7,641 square
feet. Appraised value: $289,426

(801) Two parcels of land containing
21,120 sq.ft. situated on the southern
side of East Shirley Street and 100 feet


west of its junction with "Shirlea" in
the Eastern District, New Providence.
Situated thereon is a Gas Station and
Auto Repair Shop. Appraised value:
$799,497
(601) Lot #17 located Village Allotment
with fourplex, Appraised value: $500,000
(701) Lot of land having the number
16 in Block number 16 in Section Three
of the Subdivision called and known
as Sea Breeze Estates situated in the
Eastern District of New Providence.
Property contains a three bed, two bath
residence. Appraised value: $277,000
(701) Lot of land being lot number
11 in Block number 10 on a plan of
allotments laid out byVillage Estates
Limited and filed in the Dept of Land
& Surveys as number 142 N.P and sit-
uated in the Eastern District of New
Providence. Property contains three
bed, two bath residence. Appraised
value: $165,000
(565) Lot# 1018 in Golden Gates Es-
tates #2 Subdivision situate in the South
Western District of the island of New
Providence Containing a single storey
private residence 3 bedroom 2 bath.
Property approx. size 6,000 sqft Build-
ing approx size 2,400 sqft Appraised
value: $173,176
(205) Lot B - 50 ftx 115.73 ft situated
on the north side of Shell Fish Road,
being the third lot west of Fire Trail
Road and east of Hamster Road with
a one half duplex residential premises.
Appraised value: TBA
(901) Lot #32 containing 4 bedroom
2bath concrete structure located Tri-
ana Shores Harbour Island, Eleuthera.
Property size 80' x 120' x 80' 120 feet
Appraised value: $332,735

(910) Lot#12 Madeira Park, a small sub-
division on the outskirts of Treasure Cay,
Abaco having an area of 9,444 square
feet residence containing a concrete
block structure with asphalt shingle
roof comprisesof three bedrooms, two
bathrooms, familyroom, living room,
dining room, arid kitchen. Appraised
value: $147,000
(569) Property situated on Williams
Lane off Kemp Road, New Providence,
Bahamas containing a two-storey house
and an apartment building consisting
of 1800 sqft. Appraised value $100,000
(569) All that piece of land being Par-
cel #3 and Parcel #4 situated on the
South side of Prince Charles Drive,
New Providence, Bahamas contain-
ing a commercial building housing
two shop space on the ground floor
and three shop space on the second
floor with a large storage area in the
rear. Total area 8400 sq ft. Appraised


value: $366,650
(569) All that piece, parcel or land
having an approximate area of 2100
sqft situated on the Western side of
Blue Hill Road about 70 ft North of
Peter Street and about 115 ft south of
Laird Street in the Southern District of
New Providence, Bahamas contain-
ing a commercial building housing a
two bed/one bath unit on the top floor
and a store on the first floor. Appraised
value: $154,000
(569) All that piece, parcel or lot of land
situated on Cowpen Road (1000 ft east
of the Faith Avenue Junction) in the
Southern District of New Providence,
Bahamas containing a duplex apart-
ment comprising oftwo -2-bedr/1-bath
apartments. Appraised value $175,000.
(800) All that parcel or lot ofland being
Lots #10 arid 11 in Block 29 of Coco-
nut Grove Subdivision, containing a
shopping plaza. The lot is trapezium
in shape, 8,383 sq ft. Appraised value
$500,000
(560) Lot of land #2 Sea View Subdi-
vision, Russell Island, Spanish Wells.
Property size 11,323 sqft, building size
2236 sq ft containing 3 bed, 2 bath,
living room, an eat-in kitchen, dining
room, laundry room, covered porch,
a one car garage, and a covered water
tank. Appraised value: $299,000
(901) Lot # 57 block# Trianna Shores
containing 3 bed 2 bath front room, din-
ing room, & kitchen. Concrete structure,
1926.40 sq ft wooden deck 321.60 sq
ft. property 9600 sqft. Appraised value:
$448,645
(901) Lot "K" Barrack Street, Harbour
Island containing a 2 storey concrete
building with 4 bed 4 bath, dining room
& kitchen -Building 2934.56 sqft prop-
erty 6563 sqft. Appraised value: $479,228
(811) Property containing Condo "Mil-
lennium II", Unit A-101, building 57,
Phase IC, 2 bed, 3 bath, living room,
dining room, utility closet & patio. Situ-
ated in the area known as Bimini Bay
Resort, Bimini, Bahamas.
Appraised value - $485,000
(008) Single Story tri-plex building,
one 2 bedrooms and two 1 bedroom
located on a multi-family Lot No.4,
block 3, Shirley Lane, section 1, Bahama
Reef Yacht & Country Club Subdivision,
Freeport Grand Bahama. Property size
is approx. 16,621 sq ftAppraised value
$348,000
(908) Lot# 52 Crown Allotments lo-
cated Murphy Town, Abaco with size
being 10,200 sq ft. Containing a one
storey house with 4 bed/2 bath - Con-
crete Block Structure -Appraised value
$200,000


(569) All that piece parcel or lot ofland
S.. ... .! .. ', ,,, i .. . 1 . . . I, ,, , ii. . ..... I
area of Highbury Park Subdivision in
the Eastern District of New Providence,
Bahamas. Approx. land size 6,000 sq
ft. Property contains a 3-bed/2-bath
house, size being 1,563 sq. ft. Appraised
Value $131,000
(908) Lot# 23 located in the Subdivi-
sion of Spring City, Abaco with size
being 8,925 sq ft. Containing a one
storey wooden structure house with
3 bed/I bath of 7985 sqft
Appraised value. $60,000
(304) Single storey triplex, situated on
Lot 615, Mermaid Boulevard, Golden
Gates #2 in the Western District, New
Providence. Two 2-bed, 1-bath units and
one 1-bed,l-bath unit. The property
is zoned as Multi Family Residential,
measuring 9,092 sq ft with the living
area measuring 2,792 sq ft. Appraised
value $374,192
(201) Duplex Lot #25 situated on Faith
Ave. North (Claridge Estates) - 7,354
sqft with duplex thereon. Appraised
value - TBA
(103) Parcel of land and improvements
thereon known as No.3 block 31 Ba-
hamia Marina & Section IX located in
southwestern city of Freeport Grand
Bahama. Approx. 13,070 sq.ft. or 0.30
acres property contains duplex dwell-
ing. Appraised value $300,000
(804) Six condominium units and
five parcels of vacant land situated
at Regattas ofAbaco, Marsh Harbour,
Bahamas. The single/multi family resi-
dential condominium/timeshare de-
velopment is situated on 9.426 acres
of land. The condominiums consist
of 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms and the
amenities on the property includes a
manned security gate, swimming pool,
2 tennis courts, landscaped gardens
and an administration building. Ap-
praised value $2,450,000
(569) Lot of land situated on Fire Trail
Road being a partition of Gladstone
Allot #41 New Providence, Bahamas
containing townhouse apartment unit
and two proposed units (completed as
is). Appraised value $237,714
(301) Lot # 14867 Bahama Sound Exu-
ma is located about 10 miles northwest
of George Town Exuma and about 1
mile south of Emerald Bay, The Four
Seasons Resort and Roker's Point. It
is located near the settlements of Mt.
Thompson and Farmer's Hill. The prop-
erty contains 10,000 sq ft in area with 80
ft frontage on the Queens Highway; the
main road. The propertyis developed
with a partially completed apartment
complex containing five, 1 bedroom
units, 4 isn. - 1. , units and 1 shop
space. Appraised value $488,240


