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The Tribune
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01197
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: December 15, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01197

Full Text









The


Tribune


McFLURRY Im ovin'I

HIGH 81 F
LOW 69F

SUNNY WITH
SSHOWERS


EMBER 15, 2008 PRICE 750







I1


Ten-vear-old hangs


FNM blames PLP


after election


b.. w- court challenges


SIII By ALISON LOWE ment the "almost impossible task
Tribune Staff Reporter of effecting boundary changes and
alowe@tribunemedia.net moving people from one con-
stituency to another in time for
SWITH all election court chal- the election" by not meeting the
Y^ lenges now resolved in the gov- mandated deadline for the


Family in

mourning

after tragic

discovery
* By NATARIO -
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
A FAMILY is
mourning the
death of 10-year-
old boy who
'accidentally'
hung himself
while playing
with the curtain in his living
room.
Henry Theohile, an older
brother of Keno Agustave, who
made the tragic discovery
around 5pm Friday, said Keno
had gone into the living room of
their Charles Vincent Street
home to watch cartoons.
"He must have got bored.
After that he started playing
with the curtain and it wrapped
around his neck. I feel so bad,"
he told The .Tribune.
Amos Theohile, another
brother of the deceased, said:
."I feel horrible. I lost my
youngest brother. He ain't start
his life yet."
Madiane Docius, the child's
mother, told The Tribune yes-
terday that she had just
returned home from work and
was preparing a meal for her
son when she discovered that
SEE page 12


Investigations into death at Doctors Hospital
'identify measures to prevent similar incidents'


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
BASED on its own investiga-
Stions into the death of a 42-year-
old man in its care, Doctors Hos-
pital has identified measures
which would have ensured that
incidents such as his death do not
occur again, according to a report
tabled in parliament.
The annual report by the Hos-
pital and Healthcare Facilities
Licensing Board (HHCFLB)
notes that the board's legal com-


mittee has recommended that ai
medical inspector be appointed
to investigate Doctors Hospital
and "establish whether or not the
matter (the death of Mr Christo-
pher Esfakis) has been properly
addressed".
The HHCFLB is appointed by
government to inspect and license
all private medical facilities in the
Bahamas.
The 2008 annual report from
the board chairman, Dr Kirtland
Culmer, notes the case of Mr
Esfakis, who died at the hospital
in 2002 after being admitted days
earlier with an over 90 per cent
survival rate, as a "thorny" legal
issue before the board.
A coroner presiding over an
inquest into the burns patient's
death ruled earlier this year that it
was'the result of natural causes
"substantially and significantly
contributed to by neglect" on the
part of medical staff there.
Coroner William Campbell left
only one verdict to the jurors in
the matter, stating that all the evi-
dence "pointed in one direction
over another."
The verdict was later quashed
on appeal by Chief Justice Sir
Burton Hall on the grounds that
the coroner should not have left
only one verdict to jurors.


SEE page 12


I Tw mn r
missin afer


AN INTENSIVE
search is on for two men
who went missing Satur-
day morning when their
boat capsized near Clifton
Pier.
Police press liaison offi-
cer"ASP Walter Evans
told The Tribune that
police received a report
of the incident yesterday.
According to reports,
three men went on a fish-
ing trip on a beige 25-foot
Bell Craft boat.
"As they were just off
Clifton Pier coming in the
vessel overturned. One of
the men was able to make
it ashore, two others are
missing," ASP Evans said.
He said that Ivan Mor-
ley, one of the three men
on the boat, was able to
make it ashore.
A search is on for Mr
Morley's brother and
another man.
Mr Evans was unable to
confirm whether the ves-
sel had been discovered.


I


ernment's tavour, the FNM has
pointed the finger of blame firm-
ly at the PLP for being "negli-
gent" in its role in the electoral
process and "wasting" overbur-
dened judicial resources in chal-
lenging the two seats.
The ruling party has called on
the Opposition to "face up to its
failures" including leaving the
parliamentary registration depart-


Boundaries Commission to
report.
On Thursday the final election
court case came to a close, with
Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing retaining his seat
by a slim margin of 27 votes over
PLP challenger, Senator Pleasant
. Bridgewater.
SEE page 14


Opposition calls for 'urgent review of
findings' from election court cases .,
SEBy ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
THE PLP yesterday called on the govern-
ment to undertake an "urgent review of the
findings and recommendations" coming out of f
the two now concluded election court cases.
Dismissing the FNM's criticism of its con-
duct in.relation to the election court matters
as "a pathetic exercise in public relations",
party chairwoman Glenys Hanna-Martin said
the government is "seeking to distract from
some very important issues."
"Both recent cases' findings of law and fact have brought to the
fore major issues relative to electoral fraud," said Mrs Hanna-
Martin.
"It is more than interesting that the government has yet to com-
ment on the findings of the Supreme Court justices with a view to
bringing the recommended review and reforms in the interest of our
SEE page 12


Going out on '
a high note
WR/CORPORAL
SEYMOUR sings for the
last time on Bay Sireei
with [he ROVal Bahamas
Police Force band
in Rawson Square
I yesterday
She was honoured
for her long service and
presented walh a plaque
and an drrangement of
flowers
Fellp6 Major,.Tnliune statt

Minister working with Sandals to
resolve firing of union members
E By CHESTER ROBARDS had no prior knowledge of the
Tribune Staff Reporter resort's plans to fire the union


MINISTER of Labour Dion
Foulkes is working with San-
dals Royal Bahamian Resort to
resolve the firing of eight exec-
utive members of The Bahamas
Hotel Maintenance and Allied
Workers Union (BHMAWU)
last Friday.
According to Mr Foulkes, he


members. He said he was
apprised of the executive board
firings by BHMAWU lawyer,
Obie Ferguson, only after they
had taken place.
He is now consulting with
Sandals management and the
Bahamas Hotel Employers
SEE page 14


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THE TRIBUNE


LOCA NEW


Tribune street sales



up a massive 14%


THINGS are tough out
there, but the soaraway Tri-
bune continues to be the suc-
cess story of the Bahamas, with
street sales up a massive 14 per
cent over last year.
Yesterday, the newspaper's
editorial staff uncorked a bot-
tle of champagne to celebrate a
non-stop six-year rise in circu-
lation in defiance of all global
trends.


"Given the very depressed
state of the newspaper industry
worldwide, and the global eco-
nomic crisis, it is remarkable
that The Tribune continues to
go up and up," said managing
editor John Marquis.
"In the USA and the UK,
metropolitan daily newspapers
are in deep, deep trouble, but
The Tribune's circulation has.
maintained an upward trajec-
tory since 2001. And, despite
the tough times, sales are still
rising."

Figures
October circulation figures
showed Tribune street sales up
14.13 per cent over the same
month in 2007, with Thursday
overall sales hitting 21,000.
This represents a total of
13,000 extra papers sold during
the month.
Monday remains one of the
best-selling days of the week,
with substantial percentage
increases recorded over last
year.
Paco Nunez, news editor,
said The Tribune's success is a


fair reflection of its journalistic
excellence and its ability to
address its market.

Journalists
"We have a team of fine
young journalists who are not
afraid to tackle any issue with
the best interests of the
Bahamian public in mind at all
times.
"I also think The Tribune's
aggressive and incisive
approach to news is appreci-
ated by the Bahamian public,
who want the truth without
any frills attached.
"The rising sales also reflect
the level of trust that exists
between us and our public.
And this is just the beginning -
we have lot of new things
planned for the future."
The Tribune's fortunes
turned around ten years ago
when it became a morning
paper.
But its- sales surge really
began in 2001, since when con-
sistent year-on-year increases
have been recorded.
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Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


. . . .. . .


PAGE 2, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008, PA.


LOANW


0 In brief


Man crashes

stolen car

into a tree
POLICE apprehended a
man after he crashed a stolen
car into a tree on Thursday.
A resident from eastern
New Providence went home
around mid-day on Thursday
and found a robber in his
home.
The robber escaped in a
Honda Inspire vehicle regis-
tration 19873. Police were
notified and a patrol in the
area saw the car, which result-
ed in a high-speed chase.
The chase ended in Pine
Yard Road when the Honda
driver crashed into a tree.
Police arrested the, man, a 26-
year-old from Joe Farrington
Road. The robber is known
to police.
N Sometime after 10pm on
Thursday, a gunman entered
Shell Service Station in West
Bay Street (near Saunder's
Beach) and demanded cash.
The robber deprived the com-
pany of,an undetermined
amount then escaped in an
aqua Nissan Sentra. Police
were informed and officers
on patrol saw a vehicle fitting
the given description. There
was a high-speed chase which
ended in West Bay Street.
Two male occupants in the
vehicle were arrested.


* By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE redevelopment of a
shopping centre in downtown
Nassau to include waterfront
restaurants and a marina aims
to raise standards in Bay
Street.
A $13 million transforma-
tion of the old Moses Shop-
ping Plaza on the corner of
Elizabeth Avenue into Bay-
side Marketplace is being car-
ried out by Charles, Nicholas
and Anthony Klonaris of
Bayside Marketplace Ltd,
Cavalier Construction and
the Royal Bank of Canada.
Developers hope the 35,000
sq ft retail and restaurant
space, combined with
7,000 sq ft of office space, two
waterfront restaurants and a
marina able to support
yachts up to 100 feet, will be
ready to open by autumn
2009.
President of Bayside Mar-
ketplace Ltd, Charles
Klonaris, said: "We think the
combination of all these
things is really the formula
for what we think is going to
be a very successful develop-
ment for downtown Nassau."
Cavalier Construction have
completed the demolition and
have started laying the foun-
dations.
Richard Wilson, Cavalier
CEO, expects work to be
complete within nine months.
Charles Klonaris said 80 per
cent of the retail space is
already committed.
He added: "It's the first
major development for down-
town and we hope others will
start investing. We are very
positive about it."
Royal Bank of Canada
senior vice-president Ross
McDonald said the current
global recession should not
affect the success of Bayside
Marketplace.
He said: "Certainly 2009 is
going to be a tough year but
as we come out of 2009 we
are going to be well posi-
tioned.
"This is going to be the first
destination in Bay Street and
we are just so pleased to be a
part of a major downtown
development programme.
This is going to be a quality
project, and we hope it will
kick-start development down-
town."


FO NiLW EVCE
FertiizerFunicide,


PM's intention to address excise tax1


issues welcomed by business people


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
BUSINESS people have wel-
comed the prime minister's sug-
gestion that he will address some of
the "unintended consequences" of'
the introduction of excise tax in
the Bahamas this vear.
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said that during the mid-year
or main budget exercise he will
"take into account some of the
unintended consequences" of the
introduction of the excise tax -
which included tax increases on
books and "make adjustments."
Excise tax, brought into effect
in the 2008/2009 budget, amalga-
mates customs duty and stamp tax.
While the budget was labelled a
"relief" budget, with reductions or
eliminations in tax on numerous
breadbasket items and others.
some imports saw an increase in
tax levied on them as in a number
of cases tax was "rounded up".
Several business people com-
plained publicly in the weeks after
the introduction of the budget that
this ushered in a slew of unexpect-
ed and unannounced tax increases
that hurt their profit margins dur-
ing already tough economic times.
Mr Ingraham said: "I can't tell
you what I will remedy or not rem-
edy but we have taken account of
all the complaints and when we do
the exercise again in May, if not


K


in February, we'll make the neces-
sary adjustments, taking into
account what we have heard,and
seen.
"For instance, some people have
said that we have now decided to
tax books that came to the
Bahamas and we never taxed
books before, but that's not true.
Books always had a seven per cent
stamp tax except if they came in
through the airport. We did the
excise tax across the board so that
if I brought goods in by boat or
the airport I pay the same tax. And
we rounded the tax up to ten per
cent and books got caught in that.
That was not our intent to increase
the tax on books at all." he added.


He said complaints from Bay
Street merchants that the replace-
ment of the stamp tax with an
excise tax raised the tax on certain
items and made them "uncompet-
itive with other destinations in the
Caribbean...will be taken into
account."
Juliette Johnson, a sales repre-
sentative at Harbour Bay-based
Logos Bookstore welcomed Mr
Ingraham's comments, saying
those in her business thought it
was "ridiculous" that tax on books
was increased.
"These are resources that help
to improve our country," she said.
The store has lost business as it
has been unable to rely on its
"main marketing mechanism" -
the fact that its books were tradi-
tionally very close to US retail
price.
Joan Thompson, owner of luxu-
ry goods stores, Brass and Leather
and Fendi, said the jump in tax on
leather goods from 120 to 125 per
cent in conjunction with the drop
off in sales linked to the downturn
in tourism and the economy in gen-
eral have seen her company's mar-
gins drop "so low it's now ques-
tionable whether we can stay in
business."
"Sales have dropped through
the floor and the luxury goods
retailers are all going to be left
with inventory they cannot move.
They're going to find it difficult to
sell for margins they need for their


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operations," she said.
"If they want a luxury goods
market here the point is this: we
have to be price sensitive to com-
parable locations or to us pricing in
everything. We have to be com-
petitive," said Ms Thompson.
Mr Ingraham said the amalga-
mation of stamp tax and customs
duty into an excise tax has helped
shore up the government's rev-
enue base which is forecast to
see $150 million revenue fall off


this year compared with last by
removing "much of the discretion
that customs officers had in terms
of determining which item or head
or tariff item they wanted to charge
a particular item against."
He said the excise tax amalga-
mation exercise which the govern-
ment initiated in this year's budget
is not yet finished and he hopes to
do so in the next two budgetary
periods.


Warning over use of voice over

Internet protocol services
THE Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is advising retailers and the
public that any unauthorised use of voice over Internet protocol
(VoIP) services or devices is in breach of the Telecommunications Act
and is punishable by fine.
"The Public utilities commission (PUC) wishes to inform retailers
and users of VoIP products that the PUC encourages the legal and
authorised use of VolP services and devices. Bahamians, in general,
mistakenly believe that any VoIP telephone device sold or used in
North America or elsewhere (such as Magic Jack or Vonage) is also
allowed in the Bahamas," a press release by the Commission's execu-
tive director Michael J Symonette stated.
According to the PUC, Section 35(40) of the Telecommunications
Act 1999, makes it an offence for anyone to directly or indirectly
instal a telecommunications system, telecommunications equipment and
or customer premises equipment that has not been approved by the
commission to a licensed Bahamian telecommunications system. This
offence is punishable by a fine of $10,000.
"The PUC wishes to advise retailers and the public that the' Com-
mission has not issued any approved standards under Section 15 of the
Telecommunications Act for VoIP telephone devices like Magic Jack
and Vonage. Unapproved VoIP telephone devices allow users to
bypass licensed Bahamian telecommunications systems iin breach oft
Telecommunications Act and Sector Policy. This has far-reachir
financial implications for licensed Bahamian telecommunications
providers and on the Bahamian economy," it was stated.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY DECEMBER 15,O008ETHEDTRIBUN
I *A 0 I 0


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Blogger's scurrilous comments


YESTERDAY a reader drew our attention
to a blog that is often sent to our e-mail, but
which we never open because of its gutter con-
tent and the writer's inferior intelligence and
writing skills. In fact the standard is so low that
it is worthy only of the wastebasket. So when it
appears on our screen, it quickly disappears
with a press of the "delete" key. And off it goes
to Hades where it belongs.
We gather that many noses must be out of
joint at Bahamas Information Services since
Sir Arthur Foulkes was appointed Director
General and Mrs. Sharon Turner, his deputy.
Together they have turned BIS into a profes-
sional news service. For the first time it is a
pleasure to work with people 'who produce on
time, are efficient and at last know as the late
Sir Etienne Dupuch used to say that news-
papers write news, not history. In other words
what happens today is news, by tomorrow it is
history. BIS in the past always ranked high in
the "history" department. As far as news was
concerned it was hopeless and a waste of the
taxpayers' money.
BIS under the PLP administration, particu-
larly in recent years, was headed by persons
who made no pretence at being professionals in
their job. Time meant nothing to them. They
were conveniently absent "not in office" was
the switchboard operator's favourite expres-
sion when information was needed by the
working press. There were more than one on
the payroll who never showed up for work..
At one time we refused to use BIS releases
because their lateness and our pressing dead-
lines caused too, much confusion.
For example, both Tribune and BIS reporters
would cover an assignment on the same day.
When The Tribune was an evening newspaper
that assignment would be reported in that
evening's newspaper.
Weeks later the BIS story would arrive at
our office. By that time so much copy had
crossed the editor's desk that he had forgotten
the assignment and had to send to archives to
find out if the BIS story was new, or whether it
had already been written by one of pur reporters
and published in The Tribune. Invariably it was
history. In the end although our messenger dai-
ly collected BIS releases they were the days
before the internet they were dropped in the
wastebasket.
Not so today. BIS keeps us on our toes. It has
a new manager an efficient, hardworking
woman. We presume that the slackers, never
knowing office discipline before, are having to
measure up at last. Obviously, they don't like it.
The blog that was drawn to our attention,
was apparently accompanied by a photograph,


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which we have not seen, but this is what the
photo's caption had to say:
"If you look closely you will see a young
woman holding a camera. And almost every
time Hubert Ingraham travels, she is some-
where right behind him. Things that make you
go Hmmmmm."
What an insult to all women journalists.
Does this insinuate that a woman reporter can-
not do her job among males without some
depraved mind suggesting she must have got
there for reasons other than the fact that she is
an expert in her journalistic profession?
They laugh at her taking photographs
* because she is not a professional photographer.
What this poor fool her anonymous critic
- does not realise is that in our profession
today persons who can write and also press the
button on a digital camera do not have to be
professional photographers. As a matter of fact
because of their versatility they are far more
valuable than a professional photographer who
can only shoot pictures. No longer do newspa-
pers have to send two persons on the same
assignment when one can do both jobs. Even we
know how to hold a camera, look through the
lens, press the button and produce a satisfacto-
ry photograph for newspaper pages.
The blogger comments on Mrs Turner's nar-
row waist. Does anyone ever comment on the
narrow waist of a male reporter/photograph-
er? No, here again an attempt is made to deni-
grate a woman who is superior to some little
man hiding behind the anonymity of a blog.
He wants to know where she comes from, what
are her qualifications.
We do not know, but what we do know is
that she is far superior to any male who has
held her position at BIS.'We do not know the
lady; we don't even know what she looks like.
But daily we see the results of her hard work
and can appreciate her obvious organisational
ability. After the FNM's election she was
appointed a Deputy Director with responsibil-
ity for the Broadcast division of BIS in addition
to responsibility for vetting and distributing
news stories. She was also designated Press
Officer to the Prime Minister. She lives in
Freeport where she heads the BIS office there.
We congratulate whoever was responsible for
her appointment. For the first time this gov-
ernment department is earning its keep.
The blogger has criticised Mrs Turner for
not having included his blog in BIS's broadcast
news lists. We approve of her decision.
After all BIS is for the serious news media
and qualified journalists.
On no count does this mud-slinger qualify
to be a member of our profession.


Pierre Dupuch




answers the




Hilton manager


EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Thursday (Nov. 6) edi-
tion of The Tribune printed a
letter from Mr. Peter Web-
ster, manager of the British
Colonial Hilton and Treasurer
of the Bahamas Hotel Associ-
ation, restating my case about
"The True Investor". I wish
to publicly thank Mr. Webster
who so eloquently proved my.
point.
But before I get into that I
wish to correct him on several
issues. First, I never criticized
the Hilton Group of Hotels.
In fact, I consider Hilton to
be one of the world's most
outstanding and respected
hotel chains.
The story I related about
Mr Bill Saunders' tour desk
being removed from the
British Colonial Hilton was
told to me by Mr Saunders
himself. He later confirmed
what I wrote. But let us not
confuse the argument with
semantics. It is not important
whether he was given notice,
written a letter or thrown out
on his ear. If I was wrong on
the details of how it happened,
I apologize. However, Mr.
Webster would be well
advised to remember what I
understand he told several
people about this matter.
The fact is that one year
after the "renovations,"
Majestic Tours still does not
have a tour desk in the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel. Mr.
Webster, in his utmost wis-
dom, says that because the
Hilton is a "business" hotel a
tour desk is not needed and
that if one of the guests wants
a tour the concierge could give
the appropriate information.
This statement amazes me.
Mr. Webster should know that
the power of suggestion, aided
by visual tools, influences a
person to do things. Would it
not stand to reason, therefore,
that a tour desk, properly
designed to fit the decor of
the hotel and located where
guests could see it would be
more effective than having to
rely on a concierge who has
many other things to do? The


truth is, it would appear that
Mr. Webster does not want a
tour desk in the hotel that he
manages. It's as simple as that.
Furthermore, who knows,
better the tools needed to sell
a tour, Mr. Bill Saunders of
Majestic Tours who has done
it successfully for fifty years, or
Mr Peter Webster who prob-
ably is not even fifty years
old? He certainly has not been
playing on the Bahamian field
for very many years.
Granted, Mr. Peter Web-
ster has the right to say whom
he wants in the hotel that he
manages. But when making a
decision he would be well
advised to keep in mind the
unspoken and unwritten "joint
venture" agreement between
the Bahamian people and the
investor. The Government, on
behalf of the Bahamian peo-
ple, has created the "Hotel
Encouragement Act" which
gives many attractive conces-
sions to hotels operating here.
Frankly, Mr Saunders of
Majestic Tours has several
options. He can appeal to the
common sense of Mr Peter
Webster; he could appeal to
public opinion; or he could
approach the CEO of the
Hilton Group to present his
case. The Government, on the
other hand, could defend its
citizens by drafting a law pre-
venting hotels from restraining
businesses from accessing
tourists and including it in all
Heads of Agreements.
I doubt that Mr. Webster
knows the background of the
British Colonial Hotel in the
Bahamas. In 1956, one day
after Sir Etienne Dupuch pre-
sented that historic resolution
to Parliament which broke
down racial discrimination,
Lady Oakes, the then owner
of the British Colonial,
announced that in the future
her hotel would be open to all
races in the Bahamas. It was
historic. Back then the British
Colonial joined in the fight


against racial discrimination;
however, today it appears that
it is being used to economi-
cally discriminate against the
Bahamian people. 'Mr Web-
ster, in my opinion, you are
treading on pretty shaky
ground.
Mr Webster also indicates
in his letter that we all should
get together to promote
tourism. I agree. But who was
it who gave Dupuch Publica-
tions fourteen days to let the
BHA know whether or not
they were prepared to give the
BHA a percentage of their
sales? Not I, Mr. Webster.
What hotel manager put
Majestic Tours desk out of the
hotel? Not I, Mr. Webster.
Who were they who contacted
various hotels and asked them
not to do business with
Dupuch Publications until
they had agreed to pay the
BHA a percentage of their
sales? Not I, Mr. Webster.
I never wanted this whole
matter to be washed in the
public forum either. Immedi-
ately upon hearing that the
BHA Endorsement Policy
had once again raised its ugly
head I wrote Mr Frank Comi-
to expressing my concerns and
asking him to respond. The
letter went unanswered.. I
must assume, therefore, he
thought that by ignoring me I
would simply fade into the
woodwork. Like so many
before him, he was wrong.
Rather than taking steps
which would effectively
destroy the largest and most
proven tourist-oriented busi-
nesses in town, their advice
and support should be sought
by newcomers like Mr Web-
ster. One does not build by
destroying.
I don't know if Mr Peter
Webster has noticed lately,
but the tourist arrivals are
quickly shrinking. People are
being laid off. Families are
hurting. Surely the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel does
not wish to add to the bread
line?

PIERRE DUPUCH
Nassau,
November 7, 2008


A magnificent act of love


EDITOR, The Tribune.
Many thanks to your reporter,
Lloyd Allen, for bringing us that
wonderful story on the front page
of your issue of December 8,


2008. For readers who may have
missed it, the story was about a
lady who lost her son as result of
a traffic accident but went to
court to beg the magistrate not
to imprison the young man who
was responsible.
Mrs. Vandetta Moorshead lost
her only son, 19-year-old Omar
Smith, last year December when
he was knocked off his motor-
bike by a vehicle driven by 21-
year-old Rashad Jolly.
Mrs. Moorshead pleaded with
the magistrate not to send Mr.
Jolly to prison as that could ruin
his life and would not bring back
her son.
There was no pointin destroy-
ing another young life. She want-
ed him to have a chance to make
something of himself.


What a powerful message,
especially at a time when so many
Bahamians, including religious
leaders, are howling for the
vengeance of the rod, the cat and
the gallows to punish criminals.
Thanks, Mrs. Moorshead, your
magnificent act of love says more
to us than a thousand screaming
sermons.
May the Prince of Peace, who
rejected the law of an eye for an
eye, bless you.
And may Mr. Jolly and all the
young men who are so easily
tempted into reckless behaviour
be touched by your compassion.
A FATHER
Nassau,
December 12, 2008


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PAGE 4, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE MONDAY DECEMBER 15, 2008, PAGE 5


LOA6 NW


Claim that Sandals may have violated

labour laws by firing pregnant women


* By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter j
SANDALS Royal Bahamian Resort
and Spa may have violated Bahamian I3c
labour laws by firing two pregnant ,"
women last Friday, it was claimed yes-
terday.
Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes
told The Tribune that the law has cer-
tain guidelines in place to protect preg-
nant women against the kind of action
taken by Sandals.
"I understand that there are two
women who are pregnant, and there
are certain provisions in the law where
special consideration should be given to women
who are pregnant," he said.
According to him, he and lawyer Obie Fergu-
son, who is also representing members of the
Bahamas Hotel Maintenance and Allied work-
ers Union, are looking into the matter.
"Mr Obie Ferguson has also made represen-
tation to myself with respect to those two women
and we are also having discussions with respect
to them," said Mr Foulkes.


One of the pregnant women, Tak-
era Thompson, 26, is a single mother of
three little boys and is expecting a
fourth child in about three months.
According to her, her physical state
and maternal responsibilities will inhib-
it her finding another job for up to 13
months.
Still, she remains with bills and oth-
er financial obligations.
She emerged from the employee
entrance of Sandals in tears after
receiving her walking papers, and
told The Tribune: "Now I have to
explain to my children that I am not
working."
Ms Thompson and her sister, who lives with
her, her mother and her three children, are now
both former employees of Sandals. Her sister
was fired only a month before she was.
She said her sister was fortunate to be able to
start her own business after being laid off from
the resort, but she is not certain about the future.
According to her, obligation number one is to
her boys and unborn child. In the future she
hopes to go back to school.


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Bahamians 'need to market themselves'


* By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter
AS THE Bahamas continues to
suffer from the global economic
downturn and hotel lay-offs are
expected to continue, the jobless
claim they have no-one to turn to
for relief and look directly to the
government for assistance.
However, a person's job is more
than just talking to co-workers. It's
about networking the skills and
services you have attained during
your time in the workforce. It is
more than just shaking hands and
passing out business cards, it's real-
ly about building your social capi-
tal, a leading businessman claims.
President of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, Dionisio
D'Aguilar, said Bahamians who
are looking for jobs or are already
in the workplace need to market
themselves every chance they get.
"First thing they need to do is to
register with the labour exchange
with the Ministry of Labour as they
are receiving applications at a rate
at 100 applications a day.
"So it's very important for them
to get their names in there other-
wise they won't know about the
job opportunities. You must put
yourself in the pool and say these
are my qualifications and this is
what I have," Mr D'Aguilar said.
Bahamians must be aware that
in the business of networking, one


must always have a timely follow-
up on referrals, a unique trait of
successful networkers. Following
up with what you say you are going
to do, when you say you are going
to do it, builds one's credibility and
trust with their network.
Another issue that Bahamians
have to tackle is having a positive
attitude in the workplace. Being
positive contributes to a person's
determination, internal motivation
and ultimate business success. A
consistently negative attitude
makes people dislike being around
you and drives away referrals and
a positive attitude makes people
want to associate and co-operate
with you.
"Bahamians have to get out of
their heads the stigmas of jobs they
won't do. A job is a job. It may
not be the job that you want or it
may not be your ideal job but you
still have bills to pay at the end of
the day. They should stop being
snobby about what jobs they will
or will not take. I can never under-
stand how people can be a maid at,
Atlantis but won't be maids in a
private home," Mr D'Aguilar said.
There is also commitment to the
networking process. Persons who
are constantly networking are nev-
er formally off-duty. Networking
should be so natural that you find
yourself networking in the grocery
checkout line, at the doctor's office,
while picking the kids up from


school as well as at business mixers
and networking meetings. Net-
workers take advantage of every
opportunity that is presented to
them on a daily basis.
"Many employers lament the
difficulty of finding people to work
who want to work. The jobs are
there but it's just Bahamians have
this built-in gene that says 'I don't
do that work or I don't work for
people in their homes and there-
fore I would rather be unemployed
and complain about the number
of work permits the government
is giving to foreigners.'
"If you are really good at what
you do. the job will come to you.
Give all. do the best you can do
and if you lose your job then your
old boss can say you were a great
worker," Mr D'Aguilar said.


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Hopes that DNA of new mothers will help solve dead baby case
* By ALISON LOWE hospitlil and hoping for the co-oper- we're certainly looking at the DNA
Tribune Staff Reporter ation of some individuals in pursuing of one or two individuals. We're
alowe@tribunemedia.net this line of inquiry. hoping that this intelligence coming
The infant's body was discovered out of the hospital can assist us bu
POLICE are hoping comparisons in a field near a Soldier Road church we're not at the stage where we car
of the DNA of mothers who were on Wednesday morning, say definitely that we have a sus
known to have recently given birth It is thought to have been born 'pect," said CSP Miller yesterday.
at Princess Margaret Hospital with only hours before it was found dead. Police have appealed for infor
that of a newborn baby found dead Clothes with spots of fresh blood mation about any female known or
last week will bring them closer to were found nearby and police not known to be pregnant who was
solving the case. believe someone may have used the suffering from depression o0
According to Chief Supt Glenn clothing to clean themselves off. appeared sick or as having "female
Miller, of the Central Detective "We're in communication with problems" to contact Crime Stop
Unit, polite are working with the Princess Margaret Hospital and pers at 328-8477.


Ckrisb


m


MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


t



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s
r
e,


~!


.







