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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01402
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: September 24, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01402

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The


Tribune


5ATODWAI4
BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009


PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Gr


IN TOWS TIBUN


o0a1I


Trav


Hollywood


star relives


son's death


Bahamian lawyer


is indicted over


money laundering


allegations

Sidney Cambridge charged in
US after FBI 'sting' operation
AN attorney and partner with a top Bahamian law
firm, Callender's & Co, was yesterday indicted by the US
federal authorities over allegations that he knowingly
helped launder hundreds of thousands of dollars in pro-
ceeds from a purported investment fraud.
Sidney Cambridge, a senior Progressive Liberal Party
(PLP) member who has served as its vice-chairman, was
charged following a Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
"sting" operation, involving undercover agents posing as
persons who wanted to launder funds from a fictitious
European-based financial fraud.
See Tribune Business for full story
A copy of the indictment obtained by The Tribune
alleged: "On or about November 23, 2007, at Nassau,
Bahamas, defendant Cambridge was told by an undercover
agent that the funds came from a 'Ponzi' scheme.
"After acknowledging his understanding of the pur-
ported source of the funds, defendant Cambridge instruct-
ed undercover agents how to launder the proceeds in the
Bahamas."
SEE page ten


By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
HOLLYWOOD superstar
John Travolta yesterday
recalled the efforts that he
and others made to save the
life of his 16-year-old son Jett
after he suffered a seizure.
Mr Travolta was the only
witness to take the stand yes-
terday as the case against for-
mer PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former
ambulance driver Tarino
Lightbourne continued in the
Supreme Court. The pair are
accused of attempting to
extort $25 million from him.
The grieving actor, who


wore a black suit and grey tie,
was escorted into the court-
room by a security detail
shortly after 10am yesterday.
His wife Kelly Preston sat in
the public gallery.
Appearing somber and
composed, Mr Travolta testi-
fied that on December 29,
2008, he and his wife, with
their son Jett and daughter
Ella, eight, travelled to
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Accompanying them on the
family trip were four nannies,
he said. Mr Travolta told the
court his family stayed at a
condo at the Old Bahama
Bay resort.
SEE page nine


3a-00


S/Kris Ingaham | US ACTOR John Travolta and wife Kelly Preston
I leave the court building.

UK judge: Cases from countries like

Bahamas taking up too much time
By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
A LEADING UK judge claims cases from other countries such
as The Bahamas are taking up too much British time and resources,
and he would like to see the burden reduced.
Referring to the caseload of the Judicial Committee of the Privy
Council, Lord Nicholas Phillip's comments have been seen by
some as a sign that Britain may soon make moves to shake off the
colonial hangover the institution represents, leaving countries like
the Bahamas to find or create another final court of appeal.
Speaking to the Financial Times newspaper, Lord Phillips, Pres-
SEE page ten


SAC principal

robbed by thug
By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
POLICE are searching for
the thug who robbed a high
school principal as she tried
to enter her home in the east-
ern area of New Providence.
The victim - St
Augustine's College Principal
Sonia Knowles - arrived at
her home in the Eastern
Estates subdivision at around
10pm on Tuesday when a
man accosted her and
demanded cash.
Police said he made off
with the victim's handbag,
which contained cash and per-
sonal effects, before fleeing
the area in a nearby vehicle -
believed to be a Honda.
Investigators are still trying
to determine whether the
thief targeted his victim or
simply struck when he saw an
opportunity.
Last night police said they
did not have a full description
of the attacker, who is said to
be a slim built, dark-skinned
male.
According to police, Ms
Knowles was not seriously
harmed during the robbery.
The incident occurred
SEE page 11


Tibtso


VINCENT Lloyd Fergu-
son (pictured) died at his
home yesterday morning
after an illness with prostate
cancer.
The former teacher/admin-
istrator, sporting icon and
sports administrator extraor-
dinaire, had celebrated his
71st birthday on August 25th.
Winston "Tappy" Davis,
who had a long affiliation
with the deceased, broke
down when he was asked to
describe his former friend and
team-mate. "It's so sad that
he had to leave us," said
Davis, who tried to contain
himself. "Vince was a straight
forward intelligent, honest
and hard working individual.
"He believed in everything
he was into and he cared a
whole lot about it. I never
knew that people that had the
kind of passion and commit-
ment in what they did the way
Vince did."
* SEE SPORTS
FOR FULL STORY


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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGEW3


TEACHERS' PROTEST

C I Gibson

students

miss classes

for third day
By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
STUDENTS at C I Gibson
High missed out on lessons for
the third day yesterday as
teachers continued their protest
over inadequate working con-
ditions at the school.
The entire teaching body of
around 80 teachers who started
their "sit-in" on Monday said
they will not return to work
until there are enough desks
and chairs for all students, and
a science teacher and vice-prin-
cipal are in place.
Bahamas Union of Teachers
(BUT) president Belinda Wil-
son said students at the senior
high school in Marathon
Estates are forced to stand or
sit on desks during lessons
because there is not enough fur-
niture to accommodate every-
one in a class. The teachers are
also angry that the vice-princi-
pal position has not been filled
since the previous vice-principal
resigned two weeks ago.
Security is another major
issue at the high school as 11
knives and an ice-pick have
been found on the property this
term. Since the industrial action
began, four security officers and
three teachers have been post-
ed at C I Gibson, one of three
public schools disrupted by
industrial action this week.
The "sit-ins" started at Uriah
McPhee Primary School on
Kemp Road on Friday as teach-
ers refused to work until air-
conditioning was restored on
the second and third floors of
the school building.
Work was done over the
weekend to repair the air-con-
ditioning and students returned
to their classes at around 11am
on Monday. Staff at Anatol
Rodgers High School in Faith
Avenue staged a two-day "sit-
in" on Monday and Tuesday
over inadequate staffing and
furniture provisions.
They resumed teaching yes-
terday after receiving furniture
and a new English language
teacher. A second English lan-
guage teacher is expected to
arrive this morning.
Minister of Education Carl
Bethel failed to return The Tri-
bune's calls yesterday to explain
why his department did not
ensure schools were sufficient-
ly staffed and furnished at the
start of the new school year.
Mrs Wilson has criticised the
ministry for being reactionary,
rather than proactive in its
work, and she is calling on par-
ents to speak out for the good
of their children's education.
The BUT president said: "It
is really disheartening that one
month into the school year we
are scrambling for teachers,
supplies, security officers, desks
and chairs.



o In brief


Inquests into

police related

shooting deaths
THREE police related
shooting deaths will be exam-
ined in three separate
inquests set to take place in
the Coroner's Court over the
next two weeks. On Septem-
ber 25, an inquest into the
death of Dario McKenzie will
begin, followed by an inquiry
into the death of Lincoln Met-
telus on September 28 and
Drexel Rolle on October 5.
Also set to be begin at the
Coroner's Court today is an
inquest into the death of
Trevor Ferguson stemming
from a traffic collision in
Andros. Meanwhile, on Octo-
ber 29 and 30, an inquest will
be held into the death of
Peter McWeeney, brother of
former Attorney General
Sean McWeeney, who died in
October 2003.
The Coroner's Court
recently recorded a verdict of
"death by accident" in the
case of the shooting of securi-
ty guard Troy Russell in 2003.
Mr Russell, who worked at


the Shell Service Station
opposite Saunders Beach on
West Bay Street, had been
shot by the manager of the
station, Marcelles Saunders,
during a robbery. Mr Saun-
ders said he mistook Mr Rus-
sell for a burglar when he saw
him running towards him
from the direction of the
cashier's cage on December
24, 2003. Jurors delivered
their verdict on August 12,
2009.


MURDER: RANDY WILLIAMS, 35


Police quiz suspect over Seagrape



Shopping Centre stabbing death


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
A SUSPECT is being ques-
tioned by police in connection
with the murder of 35-year-old
Randy Williams at the Sea-
grape Shopping Centre on
Prince Charles Drive on Tues-
day evening.
Mr Williams, of Gladstone
Road, was stabbed several
times when an argument with
another man escalated into vio-
lence at around 5pm.
He was rushed to the
Princess Margaret Hospital and
died half an hour later, accord-
ing to police sources.
Supt Leon Bethel, officer in-
charge of the homicide depart-
ment in the Criminal Investi-
gation Unit, said he expects the
suspect will be charged in court
before the end of the week.
Police reported that Mr
Williams and another man were
in the shopping centre car park,
near the entrance of Body


By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
SENATOR Jerome Fitzger-
ald will join the ranks of candi-
dates making a bid for the
deputy leadership of the PLP
when he officially launches his
campaign tonight at the Sun
And resort.
Citing his extensive business
background and experience
around the world, Mr Fitzger-
ald said that he hopes to be able
to assist PLP leader Perry
Christie in implementing his
vision for the Bahamas.
"I am running for deputy
leader and the role that I see
for the deputy leader is to assist
the leader, and of course with
myself having some input in his
decision-making, but at the end
of the day it is his vision. The
other qualities I intend to bring
to the table is that I think I have
a close affinity and relationship
to the young generation, and it
is obvious to me that the party
has a void that needs to be
filled in ensuring that we have a
message that is relevant to the
younger generation. And in
that regard I think that they will
be looking to see whether or
not the PLP is really willing to
embrace the sort of change that
they demand at this time," Mr
Fitzgerald said.
Persons wanting to be a part
of the candidate's launch can
either join the senator at the
Sun And resort at 7pm tonight,
or watch it live on his website.
With profile pictures of him-
self and his family, Mr Fitzger-


-5~"~


Zone Fitness gym, when they
started to argue.
"The argument resulted in a
fight between the two men,"
Supt Bethel said. "One of the
men produced a weapon and
stabbed the other. He was
stabbed a number of times
about the body, and we are
waiting for the pathologist's
report to tell us exactly how
many times he was stabbed.
"A sharp-pointed object was
used but we are not sure yet
what it was. The victim was tak-
en to hospital and pronounced
dead shortly after."
Mr Williams is the country's
63rd murder victim this year.
His murder was the third in
New Providence in just three
days. Rashad Morris, 21, a man-
ager at Burger King on Freder-
ick Street, and former manager
of Burger King on Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway, was
beaten and stabbed to death
outside the Tonique Williams-
Darling Highway restaurant at


ald's webs: i , i.,,, ..Ii ,
endorsement,, > In "i l . --
ful business ..ii. , ., N -
sauGuardiarx I'liili. I .iiIo -
ny Ferguson and Philip Kemp.
Mr Ferguson's endorsement
reads: "I think the country is
looking for young visionary
leadership and I think Jerome,
as a family man, as a business-
man and as true friend, Jerome
can add a lot of value. This is
what the county needs at this
particular time."
Mr Kemp's reads: "One of
the things we lack today are
persons who have a vision of
where this country should go.
Jerome has always impressed
me with his vision for the coun-
try."

Attorney
An attorney by profession,
Mr Fitzgerald is the chairman
and a director of RND Hold-
ings Limited, a diversified com-
pany he co-founded in 1993
with several subsidiaries.
Senator Fitzgerald is also a
director of A Scott Fitzgerald
Insurance Brokers and Agents,


around 1.30am on Sunday.
Burger King has put up a
$10,000 reward for any infor-
mation which could lead to the
arrest or conviction of his killer.

Soaring
Just hours later on Sunday,
Bahamasair pilot Lionel Lewis
McQueen, 29, was shot dead at
his home in Golden Palm
Estates, near the Kennedy Sub-
division. A police investigation
into the suspicious deaths of
four people killed in a house
fire last Thursday morning
could lead to the reclassifica-
tion of those deaths as homi-
cides and send the murder
count soaring to 67 this year.
That would amount to ten
more homicides this year than
the 57 recorded at the same
time last year.
Supt Bethel is appealing to
the public to come forward with
any information which could
help solve all of the above


an insurance firm started by his
mother over 20 years ago.
Additionally, he holds direc-
torships on the boards of three
public companies namely RND
Holdings Limited, Bahamas
Waste Limited, Freeport Con-
crete Company Limited and the
privately held Global United
Limited.


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crimes. "We have lots of assis-
tance from members of the
public and we do appreciate
that, but we do believe that
with more assistance from the
public we will see a better rate
of solution and we would see a
reduction in the number of


murders," he said. Anyone with
information should call 911 or
919 urgently, or call Crime
Stoppers anonymously on 328-
TIPS (8477). Calls to Crime
Stoppers are answered in the
United States and ensure total
anonymity.


L LOCATIONS


ALL LOCATIONS!!I


S E PR ]'I 14XRI) 1). I :


380-FLIX
UssVo -ctwmad tW rc-srvo thzkqts vW 380 'J641)or viM us at
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ITDISCS TRE NTIS PAG LOG N0TO WW.TIBUE22CO0


Senalop Jepome Fitzgepald in


hid fop PLP deputy leadepship


M m-, I I i i F A W nP I i I d F M "4M


Im


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 4, THURSDAYSEPTEMTBRT2ST4 200 TDTOHE TRIBU


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, cI tiinn') 322-1986
Ad c,.i iing Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


United Nations hears its detractors


WE WERE surprised yesterday morning
after the rambling 90-minute speech to the
UN of Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi to
hear news commentators wonder out loud if
people like Kadafi and Iran's President
Ahmadinejad should be allowed into the
United States.
This is what we would have expected to
hear - and did hear- from the protesters in
the streets, but were surprised that news
commentators did not seem to know that
the United Nations on First Street in Man-
hattan, New York, is located on interna-
tional - and not American - territory.
Of course, the United States could stop
such persons landing at New York's airports,
but if they were denied landing rights and
free passage to the international area, the
UN would have to be removed from the
U.S. However, there is prestige involved in
having this international body in its present
location. It is a distinction that we doubt
New York would give up lightly.
Wrapped in his flowing coffee-coloured
robes, Kadafi's disjointed speech touched
on every topic - including the jet lag from
which he was suffering to get to New York.
He highlighted the sins of the world, side-
stepping his own oppressive human rights
atrocities. He was highly critical of the Secu-
rity Council, which to him was elitist with a
handful of superpowers - US, Britain,
France, Russia and China -controlling the
world.
He complained of the limits placed on
visitors like himself in travelling around New
York, likening it to being imprisoned at
Guantanamo Bay. We wonder what free-
dom others from the outside world would
have in Tripoli if the tables were turned. Of
course, Kadafi was in New York to point
out the moat in his brother's eye, not to
examine his own - and so there wasn't
even a whisper about the aircraft blown up
by a Libyan terrorist over Lockerbie, Scot-
land - a subject so much in the news in
recent weeks.
We must admit that in the early days we
were not a great fan of the UN, dismissing it
as a debating society that spent too much
money, often unwisely.
However, as a graduate student of
Columbia University's Journalism School
in the late fifties we were assigned to the
Associated Press desk at the UN. On Feb-
ruary 8, 1958 we saw the true worth of the
UN. This was during the height of the Alger-
ian-Tunisian war of independence from
France. Early that morning French aircraft
from Algeria bombed the Tunisian border
village of Sakhiet Sidi Youssef. It was as


though the bomb had been dropped in the
centre of the UN. Delegates scattered to
find their counterparts from around the
world. They huddled in deep negotiations.
They desperately tried to extinguish the
Mediterranean fire. This was the advantage
of heads of the world's nations being togeth-
er under one roof and being able to meet
together quickly to solve world problems.
As for Iran's Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
with his downtrodden look and apologetic
frame, he believes that the Holocaust is a lie
created by the West to justify the existence
of Israel.
He too was in New York to bring his
message of "peace" to the UN, while back in
Teheran, his government is forging ahead
with its controversial nuclear programme,
ostensibly to protect itself from Israel.
Ahmadinejad was born 11 years after the
second world war, and so has no first hand
knowledge of the events of those times.
But for those who lived during the war
years and still have vivid memories of those
days, Ahmadinejad can be dismissed as an
hallucinating nut case.
We probably remember more than the
average Bahamian, because we grew up in a
newspaper office where local and world news
daily swirled.
We shall never forget our first sight of
death. In The Tribune that particular morn-
ing was Life magazine's first edition showing
bodies tumbling out of the ovens of
Auschwitz.
We were struck dumb in disbelief. Men
with sunken eyes, open mouths and thin
skin pulled over skeleton frames thrown one
on top of the other at all angles. Trenches
filled with naked skeletons - horror upon
horror upon horror. As a child we could not
believe that men could stoop to such bes-
tiality.
There is a photograph that has haunted us
all our life. It is a picture of sad faced Jews
lined up to be loaded into trains for the gas
chambers. In front there is a little boy, no
more than six years old, with the sadness of
the world in his eyes, a cloth cap is on his
head.
He is clinging to his mother's hand. Help-
less, hopeless, lost. How could any human
being treat a small, innocent child like this.
The Nazis were a special breed - they
were less than human. Whatever boat they
shipped out on for Hades, we hope that it is
the Devil who is now stoking the flames
under them.
As for President Ahamdinejad and those
who think like him, we hope that the world
will be spared their pathetic ignorance.


Which study said



Arawak Cay was the



place for a port?
EDITOR, The Tribune. __M. the government if everything


Arawak Cay port - which
consultant supported using
the Cay for a Port?
I listened to the live broad-
cast from the FNM Headquar-
ters in August and was struck
by the responses and the arro-
gance of the tone of the voice of
the various participants.
Why can't our politicians
take the licks?
We are now seeing this atti-
tude in the US - the most
recent one being that of Bar-
ney Franks when he held a
community meeting on the
Health Care proposals - his
arrogance was absolutely unac-
ceptable when one considers he
is there in that position simply
because the people voted him
in.
Getting back to the issue of
this letter - Minister of State
Laing said on this broadcast as
a response to a fax read by


-Ui
Wendall Jones that considera-
tion of the pluses for Arawak
Cay were excluded in one of
the Studies.
The Minister knows full well
as we have been there many
times that the last Study, so-
called the Ecory's Study, was
specifically for the then "chosen
site" subject to their study
results. It is my understanding
that there was no intent to
study any alternative as that
had already been completed by
Coastal International.
The Minister seems not to
understand that even the 19-
proposed shareholders of the
now Arawak Cay proposal paid
50 per cent of the Ecory's
Study cost so we surely have to
accept they were on board with


came out favourably they
would support the location at
Clifton, or am I crazy?
For the Minister to say that
Arawak Cay was excluded is
very irresponsible and, in my
opinion a deliberate attempt to
confuse.
Which study said Arawak
was the place, Minister?
Can The Tribune collect all
the studies made on the port
proposal over the years from
Checci forward and publish the
conclusion section so we Joe
Public can understand which
location was supported and
which certainly were not - The
Tribune will do the country and
us a considerable favour by
doing this....we wait.


ABRAHAM MOSS
Nassau,
August, 2009.


Too much made from Congressman Wilson's comment


EDITOR, The Tribune.

Far too much has been made from the outcry
of one Congressman Wilson during the recent
speech of President Obama at the joint session of
the US House.
There is accepted and appropriate "parlia-
mentary language" although some might say the
use of the words "that's a lie" might not be dis-
creet enough the facts say it all - in an open
democracy no man is above scrutiny and cer-
tainly no president is or no prime minister
because neither are infallible and make all kinds
of mistakes.
Certainly it is interesting that Cable Channels
like MSNBC have made a big issue over Repre-
sentative Wilson's comment but in true reality
when a speaker misquotes or says something to
cause praise (applause) are not both actions sim-
ilar and just part of the democratic process and
we should not be so thinned skinned?
Now the incredible rather stupid statement of
an ex-US President Jimmy Carter - I seriously
suggest that it would be best for the good gen-
tleman to remain on his peanut farm and stay qui-
et as his comment does not merit comment as
President Obama was elected by whites-blacks-
latinos and everyone else.


Editor, we have this prevailing thought
amongst many who sit in parliament, be it the
House of Assembly or the Senate, that when
certain people speak the "world" has to stop.
All representatives are elected, except in our
case the Senate, and therefore their colleagues
have within accepted form (regrettably it seems
the current speaker is restricting this privilege
and limiting the verbage that can be used) can say
so long established exclamations as "shame" to
indicate their personal unacceptance of a state-
ment. In this day where MPs are unable to ad-lib,
speak without written speeches, there is no excuse
for inaccurate statements. Mr Speaker, please
note this is not permitted.
Politicians have to understand that their free
spending - irresponsible policies and lacking of
definitive economic policy is what is causing the
massive grass-root protests. I suggest the man
in the street has better housekeeping qualifica-
tions than most politicians and they recognize
you can't continue to spend-spend and spend
irrationally.

W THOMPSON
Nassau,
September 16, 2009.


What is the status of COB's 'state-of-the-art' theatre?


EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am writing to ask about
the status of the College of the
Bahamas' fabulous, new, "state
of the art" publicly funded the-
atre that opened with much
fanfare at the earlier part of the
year and, as far as I know (and
I stand to be corrected), has not
been used for a public event
since.
At the inaugural event -
the Colour of Harmony - it
was stated that the theatre had
been built at much expense for
the use of the country's artists
and it was hoped that it would
be constantly in use.
It is indeed a magnificent
theatre and I applaud whom-
soever is responsible for accom-
plishing such a feat - but I
would like to find out what
exactly is the criteria for use of
the theatre, and whether the
theatre is going to remain, as


do many of our Bahamian "liv-
ing parlours", covered in plastic
for "show only" for only cer-
tain "exclusive" events, or is it
intended to be actually filled
with cultural enthusiasts anx-
ious to drink from the well of
Bahamian creativity and tal-
ent? These thoughts came to
mind as the time rapidly
approaches for one of the most
exciting dramatic events in the
country - the Shakespeare in
Paradise Festival due to take
place from October 5-12 which,
through the rich talent of dedi-
cated and hard working
Bahamian artists, is poised to
present first class dramatic tal-
ent to the people of The
Bahamas and the world.
Imagine what such a festi-
val can do to fill the literary
starved minds of our commu-
nity? Imagine how such an
event, if properly nourished,
can grow into a spectacle that


will not only offer our commu-
nity avenues to express their
creativity and talent on the
stage, but will inspire more per-
sons to write plays and books,
provide the original music for
dramatic events, design stage
scenery and costumes, learn
how to work the lights and
sound stage, exercise their pro-
motional and marketing skills
......the possibilities are endless.
I venture to speculate that most
of the work being done for this
Festival is a "labour of love"
by the participants and I
applaud any entity who is offer-
ing them much needed spon-
sorship. So I wish to ask the
question: "Why isn't the COB
Theatre listed as one of the
venues on the 'Shakespeare in
Paradise' timetable?"

