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The


Tribune


Volume: 104 No.276 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2008 PRICE-750













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Police do not


IVV jIIUIIIjIO IIIIUUI suspect gay
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te asmurder trend

**e a c- M By CHESTER ROBARDS treating this latest murder a
By Tribune Staff Reporter an isolated incident and arn
s a continuing their investigation


Ministry wants pair
involved in controversy to
comply with transfer orders


* By ALEX MISSICK
THE debacle of the two
Andros teachers, who have so
far refused to start work at the
schools to which they were
assigned, reached boiling point
yesterday as the Ministry of
Education threatened to stop
their salaries if they did
not comply with the transfer
orders.
The teachers two sisters -
involved in the Andros con-
troversy did not report at their
assigned schools.yesterday.
leaving the Director of Edu-
cation no choice but to order
their salaries stopped.
Education Director Lionel
Sands said teachers are paid
to perform a function each day
and if they are not reporting to
the schools where those func-
tions are to be performed, and
they have no legitimate rea-
son not to be present, then
their salaries should be taken
from them.
"'If they did not show up to
the schools where they were


sent, then our actions would
be to, firstly, have their salaries
stopped. Secondly, if they still
refuse to go to their assigned
schools, then we make recom-
mendation to the Public Ser-
vice Commission to have fur-
ther disciplinary action taken
against them because they
would be away on leave with-
out any kind of approval from
the Department of Educa-
tion," Mr Sands said.
Mr Sands said that once the
Department of Education
receives a report that both
teachers did not report to their
respective schools, then the
necessary action will be tak-
en.
Students from both the'Cen-
tral Andros High School and
Fresh Creek Primary Schools
returned to their classrooms
today. However, no new trans-
fer teachers were-added to the
North Andros High or Stan-
yard Creek Primary schools.
Education Minister Carl
SEE page eight


OM .-.
THE ROYAL Bahamas Defence Force Band performs at the opening cere-
mony of National Port Week at Prince George Wharf yesterday morning.


The Court of Appeal hears of
prosecution discrepancies
in case of convicted murderer


* By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
CONVICTED murderer
Vincent Dean, found guilty of
shooting and killing Geren
Kelly, could be set free after
the Court of Appeal heard
major discrepancies in the
prosecution's case yesterday.
Murrio Ducille, acting on.
behalf of appellant Vincent
Dean, told Court of Appeal


president Dame Joan Sawyer
the prosecution's case was
based on hearsay evidence,
which should not have been
accepted by the court.
Furthermore, identification
of the accused was not estab-
lished beyond reasonable
doubt, Mr Ducille said.
Dean, of St Vincent Road,
New Providence, was charged
SEE page eight


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POLICE do not suspect into it.
that there might be a trend of The multiple stabbing of iMr
eav murders in New Provi- Whylly. though. bears an
dence. according to Acting uncanny resemblance to three
Commissioner of Police, Regi- other gay slaying in the past
nald FV-iru'ion. months.
Homicide victimm number63, Well known Bahamian
who police confirmed yester- designer Harl Taylor was
day to be, 45-year-old Paul stabbed to death last Novem-
Whylly,.was the fifth member ber and COB lecturer Thad-
of the gay community to be deus McDonald in the same
brutally murdered in the past month was beaten beyond
12 months. ht
Mr Ferguson said they are SEE page eight.

Estimated $27m to be
spent on dredging off
Prince George dock
* By LLOYD L ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
ENVIRONMENT Minister Earl
Deveaux announced yesterday that an
estimated $27 million is expected to be
spent on the dredging off Prince George
dock.
According to minister Deveaux "the
actual dredging of the harbour is sched- 4
uled for about nine months from start to finish."
"Work is currently going on," he said, "where core samples
are being taken to determine the hardness of the rock, and to
also identify any environmental issues that need to be
addressed."
Expected to begin in early January, this newest transformation
SEE page eight


WORKERS' PARTY OFFICE IS
DAMAGED IN FIRE
PAGE THREE

STUDY SAYS SIX GOVT
SAGFNCIES REQUIRE
IMMEDIATE ATTENTION
PAGE FIVE


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21,2008


* iL~17rmui -ir-


FORMER DEPUTY PRIME
MINISTER and MP for St
Cecilia Cynthia Pratt,
receiving the Community
Spirit Award from Dion
Foulkes, Minister of Labour
& Social Development.


Salvation Army



hosts biennial




awards dinner

SBy ALEX MISSICK Event held under
THE Salvation Army Advi-
sory Board hosted its bienni- B
al awards dinner and silent th e m e '
auction on Saturday night athem e 'Be y
the Atlantis Resort in grand
style under the theme a'
"Beyond the Boundaries". the Boundares
The room was draped in
red and white linen as the________ _---------
atmosphere beamed with the wider Bahamian commu- they have played a role in my
soothing music by the Nassau nity by unselfish efforts. The life and many others." Mrs
CiThese awards recognised award also honours those who Pratt said.
These awards recognized exemplify the meaning of ser- The former deputy prime
those who displaying their vice and touch the lives of minister congratulated the
own ways the Salvation others through outstanding Salvation Army for the work
Army's goal of service to community involvement, they were doing and encour-
human kind, outstanding ser- Mrs Pratt said she was very aged them to continue their
vice to the community humbled and grateful that so work because the Bahamas
through the donation of time, many people had considered needed the Salvation Army.
talents and natural resources her and how good it feels "We are a young nation and
and outstanding humanitarian when people show their sup- it takes all of us to try and
efforts throughout the corn- port and offer their eongratu- build this country. There are
munity. lations. so many different aspects of
Out of the 11 awards given "The Salvation Army has the country that need building
out, such as the Otliers been one of those organisa- so I want to encourage per-
Award and Exceptional Ser- tions who over the years real- sons to do what they can and
vice Award, Cynthia "Moth- ly helped me as a youngster not look at who is doing what,
er" Pratt was the sole receiv- growing up and so I know the but to do what they can.
er of the Community Spirit impact it has made on my life. "If I do a little and you do a
Award.. "Many times if it had not little we will all help to build
This award is given to an been for the Salvation Army this country into the kind of
individual or entity instru- we may have not had a meal, country we are trying to
mental in positively affecting so today I am grateful that achieve."


Government employee


is injured after vehicle


collides with police car


RED RIBBON
"ALL

i TAKE THE LEAD
Support the 2008 Red Ribbon Ball
and Colinalmperial in its
fundraising efforts for the work of
the AIDS Foundation of The Bahamas
in paediatric AIDS care.







4
%.









( 'o liniu iperial


A
The AIDS Foundation of The ahanm

Saturday
November 15. 2008
imperial Ballroom
Atlantis Paradise tstantd
Tickets $200
Dress. Black-Tre
Telephone Queries
Nicole Henderson-Smith
396-2102
Metan ie Hutcheson
396-2160


Amiencan.. e "ohilt V .t4~U > '"
AmerncanAirfines GIVENCHY ,"


A GOVERNMENT employee was injured
yesterday when the vehicle she was driving and a
police car crashed into each other on Poinciana Dri-
ve.
The police car, registration number 121742, and
the government vehicle, registration number 2601,


were part of
yesterday.
After the a
eminent vehi
complained o
treatment.


a two-car collision at around 1.30pm
accident, the woman driver of the gov-
cle, a Ministry of Finance employee,
f pains and was taken to hospital for
A

Cubans get $80

million verdict

in slave case
MIAMI
A FEDERAL judge award-
ed $80 million in damages
Monday to three Cuban men
who won a lawsuit claiming
they were forced by their own
government to work in slave
labor conditions at a shipyard,
on the island of Curacao,
according to Associated Press.
Senior U.S. District Judge
James Lawrence King issued
the order after a hearing in
which the three men -
Alberto Justo Rodriguez
Licea, Fernandeo Alonso
Hernandez and Luis Alberto
Casanova Toledo -
described mistreatment and
harsh working conditions at
Curacao Drydock Co. and
their passports being confis-
cated.
"They were slave condi-
tions," Casanova said outside
the courtroom. "We were
working for 17 hours a day."
The men were in Curacao
for about two years before
escaping in October 2004,
eventually making their way
to the U.S. where Cubans are
generally allowed to remain.
The three now live in the
Tampa area.
Rodriguez said laborers
were also forced to watch
hours-long speeches by for-
mer Cuban President Fidel
Castro.


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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21,2008, PAGE 3


0 In brief


Man, 24,

accused of

having sex

with girl, 5

A 24-year-old man
accused of having sexual
intercourse with a five-year-
old girl was arraigned in a
Magistrate's Court yester-
day.
According to court dock-
ets, Cardinal Desmond But-
ler of Evans Street, is
accused of committing the
offence between January,
2008 and October, 2008.
Butler, who was arraigned
before Magistrate Guillimina
Archer at Court No 10 Nas-
sau Street, was not required
to plead to the charge.
He is expected to return to
court today for a bail hear-
ing. A preliminary inquiry
has been set for February 17,
2009.


Woman,

31, shot in

the chest
A 31-year-old woman
was shot in the chest in the
front of her Murphyville
home on Sunday.
The woman had just
arrived at her home shortly
after 3pm on Sunday and
was taking items from her
vehicle when a gun was fired.
The woman was shot on
the left side of her chest.
She was taken to hospital
where her condition is listed
as serious.
Moments after the inci-
dent occurred, a man was
seen leaving the area in a'
heavily tinted black Nissan
Maxima. Investigation.con-
tinues.

Police find

sulb-machine

gnn in car
e OFFICERS of the
Mdbile Division found an
Uzi sub-machine gun in a
parked car on Sunday.
Just after 2am on Sunday,
officers acting on a tip went
to Baillou Hill Road north
where they stopped near a
parked Nissan Sentra.
Inside the car; officers
found a sub-machine gun.
The illegal weapon was
taken into police custody.
No arrests have been made
as investigations continue.


Black Village serial arsonist fears


M Five fires in six months

* Workers Party office damaged
again over the weekend


PEOPLE living in Black Village
believe an arsonist is on the loose fol-
lowing five fires in six months.
Over the weekend, the Workers Party
office was damaged for a second time,
and a phonecard kiosk nearby went up in
smoke.
These followed another fire in Village
Alley on October 13 when a house occu-


pied by Mr Stephen Johnson was
destroyed.
"Neighbours believe an arsonist is
responsible," a Black Village resident
said yesterday. "But no-one knows what
the motive might be."
Workers Party leader Rodney Moncur
was called out at 4.30am on Sunday
when fire broke out in the building on


Rupert Dean Lane South. He estimates
damage at $15,000.
The nearby kiosk, on the corner of
Poinciana Drive, was also wrecked.
Fire appliances were called to the
scene, but Mr Moncur expressed disap-
pointment with the police response.
"For my party this was a great loss
because this is where we held our meet-


ings. When the PLP offices caught fire,
police took it much more seriously," he
said.
The building, he added, would now
have to be demolished, having first been
damaged on April 7 this year.
"For the community to have five fires
in six months suggests there is an arson-
ist in the area," he said.


og h"aao.


&


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Humane Society
on Tuesday, 25th November, 2008
at the
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12 noon Cocktails
lpm Luncheon/Show a
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Donation $60.00
Tickets at Cole's of Nassau on
Parliament Street .
Tel: 322-8393 / 328-7157


* By LLOYD L ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
WITH an increasing number
of European and South Ameri-
can cruise passengers visiting
the Bahamas, officials recom-
mend that Bahamians working
in the tourism sector learn addi-
tional languages.
Speaking at the official
launch ceremony of the Nation-
al Port Week held yesterday at
the Prince George Wharf, a
senior representative from the
Florida Caribbean Cruise Asso-
ciation (FCCA) said that one
of the most notable trends relat-
ed,to -cruise tourisnmislthat the
number of South American and
European tourists have
increased over the past two
years.
According to Michael Ronan,
vice-president of Royal
Caribbean International and
FCCA executive, an industry
analysis has revealed that the
visitor base for the Bahamas
has shifted over the past few
years.
"The market used to be 95
per cent North American, it's
now closer to 80 per cent. More
and more Europeans and South
Americans and others are now
looking to cruise to this part of
the world," he said.
In order for the Bahamas to
benefit from this shift, Mr
Ronan said that he advises per-
sons employed in the industry
to seek to become bilingual, and
to also be prepared to cater to
the needs of this new crop of
tourists.
While he said that the survey
showed that the Bahamas is in
fact a player in the global mar-
ket, Bahamians need to under-
stand that there are specific
demands that international vis-
itors have.
"People today want culture,
they want history, it's a part of
what you are, and that's what
passengers are coming to see,"
he said.
Minister, for Environment
Earl Deveaux, who also spoke
at the opening ceremony, said
that the proximity, of the
Bahamas to Florida, New York
and the entire eastern seaboard
of the United States is "unpar-
alleled in the world."
However, for the Bahamas to
continue to truly benefit from
this advantage, the minister said
it is important to continue to
evaluate the local tourist expe-
rience and to make an effort to
improve it.
The minister said that despite
who you are, "tourism is our


A ROYAL Bahamas Defence Force dance-off at the opening of Port
Week at Prince George Dock yesterday morning.


business." He said that each
encounter a guest has with a
Bahamian in some way affects
their decision to revisit, there-
fore it is vital for all persons to
make a conscious effort in pro-
viding the very best experience
to visitors.
The week-long celebrations


of Port Week are scheduled to
include a health fair on Tues-
day and a public careers fair on
Wednesday.
The week concludes on Sat-
urday with a closing ceremony
in the area of Festival Place at
the entrance of Prince George
Wharf.


THI TRIRLINE


^^^*iH^^lLOAL -NEWS~l^lSn


Bahamian tourism workers


urged to become bilingual


' < ". .,<' a,'


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and'share your story.


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PAGE 4,ITUESDAUOCTOBERS21,208HTHEDTROBUN


The Tribur e Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. D UPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCHCARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulate ind Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: --(242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


Rule of law lost in Russia


.THIS'MONTH marks five years since
Mikhail Khodorkovsky once one of Rus-
sia's richest men was seized in his private
plane at the Novosibirsk airport. He was sub-
sequently convicted of fraud and tax evasion
and sentenced to eight years in a labour
camp. His huge oil company, Yukos, was dis-
mantled and sold off piecemeal to Kremlin
loyalists.
In August, Khodorkovsky was denied
parole on the grounds that he had not been
attending sewing classes' at his labour camp in
the Russian Far East. Earlier this month he
was put in solitary confinement for 12 days
for giving a written interview to the Russian
edition of Esquire magazine.
The interviewer was Grigory Chkhar-
tishvili, who, under the pen name Boris
'Akunin, is one of the most popular Writers in
Russia today. He said people asked him why
he was making a fuss about an oligarch who
didn't get so fabulously rich by always obey-
ing the law. /
Chkhartishvili explained that "it was specif-
ically on the Yukos case that we lost the inde-
pendence of the judiciary- an institution
without which a democratic society cannot
exist." He added that 'i.we restore justice
and legality in the case of Khodorkovsky,
this will also help all the rest of the victims" of
Russia's authoritarian government.
The argument may be a difficult one for
'many Russians to- understand because the
men who made obscene fortunes in the first
post-Soviet years are seen as guilty by defin-
ition.
In fact, it remains unclear why then-Presi-
dent Vladimir Putin turned so viciously on
this one oligarch, while doing business with so
many others. One theory is that Putin saw
Khodorkovsky who was putting a lot of
money into political parties as. a serious
rival, and that his arrest was a signal to all oli-
garchs to stay out of politics. Another theory
is that.Khodorkovsky had personally defied
the Russian president on some unknown
issue; yet another is that the Kremlin wanted
to stop him from bringing Western companies
in as Yukos partners.
The point is that nobody in Russia believes
that the real.reason Khodorkovsky was.
imprisoned was the crimes of which he was
convicted.
For Chkhartishvili, the arrest marked the .
point at which the liberals of the first post-
Soviet years who had tried, however poor-
/.


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ly, to instil a rule of law were pushed aside
by "siloviki," the secret service and army
chiefs who rule by raw power ("sila").
What struck me in Chkhartishvili's argu-
ment was that if Khodorkovsky has indeed
.become a symbol of the lost rule of law, then
he is in effect one of the premier dissidentss"
of the Putin era an unlikely role for a rob-
ber baron.
Andrei Sakharov, Natan Sharansky and
other members of the Helsinki Group were
fighting for a noble cause: freedom. To do
that they did not challenge the legitimacy of
Soviet institutions. Instead they insisted that
the government obey its own laws on emi-
gration, freedom of speech, freedom of reli-
gion and comply with the human rights
clauses of the Helsinki Final Act.
Soviet rulers responded brutally, impris-
oning (usually for "anti-Soviet agitation and
propaganda") or exiling virtually the whole
group. But the more, the Kremlin openly set
itself above the law, the weaker it became.
The dissidents of the last Soviet years became
3 heroes of the first post-Soviet years.
The parallels with the present should not be
exaggerated. Putin's Russia is not the Soviet
Union by a long shot; Russians have many
more freedoms now. And Khodorkovsky is
hardly a human-rights crusader of the mould
of a Sakharov, though in his last years at
Yukos he moved the company toward high
levels of transparency and accountability.
But so long as Khodorkovsky is kept in a
labpur camp and denied parole for not sewing
properly, he remains a powerful symbol of the
lack of independence of Russia's prosecu-
tors and judges. So long as they are not inde-
pendent, Russia cannot have the effective
legal system it needs to combat corruption,
referee markets and create and protect a civ-
il society.
There was some hope that Russia's new
president, Dmitri Medvedev would do things
differently from his mentor (and now prime
minister) Putin. So far he has failed to live up
to his commitment to strengthen the rule of
law. But Medvedev does have the power to
pardon Khodorkovsky. That might not be in
:z class with letting Andrei Sakharov return
'm internal exile, but it would be a very
,. come signal that there is hope for Russia.
(This article was written by Serge Scheme-
mann
c.2008 New York Times News Service).


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I was very interested to read
the letter in the paper (Friday
17th) entitled "Is the PLP rele-
vant to ordinary Bahamians?"
Thinking about It, it seemed to
me that we used to refer to politi-
cians as politicians, but today we
talk very often about the "Political
Class".
To me the "Political Class"
represents the people who are in.
politics for a career and in many
cases have no other way of earn-
ing a living. The disrespect that
the "Political Class" are held in, all
over the world, and their arro-
gance towards the general popu-
lace is a root cause of the world's
economic problems and other
problems today.
If they are held in disrespect
because of their actions and they
include greed, corruption and so
on, then the "Banker's Class" is
liable to behave the same way
which they have. Their arrogance
and greed has brought the world
to its knees and we, the ordinary
man, who is also infected by this
disease will suffer for a. number
.of years to come.
But we, the ordinary man, will
suffer more than those in "pow-.
er". It seems a sad reflection on
politicians .that usually the- best
we can say about them is that we
think that so-and-so may not be
corrupt, rarely that he is a good
and honest fellow.
We assume that politicians are


corrupt and now we assume that
bankers are corrupt and greedy.
We do not expect politicians to
tell us the truth, but to "spin" the
truth to suit their particular angle.
of the moment..
We read in the papers about
the latest scandal in the Bahamian
construction industry, possibly
involving a politician, aefd there
have been many other scandals
from all sides of the political spec-
trum in' governments around the
world. It does not surprise us any-
more. Politicians drive around in
smart cars which they do not pay
for with drivers to attend to their
needs. They expect free invita-
tions to any event they would. like
to attend and forget to respond
io invitations that do not interest
them or do not show up because
they are too busy.
I am sure some of them work
very hard and are inherently hon-
est people but as they work for
the people they should behave
like the people and for example
drive around in normal cars and
be polite when invited to events.
Cut the trappings and you cut
the arrogance and let them earn
our respect and then they can
show an example to the bankers
and lawyers who earn millions for


destroying our lives and still, in
the case of the Lehman Brothers
boss, expect to get a.huge pay off.
Gordon Brown, the UK Prime
Minister, recently compared him-
self to Winston Churchill and Ted-
dy Roosevelt when he virtually
nationalised the UK banks and
therefore "saved us from eco-
nomic chaos".
Winston Churchill saved us
from possible slavery, Gordon
Brown is trying to save us from a
mess of his own making to me
not the same.And as a Scotsman,
I am appalled that the Bank of
Scotland, which was incorporat-
ed in 1695, has now virtually dis-
appeared because some high fly-
ing 41-year-old got the, bank's
business model wrong and was
too arrogant to see it at a salary of
2 million a year.
As for the Government's
nationalising and running the
banks in the US and UK and oth-
er countries around the world,
heaven forbid. If they cannot run
the country successfully how can
we expect them to run the banks
successfully without introducing
all the bad things I mention
above.Don't let them do it here.
I finish by saying bear all this in
mind the next time you speak to
your MP and,see what.he thinks.
PATRICK H THOMSON
Nassau,
October 17, 2008..


We need to fix attitudes of those running capitalism
EDITOR, The Tribune. ing with a one hundred million The writer of the theory of
A short while ago a friend dollar golden handshake and'be demand and supply never meant
posed the question: "How can we accepted into societies as rich it to be used to justify higher
fix Capitalism?" It's .not broken heroes. In those days people like prices when a disaster struck.
and does not need to be fixed. this would either go to jail or be Demand and Supply can only
What needs to be fixed are the shunned by society. Never did work if the supply is uncontrolled
attitudes of those running it. they think that loans would be and unhindered. The supply of
The people who wrote the the- given, all the time knowing, that gas is controlled from the ground
ories of capitalism, demand and they could not be paid back. to the car. But the "spin" doctors
supply, market forces, etc. did not They never heard of the "spin have convinced the public that
at the time envision people doctor" who would take their the- it's demand and. supply control-
putting these theories into prac- ories, spin them and make a lie, a ling the price of gas! Don't be
tice who lacked morality, ethics, truth. The fathers, of capitalism, fooled; gas prices are tightly con-
fair play, honesty and were demand and supply, market trolled by a small cartel that
greedy. Almost fifty years ago forces, etc. never dreamed that "spins" the facts, fingers the,pub-
an Economics professor at St. their theories would be used to lic, and laughs all the way to the
John's University. in the cold Mid- rob the victims of floods and hur- bank!. But what is morality in this
west predicted what has finally ricanes of their life savings and modem world? Is it something to
happened in the past weeks. He well being. Never did they think eat? In the United States, chil-
said then that most of the affairs that gas prices, and plywood dren cannot pray in classes; they
of the nation would be directed prices would double when disas- cannot wear a cross to signify that
by graduates of the big eastern ter struck, using the. theory of they believe .in something; the
Ivy League Schools who were "demand and supply" as a justifi- Ten Commandments cannot be
being taught to' look nowhere oth- cation for it. displayed in public places; the
er than at the bottom line in busi- The writers of these theories manger cannot. be put in public
ness. These schools had no class- thought, although serious and parks during Christmas.
es in ethics; the graduates were devastating, disasters were mere- What does all this mean and
not taught the difference between ly a "burp" on the radar screen df what does it have to do with the
right and wrong. The bottom line. the overall economic landscape. present crises? Lack of discipline,
That's all that counted. They thought that a Christian .no moral guidelines, no parame-
At St. John's, a small mid- person who had a heart in his ters in which to work. Everything
western university; ethics was a chest would realize that yes the and anything goes. It's the bot-
required course. If you majored in demand spiked but so did pro- tom line that counts. Not morali-
pre-med, it was medical ethics; if duction, and the higher the pro- ty. Not the truth. Not fairplay.
you majored in Economics, it was duction, the lower the hourly cost Fix capitalism? No, fix the
business ethics. Yes the bottom and, therefore, the unit cost of problems that exist in the minds
ine was important, but how you the item would not rise, but and hearts of those who run Cap-
got there was more important. would fall. italism!
.NT didh nnthn f fhpe- 7 %-h -1-_. ,- _._ .


theories envision a society where
CEOs would run a company into
the ground and walk away laugh-


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PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENTTO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that we, NOVELETTE and
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the mother and father of TEJAY LENOY BANTON intend
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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21,2008


THE TRIBUNE


f


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s
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t:
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a

b
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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21,2008, PAGE 5


THE-TRIBUNE .


LOCALN


0 In brief


Almost 813,000

confiscated from

merican visitor
NEARLY $13,000 was
ordered confiscated from an
American visitor who was
also fined $500 for
failing to declare that he was
carrying more than $10,000
*into the United States.
According to court dock-
ets, Jeffrey Steven Telsey, 52,
.,of Delray Beach, Florida,
while at the US Customs
`,Hall, Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport, on October
-118, falsely declared that he
was not carrying in excess of
$10,000 into the United
States. Court dockets further '
'state that Telsey failed to
declare that he was carrying
$12,720.
SA 41-YEAR-OLD man
was sentenced to 20 months
in prison after he was convict-
ed yesterday of possession of
27 pounds of marijuana.
Calvin Wilson was charged.
in 2002 with possession of
marijuana with intent to sup-
ply. Wilson, according to
*'police, was arrested at a
,Marathon Estates residence
where the drugs were discov-
*ered.
Wilson stood trial for the
"offence before accepting
responsibility for the drugs.
Magistrate Carolita Bethel
sentenced Wilson to 20
months in prison and also
'fined him $10,000. Failure to,
pay the fine will result in an
additional year in jail..
TWO men were
arraigned in a Magistrate's
Court yesterday on charges
of housebreaking, shop-
breaking and stealing.
According to court dock-
ets, Dave Brown, 29, of Fer-
guson Subdivision, and Bran-
-.don O'Neil Williams on
Wednesday, October 15,
broke into the home of Fos-
ter Rolle at Doris Johnson
Estates.
There, it is alleged, that
the two men stole $9,450 in,
jewellery and electronics
belonging to Rolle.
The two men were also
charged with receiving the
Stolen items.
-Itfis'als6'alleged that '
Between October 8.and Octo-
`ber 9, the two men broke into
'the Illest Entertainment Cen-
tre on Carmichael Road.
The accused, who were,
;!arraigned before Magistrate
'ODetrence Rolle at Court No 5
SBank Lane, pleaded not
guilty to the housebreaking
and shop-breaking charges.
They were not required to
plead to the stealing and
receiving charges.-
Both men were remanded
-'to Her Majesty's Prison. The
case has been adjourned to
-November 19.




T.h #/ca eiI,'


Study says six govt agencies





require immediate attention


AT LEAST six government
agencies require immediate
attention to rectify serious
deficiencies, a new survey has
revealed.
Speaking at the National
Public Officer of the Year
Award Ceremony on Satur-
day, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham talked about the
pilot programme that was
launched in six agencies the
Department of Public Service,
the Registrar. General's
Department, the Road Traffic


Department, the Building
Control Division, the Pass-
port Office and the Physical
Planning Department.
"You will be aware that
the first part of the exercise
involved surveying both pub-
lic officers and members of
the public our customers. I
am advised that the results of
the various internal and exter-
nal surveys'are in.
"And I am advised that, in
short, the surveys confirm
that each of the departments


Bahamas Against Crime


protests performance of


Jamaican reggae artist

* By CHESTER ROBARDS is
TribuneStaff Reporter
THE BAHAMAS Against
Crime (BAC) organisation is
protesting against the headlin-
ing performance of Jamaican
pop reggae artist Mavado at this
year's Millennium Countdown .
concert.
Executive director of BAC
Rev C Bi Moss issued a state-
ment yesterday expressing a
position of "strong opposition"
to Mavado being allowed to per-
form at the highly anticipated O "L
and well-attended concert. .
"(His) lyrics are most obscene "
and degrading to women, as well
as filled with vivid violence at a
time when we are struggling to
contain and reduce the level of
our violence," said Rev Moss.
The BAC yesterday provided The Tribune with the
lyrics of some of Mavado's songs, which are written in Jamaican
Patois.
One song entitled "Force It Up" mentions male and female
genitalia several times and speaks of sexual intercourse. One of his
more popular songs, entitled "Weh.Dem A Do," graphically
,describes shooting a victim to death.
"Marrow (bone marrow) will fly into the sky/a gun, I don't bor-
row, My money buys / a boy will die," says the song.
Steve McKinney, spokesman for Sigma Management the
Bahamian company promoting the event along with Downsound
Records said the promoters, and indeed the concert, itself stands
against crime.
"The BAC should note that we join hands with them in saying no
to violence," said Mr McKinney. "We had a wonderful concert last
year without incidence."
He-explained that artists who perform bring a testimony.about a
kind of lifestyle which they portray through their, lyrics.
However, Mr McKinney said that through the message in the
songs, concert goers can often be dissuaded to engage in a life of
crime.
The event is scheduled to last for four days. Each day will feature
a different genre of music. Mavado, along with other pop reggae
artists, will entertain dancehall fans on the third day of the highly
publicised event.
Mr McKinney said the purpose of the concert this year entitled
"Unity Through Music, God Above All" is to bring about har-
monisation through the music.
However, Rev Moss insists that Mavado's music will promote vio-
lence and the degradation of women.
"How can you contaminate what you claim to love," he said.
"Afterwards we will only have to clean it up."


"...I am advised that, in short, the
surveys confirm that each of the
departments included in the pilot
require priority action to address what
both public officers and members
of the public consider important
deficiencies in the status quo."


included in the pilot require
priority action to address
what both public officers and
members of the public con-
sider important deficiencies,
in the status quo," the prime
minister said.
The pilot is the first step
in the Service Improvement
Programme, which Mr Ingra-
ham said is part of govern-
ment's plan of public sector
modernisation and reform.
"A number of early com-
ments from the consultants
are instructive and will need
to remain in the forefront as
this programme of reform
moves into the next stage -
the organizations (depart-
ments) do not have' clear,
measurable, strategic objec-
tives that employees'and
management have agreed to.
"Systems seem to be in
place to begin tasks, but
desired results are seldom
obtained.
"The critical problem fac-
ing the public service is not,
as many claim, a lack of
resources, it is an inability to
use existing resources effi-
ciently and effectively in
meeting the legitimate
demands for public service.
The most important charac-
teristic of the Public Service is
the lack of accepted and
quantifiable criteria for mea-
suring performance.
"Clearly prompt action is
called for," Mr Ingraham said.
The prime minister said


that the Service Improvement
Programme demands change..
He also acknowledged that
change.is never easy.
"It will be particularly dif-
ficult for those persoIns who
have established 'kingdoms'
and 'comfort zones' in the
work place. In an effort to
change this inclination we
must concentrate on doing
the greatest good for the
greatest number. But public
officers will have to take own-
ership of this initiative," he
said.
Taking ownership, the'
prime minister said, requires
creating a culture of efficien-
cy and productivity, moving
frommediocrity to new stan-,
dards of excellence.
"This will require team-
work, clearly defined goals
and objectives; appropriate
training, and accountability,"
he said.


The Service Imp0rvement
Programme is being imple-
mented through a collabora-
tive undertaking by the
Department of Public Service,
the College of the Bahamas
and the Caribbean Centre for
Development Administration
(CARICAD). I )
". We anticipate the neces-
sary interventions by our
strategic partner, CARICAD,
will assist us in our decision-
making so that we may ulti-
mately provide the standards,
of service required and'
expected by the public," the
prime.minister said.


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Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their .
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning ,
for improvements in the ,
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
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P 6T D OO 22T TB


Woman badly

injured in

serious traffic

accident
* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT- A woman
survived a serious traffic acci-
dent on Friday evening after
the vehicle she was driving
overturned in a bushy area off
the Grand Bahama Highway.
Chief Supt Basil Rahming
reported that although the
driver, Darene Cleare, 25, of
Manton Close, Lincolnshire
Green, was badly injured, she
was still able to call for help
on her cellular telephone
after the accident.
Mr Rahming said Ms
Cleare's vehicle a 1999 Sat-
urn Ion with registration
number 45513- was discov-
ered some 200 feet in the
bushes off the highway. He
said speed is believed to be a
factor in the accident.
Ms Cleare was heading
home, travelling east on'
Grand Bahama Highway at
around 6.55pm on Friday,.
when she reportedly lost con-
trol of the vehicle while navi-
gating a long winding curve in
the vicinity of Gina Farm.
The vehicle skidded off the
road. It overturned several
times before finally coming to
rest in the bushes.
"When officers proceeded
to the area it took a while to
locate the vehicle due to the
thick vegetation in area and
the fact that it was not visible
from the road," said Mr Rah-
ming.
He said the officers eventu-
ally spotted some tyre marks
leading into the bushes where
they discovered the vehicle,
which was damaged'beyond
repair.
Ms Cleare was assisted
'from the wreckage and trans-
ported to the Rand Memorial
Hospital, where she received
emergency medical treat-
ment.
Mr Rahming said Traffic
Police are continuing their
investigation into the acci-
dent. He appealed to
motorists not to drive at
excessive speeds along desert-
ed highways.


Bahamian makes history





on international talk show


.ONE of the Chief Execu-
tive Officers of the GEMS
New Media Network is mak-
ing history by becoming the
first Bahamian to co-host an
international syndicated talk
show which will be broadcast
to millions.
Debbie Bartlett, GEMS
CEO, was recently in Wash-
ington, DC, where she com-
pleted the first taping of the
show "The Right Side with
Armstrong Williams."
Mr Williams is a popular
talk show host, who is affili-
ated with the Sinclair Broad-
casting Station, which distrib-
utes programmes to major
networks such as Fox, CBS
and NBC.
He was recently interviewed
by Shena C on the morning
show on GEMS 105.9 FM.
When asked why he chose
Ms Bartlett to co-host the
show with him, Mr Williams
said he made the decision
because she is a woman of


4..




t. "

S..



honour and integrity.
"It was just a match that was
necessary and one that I was


very comfortable with. I know
Deborah and in all those years
of knowing her, I have never
found her to be dishonest. I've
always known her to be a
straight shooter and she cares
about people, she cares about
the Caribbean."

Message

Mr Williams said "it's not
about money with her, that's
not the issue it's about a mes-
sage, it's about empowering
people and it's about spread-
ing the values and the issues
that impact the Caribbean
nations, especially the
Bahamas, and the United
States."
"It's a shared relationship,
it's like a laboratory, it's like a
classroom, with Deborah and
I, because really we are
becoming a global economy
and we need to know what is
going on, not just in the US,"


Mr Williams said.
Ms Bartlett said that she is
very humbled by being
offered this opportunity.
She said even though it
came an unexpected time, it
is an opportunity she believes
she has been preparing for all
her life.
"When you are determined
to submit to success principals,
when you do what is right and
when you work hard you
will get first class results," she
said.
Ms Bartlett credits the sup-
port of her partner Cyprianna
McWeeney and Bartlett
McWeeney Communications
for her accomplishments. She
said she is also grateful for the
omnipresent support of her
parents Frank and MizPah
Bartlett, her brothers Glen
and Wayne, the GEMS and
CEO Network families and of
course God.
"It's really an accomplish-
ment that gives testimony to


the GEMS family, my partner
Cyprianna McWeeney,
Bartlett McWeeney Commu-
nications and the entire
Bahamian and Caribbean
community," she said.

Platform

"It's an opening for all of us
and the platform that has been
given to us by Mr Armstrong
Williams will introduce the tal-
ents, the gifts and the great-
ness'of the people of the
Bahamas and the Caribbean.
"You can be assured that
now, people from the
Bahamas will not only be cel-
ebrated for our strength in
sports, like the Olympians, but
our intellectual, political and
business capacities and our
contribution to the local and
global communities," she said.
The show will be aired on
more than 64 major stations
and their affiliates.


SOL KERZNER'S latest Atlantis project in Dubai has hit
S a new snag and it's all over a "'rescued" shark.
Pressure is growing on the resort to release the animal
which is recognized as an endangered species
Originally. Atlantis officials in Dubai said it had rescued
the shark, but the hotel is now. refusing to say .he n it %Nill be
released, according to BBC News.
Environmentalists are now demanding the shark nick-
named Sammy by the local press should be freed
.The shark controversy is one ofa seeral ;etback to, hit th,.
new resort.
Three weeks before it opened, a fire bilohed ,smokc
through the lobby.
Then, a week after opening, the hotel wa, left v. without
water after a vat\e ruptured.
Now, the new Atlantis is attracting more ad\ rctsc publicity
with the shark rumpus.
The shark was said by locals to ha\e bccn c:augiht ,ff ih,.
e coast of Dubai six weeks ago, said the BBC.


Gasoline prices
N NEW YORK
CONSUMERS got another bieak
at the gas pump Monday, as prices
dropped further below $3 a gallon
and approached year-ago levels even
as the near-certainty of an OPEC
production cut pushed oil prices mar-
ginally higher, according to Associ-
ated Press.
Gasoline has fallen more than a
dime a gallon since Friday, hitting a
national average of $2.92 on Mon-
day, according to auto club AAA,
the Oil Price Information Service
and Wright Express. Pump prices
have fallen 29 percent from their
July record high of $4.114 a.gallon
and are only 10 cents higher than a
year ago. That difference could be"
bridged this week if gasoline keeps
falling at the current rate.
The pullback at the pump comes


tumble despite
amid a dramatic turnaround in crude
oil prices.
Chakib Khelil, president of the
Organization of Petroleum Export-
ing Countries, said Sunday that
members plan to announce a "sub-
stantial" output cut at an extraordi-
nary meeting that begins Friday in,
Vienna. Analysts say OPEC coun-
tries have been alarmed by falling
oil prices and want a production cut
to prop up members' national bud-
gets that only months ago were
bulging with hundreds of billions in
petrodollars.
Khelil, who is also Algeria's ener-
gy minister, said OPEC may cut out-
put again at a meeting in Decem-
ber, and that the group considers
the oil market oversupplied by about
2 million barrels a day.
Light, sweet crude for November
delivery rose $2.40 to settle at $74.25


likely OPEC cuts
a barrel on the New York Mercantile
Exchange. The contract Friday
gained $1.53 to settle at $71.38; crude
has fallen about 50 percent from its
July 11 high of $147.27.
Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez said Sunday he would like
prices between $80 and $90 a barrel.
On Monday, trader and analyst
Stephen Schork called those com-
ments "oddly conciliatory."
"Unfortunately for Venezuela ...
and the rest of OPEC, $80 might not
be enough for the bears ... at least in
the short run," Schork said in his
daily publication, The Schork
Report. "After all, the people ... who
(initially) denied the existence of the
bubble and who have subsequently
been telling us since $110 that the
floor in oil is in ... are the same peo-
ple who are now telling us oil cannot
last below $80."


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TI-IE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21,2008






I tit i niDUIuiLc


I


THE residential real estate mar-
ket in the Bahamas is currently far
stronger than the markets of many
other countries, CEO of Bahamas
Realty Larry Roberts said.
Mr Roberts returned to Nassau
last week after attending the Inte'r-
national Real Estate Symposium in
Italy.
He said that the conference has
left him with a better perspective of
the strength of the Bahamian mar-
ket.
The long-time industry leader was
in Rome where he addressed the
annual meeting of LeadingRE, a
network of the world's top 700 high-
end market real estate firms.
After hearing an endless "out-
pouring, a litany of tragedy" from
the other attendees, Mr Roberts said
that countries like the United States,
Spain, Italy, even Ireland that only a
few years ago was "the poster child
of prosperity", are now falling onto
hard times.*
Housing sales in those countries


"Historically,
the Bahamas has
weathered these
economic
storms fairly
well"...

Larry Roberts
are slow, prices are dropping and
dreams are being dashed, he said.
Mr Roberts said he returned to
the Bahamas buoyed by the rela-
tive stability of the local market.
"The Bahamas market is a two-
tier market," said Mr Roberts, a
member of the international advi-
sory board of the LeadingRE net-
work.


"Although there are notable
exceptions with many Bahamians
owning homes that are worth well
over $1 million, the basic local mar-
ket covers properties up to about
$750,000 and that market has, to
date, held up quite well.
"If people start to lose their jobs
here, we will begin to feel a drop-off,
but right now our local market is
far stronger than residential mar-
kets are in many places in the
world," he said.
The second tier of the market, the
international buyer, has actually
shown more vulnerability,-Mr
Roberts said.
"It isn't so much that people don't
have the money, but everyone is act-
ing with more caution, there's more
hesitation. We're talking about peo-
ple who could pay cash for multi-
million dollar properties.
"Now, instead of rushing into buy-
ing somethingjust because they feel
like they want to own a second or
third home, they are taking a wait-


and-see approach," he said.
Unlike countries that depend on a
single-tier local market, which have
been hit hard by the double blow
of the sub-prime lending crisis and
skyrocketing energy costs, the two-
tiered market of the Bahamas is still
attracting high-end buyers and,
although slowing, is continuing to
hold its own.
"We are unique in that regard that
we have the steady local market, so
if one side slows a bit, the other
helps steady it.
"And because the banks here
were more careful with lending, wve
did not end up in the crisis situation
that happened to others elsewhere,
especially in the US," he said.
This is not the first time Mr
Roberts has felt global gusts rock
the market.
"Historically, the Bahamas has
weathered these economic storms
fairly well and so long as the unem-
ployment rate does not climb sub-
stantially, our housing market will


remain relatively stable, providing a
solid underpinning for the econo-
my."
Mr Roberts was a presenter at the
International Real Estate Sympo-
sium in Rome recently, a meeting,
that attracted over 100 brokers,
managers, and real estate profes-
sionals from top real estate firms
and agencies around the world.'
All attendees were members of
LeadingRE.
"In an increasingly global mar-
ketplace, the need to build cross-
border relationships is more impor-
tant than ever," commented Lead-
ingRE president and CEO Pam
O'Connor.
"Giving our members the oppor-
tunity to meet and learn from one
another is an important part of our
global strategy."
Event sponsors included HGTV's
FrontDoor.com; The Ritz Carlton
Residences, Chicago; Palmera de
Cabarete Resort; Unique Homes
and The Wall Street Journal.


Alban Prjetcotius.tssppr


THE Bahamas Technical and Vocational
Institute (BTVI) construction department
is the recipient of a $7,000 book donation
presented by Albany vice-president Dr
Tyrone Mckenzie and president of the
Bahamas Contractors Association Steven
Wrinkle.
The donation, received by Dr Iva' Dahl,
manager and consultant at BTVI, will
enhance resources available for instructors of
the Construction Trade Programmes.
Instructors will benefit from books by the
National C.entre For Constructioti Educa-
tion And Research (NCEER).
"We know that additional resource mate-
rial will complement existing skills and


knowledge," said Dr Dahl. "Our students
will be the beneficiary of the technical
'resources.
"The books donated by the Albany Project
Will ensure that our students receive essential
information which will contribute to their
success in their programme of studies."
"This book donation demonstrates the
Albany Projects commitment to helping
BTVI's students reach their full potential
and will also aid our students in improving
their performance in the classroom and
equally important, increase their interest in
their programme of studies," Albany exec-
utives said.


IN MEMORIAL


forever in our hearts!


MRS. JESTINA M. ALLEN
Born: 5th April, 1918
Died: 20th October, 2006


MR. MARTIN A. ALLEN
Born: 19th August, 1938
Died: 21st December, 1998


0 light forever dawning beyond the
darkest night;
0 comfort of the mourning, our
strength and our delight; receive
our humble pleading for. those
whose course is run, lest pardon
they be needing for any evil done.


L


MR. HARRY HR ALLEN
, Born: 2nd August, 1912
Died: 8th November, 1985


MR. PITTMAN R. ALLEN
Born: 22nd February, 1944
Died: 2nd December, 2006

lb him who like the eagle arose
on conqu'ring wing, the cross
his banner regal, 0 death,
where is your sting?
There's surely no rejection for
those who share His strife,
but hope and resurrection
and everlasting life.


8


* THE ALLEN FAMILY *


British American Financial Breast Cancer Tip


Eating properly is important when undergoing breast cancer therapy. Treatments can cause fatigue, reduce physical
strength, and damage tissue. Patients usually suffer from a reduced appetite as a side effect of the treatment. Eating'fruits
and vegetables rich in vitamin C, high-protein foods like meat. beans, and dairy products, and carbohydrate-laden whole
grains for energy can help tremendously.

You can survive breast cancer. Early detection through regular breast self-exams and a regular program of
mammograr and physical exams are crucial steps that every woman should employ.


B\ British

BF M"AAmerican
F N A N I A i


Sabrina Deleveaux

41

Breast Cancer Survivor for 15 months


_____ BAHAMAS REAL ESTATE



RESIDENTIAL MARKET AS SAFE AS HOUSES

BAHAMAs REALTY CEO LARRY ROBERTS BUOYED BY RELATIVE STABILITY IN THE COUNTRY


ARM


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tatI-- _ ,


The.Trbune oservesBreas Cance Awareess Moth 21


-w4,


"









PAE8UiESDAYOTOBER2,2008THTRIBUNIll


Dredging
FROM page one
of the wharf area is aimed at
encouraging and facilitating
the entry of larger cruise
ships scheduled to visit Nas-
sau, beginning sometime
near the end of 2009.
This follows a recent
announcement from Florida
Caribbean Cruise Associa-
tion representative and
Royal Caribbean Cruise
Vice President Michael
Ronan, who confirmed that
there are more than 35 mod-
ern ships being constructed
by various cruise ship com-
panies, and many are
expected to frequent
Caribbean destinations,
such as the Bahamas.
"The dredging of the har-
bour will not interfere with
the current shipping. It's to
accommodate the larger
ships, and so the ships will
continue to come," said Mr
Deveaux in answer to fears
that ships now visiting could.
have docking difficulties.
In the meantime, howev-
er, "before the large cruise
ships come," said Mr
Deveaux, "a bigger Bohengi
will be here by the end of
the month, and is capable of
carrying up to 400 persons."
This, said the minister,
will give many tourists the
option of also visiting such
local destinations as Har-
bour Island, Exuma, and
Andros.
With this new expansion
phase set to transform this
"doorway" to Nassau, the
minister asked whether "the
onshore 'experience will be
here, will the quality of
experience be here?"
In his address at the open-
ing of National Port Week,
held at Prince George dock,
Mr Deleveaux challenged
tourism ministry partners to
"represent what we are and
who we are."
In his view, said the Min-
ister, far too often the expe-
rience that visitors have
here is in many ways gener-
ic. He believed that a unique
and all Bahamian experi-
ence would allow the indus-
try to survive in the current
market.


2WD 4-cylinder
engine has EPA,
ratings of 24mpg
city/30mpg
highway.


Row prompts threat


to teachers'


FROM page one

Bethel said these teachers will be dealt
with administratively as they have
failed to report to their posts.
"I can assure the Bahamian people
that the Department of Education, with
the full support of the Ministry, is
absolutely determined to ensure that
persons who serve according to the
guidelines of this service do so and if
they do not, appropriate steps will be
taken," Mr Bethel said.
Mr Bethel said the public service
rules have very specific provisions that
deal with what is refusal to obey law-
fully issued orders.
"There are very established proce-
dures and I am sure that the depart-
ment will, as indicated by the director,
take the appropriate steps," Mr Bethel
said.
Mr Bethel indicated that even in the
face of insubordination, there is still a
required due process as they cannot


salaries


allow any sense of grievance or hurt
feelings to override the practical imper-
ative of following due process.
"The Law is like a forest, and while
it may seem impenetrable, and itsways
seem obscure, at the end of the day it is
only by due process that any of us has
protection. So everyone, even the most
insubordinate public servant is still enti-
tled to due process," Mr Bethel said.
Breaking her'silence yesterday, one
of the teachers, Diana Hanna-Wilson,
denied claims that she and her sister
had been insubordinate or behaved in
a disruptive manner.
Speaking on ZNS News, Mrs Hari-
na-Wilson, who had held the position
of geography teacher at Central
Andros High School, claimed that the
Ministry of Education did not follow
the correct procedure in transferring
her to another school.
She said that she never received an
official transfer order from the Min-
istry. Mrs Hanna-Wilson added that


she will decline a transfer to North
Andros High for health reasons.
She explained that when she
* returned from her maternity leave in
2007 she found that her position at
Central Andros High had been made
redundant.
She said that-as.a Bahamas Union
of Teachers' shop steward she still
attended the school every day, although
she no longer had any teaching respon-
sibilities.
Meanwhile police in Fresh Creek,
Andros, are investigating a physical
confrontation that broke out between
the teachers' father, Rev Leroy Hanna,
and principal of Central Andros High
School Edward Rolle.
Mrs Hanna-Wilson's lawyer, Fayne
Thompson, yesterday said that the
claim that Rev Hanna assaulted Mr
Rolle is "a vicious lie."
"They spoke to each other, but at no
time was Mr Rolle assaulted," he
said.


The Court of Appeal hears of prosecution


discrepancies in case of convicted murderer


FROM page one


with murder after Kelly was
shot in the chest while in
Rose Close on June 26, 2003,
and died of his injuries later
that evening.
Witness Corporal Jason
Kelly, brother of the
deceased, claimed when he
was called to court for a sec-
ond time that his brother had
*named his assailant as
"Scalpie" when he. saw him
at the Carmichael Road
* police station before he died.
However, Mr Kelly had
made no record of hearing
this admission in a police
statement, nor had he men-
tioned-it-in his first court


appearance.
Dame Sawyer said: "There
is no right to recall a witness
once he has been excused;
that is unjustified.
"This is for want of a bet-
ter word, preposterous. In my
20 years of practice I have
never seen anything like this,
and as a prosecutor I would-
n't have dared to think of it."
Evidence given by Sgt Vic-
toria Dames, corroborating
Mr Kelly's statement, was
also scrutinised by Mr
Ducille as it was not recorded
immediately after the event.
The prosecution, repre-
sented by Franklyn Wilson,
also failed to establish when
and where Geren Kelly died,
creating inconsistencies in the


case and making it difficult
for Dame Sawyer to ascer-
tain whether the statement,
if accepted, was a dying dec-
laration.
The Appeal Court presi-
dent said the conduct of the
prosecution was unprece-
dented and the judge was
wrong to allow hearsay as
evidence without a clear
warning to the jury.
"It is simple things,"


she said.
"The problem with this
case is the only evidence w&
heard was this evidence of
Victoria Dames and Jason
Kelly, that they heard this
man say a statement identi-
fying this 'Scalpie' from Sun-
shine Park, but no one fol-
lowed through to check
where he lived."
Looking across to an
attentive Vincent Dean,


dressed in a red polo shirt
and jeans, Dame Sawyer
added: "You see, he may
very well be guilty, but if he
is that makes it ten times
worse because the judiciary
will be blamed, and we'll be
blamed if he has to walk
free."
Dean's family members
sitting at the back of the
court had only one comment:
"Freedom is a must."


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FROM page one

recognition with a clothing iron.
Only months later, well-known AIDS
activist Wellington Adderley was killed when
an assailant slashed his throat. The following
week Marvin Wilson, who police believed
fought for his life, was found at a scene washed
in his own blood, near his home. He was also
viciously stabbed to death.
The latest victim's sister, Micheala Whylly,
appealed yesterday, by local television, for
her brother's killer to turn himself or herself in.
She said that her family is conducting their
own investigation and already have an idea
who committed the murder.
Mr Whylly was found stabbed to death in a
white Honda Civic, which was found parked
near South Beach Pools. A passerby discov-
ered the former dancer's body and notified
police.
He was described by friends as a "likable"


person. He taught dance to children and some-
times worked as a substitute aerobics instruc-
tor at Mystical Gym in Palmdale.
"I didn't know his personal lifestyle and it
didn't matter to me, but he did some substitute
classes for me and he used my company to do
the lighting and the sound for his sho v at the
Shirley Street National Performing Arts The-
atre," said Derek Bullard, the owner of Mys-
tical.
According to Police Press Liaison Officer
Walter Evans, there has been no evidence that
people of a particular sexual orientation are
targets of violent acts.
However, gay activists in New Providence
have voiced their concerns that. this might be
the case, claiming that the attitudes towards
gays in the Bahamas are less than hospitable.
Last week Tribune reporters saw two sepa-
rate groups of men in the downtown area
shouting violent threats at a group of gay men.
"All ya'll sissies fer dead," the men shouted.
"F---- Faggots!"


RA Redesigned for more space


RAV4- Redesigned for more space


Police do not




suspect gay




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REWARD $10,000














REWARD FOR INFORMATION LEADING TO THE RECOVERY AND THE
ARREST AND CONVICTION QF THOSE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE THEFT OF
THIS YEAR 2002, 34.8 INTREPID, POWERED BY TWIN 2007 YAMAHA
250HP 4-STROKE OUTBOARD ENGINES


Please contact crime stoppers at: 328-8447 or 363-3011


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21,2008


THE TRIBUNE








TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21,2008, PAGE 9


TI-F TRIRI INF


'9 ~
4'",


'%-


New office and

shop opened.

by Torway

Construction

TORWAY Construction
celebrated the opening of its
new office and shop located
at the Airport Industrial
Park.
A Bahamian owned com-
pany, Torway Construction
specialises in the fabrication
and erection of heavy struc-
tural steel.
Joining in the festivities at
the grand opening were gen-
eral contractors; customers
,of Torway; executives of
DCM Erector, Canada; Tor-
way's sister company and
members of the C R Walker
Senior High School
Junkanoo Group, "The
Knights" the 2007/2008


Two beachfront lots on Paradise



Island are sold for $21 million


A LOCAL realtor has sold
what is believed to be the
Bahamas' most expensive per
square foot residential single fam-
ily lots ever.
Mario Carey. Realty recently
sold two beachfront lots on Par-
adise Islanid for $21 million.
Luxury market specialist
Mario Carey said that the Stamp
Tax on the sale of the two lois
was nearly $2 million,'paid in full
at the time of the sale.
"While this particular buyer
was not American, and the sale
was completed before the events
of the past few weeks, what we've
been seeing. recently despite the
financial markets fall-out is a con-
tinuation of the expectation that
the Bahamas' prime property
market is, at least for now, in a
class of its own," said Mr Carey.
Mr Carey, who opened the
doors of Mario Carey Realty on


Junior Junkanoo award win-
ners.
Torway supports the school
through "The Friends of C R
Walker Senior High School"
- a group of citizens that vol-


East Bay Street in May, said mena-
surable milestones are positive.
"Listings are corning in higher
than last year, those who are
interested are not casual buyers,
but serious, and there has been
no sign of interest in quick sales
or escapes from the market, just
the reverse," he said.
The level of buying activity,
he said, has taken him by sur-
prise.
"I've been in real estate in
Florida and the Bahamas for
more than 25 years, but with this
company being so new and to
already have a half billion dollars
in listings and have appraised
more than $125 million in prop-
erty in such a short time is amaz- -
ing," said Mr Carey, a broker with
certifications for sales, luxury
marketing and appraisals.
"I'm not sure how much is us
and how much is the market, but


unteers its assistance to the
students by mentoring and
aiding its department of
music.
Torway Construction offers
services such as crane rental;


I can say one thing for sure, if the
Bahamian market weren't so
strong, we would not be in the
position we are in today in this
office."
Last year, Mr Carey handled
the sale of the then most expen-
sive penthouse at the Reef, a 22-
story condo hotel on Paradise
Island built as a joint venture
between Kerzner Development
and Turnberry.
The penthouse sold for $7.6
million and re-listed a month lat-
er at $9.9 million. He was also
responsible for the most expen-
sive sale of a penthouse in Ocean
Club Residences and Marina at
$11 million and handled the sale
of baseball great Barry
Bonds' home in Ocean Club
Estates.
"There is a great shortage of
mid-level money, but there is no
apparent shortage of big money.


welding; standing seam roof
systems; gauge metal con-
struction;'pre-engineered
buildings; ornamental and
decorative railings and struc-
tural steel sales.


Mr Carey credits Kerzner for
creating the high demand-product
that buoys the New Providence


market along with enclaves like
Lyford. Cay, Old Fort Bay, Port
New Providence and Albany.


Accounts Clerk





A well established Company seeks an Accounts Clerk
with the ability to, but not limited to the following
duties:

Maintain Payables System
Maintenance of Inventory Spreadsheets
Prepare for and complete month end inventory
counts
Preparation of bank and other balance sheets
Reconciliations and various general ledger
/ accounts to sub ledger
Prepare Schedules to assist in External Audits
Assist in other duties falling within the
Accounts department where necessary

Candidates must possess the following skills:

Associates Degree in Accounting
Experience in Reconciliations
Experience in Accounts Payables would be
an asset
Excellent organizational and problem solving
skills
Proficient in Microsoft Office Products
particularly Excel.
Must be a team player and possess people skills

All Applications must be submitted by October 31st
2008.

.Apply to:

DA 68551
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box.N-3207
Nassau, The Bahamas


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E- u


I.NG so Under the Distinguished Patronage of pING so
Sir Clifford Darling, KT, GCVO, J.P. & Lady Darling, ,
SL; Bishop Samuel Greene, CMG & Mrs. Greene '

.. Zion Baptist Church, East & Shirley Streets
... will celebrate
50 Years of Continuous Ministry
of its 14th Bahamas Boys' Brigade Company
and honor the life & work of,


Captain.Fernley Palmer
The Longest Serving Boys Brigade Captain
in the Whofe Woral!
WITH A GOLDEN JUBILEE GALA BANQUET


7*_..









Under the Theme:
"I'd rather build a boy than mend a man"

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2008 7:30PM
at Sandals Resort, Cable Beach
Dress: Semi-Formal Ticket Cost: $80.00
RSVP: October 31, 2008 Church's Office 325-3556 / 328-5776

For 50 years Mother Zion through the medium of its 14th Company of Boys' Brigade, has positively
impacted hundreds of young men and boys throughout New Providence and the Bahamas. To God be all
the glory! The faithfulness of Almighty God is powerfully demonstrated through the life of Captain Femley
Palmer, as he has.served as the Company's Captain from its inception in November 1958 and continues as
its dedicated Captain to date. God has used Captain Palmer's service as a brilliant example of invincible
purpose, intense application, and indomitable perseverance. His commitment has received international
acclaim as the longest serving Boys' Brigade Captain in the entire world! He has devoted his life to fulfilling
the Object of the Boys' Brigade, which is "The advancement of Christ's'Kingdom among boys..." The
discipline and Christian values that Captain Palmer and his leaders have imparted, have not only caused
many young men to avoid lives of crime and destruction but have also given birth to numerous leaders
that hold key positions of influence and responsibility throughout our bejeweled Bahamas. His .life
purpose can best be summed up in his own profound mission statement: "I'd rather build a boy than
mend a man".
To celebrate this glorious, once in a lifetime, Golden Jubilee, a valuable Commemorative Booklet
has been created. All and sundry are encouraged to ensure that their contributions are included in
this historical Souvenir via, Advertisements, well wishes etc. by contacting the Church's Office
immediately.
ALL PAST AND PRESENT MEMBERS OP THE 14TH BAHAMAS COMPANY ARE REQUESTED TO BE
PRESENT AT THE WYNDHAM HOTEL, CABLE BEACH ON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2008 AT 6:00 AM
FOR A LIVE TELEVISION SHOW WITH CAPTAIN PALMER ON THE BAHAMAS AT SUNRISE
PROGRAM. MEMBERS MUST PURCHASE THEIR 50TH ANNIVERSARY T-SHIRTS BEFOREHAND TO
BE WORN ON THE LIVE SHOW BY CONTACTING CAPTAIN FERNLEY PALMER AT 328-8181.