PAGE 6, MONDAY,.DECEMBER 15, 2008 THE TRIBUNE


r- LOC~*ALNW


BHA president comments

on decline in tourist arrivals


E By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
A FORECAST eight per cent
annual decline in tourist arrivals is
significant as even "a one per cent
difference in occupancy year over
year can make or break the dif-
ference for hotels," according to
Bahamas Hotel Association pres-
ident Frank Comito.
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham revealed on Tuesday that,
based on discussions between the
Ministry of Tourism, hoteliers and
cruise lines, an eight per cent fall
in tourists compared with last
year is expected for 2008.
Speaking with The Tribune
about the significance of the like-
ly eight per cent figure, BHA
president Frank Comito said:
"When you're looking at already
running a tight margin, when you
look at the fact that we're down
this year over last year and the
fact that last year we were down
over the year before, when you're
looking at the fact that we're run-
ning utility bills for most of the
year 30 per cent more than last
year and next to labour that's
our biggest expense you've got a
situation where there's some vul-
nerability out there in the indus-
try so even a small difference, a
one per cent difference in occu-
pancy year over year, can make
or break the difference for
hotels." -
Detailing the drooping tourism
figures last week, the prime min-
ister noted the failure of eco-
nomic stimuli packages inthe


United States and Europe to
deliver the results that were
intended of them as contributing
to the decline.
"There has been a continua-
tion in the slide. Job losses con-
tinue to be high in the developed
World, factories are closing in Chi-
na, orders for manufactured
goods are down, consumer confi-
dence is still low, there's uncer-
tainty on the part of a number of
people who are employed in
America from which we get 80
per cent of our tourists and
because of their uncertainty about
their job prospects it affects their
decisions to travel," said Mr
Ingraham.
Mr Comito said as early as
midsummer 71 per cent of hotels
surveyed by the BHA "already
anticipated having a net loss in
2008 and that was before the bot-
tom fell out in September."
That month saw the combined
effect of hurricane threats and
the rapid acceleration of the glob-
al financial crisis begin to hit
Bahamian hotels hard.
Grand Bahama and Family
Island properties and properties
that do not cater as much to
group business or weddings have
suffered the greatest lapse in
arrivals, according to the BHA
president.
In the case of one Family
Island hotelier he spoke with last
week, Mr Comito said he is "now
living less than hard to mouth",
having not had a chance to
replenish his overdraft due to the
failure for this Christmas season
to bring visitors.


Resident voices concern


over shipping container


parked close to her home


N By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
A RESIDENT of Lincoln
Boulevard has voiced con-
cerns for weeks about a ship-
ping container parked too
close to her home and she
feels law enforcement and civ-
il officials are ignoring her
pleas.
Edith Gardiner, a police
officer, told The Tribune that
she is concerned this contain-
er, which sits atop its wheeled
trailer, might tip over, as she
feels the ground that it is on
may not hold its weight.
She said the container is so
close to her house it blocks
sunlight and breeze to several
rooms in her house.
"It is so close that if I was
on my roof, I wouldn't have
to jump on to the top of it, I
would just walk on to it," said
Ms Gardiner.
"In the day, it blocks out
the sun so much that I have
to use lights in those rooms."
According to-her, she has
approached police, the Min-
istry of Environment and the


Department of Physical Plan-
ning for help, but has yet to
receive any.
"The gentleman from town
planning said he would come
and put a notice of the con-
tainer for it to be removed
within seven days he never


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She is not the only resident
upset by the container. Her
neighbour, who also lives
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many complaints about it as
well.
Ms Gardiner said the man
who owns the lot has been
parking empty trailers, trail-
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and big rig trucks on the prop-
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, MONDAY,.DECEMBER 15, 2008


0






MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008, PAGE 7


I I I, I I Iu im1.


Ending Caribbean





border disputes


* By SIR RONALD SANDERS
(The writer is a business
consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat)

BORDER disputes are a
contentious and unnec-
essary barrier to economic and
social development in countries
involved in them. They frustrate
international cooperation on
trade, environment protection,
security, and law enforcement.
They also. scare off private sec-
tor investment and they are a
drain on budgets and resources.
For these reasons, the people
of Belize and Guatemala and
their neighboring countries
should welcome the news that on
December 8th, the governments
of the two countries signed a Spe-
cial Agreement to "submit
Guatemala's territorial, insular,
and maritime claim to the Inter-
national Court of Justice (ICJ)".
The Caribbean region has been
plagued by three border disputes.
for over four decades. Guatemala
has laid claim to the territory of
Belize (formerly a British colony),
Venezuela seeks to reopen a
claim settled over a century ago
to two-thirds of Guyana (also a
former British colony) and
Guyana and Suriname (a former
Dutch colony) quarrel over tle
area that constitutes their bound-
ary.
In 1980, the United Nations
urged Guatemala and Belize to
find a peaceful solution to their
territorial problem.
But, since then, there have
been serious incidents between
the military forces of the two
countries and bloody confronta-
tions, loss of life, and destruction
of crops.
The two sides then participated
in an initiative in 2000 by the
Organisation of American States
(OAS) to facilitate a negotiated
"settlement of their problem.
Largely because of Guatemalan
recalcitrance, the effort petered
out though the OAS-appointed
facilitators had laid the ground-
work for a lasting solution..
It is a matter of conjecture how
much better off Belize and
Guyana might now have been
had Guatemala and Venezuela
not maintained their claims,
absorbing the scare resources of
the two smaller countries to ward
them off, and frightening away
investment.

The Special Agreement
has to be approved by
the citizens of Belize and
Guatemala in referenda. It is
assumed that the Belize referen-
dum will be fairly plain sailing
since both the ruling political par-
ty arid the main opposition party
have both worked toward a reso-
lution of the problem.
Although, it has to be said, that
there may be some understand-
able nervousness in Belize
because the decision of the ICJ
,vill be binding.
In this connection, the worst
case scenario for Guatemala is
that it will not get any of the ter-
ritory to which it aspires; the
worst case scenario for the
Belizeans is the loss of their
homeland and their sovereignty.
Nonetheless, encouraged by
the efforts of the Secretary-Gen-
eral of OAS under whose aus-
pices the Special Agreement was
signed, the foreign minister of
Guatemala Roger Haroldo Rodas
Melgar declared "we are begin-
ning a process that, regardless of
its outcome, will enable the gov-
ernments and peoples.of these
two countries to act in a manner
that befits the start of the Twenty-
first Century."
That is a sentiment that had
been expressed almost identical-
ly by Assad Shoman, then
Belize's Chief Negotiator with
Guatemala, in September 2005.
Nations everywhere should
welcome the signing of the Spe-
cial Agreement and encourage
the two countries to move quick-
ly to get their issue before the
ICJ.
The fact that the governments
have chosen to settle their prob-
lems by peaceful means and inter-
national law rather than war and
bloodshed, indicates both their
growing maturity and the value
of the OAS in conflict resolution.
The procedures at the ICJ are
long and it could be three years
before the Court hands down a
decision.
During this period, both
nations will have to behave with
considerable restraint toward
each other.
And, equally, the governments


WORLD VIE'

will have to mount programmes
of education amongst their own
populations to counter the efforts
of hot heads who would seek to
sacrifice the legal process on the
altar of nationalism and perceived
patrimony.
In this connection, the role of
the OAS is not yet over and the
Secretary-General should even
now be exploring ways in which
machinery can be established to
keep the peace and educate the
public as the ICJ process
advances.

The ICJ process is also
expensive and particu-
larly so for small countries. Each
government will have to hire a
battery of lawyers, cartographers
and other specialists to assemble
their arguments.
The cost will run into millions
of dollars.
The OAS is to be congratulat-
ed for its foresight in creating and
administering a fund to contribute
to the legal costs that both coun-
tries will incur.
But plaudits are also due to the
British government, which, while
not a member of the OAS, has
announced, through oAe of its
Foreign Ministers, Gillian Mer-
ron, that it "will make an initial
contribution of 200,000
(US$300,000 approx) to this
fund."
No one can foresee exactly
what the ICJ will decide in their
adjudication of the Belize-
Guatemala issue.
However, the merits of each
side's case have been argued since
1859, and it seems unlikely that


any Court would uphold
Guatemala's claim to all of
Belize.
One of Guatemala's own
points of contention may hold the
seeds of a solution.
It is that the borders set for
Belize deprive Guatemala from
access to the Atlantic coast, thus
hampering its future economic
development and its access to the
high seas.
If the ceding of such access is
what Belize is required to grant in
the end, the peace, stability and
potential for economic develop-
ment would be well worth it.
The solution to the Guyana
border issues with Venezuela and
Suriname may also lie at some
future point in recourse to the
ICJ, but this depends most par-
ticularly on the attitude of the
Venezuela government which
could have long sought a negoti-
ated solution,
Guyana and Suriname last year
settled a maritime boundary dis-
pute by arbitration under the
United Nations Law of the Sea
Convention, and, despite an inci-
dent this year in the river sepa-
rating them, the potential for a
legal and lasting settlement is pos-
sible.
A final, fair and legally binding
settlement of their boundaries by
all these countries will put them in
the forefront of regional efforts to
embrace opportunities for coop-
eration and mutual growth. They
should end these disputes.


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e. sanpin@coralwave.com BROKiERS&AGENTSLTD
I .. .. ..... ..... ... . ..


otb n' Jtult


Extended

Holiday

Shopping Hours


December 12th 26th 2008









SANTA'S MAILBOX
Enter, for a chance to win one of live gifts
',i rhiiq our "All I Want For Chriiin';a" campaign,

GIVING TREE
Donate to oine .,f four 'li(rili(.es al our
, it Bull, 284 P .,y iStreet and HI bour IBa iy locations


SITTING IN FRONT ROW are Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and
his wife Delores, along with Minister of National Security Tommy
Turnquest.and wife Shawn.


JOHN BULL LIMITED, 284 Bay Street
Crystal Court, Atlantis
Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
Mall at Marathon
Marina Village, Paradise Island
Palmdale Shopping Centre

BVLGARI, Crystal Court Atlantis

CARTIER BOUTIQUE, 284 Bay Street
Crystal Court, Atlantis

COACH, Bay Street

DAVID YURMAN, Bay Street

DOONEY & BOURKE
Marina Village, Paradise Island

GUCCI, Bay Street
Crystal Court, Atlantis

GUESS, Mall at Marathon

LA PARFUMERIE
Marina Village, Paradise Island

THE COSMETIC BOUTIQUE, Bay Street

TOUS, Bay Street


302-2800
363-3956
393-6020
393-4406
363-1141
323-7114

363-5824

302-2872
363-5808

326-0557

302-2878


363-1156

325-0561
363-5823

393-5036


363-1152

323-2731

323-3428


* By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
TERROR turned to joy
for one young couple who
said the efforts of a police
officer, who went beyond
the call of duty, helped
them bring their new baby
boy into the world.
Imagine going into
labour at the height of early
morning traffic and trying
to reach Princess Margaret,
Hospital from the outskirts
of town.
Well, for Renaldo and
Sherron Young this night-
mare became a reality.
Mr Young told The Tri-
bune that he woke up at
7am to the sound of his
wife going into labour.
Immediately he got dressed
and helped his wife into
their car and they started
on a seemingly never-end-
ing journey to the hospital.
Driving from Coral Har-
bour, Mr Young said it
seemed as if every car in
Nassau was on the road.
He said he and his wife
spent at least 15 minutes
barely moving along Glad-
stone Road while his wife
experienced overwhelming
pain.
Mr Young said he was
certain his wife would '
.deliver their baby in the
back seat if he did not
make it to the hospital
soon.
When the couple arrived
at the traffic light near
Lakeview Memorial, Mr
Young said he spotted a
speed cop. He decided to
ask Corporal Patrick Miller
if he could escort them to
the hospital.
"Without hesitation he
said just follow me," Mr
Young said. "It felt like a
movie as the officer drove
in front of us. All the traffic
just cleared while we were
passing through."
Mr Young said after they
,arrived at the hospital and
made their way to the
maternity ward, the officer
remained until they
received help.
Mr Young said the drive,
which would have normally
taken at least an hour, was
cut down to 15 minutes.
allowing his wife to deliver
her baby at the hospital, all
of which was made possible
by the officer.
"He didn't have to do all
of that, we just asked him
to take us there, but he did
far more," she said.
Supt Melvin Lundy of the
Palmdale traffic division
said he is not surprised at
all with the efforts of Offi-
cer Miller.
Supt I(undy said it is the
duty of all officers to assist
the public. IHowever, he
said Mr Miller had a track
record of going above and
beyond the call of duty.
That's happening every
day, lie is good andl hard-
working, that's the kind of
officer he is."
The newlywed couple,
along with their baby Storm
Young, said this C'hristmas
will forever be special,
thanks to Corporal Miller
of the Palmdale traffic sta-
tion.


- E -9


PAGE 8, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


out"family island storbs in.
Enjoy Sunda'Sho th Lucay
; i z 3,6rdid, Bay, Exurha; Out h






I nt I tiilDUIIc.


Fashion tycoon offers
LyFashion tycoon offers In The Spirit of Giving

Lyford Cay home for rent


FASHION tycoon
Peter Nygard is offering
his luxury home at
Lyford Cay for rent at
$42,000 a night, or nearly
$300,000 a week.
The Wall Street Jour-
nal has described
Nygard's 10-acre Nassau
estate as "one of the
most expensive vacation
home rentals in the
world."
In an advertisement for
the property, Lyford Cay
is described as "a private PETER NYGARD (above)
community whose resi- which is pictured above)f
dents include the British
billionaire Joseph Lewis."
And it goes on to list what goes with the
rental: an 82-foot yacht, a 48-foot fishing boat,
two all-terrain trucks, a full staff, two pools
and multiple spas, a 24-seat cinema that can
screen three movies at once, plus a disco
room.
Flaxen-haired Nygard, a Finnish-born fash-
ion manufacturer and retailer whose business
is one of the largest in Canada, hired Holly-
wood set designers to create his dream home.
It appears like a gigantic tree house on a
beautiful promontory in western New Provi-
dence. Some regard it as the most desirable


r..











is offering his home (which contains two pools one of
for rent.
home site on the island.
For years, Nygard has hosted New Year's
Eve parties for friends and guests at the
house, with its stunning sea views on all sides.
He has also staged boxing tournaments for
locals.
Now the property is for rent via Unusual
Villas and Island Rentals of Richmond, Vir-
ginia.
Nygard, 65, is chairman of Nygard Inter-
national of Winnipeg and has a park named
after him in Deloraine, Canada.
In 2003, his personal wealth was estimated
at just under $500 million.


Central Bank releases new CRISP banknotes


IN its effort to continue to
upgrade the security and durabil-
ity of Bahamian banknotes, the
Central Bank today releases the
fifth denomination in its Coun-
terfeit Resistant Integrated Secu-
rity Product (CRISP) family of
banknotes.
While the new $1 banknote will
incorporate similar security fea-
tures as earlier crisp banknotes,
the durability of this banknote
has been significantly improved
in comparison to previous $1 ban-
knotes issued.
The bank is pleased with the
combination of security and aes-
thetic features used to create the
new banknote and will be watch-
ing it very closely to determine
how well its durability performs in
circulation.
The banknote is dark green,
mint green and brown in colour
and bears a portrait of Sir Lynden
Pindling on the front, and the
Royal Bahamas Police Force
Band on the back.
These new banknotes will cir-


culate alongside the existing $1
banknotes, which will eventually
be phased out of circulation. The
final denomination in the crisp
family of banknotes will be the
$100 note, expected to be
released in 2009.
As part of its public education
initiatives, the bank has available,
and has distributed to banks and
other cash handlers,.flyers and
posters which describe the new
security features of the $1 ban-
knote.
The objective is to ensure that
the public is able to distinguish
more easily and reliably between
genuine banknotes, and counter-
feits. To this end, the Central
Bank also hosts counterfeit sem-
inars bi-annually in Nassau and
annually in Freeport. The next
counterfeit seminars are sched-
uled to be held in early January,
2009.
The public can help reduce
opportunities for counterfeiters
by paying closer attention to ban-
knote posters and pamphlets


located in clearing banks and gov-
ernment agencies, and checking
their $1 banknotes for the fol-
lowing upgraded security fea-
tures:
More vibrant and lively
colours and a portrait of Sir Lyn-
den Pindling on the right.
New watermark this ban-
knote bears a watermark of Sir
Lynden Pindling and the numer-
al one (front left).
A colour shifting windowed
thread that changes colour (from
violet to green) when the ban-
knote is tilted (front centre).
A new see-through feature
that,shows only a partial image
of the sand dollar until it is held
up to a light source when a com-
plete image of the sand dollar
appears (front left, back right).
For more information on
Bahamas banknotes and security
features, call the banking depart-
ment of Central Bank at 242-
302-2629 or visit the bank's web-
site at
www.centralbankbahamas.com


284 Bay St. Harbour Bay


'V )


As we give to you, wer encourage you to give to others.
John Bull invites.you to donate to the charity of your choice:


The Sister Sister Breast Cancer Support Group. (Pink Ribbon)
The Aids Foundation (Red Ribbon)
The Sir Victor Sassoon Bahamas Heart Foundation (Red Ribbon)
Autism Awareness (Blue Ribbon)

With each donation, please accept our gift of a seed paper ornament from our giving tree.
May the spirit of the season grow within you. Plant this ornament and it will too.





284 Bay St, 302-2800 Harbour Bay, 393-6020
S- -" J *- ... ^ ^ .


4.' . ',-.


E is for Excellence.


For over 60 years now, the letter E has
been synonomous with comfort, saFety
and elegance. It's a tradition which the
new generation Mercedes-Benz E-Class
is proud to continue. The driving
experience is sublime as it always has
been, but more dynamic than ever with
its direct steering, more precise gear
shifting and new suspension tuning.


And like all the classes of Mercedes-
Benz, the E-Oass IS the definition of
driving enjoyment. Few of its competitors
come near its breathtaking power,
impressive fuel economy, superb
handling and the sophisticated elegance
of its interior design. No wonder the
E-CLass epitomises what makes a
Mercedes-Benz. Get yours today!


Mercedes-Benz


TYREFLEX STAR MOTORS
Call us today for your new Mercedes-Benz E-Class at 325.4961
WuLff Road, P. 0. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667


CREDIT SUISSE


Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch,

Private Banking
is presently considering applications for a


TREASURY ADMINISTRATOR



The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Minimum qualifications:
* Three Five years International Banking experience in the Money Market/
Forex and Securities Trading and Execution Department of an offshore
bank or Asset Management Company.
" PC Literacy (MS Word, Access, Excel).
* General banking knowledge and keen knowledge of (trading and settling).
capital market instruments.
* A Bachelor's or Associates degree with concentration in Finance/
Economics. Series 7 Certification or Canadian Securities Course
qualification would be an asset.

Personal Qualities:
* Excellent organizational and communication skills.
* A commitment to service excellence.
* Ability to work with minimum supervision.
* Goal oriented.


* Competitive salary and performance bonus
* Pension Plan
* Health and Life Insurance


APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING.
Perstons not meeting the minimum requirements need not apply.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148



DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS
DECEMBER 31, 2008.


I I I


e


s. iT"







LOALN


'' 1. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
S 72. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

Call for registration and program details.
324-7770


Shristmas
sgit shopping
made easy!


.5


20% OFF I'
STOREWIDE
now through Dec 24th 7-


All m-njor credit cards :"
a(tcep(ed as cash.' -
Customrn Gass,
Framing Department and items -
on consignment are excluded. .
. .. e . --',v


Touching hearts, changing


lives: The Lady Sassoon


'Golden Heart' Award


THE Golden Heart Award will be presented at
the 45th annual Heart Ball, scheduled to be held
February 14, 2009, at the Sheraton Hotel, Cable
Beach.
Each year, the Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas)
Heart Foundation offers the Lady Sassoon Golden
Heart Award during its annual ball.
The award has been presented since 1968, and
was initiated by the Foundation to applaud and give
recognition to individuals who have selflessly pro-
moted human welfare and dignity, making life bet-
ter for their fellow men.
Mrs Mary Profilo was the most recent awardee.
She was chosen for her generosity and involvement
in organizations such as Yellow Birds.
Even at the time of receiving the award, Mrs Pro-
filo refused to stand alone, and accepted it on behalf
of all those who helped her in making life better for
others, particularly the Yellow Birds.
Previous winners include Mrs Andrea Archer,


Mrs Orinthia Nesbeth, Mrs Patricia M Jervis, Sir
Durward Knowles, Rev Prince A Hepburn, Miss
Mary Kelly, Mrs Phyllis Aldridge, Mrs Sybil Blyden,
Dr Marcia Bachem and many, many more.

The deadline for nominations for the Golden
Hearts Award is January 19, 2009. Nominations must
be accompanied by a letter/statement explaining why
the person recommended should receive the award.
Nominations are to be submitted to: *
The Golden Heart Award Committee
PO Box N-8189
Nassau, Bahamas
Alternatively, submissions can be hand-delivered to
Grosham Property, .Cable Beach. This is the office site
for The Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foun-
dation.


HOW would you feel if you
owned two homes, with two sets of
monthly mortgage payments, two
sets of taxes and insurance, and
the responsibility for the mainte-
nance on both?
When you're ready to buy your
next home, it could happen. Let's
take a look at why. More often
than not, buyers begin looking at
prospective new homes before
they have sold their existing home.
When they find a home that suits
their needs, a potentially painful
dilemma may arise. How do they
make a commitment to buy the
second home when they have not
yet sold the first one?
One common solution is to
hopefully sign an agreement to
buy the second home that is made
contingent upon the sale of their
existing home. In other words, if
the first home doesn't sell, the buy-


ers have no obligation to complete
the purchase of the second one.
The reality is that few home own-
ers will even consider the above.
You can make the most of this
situation by remembering one very
important concept: work exclu-
sively with the same BREA real
estate professional on both homes.
Here's why. When you decide on
which new home you plan to buy,
your agent will help structure the
purchase, taking into account your
existing home.
By letting the 'same BREA
agent market your present home,
both purchase and sale can be co-
ordinated to your benefit, resulting
in deep satisfaction rather than a
deep dilemma.


the FAMGUARD group of companies

announces sinecial holiday hours


CORPORATE CENTRE, FINANCIAL CENTRE, & NASSAU
SALES OFFICES


Friday, Dec ember 12
Monday Decemher 15


Closed at 11:30am
Normal business hours resume


ALL OFFICES IN ABACO, ELEUTHERA, EXUMA, & FREEPORT


Friday, D: i li ,i 'r 12
Monday DNi.- iribr 15


Closed
Normal business hours resume


CHRISTMAS BUSINESS HOURS FOR THE ENTIRE COMPANY


W ',dne.l 'v D,,:c inb.h 24
TIhursday' Di. imtmbr 25
Fday, D0. n, iLtir 2*b
Monday, De',. eibr 2Th
Tuesday, Duuiemii 302
Wednesday De,. melier Nl,
Thursday, Janii:iry, 1
Fnday, Janntiaiy 2


Closed at 1 00pm
Closed
Closed
Normal business hours resume
Normal business hours
Closed aw I 00p ni
Closed
Normal business hours resume






FAMGUARD
CORPORATION LIMITED


(? 1, NANClIAl
; PENSION, & INVESTMENTS


SI G CAPITAL MARKETS
BIoKI RA(.E & AnvISORY SERVICES


PAGE 10 MONDAYDECEMBE 2008


THE TRIBUNE


-:-~~ I ___cc-


U


/


Jil


DAYS OF ABSOLUTE



zMADNE SS
4-&' The Christmas Countdown is On!


-,~ f
U OGI h



_ Don't be the last to visit us at our Showroom, Summerwinds Plaza, Harold Road _|
or call 356-7502 .
(f.L.,; ..:.: ..,"-


.A


KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED
22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas



Mrs Hazel
Charlotte

SPyfrom
of the Eastern Road,
,..., Nassau, N.P., the Bahamas
will be held at Christ
Church Cathedral, George
SStreet, Nassau on Thursday
the 18 December, 2008 at 2 P.M.
The Very Reverend Patrick L. Adderley, Dean and
Rector, Christ Church Cathedral, Vicar General of The
Diocese of Nassau and The Bahamas and Reverend
Father Michael Gittens, Priest Vicar, Christ Church
Cathedral, will officiate and interment will follow in
St. Matthew's Cemetery, Shirley Street, Nassau.
Mrs. Pyfrom was pre-deceased by her husband, Roscow
N. Pyfrom and is survived by her children, Charlotte
Pyfrom, Rosalie Pyfrom, Frances Sakach, and Catherine
Pyfrom; her grandchildren, Christina Halliday, Jeffrey
Halliday, Jennifer Halliday and Christina Pyfrom;.
nephews Joseph Thompson, John Thompson, James
Thompson, John Alfred Thompson, Judson Thompson,
Bill Woodman, Jolnny Woodman and George Pyfrom;
nieces Lydia Burrows, Susan Russell Kanuka, Jennifer
Alman, Julie Morris, Anne Bethel and Ethelyn Lowe
and many other relatives and friends.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Christ
Church Cathedral, P.O. Box N 653, Nassau in memory
of HAZEL CHARLOTTE PYFROM.
Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited 22
Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, NP, The Bahamas.


,=


U FAMILY GUARDIAN
INil.IRANCE COMPANY L.IMITL .


~ ~-~r~r~ee~~raararrrUs;r*i.lr;;ol T F


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-11 F*'^


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PAGE 11, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008


- .. ,. .- ..' -" ,. .t f...




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"-.. {.

4' te 97. .4


THE TRIBUNE,


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ST.-* -.
Wt^*


'. . ".-... .
~ ," ,o .1
o . -, Cs,,


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obn 3tilt

Marina Village, Paradise Island (242) 363" 1141
Crystal Court at Atlantis
Our Lucaya, Freeport, Grand Bahama
Marsh Harbour, Abaco Harbour Island Emerald Bay, Exuma


, -


-,* -() .


,eu'4A






THE TRIBUiNt


PAGE 12, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008


LOCALNW


* TEMPO TURNS
THREE IN NASSAU

REGGAE superstar Luciano
sang in front of a small crowd
until daylight S'inday as Tempo
celebrated its third birthday on
the grounds of Sup'erclubs
Breezes. Cabie Beach. Hutn-
dreds of Bahamians and tourists';
mostly Caribbean natives,
attended the special concert
which featured a number of top
reggae, soca and calypso artists,
including Mr Vegas, Cecille,
Tessane Chin, Allison Hinds,
Crossfire, Jah Bami, Jah Hem,
and surprise guests artists Sprag-
ga Benz and Mr Lex.


* *-,



- 4
1 i
r ?
1: <
e .


Ten-year-old hangs himself 'accidentally'


FROM page one
he had died.
"I feel so bad. That's my son,
only three children I have. I
have three sons. He loved me, I
loved him, everybody loved my
boy," Docius said.
Police press liaison officer
WalterFvans said the child died
before ambulance medical per-
sonnel arrived.
"EMS personnel were called
but the child showed no vital
signs," ASP Evans told. The Tii-


bune yesterday.
ASP Evans said police do
not suspect foul play and are
treating his death as an acci-
dent.
"This incident is being treat-
ed as an accidental death. We
are not treating it as anything
suspicious. We believe that this
boy may have been playing,"
ASP Evans said.
A few months ago,..an I11-
year-old boy accidentally hung
-Jitiself while playing in the
back yard of his home off Hay
Street.


FROM page one
The HHFIB report, pre-
pared in June, 2008, states that
Doctors I hospital has indicat-
ed in writing to the board that
the institution, based on its
own "investigation and analy-
sis of the case, recognized that
there were two significant
opportunities in the process
of care provided to Mr
Christopher Esfakis to miti-
gate against such an incident
occurring again."
According to the report,
which The Tribune under-
stands is only the second such
annual report to be tabled by
the board in its ten-year exis-
tence, Doctors Hospital told
the board that such "oppor-
tunities" included giving
"clear terms of empowerment
(to) a person, acting on behalf
of the hospital, to intervene
in the best interest of patient
care and outcome."
Meanwhile, the hospital
suggested that provisions
empowering attending nurses
to "withhold or defer and
inform an agent of the hospi-
tal of any physician decision
and/or order with which the
nurse is uncomfortable or
uncertain or in the opinion of
the nurse may prove detri-
mental to the patient" would
also assist in this regard.
The report states that in the
wake of Mr Esfakis' death, the
private hospital has "con-
tracted with an organisation
to provide clinical oversight
of the Intensive Care Unit and
Intermediate Care Units" and
"hired a hospitalist to attend
to all patients in these units
and engaging clinical directors
for various departments in the
hospital."


Opposition calls for

'urgent review of findings'

from election court cases


FROM page one

democracy."
Mrs Hanna-Martin was
responding to a statement
issued by FNM chairman John-
ley Ferguson yesterday, in which
he implied the PLP contributed
to instances of electoral fraud
by "failing to meet the deadline
for the Boundaries Commission
to be appointed and to report."
Stating that the former PLP
government were "negligent or
late at every turn" in their
responsibilities as part of the
electoral process, Mr Ferguson
said they "succeeded in wast-
ing the time of two Supreme
Court justices for a year and a
half" by pursuing the election
court matters when they could
have been put to better use.
Ms Hanna-Martin described
the FNM commentary as "very
foolish utterances."
"The Boundary Commission
of 2007 has no relationship or
relevance to findings of non-
nationals voting in our elections
nor to the issue of persons who
live in completely different con-
stituencies knowingly voting in
another constituency altogether
as was at issue in both recent
cases," said Mrs Hanna-Martin.
In response to claims that the
party had wasted judicial time
by pursuing the cases, the chair-
woman pointed out that Mr
Ferguson himself exercised the
right to challenge election
results in the MICAL con-
stituency in 2002.
"The avenue of challenge to
election results is governed by
clearly defined principles of law
of constitutional import," said
Mrs Hanna-Martin.
She added that it is "dis-
graceful that the FNM has


sought to disguise its incompe-
tence and monumental failing
in the Attorney General's
Office in bringing accused per-
sons to trial within a reasonable
time and hence the increasing
number of persons on bail for
serious offences...by suggesting
the election cases prevented tri-
als of criminal matters.
"Clearly this is an attempt to
run from its own responsibility
and feed upon the fears and
frustrations of our people in a
seemingly out-of-control crime
situation in our country," sug-
gested Mrs Hanna-Martin.
She hit back that the FNM is
"shamelessly searching for
scapegoats and smokescreens
to deflect from some very fun-
damental issues and from its
own duties and responsibilities."
Mrs Hanna-Martin noted that
both in the MICAL case and in
the Pinewood and Marco City
cases, the results were very close
and in the most recent of the
three, "findings of law and fact
have brought to the fore major
issues relative to electoral fraud.
"In particular, in the
Pinewood case the court found
what it called the 'most egre-
gious failures' in the parlia-
mentary registration system and
noted that the parliamentary
registrar failed for whatever rea-
son to ensure the integrity of
the registration process in
Pinewood.
"Ultimately the court recom-
mended a comprehensive
review 'of the practices and pro-
cedures of the Registration
Department with a view to
ensuring that what happened in
Pinewood does not reoccur
because it threatens to under-
mine the fundamental basis of
our parliamentary democracy,"
she said.


ex cess baggage
services


4005 NW 28TH ST. MIAMI FL.
ALSO
SUNJET BUILDING 750 SW 34TH ST. FT. LAUDERDALE


?-.
//:I.


TOLL FREE 1-877-8-EXCESS or.. 305-871-0571


I S v'me~i teded folA I


muLst be at o0ur4 Ft. LCILaudeCdadle
office no later than 3:.30pm on
Friday, Decembe*r 19+k.

We will be unable to deliver
any packages a-fter
Tuesday, December 23rd.

You may collect packages until
1:OOpmr on December 24+thk.