PAM BURNSIDE
Nassau,
September 23, 2009


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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


g










in l , i Policeman's death: Murder trial resumes


SWINE flu vaccinations will
be made available in the
Bahamas from the World
Health Organisation's global
supply, or if government makes
a direct request to suppliers and
manufacturers in the United
States.
The vaccinations to protect
individuals from serious illness
or death resulting from the
highly infectious HIN1 influen-
za were approved by the Unit-
ed States government Food and
Drug Administration last week.
Around half of the US pop-
ulation, that is 160 million
Americans are expected to
receive the inoculations from
mid-October. At risk groups
will take priority for the inocu-
lations, including pregnant
women, healthcare workers,
children and young adults, as
well as the chronically ill in the
US. People caring for infants
will also receive priority.
Dr Minnis said healthcare
workers would take priority in
the Bahamas as they are most
at risk of infection, and the
Ministry of Health is taking a
pro-active approach by work-
ing with schools to prepare chil-
dren and staff for the possibili-
ty of an outbreak in the upcom-
ing flu season.
The Minister said supplies
will be ordered through the
World Health Organisation
(WHO) when necessary, as the
WHO retains a supply of vac-
cinations for developing coun-
tries around the world.
He added: "We will watch
World Health Organisation
reports and communicate with
them and purchase the vacci-


nations as necessary. We will
not be left out in the cold."
Local pharmaceutical com-
panies in the Bahamas which
have tried to order the vacci-
nations have been told by sup-
pliers and manufacturers they
cannot purchase the live vacci-
nations without a special
request from the Bahamas gov-
ernment as the new inocula-
tions are in limited supply.
Nassau Agencies Barbara
Donathan-Henderson said:
"At least one doctor has been
harassing us to bring it in, but
the only way we can do that is if
it was being sold to government
in a government purchase
order, and even then they may
not order it through us. "If we
had the option we would have
brought it in so people would
be able to take it if they wanted
to, but it is up to the govern-
ment to make that decision."
Lowe's Wholesale Pharma-
ceutical has also failed to bring
in the inoculations. Sales Man-
ager Carrol Sands said: "I have
not had any confirmation as to
when we will be getting any as
yet. "I have been communicat-
ing with companies that we deal
with, and they have told me
their first priority is providing it
to institutions in the US."
A representative from Com-
monwealth Drugs and Medical
Supplies told The Tribune: "It is
all being sold directly to gov-
ernment and we have had no
indication from the government
as to whether or not they would
want us to bring in any."
There have been at least 29
confirmed cases of swine flu in
the Bahamas this year, and
although the virus has a high
infection rate, Dr Minnis said it
is far less deathly than regular
flu as about 40,000 people in
the United States die as a result
of the regular flu every year,
while just 600 people have died
from the H1N1 virus since it
became apparent earlier this
year.


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - The trial of
two men accused of murdering
a policeman resumed in the
Supreme Court on Tuesday.
Edwin Bauld Jr and Wilfred
McPhee Jr are accused of the
murder, kidnapping and rob-
bery of Police Corporal Eddi-
son Bain in October 2007.
Acting Justice Jethro Miller
is presiding over the trial, which
was interrupted briefly when
Bauld made a loud outburst in
the courtroom as a prosecution
witness was giving testimony in
the witness box.
Justice Miller advised
Bauld's attorney that the out-
burst was not acceptable and
initiated a five minute break.
Bauld was later escorted from
the courtroom by two police
officers to give him time to cool
off. The decomposed body of
Corporal Eddison Bain was dis-
covered on October 22, 2007,
in a ditch near the Casuarina
Bridge. Bain's hands and feet
were bound and a large stone
was on his head. The body was
covered with tree shrubs and
stones in a four-foot deep ditch.
K Brian Hanna represents
Bauld and Mario Gray repre-
sents McPhee. It is alleged that
the accused men kidnapped
Bain, robbed him of his ATM
bank card and withdrew money
from his account. On Monday,
the prosecution produced a
video that showed one of the
accused men withdrawing mon-
ey using Bain's ATM card.
Hospital pathologist Dr Cor-
nelius Kachali gave evidence in
the trial on Tuesday.
Dr Kachali, who performed
an autopsy on Corporal Bain,
said the cause of death was a
blunt force trauma to the head.
He said that the skull was
penetrated as a result of the
blunt force. He added that Bain
was alive when he sustained the
injury because there was a
swelling of the brain which can
only occur if a person is alive at
the time.
Lawyer Brian Hanna asked if
Bain could have survived his
injuries if he had been taken to
hospital. Dr Kachali said that
Bain's chances of survival were
"very slim." "Statistically sur-
vival is not good, he would have
lived only for two minutes after
sustaining injuries," he said.


Lawyer Mario Gray asked
Dr Kachali if Bain, while
bound, could have sustained
the injury himself by falling and
hitting his head. Dr Kachali said
that it was impossible because
the deceased was found face up
in the ditch with a huge stone
on his head.
Also giving evidence was
Gahnise Campbell, the girl-
friend of Edwin Bauld Jr.
Ms Campbell told the court


that she was Bauld's girlfriend
during 2007. She said that she
and Bauld had been dating for
six months. She said she had
known Wilfred McPhee Jr all
her life as he was her cousin
and they grew up in the same
neighbourhood.
Ms Campbell said a week
before October 20 she went for
a ride with Edwin and Eddison.
She said Eddison was Edwin's
cousin. She said Edwin and


Eddison went into a liquor
store for two Guinness. They
then went to Commonwealth
Bank because she wanted to
check her account.
"I gave Edwin my ATM card
to check if the money he had
put on the card was on my
account," she said. Ms Camp-
bell said they went to Bell
Channel Resort.
She was given $100 and went
to pay for a room for the night.


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 5


-0. Dow


THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 6, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


LCLNWI


PUBLIC Works and
Transport Minister
Neko Grant gives the
opening remarks at
the launch of a two-
day workshop for
staff of the Road
Traffic Department on
Tuesday. Road Traffic
Controller Philip
Turner is pictured in
the background.


Road Tafic eprten hls

cstmer srvic wors h op


BY KATHRYN CAMPBELL
THE Road Traffic Depart-
ment has a vital role to play in
providing services and con-
tributing to the economic and
social development of the
Bahamas, Public Works and
Transport Minister Neko
Grant said. "Each staff mem-
ber therefore has the respon-
sibility of ensuring that these
services are provided to the
satisfaction of customers."
Mr Grant officially opened
the first of a two-day work-
shop for staff of the Road
Traffic Department on Tues-
day at Workers House. The
theme for the workshop is
"Forward in Growth -
Together for Excellence."
One hundred staff members
representing various units in
the Department participated
in the workshop designed to
enhance customer service
skills. The workshop is in
keeping with the governmen-
t's service improvement pro-
gramme that aims to formu-
late strategies for internal and
external service improvement.
The programme was imple-
mented in six key service
delivery agencies within the
public service. Speakers for
both days included Philip
Turner, Controller of Depart-
ment of Road Traffic, who
spoke on the topic "The Way
Forward for the Road Traffic
Department"; Elma Gar-
raway, Permanent Secretary
in the Ministry of Education,
on "Dress Code and Work
Ethics", and Rev James Pala-
cious on the topic "Setting
Standards for Excellence."
"Excellence in service
delivery is challenging under
normal circumstances. How-
ever, it presents an even
greater challenge in today's
society from a general per-
spective in both the public
and private sectors," Minister
Grant said. "Globalisation has
had a significant impact on
customers' expectations. We
now see an increasing demand
by customers for better ser-
vice in a work environment
that reflects current economic
circumstances where more
efficiency in the use of
resources is required."


BY AVA TURNQUEST
USING an old teacher's
cottage given by the Ministry
of Works and Ministry of
Education, the newly formed
Rotary Club Cat Island plans
to create a state-of-the-art
community resource centre
and library.
With an estimated com-
pletion date of September
2010, the library is a much
needed resource on the island
as the club hopes it will bring
a fresh and exciting challenge
for the youth.
The club, currently
totalling 21 members and
directors, is the first and only
Rotary Club on Cat Island.
President-elect Gwendolyn
Rolle, former member of the
Rotary Club of Lucaya
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
says the club began meeting
in November 2008 with a
group of professionals at the
island's resource centre.
"Rotary brings a new kind
of hope to the community,"
said Ms Rolle, "the youth and
the elderly at large."
The club believes that the
library is most needed, bring-
ing a fresh and exciting chal-
lenge for the youth of Cat
Island.
The library, located in
Bennett's Harbour, will be the
club's maiden civic project
since its official installation
and charter to the global asso-
ciation June 13, 2009.
"Ready students need a
safe and informative environ-
ment in order to complete
school projects, do research,
and be in touch with the
world in a controlled envi-
ronment," said Ms Rolle.

HISTORY
The world's first service
club, the Rotary Club of
Chicago, was formed in 1905
by Paul Harris, an attorney
who wished to capture in a
professional club the same
friendly spirit he had felt in
the small towns of his youth.
Now Rotary International
is a global network of volun-
teers, enhancing their com-
munities and promoting inter-
national goodwill through


"Rotary brings a
new kind of hope
to the community,
the youth and the
elderly at large."


Gwendolyn Rolle

club projects, scholarships and
grants for development and
humanitarian projects.
Rotary Club of Cat Island is
part of Rotary District 7020
comprising 10 countries and
16 islands in the Caribbean,
being one of the 75 clubs in
the District with over 2400
Rotarians, all men and
women with the finest cre-
dentials.
Area District Governor
Felix Stubbs spoke to the
newly installed club, encour-
aging them to utilise tools and
opportunities the organisation
presents. "My personal grat-
itude and appreciation to the
business and professional
community of Cat Island for
embracing Rotary whole-
heartedly and to the Rotary
Club of South East Nassau
for the sponsorship and duly
represented by the Club Pres-
ident David Moncur, Presi-
dent-elect Anna deGregory
and other members of that
Club.
"This is your opportunity
to exploit the immense pos-
sibilities for your communi-
ty," Mr. Stubbs said. "The
onus is on you to create
friendship and fellowship, to
invite the best amongst your
vocations to join hands with
you, to do good so as to give
back, and to be recognized in
the world as an important seg-
ment of the world communi-
ty."
DONATIONS

The Rotary Club of Cat
Island has received numerous
donations from both the pub-
lic and private sectors. The
government, through the
Ministry of Works and Min-
istry of Education, has donat-


ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


CAT ISLAND: Rotary Club proposal



Plans for state-of-the-art



resource centre, library


ed the cottage with supplies
and books and has also com-
mitted to provide a librarian
upon its completion.
The club has set up a reg-
istry for material at Kelly's
Lumber Yard and Marathon
Mall location. To access this
registry, interested persons
should contact Mr. Robert
Plank. The public can pur-
chase discounted items on the
"Rotary Club of Cat Island
Material for Library List" that
Kelly's will ship to Cat Island
at the start of the project. Pri-
vate companies that have also
provided outstanding support
to this project have been Cat
Island Air, The Christie
Estate, Orange Creek Car
Rental, Neighbourhood Food
Store and many more.
Local contractors on the
island have also donated their
time, which has allowed the
club to save on labour costs.
Mr Allworth Rolle drew the
renovation plans and Mr.
Lewis Sweeting has commit-
ted to all the electrical wiring.
"I would really like to
acknowledge all members of
the community and the club
that has donated their time
and funds," said Ms Rolle,
"working tirelessly to see this
project brought to reality.
COOK-OUT

The club will host its first
cook-out from noon to 6 pm
on Saturday, October 3, on
the grounds of the library in
Bennett's Harbour. Joining
them will be representatives
from the various Rotary fam-
ilies in the Bahamas as they
kick off the first phase of the
renovation project.
"This will be a day of fun,
with work as well as play,"
said Ms Rolle. "There will be
a lot of local goodies on sale
and we are eager to share this
experience with the commu-
nity and our visiting clubs."
In addition to their sched-
uled civic duties, the club also
plans to renovate local parks
and play areas and raise funds
for a multi-purpose sport
facility for the community.
"I have great faith in your
brand new club and its
promising membership," said
Mr Stubbs. "I truly believe
that the club will make a
strong statement that indeed a
new entrant is no less versatile
and vibrant than a veteran in
the world of service and fel-
lowship."
Donations can also be sent
to The Rotary, Arthur's Town
Post Office, Cat Island. The
club meets every Thursday at
7pm at The Boggie Pond
Restaurant in Arthur's Town.
All visiting Rotarians are wel-
come.


The Bahamas Utilities Co-operative
Credit Union Limited

NOTICE OF SPECIAL
GENERAL MEETING

A Special General Meeting of
the Bahamas Utilities Co-operative
Credit Union Limited
will be held on
Friday, October 2nd, 2009
at
6:00 p.m.
in
The Patrick A. Bain Training Room
at
The Bahamas Co-operative League Building
Russell Road, Oakes Field

PURPOSE OF THE MEETING
The purpose of the meeting is to seek approval
from the membership for a merger with National
Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited. Note
that the Annual General Meeting held May 28th,
2009, authorized the Board of Directors to seek
alliance with a larger credit union.

Secretary: Dexter Cartwright


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Minister of Foreign Affairs to address the United Nations


DPM Symonette

accompanied
by Ministers

Earl Deveaux,

Dion Foulkes
BY LINDSAY
THOMPSON
DEPUTY Prime Minister
and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette left
the country yesterday to
address the 64th Session of
the United Nations General
Assembly in New York on a
number of issues relevant to
the Bahamas.
He will also sign a Tax
Information Exchange
Agreement (TIEA) with the
Republic of San Marino, in
keeping with standards set
out by the Organisation for
Economic and Cooperation
and Development (OECD).
Mr Symonette, along with
other CARICOM leaders
will address the session
tomorrow on the vulnera-
bility of Small Island Devel-
oping States (SIDS), and
devise ways for a more
cohesive union. He is being
accompanied by Minister of
the Environment Earl
Deveaux and Senator Dion
Foulkes, Minister of Labour.
Issues
Main issues for the session
are the Millennium Devel-
opment Goals; the world
financial and economic crisis
and its impact on develop-
ment; climate change; disar-
mament; United Nations
reform; review of the peace-
building commission and the
Human Rights Council.
Yesterday, United States
President Barack Obama
gave his first speech to the


UN General Assembly. In
a speech that was described
as "audacious" by some
observers, he said his coun-
try is committed to "a new
chapter of international
cooperation."
"Those who used to chas-
tise America for acting
alone in the world cannot
now stand by and wait for


ALYMINIVM


I;


America to solve the world's
problems alone," President
Obama said. The UN, head-
quartered in New York is
an international organisa-
tion founded in 1945, after
World War II. The 192
member-states have com-
mitted to maintaining inter-
national peace and security,
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE







PAGELOCAL 8,WS THURSDAYISEPTEMBER24,2009THET B


LOOKING AT VIOLENCE AND MARRIAGE



The five interesting lessons I learned at a


Bahamas Christian Consortium meeting


C615LINX

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Saturday September 26, 2009 @ 6:00 p.m.
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BY NOELLE NICOLLS


WITH the
ongoing
debate
about the
proposed amendment to the
Sexual Offences and Domestic
Violence Act of 1991, I
became very curious about the
perspectives of the Bahamas
Christian Council. I decided
to attend a meeting, but when
I arrived the group gathered
was actually a rogue Christ-
ian group, known as the


If there is no violence in
the lead up to rape then no
violent act occurred.
The BCC is very concerned
about a complete "multi-gen-
erational breakdown" in soci-
ety if the government is
allowed to make men answer-
able to the law for raping their
wives. Spiritual icon of the
movement Myles Munroe
believes the law "could" be or
"perhaps should" be amended
only if the activities leading
up to the "sexual intercourse"
are abusive, violent and force-
ful. So the sexually violent act
of rape itself is not sufficient to
warrant the government get-
ting into the marriage bed.
The lead up to "sexual inter-
course" also has to be violent.
Lesbian feminists are
trying to destroy
marriage.
The valid concern of the
BCC is there are many
"malignant, evil, spiteful,
whoremonger" women who
are itching for the opportuni-
ty to get back at their hus-
bands "because of some
unfortunate circumstance"
and married men in unhealthy
violent relationships need to
be protected by the church. If
the feminists succeed in pass-
ing this amendment it will
open the gates of hell for all
homosexuals to wield politi-
cal power in the Bahamas.
After the meeting I heard
people asking the question
on whose behalf does Rev-
erend Patrick Paul speak.


'The BCC seems
to be a rogue
organisation, or
revolutionary,
depending on
one's perspective,
run by a few
ministers in New
Providence. They
speak for them-
selves. I realized
they are so
forward
thinking that
normal people
cannot keep up
with their logic.'

He speaks for the Bahamas
Christian Council, as their
President, not for the
Bahamas Christian Consor-
tium (BCC).
Despite their names, nei-
ther organisation represents
Catholics, Methodists, and
Seventh-Day Adventists, who
all support the amendment.
The Bahamas Christian
Council is a public front pri-
marily representing Baptist
and Church of God members.
The BCC seems to be a
rogue organisation, or revo-
lutionary, depending on one's
perspective, run by a few min-
isters in New Providence.
They speak for themselves.
I realized they are so for-
ward thinking that normal
people cannot keep up with
their logic.
* Noelle Nicolls is a Pan-
Caribbean writer trained as a
professional journalist. She is
also a political commentator
and new media entrepreneur.


The Public Hospitals Authority of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas is
seeking proposals from qualified professional engineering firms to provide
consultancy services for completing a comprehensive assessment of the HVAC,
ELECTRICAL, PLUMBING, and STRUCTUAL SYSTEMS within the Princess
Margaret Hospital.

The purpose of this assessment is to develop a comprehensive Engineering Report
for the Princess Margaret Hospital.

The selected firm will be required to design and lead the assessment process and
deliver a full report on the current situation, detailing and benchmarking against
acceptable standards and trends for the proposed redevelopment of the Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Note: The project will follow GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH
OF THE BAHAMAS MINISTRY OF WORKS Standard Form of Agreement
between Authority and Consultant (Engineer) adapted for use by the Public
Hospitals Authority.

The principal project goals of the Firm are to:
* Develop a comprehensive engineering assessment report on the current
condition at the Princess Margaret Hospital;
* Provide realistic engineering schematics design of the facility for
redevelopment; and
* Provide specialist consultancy services for the planning and evaluation of
the Princess Margaret Hospital Redevelopment Project.

Firms should emphasize: (i) general consulting experience; (ii) working experi-
ence in hospital redevelopment service within an Acute Hospital; (iii) availability
of appropriate skill sets within the firm.
This Expressions of Interest will be evaluated based on the qualifications and rele-
vant experience of the firm and the results will be used to prepare a shortlist of no
more than six (6) Professional Engineering firms. Those included in the shortlist
will subsequently be invited to present technical and economical proposals on the
basis of a Request-for-Proposals (RFP) forwarded to them, which would include
the detailed Terms of Reference.

Name, Addresses and Contact Point (s):
Address: The Public Hospitals Authority
Building B, Third and West Terrace, Collins Avenue
Contact: Managing Director, Attn: Herbert Brown, P.O. Box N-8200,
Nassau, Bahamas; Tel: (242) 502-1400; Fax: (242) 323-1422.
Interested Professional Engineering Firms should submit their expression of
interest to the address above no later than 5th October 2009 during office hours
(9:00am -5:00pm)


Bahamas Christian Consor-
tium (BCC). I stayed anyway
and learned five interesting
lessons.
Marriage is the ultimate
form of martyrdom
When a man and a woman
join as one in marriage they
literally give up their individ-
ual selves to become one body
under God, not in a
metaphorical sense, but phys-
ically. A miracle happens and
their bodies join up like con-
genital twins, which means
they are incapable of raping
each other. "Marriage is a
covenant [with] yourlife life long
partner. You are no longer to
operate as individuals but a
bond where the two are to
become one. So how can one
rape themselvesespecially
when you vowed to fulfil each
other sexually?" Ingenious
words of Keith Ferguson, who
is not a member of the BCC,
but considered a prophet.
Men marry to avoid the
sin of fornication.
Since men are sexual beasts
at heart and prime fornicators,
marriage is the best solution: a
sacred space where sexual
relations are acceptable to
God not just for procreation.
Marriage is an unrestricted
pleasure club for men and
women: once signing the mar-
riage contract both parties
agree to "upfront, implicit,
open-ended sexual consent".
This is not what the actual
Marriage Act says or implies,
but the moral law of God,
according to the Bahamas
Christian Council sanctions
this interpretation. This
makes sense, considering it is
much easier for a woman to
give her man a key to the
house so he does not have to
knock on the door to gain
entry every time he wants to
get in.
Sexual violence in
marriage is sacred
and intimate.
The Bahamas Christian
Council in their official state-
ment said one of the questions
causing grave concern over
the proposed amendments
was: "How far should the gov-
ernment be going with things
that are sacred and intimate?"
A marriage is sacred no mat-
ter how unhealthy it is, even
where the most extreme forms
of sexual violence exist. An
assault against men who rape
their wives is an assault
against all married men and
women. The Christian com-
munity has a responsibility to
uphold the moral laws of God
and protect these sacred and
intimate marriages.


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Tender

CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services
Bidders re re uireid to collect bid packages from
the Corporationrs Administration Office.
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads,
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tendrs are to be addressed to;
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue HIrlI & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadlie for del I very t IEC:
9th Oteer 2019 ae later than 4:03 p.,.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 711104
CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

The Corporation reserves the right to Kccept
or reject any o all proposals.


