<%BANNER%>

DLOC



The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01199
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: December 22, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01199

Full Text







HAPPY Y
HOUDAYS I'm ovin'

HIGH 78F
LOW 68F

SUNSHINE
SAND CLOUDS


The


Tribune


~& U~AK~ UPS
me-


Volume: 105 No.26


MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


PRICE 750


'Mentally unstable'

man jumps from

Nassau-bound ship


Uil


Tragedy as
apartment
building
burns down
JUST days before Christmas,
a mother lost her two-year-old
son in a fire when an apartment
building on Hay and Market
Streets burned down on Satur-
day.
According to eye witnesses,
the mother of the toddler,
whose identity is unknown, was
standing outside the building
when it went up in flames, beg-
ging for someone to rescue her
son.
The fire reportedly broke out
at around 6.30pm on Saturday.
Persons first noticed that some-
thing was amiss when smoke
spread, from the second floor of
the two-storey building.
As residents of the building's
six apartments fled the blazing
structure, some throwing per-
sonal belongings out onto the
street to save them from the
SEE page seven


m


By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
A MAN, described by his fam-
ily as "mentally unstable", is still
missing at sea after he jumped off
a Nassau-bound ship on Friday
evening, police said.
Yesterday, search and rescue
crews continued to scour the
waters off Abaco for 31-year-old
Rodger Lamont Walkes of Mur-
phy Town, who jumped off the
deck of the "Seawind".
...An eye vitiLh.lt ,,'.lUjni on-
the mail boat said yesterday that
the Seawind left Sandy Point,
Abaco at around 5.30pm. Just 25
* minutes into the journey, one of
the passengers jumped ship, the.


witness said.
"Approximately two miles out
to sea all I saw was this guy in
the water," he said.
The witness, who said the boat
was travelling at about five knots
at the time of the incident, told
The Tribune that the captain
made a u-turn to pick up the man,
however, by the time the vessel
arrived back at the location, the
man had disappeared.
Abaco police have identified
the missing man as Rodger Lam-
. ont Walkes.
According to Sergeant Remy
Minnis of the Sandy Point police


+


SEE page seven


Some in PLP disappointed with Paul
Moss over St Cecilia Christmas card
* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
A FACTION within the Progressive Liberal
Party has expressed its disappointment with
lawyer Paul Moss, for issuing a "presumptu-
ous" Christmas card to residents of the St Cecil-
ia constituency.
Claiming that Mr Moss may in fact "not be"
the standard bearer for the PLP in St Cecilia,
some within the party, who spoke to The Tri-
bune yesterday, felt slighted by Mr Moss' ges-
ture, calling it "too bold" of a move for someone who hasn't been giv-
en the "green light" for the area.
SEE page seven


THE FOX HILL CONGOS
junkanoo group hold their
last practice on Saturday
ahead of the Boxing Day
Parade onBay Street Environm entalists call for
SEE PAGE TWOOP I
stop to Bimini Bay project


* By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
INTERNATIONAL conser-
vationists are calling on the
Bahamas government to stop the
Bimini Bay development and pre-
vent further damage of vital
Ecosystems in the country.
Environmentalists both in the
Bahamas and abroad say the
destruction thus far, revealed in
Black and Veatch's environmen-
tal evaluation made public last
week, is enough to stop the devel-
opment before it proceeds.
Backing the Bahamas National
Trust in their concerns are
Bahamas Reef Environment


Educational Foundation
(BREEF), Mangrove Action Pro-
ject (MAP), and internationally
renowned marine scientist and
shark biologist Samuel Gruder,
who runs the Bimini field station
as professor at the University of
Miami's Rosential School for
Marine and Atmospheric Science.
Dr Gruder maintains vital wet-
lands were bulldozed hundreds
of metres into the water during
construction of Bimini Bay, when
he was a council member of the
Bahamas National Trust.
Director of international man-
grove preservation group Man-
grove Action Project, Alfredo
SEE page seven


THE Federal Bureau of
Investigation (FBI) has
released new information
about the envelopes con-
taining a suspicious white
powder which have been
sent to United States
embassies around the world,
including the embassy in
New Providence.
According to reports in
the US media, the FBI has
revealed that a message was
inside the envelopes.
However, the contents of
the message are not being
released at this time. The
FBI said it is not clear what
the message means.
It is not known at this time
if the envelope sent to the
US Embassy in Nassau also
SEE page seven


Independent MP
will not seek PLP
nomination 'for
any constituency'
AS THE leadership of the
Progressive Liberal Party is cur-
rently constituted, Kennedy
Independent MP, Kenyatta
Gibson said yesterday he will
not seek the PLP nomination
for the area, "or any other con-
stituency for that matter" in any
general election.
Resigning from the PLP at
the beginning of this year, the
now Independent MP had no
comment when asked if he
would run again in the 2012
election.
The Kennedy constituency
has attracted tremendous atten-
tion from would-be candidates
such as Omar Archer, lawyer
Derek Ryan, Craig Butler, and
a fourth candidate that The Tri-
SEE page seven


0
QumznosSus

Now SERVING
6 Inch & 9 Inch Subs
Palmdale Paradise Island Oakes F1B
Bernard Road 2 Locations (Freeport,


RGER


STlRTINGAT *
V "__'*i5


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


BAHAMAS EDITION


M,
t Real unroe
908.
Estate
UPS is back
SEE INSIGHT SECTION1 SECTION INSIDE SEE PAGE NINETEEN


-0






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


LOA NW


The Shoe WIage-adeira Shopping Paza 328-0703 The Shoe Viage.Marathon Mall 393-6113
Clark's Store-Marathon Mall 3934155* The Shoe Village.RND Plaza, Freeport 242-351-3274


I


CLOSED:


December 25th


Boxing Day December 26th


New Year's Day January 1st





New Year's Eve


OPEN: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.


1 ."4.,


Hap Hs from Wed4ys,/


2CLeu~PDF


SUIT, SHIRT & TIE


Resano West Condonumunius LUndei ConIIiicuuni
NEW CONDOS FOR SALE






2 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bathroom 3 storey Townhouses.
Gated property includes pool, well appointed interiors, modem kitchens.
granite cotmtertops, stainless steel appliances, large bedrooms w! private
baths, hurricane impact windows.
lrom $249,000 with only $5,000 reservation deposit required
READY FOR OCCUPANCY JANUARY '09'
PH. 325-1325


'In brief

Woman hurt
in shoot-out
at Cocktails
and Dreams
A shoot-out at the Cocktails
and Dreams night club on Sun-
day ended with a woman suffer-.
ing minor injuries and dozens of
club patrons running for their
lives. According to police, at
around 4 o'clock Sunday morn-
ing a 20-year-old woman who
was at the club, was caught in
. the middle of an argument that
broke out between her male
Friend and another man. The
argument quickly erupted in a
shoot-out.
The woman, who suffered
injuries to her face during the
quarrel, was taken to hospital.
Police say her wounds are not
life threatening. Although no
arrest has been made in connec-
tion to the incident, police say
they are following significant
leads.
'TaDa' album
set for launch
THE much anticipated new
album by Terneille "TaDa" Bur-
rows "I'm that Girl" will be
launched on Tuesday, December
23, at the Uptown NightClub.
Performing with TaDa that
night will be many Bahamian
recording artists, including Sammi
Starr, NCity, MDeez, Sosa Man
and a guest appearance by
Bahamian Olympic Medal win-
ner Leevan "Superman" Sands.


Christmas Day


|


- I


Devo








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 3


LOA0 NW


0 In brief


Marijuana

legalisation put

forward as

answer to

economic woes

* By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

ONE young Bahamian claims
he has found the answer to the
economic downturn, and
although unconventional, he
feels the legalisation of marijua-
na is the way forward.
Sasha Dufin says 2008 has
proven to be a year of many
changes, ranging from an
unprecedented peek in oil
prices, to "the first stage of what
seems to be the death of the
tourism industry, arid the col-
lapse of capitalism in the US."
"The legalisation of this plant
may seem preposterous to
some, and down right stupid to
most, but such a move would
drastically change our tourism
product."
Compared to Amsterdam, Mr
Dunn claims the Dutch speak-
ing country continues to experi-
ence more than 4 million tourist
annually mostly because of its
liberalised approach to the use
of marijuana, while the
Bahamas this year has seen a
steady decline in visitors leading
to mass layoffs within the indus-
try.
"You cannot find one single
beach in or near Amsterdam
that can compare to one of our
worst beaches, so there must be
something else that is drawing
these tourists into their coun-
try."
Mr Dunn says apart from the
benefits from increased visitors,
the seeds of the plant which
contain hemp oil is said to be a
fuel source.
With several companies now
examining various corners of
the Bahamas for possible oil
deposits, Mr Dunn says even if
amounts are found, there will
come a time when crude oil
reserves throughout the world
will be depleted.
"Why should we further
destroy the eco-system that we
have right now to try and look
for oil, when we can simply
grow it. We are living in a peek
oil crisis, eventually oil will dis-
appear from the world."
With the Bahamas being con-
sidered a Christian nation, and
with the possibility of the
Bahamas being classed a drug
haven, Mr Dunn says aside from
criticism, "we have to survive."
Although the question did
arise of an increased number of
people becoming "hooked on
drugs" should the government
make it legal, Mr Dunn con-
tends at present there already
exists a significant number of
users.
He argues, similar to prohibi-
tion where illegal alcohol pro-
duction, use, and distribution
continued until it became legal-
ized, "it is only a matter of
time" before the same happens
with marijuana.


Police continue

probe into the

discovery of

body in harbour

INVESTIGATIONS con-
tinue into the discovery of a
body found in a submerged
Mercedes in Nassau Harbour
on Friday.
Only revealing that the
body was that of a black male,
Acting Assistant Police Com-
missioner Hulan Hanna said
on Sunday that no new leads
have yet been established to
determine why or how the car
ended underwater in the har-
bour.
Although unable to confirm
whether there were any
injuries on the body, Mr Han-
na said pathologists were ,
examining the remains as
investigations into the matter
continue.
Police say they are still
uncertain about the length of
time the 280-E Mercedes,
licence plate number 190696,
and the body were submerged,
and have still not revealed in
whose name the vehicle was
registered. The vehicle was


GRAND BAHAMA



Human smuggling 'still a challenge'
,\ .^y ., "- 4"' ',:'


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT National Secu-
rity Minister Tommy Turnquest
says human smuggling, drugs and
arms trafficking are challenges
that require continued police vig-
ilance on Grand Bahama.
Mr Turnquest was speaking
on Friday evening to hundreds of
police officers and reservists
attending the annual Police Ball
at the Westin at Our Lucaya
Resort. Police Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson was also pre-
sent.
The officers were commended
for their efforts in policing at the
container port, where many large
drug seizures were made during
the year.
"We are aware of the risks you
take, not only in seeking to halt
and reverse crime in our islands,
but also in confronting aggressive
human smugglers and drug and
arms traffickers.
"These challenges are not new,
but because of their persistence
and unpredictability, policing in
this area requires particular vigi-
lance," he said.
Minister Turnquest stressed
that a strong Police Force must be
maintained in Grand Bahama
and the northern region.
He noted that the challenges
and opportunities of policing
Grand Bahama, Abaco, the Berry
Islands and Bimini, have been
entrusted to the 444 police offi-
cers, 150 reservists and 19 civilians
comprising the Royal Bahamas
Police Force contingent in the
northern district.
"Tonight, I say to these offi-
cers that the government under-
stands the compelling reasons
why we must maintain a strong
and vigorous Police Force in
Grand Bahama and the North-
ern Bahamas.
"This is the part of our country
closest to the southern border of
the United States of America. We
know that the United States is
unfortunately a country which is
the target of a range of illicit
activities by sea, activities .that
may well transit The Bahamas,"
he said.
Minister Turnquest said that
the men and women of the Force


Drugs and arms trafficking also a concern, says Minister Turnquest


,



J.



I -


are called upon to serve with ded-
ication and commitment and go
wherever the Force takes them.
He stated that police officers
share a common purpose and
vision country-wide, and have all
pledged to uphold the values of
courage, integrity and loyalty.
"We know that policing in
each of our islands has its own
unique challenges and opportu-
nities. The Police, therefore, must
counter in their own unique way,
the security and safety concerns
stemming from crime and crimi-
nality in each island," said Mr
Turnquest.
He pointed out that police offi-
cers in Grand Bahama have had
to overcome significant challenges
from natural disasters, including
the recent serious hurricanes.
Mr Turnquest noted that
despite these challenges, the
Grand Bahama district continues
to make the necessary contribu-
tion to the nationwide effort to
make the Bahamas safe and
secure.
"The record shows that Grand
Bahama and the Northern
Bahamas have stayed the course,"
he said.
He reported that the Neigh-
bourhood Community Policing
Initiative has stimulated public
support for the police. He added
that the public is increasingly
becoming willing partners in the
-fight against crime.
He assured Bahamians that the


Police, communities and the
country are reaping the benefits
of these partnerships.
"Relationships are being
restored between the Police and
the communities where once frac-
tious events divided them,"' he
said.
Minister Turnquest also noted
that the series of infrastructural
improvements made by the Police
Force in Grand Bahama ensures
that officers now work and live
in more appropriate quarters.
He said The Police Training
College here in the northern
Bahamas continues to train new
recruits and re-train serving mem-
bers of the Force..
Minister Turnquest believes
that the new state-of-the-art
trunking communications system
and other technological advances
are making policing more effec-
tive in Grand Bahama, and in the
entire Bahamas.
"Let me assure the men and
women of the Police Force serv-
ing in the Northern Bahamas that
this area features prominently in
the Government's strategic plan
for policing in The Bahamas.
"The action we are committed
to take as part of this strategic
plan will give new impetus to
policing here, and will better
enable the Police to counter new
and emerging crime and crimi-
nality not only on land, but also
on the sea," he said.
Mr Turnquest revealed that
the government's plans include
the continued provision of the
necessary resources, transporta-
tion, equipment and assets
required by a 21st Century Police
Force.
He said it also encompasses
academic and technical training,
and strategic cooperation to build
closer bilateral and regional work-
ing relationships to counter trans-
border crime.
Mr Turnquest commended
officers in Grand Bahama and
the northern region for the hard
work they are doing in the region.
"I wish to thank the offi-
cers...and to assure you that your
work is indeed noticed, and that
the Government and people of


The Bahanmai appr: ij.t. what
you do.
"On their behalf, and on
behalf of the bnimstr\ of Nation-
al S.curit%. m% r, mfil\ and mni\elf.
I thank ihe AssisitanCommis-


sioner, his senior team arid all the
Officers for the contribution you
make to the peace and security
of our country, during ihe Christ-
mas season and throughout the
year," he said.


pulled from the water on Fri-
day.
Some witnesses did report
last Tuesday seeing the sub-
merged vehicle in waters at
the northern end of Victoria
Avenue, off Bay Street.




TROPICA
EXERIATR


NEW Holiday 2008 Collectionl Waverly Included ENTIRE STOCK
-Candle Holders Wallpaper Borders
%OO -Mirrors
M OFF -Decorative Accessories nOw$5OOROLL
ENTIRE STOCK -Lamps w$500 ROLL


SEVEN POUNDS


NEW 1:00


10:40


YES MAN T 1:10 3:30 N/A 6:10 8:35 10:45
DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL T 1:00 3:35 N/A 6:10 8:20 10:35
DELGO B 1:05 3:30 N/A 6:15 N/A N/A
QUANTUM OF SOLACE T N/A N/A N/A N/A 8:25 10:35
PUNISHER: WARZONE A 1:05 3:30 N/A 6:05 8:30 10:45
FOUR CHRISTMAS C 1:15 3:45 N/A 6:20 8:40 10:40


TEL: 380-FLIX


CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE
THP MOST THoROUGH R'STORATim N & CLEANING EVER. OR TH. JOB Is FREE!
NASSAU'S ONLY PROFESSIONAL, CERTIItDM STONE. CARPET & UPiouSTERy CARE SYSTEMS.
Carpet. Upholstery, Stone arid Marble Cleaning &
Restoration Specialist,.
Prochem Cleaning Systems removes Deep & Heavy
Soil, Bacteria, Grease.Watemiarks and Stains from
Carpeting & Fumiture,restoring them to like new
at a fraction of replacement cost.
Carpet, Sofa's, Loveseats, Chairs, Dining Chairs, Cars,
Boats. Grout. Tiles, Marble & Stone
Persian. Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist
Marble Polishing. Restoration & Care
Wood Floor Restoration
-ai.!. :.d StoneTech Professional Contractor
CAL LPROCHEM BS"AMASAS : ,.--- RonF S';TFr i n
PHONE:-3238083 32341594 ..... ..........
ONLY WE CAN DO IT RIGHT!
wwabpr dchienlysltem.tom iwwv.stonetechpro.com wwwiiicrc.org
*p.vp@corahswae.com








PAGE 4, MONDAY DECEMBER 22,O008ETHEDTRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MA GISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH,. Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


Bush's lifeline for the auto industry


FREE MARKET theories and the proper
role of government have been under the micro-
scope for weeks as sinking US auto companies
plead with a reluctant government to throw
them a financial lifeline to give them a chance to
navigate their companies to safe harbour.
With 10.3 million Americans already out of
work, the collapse of the auto industry threatens
to implode America's economy. Bahamians
who watched the implosion of the Montagu
Beach hotel several years ago will remember
how quickly explosives brought down a once
magnificent structure as it buckled, bent, folded
in upon itself, and collapsed in a cloud of dust.
This was the nightmare envisioned for America -
if certain rules were not broken to help
automakers buy time to restructure.
The major problem landed on President
George Bush's desk when Congress failed to
agree on a bailout.
In announcing the $17.4 billion loan with a
time limit to two of America's largest auto firms,
'President Bush made it clear that he was taking
a step that he wished he did not have to take.
"This is a difficult situation," said the Presi-
dent, "that involves fundamental questions
about the proper role of government. On the
one hand, government has a responsibility not
to undermine the private enterprise system. On
the other hand, government has a responsibili-
ty to safeguard the broader health and stability
of our economy.
"Addressing the challenges in the auto indus-
try," he said, "requires us to balance these two
responsibilities. If we were to allow the free
market to take its course now, it would almost
certainly lead to disorderly bankruptcy and liq-
uidation for the automakers. Under ordinary
economic circumstances, I would say this is the
price that failed companies must pay and I
would not favour intervening to prevent the
automakers from going out of business.
"But these are not ordinary circumstances. In
the midst of a financial crisis and a recession,
allowing the US auto industry to collapse is not
a responsible course of action."
In view of the circumstances we agree with
the president.
In June Professor Burton Folsom, Jr, author
of "The Myth of the Robber Barons", gave a
lecture at the Foundation for Economic Edu-
cation on this very question of how far, if at
all, government should interfere with a free
market.
He pointed out that an honest examination
of economic history "reveals that, more often
than not, when government programmes and
individual enterprises have gone head to head,
the private sector has achieved more progress at


For the best deal in town on
pre-owned cars, with warranty!



NOW


IN STOCK!

'01 TOYOTA CAMRY
'06 TOYOTA YARIS
'98 HYUNDAI ACCENT
'01 HYUNDAI COUPE
'04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
'04 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
'06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
'06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
'06 HYUNDAI SONATA
'00 HYUNDAI ACCENT
'02 SUZUKI XL-7
'07 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 5dr

m QUALITY#N9) @

M ITp YLIMITEo
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 325-3079
Vi.1 our showroom al Quality Aulo Sales (FreeporiJ Lid for .m.Ilar deals. Queen&ihwy, 352 6122
or Abaca Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916


less cost with greater benefit to consumers and
the economy at large."'
He gave several examples of how compa-
nies failed despite government subsidies, beat-
en out of the market by private enterprise.
One of the stories he told was of Edward K
Collins, who went to Congress with a plan to
develop a steamship fleet to compete with
Britain's subsidized Cunard Company in the
transatlantic passenger business. He asked Con-
gress for a grant of $3 million and a yearly sup-
plement of $385,000 to enable him to match
Cunard's fares. He assured Congress that even-
tually the supplements would be phased out.
Instead, he kept returning to Congress, hat in
hand, for more subsidies. By the time Cornelius
Vanderbilt, a river steamboat operator, tried
to sell Congress on the idea of an "Atlantic fer-
ry," Collin's subsidy for his transatlantic cross-
ings was up to an anuual $800,000, a large sum
of money in the 1840's.
Congress turned Vanderbilt down. Not only
was his ability doubted, but Congress was
already.committed to Collins in whom by now
it had a considerable investment.
That didn't stop Vanderbilt. With native
ingenuity, he launched his fleet without gov-
ernment subsidies, eventually putting Collins
- who was then before Congress pleading for
a bailout of $1 million to construct a replace-
ment vessel after half his fleet sank, killing
almost 500 passengers.
. Again Congress agreed. However, when that
ship failed, and Collins was again before Con-
gress,.he was turned down flat. Within a year
Collins was bankrupt, and Vanderbilt domi-
nated the seas.
A Senator concluded that Collin's business
had been "miserably managed," another felt
that the "whole system was wrong. It ought to
have been left, like any other trade, to com-
pete."
This was the opinion of US Congressmen
when faced with the bail out of the auto indus-
try.
But this time, we agree with President Bush,
there is now too much at stake too many
people and a whole economy would have been
destroyed if the president had not acted. If the
industry fails despite this help, then at least
automakers have time to organise an orderly
bankruptcy so that they can try to restructure
their businesses.
As the president said, "these are not ordinary
circumstances", something had to give, a lifeline
was thrown it is now up to the automakers
and the unions to grab that line and pull them-
selves to shore. If they drop the line, they will
drown.


Horse racing:




some questions




for the Minister




of Tourism


EDITOR, The Tribune.
IN the past couple of weeks,
horse racing has been men-
tioned a couple of times in
The Tribune. The first men-
tion was by Vincent Vander-
pool Wallace, Minister of
Tourism.
Mr Wallace claims that
while the legalisation of a lot-
tery might be a good thing for
the Bahamas, the re-estab-
lishment of a horse racing
track would not.
He based this observation
on his memories of everything
getting better when the old
track closed in 1977.
I have a few questions for
the good Minister. How old
were you in 1977? What,
exactly, got better? What,
exactly, are you talking about?
My distinct memories of the
track closing involved the fir-
ing of literally hundreds of
workers, the incredible situa-
tion that dozens of horse own-
ers found themselves in, being
no longer able to feed their
animals, the bogus promises
made by the then government
that the track was to be re-
opened in a new location
which meant that a lot of the
owners hung on desperately
in vain, the arrival of Ameri-
can "do-gooders" who spun
some yarn about saving the
horses and then shipped out
dozens of the animals to who
knows where probably to
American slaughter houses.
(Americaris rarely do anything
where they can't make a prof-
it).
The idiotic story appar-
ently started by an English
nurse that the children
became thinner when the
track opened each winter is a
total fabrication (I was
there and can personally
vouch for the stupidity of this
. tale) but has been seized
on by many, usually preach-
ers who have their own agen-
da as we all know,- as a rea-
spn to not even consider res-
urrecting this old Bahamian
tradition, started in the early
90's by the British and carried.
on by Bahamians and bringing
such excitement and enjoy-
ment to thousands over the
years.
And please explain to me
how today, with gambling rife
in every corner of the coun-


try, so many of our children
are obese.
The racing industry is a
sophisticated, money making
enterprise, which, when organ-
ised1 correctly can be of great
benefit to the country.
Both horse racing and polo
are great crowd pleasers and
would be tremendous tourist
draws as well as being huge
employers.
For the religious set, bear
in mind that the Queen of
England who is the head of
the Church of England, is one
of racing's greatest promot-
ers.
Every country in the
Caribbean has a race track,
but, as usual, the Bahamas is
lagging way behind.
Barbados has an arrange-
ment which encourages
retired trainers from abroad
to come and help train young
aspiring jockeys, trainers and
other track workers.
The employment opportu-
nities in a race track are innu-
merable.
By the way, what has hap-
pened to the race track mem-
orabilia there was an office
full of trophies, historical
records, etc, on Prince George
dock after,..[tr.hli close---
where is all that stuff now.
In The Tribune of-the ,17th
of December, page 4, a lone
voice -in the wilderness is ask-
ing the question: "Will the
horse track ever open again
?" Enquiring minds would like
to know.
F WILSON
Nassau,
December 17, 2008.
(We probably know even
more about the race track
than Mr Wilson. In fact we
were a horse riding family.
Lady Dupuch, a keen
equestrienne who could still
sit a horse in.her early eighties,
owned a champion race horse
who won many trophies at
Hobby Horse Hall.
(Racing started among
friends who were keen on
horses and would race them
just for the excitement of
watching a magnificent horse,
frothing at the bit, mane flying
in the wind and muscles rip-
pling as it strained, galloping
neck and neck for the finish
line. Lady Dupuch was in the
early stages of pregnancy with
-her fourth child when she
competed in her last race at
the track. In those early days
there was no betting. Sir Eti-
enne always said that the joy
of racing ended when the pari-
mutuel was introduced.
Harold Munnings should
remember the days of Hobby
Horse Hall because his family
owned another prized race
horse.
(It is true that when the


track was finally closed, many
owners who raced for the
money could no longer afford
to keep their horses. The poor
creatures were left to wander
aimlessly around the aban-
doned rat-infested track,
scratching in the dust for a
blade of grass. A small group
of animal lovers from the US
took pity on them and raised
money to have some of them
flown to horse country in the
US where they spent the rest
of their days grazing on rich
farmland. They did not go to
American slaughter houses as
this writer suggests.
(The story of the nurse who
complained about Bahamian
infants being undernourished
during racing season because
their fathers spent all their
money betting on the horses,
rather than buying milk for
their babies, was no fabrica-
tion. Nor was the nurse who
complained about. their con-
dition English. She was
Bahamian through and
through. In fact she was Nurse
Alice Hill Jones, who headed
government's Infant Welfare
Clinics. The children were so
undernourished during racing
season that she came to The
Tribune to plead their cause in
these columns. The Tribune
investigated and wrote many
stories on what was happen-
ing. Sir Etienne also took up
the children's cause in his edi-
.to rials. I
(This was the mair reason
that'ss a member of' parlia-
ment and publisher of The
Tribune he supported those
who were against Bahamians
gambling in the casinos. The
race track was doing enough
damage to Bahamian children.
Their fathers, addicted to
gambling, forgot their fami-
lies when throwing their mon-
ey on the horses.
(Polo was also a popular
sport during the war years and
well into the fifties. It was
played on Clifford Park every
Friday afternoon the day
that all shops closed for half
day. It always attracted a good
crowd, among them Lady
Dupuch and her young brood.
The outstanding polo players
of that era were A B Malcolm,
AK Cole, his son, Kirkland,
Harcourt (Cookus) Maura,
Alva Brooks, Allen Roberts
and Capt Carey, an ADC to
one of the governors.
(Governor Sir Bede Clif-
ford was a polo enthusiast and
was instrumental in the con-
struction of the polo field at
Clifford Park, which accounts
for the hardness of the
ground, and the name of the
park.
(When Hobby Horse Hall
closed it was no longer a
sophisticated, money making
enterprise, children were suf-
fering, and much was going
wrong at the pari-mutuel win-
dows. These were the main
reasons for its closure. Ed).


DON STAINTON

PROTECTION Ltd.
Tel: 322-8219 322-8160

TOP QUALITY TEMPERED
ALUMINUM SECURITY SCREENS











CLASSIC








NO


e BEAUTYGUARD




Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978 J


*A 1DEAUS
INSURANCE BROKER Co. Ltd.


Please be advised that our office hours for
the Holiday Season will be as follows:


Closed at 1:00pm on Tuesday 23rd

December 2008 and re-opening
on Monday 5th January 2009 for

regular business hours 8:00am thru
6:00pm.


PAGE 4, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


THE TRIBUNE






MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


The 2


.amas


INAT hUNDERFj,
now in his nirinqties,
Is iStil. tomposing. .


Handbook released
,. ,, '..-z : ..',.--,,'-,' "i L':* A


THE 2009 Bahamas
Handbook. published by
Etienne Dupuch Jr Publica-
lions, is fresh off the pxess
and now available in stores.
At 656 pages. ti.e-Hand-
book is filled with insight- -
ful features, beautiful pho-
tographs and illustrations
that bring the stories to life:
, Readers can trxavel-back
-in time to ihe 18th century
where they they'll meet
,William LIfTord'Jr. a shad-
.owy privateer and: slave
:oiner. Oddly enough, this.
debt-ridden and complain-
ing gentleman.became the.
namesake of Lv'ford Cay,
the most exclusive address
in the Bahamas today.
Not many Bahamniins still
remember the Conrtract an
international agreement
signed during the Second
World War. Under its terms
B-ahamians became migrant
farm workers in the US.
These Bahamians, now old-
er, recall the good times and
the bad. working for the
Yankee dollar.
Ever wondered what Nas-'
sau was like 100 years ago?
Handbook- readers will dis-
cover it was a fime of fast-
- paced change. Electric lights
were replacing gas.latnps
-'.along Bay Street. Tele-
phones were being hooked
up and-motor-cars were
j'"'arriving by -the
boatload.


~.> ':~:


.LEFT: The sponge trade was the
economic mainstay of Nassau
100 years ago in 1909. It was a
;ime when electricity, telephones
and automobiles were just arriv-
ing in the Bahamas.


T I


- K


replacing dohkeya e4rts a tid s, t h,4t.i tle bar in Alice
horse-drawtar-itages-. ., ,TO,.-i est-know e song
There's an artic i, :-,Big-FaSlob. all about
ator GaryT-H~it, -.marriWd.; a.istfight involving his pal,
man who scultledJ.i .r:dhior Ernrest Hemingway.
to become president fH ."-Readers will also learn
Uniited States when hfitl.A 11
aI a a I., -
an ill-advised f 1.
Bahamas wih.a tfe utl"a'-"
woman an inditeretrW ,
that may have qiange'dth q
course of world history
throws a spotlight O .
Nat Sattndets, tb 't

ni. -No N:" iv


2009 EDITION

BAHAMAS-

HANDBOOK


Ii
.1
~%
2 \ ~ '5.3


.* --.


ALL THE BAHAMAS
IN ONE BOOK


S"656 pages
S- informative articles, full-colour
S illustrations and maps

EXCITING FEATURES
HISTORY
FAMILY ISLANDS*
BUSINESS
',, FREEPORT/LUCAYA
GOVERNMENT
INFORMATIVE
, BLUE PAGES


LUUIV run i NAMun / V u
People merticqh'd
S from al Il'dloflfe! .....t
AN ETIENNE bUPUCH JR PUBLICATION
Etienne Dupuch Jr PUblicatihns,PO Box N-7513, Nassau, The Bahamas (242) 32345665

Onsll owa soestrooou heihais


BEST USED CAR PRICES IN THE BAHAMAS


,.(
. .. . ... ..' J
IJ y
k.^D "i


'~r~-'


;-WE WILL MATCHUO:BETAY PICE.IN TOWN


- .( ii


a


W,
A.* I


- %







PAGE 6, MONDAY DECEMBER 22, 2008 THE TRIBUNE


LOA'NW


MP implements relief programmes

for senior citizens, disabled residents


-Quote

of the

Betty Taylor Week
Journalist / Entrepreneur


you are here for a reason
anda season.
Therefore, enhance you season
by completion your purpose---
cs time fades away!
-Betty T'aylor

season's Greetings

mypersonalquote@live.com


S&eve

10% OFF NEW ARRIVALS

ON CLOTHING



+ G


FOR A EXTRA DISCOUNT


Harbour Bay FASHION FINDS $10.00 & UP


4


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT State Min-
ister for Finance Zhivargo
- Laing is "making a differ-
ence" in his constituency by
implementing relief pro-
grammes for senior citizens
and disabled residents in
Marco City.
Mr Laing announced on
Friday plans to launch a dis-
count card and roof repair
programme next year to
assist the elderly and dis-
abled persons who live in the
Marco City constituency.
The MP for Marco City
hosted a Christmas luncheon
for seniors at Mary, Star of
the Sea auditorium on Fri-
day. Mr Laing said that


seniors are the "pillars of
strength" in the community
and should be cherished.
Mr Laing will provide
photo ID discount cards that
allow seniors aged 60 and
older, and the disabled to get
discounts on purchases at
participating stores through-
out the island.
He was very pleased with
the feedback from store-
owners on the island.
"We have organised with
stores across the island for
their participants in this dis-
count programme and many
have responded positively.
"Unfortunately, I have
not yet been able to get the
major foodstores and I am
still waiting on an answer
from them," he said.
Mr Laing said that he is
also aware that some elderly
and disabled persons have
roofs that are compromised
and leaking in Marco City.
The roof repair pro-
gramme offers assistance for
repair projects that are
$2,500 or less. Only seniors
occupying the home can call
in and sign up for assistance.
S"Social services will certi-
mfy to us that you are such a


MARCO CITY MP Zhivargo
Laing hosted a Christmas lun-
cheon for senior citizens of
his constituency. Sarah
Sweeting, 85, was recognized
as the oldest female resident
of Marco City, and Otis Let-
tice, 81, was the oldest male
resident of Marco City attend-
ing the luncheon.
Marco City, as well as the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas," he said.
Mr Laing said that as MP
for Marco City he is avail-
able to hear from all his con-
stituents, regardless of their
political affiliation.
"When I became the MP
for Marco City I determined
that as best I could, I simply
wanted to make a difference.
"So we need to hear from
you.
"It doesn't make any dif-
ference to me where you
stand on politics, I am the
MP for all of Marco City,
and as long as you need my
counsel I will be there, I
invite your counsel," he
said.
Mr Laing has also provid-
ed educational programmes,
computer training, and
scholarship assistance for
the youth in Marco City.


PERSONALIZED INITIALS ON CUFFS


N


'-
a I$,


OTICE


,Sanpin Motors Limited


will close


from Wednesday,


December 24, 2008 at 1:00 p.m

and re-open Monday,


December 29,


2008 at 8:00 a.m.


for the Christmas Holidays.