I


--~---






PAGE 10, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2008


TUESDAY EVENING OCTOBER 21, 2008

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

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B WFOR n (CC) the killer of a marine. (N) 0 (CC) banker found murdered inside his teenage son of a Secret Service
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foot forward. visit. (CC) ment. (N) Ford. (CC)
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I C A(CC) SquarePants A SquarePants A ment ( (CC) ment f (CC) ( (CC) (C)
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Lucky Strike' has a bad date. (N) A (PA) (CC) (CC)
SPEED ass Time Unique Whips Lvin'the Low SuperCars Ex- uper Bikes! Super Bikes!
SPE _E .___ pLife posed
Perfect Weight Behind the J M r: John Hagee To- Precious Memo- Praisethe Lord (CC)
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TBS and Elaine dis- ousy rears its (CC) i teaches a sex-ed Stewie marries Michael has a Parking-lot evac-
cuss reuniting. ugly head.. class. (CC) his old friend panic attack. n uation.
:00)That's Got- A New Face For Marlie A young gii Mystery Diagnosis A 3-month-old Dr. G: Medical Ex'miner A couple
TLC a Hurt (CC) from Haiti has a growth in her boy has breathing difficulties. (CC) are found dead in a car in a church
throat (CC) parking lot. (CC)
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order "Hindsight" A murder Law & Order "Quit Claim"A mother Law & Order When detectives
TNT der Prejudice" victim is found in Falco's bathroom, and daughter are killed in a hit-and- robe a series of random murders,
A (CC) (DVS) n (CC)(DVS) run accident. (CC) (DVS) hey find a hit list. A
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Jail Jail Jall Coast" (CC)
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TV5 hlstolre .
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~__________~____"Titanic" Titanic.
(:Q0) Querlda Culdado con el Angel Marichuy es Fuego en la Sangre Hermanos Aquly Ahora
UNIV Enemiga una joven criada en un hospicio. buscan venganza.
(:00) NCIS "Enig- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit House House's diagnosis leaves a House "Kids" A meningitis scare
USA ma'" (CC) Benson and Stabler think two ath- pregnant woman with a.terrible overwhelms the resources of the
letes murdered a student. choice. A (CC) hospital. 0 (CC)
VH1 00) Scream Real Chance of Love n (CC) Rock of Love Charm School Rock of Love Charm School
1 ueens (CC) Sharon Osboume. 0 (CC) Teamwork. 0 (CC)
VS (:00) NHL Hockey Boston Bruins at Buffalo Sabres; From the HSBC Are- Hockey Central Sports Soup (N) Sports Soup
VS* na in Buffalo, N. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) A (Live)
(:00) 7th Heaven Nash Bridges Nash puts his vaca- Nash Bridges Lisa's eyewitness ac- WGN News at Nine (N) n (CC)
WGN (CC) tion and Kely on hold to pursue an count of a murder is questioned
important betting book. when no body is found. 0
Family Guy Pe- 90210 "Lucky Strike" Harry and Privileged Megan convinces Laurel CW11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX ter acts like a Debbie plan a family bowing night. to use the twins in her marketing Tong, Jim Watkins (N) (CC)
child. 0 (CC) 0 (CC) campaign. (N) n (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) Dr. Phil 0 (CC) WBZNews (N) That '70s Show Frasier"Adven- Frasler Martin's
WSBK (CC "Misfire" Kelso tures in Paradise" Russian clock.
gets a job offer. (CC) 0 (CC)
Costas NOW With Aaron & Mays I* x SHOOT'EM UP (2007, Action) Clive Owen, REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel
H BO-E Bob Costas interviews former pro- Paul Giamatti. A mysterious gunman must protect a (N) 0 (CC)
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(6:00) ** x BEE MOVIE (2007, Comedy) Voices of Jerry *s BECAUSE I SAID SO (2007) Diane Keaton,
H BO-P MEET THE PAR- Seinfeld. Animated. A bee decides to sue the human Mandy Moore. A meddlesome woman tries to find the
ENTS (CC) race for the theft of honey. A 'PG' (CC) perfect man for her daughter. 0 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:45) t FANTASTIC FOUR: **K THE SEEKER: THE DARK IS RISING (2007, (15) Costas NOW
HBO-W RISE OF THE SILVER SURFER Fantasy) lan McShane. A boy discovers he is part of a hangeling: With Aaron &
(2007) loan Gruffudd.'PG' (CC) group of immortal warriors, 'PG' (CC) HBO First Look Mays (CC)
15) HANGING UP (2000, Comedy-Drama) Meg ** THE HEARTBREAK KID (2007, Comedy) Ben Stiller, Michelle Mon-
H BO-S yan. Caring for her ailing father drives a woman to aghan, Jerry Stiller. A man meets his true sou mate after marrying a beau-
distraction, A'PG-13' (ul shrew. 'R' (CC)
(;15) *** SUPERMAN RETURNS (2006, Adventure) Brandon Routh, Kate Bosworth, *** IAM LEGEND (2007) Will
MAX-E James Marsden. The Man of Steel faces an old enemy. 0 'PG-13' (CC) Smith.Bloodthirsty plague victims
.surround a lone survivor. 'PG-13'
S(:15) *A THE JACKET (2005, Science Fiction) * IN THE VALLEY OF ELAH (2007, Drama) Tommy Lee Jones,
MOMAX Adnen Brody, Keira Knightley. An amnesiac has flash- Chariize Theron, Jason Patric. Premiere. A retired Army sergeant probes
backs and visions of the future. A 'R' (CC) his son's disappearance. 0 'R' (CC)
(6:00) **%4 THE ** HANNIBAL RISING (2007, Suspense) Gaspard Ulliel, Gong Li, He- Dexter "All in the Family" (iTV) Sin-
SHOW MAN WHO WAS- lena ia Tachovska. iTV. Trauma endured during World War II warps cere proposal. 0 (CC)
N'T THERE young Hannibal Lecter's mind. n 'R' (CC)
6:30) SILENCE **s THE FACULTY (1998, Honor) Jordana Brewster, Clea DuVall, Lau- I'LL ALWAYS KNOW WHAT YOU
TMC ECOMES YOU ra Harris. High-school students suspect that their teachers are aliens, DID LAST SUMMER (2006, Horror)
(2005) 'R' (CC) 'R' (CC) David Paetkau. 0 'R (CC)


Letf C a,'lie thke
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110nonl of Octobei 2008.


Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.


i'm lovin'it


love Gift Cert ifi

SLmake great gifts!


THE TRIBUNE


0orNA




L'P







TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2008, PAGE 11


THE COLINAIMPERIAL


INSURANCE LTD

invites tenders for the purchase of.-


ALL THAT piece, parcel or lot of land situate in the
Subdivision called and known as Yamacraw Shores
Subdivision having the number (99). Single Family
Residence. Property size: 8,221 sq. ft. Building size:
2,596 sq. ft. Three (3) Bedrooms & Two and a half (2
1/2) Bathrooms.
Colinaimperial Insurance Ltd. will sell as mortgagee
under power of sale contained in a Mortgage dated
28th day of September, A.D., 2004.


ALL THAT piece, parcel or lot of land situate in
the vicinity of Johnson Road in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence and
having the Number 5 in the Valentine's
Extension Number 2 Subdivision.
The Subject Property consist of the following
accommodations:- (3) 1 Bed Room Apartments
each with Living Room, Dining Room and
Kitchen. (2) 2 Bed Room Apartments each
with Living Room, Dining Room and Kitchen.
Colinaimperial Insurance Ltd. (formerly Imperial
Life Financial) will sell as mortgagee under
power of sale contained in a Mortgage dated
30th. Day of November, A.D., 1990, stamped
and recorded in Volume 5548 at Pages 90 to
114.


ALL THAT piece, parcel or lot of land
situate in the Subdivision called and
known as Vista Marina Subdivision
having the Lot number seven (7) in
Block number sixteen (16) situated in
the Western District in the Island of
New Providence. Residential Property
size: 10,500 sq.ft. Building size: 4,970
sq. ft. The subject property is a four
bedroom, two bathroom single storey
dwelling.
Colinaimperial Insurance Ltd. (formerly
Colina Insurance Company) will sell as"
mortgagee under power of safe
contained in a Mortgage dated 30th-
day of July, A.D., 2003.


,,.. p-.

.


a...


ALL THAT piece, parcel or lot of land
situate in the Subdivision called and
known as South Beach having the
number thirty (30) in Block number five
(5). Single family residence-Property size:
6,364 sq. ft. Building size: 2,133 sq. ft.
Three (3) Bedrooms &Two (2) Bathrooms.
Colinaimperial Insurance Ltd. (formerly
The Canada Life Assurance Company) will
sell as mortgagee under power of sale
contained in a Mortgage dated 28th day
of March, A.D., 2001 stamped and
recorded in Volume 8157 at pages 395
to 417.


I



jII~


.


ALL THAT piece, parcel or lot of land situate in
Section Three (3) of the Subdivision called and
known as Sea Breeze Estates having the
number Seventeen(17) in Block Number
Thirteen (13).
The Subject Property consist of the following
accommodations :- (3) Bedrooms, (2)
Bathrooms, Kitchen, Living Room, Dining
Room and Utility Room.


Colinalmperial Insurance Ltd. (formerly
~ . .Imperial Life Financial) will sell as mortgagee
under power of sale contained in a Mortgage
dated 19 day of September, A.D., 1984
stamped and recorded in Volume 4154 at
_Pages 357 to 377.

Colinaimperial Insurance Ltd. reserves the right to reject any and all offers.
Interested persons may submit written offers in a sealed envelope
addressed to General Manager, Mortgage Operations,
P 0 BOX N-3734, NASSAU BAHAMAS
to be received no later than the close of business on
November 30th, 2008.


4.


4 41


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WIMIIMNWI


~a~Bsss~BsrsP~a~


'


THE TRIBUNE


3.


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P








PPAGE 12. TUESDAY. OCTOBER 21, 2008


TRIBUNE SPORTS


m


Jets hand Pros

their first loss

FROM page 15

from Jets' quarterback Drameko
Clarke for a 45-yard TD.
But the Pros, with veteran
Michael Foster at quarterback,
missed the extra two-point conver-
sion that could have tied the score
at 88.8
Instead, the Pros trailed 8-6.
I Orry J Sands came back on a
,(three-yard run from running back
Charlie Edwards that put them
2-ahead 12-8 as they once again
bmnissed the extra two-point conver-
o'ion.
gn However, it was short lived as
31knowles came through down the
Oktretch as the-Jets' new coach and
former Pros' player Obie Roberts
I-elebrated the huge.victory.
1s.i' "I was a little more happier for
Mthe players on the Jets than for
nite," Roberts said. "This was the
first time that they ever beat the
wpros and so I had a chance to watch
-ithem celebrate.
-7'. "It was an up hill battle for them
14ha.t they struggled with for a long
sfime. I saw a lot of old Jets who
-)were there 15-20 years ago when I
Started playing. So they were there
faelebrating too."
Despite the loss, Roberts said
bhe's confident that the Pros are too
stWfull of pride" to allow the loss to
dret them down or discouraged.
dll, And, he said, the "next game we
dplay them, it will be a very good
classic."
t, Whether they duplicate it when
they meet again, Roberts said the
Pians know now that the Jets are
.for real" and they are going to be
,t".a force to reckon with" in the
League this year.
n" "From this point forth, we will
continueue to improve. We only just
-scratched the surface. We have to
ngo back to the drawing board and
aZvork on both sides of the ball. But
we have a lot of depth, speed and
J'size."
dt" Roberts, who got a different per-
sspective on the opposite side of the
-field, said the victory was for the
-iJets of yesterday, the Jets of today
- and the Jets of the future."
Said it was a "bitter-sweet moment
ifor me because I'm a Pro inside
l'and out," but they have the
YStingrays on Sunday and they will
be looking to redeem themselves.
-' On Saturday, the Jets will hope
to climb- to-3-0, as they face the
'Kiigdd6m Warribrs:Gamee time on
both days is 1pm. "


., ,.FA


Transfiguration beats Macedonia


17-AND-UNDER
TEAMS W L Pct. GB
Faith United 2 0 1,000
Macedonia 2 1 .666 1/2
Temple Fellowship 1 1 .500 1
Golden Gates 1 1 .500 1
New Bethlehem0 3 .000 11/2
Co-Ed
Macedonia 2 0 1,000 -
Temple Fellowship 1 1 .500 1
Golden Gates 1 1 .500 1 -
Transfiguration 0 1 .000 11/2
Faith United 0 1 .000 -11/2
Men's Division
Calvary Deliverance 2 0 1,000
Shaw AME Zion 2 0 1,000
Transfiguration 1 0 .1,000 1/2
Macedonia 2 1 .666 1/2
Temple Fellowship 2 1 .666 1/2
Golden Gates 1 1 .500 1
"Calvary Bible 1 2 .333 11/2
Faith United 0 1 .000 11/2
St. Paul's 0 3 .000 11/2
New Bethlehem- 0 3 11/2


November 7th & 8th


TRANSFIGURATION
handed Macedonia its first loss
of the season during the Baptist
Sports Council's '08 Rev Dr
William Thompson Softball
Classic at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex on Saturday.
Transfiguration, who hold the
men's title, pulled off an 8-5
decision for a 1-0 win-loss
record, while Macedonia
dropped to 2-1.
In other men's games played,
Calvary Deliverance improved
to 2-0 with a 17-8 win over Faith
United (0-1).
Shaw AME Zion also stayed
unbeaten at 2-0 with a 14-8 vic-
.tory over Golden Gates (1-1)
and Temple Fellowship (1-1)
blanked New Bethlehem (0-3)
13-0.
In the lone co-ed game
played, Golden Gates are 1-1
with' a 17-14 slugfest over Faith
United (01).
And in the 17-and-under divi-
sion, Macedonia improved to
2-1 with a 13-6 win over Golden
Gates (1-1) and Faith United
(2-0) held on for a 18-13 tri-
umph over New Bethlehem (0-
3).
Transfiguration 8, Macedo-
nia 5 (Men):
Eddie Russell was 3-for-3
with a solo home run, scoring
twice; Nelson Farrington was 2-
for-3 with a RBI and run
scored; Reynaldo Russell 2-for-
3 with two RBIs and Van "Lil
Joe" Johnson had a solo homer
to lead Transfiguration.
Alvin Lightbourne got the
win over Harold Fritzgerald on
the mound.
For Macedonia, Cardinal
Gilbert was 2-for-3 with a RBI
and two runs scored and
Michael Thompson and Sandy
Morley were both 2-for-3 with
Thompson driving in a run.
Golden Gates 17,
Faith United 14 (Co-ed):
Nicara Curtis had three hits
with a RBI and two runs scored


and Ramon Johnson, Renee
Davis and Randy Wallace all.
had two hits and two runs with
Wallace driving in a mate for
Golden Gates.
Junior Moss got the win on
the mound over Collin "Trop-
py" Knowles.
Theodore Sweeting was 3-for-
4, missing the cycle with a two-
run homer, RBI triple and a sin-
gle. Dawn Forbes had two hits
with three runs; Christine
Edmunds was 2-for-4 with two
RBIs and two runs and Kenvon
Sands had one hit, scoring three
times.
Shaw Temple AME 14,
Golden Gates 8 (Men):
Darren Stevens had a perfect
3-for-3 day with a RBI and two
runs scored; Garfield Bethel
had two hits with two RBIs and
a run scored and Andy Per-
centie scored three times for
Shaw Temple.
Edwin Culmer got the win
over Junior Moss, who came in
relief of starter James Robin-
son in the first inning.
Angelo Dillett had two hits
and scored three runs and
Ramon Johnson had one hit
with a RBI, scoring three times.

Calvary Deliverance 17,
Faith United 8 (Men):
Brad Wood Sr had three hits
with two RBIs, scoring four
runs; Brad Wood Jr was 2-for-4
with two runs; Clayton Rolle
had two hits with two RBIs,
scoring two runs and Sidney
Curtis had two hits with a RBI,
scoring twice.
Brad Wood Jr was the win-
ning pitcher and Collin Knowles
got the loss.
Leslie Darville was 3-for-4
with four RBIs and a run scored
and Theodore Sweeting had
one hit with a RBI and two runs
in the loss.
Temple Fellowship 13,
New Bethlehem 0 (Men):
Manzaro Hepburn had the


first grand slam for ,the season;
Kurth Stubbs was 2-for-2 with a
solo homer;, Addie Finley had
two hits, scoring two runs; Her-,
bie Brown had two hits, scor-
ing a run and Brian Armbris-
ter had two hits with three runs
in the win.
Alfred Munnings got the win
over Dale Clarke.

Macedonia 13, Golden Gates
0
(17-Under):
D'Kyle Rolle went 2-for-3,
scoring two runs and Bernard
Ferguson 2-for-4 with two runs;
Kyel Rolle 3-for-4 with a run
and Quintin Williams 2-for-3
with.two runs in the win.
Walter Bell was the winning
pitcher and Daneko Carey got
the loss.
Giovanni Willie had one hit
with two runs scored and Kayle
Carey was 2-for-3 with a run
scored in the loss.
Faith United 18, New Beth-
lehem 13
(17-under):
Kenvaughn Saunders had a
two-run and solo home runs;
Stephen Russell was 3-for-4
with a solo homer; Ashton
Aliens was 3-for-4 with three
RBIs and three runs and DeAn-
gelo Cartwright had two. hits
with three runs in the win. ,
Cartwright was the winning
pitcher over Nacara Bullard.
Omar Beckford missed the
cycle with a RBI single, three-
run homer and a triple; Rayon
Cartwright had one hit with
three runs and Kyle Bodie had
two hits with three runs in the
loss. "

Due to the Bahamas Soft-
ball Federation's Austin
Knowles High School Tourna-
ment this weekend at Baillou
Hills, the BSC has moved their
games to the Charles W Saun-
ders High School, Jean Street
on Saturday.
Here's a look at
the schedule:
10am Calvary Bible vs
Shaw AME Zion (M)
11am Calvary Deliverance
vs Transfiguration (M)
Noon Faith United vs Tem-
ple Fellowship (M)
1pm Golden Gates vs
Macedonia (M)
2pm Transfiguration vS Cal-
vary Bible (M)










FROM page 15
more of the seasoned box-
ers will be fighting.
In the main event,
Valentino McPhee will take
on Rashell Williams in the
junior welterweight division
(141 pounds) and in the
light-heavyweight division,
Godfrey Pinder will face
Maxsina Gordean in a semi-
final bout.
"We should be having a
very exciting show on Sat-
urday as we wrap up the L
Garth Wright show," Minus
Jr projected.
The action will get under-
way at 5pm.


CC Sweeting students shine





MEMBERS of C C ..
Sweeting Senior High -
School's volleyball
teams wearing
medals and holding..
trophies can be seen
with their coaches... l








SHOWN (I-r) are
Valentino Williams, PE A .
teacher Andrew Tynes E
and Derick Marriot
who took part in the .
first road race for the
season. Williams
placed second and
Marriot came fourth...
OUTSTANDING PLAYERS Volleyballers (I-r) Jaleel Deems (best
.. center, Fresnel Vassor (best passer) and team captain Gabi Laurent
(most valuable player) can be seen with their awards...


'04 NISSAN MURANO

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2008, PAGE 13


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Flacco and Ravens beat Dolphins Budefeat the


* By STEVEN WINE
AP Sports Writer

MIAMI (AP) With the Ravens
defense swarming and the ground game
clicking, Joe Flacco looked a little less
like a raw rookie.
Flacco had his best game yet in the
NFL on Sunday, throwing for 232 yards
and one touchdown without a turnover
in the Baltimore Ravens' 27-13 win
over the Miami Dolphins.
"He was too relaxed back there,"
Miami linebacker Joey Porter com-
1lained.
Flacco hardly looked like the shaky
quarterback he has often been this sea-
son. He completed 17 of 23 passes, and
a rating of 120.2 was by far his highest.
"There's a little bit of a roller-coast-
er ride to an NFL season with a rookie
quarterback," Ravens coach John Har-
baugh said. "There are going to be dips,
but hopefully it will be an ascending
ride."


While their young passer showed
signs of improvement, the Ravens
broke a three-game losing streak to
keep pace with NFC North leader Pitts-
burgh (5-1).
"This was going to make or break
our season," said Terrell Suggs, who
returned an interception 44 yards for a
touchdown.
"When you lose three or four games
in a row, players are only human, and
they stop believing. We've got guys
believing."
They're believing a little more in
Flacco, and in new offensive coordina-
tor Cam Cameron.
Cameron orchestrated four scoring
drives against the team he coached to
only one win in 2007. Mindful of his
history in Miami, the Ravens gave him
a game ball.
"This is going to go home to my wife
Missy and to my kids, because it's a lot
tougher on them than it will ever be
on us coaches," Cameron said in the


locker room, his eyes watery and his
voice breaking. "That's why it's a little
emotional.... When you give your heart
and soul to something and it doesn't
work out, some of that pain comes
back."
Cameron's offense mounted scoring
drives of 42, 67, 67 and 68 yards. Balti-
more totaled 140 yards rushing, includ-
ing 105 by Willis McGahee on 19 car-
ries.
The NFL's top-ranked defense did
the rest, rebounding from a 31-3 drub-
bing at Indianapolis a week ago. The
Ravens limited Ronnie Brown to 27
yards rushing, and they blitzed to con-
tain Miami's Wildcat offense, which
netted only four yards in five plays.
"They're one of the top defenses in
the league, and it showed," Brown said.
"They had an answer for a lot of things
we were doing."
The Dolphins fell to 2-4 and
remained last in the AFC East.
Baltimore frequently went with no


huddle, and the quick tempo worked
for Flacco. He led four scoring drives of
nine plays or more and threw only his
second touchdown pass this season, an
I -yarder to Derrick Mason.
"I don't think the offense could have
played a better game," Suggs said.
"It was really fun," Flacco said. "It
was good to go out there and get anoth-
er win under our belts."
Miami fell behind early in part
because two first-half drives inside the
Baltimore 10 ended with field goals.
"That hurt," guard Justin Smiley
said. "When you get down there, you
have to punch it in. If you do that, it's a
different game."
Those missed opportunities early
allowed the Ravens to build a lead and
play keepaway. They ran the ball 24
times in the second half, when they had
possession for nearly 19 minutes.
"This game," Miami defensive end
Vonnie Holliday said, "played out
exactly how they wanted it to."


Williams beats Pennetta




to win the Zurich Open


* By GRAHAM DUNBAR
Associated Press Writer

ZURICH, Switzerland (AP) -
Venus Williams won the Zurich
Open on Sunday for her second sin-
gles title of the season.
Williams beat Italy's Flavia Pen-
netta 7-6 (1), 6-2 to take the tourna-
ment she last won as a teenager in
1999.
The win should seal the 28-year-
old American's place at the season-
ending WTA Tour Championship
in Doha next month. She also won at
Wimbledon this year.
"I love the pressure," Williams
said. "I need it in my life.
"It is great to come here and play


my best tennis of the week in the
final against someone who is playing
as well as she is."
Pennetta had upset top-ranked
Jelena Jankovic in the second round
and went in with a 3-1 career record
against Williams after beating her
in Moscow last week.
"She just played unbelievable
today," the 17th-ranked Pennetta
said.
I. 'It is tough to play against some-
one who serves like she did today. I
didn't have any chance to make any
breaks."
The first set stayed on serve, with
neither player allowing a break point
opportunity.
Williams dominated the tiebreak-


er, racing to a 6-0 lead. Pennetta
saved one set point but then netted
a backhand.
Williams created her first break
chance at 1-1 in the second set, and
Pennetta netted another double-fist-
ed backhand.
In the, next game, Williams deliv-
ered four straight aces.
"I have never had one of those
games before," she said. "That was
obviously a great moment."
Serving at 5-2, Williams let her
first match point slip away when she
allowed a backhand from Pennetta
to pass her, thinking it would land
long.
A forehand winner created a sec-
ond chance, and her next serve was


too powerful for Pennetta to han-
dle.
Williams said she would return to
Florida before the Nov. 4-9 Tour,
finale in Qatar.
"I will go home and rest a little
bit and continue to prepare and get
ready for Doha," she said.
Williams is expected to climb one
place to No. 8 when the new WTA
rankings are published Monday;
Pennetta hopes to rise three spots
to a career-best 14th.
The 26-year-old Italian was try-
ing to become the third player to
beat Williams for a fourth straight
match. Only Serena Williams and
Lindsay Davenport have achieved
the feat.


Texans earn second straight victory over winless Lions


* By CHRIS DUNCAN
AP Sports Writer

HOUSTON (AP) Andre
Johnson dominated, Calvin
Johnson disappeared and the
Houston Texans kept the
Detroit Lions winless.
The Texans scored touch-
downs on their first three pos-
sessions, then hung on in the
second half to earn their sec-
ond straight victory, 28-21 on
Sunday. Detroit (0-6) matched
its worst start since 2001, when
it dropped its first 12 games
and finished 2-14.
Andre Johnson, the Texans'
two-time Pro Bowl selection,
caught 11 passes for 141 yards,
his third straight 100-yard
game. Tight end Owen Daniels
scored two touchdowns and
rookie Steve Slaton and
Ahman Green added a touch-
down each.
Calvin Johnson, the Lions'
first-round draft pick in 2007,
had a career-high 154 receiving
yards but only two catches, one
of them a 96-yarder that cut
Houston's lead to 28-18 in the
fourth quarter.
Detroit was playing its first
game since trading Pro Bowl
receiver Roy Williams to Dal-
las and coach Rob Marinelli


credited Houston's defense for
taking Johnson away.
"A couple of times, the cov-
erage rolled to him. A couple
of times, our protection broke
down," Marinelli said. "We
know we've got to get the ball
to him. Sometimes, the cover-
age dictated that the ball
would go in a different direc-
tion."
Andre Johnson, meanwhile,
caught eight passes for 95
yards in the first half, when
Houston's offense clicked as
well as it has all season. Matt
Schaub completed 16 of 18
passes and Slaton and Green
combined for 97 yards as
Houston (2-4) built a 21-0 lead.
"The whole week we were
saying we wanted to come out
and play our best football,"
Johnson said. "We did that for
a half."
Slaton broke a 37-yard run
on the game's third play and
Schaub found Daniels wide
open in the end zone for the
Texans' first touchdown in the
first quarter this season.
Zac Diles sacked Dan
Orlovsky on Detroit's second
play and the Lions couldn't get
a first down and punted.
The Texans moved to the
Lions 17 and cornerback Leigh


Bodden was called for pass
interference trying to cover
Johnson in the end zone to set
up first-and-goal. Green scored
on second down, his first
touchdown this season.
"We were explosive coming
out of the game," said Hous-
ton coach Gary Kubiak. "We
talked about starting fast and
we definitely did that."
The Lions have been
outscored 54-0 in the first
quarter and neither Marinelli
or his players can pinpoint why
they start so poorly.
"It's a weird dynamic," said
Orlovsky. "I don't know what
it is, but it needs to change.
When we play, we're pretty
good."
Schaub found Daniels for a
25-yard gain to the Lions 15
on Houston's third possession.
Slaton carried six times for 29
yards on the drive and finished
it with a 1-yard run, his fourth
touchdown of the season.
The Lions had no yards
passing until a 25-yard recep-
tion by Mike Furrey with
about 9 minutes left in the first
half. That drive stalled and
Jason Hanson made a 54-yard
field goal.
Houston was on the verge
of scoring again when Schaub


was sacked by Dewayne White
and fumbled inside the 10.
Calvin Johnson caught a 58-
yard pass on the resulting dri-
ve, but time ran out before the
Lions could convert.
Schaub was sacked by Cory
Redding on Houston's first
series after halftime and the
Texans punted for the first
time. Rookie Kevin Smith had
a 21-yard run to the Texans
26, then broke a tackle and
scored on the next play to
make it 21-10.
Kubiak felt like Schaub's
fumble turned momentum.
The Texans are minus-9 in
turnover margin this season.
"It seemed like that
turnover right before the half,
almost like it puts back in
everybody's mind, you know,
here it comes again," Kubiak
said. "We kind of played that
way the rest of the way."
The Texans got a favorable
call later in the third quarter
that kept alive a 15-play scor-
ing drive.
Schaub dove into the pile on
fourth-and-1 from the Lions 3,
and Marinelli challenged the
spot. After review, officials
moved the ball slightly and
measured again, but still said
Schaub had made the first


down.
Schaub threw another short
touchdown pass to Daniels to
put Houston up 28-10.
The Texans punted early in
the fourth quarter, pinning the
Lions at their own 4-yard line.
Calvin Johnson ran past the
Texans' defense and caught a
perfect pass from Orlovsky
and scored. It was Detroit's
longest pass play since 1998
and the fourth longest in team
history.
Marinelli said the Lions
called other plays for Johnson,
but Orlovsky said Houston's
defense was always ready.
"Teams are obviously doing
some good things against him,"
Orlovsky said. "I've got to try
to get him the ball more."
Hanson kicked another 54-
yard field goal with 4:17 left.
The Texans held the ball until
there were just 20 seconds to
go and Detroit's last play end-
ed in a fumble.
Houston cornerback Dunta
Robinson had two tackles in
his first game since sustaining
severe knee and hamstring
injuries almost a year ago.
"It was emotional," Robin-
son said. "My dad told me I
better not cry on TV, so I
made sure of that."


Seahawks

20-10

* By MARK WANGRIN
Associated Press Writer

'TAMPA, Florida (AP) Jeff
Garcia has his touch back. His job,
too.
Garcia completed 26 of 37 passes
for 310 yards, including a 47-yard
touchdown strike to Antonio
Bryant on Tampa Bay's opening
drive, and the Buccaneers beat the
struggling Seattle Seahawks 20-10
on Sunday night..
Making his second straight start
in place of Brian Griese, Garcia
helped the NFC South-leading
Bucs (5-2) remain unbeaten
through four home games.
Garcia clearly outplayed fellow
backup-turned-starter Seneca Wal-
lace, the Seahawks' third quarter-
back in three weeks. Garcia was
14-of-17 by halftime, helping the
Bucs take a 17-0 lead, and the out-
come was never in doubt. He was
sacked once and completed passes
to 10 different receivers.
Bucs coach Jon Gruden said
Garcia will continue to start. The
38-year-old Garcia made his fourth
Pro Bowl last season, his first with
the Bucs, but lost the starting job
earlier this season.
"His mobility was a factor
tonight, and he created a.lot of
opportunities running and throwing
for a lot of people," Gruden said.
Wallace, meanwhile, never got
rolling. He finished 12-of-23 for 73
yards, with a 2-yard touchdown
pass to John Carlson with 1:55 left,
and had two turnovers-in the sec-
ond quarter. Maurice Morris ran
for 56 yards for Seattle (1-5) in its
third straight loss.
"Our confidence on offense isn't
where it should be," Seattle coach
Mike Holmgren said. "Now we
have to keep them going, some-
how, some way, and get that oonfi-
dence we used to have."
Bryant finished with 115 yards
receiving, and Earnest Graham
added a 1-yard touchdown run for
the Buccaneers, a fitting up-the-gut
score on a night where Tampa Bay
honored retired fullback Mike
Alstott with a halftime ceremony.
"It was a great night for a great
player," Graham said. "It was a
pleasure to be a part of it."
Alstott sees plenty of similarities
between himself and Graham, who
switched to fullback last week.
"He can do a lot. He's versatile.
He's a team player," Alstott said.
"When he gets an opportunity he
makes the best of it and, if he does-
n't get the opportunity, he doesn't
complain about it. That's what wins
championships."
So does defense, and Tampa Bay
was strong there again.
The Bucs entered the game hav-
ing given up an NFL-low three
touchdowns in 11 trips inside the
20, and held Seattle to a TD and
field goal in two trips into the red
zone. Tampa Bay had a 402-176
edge in total yards, and forced the
Seahawks into settling for a 26-yard
field goal by Olindo Mare in the
third quarter on a drive to the 8-
yard line.
Tampa Bay controlled the ball
for nearly 42 minutes.'
"The thing about it was we were
tough against the run, and we knew
that with a young quarterback, they
were going to have some timing
issues throwing the ball downfield,"
Bucs end Kevin Carter said.
The Bucs got their longest pass
play of the season to open the scor-
ing, the 47-yard hookup from Gar-
cia to Bryant who hadn't caught
a TD pass since Dec. 3, 2006.
Graham's score capped a six-
play, 59-yard drive to give Tampa
Bay a 14-Q lead midway through
the second quarter. Matt Bryant
added two field goals for the Bucs.
There was a scary moment early
in the second quarter, when Seattle
linebacker Leroy Hill delivered a
hit that injured two players -
including teammate Lofa Tatupu.
Tampa Bay wide receiver Ike
Hilliard made a catch around the
Seattle 5, with Tatupu dragging him
from behind. Hill came from the
front, slamming into both, and
Hilliard crumbled to the turf in
such a way that teammates began
instantly waving to the sideline for
medical assistance.
"You never want to see that hap-
pen," Hill said.
Hilliard who fumbled was
driven off in a cart, but sat up for
the ride. Gruden said he had a con-
cussion and would be hospitalized
for observation overnight. Tatupu
had a concussion, and because the
play was blown dead, Seattle felt
it was denied a chance to run the


fumble in for a touchdown.
"It was a factor in the game,"
Holmgren said.
Notes: Bucs halfback Warrick
Dunn left the game with a back
injury but Gruden said he expects
him to play next week at Dallas.
Tatupu was "foggy" but other-
wise all right, Holmgren said. Seat-
tle is hopeful QB Matt Hasselbeck
can return next Sunday to face San
Francisco.








PAGE 14, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2008


2008 FINANCIAL SERVICES '


EXCELLENCE A .

EXECUTIVE OF THE YEAR FINA (





EXECUTIVE OF THE YEAR FINALLY


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,, .I-n ,










TH E T R I B U N E PAG E 1


Venus
Williams
wins Zurich
Open...
Seepage 13


ES D A Y, OCTOBER R 2 1 2i) S


Jets hand
Pros their
first loss in
40 games

* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
THE John Bulls Jets avenged
a big loss in last year's champi-
onship game to keep their win-
ning form alive as they snapped
the Orry J Pros' streak.
. In the second weekend of the
Commonwealth American
Football League, the Jets hand-
ed the Pros a tough 14-12 loss
on Sunday at the DW Davis
playing field, handing them
their first defeat in 40 games.
Once again Reggie Knowles
stepped up big, catching the
clutch 19-yard pass to seal the
victory for John Bull, just as he
did in the fourth quarter in their
second opener against Defense
Force Destroyers on October
5.
Orry J Sands was holding a
12-8 lead over John Bull at that
point in the game when quarter-
back Drameco Clarke connect-
ed on the pass to Knowles with
about three minutes left on
fourth down and 12.
On Saturday, the Porky's
Stingrays defeated the Defense
Force Destroyers 24-6.
In their game, John Bull
struck first in the game as run-
ning back Valdez Bodie had an
11-yard run in the second quar-
ter for the game's first touch-
down. He also scored the extra
two-point conversion for an 8-0
lead.
In what turned out to be a
hard hitting defensive game, the
Pros got an interception from
Ricardo Hamilton on a pass
SEE page 12


k 4 2 G 2 Boxing show
SparPls cpush Giants 40W12ase


* By RENALDO
DORSETT
Sports Reporter
T he defending
champions of the
Catholic Arch-
diocesan Primary
School basketball tournament
served notice on the opening
day that their return to the
championship series should
be widely expected.
The St Thomas More
Sparks began the tournament
with a dominant performance
in their 40-12 win over the
Xavier's Giants.
Opening the tournament at
home, the Sparks turned a sti-
fling half court trap into
instant offense as they raced
out to a 10-0 lead by the end
of the first quarter.
Sparks" center Joel Morris
dominated on both ends of
the floor with his tenacious
rebounding, which resulted in
fast breaks to finish adeptly
around the rim on offense.
Morris finished with 12
points, 15 rebounds and four
blocks, all team and game
highs.
The Sparks opened the sec-
ond quarter with a new line-
up. And Sebastian Gray
picked up where Morris left
off.
Gray opened the second
quarter with a needle-thread-
ing assist to Randy Forbes,
and finished %with eight points.
Forbes also added eight
while team captain Deajour
Adderlev finished with nine
for the Sparks.
The Sparks widened their
margin to 26-0 before the
Giants' Tyrell Curry made a


GETTIN' UP St Thomas More Sparks' Joel Morris dunks the ball with


power after a fast break yesterday...
baseline jumper with under
20 seconds remaining in the
second quarter.
The St Thomas More half
court trap continued to net
turnovers %which translated
into easy baskets on the other
end of the floor.
The Sparks took a 33-6 lead
heading into the fourth quar-
ter and. with both benches
cleared. cruised to an eas\
win.


Curry finished w ith six
points while Tra'vis P att fin-
ished with foui to tlic Giants.
Nkomo Ferguson. head
coach of the Sparks, said this
year's team and its quick start
bears many similaities to the
107 team.
"It does not feel an\ differ-
ent from last \ear...we ha\e
most of our guis returning."
he said "All we hate to do is
step up on our defense just a


little better. It was a little slop-
py in the first quarter but we
t ill conic around when we get
to the bigger teams."
Ferguson said he expects
his team to be one of the top
teams in the league once
again based on the amount of
returning talent and experi-
enced leadeiship.
\\'e plan to go straight to
the tinals.. De ljoui is an'
excellent captain this \ear and
\we ha\e I co-captain." he
said -So %ith them all togeth-"
er I do not see us losing any
games this Near."
Giant'" head coach Nelson
Joseph said hi_, team must'
return to the drawing board,
but he was proud of the effort
by hli less experienced play-
ers
"We ha\ e to go back to the
basics, lay-up,., free throws,
defense. Overall, I think they
played %\ell...for some of them
it a1 their first game they
hae e\er played in and they
were playing a\\ay from home
too.
"I think it w\\s a good e\pe-
rience for some of
them...O\erall. I hae to gie
St Thomas More credit and
hopeful\ our team will
bounce back." he said. "'\e
lost quite a few player-, I \as
looking for some ,,t m\ older
players ti .,call\ itkeo\er
toda. but I guce.s they were
nervous themselves. This ai-,
rebuilding year for us."
The tournament continues
on October 22 with the Sti
Francis and Joseph Shockers
traveling to face the St Cecil-
ia Strikers and the Our Lad\'s
Blue Flami : \. ill take on St
Bede s at home.


SUCCIS31 LII


FIRST Class Promotions'
kicked off the 15:h annual 1,
Garth Wright Golden Glo\cs
Boxing Tournament on S.ituir-:
day at the Baillou Hills Sporning
Complex with six matches con-
tested.
Rotavieo Adderley pulled,,if
a.third round dec is lin ii .e
Chadson Joseph and Ja\ aughn',
Cornish won over Don Rolle Il!
three rounds.
However, Adderle\ and.
Rolle were matched in a later.
bout with Rolle securing the.'
win.
In other matches. Michael
Bethel won in three rounds o\ er"
Reno Lloyd. Richard Sheldon
upset Rudolph Polo in three'
rounds and De\on King'
stopped Andino Simms in a
third round technical knockout
The show got a big boost as;
Dr Norman Gay, a past minister'
of sports and past chairman of
the Bahamas Boxing Commis--
sion, was in attendance.
"We had a very'successtul
show, even though we onl\ did.
some matches," said First Class;
coach Ray Minus Jr. --This Sat-
urday, We are looking for some'
more keen matches.
"We were very excited and,
happy to have Dr Norman Gj\.
at the show. I tbdrft r.-all'
gave us \g boo..
The show was sponsored b\,
the D'Albenas Agenc\ Limit-,
ed.
While boxers bet\we' n the'"
ages of 10-14 participated in
Saturday's show, Minus said.
they expect to ha\e the"
Carmichael Knockout Boxin'-
Club competing on Saturid as.'
SEE page 12


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WSC pumps more than $500,000



to improve water supply to North



Eleuthera & Harbour Island


MINISTER OF STATE IN THE MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT Phenton Neymour
along with WSC personnel Robert Deal, assistant general manager for the Fam-
ily Island and Marine Operations, and Gregory Johnson, senior manager of
Eleuthera Operations.


MINISTER of State in the Ministry of Environment Phenton Neymour and
WSC assistant general manager for the Family Island and Marine Oper-
ations Robert Deal tour the Harbour Island well field. They are standing
beside the refurbished tank with a storage capacity of 250,000 gallons.


MINISTER of State in the Ministry of Environment Phenton Neymour
inspects the new pumps installed for the Harbour Island well field.


Eleuthera
IN April of this year, a town meeting was held in
Harbour Island, Eleuthera, to address residents'
water supply issues. As a result of that meeting, the
government gave the Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration (WSC) a mandate to formulate and pro-
ceed with initiatives to correct the problems.
Seven months later, Water and Sewerage deliv-
ered on the government's commitment. On Friday,
October 10, Minister of State in the Ministry of
Environment Phenton Neymour along with WSC
personnel Robert Deal, assistant general manager
for the Family Island and Marine Operations, and
Gregory Johnson, senior manager of Eleuthera
Operations, toured the well fields and inspeLted the
new pumps, generators and equipment, and report-
ed on the significant progress that had been made.
Supplying water-in an archipelago like the
Bahamas with its unique geography always car-
ries a range of challenges. As a result of rapid
development that has surpassed the available util-
ity infrastructure, Harbour Island and other com-
munities, over the years, have faced a number of
issues regarding the groundwater resources. Some
of the challenges have included identifying new
systems to provide better quality water and replac-
ing the old pipes, keeping up with the changing
technology to keep up with population growth
and the changing habits and use of water. ,
Harbour Island's water supply is pumped from
North Eleuthera. Minister Neymour said that the


Corporation has launched a number of initiatives
in North Eleuthera, recognising that the related
water distribution system was in need of some
improvements.
"We began by performing a number of electrical
works to automate the well fields in North
Eleuthera. We also improved the back-up gener-
ation, so if there were challenges with the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC) supplying the elec-
tricity, we would have sufficient electricity for not
only the pumping station, but also in the well
fields," the minister of state said. He also noted that
the Water and Sewerage Corporation completed
the improvement project on time in April of this
year.
Another area of concern raised in the April
town meeting was the inadequacy of water storage
facilities on Harbour Island. The storage tank,
Minister Neymour said, was taken out of commis-
sion three years ago due to excessive leaks, and
rehabilitation works were carried out this year.
That initiative is now completed and the refur-
bished tank with a storage capacity of 250,000 gal-
lons is presently in service.
Mr Neymour emphasised the uniqueness of the
Harbour Island water supply system, noting that it
originates in the Bogue well fields in North
Eleuthera and is carried to its destination by an
underwater pipeline.
"It is therefore critical that there is storage on
both islands, so that if there are any interruptions
in water supply, there is adequate water in storage


for the consumers, The installation of the storage
tank will also minimise the fluctuation of pressure
on Harbour Island," he said.
"In addition to improving the well fields and
providing additional storage, we have brought in
new equipment to assist the Water and Sewerage
Corporation, we brought in a-new backhoe, pumps
- to improve storage arid other equipment to help
to address any challenge and consumer complaints
in an aggressive manner," he added.
Cost of improvements
"It has cost us in the Bogue well field, (to put in
the storage tank, to automate the electric system),
some $350,000," the state minister said
"On Harbour Island the storage tank rehabili-
tation was another $200,000. We felt that we got a
pretty good'deal from the contractors, in terms of
the rehabilitation works and their progress has
been up to par. We are pleased with it."
Member of Parliament for North Eleuthera
Alvin Smith expressed his delight at the progress
that the WSC has made in a bid to improve its
service to the people of his constituency. I
S"I am tremendously pleased with the concerted
efforts of the Water and Sewerage Corporation
as it relates to correcting the problems that we
have had in the North Eleuthera constituency. It's
not just one dimensional problem, we have had
a myriad of problems in this'constiruency. "!
"If there is a problem pumping the water across,


Harbour Island now has its own generator,
attached to its own water tank. to ensure that the
residents hate a constant flow of water. It's a wel-
come solution, it's a needed solution, and I am
happy that the Water and Sewerage Corporation
showed the le\el of concern that we expect," he
added.
NMr Neymour announced that Current Island
was next in line for water system improvements.
-"We are now going to proceed with works on
Current Island, we are going to put in a new
reverse osmosis system there and put in pipelines,
we hope to hate that project completed within
the next year," Mr Nevmour said.
"The groundwater, due to development and the
rate of development, is being depleted, so we are
faced with challenges of finding new systems to
provide better quality water.
"At the present time we use reverse osmosis,
\ which is very expensive, but at this time it is very
necessary, in order to provide good quality water
at the international standards that they are required
to be."
In conclusion Mr Neymioiur. sid, "Over the last
year we have improved our services to the people
for Eleuthera and we will continue to do so, we
were mandated by the government, and we
promised to do so.
"We are concerned about their situation and
we are working very hard to alleviate whatever
challenges they may have in regards to their water
services."


PAGE 16, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21,2008


THE TRIBUNE













THE I I I



bus


ness


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2008

. .L '. A' '. . h -, ,., ',. *.;: .
:.":I-- '::;., ,ir. :-:-&A ? f- : ,' :" .


.- ,.... ../.':.,,...
, ,


$250m waste-energy plant




in 10% power supply goal


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

Bahamas Waste is
partnering with
international
companies in the
construction and
operation of a proposed $250
million waste-to-energy facility
for New Providence, with plans
to initially produce 10 per cent
of BEC's nationwide electricity
demands and earn this nation
"millions of dollars" from car-
bon credits.
Len Enriquez, president of
Cambridge Project Develop-
ment Inc, which is partnering
with Bahamas Waste in the NP
Renewable Ltd consortium,
said the technology they "exper-
tise and proven technology"


* BISX-listed Bahamas Waste partners with international firms
on proposal that could earn 'millions' from carbon credits
* Project to generate power from 200,000 tonnes of municipal waste per year
* 20% of capital budget on air emission controls,
with financing interest from IDB and Citibank
* Equity participation from Bahamian investors
sought in venture that aims to create 40 jobs


they planned to bring to the
proposed New Providence plant
was already in use in 400 similar
commercial-scale facilities
across the world.
Mr Enriquez said the plan,
submitted in response to the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion's (BEC) renewable ener-


gy request for proposal (RFP)
tender, would generate elec-
tricity from converting the
200,000 tonnes of municipal sol-
id waste deposited at the
Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway every year some' 600
tonnes per day into renewable
energy.


"Our goal is to provide 10 per
cent of the Bahamas' kilowatt
hour power requirements, and
go up as the tonnage [of waste]
goes up," Mr Enfiquez said.
"Our approach is to utilise all
tle municipal solid waste cur-
rently being landfilled at the
[Harrold Road] landfill."


He told Tribune Business that
the "controlled combustion,
waste-to-energy" facility would
require start-up capital invest-
ment "in the order of $250 mil-
lion". The plant, like the rival
biomass energy proposal sub-
SEE page 4B


'Final' Insurance Act

regulations under review


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Registrar of Insurance's
Office is reviewing the "final
draft regulations" for the long-
awaited Domestic Insurance
Act over "over the next few
weeks", with the legislation's
- implementalion set to "-**'.wmIl-
cantly beef up" the industry reg-
ulator's powers.
Lennox McCartney, the Reg-
istrar of Insurance, in an e-
mailed reply to a series of Tri-
bune Business questions, told
this newspaper: "The Domes-
tic Insurance Act, once imple-
mented, would significantly beef
up the powers of the office.
"We are reviewing the final
draft regulations over the next
few weeks to finalise these reg-
ulations. The timing of imple-


mentation would then be up to
the Government.
"Some other technical sup-
port would also be needed. The
Government has budgeted for
the.necessary technical support
in its 2008-2009 Budget. This
support will be engaged with
the implementation of the new
legislation."
The Domestic Insurance Act
was passed by Parliament back
in 2005-2006, but it has never
been implemented and put into
effect because the accompany-
ing regulations needed to give
it enforcement teeth have not
been completed and laid on the
House of Assembly floor.
The Act, seen as necessary to
modernise the Bahamian insur-
ance industry and its regulation,
was also held back by the for-
mer PLP administration due to
concerns over whether the Reg-
istrar of Insurance's Office had
the supervisory and adminis-
trative capacity to oversee the
legislation's requirements.
Apart from upgrading the
Registrar of Insurance's Office
to an Insurance Commission,
with enhanced regulatory and
enforcement powers (including
sanctions), the Act will also
imposed tighter solvency and
capital ratio requirements.
Meanwhile, Mr McCartney
took issue with a Tribune Busi-
ness article published on Octo-
ber 10, 2008, on the captive and
external insurance industry, and
the Bahamas' prospects for
regaining market share in this
sector.
The Registrar said it was "not
the, case" that "it could take
nine months to obtain a captive
licence in the Bahamas", or that


SEE page 5B


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Telecoms 'void' on dispute resolution Contractor Bill


. By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor
A "void" in Bahamian
telecommunications laws and
the Government's sector poli-
cy has forced the industry reg-
ulator to create its own p'oli-
cies and procedures to deal
with disputes between rival
operators.
The Public Utilities Com-
mission (PUC), in its public
consultation document on dis-
pute resolution procedures said
that while the Telecommuni-
cations Act empowered it to
deal with disputes between
competing carriers, and the
Telecommunications Sector
Policy did similar, they did not
address the 'how' element.
The PUC said: "The Act is
otherwise silent about the prin-
ciples and procedures the PUC
should employ to resolve any
complaint or dispute.
"This differs markedly from
the state of affairs in many oth-
er countries. In the US, Cana-
da, the UK, the European


Union countries and even the
Cayman Islands, national (and
in the EU countries, the EU)
legislation recognizes the
importance of, and address,
dispute resolution procedures."
The consultation document
said that in response to its pro-
posed guidelines to govern
interconnection agreements
between Bahamian telecoms
carriers, "one of the common
threads" dominating licensee
responses "was the need for
the PUC to provide detailed
procedures for processing dis-
putes".
"Because of the void in the
legislation and sector policy,
the PUC must create its own
quasi-legislative procedures to
address inter-operator dis-
putes," the regulator said.
"There is no formal, docu-
mented dispute handling pro-
cedure in place'now for
.breaches of licensing or regu-
latory conditions. Since intro-
ducing alternative telecoms
service providers in 2002, the
PUC has dealt with complaints


individually, without any for- .
mal procedures for affected
parties to follow that is, appli-
cations, time periods have
varied from case to case.......
"It is clear the successful res-
olution of such disputes in a
timely and efficient manner is
the key driver for ensuring
competition flourishes in the
telecommunications sector and
the benefits of that competi-
tion accrue to the Bahamian
consumer."
Before the PUC was created
and the telecoms sector liber-
alised, all telecoms-related dis-
putes would have been dealt
with between BTC and its cus-
tomers, since the former was
a monopoly.
The PUC added that the
code of practice for resolving
customer complaints, which
was built into every licensee's
licence, was key because "in a
liberalised market, customer
care will become a key differ-
entiation consideration for
competing operators and this
will benefit the consumer".


'critical for JV

partnerships

U By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor
THE Bahamian Contractor
Association's (BCA) president
yesterday told Tribune Business
that he hoped the Bill to regu-
late the industry would be ready
to go to Cabinet by Christmas,
saying its passage was vital to
enabling Bahamian firms to
establish joint ventures with
their foreign counterparts on
major projects.
"The position of the Bill at
the moment is that it's at the
Ministry of Works," Stephen
Wrinkle said. "They have
received it from the Attorney
General's Office, and we're
waiting on a copy of it.
"Tliey'%e [the Attorney Gen-
eral's Office] included all the
SEE page 6B


ROYAL i FIDELITY
Money at Work


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Key

subdivision

ruling

appealed

By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor
Attorneys representing,
the purchasers of lots in real
estate transactions deemed
'illegal' by a Supreme Court
judge have appealed the
verdict to the Court of
Appeal, challenging a rul-
ing that had major implica-
tions for subdivision devel-
opers and property buyers.
Three separate appeals
against Justice John Lyons'
ruling on a contract dispute
involving a 40-acre subdivi-
sion in Exuma were filed
'with the Court of Appeal
earlier this month, all list-
ing as one ground of appeal
SEE page 2B


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coordinating a team of experienced Senior Desk Heads and Client Advisors

We are searching for an individual with the following qualifications:

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* Excellent communication and presentation skills
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Human Resources,
P.O. Box N-7757,
Nassau, Bahamas

It starts with you.


M By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter
EXUMA'S main town is
operating as a one-and-a-half
to two-star destination despite
the island's attempts to offer a
five-star tourism product, and
is in desperate need of an over-
haul, something that will be dis-
cussed at the third annual Exu-
ma Business Outlook scheduled
for later this week.
Taking the theme The Real-
ity, The Vision, The New Direc-
tions, conference organiser Joan
Albury, President of The Coun-
selors, said yesterday she was
convinced of Exuma's econom-
ic potential, and sees the one-
day event as an opportunity to
help Exumians develop a vision
for their island.
"This may require doing
some things we've never done
before in Exuma, or doing some
things we've done before but
doing them differently," Mrs
Albury said.
Chester Cooper, British
American Financial's chief
executive and president, said
there had to be a repositioning
and reshaping of George Town,
which was operating as a one-
and-a-half to two-star island
destination, rather than a five
star.
He said the time had come
to seek out new opportunities to
develop the island.
Randy Butler, the newly-
appointed chief executive and
president of Sky Bahamas, will
address the challenges impact-
ing the aviation industry.
Mr Butler explained that his
airline was being impacted not
only by the rise in fuel costs,

RULING, from 1B
that the judge "erred in law and
in fact" on his understanding of
the Private Roads and Subdivi-


Airline sasUisaefe
on airrat.ars, eycocern


SHOWN (1-r) are Rochelle -Newbold, environmental project manager at
Albany House, Joan Albury, president of the Counsellors Ltd, I Chester
Cooper, CEO and president of British American Financial, and Captain
Randy Butler, CEO and president of Sky Bahamas.
(Photo: Timothy Clarke/Tribune Staff)


but also through the increase in
operational fees imposed by the
Nassau Airport Development
Company (NAD).
Mr Butler said the new fees
have been a real challenge, par-
ticularly as it relates to the pay-
ment of fees to the US for air-
space regulation. This means
that Sky Bahamas is paying the
US thousands of dollars to fly
over the Bahamas, the com-
pany recently paying the US
$74,000 in air space dues.
Mr Butler said Sky Bahamas
had also been impacted by the
new Customs duty rates. Air-
line parts, which would previ-
ously have been cleared at a
duty rate of 7 per cent, are now
clearing at 45 -per cent a major
difference.
Mr Butler said insurance for
airlines, as it relates to the com-
pany offering international ser-


sions (Out Islands Act).
Justice Lyons had ruled their
purchases 'illegal' on the
grounds that developers cannot
sell lots without their subdivi-
sion having full approval from
the Ministry of Works. Permit-
ting.them to do so in the
absence of such approval, he
ruled, would breach the Pri-
vate Roads and Subdivisions
Act.
The Mackey & Moxey law
firm, acting for two purchasers
.of lots in the proposed 125-lot
Willard Heights subdivision,
Rev Dwight McArthur Bowe
and Nancy Bowe, alleged as
another ground of appeal that
Justice Lyons should not have
found that the plaintiff, Oceania
Heights Ltd, "had the right to
challenge" their lot purchases
"when there was no privity of


vices, also needed to be exam-
ined. He explained that this was
one area where Sky Bahamas
was having difficulty because
the Bahamas had the same
requirements for flights coming
in as the US.
Also scheduled to speak at
Exuma Business Outlook are
Wendy Craigg, Governor of the
Central Bank of The Bahamas;
Reginald Smith, president, Exu-
ma Chamber of Commerce;
Lynn Gape, deputy executive
director, Bahamas National
Trust; Rochelle Newbold, envi-
ronmentalist; and Dionisio
D'Aguilar, president of the.
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce.
The third annual Exuma
Business Outlook will be held at
the Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort in Exuma on.Thursday,
October 23.


contract' between them and the
latter.
The same ground of appeal
was also relied on by attorneys
for another purchaser,;Peter'
Burrows. Like Mackey and
Moxey, they put forward two
more grounds of appeal that
Oceania Heights "acted with
full knowledge" of their trans-
actions with the original subdi-
vision developer; and that
Oceania Heights itself allegedly
sold lots in 2003 prior to receiv-
ing its own subdivision approval
in 2005.
On the latter ground, they
alleged that Oceania Heights
had "therefore acquiesced in
the terms of the contract"
where they acquired the lots the
previous developers, Willard
SEE next page


.,-
..7" .,. "-


.09 -I .


Last Name:_____


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Requested Start Date:


Y OF THE TRIBUNE AND WAKE UP TO THE BEST NEWSPAPER FOR YOU!!