(301) All that piece parcel of land or
premises being lot # 659 on the north-
western side of Malawi Street in Eliza-
beth Estates East Phase 2 in theYamac-
raw constituency on the island of New
Providence. Lot size - 5,085 sq ft. with
a 22 year old single storey residence, 3
bed, 1 bath. Appraised value $94,871
(301) Lot # 549 Gladiator Road Sta-
pledon Gardens containing concrete
single f ,,,il, i. 1.. . and wooden
single and multi family residences. Lot
size is 80' X 120' (9600 sq ft) enclosed car
port and perimeter wall surrounding
property. Appraised value $$219,767
(569) All that Southwestern Moiety or
Half Part of a Lot of Land being part of
a Tract of Land now or formerly called
Annstown situate 610 feet Southeast of
Kemp Road in the Eastern District of
the Island of New Providence aforesaid
and set out as Lot #35 containing a
duplex. Property size 50 ft x 50 ft Ap-
praised $61,000.
(569) Lot# B Block B situate on Rosedale
St in the Carey's Subdivision containing
a 4 bedroom 2 bath residence. Building
size 1,234 sq ft. Property size approx
4,500 sq ft. Appraised Value TBA.
(569) Lot # A and B on Northern side
of Carmichael Rd. Nassau with build-
ing and foundation for a warehouse.
Property size 15,780 sqft. Appraised
value $325,000.
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of land
situate on the East Side of Miller's Road
and 2763.58 ft South of Carmichael
Rd. being Lot #B containing a Triplex
Property size 80' x 100' (8,000 sq.ft)
Appraised Value TBA
(801) Lot No. 1, Block 5, located in the
Baillou Dale Subdivision, Nassau, Ba-
hamas. The property contains a split
level building comprising of 5 retail
shops/offices. The land size is approx.
5,000 sq.ft. with the building area approx
3,735 sq.ft. Appraised value $370,260.00
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land situate Graham Drive in the Yel-
low Elder Subdivision being Lot #446
containing a 2 bed 2 bath residence.
Appraised Value $110,000.
(101-F)Residential Canal Lots 30, 31
& 32, Block 1, Pine Bay Subdivision
Freeport, Grand Bahama, containing
two storey house, 4 bed, 3 baths
Situated on 1.62 acres of land.
Appraised value $1,372,200
(101 -F)Property situated Alice Town,
being Parcel "A", North Bimini, measur-
ing 9,267 sq ft with incomplete 3 storey
single family home. Appraised value
$542,000


I AANTPOPRIES


(702) Undeveloped lots #4A, 16, 17,
18 and 19 located Chapman Estates,
West Bay.Appraised value: $348,000
(701) Undeveloped lot #149. Sea-
fan Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivi-
sion. Grand Bahama, 18750 sq ft.
Appraised value: TBA
(565) Vacant lot #5 located Eleuthera
Island Shores, Seaside Drive Section
B, Block #15, Eleuthera, Bahamas.
9,691 sqft, Appraised value: $27,620
(402) Lot89,Block7Aberdeen Drive,
Bahamia West Replat Subdivision,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, consist-
ing of 12,100 sqft.
Appraised value: $51,000
(800) Vacantpropertylocated Baha-
mia South. Block 16 lot 9A, Freeport,
Grand Bahama consisting of 24,829.20
sqft. Appraised value: $52,000
(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65 sqft)
situated in Mango Lane Section "B"
Block#15, Eleuthera Island Shores,
Eleuthera. Appraised value: $50,189
(909) Vacant residential Lot# 63 (7800
sqft) CrownAllotments located Mur-
phy Town, Abaco.
Appraised value: $18,000

(802) Vacant Commercial Lot No:
3A, Block 60 Bahamia Subdivision
VI containing 3 acres located Free-
port, Grand Bahama. Appraised
value: $750,000


(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5
Block F Bahamia South Subdivision
Freeport, Grand Bahama. Appraised
value $35,700
(569) Vacant propertylocated in Sub-
division called "Culmerville" being
a portion of Lot #47 and a portion of
Lot #57. Appraised value: $24,000
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of land
situate in the settlement of James Cis-
tern on the Island of Eleuthera one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas measuring approx
10,000 sq.ft. Appraised value TBA
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot No. 102 in the Subdivi-
sion known as "EXUMA HARBOUR"
in the Island of Great Exuma meas-
uring 10,000 sq.ft. Appraised value
$20,000.00.

(202) Vacant lot of land containing
41,164 sqft, Lot #8, Love Estate, Phase
1, 2,300 ft. south of West Bay Street,
Western District, New Providence.
Appraised value $165,000
(503) Vacant property consisting of
Lot #894 situated in the Free-
port Ridge Subdivision, Section #1,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.
Appraised value: TBA

(505) Ten (10) acres ofland situated
onWoods Cay, known as Little Abaco,
between Cooper's Town and Cedar
Harbour inAbaco, Bahamas. The prop-
ertyis undeveloped with aviewof the


sea from both the North and South
side. Appraised value: $1,078,750
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land Lot # 977, Pinewood Gardens
Subdivision, Southern District, New
Providence. Appraised value: $65,000
(008) All that piece parcel of lot and
land on the Island of Great Exuma
situated about 10 1/2 miles North-
westwardly of George Town which said
piece parcel or lot of land is #10750
Bahama Sound O.A.E. 10,900 sqft.
Appraised value: $65,000
(008) All thatpiece parcel orlot ofland
designated as Lot Number 563 on a
plan of a Subdivision called or known
as Bahama Highlands #4.11,223.41
sqft. Appraised value: $87,000
(201) Single family residential Lot No.
11703 Bahama Sound Subd. Number
11West, Great Exuma. Size: approx.
10,000 sq ft.Appraised value $15,000
(201) MultifamilyLotNo. 10 -South-
east Corner of Mandarin Drive, Sugar
Apple Road, Sans Souci Sudv. Size:
14,368 sqft. Appraised value $165,000
(201) Single family residential Lot No.
11698 Bahama Sound Subd. Number
11 West, Great Exuma. Size: approx.
10,426 sq ftAppraised value: $15,000

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot #1 located in Block 3
in the Subdivision known as Eastern
Estates situate in the Eastern District
of the island of NewProvidence. Prop-


erty approx. 6950 sq. ft. Appraised
value $80,000
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land located on Marigold Road in
the Subdivision known as KoolAcres.
Lot is approx.9455 sq ft. Appraised
value $93,000.
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot #152 located in the
Subdivision known as West Ridge-
land Park situated in the Southern
District of the island of New Prov-
idence. Property approx. 4000 sqft
Appraised value $55,000.
(008) An undeveloped waterfront lot
land being Lot #12032 with a size of
10,600 sq.ft. in the Bahama Sound of
Exuma Subdivision # 11 West, Great
Exuma, Bahamas. Appraised value
$224,000

(008) Partially developed parcel
of land being 10,000 sq.ft. situate
about the eastern portion of The For-
est Estate in the vicinity of the settle-
ments of Southside and The Forest
being Lot Number 4803 in Bahama
Sound of Exuma 6, Exuma, Baha-
mas. Appraised value $25,000
(724) Vacant land at Love Beach,
Western District of New Providence
comprising a portion of "LoveEstate"
containing 1 acre. Appraised value
$225,000
(800) Lot#2vacantland 30,000 sq
ft located Chapman Estates Subdi-


vision .,i \i. - i .. 'sii.. - with open
zoning. Appraised value $600,000.
(800) Single/multi family residential
vacant lot being a portion of lot #77
situated on the Southern side of Fire
Trail Road in theWestern District of
NewProvidence. Property size 110,000
sqft. Appraised value $550,000
(301) Vacant lot single/familyzon-
ing. Lot#21 of the subdivision called
Southern Shores, Canaan Subdivision
located on Marshall Road. Property
size is some 67.86 feet on the sub
road and 84.49 on one side, 55.21
at the back and some 85.61 on the
other side of 5,475 S/F ofland space.
Appraised value $86,000
(569) Vacant lot of land containing
1.786 acre, situated east of Knowles
Drive, approximately 1,420 ft. south-
ward of Harold Road in the western
district of New Providence.- Baha-
mas. Appraised value $ 170,000
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot #5, Block 29A Sec-
tion C Eleuthera Shores, Eleuthera
Island, Bahamas. Appraised Value
$29,000.
(902) Vacant Lot #18 Block 33 Sec-
tion "C" Rainbow Bay on the island
of Eleuthera, Bahamas. The property
is located in a developed residential
subdivision with all amenities.
Appraised valued $20,000