New Years we will close


Wednesday, January


31,


2008


and re-open Friday,


January


We pra)

families w


2, 2009 at 8:00 a.m.


y that you and your .

ill have a Blessed and"


Joyous Christmas and

and Prosperous New


Happy ,

Year.
4 b

.i ii


i .. ...... ....... ... . l lt Ao lt 4% 6
I ,.- I E
Uniform$ Screen Printing Promotionl i
|~ ~~~~Cre &.*r. Casual V. .-. kar *f9 *V^

East Shiday t aP b: 9-00/14- a 9-83 4wosu-m^o


person so that we will be
able to do what is required
under that programme. I
invite those of you who have
issues to call in and take
advantage of that pro-
gramme' as well," said Mr
Laing.
Mr Laing plans to meet
with senior citizens as a
group every quarter to hear
from them about any con-
cerns and projects for the
community.
The MP has also ear-
marked $10,000 for a com-
munity project to be decided
upon by the seniors of Mar-
co City.
Mr Laing noted that the
elderly are often forgotten
by society and he did not
want to make that mistake.
. "Too many leaders have
found themselves discon-
nected from you and there-
fore don't get the benefit of
hearing your guidance, and
the Bahamas is one place
when you get older people
start discarding you like you
ain't got no value," he said.
"I never forget the ones
who paved..thq ,,ayfor,,u ;. I.
want to thank you for being
the pillars of strength in


p 1

p
m I ^


a #
K. .


J1


I I I


PAGE 6, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


THE TRIBUNE








MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


i LOCALNWI


Some in PLP

FROM page one

However, Mr Moss, who is a
relative newcomer to the PLP
and to politics, defended his
actions, telling The Tribune
that his card was created and
distributed in the "spirit and
tradition of Christmas."
"Anyone who is offended
by it is someone who is too
political and someone who
doesn't understand the true
meaning of Christmas," he
said.
The card, which shows a
photograph of Mr Moss, his
wife, and their two young chil-
dren in a warm embrace,
reads: "I hope this Christmas
season brings you and your
family every happiness. May
the New Year bring you and
yours many opportunities to
make life better for all in St
Cecilia. From my family to
yours, Merry Christmas."
"Those persons who are
offended by the card had bet-
ter get with it," Mr Moss said.
"Mother Pratt (PLP deputy
leader) has indicated that she
isnot offering again and Paul
Moss has indicated that he
intends to run for Parliament
to represent the people of St
Cecilia. So just as she is going,
I am coming," he said.
However, detractors of Mr
Moss, such as long time pho-
tographer, and PLP activist
Franklyn G Ferguson said that
a die-hard PLP seat, such as
St Cecilia, should go to a PLP
who has "a long standing"
within the party..
"The person I think who
should get the nomination is
the former Minister of State
for Finance James Smith. St
Cecilia is a strong PLP seat,
and if he, (Paul Moss) is sin-
cere, he should pick another
seat, but that seat should go
to a person who has shown in
the past to have made a great
contribution to the party."
As a founding member of
the Junior PLP, which later
became theYoung Liberals,
Mr Ferguson said that his sec-
ond choice for the St Cecilia
seat would be the former
Young Liberal and Senator
Paulette Adderley-Zonicle.
"She has lived in the area
until she got married, and has
campaigned in St Cecilia from
since she was a young girl. In
all honesty, she was there even
before Mother Pratt," he said.
Another PLP, who spoke
on condition of anonymity said
that Mr Moss is carrying him-
self as if he is the nominee for
the area "and that is not fair."
"There are other people
who are seeking nominations
but they are not as presump-
tuous as this guy. He has to
tow the line like everybody
else," he said.
Calls to Mrs Zonicle for
comment on the matter were
not returned up to press time
last night.
However, Mr Moss has
vowed that he will represent
the St Cecilia constituency,
whether his nomination is
opposed, or blocked.
The PLP, will face similar
challenges for nominations in a
number of areas, including
what is expected to be a fierce-
ly contested nomination for
Kennedy.
Reportedly, the seat has
already brought out four pos-
sible candidates; Omar
Archer, lawyer Derek Ryan,
former PLP, now Independent
MP Kenyatta Gibson, and a
fourth candidate that The Tri-
bune has learned has yet to be
formally named.

Independent MP
will not seek PLP
nomination 'for

any constituency'
FROM page one

bune has learned has yet to
be formally named.
As a long held PLP strong-
hold, the Kennedy con-
stituency is a seat that politi-
cal pundits believe should be
the "reward" of a candidate
of long standing "PLP con-
nections."
PLP sources insist that Mr
Gibson, having criticised par-


ty leader, Perry Christie when
he (Gibson) resigned in Jan-
uary this year, will be
replaced,by a candidate who
they know will not "follow in
his footsteps."
The Kennedy constituency
has seen two prominent res-
ignations in the recent past
with Mr Gibson in 2008 who
became an Independent, and
current Opposition business
leader in the House of
Assembly, Dr Bernard Not-
tage resigning from the party
when he was the area's MP
in 2000. He later rejoined the
party.


FROM page one

Quarto, said the development
must be stopped before further
damage is done and the vital
mangroves are threatened.
He said the four 'gaps' were
identified in the Bimini Bay Pro-
ject Report; lack of public access
to documents, an alteration of
the master plan, lack of an Envi-
ronmental Management Plan
and environmental degradation
beyond what was anticipated,
are enough to stop the project.
However, Black and Veatch
have advised government to go
ahead, with conditions.
Mr Quarto said: "We wonder
how Black and Veatch can so
nimbly make the leap of faith
from one very slippery inves-
tigative stepping stone to anoth-
er in stretching to reach their
conclusion without falling into
the mulch that surrounds this
whole development process, and


U


Suspicious envelopes sent to US embassies
FROM page one

contained the cryptic message.
A plain white envelope, which is similar to others received by US
embassies around the world over the last two weeks, was delivered
to the Embassy in Nassau on Friday. It is thought to contain a mys-
terious white powder.
Following preliminary testing, the FBI said it does not believe the
powder is dangerous. However, it said, it looks suspicious.
Jeff Dublel, spokesman for the US Embassy in the Bahamas,
told The Tribune that the white substance in the envelopes could be
anything from talcum.powder to powder sugar, "or any number of
things that might not be as innocuous as that."
The FBI said it believes the substance could also be corn starch.
The envelope, which was sent to the Bahamas embassy, was
secured and taken away for testing.
The complete test results from suspect packages sent to embassies
around the world are not yet available to the embassy in Nassau, but
well-trained diplomats acted with caution.
"All US diplomatic facilities receive extensive training in respond-
ing to these types of incidents," Mr Dubel said.
"Procedures in place were followed, including contacting appro-
priate Bahamian authorities."
The US Embassy is expected to keep the Bahamas govern-
ment informed of test results and their response to the threat. The
services provided by the US Embassy to American and Bahami-
an citizens are not expected to be affected.


FROM page one

flames, a distraught mother of
two held on to one of her chil-
dren while shouting for help for
her two-year-old son.
Eye witnesses said that by the
time Fire Services arrived at the
scene, the building was com-
pletely engulfed in flames.
Supt Jeffrey Deleveaux of
Fire Services said that it was at
first difficult for fire fighters to
even confirm if a child was still
in the burning building.
However1 as the blaze per-
mitted, fire fighters attempted
to reach the apartment to
search for the toddler.
After beating back the
flames, fire men were able to
locate the apartment, but their
search for the two-year-old was
unsuccessful.


GIFT


Two-year-old
It took fire services over two
hours to extinguish the intense
blaze. Sometime after 8pm, they
finally found the remains of a
child in a back bedroom of one
of the apartments.
Fire Services said an autopsy
' will be carried out to determine
the exact cause of death of the
two-year-old boy.
Investigations are also under-
way to determine the cause of
the fire that left one child dead
and dozen others homeless.


"The development should not
be given approval for an addi-
tional phase of development
while there has been such an
egregious failure to meet the
requirements of the first phase."
Black and Veatch suggest
developers RAV Bahamas Ltd
apply for Blue Flag marina cer-
tification, but the Foundation.
for Environmental Education
rejected a previous application
because of the development's
serious environmental impact,
Mrs McKinney-Lambert said.
The golf course, which Black
and Veatch maintains should be
on solidly terrestrial land, has
received no support from the


BNT or BREEF as the proposed
site is directly linked to wetlands
and the marine protected
area.
Mrs McKinney-Lambert said:
"There is very little elevated
land in the area proposed for
phase two of the development
and the 'land' where the golf
course would be placed would
include a considerable amount
of wetland.
"The environmental impacts
on this and adjacent areas is like-
ly to be severe, far reaching, and
irreparable."
To see the Black and Veatch
Bimini Bay Project Report log
on to www.best.bs


Environmentalists
has since its contentious incep-
tion.
"The so-called 'gaps' should
have raised red flags, but instead
Black and Veatch are raising
their green flag."
MAP is advising government
to ensure Bimini Island coastal
ecosystems are protected,
including the mangroves, sea
grass beds and corals, as well as
the viability of the proposed
marine sanctuary, which may be
adversely affected if phase two
goes ahead.
BREEF executive director
Casuarina McKinney-Lambert
said she was "disturbed" by what
she has seen on visits to the site,
and proceeding to phase two
will negatively impact wetlands
severely, and undermine the
islands' ecological function.
Mrs. McKinney-Lambert said:


S


iPod (- ,n s

HP Computers



Apple Co peters
I Ode


C OPIERS D;
)UL- ,, iod1sff


FOR
EVERYONE
FOR CHILD,
HUSBAND, WIFE
BOSS, SECRETARY
k* BUSINESS
ASSOCIATES
ALL
NEW!
2009
-m A EDITION



-- $39.95

BAHAMAS

HANDBOOK
AVAILABLE AT BOOKSTORES
& NEWSSTANDS EVERYWHERE
DUPUCH PUBUCATIONS


I I IL- I I tl- -


I


'Mentally unstable' man

FROM page one
department, Mr Walkes was suffering from a mental condition, which
may have played a part in his unusual boat departure.
Mr Minnis said: "According to his family, sometimes he is up and
sometimes he is down, they believe he was experiencing some sort of
mental problem at the time." The officer also said that the man had no
criminal record, but said stress may have been a factor in his actions.
The officer said that the Defence Force, the United States Coast
Guard, police and other vessels conducted an extensive search for
the man over the past two and a half days, however up to Sunday
evening none of the rescue teams was able to find Mr Walkes.
Police said the man was travelling by himself to Nassau at the time
of his disappearance. Search efforts for Mr Walkes are continuing.


Murphyiville, 2nd louse lef t fromSearsRoad



fLolidng almmns:


I Clri sti l]ll~ ',isl peI1o1Bell11 [III 11








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


LOCAL NES I


CARICOM


* BY SIR RONALD
SANDERS
DOMINICA'S Prime Min-


ister Roosevelt Skerrit says
the current situation in which
holders of Caribbean Com-
munity and Common Market


HOLIDAY SEASON


passport

2ARICOM) passports are The situation is not
)t enjoying any real atten- "almost" laughable. It is
ant benefits is "almost laugh- laughable.
ble." The CARICOM passports
provide not one more practi-
cal benefit than the national
passports of the CARICOM
member countries.
At the airports of some
CARICOM countries, many
holders of CARICOM pass-
ports are subject to the same
scrutiny, the same suspicion
and the same grilling by immi-
gration officers that they
endured prior to the adoption
N HOURS of the passport by some
CARICOM states. .


'Symbolism'
The CARICOM passport
does not even provide the
"symbolism" of one-
Caribbean people that it was
supposed to engender. If any-
thing, it does the opposite by
emphasizing that, despite the
fact that CARICOM has.
existed for 35 years, there
remains no welcome mat at
the doorstep of many CARI-
COM countries for the peo-
ple of their partner states.
In the official literature
related to the Caribbean Sin-
gle Market (CSM), it says that
CARICOM enjoys "free


In


-a joke




insight
... .. .-, fwit. .;. .. . .! (.
'< : ,' ,- I- '* .: < a .,* ..: ,.. .,. -


movement of goods, services,
capital and people."
A quarrel could be.picked
and won on the motion that
none of these categories of
free movement exist, but on
the last of them people -
most of all.
The reality is that CARI-
COM is a single market "in
the making", and one that is
being made very slowly-
despite the urgency that has
existed for some time to get
on with its completion.
North Americans and
Europeans enjoy far greater
freedom of everything in
CARICOM states than *
CARICOM nationals do.
And, the recently signed
Economic Partnership Agree-
ment between the EU and
individual CARICOM states
will give European companies
and individuals greater free-
dom, rights and protections.in
CARICOM countries than
CARICOM governments give
to companies and individuals
of their own states.
Some governments will
point out that there are groups


Some
governments
will point out
that there are
groups within
their countries
who, through
their own
insecurities,
are virulently
anti-CARICOM
nationals.


within their countries who,
through their own insecurities,
are virulently anti-CARICOM
nationals.

Insularity
That is so. But no govern-
ment should pander to such
short-sighted insularity.
Instead, they should edu-
cate their populations about
the importance of deeper
CARICOM integration for
their own survival.
They ought not to pretend -
as some do that they pos-
sess some unidentified magic
formula to prosper on their
own for it is simply not true.
Governments, who indulge
in this pretence, do their peo-
ple an enormous disservice.
If people conduct their lives
in the belief that they have no
need to worry, when the
crunch comes, they will be
fatally unprepared.
Two points are worth mak-
ing here.
SEE page 9


FABRIC & DEPARTMENT STORE


Easy Bake Ovens
Baby Alive Dolls
Gourmet Cupcake Makers
Incredible Hulk Toys
Transformers
Barbies, Games
Bikes & Trikes
Educational Toys

Silks, Lamours, Mandarins,
Taffetas, Velvets,
Sequences
Crepe Back Satins
Spandex, Mens Suiting


The Spirit of Giving


'-
s /?W









THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 9


OA NEWS.


CARICOM

passport.
FROM page eight

First, in the case of many
CARICOM countries, a sig-
nificant portion of their
exports of manufactured
goods and services relies on
the CARICOM market.
If the CARICOM markets
bought elsewhere, these coun-
tries would suffer a fact that
many governments fail to tell
their people.
Second, if 'CARICOM
nationals in many CARICOM
states were to leave, the'
economies of these states
would decline in myriad ways.
Not only would they lose
skilled and unskilled labour
that they nced, they would
lose the taxes these people
pay, the services they use such
as rented houses, and the
money they spend in the econ-
omy on items such as food,
clothing, transportation, utili-
ties, and medical care.
In this regard, the authori-
ties in all CARICOM coun-
tries should be mindful of the
importance of according to
CARICOM nationals, who
are legitimately living and
working in their states, the
rights and respect to which
they are entitled.
They should not be treated
as "second-class"; they should
not be exploited and they
should have the same rights
of protection as any legitimate
resident in the country.
Picking-up people in the
middle of the night and
deporting them without due
process is not right or legal;
nor is deporting people who
are legitimately waiting for a
work permit to be renewed.
This is especially so when
the only people treated in this
way are those from the
Caribbean.
It should also be clearly
understood by all that at some
time in,the not too distant
future, all CARICOM coun-
tries will be confronted by the
staik reality that they cannot
survive on their own.
In the cycle of livelihood,
some countries have enjoyed


IDMNCPRMMINITE Rooevet** rit


the upswings that have come
from preferential markets and
official development assis-
tance both of which are
declining fast.
In the enjoyment of the
temporary upswing, they seem
to have forgotten that CARI-
COM's small and vulnerable
economies are not sufficiently
well endowed or diversified
to survive on their own, and
the downturns come.
And when they come, they
do so with a vengeance.

Crisis
Were the countries of
CARICOM a genuine Single
Market in which free move-
ment of goods, services, capi-
tal and people were a reality,
they might have a better
chance of survival.
As one small example, think
of what would have happened
in the mighty United States in
the present financial crisis, if it
was not a single market and
economy and each of its 51
states had to struggle for itself.
Businesses in CARICOM
states have long recognized
the value of a Single Market
with free movement of goods.
services, capital and people.
If there were free move-
ment in all these areas, they
know that CARICOM would
be a stronger entity today bet-
ter able to cope with the world
economic crisis.
And, on the matter of free
movement of people, busi-


nesses know that they would
have a wider pool of people
on whom to draw for the
knowledge and skills they
need to compete both in the
global community and in their
own domestic market where,
increasingly, they have to fend
off foreign competition.
The most apt analogy is the
West Indian Cricket team. If
we can't find 11 globally com-
petitive players in all the
CARICOM states together,
how will we each find them
from within our individual
borders?
The truth is that the issue of
movement of CARICOM
nationals between all CARI-
COM countries can be settled

BIGGEST

BEST*










SELLER
ON BAHAMAS
GIVE BAHAMAS
HANDBOOK
DUPUCH PUBLICATIONS


if LCARICOLUM becomes a gen-
uine Single Market with free-
dom of movement of all the
factors of production including
labour. Both the gain and the
pain will be shared by all.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com
(The writer is a business
consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat)


QUANTITY
RED (R) P[NK (P) WHITE (W)
,MRBLF. (M)


POT SZE -


PR ICF


s 10.004
yf)M


___(R)-___ )_-(W)


jR)


Company Name: _____.._____


1" (fl)


Contact Perseo:


Telephone No:_______ Fax No: P.0 Box_____

Address:




FREE DELIVERY FOR TWENTY
PLANTS OR MORE!
ARCHER'S NURSERY
#55 DUNMORE AVE, CHIPPINGHAM-SOUTH OF
BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY
HOUSE GARDEN & LANDSCAPING PLANTS-SEEDLINGS,
LANDSCAPING, INTERIORSCAPING
YARD & MAINTENANCE SERVICE





A line upiyou won'


soon forget.


w ~, .. -
.- .~ ~ -
'~. -~:~='


SUARU Ip-ez Leacy& Forste


.... I
A...
A


I.


I


I I
...^..'^a a.^^
iS?/- =- =!- Ja =-


Tyreliex Star Motors is the Fxclusive-'


Aiuthorize(d Dealer for Me .-!'
Subaru and IsuLIz vehicles.
> New & Used Cars & Trucks
> Sales, Parts & Service

Call us today at 325.4961
Visit our showroom on Wulff Rd!


S E L TA Fax: 323.4667 / Open Mon-Fri, 8am-5pmi
YREFLEX STAR IMOTORS Wuiff Road, P. 0. Box'N 9123, Nassau


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps 7'J}.I -
you are raising funds for a .
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the /
area or have won an
award. If so, call us on 322-
1986 and share your story.


ARCHER'S NURSERY
P.O. BOX N-313
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TELEPHONES (242) 325-1769
OR (242) 323-5904
FAX: (242) 356-6691


ORDER FORM


POINSETTIAS


"Soon to be available in
Haitian, Jamaican, Canadian, US, and British Nationalities'



THE BRASS & LEATHER SHOPS LTD
Charlotte Street Off Bay Street Tel: 322-3806
Mall at Marathon Tel: 394-5676
Marsh Harbour, Abaco Shopping Centre -Tel: 367-3643
www.brass-leather.com

THE LUGGAGE STORE
East Ave & 6th Terrace, Opp. Centreville Food Market Tel: 328-1477


I


LANI3








PAGE 10, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008 THE TRIBUNE


The world needs to know



what Cat Island has to offer


* By SYLVIA
LARAMORE-CRAWFORD
CAT ISLAND is described as
the most cultural island in the
Bahamas, the cultural bedrock
of Bahamian culture.
If this is so, and I believe it is,
why is it that Cat Island is
described so poorly on the page
A Nation of Islands, in the
Bahamas Telephone directory?
For years, Cat island is listed in a
paragraph of 11 lines with the
same old tired comments, and I
quote:
"Cat Island is rich in history
and culture; it is home to Como
Hill, the highest point in the
Bahamas at 206 feet above sea
level, on top of which sits Mount
Alvernia, the tiny herinitage built
by famed architect Monsignor
John C Hawes, a popular tourist
attraction today. It is also the
home to Deveaux House, an old
plantation house with out build-
ings."
Cat Island has much more to
offer, and vacationers need to
know this. As a matter of fact,
the world needs to know this.
The late Monsignor John C
Hawes was affectionately called
Father Jerome. Ask most young
Cat Islanders about Father
Hawes, most won't know who
you were talking about, and only
a handful of people remember


0i llS tAY


him. Practically all who kiew
him passed away a long tim, -go.
The name Father Jerome draws
the tourists to Como Hill, not
John C Hawes, therefore, the
name Father Jerome should have
been included in the article. No-
one has ever asked me about
Father Jerome Hawes.
There are a number of things
tourists could do:
They could walk and take ..me
out to talk to Cat Islanders who
are very friendly without fear;
swim daily in the translucent
emerald waters; beach walking;
sample rock-oven bread, coconut
tarts, potato bread and other
sweets.
In the dense vegetation, one
could find a wide variety of
plants including species of lilies;
plants known to be medicinal;
fruits including mangoes,
coconuts, all sorts of other fruit
and vegetables; ride a bike, rent
a car, visit creeks, play paddle
tennis, bonefishing, scuba div-
ing, visit bat caves, visit ruined
slave houses, see craft work -
lovely shell creations, jewellery,


friendly resorts, rake and scrape
music, writers' exhibition, poetry
readings, concerts, annual fairs,
cookouts, and one does not have
to worry about which church to
'attend, Cat Island is full of them,


obeah, fishing, annual fashion
shows, scuba diving, canoes and
kayaks, junkanoo, boat rentals,
blue holes, crawfish, conch and
other types of fish, including
grouper, jacks, snappers, name
it and you will find it in our
waters.
Cat Island also has crabs and
the entire island is an archive of
birds.
You won't find any tourist
harassment on Cat Island.
Merry Christmas.


THE owners of an arthritic 10-year-old dog who needs medication
on a daily basis are offering a reward of $1,000 for his return after he
went missing in the Eastern Road area.
The reward is being offered for the safe return of Zoey, a distinctive
border collie/schnauzer mix. The dog has been gone from his home,
opposite the entrance to Mount Vernon, since Wednesday evening.
Although there have been several reported sightings of the elderly
pooch, he has yet to be reunited with his owner.
He has black shaggy fur with a white patch on his front and white
tipped feet.
Anyone who sees Zoey is asked to call his owner on 325-3535
(home), 393-7150 (work) or 431-6651 (cell).


SAVE*SAVE*SAV


Our Already 30%

Discounted Prices


Total Discount Now 40% i
These are some of our Nett Prices:

4 Cube Refrigerator One Door -- ---------------$239.00
8 Cube Refrigerator Top Freezer -- -------------$525.00
12 Cube Refrigerator Top Freezer ----------------------- $614.00
14 Cube Refrigerator Top Freezer ---- ------ $675.00

15 Cube Refrigerator Top Freezer-------------- $702.00
18 Cube Refrigerator Top Freezer ----------------------- $753.00
21 Cube Refrigerator Top Freezer ----------------------- $912.00


TOG*


HEAVY TRUCKS, 2OFT & 40FT
CHASSIS, FLATBEDS, TRAILERS,
FORKLIFTS & MISC. VEHICLES
FOR SALE







52 trucks, vans and trailers including heavy
duty Mack trucks, enclosed bok delivery trucks
and trailers, various forklifts and 150 container
chassis priced for immediate sale.

In Nassau call 377-0165 and ask for John
In Freeport call 352-9315 and ask for Fred


KINGSWAY ACADEMY
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION FOR
SEPTEMBER. 2009.

The Entrance Examination will be
held at the school on Bernard Road on
Saturday, January 17, 2009 at
8:00 a.m. for students wishing to enter
grades 7, 8, 9. or 10. Deadline for
applications is Monday, January 12.
Applications can be collected at the
Business Office or at the High School.
Contact the school at
Telephone numbers 324-8811,
324-6269, 324-6887 for further
information


HERE'S YOUR CHANCE TO
UNLOCK A WORLD OF
ENDLESS OPPORTUNITY FOR
YOUR CHILD!


IREWARD OFFEEDFOR ISSING DOG, I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008







LOCLNW


The 2009 Bahamas Handbook released


FROM page five
something about the late.,
Robert dallam "Bobby"
Symontte, surely one of
the most creative and suc-
cessfdi businessmen The
Bahamas has ever pro-
ducel. Among other accom-
plisiments Bobby headed
theall-Bahamian Common-
wralth Bank, won his share
a, international sailboat
-aces and became the
youngest person ever
named Speaker of the
House of Assembly.
Contemporaries recall
that Bobby was a man of
the people who was equally
at ease hobnobbing with
celebrities and royalty.
Other Handbook stories
tell readers how:
. Regattas and festivals
keep Out Island economies
humming
UNEXSO introduced
scuba diving to the world
Church plaques allow
glimpses into the life and
times of Bahamians who
died in the 1800s.
These are just samples of
what to expect in the Hand-
book for 2009 a carefully
researched reference guide
that is essential reading for
anyone who lives, works,
plays or invests in the
Bahamas.
Readers include business
leaders, academics, histori-
ans, researchers and gov-
ernment officials at home
and abroad, as well as


FORMER PRESIDENTIAL HOPEFUL Gary Hart with
his wife Lee by his side.


young families and students.
You'll find sections devot-
ed to the history of the
Bahamas, the Out Islands,
Grand Bahama, business
and real estate.
A Year in Review section
lists the events that made
headlines in 2008.
You'll also find compre-
hensive guides to govern-
ment departments,
embassies, consuls, interna-
tional organizations, plus


UNEXSO, the pioneering dive company in Grand
Bahamas, introduced the world to the wonders of
scuba diving.


the famous Blue Pages, a
compendium of the most
up-to-date and reliable
information on the
Bahamas, arranged in a


user-friendly A to Z format.
The Bahamas Handbook:
everything you want to
know about The Bahamas,
all in one place.


C. A. Christie Real Estate
HAS MOVED
To Pilot House Complex,
East Bay'Street
P. O. Box N8245,
Nassau, The Bahamas





WWW.CACHRISTIE.COM
SALES@CACHRISTIE.COM



Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.
Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 Fax: 326-7452
EXTRA, EXTRA, EXTRA,

Large Shipment

Arrived This Week

Check Out Our New LOW

PRICES


Hurry, Hurry, H
Get Your First


For Easy


urry and
Choice


Financing


Bank And Insurance
On Premises


IUCAL3mI


ballon bleu


de







V. ( *** ^ 'i .**


Catir


CARTIER BOUTIQUES
Nassau: 284 Bay Street Tel. (242) 302 2872!
Paradise Island: Crystal Court, Atlantis Tel. (242) 3(63 5808


LITTLE FEET ACADEMY
Nursery and Pre-School
2 Locations to serve you
#1 Carmichael Rd. opp. Diplomat Center;
Telephone #341-4503
#2 Faith Ave. South, 16 building on right;
Telephone #341-5368
*Ages 6 weeks to 5 years P
*Professional, Trained, Caring, Christian Staff
Q a J, *Abeka Curriculum a e 1
Swimming & TenpisOn Campus, -
J, *Hot, Nutitional Meals 4 k
Zz' Hours: 7am 6pm Daily
www.ifaschool.com
Open during the summer-months

NOW REG'ISSTERING








PAGE 12, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008 THE TRIBUNE


.. I *'/.' -,". .


CYCLES UNLIMITED

wwi.cyclesbahlamas.comn


Tel: 393-0155


MACKEY STREET


Nassau's oldest & most trusted bicycle, parts & accessories source,


Charities feel the pinch


in tough economic times


* By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter __
CHARITABLE organizations arc feeling the pinch
in these tough economiL times as many Bahamians
may be finding it harder to "give" this Christmas sea-
son.
Kim Sawyer, director general of the Bahamas Red
Cross, told The Tribune that while the organisation has
been receiving some donations, more are needed.
"We have had some donations, but I would not say
that it has been overwhelming. We also have our
standard people we assist through our meals on wheels
programme and we have gotten more requests," Mrs
Sawyer said. '
She said that any donation to assist the organisation
is appreciated.
While donations by private persons may be down,
Mrs Sawyer said that some corporate donations have


Bring


em on !
IN A highly competitive indus-
try like real estate, what reasons
would a seller have for going it .
alone? Not surprisingly, the
majority of unrepresented sell-
ers choose to sell By Owner in Before trave
order to avoid paying a commis- 'By Owner rou
sion. following ques


been coming in. The Bahamas Telecoirmunications
Company (BTC), she said, recently donned $20,000.
"We do have some fundraisers going oland we are
working towards the ball," Mrs Sawyer sad.
Madeline Froning, Salvation Army cOnmunity
relations and development associate, saidthat the
organisation is definitely feeling the effects G a slow
economy as monetary donations are down.
"As of about three weeks ago (we) were eperi-
encing a 38 per cent downturn. We are definitelyfeel-
ing the pinch. We have seen acts of generosity, bu we
are still down," she said, noting that most of the organ-
isation's monetary contributions came from corp,-
rate sponsors such as BTC.
Ms Froning said the Salvation Army's Christmas
campaign is not yet over and the goal is to raise
$100,000. She said that donations of food and cloth-
ing to the organisation have been pretty "steady" for
this time of year.


ling the For Sale
ite, consider the
tion. Would you


be killing to pa\ a commission if
a real estate agent brought a
ready and willing buyer to you?
Focusing too much on com-
mission might be penny-wise but
pound foolish, especially when
you learn that homes sold by
realty professionals fetch 16 per
cent more than those sold by
unrepresented sellers (this is the
US standard). 16 per cent is
roughly three times the fee that
many brokerages charge for their
valuable service, so it's easy to
see how paying for representa-
tions likely to put more money
in your pocket, not less.
What's the explanation for the
difference in sale prices? Most
commontly, it comes down to the
fact that unrepresented sellers
are showing their home to a
much smaller universe of buyers
than the one that BREA real
estate agents can bring. By
exposing your property to the
widest segment of qualified buy-
ers, you significantly increase
your chances of a full price offer
from a genuinely motivated par-
ty.
Honestly discuss your con-
cerns about brokerage fees with
an agent you trust, who will
cooperate with you to create a
fair and valuable relationship.


The College of St. Benedict and

St. John's University Brass Choir

to Perform in Nassau


"-i i ; ,ii ....
IW,il j ,i, !, Ar
_. i I
'-- -. it.- , I .. nT
. = h -.- j .. -: ..i


Tuba player Brian Cooper of Nassau, along with other
members of the Brass Choir; will perform at St. Anselm
Parish on Sunday, January 4, 2009.

Alumnae, alumni, parents, students and friends of the College
of Saint Benedict and Saint John's University are invited to a
concert and reception on Sunday, January 4, 2009, at 6:00 p.m.
The concert and reception will be held al St. Anselm Parish,
Fox Hill.

Please join us for a wonderful evening of music and hospitality.
Please let us know you are coming by contacting St. Anselm
Parish at (242)-324-1325, or e-mail: stanselm@batelnet.es

The College of St. Benedict/St. John's University Brass Choir
consists of approximately 16-18 students under the direction of
Dr. Dale White. Membership is made up of both music and
non-music majors who enjoy a similar passion for brass ensemble
music. The repertoire of the ensemble includes music of all
historical styles, from original contemporary works for brass,
to light classics and hymn tunes, to Renaissance and Baroque
transcriptions. The CSB/SJ U Brass Clhoir rehearses once a
week and performs tt a variety of events on and off campus.
The 2009 tour to the Bahamas is the Iirst major tour outside the
state of Minnesota for the ensemble.


GIBSON, RIGBY & Co.
Counsel & Attorney-at-Law
Notaries Public








I .?...






Please be advised that our offices will be

CLOSED


1:00p.m. Wednesday, December 24th 200$

Thursday, December 25th 2008

Friday, December 26th 2008


1:00p.m. Wednesday, December 31st 2008

Thursday, January 1st 2009

Friday, January 2nd 2009


We will re-open at normal working hours at
9a.m. 51,.m. Monday, January 5th, 2009.


Partners ( 'hunbcrs
Dwayne A. Gibson Ki-Malex I louse, Dowdeswell Street Tel:(242) 302-6100
Raynard S. Rigby PlO.l3ox SS-6836 Fax:(242) 302-6106,7
Associates Nassau, The iahauas
Wecnce M.J. Martin and E-nmail: gibrig.com@batelnet.bs
Melissa L.Selvcr-Rolle (corgc '\o'mn Tel:(242) 336-3485
Queens I ligh-vay 1FAx:(242) 336-3487
S\1i;xt i, liahlunas


I I I


PAGE 12, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


*.


71M'rw I -,1.-,






MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 13


NSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW


NG I O'L3RIEN WILL HA\E I HE FOLLOW \ INk--.,
-INCG E I illis CHRIS IMI\A I lOt-..iL -\' \ SSON:


T\ PL.Ii, 24 December iChristmah L,.el
Th rLd0\, 27 D -aem-iber it_-i ri.Tni,-tiE )1i\ i
Frio ,,. 20 Decc r'iberr IBpo\in Daii\ )
WCdr-.sda, 31 -'cember I Nei c'a E[.ci
Thuir.t1, i ['I ar, i \ariN \lcar', Da,i


Public I-- lida.i
Public Holida
Public l ido-ia,


OLR OFFiUR \\il RFI''\F NIORM \.I \ORkI\ I 101- S ON


WETAKM IHISOPRPCiLl1II 10 1HA\kOLR \.\l L I II Is .l)K
THEIRCONiI\L'UIHStpPORp I .\\1) I \ I NI1 OURLlr \i FRI (, i IIV1C.
FOR AHAPF H\ -Ol (IIA si A, )N AMN A I'I P'5PI ROL NI \\ Li \RN







FEN Di._


















Ba &CaroteSret- e: 2-60


FURNI E
Celebrating
20years
Nassau Grand Bahama World Wide Web



* While Supplies Last
* With Approved Credit
* Some Stipulations May Apply

Tel: (242) 397-PLUS (7587)
NASSAU Town Centre Mall
Mon-Sat ,9am-9pmn
Fax: (242) 325-6368


Luxurious Bedroom Suites
for as low as


per week*


ApplyforIn0ous
Finacingonlne 0day


VISA


Tel: (242) 352-PLUS (7587)
GRAND BAHAMA Madeira Croft
Mon-Fri 9arn-6pm Sat 9am-4prn
Fax: (242) 352-9823


www.furniturep s. com
FP87 1


I. 1


GLINTON

icOU

. GUNTON I SWEETII
OFPi'CE HOL'RSDL R


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 14, MONDAY, DECEMBER ~2, 2008 THE THIliui'uz


LOCAL NEWS


FROM LEFT: Denise
Adderley, director of
marketing services at
the Grand Bahama
island Tourism Board;
Earnestine Moxyz,
public'relations man-
ager at the Westin and
Sheraton Our Lucaya
Resort, and Sandra
Russell, senior man-
ager in the Ministry of
Tourism with respon-
sibility for human.
resources and train-
ing.