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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2008


THE TRIBUNE












Bahamians urged to curtail spending this Christmas season


* By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
A PERSONAL financial expert yes-
terday encouraged Bahamians to cur-
tail their spending as the Christmas
holiday season approaches.
Chester Cooper, British American
Financial's chief executive and presi-
dent, said that while some persons are


hopeful the recession will go away, the
reality is that the Bahamian economy
will experience some challenging times
well into 2009.
Noting that the end of the year is
when people make travel plans to do
Christmas shopping and remodel and
refurnish their home, Mr Cooper said
it would be wise to do less and plan a
budget-friendly holiday


"I think people must pay close atten-
tion to their spending and may want to
scale back on spending this Thanks-
giving and Christmas," Mr Cooper
said.
He encouraged persons not to over-
extend their credit, purchase higher-
end items that may not be necessary,
and to generally make a conscious
effort to spend less.


However, Mr Cooper also pointed
out thatit was not at all gloom and
doom on the economic front, as reces-
sions often created millionaires.
"For those who have managed their
affairs, and have saved food for the
famine, there are tremendous oppor-
tunities for investment," he added.
Mr Cooper said there were a number
of homes that have gone into foreclo-


sure, and were thus on the market at
much lower prices than appraisal value,
creating a buying opportunity. People
are also trying to downsize and will
put their homes on the market for sub-
stantially lower prices.
Therefore, Mr Cooper said this was
also a good time for persons and com-
panies with the financial means to
make sound and lucrative investments.


RULING, from 2B

Clarke Enterprises, had sold to
them.
Both the Bowes and Mr Bur-
rows are asking the Court of
Appeal to overturn Justice
Lyons' ruling and reinstate their
real estate purchases.
The case revolves around the
proposed 125-lot Willard
Heights subdivision, situated
half a mile north of Moss Town
in Exuma. Some 11 lots were
sold in the subdivision prior to
full Ministry of Works approval,
and in contravention of the law,
something that caused problems
when the plaintiff, Oceania
Heights Ltd, attempted to pur-
chase the subdivision from its
original developer, Willard
Clarke Enterprises Ltd.
Justice Lyons recorded that
attorneys for the defendants
argued that because the con-
veyances for the 11 lot sales had
been completed, they should be
allowed to stand.'
In the Willard Heights case,
Oceania Heights and its presi-
dent, Anthony Thompson,
agreed to buy the 40-acre site
from Willard Clarke Enterpris-
es on September 25, 1995.
However, Mr Thompson
found that agreement was
"void" due to the illegal lot
sales, and wrote to Willard
Clarke Enterprises in Decem-
ber 1995 to argue that the sales
agreement should.not include.
the 11 lots already sold.
A new sales agreement was
reached in January 1996, in
which no reference was made
to the 11 lot sales. It was agreed-
that Oceania Heights would
-indemnify Willard Clarke
Enterprises against any claims :
by the purchaser up to $35,000.
Oceania Heights completed
payment for the land, and
obtained full subdivision
->approval. from ,the Ministry, of.,
Works' on November 1, 2005.


Yet it has not received the con-
veyance for the land purchased.
Willard Clarke Enterprises,
though, had conveyed the 11
lots already sold to the buyers in
February-March 2000, causing
Oceania Heights to go to court
to obtain an order that it com-
plete the conveyance. It also
sought a declaration that the
previous sales were void.
Lockhart & Munroe, attor-
neys for Willard Clarke Enter-.
prises and three other buyers,
cited many of the same appeal
grounds as the attorneys for the
SEE page 6B


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PUBLIC AUCTION


By Order of
The Bahamas Development Bank
Cable Beach, Nassau, The Bahamas
Commonwealth of The Bahamas


I. G. STUBBS WILL SELL


WHAT:


Eleven (11) assorted used vssels as set out in the
schedule below:


MAKE/MODEL


NAME


1990 34' Offshore Vessel
1977 53' Defender
1992 45' Defender Vessel'
1989 48' North Carolina
1979 52' Hatteras Fibre Glass Vessel
1980 47' Garcia
1981 51' Defender Vessel
80' Custom Steel Hull Vessel
94' Steel Hull Gulf Coast Shrimp Trawler
1980 with two (2) Volvo Diesel Engine


122' Single Screw Steel Hull (1960)


Der Berry's
Shabak
Liminos

M.V. Buddy
Miss Quality
Equality
Lady Kristy


LOCATION


Potters Cay
Potters Cay
Potters Cay
Coral Harbour
Arawak Cay '
Potters Cay
Owner/Andros
Owner Possession


Sweet Charlotte Owner Possession,
Morgan Bluff
Andros
M.V. Lisa III Bradford Marine


Freeport
LOCATION: Potters Cay Dock Nassau, The Bahamas
TIME: 1:00am Saturday, October 25th, 2008 Preview and Inspection from 9:00am Until Auction time at
the site.
TERMS: ALL items to be Sold Where-Is As Is for Cash, Cashier' Check or current Bank Guarantee Letter.
Purchase will not be released until paid for in full not later than 4:00pm Tuesday, November 4th, 2008. Where
a deposit is required, the same is non refundable. If final payment is not made by 4:00pm Tuesday, November
4, 2008 any and all deposits made will be forfeited.
Any and all Notices or amendments'by Auctioneer on said Auction Day whether written or verbal shall supercede
this or any subsequent advertisement.
For further information contact L G. Stubbs at 322-2028 or Fax: 328-8086 or Email: igstubbs@coralwave.com
or
Bahamas Development Bank
At (242) 327-5780/ 702-5730/702-5724
Or Fax 42) 702-5730 email: BahamasDevelopmentBank.com
I.G. STUBBS
PUBLIC AUCTIONEER LICENSE #0360
t' I


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supervision, time requirements. References are required, and helpers
with their own tools is a plus.

Please send your resume and references to the Warehouse Manager,
via fax, email or in person:

Attn: Craig Rahming
Prime Bahamas
crahming@primebahamas.com
fax: 394-0282


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Ferrari-Carano / Parking at Queen's College


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Fontana Candid
Robert Mondavi
Lindemans
Cloudy Bay
Moet & Chandor


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General Public $20
Children U-12 free
Children over 12 $10



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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2008, PAGE 3B


kpl

cu


THE TRIBUNE


~






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2008


$250m waste-energy plant in 10% power supplygoal


FROM page 1B
mitted by Plasco Energy Group,
would be based near the landfill
site, on a six to 10-acre site close
to BEC's existing transmission
lines.
Mr Enriquez said NP Renew-
ables' project, if it received the
go-ahead from the Government
and BEC, would create about
40 jobs. "Initially, we'd have
some expatriate workers- for
training purposes, but after four
years it would be 100 per cent
Bahamian," he explained.
"We'd have managerial posi-
tions plant managers, assistant
plant managers, supervisors.
Those are good paying jobs,
because the whole facility would
be very automated and will
have a lot of machines, requir-
ing technicians and mainte-
nance personnel.


"We're looking at 60 per cent
of the $250 million being equip-
ment. Over tens of millions of
dollars will be invested into
equipment that has to be main-
tained. There's no manual sort-
ing of the waste or anything like
that."
Mr Enriquez said municipal
solid waste was "matter that is
very high in renewable bio-
mass" potential, with some 90
per cent of the 200,000 tonnes
of waste currently being land-
filled in New Providence annu-
ally consisting of items, such as
wood and paper, that could be
combusted without any harm-
ful air emissions.
"The fuel is 90 per cent bio-
mass renewable, and therefore
the project should qualify for
significant carbon credits," Mr


Legal Notice
NOTICE


CEDAR CONES LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of CEDAR CONES
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


ORANGE HILL GROUP LTD.




Notice is hereby. given-that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International "Business Compa-
nies Act 2000, the dissolution of ORANGE HILL
GROUP LTD. has been completed;' a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


AIRE BOURNE VENTURES INC.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of AIRE BOURNE
VENTURES INC. has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


SANTA DONNA S.A.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Compa-
nies Act 2000, the dissolution of SANTA DON-
NA SA. has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.


Enriquez said. "The value of
carbon credits could be very sig-
nificant. All those carbon cred-
its are worth millions of dol-
lars."
Project

The NP Renewables project
could generate carbon credits
in three ways, he explained.
When waste was disposed of in
landfills, it decomposed anaer-
obically and produced methane
gas, which was harmful to both
the environment and global
warming.
Some 25 per cent of the
world's methane gas emissions
came from landfills either flar-
ing off or not dealing with it,
Mr Enriquez explained, adding:
"The waste being produced


through our plant will not create
methane. We're actually elimi-
nating many, many tonnes of
methane."
He estimated this amount to
be equivalent to 140,000 tonnes
of carbon dioxide, with one
molecule of methane being 23
times' more harmful to the
Earth's atmosphere than that
product. As a result, some
140,000 tonnes of carbon credits
were potentially available from
avoiding the disposal of waste in
the Harrold Road landfill.
In addition, Mr Enriquez said
the NP Renewables plant would
avoid "30,000 net tonnes of car-
bon dioxide" emissions per year
by replacing the oil BEC cur-
rently bums to produce its exist-
ing electricity.
Finally, there were "25,000


Legal Notice
NOTICE


GROSDEAUD LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
GROSDEAUD LTD. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


BURNT OAK LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Com-
panies Act 2000, the dissolution of BURNT
OAK LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE-


POLYTEC INVESTMENT HOLDING
LTD.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of POLYTEC INVESTMENT
HOLDING LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


MGS INVESTMENTS LTD.


Nhnc-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of MGS
INVESTMENTS LTD. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


tonnes of carbon credits that
will come from the ferrous met-
als being recycled from the
waste".
Mr Enriquez added: "This
project is going to be based on
World Bank standards for envi-
ronmental controls. There will
be computerised combustion
controls, and air quality con-
trols will be 20 per cent of cap-
ital investment.
Depending
"Depending on how quickly
the initial steps are done in
breaking ground, we could be
operational in 2012 or 2013."
Mr Enriquez expressed con-
fidence that financing the NP
Renewables proposal would not
"be any problem", as the group
had received project-specific let-
ters of interest from the Inter-
American Development Bank
(IDB) and Citibank's Nassau-
based Global Corporate and
Investment Bank.
"We also expect a number of
local partners to come forward
with equity participation," Mr
Enriquez said. "There will be
substantial lbcal private entities
that could take up equity posi-
tions in NP Renewables."
In addition, NP Renewables
would not charge a tipping fee
or any fee associated with waste
and garbage handling, instead
simply looking for an electricity
sales price that enabled it to
cover costs and generate a
return on its investment.'
Mr Enriquez said he had per-
sonally been involved with
renewable energies since 1989,
and was responsible for the
operation and expansion of six
waste-to-energy facilities in
North America.
His company, which has
offices in Barbados and Florida,
is involved in the existing phase


one of a waste management
project in Barbados which, next
year, will move to phase two
construction of a waste-to-ener-
gy facility for that Caribbean
island.
NP Renewables' technology
partner, Swiss-based Von Roll
Innova, was last month selected
to build the UK's largest waste-
to-energy plant, which will be
operational by 2011, while
Canada-based Stantec Interna-
tional is working on the site
plan and how it interacts with
the landfill.
NP Renewables would
finance, build, own and oper-
ate the proposed plant, of which
some 400 similar facilities exist
in Europe. Another 90 waste-
to-energy plants are in opera-
tion in North America, Mr
Enriquez said, and 100 in Asia.
He added that the NP
Renewables plant would be
operational "90 per cent" of the
time, unlike solar, wind and
wave-generated renewable
energy, which relied on the sun,
wind and tide respectively.
"The facility will improve air
quality in the area of New Prov-
idence, because it will offset
16MW of oil generation," Mr
Enriquez said, "and it will help
to prevent landfill fires in the
future."
The more electricity renew-
able sources can produce inter-
nally for BEC, the more stable
and secure this nation's energy
supply, with the Bahamas hav-
ing greater control over energy
costs by becoming less reliant
on oil imports.
The Bahamas' 'foreign
exchange reserves would also
be protected by less reliance on
fossil fuel imports, with BEC
having already projected that it
will spend about $350 million
in foreign currency on-fuel sup-
plies in 2008.


Legal Notice
NOTICE


OPPORTUNITIES DRAGON LIMITED.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of OPPORTUNITIES DRAGON
LIMITED has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


CENTURY GREEN INTERNATIONAL
LTD.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of CENTURY GREEN
INTERNATIONAL LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice


NOTICE


INZO INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
16th day of October 2008. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


ARGOSA CORP. 1 IC.
(Liquidator)













Realtor encouraged by Bahamas market stability


. LARRY ROBERTS, Bahamas Realty's chief executive, addressed the Inter-
national Symposium of the Leading Real Estate Companies of the.World
(LeadingRE). Shown in the front row (1-r): Ruth Ann Pepple, LeadingRE
president, Network Services; Benedetta Vigano, Giorgio Vigano SRL,
Italy; Beverly Sunn, Asia Pacific Properties, Hong Kong. Back row: Michael
Green (chairman), Harcourts, Australia; Larry Roberts, Bahamas Realty,
the Bahamas; Jose Ribes Bas,' Inmobiliaria Rimontago, Spain.,


THE relative stability of the
Bahamian real estate market
has further encouraged a lead-
ing realtor, following an inter-
national conference where he
heard tales of property woes
aplenty.
Larry Roberts, Bahamas
Realty's chief executive,
returned to Nassau comforted
after attending the annual
meeting of LeadingRE, a net-
work of the world's top 700
high-end real estate firms.
Although real estate markets
in countries such as the US,
Spain, Italy and Ireland are all
suffering from reduced proper-
ty sales, falling prices and
depressed conditions, the Rome
conference renewed Mr
Roberts' faith in the Bahamian
market.
"The Bahamas market is a
two-tier market," said Mr
Roberts, a member of the Inter-
national Advisory Board of the
LeadingRE network.
"Although there are notable
exceptions, with many Bahami-
ans owning homes that are
worth well over $1 million, the
basic local market covers prop-
erties up to about $750,000, and
that market has, to date, held
up quite well.
"If people start to lose their
jobs here, we will begin to feel
a drop-off, but right now, our
local market is far stronger than


residential markets are in many
places in the world."
The international segment of
the Bahamian real estate mar-
ket has shown more vulnera-
bility, Mr Roberts added.
"It isn't so much that people
don't have the money," he said.
"But everyone is acting with
more caution; there's more hes-
itation. We're talking about
people who could pay cash for
multi-million dollar properties.
Now, instead of rushing into
buying something just because
they feel like they want to own
a second or third home, they
are .taking a wait-and-see
approach."
The two-tiered Bahamian
real estate market, although
slowing, is still attracting high-
end buyers and continuing to
hold its own.
"We are unique in that we
have the steady local market,
so if one side slows a bit, the
other helps steady it. And
because the banks here" were
more careful with lending, we
did not end up in the crisis sit-
uation that happened to others
elsewhere, especially in the
US," Mr Roberts said.
"Historically, the Bahamas
has weathered these economic
storms fairly well and so long as
the unemployment rate does
not climb substantially, our
housing market will remain rel-


atively stable, providing a solid
underpinning for the econo-
my."
Mr Roberts was a presenter
at LeadingRE's International
Real Estate Symposium, a
meeting that attracted over 100
brokers, managers and real


estate professionals from top
real estate firms and agencies.'
All attendees were members
of LeadingRE, which is an
international real estate net-
work, comprised of 700 firms
representing 170,000 sales.asso-
ciates worldwide.


FROM page 1B

his Office was incapable of reg-
ulating the external insurance
industry.
"Once all the information. is
received, a [captive] licence
could be issued within 30 to 60
days," Mr McCartney told Tri-
bune Business.
"Our office is quite capable of
licensing and regulating the cap-
tive industry. Our staff is as
capable as anyone in the region:
4The office is continuously train-
.ing and exposing its staff to the
latest issues in the captive induiis-
Stry."
Mr McCartney said two staff
frnom.the .Registrar of-Insur-
ance's Office had attended a
Captive Insurance Supervisors
Workshop in the Cayman
Islands, organised 'by the Off-
shore Group of Insurance
Supervisors (OGIS), the Inter-
national Association of Insur-
ance Supervisors (IAIS) and
Cayman Islands Monetary
Authority (CIMA).
He himself had last week
attended the IAIS international
conference in Budapest, Hun-
gary, "where one of the topics is
the review and 'approval of a
new guidance paper on the reg-
ulation and supervision of cap-
tive insurance companies".
Mr McCartney had been
responding to Guilden Gilbert,
a partner in Chandler Gilbert
Insurance Associates and for-
mer Bahamas Insurance Bro-
kers and Agents (BIBA) presi-
dent, who had told Tribune
,Business: "I think one of the
most 'fundamental issues when


it comes to a captive domicile is
the efficiency of turning around
an application.
"I have not been involved,
but there have been situations
. where I have been advised that
it' has taken the .Registrar nine
months to respond, and that is
simply not good enough. A suf-
ficient turnaround time should
be three weeks."
The Bahamas currently has
16 captive insurance companies
domiciled in this nation, and Mr
Gilbert had suggested that it
create two insurance regulators
one for the domestic industry,
the other for the international


segment.
However, Mr McCartney
appeared to reject that idea,
telling Tribune Business: "I
don't know of any other juris-
diction where .two regulators
exist. I don't believe that this is
an essential criteria."
He added: "Maybe there is
confusion between the role of
the regulator and the role of the
promoter and developer of the
captive industry.
"While our office is primarily
'responsible for regulation, we
,work. yexy. plosely.wyith persons
who promote the industry, such
as the Bahamas Financial Ser-


vices Board (BFSB). The roles
are distinct and should not be
the same. We would welcome
the opportunity to work along
with any group to further pro-
mote the captive insurance
industry in the Bahamas."
Plans to update the External
Insurance Act and its accom-
panying regulations were "being
reviewed at this time", Mr
McCartney said, adding that
when this was completed BFSB-
led promotional activities could
begin.


CFA SOCIETY OF THE

BAHAMAS

Invites You to Our:

ANNUAL AWARDS CEREMONY AND

CFA PROGRAM INFORMATION EVENING


TOPIC:




DATE:

TIME:.



PLACE:




GUEST SPEAKER:



COST:


"AN INTRODUCTION TO THE CFA (CHARTERED
FINANCIAL ANALYST) PROGRAM AND THE
EDUCATION REVIEW COURSE"

Friday, October 24th, 2008

6:00 p.m. Cocktails and Hors D'Oeuvres
6:30 p.m. Presentation

Governors Ballroom "A"
British Colonial Hilton
One Bay Street

Charles W, L. Deale, Head of Society Relations
CFA Institute, Charlottesville, Virginia


Complimentary


' RESERVATIONS: PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED
Contact: Jeremy Dyck, CFA
jereny.dyck(lom.com
Telephone: 323-0032


I,


NOTICE OF RECEIVERSHIP


NEW HOPE HOLDING COMPANY LIMITED



NOTICE is hereby. given that NEW HOLDING
COMPANY LIMITED, a company incorporated
under The Companies Act, has on the 2nd day of
October, 2008 been placed into receivership by the
Supreme' Court upon the Ex-Parte Summons filed on
30th September, 2008 and be advised that PHILIP
GALANIS of HLB Galanis Bain has been appointed
the Receiver and Manager of the property and assets of
the company.


Legal Notice

Notice

DOUBLE CROSS INVESTMENT CO. LTD.


Pursuant to tha Provisions of Section 138(8) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000 notice is hereby given that the
above-named Company has been dissolved 'and struck off the
Register. pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 8th.day of October, 2008.


Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of '
DOUBLE CROSS INVESTMENT CO.'LTD.


--- r-


LEGALINOTICE


NOTICE

BOLIVIANADDEOPETROLEOSDINC.


PursuantO toO then Provisionl ofl SectionO 1380 (8)0 ofD the
InternationalfBusinessD CompanieslActl 20001 notice is
herebylgivenDthat'fthelabove-namedlCompanyOhas0been
dissolved andl struckD offtl thel Registerl pursuantO toO a
CertificatefoflDissolutioflissuedlby.thelRegistrailGeneral
onDthed7thDdayloftlOctober,02008.


SophielBarthe
Liquidator
of
BOLIVIANADDEUPETROLEOSOINC.


A leading retailer is seeking applications for the position of
BOOKKEEPER/ASSISTANT ACCOUNTANT

REQUIREMENTS
Applicants should possess the following:
* Experience in the field of Accounting or Bookkeeping
* An energetic personality
Strong Interpersonal Skills
Good Organizational Skills
* Computer Literacy (Microsoft Office Suite)
* Willingness. to work flexible hours and weekends
* Experience in Payroll preparation, would be an asset

RESPONSIBILITIES
The successful candidate will be responsible for properly preparing cheques,
maintaining general ledger with QuickBooks, Bank reconciliation, payment of salary
maintain and reconcile current payable and receivable listings, reconciling credit cards
spreadsheets, resolving accounting queries.

REMUNERATION
We offer in return an excellent remuneration package, inclusive of medical and life
insurance.

Interested persons please forward your resume to:
jThe Human Resources Manager
P. O. Box N-623
Fax: (242) 322 -6607
/Email: hr@luxuryretaillimited.com


The Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) Program is a globally recognized
standard for measuring the competence and integrity in the fields of portfolio management
and investment analysis. Three levels of examination verify a candidate's ability to apply
the fundamental knowledge of investment principles across all areas of the investment
decision-making process.
The next examination date is June 6, 2009 and the final registration and enrollment
date is March 16, 2009. We encourage all interested persons to attend the information
evening to learn more about the CFA Program.
The CE4 Society of The Bahamas, will present a brief outline of the CFA Institute,
and the local society. Special Guest Speaker, Mr. Charles W.L. Deale, Head of Society
Relations, CFA Institute will provide an outline of the CFA Program and present the
charters to the new CFA Charter holders. The Education Committee will provide a brief
outline of the 2008-09 Education Programs planned for Level I, II, and Ill candidates. A
Q&A Panel Session will follow the presentations.


---


'Final' Insurance Act



regulations under review


I UtbUAY, UC I Ub-RH 21, ZUUt, I-AUtr bb


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


Bernanke supports additional spending





measures to help stimulate US economy


* By EDMUND L
ANDREWS
c.2008 New York Times
News Service

WASHINGTON The
chairman of the Federal
Reserve, Ben S Bernanke, said
Monday that he supported a
second round of additional
spending measures to help stim-
ulate the economy.
"With the economy likely to
be weak for several quarters,
and with some risk of a pro-
tracted slowdown, considera-


tion of a fiscal package by Con-
gress at this juncture seems
appropriate," Bernanke told
the House Budget Committee.
His reinarks are his first
endorsement of another round
of energizing stimulus, whiph
Democrats on Capitol Hill have
advocated.
The White House, which has
been cool to the idea of a sec-
ond stimulus, said Monday that
President Bush is open to the
idea. But aides to Bush said the
president's first priority is to
put the rescue package passed


by Congress in place.
"We've had an open mind
about it," Dana Perino, Bush's
press secretary, said aboard Air
Force One as the president was
flying to Alexandria, La., for a
business gathering, "but what
we are focused on right now is
the urgent need to get this res-
cue package implemented."
Still, Bernanke's testimony
ups the ante, forcing the Bush
administration to give the idea
of a stimulus careful considera-
tion: White House officials,
however, say the stimulus ideas
put forth so far by Democrats
are unacceptable to them.
"There are several pro-
gramines that have been rec-
ommended that are coming in a
cloak of being stimulative, and
we don't think that those would
actually stimulate the econo-
my," Perino said.
Bernanke said the economic
outlook was still so uncertain
that the optimal size, composi-
tion and timing for any new
stimulus plan were unclear.
But he said Congress should
try to develop a plan that would
have its maximum impact when


CONTRACTOR,
from lB

revisions in it, and it now has
to go to the Ministry's Technical
* Committee. What adjustments
need to be made, they will
make, and then the Bill will
come back to the Minister" of
Works and Transport, Neko
Grant.
Praising Mr Grant and his
permanent secretary, Anita
Bernard, for their support of
the Bill and the aims behind it,
Mr Wrinkle said that once it'
was returned to the minister by
the Technical Committee, the
BCA planned to hold one final
forum on it for the construction
industry and any interested par-
ties.
That forum would provide
the final opportunity for con-
tractor feedback and any major
concerns to be raised, Mr Wrin-
kle said, with the Bill afterwards


'the economy was probably at
its weakest. Many if not most
private forecasters contend that
the economy has already
entered a recession, which
would seem to argue for mea-
sures that would bolster overall
spending as soon as possible.
"If Congress proceeds with
a fiscal package, it should con-
sider including measures to
help improve access to credit
by consumers, homebuyers,
businesses and other borrow-
ers," Bernanke said. "Such
actions might be particularly
effective at promoting eco-
nomic growth and job cre-
ation."
It was unclear what kind of
measures he had in mind.
The.government announced
last week that it would invest
$250 billion directly into the.
nation's banks as part of a $700
billion bailout package to ease
the financial turmoil and loosen
the credit markets. In addition,
the government has helped bail
out the mortgage finance giants
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac
as well as the insurance giant
the American International


heading back to Mr Grant by
December2008 and then, hope-
fully, Cabinet.
"We were trying to do that
in the month of October," Mr
Wrinkle said of the planned
forum, "but are probably look-
ing at December by the time it
and the committee are finished.
"The Technical Committee
just have to make sure the tech-
nical terms and language the
Attorney General's Office has
used is compatible with the
technical terms used in the Min-
istry, so we don't have confu-
sion there."
Mr Wrinkle said that by
licensing and certifying Bahami-
an contractors for the first time,
the legislation when it came into
effect would give international
developers and contractors a
standard against which they
could be measured.
This was especially important,,


Group.
Democratic leaders have
called for an additional $300
billion package of spending
measures that would include a
big increase in spending on
infrastructure projects, an addi-
tional extension of unemploy-
ment benefits and increases in
spending for food stamps, home
heating subsidies and state
Medicaid programmes.
Bush has repeatedly asked
American consumers to be
patient and give the bailout,
package time to work. Many
Republicans instead have
favoured tax cuts to corpora-
tions and individuals.
Bernankd also cautioned that
"any. programme should be
designed, to the extent possi-
ble, to limit longer-term effects
on the federal government's
structural budget deficit."
In his comments, Bernanke
essentially reiterated the grim
economic outlook he provided
in a speech last week. .
"Even before the recent
intensification of the financial
crisis, economic activity had
shown considerable signs of


the BCA president said, for
Bahamiatn contractors when it
came to seeking work on the
major mixed-use resort and for-
eign direct investment projects,
and in joint venturing with large
international contractors.
"It will enable us to deal
much better at an international
level," Mr Wrinkle explained.
"The international developers
and contractors coming here
have no way to work out who is
a suitable joint venture partner
other than word of mouth and
reputation.
"We're starting to get interest
from international contractors
in looking at work on the Lyn-
den Pindling International Air-
port, those resort projects that
are still around. There's some
big BEC work ready to go, too.
"Most of them [international
contractors] are very keen to
establish relationships with local
contractors, but they have the
same problem in knowing who
to deal with because there's no
licensing."
Mr Wrinkle added that the
Ministry of Works "has the
same problem as the consumer
public, in as much as an indi-
vidual can come into the Min-


weakness," he told lawmakers.
Private sector.employers
shed 168,000 jobs in Septem-
ber and a total of 900,000 jobs
since January.
Real consumer spending,
adjusted for inflation, declined
during the summer and appears
to have declined yet again in
September.
"The pace of economic activ-
ity is likely to be below that of
its longer-run potential for sev-
eral quarters," he said.
Bernanke and his colleagues
at the Federal Reserve meet
later this month, and many
economists say they believe the
Fed could again lower rates.
Earlier this month, the Fed,
along with the European Cen-
tral Bank and other central
banks, reduced primary lend-
ing rates by a half percentage
point.
. An earlier.stimulus package,
in which the government
mailed out about $50 billion in
checks in April and May, pro-
vided a lift to income and con-
sumer spending. Consumer
spending increased 0.4 per cent
in May, but dried up after that.


istry of Works and say: 'I'm, a
contractor, and I want to bid bn
this job.' They don't know
whether he's. a contractor or
not."
. While the Ministry of Works
had a list of approved contrac-
tors to undertake the develop-
ment of government housing.
subdivisions, it had nothing to
indicate who was suitably qual-.
ified to undertake larger pro-
jects, such as court complexes.
and-roadworks.
"There's no way to decide
who's qualified and who isn't,"
Mr Wrinkle said. "There's no
definition of a contractor.
There's no standards. The Min-
istry is aware of this, and wants
to pursue the legislation to set
standards."
I Once the Contractors Bill
became law, it would create
"'boha fide, licensed contrac-
tors" who could work at certain
levels in the industry.
"The contractor will have to
meet the requirements the Gov-
ernment deems necessary to
build, and build at that level,"
Mr Wrinkle said. "We don't
have that now and it's a free-
for-all. The licence is so cru-
cial."


BETWEEN

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
known as Grant B-117, Big Fish Cay, one of the Fish Cays
being fifty-five and a half acres (55.50) situate North of Little
Abaco Island, one of the islands in the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas
AND
IN THE MATTER of Quieting Titles Act 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of,
Arthur H. Lowe Jr. ,

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that Arthur Havelock Lowe Jr. is applying to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas to have his title to
the following investigated under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act
1959 and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by ,the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said-Act. A plan of the said land may-be inspected during
normal working hours at the following places:

1. "ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land known as
Grant B-117, Big Fish Cay, one of the Fish Cays being
fifty-five and a half acres (55.50) situate North of Little
Abaco Island, one of the islands in the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas

Copies of the same may be inspected during normal office hours at the
following places:

a.) The Registry of the Supreme Court of Nassau, Bahamas.

b.) The Chambers of Andrew C. Allen Law Chambers, 204
Lagoon Court, Olde Towne, Sandyport, Nassau, The
Bahamas.

c.) The Administrator's Office, Cooper's Town, Abaco,
The Bahamas.
Any person who objects to the granting of the said Certificate of Title
is required to file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or
their attorney a Statement of his, her or its Claim in the prescribed form
verified by an Affidavit served therewith by failure of any such person
to file and serve a Statement of his, her or its Claim aforesaid non-
compliance "With this Notice will operate as a bar to such claim.

Andrew C. Allen Chambers
204 Lagoon Court
Olde Towne, Sandyport
Nassau, The Bahamas


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CLE/qui/01133/2008


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW & EQUITY SIDE


RULING, from 3B

other buyers.
It also cited as another ground for appeal that Oceania Heights
had an unfair advantage because it knew Willard Clarke Enter-
prises' rights, title and interest in the property.
Lockhart & Munroe is also set to argue that the September 25,
1995, agreement between Oceania Heights and Willard Clarke
Enterprises be set aside, alleging that the latter's attorney had
been absent when it was given legal advice by Oceania Heights.


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DIVIN WISAY of
POODELO STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, GT2291 is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that,any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of
OCTOBER 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.






SAN SALVADOR




SUGAR LOAF


mm| Guest Organizer

Our success depends on your success, Our ability to accomplish
what we set out to do is based primarily on the people we hire-we
call each other "Organizers" We are always focused on our people..
We provide opportunities to develop your skills, further your career
and achieve your goals.
At San Salvador Funtimes, you'll find a commitment to excellence
among our organizers; an emphasis on respect in how we treat our
guest and each other; and a dedication to social responsibility.
We look for people who are adaptive self-motivated, passionate,
creative team players, able to speak and write in French, Italian
and Spanish, If that sounds like you why not bring your talent and
skills to Funtimes? We are growing in dynamic new ways and we
recognize that the right people, offering their ideas and expertise,
will enable us to continue our success.
San Salvador Funtimes is a service provider of Excursion to
CLUB MED, Columbus Isle, San Salvador Bahamas.
Contact: email: everettejackson@hotmail.com


FG CAPITAL MARKETS
!!VIM &ACSOIYSECES


C FF A I'- ( ()> I- C. "1-'- .Ni 1-
BIS1: LISTED TRADED SECuRITE-E AS OF.
MONDAY. 20 OCTOBER 2008
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX CLOSE 1.815 20 1 C1HG -0 O H I --,1 H0 0 00 I YTD .-251 55 1 YTD / -12 17
FINDEX. CLOSE 87.-) 23 I YTD -B -39'., I 2007 28 29/
VVWWW.BISXBAHAMAS COM or 2-42-394-'t503 FOR rP.4i'RE DATA & INFORMATION
11.80 11.60 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 11.80 0.00 1.061 0.200 11.1 1.69%
9.68 7.64 Bank of Bahamas 7.64 7.64 0.00 0.643 0.160 11.9 2.09%
0.99 0.85 Benchmark 0.89 0.89 0.00 -0.877 0.020 N/M 2.25%
3.74 3.49 Bahamas Waste 3.49 3.49 0.00 0.152 0.090 23.0 2.58%
2.70 1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 0.040 43.1 1.69%
14.15 11.00 Cable Bahamas 14.14 14.14 0.00 1.224 0.240 11.6 1.70%
3.15 2.85 Colina Holdings 2.85 2.85 0.00 0.118 0.040 24.2 1.40%
8.50 4.80 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 7.27 7.27 0.00 0.446 0.300 16.3 4.13%
6.88 1.99 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.57 2.55 -0.02 0.122 0.052 20.9 2.04%
3.00 2.25 Doctor's Hospital 2.77 2.77 0.00 0.256 0.040 10.8 1.44%
8.10 6.02 Famguard 8.06 8.06 0.00 0.535 0.280 15.1 3.47%
13.01 12.00 Finco 12.00 12 00 .00 0.665 0.570 18.0 4.75%
14.66 11.54 FirstCaribbean Bank 11.60 11 60 0.00 0.682 0.450 17.0 3.88%
6.09 5.05 Focol (S) 5.20 5.20 0.00 0.385 0.140 13.5 2.69/o6
1.00 1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1. 00 0.40 Freeport Concrete 0.40 0.40 0.00 0.035 0.000 11.4 0.00%
8.20 5.50 ICD Utilities 8.20 8.20 0.00 0.407 0.300 20.1 3.66%
12.50 8.60 J. S. Johnson 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.952 0.620 11.6 5.64%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10 00 1000 0.00 0.180 0000 55.6 0.00%
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES iBrr.dc Irca, -o _n *-, P.- --'.i a -1,_e Prlinr-.g ta3o)
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Dally Vol. Interest Maturity
1000000 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 0.00 7% 19 October 2017
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Serles C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7% 30 May 2013
1lb.: :. :.0. 10t.::.:.._' Fiae.. a -s..m N : e 15 iS -e'-o s .,. e- ... ...., ." -- . 1 - r 0 T
F0dolC.. C.er.-Toe-..-,nS .. ... 1. 1,llN-
14 .-'--, 2-5 ara..as S,.:.-. .0 ...r. _.0 l i -..1 .'._-. ._ ,_ -* .. 1,_.. 1 ,,
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 N/M 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35 0.001 0.000 256.6 0.00%
C4OiZ-.o. -r0- Trm.,--C- u.-.-I. .- .,.E l. -
14.00 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.80 14.80 14 00 -0.041 0.300 N/M 2.17%
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000 261 .9 0.00%
BI5S2 LIFS ,' .., r.,o3 v i ,'..--
3.0250 2.8869 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 3.0250 O 81 4 78 31-Aug-08
1.4217 1.3591 Colina Money Market Fund 1.4217 3 38 4.60 10-Oct-08
3.7969 3.5388 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.6090 -4 95 3.62 30-Sop-08
12.4456 11.8192 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.4456 4 29 5.78 30-Sep-08
100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.0000 31-Dec-07
100.9600 99.9566 CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.9600 1 01 1 01 30-Jun-08
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 31-Doc-07
10.5000 9.1958 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.1958 -12.42 -12.42 30-Sep-08
1.0216 1.0000 F3 Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0216 2 16 2.16 30-Sop-08
1.0282 1.0000 FG Flna cal Growth Fund 1.0282 2 82 2.82 30-Sep-08
S .a- :a ..- 3 10244 2.44 2.44 30-Sep-08
MARKET TERMS
52wk-Hi Highest closing price In last 52 weeks i S Buyn
52wk-Low Loawest closing price In tiost 52 weeks A.k el Ii,, f f. im nd IhJIlty
Previous Clos.. Pe.vioudys s woightad priem for doily v.10n0 10.1 P, I .i, .I[,,, v, 1 Counter
Today Clos Courrent dys wsagOh.d rie fr dally volme W ,v kly v l .,rlo .l.n of mo prio we k
Change Change In clo "=ng prIc, from day to day .Ps A corpary' reported Uarnnlg per share for the Inst 12 rnith,
Dally Vol. Number of totan shares traded tododay NAV Not A..11 Vluf
DIV Didend per ,hare paidIn the las,, 12 months NM Not M
PE C.l- nos reacedivde.d by h. last 12 -.monh .eIan,-g INeEFx hF I..l,ly .nh.,ln-n S -o01 ndx .J.luarl 11 884 100
IS) 4-for-1 Stock Splt Effective Datae 88/2007
TO TRADE CALL COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDEL.ITI :. .- "I I | *. ..FiT.-L r..1. rKETS Z..t2-3 *e-4100 ) COLONIAL 4-. *Z2 7525


EXCLUSIVE LISTING

GRAHAM ACRES
Part of Blair Estates, East


Furnished 4 bed/2 bath house, Living,
Dining and Family Room (1,781 Sq. Ft.)
air-conditioned, large Wooden Deck,
fenced in, landscaped lot in great area.


$345,000.00 Gross


Please call:
'Real Estate International (Bah.) Co. Ltd.

Tel: 322-4187
e-mail: hw@realestateint.com







THE TIBUNEBUSIESS TESDA, OCTBER 2,O208, PAAGE7


Tribune Comics


JUDGE PARKER
Nice O-HL....
AND VERY
THOR^OUGH!


CALVIN & HOBBES
IT'SSCA 8 BEING S ICK... | T IF SOMETHING ISAWl WMAT F WTIEN STICK ME RJUlOF TIEN I CAR IFEW T IMS
ESPECWLL. AfT M\G T. i WRG jTUi ME, AND I HRXE TUBES .AD OSES? WHrAT IF LOOK FORWARD ARE LSS
-TO GO TO TWE HOSPITAL?? ThEN lTVE TO OPERA? 4NHT TO MkiG ThE COMFORTING
IF TE OPERATON FAnS? WM N' BED IT wMSELF 'TmN a IGEP
IF VTIS ts M..t LAST TOMORRowo. iwOr UP iOm
6;r\GT...ALIVEP LATE.


DENNIS THE MENACE


APT 3-G


BLONDIE


MARVIN


TIGER


'FRES SOME APlIC-E.,,TOy... WHEN YOUK.
PARENTS SAY ITY FOR YOUR OWN ,00p,
WATCL OUTI'!"


Sudoku Puzzle
Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row. each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday

1 2 3 -_ 6





3 4

9 7

5 6

4 5



6 5 9 2
- ------------2__ _


Difficulty Level A*****


I(1/17


Kakuro Puzzle
|i i Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
I fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on 'its top. No number
g may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
S I level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.


Yesterday's
Sudoku Answer


Yesterday's
Kakuro Answer


Boris Gutko v Karen Grigorian,
Vilnius 1987. Gulko was USSR
champion, but then became a
refusenik who went on hunger
strike and staged one-man public
*demonstrations in his bid to leave
the Soviet Union. Eventually he
succeeded, and he then became
the only player to win both the.
USSR and US titles. With better
circumstances he might have
achieved still more, for he was
one of a handful of grandmasters


Chess
with a plus score against the
legendary Garry Kasparov. Here
as White (to play) Gulko has to
be careful since the obvious 1
Qd5+ Kh7 2 Rf8?? fails brutally
to Qgl mate. Instead a slightly
different sequence, utilising a rare
chessboard rule, enabled White to
win in imaginative style. Can you
spot the finish?
chew Stes: 9 3ti t RS 2 OdSr! Kl,7pff 3 One
Oa Kih8 3 exia*e 3 t 3 enot ea0'i Q9 mAtel)
h 4Ni mate. ...

Target


......... . 8699

-_ ___ J A ,
^ _ _ _ J


B C


0g


Across
1 Student in the teacher's
eye (5)
4 Capacity to please (7)
8 Sound company touches
zero (3)
9 Customarily, it's no
walkover for the bride (9)
10 Anticipate charge for con-
cealing minerals (7)
11 Pay for judges? (5)
13 Play for fun (6)
15 Attack a devil with a gun,
perhaps (6)
18 Sort of peach that's not
expensive (5)
19 You're in a sound position
in this (7)
21 Check an open invitation
to shoplifters (4,5)
23 An alternative to a key ring
(3)
24 The Spanish gentleman at
the centre is a politician (7)
25 Needs organising, being
stupid (5)


Down
1 Calm sea (7)
2 A plan for. gaining weight
(9)
3 Water lily collection going
to America (5)
4 Restricted place for the
dog to sleep (6)
5 Rum's not what the cure's
made of (7)
6 I say nothing (3)
7 Naturally they have their
ups and downs (5)
12 Try to land (5,4)
14 Security is lifted in the
store (7)
16 Well-known to be helpless
(7)
17 I'm more upset by a per-
sonal account (6)
18 Names grounds for devel-
opment at a hearing (5)
20 Had an inclination and
worked in
the garden (5)
22 Personal connections (3)


Yesterday's Cryptic Solution Yesterday's Easy Solution


Across: 1 Black Watch, 8 Cater, 9
Solvent, 10 Naivete, 11 Inset, 12
Ideals, 14 Adhere, 17 Ellen, 19
Welcome, 21 Captain, 22 Gains, 23
Red herring.
Down: 2 Lattice, 3 Curie, 4 Wastes, 5
Tallied, 6 Heels, 7 Stutterers, 8
Confidence, 13 Lanyard, 15 Emotion,
16 Twinge, 18 Leper, 20 Lager.


Across: 1 Closed book, 8 Mecca, 9
Builder, 10 Nonplus, 11 Onset, 12
Sherpa, 14 Volume, 17 Recur, 19
Bushido, 21 Pavlova, 22 Aloof, 23
Nom de plume.
Down: 2 Licence, 3 Small, 4
Debase, 5 Orinoco, 6 Kudos, 7
Written off, 8 Manuscript, 13
Perform, 15 Uniform, 16 Ablaze, 18
Coven, 20 Stall.


1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8 J m1.


I Eu..


21 22 23


24 25


Across
1 Principal (5)
4 Show indignation (7)
8 Shrill bark (3)
9 Travelling (2,3,4)
10 Weak flow (7)
11 Up in the air (5)
13 Notably superior (6)
15 Dexterous (6)
18 Work dough with
hands (5)
19 Of times long past (7)
21 Formerly (2,3,4)
23 Tavern (3)
24 General pardon (7)
25 King with golden
touch (5),


Dow
1

2
3
4
5
6
7
12
14
16
17


vn
Having hidden mean-
ing (7)


Confidential


ly (2,7)


Gather in a crowd (5)
Acrimonious (6)
Emerald Isle (7)
Besides (3)
A happening (5)
Unanimous (2,3,4)
Sorrow (7)
Lockjaw (7)
Area of tooth decay


18 Australian arboreal
marsupial (5)
20 Choicest part (5)
22 Possess (3)


E



B
N

N


0







J .....


0



......


.. ,,,..,,


The
Target
uses
words In
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)


HOW many words of four letters or
more can you make from the
letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once
only. Each must contain the centre
letter and there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 10: very good 15; excellent 20
(or more). Solution-toiporrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION
amino amnio anti apron
IMPORTANT inapt into intro
iron main manor martin maltr'on
minor mint moan morn noria
norm orpin pain paint pant
panto patron piano pint pinta
pinto pion piton point print. rain
rampion rani rant ration roan
roman taint tampion tarn tarpon
tinpot tint titan torn train triton


Contract Bridge

by Steve Becker


Bidding Quiz


You are South, both sides vulner-
able. The bidding has been:
West North East South
1 + Pass Pass ?
What would you bid with each of
the following five hands?
1.4 853 V KJ72 +AJI0 +4 K96
2. 4 KQ9 V QJ4 AQ6 4- K1072
3. 4J87 V KJ854 +3 4 KJ86
4. 4J64 VTAK9 KQ9874 4 100
5. 4 AJ8 V AKQ86 + 52 4* KQ7

1. One notrump. When the bid-
ding is on the verge of dying at a low
level, you are permitted to make bids
you would ordinarily not make in
any other position. Such bids in the
so-called balancing seat often don't.
have their normal meaning..
The player in the balancing seat
has an obligation not to sell out
cheaply if there is a reasonable way
to compete for the contract. If he
does elect to compete, whatever
action he takes must tentatively be
regarded as suspect. The one-
notrump bid in this sequence indi-
cates about 11 to 14 points rather
than the 15 to 18 you would be
expected to hold if you bid one
notrump directly over the 'opening
bidder.
2. Double. If you were in second
position, you would overcall with
one notrump, but in the balancing
seat you are much too strong for that


action. Partner would think you had a
much flimsier hand. such as in the
first problem. The \"ay to show real
opening notrump values in the bal-
ancing position is by doubling and
then bidding hotrump at your next
turn to complete the description ol'
your hand.
3. One heart. This isn't much ol' a
hand, but it is better to bid tlan to
pass. Partner probably has 10 or
more points, which gives your side a
shot at a partscore that would be lost
if you threw in the sponge prema-
turely. Because you are in the bal-
ancing scat, partner should not
become overly enthusiastic about
your bid.
4. Pass. The opponents couldn't he
in a worse spot, and it's not wise to
help them out by competing. West
will probably go down a trick or tl\o.
and you may wind up with a
respectable plus. Besides, partner
probably doesn't have much, since
he's marked with diamond shortness
and failed to bid over one diamond.
5. Double. Here you ha\c \alues
with which you would act in any
position, and these can best be sloim\
by doubling and then bidding hearts.
An immediate jump to two heals
would suggest a strong hand iniler-
ested only in hearts, but this lh ,d
may well play better in notrunip or
spades, if partner is so inclined.


Tomorrow: The battle for trump control.
C2008 King Features Syndicate Inc.


CRYPTIC PUZZLE


c
R
0
S
S
W
0
R
D


10 11 12


13 14 1516


I I .2-0 .
118 19 20 .1, 1


I I


i


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2008, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


I I I1I III


t







P B SC2 8T


a BODY





a)


mu, m s.i


'.'-CIRRHOSIS is a deadly, irreversible disease Ii
which is mainly caused by excessive con-
Sumption of alcohol and chronic hepatitis B.




,, ' ;, .n-




.. ...


Ai"<'


Unde standing


cor:




E By JEFFARAH GIBSON

IMAGINE your liver -
that essential organ
that rids the body of
toxins and waste with
its large, shiny, plum-red
appearance transform-
ing into a shrunken,
whitish, nodule filled,
inert mass. The latter
describes the appear-
ance of the liver after a
condition, known as cir-
rhosis, has taken com-
plete control of the
organ and its functions.
The liver is the largest gland in the human
body, and has countless functions; it pro-
duces enzymes and proteins, produces bile to
help digest fat, filters the blood, and regulates
cholesterol and hormones.
According to www.wikipedia.com, cirrho-
sis of the liver is a consequence of chronic liv-
er disease that is characterized by replace-
ment of liver tissue by fibrous scar tissue
and regenerative nodules that occur as a
result of a process in which damage tissue is
regenerated leading to progressive loss of
liver function.
Dr Harold Munnings, a gastroenterolo-
gist at the Centre for Digestive Health, clas-
sifies cirrhosis as a deadly, irreversible disease
which is mainly caused by excessive con-


sumption of alcohol and chronic hepatitis
B. There are many other causes of cirrhosis
including auto immune hepatitis, hepatitis
C, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), but
alcoholism and hepatitis B are the most com-
mon causes.
Many people may not know of cirrhosis
and its seriousness, but it is essential that
people are aware of the disease especially if
they are habitual alcohol consumers.
Alcohol-related cirrhosis develops after
decades of heavy drinking, and the end
results are often very serious, but the amount
of alcohol that is detrimental to the liver dif-
fers from .person to person.
"We measure alcohol by equivalents, we
would say a glass of wine is equivalent to
one tin of beer and this is equivalent to one
shot of spirits like whisky. Women should not
drink more than one unit of alcohol a day
and for men they should not have more than
two units of alcohol a day," Dr Munnings
told Tribune Health.
While alcohol is'often used at social gath-
erings and may be conducive to having a
good time, as it flows smoothly down your
throat it enters various organs and makes
its way to the liver where it causes a digestive
hurricane.
The liver, with its numerous functions, is
also responsible for breaking down alcohol so
that this toxin can be eliminated out of the
body. If there is to much alcohol for the liv-
er to process, this results in an imbalance
that somehow interferes with the breakdown
of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.
On the other hand, hepatitis B causes the
liver to be inflamed.
According to Dr Munnings there are no
visible symptoms of cirrhosis in the early
stages, but as the disease progresses symp-
toms of cirrhosis become more acute. "Some
of the symptoms of cirrhosis include meta-
bolic abnormalities. There will be a loss of
secondary sexual characteristics, breast
enlargement for men, nose bleeds, jaundice,
gallstones, and fluid retention in the legs and
abdomen," he said.


^ .' ,
Is1.$




The liver is a very important part of the
digestive system and cirrhosis is a very seri-
ous condition. People must take precautions
to prevent the disease or stabilize it since it is
irreversible and deadly.
Dr Munnings gives some suggestions that
people can take in order to prevent the dis-
ease. "They should prevent the disease by
not drinking, getting a hepatitis B vaccine
and they should not use drugs," he said.
Although the disease can be treated, once
it has progressed the only option is to get a
liver transplant, which is very expensive.
"Liver transplants are very expensive. They
usually cause $100,000 plus."
According to Dr Munroe, transplants are
expensive because funding is necessary for
the various surgeries that must take place.
Follow up care and immunosuppressive med-
ications also play a part in the cost of a liver
transplant.
For some patients however, money is not
the issue. Dr Munnings noted that even peo-
ple who have the money to pay for the trans-
plant have be placed on the organ waiting list
where the decision to give a person a new
organ is based on the urgency of their current
status.
And even if you are set to get a trans-
plant, the operation is a high risk one and
there is no telling if the transplant will be a
success.
It is very important that people do what-
ever is necessary to increase their knowl-
edge and awareness of cirrhosis, he said. If it
is not given attention and people are not
doing what they can to stabilize or prevent
the disease from occurring, the result can
be dire.
So take care of your body and be con-
scious of any sudden changes you never
know what you can prevent by being aware
of your body.

For more information on cirrhosis of the
liver and its treatment, contact Dr Harold
Munnings at 328.5550


Treating


sunburn in


children
BABIES under six
months of age should never
be exposed to the sun.
Babies over six months can
be exposed to the sun but
should wear UV blocking
glasses to protect their eyes.
Young skin heals faster
than older skin, but at the
same time is less able to pro-
tect itself from injury,
including injury from the
sun;
For a baby under one
year, sunburn should be
treated as an emergency and
you should call your doctor
immediately.
For a baby over one
year, call your doctor if
there is severe pain, blister-
ing, lethargy or fever over
101 F.
Sunburn may cause
dehydration. Give your child
enough water or juice to
replace body fluids especial-
ly if they are not urinating
regularly.
Give acetaminophen if
your child's temperature is
above 101 F.
Try baths in clear, tepid
water as this can cool the
skin.
Light moisturizing lotion
may soothe the skin, but do
not rub it in. If touching the
skin is considered painful
then do not use the lotion.
Try using plain calamine
lotion as this may be of ben-
efit.
Do not apply alcohol
which'can overcool the skin.
Do not use any medicat-
ed creams unless your doc-
tor informs you to.
Keep the child out of the
sun entirely until the sun-
burn completely heals.
Ensure that no matter
where your child goes day-
care, nursery school, play
dates sun safety is always
taken into account.
If your child experiences a
sunburn, follow the above
guidelines or call/visit your
doctor if you need further
advice.

If you have any ques-
tions please contact Dr
Richelle Knowles at Olde
Town Mall Sandyport 327-
8718/9.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21,2008


ar *','

te


. at


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21,2008, PAGE 9B


Genesis therapy aims to


improve quality of life


A conversation with

physiotherapist Hannah

Foster-Middleton


FOR stroke survivors,
amputees, and even those who
have suffered sports-related
injuries, adjusting to a world in
which they have limited move-
ment can mean a decline in
their overall quality of life. So
for Hannah Foster-Middleton,
administrator of the newly
opened Genesis Therapy
Group Clinic on Mount Royal
Avenue, confinement to beds
and wheelchairs and a lifetime
of immobility is something
patients should not necessarily
take sitting down.
"Stroke patients require
intense one on one, sometimes
two, therapy sessions on a reg-
ular basis over several weeks
or months. Maintaining moti-
vation during the slow recov-
ery process is paramount and
all accomplishments, however
small, are celebrated," she said
in her usual cheerful tone.
To look at her, you would
never know that her average
day usually consists of long,
grueling hours diagnosing
patients, and physically help-
ing them to return to normal
function.
A member of the Chartered
Society of Physiotherapy (Lon-
don), Ms Foster-Middleton has
spent over a decade in the field
still often referred to as "phys-
ical therapy". Initially, she
trained as a nurse but then
moved on to social work with
abused children and young
offenders. She then attended
the University of.Brighton for
four years to train as a physio-
therapist.
"As an undergraduate, I was
fortunate enough to gain my
clinical training in the teaching
hospitals of London," she said.
Her enthusiasm no doubt stems
from the fact that in the United
Kingdom it is necessary to con-
tinue your clinical education in
an internship programme for
two years after graduating,
which she feels served to
enhance 'her knowledge base.
Following this, she worked
in the UK as a locum in order
to gain as much experience in
as many specialties as possible.
"My goal was to become a well
rounded therapist and not settle
into one specialty too soon,"
Ms Foster-Middleton said.
An offer for the physiother-
apist to work for Doctors Hos-
pital brought. her to the
Bahamas and began the
acclimatization process to a cul-
ture where outdoor life and
sports play a meaningful role
in the lives of everyday


Bahamians.
"The most popular sports in
the Bahamas are athletics and
basketball. Therefore most
injuries that present involve the
knee joint. This does not have
to be the end of the sport for
that patient. With prompt and
thorough attention there is
rarely a reason why that per-
son could not return to their
chosen sport even if surgery is
necessary.
"Rehabilitation of the knee is
hard work for the patient but if
they follow all the medical
advice given there is no reason
why they can't make a full
recovery," she said.
Following her term with Doc-
tors Hospital, Ms Foster-Mid-
dleton worked with a local doc-
tor. And now she has founded
Genesis Therapy Group, a clin-
ic whose value is seen on the
faces of patients who due to
accidents, illness or disease -
find themselves moving in ways
that may have been out of.
reach months before.
"My main skills lie in diag-
nostic evaluation of rnuscu-
loskeletal problems predomi-
nantly spinal. Osteopathic
mobilizations have achieved
some excellent results with
some patients no longer requir-
ing surgery.
"Rehabilitation of stroke vic-
tims, joint replacement, post
surgery and trauma can be
effectively treated. Outcomes
are aimed at achieving pre-con-
dition mobility as much as pos-
sible with minimal impact to
daily life," she asserts.
The clinic has a rehabilitation
gymnasium and provides an
enormous selection of braces,
orthotics and walking aids for
those who are suffering from a
sports injury, fractures or
require some support for any
part of the body all at whole-
sale prices. This further demon-
strates Ms Foster-Middleton's
underlying motivation for open-
ing Genesis Therapy Group; a
desire to see Bahamians with
special rehabilitative needs
enjoy a better quality of life.
Children appear to be a
group particularly close to her
heart. "Other than sports
injuries and trauma, the main
presentation for children is
those born with cerebral palsy.
"I, along with a prothetist,
have been instrumental in pro-
viding equipment and therapy
to assist in promoting normal
movement and development
for this group of kids, with
rewarding results. Seeing a


child get excited about finding
new independence is amazing,"
she reflects.
According to Ms Foster-Mid-
dieton, many elderly people
attend the clinic for therapy
voluntarily for general condi-
tioning, to improve strength
and maximize their balance and
co-ordination which will mini-
mize their risk of a fall.
"A fall can trigger a series of
fatal consequences for the
elderly who by their very
nature can have an existing pre-
sentation of multiple medical
issues. To have specific and
monitored exercises for their
needs in a safe and nurturing
environment affords them the
opportunity to maximize their
physical potentiall" she said.
She also attests to the fact
that amputees are a special
group of patients who, among
their physical and medical
needs, also have complex emo-
tional, psychological and social
issues. "The therapy provided
is not just to teach them how to
use their 'new' limb but to help
them to become adjusted to a
whole new way of life and still
feel they are a productive mem-
ber of society. Some even go on
to continue in their chosen sport
with specialist limbs being made
for the purpose," she said.
One has only to look at Oscar
Pistorious, the double amputee
South African;who attempted
to become the first amputee
runner to compete in the
Olympics, to see what rehabili-
tative therapy can accomplish.
Though qualifying for Beijing
eluded him, he served as a tes-
tament to the potential of phys-
iotherapy and prosthetics.
Ms Foster-Middleton only
smiles at the mention of Pisto-
* rious, and instead talks about
the role physiotherapy plays in
the lives of Bahamians who also
want to take a holistic approach
to the treatment of illness.
"Physiotherapy has many
forms depending on the train-
ing. With a background in nurs-
ing and social work, sociology
and psychology play an impor-
tant and effective role in my
practice. This, and my training
that involved osteopathic tech-
niques for all joints in the body,
allows me the opportunity to
treat the whole person holisti-
cally," she said.
In the near future, Genesis
Therapy Group will offer the
services of a prothetist/ortho-
tist, an occupational therapist,
and a massage therapist, who,
along with Ms Foster-Middle-
ton will complete the team.

For more information on the
Genesis Therapy Group visit
www.genesistherapygroup.com
or email Ms Foster-Middleton at
phyzio@hotmail.com


FOR stroke survivors, amputees, and even those who have suffered sports-related injuries,
adjusting to a world,in which they have limited movement can mean a decline in their overall
quality of life.


I I S


Oral health and its effects on overall health


(The Ministry of Health observes
Oral Health Month this October. The
month is set aside each year to
increase public awareness about the
importance of good oral health and
its impact on overall health. Resi-
dents are invited to join the oral
health team and its partners in this
venture, Thompson Trading, as they
interact with members of the public
educating and demonstrating proper
oral health practices, at the Mall at
Marathon on Saturday, October 25.)