I OFFIC^E6 S 11


COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE
Tel: 242-356-8568
(800) Mrs. Monique Crawford
(801) Mr. Jerome Pinder
(802) Mr. Brian Knowles
(803) Mr. Vandyke Pratt
(804) Mrs. Hope Sealey
(805) Mrs. Tiffany Simms O'brien
(806) Mrs. Lois Hollis
(807) Mr. Lester Cox
(808) Mrs. DaShann Clare-Paul
(810) Miss LaPaige Gardiner
(811) Ms. Lydia Gardiner
PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-322-4426/9 or
242-302-3800
(201) Ms. Nicola Walker
(202) Mr. Robert Pantry
(205) Mrs. Anya Major


NASSAU MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-322-8700
(701) Mr. James Strachan
(702) Mr. Antonio Eyma
(301) Ms. Thyra Johnson
(304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson
MACKEY STREET BRANCH
Tel: 242-393-3097
(601) Ms. Cherelle Martinborough
JOHN F. KENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH
Tel: 242-325-4711
(401) Mrs. ReneaWalkine
(402) Mrs. Chandra Gilbert
PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-393-7505/8
(501) Mr. Jason Sawyer
(503) Mr. Dwight King
(505) Ms. Patricia Russell
CABLE BEACH BRANCH
Tel: 242-327-6077
(466) Mrs. Winnifred Roberts
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
Tel: 242-502-5170/502-5180
(716) Ms. Quincy Fisher


(717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby
(723) Ms. Deidre King
(724) Mrs. Faye Higgs
(725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson
(565) Mrs. Catherine Davis
(569) Mrs. Vanessa Scott
NASSAU INT'L AIRPORT
Tel: 242-377-7179
(433) Mrs. Suzette Hall-Moss
LYFORD CAY BRANCH
Tel: 242-362-4540 or 242-362-4037
(101-N) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson
GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA
Tel: 242-332-2856/8
(902) Ms. Nicole Evans
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
Tel:242-333-2230
(901) Ms.Velderine Laroda
ANDROS TOWN BRANCH
Tel: 242-368-2071
(400) Ms. Cyprianna Williams
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO
Tel: 242-367-2420
(908) Mr. Toure Holder


(909) Mrs. Sylvia Poitier
(910) Mr Kermit Curry
BIMINI BRANCH
Tel:242-347-3031
(105) Miss. Ganiatu Tinubu
GRAY'S, LONG ISLAND
Tel: 242-337-0101
(100) Mrs. Lucy Wells
EXUMA BRANCH
Tel: 242-336-3251
(008) Ms. Jocyelyn Mackey
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-352-6631/2
(101-F) Ms. Garnell Frith
(102) Ms. Elaine Collie
(103) Mrs. Damita Newbold-Cartwright
(108) Ms. Sylvie Carey
SPANISH WELLS
Tel: 242-333-4131 or
242-333-4145
(560) Mr. Walter Carey


I ODSUSSOISO HSIPAGE LG ON5T WWW.TIBUE22CO5


I I I - - - I I


I I I


I--






PAGEBSIES IB ODY COE ,20 H RBN


Re: Lot # 12, Block # 86, Richmond Park
Subdivision, Unit 3R Freeport, Grand Bahama

�. . ... .,. -








Recently Constructed Six-Plex

Five Units:
One bedroom one bathroom, living and dining
area, kitchen and laundry area.

One Unit:
Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, a powder room,
living and dining room, family room, kitchen,
office and laundry room and arctic area.

Potential Income:
One bedroom units $3,250.00 per month
Four bedrooms unit $1,400.00 per month.

For conditions of sale and any
other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas


Interested persons should
submit offer in writing addressed to
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
P. O. Box N-7518 Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before October 9th, 2009


Cable hopes 'long 14-


FROM page 1B

Bahamas and the US] in 2000,
the Government has done its
side of it.
"We are now looking to the
US government to do their
side, and they haven't fulfilled
it yet. That's to get the pro-
grammers to us to give us
their programming from the
satellite."
However, Mr Butler said
Cable Bahamas was encour-
aged by the statements made
by Ron Kirk, the US Trade
Representative, in unveiling
the Bahamas' move to imple-
ment the Copyright Act 2004
amendments, to believe that
Washington was now moving
to push programming rights
holders - especially those with
premium content - to finally
negotiate commercial tie-ups


with it.
While stating that the
Bahamas' amendments would
"ensure that legitimate Amer-
ican companies don't have to
compete with unauthorized
transmissions of their own
shows", Ambassador Kirk
added that if properly imple-
mented, "this law should help
to open up a new export mar-
ket for the programming of
American pay television
channels and provide a posi-
tive example of respect for
intellectual property through-
out the region".
While some may question
why the Bahamas had to
learn of the amendments'
enactment from Washington,
rather than its own govern-
ment, Ambassador Kirk's
statement nonetheless hints
at progress being made on all


fronts to bring an end to the
long-running intellectual
property rights sags involving
TV transmissions in this
nation.
"This is where we take the
encouragement," the Cable
Bahamas president told Tri-
bune Business. "It's been a
long road that we've been on
for the last 14 years, and this
gives us great encourage-
ment."
Mr Butler said Ambassador
Kirk's statement indicated
that the US government had
"started the process of
encouraging those rights hold-
ers not selling to the Bahamas
to sell to it".
"We've set up meetings
with a number of the pro-
grammers going forward," he
added, "starting next week.
We hope this is a catalyst so
that the offers on the signals
can come. Hopefully, the US
Trade Representative's Office
will encourage those compa-
nies that have refused to start
offering their channels."
Emphasising that this was


an issue that would impact all
companies offering TV-type
products in the Bahamas, not
just Cable Bahamas, Mr But-
ler said moves to close the
long-running intellectual
property rights saga would
eventually have "some signif-
icant implications for TV line-
ups going forward".
He explained: "There's pro-
gramming out there we could-
n't get access to. There's
video-on-demand program-
ming, there's HD (high defi-
nition) programming avail-
able in the US that we can't
access.
"We're encouraged, and
hoping from those initiatives
between the governments that
we'll able to access that pro-
gramming. I'm sure the view-
ers would be delighted, too."
Mr Butler also suggested
that the Bahamas' move to
implement the 2004 Copy-
right Act amendments result-
ed from an August 2009

SEE next page


Rt. Hon. Hubert A. Ingraham

PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, it is the objective of Toastmasters International to
provide a mutually supportive and positive learning environment in
which every member has the opportunity to develop communication
and leadership skills, which in turn foster self-confidence and personal
growth;

AND WHEREAS, Division I, established 5th December, 1968,
is a part of Toastmasters International, Region VIII, District 47, and to
date has some thirty-nine (39) clubs throughout the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas;


AND WHEREAS, Division I, as part of
International, has as its core values integrity,
excellence, service to the member and respect for


Toastmasters
dedication to
the individual;


AND WHEREAS, Division I is dedicated to the empowerment
of people through teaching the arts of speaking, listening and
thinking, which are vital skills that promote self-actualization,
enhance leadership, foster human understanding, and contribute to
the betterment of mankind;

AND WHEREAS, Division I, in an effort to bring greater public
awareness to its mission to develop effective communicators,
wishes to set aside a month to engage in activities in support of that
effort;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim
the month of October, 2009 as "TOASTMASTERS MONTH",


IN WITNESS WHEREOF,
I have hereunto set my
Hand and Seal this 21st.
day of August, 2009

- 6:sj�M


HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER


IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I


SITUATION VACANT
MERCHANDISE/PARTS MANAGER

Needed for expanding
Freeport Auto Dealership

Mature applicants must have a thorough understanding of
computerized inventory systems, be able to interpret parts
usage, generate parts orders, supervise AND train parts
personnel.

Knowledge of Japanese and Korean parts is preferred along
with proven dealership experience.

Attractive and competitive remuneration package available
to successful applicant.


Please apply in writing to:
Administrator
P.O. Box F-41060
Freeport


Be first, only 20 American

Certification Exam

Application available.