HolIday Hours


CHIODO COLLECTION
stainless steel-and diamonds With white mother of pearl flnqu6 dial
284 bay street nassuu bahamas 242 302 2800
mall at marathon harbour bay palmdale
marsh harbour abaco
s till ~gucci crystal court at aotlanlis


Al~


Holiday Hours
Saturday, December 6 to Wednesday, December 23
10:00am; 7:00pm
December 24, 10:00am -.7:00pm





a $ax

&ww,

Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

Very Best of Burt Bacharach, Beethoven's Nine Symphonies, 5CD set;
Aretha Franklin's Queen of Soul, 4 CD set, Johnny Cash the Legend,
Classic Songs, 4 CD set; Greatest Pop Hits of the 60's 6CD set; Best of
Black Gospel, 74 Beloved Gospel Greats, 3 CCD's; Sam Cooke, Portrait
of a Legend CD, 30 hits 1951-1964; Hit Parade 1955 25 Original Hits
Cl); F6nk Sinatra Album (LP) "Trilogy The Past, The Present and The
Future (Some Very Good Years)"; Reproduction Royal Readers Vols. 111,
IV and V, Steiff Teddy Bears, Vintag Children's Hankies, Adult Hankies,
New and Vintage.


__ _


I




THE TRIBUNE


9yF
IW
ow'vv


(Excluding Net Items ad New Arrivals)
PW FAEUntO Mjth9tve
PLUS FABUL OUN.Sl


ENr| A nE-S Ln ^ IM jniTE.,
Iillt" E m4
NTf gBRl& jjjFEi


5wAdiu N iMu
*j hug B'eAJA
mw4 ii i1 P 'W
*^IW *^ -* ^ ^ 9s1^"if ***'^**"W *WH^-W < ;C,441 Z ir Kd -.Lf


PAGE 13, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008
COMING
SOON a


^^^^8^~~. -;21iJ~!fc|-
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N OW B
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008


As time goes by


yviEW


IT IS traumatic when funda-
mental changes, which result
from selling traditional Gov-
ernment enterprises, are made.
The sale of the telephone com-
pany is now on the front burner.
That is a good thing. It has
been on the kitchen counter for
many years now but in the
interest of the Bahamian people
as a whole that it has finally got
onto the front burner.
It may be hard on a number
of persons whose employment
may be affected by the sale but
it is for the common good.
The timing is problematic
because of the financial crisis
that has descended on the
world. However that is the least
of the problems. Suggestions
have been made that the sale
should be delayed because of
this crisis. If that were done it
would be disastrous. For if truth
be told the value of telephone
companies whose monopoly


oALi
"
' I


^^*^j^.


business is largely generated
from the capital intensive land
line business
has been diminishing each
year for at least the last ten
years. That is tfie nature of the
telecommunications business of
today. So the longer it takes to
complete a sale the less the
company will be worth.
ATT the former giant of a
land line business is only prof-
itable now as a cellular and wi
fi company. Each quarter what
is left of the landline business
continues to decline. Should this
trend continue this business seg-
ment will eventually disappear
altogether.
Just as we can't fight nature
neither can we fight the changes
brought about by new technol-
ogy. Let's sell now while we
have something to sell.


FROM page one

Association to bring about a quick resolu-
tion to this matter.
"I have been speaking to the Bahamas
Hotel Employers Association, Mr Barrie
Farrington, also with Mr Don Cook and
with Obie Ferguson with the view of finding
some resolution to the current problem," he
said.
Consultant for Sandals, Don Cook, said
on Friday that the resort does not recognize
the BHMAWU as the umbrella union for
their employees, only the Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied workers Union.
According to Mr Foulkes, the two unions
are in the appeals stage of a court battle to
determine who would be the official repre-
sentatives for Sandals employees.


FROM page one

The case was the second to goe
in the government's favour, after
Byran Woodside successfully held cld h
on to his post in the Pinewood
constituency in the face of a chal-
lenge from Senator Allyson May- ple by goi
nard-Gibson. "They
In a statement released yester- time of te
day, FNM chairman Senator tices orth
Johnley Ferguson said: "Having when the
lost all two of their election cases, could ha
and being unable to proceed with use dealir
a third because the candidate very es include
sensibly refused to be involved, Mr Feh
PLP politicians are now trying to time that
convince the pubic that they did everyboc
the country a favour by exposing their failu
flaws in the system. "To he
"'The truth is that PLP leaders would cor
could not accept their defeat in the last e
May, 2002, and were desperately not possil
holding out the hope to some of However,
their supporters that they could ber all to'
overturn the decision of the peo- the gove
had ulti


Minister working with Sandals
"The BHCAWU headed by Roy Cole-
brooke is the recognized bargaining agent
for employees at Sandals presently," said
Mr Foulkes.
However, he said the labour laws and
the Code of Industrial Practice provide pro-
tection to union executives in the work-
place. And, according to him, both unions
are recognized by the Ministry of Labour
because they are registered organizations.
"The protection that the law gives to
union executives, in terms of fair treatment,
should be accorded to both unions," said Mr
Foulkes.
"The practice is, whenever there are ter-
minations or lay-offs, the executives or lead-
ership of the unions should be the last per-
sons who are terminated so that the lead-


M blames PLP aft(

action court challen


ing to court.
succeeded in wasting the
wo Supreme Court jus-
a year and a half at time
services of these judges
'e been put to far better
ig with a backlog of cas-
ng criminal matters."
rguson said it is "high
the PLP stop blaming
ly and the system for
ires".
ar them talk, a stranger
iclude that at the time of
election the PLP could
bly have been in office.
Bahamians will remem-
o well that the PLP was
rnment of the day and
mate constitutional


responsibility for the co
the elections."
The party were "neg
late at every turn" in re
their electoral response
claims the statement.
"Their most grievous
when they failed to r
deadline for the Boundai
mission to be appointed
report as required by Art
the Constitution," said IN
son.
This delay gave the Pa
tary Registration Dep
"the almost impossible
effecting boundary cha
moving people from c
stituency to another in
the election."


ership ol the unibn will remain in the work-
place to protect their membership."
BHMAWU leaders expressed concern to
local media over the firing of their entire
executive board outside of the Sandals
employee entrance on Friday.
They felt the resort made a concerted
effort to weed out their members.
Mr Foulkes said his hands are tied until
the court case is complete.
When a ruling has been handed down he
will consult with employees to determine
which union theywant reprepresenting them.
"I cannot do anything until the court
makes its ruling," said Mr Foulkes.
"Then I can decide whether I should hold
a poll at the hotel to find out who the work-
ers wish to have as their bargaining agent,
whether they want the BHMAWU or the
BHCAWU." ,-

It also deprived candidates and'
e their campaign organizations of
"sufficient time to check the reg-
ister against the facts on the
ge ground and to determine what'
eS persons were or were not prop-
erly registered 1in their
induct of constituencies," said the chair-
man.
aligent or "The PLP should try honestly
elation to to face up to their failures, to the
sibilities, fact that they lost the last election
Fairly and squarely, and why they
fault was lost...While in government they
neet the often acted as if they were still-in
rics Con- opposition, .and since they have
,d and to been in opposition at least some
tidcle 70 of of them have been acting as if
vir Fergu- they arc still in government.
"If they fail again they would
arliamen- have betrayed their mandate to
)artment give the country a responsible
e task of opposition and forfeited any right
nges and to favourable consideration for a
one con- new mandate from the people in
time for the next election," said Mr Fer-
guson.


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IN LOVING MEMORY

DEBORAH (DEBBIE)

ANNE KEMP















SUNRISE: JANUARY 5. 1962
SUNSET: DECEMBER 14. 2007

GOD SAW YOU GETTING TIRED.

GOD SAW YOU GETTING TIRED
AND A CURE WAS NOT TO BE,
SO HE PUT HIS ARMS AROUND YOU
AND WHISPERED COME TO ME"!

WITH TEARFUL EYES WE WATCHED YOU
SUFFER,
AND SAW YOU FADE AWAY.
ALTHOUGH WE LOVED YOU DEARLY,
WE COULD NOT MAKE YOU STAY.

A GOLDEN HEART STOPPED BEATING
HARD WORKING HANDS WERE PUT TO REST.
GOD BROKE OUR HEARTS TO PROVE TO US,
HE ONLY TAKES THE BEST!!!

SADLY MISSED BY HER HUSBAND, CHRIS; HER
TWO CHILDREN, ANNORA AND YASMIN; HER
GRANDSON LEADER; H ER MOTHER,
EUNICE; HER SISTERS, KATIE, ROSIE AND
PAULA, HER BROTHERS, PAUL, DERAL,
DENNIS, RICKY AND ANDYAND A HOST OF
RELATIVES AND FRIENDS TOO MANY TO
MENTION.

MAY SHE REST IN PEACE.


LOCA NEW














MONDAY. D E EM IER I 1 2 1


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
BACK in the ring for his first fight since April 2007, Sherman 'the
Tank' Williams went the full distance before he out-decisioned Andrew
Greeley on Friday night.
Williams, 36, out-slugged the 27-year-old Greeley from Louisiana to
secure the unanimous victory at the Bourbon Street Stadium in Jack-
sonville, Florida.
"Everybody that was with him was extremely pleased," said Williams'
new manager Si Stem. "He just looked absolute solid. It didn't look like
he was off for 16 months."
Stern said Williams should be given a A grade for shutting out
Greeley by winning every round to close out the year on a successful
note.
But Stern said there will not be any
rest for the weary as Williamns will have
"Fortunately for to spend his Christmas holiday in the
me, I stuck to my gym training for his first fight in the
new year on January 16 against Darrel
game plan. Madison at the Mallory Square in Key
I started the fight West, Florida.
"We're looking forward to it. I think
off with a rhythm, he will do very well," Stern stressed.
getting my jab off "He just have to continue to work hard
Sand we will have a sparring partner
and I watched tO come in and get him a little sharper."
see what my Williams, who improved his win-loss-
draw record to 34-10-2 with 19 knock-
opponent was outs, said he was quite pleased with his
going to bring to performance.
"After 16 months off, fighting in the
the table main event put a little pressure on me,
but I had no doubt in my mind that, I
just had to stay focus and pick utip where
Sherman Williams I left off," Williams stated.
"Going,in as the main event, every-
body was waiting. Fortunately for me, I stuck to my game plan. 1
started the fight off with a rhythm, getting my jab off and I watched to
see what my opponent was going to bring to the table."
After controlling the tempo from the first round, Williams said he
took his time and just took the fight to Greeley.
"By the third round, it seemed as if I was going to knock the kid out.
He was holding and wasn't comfortable fighting on the insidee"
Williams reflected:
"He was strong, but I rocked him at the end of the third round and
he held on and made it through the bell. I caught with a vicious body
shot in the fourth and he stumbled back in the corner and I got a bar-
rage of punches in that he survived as well."
Realizing that he was up against a real stud, who refused to go
away, Williams said he tried to out-box Greeley the rest of the way to
SEE page 17


NEW PROVIDENCE VOLLEYBALL ASSOCIATION: LADIES' CHAMPIONSHIP CROWN


I


Fourth straight crown as Lady Truckers are sent crashing


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
ALREADY stretched to the
limit in five sets in the fourth
game, the Scottdale Vixens was-
n't prepared to play a fifth and
deciding game against the John-
son's Lady Truckers.
On Friday night at the DW
Davis Gymnasium, the Vixens
prevailed with a 25-22, 24-26,
21-25, 25-22 and 15-11 decision
to snatch their fourth straight
New Providence Volleyball
Association ladies' champi-
onship crown,
After bouncing back from
losing game one, Vixens
clinched the next three games to
join the Scotiabank Defenders,
who were crowned the men's
champions on Wednesday night
after they swept the Technicians
in three straight games.
"We played in spurts and the
Truckers played us hard," said
power hitter Cheryse Rolle.
"This wasn't our best perfor-
mance, but we came through at
the end.
"It feels excellent. We can
now take a break because we
worked hard for this one. We're
pleased with the win and we're
looking forward to next year."
With such a young team-plus
veteran Jackie Conyers, coach
Joseph 'Joe Mo' Smith said they
didn't win in the style they
wanted'too, but it's good to be
champions again.
"We haven't played up to the
par that I know we can. We


THE SCOTTDALE VIXENS are the New Providence Volleyball Association's
champions again. Pictured above seated from left are Latondra Brown; Lav-
erne 'Nancy' Symonette, sisters Cheryse and Krystel Rolle and Avoni
Seymour. In back are assistant coach Raymony 'Rhymes' Wilson, Laval
Sands, Tamasaine Emmanuel, Jackie Conyers and head coach Joe Mo
Smith..


played in spurts and that threw
us out of our game mentally,"
he said. "Laval (Sands) is our
best defensive player, but if she
is not on, it throws us our of
sync."
Smith, who was assisted by
Raymond 'Rhymes' Wilson,
said he wasn't concerned
because he knew his Vixens
could beat the Lady Truckers
on any given day.
"They haven't realized yet
what they need to do when
Kelsie (Johnson) is not in the
front court," Smith lamented.
"Until they realize that an d get
another piece of the puzzle to


off-set that, they can never beat
us."
Johnson, the power hitter for
the Lady Truckers, tried to car-
ry the team on her shoulders,
especially when she played in
the backcourt.
But she admitted that it was-
n't easy against the Vixens.
"We came out,-we knew our
bats were against the wall, we
played tough, we tried every-
thing and we had them shut
down for a minute," she pointed
out.
"But the Vixens is a youth-
ful team so when you have the
opportunity to put them away,


.you have to put them away. We
have a lot of older, players on
our team who get tired, so
fatigue set in and things hap-
pen that shouldn't happen."
The only other comment that
Johnson could give was: "Con-
gratulations to them. They are
the champions."
Had it been one or two plays
they successfully executed, Lady
Truckers' coach DeVince Smith
said they could have been cele-
brating just like his Defenders
did on Wednesday night.
"The setter is the brain of the
team. She controls the team and
I think we had a lot of prob-
lems with our setting and that
threw the whole team out of
sync," Smith pointed out.
Despite the loss, Smith said
he's not in the least disappoint-
ed as his Lady Truckers are
much older than the Vixens and
they went out and gave it their
all. .
"I couldn't ask for anything
more than that," Smith summed
up. In the final analysis, Cheryse
Rolle had 13 spikes and Jackie
Conyers came through with 11.
Tamasaine Emmanuel posted
eight blocks and Laval Sands
added two. Conyers also record-
ed six serves, followed by
Emmanuel with four.
For the Lady Truckers, Kelsie
Johnson had 16 kills and Edrica
McPhee added 12. McPhee also
* contributed four blocks and
Shavaughn Woodside had two.
Margaret Albury had six serves
and Woodside was responsible
for two.


.... ........ ---for -tw o.-


*, TODAY
Track and Field
3 pm College of
the Bahamas' first.
Track and Field Clinic for
high school athletes at their
Wellness Center and the
Thomas A. Robinson Track
and Field Stadium.
TUESDAY
Track and Field
3 pm College of the
Bahamas' first Track and
Field Clinic for high school
athletes at their Wellness Cen-
ter and the Thomas A. Robin-
son Track and Field Stadium.

.- .

BASKETBALL

Basketball
Wildcats win
Catholic High
tournament
"^ THE Sir Jack Hay-
way Wildcats took
advantage of the
home court to pull
off a 56-47 victory to claim the
33rd Catholic High Christmas
Invitational Basketball Tour-
nament on Saturday at the Jack
Hayward Gymnasium in Grand
Bahama. Shavano 'Buddy'
Hield of Tabernacle was named
the most valuable player.
In the consolation game, the
CC Sweeting Cobras brought
home third place with a 44-41
over the Tabernacle Falcons.
The RM Bailey Pacers
secured fifth place with a 51-49
triumph over the Sunland
Lutheran.


SHAREESE
Richardson
drives in for
a lay up
against the
COB Caribs.


COB'S Garvin
Lightbourne
is fouled on
his way to the .'
basket. .*-*'






Derek Smith/
BIS


Bees enjoy


double


victory
By RENALDQ DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net
The College of the Bahamas Athletics Depart-
ment, hosting the first combined men's and wom-
en's intercollegiate series of its kind on Saturday
against the Savannah College of Art and Design,
struggled against their visiting NAIA affiliate mem-
bers, Saturday at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.
Men
SCAD Bees 90
COB Caribs -.64
A stagnant Caribs offense leaned too heavily
on its leading scorer and despite a more productive
second half were unable to recover from
Garvin Lightbourne led' all scorers with 33 of
the Carib's 64 points and took 18 of the team's 46
total field goal attempts.
Lightbourne shot efficiently from the field at 56
percent (10-18), including 3-5 from beyond the
arch and 10-14 from the free throw line.
Damian Sturrup was the only other starter in
double figures with 12, while Tario Brooks chipped
in with 10,off the bench.
A closely contested game early in the first half,
the Caribs trailed by just two, 17-15, midway
through the first half before the Bees
Theron Butler scored the opening basket of the
game for the Caribs and the game remained close-
ly contested as the Bees led just 17-15 early in the
first half.
SCAD went on an 11-2 run to widen an 11 point
advantage, 28-17.
The Bees were more patient, choosing their
spots to attack the Caribs zone and Rashad Park-
er basket made it 33-19 before Brooks scored for
the Caribs and ended a 16-4 Bees run.
SCAD shot 50 percent from the field in the first
half while COB shot 34 percent led 44-23 at the
half.
SEE page 18


ens


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cha


P


S


S









- AMERICAN FOOTBALL


The Warriors overcome
* by RENALDO DORSETT Warriors will make a trip to the Destroyers yesterday at t
Sports Reporter Commonwealth American Foot- Davis field. The Warric
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net ball League playoffs. the tiebreaker over the I
The Warriors earned the fourth ers based on total point
In just their second year of exis- and final playoff spot with a 14-8 and margin of victory..
tence, the Tripoint Kingdom win over the Defence. Force Both teams finished th
MM other. The Destroyers
S with a 34-30 win when th
faced off in November, b
to seal a third consecutive
berth. The Warriors hel
Advantage for much of th
before they added a secoi
on short yardage midway
the fourth quarter for
score advantage.
.The Destroyers adde
Touchdown pass howev
clock management and aI
defensive unit failed to r
late game stop as the W
managed to run out the c
Ron Rollain, Warrior
Coach, said his team co
to overcome the adverse
faced throughout the
including the heartbreak
against the Destroyers last
"It feels great. I am jus
~ R. \w rm'excited for my guys. Thi
worked really hard all sea
it paid off today. We ha
close game earlier in the
that we sort of gave aw
that fumble at the goal li
..that was a really tough


Destroyers
he D.W. was hard but we got over that and
ors hold we think we're moving in the
Destroy- right direction."
s scored Rollain said the competitive
nature of the first matchup gave
e season his team confidence headed into
nst each yesterday's game, knowing a trip
escaped to the playoffs was on the line.
he teams "It was motivation for the team
ut failed because coming into this game
e playoff they knew they could beat this
d an 8-0 team and they know they should
e contest have won the last game," he said,
nd score "It shows growth in the program
through and it's a major opportunity just
a two to be able to make the playoffs."
As the fourth ranked team in
d a late the playoffs, the Warriors will
er poor square off against the top seeded
fatigued and undefeated John Bull Jets.
register a Rollain said although his team'
Warriors has failed to challenge the Jets
lock. thus far, he said his he squad feels
rs Head they have alot to prove in their
ntinued inaugural playoff berth.
ity they "We're the fourth seed and
season, that's fine. We just have to prove
ing loss to ourselves and prove to the rest
t month, of the league that we are a legiti-
st really mate threat," he said, "The first
ey have time was not very pleasant, the
son and second time we played better and
d a real for the playoffs we just have to
season intensify and improve in every
ay with area, especially strengthening that
ine and middle of the defense."
loss. It


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The more you spend with us, the more chances you have.to win.
Drawing rakes place December 24"' 2008.




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NASSAU: Rawson Square, Bay Street, 240 Bay Street
Atlantis, Beach Tower Atlantis, Royal Towers + Marina Village at Atlantis

*Cruise certificate is valid for a complimentary cruise for two persons on select sailings and stateroom categories. Port charges, government fees and iiel surcharges are additional.-.
Certificate is not redeemable for cash, is non-transferable and must sail by 12/31/09. Restrictions may apply and terms and conditions are subject to change.


jI LL
DEFENCE FORCE STINGRAYS Jermaine baker is pushed back by the strong
defence of the Kingdom Warriors yesterday. The Warriors won.


Bethel Brothers Morticians
e Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026




Stanley
Alphonso
Wright, 72
of Wright's Lane, Fox Hill will
be held on Wednesday
December 17th, 1:30 p.m. at St.
Anne's Anglican Church, Fox
U Hill Road. Fr. Crosley Walkine
and Fr. Ormand Wright will
*. officiate. Interment will follow
in the Church's Cemetery.
Left to cherish memories of him
are his son, Wayde Wright;
daughter-in-law, Mavis Wright and two grand children. Onesh and
Owen Wright; his siblings, Harold "Junior" and Yvonne Wright,
Lawrence Wright, Father Ormand and Theresa Wright, John Vincent
Wright, Gerald and Robert Wright of Coco, Florida, Florence
Wright-Rahming, Avis Wright, Jackie and Leslie Wright, Bettty
Gardner, Hattie Wint, and Mary Wright of Coco, Florida.
His nephews and their wives, Charles Jr. and Laverne Rahming,
Andrae and Phedra Rahming, Gary and Simone Rahming, Dwight
and Kizzy Rahming, Devaughn and Shakera Rahming, Sergeant
Craignal and Tealah Wright, Lead Seaman Darrell and Dora Wright
and De'Andre.
His nieces and their husbands, Sheila and Pastor Wilfred Adderley,
WPC 1266 Fredricka Rahming, Ingrid and Fredrick Brooks, Argua
Wright, Michelle Rahming, Bridgette Ferguson, Peggy and Adrian
Styles, Andrinique Brown, Latoine Brown, WPC 3319 Tara Wright,
Natasha and Rev. Reuben Rahming, Giselle and Terrance Gardner,
Keria and Ricardo Russell, Pleshette and Stephen McPhee and
Khandi Wright of Freeport G.B.
Grand nephews, thirty six (36), grand nieces, twenty four (24),
great grand nephews, nine (9) and great grand nieces, four (4),
two aunts, Avis Moss and Ruth Bonamy both of Florida and all
of his uncles both sides, Wrights and Kerrs (deceased).
First cousins, Leroy "Roy" Edgecombe, Hilda Galanis, Agnes
Bonamy, Maryanne Newchurch, Patsy Long, Elaine Grandberry,
Verna Blue, Gail Moss all of Florida, Gertrude Gibson, Eltoy,
Della, Eveline, Sheila, Gerald Wright, Alvin, Leviticus and Esau
Wright, Malcolm Nell Wright Hutchinson, Nataniel "Nat" Cooper
and his siblings, Albert Rolle, Peter Galanis, and Eva Edgecombe.
Other relatives and friends includes, Lana Edgecombe, Gregory
Edgecombe, Fr. John Clarke, Fr. Nobert Cooper, Rev. J. Carl and
Mother Evangeline Rahming, Mrs. Judy Tynes and Eve family,
The families of Davis, Rahming, Brice, Kerr, Edgecombe, Curtis,
Coopers, and Wrights of Creek Village and Fox Hill Village, The
Wrights and Edgecombes of Long Island, Earnestine Moxey, Berth
Ingraham, Marolyn Knowles and Knowles family, J. Barnie
Farrington and Kerzner International family, Thomas Bastian, Drs.
Rao and Chea, The Staff and friends of Netts Restaurant, Epiphany
Anglican Church family, St. Anne's family. Ministry of Youth
Sports and Culture, Seventeen Shop family, Mr. Fredrick Mitchell
M.P, for Fox Hill and Senator Dr. Jacinta Higgs and the entire Fox
Hill Community.
Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians
#44 Nassau Street on Tuesday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and
on Wednesday from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. and at the church
from 12:00 noon until service time.


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PAGE 16, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008


TRIBUNE SPORTS


P-








TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008, PAGE 17


BSC champions crowned


WHILE Transfiguration
repeated as the men's champions,
two new champions were
crowned in the co-ed and 17-and-
under divisions in the Baptist
Sports Council's 2008 Rev. Dr.
William Thompson Softball Clas-
sic.
On Saturday at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex, Trans-
figuration completed a three-
game sweep of the best-of-five
championship series against pen-
nant winning SHAW AME Zion
with an 11-1 rout.
Left fielder Ed Knowles was
named the Most Valuable Player
for the series. The league's batting
champion went to third base-
man/shoitstop Darren Stevens of
Shaw AME and injured Alexan-
der Bain of Transfiguration cart-
ed off the Best Pitcher award.
The co-ed division went the full
distance with pennant winning
Golden Gates dethroning Mace-
donia. On Saturday, Golden
Gates won 7-5 in game three,,
Macedonia took game four 6-4
and Golden Gates won the finale
21-14.
While Golden Gates' catch-
er/pitcher Ramon Johnson was
named the championship's MVP,
the league's batting champion was
third sacker/shortstop Renee
Davis of Golden Gates and the
best pitcher was Junior Moss, also
of Golden Gates.
And in the 17-and-under divi-
sion, Temple Fellowship also had
to go the full distance before they
prevailed in the fifth and final
game over Macedonia to emerge
as the champions. Temple Fel-


Transfiguration repeat their triumph


MEMBERS of Transfiguration celebrated as the repeat men's champions
of the Baptist Sports Council's 2008 Rev. Dr. William Thompson Softball
Classic on Saturday at the Banker's Field, Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.


. lowship won game three 9-4 on
Saturday, Macedonia took game
four 13-7 and Temple Fellowship
clinched the series 20-7 in the fifth
and deciding game.
Left fielder Deval Storr of
Temple Fellowship was named
the championship's MVP. The
, league's batting champion was
versatile Addie Finley of Temple
Fellowship and the Best Pitcher
was Walter Bell of Macedonia.
Here's a summary of the dec-
dinig games in the three series
played on Saturday:
Transfiguration 11, Shaw AME
Zion 1: Nelson Farrington spun a


three-hit shut-out through three
innings for the win before Alvin
Lightbourne came in to relieve
him in the fourth giving up the
only run to Shaw on Dwayne
Stevens' RBI sacrifice fly that
sent home Walbert Hanna.
MVP Ed Knowles had a pair of
doubles with three RBI, scoring
twice to lead Transfiguration's


/
TEMPLE Fellowship clinched the Baptist Sports Council's Rev. William
Thompson Softball Classic 17-and-under championship crown on Saturday
at the Banker's Field at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.


offensive attack. Van Johnson
had a triple, two RBIs and a run
scored and Stephen Brown scored
two runs.
Valentino Munroe suffered the
loss.
Golden Gates 21, Macedonia
14: MVP Ramon Johnson helped
his own cause by producing a solo
in-the-park home run, a run-pro-


ducving double and scored three
times to secure the upsetting win
for Golden Gates.
Renee Davis went 4-for-4 with
four runs; Calvin Greenslade had
two hits with a RBI, scoring four
times as well; Randy Wallace had
two-run triple, scoring three
times; Nacara Curtis was 2-for-4
with two RBI and two runs; Dino


GOLDEN Gates dethroned Macedonia to win the co-ed championship
title in the Baptist Sports Council's 2008 Rev. William Thompson Softball
Classic on Saturday at the Banker's Field at the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex.


Sherman 'the Tank'


Williams outguns


Andrew Greeley

FROM page 15
secure the win. "I think I'm my biggest fan and I never ever doubted
in myself. There were a lot of naysavers wondering how I would react
if I got hit with a big punch," Williams charged.
"But my best defense is my best offense, so in my mind, I knew that
whatever he did, I will not waste any punches. I pretty much expected
the performance that I gave."
Shaking off the rust in the first two rounds, Williams said the enor-
mous training sessions he went through in Europe over the past year
has really paid off for him.
"I was a bit cautious, not too much tentative," Williams stressed. "I
expected to pull out the fight the way I did because I envisioned it in
my mind on.my way to the fight."
With a successful return to the ring, Williams said he's now looking
forward to his first bout in the new year with renewed vigor.
"After I was announced the winner with an unanimous decision
when I stepped out of the ring, I felt great and come Monday morning
(today), I will be back in the gym training," Williams projected.
"It's kind of odd having a training camp just before the Christmas
holiday and the New Year when most people take time off.
"It's going to be hard to find sparring partners, but I've made a com-
mitment to fight, so I will have to wait until after January 16 to cele-
brate."


rake An


Aditional


Our Alrea

Discounted Price


Total Discount Now 40%
These are some of our Nett Prices:


I


SPORTS


RooT^ili


MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008, PAGE 17


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Sweeting was 3-for-4 with thrie
RBIs and two runs and Candicv
Smith was 1-for-4 with three RB i
and two runs scored.
-Losing pitcher Cardinal Gilberl
went 3-for-4 with threc runm,
scored to lead Macedonia. Lyn -
den Gaitor had a pair of triple;'
with three RBIs and two runs.
Davanna Mackey was had twu
hits, scoring four times; Brian
Capron had a double with a RBI
scoring twice and Willard Elliolt
had two hits with a RBI, scoring a
run.
Temple Fellowship 20, Mace.-
donia 7: MVP Deval Storr was 3
for-4 with a pair of solo in-the
park home runs, scoring a total
of four runs'to lead the charge in
the 17-and-under clincher for
Temple Fellowship.
Angelo Butler went 4-for-4
with two RBIs and four runs
scored; DeShawn White had
three hits with three RBI, scoring
three runs; Chad Burrows had a
triple and scored three times and
winning pitcher Dominic Collie
helped his cause with three hits, '
three RBi and two runs scored.
Crandon Wallace, who relieved
starting and losing pitcher Waltei..'
Bell, had two hits and two runs...
scored and D'Kyle Rolle had .1
pair of hits with a RBI, scoring a
run for Macedonia,












tv


SAVE*SAVE*SAV


An






TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 18, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008


BASKETBALL

Bees enjoy double victory in intercollegiate series igI.