ORAL health is not only important
to one's appearance and sense of well-
being, but also to the individual's over-
all health. Cavities and gum disease
may contribute to serious conditions,
including heart disease, diabetes, and
respiratory diseases, and premature
and low weight babies. Untreated cav-
ities can also be painful and lead to
serious infections.
Throughout October the Ministry of
Health will undertake a number of
activities aimed at' increasing public
awareness about the importance of
good oral hygiene. These include: a
church service, special presentations
on oral health during assemblies at var-
ious schools in New Providence, and
annual oral health screening at the
Mall at Marathon with Dr Rabbit the
famous Oral Health Mascot on hand.
Maintaining good oral health
includes keeping teeth free from cav-
ities and preventing gum disease. Poor
oral health can affect your appearance
and self-esteem, and has been linked
to sleeping problems, as well as behav-
ioural and developmental problems in
children..Poor oral health can also
affect your ability to chew and digest
food properly.
Good nutrition is important to help
build strong teeth and gums that can
resist disease and promote healing.
Dr Emmanuel Francis, senior dental
officer in the Department of Oral
Health School Dental Clinic said


good nutrition with the daily con-
sumption of raw fruits and vegetables
in the proper amounts helps not only
to build strong teeth, but also helps
to scrub the teeth keeping them
clean. He described such foods as
detergents because of their cleaning
action on the teeth.
On the other hand, smoking is a
major risk factor for oral and dental
disease, including oral cancer. Tobac-
co reduces blood flow to the gums,
therefore the gums do not get the oxy-
gen and nutrients needed to stay
healthy and prevent bacterial infec-
tion.
Oral health needs to be a priority
throughout all stages of life, especial-
ly since older adults and seniors are
keeping their teeth longer than ever
before. However, older adults may
have less access to oral care services
and dentists because of lower incomes
and/or a lack of dental insurance.
Seniors living in long-term care facil-
ities are at particular risk for compli-
cations from poor oral health because
of frailty, poor health and increased
dependence on others for personal
care. In many cases, oral health prob-
lems in residents go undetected until
there are acute symptoms such as pain
or infection.
Besides pain and discomfort, poor
oral health can also contribute to a
number of serious health issues.

Health risks of
poor oral health
Gum disease is an inflammation of
the gums, which may also affect the
bone supporting the teeth. Plaque is a
sticky colourless film of bacteria that
constantly builds up, thickens and hard-
ens on the teeth. If it is not removed
daily by brushing and flossing, this
plaque can harden into tartar and con-
tribute to infections in the gums.
Left untreated, gum disease can lead
to the loss of teeth and an increased
risk of more serious diseases, including


heart disease and stroke. The bacteria
in plaque can travel from the mouth
into the blood stream, and has been
linked to the clogging of arteries and
damage to heart valves. The same bac-
teria can also travel to the lungs, caus--
ing infection and aggravating existing
lung conditions.
There is also a link between diabetes
and gum disease. People with diabetes
are more susceptible to gum disease,
and it can put them at greater risk of
diabetic complications.
Oral health is also extremely impor-
tant for pregnant women. Studies show
that pregnant women with gum dis-
ease are at higher risk of delivering
pre-term low birth weight babies than
women without gum disease. This is a
concern because such babies are
already at risk for many ailments,
including development of complica-
tions, asthma, ear infections, congeni-
tal abnormalities and behavioral diffi-
culties such as attention deficit disor-
der. They also have a high risk of infant
death.

Minimizing your risk
To maintain good oral health, you
should take the following steps:
Brush and floss your teeth daily
Visit your dental health care
provider regularly to have your mouth
examined. See your dental profession-
al immediately if you notice any prob-"
lems
Eat a healthy diet according to the
Bahamas' food guide to health eating
(the food drum)
Do not smoke. If you do smoke,
make sure to visit your dental profes-
sional regularly.
If you are pregnant, be sure to eat
healthy foods and maintain good oral
health
Brush your children's teeth for
them, until they have ability to write
their own name (not print cursive).
They should then be able to brush their
own teeth with your guidance.


Ministry of Health's role
The Ministry of health is commit-
ted to helping all Bahamians maintain
their health. The Oral Health Depart-
ment of the Ministry of Health works
to maintain and improve the oral
health of residents throughout the
Bahamas.
The Department delivers and man-
ages a broad range of oral health activ-
ities including proactive disease pre-
vention, oral health promotion and
basic dental treatment services pro-
vided by dental therapist's dentists and


4/
A'


1'2


other staff.
Residents can access oral health ser-
vices through the Department of Pub-
lic Health, Community Health Clin-
ics in New Providence and major Fam-
ily Islands.

For more information on Oral
Health in the Bahamas and the
activities for Oral Health Month
please call the Department of Oral
Health at telephone number
502.4878 or visit the community
health clinic nearest your home.





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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2008


WOMAN


Are your employers

really c


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"SLACKERS" can
emerge in your office
in many different
shapes and sizes.
There are "slackers"
who waste time on the
phone or by dragging
out a simple task over
an extended period
of time.


You have "slackers" who spend too much time
talking and gossiping or counselling coworkers
on their private affairs. They feel justified in tak-
ing time from the company on a regular basis
because they are helping others. While counseling
coworkers can be uplifting and supportive and is
sometimes necessary to circumvent morale issues,
employees who take too much time out of the
day on a continuous basis to achieve this objective
are abusing the company's time.Then you have
employees who spend inordinate amounts of time
on the internet, surfing, playing games, chatting,
checking out "You Tube"...you name it. There
are employees who are easily bored and there
are employees who have their own businesses and
so their attention is divided. From time to time
mangers lament about their unproductive employ-
ees accusing them of stretching work, disap-
pearing for extended periods of time or not meet-
ing targets. These managers place full responsi-
bility on. employees for the lack of interest in and
commitment to targets. However, contrary to
common beliefs among managers, the employee is
only one part of the "slacker" equation.
How managers contribute
to "slack" team behaviours
Here is a list of behaviours exhibited by man-
agers that demotivate and demoralise the team.
Employee disengagement is erroneously labeled as
"slackness" or laziness but what is really happen-
ing is employees are demoralized and disen-
chanted by unfair or inappropriate behaviours.
For example, there are:
1. Managers who speak to and email employees
using abusive language and tones.


2. Managers who blame employees for every-
thing that goes wrong on the team, not accepting
responsibility for targets that were not achieved.
3. Highly political office environments where
employees are working against the good of the
team.
4. Managers perrc-;ed as double crossing
employees by not ling them with merit
increases or bonus ;ir hard work.
5. Employees fee. .ey have no voice.
6. Unfair or slow 'decision making due to crony-
ism, nepotism etc.
7. Managers who don't provide employees with
necessary training.
Given any one of or a combination of thesd
behaviours, employees become demotivated feel-
ing that effort is pointless.
Now don't get me wrong, employees are not
excused from accountability for "slackness".*
Sometimes, employees take a job because they
don't want to be challenged. In these cases they
have no intention of applying themselves. Other
employees feel entitled to promotions or pre-
ferred treatment and disengage because their
manager makes a fair decision based on perfor-
mance and merit. Then there are employees with
personal problems that reduce productivity. In
all these cases, effective managers can either coach,
counsel or take corrective action with non-pro-
ductive employees.
Common mistakes managers
make in trying to correct
If there are toxic behaviours within a team,
motivational speeches will have little to no effect
as they do not address root causes. Additionally,


closer supervision will not work if the root issues
are not identified and solutions found. For
instance, if a manager usually uses abusive lan-
guage and is now under pressure to closely super-
vise employees, without proper development and
accountability, they will proceed to closely super-
vise using even more abusive language.

How to turn around
a team of "slackers"
In order to turn around a team with members
labeled as "slackers", managers and supervisors
need to be trained as leaders who can develop
others, make difficult decisions and inspire mem-
bers of the team to achieve higher and higher
performance levels.
Training or corrective action in isolation will
not remedy the problem of unproductive employ-
ee behaviours so managers and supervisors can be
held accountable to appropriate team building
behaviours through an effectively executed per-
formance management process or through restruc-
turing teams.
The point of developing managers is to help
them treat employees with dignity and respect
and to enable them to make the tough decisions
necessary to transform the team through further
training, restructuring and accountability.

Yvette Bethel is the president of Organisational
Soul. She can be contacted by telephone at
242.424.7166 or fax 242.324.1631 or write to her
at PO Box N-511, Nassau, Bahamas. Interested
persons can also check out her website at:
www.orgsoul.com.


eling youth: Are we


prostituting


our


C


h


dren to


survive?


* By IAN BETHELL BENNETT


article


response
JL to ,a deba-

cle that has surfaced in
Puerto Rico. Many of
you will complain that
Puerto Rico has noth-
ing to do with the
Bahamas. But in
today's global village,
we are all intercon-
nected.
In brief, the story sur-
faced that a young girl,
ten years old, was pro-
viding sexual favours
to older men.


This is not uncommon in the
Bahamas where we find a hotbed of
such activity on some buses. This,
unfortunately, goes on in a number
of places. The more horrifying part
of the story was that her mother was
in the front of the'bus as this was
occurring. And the man was not
forcing the girl, nor was the mother
unaware of the deeds transpiring.
She, in fact, was the agent of said
deeds. She encouraged her daughter
to do this, and then profited from
the proceeds from the activity.
Where has society gone wrong?
It would seem that we must hark
back to the 18th century and 'A
Modest Proposal' by Jonathon Swift,
that proposed for people who had
too many children and could not
feed all of them that they should sell
their children to the rich. At least
Swift's 'proposal' though not at all,
was being ironic. Today, we claim
that we are so advanced from such
barbarity, as that proposed by Swift.
But how different is selling children
to the rich from prostituting them
to whomever is willing to pay for
sex?
While readers may argue that this
does NOT happen in the Bahamas,
we know for a fact that it does. How
does a parent prostitute child?
Have times become so desperate
that we must corrupt our young even
before they can fully understand the


risks to which they are exposing
themselves?
Parents are meant to protect, pro-
vide love and care, and basically pos-
itively influence the lives of their
children. Is this positive influence?
If ten year olds are being used to
provide financial support for families
in this way, what will happen when
they reach sixteen? Or eighteen? Or
twenty? How many children will
they have? What kind of role models
will they be? What kind of human
relationship will they have with their
children?
If this is the trend in societies
today, it speaks to a serious de-'
humanising of humanity. To be sure,
we do not expect utter morality from
everyone, but to be so completely
amoral, seems like a condemnation
of society's basic functioning. If it
were an isolated case then we could
,say it does not reflect anything more
troubling than that.
However, because we know that it
is far more widespread than this, and
it speaks to the existence of the girls
who use men to meet their financial
and material needs; the phone-card
man comes quickly to mind. This
clearly highlights the trend to com-
modify sex.
Sex has become transactional.
Love is removed and certainly any-
thing more profound than paying
this months bills is absent from the


equation. As societies then, we have
become empty of meaning more
profound than material 'success'.
Could this by why teenage preg-
nancy, teenage HIV and other prob-
lems with teenagers are on the rise?
Could it be that we are so utterly
failing or children that they have no
inkling of what is right and what is
wrong? If abusive sex is all children
ever know we cannot expect them to
become normal, functioning adults in
later life. Is the economy in such a
grave state, and families living so
tenuously between eating and star-
vation that we must prostitute our
children?
Perhaps it speaks to the reality
that all we see is material success
and this is all that is sold to us by
the media. If you want to be popular,
you must have the latest mobile
phone. But this kind of empty con-
sumerism only serves to destroy all
the moral fibre in a society.
Certainly, the Bahamas Christian
council would be interested in pro-
moting a new relationship with our-
selves. Obviously, if we do not have
a good relationship with ourselves
we cannot have good'relationships
with others. What kind of relation-
ship with herself does a woman have
who has been used for sex-for-prof-
it from the time she was eight years
old? What kind of person will she
grow into? What does this say about
HIV prevention programmes? Are
we heading in the right direction?
We must, though, recognize that
some parents are doing all they can
to raise their children to be loving,
responsible and well-formed indi-
viduals. These children are always
going to come into contact with oth-
er children who seem to have every-


thing material they want. How do
we deal with this kind of disparity?
The existence of peer pressure is
no where more daunting than in
school, and this is where many of
the children fall into real problems as
they run into conflict between the
mores taught at home and the
behaviour evidenced at school.
Often the school behaviour of vio-
lence, sex and drugs, not to mention
disrespect, wins out as peer pressure
become too strong to ignore. The
hope remains that if the home is
strong enough and the parental influ-
ence sufficient to keep the positive
models active, then, some youngster
will survive. But the others whose
parents are too busy working do not
have this model of home life to
strengthen them.
Can we begin to separate the eco-
nomic reality from the breakdown of
family values? Yes, the Bahamas
may have surpassed some of the UN
Global Millennium Goals, but what
impact has this had on human devel-
opment in our country? Millennium
Goals are not simply about growth
and development, but about food
security, health matters, education,
and poverty reduction. Clearly, we
are suffering a huge setback in the
fight to reduce poverty, if not eco-
nomic then certainly spiritual. Selling
children, into sex was always some-
thing that was seen as distant from
us. Now,, it has become a part of
many societies. What can we do to
fix this problem?
*Ian Bethell-Bennettis a Bahami-
an lecturer at the University of Puer-
to Rico. For questions or comments
email: bethellbennett@yahoo.co.uk


Getting her drink on


FROM page 12
"Women are looking to have a good time
when they drink, said David Knowles, of
Alcoholic's Anonymous, [but] women who
are drunk are often targeted by men who
place different drugs, including ecstasy, into
a woman's drink in order to have his way
with her".
A fellowship of men and women, mem-
bers of Alcoholic's Anonymous share their
experience, strength and hope with each
other in an effort to solve their common
problem and help others to recover from
alcoholism.
The only requirement for membership,
AA's website states, is a desire to stop drink-
ing. There are no dues or fees for AA mem-
bership, which is self-supporting through
voluntary contributions. AA is not allied
with any sect, denomination, political organ-
isation, civil organisation or institution. "Our
primary purpose," the website reads, "is to
stay sober and help other alcoholics to
achieve sobriety."
Mr Knowles told Tribune Woman, that
women who have children and who are


struggling to control the amount of alcohol
they consume, should understand the impact
their behaviour is having, not only on them-
selves, but on their children.
Mothers who abuse alcohol are often
drunk, he said, are always unstable, and are
not in a position to care for or protect their
children.
Mr Knowles said further that parents who
want to set a good example for their children
should realize that they are watching them
and are learning from and, possibly, mim-
icking their destructive behaviour.
Women who have children, if they have to
drink, should only drink in moderation, he
said. Especially in single-parent homes
where children depend on their mothers
for love, care and attention, if the mother is
a drunk, then who are they to turn to for the
necessities of life, he questioned.
"It is outrageous to see how these women
with children act when they are drunk. It is
often disgraceful and children look at this
type of behaviour as something acceptable,"
Mr Knowles said.
For women who want to get help with
their addiction, the tough thing is that soci-


ety seems to be only minimally concerned
with offering them real support, he admit-
ted.
To date there is only one rehabilitation
centre that is open to women, the Commu-
nity Counselling and Assessment Centre
on Market Street, although those treated
there may also be referred to Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre for further treatment.
"There are many different houses that cater
to men, but women, after they have come
from the one rehabilitation centre, they are
back into the same environment they left,
which then causes them to regress," he said.
Agreeing with this sentiment, Nurse John-
son acknowledge that women who are alco-
holics are often looked down upon by peo-
ple and are shunned by even their family
and friends. "Society has become more open
to men being alcoholics, but families usual-
ly avoid association with these women and
disregard them from their inner circle."

For more information on treatment for
alcohol abuse contact Community Coun-
selling and Assessment Centre at
323.3293, Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen-
tre at 364.9601 and Alcoholics Anonymous
at 322.1685


S





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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2008, jArpE 11B


THE TRIBUNE


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E ByJEFFARAH GIBSON


BAHAMIAN women who abuse alcohol have
the same intentions as men who drink. Some
are just after the soothing, relaxed feeling of
intoxication. They want to be able to let loose and
have a good time but they don't know how to self
regulate and draw the line at an acceptable level.
Ot ers just want to distance themselves from reality -
forgetting about any problems they are having and
numbing the pain of difficult situations.


Although consuming alcohol in modera-
tion is not seen as harmful studies have
shown the benefits of drinking red wine in
moderation women who abuse alcohol,
who are chronically intoxicated or who are
even drunk occasionally, face far greater
risks of health problems and social stigma
than men. -
Particularly for women, alcohol abuse and
being drunk is seen as socially unacceptable
and embarrassing, but even more critical is
that it impairs a woman's judgment.
Women who consume even moderate
amounts of alcohol are vulnerable and can
become potential targets for sexual assault.
On the flip side, women can themselves
become a danger to others if they get behind


the wheel of a car after having had a few
drinks. According to www.athealth.com, a
140 pound woman who has a blood alcohol
level equivalent to having one drink on an
empty stomach, has a greater chance of being
killed in a single-vehicle crash than a woman
who has, not been drinking.
For women, another concern when the
issue of alcohol abuse is raised, is the effect
alcohol has on the fetus.
Psychiatric Nurse Sue Johnson told Tri-
bune Woman
that alcoholism presents serious problems
for pregnant women and their babies. "As it
regards their health, alcohol affects the birth
process for a woman. If she is pregnant and
consumes alcohol the fetus may develop


fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS)," she said.
The US-based Centers for Disease Control.
and Prevention lists FAS as one of the lead-
ing known preventable causes of mental
retardation and birth defects. Babies that
are born with FAS are faced with a lifelong
condition that causes physical and mental
disabilities, the website stated further.
Babies diagnosed with FAS may be born
small and are characterized by abnormal
facial features. They also have central ner-
vous system problems. People with FAS
may have problems with learning, memory,
attention span; communication, vision, hear-
ing or a combination of these.
Children born with FAS may also face
difficulties in school and problems socializing
with others. And what is important to note,
is that these alcohol-related changes in the
brain may be present even in babies whose
appearance and growth are not affected.
According to the CDC, for women who
are pregnant, there is no known safe level of
alcohol consumption, nor is there any stage
of pregnancy in which drinking at any lev-
el is known to be risk free.
For women who are not pregnant, enjoy-
ing a glass of red wine or sparkling cham-
pagne is an acceptable social activity once
they are aware of how much they are drink-
ing, are able to remain in control of the sit-
uation, and understand that even a single
drink negatively impacts their ability to dri-
ve safely.
SEE page 10


PARTICULAR-
LY for women,
alcohol abuse
and being drunk
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embarrassing,
but even more
critical is that it
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.9.


_ __ _I_ __


2008




The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01188
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: December 4, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01188

Full Text







FRUIT&NUT lM
McFLURRY I'm lovin' f

HIGH 82F
LOW 73F

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SUNNY


The


Tribune


Volume: 105 No.12


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008


PRICE 750


OP Pl t Concerns over

oe Customs w I 'weaknPsse'i


corruption claims


Govt is urged to

fire at least 1,200


GOVERNMENT is being
urged to "dismantle" .the Cus-
toms Department and fire at
least 1,200 of its 3,000 staff as
corruption charges mount
against several key officers.
Sources either inside Customs
or close to the department say
the present situation can't con-
tinue, with one claiming that,
more'than $2 billion in potential
duty has been "lost" over the
last ten years.
"Some of us are catching hell
down here while others just get
away with everything," one
Frustrated employee told The
Tribune yesterday, while anoth-
-r reeled off a list of who they
claimed were "crooked offi-
cers," allegedly robbing the
Bahamas of millions.
The outrage inside and out-
side the department follows last
week's fire at the home of Cus-
toms officer Roslyn Ritchie.
At the ,time, arson was
blamed for the blaze, but
intense investigations are now
underway to find out how the
fire-raisers could have torched
the house in broad daylight.
Several theories are being
considered, one being that Mrs
Ritchie was targeted by angry


business people as a result of.
her task force work.
Another is that certain Cus-
toms officers grew angry after
the task force "blocked" their
illicit dealings, which allegedly
net up to $30,000 a month for
some staff.
However, the fire has also
sparked interest in the unex-
plained wealth of several offi-
cers, including one who alleged-
ly has a string of apartments
throughout Nassau, and anoth-
er who is alleged to have accu-
mulated $5 million in his per-
sonal accounts.
Next Monday's Tribu'ne
Insight article also deals with a
$5,000 bribe allegedly offered
to one officer who then instruct-
ed another officer to clear a
container of imported goods.
However, the importer felt
betrayed when the container
was seized and searched, with
no attempt being made to
-return the bribe money.
Yesterday, The Tribune was
deluged with information about
Customs "criminality" from
inside sources, with claims that
several persons are being pro-
SEE page 11


CONTAINERS WAITING to be inspected by the Department of Customs
yesterday. Sources either inside Customs or close to the department
say the present situation can't continue.





E By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
SOME senior police officers are not interested in justice when it
comes to matters involving complaints of abuse by other officers, it
was claimed yesterday.
According to Quincey Johnson, an ex-prison guard, officers
entered his Exuma home and beat him in front of his fiance's
children. They then took him to the police station where he was
held, but never charged.
"The officers asked the officers in charge what they should
charge me with," he said. "She told them she was not getting
involved."
Mr Johnson said a corporal suggested the officers, whom he
contends assaulted him, take him to the clinic because he was
bleeding from an injury to his head.
When they arrived at the doctor's house, because the clinic was
closed, Mr Johnson said the doctor told the officers, "Ya'll need to
stop this."
The doctor's report stated that he was injured in an. "assault
SEE page 14


VCust Dept

Customs Dept


* By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
THE auditor-general has
raised concerns regarding
"weaknesses" in the Depart-
ment of Customs which
allowed some officers to claim
overtime pay totalling three
to four times their annual
salary. *
These concerns are outlined
in a letter dated January 23,
2006 a copy of which was
obtained by The Tribune -
sent to the former Comptroller


of Customs John Rolle in 2006
regarding an audit inspection
of Bahamas Customs/govern-
ment overtime for the period
of July 31, 2003, to June 30,
2005.
A separate correspondence
from the Acting Comptroller
of Customs Anthony Adder-
ley sent to the financial secre-
tary at the Ministry of Finance
on December 1, 2008, revealed
that several officers claimed
tens of thousands of overtime
pay between July, 2007, to
SEE page 11


Airport fees will increase

on completion of Phase I

FEES payable for international travel at Lynden Pindling
International Airport, which were recently raised from $15 to-
$20 per passenger, will increase to $25 following the completion
of Phase I of the airport's redevelopment, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham told parliament yesterday.
Mr Ingraham made the announcement last evening as he con-
cluded the debate on a Bill for an Act to Grant Certain Import
Concessions on Construction Materials Required for Airports
and matters connected therewith.
The facility fee of $15, the prime minister explained, was
SEE page 14

Parliamentary report says doctor
was licensed despite clinic concerns


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
AN EAST STREET doctor
was licensed to treat the public
despite concerns raised that his
clinic was initially found to be
"very unsanitary" and that he
himself was "not stable", a
report tabled in parliament
revealed yesterday.
In the 2007 report by Dr


Kirkland Culmer, Chairman of -
the Hospital and Healthcare
Facilities Licensing Board, pre-
pared on June 30, 2008, the
case of Dr Charles Cleare is
raised as one of three "thorny"
issues currently before the
Board.
After first having his license
suspended by the Board, Dr
SEE page 14


liii


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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


TV gear worth $22,000 stolen from Jones Communication Network media house


I By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter


AROUND $22,000 worth of tele-
vision equipment was stolen from
thi Jones Communication Network
m dia house on East Street early
ytqterday morning.
Robbers are thought to have dis-
mantled CCTV security cameras
when they broke into the building


under the cover of night between
2am and 3am as wires connecting the
cameras were out of place.
Once inside the building, the
intruders broke into the newsroom
where they dismantled a 601b flat
screen television from the wall.
They got away with three flat
screen televisions, and two ENG
video cameras for television broad-
casts worth around $22,000 in total.


JCN CEO Wendall Jones said: "I
can't imagine who would run the risk
of trying to sell or use the equipment
because it is all marked and clearly
identifiable. But we realise we have a
security problem here which we are
. seeking to rectify.
"We are stepping up our security
measures now because we are deal-
ing with very expensive equipment."
JCN operated as normal yester-


day, while assisting with the police ~tihs curve ball, and throw us back.
investigation into the robbery and "We have to work with our insur-
working with their insurance com- ance company and the police to
pany to replace the cameras and tele- come back from this setback.
visions as soon as possible. "It is distressing that we have this
Mr Jones said: "We are able to level of criminality in our society,
carry on as normal but it's a setback and I know the police are over-
as we have to replace the equipment wlhelmed," he said.
immediately. When we thought we Anyone with information which
were taking some steps forward, we may assist investigations is being
have these people who throw you asked to call police on 919.


" Bahamian Family Seafood Traditi


Raising disabilities awareness


* BY ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas joined hands
with the global community yes-
terday to increase awareness of
the need to integrate persons with
disabilities into every aspect of
national life.
Yesterday, the country offi-
cially observed International Day
of Persons with Disabilities, an
annual celebration which aims to
promote understanding about dis-
ability issues and mobilise sup-
port for the dignity, rights and
well-being of persons with dis-
abilities.
This year's theme Dignity
and Justice for All of Us was
selected by the United Nations
based on its goal of full and equal
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with disabilities.
Minister of State for Social
Development Loretta Butler-
Turner said the annual obser-
vance of this day also creates
tremendous opportunities for


* By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bank of the Bahamas'
main branch on Shirley Street
remained closed yesterday as
the staff are still battling a
strong odour circulating
throughout the building.
Senior manager of business
development, public relations
and legal affairs, Tameka Bur-
rows-Forbes said that the
strong smell is the result of
diesel leaking from a genera-
tor unit on the roof of the
building.
"The generator's diesel
holding tank had a leak and
the diesel managed to get into
the air conditioning vents of
the entire building," Mrs
Forbes explained.
She said that the company
takes the health of its employ-
ees very seriously, and con-
firmed that two employees
have fallen ill after inhaling
the diesel fumes.
This, she said, resulted in
other employees being sent to
work at other Bank of the
Bahamas branches through-
out New Providence.
"Our employees are our
most valuable resource so we
take whatever measures we
need to take to ensure their
safety and at the end of the
day that's our responsibility


government and non-govern-
mental organizations.
"These organizations and soci-
ety as a whole can focus upon and
take stock of the gains made from
the inclusion of persons with dis-
,abilities in every aspect of politi-


to our employees," Mrs
Forbes said.
She said that Environmental
Health officials came to the
branch to conduct numerous
tests to determine whether or
not it was safe for employees
to return-to. thefirst or sec-
ond floors of the building.
"They were still not satis-
fied after flushing the vents
yesterday and asked that we
close the branch. However,
they do anticipate that the cor-
rective action taken yesterday
will allow the bank to be open
as of today," Mrs Forbes said.


, cal, social, economic and cultural
life," she said.
Mrs Turner said that despite
the many challenges and' obsta-
cles that still exist, persons with
disabilities continue to "scale
.mountains" and achieve success
in various fields including educa-
tion, religion, music, accounting,
manufacturing, law, and commu-
nication technology.
"It is important however, for
those who have excelled to recog-
nise that they have a responsibil-
ity to their brothers, and sisters in
the community of persons with
disabilities to ensure that the steps
on the ladder of success are nev-
er without a climber until all have
achieved their chosen level of suc-
cess," Mrs Turner said. She urged
all Bahamians to renew their
commitment to the removal of all
barriers that prevent persons with
disabilities from enjoying full an
equal participation in their com-
munities and society at large.

0 In brief

Christian TV station
to be launched soon
A TELEVISION station pro-
claiming Christian teachings will
be launched in early January.
The Bahamas Christian Net-
work, or BCN TV, will be oper-
ated from Radio Abaco in Dun-
das Town, Abaco.
Pastor Silbert Mills publicised
the launch of the nation's first
Christian television channel with
a presentation at the Wyndham
Hotel in Cable Beach yesterday.
He said: "This is history in the
making! This television station
will seek to provide Bahamian
pastors with the first opportunity -
to spread the Gospelthroughout
the Bahamas."
He said similar presentations
will be held in Freeport, Grand
Bahama, next week.


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THE TIBUNETHURSAY, ECEMBRL4,C008,NAGES


PM tight-lipped on claim he requested


records on some customs officers


* By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham would not confirm
or deny yesterday whether he
has requested that records on
around two dozen customs offi-
cers be turned over to his office
by the Department of Customs.
The question was put to him
after sources claimed corrup-
tion within Customs prompted
the nation's chief to ask for the
records earlier this week.
When asked if records on
certain officers were request-
ed, Mr Ingraham replied: "I am
the prime minister of the
Bahamas. The people of the
Bahahmas may have an interest
in knowing what files I see. I
see many files.".
When pressed about whether
he requested any files on cus-
toms officers which discussed
illegal activity, the prime min-
ister would only say: "Many
files, many files, everyday of
my life I see files".
The prime minister contin-
ued to remain vague when


"I look at many
files everyday...
I am concerned
about corruption
wherever it
exists."

Hubert Ingraham

asked if he was personally
looking into allegations of cor-
ruption at Customs and if he
was concerned about allega-
tions of corruption in that
department.
"I look at many files every-
day. .I am concerned about
corruption wherever it exists,
wherever it exists," he told The
Tribune at the House of
Assembly yesterday.
In July, the prime minister
pledged to prosecute all public
servants who break the law. In
response to claims about cor-
ruption published in an Insight


article that month, Mr Ingra-
Sham admitted authorities had
not handled the problem cor-
rectly in the past.
"There has been a reluctance
on the part of government to
prosecute persons engaging in
.activities that are dishonest or
fraudulent, which includes a
minority of Customs officers,"
Mr Ingraham said in that inter-
view.


"That will change," he con-
tinued, asking members of the
public suffering intimidation at
the hands of rogue officers to
report the situation immedi-
ately, and "test whether or not
the government is willing to
enforce the anti-corruption
laws I think they will find that
we are."
"Yesterday, sources said a
number of customs officers are
the subject of investigations
regarding a host of issues,
including: an alleged petrole-
um scandal on a Family Island;
falsifying educational records;
allegedly defrauding Customs
of revenue; and allegedly
accepting bribes in order to
allow containers of goods to
enter the country without the
relevant duty being paid.
The department reportedly
has a revenue shortage of
about $400 million as a result
of goods entering the country
without duty being paid, the
source said.
"Corruption is rocking the
Bahamas Customs from its
very foundation," the source
claimed.


Former Bahamasair pilot refuses proposed


settlement after unfair dismissal ruling


* By MEGAN REYNOLDS ,
Tribune Staff Reporter
A FORMER Bahamasair pilot re:
an offer of 15 months pay plus bet
from the airline when an industrial
bunal ruled he was unfairly dismiss
Anthony Dean, 59, served as a ca
in the airline's Boeing 737 fleet un
was dismissed in early 2003.
The reason for his dismissal was pi
on his "miserable failure" of aircraft
ulator training in Miami, Florit
December 2002, by crashing the ail
simulator four times, the tribunal h
But the pilot, who had work'
Bahamasair since 1974 and was ea
$125,000,a.year at the time his cor
was terminated, claimed unfair dismn
He alleged there was a disparity i
treatment compared with treatme


0 In brief


Three men are

charged with

armed robbery
THREE men appeared in
a Magistrate's Court yester-
day on an armed robbery
charge.
It is alleged that on Friday,
November 28, Timothy
Fountain,.29, of Zion Boule-
vard, Brad Charlton, 29, of
Hampton Street and Tamiko
Arthur, 27, of Buttonwood
Avenue robbed Avery John-
son of $650 cash while armed
with a silver handgun on
November 28.
The accused, who
appeared before Magistrate
Derrence Rolle in Court 5,
Bank Lane yesterday, were
not required to plead to the
charge.
The men were remanded
to Her Majesty's Prison and
the case was adjourned to
February 4, 2009.


Christmas coming'

for children's

singing groups
CHILDREN will usher in
the spirit of Christmas at the
'Christmas Comin" singing
competition tonight.
School choirs and other
children's singing groups will
participate in the competi-
tion held in the grounds of
Collins House, Shirley Street
at 7pm.
The National Museum and
the Antiquities, Monuments,
and Museums Corporation is
staging the event.
Parking can be accessed
from the car park entrance
on Collins Avenue, across
from Colina Imperial Insur-
ance Ltd. -


other Bahamasair pilots who also failed
aircraft simulator training and crashed
the aircraft simulator once in November
2002.
In his judgment of the industrial tri-
bunal released yesterday, president Har-
rison Lockhart wrote: "During the course
of the hearing the tribunal was satisfied
on the evidence that the applicant was
unfairly dismissed, but to a significant
extent his dismissal wis caused or con-
tributed to by his own miserable failure at
aircraft simulator training which included
his crashing the aircraft simulator four
times."
Mr Lockhart advised both parties that
any award to Captain Dean in respect of
.unfair .dismissal, would not exceed 15
months pay, according to the. 2001
Employment Act.
Bahamasair agreed to pay Captain
t 4


E N T


Dean 15 months salary, amounting to
$156,250, in addition to any other accrued
monetary benefits owing to, but not
received by, Captain Dean when his
employment was terminated.
The airline also agreed to withdraw its
letter of termination from Captain Dean's
fHe and restore all benefits to which
retired pilots are entitled, such as.travel
privileges for himself and his family.
Captain Dean refused the proposed
settlement and the originating applica-
tion has been dismissed.
Following the hearing Captain Dean
said: "I have been out for six years and
the amount that was offered... there is
no way that could compensate me for the
rest of my life.
"Fifteen months, could n-v'r-be-b
enough. My career is over. It's finished."
He intends to seek a larger settlement. -


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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008


EIOI *AULETE 6T TH EDTO


ATLANTA Every time terrorists strike,
the civilized world vows not to let them win.
Yet time after time, we give them exactly
the victory they seek.
In the Middle East, Palestinian terrorists'
have attacked repeatedly in hopes of dis-
rupting peace efforts; time after time, they've
got their way.
In the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, Osama
bin Laden made it clear that he was trying to
provoke the United States into an overreac-
tion; by invading Iraq, an oil-rich Islamic
country that had nothing to do with 9/11, we
gave him just what he wanted. Iraq became a
great recruiting tool and rallying point for
al-Qaida. So it's pretty simple: If you want to
deny victory to terrorists, you figure out what
they're trying to get you to do. Then you
don't do it.
But given the emotional impact of terror-
ism, that can be extraordinarily hard, as the
people of India know.
The goal of the terrorists who attacked
Mumbai last week was not to kill hundreds of
victims. "Victims are just the language of
war," as Khalid Sheikh Muhammad, the mas-
termind of September 11, told his captors.
Muhammad and other terrorists are
engaged in "asymetric warfare," in which a
much weaker party faces a much stronger
opponent. Unable to win a head-on strug-
gle, the weaker party tries to provoke its
opponent into reacting in anger or fear, an
overreaction that weakens it in the eyes of the
world, reduces its legitimacy and makes it
vulnerable. To the Mumbai terrorists, those
many dead innocents were a means of achiev-
ing their goal, which was to undermine rela-
tions between Pakistan and India and pro-
voke the. two nuclear-armed nations to war.
The world is now trying to ensure that rising
anger in India anger that is natural and jus-
tified doesn't give the murderers what
they sought..
Ironically, one of the best lessons about
how to respond to terrorism can be drawn
from a seemingly unlikely source, the career
of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. In his own,
very different form of assymetric warfare, he
too tried to provoke his more powerful oppo-
nents into an overreaction that would weak-
en them, with the very important moral dif-
ference that King chose to provoke through
nonviolence. And as King discovered, some
foes are too smart to play along.


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In 1962, King was drawn into the struggle
to desegregate the town of Albany, Ga. He
led protests and marches, trying to provoke
local officials into an overreaction that would
reverse the power dynamic. But the Albany
sheriff, Laurie Pritchett, had studied King's
tactics and refused to give King what he
sought. As Pritchett later explained, he met
non-violence with non-violence.
King would organize mass demonstrations;
Pritchett's deputies would arrest the demon-
strators, but they would do so calmly and
professionally. King and his lieutenants would
get themselves arrested, hoping to become
high-profile martyrs; Pritchett would secret-
ly arrange to let them go.
"I've been thrown out of a lot of places in
my day, but never before have I been thrown
out of jail," King's assistant, the Rev. Ralph
David Abernathy Jr., complained after his
release. Through patience, Pritchett denied
King the images of brutal repression that
could be broadcast worldwide by the media,
images that would build :sympathy for the
underdog. Frustrated, King left Albany with
segregation still in place.
But a year later in Birmingham, King met
a more cooperative foe in Police Commis-
sioner Bull Connor. When demonstrators
marched, Connor respo ded just as King
hoped, with firehoses aid nightsticks and
police dogs sicced upon children. The images
out of Birmingham of the strong attacking the
weak horrified the nation and forced federal
intervention. Within days, legal segregation in
Birmingham was ended forever. The weak
had beaten the strong.
"We were witnessing police violence and
brutality Birmingham-style," as John Lewis
put it. "Unfortunately for Bull Connor, so
was the rest of the world."
Military force is a legitimate and neces-
sary tool to defend ourselves and loved ones.
When we can find terrorists, we should kill
them, and where possible we should deny
them sanctuary. But it is important to remem-
ber that the civilized world is far stronger
than they are. Whatever power they have is
power that we give them through the anger
and fear we allow them to provoke.
It's hard to cite a segregationist sheriff as a
role model, but Laurie Pfitchett had it figured
out.
(This article was written by Jay Bookman of
Cox News Service).


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday,

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassad Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


Our Government needs to pro-
tect both Customs Officials,
those employed at the various
shipping ports throughout the
Bahamas as well as general pub-
lic.
EDITOR, The Tribune.
I extend.my condolences to the
Ritchie family whose home has
been wrecked due to an extreme
arson attack; it is such a sad
tragedy. We all know the impor-
tance of the Bahamas customs
department and we can definite-
ly appreciate the revenue they
generate especially at a time
when our economy is suffering
from decreases in our tourism
industry. When I mention pro-
tection as a necessity I am not
only specifically talking about
physical harm but the protection
of ones livelihood and ones psy-
chological capacity.
Corruption is dormant in the
hearts of all human beings,
including myself and sometimes
those with the highest self esteem,
integrity and honesty fall weak
to greed and this materialistic
world; others just have a strong
natural desire to be corrupt. This
corruption stems from man's
weakness, envy and pride. Our
country is corrupt because of our
various weaknesses. If the gov-
ernment selects a team to thor-
oughly investigate corruption in
any of its agencies or corpora-
tiohs these individuals should be
placed in protection programmes
and the government should not
only be held responsible for any
infractions but accept the respon-
sibilities themselves for any
infractions if they occur.
I work for a local shipping com-
pany and prior to my employ-
ment at this fine institution I have
shipped items frqm South Florida
to the Bahamas and have wit-
nessed a clearance system that is
both complicated and frustrating.
There are flaws that affect my


employer's revenue which can
affect my colleagues and my
livelihood any time soon due to
the Government's ludicrous up
and down clearance system. Indi-
viduals who ship goods go
through a long tiresome process
which they travel back and forth
between Customs and the ship-
ping port of their respective
choice.
During this time their invento-
ry is thoroughly searched and
exposed; in some cases over and
over again, it is ridiculous. I
understand that the government
is trying to avoid the shipping of
explosives, firearms, drugs and
any illegal items but this process
needs to be more moderate, con-
fidential and professional. I feel as
if the government needs to revise
the current process and allow
individuals to pay taxes and tariffs
at the port where their merchan-
dise has entered the country. This
is the 21st century; therefore we
need 21st century leaders, ideas
and solutions.
I know it is risky to have a
large volume of cash circulating at
these docks and security may be
an issue but we have a hand full
of competent officers who can get
the job done.
,Just set up a proper system
with police, marines and custom
officers and provide them with
the necessary equipment to be
accurate on their duties and to
combat any unfortunate events if
they occur.
The central police station is
near and DEU representatives
are stationed right next to our
port as well as RBDF marines
adjacent to the rear of our dock,
so security issues should not be
that much of a challenge.


With this current process cus-
tomers are frustrated and are
mentally and physically drained,
which discourages them from
shipping goods into the Bahamas
at times.
If people stop shipping it
affects my employer, who may
lay off staff which will lead to an
increase in the unemployment
rate which can lead to an increase
in crime. This also affects gov-
ernment because that is revenue
the country looses which affect
gross domestic product. The sig-
nificance of it is that these indi-
viduals who ship goods into the
country are prohibited from using
exemption relief.
Let's keep in mind that people
like myself (those working at
shipping ports) and custom offi-
cials are exposed to all types of
diseases and misfortunate events
such as: malaria, the bird flu and
the severe acute respiratory syn-
drome (Sars).
I won't take anything.away
from the government; The
-Department of Environmental
Health usually sends representa-
tives who properly spray con-
, tainers saturated with tyres with
chemicals to ensure that malaria
outbreaks don't occur. There are
also agriculture officials present
when produce is shipped and
entered through our port, etc.
I am asking the government
just to protect its citizens from
harm and mental frustration at
both the micro and macro levels
to ensure a safer and more friend-
ly environment so that we all can
be content and cooperative
through these tough economic
times.
Please reevaluate the clearance
of shipping goods process.
ELKIN SUTHERLAND Jr
A concerned
citizen and stevedore
Nassau,
November 28, 2008.


Hoping officials will do their jobs


EDITOR, The Tribune.
May I get some gripes off my
back and hope the officials con-
cerned will finally do their jobs?
PASSPORTS ZNS News
item last night on renewing pass-
ports suggested that anyone
whose current passport might be
due in the next six-months should
apply for a new e-passport and
then simply hold onto the old
passport until when the new one
is active. To my knowledge I
believe that is illegal and a serious
offence. Passport Office please
correct if this is so.
WALK-A-THONS on West


Bay Street surely it is time owing
to the increase in traffic and for
basic public safety that walk-a-
thons should no longer be held
on the West Bay Street route.
The Sports Centre, Oakes Field
surely is a better location. Also
if a sponsor is donating water as a
refreshment for the walkers, the
organizers need to ensure that the
road and grassed areas are not
littered with empty bottles as it is
today, Saturday November 29th.
SIGNS-BANNERS & BILL-
BOARDS everywhere do they
have permission of Physical Plan-
ning? If 50 per cent of them actu-
ally have permits then we have
identified where the problem is
- Physical Planning is issuing too
many permits, Look at the signs
at the Clifford Park Cricket Oval
- Goodman's Bay- Tonique
Williams Highway for example -
simply ugly.
CABLE BEACH 'Container
Park' before the Police Station -


surely Baha Mar can remove this
eye-sore these containers have
been there so long that they had
to remove the rust and repaint
the containers. You have a lot of
places where these could be out
of sight.
FISH FRY I am sure that the
laws governing restaurants and
bars require that all have sepa-
rate rest rooms for men and ladies
- why are all the fish fry places
then for years now breaching the
law? I recall the FNM promised
to extend the West Bay Street,
sewer but that was two-years ago.
DUTY FREE
ALLOWANCES these are hard
times for Customs Revenue -
Minister of Finance please reduce
immediately the $600 per annum
allowance to $200 a year imme-
diately.
SHEPARD SMITH
Nassau,
November 29, 2008.


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Reevaluate




clearance




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SUNDAY SERVICES
7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15anr
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Phone: 323-6452 4 393-5798
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THE TIBUNETHURSAY, ECEMBR 4, 008, AGE


Government set to pay millions



towards airport development


* By ALISON LOWE this regard.
Tribune Staff Reporter This announcement comes in
alowe@tribunemedia.net the same week as the government
announced that it expects a $150
DESPITE initial expectations million shortfall in its revenue
that the government would not pay intake for 2008.
anything towards the redevelop- It was revealed as Mr Ingraham
ment of the country's main airport, moved for a second reading of a
this is set to soon change to the bill intended to reduce the cost of
tune of many millions of dollars. the re-development of the Lynden
Speaking in the House of Pindling International Airport.
Assembly yesterday, Prime Minis- A Bill for an Act to Grant Cer-
ter Hubert Ingraham said the gov- tain Import Concessions on Con-
ernment has already committed to struction Materials Required for
pay off an $11 million cost overrun Airports and Matters Connected
on repaving work at the airport. Therewith was passed yesterday
Meanwhile, he added that in the lower chamber.
because the payment of an $80 mil-
lion loan already held by the Air- Pr s i
port Authority is an "essential pre- Provision
requisite to the raising of $210 mil-
lion for the airport redevelopment" It makes provision for develop-
the government has chosen to ers to be exempted from paying
assume responsibility for the customs duties and excise tax on
majority of that figure. certain building materials required
He said: "We are quite confi- for the construction or.remodel-
dent that the $210 million can and ing of designated airports.
'will be raised but it will be subject The international airports set to
to the disposition of the $80 mil- benefit from the five year exemp-
lion. This will be disposed of by tions, intended to come into effect
the government assuming respon- by January 2009, will be: LPIA,
sibility for the first $50 million of Marsh Harbour, Treasure Cay,
the $80 million and facilitating and North Eleuthera and Moss Town.
accommodating the issuing of Under the Bill, the minister of
bonds for the other $30 million." finance has the authority to extend
He added that he will shortly the ambit of the Bill to include oth-
seek permission from parliament in er airports as he sees fit.


Bahamas Against Crime extends its

condolences to murder victim's family
THE Bahamas Against Crime committee has extended condolences to
the grieving family of the country's latest murder victim.
The victim, 25-year-old Dion Brendon Strachan, was killed on Thursday,
November 27 in Marsh Harbour, Abaco. It was the first murder of 2008 in
Abaco.
Chairman of the BAC, Dr William Thompson, said that Bahamians
must not ignore the ever increasing rate of serious crime in our communi-
ties.
"Either we band together and seriously address this crisis, or we will all
suffer together," he said.
Dr CB Moss, executive director of BAC, added that the committee is now
calling upon the government, the business community and the media to
"reduce the talk and increase the action" in tens of working to prevent
crime.
"If we continue to stick our heads in the sand, we are. going to have a very
rude awakening," he said.
"Several months ago, several leaders in Marsh Harbour were approached
with a view to implementing the BAC project in their community. However,
they felt that there was little need, as crime was not a problem there.
"The truth," Dr Moss said, "is that crime is everywhere, and can easily and
quickly explode into a major tragedy. And the Bahamian people must not
ignore this."
Dr Moss concluded his statement by reminding government that while
crime is not a political issue, the response to crime can become a political
issue and indeed a political problem.


The prime minister also
announced that he expects to take
steps to contract private compa-
nies to manage "all or some" of
the Bahamas' other major airports,
as has been done with the LPIA.
He said that in this way the ser-
vice they provide will be improved
as the facilities will not be "sub-
ject to the regular -bureaucracy of
the state."
Opposition MPs, including MP
for Engleston Glenys Hanna Mar-
tin, called on the government to
ensure that other airports which
may not be "so profitable" but
which are equally critical to their
communities, benefit similarly.
Praising the Bill as "good for
the Bahamas, good for the econo-
my and good for job creation", MP
for North Andros, Vincent Peet,
called on the government to imme-
diately take steps to improve con-
.ditions at the airport in his con-
stituency, where trailers have been
used in place of permanent build-
ings since a fire in 2005.
Minister of State for Finance,
Zhivargo Laing, noted that while
some might wish the LPIA rede-
velopment project had begun ear-
lier, it will now be an boon in these
lean economic times.
Adding the "multiplier effect"
to the $175 million being directly
pumped into the project, Mr Laing
said the transformation of the
country's transportation hub may
represent "almost $600 million of
economic stimulus."
At its peak, the redevelopment
of the LPIA will employ 400 peo-
ple.
Meanwhile, airport enhance-
ments in other islands for exam-
ple, Marsh Harbour, where a new
airport control tower and termi-
nal will shortly be built will give a
boost to local economies, said Min-
ister of Works Neko Grant.
Former minister of tourism Obie
Wilchcombe said now is an ideal


time to "fix what we can fix" in
the Bahamas, so as to be ready to
take advantage of a pick-up in
tourism when conditions improve


globally.
The first phase construction at
LPIA is set to begin by the sec-
ond quarter of next year.


Ingraham speaks in the House.


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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


. . ; .


AL













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BAHAMIANS looking to
brighten their skin often run the
risk of suffering severe skin
health problems, a local thera-
pist says.
Hydroquinone, long consid-
ered a staple ingredient in skin
brightening products used in the
Bahamas, has been banned in
many countries due to concerns
about its affect on skin health
and its cancer-causing poten-
tial.
Sarah Simpson, a profession-
al skin therapist and owner of
Dermal Distributions, said she
has long awaited a safe prod-
uct that targets hyper-pigmen-
tation and discolourations on
the skin.
"Many Bahamians are cur-
rently using hydroquinone to
'bleach' the skin, however, this
ingredient is illegal in most
countries as it can cause skin
sensitivities, irritation and actu-
ally can cause more hyper-pig-
mentation to the skin. For years,
Dermalogica has researched
new ingredients that will suc-
cessfully treat skin discoloura-
tions without causing any harm-
ful effects, and with this new
technology it finally exists."
She said ChromaWhite TRx
is the first brightening system
to take a three step approach
to controlling hyper-pigmenta-


"I have treated all
skin types and skin
conditions for the
past seven years and
the number one
problem I see
with clients is
hyperpigmentation."

Sarah Simpson
tion while simultaneously focus-
ing on improving skin health
Typically, consumers rely on
a single treatment containing
skin brighteners, rather than
factoring pigment-balancing
into every aspect of their skin
care regimen.
Ms Simpson said: "I have
treated all skin types and skin
conditions for the past seven


THE Bahamas Electricity Corporation is
Doing all it can to clean up its Clifton Pier
plant, BEC board chairman Frederik Gottlieb
said.
This follows the disclosure that over the
years, tens of thousands of gallons of oil have
been,spilled into the ground by the corporation
in the area surrounding the facility
"BEC wants to make the Bahamian public
aware that every effort is being made to make
Clifton Pier environmentally sound and sta-
ble," Mr Gottlieb said.
He said that he is pleased with the
"revamped physical appearance" of the plant.
Mr Gottlieb was speaking as BEC members
of the board and managers accompanied by


years and the number one prob-
lem I see with clients is hyper-
pigmentation. No matter what
colour skin, what age or what
skin type, a large number of
people are affected by this con-
dition. I am extremely excited
to finally have a system of prod-
ucts that I can proudly recom-
mend to treat pigmentation and
I feel confident that it will work
and is safe for the skin."
ChromaWhite TRx report-
edly makes use of algae extracts
and vitamin C derivatives.
Exposure to sunlight, hor-
monal factors and changes,
usage of prescription drugs and
the healing process when skin
has been damaged are all fac-
tors that contribute to hyper-
pigmentation.
No matter how it is triggered,
hyper-pigmentation shows on
skin in the forin of darker spots
and can cause an uneven skin
tone.


Minister of State for the Environment Phenton
Neymour conducted a clean-up assessment at
the plant.
"The main objective of the tour was to focus
attention on BEC's current plans and what
was already achieved," Mr Gottlieb said.
Plant Manager James Gilbert led the assess-
ment tour of the facilities.
During the assessment Kevin Basden, BEC
general manager, commended the Clifton Pier
team for its assistance in the revitalisation
process at the facility and further explained
that the "remediation efforts" at the station
included the installation of new machinery and
other components.


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BEC working to keep


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PICTURED (left to right) are: Kevin Basden, Minister Phenton Neymour, James
Gilbert, Frederik Gottlieb and DeCosta Bethel.


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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE







THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


LOA NW


Mitchell criticises


PM's comments on


PetroCaribe accord


* By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
"STRONG and uncalled for"
was how PLP member of parlia-
ment Fred Mitchell described
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham's language with regard to the.
PetroCaribe accord.
During a conference with
reporters Sunday, Mr Ingraham,
when asked about the possibility
of the Bahamas adopting the
PetroCaribe initiative, called it a
"stupid proposal."
Mr Mitchell told The Tribune
that he is quite concerned about
Mr Ingraham'9 choice of words.
He said he thought Mr Ingra-
ham's comments on the Venezue-
lan oil exporting plan were "inel-
epant" and "unnecessarily abu-
sxe."
Mr Ingraham accused former
PLP MP Leslie Miller of attempt-
ing to sign onto the PetroCaribe
accord without the advice of his
colleagues.
However, Mr Mitchell said
there is a misunderstanding about
the PLP's position on the accord.
He said Mr Miller, then minis-
ter of trade and industry, did not
sign an agreement, but a "state-
ment of principle or letter of
intent."
According to Mr Mitchell, the
suggestion that the Bahamas
should join PetroCaribe was not
rejected but simply placed on
hold.
"We asked them if the matter
was something that were
reviewed by us and turned out to
be, in our view, beneficial for our
country, could we join the initia-
tive and the indications from the
government of Venezuela was
certainly that we could," said Mr
Mitchell.
He said the reason the accord is
not feasible for the Bahamas at
present is that these islands do
not have the capacity to refine
oil, and do not have a retail dis-
tribution system for petroleum.
However, Minister of State for
the Environment Phenton Ney-
mour told The Tribune yesterday
that signing the PetroCaribe
accord would be mortgaging the
future of the country.

TROPICAL

MEMIATR
PES I O O


"It is not a proposal that we
are interested in," he said.
According to Mr Neymour the
government is looking more
toward alternative sources of
energy and curbing excessive
energy consumption.
"We are seeking a proposal for
renewable energy, seeking to put
together a national energy policy
that will help to reduce energy
demand and putting in place
processes and procedures to
increase the efficiency of BEC,"
he said.
The PetroCaribe accord allows
CARICOM countries to pur-
chase fuel from Venezuela at
market value, while only paying a
certain amount upfront with the
balance to be paid over 25 years
at one per cent interest.
Mr Mitchell said that the
accord is essentially a device for
Venezuela to market their oil at a
discounted rate and that though
the Bahamas cannot benefit from
it at the present time, as other
Caribbean nations have, we might
look at the proposal in the future.


"It's just that you don't
describe something which is
offered by another country with
which we have good relations, as
a stupid proposal clearly it is a
proposal that has benefited
all CARICOM countries," he
said.


Man's body found in waters off Grand Bahama
I A SEARCH of the waters off Grand Bahama turned up the body of
a 54-year-old man yesterday, after he had been missing at sea for
nearly 24 hours.
According to information released by the police in Grand Bahama,
Washington Laing, 54, left home at 9.30 Tuesday morning from Gam-
bier Point.
Mr Laing's wife, Patricia, reported her husband missing when he did
not return home by 8.35pm the same day.
Her report resulted in a search of the area conducted by locals and
law enforcement officers with the help of the Bahamas Air Sea Rescue
Association (BASRA).
BASRA conducted an aerial search that covered an area up to 25
miles off the shoreline of Gambier Point, without positive results.
However, at 6.30am yesterday, a relative of the missing man went out
searching in his boat and reported discovering the body of Mr Laing
floating.
The body was retrieved at around 9am and pronounced dead by a
doctor.
The boat was also recovered from the sea. An autopsy will be per-
formed to determine the exact cause of death.
Police say investigations into the incident continue.



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ComThe Board of Directors of Commonwealth Bank Ladimited has TopsDeclared a Quarterly Dividend









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- 7% per annum payable quarterly
- 7% per annum payable quarterly
- 7% per annum payable quarterly
- 7% per annum payable quarterly
- 7% per annum payable quarterly
- 7% per annum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly


The payment will be made on December 31, 2008 through Colina Financial Advisors Limited,
the Registrar & Transfer Agent, in the usual manner.
Charlene A. Bosfield
Corporate Secretary


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Environmentalist says


government should


focus on alternative


energy instead of LNG


* By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net
THE government should
continue its focus on explor-
ing alternative energy
sources instead of turning to
liquefied natural gas as
means of potentially
spurring economic growth,
environmentalist Sam Dun-
combe said yesterday.
Her comments came in
response to statements
made by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham on Sun-
day.
He told reporters the gov-
ernment was awaiting rec-
ommendations from "envi-
ronmental and other agen-
cies" before determining
whether to sign onto the
controversial liquefied nat-
ural gas (LNG) develop-
ment proposed by Virginia-
based Applied Energy Ser-
vices (AES). Mr Ingraham
was speaking during his sec-
ond meet-the-press event
for the year.

Future
Ms Duncombe said: "We
still have significant issues
with LNG, and even when
even when AES came back
as ,an afterthought and
offered to convert one of the
BEC stations into LNG, the
reality is we really need to
be looking into the future
for energy and the future of
energy is not fossil fuels.
AES has proposed to con-
struct an LNG pipeline from
man-made Ocean Cay off


"We still have
significant issues
with LNG, and
even when even
when AES came
back as an
afterthought and
offered to convert
one of the BEC
stations into. LNG,
the reality is we
really need to be
looking into the
fiuturei fnr enerv


ously looking at moving for-
ward, maybe we need to
look at partnering with wind
companies, solar companies
that can provide what we
need in a true partnership,"
she said during an interview
yesterday.
Ms Duncombe argued that
even if the project is given
the green light to provide
LNG to BEC, it would take
"at least seven years" before
the plan could be launched,
because a gas pipeline
would need to be construct-
ed first.

Project


... .. "Even if this project went
and the future Of ahead,., even with the addi-
energy is not tions that AES has promised
fossil fuelss" us, we're not looking to have
the BEC terminal outfitted
to receive LNG until after
Environmentalist AES.is finished building
Sam Duncombe (their pipeline) at Cat Cay.
We're looking at least sev-
Bimini to service Florida en years before we can get
with the gas. up and running at BEC with
, As part of the project, the LNG," she said.
company said it could con- ReEarth, the environmen-
struct a pipeline that would tal group headed by Ms
service New Providence as Duncombe, has long been an
well. opponent of0LNG, arguing
"I still cannot see any ben- that the gas plants are envi-
efit to the Bahamas having ronmentally unsound.
that proposal here. In July, head of LNG pro-
"There's been enough jects for AES Aaron Samp-
time gone by and the whole son argued that natural gas
issue for alternative energy is known for its friendliness
has exploded. to the environment and its
"And we need to get on low carbon signature.
that train and we need to He also claimed in a pre-
leave the fossil fuel issue vious interview with The Tri-
behind," Ms Duncombe said. bune that LNG would save
"I don't think that going BEC between $1.4 billion
backwards is the way to go and $4 billion in fuel costs.
at bur stage of development. over 15 years if the proposal'
If the government is seri- is approved.


