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The


LATEST NEWS


Tribune


ON WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


volume: 1p/ No.159 MC



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PRICE 750 (Abaco and Grand Baharn.6 $ I1.


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bloodsh


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Murders over weekend

bring years total to
By MEGAN REYNOLDS armed robbers at his home in
Tribune Staff Reporter the Carmichael area, and a
mreynolds,'lribunomedia net fourth %\as stabbed in the


BANK holiday bloodshed
brought the annual murder
toll to 57 following the vio-
lent murders of four men in
Nassau this holiday weekend.
Police have not yet 6ffi-
cially identified an3 of the vic-
tims or divulged possible
motives for the'killings, t o ot
which occurred %within min-
utes of each other on Satur-_
day. .
Both men were shot in the.
head in two separate inci-
dents .
A third man was shot sev-
eral times when he confronted


chest with a knife.
Police are asking the public
to come forward with any
information which may assist
their investigations.
A man was shot in the
head in a scrap metal yard.
off a dirt track in Cowpen
Road, during an argument.
with group of men on the
site at around S.15pm on Sat-,
urday.
Emergency 'Medical Ser-
vices (EMS) responded aind
pronounced him dead at the
-scene. His name and age have
SEE page nine


MP TELLS BTC STAFF: TURN DOWN
VOLUNTARY SEPARATION PACKAGES
By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribuhemedia.net
1'MICAL MP V Alfred Gray has urged BTC employees not to
accept the voluntary separation packages to be offered by Cable &.
Wireless executives.
H6 told employees to wait until after the next election, and
added that if the Progressive Liberal Party is elected as the next
government it will wrest the majority control of the company
",away from C&W.
'-"Let me ask BTC staff not to take the package; if I were to advise
them I wil'tell them don't take it (because) under the agreement
SEE page 10


FRESH BREAP BAKED PAILY
TO ENSURE QUALI/ Y TASTE
AND FRESHNESS.
Ter a our ew cme, -,,
and n .. a mmn h -m.


A CLLttBUnAIIUN: union members marcnea in tneir tnc
day as the Bahamas celebrated Labour Day 2011.


MP TELLS LOCAL GOVT: BE PRUDENT WITH TAXPAYERS' MONEY


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemeolia.net
PINEWOODD ,MP Byron
Woodside said the days of
using'public funds for nepo-
tism and political partisanship
are over as he warned local
government officials to exer-
cise prudent, discretionary
spending of taxpayers' money:
Mr Woodside's comments


came the same day the nomi-
nation process for local gov-
ernment elections begai, with
polling slated for June 23.
"One of the most important
functions of district councils is
the discretionary allocation of
funds sent to the Family
Islands. The use of external
controls, transparency and fair
play must be the modus
operandi throughout the local
government administration.,


'The years of financial abus-
es are over. No longer can
councils be allowed to play
games of political partisanship,
nepotism and conflicts of inter-
est at the expense of taxpay-
ers," said Mr Woodside, the
minister of land and local gov-
ernment, as he led yesterday's
budget debate.
He added that "the greatest
SEE page nine


de


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OFFICERS i' the Royal
Bahamas Police Force are
demanding a forensic audit
of all of the Force's financial
accounts, as they believe they
may have been mishandled
or abused in recent years.
Laying the blame at the
feet of a number of senior
police officers, scores of offi-
cers within the Force have
recounted stories of funds -
"going missing" and purchase
orders being doctored.
In one instance, building
supplies destined'f6r the Paul
Farquharson Centre at Police
Headquarters in East Street
were found in the home of a
senior officer, claimed sources
within the Force.
And accounts, such as the
Senior Officers Mess Fund,
were treated as a "personal
ATM" for a select few over
the years, the officers alleged.
SEE page nine

CARL BETHEL CLAIMS
PLP 'BLATANTLY'
BOUGHT VOTES, JOBS
By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net
THE Progressive Liberal Party
(PLP) was "blatant' in what it did to
buy votes with jobs before the last
general election, according to Carl
Bethel, Member of Parliament for
Sea Breeze.
Mr Bethel said he saw the con-
tracts left behind by the former
administration showing that more
than 50 employees were hired days
before the April general election of
2007.
The "vast majority" of the new
hires were constituents of Fort Char-
lotte, said Mr Bethel in the House of
Assembly on Thursday. The jobs
were for security and janitorial posi-
tions as well as secretarial and clerk
posts.
Mr Bethel was responding to crit-
icism from the PLP that the recently
revealed FNM budget was a vote-
buying scheme. When he was chal-
SEE page 10


REPORTS reached The Tribune
late last night that a three-year-old,
child had drowned at the Blue Hill
Road South canal. There were no
further details at presstime. See
tomorrow's Tribune for more.


lss










PAGE 2, MONDAY, JONE 6, 2011


,THE TRIBUNE


I A


* LABOUR DAY IN GRAND BAHAMA


Junkanoo Parade 'massively successful'


By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net
THE "massively successful"
',our Day Junkanoo Parade
S. report Grand Bahama,
prove domestic tourism is
"viab ", according to
Jiunkat a enthusiasts.
Thou hands of spectators and
participa its celebrated Labour
d4 in FT .epurt this weekend.
fothie 20' Peace Rush. It was
a four-y contest between
Nasau n Freeport's two top
rops fri m the 2010. Christ-
mns and N Year's parades.
The Saxbns Superstars came
out on top, winning every cate-
gory, including best music, ban-
ner and off the shoulder cos-
tumes.
"It was a massive turnout. It
was the best I have ever seen
Junkanoo in Grand Bahama.
Participation was heavy for
spectators and participants. The
public was well pleased with it,"
said Phil Cooper, chairman of
the National Junkanoo Com-
mittee.
"This will probably be an
annual event. It looks that way


at least from the success of it. I
don't see how the government
can go any other root. It did a
lot for Freeport as far as I could
see. Every hotel was booked
out; there was no room any-
where," said Mr Cooper.
Despite the high praise for
the event, some observers said
the weekend demonstrated the
country is "not ready for
domestic tourism". One source
noted the "chaos" at the
nation's main airports.

Delays
There were'extensive flight
delay on Bahamas Air. There
were claims that check-in coun-
ters were understaffed, causing
major delays. The domestic
waiting lounge was packed and
many of the stores inside ran
short onsupplies.
"I just think the mindset of'
the people needs to change
somewhat. We are so used to
treating the foreigner with the
utmost respect, but it seems like
our own do not receive the
same treatment. We don't look
at each other as potential guests


and visitors. We just don't see
each other in that same light. I
think we have a lot of work to
do in that avenue in terms of
making our people look at
domestic tourism in a different
light," said Patrick Adderley,
deputy chairman of the Valley
Boys.
Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Charles Maynard
said he was unable to quantify
the scale of the benefit from
the Junkanoo event, but he said
Grand Bahama would. "expe-
rience an economic injection
out of this world".
Between airfare, hotels,
restaurants, and entertainment
expenditures, he projected hun-
dreds ofthousands of dollars
would be spent over the course
of the weekend. "Nobody
spends more and has a better
time than.Junkanoo people,"
said Mr Maynard.
The Ministry of Culture
made a $20,000 contribution to
the event. Each Junkanoo
group paid for at least 150
members; however, there were
hundreds of additional mem-
bers who paid their own way. -
Overall, Grand Bahama is


set to experience a major eco-
nomic boost from domestic
tourism this month, said Mr
Maynard. The Junkanoo march
kicked off the activity, but left
to follow is the Junior Baseball
Championship and the Nation-
al Track and Field Champi-
onship. He noted that across
the world, sports and culture
'events are "recession proof".
"The truth is these kinds of
events can and do very well and
can attract huge crowds,
because you know if you have a
penny to pinch you are going
to try to.do something that is
going to fulfill you the most.
And for many people who fol-
low these kinds of events, they
figure this is worth my dollar
to participate in. So that is what
you are seeing even here (with
the Junkanoo event)," said Mr
Maynard. The Labour Day
junkanoo rush would usually
take' place in Nassau, after the
annual Labour Day march. This
was Grand Bahama's first time
hosting the rush. The last time
they hosted a major joint rush
was about four years ago, when
Feel the Rush parade made its
last lap.
Fast "Eddie" Dames of the
Saxons said there was ''adren-
aline in the air" throughout
Grand Bahama, knowing that
.the Valley Boys and the Sax-
ons were coming. He said the
event provided an opportunity
for Junkanoo enthusiasts to
travel from all over the country
to participate.


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* LABOUR DAY IN NEW PROVIDENCE


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 3


Body believed to be jet ski disappearance man


A BODY found in shallow waters off
Grand Bahama is believed to be that
of a young man who disappeared on a
jet ski on Friday.
The 17-year-old Freeport resident
was last seen by a watersports operator
who said he left the Lucaya area for the
Williams Town area at around 6pm on
Friday.
BASRA, the Royal Bahamas
Defense Force, the Royal Bahamas
Police and other concerned residents
searched the area and recovered the jet
ski in Silver Point, but it was not until


7am on Saturday that the body of a man
was found floating in shallow waters
near the beach in Williams Town.
A doctor at Rand Memorial Hospital
confirmed the death and the official
identification of the victim is expected to
be made following an autopsy today.
Meanwhile, investigators in Nassau
are still searching for a man who disap-
peared following a boating accident
near Prince George Wharf on Friday
night.
Police said the man was on a 17ft
outboard vessel with a 19-year-old


woman when he lost control and
crashed into a pier.
The boat sank on impact, and
although the woman swam to safety,
the man who had been driving the boat
disappeared.
He is in his mid-20s and understood
to be an officer in the Royal Bahamas
Police Force.
Police and Defence Force officers
searched the area over the weekend,
and had not found him before The Tri-
bune went to press.
Investigations continue.


I MNHTBIHIBESRl


$90,000 WORTH OF MARIJUANA SEIZED


POLICE seized nearly
$90,000 worth,-of marijuana
when they searched a home in
Carmichael, and arrested the
husband and wife who live
there.
The Drug Enforcement Unit
.had a warrant to search the
property in Hamster Road and
found 881bs of suspected mar-
ijuana in a "structure" on the
premises.
Meanwhile, police from the
Central Division found mari-


juana and cocaine when they
searched a home in York
Street, off Shirley Street.
A 53-year-old woman was
arrested and taken into cus-
tody for questioning.
A suspected drug dealer was
arrested in Pinewood Gardens
on Wednesday.
Officers from the mobile
division arrested the 34-
year-old man in Braziletta
Street.
Investigations continue.'


ARMED ROBBERY ATTEMPT IS THWARTED
POLICE thwarted an armed robbery attempt at the Nassau
Paper Company, off Jerome Avenue, on Thursday afternoon.
After receiving information on the armed robbery, police came
across the 23-year-old suspects "in the process of robbing the
store".
On man, who was wearing a bullet-proof vest, fired shots at the
police. They returned fire, shooting the suspect in the hand and
thigh. He was taken to hospital via EMS personnel where he was
treated and discharged into police custody.
Police recovered a handgun and cash. Investigations continue.


HOME INVASION AND ARMED ROBBERY
FREEPORT: Grand sustained minor injuries.
Bahama police'are investigat- The accident occurred
ing a hqmime invasion and armed around 8.12am when a police
robberywhich occurred at a res- car with sirens and flashing
idence in the Hearn Lanearea. lights were traveling south on
The incident occurred around EastMal Drive.
5.30am.,on Thursday when three A 25-year-old female driver
masked' and armed men held of a Suzuki Baleno was driving
up a woman and her daughter west on Explorer's Way when
after kicking down. the back the collision occurred.
door to their home. Both vehicles were exten-
The robbers demanded cash, sively damaged, and the victims
tied uip their victims and were taken to Rand Memorial
searched the residence. Hospital.
Cash, jewellerv. clothing, Theymwere treated by doctors
ke s. and a grey 1999 Toyota and later discharged. Investiga-
Farinavan, licence number tions are continuing.
30371, were stolen. ,
sim3l 1 sion

in the'r'in s so
call 352-977-4/5. 5 -3107/8 or
911. 1
POLICE CAR ACCIDENT
TWO police officers and a
motorist were invoked in a traf-
fic accident on Thursda) and ..... ..


POLICE shot a 20-year-old
suspect in the thigh on Satur-
day morning after he attempt-
ed to disarm an officer during
a vehicle search.
Officers of the Central Divi-
sional Detective Unit (CDU)
were on routine patrol at the
corner of Mount Royal
Avenue and Wulff Road
when they observed a white
Ford Taurus, with one head-
lamp, occupied by two men
acting suspiciously.
After stopping the car,
police report states: "The dri-
ver attempted the disarm one
of the officers and was subse-
quently shot by police to the
thigh."


The suspect was taken to
hospital via EMS personnel
where he remains in police
custody, in stable condition.
The second occupant, a 17-
year-old boy, was also taken
into custody.
The search recovered a
shotgun, an additional set of
licence plates, and a pair of
gloves.


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DATE SET FOR

MURDER RETRIAL
THE retrial of an American
girl and a Bahamian man
charged in the murder of Anna
Garrison is set for May 21, 2012.
Their initial trial came to an
abrupt end in March with
Senior:Justice Jori Isaacs dis-
charging the jury and ordering
a retrial following a closed court
hearing. Up until that point,
only two witnesses had taken
the stand.
Zyndall McKinney, 23, of
Isabella Boulevard, and the
teenage girl are accused of the
murder of Mrs Garrison.
It is alleged that between
Sunday, February 25, and Sat-
urday, July 4, 2009, McKinney
and the girl, being concerned
together, caused the death of
the victim.
Mrs Garrison's badly decom-
posed body was discovered in a
bushy area off Fox Hill Road
South near the Blue Water Cay
development on Saturday, July
4, 2009 at around 6.20pm. Pros-
ecutors claim that she had been
stabbed multiple times.
Attorney Murrio Ducille is
representing McKinney. Attor-
ney Elliot Lockhart represents
the American girl. Their retrial
is expected to be heard before
Justice Roy Jones.


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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


THE TRIBUNE


-I IS IE T


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm


Don't make the criminal your bedfellow


I LAST WEEK Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham gave politicians on all sides of the
political divide sound advice:' Distance your-
selves from known criminals in the run up to
the 2012 general election, he said.
Every five years, the sewers of humanity
disgorge disrepuitables seen only at election
time. Suddenly from being Nobodies, they
assume airs of Somebodies. Strangely, like
bees to honey, they are always seen crawling
S, around election headquarters and rubbing
elbows cosily with politicians. They seem to
have an inbuilt radar as to which party has
the most funds to disperse.- and there they
are ready for any task, be it underhand or
legitimate as long as the upended palms
are suitably greased.,
Mr Ingraham has said that although he
knows that both political parties want to win
the next election, keeping company with law-
breakers to gain votes is a practice that should
be stopped.
Opposition Leader Perry Christie had his
own embarrassing moments during his election
campaign' when a known drug dealer at
Eleuthera boasted that it was he who-had paid
for all the PLP election paraphernalia for the
rally.that particular night, and organised the
motorcade leading up to the rally. In the back-
ground we heard mutterings from supporters
that this man of dubious repute was the only
man who had Mr Christie's ear and knew of
his plans while at the island. Apparently, if
reports were to be believed, even the noses of
Mr Christie's generals were out of joint.
S Also over time ever since the drug years
of the seventies/eighties drug dealers have
aligned themselves with the PLP and come)
away with the erroneous belief at least it
was erroneous by the time Mr Christie head-
ed the party-- that the PLP was their party
under whose umbrella they could expect pro-
tection. Tribune reporters often heard dur-
ing the 2002 election campaign, especially at
Eleuthera, that the drug dealers had their fast
boats ready to get back into the trade as soon
as the PLP won the election. Mr Christie lat-
er made it clear that it certainly was not going
to happen under his watch.
The FNM also had a nasty scrape during
the seventies in the Barry Major murder case
known as the Perpall Tract murder -
November 17,1970. The'late Sir Lynden Pin-
dling read a statement to the House, mysteri-
' [ ously given 11 years after the murder'by some-
one close to the event who suddenly had total
recall of what he remembered being told at the
time of the murder. He alleged that Major
had tried to "blackmail. the chief" the late
Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield and Mr Whit-
field had given "the boys" the go ahead to
"fix him up." Major was shot, and'the election
mayhem that was started by the PLP with
their "goon squads" at election time in the
late sixties, continuing into the seventies was
all blamed on the FNM. According to the
informant, after the murder, Wendell "Red"
Burrows, who two years later was hanged for


the crime, was given $15,000 to $20,000 to dis-
appear in the US until things quieted down on
the home front. In the meantime "the organ-
isation continued and we kept up with our
criminal acts of burning and the like," said
the questionable informant, who at the time
claimed he was FNM.
One day about that time, one of "the boys"
came to The Tribune trying to get us to pub-
lish what Sir Lynden eventually had to do
himself from the floor of the House. They
admitted that Sir Lynden had sent the infor-
mation. Sir Lynden obviously wanted clean
hands. He wanted The Tribune, as part of its
investigative reporting, to publish what even-
tually he had to read himself in the House. We
refused and quickly showed the criminals the
door. We felt that if Sir Lynden wanted a
smear campaign it was his to handle.
The Tribune never believed a word of what
was said in that statement as we saw the plot
building behind the scenes from the day of
the murder. This was a case of politicians get-
ting too close to criminals and being destroyed
by that contact.
Supt. John Crawley, a respected police offi-
cer, had investigated the murder of Barry
Major. The day after the murder he told us
that it was a simple case of a drug deal gone
wrong. To the end he maintained that it was
not:political and that no politicians, were
involved. However, during the election of that
year Major hung around Sir Cecil's election
headquarters. His death was turned into. a
political fiasco, and. Sir Cecil was smeared by
association. It was a convenient turn of events
at the time because the heat was on the PLP
for all the criminal mayhem created by their
"goons" a few years earlier. The murder of
Barry Major was a convenient way'of turning,
the tables on the FNM. ,
One only has to look at the precarious
position the Jamaican government is now in
with the politicians and the gangsters being
perceived as a team for so long that eventual-
ly the day came when "the President"-
Christopher "Dudus" Coke, now in a US fed-
eral prison'on drug charges almost became
more powerful than the Jamaican government.
and its prime minister. When all the evidence
is out in this case the reputation of Bruce
Golding's, government will probably be in tat-
ters. Former Jamaican prime minister Edward
Seaga, when asked after his government was
defeated at the polls; what he most regretted
during his administration admitted that lead-
ing the funeral procession of strong man: Jim
Brown was his biggest mistake. Jim Brown,
father of "Dudus," headed the Shower Posse
gangsters and was don of Tivoli Gardens..
Dudus inherited his father's fiefdom and
developed the criminal .enterprise to such
heights that in the end the US was demanding
his extradition as the "world's most dangerous
drug dealer."
It is now time for Bahamian politicians to
take note. Remember one is .judged by the
"friends" one keeps.


The struggle to earn



a sustainable living



from tilling the soil


EDITOR, The Tribune.


ON behalf of the members
of BAPA, and indeed all citi-
zens of our country who seek
to earn a sustainable liveli-
hood'is primary producers
and all those who also seek
to do so as processors of those
products, I would be grateful
if you would again afford me
space in your valuable
columns to comment' on a
question that was posed in an'
honourable place within our
country this afternoon.
The question posed was:
How could farmers be put out
of business IF, WHEN they
are able to FULLY supply
the market, the Minister of
Agriculture would impose a
prohibitive duty of 300 per
cent?
The posing of that ques-
tion begs first the answer to
several questions:
0. Having regard to the fact
that the reduction in tariff
rates is presumptioned upon
our producers not presently
being able to fully supply the
market, what specific policies,
plans and programmes have,
'been implemented by the
Minister of Agriculture in
order to empower our prima-
ry producers in being able to
fully supply the market and
.what is the time frame, in
which we should expect to see
the fruits of the aforemen-
tioned?
1. Having regard to our
imminent entry into WTO, as
well as further regard to the
fact that seasonal tariff
increases are prohibited with-
in that organization and also.
regarding the fact that, while.
it is exceedingly easy to lower
rates in WTO, the raising of
those same rates is almost, if
not totally, prohibited, how
would the lowering of tariff
rates to zero on fruits and
preservatives and jams made.
Stherefrdm ifi this budget, cou-'
pled with the progressive low-I
ering of tariff rates on veg-
etables from 35 per cent to 15
per cent and then to,10 per
cent in previous budgets,
impact upon whatever poli-
cies, plans and programmes
that may be. in place to
empower primary producers
and processors to be compet-
itive within the parameters
dictated by The WTO?
2. What is the current stage
of WTO Accession negotia-
tions and under what terms
and conditions will we enter,
with particular regard to our
productive sector and the
effects of this budget?
3. Having regard to the fact
that the health benefits of eat-
ing fruits and vegetables are
greater from eating mature,


fresh local fruit than from eat-
ing immature, aged, preserved
imported fruit, how does the
government intend to supple-
ment the diet of our people,
especially the most vulnera-
ble, to compensate for their
consumption of "cheaper"
imported fruits and vegeta-
bles?
4. Having regard to the fact
that the cooperative society
movement, composed of cred-
it unions and cooperative
societies have been proven to
be the most effective means
of empowering small and
medilhm sized enterprises
(SMEs) in capitalist and in
socialist countries as well as
in developed, developing and
lesser developed economies,
and also considering the fact
that the credit unions in our
country have done exceed-'
ingly well, why is BAIC
spending public money in
forming a plethora of farm-
ers associations, which are
each individual unconnected
limited companies falling out-
side of the umbrella of The
Bahamas Cooperative League'
Ltd, as opposed to engender-
ing the formation of inputs
supply and marketing coop-
eratives by our primary pro-
ducers and processors?
5. Having regard to the fact
that BAIC has invested public
funds in promoting and sub-.
sidizing the formation of our
primary producers and
processors into limited com-
panies or associations, what
plans does BAIC have for
empowering them in being
able to readily access collat-
eral free microcre'dt afid in
embarking upon the'process
of disintermediatidn as a
means of decreasing their
costs of production with resul-
tant savings to the consumer?
-Our farmers have yet.to.
recover from the devastating,
and debilitating blow that was
done to their ability to earn a
sustainable livelihood by till-
ing our soil by the institutors
of these tariff reductions
shortly after 1992. At that
time a CEILING of $9000.00
was summarily instituted as
the maximum in gross annual
sales that a farmer could
transact with'the produce
exchange and packing house
system.in any on year.
This crippling blow was
precipitated by the flooding
of the system with produce
from North Andros which
was the direct result of a


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Parents should share

blame for crimes of

these young people
EDITOR, The Tribune.
The daring daylight arm
robbery of John Bull on May,
22 is yet another indicator of
S how lawless our young men
and women are. I listened
with keen interest to the
'PLP's press release the day
after the robbery. The PLP
seems to be blaming the FNM
government for the crime sit-
uation in this country.
However, I don't think that
it is fair for the Opposition to
use this horror story to score
one or two political brownie
points. Both the PLP and the
FNM have failed to adequate-
ly address the issue of crime.
But with that being said, I
believe that the fingers should
really be pointing at the par-
ents of these young people.
/ They have failed to instil bib-
lical principles in their chil-
dren. Now, we are all reaping
the dire consequences of their
secular, humanistic upbring-
ing. These young people are
biblically illiterate. They were
never a part of a Sunday
school class or Church youth
group.
These young people's role
models are Jay-Z and 50
Cent. Hip hop America has
greatly influenced our
Bahamian youths. We need to
teach them the Bible instead.
KEVIN EVANS
Freeport
May 28, 2011.


HOY A 'W GAE ILE


$10,000,000 gift from the
United States Agency for
International Development
(USAID) to our government
to increase the productive
capacity of that island; not
one penny, however, was
spent on our marketing infra-
structure and systems even
though they were already
inadequate prior to the incep-
tion of the project in the mid
1970's.
Further I am to unequivo-
cally assert that the problem
.that we face in our country is
not whether our agricultural
sector has the capacity and
the growth potential to com-
petitively produce for our
local,' tourist and export mar-
kets, but whether the policies,
support mechanisms, institu-
tions and infrastructure are in
place to effectively and effi-
ciently guide and facilitate our
producers and processors in
the formation of cluster and
in developing and fine tuning
appropriate production sys-
tems and value chains.
In the book "San Min Chu
I", also known as "The Three
Principles of The People", the
philosophical father of The
Republic of China on Taiwan,
Dr Sun Yat-sen, said that just
as forts are built at the
entrances, to harbours to pro-
tect against foreign military
invasion, so a -tariff against
foreign goods gives native
. industries a chance to devel-
op.
We, the primary produc-
ers and processors of this
nation, are being told that
once we are fully fledged and
able to fully supply the mar-
ket, we will then be afforded
tariff protection. As The
Chairman of The Board of
Governors of The IMF and
The World ,Bank Group
Should knoiv, this'r'uns con-
trary to the tenets of the
WTO and is what is known
as protectionism in that
forum.
As a.trained son of our soil
who has pondered the ques-
tion of empowering our farm-
ers in order that they might
earn a sustainable livelihood
from tilling our soil, my
answer to that question posed
within an honourable place in
our country today is that, giv-
en the economic obstacles
placed in their way, coupled
with a lack of meaningful sup-
port, how could many farmers
not yet again go ,out of busi-
ness?

DR KEITH B CAMPBELL
President,
Bahamas Agriculure
Producers Association,
Nassau,
June 2, 2011.







THE TRIBUNE MONDAY JUNE 6, 2011, ~E 5


*OCAL A


MP: new budget did not address

health care system 'deficiencies'


By CELESTE NIXON
Tribune Staff Reporter
cnixon@tribunemedia.net
A PLP MP criticised the
government and its new bud-
get for not addressing the.
"serious deficiencies" in the
health care system.
During the budget debate
in Parliament, PLP MP for
Englerston Glenys Hanna-
Martin said the initiatives
outlined do not substantially
address the challenges or
dramatically improve the
quality of health care for
Bahamians.
Quoting statistics from the
World Heath Organisation,
Mrs Martin said while the
Bahamas is ranked as hav-
ing the third highest standard
of living in the western hemi-
sphere, the state of health
system in the country lacks


Ii


UHIIIUCISM:
Glenys Hanna-Martin


quality and accountability,
ranked behind Dominica,
Barbados, Jamaica, Grena-
da and several other
Caribbean countries.
She said: "The Bahamas


pays a high cost for health
care but with a lower quality
of care delivered of that in
many other countries. A Pan
American Health Organisa-
tion report stated we rank
22nd in expenditure per capi-
ta but 94th in quality of
health care."
Many patients experience
'"disgraceful" and "inhu-
mane" conditions because
they are unable to access
good care or facilities due to
their financial status that
often determines whether
your life is saved or not, said
Mrs Martin.
She added: "To put it
another way, the rich live and
the poor will die."
While private hospital
facilities will receive tax
exemptions, Mrs Martin said
the question is how will it
help and advance the state
of health for the poor peo-
ple who cannot afford the
cost of private care or health
insurance.
Mrs Martin further stated
the health policy should not
onlyconcentrate on the
treatment but should also
include prevention strategies
and the promotion of healthy
living.
Mrs Martin said: "I remain
disappointed that our health
policy remains focused
almost exclusively on the
treatment of sickness as
opposed to the promotion of
wellness which I am told is
the compelling mandate for
countries globally but again
we fail to bring this to focus
in our health policy."
An integrated approach
and change is public policy
is required to tackle the chal-
lenge and growing health cri-
sis, she claimed.


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PETER 1:13-21
Therefore gird up the loins of your mind, be
sober, and rest your hope fully upon the grace
that is to be brought to you.at the revelation of
Jesus Christ;as obedient children, not conform-
ing yourselves to the former lusts, as in your
ignorance;but as He who called you is holy,
you also be holy in all your conduct,because
it i.s written, "Be holy, for I am holy."[c]And if
you call on the Father, who without partiality
judges according to each one's work, con-
duct yourselves throughout the time of your
stay here in fear; knowing that you were not
redeemed with corruptible things, like silver
or gold, from your aimless conduct received
by tradition from your fathers, but with the
precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb with-
out blemish and without spot. He indeed was
foreordained before the foundation of the
world, but was manifest in these last times
for you who thFough Him believe in God, who
raised Him from the dead and gave Him glory,
so that your faith and hope are in God.


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i. 4 4


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I -


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, ..,E 5


THE TRIBUNE


I







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6 MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


LOCAL6NEWS


By DENISE MAYCOCK
iTribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT: Four American fishermen arrested in
waters off West End were granted $10,000 bail and
released following a court arraignment on Grand Bahama.
William Fischer, 53, Robert Kene, 53, Shawn Miskura,
43. and Daniel Dreyfuse, 24, appeared at Freeport Mag-
istrate Court before Magistrate Debbye Ferguson in
Court One on Tuesday.
They were charged with possession of longline appa-
ratus on a fishing vessel, possession of longline used for
fishing in the exclusive economic zone, possession of
apparatus used in longline fishing and illegal foreign fish-
ing.
Carlson Shurland represented the men.
They were not required to enter a plea to the
charges.
Last week, fisheries officials seized thousands'of pounds
of fish, including tuna, wahoo, kingfish, and swordfish
from a longline vessel off West End.
Magistrate Ferguson adjourned the matter to Novem-
ber 2.
When the bail sum was paid, the men were turned
over to Immigration officials and deported.


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Christie: PLP committed to best


interests of Bahamian workers


PLP Leader Perry Christie pledged
at his party's rally last week that the
PLP is committed to working for the
best interests of Bahamian workers.
"We demonstrated our commitment
recently in dealing with the approvals
given to Baha Mar for their multi-bil-
lion dollar development. This devel-
opment involved the government of
the Bahamas having to approve up to
8,000 work permits for Chinese work-
ers and bringing the issue to the House
"of Assembly for its approval.
"The PLP made a decision to engage
in a comprehensive examination of the
proposed development so as to ensure
that its decision served the best interest
of our country. We examined all of the
documentation. We met with the Con-
tractors Association and had detailed
discussions'.
"We decided that we would support
the development provided there was a
full commitment to the training and
meaningful involvement of Bahami-
ans. In arriving at this position we were
following and strengthening the com-
mitment made in the 2005 Agreement
between the PLP Government and
Baha Mar," he said.
Mr Christie added that he and his
*party. met with three Ministers of the
government, the Executive Members
of the NCTU and the TUC, and
advised them of their position on Baha
Mar with a view to have a shared posi-
tion on maximizing the return to
Bahamians from this historic develop-
ment.
"We met with the developers and
established a continuous dialogue with
them towards ensuring as best we could
that our position on Bahamian partic-
ipation in the development was under-
stood and its significance appreciated.
"When the Prime Minister presented


'COMMITTED': PLP leader Perry Christie
the final agreements in the House 'of
Assembly we were satisfied that our
considerable efforts had significantly
contributed to Baha Mar committing
itself to a major training programme
for Bahamians and a further commit-
ment to ensuring the substantial
involvement of Bahamians in the'
development.
"Our collective obligation must now
be for the Trade Union organizations
and other stakeholders to ensure that
Bahamians benefit as agreed. The
appeal that I would like to sound
tonight is an appeal for the labouring
masses and their Leaders to embrace'
with freshened vigor the great spirit
that united the labouring masses in the
glory days of the. fifties and early six-
ties," he said.


Mr Christie added that often times it
is easy for Bahamians to forget the
monumental struggle of the Trade
Union movement in the 1950s which
was a "dominant agent for social
change" in the Bahamas.
"There was a time when it was Ran-
dol Fawkes and Clifford Darling who
were the dominant figures in the strug-
gle before Lynden Pindling came to
centre stage and became the Chief
Apostle for change. It was Randol
Fawkes and Clifford Darling and it was
the Trade Onion movement that held
centre stage.
"Indeed the single most important
and most historically impactful episode
of the 1950s was the great General
Strike of 1958. It was that event, that
episode that primed the pump for the
great struggle of majority rule that
would come to fruition on January 10,
1967.
"Sadly, however, much of the
momentum that the Trade Union
movement had in the 1950s and 60s
did not survive in the 1970s and
beyond. Trade Union Leaders came
and went and in all too many cases
Trade Union Leaders were co-opted
by the larger body politic and pursued
political careers. And so the Trade
Union Movement was not able to
maintain the vigorous fighting spirit
and influence that it enjoyed in an ear-
lier time.
"It gladdens me however, to know
that the movement continues to grow
and to meet the challenges of 21st cen-
tury Bahamas. We have continued to
produce dedicated and outstanding
Trade Union leaders who in many cas-
es demonstrate the same kind of sacri-
fice' and courage that characterized the
leaders of the movement a half centu-
ry ago," MT Christie said.


QUESTIONS RAISED OVER CANDIDATE FOR LOCAL GOVERNMENT


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
A CANDIDATE for local
government whose right to
run as a representative for
Current Island has been ques-
tioned by locals has put him-
self forward for the June 23
election.


-'"' MEN'S HEALTH

LECTURE DATE
T rsday.jU.Inc 16th, 2011 ,' 6PIlM

DOCTORS HOSPITAL
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Residents said George Tay-
lor, 48, a Nassau businessman
with North Eleutheran her-
itage, did not meet all the
requirements for candidates
as they said he does not live
on the island and those who
are nominating him are not
full-time residents either.
His nomination presents
,the first contest for a local


government representative in
Current -Island, as recently
married resident Anne
Brown-Thompson is also run-
ning for the seat. C
Law requires candidates to
have lived in the constituency,
for at least three months prior
to nomination.
At least five people in the
constituency who support his.


nomination must also have
lived in the constituency for
the same period of time.
And while residents have
said they are concerned he
does not live on the island full
time, Mr Taylor maintains he
has lived there since 2008
when he started building a
''home that was destroyed in a
fire last June.
He believes the fire may
have been an arson attack as
it occurred two days after he
applied for a license to run-a
water taxi to and from the
mainland.
As he has been working to
rebuild his house on the island
where his mother grew up, Mr
Taylor has continued to trav-
el to Nassau every month to
run Taylor's Electrical and
Mechanical Company Limit-
ed in East Street South.
Over the last three years
his participation in the Cur-
rent Island community
includes agitating for town
meetings and more trans-
parency in awarding local
contracts, he said.
"I was encouraged to run
for office by the residents
based on my involvement in
the community and the assis-
tance I have rendered since
moving there," added Mr
Taylor.
"I was nominated by resi-
dents currently living on the
island, some who have lived
there for more than 20 years.
"As someone who is inter-
ested in the well'being of Cur-
rent Island, Eleuthera, I know
the people would want to
have an option to the current
state of affairs.
"I have offered myself as a
candidate for local govern-
ment and hope to win and
provide competent, clear and
consistent representation for
Current Island."
As well as retiring in the
community of just 50 resi-
dents, sustained by tradition-
al industries of fishing and
straw work, Mr Taylor plans
to help three of his four adult
children develop vacation cot-
tages on an estimated three
acres of property in an eco-
tourism venture.
He believes the undevel-
oped land on Current Island
is Commonage Land, rather
than Generational Property
as other islanders have said,
and that his family is one of
the few entitled to land on
the island as they can trace
their heritage to the original
slaves.
By laying claim to the land
Mr Taylor plans to use his
business expertise to develop
Current Island.
Local government nomi-
nations were submitted on
Wednesday and elections will
be held June 23.


D O CTO RS


HOSPITAL
DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES


KEMP'S FUNERAL HOMELIMTED
22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Mr S r,.F,


MARIE A.,
DEAR, 99

.. of Eastern Road,
Nassau, The Bahamas,
died peacefully at her
daughters residence,
on Wednesday,lst
June, 2011.

',-^' Beloved mother of
Judy Ansell-Grindrod, grandmother, of Vicki
Liddell and great grandmother of Jamie and
Emma Liddell.

Left to cherish happy memories of an amazing
lady are the family including Ernie Grindrod,
Oliver Liddell, great niece, Katherine Baynham
and family, John Ansell and numerous friends
in Nassau and England.

The family are so appreciative of the wonderful
care given to Marie. and would especially like'
to thank Dr; Ian Kelly, Angena Elvius, Betty
Canter, Willamae Braynen arid Josephine
Ramirez.

A Memorial Service will be held at Sacred
Heart Roman Catholic Church, Shirley Street,
Nassau, on Thursday, 9th June, 2011 at 3:30p.m.

Father Mel Taylor, O.S.B., will officiate.,

Instead of flowers, the family have set up a
Book Fund for the children of Sandiland's
Primary School, Fox Hill, Nassau. Please send
donations to The Royal Society of St. George
(Book Fund), P.O. Box S.S. 6882, Nassau, in
memory of Marie A. Dear.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited.


I %% L .. I --,








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 7


LOCALNEWS


Bay Street water


system

By GENA GIBBS
Bahamas Information
Services
THE p.iving on N.a\ Lion
Road and MailLICorough Streels
and the upgrades t tihe afterr
system %%ill l,,\ [the foundation
for the Dovnton Redeelop-
ment Piolect and the facelift to
Bay Street.
"The scope of the project
covers n .aiea from Nassau
Court and Marlborough Street.
down Ba\ Street. as far as the
Paradise Island Bridge. includ-
ing the side streets and Woodes
Rogers \Walk." said Leslie
Hutchinson. senior manager for
the Water ind Sewerage Cor-
poration i \SC i Project Man-
agement Lnit.
"The scope "ill encompass
changing all of the water and
sewer laterals in the mentioned
areas."
For the past four weeks, the
WSC has been conducting
inspections of cast iron pipes
that have been underground,
supplying New Providence for


n upgrades

some S3 'ears. They are being
replaced with a high-resistjnt UTILITIES CREWS from WSC
polyurethane pipe, which will inspect and change the main
withstand the wear and tear of water and sewerage mains on
future population expansions. Navy Lion Road and Bay Stree
"We are also undertaking a They are also inspecting the la
\ery detailed inspection of the als, which connect each build
sewer system %with the camera on Bay Street to the main was
An\ defects that ve find. \%e water system.
are going to be changing them." Gena Gibbs
said Mr Hutchinson.
"All of the work is being not to excavate the sidewalks
done in conjunction \ th the unless absolutely necessary.
Downtown Nassau Partnership. That is one of the reasons lwhy
And %hat the Government otf e are doing the camera sur-
the Bahamas has asked us to e We are g to a-
do is to make sure we cover all vaie the sidewalk unless we see
areas and all aspects of the some sign of fadure of the mfra-
water and sewer works, so that structure through the side-
there is no need to come back walk," said NI Hutchmson.
in the future to make any "We are not going to leave 3
adjustments." single stone unturned. E\er\-
The government has assured thing \will be examined, e\er)-
the public that the plans for the thing will be checked and any-
Downtown Redevelopment thing, if it needs to be changed
Project, already approved by will be changed."
the Town Planning Committee, The work will be done in sec-
will not be altered by the water- tions. The first section will be
works inspections, from Nassau Court to Marl.-
"We've also been asked by borough Street, as far as Par-
the Government to be careful lament Street. It would include


llCmllntUL 3tLreeL. iT wow1i inciti
all the side corners, the main
Bay Street, and Woodes Rogers
Walk.
"The original sewer system
was installed in 1928. There was
some work done to the main
trunk sewer on Bay Street in
1981. and that work did not
include the sewer laterals, so
for the sewer on the main Bay
Street, what we are doing is
changing the sewer laterals,"
said Mr Hutchinson.
"Again too, for the water,
many of the water mains were
changed during previous work,
so the focus now is on changing
those water laterals to polyeth-
ylene pipe, which is a new
material. far more resilient."
BT.C and BEC have done
their work already on the main


I


it.
ater-
ing
*ter

s/BIS


Bay Street and are working
hand in hand with WSC.
They are ensuring that none
of the infrastructure is damaged
along with Ministry of Works
engineers to minimise the need
for excavation after the road-
way is built. Most of the engi-
neering groundwork was done
in the early 1920s with a vision
for the future expansion of New
Providence to accommodate a
flexible capital citN. so it has
made the renovation work for
today's utilities engineers less
stressful.
"Back in the 1920s. when
they did the original design
without the aid of computers,
they tended to over design. So,
there is no need for us to upsize
or change the size of the sewers.
I must say the engineering work
in those days was excellent and
we can use grades they are
using and it really helps in
terms of mnumising the amount
of work that we have to do."
said Mr Hutchinson.


WSC replaces old fire hydrants with brand new red ones, a precaution
notion, retrospective of the recent fires on Bay Street. Four new hydrants
are already in place and can be seen at Queen Street, George Street, Fred-
erick Street, and Parliament Street. Pictured is the hydrant at Queen Street.


THEjmtiAffgement ofFreeport Harbo.r Company, Freeport
Container Port and Grand Bahama Airport Company recently
recognized 56 supervisory employees on completing an eight-
week supervisory learning and development course under the
theme: "Profiling Supervisory Skills to Succeed."
The course included training in management and supervision,
communication, team building, conflict resolution, and human
resources. I
Guest lecturers for the programme were Dr David Allen,
Senator Michael Pintard and Cherrylee Pinder along with in-
house lecturers, Malvese Capron, Dr Shawn Thurston, Lisa Gib-
son, Jason Pinder, Joan Fountain and Bridgette Swann.
Cost centre managers and members of the senior manage-
ment team made special presentations on their respective areas.
The programme culminated with a commencement exercise
and luncheon where team leaders made presentations on behalf
of their respective teams.
Awards of Excellence were presented to Georgiana Albury
of Freeport Harbour Company, Natasha Bain of Freeport Con-
tainer Port and Carmel Russell of Grand Bahama Airport Com-
pany.


U


The following policyowners are asked to contact their respective sales office at
Family Guardian Insurance Company Limited as soon as possible.


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Donahue Knowles 2031635 Latiska Brown
Brandan Carey 2209984 i Adora Smith
Rachel Knowles 1001812 Jasmine Delancy
Devano Kelly 1041949 Chailie Joseph
Damian Thompson 1059521 Patricia Clarke
Dereka Kelly 2001035 1 Robert Knowles
Marioranne Miller 1005602 James Romer


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1208585 Patricia Brennen
2100061 Shirelle Forbes
2101563 Michael Moss


2103911 Gail Clarke
2105905 Soonmae Scottr
2105906 Lance Wallace
2105907 Kevin Wallace
2108661 Samantha Ferguson
2108663 Giovanni Ferguson


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2108665
2109220
2109596
2109775
2109895
2111002
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2113485
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Hattie Dean
Cynteach Thompson
Monique Hanina
Valentino Han
Fernando Brown
1 Auscono Goodman
Romeyo Dames
Kendrick Issacs


Carmichael Sales Office, Blue Hill Road South (on top of the hill)


'It~~


2233109 Yvonne Spence
1209734 Ivan Peterson
2201513 Barbara Penerson
2204781 Jiavanna Petterson
2207116 Abraxtes Williams
2207412 Angela Rahming
2207626 Jiavanna Pelerson
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1146514 Oswald Pran


Phone: (242) 393-0091


1028282 Glen Hall
1007815 Anthony Armaly
10077816 Craig Armaly
1062052 Craig Armily
1062053_ i SherylArmaly
2016199 [Ken i Curry
2014122 Shirmanda Jospeh
2061640 Keashe Harrison

Phone: (242) 325-1811


2113571 Tynockin Thurston
2113129 Kennedy Thurston
21142065 IAntonio Farnngton
2114208 j BichanoFartinglor,
1079539 Ronrici Simms
1159058 Deangelo Neely
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Phone: (242) 341-4429


1146515 I Randy Williams
1146516 Joycelyn Williams
1146526 Patrick ULghtbourne
1146532 Marty Ughtbourne
1185070 Janice Lightfoot
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1189928 Eugene Strachan


FAMILY GUARDIAN N

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A member of the FamGuard Group of Companies


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PAG 8MNAJN ,21 H RBN


FORMER SNR ASST
COMMISSIONER OF
POLICE REFLECTS
ON GB TENURE
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT Former
senior Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Quinn
McCartney's tenure here in
Grand Bahama came to end
on Thursday.
Mr McCartney, who has
been promoted to the rank
of Deputy Commissioner of
Police, will return to New
Providence.
He was transferred to
Freeport over a year ago as
officer in charge of the
Grand Bahama District.
The command of the
Grand Bahama District was
handed over to Acting
Assistant Commissioner of
Police Emrick Seymour at
Police Headquarters in the
Gerald Bartlett Law.
Enforcement Centre on
Thursday.
Mr McCartney said he
enjoyed his time in Grand
Bahama as he reflected on
his tenure here.
"I will confess when I first
came I was reluctant to
come... I think I tried to
serve the residents to the
best of my ability," he said
in a local newspaper.
Among his accomplish-
ment, McCartney imple-
mented the Police Cadet
Corp programme on Grand
Bahama for high school stu-
dents. The programme is to
attract young, bright cadets
who have interest in law
enforcement, with the
opportunity to join the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force in
the future.
He had also announced
plans to have EMS person-
nel stationed at the Police
Control 24-liours to
improve response time to
emergencies throughout the
island.
February, 32 new recruits,
joined the Royal Bahamas
Police Force and Mr
McCartney said the group
represented one of the most
qualified groups in Grand
Bahama.


Anguilla independence



within CARICOM dimmed?


By SIR RONALD SANDERS
(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean diplo-
mat)
THE Chief Minister of
Anguilla, Hubert Hughes, has
repeated a call for his small
Caribbean island of 90 sq km
and 13,600 people to become
independent from Britain
whose colony it has been
since 1650. He is doing so in
the worst of economic times
for Caribbean countries and
during a period of great
uncertainty in the world gen-
erally.,
The leaders of the
Caribbean Community and
Common Market (CARI-
COM), to which Anguilla has
Observer status, have put
their countries economic inte-
gration arrangements on hold,
deciding that it would be
"best to pause" efforts to cre-
ate a Single Economy and to
"consolidate the gains of the
Single Market" before taking
any further action on specific
matters "such as the move-
ment toward a single curren-
.cy". Indeed, it is understood
that the Heads of .Govern-
ment at a special meeting in
Guyana from 21 to 22 May,
agreed that a single currency
"should be moved off the
immediate agenda."
Yet, if a tiny country like
Anguilla is to seek indepen-
dence, with all the costly
requirements that come with
such a bold step, it would
have been better-off doing so
within the framework of a
Caribbean Single Market and
Economy where it would ben-
efit from economic integra-
tion, sharing in arrangements
such as the Regional Security
System operated by Barba-
dos and the seven countries
of the Organisation of East-
ern Caribbean States, joint
regional trade negotiations as
exists in CARICOM, and
joint. diplomatic representa-


insight

WORLD VIEW


tion with one or more CARI-
COM countries. Within a
CARICOM framework,
Anguilla's independence from
Britain would not leave it
swimming alone in the ocean
of international relations with-
out even a meagre life belt.
But, CARICOM itself
does not now offer an enticing
prospect.
With the Single Economy
off the immediate agenda and
a decision to consolidate "the
gains of the Single Market"
which have not been signifi-
cant, CARICOM is now
marking time. The prospect it
once held out of a Single
Caribbean space in which
Caribbean citizens would be
able to travel, live and work is
now dimmed. The idea that,
together, the countries of
CARICOM could become a
strong entity providing better
glqbal representation for its
people than its individual
states also now appears
remote.
Many independent
Caribbean countries, much
larger and better resource
than Anguilla, are finding it
very. difficult to survive as sov-
ereign'states. The cost of
overseas representation, even
if this were to be kept to the
barest minimum, will add to
Anguilla's recurrent expendi-
ture of US$40 million. When
the additional costs of defence
are thrown into the mix, the
island's recurrent revenues of
US$47 million will prove to
be inadequate.
There is also not much
elasticity in the island's capac-
ity to increase its revenues.
Highly dependent on tourism,
the small size of the country,


and the absence of an inter-
national airport, cramps its
capacity for much more large
scale tourism development.
Further, the actions of the
Organisation for Economic
Co-operation and Develop-
ment, the Financial Action
Task Force and the Interna-
tional Monetary'Fund to
impose costly new rules and'
regulations on offshore finan-
cial centres have all but crip-
pled Anguilla's nascent finan-
cial services sector.
Borrowing on commercial
terms will not be an easy
option for a sovereign Anguil-
la government if. it wishes to
maintain existing physical
infrastructure or build new
capacity. Burnt by poor
investment decisions that cre-
ated the global financial crisis
that began in 2008, financial
institutions are now far more
cautious than they were even
in lending to governments.
And, an independent Anguil-
la will not have the back-stop
support of the British gov-
ernment that, in the past, gave
comfort to institutions that
lent money to governments
of British colonies.
Anguilla will also continue
to be exposed to problems of
the HIV/AIDS pandemic,
drug trafficking and small
arms smuggling, crime, secu-
rity, global warming and sea
level rise that now severely
challenge all Caribbean coun-'
tries. These are problems that
no one CARICOM country
can cope with alone.
As a British Overseas Ter-
ritory, Anguilla has a right to
expect British assistance on
all these issues. But an inde-
pendent Anguiila will find


SIR RONALD SANDERS


that such assistance is not
automatic, not even at times
of natural disasters created by
hurricanes.
Additionally, citizens of
Anguilla will lose their British
citizenship which gives them
full rights in the United King-
dom and in European Union
countries with which Britain
has reciprocal arrangements,
to live, study and work. This
is bound to add pressure to
the unemployment rate in
Anguilla and to the expan-
sion of the areas of poverty
that exist within the island. Its
present per capital income of
US$9,700 may very well
decline as well as the double
digit growth rates that its
economy has experienced in
recent years.
Independence for Anguilla
is, therefore, a tough call. It is
one that 'the majority of the
people of Anguilla must be
free to determine once all the
advantages and disadvantages
are placed before them and
they fully understand the
choice they will have to make.
Chief Minister Hughese
cannot be unaware of these
challenges. However, from
statements he has made, it is
clear that he believes facing-


up to these challenges, how-
ever overwhelming, is better
than continuing to live as a
British Overseas Territory
where the British governor
exercises certain powers that
the Chief Minister finds
unpalatable. For instance, Mr
Hughes has declared: "Will
we be a people with a culture
and identity that distinguishes
us as an entity in this place
we call our world, or will we
let the erosion of all that we
hold dear to us as a people
continue, leaving us being
simply absorbed culturally,
religiously and socially by a
greater administrative pow-
er?"
The desire for self-deter-
mination is perfectly under-
standable. But, does the
choice have to be indepen-
dence with all its almost insur-
mountable challenges and
costs, or could improved
structures of governance suf-
fice?
If CARICOM had contin-
ued to move to the realisa-
tion of a Single Caribbean
space where each country
pools its individual sover-
eignty for the greater good of
all, it would have offered
Anguilla and other territo-
ries like it a viable option
for independence.
Since this option is now to
be delayed, the Anguillan
government should engage
the British to improve the sys-
tem of governance giving the
local government a bigger say
on those international issues
that affect their economy and
their culture. Representation
in the British parliament and
a permanent Council of min-
isterial representatives of the
British government and the
governments of their overseas
territories, such as Anguilla,
might be a good start.

Responses and previous
commentaries at:
www.Sirronaldsanders.com


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


J .


'r O.tS
RfP







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 9


LOCALNW


MP tells local government: be
prudent with taxpayers' money


FROM page one
weakness" in the local govern-
ment system has been the lack of
consistent bank reconciliation in
all districts.
"It is anticipated that to elim-
inate this impediment, a train-
ing programme of clerical staff is
proposed for the ensuing fiscal
period to create uniformity and
consistency in accounting and
reporting of financial data."
Government is committed to
ensuring that Bahamians have
the opportunity to own or invest
in land and has issued 239
Crown Land grants and 39 leas-
es from 2008 to 2011, Mr Wood-
side told Parliament.
Mr Woodside also gave Par-
liament an update on govern-
ment's land reform bills, intro-
duced last year, which are being
reviewed by the Law Reform
,' Commission. The commission is
taking into consideration the
slew of recommendations and
criticism of the package of bills
last year.
"(Current land) legislation has
proven to entail a long and
painstaking exercise that can be
exhaustive and expensive for


Bahamians. Not one of them
requires or mandates the regis-
tration of land."
The package of new laws
include the Land Adjudication
Bill, the Law.of Property and
Registered Land Bill.
Mr Woodside said the cre-
ation of a land registry will help
reduce fraudulent land sales.
"The implementation of a
land registry will also advance
the efforts of the government to
bring its methods of conducting
business in line with accepted
standards while enhancing the
efficiency and effectiveness of
revenue administration," he
added.
In the 2011/2012 fiscal year,
his department will spend some
$500,000 to continue its ongoing
survey campaigns of Crown land.
South Andros MP Picewell
Forbes, the opposition's first
speaker yesterday, hit out at gov-
ernment for its "painful neglect"
of the Family Islands and for its
heavy focus on the development
of New Providence.
He said if the Progressive Lib-
eral Party wins the next general
election, the party will focus on
even economic expansion
throughout the whole country.


BYRON WOODSIDE
He also criticised the govern-
ment for abandoning the PLP's
family island "anchor project"
strategy.
"These anchor projects were
to serve as .a catalyst for other
forms of economic develop-
ment," lamented Mr Forbes.
While making his contribu-
tion to the debate, Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux noted
the large number of illegal work-
ers who are found aboard
Bahamian fishing vessels and
marine fleets.
The Marathon MP said with
the high levels of unemployment
throughout the country, if these.
illegal workers were replaced
with Bahamians, it could impact
joblessness.


Four dead in bank holiday bloodshed


FROM page one


not been released.
Around 15 minutes later, a 42-year-old man
was shot im the head while visiting a friend at
his home in Deveaux Street, off East Street.
Police said the gunman, who was wearing a
hooded jacket, fired his pistol directly at the
man, shooting him in the head.
The victim, believed to be Brian Hanna, of
Tall Pines Estates, was pronounced dead in
hospital.
Police said the motive for the shooting is
unknown, however Hanna also known by
his street name as "Fathead" has been iden-
tified in unconfirmed reports as having crimi-
nal links.
Police press liaison officer Sgt Chrislyn
Skippings was unable to confirm reports yes-
terday as police continue their investiga-
tions. I
Meanwhile a man was shot at his home in
Summer Set Way, off Carmichael Road, in
what appears to have been an armed robbery.
The 34-year-old victim arrived home at
around 1.15am on Friday and was confronted
by two men armed with handguns who
demanded cash.
i A struggle ensued and the man was shot
1 multiple,,times about his body.
) EMS medics pronounced him dead at the


scene.
The fourth murder reported this weekend is
of a 37-year-old man who was stabbed in the
chest with a knife.
Police said he got into an altercation with
another man in Constitution Drive, off Boyd
Road, when he was stabbed in the chest at
around 10.30pm on Thursday.
EMS medics pronounced him dead at the
scene.
Police are following "significant" leads into
the matter.
Last year, the 57th murder was recorded on
August 11.
Supt Paul Rolle, the newly-appointed offi-
cer in charge of the Central Detective Unit
(CDU), said: "One life taken is too many.
Right now we are at 57, that's 54 per cent
more than it was at this time last year.
"Over the last week there has been a meet-
ing of the top team and strategising about how
we are going to move forward.
"We have established four teams of investi-
gators looking at the overall operation in the
unit and we are looking at putting measures in
place to respond better and also conduct fol-
low-ups."
Anyone with information about any of these
killings should call CrimeStoppers anony-
mously on 328-TIPS (8477) or the Central
Detective Unit on 502-9991/9910, or the emer-
gency lines 911 and 919.


OFFICERS DEMAND AUDIT OF POLICE ACCOUNTS


FROM page one
When questioned about this particular
account by The Tribune a senior officer
denied there was such a fund.
However, upon investigation, it was
revealed this account, held at Scotiabank, had
up to $134,141.64 in September of 2009, and
the closing balance in February 2010 was
$96,260.95.
After repeated questions from within the
Force about the actions of this account, it was
revealed it was finally ordered closed by the
senior command.
"There have been countless issues with


this and other funds for years," a source said.
"For instance, if the Force needs to order
$50,000 worth of headlights for squad cars, we
would be directed to place that order with a
particular company and at the end of the day,
only $20,000 worth of lights would arrive.
"The guys at the storage unit can't be
blamed, all they know is the lights have
arrived.
"The misappropriation of funds has been a
blotch on the Force's face for years.
"Every Commissioner that comes in has to
deal with these issues.
"They all try their best but it is difficult to
discern who'to trust and who to move."


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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


THE TRIBUNE


PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.