FROM page 15
The second half produced
much of the same as the Bees
opened on a 7-2 run for a 51-25
advantage. Lightbourne
brought the Caribs as close as
they would get in the second


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half when he drove the lane and
flushed a dunk over Christian
Moore.
He converted on the free
throw for the three point play to
make the score 67-47.
A three pointer by Romell
Witherspoon gave SCAD their
largest lead of the game of 31


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with an 86-55 advantage.
The Bees balanced scoring
attack fielded five players in
double figures led by Xavier
Blain-Cruz and Mihajlo
Crnogoroc who both finished
with 15 each.
Witherspoon added 11 points,
six rebounds and two assists,


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Rashad Parker finished with 10
and Rob Kurs chipped in with
14 points of the bench.
The Bees ended a two game
losing streak with the win and
improved to 9-3 on the year.
Women
SCAD Bees 67
COB Caribs 42
The Caribs struggled to over-
come an obvious size advan-
tage, telling on both ends of the
floor.
Defensively the Caribs were
outrebounded 51-31, and offen-
sively the Bees pounded the
COB inside as center Katie
Stover led all scorers with 16
points.
The 6' 4" Stover also finished
with five rebounds and tWo
assists. ,, ,
* Reserve ceiffre Brittany Ter-
ry also dominated theh interior
with nine points aid a game
high 13 rebounds.
Standing at 5'10", the tallest
player for the Caribs, Ashley
Moss finished with six points
and nine rebounds.
The Bees took their first lead
of the game on a Catherine
VanderLaan score to give
SCAD a 6-4 three minutes into
the first half.
The Caribs were outscored
28-7 throughout the remainder
of the first half thanks to woeful
shooting from COB.
The Caribs shot just 16 per-
cent (5-31) in and were 0-10
from beyond the arc in the first
half.
The Bees led 34-13 at the
half.
COB opened the second half
on a brief 6-0 run. halted by a
VanderLaan three pointer


ON THE BALL: The SCAD Bees tak-
ing op COB Caribs.. The SCAD Bees
,.won 90-64.
stemming from a perfectly exe-
cuted play out of a time-out.
The second half deficit grew
as large as 29 points on a layup
by Stover to give the Bees a 57-
28 lead with just over seven
minutes remaining.
Christine Sinclair and Alyse
Dean were the only Caribs to
reach double figures 13 and 10
points respectively, while Dean-,
dra Williams fouled out with
eight.
Stover and Terry led a bal-
anced Bees scoring attack which
also included Vanderlaan who
finished with nine points and
four rebounds, Shareese
Richardson with 10 points and
five rebounds, Kanoa
McGowan with eight points and
three rebounds and Janay Wil-
son with eight points, seven
rebounds and two assists.
The Bees improved to 7-5 on
the season.


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Chelsea

miss top

spot with

1-1 draw
* LONDON
Associated Press,
Nicolas Anelka scored his
14th goal of the season on Sun-
day to save Chelsea from an
embarrassing home defeat to
West Ham and earn a 1-1 draw.
Anelka equalized six minittes
into the second half after Ciaig
Bellamy had scored to put
Chelsea, which needed a victory
to overtake Liverpool at the top
ofthe beEnglish Premier League,,
in danger of a third home defeat
of the season.
Chelsea manager Luiz Feli e
Scolari had to bring ontstriker
'Didier Drogba for the second
lalf afterit took his team
almost 45 minutes to draw. a
save'frm West Hamn gdalkeep-
er Robert Green. With Drog-
ba's presence seeming to occur
the West Ham defense, Anelk
collected a delicate pass over
the top from former Hammer!
midfielder Frank Lampard'an
shot through Green's legs -
becoming the 16th player to
score 100 Premier League goals.
"It was a difficult game for
us," Scolari said. "We had-more
time with the ball but we only
scored one.goal. If we have
more quality on the last shot, wr
would win this game."
Second-place Chelsea has 37
points, one behind Liverpool,
which drew 2-2 with Hull on
Saturday. Defending champion
Manchester United drew 0-0
with Tottenham on Saturday
and is five points further back ir
third. Newcastle won 3-0 at
Portsmouth in Sunday's other
match.
MILAN, Italy (AP) Zlatan
Ibrahimovic scored twice to
lead Inter Milan past Chievo
Verona 4-2 and widen its lead ir
Serie A with its seventh straight
Win. After jumping out to a 2-0
lead 6on goals by Maxwell and
Dejan Stankovic, Inter let last-
place Chievo draw even midwa)
through the second half before
Ibrahimovic secured the win.
Ibrahimovic gave his team the
lead in the 79th minute on a
header and he added the insur-
ance.goal.10 minutes later on a
hard shot from the edge .of the
area to give him 10 Serie A
goals on the season, two short of
the league leaders.


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THE TRIBUNE


YOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD




'^ir w<^^ , "Si-^ ^i 4 "


"Keeping Our


Customers Informed"


~\

aI


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A


Though the holiday of
Christmas comes but once a
.year, all of us at BTC try to make that Christmas
feeling of giving prevail year 'round with savings
and specials on our many products and services.
Whether it's with our "Mad Minutes" program of
last July and August, or the day-to-day savings of
S BTC's Vibe, Y. eMail and I-Connect, just to
name a few .'Iur money saving products, we
want ou ; ed customers to have that
Christmas g 6g every day of the year!
A. we enter the holiday season this year, we are
especially aware that, although now, more than
ever before, everyone is looking to economize
wherever possible, we still need to stay connected
to friends and family as we go about our daily
lives because that is what is at the heart of the
holidays: staying in touch with our loved ones.
We at BTC want to make that a bit easier for
in particular all of our cell phone
...... rs,._re-paid and post-paid. So, as our
^ 4e__ia! C^^l:' gift to you this year, as of
ecii ie will be eliminating forever the
asic mobile services.
F ecemer 1st, there will never again be a
oi-. -aroe-'Caller ID, Call Waiting and
VT W Fbile customers. These
money:
is calling you
g you


important call. And now they will be absolutely
free to all cell phone users who depend upon this
kind of communication for their personal and
business needs.
And there is no installation fee. If you do not
have these services presently, as of December 1st,
these features will automatically show up on
your. phones, free of charge. Moreover, starting
December 1st, every-SIM car4d-urch.ased.will be
pre-programmed to include Caller ID, Call
Waiting and Voicemail automatically at no cost to
the customer.
All of us here at BTC are working tirelessly to
ensure that you are able,'to stay connected to
those you love du ing ie holiday season and
throughout, the year. This is our way of making
sure you can and save money at the same time.
We hope that this special Christmas gift to our
customers will help to make the holidays
brighter, while allowing you to spend just a little
more on spreading Christmas cheer.
So, on behalf of all the team here at BTC, I want
to wish each and everyone the very merriest
Christmas and a Happy and brighter New Year.


gan


nI -Wo


www.btcbahamas.com I


CALL BTC 225 5282


VOL2


/ -


NO MONTHLY CHARGES FOR

Caller ID

Call Waiting

VoicemailI

Multiparty Calling

All existing pre paid and post paid customers will now
automatically get these features. Also all new SIM cards
will be customized with these four free basic features!
CHARGES STILL APPLY for Call Privacy Feature.
To remove any of these features please contact us at
CALL BTC (225-5282)




PAGE 20, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008


Wishing you a magical holiday season


Scot9,,n


and many good things in the New


Year.


From your friends at Scotiabank


THE TRIBUNE









MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008, PAGE 21


LOA ANDINTERNATIONAL' NEW


INTERNATIONAL Certified General Accountants recently called on Minister of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing at the Ministry of Finance in
the Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building. Pictured from left are Mary Mitchell, past president and board member of Certified General Accountant Asso-
ciation Bahamas (CGA); Errol Haines, member of the CGA Bahamas; Roger Forbes, vice-president of the CGA Bahamas; Zhivargo Laing, Min-
ster of State for Finance; Tony Ducie, chairman of CGA Canada; Lyle Hanfield, vice- president CGA International; Daphne Russell, member of
CGA Bahamas; Christine Thompson, chief economist in the Ministry of Finance.





More outages possible




in ice-ravaged Northeast


* ROCHESTER, N.H.
UTILITY officials trying to
recover from the devastating ice
storm in the Northeast warned
there could be more outages
Sunday as drooping branches
shed ice and snap back to their
original positions, potentially
taking out more power lines,
according to Associated Press.
Roughly 800,000 customers
were still without power in
upstate New York, Massachu-
setts, New Hampshir'e and
Maine late Saturday. Utilities
in hardest-hit New Hampshire
said power might not be totally
restored to the region until
Thursday or Friday, a week
after the storm knocked down
utility lines, poles and equip-
ment and blacked out 1.4 homes
and businesses.
President Bush declared a
state of emergency in the Gran-
ite State and in nine of Massa-
chusetts' 14 counties late Sat-
urday, directing the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency to provide relief assis-
tance.
Temperatures early Sunday
were largely in the teens and
20s, with single-digit readings
in much of Maine. The low at
Concord, N.H., was just 9
degrees, the National Weather
Service said.
At a shelter in the Rindge
town recreation center, volun-
teers serving soup and sand-
wiches saw some new faces as
residents decided not to try to
endure a third night without
electricity or heat.
"I have an apartment, but
there's no heat, no lights, no
water. I spent last night there,
but after going through that, I
decided not to do it again," said
Amy Raymond, 74.
"If you don't have power,
assume that you will not get it
restored today, and right now
make arrangements to stay
someplace warm tonight," Gov.
John Lynch said Saturday.
Crews across the region
reported the ice had destroyed
utility poles, wires and other
equipment, but said the extent
of damage was unclear because
some roads still were impass-
able.


WORCESTER DEPARTMENT of Public Works employees clear tree limbs
Saturday, Dec. 13, 2008, in Worcester, Mass. Utility crews worked
through a night of hand-numbing cold in the Northeast but they still had
a long way to go before restoring power to all of the more than 1 million
homes and businesses blacked out by a huge ice storm.


"We'd put one line up, and
it seemed like another would
break," said Stan Tucker, oper-
ations supervisor in Springfield
for Central Vermont Public Ser-
vice Corp. "It seems like every
line has multiple problems."
Despite the difficulties,
progress was being made. As of
Sunday morning, Public Service
Company of New Hampshire
said about 194,000 of its cus-


tomers still had no electricity,
down from 313,000 Saturday.
Statewide, about 234,000 cus-
tomers were still blacked out
Sunday, down from a peak of
430,000 on Friday, utilities
reported.
In New York, all but five
roads managed by state high-
way officials had been cleared
Saturday. "But there are still
trees coming down because of


ice on branches; they're heavy
and they can break at any
point," said Carol Breen of the
state Department of Trans-
portation.
New Hampshire, Massachu-
setts, New York and Maine
declared either limited or full
states of emergency.
Utility crews flocked to the
region from Canada and as far
away as Michigan and Virginia.
At least four deaths appear
to be related to the storm. A
Danville, N.H., man died of car-
bon monoxide poisoning from
the generator he was using after
his power went out Thursday
night. Carbon monoxide from
a gasoline-powered generator
killed a couple in their 60s at
Glenville, N.Y., police said Sat-
urday. The body of a Marlbor-
ough, Mass., public orks
supervisor was recovered from
a reservoir Saturday, a day after
he went missing while checking
on tree limbs downed by the
ice.
At the shelter in Rindge,
about 30 miles west of Nashua,
Raymond's plight was shared
by many.
"Everyone asks, why don't I
just stay with friends and rela-
tives, but I say, 'Who?' They're
all in the same boat I am,"' she
said.
In nearby Jaffrey, gunsmith
Len Vigneault said the storm
was impressive.
"Telephone, poles snapped
like toothpicks just laying
there," he said. "Fifteen-, 20-
inch trees, just in splinters and
laying in the road."


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CABiEi BAHAMAS


Cable Bahamas to Launch Innovative Online Email Service

December 3rd, 2008 Cable Bahamas announced today the imminent launch of CoralWave's newest innovation for its subscribers,
CoralWave Pronto!


"This is one of the most dynamic online
platforms we've seen for e-mail and
online living"' says David Burrows, Director of Marketing
"Imagine a world where all the functions you need for online living
comes in one seamless, integrated interface. Imagine a world
where, when you log in to check your email, you gain automatic
access to your photographs, your contacts, your calendar, your
music, your video email, and your instant messages while you drag
and drop your photographs into your own personal webspace and
blog about your day, all while listening to your music. This is what
our customers will have access to with CoralWave Pronto! We are very
excited to bring this innovation to our subscribers."

The new e-mail system branded"CoralWave Pronto!", promises to offer
one of the most innovative email web clients available today. Exciting
features include dynamic calendar functionality, instant messaging
systems, video email, storage and playback functionality for music, photos
and movies. Future enhancements will include the ability to create your
own web site and blogs.








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Mail. Music. Media. Talk.

Pronto!


"CoralWave Pronto! is one of the most
powerful unified communications
interfaces in the world offering
unparalleled email stability and
security to this market," says Sophia Walker, Director
of Information Technology. "AtCable Bahamas, we recognize that e-mail
is the number one usage activity conducted online as such we want to
ensure that the experience our subscribers have in interacting with their
e-mail is second to none".

For the past eight years, CoralWave has been the leading Internet service
provider in The Bahamas. Subscribers have grown accustomed to email
services, high-speed broadband connectivity and flexible options.! But,
with this soon to be released upgrade, all CoralWave subscribers will
automatically not only get email, but online contacts, photographs,
calendar, music, instant messages and video email in a single Integrated
Unified Communications package offered as a Software as a Service
(SaaS) offering all at no additional charge to its Internet subscribers.

This is all made possible thanks to a partnership between Cable Bahamas
and CommuniGate Systems, the leader in carrier-class Mobile Unified
Communications. CommuniGate Systems' goal is to consolidate all forms
of Internet communications into one address space, making the single
address for email, IM, and video calling more productive, portable, and
accessible to multiple media types through one account, providing true
portability of an "address" no matter where you access the Internet.

"We are excited to see Cable Bahamas' integrated Unified
Communications offering as SaaS going live. Cable Bahamas understands
the importance of delivering today's market demands for value added
services and how to increase subscriber loyalty by delivering more and
better services for tomorrow's communications. CoralWave powered by
CommuniGate Pro and Pronto! will generate the "Wow" applications
impact Cable Bahamas wanted for their existing subscribers while
attracting new subscribers;' says Joe Pestana, VP Sales Americas,
CommuniGate Systems."With the CommuniGate Pro platform Cable
Bahamas gets the platform stability and five nines reliability essential to
meeting their system needs.'


CoralWave Pronto! brings Rich Media communications to the desktop in a secure and fast Flash based client. Whereas before, subscribers would have
to navigate to different sites or open different programmes to access all their Internet needs, Pronto! provides a single web 2.0 dashboard for the
most-used internet activities, all combined with increased security and the highest industry-standard reliability.

Unique modules bundle together different packages for subscribers'convenience. CoralWave will be providing the first of these modules, the email,
instant messaging, video'email and calendaring module, to all its subscribers immediately. CoralWave is already planning a second roll-out of modules in
* early 2009, including My Stuff, where as a CoralWave subscriber you can create your own personal websites, blogs, store and playback your favourite
music and view your family photo albums all in one space. In addition, each CoralWave customer will receive a minimum of 10 gigabytes of
storage space to go with this expanded platform of online services.

Subscribers are encouraged to preview for themselves the exciting features of this feature rich interface at www.coralwave.com.

Cable Bahamas Ltd. is majority owned by over 2,000 Bahamians and the Government of The Bahamas. The company's full time and contracted
employees provide world class broadband services on 16 islands, international data communications, web hosting, business continuity and high-speed
Internet services in The Bahamas.

CommuniGate Systems develops carrier-class Unified Communications and media delivery software for broadband and mobile operators to deliver
value-added services and SaaS solutions. CommuniGate Systems is the first choice in technology solutions for over 12,000 customers with over 130
million subscribers unifying email, collaboration, IM, presence and VolP with a single identity.


CABLE BAHAMAS


* **" 3~--


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THE TRIBUNE


AP GE 22 MONDAY DECEMBER 8


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THE TRIBUNE


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L-


* GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip
GAZA'S militant Hamas
rulers marshaled hundreds
of thousands of supporters
to a huge anniversary rally,
on Sunday, a show of mus-
cle featuring a skit of a
mock-captive Israeli sol-
dier begging for his free-
dom, according to Associ-
ated Press.
Marking 21 years since
its founding, a triumphant
Hamas bragged about its
violent exploits, promised
more money to Gaza's
impoverished people, and
announced it would soon
stop recognizing the legiti-
macy of Palestinian Presi-
dent Mahmoud Abbas,
who -rules only the West
Bank now.
Organizers said about
300,000 Hamas supporters
crowded into a dusty out-
door arena and spilled over
into nearby streets. Many
waved flags and sported
baseball caps in the Islam-
ic group's signature green
color.

Uniform
In the skit, Hamas parad-
ed a Palestinian speaking
Hebrew and dressed in an
Israeli soldier's uniform -
a reference to Israeli Sgt.
Gilad Schalit, captured by
Hamas-allied militants in
June 2006.
;"I miss my Mom and
Dad," said the man play-
ing the Israeli soldier,
kneeling as he spoke. "Tell
Olmert, why don't you take
care of your soldier?"
The capture of Schalit in
a June 2006 cross-border
raid is an open wound in
Israeli society. The taunt
at the rally drew condem-
nation from Israel, which
has been indirectly negoti-
ating the soldier's release
with Hamas for the past 2
1/2 years.
A spokesman for the
Israeli government, Mark
Regev, called the skit
"another example of
(Hamas) cruelty and inhu-
manity."
In comments aired Sun-
day, exiled Hamas leader
Khaled Mashaal said a six-
month truce with Israel
would not be renewed after
it expires this week. Inter-
viewed on a Hamas-affili-
ated Lebanese TV channel,
Mashaal did not explicitly
threaten renewed attacks,
saying instead that Hamas
would respond to develop-
ments.
On Sunday, Israel closed
its passenger crossing with
Gaza to journalists in
response to Palestinian
rocket fire over the week-
end. For much of-. the past
month, Israel has banned
reporters from entering the
territory after militants
fired rockets and mortars
at Israeli communities.
Hamas, founded in Gaza
in December 1987, is sworn
to Israel's destruction and
was involved in dozens of
suicide bombings that
killed more than 250
Israelis. It seized Gaza by
force in June 2007 after
months of fighting with
Abbas' Fatah forces.
Hamas contends Abbas'
term ends Jan. 8, four years
after he was elected presi-
dent. Abbas has argued
that he had an additional
year so the presidential
term could dovetail with
parliament's.
The huge.turnout at the
Gaza rally was a pointed
display of strength directed
at both Israel and Fatah,
and further evidence of the
Muslim militant group's
unchallenged control over
1.4 million Gazans.
During an hourlong
speech, the Hamas Gaza


riHP :.-ft ML ^-iliMirW -- f __
PALESTINIAN WOMEN, supporters of the Hamas, attend a rally in
Gaza City, Sunday, Dec. 14, 2008. Some tens of thousands of Hamas
supporters marked the Islamic militant group's 21st anniversary with
an outdoor rally Sunday, and the show of strength included a play
featuring a mock-captive Israeli soldier' begging for his freedom.


prime minister, Ismail
Haniyeh, read out a list of
construction projects and
funds to be distributed to
impoverished. Gaza resi-
dents.
The projects indicate
Hamas is still able to smug-
gle cash.through tunnels
that crisscross the territo-
ry's border with Egypt --
at a time when the West-
ern-backed Abbas govern-
ment in the West Bank has
struggled to .pay salaries.

Attacks
Hamas also bragged of
attacks conducted against
Israel in the past 21 years,
inflating the numbers.
In his speech, Haniyeh
said Hamas was only
strengthened by Israeli
sanctions.
"It is a letter to Obama,
to the Zionists and those
who stand in the same
trenches as them: We say
with confidence, you will
not be victorious,"
Haniyeh said.
,The U.S. and other West-
ern countries designate
Hamas as a terror organi-
zation, but President-elect
Barack Obama has not
made his position clear.
Also Sunday, Israel said
a delayed release of 227
Palestinian prisoners would
take place on Monday. The
release is a goodwill ges-
ture to Abbas' Western-
backed government.
The prisoners were to be
released last week for the
Muslim Eid al-Adha holi-
day.


Huge crowds



rather in Gaza




for Hamas



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PALESTINIAN WOMEN, supporters of the Hamas, attend a rally in Gaza City, Sunday, Dec. 14, 2008. Tens of thou-
sands of Hamas supporters marked the Islamic militant group's 21 st anniversary with an outdoor rally Sunday.

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--






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 24, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008


INERATONL EW


Seeds of hope:




Freezing vaults




guard Earth's flora


* ARDINGLY, England
THE underground, bunker can
block nuclear fallout,'withstand a
direct hit by a jetliner, and is cooled
to a deathly chill.
.The ultramodern facility in the
tranquil English countryside looks
like a perfect lab for a James Bond
villain, but it doesn't hide anything
sinister. The only thing kept here
are seeds, lots of them more than
a billion, in fact, according to Asso-
ciated Press.
Scientists say this is the world's


most diverse seed bank, but its keep-
ers worry that the global financial
crisis could cut its government and
corporate funding and cause the
seed gathering to wither at the end'
of next year, well short of its goal.
"This is the world's biodiversity
hot spot," said Paul Smith, director
of the Millennium Seed Bank Pro-
ject, standing outside two room-size
vaults filled with precious seeds
which are kept at minus 4 degrees
Fahrenheit to slow their metabo-
lism.
"That's important for mankind.


Villaggio


O f ('" f

.4A









: 4 is ilSCfi


1'. p 7 -3p0 t


edione ,. 327-0962 ,o,327-0965


But if the funding situation doesn't
improve, we'll have to stop collect-
ing."
He has already seen a tightening
of philanthropic budgets in recent
months that is affecting the seed
bank's future. "We have not raised
the kind of money we had hoped to
at this point," Smith said.
There are more than 1,000 seed
banks including a newly opened,
unmanned "doomsday" facility in
the Arctic wastes of Norway that
will ultimately house more than I
billion crop seeds. But the one at
Wakehurst Place, about 30 miles
south of London, says it's the only
global facility of its kind, unique for DIRECTI
its focus on wild species, not just bank att
crops.
It says it aims to store a quarter of
the world's species by 2020, and counmtri
could eventually house half of them. oic
It currently has 25,000 species and ciounstancse
1.5 billion seeds. kept in
The seed bank's scientists gauge the couin
the total number of plant species at tored b
300,000, which represents a middle experts.
figure in the widely varying, con- The
stantly changing, global estimate. Botanic
It doesn't just take in seeds it in 2000
sends them out. Millennium Bank about $
seeds are being used in Australia to Britain'
figure out what plants can grow in rnmen
salty reclaimed land, and in Pak- ernmen
istan and Egypt to find plants that ual spot
can withstand drought and slow raise ab
desert encroachment. million)
The bank is helping to restore tall million)
prairie grass in the United States slung ste
and a tropical forest in Madagascar. the vaul
Saving the world's seeds does not inse vaul
come cheap. human
At the Millennium' Seed Bank, it where
costs about $3,000 per species to smocksw
ship in the seeds, meticulously clean by hansmocks
them, X-ray them for iQsect dam- by hand
age and freeze them for possible forcept
future use as medicine, a commercial largest
product, or a reviver of a plant that a is a
has gone extinct. vith m
It is a global effort: The bank has t int
more than 120 different partners in tninto
some 50 countries where seeds are vaults,
collected and stored. In many cases, vau, s
seeds are kept b.ih ir rii,r .nat.i ,v--


. .



OR OF the Millennium Seed Bank Project Paul Smith points to one of the storage facilities, at the Millenium Seed-
the Royal Botanical Gardens at Wakehurst Place, Ardingly, England,, Monday, Dec 1, 2008.


es and here as a backup.
e countries, Brazil for
;, are unwilling to send pre-
eeds overseas, so they are
it least two seed banks inside
ntry, their standards moni-
y Millennium Seed Bank
project, under the Royal
al Gardens at Kew, started
with 72 million pounds, then
110 million, in funding from
s national lottery and gov-
tal, corporate and individ-
isors.
i said the seed bank needs to
out 10 million pounds ($15
a year for the next.decade.
futuristic facility, with its low-
eel and glass structure over-
ts, is seen by scientists as an
ce policy against nature and
folly. It is a quiet place,
young scientists in white
spend hours cleaning seeds
, using microscopes, scalpels,
s, and tiny brushes. The
s the double coconut seed,
as big as two coconuts; small-
he Venus looking glass -
ore than a million seeds fit-
o a small canister.
re depositing the seeds in the
ab workers don floor-length
'"


Even then, the temperature is so
low that bodies start losing core heat
in 15 minutes. So elaborate safety
systems are in place in case anyone
is trapped in a vault; an AP photog-
rapher inadvertently tripped a series
of ringing alarms when he left the.
vault while a worker remained
inside.
Scientists call the Millennium
effort invaluable as climate change
accelerates.
"The potential value of this pro-
ject is almost unfathomable," said
David Astley, head of the Genetics
Resources Unit at the University of
Warwick in England, who corrobo-
rated the Millennium Projects claim
to be the world's most diverse seed
bank.
"If you look at the way the world
is going, it's inevitable that genetic
material will be lost," said Astley,
who is not connected to the project.
"The big fear is that, if global warm-
ing comes sooner rather than later, it
may be too late to conserve the
material." .
Scientists here are also developing
new ways to germinate endangered
species, including some like the
South African faucaria that are
down to a single population of plants
in the wild.
"We don't know that they are


'.' ~,'s'


A TECHNICIAN storess some seeds in a Ireezer
at the Millenium Seedbanl a tr e Ro,al l
Botani:a! Garijens, at Wakehurst Place, Ardingly,
England,, Monday, Dec 1, 2008.


Tom Hevezi/AP


useful for anything," Smith said,
"but we don't know that they aren't
useful either."
The same could be said of the
roughly 80 percent of species here
that have not yet been screened for
possible medical use. *
"Twenty years ago we didn't
know the rosy periwinkle from
Madagascar would reduce childhood
leukemia to the extent that, it has,"
said Smith.
"So who knows what we have in
the bank? Our worry is that we're
going to lose those in the wild before
we even have a chance. So putting
them in the seed bank is the most
logical first step."
Already, a handful of species col-
lected here have vanished in the
wild as habitat is destroyed. Scien-
tists believe these could be reintro-
duced in the next few centuries.
Some seeds, they believe, may last
one thousand years under ideal con-
ditions.
Researchers here have already
been able to germinate seeds that
are more than 200 years old, bring-
ing to life a "pin cushion flower" -
known as the leucospermum -
from seeds dating back to 1803.
The seeds tell the story of lost
empire they were first collected
by a Dutch merchant trading .in.
South Africa, but he was intercept-
ed on his return voyage by a British
privateer because Britain was at war
with the Dutch at the time.
The seeds were taken from the
Dutchman, who was imprisoned in
the Tower of London, and were
eventually discovered in the Nation-
al Archives and given to the seed
bank.
Scientists expected germination
attempts to fail. but were pleasantly
surprised when they were able to
grow the flowering plant at the Mil-
lennium Seed Bank, where it can
sometimes be seen in the green-
house.
They take this as a hopeful sign
that other seeds can lay dormant for
hundreds of years and be brought
back to life.


Illinois officials



issue fresh calls



for resignation

* CHICAGO

A HANDFUL of Illinois' top politicians called disgraced Gov.
Rod Blagojevich incapacitated Sunday, issuing fresh calls for his
resignation as lawmakers gear up for a session that could lead to
his impeachment, according to Associated Press.
Attorney General Lisa Madigan and Lt. Gov. Patrick Quinn,
both likely candidates in the 2010 gubernatorial campaign, criti-
cized the governor anew during appearances on NBC's "Meet the
Press" and CBS's "Face the Nation."
"We don't have a governor that can legitimately govern,"
Madigan said.
Blagojevich was arrested Tuesday on federal corruption
charges, including allegations he tried to sell President-elect
Barack Obama's vacant Senate seat to the highest bidder.

Media

Madigan also cited what she called "rumors" in Chicago media
reports saying Blagojevich could make an announcement about
his political future Monday.
Blagojevich spokesman Lucio Guerrero said Sunday that he
has "no knowledge" of an announcement of any kind and that
the governor "lhas no plans on resigning Monday."
Quinn said he did not know what Blagoje\ ich's plans were but
that resignation would be best for the governor, his family and
the people of Illinois.
"He:s gotta do something because our state is in crisis," Quinn
said on "Meet the Press."
The Illinois Legislature meets Monday to consider stripping
Blagojevich of his power (oipick a replacement to fill Obama's
seat and calling a special election. Thev also could consider
beginning impeachment proceedings.
State I louse Minorityv Ieader Tom ('ross said on "Fox News
Sunday'" that a special election w\as the best option because it was
important to "eliminate any appearance of impropriety."
"We've just been shocked as a state o\ cr the last four or five
days and in order to restore whatever integrity we have left in this
state, we have to make it as transparent as possible," Cross said.
Quinn said he has seen legislation that would allow him to tem-
porarily appoint someone to the Senate seat until a special elec-
tion if Biagoje\ ich stepped do\w n.


I I





Sunduay L inicfi


~*C;*r~,~








THE TOA


Greece calm after



eight days of riots



by angry youths


* ATHENS, Greece
ATHENS was calm Sunday
after eight days of the worst
riots Greece has seen in
decades, sparked by the police
killing of a teenager, according
to Associated Press.,
Traffic returned to normal in
the center of town and open-
topped double-decker buses
carried tourists around the
city's main sights. The cafes in
the Thissio area under the
Acropolis were busy, and cou-
ples took their children for Sun-
day walks.
But Greek youths who have
protested daily since the boy's
death have vowed to remain on
the streets until their concerns
are addressed. Protesters are
angry not just at police but at a
government'already on the
defensive over a series of finan-
cial scandals, and over eco-
nomic issues.
"We are not in this for the
short term," said Petros Con-
stantinou, an organizer with the
Socialist Workers Party. "We
want the protests to continue
after Christmas and New Year,
until this government of mur-
derers goes."
Protesters say they will
march Monday to the police
headquarters .ip Athens.
Schoolchildren are planning
demonstrations throughout the
city.
Analyst Theodor.e
Couloumbis said he expected
the disturbances to "peter out"
over the next few days.
"We are going to have peri-
odic flare-ups," said
Couloumbis, a professor emer-
itus of international relations
at the University of Athens. "It
will take a generation or two
to straighten things out in
Greece."

Poll
A newspaper poll published
Sunday showed the governing
conservatives' popularity at 20.6
percent, 5.6 percent below the
main opposition Socialists.
However, 55 percent of respon-
dents said neither party seemed
competent to handle the situa-
tion.
"Political parties initially
made things worse because
they acted as if it was business
as usual... trying to score polit-
ical points," Couloumbis said.
The Focus poll of 1,000 peo-
ple for Real News gave a 3.1


percent margin of error.
Violence has wracked
Greece since the death of 15-
year-old Alexandros Grig-
oropoulos Dec. 6. It spread
from Athens to more than a
dozen other cities. At least 70
people have been injured, hun-
dreds of stores have been loot-
ed, and more than 200 people
have been arrested.
Late Saturday and early Sun-
day, youths in Athens attacked
a police station, stores and
banks, and fought with police as
candlelit vigils were held to
mark a week since the shoot-
ing.
About 300 people staged a
peaceful vigil Sunday at the site
of the boy's death.
"We want police to leave so
that our neighborhood can be
at peace," said local resident
Giorgos Alexatos. He said res-
idents also wanted a street at
the spot to be named after the
dead schoolboy.