__...... .. .. ... .. ... .._ .- -.


FINAL BLOWOUT


I[


M~i J-UO
Js


KIP9I@


I|- Don't be the
l.-._ -


'SALE


.. _- v -- O

last to visit us ait. our Showroom. Sainimerwinds Plaza, Harold Road I
or- ca U 3156- 7502 .__ .


1,200 get 'Grand Life


Ambassador Training'


GRAND Bahama In June,
2008 the Grand Bahama
Island Tourism Board, with
the support of the Ministry of
Tourism, launched a customer
service awareness training
programme.
The "Grand Life Ambas-
sador Training" has resulted
in the training of over 1,200
employees in the hospitality
sector who have become
ambassadors of service,
including employees from
hotels, Customs and Immi-
gration, airlines, car rental
agencies, airport security, taxi
drivers and educators in the
school system.
On December 12, Earnes-
tine Moxyz, public relations
manager of the Westin and
Sheraton Our Lucaya Resort,
was awarded her gold pin, the
highest honour of the Grand
Life Ambassador programme.
Ms Moxyz was responsible
for leading a total of 36 face-
to-face Grand Life training
sessions. Eight of those ses-
sions were co-facilitated by
Karenda Swain of the Min-
istry of Tourism.
"Earnestine is to be com-
mended for her outstanding
efforts with this programme.
She took the ball and ran with
it. She exemplifies what it is
to be a Grand Life Ambas-
sador. We encourage every-
one in Grand Bahama Island
to follow this fine example,"
said Denise Adderley, director
of marketing services for the
Grand Bahama Island
Tourism Board, who present-
ed the gold pin to Ms Moxyz.
Approximately 1,000 per-
sons inclusive of managers,
led by the general manager
and United States-based sales


team successfully, completed
the Grand Life Ambassador
Training programme. More
than 6,891 man-hours of train-
ing where put into the pro-
gramme.
The sessions began in
August 5 and ended on Octo-
ber 31.
Up to November 6, an addi-
tional 115 persons completed
the online e-learning training
programme.
"Feedback from the ses-
sions has been both positive
and inspiring. Staff members
are motivated to ensuring that
all of our guests experience
the Grand Life on Grand
Bahama through the delivery
of excellent service. They wel-
comed the opportunity to par-
ticipate in the training and
have committed to sharing its
contents with their family
members and friends," Ms
Moxyz said.
The Grand Life Ambas-
sador Training Programme
consists of one eight-hour
training session or one online
learning experience.
Every resident and second
home owner is encouragedto
take either the face-to-fice
class or the online e-learing
course.
The class'is facilitaed by
either one or two repesenta-
tives, or by GrandBahama
Island Ambassadc's, chosen
and trained by.he Grand
Bahama Islard Tourism
Board and th, Ministry of
Tourism..
Some 25 ,ersons from a
cross-sectio, of local compa-
nies competed the train-the-
trainer Randd Life Ambas-
sador curse in early June
2008.


Blue Tor Rin, .
entia ,1 and a


Emerald &
[Diaimond
f leat

I'00


', N


., ,

I.


F nicrill, ,nd Di.inionmdl
lagutar RIng

0O_ 4


1 u,1,r I. .I l, -I I .
7),oo,, Cn7,,'l


.' I, "L Silver and 14k gold Gemstone
Rings, Earrings and Pendants, Available
in Your Choice of: Smokey Quartz,
Ameithyst, lemon Quartz & Garnet.


Blue Topaz Ring with
Diamonds


U


I ~. ~ '


7 Nd' ~i.i Ti.S egs

jR I.. ,.
;, r l


Blue lopaz Earrings






Ruby and Diamond Ring

A


R l.i.- l I ,,l r -li ,, -
[)li.ill. r i I. jil irlm.2


<:!fa.
^.
*'*W4


'^'^ JS
'l "'"'^''iu '^^1


6 6 I


I "Y


' R C 1 1 'll


"-, -*.


The Bahamas -"
f"or nations,



to '


Want to reduce electricity
consumption and lower
your bills? Start by replacing
regular incandescent light
bulbs that are used more
than two hours per day
with Energy Star@ compact
fluorescent light bulbs or
CFLs. CFLS use about 75 %
less electricity than regular
light bulbs and last up to
seven years!



re, ,e alnl ti s Uil .,eier


p.


Y .o u "o B '.- -


* Ti *. ~ j~a.id~ ~tO


ErI :l 2'


F- -@z-


. 4.6


Hotel Chief Elgineer
Management Employgent Opportunity

POSITION WAILABLE
HOTEL CHIIF ENGINEER
A leading hotel invites qualifiedgrsons in the above mentioned field to
apply for the position of Enginei Manager.
The successful candidate muspossess the following:
A minimum of 5 years experience as a Supervisor in the Engineering
Department
Must be proficient in piventative Maintenance Programs
Must possess a proveprecord of Team Leadership skills, and able to
work with little or noupervision
Must possess strong aterpersonal, communication, problem solving
and customer servi skills
Must possess know-dge of Electrical & Mechanical Systems i.e.
HVAC, Plumbing t Heating
Must possess basic Administrative skills with some knowledge of
Microsoft Excel
Must be able tcwork long and flexible hours
Applicants with supporting documents also including a clean Police
Certificate should be sent to the address below.
Competitive salay and benefits package are commensurate with experience.
Applicants for Hotel Chief Engineering,
DA#67770
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas


'Ti
.7,.


I'.-
'-A


THE TRIlbuijr-


PAGE 14, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


1 11199 I


I ,L '.*


!.
%. ,


MO]AblrbMs







MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE


Ross University introduces Grand Bahama

doctors to Clinical Education Partnership


GRAND Bahama- Ross Univer-
sity, invited all doctors in Grand
Bahama to a breakfast meeting on
Tuesday, December 16, to introduce
the Ross faculty to the Island's med-
ical community. Senator Kay Forbes-
Smith was also in attendance.
The meeting provided the oppor-
tunity to introduce the Ross' Clinical
Education Partnership, which will
not only bring a rich educational
experience to Ross students, but will
enhance the professional growth of
Bahamian physicians, thus improv-
ing the overall health and medical
care system within the Bahamas.
On hand to lead the meeting was
Dr Mary Thoesen Coleman, Dean of
Ross University School of Medicine,
and newly appointed Director of
Clinical Education Dr Desiree Cox.
The doctors explained the history
of the university, how it will operate
in Grand Bahama, and the acade-
mic level of the students who will
be starting at the new campus in Jan-
uary. Each doctor, upon signing in
for the meeting, was asked to speci-
fy whether they would be interested
in becoming part of the Clinical Edu-
cation Partnership, whereupon they
would be agreeing, if eligible, to
assist in the practical clinical educa-
tion of Ross students.
This programme will provide third
and fourth semester students the
opportunity of a basic clinical expe-
rience involving one half-day, three
times per semester, at a local clinic or
doctor's office.
During a typical half day, the
medical student will be introduced to
the patient by the doctor: be allowed
to interview the patient, examine
and obtain history of a present ill-
ness; examine the patient (applying
only those skills they have been
taught); present the patient to the
attending physician; write up the his-
tory and physical, and obtain feed-
back on the presentation and the


DR PAMELA ETUK speaks during the question and answer session at a
meeting held to introduce the Ross University Clinical Education Partner-'
ship programme. Dr Desiree Cox, Ross' Director of Clinical Education
(standing left) was one of the facilitators of the meeting.


write-up from the attending physi-
cian.
The doctors will then be required
to provide evaluations of the stu-
dents to the university.
By participating in this educa-
tional partnership, the local medical
community will benefit by being able
to subscribe to an evidence-based
medicine database for clinical prac-
tice as determined by Ross Univer-
sity; have access to local and online
faculty development activities spon-
sored by Ross; participate in Ross
faculty development sessions; par-
ticipate in Ross clinical teleconfer-
ences, and be able to participate in
simulation workshops and have
access to recorded step one USMLE
review courses.
After hearing about the Clinical
Education Partnership, the floor was
opened to questions and feedback,
and members of the local medical
community where asked to suggest
ways in which Ross University might
support and further facilitate medical
education on Grand Bahama.
"We were very pleased with the
number of physicians and health care
professionals that attended the meet-
ing and shared ideas about how Ross


.... ....... k"707-" -



TECHNOLOGY


HOLIDAY STORE HOURS:
Office Hours During the 2008 Christmas Holiday Season:
4 Wednesday, 24 December (Christmas Eve) Office Closed
P Thursday, 25 December (Christmas Day) Public Holiday
. Friday, 26 December (Boxing Day) 'Public Holiday
Wednesday, 31 December (New Year's Eve) Office closed at 3pm
Thursday, 1st January (New Year's Day) Public Holiday

Our office will resume normal working hours on
T, Friday, 2nd January, 2008


ser'. .









S4005 NW 28TH ST. MIAMI FL .
a AirrLSOe
SUNJET BUILDING 750 SW 34TH ST. FT. LAUDERDALE
TOLL FREE 1-877- e.- -;,S, ,', 305-871- 0571


and the community can work togeth-
er. It was wonderful to have the
opportunity to begin a dialogue,"
Dr Thoesen Coleman said after the
meeting.
At the end of the session, Robert
Moore, director of the university's
Simulation Centre, presented infor-
mation on the patient simulators
which will be used by the students
for training, and will also be available
for use by participating doctors of
the programme.
"This is a significant moment in
the history of Grand Bahama. We
look forward to a long and fruitful
working relationship between the
university and the medical commu-
nity on Grand Bahama. What we do
now and how we work together in
the future will impact both pre-clin-
ical and tertiary medical education
on this island, and, possibly the edu-
cational development of the next
generation of health care profes-
sionals in The Bahamas," said Dr.
Cox.


LOCAL NEWS
___________________________________________________________________________________I_ nn_ ** '* sRwm**w r mr AfI-


QUANTUM
DUTYFREE


FOR THE PERFECT GIFT


VACHERON CONSTANTIN
Manufacture Horlogbre. Gen-ve, depuis 1755.


PIAGET



Ge n ve





BAUME & MERCIER
'' 'GENEVE 1830 -






D10
Dior






U-BOAT
ITALO FONTANA


WATCHES, JEWELRY, PENS & LEATHER ACCESSORIES




240 BAY STREET
TEL: (242) 328-5007
MANAGER( QUANTUM DUTYFREE.COM


JAEGER- LECOULTR3~~


IWC


]B



BLANCPAIN





MONT0

BLANC




BEAT & C
GENE VE


ORX MARY THOPPN-COLE-
MAN, Dean of Ross Univer-,
sity School of Medicine,
speaks to the many Grand
Bahama health cAre profes-
sionals who attended a
breakfast meeting held on
December 16 at the Sea-
S v horse Plaza campus.

BRobbin Whachell

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITY

A Regional General Insurance Company which has been operating successfully for more
than 40 years has opened an office in The Bahamas and is looking for a candidate to
work closely with the local Country Manager.

Prospective candidate should:
* Have at least 5 years working experience in a General Insurance Company or a
General Insurance Agency/Brokerage
* Have General Insurance Underwriting and Claims Experience
* Have a Certificate in Insurance (Cert CII) or Diploma in Insurance (Dip CII) from
the Chartered Insurance Institute and/or pursuing the Advanced Diploma in Insurance
(ACII)
* Have at least 5 GCE 'O' Levels
* Have the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing
" Be computer literate (e.g. Microsoft Office Suite, Contact Management Software
and General Insurance Software Applications)
* Have the ability to deal professionally with Agents/Brokers and Clients"

Possession of any of the following attributes will bring added value:
* Being goal oriented and able to work effectively and efficiently with minimal
supervision
* Being career-minded, energetic and enthusiastic

All information will be held in strict confidence.

Please e-mail CV's to: insurancecareeropportunity@gmail.com


I


, Rn ill lOV TIul rorM | r











Units at Florida power plant will close
Units at Florida power plant will close ]


* CRYSTAL RIVER, Fla.
* AN ENERGY company has
agreed to retire two coal-fired

S It

You would expect to find both objects
in the Secret Sound at any office.


units at a power plant north of
Orlando, according to Associ-
ated Press.
The Crystal River power
plant is run by Progress Energy
Florida and has a total of four
units.
Environmentalists say the
plant is one of the dirtiest in
the nation.
An executive with Progress


Energy Florida says shutting
down the units will cut emis-
sions of carbon dioxide by 5.5
million tons a year.
The two units were built in
the 1960s and can generate
enough power for 53,000
homes. They'll be retired after
the utility builds a nuclear plant
10 miles away. The plant is
expected to open in 2016.


If you have an OLD CLUNKER
and want to get rid of it!



WE WANT IT


WE WiLL TRADE IT



*U RAN TEED

Now is the time to get that Ford you have always
dreamed about owning, we have available
I- - - -- -- - -- -- - -- 7-- - ---- -
2008 -
i FOcus, Taurus, Taurus X, Escape, Everest, Explorer, i
i Edge, Ranger, F-150 and the diesel Crew Cab Ranger ,
L ----------------_---_-_---__ __- _


ETM.. SPECIAL

$1i DO-O A'-GINST 2007 FREESTYLE

6 Passenger with Leather Interior- 4 available



An t -cg wthCom wel h. ,. --


3fobn ?J 11


Extended

Holiday

Shopping Hours


December 12th 26th 2008


At


A

ip~


SANTA'S MAILBOX
Enter for a chance to win one of five gifts
during our "'Al I Want For Christmas" campaign.

GIVING TREE
Donate to one of four charities at our
John ,lH!, 284 Bay Streel and Harbour Bay locations,


Ohio State students


teach the value of


Junior Achievement


COLLEGE of the Bahamas
(COB) International Rela-
tions liaison Valdez Russell
welcomed Nancy Lahmers,
Honours Cohort Coordinator
at the Fisher College of Busi-
ness at Ohio State Universi-
ty, and 20 senior business stu-
dents from the programme to


JOHN BULL LIMITED, 284 Bay Street
.Crystal Court, Atlantis
Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
Mall at Marathon
Marina Village, Paradise Island
Palmdale Shopping Centre

BVLGARI, Crystal Court Atlantis

CARTIER BOUTIQUE, 284 Bay Street
Crystal Court, Atlantis

COACH, Bay Street

DAVID YURMAN, Bay Street

DOONEY & BOURKE
Marina Village, Paradise Island


GUCCI, Bay Street
Crystal Court, Atlantis

GUESS, Mall at Marathon


LA PARFUMERIE
Marina Village, Paradise Island

THE COSMETIC BOUTIQUE, Bay Street

TOUS, Bay Street


the Bahamas on December
15.
This is the third time that
Ms Lahmers has brought stu-
dents from Ohio State to the
Bahamas and the second time
she has brought them to COB.
The Honours Cohort from
Fisher College comprises the


302-2800
363-3956
393-6020
393-4406
363-1141
323-7114

363-5824

302-2872
363-5808

326-0557

302-2878


363-11.56

325-0561
363-5823

393-5036


363-1152

323-2731

323-3428


top 30 students in the 1,200-
strong business school.
The school's programme
contains a community out-
reach requirement in which
the students go out into ele-
mentary schools in Columbus,
Ohio, and teach the children
about Junior Achievement
(JA).
The group was in the
Bahamas to do their outreach
in an international setting and
spent a whole day at Sadie
Curtis Primary School work-
ing with second and fourth
grade students.
At Sadie Curtis School they
started a donut store with the
younger students.
The second grade children
made little donuts which they
coloured and labeled, and
they also timed themselves to
compare the length of time it
took one person to make the
finished donut compared to
setting up an assembly line.
Dominic Sacco, a market-
ing major, enjoyed the chal-
lenge of working with the
Bahamian children and said,
"We built a city and explained
where the different types of
businesses would go. We also
spent some time teaching
them how to pronounce entre-
preneurship."
Bijal Patel, a finance stu-
dent, added, "The little stu-
dents were very excited to
learn and to hear about some-
thing different from a different
perspective. We taught them
about profit and loss and
asked them to decide what
they might like to be when
they grew up and to say where
they would put a particular
type of restaurant to make the
most profit. It got their cre-
ativity flowing."
Miss Patel and Mr Sacco,
who both love the Bahamas,
said they would like to have
the opportunity of showing
some Bahamian faculty and
students how to teach JA to
primary age children.
COB's vice-president of
Research, Graduate Pro-
grammes and International
Relations Linda Davis spoke
about her plans for developing
the relationship between COB
and Ohio State University and
putting in place student and
faculty exchanges.
The Ohio students and their
coordinator enjoyed junior
junkanoo last week and also
toured the island. They also
spent a very instructive two
hours with Enrico Garzeroli
at Graycliff Hotel and Restau-
rant where they watched cig-
ars being rolled and discussed
the business aspects of run-
ning a restaurant.


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


PAGE 16, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


THE TRIBUNE






II


customer Appreciation


s


SATURDAY DECEMBER 20TH TO MONDAY DECEMBER 22ND


~K .4


Celebrate the Holidays with Gifts of Love.