HOUS 5''S A SsasssassBUILING


NEW PROVIDENCE
(801) Lot #18 in Sandilands Allotment on the
western side of Crosswind Road between Sea-
breeze Lane and Pineyard Road in the Eastern
Distract of The Island of New Providence-The
Bahamas, containing single storey private resi-
dence comprising the following: covered entry
porch, living room, dining room, kitchen, laun-
dry room, family room, sitting area, 4 bedrooms,
2 bathroom and patio. The total area of land
is approximately 7,641 sq ft. Appraised value
$212,800.
(801) sTvo parcels of land containing 21,120
sq.ft. situated on the southern side of East
Shirley Street and 100 feet west of its junction
with "Shirlea" in the Eastern District of the Is-
land of New Providence The Bahamas. Situ-
ated thereon is a Gas Station and Auto Repair
Shop. Appraised value $422,000.
(805) Single Family Residence located on the
Northern Side ofWest Bay Street, arid immedi-
ately East of Caprice Condominium Complex
(Cable Beach). The home of 5,854 square feet
consist of 5 bedrooms, 4 1/2 bathrooms, de-
tached building (double car garage) is 686 square
feet, with reinforced sea wall, swimming pool &
deck. The waterfront property has a land size of
20,994 square feet. Appraised Value$1,512,571
(801) All that parcel or lot of land being Lots
#10 and 11 in Block29 of Coconut Grove Sub-
division, containing a shopping plaza. The lot
is trapezium in shape, 8,383 square feet. Ap-
praised value $315,000
(811) Residential/Commercial property, lot#
137, located Culmersville, Eastern District, New
Providence with a size of 4800 sq. ft. The prop-
erty contains a2 storey 1500 sq ft building, up-
per level: 2 bed 1 bath apartment, lower level:
Beauty salon. The building finishes:'8" concrete
block wall, 4" concrete partitions, asphalt shin-
gle roof, tiled floors, wood ceilings, private water
system, standard electrical and plumbing fix-
tures, central air-condition (split system), bur-
glar bars. Appraised value $191,000.
(811) Two lots #248 & 249 located Dorsettville
Subdivision, Southern District, New Providence
on which an incomplete building is situated.
The properties are residentially and multi-fam-
ily zoned, with graded, incomplete landscaped
and fenced in on 3 sides. The building is 4266 sq
ft with a 2 storey multi-family at the roof stage
with 1 bedroom unit attached. There are accom-
modations for the upper floor: 4 units 1 bed 1
bath each- 3 units, 1 bed 1 bath each, Lower
floor 2 bed 1 bath. Garage converted to 1 bed
1 bath, which is 90% completed with a tenant.
Appraised value $296,000.
(569) Parcel of land situated in the subdivision
ofGleniston Garden 11,250 sq ftLot# 9 block 20
in the district of New Providence containing a
two storey residence, ground floor contains a
kitchen, dining room, lounge, a family room, a
veranda at the front and side with a patio to the
back of the house. The upper floor contains 2
bedroom, 2 bathrooms, walk in closet and a stor-
age area with a balcony to master bedroom. Ap-
prox size of building 2900 sq ft. Appraisal value
$362,000 "as is" 90% completed
(569) Lot #27 of Village Allotment #14 in the
Eastern District, containing residence situated
on Denver Street offParkgate Road in the Ann's
Town Constituency, New Providence. Property
size 2,500 sq. ft. Building size 990 sq. ft. Appraised
value $50,000.
(569) Lot #2 in block #8, Steward Road, Cor-
ai Heights East Subdivision, western district of
New Providence, approx. size 8,800 sq. ft. with
a split level containing 2 bed, 2 bath, living, din-
ing & family rooms, kitchen and utility room -
approx. building: 2,658 sq. ft. Appraised value:
$322,752
(569) Lot #20 with residentialproperty located
Skyline Heights. Appraised value $280,000.
(569) Lot of land #11 in Block # 10 on a plan"
of allotments laid'out by Village Estates Lim-
ited and filed in the dept of Land & Surveysas
# 142 N.R Eastern District, New Providence.
Property contains 3 bed, 2 bath residence. Ap-
praised value $165,000
(569) Lot B 50 ft x 115.73 ft situated on the
north side of Shell Fish Road, being the third
lot west of Fire Trail Road arid east of Hamster
Road with a one half duplex residential prem-
ises. Appraised value TBA


NEW PROVIDENCE
(801) Vacant property located 40 ft. east of
Balls Alley on the northern side of East Shirley
Street and known as "Old Plantation Inn", in the
eastern district of New Providence. Property size
7,113 sq.ft. with open zoning/Appraised value
$128,000.
(801) Vacant Lot No. IA, located on the east-
em side of FoxHill Rd., 235 feet north of Prince
Charles Drive, Nassau, Bahamas. The open zon-
ing/multi-family property size is approx. 10,322.05
sq.ft Appraised value $150,000.
(569) Lot of land in the subdivision called and
known as EASTERN ESTATES in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence being
Lot Number 14 in Block Number 9. property is
approx 7,044 sqft. Appraised Value TBA. .
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of land be-
ing Lot No. 977 in the Subdivision called and
known as "PINEWOOD GARDENS" situated in
the Southern District of the Island New Provi-
dence. Appraised valde $65,000. .
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of land located
on Marigold Road in the Subdivision known as
KoolAcres. Lot is approx. 7145 sq. ft. Appraised
value $93,000.
(569) Vacant lot single/family zoning. Lot #
21 of the subdivision called"Southern Shores" /
Canaan Subdivision located on Marshall Road.
Property size is some 67.86 feet on the sub road
and 84.49 on one side, 55.21 at the back and
some 85.61 on the other side of 5,475 sq ft of
land space. Appraised value $86,000
(569) Undevelopedlots#4A, 16,17,18and 19
located Chapman Estates, West Bay. Appraised
value $348,000.
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of land being
Lot #11 of the "Lee Acres" subdivision situate in
the vicinity of Sandilands Village in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence. Ap-
praised Value TBA.
(569) Lot #3 being a portion of Lot #24 Crown
GmntA8.44 situate Road offCarmichael Road in
thesouthern district of New Providence. Prop-
erty is 5075 sq ft. Appraised value $50,000.
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of land situ-
ated on the northwest corner of Butler's Lane
& Romer Street, Fox Hill in the Eastern District.
of New Providence. Appraised value. $57,000.


(569) Lot #17 located Village Allotment with
fourplex- value $500,000
(569) Property situated on Williams Lane off
Kemp Road, New Providence, Bahamas con-
taining a two-storey house and an apartment
building consisting of 1800 sq ft. Appraised value
$100,000.
(569) Lot of land situated on Fire Trail Road
being a partition of Gladstone Allot #41 New
Providence, Bahamas containing townhouse
apartment unit and two proposed units (com-
pleted as is). Appraised value $237,714.
(569) All that piece, parcel or lot of land situ-
ated on Cowpen Road (1000 ft east of the Faith
Avenue Junction) in the Southern District of New
Providence, Bahamas containing a duplex apart-
ment comprising of two 2-bedroom/i-bath-
room apartments. Appraised value $175,000.00.
(569) Lot of land #382 situate on Chestnut St.
in Pinewood Gardens in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence with a partial-
ly constructed concrete residence thereon.Ap-
praised value $88,000.
(565) Lot # 1018 in Golden Gates Estates #2
Subdivision situate in the SouthWestern District
of the island pf New Providence Containingasin-
gle storey private residence 3 bedroom 2 bath.
Property approx. size 6,000 sq. ft. Building ap-
prox size 2,400 sq. ft. AppraisedValue $173,16.
(569) Lot # B Block B situate on Rosedale
Street in the Carey's Subdivision containing a
four bedroom two bath residence. Building size
1,234 sq.feet. Property size approx 4,500 sq ft.
Appraised Value $149,000.
(569) Single storey triplex, situated on Lot
615, Mermaid Boulevard, Golden Gates #2 in
theWestemrn District, New Providence.Two two
bedrooms, one bathroom units and one one
bedroom, one bathroom unit. The property Is
zoned as Multi Family Residential, measuring
9,092 sq ft with the living area measuring 2,792
sq ft. Appraised value $374,192.00
(569) Lot #AandB on Northemside of Car-
michael Rd. Nassau with building and founda-
tion for a warehouse. Property size 15,780 sq.ft).
Appraised value $325,000.
(569) Lot of land on the east side of Miller's
.Road and 2763.58 ft South of Carmichael Rd.
being Lot #B containing a Triplex Property size
80' x 100' (8,000 sq.ft) Appraised Value TBA.
(569) Lot #2, Block #5, Englerston Sub-Divi-
sion, Southern District of N.P. containing a partly
completed building. Property size approx. 3,535
sq.ft. Appraised value $84,000
(008) Property containing bed lbath home
Single Family Residence. Lot. # 2819 in Cedar
Groves Estate, southern district New Providence.
Property Size 8,250. AppraisedValue $157,100.00
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of land situ-
ated in Englerston being Lot #12 and #13 con-
taining an incomplete triplex apartment. Ap-
praised value$195,000.
(569) All that piece parcel orlot oflandsituated
Pinewood Gardens containing thereon a three
bedroom residence. Appraised value $ 85,000.
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of land num-
bered Lot #262 Austrhlia Blvd., Elizabeth Estates
containing thereon a Three (3) bedroom resi-
dence. Appraised value $110,000.00
(569) All that piece parcel or Lot of land num-
bered 1802 in the area called and known asPine-
wood Gardens Subdivisioon the island. f New
Providence and contains thereon a 1,449 sq.ft.
building. Said Property is 5000 sq.ft. Appraised
Value$179,000
(569) All that piece parcel or Lot of land num-.
bered #35 and #36 in Block #23 in the area called
and known as NassauVillage Subdivision on the
island ofNew Providence and contains thereon
a 915 sq.ft,apartment building. Said Property.
is 5000 sq.ft. Appraised Value $178,000
'(569) Lot #201 ArawakAvenue ofPyfromEs-
tates Subdivision situated inthe Eastern District,
-New Providence Island and containing thereon
a 3-bedroom residence. Lot approx. 6,000 sq ft.
(60' x 100'). Appraised value TBA
(301) Lot #659 on the northwestern side of
Malawi Street, Elizabeth Estates East Phase 2,Ya-
macraw constituency, New Providence island.
Lot of the land 5,085 sq ft. with a 22-year old
single level residence, 3 bedrooms, I bathroom.
Appraised value $94,871


(723) Lot of land being Lot #5 in Block #9 in
the Subdivision known as Millar Heights sitd-
ate in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence. Property is 75' x 100' approx 7,500
sq.ft. Appraised value $90,000
(569) All that pieceparcel orlot ofland located
Coral Heights East. Appraised value. TBA.
(570) All that piece parcel or lot of land known
as Lot # 5 being portion of larger tract of land
known as Lot # 11 of Southern Shores Subdivi-
sion situate in the Southern District ofthe Island
of New Providence. Property is 6222'x 109.29'
approx 7,019 sq ft. Appraised Value $80,000. .
(569) Lot ofland being Lt #5 in block#5 in the
Subdivision called and known as Baillout Dale
situated in the Southern District in the Island
of New Providence, Bahamas. Appraised value
$95,000
(569) All that piece parcel or lot ofland being
Lot #5 ofthe Forest Drive Subdivision situated
South of Camperdown Drive and approx.300
ft.West of Culberts Hill Drive located in the East-
ern District of the Island of New Providence.-
Property is 15,681 sq.ft. and is hill top.Appraised
value $201,000.
(569) Lot #21 Grantanna Subdivision western
district of New Providence. Property is approx
6,505 sq.ft Appraised value $80,000.
(571) Lot of land being a portion of Lot #5
of block E situated in Garden Hills Subdivision
in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence. Property is vacant and measures
9,406 sq ft. Appraised Val $312,000.
(571) LotoflandbeingLot#24inaSubdivision
known as and called "Rhoda's Vineyard situate
in the Southwestern District of New Providence.
Prop. is 7,256 sq.ft. Appraised value $90,700.
(569) Lot of land having an area of 7000 sq.ft.
being Lot #12 Yamacraw Beach Estates in he
eastern district of New Providence. From the
intersection of Fox Hill Rd and Yamacraw Hill
Rd turn ontoYamacraw Hill Road, take the first
corner on the right, take the first left and prop-
erty is second property on the right. Appraised
value$91,000.'
(569) Lot #2 situated on the western side of
Golden IsleslRoad South of Carmichael Rd. in the
Western District of New Providence. Appraised
value $65,000.00.


(569) All that piece parcel or plot of land com-
prising2,513 sq.ft. situated on the Eastern side of
Armstrong St. and approx. 30ft. north of Shirley
St. containing a two-storey wooden structure.
Appraised Value $152,325
(569) Lot of land on the east side of Miller's
Road (now known as Bacardi Rd) and 2,763.58
feet south of Carmichael Rd in the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence and
containing thereon a duplex (2bed 1 bath).Build-
ingis 1,616 sq.ft. and property is 8,071 sq ft, Ap-
praised value $180,000.
(569) Lot of land being Lot #A4 of the subdi-
vision known as Johnson Estate situated in the
Eastern District, N.R and containing thereon a
two storey concrete building. Appraised value
$277,000.
(569) Lot of land in Shirley Heights Subdivi-
sion being Lot #8 Block 21 containing thereon a
3-bed 2-bath concrete building. Appraised value
$155,000.
(571) Lot#223, Coral HarbourWateiwaysSub-
division, Western District, New Providence con-
taining a split level 5 bed 4 1/2 bath residence.
Living space is 5,200 sq.ft. Property is 10,654
sq.ft. Appraised Value $992,000
(569) Lot number 676 in the Subdivision called
and known as Pinewood Gardens situate in the
East-Central District of the Island of New Provi-
dence and containing thereon a 3-bedroom 1I-bath
concrete residence. Appraised Val $133,000
(569) Lots ofland being Lots number 359 and
674 in the Subdivision called and known as Sta-
pledon Gardens situate in the Western District of
the Island of New Providence, containing thereon
rental units. Appraised value TBA
(501) Lot of land with rental complex situated
in Union Village Nassau, Bahamas. Appraised
valued $50,000.
(569) .Lot of land situate on the Southern side
of Martin Stand containing thereon a triplex (2)
2bed I bath units and (1) lbed 1 bth unit and
a duplei(2) 2 bed 1 bth units. Property is 7,245
sq.ft. Appraised value: TBA
. (569) Lot of land referred to as Lot #1 in the
immediate vicinity of Golden Gates #1, which
is located on the western side of Mutton Fish
Drive approx 970 ft south of Bird Road in the
Southern District of New Providence. Proper-
ty contains thereon a Car Wash Shed-571 sq ft,
office(Beauty Salon)-204 sq ft, Restaurant and
Bar Bldg- 1,490 sq ft. Total property is approx.
5,000sq ft. Appraised value TBA.
(573) Lot #13 Sunshine Park Estates, south-
western New Providence with a 60' x 30' foun-
dation for a duplex. Property is 5,000 sq.ft. Ap-
praised value $65,000.
(571) Lot #6 situate in Garden Hills #2 Sub-
division in the southern New Providence and
containing a partially completed shopping pla-
za 8,960.sq.ft Property size is 17,000 sq.ft. Ap-
praised value $448,000.
(571) Lot ofland in Boughton Estates located
immediately south of Southern Heights Subdiv
and north ofCowpen Rd containing an incom-
plete duplex bldg. Property: 8,737 sqft bldg: 1,740
sqft. Appraised value $131,000.
.(572) Lot #4WulffRoad eastern district, New
Providence containing an office building. Prop-
erty is 4,500 sq. ft (50' x 90') Appraised value
$222,000
(571) Lot of land being referred to as Parcels
A & B situated on corners of Nassau Street and
Polhemuts Street and containing thereon a single
storeyconcrete church building approx 1,868
sq.ft. Property is 10,071 sq.ft. Appraised value.
$217,960.
(725) Lot #3 Block #1 in Churchill Subdivi-
sion 100 ft north of Soldier Rd, eastern district
New Providence containing a concrete triplex
apartmentt building. Property is 4,750 sq.ft. Ap-
praised value TBA.
(801) -Lot of land'containing ay'prox 35,957
sq ft, located on the Southern Side of Bernard
Road, approx 500 feetWest of St. Augustine Col-
lege Entrance. The property contains tw6 con-
crete block structures and a wooden work shed,
which houses a tyre and automobile repair shop.
Appraised value $490,478.
572)' Lotofland beirigLot# 12 on the Northern
side ofPoinciana Driveand containing thereon
a two-storeybuilding. Appraised value $293,000


(569) Lot of land situate off Cowpen Road and
bounded by Silver Gates Subdivision measur-
ing 90' x 110' and zoned multi-family. Appraised
value $118,000.
(565) Lot of land situate in the Western District
of the Island of New Providence being Lot # 1B
of Coral HarbourVillage Subdivision. property
is 25 sq ft x 70 sqft. Appraised value $45,000
(008) All that piece parcel of land lot#5 & 6 in
the Nassau Village Subdivision situated in the
Holy Cross Constituency in the Eastern District
in the island of New Providence. Containing a
single family concrete dwelling. Appraised value
TBA.
(570) Lot of land being Lot # 15 Block #17 on
the Eastern side ofWestAvenue located in Miller's
Heights Subdivision. Property is zoned multi-
family and is 75'x 100' (7,500 sq.ft.). Appraised
valueTBA
(801) Three single-family/multi-family resi-
dential vacant parcels of land being Lots # 10,
11 & 12 situated on the Southern side of Fire
Trail Road in the Western District of New Prov-
idence. Property sizes are Lot #10 8,967 sq ft
Appraised value: $75,000
(801) Single/ Multi Family vacant lot, located
at No. 112,Westridge Drive, Westridge Estates,
Nassau, Bahamas. The property size is 22,000
sq.ft. Appraised value $350,000
(569) Lot of land situateWinton Estates'in the
Eastern District of New Providence being Lot
#7.Property size 107.5' x 137'(14,728 sq.ft) Ap-
praised Value TBA
(572) Lot of land being Lot #526 of the sub-
division known as Golden Gate Estates Section
Two situate in theWestemrn District ofthe Island
of New Providence. Appraised Value TBA
(572) Lot of land being Lot #159 of the sub-
division known as "Victoria Gardens" situate in
theWestem District of the Island of New Provi-
dence. Appraised Value TBA
(572) Lot# 6 of the subdivision known as "Or-
chid Gardens" situate in the westerndistrict of
New Providence. Appraised Value TBA
FREEPORT
(801) Vacant propertylocated Bahamia South.
Block 16 lot 9A, Freeport, Grand Bahama con-
sisting of 24,829.20 sq.ft. Appraised value 52,000.


(801)Single-family/multi-family residential
property 1/4 mile east of South Ocean Boule-
vard western New Providence consisting of a
portion of lot #15 comprised of 0.472 ofan acre
containingla 3 bediooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms res-
idence and 3 residences under construction;
Appraised value $230,000. Other portion of lot
#15 vacant, comprised of 0.574 ofan acre; Ap-
praised value $150,000
(801) Parcel of land containing 4,938 sq ft on
the northern side of Delancy St., approx 135 ft
East of Nassau St., housing a newly constructed
commercial building with over 2,500 sq ft ofRe-
tail / Office Area. Appraised value $670,000.00.
(801) Parcel of Land known as Lot 8, located
northwest ofWulf Rd and Mackey Street on the
northern'side of a road reservation known as
Rosedale Street, containing a two storey com-
mercial building known as "Deal's Plaza," Nas-
sau, Bahamas. Appraised value $573,960.00.
(801) Lot No. 4, Block No. 1, Eastern Estates
Subdivision, situate on Mars End, Eastern Dis-
trict, Nassau, Bahamas. Lot Size 16,301 sq ft, con-
taining a Single Family Residence with a living
area o 2,271 sq ft. Appraised Value $282,000.
(571) Lot # 59 Pride Estates Phase 2 Subdivi-
sion situated in the Southern District of the Is-
land of New Providence containing thereon a
concrete residence. Appraised value .TBA
(572) Lot of land being Lot #62 of Dorsette-
ville Subdivision, waster district New Providence.
containing a duplex with two 2bed 1 bath units.
Property is approx 5,000 sq.ft. and bldg is 1,700
sq.ft. Appraised value. TBA.
(572) Lot of land situate on Poincianna Drive
in the Southern District of New Providence and
containing thereon a wooden stucco building.
Property is approx 2,388 sq.ft. and is zoned com-
mercial. Appraised value $111,245.00.
(571) Lots of land being Lots #11, #9 and a
portion of #7 on the Western side of Moore's
Road 200 feet south of Wulff Road Junction in the
Southern district of New Providence and con-
taining thereon a split level commercial struc-
ture. Property is 6,536 sq.ft. Bldg is 1,586 sq.ft..
Appraised value. TBA.
(572) Lot #12 of plan #20 Malcolm Allotment
eastward of East Street South, eastern district New
Providence containing a 3 bed 2 bath concrete
residence. Property is approx 5,600 sq.ft. and
bldgis 1,824 sq.ft.Appraisedvalue $195,630.00.
(572) Lot # 8 Block #77 Crooked Island Street
Englerston Addition Subdivision situated in the
southern district New Providence. Containing a
wooden building 600sq.ft. Property is 5000sq.ft
(50 x 100). Appraisedvalue $81,000
(569) Lot of land being part of Crown Grant A-
5-55 situated on the North side of Shell Fish
Road, East of Hamster Road and West ifFiretrall
Rd containing thereon a one and a half storey
split level building. Bldg is 4,200'sq.ft and prop-
erty is 6,325 sq.ft. Appraised value. $405,000.

FREEPORT
(008) Single Story tri-plex building, one 2 bed-
rooms and two 1 -bedroom locatedon a multi-
family Lot No.4, block 3, Shirley Lane, section
1, Bahama ReefYacht & Country Club Subdivi-
sion, Freeport Grand Bahama: Property size is
approx. 16,621 sq. ft. Appraised value $348,000.
(103) All that piece parcel of lot of land and
improvements thereon known as No.3 block 31
Bahamia Marina & Section IX located in south-
western city of Freeport Grand Bahama Island.
Approx. 13,070 sq.ft. or 0.30 acres property con-
tains duplex dwelling.Appraised value $300,000.
(101 -F) Residential Canal Lots 30, 31 & 32, Block
1, Pine Bay Subdivision Freeport, Grand Baha-
ma, containing two storey House, 4 bed, 3 baths
Situated on 1.62 Acres of land. Appraised value
$1,372,200
(569) Lot of land #72 Malcolm Allotment
southern district New.Providence and con-
taining thereon a duplex. Property: 100' x 100'
(10,000 sq.ft) Appraised Value TBA
(572) Lot of land #22 of the Gladstone Road
Crown Land Allotments situate on the east-
em side of Gladstone Road in the western dis-
trict New Providence and containing thereon
a residence. Property is 0.75 acre Appraised
ValueTBA


(802) Vacant Commercial Lot No: 3A, Block
60 Bahamia Subdivision VI containing 3 acres
located Freeport, Grand Bahama. Appraised
Value $463,914.
(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5 Block F Ba-
hamia South Sub, Freeport, Grand Bahama.Ap-
praised value $35,700.
(569) Undeveloped lot#149. Seafan Lane, Lu-
cayan Beach Subdivision. Grand Bahama, 18750
square feet. Appraised value: TBA
(569) Vacant land Lot #8, Block #19 at Baha-
miaWest Sub Division (Port Area) of Freeport,
Grand Bahama Property size approx 25,500 sq
ft. Appraised value $65,000.
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of land being
Lot #1, Block N situated in Bahamia South Sub-
division, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Appraised
value $30,000.
(571) Lot 89, Block 7 Aberdeen Drive, Baha-
mia West Replat Subdivision, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, consisting of 12,100 sq ft. Appraised
value $51,000.
(569) Vacant property consisting of Lot #894
situated in the Freeport Ridge Subdivisioti, Sec-
tion #1, .Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas. Ap-
praised value: TBA
(571) Lot of land beingnumber ten (10) Block
NumberThree (3) Bristol Bay Subdivision, Unit
One (1) in the City of Freeport in the island of
Grand Bahama, Bahamas. Property is approx
0.42 acre. Appraised value $55,000.
(811) Vacant Lot of land located West End
Grand Bahama containing 8581 square feet or
.20 acres situated in Ginn Sur Mer subdivision,
in the island of Grand Bahama. Appraised value:
$575,000.00.
(811) Vacant lot of land #476, Versailles Sur
Mer Club & Resort, West End Plat No. 3 subdi-
vision, on the island of Grand Bahama, Baha-
mas. Appraised value $560,000.
(910) Lot #16, Unit 5, Block 22 Clearwater Cove,
Lincoln Green Subdivision Grand Bahama, resi-
dential property. Appraised value: TBA.
(565) Lot of land situate in the Queen's Cove
Subdivision on the Island of Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas and being Lot #24 in Block 19, Section
1. Lot is 75 sq ftx 125 sq.ft. Appraised value TBA.


I OFFICERS


COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE
Tel: 242-356-8568
(800) Mrs. Monique Crawford
(801) Mr. Jerome Pinder
(802) Mr. Brian Knowles
(803) Ms. Gillian Beckles-Slatter
(805) Mrs. Tiffany Simms O'brien
(806) Mrs. Lois Hollis
(807) Mr. Lester Cox
(808) Mrs. DaShann Clare-Paul
(811) Ms. Lydia Rahming
PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-322-4426/9 or 242-302-3800
(201) Mrs. Patrice Ritchie
NASSAU MAIN BRANCH


(701) Mr. James Strachan
(301) Ms. Thyra Johnson
(304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson
MACKEY STREET BRANCH
Tel: 242-393-3097
(601) Ms. Nicole Evans
JOHN F. KENNEDYDRIVE BRANCH
Tel: 242-325-4711
(401) Mr. Robert Pantry,
PARADISE ISLAND BRANCH
Telephone: 242-363-1404
(550) Ms. Cherelle Martinborough
PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-393-7505/8
(501) Ms. Nicole Evans


(717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby
(723) Ms. Deidre King
(725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson
(565) Mrs. Catherine Davis
(566) Mrs. Kenyatta Johnson
(569) Mrs. Vanessa Scott
(570) Mr. Elton Kemp
(571) Mrs. Faye Daniels
(572) Mr. Ryan Brown
(573) Ms. Annisha Wilson
NASSAU INT'L AIRPORT
Tel: 242-377-7179
(433) Mrs. ReneaWalkine
LYFORD CAY BRANCH
Tel: 242-362-4540 or 242-362-4037


(400) Ms.
MARSH I
Tel: 242-3
(908) Mrs
(909) Mr.
(910) Ms.
(914) Mr.
BIMINIB
Tel:242-3
(105) Ms.
GRAY'S,L
Tel: 242-i
(100) Mrs
EXUMA I
Tel: 242-3


Tel: 242-322-8700 (505) Ms. Patricia Russell (101-N) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson (008) Ms.
CABLE BEACH BRANCH GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR, FREEPO0
Tel: 242-327-6077 ELEUTHERA Tel: 242-3
(466) Mr. DerekSturrup Tel: 242-332-2856/8 (101-F) I
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE (902) Ms. Evette Burrows (102) Ms.
Tel: 242-502-5170/502-5180 HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH (103) Mrs
(716) Ms. Quincy Fisher Tel:242-333-2230 (108) Ms.
(901) Ms. Velderine Laroda SPANISH

Teh 242-368-2071 (560) Mr.


Bianca Simms
HARBOUR,ABACO
367-2420
s Sylvia Poitier
Travis Spicer
Elivira Moss
Julius Seymour
BRANCH
347-3031
Italia Beckford
LONG ISLAND
337-0101
s. Lucy Wells
BRANCH
336-3251
Joycelyn Maokey
RT, MAIN BRANCH
352-6631/2
Is. Garnell Frith
Elaine Collie
s. Damita Newbold-Cartwright
Sylvie Carey
WELLS
333-4131 or 242-333-4145
Walter Carey


US CRUISE PASSENGER MISSING
AN AMERICAN cruise passenger has been reported miss-
ing following an excursion on a jetski.
Cincinnati resident Sonia Wells said her husband was last
seen when he took a jetski out on Saturday.
The machine was recovered more than 400 metres off Par-
adise Island.
Police are investigating.




MAN SHOT FROM PASSING CAR


GUNMEN who shot a 20-
year-old man from a car in
Fox Hill are being sought by
police.
They were driving a white
car in Reeves Street when
they fired at the pedestrian
and shot him in the back just
before 9pm on Thursday.
The victim was treated in
hospital and released.
Anyone with any informa-
tion should call 328.-TIPS
(8477). Total anonymity is
guaranteed. .

ELEUTHERA police are
looking for a man who
dropped a bag of ammunition
at the Deep Creek Home-
coming festival when con-
fronted by police and fled.
The man was seen in the
festival parking lot at around
10.30pm on Friday. When
officers approached him, he
dropped the bag and ran into
the bushy area nearby.

DRUG Enforcement
Unit (DEU) officers arrested
three men found with a hand-
gun and ammunition in


Hampton Street and Mount
Royal Avenue just after 10pm
on Thursday.
The officers were on a rou-; .
tine patrol when they saw a
man throw something into a
nearby building.
They stopped to search the
area and recovered the gun
and ammunition.
A 34-year-old man and
two 36-year-old men were
taken into custody for ques-
tioning.

A BULLET-PROOF
vest, ammunition and an imi-
tation firearm., were found by
police in a bushy area off
Lightbourne Avenue, Rock
Crusher, at around 6.30pm on
Friday, following a tip from a
member of the public.

EXUMA police issued
tickets for traffic violations to
11 people on Friday.
Officers said some were dri-
ving without a licence or with-
out insurance, while others
were caught speeding, or dri-
ving badly damaged vehicles
not fit for the road.


CARL BETHEL CLAIMS THE PLP


'BLATANTLY' BOUGHT VOTES, JOBS

FROM page one

lenged in the House to withdraw the statement in the absence of
physical evidence, Mr Bethel refused-
"I refuse to withdraw'the statement because I personally wit-
nessed it and I personally saw the evidence," he said.
Alfred Sears, MP for Fort Charlotte and former Minister of
Education, was absent from the House.
When contacted, he said: "I certainly do not know anything '.
about it. There certainly was no conscious effort to hire people on '
the eve of the election. It was a continuous process and whoever:' "
would have applied would have applied in the normal process."
During the last PLP administration, there was a public sector hir-
ing freeze. Mr Sears said the freeze created "acute' shortages" ,,, A
inside the Ministry of Education at the level of security and jani-
.torial staff. When the hiring freeze was lifted around 2005, hiring,
b egan ., . ,, .. .. . .
"The process of hiring, is not a unilateral process. I would not
have had the authority td hireanhyone without going through the
process of clearance. And for there to be clearance, the Ministry
of Finance has to be satisfied of two things: the need for the peo-
ple to be hired and the money being present for the purpose of hir- ;.
ing," said Mr Sears.
There would also have been clearance by the Ministry of Pub-
lic Service and the department of public personnel, said Mr Sears.
"Why should persons from Fort Charlotte not be eligible if
they met the qualifications? It certainly would not have been up to
me unilaterally controlling their hiring. I did not have any control
of the public service commission or the Ministry of Finance. And
the ministry could not have hired anyone without cabinet
approval," said Mr Sears.
"This is political mischief, but I expect that at this time of year,"
he said.. :
When the ministry made its application to Cabinet for critical
needs, including staffing, Mr Sears said the request would have
been prepared by the technical officers at the ministry after a
process of consultation with the schools.
He said at the time the freeze was lifted, the ministry had
recently established a collaboration with the Police Training Col-
lege to train security personnel to work in the schools.
"Once the freeze had been lifted and the needs assessment
determined and cabinet approval secured, applications would
have been received throughout the country. People were hired
from Fort Charlotte, other constituencies and on every major
island of this country," said Mr Sears.



MP TELLS BT( STAFF: TURN DOWN

VOLUNTARY SEPARATION PACKAGES


FROM page one

they can't make you take it,"
said the MP.
While giving his contribution
to the 2011/2012 debate in Par-
liament, Mr Gray also revealed
the next election will be his last.
He said he will retire from pol-
itics in 2017 if elected to the
House of Assembly for a third'
time.
His announcement came as
he gave his contribution to the
2011/2012 budget debate.
"I know I've given the best I
have been able to give over the
last four and a half years or so,
and I would continue to do that
as long as they will permit me.
But I can fairly say that this
election coming will be my last
one. I do not intend to run
again, but I do believe that
when I win in 2012 it will take
me until at least 2017 -I will be
very close to 64 and that's good
enough for me.
"I intend to after that time,
should my life lengthen, to
enjoy what is left of it with my'
wife and family, friends and
contribute to my country in a
different way," said the former
agriculture and local govern-
ment minister.
During his speech, Mr Gray
also criticised the Ingraham
administration for not carrying
out critical repairs to damaged
roads in Mayaguana and not
upgrading the island's airport.


"All you could see is a muf-
fler piece here,,a muffler piece
there and that's because of you
the road has not been
repaired in years.
"This government has
allowed the Mayaguana airport
to get into a state of disrepair
that Bahamasair cease to fly in
there that's a disgrace. There
cannot be any excuse for the
weeds on the airport to have
grown to the extent that
Bahamasair said to the govern-
ment we are not flying in
there," Mr Gray said.
He added that a doctor has'
not been able to fly into
Mayaguana for months because
of the state of the airport.
"The doctor has not been in
Mayaguana for the past three,
four months. You know why?
Bahamasair used to take the
doctor from Inagua to
Mayaguana, so now Mayagua-
na people have not had a doc-
tor since around January or
February. Something is wrong
with that."
The MP also urged govern-
ment to provide potable water
for residents of Crooked Island.
He added there are bad
roads in Salina Point, Acklins,
which need repair, an area he
argued is neglected because it is
a PLP stronghold.
"Salina Point is absolutely,
PLP and I believe that's why
they ain' do nothing for them,"
Mr Gray argued.


A P PE RTIES


-I


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 11


-


PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.


HOSSA IARTETSCMMRIAL B IIG


The Peal estate

agents are coming

By MIKE LIGHTBOURN

YOUR home may be a
good candidate for an open
house. If your BREA
agent offers to show off
your home to other real
estate brokers and agents
on a weekend or during
the week, apply some
elbow grease and take
advantage of this great
marketing opportunity!
BREA agents constantly
monitor what's on the mar-
ket so they can find the
best match for their clients
in as short a time as possi-
ble, regardless of which
company lists the property.
That means knowing the
property.
The first step to an open
house obviously is to tidy
up. Give all your counter-
tops a spacious feel by, hid-
ing your toiletries under
the sink in the bathroom.
Stash your kitchen appli-
ances in the cabinets.
Clean and clear make a
great impression.
Also remove pho-
tographs, appointment
cards, school artwork, etc.
from the refrigerator and
other areas of the house.
Yes, it's your home, but
you want buyers, through
the eyes of their agent, to
picture it as their home, so
don't intrude on the fanta-
sy!
The one thing that
shouldn't be in the home
during an open.house is.. .
you. No offence meant, but
agents are there to see the
home,tnot the owner, and
they may feel uncomfort-
able having candid dia-
logue with your BREA
agent if you are within
earshot.
Your BREA agent
knows how to field ques-
tions. In turn, they will
report on the feedback.
Don't take offence about
what you hear (the colour
you love may be too loud),
but welcome the honest,
free advice.
Make your visitors feel
at ease, and trust your
agent to take care of the
rest! After all, it's what
they're trained to do.

(Mike Lightbourn is
president of Coldwell
Banker Lightbourn Realty)


EVACUATIONS

PLANNED AFTER HAITI

LAKE BURSTS BANKS

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
Associated Press

AID OFFICIALS say
they plan to evacuate as
many as 1,000 stranded vil-
lagers because the coun-
try's largest lake has over-,
flowed its banks after
weeks of steady showers.
Leonard Doyle of the
International Organization
for Migration says two or
three villages near Lake
Azuei are surrounded by
water after brackish lake
burst its banks overnight.
Humanitarian groups are
planning to evacuate flood
victims by boat.
Canals that are supposed
to stabilise the lake's water
levefare clogged with
trash.
Lake Azuei straddles the
Haitian-Dominican border
and has seen flooding for
years.
Haiti has seen weeks of
downpours as the rainy
season shifts into the hurri-
cane season, which began
last week.


I


I


I


I


I


VACAT PRPERIE


EXUMA
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of land be-
ing Lot No. 102 in the Subdivision known as
"EXUMA HARBOUR" Great Exuma measur-
ing 10,000 sq ft. Appraised value $20,000. .
(569). Lot ofland being Lots #961 and 962 Ba-
hama Sound of Exuma No.4, western portion
ofthe FOREST Estate in the vicinity ofFOREST,
Great Exuma, Bahamas. Property is 20,000,sq
ft. Appraised value: $20,000.
(569) Single family residential Lot # 11698 Ba-
hama Sound Subd. #11 West, Great Exuma. Size:
approx. 10,426 sq ft. Appraised value $15,000.
(569) Single family residential Lot No. 11703
Bahama Sound Subd. Number 11 West, Great
Exuma. Size: approx. 10,000 sq.ft. Appraised'
value $15,000.
(008) Vacant lot of land #6592 Bahama Sound,
ExumaNo8E, Great Exuma. PropertySize 10,000
, sq ft. Appraised Value $20,000.
(008) Partially developed parcel ofland being
10,000 sq.ft. situated about the eastern portion
of The Forest Estate in the vicinity of the settle-
ments of Southside and The Forest being Lot
Number 4803 in Bahama Sound oif Exuma 6,
ExumaThe Bahamas. Appraised value $25,000.
(008) Lot and land on Great Exuma, Bahamas
and situated (10 1/2) miles Northwestward-
ly of George Town, lot #10750 Bahama Sound
O.A.E. 10,900 sq ft. Appraised value $65,000.
(008) An undeveloped waterfront lot #12032
size 10,600 sq.ft. in the Bahama Sound of Exu-
ma Subdivision Number 11 West, Great Exuma,
-Bahamas. Appraised value $224,000.
(008) Vacant Residential Property all that piece
parcel or lot of land being lot No. 12903 Baha-
ma Sound No.14 a subdivision of a tract of land
situated approximately 15/8 miles southeast-
wardly of George Town, Exuma Bahamas. Prop-
erty Size 10,000 sq ft. Appraised Value $20,000.
(008) Vacant Residential Property all that
piece of parcel or lot of land being a portion
of Lot No. 51, Area 3, Palm Hill Section, Fla-
mingo Bay Estates a subdivision situated im-
mediatelysouth of George Town, on the Island
ofExuma Bahamas. Property Size 10106 sq.ft.
Appraised value $35,000.00
(008) All that piece parcel or lot of land being
Lot No. 9773, Bahamas.Sound No. 9, a subdivi-
sion of land situated a the northern portion of
'The Forest Estate' in the vicinity of the settle-
ment ofMt. Thompson and Farmer's Hill, Great
'Exuma, Bahamas. 111/4 miles from George
Town. The subject site contains 10,000 sq ft


COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE
Teh 242-356-8568
(800) Mrs. Monique Crawford
(801) Mr. Jerome Pinder
(802) Mr. Brian Knowles
(803) Ms. Gillian Beckles-Slatter
(805) Mrs. Tiffany Simms O'brien
(806) Mrs. Lois Hollis
(807) Mr. Lester Cox
(808) Mrs. DaShann Clare-Paul
(811) Ms. Lydia Rahming


and undeveloped. Appraised value of $18,000.
(008) Lot of land No. 19726-7 & 19283-4 lo-
cated Bahama Sound No. 21, on Taxi Way, a
subdivision of land situated at approximately
2000 feet north east of George Town, Old Air-
port and about 1.5 miles southeast of the set-
tlement of George Town, Great Exuma, Baha-
mas. The undeveloped properties are a total
of 8,000 sq.ft. Appraised value $32,000.
(008) Lot #14857, Bahama Sound No. 17, sub-
division approximately 1/4 mile Southeastwardly
of the Southside and 1 mile from Moss Town
Airport, Great Exuma, Bahamas, located Morn-
ing Glory Road. This partially developed lot
contains 9,010 sq ft. Appraised value $12,764.
(008) Vacant property, lot#10948, Bahama
Sound #8, northeastern portion of The Forest
Estate, vicinity of MtThompson and Farmer's
Hill, Great Exuma, Bahamas. Appraised value:
TBA
(008) Lot No. 1862, located Bahama Sound
No. 5 East, a subdivision ofland situated at the
southeastern portion of The Forest Estate, in
the vicinity of the settlements of the South-
side and The Forest, Great Exuma, Bahamas.
This undeveloped property.contains a total of
10,000 sq ft. Appraised value $12,000.
(569) Lot #14872 situated at the northeastern
portion of The Forest Estate in the vicinity of
the settlements of Mt. Thompson and Farm-
er's Hill, Great Exuma one of the Bahama Is-
lands. Property is 10,000 sq.ft. Appraised value
$110,000.
(401) Vacant lot of land and being part of a
parcel of a tract of land known as "Hooper's",
Great Exuma. The property is comprise of 8,661
sq. ft. Appraised value $25,000.
(008) Lot#5101 located Bahama Sound #6,,
western portion ofThe Forest.Estate near South-
side and The Forest, Great Exuma. Appraised
value $20,000.
(569), Lots #7531B, #7890R and #7890T Ba-
hama Sound of Exuma No.II Subdivision sit-
uate on the Island of Great Exuma, Bahamas.
Appraised value $55,000.
(008) Parcel oflandlot#8819, Bahama Sound
#12 situated about 7 miles northwest of George
Town, Great Exuma. Appraised value TBA.
(008) Lot No. 3199, Bahama Sound, Exuma
No.5 Great Emma and Lot No. 6735 situated
10.5 miles northwest of GeorgeTown, Bahama
Sound No. 8 east Exuma Bahamas. Both lots are
vacant and are 10,000 sq ft. Appraised $20,000
& $8,000.


PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-322-4426/9 or 242-302-3800
(201) Mrs. Patrice Ritchie
NASSAU MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-322-8700
(701) Mr. James Strachan
(301) Ms. Thyra Johnson
(304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson
MACKEY STREET BRANCH
Tel: 242-393-3097
(601) Ms. Nicole Evans
JOHN F KENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH
Tel: 242-325-4711
(401) Mr. Robert Pantry,
PARADISE ISLAND BRANCH
Tel: 242-363-1404
(550) Ms. Cherelle Martinborough


(008) Lot No. B-7429 Bahama Sound No. 11
of Great Exuma, Bahamas. Property Size 10,000
sq ft.Vacant property. Appraised value $16,800.
(008) Lot #4919 Bahama Sound No. 6, Exu-
ma. Property Size 10,000 sq ft. Vacant property.
Appraised value $10,000.
(008) All that piece of parcel or lot of land
being lot Nos. 9652 &9653 of Bahama Sound
No. 9, Great Exuma situate about 101/2 miles
Northwest of settlement of George Town, Ex-
uma, Bahamas. Property Size 10,000 sq ft. Va-
cant property. Appraised value $34,000.
(008) Lot #1202, Bahama Sound No. 3,Ex-
uma. Lot size 10,000 sq ft. Appraised value
$9,000.
(571) Lots ofland being Lot #C-14068, C-14069
and C-14070, C-14071, Bahama Sound No.16,
Great Exuma, Bahamas: Appraised value. TBA
(008) Lot 6-2R being a part of Parcel 6, "Hope
Hill Estate", approximately 3/4 mile southeast
of Rolleville on the Northern coast of Great Ex-
uma, Bahamas. Property size: 11,989 sq ft. Ap-
praised Value $140,000.00.
(008) Vacant Lot No 8B in Southside Settle-
ment, subdivisions of land situated at approxi-
mately 1/4 mile Southeastwardly of Southside
and 1 mile south ofMoss Town Airport, Great
Exuma,.Bahamnas. Property size: 11,029 sq. ft.
Appraised value $44,116.00.
(572) Lot # 14842 Ocean Addition West, Ex-
uma. Great Exuma, Bahamas and containing
four 2 bed I bath cottages. Property is 10,000
sq.ft. Appraised Value $687,000
(725) Lot of land situate Southwardlyof the
Queen's Highway near Hooper's Bay having #33A
& #33B in the Island of Exuma one of the Is-
lands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Proeprty is in two parcels with a total of 26,634
sq.ft. Appraised value $106,000.

ELEUTHERA
(902) Vacant Lot #18 Block 33 Section "C"
Rainbow Bay on the island of Eleuthera, Ba-
hamas. The property is located in a developed
residential subdivision with all amenities. Ap-
praised value $35,000.
(569) All that piece parcel or lot of land being
Lot #5, Block 29A Section C Eleuthera Shores,
Eleuthera Island, Bahamas. Appraised value
$29,000.
(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65 sq. ft.) situated
in Mango Lane Section "B" Block #15, Eleuthera
Island Shores on the Island of Eleuthera. Ap-
praised value $50,189.


(565) Vacant lot #5 located Eleuthera Island
Shores, Seaside Drive Section B, Block #15,
Eleuthera, Bahamas. 9,691 sq. ft. Appraised
value $27,620.
(902) Lot # 10 comprising 10,546 sq ft situ-
ated on Northeast side of the Queen's Highway
on the island of Eleuthera approx. Three hun-
dredths of a mile Northwest of the Palmetto
Point crossing. Appraised Value $32,000
(569) Lot of land James Cistern, Eleuthera,
Bahamas approx 10,000 sq ft. Appraised value
$56,000
(569) Lot #3 being a portion of the subdi-
vision of a tract of land located in the village
approximately 1.41 miles southeast ofWemyss
Bight, Eleuthera, Bahamas and measuring 3.240
acres (281.27' x502') Appraised value $60,000.
ABACO
(909) Lot # 1, Aunt Pat's Bay Subdivision ,
Elbow Cay, Abaco containing 15,549 sq ft. Ap-
praised value: TBA
(909) Lot #54, in the Hopetown Point Subdi-
vision, located Hope Town, Elbow CayAbaco.
Appraised value TBA
(909) Lot of land situate on the Southwestern
side ofS. C. Bootle Highway and approximately
2 miles Northwesterly from the settlement of
MurphyTown, on the Island ofAbaco qontain-
ing 64,905 square feet. Appiaised Value: TBA.
(909) Lot #39, located Central Pines Subdivi-
sion containing 12,473 square feet situate south
of Dundas Town and west of Marsh Harbour,
Abaco. Appraised value: TBA
(505) Ten acres of land onWoods Cay, Little
Abaco, between Cooper's Town and Cedar Har-
bour, Abaco, Bahamas. The property is unde-
veloped but has a seaview from both the north
and south side. Appraised Value $1,078,750.
(909) Vacant residential Lot# 63 (7800 sq. ft.)
Crown Allotments located Murphy Town, Aba-
co- Appraised value $18,000.
(910) Lot #14, in block No. 194 residential
property situated in Treasure Cay, Abaco. Ap-
praised value $28,000.
(910) Developed residential property known
as Lot No.3, Block 211, Treasure Cay, Abaco.
Appraised value: $75,000.
(801) Parcel of Land known as Lot B, consist-
ing of0.306Acres, "Ocean Point," Winding Bay
Su division, Abaco, Bahamas. Appraised Value
$250,000.
(801) Parcel of Land known as Lot E, consist-
ing of0.217Acres, "Ocean Point,"Winding Bay


Subdivision, Abaco, Bahamas. Appraised Value
$300,000.
(801) LotG, consisting of 0.349 Acres, "Ocean
Point," Winding Bay Subdivision, Abaco, Baha-
mas. Appraised Value $250,000.
(801) LotA, consisting of 1.103Acres, "Ocean
Point'Wminding Bay Subdivision, Abaco, Baha-
mas. AppraisedValue $500,000.
(801) Lot C, consisting of 0.321 Acres, "Oceanr
Point," Winding Bay Subdivision, Abaco, Baha-
mas. Appraised Value $300,000.'
(801) Lot E consisting of 0.381 Acres, "Ocean
Point," Winding Bay Subdivision, Abaco, Baha-
mas. Appraised Value $300,000.
(908) Undeveloped property located lot #4,
Crossing Rocks, Abaco. Appraised value:TBA
(910) Undeveloped property Lot No. 41,Treas-
urea Cay, Abaco. Appraised value $130,000.00
(910) Lot No. 40 Block No. 211, located at
Treasure Cay. Appraised value $80,000
(910) Developed land Lot#13 near the settle-
ment of Fire Road; Abaco, Bahamas. Appraisal
Value $219,680.00.

OTHER FAMILY ISLANDS
(569) Lot#518 Section 2, Phase III Stella Maris
Subdivision, Long Island. Property is 11,700
sq.ft. Appraised value $45;000.
(569) Vacant land, Lot #184 of Phase 3, Sec-
tion 2 of Stella Maris Sub-Division (11,500 sq.ft.)
situated at Adderley's, Long Island. Appraised
value $30,000.
(569) 4.8 acres of vacant land being portion
of Lot #68, Flowers Road, Driggs Hill, South
Andros. Appraised value $35,000.
(902) Lot #s 13 & 14 Block 50 Greenwood Es-
tates Subdivision, Cat Island. property size 8,000
sq ft each. Appraised Value $40,000
(560) Two vacant properties (Lot 12c 5789
sq.ft and Lot 12d 5231 sq ft) Creek Bay Subdi-
vision, Russell Island Bridge on the northern
side of the island, Russell Isand, Spanish Wells.
These lots are elevated lots that offer outstand-
ing ocean views and a short path to the beach.
Appraised value Lot 12c $85,000 and Lot 12d
$80,000.
(105) Lot of land situate in South Bimini be-
ing Lot 11 Block No.2 of the Buccaneer Point
Subdivision Bimini Bahamas Appraised Value:
TBA
(566) Lot of land near Nicolls Town, Andros
measuring 10,800 sqft. AppraisedValue $19,000.


OFIC R


PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING
CENTRE
Tel: 242-393-7505/8
(501) Ms. Nicole Evans
(505) Ms. Patricia Russell
CABLE BEACH BRANCH
Tel: 242-327-6077
(466) Mr. Derek Sturrup
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
Tel: 242-502-5170/502-5180
(716) Ms. Quincy Fisher
(717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby
(723) Ms. Deidre King
(725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson
(565) Mrs. Catherine Davis
(566) Mrs. Kenyatta Johnson
(569) Mrs. Vanessa Scott
(570) Mr. Elton Kemp
(571) Mrs. Faye Daniels
(572) Mr. Ryan Brown
(573) Ms. Annisha Wilson


NASSAU INT'L AIRPORT
Tel: 242-377-7179
(433) Mrs. ReneaWalkine
LYFORD CAY BRANCH
Tel: 242-362-4540 or 242-362-4037
(101-N) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson
GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR,
ELEUTHERA
Tel: 242-332-2856/8
(902) Ms. Evette Burrows
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
Tel:242-333-2230
(901) Ms.Velderine Laroda
ANDROS TOWN BRANCH
Tel: 242-368-2071
(400) Ms. Bianca Simms
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO
Tel: 242-367-2420
(908) Mrs Sylvia Poitier
(909) Mr. Travis Spicer
(910) Ms. Elivira Moss
(914) Mr. Julius Seymour


BIMINI BRANCH
Tel:242-347-3031
(105) Ms. Italia Beckford
GRAY'S, LONG ISLAND
Tel 242-337-0101 -
(100) Mrs. Lucy Wells
EXUMA BRANCH
Tel: 242-336-3251
(008) Ms. Joycelyn Mackey
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
Tel 242-352-6631/2
(101-F) Ms. Gamell Frith
(102) Ms. Elaine Collie
(103) Mrs. Damita Newbold-Cartwright
(108) Ms. Sylvie Carey
SPANISH WELLS
Tel: 242-333-4131 or 242-333-4145
(560) Mr. Walter Carey


NR3C.Hi


-1


EXUMA
(008) Lot #4742 Bahama Sound ofExuma No.6
a subdivision of land situate at the southeastern
portion of The Forest Estate near Southside and
The Forest Great Exuma. Property size 10,000
sq ft. Building size 2400 sq ft. Consistingof 2- 1
bedroom and bath unit and 1-2 bedrooms bath
unit. Appraised value $219,200.
(569) Lot # 14867. Bahama Sound, Exuma,
10 miles northwest of George Town, Exuma
and about 1 mile south of Emerald Bay, The
Four Seasons Resort and Roker's Point. Locat-
ed Mt. Thompson and Farmer's Hill. Property
size 10,000 sq ft with 80 ft frontage on Queens
Highway; the main road. Property contains a
partially completed apartment complex with
five, 1 bedroom units, 4 efficiency units and 1
shop space. Appraised value $488,240.
(008) Property containing 3 beds 1-bath home
constructed of concrete blocks located Moss,
Town and number 18 in The Department of
,Housing Subdivision, Moss Town Exuma Ba-
hamas. Property Size 7853. Appraised Value$
131,800.
.(008) Property containing 6 Units 1-bed 1-bath
apartment units to First Floor Belt Course. Par-
tially developed properties. All those piece or
lots of land being Lot # 1679 and 1680 Bahama
Sound Subdivision, Exuma Number 3, Great
Exuma. Properties Size: 10,000 sq ft each. Ap-
praised Value $205,000.
(008) Partially developed property located
Golf Boulevard, lot# 20, Flamingo Bay Estates
near George Town, Exuma, Bahamas. The land
is 25,017 sq ft and with a two storey apartment
complex with a living area of 1770 square feet.
The building is completed to the first floor belt-
course and all electrical, plumbing and other
rough work have been completed on the ground
floor. Appraised value $100,050.
(008) Developed propertylocated lots #11165
& 11166, Bahama Sound #8, Great Exuma. The
land is 7,200 square feet containing duplex with
a building area of 1,706 square feet with (1) two
bed/2bath unit and (1) two bed/l bath unit. Ap-
praised value $185,376.
(008) Developed property located lot#9.786,
Bahama Sound F9 situated at the northwestern
portion of the Forest Estate in he vicinity of the
settlements of MountThompson and Farmer's
*Hill and ten miles south northwest of George
Town, Great Exuma. The land is 10,000 square
feet developed with a single family residence
with 1300 square feet of living area, containing
three bedrooms, and two bathrooms. The build-
ing is constructed of hardi-siding. Appraised
vaue $154,000.
1008). Lot located about 10.5 miles north-
west of George Town, Bahama Sound #8 East
lot#6647, a subdivision of land situated at the
northeastern portion of The Forest Estate, in
thevicinityof Mt.Thompson and Farmers Hill,
Great Exuma, Bahamas. Site contains 10,000 sq
ft and is developed with a duplex apartment,
containing 2-bed, 1 -bath apartments. 2,160 sq
ft living area of hardiplank construction. Ap-
praised value $198,000.
(008) Lot of land#12975, #14 Bahama Sound,
Exuma (situated about 1-5/8 miles southeast-
wardly of GeorgeTown). Containing Hardi- plank
building consisting of a triplex partial complete
2-1 bedrooms 1 bath and 1-bed 1 bath units.
Building size 2160 sq ft. Lot size 10,000 sq ft.
Appraised value $180,000./
(008) Lot # B-5707 situated approximately 11
miles north west of the settlement of George
Town, Bahama Sound No. 7 east. Located be-
tween the settlements of Mt. Thompson and
the Forest, Great Exuma, Bahamas. Contain-
ing a triplex of two-1-bed 1-bath units and one
- 2 bedrooms 1-bath unit. Building size 1705
sq ft. Property size 4,000 sq ft. Appraised value
$216,980.
(008) Lot No. 9800, Bahama Sound No. 9, a
subdivision of land situate at the northeastern
Sp.or tionoft lForest Estate in the vicinity of the
Ssetlemenit of Mf.Th6ompson and the Forest,
GOeat Enuiih; Bahamas. Containing a triplex.
Building size 2492 sq ft. Property size 10,000 sq


ft. Appraised value 336,500.
(008) All that piece of parcel of lots of land
being Lot No. 6226, Bahama Sound No. 7 East a
subdivision of land situate at the eastern portion
of the Forest Estate in the vicinity of Southside
and Forest, Great Exuma, Bahamas. Property
size 10,000 sq ft. Containing a duplex. Building
size 1152 sq ft Appraised value $186,320.
(571) Lot of land being Lot #6582 Bahama Sound
#8 East situate at the northeastern portion of
"The Forest Estate", Exuma near Mt. Thomp-
son and Farmers Hill and containing a duplex
(2bed 1 bth each side) Bldg is 1,800 sq ft; prop-
erty is 10,000 sq.ft. Appraised value $260,000.
(008) Lots #6108 & 6109 of Bahama Sound # 7
East situated 101/2 miles northwest of George
Town, Great Exuma. Containing a 1,680 sq ft
single storey hardy plank duplex, with two 2
bed, 2 bath units. Appraised value $214,800.00.
(008) Lot of land being lot #243 in Section
#2, Little Exuma 10,000 square foot. Containing
a 753 sq ft single family home constructed of
concrete slab and T-I Eleven sides with 2 bed-
room/I bathroom. Appraised value $107,344.
(008) All that piece parcel or lot #7794, Calab
Drive, Bahama Sound #11, 31/2 miles south of
GeorgeTown, Great Exuma. Containing a 1,800
square foot single storey concrete duplex, with
(2) 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom units. Appraised
value$157,956.
(008). Lot#18 Section #11 Northeast Flamingo
Bay, Great Exuma 11,396 sq ft single and-multi
family residential lot partially developed with a
1,000 sq ft foundation. Appraised value $101,000.
(008) Property containing 3 Bed 1 Bath Home.
Single Family Hardi-Plank w/ Wood Stud Resi-
dence located 15/8 miles southwestwardly of
George Town and being Lot # 12831, Property
size 10,000 sq ft in Bahama Sound No 14. Ap-
praised Value TBA
(008) Lot No. 5596, Bahama Sound No. 7 east, a
subdivision of land situate at the eastern Forest
Estate near Southside and Forest, Great Exuma,
Bahamas. Containing concrete home with 3 bed
2 bath sized 1062 sq ft. Lot size 10,000.00 sq ft.
Appraised value $219,050.00.
ELEUTHERA
(902) Lot of land 94 x 94 x 150 x 150 on Queens
Highway just south of Palmetto Point Eleuthera
with a two storey stone building containing two
apartments. Each unit has 3 bed/2 1/2 bath,
kitchen, living room and 3 linen closets. Ap-
praised value $287,209.
(901) Lot #32 containing 4 bedroom 2bath
concrete structure located Triana Shores Har-
bour Island, Eleuthera. Property size 80' x 120'
x 80' 120 ft. Appraised valued at $ 332,735.
(901) Lot # 57 block # Trianna Shores, Har-
bour Island Eleuthera containing 3 bed 2 bath
front room, dining room, & kitchen- concrete
structure, 1926.40 sq. ft wooden deck 321.60
sq.ft. property 9600 sq. ft. appraised value -
$448,645.
' (902) Registered Legal Mortgage over Lot #6A
Banana Beach, Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera
with a triplex foundation AppraisedValue Ap-
praised Value $93,000
(560) Tract of land located The BluffEleuthera,
overlooking the beautiful Bluff Harbour. Prop-
erty contains four parcels of land with a total
area of approximately 151,528 sq ft. Property is
ideal for a waterfront development. Contains a
triplex condominium under construction up to
belt-course and a private dock. Appraised value
$1,118,000.
(902) Lot 6A North Palmetto Point Eleuthera
containing a 2bed/ Ibath residence with adjourn-
ing incomplete apartment. Property size 8,500
sq. ft; building size floor/area 1,639.08 + covered
porch. Appraised Value $188,740.
(902) Lot #A54, Lower Bogue, Eleuthera con-
taining 2-bed/1 bath duplex, property size 7,500
sq ft. Appraised value $146,437
(902) Lot # CA 1, Palmetto Shores, South Pal-
metto Point, Eleuthera, containing 3-storey 4
bedroom 3 bath house approx. 3,336 sq ft liv-
ing space; property size 11,868 sq ft. Appraised
value $230,000


(902) Lot south of Palmetto Point on the main
Eleuthera Highway, Eleuthera, Bahamas con-
taining a 2 bed, 1 bath duplex unit with gross
floor area 1,457.84 each. Property size 1.115
acres. Appraised value $212,667.
(901) Lots # 12E and 13W of Johnson's Har-
bourView Estates Subdivision Harbour Island
Eleuthera, with a duplex 2 bedrooms, I bath
each. Appraisal TBA.