Register Ilow for October Session


Call Hepson at:


356-4860


I


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009


THE TRIBUNE







THE TIBUN MONDY, OTOBER5, 209,IPGES7


year road' at end


meeting between Cable
Bahamas and the program-
ming rights holders, which
was facilitated by both gov-
ernments.
Recalling the meeting, he
told Tribune Business: "The
comments from the owners at
that point were that they
wouldn't negotiate with the
Bahamas until the amend-
ment was enacted."
The crux of the intellectual
property rights issue that has
dogged Bahamian-US rela-
tions over the past 14 years is
that the Bahamas and rest of
the English-speaking
Caribbean are seen as too
small a market by many of
the programming rights hold-
ers, making them disinclined
to negotiate commercial
arrangements with Cable
Bahamas.
Their distribution and roy-
alty rights do not allow them
to broadcast outside the US,
and the legal fees and other
costs required to change these
agreements would exceed the
revenues gained from a small
market such as this nation.
Under the 2000 agreement,
the US Trade Representa-
tive's Office was supposed to
encourage the Motion Picture
Association of America
(MPAA) and the likes of its
individual members to enter
into commercial agreements
with Cable Bahamas, in
return for this nation amend-
ing its compulsory licensing
regime via the 2004 Act
amendment. Yet while the
Bahamas has now fulfilled its
side of the bargain, the US
has yet to hold up its end.
However, Mr Butler and
Cable Bahamas are hopeful
that last week's developments
will put an end to recent
episodes such as the one
where two industry bodies


representing US program-
ming royalty rights holders
urged the Obama administra-
tion to take away trade bene-
fits that allow Bahamian
exports to enter the US tariff-
free, on the grounds that this
nation was not fulfilling its
obligations to protect intel-
lectual property rights.
Both the MPAA and Tele-
vision Association of Pro-
grammers Latin America
urged that the Bahamas lose
its trade benefits under the
Caribbean Basin Economic
Recovery Act (CBERA) due
to its compulsory licensing
regime for cable television,
under which Cable
Bahamas was allegedly
pirating premium program-
ming satellite signals.
This, though, is exactly the
issue the Bahamas addressed
on Thursday by enacting the
compulsory TV licence
amendments, hopefully mak-
ing it a dead issue.
In its submission to the US
International Trade Commis-
sion's (USITC) latest report
on the economic impact made
by the CBERA, and its twin
Caribbean Basin Initiative
(CBI) programme, the
MPAA alleged that the com-
pulsory licensing regime had
been used by the Bahamas
"to justify the retransmission
of premium pay television
programming to the detri-
ment of US rights holders.
"This compulsory licence
allows cable operators in the
Bahamas - including the par-
tially government-owned
Cable Bahamas - to essential-
ly steal films and program-
ming from the United States,
thus destroying the economic
viability for US pay television
networks that own the rights
to sell films and programming
to the Bahamas."


MEDICAL SERVICE:
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SHr.nith Cfiakkuwl * AnnLujl P 'ylOie (iPp �mir, Prowlw. BOk'd Thl)i
* 20MrvwHilv7Is.M
A* rii SUrlig Sy i�ti. lflhiftafl l2',ilbl. Autiae,'i arid Mluch mr'.

I p: MEDISPA SERVICE: w rct:
' Ai. Oly Siln Snaing BurnpO, Darn ilaik S':cars Pino Lin", aid'Aimrkia
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(l y LCi VWei. Wuohni LOM Maliag',nriti

Walk-iln Welcan lt Appolntment Availble


OPIN; Monday-y iwy O-ms - 6: lpm
Ealur my 1 Q:Dam Le S�Dilpm


SI326-1 111


NW 20 H it Irg 4tig mm (marIHPin LfIlne 1149 SMrl*y ST,




NOTICE



OF

RED STRING LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 1 October, 2009 and that
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial
Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, P.O.Box N-3023,
Nassau, The Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of
the Company.


As a result, the MPAA
argued: "The Bahamas should
not continue to benefit from
preferential access to the US
market while it is simultane-
ously expropriating US rights
holders' property."
However, in its response to
the US International Trade
Commission, Cable Bahamas
said that "for over five years,
Cable Bahamas has sought a
meeting with Television Asso-


RENT


ciation of Programmers Latin
America and its members
without success.
"Instead of meeting with
Cable Bahamas, HBO Latin
America and Television Asso-
ciation of Programmers Latin
America seek to use the office
of the
United States government
to coerce the settlement of
their private business dis-
pute," the company added.


Sales Representative

We are seeking to hire talented, assertive, charismatic and
outgoing individuals with an aptitude for sales and a desire to
succeed.

Skills and Requirements

* Excellent oral and written communication skills
* Proficient in Microsoft Office applications
* Ability to work in a fast paced environment
* Strong mathematic capabilities
* Ability to multitask
* Possess excellent planning, organizational and
implementation skills
* Excellent interpersonal skills
* A team player with the ability to work independently
* Professional appearance
* A desire and passion to get ahead


Minimum Requirements

* Associate degree in marketing or business
administration
* Sales experience desired but not essential

Paid training and benefits program available

APPLY VIA E-MAIL TO:

salesrepresentativeneeded@gmail.com


ONE SANDYPORT PLAZA
West Bay Street
www.bohomrnscornmerciol.cornm
www.cbri chardellis.com


RETAIL/OFFICE SPACE

* 1,042 - 2.264 sq. ft.
* Ample Parking
* Immediate Occupancy
* For more information call 396-0000


BAHAMAS REALTY Lm
COMM E K CIAL
Il axaifdt imWtt


CBRE
CEl RICHARD ELLIS
NAVlGATIN- A NEW WORLD


I ODSUSSOISO HSIPAGE LG ON5T WWW.TIBUE22CO5


NOTICE
S SIH S1 S


OF

INI LIMITED


Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 1 October, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial
Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, P.O.Box N-3023,
Nassau, The Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of
the Company.


Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator


Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator


FIG CAPITAL MARKETS

ROYAL FIDELITY CE E SLICES

Money at Work
C F A L"'C (C: . 0 NIA 1.
BISX LISTED S TP"DED SECLIPITIES S COF
FRIDAY, 2 OCTOBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,473.49 | CHG -28.18 | OoCHG -1.88 | YTD -238.87 | YTD 0o -13.95
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.401o | 2008 -12.310o
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM |I TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
1.71 1.03 AML Foods Limited 1.17 1.17 0.00 3,050 0.127 0.000 9.2 0.00%
11.80 9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 10.75 10.75 0.00 0.992 0.200 10.8 1.86%
9.30 5.90 Bank of Bahamas 5.90 5.90 0.00 0.244 0.260 24.2 4.41%
0.89 0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00 -0.877 0.000 N/M 0.00%
3.49 3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.125 0.090 25.2 2.86%
2.37 2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 0.040 43.1 1.69%
14.20 9.93 Cable Bahamas 9.93 9.93 0.00 1.406 0.250 7.1 2.52%
2.88 2.72 Colina Holdings 2.72 2.72 0.00 0.249 0.040 10.9 1.47%
7.50 5.26 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 5.86 5.44 -0.42 1,500 0.419 0.300 13.0 5.51%
3.85 1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.08 3.09 0.01 0.111 0.052 27.8 1.68%
2.85 1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.05 2.05 0.00 0.625 0.080 3.3 3.90%
8.20 6.60 Famguard 6.60 6.60 0.00 0.420 0.240 15.7 3.64%
12.50 8.80 Finco 9.30 9.30 0.00 0.322 0.520 28.9 5.59%
11.71 10.00 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.631 0.350 15.8 3.50%
5.53 4.11 Focol (S) 4.50 4.11 -0.39 3,064 0.332 0.150 12.4 3.65%
1.00 1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%
0.45 0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27 0.27 0.00 0.035 0.000 7.7 0.00%
9.02 5.49 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00 0.407 0.500 13.7 8.94%
12.00 9.98 J.S. Johnson 9.98 9.98 0.00 0.952 0.640 10.5 6.41%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.156 0.000 64.1 0.00%
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest Maturity
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7% 19 October 2017
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7% 30 May 2013
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015
Fidelity Over-The-Counler Securities
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
14.60 7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.00 -2.246 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00 0.000 0.480 N/M 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55 0.001 0.000 256.6 0.00%
Colina Over-The-Counler Securities
41.00 29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540 0.000 9.03 0.00%
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000 261.90 0.00%
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield % NAV Date
1.4038 1.3344 CFAL Bond Fund 1.4038 3.72 5.20 31-Aug-09
3.0350 2.8952 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.8990 -1.39 -4.16 31-Aug-09
1.4920 1.4129 CFAL Money Market Fund 1.4920 4.06 5.59 25-Sep-09
3.6090 3.0941 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.0941 -8.61 -13.59 31-Aug-09
13.0484 12.3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.1136 3.93 5.87 31-Aug-09
101.6693 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101.6693 1.10 1.67 30-Jun-09
100.9600 93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.7398 0.35 -4.18 30-Jun-09
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00 31-Dec-07
9.4075 9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.3399 2.69 -1.41 31-Jul-09
1.0707 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0707 3.38 5.14 31-Aug-09
1.0364 1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0319 -0.11 2.05 31-Aug-09
1.0673 1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0673 2.89 4.93 31-Aug-09
MARKET TERMS
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX- 19 Dec 02 = 1,000 00 YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX- The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1, 1994= 100
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 I ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 I FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 I COLONIAL 242-502-7525


Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) GYROSCOPE LIMITED (SAC) is in dissolution under the provisions of
the International Business Companies Act 200.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on August 11, 2009 when
its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Alisa Richardson of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 11th day of September 2009 to send their names and addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or,
in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.