Protest
In the northern port of Thes-
saloniki, a few dozen people
held a peaceful protest at noon.
Overnight, suspected anarchist
arsonists attacked two Com-
munist party offices with home-
made gas-canister bombs and
molotov cocktails, causing
minor damage but no injuries.
While most protesters have
been peaceful, the tone of the
demonstrations has been set by
violent fringe. And more
young people have been will-
ing to join those fringe elements
than in the past.
Couloumbis said the violence
appeared to have been caused
by "an abysmally insignificant
group of destructive elements,"
whom students joined "for the
fun of it."
In a poll released Sunday, 62
percent of respondents said the
riots following the shooting
were inexcusable, compared to
35 percent who believed the
violence was justified. The poll
of 1,000 people gave no mar-
gin of error.
According to another poll,
Greeks see more in the vio-
lence than a simple reaction to
the shooting. Asked whether
the riots were a social uprising,
60 percent said yes. Some 64
percent considered police
unprepared for the violence.
The poll of 520 people pub-
lished in the Kathimerini news-
paper gave a 4.5 percent margin


of error.
Demonstrations in support
of the protests in Greece have
been held in several European
cities. In Berlin, a peaceful
gathering on Sunday at Mauer-
park drew about 50 people;
"We're not in favor of vio-
lence. We just want to show our
support," said Yannis, 27, a
Greek man who declined to
give his last name.
"We're not expecting any
violence in Berlin because the
circumstances in Greece are
very different from those in
Germany."


RIOT police officers run
towards their positions during
clashes with protesters in Athens,
Saturday, Dec. 13, 2008.
Petros Karadjias/AP


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THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 26. MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008

MONDAY EVENING


DECEMBER 15, 2008


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

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TMC


THE TRIBUNE


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:. ::








THE TRIBUNE


Police thwart




oscow rally,




seize 90-1 0


MOSCOW
POLICE thwarted a banned
anti-Kremlin protest in central
Moscow on Sunday, seizing
demonstrators and shoving
t icm into trucks. Organizers
slid 130 people were detained
a round the capital but police
put the number at 90, according
tv Associated Press.
The opposition movement
headed by fierce Kremlin critic
nd. former chess champion
arry Kasparov said the co-
I ader of the group was one of
lose seized.
The Other Russia movement
organized the protest, in defi-
nce of a ban, to draw atten-
on to Russia's economic trou-
les and to protest Kremlin
plans to extend the presiden-
al term from four years to six.
critics say the constitutional
cange as part of a retreat from
democracy and is aimed at
strengthening the grip of Prime
Minister Vladimir Putin and his
allies.
News broadcasts on the main
television networks made no
mention of the Moscow crack-
cown or of protests in St.
Ietersburg and Vladivostok.
Kasparov and other promi-
r ent liberals have just launched
new anti-Kremlin movement
called Solidarity in a bid to
unite Russia's fractious liberal
frces and encourage a popu-
1 r revolution similar to those
iT Ukraine and Georgia.
1Kasparov had vowed to carry
dut Sunday's protest although
authorities had denied permis-
sion for it.
Before the scheduled start,
I hundreds of officers guarded
riumph Square, which was
ringed by police trucks and
metal barriers.
Police roughly grabbed pro-
tsters who tried to enter the
square, dragging at least 25
people into waiting trucks.
Police also seized Other Rus-
sia co-leader Eduard Limonov
along with a handful of body-
guards as they walked toward
the square. They were bundled
i to police vehicles.
SKasparov and a group of sup-
Oorters decided to avoid police
by marching in a different loca-
ion, then set off for a third site
after finding another strong
Police presence, spokeswoman
Marina Litvinovich said.
Dozens of protesters gath-
red at the third site and
marched about a kilometer
half a mile) along a major
street, shouting slogans such as
' Russia without Putin!" before
they dispersed.


Kasparov traveled by car and
the march was over when he
arrived, Litvinovich said.
Kasparov's Web site said
police in Moscow also broke up
a protest by a hard-line group
of retired generals in a square
nearby and detained about 50
participants.The group, the
Soviet Officers' Union, could
not be reached for comment.
The Moscow police said they
detained 90 people. Some of
the detainees were members of
a pro-Kremlin youth group that
staged a counter-demonstra-
tion, dropping leaflets from a
concert hall rooftop.
Litvinovich said that 130 peo-
ple were detained in Moscow,
including 18 who tried to enter
the Kremlin through one of its
guarded gates.
Other Russia said many were
released but ordered to appear
in court later on charges of
involvement in a prohibited
public activity. It said Limonov
appeared before a judge and
was fined 500 rubles (about
$18; eurol3) for that infraction.
Lyudmila Morozova, 61, a
nurse from the. southern city of
Voronezh, had planned to
protest in Triumph Square but
was put off by the massive
police presence. She said the
police actions showed that the
government was afraid "some
kind of power will rise against
them."
"I want my country to devel-
op along a democratic path,"
said Morozova, standing against
a wall at the edge of the square.
"It's not only not democratic,
it's becoming totalitarian."
She said she has joined Soli-
darity.
In St. Petersburg, about 200
Other Russia supporters
demonstrated at a site
approved by city authorities.
But local leader Olga Kurnoso-
va said at least one organizer
was detained beforehand, and
St. Petersburg police said about
10 people were detained at a
separate site.
Popular support for Other
Russia and other vocal opposi-
tion groups is minimal, but the
Kremlin is wary about any evi-
dence of public anger as its
struggles with a potentially
politically damaging economic
downturn.
There has been little evi-
dence of change in the govern-
ment's heavy-handed treatment
of critics since Dmitry
Medvedev's succeeded Putin as
president in May and stressed
the importance of civil rights
in his inaugural address.
Ekho Moskvy radio and


Russian news agencies reported
that several thousand motorists
took part in protests in the
Pacific coast city of Vladivostok
against government plans to
raise import tariffs on used
cars.


PLAIN CLOTHED police officers detain an opposition demonstrator during an anti-Kremlin protest in
Moscow, Sunday, Dec. 14, 2008. Police thwarted an anti-Kremlin protest organized by Garry Kasparov's
opposition group on Sunday, seizing demonstrators and shoving them into trucks.They detained at least 25
people including the group's co-leader.


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MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008, PAGE 29


THE TRIBUNE


INERATIOALNW


Bush.: I

E By JENNIFER LOVEN
AP White House
Correspondent
BAGHDAD

On an Iraq trip shrouded in
secrecy and marred by dissent,
President George W. Bush on
Sunday hailed progress in the
war that defines his presidency
and got a size-10 reminder of
his unpopularity when a man
hurled two shoes at him during
a news conference.
"This is the end!" shouted the
protester, later identified as
Muntadar al-Zeidi, a corre-
spondent for Al-Baghdadia
television, an Iraqi-owned sta-
tion based in Cairo, Egypt.
Bush ducked both shoes as
they whizzed past his head and
landed with a thud against the
wall behind him.
"It was a size 10," Bush joked
later. The U.S. president visited
the Iraqi capital just 37 days
before he hands the war off to
his successor, Barack Obama,
who has pledged to end it. The
president wanted to highlight a
drop in violence in a nation still
riven by ethnic strife and to cel-
ebrate a recent U.S.-Iraq secu-
rity agreement, which calls for
U.S. troops to withdraw from
Iraq by the end of 2011.
"The war is not over," Bush
said, adding that "it is decisive-
ly on it's way to being won."
In many ways, the unan-
nounced trip was a victory lap
without a clear victory. Nearly
150,000 U.S. troops remain in
Iraq fighting a war that is
intensely disliked across the
globe. More than 4,209 mem-
bers of the U.S. military have
died in the conflict, which has
cost U.S. taxpayers $576 billion
since it began five years and
nine months ago.
Polls show most Americans
believe the U.S. erred in invad-
ing Iraq in 2003. Bush ordered
the nation into war against Sad-
dam Hussein's Iraq while citing
intelligence claiming the
Mideast nation harbored
weapons of mass destruction.
The weapons were never found,
the intelligence was discredit-
ed, Bush's credibility with U.S.
voters plummeted and Saddam
was captured and executed.
"There is still more work to
be done," Bush said after his
meeting with Iraqi Prime.Min-
ister Nouri al-Maliki.
It was at that point the jour-
nalist stood up and threw a shoe
from about 20 feet away. Bush
ducked, and it narrowly missed
his head. The second shoe came
quickly, and Bush ducked again
while several Iraqis grabbed the
man and dragged him to the
floor. In Iraqi culture, throwing
shoes at someone is a sign of
contempt. Iraqis whacked a
statue of Saddam with their
shoes after U.S. marines top-
pled it to the ground following
the 2003 invasion.
White House press secretary
Dana Perino suffered an eye
injury in the news conference
melee. Bush brushed off the
incident, comparing it to politi-
cal protests at home.
"So what if I guy threw his
shoe at me?" he said.
Al-Maliki, who spoke before
the incident, praised postwar
progress: "Today, Iraq is mov-
ing forward in every field."
After the news conference,
the president took a 15-minute
helicopter ride through dark
skies over Baghdad to Camp
Victory. Telling hundreds of
troops he was "heading into
retirement," Bush blamed Sad-
dam for the 2003 invasion and
said, "America is safer and
more secure" than it was before
the war.
For Bush, the war is the issue
around which both he and the
country defined his two terms in
office. He saw the invasion and
continuing fight as a necessary
action to protect Americans and
fight terrorism. Though his deci-
sion won support at first, the
public now has largely decided
that the U.S. needs to get out of
Iraq.
Air Force One, the presiden-
t's distinctive powder blue-and-
white jetliner, landed at Bagh-
dad International Airport in the
afternoon local time after a
secretive Saturday night depar-
ture from Washington. In a sign
of security gains in this war
zone, Bush received a formal


arrival ceremony a flourish
absent in his three earlier trips.
Bush soon began a rapid-fire
series of meetings with top Iraqi
leaders.
He met first with Iraqi Presi-
dent Jalal Talabani and the
country's two vice presidents,
Tariq al-Hashemi and Adel
Abdul-Mahdi, at the ornate,
marble-floored Salam Palace
along the shores of the Tigris
River.
Later, Bush's motorcade
pulled out the heavily fortified
Green Zone and crossed over
the Tigris so he could meet al-


raq war

Maliki at the prime minister's
palace. A huge orange moon
hung low over the horizon as
Bush's was ferried quickly
through the city.
The two leaders signed cere-
monial copy of the security
agreement. The Bush adminis-
tration and even White House
critics credit last year's military
buildup with the security gains
in Iraq. Last month, attacks fell
to the lowest monthly level
since the war began in 2003.
Still, it's unclear what will
happen when the U.S. troops
leave. While violence has
slowed in Iraq, attacks continue,
especially in the north. At least
55 people were killed Thursday
in a suicide bombing in a restau-


is not over, more work ahead


rant near Kirkuk.
It was Bush's last trip to the
war zone before Obama takes
office Jan. 20. Obama,won an
election largely viewed as a ref-
erendum on Bush, who has
endured low approval ratings
because of the war and more
recently, the U.S. recession.
Obama, a Democrat, has
promised he will bring all U.S.
combat troops back home from
Iraq a little over a year into his
term, as long as commanders
agree a withdrawal would*liot
endanger American personnel
or Iraq's security. Obama has
said the drawdown in Iraq
would allow him to shift troops
and bolster the U.S. presence
in Afghanistan. The new U.S.-


Iraqi security pact, calls for all
American troops to be with-
drawn by the end of 2011, in
two stages. The first stage
begins next year, when U.S.
troops pull back from Baghdad
and other Iraqi cities by the end
of June. Gen. Raymond Odier-
no, the top U.S. commander in
Iraq, said Saturday that even
after that summer deadline,
some U.S. troops will remain in
Iraqi cities.
Journalists and staff who
made the 10 1/2-hour trip to
Iraq with the president agreed
to tell almost no one about the
plans, and the White House
released false schedules detail-
ing activities planned for Bush
in Washington on Sunday.


IN THIS IMAGE from APTN video, a man throws a shoe at President
George W. Bush during a news conference with Iraq Prime Minister
Nouri al-Maliki on Sunday, Dec. 14, 2008, in Baghdad. The man
threw two shoes at Bush, one after another. Bush ducked both
throws, and neither man was hit.


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PAQE 30. MONDAV. DECEMBER 15. 2008


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IN RATOAL


Pakistan offensive




shows slow success


* By KATHY GANNON
SABAGAI, Pakistan
From atop a cratgy hillock, the
silver-haired Lt. Col. Javed
Baloch gestures toward a small
black opening in a sandstone out-
cropping. It's the mouth of a cave.
Two minutes later a powerful
explosion rattles the hillock, and
a massive plume of grayish-white
smoke rushes skyward.
Cave by cave, the Pakistani
army is trying to blow up the
underground labyrinth running
from tribal areas toward the bor-
der with Afghanistan to ,keep mil-
itants away.
This is the front line of Pak-
istan's battle against militants on
its own soil. The three-month-old
offensive is the country's most
aggressive effort to date, coun-
tering U.S. and Afghan charges
that it is not doing enough to root
out Taliban and al-Qaida fight-
ers who crisscross the border. It is
also the Pakistani military's first
foray into the Bajur region, where
militants are dug in-and have in
places setup a parallel adminis-
tration.
An Associated Press team trav-
eled with the Pakistani military
deep into a tribal area late last
month, almost to the Afghan bor-
der. The operation shows the
army can put pressure on mili-
tants and even wrest some terri-
tory back from them, but it may
never be able to drive them out
from a rugged area of nooks and
crannies. More militants are
already sneaking in from
Afghanistan as reinforcements,
and U.S. troops in Afghanistan
have installed 68 motion sensors
along the border to try to detect
them. The battle is for Bajur, a
key base and transit route for
Arab and other foreign militants
headed for Afghanistan. Here a
CIA drone once targeted al-
Qaida's No. 2, Ayman al-
Zawahiri, without success.
Any progress, however, is now
in danger from an unexpected
front. The recent terrorist attack
in Mumbai has raised the
prospect that Pakistan might shift
troops from its tribal regions to
the border with India. Both sides
want to avoid a confrontation,
but emotions are running high.
In the meantime, the Pakistani
army has used helicopter gun-
ships and fighter jets to blast
entire villages in Bajur to rubble,
driving 250,000 tribesmen out of -
their homes and burying 82 of
their own soldiers. Pakistan has
battled militants in tribal areas
before, but never with such inten-
sity. "I feel hurt. There is so much
destruction. That is why always
we are trying to prevent war, but
we were left with no choice,"
Baloch says.
He bristles at any U.S. ques-
tioning of the will of Pakistani
soldiers to fight the militants.
"Listen, I have picked up the
bodies of my dead soldiers and
carried them out. I haven't left a
body behind. Do you think this is
something we do without pain in
our heart?" he asked. "I tell
everyone who is saying we aren't
doing enough, 'Send.your broth-
ers, your fathers, your uncles and
I will take them into battle with
me. I will show them.'"

The convoy of Pakistani sol-
diers rumbles out of Khar on a
crisp morning, a slight mist hang-
ing in the air.
It was from here, the capital of
Bajur, that the army had
launched its offensive on Sept. 8.
Previously, only the ill-equipped
Frontier Corps, a paramilitary
force, was deployed in Bajur.
"Since it was ignored, not eas-
ily accessible, it was an ideal
breeding ground," says Gen.
Tariq Khan, the commander of
the Frontier Corps.
In August, the Frontier Corps
fought militants in one village in
Bajur but was driven out with sev-
eral dead and many more wound-
ed. That's when the army was
called in. The army has since
wrested control of the key road
link from Khar, clearing the road
of insurgents. As of late last week,
troops were taking their offen-
sive into the Mohmand tribal belt
that borders Afghanistan.
The signs of battle litter the
roadside: flattened markets,
bomb craters and mud homes,
scarred by mortar fire.
At Nazirabad, six miles (10
kilometers) from Khar, troops
faced a two-day battle against
nearly 100 militants. Insurgents
popped up from fields of shoul-
der-high corn stalks to launch
rockets or fire bursts with Kalash-
nikov rifles, then seemingly dis-
appeared, says Maj. Kamal, who
gave only his first name. Two sol-
diers were killed and 22 wounded.
"We couldn't see where they
were firing from," Kamal says.
"We discovered later that they
would fire at us and then run into


caves hidden by the corn."
The army found an extensive
network of caves and tunnels
reminiscent of those dug in the
1980s by Western-backed anti-


-









A SUSPECTED militant-captured in the Bajur area is seen inside a cell
at the Khar headquarters of the Frontier Corps in the Bajur tribal region
in Pakistan, on the border with Afghanistan, Saturday, Nov. 29,
2008. The Pakistani army operation to rout militants from the Bajur
tribal region and the evidence uncovered during the three month
assault would indicate a frightening amount of coordination among
militant groups, some of whom have been accused by India of car-
rying out the vicious weekend rampage in Mumbai that killed more
than 171 people and wounded hundreds more.










PAKISTANI SOLDIERS take new positions on the street in Sabagai vil-
lage in the Bajur tribal region in Pakistan, on the border with
Afghanistan, Friday, Nov. 28, 2008.


communist rebels in Afghanistan
during the Soviet occupation. In
one compouwi, of nine mud
homes surrounded by a high wall,
the army found six underground
rooms and a maze of tunnels.
Kamal climbs a precarious steel
ladder that leads to a lookout.
Peering over sandbags lined up
against the mud wall, he points
toward a dark speck in a series
of eroded sandstone hills.
"That's another cave. The tun-
nel runs from here, 100 meters to
there."
More caves lie at the end of a
20-foot-deep (6.1-meter-deep),
narrow mud staircase barely wide
enough for. a thin person. Inside
the small underground rooms, the
army finds bedding and weapons,
from anti-tank guns modified to
fire 22 mm mortars to homemade
bombs planted by roads and det-
onated from afar as military vehi-
cles pass.
The Nazirabad compound was
one of several hubs established
by militants in Bajur, Kamal says.
"We were expecting a lot of
resistance, but these tactics the
tunnels. I never expected this,"
he says. "One room could hold
five or six men."
Every day, Kamal's men search
the caves to make sure the mili-
tants don't return.
The Bajur operation is an
example of cooperation between
the U.S.'and Pakistan, with U.S.
forces on the Afghan side of the
border providing intelligence, sur-
veillance and reconnaissance to
Pakistani forces.
"The Pakistani army's drive to
retake this Taliban hotbed
demonstrates to the world that
they are serious about tackling
the threat of terrorism," says Bri-
an Glyn Williams, associate pro-
fessor of Islamic history at the
University of Massachusetts.
However, Bajur is just one part
the northernmost of seven
major jurisdictions of the vast
tribal belt that borders
Afghanistan. The scorched-earth
tactics in Bajur contrast with the
softer approach taken farther
south in another tribal area,
Waziristan, where most of Pak-
istan's 70,000 soldiers are based.
U.S. officials have questioned
whether Pakistan is accommo-
dating the insurgents in Waziris-
tan rather than rooting them out.
U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff Chair-
man Mike MUllen, visiting Pak-
istan last week, praised the Bajur
offensive but also encouraged the
military to step up efforts else-
where.

Roughly nine miles farther, the
convoy stops at Loi Sam, set in
the middle of undulating corn
fields.
This town has been flattened.
The market that dominated the
town square was pummeled to
ruins. Electricity poles list to one
side. The only gas station is half
collapsed; giant holes mark where
the pumps once stood.
It was early October when the
army backed by fighter jets and
helicopter gunships drove the mil-
itants out of Loi Sam. But less
than a week later, the militants
were back, firing at soldiers from
the buildings that remained stand-
ing. Only after a fierce air assault
did the army take full control.
From Loi Sam, it's a short dri-
ve past seared fields and ruined
villages to Sabagai, barely two
miles from Afghanistan.
A white banner hanging inside
a militant's former home in Saba-
gai is signed by "relatives of the


martyrs of Kashmir." The ban-
ner is worrisome evidence of
coordination among militant
groups in the tribal area and those
battling India in the disputed ter-
ritory of Kashmir.
Two secret meetings revealed
earlier this year by the AP also
suggested militants are pooling
their resources. Several militant
groups including Lashkar-e-
Taiba, blamed by India in the
Mumbai attacks, and Jaish-e-
Mohammed, another group with
links to Kashmir met to settle
differences and forge common
goals, according to a militant and
a Pakistan military official.
The militants also called for a
recruitment drive among the rel-
atives of fighters killed in Kash-
mir. The banner in Sabagai sug-
gests the drive has met with some
success. The persistence of the
militants is sobering. Baloch gazes
toward the towering peaks that
embrace Bajur and straddle both
Pakistan and Afghanistan.


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SUPREME


COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00742

Whereas BARBARA SAUNDERS, of Douglas Road,
Gambler Village, Western District, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of LYNDEN PRATT, late of Sequoia Street, Pinewood
Gardens, Southern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00743

Whereas HARTIS EUGENE PINDER, of Mareva House, 4
George Street, New Providppne, ne of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of TheBahamras, Attorney by Deed of
Power of Attorney,for, Charles Dwight Sawyer, has made,
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
Letters of Administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of LOTTIE SAWYER, late of the Settlement of Cherokee
Sound on the Island of Abaco, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the date
hereof...

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18,2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00744

Whereas DORRETTE CHERYL BETHEL a.k.a. CHERYL
BETHEL, of Fox Hill, Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of TORRY BETHEL, late of Fox Hill, Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/npr/00746


Dec. 18, 2008


IN THE ESTATE OF CAROLYN COLE NEWELL, late and
domiciled of Hillsborough County in the State of Florida,
one of the States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB, of Bay Street, Marsh Harbour,
Abaco, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealing of Letters of
Administration, in the above estate granted to CAROL
NEWELL TORRENS, the Personal Representative of the
Estate, by the Circuit Court for Hillsborough County, Florida,
one of the states of the United States of America on the
15th day of June, 2006.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


Dec. 18, 2008


PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/npr/00747


IN THE ESTATE OF ROBERT A. FLORA, (a.k.a. ROBERT
ALLAN FLORA), late and domiciled of the city of Fremont
in the County of Winnebago in the State of Wisconsin, one
of the States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by WILLIAM PILCHER, of the Eastern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealing of Domiciliary
Letters (Informal Administration) in the above estate granted
to ROBERTA L. FLORA, the Personal Representative of
the Estate, by the Circuit Court, in the state of Wisconsin,
Winnebago County, one of the States of the United States
of America on the 20th day of August, 2007.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


Dec. 18,2008


PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/npr/00749


IN THE ESTATE OF CARL M. HERBERT JR., late and
domiciled of 2801 NW 83rd Street, Gainesville, in the State
of Florida, one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by HARTIS EUGENE PINDER, of McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, Mareva House, No. 4 George Street, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealing of Letters of
Administration, in the above estate granted to CARL M.
HERBERT, III, the Personal Representative of the Estate,
by the Circuit Court for Alachua County, the Probate Division
in the state of Florida, one of the States of the United
States of America on the 20th day of November, 2006.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00751

Whereas ANTHEA CHERRIE CULMER, of Coral Harbour
in the Western District of the Island of New Providence,
one of tiRl 1 hd &ir 8frBHi~wealth ofTh& ahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of EDITH CHRISTINE ROLLE, late of
Joan's Heights in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00752

Whereas ROSTON LEWIS, of Lumumba Lane in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the.Supreme Court.of The Bahamas, for
Letters of Administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of PRINCE ALTON LEWIS, late of Miami in the State of
Florida, one of the States of the United States of America
and formerly of Lumumba Lane in the Eastern District of
the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00753

Whereas VERLINE BANNISTER and RAYMOND FINLEY,
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas have made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of
RAYMOND FINLEY JR., late of Singapore Road, Flamingo
Gardens in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/npr/00754


Dec. 18, 2008


IN THE ESTATE OF ALYCE YOUNG (a.k.a.) ALICE YOUNG,
late of No. 30 rue Bruno Nantel in the City of Saint Jerome
in the Province of Quebec, one of the Provinces of Canada,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by VERONICA DELORES GRANT, of 19D Santa Maria
Avenue in the City of Freeport in the Island of Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Certificate of
Appointment, in the above estate granted to PIERRE GUY
CHARETTE, the Personal Representative of the Estate,
by the Superior Court of the Province of Quebec in the
District of Terrebonne, on the 20th day of June, 2000.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00756

Whereas ELLEN SERVILLE, of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration with the will
annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of J. PETER
TURCO, late of No. 10 Old Winthrop Road, in the state of
Maine, one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00758

Whereas NORA PASTORIA GIBBONS, of No. 44 Laird
Street in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
Letters of Administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of ALBERT ALFRED GIBBONS, late of No.44 Laird'Street
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00759

Whereas MARCUS HUMES, of Sunshine Park in the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of LILLIAN McQUAY-JOHNSON,
late of Peardale in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00761

Whereas CHRISTINE SYMONETTE, of Sir Lynden Pindling
Estates in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real
and Personal Estate of ALPHONSO EMMANUEL
SYMONETTE, late of Sir Lynden Pindling Estates in the
Southern District of the Island of New Providence, one of
. the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.


Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


PAGE 32. MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008, PAGE 33


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18,2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00763

Whereas DORIS GIBSON, of Eastern Estates in the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of KENNETH GIBSON, late of Lincoln Boulevard
in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18,2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00767

Whereas DILITH NAIRN, of Polhemus Gardens, Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of REGINA
ARNETTA NAIRN, late of Polhemus Gardens, Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18,2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00768

Whereas RANDOLPH WILSON, of Garden Hills Estate
Subdivision, Southern District, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of ALONZO WILSON, late of Peach Street off Mt.
Rose Avenue in the City of Nassau, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18,2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00769

Whereas DENSIL MYRON CHARLES MAJOR, of No.
19 Valencia Drive, South Beach Estates, Southern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration with
the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of FRED
CEPHAS COOPER, late of Rupert Dean Lane, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18,2008


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00770

Whereas GERARDA MARIA LIDUINA CAESAREA VAN
RIET, of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration with the Will annexed of the Real and
Personal Estate of ROBERT ELI SCHRODER, late of #3
Highland Terrace, Montagu Heights, Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth


of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00771

Whereas JILLIAN T. CHASE JONES, of Jacaranda,
Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed
of Power of Attorney for Sheikha Bint Humaid Bin Rashid
Al Araimi, Khadija Bint Hamed Bin Hamoud Al Araimi,
Badar Bin, Khalid Bin, Qees Bin, Fahad Bin, Budoor Bint,
Khalood Bint Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Fannah Al Araimi,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of MOHAMMED BIN RASHID BIN
ABDULIAH AL FANNAH AL ARAIMI, late of House 2651
Way No 1949 Plot No 80 Eastern Madinat Quaboos
Sultanate of Oman, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00773

Whereas BRENDA HANNA, of Kennedy Subdivision,
Southern District, New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
Letters of Administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of BRENVILLE DONATHAN HANNA, late of Kennedy
Subdivision, Southern District, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby 'given that such applications willbe
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00775

Whereas PATRICE KNOWLES PHILLIPS, of Lou
Adderley Estates, Southwestern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of ANTHONY A. PHILLIPS, late of Lou
Adderley Estates Southwestern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased'

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dec. 18,2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00776

Whereas VALARIE SAWYER, of the Southern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration with
the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of


WILLIAM SAYWER, late of Golden Gates #2, Southern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


DEMONSTRATORS protest outside of the Organization of American
States against the policies of Bolivian President Evo Morales during
his U.S. visit in Washington on Wednesday Nov. 19, 2008.

* By DAN KEANE
LA PAZ, Bolivia
The two upstarts made history by breaking the racial ceiling.
Now Bolivians hope Barack Obama and their president, Evo
Morales, can lean on a common outsider heritage and a skin col-
or shared in one shade or another by most of Latin America to
repair the country's frayed U.S. ties, reports The Associated Press.
"Between the Indian and the black guy, they're going to find a
way to solve this," said Natividad Maldonado, a 55-year-old coca
farmer in a La Paz market. She sat on a giant sack of the small green
leaves at the heart of the tension: sacred to many Bolivians, coca is
targeted by Washington as the base for cocaine.
Morales, the first Indian president of this Andean country long
ruled by its tiny European-descended elite, has joined leftist lead-
ers across Latin America in voicing hope for a new tone from
Washington, which they say has too long considered the region its
own backyard.
Venezuela and Cuba's socialist leaders have warily offered Oba-
ma a rhetorical olive branch. ButfMorales has outdone his allies in
acting out'his conflicting passio6i abbiffie 1e sperpower to the
north. to b ... ......iA en..sr. .-... -.. '.-. -
Morafes booted out Bolivia's IiS.ambsisa'dor in September
over accusations, denied by Washington, that American diplo-
mats collaborated with the conservative opposition. Next he kicked
out the Drug Enforcement Administration, vowing its agents
would never return as long as he held office.
And then he visited Washington and placed a wreath at the
Lincoln Memorial, honoring one of the president-elect's heroes.
He did not meet Obama or President George W. Bush, but had
a private meeting with Sen. Dick Lugar, the Indiana Republican
who is a close foreign policy adviser to Obama. Afterward, he
wrote to Lugar: "I think we have begun a long and fruitful journey
to reconstruct the relations between our countries."
Old resentments die hard, however. On.the-same day Morales
wrote that warm letter, he claimed to a crowd of Bolivian coca farm-
ers that the U.S. backed plans to assassinate him before he won the
presidency in 2005.
Mixed messages aside, the affable Morales seems to have won
allies on Capitol Hill.
Lugar said in a statement that the U.S. "regrets any perception
that it has been disrespectful, insensitive, or engaged in any improp-
er activities" against Morales' government. He also called for rein-
stating trade benefits that Bush suspended last month for what his
administration called Morales' lack of cooperation fighting the
drug trade.
The personal contact was crucial for a hands-on politician like
Morales, whose previous impressions of Washington were rooted
in his years as head of Bolivia's largest coca-growers union, when
he led protests against U.S.-backed efforts to eradicate the plant.
"Morales' anti-U.S. rhetoric is born out of really intense drug war
friction, out of his own personal experience," said Kathy Ledebur,
director of the Andean Information Network, an advocacy group
monitoring anti-narcotics efforts in Bolivia.
"That Morales went and sat down and talked to all of these
guys in Washington is a big step. And that they were nice to him -
and that somebody's regretting something is really pretty revo-
lutionary."
Bolivia's U.S. ties are dominated by the struggle to control coca,
revered here for millennia as a mild stimulant but also processed
into cocaine, largely for markets in Brazil,. Argentina and Europe.
Morales seeks to radically scale back a decades-old partnership
in the war on drugs, exalting Bolivian sovereignty while claiming the
U.S. anti-narcotics effort is cover for political meddling.
U.S. officials deny the charge, and point out that Morales has
allowed Bolivia's illegal coca crop to grow though much more
slowly last year than in staunch U.S. ally Colombia. Washington
argues that South America's poorest country cannot fight drug
trafficking without its help.
But last week the European Union announced 234 million euros
($312 million dollars) in aid to Bolivia over the next five years, a sig-
nificant increase that includes an unspecified amount to fight drug
trafficking offering Morales a potential substitute for U.S. sup-
port.
And Venezuela has already signed deals to buy the Bolivian-
made T-shirts formerly sold to U.S. buyers under the preferred
trade status pact that Lugar wants to renew.
While Obama has offered few specifics on his future approach to
Latin American affairs, his very presence in the White House in
place of Bush dogged across the region by widespread resent-
ment of his 2003 invasion of Iraq will undercut Morales and his
fellow leftists' anti-American rhetoric.
But the U.S. will have to adapt too, said Bruce Bagley, a Latin
America expert at the University of Miami.
"I think the U.S. is going to have to accept a lower profile and
working through multilateral institutions," he said. "Ultimately
the U.S. has a lot of weight. We have some levers here. But we don't
need to exercise those levers by bludgeoning them over the head."
Back at the La Paz coca market, taxi driver Sergio Condori, 33,
paused from tying huge sacks of dried coca to the roof of his
weathered Datsun to offer the incoming U.S. president his own
advice.
"Don't be so authoritarian," he said with a mischievous grin.
"Because we campesinos, we're rebels."