SPANISH WELLS
(560) Lot of land # 2 SeaView Subdivision, Rus-
sell Island adjacent to the settlement of Spanish
Wells. Property size 11,323 size 11,323 sq. ft, building size
2236 sq. ft. containing 3 bedrooms, 2 bath, living
room, an eat-in eat-in kitchen, dining room, laundry
room, covered porch, a one car garage, and a
covered water tank. Appraised water tank. Appraised value $299,00
(560) Lot oflandin SpanishWells located be-
tween 8th and 9th street nearThe Islander Shop.
Property size 3,654 sq. ft. Building (wooden struc-
ture) size 1370 sq. ft. containing 3 bedrooms,
2 bath, frontroom/dining room/diing room and kitchen,
House is in good condition. Proper landscap-
ing with poured concrete driveways & walkway.
Appraised value $155,000.00.
(560) Lot # 1 and 2 of a tract of seven parcels
between Harbour Road and the Main Public
Road near 22nd Street Spanish Wells Bahamas.
Property size 12,428 sq. ft. Building size 4516 sq.
ft. containing 3 bed, 2 bath, living room, an eat-
in kitchen, laundry room, covered porch, and a
covered water tank. Basement offers a garage,
work-shop, play room and small office area.
House is in excellent condition Proper landscap-
ing with poured concrete driveways & walkway.
Appraised value $555,179.
(560) Lot of land #2 Ocean Estates, Russell Is-
land, SpanishWells. Property size 12,179 sq. ft,
building size 1976 sq. ft. Buildingis constructed
of lumber and hardy plank, containing 3 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, living room, an eat-in kitchen,
dining room, utility room, covered porch, and
covered water tank. Landscaped with poured
concrete driveway & walkway. Appraised value
$455,190
(560) Lot of land on Russell Island, Spanish
Wells. Property size 13,446 sq. ft, building size
3074 sq. ft. containing 3 bedrooms, 2 bath, an
eat-in kitchen, living/dining room, utility room,
laundry room, covered porch, covered driveway
and a two car garage. Also contains a30,000 gal-
lon rainwater tank. Appraised value $460,780
(560) Lot #27 in a subdivision of8 parcels situ-
ated immediately east of Ocean Heights Subdi-
vision, Russell Island, Spanish Wells. Property
size 12,500 sq ft. Building 1820 sq ft. containing
2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, an eat-in kitchen, liv-
ing/dining room, laundry room and a one car
garage. Covered front entryway an observation
deck and patio. House in excellent condition.
Appraised value $314,000.
(560) Lot of land #1, Sea View Subdivision,
Russell Island, Spanish Wells. Property size 11,
284 sq ft, Building size 2,485 sq ft. containing
3 bed, 2 bath, an eat-in kitchen, living room,
dining room and laundry room plus one car
garage, covered front porclh/entryway and a
rear patio/water tank. Properly landscaped,
with poured concrete driveway and walkway.
Appraised value $375,000.
'1560) Lot of land 1520 feet west of the gov-
ernment dock at Muddy Hole, Russell Island,
SpanishWells. Property size 17,083 sq. ft. Build-
ing 2,426 sq ft. containing 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2
bathrooms, front room/ dining room, kitchen,
garage and covered front porch. Appraised value
347,000.
.(560) Lot on 30th Street Spanish Wells, Ba-
hamas. Property size 6,500 sq. ft, building size
1800 sq.ft. containing 3 bedrooms, 2 bath, living
room, kitchen, laundry room, covered porch,
and a covered water tank. House in good condi-
tion, proper landscapingwith poured concrete
driveways & walkway. Appraised value $272,000.
(560) Lot of land in Spanish Wells located
17th street.-Property size 9,259 sq.,ft. Building
(wooden structure) size 288.9 sq. ft, contain-
ing 3 bedrooms, 2 bath, great front room, full


kitchen, one-car garage, covered front porch/
entry way, back porch. Proper landscaping with
poured concrete driveway & walkway. Appraised
value $322,000.

ANDROS
(400) Property in Calabash Bay, Andros. 75'
x 150' with a small grocery store 480 sq. ft. and
an incomplete 3 bed 2 bath house 900 sq. ft.
Appraised value $65,000.
(400) Lot #14 Love Hill, Andros totalling20,000
sq. ft. Property contains a two storey 5-bed, 3-bath
residence. Appraised value $185,000.
(400) Lot is situated Queens Highway in Cargill
Creek, Andros, totalling 30,000 sq ft. Property
contains one completed building 2 bedroom,
2bath 1,200 sq feet, and two under construc-
tion. Appraised value $324,502.
(571) Lots # 17 & #18 CrownAllotments, Love
Hill Settlement, Andros. Containing a two-sto-
rey residence. Appraised Value $100,000.
(400) Lot is situated in CoakleyBight, Behring
PointAndros totalling 30,339sq ft. Propertycon--
tains a split level 3-bed 2-bath 2,386 sq ft house.
Appraised value $196,253
(400) Lot #16 is situated in Marina Ridge in
the settlement of Fresh CreekAndros, totalling
16,200 sq ft. Property contains a one bedroom
one bath house 840 sq ft. Appraised value -
$90,280
(400) Lot 221702 sq ft Davis Creek, Fresh Creek
Town Area, Central Andros Island, containing
5-unit apartment complex sized 3030 sq ft. Ap-
praised value $195,322.
(565) Lot west of the Coastal Water front and
east of Queen'sHighway directly opposite Har-
old Road the location of (he National Insurance
Sub-Office at the Bluff Settlement of SouthAn-
dros and containing thereon a 2-bed 1-bath
residence. Property size (63' x 75') approx 4,725
sq.ft. Appraised value $75,000.

ABACO
(910) Lot #12 Madeira Park, a small sub-di-
vision on the outskirts of Treasure Cay, Aba-
co with a 9,444 sq ft concrete block residence
with asphalt shingle roof 3-bed, 2-bath, family
room, living room, dining room, and kitchen.
Appraised value $147,000.
(908) Lot# 52 Crown Allotments located Mur-
phy Town, Abaco with size being 10,200 sq ft.
Containing a one storey concrete house with
4 bed/2 bath. Appraised value $200,000.
(908) Lot# 23 located in Spring City, Abaco
sized 8,925 sqft. Containing a one storeywood-
en house with 3 bed/1 bath of 7985 sq ft. Ap-
praised value $60,000
(909) Lot #24, Dundas Town, Abaco known
as Lot #24C, containing 8,914 sq ft containing
a duplex with a 3 bed 2 bath unit and a 2 bed
1 bath unit taking up a total of 2,040 sq ft. Ap-
praised value: $181,028
(909) Lot #2, comprising a portion of Com-
mercial Parcel LotA, MurphyTown, Abaco, con-
taining 14,725 sq ft with wooden duplex with
a 3 bed 2.5 bath and a 2 bed 1 bath rental unit,
with v-joint ceilings and central air-condition-
ing. Appraised value $320,000
(909) Lot #46, being portion of the Murphy
Town Crown Allotments on the island of Aba-
co, measuring 6,483 square feet, containing a
duplex with 2 beds and 1.5 baths for each unit.
Appraised value at $222,463.00
(909) Lot 356 H, situate in the settlement of
MurphyTown on the island ofAbaco, measur-
ing 7,631 square feet containing a triplex that
has two 2 bed 1 baths and a 1 bed 1 bath. Ap-
praise value TBA. "
(909) Lot of land situate in the settlement of
Dundas Town comprising a portion ofLot #11
of the Dundas Town Crown Allotments on the
.island ofAbaco, containing residence. Appraised
value TBA
(909) Lots of land containing 10,178 sq ft and
10,176 sq ft, being a part of MurphyTown Crown
Allotment No. 70 situate in the Settlement of
MurphyTown, Abaco, containing a duplex. Value


$243,000
(909) Lot #59, Central Pines Subdivision, south
of Dundas Town, west of Marsh Harbour, 80 feet
by 140 feet containing a 1,404 square feet house
comprising of 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms,
kitchen, living and dining area. Appraised value
TBA
(909) Lot #56 located Murphy Town Allot-
ments with dimensions of 109 square feet by
109 square feet containing a duplex with an
area of 1,456 square feet and each unit having
two bedrooms on bathroom living and kitchen
area. Appraised value 155,000.00
(909) Lot #22, situate on the northern side of
S C Boote Highway and approximately 558 feet
southwesterly from New Hope Baptist Church
in the settlement of Mount Hope, Abaco, con-
taininga residence 1,500 sq ft and 3 bedrooms
and 2 bathrooms. Appraised value "$157,500.
(908) Lot #40 being a portion of Dundas
Town Crown Allotments containing a 4-plex
located Dundus Town, Abaco. Appraised val-
ue $494,022.00
(908) Lot #21 Dundas Town, Abaco contain-
ing a 3 bedroom 2bath wooden structure. Ap-
praised value $130,000.
(908) Lot #106, Central Pines Estates, Dun-
das Town, Abaco contain a bedroom 2bath
residence. Appraised value $161,425.00
(908) Lot #119 in Section 4 known as Casu-
arina Point, Abaco containing a 1,614 sq. Ft.
residence. Appraised value $240,000.
(910) Parcel of land known as Joe's Creek 3.5
miles south of Treasure Cay containing 3.42
acres located at Joe's Creek, Abaco. Sea view,
Living area, upper & lower, garage/workshop,
Carport, 10' ceiling, two sets of stairs, interior
& Exterior to ground level, covered porch and
extra large kitchen, 24'x 14', with top of the line
cupboards. Appraised value: $625,000.
(909) Partially developed property located Lot
#15, Government Subdivision, Murphy Town,
Abaco containing a two story CBS residence:
Appraised value -$330,000.00
(908) Developed property located lot #37J Pine
Needles Subdivision, Dundas Town, Abaco con-
taining a 2,634 sq. ft. residence. Appraised value
$373,000.00
(908) Developed property located lot #398 in
the Central Pines Subdivision, Dundas Town,
Abaco containing a Triplex. Appraised value
$490,000.00
(908). Developed property located Lots #54
and #55, Block 167, Anchorage Estates, Treas-
ure Cay, Abaco containing a fourplex. Appraised
value $541,000
OTHER FAMILY ISLANDS
(811) Property containing Condo "Milleni-
um II", Unit A-101, building 57, Phase 1C, 2
bedrooms, 3 bathrooms,'living room, dining
room, utility closet & patio. Situated in the area
known as Bimini Bay Resort, Bimini, Bahamas.
Appraised value $485,000.
(105) Lot containing story bldg. with three
bed, two and a half bath residence, and 30' x86'
situated BaileyTown, North Bimini. Appraised
value $235,000
(101-F) Property situated Alice Town, The Is-
land of North Bimini, being Parcel "A" measur-
ing 9,267 sq.ft. with incomplete 3 storey single
family home. Appraised value $542,000
(811) Condo Bldg 20-T (TREEHOUSE) in "Bi-
mini Bay Condominium phases l-A(1)", Bimini
Bay, North Bimini. Unit has 1-bed 1-bath with
1140 sq ft, front porch, balcony and central a/c.
Appraised value: $390,000.
(811) Condpminuim Unit Bimini Bay Subdivision,
2 bed, 2 bath Oceanfront unit, 1385 square feet,
incd patio/balcony located Bimini Bay, North
Bimini. Appraised value $419,900
(100) Developed property part of a Morley's
Tract, corner Lot with a frontage of 149 ft, run-
ning 149 ft on the north boundary and 120 ft
on the south boundary. Property is in Lower
Deadman's Cay, Long island with home (7 years
old) under construction; 65 % completed Ap-
praised value at $148,000.










AP GE 12 MONDAYJUNE 6 20 1


II.


THE TRIBUNE


Ministry Of The Evnironment




Port Department


Notice of Sitting for New Providence Port Authority
to consider Application For Licence Under The Boat Registration
Act Chapter (277) & Commercial Recreational Watercraft Act, 2006

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the New Providence Port Authority Board for
New Providence and the Family Islands will be held at the Port Administration Building,
Prince George Wharf on Thursday 30'h June, 2011 at 3:00 p.m., for the purpose of
granting licences under The Boat Registration Act Chapter 277 & Commercial
Recreational Watercraft Act of, 2006.

Any Person entitled to and wishing to object to any application should do so at least six
(6) days before the date of the hearing, by submitting his/her objections in writing to the
Board and to the applicant.

Persons attending the meeting on behalf of an applicant must produce written
authorization at the meeting.

Applicants for renewals are not required to attend, unless they have received written
notification from the New Providence Port Authority Board.

The under mentioned persons have applied for the grant of licences and renewal as
specified below.



NEW MASTER'S LICENCE -NEW PROVIDENCE


Collie Dudley J.
P.O. Box CB-12875
Nassau, Bahamas

Gomez Jerome P.
P.O. Box SS-5212
Nassau, Bahamas


Nixon Julian R.
Nassau, Bahamas

Robins Kenneth J.
P.O. Box N-4446
Nassau, Bahamas

Roberts Leron C.
P.O. Box GT-2945
Nassau, Bahamas

Stuart Laron F.
P.O. Box SS-19949
Nassau, Bahamas

Seymour Alvario E.
Nassau, Bahamas

Stuart McDonald Deandra.
P.O. Box GT-2282
Nassau, Bahamas


COMMERCIAL RECREATIONAIWATERCRAFT'..


LICENCE NO

NB/12/111


?ERALTJP ?S-LL -E5L rIUJVIuWlL,,.3


.'-: : : '


McKenzie Rashad C.
P.O. Box EE-15853.
Nassau, Bahamas


APPLICATION

Bahamas Yacht &
Sailing Vacation Ltd
P.O. Box N-3545
Nassau, Bahamas


Demeritte Demaro
P.O. Box CB-13600
Nassau, Bahamas

Deveaux Philip T/A
Law & Order
Watersports
P.O. Box N-7225
Nassau, Bahamas


Dolphin Encounters
NB/11/11 Ltd
P.O. Box SS-6257
Nassau, Bahamas


Ellis Prince T/A
Fishy Business Co
Ltd
P.O. Box N- 3941
Nassau, Bahamas


NB/30/11 Bethel Demycon
P.O. Box CR-55350
Nassau, Bahamas


BOAT
NAME ,

"Morning
Glory"
47ft
Catamaran


"Balance"
24ft
Jet Boat

"No Name"
18ft
Angler


"Islander
IV"
72ft
Catamaran
"Treasure
Divers"
34ft
Crusader


"Banana Boat"
18ft
Fibreglass ,


Bethel Demyeon "Banana"
P.O. Box CR-55350 14ft
Nassau, Bahamas Yellow Tubie


Bethel Demyeon
P.O. Box CR-55350
Nassau, Bahamas

Davis Munsine
P.O. Box SB-51123
Nassau, Bahamas


"Parasail"
25ft
Fibreglass
"Hustler IF'
Banana Boat
24ft
Welcraft


NB/34/11 Davis Munsine "Banana"
P.O. Box CB-51123 15ft
Nassau, Bahamas Yellow Tubie


NB/3511 Deveaux Philip T/A
Law & Order
Watersports
P.O. Box N-7225
Nassau, Bahamas


"No Name"
29ft
Premium


A 20




B 10



D 9




B 350



A 34


Charter




Snorkeling/Sight
Seeing/Charter


Transport Boat
For Parasail



Ferry Boat



Snorkeling/Fishing
Charter


B 14 Rental
Atlantis Beach,
Area-Only'

D 14 Rental
Atlantis Beach,
Area Only

B 10 Rental
Atlantis Beach,
Area Only

B 10 Rental
Cable Beach
Area, Only


D 10 Rental
Cable Beach
SAreaOnly

B 14 Parasail
Atlantis East
Beach Area Only


COMMERCIAL RECREATIONAL WATERCRAFT "
NEW JET SKI-LICENCE -NEW PROVIDENCE


CLASS EASS USE


NB/22/11 Davis Errol
P.O. Box SB-51123
Nassau, Bahamas

NB/23/11 Deveaux Philip T/A
Law & Order
Watersports
P.O. Box N-7225
Nassau, Bahamas


"No Name" D
9ft
Jet Ski

"No Name" D
9ft
Jet Ski


2 Rental
Cable Beach
Area, Only

2 Rental
Atlantis East
Beach, Area
Only


"No Name"
9ft
Jet Ski


REG NO APPLICATION BOAT
NAME


NP: 619 ATW Dames Okinawa -.Bowe Sharad
P.O. Box SS-5048 Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas


D 2 Rental
Atlantis East
Beach, Area
Only


"No Name" D 2 Rental
9ft Atlantis East
Jet Ski Beach, Area
Only

"No Name" D 2 Rental
9ft Atlantis East
Jet Ski Beach, Area
Only

"No Name" D 2 Rental
9ft Atlantis East
Jet Ski Beach, Area
only


NB/24/11 Deveaux Philip T/A
Law & Order
Watersports
P.O. Box N-7225
Nassau, Bahamas

NB/25/11 Deveaux Curtis T/A
Splash Watersports
P.O. Box N-7225
Nassau, Bahamas

NB/26/1 1 Deveaux Curtis T/A
Splash Watersports
P.O. Box N-7225
Nassau, Bahamas

NB/27/11 Deveaux Curtis T/A
Splash Watersports
P.O. Box N-7225
Nassau, Bahamas

NB/28/1I Deveaux Curtis T/A
Splash Watersports
P.O. Box N-7225
Nassau, Bahamas


NB/29/11 Deveaux Curtis T/A
Splash Watersports
P.O. Box N-7225
Nassau, Bahamas


NB/30/11 Deveaux Curtis T/A
Splash Waterspports
P.O. Box N-7225
Nassau, Bahamas

NB/31/11 Deveaux Curtis T/A
Splash Watersports
P.O. Box N-7225
Nassau, Bahamas

NB/32/11 Deveaux Curtis T/A
Splash Watersports
P.O. Box N-7225
Nassau, Bahamas

NB/33/11 Deveaux Curtis T/A
Splash Watersports
P.O. Box N-7225
Nassau, Bahamas

NB/34/11 Josey Pedro H.
P.O. Box CR-54821
Nassau, Bahamas




NB/35/11 Josey Pedro
P.O. Box CR-54821
Nassau, Bahamas


D




D


2


Rental
Atlantis East
Beach, Area
Only


"No Name"
9ft
Jet Ski



"No Name"
9ft
Jet Ski



"No Name"
9ft
Jet Ski


"No Name"
9ft
Jet Ski


"No Name"
9ft
Jet Ski


"No Name"
9ft
Jet Ski


"No Name"
9ft
Jet Ski




"No Name"
9ft
Jet Ski


2 Rental
Ocean Club
Beach, Area
Only


D 2 Rental
Ocean Club
Beach, Area
Only

D 2 Rental
Ocean Club
Beach, Area
Only

D 2 Rental
Ocean Club
Beach, Area
'Only

D 2 Rental
Ocean Club
Beach, Area
Only

D 2 Rental
Paradise Island
West
Beach, Area
Only


D 2 Rental
Atlantis West
Beach, Area
Only


FROM TO
CLASS CLASS


NP: 6880 Brown Robert "Summer B A
P.O. Box N-8223 Wind'
Nassau, Bahamas 53ft
Hatteras
"flCOMMERCIL'DfV AL T f'D l A 'nTl AT *T A r


D 2 Rental


RENEWAL OF COMMERCIAL RECREATIONAL WATERCRAFT
(JET SKDI-NEW PROVIDENCE


E NO APPLICANT BOAT NAME


NP: 726 RCB Duncombe Samuel
T/A Sam Ash
.Watersports
Nassau, Bahamas

NP: 727 RCB Duncombe Samuel
T/A Sam Ash
Watersports


"No Name"
9ft
Jet Ski

"No Name"
9ft
Jet Ski


CLASS PASS USE

D 2 Rental



D 2 Rental


RENEWAL OF BOAT LICENCE-NEW PROVIDENCE


REG NO APPLICATION


NP:1341 Moxey David
P.O. Box CR-54760
Nassau, Bahamas

NP: 5076 Munroe Prince
Nassau, Bahamas


BOAT
NAME

"No Limit"
41ft
Hatteras

"Lady D"
98ft
Steel


NP: 6495 Raine Deborah "Solid"
P.O. Box SS-6668 40ft
Nassau, Bahamas Custom
Power Boat
RENEWAL OF MASTER'S LICENC


8543


CLASS PASS USE


B 25 Charter


A 50 Mail Boat



A 18 Charter



v -FAMTILY ISL AND


Gomez Philip A.
Berry Island, Bahamas


Munroe Prince A
Andros, Bahamas

Taylor Chase A
P.O. Box F-40326
Freeport, Grand Bahama
RENEWAL OF MASTER'S NEW PROVIDENCE


LICENCE #


Burrows Jason C.
P.O. Box CR-54219
Nassau, Bahamas
Coleby Cadrington M.
P.O. Box N-7
Nassau, Bahamas

Coakley Doswell K.D
P.O. Box N-9890
Nassau, Bahamas
Forbes Cameio A.
Nassau, Bahamas
Forbes Randy A.
P.O Box EE-17789
Nassau, Bahamas
Hepburn Delton K
Nassau, Bahamas
Robinson Darren L.
P.O. Box EE-16598
Nassau, Bahamas
Varga Travis
P.O. Box SS-5219
Nassau,Ba


Commander Patrik McNei
Port Controller


*PASS USE


18 Charter


S- .: TRANSFER OF JET SKI-NEW


I.
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LICENCE NO.

NB/24/11



NB/25/11




NB/26/11


NB/27/11




NB/28/11




NB/29/11



NB/30/11


NB/31/11


TRANSFER OF CLASS -BOAT LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE


REG NO PREVIOUS
OWNER


NEW OWNER CLASS PASS USE ,


NB/08/11




NB/09/11



NB/10/11


NB/12/11


COMMERCIAL RECREATIONAL WATERCRAFT
NEW BOAT LICENCE-NEW PROVIDENCE

EG APPLICANT BOAT NAME CLASS PAS


NB/31/ll



NB/32/11



NB/33/11I


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Royal Bahamas Police Force National Crime


Prevention Office: Safety tips for joggers


By CONSTABLE 3011 do not continually get it out approached by a attacking
MAKELLE PINDER to change the song as this dog.
can attract thieves.
JOGGING is a great form Furthermore, also when CLOTHING
of exercise that one can do jogging keeping wires Always make sure to wear
at their leisure, however tucked inside of clothing appropriate clothing for the
while enjoying this particu- makes the risk of tripping environment.
lar activity, one has to take over wires very slim. The If it is a cold environment
some form of precaution for. headphone may come' out wear clothing that will keep
their safety. A frequent of your ears and fall to the you warm such as a track
error that joggers or runners floor thus you trip over it, suit. If it is a hot environ-
make is that they become so but when tucked in it will ment keep cool with light
preoccupied in their physical not do this. clothing that will keep you
activity; they fail to be alert In addition, always make cool. In addition, choose
and pay attention to their sure that you can hear back- appropriate footwear and
surroundings. There are pre- ground noise and never turn make sure to tie the laces
cautions one has to take up your player so that you properly as you can trip over
ranging from all topics, cannot,. them.
which are listed below.
DOGS WATER
AREA Some runners are afraid .If you get thirsty easily or
Always make sure to run of dogs, and may see a few for safety, it is best to carry a
in an area that you are dogs on their journey. If you water bottle with you, this
familiar with and that is safe are extremely afraid and dis- will keep you hydrated.
and do not jog or run near like dogs, try to avoid these Some people may get very
bushes, which can provide situations. If you see a dog thirsty and tired during their
* concealment. This way you by far take a different route run so drinking water will
will not get lost at you know or. stay far away as possible. cool you down.
the particular area and also However, inevitably some-
if it is safe the crime rate will times you will encounter MISCELLANEOUS
be low. Always jog or run dogs on your jogging expe- If you have asthma make
with a known companion. edition, so make sure to keep sure to always carry your
calm and not be tempted to pump with you, even if you
MP3s run away as they may chase feel you may not need it.
A lot of joggers carry a you or if a dog does attack, Also if you are carrying keys
music player along with try to "Feed" it your work- or a phone with you keep it
them; make sure this is hid- out jacket or other item of in a safe place where it is
den as possible, by putting clothing. Remember to also not likely, to fall out.
the wires underneath cloth- carry some canine repellent When jogging, make sure
ing instead of out of it. Also just in case you are to make the experience as



The Bahamas granted. .

$1.6m from partnership

to fund programmes

for law enforcement


By LAMECH JOHNSON.

THE Bahamas has been
granted $1.6 million through
a US-Caribbean security
partnership to fund pro-
grammes for local law
enforcement, National Secu-
rity Minister Tommy Turn-
-quest announced last week.
, Speaking during the first
of four technical work group
meetings on maritime secu-
rity at the Sheraton Nassau
Beach Resort, Mr Turnquest
said the funds were made
available to the Bahamas in
the first year of the
Caribbean Basin Security
Initiative (CBSI).
In his remarks, the minis-
ter outlined the benefits of
the CBSI to the Bahamas.
"During the first fiscal
year of CBSI funding,
approximately $1.6 million
was provided to fund activi-
ties in.the Bahamas. These
activities included training
programmes to enhance the
criminal investigative capac-'
ity of Bahamian law enforce-
ment agencies, the provision
of equipment to law enforce-
ment agencies to interdict,
disrupt and deter narcotics
trafficking throughout the
Bahamas and support for the
Bahamas government's
effort to 'reduce the demand
of illicit drugs in. the
Bahamas."
He attributes the recent
successes of law enforcement
agencies to the "close and
productive partnership" with
US and regional govern-
ment. In 2010, under the
Operation Bahamas Turks
and Caicos, the joint forces
seized in weight an excess of
400 lbs of cocaine, 6,000 lbs
of marijuana, 35,000 mari-
juana plants and 400 lbs of
hashish.
Mr. Turnquest also noted
that the support of the US
through the initiatives out-
side of CBSI as they have
donated "six 43-foot state-
of-the-art interceptor patrol
boats, training for more than
155 officials in document
fraud recognition, airport
security management and
response to weapons of mass
detraction."
The CBSI was first
announced by US President
Barack Obama at the Fifth
Summit of the Americas in
April 2009, held in Trinidad
and Tobago. The multi-year
initiative is a partnership
between the US government
and the Caribbean to devel-
op a joint regional citizen


safety strategy, reinforcing
efforts already in place to
secure the region from crim-
inal threats.
It's also improves infor-
mation sharing aiid cooper-
ation.


IUNUINU: I ommy I urnquest


RBC Royal Bank"


Em


RBC Royal Bank (Bahamas) Ltd. invites
tenders for the purchase of the
following:

"All THAT" piece parcel or lot of land
being Lot No. 112 situate in Westridge
Estates Subdivision situate in the
Western district of the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

r Property Size: 22,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: N/A

This property is being sold under Power
of Sale contained in a Mortgage to RBC
Royal Bank (Bahamas) Ltd.

All offers should be forwarded In
writing in sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Commercial
Financial Services, RO. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked "Tender
7939". All offers must be received by
the close of business 4:00 p.m., 17th
June, 2011.


WWw.rbcroyalbafnk.com/caribbean
TM Trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada. Used under licence.


pleasant as possible by tak-
ing these precautions.
Always Remember the B
Three A's: Be Alert, Be
Aware, and Be Attentive to
your surroundings at all
times.
Should you be a victim of
crime while jogging, please
do not resist but take note of
the description of the cul-
prit e.g. his appearance,
clothing, height, physical
details and the direction or


mode of escape. Call the
Police as soon as it is safe to
do so.
If you come across any
suspicious persons) loiter-
ing around your business or
have any information per-
taining to any crime, please
do not hesitate to contact
call the police emergency
at '919' or Crime Stoppers
at 328-tips (New Provi-
dence), 1-300-8476 (Family
Islands)


I_


CONSTABLE 3011 Makelle Pinder


I PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
ADVERTISEMENT

VACANCY

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER
GRAND BAHAMA HEALTH SERVICES


The Public Hospitals Authority (PHA) invites applications from suitably
qualified persons for the post of Financial Controller, Grand Bahama
Health Services.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:

Professional qualification from a recognized accounting body, namely,
American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA), designation
CPA, or Association of Chartered Certified Accounts (ACCA), designation
CA or Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants (CICA), designation CA
or Certified General Accountants Association of Canada (CGA), designation
CGA and at least three (3) years experience as a Financial Controller in a
similar size institution., OR professional Qualification CPA, CA or CGA
and three (3) years experience as a Manager with a public accounting firm;

Excellent leadership and organizational skills;

Excellent communication skills (oral and written); analytical and
conceptualized thinking skills; computer skills- excellent
interpersonal and leadership skills.

The Financial Controller will report directly to the Finance Director of the
Public Hospitals Authority, Corporate Office. I


JOB SUMMARY:
Participates fully in the management and governance of Grand Bahama
Health Services and support Senior Management and the Board with
financial and other business advice to permitdischarge of responsibilities
for public accountability, operation of effective-systems of financial control,
corporate governance and ensure that financial targets for the year are met
in a manner that maintains financial stability.
Leads management role for the Audit Committee work plan and for delivery
of the Authority's five (5) year financial plan and in year revenue budget;
ensuring sound systems of internal controls and good financial management
are in place. The post holder will provide high level financial advice and
support to the Hospital Administrator, Director of Finance, other Directors,
and Divisional budget holders.
Ensures accountability by all persons charged with the use of the
Authority's funds.
Drives the "people" strategy of the organization to ensure that, the
Authority's resources provide the overall business performance needed to
achieve its strategic aims and objectives.


DUTIES:
1. Provides high level expertise in the areas of financial management
and corporate governance to the Board and senior management, that ensure
financial strategies are effectively integrated and aligned within the
corporate management process.
2. Plans, controls and monitors the flow of the Authority's funds to ensure
expenditure is contained within budget. Produces financial reports as
required by the Board, the Managing Director and all its levels of
management, as well as for statutory purposes that are timely, relevant
and proactive.
3. Assists in the development and implementation of the Authority's
financial strategy and plans. Ensuring the appropriate levels of expertise
are in place for effective delivery of financial and management accounting
services and that all statutory and regulatory requirements are met relating
to Grand Bahama Health Services' accounts; including the submission of
audited accounts to strict deadline.
4. Reviews and supervises the implementation of financial policies and
.supervises approved systems of financial control to ensure the effective use
of resources and compliance with PHA's financial policies; accounting
standards; liaises with audit, both internal and external to ensure
systems of control are adequate and secure; promotes optimum standards
of professionalism within financial functions to ensure compliance with
best accounting standards and practices.
5. Coordinates integrated activities across the Authority and its institutions
ensuring the Board,'Managing Director, Hospital Administrator and all
levels of management have the appropriate skills and tools to maximize
scarce resources so as to deliver sustainable improvements to patient care.
4 6. Ensures that there is effective coordination across all elements of the
'finance functions of Grand Bahama Health Services; contributes fully to the
business planning cycle of Grand Bahama Health Services; liaises with the
relevant key managers and clinicians to encourage their participation in the
process.
7. Leads, motivates, develops and trains staff within the department to ensure
that they have the necessary skills to achieve required objectives and to
encourage the development or innovative, creative thinking and team work
across the departments.
8. Develops, after consultation with relevant stakeholders, an Annual Plan for the
management of resources. The plan must be submitted to the Director of Finance
for review and approval.
Letters of application and curriculum vitae should be submitted to the Director of
Human Resources, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals Authority, Third and West
Terraces, Centreville; or P.O. Box N-8200, Nassau, Bahamas no later than 24 June.;
2l*


PUBLIC NOTICE.

INTENTTO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, ALICIA BANITATOUSSAINT
nee BULLARD of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas intend
to change my child's name from ALEXIS SAMIKA ALISSA
WOODSIDE to ALEXIS SAMIKA ALISSA TOUSSAINT. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 13









PAG 14 ODY UE621 H RBN


I|m^rmumrl*lmrl~MINTiERNATIONAL NAE


MAJDAL SHAMS, Golan Heights
Associated Press
ISRAELI TROOPS on Sunday battled hun-
dreds of pro-Palestinian protesters who tried
to burst across Syria's frontier with the, Golan
Heights, killing a reported 20 people and wound-
ing scores more in the second outbreak of dead-
ly violence in the border area in less than a
month.
The clashes, marking the anniversary of the
Arab defeat in the 1967 Mideast war, drew
Israeli accusations that Syria was orchestrating
the violence to shift attention away from a
bloody crackdown on opposition, protests at
home. The marchers, who had organised on
Facebook, passed by Syrian and U.N. outposts
on their way to the front lines.
"The Syrian government is trying to created a
provocation," said Israel's chief military
spokesman, Brig. Gen. Yoav Mordechai. "This
border has been quiet for decades, but only


now with all the unrest in Syrian towns is there
an attempt to draw attention to the border."
Human rights groups say President Bashar
Assad's forces killed at least 25 people in north-
ern Syria over4he weekend, and another 65
activists were killed in the central city of Hama
on Friday, as anti-government protests spread
through the country demanding his resignation.
There was no Syrian comment on why the
protesters were allowed to storm the border,
apparently undisturbed by authorities. But Syr-
ia's state-run media portrayed the event as a
spontaneous uprising of Palestinian youths from
a nearby refugee camp.
After nightfall Sunday, Syria's state TV said
there would be an open-ended sit-in at the bor-
der, and thousands more protesters were on
their way.
The protests began around 11 a.m. with what
appeared to be several dozen youths, brought in
on buses.
It gained strength through the day.


PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
< ADVERTISEMENT

VACANCY

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL

The Public Hospitals Authority (PHA) invites applications from suitably
qualified employees for the post of Financial Controller, Princess Margaret
Hospital. .

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:
* Professional qualification from a recognized accounting body, namely,
American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA), designation
CPA, orAsspciatipn of Chartered Certified Accounts (ACCA), designation
CA or CGaatian4ia Institute of Chartered Accountants (CICA), designation
CA or Certified General Accountants Association of Canada (CGA),
designation CGA and at least three (3) years experience as a Financial
Controller in a similar size institution., OR professional Qualification
CPA, CA or CGA and three (3) years experience as a Manager with a
public accounting firm, n

* -Excellent leadership and organizational skills;

*: Excellent communication skills (oral and written); analytical and
conceptualized thinking skills; computer skills; excellent interpersonal and
leadership skills.

The Financial Controller will report directly to the Director of Finance of the
Public Hospitals Authority, Corporate Office.

JOB SUMMARY:
* Participates fully in the management and governance of The Princess
Margaret Hospital and support Senior Management and the Board with'
financial and other business advice to permit discharge of responsibilities
for public accountability, operation of effective systems of financial
control, corporate governance and ensure that financial targets for the year
are met in a manner that maintains financial stability.

* LLeadsrmanagement role-fbr the Audit Committee work plan and for .

budget; ensuring sound systems ofmtemal controls and good financial
,management are in place. Provides high level financial advice and
support to the Hospital Administrator, Director of Finance, other Directors,
,and Divisional budget holders.

* 'Ensures accountability by all persons charged with the use of the
!Authority's funds.

* :.Drives the "people" strategy of the organization to ensure that, the
.Authority's resources provide the overall business performance needed to
'achieve its strategic aims and objectives.

DUTIES:
1", Provides high level expertise in the areas of financial management and
corporate governance to the Board and senior management, that ensures
` financial strategies are effectively integrated and aligned within the
corporate management process.

2. Plans, controls and monitors the flow of the Authority's funds to
ensure expenditure is contained within budget, Produces financial
reports as required by the Board, the Managing Director and all its levels
of management, as well as for statutory purposes that are timely, relevant
and proactive.

3%Assists in the development and implementation of the Authority's financial
;strategy and plans; Ensures that the appropriate levels of expertise are in
,place for effective delivery of financial and management accounting
'services and that all statutory and regulatory requirements are met relating
ito the Princess Margaret Hospital's accounts, including the submission of
)audited accounts to strict deadline.

4s Reviews and supervises the implementation of financial policies and
supervises approved systems of financial control to ensure the effective
use of resources and compliance with PHA's financial policies; accounting-
standards; liaises.with audit, both internal and external to ensure systems
of control are adequate and secure; promotes optimum standards of
professionalism within financial functions to ensure compliance with best
accounting standards and practices.

5i Coordinates integrated activities across the Authority and its institutions
ensuring the Board, Managing Director, Hospital Administrator and all
levels of management have the appropriate skills and tools to maximize
scarce resources so as to deliver sustainable improvements to patient care.

61 Ensures that there is effective coordination across all elements of the
finance functions of the Princess Margaret Hospital; contributes fully to
the business planning cycle of the Princess Margaret Hospital; liaises with
'the relevant key managers and clinicians to encourage their participation
in the process.:

7T Leads, motivates, develops and trains staff within the department to ensure
;that they have the necessary skills to achieve required objectives and to
Encourage the development of innovative, creative thinking and team
: work across the departments.

8& Develops, after consultation with relevant stakeholders, an Annual
SPlan for the management of resources. The plan must be submitted to the
.'Director of Finance for review and approval.

Letters of application and curriculum vitae should be submitted through
your Head of Department to the Director of Human Resources,
Corporate Office, Public Hospitals Authority, Third and West Terraces,
Centreville; or P.O. Box N-8200, Nassau, Bahamas no later than 2_.
June, 2011.


ANTI-GOVERNMENT PROTESTORS reach their hands to catch a protestor after throwing him in
to the air as they celebrate President Ali Abdullah Saleh's departure to Saudi Arabia, in Sanaa,
Yemen, Sunday. (AP)



PROTESTERS CELEBRATE THE


DEPARTURE OF YEMEN'S LEADER


SANAA, Yemen
Associated Press


PROTESTERS danced, sang
and slaughtered cows in the
central square of Yemen's cap-
ital Sunday to celebrate the
departure of the country'-
authoritarian leader for mf
ical treatment in Saudi Ara
after he was wounded in a roc.
et attack on his compound.
President Ali Abdullah
Saleh, who was taken to a mili-
tary hospital in the Saudi capi-
tal, Riyadh, underwent suc-
cessful surgery on his chest to
remove jagged pieces of wood
that splintered from a mosque
pulpit when his compound was
hit by rockets on Friday, said
medical officials and a Yemeni
diplomat. They spoke on con-
dition of anonymity because
they did not have permission
to'release the information.
Vice President Abed Rabbo
Mansour Hadi was acting as
temporary head of state, said
the deputy information minis-
ter, Abdu al-Janadi. The min-
ister said the-president- would--
return to assume his duties after
vWf treatmunt.'--- .. .
'"Saleh will come back. Saleh
is in good health, and he may
give up the authority one day
but it has to be in a constitu-
tional way," al-Janadi said.
"Calm has returned. Coups
have failed. ... We are not in
Libya, and Saleh is not calling
for civil war."
But in the streets of the cap-
ital, joyful crowds were cele-
brating what they hoped would
be' his permanent exit after
nearly 33 years in power.
Saleh's absence raised the
specter of an even more vio-
lent power struggle between the
armed tribesmen who have
turned against him and loyal-
ist military forces. Street bat-
tles between the sides have
already pushed the more than
three-month, political crisis to
the brink of civil war over this
deeply impoverished and unsta-
ble corner of the Arabian
Peninsula.

"Soldiers
But for one day at least, the
capital was celebrating. Pro-
testers thronged Sanaa's
Change Square, the epicenter
of the nationwide protest move-
ment since mid-February call-
ing for Saleh to step down
immediately. Some uniformed
soldiers joined those dancing
and singing patriotic songs and
were hoisted on the shoulders
of the crowd. Many in the jubi-
lant crowd waved Yemeni flags,
joyfully whistling and flashing
the "V" for victory signs.
"Who would have believed
that this people could have
removed the tyrant?" said 30-
year-old teacher Moufid al-
Mutairi.
Women in black veils joined
demonstrators carrying banners
that hailed Saleh's departure.
One read: "The oppressor is
gone, but the people stay."
Activist and rights lawyer
Khaled al-Ansi said families
and children were arriving in
the square in party clothes.
"People have trickled in since
dawn to the square. Some have
not slept yet. It is like a holi-
day," he said.
But there were also fears that
the president would attempt a
comeback or that his son
Ahmed, who heads the Repub-
lican Guard, would take power
or even try to leave the country
in ruins if he feels he has no
way out.
"I fear the battle of the des-
perates from the regime," said
human rights activist Majed al-
Madhaji. "This is the biggest


AN ANTI-GOVERNMENT PROTESTOR, his face painted with the
colours of his national flag, shouts slogans while celebrating with
others following President Ali Abdullah Saleh's departure to Saudi
Arabia, in Sanaa, Yemen, Sunday. (AP)


fear, that they decide to bring
down the temple."
Yemen's conflict began as a
peaceful protest movement that
-the government at times used
.brutaLforceto.try.to. suppress.
It transformed in recent weeks
into armed conflict after the
president's forces attacked the
home of a key tribal leader and
one-time ally who emerged as a
dangerous rival after throwing
his support behind the upris-
ing.
The fighting turned the
streets of the capital, Sanaa,
into a war zone.
Other forces rose against
Saleh at the same time. There
were high-level defections with-
in his military, and Islamist
fighters took over at least one
town im the'suth in the :past
.two weeks. Saleh blamed the
tribal rikals for the attack on
his compound Friday that killed
S11 bodyguards and wounded at
least'five: senior government
officials in addition to the pres-
ident.',
.. n Taiz, emen's second
largest city, dozen of gunmen
attacked the presidential palace
on'Sunday, killing four soldiers
* in an attempt to storm the com-
pound, according to militarN
officials and witnesses.
They said one of the attack-
ers' was also killed in the vio-
lence. The attackers belong to a
group set up recently to avenge
the killing of anti-regime pro-
testers at the hands of Saleh's
security forces.
Nine soldiers were killed
when gunman ambushed a mil-
itary convoy in the south, offi-
cials said. They spoke on con-
dition of anonymity because
they were not authorised to talk
to the media.
Saleh has been under intense
pressure to step down from his
powerful Gulf neighbors, who
control a large share of the
world's oil resources, and from
longtime ally Washington. They
all fear Yemen could be headed
toward a failed state that will
become a fertile ground for al-
Qaida's most active franchise
to operate and launch attacks
abroad.,
In a display of the kind of
political maneuvering that has
helped keep in power through
numerous perils, he agreed
three times to a U.S.-backed
Gulf Arab proposal for ending
the crisis only to back out at
the last minute.
Now, Saleh's injuries and his
treatment abroad provide him
with what could turn out to be a
face-saving solution to exit
power.
A Yemeni official, who
spoke on condition of anonymi-
ty because he wasn't authorised
to release the information, said
Saleh left with his two wives
and some of his children. The


official said he and others
learned about Saleh's plans
only after the president left. A
SSaudi medical official said his
condition was "not good."
... Salehldid not issue..a.decree
putting his vice president in
charge while he is away in Sau-
di Arabia. A terse statement
from his office only said he had
arrived in Saudi Arabia for
medical tests and that he was
in good health.,
The president's departure
was shrouded in extreme secre-
cy and many in the government
did not know of his early Sun-
day departure until he had actu-
ally arrived in Saudi Arabia.

Officials

Significantly, military officials
said Hadi, the vice president,
met late Saturda. night in
Sanaa with several members of
Saleh's family; including his son
: and one-ti e heir apparent
:Ahmed, whio commands the
powerful Republican Guard.
Others who attended the meet-
ing included two of the presi-
dent's nephews and' two half
brothers. All four head well-
equipped and highly trained
units that constitute-;t ie presi-
dent's main power base in the
military.
That such powerful members
of Saleh's family have been left
behind in Sanaa suggests that
the president's departure will
not necessarily end the crisis in
Yemen and that he could be
trying to maintain control and
planning to try to return.
For one thing, fighting could
continue between the tribal
forces and pro-regime units led
by loyal members of Saleh's
inner circle.
In his more than three
decades in power, Saleh admin-
istered an elaborate patronage
system to ensure the loyalty of
military officers and some of
those beneficiaries would be
tempted to continue the fight
in the hope of keeping the
perks they had enjoyed under
the president.
If Saleh's departure causes
the regime to collapse, tribal
chieftains would want to take
credit for the ouster of the
regime and get a dominant role
in the country's future. Given
the conservative politics of trib-
al leaders, that could well place
them on a collision course with
the youth groups that have for
months staged peaceful demon-
strations in Sanaa and across
much of the country to demand
Saleh's ouster and political
reforms.
Saleh's tribal opponents are
led by Sheik Sadeq al-Ahmar,
who heads Yemen's most pow-
erful tribal confederation, the
Hashid.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011









MONDAY, JUNE 6,2011, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE


IN T R N A IO A L N WI


UN CHIEF VIRTUALLY CERTAIN

TO GET A SECOND TERM
,UNITED NATIONS
Associated Press


THE worst kept secret at the
United Nations-is that Ban Ki-
moon wants a second term as
secretary-general and will almost
certainly get it, possibly this
month.
As he travels the world, work-
ing behind the scenes and pub-
licly, to help defuse crises and
push for action on issues like cli-
mate change and women's rights,
Ban has also been quietly lob-
bying for support from the 192
U.N. member states for a sec-
ond five-year term.
Egypt's U.N.. Ambassador
Maged Abdelazik, whose coun-
try heads the 120-member Non-
aligned Movement of mainly
developing countries and Chi-
na, said last month that he knew
of no opposition to Ban.
"And myeeling is among the
countries of the Nonaligned
(Movement that all of us are in
support of is election," he told
The Associated Press.
U.N. diplomats believe the
South Korean could announce
his candidacy for a second term
as early as this week. Ban has
scheduled a news conference for
Monday tqo discuss his recent
travels to Ivory Coast for the
president's inauguration; Addiso
Ababa, Ethiopia, for the African.
Union summit, Ethiopia; as well
as to Nigeria, France and Italy.
Ban's. spokesperson would not
confirm that the U.N. chief
planned to announce that he is
seeking a second-term. '-. :
"During the past four-and-a-
half years, the Secretary-Gener-
al has been working hard to
address multiple global chal-
lenges, with a strong sense of
commitment and:mission," said
spokesperson Martin Nesirky.
"He believes that when the
appropriate time comes, he will
be able to express his views
about his future."
Once Ban makes an
announcement, the U.N. Secu-
rity Council must give a positive
recommendation which it would
do in a resolution that needs at
least nine "yes" votes and no
veto by a permanent member
- the U.S., Britain, France, Rus-
sia and China. The General.
Assembly would then elect Ban
for a second term starting Jan. 1,


UNITED NATIONS Secretary-
General Ban Ki-moon. (AP)
2012, probably by acclamation.
The diplomats, speaking on
condition of anonymity because
all discussions are private, said
Ban's re-election could be
wrapped up by the end of June.
The U.N. chief won endorse-
ments from two former U.S.
ambassadors who served during
George WV. Bush's presidency-
John Bolton and Zalmay
Khalilzad.
' "I think by U.N. standards he
deserves a second term," Bolton,
a conservative -equent U.N.
critic, said -
"I think Avoided the
principal prou.,.j of his prede-
cessor which is he has not con-
cluded he is the secular pope.
And I think that anyone who
has resisted that for five years
in the U.N. bureaucracy can be
counted on to resist it for anoth-
er five years."
Kbalilzad, who said he
worked very closely with Ban
for almost two years, said "in
very difficult circumstances he's
done a good job."
"I found him to be a man with
the right values to lead the Unit-
ed Nations." he told the AP
recently. "He's committed to
human rights, committed to
democracy, committed to eco-
nomic empowerment, focused
on the plight of the disadvan-
taged.
"He's got courage. He speaks
his mind. All of those are val-
ues that I think are important
for a secretary-general."


NEW DOVE


MEN+CARE

BE COMFORTABLE 1
IN YOUR OWN SKIN J


COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL


IJLL


111 ~1 -Inn


' ';









AP AF 16 MONDAY JUNE 6,, 1


THE TRIBUNE


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'Irreconcilable differences' end Robin Hood deal


1 Finlayson
announces
'termination' of
bid to acquire


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


Businessman Mark Finlayson last night
announced he was withdrawing from
the deal to acquire Robin Hood's food
retail business, citing unspecified "irrec-


Traders, had "terminated" its bid to close
the deal in principle they signed with
Sandy Schaefer and his partner, Suresh
Khilnani, around a fortnight ago.
"The deal was terminated as a result
of irreconcilable differences," Mr Fin-
lavson was quoted as saving. Explaining


strategy of City Market and expansion
efforts of the same."
The principal players involved were
last night maintaining the low profile
they have held ever since Tribune Busi-
ness revealed in mid-May that Mr Fin-
lavson and Trans-Island had signed a


rival's food oncilable differences", his initial interest in the acquisition, he 'deal in principle' to acquire Robin
In a short press statement issued late added: "The deal was attractive because
retail business yesterday, Mr Finlayson said his fami- it fell in line with what we at Trans-Island SEE page 7B
MARK FINLAYSON ly's investment vehicle, Trans-Island envisioned as a part of our re-branding





$1.1 bn renewable energy spend goal
FOR TOUGHER ACT IP


Insurers still monitoring for
Japan tsunami rate fall-out
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
With 70 per cent of bal-
ance sheet assets as cash
holdings or term deposits,
RoyalStar Assurance's man-
aging director said the com-
pany is well-positioned to
withstand the new Insurance
Act's 'discounting' rules,
while predicting that some
rivals may be forced to
"redraw" their balance
sheets.
Steve Watson told Tri-
bune Business that the Act,
which is set to officially take
effect from September 2011,
would impact all players in
the Bahamian insurance
market "to a greater or less-
er extent", particularly on
corporate governance and
Board of Directors compo-
sition.
Another major change is
the discounts applied to cer-
S tain assets for the purpose
of calculating solvency. Dif-
ferent assets have separate
discounts associated with
them, based, on how likely
it is the insurer will realise
their full (100 per cent) val-
ue.
However, cash has no dis-
count and is valued at 100
per cent, something Mr
Watson said left RoyalStar
well-positioned to cope with
any changes.
"It's going to affect every-
body to a greater or lesser
extent," Mr Watson con-
firmed of the new Act. "It's
going to affect how compa-
nies govern in terms of com-
position of the Board of
Directors. There's going to
be a greater level of corpo-
rate governance, and that
will affect everybody, and
there will be a change in the
way assets are calculated.
"Seventy per cent of our
assets are cash, cash in hand
or term deposits, so I don't
see a major issue for us
there. I think it's going to
force some insurers to
redraw their balance sheets
and assets, and increase cash
holdings."
Tom Duff, Insurance
Company of the Bahamas
(ICB) general manager, told
Tribune Business in a recent
interview that while com-
plying with the Act was
"quite a big exercise", most
Bahamian insurance players
saw it as useful in forcing all


SEE page 9B


By NEIL
Tribune E
Betwee
lion, or $
year, at a
mate" nee
developing
technology
between
report dev
ernment
could sup
per cent o
electricity
Germar
ner, in the:
Sustainal
Bahamas
mates on
'business
one where
measures


HARTNELL
Business Editor


n $1.113-$1.149 bil-
54-$56 million per
"conservative esti-
eds to be invested in
g renewable energy
ies in the Bahamas
now and 2030, a
'eloped for the Gov-
suggesting these
ply between 34-49'
Df this nation's total
demand.
n consultants, Ficht-
ir report, Promoting
ble Energy in the
, based their esti-
two scenarios a
as usual' case and
e energy efficiency
were implemented


* Report for Gov't suggests these technologies could deliver
34-49% of total power needs by 2030
* BEC peak demand 63% higher by 20230 if no change
* Abaco and Eleuthera to generate more than own power
needs via renewables
* Hotels and households can save 53% and 57%, respectively,
of current demand via efficiency


across the board, reducing
power demand by 30 per cent
by 2030. Under both cases,
the investment in renewable
energies was more than paid
back by savings on oil pur-
chases.
Without such energy effi-


Depository's 'night


and day' difference

* Migration of all public company share registers
'on target' for end-June finish
* Hopes facility, when completed, will permit
'greater interaction with investors
* Aims to boost share transaction efficiency and


security
By NEILI
Tribune B


HARTNELL
Business Editor


The Bahamas Central
Securities Depository
(BCSD) is "on target" to
complete the migration of all
existing public company
shareholder registers to its
new platform by end-June, its
principal describing the dif-
ference between' the new sys-
tem and old .version as like
"night and day".
Keith Davies, chief execu-
tive of the Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange
(BISX), which owns one-third
of the BCSD, as well as hav-
ing operational responsibili-
ty for it, told Tribune Busi-
ness that newly-listed Com-
monwealth Brewery's 3,000-
plus shareholder registry was
.already on the new Registrar
and Transfer Agency (RTA)
system.
Ultimately, once all
processes and testing are com-
pleted, the RTA system will
be linked to all other Depos-,
itory functions, namely the
trading system (clearing) and
the banking system (settle-
ment) via the Central Bank
of the Bahamas' Real Time
Gross Settlement (RTGS)
system.
Outlining the BCSD's ben-
efits, Mr Davies told Tribune
Business that it would boost
"the speed and efficiency"
with which share transactions
on BISX took place, plus
reduce the possibility of "set-
tlement failure". He added
that it should also lead to
greater interaction between
Bahamian public companies
and their shareholders.
Explaining that there were
two distinct components to
the effort, the RTA and the
Depository, Mr Davies said:
"The RTA side is fully oper-
ational. That is the side where
we're doing all the pro-
grammes to take the registers
and transfer them to the new
environment."
Adding that this work
"takes a lot more than you
think", because not all
Bahamian public company
shareholder registers had the


sa
te
w


ciency measures, the report
said: "Projections based on
BEC [Bahamas Electricity
Corporation] expectations
indicate that the peak demand
will increase to 541 MW
(Megawatts) by 2020.
"In a further step, the pos-


We created


3,000-plus
shareholders in
ame structures or "consis- the new environ-
ncy in information applied", C
Ir Davies said Common- meant, and suffice
health Brewery did not suffer to say it's night
SEE page 8B and day."
KEITH DAVIES


sible development until 2030
was estimated. We derived
the power demand under the
Business as Usual scenario by
assuming a constant annual
growth of power demand by 2
per cent per year. Thus, pow-
er demand would increase 22


per cent against 2020 by 2030,
and would be 63 per cent
higher than present power
demand."
Having set out a context in
which the Bahamas' energy
demands are ever-increasing,
and ever-more expensive, if
nothing is done, the consul-
tants-'suggest that renewable
energies could supply 34 per
cent of'the Bahamas' total
power demands without any
efficiency-enhancing mea-
sures.
Noting that Eleuthera and
Abaco would be able to sup-
ply more than their energy
needs through renewable
technologies, generating 171
SEE page 3B


(LICO LIQUIDATOR RAISES


FIRST $1OM FROM.ASSET SALE

But no dividends coming back
to main Bahamian creditor, as ^
that awaits $40m disposal of '"
remainder of key asset CRAIGGOMEZ
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
CLICO (Bahamas) liquidator has completed the first stage in
monetising the insolvent insurer's main assets through closing the
$10 million sale of one-fifth of its real estate holdings, Tribune Busi-
ness can reveal.
But the failed life/health insurer's Bahamian creditors will have
to wait a little longer before any funds from Wellington. Preserve's
SEE page 2B


BREITLING BOUTIQUE


OPRAED BY LITTLE E 1'1 ITZERLAD
BAY STREET PHONE !242132.68929










PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JUNE 6,2011 THE TRIBUNE


LICO LIQUIDATOR RAISES


By ROYALFIDELITY
CAPITAL MARKETS
It Was a moderate week of
trading in the Bahamian stock
market.
Investors last week traded in
eight out of the 24 listed secu-
rities with one decline.
EQUITY MARKET
A total of 25,814 shares
changed hands, representing an
increase of 20,152 shares com-
pared to last week's trading vol-
ume of 5,662.
Bank Of The Bahamas
(BOB) was the sole decline
for the week, trading a volume
of 5,420 shares to see its stock
fall by $0.06 and close at $6.85.
Freeport Oil Holdings
(FOCOL) traded a volume of
4,000 shares, remaining
unchanged at $5.50.
Commonwealth Brewery
(CBB) traded a volume of
2,800 shares, remaining
unchanged at $8.33.
Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
traded a volume of 1,784 shares,
remaining unchanged at, $6.98.
olina Holdings (CHL) trad-
ed a volume of 1,000 shares,
remaining unchanged at $2.80.
BOND MARKET
The bond market experi-
enced some activity, trading
5,000 FBB Series C Notes and
5,q00 FBB Series D Notes.
COMPANY NEWS'
Earnings Releases:
There were no financial'
releases last week. -


INT
FOREX Rates
Currency
CAD
GBP
, EUR
Commodities
Commodity
Crude Oil
Gold


Weekly

1.0261
1.6377
1.4495
Weekly.

115.62 '
1,539.50


EQUITY MARKET -TRADING STATES


Week ending 02.06.11

BISX SYMBOL CLOSING PRICE WKLY PRICE CHANGE


AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FBB
FCL
FCLB
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE


$ "1.18
$ 0.18
$ 6.85
$10.63
N/A
$ 2.70
$ 8.74
$ 8.33
$ 6.98
$ 2.80
$ 8.60
$ 1.82
$ 1.38
$ 5.40
$ 1.77
$ 5.50
$ 1.00-
$ 6.00
$ 7.30
$ 9.82
$!10.00


$-
$-0.06
$-
$-
$-
$-
$- ,
$-
$-
$-
$-0.05
$-
$-
$-
$-
$- .
,$-
!i-
$-


INTERNATIONAL STOCK MARKET INDEXES


Index


DJIA
S&P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei


Weekly


12,248.55
1,312.94
2,773.31
9,555.04


Dividend Notes:
Bank of the Bahamas (BOB)
has declared a dividend of $0.05
per share, payable on June 14,
2011, to all ordinary sharehold-


% Change
-1.55
-1.36
18.72
0.35


ers of record date June 7,2011.
Cable Bahamas (BOB) has
declared a dividend of $0.08 per
share, payable on June 30,2011,


VOLUME
0
0
5,420
0
0
0
0
2,800
1,784
1,000
0
0
0
0
0
4,000
10,000
500
310
0
0

to all o
record
AGIM
J. S.
(JSJ) ha
will be I
Room
Hilton:
at 6pm.
Doct
teams (D
AGM
Hospital
Dowdes
2011, at


BOND MARKET TRADING
BISXSYMBOL DESCRIPTION VOI


FBB13

FBB15

FBB17

FBB22


FBB Series C
Notes Due 2013
FBB Series D
Notes Due 2015
FBB Series A
Notes Due 2017
FBB Series B
Notes Due 2022


%Change

0.24
-0.82
1.30
%Change

0.56
0.42


BUSINESS


RoyalFidelity Market Wrap


Bahamas'Got Talent!

Are you a Bahamian performer looking for your big break? From musicians to

magicians, the Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) is seeking

entertainers to perform in the US terminal during the peak summer travel
season.

Musical performers can be either instrumental artists or singers and

must be able to perform one or more of the following genres--Bahamian,
Jazz, R&B, Caribbean, Calypso or Rake n'Scrape.

Entertainers will be required to perform on Saturdays or Sundays between
the hours of 11:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. for a flat performance fee.

We are NOT looking for bands to perform. Soloists, duos or trios should

submit a demo along with a bio to Marketing@nas.bs or submit a hard copy
to NAD's.corporate office at the airport by Friday June 17at4p.m.

Once finalists have been selected, NAD will contact each performer or

grpup to set up a date and time for an in person audition.


For more information, please contact 702-1016.


Ph: 242.377.0
PO 0.-i AP ??'"