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009


THE TRIBUNE










Travolta: ett's final moments I-


FROM page one
Mr Travolta, 55, explained
how Jett was autistic and suf-
fered from a seizure disorder.
He said Jett would suffer a
seizure every five to 10 days.
Each time the seizures would
last for about 45 seconds. Mr
Travolta recalled that around
10.15am on January 2, he was
wakened by Eli Wheaton, one
of Jett's nannies, who was
pounding on his bedroom
door. The actor said that he
and his wife ran downstairs
to help their son.
"I saw him on the bath-
room floor. Jeff Kathrein, his
other nanny and a woman
from Old Bahama Bay were
doing CPR," Mr Travolta
said. Mr Travolta said that he
took the place of the woman
doing CPR.
"Jeff Kathrein was doing
compression and I was doing
breathing," Mr Travolta said.
Mr Travolta said that while
all this was taking place, his
wife was holding their son's
head.
Mr Travolta told the court
that Jared McGrath, who was
a part of a group visiting for a
party he was having for
employees, also continued the
compressions. Mr Travolta
said that he knew McGrath
to have medical expertise and
he fitted his son with a defib-
rillator.
Mr Travolta testified that
after 35 minutes an ambu-
lance came and Jett was
placed on a gurney and taken
to the ambulance while Jared
continued the compressions.
Mr Travolta told the court
that outside the condo, he
spoke to the ambulance driver
and following that exchange
he received a liability release
document which he signed.
Mr Travolta admitted that he
did not read the document.
"Time was of the
essence," Mr Travolta told the
court, when asked by lead
prosecutor and Director of
Public Prosecutions Bernard
Turner why he had not read
the document.


Mr Travolta said he told
the ambulance driver to take
Jett to the airport at Old
Bahama Bay, the reason
being, he said, was so that he
could take his son on a jet to


West Palm Beach rather than
taking him to the Freeport
hospital. Mr Travolta testi-
fied, however, that Jett was
taken to the Freeport hospital
by ambulance.
"I was in the back of the
ambulance. There was EMT
and one other person," Mr
Travolta told the court.
When asked by the prose-
cutor whether anything hap-
pened on the way to the hos-
pital, Mr Travolta said that
"there was a stop where there
was a switching of drivers."
Mr Travolta told the court
that once they arrived at the
hospital, he stayed with Jett in
the hospital room until he was
asked to leave.
He said the last time he
saw Jett at the hospital he was
not alive.
Mr Travolta said he stayed
on Grand Bahama for about
four days after Jett's death,


ppy

I Birthday

If you see this handsome fellow tell him
"Opa" Happy Birthday.



"11m BPI' '%

MOUSIS :� 'i


From his loving wifc,
sons and daughters,
staff of Athcna Cafe.
all the family from
Long islandd
and friLends.


then returned to his home in
the United States.
Both defence attorneys
Murrio Ducille and Carlson
Shurland opted not to cross-
examine Mr Travolta yester-
day as the actor is expected
to be recalled after certain
other witnesses have given
evidence.
Bridgewater, 49, and
Lightbourne, 47, are accused
of conspiring to extort and
attempting to extort money
from Mr Travolta between
January 2 and 20 by means of
threats. Bridgewater is also
accused of abetment to extor-
tion.


US ACTOR John Travolta, left, and wife Kelly Preston leave the
court building in Nassau yesterday.


PUBLIC NOTICE


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getting to the post office. Accordingly, cus-
tomers are advised to contact BTC at 225-5282
or visit any of our Multi Service Centers nation-
wide to obtain their outstanding bill in order fo
avoid disruption of service.

BTC THANKS ALL OF fTS CUSTOMERS FOR
TNEIR LOYAL PATRONAGE


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE






PAGEOA 10,S THURSAYIEPTTEBR2,2RB


FROM page one
Mr Cambridge was alleged to have facilitated the scheme by cre-
ating a Bahamian International Business Company (IBC), Hexa-
gon Development, and setting up a bank account for the company
at FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas).
He then allegedly handled wire transfers totalling hundreds of
thousands of dollars.
The "sting" was part of an FBI investigation into public official
corruption in the Miami area, and one of Mr Cambridge's fellow
defendants is former vice-mayor of Broward County and Broward
County Commissioner, Josephus Eggelleton.
In 2006, Eggelleton was alleged to have told an FBI agent and
"cooperating witness": "If you wanna do some deals in the
Bahamas, let me know.
"Yes sir. In fact, I'm gonna be raising some money for the
Prime Minister of the Bahamas that's running for re-election." That
appears to imply that he was going to donate to the PLP's 2007
election campaign, although there is nothing to suggest the party
or Mr Christie did anything wrong in relation to this or the situa-
tion surrounding Mr Cambridge.
See Tribune Business for full story.


UK judge: Cases from countries like Bahamas taking up too much time


FROM page one

ident of the UK's new Supreme
Court, said he is looking for
ways to reduce the "dispropor-
tionate" amount of time judges
who staff that court also spend
on cases coming from outside
the UK.
The President questioned
whether some Privy Council
cases, which have ranged from
Jamaican death row appeals to
fights over press freedom in
Bermuda, needed to be heard
by a panel of five of Britain's
most senior judges.
Robert Hazell, director of
The Constitution Unit at Uni-
versity College London, claims
it is a "minor public scandal"
that judges in the country's top
court spend almost half their


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Princess Margaret Hospital

ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT




PUBLIC


NOTICE!


IN AN EFFORT TO IMPROVE OUR PATIENT
SERVICES AT THE PRINCESS MARGARET


HOSPITAL.


WE


WILL


UNDERGO


RENOVATIONS TO THE ENTRANCE AND

TRIAGE AREA OF THE ACCIDENT &

EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT.v


WE ASK THAT PERSONS VISITING THE


DEPARTMENT


ENTER THROUGH


THE


PHARMACY DEPARTMENT ENTRANCE AND

CONTINUE ONWARD THROUGH THE

ENTRANCE OF THE ORTHOPEDIC CLINIC.


MANAGEMENT


APOLOGIZES


FOR ANY


INCONVENIENCE CAUSED AND ASK THAT

THE PUBLIC COOPERATE WITH US DURING

THIS TIME.



SIGNED: MANAGEMENT


time on business "of no interest
to anyone in the UK", refer-
ring to those cases originating in
places like the Bahamas.
One former Governor Gen-
eral told BBC Caribbean that
he sees Lord Phillip's message
as one telling Caribbean and
other Commonwealth countries
to "get your house in order and
do what you have to do" to
prepare for the eventuality that
final appeals may in the future
no longer be made to the Lon-
don-based Privy Council.
"The message," said Sir
Probyn Innis, former Governor
General of St Kitts and Nevis,
"is loud and clear."
"Enough is enough is
enough. Allow us to get on with
our business of modernising our
legal system in the United
Kingdom."


Yesterday former Attorney
General and MP for Fort Char-
lotte Alfred Sears said the time
is "long overdue" for the
Bahamas to make a "contin-
gency plan" for the likely even-
tuality that the Privy Council
will not act as the final court of
appeal forever.
"I think it's our responsibili-
ty to provide the critical insti-
tutions of governance for our-
selves and the time has come,
before the British tell us to go
- a likelihood that will only
increase as the demands of their
own society call for giving pri-
ority to their needs - that we
assume the responsibility for
ourselves," said Mr Sears.
He noted that the Bahamas
already helps fund the
Caribbean Court of Justice
despite not using it as a final


court of appeal.
Meanwhile, he said, he has
no doubt that there is sufficient
legal talent within the
Caribbean region and the rest
of the Commonwealth to deal
adequately with any legal issues
that may arise.
Many Bahamians have called
for the Bahamas to end its
dependence on the Privy Coun-
cil since it ruled in 2006 that it
was unconstitutional for the
death penalty to be mandatory,
perceiving a foreign court to
have placed an unfair impedi-
ment to convicted Bahamian
killers receiving their just
deserts.
However, Mr Sears said that
this in itself is no argument in
favour of a national or
Caribbean court as such a court
could make the same ruling -
as it did in South Africa.
Nonetheless, he said, he does
believe the issue of capital pun-
ishment should be decided by a
court "in our region", rather
than Europe.
PLP leadership contender
Paul Moss raised the issue of
the final court of appeal pub-
licly during his campaign launch
on Tuesday evening, telling his
audience that he would bring
"unparalleled focus to fixing
the administration of justice,"
culminating in the "removal"
of the Privy Council as the final
court of appeal.
Yesterday Mr Moss said he
feels it is unlikely that Britain
will itself move to stop other
countries appealing to the Privy
Council as he believes it is "an
industry" for the country.
However, he said, he strong-
ly believes The Bahamas
"should not outsource" its final
court of appeal, whether to
Britain or the Caribbean Court
of Justice.
"The judiciary is part of gov-
ernment. We do not have a for-
eign prime minister why then
should we have foreigners sit-
ting on another arm of govern-
ment, such as the judiciary," he
said.


INSIGHT
Forthestoie
bein henes
reaIsig0 t


CREDIT SUISSE


Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

is presently considering applications for a


Senior Globus System Developer


The 1w ition is open to canididate-, with flie folniIg milirniurn, requi remneI1Is.


At least Five (5) ycar-5 cxpcncucc, in installation, con rigurafion and
troubleshooting in -a banking environment
*Superkwi knowledge of G LQBUSVJ24 Banking Applicafien in botb support
and development rolies
- aihIJkr Of ScLentce dkLTL inl CLomputer.;LiC-nCC or e~.]IurlnatL
-Knowledge of AIX 5.1L - 5.3, UNIVERSR'JBASE, PL-.-',SQL
F-x nnc in working with 6(fslkbs 24 mifd �n igration or implementa.tioni


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Excellent organ Iztz iima]. inlerpersnal and communication skills
-Giod tkcbnical and p~rubltem wsov inL, ��is and expterienice,
-Ability to work under prvn.-uriu anrd wilh minimum t uperv isOn
- ifniusias~rn, a pos~itive attitude and willi ngncm toL work flexible hourg &s
o1vcrtim~
-Previoas cxpecricnc working in a prodiL~ctio11 support role in ma~intaining
Globusf-12 4 system is a plus.

4- Other Dutiies:
-Answer II elpdesk rqtuests (provide SupWurL & truub]eshoiou
-Pro YidL NIV ERS E & C, L0B1.S !rtining tro IT S~iz T
E nsur-e comp [liancec t IT guiddline~i / direct'LVCi
*Ensure t~hat "d2 Busl ncs Cantingcncy P kinning'"M 3rcquircmcntitsar
ro II ow Cd
*Other duties & proccis assigned by die Manager of Dcparntmr

v Benefits provided include:
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-Ongoing internal and external career dcvcr~opment.'trining program

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Peirons not meefna the
minimum Mtiuretnents need not auRpX.


Applications sboucld besubrritied to:
Human Remiurru Dup~artment
P.O. Box N-4�29
Nassau, Baha~mas

DEADLINE: OCTOBER 2,2009


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We apologise to our valued customers and
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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009


THE TRIBUNE






THE RIBUE THRSDA, SETEMBR 24 200, PAE 1


Schools in Long Island


receive greenhouses


A"


1,


AGRICULTURE MINISTER Larry Cartwright (right) inspects one of the greenhouses with (from left)
BAIC's assistant general manager of Agriculture Arnold Dorsett, Long Island administrator Roderick
Bowe, and local government official Wellington Taylor.


FURTHERING the local
food production initiative, four
schools in Long Island received
greenhouses during special
assemblies last week.
The greenhouses went to
North Long High, NGM Major
High, Glinton's Primary, and
Simms' Primary. Three green-
houses came from the Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial Cor-
poration (BAIC) and the other
through the Food and Agricul-
ture Organisation's Initiative
on Soaring Food Prices.
Among the dignitaries pre-
sent were Minister of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources and


Member of Parliament for
Long Island and Raged Island,
Larry Cartwright; BAIC exec-
utive chairman Edison Key;
administrator Roderick Bowe,
and Ministry of Education and
local government officials.
Mr Cartwright told the stu-
dents that agriculture is for life.
"Everybody needs food," he
said.
"And the greatest thrill of
one's life is to be able to grow
one's own food."
Mr Key underscored BAIC's
theme to 'grow what you eat
and eat what you grow'.
He said there is no need for


the Bahamas to be importing
some $500 million in food each
year when the means are here
to produce much of that.
"If there is a magical word
in agriculture today, that word
is 'greenhouses'," agricultural
officer, Maurice Minnis told
students.
"The appeal of growing
plants in a controlled environ-
ment protected from the open
sun without most of the physi-
cal labour normally associated
with production on the open
field makes the attraction of
greenhouses almost irre-
sistible."


SAC principal robbed by thug


FROM page one
about five hours after a man was fatally
stabbed during a scuffle at the nearby Sea-
grapes shopping centre on Prince Charles Dri-
ve.
Inspector Warren Rodgers, of the Elizabeth
Estates police station, said patrols have been
intensified as police try to crack down on crime
in the area.
"We have a lot of patrols in the night-time.
We also have been getting a lot of reserve
officers to come out and assist in the night-time
to reassure the communities in this area that


the police are out working and also to deter the
criminals," he told The Tribune yesterday.
Police launched investigations after at least
two rapes and two attempted rapes occurred in
eastern New Providence since March.
However, The Tribune has received reports
that this number may be greater than reported.
On an internet message board, a poster
claimed a woman had been attacked and near-
ly raped two weeks ago by a man who lurked
outside her home in the eastern area.
Yesterday, police at the Elizabeth Estates
station said they had no knowledge of the
reported attack.


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Experience in an AAA Five Diamond resort would be a definite advantage.
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THE TRIBUNE


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'A sporting icon of the highest order'


TODAY'S column is not
your usual one. I just had to
pause and reflect on the life of
the late Vincent Lloyd Fer-
guson, a sporting icon of the
highest order, not just as an
athlete, but an administrator
as well.
When I got the news that
the 71-year-old had passed
away yesterday after his battle
with prostate cancer, the first
thing that really came to mind
was how I first got to know
him in a personal way.
I was attending my first
major international event at
the 1992 Olympic Games in
Barcelona, Spain, and as a
young reporter on the curb, I
was eager to make the trip.
But when I got to
Barcelona, I was staying quite
a ways out from everything
that was going on. And not
being able to speak Spanish
didn't help.
Ferguson, the Bahamas
Olympic Association's trea-
surer at the time, served as
the Chef de Mission for the
team at the Olympics. Being a


very small team, there was
more than adequate space in
the Games Village.
Upon the insistence of
triple jumper Frank Ruther-
ford and quarter-miler
Pauline Davis-Thompson, I
moved into the Games Vil-
lage where I was able to hang
out with the team.
However, Ferguson was not
informed initially and when
he found out, he almost hit
the roof. He insisted that the
BOA would not be responsi-
ble for me being in the village
as the press was not allowed.
That actually showed me
the seriousness of Ferguson,
who is known as a discipli-
narian.
Anybody who got to know
Ferguson can attest to his
firmness and his commitment
to being the best out of every-
body and ensuring that noth-
ing was left to chance.
After his sting as a semi-
professional baseball player
in the major leagues, Fergu-
son returned home and took
up a long and successful


STUB


OPINI



teaching career.
It started at his a
at St Augustine'
where he and the I
cus 'Uncle Lou'


Rain delays softball game...


TB C were responsible for coining
I Bthe school's nickname The
Big Red Machine after the
Cincinnati Reds in the 1960s.
He last taught at the A F
Adderley High School before
he retired in 1994.
Ferguson leaves behind his
beloved wife Marie, a former
teacher of mine, and two chil-
dren, Anne-Marie and Vin-
cent Alex.
He had also compiled a
r6sum6 that speaks for itself.
Here's a glance at his
career:
* Attended St Augustine's
College from 1950-1955
, where he participated in bas-
ketball, softball, volleyball
and track and field
* Enrolled at St Anselm's
[O N College, Manchester, New
Hampshire, on a basketball
scholarship in 1957 and grad-
Suated with a BA in English
and a minor in Philosophy in
1961
alma mater * Started playing profes-
's College sional basketball with the Mil-
late Leviti- waukee Braves (now Atlanta)
Adderley minor league in 1964-1967,


! 7


t^


although he never got to play
in the majors
* Obtained a Master of Sci-
ence degree in Education
Administration from Manka-
to State University in 1974
* Taught locally in the
classroom at SAC from 1961-
1968
* Served as an administra-
tor at SAC from 1968-1975
* Vice principal at R M
Bailey from 1975-1977 and
acting principal from 1977-
1978
* Principal at Aquinas Col-
lege from 1978-1993
* Acting principal at A F
Adderley from 1993-1994
* Served as the longest
president of the Bahamas
Amateur Basketball Associa-
tion from 1966-1983.


* Founded the Bahamas
Association of Basketball
Officials (BABO) in 1968
* First FIBA certified ref-
eree for the English speaking
Caribbean after he refereed
at the Central American and
Caribbean Championships in
Cuba in 197
* Founding member and
president of the Bahamas
Association of Former and
Present Professional Baseball
Players.
* Inducted into the Min-
nesota State University
Mankato in 2004 when he was
presented with the Distin-
guished Alumni Achievement
Award.
My condolences to his
entire family. May his soul
rest in peace.


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0fi thinn ring # when the rain






Champion Truckers put on probation


FROM page 15
stated," Seymour said.
"I don't know where this thing about a sus-
pension or probation came from. They are
only trying to blow this thing up more than it
is because they lost money on what they call a
big night when two top teams were supposed
to meet. But we didn't have enough players to
play and so we lost the game by default."
As far as the constitution is concerned, Sey-
mour said a team is allowed three defaults,
but they are not allowed to have two back-
to-back. He said they have a game scheduled
to play on Friday and they will show up to
play that game.
"The Mighty Mitts defaulted a game the
other day and nobody made no noise," Sey-
mour said. "Two girls teams lost by default
and nobody made any noise. I think because
it's the Truckers, everybody was making an
issue out of it."


-F -
11 7
LF l


"When was the last time a Nassau team
went anywhere," Seymour asked. "They are
only worrying about themselves. They have
to start worrying about the players. They are
upset because they might have lost a big night,
but things happened."
Seymour said the NPSA knows that his team
was struggling to get players out. He said three
of their players had to work, but they came late
and about five of them played in a number of
softball games in other leagues, so the players
might have been tired.
"It's not the first time something like this has
happened on a Saturday night," he said. "The
last Saturday we played, I only had 10 players
and one had to leave."
The NPSA, according to Fernander, is
preparing to wind down its regular season so
that they can start the playoffs as they march
towards the BSF's National Round Robin in
November.


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I


TRIBUNE SPORTS


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 13


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Former boxer 'Kid Nassau'




plans to form amateur club


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
REMEMBER the name
Leroy 'Kid Nassau' Brown?
The former light welter-
weight champion, who domi-
nated the local scene back in
the days when Oswald 'Elisha
Obed' Ferguson was making
a name for himself, has resur-
faced, but this time to give
back to the sport of boxing.
Brown, a 61-year-old recov-
ering drug addict with the


Leroy Brown to stage exhibition

boxing show at BASH's Earth

Village Fun Day next month


Bahamas Association of
Social Health (BASH) for the
past 16 months, is planning
to form his own amateur box-
ing club.
He has already started the
facility on the site that used to


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GAMES
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ARM WRF ' IINI ,
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host BASH's car wash off
Columbus Drive in Chip-
pingham, but is in need of
some additional material to
complete the wooden struc-
ture.
During BASH's Earth Vil-
lage Fun Day on Monday,
October 12, Brown will rein-
troduce himself to the public
as he stages an amateur exhi-
bition boxing show.
"We're going to show the
people what we have to
offer," Brown said. "Ray
Minus Jr is assisting me. He
will put down a boxing ring
that we will use and he will
bring some of his boxers to
compete."
Kid Nassau, as he was
affectionately called, was one
of the top local boxers along
with Obed and Baby Boy
Rolle. But he would be the
first to tell you that he was
the best in his time, having
posted an impressive record
of 29-1.
"They really didn't recog-
nise me back then," said
Brown, whose only loss was
against an American in Mia-
mi, Florida. "I wasn't in con-
dition when the people called
me for that fight."
Having fought and defeat-
ed just about all of the big
name fighters whom Obed
was matched against, Brown
said he decided to quit after a
fight between himself and
Obed was canceled.
"He and his trainers
watched me and they said I


LEROY BROWN (shown) is planning to form his own amateur boxing club inside this wooden building...


was too heavy to fight Obed,"
said Brown, who noted that at
the time he was just one
pound over the weight limit.
"We fought guys who were
20-30 pounds heavier than we
were. I was a junior mid-
dleweight and he was a wel-
terweight, but they used it as
an excuse because they didn't
want him to lose."
After the fight was called
off, Brown hung up his box-
ing gear and he walked away
from the sport.
However, he continued in
his latter years to watch the
sport that he perfected more
as a technician. But he found
the urge to come back and
give back to the sport.
"I had the style like Cas-
sius Clay. I was the crowd


pleaser," Brown recalled.
"That was why everybody
wanted me to fight."
Through his boxing club,
Brown said he intends to
bring back the art of the
sport.
"The only thing I see out
there is the brute force. The
man who can punch the hard-
est win. But they want to see
something that they can
enjoy," Brown said.
"Although I got strung out
on drugs, I came back, thanks
to BASH. Now I can con-
tribute to my immediate com-
munity and society."
Brown is encouraging any
and all young men who have
an interest in boxing to come
out and participate in the
gym, which he hopes to have


LEROY BROWN (right) with Wesley Finlayson outside the wooden structure on the site that used to host
BASH's car wash off Columbus Drive in Chippingham...


completed after they have
acquired the much-needed
material and equipment.
"We need boxing bags,
training gloves, head gears,
skipping ropes, mouth pieces,
cups to protect the groins,
speed bags and a few more
items," he said.
"I'm appealing to the pub-
lic to be a part of this by lend-
ing a helping hand."
Already BASH has gotten
a lot of support from Premier
Importers and the New Prov-
idence Community Church in
getting the structure to near
completion.
However, Brown said they
are still looking for corporate
Bahamas to assist in provid-
ing them with plywood,
cement and a rug to put on
the floor once it's completed.
Interested persons can con-
tact Brown or Wesley Fin-
layson, the marketing and
media liaison for
BASH/Earth Village at 356-
2274.
Finlayson, a cousin of
Alpheus 'Hawk' Finlayson,
said they are throwing their
full support behind Brown in
his venture into getting the
gym opened.
"He's been an inspiration
to all of us," Finlayson said.
"He's been a role model,
someone who's been there
and done that and is moving
on. I'm very proud of him and
this is his way of giving back
to the community. So I feel
good about it. I think after
the gym opens, it's going to
be good."