Storewide


ON Gold AND Fine Jewellery
~ : I .S W
^, .^. / > ,^f1. i ^ ^A g ^ t . y I T tf"
~~~~~41 E'..:. :.* ..c~.vju s.li.iwo


Free 90 Day Replacemenr Plan Againsr Damage or Loss
Free Jewellery Reward Points Earn Free Jewellery
Every Purchase Earns up ro $600 off Your Next Vacation
,.! J ..............,.i';,"' .'....


..~
V ~ ~


','II


, *.. % N t .%


NASSAU: Rawson Square, Bay Street, 240 Bay Street
Atlantis, Beach Tower + Atlantis, Royal Towers + Marina Village at Atlantis
-Cruise certificate is valid for a complimentary cruise for two persons on select sailings and stateroom categories. Port charges, government fees and fuel surcharges are additional
Certificate is not redeemable for cash, is non-transferable and must sailby 12/31/09, Restrictions may apply and terms and conditions are subject to change.
,;


1


-


/ .'.. .. ',. *

/


MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE


...";>'
.: *.'*.;-









PAGE 18, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


Time for an overhaul of



land registration system


Christ Church Cathedral

Schedule of Christmas Services
December 21st, 2008 January 4th, 2009




















6:00 p.m. Sunday December 21st, 2008
"For Unto Us A Child Is Born, For Unto Us A Son Is
Given"
A Service of Nine Lessons & Carols
By The Men and Boys Choir

The Eve of The Nativity of Our Lord Jesus Christ
Wednesday December 24th, 2008

11:00 p.m. "Once Upon A Silent Night"
A Christmas Eve Concert
Presented by:
The Combined Choirs of Christ Church Cathedral

11:45 p.m. Christmas Eve Solemn Pontifical Eucharist

Christmas Day
Thursday December 25th, 2008
7:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist
10:00 a.m. Sung Eucharist

Wednesday December 31st, 2008
The Eve of the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus
New Year's Eve
11:00p.m.
This Service leads into the First Mass of
The New Year, 2009


6:00 p.m. Sunday January 4th, 2009
Service of Light
Presented by The Men & Boys Choir


* By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

TODAY, I'm travelling
to my hometown-
Long Island-where, like many
other Family Islands, residents
have waged legendary land
wars, due in large part to the
Bahamas' antiquated land reg-
istration system that has served
as a staging ground for thievery
and abuses via the Quieting of
Titles Act and the prevalence
of generation property (partic-
ularly on islands such as Long
Island, Cat Island, Eleuthera,
Crooked Island and Rum Cay).
It is high-time for an over-
haul of the land titles and reg-
istration system and a revamp
of the Quieting of Titles Act.
The Bahamas' land registration
system is in desperate need of
modernization and parliamen-
tary/legal reform.
In April, The Tribune
reported the concerns of Ian
Young, President of the
Bahamas Land Surveyors
Association, who said that the
increasing problems with land
titles, with property owners
who had obtained what they
thought was legitimate title-
in some cases many years
before-now being challenged
on their ownership, threatened
to undermine a society based
upon property rights and land
ownership.
Mr Young told The Tribune
that he was "getting calls on a
regular basis" from persons
whose title and right to their
property was being challenged
by others. This was often
despite the fact that these peo-
ple had been given an opinion
by their attorney and that of
the lender, that they had "clear
and marketable title" many
years before. Because of these
slip-ups, many people are find-
ing themselves in danger of los-
ing their investments, after pos-
sibly spending thousands of dol-
lars .on legal fees, bank loans
and putting some infrastructure
in place so that they could
access their loans.
Legal freeholds-i.e. private


property held in fee simple eage-even though I've never
that may be obtained through lived in Eleuthera.
purchase, deed of gift or estate Qne look at, traditionally
inheritance and are saleable are African communities, such as
virtual rarities in the Bahamas, Bain and Grants Town could
particularly as title woes hit give a microcosmic view of the
one-third of local.real estate origins of family or generation
deals and, as noted by Daniel land, particularly since two or
Drosdoff in a recent article for three family houses remain
the Inter-American Bank built on one small plot of land
(IBD), "seventy per cent of with hardly anyone holding
land in the Bahamas is 'Crown clear title to the property.
land', owned by the state and Nicolette Bethel writes that:
controlled by the prime minis- "In the Bahamas, the tradi-
ter's office," with "many fami- tion of generation property
lies living on 'generational echoes many of these broader
land', which is handed down by Afro-Caribbean themes, and
families from generation to the convention is responsible
generation, often without a for vast land holdings through-
clear titleholder." out the archipelago. Particu-
larly on those islands settled by
Loyalist planters at the turn of
ince the days of colo- the nineteenth century, (Ack-
nialism, countless lins, Cat Island, Crooked
Bahamians have not been given Island, Exuma, Long Island,
saleable titles to many acres of Rum Cay and San Salvador)
prime land on the Family groups of kin lay claim to large
Islands. According to historian estates. Such property is held
and Director of Culture Dr in trust for the use of all descen-
Nicolette Bethel, "land owner- dants of the kin group forever
ship (in the Bahamas) is tightly 'while grass grow and spring
knitted with the idea of family." flow', I was told on Long
Here, she refers to generation Island.
land as "one's family land." "Although individual family
However, generation prop- members may farm it, or-live
erty described as land that was on it, it may never be sold. Like
once privately owned but had their counterparts further
not been managed through the south, Bahamians use the con-
courts following the death of vention of generation property
the fee simple owner. This to solidify identity, to provide
property, which descendants themselves with some subsis-
usually occupy without legal tence, and to unite groups of
paperwork is non-marketable kin. Access to land, however, is
and it's therefore difficult to problematic: the land is not the
discern its rightful heirs-par- sole possession of any one
ticularly after the deaths of member of the kin group, and it
groups of descendants from may not easily be converted
whom the land is unofficially into cash. Land holdings on the
passed on to another group, Family Islands are often quite
without probate, large, particularly in those
Recently, I was invited to islands in the southern part of
travel to Eleuth'era to "claim a the Bahamian chain where land
piece of the Gibsmo land"; 'prrce are-only beginning to be
-which it is assux_ dTl:u i .suhp- inflated by considerable foreign
posedly privy to-due to my lin- investment. In fact, many


THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES
a al


* UWI Mona. November 8, 2008 Io January 31. 2009
* UWI Moru. Western Jamaica Camp~u Novneber 8, 2008 Iu January 31. 2,')
* Cave Hill andl Sl Augustine Campuses November 17. 2008 janualy 31. 2009
* Open Campus Feb'u.wy 2. 2009 Mach 29, 2009
Foi Inlo maiisonon undergraduate programmes offered at lhee campu s.ple ,e revi'w, e in.li,, ni h.,i..' 1 .:1 -.h -,C o.,ii ",
nw Nrorin uwl eduJadrmission or comc1 the Admiusions Sectio0 o Itie Camnpus I 01 Chi
APPUCmNT SHOULD
1 APPLY ONUNE FREE OF CHARGE u
2 SUBMIT SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS to Undergradute Admissions UWI Mons, King.Aon 7
Suip ,rt ,, um mer,f in d l ie oigiri. anr ,I ,pyo itihnc nCe r itIX aF' P j'ii t w n e.Cd i'i- .I.: T. ,, ,, .i .
Or ,, h L ir tf0 ,t c l'icd O cn hy la3g li edt pe o lt'w il t:111t iA VI Ce. 'ir ', ihrrmoL r 1,i ,n ii Ir. :.: .....:
oJ Vla% tljh iiO.l i iU If iinh lcOuil.rf..


HOW TO APPLY

ENGLISH LANGUAGE
PROFICIENCYIEST.





UWI OPEN
SCHOLARSHIP


Complete the application online it the campus websit. oi voui hoicc'e wwUi uI CJiJ
Submit all supporting documents as soon as you have completed iNh li.ii.: ir.uin .Onli,,r
Applicants with a Grade 1 in CSEC,/CXC English A. or a Grad A in C6'E Fngi,.'h Lar.iu.ieg.
ora Grade 1 or Grade 2 In CAPE Communlcallon Studies or a Grade A r, GCC ucn..,.i 'Popr,
or approved equivalent, will be exempt irom the Engish Language P,'liicjii.:v T;.i I LPTI
All others will be required to lake the ELFI
rhe test dates are November 28. 2008, February 6. 200i'i and Mj,'- I 2,'
April 28, 2009 and June 19. 2009
Please visit our websile at www mona uwl edu/dllp.'Ianeuage elpoui;Ul. lehiT,
for test registration and other information
Applicants are encouraged to lake the UWI Open Scholaiship Ea.n_,'iron Lin
February 26-27, 2009.Please contact the Etamiriation Seclihr, UWI. Monar,. or
for high school applicants, the 6th Form Co-ordinators


APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED UNTIL ALL SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS ARE RECEIVED.
For any further Ilfbmation please contact us at admissns@uwimona.edu.jm
or Telephone: 927-2779,935-8651









i~mffl~toi^ J
IBMBB^ ^^fe,:


[apd{ ^f(QkanyJs


U'.,

le ~4.. i~

4 4
L


eCOr^e O)6fief()jfstcoocd


Do Not Weep (Mary Frye)

Do not stand at my grave and weep,
I am not there, I do not sleep.

I am a thousand winds that blow.
I am the diamond glint on snow.
I am the sunlight on ripened grain.
I am the gentle autumn rain.


When you wake in the morning hush,
I am the swift, uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circling flight.
I am the soft starlight at night.

Do not stand at my grave and weep.
I am not there, I do not sleep.
Do not stand at my grave and cry.
I an not there, I did not die!


We, the family would like to express our sincerest gratitude to our relatives and friends at
home and abroad for your prayers, telephone calls, visits, floral arrangements and other acts
of kindness.

Sincerest thanks and gratitude are extended to Rev. Fr. Joseph Mycklewhyte. Canon Basil
Tynes, Darville "Sonny" Walkine, the St Margaret's and St. Barnabas Anglican Church
families, the Pastoral care of St Margaret's Anglican Church, the Watkins family (Carl and
"" Rebecca), the Turnquest family (Addison and Beatrice), the family of the late Arlington
Anderson and Olive "Tiny" Rolle, the family of the lat Hiram Knowles and Willamae Smith
and Nita Bodie and family, Alfred Fountain and family, the Brougham Street and the Fort
Fincastle family, Kirk Moss and family, Rudell Capron, the management and staff of the
Central Bank, Government Printing Department, the Cabinet Office, Floyd Watkins & Co.,
Great Western Convenience Store, Demeritte's Funeral Home. Bethel Brothers Morticians.
Kemp's Funeral Home, Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel, Butler's Funrral Home & Crematorium.
Riverside Funeral Chapel, Newbold Brothers Chapel, Cedar Crest Funeral Home. the Print
Shop, Woodlwan Gardens Cemetery, the Union of Central Bank, the Hon Alflred Sears for
Honourable mention in The House of Assembly, the traffic Division of the Police Staff
Association, the committee to Elect Paul Moss, 3 S Bakery, Simply Better Catering and
numerous other relatives and friends who have offered their condolences and prayers.

Daddy loved the Christmas Season. We can hear his voice in the wind as he counts down
our shopping days until Christmas. So, in the spirit of Christmas we would like to wish our
dearly beloved husband, father, grand, great and great-great-grandfather, brotllir, uncle,
cousin, in-law and friend a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. And, it's on Ins
behalf that we would like to wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year filled willth
God's grace and mercy.
The Astwood famniily
"Y \ If ?';*:


Bahamians suffer from the
opposite problem, a physical
overabundance of common
property combined with the
inability of individual family
members to make use of it,"
she asserts.
, I "What is more, because the
rights to generation property
do not dissolve with time, the
longer the members of a family
have lived away from the prop-
erty (that is, the longer they
have been unable to establish
superior rights to the land
through residence), the more
complex their rights to land
become," Ms Bethel contin-
ued.
Commonage and squatting
are two other aspects of the
unending land quarrels in the
Bahamas.

C -ommonage refers to
land that is non-
vendible by any of its owners-
whether for bank loans or
sale-as none of them can pre-
sent titles to the land. On the
other hand, when squatters
occupy land without purchase
or the permission of the owner,
disputes that has outlived gen-
erations arise if the squatter
petitions the Supreme Court
under the Quieting of Titles
Act, Chapter 357 and actually
acquires a Certificate of Title
after occupying the property
for 20 or more years. On Fam-
ily Islands, grants such as this
have been known to disrupt
entire communities and some-'
times lead to violent outbursts.
In 2007, William Wong, a
senior executive in the
Bahamas Real Estate Associ-
ation, told. The Tribune that
almost one-third of Bahamas-
based real estate transactions
either collapse or take as long
as one year to conclude due to
problems with establishing clear
title to the subject property or
land. As is noted in Drosdoff's
IDB report, "private parties are
allowed to buy and sell land in
the Bahamas among them-
selves using their own legal doc-

SEE page 23


r 1,


I I II


I x 1 II e.r


.7'-'. **^-;."7"t .11T.--11--11



















MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008
.2, Kaef!aeIBaPI-


i


. ,


-

MARVIN Rolle keeps an eye on
the ball as he volleys against
Bjorn Munroe yesterday at the
December Invitational at the
National Tennis Center.
* RESULTS of the
Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association's 2009
December Invitational,
held over the weekend at
the National Tennis Cen-
ter, are as follows:
Men's Final
Devin Mullings def. Tim-
othy Neilly 7-5, 2-1 ret.
(wrist).
Third place
Bjorn Munroe def. Mar-
vin Rolle 7-5, 6-1.
Men's Semifinals
Devin Mullings def. Mar-
vin Rolle 6-0, 5-7, 6-4.
Timothy Neilly def. Bjorn
Munroe 3-6, 6-1, 6-4.
Fifth place
Rodney Carey Jr. def.
Jonathan Hanna 6-2, 2-1
ret. (shoulder).
Seventh place
JJ Fountain del. Jamal
Adderley w/o
(back/knee).
Playoff
Jonathan Hanna def.
Jamal Adderley 4-2, ret.
Rodney Carey Jr. def. JJ
Fountain
Pool A
Timothy Neilly def. JJ
Fountain 6-3, 6-3
Timothy Neilly def.
Johnathan Hanna 6-3, 6-
1.
Timothy Neilly def.
Jason Rolle 6-1,6-2
JJ Fountain def.
Johnathan Hanna 6-3, 6-
2
JJ Fountain def. Jason
Rolle 6-2, 7-5
Jason Rolle def.
Johnathan Hanna 6-2, 6-
1
Pool B
Marvin Rolle def. Jamal
Adderley 6-7, 6-2, 6-1
Marvin Rolle def.
Matthew Sands 6-4, 6-0
Marvin Rolle def. H'Cone
Thompson 6-4, 6-4
Jamal Adderley def.
Matthew Sands 6-4, 6-1
Jamal Adderley def.
H'Cone Thompson 6-3,
4-6, 6-4
H'Cone Thompson def.
Matthew Sands 6-3, 6-2
Pool C
Bjorn Munroe def. Ceron
Rolle 6-4, 6-1
Bjorn Munroe def.
Jonathan Hanna 6-1, 6-4
Bjorn Munroe def. KC
Strachan Jr. 6-1, 6-0
Jonathan Hanna def.
Ceron Rolle 1-6, 6-3, 6-1
Jonathan Hanna def. KC
Strachan Jr. 6-0, 6-2
Pool D
Devin Mullings def.
Justin Lunn 6-2, 6-2
Devin Mullings def. Alex-
is Roberts 6-0, 6-0
Devon Mullings def.
Rodney Carey Jr. 6-3, 6-
0 .
Rodney Carey Jr. def.
Justin Lunn 6-2, 6-7, 6-
3
Rodney Carey Jr. def.
Alexis Roberts 6-0, 6-2
Women's Play
Nikkita Fountain def.
Elanqua Griffin 6-3, 6-0
Nikkita Fountain def.
Kerri Cartwright 6-2, 6-3


Kerri Cartwright def.
Elanqua Griffin 6-3, 6-1


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@triubunemedia.net


out last year
A Bwith-an injury.
Bjorn Munroe
was back in fine form, providing
the leadership that will be need-
ed for the Davis Cup team in
the absence of veteran Mark
Knowles.
Munroe, the oldest player
participating at the age of 30,
secured the third spot at the
Bahamas Lawn Tennis Associ-
ation's December Invitational
yesterday at the National Ten-
nis Center.
The three-day invitational
gave the BLTA a look at the
players available for the Davis
Cup team that will travel to
Paraguay in March for the first
round of the American Zone U
tie, as well as the Fed Cup for
ladies going to Canada in Feb-
ruary.
Based on their
performances.,
Munroe should
join top seeds
Devin Mullings fls
and Timothy
Neilly, along with
Marvin .Rolle.
The remaining
two spots could
possibly see at
least one new face
in Rodney Carey 0
Jr.
While Mullings I S
retained his top
spot with a 7-5, 2-
1 (retire) win over
Iellly (who suf- B
fered a wrist
injury), Munroe
took care of Rolle 7-5, 6-1 to
return to the selection process
with a third place finish.
"It was good. I played pretty
well. I mean the whole tourna-
ment I played pretty well," said
Munroe, who 3-0 in match play
in Pool C of the round robin
tournament before he lost 3-6,
6-1, 6-4 to Neilly in the semifi-
nal.
Against Rolle, Munroe got
off to a quick start with a 5-2
lead before holding on for the 7-
5 win in the first set, only to
dominate the second set after
breaking away from a 1-1 tie to
win the next five games.
"I played solid and I capital-
ized right away and I hit the ball
pretty good," said Munroe. "My
body feels good. This is the
healthiest that I've felt. So I'm
just happy with the way I played
the whole tournament."

Leadership
Looking ahead to Davis Cup,
Munroe said without Knowles
playing doubles, he still feels
that he can team up with any
of the players and still provide a
good tandem for the Bahamas.
"I'm just happy to be on the
team again after missing last
year," Munroe said. "I like the
leadership role, but I think we
will do very well."
Rolle, who also won his Pool
B with a 3-0 record before he
dropped his semifinal match to
Mullings 6-0,5-7,6-4, admitted
that Munroe was on his game.
"He put a lot of pressure on
me. He was serving well," Rolle
pointed out. "He was mixing it
up well, so he deserve the vic-
tory today."
Rolle, however, said his main
objective was to finish in the
top four to secure his berth on
the Davis Cup team, so he was
pleased with his performance.
"We have pretty much the
same guys from last year, with
the exception of BJ, who did-
n't play last year," Rolle stat-
ed. "So it's good to see him
back this year."
Mullings, the southpaw who
got some valuable experience
playing at the Olympic Games
in Beijing, China in August, had
a tougher time getting back to
the top spot.
In his match against Neilly,
Mullings had to work extra hard
before he prevailed in a tight


U After injury layoff, 30-year-old secures


the third spot at the Bahamas Lawn Tennis


Association's December Invitational


MARVIN Rolle.
shown in action
above against
Bjorn Munroe at
the December
Invitational yes-
terday at the
National Tennis
Center.


PHOTOS: Felipe Major/Tribune staff


first set. But in the second after
he went up 2-1, Neilly was
forced to withdraw with a wrist
injury.
"I think this weekend I basi-
cally got by on grit. I don't think


I played that well," he insisted.
"I wasn't feeling the ball very
well, but I fought well.
"I took care of business, so I
was happy to win all of my
matches. It was unfortunate that


Timmy couldn't finish his
match. He said his wrist was
bothering him, but I would have
liked to finish that match."
Mullings, who breezed
through Pool D, said by the


-is



TIMOTHY NEILLY returns a volley
* against Devin Mullings at the December
Invitational yesterday at the National
Tennis Center.

time Davis Cup roll around in
March, hle will definitely have to
improve\ c on his level of play.
"I have to keep working on
mv serve and make sure that I
peak al the right time," he
stressed.
"But 1' Ihink I will be okay.
All of us just have to go back to
the drawing hoard and get
read'."
Neill\, the winner of Pool A
with a 3-0) recoi-d.as well, played
to a 2-.2, 4-4 and 5-5 tie in the
first set, but Mullings prevailed
down the stretch as he held and
broke serve to snatch the first
set.
In the second set, Both play-
ers held serve before Mullings
got the break to go up 2-1. That
was \\lihen Neillv walked up to
(lie net and conceded defeat.
"It w\is :i good first set, but I
\as having some pain in my i ,
wrist for the past couple. If'.-
montlis and it fired up tod.1v,"
so I didn't want to push rn too.
far,'" Neilly slated.
SEE page 22


'. : ..i : -4"







PAGE 20, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008.


THE BAHAMAS ASSOCIATIONS OF ATHLETICASSOCIATION


AI A etes iwrdied scholarships


EXECUTIVES, parents and students of the BAAA's Parents Asso6ia-
tion Scholarship Programme'are shown above. .


. All Our Customer & Frieids

~ ~ ~ T H ,' *'*' \ '''*....*'*/**"


I By BRENT STUBBS
Senlor Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedla.net
THE Bahamas Associations
-.of Athletic" Association, which -
Sas4 helped to get a number of
athletes get off to school in the
past decade, have added ten more
athletes to the List for the year
2o068-9. .
,Whbile.four oi the athletes.
including Harrison Thompson,
"who is n.ow playing football at-


,:-*
" # : -" "* "I


' 4

-. 4' .- 1
.-: ....^

-'. .. ., '


.' x L


PREMIER.m-,


WIPORER


May the Holidays be shared with Loved
ii Ones in Peace and Happiness.

-WEWILL GLOS
SFor the Holidays
Sat 12:00 p.m. Wednesday, December 24th j- .
S/. "&REOPEN at 7i30 a4,, Monday .- ,
S.December 29th, 2008,
ST. ALBANS DR. OFFWEST BAY ST. EAST BAY AND MACKEY ST.
P.O. BOXN-1 5 BRIDE PLAZA COMMON BLDG.,
* TEL.: (242) 322.8396 TELUPAX: (22) 393-4210
SFAX- (242) 33774 -TOLL FREE: (242) 300-70

v.N-- 1 '
,, .. -: _,,, .__ Q~ x .,, ..... = __0


Diclunson State Universtty, left .
in August, the remaining six are
departing in January. .
On Friday eightt at the Colony
Club. Harrison Petty. whose
Group of Companies is the major
sponsor of the programme, met
with the athletes and the parents
to inform them of the importance
of making the best of their oppor-
tunities to beaore successful-.
The- other three athletes who
enrolUed in college in August
--were distance rumrrTrevIlbc.-
Thompson. also at Dickinson
Stale University; Javomya Wilson
at Nassau Christian Academy and
Deneko Brown at Missouri Val-
ley-College., .
Those departing in January are
Keshieka Baitn-at Dickinson State
University; Scotty Ward, Elrich
Walker, Dwayhe Ferguson and
Ashlee Dorsett at Lindenwood
University and Keithra Richards
at AHien County Community Col- .
Petty also took the time out to
advise the athletes to make sure
that they not just live up to their
responsibilities as good students
representing the Bahamas. but
that they also fulfif the academic
requirements to graduate with
their degrees.
And he encouraged -the abt-
letes to look at some of the jobs
that local companies have.to
-. import :workers to- fill because
Bahamians are-hot qualified to
do .hem so that they can have a
go'od-tareer to prepare them-
selves for in the future. . .. .
SAlso ini attendance was
Olymptc sprinter and farmer
national record holder Andrew
Tvnes.
"Now teachingat CC Sweeting
Senior High School Tynres ttd
the students that it's important
for them today attention to their _
--scdlm !r nool.iffif they grasp
every opportunity that they can
be productive students.
"When-you gonff to school,
have responsibility and don't
bang out with the wrong crowd,"
said Tynes, who.attended the
"University of Texas at El Paso.
"The Americans ar'foame, Whep
you get in-trouble;.ty send you
home. So be respOtisible. The
preparation is. there, thedoppor-
tunities is there. The ky'is the '
limit," .- : '
.;SEEpage,21 '..e


S.' Going to indenwood.
. University .


Sponsor of the
scholarship.programme.


Attending Missouri
-Valley.College


O-L




PEPSI
rv.t" i the general public to bid on the-following
:equipimelt listed:
Year/Make: 1995 International Model: 4900 4x2 Delivery Truck'
Year/Make.:'1991 International Model: 4700 4x2 Delivery Truck
.. Year/Make: 1991 International- :. Model: 47004x2 Delivery Truck
Year/Make: 2004 International ::Model: 4300 4x2 Delivery Truck.
Year/Make: 2003 Ford M- odel: Ranger
Y- ear/Make: 1990 Interniational Model: 4900 4x2 Delivery Truck
. Year/Make: 1990International Model: 4900 4x2 Delivery Truck


- Year/Make: 1997 Ford ,
- Year/Make: 1998 Ford.'
Year/Make: 2000 Ford :
Year/Make: 1991 Ford .
Year/Mike: 1997 Ford
Year/Make: 1997 Ford
Year/Make 3.1997-Frightliner ..
Year/Make: 1997 Ford
Year/Make: 1996,Ford
Year/Make: 1997 International
Year/Make: 1997 Ifiterhational.
Year/Make: 1999 International
---Year/Male:-T9971hifrna-tio.hai .
Year/Make: YALE=FORKLIFT
Year/Make: YALE-FORKLIFT -.
Year/Make: 1970 Lubbock
Year/Make: 1994 Tomco
Year/Make: 04'YALE-FORKLIFT
Year/Make 04'YALE-F#ORKLIFT'
Year/Make: 1992 Ihternmatiorn'al
Year/Make: 1992 International
Year/Make: 1997 Ford
Year/Make: 2002 Ford
' Yeat/Make: 2001 Ford
Year/Make: 2000 Ford
Year/Make : 99( Ford,-:
Year/M'ake: 1*998 Ford .
Year/Make: 1997 Ford
Year/Make: 1996 HONDA


Model: Ranger .
Model: Ranger .
Model: Ranger
Model: Ranger
Model: Ranger
Model: Trailer Head
Model:Trailer'Head -
-Model:- Ranger,
Model: F350 Service Truck
* Model: 4900. 4x2. Delvery Truck
-Model: 4.900 4x2 Delivery Truck
- Model: 4700 4x2 Delivery Truck.
Model: 4700 4x2 Delivery Truck
Model: GLLO46AFNUAVQ84
Model: GLCO50R-NIUAE082
Model:,Tank-Ttailer -
Model: Tank-Trailer- "
.'Model: F156009-
Model: F168123
Model: 4900 4x2 Delivery Truck
Model: 4900 4x2 Delivery-Truck
. Model: Ranger
;Model: F350 ServiceTruck


Model:
Model:
Model:
Model:
.Model:


Ranger.
Ranger -
Ranger -
Ranger
E350 Service Truck


Model: CIVIC


Send bids to: Al.warner@pepsiamericas.com
S .- No phone calls will be accepted.


-t .


omgJino Linenwoo .
University


S" Mother of .
Elrich Walker


TRIBUNE;SPORTS








m THE BAHAMAS ASSOCIATIONS OF ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

Athletes awarded

scholarships ..
FROM page 20
Attending Dickinson State University Going to Lindenwood University Going to Lindenwood University Attending Dickinson State University
Harrison Thompson, a 20-year-old Kingsway Academy graduate
who attended the College of the Bahamas before he transferred to
Dickinson State, informed the new students that when they travel, they
will have to make the adjustment being away from home.
"Sometimes it's hard getting out of bed to go to-practice," said
Thompson about the cold weather conditions he had to endure. "But
coming from Nassau where the climate is so warm, it could be a culture
shock."
However, the linebacker and defensive tackle said once the athletes
hold onto high morals and keep God in the forefront, they can be able
to overcome any obsticle that they might face when they go off to
school.
"My first college experience is one to be remember," said Thomp-
son. "I got to see a lot of negative aspects like the drinking and party-
ing. But I'm there for the long haul."
As they prepare for the college experience, each of the athletes
talked about their goals and aspirations.
Scotty Ward, an 18-year-old sprinter from the Church of God
Academy, said he's "going to train hard and study hard and hopeful-
ly look forward to a good future" at Lindenwood University.
Middle.distance runner Dwayne Ferguson, a 19-year-old Nassau
Christian Academy graduate, said ASK US ABOUT OUR
he's "looking forward to going to
school, get a good education and "I'm extremely OUTDOOR PARTY
make his country proud" when he
attend Lindenwood University as proud because I RENTALS!
well. know I speak on
Another Lindenwood University k I
prospect Elrich Walker is an 18- behalf of many par-
graduate of NCA as well, who stat- ents here tonight
ed that "whatever God has me to do
over there, I will do it. I'm just hop- that an opportunity
ing for the best" in the 400 and 400 like this is very rare
hurdles.
Sprinter Ashlee Dorsett, a 17- and I'm thankful for
year-old graduate from Queen's the opportunity.
College, who will also be attending
Lindenwood University, hopes to
"be the best and just give it my all." Terez Hepburn
Trevino Thompson, an 18-year-
old graudate of Church of God Academy, is a middle distance runner
at Dickinson State University where he eventually want to excel so that
he can "break Chris Brown's record and be the champion."
Keshieka Bain is a 17-year-old graduate of RM Bailey who will also
run the 800 like Thompson at Dickinson State University where she
"hopes to do her best."
And Deneko Brown, a 17-year-old graduate of Jordan Prince
William High, is enrolled at Missouri Valley College where he will com-
pete in the sprints. He noted. that he just want to excel in whatever he
do. a
National songbird Terez Hepburn, mother of Walker, thanked
both Petty and journalist Bernard Newbold, the administrator of the
Athletic Scholarships, for not only assisting her son, but all of the
athletes who are being afforded the opportunity to travel aboard.
"I'm extremely proud because I know I speak on behalf of many of
the parents here tonight that an opportunity like this is very rare and0
I'm thankful for the opportunity," she stated.
"I know all of the athletes by faces and their accomplishments that
they have done.
"I know that they will do their best when they go off and they will'
represent the country very well and make us proud."





the-


POTS


CENTER"



2 0 oOFF






STORE WIDE.!

TffAV(NTV


I AXJLI A VJLL Ai
Already discounted and net-priced items excluded.



Harbour, Bay (394-7660) Marathon Mait (39-,i>,
And Now The Sandyport Plaza (327-5956)


MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 21


TRIBUNE SPORTS











BLTA December Invitational
'" ^ ( I lI 1


FROM page 19 4
"I played okay in the tournament, nothing
spectacular, that was why I made it so far. But the
level here was good. It could have gone either
way. It was just a matter of who executed the '
best that won."
Once everybody is healthy going to Paraguay,


Neilly said they should have a good chance of
pulling off the upset.
As for ladies, only three players participated
with Nikkita Fountain coming out on top with a
2-0 record. She won 6-3, 6-0 over Elanqua Griffin
and 6-2, 6-3 over Kerrie Cartwright.
Cartwright won the only other match played
with a 6-3, 6-1 win over Griffin.


BRITISH SOCCER

Keane gives Liverpool a 1-1 draw at Arsenal


Holiday Office Closure
MALL AT MARATHON & THOMPSON BLVD.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 24-CLOSED
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 25-CLOSED
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 26-CLOSED
MONDAY, DECEMBER 29- OPEN


N LONDON
Robbie Keane's equalizer gave
Premier League leader Liverpool
a 1-1 draw at Arsenal on Sunday,
with the Gunners playing short-
handed after Emmanuel Ade-
bayor's 63rd-minute red card.
reports the Associated Press .
Keane collected a long ball to
drive a shot into the roof of the
Arsenal net in the 42nd minute.
Robin van Persie had scored a
quality solo goal for the Gunners
in the 24th.
The draw gives Liverpool 39
points from 18 games, but sec-
ond-place Chelsea (37 from 17
matches) can go on top by win-
ning at Everton on Monday.
Liverpool manager Rafa Ben-
itez w'as not at the game because


he is recovering from surgery to down 2-1 at Newcastle in Sun-
remove kidney stones. His assis- day's other games.
tant, Samimy Lee, said the Roman Bednar.headed home
Spaniard was able to relay mes- Albion's winner in the third
sages to the bench. minute of injury time. Damien
Liverpool failed to take advan- Duff scored Newcastle's clincher
tage of Arsenal playing the last 27 in the final minute to push the
minutes with 10 men after Ade- Magpies up to 12th and leave
bayor was sent off. Spurs down in 16th place.
"I believe that staying with 11 Man City's loss means the rich-
men we would have won the est team in the Premier League
game," Arsenal manager Arsene after being bought out by busi-
Wenger said. "I think it was the ness investors from Abu Dhabi,
wrong decision. I would love to remains at 18th in the relegation
have sending off like that at zone.
home when we get kicked off the Defending champion Man-
park. I believe that if Adebayor chester United missed this round
has to go off, then Keane has to of games because it was in Japan
go off in the first minute (for a winning the Club World Cup.
foul on Gael Clichy). Wayne Rooney scored the only
Manchester City tuiOedol .goal. in a 1-0 victory over
1 at last place West|omwia. 6Ecuador's Liga de Quito in
Albion and Totten am we t Yokohama.


Give the
lasting

gift of
knowledge
to children,
teachers,
family and
friends.


"+... r ,_ .... .-








"An Economic


HISTORY
of The Baham..as"

A~/1' /ia a lllaing bookstore

323-253 or/


RAV4 Redesigned for more space


,


'


-~


2WD 4-cylinder 14" longer
engine has EPA
ratings of 24mpg The all-new RAV4 has a powerful,
city/30mpg yet modem, eye-catching look and
highway. comes equipped with air conditioning,
alloy wheels, air bags, ABS, 2.4 litre
engine, power mirrors, windows and
steering and CD player.

[ 40% more cargo space


Large wheels
emphasise the
powerful nature
of the SUV.


-UP
A,


All new Toyota vehicles are backed by
a 3-year/60,000-mile factory warranty.


jU~1a ? t.Tl A\uto Mall, Shirley Street opp. Sttui ,,'s Chicii)
EOECpen Mon to Fri am- 5:30pm
anrlp Sat 8am I2noon 0 11:",1P)
MOTORS LTD Tel; 397-1700
E -in a il: 1. 1. iii .'l,.11 i' ;:11 I .'] nI 1r,
AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER Parts and service guaranteed 14.
Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales iFreeport) Queens Hwy, 352-6122 Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd. 367-2916


PAGE 22, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


TRIBUNE SPORTS


SI














Time for an overhaul of



land registration system


FROM page 18
uments and titles, and without
registering the transaction in a
central government location,"
which in my opinion,'con-
tributes greatly to the title woes
many land purchasers face.
Further compounding the
land registration system is the
penchant of crooked landown-
ers and unscrupulous attorneys
and realtors to duplicate land
titles and sell the same proper-
ty to several buyers.
Frankly, all parties involved
in land fraud and the re-sale of
property to multiple parties
should be prosecuted to the
fullest extent of the law.
Unnecessary red tape and
bureaucracy, the disappearance
of land-related documents at
the Registry, the ancient and
labour-intensive land registry,
and the abuse of the Quieting
of Titles Act all contribute to
the frustration experienced dur-
ing land sales/titles searches.
The Quieting of Titles Act
must be repealed or revised, as
it has been abused and used to
commit land fraud and theft of
hundreds of acres of land. This
Act, which allows persons to
apply to the Supreme Court to
"'quiet" or remove any existing
title to a certain parcel of land,
has lost its usefulness as it's no
longer used to quiet disputes
over questionable ownership
(as was originally intended) and
has recently been used as a tool
to steal land from legitimate
owners.
In theory, the Quieting 'of
Titles Act allows for applicants
to inform all interested par-
ties-including landowners of
properties that border the par-
cel being questioned-of- their
interest, usually through a
newspaper advertisement.
However, even this approach
is flawed, as many Family
Island residents either don't get
newspapers, may not frequent-
ly read certain sections of the
newspaper and/or the survey-
ors' maps showing the bound-
aii, of the land. parcel being
quieted are..-. ,hlk hed. there-
by leaving residents wi.,..-
visual representation of
whether or not their title rights
are in jeopardy.
Last year, government con-
sultants revealed that problems
associated with title searches
were costing the private sectoi
a whopping $230 million a year.
One way that has been sug-
gested to comprehensively
reform the Registry is to either
introduce a Parcel-based Index
system or Title Registration
system, where it is made com-
pulsory that all deeds and doc-
uments be registered to ensure
security of tenure-or, the title
holder should be subject to
penalties.
Currently, the deeds record-
ing system uses name indexing
and the names of persons
involved in real estate transac-
tions to find the relevant docu-
ments-in addition to dates and
chronologically filing deeds.
However, in moving to com-
pletely modify the Registry,
International Land Systems
(ILS) has recommended a land
parcels indexing system and a
Parcel Information Manage-
ment System (PIMS), which is a
comprehensive land manage-
ment tool that can be used to
map land parcels on most
islands.
ILS has also recommended
that the present deeds record-
ing-system be scrapped and
replaced with a Title Registra-
tion System, which would result
in bona fide Bahamian proper-
ty and title owners being issued
a Certificate of Title that is pro-
posed to disclose and contain
all information on their prop-
erty, including encumbrances
such as mortgages and ease-
ments.
According to Daniel Drosd-
off's article, the IDB is also
assisting with the reform of the
land registration process with
a $3.5 million loan.
"By the end of the three-
year project, information on the
value, ownership and location
of 75 per cent of all land parcels
in New Providence and Grand
Bahama islands the two
most populous islands of the
archipelago will have been
collected and stored electroni-
cally. Document recording time
at the Deeds Registry will be
reduced from an average of
nine to two months, and tax


registration and collection will
have substantially increased,"
Mr Drosdoff stated:
"A third component of the
project will begin with the


development of a comprehen-
sive national land policy. This
will involve a consultative
process with civil society, prin-
cipally at the local and Family


71 Ba/him/an


islands level, which will gener-
ate the guidelines to prepare
the country's land policy and
land use management plan,"
Drosdoff noted.


Ranmiiv Seaobod 7 rad/O/iti:


* Crawfish (Tails & Meat)
* Groupers (Whole, Steaks & Fillet)
. Conchs (Regular & Tenderized)
Snappers (Whole & Fillet)
Stone Crab Claws .
* Shrimps
Salmon

Place your orders today and avoid the rush!! .
Best Price!!! Best Quality!!! l
&A^te: Save and present this ad fof
additional 5% Discount

Carmichael Rd. 341-3664 .
Houe a Healthy 6 Prosperous Holiday Seas
















December 24th, 2008
Closed at 1:00 P.M.


December 25th,

December 26th,


2008 Closed

2008 Closed


Re-open December 29th, 2008












December31st 2008
Closed at 1:00 P.M.

January 1st, 2009 Closed

January 2nd, 2009 Closed


Is


Re-open January 5th,


20(


The government should
move to make the necessary
changes to Bahamian statutory
law, in order to truly transform