AD
Nassau Airport
Development Company


ERNATIONAL MARKETS


p


5IN


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


"TICS


YTD PRICE CHANGE
21.65%
0.00%
39.80%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
-16.44%
0.00%
-0.29%
16.67%/
-8.41%
2.67%
-13.75%.
-11.04%
-18.43%
0.73%
0.00%
-17.01%
30.59%
0.00%
0.00%

ordinary shareholders of
date June 17, 2011.
I Notices:
Johnson & Company
as announced its AGM
held in the Governors C
at the British Colonial
Hotel on June 20, 2011,

ors Hospital Health Sys-
)HS) has announced its
will be held at Doctors.
all's Conference Room,
swell Street, on June 23,
t5.30pm.

i STATISTICS
LUME PAR VALUE
5 $1,000

5 $1,000

0 $1,000

0 $1,000


FIRST $0OM FROM ASSET SALE
FROM page 1B

sale are returned to this nation, as proceeds from the initial 102.74-
acre disposal have been used to satisfy the real estate project's US
creditors.
While some $720,000 of the $10 million realized from the sale to
Zacara Farms has gone directly to CLICO (Bahamas), Wellington
Preserve's major creditor, the insurer's CLICO Enterprises affil-
iate, which is owed some $73 million, will have to wait on the
pending sale of the remainder of the property.
Confirming the sale's closure via a May 31,2011, filing in the US
Bankruptcy Court in the southern district of Florida, Craig A.
'Tony' Gomez, the Baker Tilly Gomez accountant and partner, said
"all allowed secured claims were paid directly out of the closing,
along with closing costs. The purpose of this notice is to advise that
the debtor has paid an initial dividend of 100 per cent of the
allowed claims of unsecured creditors".
Some $8.527 million was paid out to these creditors.
Apart from the contested claim of the Internal Revenue Service
(IRS), the only other Wellington Preserve creditor yet to be paid,
said Mr Gomez, was the "general unsecured claim" of CLICO
Enterprises.
Payment to CLICO Enterprises, and by extension CLICO
(Bahamas), "shall await the remaining closing on the sale of real
estate". That is the deal to sell the remaining 420.81 acres at
Wellington Preserve to J-5 Wellington Preserve, for a $40 million
purchase price.
Referring to the Chapter 11 reorganisation plan for Wellington
Preserve, tqie US Bankruptcy Court for the southern district of
Florida noted in a previous filing: "The plan is based upon three
separate real estate transactions whereby the debtor [Wellington
Preserve] is selling all of its real estate holdings and development
rights pursuant to the three purchase and sale agreements (PSAs)
for the total gross price of $50 million. /
"The purchasers identified in the relevant agreements are Zacara
Farms, which has contracted to purchase 102.74 acres; members of
the Tanen family, who have agreed to exchange [Wellington Pre-
serve's] parcels 23B and 24B for lots 24C and 25C currently owned
by the Tanen's, and J-5 Wellington Preserve, which has contract-
ed to purchase 420.81 acres together with developmentalftights."
The collective $50 million purchase price arguably represents the
best Mr Gomez could do with CLICO (Bahamas) main asset in the
circumstances, given that the Bahamian and world economies are
still mired in recession, and that the Florida real estate market of
which Wellington Preserve is part has been particularly heavily hit.
Still, the $50 million is equivalent to just 75.8 per cent of a
December 31, 2008, Valuation of Wellington Preserve, which
placed the property's worth at $66 million. At it is just 67.8 per cent,
or two-thirds, of the estimated $73.802 million owed to CLICO
Enterprises, the 100 per cent CLICO (Bahamas) owned affiliate.
Indeed, now the first $10 million has been used to satisfy Welling-
ton Preserve's US creditors, some $40 million will be left for their
Bahamian counterparts. This means they will probably recover 54
per cent, or $0.54 cents out of every dollar, CLICO (Bahamas) is
owed by the real estate project accounting for 63 per cent of its total
assets. Mr Gomez also alleged previously that CLICO (Bahamas)
was "asset stripped" by its Trinidadian owner, Lawrence Duprey,
to finance his dreams of creating a Florida real estate empire.
Noting that any dividend received by CLICO (Bahamas) affil-
iate, CLICO Enterprises, from the Wellington Preserve liquidation
would go back to the.Bahamas for distribution to the former's cred-
itors, Mr Gomez said: "One of the primary creditors of CLICO
Enterprises is, of course, CLICO (Bahamas) which, before its
demise, was a Bahamian insurance company, which had been
stripped of liquidassets by Duprey in his quest to develop real-
,estatein Florida.": ...


THE TRIBUNE








THE TIBUNEMONDA, JUE 6,2U1,IPNESS





Bahamas.sI





must have

S


winner's





mentality


By SIMON COOPER
Res Socius

.report SIMON
j ust
issued ',
Ab y
financial market inter-
mediaries, Tullett Pre-
bon, entitled No Way Out why the British economy is in very
deep trouble, should be required reading for all those who
know the impact current world economic trends could have on
our chain of tiny islands. In a nutshell, the message is alarmingly
clear. The Gordon Brown bubble that floated along' on UK pub-
lic spending and private borrowing has popped in rarified air.
This is alarming news indeed. It is bad enough to read about
the possibilities of euro-newbie's like Greece defaulting. But
when a prime supplier of things we all rely on appears to be in
equally deep economic trouble, too, it is time to sit up and
take note of what is happening beyond our shores. Things are
not going that much better in America either, despite what
politicians like to say.
We all know the fundamental reasons behind these problems.
First World economies boomed as borrowing became easier
and government spending grew on the back of entrepreneurial
profit.
That is not happening at the same rate any more here either.
and I just hope and pray the Bahamian government has a
steady hand on the national tiller.
I commented recently on the state of local business loans, and
the worrying fact that around 25 per cent of this sum is in
arrears. This will inevitably cause our banks to become more
risk averse and turn down taps that control the flow of finance
in our country. Hopefully, our government spending can still be
maintained at a healthy rate, or else the consequences could
become far worse.
That said, I am not going to add further to this tale of woe. I
amanl optimist because I believethat all of us in business have
to be that way, especially during economic downturns. There
will always be people wanting to sell good businesses for valid
reasons (and valid purchasers wanting to buy good businesses
with hard-earned money). This does, however, mean that deals
are going to become harder to negotiate.
Discounting vulture funding, which should not exist, and
mindful of banks' increased aversion to risk taking, what this all
seems to mean to me, is that the parties to a business sale
need to be more flexible in their approach. There are a number
of tried and tested models, that I have worked with down the
years. This does not mean they are easily implemented, though.
They also require an atmosphere of trust that is often enhanced
by the presence of an independent facilitator.
I take a keen interest in athletics these days. This is not just
to while away the time.
I like to spot the winners in advance. This is not that difficult
to do if one can discern the expressions on their faces. People
who expect to win do so. People who expect to lose do just that.
I personally believe the Bahamas will come out of these times
perhaps a little leaner, but certainly with a lot more savvy,
and that our indomitable determination will see us through. We
have no alternative. :
NB: Res Socius was founded by Simon Cooper in 2009, and
is a business brokerage authorised by the Bahamas Invest-
ment Authority. He has extensive private and public SME
experience, and was formerly chief executive of a publicly
traded investment company. He was awarded an MBA with dis-
tinction by Liverpool University in 2005. Contact him on 636-
8831 or write to simon.cooper@ressocius.com.


FROM page 1B
per cent and 125 per cent,
respectively, of their power
demand, the consultants sug-
gested: "The excess power
would be transferred via
interconnectors to New Prov-
idence, Grand Bahama
respectively."
In contrast, though, only 7
per cent of Exuma's power
demands would be supplied
via renewable energy, while
Family Islands employing
only Photovoltaic (PV) tech-
nologies would just be able to
generate 9 per cent of their
needs.
"Total required investment
in renewable energy tech-
nologies for the period 2010
to 2030 sums up to $1.149 bil-
lion or an average of $54.4
million per year," Fichtner
noted in the report to the
Government.
"The major share is for
Ocean Thermal Energy Con-
version (OTEC), even though
biomass contributes most in
terms of energy supply."
If efficiency measures were
implemented, renewable
energy technologies would be
able to generate some 49 per
cent of the Bahamas' overall
energy needs by 2030.
Eleuthera and Abaco would
again generate some 238 per
cent and 173 per cent, respec-
tively, of their power needs
through these power sources,
supplying the excess to New
Providence and Grand
Bahama via interconnectors.
"Biomass would contribute
52 per cent of total supply
from renewable energies fol-
lowed by OTEC generation,"
the report said. "Total
required investment in renew-


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able energy technology for
the period 2010 to 2030 sums
up to $1.113 billion or an
average of $56 million per
year. Again, the major share
is for OTEC even though bio-
mass contributes most in
terms of energy supply."
Noting that this showed
renewable energies could
"cover substantial shares of
power demand", Fichtner said
that they could achieve almost
a 50 per cent share of total
energy supply by 2030.
While the low-cost poten-
tial of renewable energy tech-
nologies on New Providence
was "limited", the report
added: "Going beyond a
share of 20 per cent renew-
able energies on power supply
would require that renewable
energies are to be transferred
from one island to another
through either interconnec-
tors or as a fuel.
"Interconnectors might well
be advisable even before,
since they would allow tap-
ping low cost potential of
renewable energy to substi-
tute, in particular, PV on New
Providence. Promoting ener-
gy efficiency to limit the
future demand growth would
allow for reaching higher
shares of renewable energies
at lower costs."
When it came to existing
energy consumption, the
Fichtner report said the "total
potential from electricity sav-
ings in existing buildings with-
in the residential and hotel
sector" stood at around 605
GWh or 27 per cent of cur-
rent electricity demand.
When it came to hotels,
based on'energy audits the
greatest energy saving poten-
tial lies in smaller Bahamian


resort properties, possibly up
to 63 per cent of current pow-
er demand.
"The lowest potential is
with mid-sized hotels," the
report said. "However, the
saving potential amounts still
to almost 50 per cent of pre-
sent power demand.
"Overall, an energy saving
potential of 53 per cent can
be expected for all existing
hotels in the Bahamas. This
potential amounts to 226 mil-
lion KWh (Kilowatt hours)
equivalent to 10 per cent of
Bahamian total power
demand in 2009."
Households consume some
40 per cent of all electricity
produced in the Bahamas,


and the Fichtner report said:
"In total, our analysis reveals
a potential saving of 57 per
cent for all Bahamian house-
holds against present common
average practice. These sav-
ings can be achieved if all
households would apply the
best practice technologies we:
already found in the
Bahamas." :'
The report added that if the
best technologies were pre-
sent in the Bahamas, the ener-'
gy saving potential in many!
households would reach to 83
per cent. "Small households
have the lowest potential for
energy savings, both in rela-,
tive and absolute terms," the
report said. -


Commercial Building

For Sale by Owner
Prime Location Rosetta Street
High Traffic great for Retail
Store/MedicalOffices.
Building Size 3360sq ft
Property y Size 7186sq ft
Price. Upon request


Call Tel 424-2173


SrU-STINE'S COLLEGE

is accepting applications for the following positions immediately


ENGLISH LANGUAGE / LITERATURE
One person to teach English Language / Literature to the junior section of the school (Grades 7
to 9).

SOCIAL STUDIES I HISTORY
One person to teach Social Studies and History from grades eight to twelve. Experience in
preparing for external examinations is a requirement,

CHEMISTRY GENERAL SCIENCE
One person to teach General Science and Chemistry to all grade levels. The applicant must
have experience in preparing students for external examinations.
i
PHYSICS / GENERAL SCIENCE
One person to teach General Science and Physics to all grade levels. The applicant must have
experience in preparing students for external examinations.


ECONOMICS
One person to teach Economics to grades ten through twelve. Familiarity with the National
examination of the Bahamas is needed.

COMPUTER STUDIES
One person to teach Computer Keyboarding, Basic Personal Computer Applications and
Computer Science to grades seven through twelve. The applicant must be proficient in Microsoft
Word. Excel, Access and Powerpoint.

LIBRARIAN
Minimum qualifications are a degree in library science and/or extensive experience as a librarian.
Knowledge of computerized library systems is beneficial.


Only persons with a degree from an accredited University and a Teacher's Certificate need apply.
Two letters of reference, copies of all degrees and certificates, proof of teaching experience and
two passport size photos should be submitted. A commitment to the values of Catholic,
Benedictine education is expected of our teachers. Only those persons who have no difficulty
with Roman Catholic beliefs and teaching need apply. Please submit applications and required
documents to:


THE PRINCIPAL
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE
P.O. BOX N-3940
NASSAU, BAHAMAS


STHE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visit our website at www.cobedu.bs

The Centre for ContnuIng Education & Extension Services

Professional Development Course

Improve your chance for success in the international
Certified Public Accounting (CPA) examinations. Signup
for the BECKER CPA REVIEW today. Concentrations
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COST:
Financial Reporting-$650
Accounting & Reporting/Regulation- $520
Law/Business Law- $465
Auditing and Attestation- $465

The Becker CPA Review starts on Saturday, 25th June,
2011 and extends for 12 weeks.


Sign up today. For a complete course schedule or more
information, call 325-5714 or 328-0093 or log on to
www.cob.edu.bs.


""


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAuE 3B


THE TRIBUNE







P E 4


Young Professionals



unveil 'new concept'


CD

E.

. -


The Organisation of Young
Professionals (OYP), a division
of the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce and Employers
Confederation (BCCEC), was
last week launched to about 150
young professionals and other
guests.
"The idea of an Organisation


OYP LAUNCH: Bahamas First General Insurance and NUA Insurance sponsored the OYP's
launch. Front Row, seated from L to R, are: Paula Adderley, Chandrice Ferguson, Jacquelyn
Gardiner-Smith, Deborah McKinney and Valarie Darville. Standing is Richard Darville. Stand-
ing from L to R are: Mark Taylor, Stanford Charlton, Pauline Ward, Glen Ritchie, Warren Rolle,
Richard Uriasz, Ethan Quant, Michelle Patterson, Kishelle Kerr, Shannelle Johnson, Rionda Godet, Franon
Wilson, Valentino Munroe and Khaalis Rolle.


of Young Professionals, sup-
ported by the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce and Employ-
ers Confederation (BCCEC) is
a new concept," said its chair-
man, Valentino Munroe..
"Some of us, for some time,
have thought that the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce has not


Legal Notice


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 45 of 2000)

BOLZA PROPERTIES LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), BOLZA
PROPERTIES LTD. has been dissolved and struck
off the Register according to the Certificate ,of
Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on the
20th day of APRIL, 2011..

Epsilon Management Ltd.
Suite 13, First Floor, Oliaji Trade Centre
S Francis Rachel Street, Victoria, Mahe
Republic of Seychelles
Liquidator



Legal Notice


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
S... .(No.45 of 2000)

CERISE INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that inm accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
-Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), CERISE
INVESTMENTS LIMITED has been dissolved and
struck off the Register according to the Certificate
of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on
the 4th day of MAY, 2011..

FIDES LIQUIDATOR INC.
Arango-Orillac Bldg.,
54th Street, Panama
Republic of Panama
Liquidator


always kept pace with the
changing business community
in the Bahamas and this is no
longer the case." -
Mr Munroe was referring to
the revamping and merger of
the Chamber and Bahamas
Employers Confederation
(BECon) earlier this year, and
the OYP's inclusion as one of


its divisions. The BCCEC has
established 10 divisions to
address important segments of
business and the community,.
as well as trade and commerce.
The OYP's stated mission is:
"To give voice and be an exam-
ple for young professionals in
promoting social and economic
awareness and change." It aims


to hold discussions in an envi-
ronment that facilitates mean-
ingful dialogue in corporate,
educational, environmental and
social issues, and to provide
y6ung entrepreneurs with
much-needed support to
become successful in business.
By focusing on young pro-
fessionals, the BCCEC aims to
tap into the benefits they bring,
such as their mindset and
skillset. Young professionals
will also help grow the
BCCEC's membership, and
they can obtain the benefits of
being a Chamber member.
OYP membership is open to
young professionals aged
between 18 to 41, who meetat
least one of these requirements:
They have demonstrated a
commitment to personal devel-
opment through work experi-
ence, academics and skill train-
ing
They are an entrepreneur,
or have been employed for two
to three consecutive years.
Employers are encouraged
to sponsor their workers' mem-
bership fee. Some of the mem-
bership benefits include: A
business-to-business 'expo; edu-
cational and global seminars;
opportunities to serve on the
BCCEC board or executive
committees; discounted busi-
ness insurance; a BCCEC pen-
sion plan, mentorship and a dis-


MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT
NOTICE.
CORRIDOR 12
EAST STREET & SOLDIER ROAD JUNCTION


count program with Bahamian
businesses.
The OYP's goals include the
establishment of a resource
centre to provide opportunities
for information sharing, men-
toring, networking and support
services for new and existing
members and businesses.
Chamber chairman, Khaalis
Rolle, said: "We must collec-
tively come together and be a
part of the process and change..
As a country we tend to not do
things collectively but with the
OYP, we must do so. By
putting ourselves forward, we
will benefit from it."
Mr Rolle,thanked BCCEC
board member, Michelle Pat-
terson, who played a key role in
making the OYP a reality. Mrs
Patterson is an experienced
human resources professional
with a long-serving career. in
hospitality and banking, and
she chairsthe-BCCEC's OYP
division. Committee members
also include Franon Wilson, a
director on the board of the
BCCEC. The other OYP com-
mittee members are Valentino
Munroe, chairman; 'Rionda
Godet, an attorney; and entre-
preneurs Ethan Quant,
Shanelle Johnson and Keshelle
Kerr.
Bahamas First General
Insurance and NUA Insurance
Agency are two companies who
are backing the. OYP.


a3c
CD1


Temporary Road Closure & Diversion

Please be ad\ ised that road construction workss will be carried out on the eastern side of the junction of East Street and
Soldier Road from Wednesday June 8, 2011,.


EAST STREET & SOLDIER ROAD (northbound)
Motorist should use the one lane traffic system in place and continue northbound on East Street.


EAST STREET (southbound)
Motorist should use MARROW LANE -* CHENILE AVENUE, cross SOLDIER ROAD and continue south on East
St.


SOLDIER ROAD (Motorist heading north or west)
Eastbound traffic heading south onto East Sircef should use MALCOLM ROAD or EMANUEL STREET as an
alternate
Westbound traffic heading south unto East Street should follow the diersion signs in place.


SOLDIER ROAD (Motorist heading south or east)
Eastbound traffic heading north onto East Street should use CHENILE AVE +"MARROW LANE and continue on
East St.
Eastbound traffic heading north onto East Street should follow the one lane traffic management system in place.


Access will be grated to residents &
businesses throughout this construction
phase. Signs will be in place to idleniy.i
safe passage fbr Pede'srian. .4andlAccess
points to the husinevves in the area from
the diversion, route.

We sincerely apologize for any
inconvenience that may be caused and
look forward to the full co-operation
of the motoring public throughout
this project.


Jose Cartellone Coastruccioaes Civiles S.A
Office Hours: Moan-Fri 8:00am to 6t400pm
Offict: (242) 322-83411312-16(0
1l.shunm.ncpiilMwr a .ra.rl-llonr..,,ni :ir


U


.4,

4-


Ii
4.,


C r.,


uARfiOW L
.ufow I.

rAu ONri A DRN ..
?.ARsoN 'a


SOLDIE ".0


,4ri U i n !R


..a- M,

4.-


I


Ministry of Public Works & Transport
Project ExKrution Unit
Hlotlinu: (242) 302-9700Emal:
Email: iutili i,.mrks lIian, .gB.i.


r iri ( lVRiDGE c(OMI\\ I.Tr.





Ad- n1 ltids I cre, > c.1:S -

NT( 01HIF(.-.A RIUI'CFC('O"IPANYLTD.isr.di, "-1,r,

i -, n
(f) T,r .,ta ,,l ,r,..-- i, '.-. J t ir -.s''i .n .,- (hr day o4yo! 'k ', b' : I[
( P) Di Lilt u rli.l: hecJAh,'-, nol l.. .lj -, (. ( L (.'.J ,




.
rx C,-u l fP '." I .

nla mi'(loinnl


I


BUSINESS


NEW CONCEPT: The Organisation of Young Professionals was launched as a division of the BCCEC
on May 26, 2011. From L to'R are committee members Ethan Quant; Shannelle Johnson; Valentino
Munroe, chairman; Michelle Patterson, division chair, BCCEC; Franon Wilson, director, BCCEC; Rion-
da Godet and Keshelle Kerr.


---.----------~


K III I L II i iI II


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


THE TRIBUNE


::~






THE~~~~~~~ ~I~ TRBN ODY UN .01 AE5


Realtor's social media reach grows five-fold


When Bahamas Realty
sales associate Monica
Knowles receives informa-
tion on a new property for
sale, she uploads pictures,
updates a Facebook status
and sends out a tweet. It is a
social media routine that has
become natural for Ms
Knowles and the Bahamas
Realty team, who incorpo-
rate blogging, Facebook
updating, Linked-in net-
working and Twitter as core
parts of their business.
And it's working.
In six months the compa-
ny's 400 Facebook fans have
grown into more than 2000,
and the 'Likes' have turned
into sales for the company.
Shopping for real estate
online is so pervasive that
experts in the US estimate
four out of every-five trans-
actions start with an online
look.
"I typically search for
properties online and use
Facebook frequently," says
Ancilleno Davis, a first-time
homebuyer. "I'm a fan of
the Bahamas Realty page,
and one day a listing popped,
up that really caught my
attention. I made immedi-
. } ate contact online with an
agent. It was so easy to use."

Expand
"We've been able to,
expand our marketing reach
and increase our accessibili-
ty through social media, and"
we're seeing real benefits,"
says Ms Knowles. "With an'
extensive online presence,
we bring listings to market
daily and utilise the
strengths of various net-
works for specific needs."
Catering to the differences
in social media is critical. As
Ms Knowles puts it: "You
don't use LinkedIn the way
you use Facebook." 1
For LinkedIn, Bahamas
Realty relies heavily on
referrals through agents,
corporate business and oth-
er professionals. The com-
pany is often sought out by
its profile to provide living
accommodations'for inter-
national corporations.
In addition to property
listings, Bahamas Realty
uploads clips of its TV show,
Bahamas Realty Now, to the
company's YouTube chan-
nel, which is then linked to
"all of its other networking'
sites.


Like buyers, sellers are
benefiting from Bahamas
Realty's recognition of the
power of the new media.
"I'm not a social media
person in general, but the
targeted campaign Bahamas
Realty organised to promote
my property generated pos-
itive results," said one seller,
who received two offers
within days of listing. The


offer started with an online
viewing.
"Our goal is to appeal to
both buyers and sellers
through our online chan-
nels," said Bahamas Realty
chief executive Larry
Roberts. "It's interaction at
its best, and we hope to use
it in the industry in a way
that ensures clients benefit
by getting the most infor-


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mation about the listing,
about the country, about the
costs of buying and selling,
and they get it in the most
efficient delivery system."


NETWORKING: Bahamas Realty chief executive Larry Roberts and
sales associate Monica Knowles discuss the company's strategy of
-incorporating social media Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter and blogs -
to expand their marketing reach.
Photo by Chris Lowe


POSITIONS AVAILABLE
We are a diverse group of companies and opportunities
exist for the right persons. Al applicants should pos-
sess, at a minimum, good passes In Maths & English,
basic computer skills and knowledge of Microsoft Office;
excellent communication and organizational skills and
an honest, outgoing and pleasant personality.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASST. Resourceful, with excel.
tent administrative, typing and word processing skills. Book-
keeping experience an asset.
SALESPERSON Previous sales experience an asset.
GRAPHIC DESIGNER Graphic & desktop publish-
ing skills. Print shop experience an asset.
JUNIOR CLERK duties include, but not limited to, re-
impilionist, filing, t)ping, copying, banking, etc. Any additional
skills would be an assel,
Fax or e-mail your r6spme &,cov-
The er letter to 356-6135 or jobs@
jC IVC C 3 atheservicogroup.com by June 10,
roUp / 2011. No calls please! We regret
that only applicants selected for
theservicegroup.t-om an interview will be contacted,


Leading law firm with offices located in Nassau and Freeport is
seeking to fill the position.


ACCOUNTS ADMINISTRATOR

The successful applicant should possess the following minimum
qualifications:

An Associates Degree in Accounting or Business Administration
Two to three years experience in a financial environment
Computer Literate proficiency in Excel a plus
Excellent oral and writing communication skills

General responsibilities will include but are not limited to:

Accounts Payable & Receivable
Client Billing
Liaising with clients and outside agencies
Bank Reconciliations




PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES

Ability to prioritize tasks
Ability to work with minimal supervision
Team Player
Punctual with excellent attendance
WE OFFER

An attractive and competitive package of
benefits including a Pension Plan



Interested persons should apply in writing to:

THE HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER
P.O. BOX EE-16663
NASSAU, BAHAMAS


BAHAMAS

Broadcasting Corporation of The Bahamas

Vacancy Notice

Reporter (sports)


The Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas invites applications from suitably
qualified individuals to fill the position of Reporter.

Candidates must possess strong writing and reporting skills. Must be a good
researcherJave_ pod contacts, be able to work independently, meet deadlines, and
execute assignments with minimal supervision. Must have sound knowledge of sports,
News anchoring is a plus. The successfulcandidate will report to the Director News.

.Candidates should, possess a bachelor's degree in Journalism/or Mass Communications
with 4-7 years experience in general news reporting.

Interested individuals should hand deliver letters of interest, together with
comprehensive resumes, marked "Strictly Confidential" and addressed to the attention
of the Director Human Resource & Training at the Corporation's Offices, Harcourt
"Rusty" Bethel Drive, Nassau, Bahamas not later than Friday, June 17, 2011,


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE

VACANCIES


Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following
positions:

Executive Vice PresidentlVice President, Academic Affairs responsible for
ensuring that students receive a quality education and the faculty is support-
ed in meeting the highest standards of research and teaching: administering
and leading in the development of academic and faculty policies and liaising
with the Ministry of Education and other national and international bodies
concerned with the development of policy and quality standards'at the terti-
ary level. Applicants should possess an earned Doctorate from an accredit-
ed college or university and a minimum of five (5) years of academic admin-
istrative experience at the Tank of Dean or equivalent.

Vice President, Student Affairs responsible for supervising the operation of
the student government; initiating actions to strengthen this area of student
life: leading in the development of an effective living-learning environment
in The College's dorms and supervising the implementation of the pro-
gramme. The successful candidate will advise the.President concerning stu-
dent life. Applicants should possess a Master's in Business Administration,
Counselling or equivalent AND at least.ten (10) years of experience in man-
agement with a focus on student leadership.

Chief Information Officer responsible for providing strategic leadership and
operational management of The College's information' technology opera-
tions, faciliies-and-services; evaluating overall operations of computing and
information technology functions and recommending enhancements and
preparing objectives and budgets to facilitate the orderly and efficient cap-
ture, storage, processing and dissemination of information. Applicants
should possess a Master's degree in a relevant technical field; and a mini-
mum of ten (10) years of operations experience, five (5) of which must have
been in management, preferably of technical staff.

For detailed job descriptions, visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply, Interested can-
didates should submit. a detailed, resume and cover letter to Associate Vice
President, H.R., Human Resources Department, The College 'of The
Bahamas or e-mail: hrapply@cob.edu.bs.


B J ......
I t


l


L


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011. PAGE 5B


ma usness ott tants






THE TRIBUNE


FqAGE 6B, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company's (BTC) chief executive,
Geoff Houston, addressed a Rotary
Club of East Nassau meeting last Fri-
day as he starts to make the rounds a
month after taking over the reins of
the newly-privatised telecommunica-
tions company.
BTC has already signed a major deal
with Sandals resorts in New Providence
and Exuma, created a single number
call-centre to handle all company-relat-
ed business, and launched its restruc-
turing, offering voluntary separation
packages to help contain operating
costs and-lower rates.
BTC's Facebook continues to be a
leading social media site with more
than 61,000 fans.


EPhoto by Farreno Ferguson


Grand Bahama business



ins TripAdvisor award


It's not been open a year the visitor experience on
yet, but Red Beard's Pub, a Grand Bahama Island."
tavern in the Lucaya area of Mr Botham returned
Grand Bahama, is boasting home to Grand Bahama
:4-. its first TripAdvisor Certifi- from Canada last year with


cate of Excellence.
"I'm thrilled and so proud
of my staff," said Brian
Botham, co-owner of Red
Beard's Pub. "We've
worked hard to promote our


restaurant and
bar, anid it's won-
derful to get this
feedback and
in international
recognition."
TripAdvis9r's
Certificate of
:Excellence 4 is'
awarded to quali-
fying accommoda-
tions, attractions
and restaurants


CERTIFICATE OF
EXCELLENCE: Pictured
is Red Beard himself.
Brian Botham, and his
wife Debbie at their
pub in Grand Bahama.
N Photo courtesy of
Red Beard's Pub


listed on TripAdvisor, which
maintain a high overall user
rating and a high volume of
recent and quality reviews.
"The Ministry of Tourism
& Aviation would like to
congratulate RedBeard's for
winning this prestigious trav-
el award in only their sopho-
more year," said Karen Sey-
mour, Grand Bahama's
tourism director. "They
have clearly succeeded in
doing their part to enhance


BAHAMAS


Broadcasting Corporation of The Bahamas


Vacancy Notice


V ETR Editor/Production Assistant


The Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas invites applications from suitably.
qualified individuals to fill the position of VTR Editor/Production Assistant.

Candidates must possess strong electronic news gathering and field production camera
skills. Must be a good ENG Cameraman/Editor, be able to work independently, meet
deadlines, and execute assignments with minimal supervision. The candidates will
report to the Deputy Director Television,

Candidate should, possess a bachelor's degree in Television Production with 3-5 years
experience in electronic field production.

, Interested individuals should hand deliver letters of interest, together with
comprehensive resumes, marked "Strictly Confidential" and addressed to the attention
of the Director Human Resource & Training at the Corporation's Offices, Harcourt
"Rusty" Bethel Drive, Nassau, Bahamas not later than Friday June 17, 2011.


his wife, Debbie, hoping to
find a business they could
run. A former truck driver
and safety consultant,'Mr
Botham spent the last 15.
years driving throughout the
US and Canada before
opening his own safety and
consulting company with his
wife.
"We've worked hard and
been successful in our busi-
ness, but at the end of the
day we wanted to come and
live here we love it," he
said.
Red Beard's employs 15
staff and opens from 4pm to
2am nightly. "We've devel-
oped a great local clientele
and our Chef, Colleen
Davies, has them coming
back regularly for her great
pub meals and specials,"
said Mr Botham.
"It's the locals who have
helped spread the word for
us, as well as the taxi drivers
and tour operators. It's a,
fantastic recognition of our
all our hard work, and I
hope a great nod for Grand.
Bahama, too."







EINS'IG


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS, 2011 FAM/div/00031
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Family Division
BETWEEN:-

NEVILLE STAFFORD DEVEAUX
Petitioner
AND


OLIVE DEVEAUX nee WHITE
Respondent
TO: OLIVE DEVEAUX of
Nassau, Bahamas.

TAKE NOTICE that a Divorce Petition has been presented to the
Supreme Court, Family Division No. 000312011 by Neville Stafford
Deveaux v. Olive Deveaux nee White in which the Petioner prays
that the marriage be dissolved.
AND THAT it has been ordered by the Supreme Court that sevice of
the Petition in the said action on you be effected by this
advertisement.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that you must within Twentyone
(21) days from the publication of this advertisement inclusive of the
day of such publication, admnowledge service of the said Petilion by
completing a prescribed form of Acknowledgement of Sevice which
may be obtained on request from theAttorneys whose name and
address appear below, otherwise the Court may proceed to hear the
Petition and pronoiuce judgment, notwithstanding your absence.


MESSRS. ARNOLD A. FORBES & CO.
Chamber
Bay & Frederick Streets North
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for ePetitioner. -
Datedthis 24 day of May, A. 0.2011.






Office Position Available

Local, established company looking for an
experienced office and administrative
employee to assist in the overall administrative
operation of two small companies.
Tasks include, but not limited to, the following:

*answering the phone on a consistent basis
*scheduling service calls and liaising with
customers
*coordinating schedules for several employees
*typing and filing for customer sales sheets
and deposits
*good communication skills
*must be honest and dependable
*must have a valid driver's license and vehicle
and,be able to run company errands
*must have at least three years experience
*must be proficient in the following computer
programs: Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook and
other Office programs (including becoming
familiarized with company POS system).
*must provide a resume, at least three refer-
ences, a passport, and police record

Salary based on experience and
qualifications. Interested persons
meeting the criteria should email
resumes to
bahamasresumes@gmail.com.


'I


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENTTO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
.The Public is hereby advised that I, MELINDA ROBINSON
nee ROBINS of-the Southwestern District on the Island
of New Providence intend to change my name from
MELINDA ROBINSON to MELINDA ROBINS. If there are
*any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.


THE .INSURANCE COMMISSION
OF THE BAHAMAS.



INSURANCE COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS

PUBLIC NOTICE

No. 2 of 2011 31st May, 2011

This NOTICE is issued by the risurance Commission of The Bahamas ("the Commission")
pursuant to sections 8 of the Insurance Act, Chapter 347, and section 4(1) of the External
Insurance Act, Chapter 348.
The general public is hereby notified that CONDOR GUARANTY, INC. is not a licensee of the
Commission and is therefore not licensed to conduct insurance business in or from The
Bahamas.


Signed
LENNOX McCARTNEY
Superintendent of Insurance


BUSINESS


I


.'


El







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 7B


'Irreconcilable differences' end Robin Hood deal


FROM page 1B

Hood's food retail assets.
Calls to Mr Finlayson, who was said to be out of the country,
went unreturned, as did messages to Mr Schaefer.
However, the collapse of the deal ,which was awaiting
Investments Board and Central Bank (exchange control)
approval is not likely to come as a total shock to many
informed observers, given the numerous unresolved questions
surrounding it. Tribune Business, too, had been told last week
that Mr Finlayson and his team had uncovered several questions
during their due diligence that needed resolving.
To recap, the terms of the deal said to be for a purchase
price of between $3-$4 million were for Mr Finlayson to take
over the foot retail business at Robin Hood's two stores, sub-
leasing the food selling space from Mr Schaefer.
Mr Schaefer, as well as becoming landlord, was to have
retained ownership of Robin Hood's high-margin, heavy duty
appliance business, effectively going back to the company's
roots when it first started in the Bahamas in 1999 and 2000.
And Mr Schaefer and his partner, Miami-based Suresh
Khilnani, would have provided supply chains to Mr Finlayson
and his City Markets business from the US, helping them to
source product and providing logistics support.
While 'termination' of the deal appears to make perfect
sense from Mr Finlayson's viewpoint, since it leaves him free to
concentrate 100 per cent of his efforts on City Markets' turn-
around, where it leaves Mr Schaefer and Mr Khilnani and
Robin Hood and its employees is less clear.
The company, which was reeling from the loss of 'several mil-
lion dollars' after its Prince Charles Drive store opened late and
missed the Christmas sales, has also seen the top-line there drop
by at least 80 per cent due to the ongoing roadworks in the area.
Mr Schaefer has dismissed claims that Robin Hood subse-
quently ran into financial difficulties, or that this forced him into
the deal with Mr Finlayson. However, numerous sources told
this newspaper that Mr Klylnani has been seeking an exit
route from Robin Hood, being unwilling to invest more funds
as either equity or loans.
The retailer, through Mr Schaefer, had also been seeking
* fresh investment from Bahamian sources as a result. It is under-
stood that Rupert Roberts. and Supervalue, and other food
retailers, were also approached to see if they were keen on pur-
chasing Robin Hood.
In last month's Business Review, Tribune Business ques-
tioned whether Mr Finlayson and Trans-Island were the right
players to be leading the food retail consolidation in the
Bahamas, given the ongoing issues yet to be resolved at City
Markets. And, it also queried why Mr Finlayson should be
spending $3-$4 million on buying a rival which, if it was in
financial difficulty, should be allowed to die a natural death and
go out of business..
This newspaper also pointed out that the Robin Hood deal
appeared to work against the interests of Associated Bahami-
an Distillers and Brewers (ABDAB), the company in which the
Finlayson family holds close to a 70 per cent interest. Had the
agreement been consummated, it is unlikely that City Markets
would have needed several ABDAB-owned properties as sites
for new stores.



COMMONWEALTH OF THE'BAHAMAS 2008/CLE/gen/01750
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Comrmon Layv& Equity DPyision

BETWEEN

SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED


Plaintiff
AND
JENNIFER M. MONCUR



Defendant



TO: JENNIFER M. MONCUR

TAKE NOTICE that:
A Summons and Supporting Affidavit both filed
on the 21s day of February A.D., 2011 have
been issued against you in the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas being Action No. 2008/CLE/
gen/01750 by Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited,
the Plaintiff herein.
On the 31s day of March, A.D., 2011 the
Court ordered that the said Summons and
Affidavit are deemed to be served on you
by this advertisement and that subsequently
the existence of further proceedings also be
deemed served on you in a like manner.
The Hearing date of the Summons has. been
adjourned and is now set to be heard on the
9th day of June, A.D., 2011 at 10:15 o'clock
in the forenoon before the Acting Assistant
Registrar whose chambers is located on the
3r Floor Ansbacher House, East Street North,
Nassau, Bahamas. Details of the claim are set
out in the Affidavit of Kelvin Briggs filed on the
21s day of February A.D., 2011.
You must attend the above-mentioned
adjourned hearing otherwise Judgment may be
entered against you in your absence pursuant
to Order 73 rule 3 of the Rules of the Supreme
Court 1978.

Dated the 31st day of May, A.D., 2011

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,


-.-


MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE

CORRIDOR IIB

MARKET STREET

Temporary Road Closure & Diversion


Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles SA wishes to advise the public that continuous road construction works will be carried out
on sections of Market Street from Monday June 6,'. 2011.


STAGE DA.T.E


1 I June6,2011


I_~ ____________


ALTERNATE ROUTE


East Street


WORKS AREA


\V'L L F RD. & CORDEAUX AVE.


2 July 1, 2011 )ORID.AUX AVE.& COCONUT GROVE East Street/ Acklins Street & Third St.
3 tJuly 20, 2011 COCONUT GROVE & ROBINSON ROAD East Street / Third Street



Access will be given to residents, pedestrians and the affected businesses in this area during the construction process. Signs will be in
place to identify safe passage for Pedestrians and Access points to the businesses in the area from the diversion route.

Your patience throughout is project is greatly appreciated, we apologizefor the inconvenience & delays camued.
For further informationplease contaCt:


Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A
Office Hours: Mon-Fri 8:00am to 6:00pm
Office: (242) 322-8341ti322-2610f
Email: bahanmasnighbor fcartcl one.com.ar


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Project ExeCrtion Unit
Hotline: (242) 302.9700
Email: pr blfli i k i 'li:iharu ,.j.,, .1,,


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SFG CAPITAL MARKETS
ROYAL FIDELITY YUEAIOILC
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Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Plaintiff


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PA Il MNAJN 6,01TERIU


Depository'night and day' difeence


KINGSWAY ACADEMY
Teacher Vacancies for September 2011
Kinii,:.i Academy invites applicants from qualified and
experienced candidates for teaching positions at the:
Elementary School
Physical Education

High School
English Language and Literature
Spanish
Christian Education
Physical Education
Physics and Chemistry (up to Advanced Placement)
Carpentry and Joinery
Music
Office Procedures
Information Technology
Media Centre Manager

The successful candidates should have the following:
An academic degree in the area of specialization
A teaching certificate
Excellent communication skills
A love for children and learning .
High standards of morality
* Be a born-again Christian
A complex application package consists of:
(a)completed and signed Kngsway Academy application form
available at he school's Admmislralion building or on the website
www kinQswavacademy conm (See Document Downloads)
(b) detailed resume with cover letter (c) copies of degrees/certificates
d) recent photograph (e) police record (f) health certificate (g) three
(3) reference letters, one (1) being from your church's minister
(h) legible e-mail address and working telephone contacts
.NtIe: All documents should be submitted at the same time.
Please forward to:
Kingsway Academy Employment Application ..
Kingsway Academy
Box N-4378, Bernard Road
Nassau, The Bahamas
e-mail:kihgswayemployment yahoo.com :
Deadline: o ensure considerrmion, complete application
materials must be received by Tuesday, June 14th, 2011


FROM page 1B

from the same issues due to its recent listing.
"Commonwealth Brewery is already on the new platform and
utilising our RTA system," the BISX chief executive said.
"Because Commonwealth Brewery was created new, from
start to finish we were able to put that into the new environ-
ment, creating its own profile and structure. Therefore, we .
were not constrained by any bid system.
"We created 3,000-plus shareholders in the new environ-
ment, and suffice to say it's night and day. One system surpasses
the other."
Mr Davies told Tribune Business that his goal had been to
complete the migration of all Bahamian public company share-
holder registers to the new RTA system by end-June 2011,
and he was "still on target".
"We'll continue the testing just to make sure," he added. i
. "Data integrity is the key. Speed is not the issue; it's accuracy .
to the extent that we bring the registers over properly, analyse
things and make sure everything is up to date and running
very smoothly." ,
However, the BCSD will not be fully functional until the
RTA is linked into the Depository's clearing and settlement
functions.

Tested
The trading system is already being tested, although settle-,
ment functions will involve a tie-in to the Central Bank and
Clearing Banks Association's (CBA) RTGS.
"We've got to do all this at the proper time," Mr Davies
explained, adding that the BCSD had been able to test the
trading system using the Commonwealth Brewery share register
to iron out any glitches.
"Once we're pretty confident that's working, we will begin to
tie this process into the RTGS settlement, and that will be a pro-
ject we'll be working with the Central Bank and one of the
clearing banksto do," the BISX chief executive said. 0
"Every broker/dealer has a settlement bank to facilitate the
settlement of its trades, so we'll definitely be testing it with one
commercial bank." ''
Emphaising that the BCSD, whose other two shareholders
are RoyalFidelity and CFAL, wanted to "get it right first time", z;!I
hence the emphasis on accuracy over speed, Mr Davies said :;
BISX also wanted to maintain its "track record" of delivering ;..:
on all its promises over the past 11 years. .
Asked about the BCSD's full benefits. Mr Davies told Tri-
bune Business: "It removes the potential for manual error. It
increases the speed and efficiency with which transactions take
place. Paper is removed from the process."
He also pointed to the security aspect, as parties on both sides
of a transaction would know whether the purchaser of a secu-
rity had enough funds on hand to complete the deal, therefore
"reducing the potential for settlement failure".
"One of the things we hope to do is have greater interaction
with the shareholders," Mr Davies added. "There are any
number of features you can turn on with this system, and hope-
fully they will allow persons to have direct access to information..
have a relationship with the BCSD and monitor their holdings-
directly, which is the best thing for them and the market."


V- BWAHAMAS.EtECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE


GENERAL SERVICE WORKER
(TECHNICAL)
FIELD OPERATIONS, PLANNING &
STORES

Vacancies exist in the Corporation
for General Service Workers (Tech-
nical) in the Field Operations Divi-,
sion, Technical Planning Division &
Stores Department.

Responsibilities of the position in'
clude, but are not limited to the fol-.
lowing:
Assisting with the overhaul and main-
tenance of diesel and gas turbines and
auxiliary equipment;

Performing cable excavation. This in-
volves digging and refilling trenches
near low and high voltage cables;

Collecting and removing debris (tree
trimmings) and waste from all job sites
and transporting them to disposal ar-
eas;

* Assisting with the, construction and
maintenance of the Corporations' prop-
erty and equipment e.g., painting elec-
trical apparatus (transformers), well
drilling, laying cables, cleaning' engine
parts; and :

Assisting with the transportation of per-!
sonnel and the delivery of goods and
materials from and to vendors and job
sites, in the absence of drivers.

Job requirements include:
* High School graduate with at least
five BJC's including Mathematics, pnd
English Language with grades of "C" or
above.

* Reading and basic verbal communica-
tion skills


MESSENGER
ADMINISTRATION
DEPARTMENT
ADMINISTRATION DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corpo-
ration for a Messenger in the.
Administration Division.


Responsibilities of the position
include, but are not limited to
the following:
Transporting and delivering mail,
goods and other materials (e.g.
cheques, drafts, etc) to and from.
vendors and sites e.g., power
stations, banks, post office, etc.
This includes the loading and off
loading of goods.

* Sorting and distributing depart-
mental mail and other vehicle
materials (e.g. newspapers, etc),

Job requirements include:
-Completion of High School with
five (5) BJC's with grade "C"or
above including English and
Math. .

: Valid driver's license

* Good verbal communication
. skills :

* Good interpersonal skills

* Must be physically fit... ... -.


TYRE REPAIRMAN
TRANSPORT DEPARTMENT..
FIELD OPERATIONS DIVISION


A vacancy exists in the Corporation
for a Tyre Repairman in the Transport
Department, Field Operations Divi-
sion,

Responsibilities of the position in-
clude, but are not limited to the fol-
lowing:

Repairing damaged tyres and tubes for
company vehicles including forklifts,
tractors, heavy duty equipment etc., by
replacing tubes and plugging or patching
punctures.

Removing and replacing damaged tyres
on company vehicles by using the appro-
priate jack or hydraulic machine.

Maintaining the tyres of all other machin-
ery by changing and repairing the same
on lawn mowers, forklifts and wheel bar-
rows as needed

Job requirements include:
* A minimum of High School Diploma

* A minimum of 1-2 years experience

* Technical knowledge of tyre repair

* Ability to use tyte repair tools and equip-
ment e.g., hydraulic tyre, air machines,
jackhammer compression etc.

- Adherence to BEC safety and environ-
mental policies and procedures


FORKLIFT OPERATOR
STORES DEPARTMENT
SUPPLY CHAIN DIVISION


A vacancy exists in the Corpora-
tion for a Forklift Operator in the
Supply Chain Division.


Responsibilities of the position Include,
but are not IImited to the following:


Operates designated piece of equipment
to collect and deliver goods and materi-
als, and transport personnel. Examples
of vehicles, trucks (lighter tonnage than
heavy duty), cars, forklifts.

* Drives forklift to deliver goods and assist
with stocking supplies in designated
areas.

* Loads and unloads trucks while ensuring
proper weight distribution.

* Ensures safe operation of vehicles and
equipment


Job requirements Include:
* High School Diploma

* A minimum of 1-2 years of'experience.

* Knowledge of safety limitations and
routine maintenance of vehicles and
equipment.


Knowledge of and skills in the operation
and handling of vehicles and equipment:.


SValid drivers* license


I Must be physically fitI |

^^^Interested persons should apply by cllect!~fingEan plictin om fomBEConBlg3ue Hfill nd Tucker5Rds^^^^^^.^^
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^C-ornpleted forms sh^K|^^u^K^d be returned to:^^^^^^^^^^^^
The ssitantManger-uma Resurcs, Bhams Elctrcit CororaionBlu Hil & ucke Rd., P 0.BoxN-759 NssauBahmas n o befre:JUNE10 011


SUGAR BEACH 7.2KV
TRANSMISSION/DISTRIBUTION OVERHEAD UNE
EXTENSION
SUGAR BEACH, GREAT HARBOR CAY

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
:Corporation's Administrative Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
.: Contact: Ms. Charlene Smith at telephone 302-1158

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
SBahamas Electricity Corporation
.. Executive Offices Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

. Tender No, 749/111
'CONSTRUCTION OF 1.5 MILES OF 7.2 KV, 7/.183 AAAC
3-PHASE TRANSMISSION LINE GREAT HARBOR DRIVE,
GREAT HARBOR CAY

S. Deadline for delivery to BEC:
June 10, 2011
no later than 3:00 p.m.

.. The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals.
For all inquiriesigardiisPieTenefrsplease contact
M'r Wy;.ne Farquharson at telephone 302-1216


* '"- -. ;'.


9

A'








U


IIS I S


m


~.. ......~ .~ ~ ...~..........~...~ ...~ ......~~ ......~-~.....~...~.1- ..~.~~II. .~~~.... -~ .~ - ...~- ....~ ~ ..... ~I~... ..~-....~


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011











70% cash holdings


set RoyalStar well


for
FROM page 1B

"to play at the same lev
playing field".
"We're working away
that one, and have been f
quite some time," Mr Di
said of the new Act.
"All insurance company
have been given a deadli
of the end of September
be compliant.
"By then you have to ha
re-registration complete
and we will definitely be
compliance by the end
September."
Despite the size of tl
undertaking, Mr Duff sa
Bahamian insurance con
panies viewed the Act
being able to "bring mo
order to the market, ai
produce rules requiring
companies to play at t
same playing field. It's
good thing, and we welcor
the regulations."
Meanwhile, the Bahan
an general insurance ma
ket says it is too early to t
whether there will be a:
upward pressure on cat
strophic insurance premium
paid by consumers and con
panies as a result of the de
stating earthquake/tsun
mi in Japan.
That event, coupled wi
recent earthquakes in Ne
Zealand and Chile, h
plunged major global rei


tougher
surers into multi-million dol- an
lar losses. Given that tr
vel Bahamian general insurers na
buy large quantities of rein- su
on surance for their books, the' re
for fear remains that reinsurers
uff will increase their rates su
when renewals come due for ab
ies 2012, some of which will er
ine have to be passed on to con- m
to sumers in the Bahamas. Ba
"The one thing I'm look- ba
yve ing at with some interest is
d, the dreadful earthquake in ag
in Japan," Mr Duff told Tri- Bo
of bune Business. pr
"I've been looking at wl
he some of the first quarter nc
aid results of the major interna- in
m- tional insurers, and Munich in(
as Re lost 948 million euros
ire compared to a profit of 485 si'
nd million euros for the same of
all time last year. You can see
he the extent of the swing th
Sa there. ly
me "Swiss Re had a signifi- w(
cant loss of $665 million, pe
ni- compared to a profit last
ar- year of $158 million. I see th
ell the huge swings there, and mi
ny one would expect that unless cu
ta- these reinsurers have a very
ms good last three quarters of sa
m- the year, they will post dis- as
-v-- astrous results, which could be
la- put some pressure on the be
cost of reinsurance capital. th
ith "That, in turn, will impact pr
ew the price of catastrophic cov- wi
as er offered in 2012." m(
n- Mr Duff said the Bahami- Ba


Act
general insurance indus-
y were hoping that inter-
ational reinsurers "don't
.ffer any major losses the
st of the year".
If they did not, the rein-
rance industry would be
>le to spread their recov-
y efforts across the world,
meaning the impact on the
ahamas "may not be too
ad".
RoyalStar's Mr Watson
;reed that any impact on
ahamian 2012 insurance
premiums depended on
hat happened between
)w and year-end for the
ternational reinsurance
dustry.
"I don't know if it will be
significant Mr Watson said
any impact.
"If it was year-end now, I
ink there would be a fair-
modest impact. That
would be my feel for it 5
r cent or thereabouts.
"But if a big hurricane hit
e US, who knows? It
ight make for a very diffi-
It renewal in December."
Like Mr Duff, Mr Watson
id if no further major cat-
trophes took place
between now and Decem-
er, reinsurers would have
e ability to spread their
emium increases world-
ide, therefore creating a
odest impact for the
ahamas.


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 9B


THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD



VACANCY NOTICE


The National Insurance Board (NIB) invites applications from suitably qualified persons to fill
the position of INTERNAL AUDITOR, in the Board's Internal Audit Department.

JOBQ SUMMARY
To assist in determining whether organizational units in the company are performing their
accounting, custodial or control activities in compliance with management instructions, applicable
statements of Policies and Procedures, and in, a manner consistent with both company objectives
and the National Insurance Act and Regulations.

RESPONSIBILITIES
> To assist in identifying those activities subject to audit coverage, evaluates their significance
and assesses the degree of risk inherent in the activity in terms of cost, schedule and quality.
> To conduct review of assigned organizational and functional activities,
>' To'assist in determining whether organizational units in the cofipany are performing their
accounting, custodial or control activities in compliance with management instructions,
applicable statements of Policies and Procedures, and in a manner consistent with both
company objectives and the National Insurance Act and Regulations.
> To plan and execute Financial and Operational audits in accordance with accepted
standards and policies of the National Insurance Board.
> To report auditory findings and make recommendations for correctingunsatisfactory
conditions, improving operations and reducing costs.
> To perform special reviews at the request of Executive Management.
> Makes oral or written presentations to management during and at the conclusion of the
audit. Discuss deficiencies and recommends corrective action to improve operations.
> Prepares formal written reports, expressing opinions or the adequacy and effectiveness of
the system and the efficiencywith which activities are carried our.
> Conduct follow-up reviews to appraise the adequacy ofthe corrective action taken to
improve deficient conditions.

QUALIFICATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS
> A Bachelor's degree from an accredited College or University in a business field, preferably in
Accounting or Fin.ance.
> Certified Public Accountant (CPA) or equivalent with BICA Registration current.
> A minimum of five (5) years experience in an administrative/supervisory capacity.
> Must demonstrate the ability to define objectives, plan the work, communicate priorities
and motivate staff.
> Competent in Microsoft Office Applications- including Word, Excel and Powerpoint.

APPLICATION
Interested persons may apply bysubmittingacompleted application form, along with the necessary
proofofqualifications on or before June 15, 2011, to the:

Senior Manager, Administration
Human Resources
The National Insurance Board
Clifford Darling Complex
P. O. Box N-7508
Nassau, Bahamas


SCHOOl





world school

St Andrew's School, The .imrnational School of The Bahamas, an authorized
International Baccalaureate ,(B) World School, invites applications from. qualified and
experienced Bahamian candidates for the following teaching vacancies, with effect
from August 2011. Fult information regarding the school may be found at its website:

Candidates should be qualified teachers who possess the necessary academic
qualifications for the positions) for which they apply, including a teaching qualification
and a bachelor's degree, and normally need to have a minimum of two years successful
school-based experience. Desirable qualifications, in addition to those specified for
individual posts, are that teachers have successful experience in an independent and/or
international school and an advanced degree. Applications from candidates able to
coach team sports or advise school clubs and activities are particularly welcomed.
Secondary (i.e. middle and upper) school teachers will be expected to undertake the
responsibility of a homeroom.
Please note that applications received from non-Bahamian candidates will not be
considered at this time, although permanent,'residents with the right to work are invited to
submit their papers for future consideration. Applications from candidates living outside
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas will not be acknowledged or considered at this
stage of the recruiting process. If the school is unable to recruit any position locally, it
will advertise internationally,
PRIMARY SCHOOL
The school is authorized to teach the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the
International Baccalaureate Organization. Candidates for all posts in the primary school
should be committed to the principles of, and preferably trained in, the PYP.
Primary School IT/ Computer:
The Primary IT/ Computer teacher is responsible for teaching classes in Years 1 through
6. following the school IT Curriculum and coordinating the two primary school computer
labs.
Interested candidates should apply to the school's principal, Mrs Sharon E Wilson, by.
letter, email or fax as soon as possible. All applications, MUST include the following:
* letter of application
" a personal statement detailing the candidate's educational philosophy
* a full curriculum vitae,
* either the names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and email numbers of three
people who may be approached for confidential professional references or the
name and address of the recruiting agency from which the candidate's confidential
dossiers may be obtained,
Information on the teaching posts offered may be obtained from the principal or head of
the school by email or fax only.
Yvette Simms, Head of the primary school:
Email vvette.simmsf(st-andrewscom
Fax (1 242) 677 7846
Sharon E Wilson
Principal
St Andrew's School
P 0 Box EE 17340
Nassau
Email: Sharon,Wilson@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1 242) 677 7802 or (1 242) 324 0816
The closing date for applications is 15th June 2011. Applications from unqualified
candidates, applications arriving without the full information requested,
applications from outside The Commonwealth of The Bahamas or, applications
received after this date will not be considered.


THE TRIBUNE


THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD l


VACANCY NOTICE uj

The National Insurance Board (NIB) invites applications from suitably qualified persons to fill
the positions ofINSPECTOR, in the Board's Compliance/Inspectorate Department.

JO SUMMARY
To ensure full compliance among employers and self-employed persons and voluntarily insured
persons (entities) in accordance with the National Insurance Act and Regulations.

RESPONSIBILITIES
Partner with Employers as a Relationship Officer to ensure compliance with the National
Insurance Act and Regulations, including but not limited to, the following:
> Registration in accordance with the required standards;
' Reviewing employment records to ensure that contribution payments are made;
> Completion of Inspections and processing ofcases;
> Investigating and acting on all matters relative to registration and non-compliance;
> Maintenance of confidential information using the systems, policies and procedures of
the National Insurance Board; *
> Preparation of reports and completion of standard forms; and
STo-provide on-going education on the prescribed benefits, requirements and policies of
the National Insurance Act and the National Insurance Board.

QUALIFICATIONS ANDREQUIREMENTS
> A Bachelor of Arts degree in Business Administration or a related field, from an accredited
educational institution.
> Competent in Microsoft Office Applications including Word, Excel and Query tools.
> Excellent communications skills, oral and written,
> Excellent Customer Service skills.
> Piss the NIB basic aptitude test
> A high degree of confidentiality and professionalism.