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


Tender
CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

The Bahamas Electricity Corporalion
invites Tenders for the above named services,

Bidders are required to collect bid packages from
the Corporation's Administration Oflice,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads.
Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevinr Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

hadllnt for dellvry to BEC:
9th October 20I6 l later Than 4:01 pm.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tendr No. 711109
CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

The Corporation rezurves the right to accept
or re)�

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


12 1






THE TRIBUNE


hi


TH liRI)DAY SEPTEMBER 24, 2009


�F� 13 0 Stumbbs' Opinion0I


Champion




Truckers put




on probation


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
THE New Providence Softball Association (NPSA)
has placed the defending champions Commando Securi-
ty Truckers on probation after they defaulted a live tele-
vision game against the Heavy Lift Dorsey Park Boyz that
was set to be played on Saturday night.
As a result, a number of dedicated fans were disgrun-
tled. So in an effort to lure them back to the park, Fer-
nander said the NPSA designated Tuesday and Wednes-
day as fan appreciation nights when softball lovers were
able to watch the game free of charge.
Calling the default an embarrassment for the league,
NPSA president Sidney 'Bobby Baylor' Fernander said
they are not going to showcase the Truckers in any radio
or television game, nor will they "recommend them for
any national team consideration."
"We will hope that the BSF (Bahamas Softball Feder-
ation) will uphold what we do because we will not rec-
ommend them for any national team consideration," he
said.
"Any team traveling out of New Providence going
anywhere, they will not be recommended for team play
based on our sanctions that we will put on them."
But Truckers manager Perry Seymour said it's not fair
to his team because they didn't do anything wrong, except
lose a game by default.
"With a defaulted game, the constitution states that you
are allowed to pay a $50
fine and you are rein- SEE page 13


THE Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools' '09 softball season got started yesterday.
But at St Augustine's College, the senior boys' game between the Big Red Machine and the Nassau Chris-
tian Academy Crusaders was stopped in the bottom of the fifth inning when the rain came pouring down.
The game was tied 11-11 when it was halted by plate umpire Michael Hanna. As the seven-inning game
was not official, it will have to continue from that point at a date to be announced.
* SOME of the players can be seen in action here and on page 13


*i


Sporting icon dies at 71


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
VINCENT Lloyd Fergu-
son, who was battling prostate
cancer, died at his home while
having breakfast yesterday
morning.
The former teacher/admin-
istrator, sporting icon and
sports administrator extraor-
dinaire just celebrated his 71st
birthday on August 25.
Winston 'Tappy' Davis,
who had a long affiliation with
Ferguson, broke down when
he was asked to describe his
former friend and teammate.
"It's so sad that he had to
leave us," said Davis, who
tried to contain himself.
"Vince was a straight forward
intelligent, honest and hard
working individual.
"He believed in everything
he was into and he cared a
whole lot about it. I never
knew that people had the
kind of passion and commit-
ment in what they did the way
Vince did."
Davis and Ferguson were a
part of an historic committee
that was commissioned by the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture to put together the
history of the game of bas-
ketball in the country.
The committee was sched-
uled to meet again today.
Tom 'the Bird' Grant, who
was also a part of the com-
mittee, said the Bahamas has
certainly lost a giant of a man.
"He was a no nonsense
man period," Grant stated.
"He did all he could for
sports, but he was an individ-
ual all by himself. He wasn't
one to follow the crowd.
"He did things his way. At
times we couldn't see eye to
eye, but I knew he meant
well. We were going down the


VINCENT FERGUSON
same road. It's just that we
did it on different paths. That
was just Vince."
Basketball standout Reggie
Forbes, who shaped his life
after his disciplinarian men-
tor, said it's a sad day for
sports.
"Vince was one of the rare
Bahamians, real men, an icon,
who has served the Bahamas
in many capacities, both aca-
demically, athletically, social-
ly and has made immeasur-
able contributions to the
building of our nation,"
Forbes said.
"Today is a sad day. It caus-
es us to reflect on the contri-
bution he has made and the
impact he has made in the
lives of both men and women.
To me, he has made an
invaluable contribution in my
life as I developed through
the ranks of playing basket-
ball."
Having had the pleasure of
working with him as a teacher
at Aquinas College, Forbes,
now the Dean of Student
Affairs at SAC, said Fergu-
son always tried to get the
best of everybody he came in
contact with.


"To his wife and children,
God knows best. Just hold on
and be strong," he said. We
just wish that his legacy will
live on in each of them."
Ferguson had a storied
career.
It began as a multiple ath-
lete at St Augustine's College,
to his collegiate days at St
Anselm's College, to his pro-
fessional baseball sting with
the Milwaukee Braves, to his
return home as a high school
administrator, to his latest
role as the founder of the
Bahamas Association of For-
mer and Present Professional
Baseball Players, and his con-
tribution on the committee
for the history of basketball
in the country.
Ferguson leaves behind his
beloved wife Marie and his
two children, Anne-Marie
and Vincent Alex.
* See column (Stubbs'
Opinion) on page 13 for more
on Ferguson's achievement


Eno s ion at

Town Center Mall &

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PAGEOA 16,S THURSAYIEPTTEBR2,2RB


Young Bahamian Marine Scientists host


,, Summer


YOUNG Bahamian Marine Scientists
(YBMS), an educational component of the Dan-
guillecourt Project, hosted a seven-day summer
camp on Little Farmers Cay, Exuma.
Seventeen students between the ages of 10 and
18 attended the camp, where they were intro-
duced to different aspects of the Bahamian envi-
ronment. The mornings were spent in the class-
room discussing and learning the important facts
about each daily topic. Afternoons were spent
outdoors in the field.
Nikita Shiel-Rolle, director and founder of
YBMS, said: "For many of these students it was
their first time putting on a mask and snorkel,
their first time swimming with sharks in 70 feet of
water, their first time walking through mangrove
creeks where they identified the four different
types of mangroves and their first time making the
connection that these same mangroves act as
nurseries to countless juvenile creatures which,
when grown, relocate onto nearby coral reefs."
Each day brought a new topic of discussion
and adventure. A full day was dedicated to inva-
sive species where lionfish were the focus. Com-
munity members accompanied the students on a
lionfish hunt after the morning discussion which
addressed the environmental threats associated
with this predator. The day ended with a grill-out
on the Farmer's Cay government dock where
fishermen, who just hours before swore that they
would never consume the deadly creature,
cracked jokes and savoured the white meat of
the lionfish. The summer camp would not have
been complete without a trip to the Exuma Cays
Land and Sea Park, a protected area established
by the Bahamas National Trust in 1959. Students
visited the park's headquarters on Warderick
Wells and learned about the importance of
marine conservation and the spill-over effect,
gaining an understanding of how wildlife in these
protected areas can flourish resulting in an abun-
dance of species that will eventually take up res-
idence outside the designated protected area.
Upon exploring the area, the group saw the
skeleton of a sperm whale that had died as a
result of pollution, and observed hutia, the largest
native mammal in the Bahamas, as well as arti-


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facts left from the days of the Loyalists' occupa-
tion.
Stromatolites, ancient microbial reefs unique to
the Exuma cays, were another topic of study.
These living layered outcrop structures called
stromatolites date back to the origins of the plan-
et, when their photosynthetic properties were
attributed to creating Earth's atmosphere.
Students visited the Danguillecourt Project's
research lab located on Little Darby Island where
Dr Pamela Reid of the University of Miami along
with researchers from 12 other institutions, includ-
ing NASA, are conducting ground-breaking sci-
entific studies.
On the last day of the YBMS summer camp
students gave a presentation to the local com-
munity highlighting the events of the week. Gov-
ernment officials from George Town, Great Exu-
ma, made the trip to Little Farmers Cay along
with residents from neighboring cays. The stu-
dents' demonstrations included poetry about the
invasive lionfish, a song about coral reefs and a
dance illustrating the four mangrove communities.
In closing remarks, the visiting George Town
administrator said that YBMS camps should be
duplicated in every local fishing community. He
added that it was particularly nice to have
Bahamians running this programme as opposed
to having foreigners educating us about our coun-
try. The 2009 YBMS summer programme was
run by George Allen, Kristal Ambrose, Nikita
Shiel-Rolle and Ryan Winder - all Bahamians
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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


w


ffl--Iq









THE TRIBUNE -




)US1


SS


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009


S B o c b I


JOHN DELANEY


'The perfect


location' for


the wealthy,


companies

* Top attorney says
Bahamas 'can compete
more effectively than
any other international
financial centre' in
attracting companies,
high net-worths to base
themselves here as
primary domicile
* Investment to 'stay in the
game' increasing, but
lawyer confident Bahamas
has 'wherewithal'
to compete

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas "can com-
pete more effectively than any
other international financial
centre" when it comes to
attracting companies and
high-net worth individuals to
use this nation as their pri-
mary operational base, a lead-
ing attorney said yesterday,
asserting that this nation has
"the wherewithal to stay in
the game".
John Delaney, managing
partner at Higgs & Johnson,
urged attendees at a seminar
organised by his law firm to
"not believe the doomsayers"
who claimed that the
Bahamas was finished as an
international financial services
centre due to the concerted,
and increasing attacks on such
jurisdictions by the G-
20/OECD grouping.
Warning that the Bahamas
"must invest more in educa-
tion" if its international finan-
cial services sector was to sur-
vive and grow market share,
Mr Delaney said: "There is a
place in the world for an
international financial centre
that maintains alignment with
evolving standards, and is pre-
pared to invest in human cap-
ital and infrastructure in what
is a highly competitive envi-
ronment.
"The space is getting small-
er and smaller, and the invest-
ment needed to stay in the
game has increased signifi-
cantly. More and more are
falling by the wayside, but I
believe we have the where-


SEE page 4B


Fop attorney



is charged



with money



laundering


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A prominent
Bahamian attor-
ney was yesterday
indicted in the
US on allegations
that he helped to knowingly laun-
der hundreds of thousands of dol-
lars in proceeds from an invest-
ment fraud, after being seemingly
being caught in a Federal Bureau
of Investigation (FBI) 'sting' oper-
ation.
Sidney Cambridge, an attorney
and partner with Callender's &
Co, was named as a defendant
along with the former vice-mayor
of Broward County and Broward
County Commissioner, Josephus
Eggelleton, in an indictment
unveiled yesterday by the US Dis-
trict Attorney's Office for south
Florida in connection with a mul-
ti-year FBI investigation into pub-
lic sector corruption in the Miami
area.
Mr Cambridge did not return
Tribune Business's calls seeking
comment before press deadline
yesterday, despite this newspaper
leaving detailed messages on his
cell phone and with his assistant
asking for an urgent reply.
However, his indictment is like-
ly to stun many in Nassau's legal
circles, where he is held in high
regard for his ability and integrity.
The Callender's & Co attorney
and partner is well-known in both
legal and political circles, having
served as vice-chair of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party (PLP).
He is also the attorney repre-
senting CLICO (Bahamas) liq-
uidator Craig A. 'Tony' Gomez
in that liquidation, and is also act-


Cable attacks

'flawed' retail

price analysis

* BISX-listed firm says own
analysis shows cable TV
and Internet prices 28%
and 118% lower than
Caribbean regional
average
* Warns that programming
costs up 95% in 15 years,
with other operating
expenses up 200%, to
justify basic cable
TV fee rise

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Cable Bahamas has argued
that a 'benchmarking' exer-
cise designed to justify retail
price regulation in the
Bahamian communications
industry "is flawed and does
not provide a valid basis" for
regulating either its cable TV
or Internet services, arguing
that its prices for the latter
market are 118 per cent below
the Caribbean average.
In its response to the
request for feedback on retail
price regulations for the
Bahamian communications
sector, the BISX-listed utility
provider said its own "more
comprehensive" benchmark-
ing exercise showed that its
prices for cable TV, Internet
and other data services were
below Caribbean compara-
tives.


* Callender's & Co partner,
and PLP vice-chair,
indicted in Miami
* Co-accused bragged of
allegedly helping to fund
raise for ex-PM Christie's
2007 election campaign

ing for Mr Gomez in another
prominent court-supervised liq-
uidation, that involving Leaden-
hall Bank & Trust.
There is nothing to suggest that
Callender's & Co has done any-
thing wrong, and the firm is not
named in the indictment relating
to Mr Cambridge. Mr Cambridge
is understood to still be in the
Bahamas, although all his fellow
defendants appeared in court in
Miami yesterday.
The indictment alleged that FBI
undercover agents made contact
with Eggelleton in February 27,
2006, then donated a $5,000
cheque to one of his charities.
Eggelleton then allegedly said, on
May 30, 2006, to an FBI agent and
'cooperating witness': "If you
wanna do some deals in the
Bahamas, let me know.
"Yes sir. In fact, I'm gonna be
raising some money for the Prime
Minister of the Bahamas that's
running for re-election." That
appears to imply that he was
going to donate to the PLP's 2007
election campaign, although there
is nothing to suggest the party or
Mr Christie did anything wrong
in relation to this or the situation
SEE page 8B


Sandals exec



blasts Exuma



Chamber boss


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


A SENIOR Sandals executive has
blasted the Exuma Chamber of Com-
merce's president for making the most
"inappropriate, misplaced and unpro-
fessional" demands of the resort chain
that he has ever seen, in relation to
its plans for re-opening the Emerald
Bay resort.
Floyd Armbrister, the Chamber's
president, in a September 10, 2009,
communication sent to senior Sandals
executives had demanded that they
answer a number of questions, and
provide details, on the resort chain's
plans for the Emerald Bay resort,
warning that he could not simply stand
by and watch "the total disregard" for
the island's business community.
He also railed at the alleged "rape
and pillage" of Exuma's economy by
previous investors who had failed to
deliver on their promises.
Mr Armbrister, in a communication
obtained by Tribune Business, said he
was "surprised at the lack of informa-
tion being provided to the local com-
munity to date", saying what Exumi-
ans knew of Sandals plans had come
from the media and a press release.
He added that he had been unsuc-
cessful in contacting Gordon 'Butch'
Stewart, Sandals' chairman, as had
others, in seeking to learn how they
could help Sandals, but added that the
'word on the street' regarding the
resort chain's plans "does not seem
very positive".
Stating that he was "elated that Exu-
ma, the Bahamas was to be beauty
behind it all" when it came to San-
dals' latest resort acquisition, Mr Arm-
brister wrote: "I am aware of the
repeated rape and pillage of the Exu-
ma economy in the past.
"Many have come, they have got
concessions and did not perform for
the concessions received. All that the
Government gives belongs to the peo-
ple, and thus makes the people
investors in the company receiving the
concessions.
"As president of the Exuma Cham-
ber of Commerce, I cannot stand and
watch the total disregard for the busi-


ness community by any individual or
group...... The Chamber expects to get
a return phone call. We expect that
with this acquisition that your corpo-
rate social responsibility would lead
you to honour the triple bottom line:
people, planet, profits."
Mr Armbrister then demanded that
Sandals disclose a variety of details
regarding its plans, including the total
dollar value of concessions it was
receiving from the Government; how
many non-Bahamians it was planning
to bring in; whether Bahamian con-
struction workers would be employed
in upgrades to Emerald Bay; when
staff would be hired and trained; and
how non-local staff would be housed.
Other demands related to Sandals'
plans for water sports and ground
transportation; its "vision for the com-
munity"; its "attitude towards local
people; and its expectations of them.
The concern generated by letters
such as Mr Armbrister's is that the
content could potentially scare away
prospective investors in the Bahamas,
although there is no sign of this hap-
pening with Sandals.
However, the resort chain may now
be wondering about the quality of the
reception it will get in some circles in
Exuma, despite having effectively res-
cued the island's economy by acquir-
ing Emerald Bay - for a price believed
to be in the $20-$30 million range -
more than two years after it was
placed in receivership under the pre-
vious ownership.
In a withering response to Mr Arm-
brister, Sandals' director of operations,
Shawn DaCosta, wrote to the Exuma
Chamber president on September 11,
2009, to express "displeasure" over
the previous day's letter following his
conversation with Mr Stewart.
"We have worked with various
Chambers of Commerce throughout
the world, but never in all the years of
our operation have I seen opening dis-
cussion so inappropriate, misplaced
and unprofessional as yours," Mr
DaCosta wrote.
"Need I remind you that one hotel
has already failed on this island, which
SEE page 8B


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'Playing a role' in stopping loss


DURING a training ses-
sion this morning, I had to
deal with a recruit who we
will call 'Jeff'. Jeff was
stronger and more aggres-
sive than his partner, who
we will call 'Peter'. As the
various drills were given out,


I observed how Jeff would
throw and toss Peter around
the floor as if he was a rag
doll. On the other hand,
when the roles were
switched unexpectedly, the
rough and aggressive
response was not given. Jef-


f's action became more
aggressive to the point
where I had to step in and
admonish him about his
actions, which in my opinion
equated to abuse. However,
in Jeff's opinion he was not
doing anything wrong, as he


felt that he was in control
and stressed the fact that
Peter was doing the same
thing.
Jeff's perspective is what
he operated on, so he made
a decision to act accordingly.
If this action was not
checked, the end result
could have been injury. We
are observing various behav-
iours in our society that, for
whatever reason, are going
unchecked. They are being
allowed to fester and grow.
Compounding this is that
what we believe is unusual,
dangerous and unsafe, based
on our norms and culture, is
not necessarily the case. We
are seeing before us the evo-
lution of a very different
Bahamas. The sleepy island
has awakened, and the per-
ception of risks to survival is
being met head on with the
same violent and aggressive
force.
Unfortunately, those of us
who hold fast to now ancient
and historic beliefs are not
taking the necessary steps to
reduce the potential for
large-scale loss that may
result from our inaction or
disregard. We prefer to sing
and hold prayer services in
our attempt to pacify the
eruption around us. Not
good enough, so sorry!
Agreed, prayer can move
mountains, but who is going
to move if everybody is
down on their knees pray-
ing.
Now, we all have our own
way of managing events, be
they loss or criminal in
nature. Who is to say which
is the right way or, as some
would say, reasonable. One
thing for certain is that
choosing not to do some-
thing or ignoring the event is
action within itself.
The time is long past, in
my opinion, for peace rallies
and prayers that are not
backed or supported by spe-
cific actions to change


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behaviour. The change in
behaviour is not limited to
the would-be-criminal but,
more importantly in my
opinion, this change is for us
who are at risk. How do we
reduce the risk of loss and
crime? Risk, too, is relative
to culture, location, time of
day and individuals or
organizations being exposed
to the threat. Thus what we
perceive as the crime risk is
not recognized in the same
way by the police.
When I speak of the
police in this instance, I
speak regarding the organi-
sation, not any one individ-
ual. Their view, in many
instances, becomes perplex-
ing as it appears they take a
very nonchalant approach to
conditions that we believe to
be extreme. Just as Jeff's
actions to the untrained eye
may be seen as 'horsing
around', the trained eye sees
him taking advantage of a
perceived weaker partner
and abusing that relation-
ship. But again this, too, is
relative as Jeff also stated he
was reacting to a threat, and
rather than seek assistance
from the authority figure
(me in this instance)m he
decided to resolve this issue
his way.
Is Jeff wrong for this, or is
he just acting the part that
he has so efficiently been
taught over the last 18 or so
years. Can we blame him or
any other individual com-
pletely for actions that
essentially have brought
them this far in life. No, we
cannot, but we as a society
must take part of the blame,
and incarceration and hang-
ings cannot be our escape.
It is false to think that we
can live in a society free of
crime and loss, since both
have been with us since time
began. Loss is associated
with the removal of cher-
ished possessions or people,
and crime relates to the
means by which the event
occurred.
Bear in mind that all
crime is loss, but not all loss
is crime. For example, loss
resulting from a hurricane,
floods and other naturally-


LlhBff. ffernn^,hfiiniii m I, l 5


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


occurring events is not
crime. However, loss from
stealing, rape and murder is
crime. Many work-related
incidents, such as extended
lunch hours and tardiness,
are also loss events.
We must also consider
that crimes such as driving
without the proper vehicle
inspection certificate or
licensing are also crimes, but
because they are seen as
minor threats to safety they
are regularly disregarded.
Yet as the story described
earlier, if they go unchecked
they create a breeding
ground for more serious
offences. What can be done
about this? Do we give up
hope or do we press on with
the ensuing battle? Unfortu-
nately, we cannot complete-
ly remove ourselves from
any of these occurrences;
they will happen in one form
or the other. With that said
we must now develop pre-
ventative and preparatory
measures so we might ade-
quately deal with them as
they occur. This is - and has
been - the premise for my
column, to recommend solu-
tions to the challenges of
crime and loss that may pre-
sent themselves.
As crime is on the minds
and, in some instances, the
hearts of many, it is only
appropriate to address these
issues and provide realistic
solutions to this dilemma.
As it pertains to loss events,
this is a bit more complex,
so preventative solutions
that pertain to management
styles will be suggested. A
'no rules' society that is free
from defined crime; some
have dared to say is the way
to go. This 'survival of the
fittest' mentality would take
us back to 'uncivilised' and
chaotic times, very similar to
the times we are living now
here in the Bahamas.
NB: Gamal Newry is the
president of Preventative
Measures, a loss prevention
and asset protection training
and consulting company,
specialising in policy and
procedure development,
business security reviews
and audits, and emergency
and crisis management.
Comments can be sent to
P.O. Box N-3154 Nassau,
Bahamas or e-mail
gnewry@gmail.com or visit
us at www.preventativemea-
sures.net


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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009


T I h I e I'll Tr I i 11 b I unle


THE TRIBUNE


l/





THE~UINS TRBNIHRDY ETME 4 09 AE3


Port urged


to


stop


licensing realtors


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas Real Estate
Association's (BREA) presi-
dent yesterday urged the
Grand Bahama Port Author-
ity (GBPA) to stop issuing
persons with real estate
licences, arguing that this was
creating unfair competition in
the Freeport market and
leave consumers exposed.
William Wong told Tribune
Business: "For several years
now, we've been trying to get
the Port Authority not to
issue persons with licences to
sell real estate because they're
not mandated to do so. They
can issue licences, but not for
the selling of real estate.
They're unleashing untrained
people on the market in
Freeport."
Mr Wong said the issue was
causing BREA's 70-plus
members in Freeport and
Grand Bahama "a lot of frus-
tration and a lot of stress, and
it's been going on for at least
the last 10 years."
The BREA president said
that for the last four to five
years, the organisation had
been trying to get the Port
Authority to recognize it as
the only licensing body for
realtors in Grand Bahama
and Freeport, but without suc-
cess.
Mr Wong said BREA's
position was that the 1995
Real Estate Act empowered
it as the sole boy to licence
practising realtors throughout
the Bahamas - including
Freeport and Grand Bahama.
The profession, he added, had
been placed on par with the


WILLIAM WONG


likes of architects, doctors and
attorneys in terms of being
able to self-regulate.
"For anyone to practice
real estate in Freeport they
need to be licensed by us,"
Mr Wong told Tribune Busi-
ness. "They [the Port Author-
ity] need to recognize this and
stop doing what they're
doing."
BREA said a legal opinion
on the issue that was drafted
on its behalf had been sent to
the Port Authority, but no
reply had been received.
"All the complaints we
have heard about in Freeport
recently have come from peo-
ple the Port has given a
licence to. People have been
putting themselves forward as
real estate agents and they're
not. That's against the law,"
Mr Wong said.
"We are trying to bring
some order to this Wild Wild
West. It's in everyone's inter-


"For several years now, we've been
trying to get the Port Authority not to
issue persons with licences to sell real
estate because they're not mandated to
do so. They can issue licences, but not
for the selling of real estate. They're
unleashing untrained people
on the market in Freeport."
- William Wong


ests for people to be licensed
so the public are protected.
We have 70-plus people in
Freeport paying dues, play-
ing by the rules, and the Port
is licensing people not play-
ing by the rules.