August 12, 2009

ALISA RICHARDSON

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY


I


MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE





PAGEBSIES IB ODY COE ,20 H RBN


Attend the

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November 9-10, 2009
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Insurer generates





22% profit growth


lion in 2008, something Mr Bethell attributed to a 5.1 per cent
growth in staff costs to $4.548 million.
The improvements were even more marked on the ICB
side, where net income increased year-over-year for the 2009
first half by 37.9 million, growing from $1.303 million to $1.797
million. This was largely due to a more than three-fold increase
in net commissions and fees to $1.156 million, compared to
$262,000 in 2008.
ICB's insurance expenses also fell by 10 per cent to $3.115
million during the 2009 first half, although total expenses rose
by 2.7 per cent to $4.036 million, compared to $3.298 million in
2008.


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


THE COEl�GE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visit o-W it e r wwNw.c6,efda.h

NOTICE
Master of Science in Eklenmary Education Degree
Programme in collaboration with Whelock College.
Applications are available from:
The G(raduate Programmies Otkic,
The Ciollege of The Bahamas. Mchael H. Eldon
Complex, Room 306 Thompson Blvd.
For more nformUn ion call: 397-2601/2 or
send emails t: swis omgb.edu.
Application Deadline: 16th Oclober, 2009.


"Rew rd Ing. My work at The Tr~bUrw is creative and chai1Ietiging. I eiljoy
contributing to the look (if our newspaper, while meeting thenee.& of
our advertisers. I enjoy work~ig here. The Tribune is my newspaper:'t


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009
In The Supreme Court FAM/div/603
Family Division

BETWEEN:
JOHN HENRY BURROWS Petitioner
And
LORMA BURROWS Nee CHAMBERS Respondent

NOTICE OF PETITION

TAKE NOTICE that the Petitioner JOHN HENRY BURROWS has
commenced Divorce in the Family Division of the Supreme Court
against LORMA BURROWS Nee CHAMBERS

AND TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that in the event that LORMA
BURROWS Nee CHAMBERS desiring to defend the porceed-
ings in the Supreme Court LORMA BURROWS Nee CHAMBERS
will be required to enter an Appearance in the Supreme Court by
delivering a Memorandum of Appearance to the Registry of the
Supreme Court on the Family Side of the Supreme Court which is
situate on the Second Floor in the Ansbacher Building, Bank Lane
and East Street North in the City of Nassau in the Island of New
Providence by delivering the said Memorandum of Apperance at
the firm of Wells Legal & Corporate Services, the Ground Floor,
Columbus House, East Street and Shirley Streets, Nassau, Baha-
mas by or on or before the 30th day of October, A,D, 2009,

Dated: This 29th day of September, A, D, 2009,

Stephanie Anne Wells
Wells Legal & Corporate Services
Ground Floor
Columbus House,
Nassau, Bahamas


TO D


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009


THE TRIBUNE


A e No,
pf�, tlw�,P- oo� �ewlvpol






THE~UINS TRBNIODY COBR5 09 AE9


BFSB


backs


Bahamas


on


G-20 tax standard


THE Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) yesterday
released a statement reaffirming
that the Bahamas will meet the
G-20/OECD minimum standards
on tax transparency and informa-
tion exchange before year-end
2009.
In its statement, the BFSB said
the Bahamian government had
confirmed its commitment to this
goal and deadline more than
once, and now had three Tax
Information Exchange Agree-
ments (TIEAs) - with the US,
Monaco and San Marino - that
were deemed to be OECD com-
pliant.
The BFSB said: "The Bahamas
has a history of leadership and
ongoing adherence to meeting
international protocols. The early
introduction of regulation of trust
companies in 1965, being the first
to sign the United Nations Con-
vention Against Illicit Traffic in
Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic


HUBERT INGRAHAM WENDY WARREN


Substances, and its comprehen-
sive framework to prevent money
laundering and terrorist financing
are hallmarks that reinforce The
Bahamas' position as a leading
financial services centre."
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, the BFSB said, had reiterat-
ed in March that the Bahamas
was prepared to make good on
commitments given to the OECD
back in 2002, given that the 'level
playing field' condition - with all
nations prepared to adopt the
same standards and timelines -
had been met.
The BFSB added that, follow-
ing this announcement: "The
Bahamas readied itself for negoti-
ations with G20 and other coun-
tries, and on July 29 announced
that it had commenced negotia-
tions with 14 countries.
The 'Tax Cooperation 2009:
Towards a Level Playing Field'
report, released by the OECD in
September as a result of the latest


assessment by the Global Forum
on Transparency and Exchange of
Information, confirmed that The
Bahamas had opened negotia-
tions with a number of countries
and recognized the strong legal
framework for cooperation that
already exists in The Bahamas as
a result of its 2002 agreement with
the United States of America and
its anti-money laundering frame-
work.






INSIGH

Fo*testorie


Is the sun setting on government transparency once again?


FROM page 12B
serious politicians for
decades in all but the most
authoritarian countries.
Minister of State for
Immigration
Branville McCartney:
When harrowing allega-
tions of brutality and sub-
human conditions at the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre arose earlier this
year, the claims were imme-
diately denied by Mr
McCartney and Immigration
Director Jack Thompson.


However, in an exclusive
interview with Insight, an
officer stationed at the centre
responded to their denials,
describing a place suffocat-
ed by fear, where detainees
are treated like animals -
beaten, tortured and sexual-
ly assaulted by guards.
Through it all, Mr McCart-
ney maintained that no such
abuses have taken place on
his watch. So efficient were
the ministry's investigations
that it could be stated cate-
gorically, little more than a
day after the allegations first


arose, that they were untrue.
This was either the most
efficient investigation in his-
tory of analytical inquiry or
the most preposterous, and
many suspect that the min-
istry's inquiries consisted of
little more than asking the
guards and their superiors
whether they had engaged in
the behaviour described, and
relaying their predictable
denials to the public.
While maintaining that
aside from a bit of house-
keeping, nothing is wrong at
the centre, the government


BAIC

In CounlM n With Gil

The College of The Bahamas
e il f t

6W ksin Epmr#'l folraf.-L Series


REGISTRATION FORM


1 il l PI Ht T






FAX MM.R:



EMAIL ADDRESS:


t i, nm qynuida
villa h is u, ad
Vi eMip lb. 11





DEE: OL*HIWkbOIaHm

TM AIxW .kkk LA'INW

TIE: ly zilr/Nuutu

W41hn WPuhAul



MTE i mue k Rditq


as a whole has failed to
respond to repeated requests
from The Tribune, other
media organizations and
human rights groups to tour
the facility and see for them-
selves.
Mr McCartney did organ-
ise a visit for social workers
and psychologists, but did
not release the findings, say-
ing the report must first be
seen by cabinet. Months
have passed, and there is still
no word on when this infor-
mation will be made avail-
able.
Either the alleged suffer-
ing of helpless human beings
at the hands of government
officers is a matter that cab-
inet has little interest in, or
more likely, the "waiting for
cabinet approval" line was a
stalling tactic in the first
place.
Minister of Agriculture
Larry Cartwright:
Just a few weeks ago, a
14-year-old boy sent a letter
to The Tribune claiming he
had witnessed horrifying
conditions at the government
dog pound.
He told of seeing, among
other things, a dead dog
locked in a cage with a live
one, animals starved of food
and water and absolutely dis-
gusting conditions.
The immediate reaction
was to close ranks and pre-
tend nothing was wrong, and
just as at the detention cen-
tre, The Tribune sought to
verify the claims, but was
turned away at the gates.
A senior government offi-
cial promised a statement in
response to the story, but this
never materialised. When
contacted a few weeks later