the system and thereby possibly


INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) UNITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


* B ra s ~, I


rectify outstanding title woes.
MERRY CHRISTMAS
AND HAPPY NEW YEAR
BAHAMAS!


F i n .. .. T h .. re a d s


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 23






PAGE 24, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008 THE TRIBUNE


YOUR CONNICrTION O THE WORLD


NOKIA
Connecting People


Cw g '
Ii F m'nCl


oer World
ST. & MALL AT MARATHON


(~,


(QV
''0


/^


C


4-
%(0/8 i<^Q


ML'


A% INR


~(2 (~\2L


COME IN TO ANY OUR CYBERWORLD LOCATIONS FOR
SAVINGS ON THESE PHONES AND MORE THIS CHRISTMAS


I iL L *o


B :BlackBei





- L'LmLL


rny.


uwil
omm
LUW
L, Ul


smart mobility
smart mobility


/


0


~' K


LOGON TO WWW.BTCBAHAMAS.COM


FOR MORE INFORMATION


, IL'


PAGE 24, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


^^^^I-


SLNNL4Me L LO_


,q6 -- lQ


AIR I .l o,


N IM LLL'LL : 'L








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 25!


teift card
a'HIft


All smiles after

the St. Francis

Bazaar & Raffle

The members of St. Francis
Xavier Cathedral Bazaar Commit-
tee would like to thank everyone
who assisted in any way during
its recently held Bazaar, Steakout
& Raffle. Father Glen Nixon, Rec-
tor, reported that the Bazaar was
truly a "fusion of culture and fun"
and its success is attributed to
the overwhelming show of sup-
port by the general public. Ms.
Angela Brennen (3rd.from right)
the winner of the Grand Prize, a
2009 Toyota Corolla smiles hap-
pily in the photo as the Associate
Rector, Father Elvado Turnquest
(1st. from right) and Committee
Members Mrs. Debra Wood (2nd.
from right) and Mrs. Rose Fergu-
son (1st. right) presented the
keys to her.


OVERSEAS NEWS.

Iran shuts

office of Nobel

winner's

Rights group
+ TEHRAN, Iran
Iranian authorities shut down
the office of a human rights group
led by Nobel Peace Prize winner
Shirin Ebadi on Sunday as the
group was preparing to honor a
political activist who spent 17
years in prison in the Islamic
republic, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.
Iranian authorities banned
Ebadi's Center for Protecting
Human Rights last year, but it
had continued to operate from
an office in the north of the capi-
tal, Tehran.
Ebadi said police in uniform
and plainclothes security officials
raided and sealed the building
where her group was working
without presenting a warrant. No
arrests were reported.
The semiofficial Mehr news
agency reported that judiciary
officials ordered the center's clo-
sure because it did not have the
required legal permits. A judicia-
ry statement said the human
rights center had issued state-
ments that created an atmosphere
"of media publicity against the
establishment in recent years,"
Mehr reported.
Ebadi said her group would
continue its work despite the raid.
"Shutting down our offices
won't make us stop our human
rights activities. We will meet
again somewhere else and will
continue to support the rights of
activists and political prisoners,"
she told The Associated Press.
Ebadi said recent reports by
her group accusing the Iranian
government of human rights vio-
lations might have prompted the
crackdown. She said U.N. human
rights representatives are not
allowed to visit Iran but have seen
the, group's reports and subse-
quently condemned what they
called gross human rights viola-
tions. In an annual report in May,
Ebadi's group said "freedom of
speech and freedom of circulating
information have further
declined" since hard-line Presi-
dent Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
took office in 2005.
Among her group's work, it has
campaigned for judicial reforms
such as banning stoning and cut-
ting off limbs as punishments for
convicted criminals. It has also
campaigned against executions of
juvenile offenders.
Ebadi said the building author-
ities targeted Sunday was bought
with money she recei'ed.Mater
winning the Nobel Peace Prize in
2003. Ebadi, a lawyer and human
rights and democracy campaign-
er, won the prize for efforts that
included promoting the rights of
women and children in Iran and
worldwide. She is the first Iranian
and Muslim woman to win the
award.
"We will remain committed to
defending the rights of defendants
jailed for their political views and
beliefs," she said.


LOCAUINTERNATIONAL NEWS


GRAND PRIZE WINNER




PAGE*MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008 THE TRIBUNE

EVAPORATED
SUPER MILK
NOW ACCEPTINGSTORES HOLIDAY HOURS: ALL STORES WILL BE OPEN CHRISTMAS & BOXING DAY MORNING.
-. SUNCARD TOP OF THE HILL, MACKEY STREET, WINTON, CABLE BEACH & GOLDEN GATES
T Bomian Creo crd WILL BE OPEN ON NEW YEAR'S DAY MORNING
OQUANTITY RIGHTS AND PRICES RESERVED
I i eI IT-







MACARO READY CUT VEGETABLEICORN SODAS
& CHEESE MACARONI OIL 12 oz., 6 pak
S89 19.$349 ,89

KRAFT SAUCERS HUNT'S.KRAFT
R MAYONNAISE KETCHU SABBES
$49 $99 $ 29 $ 09


MURACHANAM RED GOLD ISLAND QUEEN
ONG GRAIN/PARB STEWED/CRUSHEDGREEN
NOODLES RICE TOMATOES EAS
5 lb.OMATOES
4/$1 o0 $ 79T '1 29 $ 29


S^VITAMALTd^ r HAWAIIAN BLUEBIRD VAFLU TIME 1
z imNCH ORANGE/CRANBE FOAM
SJ JUICES PLATES
ji$ 09 2$5 0269 $ 59


SKTRIFUN G SLICED/CRUSHED AMERICAMON SPICE SHURFINE
CEREAL PINEAPPLES JUICE FOIL
$ $099 793 199 $ 39i


GAIN CHARMING DOWNY joy
POWDERED BATH FABRIC
* DETERGENT TISSUE SOFTENER DISH LIQUI
63 oz..............$7.99 00
126oz..........$14.99 / 00l $ 9 00
I^B^~ z""""a~i 22"99B~ciBW "SW^B .... ^-B~^ ^~i~ at i^^^^^









INTERNATIONAL NEWS


Cheney says Congress failed struggling automakers


* By STEPHEN
OHLEMACHER
WASHINGTON


Vice President Dick Cheney
blamed Congress for failing to
bail out the auto industry, saying
the White House was forced to
step in to save U.S. car compa-
nies, according to the Associated
Press.
In an interview broadcast Sun-
day, Cheney said the economy is
in such bad shape that the car
companies might not have' sur-
vived without the $17.4 billion in
emergency loans that President
George W. Bush approved on
Friday. "The president decided
specifically that he wanted to;try
to deal with it and not preside
over the collapse of the automo-
bile industry just as he goes out of
* office,"-Cheney said in an intep-
* view broadcast on "Fox News
Sunday.' .
Lawmakers "had ample oppor-
tunify to deal with this issue and
they failed," Cheney said. "The
president had no choice-but to
step in."
Congress rejected an auto
bailout .package after many
Republicans and some Democ-
rats opposed it. Some said U.S.
auto companies would be better
off if they were required reorga-
nize through bankruptcy.,
Cheney leaves office Jan. 20 as
one of the most powerful, if
unpopular, vice presidents in
recent history. He played a key
role in many of Bush's major pol-
icy decisions and, in the interview,
was unapologetic in his review of
the past .eight years.
He staunchly defended the
Bush administration's use of exec-
utive power in the fight against
terrorism and disagreed with calls
to limit presidential authority. "If
you think about what Abraham
Lincoln did during the Civil War,
wh.at FDR did during World War
II. They went far beyond any-
thing we've done in a global war
on terror," the vice president con-
tended. Cheney said he was
unconcerned about polls show-
ing him as unpopular, saying that
people who spend too much time
reading polls "shouldn't serve in
these jobs."
He offered a somber assess-
ment of the economic challenges
facing the incoming Obama
administration, saying there is a
growing consensus that govern-
ment action will be needed next
year to help revise the economy\
But he jeclinedto judge the eco-
nomic suimulu' plan thit Oban-ra


I


IN THIS NOV. 6, 2008 FILE PHOTO, Vice President Dick Cheney
applauds President Bush during an event at the White House in
Washington. Vice President Dick Cheney blamed Congress for fail-
ing to bail out the auto industry, saying President George W. Bush was
forced to step in to save U.S. car companies and that the economy is
in such bad shape U.S. automakers might not have survived without
the $17.4 billion in emergency loans approved by Bush.


is considering because the pro-
gram has yet to be announced.
Obama and his team are work-
ing to come up with details of a
plan to pump up the economy
with $850 billioA or more in gov-
ernment spending over the next
few years. Their goal is to create
or save 3 million jobs in the next
two years. "I'd want to see what
they're going to spend it on,"
Cheney said. "There usually are
fairly significant differences
between we Republicans and the
Democrats on how you stimulate
the economy."
Cheney, also speaking about
the future of the Republican Par-
ty, the hunt for Osama bin Laden,
and the role.for his successor, Joe
Biden, said he:
-expects the Republican Par-
ty to rebound from this year's
election defeats, but is unsure
whether Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin
will lead the comeback as the par-
ty's nominee for president in
2012. "I don't think she has any
kind of lock on that," Cheney said
of this year's vice presidential can-
didate. "She'll have to go out and
earn it just as anybody else would
have to."
-thinks bin Laden is alive but
querioped whether r he is till
effectui runningn g al-Oaida
HL' c teii.liolcd up in .1 %%i
he r s-4%-'s t cn been com-
t :,+ fr


municating and there are ques-
tions about whether or not he's
even running the operation,"
Cheney said.
"Capturing Osama bin Laden
is something we clearly would
love to do" before leaving office,
Cheney said. But he said it has
been more important to stop ter-
rorist attacks against the United
States.
-Biden has not asked for any
advice.about being vice president.
Biden has called Cheney "the
most dangerous vice president
we've had probably in American
history." Cheney strongly dis-
agreed with the assertion and said
he doesn't think Obama will give
Biden as consequential a role as
Cheney has had under Bush.
-disagreed with the firing of
Defense Secretary Donald H.
Rumsfeld in late 2006, though he
praised Rumsfeld's successor,
Robert Gates, who will stay on
as Obama's defense secretary. "It
wasn't my decision to make,"
Cheney said of firing Rumsfeld.
"The president doesn't always
take my advice."
-did not regret using an
obscenity beginning with "f'"in
an exchange with Sen. Patrick
Leah\. D-Vt.. on the Senate floor
in June 2004 "1 thought he mer-
ited n at the time Chenr.:id
%itih a chucklk in ilte interti,'.


HOUSE FINANCIAL SERVICES COMMITTEE members Rep.. David Scott, D-Ga., left, speaks with UAW
President Ron Gettelfinger, centre, as General Motors Chief Executive Officer Richard Wagoner looks on at
right, prior to the start the committee's hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Dec. 5, 2008, on the
bailing out U.S. automakers.


December 15th to 18th 8am to 9pm


December 19th and 20th

December 21st Sunday

December 22nd & 23rd


December 24th Christmas Eve
I^--- -ijhw~eiiaM- ^---f A^^^^^.^.^^^^^^^^^


7am to 10pm

7am to 8pm


8am to 11pm

7am to 12 Midnight


Interior Exterior



Renovators & Distrinbut ors

83 Mount Royal Plaza ... |. |

(3 doors north of Home Fabric)




Top Qualiat t,, I I.I



iuppicane Impac Casement Windows & DooFs at e


LOWEST PRICES woplwide (even Miami)


* ~7** -


Phone: (242) 225- 1589 or 356-0221
e-mail: sales@interiorexterordistributors.com website: www.interiorexteriordistributors.com

We ship to Family Islands & Turks Islands
:. .'- ... .. ..... *.-. .....


windows & DoJrs can wit
20 MPH Winds (Categor


ismcand up) to

I cane)


IN O WS


lMOW IN-STOCK


-/ ~ I


|J u









PAGE 8, MODANTEECEMERI22N2008THEWTSBUN


Top US general in Iraq prepares for troop decision


A US .3SODI Rlooks.'a,.s.gaebarwilepatrollBIng Baghdad.


* By CHELSEA J. CARTER
BASRA, Iraq ,

The top U.S. general in Iraq
said he will make a decision
about the future role of Amer-
ican troops in early spring, to
allow enough time to address
any violence that may arise
from January's provincial elec-
tions, according to the Associat-
ed Press.
Army Gen. Ray Odierno told
The Associated Press that the
two-month period after the
election will allow U.S. troops
and Iraqi security forces to
ensure those legitimately elect-
ed can take office. He also said
U.S. troops will move into
southern Iraq early next year
to replace departing British
forces.
"So we have to make sure in
the election those who didn't
win understand that, and we will
be able to seat the new govern-
,ment properly," Odierno, the
overall commander of U.S. and
allied forces in Iraq, told AP
late Saturday. "And once we
get to that point, it's now time
for us to take a look at what is
right for the future."
Violence is dropping sharply


.-
'K .
I/8 tkj~

'r ,%


0Qstr Blenders
10 speed ......... $5900
12 speed.........$8000
14 speed....... $8800

Rice Cookers
10 cup.............$8000


throughout the country an
Xraqi military official said Sun-
day that murder rates have
returned to pre-war levels.
Military officials say Odier-
no has already outlined for Pen-
tagon leaders a withdrawal plan
that would pull thousands of
troops out of Iraq early next
year but move more cautiously
than the 16-month timetable
pledged by President-elect
Barack Obama.
"I expect we will start to thin
our forces in '09. It's the right
time to do that," he said. "We
will do it in a deliberate, careful
way to make sure we have
enough combat power to sup-
port the Iraqis in case there is
the unexpected, a resurgence of
an extremist group of some sort
that tries to have an affect of
the stability inside Iraq."
Odierno said he has not
talked with anyone on Obama's
transition team.
"I have a mission I currently
have with the current comman-
der-in-chief, and I am working
toward that mission," Odierno
said. "When our new comman-
der-in-chief comes iin and tells
us what'he would like us to do,
then I will migrate my mission


"I expect we will start to thin
our forces in '09. It's the right
time to do that. We will do it in
a deliberate, careful way to
make sure we have enough
combat power to support the
Iraqis in case there is the
unexpected, a resurgence of an
extremist group of some sort
that tries to have an affect on
the stability inside Iraq."

Ray Odierno


and my plan to what he wants
to do. Until then there is not
much to talk about."
News of America's southern
deployment came as Iraq's
major parliamentary leaders
reached a compromise Sunday
that would allow all non-Amer-
ican foreign troops to remain


WHAMILTON BEACH


Food Choppers 1.5 cup. . ........ $2100
3 cup. ...... ..... ..... $4700
Slow Cookers 3 quart oval ............ $3700
S6 quart oval....... $5500


Hot Plates.............................$26 O
Battery Fans..........................2400


Toasters
2 slice.......$2400
4 slice.........$3200


PRESTO Deep Fryers
6 quart. ......... ............. $6700
Electric Room Heaters. $5300
Wall Clocks from.......... ..$7 5


BLACK&DECKER
Irons ....... .. .. .. ...... . ... . .. $4 300
Juicers........ ... ........ .. .. .. $3400
Juice Extractors............. ....... 5600


until the end of July 2009. A
U.N. mandate authorizing mili-
tary operations in Iraq expires
Dec. 31 and those troops would
have no legal ground to remain.
Britain has already
announced it plans to withdraw
its 4,000 troops from southern
Iraq by the end of May, and


A..........


SCA
T 00
H ..


Telephones


DeskJWall from ....... $105
Cordless 2.4 GHZ. ......$2800
Cordless 5 8 GHZ . . 3900
JWIN Portable CD Radio .. $5200
JWIN Cassette Recorders $2200


Odierno told the AP that U.S.
troops would replace British
forces in the region early next
year.
Odierno said he is consider-
ing moving either a brigade or
division headquarters about
100 personnel as well as an
undetermined number of com-
bat troops to Iraq's second-
largest city.
"It will be a smaller presence
than what is here now. We
think it's important to maintain
some presence down here just
because we think Basra is an
important city, and we think it's
important to have some over-
sight here," Odierno said in
Basra shortly after being briefed
by British Maj. Gen. Andy
Salmon about the area's stabil-
ity.
Odierno said Multi-National
Division Center, which is
responsible for the area just
south of Baghdad will expand
down to the Persian Gulf and
the Kuwait border. Basra is at
the heart of the country's vital
oil industry.
Odierno said he expects the
transition between U.S. and
British troops to begin at the
end of March.. '
Abbas al-Bayati of the Shiite
United Iraqi Alliance said Par-
liament will vote on Monday
after "the decision to approve a
draft resolution was reached
with heads of political blocs."
Unlike a draft law that was
rejected by the Iraqi parliament,
the resolution needs to be rati-
fied by a simple majority -
sidestepping the need for sup-
port from smaller radical par-
ties.


A separate agreement
approved by the Iraqi govern-
ment allows the United States
to keep troops in the country
until the end of 2011. That
agreement, which takes effect
on Jan. 1, gives Iraq some over-
,,. sight over the nearly 150,000
American troops now in the
country.
Odierno also said no decision
has been made to withdraw the
nearly 22,000 Marines in Iraq,
mostly in Anbar province,
where insurgent violence is rel-
atively low, despite comments
from the Marine commandant
that there was a greater role for
them in Afghanistan.
"Any decision on force struc-
ture here in Iraq will be made
by me," he said, adding he
would then make recommen-
dations to Gen. David Petraeus,
commander of all U.S. forces
in Iraq and Afghanistan.
He said any decision would
be based on being able to con-
tinue the U.S. mission and not
give up security gains.
In 2006, U.S. forces attempt-
ed to hand over security in por-
tions of Iraq to security forces

I -'75""7-


only to have them collapse in
the face of sectarian violence
and insurgent attacks.
Iraqi forces are now respon-
sible for security in 13 of the 18
provinces with coalition forces
available for help if requested.
There has been an 86 percent
decline in violence this year
from the previous year, Iraqi
Army Maj. Gen. Qassim Atta
said Sunday. Attacks have'
dropped from 180 a day last
year to about 10 a day this year.
He also said murder rates had
declined to below pre-war lev-
els, about one per 100,000 peo-
ple.
In the only reported violence
Sunday, a suicide bomber killed
an Iraqi army soldier in Mosul
when he detonated himself as
a patrol passed him, said an
Iraqi police officer, speaking on
condition of anonymity because
he was not authorized to talk
to media.
But U.S. officials say the
security situation remains tenu-
ous, and some areas of the
country are still dangerous.
Chief among Odierno's con-
cerns is providing adequate
security for the Jan. 31 Iraq-
wide provincial elections.
U.S. and Iraqi officials hope
the elections will redress prob-
lems created by the last region-
al balloting in January 2005,
when Sunnis largely stayed
away from the polls.
As a result, Kurds and Shi-
ites won a disproportionate
share of the power, and Iraqi
and U.S. military officials have
expressed concern of a possible
increase in violence prior to the
election and after the balloting.
"It is important that we work
with the Iraqi security in order
to ensure that the Iraqi people
have the security prior to the
election to campaign, then to
vote and then afterward to seat
the government properly," he
said.
Odierno also said the out-
come of the election may under-
cut an effort by some groups to
hold a referendum on whether
predominantly Shiite Basra
province should become a self-
ruled region with the same pow-
ers as the Kurdish self-ruled
area in the north. That would
give local authorities more con-
trol of the province's vast oil
wealth.
"I think after the provincial
elections, if that goes right and
the people believe they are
being represented properly," he
said, "we'll see if they still want
to do that or not."

Associated Press writers Qas-
sim Abdul-Zahra and Jim
Heintz in Baghdad contributed
to this report.


StreHur:So.-Fi...0m-


ProctorSilex


Coffee Makers
12 cup ..$.$2900
Percolators
42 cup...... $6300
Rice Cookers
5 cup........ $3500
Irons.........$2100


-7-


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 28, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008












m Vill
OF


-go


SBoch

,roy & Boch 4


w -,^


AV
yW


I,.


4^
,..-- --..-
7 r-


Christmas Popcorn
in Decorative Tin
r $9099
S3850-04492
Sreg $12 99


Chocolate Pro
SMelting Pot
21bs melting chocolate 14.99
1632-26180/2104-2618 reg $17.99
$. $ 99 .


Homedics Jet Spa
Foot Spa
with attachments


Homedics Shiatsu
SPillow Massager
6 with heat
9P1H2216-30002
Ileg $7.99


6 days only!
December 18th-24th, 2008
Kelly's House

f l y AII k AI


Tel:
Fax:


(242) 393-4002
(242) 393-4096


Mail at Mianrtnon
Monday-Friday 9:00am-8:OOpm
Saturday 9:00am-9:OOpm
Sunday closed
wwvy.kellysbahamas.com


lwf


Taylor Graves
Scale
$1 50
1700-32011
823407
6 reg $24 50


Check out our others:
great in-store specialsH
::grC i7a.


iI


I







THE TRi.-.


*iIiNTENATNAL NEWS


IN THIS FILE PHOTO DATED NOV.
9, 2008, a Zimbabwean opposition
supporter calls for President Robert
Mugabe to step down from office,
at a'SADC extraordinary summit
in Jobannesburg. South Africa. In
an interview broadcast late Thurs-
day,.Dec. 4, 2008, Nobel peace lau-
reate, Desmond Tutu told Dutch
current affairs show Nova that
Mugabe has. to leave office, if not
voluntarily then by a military inter-
vention from his African neighbors.
A call for military intervention from
a peace activist like Tutu appeared
aimed at drawing attention to the
desperation in Zimbabwe, a once-
prosperous nation.


US: Zimbabwe unity dNal



can't work with Muga e


E By DONNA BRYSON
PRETORIA, South Africa
The U.S. can no longer sup-
port a proposed Zimbabwean
power-sharing deal that would
leave Robert Mugabe, "a man


S, AI I App IA lfF

11111AllI CF APPIIANCFS


Last Name:

Company:

Telephone # Home:


First Name:

Title:

Work:


who's lost it," as president, the
top U.S. envoy for Africa told
reporters Sunday, according
to the Associated Press.
Jendayi Frazer, the U.S.
, assistant secretary of state for
African affairs, made the
announcement in South
Africa after spending the last
several days explaining the
U.S. shift to regional leaders.
The new U.S. stance will put
pressure on Zimbabwe's
neighbors South Africa in
particular to abandon
Mugabe. But South Africa
said its position -was
unchanged.
The U.S., Frazer said, has
become convinced Mugabe is
incapable of sharing power.
She cited political moves he
has made since September
without consulting the oppo-
sition, reports his regime has
continued to harass and arrest
opposition and human rights
activists, and the continued.
deterioration of Zimbabwe's
humanitarian and economic
situation. Particularly worry-
ing, she said, was the rapid
spread of cholera, an easily
treatable and preventable dis-
ease that has killed at least
1,000 Zimbabweans since
August.
Biological

Frazer cited accusations
from the Mugabe regime that
the West waged biological
warfare to deliberately start
the cholera epidemic as an
indication Mugabe is "a man
who's lost it, who's losing his
mind, who's out of touch with
reality."
If Mugabe's neighbors were
to unite and "go to Mugabe
and tell him to go, I do think
he would go," she said.
Secretary State Condoleez-
za Rice said Sunday on the
American TV program "Meet
the Press" that Zimbabwe was
discussed at the United
Nations last week.
"This is another circum-
stance in which the interna-
tional community, most of it
including, by the way, sev-
eral African states: Botswana,
the leadership of Kenya and
others are saying that the
regime of Robert Mugabe has
got to go," Rice said. You
have a cholera epidemic there.
You have a humanitarian dis-
aster in terms of food. You
have the goons of the Mugabe
regime going around and
detaining people and fright-
ening people, terrorizing peo-
ple. Again, the international
community in that circum-
stance'needs to act."
But South Africa said Sun-
day the agreement under
which Mugabe would remain
president and opposition
leader Morgan Tsvangirai
would take a new prime min-
ister's post was the only way
forward.
South Africa is the region's
diplomatic leader. Its former
president, Thabo Mbeki,
mediated Zimbabwe's power-
sharing agreement in Septem-
ber and has worked since then
to break an impasse between
Mugabe and the Zimbabwean
opposition over how to divide
Cabinet posts.
When the power-sharing


"This is another
circumstance ,n
which the
international
community, most
of it including,
by the way,
several-African
states: Botswana,
the leadership of
Kenya and others
- are saying that
the regime of
Robert Mugabe
has got to go."


Condoleeza Rice

agreement was announced,
the U.S. gave crucial support,
offering to lift sanctions and
help Zimbabwe re-negotiate
relations with' international
lenders if the deal were imple-
mented.
"We're not prepared to do
any of that now," Frazer said
Sunday.
Asked later whether that
robbed Zimbabwe's neigh-'
bours of important leverage,
Thabo Masebe, spokesman
for South African President
Kgalema Motlanthe, said only:
"Our position has not
changed."
Tendai Biti, chief negotia-
tor for Zimbabwean opposi-
tion leader Tsvangirai, said the
opposition remained commit-
ted to the stalled talks aimed
at forming a power-sharing
government with Mugabe and
Tsvangirai. But Biti noted that
Tsvangirai said Friday that he
will ask his party to halt the-
power-sharing negotiations
i.ess ptolitieal defaiiee4 are
released or charged by Jan. 1.
Biti said the U.S. position
was difficult to contest, say-
ing that in Mugabe, "you are
dealing with someone ... that
cannot be trusted."
South Africa's Motlanthe
had said as recently as last
week that he believed the uni-
ty proposal was the solution,
because it was what Zimbab-
wean negotiators wanted.
SFrazer said the U.S. also'
believed a unity government
could move Zimbabwe for-
ward, but "it's not credible
with Mugabe as president."
Cholera has spread from
Zimbabwe to South Africa
and other neighbors, under-
lining the threat Mugabe pos-
es to the region, Frazer said.
She said it was understand-
able that South Africa would
try not to do anything that
could lead to Zimbabwe's col-;
lapse and perhaps create a
refugee crisis. It was "fair,"
she said, for South Africa to
try .quiet diplomacy and to try
to move the stalled unity deal
forward.
"But when these actions
don't work," more robust
response must be considered,
she said.


P.O.Box:


Exact Street Address:


House #

House Colour:


Requested Start Date
S ,' lu ne,4
fln'% .^--'?


House Name:,


Type of Fence/Wall:


I.
p. -


Nomate ha.yu sheue is



leR OF THE tRIBUNE Atn WAKE uP o Ti BES PAPER FOR YOU!
.3IR MON THS T 6IU MO NTHWAS -ITO YEARSEWPPRFO O!


In Just One Day!
Our DuraBath SSP Bathtubs & Wall Systems
are custom made to cover worn-out bathtubs
and out-of-date wall tiles...
L jjNo Mess. No Stress.
t No Inconvenience.


RE*BATH BAHAMAS
(Manufacturer's Lifetime Warranty).


Telephone
(242) 393-8501


I ,c0-l 1
'Authorized Deal~er?


V o w OR r p ...I..,


THE TR, .....


If


I


PAGE 30, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


0


V






THE TRIBUNE


OCEAN SPRAY, 16 oz.
CRANBERRY
SAUCE.. ..............................................$..7.9. $179
DIXIE CRYSTAL, 2 lb.
LIGHT/DARK BROWN
SUGAR .....................:...........................$........ $1 .79
KEEBLER TOWNHOUSE, 16 oz.
CRAC K ERS .................................................... $3 .89
SHURFINE
CHERRIES
$oz ................................................................................. $ 1 .7 9
16 oz.......................................... ......--".. ....... $ 3 .4 9

CHRISTMAS, 4o0q.r f
WRAPPING PAPER.... .$1.49
ROYAL DANSK, 12 oz.
BUTTER COOKIES .............................$4.99
SHURFINE, 18 oz.
CORN FLAKES..... SAV.E...60... ........$1.79
INDIAN SUMMER
APPLE JUICE
oz ................................................ ........ ... $ .9 9

|OCEAN SPRAY, 64 O .
CRANBERRY JUICE .........................$4.59
PEPPERIDGE FARM, 8 oz.
CORN/HERB
STU FFINGS ............................................ $2........ 2..89
PILLSBURY, 18 oz.
CAKE MIXES
OR FROSTINGS ......................................$1 .79
VALUE TIME, 20 ct.
FOAM CUPS ................................................ $1.99
SHURFINE, 12 oz., 30ot $

GLADE, 8 oz.
HOUSE SPRAYS.....................................$1.49
SHURFINE, 24 ct.
KNIVES/FOpKS/
S P O O N S ......................................... ................... 9
I SHURFINE, 1 Roll
TO W ELS.........................................................$ 1.29 '
S VALUE TIME, 200 oCt.
NAPKINS ...................... $2.29


LAY'S, 6.5 oz.
3 C H IPS.............................................................. $ 2 .6 9
SUNCHY, 12 oz. (CASE $16.99)
MALT TONICS ......................................... 79
XTRA, 48 oz.
PINE CLEANERS ..................................$2.59
AWr 4|0AWM|8Jj|il|H|M^


MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 34
OMAN -lodwr mmwwI1


THIS
YEAR'S
STOCK OF
GRADE A
HAMS &
TURKEYS


WE HAVE A FULL VARIETY OF /
BUTTERBALL TURKEYS GEESE & DUCKS, CAPRON (
ROASTERS, BONELESS HAMS AND TURKEY BREASTS
SCUT DANISH
CHICKEN SPARERIBS
WINGS perib 5
perlb ,




US. CHOICE TYSON
S BONELESS CORNIISH'
CHUCK BOAST HENS
* or STEAM :
$ *per bIb'9 "' 1" p .







PHILADELPHIA REGULAR, 8 oz. PEPPERIDGE FARM, 19 oz.
CREAM CHEESE....$1. 99 .,,AYERED*
S. ....CAKES..............................$3.99
BREAKSTONE, 8 oz.
SOUR CREAM.........$1.99 FROSTY ACRE, 8 Ears
CORN ON COB ........... $2.79
SUNNYDELIGHT
CITRUS & CALIFORNIA, 64 oz. EDYS CLASSIC FLAVOR, 48 oz.
PUNCHE.................... 2/$5.99 ICE CREAM....................$9.89 i



OSCAR MAYER BARS BAR-S
SLICED LICED, COOK CHICKEN OR MEAT
BACON HAM FRANKS

S$ 99 $ 79 $119



FRESH BAKED WHOLE ROTISSERIE
POUND CAKES CHICKENS
8 Inch each
$99 $ $99

PMEL PARTY PLATTERS AVAILABLE AT OUR DELIS


SWEET JUMBO
YAMS
per b

49'
HARVEST FRESH
TOMATOES
lb.
$.439


I CRANBERRIES, FRUIT BAS
AVAILABLE AT ALL


HARVEST FRESH
LETTUCE
per lb.
$ 449


ALL PURPOSE
WHITE
POTATOES
5 lb. bag
$299
CETS & POINSETT






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 32, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


.v %bl.


YOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD





^P~jopt^


* .. r


Customers Informed"


though the holiday of
%m .. i C hristmas comes but once a
year, all of us at BTC try to make that Christmas
feeling of giving prevail year 'round with savings
and special-, on our many products and services.
Whether it's with our "Mad Minutes" program of
la.t July and August, or the day-to-day savings of
BTC s Vibe, Vo.iceMail and I-Connect, just to
name a few. ir money saving products.. we
want our~ d .customers 'to. have 'that
Christmas fell ig every day of the year!
As we enter the holiday season this year, we are
especially aware that, although now, more than
ever before, everyone is looking to economize
wherever possible, we still need to stay connected
to friends and family as we go about our daily
lives because that is what is at the heart of the
holidays: staying in touch with our loved ones.
\~e at BTC want to make that a bit easier for
everyone, in particular all of our cell phone
-cu.stomers, pre-paid and post-paid. So, as our
'special Christmas gift to you this year. as of
December;1kst .e will be eliminating forever the
charges for some basic mobile services.
From December 1st, there will never again be a
monthly charge, for Caller ID. Call Waiting and
Voicemai] for All 6iit mobile customers. These
features- all ena Bg'bii-sa-s money:
Caller IW b k O is calling you
before yoa fa"Wing vou
to take m'ore ni 'a'time in.Voicemail
b ~~aking t to receive messages
*--'^^v~cte^^^ft to mir hary


important call. And now they will be absolutely
free to all cell phone users who depend upon this
kind of communication for their personal and
business needs.
And there is no installation fee. If you do not
have these services presently, as of December 1st,
these features will automatically show up on
your phones, free of charge. Moreover, starting
December 1st, every SIM card purchased will be
pre-programmed to include Caller ID. Call
Waiting and Voicerail automatically at no cost to
the customer.
All of us here at BTC are working tirelessly to
ensure that you are able to stay connected to
those you love during the holiday season and
throughout the year. This is our way of making
sure you can and save money at the same time.
We hope that this special Christmas gift to our
customers will help to make the holidays
brighter. while allowing you to spend just a little
more on spreading Christmas cheer.
So, on behalf of all the team here at BTC. I want
to wish each and everyone the very merriest
Christmas and a Happy and brighter New '\ear.


NO MONTHLY CHARGES FOR

Caller ID

Call Waiting

Voicemail

Multiparty Calling

All existing pre paid and post paid customers will now
automatically get these features. Also all new SIM cords
will be customized with these four free basic features!
CHARGES STILL APPLY for Call Privacy Feature.
To remove any of these features please contact us at
CALL BTC (225-5282)


Si.w.btcbahamas.com


CALL BTC 225 5282


I












THE TRIBUNE





MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 20,08

5,' ; c b ..


BISX: 'We must be first place for capital formation'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
T he Bahamas International
Securities Exchange (BISX)
is aiming to make "significant"
progress in facilitating capital raising
for Bahamian small business develop-
ment in 2009, its chief executive saying:
"We've got to be the first place to go
when seeking capital, and are not there
yet."
Outlining BISX's 2009 plans for the
Bahamian capital markets, Keith
Davies told Tribune Business that


* Exchange 'not there yet', but aiming to aid small business capital raising in 2009
* First quarter next year 'target for a lot of things', including government debt market completion
* BISX targeting BISX Global development, expansion of debt listings,
preference shares and creation of secondary market tier in 2009


among his goals was to establish the
exchange as a platform. for raising cap-
ital to finance Bahamian small busi-
nesses.
With the 2009 first quarter "a tar-


get for a lot of things for us", Mr
.Davies said BISX was targeting Feb-
ruary as the deadline for completing
everything it felt was necessary to facil-
itate the listing and trading of govern-


ment debt securities on the exchange.
He added that 2009 would also be a
pivotal year in the development of
BISX Global, the joint venture entity
set up to work with the exchange on


structured product development for
the international market, and attract
global clients to use the Bahamian
SEE page7B


Bank 'would have

beaten '07' but

for $600k charge


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BANK of
the Bahamas
International
would have
exceeded
2007's record
first quarter net
income by 16.7
per cent if it
had not taken
a $600,000 loan
loss provision,
its managing
director warning that deposit
rates were being negatively
impacted by uncertainty over
whether the annual liquidity
replenishment cycle would take
place.
Paul Mc\.eeney said the
BISX-listed bank, which saw
2009 first quarter net income
decline by 6.7 per cent to $2.8


* Bank of the Bahamas head
says net income would have
been closer to $3.5m, not
6.7% decline on last
year's record
* Warns deposit rates being
pushed up due to liquidity
replenishment uncertainty
* Plans to double capacity of
Village Road branch in 2009
million, would have surpassed
last year's $3 million perfor-
mance had it not chosen to take
a $600,000 loan loss provision.
In the absence of that provi-
sion, Bank of the Bahamas
International's net income for
the three months to September
30, 2008, would have been
SEE page 5B


Foreign fund boost

aiding financial sector


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor
WHILE while Bahamian
investment fund administra-:
tors may have seen an
increase in business, it has,
largely been from foreign-
licensed funds rather than
their Bahamas-licensed coun-.
terparts, Tribune Business
has been told.,
Hillary Deveaux, the Secu-
rities Commission's executive
director, said that while the
Bahamas did not appear to
have experienced. "anything
major" to date from the antic-
ipated global hedge fund
industry fallout, the regula-
tor had seen an increase in
Recognised Foreign Funds
(RFFs) beingadmifi ste red
frony4he Bahamas.-"
"A't~tle sme timfe-' there.
had beeti a decliM ini the
number of funds actually


* Bahamas fund
administrators dealing
with over 850 funds,
with decline seen in
those Bahamian licensed
* BISX chief says fund
listings growth likely to
be muted in 2009, due
to global sector woes

licensed by the Bahamas.
With niore than 850 invest-
ment funds both registered
RFFs and Bahamas-licensed
- operating \%tth a Bahamian
nexus. Mr De'eaux said of
the teetering hedge fund
industry: "I don't think there
has been anN real, significant
impact" on the Bahamas..
- ""W--know-there.are son*-'
SEE page 10B


Airport confident finance

in place by 08 year-end

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
THE Nassau Airport Development Company(NAD) is confident
it can obtain commitments for the full $310 million financing
required for Lynden Pindling International Airport's (LPLA) first
phase redevelopment by year-end.
Speaking with Tribune Business on Friday, Stewart. Steves,
NAD'S chief financial Officer said that while he could not confirm
the January 29, 2009, closing date for the airport's first phase
financing, the target was the end of January or shortly thereafter.
He added that while progress will be affected by the Christmas
season, NAD and its advisers have had strong indications they
will have investor commitments for the balance of the financing by
year-end 2008, with or two more possibly coming in January.
Mr Steves acknowledged that the current economic challenges,
particularly in the US and the global credit markets, had made it dif-
ficult for NAD to secure the necessary funding. .
Now, though, they were "on track and things are looking positive.
"It has been more difficult, with the US markets closed because
the banks have beqn. more cAtservative and more deliberate in their
due diligence." he added. '
Mr Steres also commented on concerts, voiced to Tribune Busi-
ness by financial market participants, aboqt the 23-year length of the
senior secured debt issue,'and the fact investors are unable to