"Right now, the public are
not protected.
"BREA is the only author-
ity to licence realtors any-
where in the Bahamas, and
that's set out in an Act of Par-
liament."


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EEG Bank & TnAfrit (nhMff~Ltd continu~es to expand as evidenice~d by
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We = look~king for a se.asoned prfessiona] w~iih atrleast 10 years of scales
and marketing cxpcricricc in providing financial soul Lions to high net worth
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knowledge of inivestments, banking and trust services, The ability to servic
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The canididate rmust have a university degree- The individual must have the
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EFG offers an attractivec compensation plani that includes salar~y. benefits
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Fu~x (242) 502-M8S7


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 3B


0�.


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'The perfect location' for



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FROM page 1B

withal to stay in the game."
Mr Delaney said the G-
20/OECD offensive was
aimed at controlling interna-
tional financial centres and
the offshore world, rather
than eliminating it altogeth-
er.
As a result, he advocated
that there "is a place for inter-
national financial centres"
that were able to create effi-
cient structures, aggregate


investment capital from across
the globe and send it into G-
20/OECD states. These cen-
tres also needed to be well-
regulated and have a strong
brand reputation.
"Bahamian financial insti-
tutions have been preparing
for years for this sort of thing.
Since 200, they've been try-
ing to ensure they have a tax
compliant book of cus-
tomers," Mr Delaney said,
adding that banks and trust
companies regularly sought
opinions from tax attorneys
in their clients' home coun-


tries to ensure structures and
solutions were compliant.
Still, the Higgs & Johnson
managing partner urged: "We
must act. Nature has proven
very unkind to those who will
not adapt to change. One
thing is certain, and that is
change. We must adapt, and
must ensure all the ingredi-
ents required for success
exist."
Among these ingredients,
Mr Delaney suggested, were
possessing the "best talent",
which meant the Bahamas
"must invest more in educa-
tion that we have up till now".
The Bahamian workforce
in the financial services indus-
try also needed to be "sup-
plemented" with specialist,
skilled and high-end expatri-
ate talent, Mr Delaney sug-
gested that this nation needed
to examine its Immigration
policies and, if necessary,
make some changes if these
were not conducive to that
objective.
Other prerequisites, he sug-
gested, were improving the
administration of justice, plus
the efficiency and effective-
ness of the enforcement and
regulatory agencies.
While the Bahamas need-
ed to implement a "greater
effort" when it came to long-
term planning, and "invest
more in selling the brand",
Mr Delaney said this nation
had the "potential to be the
location of choice" for com-


panies who wanted to move
their operational base and
substantial activities offshore,
plus high net-worth individu-
als wanting to use this juris-
diction as their primary domi-
cile.
"That is an area where we
can compete more effectively
than any other international
financial centre," Mr Delaney
said, pointing out that the
Bahamas' 20-plus inhabited
islands created "ample room
for high-end residential devel-
opments".
This nation's location, close
to US metropolitan areas and
in the US east coast time
zone, meant that the Bahamas
was "ideal" as a base for both
companies and high net worth
individuals.
Mr Delaney said the
Bahamas needed to " - -. , -
sively go after" this market,
as the land purchase and
building boom it might cre-
ate would generate employ-
ment in sectors such as real
estate and construction.
Crime, though, would need
to be tackled.
"We are in a period of sig-
nificant global change that is
impacting our way of life," Mr
Delaney said. "I have every
confidence we will be able to
survive, and every confidence
we can get the job done."
To achieve this, the
Bahamas would need to
exploit its size and respond
with agility and efficiency.


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s, good
property


LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

ALAMOSA HOLDINGS LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of
2000), ALAMOSA HOLDINGS LTD, is in dissolution. New
World Trustees (Jersey) Limited is the Liquidator and can be
contacted at Norwich Union House, 8 Church Street, St. Helier,
Jersey, JE4 OSG, Channel Islands. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names, addresses and particular of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator before the 18th day of December, 2009.

Z___- --_
Liquidaor
New World TMrustees (Jerey) Limited



NOTICE


OF
DRD CORPORATION LTD.


Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above com-
pany commenced on the 28th day of August, 2009. Credit
Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre, Shir-
ley & Charlotte Streets, P.O.Box N-3023, Nassau, The Ba-
hamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.


Bahamas Business




!N WBA OECHNiOocGYM UIRED O Lo Y




From our office to y


'WirdessMdapem ~kXS~

COMPUTER STORE HP&a�me orI e It h Samora


0P& eniMAI,)'C~ea

ut)I


xerox NCR NM1


til go 2


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


NOTICE
HUDSON GLOBAL ENTERPRISES INC.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, HUDSON GLOBAL ENTERPRISES INC. is in
dissolution as of September 17, 2009.

Neofytos Nikolaou of Seychellon 14, 3067 Limassol,
Cyprus is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR


S. A. T. PREPARATION
CLASSES
AT KINGSWAY ACADEMY

Beginning Saturday September 26 through Saturday
December 5, 2009, Kingsway Academy will hold
S.A.T. Preparation Classes from 9:00 a.m. to
12:00 noon culminating in the writing of the S. A. T.
Examination in January. The cost is $250.00 per
person and includes all materials.

Interested persons are asked to contact the
Business Office at telephone 324-6887 / 324-6269
or the Guidance Conselor at 324-8811 or 324-3409.


Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


I leovo




THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 5B


China pushing for bigger IMF role at G-20


By JOE McDONALD
AP Business Writer


BEIJING (AP) - Beijing
is pressing for a bigger voice
in the International Monetary
Fund and says Group of 20
leaders at their Pittsburgh
summit should start making
good on promises to give
developing countries more
IMF votes.
The G-20 has agreed in
principle but could face an
obstacle: European govern-
ments, which hold a big share
of the IMF board seats and
are reluctant to accept
changes that might reduce
their own status in the IMF.
"For many of them, it's the
only way they can do some
grandstanding globally," said
Daniel Gros, director of the
Centre for European Policy
Studies in Brussels, the center
of the 27-nation European
Union. "They don't even
want to talk about it."
The agenda at the Septem-
ber 24-25 summit includes
possible curbs on financial
industry pay, joint economic
policy and whether to start
winding down stimulus spend-
ing. But for China, the prize is
greater representation in the
IMF, which Beijing sees as a
way to influence global eco-
nomic policy. Working
through such a multilateral
body could help to allay
unease abroad about rising
Chinese economic and politi-
cal power.
The change holds symbolic
appeal for Beijing, rearrang-
ing a global order that dates
to World War II and signify-
ing the start of a new era.
By tradition the IMF boss is
a European, while an Ameri-
can leads its sister institution,
the World Bank. The IMF
Executive Board has eight
directors from individual gov-
ernments - the United
States, Japan, France, Britain,
Germany, China, Russia and
Saudi Arabia. Sixteen seats
are assigned to groups of
nations from the Middle East,
Caribbean and other regions,


many of them represented by
a European government such
as Ireland or Belgium.
Increasing developing
countries' voting power might
require cutting the number of
European seats or creating
joint European Union seats.
Beijing has been unusually
assertive in pressing its
demands, reflecting its grow-
ing confidence as an econo-
my that has suffered little
damage from the worst glob-
al downturn since the 1930s.
Its banks avoided the turmoil
that battered Western
lenders, it has $2 trillion in
foreign reserves and it is
expected to be the first econ-
omy to recover from the
slump.
"We believe the Pittsburgh
summit should work toward
transferring voting power
from developed countries to
developing countries," said a
deputy governor of China's
central bank, Guo Qingping,
at a news conference this
week.
"At the same time, we hope
there will be more members
from developing countries in
the senior management of the
IMF," Guo said. "This will
help to increase representa-
tion and legitimacy of the
senior management."
Beijing wants developing
and developed countries to
have equal voting shares in
the IMF and World Bank,
said Zhu Guangyao, a deputy
finance minister. Currently,
developed countries hold 57
per cent of IMF shares and
56 per cent of World Bank
shares.
China announced Septem-
ber 2 it would buy the equiv-


INSIGHTu



Frthe sorie


alent of $50 billion of the
IMF's first bond sale. It is part
of the Fund's effort to raise
$500 billion for lending to
economies battered by the
global downturn.
This month in London, G-
20 finance ministers reaf-
firmed the group's promise of
reforms at the two institu-
tions. They stopped short of
committing to specific
changes but said World Bank
reforms will be completed by
the first half of 2010 and the
next IMF quota review -
which decides voting rights -
by January 2011.
In March, EU leaders
endorsed IMF reforms to
reflect "relative economic
weights in the world econo-
my" - a reference to new
economic powers such as Chi-
na, Brazil and India.
Britain, Germany and


France are confident they can
retain a leading role. But mid-
size nations such as the
Netherlands, with just 20 mil-
lion people, and Spain worry
about their status.
European politicians know
this and have hinted that
Europe could help defend its
voting share by increasing its
contribution to the new IMF
lending facility to 125 billion
euros ($180 billion) - or 35
per cent of the total.
"Maintaining a significant
share would ensure that EU
member states' views are ade-
quately represented," Ger-
man Finance Minister Peer
Steinbrueck and his French
counterpart, Christine
Lagarde, said in a joint state-
ment this month.
European governments are
resistant to accepting a joint
EU seat.


"We need to have a Euro-
pean leader who is basically
bold enough to overcome this
impasse" and persuade Euro-


peans to a reduction in their
representation, Gros said.
"But before that happens,
many years could pass."


rr.





CI DOCTORS HOSPITAL
E d ' S S -i"'



Physician Liaison:
Position: Responsible for the support of the development of clinical information
systems that assist physicians in the delivery of patient care. Participates as a
member of the MIS department in representing the needs and requirements of the
physician community and serves as an advocate of management in promoting the
use of information technology in the clinical setting. Works in partnership with
Physician Care Management Design and Implementation Teams to translate
clinician requirements into specifications for new clinical systems.
* Helps lead, and facilitate clinician advisory groups in the design of clinical
systems to support excellence in patient care. Engages patient care providers with
varying roles including physicians, nursing practitioners, nursing staff, ancillary
department personnel, & medical records professionals to contribute to the
development and use of the clinical information system. Develops empathy &
understanding of physician needs & builds relationships with physicians to gain
support of IT initiatives.
* Review medical information trends, experiences and approaches helps develop
technical and application implementation strategies and assists in the development
of strategic plans for clinical information systems.
Education & Experience: PhD qualification in medicine or a related
clinical background. (no physician licensing necessary for the post)
Special Range of Skills: Possess excellent interpersonal skills and can work
effectively with a diversity of personalities. Must be approachable, show respect for
others and be able to present data with effective communication and presentation
skills. Must be an effective consensus builder. Possess a good grasp of clinician
work flow in both inpatient and outpatient settings, interest in clinical information
system and outcomes measurement.

Please submit resume to: Human Resources Department I Doctors Hospital
P.O. Box N-3018 w | Nassau, Bahamas I or Email: info@doctorshosp.com
w w w . d o c t o rs h o s p . c o m


NAD
Nassau Airport
Development Company

Nassau Airport Development Company Limited 'NAD) is seeking a Proponent or
Proponents [ind ividual, consortium or joint venture that must include an experienced
newsstand operator) to final nce, design, develop, operate and manage three newsstand,
bookstofe and convenience shop locations in the new U,. Departures Terminal currency
under construction at the Lynden Pindling International Airpot, These stores will be
world class in operation, design and appearance with a distinctive'sense of place'and
will offer a broad selection of newspapers, magazines books, sundry & convenience
items and miscellaneous gifts at competitive prices.


1 [a] NEWSSTAND/BOOKSTOREIGIFTS In the U.S. Departures lounge
(b| NEWSSTAND KIOSK1COFFEE BAR/BAR in the U.S. Departures Concourse


2 NEWSSTANDJCONVENIENCE STORE/COFFEE BAR in U.S. Check-in.


Locations 1(a) and 1 [b) must be bid together. NAD will consider individual proposals for
11a]/(b) and 2 above or combined proposals for all locations.


Mandatory qualifications
i. Proponents must be Bahamian and incorporated in The Bahamas.
ii, Proponents must have operated a similar newsstandibooksigifts facility within
the last three (3) years.


NAD'S goals and objectives are to:
(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service;
(b) offer a mix of concepts that will help to enhance the image of LPIA as a world
class airport;
(c) offer retail and food & beverage choices to passengers at fair prices;
(d) offer a mix of local, regional and natiornl and international brand-name
companies;
(e) develop and design retail facilities that complement the qualities of the new
terminal while recognizing the distinctive spirit, character and 'sense of place'
of The Bahamas; and
(I) optimize revenue to NAD,


REQUEST FOR





PROPOSAL





NEWSSTANDS BOOKS, GIFTS AND

CONVENIENCE SHOPS


Qualified and interested parties may pick-up the Request for Proposal package at NAEYs
offices at the reception desk on the second floor Domestic/International Terminal at
Lynden Pindling International Airport between the hours of tO0am and 4O00pm, from

September 15th to September 28th, 2009. A mandatory pre-proposal briefing for
these who have picked up packages will be held in the Arawak Lounge at the Airport on
Wednesday, September 30th at 10:00am.


TO DICS TREUNTI AELGO OWWTIUE4.O


KING'S
REAL ESTATE




Real Estate Agents

Applicants must have:
* Outstanding personality
* Current BREA license
SMi nimum 2-ycanr experience
* Proven sales record

Apply to bahamas@kingsrealty.com
Deadline: September 30, 2009
Information: 394-4397


I












Small business





angst rises as





tax deadline





draws near


By JOYCE M
ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK (AP) -
These are anxious times for
some small business owners
who face an October 15 due
date for their 2008 income tax
returns. These owners got
extensions of the deadline for
filing their returns back in
April but aren't ready to file.
Or, they can't pay the gov-
ernment the money they owe.
Some of them are just dis-
organised. Others might be
having a cash flow crunch.
No matter what the prob-
lem is, if you're one of these
owners, you must submit your
return by the deadline or face
big penalties for late filing.
And not filing your return will
only prolong the agony.
If your issue is disorganisa-
tion, it's time to rethink not
just how you're running your
taxes, but your overall busi-
ness. And maybe more than
that.
"My observation of these
types of people is that it's not
just their business that runs
this way, it's their life," said
Gordon Spoor, a certified
public accountant in St Peters-
burg, Florida.
Despite the availability and
simplicity of software that
helps small businesses keep
their books and compile their
tax returns, many of these
owners have piles of receipts,
invoices and statements that
they bundle up and take to
their CPAs or tax lawyers
each year. Tax professionals
call these owners shoeboxx
clients," and many preparers
don't want to work with them,
especially since they tend to
show up right before the filing
deadline looking for service.
The solution for these own-
ers is clear: Get help, either
from software, or get some-
one else to help you keep
your accounts year-round.
There are good, even critical
reasons for doing this. Spoor
pointed out that a CPA who
charges a client $300 an hour
for tax prep will also charge
$300 an hour to sort through
piles of receipts and invoices.
That is money badly spent.
Moreover, a disorganised
owner often doesn't have a
good handle on how the busi-
ness is doing, and that could


"My observation of

these types of people

is that it's not just

their business that

runs this way,

it's their life."


- Gordon Spoor, certified
public accountant


be a threat to the company's
survival.
Some business owners just
don't want to work with com-
puters. Gregg Wind, a CPA
with Wind Bremer Hocken-
berg LLP in Los Angeles,
suggests some easy, low-tech
organisation tips: "If you do
nothing else, set up folders
and drop invoices in there."
The good news is there is
still time to sort through the
paper, input the data into a
programme and get it to a tax
professional. It may take a
day or two, but it'll save mon-
ey in the long run.
If your papers are so disor-
ganised that you have many
missing checks or invoices, or
can't figure out which receipts
go with which payments, do
the best you can. But be up-
front with the government
and tell the IRS you're filing
an estimated return. You can
always amend it in the future.
Spoor recalled the case of a
client whose disorganisation,
the result of serious personal
problems, extended back
more than a decade. When
the client, who hadn't filed
returns during that time,
decided to settle up with the
government, many of his
records didn't exist.
"We constructed estimates
based on what we knew,"
Spoor said. "The IRS accept-
ed it."
October 15 is generally a
hard and fast deadline for fil-
ing a return if you've had an
extension. The IRS has been
known to make exceptions in


some cases, but Spoor noted,
"being a disorganised small
business owner is not a rea-
sonable cause."
Wind noted that e-filing, or
submitting your return to the
government online, can buy
you a little more time.
The IRS is quite clear on
its Web site, www.irs.gov,
about the reasons you should
file your return on time. "If
taxes are owed, a delay in fil-
ing may result in penalty and
interest charges that could
increase your tax bill by 25
percent or more."
The government does rec-
ognize that not everyone can
afford to pay their taxes right
away. While it will charge
interest on taxes not paid on
time, it is willing to work out a
payment schedule.
If you owe the government
$25,000 or less in taxes, penal-
ties and interest, you can
apply to set up an installment
agreement. There are several
ways to do this. One is to
download and complete IRS
Form 9465, Installment
Agreement Request. Or, you
can use the Online Payment
Agreement Application at
www.irs.gov/individuals/arti-
cle/0,,id149373,00.html.
However, if you can pay
the IRS your entire bill with-
in 120 days, the agency says
you can avoid the fees for set-
ting up an agreement. You
need to call an IRS toll-free
number, 1-800-829-1040 to
arrange for this option.
If you owe the government
more than $25,000, you may
need to complete Form 433-F,
Collection Information State-
ment, which asks for infor-
mation including your assets,
liabilities and income.
Whatever the reason for an
owner's October 15 anxiety,
it's a good idea to meet with
an accountant or other finan-
cial adviser to figure out how
to prevent it from becoming
an annual occurrence. Since
the year is nearly three-quar-
ters over, "people should be
thinking about getting organ-
ised for next year's tax plan-
ning," Wind said.
"And if they're going to
talk to a CPA about 2008,
they should spend a few min-
utes talking about 2009," he
said.









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your

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award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
BAHAMAS NATIONAL DRUG AGENCY

PUBLIC NOTICE
SUPPLEMENTARY TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY
OF DRUGS AND RELATED ITEMS

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and Related
Items for the Public Hospitals Authority and the Ministry
of Health, The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

The Supplementary Tender Document, which includes
instruction to the Tenderers along with other relevant
information, can be collected from the Bahamas National
Drug Agency, Market & McPherson Streets, from
Thursday 24th, September 2009 from 9 am - 5 pm.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicated in a sealed
envelope or package identified as "Supplementary
Tender for the Supply of Drug and Related Items" and
addressed to:

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
Third Terrace, West Centerville
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau, The Bahamas

Electronic and hard copies must be received at the above
address on or before 5pm Friday, October 16th, 2009. A
copy of a valid business license and Nationals Insurance
Certificate must accompany all proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to
reject any or all Tender(s).