PLACE:

ITEMS OF
BUSINESS:


RECORD
DATE:
FINANCIAL
STATEMENTS:

MAILING
DATE:

PROXY
VOTING:





October 9, 2008


,Teachers & Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit Union
Head Office East Street & Independence Drive
(1) To announce the results of the examination of proxies;
declare a quorum present and proceed to business;
(2) To receive and approve the Minutes of the last Annual
General Meeting held on December 7, 2007.
(3) To receive and consider the Chairman's report;
(4) To receive and approve the financial statements and
the reports of the Directors and Auditors thereon;
(5) To elect Directors for the ensuing year and fix their
remuneration;
(6) To approve the appointment of Deloitte & Touche as
the Auditor of the Company, and authorise the Directors
to fix their remuneration; and
(7) To transact such other business as may properly come
before the meeting and any adjournment thereof.
Holders of 400,000 shares of record at the close of business
on October 22, 2008 are entitled to vote at the meeting.
The Company's audited financial statements are included
in the Company's 2007 annual report, which is enclosed
as part of the proxy soliciting material.
The Company will cause the accompanying materials to
be delivered on November 6, 2008 to the last registered
address.
It is important that your shares be represented and voted
at the meeting. You can vote your shares by appearing in
person or by completing and returning the proxy form
enclosed. You can revoke a proxy at any time prior to its
exercise at the meeting by following the instructions in
the accompanying proxy statement.
By order of the Board of Directors:
Mrs. Cheryl Bowe-Moss
Secretary


Te ri


ISAIAH 40 31 "But those who wait on the Lord
shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with 4 ,
wings like eagles. They shall run and not be weaty;
they shall walk and not faint."
WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO JOIN US
IN OUR WORSHIP SERVICES



on SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7th at 10.00 am
at
The Paradise Island Harbour Resort
(Formerly: Holiday Inn Sun Spree Resort)
Paradise Island, East of the round-about at the foot of the 'old' bridge
Join us in our Praise and Worship services and hearing from God's 'word where
"We Love God and Love People"
For more details: Email: revdavidlamb@yahoo.com


TEACHERS REAL ESTATE
HOLDINGS LIMITED




TIME & DATE: Friday, December 5, 2008 at 6:00pm


Shareholders are invited to visit the webpage at www.tswccul.com
for additional information (Proxy Form and Proxy Statement)


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE








--LOALNW


Work of three local artists


available from The Gallery


-^:'

It -
AllI~


WITH a mission statement
to offer an-authentic and
affordable Bahamian expe-
rience through art, three
well-known local artists have
joined together with the sup-
port of Bahamas Parks, Gar-
dens, and Recreation to
bring "The Gallery" into
existence.
The new gallery is located
at the back of the chapel on
the hill at the Garden of the
Groves.
The works of Chantal
Bethel, Claudette Dean and
Antonius Roberts can now
all be seen and purchased
from one location in Grand
Bahama.
The chapel, a replica of
the first chapel in Pineridge,
has much history behind it
and has been -the setting of
many happy occasions. Wed-
dings, ceremonies, and bless-
ings have all been held there.
Previously a meditation
room, the space has been
converted into a light and
quaint gallery that has an
entrance nestled in the yew


S .
: ,! %. -, . i. .


THE ARTISTS Antonius Roberts, Chantal Bethel and Claudette
Dean stand at the entrance to The Gallery which features their art
work for viewing and sale at the Garden of the Groves.


trees of the garden.
Anton us Roberts'
"Sacred Women" stand
'majestically outside as if to
invite visitors up the steps
of the hill into the chapel


and the gallery.
Mr Roberts is known pri-
marily for his carvings from
indigenous wood. Chantal
Bethel and Claudette Dean
for their colourful, flowing,


WELCOME -A 'Sacred Woman'
by Antonius Roberts welcomes
visitors to The Gallery at the
back of the chapel on the hill at
the Garden of the Groves.
cultural depictions of life
seen and unseen.
Persons may feel that they
are walking into a museum,
but the pieces are not only
for show, they can also be
purchased, as like in any
gallery. Aryana Roberts is
on-hand to welcome visitors
with a smile. and offer
assistance at The Gallery,
which is open Monday
through Sunday from 9am to
5pm.


BOATS FOR SALE

1995 Luhrs 32'
S31 16 Cats, diesel
,..'q .4 4gen., new hull
-. paint, new Isin-
glass & soft
gbods, excellent
condition.
$115,000.


2005 34'Yellowfin
Center console,
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top of the line
equipment, fast
and economical
cruise. Pristine.
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2006 245CC
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$68,500.

Management I Brokerage Provisioning I Maintenance
Call Chris @'242.380.BOAT (2628)


Is it Right


To do






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Book Launch & Signing
LOGOs Bookshop,
Harbour Bay,
Thursday, December 4th
5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Distributed through Media Enterprises


Vi -1


. I I.. .. . ... .. . .


I


IK'










Ross University to buy local


art for Grand Bahama campus A


QUANTITY
RED (R) PINK () WriTE (W)
MARBLE (


FREE


campus, it was revealed yes- business development and
terday. interim executive administra-
Sandi Cutler, Ross vice tor of the Freeport campus,
president for planning and said that once staff have set-


POT SIZE


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PLANTS OR MORE!
ARCHER'S NURSERY
#55 DUNMORE AVE, CHIPPINGHAM-SOUTH OF
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YARD & MAINTENANCE SERVICE

W Mmr AUW m


17


Ebenezer

Methodist Church

Christmas Fair


on Saturday, 6 Dec

12noon-5pm

at Epworth Hall,

Shirley Street


Come and enjoy all of

your old time
favourites:
Oh! so good coconut ice cream
Tempting cakes and candy
Creative treasures
Delicious Take-Away lunch, steak or chicken
Mouth-watering conch salad & conch fritters
Sodas & hamburgers
Hoop-la, toys & games


PRICE


$10.00
$16.0


tied into their new offices, the
procurement process will
begin.
This is just one of many
benefits for the local commu-
nity that are expected as a
result of the new campus.
Others include full-time
employment opportunities,
short-term construction jobs
and a boost to the local econ-
omy through the arrival of
hundreds of foreign students.
Mr Cutler said Ross will
make this opportunity avail-
able "on a broad public
basis". A committee of local
staff and faculty will be
responsible for selecting the
various artworks.
This came to light after
Ross University held a five
day leadership planning
retreat at its new campus
from November 19 to 23.


ROSS FACULTY listen to Dr Phillip Cooles, department of introduction to
clinical medicine, during a planning session at the interim campus at Sea-
horse Plaza in Freeport. This group includes the core academic and fac-
ulty leadership of the Freeport, Miami and Dominica campuses.


This retreat involved senior
Ross University administra-
tors from its New Jersey
headquarters, medical school
leaders and leaders from its
Dominica and Miami cam-
puses.
Also participating were cur-
rent and future staff and fac-
ulty for the Bahamas campus.
"We are moving ahead as
planned to open our interim


ALL ROSS FACULTY, leaders and staff gather for a group photo during
their five-day planning retreat.



LOST DOG
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from High Vista
Drive &
Eastern Road
on 28/11/08.
Please call 324-1154 or 393-2205
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P.O. Box N-313
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TELEPHONES (242) 325-1769
OR (242) 323-5904
FAX: (242) 356-6691

ORDER FORM

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S".. Call for registration and program details.
324-7770 1
D 3- 4 -, I A A



TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLIES

PRE CHRISTMAS _


25% STOREWIDE



l SALE


All Praise & Worship C.D's $5
Children's Songs C.D's $5

S Children's Bible Stories DVD $7
Children's Bible Stories Video $5


Wireless Microphone 2 Mic. System $75


H.P. Laptops $695
- 19" LCD Monitors $350


All Christmas CD's: $10


E & Cassettes: $5
Gift & Award Bibles: $5


Desktop Computers eMachines $395
LARGE SELECTION OF BIBLE COVERS, STUDY BIBLES, REFERENCE BOOKS


Evangelistic Temple, Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace West
Hours: 9:00-5:00 P.M., MONDAY-FRIDAY
Phone: 322-8304
.1. 1 M gp U & &13 Go ED UV I


WORKS by local artists
will be purchased by Ross
University to decorate the
interior of its Grand Bahama


campus for students the first
week of January", said
"There is a lot of work to
do to plan for a smooth tran-
sition of faculty and students.
Our faculty will be a blend of
existing instructors transfer-
ring from Dominica and new
hires, some of whom are
native Bahamians. They need
to plan through the imple-
mentation of our curriculum
in this new location, and will
have a number of innovative
teaching facilities to deliver
that curriculum.
"In addition this is the first
time we have had the entire
leadership team for the
Bahamas campus together for
planning purposes. We have a
lot to get done over the next
six weeks in order to be well
prepared."
Already a number of fac-
ulty and students have locat-
ed their accommodations
through the Ross housing
website.
Mr Cutler also expressed
appreciation for the "out-
standing" work done by its
contractors in,preparing the
Seahorse Plaza facility.
"We were on a very tight
construction schedule, as we
needed to occupy adminis-
trative offices less than 10
weeks after awarding the con-
tract. Work on the campus is
actually a little ahead of
schedule, and the quality is
first-rate."
Ross will take possession
of the remainder of its inter-
im campus by mjid-Decem-
b er, including faculty offices,
classiomins and' a' student
'lounge.
"We plan to have a formal
groundbreaking shortly aftei
the beginning of the year,
once students are here and
well adjusted," he said.


_ (R) 10"(HB) $2
Company Naie: ._Contact Peroso:______
Teiep No No____ .P.Fax No: P.O Bo
Address:


mm"


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


-








THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


Concerns over


'weaknesses'


in Customs Dept
FROM page one
June, 2008, alone.
As outlined in that letter,
nine officers claimed to
have logged overtime hours
worth about $6,000 to more
than $50,000 from July,
2007, to June, 2008. From
July, 2006, to June, 2007,
the same officers claimed
overtime ranging from
.$9,474 to $43,368; and from
July, 2005 to June, 2006 the
same officers claimed*
between $3,819.99 to over
$53,000, the acting comp-
troller's letter says.
According to the auditor-
general's letter, between
July 31, 2003 to June 30,
2005 a number of customs
officers either logged "over-
lapping" overtime billings
which were subsequently
paid; submitted and were
paid for overtime hours that
were illegitimate; "certified
the authenticity" of their
own overtime billings; and
were paid overtime without
supervisory approval prior
to payment.
The letter also reveals
that about a dozen officers
claimed to have worked
continuous overtimedhours
in excess of 24 hours, which
"seemed excessive for an
officer to competently com-
plete."
In the letter, the auditor-
general recommended that
management "consider the
implementation of a sched-
uled shift system where
practicable, to allow officers
adequate periods of rejuve-
nation in order to function
at optimal efficiency."
It was also revealed in the
letter that three officers
received $4,044 collectively
in overtime pay while either
on vacation or sick leave. It
was recommended that
management ensure that
officers were not paid over-
S"time while oh leave and that
the aforementioned pay-,
ments be recovered without
delay.
The 12-page letter was
sent to the comptroller in
2006 regarding an audit
inspection of Bahamas Cus-
toms/government overtime
for the period of July 31,
2003 to June 30, 2005.
The auditor-general rec-
ommended "immediate
attention" be given to his
recommendations "to
strengthen these areas of
weaknesses and further
enhance and protect gov-
ernment revenue."
He also recommended
that Customs evaluate staff
sizing and other factors con-
tributing to persons work-
ing overtime everyday or
every other day; that Cus-
toms consider reducing the
number of overtime hours
one staff member can be
assigned to work; and sug-
gested a need to hire more
staff.
"During our analysis it
was observed that there
were staff members whose
overtime pay totalled three
and one half times their
salary and in one case, four
times," the letter says.
The primary objective of
the audit was to determine
whether overtime payments
were properly controlled,
authorised, made to actual
employees, that policies and
procedures relating to over-
time pay existed and were
adhered to, and that over-
time pay was equitably dis-
tributed.
Regular overtime pay is
paid to officers in Nassau
and Freeport only for "pay-
ment made to officers for
attendance outside normal
hours of general attendance
when requested by private
agencies" like shipping
agents.
Government overtime is


paid to the officers when
they are required to work
beyond normal hours, 9 am
to 5 pm, or in excess of their
40-hour work week. It is
also given to officers at Cus-
tom's headquarters for
work performed for security
purposes and in cases of
special revenue enhance-
ment assignments.
Attempts to get com-
ments from the acting
comptroller, the additor-
general and the financial
secretary were unsuccessful.


SLES7


More Customs


corruption claims


FROM page one

tected by their high-level political connections.
One of the main grievances is that some
employees are disciplined for minor infractions
while others "favoured" by the powerful are
allegedly allowed to get away with theft and
bribery.
Much resentment centres on an imported
cars racket in Andros, and the appointment of
officers to internal investigative roles when
some are themselves allegedly under suspicion.
"That's putting them in a position to just do
more s...," said one Customs source, who also
named officers who cleared containers, and,
allegedly altered manifests, to pocket bribe
money. I
"This is a puppet show. They have files dis-
appearing right, left and centre. People are
doing all sorts of s... in the Customs depart-
ment and nothing is being done to these offi-
cers."
The source also claimed that the Drug
Enforcement Agency (DEA) had photographs
of a corrupt officer on a Family Island alleged-
ly caught in the act. "They also have informa-
tion on officers forging certificates to get into
the Customs department," he alleged. "And
yet they are still here. When will this end?"
Another Customs source said at least 1,200
people working in the department could be
considered corrupt in one form or another.
"It really needs to be dismantled and rebuilt
around a core of honest people," the source
said, "And there are some decent people in the
department. It's not all bad."
The source said $500 bribes frequently
changed hands so that containers could enter
the country without proper inspection.
"Some cargoes can command duty of


$300,000, $500,000 or even more, depending
what's on board. Over the last ten years, I would
estimate that $2 billion has been lost to the
country because of corruption. That's how bad
it is."
Mrs Ritchie herself said "I'm looking around
for some place to live" following the destruction
of her Nassau,home.
She said she was getting information from
government, including Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, suggesting they would help.
"Right now I'm staying anywhere I can. I
don't want to put anyone else in danger or have
what has been done to me done to them. I don't
know how far these people are prepared to
go."
Asked who might have started the fire, she
said: "You can always have thoughts but you
can't really accuse anyone outright. I am sure
the investigation is an active one.
"I have been in touch with police and they say
the investigation is very active and ongoing. 1
am keeping up with them so I know exactly
what's going on and hopefully they can get to
the bottom of this because these acts of terror-
ism shouldn't be allowed to be carried out on
law enforcement like that."
Asked if she would stay with Customs, she
said: "I will stay with Customs. If all law
enforcement would be afraid like that we
wouldn't have police officers."
Mrs Ritchie was also asked whether the
destroyed house was her only home.
She replied: "It was not my only house. I
have a little family home in the Out Islands."
She didn't want to say where it was, adding:
"When the newspaper gets out there's everyone
reading it and I have to protect what else I
have. I don't know what they intend to do or
anything like that. I am just concentrating right
now to find a place for my family to stay."


UE

MUC AS:


* S9x3 1
Locatio:RstaSre


ROLEX


OYSTER PERPETUAL
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I---


''


rrrrs~Q~T~j~




THE TRIBUi m


COMING
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ow'.ve


(Excluding Net Items and New Arrivals)
thC EirMont atM ave-mnber!
PLUS FABULOUS J0-St t e
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DEC 2


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PAGF 19 THURSDAY. DECEMBER 4. 2008


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W^ /. -*"








THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


6'



Oakwood Academy

Private Schpol




Looking for an academically innovative school?


Bahamian-produced film 'Changes'

debuts at Bahamas Film Festival


-Wiv
'e ffr^fa, f' J


t kwood education offers
Class sizes, degree

Ien curriculum.



- e -.r"g PreKi 2 G6




"o... ,,


THE Bahamian-produced
film "Changes" debuted at
the fifth annual Bahamas
Film Festival to great
acclaim.
At this year's event, held
on the weekend at Galleria
Cinemas on John F Kennedy,
the Bahamas Film Society
producers honoured "three
giants that contributed great-
ly to the development of the
festival and to the arts in this
country."
Neville Wisdom, former
Minister of Culture, and
Charles Maynard, present
Minister of Culture, were
both lauded for assisting the
Society on a personal and
profession level. Veteran
actor Rudy Levarity was also
honoured for his dedication
and commitment to the
movie industry.
In accepting the' award,
Minister Maynard, thanked
Celi Moss, president of the
festival.
Ricardo Smith accepted on
behalf of Mr Wisdom, who
was reportedly out of the
country.
Branville McCartney, Min-
ister of State for Immigra-
tion, was also in attendance


and joined in giving kudos to
Mr Moss.
He spoke about Mr Moss'
involvement with the Bam-
boo Town Film Club and the
upcoming movie "My MP."
Mr McCartney joked that
he was not sure if the fea-
tured character in the movie
was fashioned after him.
The movie shown at the
opening of the festival was
"Changes" written by
Andrew Coakley, directed by
Antonio Coakley, produced
by Julian Anderson-Rolle
and featuring the cinematog-
raphy of Charles Kemp.
In reviewing "Changes",
Mr McCartney said that "it
was an excellent movie."

Impressive

"The Bahamian cast was
very impressive. They were
extraordinarily good. I com-
mend the production team
and Mr Celi Moss for giving
them a venue to showcase
their work. I look forward to
more productions in the
future."
Mr Maynard also shared
his thoughts on the movie.


"I thought the movie had
an excellent story line. I com-
mend the cinematographer
for a superb job. The quality
of the camera angle could be
likened to that of any Holly-
wood movie.
"The movie showed that
Bahamians could do anything
at a top class level. They all
appeared to have gotten into
their characters and were
able to portray the strong
message of the movie. The
sky is the limit and technolo-
gy is levelling the playing
field when it comes to the
quality of work that can be
produced with the equipment
now available," he said.
In closing, Mr Moss
thanked the many sponsors
of the festival, including Gal-
leria Cinemas, Lifestyle Lim-
ousines, Nitro Filmz, Sea
Food Haven, Mystical Gym,
Junkanoobeat Media and the
Counselors Ltd.
He also welcomed on-
board new sponsors like
Jones Communications and
Sands Beer.
An after-party was held at
'Da Tambrin Tree', where
patrons danced the night
away.


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THE TRIBUNE-


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008


LOCALNW


Hcipp1Li


;.4


tI Iom In 11%iiin' k if'. nt r% i: riI.re iin.
(in' .tlthlrne:. gran hlihlrt ii:
brother. ohn, Railph a ( arl: rr.
Ehla. Ruth & iGwindolyn & Enir
( oinnunity] of JDeadinanl, ( a'y.


!^. f-,


Ex-prison gu

he was beaten
FROM page one
with police officers" and suffer.
"swollen" eye and "soft tissue injury
Following the visit to the doctor
Johnson was taken home by the offi
He asked them to let him off yards f
his home.
"I didn't want them anywhere nea
house again," he said.
According to Chief Superintende
Police Hulan Hanna, the matter is be
a police tribunal.
"It has been investigated," he said
"I can assure the gentleman, as
commissioner has assured him in my
ence, that the matter is at the tribe
and the officers are to be tried foI
allegations."
Mr Johnson said he is not sure w
has taken so long for the police to
with his case, however, he has been
ter.
"This is what causes bad things,"
even know...
"You see a citizen do this to anoth
Hill (prison) long time.
"And it doesn't look like they are
According to Mr Hanna the two
Mr Johnson's alleged assault are sti
could not say if the men are still wo:


FROM page one
Cleare was granted a "temporary license" when
the board "decided it could not indefinitely with-
hold his ability to have gainful employment" after
he rectified "physical infractions" at his practice.
The report says this occurred while the board
awaited a response from the Bahamas Medical
Council to a letter requesting that it determine the
doctor's fitness to practice medicine.
The Board's report states: "Dr Charles Cleare's
facility is located on East Street Central, His mat-
ter was brought before the board during the pre-
vious year (2007). The inspector gave the report
of a very unsanitary facility in serious disrepair.
"There was also a report of patients' laborato-
ry specimens, which should have been forwarded
to a lab, lying around gathering moss. The build-
ing was leaking."
According to the Board's inspector, identified
as Cheryl Watkins, Dr Cleare's demeanour "did
not appear to be normal."
Meanwhile, the report adds that Dr Locksley
Munroe, who knew Dr Cleare, also made it
known that "he felt this practitioner was not sta-
ble."


The Hospital and Healthcare Facilities Lice-d
ing Board has responsibility for licensing all pri-
vate healthcare facilities in the Bahamas. t
Its Chairman goes on to state that it was suglJ
sequently decided to suspend the license pre[1l
ously granted for Dr Cleare's clinic, given tlJ'
infractions he had committed. :A
In the meantime, Dr Culmer adds that he wrapf
a letter to the Bahamas Medical Council (BMC)
accompanied by the statements from 'tr
Munroe's report and the Board's inspector,
requesting that organisation's assistance in "deter-
mining whether (Dr Cleare) is a fit and propW.
person to be licensed in such a facility."
The BMC, according to its website, is the statU-
tory and administrative authority established "th6
regulate the medical profession...and to safeguard,
the public through means of receiving and dis-
posing of complaints." js.
The "temporary license" was granted to l~if
Cleare by the board at some point after this lettio
was sent.
The Tribune left a message for BMC Chalf--
man Dr Duane Sands yesterday to find 6otV
whether the BMC had yet reached a conclusiodil
on Dr Cleare's case, however the call was idi
returned up to press time. oI


PUBL


C


NOTICE


- '
r"" '' 1 v
.4 '"


'Attention all BatelNet subscribers.. BTC has
been made aware of an email scam
directed to our BatelNet subscribers. There is
an email being circulated with the subject
"Verify and Update your batelnet.bs email".
The email asks customers to provide their


name, user name and password,


and


threatens to suspend service if you do not
comply. BTC strongly advises its customers
not to open or respond to this email, as you
may be at risk for identity theft.. If you have
responded to this email, please change
your password, and call our BatelNet Help
Desk at 225-5282 as soon as possible. BTC


for your cooperation with this


matter.



www.btcbahamas.com CALL BTC 225-5282


BAHAMAS

CONFERENCE OF THE

METHODIST CHURCH
NASSAU, REGION


Tiniyt Meodist Chupch

"11e encourage your prayers during
this festive time of the year"

Special Events
SUNDAY 30TH NOVEMBER 7PM
Nassau Regional Service at Curry Memorial
Methodist Church to Pray for Peace.
MONDAY, 1ST DECEMBER 6:30PM
Special meeting at Queens' College Primary
School Hall with Re% Neal Christie. of the
United Methodist Church (USA) Board of
Church and Society focus on issues oft
violence and crime in our Society.
WEDNESDAY. 3RD DECEMBER
BCMC Day of Praying. Fasting & Giving.
We encourage everyone to pray for our
nation and for those who are negatively
impacted by the economic crisis. We also,
encourage everyone to fast, focusing on
God. our sustainer. And we encourage
everyone to give to help others (maybe
,what your lunch would have cost) doing
without so that we can assist someone else.

SUNDAY. 14TH DECEMBER
3RD SUNDAY IN .ADVENT
I lam White Gift Service led by the Sunday
School. Followed by a fellowship luncheon.
SUNDAY 21TH DECEMBER
4TH SUNDAY IN ADVENT
1 lam Worship Service
7pm Candle lighting Service
THURSDAY, 25TH DECEMBER
Christmas Da,
I lam Worship Service
WEDNESDAY, 31TH DECEMBER
NEW YEARS EVE
11pm Watch Night Service
A generous person will be enriched.
-Proverbs 11:2-3..


& Hliday our
SaurayDaemer6toWenedaDeemer2


YOUR CONNECTION THE WORLD


thanks you


I-


I


_I


1 "p ~n~-- .


ard claims Airport fees will increase

by officers on completion of Phase

eed a FROM page one LPIA. .
ieda *For the fee of $20, and later
es Mr fixed at a time when econom- $25, the prime minister said
cers. ic circumstances were differ- that Bahamians travelling,;
from ent, and when the Bahamas through the US/Internatiogltj
still expected an influx of hun- Terminal will experience,;q..
ir my .. dreds of thousands of visitors first-class facility., "
to the country due to the The first phase of the newn
nt of I opening of properties such as US pre-clearance facility and/
before Baha Mar on Cable Beach. associated land-side, terminal1
d THE DOCTOR'S report However, with the drastic and air-side construction work
s the stated that Quincey John- downturn in the global econo- at LPIA is scheduled to start
pres- son was injured in an my and the subsequent drop in during the second quarter of;
>unal 'assault with police offi- international travel, and with 2009. iiv
r the cers' and suffered a Baha Mar's plans to transform Phase II will then encormdi
'swollen' eye and 'soft tis- Cable Beach having failed to pass the transformation of thti
'hy it sue injuries.' materialise, a lot feirer pas- US Terminal into an Interrf2
deal sengers than projected are cur- tional Terminal. -
seeking legal advice in the mat- rently utilising LPIA. Phase III will include thl4
said Mr Johnson. "You dont With the decrease in visitor creation of a brand ney
numbers, Mr Ingraham said, Domestic Terminal. ,-;
>er citizen they would be in Fox $15 per passenger would in no Mr Ingraham said yeste.1
way cover the airport's day that government will kepj
planning to do anything." expenses or enable airport a watchful eye on economic
officers under investigation for management to pay back the developments in the Bahanmas
ill on active duty, however, he loans necessary for the $210 before Phases II and III gt i
rking in Exuma. million-redevelopment of ahead. B;w


Parliamentary report says doctor i:


was licensed despite clinic concerns


I Rihar A.Carwri


'-; *' .1


m








THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNW


92 nations sign

cluster-bomb an;.

US, Russia don't
* OSLO, Norway _
SAN AFGHAN teenager
1uho lost both legs in a cluster
bomb explosion helped per-
suade his country to change
its stance and join nearly 100
nations in signing a treaty
Wednesday banning the dis-
puted weapons, according to
Associated Press.
.Afghanistan was initially
reluctant to join the pact -
which the United States and
Russia have refused to sup-
port but agreed to after
lobbying by victims maimed
by cluster munitions, including
17ryear-old Soraj Ghulan
Habib. The teen, who uses a
wheelchair, met with his coun-
try's ambassador to Norway,
Jawed Ludin, at a two-day
signing conference in Oslo.
>S'I explained to the amb .s-
sador my situation, and that
the people of Afghanistan
wanted a ban," Habib, who
said he was crippled by a clus-
ter bomb seven years ago, told
The Associated Press.
Speaking through an inter-
preter, Habib said the ambas-
sador called Afghan President
Hamid Karzai, who agreed to
c ange his stance on the
ti.eaty.
"Today is a historic day,"
Habib declared.
-Afghanistan's reversal even
surprised the activists who are
urging countries to join the
p-ct against cluster munitions,
which have been widely criti-
cized for maiming and killing
civilians.
`'It is just so huge, to get this
t4#naround. Afghanistan was
under a lot of pressure from
the United States," said
Thomas Nash, coordinator of
The Cluster Bomb Coalition.
"If Afghanistan can withstand
the pressure, so can others."
Australian activist Daniel
Barty said the Afghan ambas-
sador appeared to start chang-
ing his mind after meeting
Iabib at a reception Tuesday.
The U.S., Russia and other
countries refusing to sign the
treaty say cluster' bombs have
legitimate military uses, such
as spelling advancing troop
columns.
Cluster bomblets are
packed by the hundreds into
artillery shells, bombs or mis-
siles, which scatter them over
vast areas. Some fail to
explode immediately. The
unexploded bomblets can
then lie dormant for years
until they are disturbed, often
by children attracted by their
small size and bright colors.
The group Handicap Inter-
national says 98 percent of
cluster-bomb victims are civil-
ians, and 27 percent are chil-
dren.
i Organizers hoped that more
tpan 100 of the 125 countries
represented will have signed
by the end of the conference
n Thursday. Norwegian For-
ign Minister Jonas Gahr 10o-
re said 92 countries did so
on Wednesday.
i The treaty must be ratified
ly 30 countries before it takes
effect.
His country, which began
the drive to ban cluster bombs
18 months ago, was the first to
sign, followed by Laos and
Lebanon, both hard-hit by the
Weapons.


LIS ends 'Bahamas Week'




with all-Bahamian concert


FREEPORT Last week Friday the
Lucaya International School (LIS) end-
ed its week-long celebrations of One
Bahamas with an all-Bahamian con-
cert at the school.
Guest speaker Senator David
Thompson was on hand to speak to
the students and even joined in dur-
ing a junkanoo rush-out to close out
the week's events.
Spearheaded by Erin Carroll, LIS
guidance and college counselor, and
Kevin Tomlinson, LIS primary music
teacher, the school embraced every-
thing Bahamian for an entire week.
This included learning Bahamian
folk songs, writing poems about the
islands, performing dances and of
course eating traditional Bahamian
food. "Although we're an internation-
al school we still believe that it is impor-
tant to celebrate our local culture. The
students had a fabulous time this week
and we are looking forward to mak-
ing this a yearly tradition "said Ms Car-
roll.
To end the week of activities, Ms
Carroll and Mr Tomlinson organised a
morning concert, which was held in the
school's quadrangle.
This included singing of the Nation-
al Anthem, an address by Senator
Thompson, local songs performed by
years two and three, a Bahamian poem
by year four students, limbo by year
five and a performance of the may pole
flag dance by year six students.
Senator Thompson spoke to the stu-
dents on behalf of the government and
talked to them about embracing their
heritage. He said that the students
should be proud of their Bahamian
home.
"Looking at our students in the audi-


GUEST SPEAKER at the end of Lucaya International School's 'Bahamas Week' was
Senator David Thompson. Mr Thompson spoke to the students about the beauty of
the islands and how those lucky enough to live in the Bahamas can enjoy the coun-
try's rich culture The senator was entertained by the student's presentations and was
up on his feet dancing with the junkanoo rush.


ence you could see that his charisma
was contagious," said Ms Carroll.
"When he finished his talk they
cheered for the Bahamas."
The students were also able to enjoy
a performance by Mathice Rigby of
Port Lucaya Marketplace fame, who
got the whole school on their feet danc-
ing to "Shake it up and Shake it Up."
Local artist Lilly Newton spoke


about her straw crafts and the training
that is offered to those who are inter-
ested in this unique Bahamian art form.
The celebrations ended with a
junkanoo rush-out that had the whole
school up and dancing with their home
made rake-n-scrape instruments.
"As an international school it is our
responsibility to educate our students in
regard to the cultures and celebrations


from all around the world. As a school
with its roots in the Bahamas it is essen-
tial that we therefore celebrate all that
is Bahamian.
"Today it was wonderful to see that
all the hard work that was put in by
the teachers and pupils came to fruition
with a wonderful concert that got
everyone, including Senator Thomp-
son, up to dance," said Nigel Kirkby,
acting director of LIS.


THE Alpha Phi Alpha Fra-
ternity's Black and Old Gold
Scholarship Ball Committee
will host its gala fundraising
event, "A Gold Carpet Affair
- An Evening at the Oscars",
on Saturday, December 13,
2008 at the Sandals Royal
Bahamian Resort.
This year's honouree is
renowned musician Leroy
Thompson.
Warren Rolle, co-chairman
of the committee, said that
attendees will experience a ball
like no other in the Bahamas.
"A Gold Carpet Affair An
Evening at the Oscars is a star-
studded affair which will fea-
ture a cocktail reception, live.
jazz entertainment,' a silent
auction and an award-style
dinner, accompanied by some
of the Bahamas' finest per-
forming artists," he said in a
press statement.
President of the local chap-
ter Lynden Maycock said that
the ball is an annual event to
raise funds for the fraternity's


scholarship programme and
high school mentorship pro-
gramme for at-risk young men.
Last year, the fraternity's
ball raised more than $25,000
in scholarship and prize mon-
ey.
"Among our many works
over the past 31 years in the
Bahamas, we have forged part-
nerships with the Cancer Soci-


ety, the Salvation Army, the
Bahamas Red. Cross and
other civic organizations," he
said.
Honouree Leroy Thompson
is a director of Water Special-
ists and Environmental Con-
sultants in Nassau.
He attended Benedict Col-
lege in South Carolina, where
he obtained a Bachelors of Sci-
ence Degree in Chemistry.
Mr Thompson is a profes-
sional musician and holds an
Associate Degree from the
Royal School of Church and
is currently the minister of
music at the Most Holy Trini-
ty Anglican Church.
He is also founding member
of the Bahamas Guild of
Church Organists. Mr Thomp-
son is a family man and has
been married for 44 years to
Shirley Thompson.
The couple has four chil-
dren, Leandra, Byron, Rena-
tus and Bronsdon, and six
grandchildren..
Mr Thompson has been a


member of the Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity for 50 years.
He was initiated at the Gam-
ma Pi Chapter at Benedict
College, Columbia, South Car-
olina. Based on a strong fra-
ternity experience, Mr Thomp-
son has life membership sta'-
tus with his fraternity.
Alpha Phi Alpha, is the first
inter-collegiate Greek-letter
fraternity established for


African-Americans. It was
founded at Cornell University
in Ithaca, New York, on
December 4, 1906 by seven
college men who recognized
the need for a strong bond
of brotherhood among
African descendants in the US
during the turn of the last cen-
tury.
, The local chapter was estab-
lished in May 1977.


Alpha Phi Alpha to honour a



life member in Oscar-style event


Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
.from picple who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you, are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the -.
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


BALDWIN


























Charges E Ca,

*FINE BUILDERS HARDWARE & PLUMBING*
E stblished 1951
Dowdeswell Street Tel: 322-1103


Royal Bahamian Resort & Offshore Island

Invites application for the position of:

FOOD & BEVERAGE DIRECTOR

A five star resort is seeking a person to plan, direct
and coordinate all activities of its food service
facilities, including kitchen preparation and sanitation,
restaurant, catering, banquet, beverage service
operations and support services with:

* A thorough background in all aspects of food and
beverage operations, including, "outside The
Bahamas experience".
* Expertise in food, wine and service details with
extensive operational experience in each.
* International training of service flow and
accountability is essential.
* A proven, sustained record of results with regards
to cost management and customer satisfaction.
* Intense leadership skills and style with proven
management development.

At least ten years appropriate experience coupled
with a degree is desired.

Applications should be email to
cmajor@grp.sandals.com


TIinitI Mehoclisl Cihupch
invites you to celebrate the



with us... at our

CONCERT oF
CHRISTMAS MUSIC
produced by Marva Musgrove
featuring
Trinity Methodist Ensemble
Organist Kendrick Coleby
Government High School
Handbell Ensemble
Flautist Christine Gangelhoff and more!!
S ,7tDcm r I8 gI,

Our Gift to the City
(free admission an offering will be received)
Secured Parking enter from Frederck Street. opposite Church



*-












M CIN Smith, Darling in NFL playoff push


AN AF ADDERLEY TIGERS player goes for a layup...


* By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
THE Bahamas' foremost gridiron stars
are going through contrasting seasons in
the 2008-09 National Football League
season as their respective clubs make a
push towards the playoffs.
Alex Smith, tight end for the Tampa
Bay Buccaneers, has equalled his career
high in touchdown receptions with three,
just 10 games into the season.
Despite missing an additional two
games due to an injured ankle, Smith
has caught three touchdown passes,
equalling his previous output both in
2006 and 2007.
Smith has caught 19 receptions for 228
yards with an average of 12 yards per
catch.
'Smith returned from his ankle injury
last weekend against the New Orleans
Saints but had no receptions and just
one target on the afternoon.
He had not played since November 2
in an overtime win against the Kansas
City Chiefs when he caught his last
touchdown pass.
Following that game, Tampa Bay had
a bye week, and he missed against Min-
nesota and Detroit.
His best game of the season came
against the Carolina Panthers in week 6
when he caught three passes for 43 yards
and a touchdown.
The Buccaneers face the Panthers for
the second time this season on December
8.
Tampa Bay is on a four-game winning
streak and have won six of their last sev-
en.
At 9-3, they remain tied with the Pan-
thers for the lead in the NFC South and
lead the Atlanta Falcons by just one
game.
Devard Darling has struggled mighti-
ly across the board in his first season
with the Kansas City Chiefs in the AFC
West at 2-10. The fifth year receiver has
caught just 10 passes for 137 yards as
the Chiefs passing game has fluctuated


throughout the course of a woeful sea-
son. Kansas City has started three dif-
ferent quarterback over the course of
the year, beginning with Brody Croyle,
Damon Huard and most recently Tyler
Thigpen.
The Chiefs have also been hindered
on the ground with Pro Bowl running
back Larry Johnson missing games spo-
radically over. the course of the season
due to injuries and suspension.
At 2-10 the Chiefs are the bottom
feeders of the AFC, where the Denver
Broncos lead at 7-5. Darling's best game
of the season came on opening day when
he hauled in a 68 yard reception.
New York Jets offensive lineman,
D'Brickashaw Ferguson has been an
instrumental element to an offensive line
that has paved the way for the teams
resurgence from a two-win team in 2007
to a division leader.
Ferguson has started all 12 games for
the Jets at tackle and been a member of
a star studded offensive line which
includes Damien Woody, Nick Mangold,


and perennial Pro-Bowler Alan Faneca.
Ferguson and the offensive line have
helped running back Thomas Jones to
reach the 1000 yard plateau the second
quickest he ever has in his career and
have helped Brett Favre to extend his
career in New York successfully.
In a November 30 interview with the
New York Daily News, the 39-year-old
Favre raved about the tenacity and
upside of the young lineman.
"It goes without saying that Brick is
ultra-talented. I think he's finding out,
day-in and day-out,'he can be pretty darn
good," he said. "Having a little spunk
about you is not a bad thing. (He) got in
a little scrap one day with Shaun Ellis.
Most people were like, 'Man, we haven't
seen that side of Brick.' Maybe Alan
(Faneca) is rubbing off on him a little
bit."
At 8-4 the Jets lead the competitive
AFC East a game ahead of the Miami
Dolphins and New England Patriots. The
Jets are slated to travel next week to
face the San Francisco 49ers.


BALL, from page 19

BAISS champions with a timely
fourth quarter scoring run.
In a game that featured constant
ties and lead changes, the Warriors
pulled away in the games waning
moments with a 6-0 run.
The game was tied at four after
the first quarter, and the Giants
led 6-6 heading into the half.
The teams were tied at 10 head-
ing into the fourth when the War-


riors went on their run late in the
game.
They took a 19-16 lead on a pair
of free throws by Aren Pratt with
just over one minute remaining and
secured the win on the defensive
end.
Pratt finished with eight points,
four rebounds and two assists.
Caryn Moss led the Giants with
eight points, three rebounds and
two assists.
The Giants staved off elimina-
tion later that night with a win over
the C C Sweeting Cobras.


C R Walker Knights 17
Freeport Anglican Warriors -15
Following their closely contested
win over the Giants, the Warriors
returned just two games later but
were unable to pull off the upset
against the defending champions.
The Knights led the Warriors 8-
3 midway through the second quar-
ter behind Malesha Peterson's
activity on both ends of the floor.
The Warriors managed to rally in
the quarter and tied the game, 8-8
just before the half on a three point
play by I'Leah Knowles.


With the Knights pulling away
late, Peterson gave her team their
biggest lead of the game when she
blocked a shot and took the ball
coast to coast and finished the play
with a layup plus the foul.
She finished with eight points,
six rebounds, two assists and two
steals. Pamela Bethel chipped in
with five points and three
rebounds.
The Warriors staged a late come-
back in the fourth quarter but fell
just short as the Kni its held on
for the win.


.-ICARIBBEAN LANDSCAPE'S

GARDEN CENTER


70t DE C.;T f.
1Jvlltr tN~


SI


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Black Kow
Potting Soil Top Soil
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Marble Chip
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Pro'Mix
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Bouganvillea Pygmy Palm Eugenia Dbl
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Square Plastic Rolled Rim Pot ChataPalm Heron Pot $85 Privacy Fence
15in $10.50 $23 Pot $74 Filler 250ft $61


Shade Cloth 6ft Wide
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Straight $4.75 Ei
Curved $5.50 concrete
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Solar Brushed IHummingbirdi
Nickel Light $16 Iron Benchi$216
.3 tf, ".,-, .*


Marcel Teak Flat Bed Chaise Java Mahogany
Bench $468 Lounger $569 King Bed $1385


INSIGH

Fo hesore

behndth nws


;:.


I I I I I


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008.


TRIBUNE bHUH Ib


;}. ,- -,










TRIBUNE SPORTS


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE 17


Appointments will have huge impact on development of sports in Bahamas


T wo significant appointments
that will definitely have a huge
impact on the development of
sports in the Bahamas have been made.
The first came on the international
front when veteran journalist Fred
Sturrup was elected as president of the
Commonwealth Boxing Federation,
an organisation that will oversee the
professional segment of the sport
throughout the 50-plus countries in the
region.'
The other was on the local front with
the announcement of Kimberly Rolle
as the new athletic director of the Col-
lege of the Bahamas. She replaces
American Greg Harshaw as the col-
lege continues its move from a two-
year to a full fledged four-year institu-
tion.
No doubt, both appointments are
significant in their own rights.
Let's look firstly at Sturrup's posi-
tion.
The Bahamas has and continues to
produce a vast amount of professional
fighters, but rarely do they get the
exposure that they need to go after the
more prestigious international titles.
The rest of the Caribbean are in the
same position.
With Sturrup on board as the new
president, you can expect for all of that
to change.
There's no reason why the Bahamas


and the other Caribbean nations can't
compete for the titles that are mainly
held by the British and African fight-
ers. It's obvious from the impact that
the Caribbean has made in other sports
that the potential is there for these
fighters to succeed.
So once Sturrup gets his feet wet,
we expect to see more local and
Caribbean fighters being put in a posi-
tion to first get the international ratings
and then the opportunities to fight for
more of the titles.
Jermaine "Choo Choo" Mackey was
the first Bahamian fighter in 20 years to
fight for a British Commonwealth title.
He went on to win the super mid-
dleweight crown here in August.
The fight was promoted by First
Class Promotions the organisation is
currently serving a 12-month suspen-
sion by the Bahamas Boxing Commis-
sion. Ironically, Sturrup serves as the
secretary general of that body.
It would only be in the best interest
of the sport, as Mackey gets set to
defend his title by June, that the BBC
sits down' with First Class Promotions
to iron out their differences.
We would hate to see Mackey have
to go overseas to defend his title or
get stripped of it because First Class
Promotions is not in a position to stage
another show in the specified period.
Sturrup, obviously, has a great deal


of influence on
how things turn
out. [
Let's hope that
an amicable deci-
sion that will be
beneficial to all
concerned is .
made and agreed nF
upon.
Concerning the I' s ,
second appoint-
ment, we have to
commend Kim-
berly Rolle on
being appointed
as the first female
to hold the posi- OPINION
tion of athletic
director at COB. m n, wm
It's a tremen-
dous move, but
one that I'm sure Rolle is gladly
embracing.
She has already shown her leader-
ship capabilities when she founded and
functioned successfully as the first pres-
ident of the New Providence Wom-
en's Basketball Association.
If that was any indication, I'm sure
that COB will be in a much better posi-
tion than it was before.
Rolle, as demonstrated when she
played basketball, stands tall and
demands the respect from her peers.


As the college moves forward to uni-
versity status, Rolle should fit in quite
well in her quest to make our major
educational institution the vibrant body
that it needs to be, on the local and
international scene.
Thanks to the efforts of Greg Har-
shaw and his staff, the COB Caribs
Athletic Department already has its
foot in the door of the United States'
NAIA programme, currently compet-
ing in the Florida region.
But it's going to be up to Rolle and
her staff to look at ways of trying to
lure more of the talented Bahamian
student-athletes to stay home to study
and compete rather than jetting off to
the US and Canada.
One of the issues that needs atten-
tion is more scholarship opportunities
for the student athletes. And with the
support of the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture, it would appear
that the process will come into fruition
sooner than later.
So while we congratulate Rolle on
her prestigious post, we look forward
to the inroads she will continue to
make for the college and the athletic
programme as they embrace the future.
Just before I end this column, let me
also congratulate Dexter Bodie and
executives of the Road Runners Track
and Field Club.
I was quite impressed once again


with the magnitude of their annual
awards presentation banquet.
Over the weekend, the club hosted
its ninth presentation before a packed
Wyndham Crystal Palace where they
honoured businessman Basil and Paula
Neymour for their contribution to the
club.
It was a fitting tribute to the man
known as the "Godfather of Sports" in
the country as he has made consider-
able contributions not just to Grand
Bahama, but throughout the Family
Islands.
New Providence is no exception as
Neymour's generosity has spread here
as well.
What I was also impressed with was
how the club honoured so many of
their athletes, not just for sports, but
academics aswell. It showed just how
important the two aspects are in mold-
ing the individual.
And they couldn't have selected a
better role model than Dominique Hig-
gins to name the top honours after.
Higgins, a former athlete, excelled
through the club and went on to fur-
ther his education on an athletic schol-
arship.
To Bodie and the executives, keep
up the fine work you're doing. And
thanks to the parents for allowing their
children to participate and supporting
such a positive and vibrant programme.


Zion, Transfiguration clash


PENNANT-winning Shaw
AME Zion and defending
champions Transfiguration
Baptist both won their decisive
third and deciding games Thurs-
day night at the Banker's Field
to step up the much anticipated
showdown in the men's final of
the Baptist Sports Council's
2008 Rev Dr William Thomp-
son Softball Classic. -
The two teams are expected
to clash in game one of the best-
of-five final 1pm Saturday at
the same venue.
Sha'w AME Zion exploded
for seven big runs in the bot-
tom of the fourth inning to
break up a 5-5 tie as they went
on to eliminate Temple Fellow-
ship 13-5 in their half of the
best-of-three playoff series.
And Transfiguration jumped
out to a quick 7-0 lead in the
first inning..and they held off
Calvary Deliverance 13-3 to
oust the former champions in
the other half of the bracket.
Calvary Deliverance lodged a
protest after losing game two,
but the league upheld its deci-
sion.
Before the men's champi-
onship gets started on Saturday
at the Banker's Field, defending
champions Macedonia and
Temple Fellowship are slated
to clash at 10am in the third and
deciding game to determine
who will advance to the co-ed
final to face pennant winning
Golden Gates.
Immediately following that
game, it will be the start of the
17-and-under final between
pennant winning Temple Fel-


lowship and Macedonia.
Here's a summary of last
night's decisive game threes in
the men's series:
Shaw AME Zion 12, Temple
Fellowship 5
Valentino Munroe, Tory
Stevens and Darren Stevens all
had a two-run single to fuel the
seven-run fourth inning that
clinched the game for Shaw
AME as they batted around the
clock.
Garfield Bethel had two hits
and he along with Munroe and
Andy Percentie scored two runs
apiece in the victory. Munroe
got the win on the mound over
Alfred Munnings.
All of Temple Fellowship's
runs were unearned with Brian
Armbrister scoring two of them.
Transfiguration 13, Calvary
Deliverance 3
Rayn'aldo Russell and
Rashad Seymour both went 2-
for-3 with a two-run homer
each, scoring twice to lead
Transfiguration in the clincher.
Kirk Johnson had a pair of
doubles with two RBIs, scoring
two runs, Van Johnson was 2-
for-4 with a double and triple
and a RBI, scoring a run and
Edron Knowles and Everette
Johnson both had two hits,
while Nelson Farrington had a
RBI triple, scoring a run.
Alvin Lightbourne got the
win on the mound over Danny
Stubbs.
Brad Wood Jr was 2-for-3
with two RBIs and Jeff Beckles -
had the other RBI single as they
scored Shawn McIntosh, Jayson
Clarke and Brad Wood Sr.


Ia B & uCI
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The Bahamas Electricity Corporationrinvites Tenders from
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FUEL OIL TANK ERECTION AND ASSOCIATED WORKS
HATCHET BAY, ELEUTHERA.

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Telephone No. 302-1158.

Tenders are to be delivered on or before
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and addressed as follows:

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AGM/Engineering
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Marked: Tender No. 661/08
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Pistons' Wallace uses technical foul as motivation


M By The Associated Press
RASHEED Wallace has
been called for so many tech-
nical fouls in his career he rarely
lets one affect his game. Some-
times he even uses them as
motivation.
After being hit with a tech-
nical with 15 minutes remain-
ing, Wallace scored 17 points,
including three 3-pointers in the
fourth quarter, to help the
Detroit Pistons rally from 10
points down to beat the Toron-
to Raptors 89-77 on Tuesday
night. "After the tech, he kind
of took matters in his,,own
hands, started being a lot more
aggressive," Allen Iverson said.
"It paid dividends for us."
But scoring wasn't the first
thing on Wallace's mind in the
second half. He was more con-
cerned with how the game was
being officiated tipping
toward the Spurs, he thought.
"I knew what it was going to
be out there, and I didn't want
our team to fall into that," Wal-
lace said. "We knew how it was
going to be, especially going
against the league darlings."
Wallace finished with 19
points and Iverson also scored
19 for Detroit (11-6), which has
won two of three.
In other NBA games Tues-
day, it was: Indiana 118, L.A.
Lakers 117; Washington 108,
New Jersey 88; Portland 104,
New York 97; Philadelphia 103,
Chicago 95 in overtime; Dallas
100, L.A. Clippers 98; Denver


132, Toronto 93;'and Utah 99,
Sacramento 94.
In San Antonio, the Pistops.
trailed by 10 twice in the third
quarter and pulled ahead.when
Wallace hit a 3-pointer almost
four minutes into the fourth.
Wallace hit two more 3s in the
period to help Detroit outscore
the Spurs 28-14.
"We should have played that
hard from the gate," Wallace
said. "We wouldn't have been
in that deficit. We're a resilient
young team. Guys knuckled up
in that second half."
The, Spurs lost their second
straight despite the return of
Manu Ginobili to the starting
lineup. Ginobili scored 13 in his,
first start of the season after
missing the .first 12 games.
because of offseason ankle
surgery. He was 4-of-ll (rom
the floor and only 1-of-4 in the
fourth quarter.
The Spurs (9-8) were led by
Tim Duncan's 23 points, but
only one came in the fourth
quarter. San Antonio went 5-
of-15 from the floor in the
fourth, and the Pistons con-
,verted the Spurs' six turnovers
into 10 points.
, "The most disturbing thing is.
that we were very soft," Spurs,
coach Gregg Popovich said. "I
think Detroit intimidated us. It
was really'sad to watch in that
respect. 1 thought we totally
folded to their aggressive play."

Pacers 118, Lakers 117
At Indianapolis, Danny


RASHEED WALLACE (right) shoots over San Antonio Spurs forward Tim
Duncan (21) during the first quarter of Tuesday night's game in San
Antonio...


Granger scored 32 points and
led Indiana back from a 15-
point fourth-quarter deficit, and
Troy Murphy tipped in a missed
shot at the buzzer to complete
an improbable victory. Murphy
finished with 16 points and 17
rebounds.
The Lakers (14-2) came into
the game with seven straight
wins. Kobe Bryant scored 28
.points and had seven rebounds.

Wizards 108, Nets 88
At East Rutherford, N.J.,

By The Associated Press

SCOREBOARD

Thursday, December 4
San Antonio at, Denver
(10:30 pm EST). Tim Duncan
and the Spurs, losers of two in a
row, face the Nuggets, who are
12-3 since acquiring Chauncey
Billups in a trade.

STARS
Tuesday
Danny Granger, Pacers,
scored 32 points and led Indiana
back from a 15-point fourth-
quarter deficit for a 118-117 vic-
t"ry over.the Los Angeles Lak-
ers.
N..g. ._- Chaudney _Billuns,
Nuggets, had 24 points and 14


Caron Butler had 22 points and
10 assists, and DeShawn Steven-
son added 21 to lead Washing-
ton to its first road win of the
season and first win over an
Eastern Conference opponent.
after 11 straight losses.
Devin Harris led the Nets
with 18 points but scored only
three after halftime.

Trail Blazers 104, Knicks 97
At New York, Brandon Roy
scored 23 points, and Portland
dominated in the fourth quarter


assists in Denver's 132-93 tout'
of Toronto.
Dirk Nowitzki, Mavericks,
scored 29 points as Dallas
moved over .500 for the first
time this season with a 100-98
win over the Los Angeles Clip-
pers.
Rasheed Wallace, Pistons,
made three 3-pointers in the
fourth quarter and scored 19
points as Detroit rallied from
10 points down to beat San
Antonio 89-77. -
Andre Miller,. 76ersa,
sc.qed ninepLhis se.aspn-high.
28 points in overtime and
Philadelphia ended its four-
game losing streak with a 103-95
victory over Chicago.
DEBUT DEBACLE
Trail Blazers rookie Greg
Oden, who botched two dunks
in the first five minutes and fin-
ished with two points in Port-
land's 104-97 road win over the
Knicks, matched Kwame
Brown for the lowest-scoring
effort by a No. 1 overall pick in
his Madison Square Garden



For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Monday


for its fifth straight victory.
Rudy Fernandez made a pair
of 3-pointers early in the final
period and scored 18 for the
Trail Blazers, who shut down
the Knicks' high-powered
offense for the first seven-plus
minutes of the fourth and
improved to 13-6, their best
start after 19 games since the
1999-00 club was 15-4.
The Blazers shook off a dis-
mal offensive night from rookie
Greg Oden, who botched two
dunks in the first five minutes
and finished with. two points,
matching Kwame Brown for the
lowest-scoring effort by a No.
1 overall pick in his Madison
Square Garden debut in 40
years.
Chris Duhon scored a season-
high 23 points and added 13
assists for the Knicks.

76ers 103, Bulls 95 OT
At Chicago, Andre Miller
scored nine of his season-high
28 points in overtime to help
the 76ers end a four-game slide.
Andre Iguodala added 25
points and Elton Brand had 22
points and 14 rebounds as the
Sixers avenged a loss to the
Bulls two days ago in Philadel-
phia.
Derrick Rose led Chicago
with 24 points, Ben Gordon
added 18 and Tyrus Thomas
had 14 points and 13 boards.

Nuggets 132, Raptors 93
At Denver, Chauncey Billups
had 24 points and 14 assists in


,. debut in 40 years. Cazzie Rus-
sell (1966) and Jimmy Walker
(1967) had the only two other
two-point outings in an MSG
debut since 1966, when the
'NBA switched from a territori-
al draft.
INJURED
Houston guard Tracy
McGrady will miss three weeks
- to rehabilitate his sore left knee,
another blow to an injury-
plagued -season for the Rcfk"'
-:ets:McGrady sat out Houston's
.,9t.itbhree games after starting
the first 15. He had arthroscop-
ic surgery on May 6, but said
Tuesday that doctors have told
him that the knee is not healed.
Also hurt for the Rockets:
Shane Battier, Ron Artest,
Brent Barry and Yao Ming,
who missed one game with a
sore left foot.

ROAD WINNERS -
FINALLY,
Washington beat New Jersey
108-88 for its first road win of
the season (1-6) and their first
win over an, Eastern Confer-
ence opponent after 11 straight
losses.
STARTING
Manu Ginobili scored 13
points in his first start of the
season for the Spurs after miss-
ing the first 12 games because of
offseason ankle surgery. Gino-
bili's return to the starting five


Denver's rout of Toronto.
After a slow start, Carmelo
Anthony finished with 23 points
48 hours after scoring just one
bucket against Houston, which
snapped his NBA-best double-
digit streak at 222 games.
Chris Bosh scored 24 poi
for the Raptors and Jermai
O'Neal added 12 in his retu'
after missing three gam
because of a left ankle sprain.

Mavericks 100, Clippers 98
At Dallas, Jose Barea hit thl
go-ahead 3-pointer in the final
minute, Dirk Nowitzki scored
29-points and the Mavericks ral-
lied from a 15-point deficit to
move over .500 for the first time
this season:
Barea capped Dallas' closiifg
18-4,run with a long-rangfi
jumper with 50.2 seconds leflt
that gave Dallas its only lead c6
the game. '
Zach Randolph had 27 points
and 10 rebounds for the Clip-
pers, who failed to.score in the
last 2:55.
ib
Jazz 99, Kings 94 i,
At Sacramento, Calif., Kylde
Korver scored 15 points andc
Deron Williams had two key
baskets in the final minute to,
give Utah the win. j!
Paul Milsap had 13 points an&d
11 rebounds for the Jazz, who
won in spite of 25 turnovers. -
Kevin Martin scored 22
points as Sacriamento lost its
seventh straight and 10th in 11
games.

didn't help San Antonio, whi.
was beaten by Detroit 89-77,

TECHNICAL
MOTIVATION
Detroit's Rasheed Wallace
made three 3-pointers in the
fourth quarter and scored 17
points in the final 15 minutes
after picking up a technical foul
helping the Pistons rally fro
10 points down for an 89-77 vic
tory over San Antonio.

HOME WOES, "
The Sacramento'King o10
99-94 to LiUtah and ha ,
dropped seen consecutive%
games at .aced Arena fo.
first time 'simc.the 19.9,B
son and are dif#los'away frl
tying the franchise record.

STAT .
With a 132-93_.-6ut of tld
Toronto Raptofs on Tuesday
night, the Nuggets improved to
12-3 since trading Allen Iver-
son. to the Detroit Pistons for
Chauncey Billups. "t

SPEAKING .
"It's embarrassing not o
for us but for' those wli d
port the Toronto Raptork't
organization, the city and t
country. That should never hap
pen. This is a business, We g
paid a heck of a lot of ioney
play a certain way ani if
think we can turn it on and
like that then: we are fooli
ourselves."
Toronto's Jermai
O'Neal criticizing his team after
a 132-93 loss to the Denver
Nuggets.