Associated Press writer Frank Bajak in Bogota, Colombia, con-
tributed to this report.


Bolivians




hope Obama,




as outsider,




heals US rift


MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008, PAGE 33


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE34.MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008


COI PG


Tribune Comics


JUDGE PARKER


APT 3-G


BLONDIE


MARVIN


TIGER

ARV THe WIe MEW CAME
M7 &Aue H Ip MFt P
OF FiAyLKWCE'f4
ANIPIQk


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


F


CRYPTIC PUZZLE


ACROSS
I O.i'e a ri.rdeioped area on the
,nap (5)
6 Was iit queen a bachelor girl? (5)
9 Colourlultalilte (7)
10 aiTiamy Oulr ...I turn. bul may do a
good deed (51
11 (Calls lr personal adornments (5)
12 U.uaily recta 'qular piece of glass
lell (5I
1I G,;r, leade,. wounding like a male
quanel (I I
15 (dirner ol .3a haid piece of wood (3)
I1 A pupi l o.: backward, should not
be tale, (4)
18 Butler or cam i16)
19 There prvlurdityin what a
plumber may lind (5)
20 Cealure jouir.-g around in prides
(6l
22 form or address on a note to
leactne (4)l
24 Female in rie news (3)
25 With only thi. 10 eat, you'd waste
awa3y 171
26 toid of Bultu', (5)
27 A diminulave swimmer (5)
28 ine louiralistl crowd (5)
29 Pa. ed earl), perhaps, to the
Editor I('l
30 A bird used i-ne, ely as decoration
5I)
31 bern e'.qualr successful as
Irnlmpen Il',)


DOWN
2 Silly sort of clock? (6)
3 A stubborn beast, Middle Eastern,
with charm (6)
4 He's a bit of a lunatic! (3)
5 French lown rebuilt by Danes (5)
6 A sentence that can be made
longer (7)
7 Cry from the heavens? (4)
8 Great revolutionary circus feature?
(3,3)
12 Name a favourite monarch (5)
13'At poker, try not to do so when
you have one! (5)
14 Sculptor, never ending, immortal
(5)
15 Customary line in bath design
(5)
16 Postpone being freed, possibly
(5)
18 It's grim, getting set about by
sailors! (5)
19 Discussed at tihe club, indeed
(7)
21 Very quietly look around for
something hot (6)
22 Well built redhead interrupting
research (6)
23 Why the senora's upset? (6)
25 Fight and fight again, nothing less
(5)
26 In town, keep out of the centre of
crime or sin (4)
28 Favourite part of Morpeth (3)


m


Yesterday's crypti solutions
ACROSS: 3, S-tub-s 8, Fu-to-n 10, Ratty 11, Mo-0 12, Local 13,
Hand-tes 15, Venus 18, Bad 19, Resume 21, Goggles 22, Alry.
23, A-Gog 24, Brownie 26, Sham-U.S. 29,0 -il 31, Hat F-s 32,
Dole out 34, A-head 35, Ram 36, S-t-ole 37, To-Kay 38, Slope
DOWN: 1, Dumas 2, Good buy 4, Twos 5, B rave-S 6, Sales 7,
Strum 9, Ton (rev.) 12, Le dg.ers 14, Lag 16, Nudge 17, Se-DG-C
e 19, Redwood 20, Ha-R-sh 21, Great 23, Aileron 24, Bus he-L
25, Nil 27, Haste 28, M-E-als 30, Human 32, D-amp 33,0 a-K


-LLJ
N
N

>-
C,)
wi


Yesterday's eay solutions
ACROSS: 3, Madam 8, Habit; 10, Get at 11, Rat 12, Peda
Citadel 15, Tepid 18, Peg 19, Cheese 21. Panacea 22, A
Ring 24, Hurtful 26, Closes 29, Ail 31, Henna 32, uibera
Organ 35, Our 36, Kudos 37, Pumps 38, Petly
DOWN: 1, Paris 2, Pitapatl 4, Abel 5, Agatha 6, Melee
9, Bat 12, Pegasus 14, Den 16, Perl 17, Deign 19, Cer
Watch 21, Put on 23, Rule out 24, Hearse 25, Fib 27,t
Snoop 30, Warps 32, tast 33, Hum


ACROSS
1 School of fish (5)
6 Slap (5)
9 Clerical cap (7)
10 Highest point (5)
11 Firearm (5)
12 Man's name (5)
13 Skyline (7)
15 Domestic fuel
(3)
17 Spoken (4)
18 Term ol office
(6)
19 Animal's trail (5)
20 Eatable (6)
22 Eyelid
inflammation (4)
24 Colour (3)
25'Garland (7)
26 Escargot (5)
27 Destined (5)
28 Types (5)
29 Imaginary
being (7)
l 13, 30 In motion (5)
Abut 23, 31 Rips (5)
al 34,
I, Oasis
ain 20,
el up 28,


CALVIN & HOBBES
I DONT' UNERS AM.D HOWI
SATN RUNS HIS cERAToM..
WK0 CA lE AFFORD 1O GIE
1T3S AIM


t1O DOES "E PW ( RFPR HE
RA tNtMM N5 IE U ES TO
MNY E IE TOIS? H O0ES
HE PMM 5 ELVES ?
"--\sI -


DENNIS THE MENACE


"KEMBER,eEOR YOU W5RE ONCEA KIP A KIP LIKFVFNNIS."
LIKEMNNS16."


iAERES NO INCOME
TO QCZER. E1\S
COSTS. "Ow
DOES gE 00 IT?


Sudoku Puzzle

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday

2 6

1 3

5 7 6 9

4 66 7 I

69 74

3 1 9 5

837

2 _5 3

3 2
~ ~~~ -2-- -


Difficulty Level *


.Kakuro Puzzle
Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro' is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than onde. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.


Yesterday's
Sudoku Answer


Yesterday's
Kakuro Answer


Chess


Mark Hebden v Michael Adams,
Kilkenny Open 2006. This spring
England number one Adams
competes in the world title
candidates matches in Elista,
southern Russia. it could be the
last chance for the 35-year-old
Cornishman, who has three
times reached the championship
semi-finals or final, to challenge
for top honours. His warm-up
event at Ireland's top weekend
open turned out badly, as the
veteran Leicester grandmaster
Hebden took first prize and
trounced the favourite in their
individual game. Here Hebden
(White, to move) is a pawn up
with all his pieces more active
than their black counterparts.
Adams's last hope is that his
opponent will fall for the
trap1 Bxd7 Rel+ 2 Kd4Rx7 3
dxe7 Bxd7 and White has lost a
bishop. Can you find White's
quickest win?


DOWN
2 Extreme fear (6)
3 Descend by
rope (6)
4 Illuminated (3)
5 Citrus fruit (5)
6 Attacking
footballer (7)
7 Principal (4)
8 Underground
room (6)
12 Style of car (5)
13 Float (5)
14 Quick (5)
15 Relish (5)
16 Number (5)
18 Cloth for drying
(5)
19 Slim (7)
21 Defers (6)
22 Long step (6)
23 Over there (6)
25 Movies (5)
26 Type of house
(4)
28 Equipment (3)


W
1*

L.. -. I
II
T~r
.~Iii. .5L 1


Chasssolutfon 325 1sltRelu* 2Kd4RtSe.s
aec6! and tack esknedas dwepawn wi queent
Menaa quia: a) e rmury b) Colnd c) Casement
One. ossbeword ladder soeionfimewAM, ware
me.coec, wa. rwy costY


Target


HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from (the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may
be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and
there must, be at least, one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 23: very good 34; excellent
45 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION
acute acuter aura capture
chateau chute cruet curate
cure curt cute cuter ecru
erupt hurt PARACHUTE puce
pure ruche taupe teacup thru
truce true uprate urea


Contract Bridge

by Steve Becker


Preparing for the Unexpected


North dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
*J762
VQ 75
*A
4AQJ 83
WEST'
4 1053 4
V3


*Q1062
4109742
SOUTH
+AK
VAK642
.1 9 43
4K 5


EAST
Q9 8 4
.1 1098
* K 8 7 5
1.6


The bidding:
North East South West
1 4 Pass 2 V Pass
3 V Pass 4 NT Pass
5 V Pass 6 V
Opening lead two of diamonds.
When five cards of a suit are
missing, they will divide 3-2 68 per-
cent of the time, 4-1 28 percent of the
time, and 5-0 4 percent of the time.
These figures are worth remember-
ing, because the best way to play a
hand frequently depends on how the
missing cards are likely to be distrib-
tited.
South was defeated in this deal
because he failed to guard-against a
4-1 trump division., He won the dia-
tnond lead and cashed the Q-K of


trumps. disclosing the bad trump
break. He then runffed a diamond in
dummy and attempted to run the
clubs. But East rufted the second
club and played the king and another
diamond, and the slam went down
two.
Declarer should have considered
the possibility of a 4-1 trump break
and taken steps to guard against it if
it existed. Had South been thinking
along these lines, he might have seen
that there was a simple way to pro-
tect against either opponent holding
lour trumps.
The winning play is to lead a low
heart from dummy at trick two and
allow the opponents to win the trick!
This would leave the defenders with-
out recourse.
In the actual deal, East would win
and, let's say, return a spade. South
would take the ace, ruff a diamond,
cash the queen of hearts, lead a club
to the king, draw East's trumnps and
easily make the rest. In all, he would
score two spades, four hearts, a dia-
mond, a diamond ruffin dummy and
four club tricks.
It is true that South would lose a
trump trick unnecessarily if the
hearts turned out to be divided 3-2.
But the loss of 30 points would be
tri ial compared with the 1,630
points South could score by making
the slam.


lTomorrow: Solving a dillicult problem.
S'2008 King IFe.UirLes Sundicate Inc


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THE TRIBUNEf


HEALTH,


AND


WEALTH


HAPPINESS.


OUR CHRISTMAS
WISH FOR.YOU.


As part of a global group, our employees will be celebrating
Christmas all over the world. We would like to join them in
wishing our clients in the Bahamas a very happy Christmas.


For more information about our range of healthcare
plans, visit our office at Sandringham House,
83 Shirley Street, Nassau, or call us on 242-328-6330.


And while wishing you good health is also part of the
tradition, with us it's more than just that we are here
to help you achieve it.


GE NERAU
SWorldwide


www.generali-gw.com


PAGE 36,, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008


Ck










.'/


M wN D


MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008


Colinalmperial.


Conf~idence For Life


Bahamas Post 'front loaded" on tax free-up


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


* Study says nation will incur 'almost three-quarters' of EPA revenue.10ss by 2013
*
Bh h th lrest ercentae of 'hih tariff' products to be lib d


he Bahamas has the most ,J iaiacI Lxx 11 ILa.tIL Yv_3. VII v'J xjxLA tJA .4 x Jxv... L 1 x v.,x xx ,.. .
l sharplyifronloaded tariff Bahamian exports would incur 1.627 million euro tariff rise if stayed outside EPA
states for the Economic Partnership But study says leaving costs for the Bahamas 'negligible'
Agreement (EPA), a report prepared
for the Com m onwealth Secretariat has ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------.----------------- --------- -
found, with almost three-quarters of the trade agreement with the EU and its 25-year tariff liberalization schedule, others. / will have been incurred by the start of
its revenue loss on European Union the challenges that will bring, in its concluded: "The revenue loss is very "Almost three-quarters of the hypo- 2013. For Antigua/Barbuda, the pro-
(EU) imports incurred by 2013. assessment of how each CAJURIFO- .sharply front loaded for the Bahamas thetical revenue that the Bahamas will
The study, described as an analysis of RUM country would be impacted by and Antigua/Barbuda, but not for the lose as a result of EPA liberalization SEE page 5B


Bank liquidator 'entirely

rejects' $330m claim


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


* Legal action by fraud
victims still likely


A Bahamian Leadenhall liquidator
bank's liquida-
tor has "entirely warns creditors unlikely
rejected" a $330
million claim to see full recovery,
made against it as attempts to regain
by US victims
of a financial $3.458m in outstanding
fraud, a move loans under review
that has
prompted attor-
neys acting for victims' Bahamian attorneys,
the group to file a summons Peter and Charles Maynard,
with the Supreme Court. said: "I have completed my
Craig3 omez, a partner with review of the claim you submit-.
the Baker Tilly Gomez account- ted to me on behalf of the Cash
ing firm, "absolutely denied" 4 Titles claimants, attempting
that Leadenhall Bank & Trust to have the default judgment
had knowingly aided the prin- by the Florida court recognized
cipals of the Cash 4 Titles ponzi in the Bahamian liquidation
scheme, but it appears likely proceedings.
that the victims will press ahead "I take this opportunity to
with legal action in a bid to advise you that after my review
enforce the judgment they of the information sent to me,
obtained in a Florida court.
Mr Gomez, in a letter to the SEE page 6B


Import 'tax gap' well-known


Five global suitors Investor lawsuit mulled

interested in BTC against City Markets


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter
THERE are at least five
international suitors who have
expressed an interest in pur-
chasing a majority 51 per cent
stake in the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny (BTC), the company's
legal vice-president said last
week.
In canvassing internation-
al telecommunications oper-
ators, Felicity Johnson, BTC's
vice-president of legal, regu-
:litorv and intLrrconnection
affairs, told Rotai plans of East,
Nassau that' there *tas signit-
cant interest in the company's
pri alisation both interna-
uonally andidn the Bahamas.
"'We're going out to the
market to sell 51.per cent of.
the shares... Are there any
local groups who want to pur-
chase 51 percent, of.the
shares'7 I. ust socially, have


Revised telecoms
laws to go to
Parliament
early in 2009
been told by people: 'Hey, we
are putting a group together,
so from that point of view',
yes, I've heard a few local
groups are organising them-
selves for this process, but I
am not sure if they have
approached any of the advi-
sors at this time."
The Government and BTC
were looking for a partner
who can bring a long-term
strategic vision to the compa-
ny post-privatisation, said Ms
Johnson, who is also a mem-
ber of the BTC privatization
committee.
"BTC is a national trea-
sure," she added. "Telecom-
SEE page 3B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
MOVES are underway to determine whether there is sufficient
minority shareholder interest to launch a class action-type law-
suit against City Markets and its Board of Directors, Tribune Busi-
ness can reveal, with an attorney already engaged to work on the
project.
Sources familiar with the situation told Tribune Business that the
unnamed attorney had been hired to assess whether there was
any legal basis for such a lawsuit against the board of the grocery
chain's operating parent, Bahamas Supermarkets, and the likelihood
of any action succeeding.
Active moves are being made to sound out minority sharehQld-
ers as to whether enough are interested in participating as plaintiffs
in such a lawsuit, following Bahamas Supermarkets' announce-
ment that it was likely to make a $10 million loss in its fiscal 2008
year. This came after it incurred an $8 million swing into the red,
with a $189,000 loss, in its 2007 fiscal year.
"It is being considered," one source close to the situation said of
a potential minority investor lawsuit. "The minority shareholders
are extremely unhappy.
"As a result of the information that was revealed at the last
annual general meeting, and the indications about the future that
were made by the chairman, Basil Sands, some of the minority
shareholders are unhappy and may be considering litigation."
It is unclear what legal grounds for the litigation are being__f
explored, but it is likely that any action would be brought under the '
..Companies At,andallege that the board failed 'to act in the
company' s best interests' and ..
breached their duty to protect' SEE page 7B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
IT is "generally accepted"
that there is always a discrep-
ancy between import-related
foreign currency purchases and
government tax revenues, a
government minister has said,
telling ibune Business to "rest
assured" that the Ingraham
administration will move to
stamp out tax evasion.
Responding to a series of Tri-
bune Business articles on wide-
spread tax evasion by business-
es via the submission of falsi-
fied inv )ices that undervalued
import shipments, Zhivargo
Laing, minister of state for
finance, acknowledged that the
Government had to "rational-
ize" the difference between its
import duty revenues and for-
eign currency purchases to pay
overseas suppliers.


"There's always been a gen-
eral acceptance that there is a
difference between the receipts
recorded by the Central Bank in
terms of import-related foreign
currency purchases, and what.
is received in terms of revenues
based on the average tax rates,"
Mr Laing told Tribune Busi-
ness.

SEE page 4B


55% utility bill

rise hits Abaco

Markets profits

HIGHER utility costs con-
tinue to prevent Abaco Mar-
kets' 8.3 per cent year-to-date
sale growth from filterifig
through to the bottom line,
with profits for the first nine
months of its 2009 fiscal year
down by 69 per cent against
prior year comparatives.
Unveiling its results for the
three months to October 31,
2008, the BISX-listed retail
group said net profit for the
first nine months had
dropped from $1.522 million
last year to $473,000 this time
around. Stripping out a
$35.0,000 one-time gain
incurred in 2007, which would
take the prior year's net prof-
its to $1.172, left Abaco Mar-
kets 60 per cent below prior
year levels for the first nine
months.
The three months to Octo-
ber 31, 2008, the third quarter
of its financial year, saw

SEE page 8B


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PAGEiiiSI M,1


" HiYlAliii Y M1'i T!R AI


* By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets
TRADING momentum
increased slightly last week in
the Bahamian market.
Investors traded in six out of


the 25 listed securities, of
which three declined and
three remained unchanged.
There were no advancers in
the market this week.
EQUITY MARKET
A total of 75,890 shares


changed hands last week, rep-
resenting an increase of 4,767
or 6.7 per cent versus the pre-
vious week's trading volume
of 71,123 shares.
Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) led the volume for a


second consecutive week with
33,500 shares trading, decreas-
ing by $0.19 to close at $7.19.
FirstCaribbean Internation-
al Bank (CIB) led the decline
for a second consecutive
week, plummeting in value by
$0.90 to $10.50 on a volume
of 8,000 shares. Cable
Bahamas (CAB) also experi-
enced a noticeable drop in
market price as well, falling by
$0.09 on a volume of 33,100,
to close the week at $13.91.
BOND MARKET
No notes traded in the
Bahamian market last week.
COMPANY NEWS
Earnings Releases
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
(FBB) released its unaudited
financial statements for the
quarter ended September 0,
2008.
FBB reported net income of
$832,000, a decline of $416,000
or 33 per cent compared to
2007.
Total income, of $10.4 mil-
lion, increased by $1.9 million
or 24 per cent, and total
expenses of $9.5 million were
up by $2.4 million or 34 per
cent.
Higher income was due pri-
marily to an increase in non-
interest income, while higher
expenses could be attributed
primarily to increases in
staffing costs and general and
administrative expenses.
Earnings per share
decreased to $0.029, a fall of
0.31 per cent, compared to
$0.042 at September 2007.
Total assets and liabilities
stood at $262.7 million and
$229.7 million respectively,
compared to $223.6 million
and $190.8 million at the'year-
end 2007.
FBB experienced an
increase in its customer
deposit base of $34.4 million
or 21 per cent during the first
three quarters, reporting total
customer deposits of $196.7
million.
Correspondingly, mortgages
and loans increased by $39.7
million or 26 per cent to end
the quarter at $192.4 million.


The Bahamian Stock Market
FINDEX 827.67 (-13.06%) YTD
BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $1.71 $- 0 3.01%
BBL $0.73 $- 0 -14.12%
BOB $7.64 $- 0 -20.50%
BPF $11.80 $- 0 0.00%
BSL $13.86 $- 0 -5.07%
BWL $3.15 $- 0 -13.93%
CAB $13.91 $-0.09 33,100 -15.44%
CBL. $7.00 $-0.19 33,500; -16.96%
CHL $2.83 $- 0 -10.16%
CIB $10.50 $-0.90 8,000 -28.08%
CWCB $2.36 $0.22 0 -53.17%
DHS $2.55 $- 0 8.51%
FAM $7.80 $- 140 8.33%
FBB $2.37 $- 0 -10.57%
FCC $0.33 $- 0 -57.14%
FCL $5.20 $- 0 0.39%
FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%
FIN $11.87 $- 950 -8.34%
ICD $6.81 $- 200 -6.07%
JSJ $11.10 $- 0 0.91%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%
DIVIDENDS/AGM NOTES:
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) (FBB) has declared a dividend of
$0.02 per share, payable on December 23, 2008, to all share-
holders of record date Decempber 15, 2008.
Finance Corporation of The Bahamas (FIN) has declared
a dividend of $0.13 per share, payable on December 18, 2008, to
all shareholders of record date December 11, 2008:
Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared a dividend of
$0.05 per share, payable on December 31, 2008, to all share-
holders of record date December 12, 2008.
Consolidated Water Company (CWCB) has declared a
dividend of $0.013 per share, payable on February 7,2009, to all
shareholders of record date January 1, 2009.
PRIVATE PLACEMENT OFFERINGS:
FOCOL Holdings (FCL) announced it will be extending the
deadline of its private placement offering. The preferred shares
will be paying a dividend rate of prime + 1.75 per cent, payable
semi-annually.


International Markets

FOREK Rates


MINISTRY OF LABOUR AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT GN 798
THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971
CHAPTER 339
THE PRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)
(AMENDMENT) ( REGULATIONS, 2002


The public is advised that prices as shown in the Schedule for LEAD FREE
GASOLINE sold by CHEVRON (TEXACO) BAHAMAS LIMITED will become effective on
Monday, December 15,2008.

SCHEDULE
MAXIMUM WHOLESALE SELLING
PRICE PER U.S. GALLON MAXIMUM
I- RETAIL SELLING
PLACE ARTICLE PRICE PER U.S.
MAXIMUM MAXIMUM GALLON
SUPPLIERS' DISTRIBUTORS'
PRICE PRICE $

PARTA
NEWPROVIDENCE INCLUDING SEA FREI G H T
TEXACO BAHAMAS
LTD. LEAD FREE 2.79 2.79 3.23
PARTC
GRAND AHAMA INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
(NOT FiREEPORT)
TEXACO BAHAMAS
LTD. LEAD FREE 2.69 2.85 3.27

ABACO,ANDROS NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
ELEUTHERA
TEXACO BAHAMAS
LTD. LEAD FREE 2.79 3,00 3.39
PART
ALL-OTHER NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
FAMILY ISLANDS
TEXACO BAHAMAS
LTD. LEAD FREE 2.80 3.02 3.42





PERMANENT SECRETARY


Weekly
1.2478
1.4948
1.3370-


Weekly
$46.55
$822.50


Commodities


Crude Oil
Gold


% Change
-1.75
+1.31
+4.98


% Change
+11.50
+8.49


International Stock Market Indexes:


DJIA
S & P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei


Weekly
8,629.68
879.73
1,540.72
8,235.87


% Change
-0.07
+0.42
+2.08
+4.02.


:1''


NASSAU, BAHAMAS


Centrally Located At Union Wharf

Sailings Twice Weekly

Departures Every Thursday & Saturday

Arrivals Every Friday & Sunday

* LCL / FCL / Vehicles / Heavy Equipment

* Full Container Load Pickups throughout Florida
& the U.S.

* Private Terminal with Flexible Gate Hours
Centrally Located in Ft. Pierce, FL


RATES, BOOKINGS AND INFORMATION
(772) 46547700
WWW.SHIPACL.COM

Local Agent
ACL Bahamas Ltd., Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 322-1158 Fax: (242) 326-4206


"-I -'


British American Financial




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HOLIDAY HOURS
Friday, December 19th, 2008
Annual Staff Christmas Party
AN offtes wtM close at 3-00 p.m.
Wednesday, December 24th, 2008
Christmas Eve
All oIrca wi close at 1t 00 p.m.
Thursday, December 25th, 2008
Christmas Day
CLOSED
Friday, Decembe.r 2 th. 2008
Boxing Day
L CLOSED

Wednesday, December 31 st, 2008
New Year's Eve
Al offices will close at 3:00 -rnm,
Thursday, January 1 st, 2009
New Year's Day
CLOSED


Friday, January 2nd, 2009
CLOSED
Monday, January 5th. 2009
All offices will reopen


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008








I n lI i r .., t . .. ..
-


More than 1,200 hotel jobs lost in New Providence


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter

THE 150 lay-offs at the San-
dals Royal Bahamian resort last
week were among the deepest
cuts of any property in this
nation's hotel industry, with just
over one in five or 23 per cent of
the workforce made redundant,
a move that takes known sec-
tor redundancies to more than
1,200 within the last few months.
When added to the 800 job
losses at Atlantis, amounting to
8-9 per cent of the resort's staff;
the 100 lay offs at Baha Mar;
the 18 at the British Colonial
Hilton; and the 140 at Harbor-
side, amounting to nearly 50 per
cent of the staff, the Sandals job
losses have taken total hotel
industry redundancies in the
Nassau/Paradise Island market
to around 1,208.
And those are only the jobs
losses to have received wide-
spread publicity, with other
redundancies fewer in num-
ber likely to have taken place
across the resort sector, in affil-
iated industries, and across the
Bahamian economy as firms cut
staff headcount to survive amid
falling revenues and rising costs.
When the hotel industry lay-
offs are added to the 64 job loss-
es at Pepsi-Cola, around 114 at
Bacardi, some 30-40 at the now-
closed Pioneer Shipping, and
potentially 30-40 more at the-


Freeport Container Port, close
to known jobs have been lost to
the Bahamian economy. In
total, several thousand jobs are
likely to have been los this year,
largely due to the global eco-
nomic crisis that has reduced
tourist arrivals and foreign direct
investment inflows.
The severance packages
received by the laid-off employ-
ees, coupled with the Christmas
shopping season, are likely to
mitigate the worst effects of the
redundancies until early 2009,
when these funds are likely to
be used up by some.

Workforce

With at least 3,000 out of the
5,000 school leavers per year
immediately entering the work-
force, it is clear the Bahamian
economy will not be able to
grow fast enough to accommo-
date them and the newly-unem-
ployed for some time to come.
Many observers, though,
believe some hotel properties
have used the downturn to right-
size where they have been over-
staffed, with not surprisingly -
the most unproductive employ-
ees being among the first to go.
Still, last week's lay-offs at
Sandals Royal Bahamian have
renewed calls for trade unions to
be in place to protect Bahamian
workers.
Labour attorney Obie Fergu-
son, legal counsel for The


Bahamas Hotel, Maintenance
and Allied Workers Union
(BHMAWU), said the organi-
sation had not yet been official-
ly recognized as the bargaining
unit for Sandals' remaining 500
employees.
The union has been
embroiled in a legal battle over
whether it can lawfully repre-
sent Sandals employees for the
past several years, after it was
claimed that at least 80 per cent
of the staff did not want the
Bahamas Hotel, Catering and
Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU) to represent them.
A day before the vote to
determine employee preference
was scheduled, the BHCAWU
and Sandals filed an injunction
to block the poll, alleging that
Mr Ferguson's client was not a
registered union. The matter is
now before the Court of
Appeal.
Mr Ferguson said Labour
Minister Dion Foulkes has indi-
cated he will wait for the deci-
sion of the court before autho-
rising a poll a decision that,
according to Mr Ferguson, was
detrimental to the employees
now faced with termination
"This is the classic example
of why there needs to be repre-
sentation in place, because now
you have 150 workers from San-
dals who have been laid off and
there is no organisation to act
in their best interest and ensure
that they are given a legal and


Fie lba uios interested in


FROM page 1B

munications itself is an extreme-
ly important element of our
development, particularly since
we have tourism and banking
as our majorsources of income.
So it is extremely important that
the vision and business plan of
our strategic partner lines up
with the direction that the gov-
ernment,wants the company to
go in."
Although the initial end-2008
privatization deadline will not
be met, Ms Johnson said there
have not been any major hic-_
cups in the process.
"We could have really com-
pressed the process further, but


I suppose we started to ease up
a bit when we started to look
at what was happening with the
international financial markets,"
Ms Johnson said. "It is obvious
that that the world is distracted,
and so it does not hurt to go a
little slower, because a lot of
things are happening."
The public consultation doc-
ument on the proposed new
Communications Act and tele-
coms regulatory reform has
been released, with the legisla-
tion now before the Attorney
General's office.
"The Attorney General's
Office is looking at the legisla-
tion, and we anticipate that the
legislation will go to Parliament


by the end of January, early
February," Ms Johnson said.
"Certainly, we want the Bills
passed in Parliament by the clo-
sure of the sale, but we will not
be waiting for them to go out
through Parliament before we
go out and start the sale
process."
By the end of 2009, Bahami-
an consumers could see as many
as three fixed-line voice services
carriers operating in this nation,
she added, with cellular services
to follow.
Employment opportunities in
the sector should increase,
although there is a chance and
concern about downsizing in
BTC by a new buyer.


just severance package. There
is no unified voice to speak for
them," Mr Ferguson told Tri-
bune Business.
He said that were a union in
place, it could have worked with
Sandals to determine how best
to proceed and minimise lay-
offs. Mr Ferguson added that as


the union's legal adviser, he will
be assisting the dismissed work-
ers if needed.
"This is not fair to the work-
ers to not be able to exercise
their legal right to choose the
bargaining unit that they wish
to represent them," he said. "It
is also not fair to terminate per-


sons without giving them any l
indication that it will happen,
so that they have can plan their
finances."
Mr Ferguson said that given
the current economic climate,
lay-offs may be inevitable, but 'W
that there must be some dignity ,t
in how the process was handled. r'


MINISTRY OF LABOUR & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971
CHAPTER 339
THE PRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)
(AMENDMENT) (-") REGULATIONS, 2002


GN-799


The public is advised that.prices as shown in the Schedule for LEAD FREE
GASOLINE sold by SUN OIL LTD. (SHELL) will become effective on Monday, December
15,2008.