Director


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE






PAGEBSIES BIHRDY ETMER2,20 H RBN


TAK FUMRNIR


*SALE*
10-50% OFF
GMi, Nandicrams Balk Clotlhmg
Sept. 26th - 24th Oct.
OPEN 10am - 5pm


KURA KURA
26 Virginia St., Tel; 325 - 1389
1 bik west of Hiton hotel entrance, in large two story
turquwose building, on one way westbound Street



(,a- ..*e..w.tiia, s- . .
. T


W. I UAs n r. ii
--: -. - --.-. :-- --.. .. ----- - -. ..-:: -
-. -- --.- - ---.i_-- .- . .












GN-919
GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF

FINANCE

THE REAL PROPERTY TAX
ACT. 1969
Pursuant to Section 7(2) of the Real Property Tax Act, 1969, as amended,
the Chief Valuation Officer hereby gives notice:-
(a) that copies of the assessment list are available as required by
subsection (4) of Section 7 of the Real Property Tax Act, 1969
(hereinafter in this notice referred to as the Act) and may be
inspected at the Valuation Office or the Treasury, on or after 15th
October, 2009.
(b) that a Notice of Assessment addressed to each owner of property
liable to tax under the Act is available at the Valuation Office,
located at Frederick House, Frederick Street and may be collected
there from by or on behalf of the owner of such property during
normal working hours;
(c) that pursuant to subsection (3) of Section 7 of the Act, upon the
expiration of five (5) days after the publication of this notice, a
Notice of Assessment shall be deemed to have been served on
every owner of property liable to tax under the Act;
(d) that without prejudice to the provision of subsection (3) of Section
7 of the Act, the Chief Valuation Officer may at any time after the
publication in the Gazette of this notice send by post, a Notice of
Assessment addressed to any owner of property liable to tax under
the Act;
(e) That pursuant to Section 11(1) any person aggrieved by a notice
of assessment deemed to have been served under this Act may
object thereto by serving on Chief Valuation Officer within thirty
days after the date on which the notice of assessment is deemed
to have been served, a notice in writing of such objection stating
the grounds upon which he relies.
(f) that pursuant to Section 18 of the Act (but subject to provisions of
Section 11(1)* of the Act) the tax in respect of property will be
due and payable by the owners of property not later than sixty days
after the date on which notice of assessment is deemed to have
been served. Accordingly, it is the duty of each taxpayer to ensure
that he receives a Notice of Assessment;
(g) that the exemption has been allowed for 2009 on those properties
which have been declared as owner-occupied residences, and have
satisfied the conditions under Section 2(d) of the Real Property
Tax (amendment) Act 2009. However, owners are by law, Section
(43)(1) required to disclose to the Chief Valuation Officer any
change in the circumstances of occupation which does not entitle
the property to the exemption allowed. *(Section 43 is reproduced
below):
(h) that pursuant to Section 7 (3) of the Act, persons receiving a Notice
of Assessment and Demand Note for the first time should therefore
examine the columns labeled 'Current Tax', 'Accumulated Arrears
of Tax' and 'Total Now Due', as it would indicate the amount due
for current and prior years.
(i) that if you are a Bahamian citizen/company and own improved
property situate in New Providence or a non-Bahamian
citizen/company (less than 60 percent of shares beneficially owned
by citizens of The Bahamas) and own property situate in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and have never received a Notice
of Assessment and Demand Note, you are required by Section (10)
of the Act to make a declaration of your property not later than
31st December, 2009. Declaration forms for this purpose are
available at the Valuation Section or online at
https://forms.bahamas.gov.bs and shouldbereturned accompanied
by documentary proof of Bahamian citizenship and in the case of
a Bahamian Company, a copy of the Company's latest annual
statement of return.
* Section 11 (1) is as follows:-
The Chief Valuation Officer shall dismiss any such objection unless the
whole of the tax payable under the Notice of Assessment shall have been
deposited with him or for good cause, the Chief Valuation Officer determines
that the objector shall be relieved of the requirements of this subsection
in whole or in part and is satisfied that the objector has complied with any
such determination which gives partial relief only.
Section 43 is as follows:-
(1) Any owner who is granted an exemption under the provisions of
Section 42(1)(f), by reason of the property qualifying as owner-
occupied property, shall where he is aware of any circumstances
or facts which do not entitle the property to the exemption disclose
to the Chief Valuation Officer those circumstances or facts;


Sandals exec




blasts Exuma




Chamber boss


FROM page 1B

resulted in hundreds of
Bahamians without their
livelihoods. This is not a path
we intend to follow, and for
that reason we will take the
time we need to ensure suc-
cess and do not welcome let-
ters such as yours.
"Not only is it impossible
to provide the information
you have asked for, it's not
your place to ask for it. As a
businessman, I'm sure you
would take the perceived lack
of information at this present


time and exchange it for a
successful resort in the
future."
Mr DaCosta pointed to
Sandals' 14 years of operat-
ing in the Bahamas, and its
"strong affinity" and "deep
love for the people".
He added that Sandals had
"continued to invest when
others have not, and the
acquisition of Sandals Emer-
ald Bay has once again
demonstrated our love for
these islands and its people.
"The success of our organ-
isation is based on a tried and


tested formula, a fundamental
part of which is sound plan-
ning. We leave nothing to
chance, and everything hap-
pens for a reason. It is due to
this that we can boast some
of the highest average occu-
pancies in the region, bene-
fiting economies and commu-
nities in which we are."
Mr DaCosta said Sandals
was open and easy to work
with "providing one respects
the boundaries of the part-
nership, and doesn't overstep
the mark, as has happened
here".


*F ;-rriU brrnn

Rel st.


15


Top attorney


is charged


with money


laundering

FROM page 1B

surrounding Mr Cambridge.
The indictment then
alleged that Eggelleton
offered to provide the under-
cover FBI agents with con-
tacts in the Bahamian finan-
cial services industry around
July 31, 2006, stating that " in
the Bahamas, he does not
have to adhere to the ethical
restrictions he has in the Unit-
ed States".
That offer was repeated in
October 2006, the indictment
alleged, Eggelleton the fol-
lowing month telling an
unnamed hotelier with
Bahamas connections that the
FBI agents needed help in
establishing a Bahamian bank
account and company.
However, the hotelier and
another man, referred to as
'E.D', who had "very good
connections in the Bahamas",
were "frightened" and "scep-
tical" about helping Eggel-
leton and the FBI agents,
especially after the latter told
Eggelleton they wanted to
hide and launder proceeds
from a fictitious 'fraudulent'
investment scheme.
Instead, Eggelleton alleged-
ly introduced the undercover
agents to the two other defen-
dants in the case, Joel
Williams and Ronald Owens,
who would assist them with
their banking needs.
The pair met an undercov-
er FBI agent in Nassau on
March 6, 2007. After hearing
of the need to conceal and
launder proceeds from the
fake financial fraud, Williams
was alleged to have said that
"in the Bahamas, they did not
call it money laundering as
long as the money did not
come from arms, drugs or ter-
rorists".
Agent
Around the same time, the
FBI agent and the two defen-
dants allegedly met with Mr
Cambridge. He was said to
have provided the undercover
agent with an application
form for opening a Bahamian
International Business Com-
pany (IBC) and wiring
instructions to the attorney's
trust account at First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas).
Then, on March 20, 2007,
the undercover agents
allegedly sent Mr Cambridge
a $100,000 wire transfer from
a Miami bank. Eight days lat-
er, the Bahamian attorney
allegedly took the FBI agent
to meet 'S.B', a First-
Caribbean banker, to be inter-
viewed and sign bank account
opening documents for Hexa-
gon Development.
The indictment alleged that
the undercover agent paid
$7,000 to be shared between
Mr Cambridge and the other
defendants on March 30,
2007.
From then on, Mr Cam-
bridge was alleged to have
transferred $97,000 from his
trust account to the Hexagon
Development account on
April 4, 2007, and received a
$200,000 wire transfer in May
2007. He then allegedly trans-
ferred $199,000 from the
Hexagon Development
account with FirstCaribbean
to a bank account in St Croix.
Between August 30, 2007,
and November 23, 2007, Cam-
bridge was alleged to have
received three wire transfers,
valued at $200,000 each, from
the undercover agents.
"On or about November
23, 2007, at Nassau, Bahamas,
defendant Cambridge was
told by an undercover agent
that the funds came from a
'Ponzi' scheme," the indict-
ment alleged. "After acknowl-
edging his understanding of
the purported source of the
funds, defendant Cambridge
instructed undercover agents


how to launder the proceeds
in the Bahamas."
That same day, Mr Cam-
bridge was alleged to have
told the FBI agent he
received $2,000, not $1,000,
for laundering the money, and
the same day gave him a
$399,000 cheque to deposit
into the Hexagon bank
account at FirstCaribbean
International Bank
(Bahamas).


I ODSUS STOIE ON THI 0AG 0LG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


URGENT NOTICE







DUE TO THE LACK OF A QUORUM


ALL MEMBERS Of

Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos


Cooperative Credit Union (BIRCCCU)

Limited Are Urged To Attend The


Special Called Meeting


Which Will NOW Be Held


Date:
Saturday, October 3', 2009


Location:

Grounds Of The Credit Union

Time:

10:00 A.M.


Purpose of The Meeting:


To Discuss & Vote On The Proposed Opening

Up Of Our Bond To Allow Your Family To

Become Members Of BIRCCCU Ltd.

UV S0


(2) Any owner who knowingly fails to comply with the requirements
of subsection (1) is guilty of an offense and liable on summary
conviction to a fine of one thousand dollars or to imprisonment
for a term of three months or to both such fine and imprisonment;
and the court shall upon conviction of an offender, in addition to
any other penalty imposed, order the offender to pay to the Treasurer
a sum equivalent to twice the amount of the tax which would have
been payable but for the exemption had the disclosure been made;
(3) No limitations as to the time within which proceedings may be
brought for the prosecution of a summary offense shall apply to
proceedings under subsection (2).
Chief valuation Officer/
Controller Of Inland Revenue
Ministry Of Finance


I


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


I












Cable attacks 'flawed' retail price analysis


FROM page 1B

As a result, there was "no
justification" to introduce new
retail price regulations with
respect to any of its services
due to price level concerns,
Cable Bahamas argued.
The company compared 16
other Caribbean countries to
the monthly fee charged for
its CoralWave Jazz Internet
service, priced at $21.70, with
a download speed of 1,500
kilobytes per second and
upload of 256 kilobytes per
second.
"The average monthly sub-
scription price for compara-
ble services in the other 17
Caribbean countries surveyed


(excluding the Bahamas) is
$47.33, which is about 118 per
cent higher than Cable
Bahamas monthly price of
$21.70," Cable Bahamas said
in its submission to the Utili-
ties Regulatory and Compe-
tition Authority (URCA).
"Looking at the price per
kilobytes, the average
(excluding the Bahamas) is
$0.039, which is about 178 per
cent higher than Cable
Bahamas' per channel price
of $0.014. These results indi-
cate the robustness of the con-
clusion that Cable Bahamas
prices are lower."
On the cable TV front,
Cable Bahamas used as its
benchmark its SuperBASIC


Re: Lot # 12, Block # 86, Richmond Park
Subdivision, Unit 3R Freeport, Grand Bahama

,. . . ..








Recently Constructed Six-Plex

Five Units:
One bedroom one bathroom, living and dining
area, kitchen and laundry area.

One Unit:
Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, a powder room,
living and dining room, family room, kitchen,
office and laundry room and arctic area.

Potential Income:
One bedroom units $3,250.00 per month
Four bedrooms unit $1,400.00 per month.

For conditions of sale and any
other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas


Interested persons should
submit offer in writing addressed to
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
P. O. Box N-7518 Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before October 9th, 2009



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009/CLE/gen/00040
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division

BETWEEN
SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
BARBARAA. DEVEAUX
Defendant
To: Barbara Deveuax

TAKE NOTICE that

1. An action has been commenced against you by
Scotiabank (Bahamas) limited in the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas by Writ of Summons filed on the 15th of January
2009 being Action No. 2009/CLE/gen/00040, wherein the
Plaintiff's claim is for the total sum of $34,279.08 which
represents the principal sum of $24,266.51, accrued
interest on the said principal in the sum of $9,316.57,
add-on charges in the sum of $616.00, interest on the said
add-on charges in the sum of $127.14 and late fees in the
sum of $80.00 due under a loan numbered 1746456.

2. It has been ordered that service of the Writ of
Summons in the said action be effected on you
by virtue of this advertisement

3. You must within 21 days from the publication of this
advertisement inclusive of the day of such publication,
acknowledge service of the said Writ of Summons
by entering an Memorandum of Appearance on the
Attorneys whose name and address appear below,
otherwise judgment may be entered against you.

Dated the 22nd day of SeptemberA.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Plaintiff


service that includes between
48 to 54 video channels at a
monthly price of $30.
The BISX-listed utility
provider said: "The average
monthly subscription price for
comparable services in the
other 12 Caribbean countries
surveyed (excluding the
Bahamas) is $38.39, which is
about 28 per cent higher than
Cable Bahamas' monthly
price of $30.
"Looking at the price per
channel, the average (exclud-
ing the Bahamas) is $0.75,
which is also about 28 per
cent higher than Cable
Bahamas per channel price of
$0.60."
To further back its case,
Cable Bahamas pointed to
the fact that Bahamian gross
domestic product (GDP) per
capital, based on purchasing
power parity, was relatively
high in the Caribbean con-
text.
In addition, the Bahamas'
population density was one
of the lowest in the region,
preventing the company from
exploiting economies of den-
sity, as it alleged that it was
further disadvantaged by hav-
ing to provide services to mul-
tiple islands - instead of the


one normally served by rivals.
Cable Bahamas then
moved to justify its case for a
rise in the $30 per month rate
for its basic cable TV pack-
age it has been forced to levy
since 1994, pointing out that
the Bahamian all-items infla-
tion index had increased by
30 per cent over the same 15-
year period.
"More specially in the case
of Cable Bahamas' operating
costs, since 1995 Cable
Bahamas' programming costs
per subscriber for basic cable
TV service have increased by
roughly 95 per cent," the com-
pany said.
"Salary and benefit costs
per subscriber (for customer
service, technical and IT and
administrative personnel have
increased by over 200 per
cent, and other operating
expenses per subscriber
(including plant maintenance,
electricity, vehicles) have also
increased by over 200 per
cent."
Cable Bahamas contrasted
this situation with what had
happened in the US, pointing
out that in response to
increased operating costs,
cable companies there had on
average increased basic TV


package fees from $22 per
month in 1995 to $49.65 in
2008, a 122 per cent increase.
Over the same period, infla-
tion, as measured by the US
consumer price index, grew
by just 38 per cent.


"Cable Bahamas is simply
not in a position to hold basic
cable TV service price con-
stant at $30 indefinitely with-
out significant deterioration
in the quality of that service,"
Cable Bahamas said.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009/CLE/gen/00119
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division

BETWEEN

SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
KELPHINE D. JOHNSON
Defendant
To: Kelphine D. Johnson

TAKE NOTICE that

1. An action has been commenced against you
by Scotiabank (Bahamas) Umited in the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas by Writ of Summons filed on
the 30th of January 2009 being Action No. 2009/CLE/
gen/00119, wherein the Plaintiff's claim is for the total
5um of $28,367.40 which represents the principal
sum of $15,047.39, accrued interest on the said
principal in the sum of $10,751.51, add-on charges
in the sum of $912.85, and interest on the said add-
on charges in the sum of $1,655.65 due under a loan
numbered 1579053 and the principal sum of $1,118.76
due under a Mastercard No. 5449 68501002 7759.

2. It has been ordered that service of the Writ of
Summons in the said action be effected on you by virtue of
this advertisement

3. You must within 21 days from the publication of this
advertisement inclusive of the day of such publication,
acknowledge service of the said Writ of Summons
by entering an Memorandum of Appearance on the
Attorneys whose name and address appear below,
otherwise judgment may be entered against you.

Dated the 22nd day of SeptemberA.D., 2009
GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Plaintiff



GN-922







JUDICIAL AND LEGAL SERVICE COMMISSION

VACANCY NOTICE

Stipendiary & Circuit Magistrate
Office Of The Judiciary
New Providence & The Family Islands

Applications are invited from suitably qualified
persons for appointment as resident Stipendiary
and Circuit Magistrates in:

(a) New Providence;
(b) Abaco;
(c) Andros;
(d) Eleuthera;
(e) Exuma;
(f) Long Island.

Applicants must be members of the English, Irish,
Scottish or Bahamian Bars or of the Bar of any
country of the Commonwealth to which a member
of The Bahamas Bar is admitted without
examination. In addition, they must be at least five
(5) years in the above-mentioned countries.

The duties of the post are as set out in The
Magistrates Act Chapter 42 of the Statute Laws of
The Bahamas and all other applicable Statutes as
well as The Common Law, where applicable, and
all rules made thereunder, and all other statutory
duties which may be prescribed from time to time.

The Salary of the post is in Scale JL14 - $49,800
x 700 to 55,400 per annum, with a Responsibility
Allowance of $4,000 per annum and a Scarcity
Allowance of $7,500 per annum. Housing and
Utilities, along with a vehicle, are attached to the
positions in the Family Islands only.

Serving officers must apply through their Heads
of Departments.

Application forms may be obtained from the
Judicial & Legal Service Commission, 3rd Floor,
Ansbacher House, East Street & Bank Lane, and
should be returned to the Secretary, P.O. Box N-
167, Nassau, The Bahamas, not later than Friday,
16th October, 2009.


IODSCUSS STOIS ON THIS PAG LO NTSW.RIUE4.O


GN-921









Ministry Of Finance


Licensing Authority



PUBLIC NOTICE

The Licensing Authority wishes to remind the public
that in accordance with the instructions issued, with
every Music and Dancing License, it is an offense to
disturb the peace in any way, whether by the volume
of the music being played in your establishment or by
the behaviour of the patrons of your establishment.

Over the past several months the Board has received
many complaints related to disturbance. Investigation
by the Police has proven that many owners and operators
of establishments are abusing their Music and Dancing
License and causing much distress to their neighbours.

The Board wishes to reiterate its policies with regard
to Music and Dancing Licenses. All establishments
holding Music and Dancing Licenses are required to
contain their music within the confines of their building
and that music should not be heard outside of the
building. Further, at no time should music be played on
the outside of the building. Recently some establishments
have circumvented these rules by applying for Occasional
Licenses covering days of the week when they wish to
move music out onto the street and to extend their hours.
In many cases their requests are submitted as medical
cookouts or promotional days and, being
accommodating, the Board has often granted these
requests only to discover subsequently that the entire
neighbourhood has been disrupted and disturbed.

The Board hereby gives notice that no further Occasional
Licenses will be given for any space directly outside
any establishment. The Board wishes to commend
owners and operators who put on promotional events
and encourage them to hold these events in public areas
designated for such events and for which there is already
in place the means by which police monitoring and
oversight can be offered. Places include Public Parks,
R.M. Bailey Park, Arawak Cay, Western Esplanade,
and Goodman's Bay and other areas approved by the
police.

The method of obtaining such license is as follows:

For liquor only: make application to Roads and Parks,
Ministry of Works and Transport or the relevant
Government agency to use the chosen site; if granted,
take this permit to the Officer in Charge of Licensing
at Police District Headquarters and request a Vendor's
Permit.

We suggest that this be done at least one week in advance
of your function.

Upon receipt of permission from the Police, take your
documents to The Licensing Authority and you will
receive your license within two working days.

For food sold with liquor: In addition to the above,
you must also obtain a health certificate for at least two
persons and request that Environmental Health inspect
the place where the food will be prepared and issue you
a Food Vendors Permit.

For food only: Environmental Health Food Vendor's
Permit and a Police Vendor's Permit are required. No
permit from the Licensing Authority is required.

The Board
The Licensing Authority of New Providence


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 9B





PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Asian markets lower as





monthslong rally sputters


BANGKOK (AP) -
Asian stock markets fell
Wednesday as a monthslong
rally sputtered and investors
waited for clues from the US
Federal Reserve about the
global recovery's strength.
European shares were high-
er.
Oil prices hovered above
$71 a barrel following a big
jump overnight while the US
dollar continued to languish,
falling against the yen and
euro. Japan's market was
closed for a national holiday.


Asian markets were invig-
orated Tuesday by the Asian
Development Bank raising its
growth forecasts for China
and India, two of the region's
biggest economies.
Investors have piled into
Asian equities this year but
some analysts say the rally,
fueled by loose monetary pol-
icy and government stimulus
spending, has gotten ahead of
economic reality.
Markets in Europe were
higher in early trade with
benchmarks in Germany,


NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE MARTHE BALLOT
of P.O. Box AB-20554, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 17th day of September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


SRoiad Trffic Departmeat

Road Safth 0 Compeition


I'n okvin' it


A i. f i i if r, d IIiruirL


A


WilnE_
MMLR-


TTlEPIm[~:


Iv.W v-ps bh dr3ki..u i - .n4J 1:.-r -J
h.U *j Lzc ..Tv .J .v . I d'rIV.. U� IT. l .. JI

~ir.4'.v. 4 df. :q4,47*h.. :
o m:, kL jl..z4i ki*.a:. !. I q. L.kJ I '' .

I,,t i� d %Y- wd











V

V





tE







1~


France and Britain up 0.5 per
cent or more.
Hong Kong's Hang Seng
index fell 105.62, or 0.5 per
cent, to 21,595.52 and South
Korea's Kospi dropped 7.41,
or 0.4 per cent, to 1,711.47.
Australia's benchmark gained
1.5 per cent while China's
Shanghai index shed 1.9 per
cent as investors cashed out
ahead of a slew of new initial
public offerings.
Elsewhere, New Zealand's
market rose 0.2 per cent after
its economy unexpectedly


grew in the second quarter.
Singapore's index was frac-
tionally higher and Taiwan
fell 1.9 per cent. India's Sen-
sex was down 0.1 per cent.
"All the markets are over-
bought and people are waiting
for a reason or catalyst to take
profits," said Peter Lai, invest-
ment manager at DBS Vick-
ers in Hong Kong.
Some economic data from
the US, the world's largest
economy, has showed signs of
improvement but unemploy-
ment is likely to continue ris-


ing, resulting in a weak recov-
ery, he said.
Investors will watch closely
what the Fed has to say about
the economy and the scale of
the recovery after its meeting
wraps up Wednesday. The
Fed is widely expected to
leave rock-bottom interest
rates unchanged, though
investors will be looking for
clues in the central bank's
statement about when hikes
might start.
Also toward the end of the
week, markets will be focus-
ing on the Group of 20 meet-
ing of the world's leading
economies on Thursday and
Friday in Pittsburgh.
In the US Tuesday, the
Dow Jones industrial average
rose 51.01, or 0.5 per cent, to
9,829.87, its highest close since
October 6, when it finished at
9,956.
The broader Standard &


Poor's 500 index gained 7.00,
or 0.7 per cent, to 1,071.66,
while the Nasdaq composite
index rose 8.26, or 0.4 per
cent, to 2,146.30. Both index-
es are at 11-month highs.
Futures pointed to gains
Wednesday on Wall Street.
Dow futures were up 19, or
0.2 per cent, at 9,790.
Oil prices hovered above
$71 a barrel in Asia as signs of
weak crude demand were off-
set by a slumping US dollar.
Benchmark crude for Novem-
ber delivery was down eight
cents at $71.68 a barrel by late
afternoon Singapore time in
electronic trading on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.
The contract added $1.83 a
barrel to settle at $71.76 on
Tuesday.
In currencies, the dollar fell
to 90.97 yen from 91.15 yen.
The euro rose to $1.4795 from
$1.4788.