APPLICATION
Interested persons mayapply by subMittinga completed application form, alongwith the necessary .
proof of qualifications on or before June 15,2011, to the:

Senior Manager, Administration
Human Resources
The National Insurance Board
Clifford Darling Complex
P. 0. Box N-7508
Nassau, Bahamas







PAGE OB, ONDA, JUE 6, 011IHESTIBUN


CHINA SHOPS FOR



LATIN AMERICAN OIL,



FOOD AND MINERALS


Recent deals make China a key

financier to Venezuela, Argentina
CARACAS, Venezuela projects for the borrowing go vernments.
Associated Press Venezuela has become the China Develop-
ment Bank's biggest borrower, said Erica
LATIN AMERICA is blessed with a Downs, an expert at the Brookings Institu-
wealth of natural resources such.as oil, cop- tion think tank in Washingtbn.
per and soy, and needs financing to capi- Direct Chinese investments totaled more
talise on them. China needs commodities than $15 billion in Latin America and the
to keep its economy growing and has about Caribbean last year 9 percent of the
$3 trillion in reserves to burn. region's foreign direct investment, according
Those interests have come together in a to a report by the U.N. Economic Commis-
burgeoning and unorthodox partnership, as sion for Latin America and the Caribbean.
China lends and invests tens of billions of The -U.S. is still Latin America's largest
dollars in countries around Latin America in investment source, but China has climbed to
return for a guaranteed flow of commodities, third place, behind the Netherlands.
Recent deals have made China a. key In Argentina, Chinese companies ha'e
financier to the governments of Venezuela replaced U.S. and British::corporations in
and Argentina. At the same time, Chinese ,controlling stakes in lurntiive natural gas
companies have secured a decade's worth of and oil resources.
oil from Venezuela and Brazil, and steady "Clearly, the U.S. remains the significant
supplies of wheat, soybeans and natural gas actor in Latin America and will remain so
from Argentina. for the foreseeable future." said Eric
China is breaking new ground by aggres- Farnsworth, vice president of the Council of
sively locking down resources around Latin the Americas, a U.S.-based business group.
America through large loans, investments "But China's a huge part of the scene no%\.
and other financial arrangements, said It was commodities exports to China over
Orville Schell, director of the Center on the last five years that allowed Latin Amer-
U.S.-China Relations at th6eAsia Society in ica to weather the economic turmoil."
New York. China and Chile created a $2 billion sales.
"I don't know of any other government finance and investment joint venture in 2005
which has done this sort of securing of rights that guaranteed China 836,250 metric tons of
for commodities .and natural resources so copper over 15 years, at rates partially fixed
systematically around the Third World as to the then-market price of $2.07 a pound.
China, and they've used a whole host of With copper now trading above $4 a pound.
new financial instruments to do this," Schell Chile's top client is getting .copper at far
said. below market prices.
Large investments have gone to Brazil In Argentina,,the Metallurgical Corpora-
and Argentina, but China has extended even tion of China has invested $80 million to
bigger loans to Venezuela, agreeing to pro- reactivate an iron ore mine, and China's
vide more than $32 billion to President Hugo Beidahuang Group company has promised
Chavez's government. $1.4 billion in irrigation infrastructure in
Venezuela will pay its debt with increasing exchange for a 20-year contract to produce
amounts- of it during the next decade. The corn, wheat, soy and dairy products for Chi-
infusion0 .o .cash..ias-.wiftly made,Chinap.,,qese consumers. The China Development
Venezuela's.biggestforeignjlende.r, enabling Bank has also-offered a $2.6 billion.. _Q-vear_
Chavez to bo.st spending aliead of texl loan to revive a freight train system linking
xear'k le if eit1on. A' '"'' "Argentirina's central ieartlind ti6 Bferos
Aires.
Meeting Rubens Barbosa, Brazilian ambassador
i to the U.S. from 1999to 2004, said Biazil-
"Viva China!" Chavez exclaimed during a ian officials have complained that cheap
televised meeting with business leaders from Chindustries exports have destroyed domestic
Beijing, thanking them for helping set up factis such as shoe and textile manrers.
mobile phone factories and build railways "With trade, we have a problem because
and public housing in Venezuela. He gushed: the "With trade we have a prCh obeseem because
"I'm in love withChina." aggressiveness of Chinese companies is
While the relationship is driven in part very strong," Barb'osa said.
by Chavez's eagerness to form alliances that "But the government still has a lot of
exclude the U., it's also good business for interest in these relations with China. China
Chinese companies: Venezuela says it has is now the principal partner of Brazil."
been exporting to China about 460,000 bar- About 14 percent of Brazil's oil produc-
rels a day, about 20 percent of its oil exports, tion went to China in 2009, and that was
according to official figures. It hopes to dou- before Brazilian oil company Petrobras
ble that soon. signed a 10-year deal with Chinese-owned
"Venezuela has what we need," said Chen Umpec Asia to boost oil exports.
Ping, political counselor at the Chinese In a separate deal, Petrobras secured a
Embassy in Caracas. "And we also have $10 billion, 10-year loan from the China
what they need, for example technology .. DevelopmentBank.
Therefore we can help each other mutually." According to.Schell, China is just getting
The Chinese oil company PetroChina also steal tippiarte. point moment, of
agreed in 2009 to lend $1 billion to state "This is areal tippingpoint moment, of
company PetroEcuador in exchange for oil modhich thies and Chinese investments in coLatin-
deliveries. And the China Development modities and extractive, resources of Latin
deliveries. And the China Development America is just the' opening bell." he said.
Bank agreed to lend $1 billion last year to "Who's Jgot the monen? Arid it's not the
Ecuador's government, to be repaid through United States any longer. It's China. This is
oil shipments. United States any longer. It's China. Ths is
In some cases, such as in Venezuela and the next.great pool of (foreign investment)
Argentina, loans appear tied to hiring Chi- that the world is going to reckon with in
nese companies to carry out public works myriad ways.


S ..

IN THIS APRIL 9, 2008 FILE PHOTO, Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, right, shakes hands with Chi-
nese Vice President Xi Jinping during a meeting at Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing. In recent years,.
China has agreed to lend and invest tens of billions of dollars .around South America, outdoing many oth--
er traditional lenders such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. In return, Chinese offi-
cials have signed long-term contracts in which borrowing countries pay back their loans through guar-
anteed shipments of precious commodities, particularly oil, that China needs to keep growing. (AP)




Mayo C inic doctors


finish work in Haiti


ROCHESTER, Minn.
Associated Press'
ABOUT 100 doctors, nurses and phar-
macists have volunteered in Haiti since
the January 2010 quake.
Now, the last team of doctors is return-
ing to Rochester beginning Saturday.
Minnesota Public Radio News report-
ed Sunday that the teams from Mayo
Clinic helped with emergency care imme-
diately after" the earthquake, then they
helped rebuild the country's medical sys-
tem.


They helped Haitian medical profes-2
sionals restore an adult hospital in Port-:i
au-Prince.
Mayo family doctor Walter Franz says
the goal was always to set up a system,
Haitian doctors could maintain them-
selves.
Cholera is still a problem in Haiti.
Franz says this latest team was reluctant
to leave, because members feel the\
could stillbeuseful.
Franz said Mayo doctors will continue
to mentor colleagues in Haiti through
weekly video conferences.


EFN Dndb--B


- I--


WASHERS:
GTWP1000
GTWP2000
GCWN3000

DRYERS:
GTDX200E
GTDP200E
DRSR495E
GTDX300G


$920
$984
$1064


$780
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$1000


Cash $690


Cash
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G-EOFFREY


JONES & CO


..


imagination at work
-________


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PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


THE TRIBUNE


b








TUl: T IIII I F


RBC Royal Bank'


RBC FINCO


' Trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. Used under licence.


1 rir_ 1 M IL D"I-NC


- --


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011. PAGE 11B



















* IIWN


~. ~
,. J
J.
I I


CLIMATE NEGOTIATORS DEBATE NEW GLOBAL WARMING ACCORD


AMSTERDAM
Associated Press

DESPITE 20 years of
effort, greenhouse gas
emissions are going up
instead of down, hitting
record highs as climate
negotiators gather to
debate a new globalmwarm-
ing accord.
The new report by the
International Energy
Agency showing high
emissions from fossil fuels
is one of several pieces of
bad news facing delegates
from about'180 countries
heading to Bonn, Ger-
many, for two weeks of
talks beginning Monday.
Another: The tsunami-
triggered nuclear disaster
in March apparently has
sidelined Japan's aggres-
sive policies to combat cli-
mate change and prompt-
ed countries like Germany,
to hasten the decommis-
sioning of nuclear power
stations which, regardless
of other drawbacks, have
nearly zero carbon emis-
sions.

Burning

"Japan's" energy future
is in limbo," says analyst
Endre Tvinnereim of the
consultancy firm Point
Carbon. The.fallout from
the catastrophe has "put
climate policy further
down the priority list," and
the short-term effect in
Japan..- one of the.
world's most carbon-effi-
cient countries will be
more burning of fossil-
fuels, he said.
And despite the expan-
sion of renewable energy
around the world, the.
Paris-based IEA's report
said energy-related carbon


IN THIS MARCH 24, 2011 FILE PHOTO taken by'a small unmanned drone and released by Air Photo Service, damaged Unit 3, left, and
Unit 4 of the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant are seen in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture, northern Japan. The
tsunami-triggered nuclear disaster in March apparently has sidelined Japan's aggressive policies to combat climate change.
AIR PHOTO SERVICE, File/AP


emissions last year topped
30 gigatons, five per cent
more than the previous
record in 2008. With ener-
gy investments locked into
coal- and oil-fueled infra-
structure, that situation
will change little over the
next decade, it said.
,.Fatih Birol, the IEA':s
chief economist, says the
energy trend should be "a
wake-up call." The figures
are "a serious setback" to
hopes of limiting the rise
in the Earth's average
temperature to two
degrees Celsius (3.8 F)
above preindustrial levels,
he said.


Any rise beyond that,
scientists believe, could
lead to catastrophic cli-
mate shifts affecting water
supplies and global agri-
culture, settingoff more
frequent and 'fierce storms
and causing a rise in sea
levels that would endan-
ger coastlines.

Showdown

The June 6-17 discus-
sions in Bonn are to pre-'
pare for the annual year-
end decision-making U.N.
conference, which thTis
.year is in Durban, South


Africa. Even more than
previous conferences,
Durban could be the
forum for a major show-
down between.wealthy
countries and the devel-
oping world.
Poor countries say the
wealthy West,, whose
industries overloaded the
atmosphere with carbon
dioxide and other climate-
changing gases over the
last 200 years, is not doing
enough to cut future pol-
lution.
A study released Sunday
supports that view.
The report-,based on an
analysis by the Stockholm
/ -,


Environment Institute
commissioned and
released by Oxfam, eval-
uated national pledges to
cut carbon emissions sub-
mitted after the 2009
Copenhagen climate sum-
mit. It found that develop-
ing countries account for
60 percent of the promised
reductions.
The analysis is compli-
cated because countries
use different yardsticks
and baseline years for
measuring reductions.
But the study calculated
that China, which has
pledged to reduce emis-
sions in. relation to eco-


nomic output by 40-45
percent, will cut its carbon
output twice as much as
the United States by 2020.
"It's time for govern-
ments from Europe and
the U.S. to stand up to the
fossil fuel lobbyists," said
Tim Gore, a climate ana-
lyst for Oxfam, the inter-
national aid agency.
Another keynote battle
in Bonn will be the fate of
the Kyoto Protocol, the
1997 accord whose provi-
sions capping emissions by
industrial countries expire
in 2012.
-Wealthy countries
falling under theproto-
col's mandate are resisting
demands to extend their
commitments beyond 2012
and set new legally bind-
ing emissions targets
unless powerful emerging
economies like China,
India and Brazil accept
similar mandatory caps.
"The Kyoto Protocol
uncertainty is casting even
a bigger shadow over the
negotiations than in years
,past, and is going to come
to a head," said Jake
Schmidt of the New York-
based Natural Resources
Defense Council.
Negotiators also must
prepare options for the
Durban conference on
how to raise $100 billion
a year for the Green Cli-
mate Fund created last
December to help coun-
tries cope with global
warming.
One source under dis-
cussion is a levy on inter-
national aviation and
shipping, said Oxfam's
Gore.
"South African negotia-
tors are hoping a deal on
sources for long-term
finance will be Durban's
legacy issue," he said.


TOYOTA moving forward


When a car becomes more.
The Toyota Camrj sets a new global standard lor
safety A more comfortable cabin oflers superior design


CAMRY


amenities, generous legroom and a bigger Irunk And
the tuel-efhicent 4-cylinder 2400 ,:c engine gives up lo
34 mpg (EPA highway rating) Availdable options inclijde
V-6 engine, and right or l0ft hand drive

EX E C U TIV E 'O W i, ,.trC ,, .,.' ,, ,'U..,o

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At. 1 I'IORISEI )01 I)E O ID 0 LER Part and senice guaranite-d :


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I __ i _~__ ~_


~M ---- I


. *, '>,"


N


I























INSIDE


Heat take 2-1 lead,


TURN TO 4E...


Soccer: Portugal
wins, England

draws in Euro

qualifiers
TURN TO 7E...


Li wins

China's 1st

Slam title,

Nadal beats

Federer
TURN TO SE...




JBLN'ssenior ..

all-star team

wins theWenty

Ford tourney
.THE Wenty Ford Tourna-
ment championship game at
Windsor Park lived up to the
excitement as the senior all-star
team from the Junior Baseball
League of Nassau came from
behind to stun New Breed by a
final score of 4-3 in dramatic
,fashion. TURN TO 3E...


Simon's

triathlon'

victory
S'i mon
Lowe of New
Providence
covered the
500m swim,
10km bike and
5km run
course in 57
minutes and
37 seconds to
win the race,
easily breaking the course
record set last year by three-
time men's champion Ken Bots
of Port Orange, Florida. Bots
made a valiant effort to add a
fourth title, finishing second in
54.53. TURN TO 3E..,


Longley walks away with top awards


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
Paul Longley knew' that,
he had the training
squad at Body Zone to
get him ready to step on
stage at the National
Center for the PerformingArts. The
rest was up to. him.
Saturday night, he didri't disap-
point his coaches Albert Rahming
and Joel Stubbs as he walked away
with the top three awards in the
male bodybuilding segment of the
Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fitness
Federation's National Novice
Championships.
He got the most muscular, the
best poser and he was named the
overall champion.
"I want to thank God for giving
me the ability and my coaches for
believing in me," said Longley. He
credited his mentor, Dr Cyprian
Strachan, for the extra help.
"It was all about having fun. I just
went out there displaying what I
could do and displaying the talent
and the ability that God gave me to.
do it."


Kenzi Thompson
ON TOP: Paul Longley with his trophy
Lockhart admitted that during the
first round, he was a bit nervous,
but once he got back stage and he
got the motivation he needed from
his coaches, he was able to relax and


perform at his best.
"It feels great. This is just step
one. Freeport is next," said Longley,
who was awarded a $300.00 cash'
prize and an all-expense paid trip
to Grand Bahama this weekend for
the Northern Bahamas Bodybuild-
ing arid Fitness Championships.
The incentives came from the
New Providence Bodybuilding and
Fitness Association, headed by
Stephen Robinson, who was a co-
master of ceremonies for the show
along with federation president
Danny Sumner.
Longley,' who was no match for
Chamar Edgecomb9 in the men's
middleweight division, won the pose
down over Charles Reckley, Calvin
Lockhart and Mark Dean.
Reckley emerged as the light-
weight champion after he out-posed
Shannon Beneby. Lockhart clinched
the welterweight title over Omar
McKenzie, and Dean was the lone
competitor in the heavyweight divi-
sion. /
"It was good. I enjoyed it. It was
intense. I worked hard. over' a year
and I'm happy with my perfor-
mance," said Reckley, who thanked
his coach CJ and the members of


Better Bodies, who pushed him
along.
"I knew Paul looked good. I tried
my best, but unfortunately he won
it. I didn't get the overall title, but I
will be back for the Nationals (in
July)."
There were no female body-
builders entered, but in the new
Bikini competition, Amy Sands
secured the crown in the Short Class
over Nicole Richardson and Dereka
Kelly was the lone competitor in the
Tall Class.
"It was really great..I was excited.
I just went out there and put my
best foot forward," Sands said. "I
guess my best foot got me the win. I
feel great because this was my first
time. I can't wait for Nationals."'
A confident Sands, who was
trained by Dr Dwight Marshall at
Better Bodies, was also awarded
$300.00 and earned an all-expense
trip to Grand Bahama this week-
end.
Although she fell short of her goal
of winning the overall title, Kelly
said her late arrival may have been
her dowfifall.
SEE page 2E


Felip6 Major/Tribune staff
HAND-OFF: The Bahamas Flag Football League (BFFL) postseason began yesterday with the opening round matchups in the quarterfinals between four of the six play-
off teams. The BFFL Championship is all set for June 26. SEE FULL RESULTS AND MORE PHOTOS IN SPORTS TUESDAY



Three Bahamians compete in US track meets


THREE Bahamians competed in
two separate track and field meets
in Eugene, Oregon and Clermont,
-Florida, over the weekend.
In the Prefontaine Classic Satur-
day at the Hayward Field in Ore-
gon, Grand Bahamian high jumper
Donald Thomas struggled as he
managed to only clear 2.21 metres
or 7-feet, 3-inches to finish at the
bottom of the eight-man field.


He attempted 2.26m or 7-5 and
failed.
Raul Spank of Germany won the.
event with a season's best of 2.32m
or 7-7 1/4, the same height as second
place finisher Andrey Silnov of
Russia and American Jesse
Williams.
And over in Florida at the NTC
Classic track and field meet, Bianca
Stuart led the way for the Bahami-


RAMON MILLER BIANCA STUART


ans as she soared to victory in the
women's long jump with a wind-
aided leap of 22-7.
Ramon Miller got second in his
specialty in the men's 400 in 45.87
and he was fifth in the 200 in 21.06.
Grand Bahamian Andrae Williams
got fourth in the 400 in 46.52 and
12th in the 200 in 21.66.
Rodney Greene was ninth in the
100 in 10.36.


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AGB2EMOINDAYJUNE6,2011CALSPRTRBUNPOT


HERE'S a look at the final results of the Bahamas Body-
building and Fitness Federation's Novice Championships.
The event was held at the National Center for the Per-
forming Arts on Saturday.
Men's Overall Champion Paul Longle'y
Most Muscular Paul Longley
Best Poser Paul Longley
Men's Lightweight Charles Reckley, Shannonn Beneby
Men's Welterweight Calvin Lockhart, Omar McKenzie
Men's Middleweight Paul Longley, Chamar Edgecombe
Men's Heavyweight Mark Dean
Men's Physique Zokreyol, Jason Smith, Omar
McKenzie and Mark Dean
Women's Bikini Short Class -Amy Sands,
Nicole Richardson
Women's Bikini Tall Class Dereka Kelly
Women's Overall Champion Amy Sands


;, PAUL LONGLEY walked away with the top three awards in the men's
, bodybuilding segment of the Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fitness
"i Federation's National Novice Championships. Also shown clockwise
a from left are women's overall champion Amy Sands, Dereka Kelly,
Y Charles Reckley and Shannon Beneby.


Longley walks away

with top awards


FROM page 1E
"I tried to get everything
organised, but at the end, it
paid off. It was excellent," she
added. "Next time, I will
come back and do even bet-
ter. I came here late tonight,
but my head was still in the
game." .
Kelly' was. also the only
competitor entered in the Fit-
ness segment. She competed
in the Tall Class as well, dis-
playing a fantastic routine to a
melody of Bahamian songs in
her Bahamian flag-coloured
(outfit.
There was also a Physique


open division for men with
Zokreyol and Jason Smith
putting on a show for the
crowd. In the end, it was
Zokreyol who was crowned
the champion. He also earned
$300.00.
All of the competitors, in
addition to receiving their tro-
phies, got a gift bag'from
Island Game.
During the show, veteran
bodybuilder Raymond Tuck-
er put on a demonstration and
two Wallace sisters from the
Gymnastics @ Mystical Gym,
put on a gymnastic display for
the crowd.


Mall at Marathon; Centre Court
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TRIBUNE SPORTS













Simon Lowe wins Pineapple-a-thoq,



easily sets new course record


THE 2011 Pineapple-a-
thon Sprint Triathlon in Gre-
gory Town, Eleuthera, on Sat-
urday saw a record turnout of
competitors, new course
record and closely contested
divisions.
Simon Lowe of New Provi-
dence covered the 500m
swim, 10km bike and 5km run
course in 52 minutes, and 37
seconds to win the race, easi-
ly breaking the course record
set last year by three-time
men's champion Ken Bots of
Port Orange, Florida. Bots
made a valiant effort to add a
fourth title, finishing second in
"; 54.53.
1 The women's division was
Sven'more closely contested
/ as the top three women came
in within two minutes of each
other.
Molly Brutvan of Canton,
Ohio, took the title in 1 hour,
8 minutes and 8- seconds.
Brutvan began the 5k run leg
in third but stormed past Lau-
ra Bartenfelder (1:09.12) and
'Kate McAlaine (1:09.52) to
take the title in her first-ever
Pineapple-a-thon. "
Lowe and Brutvan each
won around trip airfare to
4Nassau courtesy of Pineapple
k Air and a case of beer cour-
tesy of Sands Beer.
Thirty four entrants, includ-
ing nine entries in a hotly con-
tested team division, suited
upiSaturday morning at the
i Gregory Town eove.
.' The three-man team of
| Mark Updegraff, Nate Partee
and Sean Updegraff set a
team course record of 1:01.16
Sfor the :title. The trio repre-



/iBLN's

* I.*1.11


i,


:.ILUj


SWINNER: Molly Brutvan (far left) took the women's title.


ON THE RUN: Simon Lowe of New Providence competes in the 2011 Pineapple-a-thon Sprint Triathlon
in Gregory Town, Eleuthera, on Saturday.


sented Bahamas Methodist
Habitat as did 2011 poster
boy Abe McIntyre who took
fourth in the men's division
while competing in his record
fifth Pineapple-a-thon.'
Megan Piechowski, Jake
Aulin and Tom Fields, repre-.
senting the Cove Resort, were
just over a minute behind and
edged second place in 1:02.31
just ahead of Nick Ryan and
Jordan Bots (1:02.55) of.Day-
tona Beach, Florida. Bots' run
split of 21.27 was the fastest of
any competitor.


Gregory Town's, own
Thomasino Thompson, Keino
Burke and Donathon Sands,
competing in their first
Pineapple-a-thon, took a very
respectable fourth place in
1:03.10 and posted a run split
of 22.51 which was third best
overall.
Also of note, former
Bahamas national swim team
member Dorian Roach, of
New Providence, completed
his first ever triathlon. Lee
McCoy, also from Nassau,
had the fastest swim in 7 min-


utes, 10 seconds.
2011 Pineapple-A-Thon
RESULTS
WOMEN
1. Molly Brutvan, Canton,
Ohio, USA 1 hour 8 min-
utes, 8 seconds (9.35, 33.03,
25.20); 2. Laura Barten-
felder, Harbour Island
,1:09.12 (11.55, 30.18, 27.38);
3. Kate McAlaine, Deep.
Greek 1:09.52 (8.59, 33.25,
.27.27)


' MEN
1. Simon Lowe, Nassau 52
mins, 37 secs. (7.54, 22.36,
22.07); 2. Ken Bots, Port
Orange, FL 54.53 (8.07,
23.35, 23.11); 3. Alec Pack-
ington, Nassau 1:00.06 (8.03,
23.59, 28.04); 4. Abe McIn-
tyre, James Cistern 1:05.15
(9.15, 23.59, 28.04); 5. Lee
McCoy,-Nassau 1:07.46
(7.10, 28.25, 32.11); 6. David
Eglinton, United Kingdom
1:08.42 (10.09, 30.10, 28.23);
7. Dorian Roach, Nassau
1:15.57 (8.07, 29.55, 37.55)
TEAM
1. Mark Updegraff, Nate
Partee, Sean Updegraff


1:01.16 (10.36, 26.34, 24.06);
2. Megan Piechowski, Jake
Aulin, Tom Fields 1:02.31
(10.14, 28.21, 23.56); 3. Nick
Ryan, Jordan Bots, Daytona
Beach, FL 1:02.55 (7.38,
33.50,21.27); 4. Thomasino
Thompson, Keino Burke,
Donathan Sands, Gregory
Town 1:03.10 (12.22, 27.57,
22.51); 5. Anna Misiew cz,
Marion Johnson, Dejaj ohn-
son Nassau 1:12.51 (7.3),
30.45, 34.36); 6. Kris B3 wn,
Brandon Hayden Oren UT
1:15.56 (14.44, 28.46, 32 26);
7. Sarah Gilmer, Sarah
Packington, Sarah Cox
1:17.04 (9.35,42.05, 25. 4);
8. Ayisha King, Kavita ing,
Orem UT 1:36.55 (14.3 8,
52.12, 30.05)


senior all-star team



as New Breed 4-3


. ir i. ,';~ :' -
-


CHAMPIONS: The senior all-star team from the Junior Baseball League of Nassau


THE Wenty Ford Tourna-
ment championship game at
Windsor Park lived up to the
excitement as,the senior all-
star team from the Junior
iBaseball League of Nassau
came from behind to stun
New Breed by a final score
of 4-3 in dramatic fashion.
SNew Breed led 3-2 enter-
f ing the bottom of the seventh
Sand final inning .on the
strength of a two-run double
by Sherman Ferguson. Three '
/ 'outs and New Breed wins the
first tournament of the newly-
formed Ed Armbrister Base-
/ ball League.
After one out, tournament
most valuable player Trae
Sweeting starts the rally for
JBLN with a single, steals sec-
ond and third base and scored
the tying run on Lynden Pin-
dling's double to right-center
field. ,
New Breed manager Mar-
tin "Pork" Burrows decided
to issue an intentional walk
to Jeffery Woodside, who hit
the only home run of the tour-
hament.
That set the stage for
'JBLN's next 'hitter, Crachad
Laing, who drilled what
appeared to be a sure double-
/ play grounder to end the
inning and send the game into
extra innings.
However, the ball went
through the legs of sure-hand-
ed shortstop Ken Wood Jr as
Pindling-III scored the win-


ning run to secure bragging'
rights for JBLN and coaches
Terran Rodgers and Victor
Cartwright.
The tournament, which
was organised by Mike Butler
and Tommy Stubbs, was
sponsored by Y-11 Shipping
and Buttons Formal Wear.
Ed Armbrister, who is the
last living Bahamian to play
Major League Baseball and
winner of two World Series
rings in the mid-1970s with
the Cincinnati Reds, present-
ed individual and team
awards to JBLN and New
Breed teams.
He congratulated both
teams for an inspired cham-
pionship game and thanked
everyone who participated
and contributed to a success-
ful tournament that honoured
the memory of Wenty Ford,
who pitched for the Atlanta
Braves in 1973.
Other Bahamians to play
at the Major League Baseball
level were Tony Curry, Wil
Culmer and Andre Rodgers,
all deceased as well.
Numerous others were
recognized for their valuable
contributions to the tourna-
ment, including scorer Renee
"Sunshine" Davis, umpires
Michael Hanna, Eddie Ford
and Rodney Hanna; volun-
teers Kendal Thompson,
Keno Wong, Garvin Wallace,
Lyndon Johnson, Reney
McPhee,, Eugene Davis,


Shanteka Rolle, Ashley
Stubbs, Mario and Andy
Ford, Dwayne Strachan,
Makeva Wallace and Eugene
McMinnis; and tournament
sponsors Y-II Shipping and


Buttons Formal Wear.
The Ed Armbrister Base-
ball League (EABL) is now
preparing to stage a summer
baseball season for all ages at
Windsor Park.


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 20-1i, PAGE 3E


..._..,


)pm








PAGE E, MNDAYJUNE6,201ATRIUNE PORT


DWYANE WADE goes up for a shot in the second half of Game 3 of the NBA Finals against the Dallas Mavericks last night in Dallas. The Heat won 88-86.


Heat take


(AP Photo)





2-1 lead


By JAIME ARON
AP Sports Writer


DALLAS (AP) The
Miami Heat didn't blow this
one. Now they're just two
wins from being crowned
NBA champions.
Chris Bosh made a 16-foot,
go-ahead jumper from the
baseline with 39.6 seconds left
and the Heat held on for an
88-86 victory over the Dallas
Mavericks on Sunday night
for a 2-1 lead in the NBA
finals.'
Recent history says this is a
huge win for the Heat. The
Game 3 winner in a tied finals
has won the championship all
11 times since the 2-3-2 for-
mat began in 1985.
Miami got into this tight of
a series by blowing a 15-point
lead in the last quarter of
Game 2. The Heat already
had wasted a 14-point lead in
this game when they went,
back ahead. 81-75 with 6:31
left. They knew Dirk Nowitz-
ki would drive Dallas' rally,
but he burned them anyway.
for 12 straight points six
free throws, a layup, a dunk
and a tough jumper.
But after Bosh's clutch
shot, Nowitzki's streak ran
out. He tried passing out of a
double team and threw the
ball away, then hit the back
iron on a jumper, at the
buzzer., .
"This is a total win," said
Dwyane Wade, who led Mia-
mi with 29 points and 11
rebounds. "You want to win
the game on the defensive
end of the floor and we got a
stop."
The Heat go into Game 4
on Tuesday .night with a
chance to do what they did in
2006: win it all on Dallas'
floor. They'll need to win that
game and the next, on Thurs-
day night.
Bosh, a Dallas native who'd
been 0-8 in his hometown,
overcame a swollen left eyelid
caused by a poke during the
first quarter to scored 18
points. He had seven in the
fourth quarter.
LeBron James added 17
points and nine assists. But
he also had four turnovers,
including a pair during the
fourth quarter that helped
bring Dallas back. Mario
Chalmers added 12.
Udonis Haslem had only
six points, but his tough
defense on the final two pos-
sessions saved the Heat.
When Nowitzki's final shot
from the top of the key
missed, Haslem swung his.
arms and screamed in delight.
Nowitzki finished with 34
points, but didn't get much
help. Jason Terry scored 15
and Shawn Marion had 10,
but both were shut out in the
fourth quarter.
Wade was at his dynamic


best from the start, looking
like the guy who soared and
scored the Heat past Dallas
and to the title in '06. ,
Most of his baskets came
in the paint where the
Heat outscored the Mavs, 40-
22 and many of them were
spectacular. But he also
stemmed Dallas' rally by hit-
tinm a go-ahead jumper over
Jasbon Kidd for Miami's sec-
ond-to-last basket.. : -
.. James came in talking
about being more aggressive,
but wasn't. He went more
than 6 minutes before taking
his first shot, but certainly
made it worth the wait a
drive through the teeth of the
defense for a powerful dunk.
He.also had a two-handed
jam in the second half that
put Miami up by 13.
The Heat just couldn't put
the Mavs away. Dallas would
surge close or ahead, then
Miami would turn it up again.
The final 18 minutes played
out with both teams realizing
any possession could change
the game and the series.
Nothing came easy for any-
one. Shots were contested,
bodies collided for every
rebound and guys were flying
into the stands after loose
balls.
Fans stood throughout,
wearing their blue gimme T-
shirts and fired up by videos
such as one featuring encour-
.aging words from Roger
Staubath, Troy Aikman,
Emmitt Smith, Nolan Ryan
and others.
Yet it was the visitors from
Miamni who walked off cele-
brating.
Heat coach Erik Spoelstra
talked about wanting his guys
to get back to their identity
of being "an aggressive,
!attacking team that tries to
get into the paint, to the rim,
to the free throw line." They
followed that script to a 14-
point lead late in the second
quarter, then fell into the
same bad habits they showed
at the end of Game 2, letting
Dallas get within 47-42 at the
break.
Maybe Miami players just
got bored because things were
coming so easily.
James anl Wade seemed to
get whatever shot they want-
ed, whenever they wanted.
But they kept trying to get
others involved. They espe-
cially force-fed Bosh, even
though his left eye was
swollen from an early, acci-
dental poke by Jason Kidd;
he missed 7 of 9 in the first
half.
The Heat also made things
tough on Nowitzki by keeping
him from even getting the
ball. He took only two shots
in the first quarter. He didn't
start getting free until Miami's
lead grew and guys were less
intense on defense.


DIRK NOWITZKI reacts in the second half of Game 3 of the NBA Finals against the Miami Heat Sunday in Dallas.
(AP Photo)


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 4E, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011














Li defeats Schiavone for


China's


1st Slam title


By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Tenni ___

PARIS As Chi-
na's Li Na tossed the ball
while serving at match point
in the French Open final, a
cry from a fan in the stands
pierced the silence at Court
Philippe Chatrier.
Distracted, Li stopped and
let the ball drop. The words
of support were in Mandarin:
"Jia you!" which loosely
translates to "Let's go!"
After so many years of
"Come on" and "Allez" and
"Vamos," there's anew lan-
guage on the tennis land-'
scape.
Li became the first Chinese
player, man or woman, to
win a Grand Slam singles title
by beating defending cham-
pion Francesca Schiavone of
Italy 6-4, 7-6 (0) at Roland
Garros on Saturday.
The sixth-seeded Li used
powerful groundstrokes to
compile a 31-12 edge in win-
ners, and won the last nine
points of the match, a run
that began when the fifth-
seeded Schiavone was flus-
tered by a line call she was
sure was wrong.
"China tennis we're get-
ting bigger and bigger," said
Li, who is projected to rise
to a career-best No. 4 in
Monday's new WTA rank-
ings.
She already was the first
woman from that nation of
more thah one billion peo-
ple to win a WTA singles
title, the first to enter the top
10 in the rankings, and the
first to make it to a Grand
Slam final she lost to Kim
Clijsters at the Australian,
Open in January.
Thinking back to that
defeat, Li' said: "I had no
experience. I was very ner-
vous. For my second time in
a final, I had the experience.
I knew how to do it. And I
had more self-confidence."
Tennis is considered an
elite spot in China, and'
while participation is rapidly
increasing, it still trails bas-
ketball, soccer and table ten-
nis, among others. But Li's
victory was big news back
home, where the match fin-
ished shortly after llpm local


time on a holiday weekend..
State broadcaster CCTV
posted the banner, "We love
you Li Na," on their gushing
coverage, and announcer
Tong Kexin pronounced:
"This has left a really deep
impression on the world."'
People at the Green Bank
Tennis Club on Beijing's
northern edge gathered to
eat barbecued food, drink
beer and watch the events
fro- -ris on a big-screen
T on a court. Some
w, inese flags during
the -,Ltmatch trophy cere-
mony.
Li broke away from the
Chinese government's sports
system in late 2008 under an
experimental reforin policy
for tennis players dubbed
"Fly Alone." Li was given the
freedom to choose her own
coach and schedule and to
keep much more of her earn-
ings: Previously, she turned
over 65 percent to the
authorities; now it's 12 per
cent. That comes to about
$205,000.of the $1.7 million
French Open winner's check.
"We took a lot of risks
with this reform. When we
let them fly, we didn't know
if they would succeed. That
,they have now succeeded,
means our reform was cor-
rect," said Sun Jinfang, an
. official with the Chinese Ten-
nis Association.. "This reform
will serve as a good example
for reforms in other sports."
At her news conference, Li '
wore a new T-shirt with Chi-
nese characters that mean
"sport changes everything,"
and offered thanks to Sun.
"Without her, reform, then
possibly we wouldn't have
achieved this success," Li
said.
When a reporter men-
tioned the June 1989 crack-
down on pro-democracy
demonstrators in Tiananmen
Square and asked whether
her victory could spark' a
spoEts revolution, Li said
she's "just" a tennis player
and added, "I don't need to
answer ... this question."'.
Her tennis game, filled'
with flat forehands and back-
hands, looks better-built for
hard courts, rather than the
slow, red clay of Paris.


CHINA'S 1ST SLAM: Li Na reacts'as she plays Italy's
Schiavone during theirfinal match of the French Open to
the.Roland Garros stadium Saturday.


Indeed, Li never had won a
clay-court tournament until
Saturday. She lost in the third
round in three of her previ-
ous four Fren.h Opens,
including against Schiavone
a year ago.
But Li's movement on.clay
is better now, Schia\ one
explained, saying: "She slides
a' little bit more."
Li repeatedly set tip points
with her.backhand, then
closed them with her fore-
hand, arid she, finished with
21 winners from the baseline,


15 more than Sc
Only after Li cont
first set and the eai
. the'second did S
begin working her
the match.
"I tried'to push
risk more," Schiav
She broke to 4-
second, arid hld t(
The 12th game was
Serving .at de
smacked a back
landed near a sideli
tially was called ou
judge, which would


Sen Schiavone a set point. But
S Li began walking up to take a
closer look at the mark left in
the clay by the shot, and chair
umpire Louise Engzell
climbed down to examine it,
too. She told Schiavone the
ball touched the line. Schi-
avone leaned forward and
pointed at the spot in ques-
tion, discussing the ruling
with Engzell; the restless.
crowd began whistling and
jeering, as French Open spec-
tators often do when a player
vigorously questions a call.
Engzell's call stood,' and
eventually she returned to
.'v her perch.
"0 Schiavone wouldn't win
another point.
"That ball was out," she
said later. "Sure, you get
angry.... So what do you do?
You're playing tennis, you
have to go back to playing
tennis and think about what
you need to do. Obviously, I
think it was a big mistake.
But it's up to the tournament
and others to watch .that
match again-and evaluate the
call." n
Li is 29, and Schiiavone
turns 31 later this month,
making for'the oldest com-
bined ages of French Open
women's finalists since 1986.
*9.f' Perhaps that's why neither
appeared to be too shaken
by.the stakes or the setting
until the latter stages.
"The young people, they
just play 100 percent all the
time. (Li and Schiavone) are
more selective. They know
Francesca' when to play the big points
urnament at and not use too much energy
when it's not really neces-
sary," said Li's coach,
(AP Photo) Michael Mortensen. "They
hiau. se their brains more than
hiayone. the young ones are doing."
rolled the Serving while ahead 4-2, Li
rly part of missed four forehands in one
chiavone game to get broken for the
way into only time all match. Schi-,
avone, as demonstrative an
mote, to athlete as there is; leaned
one said. over, punched the air and .
all in the. shouted, while the vocalsup-
o lead 6-5. port group in her guest box
s pivotal. launched into one of its many
euce, Li songs saluting her in Italian.
land that Schiavone then held for a
ne but ini- 5-4 lead. In the next game,
t by a line she moved within two points
[have giv- of tying the match at a set


apiece by hitting a backhand
return that skipped off the
baseline oddly, producing a
swing-and-miss whiff by Li.
All told, there were five
times when Schiavone was
two points from winning the
second set but she never
got closer than that.
The fifth time came on that
call she didn't like. Schiavone
put a backhand into the net
on the next point to make it
6-all. In the tiebreaker, two
.of Li's points came on volley
winners, and one from a pass-
ing shot she hit that Schi-
avone volleyed into the net.
The other four tiebreaker
points ended with return or
groundstroke miscues by the
Italian.
When Schiavone's back-
hand sailed long on match
point, Li fell to the court,
covering the back of her
white shirt with rust-colored
clay.
Schiavone was the fourth
consecutive top-10 seeded
player that Li beat, including
'three-time major champion
Maria Sharapova in the semi-
finals.
There's nothing subtle
about Li's style of play:
Essentially, she pounds the
ball hard, pushing opponents
back near the baseline, and
hopes to outswing them. Li
never let Schiavone get com-
fortable, never let her employ
the all-court, net-rushing
strategy that worked so well
for what had been 13 consec-
utive victories at Roland
Garros.
In 2010, SchiavQne became
Italy's first female Grand
Slam champion. This time, it
was Li who bit her lower lip
when accepting the tourna-
ment trophy, and who
mouthed the words while
China's national anthem was.
played and its flag was raised
at'the stadium for the first
time. Chinese players had
won three women's or mixed
doubles Grand Slam titles in
thepast. But none at the
French Open. And none in
singles.
"Amazing," Li said. "I got
a text message from my
friend. They said they were
crying in China because they
saw the national flag."


Nadal overcomes Federer for 10th major


By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Tennis Writer

PARIS (AP) Regardless of the
setting or the surface, Rafael Nadal
confounds Roger Federer the way
no other man can.
Put the two greats of the game
on opposite ends of a court in a
Grand Slam'final particularly at
Roland Garros, on the red clay.that
Nadal rules and the one-sided
nature of the rivalry grows even
more pronounced. 1,
Grinding along the baseline, using
every inch of his wingspan to extend
points; whipping fearsome fore-
hands this way and that, Nadal
flummoxed Federer yet again'Sun-
day in a riveting, highlight-filled
match, beating him 7-5,7-6 (3), 5-7,
6-1 for a record-tying sixth French
Open championship and 10th major
title overall.
"He plays better against the bet-
ter ones, and that's what he showed
today," said Federer, owner of 16
Grand Slam trophies. "He's a great
champion,. on clay, especially."
There's no question that Nadal
is as good as it gets in Paris.-- 45-1
for his career, and the same number
of titles there as Bjorn Borg but
the Spaniard already also has shown
that he is-much more than the King
of Clay.
And Sunday's victory only will
raise more questions about whether
Federer truly deserves to be called
the Greatest of All Time if he is not
even the Greatest of Right Now.
Nadal leads their head-to-head
series 17-8. That includes, a 6-2
advantage in Grand Slam finals and
a 5-0 edge at the French Open (in
the 2005 semifinals, and the 2006,
2007, 2008 and 2011 finals).
When a reporter recited those
numbers and asked for an assess-
ment, Nadal replied: "Well, it means
I can play well, too."
"When you talk about these sta-
tistics, when you try and make these
comparisons, really it's not very
interesting to me," continued Nadal,
who would have ceded the No. 1
ranking to Novak Djokovic with a


loss Sunday. "I'm very happy with
what I have, with who I am. I'm not
the best player in the history of ten-
nis. I think I'm among the best.
That's true. That's enough for me."
'He's rapidly gaining on Federer.
Nadal turned 25 Friday, making him
about six months younger than Fed-
erer was when' the Swiss star col-.
lected his 10th major title.
Their rivalry is a friendly not
heated one. Nadal conceded a
point Sunday when he saw Feder-
er's shot landed in but was called
out. A few years ago, Federer gave
Nadal a lift on a private jet from
one tournament site to another after
learning his on-court nemesis had
trouble finding a commercial flight.
This was their first meeting in a
Grand Slam final in more than two
years. It also was the first major
championship match contested by.
any two men who already complet-
ed career Grand Slams. And Nadal
and Federer put on a worthy show,
more than 3 hours chock-full of
lengthy exchanges, brilliant defense,
sublime shotmaking, and some
dizzying shifts of momentum.
"A big occasion," the third-seed-
ed Federer said. "I was aware of
it. I
He won't acknowledge publicly
that Nadal drives him crazy with
those high-bouncing lefty forehands
that arrive shoulder-high on Fed-
erer's backhand side, and that per-
petual-motion, cover-every-spot,
never-cede-a-thing scrambling that
forces an opponent to produce sev-
eral superb shots just to earn a sin-
gle point.
"It's always pretty straightforward
when we play each other ... because
we know what to expect," Federer
said. "I'm not in any way frustrated
with his play."
Perhaps that's true, but consider
this: Federer is 14-1 in the Grand
Slam finals he has played against
any other opponent. The only time
Federer won the French Open, in
2009, he avoided Nadal, who was
eliminated in the fourth round that
year by Robin Soderling.
Nadal, for his part, doesn't like


6TH FRENCH TITLE: Rafa
Spain celebrates after defe
Federer of Switzerland.


to boast about his supre'
Federer, whom he always
as the top player ever.
But Toni Nadal, Rafa
and coach,,spoke plainly
day's match.
"The game of Rafael
good for Roger," Toni sa
that Federer's mentali
Rafael is not the best."
On Sunday, Federer n
5-2 at the outset, but b
point by missing a drop
landed barely wide.
"I definitely thought
maybe a touch unlucky t
he got a touch lucky," Fei
"That was one of m
chances."
Nadal then won seven
row. Later, when Nadal
break in the third and le
match appeared over, unt
charged back to force a f


But Nadal once more assumed
control, winning the last five games,
then dropping to his knees and lean-
ing forward with his hands covering
his eyes.
"I was able to play my best when
I needed my best," Nadal said. "For
that reason, today I am here with
the trophy."
Midway through the tournament,
Nadal talked down his chances,
admonishing himself for not hitting
the ball with enough "conviction"
and questioning whether he was
playing well enough to take home
the title. After all, he fell. behind
unseeded John Isner of the United
States 2-1 in sets in the first round,
pushed to five sets for the only time
in his seven trips to the French
Open.
"Last week, when Rafael was
playing so badly," Uncle Toni
recounted Sunday evening, "to lift "
some of the pressure, I told him:
'Stay calm. Winning or losing won't
change your life'.'"
iel Nadal of' Not that Sunday's match needed
ating Roger any assistance in the drama depart-
ng og ment, but a little extra came in the
form of a rain delay the very first
(AP Photo) of the entire 15-day tournament -
while Nadal was serving to take a
macy over two-set lead.
's refers to He had a set point at 5-4, 40-30,
but wasted it with a forehand that
ael's uncle clipped the net and flew long. That
after Sun- made it deuce, and that's when
drops began falling. As spectators
is not too pulled on hats and popped open
lid, adding umbrellas, Nadal and Federer wait-
ty against ed a few seconds before walking off
the court.
raced to a Federer slipped into a private
lew a set trainer's room and hopped up on a
shot that table. Nadal switched shirts and fid-
geted with his racket strings in a
that I got hallway, then had a brief chat with
there, and his mentor.
derer said. "Rafael was very nervous in the
y bigger locker room," Uncle Toni said. "I
(told) him: 'It's.difficult for you. But
games in a it's very difficult for him, too.'"
went up a After a 10-minute break, the
-d 4-2, the match resumed, and Nadal imme-
til Federer' diately earned a second set point.
ourth set. But Federer saved that one, too,


opening an eiglit-point run for him.
And then it was Nadal's turn to take
eight points in a row, including a 4-
0 lead in the tiebreaker, which he
'eventually closed with a forehand
winner.
Federer wasn't finished, break-
ing Nadal at love to get within 4-3 in
the third set. When Federer struck a
forehand winner down the line to
break again and go ahead 6-5, he
earned a standing ovation and
chants of "Ro-ger! Ro-ger!" from
thousands of fans at Court Philippe
Chatrier.
"When Roger plays like this,"
Nadal said, "the opponent has noth-
ing to do, sometimes."
With the crowd roaring each time
he won a point, Federer served out
the set, capping it with another fore-
hand winner. The outcome seemed
in doubt. Federer had won 1.17
points, Nadal 116.
"All of a sudden, at 0-0 in the
fourth set," Federer said, "you
think, 'OK, we have a match
again.'".
Nadal served to begin the fourth
set, and Federer quickly gained
three break points at love-40. This,
then, would be the final twist. Nadal
erased two break points with
groundstroke winners, and the third
with an ace at 120 mph. A service
winner at 114 mph followed. Then
Federer shanked a backhand off his
frame and into the stands:
"Very important for me, no?"
Nadal would say later. "That was a
big turning point of the match, in
my opinion."
That made it 1-0, and Federer
held to 1-1. But that was it. Nadal
didn't lose another game as the sun
finally broke through the gray
clouds, bathing the court in light.
An appropriate conclusion for
Nadal, the kid from the island of
Mallorca who loves to spend free
time fishing or at the beach.
On the back of each of the sky-
blue sneakers that kept carrying him
to balls that should have been out of
reach, Nadal had the number "5'' in
a circle, signifying his French Open
title count until Sunday.

/


TRIBUNE SPORTS


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 5E








PAGE 6E, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


TRIBUNE SPORTS


JUDGE PARKER APT 3-G


MARVIN


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


CALVIN & HOBBES


" CA V OU GET SSOME51PYEL.9TO PICKUP
MY 6TUFF~ I'M PCTIN' CALLL"


Sudoku s a numDer-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object Is to place the numbers
1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row. eacn column
and each 3x3 oox contains the same number only once
The difficulty level of the Concepts Sudoku increases from
'Monday.to Sunday


Difficulty Level ** *


5/14


HOW many words of four
,letters or more can you
make from the letters
shown here?,
In making a word, each
letter may be used once
only. Each must contain
the centre letter and
there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No
plurals, or verb forms
ending in "s", no words
with initial, capitals and.
no words with a hyphen
or apostrophe permitted.
The first word of a phrase
is permitted (e.g. inkjet in
inkiet printer).


Good 23; very good 34;
excellent 45 (or more).
Solution Monday. .i
YESTERDAYS q
SOLUTION ,
able abler aerobe bagel
bale -baler. bare barge
bargee BARGEPOLE'
beagle bear beep beer
berg blag blare blWar
bleep blog boar bole
borage. bore brae brag
.earlobe gable garb
garble garbo glebe
glob globe grab grebf
lobar lobe, operable
pleb PORBEAGLE prpbe
rebel robe ropable
ropeable


Across
1 He's not bent but on the
level (6)
4 Slaughter in the service
area (8)
9 ..Charged for being drunk (6)
10 This bean goes into drink
(8) '
12 Of course it's a better
device (4)
13 Heaped like carpets? (5)
14 This editor may give stock
advice (4)
17 They're wom after the
match (7,5)
20 What the moth does is
revealed (5,2,5)
23 The attraction of an
inconclusive result (4)
24 French physicist set to
return (5)
25 Given the rent (4)
28 Continues to make money
(8)
29. Recreated a reign of Latin
queen (6)
30 Defence raised when things
get too hot (8)
31 Examined in depth because
of complaint (1-5)

Yesterday's Cryptic Solution
Across: 1 Still, 4 Marconi, 8 Ale,
9 Lady's maid, 10 Infests, 11 Lacks,
13 Albums, 15 Brenda, 18 Abeam,
19 Washout, 21 Ordinance, 23 Aga,
24 Apology, 25 Sweat.
Down: 1 Stamina, 2 Ineffable,
3 Lulls, 4 Modest, 5 Rustler, 6 Ova,
7 Indus, 12 Cannonade,
14 Memento, 16 Attract, 17 Twenty,
18 Aroma, 20 Steps, 22 Duo.


Down :
1 Built-up.area of urban
development (4,4)
2 When high water is low
(4,4).
3 He's not blind to the future
(4). '
5 Form that saves time for
the writer (12)
6 Diamonds perhaps are
acceptable (4)
7 Critic unreasonably acid (6)
8 Name evenly distributed for
girls or boys (6)
11 Unswervingly determined to
remain unmarried? (6-6)
15 Turn to someone important
to get a rise (5)
16 I shake a leg about, being
nimble (5)
18 Shamel (8)
19 Regimental flag and I
uniform (8)
21 Makes work play perhaps
(6) .
22 The French make progress
in the pool (6)
26 Hems made of mesh,(4)
27 Clothes may be changed in (
the car (4)
L
Yesterday's Easy Solution
Across: 1 Chasm, 4 Comrade,
8 Awl, 9 Round trip, 10 Request,
11 Apply, 13 Nearly, 15 Decamp,
18 Piety, 19 High-hat, 21 Tempt
fate, 23 Vie, 24 Harvest,
25 Tacky.
Down: 1 Chagrin, 2 All square,
3 Merge, 4 Crusty, 5 Mediate,
6 Air, 7 Empty, 12 Play havoc,
14 Layette, 16 Pottery, 17 Thwart,
18 Pitch, 20 Greet, 22 Mar.


1 2 3 4 5 6 17 8

0 n in ~

121


13' 14 -
17

20D
21 22
23 24
2627
28 2

3o i i


Across
1 Be sparing (2,4)
4 Artificially assumed
) : -. ( (8. )
9 To spread out (6)
" 10 Athletics field event
* ... (4,4)
) 12 Sensitive
perception (4)
13 Glaziers'cement
(5)
14 Knock senseless
(4)
17 Wide-ranging work
of reference (12)
20 Pompous or formal
person (7,5)
23 Principal role in
play (4)
24 Extortionate
moneylending (5)
25 Placid (4)
28 A freshwater turtle
(8)
29 Spurious (6)
30 Recklessly
determined (8)
31 An instant (6)


Down
1 Medieval armoured
glove (8).
2 Ability to achieve.
result (8)
3 Resentful mood (4)
-5 With sincerity
(4,3,5)
6 Nervously irritable
(4)
7 Faithful (6)
8 Rely (6)
11 Old hat in style
(3,2,7)
15 Shrewd (5)
16 Slightly intoxicated
(5)
18 Undeceive (8)
19 Put an end to (5,3)
21 Grasp tightly (6)
22 Cask (6)
26 Style of dress (4)
27 Norwegian capital
(4)


South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
4A64
YJ 109 72
.*AK93
410.
WEST .
#K1095 .
V6 V4
*Q106 +J
+KJ985. '
SOUTH
4 Q72
VA-KQ853
*52
4AQ


EAST
J83
4
J874
76432


The bidding:
South West North !
...1- Dble Redble I
Pass, 24 4NT I
S5Y Pass 69
Opening lead six of hearts.


East
Pass:
Pass


There are players who, at times,
are constitutionally unable to say the
word "pass." West was obviously a
member of this school, as can be
seen by studying the bidding and
attempting to reconcile his takeout
double of one heart with nine high-
card points.
North was likewise a distin-
guished member of the same school.
In effect, he bid six hearts on only 12
high-card points opposite a partner
02011 King Fcatu


who opened the bidding and never
indicated any extra values. ,outh,
might easily have held only '2 or 13
high-card points instead of the 17 he
actually had.
However, North proved to be the
winner in the overbidding contest.
True, South had to play his ;cards
well to make the slam, but he did'
have West's ultralight double to steer'
him in the right direction.
Declarer won West's truml lead
with the ace, cashed the A-K qf dia-
monds, ruffed a diamond, re-eptered
dummy with a trump and ruffed the
nine of. diamonds, producing this
position:
North
4*A64
VJ710
410
West Eafst
4K 1095 Immaterial
#K J 9
South
4Q72
VK8
+AQ u
South now led the A-Q of lubs.
When West covered the quee4 with
the king, declarer discarded the
spade four from dummy, leaving
West between the devil and thg deep
blue sea. Whatever he returned,
declarer could not be denied the rest.
of the tricks. \
ires Syndicate Inc.


9 8 72 _
7 51
67

4 6' 7S

1 6 8i


5 '131 9

,5 3 4

81 9

7 4 9 2


CRYPTIC PUZZLE


The Devil and the Deep Blue Sea
The Devil and the Deep Blue Sea


MAT




CJ-E




RB I-


I










.TRIBUNE SPORTS


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 7E


Portugal wins, England






draws in Euro qualifiers
q rs.


By STEVE DOUGLAS
*AP Sports Writer

'LONDON (AP) Portugal
climbed to the top of Group H in
European Championship qualifying
.-by beating Norway 1-0 on Saturday,
While Group G leader England drew
,2-2 at home to Switzerland to jeop-
"ardize its hopes of making next
year's finals in Poland and Ukraine..
Helder Postiga scored the 53rd-
minute winner for Portugal in the
top-of-the-table match in Lisbon,
securing his side a third successive
victory in qualifying since Paulo
Bento took over as coach in Sep-
-tember.
England came from 2-0 down to
jrab a point at Wembley and only
remained top of its group on goal
difference from Montenegro, which
missed a, chance to go above Fabio
Capello's side by drawing 1-1 to Bul-
garia.
Greece eased past Malta 3-1 to
return to the top of Group F and
',Robbie Keane's double earned Ire-
'land a 2-0 victory at Macedonia, '
keeping Giovanni Trapattoni's side
.first in Group B ahead on goals
scored from Russia and Slovakia -
.who both won on Saturday.
'Postiga pounced at the near post
to poke home a cross from winger
Nani as Portugal, captained by a
subdued Cristiano Ronaldo, finally
broke down an obdurate Norway
defense.
" 'This game was no less harder
than we'd expected," said Bento,
who has revived Portugal's cam-
paign since taking over from Carlos
Queiroz when the team was on just
'3f;'


PORTUGAL'S Helder Postiga (right) celebrates with Nani (left) and Carlos Martins after scoring against Norway during
2012 Group H qualifying match at Luz stadium in Lisbon on Saturday.


one point from two qualifying
games. "We managed to take con-
trol and keep control."
Denmark tied with Portugal and
Norway in the standings with a 2-0
win at Iceland, with midfielders
Lasse Schone and Christian Erik-
sen scoring secodd-half goals in


Reykjavik.
Like Portugal, England's place at
Euro 2012 is far from secure after
being held by Switzerland.'
Tranquillo Barnetta scored two
free kicks in thle space of three min-:
.utes to put the Swiss 2-0 ahead by
the 35th but Frank Lampard pulled


one back from the penal
England in the 37th minus
i Substitute Ashley You
with a powerful strike s:
into the second half.
"The Switzerland pla
fresher, they have had
season," said England co


Capello. "We suffered because we
arrived without energy."
Switzerland is six points behind
the joint leaders with three matches
left. Only the top team qualifies
automatically from each group.
"To draw in the home of football
is very good, but we don't want to
overestimate it. We have to go on,"
Switzerland coach Ottmar Hitzfeld
said.
Montenegro failed to take advan-
tage of England's slip-up, conced-
ing a goal to Ivelin Popov in the 64th
to draw with Bulgaria.
Radomir Djalovic put the hosts
ahead in the 52nd with a volley from
Vladimir Bozovic's left-wing cross.
"We are fine with this draw, but it
is a pity that we did not score a pos-
itive result," Montenegro coach
Zlatko Kranjcar said.
All three of Group B's paceset-
ters won to leave the pool wide open
with four matches left for each side.
Keane became the first British
player to reach the 50-goal mark in
internationals, moving onto 51 with
his brace in Macedonia.
Roman Pavlyuchenko, Keane's
teammate at English side Totten-
ng their Eur ham, scored a hat trick in Russia's 3-
ig tir 1 home win over Armenia and SI1-
vakia edged past Andorra 1-0 thanks
(AP Photo) to Miroslav Karhan's 63rd-minute
winner.
ty spot for In Group F, Yiannis Fetfatzidis
ite. scored twice and Kyriakos
ng leveled Papadopoulos added a goal on
ix minutes debut to help visiting Greece beat
Malta.
years were Israel stayed one point behind
a different Greece and level on points with
)ach Fabio Croatia after a 2-1 victory at Latvia.


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AP GE 8E MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


THE TRIBUNE






















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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE


BAHAMAS
R. F .A. I.. T Y

EST> 1949 I 1


www.bahamasrealty.bs


a Sitting on the covered porch of this charming classic home in
.-. .. : "the early evening, drink in hand, being wafted by a soothing
S- "?y'tropical breeze and taking in one of many spectacular
S'" sunsets it is easy to transport yourself back to a simpler time.