SCHEDULE


MAXIMUM WHOLESALE SELLING
PRICE PER U.S. GALLON MAXIMUM
RETAIL SELLING
PLACE ARTICLE MAXIMUM MAXIMUM PRICE PER U.S.
SUPPLIERS' DISTRIBUTORS' GALLON
PRICE PRICE
s $s
PART A
NEW PROVIDENCE INCLUDING SEA FREIG H T


SHELL LEAD FREE 2.91 2.91 335
PART C
GRANDBAHAMA INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
(NOT FREEPORT)

SHELL LEAD FREE 2,81 2.97 3.39
PART
ABACO,ANDROS NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
ELEUTHERA

SHELL LEAD FREE 2.91 3.12 3.51
PART
ALL OTHER FAMILY NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
ISLANDS

SHELL LEAD FREE 2.92 3.14 3.54


PERMANENT SECRETARY


THIS MONTHS TOPIC:

Depression

LECTURE DATE

SIThursday, December 1.8th '08 @ 6PM
Doctors Hospital Conference Room
RSVP Seating is Limited 302-4603


Please join us as our guest every third
SPEAKER: IThursday of the month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues
Dr. Michael Neville affecting society today.
Psychiatrist


Pu : LECTURE SERIES

To educate the public about
':..ithe important health isues.
presented by.distinguished
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: Dr. Michael Neville
Screenings: \
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Ci ur re o, d- Autism in Children

,_.Glose tesng between Dr. Michelle Majorl
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Dr. Jerome Lightburne
To ensure available seCuing .
Phone: 3024603
Ethics in Healthcare
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Dr. N'tari Darville



5 DOCTORS HOSPITAL


I








PAGE 4B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


Im'


own


FROM page 1B

That is effectively a tacit
admission of what virtually
everyone knows to be the case -
that there is widespread tax eva-
sion and loss of government


revenue through the use of fal-
sified invoices, which under-
mines the latter's social and
infrastructure programmes, thus
impacting quality of life in the
Bahamas.
While unable to comment on
how widespread the practice of


under-invoicing was, as no study
had been done on the issue, Mr
Laing said: "Rest assured that
we are not interested in having
continued at Customs, or any-
where else, any breach of the
law or policies of the Govern-
ment as it relates to compliance


with our tax regime.
"We have recognized for a
while the need to strengthen tax
compliance methods, and that's
what we're going to be doing
with significant aggressiveness
and assertiveness going forward.
"Those businesses and those
persons who have been evad-
ing payment of taxes, or are
seeking to do so, they do so at
their own risk. It's better now to
stop and comply with the law,
rather than have the law fall on
them."
Mr Laing said he did not
want to go into specific details
about any new tax compliance
methods the Government was
planning, for fear of alerting
current offenders about what
might take place.
He would only say that the
Government was committed to
ensuring "maximum compliance
with the laws of the country as it
pertains to paying taxes, and
doing what is required. Citizens
must continue to take it upon
themselves to do the right thing,
and comply with the law and
pay taxes".
Mr Laing indicated that
greater enforcement of the tax
laws was tied in to the wider
issue of public service reform,
an FNM manifesto commit-
ment, which aims to make
broad changes in agencies such
as Customs and Immigration.
He added that if the Bahamas
was to "be a well-governed,
properly ordered, compliant
jurisdiction that can 'serve citi-
zens in the way that is required,
in many ways citizens them-
selves have to help in that
regard. If a public officer is
committing an abuse of the law,
he is often being aided by citi-
zens on the outside.
"It's like a chicken and egg
approach. It's not the chicken,
it's not the egg, in this instance
it's the chicken and the egg.
Both are in the wrong".
Tribune Business revealed
earlier this week how the Gov-
ernment was being urged to
examine the amount of foreign
currency Bahamian businesses
purchase to pay overseas sup-
pliers as "the only way to choke
off at the source" rampant tax
evasion that costs this
nation millions of dollars in
lost customs duty revenues per
year.
A businessman, speaking to
Tribune Business on condition


of anonymity, said a huge tax
evasion industry had grown up
around the practice of submit-
ting invoices from foreign sup-
pliers that grossly undervalued
imported shipments coming into
the Bahamas, enabling local
firms to avoid paying substantial
stamp and import duties to the
Public Treasury.
Rather than open-up import-
ed shipments to inspection and
request invoices from US and
other overseas suppliers, the
businessman suggested that the
Government and Customs,sim-
ply compare the invoices they
were handed with the ones pre-
sented to commercial banks
when Bahamian companies
wanted to obtain foreign cur-
rency to pay their creditors.
This, he said, would likely
reveal substantial differences
between the import shipment
value, upon which any import
and stamp duties were based,
and the actual amount required
to pay the supplier, thus expos-
ing any tax evasion.
"If the Government was to
compare the duty paid on the
invoices with what businesses
requested from the bank, they
would choke it off completely at
the source," the businessman
said.
"Because businesses are able
to go in and easily access for-
eign currency, be it through a
wire transfer or drafts, which is
the easy way to get substantial
sums of money to creditors,
that's what makes it so easy to
do what they're doing."
The businessman suggested
that an 'industry' had effective-
ly grown up around the prac-
tice of submitting falsified
invoices, with some Bahamian
companies establishing either
physical operations or 'shell
companies' in the US so that
they could effectively re-invoice


themselves and evade taxes due.
In addition, the businessman
said the practice of import duty
evasion was not confined to the
Bahamas, being widespread in
the Caribbean and Latin Amer-
ica, so much so that Miami and
Florida-based businesses
regarded the submission of fal-
sified invoices in behalf of their
clients as a routine practice.
The source recalled how, in
one episode, a new supplier had
sent them an invoice for 25 per
cent of the shipment's actual
cost without them even asking,
in the automatic belief that the
company wanted to evade
import duties.
"For years, Bahamian busi-
nessmen and women have been
consistently asked the follow-
ing question: 'How do you want
your customs invoice dc ie?' or
'Would you like a dummy
invoice for this order?'," the
source said.
"This is especially true of
Florida, and particularly south
Florida suppliers, who have
grown so accustomed to this
practice that they willingly use it
as a sell point and service with
new accounts.
"Unfortunately, in our coun-
try and commonly throughout
the Caribbean and South
America, the governments fail
to consistently compare
declared values of goods
imported by a company against
the foreign currency requested
on those same invoices.
"Therefore, vast numbers of
companies have discovered an
easy way to greatly increase
their profits. This is achieved
illegally, through the falsifica-
tion of incoming invoices for
'customs purposes'; whilst the
true or even inflated value
invoices are submitted to the
bank to ensure payment with
foreign currency."


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Legal Notice


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

LENZBURG LIMITED
In Voluntary liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
LENZBURG LIMITED has been dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 1st day of December, 2008.

Christopher John Roscouet
Fairbairn Trust Limited
Fairbairn House
31 Esplanade, St. Helier
Jersey, JEI IFT
Liquidator






Employment



Opportunity


for an


OBGYN

and also for a


General


Practitioner


with two or more years experience

in obstetrics and gynaecology at

established medical practice.



Address applications to:


Manager, Human Resources
Life Medical Clinic
P.O. Box EE-17877
Nassau, Bahamas


BUSINESS


I Mol













Bahamas most 'front loaded' on tax free-up


FROM page 1B


portion is 40 per cent. By con-
trast, there are seven states
which, by 2013, will have lost 1
per cent or less of the revenue
that they stand to lose over the
full implementation period."
The report also found that
the Bahamas had the greatest
percentage of high tariffs that
would be liberalized under the
EPA agreement. "Only 14.1 per
cent of Antigua/Barbuda's
imports from the EU that will
be liberalized at some point dur-
ing the implementation period
currently face a tariff of 20 per
cent or more or a specific duty,
whereas 73.8 per cent of St
Lucia's and 93.6 per cent of the
Bahamas' liberalization prod-
ucts do so," it said.
While some may be alarmed
that the Bahamas appears to
have moved fastest towards tar-
iff liberalization, there is no rea-
son to panic. Many EU imports
coming into the Bahamas
already, such as perfumes and
luxury goods, attract zero
import duty or minimal import
duty rates because of their
importance to the nation's
tourism industry.
Both the current government
and former PLP administration
have estimated that the revenue
loss from EPA-related tariff lib-
eralization will be anywhere
between $6 million to $10-$14
million per annum, a relatively
small amount given that the
Bahamas has a $1.5-$1.6 billion
revenue Budget.
This is one area where the
Commonwealth Secretariat
study needs to be treated with
caution, for it described the
Bahamas as incurring "the high-
est revenue loss over the full
implementation period" of
EPA tariff liberalization, and


suggested that new revenue-
generating mechanisms needed
to be in place to avoid a shock
to the public finances.
While Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, on his Cuba trip last
week, finally acknowledged that
the Bahamas would at some
point have to reform and
restructure its tax system, such
moves are likely to be ushered
in by any free trade agreement
reached with the US who
accounts for almost 90 per cent
of our trade and not the EU.
Trade data for 2004, the last
year for which statistics are
available, showed that the
Bahamas received around just
$44 million worth of imports.
The Commonwealth Secre-
tariat study found that the
Bahamas had excluded some
431 tariff lines from being lib-
eralized under the EPA, con-
sistent with a programme that
saw this nation offer to liber-
alise around 86 per cent of its
tariff lines.
Of the excluded tariff lines,
the greatest number are in the
live animals'and animal prod-
ucts category, which account for
23.9 per cent of the total exclud-
ed tariff lines. Thq next largest
excluded percentage comes
from the prepared foodstuffs,
beverages and tobacco product
line, which accounts for 23.2 per
cent of the Bahamas' excluded
tariffs, and vegetable products,
which account for 14.2 per cent.
Elsewhere, the Common-
wealth study, a copy of which
has been seen by Tribune Busi-
ness, estimated that Bahamian
exports would only incur a net
1.627 million euro increase in
tariffs imposed upon them if
they were taxed at the General
System of Preferences (GSP)
or Most Favoured Nation
(MFN) rate., -
This will not happen to
Bahamian exports to the EU,


Legal Notice



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
INVESCO INTERNATIONAL
LIMITED
In Voluntary liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
INVESCO INTERNATIONAL LIMITED has been dissolved
and struck off the Register according to the Certificate of Dissolu-
tion issued by the Registrar General on the 2nd day of December,
2008.

Andreas Isenschmid and Markus Amrein
Todistrasse 51
CH 8002, Zurich
Switzerland
Liquidator









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BERKELEY (BAHAMAS) LIMITED


chiefly crawfish and other fish-
eries products, plus polystyrene,
given that signing the EPA and
submitting a market access offer
will secure their duty-free
entrance to the EU.
The Commonwealth Secre-
tariat study said that out of 217
different products exported by
the Bahamas to the EU in 2007,
50 would have faced being
placed under GSP/MFN tariff
rates had this nation remained
outside the EPA.
Some 31.152 million euros
worth of crawfish exports, the
main product exported by the
fisheries industry, would have
been the chief victim of this, the
study projected, with 1.339 mil-
lion euros worth of tariffs
imposed on them.
This was why the fisheries
industry pushed so hard for the
Bahamas to sign the EPA as a
way to ensure it maintained
preferential market access to
the EU, as the imposition of
tariffs would have made their
products more expensive and
uncompetitive, with a subse-
quent loss of revenues, market
share and profit.
Around 4.811 million euros
worth of polystyrene products
supplied to the EU in 2007,
mainly by Polymers Interna-
tional, would have taken the
next biggest hit from the impo-
sition of GSP rates, attracting
duty of around 144,337 euros.
After that, the Bahamas' next
largest EU-bound exports were
estimated by the Common-
wealth Secretariat study to be t-
shirts, vests and singlets, plus
frozen rock lobster, which could
have attracted GSP tariffs of
81,177 euros and 29,734 euros
respectively if subject to GSP
tariff rates.
The relatively minimal impact
on Bahamian exports from the
imposition of GSP preferences,
compared to the effect on other
CARIFORUM countries, led
the Commonwealth Secretari-
at study to state that for the


Bahamas, "the costs of leaving
[the EPA] are small or negligi-
ble".
The report also noted that the
inclusion of a Most Favoured
Nation (MFN) trading clause in'
the EPA was "unique", as the


EU had not done this in any of
its existing trade agreements
with the likes of South Africa,
Mexico and Chile.
It also highlighted the con-
cern that the clause, which
requires the Bahamas and


SCARIFORUM states to offer
the EU any trade prefer-
ences/benefits it has offered to
others but not to it, could "con-
strain" future trade agreement
talks with nations such as the
US, Canada, India or China.


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of:
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and the opportunity to make a significant contribution to our business while expanding your
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Interested person meeting the above criteria should apply in writing, on or before December
19th, 2008 enclosing a full r6sum6 with cover letter to:


BY MAIL:
Personal & Confidential
Deputy Resident Manager .
P.O. Box N 4890
Nassau, Bahamas


BY HAND
Personal & Confidential
Deputy Resident Manager
Julius Baer & Bahk & Trust (Bahamas) L
Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore,
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas


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It


MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


WWm








THE TRIbuimt-


PAGE 6B MONDAYDECEMBER 15, 2008


Bank liquidator 'entirely rejects' $330m claim


FROM page 1B


the claim is rejected and shall
not be considered in our pro-
rata distribution of the assets of
the Bank."
Outlining his reasons for
rejecting the Cash 4 Titles vic-
tims 'complaint in his October
2, 2008, letter to Maynard &
Co, Mr Gomez said: "The
default judgment in Florida is
not recognized by the Bahamas
Supreme Court.
"The allegation that the Bank
aided and abetted the Cash 4
Titles principals is absolutely
denied. I contend that at all
material times the Bank simply
conducted normal banking busi-
ness, as any other bank in the
Bahamas would have.
"All actions against the Bank,
both local and abroad ceased, or
ought-totive ceased, by virtue
of the Order of the Bahamas


Court placing the Bank into liq-
uidation."
That position is likely to be
put to the test, though, as Mr
Gomez himself acknowledged
in his eighth report to the
Supreme Court on Leadenhall
Bank & Trust's liquidation.
Following receipt of the initial
documents from Messrs May-
nard, which included written
submission from the Cash 4
Titles victims to prove the debts
owed to them by Leadenhall,
and reasons as to why the
Bahamian courts should accept
the Florida judgment, Mr
Gomez said the response to his
October 2 letter was a sum-
mons, filed with the Supreme
Court on October 29, 2008, that
sought "to appeal my rejection
of their claims".
Subsequently, Mr Gomez
said he was served with another
batch of documents by May-
nard & Co on November 4,
2008, and eight days letter


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH EXAMEE
TOUSSAINT of PODOLEO STREET, P.O. BOX
N-8889, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/anaturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 8TH day of DECEMBER
2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.








NOTICE!


The Public Workers' Co-operative Credit
Union Limited proudly announces the
reintroduction of fixed deposits, effective
January 1st, 2009, as follows:


.1 year at 5%
2 years 5.5%

3 ...... years
i _yearsatf7%


Minimum deposit of $1,000.00
Early withdrawal penalties apply.


All members and non-members are invited
to come into our offices, in Nassau (323-
6594) and Freeport (351-7129) to take
advantage of this opportunity.


- rAlso,check out our competitive rates on

Deposits and Christmas club accounts.



The Public Workers' Co-operative

Credit Union Limited

"The Family Credit Union"


received a letter from that firm
informing him he had been
advised to attend the Supreme
Court on November 21, 2008,
to appear before Senior Justice
John Lyons.
The hearing was due to have
dealt with the summons, and
agree dates for the hearing of
submissions by both parties, but
the matter was adjourned on
that date to give the Cash 4
Titles victims and their attor-
neys time to "perfect the origi-
nal bundle" of documents filed
with the Supreme Court reg-
istry.
Cash 4 Titles was an Atlanta-
based investment scheme that
provided vehicle purchase
financing to lower income indi-
viduals, with the collateral being
the title to vehicles subject to
the loan. Pawning car titles
received favourable tax treat-
ment in Georgia, and with the
high interest rates involved -
due to the high risk attached to
many borrowers the scheme
attracted multiple investors.
Ultimately, some $140-$150
million was invested into Cash 4
Titles, but it developed into a
Ponzi scheme where new
investor monies were used to
repay old investors. Leadenhall,
and its former Bahamas-based
affiliate, Axxess International,
were sued because they had
provided financial services to
Cash 4 Titles, the investors
alleging they had knowingly aid-
ed and abetted the fraud.
Some 2,600 former Cash 4
Titles investors are part of this
latest claim against Leadenhall,
having won a $110.076 million
judgment in the south Florida
district court. The ultimate
award, using the US Racketeer
Influence and Corrupt Organ-
isations Statute (RICO), was


n


trebled by the court to $330 mil-
lion.
The Cash 4 Titles' issue's
fresh emergence is an inconve-
nience for Mr Gomez's attempt
to complete Leadenhall's liqui-
dation, as he has recently set-
tled litigation between the bank
and Turks & Caicos-based First
Financial Caribbean Trust
Company (a firm owned by a
number of former Axxess Inter-
national executives) over the
Bahamian bank's former Mas-
terCard credit card portfolio.
An August 25,2008, Supreme
Court order attached to Mr
Gomez's liquidator's report,
confirmed Tribune Business's
previous revelation that Justice
Faisool Mohammed had autho-
rised First Financial to distrib-
ute some 70 per cent of the card
portfolio's assets back to card-
holders.
The total amount involved in
the distribution was $9.8 mil-
lion, coming from the $14 mil-
lion in cash deposits Leaden-
hall had already transferred to
First Financial in the latter's
capacity as successor trustee.
The order noted that some
$17 million was due to the cred-
it card holders, the balance
being made up of $1.3 million
still owed by those clients and a
further $1.898 million held by
MasterCard as a licence issuing
fee.
MasterCard, the Supreme
Court Order stated, was pre-
pared to return $284,551 to First
Financial, as it was claiming a
$1.7 million termination fee as a
result of suspending Leaden-
hall's card issuing licence.
In addition, the Order autho-
rised the Bahamas-based
branch of BNP Paribas Bank to
pay Gibson, Rigby & Co, First
Financial's attorneys, some


Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street


Invites applications from qualified
teachers for the following position
2008 2009 School Year.


Christian
for the


MUSIC

Applicants must: .

A. Be a practicing bom-again Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith
of Temple Christian School
B. Have a Bachelor's Degree in Education or higher
from a recognized College or University in the
area of specialization.
C. Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or Diploma.
D. Have at least two years, teaching experience in
the relevant subject area with excellent
communication skills.
E. Have the ability to prepare
students for all examinations to the BJC/
BGCSE levels
F. Be willing to participate in the high school's.
extra curricular programmes.

Application must be picked up at the High School
Office on Shirley Street and be returned with a full
curriculum vitae, recent colored photograph and
three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is December 15th, 2008


$253,000 from an account under
the name Axxess Investments
Funds Ltd.
Meanwhile, Mr Gomez's
report indicated that Leaden-
hall's creditors were unlikely to
recover the full sums owed to
them, as there were insufficient
assets to meet all the bank's lia-
bilities to them.
Currently, Leadenhall's assets
total $24.303 million, of which
$20.063 million is cash in the
bank at the liquidator's dispos-
al. However, the total sum owed
to creditors is $26.774 million,
leaving a shortfall of $2.471 mil-
lion.
At current standing, this
means creditors stand to recov-
er $0.91 out of every $1 owed -
not a bad sum for most court-
supervised liquidations. How-
ever, Mr Gomez warned that
he might not be able to recover
all outstanding loans owed to
Leadenhall by borrowers, which
amounted to $3.458 million as at
November 30, 2008, meaning
that the sum recovered by cred-
itors could be less than the $0.91
ratio.
Mr Gomez said he was "con-
sidering whether it is feasible
to further deplete the assets of
the Bank to recover the remain-


ing loans, which in my assess-
ment would be difficult as many
of the borrowers reside in for-
eign countries".
The same applied to an
alleged forged cheque incident
involving $125,937 in Canadian
dollars, as the person in ques-
tion also resided outside the
Bahamas.
The strengthening of the US
dollar against its Canadian and
British counterparts had deplet-
ed Leadenhall's cash deposits
on hand at banks by more than
$900,000 between July 16, 2008,
and November 30, 2008, Mr
Gomez added, directly impact-
ing the sums available to
investors.
The liquidator said some
$2.963 million had been recov-
ered from the liquidation of
Caledonia Fund Investments
Ltd, in which Leadenhall had
held a 78 per cent stake,
although this had resulted in an
actual loss of $36,743.
Mr Gomez added further that
the Ministry of Finance's sec-
retary for revenue, Ehurd Cun-
ningham, had contacted him to
request the reproduction of
information on Leadenhall and
Axxess International's former
cardholder customers.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that VIRENDRA KUMAR PANDEY
OF #15 VEOMAN WOODS, WOODCOCK LOOP, P.O. BOX F-
40071, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
8th day of DECEMBER, 2008 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that NISHA PANDEY OF #15
VEOMAN WOODS, WOODCOCK LOOP, P.O. BOX F-40071,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why. registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
8th day of DECEMBER, 2008 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS IN
THE SUPREME COURT 2008/QUI/equ/00097

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER of all that piece parcel or lot of land
comprising 290 acres more or less situate south of the
Township of RockSound in the Island of Eleuthera one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of CARMEN J.
KNOWLES by Power of Attorney for Reginald Knowles
Sr.

NOTICE

The Petition of CARMEN J.KNOWLES by Power of
Attorney for Reginald Knowles Sr. of the Township of
Rock Sound in the Island of Eleuthera one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of:-

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising 290
acres more or less situate south of the Township of Rock
Sound in the Island of Eleuthera one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas which said piece parcel
or lot of land has such position shape boundaries marks
and dimensions as are shown on the diagram or plan filed
herein and is delineated on that part which is coloured
PINK of the said diagram or plan and being the land which
is the subject of the Petition filed herein.

CARMEN J. KNOWLES by Power of Attorney for
Reginald Knowles Sr., claims to be the beneficial owner
in fee simple in possession of the parcel of land
hereinbefore described and such ownership arises by virtue
of possession of the said land.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected during normal
office hours at:-

The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher House,
East Street, Nassau, Bahamas;

The Chambers of Johnson & Co., # 1 New Bond Street,
Governors Harbour, Eleuthera

The Office of the Administrator, Rock Sound, Eleuthera,
Bahamas

Notice is given that any person having dower or right of
dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized in
the Petition shall on or before the 27th day of December
A.D.,2008 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of such claim
in the prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure by any person to file and serve a
statement of such claim on or before the 27th day of
December A.D.,2008 will operate as a bar to such claim.

JOHNSON & CO.
Chambers
# 1 New Bond Street
Governors Harbour
Eleuthera, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner


FIG CAPITAL MARKETS


cC F :. L ~C 7 c.- Ii' ^ I.-
BmiX LISTED & TRADED sEcURiTIE AS OF.
FRIDAY. 12 DECEMBER 2008
BIlX ALL SHARE INDEX CLOSE 1,718.35 I CHG -9.30 I %ACHG -0.54 I YTD -348.40 I YTOD % -18.86
FINDEX CLOSE 830.99 I VTO -12.71% ,I 2007 28.29%
WWVVW.BISXBAHAM.AS COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
625K." n.Lo se.-. l .. .s .se Tc ., :.Er.a.-.. a ', ... EPE P b le .d
195 1'5 Alsace r*ar ets 1 11 -1 ,.,,- 1 i ,,1
11.80 11.65 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 11.80 0.00 1.061 0.200 11.1 1.69%
9.68 7.64 Bank of Bahamas 7.64 7.64 0.00 0.319 0.160 23.9 2.09%
0.99 0:73 Benchmark 0.73 0.73 0.00 -0.877 0.020 N/M 2.74%
3.74 3;15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.152 0.090 20.7 2.86%
2.70 1:95 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 0.040 43.1 1.69%
14.15 12.00 Cable Bahamas 13.91 13.91 0.00 12,150 1.255 0.240 11.1 1.73%
3.15 2.83 Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83. 0.00 0.118 0.040 24.0 1.41%
8.50 4.80 Commonwealth Bank (SI1) 7.19 7.00 -0.19 10,100 0.446 0.310 15.7 4.43%
8.69 1.88 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.0l 2.35 0.30 0.111 0.052 21.2 2.21%
3.00 2.27 Doctor's Hospital 2.55 2.55 0.00 0.256 0.040 10.0 1.67%
8.10 6.02 Famguard 7.80 7.80 0.00 140 0.535 0.280 14.6 3.59%
13.01 11.87 FInco 11.87 11.87 0.00 0.665 0.520 17.8 4.38%
14.66 10.50 FIrstCaribbean Bank 10.50 10.50 0.00 0.682 0.450 154 4.29%
8.04 5.01 FocolI (S) 5.20 5.20 0.00 0.337 0.170 15.4 3.27%
1.00 1.00 Foeoel Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1 00 0.33 Freeport Concrete 0.33 0.33 0.00 0.035 0.000 9.4 0.00%
8.20 5.50 ICD Utilities 6.81 6.81 0.00 200 0.407 0.300 16.7 4.41%
1250 860 J S Johnson 11.10 11.10 0.00 0.952 0.620 11.7 5.59%
luuu lu'00 Pre-er Ros- Estale I3.u 7 ,: .. .:. 0., ':'66 'E 'I C. E,00 5 6
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES iBonds. irade On a Percenlage PrCing bass)
52w..HI 52...Lo.. Se u-'.l,_, :l .. L-iS ..l- Cr.,- ,. ?117 '..2 ci. esal,.'l _
1000.00 lOGO.0. Fielry Barnk. Note 17 ." k ',.. r -l" a ,O : 19 C .oDor >2017
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 10 October 2022
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7% 30 May 2013
1000 00 100000 Fidelity Ba-_ Nato 1 5Ser'es D\ FBBIE- 100 0o 0 0 Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015
Fideity rOvor-Tho-Cosnter Sec.nuriUes
52wH-,.M 52n-,.L.-w t5,r 1.,.o a. s I L.. b.:e ,er., EPS EC i' .8 41',r
14 60 14 2 Bo r.-aras ..-,e a ... 1 1 1 -' -' r 'r.1 o ao o "
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Prof) 6 00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 N/M 7.80%
S54 0 20 PRND 9..id-s 0 3- I 40 n 3 0001 0 000 256 6 0.00%
Call-na (_Snr Ir-2e-Count2.r S 1oG3irll-Ue
41 00 29,. O ABDAB 35.15 36.86 29.00 E1 ,'.- 0*d '1 5 0 D:- .0
14.00 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.45 13.35 14.00 -0.041 0.300 N/M 2.40%
065 040 RND H:.iJr.g .; J ,:, --, 0002 0000 261 9 0 00%a
BISX LIloldd Mutual FundBs
w2HwK.H. 62.W -.0 F..', N r, r.. ,T-. r ,1 L r.1: ir S .,.. S -ViN-,Tl3 --NA'. I O.,
1 3465 1 2827 Co,,r.a .3O-. i -Ir.3 1 i. J i l ,, .ll.r.:.. L.3
3.0351 2.9522 Collna MSI Preferred Fund 2.9522 -1.62 -1.27 30-Nov-08
1.4306 1.3663 Colina Money Market Fund 1.4305 4.02 4.69 5-Doc-08
3.7969 3.4931 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.4931 -8.00 -15.79 30-Nov-08
12.5r97 11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.5597 5.25 5.73 30-Nov-0o
100.2421 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.2421 0.24 0.24 30-Sop-08
100.9600 96.7492 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.7492 -3.25 -3.25 30-Sep-08
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00 31-Doc-07
10.5000 9.0775 Fidelity Intarnational Investmoent Fund 9.0775 -13.55 -13.55 30-Nov-08
1.0264 1.0000 FO Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0264 2.64 2.64 31-Oct-08
1.0289 1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0289 2.89 2.89 31-Oct-08
1 0289 1 0,00 F F..-ar,.lai Di.orsi'irL Fa -1 1.0287 2.87 2.87 31-Oc1-08
MARKET TERMS
.u k i.. v I'.. .: .Z : .: '.. ". . . ...I I 9 416o01 ir 9114
62wk-H Highest closing price In Ilst 52 week. il $ Buyl~a prlce of connl. ."id Fidelity
62WK.0W LOeS l -lo-sing orc 2 In los, 52 wokB Ask $ $ Sellino |,lc. ol Ct ln 0 tnd t,. jni1y
Prevloug Clogf Prevlou dy'... we..itld price ,or tlllly tvoUi. LOtI Price L ti trtld ovor-the-countc prc..
Today's ClOt, Current daysf w ighted price for d0ily volume 4 W2okly Vol TrOdong volutt, Qf tlt, prior week
Change Change In closing price from dy to day EPS A co$ p ny1 r-portod oerninl Per hr for t1> Int 12 1 tl
D-lly Vol Number of tot- l snares traded todny NAV Not A orl Vnluo
0 IV S Dlvidends per sfh .re paId In th lt 12 month N/M Not Mo' ningful
P/E CIO lsing prl1ce divided by Ih lat 12 1 month artlng FINDEX Th. FIdUllIy -h-- s Stck it-ll1 Jacu- ry 1 1-9l 4 100
1S) 4.for-1 8 ck< Split Effectiv. D O. l. I8/2007
TO TRADI CALL: COLINA 242-602-7010 1 FIDELITY 242-356-7764 I FG CAPITAL MAARKETS 2.12-396-4000 i COLONIAL 242-602-7525


I ,%.L WL.P, IV I


BUSINESS








THETIN M, E5 8 PG B


Investor lawsuit mulled against City Markets


FROM page 1B

minority shareholders follow-
ing the botched transition from
Winn-Dixie's ownership to that
of BSL Holdings.
At the AGM, Mr Sands
appeared to acknowledge that
the board was at least partly to
blame for Bahamas Supermar-
kets' woes since the Winn-Dix-
ie takeover.
He said that "with hindsight",
the Bahamas Supermarkets
Board "could have acted with
greater speed and questioned
management more aggressive-
ly", in addition to pushing its
.management partner for more
resources and greater involve-
ment.
The BSL Holdings consor-
tium, featuring Bahamian and
international investors, acquired
Winn-Dixie's 78 per cent major-
ity stake in Bahamas Super-
markets for $54 million in sum-
mer 2006, paying another $2
million in corporate advisory
and legal fees related to the
transaction.
Bahamas Supermarkets'
board is dominated by BSL
Holdings' investors. Those
investors who sit on the board
include Anthony King and
Frere Delmas; of Barbados
Shipping and Trading, the Neal
and Massey subsidiary that is
the largest investor in the
majority shareholder with a
more than 40 per cent stake; J
Barrie Farrington, representing
the hotel pension funds; Anwer
Sunderji, representing Fidelity;
and the late Franklyn Butler.
The-two independent directors
are chairman Mr Sands and Dr
Gail Saunders.
In the absence of a takeover.
code, BSL Holdings made no
offer to buy out the 22 per cent
minority shareholders at the
same price and terms when it
purchased Winn-Dixie's stake
since it was not required by law
to do so.
Meanwhile, Tribune Business
understands that the Bahami-
an investors in BSL Holdings
have committed to injecting a
further $5 million in collective
equity into Bahamas Super-
markets. This is due to be inject-
ed in stages, with some $2-$3
million already received by the
operating company.