against l46ir.4 N sttaaiseSitHe Bahamian market.
He said NAD hbftarg'etedthose investors witfi long-term inves;-
ment horizons, such as insurance
* companies and pension funds, for SEEpage 4B


Operator against

PUC dispute plans


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Public Utilities Com-
mission (PUC) does not have
"all encompassing powers" that
allow it to hear every telecom-
munications sector dispute, a
leading operator has argued,
with there being "no automatic
right" for every complaint to be
heard.
Responding to the PUC's
proposed dispute resolution
procedures for the industry,
Paul Hutton-Ashkenny, Sys-
tems Resource Group's (SRG)
president, said the existing
Telecommunications Act did
not appear to give the regulator
the power to hear all telecoms-
related complaints.


Disagreeing with the PUC's
interpretation of the Act, Mr
Hutton-Ashkenny said: "SRG
does not accept what appears
to be the wide-ranging inter-
pretation that the PUC has
placed upon section 6 (2) of the
Act."
SRG,-which trades as the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company's (BTC) only fixed-
line competitor, IndiGo Net-
works, said the PUC appeared
to believe that section of the
Act empowered it to 'hear com-
plaints by any person regarding
the operations of any telecom-
munications or radiocommuni-
cations service'.
Describing'this as "inaccu-
SEE page 9B


'Compromise'

urged on Bimini

Bay resort

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
TH 'Bimini Bay resort's
developers and the Govern-
ment have been urged to com-
promise over the project's
PhaseilI design in order to
achieve sustainable develop-
ment, the former having invest-
ed m6re than $110 million to
date on first phase construction.
An independent study on the
controversial resort project by
SEE page 8B


Save. valuable.tnm in Ie i byn.ii "te
Exclusively; aail abe though our.ne k a eox tthe. .,
Convhiem," b insu and jit iesae- JC1-5 .




ne be tb woi




o Colina General
Insurance Agency


'TIS


acer

TOSHIBA i...*
Come in anb see the many rnobets we have, from Toshiba,
HP, Dell & Acer, alt covered by Micronet's superior support.


THE SEASON TO SAVE!


LAPTOPS STA N A



IIQ


Unbeatable Prices, Variety, & Support


U. t


ificronet
BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
Mf56M.if2I3,lf PAIMM)lf-IO
242.328.3040


ColinacmpeFral.


"W- -









PAGE 2B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


I-AL

BURN OS RUPO OPNE

. .[ . . . .I 1Ih qE II!'I


SPU NI ANT F


* By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

THERE was moderate trad-
ing in the Bahamian market last
week, with a small increase-in
the trading momentum.
Investors traded in nine out
of the 25 listed securities, of
which one advanced, four
declined and three remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 76,887 shares
changed hands, representing an
increase of 997 or 1.3 per cent,
versus the previous week's trad-
ing volume of 75,890 shares.

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) led the volume for a
third consecutive week with
38,800 shares trading to end the
week at $7.
Cable Bahamas (CAB)
was the sole advancer last week
with 3,675 .shares trading, its
stock price increasing by $0.12
to close at $14.03.
ICD Utilities (ICD) led the
decline, plummeting by $0.68
to $6.13 on a volume of 1,600
shares.
Benchmark Bahamas
(BBL) saw 1,000 shares trade,
its price falling by $0.07 to end
the week at $0.66.
FirstCaribbean Interna-


The Bahamian Stock Market


FINDEX 828.59


(-12.96%) YTD


BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE


SYMBOL
AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FBB
FCC
FCL
FCLB
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE


PRICE
$1.71
$0.66
$7.64
$11.80
$10.19
$3.15
$14.03
$7.(00
$2.83
$110.-15
$2.7-
$2.55
$7.80
S2.37
$0.33
$5 10,
$ 1.00
$11.87
$6.13
$11.10
$10.00


$-
$-0.07
$-
$-
$-3.67
$- .
$0.12
$-
$-
$-0.05
$0.43
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-0.01
$-
$-
$-0.68
$-
$-


tional Bank (CIB) saw 4,300
shares trade, its stock decreas-
ing by $0.05 to" end the week at
$10.45.

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
fell by $0.01 to $5.19 on a vol-
ume of 7,320 shares. (See 6B)


0
1,000
0
0
0
0
3,675
38.800
108
4,300
0
U
0
84
0
7.320
20,000
0
1.600
0
0


CHANGE
3.01%
-22.35%
-20.50%
0.00%
-30.21%
-13.93%
16.43%
-16.960o
-10.16%
-28.42%
-44.64%
S.51%
8.33%
-10.57%o
-57.14%
0.19%
0.00%
-8.34'o
-15.45%
0.91%
0.00%


DIVIDENDS/
AGM NOTES:
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
(FBB) has declared a dividend of.
$0.02 per share, payable on
December 23, 2008, to all share-
holders of record date December
15, 2008.
ICD Utilities (ICD) has
declared a dividend of $0.30 per
share, payable on December 31,
2008, to all shareholders of record
date December 22, 2008.
Finance Corporation of The
Bahamas (FIN) has declared a
dividend of $0.13 per share,
payable on December 18, 2008,
to all shareholders of record date
December 11, 2008.
Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
has declared a dividend of $0.05
per share, payable on December
31, 2008, to all shareholders of
record date December 12, 2008.
Consolidated Water Company
(CWCB) has declared a dividend
of $0.013 per share, payable on
February 7, 2009, to all share-
holders of record date January 1,
2009.
PRIVATE PLACEMENT
OFFERINGS:
FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be extending
the deadline of its private place-
ment'offering. The preferred
shares will be. paying a dividend
raterof prime + 1.75 per cent,
payable semi-annually.


Geron Gibson and Khristi Samuel being congratulated by Lambert
Longley (Nassau Partner) on the passing of their CPA exam.


John Lopez (Freeport Partner) congratulating Marcia Sands and
Philip Pinder on the passing of their CPA exam.


Lambert Longley, Partner congratulating Marilyn Ward-Kemp on
successfully passing the Certified Professional Secretary exam.


Congratulations On Passing The CPA Examination


Philip Pinder


Philip completed his undergraduate
degree at Florida Memorial University
where he graduated with a Bachelor of
Science degree in Accounting. He sat
and successfully completed the uniform
CPA Examination in August 2008.

Philip is the son of Philip Pinder
(deceased) and Ingrid Pinder. He is
married to Keldra Pinder and they have
three children Jalen, Janaiya and
Jalanna.


Khristi Samuel Geron Gibson


Khristi earned a Bachelor's Degree in
Accounting at Winona State University.
Determined to excel, she obtained an
MBA in Accounting and Finance at
Missouri State University, Springfield,
Missouri in 2006. She sat and
successfully passed the Certified Public
Accounting (CPA) exam in May 2008.

Khristi attributes her success to her
husband Kareem Samuel, mother, Helen
Simmons, siblings Khristle, Christiaan
and Christophe, the entire Simmons and
Samuel families, the Melfords and the
Thompsons.


Geron completed a Bachelor's degree
in Finance at Acadia University. He
successfully completed his CPA
examinations in July 2008.

Geron would like to extend his utmost
gratitude to God for his continued
guidance. He would also like to thank
his mother, Rosemary Gibson and close
friends Karen Major and Elijah Knowles
for their support and encouragement.


Marcia Sands


Marcia completed her Associate's
Degree in Accounting at The College of
The Bahamas. She earned a partial
scholarship to attend Louisiana State
University where she graduated with a
Bachelor of Science degree in
Accounting..

Marcia is the eldest of three daughters
born to Richard (Sammy) Sands Jr. and
Rosena Sands of Palmetto Point,
Eleuthera, Bahamas. Marcia credits
much of her success to her parents and
siblings Roshea and Samara.


Tatiana Turner

In 1993, Tatjana completed
her Bachelor's degree at
Florida Institute of
Technology in Melbourne,
Florida and her Master's
degree in Accounting at
Nova Southeastern
University in Fort
Lauderdale in 2006. She
successfully completed her
CPA examinations in April
2008.
In the future, she intends to
sit the CFA and CIA
examinations.

Marilyn Ward-Kemp
Marilyn is the Senior
Administrative Assistant to
the Senior Partner. She sat
and passed the Certified
Professional Secretary
(CPS) examination on her
first attempt in May 2008.
Marilyn is thankful to her
husband Harry, son
Matthew and immediate
family for their
overwhelming support over
the years.


S
a f1


i (FA7160


0 tM 8<0tnwi~w fit v tn wt t tii t41*P61Q aa tAk * hutdptwi 'v -v f r ftrnis a* id witti KC G bItnt a o mtoi l. i Swia s jiooperatve. Alt rithtns tsnvd.


AUDIT ,


................ I- .- - -.. -t, .......... ......


m


-1







MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 3B


THF TRIBUNE


Family Island hotels



feel economic pinch


* By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
FAMILY Island hotels and businesses
are suffering a lull in business this holiday
season as a result of the current economic
environment.
Speaking with Tribune Business last
week, Lockwood Turnquest, of Ellen's Inn
in Deadman's Cay, Long Island, said book-
ings have been few and far apart in the lead
up to Christmas.
The property will be benefiting from
some domestic tourist bookings, as persons


come to spend the four-day holiday week-
end with family, he added, but said that
overall things are slow.
"This is not like the regular Christmas.
Business has not been very brisk and people
are watching what they spend," Mr Turn-
quest said of the atmosphere in Long Island.
However, he added that despite the eco-
nomic downturn, Long Island residents
were resilient and always in good spirits.
Vincent Miller, of the Chickcharnie Hotel
in Fresh Creek, Andros, said that business
has not been as good as in other months.
In most cases, he said, visitors seem to be


travelling throughout the island moving
from settlement to settlement, which has
proven to be a good thing as it spread busi-
ness throughout Andros rather than just a
single establishment.
He added that most persons have been
travelling to Nassau and the US to shop
for Christmas.
"They have been getting exactly what
they need to buy, no more and no less,"
Mr Miller said. To drive business, he said
the resort had some activities planned in
the park over the weekend to stimulate
business.


1$1,0 wiretrasfe vei[IfU[ication thre1shol]d


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Central Bank of the
Bahamas is proposing that all
information regarding Bahamas-
based senders of cross-border
wire transfers worth $1,000 or
more accompany such transac-
tions, due to the fact that a
"fleeting relationship" with
clients makes such businesses
vulnerable to money launder-
ing/terror financing.
In its proposed amendments
to its anti-money laundering/anti-
terror financing framework, the
Central Bank in an entirely
new section on money transfer
businesses said they were par-
ticularly susceptible because cus-
tomers did not have to open a
bank account or establish a long-
term relationship with them.
Clients could switch business
between different money trans-
mission businesses, and the high
volume of cash these companies
handled, and their ability to
instantly move money around
the world, further increased their
vulnerability.
As a result, the banking sector
regulator is proposing that "com-
plete payer information must
accompany all wire transfers of
$1,000 or more where the bene-
ficiary financial institution (the
financial institution that receives
a funds transfer on behalf of a
payee) is located in a jurisdic-
tion outside the Bahamas".
The information, the Central


Bank is proposing, should consist
of the sender's name; account
number, transaction number or
some form of identification num-
ber; and an address, date, place
of birth, national identity/cus-
tomer identification number.
Money transfer businesses,
under the Central Bank's pro-
posal, will also be required to
keep all transaction information
for a period of five years from


the date of the transaction.
It is unclear what impact the
Central Bank's proposed regu-
lations will have on Bahamas-
based money transfer businesses,
and whether they will increase
the bureaucracy and cost of
doing business.
They may also discourage
immigrants to the Bahamas, both
legal and illegal, from using legit-
imate money transfer businesses


to remit money back home to
friends and family, in the latter's
case because of fears the trans-
action details could be used to
detect their presence.


NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF
MINORCA INVESTMENTS LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, MINORCA INVESTMENTS
LTD. is in Dissolution. The date of commencement of
dissolution was December 17th 2008. Macgregor
Robertson of 308 East Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas is the Liquidator of MINORCA
INVESTMENTS LTD.

Macgregor Robertson
Liquidator


The Chambers of

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Counsel & Attorneys-at-law


will be closed for the Holidays
commencing at 12:00 noon
Wednesday, the 24th December, 2008
and will re-open on

Monday, the 5th January, 2009



Happy Holidays
to our valued clients

K.MILES PARKER
Managing Partner
I-F--


PEPSI Is having

Liquidation Sale


Pepsi-Cola Bahamas an
affiliate of PepsiAmericas Inc.
will be having Liquidation
sale on all furniture and
office supplies on Tuesday
December 23rd beginning at
9:00a. m. at the plant on Prince
Charles Drive.


i BUSINESS I


11








PAGE B, MNDAY DECMBER22, 008UHEITIBUN


This is to inform the public that the road known as

BRACE RIDGE,

which is off of East Bay Street,

between New Gate Road and Johnson Road,

WILL BE CLOSED

TO THE PUBLIC ON:.






BRACE RIDGE MANOR ASSOCIATION, ITD.
P.O. BOX N-1039
NASSAU, BHAMAS


December 23rd

December 24th 26th

December 29th 30th

December 31st

January 1st

January 2nd


8:30am l1:00pm

Closed

8:30am 5:00pm

8:30am 1:00pm

- Closed

Reopen for Business


-- ---- -
"7g








< 1---* ... -* ..-
Eu^^


NASSAU Collins Ave. & 7th Terrace P. O. Box N-4950 Telephone: (242) 302-9250 Fax: (242) 323-3581 www.bbsl.com
GRAND BAHAMA Queens Highway P. 0. Box F-40731 Telephone: (242) 352-7022 Fax: (242) 352-7619 www.bbsl.com
xerox )r- tic a O NCR ])C0) [~i


Airport confident



finance in place



by '08 year-end


HELP WANTED


Accounts Clerk urgently needed with
minimum of 3 years experience, proficient
in Microsoft applications, preferably 30
years and older-
Fax resume to 394-3885

Accounting urgently needed with minimum
of 5 years experience, preferably 35 years
and older -
Fax resume to 394-3885

Cleaning/Massager needed, preferably
35 years or older must have valid drivers
license.
Fax 394-3885


For the year ended June 30,
2008, the passenger facility fee
generated 82.4 per cent of
NAD's revenues, or some
$21.554 million out of $26.183
million. Of the rest, landing fees
produced the next largest
chunk, at 12.9 per cent or $3.381
million.
Non-aeronautical fees pro-
duced $8.445 million in rev-
enues for the 12 months to June
30, 2008, giving NAD a total of
more than $34.5 million in rev-
enues for that year.
The Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport (LPIA) is cur-
rently served by 30 airlines that
offer 3,700 inbound flights -
with 188,000 total seats per
month from 49 destinations.
Bahamasair still has the
largest market share, with 23
per cent of flights and 28 per
cent of seats inbound into LPIA
during NAD's last financial
year, which closed on June 30,
2008.
The national flag carrier's
biggest competitor was Ameri-
can Eagle, which had a 12 per
cent and 14 per cent share of
total flights and seats respec-
tively. Behind that airline came
Delta Airlines, US Airways and
Spirit in that order.
The NAD document said that
unlike other Caribbean airports,
LPIA was likely to see
increased flight services via
Delta and Jet Blue in 2008-ear-
ly 2009. "One major reason for
this trend is due to the higher
realizable flight yield of $0.18
per mile to US carriers at LPIA,
compared to an average flight
yield of $0.13 per mile for
domestic US services in
2006 and $0.12 per mile for
international destinations," it


added.
International traffic at LPIA,
NAD said, had grown at a rate
of 2 per cent per annum
between 1995 to 2007, advanc-
ing from 2.1 million passengers


to 2.7 million passengers. For
the nine months to September
30, 2008, international and
domestic passengers totalled 2.1
million and 519,000 passengers
respectively.


FROM page 1B

the $90 million senior secured
debt tranche, which has been
split into $70 million in US cur-
rency and $20 million in
Bahamian dollars.
Mr Steves said NAD realized
the airport financing was not an
ideal option for many, but the
company was targeting those
for whom it is.
The Government has already
effectively underwritten the
LPIA first phase, financing by
agreeing to take $50 million of
the $80 million participating
debt facility, the third and final
tranche in the financing
arrangement.
That $80 million is required
to refinance NAD and the air-
port's existing seven-year cred-
it facilities, and having that ful-
ly subscribed was a condition
precedent to raising the other
two trenches. Without that $80
million, the $140 million bank
credit facility and $90 million
senior secured level would not
happen, and although NAD felt
it could lace $30 million, rais-
ing the $50 million remainder
was impossible without govern-
ment support given current
global credit market conditions.
There appears to be no short-
age of revenue streams avail-
able to NAD when it comes to
paying for the airport's rede-
velopment, with current aero-
nautical fees said to be 36 per
cent below the Caribbean
regional average.
Aeronautical revenues, which
include landing fees, aircraft
parking fees, terminal fees, and
fees for the use of aircraft
bridges, account for 76 per cent
of NAD's total income streams.
Non-aeronautical revenues,
which come from fuel royalties,
vehicle parking, concessions and
advertising, account for the
remaining 24 per cent.


Wednesday, Thursday & Friday
December 24, 25 & 26
Monday &Tuesday
December 29 & 30
Wednesday, December 31 I
Thursday & Friday
January 1 & 2
Monday, January 5


Closed

Normal business hours
Closed at 1:00pm

Closed
Normal business hours


Nassau Chambers Freeport Chambers
Sassoon House The First Commercial Centre
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue 3rd Floor, Suite 9
P.O. Box N- 272 P.O. Box F- 42451
Nassau, N.P, Bahamas Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
Tel: (242) 322-4130 Tel: (242) 351-7474
Fax: (242) 328-1069 Fax: (242) 351-7752




JOB VACANCY


JUNIOR ACCOUNTANT

Local manufacturing company in Freeport, Grand Bahama is seeking a Junior
Accountant.
Qualifications:
* Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting is preferred with 1 to 2 years
of work experience. Candidates who have earned an Associate Degree in
Accounting will be considered if they have 3 to 5 years of work experience.
* Proficient in the use of automated accounting systems.
* Ability to solve problems and apply appropriate accounting standards as
needed.
* Proficient in the use of Microsoft Applications. Candidate must be able
to create and maintain EXCEL spreadsheets.
* Ability to communicate effectively written and oral.
Responsibilities will include:
1. Accounts Payable coding, data entry, preparing cheques, mailing
remittance advices, filing and resolving discrepancies with invoices and
vendors.
2. Monitoring and resolving outstanding or aged transactions on the A/P
Aging.
3. Assist with month-end closing procedures Posting accruals, amortizations,
performing g/l account reconciliations.
4. Assist with year-end audits.
5. Special Projects as required by the Financial Controller or Accounting
Manager.

The company offers a competitive salary with outstanding benefits.

Please email your resume to:
grandbahjobs@yahoo.com


: .', .. :l:i i : --





CAREER OPPORTUNITY
PROJECTS & FACILITIES MANAGER

PURPOSE OF ROLE:
To provide oversight for all premises (includes security) and
information technology (IT) vendor relationships within the
Administration and IT Department. To oversee all Company premises
in The Bahamas, including the day-to-day management of premises,
and the organization and review of all premises related contracts
and costs. Additionally, to manage projects within the Administration
structure, covering all the domains of change through information
technology and premises that impact departments within the
Company. Note: Projects likely to be limited to three or four major,
but non-complex, projects per year and ongoing mini-projects.
KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS:
* Over 2 years experience managing projects at a supervisory level
* Bachelor's Degree in information technology or related field;
project management certification
* Excellent organisation skills
* Well-developed writing skills
* Excel and Word processing skills
Resumes with accompanying certificates should be forwarded via
email to careers@familyguardian.com by January 2, 2009
Family Guardian thanks all applicants however, only those short-
listed will be contacted.
K~i~a^^^i^s^^'^SK~s s .~sasss~ssa ^issss a^ B 5BES3~


GRAHAM, THOMPSON & Co.
COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW NOTARIES PUBLIC

To our Valued Clients please note our
SPECIAL HOLIDAY HOURS


fb ^ Bc2iTaIcis
UBasil SS SOlUtiOns Ltd.

V*p ^
( tOt, to S0"m"' cAvaoteM,

&a 1 4) u OM/ w o UA SeAoUK o0 PeAce,
")jh~PjoA a",jveweavf&O6


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


HOuDAY HOURS:











Bank 'would have beaten '0'7'

but for $600k charge


FROM page 1B
between $3.4-$3.5 million, Mr
McWeeney said, an increase of
between 13-16.7 per cent.
Explaining that the bank
made no loan loss provision
during the 2007 comparative
period, Mr McWeeney said of
this year's move: "We are
padding the balance sheet,
building those primary reserves
to deal with any asset quality
issues we face."
Describing the 2009 first
quarter results as "very, very
strong", Mr McWeeney said the
bank would have been "way
ahead of last year at almost
$3.5 million" in net income -
had it not elected to take the
provision.
"Because we got such a
strong performance, that's why
we went ahead and took the
provision," Mr McWeeney
explained. "We put it in the bal-
ance sheet to grow the strength
of the bank."
Most Bahamian commercial
banks have increased their lev-
el of loan loss provisions this
year as a result of the contract-
ing Bahamian economy, com-
plete with mass hotel sector lay-
offs, reduced work weeks and
lower salaries, which have left
increasing numbers of borrow-
ers in default on their loans.
Close to 15 per cent of, all loans
are in arrears, meaning they are
31 days or more past due.
However, Mr McWeeney
told Tribune Business that
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional's non-performing loans -.
those past 90 days due were
well within industry norms,
standing at "within 5 per cent"
of all outstanding loans as at
* the 2009 first quarter end.
He added that the bank had
been able to "stabilize" the
deterioration in asset quality
and loan portfolio that all com-
mercial banks had experienced
in 2008.
Increasing numbers of bor-
rowers experiencing repayment
difficulties were coming into
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional to restructure their loans,
and Mr McWeeney said: "The
signals are that we should see
some improvement in loan
,quality."
He indicated that Bank of the
Bahamas International's deci-
sion to focus on mortgages and
commercial and industrial loans
was likely to pay dividends in a
depressed economy, as most of
these were collateralized by
physical assets such as property,
thus minimizing the risk.
With consumer loans now
accounting for about 10 per cent
of Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national's total loan portfolio,
Mr McWeeney said the bank
had "much more flexibility"
when it came to loan restruc-
turing.
In its infancy 10 years ago,
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional's loan portfolio had con-
sisted almost entirely of con-
sumer loans, and its managing
director told Tribune Business:
"The downside risk for the bank
has been minimized by the deci-
sion to move away from con-
sumer loans.
"The bank is still very keen to
grow its loan book, but the
growth has to be tempered and
take into account the economic
circumstances."
However, the bank remains
concerned by the continued sys-
temic liquidity challenges fac-
ing all Bahamian commercial
banks due to uncertainty over
whether. the normal replenish-
ment cycle will take place in
early 2009.
Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national saw a 13 per cent
increase in interest expense paid -
to depositors during the 2009
first quarter, both as a result of
its expanding customer base
and the higher rates institution-
al clients were able to com-
mand.
Mr McWeeney said the
bank's deposit base had grown
by $112 million year-over-year
as at the first quarter-end, an
increase of 20 per cent to $613
million. That was largely due to
the addition of 5,000 customers,
and during the three months to
September 30, 2008, the deposit
base expanded by 6 per cent or
$36.78 million.
Acknowledging that the
interest rates paid to depositors
had increased, Mr McWeeney
said that, traditionally, the third
and fourth quarters of every
year saw a drawdown on sur-


plus assets in the banking sys-
tem. In the former period, com-
panies stocked up on inventory
in preparation for Christmas,
and in the latter consumers
sucked out liquidity to purchase
those goods as Christmas gifts.
Normally, liquidity was
replenishedby businesses -
especially in the retail sector -
depositing their Christmas tak-


ings into the banking system.
Yet many were predicting a
tough holiday season for retail-
ers as a result of the economic
downturn, creating uncertainty
over whether liquidity would be
rebuilt in the New Year.
As a result, large depositors -
companies and institutional
clients such as pension funds
and insurance companies were
exploiting "the uncertainty of
the short-term outlook" to'
demand, and get, higher deposit
rates from banks eager to
obtain funding.
Typically, they were able' to
obtain rates that were 0.25 per
cent higher than the norm, Mr
McWeeney said. "Because of
the outlook and potential for
liquidity concerns, customers
have been asking for, and get-
ting, increases on their deposits,
especially institutions and cor-
porate clients," he added.
Meanwhile, Mr McWeeney
said Bank of the Bahamas
International had moyed to
"double capacity" at its Village
Road branch in 2009 by agree-
ing to lease an additional two
bays at the Village Road Shop-


ping Centre.
Describing the location as the
bank's "busiest branch", he
added: "One of the things we
are doing is that we acquired
two additional bays at Village
Road. We intend to double
capacity at that branch during
the New Year, and have just
completed planning for the new
floor plan."
As for the bank's proposed
West Bay Street headquarters,
Mr McWeeney added: "We'd
like to. move in the New Year.
We're looking very closely at
that, and are still working with
prime potential tenants.
"We hope to make headway
in the New Year. Having lease
agreements in place is key, and
we are not going to put the
bank at a disadvantage by not
Having any tenants."
Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national saw its total assets grow
by 4.9 per cent during the 2009
first quarter, increasing from
$736 million at the 2008 year-
end at June 30, to $772 million.
Year-over-year, it was a 17 per
cent increase from $660 million
in 2007.


NOTICE

The Physically Challenged
Children's Committee (PCCC)
will continue the sale of its annual
raffle tickets until January 31,
2009. All tickets purchased since
the raffle began in November will
be honored.


To contact the PCCC,

call 328-6147.



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS IN
THE SUPREME COURT 2008/QUI/equ/00097

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER of all that piece parcel or lot of land
comprising 290 acres more or less situate south of the
Township of RockSound in the Island of Eleuthera one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of CARMEN J.
KNOWLES by Power of Attorney for Reginald Knowles
Sr.

NOTICE

The Petition of CARMEN J.KNOWLES by Power of
Attorney for Reginald Knowles Sr. of the Township of
Rock Sound in the Island of Eleuthera one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of:-

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising 290
acres more or less situate south of the Township of Rock
Sound in the Island of Eleuthera one of the Islands of the.
Commonwealth of The Bahamas which said piece parcel
or lot of land has such position shape boundaries marks
and dimensions as are shown on the diagram or plan filed
herein and is delineated on that part which is coloured
PINK of the said diagram or plan and being the land which
is the subject of the Petition filed herein.

CARMEN J. KNOWLES by Power of Attorney for
Reginald Knowles Sr., claims to be the beneficial owner
in fee simple in possession of the parcel of land
-hereinbefore described and such ownership arises by virtue
of possession of the said land.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected during normal
office hours at:-

The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher House,
East Street, Nassau, Bahamas;

The Chambers of Johnson & Co., # 1 New Bond Street,
Governors Harbour, Eleuthera

The Office of the Administrator, Rock Sound, Eleuthera,
Bahamas

Notice is given that any person having dower or right of
dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized in
the Petition shall on or before the 27th day of December
A.D.,2008 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of such claim
in the prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure by any person to file and serve a
statement of such claim on or before the 27th day of
December A.D.,2008 will operate as a bar to such claim.

JOHNSON & CO.
Chambers
# 1 New Bond Street
Governors Harbour
Eleuthera, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner


I I I I I I I I I I I I I I1


f1% Public Utilities Commission




PUBLIC NOTICE


STATEMENT OF RESULTS

ON

PUBLIC CONSULTATION


Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.'s Application to Modify
Schedule 1 of Interim Licence

The Public Utilities Commission has concluded its public consultation on
the Application by Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) to
Modify Schedule 1 of the Interim Licence to include states for various GSM
Cellular Mobile Services.

Section 12(2) of the Telecommunications Act, 1999 requires the Commission
to consider any representations or objections received from the public and
interested parties on the Application received from BTC.

The Commission is satisfied that the modification to Schedule 1 of the
Interim Licence, as requested by BTC, will bring about improved benefits
to the Bahamian public and has decided to approve the Application for
modification.


Copies of the Statement of Results and all responses to the Public Consultation
Document may be obtained from the Commission's office located at Fourth
Terrace East, Collins Avenue, Nassau or by downloading the documents from
the Commission's website at www.pucbahamas.gov.bs.


Mr. Michael J. Symonette
Executive Director
Public Utilities Commission
P.O. Box N- 4860
Fourth Terrace East, Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: 242 322 4437
Fax: 242 323 7288
Email: PUC@pucbahamas.gov.bs.

Issued on December 19, 2008




The Anglican Central Education Authority


The Anglican Central Education Authority invites applications for teaching
positions available at St. John's College and St. Anne's School on New Providence,
Bishop Michael Eldon School on Grand Bahama, and St. Andrew's Anglican
School on Exuma.


English Language and Literature
Mathematics
Physics/General Science
Chemistry/Health Science
History/Social Studies
Geography/Social Studies
Religious Studies
French
Spanish
Music
Art
Consumer Science
Lower Primary
Upper Primary
Primary School Librarian
Information Technology
Accounts/Commerce/Economics
Physical Education
Guidance and Career Counselor
School Nurse


Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12
Grades N-12
Grades N-12
Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12
Grades K-3
Grades 4-6
Grades N-6
Grades 1-12
Grades 7-12
Grades K-12
Grades 3-12
Grades N-12


(6 positions)
(6 positions)
(2 positions)
(2 positions)
(2 positions)
(2 positions)
(4 positions)
(2 positions)
(3 positions)
(3 positions)
(2 positions)
(2 positions)
(5 positions)
(5 positions)
(2 positions)
(3 positions)
(4 positions)
(3 positions)
(4 positions)
(2 positions)


Qualifications: Candidates must possess at least a Bachelors Degree from
an accredited..University together with a Teacher's Certificate
from an accredited Teacher's College.

Applications may be collected from the Education Departlment located on Sands
Road off of East Street.

Completed application forms with the requested supporting documents must
be received by the Anglican Education Department by Friday, 23rd January
2009, and must be addressed to:-

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
P. 0. Box N656
Nassau, The Bahamas
Providing quality education in a Christian environment by developing the whole child: spiritually,
academically, physically and socially thus preparing the child for life.










- {Ih ii ii~i ,~ i [i |1j iii~i


Legal Notice
NOTICE
GREENFIELD MOUNTAIN LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 15th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
ACE TRADING
MANAGEMENT LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of November 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


BOND MARKET
Investors traded $50,000 (par
value) worth of Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) Notes, all in Series
C Notes (FBB13) Due 2013.
COMPANY NEWS
Earnings Releases a,
Doctors Hospital Health
Systems (DHS) released its




INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Monday


unaudited consolidated com-
parative financial results for the
quarter ended October 31,
2008.
During the period, net
income for the quarter
decreased to $583,000 or 21.95
per cent from $747,000. For the
nine-month period, net income
decreased by 31.38 per cent or
$1.01 million, which was a direct
result of greater increases in
operating expenses, with rev-
enues remaining fairly static
despite a softening economy.
The company's total revenues
decreased by $523,000 or 1.7
per cent to $31.1 million, while
total operating expenses
increased by $612,000 or 2.19
per cent to $28.6 million. Earn-
ings per share declined by $0.10
to $0.22, compared to $0.32 in
the previous year.
Total assets stood at $30.9
million and total liabilities at
$9.3 million, compared to $31.3
million and $11.5 million at
year-end.


Legal Notice
NOTICE
DRAGON INVESTMENTS
TRADING LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of November 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
VIXBY LAKE HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 15th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


EXCLUSIVE BEACH RESIDENCES


&ginaf J7ase
NOW UNDER CONSTRUCTION

A meticulously designed exclusive
oceanfront community located on
fabulous Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas.


A one-of-a-kind residential gem offering
fourteen new elegantly appointed,
spacious oceanfront residences with
every imaginable feature to ensure the
total enjoyment of a luxurious yet
carefree island lifestyle.


Prices starting at $1.75 million.
Occupancy March 2009.


,or more information
contact us at.

242.327.0112
0.00. C 0 GB- i3,
)assau, Sa) anas
-mawL info @ ayroc. com
waiw. 1aayroc. coin


This Is not an Offer. The Offering of the condominium interest will be made only by a Sales Agreement.


Bahamas Property Fund
(BPF) released its unaudited
consolidated income statement
for the quarter ended 30 Sep-
tember, 2008.
Net income for the quarter
was $648,000, and $1.5 million
for the nine months, declining
by $158,000 in comparison to
the previous nine-month peri-
od.
Rental revenues increased to
$2.99 million or by 31.2 per cent,
compared to $2.9 million for the
prior year, while total expenses
of $1.4 million increased by
$203,000 or 16.9% per cent.
Earnings per share declined
by $0.07 to $0.63, compared to
$0.70 in the previous year.
The NAV per share of BPF
stood at $13.48 per share, com-
pared to $12.56 in the prior
year.


Abaco Markets (AML)
released its unaudited financial
statements for the quarter end-
ed October 31, 2008. For the
quarter, AML reported a net
profit of $229,000 compared to
a profit of $246,000 for the same
period of the prior year.
Sales grew to $24.5 million,
representing an increase of
13.66 per cent over the same
period in 2007. AML's man-
agement cited an increase in the
company's sales volume due to
the strong performance of its
core businesses.
Earnings per share for the
third quarter stood at $0.014.
Total assets stood at $29.8
million, an increase of $3.5 mil-
lion in comparison to the 2007
year-end. Total liabilities were
$19 million, up $2.5 million or
15.3 per cent.


Pursuant to the provisions of Section 138

(8) of the International Business Compa-

nies Act, 2000, notice is hereby given that

RSM (Bahamas) Global Ltd. has been dis-

solved and struck off the Register as of the

25th day of November, 2008.



ARGUS ADVISORS


Legal Notice
NOTICE
BLACKTHORN
HOLDINGS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 12th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
OLIVE INVESTMENT
GROUP LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
KLADRUBY HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE
PUNCAK INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 17th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


THI TRIBUNE








MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


BISX: 'We must be first place

for capital formation'


FROM page 1B

exchange.
Other target areas include an
expansion of BISX's debt mar-
ket, a "consolidation" of the
preference share market,
increased secondary listings and
the creation of a secondary list-
ings tier for the market. The lat-
ter is where companies who do
not yet want to go public via an
IPO, but want to operate in a
rules-based environment! can
test the water and get their feet
wet.,
On the small business front,
Mr Davies explained: "One of