. ''. "Heartsease" is a typical Harbour island style home with clap
-board siding, cedar shingle roofs, upper and lower porches,
'' picturesque harbour views, painted wood floors, open
.i '^"s*:!;" :: ;-i "i i- "... 'L ". '' "~ "^ -* '" beamed ceilings, ceiling fans, split unit a/c, outdoor shower,
S ..double French panelled doors, private outdoor deck and an
S. .. attached "L' shaped 2-bed cottage with laundry room
W. Larry Roberts I T 424-7933 1 T: 396-0022
lroberts@bahamasrealty.bs


#565316; 5bd/4.Sbth: $695,000
NEW PRICES REDUCED FROM$725,000
For the buyer who Jongs for a spacious home on
Lake Cunningham with gorgeous views, this
residence is 75% complete. Finish it with your
personal style. The 24,050 sq.ft. property, with 120
feet of lake frontage, Is walled and fenced. The 2-
storey home comprises 4,752 sq. ft. and has a
pool cottage which is 1,024 sq, ft. Special
opportunity Conservatively priced for a quick sale.
Stuart Halbert I Tz 242.391.0034


Sit
i t =1, IM ,JI 4Civ i .
#564580: VACANT: $100,000
This creek front lot is located just inside the
harbour mouth of Fresh Creek. Andros. It is 64 feet
wide and 124 feet deep, and runs along an
elevated rocky ridge. There is a public jetty to the
left of the lot where a boat could bq secured. This
is a prime area for boaters and the fishing here is
reputed to be some of the best in the country.
There is also the potential for the development of
marina facilities here. The airport is 2 miles away,
David Lunn TI T 242.396.0015


#5665465: 5bd3bthb $375000
This very spacious home is just moments from the
beach and close to all amenities, With just under
3,000 sq, ft, of living space, this family home has
lots of space and charm. 'Features Include maids
quarters, hardwood floors, utility room & spacious
master suite with balcony and large master bath
, boasting Jacuzzl tub and separate shower, Fully
enclosed lot with beautiful landscaping including
numerous fruit-bearing trees,
Brian Austin I T. 242.396.0016


#565470: 3bdl2bth: $2,000 P/M
SUPER RENTALI! Great views! From The Atlantic
Ocean to the sea on west side of Abaco where the
bonefish play, you will never tire of the refreshing
breezes and spectacular views. The second level
of the cottage is the main living area, with open
plan living, dining and kitchen and two bedrooms.
The ground level boasts a self-contained suite
compiele with kitchen, bed and bath and a large
covered porch,
Molly Roberts I T: 242.367.3262


#565415: 2bdPf.Sbth: $250,000
Enjoy maintenance free living at one of these
brand new condos in a private, gated complex just
minutes from Cable Beach.The ground floor is an
open living plan with French doors opening to a
lovely patio. Features include porcelain tiles,
recessed lighting, hardwood cabinetry and granite
countertops in the kitchen, bamboo flooring in the
bedrooms, spacious closets & central a/c. There
is a shared pool & cabana. For rent at $2,000 P/M
Monica Knowles I T: 242.396.0080


#565456: lbdllbth: $800 PIM
Brand new apartments at Hill Side Place in the
southwest. These units feature a bright, open floor
plan and kitchen with custom wood cabinets and
tiled floors throughout. The upstairs unit features a
walk-out balcony. There is a total indoor area of
approx, 800 sq. ft. giving ample room and is a
perfect starter home for a newly wed couple.
These are delightful apartments in a quiet area.
Call for a viewing today.
KIm Kikivarakts I Ti 242.3986.0033


#565441: 3bd/3bth: $230,000
Why pay rent, when you can be a landlord
yourself? This well built duplex is a great find and
perfect for first time buyers. The 2-bed/2-bath unit
has a specious kitchen with lots of storage, an
open living area and master suite with split a/c
unit The 1-bed unit can be rented for additional
income or used for visiting guests: The yard' is
fenced and there is ample parking. Sold with
appliances and an alami system for security.
Brian Austin I Tel. 242.3096.0016



Watch us for exciting real estate trends
ZNS: (Cable Channel 11)
Thursday at 8:30pm
JCN: (Cable Channel 14)
Monday at 7pm



I Facebook.com/BahamasRealty

STwtrttenrcom/Bahaineas-Reatty
D. GuideMeHome2TheBahamas.com
yilou YouTube.com/SahamasReatty


.r. rs ih', si ll.I n) lrl" I N'l 1.'- I *' Ii I'1 KI M '.1 ',W '
ROBERTS ROWNRIGG ANDEIWS AtUSTIN HALB:f'RT KIRIVARAK-S KNO',L}:S


2 11%

(CHRISTO'iPIm ..*..i 'I ,ri pyPE[w RG SARA t ANi P JASN
LOWF L UN L'AMtKER PARKFi. RAItKEi. STU. M WON(
McAx,rLUM .


Bahamas Realty Ltd. I East Bay Street I T: 242.396.0000 1 info@bahamasrealty.bs


Te oen I *I 4' $ I 4aresb cter rnsos ha si i


e llXRY .:.
......- - Il -iI l I' .I/'il


* *' Q 01







THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 3


LIST~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ YORPOET IHCLWL AKRADGTIMDAEACS ODM3 f


I. I 11 : '.f.


; .. '*.. : ,^ j i^
X5,


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..50,


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WINTON HOME With Rental Units Exclusive
4 bed, 2 bath main home with 2 additional 1 bed, 1
bath efficiencies. Affordable way to own your own
home. Generator, large enclosed property close .to
the beach. This is a tremendous deal.
$350,000-Ref#7543


Exclusive
WATERFRONT HOME WITH DOCK
This 2,342 sq. ft. Eastern Rd. home has 2 beds,
2 baths, numerous living areas and stunning
unobstructed ocean views. 7,200 sq. ft. lot.
$675,000-Refj#7200
heather@coldwellbankerbahamas. comr


Spacious and well maintained 3 bed, 2 bath
home in quiet family neighborhood off Prince
Charles Drive. The property is landscaped and
enclosed on all sides.
.022' 0nn0- RW17d2


Exclusive Beautiful Nassau Home Loaded with
Charm & Character
This turn key exquisite West Indies style 3 bedroom, 2 bath 3.000sq. ft
home is located minutes from downtown Nassau in a quiet, small
gated community. Property is 17,920 square feet of meticulously mani-
cured grounds, professionally furnished in a very sophisticated style,
wood flooring throughout and numerous upgrades. One of a kind.


- Large Lot
- High Traffic Area
- Ideal for walk in c


: or Law office
-Ref#6936


New Exclusive
CORAL HARBOUR HOME Attention To Details
Modern 3 bed, 2.5 bath home. First class fixtures and
finishes. 14ft, ceilings, hurricane proof windows, stun-
ning kitchen and stylishly furnished. Enjoy privacy
and peace on the quiet side of the island.
$495,000-Ref#7610
alex@coldwellbankerbahamas.com







Commercial Property,
"Shirley Heights Offers Wanted!"
- 5,000 sq. ft Lot size
2,155 sq. ft. storage facility
- Perfect for warehouse or manufacturing business.
$250,f000-Ref#7428
unpnrpe^rdClndwpllhannbprhnhnmvna nwi


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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE


Laura Kimble Realtor, Linda Eldon PropertyAfccounts Manager, Gregory Graham President. Katina Schopper Reallor,
June Russell CRS, BRI Broker, Abato, Patti Love Realtor, Abaco, Kevin Bastian Realtor, Eleuthera


#1948 Rose Island Acreage


GRAHAM



REAL ESTATE
Showing Integrity Every Day


#4495 TumberryTown Home


AW


$2,500,000
Total of 6.5 acres, open zoned. Located on the
western end of Rose Island, these 2 sea to sea
lots measure about 550ft of ocean frontage on
both north & south sides, w/ 30ft elevations.
Great investment opportunity for a variety of
commercial uses such as a tourist excursion
operation or small boutique resort. Priced to
Sell!


$543,000
Turnkey, 3 bed, 3.5 Bath 1827 sqft Townhome
in the gated community of Turnberry.
Travertine floors downstairs, and hardwood
floor upstairs. Community pool, clubhouse,
tennis courts. Great family environment.


I Fo Rn


East Nassau:
#3926 Ocean View Townhome -
3bed/3.5 bath luxury townhouse in gated com-
munity of Dicks Point Dock Slip, community
ppol, tennis courts. Enjoy beautiful views of
Montagu Bay. $5000 p/m.
#4581 Water's Edge, Eastern Road -
Completely renovated 2,800 sqft 4 bedroom, 3.5,
bath waterfront home. Enjoy fabulous amenities,
including a sparkling swimming pool and fountain,
multi-level patio terrace with brick fireplace/BBQ
and a floodlit cabana with full built-in wet bar.
This Bahama-style villa is a stunner on the inside
as well. $8,500.


West Nassau:
#4578 Sandyport 2 bed/2.5 bath. Newly
renovated kitchen, new carpets and just painted,
this charming 2 bedroom townhouse located in
Sandyport has been given a face lift for the new
tenants to enjoy. $3000 pm.
4#4376 Lyford Cay Luxury Beautiful 4
bedroom 4 bathroom home located in Lyford
Cay. $6800 p/m.


I Vn L a


New Providence:
#4570 Venice Bay Annex 10,000
squarefoot homesite off Bacardi Road.
$105,000.
#4576 Westwinds Multifamily Lot-
Great investment property in popular new gated
community. $145,000.
#4568 Killarney Shores Lot -9,500
squarefoot homesite in the new peaceful residen-
tial community of Killarney lakes. $150,000.


Abaco:
#3984 Treasure Cay 8900 sqft. Lot ready
for development and only one block back from
the beach. $39,500.
#4471 Lot 101, Lubbers Quarters,
.Abaco Only minutes from Marsh Harbour &
Elbow Cay, this lot boasts picturesque sunsets
and views of the Sea of Abaco. $95,000.
#4105 Pelican Shores Canalfront
Homesite 33,000 sqft lot in lovely communi-
ty. Cleared, landscaped and ready for develop-
ment.Access to 60 feet of dockage in a canal.
$525,000.


. , '
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STARTING AT

$15,500
ONLY 16 LOTS
UNDER $20,000 LEFT!
SINGLE*FAMILY LOTS
Lot 2 $18,500
.Lot 17 $19,500
Lot 36 $19,500
Lot 37 $19,500.
Lot 38 $19,500
Lot 48 $19,500
Lot 49 $19,500
Lot 59 $17,500
Lot 60 $17,500
Lot 62 $18,500
Lot 63 $18,500
Lot 65 $17,500
Lot 70 $15,500
Lot 72 $18,500
Lot 73 $16,500
Lot 74 $17,500

Make 2011 the year that you
purchase your family land in
the family islands., This is an
excellent chance to invest in
The R:ah .In,'


COOL BREASE",,'-

TARPUM BAY
E L I.`: U T H E R A
Only 39 lots remaining! Buy a lot today for your vacation home,
retirement home, or simply a future investment. Thi siubdlvision is situated
in an area known as "Bull Patch" minutes from the Tarpum Bay settlement.
With road access direct to the stunning Winding Bay Beach, this is the ideal
place to have your island retreat. Cool Brease is just minutes away from the
settlement of Tarpum Bay where you will find all your amenities! Fly into
Rock Sound airport on a short flight from Nassau. Nine Multifamily Lots
are sI ill av.al,k.. qSui\'viion approvals have been granted. All intra-truictuirc
has been completed.


Call for property information 356-5030


vie al of ou litnsa w-rha ral'tt~


I I _








THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 5


mo. DUPUCH

ERA REAL ESTATE


Follow Us OR
X ::.....


7ww .ERA b a h am as.c0


., 6I 1.


*~a4f~;~s**~a


A wonderful opportunity to own an immaculate townhome in a fam-
ily oriented community with secured grounds, pool and playground;
offering all the comforts of home! Features of this townhome in-
clude 3 bedrooms, 2.6 bathrooms, two-car garage, fully equipped
kitchen with spacious breakfast nook, pantry and more. $495,000
602 COALVIT


Lovely 4 bed, 2.5 bath home features an open plan living/dining
room, family and sitting area. The large kitchen is customized
with centre island and includes built-in stainless steel appliances.
Other features include sprinkler system, CCTV, electronic gate
and a 2 bed, 1 bath apartment with separate entrance. $499,900


' g-. :., F E ... ,, .





Lovely 3' bed, 2.5 bath townhome
within a friendly gated community of-
fers central A/C, washer & dryer hook-
ups, enclosed patio & pool. $285,000









Attractive 3 beds, 2.5 bath home in a
desirable neighborhood offers hurri-
cane impact windows, alarm, granite
counter tops, two-zone A/C. $375,000









This lovely 3 beds, 2.5 bath ground
floor unit, sited in a secure & prestigious
community offers roll down shutters,
pool, ocean views & more. $550,000


."

"
S,, .
Exquisite 4 bed, 5 bath home offers
beautiful interior & exterior. Features
include spacious living/dining areas,
wetbar, jacuzzi, pool & more. $725,000



LIf,-s. ..-, S -





Beautifully appointed 2 bed, 2.5 bath
townhome with pool. Conveniently lo-
cated near Cable Beach, schools &
beaches. Offered fumished! $280,000


13,378 sq. ft. residential lot located in
quiet and gated community. Amenities
include a clubhouse, communal pool
and underground utilities. $199,000


1 609 SUNST PAR


Move in ready; with an entry porch, liv-
ing/dining area, 3 beds, 2 baths, family
room and open kitchen. A must see
home in a desirable location! $220,000






t-"
5243 THE REEF AL T




Executive 1 bed, 1 bath condo offers
luxurious finishes. Owners enjoys ac-
cess to a private gym, concierge team,
spa, pool & beach club. US$490,000


New Price and Looking for Offers. 2
bed, 1 bath townhouse adjacent to
pool, private patio,. semi-furnished,
ample storage. Bring offers! $205,000


I 5883 Silver Cay Spacious 3 beds, 2 bath townhome situated in fantastic location. $1,800 6071 Eastern Road 2 bed, 1 bath cottage, close to all conveniences; pets allowed. $1,000
5932 Prospect Ridge Conveniently located 2 bed, 2.5 bath townhome with pool. $3,000 4921 Danottage Estates Tastefully furnished 1 bed, 1 bath cottage; utilities included. $1,100
5078 Love Beach Beautifully furnished 3 bed, 3.5 bath condo with beach access. $6,500 5756 Harbour Mews Beachfront community offers lovely 2 bed, 2 bath townhome. $2,000
6076 Westridge Lovely 3 beds, 3.5 bath home with attached 2 bed apartment. $5,500 5538 Grove Tastefutlly appointed 2 bed, 2.5 bath townhome within gated community. $2,200
5996 Eastern Road Waterfront 3 bed, 3.5 bath villa with stairs leading to the ocean. $3,000 6084 Eastern Road Beautifully furnished 4 beds, 3.5 baths home on the waterfront. $8,500


EAST BAY ST. I P.O.BOX SS 6650 1 NASSAU, BAHAMAS I T: 242.393.1811 I F: 242.394.1453 1 E: info@ERAbahamas.com


THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 5


S, .









PAGE 6, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE




'
aK A. V
'y"-)-v T


-#3437 Columbus Cove Rental Furnished 3
S 12bath condo with gorgeous ocean views, in
.4ated community with dark wood cabinetry, gran-
:tre countertops, stainless steel appliances, tile
floorss community pool, 24 nr security and much
( more. $3,800 per month


#3828 Turtle Hill Resort & Bar Abaco Island
resort with four 2B'2B villas and two 3B'3B villas
with both pool and ocean views, bar & grill, dock-
age and so much more! $5.25m Gross


#4143 Sandyport Canal front Rental Fully fur-
nished 3bed 3 1/2 bath 2000 sq ft towrtiome W=tt
large deck overlooking the canal.
$4.300 per month


#4086 Treasure Cove Sea view lot Located #4095 Long Island Beachfront Lot Secluded
directly opposite the community beach offering vacant property consisting of almost 3 Acres with
unobstructed ocean views, cool breezes, beautiful 185 feet of beach frontage on the Atlantic coast.
sunrises & all the Treasure Cove amenities. Build Amenities nearby. Call or visit our website for
your dream home here! more info. $338,000 Gross
$187,000 Gross


#1834 Westridge Spacious, luxury, 3bed/
3.5bath open plan townhome with garage, private
pool, custom kitchen, travertine flooring, high
'end fixtures, patio and a standby generator.
$529,000 Gross


Get the free mobile app at
nttp://get.beetagg.com
or txt BEE to +44 762 480 24 86


-"~"'


- rr


gga






THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 7


S701 East Bay Street,
J \ r Nassau, Bahamas
SPhone: 242-322-7979

T T- T XTT l Fax: 242-325-6473


RA V ESTATE.L

REAL ESTATE.


Email: sales@islandlivingrealestale.com
www.islandlivingrealestale.com


RAill.\I
Le:M ^


'INDER WICKV WELLS KNOWLES CAREY
r'Appralrr Broker Broker/ApBpramr Broker, BRI, CRS Etalb Agea

REAL ESTATE SALES, RENTALS,
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT & APPRAISALS


This 3 bedroom
condo offers
stunning canal
views from the
.. open living
room, spacious
kitchen, gener-
ous master bedroom with private study area,
.2 guests bedroom with en-suite baths and
private patio. Offered at $3,250/mth

SEA BEACH #1553 Rental
Charming 2 bed,
1.5 bath town-
house.'
Townhouse is
newly renovated
kitchen, fully fur-
nished in quiet
area within walk-
ing distance of beach. Very well kept.


Great. Opportunity; :Three Open This uniquely designed and decorated property is,
in Lots aaab~ on hgh. traf located on a stunning.beach inCasuarinaPoint, 20
Zoning Lots available on high traffic minutes south of Marsh Harbour, Abaco. The
area. property consists of 2 buildings a 1-bed/2bath
cottage and a2 bed/2.5bath 3 story home on stilts.
Offered at $120,000 gross e h RECENTLY REDUCED!!
Offered at $120,000 gross eah Offered at $850,000 gross


PEETSRIDGE #2264' FLAMINGO GARDENS #2335







This duplex lot is located in the sub- This duplex is well maintained each
division of Peetsridge, between side having 2 bedrooms and 1 bath-
Millaris Heights and Cowpen Road. room. It has an open floor plan,
There is a foundation in place. income producing and presently
rented.
Offered at $80,000 gross Offered at $228,000 gross


SANDYPORT #2158 CONCHREST #2330







This beautifully maintained 2nd floor condo, This lovely executive condo is located
overlooks the winding canals of Sandyport. in a gated community on the water-
An open plan living/dining area opens onto a front in the heart of Cable Beach, there
large covered balcony ideal for entertaining is also a large pool with an entertaining
or outside dining and allowing wonderful area and accessto the beach.
light and breeze throughouttn0r Oeaand access to the beach.
Offered at $475,000 gross Offered at $649,000 gross


PARADISE ISLAND #2272 :


This 2 bed 2.5 bath unfurnished
townhouse offers garden and har-
bour views along with its own pri-
vate dock.
Offered at$589,000 gross


I-t:NIAL Inis j oea/z Damn zna This lovely townhouse features 3 bed-
floor condo features tiled floors, rooms with ensuite bathrooms, travertine
central air-conditioning and hurri- & wood flooring custom kitchen cabinetry
cane proof windows. It is offered with granite countertops and bathrooms
fully furnished and has a balcony. finished with granite countertops and
Offered at $3,500/mth slate tiles. Offered at S543,000 gross


West Bay Street 42247 Tis home is solit level 1wth two bedrooms with baths ensuite. $3,500/mth
Love Beach Walk #2248 ? bedrnr:s 35 bathrooms cDen clan dJinino room/livinn co m and CL-UStOm Wtche
' wViTh or-mnit coJntertD hroi Blackbeara s Terrace #2250 Lo.'-I Derconm ? aOrw, Ctae ;'.IP an autor-iu qate and "OncioG
yarc. S2.GO0/mth
S O;J y r t V- .,
, . : , : 7 :;


Bahama H arbour, Andros #1967 Large -esid4ntiai single family lot, :'.000 sc ft. $19,500
Gilpin Pcint, Abaco #1637 Resicetial 2o ,n gaiec community, .4S of an acre. $55,000
Pine,'u0d Sardens 41907 vac,.-i ;i+ 5.. so 69,000,
Chazon Estates 41655 lo es,. i -ot i o atecd ,'omnmunt'v. $117,00
i. R 4 ,..- -.


THE BALMORAL #2338 Rental
Enjoy condo living at
the centrally located
Balmoral
Development only
minutes from down-
town Nassau,
Nassau's Airport and
Cable Beach. This
new condo offers 2
spacious bedrooms, 2 baths, with elevated views and
tasteful furnishings. Hardwood floors throughout with
the exception of travertine tile in the kitchen and Baths.
Offered at $3,000/mth

NAUTICA #2342 Rental

This tastefully
furnished turn-
S key townhouse is
) offered for rent
consists of 3
bedrooms, 2.5
bathrooms. The
spacious living
and dining rooms
lead on to a large deck which affords great
entertaining. Offered at $4,200/mth


I






PAGE 8, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE


THE BEST INVESTMENT IN
THE BAHAMAS TODAY
Stunning Ocean Views!
*
5 minutes from International Airport

Ideal Rental Investment with
expected return of 9% Net

REDUCED $100,000


Tennis Courts, Pool & Gym


Large Balcony

Great Investment at $330 per sq ft.

Monaco Style #4179 &-Provence Style #4180






CAVES POINT PENTHOUSE
Panaramic views over two swimming pools and endless
Ocean and beach. A fantastic 5 bedroom penthouse in
a superb location with a tremendous wrap around
balcony with sunset and beach views! This 4,000 sq foot
-condo has been finished with marble bathrooms,
jacuzzi tubs, custom designer kitchen and pickled wood
ceilings. #4206


Jason McCarroll Sean McCarroll Tamara D. Dorsett
477-7027 359-2957 357-7811


LYFORD CAY VACANT LOT
Large 1.6 acre Estate lot on a no drive thru family road, Hibiscus Drive. The lot is
#46.9 and a plan is attached. There are several large family,homes on the road.
Not many large lots available for sale in Lyford Cay arid this is a very desirable
family road, all the lots are Estate lots, there are some established family homes'
and it is a quiet no drive through road. #4260



WATERFRONT ESCAPE
Recently renovated! This three bedroom, two and one
half bath condominium is a great investment. Located in
the secure and private community of Delaporte Point
which features such amenities asi beach, two pools,
beautiful landscaping, ample parking, gated security
shopping,and restaurants just a short walk away. #4231


CA AL .c)- L ,- $299 0


3/ 7S3 iq.ft .e

5


CANAL FRONT VACANT rlTI
Vacant lot located in SandyPort Phase V, Jaca-
randa Close # 4. This lot is minutes away from
schools, shopping, restaurants, and the beach.
Canal Front Lot. Land Size 3,753 Sq Ft. #3975


K GREAT FAMILY HOME
...- .;...; 3 beds, 2.5 bath home in great neighbourhood
features a large master bedroom with en-suite
bathroom, his and her basins, granite counter tops,
jacuzzi tub, separate shower and a large walk in
closet. #4269



CAPRI $625,000
2 Bedroom 2/2 Bathroom Ocean View Home
Living Area: 1,850 Sq Ft #3845
MONACO.- $745,000
3 Bedroom 3V2 Bathroom Ocean View Home
.,,. Living Area: 2,439 Sq Ft #4179

Office Located at Caves Village

Call us Today 242.327.5000







THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE


................................-....I


, .. ,. .." ... . ..





E BEACH,
m, 3.5 bath waterfront home offers
s and more. $1,000,000. NS07025


'The Reef' PARADISE ISLAND
Luxurious 1 bedroom 'Ocean Resort View' junior suite
with state-of-the-art amenities. $1,250,000. JS00148


'Caprice' CABLE
Beautiful 3 bdr
spectacular view


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 9









NASSAU / NEW PROVIDENCE
Lyford Cay: 0.68 acre canaJfront lot in prominent
community. $2,350,000. NS07104
Sandyport: This lot comprises 9,450 sq. ft. with 70
ft of canal frontage. $239,000. NS06859
OTHER ISLANDS
Andros: Superb 0.405 acre homesite has 100 ft. of
stunning beach frontage. $300,000. DS10604
Cat Island: Reduced for quick Salel 12,000 sq. ft. lot
with 81 ft. of beach frontage. $200,000. CS10630
San Salvador: Near to Club Med, this lot offers 142
ft. of pristine beachfront. $175,000. VS10587


'Turnberry' CHARLOTTEVILLE 'Bristol Bend' HAMSTER ROAD
New high-end 3 bdrm, 3.5 bath Affordable and gated, 2 bdrm
townhome. $543,000. NS07203 townhomes. $205,000. NS07161 : ., .'


CORAL CAY Private Yacht Club Community
All waterfront lots, gated, rental bungalows,
and more. Starting at $290,000. NS07169


BALMORAL 'Nautica' WEST BAY
Newly built! Beautiful 4 Brand New 3 bdrm, 2.5
bdrm, 3 bath townhome. bath townhome with pool.
$5,800/mo. NR10643 $3,800/mo. NR00949.



.' ,, 3 1
S-.-.... '. .4 .




EASTERN ROAD HAMPTON RIDGE
Fully furnished 3 bdrm, 3 Brand New! 2 bdrm, 2 bath
bath townhome. unit within gated complex.
$2,500/mo. NR01277 $2,200/mo. NR10689


LOVE BEACH WALK


Beautiful tur
gated comm







-'Sulgrave Mano
3 bdrm groun'
onto the beach


'Conchrest' CABLE BEACH
2 bdrm unit with exquisite sea views, a/c,
pool and secluded beach. $490,000. NS07197











'Vista Del Mar' EASTERN ROAD


n-key 3 bdrm penthouse within 2 bdrm townhome with central air, modern
unity. $799,000. NS06960 appliances and more. $366,000. NS06139



r.: ,-. ..-y... r J" ,tr,: -

-~
... - .... :,: -,^ : .. ,-
*r' CABLE BEACH 'The Balmoral' SANFORD DRIVE MILLER HEIGHTS
d floor condo opens Modern 2 bdrm town homes with Great Starter Home! 3 bdrm, 2
$995,000. NS07212 luxury amenities. $385,000. NS06708 bath home. $235,000. NS07234


* 3:.... ; .:. : .







PAGE 10, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


' -.-'" :


r-^
vt^


THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE


ftl,^^




7c


THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 11


IWWW.BALMORALBAHAMAS.COM







PAGE 12, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011 THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE






77. 0 0 /


SIRbahamas.com


*- S^-,l.. ..,. .. ,


listed d Exclusively
*v y'


PARADISE ISLAND OCEAN CLUB OCEAN CLUB RESIDENCES & MARINA PARADISE ISLAND #5380 One of the best PARADISE ISLAND #6007 Private 3 bed 3
ESTATES BEACHFRONT CABBAGE BEACH #4810 Professionally decorated luxury 3 BR 3.5 bath building plots in Ocean Club Estates, nearly.2 acres bath executive villa in the heart of Paradise Island.
Large elevated lot on world-famous Cabbage Beach apartment, 2,900 sf under air with outdoor patios of- on the tip of a peninsula with spectacular seaviews Charming community of only 4 villas. Pool, garage,
with 149'on the beach.Priced tp,sell at US$6.9m. fearing ocean views. Includes a 45' boat slip. Offered and over 800 feet of water frontage. US$8.Sm. storage, generator. New Price $975,000.
Gearge.Damianos@SothebysRealty.com 242.424.9699 fully furnished. Lana Rademaker 242.322.2305 Nick.Damianos@SothebysRealty.com 242.376.1841 Ridley.Carroll@SothebysRealty.com 242.424.5801










SKYLINE DRIVE #3492 Exquisitely remodeled. WEST BAY ST. #6066 LOVE BEACH WALK OCEAN CLIFF #5942 New gated waterfront PARADISE ISLAND #6035 HARBOUR
Main house with 3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths and office Gated beachfront community. Spacious I,800sf 3 community. Offered pre-construction, 3 BR 3 bath RIDGE RD. Multi-family 41,800 sf elevated property.
room plus 2 guest cottages. Mature landscape, pool, BR 3.5 bath apartment, granite counters, stainless apts. and townhouses. Upscale finishes. Early.2012 Investment opportunity. Approval in place for a 6-
gazebo, generator, R/O water system. $1.695m. appliances, 10' ceilings, ocean views. US$650,000. completion. Great investment. From $599,000. home gated community or 21 condos.US$2.095m. e
Samira.Coleby@SothebysRealcy.com 242.376.6248 Samira.Coleby@SothebysRealty.com 242.376.6248 Ridley.Carroll@SothebysRealtycom 242.424.5801 Monty.Roberts@SothebysRealty.com 242.424.4944










MONTAGU HEIGHTS #5815 Impeccable CABLE BEACH#5778Oneofafewhomes tht ABACO, MARSH HBR. THE CROSSINGS ELEUTHERA, ROCK SOUND #6037
2,698 sf 3 BR,2 BTH home on elevated 15,600 sfa lot. offer direct Cable Beach views. Private, furnished #6013 Gated beachfront complex with 120' dock Wide open spaces to be enjoyed on lush 3 acres with
Remodeled kitchen, new roof and hurricane windows, 2-storey, 3 BR, 3 bath, modern kitchen, travertine with 30' slipsgazebo, sea wall, private beach, back up hilltop 3,500 sf5 bed 4 bath home. Solidly built with
Kohler generator, fumished. $575,000. Make an offer. floors, patio, garden. New Price US$780,000. generator. 2 bed & 3 bed apts. From $595,000. working fireplace, cut limestone patios. US$495,000.
Lana.Rademaker@SothebysRealty.com 242.322.2305 Samira.Coleby@SothebysRealty.com 242.376.6248 Samira.Coleby@SothebysRealty.com 242.376.6248 Jonathan.Morris@SothebysRealtycom 242.557.7917
ACREAGE RENTALS................ .......... ... ....


#5362 NASSAGU HEIGHTS, OLD FRT BAY Deep water canal lots in Charleston, Charlotte and Fincastle. From $655k. #6020 NASA, DELAPOTE Waterfront 3 bed 3 bath townhouse. PoolHBR. THE CROSSINGSplayground and beach. Gated. $2,500 pm.6037
#5680A ROSE ISLAND Two hilltop lotssea to sea 13,350 sf each. Gorgeous ocean views! New price $125,000 each. #066 NASSAU, Lbeach BEAfront compl Beahfront condo development Luxuy 3 bed 3.5 bath,pool. Gated. $4,500 p/cres withm.
#5429 RRemodeled ISLAND 16 Aces sea to sea, house and cottage. Fresh waste all seasons dock, protected harbuavertine $6m. #5978 NASSAU, CAVES HeIGHT Private community, 3 bed 3 bath condo, swimming pool, sea views. $6,000 p/m.built with
#4993 ABAco,TILLOO CAY Elevated lot boasts fantastic views to the east, south and north. New Price US$129k. #1321 NASSAU, SANDYPORT Beautiful 4b/4.Sb canalfront, 50' dock, 30' beach, heated pool. Gated. $12.000 p/m.
#4094 ELEUTHERA, 717 ACRES SEA TO SEA 8,090 feet of beach, elevations of up to 125 feet. Call today. #5438 NASSAU, LYFORD CAY Impeccable 4b/4b main house, lush garden, pool, I b/I b guest cottage. $12,000 p/m.




~ELEUTERAA ALE &HE& A
George Damianos Virginia Damianos Ridley Carroll Richard Sawyer Lana Premock -Nick Damrianos Suzanne Harding Mark Hussey Monty Roberts Samira Coleby Jonathan Morris DarrinSands Angelika Bacchus
CRS, CIPS Premock, CRS Rademaker ELEUTHERA ELEUTHERA ELEUTHERA
DAMIANOS SOTHEBY'S INTERNATIONAL REALTY 75 SHIRLEY STREET I NASSAU t 242.322.2305 info.Bahamas@SothebysRealty.com i ji






THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 13


SIRbahamas.com


Ocean Club Estates


PARADISE ISLAND #5338 OCEAN CLUB ESTATES,
CASA DELEON Opulent 9,500 sq. ft. residence with 120 feet of
sandy beachfront, featuring 25-foot atrium with floor to ceiling win-
dows looking out to the infinity pool and the ocean beyond. Five
bedrooms 6.5 baths and every possible luxury with Travertine
floors,Wolf and SubZero appliances, state of the art Media room
and Crestron home automation touch pads. NEW PRICE.
Monty.Roberts@SothebysRealty.com 242.424.4944


PARADISE ISLAND #3969 OCEAN CLUB ESTATES
Newly built Tuscan-style 5,579 square foot villa sits on a hand-
some 0.65 acre golf course lot. Spacious ground floor and very
private master bedroom with large walk-in river stone shower
and oversized master closet. Separate I bedroom I bath guest
cottage. Travertine stone, hardwood and ceramic tile flooring
throughout. Offered.unfurnished. New Price US$3,200,000.
Ridley.Carroll@SothebysRealty.com 242.424.5801


PARADISE ISLAND #3822 OCEAN CLUB ESTATES,
CAPANNA LUSSA Designed by internationally-renowned architect
Yianni Skordas,6 bed 6% bath 7,500 sq.ft.waterfront residence com-
bines simplicity and elegance to create a sophisticated island retreat.
The house wraps around a central atrium and is masterfully posi-
tioned to take advantage of the breathtaking views down the har-
bour. Exquisite finishes and boat dockage. New Price US$8.9m.
Nick.Damianos@SothebysRealty.com 242.376.1841


Old Fort Bay


ISLANUS Al ULU 1-Ut I nBAT #6005 ANANAS, UUN- ULLFU FrT DAi I nis is your opportunity to
MORE ISLAND Spacious two storey colonial waterfront home en- in this exclusive gated community with quality life
joys water frontage on two sides and the property totals 12,582 sq.
ft. Accommodations total 6,206 sq.ft. under roof,4,482 sq.ft. in the Charleston Lots: From $655,000.
main house that offers 4 bedrooms with ensuite baths, separate din- Charlotte Lots: From $865,000.
Fincastle Lots: From $1,335,000.
ing room, den, breakfast room, family room open to kitchen plus
staff bedroom and bath.Veranda total 862 sq. ft. and 2 detached E Security Gated n Deep watel
garage/storage buildings are 430 sq.ft. each. Pool, patio, dock, standby N Old Fort Bay Club N Vibrant cor
generator and R/O water plant. US$2,950,000 unfurnished.
George.Damianos@SothebysRealty.com 242.424.9699 George.Damianos@SothebysRealty.com 242.


purchase


purchase
style.


r canals
immunity
362.4211


Sothebys
INTERNATIONAL REALTY


ISLANDS AT OLD FORT BAY #6074 Charming 4,850 sf
4 bed 4 bath home is located in the fully completed section of Is-
lands At Old Fort Bay. The home is well positioned on the waterway
offering fabulous views and superior accommodations for a boat. A
wonderful opportunity to acquire a very competitively priced home
in Old Fort. Exclusive gated community with numerous amenities for
residents including the Old Fort Bay Club, beautiful beach, swimming
pool and restaurant. Asking US$2.5m. Make an offer.
Richard.Sawyer@SothebysRealty.com 242.424.9792


7




Damianos Sothebys
INTERNATIONAL REALTY (_Xsted Exclusively


Memberof TheBahama M LS .. anoher reson tolist wth us






PAGE 14, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


cacffK'


LTI-UHU URT 9fID4l


DAT O I ncle


THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE

Appraisal Services I www.cachristie.com / sales@cachristle.com
Tel: 242-677-8100 / Fax: 242- 677-8104 / US: 1-305-600-3357
West Bay St ret. P.O. Box N-8245, Nassau, Bahamas

GAMBLER HEIGHTS #4356 Y OLD FORT BAY #4266 T WEST BAY STREET #3760
i8 iiiini .ii : i wiiiiiiiiiii 9 i------------------ s v m ~ "e 1 M II M 'i w S


Majestic 4b,'4 1'5 IS,. rz-_d.rnc. 2- i h 40 Room Small Hotel Just Wesi of Baha 10 Room Full) Loaded Bounqque 3r- ; ;r \%o iia N sil.i; e el pplianrice.
hill lcp re, CUt:.ir.m -d kiJrchLr. h1i .in ,-,,0 Mar Resort Merrophlis Lise allemrna- Resort wnh panoramic %nie s Lise alter- Cerm.Ti ilej ioor mrnu i-zoned^- sN icm
floor. Elception.Ill% I- rvoi i Tpres... e iely as a medical recovery centre, natikelv as Family home, retreat or & 4ecurin, ,*iem Full far ril n memrer-hF,
ca'nor^hc" rmderanJidk- lpati'm retreatl or condo complex\ Asking medical recover) centre Asking includ.n golf so rlle world ren.neo
CallB. Mier .7M. RenI $S75 pfmn .$q.,00,0. C0.al Bryant 376-6996 $.500,00. CallBryant 376-6996 ,Moir., Deeiopmen $2.995.000

FIRE TRAIL ROAD #4311 OCEAN PLACE, P.I. #2525 CARMICHAEL RD. #4310 SHIRLEY STREET #4327









F ,..,j t- I i "'lr ..,,-1% oCated and ha room tr Macke A iii re.a id.al or
located near : ....




L [S-n 0 0h2.160.000. i [.I t, -a ,

Contacn l bnanI@carhrislie.cornm I ir,.,, REDUCEFIl ino"i. Ia.l. L- T......t T.. h, .'t--I* .. .... r- ". -tkng1 a.,2 .0UIl, Uih


This loel lecel comprnes 2" Lasle fid
trn. rooms. obb '/reception. office PLLiS
l(X-seat restaurant Opposite beach and
ilhm un lIkmg distance lo downlownk
Nassau REDLICED$2,9O000.


i Thr i Il b, diullir, ta.-i*' :,d aId d,:o-
'jdl d u,-"l .*i I :,ra-chre.l 'r-ir I>:i.: ,1i.-'..:I
n:': a *c, p. ",' In l ll' 'urr-i i
L-r.,, :c-.uilcr. Reduced i6.ll.li9 I
Lialed b% Inna(@uachnslie.com.


WEST BAY STREET #4290


1 9 1.* II ci l u d h n. i I, u'I : -
in .TT, r iul j .., i, n..:,p TIcJ I>,.- :
uni -. .ruplc. -: i i n rulL :
en ripl: .-rp B .urt 31i : 1 .
ien.-ni C .nu '%31ll:'l'l


GEORGE TOWN, EXUMA 438f

SPECIAL
OFFER:
T\,o 5.2 acre tracts
3.5 miles North West of
Georce To\ n. Exuma.

S250.000 each.
Contact
Hon. George A. Smith


I Mult,.Famil. t'Cii .,e hordw iing
Midlar z Sound
RE DUCED TO $250.00011.
Call Shell. Archer 454-0098:
shelIy@cachri.lie.com


'R.E. COOPER ESTS. #4443 LIVAL ESTATES #3071








o,-h PrnC, h r .i a 1Ip r n. Ibed 2 bah I houe
ilcaicd 3 tbd jbh hia?- In qude U il t\ 1and orage ro*ms orftice
nDeilghbirhood A.sking $250.000. Call re pact .':'nd Good bu) at
Bran 7 Cona biller@cahr249.000.e.com
I Btani 376-6Q96 Conlact bmiller@cachrisiie.com


VICTORIA COURT #4371 WESTRIDGE ESTATES #4232 PARADISE IS. VILLA #1005 COLUMBUS COVE #4193 CABLE BEACH #4429 Rental







d- i' .' .. .. l..th -id-" i Fi a m.' ''"I.Ia trir .1 i k'r .
I. i' '... .1 i I 1..1 .. I r F u .c .l .
2, r nIi:. . ii' a, iii ,] ).' .i li' .- B .l,-ia D I..l -- .


r' ...... ... :. n. ln, tn- t'e |,1 :il$ .S,<,m .C . .... ,,,ei i t .; , .Fu I .. ar' lit '+..rd .
SCall Bryanl 37(6-(096q(.I.. ,.,i.. .. ,.. .... Ir hI. ..it i .-, $6.hr0tnltpm (Coniaci (Chelie. rull r uri-n ,..,3 *b 1.80l1 p/m


COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL RENTALS
Sandlpi rl ff4381 'h-.J 2 .I.i T. ri.Ih.u i. ... ,.u $3.5111 p/m
, C hariolleiille 4-137(> 41".,-.. : '. a Full t J _r,, r ,,il I 1,. \\... n i rn D i .Fr,
."5.5In p/irui
Shirlei 1lreel 9f4. 4l7 i in .- i I l ...i ... ii.i'i i ii-, II 2.2 i i
|l t .l Il *L' <'in n -! ',' I h -. r ; , ., I , :., 1111 ) 1ni
, .i.... !-^i;0( iop m
Tomiers Cabl e B44 aa ii #4 5iB.''. n., :. h ic..._..-: ,. f, t pi ;.7.
,.-.- :40 'J- S2. 4, .
q1 pc' S2.9j-ll


d1 .,
Ld


VACANT LAND
Chippinuhiaa f44-112 Mi4 li.F. ,-.l L- Ii ii i ir.ilh : -rii i "n .-4 il $89.011
(.jlhbiel-/T opnal. Garden-. n4414 _i ir:c F -mil, I-.I .I i.. [-,- i 31"Al .III.
, .'a..iu Fa-I Pl-1324 ",ri ,.- F I ,. i i .. I -. .i. ,: 1 5.lllll)
T h,.. ..i, i.Ia , , : UL. i
. l : ' "
L ::; 777 Trii-l. h n ,ctor; G runs -.. i 9 2."- .
F % nil ulot \ .










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- 6n


~ - --- - ----- ----~-~-*~rarr n--wP~--~--- -rl --


~


--i -- ----- ,~


oulact rsang cac r r











THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 15


JACK ISAAC
REALTY
EST. 1978

S SAHAMIAN











Seaview waterfront estates on
approx. half an acre. Panoramic
views, 4 bed/4bath
Price Reduced $1,950,000.00


Elegant house overlooking Lyford
Cay Golf Course. 4bed/4.5bath,
pristine garden & sparkling pool
Ref# 15308 $4,500,000.00


DESIREE
ARANHA
242-422-1814
Licensed Sales
Agent & Member
of the Bahamas
Real Estate
Association
S ; ........... ............
j KENTON
MORTON
242-552-1723
Licensed Sales
\9 Agent & Member
-" of the Bahamas
Association



U.


Brand New Townhouses Cable
Beach. Breathtaking views. Approx.
1,400 sq. ft.
Starting at $600,000.00
aS.- ;- .S. .










Approx. $7,000 sq. ft. Oceanfront.
lot. Beautiful sunsets.
Ref# 49009 $2,370,000.00


I


ENT!MUJ CBLE EAC


Beautiful Oceanview, Riviera
Penthouse, 3 bed/3bath. Pristine
unit conveniently located.
Ref #46609 $675,000.00


4 bed/3bath townhouse with
beach access.
Ref# 38009 $1,200,000.00


Exceptional 4 bed/4.5bath. Heated
swimming pool & extensive patio.
Ref# 41909 $1,750,000.00


Ilk l;


4bed/4.5bath. Double car garage
w/ covered patio. Master Suite
opens to swimming pool & patio.
Ref# 50609 $2,500,000.00


a'. I. a-. a m a. : .. l


Elegant 5bed/5.5bath elegant
home wth panoramic views
situated on 2.4 acres.
Ref# 32609 $5,700,000.00


W
41
w--,


sB .-
',- 7
jn 'ju' M?*-'"


Located directly across from Mall at
Marathon. Multi-purpose complex,
4bed/4bath, nearly 7,000 sq.ft.
"l.u c7nnf tcnn Mll nn


Oceanfront 6bed/6bath. 7000 sq.
ft., Spanish style home w/ poolside
sauna, dock & staff quarters
Ref# 44509 $6,870,000.00




Cable Beach
estate
comprising of 4
L 1 t4,,--. ,. buildings (main
*.' house&3
A separate units)
over 1.2 acres.
Includes lush
i .. .-' landscaping and
5 beach access.
Ref#59809 $2,950,000.00


Ocean Club Estates, 200 + ft.
sandy beach, approximately
40,000 sq.ft.
Ref # 53109 $7,500,000.00


-U

a


3 bed, 2.5 bath townhouse, includes
a 1 bedroom efficiency. Great
investment opportunity
Ref#60009 $499.000.00


6,431 sq ft, mutli-purpose commer-
cial property conveniently located in
the heart of central Nassau.
Ref # 58609 $250.000.00


EXETOAL
OCAFRN ESTAT6


6bed/6bath estate w/ Spanish styled archi-
tectural features. Poolside sauna, private
beach & dock. 3 guest cottages, staff quar-
ters. Overlooking Old Fort Bay
Ref# 44509 $9,000,000.00
*eoee@0e@@eeeeee0OO


Lcdy sardybeatront4bedV.Sah.5Slate
ofdthe at kkuherN t malt n onx Cedar
ied dos. Desied r egat etert-arg.
Lagepodv ouspadou Amaingviews
Ref# 40809 $9,700,000.00
H jr.7. Hr


a- OL 6.~ BA HOE


4 bed/4.5 bath home with
1bed/1 bath charming cottage,
beautiful pool, deck and, dock.
Ref# 58109 $4,700,000.00


FOR SALE
336 ACRES: LAST PRIME SITE ON NEW PROVIDENCE IDEAL FOR
MULTI-USE DEVELOPMENT
For further information contact: Jack Isaacs 359.2964

FOR RENT-:
RE # 49209 PNCE CHARLES DRIVE 2BEed/2bath, Semi-fumished.
Monthly $1,300.00
* REF # 59909 SANDYPORT 1bed/1bath fully fumished. Monthly $2,000.00
* REF # 41409 ORANGE HILL WEST 2bed/2.5bath, fumished. Monthly $3,000.00
* REF # 42609 SANDYPORT 2beds/2.5, furnished. Monthly $3,500.00
* REF # 59509 DOWNTOWN 2 commercial spaces 900 sq.ft. & 708 sq. ft.
MONTHLY $2,200.00 and $1,800.00 respectively


Tel:1.242.322.1069 Eve 1.242.359.2964 or 1.242.362.6932 www.bahamasproperty.com I info@bahamasproperty.com


EXCLUSIVE USING: HARBOUR FRONT LOT OCEAN CLUB ESTATES

This highly protected oceanfront lot boasts
nearly 150' of harbour frontage & beautiful
oceanviews of the Eastern End of New
Providence. Dockage accommodates 100
plus ft. yachts. The lot comprises approxi-
-mately 37,000 sq.ft.
$6,500,000.00


Re








PAGE 16, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011







Sdo Real ty
a. tIV ..0


1.


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.... -, ..%


THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE


4.- ~



b*1


Canal Front Apartments For Rent
I bedroom from $ 1,800 p/m. Residents have
access to boat docks, beaches, pools, tennis court.
With gym restaurants and bank nearby. -

i'


Canal Front Apartments For Rent
2 bedrooms from $2,300 p/m. Residents have
access to boat docks, beaches, pools, tennis court.
With gym and bank nearby.


Canal Front Lot For $ale with outstanding
views 48 ft of canal frontage. Build your dream
home and moor your boat. $310,000.


IA


'


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If-s : ,' '."- -,* ". 1 .. ... :, "
*"4." : -t "-* '',. "'AS .
.. ,'"o ._''.~ I -A'" '


Canal Front Office For Lease on Buckner Sq. Canal Front Office For Lease on
1508 sq feet $3,800 plm new fit out.With lots of Buckner Sq.436 sq feet $980 p/m With lots of
parking and within walking distance of bank, post parking and within walking distance of bank; post
office, gym and four restaurants. office, gym and four restaurants.





-" 1g :" j ij '




Canal Office Front For Lease Buckner Sq. 1039 Canal Front Lot For Sale with outstanding
sq feet $2,500 p/m. With lots of parking and within views down the grand canal and with over 100 ft of
walking distance of bank, post office, gym and four canal frontage. Build your dream home and moor
restaurants. your boat. $526,000.


Canal Front Single Family Home For Sale
New construction 3 bedroom 2.5 bathroom 2 story home
with over 85 ft of canal front.' 820K


Canal Front Single Family Home For Rent
This 2 storey home with 2,200 sq ft of living space
is well designed from every aspect, featuring three
bedrooms and 3.5 baths Reduced $5,500


www.sandyport.com

t. 242-327-2425 email.info@sandyport.com


... . ......-


* y't
. .


DEVELOPERS DIRECT
COMMERCIAL LAND
OFFICE LEASE
HOME RENTALS
RESIDENTIAL LOTS
RESTAURANT SPACE


1-' ,,..


tl'l~ljaw-








THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 17


David F Morley, CCIM, CIPS -
Commercial Services


MORLEY REALTY
LIMITED



COLLINS AVENUE Located between 5th and 6th Terrace on
Collins Avenue, this office building has a standby generator and
i- move in ready. There is 5,060 sq. ft. on the ground floor and
5.370 sq. ft. on the second floor. There is also the option to lease
the entire building. Call for more details.



MONTAGUE STERLING CENTRE Located east of the down-
town business area of New Providence, overlooking
Montague Bay. This building was constructed new in the
late 1990's and offers all modern amenities and infrastruc-
ture. Located on the second floor is a sub-lease premises
which is ready for immediate. occupancy for a 2 to 3 year
period. Existing furniture is available for purchasing if
interested.

MALCOLM BUILDING Situated on the southeast corner of Bay
Street and Victoria Avenue, this property offers 1,000 sq. ft. of
fitted office space available. Some tenant fit out required. Also
available is 5,480 sq. ft. of office space, ideal for a midsize estab-
lishment. Standby power is available and offices are ready for
occupancy. Great Prices!!



S BAHAMAS FINANCIAL CENTRE One of the premier
office buildings in Nassau located in the prime
financial business district. 1,100 to 10,000 sq. ft. of
executive office space! Can be sub-divided to fit ten-
ant needs! On site covered parking available.


MONARCH BUILDING This property is located immediately
east of the downtown business -area of New "Providence.
Recently constructed, this building offers most modem ameni-
ties and infrastructure. Each floor contains approximately 3,930
sq. ft. and the building has a total of 7,860 sq. ft. of leaseable
offices and is ready for occupancy.


ONE MARINA DRIVE Located on the harbor,
this office building has 889 sq. ft. and 1,103 sq.
ft. available and offers fantastic views of
Nassau Harbor and the Atlantis Marina.
Located between the two bridges, there is easy
access to the property from ;anywhere on
Paradise Island and New Providence. Lease
this space to avoid the traffic delays and park-
ing problems of downtown Nassau!


2006 CreativeRelations.net


Tel: 394-7070
www.morleyrealty.com


SANDRINGHAM HOUSE 1,570 sq. ft. of finished
climate controlled basement storage, located on
Shirley Street. Parking available. Call for details.
EAST BAY SHOPPING CENTRE 3,000 sq. ft. of
office space, located in a central area for easy
access. Lots of parking available. Call for details.
ISLAND STATION- 512 sq. ft., and 820 sq. ft. of
office space available! Some tenant fit out
required. Tiled and with A/C.
CHESAPEAKE ROAD Large 5,980 sq. ft. office
space available and ready for occupancy in a
.central area of Nassau! Call today, for more
details!
MARKET STREET -Office sizes from 280 sq. ft. up
to 1,500 sq. ft. available and ready for occupancy.
Located just off from Bay Street near the Central
Bank of the Bahamas. Ideal for lawyers, account-
ants and architects etc. Parking available on
complex.
NORFOLK HOUSE 1,010 sq. ft. to 2,322 sq. ft. air-
conditioned offices on Frederick Street.
MARKET STREET 365 sq. ft to 900 sq. ft. of stor-
age space available. Call for details!
SHIRLEY HOUSE 1,298 sq. ft. of executive office
space available for immediate occupancy, oppo-
site the Bahamas Financial Centre on Shirley
Street. Parking available.



PALMDALE SHOPPING PLAZA 3,670 sq. ft.
shop space available for immediate occupancy.
INDEPENDENCE SHOPPING CENTRE 1,600 sq.
ft. 1,750 sq. ft. and 16,240 sq. ft. of shop, space
available for immediate occupancy.
EAST BAY SHOPPING CENTRE 556 sq. ft. of
shop space available with lots of convenient
parking. Would be ideal for a deli / coffee
shop.
WONGS PLAZA 936 sq. ft., 1,334 sq. ft. and
3,100 sq. ft. shop space available for immediate
occupancy. Call for details.
MADEIRA PLAZA 1,210 sq. ft. of shop space
:conveniently located in Palmdale with lots of
.parking!



CHESAPEAKE ROAD Available now for imme-
diate occupancy 3,590 sq. ft. and 6,370 sq. ft.
warehouses.


* -I-.J
.9 t S -*_ _- :.";
.o I f





THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE


THE
ML


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PAGE 18, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011




1"


THE TRIBUNE, REAL ESTATE GUIDE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 19


in


The Tribune s

1= wmffla Ann


CALL 502-2894


... ~~. ......I __ ..._._I ~_ .__.... 1..__. I I


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THE TRIBUNE. REAL ESTATE GUIDE


' i


n 41

I ^Mj gJU


BAHAMAS
Nfl 1 .SS


7. St Andrews Beach Well appointed 2 bed, 1 bath 1,015 sq ft duplex unit
...'S. f -.- 'in quiet eastern community. Open plan layout, tile flooring throughout,
ceiling fans, A/C wall unit, utility room and Burglar bars. Offered
-,,-'- iUnfurnished and Semi-Furnished. $785 per month
". Little Blair Cozy 2 bed, 1 bath apartment located in the secure neigh-
I bourhood of Little Blair. Unit features an open ivin dining area,
S. equipped kitchen, tile flooring throughout, ductless A/C in living areas and
wall units in bedrooms. Private garden area with shared laundry facilities.
Water included. Furnished. $1,250 per month
Carefree Condo Lovely 2 bed, 2 bath 900 sq ft condo on Cable Beach
offering partial ocean views. En-suite baths, central A/C, tile flooring, ceil-
ing fans, hurricane shutters and lots of added storage space. Amenities
s-- Stunning 2 and 3 bedroom 2,000 sq ft luxu- include laundry facilities, pool with sundeck and parking. Furnished.
-'F.Fi'r .._:qur F,-I :- : ljh,-,-,.,'rF _-. ,ir..,_ ,..-- t-J 4 : l.h ry townhomes finished to the highest quali- $2,300 per month
remodeled to elegance. Stunning ocean views from almost every ty. This well known western community is
room The hnmp boactc mm' In.le1- fetriiurc inrludintc np-' plkwmhin lnrated net t Charlntpill Femturinp Treasure Cove Charming 3 bed, 2 bath 1,700 sq ft Bimini model home in
i ,, ,, J .,iF.'''. ,.


h u,.j rri.:-r, t. I.(. i. i ,n d ,:, 1-,.I 1 ,[ ,,:, ,I.: .:..-i ,.-j r .. I- I I I.,: ].,. .,[ 1i
* I .rn-tu __ .l I,., ,r. .. ,. n ,: r. r j., .h r I r -,] J l It' ,:,pi,
'i. :uh pu 'll .. r i,,F ,jlr l- ,l;. .. [. 1. .11i r ,.. -,, ,
,Ir.F .ri l l.:.r., I '.;, r._ .. r..j -. i.. . lr ..:, Err ,,i 'F. iF, d r,,i
rl. ,l r.-lj .,n] ..:.r- -i..- i| ,,:.u -'._.--fr.ii,-,^ :il r.: o.,n.. -, .: ,ri.: :' l I
Sr, r1.00,0
$1 ,200,000


n,' kl, I.I. r. .. I IL .-..-.r .l F I, l1


p:' j,, ,- ,,I -, h,:.u- "r .. J,'.[, ni -.1r ;
, .n-, .: i .,, r i, .r .-, II t:.. d


Slarling at $549,900


Bernard Road Open-Zoned Lots
T kei- adarF ia.e .oit r, r._ .i --r h.J I,. F ,_, n ri _, T,,- ., rn er ,. i_ I rF- I- F ron rl',fl i, hlz' rr-Fll -I .d 4c ,_rv,_' n ,)F
Bernard R.oa'id in L3-' rro N. r ,-ls fu .-nc ,l -..F Iro- rn .e ,._,r' raF,.r: Irom 'r: -, IT F o-, i 02 6 t .q rF] Se .r on rh
Inl rr ectiF n -fl rr.,r.j r ,:l n r, erle, irreIi rh-n Ir F'l.,'rlFa-r : .'rFiL -' la, ij r F'',, ,rnerF ll reri I. r ImlrF I mF ,
ri:F.FeII nrFFJ dI -fLlopri-F-n L -, an. d Fr d '.-1 It h .r .lFir r ..* I,' 'r '-' 1 'c _- iF 1 ,j ,l l.11 tIFmlIz p- I_ 1
Starting from $140,000


i.. .'F".. ".1 I ...i .: , -. : 1- rr.. ..::l ,225050) per monlh
Ba,.%i e.u \ llja e U., I -- i:,>:,.1 t'.,rh I _'ei i :.I n ,,.,n .:, I,-,,: ,-, ll-


Palm o0 Lose Beach F- .' :r. F .1 .-. F I-, .r-, F I : . .. .. ,, .rr
. .,. -.. r ..,:.F,i.jr. r, F. j .jr- .:,. ir.il .'_ ,r :._ ..,ri. .r h .ir,- r
I .. 1,.-F: ,. F i . ,. _. . : r_.l1 .F .-.. r. th r r r ', I, .T. r,.,r-- rr.-., -.
Aiipori ,ind *.h.-,ppin--. Furnr,,hi $2.000 ptr monlh
Charlottesille Home \'- ll .. -. 4 L.".' -' i:.:-F .' I2 I.. ,' rI
hi..T._ .*, r.-: r. n .-.r-.rur.nn.r, 'ri .r. p: lr L ,L.:.' r t .-..1.-.r. k.. ih i. ..-.h
stal nleis.F F :pp. -ar..: F.- |ur r.r, .::ih...:lr | ,:rl..-r., .. r, :1.:.: I jl. r.Ti
", .r-,T, ,,Tp .:r ,rd.:..' ,c.rr, [,.., u-,.:h r.1 r ., r ,Fh... L t i-'.. .. 1r- r.l
F.jrr,,-.:-l $.5.500 per monlh
Ba roc ., ..:.:rl, re .-. .J i.:. 1 bt -, lu ur, -.r.j-. i; .- r.:,.
li-nr. .:.:.-.',n u.-..r, F i: r ru r. ir : .: l r k.. t.r- rn1 I r.. n'i..3 r, ,..jr. .
uare I ... :. .. i rl F. r i . .- .-:.. h .n ... : .u :lu... '.i r .. pr..
. m on h'- '-. p,:,|: b, 1,- ,,d1- j, i I. -.
,r:,ur ,:u,,ir, rr,.,r,,,:_l l ir,,j C:>:,pir, ,r ,-,ij ,T-,,, Furr r-h,:d '$7.500 per
monlh


r t -:~


Reduced and Priced To Sell' :n.L I...F1,
'J, I '4 sq It rat, djd ,_crL t U COi'al Lak. .ub-
division. Building Permit with approved
house plans available. Utilities to site. Treed
Lot on paved street in fine neighborhood.
Close to shopping and international airport.
Invest in your future and build today! A great
bargain! Call Marilyn.
$90,000


-; ...-- -. ;.-. -- j ::.-: .: : - '^ .. 5 2 :-




F -- T I. r F. 1 r. Build .-LFlr Fdrtam lr hon A' F- F
S.. ....... ..FF F.-r..I ..- .; .

Amenities include beach access, Clubhouse, community of Port New Providence. The well-
security, playground, pool and Tennis court, elevated lot with its park-like setting of mature
Choose the lot with house plans or the option trees is ready for development. Wonderful family
of two (2) house packages. Home #1 is a 4 bed, environment and boater's paradise. Amenities
3 bath 4,074 sq ft home with no basement for include a private beach, tennis courts, club-
$775,360. Home #2 is a 5 bed, 4 bath 5,318 sq house, playground and 24 hour security. Close
ft home with basement for $949,520. proximity to St. Andrews' School. Contact
$205,000 Marlyn. $479,000


' i. '- '.F r. . -. .: '.

turesque canal frontage. 1he lot includes
Approved Home plans. Old Fort Bay is a'gated
waterfront community which provides a num-
ber of community amenities including 24 hour
security, beach access, private beach club, ten-
nis courts, marina and children's playground. A
welcoming and secure family-friendly environ-
ment.
$860,000


. .-


PAGE 20, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011














1?0


H A M A S BA R


GAIN


a


F I N D_9


Frigidare 1 Ton
Ductiess AC,
_l_ iSp Units


T: 328-0002


SALE.... .