Sources close to the situation
said this had been 'encouraged'
by Royal Bank of Canada, the
institution that advanced $24
million in debt financing to BSL
Holdings to enable it to acquire
the Winn-Dixie stake. It was
said that Royal Bank had urged
the Bahamian investors in BSL
Holdings to match the $5 mil-
lion previously injected into
Bahamas Supermarkets by Neal
and Massey, funds which were
used to pay down supplier debts
and order much-needed inven-
tory for a company that is still
hampered by ongoing cash flow
issues.
Tribune Business understands
that Bahamas Supermarkets'
external auditors, KPMG, have
completed the field work for
the fiscal year 2008 audit, and
all that remains is for them-
selves and the board to sign off
on the financial before their
release to investors, who have
had plenty of time to brace
themselves for bad news.
Acknowledging that
Bahamas Supermarkets' finan-
cial performance had "been
very disappointing to say the


least" since the BSL Holdings
buyout group acquired the
majority 78 per cent stake in
Winn-Dixie in the summer of
2006, Mr Sands said the poten-
tial 2008 loss would result from
higher expenses many one-
time charges and a "sharp
decline" in gross profit on sales.
"Unless a large positive
change arises in the review of
accounting transactions," Mr
Sands said, the $10 million pre-
liminary, unverified loss would
be incurred.
"During 2007, and for much
of 2008, what did occur at City
Markets was a breakdown in
controls and procedures, par-
ticularly in the area of the
recording of goods received,"
he added.
"In 2007, our gross margin
eroded by some $5 million due
to shrink and control-related
issues. In the absence of timely
and accurate financial informa-
tion, this situation was not
remedied for 2008."
The focus was now on restor-
ing operational controls and
City Markets' financial books
and records, with a "crises man-


agement committee" formed to
oversee the company's opera-
tions.
Mr Sands conceded that City
Markets was ."not out of the
woods", and that it would "take
at least two years to bring the
company's performance to sat-
isfactory levels" given the cur-


DUTIES:


Support


rent economic climate.
BSL Holdings insiders previ-
ously said the group underesti-
mated just how reliant the
Bahamian grocery chain was on
Winn-Dixie and its Jack-
sonville head office for'
absolutely everything, ranging
from the extensive range of


EDUCATION: Preference given to
college graduates. Computer literacy
reasonable proficiency in Microsoft -
nr ducts -


'own brand' labels to the back-
office accounting and support
systems. The latter was the
cause of most of the trouble,
when Bahamas Supermarkets
dumped the Winn-Dixie sup-
port services and transition
agreement early, without having
a replacement system in place.


university or:
required"with'
Office suite of


I The Anglican Central Education Authority


The Anglican Central Education Authority invites applications for teaching
positions available at St. John's College and St. Anne's School on New Providence,
Bishop Michael Eldon School on Grand Bahama, and St. Andrew's Anglican
School on Exuma.


English Language and Literature
Mathematics
Physics/General Science
Chemistry/Health Science
History/Social Studies
Geography/Social Studies
Religious Studies
French
Spanish
Music
Art
Consumer Science.
Lower Primary
Upper Primary
Primary School Librarian
Information Technology
Accounts/Commerce/Economics
Physical Education
Guidance and Career Counselor
School Nurse


Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12
Grades N-12
Grades N-12
Grades 7-12
Grades 7-12
Grades K-3
Grades 4-6
Grades N-6
Grades 1-12
Grades 7-12
Grades K-12
Grades 3-12
Grades N-12


(6 positions)
(6 positions)
(2 positions)
(2 positions)
(2 positions)
(2 positions)
(4 positions)
(2 positions)
(3 positions)
(3 positions)
(2 positions)
(2 positions)
(5 positions)
(5 positions)
(2 positions)
(3 positions)
(4 positions)
(3 positions)
(4 positions)
(2 positions)


Qualifications: Candidates must possess at least a Bachelors Degree from
an accredited. University together with a Teacher's Certificate
from an accredited Teacher's College.

Applications may be collected from the Education Department located on Sands
Road off of East Street.

Completed application forms with the requested supporting documents must
be received by the Anglican Education Department by Friday, 23rd January
2009, and must be addressed to:-

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
P. 0. Box N656
Nassau, The Bahamas
Providing quality education in a Christian environment by developing the whole child: spiritually,
academically, physically and socially thus preparing the child for life.


.4.


POSITION AVAILABLE:

Client Support Officer


Applicant must be fluent in French, English and
Spanish. Interview will be done in French.


Client Relationship Officers in.


administrative frontline duties, ability to deal with
high net worth clients, monitor profit centre costs
and retrocession payments, follow up on executions,
deal with telephone enquiries prepare client visits,
and organize business travel.


EXPERIENCE: Preference will be given to
individuals having business experience dealing
with high net worth clients.


Interested applicants must submit applications to:
Human Resources Manager, (Re: CSO Position),
P.O. Box SS 6289, Nassau, The Bahamas, by 31st
December, 2008 or fax to (242).502-5487.


k


0


MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


ThLeba i


Fl >^^UUO.*






PAGE 8B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


PATRICIA CLARKE is pictured (right)
S with Reece Chipman,managing director
Ci V of the Nastac Group, which stands for
The National Associption of Securities
Training and Compliance...

assstat psse th


THE assistant to Credit Agricole (Bahamas)
head of investments has passed the Canadian
Securities Course Volume 1 exam after studying
with the Nassau-based Nastac Group.
Patricia Clarke, a 15-year financial services


veteran, who has been with Credit Agricole for
two years, will only be able to apply for registra-
tion as a broker/investment adviser with the
Securities Commission when she passes volume
two.


JOB VACANCY


JUNIOR ACCOUNTANT


Local manufacturing company in Freeport, Grand Bahama is seeking a Junior
Accountant.
Qualifications:
* Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting is preferred with 1 to 2 years
of work experience. Candidates who have earned an Associate Degree in
Accounting will be considered if they have 3 to 5 years of work experience.
* Proficient in the use of automated accounting systems.
* Ability to solve problems and apply appropriate accounting standards as
needed.
o -Proficient in the use of Microsoft Applications. Candidate must be able
to create and maintain EXCEL spreadsheets.
* Ability to communicate effectively written and oral.
Responsibilities will include:
1. Accounts Payable coding, data entry, preparing cheques, mailing
remittance advices, filing and resolving discrepancies with invoices and
vendors.
2. Monitoring and resolving outstanding or aged transactions on the A/P
Aging.
3. Assist with month-end closing procedures Posting accruals, amortizations,
performing g/1 account reconciliations.
4. Assist with year-end audits.
5. Special Projects as required by the Financial Controller or Accounting
Manager.

The company offers a competitive salary with outstanding benefits.

Please-email-your'resume to:
grandbahjobs@yahoo.com


Candace Thomas



passes Series 7

BAHAMIAN Candace Thomas passed the Series 7 examination
in the US after studying with the Nassau-based Securities Training
Institute (STI).
Michael Miller, STI's president, said: "We are dedicated to pro-
viding the highest quality investment training for Bahamian finan-
cial professionals. Our commitment is reflected in the stellar per-
formance of our students over the years."





55% utility bill rise hits


Abaco Markets profits


Title:


Work: -

P.O.Box:


House Name:


Type of Fence/Wall:


OF THE TRIBUNE AND WAKE UP TO THE BEST NEWSPAPER FOR YOU!!


* improved year-over-year prof-
itability, though, with net
income of $229,000 only 7 per
cent below the prior year's
$246,000.
Still, utility costs and other
expenses have prevented Abaco
Markets from translating
improved sales growth into
profits. For the third quarter,
group sales were up by 13.6 per
cent or $2.95 million, while for
5 the year-to-date they were
Z ahead by $5.28 million or 8.3
per cent.
And although expenses had
increased in gross dollar terms,
as a percentage of sales they
,remained comparable with the
previous year, standing at 26.8
per cent compared to 26.7 per
cent last year.
Net margins for the third
quarter fell to 28.2 per cent
compared'to 28.8 per cent,
largely due to a decline in sales
of high margin general mer-
chandise due to the current eco-
nomic environment, which has
seen consumers eschew pur-
chases of big-ticket items.
Meanwhile, Tribune Business
can also reveal that Keith
Evans, brother of leading
Bahamian wholesaler Garland
Evans, is a member of the con-
sortium leading the race to
acquire Abaco Markets' Cost
Right store in Abaco. ,
Other members of the group
are unknown, although there
have been unconfirmed sugges-
tions from various market
sources that ex-City Markets
managing director, Bruce Soud-
er, could be in line to take oper-
ational charge and run that Cost
Right store if the consortium's
purchase goes through.
There was no mention of the
pending sale in Abaco Markets'
third quarter results statement,
which suggests the sale has yet
to be completed.
In the statement, Gavin
Watchorn, Abaco Markets'
president, said the Solomon's
SuperCentre format was per-
forming especially well in terms
of sales. But he added: "While
we are recording increases in
customer traffic, there has been
a slight decrease in the average
transaction, along with some
weakening in the sales of high-
cr margin general merchandise
categories reflective of the cur-
rent economic conditions."
Mr Watchorn said the
upgrades and improvements to
the company's Solomon's
SuperCentre and Cost Right
formats in Grand Bahama had
! helped both businesses achieve


solid growth.
Elsewhere, while the Domi-
no's Pizza franchise had experi-
enced a slight decline in like-
for-like sales growth, the addi-
tion of new outlets on
Carmichael Road and the Sea-
grapes Shopping Plaza had
increased total sales.
"Utilities have increased by
55 per cent for the quarter com-
pared to the same period last
year," Mr Watchorn said. "We
do, however, expect some relief
in the coming months and, in
the meantime, we are very
focused on controlling all costs
possible and better managing
our shrink, which is improving
slightly."
Abaco Markets' sales increas-
es also resulted in an increase in
business licence fees.
Abaco Markets has also
restructured its preference share
debt, effectively consolidating
this into one class through its
Class B holders agreeing to sub-
scribe to an extra $1.25 million
preference shares. The proceeds
from this issue will be used to
payout and redeem the Class A
preference shareholders in full.
The new terms extend the.
maturity date for Class B pref-
erence shareholders by one year
from December 31, 2012, to
December 31, 2013 with an
8.5 per cent coupon rate. The
repayments will begin on March
31, 2010, in quarterly instal-
ments of $357,000.
Mr Watchorn said the
arrangement would enable
Abaco Markets to focus on
building liquidity, with total out-
standing preference share debt
at $5.7 million following the
restructuring.
The company had paid back
some $2.2 million in preference
share debt over the previous 21
months, with Abaco Markets
continuing to put aside funds in
a designated account to fund
redemptions in 2010.
Craig Symonette, Abaco
Markets chairman and chief
executive, said the company
expected the economic climate
to further impact average trans-
action spend and sales in cer-
tain categories during 2009.
He added: "As with most
retailers, we expect a continued
softening of the economy in
2009, which will impact our
sales in the coming months.
While none of us is certain just
how long these conditions will
persist, we remain focused on
expense management, aggres-
sive.buying and efficient opera-
tions in all of our locations to
help offset the challenges
ahead."


FROM page 1B


Last Name:.


-I.


Company:

Telephone # Home:

SFax #


First Name:


Exact Street Address:


sHouse#

H use Colour:

Requested Start Date:








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2008, PAGE 98


in it

emIIn


Re: It's even worse than practised in providing false
we thought (Customs) invoices.
I know in the long run the
DEAR Mr Marquis, loser is Joe Public and winners
After reading your Insight are the brokers, customs free-
expos6 on the customs depart- lancers and myself,
ment, I laugh out loud at the the importer--the system must
sheer futility of your quest. Yes, have a complete overhaul. Cut
you truly have a set of b...s and I the head off the beast, not just a
commend you for using The leg or two.
Tribune to expose these crooks, Insight regular
but really I ask you: surely the
customs, public and BROKERS Mr Marquis, I have been fol-
all should be tarred with the lowing your articles on the cor-
same brush? ruption that exists in Customs
I am about to leave the Department. I must admit that
Bahamas after seven years here, it is a timely topic and one that
and the whole customs clear- should have been addressed a
ance fiasco has been a part of very long time ago and I hold
my life here for all but two of both governments responsible
them as I now do not bother for the debacle.
ever bringing in anything unless I must say that former senior
completely necessary. officials facilitated the corrupt'
When I used to bring in 40- practices that exist to date. They
foot containers my then broker did this by actually placing offi-
would ask for invoices to sup- cers in certain areas to facilitate
port the contents. As everybody corruption for kickbacks and
knows we, the public, would actually transferred officers who
provide an altered version of were doing their jobs and
the invoice, the broker then replaced them with their cor-
gives this to his guy in customs rupt friends.
who tells you this can be Let me give you a brief syn-
cleared very quickly if the cus- opsis of the corrupt practices in
toms guy comes to the job sit6 customs. One officer owns a
and.the container can be house on one of the Family
inspected there. Islands that is twice the size of
The broker then informs me the one they'have in Nassau and
for an envelope of say $3,000 I understand that it is on the
he guarantees the container market for one million dollars. I
won't be inspected, because if also heard this officer is present-
the inspector finds out the value ly building a house in the east-
is much more'we would all be in ern district of Nassau.
serious trouble. It is a massive amount of
"HA!" and there lies the wealth to have achieved as a
irony: I know the invoice is customs officer.
moody, the broker knows and Another officer has amassed
the inspector knows, because a lot of wealth, with a one mil-
EVER.YBODY, does it. lion dollar house on New Prov-
The inspector duly shows up in idence. He owns a recently built
a brand new Escalade in. 100 building on ....... Road. He also
per cent heat and barely cracks owns a group of apartments in
his window before taking the the eastern district of New Prov- -
envelope and scooting off idence. Finally, he owns three
this whole process took 30 sec- luxury vehicles. A lot to achieve
onds not once but eight times as customs officer, would you
during a period Of 18 months. say.
Then the broker gets his share There is also an officer who
of the duty 'saved'. owns two triplexes in the west-
Most to all developers here em area and a house in the east-
in the Bahamas factor into their ern district with pool, and is
budgets a percentage cost to be presently building a massive
allotted to Custom pay-offs structure elsewhere.
suppliers Trrm ,hn U. are ,el, .- cMr Marquis, this is only a tip


MONDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2008 IO I







The stories behind the news



It's even worse than we though


E By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor
Sknew it wns bad. hu just
department is a c=1spit of cor-
rupin, and the whle country
s picking up the tab It pay for tle criminality at
its core.
r .. , I
But nlst week's Insight accusations. levelled in
the wake of an arson attack on the home if Cus-
toms task force officer Roslyn Riltchie. have'
unearthed startling new information about Cs-
it e I .
The information pouring ti lo Insight's desk



Sources clIaim it I I ,Customs iffiers
setyiporls rm making sits much as $2t1(iXl or $,i.(XX)
a Oionth in pay-offs while living It elean ip thie
duty collection prtmesms.
And Ibusiessmen are fretluinly asked itn


S ... . .
It hnI not only ben cnt lo Cusloins astihoriesi
themselves, hut also .senior government figures.
they claim.

regard payt T s .is extremely lucrative prts of tIhe
hob. niire ofitn than not iouLstripping Ither salaries
five or len-fold.
This explains how s nce manage Io build them-
selves luxury homes, even i apartinei complnexi,
tha are far inutside the sctpe of their pay levek,
understiid tha t (name given) has nulttple apart-
etels in Carmiclhael. a hieated pol, anId naiter-
tiis apartments in Ahbacu..
"1 call them crooks of tihe year Iecause they cut
ofjill the other crooks in Customs amd were the
sotile crnoks frenm April. 20(k.. so Septelber. 2008.
"It is asio documented where if individuals, had
one case of a particular item over, (name given)
would sei/e the entire shipment, whether the
additional case was an error or not."
The video recording of a senior Custon-. officer
allegdly accepting a bribe iwas mentioned inr


rl L I I II II II


Customs: s time fopr a clean-out
ciB-|-- t ttne'
*I-I-'J''I "'^ "$


.... ..... .. .. ..,; .-' .,. .,
E- FRN .i.I.
A I
. _---"







- -




THE FRONT PAGE of the Degember 1 edition of INSIGHL.


... . .. .. .. ... .. ........ W .
single readable piece.

good in relative terms. It's ineresting thai one of
my informanos signed herself "A fairly honest
Customs officer" (also giving her real name)
while condemning the actions of others.
Some readers in the department vilified Insight
for blaming Customs officers instead of the busi-
nesmenv who bribe them. implyving that if temp-


department's many shortcoming.
"I am incapable of distinguishing between con-
sumers and.businessnmcn shorting the govern-
ment and the government shorting its citizens
when they mismanage the public's treasury and
allow its own members to steal and cui deals and
get filthy rich in five years as (name given) did.
while these clowns whom we call our leaders
don't even have the integrity to identify him by
name.
"This is nation of crooks and dishonesty is so
deeply-rooted in this country that if there was
an attempt to unroot it there would be divil


Last week's article
on corrupt Customs
officers has sparked
a massive response,
including exposure
of an alleged ring of
conspirators within
the department who
it is claimed have
made a fortune by
stealing fr6m the
Bahamas and
its people...
real villains in Cusloms.
Meanwhile, calls are growing from within lt
depamrtcnt for the task force itsalf.l and its work
ing methods, to be invesligated in an efforl1t
cool down lemticrs among colleagues.
Sources claim in re is a ot of bitter hIsiilit
towards the team from seveil tiof their own col
leagues.
"How would you feel," asked on informan. "i
someone was presenting you from carnin]
$20,00t a month in pay-ofs ?"
What is needed, he mid, is an i nqui
into every suspected officers living sand4arda.
It s the government's prerogative. he amid. tl
examine employees' sources of income and Is
ask how someone earning say. $24,000 a year i
able to buy lavish cars and homes.
One particular officer, who is related lit Imhlh
er, is said to have two well-appintecd homes ii
New Providence, a commercial properly, number
ous apartments and a ho.m on Long Island.
Customs insiders believe police should fcus a.
the task force itself, especially in relttion to it
handling of incoming containers.
-Containers sit unopened for weeks on ens
until some harried businessman finds it nes
sary to1 offer a sizeable 'tip' so their shipments an
opened in a timely manner. Insight was told.
The words Customs and corruption have Ionj
since been mentioned in tandem. Instead of lpr
testing the nation's inersts, rogre officers hai
for years been swindling the Treasury rapaciom


THE FRONT PAGE of the December 8 edition of INSIGHT...


of the iceberg. Something has
to be done. I want you to keep
this fight going. Don't stop
putting pressure on the gov-
ernment. Something has to be
done in this department.
I -have more. This is just an
appetiser.
Potcakedog

Your piece on the rampant
corruption in The Bahamas
Customs Department is only
the tip of an iceberg of the cor-
ruption that has taken place and
continues to take place in The
Bahamas.
Corruption pervades our soci-


ety and has become such a part
of the culture where eradicat-
ing it will be next to impossible
and if serious attempts are
made to expose the hundreds
of "prominent" citizens, our
society will certainly collapse.
One only needs to consider
the history of the islands, based
upon piracy since the 1700s, to
understand the current state of,
affairs. Woodes Rogers must be
turning in his grave, having
spent a part of his life eradicat-
ing piracy, hence his famous
statement "Expulsis Piratis,
Restituta Commercia", only to
discover, if he suddenly reap-.


peared, that his efforts were all
in vain.
But a positive side to this is,
those Bahamians who are cor-
rupt at least have a conscience,
how else can you explain the
proliferation of churches in the
country? After all, they need
some medium where they feel
they can gain God's forgiveness,'
otherwise how can they justify
their deeds?
C. Knowles

MAY I suggest that the gov-
ernment conduct a count of
Rolex watches in the Customs
department? Ask yourselves:


how does someone earning
$24,000 a year end up wearing a
watch costing $24,0007
Watchful and Wary

IT'S good to see the govern
ment moving on the various
corruption issues facing our
country. Immigration first, Cus-
toms next, then I suggest vari-
ous areas of our legal system.
The biggest danger we face
is to see corruption as par for
the course and ignore it. It's up
to The Tribune and Insight to
expose corruption for what it is
in the hope we can rid ourselves
of the scourge.
HBN, Nassau

Re: The Pure Joy of
Doing Without *

I LOVED your piece about
cellphones: I have cut it out to
keep with some of your other
articles.
Banker

ANOTHER priceless Insight
Death to all cellphones!
E V Johnson

Miscellaneous,

MR John Marquis, you better
put those houses of yours on
rent because there's no way you
are leaving this country..
This is a small island where
everybody knows everybody, so
therefore you can't trust
Bahamians to do the right thing.
That is the problem with the
Bahamas.
Whatever else you want to
-do in life you can do from here.
What you are doing by levinA
this country is,breaking aIrusW
In my estimation, it will take
years for that level of trust to be
established again.
The connections in this coun-
try are unbelievable. We are a
very corrupt country and it runs
very deep. But ihe wrongdoers
fear The Tribune. more than
they fear the law. With the law,
all you need to do is pick up the.'
phone. Your. leaving means we
have moved forward 150 paces
and are now about to go back
300. The attorneys have some of
the police in their pocket,
It is very scary to see us as a
people sit down'and accept
wrong.. Our wrongs have
become our rights. You must
not go. Whoever replaces you,
the transition will take two
years at.least. Yours etc
Regular Insight reader


Newspapers struggle as Internet takes its toll


FROM page 10B

pers were fired as part of a dramatic
downsizing operation.
The management's strategy was to
sack everyone with the intention of re-
hiring only those they really want, cut-
ting costs and off-loading deadwood
at the same time.
Elsewhere in Britain, titles are being
merged, branch offices chopped, staff
made redundant and even manage-
ment itself being streamlined in a des-
perate attempt to keep long-estab-
lished businesses afloat. Several edi-
tors of prestigious local titles have been
axed, along with .large portions of their
staffs.
On the national front, things are no
better. Several titles look in danger of
eventual closure, including The Inde-
pendent, its sister paper Independent
on Sunday, and once enormously pop-
ular tabloids like The People.
In fact, the situation is so bad that
media analyst Claire Enders predicted
over the weekend that a third of
Britain's regional papers, two national
titles and half the jobs in the regional
press will disappear in the next five
years.
She is urging the British government
to ease rules on cross-media owner-
ship and help the process of media
diversification in an attempt to save
what has traditionally been the single
most important component of a flour-
ishing democracy.
With local titles disappearing at the
rate of 10 to 15 per week, Enders
observes that practically no-one outside
the media wants to invest in the press
anymore.
Among the few flickers of light in
the gathering gloom are The Daily
Mail and its stablemate The Mail on
Sunday, which somehow continue to
buck the trend.
The Internet is being blamed, but in
reality the seeds were sown long before
the World Wide Web was even
thought of. Newspapers are in trouble
because of appalling mismanagement
and a misguided belief that journalism
was no longer important as accoun-
tants gained control of the industry.
It's interesting that The Tribune and
the Daily Mail are among the star per-
formers because, in truth, they share
many characteristics.
Both know their markets well and
fashion their news, features and sports
coverage to meet their readers' pref-
erences. They are "editorially-led", giv-
ing journalists their heads over the
grim dictates of the bottom line.
While the Mail aims for Middle Eng-
land and more specifically the wives


of Middle England The Tribune
caters for the entire spectrum of
Bahamian society. It's their ability to
target and serve the market that puts
both papers ahead of the game.
The newspapers that fail are those
that, accountancy driven, have no sense
of direction and no identifiable mes-
sage. That has been the fate of much of
the British regional press for the last
two decades.
There's another feature the Mail and
Tribune share. They are both hard-hit-
ting, no-nonsense newspapers with a
fervent dislike of the liars, shysters and
conmen of society.
British politicians are terrified of the
Mail. Its editor, Paul Dacre, is viewed
as a satanic presence in English society,
a man with the awesome power to
manipulate the entire political scene
to his own ends. Expletives are heaped
on his head every week.
In the Bahamas, population num-
bers and newspaper sales are, of
course, much smaller, but the role of
the press no less significant. Thus, The
Tribune is also reviled in some quar-
ters, with both its publisher and man-
aging editor described as "terrorists" by
politicians over the last few years.
The most important characteristic
shared by the two papers, however, is
sheer readability combined with
colourful presentation. Readers must
be encouraged, by content and design,
to choose a paper ahead of its rivals.
Stand by any news stand in London
for ten minutes, and you will witness
the Mail disappearing fast while the
Daily Express, The Independent and
The Times languish alongside other
less alluring titles. If you try to buy it
late in the day, more often than not'


the Mail will have long gone. Ditto
The Tribune.
In both cases, it is journalism the
writing and presentation of hews, fea-
tures and sport that is central to the
paper's success. Once journalism is
compromised, for whatever reason,
newspapers fail. That is the key to the
industry's dire performance in recent
years. Now it is probably too late to
turn the tide.
In the UK and USA, managements
are now striving to see how traditional
print operations can be made to work
commercially as online news and fea-
tures outlets.
Chopping print editions is easy
enough, but is it really possible to repli-
cate a newspaper online and generate
the revenues necessary to hire the right
quality and quantity of staff to maintain
journalistic standards?
There's no doubt that some titles
have benefited greatly from the online
revolution. The Financial Times and
The Guardian of London are two cas-
es in point.
Neither of these well-regarded news-
papers was a mega-seller in Britain,
their home market. The Guardian was
always a left-of-centre broadsheet for
the liberal intelligentsia while The
Financial Times was the bible of the
moneymen. Neither was able to get
even close to half a million sales, even
in a nation of 60 million people.
But they had an unexploited mar-
ket of overseas supporters which was
never reached by print. Now both
enjoy multi-million readerships all over
the world, thanks to the Internet.
While Guardian-style liberals and
FT-style financiers and investors are a
finite market in Britain, they lurk in


abundance in places like New York,
Mumbai, Sydney, San Francisco and, of
course, western Europe. Hence, these
two prestige publications have found
new life beyond Britain's shores.
In a smaller way, The Tribune hopes
to capitalise on a new international
market when its website appears in the
New Year.
Though this newspaper's domestic
print sales are inevitably limited by the
size of the local population and other
factors, including low literacy levels,
its appeal overseas is extensive.
Inevitably, Bahamian exiles.and stu-
dents form a core market for The Tri-
bune's online product. But there is also
an unquantifiable body of interest out
there among investors, bankers, diplo-
mats, tourism entities and others who,
for whatever reason, have an interest in
our island chain.
Thus, The Tribune will be able to
offer its unique package of editorial
material to readers as far flung as Bei-
jing and Baton Rouge, Montreal and
Melbourne.
For traditional readers, it isimpos-
sible to envisage the day when news-
papers will no longer exist, yet all the
signs are that print in this particular
form is into its last two or three
decades.
The publisher of The New York'
Times, Arthur Ochs SulzbergeiJr., is
on record as saying his newspaper will
no longer exist in print form by the
middle of the 21st century.
Realists in other news groups are
reaching the same conclusion, but think
doomsday may come sooner. The fight
to secure an acceptable transition is
already underway. There will be casu-
alties, that's for sure.
Whatever the strengths of the news-
paper whether tabloid, Berliner or
broadsheet it will increasingly be
seen by the computer generation as
awkward, blotchy and wasteful, with
absolutely no advantages to outweigh
the slicker attributes of a personal com-
puter.
"If it doesn't happen online, it does-
n't happen as far as my generation is
concerned," my 25-year-old son told
me earlier this year.
It was a chilling message to some-
,one like me, who entered the newspa-
per business while still legally a child
and is still in it today beyond my offi-
cial pensionable age.
Like typewriters, steam locomotives,
fountain pens, black-and-white televi-
sion, washboards and itinerant knife-
grinders, newspapers will ultimately
fall victim to the march of technology
and become relics of a bygone age.
What has yet to be determined is
the impact this will have on'the demo-


cratic process.
Over the last three or four decades,
non-journalists in newspaper manage-
ment have been allowed to dictate the
'strategy and character of an industry
whose existence has always meant
something far more than the bottom
line.
The result has been blander prod-
ucts which have become little mo'
than printed shopping malls adver
tising vehicles with no punch, no
courage, no chutzpah and no influence.
None of the things, in fact, for which
newspapers were always revered. Little
wonder, then, that so many of them
are now seen as dispensable fripperies.
No-one ever went into the newspa-
per business to make money. Leon
Dupuch certainly didn't when he
launched The Tribune in 1903. Manu-
facturing clothes-pegs is far more prof-
itable and far less trouble. But accoun-
tancy essentially a non-creative dis-
cipline has been permitted to sacri-
fice editorial quality for shortheorm
gains in'other media organizations
worldwide to satisfy the shareholders'
constant cry for better returns. It has
been a catastrophic formula leading to
a long decline in newspaper circula-
tions and advertising revenues. The
Internet is merely providing the topsoi
for a grave dug by the newspaper
industry itself.
The Tribune's circulation success is,
therefore, something to savour, point-
ing hopefully to a need among Bahami-
ans to maintain loyalty for a form of
communication dating back to the
1700s. The attractions of the electron-
ic age, while they are undoubtedly'the
future, will have to wait awhile before
becoming the premier brand in the
Bahamas.
As educational tools, newspapers
have had few equals since the late 18th
and early 19th centuries. They have .
nurtured, and employed, some of the
best brains of the day, including great
literary names like Dickens, Orwe.l,
Waugh, Hemingway and Steinbeck, t
name but a few. 4
Love them or loathe them, they have
been indispensable parts of every
thinking person's life for generations,
not only informing, entertaining and
enlightening, but also providing the
foundations of national debate.
"Without newspapers, none of us
would have anything to say," a scholar
of the last century said of the age of
print. But for how much longer will
newspapers be able to resist a multi-
pronged assault by TV and cyber-
space? The signs are not good.

What do you think? Fax 32$M
or e-mail jmarquis@tribunemedia.det


INSIGIHTI I III


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DECEMBER. 15, 2008


The stories behind the news


N By JOHN MARQUIS,
Managing Editor



B y the year
2050,
there's a,
g o b ,d :
chance thatnewspapers,
the mainstay of public
debate for more than
200 years, will be gone, c
swept away by the
Internet and technolog-
ical developments yet
to come.
With them will go all
the romance, mystique
and panache surround-
ing the most glamorous
and intriguing profes-
sion on earth and the
indefinably unique
appeal of print in all Iis
inky, smudgy glory.
In their place will be
computers. Sleek. sani-
tised, functional, these
unfathomably. complex
creations will be left
competing with tele i-
sion for the world'ss
attention. Newspapers
will be seen, along % ith
oil-lamps, .penn far-
thing bikes, the pigeon
post and feather-quill
pens as relics of a quaint
but no longer rele. ant
past.
Statistics from around
the world and
notably the UIK and
USA spell out the
gloomy truth. With sales LEGENDS who learned
plummeting by up to 17 their craft on newspa-
per cent a year; manype
once prestigious titles pers Charles Dickens
are now looking death (top), George Orwell
in the face, with little or and Ernest Hemingway
no chance of revival. (above)...


Newspapers struggle as Internet takes its toll


GLOOMY predictions about
the future of newspapers are
now commonplace in the
trade press. With circulations
in freefall, advertising
revenues down, and staff cuts
occurring weekly in the UK
and USA, media groups are
wondering whether the press
can survive in its present
form. INSIGHT reports...

Others are scratching around for new ways of
maximising their skills. Many are secretly
resigned to an extremely bleak future.
Against this background of despair and
despondency, it is remarkable that The Tri-
bune even in these economically depressed
times continues to show circulation increas-
es, with October street sales up an astonishing
14.13 per cent.
For the last seven years, this newspaper has
posted impressive year-on-year circulation
gains to confound all the grim prognostica-
tions of media pundits everywhere. Like a
frontline stormtrooper, it staggers forward
while most others are in retreat.
As Tribune staff celebrated the paper's latest
triumph, British journalists were left downcast
by news from their own industry, where the
entire staffs of Glasgow's three main newspa-


SEE page 9B


MONDAY,


1.Terrrin miwin


fr