Medical

Sales Representative


Introduction:
A local healthcare supplier is currently looking to
recruit a Medical Sales Representative to sell
medical and surgical products in the local market.
With this position experience in ihe lealthcare
field would be an asset but is not essential.

Job Specification:
Main Purpose of the Medical Sales Representative:
- To achieve sales targets for the various product
lines through planned activity.
- Maintain business records for all Health Care
Professionals and key accounts within the local
healthcare industry to help select and deliver
business management objectives linked to sales
and market share growth.

SkillslExperience Requiremments:
- Excellent communication and Interpersonal
skills.
- Tenacious, driven and resilient,
- Good planning and organizational skills.
- Self discipline and self motivated.
- Interested in the healthcare indust.
- Ability to interpret data.
- Ambitious and keen to develop a career in a
successful organization
- Able to provide evidence of individual
achievement in line with core comnpetencies of
a medical representative, this can be from other
fields of employment, education and social and
sporting activities.

Education Requirements:
- Degree Level or equivalent, ideally in sales or
medical related

The area covered is the Caribbean, You will live
in the Bahamas and be prepared to travel.

The Salary offered for the Medical Representative
is competitive and depends on experleoce +
bonus + benefits.

To apply for this position, candidates must be
eligible to live and work In the Bahamas,

Please send resume's to
medrephumanresources@gmrnail.comr


5. Provisional time table:
NASSAU/ANDROS TOWN

ANDROS TOWN/NASSAU


Local Times
0630/0645 Daily
1530/1545"
0700/0715"
1600/1615"


6. Frequency of flights: See above time-table.

7. Type of Aircraft: EMBRAER-110, CESSNA 402-C &
PIPER AZTECS

Any representation regarding or objection thereto in
accordance with Regulation 10 must be received by the
Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Tourism & Aviation & the
Department of Civil Aviation within fourteen (14) days after
the date of first publication of this Notice.

Signed
HYACINTH PRATT
PERMANENT SECRETARY


ITDISCS STOIE ON THI PAG LOG ON TOWWTIUE4.O


NOTICE is hereby given that KENOL LOUIS PIERRE of P.O.
Box AB-20541, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 17th day of September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE is hereby given that WILSON AUSTRAL of TREASURE
CAY, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 17th day of September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-
7147, Nassau, Bahamas.







The Public is hereby advised that I, NAWAKO KIKI ROLLE of
STAPLEDON GARDENS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, intend
to change the name to MAWAKO KIKI ROLLE. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objectionstotheChief PassportOfficer, P.O. BoxN-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.




GN-917




MINISTRY OF TOURISM & AVIATION DEPARTMENT
OF CIVIL AVIATION

PUBLICATION BY THE MINISTRY OF
TRANSPORT & AVIATION DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL
AVIATION PARTICULARS OF AN APPLICATION TO
OPERATE SCHEDULED AIR SERVICES

In accordance with the provisions of Regulation
9 of the Civil Aviation (Licensing of Air Services)
Regulations 1976, the Minister responsible for
Aviation hereby publishes the following particulars
of the under-mentioned applicant to operate
scheduled air services to and from The Bahamas.

PARTICULARS OF APPLICATION

1. Application: LEAIR CHARTER SERVICE LTD.

2. Date of first publication: 17th September, 2009

3. Routes: BETWEEN NASSAU ON THE ONE
HAND AND ANDROS TOWN ON THE OTHER.
4. Purpose of services: Passenger, mail and freight.


ROYAL9FIDELITY
^^^^fghw 4^ Money at Wwk LN q
C FA L" : �.I_ N I iA L_
I~ , � Tn- -, ,- T- ,T,,,-n ,
TUESDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1 513.891 CHG -0 771 .CHG -0 05 I YTD -198.47 I YTD ' -11.59
FINDEX CLOSE 789 77 I YTD -540 I 2008 -12.31--
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM I TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 I FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52 k.-H 52 k-L Secur....., Pe..... UCloe Tod sCloe Ch.ng. D.l, Vol EPS D,. i PE Yeld
1 81 1 03 AML Foods Limited 1 14 1 03 -0 11 1,000 0 127 0 000 81 O 00%
11 80 990 Bahamas Property Fund 1075 1075 000 0992 0200 108 1 86%
930 5 90 Bank of Bahamas 590 5 90 0 00 0244 0260 242 441%
089 063 Benchmark 063 063 0 00 0 877 0 000 N/M 0 00%
349 315 Bahamas Waste 315 315 00 0078 0090 40 4 286%
237 214 Fdelty Bank 237 237 0 00 0 055 0040 43 1 1 69%
1420 10 00 Cable Bahamas 1003 1003 0 00 1 406 0250 71 249%
2 88 274 Cona Holdings 2 74 2 74 0 00 236 0249 040 11 0 1 46%
7 50 5 26 Commonwealth Bank (1) 592 592 0 00 0 419 0 300 14 1 5 07%
385 1 27 Conso Idated Water BDRs 362 344 018 0111 0052 31 0 1 51%
285 1 32 Doctor's Hospital 205 205 0 00 0 382 080 5 4 3 90%
8 20 6 60 Famguard 660 660 0 00 0 420 0 240 15 7 3 64%
150 8 80 Fnco 930 930 0 00 0322 0520 289 559%
1171 10 00 FrstOabbean Bank 1 00 1 00 0 00 0794 0350 126 350%
5 53 4 95 Focol (S) 499 499 0 00 0 332 0 150 15 0 3 01%
100 1 00 Focol Class B Preference 00 100 0 00 0 000 0 000 N/M 0 00%/
045 027 Freepot Concrete 027 027 0 00 0035 0000 7 7 0 00%
902 5 49 IO Utilities, 550 550 0 00 0407 0 500 135 9 09%
1200 998 J S Johnson 998 998 000 0952 0640 105 641%
1000 10 00 Premier Real Estate 10 00 10 00 000 0180 0 000 55 6 0 00%
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest Maturity
100000 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100 00 0 00 7% 19 October 2017
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100 00 0 00 Prime + 1 75% 19 October 2022
100000 100000 Fdelty Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 00 0 00 7% 30 May 2013
1000 00 1000 00 Fdelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 1000 00 Prime + 1 75% 29 May 2015
Fidelity Over-The-Counter SecUritlas
52 k-Hi 52 k-Lo Symbol Bid i Ask - it LsL Puce '.eekl Vol EPS i DI. i P E Yield
460 792 Bahamas Supermarkets 792 842 1400 2 246 0 000 N/M 0 00%
8 00 6 00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2 00 6 25 4 00 000 0 480 N/M 7 80%
054 020 RND Holdings 0 35 0 40 0 55 0 001 0 000 256 6 0 00%
Coline Over-The-Counter Securities
BISX Listed F.,utual Funds
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Naoe NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield % NAV Date
1 4038 1 3344 CFAL Bond Fund 1 4038 3 72 5 20 31 -Aug-09
3 0350 2 8952 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2 8990 -1 39 -416 31 -Aug-09
1 4892 1 4119 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 4892 387 547 11 -Sep-09
36090 30941 Fdelty Bahamas G & I Fund 3 0941 -8 61 13 59 31 Aug 09
130484 12 3870 Fidelty Prime Income Fund 13 1136 3 93 5 87 31 -Aug-09
101 6693 100 0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101 6693 1 10 1 67 30Jun 09
1009600 93 1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 967398 035 4 18 30-Jun- 09
1 0000 1 0000 CFAL H gh Grade Bond Fund 1 0000 000 000 31 -Dec-07
9 4075 9 0775 Fdelity International Investment Fund 9 3399 2 69 -1 41 31-Jul-09
1 0707 1 0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1 0707 3 38 5 14 31 -Aug-09
1 0364 1 0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1 0319 -011 2 05 31-Aug-09
r MARKET TERriS
BilSX ALL sHARE INDEX -1 Dec 02 = 1000 0 YIELD st 12 month dividends divided by closing price
5/k-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask a Selling price of Colhna and fIdehty
Today's Close -Cutrent days weighted price for dally volume WeeklyVol. -Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPsS -A company reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. - Num be of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N-M Not Meaningful
PIE C losing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX -The Fdelty Bahamas tock Index January 1 1994 = 10 0
(S) - 4-for- Stock Split - Effective Date F/1/2007
TO TRADE CALL! COLINA 24.2-.S02.-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-338.-7764 | FO CAPITAL MARKETS 242-.396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-50.SO2.-7525











THE WEATHER REPORT
k iAI1 'II


inOTA


ORLANDO
High:91�F/330�C :"'" .
Low: 750 F/240�C *



3�C
P�C











. . .. ........

FT. LAUDI
High: 890
Low: 78�


Sun and some clouds
with a shower.


Patchy clouds with a
stray shower.


Partly sunny, a t-storm
in spots.


ri'
Bl s

Brilliant sunshine.


Partly sunny, a t-storm
possible.


Partly sunny.


High: 890 High: 890 High: 880 High: 880
High: 880 Low: 790 Low: 770 Low: 780 Low: 780 Low: 770
runMfir7ArrM �..=fl . I rMM :M omarIM M ,-rl�Mm rM FmM, rmMe
9 gOF I 82oF I I 101-Bl1oF 940-840 F 970-890 F I 103-85oF
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature� is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body-everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.


I. Al R.A l I


ABACO
High: 89� F/320 C
Low: 760 F/240 C


WEST PALM BEACH
High: 890 F/320 C
Low: 790 F/260 C


ERDALE
F/32� C L
F/26�C


-A


MIAMI
High: 880�F/31� C
Low: 79� F/260C


KEY WEST
High: 880�F/31� C
Low: 790 F/260 C
�.


Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
68/20 49/9
47/8 41/5
86/30 69/20
86/30 56/13
85/29 58/14
77/25 54/12
74/23 48/8
87/30 70/21
81/27 55/12
77/25 52/11
75/23 57/13
60/15 40/4
79/26 53/11
89/31 75/23
82/27 68/20


W High
F/C
pc 78/25
r 49/9
pc 87/30
t 70/21
t 75/23
pc 66/18
pc 65/18
pc 86/30
pc 71/21
pc 74/23
t 80/26
sh 66/18
pc 71/21
s 89/31
t 85/29


Friday
Low
F/C
55/12
41/5
67/19
45/7
51/10
45/7
45/7
65/18
56/13
50/10
62/16
44/6
51/10
76/24
73/22


Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
81/27 59/15
87/30 72/22
74/23 56/13
96/35 66/18
79/26 63/17
94/34 66/18
85/29 64/17
83/28 69/20
88/31 79/26
77/25 59/15
88/31 67/19
89/31 76/24
82/27 62/16
75/23 52/11
91/32 75/23


FREEPORT
High:880F/31�C
Low: 75� F/240 C














-An


ANDROS
High: 89� F/320 C
Low: 76� F/240 C


W High
F/C
t 79/26
t 90/32
pc 76/24
s 99/37
t 78/25
s 90/32
t 83/28
t 84/28
pc 89/31
pc 69/20
t 83/28
t 89/31
t 68/20
c 78/25
t 92/33


Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, OR
Raleigh-Durham
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tucson
Washington, DC


NASSAU
High: 880�F/31� C
Low: 790�F/260 C






,_.,."'",,


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
84/28 61/16
97/36 72/22
78/25 54/12
77/25 52/11
89/31 66/18
82/27 64/17
78/25 55/12
74/23 62/16
83/28 63/17
77/25 55/12
69/20 48/8
92/33 72/22
91/32 75/23
91/32 64/17
86/30 62/16


ELEUTH
High: 900 F
Low: 760 F









GREATEXUMA
High: 870�F/31� C
Low: 75� F/24� C

.-..'....


W High
F/C
t 73/22
s 100/37
pc 73/22
s 79/26
pc 80/26
t 74/23
pc 84/28
t 84/28
s 80/26
pc 79/26
s 72/22
t 92/33
t 91/32
s 95/35
t 78/25


I AMiurANrA


Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature
H igh ........................... .................. 9 1� F/33� C
Low ............................ .... .............. 78� F/260 C
Norm al high ................................... 870 F/31� C
Norm al low ...................................... 74� F/24� C
Last year's high ............................... 900 F/32� C
Last year's low ............................... 770 F/250 C


U


4%t


0 112 31415 617 8191 1
LOW MODERATE HIGH V. HIGH EXT.

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexm number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.



High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.)
Today 11:40 a.m. 3.1 5:13 a.m. 0.7
11:59 p.m. 2.5 6:11 p.m. 1.2
Friday 12:36 p.m. 2.9 6:05a.m. 1.0
--- 7:10 p.m. 1.3
Saturday 12:57 a.m. 2.4 7:03 a.m. 1.2
1:35 p.m. 2.8 8:11 p.m. 1.4
Sunday 2:00 a.m. 2.4 8:05 a.m. 1.3
2:35 p.m. 2.8 9:09 p.m. 1.4


Precipitation Sunrise ...... 6:59 a.m. Moonrise ... 12:41 p.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .............................. 0.15" Sunset . . . . . . 7:04 p.m. Moonset . . . . 11:17 p.m.
Year to date ............ ...................... 30.51" First Full Last New
Norm al year to date .................................... 36.74" .

AccuWeather.com ..
Forecasts and graphics provided by.
IERA AccuWeather, Inc. @2009 Sep. 26 Oct. 4 Oct. 11 Oct. 18
/320 C
/240 C


CAT ISLAND
High:870F/31�C
Low: 750 F/240 C


SAN SALVADOR
High: 89� F/32* C
Low: 76� F/24� C


'�";



LONG ISLAND
High:880F/31�C
Low: 780 F/260 C


Friday
Low
F/C
53/11
75/23
49/9
53/11
58/14
63/17
55/12
67/19
64/17
57/13
52/11
71/21
76/24
65/18
54/12


H


MAYAGUANA
High:870F/31�C
.ow: 770�F/250 C



" -'*


CROOKED ISLAND/ACKLINS
RAGGED ISLAND High: 890F/320 C
Low: 790 F/26� C
High: 880�F/310 C
Low: 76� F/24� C

GREAT INAGUA
High: 920�F/330 C
Low: 770�F/250 C


QR1 INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


II


I WRDCTE I


TAMPA
High:91�F/33
Low: 750�F/24
�L


Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Paris
Prague
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg


High
F/C
91/32
65/18
75/23
77/25
65/18
90/32
86/30
78/25
78/25
79/26
82/27
65/18
81/27
68/20
69/20
81/27
64/17
90/32
93/33
85/29
90/32
81/27
83/28
60/15
61/16
64/17
73/22
64/17
91/32
57/13
88/31
107/41
76/24
81/27
77/25
88/31
74/23
70/21
82/27
86/30
73/22
82/27
72/22
55/12
72/22
87/30
99/37
59/15
72/22
62/16
74/23
99/37
82/27
88/31
79/26
87/30
73/22
87/30
65/18
79/26
55/12
73/22
89/31
79/26
74/23
82/27
66/18
70/21
64/17
77/25


Today
Low W
F/C
79/26 pc
51/10 s
43/6 s
64/17 s
56/13 r
77/25 sh
78/25 pc
63/17 s
54/12 s
71/21 s
58/14 s
47/8 s
74/23 sh
38/3 pc
46/7 pc
56/13 s
46/7 s
65/18 s
84/28 r
39/3 s
73/22 t
72/22 t
62/16 s
50/10 sh
48/8 pc
48/8 c
54/12 pc
45/7 pc
73/22 t
39/3 pc
81/27 t
73/22 s
64/17 pc
60/15 s
54/12 pc
80/26 r
57/13 pc
50/10 pc
54/12 s
77/25 t
54/12 t
63/17 c
46/7 pc
45/7 c
51/10 c
55/12 pc
79/26 s
48/8 pc
54/12 c
46/7 sh
65/18 sh
74/23 s
61/16 s
79/26 pc
45/7 s
73/22 t
48/8 s
74/23 sh
54/12 r
59/15 pc
41/5 r
55/12 s
77/25 sh
66/18 s
50/10 pc
64/17 c
50/10 s
55/12 pc
50/10 c
54/12 s


High
F/C
92/33
63/17
77/25
79/26
61/16
89/31
87/30
75/23
75/23
78/25
76/24
63/17
80/26
70/21
66/18
73/22
68/20
91/32
91/32
74/23
89/31
82/27
81/27
63/17
63/17
65/18
68/20
59/15
88/31
55/12
90/32
110/43
76/24
81/27
61/16
89/31
73/22
70/21
82/27
85/29
73/22
82/27
64/17
54/12
61/16
88/31
101/38
64/17
70/21
64/17
73/22
100/37
82/27
88/31
86/30
87/30
64/17
86/30
67/19
79/26
63/17
81/27
88/31
77/25
64/17
90/32
65/18
64/17
63/17
73/22


WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86� F
Friday: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86� F
FREEPORT Today: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86� F
Friday: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86� F
ABACO Today: E at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 10 Miles 850 F
Friday: E at 8-16 Knots 3-5 Feet 6 Miles 850 F


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace


Friday
Low W
F/C
79/26 pc
52/11 pc
47/8 pc
66/18 pc
53/11 r
78/25 r
77/25 pc
63/17 s
62/16 pc
72/22 s
54/12 pc
46/7 c
70/21 pc
41/5 pc
46/7 pc
50/10 pc
50/10 pc
68/20 s
83/28 r
44/6 s
73/22 t
72/22 t
61/16 pc
52/11 c
50/10 pc
47/8 pc
50/10 pc
43/6 pc
71/21 r
50/10 c
79/26 s
72/22 s
63/17 s
59/15 s
52/11 r
79/26 sh
58/14 pc
52/11 s
54/12 s
76/24 r
55/12 t
64/17 pc
45/7 s
41/5 r
45/7 c
55/12 s
77/25 s
52/11 c
49/9 s
45/7 pc
65/18 pc
73/22 s
61/16 s
80/26 s
49/9 s
73/22 t
43/6 c
73/22 r
60/15 s
58/14 pc
52/11 pc
59/15 s
77/25 pc
66/18 s
48/8 s
72/22 pc
54/12 pc
50/10 pc
48/8 pc
55/12 pc


Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston


1~ I ~ I �


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U.S. CITIES Ill sll lll1 ll 1 sll sll 11


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PG 22 Thursday. September 24, 2009


RELIGION


The Tribune


Carmichael Baptist Holiness Church
Ferguson Sub-Division; Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 361-5798 P.O. Box CR-55785
Pastor Rev. Paul J. McPhee J.P.
Assistant Pastor Gertrude Miller



Re: 4th Pastoral Anniversary
Theme: "A MAN WALKING
BY FAITH"
Date: 23rd September - 25th
September 2009



Speakers





Wednesday night:
Asst. Pastor Gertrude Miller




Thursday Nigh t:
Rev. Albert Kerr






Friday Nigh t:
Min. Lennis McPhee


Services Begin at 7:45 pm nightly
Closing out on Sunday 27th at 3:00pm
Guest speaker: Pastor Lawrence McPhee
Greater Pentecostal Church of God


I I K)FL


FACULTY and board members of Hope College shown here at an Open
House over the weekend.




HOPE COLLEGE

TO OFFER RELIGIOUS DEGREES
By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
WITH the national average down for the Fall 2009 BGCSE examina-
tions-dropping to a 'D' this academic year, there is no doubt that many
class of 2009 graduates received reject letters from local colleges they
desired to attend this semester.
For such persons, this desire to continue their education was tarnished,
leaving them with little option, which includes finding work in a depressing
job market. One institution is offering an alternative solution for such indi-
viduals, with a message of hope.
Hope College, located on JFK Drive in the Christian Life Centre (CLC)
pitched its degree programs to the public in an open house over the weekend,
and began registering new students for the Fall 2009 academic year.
The Christian based college, spareheaded by the Assemblies of Brethren in
the Bahamas is targeting those whose aspirations for higher education were
tarnished by unsatisfactory BGCSE results, Dr June Wilson, Research and
Education Director at the college told The Tribune yesterday.
In addition to secular training, the college seeks to equip persons interest-
ed in entering Christian ministry, providing an at-home ministry training
experience however, for aspiring church-workers in the Associate of Arts
Divinity degree (A. T.H.).
Institutes that offer Biblical studies at home are very limited; leaving aspir-
ing pastors with a starkly brisk decision where they should receive their min-
istry training.
"Church members who want to take on leadership positions but don't have
knowledge on Biblical principles can equip themselves with these classes and
upgrade themselves so that they can be impactful in ministry," said Dr Wilson.
Studies show that the success of church's growth,and impact in the com-
munity it is in, is directly attributed to whether the church's pastor has
received any formal biblical training.
"When it comes to the school of divinity, leaders and members can take
those classes and not necessarily enroll in Associate degree programs at this
time but they will receive certificate verifying that they completed the class,"
she explained.
Courses offered in the School of Divinity include: BIB 193 Biblical
Interpretation and Hermeneutics, MIN 403 Homiletics, TH 202 Systematic
Theology I, and TH 401 Women of the Bible.
In a press statement to Tribune Religion, representatives expressed their
vision as follows for the college:
"The mission of Hope College is to educate students for lives of leadership
and courage in the global environment, through academic and co-circular
SEE page 26


�I � _






The Tribune RELIGION Thijr~rfr~vi S~nt~mh~r 24. 2009 PG 23


Do we need


a revival?
LAST Sunday F .
evening the discussion
centered around the '
topic of revival. The - REV \N(,EL\
approach took the J
form of four questions X PL \( . )I (i
and the persons pres-
ent were invited to give
individual responses.
The answers are not in any particular order of importance.
You are also invited to engage in the same exercise. Before
reading the suggestions, write your answers down if you like, and
foster dialogue between members of your family colleagues, fel-
lowship groups, or church sisters and brothers and among the
youth. Add more questions and be prayerfully open to the move-
ment of the Spirit.
QUESTION #1 WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OF REVIVAL?
1. Care and concern for others
2. Engaging in personal spiritual devotions and disciplines
3. Young people worshipping regularly and with enthusiasm
4. A deep love for the Lord
5. Love in the heart and kindness towards others
6. Involvement in church activities
7. Testimonies, occasional altar calls
8. Forgiveness, healing and joy
QUESTION #2 BLOCKS TO REVIVAL
1. Laziness
2. Resistance to change
3. Not being holy as God's people.
4. Not accepting God's condition, " if you turn to me...confess,
then I will heal"
5. Lack of a Ninevah-like spirit of repentance
6. A mind-set fixed in stone
7. Limited resources
8. Pushing our own agenda, not God's agenda
QUESTION #3 HOW CAN WE HELP AS THE CHURCH
1. Ongoing prayer both personal and corporate
2.Sermons, seminars, workshops, teaching, and prayer ministry
3. The alliance of area ministers to combine their efforts and
prayers
4. To be open and expectant as a people
QUESTION #4 HOW CAN I HELP AS AN INDIVIDUAL?