the key areas I want to see take
off is more of a focus on small
business development. They


need to find capital, and that is
exactly what a structured
exchange is for. I hope 2009 will
see us take significant steps
towards achieving that.
"It's [BISX] got to become
the first place we go when seek-
ing capital, and that's not the
case right now. The ball is in
our court. We've got to build
confidence through our
actions."
The BISX chief executive
explained that the exchange was
working to develop ways for the
Bahamian capital markets to be
"used to facilitate the develop-
ment of small business capital -
capital formation. A business
has'to say: 'I need capital', then
find persons willing to give it to


Notice
Notice ,is hereby given of the loss of Bahamas Government Registered
Stock Certificate as follow:
Stock Interest Rate Cert.No. Maturity Date Amount

2015-2024#2 9,32%APR 71-439 22/10/2023 $40,000.00

The owner intends to request the registrar to issue a
replacement certificates. If this certificate is found,
please write via email to: bgrs71439_lost@yahoo.com




OFFICE SPACE REQUIRED


Well established financial services.
company looking for 500-800 sq ft
in Western area of Nassau


Please contact: Warren Roberts

427 4153
trader 1 @bahamas.net.bs



BERKELEY (BAHAMAS) LIMITED


them. An exchange plays an "We believe the provision of
integral part in that." this facility will facilitate the
Stock exchanges and capital move of government securities
markets ensure the efficient and government agency securi-
allocation of national resources ties to the formalized market."
to the most productive areas of When asked when all BISX's
a nation's economy, and do so work would be complete, Mi
in a regulated, formalized envi- Davies'said: "I would say very
ronment. early next year. I would say
When it came to small busi- within the first quarter of next
ness capital formation, through year it's the target for a lot of
the transparency and account- things for us and be February
ability provided by BISX, next year we'll be well on our
investors would discover way to completing our side of
whether their capital was being things; what we envision is
put to good use via the needed to operate the govern-
exchange's disclosure require- ment debt market efficiently,
ments. and at the level of satisfaction
And, if the business was not we believe is required."
doing well, Mr Davies said And BISX's chief executive
investors could exit and obtain a added: "2009 will be a continu-
return by selling their shares to ation of.our growth and expan-
others via BISX. sion plans. 2009 will see the
When it came to the listing introduction, and hopefully the
and trading of debt securities enactment, of the amended
issued by the Government and BISX Rules. It's really an
its agencies, a market estimated important year for BISX Glob-
to be worth more than $2 bil- al as well as the domestic mar-
lion, Mr Davies said: "There's ket.
been progress on our side of "2009 should also see the
things; the market side of expansion of our market,
things." through the Rules and intro-
Using BISX as the duction of new products and
listing/trading mechanism for. services definitely new ser-
government debt has been vices. BISX Global should also
mooted ever since the exchange begin to come to fruition in ear-
began live trading in mid-2000, ly 2009, as we begin to consoli-
under the first Ingraham admin- date the equity partners. It's
istration, but has never hap- really taking a very measured
opened. It would replace the cur- approach to what we've been
rent 'auction system' used by planning."
the Central Bank of the Mr Davie's acknowledged
Bahamas, where government- that the structured products
registered securities and Trea- market, and potential interna-
sury Bills are sold on a 'first tional equity partners, had tak-
come, first served basis' and no en a huge hit from the Wall
formalized market exists for Street crash, stock market melt-
their subsequent trading and down and global financial cri-
pricing. sis. In some cases, the impact
An International Monetary had been reputational as well
Fund (IMF) report prepared for as real, and all BISX's interna-
the Government last year listed tional plans were "subject to
a number of requirements and change", the exchange being
steps BISX had to take before poised to adapt to a still-fluid
government debt securities market situation.
would be transferred to its plat- While structured products
form, and the exchange has and securitizations would be "a
been working to meet those little bit touch and go, because
ever since, they've taken a beating world-
"The plans are to essentially wide" as a result of their role
provide the Government with in mortgage-backed securities
a functioning market, a func- woes, Mr Davies said BISX
tioning trading system and a could play a role in restoring
functioning clearing and settle- investor trust and confidence in
nlent system"' Mr, Davies told ; them through their listing on its
tribune Business. r -r ..-.- gKri-driYen:market.


,'8'

,t I ~
.1


Contact: TFI.CI BRILBY
Conrld 8 PfnrCurmen-ril Marinager
LF-lA L:.pa n-o n Pr.:,le:t
Ph (242) 702.1036 1 Fa, f(42)377, 2117
PO Be, AF 592'? rla"du Barram.na
Emal ira .i orjfitT. 'na: 'b;


HPDESKJETPRINTERS

HPPHOTOSMART PRI
$71.00 Starting @
$130.o


H i jH ''l,..,,. Ly
.uvup


HP DESKJTINKS -m m -
#21- $2100
#22-$23.00
4 #4-$23.00 MEMORY
;,, #75-'$28.00 DESKTOP DDR MEMORY-1GB. $70.00
#27-$2100 DESKTOPDDR2-1GB-.55.00
#2 8- $25.00 NOTEBOOK DDR-IGB-. 76.00
NOTEBOOK DDR 2-1GB-. 59.00
u/n ; \u


NiBS


I I 'ICA A *,
inTu iiT u TTTuin^ ''iTiH l


^u UH.---.. M HI liEI -.
LicuDs,, 361.00

32".893ZOO l
42"-$1,890.00 ] 1 lilll
55 S2 ,950.00 CllEMS


am*,
"N.$4mf
all I


HARD UDRIVE
:* OGB-.1TB1-Stang @$70.00
ETERNAL HARD DRIVES 250GB-
S| Slarting@ $155.00
DVDIRWDRIVES.-55.00


19" LCD MONITORS. $270.00
22 LCDMONITORS- $339.00 ,


II STIlE
* PC GAMES SOFTWARE
Jumpstart Phonics QSOffice
Spongebnb Typing orel Oraw
Need for Speed Nl' rr
Fear Acc sPon
Age ol Eipire 'Keyboard
wireless Adapters
Blazing Angels '*Ge Conlblkes
Fibel HP LeArnJA1t i


Electric / Gas Powered High

Speed, Remote Controlled

Powered Boats

Prices start at $100.00











Nassau Airport
Development Company





C-220, Structural Steel Stage 1

Nassau Airport Development Company is pleased to
announce the C-220 Structural Steel Stage 1 Tender
associated with the expansion of the Lynden Pindling
International Airport. The C -220 Steel Stage 1 Lump Sum
Contract will include the following components
Supply, shop drawings, fabrication, shop painting,
transport and installation of Structural Steel Joist; and
Supply, shop drawings, fabrication, transport and
Installations of steel decking.
Tender Packages can be picked up after 1:00 pm, on
Thursday, December 18th, 2008. Please contact Traci
Brisby for more information.
Tender closing is at 3:00pm, Thursday, January 22nd,
2009.
There will be a Tender Briefing, Thursday, January 8th.
Please RSVP Traci Brisby by 1pm January 7th for
briefing location details.


PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
ADVERTISEMENT

VACANCY

MANAGER III (HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT)
The Public Hospitals Authority invites applications from suitably qualified persons for
the post of Manager III, Human Resources Department, Princess Margaret Hospital,
Public Hospitals Authority.
Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-
Bachelors Degree in Business Administration, Management or equivalent, OR related
field;

Three (3) years relevant experience in Human Resources Management;
Excellent communication skills (oral and written); analytical and conceptualized thinking
skills; computer skills;
The Manager Ill, Human Resources, Princess Margaret Hospital reports to the Senior
Manager, Human Resources, Princess Margaret Hospital.

JOB SUMMARY

The Manager Ill, Human Resources is responsible for all Human Resources matters for
area (s) assigned.

DUTIES:

1. Processes recommendations for HR matters; i.e., appointments, promotions,
transfers, disciplinary matters, terminations, resignations, reclassifications, etc.

2. Liaises with and a assists Administrative Officers and Area Supervisors to ensure
all human resources matters are dealt with in accordance with the rules and
regulations of the Authority as expeditiously as possible;

3. Liaises with the Payrolls Unit to ensure efficient processing of employees' salary
and financial matters;

4. Manages the Performance Appraisal process for employees within assigned
area of responsibility, ensuring proper preparation, execution and distribution;

5. Maintains a current detailed record of applicants for positions within assigned
area and ensures that all applications are acknowledged effectively;

6. Participates in the interview process, completes background checks and
processes appointments;

7. Completes staff orientation process;

8. Assists with the coordination of Human Resources routine and special projects;

9. Participates as a member of the Human Resources Management Committee
and the Human Resources Department Internal Executive Committee;

The post of Manager III, Human Resources is in Scale HAAS8 ($28,050 x 700 $34,.650).

Letter of application and curricula vitae should be submitted to the Chief IHospital
Administrator, Princess Margaret Hospital or the Director of Human Hesources,
Corporate Office, Public Hospitals Authority, 3rd Terrace West, Centreville; or P.O. Box
N-8200 Nassau, Bahamas no later than 31st December, 2008.


EflM lti


BUSNES


.1 I: A 9 .5 -V "1 1-
( ____ U ^~~~ ~~~ QA Diit, y b.fi ^ ^.-*-*' __ ?


F-


13 0- "li 1'11 ffl l 1 Starting@ Ir,1elandAMOD
itsbl e-$8U 1M IIIH1 $ 0 0 tesi n mo rads0 ocessor
~te s ... ... .. v Cards&SoundCards.
All media ptintabl surface. L



1.UN AV.9 T TRAE da Fia


0







PAGE 8B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


THE TRIbui-.-


NOTICE

DUNMORE ENTERPRISES LTD.

NOITCE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an Extraordinary General
meeting of the Shareholders of the DUNMORE ENTERPRISES
LTD. is hereby called to be held at the Registered Office of the
Company, 14 Governor's Cay, Sandyport, Nassau, Bahamas
on the 30th December 2008 at 11:00 o' clock in the forenoon.

The object and purpose of said meeting is to have laid
before the Shareholders of the Company the accounts of
the Liquidators, Mr. Kevin Carroll and Mrs. Barbara Carroll,
showing the manner in which the winding up up of the
Company has been conducted, the property of the Company
distributed and the debts and obligations of the Company
discharged, and also to hear any explanation that may be
given by said Liquidator.

Dated the 28th November 2008.

Mrs. Barbara Carroll
Liquidator
Dunmore Enterprises Ltd.




BRIGHT HOLDINGS LIMITED.
(Company number 101,591B)


An International Business Company

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Pursuant to Section 137(4) of the International Business
Companies Act, 2000 notice is hereby given that the voluntary
winding-up and dissolution of the Company commenced on the 19th
day of December, 2008 and that Pine Limited of Devonshire House,
Queen Street, PO. Box N-8176, Nassau, Bahamas has been appointed
Liquidator.

Dated this 19th day of December, 2008



Pine Limited
Liquidator


Legal Notice
NOTICE

LAVENDER SPRINGS CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on,
the 11th day of November 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

TAMARIND VALLEY INC.
.(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa CQrp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas. .






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

HUNTERWAY SHORES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


'Compromise' urged on Bimini Bay resort


FROM page 1B
consultants Black & Veatch,
which has been studied by Tri-
bune Business, urges developer
RAV Bahamas and the Gov-
ernment to work together to
ensure Bimini Bay's second
development phase is appro-
priate and ties in with the
administration's plans for a
Marine Protection Area (MAP)
in north Bimini.
In the recommendations sec-
tion of the report, Black &
Veatch said: "As part of the
Phase II scoping process, the
Government of the Bahamas
and RAV Bahamas should-
actively engage in good faith
dialogue to seek mutually
acceptable compromises and
compatible sustainable design
solutions to competing project
development, environmental
preservation and land use objec-
tives."
Black & Veatch found that


the proposed boundaries for the
MAP in northern Bimini "over-
lap and encompass most of
Phase II (essentially all of Phase
2 B) of the Bimini Bay Resort
development area authorised
under the Heads of Agree-
ment".
It also uncovered, based on
interviews with the Department
of Marine Resources, Bahamas
'National Trust (BNT) and
Bahamas Reef Environmental
and Educational Foundation
(BREEF) staff, that the pro-
posed MPA's boundaries were -
set without "knowledge of the
geographic extent of develop-
ment authorised for the Bimini
Bay Resort".
Moving to concerns over
whether an island of Bimini's
limited size could accommodate
development beyond Bimini
Bay Resort's Phase I bound-
aries, given that RAV Bahamas
and the Government had exe-


Legal Notice
NOTICE

MAXITREAT GLOBAL LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 15th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ESKIMO HOLDINGS LTD. is in dissolution under the provisions of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on December 19, 2008
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
.th.Reg tar eneralci ; -. : : ,"
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.
(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 30th day of January, 2009 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.
DECEMBER 22, 2008
LAKEISHA COLLIE
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



Legal Notice
NOTICE

ARLINGTON UNITED LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 3rd day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

HARP GROUP LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


cuted a Heads of Agreement
for a 700-acre project, Black &
Veatch paid particular atten-
tion to the Phase II golf course.
The first Ingraham adminis-
tration had restricted this to just
nine holes, but the former
Christie administration
increased this to 18 with the
revised 2004 Heads of Agree-
ment. Upon regaining office,
the current government, via the
Bahamas Investment Authority
(BIA), informed the develop-
ers it wanted a return to the
original nine holes, with the golf
course built on "hard lands".
RAV Bahamas, a subsidiary
of principal developer Gerardo
Capo's Capo Group, had
restructured its 2006 master
land use plan to scale back
Phase II in terms of density,
-although marina, commercial,
utilities and golf course uses
were still planned. The devel-
opment footprint was reduced,
with 153 acres taken out of the
project.
These are the 153 acres that
RAV Bahamas in 2006 offered
to the Government in exchange
for 49.11 acres of reclaimed land
for use in Bimini Bay's Phase
I, an offer the Christie govern-
ment apparently accepted in
return for the developer paying
$10,000 per acre.
While the layout of lots for
Phase II A had been completed,
RAV Bahamas said its devel-
opment plans beyond that were
still "fluid".
In its assessment, Black &
Veatch said some 276.6 acres
of land was available in Phase II
B for a golf course. Taking out
areas such as red mangroves,
natural ponds and the flood-
plain area, would remove
between 142.67-164.13 acres
from the land available to a golf
course, leaving just 112.5-133.93
acres left.
"Whether this provides suf-
ficient space to accommodate
the desired 18-hole golf course
will depend upon the type of
course and design layout to be
developed," Black & Veatch
said. "Eighteen-hole golf facili-
ties in the US average about
150 to 200 acres of land, accord-
ing to the US Environmental
Protection .Agency by reference
to the Golf Course Superinten-
dents Association of America.
A typical urban course is only
110 to 120 acres, while courses
in resort areas may be 170 to
190 acres." .' -


RAV Bahamas is planning a
'links-style' golf course, but in
summary the Black & Veatch
report is saying that an envi-
ronmentally sustainable facili-
ty will be a 'tight fit'. And its
report warned that "significant
limitations to avoid environ-
mental impacts will make
course design a challenging and
sensitive matter".
RAV Bahamas has acquired
its 700 acres via quieting the
title to the land, having first
landed in Bimini in 1997 when it
acquired the project rights from
ROBEX International.
The project's 2006 proposed
Master Plan envisions a 410-
room Conrad Hilton Hotel and
10,000 square foot casino, with
an operating partner for the lat-
ter still being sought.
It also includes 559 marina
slips, inclusive of the 140 exist-
ing slips; 50 over-the-water bun-
galows; 125 timeshare or con-
do units (at the developer's dis-
cretion); 250 timeshare units on
the commercial site; 358 con-
-duct units on the island opposite
the hotel; 40 Bay Front bunga-
r lows; 100 space site condo units;
91 single family homes; 34
estate beach homes; 100 golf
course condo units.
Some 329 units in the condo
homes are currently completed
or under construction, and
Black & Veatch said in its
report that 59 single family res-
idences had been built. Anoth-
er seven parcels, of land had
been sold, while 240-250 boat
slips had been installed.
Currently, the report said
between 210-270 construction
workers were working at Bimi-
ni Bay, while 175-185 Bahami-
ans, out of a staff pool of 230,
were working in operations. Of
the Bahamian contingent, 80
were from Bimini.
Bimini Bay had also com-
pleted construction of a com-
mercial village near the resort
entrance and ferry dock, with
the facility including shops, deli,
a mini-mart, marine shop and
liquor store.
Black & Veatch's report said
there had been substantial eco-
nomic and social gains for Bimi-
ni as a result of the Bimini Bay
project. It has been one of the
few to continue progression, its
financing having already been
put in place, during the current
credit crunch that has placed so
many Bahamas-based develop-
ments on hold.


NOTICE
DUNMORE ENTERPRISES LTD.
(in Voluntary Liquidation)
Creditors having debts or claims against he above-named Company are
required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P.C. Box N-
8772, Nassau, Bahamas on or before the 29th December, 2008. Ih default
thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made by
the Liquidator.
Dated the 18th December 2008.
Mrs. Barbara Carroll
Liquidator
Dunmore Enterprises Ltd.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

MAX WEALTH LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th. day of June 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

SAGO ALPS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 2nd day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 5th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


BUSINESS






MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE


Operator against PUC dispute plans


rate", Mr Hutton-Ashkenny
argued: "It is clear from a prop-
er reading of the [Act] that the
PUC is not empowered to hear
complaints as a function under
the Act, but to solely hear com-
plaints, when carrying out one
of its functions under the Act.
The distinction is not an obtuse
one.
"SRG is of the view that the
PUC does not have the power
to hear any complaint brought
before it, unless it can be shown
that the PUC must hear the
complaint in order to carry out
one of the functions that are
articulated in section 6.1 of the
Act. Under the Act, there is no
automatic right for a complaint
to be heard, and no all-encom-
passing power conferred upon
the PUC to hear complaints
whatever the situation."
In unveiling its public consul-
tation, the PUC had admitted
there was a "void" in the


Telecommunications Act when
it came to addressing how dis-
putes between rival operators
were resolved, forcing it to
develop its own policies and
procedures.
Yet Mr Hutton-Ashkenny
said the regulator appeared to
be "widening its remit" bys sug-
gesting it would deal with dis-
putes involving issues such as
billing/invoicing and document
interpretation.
In such instances, he argued it
would be difficult to see where
the PUC would be 'carrying
out its functions' under the Act
by hearing such disputes.
"In such cases, SRG respect-
fully submits that the PUC does
not have the jurisdiction to be
able to insert itself at will as an
arbiter into general disagree-
ments between operators," Mr
Hutton-Ashkenny said.
"In practical terms, the Act
does not provide for a dispute


between operators to be filed
with, and adjudicated by, the
PUC." He explained that the
Telecommunications Act only
stipulated that interconnection,
disputes be referred to the PUC
at the regulator's request, and
did not mandate that the dis-
pute be filed by either of the
parties involved.
Still, rival operators were able
to make complaints to the PUC
about each other's operations,
and the regulator would be able
to hear these in carrying out its
functions under the Act.
Mr Hutton-Ashkenny also
challenged the PUC's opinion
to use section 6 (5) of the
Telecommunications Act to
underpin its moves to develop
its 'quasi-legislative' procedures
to deal with disputes.
This section talks about the
PUC publishing proposals on
any 'general instruction' that it
intended to issue, but Mr Hut-


ton-Ashkenny argued that it
could not be used in relation to
disputes for the very reason that
the Act was 'silent about the
principles and procedures' to
be used in resolving them.
"There is no general provi-
sion anywhere in the Act for
any general instruction to be
issued in that regard," the SRG
head said. "Nor can it be said
that complaint resolution pro-
cedures were 'intended to be
issued by the Commission
under any part of the Act'.
"Regardless of the PUC's
good intentions, SRG respect-
fully submits that section 6 (5)
cannot be used as the basis for
the establishment of the PUC's
proposed complaints handling
procedures."
Mr Hutton-Ashkenny urged
that in resolving telecoms sector
disputes, the first issue to be
resolved was whether the PUC
had jurisdiction to hear them.


Once that was settled, the appli-
cant operator should then file
a Notice of Complaint.
Under the PUC's proposal,
he argued that issues such as
whether a complaint was "sim-
ply too trivial to be heard" were
not considered until after a
respondent had to "expend time
and money on perhaps need-
lessly defending itself". This Mr
Hutton-Ashkenny said, was
"highly inefficient".
He also took issue with the
PUC's plans to give itself the
power to order that parties to a
dispute pay its costs, and that
the applicant party pay a non-
refundable $2,500 processing
fee for filing its compliant. The
PUC also proposed that "some-
what ludicrously", the respon-
dent pay a similar fee regard-
less of whether the complaint
is heard or whether it is vindi-
cated.
"However, SRG respectfully


points out that with the excep-
tion of penalties for offences
under the Act, the PUC has
been given no statutory power
to levy any fee on an operator
other than the licence fee that is
provided for under section 10
of the Act," Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny said.
"SRG is of the view that the
PUC does not have the power
to charge any discrete process-
ing fee on those who are party
to a complaint, or to recover its
costs of hearing a complaint
except through the imposition
of licence fees."
Meanwhile, Felicity Johnson,
BTC's vice-president of legal,
regulatory and interconnection,
also queried why respondents
to any telecoms sector com-
plaint should pay a $2,500 inter-
connection fee. If they were
found blameless, she suggested
that such fees be refunded to
them.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

ZENNON VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 12th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal. Notice
NOTICE

YONAGUNI HOLDINGS CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 17th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


SCHNARCHHAHN LTD.




Notice is, hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SCHNARCHHAHN LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


SPRING HARBOUR LIMITED

/


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SPRING HARBOUR LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

SIANA VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation) (


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 12th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
I (Liquidator)



Legal Notice,
NOTICE

PRIMROSE MEADOW INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

WINDY HEIGHTS HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


SPRING DROPS LIMITED


Legal Notice
NOTICE

TRINITY PROVISIONS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 2nd day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE
SWEET SYMPHONY
CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is heleby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


MAN ON THE MOON INVESTMENTS LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MAN ON THE MOON INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


ALBANY CLOUDS COMPANY LTD.
--- .---


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ALBANY CLOUDS COMPANY LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SPRING DROPS LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


i


L I BUSINESS







PAGE 10B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


bIdvpis' in M


Tpiov -the#1nespa


m

incicuato, us cl


NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF
MALLORCA INVESTMENTS LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, MALLORCA
INVESTMENTS LTD. is in Dissolution. The
date of commencement of dissolution was
December 17th' 2008. Macgregor Robertson of 308
East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator
of MALLORCA INVESTMENTS LTD.


Macgregor Robertson
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE


RELIC LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 RELIC LTD. is in
dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 17th
December 2008. David Thain of Amer.Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, PO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator
of RELIC LTD. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their address and particulars
of their debts to the Liquidator before the 17th January 2009.


.em '. '

idaor



Legal Notice


NOTICE


RELIC LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 RELIC LTD. is in
dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 17th
December 2008. David Thain of Amer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, PO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator
of RELIC LTD. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their address and particulars
of their debts to the Liquidator before the 17th January 2009.




J i uidator


FROM page 1B

concerns, but right now there
does not appear to be anything
major in this jurisdiction".
However, Mr Deveaux then


said the Securities Commission
had "seen a reduction in the
number of funds licensed in this
jurisdiction" and a correspond-
ing "increase in Recognised
Foreign Funds".


Counsel and Attorney-at-Law,
Notary Public


Carol D. Misiewicz

Would like to inform the Pubic of their
Christmas Season Hours:
Monday, December 22nd, and Tuesday,
December 23rd
OPEN Normal Business Hours
Wednesday, December 24th,
through Friday, December 26th
CLOSED
Monday, December 29th
and Tuesday, December 30th
OPEN Normal Business Hours
mf.TX, Valans, IEi7A UVXoa -.rQna'1n Thor.t sko s I t
N1IO Y0. aOYtaltaUyLIAL~~.I.' '


eqw /o ear s ve e lunesuay, JeceL. IIIUtI J i
OPEN Until 4:00pm

January, 1st 2009 and January 2nd. 2009
CLOSED
Office re-opens January 5th 2009
Normal Business Hours


The management and staff would like to wish
all a safe and Happy Holidays
Contact the Nassau Office at
(242) 328-0396 or Fax (242) 328-1388
Suite No. 7 Grosvenor Close Grosvenor Close and Shirley
Street, P.O. Box SS-5467 Nassau, The Bahamas
Email: carol.misiewicz@gmail.com
www.misiewiczlaw.com


RFFs are investment funds
that are incorporated and
licensed in other jurisdictions,
or listed on exchanges in pre-
scribed jurisdictions (those
countries with equivalent anti-
money laundering and anti-ter-
ror financing laws to the
Bahamas), but have some kind
nexus to this nation, usually
because they are administered
by Bahamian fund administra-
tors.
For example, an RFF may be
incorporated in the British Vir-
gin Islands, licensed in the Cay-
man Islands but administered
from the Bahamas. All RFFs
have to be registered with the
Securities Commission, as do
Bahamian-licensed funds.
Included in the latter category
are the various fund types cre-
ated by the Investment Funds
Act 2003 the Standard Fund,
the Professional Fund and the
various SMART fund tem-
plates.
Meanwhile, the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange (BISX) told Tribune
Business that it expected to see
"minimal growth" in its invest-


NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF
COHAN INTERNATIONAL LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, COHAN INTERNATIONAL
LTD. is in Dissolution. The date of commencement
of dissolution was December 17th 2008. Macgregor
Robertson of 308 East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas
is the Liquidator of COHAN INTERNATIONAL
LTD.


Macgregor Robertson
Liquidator


Foreign fund boost



aiding financial sector


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, QUINCY ROLLE
JR. of RO. Box N-1915, Market Street, Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to TARVAN LINTON
SYMONETTE JR. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas, no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.




NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF
LONTUE INVESTMENTS LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, LONTUE INVESTMENTS
LTD. is in Dissolution. The date of commencement
of dissolution was December 12th 2008. Macgregor
Robertson of 308 East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas is
the Liquidator of LONTUE INVESTMENTS LTD.


Macgregor Robertson
Liquidator






NOTICE

EXXON BOLIVIA TUICHI LIMITED



Creditors having debts or claims against the
above-named Company are required to send particulars
thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624,
Nassau, Bahamas on or before 13th day of January,
A.D., 2009. In default thereof they will be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 19th day of December A.D., 2008.



MaryBeth Taboada
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.




NOTICE

EXXON BOLIVIA TUICHI LIMITED

N 0 T I C E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) EXXON BOLIVIA TUICHI LIMITED is in dissolution
under the provisions of the International Business Companies
Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on
the 18th day of December, 2008 when its Articles of Dissolution
weresubmitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is MaryBeth
Taboada of 16945 Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060,
U.S.A.
Dated the 19th day of December, 2008.



HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY
MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named
Com pany


-FG CAPITAL MARKETS


C F A L'" 0 ( C.) L C) N ,1* A. L
'.' :'. .STED & TRADED SECUFilTlES AS OP
:;' i. FIAY, 19 DECEMBER 2008
B Ax-L L'IJI, t EXJn 2ca..LOe 1.713.08 I CHO 0.17 I %-:aCHG 0.01 1 VTD -3s3er67 YTD v. -17.11
.. ..1 -3 i CLOi. 828 1 I YTD -12 9"/% 2007 28 29%?
..'"" tgt Ad MA. OOM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
52A.k-HlI 52dKn.LonV Securat y Prei.,.us. Cr.ae T.oa, 5 Close '-.h-.an.ge Deail *1 EPS S Dr. P E YleVi
1.95 1.55 Aoaco r. araet. 1 1 0- 1 i:1:1* r:i ': r0.. O 2. d "0:4
11.80 11.685 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 11.80 0.00 0.992 0.200 11.9 1.69%
9.68 7.64 Bank of Bahamas 7.64 7.64 0.00 0.319 0.160 23.9 2.09%
0.99 0.66 Benchmark 0.66 0.66 0.00 -0.877 0.020 N/M 3.03%
3.74 3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.152 0.090 20.7 2.86%
2.65 1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 0.040 43.1 1.69%
14.15 12.05 Cable Bahamas 14.03 14.03 0.00 1.255 0.240 11.2 1.71%
3.15 2.83 Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83 0.00 0.118 0.040 24.0 1.41%
8.50 4.80 Commonwealth Bank (81) 7.00 7.00 0.00 0.446 0.310 16.7 4.43%
6.59 1.88 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.62 2.78 0.16 0.111 0.052 25.0 1.87%
3.00 2.27 Doctor's Hospital 2.55 2.55 0.00 0.240 0.040 10.6 1.57%
8.10 6.02 Famguard 7.80 7.80 0.00 0.535 0.280 14.6 3.59%
13.01 11.87 Finco 11.87 11.87 0.00 0.666 0.520 17.8 4.38%
14,66 10.45 FIrstCarlbbean Bank 10.45 10.45 0.00 0.682 0.450 15.3 4.31%
6.04 5.01 Focal (S) 5.19 5.19 0.00 120 0.337 0.170 16.4 3.28%
1.00 1.00 Focal Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1.00 0.33 Freeport Concrete 0.33 0.33 0.00 0.035 0.000 9.4 0.00%
8.20 5.50 ICD Utilltiles 6.13 6.13 0.00 0.407 0.300 15.1 4.89%
12.50 8.60 J. S. Johnson 11.10 11.10 0.00 0.952 0.620 11.7 5.59%
1000 10 00 Premier Real Estate 10 00 10 00 0.00 0.180 0.000 55.6 0.00%
S- ,' :I C' Ti T SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing oases)
652a.t-HI- 52 ka-Low Securllty Sy ,mbo l ..as Si.ae .-a..20 C.arla I1 Ir-le -eelr Ialurt'.
1000 00 117000 00 FIdelly Bank Nole 17 Searle At FBB 17 7 1 C.-ic.er 2.1
100000 100.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Serles B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 50 7% 30 May 2013
.'0, GOCO 100000 Fidaiit, Bank Note 16 (Serie. D) IBBI1 10? o.. 2 00 Prime 1 '5 29 QMa.. 2015
" -.-. -.-. -..' *. -"% ". PI ld a l lty O v e r- T h e C o u n lt r S a. u ri io.e
52. .-.H, 52wk.Low Symbol arl s AtB3k A La ..1 -i o .'.ee-i, '.' EPS C I. I Pr E'.lola
14.60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 1 5 A., I.1 ... .:, ..- 1 0 01 3C, NI r. 2 0- .,
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 N/M 7.80%/
054 020 RND Holdlr.gs 0 3E O-10 n 3i 0001 0000 2 -51 O1" 0O
. j;" .-l .'.'.*., :'-"r.'..n i. ". coiln Over-The-Counter seouarllles,
4100 2900 ABDAB 35 15 _I ._':. 2-C... 51r u 0E006l L; :, C C-.. : '.
14.00 14.00 Bahamas Suoermarkets 12.45 13.35 14.00 -0.041 0.300 N/M 2.40%
066 C 40 RND t-Gran e 45 ,, '--, ,: 0 ,5,, .. :,:, 2 Z * ,,
.6 '"r -R" .' BISX L.ited MIlutual Fundst
52-k.r-ai 52-. .L., F-rtd Name NA TD :: Las' I r er.1 Oi. I3 ENA Date
I 345_ 1 2827 Co.lna Bona Fund 1 3.1 1.1 .a. E..' 3.3.t.- .. C8
3.0351 2.9522 Collna MSI Preferred Fund 2.9522 -1.62 -1.27 30-Nov-08
1.4305 1.3663 Colina Money Market Fund 1.4305 4.02 4.69 5-Dec-08
3.7969 3.4931 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.4931 -8.00 -15.79 30-Nov-08
12.5597 11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.5597 5.25 5.73 30-Nov-08
100.2421 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.2421 0.24 0.24 30-Sep-08
100.9600 96.7492 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.7492 -3.25 -3.25 30-Sep-08
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00 31-Dec-07
10.5000 9.0775 Fidelity Internatlonal Investment Fund 9.0775 -13.55 -13.55 30-Nov-08
1.0264 1.0000 FPG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0264 2.64 2-64 31-Oct-08
1.0289 1.0000 FPG Financial Growth Fund 1.0289 2.89 2.89 31-Oct-08
1.0287 1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0287 2.87 2.87 31-Oct-08
MARKET TERt.1S
52wk-Hl Highest closing price In last 2 weeks Bid BuyinS price of Colin tar FlIIollty
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 week Ask $ Sellin pri. of 1 Co1lln n an- ftdolity
Previous Close PrevIous day'a weighted pHca for daily volume Last Price 1 l-tL Irudd co ver-the-cou-r1ter price
Today's Croe Current day' weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol Tradin volume of the prior we.k
Ch g- hano In oloslng price from dayt dy EPS A comp ny's oporlod elarnln per share for th. Iot 12 m-thn
Dally Vol. Number of total sha, traded today NAV Not Arrol Valto
DIV S Dividends per share paid In the lrat 12 months N/M Not Mo annoful/
P/IE Closin price divided by the lart 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bl-hlmaoB Stock Index Jonuary 1. 1994 100
(1) 4-for-1 StocSplilo-t Eftectlve Dat 8/81/2007
TO ETLDE IArL., C OLIN a1a -TO1l FIDELITY 43-356- 'e6 i Fr- C.P'TAL r I aRKETS 242-3JB-4000 I COLONI.:,L 242-502 752E
.', V -., .


BUSINESS I


IN(


ment fund listings during 2009
as a result of th likely hedge
fund industry fallout from the
global financial crisis.
To date, BISX has some 22
investment fund listings, and
while still attracting listings
interest, expects growth to be
more muted than in the past,
especially in the 2009 first half.
"The industry has taken a
beating in terms of returns,"
Keith Davies, BISX's chief
executive, told Tribune Busi-
ness. "Believe it or not, we've
gotten a number of new
inquiries regarding listings.
"Some of our existing issuers
in the industry are planning to
create more funds, and the
intention is to list them. But the
indication from the markett is
minimal growth, and we don't
expect to see much.happening.
It's going to take several months
before we see growth from
mutual funds from a listing per-
spective.
"Although we're getting
interest, it's not as strong as in
the past. We expect there to be
a lull for the next three to six
months to next year."


- I A *OM* *











m 5
CL c ~C-)
cr/)



r tJ 2 ., ,A i .k > i, --. ' i , 1 * , .' ,
-04


,o'^.-a -o -.. ^ -" a," , SiT ' ", ,T.-1 '.^'-,' ^ ,N *. 1 S ']
. ': | 3 ',, .' .. . .''* r S f-' -1 '.., .. *
~ =r

| i +=.. i. .| -'r3 ,' ." C__" -. <*'" U ( ,

(I n N, 0 ||
^ , 0 e n 0 ,^ -% I -O "1 -- ^" _ __ H.
eA CD .) S


-e al o -C ID 2
8W '_j r-CD









-oc^ o o LI*' *^ l llA NI *
,.G C,__LA
C-SD

. .- -. ' .' . .."-.' .. '..? .... .. .. ..- -.. 8,
....................................................................................................





m -0 I



"W I".' .-, a' - _". . lT .-'.,. _. '.n i g J
'- o -+ o 3 . |
*'00 CCDOm 10 d"k








.. .+ .,, '. 0 S. ,, .- .. ... _i hi -Sl ----I, ,:.- -I .. .
+ C I Cii 0 1 d i 01+ & ++ I CD+"m" +. ++ I
a, c to--- .-)" . c.. .-"



C .2 W D 0a t

Z (3i M .- -M c7 I n .



-c C L0C1C
C c c0 c C C. C_.C,





















B i Ii
















' C oi i. -^ -^ ^ ^ ,og o e OB o ~ C ,j ^O .[i~r '^Q o cio ,C 01 01 o en o o__.j^^ n i T c oo -lj c ,^^ _- ___j ^