I


for an explanation of why
reporters were kept out,
Minister of Agriculture Lar-
ry Cartwright said the pound
is "normally off limits
because they bring in dogs
from the streets who could
have all sorts of diseases."
While I am sure all work-
ing journalists appreciate Mr
Cartwright's concern for
their safety, I am equally cer-
tain they can take care of
themselves. The squalid, sor-
did and often precarious sce-
narios into which their pro-
fession leads local reporters
on a regular basis has surely
qualified them to handle the
worst the dog pound can
muster.
In any case, it is not the
job of a government official
to ensure the health and
safety of journalists on the
job; were this the case, the
world would know nothing
of starvation, disease and
conflict outside of what gov-
ernments chose to make
public.
Mr Cartwright's next
move was a classic: kill the
messenger. He accused the
14-year-old schoolboy and
his friends of bhi jLini91."
their way into the facility
under "false pretences", hav-
ing claimed to be working
for the Humane Society.
This, of course, has no bear-
ing whatsoever on whether
the boy's claims were true -
not a single allegation has
been outright denied - and
can therefore only be taken
as an attempt to change the
subject and discredit a young
man who was brave enough
to bring light to so horrible a
situation. Personally, I hope
the boy did sneak in; if so, I
congratulate him on an


mhel ,bljfe


a~_ p m


1114 U 141441
i Ia r


undercover job well done,
and recommend that he tries
his hand at a career in jour-
nalism when he gets a bit
older.
Mr Cartwright could not
say why a statement was yet
to be released, but said that
once it has, "I am sure the
understanding public will
realise that it's not a tourist
attraction, it's not a place
where you can take anybody.
It's cleaned on a daily basis
but needs some minor
repairs and cleaning up, and
I think it would be naive of
us to say that everything is
in tip-top shape because it's
not, we are human beings
working there... Need I say
more?"
I believe animal rights
advocates and dog lovers
would suggest Mr Cartwright
needs to say a great deal
more. Not only does his
explanation make no men-
tion whatsoever of the alle-
gations of animal cruelty -
an offence punishable by law
- his excuse that the workers
are "human" leaves much to
be desired. Firstly, it is
arguable that anyone who
subjects an animal to unnec-
essary cruelty might not
qualify for the label
"human." Secondly, no one
asked that the pound be a
"tourist attraction" - only
that its staff do all they can to
ease the last days of animals
who have suffered their
entire lives because of
human recklessness and irre-
sponsibility.
Minister of National
Security Tommy
Turnquest:
Most disturbing, perhaps,
is Mr Turnquest's involve-
ment in what appears to be a
stranglehold on information
regarding the death of Pre-
ston Ferguson in Exuma.
It has been claimed that
when Preston died under
mysterious circumstances
two months ago, police offi-
cers failed to impound the
vehicle in which the body
was discovered, neglected to
interview persons of interest,
did not confiscate his clothes
or the possessions, and did
not even bother to check his
phone records. As a result,
it seems, the police have
been forced to put forward
what appears to be a com-
pletely fantastical accident
scenario to explain his death.
So far, the minister has
used the tried-and-true
defence of "ongoing investi-
gation." Fair enough, but if
the manner of Preston's
death cannot be discussed
because it is still under inves-
tigation, what about the alle-
gations against the officers
on the scene?
Over the last few weeks,
the public has made it clear
that what it wants from Mr
Turnquest is a vow to get to
the bottom of what hap-
pened in Exuma on the

SEE page 10B


IODSCUSS STOIS SNTI AELGO TO ' WWTIBUE4.O I


CONTACT: Balami Agricultramlaindliduirtal Corporatlo (BAIClatl22-3740wr .,25-I2l
NM. I1BJ FurLguH' llr. Tonjik lHUmmtT4 irv' 4imincttL Rli


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009, PAGE 9B


pp'..j












Baha Mar's closure savings




'close to what we projected'


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


BAHA MAR believes it has
saved "close to what we project-
ed" through the two-month closure
of the Wyndham Nassau resort and
adjacent Crystal Palace casino, as
the two properties re-open today
with some 1,000 staff returning to
work.
Robert Sands, Baha Mar's senior
vice-president for governmental
and external affairs, said the
planned closure - done as a way
to slash millions of dollars in losses
incurred during the traditionally
slow period from mid-August to
early October - had been "very
effective" and "a good strategic
decision we made".
While unable to quantify the
scale of the savings accruing to
Baha Mar, he did tell Tribune Busi-
ness: "We believe it's close to what
we had projected."
"I think it has been very effec-
tive," he added. "The period is not
totally over yet, so we do not have


ROBERT SANDS


* 1,000 staff back to work today, as two-month Wyndham

and Crystal Palace closures 'very effective'

* But resort group still 'slightly behind projections'

* Business still 'very soft and challenging' heading into winter season


the numbers in hand, but we
believe it was a good strategic deci-
sion that we made. We believe [the
savings] is close to what we pro-
jected. It reduced the loss signifi-
cantly during the period we were
closed."
As for today, Mr Sands had told
Tribune Business on Friday:
"We're on schedule for opening.
Staff have been coming back, and
came in for orientation and training
today. We will be opening to the
public on Monday as scheduled, as
planned.
"The staff that went on leave will
come back on Monday. That's in
excess of 1,000 between the hotel
and the casino." Some 700 staff at
the Wyndham, and 300 at the Crys-


tal Palace casino, will be reporting
for duty today, Mr Sands added,
the Sheraton Nassau Beach having
remained open throughout the
summer.
Baha Mar had used the Wynd-
ham and Crystal Palace closures to
effect some modest capital works to
improve the guest experience, Mr
Sands told Tribune Business,
including painting, "correcting mal-
functioning equipment" and back
office improvements.
Yet while Baha Mar was antici-
pating a "seamless" transition back
into a working environment, noth-
ing had changed in terms of the
outlook for the Bahamian hotel
and tourism industries as they
headed into the 2009 winter sea-


Acknowledging that the Wynd-
ham and Crystal Palace were like-
ly to see a gradual and slow build
up in business, with staff working
weeks rostered accordingly, Mr
Sands said: "Business will be soft.
We still expect this quarter to be
reasonably challenging. It's still
very soft and challenging, no ques-
tion. I think we're behind our pro-
jections; slightly behind."
However, Mr Sands said Baha
Mar hoped to get a short-term
boost from the Bahamian conven-
tions market, with both major polit-
ical parties - PLP and FNM -
scheduled to stage their party con-
ferences, spanning a week each, in
late October and November.


Is the sun setting on government transparency once again?