BRAND NEW
Mattress and Boxspring
$329.99
Pft# 326-2940


Platinum i
Cuts EA)j
BarberShop
Mon. 11 -5. Tues.-Sat.9-7
Ph. 393-5649,
424-0910 iDA' rJiGHTi
M.lacke',' '-r opp,.3It
berth.i
in Carey 'Uniform BLi.Id:nq
upstairs 3rd Door


WsswaSes 32 S- S e-BE
Pi,*a^ 3ae-2940___


Samsung Monte HTC Wildfire C LG Cookie Sam-
touchscreenGPS 3G ANDROID o :chsireer, radi,
GPS, 5MPcamera
;$229(WIFI) $349(w $179 Special) "
Moti oli v kberry B220 lacberrylcormll Ninri

5 $ $99 (FLIP) S 5209(WIFI) 5449 (WIFI) S29
CREDIT CARDS NOW ACCEPTED IP!."in, Memory 2 Gig ...S20 Sim C


New 6 rigs Jordan
IN STOCK $79.99
Airforce I's white aadblack
1 for $55
2for $S100
Special on iAifrce I's
,(5. 6112) $39.99



Call today 328-0002 / 502-2351
STARTING AT
$25


VISIT OUR NE


Carmichael Rd, (opp. police station) _
DAILY 8 an to 6pm --
SUNDAY Sam to 2pm
361-1363


B A


VNhaTJWhuo KDg






















mooclate Sectional Sofa Saddle Sectional sowf w ottomawa
$1,100.00 $1,100.00


ChccAtal Sectional a4justaeei sofa
$899.99 Special


SZ2'Tube Rainbow Bunk Bed
^ (fNU/lwtn)
Mattrss not included
$349.99


King Size Espresso Finish P
Does not include Mattress and
boxspring
$1,769.99


.ueen Size Louis Pthifip- I'
'-- nhfa rea aar ro c lmrorJ in ii ata )
Does not include Mattress and
Boxspr999
$1.,499.99


1322
32' Phillips Tv $599 99
40"Phillips Tv $849.99

BARGAIN WHOLESALER

PH:326-2940 / 328-0002
Location: Beige building West of Scotia Bank Wulf Road and East SU.
......F.. ... MDi'. = a"'- f.f-lTf FAti, m M C e I.r" -







MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 3


2008 HONDA RIDGELINE,
blue exterior, dark grey interior, A/C, CD player,
clean title, low mileage, asking $26000 OBO
ALSO 2000 GS300, asking $7500 OBO
ph#341-2238/341-4869/434-0882


2002 FORD TAURUS,
hdr, A/C, CD Player, fully loaded, Pwr
windows, Lock, clean inside, and out,
Asking $5,400
2002 HYUNDAI SONATA, LX 4DR, A/C, CD
Player, fully loaded, Pwr windows, Lock, clean
inside out, asking $6,800 ONO
ph# 324-7266/424-5354


1997 NISSAN MAXIMA,
Needs a spray job, standard shift,
Asking $2,500 ONO
ph# 454-2196 or 467-0981
20" rims sold separately. $900.00


BBF #147
2000 MACK CH613,
Tandem Axle Fleet, maintained service Mar
2011, License and inspected, Mar 2012, asking
.$26,000.00, Also 2002 Ford Explorer,
champagne extedlor, asking $5,000 sold as is
ph# 457-4346 / 376-8009


BBF #171
2008 HONDA ACCORD,
black exterior, black leather interior, sunroof,
foglights, 22" rims, fully loaded, asking $23500
ONO with rims, asking $21000
without rims ONO ph#395-4367


BBF1 #189
2007 C180 MERCEDES,
FULLY LOADED, Excellent condition,
Asking $25,000
ph# 376-0061 (9am -6pm)


2007 HONDA,
dark blue exterior, 22" rims cold A/C, clean
inside and out, asking $15500 with rims and
asking $14000 without rims
ph#432-8719/445-5088/436-8977


55F #174
2007 F150,
ice cold A/C,1 owner, interior like new,
customized hood and custom headlights, a must BBF #190
see, low mileage, 6 CD in dash player, factory 2001 FORD MUSTANG,
alarm power everything chrome rims, good title, Good Condition, asking $7,500 OBO
asking $25000 ONO. ph#565-9950 ph# 376-0061 (9am -6pm)


2004 GMC CANYON,
blue exterior, black leather interior, A/C, chrome
running boards, CD player, nice work truck,
asking $1.2500 OBO, ph#424-8505/393-8978.


2001 HONDA CIVIC,
4 door, A/C, CD license till November, come
with full tank of gas asking $5500 OBO,
ph#565-0590


BBF #133
2000 MONTE CARLO,
sublime green and black with green HIDs black
leather interior, A/C, sunroof, power everything,
22 inch rims, in solid condition, no jokes
A30sking $7800 ONO willing to negotiate
ph#392-8887/436-7093


BBF #156
2008 NISSAN ALTIMA,
A/C, CD player, clean inside/out, black exterior,
$11000 without rims $13000 with rims
Factory rims 03-07 for Honda Accord
asking $45Q. ph#422-1 228
1 monin tribune Issue 88


BBF #177
2005 CADILLAC CTS SUPER SALEI!
Expat left island ONLY $8999.99
(no-haggle price)Buy it Today! Auto Doors
Windows/A/C/Automatic Transmission/Leather
Seats/Emergency Phone/Remote/Satellit Radio
ready/Sunroof/Airbags / CD player/Radio/ABS/
full of extras. call 424-9495


4.


ITE TRIBUNE I


---


BBF #170
2008 HONDA ACCORD COUPE V6
black leather interior, silver exterior, sunroof,
power everything, 6 disc CD player asking
$19000 OBO
ph#424-8505/535-5635/425-0987


I&


. i :r :7








PAGE 4, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


BBF #214
2005 HONDA ACCORD,
grey blue exterior, grey interior, sunroof, A/C,
low mileage, fully loaded,
,Asking $14000
ph#361-2928/431-5448


1994 HONDA CIVIC,
2door Standard Shift, Red/Red & Alloy 17" Sport
Max Racing Rims/new tires. Flip-out dvd,cd,mp3
player.1 5" Square Kicker L5 Subwoofer/ full
setup. Everything works, car runs smooth.
Great on Gas. $4100. ono
425-9102


2002 CHEVY IMPALA,
owner leaving island, clean title,
Asking $3500 ONO
ph#432-9851/392-6502


DDor '*
1998 ODYSSEY VAN,
clean inside/out, cool A/C, CD player HID lights,
asking $4500 ONO
ph#393-4707/428-9328


1994 HONDA ACCORD,
licensed and insured, runs good, minor repairs,
asking $13,000, fully loaded.
ph#565-2115/356-0617


~r


I JUST IN FROM US
2003 FORD. EXPLORER,
low mileage, like new, A/C, CD player, new
Crystal lights, new tires, fuel efficient, free
license and inspection, no down-payment for
Atlantis and government employees, asking
$7500 ONO, ph# 425-2713/565-4472


BBF #232
1999 MERCEDES BENZ JEEP,
22" rims, DVD player, TV in headrest, sound
system, fully loaded, -
asking $11500 ONO willing to trade
ph#467-8492









BBF #233
2009 FORD FUSION,
must see to appreciate ph# 12,000 ONO
ph# 426-4565


2000 IMPALA,
A/C, good working condition, grey interior, silv
exterior, sound system, 22" rims HID lights,
asking $6500 ONO,
ph#558-8306/468-7559


THi"=iBiUi'iJl


E ..








MONDAY, JUN1l 6, 2011, PAGE 5


2003 HONDA ACCORD
AC, SUNROOF, CD PLAYER, IPOD, NEW
PAINT JOB CLEAN AN AND OUT ASLO 2003
2003 HONDA ACCORD $7,500
C423-3824 OR 466-7936


2000 KIA 3600 DUMP TRUCK,
white with gray interior, nice truck, good
condition, fully restored, power everything and
AC, all parts available at sanpin motors, runs
great, come with extra parts truck.
Ph: 393-2000 or cell 565-0575 after 5pm


FRIB #434
2007 MERCURY MILAN
White exterior with camel interior, 6 speed
automatic transmission sirius satellite radio,
Forty thousand miles, six CD charger/with
premium stereo system. $14,000
Call 361-3519 or 426-8432


JUST IN FROM US,
2002 HONDA ACCORD,
like new, leather interior, sunroof, A/C, CD
player, 18" chrome rims, low mileage,
clean title, new crystal lights, fuel efficient, no
down payment for Atlantis and
government employees,
$7300 ONO 425-2713


rRIB #363
2008 HONDA CIVIC/COUPE
Silver exterior with grey interior, gas saver,
comprehensive insurance, bank financing
available for government and Atlantic
employees, just like new.
Must see to appreciate. $16,500
Call 324-0219 or 431-6007 or 525-7156


CRIB #426
2004 HONDA ACCORD CQUPE
for sale or legitimate trade, black exterior with
black/leather interior, v6 engine, sunroof, heated
seats, AC, well under 75,000 miles
Trades welcomed, trades & cash also
welcomed. $12,500. 454-6850,535-1669


.~


2009 LACROSSE CXL
Silver exterior with beige leather interior
$18,000.
Drive smooth, one crank, 24" rims
comes with original factory tires, low miles,
power windows & locks, fully loaded.


2000 FORD MUSTANG
Grey exterior with dark grey interior.
Five thousand dollars $5,000
Runs well, AC, 20 inch rims and ready to go.
Owner leaving Island.
Cell 465-7051 636-9865




S'~




rRIB #477
1998 HONDA ACCORD
RHD Pearl white w/black interior, 4 dr, great on
gas, low miles (56k) 4 cylinder, no accidents S-
matic transmission, new tires on 17 alloy
wheels, new brake, just serviced, HID fogs and
the list goes on. $7,500.00
Call Vado 432-0759


rRIB #424
2000 CADILLC ESCALADE
Black exterior with beige interior Sound system,
DVD system VCR system toun, cream Ao, low
miles engine look like new. $11,000
Call 426-4627 or 465-3778


THIB #413
2007 HONDA ACCORD
Grey exterior with grey interior, sunroof,
low miles, financing and 10% down. $7,000
2008 CHEVY TAHOE,
$7,000.00
DVD player rims, one owner, financing
Call 454-5771 leave a message.


TRIB #452
HONDA PRELUDE
Wine red exterior with black interior.
$6,000
Power window, power locks, low miles, just in,
excellent running condition, ice cold Ac
I Price negiable
1996 HONDA ACCORD WAGON. $2,000
Call 323-0118 cell 565-4007












2005 FORD F150
White exterior, grey leather interior.
$12,000.00
Just in from US. long back, good working truck
V8, AC, free shipping to your Island.
Serious only call 556-0392


TRIB #416
2005 FORD EXPLORER XLT
Gold exterior with tan interior. $12,500.00 Clean
title SUV with 3rd row seats, cool AC, clean
interior with only 54,000 miles, power
everything. Call 393-2000 '


2000 HONDA CIVIC
White exterior, 2 door, AC, sunroof,
power everything, excellent condition.
$5,500.ono
ALSO FRONT END PARTS
HONDA CIVIC 01-03
Call 328-6877 cell 357-4399


2000 FORD FOCUS
Blue exterior with grey/blacki interior.
Two (2 door) coupe.
Excellent condition, fresh of the lot, runs like
new, One owner, must sell.
Asking $6,800 ono. Low mileage, 70k
SCall 424-8380 or 376-0083


1995 ISUZU BIG HORN
Green exterior, deisel engine, ac/ cd
changer,power windows & mirror. $4,500
Phone: 341-6892 or 445-8765


I I


BBF# 975
2003 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT WAGON,
leather int, sunroof, 77k miles, excellent
condition, asking $7,000 ONO,
ph# 456-8834







PAGE 6, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


1998 FREIGHT LINER
2 door box truck, serviced and runs perfectly,
Auto white, 24ft long cummins diesel,
6 cylinder. $25,000 ono
Call 357-3520 or 394-0773


1997 HONDA ACCORD 4 DOOR,
IN EXCELLENT CONDITION. 4 CYLINDER,
COLD AC, PWR WINDOWS, DOORS ETC
$5200 OBO, SERIOUS ENQUIRIES ONLY
CALL @ 394-1005, 376-4678


rRIB #486
1997 MERCEDES BENZ
Navy blue exterior, 4 cylinder.
In excellent condition, CD/DVD player, 4 door,
power windows. $9,500 ono
Call 434-5604 or 364-5827


rRIB #489
1998 HONDA ACCORD
Silver exterior. $5,800.00. AC, CD, tints,
18" chrome rims.. Just like new
2001 honda civic,
AC, CD, RIMS RED. ASKING &6,800.00
Call 364--3691 cell 557-1205


--
'RIB #519
2007 MITSUBISHI L-300
Blue exterior, grey interior, 12 seater, air
conditioned bus, 2.5 litre diesel engine, great
condition. Can use as taxi or church bus,
$17,5000 O.N.O. Phone : 428-7836


1996 NISSAN SKYLINE
Grey (silver) exterior, car in very good
condition, clean, runs excellent, very fast,
upgrades, $6,800 O.N.O
Phone: 525-2628


TRIB #545
2003 LAND ROVER -RANGE ROVER
Light green exterior, beige interior,
$30,000. Fully loaded. Series inquiries only
Owner leaving the Island
phone: 395-5961


FRIB #562
1997 Audi A4:
Auto, AM/FM CD & changer stereo, sunrobd,
clean car no accidents and less than 72k miles
$7,800.00
Ph: 676-4019 or 424-0035


TRIB #562A
2010 FORD F-150 SUPER CAB
truly "Like New" with only chrome wheels and
chrome running boards, and only 3,500 miles
and priced for you to save thousands.
$57,000.00.
Ph: 676-4019 or 424-0035


TRIB #580
2011 NEW CLUB CAR GOLF CART
Family Island Special. 4 Passenger Gas Cart
'with,
Lights,Top, W/S, Mirror. For a limited time only
$8891
Call 242-394-4823 or Toll Free 1-242-300-1213


1995 SUBARU IMPREZA WRX JDM SEDAN
Silver exterior, black interior. $5,500.00
Serious inquiries only, great condition, AC,.
turbo, turbo timer. Call 449-67931


'RIB #635
2003 INFINITI G35
Pearl white exterior with tan leather interior
$10,000
Automatic, power everything, doors, locks,
windows mirrors, keyless entry, (trunk door)
alarm, auto climate control, cruise control,
sunroof, alloy, HID leather. Cell 434-0828


2008 FORD F150
Forest green exterior with grey interior
$14,500.00 AC, CD, short bed, like new, 5
speed, like new, 37 miles, new tyres, full tank of
gas, ready to go. Call 357-3774


1972 ROLLS ROYCE SHADOW
Cream top & beige body, with tan interior.
$16,000.ono
Excellent condition, need a fuel pump
Phone: 676-3581 or 558-6660


HEIl T NEll:


2000 HONDA ACCORD,
4 DOOR, LEATHER INTERIOR, SUNROOF,
V6, POWER WINDOWS, LOCKS ETC, JVC CD
PLAYER, COLD AC, ONLY 68 K MILES, VERY
CLEAN, $8200 ONO,
SERIOUS ENQUIRIES ONLY
CALL @ 394-1005, 376-4678


'RIB #492
2002 HONDA CIVIC COUPE
Black exterior with black/leather interior
Manual transmission, brand new tires out,
DVD system, full lip kit, just serviced lambo
door kit, led tail lights. $6,700 obo. No good
offer refused. Call 361-2688 or 448-4620


TRIB #512
2005 CRYSLER SEBRING
Green exterior, grey interior, just arrived, low
mileage, 4 cylinder, good condition, $8,500 as
is. Phone: 341-6892 or 445-8765



















1997 NISSAN FRONTIER PICKUP TRUCK
Double Cab Standed Shift 4WD Diesel Truck,
AC.
Great work or everyday truck.
$4,000.00
376-7958 or 357-9966


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 7


. ..A


2002 SUZUKI HAYABUSA,
Good condition, black/grey nitres set up, 210
mph, experience riders only $4500
2007 HONDA CBR 1000 RR
Yoshi pipe, great running condition, new
tires/gun methal rims. $4500.
Ph 376-9126


CRIB #720
2004 SILVERADO 2500 HD
Charcoal exterior with black interior.
$20,500.ono extertendo cab, ice cold, AC, CD
player, 4x4, bed cover, brand new tires, new
tires. Vehicle in mint condition.
No reasonable offer refused.
Serious inquiries only. 359-1598


CAR FOR SALE
2000 Pontiac Grand Prix
2 Door Black Ext & Int. Sport GT Rims
Perfect condition low miles 30,000.00
$5,500 ono
Telephone: 361-5177 &
361-5220 ext 239 or 241


2001 MERCURY SABLE
four door,automatic,maroon,Tan leather
interior,AM and FM Radio,sun roof,power
windows,ln good condition,asking $5,800
Ph: 322-2801- 565-8190


TRIB N755
2006 LEXUS ES 330
Dark blue /cteam color leather interior, fully
functioned tv gps, 6 changer CD player, heated
seats, power windows, doors, mirrors, self
adjusting fog & headlights, automatic, rain
detecting windshield. Serious inquiries. $15,000
324-9217/431-3651


2007 CHEVROLET HHR STICK SHIFT,
MINT CONDITION, DARK GREY, GREY INTERIOR,
A/C /CD PLAYER/ ALARM SYSTEM, WANT QUICK
SALE $10,000.00 ONO
STEL: 525-9276/ 327-7189


FRIB #629
2005 DODGE DURANGO JEEP BLACK
Price- $14,500. or nearest offer
Excellent condition
Phone contact- (242) 464-1197 or
(242) 454-4678.
Serious Inquiries Only!!


1996 GMC-3500 MODEL BUCKET TRUCK
37FT Vehicle for sale.
Serious inquiries only
Contact. 325-4036 or 326-6344 or 356-5580


TRIB #721
2007 CADILLAC SRX SPORT
LUXRUY SUV
Pearl white exterior with tan leather interior, 20"
factory rims, sunroof, XM radio, 6 CD
discchanger, low miles. In mint condition,
$30,500 ono. Must see to appreciate.


2000 HONDA CIVIC EX
Black exterior with grey/black interior.
$4,800.00
2 door, HD head lights, cold AC, 4 cylinder,
alarm. Call 376-2830


FRIB #719
2008 MITSUBISHI ECLISPE
Grey exterior with black interior, great condition,
clean in & out, fog light, AC, CD player, alloy
rims, 4 cylinders, engine, great on gas,
low miles, must go. $16,500.00
Contact 394-8847,432-2772


"RIB #763
2008 HONDA ACCORD
White exterior with tan interior. $27,000.ono
white & chrome 22" rims, full chrome kit, .
custom grill, just serviced, 24k miles,
in mmaculate condition. Serious inquiries only.
Call 361-1310 cell 425-6384,445-6561


TRIB #776
1999 MERCEDES ML 320
Black exterior with tan interior, 22" rims,
sunroof, AC, CD player, automatic windows
$12,500
Contact 376-1706


11"= H:-i BUNEisI









PAGE 8, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


2004 DODGE RAM 1500
White exterior with black interior. $8,000.00
Clean title, one owner, 59,000 miles.
-Owner leaving Island, must sell, ice cold Ac.
Call 676-6962 or 646-6842


2002 FORD FOCUS
White exterior, with grey interior,
$6,000.00 ono. Clean, cold, AC,
In good condition.
Call 324-2795


2008 CHRYSLER 300
Black exterior black interior.
In excellent condition
$10,999.00
Call 429-5344 or 394-6494










TRIB #767
2001 HONDA ACCORD
Silver exterior with black/leather interior
$5,999.ono,
In good condition, runs well, sunroof, 2 door
Must see to appreciate.
Serious inquiries only,.
Call 429-2461/394-4590/429-2461/ 3393-0426


2005 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
Black exterior, black leather interior. $11,200
AC, 6 disc player, XM radio, power everything
Call 434-7098 or 341-3301 '


2000 HONDA CIVIC LX
4 door, green exterior with grey interior,
18" rims, sound system, cool, AC and fog lights'
$5,800.00
Cell 456-3785


TRIB #775
2000 LAND ROVER DISCOVERY 2
Black exterior with tan interior. Good condition,
everything works.
Call 434-6748 or 525-9934


2Q05 KIA CERATO/SPECTRA
Silver exterior $7,500obo 2.0 (5) speed manual
transmission, mp3 CD player with ipod and blue
tooth connectivity (6) airbags, very clean,
AC, Licensed for March 2012:
Call 362-2648 or 558-6080


FRIB #782
2002 HONDA ACCORD
Silver exterior with wood & grey interior -
$8,500.00. Original rims, tires like new, 4 door,
power windows and door locks, tape & CD
.player, sunroof.
Bank assistance available.
325-0815' or 376-3655


rRIB #816
1978 CADILLAC DEVILLE COUPE
$5,500 ONO
Everything original, 22" rims AC.
With this you will be ready for the
next car show.
Call 362-2453 or 1-242-551-3271


TRIB #780
1997 FORD TAURUS
Red/maroone exterior with tan interior. In good
condition. Price is negtiable
.Also
2003 ALTIMA. $6500.00
Call 448-3804 or 456-7667


TRIB #805
1996 HONDA ACCORD
Light blue exterior grey interior. $2,000 ono
I CD player, tinted windows, RHD
Serious inquiries only.
Call 425-6385 cell 455-7434


IliTHE1 iRIJUI"




c --- *---


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 9


TRIB #817

Ai .-1992 180SX NISSAN
': BlaQk exterior with black interior.
$7,500.00
152 engine swap, 6265 turbo ball
bearing
650 injectors, runs great. Your
gain my lost.

-Call 394-5714 cell 357-4182.


TRIB #819
FOR SALE
2004 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LEREDO
S'60,000 Miles Automatic -
Power everything Cold air
--- conditioning- Black leather











2003 ISUZU TURBO
INTERCOOLED TRUCK
.-.'-. interior Clean throughout












$14.500 or nearest ofer


S Please contact 328-5457
or
S (or 357-7491422 after 7pm3239
2 S T
I O T


-19A


1999 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX
Red exterior with black interior.
$4,500.00 neg. Ac, clean leather
interior, crystal back lights.
Excellent condition, Auto-trans,
recently ,
serviced. Serious inquiries only.
Cell 425-2942 cell 558-9963


. ... *- ..... ," ...,:-.. ..... .......... .



""


U--


TRIB #813
2003 NISSAN MAXIMA SE
Black exierior witn grey
leather interior $7,000.00 obo
Full' loaded. AC. alarm, boss


sound syslem. sunroof,
.. remole s.Iarl very clean. HID

Mus see. make ch er
Call 46 .--24.-1.


l flI 1 ,ti .I nyu WC ew q 04_'; v,,, ... ;h K i .x ,": 2 I !, _.., :Is "


'9' t-rU 2 ,O4' (lOG 2. IIi _~:~s-. .0


ITHE TrIBUNE I









PAGE 10, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011
ITRIR RAnn--


2002 HONDA ACCORD
e White exteriopr with tan leather
interior.
sunroof.
Fully loaded, HID lights, 4
cylinder.
$6,000 ono
Call 361-1907 or 466-0231 or
455-5893


1995 HONDA INSPIRE
Champagne with black
Interior. runs and drive
Good easy on gas.
Price for quick sale.
$2,800 ono.

Call 434-6782


TRIB #786

2001 MERCEDES S- CLASS
I .. Silver exterior with black
interior. $30,000 obo Clean title
5500. 60K miles. leather,
sunroofl. touch screen, wood
dash
Excellent condition
Call 242-324-6922


BBF #242

S, .. 2005 FORD EXPLORER,

fully loaded, A/C, CD player,

68,600 miles,
in good condition,

$11,000.00

ph#328-2700/

453-1609/429-5688



STRIB #87G

': : ,o- 2005 BUICK LACROSSE
.Gold exterior with tan
leather.
$7,000.00
Sunroof, remote start,
leather seats. $7,000

Cell 467-8134
M: r;


TRIB #910

1998-09 HONDA's ALL MODELS
Clean Vehicles.
Sedan.Coupe.Minivan.SUV. Fuel
Efficient. Powered Windows.
Moonroof. Leather Interior. Rims.
A/C. CD Player. EX,LX,DX,V6.

Call for more information
Vado (242) 432-0759


TRB #862

Ji '2000 FORD EXPLORER

Navy blue exterior, leather seats.


oMo
-^ .

H^. *^MteE~~~a~s;. *:^.Ai ^- N5
!y ^*MSSSSSS~ snSSBSsSBE lawi


|WM SN" 915^^'Ul~fllil^


.$6,500.00 Excellent condition, new

tires, license &

insurance until next year.

Cell 455-5876





\--


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 11


2002 HONDA CIVIC
Black exterior with grey interior 4 door
$6,000.00
Call 394-1695 or 436-1940.


IRIB #860
2007 HONDA ACCORD
Silver exterior with grey interior, low miles, xm
radio, 6 disc changer, fully loaded, v6, factory
17" rims, HID lights. $16.000.
Call 394-3436 cell 465-9609


2003 INFINITI G35
Black exterior with tan leather interior, sunroof,
airbags, AC, 20" rims, HID headlights,
clean title, runs great. $10,000.obo
Call 322-1763 or 455-8169


1997 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX
Purple exterior, grey interior, 6 cylinder, 2 door
dual exhaust. Call 325-5060


*RIB# 706
2005 DODGE NEON SXT,
power windows and locks, chrome factory
wheels, runs and drives, in immaculate
condition, vey low miles, clean in and out.
$5,500.00
Call 393-8778 or 535-5635 or 425-0987



1111 111111:


rRIB# 525
2004 HONDA ACCORD,
Dark Green with tan leather int., sound system,
22" rims,Lambo doors, Also
1999 AVALON, $1,000.and 2002 DODGE
..-. NTREPI D$4,500o ......
| Phone: 429-6488 or 364-2837


*RIB# 414
2006 FORD ESCAPE,XLT
green with gray int., great SUV with sunroof,
6 CD changer, power everything, cool AC with
only 34.000 miles, interior like new. Salvage
title, runs like new. Asking $14,000.00 ono
Ph:424-9140/565-7085.


FOR SALE
CHRYSLER TOWN AND COUNTRY 2001
7 seater, very good running condition
Original paint job
Front and rear air condiiiorn;ng
Automatic cloor
Price ',.8 000 00 e1i-gni inou ,ana aoil5rs
F r _r m ,-irn'n nrrtrnt- riOl pl-i3e 'rrii nt r .lr -n "
,m,,:,r., .- 1 .: I


2001 FORD EXPLORER.
White exterior. No air condition and minor body
work required. .
Asking $5000.00 price negotiable.
Contact 376-8428









rRIB #868
1997 HONDA CIVIC
Green exterior with grey interior 2 door,
stick shift. $2,000. ono
Cell 468-3248


2000 HONDA ACCORD
Light brown exterior with grey leather interior
Licensed until May 2012, alarm, CD player, AC,
sunroof. $6,500.00
Call 393-2430 or 456-5632


2004 HONDA STEAM
White exterior, black interior, LHD, NMC model,
excellent condition, clean title, low miles, 4
cylinder, all power option, sunroof, factory alarm,
AM/FM/CD player, CD/AC, tinted, regularly
- -..-- serviced-@-dealer. -$14-,000 ono -- -
557-4251.394-3839


'RIB #866
2007 FORD SPORT TRAC
Beige exterior with tan interior.
$23,000 ono
Serious inquiries only. Call 359-2545'


THSES SRIB










PAGE 12, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


"'--- ..... .L IP


rRIB #902
FOR SALE- 1997 HONDA CIVIC.
Lady owner.
Nassau Motor Company serviced.
Excellent condition.
Standard shift.
Silver. Grey interior. Tinted glass. A/C.
$4,500.
Call 325 8077 or 376 6303. West Bay Street.


2001 BMW 3251
leather interior, 4 door, AC, sunroof,
CD player, automatic.
Asking 8,100 ono. Very good condition
Call 535-2424


2001 LAND ROVER
Blue exterior with tan leather interior.
$14,800 obo. Very good condition,
Recently serviced.
1996 DODGE CARAVAN
Good condition. $2,500 ono
Call 525-0476 or 544-1295


2006 HONDA ACCORD EX
Outragous blue, leather, sunroof, DVD, 22" rims
with painted clips
Also 2007 HONDA ACCORD EX,
Leather, sunroof, very clean. $17,500.00
Call 322-8759/434-8001




- - - t-.- - --




BBF #244
2005 NISSAN MAXIMA,
BIk exterior, tan leather interior, moon roof,
excellent running condition, only 40k miles,
Ice cold A/C, Everything in working order
Asking $11,000 ONO
ph# 432-5490 / 432-5491


rRIB #823A
2003 HONDA ACCORD
Black exterior, black/leather interior, 2 door
coupe. $8,500.00 ono
AC, sunroof, 6 disc changer factory rims,
chrome grill,
fog lights. Call 392-0783 or 467-8739


JUST IN FROM US,
2005 NISSAN SENTRA,
fully loaded, clean title, A/C, CD player, new
tires, new crystal lights; like new, low mileage,
fuel efficient, no down payment for Atlantis and
government employees, $7000 ONO,
ph#425-2713


1998 JEEP CHEROKEE
Dark green exterior with grey interior.
$2000 obo. Runs and drives. Needs TLC.
Cell 359-1259


rRIB #899
1998 FORD F-150, TRITON V-8
Blue exterior,grey interior.
Excellent condition, a must see!
Power windows, locks and mirrors.
Factory alarm, keyless entry, dual exhaust,
bed liner cover, side steps and cold A/C.
$7,500 obo.-
636-4-80 or 341-1380












!BF #219
2000 YAMAHA WAVERUNNER
WITH TRAILER INCLUDED,
67.5 hours on motor. Model GP 1200R. 2
seater, Asking $4500.00, Serious inquiries only
535 7303 / 677 5741 !


2005 MERCEDES BENZ C320 SPORT
Black exterior with black/leather interior
$31,000
Sunroof, very fast, auto fully loaded.
Call 395-5511










TRIB #101
SEACRAFT 23' FT
BOAT FOR SALE
New upholstery, Bimini top, stereo, benette sport
tabs,Twin 200 HP Yamaha Aluminum float-on
trailer. $16,,500.ono
MUST SELL
Call 427-6453 or 364-0453


TRIB# 416
2005 FORD EXPLORER XLT
Gold with tan int., clean title SUV, with 3rd row
seats, cool A/C, clean interior, only 54,000
miles, power everything. $12,500.00
PH:393-2000.


BBF #180
1994 36FT AVANTI BOAT,
2005 Twin 275 Mercury Verado's, trailer
included, 300 gallon tank, all instruments, asking
$45,000 OBO
-ph# 535-5662


I1TiRIBIUN










MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 13


1997 35FT MARLIN
Twin 2009 250hp e-tecs, garmin
VHF, GPS, auto pilot, Windless,
Clarion Stereo, salt/freshwater washdown ,head
below. Duty Paid, Fantastic Summer Deal!
Located in "lyford Cay" Asking: $50,000.00
Call Brooks 424-6450


TRIB #510

1988 77FT
CLASSIC SAILING
YACHT
2010 complete refit,
Located:
Nassau/St.Maarten
Price
reduction!
e-mail:
brussell@iyc.com


DONZI HORNET 21,
as new condition, 575 hp Mercruiser
50 hrs, trailer only wet once, lift stored,
beautiful,fast, reliable.$26,000
427-8761 or 356-5085










,11
-------- ---.. ...''" .m--- --


TRIB #637
TOUR BOAT FOR SALE
REDUCED TO 44,000
Boat was primarily used for diving,
snorkeling, sightseeing, and day away trips.
It is an easy convert for commercial
fishing as well. Motivated seller.
Info 242-525-9754
ExpatBahamas@yahoo.com


COMMERCIAL
FISHING VESSEL
Hull fiberglass engine: 820h.p man diesel
freezer capacity 14,000lbs,
2-2 ton compressors(Copeland)central ac
1-Cummings 32k.w generators
550 gallon fresh water
capacity 2,000-gallon diesel cap.
$125,000,Now $90,000
242-367-2997/242-475-2160










rRIB #792
1974 36FT SPORT FISHERMAN BOAT
Yellow/white, 2-3208 caterpillar 1-8.8 onon
generator, 100 gal water maker,AC,New fly
fridge, VHF, GPS out riggers, new fuel tanks
in great shape. Bait box and fishing chair.
$50,000.ono
336-2353/357-0390


TRIB #881

65' DAY & OVERNIGHT CRUISER

Former dive boat. Excellent condition
Seating for approx. 20 people
Below main deck bunk sleeping for up to
18
Stapleton fiberglass hull/
fiberglassed wooden superstructure
Twin GMC 671 Engines
15 KW Generator 220/120 V

Asking $225,000

Tel: Erskine Knowles (242) 327-5237
Email: info@knowlesrealty.com


.~, .:


TRIB #795
SKI NATIQUE 18FT ,
White exterior $7,500.00
Inbroad ford engine, good condition,
New upholstery, new Bimini top.

Call 376-4272






~A.





TRIB #803
57FT VIKING SPORTFISH ("SUNRISE")
2-Detroit Diesels,20kw Generator,
Sleeps 6,2010 refit
Located: Nassau. Duty Paid
MAJOR PRICE REDUCTION-
asking $525,000
e-mail brussell@iyc.com. Call 424-6450


CARIBE RIGID INFLATABLE 14FT WITH
40HP YAMAHA OUTBOARD AND TRAILER,
very clean and good condition boat, must see,
cheap on gas and fast,
perfect to go'to the beach!
ready to sail, as is $ 4500.OBO.
424-0130


COMPRESSOR FOR TANK FILLING,
16 tanks per hour, 8 sets SCUBA gear, inc.,
B.C.s, regs with gauges, spare 2nd stages.
10 set at least
snorkeling gear, 8 wetsuits. $55000, boat sold
separately asking $32500 rest not sold
separately. 362-1492


MIB #607
11111 4. COMMEF


RCIAL FISHING VESSELL FOR
SALE


70FT "Miss Londa Caierpillar main engine.
70k.w Izuzu generator, lankage 6,000 gal
diesel, 2,800 gal gas & 3,400 gal water.
equipped wilh R/O warer maker, 50,000
pound Ireezer hola wiih 2 6hp
compressors.All navigation &
communication equipment in good working
order,
Accomodation for 11 crew. Spare main
engine (used) included Vessel is actively
Lobstor fishing at present.
Asking $200,000 ono
Contact Nicholas 1 242-333 5212
Corey 1 242-333 4571 or Ronnie Pinder
1 242-557-7847


TRIBE
#508


48FT SMITH BOATS
Complete Refit in 2010 including Engines and
Generator rebuilt,Twin Detroit Diesels, Generac
8kw, New Paint Job, New interior, new
electronics, AC, Sleeps 4
Located Nassau, Duty Paid, 2011 Survey
.Current charter license Asking $ 165,000.00
Call Brooks 424-6450


....'!


SNORKEUNG, DIVING AND FAMILY BOAT.
duoprop outdrive, completely rebuilt engine,
transom, fuel tank in 2010, low engine hours,
dive platform, full sun cover, radar, GPS, VHF,
licensed class "A", 400 mile range,
fully accessorized- $32500,.
362-1492


I~LI-'~


oTHE TRIBUN


-- ---


Excellent condition, repowered in 08, twin
mercruisers 350, runs excellent, new Ac, hot
water, fridge, stove, stand-up shower,
inverter, too much to list, full camper top
A beautiful cruiser, top shape, must see.
$26,500
436-5065,544-6187










PAGE 14, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


';illSIP


TRIB #895
HIGH PROFORMANCE
TIRES
Starting at $170.00
size 245/35/20
call for sizes.
Auto detailing
products 1 gallon, blue
silicone tire dressing and
gallon degreaser combo.
$36.00
Call 326-8274
cell 426-361 &


TRIB #521
22" CHROME RIMS
With black inserts,and brand new tires. $2,600
Ph: 428-7836


TRIB A808
BRAND NEW TIRES
And used factory rims able to fit Chevrolet
Monte carlo or chevrolet Impala at a low price of
$500.00. For more information contact
467-r '38 between the hours of 8am- 6pm


T;I 6 4 40



HID (HIGH INTENSITY DISCHARGE) KITS
All colours available e warranty on all
ballas factory replacement HID bulbs &ballast...,.
LED LIGHT ALSO IN STOCK.
Please call 424-4273 or 556-0358 or 324-0961


rRIB #771 D
DUCTLESS A/C MINI SPLITS
ENERGY EFFICIENT
WESTINGHOUSE & COMFORTSTAR BRAND
ON SALE NOW STARTING AT $559
CALL 394-4823 OR FAMILY ISL. TOLL FREE
242-300-1213.


Low profile tires for cheap, 235-35-19 $195
nexxen, durum, clear, 265-30-19 $265
nankang, dilente 235-30-22 $230
205. 40-17 $95 245-30-22 $225
215-40-17 $110 255-30-22 $215
225-45-17 $120 265-35-22 $235
*15-50-17 $145 85-45-22 $265
215-35-18 $125 265-40-22 $230
225-40-18 $135 305-45-22 $235
12530-20 $175 305-40-22 $235
225-35-20 $170 255-30-24 $285
245-35-20 $175 305-35-24 $290
245-40-20 $175 275-25-26 $300
255-35-20 $200 305-30-26 $450
>7530-20 $275
275-40-20 $200 Ph# 323-4365 Cell#434-4054
285-50-20 $200
285-30-20 Call


THE- IadI,-i I



















TRIB #586
MINI LAPTOP SALE:
1GB RAM. 160HD. WIFI. Windows XP/Windows
7. Webcam. Card Reader. Anti Virus Software.
Brands Include ACER, HP, COMPAQ,
TOSHIBA; DELL AND COMPAQ 1 Year
Warranty. Finance I LayAway from $299.99.
Call 323.6315


rRIB # 589
HP COMPAQ 15" LAPTOP SPECIAL:
Win 7. CD/DVD RW. 2GHz. 2GB RAM. 250HD.
WIFI. Card Reader. Facebook and Twitter
Ready. Anti-Virus; Fax Line. 1 Year Warranty.
Finance I LayAway from $399.99.
Call 323.6315


TRIB 4657
SATELLITE PROGRAMMER SYSTEM
FOR SALE.
Contact 544-9556(day) or 341-6241 (evening)
for more info.







.. ..



TRIB #639
N FUSION ALL TYPES
ILink and sonic 360, LNB & receiver for sale
Wireless routers 45.00 + laptop chargers 40.00
earphone noise red, 8 GB ipod nano & USB
flash drive 18.00
Call 361-4175, 428-8868


-F. I,.-I ~ u _


TRIB #591
HP COMPAQ, DELL & E-MACHINE
COMPLETE DESKTOP SPECIAL:
2GB RAM; 320 HD; CD/DVD RW; USB Ports;
Windows 7 + More; Anti-Virus; Speakers
included. Finance/LayAway from $599.99.
Call 323.6315


TRIB #790
NEW H.P COMPAQ LAPTOP $388.00
15.6" screen, DVD RW, windows 7, 2 GB RAM
250 GB hard drive, built-in WiFi
1 year warranty. Call 364-7854
Call 364-7854 -


CHEAP 27" TV'S
Starting at 149.00
All games available.
Call 376-0646 or 393-7943


FOR SALE-BRAND NEW!
Playstation psp $290
Ninetendo Wii $380
Xbox 360 4GB kinect ready $390
playstation PS3 $575
Call 525-6223


rRIB #818 -
PS3 FOR SALE!
System w/(2) controllers & (1) game. -
PS3 A/V cables also available.
Playstation 2 or 3 giving you problems?
Call for details. 341-1650 cell 535-6777


THETRIBUNE_


IB #658
LAPTOP CHARGERS STARTING @ 40
For HP, Toshiba, Dell, Acer, etc.
USED LAPTOP FOR SALE
Starting @ $300-$350.
Call 431-7704
Desrick 361-2033, 456-5192 Kareemr


NEW GATEWAY MINI LAPTOP $288.00
10.1" screen, 1 GB RAM, windows 7, web cam
Built in WiFi, 1 year warranty.
Call 364-7854


1 1TR-IB #587


PSN NETWORK
CARD:
Purchase Games,
Map Packs,
Demos and More
$20
Card for $25.
Call 323.6315.


TRIB #592
TOSHIBA LAPTOP 15" SPECIAL:
Windows 7; CD/DVD RW; 2.1 GHz ; 2GB RAM;
250 HD; Card Reader;. WIFI; Anti Virus
Software; 1 Year Warranty. Financel LayAway.
Price $489.99. Call 323.6315











TRIB #778
COMPUTERS FOR SALE
The budget special, factory reconditioned
computer like new, windows xp professional
with 1gb ram 160 gb, hd, cd/dvd
burner/keyboard, mouse & speakers, fully
loaded with office suit & anti virus $399..
677-4487/466-9767


TRIB #590
UNIVERSAL LAPTOP CHARGERS:
Charger compatible with most PC laptops. Fits
Dell, Acer, Toshiba, HP, Sony, Compaq, Fujitsu,
Asus, NEC ad more. 90W with multiple
connectors. Price from $49.99. Call 323.6315










rRIB #454
FOR SALE-BRAND NEW!!
Panasonic SC Card camcorder $240
Olympus Stylus Waterproof 12MP digital
camera. $215
Olympus 12MP digital camera $150
Olympus Styles 7030 14MP digital camera
$195
Call 525-6223


BBF #187

$80 DUAL SIM PHONES
Nokia style, music, video, radio,
mem.
T..card slot, $200- Newest
.. Android Touchscreen Tablet PC"s :
3G, WIFI, 2GB/4GB Harddrive
1.2GB / 800 Mh-z Processor,
Touchscreen, Camera, Android App
Market, 1000's of Avail. Apps, Audio
/ Video Player, E-books, USB port,
TF mem. card slot

Ph 376-8704


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 15




,..O






PAGE 16, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


9,.. &I


BAHAMAS BUSINESS SERVICE

& RESTAURANT DIRECTORY
"--H ,"r *i- y '" "' ..


L N.C.












.. . -, -.
.' r ? w S e *^ .... ,



CAN "\ Wl \ it,'-M Ll r'.1-
CiisVVticstD~


B & D Fashions
Ladies Hats & Accessories
Lined Suits From $108.00


-r


2-Pc Pant & Skirt Suits
$39.99


Telephone 356-5829


ALL ABOUT ELEGANCE :
-Cre~an Ben atifji Mewnoriesm
........ .. e r_ i_ c_ ha coers. i. -bas .ck
.. ,- "tubhu.clottm. We skirts.
Ltle i, erIa.%. ad dinner
S n k ; i ,.-W 'r a 1 I .-c-,ii 'ni


i IS. 'I. S S













The Bilingual School.
CHICKS FELICES SPANISH SCHOOL'
Ages: 1.-K5
Registering NOW -
Telephone: 341-7457
Certified Bilingual Teachers-
Abeka, 14 students per class
Ministry Education Approved
CALL TODAY!

Fshtov GC Mllert
Kids Clothing 20% off
Boy's Pants From $4.99
Ladies' Panties From 2/$5.00
Bras From 2/$5.00
Sleep Wear 20% off
Telephone: 326-3514


S(242)225- 55 6-60 15
Wa' . ;


II II


U


.-- .0 .RA I


Tfhe 'I^aii Acatenn, Pi ;
Nail Course Starts Mtrch 2 1. 20 11 .
S ,I, ".I m. .,UrC. Sp.. .vd, ",rc /wn l.. .=,ra.-5,,
r. F\ht ,u J A.l ,' : h.rm "--sh -
CosniClto1oia is W 9 month program. :.
Naill rvickrvolon k- a. 3 month pregrTam 5
REGISTER UNDER THE- %1ILISTRY OF- EIDUC
1for inow tnro. Plea.r ca.if J25-5.5-7 r ..95-,iV9


.,.r.t j


_ II __


i."HE TRl;IBUNE


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
#289 MARKET ST SOUTH PO BOX N-7984, NASSAU
THREE SERVICES SUNDAY
7:00 AM, 9:00 AM, 11:15 AM
PRAYERS FOR YOUR BABIES EVERY SUNDAY \
WEDDINGS* FUNERALS*HOMES* CARS
Just call the numbers listed, 5.&e '7. 9.
I'll personally handle your request. pW
(242) 393-5798, (242) 323-6452

agjjorniquiz.' Mtakvup Tfrli lry & Prinithop ,'
Make-up Artistry Services
Available for all occasions.
(on-site/mobile location)
Makeup Tutoring/Consultation. Face
Painting designs, Makeover. Parties for
kids/adults
Prinishop 'Viign5
Specializing in personalized greeting
cards, invitations, flyers, certificates,
bookmarks, labels, tickets. resume,
Telephone business documents. brochures,
361-2389 or 428-0762 portfolios & a whole lot more.

.YOUR BABY CAN READ!
An early literacy system for babies,
toddlers and preschoolers
t Authorized Distributor
A : Sherle Knowles
Phone: 393-8478
-S', or 380-8023

babiescanread@hotmail.com

CAR

SALES
DRIVEN FOR DEPENDABILITY
-----Telephone-----
323 8427 (Sales) or 326-6380
(Rentals) Visit our site:
www.avis.com.bs/preownedvehicles.himl


ki
IRON BOARD...................From $11.95
5-PC BATHROOM RUG Set........... $18.27
TWIN SHEET SET ...........From $9.99
24-PC CUTLERY Set ..........From $1147
COFFEE fMUGS .......................6/S5.00


I ^^


~p







MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 17


4.
* M*"
* Ji


BAHAMAS BUSINESS SERVICE


& RESTAURANT DIRECTORY


,J ; .,- _: ,.: .. : _. ;:_n. ,: -1-* -- :- -


QUALITY
KITCHEN & BATH
SALE! SALE! SALE!
$1,900.00
Wooden Kitchen Cabinet
Please view Showroom
#55 Washington Street
Telephone
323-1411, 432-8639


-E


Bahamas Proms 2011
Yaw 011111 MpisSrt PMM St.k
Wa sat or Bar
any Cawfi7r Ptaeggs I
Ta Ddluyw 7 Vtium Dps I


A--lt Depa e tu lowS- TBas I
Sft:i .A -t a $19.99 I
S^: CA YTODW 40I-78273r IV hppOat
Vflt Us Today on Faciboobk* Baharan Prorm


SUMMER SPECIAL!

Beautiful Gel Polish Overlays!
No damage to natural nails!
No chipping last 3 weeks!
Soaks off easily in 10 minutes!
ONLY $20 (for hands & toes done FREE!
V.AL Appointment ONLY. 362-0721
www.firstclassnails.com
Located Coral Harbour


ONE BEDROOM, ONE BATH UNIT FOR RENT ,
FORT LAUDERDALE FL.
IN THE CITY OF SUNRISE
Fully furnished with microwave, washer ... ..
and dryer, tv, dish network, internet, *
power and water.
$875.00 Monthly first & last plus security Ph: 242-225-22921 754-9650
Everything you need to make you feel at Website:
home away from home. questvacationhomes.com


it:vt. | i AIt ... Q'tti.Tt.-,B-


/
,, -


: -' 0,4


* S !'


BRAND NEW BEAUTY
& BARBER SALON
Air-condition very comfortable WiFi accessible
Excellent location
$80 RENTAL- LIMITED TIME ONLY
Hair Stylist Nail Tech Barber-Massage Therapist

CALL NOW!!!
327-4762 427-7651 357-0729


- t.
$~ <1


Place order today 394-8494 .. -













PALM CA Y
Gated Community. Club-house, pool,
24-hrs security and other amenities.
Offering elegant Family Homes.
4-bedrooms, 3-bath and property, $625,000
3-bedrooms, 2-bath and property, $555,000
Amenities included:
Granite wood cabinets & counter tops,
porcelain tile. laminate floors and central ac
and many more amenities.
Please call 424-9345, today!


LASERTA G F=U FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY
P.O.Box CB-12843 -Nassau, The Bahamas *-
Tel: (242)466-7599
Email Address:bflbahamas@coralwave.com
Catering to parties, fairs, corporate and community events


I


!THE TRIBUNE


*


0-






PAGE 18, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


..;. -! ; ... .. :_.: ', 4


- = .' .'. f I- ' . -- .-
':"7


. / A :.
"u-: ; ',, "r


VIRTUAL OFFICES AVAILABLE
"Enhance Your Business image without the expense!"
Great for start-up and low budget businesses. Family Island,
International businesses or anyone seeing
Aphyslcal business presence in Nassau.
coipklte Setup otanCIE dd:
Nassau Physical Address, Postal Address,
Fax #, Secretary, Phone # w. Receptionist,







ser:i s .plte deail visdiat


Qgdow "Ii







r Yor S toIt. ut A r'.1,-


Th. sir t iat X BIhsat Se saYoua W*st lIt
JAppavei, Eleetrnis, UG.idq-'i ACesriesa,
and so uch more... shop nowt l!!


[Lt,-Ierr mJ-M @ i


JUSTICE 24/7
CASH Fa GOLD LOANS fa GOLD
0-wT : te r 3:"e m Highest Prices in Bahamas & Caribbean
242 445-5070 lOKt up to $13.00 per gm.
Renimot scI aO.,d' s'clL fiomt.our 14Kt up to $17.00 per gm.
ii atr Do I.,ir i au, usilg aprplha. c 18Kt up to $21.00 per gmin.
a hig/aiour P,,otct ,our I}XM s Sunshine Park Building #13
I.D. photo.
h ,btiias, l, ,. ii v rtrit ain te cl C e ll 5 5 6- 8 76 3


Innova
+LErffIHEADS
BUSIEN CARM+ & WEB$rE


tIons
that


Work R
REFLECTIVE IMAGES


iml'S3 000
DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT
CON tI MANAGtItNI S1'SiMl Contact UsTOb,
RAIC NNE Contact U-
LfKt 'T~l.~~l'l-f ) ( 2".- -'i th
:.,58'A' -
or- v:ift us cnie
ECC3QMERCE & WEB HOSTNCG or;.Ritustnfr5


A+ PRESSURE & POOL CLEANING
SERVICES
Specializing in:
Cleaning and Maintaining Pools-Pressure Cleaning
Houses -Walkways-Driveways- Patios-Pool
Decks-Apartments- Walls-Parking Lots Store Front
-Convenience Stores And also fleet
washing -Dump Trucks Tractors-etc
Call: 242-428-4270






P S BA N A A.



S '. t;-2642 ,, ,. ,n,


YOUR MEMORIES!















2 42h433-0410 242-565l. -4375 -


Product sold locay in the Bahamas... Inua -. o







Direct TV Salellite Service, ONLY $50 Per month.
All Channels included. No Hits or blackouts.
Join our Network a Find out how you can get ree
satellite service. ph 394-435 / 449-9625

V7?/^'4L 57YL6S BCarit7Y s5L0W
Telephone 393-2953 341-0011
SPECIAL! SPECIAL! SPECIAL!
Twist with Leave-in Treatment $50
L.cs with Leave-in Treatment $50

Special Value onl with a copy of this AD
Shirley Street & Carmichael Road: 393-2953/341-0011
Hours: Wed Fri, 8am-9pm; Sat, 7am-9pm; Sun, 7am-9pm
AD can be used at Twist Loc & Braids Hair Boutique
Soldier Road next Restview Funeral Home
Telephone 393-1551
Open 7edays a week Walk-in Welcoment $50
,o Opn 7.,days a week Walk-in Welcomel


J~..


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.
cx'. .. *--
" ':' 'w y: "":" :'"-, 'T' '' : .,'"* ' "* '" ' i ';" "' ""


-, " .. .L ,
:" 4 .- s .. #:. ,=..


Salei s SIrrme
BEctrical *tes, Gneators & Wittie
Pfmps Repai 9 Rnffid
Wid1 MIha! -Psm TMt- ElectiucIl Lit
24 NlrS ffrvtc Sp1culn 5ers i Pick Up & D li vr
W ie hUN Serice The FamiI Nlodr's
WIe cI Spect Onlter NM#rs anid Ewtrcal Prts


" I


A...2 _mr --. .


~ ~LCLrj~hh~l~ni








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 19


.til B HA ASSAES S RVC
a"! ir ** s 's a' i f -! v a "f "( H '"'*<-- ~. ""i 's ^l W & 'C'' w jC ~ '
*^t4 "Ni' H^NAKi4 IIsHIf ?C '
.. ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ M cy n 1 V 1^'- ?jj. ..&. 7f._.,.tc^i ~ A ._' .-.* ^i .f hJ J ~ LkW a (cri s-


IsT NT !j7a


DIRECTORYiT


S1 -j
,- ....
.: = ' : I Ii ,-" ,' ' Y ' :


- Z


v BAT-ANVTA DIVERS '"
Nosaou's O.ldo. iv Storo
Snorkeling& S'~dbaEquipment
SUMMER SPECIAL
PADI Open Water Certification $199.00
2-3 Days To Complete
Call For Next Available Class.
Located.Below "Poop Deck" East Bay St.



Em i - 4. o..4 o4 com


A.S.E Certified Technician


NOW IN STOCK:
Water Pumps
Brake Pads
Radiators
C.V. Joints
Service Parts
Fans J


ABUNDANT LIFE ROAD. NORTH


GERI'S NATURAL HAIR STUDIO'S
MOTHER'S DAY SPECIAL
15% off ALL services for the whole month ol May lor all mothers.
(Bring this AD to redeem Discount!l)
Open: Mon-Sat, 9-5pm
Afro Kinky Twist Extension Braid Extension
Locks Grooming Treatments
Comb Twist Colors
Natural 2-strand Twist Locks & Braid Styling
Locks Repair
Call 326-7737 to make appointment.
Walk-ins are welcome


PI&NG ANDM





pyi s i i aL Tel." 341-6034
Services also available


LIGHT UP BUBBLE GUNS WITH
BATTERIES $4.99 (WHOLESALE)
Good FOR FESTIVALs AND HOMECOMINGS
SUPPLIES LIMITED
75 OTHER LIGHTUP PRODUCTS ORDER NOW
225-2320 423-9550
LET US SPONSER YOUR EVENT/FESTIVAL ON
FACEBOOK @flashersglow

CAREFREE CARPET CLEANING
DIRTY FURNITURE?
Sofa $75, Love Seat $55, Arm Chair $40
DIRTY CAR SEAT?DIRTY CARPET &
RUGS? ROOMS UNDER 150 sq. ft $35
If we can't clean it throw it away.
Dry in one hour.
Like new!
Tel: (242) 325-5108, 362-1444
Fax(242) 362-2384
CLOSE SATURDAY

SATELLITE PROGRAMMING -
one Full Year For Only
.. .. *- .. . ^ .,, :,

Pay Per Views, HBO, Cinema: .:.
Showtime, Adult, Starr, BET ,
News, ChildrenSports & Nore!
Phone: 364-9394 .



D&H

Electronic & Appliance Sales & Repairs
South Beach Shopping Centre
Nassau Bahamas
Tel 242-392-5396 Cell 242-457-3045
Pick Up & Delivery


FLORIDA PICK UPS

Starting at $39.95

Call for more info.

242-328-1801


I


- L...nt~tor iI.~, ar~
-St.*SEnesS C .-~ -~
- ~ro ram

~ r~
-Corn -


* "for At your P'er S F?,.,bsbr stam), fveefs1 8



ANCIENT CHINESE SECRET
REYOUTH SLIM
100 % Natural
Lose 10-15 pounds monthly
Fit for Hypertension.
High Blood Sugar
"Easily maintain the shape"
Check Solomons & Most
Pharmacies
Phone: 393 5157 or 557-1369
www.reyouthbs.com


DROP 2-3 Sizes

in 10 minutes
INO Pills, Diet, Surgery, Exercise

Call for an appointment
Telephone 1-242-364-3718


P. ,-' .' , I r .


'I I


GARDEN BED AND BREAKFAST
RENTAL UNITS
1-bed and bath; 2-bed and bath,
Daily, Weekly and Monthly rentals
Walking distance Doctor's and
PMII hospitals.
#94 Dowdeswell Street
4 doors east of Central GospelChapel
Tel: (242) 356-0907, 325-1816
garden04@live.conr
r.4 -07. !7 fo io rSti


I


I:'


Pw
-., ., .










PAGE 20, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


TRIB #794
2010 ROLEX DATE JUSTSTAINLESS STEEL
white gold bezel blue roman numeral dial
jubilee bracelet with hidden clasp.This model
retails for $6,600 brand new will part for $5,000
Excellent condition, box and papers.
Call 392-1444 or 426-6769

TRIB #787
BRAND NEW PHONE
"'- 3g 8gb $375

|3gs 16gb $550

4g 16gb $850


8
IS MOVADO TWO TONE WATCH
Excellent condition. $350.00.
Call 376-6231


18kt. white gold
Wedding band set/w .52 carats diamonds ($995)
Engagement set/w .65 carats diamonds
($1,250)
Solitaire 1.5 total carat weight Hcolor SI3 clarity
valued at $11,800 alone
Original $14,045. Discounted $11,800 ono
557-1701, 468-1701


PERMANENT BLEACHING CREAM
Lightening Pills NEVER BLEACH AGAIN!
Smooth and light skin in 3-5 days Forever!!
GUARANTEE! No peeling/burning!Naturally
Erase Stretch-marks/Scares/eye Darkness/Acne
! Indian WEAVE straight from India/REGROW
HAIR FAST Don't Suffer
call now 3648204!


I TRIB #911


CHEAPEST ON THE ISLAND!


BlackBerry Torch

BlackBerry Bold

BlackBerry Curve

BlackBerry Pearl


I CALL TO PURCHASE
558-3267 or 558-3268/9


TRIB #632
-------- --- TR B # 3 ----' ,m i ^-

ANDROID 2.2 h
WIFIITVIFM
HD CAMERA,
7 $295.00
plays you tube videos
Phone batt. charges...
$10 _
Tel.. 676-3397/465- rRIB #633
0291 E7 MINI TV PHONE... $150
TV Phones as low as... $99.00
Antroid 10" Epads..... $330.
Tel: 676-3397 or 465-0291


TRIB h809
GET READY FOR NBA FINALS
Jersey $60.00 or 2 for $100.00
All teams fitted caps $20.00
Car flags. $10.00
Cell 432-2428


BRAND NEW ANDROID IPADS
FOR SALE
Selling price $250.00
Contact tony or jetta.
Call 328-4060 or 445-4190 or 468-3757


NEW 40KW ISUZU DAEWOO DIESEL
ENGINE GENERATOR
With Newage alternator, 3 or single phase
operation at 120VAC or 230VAC, come full
equipped with 200 gallons fuel tank, battery,
automatic battery charger,
muff qr,r nd flex, radiator,
;$105Q0.OBQ.:424 0.130.


Call 225-8290, 454-
1288,434-2325


TRIB #376-C

FOR SALE- BRAND-
NEW!
Bla ckberry torch w/WiFi
$675.00
Blackberry 8220 flip
w/WiFi $190
Samsung Monte
touchscreen w/WiFi $23C
Nokia C3 w/WiFi $200
Call 525-6223


FRIB #811
POWER BALANCE BAND
$10.00
Casio G-shock $60.00
Oakley shades $60.00. Fitted caps $20.00
Cell 432,2428



#830A








DECREASE YOUR ELECTRICITY BILL BY
40%
INSTALL BRAND NEW SOLOR WATER
HEATER,
Call 422-2080. Take full advantage of the sun
No electricity needed, enjoy Ipt water at
no cost.