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JBR BUILDING SUPPLIES LTD.
.AND
STOPS LUMBER & PLUMBING,
AND CAN NO LONGER TRANSACT
BUSINESS'ON THEIR BEHALF. '
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I NBA Toda


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGP 18, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008









Smith and

Darling in

NFL playoff

push...
See page 16


''PAG17Sniorsportsrepor


Fr Marcian highlights


* By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

field of play picked
up considerably on
day six of the Father
Marcian Peters Basketball Clas-
sic as teams begin to position
themselves for the champi-
onship rounds this weekend.
Junior Boys
C C Sweeting Scorpions 31
A F Adderley Tigers 26
The Scorpions continue to
dominate their division and
appear well on their way to
being one of the leading con-
tenders for the junior boys title.
The Scorpions overcame a
scrappy and inspired Tigers
team for the come-from-behind
victory.


CC Sweeting trailed 17-10 at
the half but opened the third
quarter on a 10-2 run to gain
the advantage.
Led by twin towers Marvin
Saunders and Roosevelt Whyl-
ly, the Scorpions dominated the
defensive boards and sparked
the Scorpions comeback effort.
They took their first lead of
the game on an Angelo Lock-
hart fastbreak layup.
With 47 seconds remaining,
Saunders grabbed an offensive
rebound and hit a fade-away
jumper to give the Scorpions a
commanding 29-26 advantage.
Saunders finished with a
game high 13 points, nine
rebounds, three steals and two
blocks. Whylly chipped in with
eight points, five rebounds and
one block while Lockhart also
added eight. Antario Collie fin-


ished with six assists for the
Tigers.
San Salvador 16
C H Reeves Raptors 9
Steadily becoming a crowd
favourite, San Salvador won
their third game of the tourna-
mentin a low scoring affair.
Densil Burrows led San Sal-
vador with six points, while
Lester Williams added four
points, six rebounds and three
steals.
Primary Girls
Faith Temple Warriors 9
St Francis & Joseph
Shockers -1
The Warriors stringent defen-
sive effort held the Shockers
without a field goal in one of
the lowest scoring games of the
tournament. Aisha Shepard led


the Warriors with five points,
four rebounds and four steals,
while Dawn Dean chipped in
with four points.
Primary Boys
St Francis & Joseph Shockers
-27
St Anne's Blue Waves 2
Catholic Primary Schools
have dominated the division
early on in the tournament as
they remain largely untested by
the rest of the field.
Brandon Wilson led the
Shockers with 12 points, six
rebounds, two assists and five
steals while Ahkeem Neilly
added five.
Westminster Diplomats 21
Mt Carmel Cavaliers -10
The Diplomats programme
continues to grow, as the pri-
mary boys teams continue to
win just a season after the team
captured BAISS senior boys
and junior boys runners up
titles.
Shamar Burrows led all scor-
ers with 11 points while Tra-
vante McPhee added six.
St Thomas More Sparks 26.
Temple Christian Suns 3 '
Playing with last week's
Catholic Schools tournament
championship loss to St Bede's,
the Sparks have been impres-
sive, dominating each contest
thus far.
Dejour Adderley led the
Sparks with 15 points, while
Joel Morris added four points
and three blocks.
Senior Girls
Doris Johnson Mystic
Marlins- 22
C I Gibson Rattlers -9
The Mystic Marlins opened


A ORIS JOHNSON Mystic Martins player goes for a layup over Cl Gibson
Rattlers players at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium yesterday. The Marlins
won 22-9. See more photos on page 16...


the game on a 10-0 and the Rat-
tiers never threatened for the
remainder of the contest.
The Marlins led 12-2 after the
first quarter and only constant-
ly took advantage of the Rat-
tlers ball handling deficiency.
Jakia Brown led the Marlins
and scored a game high 10
points while Danielle Zonicle


finished with six points and four
steals.
Freeport Anglican
Warriors -19 .
St John' s College 16
The Warriors pulled off the
upset against the defending
See BALL, page 16


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THE TRIBUNE


MEXICAN ARMY soldiers stand r
next to suspects during a presen-
tation to the press after being CD
arrested during an operation _" U i rta
against drug smuggling and kid-C
napping gangs in Tijuana, Mexico,
yesterday. The Mexican Army ran
an operation on a safe house on
Tuesday after an anonymous call E f d u i f i
where they arrested four suspects a,
and rescued two men.


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* By TRACI CARL
AND FRANK BAJAK
MEXICO CITY

The JJ.S. government finally
released the first part of a $400
million aid package Wednesday
to support Mexico's police and
soldiers in their fight against drug
cartels, according to the Associ-
ated Press.
The money comes at a critical
time: Mexico's death toll from
drug violence has soared above
4,000 so far this year, and drug-
related murders and kidnapping
are spilling over the U.S. border
as well. U.S. Ambassador Tony
Garza formally released $197 mil-
lion at a signing ceremony in
Mexico City, calling it "the most
significant effort ever undertak-
en" by the U.S. and Mexico to
fight drugs. The rest will be dis-
bursed throughout the year.
"The Merida Initiative is not
just about money. It is about a
closer and more collaborative
effort by the United States and
Mexico to work more effectively
together to share information in a
more timely fashion," Garza said.
But many questions remain
about the direction of this drug
war. Colombia, where 90 percent
of U.S.-bound cocaine is pro-
duced, worries it would be hand-
cuffed by concerns about human
rights once Barack Obama is
president. "If the United States
strips us of those resources, what
will be done? Where will they
come from?" Andres Pastrana
asked in an Associated Press
interview. The former Colombian
president worked with U.S. Pres-
ident Bill Clinton to launch Plan
Colombia, which has spent more
than $6 billion in U.S. aid since
2000 to fight drug trafficking and
leftist rebels. Similar worries
arose in Mexico when Democrats
in Congress hesitated to approve
the Merida Initiative and tried to
impose human rights restrictions.
But with the money finally being
released, Mexico is confident that
the Obama administration will
stay committed to the program
and that any human rights con-
cerns can be resolved, said Carlos
Rico, Mexico's under-secretary
for North American affairs.
The Mexico plan which
includes no cash includes heli-
copters and surveillance aircraft,
airport inspection equipment and
case-tTacking software to help
police share real-time intelligence.
It also supports Mexican efforts to
weed out corrupt police, improve
the judicial system and protect
witnesses.
Most of it, however, will go to
notoriously corrupt police forces
and the same military whose sol-
diers have tortured, raped and
killed innocent civilians while bat-
tling the cartels, according to
Mexico's National Human Rights
Commission. President Felipe
Calderon himself said more than
half of state and local police can't
be trusted, and federal ranks are
rife with corrupt officers.
The U.S. government has stood
by Calderon. But Anthony
Placido, the U.S. Drug Enforce-
ment Administration's intelli-
gence chief, acknowledged the
dangers. "Law enforcement work
anywhere in the world, and cer-
tainly in Mexico, can be perilous,"
Placido said in October when
asked whether Mexican corrup-
tion has imperiled U.S. agents.
"Is it dangerous? Absolutely."
After both nation's lawmakers
approved thb money this sum-
mer, Mexico went public with
Operation Clean House, which
ensnared a dozen high-ranking
police officials, including the for-
mer drug czar, on allegations of
spying for the powerful Sinaloa
cartel.
Colombia has been cleaning


house as well: A week before
Obama's election, President
Alvaro Uribe fired 20 officers -
including three generals and four
colonels for negligence in the
biggest-ever purge of Colombi-
a's military. On Nov. 4, the arm)
commander resigned. Uribe'als'o
reversed his resistance to U.N.
monitoring, saying he would
assign a human rights ombuds-
man to every battalion.
"The United States is a
supremely important ally,"
Colombian armed forces chief
Gen. Freddy Padilla told the AP.
"But it's an ally that doesn't pro-
vide aid and support blindly."
Colombia places almost no
restrictions on U.S. support,
allowing U.S. soldiers and drug
agents to operate freely in its ter-
ritory. But Mexicans hade always
chafed at American military aid
After the Calderon administra-
tion objected, U..S lawmakers
backed off tough restncuons. onfl
conditioning 15 percent on State
Department confirmation thar
Mexico is meeting human riglits
and police corruption goals 1 a
Washington has been unlwa-
vering in its support of Calderonr's
drug fight, even as top membdt.s
of his security team tell in the ce.r-
ruption scandal. Obama also sEjd
Central America should get mdre
than the $65 million in aid il~is
getting as part of the Merida rni-
tiative. And while Obama has fe-
quently criticized Colombia"s
human rights record, he pledged
his full support for iUnbe's fight
against the.leftist Revolutiona!
Armed Forces of Colombia.
which sustains its rcbelhlion with
cocaine profits.
But the U.S. is taking a hard
look at how it fights the drug war
- starting with the U.S. moneN
and guns that sustain the carrels
The Brookings Institution esti-
mates that 2,000 guns enter Mre\-
ico from the United States every
day, and many Latin American
nations complain that U.S. drug
consumption is ultimately respon-
sible for the violence.
"The. U.S. has to go after the
flow of guns and bulk cash and
stolen vehicles that go from north
to south over our southern bor-
der," one of Obama's top Latin
America advisers, Dan Restrepo,
told The AP. "It's our responsi-
bility to do far more than what
we're doing to cut off those
flows."
The mostly military nature of
the aid also is being examined
after the U.S. Congress's research
arm reported that Plan Colom-
bia has failed to meet its goal of
halving illegal drug production in
Colombia, and coca cultivation
increased 27 percent last year.
Vice President-elect Joe Biden
commissioned last month's report
as Senate Foreign Relations
chairman.
Democrats in Congress already,
shifted more than $100 million of
Colombia's aid to nonmilitary
purposes, such as strengthening
the judicial system and respond-
ing to the world's worst integral
refugee crisis after Sudan.
Colombia's military, which has
nearly doubled in size under
Uribe, worries of more cuts to
come. "It would be an errornto
deprive of aid a government with
a clear democratic conviction and
a military that is infinitely respect-
ed by the Colombian people,"
Padilla said.









THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE


RATOA


Obam

* 6y ANITA SNOW
HAVANA

B arack Obama will
be the first Ameri-
can president' in
nearly 50 years to
have a relatively free hand in
deciding whether to ease puni-
tive Cold War-era policies toward
communist Cuba, and the foreign
policy team he announced this
week seems predisposed to make
it happen.
Obama said during the cam-,
paign that immediately after tak-
ing office on Jan. 20, he will lift all
restrictions on family travel and
cash remittances to Cuba not
just roll them back to previous
rules that were tightened by the
Bush administration.
Obama also said he would
uphold the embargo imposed
after the island went communist,
to use as leverage until Cuba
shows "significant steps toward
democracy," starting with free-
dom for approximately 219 jailed
political prisoners.
For nearly five decades, the
embargo is where the two nations
have been stuck, each side
demanding that the other change
first. What's different now is that
Obama says he will talk directly
with Cuban President Raul Cas-
tro, who recently and repeatedly
offered to negotiate on neutral
ground as equals.
These openings have.Cubans
feeling more optimistic about get-
ting unstuck than ever before.
"What we want is that the
Americans no longer look at us as
enemies," said Lazaro Medardo,
68, who was selling sunflowers,
red roses and.gladiolas from a
pushcart in old Havana on Mon-
day. "We aren't their'enemies."
Cuban-Americans have had a
mixed reaction to Obama's cam-
paign promises most voted
against him, but Obama carried
Florida and didn't even need the
state's votes to win the presiden-
cy, confounding the notion that
the support of anti-Castro Cuban
exiles is essential in presidential
elections. A new poll in the heart
of Florida's 2uban-American
community even indicates that
most there now believe the
embargo should end.
"Obama already has a much
freer hand than Bush did," said
Daniel Erickson of the lJnter-
American Dialogue, a Washing-
ton, D.C; think tank. "He does
not owe any of his political suc-
cess to Cuban-Americans in
South Florida."
Obama is therefore free to
chart a new course. He can
reverse some policies of Presi-
dent George W. Bush with a pen
stroke, and while undoing the
embargo would take a majority
in Congress, .that's easier than
ever with Democrats holding siz-
able majorities. A fresh U.S.
approach could'improve relations
across Latin America, according
to a report last week. from the
Brookings Institution think tank
in Washington, which said Amer-
ica's Cuba policy has hindered
Washington's ability to work with
other countries throughout the.


a free to change US-Cuba policy

relations toward Latin America. ishness and vested interests," ail- plaza. "I don't have family in tl-
Cuba's communist leadership, ing former President Fidel Castro United States, but many of mn
which blames the embargo for recently wrote about Obama. friends do and hope they will no
most Cuban problems, is skeptical But some Cubans think Obama see them more often.'"
about dramatic change, just might make change happen.
"It would be extremely naive to "His thinking is more interna-
believe that the good will of a tional," 35-year-old Eduardo Anita Snow has been the chi,
smart person could change what Betancourt said as he leaned on of The Associated Press bureau
is the result of centuries of self- his bicycle in an Old Havana in Havana since 1999.


ie
>y
w


ef
in


LAZARO MEDARDO, 68, a flower vendor, reads a newspapers in
Havana, Monday, Dec. 1, 2008. Barack Obama will be the first Amer-
ican president in nearly 50 years to have a relatively free hand in decid-
ing whether to ease punitive Cold War-era policies toward communist
Cuba, and the foreign policy team he announced this week seems pre-
disposed to make it happen.


region. Top figures in the incom-
ing administration also have
favored more open relations.
As chairman of the Senate For-
eign Relations Committee, Vice
President-elect Joe Biden called
for re-establishing mail service
with Cuba and easing family trav-
el restrictions.
The future secretary of state,
Hillary Clinton, campaigned
against Obama's openness to talk-
ing with Raul Castro, but said she
would respond positively to.
Cuban actions demonstrating a
willingness to change. Also, Oba-
ma's initial moves have a Clinton
precedent: President Bill Clinton
eased travel regulations during
the last three years of his tenure.
Obama's nominee for U.N.
ambassador, Susan E. Rice, has
said. America, needs,- a new
approach, one that "actually tries
to catalyze, change on the island."
The new commerce secretary,
New Mexico Gov. Bill Richard-
son, has been there and done that,
in small ways.
As a congressman, Richardson
secured the release of three
Cuban political prisoners during
talks with Fidel Castro in Havana
in 1996. As U.N. ambassador in
1997, he held talks about terror-
ism with then Cuban Foreign
Minister Roberto Robaina.
Richardson will replace Cuban-
born Carlos Gutierrez, a harsh
Castro critic who co-chaired the
White House Commission for
Assistance for a Free Cuba. Cuba
called it a cover for regime
change, and it seems unlikely to


survive into the new administra-
tion. The saga of Elian Gonza-
lez, the Cuban boy who was res-
cued at sea and became a cause
celebre in 2000, is being revisited
asObama's appointments are
studied for clues to future Cuba
policy: Manny Diaz, Miami's
Cuban-American mayor and a
candidate for housing and urban
development secretary, was on
the legal team that fought unsuc-
cessfully to keep Elian with his
Miami relatives.
Eric Holder, Obama's choice
for attorney general, was the No.
2 Justice Department official
when armed federal officers
seized Elian and returned him to
his father in Cuba. The White
House counsel will be Gregory
Craig, who was the father's attor-
pey. Embargo supporters fear the
Obama team will concede too
much. "For the embargo or the
additional sanctions to be lifted,
certain steps must be taken:
Respect for human rights, the
release of all political prisoners
and free and democratic elec-
tions," Miami radio and TV host
Ninoska Perez wrote in an opin-
ion piece in USA Today. "It's the
Cuban regime that must change,
not LI S policy."
Still, a post-election poll of
Cuban-Americans in Miami-
Dade County showed that 55 per-
cent believe the embargo should
end a profound shift in the
&uban exile community.
Even more of the respondents
65 percent said the U.S.
should drop restrictions on travel
and money transfers, reestablish
diplomatic relations and estab-
lish dialogue about immigration
and other critical issues.
The poll published Tuesday by
the Brookings Institution and
Florida International University
surveyed 800 people, including
300 by cellphone, and had a mar-
gin of error of 3.6,percentage
points. The poll was unrelated to
the Brookings report on U.S.


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UN concerned over treatment of Iraqi detainees


Allegations of 'grave

human rights violations'

and overcrowding













facility at Camp Cropper in Baghdad,'raq, Monday, Nov. 10, 2008.

DETAINEES are seen through the door of their cell at the U.S. detention
facility at Camp Cropper in Baghdad,'Iraq, Monday, Nov. 10, 2008.


By KIM GAMEL
BAGHDAD
The United Nations
expressed concern Tuesday
about overcrowding and "grave
human rights violations" of
detainees in Iraqi custody in
one case, 123 men crammed
into a single cell, according to
the Associated Press.
The warning comes as the
U.S. prepares to turn over con-
trol to the Iraqis of thousands of
security detainees in its custody
under a new security pact that
would end the U.S. mission here
by 2012. The pact, approved last
week by Iraq's parliament, calls
for American forces to transfer
all detainees believed to be a
major threat and to release the
rest "in a safe and orderly man-
ner."
But as overall violence
declines in the country, the
U.N.'s 13th report on .the
human rights situation in Iraq
casts doubt on whether the
Iraqis will be ready to take cus-
tody of more detainees proper-
ly. "There is no secret that the
(Iraqi) prisons are overcrowded
and frankly not in very good
condition," U.N. envoy Staffan
de Mistura said at a news con-
ferFence where the report was
" released.
.He cited one recent example
of c detention facility in which
123' detainees were crammed
int&:a .540-square-foot cell -
about the size of a studio apart-
menit !'That's obviously some-
tlhing 'that cannot be sustained,"
i he said. Reports of widespread
mistreatment and torture of
detainees also continue and
need more thorough investiga-
tion, he said, adding that none
has been prosecuted.
"Grave human rights viola-
tions ... remain unaddressed,"
the report said, citing "ongoing
widespread ill-treatment and
torture of detainees by Iraqi law
enforcement authorities, amid
pervasive impunity of current
and past human rights abuses."
'The report covered only the
six-month.period that ended in
June, so the numbers of
detainees included was outdat-
ed. The U.S. has released thou-
sands since then under an
amnesty program.
De Mistura, the U.N."s spe-
cial representative in Iraq, esti-
niated Tuesday that there were
now a total of 40,000 detainees,
including some 15,800 being
held by the U.S. military.
The report also renewed con-
cern about the U.S. detention
of suspects for prolonged peri-
ods without judicial review of
their cases.
The U.N. urged the Iraqi gov-
ernment to speed up legal
reforms and strengthen the judi-
cial system as it asserts more
control over its own affairs.
"More sovereignty means
more responsibility. More
responsibility means less
impunity," de Mistura said. "'All
that makes sustainable securi-
ty gains."
To assist the government, the
U.N. and other international
agencies have implemented
training projects in human
rights and the administration of
detention facilities.
"But we aren't going to see
the effects immediately,"
acknowledged Jose Maria
Aranaz, a senior human rights
officer for the U.N. in Iraq.
The U.N. also singled out.the
problem of so-called honor
killings of women in the semi-
autonomous Kurdish region in
northern Iraq and in the mainly
Shiite southern area of Basra. A
U.S.-Iraqi crackdown against
Shiite extremists in Basra has
failed to stop the killings.
De Mistura said 80-82 women
had reportedly been killed there
so far this year but there has
been only one prosecution.


"That shows that the problem
needs to be addressed more
forcefully," he said.
The Shiite-dominated gov-
ernment has made a more con-
certed effort to stop the killings
in Basra, but the grim statistics
show that "progress needs to
be faster," he said.
The U.N. human rights
report, which previously was
issued quarterly but is now bian-.
nual, used to be closely watched
for Iraqi civilian casualty fig-
ures. That practice stopped
when the Iraqi government
refused to release the spiraling
figures to the U.N.
De Mistura said the situation
had improved and he was hope-
ful casualty figures could be
included in the next report.
The number of Iraqis killed
has declined drastically over the
past year following a U.S. troop
buildup.
But the U.S. military has
warned insurgents are likely to
step up attacks ahead of Jan. 31
provincial elections.
Underscoring the continued
threat, a suicide car bomber det-:
onated his explosives near an
Iraqi checkpoint Tuesday in the
north city,opTal4.'ar, ing
at least five people and wound-
ing 30, according to police and
hospital officials.
A bomb hidden in a wooden
cart exploded near an elemen-
tary school in the northern city
of Mosul, killing four civilians
and wounding 12 others, police
said.
A roadside bomb also struck
an Iraqi army convoy in Iskan-
dariyah, 30 miles south of Bagh-
dad, killing five Iraqi soldiers,
police said.
The officials spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity because they
weren't authorized to. release
the information.


F


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DETAINEES are seen outside their cell block at the U.S. detention facility
at Camp Cropper in Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, Nov. 10, 2008. The U.S. mil-
itary is rushing to collect evidence against some 5,000 detainees deemed
to be dangerous including suspected members of al-Qaida i flraq in
case it loses the right to hold prisoners indefinitely without charge at the
end of the year.


I.I


*i
"
4 .- .


STAFFAN DE MISTURA. the U.N.'s special representative in Iraq,
speaks during a press conference in Baghdad, Iraq,,Tuesday, Dec. 2,
20,Q&Th.IULliteo nations has expressed concern about overcrowded
prisons and the treatment of detainees in Iraq.


"There is no
secret that the
(Iraqi) prisons
are overcrowd-
ed and frankly
not in very good
condition."

Staffan de Mistura


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P A G E 2 4 T H U R S D Y D E C E B E RE4 ,A00 8OT H E T R I B U N


Russian warships


hold exercises


with Chavez's navy

N By CHRISTOPHER TOOTHAKER
CARACAS, Venezuela
Russian warships have ended training exercises with Venezuela's
navy in Moscow's first such Caribbean deployment since the Cold
War, according to the Associated Press.
Russian television on Tuesday showed images of a Venezue-
lan-operated Sukhoi fighter jet swooping low over Russian warships
in a simulated air attack.
The exercises that ended late Monday with a fireworks display
included an air defense exercise and joint actions to spot, pursue and
detain an intruding vessel, Russian navy spokesman Capt. Igor
D)vgalo said.
The Russian ships arrived in Venezuela last week in an operation
\widely seen as a show of Kremlin anger over the U.S. decision to
deliver aid to Georgia aboard warships following that country's con-
flict with Russia.
President Hugo Chavez has said the naval exercises weren't
meant as a provocation to the United States or any other nation. He
has praised Russia for raising its profile in the Americas, while say-
ing the U.S. Navy's recently reactivated Fourth Fleet poses a threat
to Venezuela.
U.S. officials says the Fourth Fleet, which was dissolved after
World War II, will help maintain security in the Caribbean and
Latin America while performing humanitarian missions and
counter-drug operations.
This vveek's joint naval exercises featured helicopters dropping
special forces soldiers onto a ship as if it had been "seized by ter-
rorists," according to a report on state-run Rossiya television.
Russia sent the nuclear-powered cruiser Peter the Great, the
destroyer Admiral Chabanenko and support ships, and Russian
television said they were joined by three Venezuelan frigates for the
exercises, dubbed "Venrus 2008."
Rossiya television reported that the Venezuelan warships
returned home and the Russian squadron left the area. It broadcast
footage of a farewell fireworks display and Russian sailors waving
their caps in a farewell gesture.
Russian television reported that the ships operated with joint
Russian-Venezuelan crews. At one point, Rossiya reported, the
commander of the Russian squadron captained a Venezuelan
frigate while Venezuelan Rear Adm. Luis Morales acted as captain
of the Peter the Great.
Soviet ships and planes regularly visited Cuba during the Cold
War, but Russian troops have been largely absent from the region
since the Soviet Union dissolved in 1991.
The Russian ships sailed into a Venezuelan port last week for a
visit timed to coincide with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev's
talks with Chavez in Caracas.
Venezuela has bought more than $4 billion in Russian arms,
including 100,000 Kalashnikov rifles, helicopters and the Sukhoi
fighter jets used in this week's training.
Chavez, a former army paratroop commander, says he is trying
to transform Venezuela into a socialist country, and views Russia
as a key ally in moving toward a "multi-polar" world with less
U.S. influence.
Venezuelan Defense Minister Gustavo Rangel was aboard one
of the ships on Monday. Rossiya television showed him thanking the
Russians and reciting the motto often used by Chavez: "Fatherland,


v


% >. "



*-... -*.,-. --
a.,

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..,.- .... .,:.a.. C ,,=B, t"" B


i*A I


RUSSIAN SAILORS line up as they prepare for a welcoming ceremony for the presidents of Russia and Venezuela at La Guaira port, near Cara-
cas, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez toured a Russian destroyer
docked in the port, one of two large Russian warships that arrived this week for training exercises in the first deployment of its kind in the Caribbean
since the Cold War. During his visit Medvedev agreed to help start a nuclear energy programme in Venezuela and then departed for Cuba.


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PAGE 24, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


:


VENEZUELA'S PRESIDENT Hugo Chavez, right, and Russia's Presi-
dent Dmitry Medvedev wave upon their arrival at a Russian warship
docked at La Guaira port, in Venezuela, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008.


A RUSSIAN sailor cleans his face while waiting for a welcoming cer-
emony for the presidents of Russia and Venezuela at La Guaira port,
near Caracas, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008.


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THE TRIBUNE





Zimbabwe fle


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE 25





amid cholera crisis


By ANGUS SHAW
HARARE, Zimbabwe

As children pl, cd 1n,; I
cesspools, their parents slnho,
their heads ;tl a public sci'N icec
an.nounlemen d ilti Lg ieCr lIhec
radio Tuesda I: It Ii .'d people
to boil water before di inkin' it.
It sounded like a I unit in aJ
countlrv where water lm'til a 'lck
tricity' are cut olff far moi thIan
they are on.
Authorities lurnedIC ofil the
taps in Ziml abia l capiItal
again this week bccaiuseI tlil'\
had run out of puril ing chcinem
icals even as a cholera Cep)-
demic threatcncd the country.
claiming hundreds of hli\ s since
August, rc/-orts.v'thc A\.\:sociild
Press.
The crisis is the latcsl chapter
in the collapse of this on c
vibrant nation, President
Robert MIugabe, who has ruled
for 28 years, has rcl'used to
leave office follo\\ing disputed
elections in March. Aind a po\\-
er-sharing deal worked out with
the opposition has been dead-
locked for weeks over how to
divvy up Cabinet posts.
In the township of Mabu ii.ku
where residents have dug sha:l-
low wells in open giountd, pe-
pie say they know not hoilini
the water can make them sick,
but they have no choice. There
is no electricity and wood, ch.-n -
coal or other fuel to build fires
is scarce and so cxpcnsile it is
out of reach for most people.
"We are afraid, but there is
no solution. Most ol the time
the electricity is not .i\nlablec
so we just use the \\aler," one
resident. Naison Chak\\iceha,
told AP Television Newis.
In the western Harare sub-
urb of Mbare. Anna Marimbe
said she had traced the deaths
last week of two neighbor chil-
dren to the stinking open drains
where they used to play.
Residents of Chitlunw\\i/a, a
densely populated to, wnship 15
miles south of Harare, sucd the
National Water AuthoritI last
week. saving the\ had been
without running water. loi 131
months, causing an otitbreak of
cholera and leading to death hs.
The lawsuit filed with the
High Court describes 'large
pools of raw sewerage in the
streets of the town of 500t)11()),
where the first choleia cases


pi.i l: a !ali;I, Monday, December, 1, 2008. Water in
'i ;i :ri liti- litIlhleak which has left at least 425 peoz


WOMEN AND CHILDREN .vail to ul i ,
the capital -Halu lie wv s cut Il tiO ;lh .
pile dead.t

\\CIC rep>') l io l I \ i1i,
1.ikc l e i io /In t i,
lmai ci il I. \ 1 11, o I s\ I '
\vi/l oficCe h:ul 1 fill;, i l
ew'\\;ige .lin. \\ :dle l ,in Ir.t i" s \s
tleins, bh it a M11 1h 1 tlle" \ h it i ll'
no i '[p.'1 \ lo i r ',;i!
I 1ari'ae is the epa uICeter ofl e1
cholel.1 epi e ul t, n \\ klich f '
spread across the eoiintlm\. ( on
trolling lthe disease depends oni
pro\mlhng e ac:Ii \\I.i \\ i i '
means Ir\ [u'; i !.nn bl ,ok'en il,,
idul sc\ ie pe .
di p!l|idui ,li' ni lpir. : 1 I! Oh ,
kalion l iiiiiiLiii.
S A ni d 1h l c' lld ipi ol :1 L'[
\ iees. inLl lk t\ I etl,.T e i olli
(io n, hias Itii n li i e i l\ i i .
enlt s|,n)i',l i o!,,i ; i n 'it li',
diseas i ,
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47I3 cho ei'i i"l i \


sp k ," n, i n iiL',i! l \ '. ..


'b ol: ;6$~


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it Ii. i I; I I s
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I i IIt I I L I I INI '
,'! In i t'i 1-
S*I i ;ie ih lor t he
i, *! ; itopullion.


people cannot afford to buy
graves.
Zimbabwe's government,
nomnally hostile to internation-
,1 aid agencies, is welcoming an
initiative by several including
IUNICEF, WHO and Doctors
Without Borders to provide
emergency care and try to
ensure safe water supplies.
Health officials, following the
line of a government that has
I closed to declare a national
emergency, insisted the cholera
on outbreak was under control
until five days ago. The best
advice Health Minister David
Parirenyatwa could offer was
to urge people to stop shaking
hands. "I want to stress the issue
of shaking hands. Although it's
part of our tradition to shake
hands, it's high time people
stopped shaking hands." he told
state-run daily, The He.lId.
Slill., Zimnabweans continue.
to find ways to deal with the
ci isis.


.:,-



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f 2
.. .* .;




. .. . ;



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.... ..;
....


9g ~


.- .. ,.. .


It


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F .

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iq -.


I '


WOMEN carry water ill buckets afteri 1,,% n it h l ...!
underground source, following a wati ct i Harare, IVoi ,, ,
2008. Water in the capital Harare was cut due to shorly(i ,i |,ii;i !;j.llu l
chemicals as Zimbabwe battles with a choleia uttii a, .!i'ii ii "
thought to have left at least 425 people dead.


NDUSTRIE


PP"I


c 10%forS
z^^


Those who can afford it are
digging wells and bore holes.
Others are buying tanks and
pumps to install on their roof
or yards, then paying $50 in for-
eign currency for a single deliv-
ery of 500 gallons of water.
Most vendors in Zimbabwe
only accept U.S. dollars or
South African rand since the
Zimbabwe dollar, once on a par
with the greenback, devalues
with each passing hour.
On Tuesday, it was trading
for 1.8 million to the dollar -
even after the Central Bank
dropped 10 zeros from the local
currency this year in an attempt
to keep up with .inflation last
set officially at 231 million per-
cent in July.
The economic collapse of
what was once a regional bread
basket followed Mugabe's
often-violent campaign, begin-
ning in 2000, to seize white-
owned farms and hand them
over to veterans of his guerrilla
war against white minority rule.
Now, even those who have
the money often can't buy
water. One supplier told an
Associated Press reporter Tues-
day that he has a waiting list
more than two weeks long.
Those without foreign cur-
rency must turn to "water
Samaritans" residents of
Harare's wealthier neighbor-
hoods who have wells or bore
holes and are allowing people to
fill buckets and jerry cans for
free. Some residents are charg-
ing for the privilege.
Lines of mainly women and
children gather daily outside the
homes of people with wells. But
even that supply is not assured.
Parirenyatwa, the health min-
ister, voiced the fears of many
when he said the cholera epi-
demic is likely to only get worse
with the onset of the rainy sea-
son, which began last month
and brings the heaviest rains in
late December and January.
"What I am afraid of is that
now that the rainy season has
come, all the feces lying in the
bushes will be washed into shal-
low wells and contaminate the
water," he said.


Associated Press writer
Michelle Faul contributed to this
report from Johannesburg,
South Africa.


* * . -




"7",,^.~





?* *' "


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CALVIN & HOBBES


Tribune Comics


MESS OUT HERE /


JUDGE PARKER


DENNIS THE MENACE


"How PO yo LA oIK u R "'IN A CHOCOLATE CAKE.'
6GSPINNIS?"


Sudoku Puzzle


Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid witl
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and eacly
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday

3 6 9

.2

943 562

27 6 81._

6 3 '5

135 .97

6' 8 9 314 4

4

1 2 6
Difficulty Level *


Kakuro Puzzle


Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is tl
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum o
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the su
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number?
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficult
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.


Saturday's -.
Sudoku Answer :


615 2


519 8
5 811
1 87


89il
475




3 512


Saturday's
Kakuro Answer

1 214'i318 9 6
8 67,1 9 311 21(
819 9 8
849 21439
21 853 13
32.541 1.28
8.9 13
8 26 827
571 32416


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


Chess

7'ernardo R(^Hlt ll[pn' f r 875.7
Montevideo2001'Mteali a I
level, but White (to play has a a : "
useful attacking position. The
black king is in serious danger, .-,'TI
with the white queen at close -I
quarters and only available A a c 0 E G H


Chess 8757: 1 Rxc6t Nxc6 2 Ng5! fxgS 3 Bxd5+ Rf!O
4 Nf6 mate.


Across
1 Clothes of matching
colours with various
decorations (2-9)
9 The origin of an
Erin lad (7)
10 Extremist talk (5)
.11 Its purpose in sport is to
eliminate passion (4)
12 Submitted to the Spanish
guard (8)
14 Quietly yearn for table
linen (6)
16 It's sound in diplomacy (6)
18 Political favours? (8)
19 Ruler of star potential (4)
22 He's found among fuel
merchants (5)
23 Wine forced on militant
republicans (7)
24 Where to find aces well
looked after (2,4,5)

Yesterday's Cryptic Solutic
Across: 1 Muscle, 4 Mistaken, 9
Drover, 10 Starling, 12 Sets, 13 She
14 Shoe, 17 Reservations, 20
Asseveration, 23 Ante, 24 Witch, 25
Halo, 29 Aurora borealis, 30 Elepha
31 Mousse.
Down: 1 Made sure, 2 Scottish, 3
Lief, 5 Intelligence, 6 Tort, 7 Knight,
Nugget, 11 Cheap edition, 15 Brass
16 Knead, 18 Picadors, 19 Annotate
21 Marble, 22 Starve, 26 Rash, 27
Ludo.


Down
2 Half the operations
performed in the
theatre (5).
3 Breed that'may be rare (4)
4 It's certainly not out of
action (6)
5 Etching or a
watercolour? (8)
6 Baltic country resort one
is at (7)
7 Late tenders? (5,6)
8 Put in a word for the
working classes (11)
13 One who talks one round
tro comnDosin some


15

17

20

21


music (8) LI
Unusual stamp on a letter N
is entrusted to him (7) N
Smiled widely, having
support (6)
I raced around and ,
looked (5)
Notion not'quite perfect (4) L,

Yesterday's Easy Solution
Across: 1 Tip-off, 4 Leftover, 9
Enrich, 10 Meteoric, 12 Peal, 13
Cover, 14 Pull, 17 Second nature,
20 Fourth estate, 23 Thaw, 24 Stout
25 Feud, 28 Pinpoint, 29 Heroic, 30
Demolish, 31 Grudge.
Down: 1 Trespass, 2 Parlance, 3
Face, 5 Eleventh hour, 6 Teem, 7
Virtue, 8 Recall, 11 Cornerstones,
15 Enjoy, 16 Brisk, 18 Make good,
19 Headache, 21 Stupid, 22
,Magnum, 26 Toil, 27 Bear.


Across
1 Outstanding
performance (4,2,5)
9 Straggler (7)
10 Do without (5)
11 Region (4)
12 Small part (8)
14 Charm (6)
16 Short of money (4,2)
18 Impractical (8)
19 Operatic song (4)
t, 22 Mental picture (5)
23 Biographical
sketch (7)
24 Destination (8,3)


as an escape route. So how does
white break through? The victory l Target
route is hidden, but White, an
internationalmaster reasoned
that a check on the a2g8 diagonal
would be decisive. With this clue,
can you work out the four-move
sequence which led to checkmate?,


Down
2 Keyboard
instrument (5)
3 Actual (4)
4 Suffer (6)
5 Authoritative (8)
6 Borne (7)
7 Explore new
areas (5,1,5)
8 On the way to
success (5,6)
13 Magnificence (8)
15 Lower back pain (7)
17 Unrpretentious (6)
20 Rule as monarch (5)
21 Throw lightly (4)


I III- F


NITNI


West dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
4 A Q 9 5 2
YV10
*AK 1074
4,A 4


WEST
4108,
VKQ65 42
* 652
493
SOUTH
4 K J 7 4 3
VJ
*QJ8
Ak- Ct t


EAST
46
VA9873
+93
+ 10762


The bidding:
West North East Sc
2V 3V 54 D
Pass Pass 5 V 54
Pass 6 4
Opening lead king of hearts.


iuth
ble
4


There are two kinds of situations
where expert players bid like crazy:
when they have very good hands,.
and when they have very bad hands,
Consider this deal from the
Austria-United States quarterfinal
match at the 1984 World Olympiad.
The Austrians won by seven Interna-
tional Match Points over the favored
U.S team, and this deal was largely
responsible lor their victory.
At one table, the bidding went as
shown. Aller the U.S. West opened
with a weak two-heart bid, the Aus-


t310W.Jixranny v'OiralS. or
flanr letters or wraore Carn
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ant.*; txine:-Jlett.-fr' w-ordS. .40Et'



TODAY "$i TARGERT
>lxcel1s8, .5or o.,erl 2c).
Sdtnation 1'ssl'. no 'wrds
-witSi iniltIta~l oix.pit.~ais iand

no tvIE orcls 1RAY at StI, At ,lurirN
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paseer p ean' .panepa2
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fla.tc- rv yttstte'Mx .^ife p t.t'
pXea-t pen'rt. pe prani~f p~

trian North cuebid hearts to indicate
a strong hand.
Given his partner's pre-emptivpe,
opening bid, East realized -hat
North-South had a certain game and
very possibly a slam. He therelbrt
tried to throw a monkey wrench into
the works by jumping to five clubsI
After South doubled, East retreated
to five hearts, but the Austrians the'
proceeded to reach their laydow&
slam anyway.
Although East knew that seven
hearts would probably be a profitable
sacrifice against six spades, he was
afraid the opponents might be able to
make seven spades. IHe therelbfor
elected to pass, and Austria scored
1,430 points for making the slam.
At the other table, with an Au?
trian pair now East-West, the biddir.
went:
West North East Soutil
2 V Dble 4 NT Dble
6 V Pass Pass 64
Pass Pass 7 V Dble
Here the Austrians also threw u
a smoke screen, albeit in a dilTerce
fobi. Despite that, the Americani
reached their optimum spot, but Ea'
then decided to carry on to sevec
hearts. This was doubled and went
down live 900 points. in those
days but the sacrifice proved wec
worthwhile, yielding a 530-poirg
gain (11 IMPs) for Austria. Shortlj
therealler, the Americans found
themselves sitting on the sidelines. P


Tomorrow: It pays to go with the odds.
,'O2)00 Kini- Fc Ilc.', S\ Smdi-klo' In,.'


$ --I


APT 3-G


BLONDIE


MARVIN


TIGER


CRYPTIC PUZZLE


T
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I
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U
N
E


T
W
0


I
N


0
N
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C
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0
S
S
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Contract Bridge

by Steve Becker


Famous Hand


" I


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I I I I I- I I ITTJllll a--iTI. ^ ^1m It~il


1 rr- I -.


I-wt= 2(b, I MUMiUAY, DECEMBcri 4, 2008





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Dozens hurt as Hebron settlers, Palestinians clash


* By NASSER SHIYOUKHI
HEBRON, West Bank
Israeli settlers and Palestinians
hurled stones at each other Tuesday
near a disputed home in this West
Bank city, injuring two dozen people,
including a Jewish teenager with a seri-
ous head wound, medics and Israeli
officials said, according to the Associ-
ated Press.
Seventeen Israelis.and Palestinians
were arrested, police said.
The clash was the worst outbreak of
violence in the dispute over ownership
of a four-story building where settlers
have defied an Israeli Supreme Court
order to vacate. On Monday, hundreds
of right-wing Israelis rushed to the
house following rumors that eviction
was imminent.
Hebron, holy to Jews and Muslims, is
one of the most volatile flashpoints in
the West Bank. Some 500 hard-line
Jewish settlers live in guarded enclaves
amid some 170,000 Palestinians in the
city, and the sides frequently clash.
Israeli security forces did not inter-
vene Monday as hundreds of settlers
threw stones at Palestinian cars and


nearby houses, defaced a Muslim
cemetery and damaged Palestinian
property in several other areas of the
West Bank.
Fighting started up again Tuesday,
with settlers, some of them masked,
throwing rocks at Palestinian houses.
In one incident, young settlers bat-
tered at the door of a Palestinian house
with a wooden pole, and residents
rushed to the roof to throw rocks at
the group below. A 16-year-old Israeli
was hit in the head in this confronta-
tion, witnesses said. Hospital officials
described his injuries as serious.
A total of 18 Israelis were injured,
Israeli medics said. Their Palestinian
counterparts reported seven Palestini-
ans hurt by stones.
Late Tuesday, the military declared
the Palestinian section of Hebron off
limits to Israelis.
In another development, the Israeli
army commander in charge of southern
Israel and Gaza, Maj. Gen. Yoav
Galant, spoke with unusual candor
about the hardships in the territory,
which has been largely sealed off from
the world since the Islamic militants
of Hamas seized control by force in


June 2007. "Gaza is similar to a pres-
sure cooker full of metallic popcorn,
with Israel holding the lid, but in the
end it must explode," Galant said, not-
ing that Gaza's standard of living is
only a fraction of that in Israel.
An Israeli airstrike killed two Pales-
tinians in southern Gaza on Tuesday,
dealing a new blow to efforts to restore
a cease-fire.
The army said it attacked militants
who fired mortar shells at Israeli
troops. Palestinian medical officials
said the dead were civilians, boys ages
16 and 17.
Also Tuesday, an Israeli military
court convicted the Palestinian parlia-
ment speaker, Abdel Aziz Duaik, of
membership in Hamas. Sentencing is
set for Dec. 18.
Duaik is the most senior of three
dozen Hamas lawmakers arrested by'
Israel in 2006 following the capture of
an Israeli soldier by Hamas-allied mil-
itants in Gaza.
Israel has outlawed, Hamas, and
Israeli courts have so far sentenced 10
Hamas lawmakers to up to 42 months
in prison for membership in the group.
The soldier remains in Hamas custody.


A JEWISH settler throws a stone from a rooftop overlooking Palestinian houses in the
West Bank city of Hebron, Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2008. Dozens of Jewish settlers rioted
Tuesday in the West Bank town of Hebron, clashing with the Israeli troops who guard
them but who may also soon evict them from a disputed building they've occupied.
Israeli soldiers used stun grenades against the Hebron settlers, most of them
teenagers, in clashes near a building which settlers took over in 2007. The building's
ownership is under dispute in a Jerusalem court. But the settlers moved in without
government authorization and the Supreme Court has ordered them to leave imme-
diately.


SPl ithn. P.'sLt b tmindIWik
tl vc '.V lalet Fed 1 ial
Harne; En hame Is


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 28, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008









THE TRIUNE THUSDAYNECEMBER4,O2A08 NEWS.


US cruise ship outruns Somali pirates' guns


* By ELIZABETH A. KENNEDY
NAIROBI, Kenya

The luxury American cruise ship steaming across the Gulf of
Aden \jih hundreds of well-heeled tourists just might have been too
much tIr Somali pirates to resist, according to the Associated Press.
ButN0c six bandits,'riding in two skiffs and firing rifle shots at the
gleaming ship, were outrun in minutes when the captain of M/S
Nautica gunne c.lfe engine and sped away, a spokesman for the
company ff'esday.
Still, t l iplications had the pirates hijacked the ship added a
new diaiension to the.piracy scourge, as NATO foreign ministers
grope for solutions at a meeting in Brussels and the United
Nations extended an international piracy-fighting mandate for
anr6ther year.
S The potential for massive ransom payments from the families of
.hundreds of rich tourists may encourage similar attempts, especially
following the successful capture of a Ukrainian cargo ship laden
with tanks and a Saudi oil tanker carrying $100 million in crude.
And the brazen attack also raises questions: What was a cruise
ship doing in the pirate-infested waters of the Gulf of Aden? How
many such targets are sailing these seas, and how can they be pro-
tected?
Even the pirates' motives were in question: they could simply
have been testing the defenses of the massive ship, rather than mak-
ing a real effort to hijack it.
Sunday's attack on the M/S Nautica, which was reported Tuesday,
comes several weeks after a NATO mission served mainly to,
underscore the impotence of the world community. A handlubot
Western ships can do little to prevent attacks in a vast sea, and with-
out the right to board hijacked vessels, they can only watch as the
booty is towed to port.
"It is very fortunate that the liner managed to escape," said
Noel Choong, who heads the International Maritime Bureau's
piracy reporting center in Malaysia, urging all ships to remain vig-
ilant.
Some of the world's leading cruise companies said Tuesday they
are considering changing their itineraries to avoid going near the
coast of Somalia following news of the weekend attack.
Cunard's public relations manager Eric Flounders said the com-
pany has two liners, the Queen Mary 2 and Queen Victoria, sched-'
uled to go through the Gulf of Aden in March but added the com-
pany "will obviously consider changing the itinerary" should the sit-
uation not improve.
Spokeswoman Michele Andjel said P&O Cruises is considering
whether to reroute the Arcadia, which is due around the Gulf of
Aden in January.
Lt. Nathan Christensen, a Bahrain-based spokesman for the
U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet, said 21,000 ships cross the Gulf of Aden every
year, but he did not know how many cruise liners are included in
that figure. The gulf links the Mediterranean Sea, the Suez Canal
and the Red Sea to the Indian Ocean.
"We are not advising ships to go a different way, but we do
advise to go through the international corridor within the Gulf of
Aden," Christepsen said, referring to a security corridor patrolled
by the international coalition.
Pirates have attacked about 100 ships off the Somali coast this
year and hijacked 40 vessels. They still hold 14 ships along with
more than 250 crew members, according to maritime officials.
NATO said an Italian destroyer prevented five cargo ships from
being hijacked Tuesday in the Gulf of Aden by blocking the small
pirate boats from the ships and using a helicopter to disperse them.
The Nautica is not the first pleasure boat to be attacked.
The luxury yacht Le Ponant was attacked earlier this year, and
pirates opened fire in 2005 on the Seabourn Spirit off the Somali
coast. The cruise ship evaded capture by using its speed and a
long-range r ac6uistic device thatfblasted a painful wave oT sound at
the pirates.
The Nautica also escaped by speeding up as two small pirate skiffs
tried to close in, said Tim Rubacky, a spokesman for Oceania
Cruises, Inc., which owns the Nautica. He said one skiff made it
within 300 yards (275 meters) of the cruise ship and fired eight rifle
shots at the.vessel before trailing off.
"When the pirates were sighted, the captain went on the public
address system and asked passengers to remain in the interior
spaces of the ship and wait until he gave further instructions,"
Rubacky said. "Within five minutes, it was over."
He said the ship still plans to return through the Gulf of Aden.
"We believe this was an isolated incident," he said. "M/S Nauti-
ca is well-equipped to deal with these situations and the crew is well-
trained."
However, Rubacky would not comment on the crew's training or
whether the ship had weapons or other devices to help fight off a
hijacking.
The Nautica was on a 32-day cruise from Rome to Singapore,
with stops at ports in Italy, Egypt, Oman, Dubai, India, Malaysia
and Thailand, according to Oceania's Web site. Choong said the
ship was carrying 656 passengers and 399 crew members.
The liner arrived in the southern Oman port of Salalah on Mon-
day morning, and passengers toured the city before leaving for the
capital, Muscat, that evening, an Oman tourism official said.
In New York on Tuesday, the U.N. Security Council extended for
another year its authorization for countries to enter Somalia's ter-
ritorial waters, with advance notice, and use "all necessary means"
to stop piracy and armed robbery at sea.
U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice is expected to address
the Security Council on the subject of piracy at a followup session
Dec. 16.
Somalia has not had a functioning government since 1991, and
pirates have taken advantage of the country's lawlessness to launch
attacks on foreign shipping from the Somali coast.
In two of the most daring attacks, pirates seized a Ukrainian
freighter loaded with 33 battle tanks and other heavy weapons in
September, and captured the Saudi oil tanker on Nov. 15.
On Tuesday, a Somali pirate spokesman said his group will
release the Ukrainian ship and crew within the next two days after
a ransom is paid.
Sugule Ali told The Associated Press by satellite phone on Tues-
day that a ransom agreement had been reached, but would not say
how much. The pirates had originally asked for $20 million when
they hijacked the MV Faina.
"Once we receive this payment, we will also make sure that all
our colleagues on ship reach land safely, then the release will take
place," Ali said.

Associated Press writers.Katharine Houreld in Nairobi, Kenya,
Pan Pylas in London, Carley Petesch in New York, John Heilprin
at the United Nations, Barbara Surkin Dubai, United Arab Emirates,
Eileen Ng in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and Saeed al-Nahdy in
Muscat, Oman, contributed to this report.


EIGHT SOMALI pirates sit at the Kenya Ports Authority Port Police station,
in Mombasa, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008, where they are being held after being
handed over to the Kenyan authorities by the Royal Navy. The eight
pirates were arrested, and three others killed, by sailors of HMS Cum-
berland, as they attempted to hijack a cargo ship off the Horn of Africa. The
pirates will be charged in a Mombasa court.


IN THIS IMAGE made available Wednesday Nov. 12, 2008, by Britain's
Ministry of. Defence, a Yemeni-flagged dhow is seen in the Gulf of Aden,
before boats launched from the British warship, HMS Cumberland were
sent to intercept it on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2008. BELOW: Two boats from
the British warship HMS Cumberland intercept a Yemeni-flagged dhow in
the Gulf bf Aden. Russian and British forces repelled a pirate attack on a
cargo ship in the first action by a Russian warship sent to fight hijackings
off Somalia, the two nations said Wednesday. Russian Navy spokesman
Capt. Igor Dygalo said the Russian missile frigate Neustrashimy and the
British frigate Cumberland each sent up a helicopter and foiled pirates try-
ing to take over the Danish vessel. "The pirates tried to hit the ship with
automatic weapons fire and made several attempts to seize it," Dygalo said
on state-run Vesti-24 television. He did not say whether the Russians or
British opened fire. The British Ministry of Defense said that the incident
occurred Tuesday and one of its warships had boarded a foreign-flagged
dhow a traditional wooden vessel suspected of piracy.


BRITISH MINISTER of State for Armed Forces Bob Ainsworth, left, and
British High Commission Rob Macaire, right, during a press confer-
ence in Nairobi, Kenya Tuesday Nov. 18, 2008. Ainsworth said Tues-
day that the British navy had handed over eight suspected Somali
pirates to Kenyan, authorities Tuesday morning. The eight were
detained last week following an attempted hijacking in the Gulf of Aden
of a Danish vessel. Crews from a Royal Navy warship shot dead
two Somali pirates after a foreign flagged dhow, believed to be
Yemeni, was identified as having tried to hijack the Danish vessel.
Ainsworth said it showed that the presence of warships could help
deter attacks.


-<


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE


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PAGE 32, TI-]URSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008 THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY EVENING


DECEMBER 4, 2008


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Great Romances Dudu Fisher Coming Home: A Concert From Israel (N) Dudu Fisher Coming Home: A
B WPBT of the 20th Cen- Concert From Israel
tury
The Insider Kate Survivor: Gabon "The Good Things CSI: Crime Scene Investigation A (:01) Eleventh Hour "Titans" Hood
0 WFOR Winslet: Jim Car- In Life Aren't Easy" (N) f" (CC) singer is found dead outside an inla- uncovers an elaborate medical cov-
rey. (N) mous Las Vegas nightclub, er-up. (N) n (CC)
Access Holly- My Name Is Earl Kath & Kim The Office The (:31)30 Rock (:01) ER "Let it Snow" Neela has to
0 WTVJ wood (CC) Earl finds an old "Sacrifice" Kath office has a cash 'Reunion" (N) testily in court after a patient she
friend, has insomnia. surplus. (CC) treated dies, (N) n, (CC)
Deco Drive Kitchen Nightmares Chef Ramsay Kitchen Nightmares Gordon tries News (N) (CC)
0 WSVN must make many changes to a to help put a California restaurant
small New York restaurant. back on the map. n (PA) (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) Ugly Betty "Bad Amanda" Amanda Grey's Anatomy "All By Myself" (:01) Barbara Walters Presents:
WPLG (CC) and Betty team up for an assign- Cristina is awarded the first solo sur- The 10 Most Fascinating People
Sent. (N) n (CC) gery. (N) 8 (CC) of 2008 (N) n (CC)

(:00) CSI: Miami The First 48 "Last Exit; Out Cold" The First 48 "Live to Tell; Field of The First 48 "To Die For; Highway
A&E "Wannabe" n Body beside a road; man's body Lies" Ricardo John catches his first Revenge"A 75-year-old man is shot
(CC) outside a Little Havana bar. case as a lead detective. dead. CC)
(:00) BBC World BBC News Asia Business BBC News The Reporters News
BBCI News America (Latenight). Report (Latenight).
BET Ludacris Special *'; WAIST DEEP (2006, Action) Tyrese Gibson, Meagan Good, Larenz American.Gangster (CC)
E (N) (CC) Tate. A man's son is inside his hijacked car. (CC)
(:00) NHL Hockey New York Rangers at Montreal Canadiens. From the Bell Centre in Mon- CBC News: The National (N) ft
CBC real. (Live) (CC) _(CC)
CNBC (:00) CNBC Reports On the Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
(:00) Lou Dobbs Campbell Brown: No Bias, No CNN Presents "Scream Bloody Murder' Genocide. (N) (CC)
CNN night (CC) Bull
Scrubs "My Last The Daily Show The Colbert Re- Futurama Planet South Park A South Park (CC) The Sarah Sil-
COM Chance" n (CC) With Jon Stew- port(CC) Express is threat- Mormon family verman Program
art (CC) ended. moves to town. (N) (CC)
Hannah Mon- * THE POLAR EXPRESS (2004, Fantasy) Voices of Tom Hanks, Wizards of Wa- Life With Derek
DISN tana (CC) Michael Jeter, Nona Gaye. Animated. A conductor guides a boy to the very Place "Open Mic Plight"
North Pole.'G'(CC) "Alex's Choice" n (CC)
Ask This Old Cool Tools Cool Tools "High Cool Tools "On Cool Tools (N) Cool Tools "The Hardware Show"
DIY House f (CC) Faster painting. Tech" the Move"
DW In Focus Journal: Tages- Maybrit llner Thadeusz Journal: Tages- Bundesliga Kick
DW them them Off
!The Daily 10 (N) Party Monsters: Cabo "Lil' Jon" Forbes To 20 Celebrity Cash The Girls Next The Girls Next
SThe competition begins. Couples: Crazy Double Incomes Door Door
SCollege Football Louisville at Rutgers. (Live) SportsCenter
E _PN_'_ (Live) (CC)
ES I ronometro Poker Asian Pacific Tour Sydney Poker Asian Pacific Tour -- Sydney, SportsCenter -- International Edi-
ESPNI (Live) Part II. (Taped) Part 3. (Taped) tion (Live)
DWTN Daily Mass: Our Life on the Rock Eucharist The Holy Rosary Catholicism on Life Is Worth
EWTN Lady Campus (CC) Living
T T :00) Cardio Art of the Athlete "Diana Nyad" Insider Training "Basketball" Bas- FitNation "Generation Xtra Large"
FIT TV last n (CC) Marathon swimmer Diana Nyad. ketball- players. CC) Measuring fat. (CC)
F X C Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (CC) Hannity & Colmes (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FAOX-N Shepard Smith ________________________Susteren (CC)
FSN F NHL Hockey Buffalo Sabres at Florida Panthers. From the BankAtlantic Center in Sunrise, Panthers Live! The FSN Final
iFSN L Fla. (Subject to Blackout) (Live)(Live Score (Live)
CG F champions Year Paula Creamer Golf Central Big Break X: Michigan Big Break X: Michigan
GOLF End J(Live)


GSN


Catch 21 (CC)


Who Wants to Who Wants to Family Feud
Be a Millionaire Be a Millionaire (CC)


Family Feud f Catch 21 (CC) Pyramid
(CC) (Cc)


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G4T 0ech the Show! (N) et gift guide. Calif. querque" (CC)
(:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger Hit men NAUGHTY OR NICE (2004, Drama) George Lopez, Lisa Vidal. Premiere.
H ALL Texas Ranger seek out Walker and a witness A shock jock's new persona has an impact on a sickly listener. (CC)
ft (CC) when they survive a crash. (CC)
Property Virgins Holmes on Homes Attic. n (CC) The Fix "Barn Disaster DIY Home to Flip (N) Real Renos (N)
HGTV "Ryan & Katie" Room" Antique Bathroom. (N) ft f (CC) ft (CC)
S(CC) feel. (N) f (CC) (CC)
SNSP Victory Joyce Meyer: Love a Child Inspiration To- Life Today With This Is Your Day The Gospel
IIN Vr ______ Everyday Life (CC) day James Robison (CC) Truth (CC)
The Wayans My Wife and According to Family Guy Family Guy Two and a Half Two and a Half
KTLA Bros. n (CC) Kids "Road Trip" Jim Jim tries to "Death Is a Bitch" Stewie marries Men "Phase One, Men f (CC)
n (CC) party hearty. n (CC) his old friend Complete"
Still Standing Reba Reba Cheyenne ** COMFORT AND JOY (2003. Comedy-Drama) Nancy McKeon, Dixie|
LIFE Bill and Judy stop Cheyenne's thinks she ll be Carter, Steve Eckholdt. A woman awakens to a changed life following a
drinking, rushed to hospi- prom queen. f1 car accident. (CC)
SNBC :00 Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- The Rachel Maddow Show Countdown With Keith Olber-
MSNBC C)_C mann mann
N K Drake & Josh SpongeBob SpongeBob Home Improve- Home Improve- George Lopez George Lopez
SNICK A (CC) SquarePants SquarePants n ment n (CC) ment n (CC) (CC) n (CC)
NTV (6:00) Secret Survivor: Gabon "The Good Things The Real Housewives of Orange News (N) f News
NTV Millionaire (N) In Life Aren't Easy" (N) County (CC) (CC)
SSPEED Pass Time Pinks -- All Out From the Texas Pinks -- All Out From Sonoma, Wrecked "All Wrecked
SPEEDMotorplex in Ennis, Texas. Calif. Nighter"
Behind the Behind the Dr. David Jere- Winning With This Is Your Day Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Scenes "Sarah Scenes (CC) miahTimely Wisdom Nasir (CC)
Dolls" (CC) message. (CC) Sidikki. (CC)
Seinfeld "The * THE SANTA CLAUSE (1994, Comedy) (PA) Tim Allen, Judge * THE SANTA CLAUSE
TBS Soup Nazi" ft Reinhold, Wendy Crewson. An adman takes over for fallen Santa. (CC) (1994) (PA) Tim Allen. An adman
(CC) takes over for fallen Santa. (CC)
(:00) Overhaulin' American Chopper "Firebike 2" American Chopper Setbacks, LA Ink "Kat Tales" Kat faces a tight
TLC Chip & AJ Trad- (CC) stress and sibling rivalry threaten to deadline for a book about her art;
ing Places" derail thd blues bike. n (CC) Matt Bradley visits. (N)
(:00) Law & Or- NBA Basketball Phoenix Suns at Dallas Mavericks. From American Airlines Center in Dal- NBA Basketball:
TNT der "Deep Vote" las. (Live) (CC) Spurs at Nuggets
iT O 6teen "The New Chowder (N) Misadv. of Flap- Total Drama Is- teen "J Is for Total Drama Is- Total Drama Is-
ON Guy" jack land (N) Genius" land (CC) (DVS) land
T- U Cops A (CC) Speeders (N) Speeders Fight Smoking Gun Presents: World's When Animals Invade Your Home
RU_ Back (N) Dumbest (N) n (CC)
TV00) Tou ute une Club social Envoye special Cite guide "Hong
TV5 h istoire Kong
TWC Abrams-Bettes Weather: Evening Edition (CC) When Weather Changed History A Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
severe drought in the 930s.
(:00) Las Tontas Cuidado con el Angel Marichuy es Fuego en la Sangre Hermanos La Rosa de Guadalupe "Cosas In-
UNIV No Van at Cielo una joven criada en un hospicio. buscan venganza. significantes" Maria Amalia y David
planean casarse.
(:00) NCIS "Con- House "Family" Wilson prepares a House "Resignation" A 19-year-old House insensitivee" A snowstorm
USA spiracy Theory" 14-year-old leukemia patient for a college student goes to the hospital leaves the ER short-staffed on
(CC) bone marrow transplant. (CC) after coughing up blood. Valentine's Day. n (CC)
(V I :00) Maxim Hot Larry the Cable Guy's Christmas Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew
v 1 100 f (CC) Spectacular ft Family Weekend. n Family Weekend. f
(:00) The Con- Boxing Sports Soup (N) Sports Soup
VS* tender ft (CC)
:00) 7th Heaven THE WOOL CAP (2004, Drama) William H. Macy, Don Rickles, Ned WGN News at Nine (N) t (CC)
iWGN Consideration" Beatty. A troubled mute befriends an abandoned girl. n (CC)
(CC)
Family Guy Smallville "Plastique" A bus ex- Supernatural The brothers must CW11 News at Ten (N) (CC)
W PIX "Death Is a Bitch" plodes outside the Daily Planet. n save Bobby, who is crippled with
ft (CC) (CC) guilt. ft (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) Dr. Phil n (CC) WBZ News (N) That'70s Show Frasier Frasier Frasier Martin
WSBK (CC) Eric and Donna's and the rude cafe has a wealth
first date. customer, new girlfriend.