FROM page 9B

morning the body was found,
and a personal commitment
to see the officers in ques-
tion punished severely if
found guilty of negligence.
So far, he has responded on
all occasions with the dou-
ble mantra that the matter is
still under investigation and
that he is unwilling to sec-
ond-guess the police.
The Freedom of Informa-
tion Act (FOIA)
Under the PLP it was
nearly impossible for a jour-
nalist or member of the pub-
lic to get their hands on offi-
cial documents. At its most
ridiculous, the culture of
secrecy made it difficult for
the press to even obtain a
copy of an international
treaty.
Then came the light. By
late 2006, the FNM and its
new-old leader Hubert


Ingraham were in the ascen-
dancy, and made freedom of
information a cornerstone of
their campaign.
At every opportunity, the
party came to the defence of
journalists seeking informa-
tion, claiming it had a duty to
"defend press freedom in the
Bahamas as an indispensable
element of our democracy"
and even mounted its own
campaign for the release of
the Baha Mar heads of
agreement.
After winning the elec-
tion, the FNM declared that
an historic first draft of a
Freedom of Information Act
was on the desk of then
Attorney General Claire
Hepburn. She said cabinet
would review the document
and circulate it for public
consultation before present-
ing it to the House of Assem-
bly before the end of 2007.
The future seemed bright


indeed.
Then suddenly, the free-
dom train was stricken by
unexpected delays.
In February 2008, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
announced that a cultural
shift and "mindset change"
must take place in the public
sector before the ideal of
freedom of information
could be realized.
He said the government
will not rush the Freedom of
Information Act, "but we
will deliver."
A few months later, the
new Attorney General
Michael Barnett said the
government is still working
on the proposal, but is com-
mitted to seeing the bill
before parliament in a "rea-
sonable" time. He said the
delay was down to "people"
having to see the draft and
modify it and make changes.
He did not explain who


these people were, or what
happened to the promise
that the document would be
released to the public.
Mr Barnett did say media
organizations will see the Bill
before it comes law, but this
is not the same as public con-
sultation - which seems to
have gone completely out
the window, as Minister of
State for Culture Charles
Maynard recently announced
that preparations have begun
for the Act's eventual imple-
mentation.
However, public consul-


station on this issue is vital -
as some FOIAs are more
user-friendly than others.
The United States has a
relatively generous FOIA,
and in 2006 alone appeals to
this law by the American
press uncovered the poten-
tial for a huge salmonella
outbreak, revealed that a
popular form of birth con-
trol may be killing women,
disclosed that 75 per cent of
the jail cells in one state have
faulty locks, and exposed the
fact that staff at a particular
kidney transplant facility


were not properly trained, to
name just a few cases.
Just imagine what such a
law could do in a society like
this one, where countless
instances of inefficiency and
skullduggery take place on a
daily basis out of the public
view. Besides, considering
the tendency towards secrecy
being exhibited by some at
the top, would it not be wise
to take the matter out of
their hands entirely?
What do you think?
pununez@
tribunemedia.net


A major international financial institution is seeking the services of a
Finance Manager. The successful candidate must possess:

* A professional accounting qualification (CPA, CA, ACA) and at least three
(3) years post qualification work experience in an accounting firm or financial
institution, including experience in a managerial or supervisory role.


Duties to include:

* Completion of regulatory and Group financial returns
* Implementing new accounting standards and regulatory requirements
* Daily monitoring of Branch and Subsidiaries Balance Sheets and review
daily exception reports to ensure corrective action taken as necessary
* Daily monitoring of Credit and Market Risk
* Preparation of annual financial plans and budgets


Candidate should also:

* Possess good information system skills - including MS Office
(Word, Excel, etc.)
* Have the ability to work with minimum supervision
* Be able to coordinate small teams to achieve reporting results within tight
deadlines.
* Possess good interpersonal and communication skills
* Have the ability to foster a team environment,



This position reports to the Financial Controller

Applications, from qualified persons only, should be addressed and submitted
to:
Manager Human Resources
HSBC
P.O. Box N-4917
Suite 306, Centre of Commerce
One Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 502-2566/2577



Application Deadline: Friday, 09 October 2009


ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visitourwebsile at uwww~cob.eda.bs

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (EQI

FOR PREQUALWICATION FOR

DESIGN, SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION OF
FUR NITURE. FIXTU'RES & EQUI1PM ENT:

The~ Col I ege ofThe Baihamias (0)13 iswc~ki ng Expriem s iosfInterest i rm qual iJfcd vea-
dndLirs/fiais o provide smierks and products For the des -,n. supply and instaiLiation of fur-
nhlture, fi ei~tre and equipment qHF&,E) for

(j) the Harry Moore Library aind !ntiwnuiun (Centre preiwcraly unmdenisr cl IIchLm U1i
the Oak" Fied -C.5f IISu of The Col leI, e and
610~ iic imw Noi ilk: i nBahornmns CapuIii%'iThe Ci1higopI4srcn ly od isiu~o
in Ff "pi irl. Grnnd 8[Aihi nii

Interei'.ed pairtk ies my ouhdn, urtrinbtri-nlration and a copy of Lhe Lxprussitms if'Inwerst


The Mfice or the Vice Pm. i~dent FinnceN,
College alf ThlieBah2Mas
Oakes Field
Nassau, Bahamnas
Tel.- 242-302-451314M16

Or

Th ffeor c J~the Asmmialue Vice Prt-ideni

Northern Bahamas Camnpus
Fircepurt, Grand Bahamaa
Tel: 242-352-9761

An inln4matiouin mecing will he hed in Nassu, on Tuesiay,2.h~h. Stptcnier. ^20)9 mi4 on
VWeJusday, 301h Sepwrnhcr. 1IMNin FiLopIorIal a timani rd %c~niew' lobc nnoiinccd,

E(I - \�� to hi: uiiliv'J lo the lo ]Vui ) 01ivi> ;iiJi~i.tin iht E0ufRq1 IMIIAwR7101 inFUCIIIrI n


Vicc Prt'.iditnt. Finianve
Colle~ge miTThe Bahama!;

EXPRESSION0OF INTEREST - FEE -
Insert name of applicableradieiit

Firt~ms USL .UbniiL a Wp~iraIL-0I1 foeach Iaci I 1,. All E01s ire Ltu be sHuhmlkd by 12:00
pm (imd-daiy ion I-rida). 9Lh 0obeir. �19


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 5,2009


THE TRIBUNE











THE WEATHER REPORT


Ri
WOLiCTE


11 L


I MAR~~INEFRCST


" , ORLANDO
High:91 F/330C
Low: 730 F/230 C


TAMPA
High: 900�F/320 C
Low: 770�F/250 C

.


-7
:.*'- ' "


Some sun with a
t-storm in the area.


Partly cloudy, a shower;
warm.


Variably cloudy with a
shower.


., 4*
-9'
..~ ~.
Sj ~


Sunny.


Plenty of sunshine.


Bright sunshine.


Bright sunshine.


High: 880 High: 900 High: 890 High: 900
High: 89 Low: 780 Low: 790 Low: 78� Low: 790 Low: 780
. ..a .. ..i. mm airmrffl mm :Moms m m, rmMm, mmwMrmrmse M., iMi
S 111F 85*F | | 97-87 F I 104o-88O F I 11o0-87 F I I 08o B-B F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature� is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body-everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.


I. Al , . U l I


I AIuMAN AC


ABACO
High: 88�F/31� C
Low: 78 F/260 C


a WEST PALM BEACH
High: 91� F/330 C
Low: 780�F/260C C


FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 90� F/320 C
Low: 800 F/270 C


MIAMI
High: 91� F/330 C
Low:800F/270C


KEY WEST
High: 90� F/320 C
Low: 81�0F/270 C
�.


Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
79/26 50/10
50/10 39/3
60/15 55/12
69/20 45/7
70/21 48/8
67/19 51/10
59/15 46/7
74/23 64/17
64/17 47/8
60/15 45/7
75/23 71/21
68/20 33/0
65/18 45/7
86/30 74/23
89/31 74/23


W High
F/C
c 74/23
sh 47/8
r 74/23
s 69/20
s 72/22
s 66/18
pc 64/17
r 80/26
pc 63/17
s 67/19
t 86/30
pc 57/13
s 64/17
s 86/30
t 90/32


Tuesday
Low
F/C
51/10
35/1
65/18
53/11
56/13
51/10
50/10
70/21
45/7
53/11
68/20
34/1
47/8
75/23
75/23


Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
71/21 48/8
85/29 72/22
64/17 57/13
75/23 50/10
68/20 59/15
68/20 53/11
71/21 51/10
70/21 61/16
91/32 80/26
57/13 41/5
72/22 57/13
81/27 74/23
69/20 58/14
67/19 60/15
91/32 73/22


FREEPORT
High:870�F/31� C
Low: 770 F/250 C


















ANDROS
High: 91� F/330 C
Low: 770 F/250 C


W High
F/C
pc 70/21
t 87/30
c 71/21
pc 79/26
pc 81/27
pc 70/21
pc 75/23
pc 78/25
pc 91/32
r 51/10
c 76/24
t 90/32
s 68/20
t 77/25
pc 91/32


Tuesday
Low
F/C
51/10
73/22
44/6
56/13
62/16
55/12
57/13
65/18
79/26
39/3
61/16
76/24
58/14
53/11
75/23


Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, OR
Raleigh-Durham
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tucson
Washington, DC


NASSAU
High: 89� F/320 C
Low: 780�F/260 C






.:_L' "..