-- = = m E nn -


























lii 44 1 H r Iiiii.*
-,. aI c
o: M C,"- ,- : -.-. o r~ r.i ,o-"o -














.- o a U . -.
























' "S r' " -'. ''1 +-n M --L r v> "-. tn in (i "- o _a "- o ^ ii c ^ n o r n i o g ii u -a ci i .i n / .i i c -o / 'i i o .- i ii t c ^ -i ^ ^ ^ H'l
SI^fl~ 0 0 0 0 0 2* I ,0.
CL






*_o-T--E;: _'_: D0. 0
. _S 1 <= -- r .
__i -= m .. CD == =
93 Or
=ra a T, C_ W :7 2 > 02 to NL











%- = !.: I r': +. 0I oi + 0 i i
to. CA. . . . M

c o n :r -= o n'
Z CDC,


C)C) 0D -4 .- g i O.C 5-i '- C 0C C
- CD --C ,l = . . ..g
-.]. .X N :r.





-Z4 .o 9o5
C1 C. 0 DC















..C -. .J ..) '.. 01,-) 01 CD J0 C=
C, C. cn ,3I0In "0











0i .1N CJ...oi N CD _D CDoDC.., "DO 0E] ICD"I" "I" I "i1 I a~n 010 I
-C).~l ~ ~C.oJ. ..i .. , + __I~~i .
,% 0 j c -_ E.
W -4 .--4- mCIA I". C.3In L"
















L" t."mDI-.m cm o1 m U CD m
20 m I,!l .0 Ci.C-D. U i ) 1OCI .) .limI










Ci C C C i ) C,,,iici D CDDD'D C C i m l "'mC:-.CD mi .D C Cm i + in e i
03 n ,4 B .. f I I I Ii


C.,,C Se a- c,-w' w Iw r-IcI



























IVI
Ee. .C Q C 03 -. 10 )







01 .. =+o CD CD o oCCDi -. NJ = CD . . CD oo==. .o .o = =DU= -o l + --CD
-w w izi '3i OE 2' 0 0
CD'-C 9 P. C- L
























..... __ S __


.....r,,- ,- ,,,, .p u .bo rj' j ~ 1 j ~ )~0 ~ 0 N ),m O,., . ... -. r ?rj' J...", -C -J CDm
cn m n m Go i CDl C2I 4C






























I CD



.C22oCD C z

CDCLC C
C2 CS'10
I ~0~PEr
C2 C2 Er


*,3,9




b0091
I Ct II 0 i 0 IIC?.
00co CD 00CD i


090

c"T"
i mWm .oC D IC=) CDCD C3
,cm'o0



(AI,., .Im


/







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


'ID


M-. Vw "pid (St, Vincent and the Grenadines)
Winner
Mrs. Veolant Cupid is a true gem in her community and is the epitome of an Unsung Hero. She hes
sacrificed money, time and self to the villages of Lauders and Lowmans Windward, where she is a
household name and has touched the lives of many, from infancy to adulthood.
A devoted Christian, Veolant continues to open her home to disadvantaged children and be active
in her local church. For the past 13 years, Veolant has organised a special appreciation service for
Police Officers thanking them for their hard work in keeping the schools, homes and communities
r safe. These services have been so successful that Veolant has commenced appreciation services for
ui the Nurses and Teachers as well.


Mr. Thomas.Watts (Barbados)
Runner Up
Mr. Thomas Watts (right) has for the past 29 years been working to reintegrate convicts released from
prison back into mainstream Barbadian society. He used his own income to establish this Programme and
has continued to fund it from his pension as a retired person. With no reward other than the joy of seeing
someone set free from the vicious cycle of recidivism, he has opened his home and heart to a group of
persons which many in society prefer to shun. Former inmates have worn his clothes, eaten his food, slept
in his bed, and as if becoming at one with their plight he has empathised with and embraced them when
they had nowhere else to turn.


Mrs. Patsy Thomas (Dominica)
Runner Up
The work of Patsy Thomas is truly remarkable. Inspired by the pre-school education she had been denied,
she used her own scarce funds to start a movement to provide pre-school education for the children of
Crayfish River, a destitute community in the Carib Territory overwhelmed by poverty and a remarkable
deficiency in the standard of education. She has earned great respect of the people of the Carib Territory
who are eager to point out that her selfless work has given the community a new perspective into the
usefulness of all people, including the physically and mentally challenged.


Ms. Gwendolyn E.M. Chambers (Antigua)
Special Commendation Award
SAs a lover of children, Ms Gwendolyn Chambers, known as "Aunty Gwen", made a commitment early in
her life, to establish an orphanage to care for the less fortunate children in her community. Selfless,
committed and passionate, she established her orphanage in the late 1960's, opening the doors to her home.
To date she has adopted and cared for at least fourteen less fortunate children who are now qualified
midwives, nurses, bankers, pediatricians and renowned musicians all who attribute their success to
Aunty Gwen, "without whom I would be nothing".


- .A',-M


www.firstcaribbean bank.com


FIRSTCARI BBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.


"9


Unsung m
Hero


.- -,.;. : "-,? ;k -rtifl T
:o .-.. .;-. .__...B ,,


-- i.

iM
*'*^ .-^ '^ ;








MONDAY, DECEMBER 22,2008


The stories behind the news


Every year, Insight hands out its Christmas Honours to the good, bad, smart, dumb

and crazy -. all in the spirit of the season of goodwill. Here's the 2008 line-up...


* By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor


BEST EXAMPLE
OF THE YEAR
BARACK OBAMA gets this' award hands-
down because he won the US presidency with
style, vision and grace.
Apart from thinking there are 57 states in the
USA he must have got the number confused
with Heinz Foods' famous 57 varieties he was
flawless in content and presentation as he pow-
ered to The White House.
Let's hope Bahamian politicians can follow his
example of true leadership, honest ideals and
unshakeable integrity, if indeed he manages to
become everything he has promised.
And let's hope they pick up something from his
smooth oratorical style, which puts him right up
there alongside the great public speakers of the
past.
They have about as much chance of doing all
these things as an ice-cube has of surviving on a
hot griddle but, hey, it's the time of the year
when we can all dream a little.

THE NOT SAYING WHAT
YOU MEAN AWARD
ACTING Customs comptroller Anthony
Adderley wins this prize after apparently showing
such heartlessness following the fire which
destroyed the home of his colleague Roslyn
Ritchie.
Adderley effectively told fellow officers that, if
they can't stand the heat,.they should get out of
the kitchen and go work elsewhere.
We now learn there was a sub-text to this extra-
ordinary statement.
What he would have liked to say, according to
some colleagues, is that he is so overwhelmed by
evidence of corruption all around him that he
doesn't know where to turn next.
But he couldn't actually say that, could he?

BEST-LOOKING
DISASTER OF THE YEAR
INSIGHT famously described her mouth as
being."as enticing as a bowlful of sugared rasp-
berries", but good looks did not save Sarah Palin
from this award, which marks her calamitous
debut in American national politics.
John McCain's truly awful error in picking this
woman as his running mate will haunt him until
his dying day.
Palin proved to be so dumb and ill-informed
that every utterance was painful to behold. Yet
she's still out there peddling her wares as a poten-
tial presidential runner in 2012.
"She just doesn't get it, does she?" one observ-
er wailed as Mrs Palin blundered through yet
another self-promoting press conference long
after McCain had headed for the hills.
Afraid not. But then dumb people never do.

THE DULL AS
DITCHWATER
AWARD
THIS goes to the FNM Cabinet, a collection of
incredibly lacklustre politicians who give Insight
little or nothing to write about.
Some are busy getting on with the job, we'll
grant them-that, but surely someone in there can
say or do something original, provocative or even
outrageous from time to time, if only to show us
they're still alive.


BARACK OBAMA won the US presidency with style, vision and grace...


OOPS AWARD FOR
PUBLIC GAFFE
OF THE YEAR
DAME Joan Sawyer has long been admired for
her legal prowess "I have a lot of time for-her,"
one respected attorney has told Insight more
than once but her public outburst against justice
campaigner Tanya Cash was not one of her gold-
en moments.
"You are a disgrace to Bahamian woman-
hood," the judge told Mrs Cash who had gently
suggested she should recuse herself from the case
being heard at the time.
Then Dame Joan compounded her error by
suggesting Mrs Cash was not the equal of the
court I was always under the impression that
the courts are 'people's courts' and actually
asked about her level of education.
Well, I don't know how many BAs, MAs, LLBs
and PhDs Mrs Cash has, but I do know she is a
very smart, clued-up lady.
And she certainly knows her way around the
legal process, as the courts have learned to their
considerable disquiet.
So I beg to differ, m'lud. Far from being a dis-
grace to Bahamian womanhood, Mrs Cash is one
of the most admirable women around.


CLEAN-AS-A-WHISTLE
AWARD FOR INTEGRITY
OFFERED, with less than total conviction, to
Bahamas Customs Department, which has been
exposed as allegedly the most corrupt govern-
ment department of all, which is really saying
something.
We'll all be watching carefully to see who
among them gets a $100,000 Lexus for Christ-
mas. Or, even better, a 20-room mansion with
remote-controlled gates and an indoor pool and
jacuzzi. Complete with solid gold bath taps, of
course.
And we'll be checking to see if there is a sea-
sonal run on Rolex watches, one of the favourite
trinkets of the Customs backsliders as they fleece
the Bahamas and its people.
Insight will be relying on its friends inside Cus-
toms the decent folk among the trash for
more tantalising information during 2009.

STRAIGHT AND
NARROW AWARD
HAVING veered off-course with the PLP (he
quit the party because Perry Christie wouldn't
stand down as leader) Kenyatta Gibson lost his


bearings again this year by ploughing his SUV
through a chainlink fence on East Bay Street,
cutting his head in the process.
Gibson, now an independent MP, has become
an Honours List veteran, having first appeared
after finding himself on the-wrong end of a fist-
fight with fellow attorney Keod Smith.
Can chaos-prone Kenyatta make it three in a
row?

JUNKANOO SHUFFLER
OF THE YEAR
SAY what you like about
Perry Gladstone Christie
MP, his feet are faster than
those of his foes when it
comes to keeping his lead-
ership hopes alive.
While would-be rivals for
the PLP's top job have been
waltzing round the leader-
ship issue like men with two
left feet, Christie has been
shimmying and shuffling into
a powerful striking position
for next year's party convention.
Having been written off as leader after the
2007 general election, Christie now has at least an
even chance of being top dog in time for the next
campaign in three years time.
Don't be fooled by his talk of organising the
succession. The famed Junkanoo shuffler ain't
out of it yet!

JOKER OF THE YEAR
JUST when we thought
former foreign affairs min-
ister Fred Mitchell would
miss out on this year's hon-
ours, he announced his'
intention to run for the PLP
leadership, thus securing
himself the title Joker of the
Year for the third year run-
ning.
It's hard to be so idiotic, so
utterly ridiculous, that this
prize comes your way so
many times, but Mitchell's unique combination of
soaring self-regard and congenital ineptitude has
provoked so much laughter over so many years
that he remains the only serious contender.
The fact that he is even being considered for the
PLP's top slot does, however, pose many extreme-
ly pointed questions for the PLP, thr main one
being: If the nation's number one joker is in the
running for the leadership, what does that say
about the rest of your party?
The only consolation to be drawn from this is
that Mitchell's support system is so weak a
few disaffected losers and layabouts on the fringe
of the party that he is unlikely to get the job.

BACKSEAT
ROMP AWARD
(Joint winners)
TWO PLP parliamentarians share this award,
which is offered for the first time this year, but is
expected to become a regular feature.
One was "grabbing for his jockeys" their
words when caught in flagrant by patrol cops in
the back of his car with a floozie.
The other, a lawyer, was.giving a woman client
legal advice in his car while parked at Arawak
Cay in the early hours of the morning.
Actually, this explanation is apparently com-
pletely plausible as the lady in question, a non-tax-
able nightworker by all accounts, sleeps all day to
regain strength for her physically demanding

SEE page 2C


of Life!


-


Q. .


With a new engine and bigger payload. Suzuki's
APV still gives legendary fuel efficiency in three
versions pick-up, panel van or passenger van.


The Best



._-j-


ON-THE-SPOT-FINA


7L


Small Commercial Vehicle

More space, more comfort, more
convenience less fuel cost.



QUALITY e

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 325-3079
NCING waj-*l*wwmwlI w...*.. wmitl *> l


I


I '.. 1-1, 1-








PAGE 0, MNDAY DECMBER22, 008IHESTIBUN





I~Y~I~a.T* -s


,- or when run d


WASi titv s DpIr0


* Minadex contains a natural orange flavour that children.
will love

* Suitable for children from 6 months


* Available in 200ml and 400ml


SBuilds up children fast


1 occupation.
"It was a kind of briefing ses-
sion," one legal wag comment-
ed mischievously. "She was
briefing him, and he was de-
briefing her."
COMEDY TURN
OF THE YEAR
ANOTHER ever-present in
the honours list scores highly
again this year.,
Step forward Bishop Neil
Ellis, preacherman extraordi-
naire, whose Sunday night
shows remain the best thing on
Bah'amian television (not say-
ing much, admittedly).
Ellis's sermons are so Tivet-
ing, so hilarious, so unbeliev-
ably absurd, that I'm left qhok-
ing into my bedtime qbocoa
every weekend.
"It does you no good at all
watching that stuff," lectures
my dear wife, who believes my
pressure and sugar go up every
time Ellis begins rasping into
the microphone.
The finger-pointing, brow-
mopping, and bouncing up and
down on the spot are only part
-of it. It's when.the Rev does his
pulpit pirouette that I'm left.
helpless, especially when the
cameras then cut to the congre-
gation, scores of big-hipped
ladies swaying and swooning to
his words like drug-crazed
groupies.
Broadway has nothing on this
Sunday night spectacular, par-


ticularly the lady who blows a
referee's whistle every time the
excitement gets the better of
her. Priceless stuff!
FORGIVE AND FOR
GET AWARD
(Gold Medal)
HOWARD K STERN and
Larry Birkhead were seen
laughing and joking together at
Nassau's Outback Restaurant,
having once roundly con-
demned each other in the courts
as they battled for paternity
rights over Anna Nicole Smith's
baby, Dannielyn.,
The now gorgeous toddler
was with the pair as they wolfed
down kangaroo steaks and
koala soup, or whatever it is the
Aussies serve up for Thanks-
giving lunch.
"They looked very happy
together," said a fellow diner.
Good on yer mates, as they say
down under.
FORGIVE AND
FORGET AWARD
(Silver Medal)
HAVING been cruelly lam-
pooned in the now infamous
Leilagate scandal in 2006, for-
mer Cabinet minister Neville
Wisdom had no good reason to
love Insight.
But as he tooted his horn at
last year's Junkanoo parade, the
perspiring ex-minister all
done up in crepe paper suit and


funny hat took time out to
shake us by the hand as we
watched from behind a Bay
Street barrier.
There's nothing quite like the
season of goodwill for letting
bygones be bygones.
THE LEAST
FORTHCOMING
POLITICIAN
OF THE YEAR
ONLY one contender for this
title Dr Bernard Nottage, the
quiet man of Bahamian politics,
who refuses to say what he
wants, where he's going or how
he's going to get'there.
Everyone keeps talking about
Nottage as a possible PLP
leader except the man himself,
who is so deeply wary of the
press that he believes silence is
the best policy whenever tack-
led by reporters about his polit-
ical ambitions.
Well, it probably is the best
policy for mime artists, chief
librarians and Tibetan monks,
but would-be presidents and
prime ministers need to say
something once in a while. (See
Barack Obama, above he
hasn't stopped talking for two
years).
TRAGIC FIGURE
OF THE YEAR
NO joking this time. Unhap-
SEE page 5C


NASSAU, BAHAMAS

Centrally Located At Union Wharf

Sailings Twice Weekly

Departures Every Thursday & Saturday

Arrivals Every Friday & Sunday

* LCL / FCL / Vehicles / Heavy Equipment

* Full Container Load Pickups throughout Florida
& the U.S.

* Private Terminal with Flexible Gate Hours
Centrally Located in Ft. Pierce, FL


RATES, BOOKINGS AND INFORMATION
(772) 465.7700
WWWSHIPACLCOM

Local Agent
ACL Bahamas Ltd., Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 322-1158 Fax: (242) 326-4206


AS L OOw(


vhile supplies last) .
hA. b: J 1 W L 1 1 1.ii i i > .. i .


THE TRIBUNE


Fbrep Convenivat Delivefy & Consolidotion Locations to Choose From

MIAMI WAREHOUSE PORT OF FT PIERCE FT LAUDERDALE
WAREHOUSE
9999 NN, 89th Avenue 100 Terminal Drive
Bays It! & 19 Ft. Piercv% Fl. 34950 941 SM, 21 st Torrace,
Medley, F-L 333119 Tel: 772-465-7700 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
Tol, -30SM2- 1088 Fax: 772-46S-7731 Tel: 954-792-3130
Fax: 30-88M012 Fax: 954-792-2503


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008














Readers have their say...


Re: Hard

Pressed (The

future of

newspapers)
I READ your column this
morning with the same pleasure
I usually have when reading you
and I am more optimistic than
you about your profession.
Every day I read the Bahami-
an press on paper and my
French newspaper online.
The reason why I read "Le
Monde" online is simply
because I cannot get it on paper
here even though I still prefer a
traditional newspaper.
I agree with you that news-
papers on paper support are
probably going to disappear for
technical, economical and eco-
logical reasons but the need for
reliable news will always exist
and most of what goes around
the internet are rumours on
rumours without the screening
and research work that consti-
tute the journalism basics.
1 am able to find errors in the
most serious publication so I
don't even bother considering
the value of what comes from
unknown sources.
The economical model has
still to be perfected and the
online neNwspapers of the future
will probably not have the same
staff organisation as the current
ones but there will always be a
need for people who say dis-
agreeable but verified facts.
Thank you for your columns.
Thliierry Boeuf

HAVING been a newspaper.
reader for more than 40 years, I
feel sad that this medium is now
in its final "two or three
decades", as you predict,
because I don't think they will
ever be replaced in the true
sense of the word.
I know the information will
be available via computer
screens, but we shall be
deprived of the handiness and
portability of a newspaper,
which one can stuff in a bag or
pocket so much more easily
than is possible with a PC.
The one uplifting point in
your very interestingJnsight.s .
was that The Tribune is likely to
be with us for some time yet, at
least 50 years I hope,
S Hill, Nassau

I'D like to think you're
wrong, but I can't see any way
out for newspapersr. A' whole
generation is now being reared
without them. I have no doubt
they will suffer because online
papers don't quite hack it in my
view. The death of newspapers
willmnean the rise of ignorance.
A L Petty

'ONE hostile newspaper is
more to be feared than a thou-
sand bayonets' said Napoleon
Bonaparte.
'One hostile personal com-
pufer'is more to be feared etc'
doesn't have quite the same ring
to it, does it?
Helen Bannister

IT is a tragedy that newspa-
pers find themselves in such a
plight because they are, with-
out, doubt, the best value-for-
money items anyone can imag-
ine. The Tribune costs a third of
the price of a cup of Starbucks
coffee, yet contains so much
more to savour.
Devoted reader

Miscellaneous
Dear Mr Marquis,
This is my first time writing to
you, in spite of the many Insight
stories I have read. .
I am compelled to beg you
please don't leave this country
and don't retire frotn writing.
If you do life will be for me a
very boring period.
I look forward to reading
Insight every Monday morning'
and have been doing so for
almost two years and have cut
out all the stories you have
penned during this time.
If you really have to leave,
please, before you go, I would
wish you would do a story on
Bahamasair and its unfair prac-
tice that is meted out towards
the Espanic passengers that
travel here to Nassau in route to
Havana, Cuba.
Case in point: I can buy a
round trip ticket on Delta to
California making a connecting


flight in Atlanta, Georgia, on
the same airline and upon my
arrival in California all my bag-
gage are accounted for, for one
fare.
Here in Nassau the Espanic
passengers have to pay two sep-
arate fares for them to go to
Havana, a fare from Florida to
Nassau and when they arrive
another fare for Nassau to
Havana. Why can't the fare be


s', e .. ,v ",' -

,: ..- : ,, ., ^ .- ... ," ,


Newspaperst" e r struggeS as Internet takes it IOU
S newspaper LOOMY prediiccinsabout
110 co onplace! e
Or ,. I \ ulh a'tioll,


,,,e, -,. c h the r tl pt
.,.,,r 'e h, L Present
L .7....... ... /G heos.
A.


'',..'.-


....... ... : .




o. C_ .. i* Giller 4 X


all-inclusive?
Then there is the problem
with the baggage. If they want
them to go to Cuba there is
another charge, including a
charge for excess. When ques-
tioned the airline's reply is that
"it's not-an International flight"
therefore.the passengers can-.
not p a,ne.fa.ria Fldrida foij
the entire'trip to'Cubai' .'
Secondly, there are"a'f161
unscrupulous check-in clerks
who charge the Espanic pas-
sengers an additional charge on
top of the extra charge they pay
for the additional piece of lug-
gage they may be carrying.
Thirdly, there is a particular
person who goes into the depar-
ture lounge after the passengers
have checked in to see how
many carry-on luggage .the
Espanic passengers are carry-
ing in spite of the fact that there
is a special red tag attached to
the passenger's carry-on bag-
gage authorising them to do so.
This particular manager/officer
inquires of the passengers to
determine how many pieces of
carry-on they may have. If there
is more than one she takes it
away from the passenger only to
have them follow her back out
of the pre-cleared lounge area
and, once out of sight, she
charges the passenger $50 for
that piece of carry-on luggage
and gives no receipt to the pas-
senger.
I have witnessed this hap-,
pening several times. As a mat-
ter of fact this person has tar-
geted two Espanic ladies, one
from Florida and the other a
resident of Nassau. After wit-
nessing this on three of my trips
to Cuba I made it my business
td talk with the two ladies and
to get from them as much infor-
mation as possible so as to
inform you about this type of
situation with the hope that you
would find out what's going on
and expose it. Maybe-those
Espanic passengers Who now
travel via the Dominican
Republic to Cuba, may once
return and ease the burden we
taxpayers have to keep the
national flag-carrier aloft.
Private Eye

I sympathise with Regular
Insight Reader:- what is going
to happen when you leave?
I look forward to reading
Insight every Monday; it is part
of my antidote for the Monday
blues.
Here's a thought: have you
ever thought about having an
ongoing series of interviews
with ordinary and extraordinary
folk who live in the Family
Islands? You may well be pleas-
antly surprised at how good this
would be for The Tribune and
The Bahamas. And it would
also, serve to spotlight our many
populated Islands with their
potential for sustainable devel-
opment.
Montell Fox
(my pen name)


Of course you have a right to
retire, but I am one among
many who will be deeply sad-
dened by your departure as I
believe you are the one person
standing between Bahamian
society and legal and political
chaos.
Comment from customer
in Nassau resturant
2 '''-,*n-^-


EVERY DAY

VALUE.
ALL DAY. EVERY DAY.


FORONLY





FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!


AT PARTICIPATING STORES


Spicy Italian Tuna. Veggie Delite. Turkey Breast. Black Forest Ham

Cold Cut Combo Meatball Marinara. Italian BMIT, BLT











S 2008 DAI


I


INSIGHT


Ma"
L.am






THE TRIBUNE-,


PAGE 4C, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008
.: ,? ',;* "


.4


/;


4lo


L


I :. ..,'o .,; "


! ...


b <~ ~'
'4.,


"My work at The Tribune is rewarding
and challenging. I enjoy contributing
to the look of our newspaper while
meeting the needs of our advertisers.


I am proud to work here. The
Tribune is my newspaper."


ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE


-~


The Tribune


7/9(


us, b Ut. i-
-L^^


VIP,
A


.* "'.. '*'


4 A .


'j
,, .:' ....









pily, Nassau throws up all too "_"__"_ GOLDEN HEART
many tragedies in a year, but_,-TH-.E-R
the death of Hubert Farrington NOjokehere,either.Animal
sadotaoeotemswelfare campaigner Jane Math-
stands out as one of. the most .
poignant and distressing of ______.___,__-.__,."er is deeply committed to her
poignant and distressing of cause and works tirelessly for
2008. .-,,. -;11 . . . -.


In recent years, Mr Farring-
ton's bent figure, marked by a
very pronounced limp, was one
of the city's most familiar sights
as he trudged along our streets
in the searing heat.
For many people, and partic-
ularly the young, he was just
another Nassau eccentric. But
to those who knew better, he
was one of the most remark-
able Bahamians of the 20th cen-
tury, a gifted dancer who spent.
14 years with the Metropolitan
Opera in New York, and whose


talents were recognised,by some
of the most illustrious ballet fig-
ures of their day.
When he was knocked down
by a hit-and-run driver in Mack-
ey Street last week, the
Bahamas lost one of the most
intelligent members of its cre-
ative community.
His death teaches everyone
who knew him only in his most
recent incarnation a valuable
lesson: things are not always as
they seem.


,e ,,otioD c-i Required'

CELEBRATE WITH THIS EXCITING SCHED
: .-I t Ii ,


~9i'k~.


Upscale Porty FCrvors
AM a VIPBUP.RAMe tg CWDnMniE Co Vr
Si . . . ,


ae Pro d for A .

ape Provi'ded for Ait


cn-artu, Are, i cu ad: ,, Ir e I TOiTO

JNh'v 5w(c b:f
ci~Cos &sOf4?1 .; ' ';^"
. ...* -* -- ". ." '*a'--,;.'' ,"'^ .-';" '
.'. . f ,; ,-, .,* *<* .*i '* ~ *r '- "
-,'.. ,J,...... v ::,,a ,


PATIENCE OF
JOB AWARD
FOR continued stoicism in
the face of enormous provoca-
tion, former Cabinet minister
Leslie Miller gets our vote as


-J| MATLANTIC
=- MEDICAL


he continues to seek justice for
his murdered son, Mario.
, In 2009, Mr Miller opens his
new bowling alley, which will
bear Mario's name. Everyone
will be wishing him enormous
success in his new venture.


SECURITY
&GENERAL


neglected and ill-treatedu crea-
tures. This lady is full of gen-
uine caring and compassion. If
there were only more like her,
what a great place this planet
would be.
HAVE A WONDERFUL
CHRISTMAS EVERYONE!


COLONIAL


The Colonial Insurance Group

will be closing at 12 noon on both


Christmas Eve, Wednesday,

December 24th

and New Years Eve Wednesday,


December 31 st

we wotdR lkize to take this opportunity to wish
All OUR Valued Clients
A vew MerMry Christmwas Happy New yeRr


~4'


4


We're looking for a few good
people to join our team.


DO YOU HAVE

WHAT IT TAKES?

Apply for the position of




Sales Executive



* Must have'prior sales experience
* Must have transportation
* Must have great communication skills
* Must be able to work flexible hours
* Must be computer literate
* Must be able to manage client
accounts/collections and receivables


Please drop off resumes to


The Tribune



Shirley & Deveaux Streets
or email: tribune@tribunemedia.net
c/o Sales Manager


RING IN THE NEW YEAR STUDIO 54 STYLE
WTH OIE OF OUR 3 SENSATIONAl DINNER/SHOW AND &ANCE PACKAGISt

AFTER DINNER PARTY/SHOW CELEBRATION


Iof


Public Utilities Commission



PUBLIC NOTICE

MAGIC.JACK, VONAGE
AND SIMILAR TELEPHONE DEVICES

The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) wishes to inform all retailers
and users of VoIP products that the PUC encourages the legal and
authorised use of VoIP services and devices. Bahamians, in general,
mistakenly believe that any VoIP telephone device sold or used in
North America or elsewhere (such as magicJack or Vonage) is also
allowed in The Bahamas.
Section 35(4) of the Telecommunications Act, 1999, makes it an
offence for anyone to directly or indirectly install a telecommunications
system or telecommunications equipment and/or customer premises
equipment that has not been approved by the Commission to a licensed
Bahamian telecommunications system. This offence is punishable
by a fine often thousand dollars ($10,000).
The PUC wishes to advise retailers and the public that the Commission
has NOT issued any approved standards under Section 15 of the
Telecommunications Act for VolP telephone devices like magicJack
and Vonage.
Unapproved VolP telephone devices allow users to bypass licensed
Bahamian telecommunications systems in breach of the
Telecommunications Act and Sector Policy. This has far-reaching
financial implications for licensed Bahamian telecommunications
providers and on the Bahamian economy.
The PUC will continue investigating all illegal telecommunications
activities in The Bahamas and the public is reminded that such breaches
of the Act are criminal activities that can result in severe penalties.
Further information can be obtained from the Legal Counsel at the
PUC at (242) 322-4437.



MICHAEL J. SYMONETTE
Executive Director
December 12, 2008


MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 5C


Hf E TRIBUNE


I
r
t


T. T,." E 'i .'.-


,65(dle







THE ....


PAGE 6. MONDAY. DECEMBER 22, 2008


S


Tribune Comics


JUDGE PARKER


CALVIN & HOBBES
I'm opnrna pound you G
in gym class, shrimp. -


DENNIS THE MENACE


APT 3-G


BLONDIE
- LISTEN, WHY OH, C'MON,
OON'T WE AGREE OAG, OON'T
NOT TO EXCHANGE SE SUCH A
PRESENTS THIS t SCROOGE'
YEL9 .-,



ij~i 5"


MARVIN


W EHAP A/LIT TV- '
WPEN I WASYOUN."


Sudoku Puzzle


Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday


Kakuro Puzzle


Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is'to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.


Saturday's
Sudoku Answer


3589
7 <4



91412

-1 [3-7


3 1 17

6 819



12 '3


914 2
1 87
613 5
5 -1'44


3 5,1

81 216


Saturday's
Kakuro Answer


7 819 719j6 8 1
37 289 79
49 281719
j25313 -18 419
411 3 2 1 4
2 311 6 319 718
3412 5_11 72,6
7 8161912 8 3;-1


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


CRYPTIC PUZZLE


ACROSS
1 Gather about a hundred facts in'
summary (5)
6 There's a bighead on every
Continental plage (5)
9 What a batsman (but not a
footballer!) may like to be (7)
10 Leonard, charactedised as an eerie
trekker (5)
11 Noted horse the little chap urged
on (5)
12 Aptly forms an aquarium exhibit (5)
S13 Wise men see Capone as
wonderful! (7)
15 Obscure Roman numerals (3)
17 I1 have a little sister at Oxford (4)
18 As a ballroom dance, possibly
leave out "Tango" (6)
19 Old people seemed strange (5)
20 Listed as repaired (6)
22 Basically a fertilizer (4)
24 Instant bronzing? (3)
25 A vessel to sink? (7)
26 Security device left at church (5)
27 A German mug (5)
28 Though saintly, is wrong one day (5)
29 It means a lot (7)
30 Journey to the end of the line for
food (5)
31 Brief rest, perhaps, for an egghead


Friday's cryptic solutions
ACROSS: 9, Sea battle 10, lion tamer 12, Ape-X 13, Scrape 14,
Bet-imes 15, Shape well 17, Say no more 18, (Mor)N(ing)-oodles
19,Runs up 20, Chit 23, Slips away 25, Take turns 26, lays 27,
Al-home 29, Stal-fed 32, R-are even-t 34, Fruitless 35, Gilbe-rn 36,
Obige 37, B-i-e 38, Took steps 39, Over-sight
DOWN: 1, Ass-ass-in 2, bare majority 3, S-ickers 4, De-tail 5,
Sleeps in 6, Bombay ouck 7, Station 8, Prosperc-US 11, M-am-bo
16, Enl-Ist 19, Ray 21, Hardteelings 22, Strail straightl) 23, Sole
rghts 24, Wet weather 25, Tee (lea) 28,Ou-thou-se 29, Snug-gles
30, Dessens (rev) 31, Re-L-ease 32, Roll-0 34, Fell-O-w(eek)


DOWN
2 Shrubs from the Americas (6)
3 A fellow lives with e l;.idsdome
chap (6)
4 At leaving the jiarty, ask questions
(3)
5 Abuse of pills by accident (5)
6 Insects let fee, sunounded by
bees (7)
7 Marginally nervous? (4)
8 Tick on the slate (6)
12 Trimmed, again, in tIe hume
(5)
13 Could be armed force (5)
14 Allocated a soldier a number of
points (5)
15 Given a hand in school, perhaps
(5)
16 Fat girl? (5)
18 The plant Victor has to draw
(5)
19 She may seem alien to me (7)
21 A key plant, for a time (6)
22 Poms may find it unspeakable!
(6)
23 Suffers to become sallow! (6)
25 Go up for a bit of fish (5)
26 Figure a politician will make slow
progress 14)
28 Shot breathlessly in the boozer


FT

-J
N4

CL





I t


Friday's easy solutions
ACROSS: 9, Albatross 10, Bloodworm 12, Corn 13, Euema 14,
Emperor 15, Eavesdiop 17, Idealises 18, Scabies 19, Ejects 20,
Thai 23, Chipolata 25, Persimmon 26, None 27, Panama 29,
Staunch 32, llyweight 34, Alabaster 35, Realism 36, Nudist 37,
Oral 38, Ultimatum 39, Chilblain
downN] Pancreas 2, Abbreviation 3, Concerns 4, Asleep 5,
Abrasive 6, Honey-eater 7, Adeptly 8, Impressior 11, Orris 16,
'Spigot 19, Era 21, Humani n 22, Cicada 23, Ci niferous 24,
Amalgamate 25, Pea 28, Autonomy 29, Sealskin 30, Hireling 31,
Mediums 33, Yeast 34, Adduce


ACROSS
1 Dance (5)
6 Housey-housey
(5)
9 Booze (7)
10 Scottish
landowner (5)
11 Once more (5)
12 Greek letter (5)
13 Dreary (7)
15 Plaything (3)
17 Soon (4)
18 Sale (6)
19 Financial
liabilities (5)
20 Topics (6)
22 Quote (4)
24 Knight's title (3)
25 Aquatic bird (7)
26 Thighbone (5)
27 Perfect (5)
28 Kingdom (5)
29 Speaker's
platform (7)
30 Vagrant (5)
31 Indian dish (5)


Chess


Danm Sadakasov v tmo
A n an.uWoWlCup2005.Fde's
& yla $m ti- koutwas"
ui stlau e lnyMr*atlsk.
StlUwawtine tempr4uPr
of-Caewthe t in ltmo edn
girtwoameiSernMndbefoe
spedachess tibmHaHs, t s at
tootedsoametts or a tottery. But



md i*Mwfte wre d mwt c
witmr of today diagrn went o
to te the trophy ronian, 23a, w
wol about s success, descrnluog
hkmBWas 'a9 sl adccian*o
-y dratiwr baiay'. Hire as Back
( move) he tas level nateial,

*owthewltabng to escape at
g3. MeaRhUthe wim mm
manacesth hpawn. Soa dra? It
took iust two t1ns5 for Aimlasto


DOWN
2 South American
river (6)
3 Yard (6)
4 Not new (3)
5 Mannequin (5)
6 Detests (7)
7 Lady's name (4)
8 Maker of
menswear (6)
12 Noblemen (5)
13 Pub game (5)
14 Let down (5)
15 Soldier's jacket
(5)
16 Asian country (5)
18 Guide (5)
19 Bring to
maturity (7)
21 Hamper (6)
22 Picture house (6)
. 23 Pill (6)
25 Glazing paste (5)
26 Cultivate land
(4)
28 Chafe (3)


8062


7 1
s d I-

4
3 S


Target





AMT



MA T R
mNN E




MTIA


Cbasmi"iMSO2: LB"412Re22Ro32Atd2+
3K3^RZ mat) g* n Wh+te resigned
becaseof3K3Rtd3+fo rng4te3tbe3+StRe3
883 and Btack w nsa piece and the game.


HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here?
In making a word, each letter
may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter
and there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No. plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET I ,
Good 23; very good 34,
excellent 45 (or more).
Solution tomorrow. :
SATURAY'S i ,UTION
IACKCLOT.,'I' barc bath
blah( blotch botch both .satch
chalk chat choc chock 'cloth
coach hack halo halt .hock
holt kohl latch lath loach;
loath loch loth oath


East dealer.
East-West vulnerab
NOR]
4'53
VKQ8
A Q 9
*AQ9
4Q 9
WEST
+Q 1092
VJ954
*J 7
48 5 4
SOUTH
*A4
VY1073
*103
+AK J.
The bidding:
East South
14 24
Pass 3 NT
Opening lead ten
This deal occur
the 2008 U.S. Brid,
to determine the teat
resent America in
Sports Games in Be
The victorious, sqiua
ton, Richard Freema
Jell' Meckstroth. N
Eric Rodwell bes
of 25 teams, but no
to overcomnie a 3
deficit in the deciding
team led by Aubrey
The deal, which i
half rally by the
states the key role j
the highest levels oc
When the hand
Meckstrothl wound


Famous Hand

n i..iriup show \\ ad-West led tlc
le. ten of" spades. M clstrothl dudcld,
THI won Ail s.dcond *p.l ';t :.ud li.he lu.,
clubs. Jtscardinrg tu liciant, and'two
6 diamnonds from dttrmin ,. c .
8 4 East, Lew Mtansbv. could We
what would happen to hun if h4 dis-
EAST carded a spade (S'outhir.could tiqen
4 K,1 8 7. 6, simply concede a te';att the ace to
Y A 2 establish his. ninth triel). so Stansby
K 6 5 2 threw three'low diamonds followed
+7 3. by the heart deuce. l10 hoped these
'H discards might lure declarer into tak-
ing a losing diamond finesse, which
would yield a two-trick set.
But Meckstroth knew' Stansby
10 6 2 had opened the bidding and was cer-
tainly capable of blanking his king of
West North diamonds. So at trick nine, he led a
3 4 Dble diamond to tile ace, selling the king,
and finished with 10 tricks.
of spades. At the other table, Mike Beckcr
ed in the final of' also wound up in three notruimp, but
ge Championship West had not supported spades,
m that would rep- which proved critical during the play.
th(lie World Mind Here, West also led the spade ten.,
eijing in October. ducked by Becker. who wonl the next
d -- Chris Comp- spade and cashed his clubs.
in, Bob Ilanunan, But at this table, Freeman, East.
lick Nickell and discarded two diamonds. a heart and
sted a strong field a spade. Becker no\\ could hate led
t belbore they had a heart to the king to make his con-
3-IMP hafllline tract, but he was afraid last had
Ig match against a started with six spades and still held
Strul. three of them.
aided the second- If this were true, it meant East
\winners, demon- no\\ held the singleton king o' dia-
iudgrnent plays at mnonds, so Becker led a diamond to
I the game. the ace. When the king did not fall,
was first played, the defense had the rest of the tricks
d up in three lor down one and an II-IMP gain.


Tomorrow: The philosophical approach.
,.2008 Kilng I Ec urc S indlic.t I,-


YEAH, DAG, YEAH,
, EXCHANGING GIFTS C'MON,
HAS BECOME A FUN DAG...
14OLIDAY TRADITION /LIGHTEN
*I5 III OUQ LITTLE UP '- UP
SCARPOOL -





.... . ....


S 9.745 8

7

6 7 9 2

3 1 9 7

9 5 7 3

8 4 9 ii





9_ 2761_ i
^ _ _ _51/21


OKAY, FINE! AT LEAST WHOEVER
DRAWS MY NAME HAS TO PROMISE
ALARM CLOCK!
IWELLERE
Co / G


TIGER


FrT


Contract Bridge

by Steve Becker,,


y tluciffi) Level A


'I "




....TRI.UNE.M.NDAY. DECMBE 22 208 AE7
-- .I I I I I!I I I I . I | . .


k Heineken

With every purchase
of a 6-pack,
Enter to win 1 of 15
New Years
Celebration Packsl
.'/ .' --


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY DECEMBER 22. 2008. PAGE 7C




PAGE 80. MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008 THE TRIBUNE


I


S


P P IN


t.AA i I


LIVE


TERTAINMEN


'REE


OOD, DRINKS
AND TREATS


FREE
'TOYS


111


~1,~Aw8Y'
Aft4~ 1~ pin


14A1(


WIN FREE
pOBIN HOOD
r MONEY


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8C, MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008


' ,, ,A,
:',., ^' ,. ,..


,I-.-


B-. Wa


Am.