6:00) *** TRANSFORMERS De La Hoya/Pac- ** THE BOURNE ULTIMATUM (2007, Action) Matt Damon, Julia
H BO-E 2007) Shia LaBeouf. Two races of quiao 24/7 (N) Stiles, Joan Allen. Jason Bourne continues to look for clues to unravel his
robots wage war on Earth. n (CC) true identity. n 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:15) ** True Blood "Plaisir D'Amou' Bill True Blood "I Don't Wanna Know" True Blood "To Love Is to Bury"
H BO-P HARLIEWIL- must pay a steep price. f1 (CC) Sam shares a secret with Sookie. Sookie and Sam investigate her
SON'SWAR 'R' (CC) mostrecent vision (CC)
(6:45) * ERAGON (2006) Ed De La Hoya/Pac- ** TRANSFORMERS (2007, Action) Shia LaBeouf, Tyrese Gibson,
H BO-W Speleers. A dragon's egg leads a quiao 24/7 t Josh Duhamel. Two races of robots wage war on Earth. A 'PG-13' (CC)
farm boy to his destiny. PG' (CC) (CC)
(:15) * EDWARD SCISSORHANDS (1990, Fan- * WHERE THE HEART IS (2000, Comedy-Drama) Natalie Portman,
H BO-S asy) Johnny Depp. A man-made misfit cuts a tragic Ashley Judd, Stockard Channing. Kind townspeople befriend an aban-
figure in suburbia. f 'PG-13' (CC) donedteen and her infant., f 'PG-13' (CC)
(5:15) THE GOD- (15) ** THE INVASION (2007, Science Fiction) Nicole Kidman, Daniel ** KNOCKED UP (2007) Seth
MAX-E FATHER, PART Craig, Jeremy Northam. An epidemic of alien origin threatens humanity. Rogen. A one-night stand has an
Ill (1990) ( 'PG-13'(CC) unforeseen consequence. n 'R'
S:00) ** COMING TO AMERICA (1988, Comedy) *, SMOKIN' ACES (2007, Action) Ben Affleck, Andy Garcia, Alicia
MOM AX Eddie Murphy, Arsenio Hall. An African prince and his Keys. Hit men converge on Lake Tahoe to rub out a mob informant. 0A
royal sidekick come to Queens. t 'R'.(CC) 'R'(CC)
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GAME (1989) Penn, Jonathan Bennett. Premiere. Five friends have an O'Halloran. Thirtysomething slackers Dante and
Gregg Henry. wild misadventures in Las Vegas. 'R' Randal now flip burgers. f 'R'


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 32, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008


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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008


Fund liquidations





likel- to rise in '0


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ship specialists
yesterday told Tri-
bune Business that
they expect to see
an increase in business from this
line of work in the New Year,
particularly from the investment
funds sector, with some fund
managers/sponsors potentially
deciding to liquidate funds in
the face of heavy redemption
requests.
While a variety of accoun-


Receivership/liquidation specialists say hedge funds particularly
vulnerable, with their businesses likely to see increased work next year


tants and attorneys contacted
by Tribune Business yesterday
told this newspaper they had
seen no increase in liquida-
tion/receivership/insolvency/cor-
porate restructuring work "yet"
as a result of the economic
downturn, all expected work to
pick up in the New Year from
the 2009 first quarter onwards.
This is chiefly because
December 31 is often the finan-


Marina closure to cost 12 jobs

* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
AROUND a dozen employees have been made redundant after
the receivers for Exuma's Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort
decided to close the property's "loss-making" marina and stop
subsidising it to save money, Tribune Business confirmed yesterday.
Russell Down, a UK-based accountant with PricewaterhouseC-
oopers (PwC), the property's receivers, said of the decision to
close the marina: "It was loss-making. We funded it for a period of
time, but we just took the view that we can close it without any long-
term impact for the resort.
"It's something we had to do to save money in what is a very dif-
ficult situation."
Mr Downs confirmed that "about a dozen" employees at Four
Seasons Emerald Bay Resort's marina would be made redundant
and paid the proper severance packages as the closure programme
rolled-out over the "'ne t couple of weeks".
"All we've done so far is
announce the action we're tak- SEE page 8B


British American not

anticipating any lay-offs


cial year-end for a number of
companies, particularly hedge
funds, and managers/sponsors
in this industry may decide to
liquidate their investment vehi-
cles given the avalanche of
investor redemption requests
they are facing as institutions
seek to recover desperately
needed cash.
The Christmas/New Year
period will also be critical for a


number of domestic Bahamian
companies, particularly those in
retail, with a successful festive
season- in which retailers typi-
cally generate between 25-40
per cent of annual sales possi-
bly making the difference
between survival and failure.
Michael Scott, an attorney
and partner with Callender's &
SEE page 9B


Bank loan quality to 'get

worse before it gets better'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor'
A SENIOR banking execu-
tive yesterday told Tribune
Business he was surprised that
the quality of business/com-
mercial loans was deteriorating
at a faster rate than consumer
credit, with total loan portfolio
quality unlikely to "get worse
before it gets better" in 2009.
Anwer Sunderji, Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) chief execu-
tivy ,.said ,th; deterioration in
bank loan end asset quality was
in line "ith the Clearing Banks
Association's expectations, and


* More than one in 10
loans now in arrears
* Bank executive surprised
that commercial loan quality
deteriorating at faster pace
than consumer
* Loan portfolio recovery
unlikely until late
2009 at earliest

consistent "Wyji ssjip wg.econ-
omfywhere many borrowers are
SEE page 8B


Fiscal deficit


grows 18.3%


9 to hit $60.1m


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Busiiess Editor
Government's
fiscal deficit
increased by
18.29 per cent to
$60.1 million
during the first
quarter of its
2008-2009 fiscal
year, it was
revealed yester-
day, as import
duties its chief
revenue sources dropped by
20.38 per cent or almost $25
million. "
The Central Bank of the
Bahamas' report on monthly
economic developments for
October 2008 provided further
evidence of the increasing strain
the economic downturn is plac-
ing on the Government's
finances, especially as its spend-
ing continues to grow apace.
The Central Bank noted that
for the three months to end-
September 2008, while total
government revenues and
grants had increased by 7.11 per
cent to $314.6 million, com-
pared to $293.7 million in the
same period last year, recurrent
spending grew by 13.73 per cent
to $331.9 million within the
same period.
. This again indicates that the
size of government is getting
bigger, not smaller, as recurrent
spending outlays go on .the
adnninisttation'fiiidd osts such
as salaries, rents and emolu-
ments. Capital spending,


Import duties fall by
almost $25m or over
20% during Budget
year's first quarter
though, fell by 17.55 per cent
to $28.5 million, compared to
$34.6 million the year before.
The Central Bank added that
the revenue increase was dri-
ven largely by an 8.2 per cent
increase in tax receipts, which
offset a 4.5 per cent contraction
in non-tax collections.
The revenue increase most
certainly did not come from the
Government's main earnings
source Customs duties and the
new Excise Tax, coupled with
Stamp Duty payments on those
imports.
For the first quarter of the
2008-2009 Budget year, import
duties were down by 20.38 per
cent, from $122.2 million in the
same period the previous year
to $97.3 million.
Again, this provides evidence
of how the global economic
slump will directly impact gov-
ernment revenues, as all import
duties are effectively a tax on
trade, commerce and the cost
of living.
With both businesses and
consumers importing less, the
Government's revenues will
drop by a corresponding
amount, the Prime Minister ,
hav~ g indicaitd that total rev- :-
enues are hkely to come in $150
SEE page 3B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BRITISH
A m e r i c a n
Financial is not
planning or
anticipating
any lay-offs, its
president and
chief executive
told Tribune
Business,
despite moving
to "cut the fat
where necessary" in a bid to
mitigate the economic down-
turn's impact.
I Chester Cooper said the life
insurer and financial services'
provider would not make any
"knee jerk" response to the cur-
rent state of the Bahamian and


But still moving to 'cut
the fat' and generate
operational efficiencies
global economy, but was
preparing itself for a "challeng-
ing" year in 2009.
"What we are doing is
streamlining the business, cut-
ting the fat where necessary,"'
Mr Cooper told Tribune Busi-
ness. "This is an opportunity to
create more efficiencies within
our operations, but we're not
anticipating any lay-offs at this
stage. We don't expect to see
that in our business.
"We are bracing ourselves for
next year. These are challenging
times, and we're not taking it
lightly. We're advising the pub-
lic to be prudent and cut excess
spending, and that's what we're
doing, too."
To ensure British American's
insurance policy sales and rev-
enues bear-up, Mr Cooper said
the company was "trying to
position" insurance as next on
the household priority list after
keeping a roof over the fami-
ly's head, food and other basic
essentials.
One area where the company
continues to see strong demand,
in common with rival Bahamian
life and health insurers, is in
annuities. "We expect that busi-
ness to continue to perform to
target levels in 2009, and that's
on Budget levels," Mr Cooper
told Tribune Business.
"I think people are shifting
to safety and security. People
have become rather nervous
about markets, not from what
they've seen in the Bahamas,
but the impact of the financial

SEE page 3B


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UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial institutions in the Car-
ibbean. Through our Business Area Wealth Management International we look
after wealthy private clients by providing them with comprehensive, value en-
hancing services. Our client advisors combine strong personal relationships with
the resources that are available from across UBS, helping them provide a full
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In order to strengthen our team in Nassau, we are looking to fill the following
position.

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Essential Duties and responsibilities


Review of client documentation
Account opening and static data maintenance
Addressing client advisors' requests and queries
Handling client correspondence
Management reporting


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Strong organizational skills
Strong analytical skills
Strong written and verbal communication skills
Strong knowledge of "know your customer" requirements.
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It starts with you.


Ansbacher


officer


passes the


Series 7.


vY


4SUBS


ANNA ZERVOS, an invest-
ment review officer with Ans-
bacher (Bahamas), has success-
fully completed the Series 7
exam in the United States after
studying with the Nassau-based
Securities Training Iiistitute
(STI).


Michael Miller, STI's presi-
dent, said: "Our programmes
provide professionals with the
conceptual foundations and
practical skills necessary to keep
pace with the evolving fields of
securities and financial ser-
vices."


0
Plascor ,
GROUP


;7Y~ I 0 fl S


I 'sco ELneriv Gioup would like to congratulate
the Baharinas National liide Association and
the participants on tho success of this year's
Bahamas National Pride Walk-A-Thon.

Plasco was proud to sponsor the Walk a -Thon
and will continue to support events that promote
enviionrnerital sustalilability, healthy living, and
community pride.


-# ,., '~ 4,.
~


.. .I: .. : . ;.'.; ........ .


.." --


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE












THF TRIRMHiNF THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008,BPAGEESS


'Compromise' reached on Bay Street bleachers


* By CARA BR NEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter

BAY Street merchants
already crippled by a declining
economy will soon have to face
another business hurdle, that of
the iJunkanoo bleachers,
although members of the Nas-
sau Tourism & Development
Board (NTDB)'believe a stais-
factory "compronilse" has been
reached with the Government.
Merchants have always com-
plained that the bleachers,
which are time consuming to
install and remove, are a major
eyesore and detract from their
holiday windows, resulting in a
major loss of business.
This year, the fear is that the
bleachers will excaberate the
current depressed economic


environment, and take away the
vital business that retail stores
need during the holiday season.
Tim Lightbourne, of the Per-
fume Shop, told Tribune Busi-
ness that Christmas shopping
typically accounts for about 25
per cent of the year's revenues
for most retailers.
Concern

"So there is the concern
about the bleachers, there
always is the concern," he said.
Mr Lightbourne said that
while the Government was
being sensitive in waiting until
the very last minute to install
and then take the bleachers
down, so that business can start
as early as possible, there will
still be the negative impact.
"We've been told that this


may be the last year for this,
because the Government may
be outsourcing the bleachers,
and perhaps they would not
need so much time to set up and
take down," Mr Lightbourne
said.
Mr Lightbourne added that
the ideal situation would be
something similar to what hap-
pens in New York at Herald
Square during the Macy's
Thanksgiving Day. parade,
where the bleachers are set up
and taken down immediately,
with little impact to the busi-
nesses in the area.
He said the use of bleachers
which could be installed and
dismantled within 12 hours
would be very practical.
"You have a situation where
the island's main thoroughfare
is going to look like an alu-


minum jungle right at the time
of the year when, really, we
should be looking our best," Mr
Lightbourne said.
Inga Bowleg, director of
business development for the
John Bull Group of Companies,
speaking in her capacity as a
member of the Nassau Tourism
Development Board, said the
situation "is what it is" and that
given that, everything which can
be done to minimimise the
impact on merchants has been
done. "We (the Nassau Tourism
Development Board) have been
included in all of the sessions
and the planning. The Minister
of State for Culture, Charles
Maynard, has assured us that
they will do everything that they
can to accodomate us and to
work in the best interest of the
merchants, and I think that we


have come up with a compro-


mise," Ms Bowleg said.


PARADISE ISLAN. COND
S Berom,2bahfll frishd.. Q wt


Baain ane opoet dniis


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter

AS Bahamians prepare to
begin holiday shopping, the
country's data protection com-
missioner, George E Rodgers,
is reminding them to take pre-
cautions to protect their identi-
ty.
In his tips for December, Mr
Rodgers reminded persons to
secure their banking, telephone
and utilities accounts.
"With a password in place, it
makes it more difficult for oth-
ers to access your information.
Keep your banking records pri-
vate. Do not share your per-
sonal identification number
(PIN) with anyone," he said.
Mr Rodgers also encouraged
Bahamians to engage in privacy
self-defense
"Don't give your phone num-
ber or other personal details to
businesses unless they really
need it. Don't complete product


warranty cards, surveys, or
sweepstakes-these are just
tools used to collect and sell
your data. Be sure to ask busi-
nesses how they use your per-
sonal information, whether they
sell it, and how they protect it,"
he added.
Warned

Further, Bahamians have
been warned not to follow up
on unsolicited offers of credit. It
was extremely important that
persons safeguard their Nation-
al Insurance Board (NIB) num-
ber, 9Mr Rodgers said.
"The NIB number is a key
identifier. Those who have it
can steel your identity and
engage in fraud. Do not keep
you NIB card or any other doc-
ument that contains your NIB
number in your wallet. And
exercise care when giving out
your NIB number," he advised.
After making a purchase, Mr
Rodgers urged persons to


always keep a receipt as proof
of purpose if something needs
to be returned ,and to check
that goods are working before
they are wrapped.
"As a consumer, you are enti-
tled to expect any goods you
buy to be of satisfactory quality
: fit for their purpose and as
described. You have the same
rights in respect of sale goods,
unless the goods have been
reduced because they are shop-
soiled and you were made
aware of this fact before you
brought them," he said.
"If you think you might have
to take something back, check
with the seller before you buy
that you will be able to bring
the goods back for a cash
refund."
Mr Rodgers also suggested
that persons pay for items over
$175 with a credit card.
"This gives you added pro-
tection if something goes wrong
because you can claim against
the credit company as well as


the retailer if there are prob-
lems with the goods," he added.
He said: "When using your
credit card to shop on-line,
always find out if the company
has a secure site. Never send
your credit card details by e-
mail and make sure you tell the
retailer if there is a problem as
soon as possible. Don't forget to
take proof of purchase. Always
be wary of offers that seem too
good to be true, because they
probably are. Don't rush into a
purchase you might regret and
always make sure you'd know
how to contact the supplier if
there was a problem with the
goods."


All Vehicles!


Bahamian institi"flod


in Hong Kong move


AiBAHAMAS-headquar-
tered financial services compa-
ny has established an office in
Horig Kong to serve
Asian/Pacific clients, in a bid to
exploit the region's presence as
a trade and investment hub.
The Winterbotham Trust
Company said its Hong Kong
office will be headed by Peter
Tra e, who has lived and


worked in the city for 28 years,
and is formerly a director of
Schroder's, the UK investment
bank.
Geoffrey Hooper, the Win-
terbotham group's president,
will be focusing on the devel-
opment of business in Hong
Kong, with services to include
corporate services for Hong
Kong companies; consultancy


on trade and investment oppor-
tunities with China and other
regional countries, such as Viet-
nam and South Korea; and cor-
porate, trust and fund services.
Winterbotham said the cash
management and banking plat-
form provided by its Nassau-
based merchant banking oper-
ations would be available to its
Hong Kong clients.


I ritishAmricanntanticipatinganylay-ffsI


FROM page 1B

crisis in New York and world-
wide has caused some concern
among investors in the
Bahamas.
"The annuity product is a
very sound platform with insur-
ance companies in the Bahamas
for investors getting skittish
about the market. More and
more people are interested in
fixed rates of return, rather than
investing in volatile markets."
The Bahamian capital mar-


kets, though, have beep less
volatile than most. For the first
10 months of 2008, the All-
Share Index for the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange (BISX) is down 12.6
per cent as a percentage of mar-
ket capitalisation, compared to
declines of 29.7 per cent and
34.52 per cent for the Dow
Jones Industrials Average
(DJIA) and the Standard &
Poor's (S&P) 50Q indices
respectively.
Mr Cooper said British


American Financial's insurance
agency arm, Bramer General
Insurance, was continuing to act
as an agent for Generali, the
company to which his firm had
sold its health insurance port-
folio.
The British American Finan-
cial executive said Bramer was
"doing extremely well", with
five full-time staff at its sole
office in Nassau, and 15-20 sub-
agents licensed to sell insurance
products stationed across the
Bahamas.


Fiscal deficit grows 18.3% to hit $60.1m


FROM page 1B


million short of the projected
$1.574 billion.


Budget target of


Elsewhere, for the 12 months to October 2008,
the Central Bank said inflation firmed to 4.2 per
cent from 2.4 per cent, with major price increas-
es seen in furniture and household operations
(6.9, per cent); 'other' goods and services, (6.1
per cent); food and beverages (5.8 per cent); med-
ical care and health (5 per cent); transport and
communications (3.6 per cent); and housing, (3
per cent).
The fallout from turmoil in the global economy
was starting to "become more entrenched" in
the Bahamian economy, the Central Bank


warned, resulting in the mass, tourism and hotel
sector lay-offs, while new mortgage lending con-
tinued to slow, affecting the construction industry.
Bank liquidity and external reserves levels also
contracted, by $15 million and $23.4 million
respectively during October, due to a drawdown
on Bahamian dollar deposits and foreign curren-
cy outflows.
The hotel lay-offs were in part a response to
"projected low occupancy levels during the leak
visitor months of 2009", the Central Bank said.
With the Bahamas' economic prospects tied
directly to a US economic rebound, which in turn
was contingent on the restoration of consumer
confidence, the banking sector regulator said a
recovery was "not expected to occur significant-
ly before 2010".


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~51


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008

[-
, I


THE TRIBUNE


-


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<1;-,.


- -Fr


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:4"'


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"My work at The Tribune is rewarding
and challenging. I enjoy contributing
to the look of our newspaper while
meeting the needs of our advertisers.
I am proud to work here. The


Tribune is my newspaper."


ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE


The Tribune


Ift


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THURSDAYDECEMBER A 2008. PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


~.. d"'


N,.,R. .:
,, ,, ?


AP>


1 1.


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PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


Auditors find weakness on bailout guidelines


* By JIM KUHNHENN
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) -
Lawmakers want the Treasury
* to insist that banking institutions
sharing'in the $700 billion bailout
comply with limits Congress
imposed on executive salaries
and.use the money for its intend.-


ed purposes.
In the first comprehensive
review of the rescue package, the
Government Accountability
Office said Tuesday that the
Treasury Department has no
mechanisms to ensure that bank-
ing institutions limit their top
executives' pay and comply with
other restrictions.,


"The GAO's discouraging
report makes clear that the Trea-
sury Department's implementa-
tion of the (rescue plan) is insuf-
ficiently transparent and is not
accountable to American tax-
payers," said House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.
The auditors acknowledged
that the programme, created


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DECEMBER 18th, 2008


WIN A FREE GIFT WHEN


October 3 to help stabilize a
rapidly faltering banking system,
was less than 60 days old and has
been adjusting to an evolving
mission.
But auditors recommended
that Treasury work with govern-
ment bank regulators to deter-
mine whether the activities of
financial institutions that receive
the money are-meeting restric-
tions on executive pay, dividend
payments and repurchasing of
shares. "Treasury also has no
policies and procedures in place
for ensuring that the institutions
are complying with these


requirements or that they are
using the capital investments in a
manner that helps meet the pur-.
poses of the act," auditors said.
In a response to the GAO,
Neel Kashkari, who heads the
department's Office of Financial
Stability, said the agency was
developing its own compliance
programme and indicated that it
disagreed with the need to work
with regulators.
House Financial Services
Committee chairman Barney
Frank said Treasury's response
comes "very close to telling the
institutions that they will be free


Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street


Invites applications from qualified
teachers for the following position
2008 2009 School Year.


Christian
for the


MUSIC

Applicants must:

A. Be a practicing bom-again Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith.
of Temple Christian School
B. Have a Bachelor's Degree in Education or higher
from a recognized College or University in the
area of specialization.
C. Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or Diploma.
D. Have at least two years teaching experience in
the relevant subject area with excellent
communication skills.
E. Have the ability to prepare
students for all examinations to the BJC/
BGCSE levels
F. Be willing to participate in the high school's
extra curricular programmes.

Application must be picked up at the High School
Office on Shirley Street and be returned with a full
curriculum vitae, recent colored photograph and
three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is December 15th, 2008


to use the funds, as they wish."
"The bad news was confirma-
' tion by the GAO in its first
report about the programme that
Treasury has no way to measure
whether taxpayer funds invest-
ed in banks are being used.in
accordance with the purpose of
the law to increase lending,"
Frank said. "The much worse .
news is Treasury's response that
it does not even have the inten-
tion of doing so."
The GAO is one of three
watchdogs that Congress has
assigned to monitor the extraor-
dinary $700 billion financial res-
cue package, known as the Trou-
bled Asset Relief Programme,
or TARP. A congressional over-
sight panel is scheduled to issue
its report on December 10.
In addition, Congress created
an inspector general's office to
oversee the programme, but the
confirmation of veteran federal
prosecutor Neil M. Barofsky to
the post has been blocked in the
Senate by a senator who remains
anonymous under Senate prac-
tice. "This report proves the
immediate need for oversight of
the taxpayer dollars being
expended right now as part of
TARP," Senate Finance Com-
mittee Chairman Max Baucus,
D-Mont., said in a statement.
"Because of one senator's anony-
mous block on this nomination,
three weeks have been lost a
key element of the TARP over-
sight programme is not in place."
Republican Senator Jim Bun-
ning of Kentucky, a member of
the Senate Banking Committee
who opposed the bailout bill, has
said he had "serious concerns"
with Barofsky's nomination,
though he has praised his expe-
rience. Running spokesman
Mike Reynard,would not com-
ment on whether Bunning had
placed the hold.
The audit came on the same
day Detroit automakers renewed
their plea for a rescue package
with promises to dramatically
restructure their operations. Not-
ing that Congress had insisted
on those conditions, Pelosi said
financial institutions should be
asked to do no less.
"The lack of any requirement
by the administration on how
financial institutions use these
capital infusions is in clear con-
trast to Congress requiring
detailed plans for long-term via-
bility from the domestic auto
companies," Pelosi said.


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS- .
-COUNSELLING AND HEALTH SERVICES DEPARTMENt ,
Visit our website at nww.cob.edu.bs





"THE HELPING LINK"
The Counselling and Health Services Department's
Response to the Financial Crisis

OBJECTIVES

1. To provide psychological assistance and support to persons who recently
lost their jobs as a result of the current financial crisis.
2. To provide career planning and development skills.
3. To provide educational information on coping skills and guidelines for
seeking re-employment.

ACTIVITIES
1. Free psychological and career counseling on Mondays, Wednesdays and
'Fridays 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the Counselling and Health Services Department.
of The College of The Bahamas, 3rd floor Portia Smith Student Services
Centre, Oakes Field campus. Appointments needed. Call 302-4439 /
302-4380.
2. A Series of Seminars will be offered to help displaced workers.


DATE TjB^IME^ i,.,^^


Tues, Dec 2,2008


10 a.m. 12 noon
&
6 p.m. 8 p.m.


Information Group
Session


All Counsellors


Thuri, Dec 4, 2008 2 p.m. 4 p.m. Presenting the Best You Camille Smith

Coping With Stress and Dr. Suzanne Newbold
Thurs, Dec 4, 2008 6 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Loss in Challenging and Stan Smith
Times

Fri, 5th Dec, 2008 10:00 a.m. 12,00 noon Resume Writing Norma Turnquest

Tues Dec 9,2008 10 a.m. 12 noon Presenting the Best You Camille Smith

Tues Dec 9,2008 12 noon 1:30 p.m. Interviewing Techniques Norma Turnquest

Wed Dec 10, 2008' 12'noon 1:30 p.m. Career Survival and Dr. Joan Vanderpool
6 p.m.- 7:30 p.m. Transition

Wed, Dec 10, 2008 3:30 p.m. 5:00 p.m. Financial Management C. Anthony Smith
Thurs, Dec 11, 200.8 10:00 a.m. -'11:30 a.m. Financial Management C. Anthony Smith
Thurs, Dec 11, 2008 1 p.m. 2:30 p.m. Images of Resilience Anastacia Forbes
Fri, Dec 12, 2008 10:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m. Anger Management Teorah L. Ferguson


The American Embassy
following position:


is presently considering applications for the


CASHIER


Serves as Collection Clerk with responsibility for collecting Consular
fees in accordance with specific guidelines.

Receives logs of all incoming visa applications from courier service
agents and maintains a spreadsheet log of same.

Examines Non-Immigrant Visa applicants for basic requirements to
ensure completeness.

Serves as back-up NIV Clerk. Prints Machine Readable Visas (MRV)
approved by the Consular Office.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

- Completion of Secondary School is required.
- MS Office Computer Applications required
- One year of experience in performing basic clerical and cashiering
functions.


PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

- Must be able to operate an electronic cash register.
- Must possess good interpersonal skills.
- Must have the ability to deal with the general public.


BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance-based incentives, medical and dental
insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for training and
development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible
for employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday at the security area of the American Embassy, Queen
Street. Completed applications should be returned to the United States
Embassy: addressed to the Human Resources Office no later than,
December 9, 2008. Telephone calls will not be accepted.


... . .













Bankruptcy 'not an option' in auto sector
Commtteeistholda s Milarollb K 9-99I7l 1 tf'401E 1 1r


* By JULIE HIRSCHFELD
DAVIS
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) A
top executive of General
Motors Corp. said Wednesday
bankruptcy isn't a viable option,
as the United Auto Workers
braced for a decision on con-
tract concessions to the endan-
gered Big Three.
Fritz Henderson, president
and chief operating officer of
GM, said that choosing the
bankruptcy route would further
erode consumer confidence in
the automaker and "we want
them to be confident in their
ability to buy our cars and
trucks."
Henderson traveled the net-
work morning news show route
on the eve of a new set of con-
gressional hearings on some $34
billion the industry is seeking
in federal assistance. At the
same time, UAW leaders were
immersed in intense discussions
on possible givebacks for the
companies at an emergency
meeting in Detroit.
Under consideration were the
possibility of scrapping a much-
maligned jobs bank in which
laid-off workers keep receiving
most of their pay and postpon-
ing, the automakers' payments
into a multibillion-dollar union-
administered health care fund.
Henderson said that GM is
ready to undertake a host of
steps needed to resize. But he
also said on NBC's "Today"
show that "to win, you've got
to win with product and tech-
nology. ... And we do not want
to give consumers a reason not
to buy our cars and trucks."
Chrysler LLC and Ford
Motor Co. as well as GM -
have ditched their corporate jets
for hybrid cars and replaced
vague pleas for federal help
with detailed requests for as
much as $34 billion in their sec-
ond crack at persuading Con-
gress to throw them a lifeline.
Congressional leaders are
reviewing three separate sur-
vival plans from the automakers
in preparation for hearings
Thursday and Friday, as they
weigh whether to call lawvmak-
ers back to Washington for a
special session next week to
vote on an ahto bailout. -
*'Offidialt'aihe White House


and the Treasury and Com- quickly step in.
merce departments are also Democratic leaders voiced
scouring the automakers' plans. concern and a desire to do
White House press secretary something to avert an automak-
Dana Perino said it is "too ear- er collapse, but they made no
ly to say" whether the compa- commitments about helping an
nies have outlined a path industry that's made few friends
toward viability that justifies lately on Capitol Hill.
new federal assistance. "It is my hope that we would"
"It sounds to me like the pass legislation to help the
companies have given this a lot automakers, House Speaker
of thought and are willing to' Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said.
make some tough decisions," Senate Majority Leader Harry
Perino said. "We just need a lit- Reid, D-Nev., said he would
tie more time to pore through advance a bill Monday inri prepa-
the documents."' ration for a possible auto
She said the administration bailout vote later in the week.
also is waiting to see how law- Determined to burnish their
makers react to the attomak- badly tattered images, Ford
ers' testimony this week, and CEO Alan Mulally, GM CEO
what sort of support their Rick Wagoner and Chrysler
bailout requests generate. chief Bob Nardelli, road-tripped
"That remains a little bit of a the 520 miles from Detroit to
mystery," Perino said. "It is Washington in fuel-efficient
really important to see what hybrid cars for this week's hear-
kind of support they can get on ings.
Capitol Hill." Mulally and Wagoner both
i. said they'd work for $1 a year
Initial something Chrysler's plan
said Nardelli already does if
Henderson acknowledged their firms took any govern-
Wednesday that the initial ment loan money. Ford offered
appearances by the heads of the to cancel management bonus-
car makers was a public rela- es and salaried employees' mer-
tions failure. it raises next year, and GM said
"Yeah, it certainly was not it would slash top executives'
our finest hour," he told NBC. pay. Ford and GM both said
"We were not as clear about they would sell their corporate
what we wanted to do." He also aircraft. All three plans envi-
conceded that the decision by sion the government getting a
the executives to travel to stake in the auto companies that
Washington by private jet "was would allow taxpayers to share
a problem" for lawmakers, in future gains if they recover.
In blueprints delivered to Nevertheless, Sen..Arlen
Capitol Hill on Tuesday, GM, Specter, R-Pa., said the mood in
and Chrysler said they needed Congress "candidly is not sup-
an immediate infusion of gov- portive" of the automakers,
ernment cash to last until New although he called the conse-
Year's, and both said they could quences of just one of them fail-
drag the entire industry down ing "cataclysmic."
if they fail. Ford is-requesting Sen. Chris Dodd, D-Conn.,
a $9 billion "standby line of chairman of the Senate Banking
,credit" that it says it doesn't Committee, said the automak-
expect to use unless one of the ers still need to prove they can
other Big Three goes belly up. survive and be profitable. "If
But Chrysler said it needed these companies are asking for
$7 billion by year's end just to taxpayer dollars, they must con-
keep running. And GM asked vince Congress that they are
for an immediate $4 billion as going to shape up and change
the first installment of a $12 bil- their ways," Dodd said in a
lion loan, plus a $6 billion line of statement. His panel is to hear
credit it might need if econom- testimony Thursday from the
ic conditions worsen. The two auto executives, UAW chief
painted the direst portraits to Ron Gettelfinger, and the head
date --including the prospects of the Government Account-
"of shuttered factories in'Amas sa- 'ability Office on the companies'
,sive job losses of what.could". plans.
'happen if Congress..doesn'.t The House.Financial Services


Committee is to hold a similar I R I11[
session on Friday.

INow


I"l


THE WESTIN
GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND
OUR LUCAYA
Resort


Sheraton
Grand Bahama Island
R I.I ( Y\A
FESOIIT


EXCELLENT CAREER OPPORTUNITY

EXISTS FOR BANQUET MANAGER


The successful candidate effectively monitor the daily operations
of the banquet department including providing support and
guidance to fellow banquet and stewarding persons to ensure
a successful and effective operation ending in a positive guess
experience.

Candidate should possess the following minimum requirements:

Excellent oral and written communication skills
Knowledgeable in computer programs, Excel, Microsoft
Word, and Delphi ,
Bachelor's degree in hospitality management or business.
management preferred;
Minimum of five years hospitality experience in food
and beverage with at least two years in a Managerial
position.

We offer exceptional pay and benefits
Resume should be forwarded on or before
Friday December 18th 2008
to ourlucayajobs@starwoodhotels.com
or


5-'I..
,r" ,-


The Westin & Sheraton Grand Bahama Island
Our Lucaya Resort
P.O. Box F-42500
Freeport, Grand Bahama
SOlt'


BIG SAVINGS


UP TO 25% off

On Select






Outboards


jJ^


SALE ENDS DECEMBER 31, 2008
SALE ON CURRENT INVENTORY ONLY, WHILE SUPPLIES LAST



Lightbourne Marine

East Bay Street, Nassau
242-393-5285


GOLF &. OCEAN CLUB

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
You are invited to apply for the following position currently available.


Assistant Marketing Manager

Key Requirements

V A demonstrated track record of sales to high net worth clients
Extensive experience maintaining strong long term customer relationships
with significant add-on/repeat business
/ A strong existing network with high net worth clients in the U.S.A., Europe
and The Bahamas
/ Ability to develop and implement marketing campaigns to high net worth
clients

Qualifications

V Bachelor's degree in Sales, Marketing or related subject; professional
certifications
Minimum five (5) years experience in high net worth real estate
promotions
V Must be proficient in C2C software, ACT, Power Point, Microsoft Word,
Excel and Asset Manager
V Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership and customer relations
skills
/ Must have excellent written and verbal communication skills

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and
dynamic organization and must be a self-starter, team player, work at the highest
standards of performance, and meet deadlines.
If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of the Director of HR & Training, hr(@bakersbavclub.com or by
fax at 242-367-0804.

"Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!"


I~- i


_ _I


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE 7B


1'. L-


THE TRIBUNE














Marina closure to cost 12 jobs


FROM page 1B

ing," Mr Downs said. "Notwith-
standing the wider financial
position of the resort and
receivership, we are taking steps
to pay the severance pay as
well."
The PwC accountant said he
expected the marina would re-
open once new buyers/owners
for the Four Seasons Emerald
Bay Resort were found, hope-
fully in the New Year, with the
property having been tem-
porarily taken off the market
to focus on the Christmas/New
Year period after several previ-
ous purchase offers had fallen
through.
"After consideration, and
with a view to saving some


money in the meantime, we
took the regrettable.decision of
closing the marina, but hope
this will only be temporary,"
Mr Downs said.
Docks
"There's a number [of docks
and boat slips] sold, and a num-
ber unsold. The number of
boats there in the marina is
very, very slight, and that's also
been on our minds in making
this decision."
The decision, though, will be
a blow to a number of Bahami-
ans and their families just
before the Christmas season, at
a time when they can least
afford it.
The London office of the
Japanese insurer, Mitsui, holds


the Four Seasons Emerald Bay
resort's debt through insuring
the initial construction loan.
The $320 million Emerald
Bay resort has acted as Exu-
ma's main economic engine,
attracting additional foreign
direct investment to the island.
It employs almost 500 staff, and
features an 18-hole Greg Nor-
man Golf Course, two restau-
rants, three pools, spa, six meet-
ing rooms and 450-person
capacity ballroom.
Other investment projects
previously attracted to the
Emerald Bay vicinity include
the resort's Pinnacle Entertain-
ment-managed $5 million casi-
no, plus the $110 million Grand
Isle Villas development.
A shopping complex has also
opened at Emerald Bay, the


anchor retailer being the Emer-
ald Isle supermarket. The com-
plex also includes businesses
such as Scotiabank and Mail
Boxes Etc.
Planning
David Johnson, deputy direc-
tor-general in the Ministry of
Tourism with responsibility for
planning, investment and busi-
ness development, warned last
year that the Four Seasons
needed to become a sustainable,
profitable resort, and the
Bahamas could not afford for
it to fail.
He said then that factors such
as building costs being about 40
per cent higher per square foot
than they are in Nassau, had
retarded Emerald Bay's growth


and kept it from reaching the
development its owners had
previously predicted.
Mr Johnson said of Emerald
Bay: "The property was con-
ceived to be a mixed-use pro-
ject, with 185 keys under the
Four Seasons brand. The vast
majority of the property was to
be.for mixed-use, condos and
hundreds of lots sold for signif-
icant family homes.
"After four years of opera-
tion, they have developed very
little of the sold inventory.
There's been a lot of trading of
the land by the owners, but the.
cost of building is prohibitive.
"The buildings costs, the
numbers suggest, are in excess
of 40 per cent higher per square
foot to build."
Costs to construct such prop-'


erties in Nassau were $500 per
square foot, while in Exuma the
price was $800 per square foot.
Mr Johnson also underlined
the impact the relatively high
building costs on Exuma, com-
pared to Nassau, were having
on Emerald Bay's margins. He
pointed out that concrete there
cost $200 per yard, whereas in
Nassau it cost $125 per yard.
"The hotel, with a golf course
and spa, as a 185-room resort
of Four Seasons' calibre, can
only be profitable if it has a
much larger customer base out-
side those rooms," Mr Johnson
said.
He added that the resort
needed to build out to 700-800
units to get close to profitabili-
ty, whereas it was currently clos-
er to 300-400 units.


Legal Notice
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF
SOLARIS PROPERTIES LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, SOLARIS PROPERTIES LIMITED, is in
Disoltuion. The date of commencement of dissolution
was November 21st, 2008. Larry E. Roberts of 308
East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator
of SOLARIS PROPERTIES LIMITED.



Larry E. Roberts
Liquidator



Legal Notice
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF
ISLECO I LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, ISLECO I LIMITED, is in Dissolution. The date
of commencement of dissolution was November
21st, 2008. Larry E. Roberts of 308 East Bay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of ISLECO I
LIMITED.



Larry E. Roberts
Liquidator




GrantThornton

"A Passion for the Business of Accounting


JOB OPPORTUNITIES
AT GRANT THORNTON


Grant Thornton has opportunities for Associates
and a Manager in its assurance and advisory
practice. Student associates must be enrolled at
the College of The Bahamas or have graduated
with a Bachelor's degree in Accounting from a
recognized University. Student associates must
be on a path towards taking the Uniform Certified
Public Accountant examinations or other
recognized accounting examinations.

The applicants for manager must have a
minimum of 6 years experience in auditing with
proven leadership skills, excellent technical skills,
and willing to work in an exciting and rewarding
industry.

All applications should be forwarded via email
or hand delivered to the following address:

Kendrick K. Christie, CA, CFE
Partner
Grant Thornton
Chartered Accountants
P.O. Box N-8285
Nassau, The Bahamas
Email: infol@gtbahamas.net


FROM page 1B

finding it difficult to meet their
debt commitments in a timely
manner".
The Central Bank of the
Bahamas' report on monthly
economic and financial devel-
opments for October 2008
found that Bahamas-based
commercial banks had seen a
"slight worsening" in asset
(loan) quality compared to the
previous month.
For the 10 months to end-
October 2008, total non-per-
forming loans in the Bahamian
banking sector those more
than 90 days in arrears, with
three or more payments missed
- had increased by $85.4 million
or 33.9 per cent to $337 million.
Meanwhile, those loans in


arrears, meaning they were
more than 31 days or more
overdue, had increased by
$125.6 million or 23.7 per cent
to $656 million a figure that is
equivalent to just dver 10 per
cent of the some $6.434 billion
in total private sector credit out-
standing.
The Central Bank confirmed
that total loans in arrears had
risen to 10.82 per cent of the
banking sector's outstanding
portfolio, compared to 9.27 per
cent at year-end 2007. Loans
between 31-90 days overdue
had increased by $40.2 million
or 14.4 per cent since 2007 year-
end to $318 million as at end-
October 2008.
Mr Sunderji said the situation
was likely to get worse in 2009,
especially during the first half,
with the asset quality of bank


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that TALMA CAJUSTE of MARSH
HARBOUR, P.O. BOX AB-20554, ABACO, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27TH day of
NOVEMBER 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)
FAIRFIELD CONSULTANTS LIMITED
(IBCN* 141185 B)
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section
131 (2)(a) of the International Business Companies Act,
(No. 46 of 2000), Fairfield Consultants Limited is in
Dissolution
Any person having a Claim against the above-named Com-
pany is required on or before 21st January 2009 to send
their name, address and particulars of their debt or claim to
the Liquidator. of the Company, or in default thereof they
may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
before such claim is approved
Mr. Nathan Santos of Suite 2B Mansion House, 143 Main
Street, Gibraltar is the Liquidator of Fairfield Consultants
Limited.

Liquidator


NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of CYRIL FLUBERT TYNES, late of
Blue Hills Estate in the Western District, .of the Island of
New Providence The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim
or demand against the above-Estate are required to send their
names, addresses and particulars of the same certified in
writing to the undersigned on or before the 30th of December.
A.D., 2008 and if required, prove such debts or claims, or in
default be excluded from any distribution; after the above date
the assets will be distributed having regard only to the proved
debts or claims of which the executor shall have Notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
Estate are requested to make full settlement on or before the
aforementioned date.

MICHAEL A. DEAN & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor
Alvenia Court, 94 Dowdeswell Street
P.O. Box N-3114
Nassau, The Bahamas


loan portfolios continuing to
deteriorate, with the first signs
of recovery only appearing in
the fourth quarter next year at
the earliest.
"I think it's going to get
worse as time goes on," Mr
Sunderji told Tribune Business.
"I think it will continue to dete-
riorate through 2009, and recov-
ery will only take place when
the economy stabilises, the
tourism sector gets back on its
feet and foreign direct -invest-
ment returns.
- "My view is that 2009 will be
worse before it gets better. In
the first half of 2009, we will
continue to see the economy
continue to deteriorate, with
perhaps some nascent recovery
in the last quarter."
He added: "We are in an
economy where consumer cred-
it is a very significant portion
of gross, domestic product
(GDP), and there is some $6
billion in credit outstanding in
Bahamian dollars.
"It only takes a little event to
make people very vulnerable,
and of course the tourism sector
is where the bulk of employ-
ment is. That' sector has taken
some big hits in recent months.
We're so dependent on the US,
that when the US gets a cold,
we catch flu, influenza.
"Bahamians simply don't


have the capacity to endure a
serious downturn because they
are all over-borrowed."
Commercial mortgage and
business sector loans is the seg-
ment that has seen the fastest
asset quality deterioration year-
to-date, the percentage in
arrears having risen to 15.73 per
cent at end-October 2008, com-
pared to 9.27 per cent at year-
end 2007.
During 2008, the value of
commercial loans in arrears has
increased by $66.9 million or
71.1 per cent. Consumer loan
and mortgage arrears increased
over the same 10-month peri-
od by $30.9 milliofi and $27.8
million respectively, percentage
rises of 17.9 per cent and 10.5
per cent.
Although his bank does not
specialise in commercial loans,
Mr Sunderji said he was "sur-
prised" that commercial loans
had'deteriorated at a much
faster pace than their consumer
counterparts.
"I thought that business and;
commercial credit were in bet-
ter shape than consumer loans,"
Mr Sunderji said. "I don't think
the deterioration is broadly
shared by all financial institu-
tions. I think the issues are with
one or two who have aggres-
sively pursued commercial cred-
it in recent years."


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE-YOLA CAJUSTE-
CADOT of MARSH HARBOUR, RO. BOX AB-20554,
ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27TH day of
NOVEMBER 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.
















NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of JOHN WILLIAM HUNT, late of the
Settlement of Deadman's Cay in the Island of Long Island,
one of the Island of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim
or demand against the above-Estate are required to send their
names, addresses and particulars of the same certified in
writing to the undersigned on or before the 30th of December
.A;D., 2008 and if required, prove such debts or claims, or in
default be excluded from any distribution; after the above date
the assets will be distributed having regard only to the proved
debts or claims of which the executor shall have Notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
Estate are requested to make full settlement on or before the
aforementioned date.
MICHAEL A. DEAN & CO.
Attorneys for the Administrator
Alvenia Court, 94 Dowdeswell Street
P.O. Box N-3114
Nassau, The Bahamas


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008


Bank loan quality to 'get



orse before it gets better


THE TRIBUNE









I I IL. a I LILJJI 'AL.. I nur Lu-U, JLLLIVILLr, -t, LAJLJU, I I~'...AL. .JL)


I -N TE RNA TI A INS


Worker productivity in the




US better than expected


* By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) Worker
productivity slowed in the summer
while wage pressures increased, but
both developments were better than
expected and are unlikely to raise
inflation alarms at the Federal
Reserve.
The Labour Department reported
Wednesday that productivity, the key
ingredient for rising living standards,
rose at an annual rate of 1.3 per cent in
the July-September quarter. That's
down from the 3.6 per cent growth
rate in the second quarter, but slightly
higher than the 1.1 per cent increase
initially reported a month ago and bet-


Fund liquidations
likely to rise in '09

FROM page 1B

Co, who has provided legal
advice on numerous liquida-
tions, told Tribune Business that
he had "not yet" seen an
increase in activity from this
business line.
"I would anticipate that there
would be a plethora of liquida-
tions, receiverships, and actions
being brought against boards of
directors, mainly for funds. I
think you will probably see that
in the first quarter of 2009."
Craig Gomez, an accountant
and partner with Baker Tilly
Gomez, said that when it came
to an increase in liquidation and
receivership work, there had
been "absolutely none whatso-
ever. It's been extremely quiet.
There's been no real increase,
and not even the perception of
an increase".
"That's .not to say come
December 31, those who oper-
ate hedge funds might change
their game plan as a result of
the long line of redemptions,"
Mr Gomez said. "There is
thinking now, not just in the
Bahamas but elsewhere, that
these -funds might want to
rethinkitheirstrategies and close
down, but at the same time start
new funds with new lines of
investment activity."
The funds Mr Gomez and.his
counterparts referred to are
hedge funds domiciled in the
Bahamas, and administered by
a Bahamas-based fund admin-
istrator, but often managed
from elsewhere, such as the US,
UK and other onshore jurisdic-
tions, plus the Cayman Islands.
They are not funds involved in
investing in the Bahamian mar-
ket.
Still, Mr Gomez said his firm
was receiving inquiries from
hedge funds interested in domi-
ciling in' the Bahamas,- and he
and others would have to wait
until December-31 and the 2009
first half to assess whether there
would be an uptick in liquida-
tion/receivership activity.
He pointed out, though, that
receivership and administration
-was not "a death knell" neces-
sarilyfor a company or busi-
ness entity, as it provided a
chance -for it to restructure,
worik.things out with creditors
and develop a payment plan for
it to continue.
Ray Winder, senior partner
at :'.Deloitte & Touch-e
(Bahamas), confirmed: "Clear-
ly' a number of hedge funds
have been put on hold in terms
of redemption, simply because
of concerns that they don't have
sufficient liquidity. How many
of those investors unable to
receive redemptions will file
with the courts for the winding-
up of those companies [funds]?"
Clifford Culmer, of BDO
Mann Judd, agreed that hedge
funds were probably the most
vulnerable area for an increase
in liquidation activity, and also
expected an increase in this line
of business during the New
Year.
Meanwhile, John Bain, a
partner in the HLB Galanis
Bain accounting firm, told Tri-
bune Business that the
receiverships his company had
dealt with so far had come
about as a result of factors that
"were in the making last year
before the economic down-
turn".
The current economic situa-
tion, he added, would put those
businesses already in trouble
into even greater difficulty, Mr
Bain said, adding that he
expected to "see a steady
increase in work from that
area".
"A lot of things are going to
happen at Christmas," Mr Bain
said. In.my opinion, it's going to
get worse in the Bahamas
before it gets better."


ter than the 0.9 per cent rise econo-
mists expected.
Wage pressures, as measured by unit
labour costs, rose at an annual rate of
2.8 per cent, after having declined at a
2.6 per cent rate in the second quarter.
The rate of increase in the third quar-
ter was the biggest jump since a 4.5
per cent rate in the fourth quarter of
last year, but was below the 3.6 per
cent advance originally reported and
that economists expected.
The Fed closely monitors develop-
ments in productivity and wages to see
if inflation is getting out of hand. But
the. central bank was likely to view the
recent developments as temporary and
not long-run trends.
Analysts had expected a big down-


ward revision in productivity given the
fact that overall output, as measured
by the gross domestic product, 'was
revised to show a decline of 0.5 per
cent at an annual rate, a bigger drop
than the 0.3 per cent decrease that was
originally reported.
Still, the 1.3 per cent rise in produc-
tivity was the weakest showing since a
0.8 per. cent rise in the fourth quarter
of 2007.
While rising wages and benefits are
good for workers, if those gains out-
strip increases in productivity it can
create serious inflation problems as
businesses are' forced to boost the cost
of their products to cover the higher
wage demands.
If workers are more productive,


SRBC

FINCO

.


FINANCE CORPORATION

OF BAHAMAS LIMITED



NOTICE TO

SHAREHOLDERS


As a result of the Bank's financial
results for the fourth quarter ending
31st October, 2008, the Board of
Directors of Finance Corporation of
Bahamas Limited hereby notifies all
of its Shareholders that an interim
dividend of thirteen cents (13 cents)
per Ordinary Share will be paid on .
18th "December 2008;1,to a1ll:
shareholders of record as of 11th
December 2008.



D. BURROWS-HAINES
CORPORATE SECRETARY



Dated this 4th December, 2008







Employment



Opportunity


for an


OBGYN

and also for a


General


Practitioner


with two or more years experience

in obstetrics and gynaecology at

established medical practice.



Address applications to:


Manager, Human Resources
Life Medical Clinic
P.O. Box EE-17877
Nassau, Bahamas


though, businesses are able to increase
their pay and cover the costs with the
increased output of goods and services.
The Fed was likely to view the latest
development in productivity and
labour costs against the backdrop of an
economy that has fallen into a reces-
sion. During a recession, output falls,
which hurts productivity, but rising job
layoffs keep a lid on wage pressures.
,Inflation concerns practically disap-
peared last month after a report
showed that consumer prices in Octo-
ber took their biggest monthly plunge
in the six decades that records have
been kept.
The big fall in prices in October pri-
marily reflected the fact that energy
prices, which had been surging earlier


in the year, are now declining sharply.
The Fed, trying to get the country
out of the recession, cut interest rates
by a full percentage point in October.
The federal funds rate, the interest
rate that banks charge each other, fell
to one per cent, a level seen only once
before in the past half-century.
Economists believe the Fed will cut
rates again at their next meeting on
December 15-16.
A panel of economists with the
National Bureau of Economic
Research announced Monday that the
country has been in a recession since
December 2007, making the current
downturn the longest in a quarter cen-
tury. The 1981-82 recession last 16
months.