Share your ne
The Tribune wants to hear from people
who are making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps you are
raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your
story.


k


LOANS BY PHONE


GET CASH NOW!!!


S~


* Cash In Hand
* Vacation Loans * Car Loans
* Medical Loans School Fee Loans
* Homeolmprovement Loans
* Loans, Loans, Loans



FAST TURNAROUND TIME
SNO LONG WAITS * LIVE ASSISTANTS. NO MACHINES

Requirements:
Job Letter, Passport, NIB, Pay Slip

ALL Government, B.E.C., Batelco,
W&SC and Salary Deduction Employees


LIMITED TIME ONLY!!! CALL NOW!! ACT TODAY!


_ A i


0 225-


1075


The Tribune


Thiirsdav ,Fpntpmht-r 94. 2009 * PG 23


RELIGION







PG 24 * Thursday, September 24, 2009


RELIGION


The Tribune


History of Trinity Methodist Church Nassau


TRINITY Methodist Church, Nassau,
Bahamas was founded in 1861 and was
opened for worship in 1865.
The District Synod's report of 1861
states:
"The new chapel (Trinity) has not yet
been commenced, the builder's estimate
of costs being so much in advance of the
contemplated expenditure, it is wisely
judged that delay is preferable to embar-
rassment! "
However, the foundation stone of the
new church was laid on August 21, 1861
by His Honour Charles Nesbitt, Esq.
Lieutenant-Governor of the Bahamas.
It was estimated that the new chapel
would cost about �6,200. Plans were fur-
nished by W.W. Pocock, Esq of London.
The building was intended to serve as a
Chapel and a schoolroom and to accom-
modate a congregation of 800 persons.
However, difficulties were experienced as
the work progressed. Due to the Civil
War in the United States of America, the
builder was unable to get timber from the
southern states. In addition, in 1864 an
epidemic of yellow fever struck Nassau
and four of the carpenters imported from
Glasgow to work on the church died, and
the remaining two fled to the United
States of America.
In a letter to the Mission House in
London, Rev Hilton Cheesbrough,
Minister of Trinity Church and District
Superintendent, writes: "Trinity Church
was officially opened on April 2, 1865 at a
cost of �8,000 of which the Government
gave �2,000."
Writing to the Methodist Missionary
Society in 1866 Rev Cheesbrough states:
"On the evening of September 30, 1866
whilst conducting divine service in our
beautiful Trinity Chapel in this city, a
fresh breeze was blowing from the north

The next day October 1, 1866 Trinity


F-
S L\\\L01R



Church was completely demolished by
this "fresh breeze" which turned out to be
the worst hurricane this city has experi-
enced to date. This hurricane destroyed
or badly damaged ten Methodist chapels.
The "Nassau Guardian", a daily news-
paper, says in its October 3, 1866 issue:
"The Wesleyans, we believe, suffered
most, their new and beautiful Trinity
Chapel, Frederick Street, with its large
and powerful organ being entirely demol-
ished, leaving only the class and school-
rooms beneath entire.
Before Rev Cheesbrough left the
Colony in 1869 the Church had been re-
built, and he was its first minister. Rev
Cheesbrough is described as an able and
eloquent preacher, a wise administrator,
and a kind and sympathetic friend. He
died in Liverpool, England on May
17,1882.
On September 16, 1928, Trinity Church
again suffered considerable damage by
another hurricane. Two-thirds of its roof
at its western end was blown away. The
gallery disappeared and the remains of
the pipe organ was found in the base-
ment.
The minister of the church at that time,
Rev Walter H Richards, M.B.E., and the
trustees had insured the building for its
full value, and this sum was sufficient to
restore the church building to its former
glory. The building was restored by Fred
Dillet, one of Nassau's premier builders
of a bygone era.
Restoration took just over a year and


during that period members worshipped
in Victoria Hall, the building which for-
merly housed Queen's College, a
Methodist School.
A new organ from a firm in
Connecticut, USA was installed in 1929,
and gave excellent service for 36 years. In
1964, a three manual Wick's organ was
installed.
Trinity's beautiful stained glass win-
dows were installed in 1973 and dedicated
on Trinity Sunday, June 17, 1973.
In 1960 during the ministry of Rev
Harold Slater (1957-1962) the whole
building was thoroughly renovated. It
was painted, the pews and the floor revar-
nished and a new red floor matting laid.
Due to the generosity of the late PM
Lightbourne, an elevator was installed at
the western end of the church for the ben-
efit of the elderly and those not so old.
The basement hall and classrooms were
renovated for the use of youth groups and
men's and women's meetings after the
departure of the Queen's College
Preparatory Department in September
1961 to their new campus on Village
Road.
From 1865 to 1986, Trinity Church had
30 ministers. Twenty-eight of them came
from the United Kingdom and two from
the Caribbean and the Americas.
Ministers who served were as follows:
Hilton Cheesbrough (1865-1869);
Henry Bleby (1869-1879); Jonathan C.
Richardson (1879-1884); Francis Moon
(1884-1889); Thomas Raspass (1889-
1891); George Lester (1892-1896);
Frederick W. Gostick (1896-1904); W.H.E
"Willie" Bleby (1904-1916); Allworth
Eardley (1916-1921); W.T. Kilbride (1921
- -1923); T. H. Howitt (1923-1925); W.H.
Richards, M.B.E. (1925-1931); A.E.
Nelson (1932); H.S.F. Rossiter (1932); E.
Vosper Paget (1932-1937); Herbert S.
Clarke (1937-1947); W.H. Armstrong


(1947-1950); George T. Start (1950-1952);
Willie Rhodes (1952 -1955); G. I. George
Jones (1954-1956); William T Makepeace
(1955-1957); Harold Slater (1957-1962);
Frank E Poad (1960-1974); Philip
Blackburn (1962 -1966); David
Livingstone (1966-1968); Godfrey S
Johns (1968-1972); Peter B Swinglehurst
(1972-1976); Eric St. C Clarke (1976-
1978); John Bilverstone (1978-1980);
Nymphas R Edwards (1980 to 1986).
Since 1986, Bahamian Ministers, Rev
Henley Perry and Rev Franklyn Knowles
served and during the period of the
autonomy issue American ministers,
including Rev Gene Zimmerman filled
in. Another Bahamian, Rev Bill Higgs,
has been the Minister at Trinity since
January 2000.
In September 1986, Eddie Sykes of the
United Kingdom was appointed by the
Bahamas/Turks & Caicos Islands District
of the Methodist Church to serve as a
Youth Worker at Trinity. He made a pos-
itive impact on the young people of the
community. Trinity now has a creche and
Children's Storytime. Their scholarship
fund assists able students to attend
Queen's College.
Trinity Methodist Church has had an
interesting history during which time it
worked energetically for the Kingdom of
God. Over the years this Church has
made a significant contribution to the
religious, social, economic and political
life of the Bahamas. It has a strong Bible
Study Group, A Cottage Prayer Group,
A Soup Kitchen and a Ministry to the
Poor.
Today as always it 'seeks to serve the
present age' by becoming more involved
in some of the pressing social problems of
the community of which it is a part and to
be faithful to the calling of her Lord and
Master, Jesus Christ.


Deacon Miller to be ordained


to the Sacred Priesthood


DEACON Bradley Miller (on the right)
assists Fr Enrique Miller during a midday
mass held in the chapel of Addington
House yesterday. Deacon Miller will be
ordained to the priesthood next Tuesday.


REV'D Deacon Bradley Hayward
Miller will be ordained to the Sacred
Priesthood by Reverend Laish Zane
Boyd, Sr on Tuesday, September 29,
The Feast of St Michael and All
Angels.
The concelebrated mass will take
place at historic Christ Church
Cathedral, George Street, at 7pm. The
chief celebrant will be Bishop Boyd,
who will be assisted by con-celebrants


Reverend Drexel Gomez, Rev'd
Gilbert Thompson and Rev'd Fr G
Kingsley Knowles. Rev'd Fr Rodney
Burrows will deliver the sermon.
A descendant of Green Castle,
Eleuthera, Deacon Miller received his
early education at the Green Castle
Primary School, and Rock Sound
Senior High (now Preston H
Albury). He is a graduate of The
College of The Bahamas, where he


attained an Associate's Degree in
Biblical Studies. In 2006 he entered
Codrington Theological College,
Barbados, and graduated in 2008 with a
Diploma in Theology and Pastoral
Studies. He is currently the Assistant
Curate at Christ the King Church,
Ridgeland Park, West.
Deacon Miller is married to the for-
mer Vernalee Duncombe and they are
the parents of six children.







The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, September 24, 2009 * PG 25


When church folks




couldn't care less!


IT IS amazing how easy it is these
days to get a group of people to gather
and protest. The slightest problem at a
worksite results in people leaving their
work station to go outside to demon-
strate, bearing placards. Sometimes it is
a lunch-time demonstration.
Sometimes the demonstration makes
the city centre of Bay Street, often with
the general public not fully aware of the
rationale for the public show of dis-
pleasure.
When a church, the place where
Christians meet for corporate prayer
and worship to almighty God, is razed,
or in Bahamian language, 'yucked out
of the ground', and there is no mass out-
cry and mass public demonstration of
Christians from everywhere in the
nation, there must be a message being
sent, and I am not quite sure what it
is....
Our hearts palpitate at a media
report of vandals breaking and entering
a church and desecrating the altar.
What do we feel when, because of a dis-
pute, an entire church building is will-
fully demolished?
Being aware of those in the 'moneyed
class' who often wait with bated breath
to defend their honour in the court sys-
tem against anything /anyone they per-
ceive to be libelous, I would declare my
intention at the outset, which is not to
malign anyone's good name. My inten-


tion is to cause fellow Christians to
reflect on their position and the mes-
sage they send when they choose
silence in the face of opposition (as in
Ephesians 6:12).
In early 2007, the general public and
members of Firetrail Ministries Church
pastored by Dave and Michelle Baker,
saw their church and the foundation for
their new church on the adjacent prop-
erty demolished, only to be replaced by
homes in the private subdivision on Fire
Trail Road which was later named 'Ros
Davis Estates' by the developer. Some
years ago, residents living in eastern
New Providence served by Prince
Charles Drive tearfully experienced the
result of heavy equipment demolishing
a portion of the new church building
being constructed by Rhema Christian
Ministries, pastored by Pastors Eugene
& Dr Rosetta V Clare, obviously the
result of an unresolved dispute.
In mid September, 2009, the news
media reported the demolition of the
Canaan Baptist Church and there were
further media reports that other church
buildings could face the same fate.
All of these matters have business,
financial and legal sides, to which I do
not speak. I draw attention to the spir-
itual side. In all that is happening in our
little country today, can Christians
"look the other way" when a "House of
God", a Christian church in a 'Christian


'Strap ya back'


It is indeed amazing how our nation's
foundation was built on Christian val-
ues yet every now and then we still
manage to put "old wives fables" into
our mindset.
I was thinking about my name and
how common it is. This does not bother
me, because I know within myself that
there is only one me. In January of
(while employed at The Tribune) one of
the funeral homes brought in their obit-
uaries. Immediately my interest was
sparked because one of the deceased
persons was named Allison Miller.
When I explained to the funeral
home worker why I was staring at the
photo, he said jokingly to me, "well you
better strap ya back."
At first I didn't know how to


respond to his remark but realized that
I could not let that put fear in me. So I
said to him, "You know what, it does-
n't matter what happens, when it is my
time to go I will. Since there are some
things that God still has for me to do
and I want to do them, I don't think
that will be anytime soon." He looked
at me as if to say, "well that's true, you
will be fine."


nation' is smashed and removed to
make way for commercial housing
works?
Prophets and prophetesses of the
Bahamas--what is God saying about His
houses of prayer being "yucked up?"
God the Father, in Jesus Christ, was
greatly upset even when the activities in
His house were inappropriate (see
Luke 19:46). Will God judge His
"called out" ones, His Ecclesia, for
being so silent when churches are being
demolished? Bishop Ian Brathwaite's
fellowship group called "Pastors of
Prayer" reportedly labeled the Canaan
Baptist Church tragedy as the "darkest
day" in the history of the church in The
Bahamas. (See TRIBUNE RELI-
GION, September 17, 2009). Well, it is
not the first blackout, and, reportedly,
there are more dark days ahead...
Some years ago, the public will recall,
from the media, Temple Christian
Academy discovered that a portion of
their new school building under con-
struction was sitting on land reportedly
owned by Thompson Trading
Company.
As the latter entity had not yet been
built on Shirley Street, there was an
obvious mistake, by someone, some
persons or some entities. I well remem-
ber the public outcry by Christians gen-
erally and by churches connected to
that denomination and Fellowship.



You see for me God has the last say
in all things. Only what he says really
matters. However, that does not
excuse the fact that life and death is in
the power of the tongue. Many times
we allow people to say negative things
in and over our lives and we don't can-
cel it with the word of God which
speaks life to us. Negativity just ends
up playing out in our lives. We have to
cancel the negative things spoken over
our lives. This gentleman meant no
harm, he thought that he was doing me
a favor by telling me to protect myself
regardless of the manner he said it in.
However, I had to cancel the
deadly joke that was spoken to me.
The Bible tells us to "let a thing be
established in the mouth of two or
three witness" (Matt 18:16). It is
important that we know the word of
God and the power that words have
whether it is a joke or not. Sometimes
things are said in casual conversation


DR ALBERT S.


In this case, this was a Christian
SCHOOL. We are talking today about
churches being uprooted. Can actions
of this nature be pleasing to God? If
they are not, will this nation not be held
accountable and judged for their apa-
thetic silence?
In promoting the 2009 Artist Against
Violence Concert initiative, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham quoted 18th
century politician, Edmund Burke,
who said that all that is necessary for
the triumph of (the forces of) evil is that
good men do nothing. I feel that his
words are worthy of deep, deep consid-
eration, over and over again, by all of
us, especially professing Christians...

* Dr Albert S. Ferguson, J.P., is a former
senior-level corporate manager, a former
Associate Professor of Management
Studies, an ordained Minister of Religion
for over 30 years and a transformational
leader. Contact Dr Ferguson at e-mail
albertSertsferguson@gmail.com.



and we just let it go without even
being aware of the negative things
that can happen to us.

words spoken over and in our lives,
words take root and destroy many
lives. In a harsh and hurtful conversa-
tion I was told that, "I won't have any-
thing, I won't be anyone, I don't count
and I should die."
If I did not omit them, those words
would probably be my story. I know
that the Devil is a liar and those words
won't happen. God Almighty is Alpha
and Omega and only what He says
matters and will stand.
We have to cancel negative words
said in and over our lives. It does not
matter if it was said casually or jok-
ingly, they still have to be omitted bot-
tom line. God gave us His words
which is truth and life. Let's speak
that over and in our lives and the lives
of others.







PG 26 * Thursday, September 24, 2009


RELIOHON


The Tribune


Ma Becca laid to rest in




her birth place Cat Island


FAMILY and Friends of Rebecca
Williams last week said goodbye to the
matriarch last Saturday in Cat Island.
She was 86.
Mrs Williams or Ma "Becca" as she
was affectionately called was an avid
Anglican, a cornerstone in the commu-
nity and a pillar in the Anglican
Church.
Her funeral was held at the St
Andrew's Anglican Church in Arthur's
Town, the church where she had been
baptisied, confirmed and married.
She was described as a " giant of a
lady and saluted as a modern day hero-
ine. She was one of the island's premier


ambassadors who entertained prime
ministers, dignitaries, bishops, priests
and deacons.
She was also remembered for going
above and beyond the call of duty in
her devotion to the Anglican Church.
She delivered a yeoman service
organising many bake sales, cook outs
and church programs.
Tributes were given by George
Johnson (Anglican Church Men
President -St. Saviour's Parish) her
niece Cleomie Burrows, Rose Pratt
Rolle, Charles' Dommie' King, Island
Administrator for Cat Island District
and Canon Warren Rolle.


In his sermon Edward 'Rex'
Seymour Assistant Priest for St
Saviour's Parish said Ma Becka dis-
played many strong attributes and
exemplified what every member
should offer their God, priest and
church in terms of true and laudable
service without seeking any personal
fame or remuneration.
Fr Chester Burton, Priest in Charge
of St Saviour's Parish challenged the
family and friends to leave a legacy just
as Ma Becka left an indelible mark on
the pages of the Anglican Church and
in the Arthurs Town community and in
the wider Cat Island community.


Hope College to offer

Religious Degrees

FROM page 22
programmes of recognized excellence in
the context of the historical Christian
faith."
"Hope College plans to operate on
Bible-based principles, and has a non-
denominational posture to attract students
of all religious backgrounds."
"We are trying to reach high school grad-
uates who are not equipped to enter col-
lege," Dr Wilson explained. "There are
many who have graduated high school, but
haven't had the qualifications to enter a
college."
The College will offer BGCSE and Pre-
College Classes in English, Math, History,
Geography, Biology, Religious Knowledge,
Accounts and Economics at $350 per
course.
As it stands, the Ministry of Education
does not have a systematic approach to
dealing with persons who miserably fail
BGCSE subject tests. Before the written
examination is taken, students must com-
plete sufficient coursework.
"We're really focusing on the exam, and
what it takes to get them through the exam.
We are screening faculty and staff who
have taken students through the BGCSE
with a successful track record of students
who passed.
Guidelines for acceptance into a pro-
gram of study at the College of the
Bahamas require that students pass at least
5 of the major BGCSE's. If the student
passes at least 3 of the examinations, they
are required to take college prep courses
that don't credit toward their degree pro-
gram.
If they meet neither standard--unsuc-
cessfully completing at least 3 BGCSE'--
they are referred to the Bahamas Baptist
College to bring themselves up to speed.
Hope College offers an alternative how-
ever, and will register students for its Fall
semester up to next week.
Financial assistance opportunities and
payment plans are available for incoming
freshmen students.
According to Barton Duncanson, chair-
man of the school's steering committee,
they have been "working consistently over
the last few months to ensure that the facil-
ities, programs and plans are in place to
accomplish the fall semester opening of
October 5."
New Student orientation will take place
on that date. Plans for Associate and
Bachelor's degrees in The Arts, Business
Administration, Education, and Divinity
are tentative for January 2010.
Admissions applications for the school
are available at the college's campus at the
Christian Life Centre on John F Kennedy
Drive.
To be considered for admission, first
time students, transfer students, continuing
education and diploma students must pro-
vide the following:
-completed application form
-$25 application fee
-Official high school transcript
-Letter of Recommendation


RELIGION_






The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, September 24, 2009 * PG 27


* COCONUT Grove Temple will
hold its five day long Spiritual
Warfare Conference 2009 on
September 27- October 2 at the
church on Coconut Grove and
Crooked Island Street. The con-
ference is being held under the
theme " Weapons of Power
Spiritual Warfare and Prophetic
Move." Sessions begin 7 pm
nightly.
Speakers throughout the week
will include Roger Williams
Conference Host (Coconut Grove
Temple), Bishop Lindo Wallace
Host Pastor ( Coconut Grove
Temple), Evangelist Origin
Deleveaux (First Baptist Church),
Minister Antonio Rolle (Kingdom
Come Ministries), Evangelist Alisa
Collie (Living Faith Seventh Day
Adventist), Prophet Don Clarke
(First Baptist Church), and
Evangelist Marie McDonald
(Coconut Grove Temple).

* A Comm-Uni-Tee- Social
event will be held at the Gardens
of Gray's Music Center on
September 26 at pm. There will be
local Bahamian entertainers,
refreshments, and giveaways. This
social event is uplifting, empower-
ing, and the host of the event is
requesting a donation of $15 for
adults and $2 for children under
the age of 12.



* Did you recently give birth to
the newest little angel on earth?
Have you and your beloved
recently tied the knot? Is your
church planning a special event?
Tribune Religion wants to hear
from you!
We want to know about the
special things going on in your
life, so go ahead and send in your
wedding photographs, birth
announcements and church activi-
ties schedule to be posted in
upcoming Tribune Religion sec-
tions.
This service is free. Send all
information, including (especial-
ly) photographs, to features@tri-
bunemedia.net. Information can
be hand delivered to The Tribune
at Shirley and Deveaux Streets or
call the Religion section @
502.2368.


Cat Islanders celebrate Holy Cross



Anglican Church Feast of little

ANGLICANS recently marked
the Feast of Title of Holy Cross in
Dumfries, Cat Island by turning out
in droves to welcome Fr Bernard
Been, the assistant priest at St
Agnes Parish Blue Hill Road, New
Providence. It was Fr Been first
visit to the church and he took his
text from the parable of the Good
Samaritian from the gospel of Luke.
He told the congregation that
"everyone in the church is on a jour-
ney and we cannot manipulate this
trek without Almighty God". He
added that the whole Anglican
community be they Cat Islanders,
Abaconians or Exumians will one =�..
day complete this arduous task andi
be called to give an account of the
way they live, adding that no bishop,
priest or deacon can answer or
defend anyone's journey. Only the
person who completes their own
course can do this task,he explained.
After the mass, members
marched to Turning Point
Resturant and Bar for lunch...


;tJEIIOSNOE





0RELIGIONT


Ii
N,


-- - M


CHURCH

WEEK
St Christopher Church, located
in Lyford Cay and led by
Deacon Keith Cartwright has
been established for many
year,. Their dedication tn the
Antdli.Lin faith and t, t the p' i-
-fil , 0t thi' ..11 tl ' 11ha Il'P -011t
thflit' 11 lt i 'dli[i, ,1 1 a iil ' \L n i-
ati, ,l thri tl.,h 'i t thr_ \ rl'.


4I


4Ah 6


PG 28 * Thursday, September 24, 2009


The Tribune


RELIGI~N


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