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
69/20 54/12
82/27 62/16
60/15 41/5
66/18 42/5
75/23 55/12
71/21 53/11
58/14 38/3
86/30 79/26
66/18 59/15
67/19 50/10
62/16 43/6
81/27 72/22
90/32 77/25
83/28 60/15
71/21 51/10


ELEUTH
High: 910 F
Low: 780 F,









GREATEXUMA
High: 890 F/320 C
Low:780F/260C

.-..'.'..


W High
F/C
s 70/21
pc 86/30
s 70/21
s 69/20
pc 67/19
pc 73/22
pc 57/13
t 93/33
sh 69/20
pc 70/21
s 61/16
t 86/30
pc 91/32
s 82/27
s 71/21


Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature
H igh ........................... .................. 9 1� F/33� C
Low ............................ .... .............. 77� F/250 C
Normal high ................................... 860 F/300 C
Norm al low ...................................... 74� F/23� C
Last year's high ............................... 900 F/32� C
Last year's low ............................... 760 F/24� C


O1 12 31415 617 819110 1
LOW MODERATE HIGH V. HIGH EXT

The higher the AccuWeather UV Index" number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.



High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.)
Today 8:00 a.m. 3.4 1:45 a.m. 0.3
8:15 p.m. 2.9 2:23 p.m. 0.4
Tuesday 8:41 a.m. 3.5 2:22 a.m. 0.3
8:56 p.m. 2.8 3:06 p.m. 0.4
Wednesday 9:24a.m. 3.5 3:02 a.m. 0.3
9:40 p.m. 2.7 3:51 p.m. 0.6
Thursday 10:12 a.m. 3.4 3:46 a.m. 0.4
10:29 p.m. 2.6 4:42 p.m. 0.7


Precipitation Sunrise...... 7:04 a.m. Moonrise .... 7:37 p.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .. ...................... trace Sunset....... 6:53 p.m. Moonset ..... 8:16 a.m.
Year to date ................ .................... 31.59" Last New First Full
Norm al year to date .................................... 39.42"

AccuWeather.com ..
Forecasts and graphics provided by .
IERA AccuWeather, Inc. @2009 Oct. 11 Oct. 18 Oct. 25 Nov. 2

/330 C
/260 C



CAT ISLAND
High:880F/31�C
Low: 750 F/240 C


SAN SALVADOR
High: 89* F/32* C
Low:76*F/24*C


" .
'" ;


LONG ISLAND
High: 90� F/320 C
Low: 770 F/250 C


Tuesday
Low
F/C
56/13
65/18
54/12
47/8
56/13
49/9
37/2
77/25
59/15
51/10
46/7
75/23
77/25
61/16
58/14


N
H
L


CROOKED ISLAND/ACKLINS
RAGGED ISLAND High:920F/330 C
Low: 770 F/25� C
High: 90� F/320 C
Low:740F/230C

GREAT INAGUA
High: 92� F/330 C
Low: 77� F/250 C


MAYAGUANA
ligh: 90� F/320 C
.ow: 740�F/230 C




.e.. ";

'' W


Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Paris
Prague
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg


High
F/C
89/31
61/16
75/23
79/26
53/11
91/32
87/30
75/23
79/26
80/26
72/22
57/13
79/26
67/19
62/16
67/19
72/22
96/35
88/31
42/5
90/32
84/28
83/28
55/12
59/15
62/16
68/20
64/17
89/31
50/10
86/30
100/37
73/22
83/28
70/21
89/31
75/23
61/16
82/27
88/31
77/25
95/35
57/13
49/9
62/16
88/31
82/27
47/8
62/16
57/13
80/26
93/33
75/23
89/31
91/32
85/29
64/17
85/29
79/26
72/22
47/8
64/17
79/26
72/22
60/15
99/37
58/14
62/16
54/12
49/9


Today
Low W
F/C
78/25 t
50/10 c
49/9 t
64/17 s
47/8 r
77/25 t
78/25 sh
60/15 pc
52/11 s
73/22 s
53/11 s
45/7 pc
71/21 c
45/7 t
52/11 sh
53/11 s
50/10 t
67/19 s
77/25 t
27/-2 pc
77/25 pc
73/22 t
65/18 s
46/7 s
52/11 pc
55/12 r
57/13 pc
40/4 pc
73/22 r
32/0 sh
77/25 s
66/18 s
62/16 sh
60/15 s
54/12 s
79/26 sh
60/15 pc
55/12 c
53/11 pc
79/26 t
51/10 t
73/22 s
46/7 c
41/5 r
50/10 pc
57/13 pc
73/22 t
28/-2 s
60/15 r
45/7 pc
73/22 pc
67/19 s
55/12 s
79/26 sh
51/10 s
71/21 t
47/8 pc
73/22 sh
64/17 pc
48/8 s
36/2 pc
55/12 r
75/23 r
64/17 r
46/7 c
72/22 s
44/6 s
56/13 pc
39/3 pc
37/2 c


Tuesday
High Low W
F/C F/C
88/31 80/26 pc
65/18 58/14 c
72/22 42/5 pc
81/27 62/16 s
59/15 49/9 c
91/32 77/25 r
86/30 79/26 pc
77/25 63/17 s
70/21 43/6 s
77/25 71/21 sh
76/24 58/14 pc
61/16 58/14 sh
79/26 71/21 s
67/19 43/6 c
68/20 58/14 sh
68/20 57/13 c
61/16 48/8 s
90/32 64/17 s
90/32 82/27 r
53/11 27/-2 pc
89/31 75/23 sh
83/28 74/23 t
84/28 67/19 pc
61/16 60/15 c
63/17 45/7 r
65/18 58/14 sh
72/22 57/13 c
52/11 39/3 c
88/31 73/22 s
46/7 34/1 s
86/30 75/23 s
100/37 64/17 s
73/22 61/16 pc
77/25 58/14 t
79/26 57/13 s
87/30 78/25 sh
75/23 60/15 pc
68/20 57/13 sh
77/25 58/14 pc
86/30 77/25 sh
77/25 53/11 s
99/37 73/22 pc
57/13 50/10 pc
43/6 23/-5 r
73/22 59/15 r
88/31 58/14 pc
88/31 73/22 pc
52/11 51/10 r
68/20 57/13 pc
61/16 56/13 sh
86/30 76/24 s
95/35 67/19 s
77/25 55/12 s
89/31 79/26 sh
76/24 45/7 s
86/30 71/21 t
69/20 50/10 pc
86/30 74/23 sh
83/28 65/18 t
72/22 52/11 s
50/10 45/7 pc
70/21 52/11 pc
79/26 75/23 r
68/20 64/17 r
64/17 49/9 pc
96/35 72/22 pc
59/15 46/7 s
67/19 62/16 c
58/14 46/7 pc
49/9 36/2 pc


NASSAU Today:
Tuesday:
FREEPORT Today:
Tuesday:
ABACO Today:
Tuesday:


WINDS
SE at 6-12 Knots
ESE at 7-14 Knots
SE at 3-6 Knots
S at 4-8 Knots
SE at 3-6 Knots
SSE at 4-8 Knots


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace


WAVES
1-3 Feet
1-2 Feet
1-2 Feet
1-2 Feet
2-4 Feet
1-3 Feet


VISIBILITY
6 Miles
10 Miles
10 Miles
7 Miles
7 Miles
6 Miles


WATER TEMPS.
84� F
84� F
850 F
850 F
84� F
83� F


Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston


I ramVINSI'losw I


U.S. CITIES I


TUI |TDIJ.1


I


I


I


I


. . .. ........


o,


f INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS





MONDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2009


The stories behind the news


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ofitmiainan fiia ercywihdoiae tePnligea
Th FNM bycotratplege todeiver'goernentin th sushine
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