F--i


I BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK



PROPERTIES & ASSETS FOR SALE


PROPERTIES


New Providence
1. Lot #39 (25'xlOO') w/hse 1,104sq. ft., Blk #35
hse #64-Lincoln Blvd (Appraised Value
$57,780.00)
2. Lot #1246 (5,000sq. ft.) w/hse 2,257sq. ft.-
Golden Way Dr, Golden Gates #2 (Appraised
Value $244,845.00)
3. Lot #6 (7,000sq. ft.) w/duplex (2,032sq. ft.)-
Kool Acres Sub (Appraised Value
$265,000.00)
4. Lot (50'xlOO') w/building (1,912sq. ft.)-
Deveaux St (Appraised Value $189,000.00)
5. Lot #16 (60'x107') w/house-Smith Ave College
Gardens Sub
6. Lots #29 & #30, (50'xl00'), Blk #47 w/building
(l,140sq. ft.)-Matthew St, Nassau Village
(Appraised Value $145,000.00)
7. Vacant lot (18,644sq. ft.)-Carmichael Rd
(Appraised Value $95,000.00)
8. Lots #5 & #6 (150'xlOO') w/hse-Silver Palm
Ln Imperial Park (Appraised Value
$313,650.00) ,. ,
9. Lot #135 (50'x90') w/hse (1,342sq. ft.)-
I nqv'Sunflower (south) Sunshine Park Sub Hse #8
'(Appraised Value $139,000.00)
10. Lot #18, Blk #16 (50'xlOO') w/hse (1,155sq.
ft.)-Talbot St (east) Shirley Heights Sub
(Appraised Valxte $130,000.00)
11. Lot #11 (107'xlOO') w/hse (2,026sq. ft.)-Sunset
Ridge Dr, Sunset Ridge Sub Hse #28
(Appraised Value $206,000.00)
12. Lot #23, Blk #1 (17,150sq. ft.) w/split level.
hse-Captain Rd, Coral Heights Est. (Appraised
Value $480,000.00)
13. Lots #3 & #4, Blk #47 (50'x100') w/duplex
(1,532sq. ft.)-Forbes St Nassau Village
(Appraised Value $120,000.00)
14. Lot 98'xl28' w/hse 2,340sq. ft.-Mollie St
Englerston Sub (Appraised Value
$239,460.00)

Andros
15. Lot #119 (22, 500sq. ft.) w/complex (3,440sq.
ft.)-Sir Henry Morgan Dr Andros Beach Colony
Sub Nicholl's Town Andros (Appraised Value
$322,900.00)
16. Beach front lot (9,000sq. ft.) w/building
(2,100sq. ft.) Pinders Mangrove Cay Andros
(Appraised Value $200,000.00)
17. Lot (4,344sq. ft.) w/duplex building (1,174sq.
ft.)-Fresh Creek Andros (Aplraised Value
$94,640.00)

Grand Bahama
18. Vacant Lot #8 Blk #12 Unit #3 (11,250sq. ft.)-
Henny Ave Derby Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value $65,000.00)
19. Lot #43 B (100'xl50') w/hse & Duplex-Nelson
Rd. Poinciana Gardens Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value $96,000.00)
20. Lot #37 (50'x150') w/sixplex 2-storey apartment
building & Laundromat (5,400sq. ft.)-Martin
Town, Kings Sub Eight Mile Rock Grand
Bahama (Appraised Value $211,200.00)
21. Lot w/ten (10) unit Hotel (5,000sq. ft.) on 4.99
acres of beach front-High Rock Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value $1,100,000.00)
22. Vacant lot #13, Blk #59, Unit #3 (22,752sq.
ft.) 45' on canal front-Dagenham Circle &
Ingrave Dr Emerald Bay Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value $110,000.00)


23. Vacant lot #21, Blk#3 (14,161sq. ft.)-Waterfall
Dr Seahorse Village Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value $40,000.00)
'24. Lot #15, Blk #15 Unit #3 (90'x125')-Derby Sub
Grand Bahama (Appraised Value $23,000.00)
25. Vacant lot #25, Blk #15 (17,866sq. ft.)-Cutwater
Ln Shannon Country Club Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value $38,000.00)
26. Vacant lot #110 Sec #1 (12,500sq. ft.)-Bonefish
St & Polaris Dr, Carvel Beach Grand Bahama.
(Appraised Value $40,000.00)
27. Lot #59 (17,276sq. ft.) Section #1 w/incomplete
fourplex-Amberjack St & Polaris Dr Carvel
Beach Grand Bahama (Appraised Value
$74,970.00)
28. Lot #2 (20,000sq. ft.) w/building complex &
coin Laundromat-Queens Highway Holmes
Rock Commonage Grand Bahama (Appraised
Value $178,600.00)

Abaco
29. Lot #54 E (6,500sq. ft.) w/triplex foundation
(2;788sqfrt.)-Murphy irowVnrAbaco (Appraised
Value $24,896.00)
30. Lot #6 Vacant 2 acres-Fox Town Abaco
(Appraised Value $50,000.00)
'31. Lot #51 (15,000sq. ft.) w/building-Murphy
Town Abaco (Appraised Value$102,420.00)
32. Portion of lot #69 (15,000sq. ft.)-Front St
Murphy Town Abaco (Appraised Value
$29,250.00)
33. Lot 9,300sq. ft. w/bonefish lodge 4,300sq. ft.-
Sandy Point Abaco (Appraised Value
$523,000.00)
34. Lot #55 (6,900sq. ft.) w/building-Murphy Town
Abaco (Appraised Value $82,075.00)
35. Lot #45 (60'xl60') with 14 room motel
(3,900sq. ft.)-Sandy Point Abaco (Appraised
Value $485,700.00)
36. Lot 87,120sq. ft. w/four cottages and one storage
building.totaling (4,186sq. ft.)-Sand Banks
Treasure Cay Abaco (Appraised Value
$880,308.00)

Eleuthera
37. Property 31'xl 11' w/house Lord St Taprum
Bay Eleuthera. (Appraised Value $40,000.00)
38. Vacant portion of lot #7 (50'xl 10')-West James
Cistern Eleuthera (Appraised Value
$18,000.00)

Cat Island
39. Property w/twelve room motel 1.39 acres-
Arthur's Town Cat Island (Appraised Value
$630,000.00)

Exuma
40. Lot #8 vacant (65,200sq. ft.)-Moss Town
Exuma (Appraised Value $110,188.00)
41. Lot (30,400sq. ft.) with small hotel totaling
(4,520sq. ft.)and exclusive beach-Forbes Hill
Exuma (Appraised Value $1,400,000.00)
42. Vacant lot #1281 (6,600sq. ft.)-Oceanic Rd
Bahama Sound Section #3 Exuma (Appraised
Value $18,150.00)
43. Vacant lot #95 (80'x122') Commodore Rd
Elizabeth Harbour Est. Exuma (Appraised
Value $45,000.00)


ASSETS


Vessels
* 45' (1992) Defender Vessel (Limnos)
* 48' (1989) North Carolina Hull
* 52' (1979) Hatters Vessel (MV Buddy)
* 51' (1981) Defender Vessel (Equility)
* 80' Custom Steel Hull Vessel (Lady Kristy)
* 94' Steel Hull Gulf Coast Shrimp Trawler Vessel
(1980) with (2) Volvo Diesel engine (Sweet Charlotte)
* 122' Single Screw Steel Hull (1960) MV Lisa J Ill,
vessel has a new engine requiring installation. And
Trailer can be view at Bradford Marine, Grand Bahama
* 19' (1989) Fiberglass Sports Vessel (Hull Only)


Vehicles
(1) 03 Dodge Caravan
(1) 96 Ford Explorer
(1) 97 Dodge Stratus
(1) 01 Hyundai H-1 Van
(1) 01 Kia Bus 12 Seater
(1) 78 L800 Ford Boom Truck
(1) 02 Hyundai H-l Van SVX
(1) 06 Hyundai H-1 Van SVX (Silver)
(1) 01 Kitchen Tandem Cherokee


Steel Building 70'x50' Six (6) Windows, Two (2) Entry Doors, Two (2) 5'xlO' Rollup Doors White
trimmed Blue Approved plans and engineering drawings are available $50,000.00
The public is invited to submit Sealed bids marked "Tender" to Bahamas Development Bank, P.O. 1Bo\
N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas attention Financial Controller, faxed bids will not be accepted or telephone
327-5780 for additional information. Please note that all bids on the aforementioned properties and assets
should be received by or on December 8, 2008. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to
reject any or all offers. All assets are sold as is.


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"Your Bahamian Su ermarkets




SUPER

VALUE
NOW ACCEPTING
-SUNCARD
SThe Bahamian Credi Card
QUANTITY RIGHTS AND PRICES RESERVED
SPECIALS GOOD DEC. 4th DEC. 10th, 2008


Drawing Date: Pecember zzna at eacn store
REDEEM QUALITY STAMPS AT BED, BATH & HOME
DOUBLE SAPEEY


CARNATION
EVAP.

MILK
Large


(/ HUNT'S >
KETCHUP


i( CAiASE $11.966

MUELLER'S MURACHAN
READY CUT M R A 1
MACARONI NOODLES
I 16 oz. 4$iAYSG 1 00
$ S29 ,4" $ 00



A _WA HO4.A. SAVI S _


Royal Dansk Butter, 12 oz.
COOKIE$ "*.W
Martinelll, 25.4 oz.
Sparkling
APPLE CIDER...$3.69


Ocean Spray, 16 oz.
CRANBERRY
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Diamond, 1 lb.
WALNUTS ..........$.79
Dixie Crystal, 2 lb.
Light & Dark Brown
SUGAR.................$1.79


MAHATMA
LONG GRAIN/
PARBOILED
RICE
5 lb.


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POWDERED FABRIC
DETERGENT 4 SOFTENER
150 oz.
63 oz.............$7.99 j $ 99
126 oz..........$14.99 7
,90 oz2............22.99
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OPCORN ......$10.99
Ocean Spray, 64 oz.
CRANBERRY
JUICE...................$4.59
Shurfilne Red
CHERRIES
6 o .........................$ 1.79
16 oz.......................$3.49
Red Gold, 15 oz.
Stewed/Crushed
TOMATOES.........$1.29
Valu Time, 40 ct.
FOAM PLATES. .$1.69


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CORN
FLAKES
18 oz.
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THE TRIBUNE


AP GE 10B THURSDAY DE 8


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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE 11B


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.IfMHT, 64 oz.
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PIC SWEET MIXED, 16 oz.
MIXED VEGETABLES...$1.59
FROSTY ACRE, 4 Ears
CORN 0B COB ....................$2.99
NESTLE BLUE EDITION, 56 oz.
ICE CREAM .............................$6.39


OSCAR MAYER
REGIBUN-LENGTH
WIENERS
1 Ib
$079


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$799


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1.


INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY


Lot 3004 SIR LYNDEN PINDLING EST.
WEST SIDE OF PEAR STREET
OFF PRINCE CHARLES HIGHWAY Appra


.4, 'S, *
;;' -' i :<" We
swlogo ttt


aisal: $146,000.00


pis


I.


The total area of the property is 5,000 sq. ft. Located*on this property is
a 3-year-old single family residence consisting of approximately 960 sq.
ft. of living space inclusive of two bedrooms, one bathroom, living,
dining and kitchen..
Directions to property: Travelling Charles Saunders Highway east, turn onto
Marguerite Pindling Avenue, turn second corner on left. House is #3004 at the end
of the left side of the street painted blue and blue.
S 9 9999**9999*9*9 9 999


Lot 8 TERRA NOVA ESTATES


moiim


Appraisal: $195,000.00


'14
, ,


The total area of the property is 6,750 sq. ft. Located on this property
is a single family residence consisting of approximately 1,338 sq. ft. of
living space inclusive of two bedrooms, one bathroom, living, dining'
and kitchen.
Directions to property: Travelling west on Cowpen Road from Blue Hill Road,
take first corner left to go to T-junction, turn left then first right. Subject is second
property on the left.
Lot D BOWE'S COVE Appraisal: $55,000.00
The property is located in Bowe's Cove Subdivision in the Eastern District.
From Village Road heading east third corner on the right off Bernard Road,
and has an area of 5,403 square feet.








people to joman our team.



WHAT IT TAKES?





Sa les ilitecutivles


Must have prior sales experience
Must have looking fora few good
Must have great communication skills
Must be abople to work flexible hoursam.
SalesalteCUtiVe








Must be able to manage client
accounts/collections and receivables


Please drop off resumes to

The Tribune


Shirley & Deveaux Streets
or email: tribune@tribunemedia.net
c/o Sales Manager


BAR-S
SLICED THICK
BACON
12$oz.
$9%99


THE TRIBUNE


at~











INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY


A A SEpI


No. 17 WESTRIDGE ESTATES


Appraisal: $930,000.00


All that lot of land having an area
of 30000 square feet, being lot
Number 17 of the subdivision
'- . B, -.known as Westridge Estates
Addition. Situate in the Western
Sb ll District on the island of New
Providence.
Located on the subject property is
Sa newly con-structed single storey
structure comprising 6,000 feet of
living space with a three Car
Garage.
The building is 75% completed and comprises five bedrooms, four and a half baths
study, living/dining, family room, kitchen, laundry and generator room.
Location: From SuperValue West Bay, take the road heading west into Westridge, take the first
corner on the Right, Westridge Drive. Subject property will be about the seventh on the right
hand side of the road.


Lot 238 SUN CLOSE
SUNSHINE PARK


Appraisal: $136,000.00


PARCEL OF LAND, PALMETTO POINT
ELEUTHERA


1

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ELEUTHERA
Lot #115 GOVERNMENT SUBDIVISION
ALICE TOWN, HATCHET BAY


E-mil harrl [yli c ] II i [egscotli a banki Icom it




E-mail phil 1 lpwi -rtesc i! a ,]ii]
Send ids o Fa:'35-3851or P 0. ox N7518Roseta SteetNassu, B ham


PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE-


Appraisal: $112,105.00
All that piece, parcel or lot of
land 2,743 feet East of the
Junction of the Palmetto Point
road and main Eleuthera
Highway containing 2.45 acres.
This site encompasses a 28-
year-old single storey concrete
structure of approximately 832
square feet of enclosed floor
space inclusive of shop space
and rest room facilities.



)N
Appraisal: $101,023.00


Located on this 4,200 square feet
single/multi family property is a '
20-year-old building of T-111 wood .
with concrete floor, consisting ,----"
approxi-mately-2,198 square feet
of enclosed space.. The structure Ls:
was formerly used as a retail
store and storage facility. -
Directions: From Golden Gates .t.-l^."" .- --- .-..
Shopping Centre, Bailloj Hill Road. .
Take the third corner on the Right after
passing Farmer's Market. Take the
second Right then First right (Sun Close) subject is the fourth property on the
Right white trimmed black.

,............................i....~i I II 0e 0


Located on this property of 5,500 square feet is a 20-year-old
single family residence of approximately 1,635 square feet of
living space. Included in this home is three bedrooms, two
bathrooms, living, dining rooms and kitchen. The house is in need
of repairs.
................ 00..... Poo.
ELEUTHERA
Lot #64 RIPLY STREET, DUNMORE TOWN
HARBOUR ISLAND Appraisal: $286,569.00


LOT #1440


GOLDEN GATES
,,. -;*.:^...


Appraisal: $335,000.00


The property has a total
area of 4,604 square feet.
The site encompasses a
structure that was
converted into a triplex
apartment and is 11 years
old. Accommodations
include: Three 1 bedroom,
1 bathroom, living, dining
and kitchen area with a
total area of 1,950 sq. ft. in


,.. ... Located on this 6,000 square feet
AiW ss ., property is a split level single family
'' |iH iMdwelling comprising four bedroomrns,
two and a half bathrooms, living and
S. 'dining rooms, kitchen and TV room.
^ Attached to the main house is two
-. =.-. ~ one bedroom apartments.
Directions:- Take Carmichael Road heading west, turn comer opposite BFM Church, Cedar
Way, then take first corner on the right, Tangerine Street. Subject will be about the second on
the right hand side of the road.


addition to a porch of 160 sq. ft. and a basement of 90 sq. ft.


EXUMA
CASTELRAG ESTATES, LOTS 129 & 130
EXUMA HARBOUR SUBDIVISION Appraisal: $673,075,00


#7 MALCOLM ROAD
Lot 18, House #7, Malcolm Road
West having an area of 5,000
square feet. Existing thereon is
a 40-year-old split leveled
residence divided into five (5)
one bedroom, one bathroom
apartments, four located on the
main floor and one on the upper
portion is made of durock and is
about 50% complete. The
building is in fair condition and
is in serious need of
maintenance.


Appraisal: $156,747.50




-
SBI??-'-"' S sK


Directions: From Baillou Hill Road heading South pass S.C. McPherson
School, take Malcolm Road heading East. Pass the first corner on the left to
House #7 painted white trimmed green.


The subject property is located on Kingway Road and is
developed with an area of 20,000 square feet. Situated thereon is
a residence comprised of 3,645 square feet of living
accommodations, inclusive of 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, with laundry
and utility spaces and a two bedroom one bath guest cottage of
600 square feet. The property is fenced with white picket fencing
and has a Gazebo at the highest portion of the property.


Lot 20 COOPER'S TERRACE
OFF KEMP ROAD


Appraisal: $91,000.00


The property has a totaled, ,,
are p a of approximately 2 .
4,550 sq. ft. Located on the wil b l.
subject property are 2
structures. Building 1 .*''
comprise an approximately 7,.,
25-30 year old single family --. .
residence consisting of
approx. 937 sq. ft. of livingA
space with 3 -bedrooms
with closets, 1 bathroom,
living, dining, kitchen and
porch.,
Building 2 comprises a single storey building of poured concrete
foundation approximately 20 years old. Floors are tiled; ceilings are sheet
rock with standard plumbing and electrical fixtures. The building appears to
be occupied as a residence having an area of approximately, 283 sq. ft.
DIRECTIONS: Take Kemp Road heading north, turn left on to Cooper's
Terrace go about midway through, subject will be located on the left hand
side of the road.


EXUMA
BAHAMA SOUND #18
Lots 17663, 17664, 17665


Appraisal: $220,180.00


The subject property is being
developed with a single family
split level residence of CBS |
construction with 1956 square , ,
feet of living space. The top ';: ..-', :'':,: '
floor comprises 1496 square ; .. ,.... ...
feet and the lower floor '" ..,. "'.
comprises 460 square feet. All "-'" "' . : .-..,
plumbing and electrical rough .....
work has been completed. The block work is completed on t
bottom floor with a portion of the upper floor completed.


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THE.TR. E T D M 4 2 PG


INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY


0 3 EL.1


Lot 23A, Block KN, John Wentworth Avenue, Unit 1
BAHAMIA NORTH SUBDIVISION
FREEPORT GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $718,000.00


Located on this Multi Family lot of 23,564 square feet are two incomplete
buildings. Single story Triplex of 3,502 square feet inclusive of Living and
dining-area with full service kitchen three bedrooms inclusive of Master
bedroom and two bathrooms per unit.




Lot No. 37 BLOCK 33, CHURCHILL COURT,
BAHAMIA MARINA & BAHAMIA 4 SUBDIVISION,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $337,000.00


All that lot of land having an area of 16,533 sq. ft. being lot No. 37 of the
subdivision known and designated as Bahamia Marina and Bahamia Section
4 Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Located on this property is a
structure comprising a 3 year old duplex structure which covers
approximately (3,058) square feet. Apartment consisting of two 2-bedrooms,
2-bathroom with private Jacuzzi in master bath, spacious living and dining
room, full service kitchen, a laundry and utility room, foyer/hallway with linen
and storage closet. The property is fully secured by six foot plastic coated
chain-link fence runs along the side and rear and adjoins the painted 4 foot
wall, with 5 foot pillars at front with electronic gate.


. *9 o 0.0e. S...... ..... 0.0000.o


Lot 7 Block 8 BAHAMIA SECTION IV
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, A
Located on the property of 1.08 acres
that has,been zoned for multifamily
development are four buildings: A, B,
C and D. Houses A and B are
positioned along the road and they
face each other. Houses C and D are
located to the rear of the building and
are facing -each other. The
constructions of Houses A and B are
just about completed, houses C and D .
are incomplete. The lot is enclosed
!with chain linked fence except .along
the front where a concrete wall is
erected. A concrete driveway (also
used for parking and about the centre
of the lot) leads from the road and
runs through the middle of the yard i
separating House A and B.

Each building contains a total area of
two thousand and seventy-two (2,072)
square feet. Inclusive of the entrance
porch with an area of 182 square feet.

Each house contains an entrance .
porch, living and dining rooms and ..
kitchen, three bedrooms, two
bathrooms, a laundry area, adequate ''
storage and closet space.


appraisal: $799,560.00


-i 'U


Lot 14, Block 11
DERBY SUBDIVISION,


FREEPOR1


*LA-'


i.


T Appraisal: $112,68
Lot 14, Block 11 D
Subdivision.. Located on
subject property of 1
square feet, is an income
single storey single f
house of approximately
square feet of enclosed
space. The space consi
one bedroom, one bathi
living, dining, kitchen.
are porches at the froni
rear entrances.


0**~


Lot 4 Block U BAHAMIASECTION 1
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA /


Appraisal: $348,72


The property has four unequal
sides for a total area of
approximately .38 acres.
Located on the subject
property is a split leveled
structure comprising
approximately 4,427 square
feet of enclosed living space.
The space, consist of five -
bedrooms, three bathrooms, .
kitchen, living room, dining'
area, two Bahama rooms, a double car garage and laundry area.


Lot 13, Block 11, DERBY SUBDIVISION
FREEPORT GRAND BAHAMA Appraisa


I: $180,300


30.0.0
)erby
the
1,250
iplete
family
1,008
living
st of
room,
There
t and





1.00















.00


~1


Lot 13 fronts along the northern side of Henny Road at the end of the
cul-de-sac. Its configuration has four unequal sides. The rear
boundary is along the canal. The front boundary has a curvilinear
road frontage of 45 feet. The rear boundary (canal frontage) with one
point of inflection has a total length of 165 feet. The western side
boundary has a length of 146 feet and the eastern side a length of
125 feet. These dimensions result in an area of .32 acres.

Erected on this property is an incomplete building, of a proposed
single storey house. The living space is approximately 3,228 square
feet; inclusive of foyer, living and dining rooms, kitchen, breakfast
nook; four bedrooms, three bathrooms, powder room, den, laundry
area, study and ample closet and storage space.



Apt. 101 FAIRWAY MANOR CONDOMINIUMS
FREEPORT GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $62,000.00


.. ..*:.' ,.' ., .\


'''~''.* ....,.


Lot 1, Block 8, SEA HORSE VILLAGE, BAHAMA
REEF YACHT & COUNTRY CLUB SUBDIVISION
FREEPORT GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $290,000.00'


The unit is a one bedroom unit consists of a living and dining room,
bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom. There is a laundry room facility on
each floor, a common swimming pool, and fencing with an electronic
gate securing the perimeter of the grounds. The rear boundary of the
subject building is the Ruby Golf Course. The total' living area is
approximately 897 square feet.


<"" *. .- l 1 U ,.


Situated on this property of 12,500 square feet is a 36-year-old
quadroplex apartment building containing two 2 bedrooms and 2
bathroom units and two 1 bedroom, one bathroom units. Each unit
contains foyer, living and dining area, laundry and kitchen.


Lot 12B, Block LN, Unit 2
BAHAMIA NORTH, FREEPORT Appraisal: $54,000.00
The property is located on Cadwallader Drive and has an area of
approximately 24,001.56 square feet. It is multi-family zoned.


THE TRIBUNE


I r-





THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE 13B


For conditions of sale and any other information
contact:


HARRY COLLIE @ 502-3034
E-mail harry. col I ie@scotia bank.com
or
PHILIP WHITE @ 502-3077
E-mail philipwhite@scotiabank.com


Send bids to Fax:' 356-3851 or P. 0. Box N-7518
Rosetta Street, Nassau, Bahamas
... ........... .... ........ ................ ..... ..... . . ......... ............ ..........


I


I '








THE TRIBUNE


V ', L l!,41E GAPO UI ,.- tJ I,- V .


INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY




I ,.,SE.L.


Lot 12 Block 13 Unit 2
GREENING GLADE
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA


Appraisal: $254,355.00


Located on this .35 of an
acre property is a sixteen-
year-old single family
residence comprising four
bedrooms, two bathrooms,
living, dining, storage, utility
and laundry rooms; there is a
foyer, kitchen and den. The
total area of living space is
3,016 square feet.


.. .. .-. .
^ -. '* -. ,.. . .


S 55* 555 5555* 55 *55* 5** S S *5


Lot 96 HUDSON ESTATES


Appraisal: $116,190.00


I j*rl.


Located on this 72x102 feet property is a 16 years old single
family dwelling comprising 1,490 square feet of living space. This
includes, a living, dining and laundry room, kitchen, three
bedrooms, two bathrooms, a garage and entrance porch.




Apt 9, VILLA MARTINIQUE CONDOMINIUMS
FREEPORT GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $125,000.00


.-. .,- ..--"

The unit is a one bedroom flat consisting an open area living and
dining room, bedroom, kitchen, linen closet and bathroom. The total
living area is approximately 660 square feet. The porch has an area of
approximately 75 square feet.


Lot 36 SUNRISE PARK SUBDIVISION,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal:'$95,000.00














The property has a total area of approximately .28 acres or 100 by 125
feet. Located on the subject property is 'a Duplex apartment building.
Apartment 36 A contains a total of approximately 1,526 sq. ft. of living
space. The space consist of 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, kitchen, living
room, dining area, a den and laundry area.
S *** 555*"* *"*5S 58"** "


Lot 117 (Section 1)
MALIBOO REEF SUBDIVISION
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA


Appraisal: $264,300.00


The lot is rectangular in shape at the end of a cul de sac and
measures a total area of 11,128 square feet or .25 acres. Erected on
the property is a 2,664 sq. ft. single family residence. In addition to
an entrance porch of 120 sq. ft. and cart porch of 432 sq. ft. The
living space is divided into a foyer, living, dining, kitchen, family and
a Bahama room. Three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a powder room
and laundry room.


Lot 2 Block 4
HARBOUR WEST SUBDIVISION
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA'


Appraisal: $243,000.00
._'-"-1


The lot is rectangular in shape and is 120 by 118 feet or .32 acres.,
Erected on this property is a triplex building of 2,598 sq. ft. This.
space is divided into three apartment units with different sizes and'
layouts. One 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, entrance porch, living, dining
and kitchen. Two 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom, living, dining and kitchen
.area with an entrance porch.

DERBY
UNIT 3, BLOCK 10, LOT 11 (CANAL LOT)
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $96,000.00
All that piece, parcel or lot land being Block 10, Lot 11 of Derby
Subdivision. The land is vacant, rectangular in shape, on level ground
and is on a canal. Contains approximately 11,250 sq. ft. and is in a
single family residential area.

011ffm M % gm.1-11o 4


Lots 26, 27, 37, Block 1
SEABREEZE ESTATES


Appraisal:. $638,676.00


Executive styled house which has been converted into three units.
The first unit features an open plan in the outer area consisting of
living, dining with sunken floor, kitchen, and powder room. The inner
area consists of three bedrooms, three baths including a master
suite and master bath, consisting of a large Jacuzzi, shower and
walk-in closets. The second unit consists of two bedrooms, one
bath, living, dining, kitchen, office area. The third unit consists of an
open plan with kitchen, living, bedroom and a private bedroom.
Added features: Enclosed pool, central air condition, courtyard, and
fenced in patios
Directions to property: Take Prince Charles heading east, turn at the light
at the intersection of Seabreeze and Prince Charles Drive. Golf Course
Boulevard, take third corner on the right, Bay Cedar Avenue, then take
second corner on left, Darling Plum Grove, subject will be about the 5th
property on the left.


Lot 21 HIGH VISTA CLOSE
SUBDIVISION


Appraisal: $515,000.00


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The lot has a total area of 9,419. Situated on this property is a two-year-
old triplex apartment building of approximately 3,332 square feet of
enclosed living space.
Unit 1 comprises ground level-entry foyer with stairway alcove, living,
dining and powder room; kitchen, utility room and study. Upper level
comprises stairway alcove corridor, three bedooms, with closets and two
bathrooms.
Units 2 and 3 comprises living and dining areas, kitchen, two bedrooms
with closets, one bathroom and bedroom corridor,
Directions: Take Eastern Road heading east, turn High Vista Drive, turn left
at junction go around bend, turn fourth corner right, turn left, subject will be
about 7th property on the left side painted dark green trimmed white.


For co^ditio s o sae aridany ther nforatio
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^contact:^^^^
|^^^HARRY COLLIE @ 502-303
E-mail hary^ col Iie ^scoti bank co
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^or^^
^^^^PHI~LSIP WHITE @ 502-3077
E-mail ohilipwhite ^scotiabank^co

Sen bis t Fa: 36-851or 0 Bo N-51
Rosetta Street, Nassau, Bahama


B THURSDAYDECEMBER 8


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE 15B


1. 2.1T U


LotNoJ.U 1081, Uorsettevii ilUU JlU i. own
All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 5,000 sq ft, being lot # 181, of the subdivision known as Dorsetteville which is situated in the southern district of New Providence
located on this property is an approximately 25yr old single family residence comprising of approximately 1,162 sq ft & consisting of 2-bedrooms, 1-bath, kitchen, living, dining room
& carport. The land is on a grade and level; the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly kept with
improvements of concrete parking area & concrete walkways around the premises. The yard has chained linked fencing at the sides and back.

Appraisal: $149,016.00

Traveling Epst Street South, turn right at porky's service station [Victoria Blvd]. Take the 4th comer on the right (Raynell Drive) the subject property will be the 4th on the left side.Painted
white trimmed light agua.


Eleuthera Island Shores Subdivision LOT NO. 1, BLOCK NO. 45, SECTION E, ELEUTHERA ISLAND SHORES

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 9,644 sq. ft. being lot #1 in block 45, Section "E" in the subdivision called and known as Eleuthera Island Shores Subdivision,
situated in the vicinity of Hatchet Bay Harbour, on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahams. This site encompasses a two storey
SB building which is approximately 14 yrs old and is abandoned. There is a wooden landing approximately 7'-4",wide by 20'-0" on the upper level, approximately 1,610 sq. ft. of
E enclosed living space, with 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms, front room, dining room, den, kitchen, and utility room. The wooden porch on the upper level is approximately 148sq. ft.
There is also a water cistern under the dining room floor area. All utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $151,007.00
This property is situated in Eleuthera Island Shores.



S .U Lot No. 186, Coral Harbour Waterways, Coral Harbour

All that lot of land having an area of 12,150 sq ft, being lot # 186, of the subdivision known as Coral Harbour Waterways, situated in the western district of New
Providence. Located on this property is a single family residence comprising of approximately 2,482 sq. ft. of enclosed living space consisting of 3-bedrooms with
closets, 2 bathrooms, kitchen, living, dining, family & utility rooms with office (loft), the residence is also equipped with 2-car garage with electronic doors the
land is on a grade and level; the site appears to .be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during heavy rainy periods.
$427,726.80

- .. Take coral harbour road from the round about, head straight toward the canal, take about the:.3rd right, hopkins drive, the subject property will be the 1st house on
the right side painted all white.
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KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)
Lot No. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single
story house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living room,
dining area, family room, kitchen, study, laundry and
an entry porch.
Appraisal: $188,406.00
Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance
to Kennedy Subdivision on the left, then take the 1st
corner on the left then 1st right, house Is second on
your right with garage.


DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)

3 two bed, 1 bath fourplex 9,000 sq, ft., lot no. 18b
with an area for a small shop. Age 12 years the land
is a portion of one of the Dundas Town Crown Allotment
parcels stretching from Forest Drive to Front Street,
being just under a quarter acre in size'and on the
lowside. A concrete block structure, with asphalt
shingle roof and L-shape in design with a total length
of 70x26 ft, plus 50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the interior
walls are concrete blocks, ceiling is sheet rock and
the floors of vinyl tiles.
Appraisal: $265,225.00


LOT NO. 12, BLOCK 3, MILLER'S HEIGHTS

M I All that lot of land having an area of 7,500 sq. ft., being lot
12, of the subdivision known and designated as Millar's
S Heights, situated in the Southwestern district of New
Providence, Bahamas. This property is comprised of a 25
S' ... :.. yr old single family residence consisting of approximately
2,375 sq. ft of enclosed living space with three 2-bedrooms,
1-bathroom, living/dining rooms, and kitchen apartment
complex. The land is on a grade and level and appear to
.. }be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding
during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly
kept, with improvements including parking area, walking pathway and low shrubs. The yard is enclosed with chain
linked fencing at the back and southern sides.
Appraisal: $239,500.00
Traveling west on Carmichael Road, enter West Avenue, on the South side immediately after Topps Laundromat. Take
first right which is Wimpole St., go around the curve on the left which is London Avenue, traveling south on London
Avenue the subject property is the 9th building on the right before the T, Junction (high street) the subject building is
an L shape triplex, painted green, trimmed white. .


Lot No. 3 Yamacraw, Beach Estates
All that lot of land having an area of 10,000 sq ft, being
lot no. 3 in Yamacraw Beach Estates, in the said
subdivision situated in the eastern district of New
Providence Bahamas. Located on the subject property
is a single-storey triplex building comprising of 3 units
with two 2-bedrooms, 1-bathroom,.living, dining, kitchen
apartments unit and one unit being used as a barber and
beauty salon, the land is on a grade and level; however
the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow
the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy
periods of the year.


Appraisal: $313,016.00
Traveling south on Fox Hill Road, go pass Yamacraw Hill Road and Joe Farrington Road. The subject
property is located on the left hand side of Fox Hill road painted white trimmed brown.

Dorsetteville, Bamboo Town Investment Opportunity Must Sell Lot No. 51
All that lot of land having e anI aof 5,000 sq ft, being lot no. 51,
of the subdivision known as Dorsetteville, the said subdivision
situated in the southern district of New Providence Bahamas.
1 Located on the subject property is a structure comprising of an-:
approximately 20yr old duplex apartment comprising of
approximately 1,641 sq. ft. of enclosed living space which includes
two 2-bedrooms, 1-bath, kitchen, living & dining rooms units. and
an approximately 9yr old one bedroom apartment building
comprising of 382 sq. ft. with bath, kitcWen, living/dining room. the
land is on a grade and level; the site appears to be sufficiently
elevated to disallow the.possillity ofAflooding during annual heavy
rainyperiods of the geartTp.g ateaw. fairiy1eptwith improvements
of o'nicrte parking area & concrete walkways around the premises.
The yard is enclosed with chained linked fencing at the sides and back.
Appraisal: $202,225.40
Traveling south on East Street from Soldier Road, turn right at Porky's Service Station [Victoria Blvd]. Travel pass the third
corner on the left, the subject property will be the 9th on the left side. Painted green trim white.


Investment Opportunity Must Sell Lot No. 217
Pinewood Gardens Subdivision
All that lot of land having an area of 5,000 sq ft, being Lot
No. 217 of the Subdivision known as Pinewood Gardens, the
said subdivision situated in the Southem District of New
Providence Bahamas. Located on this property is a structure
comprising of an approximately 20 yr old single family residence
consisting of 992 sq. ft of enclosed living space with 3-
bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living/dining rooms, kitchen, drive
way and walk way. The land is on a grade and level and
appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility
of flooding. The grounds are fairly kept and yard is open.


Appraisal: $127,988.00

Traveling south on East Street to the junction of Soldier Road, make a left at the light then turn right into'Kennedy
Subdivision, go all the way to T-junction, turn right then first left then right again toward Mount Tabor Church building,
after passing Mount Tabor take first left sapodillaa blvd), the subject house is about 400 yards on the right painted yellow
trimmed green, with green and white door.


ELEUTHERA LOT NO. 90-D, LOWER BOGUE
All that piece parcel or lot of land containing 42,616 sq. ft. and being Lot # 90-D on a survey plan situated in the settlement of Lower Bogue on the island of Eleuthera, this
site encompasses a commercial building consisting of a restaurant and disco that is approximately 13 yrs old, with a total sq. ft. of approximately 4,852.12, which includes
male & female rest rooms, stage area, 2-dressing rooms; dining room, commercial kitchen and storage improvements also includes a 660.4 sq, ft, front veranda, 752 sq,
ft, concrete walk-ways, and 192 sq, ft, back porch. This building is central air-conditioned.
Appraisal: $490,671.00
This property is situated on the western side of the main Eleuthera Highway & approximately 2,219 ft. northerly of Four-For-Nothing Road, in the settlement of Lower
Bogue North Eleuthera. All utilities and services available.


MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 44,714 sq. ft., and designated "E" which forms a portion of land known as "Mutton Fish Point" situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the island of
Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly by the land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance of 393.13 hundredth ft.;
outwardly by a 30' wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 402.57 hundredth ft; eastwardly by the main Queen's Highway and running thereon for a distance of 109.73 hundredth ft; westwardly by land now or formerly the
property of Caridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 110.75 hundredth ft. this property having an area of approximately 44,714 sq. ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential development and is quiet, peaceful and has
a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $51,421.00


T


ISLAND HARBOUR BEACH, EXUMA
All that parcel or lot of vacant land containing 10,000 (80'X 100') sq. ft. being Lot No. 9, Block 2, Island Harbour
Beach Subdivision situated the western most portion of the Hermitage Estate, Little Exuma Bahamas. The
property is located on an unpaved road known as Stocking Road. The property also has a commanding view
of the ocean.
Appraisal: $80,000.00



MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
All that piece, parcel or tract of land containing 1 acre situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement
of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is
bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwestwardly by the main Queens Highway and is running thereon for a
distance of 125.462 feet northwestwardly by the land now of formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and
running thereon for a distance of 390.274 hundredth ft.; southwestwardly by a 30' wide road reservation and
running thereon for a distance of 128.128 hundredth ft; southeastwardly by the land now or formerly the property
of the Venor and running thereon for a distance of 322.955 hundredth ft. This property having an area of
approximately 44,847.76 sq. ft. This neighbourhood is zoned commercial development and is quiet and peaceful
with a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $51,574.00
This lot is vacant land and is located in the area known as "Mutton Fish Point"


LOT NO. 10B, PALMETTO POINT
All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 9,000 sq. ft., arid being Lot No. 10B situated North of
Ingraham's Pond and Eastwardly of North Palmetto Point, on the Island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- on.the north by Lot No, 3B and
running thereon for a distance of (90) ft; on the East by Lot No. 11 B and running thereon for a distance of (100)
ft; on the south by a 20' wide road reservation and running thereon (90) ft on the west by Lot No. 9B running
thereon for a distance of (100) Ft, the said Lot is overgrown with shrubs and is in close proximity of a white sandy
beach. This neighborhood is zoned residential development and is quiet and peaceful with a topography of
approximately. 50ft and because of this there is no danger of flooding. The area is approximately 80% developed
with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $72,000.00



MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land and improvements containing approximately 44,587 sq. ft. and
designated "F" which forms a portion of land known as "Mutton Fish Point" situated about two miles northwestward
of the settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, and bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly by the land now or formerly the property of
Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance of 383.56 hundredth ft; southwardly by land now or formerly
the property of Caridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 393-19 hundredth ft. eastwardly by the
main Queen's Highway and running thereon for a distance of 113.40 hundredth ft. westwardly by land now or
formerly the property of Coridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 113.40 hundredth ft. this
neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential development and is quiet, peaceful and has a topography of
approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $51,276.00


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PAGE 16B. THURSDAY. DECEMBER 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


,e rt 2


Lot No. 5, Block 20 Millar's Heights

All that lot of land having an area of 7,500
sq, ft, being Lot 5 block 20, of the subdivision
known as Millar's, the said subdivision situated
in the southwestern district of New Providence,
"oug, e Bahamas. Located on the subject property is
San approximately 19 yr old single-storey
*' '$ duplex apartment consisting of approximately
1,514 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with two
2-bedrooms 1-bathroom, living, dining rooms
& kitchen. Ventilation is by wall air-
conditioning units in the bedrooms. Minor
repairs needed. The land is on a grade and
level; however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during
annual heavy rainyperiods of the year. The grounds are fairly kept, with improvements including parking
area & walking pathway. The yard is inclosed with chain linked fencing at the back & southern sides, with
low wall in front
Appraisal: $182,536.00
Traveling west on carmichael road, go pass the intersection of faith avenue heading towards Bamboo
Shack. Take the corner opposite Bamboo Shack where washhouse is located. Heading south all the way
through, the subject property will be the 3rd on the left side after passing the 3rd corner painted yellow
trimmed green.


LOT NO. 2 MQRIGOLD FARM
SUBDIVISION

-- All that lot of land having an area of approximately
S' L : 5,638 sq. ft. being lot No. 2 of the subdivision
U known as Marigold Farm Subdivision, the said
S. .-subdivision situated in the Eastern District of
New Providence and located Lumumba Lane
North off Marigold Road situated on the property
is a year old single storey residence consisting
of 3 bedrooms, 2 & 1/2 bathrooms, living, dining,
kitchen and utility room. The Land is on a grade
and level and appears to be sufficiently elevated
to disallow the possibility of flooding. The
property is open from the front but has chain linked fencing at the sides and back.

Appraisal: $197,107.60

Take Joe Farrington Road heading east, turn onto Marigold Farm Road go pass Marigold Farms, then turn right
onto Lumumba Lane, go almost to the middle of the corner and the subject property is about the eight house
on the right hand side of the road.


Lot #4 Jackfish Drive, Golden Gate #1


HAMILTON'S, LONG ISLAND
All that piece parcel or lot of land and
S. improvements situated in the settlement of
Hamilton's in the Island of Long Island, and
comprising of approximately 13,547 sq. ft. and
i1 is elevated approximately 7-8 ft above sea level.
This site encompasses a 35yr structure. A simple
style home consisting of two bedrooms, one
.-* ., ,,* ...y ..:...- bathroom, kitchen, living and dining room. the
'- *: home however is consisted of 2 separate
"'. ., constructions; 613.60 sq. ft of concrete
.construction and 624 sq. ft of wooden construction
all amenities are to the property such as electricity,
water, cable and telephone.
Appraisal: $67,000.00.
The property is accessed by the main Queen's Highway.


LOT NO. 359, ELIZABETH
ESTATES


All that lot-of land being Lot No. 359,
S, :in.he.subdivision known as Elizabeth
SEstiates sjted in the eastern district of
l eNv vPd6 tence, Bahamas & having an
area of approximately 5,000 sq. ft. located
on the subject property is a 22 year old
S single family residence comprising of
approximately 871 sq, ft of enclosed
living space consisting of 3-bedrooms,
1-bathroom, living, dining, kitchen &
laundry room. The land is flat but appears
to be sufficiently elevated to withstand the annual rain fall. The property is landscaped & contains low
shrubs, flowering & fruit trees

Appraisal: $123,425.00
Travelling east on Prince Charles Drive, turn through the main entrance into Elizabeth Estates -
Cominonwealth Blvd, travel all the way to Thelma Gibson Primary School & turn right St. Vincent
Ave. the subject property will be located on the next corner on the right side of Jamaica Ave & St. Vincent
Avenue painted all white.


MURPHY TOWN ABACO .
Alll that parcel of land having an approximate area of
9,000 sq ft, located on the above mentioned lot is a
1- single family wooden structure, 25ft by 40 ft with
asphalt shingled roof. This house is approximately
15 yr old and comprising of 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
Sliving/dining area and kitchen. This house is in need
of some serious repairs. The future life of this house
depends on the repairs that will be carried out. Without
repairs it is not more than about 5 years. If upgrading
and maintenance is carried out it could be longer the
land rises above road level, to a height in excess of
approximately 15ft above sea level, with.no likelihood
of flooding in a hurricane.
Appraisal: $72,250.00
This house is located off the main Murphy Town Road about 150 ft to the Northeast of the comer and is painted blue
trimmed white.

LOT LOCATED STELLA MARIS,
LONG ISLAND

S'. : All that lot of land having an area of 30,000 sq
ft, more or less, having a 150 ft of road frontage
& running back 200 ft at its most is located
lip .... within the Stella Maris Subdivision in North
Long Island one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Located on
this property is a 6yr old split level residence
consiting of approximately 3,058 sq. ft. of
enclosed living space with 2-bedrooms, 2-
bathroms, living, dining & tv rooms, kitchen & breakfast room, also a garage which serves as a laundry
room. There is also attached to the home a 10,000 gallon rain water holding tank & 1,202 sq ft of tiled
patio.
Appraisal: $658,000.00



s -(LOT NO. 62, LOWER BOGUE)
W ) ELEUTHERA

All that piece parcel or lot of land and
improvements, in the settlement of Lower Bogue,
North Eleuthera, being No. 62, comprising of
:. about 34,210 sq. ft., this site encompasses a 12
S. -:' -' year old single storey home comprising of 4
S bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, front room, dining,
44. -" breakfast room, kitchen and laundry room, with
a total living area of approximately 2,342.06.
Property also includes a double car garage, and
front entrance with a total sq. ft. of approximately
655.75. This home is approximately 85% completed. The property is well landscaped with crab grass, fiascos
and some fruit trees.

Appraisal: $229,426.00

This property is situated on the western side of Eleuthera Highway in the settlement of Lower Bogue.


VACANTROERIE


Lot No. 3, Block 8, Derby Subdivision Freeport
All that lot of land having an area of .26 acres, being Lot # 3, Block 8, Unit 3, of the subdivision known
as Derby Subdivision, situate on the Island of Freeport, Grand Bahamas.
Appraisal: $65,000.00
This property is located on Henny Terrace & about 500 yards from Casuarina Drive & 150 yards from the
Queens Highway. All service & utilities included. The subdivision is zonned as single family residential.


Lot B, Wilson Street, Rocd Crusher
All that lot of land having an area of 10,498 sq ft, being lot B, between the subdivision known as Rock
Crusher and in the vicinity of Perpall Tract situated in the western district of New Providence, Bahamas.
This property is zoned multi family/single family. Also located on this property is a structure comprising
of a duplex at foundation level under construction, and consisting of approximately 1,566 sq. ft. of enclosed
living space with a patio consisting of 270, sq. ft. the starter bars are in place and foundation poured.
Appraisal: $97,214.00
Traveling West on Farrington Road take a right after the P.L.P. headquarters, go about midways
through to Wilson Street, go though the comer all the way to the dead end. The property is located
behind the chain linked fence at the back of the yard.


BLACJKWOOD, ABACO

All that lot of land having an area of approximately 258,064 sq. ft. This property is yet to reach its highest and best use.
It is ideally suited to single or multi-family development as is the nature of surrounding properties within the community.
The site may also serve well as a commercial site as the area remains un-zoned the property remains largely in its original
state. It is covered with low brush and broad leaf coppice vegetation intersperse with broad strands of mature Yellow
Pine indigenous to the area. The property is well drained and represents no immediate flooding danger under normal
conditions.
APPRAISAL: $219,354.40
The subject property is vacant and is situated at the Southeastern entrance of the Community of Blackwood, Abaco. The
property is undivided and comprises approximately 6 acres of a larger tract of land of approximately 26 acres.


Lot No. 1010 # 1011, Pinewood Gardens Subdivision
All that lot of land having an area of 10,000 sq ft, being lot # 1010 & 1011, of the subdivision known as
Pinewood Garden, situate in the southern district of New Providence, Bahamas. Located on the subject
property is a foundation of a proposed structure. the land is on a grade & level; however the site appears
sufficiently elevated to disallow flooding during heavy rainy periods.
Appraisal: $140,000.00

Travelling from East Street south, take Sappodilla Blvd then turn onto Pigeon Plum St heading south, the
subject property is located on the corner of Pigeon Plum & Cordia Street


NORTH ELEUTHERAJIEIGfHTS (ELEUTHERA) Eleuthera Lot No. 15, North Palmetto Point
Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq ft., and bounded Early Settler Drive and South by Deal All that piece parcel or lot of land containing 22,316 sq. ft. being a portion of a 25.166 acre tract "A" &
Lot #20 approximately 11200 sq. ft., and bouning handed onNorth,by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal being lot # 15 in a development known as Spanish Main situated in the settlement of Palmetto Point on
Investment Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation the Island of Eleuthera, one of the Islands of The Bahamas. This area is complete with all utilities and
with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured services available
as yet. The foundation is 2,51,1 sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The services avaiAppraisal: $65832.00
said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean.
Appraisal: $41,275.00 This property is situatedat Spanish Main just off the Bank Road North Palmetto Pdint South Eleuthera
Appraisal: $41,275.00 district.



Lot B, Marigold Farm Road Allotment 67

All that lot of vacant land having an area of 1,173 acres and being referred to as the plot. the property is lot No. B and is situated on Marigold Farm Road in the area known as Allotment 67, a subdivision situated in the south eastern district of
New Providence Bahamas. This property is zoned multi family.
Appraisal: $290,000.00

Traveling from Joe Farrington Road onto Marigold Farm Road heading south. The subject is th 2nd to last property on the left hand side of the road near the pond.









THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE 17B


GN-786



GOVERNMENT NOTICE

Public Service Commission

VACANCY FOR DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH
MINISTRY OF HEALTH

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the
position of Director of Public Health, Department of Public Health,
Ministry of Health.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE POST:

Interested applicants must possess a Medical or Dental Degree
from an accredited institution and should have completed graduate
level training in Public Health or equivalent. In addition, a minimum
of two (2) years relevant post qualification experience is required.
Specialist from Medicine and other Public Health disciplines with
extensive Public Health related experience will also be considered.

Knowledge of computer application for the delivery of Emedicine
is desirable.

The preferred candidate will have a thorough knowledge of
fundamentals of health service organization and administration,
research and planning. In addition, experience of participation in
international meetings, comprehensive knowledge of standards,
regulations and laws applicable to Public Health Organization will
be an asset.

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES:

Participates in the establishment,of policy objectives and
priorities for the Department of Public Health and ensures
that they meet with the highest possible professional care
and treatment of patients, as well as standards prescribed
by accrediting agencies.

Interprets and transmits policies of the Ministry of Health
and ensures compliance.

Provides leadership for the Executive Management
ppmmjttee .otth Department of Public Health.

Develops management strategies in collaboration with the
Executive Management Committee to maximize operational
efficiency and utilization of resources.

Ensures that the daily operation of the Department of Public
Health, including clinics, programmes and services are
effectively managed.

Monitors the activities of the professional and technical
staff of the Health Service in accordance with the relevant
by-laws and Regulations. *

Develop standards and methods of measurement of service
activities that ensures the delivery of quality health service.

Ensures proper development of services and allocation of
resources through short and long term planning.

Participates in collective agreements with labour unions
and other professional and technical associations.

Facilitates execution of wills-and other legal documents
related to patient care through the notary public function.

OTHER DUTIES:

Negotiates contracts for care and treatment of patients,
with the various responsible agencies such as the.,Public
Hospitals Authority and private health facilities.

Represents the Department of Public Health at local, regional
and international meetings and conferences, workshops,
etc.

Develops collaborative relationships with other service
organizations to exchange information and promote training
and technical support.

COMPENSTION/RENUMERATION:

The salary of the post is in Scale GR6 $57,850 (x $800) -
$62,650 per annum. An allowance of $4,500.00 per annum and
housing is payable to any successful recruited non-Bahamian


applicant.

Application forms may be obtained from the Ministry of Health
or the Public Service Commission, Poinciana Hill Complex,
Meeting Street. They should be returned, complete with certified
copies, of qualifications and documentary proof of relevant
experience, to the Secretary, Public Service Commission, Poinciana
Hill Complex, Meeting Street, not later than 19 December, 2008.

Interested serving officers must apply through their Heads of
Departments.

SECRETARY
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION


GN-787


MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS

AND TRANSPORT


NOTICE FOR ROAD CLOSURE
(COLLINS AVENUE FROM WULFF ROAD TO SHIRLEY STREET)


The Ministry of Public Works and Transport wishes to advise
members of the General public that Collins Avenue and a number
of adjacent roads will be closed to vehicular traffic, commencing
Monday, 1st December, 2008 in order to facilitate the repaving'of
Collins Avenue.

TIMES OF CLOSURE:

The road paving Contractors have programmed the work on Collins
Avenue during the "off peak" hours between 7 o'clock in the
evenings and 5 o'clock in the mornings in order to minimize the
disruption to traffic flow and business activities in the affected
areas.

PROPOSED ON-SITE WORK SCHEDULES
AND PHASING OF THE WORKS:

This work will be carried out in Phases of approximate 1000ft
each. Therefore the road diversions during the execution of these
works are as f6llows:


1. PHASE 1:


Wilff Road/Collins Avenue Northwardly to
the Junction with Seventh Terrace.


Diversion No. 1 From the Wulff Road/Collins Avenue
Junction, proceed West along Wulff Road to
,, , East Street, north along East Street to Toote-,
Shop otner then connect to Seventh Terrace,
and back to Collins Avenue.


Diversion No.2







2. PHASE H:


Diversion No.





Diversion No..





3. PHASE III:


Diversion No.


Collins Avenue/Seventh Terrace:
From Collins Avenue proceed east along
Seventh Terrace to Arundel Street and on to
Mt Royal Avenue, South on Mt Royal Avenue
to Wulff Road and west on Wulff Road to
Collins Avenue.

Seventh Terrace Northwardly to the Junctions
of McCullough Corner and Fifth Terrace


1: From Collins Avenue proceed west on Seventh
Terrace to Toote Shop Corner and on to East
Street, north on East Street to McCullough
Corner, east on McCullough Corner to Fifth
Terrace and back to Collins Avenue.

2 From Collins Avenue proceed east along Fifth
Terrace to Mt Royal Avenue, south on Mt.
Royal Avenue to Arundel Street, west on
Arundel Street onto Seventh Terrace and back
to Collins Avenue.

From Fifth Terrace Northwardly to Shirley


1:


Street;

From Fifth Terrace proceed west on
McCullough Corner to Saxons Way, north to
Masons Addition, west along Masons Addition
to East Street, and north on East Street to
Shirley Street.


Diversion No. 2: From Fifth Terrace proceed east to Mt Royal
Avenue and north to Shirley Street.

WARNING AND PRECAUTIONARY SIGNS

The paving Contractor will erect precautionary signs to enhance
road safety for both motorized and pedestrian traffic.

Members of the Public and motorists in particular, are therefore
urged to take note at all times of the posted warning or diversionary
road signs for restricting movement along the construction routes
and adjacent roads. Should the need arise, further notifications of
possible traffic flow disruptions will be issued to the Public in a
timely manner.

Signed by:
Anita D. Bernard (Mrs.)
Permanent Secretary
MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT


THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 18B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


IN A TERNTIONALB INESS


World markets inching higher


* By PAN PYLAS
AP Business Writer


Legal Notice
NOTICE


D'EW OVERSEAS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution,' which commenced
on the 8th day of April 2008. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas. '






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
.(Liquidator)


.. .. NOTICE

EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
AZERBAIJAN LIMITED

N 0 T I C E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
AZERBAIJAN LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of.the. International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 2nd
day of December, 2008 when its Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. L. Floyd of 16945
Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Dated the 2nd day of December, 2008
HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY
MANAGEMENT CO. LTD
Attorneys for the above-named Company



EAGLE ELECTRICAL
& LIGHTING
Tel (242) 341-4000 Fax (242) 341-5080
Email: eaglebahamas@gmaiLcom






$1,000 WINNER!


LONDON (AP) Euro-
pean and United States stock
markets moved higher Wednes-
day as investors brushed aside
further dismal economic news
ahead of key interest rate deci-
sions and the closely-watched
US jobs report for November.
Late buying helped the FTSE
100 index of leading British
shares to close up 47.41 points,
or 1.2 per cent, at 4,170.27,
while Germany's DAX was
35.45 points, or 0.8 per cent,
higher at 4,567.24. The CAC-
40 in France was up 13.75
points, or 0.4 per cent, at
3,166.65.
Meanwhile, on Wall Street
the Dow Jones industrial aver-
age was 72.32, or 0.9 per cent,
higher at 3,159.54 and the


Ffs M s.


Legal Ittice

NOTICE

EXXON EXPLORATION AND
PR661UGTio' AZEABAIJAN LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on
or before 17th day of December, A.D., 2008. In default
thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 2nd day of December A.D., 2008.

K. L. Floyd
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.,



Legal Notice

NOTICE

MOBIL ASSET
INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on
or before 17th day of December, A.D., 2008. In default
thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 2nd day of December A.D., 2008.


K.L. Floyd
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.






INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

ALCA HOLDINGS LIMITED


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
the Dissolution of ALCA HOLDINGS LIMITED has been
completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued:and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register. The date
of completion of the dissolution was the 21st day of November,
2008.
T.


id ait a tit s,
(I uik


group of purchasing executives,
said the services sector con-
tracted dramatically in Novem-
ber as slower spending hurt
insurers, retailers and hotels. It
said its services sector index fell
to 37.3 in November from 44.4
in October.
The reading was significantly
lower than the 42 the market
expected and means that the
sector is in a deep recession. A
reading below 50 indicates con-
traction and the lower the num-
ber, the greater the contraction.
"The steep drop in services
industry activity in November
is another sobering reminder of
the potentially devastating con-
sequences of the current long
and painful recession," said IHS
Global Insight's chief US finan-
cial economist, Brian Bethune.
As a result, a number of ana-
lysts have downwardly revised


their expectations for Friday's
US non-farm payrolls data, with
some now projecting that
around 350,000 jobs were lost
in November. The consensus is
that around 325,000 jobs were
shed during the month.
The disappointing data was
not just confined to the US,
though. The euro-zone service
sector purchasing managers
index, or PMI, fell to 42.5 in
-November, ,below the prelimi-
nary estimate of 43.3 and Octo-
ber's 45.8. November's reading
was the lowest in the survey's
ten-year history.
Meanwhile, the equivalent:
survey into the British services
sector was even worse. The PMI
dropped to 40.1 in November
from 42.4 the previous month.
November's reading was the
lowest since the survey began
in 1996.


NOTICE

EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
AZERBAIJAN LIMITED

N 0 T I C E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
AZERBAIJAN LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 2nd
day of December, 2008 when its Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. L. Floyd of 16945
Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Dated the 2nd day of December, 2008
HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY
MANAGEMENT CO. LTD
Attorneys for the above-named Company


broader Standard & Poor's 500
index was up 10.68 points, or
1.3 per cent, at 859.49.
Earlier, all the indexes had
been sharply lower as the opti-
mism that fueled last week's ral-
ly evaporated amid poor eco-
nomic news.
Financial
"Financial markets are
expected to remain volatile for
some time, as they take on
board two sets of issues, the
credit crisis and the economic
crisis," said Andrew Milligan,
head of global strategy at Stan-
dard Life Investments.
A raft of data on the services
sector Wednesday reinforced
investor concerns about the US
and European economies.
In the US, the Institute for
Supply Management, a trade


NOTICE

EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
CASPIAN SEA LIMITED

N 0 T I C E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION CASPIAN
SEA LIMITED is in Dissolution under the. provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 2nd
day of December," 2008 when its Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. L. Floyd of 16945
Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Dated the 2nd day of December, 2008
HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY
MANAGEMENT CO. LTD
Attorneys for the above-named Company


the 29th day of December, 2008.


a .
I ,B. Foi."r
'or: Co"linttal tlJ idatort. ItiC. '
ILiqumda(W


Mark, Martyra & Furtina Turnquest of Triad Builders (win-
hers), W/ Marvin Stuart of Eagle Electrical & Lighting
Four more WINNERS to be. chosen every weekend
from now 'til Dec 23. Come in now and make a
minimum purchase of $20 and enter to win CA$H.





Xmas Trees Ceiling Fans Light Bulbs Electrical Tools
Other Prizes: Artificial Christma4tree, Bahama Breeze Ceiling Fan,
$50 gas voucher, chandelier, or a 12 pack of energy saving light bulbs

-'Eagle Electrical Supplies & Ughting Center
Tonique Williams Darling Highway (formerly Harold Road)
P.O. Box CR-55440 Nassau, Bahamas
BEST QUALITY, BEST PRICE, GUARANTEED til


- - - - - - - -



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000.
(No. 45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),,
HRT HOLDINGS INC., is in dissolution. CONTINENTAL
LIQUIDATORS INC. is the Liquidator and can be contacted
at 60 Market Square, P.O. Box 1906, Belize City'"Belize. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are
required to send their namunes, addresses and particulars of their
debts or claims to the Liquidator before the 29th day of Decem-
ber, 2008.

S ,,,

For: Conintmatl iquidalors, ble,.
I i tudt))r


NOTICE

MOBIL ASSET INVESTMENTS LIMITED.

N 0 T I C E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MOBIL ASSET INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in
dissolution under the provisions of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 2nd
day of December, 2008 when its Articles of Dissolution were,
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. L. Floyd of 16945
Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Dated the 2nd day of December, 2008

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY
MANAGEMENT CO. LTD
Attorneys for the above-named Company


Legal Notice

NOTICE

EXXON EXPLORATION AND
1- DUCTION CA-S 'SEI/itMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the 'above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the'
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on
or before 17th day of December, A.D., 2008. In default
thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 2nd day of December A.D., 2008.

K. L. Floyd
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.







INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
MAYREAD ENTERPRISES LIMITED, is in dissolution.
CONTINENTAL LIQUIDATORS INC. is the Liquidator and
can be contacted at 60 Market Square, P.O. Box 1906, Belize
City, Belize. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their names, addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before


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