TRIB #771C
SCAG COMMERCIAL MOWERS
ALL MODELS ON SALE NOW FOR A LIMITED
TIME
SPECIAL 52" ZTR W/ 27HP KOHLER $11,880
Sale Price
CALL 394-4823 OR FAMILY ISL. TOLL FREE
242-300-1213. -


BBF #73
SWAG SET W/ MATERIALS @193.&UP
Faux wood blind w/Valances@ $170.& up
-& Lots More
: -h: 242-449-5704


I l T E T-SlI l


sem


=i










____________________________________________ u I


... ....


'RIB #771B
GUARDIAN STANDBY & PORTABLE
GENERATORS
BE PREPARED FOR HURRICANES &
SUMMER OUTAGES
PORTABLES STARTING @ $599
LIQUID PROPANE & DIESEL STANDBY
GENERATORS ON SALE NOW!
STARTING @ $2895
394-4823 OR FAMILY ISL.
TOLL FREE 242-300-1213. ,,


I


TRIB #798




TRANE CENTRAL
AIR CONDITION
UNITS
13 18 SEER
Systems starting
@$1568
Call 394-4823 or
email: sales@
sebahamas.com


FRIB #215
GENERALC AUTOMATIC
STANDBY GENERATORS.
Prices starting from $2,995.00.
Units in stock
Contact Loran at 393-7873
For more information"


4

ph:


TRIB #863

RESTAURANT &
HOME EQUIPMENT
1 Deep fat fryer. $600
1 Gas grill burner.
$450.00
1 1800 BTU Wall
mounted air condition
unit. $150.00

Call 341-2519
or 426-8486
or
434-4182


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 21


II


RIB #771A
DIESEL GENERATORS
BE PREPARED FOR HURRICANES &
SUMMER OUTAGES
TRADEWINDS 7kW 1500kW
Perkins & John Deere Engines
Complete Standby Generator Systems &
Installation available.
CALL 394-4823 / FAMILY ISL. TOLL FREE 242-
300-1213.








{;.'.'.' ---- ---.......
*'4 " .: 3 ".-








rRIB #541
Radiators starting at $170
Call 468-7821 or 394-0258


I ni #783


GERMAN SHEPHERD
10 months male black &
tan
$2,500.00
N.K.C register & health
certificate,
Huge & excellent
temperament, new travel
crate. Cell 535-1955


NEW KENMORE
GAS DRYER
Only $475.00

Call 362-6040


PUPPIES FOR SALE
Rottwielder & German Shepard mix and pure
German shepard. Asking $300-800
Cell 557-2204 or 525-9172


TRIB #770
PITBULL PUPIES
Mixed with American bull dog. Only 5 females,
left, starting at $400 ono .No reasonable offer
will be fefused. Serious inquiries only.
Phone: 3 6-7c4 2M4-200


TRIB #812
SHIT-TZU PUPPIES FOR SALE
First vet visit, first vaccinations, dewormed Price
$500.00
Home 361-7742 cell 434-9967 or
456-8289









.-i

rRIB #703
PURE BREED BASSETT HOUND PUPS
$550.00
Call 324-8636 after 5pmr
la 1 JiOT .r3! YJIMAI FO CS8 J4 A


"BULL TERRIER"
husky, Westie, laborpoodle, york, Maltese,
serious inquires only,
ph# 325-4994 / 432-9275 / 431-1512
10 days tribune issue 89 065

TRIB #459
PERSIAN KITTENS FOR SALE
Phone contact Alexis at 427-0040 or 364-4548










SSilver & Chinchilla silver.available- Sire and
Dame are CFA certified. Born March 29th 2011
j Loving, pl9aful'a+fiWiap0An&litty.


Phone Contact Alexis at 427-0040 or 364-4548
Three beautiful kittens available, black, dilute
calico and blue/white. Sire and Dame CFA
certified. Born April 15th 2011


0750







$1,000 REWARDI!
"LOST CAT"
Domestic 2 year old short hair ginger male tabby
Disappeared early May
Last seen with yellow toy in front of home in the
Carmichael Road area
455-1604 or
slpptrictLe@hotmail.com
with any information
i.t.oo n r


A~,,., *tt


rRIB #460
PERSIAN KITTENS FOR SALE


bITHE lTRIBUNEI


'"'" "'^^


.---b


.


-- -- --... i I







+


PAGE 22, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011


The Tribune


THE TRIBUNE


E-mail: classified @tribunemedia.net


Bradley St., Plamdale
Tel: (242) 323 0800/1
sales@RTBahamas.com
www.RTBahamas.com
Rentals
Cable Beach: 1 bed/1 bath
fully furnished $1,000.00 p/m
Cable Beach: 1 Bedroom near
ocean efficiencies starting at
$1,200 p/m
Cable Beach: 2 bed 1" bath
beach access pool condo no
kids no pets. $1400
Cable Beach: 2 Bed, 2 Bath
Fully Fum Apt. Gated w/ Ocean
Access $2,000 p/m
Cable Beach: 3 Bed, 3 Bath
Furnished, spacious Cottage
$2,900 p/m
Coral Harbor: (2) 2 bedroom
2.5 bath townhome fully-furn
$1,600 & $1,800 p/m
Stapledon Gardens: 2 bed 1
bath un-fumished $700 p/m
Stapledon Gardens: 3 bed 1
bath un-furnished $850 p/m
Delaport: 3 bed 2.5 bath
townhouse ocean view & beach
access. Reduced $3500
Restaurant: Tumkey, with
seating for 75 people, Nassau
Village -$1,200 p/m
Tropical Gardens: 3 Bed, 2.5
Bath Unfum Apt. New w granite
counters $1,600 p/m
Standford Drive: 3 Bed, 3
Bath Fully Fumished &
Spacious Townhome $2,000
p/mi
Stanford Drive: 2 Bed 1.5
Bath, Fully-fum, great location,
$1,800 p/mi

Grove West: 2 Bed, 2.5 Bath
Fully Fum Apt with Security
System $1,800 p/m
Paradise island: 2 Bed, 2.5
Bath Fully Fum Apt with Pool.
Great Location $2,000 p/m
Love Beach: Cottage- 3 Bed 2
Bath fully fumished $2,000
p/m
Sulgrave Manor: 2 bed 2bath
condo w/pool/ beach- $2,500
p/m
Near Sandals: 4 Bed, 4 Bath
Home Fully furnished near
ocean $3,500 p/m
Sandy Port: 3 bed 3.5 bath
fully furnished w/dock slip. Kids
allowed $3,500 p/m
Sandy Port: 2 bed 2.5 Bath,
townhome, Brand New, $3,000
Sandyport: 4 Bed 4 bath,
Executive house, Swimming
Pool, boat slip, $6,000


Bradley St., Plamdale
Tel: (242) 323 0800/1
Sales
Residential/Commercial
Treasure Cove: 4 Bed, 2 Bath
Home, $465,000
Palm Point: 2 bed 2.5 bath
Townhouse in West winds,
$269,000
Bernard Rd: 3 Bed, 2bath
Home with attached 1 bdrm apt
unit $178,000
Hilltop (2nd Terrace): 2 Bed, 2
Bath, a/c. View of Atlantis and
harbor $185,000
Marigold Farm Rd: 2bed 1
bath / 1 bed 1 bath Incomplete
Duplex $190,000
Twynam: New 2 Beds, 2.5
Bath Townhouse, Unfurnished
with deck $250,000
Millar's Heights: Duplex, 2
Bed 1 Bath each side, Marble
flooring $250,000
Malcom Allotment: New Tri-
plex, fully rented $335,000
Off Hanna Rd: Duplex Building
Brand New. Burglar Bars
$265,000
Stapledon Gardens: Duplex
on Christie Ave, 3/1 & 2/1 unit,
Large lot with room to build
$395,000
Marshall Road: 3 bedroom 2
bath, Home 'like new' $280,000
Eastern Area: Shopping plaza,
'fully rented, great deal $1.7
million
West Bay St.: 6 Cottage
complexes on 18,000 sq. ft. lot
-$800,000
Colony Love Beach: 2 Bed, 2
Bath condo with Ocean Access
$398,000
Misty Gardens-Off Marshall:
Rd Triplex 'great condition' 3
bedroom 2 bath home and 2/ 1
bedroom 1 bath units for
$410,Q00
Off Prince Charles: 3 Bed, 3.5
Bath Home Unfurnished,
landscaped'$420,000
High Vista: 6bed, 6.5 bath,
Brand New Home $550,000
Eastern Road Estate: 4 bed, 5
bath, Hill top, Acreage, Ocean
views, private road, pool, fully
frun. $2,950,000
Lots
High Point Estates: 8,517 sq
ft. Triplex lot with plans
$130,000
Off West Bay St: 7,945 sq: ft.
Multifamily near Yuma Estates
$130,000


Bradley St., Plamdale
Tel: (242) 323 0800/1
Joe Farrington Rd: (3) Multi-
family lots, starting at $79,000
Twin Lakes: 90 x 140. Large
lot in great new community
$210,000
Treasure Cove: Residental
Lot, great gated community
$155,000
Treasure Cove: Ocean View
residential lot, $197,000
South Ocean: 12,600
multifamily lot $192,500
Jacaranda: 11,361 sq. ft.
residential lot $150,000
West Grove (Westglade): 84 x
110 9,000 plus sq ft.
$195,000
Skyline Drive: Large
Residential lot.. $225,000
Coral Harbor Roundabout: 4
lots 20,000 sq ft. Commercial.
$304,000 each
Carmichael Rd: Commercial
lot on Main Road, 15,000 sq. ft
$450,000
East Street South:
'Commercial' 3 "Acres, with
income producing buildings
$2.5 million
Sappodilla Boulevard: 5,000
sq.ft Single Family Lot 50x100 -
$75,000
Kool Acres: Duplex Corner Lot
74 x 96 at great price only
$80,000
Lumuba Rd.- Multifamily lot,
Private Rd. 70x145 $105,000
West Winds: 60 x 100. Single,
Family Lot between two roads
$115,000














HOUSE FOR SALE
BY OWNERS
2 storey
4 bedroom, 2.5-bath,
$295,000 ono
361-3898/454u3082,
468-3248.
sporting ~ faiiis


OK. .l.U[la i L[EIV Ull VVwooL lay
St. walk to beach: Large 2 bed
2 bath furnished condo
$189,000
Meeting Street: Split-level
building ideal for Office,
reduced for quick sale
$215,000.

Off Marshall Road:
2 bed 1 bath Duplex $225,000.
St. Andrews Beach Estates: 3
bed 2 Bath Cottage Style Home
$250,000.00
Yamacraw Beach Estates: 3
bed 2.5 bath home
$266,000.00
Silver Cay: 3 bed 2 bath well
maintained Condo with
exceptional sea view $310,000
Montaque Heights/ Village
Rd: 3 bed 2 bath large
living/dining area on 1/2 acre lot
$395,000
Rawson Court: 3 bed 3 bath
Condo, Exceptional Sea -View
$399,000
Glengarriff Gardens: Two
Storey Home 4 bed 2 bath
$418,000
Sandford Drive: 3 bed 2 .5
Bath House $450,000
Sea Breeze: Executive 4 bed 3
bath house with Tennis Court
on two Lots $463,000
Sulgrave Manor: 2 bed 2 Bath
Townhouse $475,000
Westward Villas: 3 bed 2 .5
bath full A/C Town House
Condo Front and rear
balconies, garage, pvt yard
$495,000

East Street: Large Commercial
Lot w/ Structure $400,000

Rosetta Street: Two Storey
Commercial building $695,000
with Property at rear 70 x 100 $
250,000.00
Blue Hill Road South:
Commercial building 600,000
Airport Industrial Park:
Warehouse/Office building on
Large Lot Sold Furnished
$1,200,000.00

Oakes Field: Commercial
Building 23,700 sq ft
Warehouse and office 1.1 Acre
land$1,500,000

Claridgedale Sub. Corner lot
$63,000.00

Foxdale Sub. Lot $60,000
Serenity-Gated:Single & Multi
Family lots starting @ $80,000
South Seas-Gated: lotIs
starting @ $83,796
Ph: 328-2001 / 326-4400


Coral Vista: Multi-family lot
$89,500.00
Emerald Coast: Lot $99,500
Coral Breezes: Family lots
starts @$99,500
Lyford Hills: great living, Lots
starting @ $117,600
Airport Industrial Park:
10,085sq. ft. $115,000
Destini Lakes: lots starts @
$99,000
Off Blue Hill Road South: lot
7,752 sq.ft $93,000.00
Off Carmichael Road: Large
M/F lot 10,107 sq.ft
$121,000.00
Hillside Park: large lot 15,000
sq.ft $135,000.00
Charlottesville-Gated Lot
$149,500
Stapledon Gardens: Large Lot
12,900sq.ft $168,000
Saffron Hill: lots Starting @
$175,000,
South Westridge: With Lake
View $237,000
Balmoral:Gated:lots
$238,000.00
indigo: Out West Lot with Sea
View $240,000
Love Estates: 1 acre lot
$245,000.00
Infant View Road: Large lot
$250,000
Serenity Estates lots 100 x
304 $250,000.00
Boatswain Hill: Large lot
44,456 sq.ft $250,000.00
St. Albans Drive: Large M/F
lot easily subdivided
$280,000.00

Westridge: Large Lot
22,000sq.ft $300,000
Westridge: Large lot 1.2 Acres
$390,000
Silver Gates: vacant lot
$61,000.00
Yamacraw Beach Estates: lot
$91,000.00
Ph: 328-2001 / 326-4400
Fax: 356-4044






clan qitarea


Our Motto: "PUT GOD FIRST"
326-8017, 326-8112


Bishop Walter S. Hanchell, JP
Broker/Appraiser
VACANT PROPERTIES
FOXDALE, residential hill-top
lot, 50x100, $65,000.
WESTRIDGE, oceanview lot,
1.03 acres, $450,000.
CHARLOTTEVILLE, exclusive
Jated community, lot 60x120,
175,000.
INDIGO, residential lot, 50x120
in exclusive western suburb,
$195,000.
OFF SUTTON STREET, lot
63x17 ideal for 4 unit complex,
$70,000.
SEAGULL GARDENS, ofi
Yamacraw Rd., residential lot,
80x103, $115,000.
BERNARD ROAD, two
commercial lots $158,000 and
$165,000.
BLUE HILL ROAD SOUTH,
large commercial property,
100x220, $335,000.
OFF BACARDI ROAD, duplex
lot, $67,000.
WESTWINDS, duplex lots,
$130,000.
WILTON STREET, commercial
property off Mackey Street
near Tops Lumber, corner lot,
$200,000:

CORAL HARBOUR, large
beachfront lot. with incomplete
2 storey mansion, $900,000.
TWYNAM, .large elevated
residential lot 80x146,
$160,000.

NIVEN MEADOWS, duplex
lots, $68,500.
WINDERMERE SUBDIVISION,
3 large multi-family lots in
Grand Bahama, $54,000.
JACARANDA, residential lot,
$170,000.
OFF FIRETRAKIL ROAD,
multi-family lot, 50x135,
$90,000.

BALFOUR ESTATES,-triplex lol
63x122, $99,000.


- I












THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011, PAGE 23


The T 41 s INTERESTING BARGAINS!!! INTERESTING BARGAINS!!! INTEREST






CLASSIFIED
Telephone:322-1986 1 I&t G


NG BARGAINS!!! INTEREST


CHECK YOUR AD: Read your ad. Any errors must be reported the first
day of publication. Should the error inhibit response. credit will apply
only to the run date. The Tribune is not Liable for any loss on expense
that results.from publication.


REAL ESTATE







Our Motto: "PUT GOD FIRST'
326-8017, 326-8112









6 i r-,:.p k'./a 1-r p p -a ri,:hrie ll ..) -
Broker/Appraiser
BUILDINGS
BEL AIR, spacious 2 storey 3
bed 2 bath house with double
carport, sunken living room,
study, porch, utility room,
enclosed landscaped property,
$295,000.
EMERALD COAST, exclusive
gated community off J.F.K.
Drive with elegant 3 bedroom,
2 bath house with central air,
double car park and lush
landscaped, $395,000.
CORAL HARBOUR CANAL,
luxury 4 bed 4? bath executive
home with large balconies,
10,000 gal water tank,
automatic generator, roll-up
shutters and gate all on a large
comer lot, $900,000.
FIRETRAIL ROAD, new 2 bed
1 bath condo, $130;000.
LOU ADDERLEY ESTATES, 3
bed 2 bath house, $175,000.
MALCOLM ROAD, attractive 2
storey 4 unit apartment, a
super deal at $230,000.
EASTERN ROAD, 4 bed 3?
bath oceanfront house, fully
furnished, $1.2 million.
OFF CARMICHAEL ROAD,
well built triplex in quiet
neighbourhood, excellent
condition, lush landscaping,
private road, $295,000.
BELLOT ROAD WEST, palatial
4 bed 3 bath house with
swimming pool, plus two
apartments (1) 2 bed 1 bath
and (1) 1 bed 1 bath, was
$650,000 reduced to
$550,000.
PINEWOOD GARDENS, 4 bed
3? bathrooms, split level house
with burglar bars, water
system and balcony, 50x100,
$195,000.
WESTWARD VILLAS, brand
new 4 bed 3.5 bath on
property 92x130, was
$630,000 reduced to
$495,000.
FLAMINGO GARDENS, 3 bed
1 bath house with foundation
for (2) 1 bed apartments,
$190,000.


I REAL ESTATE III REAL ESTATE III REAL ESTATE


Our Motto: "PUT GOD FIRST"
326-8017, 326-8112




4 ;-.. ..;.




Broker/Appraiser

BUILDINGS
PINEWOOD GARDENS,
conventional 3 bed 2 bath
house in western section near
East St. South, includes
generator, a deal at $170,000.
SEVEN HILLS, 3 bed 2 bath
house ,with attached 1 bed 1
bath apartment, $175,000.
JOANS HEIGHTS, newly
renovated spacious 3 bed 2
bath house with family room,
patio, $1.85,000.
SEVEN HILLS, 4 bed 2 bath
house with hurricane shutters,
$225,000.
FAITH GARDENS, brand new
duplex, 2 bed 1 bath each
side, $230,000.
COLONY VILLAGE, beautiful
triplex plus 1 bedroom cottage
.on enclosed landscaped
property, $350,000.
SOUTH OCEAN, near
Commonwealth Brewery,
brand new duplex townhouse
overlooking. the ocean, 2 bed
2.5 bath, $350,000
MISTY GARDENS, elegant 3
bed 3 bath house, 2 years old
with Jacuzzi, wooden floors
plus 2 attached apartments
appraised at over $440,000
asking $399,000.

BORIS CLARIDGE, near
Winton, executive 4 bed 3 bath
house with 3 apartment units,
excellent condition, $750,000.
OFF WEST BAY STREET,
luxury 3 bed 2 bath condo, 2
years old, $295,000.
FOX HILL, Dorsett St. off
Adderley St. 6-unit apartment
building, (4) 2 bed 1 bath and
(2) 1 bed 1 bath, $396,000.
NASSAU VILLAGE, duplex (1)
2 bed 1 bath and (1) 1 bed 1
bath, $175,000.
VINEYARD ROAD, duplex
townhouse, excellent
condition, $295,000.
GIBBS CORNER, lot 49x100,
may be used for residential or
commercial use, $48,000.


Our Motto: "PUT GOD FIRST'
326-8017, 326-8112








Bishop Walter S. Hanchell, JP
Broker/Appraiser
BUILDINGS
WEST BAY STREET, attractive
38 bed hotel near Bahamar,
amenities includes restaurant,
reception area, meeting room,
$4.1 million.
PALM TREE AVENUE, two
storey commercial building
with large store unit and (3) 1
bed apartments plus extra
vacant lot, was $490,000
reduced to $440,000.

GOLDEN PALM, complex with
barber shop, take away, water
depot and three (3) bed
apartment, $380,000.
NASSAU VILLAGE, 3 bed 1
bath house on large enclosed
lot 80x1 00, $95,000.
ST. JAMES ROAD, attractive 2
bed 1 bath house, $80,000.

BERNARD ROAD, commercial
building -with 4 stores,
excellent condition, was
$375,000 now $345,000.















Newly built homes
3-bedrooms, 2-bath
on St Vincent Road, $215,000
ALCAL HOMES
3-bedroom, 2-baths,
GoldenGates #2. $210,000
We offer Packages
3-bedroom, 2-baths
STARTING FROM $179,000
3-bedroom, 1-baths $170,000,
2-bedroom, 1-bath $165,000
2-bedroom, 1-bath $160,000
Tel:433-7927,
434-8209, 341-8373.


E.- r,,p Ja.lle-r 5. I-Mar,,:r, 11 J
Broker/Appraiser
VACANT PROPERTIES
OFF SANDILANDS VILLAGE
ROAD, residential lot 65x100,
$60,000.
OFF SPIKENARD ROAD, lot
50xl 50, $95,000.
KOOL ACRES, duplex lot,
6,487 sq. ft., $78,000.
BAHAMA SOUND, residential
lots from $18,000.
LONG BAYS CAY Two
commercial building on 2 acra
property, $300,000.
SENTINEL BAY, multi-family
lot located in Freeport,
$45,000.
OFF FIRETRAIL ROAD,
duplex lots, $95,000.
ROSEDALE, off Marshall
Road, .duplex comer lot
100x50, $75,000.
GODLEN GATES, residential
lot 60X100, $75,000.

WESTRIDGE, large elevated
property in exclusive western
suburb, 120x207 elevated -lot,
valued at $398,000 priced for
quick sale, $275,000.
SEABREEZE LANE, comer
duplex lot, 60x100, $75,000.

SAN SOUCI, large corner lot
81x101,, $125,000.

KILLARNEY SHORES, 100x
95, $145,000.
FIRETRAIL ROAD, off
Carmichael, large commercial
lot 74x221, $195,000.
WESTRIDGE, large elevated
property in exclusive western
suburb, 120x207 elevated lot,
valued at $398,000 priced for
quick sale, $275,000.

SEABREEZE LANE, corner
duplex lot, 60x100, $75,000.
SAN SOUCI, large corner lot
81x101, $125,000.
KILLARNEY SHORES,
100x95, $145,000.

FIRETRAIL ROAD, off
Carmichael, large commercial
lot 74x221, $195,000.


Bizn ,-p zVall1er '.3 M anr.rell .IP
Broker/Appraiser
VACANT PROPERTIES
WESTRIDGE, large elevated
property in exclusive western
suburb, 120x207 elevated lot,
valued at $398,000 priced for
quick sale, $275,000.

SEABREEZE LANE, corner
duplex lot, 60x1 00, $75,000.
SANS SOUCI, large corner lot
81x101, $125,000.

KILLARNEY SHORES,
100x95, $145,000.

FIRETRAIL ROAD, off
Carmichael, large commercial
lot 74x221, $195,000.

EASTWOOD, double lot near
Prince Charles Drive, was
$195,600 reduced to
$160,000.

WINDEMERE ISLAND, 1.63
acre elevated beachfront
property on exotic Windemere
land, an exclusive gated
community. .

LONG ISLAND, residential lots
in Stevens starting from,
$30,000.

BLACKWOOD ABACO,
eleven (11) beachfront lots
appraised at $1.85 Million,
owner will accept $1.4 Million.
The property is ideal for hotel,
condominium or residential
development, located 14 miles
northwest of Coopers Town in
the vicinity of the proposed
port.

WESTRIDGE, large elevated
property in exclusive western
suburb, 120x207 elevated lot,
valued at $398,000 priced for
quick sale, $275,000.
SEABREEZE LANE, corner
duplex lot, 60x100, $75,000.
SAN SOUCI, large corner lot
81x101, $125,000.

KILLARNEY SHORES,
100x95, $145,000.
FIRETRAIL ROAD, off
Carmichael, large commercial
lot 74x221, $195,000.

EASTWOOD, double lot near
Prince Charles Drive, was
$195,000 reduced to
$160,000.


Our Motto: "PUT GOD FIRST'
326-8017, 326-8112









B r..:'.p W a, r . Harineii .
Broker/Appraiser
VACANT PROPERTIES
WINDEMERE ISLAND, 1.63
acre elevated beachfront
property on exotic Windemere
Island, an exclusive gated
community.

LONG ISLAND, residential lots
in Stevens starting from,
$30,000.
BLACKWOOD ABACO,
eleven (11) beachfront lots
appraised at $1.85 Million,
owner will accept $1.4 Million.
The property is ideal for hotel,
condominium or residential
development and is located 14
mi
The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01185
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: December 1, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01185

Full Text









McFURRY m ovin'

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NOT AS
WARM, RAINY


The Tribune

ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


BAHAMAS EDITION


Volume: 105 No.9


MONDAY, DECEMBER 1,2008


PRICE 750


Son of r adio b SS iS






quizzed over Pmurer


Dario Mills one of five

helping police inquiry


* By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE son of a senior
media figure is one of five
men being held for ques-
tioning in connection with
last week's Abaco store
murder.
Dario Mills, only son of
Radio Abaco boss Silbert
Mills, is helping police
inquiries into the death of
24-year-old Dion 'Brendon'


Strachan.
A family friend said last
night: "Silbert is very upset
about this and we feel very
bad for him and his wife
Dolly."
Dario, whose only sister
Teneil studied law in Lon-
don, is expected to be flown
with four others to Nassau
as investigations continue.
According to Police Com-
SEE page 12


38 pounds of cocaine

seized in Freeport
POLICE in Grand Bahama reported last night the discovery
of 38 pounds of cocaine in a 40-foot container destined for
Naples, Italy, at Freeport Container Port.
The discovery, officers said, was made as the container was
being X-rayed and "inconsistencies" were discovered.
As a result, police joined up with Customs, security personnel
and others to search the container, which supposedly contained
frozen seafood loaded in Peru.
"The seal was then broken by Bahamas Customs and, upon
SEE page 12


FIREFIGHTERS move into position to fight a fire at the city dump last night.
The fire started on Saturday and the heavy smoke had residents in the near-
by areas, especially in the Cable Beach and Goodman's Bay areas, literally
'choking in their beds' at night. Although firefighters were able to contain
most of the blaze by yesterday evening, there were still fires burning deep
under the surface of the dump. Windy conditions were also a hindrance
to the fire department as its personnel battled with the flames.


The Tribune joins the

Facebook revolution


IN ADDITION to building
its first online presence with a
state-of-the-art website, The
. Tribune has embraced Face-
book,,one of the fastest growing
social networking sites on the
World Wide Web.
On Tuesday morning, the
newspaper is launching its offi-
cial Facebook page, effectively
reaching out to the thousands
of Facebook users who have
identified themselves as being
a part of the Bahamas network.
"Facebook presents us with
an incredible opportunity to
take our content to the more
than 20,000 people known to be
associated with the Bahamas on


Facebook. In addition to
sharing our content with them
in an environment where
they've grown accustomed to
getting information, we are also
able to
utilise Facebook to engage
our audience in a more inter-
active manner," said Jessica
Robertson, online editor.
The Tribune's Facehook page
includes a sneak peck at the fol-
lowing day's headline stories.
This preview will be posted
each evening along with a pho-
to of the following day's front
page.
SEE page 13


Govt expects

in revenue50m shortfall

in revenue intake


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net
GOVERNMENT expects a
$150 million shortfall in its pro-
jected revenue intake for 2008,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said yesterday.
As the global financial crisis
continues to significantly affect
the Bahamas' economy, Mr
ing.aham. at ameet.-the-press
Ceent he ierday revealed that
"government revenue is about
10 per cent below forecast.".
He added, however, that this
development -continues to mir-
ror what happened in 2007."
As a consequence of the pro-
jected decrease in revenue, Mr
Ingraham said a stand-by facil-
SEE page 13


I ,-
PRIME MINISTER Hubert
Ingraham speaks to the
media yesterday.
Felip6 Major/Tribune staff


'New direction' for

Dept of Immigration
THERE will be new faces and a new direction for the Depart-
ment of Immigration as Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham dis-
closed yesterday that there will be another round of "retirements"
at this ministry, which has been plagued with rumours of corruption
for decades.
Commenting on recent retirements of senior officials, Mr Ingra-
ham said he fully expects "additional retirements" at the Depart-
ment of Immigration of those either "eligible to retire" or who sim-
ply need to be retired.
"I expect that the Immigration Department will become more
responsive, more efficient, more focused, and we expect to be
SEE page 13


* By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
BEC customers may see a
decrease in electricity bills as
fuel surcharges arc expected to
drop in the near future, Prime
Minister Ingraham said yester-
day.
During a press conference at
the British Colonial Hilton, Mr
Ingraham said: "Yes, we should
expect a lower fuel surcharge
from BEC. I'm told that the
surcharge will be 16.08 cents,
SEE page 13


Woman dies
in car crash
A YOUNG woman lost her
life when a car left the road on a
sharp bend in Abaco on Friday.
Felicia Pritchard, 22, was killed
when the 2005 Chevrolet Equinox
crashed at Cedar Harbour, her
home village.
No other vehicle was involved.
A man, Anon McIntosh, from
Murphy Town. was seriously
injured and, after treatment local-
ly, was flown to Nassau.
Another man. Manford Arm-
brister from Central Pines, Dun-
das Town. was released from the
local clinic after treatment.
Police said speed was believed
to be "an element" in the crash,
which happened at 3.15pm in
broad daylight.
Sources were unable to say
who was driving the car at the
time.


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Tens "a







PAGE MODAY, ECEMER 1,2008THE TIBUN


Change in police force

leadership early next year
EARLY next year there will be a change in leadership of
the Royal Bahamas Police with the return of Elliston
Greenslade and Marvin Dames from their training exercise
in Canada.
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham did not specify which offi-
cer would ultimately gain the leadership post from Acting
Commissioner Reginald Ferguson, who is expected to retire
next year.


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Road improvement scheme


to commence in January


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net
PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham said yesterday that
his government is accelerating
implementation of a number
of planned development pro-
jects, including the road
improvement scheme and work
at Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport to help stimu-
late the sluggish economy.
At a meet-the-press event at
the British Colonial Hilton yes-
terday, Mr Ingraham said the
$120 million contract for the
New Providence Road
Improvement Project will be
signed before Christmas.
"Work is expected to com-
mence during the second week
in January, 2009.
"This project is being funded
by a loan, previously approved
by Parliament, from the
Inter-American Development
Bank.
"The contractor, Jose Cartel-


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For


lone out of Argentina, has
already engaged 11 Bahamians
and seven expert expatriate
staff who are also on location,"
he said.
Construction
The prime minister also said
the first phase of the new Unit-
ed States pre-clearance facility
and associated land-side ter-
minal and air-side construction
work at LPIA will begin
early in the second quarter of
2009.
The design for the new facil-
ity is already 60 per cent com-
pleted, he said.
"It will also house many dif-
ferent food and beverage and
retail offerings, all owned and
operated by Bahamian busi-
ness persons. At the height of


construction some 400 con-
struction jobs will be created,"
he said.
He explained that this $175
million project will be funded
by loans and bonds, and be ser-
viced from operating revenues
of the airport.
"It is not expected that the
borrowings by the Airport
Authority will require a gov-
ernment guarantee.
"However, ,to facilitate this
construction the government
will assume responsibility for
$50 million of the present out-
standing debt of the Airport
Authority," he said.
Mr Ingraham added that he
also expects work
to begin on announced con-
structions of government com-
plexes in Abaco and Grand
Bahama during the first and
second quarters of 2009.


THE Harcourt Group will not be able to go
ahead with its plans for the Royal Oasis resort at
this time due to the global financial crisis,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham revealed yes-
terday.
"They sent to my office a number of drawings
and renditions as to what they are proposing to do
when they are in the position financially to do so,"
he said yesterday at a press event at the British
Colonial Hilton.
The Royal Oasis closed in 2004 after sustaining
substantial damage during two major hurricanes'
that hit Grand Bahama that year.
The hotel was subsequently bought by the Har-
court Group and Grand Bahamians hoped for a


grand reopening and new jobs to be created.
The prime minister said yesterday that gov-
ernment agreed to give the Harcourt Group $8
million in "marketing support."
The government has already paid half of the
promised money and another $4 million is due.
However, Mr Ingraham said the government
will not pay the other $4 million until such time
proposed construction and development begin
at Royal Oasis.
Hefurther assured the public that the $6 million
that government paid to compensate, the former
Royal Oasis workers is wholly unconnected to
the $8 million payment for the hotel's marketing
support.


Govt helping Four Season's Resort in 'big, big, way'


THE Bahamas government is
helping Four Seasons Resort in
Exuma "in a big, big way" to
ensure that the hotel keeps its
doors open, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham confirmed yes-
terday.
Mr Ingraham's statement comes
after several weeks of speculation
that Four Seasons is struggling and
may be forced to downsize its staff.


Speaking at a press event at the
British Colonial Hilton yesterday,
Mr Ingraham said he did not want
to expand on details about the
assistance his government is giving
the Four Seasons.
"There is not a hotel in the
Bahamas that's receiving more
concessions from the Bahamas
government than the Four Sea-
sons hotel in Exumnia We-wanted


to keep its doors open and we
support it in a big, big way," he
said.
While he did not directly answer
the question if any Four Seasons
employees would be made jobless,
Mr Ingraham at a later point in
yesterday's press conference said
there are no further lay-offs on
the table for the hotel industry at
this time.


Royal Oasis plans on hold

due to global financial crisis


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PAGE 2, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008


K1-51


,0' L


THE TRIBUNE










THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, DECEMBER 1,2LOCA['NESAU


PM tells Bahamians

to do all in their

power to withstand

these tough times
By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff
Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

WITH no end it sight
to the current global eco-
nomic downturn, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham yesterday advised
Bahamians to do all in
their power to strengthen
their ability to withstand
these tough times.
"For persons who have
been laid off with finan-
cial packages, I would
strongly urge them not to
fritter away their money
on unnecessary expendi-
ture and Christmas shop-
ping sprees. We do not
know how long or how
deep this economic crisis
will be," he said while
speaking at a meet-the-
press event at the British
Colonial Hilton yester-
day.
Mr Ingraham said it is'
extremely important at
this time for Bahamians
to support local mer-
chants both to help
keep others employed
and to increase govern-
ment revenue intake.

Businesses

"Buy locally, if you
can, food, clothing, and
equipment. Support of
local merchants is imper-
ative in these times.
Your support of local
business will save jobs -
perhaps your own. Local
businesses pay customs
duties essential for gov-
ernment revenue," he
said.
Mr Ingraham advised
Bahamians to conserve
energy at home and in
the workplace. "I espe-
cially appeal to the gov-
ernment employees to do
that," he said.
"Use energy efficient
light bulbs, keep windows
aR4 dpors,closed when ....
using air-conditioning;.
minimise air condition
use, especially now in the
cooler months, conserve
water check for leaks
and repair them quickly.
If replacing major house-
hold appliances make
certain that you acquire
the most energy efficient,
and if you can, consider
going solar."
The prime minister fur-
ther urged people to car-
pool and/or use public
transport to reduce fuel
consumption.
"Where there is more
than one car in the
household, use the most
energy efficient and park
the gas guzzler," he said.
As for Christmas pre-
sents for friends and fam-
ily, Mr Ingraham said the
recent authentically
Bahamian craft show'
demonstrated that there
are any number of fine
locally-made products
that can be used as
Christmas gifts.


iiii [II :l


PLP to hold convention in


October or November '09


THE PLP has announced that it will
hold its next national general conven-
tion in October or November next year.
Chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin said
the party's national general council had
unanimously decided this, as mandated
by the party's constitution.
In January, 2009, the PLP will com-
memorate and celebrate the anniver-
sary of January 10, 1967 "the date
when political equity was obtained in
the Bahamas and marking the incep- .
tion of PLP government and unprece- *7
dented political, social and economic
advances for our people and the build-
ing of the modem Bahamas," Mrs Han-
na-Martin said.
"In celebration of its role in support
of the suffragette movement and the cause of women
generally, the PLP will also in J.anuary commemo-
rate the 50th anniversary of the historic address of
Dame Doris Johnson to the House of Assembly on
the question of the right of women to vote.


"The opportunity will he used to cel-
b. hratIe the achievements of' outstand-
ing Bahamian women but also to bring
focus and the pursuit of resolution to
the continuing plight of many women in
this country including the difficult chal-
lenges posed by teenage pregnancy and
,' conditions of poverty," the chairman
said.
Mrs Hanna-Martin said that, in the
ensuing months, the PLP will "cause
young people from across the country
to meet and caucus to analyse and dis-
cuss'political and other matters of
importance to the youth population in
our country."
She added: "We expect these events
to occur in the months of February and
March of next year."
The party will also spearhead activities in each
constituency through its branches to assure the
PLP's ideas and philosophy are disseminated among
all Bahamians, Mrs Hanna-Martin said.


THE pace of privatization of
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company is quickening with the
launch of a website www.btcpri-
vatisation.com, and a series of
public consultations planned
throughout the Bahamas, the
BTC Privatisation Committee
has announced.
Committee chairman T B
Donaldson noted the publica-
tion in today's dailies of a wide-
ranging supplement on the
process of privatization.
"We are pleased to announce
that some 40,000 copies of the
newspaper supplement, The
Future of Telecommunications
in The Bahamas, are available as
of this morning," said Mr Don-
aldson.
"This is an important docu-
ment for the general public,
BTC staff, vendors and busi-
nesses because it explains the
process of privatization, the
timeline and the benefits of a
fully competitive telecom sec-
tor.
"It also addresses other
important niatters' related to the
BTC privatization, including the
commitment to continue Fami-
ly Island service."
BTC chairman Julian Francis,
also deputy chairman of the Pri-
vatisation Committee, said: "We
believe this combination of
material, the supplement and
the website, will go a long way
toward providing an update on
what has been achieved, so far,
as well as outlining the benefits
of privatization for BTC, its cus-
tomers, the telecom sector and
the overall Bahamian economy.
"We know from similar expe-
riences in other countries that


when privatization is followed
by competition it opens all sorts
of economic opportunities job
opportunities and entrepre-
neurial opportunities for those
pursuing careers in or connected
to communications."
Views of the business com-
munity, including the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, the
Bahamas Hotel Association,
technology giant IBM and the
Bahamas Financial Services
Board are included in the print-
ed supplement and on the web-
site.

Support

Mr Francis said: "They are all
in support of BTC privatization,
paving the way for broader com-
petition."
He cited Russell Miller, pres-
ident of the Bahamas Hotel
Association, who commented
"Our industry would enthusias-
tically welcomewprivatisation
efforts" and Wendy Warren;
executive director of the
Bahamas Financial Service
Board, who noted: "Privatisa-
tion and competition will lead
us into a new era of telecom-
munications in The Bahamas
with a greater variety of services
at competitive prices."
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce executive director Philip
Simon sees privatization as crit-
ical to the growth of business.
"If we are serious about growing
business then we must be just
as serious about delivering the
fastest, most reliable communi-
cations," he said.
And Felix Stubbs, president


and general manager of IBM
(Bahamas) Ltd, lent support,
saying privatization would take
BTC to new heights.
"Privatisation followed by
competition will allow an
unshackled BTC to grow to a
whole new level and we might
all be very surprised at what a
new BTC has to offer," said Mr
Stubbs, who is also chairman of
Grand Bahama Port Authority.
The government has
announced plans to sell 51 per
cent of BTC to a private tele-
com operator who has demon-
strated a strong track record in
providing quality service.
It has also announced plans
to liberalism fixed-line service,
the type that home or desk
phones use, upon the sale, and
wireless services for bidding one
year later with the first cellular
call from a competitive company
to be made on the second
anniversary of the privatization.
A team of professionals head-
ed by KPMG Corporate
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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008, PAUL :;








PAGE 4, MONDAY DECEMBER 1, 208 THE TRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398


Nassau becoming a shanty town


AFTER LUNCH yesterday we decided to
take a UK journalist- here on a weekend
visit to Nassau on a quick tour of the
downtown area. The drive was to take in
Shirley Street as far as Fort Charlotte, return-
ing up Bay Street and across Paradise Island
bridge and back to his hotel.
It was a windy, muggy day a day that
did not show off Nassau at its best. It was a
day that seemed in tune with the depressed
state of our town. However, just out from
the freezing temperatures of London, our
guest was happy to be here enjoying a few
days of warmer weather.
As we crossed the bridge, looking west to
a port that usually accommodates four to
five large cruise ships, a lone liner was at
dockside. It was obvious, in the words of
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham at his con-
ference with the press yesterday, that "our
economy is contracting."
"Weaknesses have become more
entrenched in tourism," he told journalists,
"visitor arrivals declined by a larger per-
centage in the year-to-date estimates as com-
pared to the same period last year."
As soon as we turned from Mackey Street
for the drive up Shirley Street we knew that
a short tour of the city of Nassau was a .big
mistake. We had not gone very far when
our guest asked: "Do the people here have
any civic pride?"
How does one answer such a question?
The obvious answer is: "Obviously not." But
is it only a lack of civic pride, or is it a lack of
pride coupled with a sense of hopelessness?
Many Bahamians have ceased trying to main-
tain their properties because no matter how
hard they try they can't keep pace with reck-
less drivers who knock down their walls, or
the graffiti artists who deface their newly
painted walls with their ugly doodles; or the
thieves who break into their homes, or the.
ever growing community of litterbugs?
It has been years since we have driven up
to Fort Charlotte.
Those were the days when one could drive
around the main fort, take photographs of vis-
itors posing next to the ancient cannon with
New Providence's western shore as a back-
drop. No more.
We were never so embarrassed as when
we were faced with a shanty town. Here were
shoddily constructed wooden stalls, badly in
need of a coat of paint, squeezed side by side
and blocking the harbour view.
The fort was cordoned off from all traffic,
so the drive around the fort was no longer
possible.


Much has been written about straw ven-
dors displaying their wares for tourists at this
site, but surely there must be some building
regulations to maintain high standards, espe-
cially in tourist areas.
We appreciate that vendors also have to
make a living, but surely they cannot be
allowed to knock together a couple of two by
fours to erect these hideous lean-to struc-
tures. If the Fort is to be turned into a market
area, then government should provide an
architect and landscape designer to create
an attractive scene for these vendors. And
health regulations should be strictly enforced.
Anyone who wants to build on this island,
has to first get planning permission, and then
submit his architectural drawings to the Min-
istry of Works' town planners for approval
before construction can start. During con-
struction, Works inspectors visit the site to
make certain required standards are met.
Yet these eyesores are allowed to grow,
unsupervised, throughout the island, con-
tributing to the dirty shanty-town look that is
quickly replacing a once elegant main street.
We apologised to our guest, and made a
mental note that never again would we take
anyone near Fort Charlotte. This fort, once a
scene of a well presented. Son et Limidre
enactment of a period of Bahamian history,
has great tourist potential for anyone with a
little bit of imagination. Of course, nothing
will succeed unless the criminal element can
be kept away from the area.
The drive dgwn Bay Street did nothing
to impress our visitor. It was just more of
the same run down. dirty look.
Although attractive plans to revitalise and
beautify Bay Street have been completed,
the serious downturn in the economy will
obviously delay those plans.
Prime Minister Ingraham told the press
that the promised removal of the trailer con-
tainers from the Bay Street waterfront, as a
first stage for the revitalisation of downtown,
was not a "do-able proposition" for this year.
However, he said, government was in an
advanced stage of discussions with the private
sector and agreement was expected shortly to
present plans for a new Bay Street.
In the meantime, said the Prime Minis-
ter, government is undertaking a number of
infrastructural development plans to "help
stimulate the economy at this time."
However, this will be the last time that
we volunteer to show visitors downtown Nas-
sau. We shall now stick to the resort areas.
At present we have no town in which to
entertain guests.


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EDITOR, The Tribune.
I just had to write this mom-
ing after again listening to
foolish partisan politics this
morning during the news on
one of the radio stations.
One time ago I enjoyed lis-
tening to news on this partic-
ular Bahamian radio station,
because I thought that it was
fair and balanced, but since
the departure of the former
news director the news at this
station leaves much to be
desired.
This morning a Bahamian
attorney was interviewed, no
not interviewed, he was
allowed to give his position on
what happened on Paradise
Island last week.
As I listened, I groaned
within.
I groaned because, he ran
on with foolishness as to why
the action should not have
been done the way it was
done, he continued in his
rhetoric asking where is the
hotel union president, he fur-
ther stated that when Prime
Minister Ingraham gave his
address last week, he should
have advised the country that
these workers were going
Shqme; were there foreign
workers sent home and on
and on and on, his final ques-
tion was'to the legality of the
exercise.
Throughout this presenta-
tion, there was no interjection
from the other side of the
microphone with regard to
world events that could have
factored into the painful deci-
sion that had to be made by
the management of the resort.
This same station then
allowed another statement
from a "member of a parlia-
ment-wanna-be" who leads a
political party and who has
never won his own con-
stituency seat.
To me this individual has
substance once in a while, but
this morning was not one of
those times in my opinion.
I sometimes wonder
whether these persons listen


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or research what is going on in
the world.
Whether you agreed with
the Senior Manager or not
when he gave his response to
the action that was taken last
week as he was interviewed
by a top journalist this past
Monday your thoughts
might have been good, inter-
esting.
What company once they
have laid you off provide assis-
tance with regard to resume
preparation and job interview
instructions?
*Former employees take
advantage of these opportu-
nities.
It is sad what is going on in
the country with regards to
lay-offs, unfortunately global-
ly we are facing a recession,
and some countries, surpris-
ingly Japan is one of them, are
already in recession.
At this time persons who
have been laid off and have
received packages should use
what they have been -given
financially wisely, they should
be encouraged to know that
this is not the end of the
world.
I believe that in every dis-
appointment there is an
appointment.
For some persons you might
have always wanted to do
something else, but you welc
afraid to move in another
direction, because you were
so dependent on that particu-
lar position you had.
Five years ago I was laid off
from a job that I thought I
would have retired from.
For me my department was
advised some six months
before it happened that we
might have to close our
department.
When it happened, my for-
mer employer and I shook
hands, and I was on my way
with over 30K in my hands. I
started my own business.
Not every day is a good day,
not every month is a good
month, but I have been able to


sustain it for five years and I
am proud.
My former employer and I
have a good relationship and
that company supports my
company. I have seen this
same model come out of what
happened at BTC years ago.
Former employers formed
companies and are to this day
still supported by the mother
company.
As Bahamians we have to
be more global in our thinking
and our outlook on life.
How about going to another
country and working.
I have a good friend who
has lived overseas in prior
years along with his family.
They decided to take the
opportunity of his layoff to
return to that European coun-
try.
He has already received two
job offers one from his for-
mer employer.
Good for the Bahamas we
have excellent regulations in
place when it comes to our
financial services and I believe
that we will be okay as a peo-
ple. .
Bahamians let's help to
feed, clothe and generally
assist each other genuinely as
a people we have done it
before and we will do it again.
We need to stop this con-
tinual partisan hostility in The
Bahamas, it gets us nowhere
and stifles our progress.
Reporters and journalists
alike need to bring more infor-
mation to the Bahamian peo-
ple when they are reporting
and give us fair and balanced
reporting.
As a nation we have grown
up and no longer desire milk,
but we are looking for meat
on the platter of information
you are serving us, or we will
switch stations from local to
regional .or nationally and
internationally if we have to.


DL SMITH
Nassau,
November 19, 2008.


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invites you to celebrate the




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featuring
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Organist Kendrick Coleby
Government High School
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Secured Parking enter from Frederck Street, opposite Church


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008









LOCALNW


MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


Reucin! 'Strong police presence'
new cases


of HIV/AIDS

in Bahamas

* By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
ACCORDING to world
reports, the HIV and AIDS
epidemic since first being
diagnosed in the early 1980s
has caused nearly 25 million
deaths worldwide, and today
affects more than 33 million
living carriers who continue
to hope for a cure.
In the Bahamas, the HIV
and AIDS centre estimates
that around 7,405 Bahami-
ans are living with HIV or
AIDS. However, officials
said there had been a reduc-
tion in new cases mostly
attributed to efforts made by
young persons.
Minister for Health
Hubert Minnis told The Tri-
bune during a recent inter-
view that, considering an
almost 50 per cent decline in
new AIDS cases over the
past five years, young peo-
ple remain the most effec-
tive group in reducing new
cases.
With the most recent ini-
tiative being the College of
The Bahamas free annual
AIDS initiative, which test-
ed more than 300 students,
the minister explained that
through similar efforts, stig-
ma toward the disease had
been significantly reduced.
Mr Minnis noted that in
the past, where many were
ostracised based on their
health status, education and
various campaigns had
proven successful in cement-
ing healthy sexual practices
among the group.
Though there is much
work to be done in preven-
tion and health-care, the
minister claimed that within
the next five years, it is
expected that half as many
new cases will be reported,
leading to a further decline
in the HIV/AIDS epidemic.
With close to 4,000 report-
ed deaths in the Bahamas
resulting from AIDS related
symptoms, the minister says
there are numerous reasons
for new cases ranging from
misconceptions, risque sexu-
al practices, and the pre-
sumption by many who say:
"It'll never happen to me."
Dr Minnis concluded that
these unfortunate decisions
make the work of advocates,
educators, and leaders that
much more important in
sending the right messages.
Throughout this week,
The Tribune will run a series
of articles looking into the
social impact of AIDS on
the local front, and will also
reveal the changed lives of
several individuals who have
been diagnosed with the dis-
eases. Additionally, we will
examine barriers to
HIV/AIDS prevention in
various community sectors,
including the prison,
schools, churches and within
many homes.


for the festive season


beliefs," said Mr Turnquest.
, He confirmed that there will be
"a very, very strong"' police pres-
ence on the streets during the year-
end festive season.
"You are going to notice a num-
ber of strategies taking place at the
same time," he said. "And you are
going to notice an increased number
of toad checks.

Dividends
"We are finding that the police, in
terms of its intelligence-led polic-
ing, are paying excellent dividends."
Although an 11-year-old brought
a gun to school recently, there will
be no police stationed at schools, he
said.
"To have an 11-year-old exposed
to an 11-millimetre firearm is a very
serious thing in our society," Mr
Turnquest observed.
But it "would not help" to have


POLICE are having "great suc-
cess" in apprehending people with
illegal firearms, National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest has con-
firmed.
"But there still remains far too
many firearms," he added, "so the
police will continue with its strategy
to confiscate them.
"We are not going to stop until
we return the Bahamas to the safe,
peaceful place that we know it ought
to be."
Mr Turnquest was outlining to
plans for the government's 'Good
ole days of Christmas' celebrations.
It begins 7pm on Tuesday with
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
lighting the Christmas tree in Raw-
son Square in downtown Nassau.
Similar events are planned for
Grand Bahama, Abaco, Eleuthera,
Exuma, Andros and Long Island.
"We hope that the celebrations
will give Bahamians a sense of pride
in our Bahamian traditions and


police stationed on campuses, he
said.
"Campuses must be run by edu-
cators," said Mr Turnquest. "We are
not a police state.
"What we must be able to do is,
when an educator calls for police
assistance, then that must be readi-
ly available and readily provided.
"But to have officers just sta-
tioned on an educational campus,
in the view of the government, is
that we are creating the wrong envi-
ronment, sending the wrong mes-
sage to our students."
Through the 'Good ole days of
Christmas' celebrations, Mr Turn-
quest said, the government is
encouraging Bahamians to
"embrace the true spirit of Christ-
mas."
"We want our Christmas cele-
bration to be meaningful, inspiring
and uplifting, and representative of
the Bahamas' standing as a Christian
nation," said Mr Turnquest.


Public defender programme suggested to



ease Her Majesty's Prison overcrowding


* By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
THE government should
seriously consider implement-
ing a public defender pro-
gramme for those who can't
afford an attorney as part of
an effort to lessen prison over-
crowding, Senator Frederick
McAlpine said.
During a debate on two new
crime bills the Human Traf-
ficking and Suppression Bill
and an Amendment to the
Penal Code..which would
include electronic monitoring -
the senator argued that many
persons are incarcerated and
forced to await trial in prison
simply because they cannot
afford legal representation.
Citing incarceration statis-
tics at Her Majesty's Prison in
Fox Hill, Senator McAlpine
said not all of those detained
are guilty and some are sim-
ply behind bars for minor
offences because of their finan-
cial circumstances.
"What is perturbing to me
about the figures of those
incarcerated, of the 1,370 per-
sons (jailed), 1,324 of them are
males. I am not naive
enough...to believe that all
those persons in Fox Hill are
guilty of what they may have
been accused of.
"A number of persons
imprisoned at HMP's criminal


centre have been charged with
minor offences. Some are
there because they could not
afford a lawyer; others could
not pay the bail. Some are not
guilty, but are guilty of being in
the wrong place and with the
wrong person," he said.
While noting the benefits of
electronic monitoring to lessen
overcrowding and keep those
charged with minor offences
out of prison, Mr McAlpine
said the government should
look at a legal aid system as
well.
"I am hoping that govern-
ment would also take into
account as we talk about plea
bargaining and electronic mon-
itoring, maybe the time has
really come for us to really
think about public defence
(for) people who can't afford a
lawyer.
"Lawyers are graduating:
maybe a part of their national
service should be to give so


many years to public defence,
particularly those who decide
to (focus) on criminal law.
On Wednesday, after a day-
long debate, the Senate passed
six pieces of crime legislation
including: The Trafficking in
' Human Persons and Suppres-
sion Act; An Act to Amend
the Sexual Offences and
Domestic Violence Act and
for Incidental Matters; an Act
to Provide for the Establish-
ment of a System of Plea Dis-
cussions; An Act to Amend
the Mental Health Act; An
Act to Amend the Penal Code;
and An Act to Amend the
Criminal Procedure Code.


"I am not naive
enough...to
believe that all
those persons in
Fox Hill are
guilty of what
they may have
been accused of."

Senator Frederick
McAlpine


- Ph: 325-3336


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BEC inspects clean




up at Clifton Pier
'4^- ,* .' a.<..


A CLEAN-UP assessment
has been made of Clifton Pier
power plant with the focus on
its environmental sustainabili-
ty and safety.
BEC board members and
managers, accompanied by
Minister of State for the Envi-
ronment Phenton Neymour,
toured the plant on Thursday.
Frederik Gottlieb, chairman
of the BEC board, said the
assessment aimed to focus
attention on BEC's current
plans and analyse what was
already achieved.
He said: "We want to make
the public aware that every
effort is being made to make
Clifton Pier environmentally


sound and acceptable.
"Since the last time we were
here, several months ago, there
has been tremendous improve-
ment not only environmentally,
but also with the morale of the
staff here."

Conditions
He noted that consistent
assessments of conditions at
the plant will help avoid future
ecological and environmental
disasters.
"From what I'm seeing here
today, tremendous improve-
ments have been made, but we
still have a way to go, and we
are continuing with those


efforts," said Mr Gottlieb.
He also said the physical
look of the power station had
been revamped.
"Compared to last year, I
am impressed because now
things look more orderly, the
buildings have been given a
facelift, and all of this helps to
bring Clifton Pier up to the lev-
el and standard that it should
be."
Extending gratitude to James
Gilbert, Clifton Pier power
plant manager, and his team,
he said: "The clean-up initia-
tive has helped to increase the
morale of those working here.
They now feel like there is an
interest by the board and man-
agement to improve their
working conditions."
During the walkabout, Kevin
Basden, BEC general manager,
also commended Clifton Pier's
staff for the revitalisation
process to date.
He explained that remedia-
'tion efforts at the station
included installation of new
components, repair and main-
tenance of equipment designed
to minimise adverse conditions,
general housekeeping, and the
training of staff overall.
According to Basden: "What
we have seen is a total
improvement in the mindsets
of the staff. They now have a
willingness to do things better,
and to do things right. If one.
was to consider where we are
now, we are much further
ahead."
Mr Neymour said that to
date more than $2.5 million
had been spent on the Clifton
Pier clean-up. "We have pur-
chased a new boiler, an invest-
I l.lNiL; -"
F rtilizF ungicide,


ment which will be used to help
with the efficiency of the pro-
duction of energy at the Clifton
Pier site."
Mr Neymour emphasised the
government's commitment to
ensuring the environmental
safety of the Bahamian people:

Efficiency
"A year ago I indicated that
this government was concen-
trating on efficiency, safety,
health and environment, so the


clean-up at Clifton Pier has
been an ongoing process that
began in May of last year."
Recognising that part of the
operations at BEC depended
heavily on its protection of the
environment and maintaining
its operational procedures, Mr
Neymour noted: "It is impor-
tant that we demonstrate to the
Bahamian people that we are
serious about cleaning up oil
spills and incidents in the
Bahamas, and also demon-
strate to BEC and its staff how


costly it is to clean up incidents
that may have occurred."
Comparing the site from last
year, Mr Neymour said the
facility is now more pleasant
to the eye, and the visual
inspection demonstrated
BEC's commitment to clean-
ing up the area.


TEACHERS REAL ESTATE HOLDINGS LIMITED
NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING TO SHAREHOLDERS
TIME & DATE: Friday December 5, 2008 at 6:00 p.m.


ITEMS OF
BUSINESS:


NOTICE


Attention all BatelNet subscribers. BTC has


been made


aware


of -an


e-mail scam


directed to our BatelNet subscribers. There is
an email being circulated with the subject
"Verify and Update your batelnet.bs email".


The email
name, us


asks customers to provide their


er name


and password,


and


threatens to suspend service if you do not
comply. BTC strongly advises its customers
not to open or respond to this email, as you
may be at risk for identity theft. If you have


responded


to this


please


RECORD
DATE:

FINANCIAL
STATEMENTS:


MAILING
DATE:

PROXY
VOTING:


change


your password, and call our BatelNet Help


Desk at 225-5282 as soon


thanks
matter.


as possible. BTC


you for your cooperation


with this


October 9, 2008


Teachers & Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit Union Head Office
East Street & Independence Drive.

(1) To announce the results of the examination of proxies; declare a
quorum present and proceed to business;

(2) To receive and approve the Minutes. of the last Annual General
Meeting held on December 7, 2007.

(3) To receive and consider the Chairman's report;'

(4) To receive and approve the financial statements and the reports
of the Directors and Auditors thereon;

(5) To elect Directors for the ensuing year and fix their remuneration;

(6) To approve the appointment of Deloitte & Touche as the Auditor
of the Company, and authorise the Directors to fix their
remuneration; and

(7) To transact such other business as may properly come before the
meeting ant any adjournment thereof.

Holders of 400,000 shares of record at the close of business on
October 22, 2008 are entitled to vote at the meeting.

The Company's audited financial statements are included in the
Company's 2007 annual report, which is enclosed as part of the
proxy soliciting material,

The Company will cause the accompanying materials to be delivered
on November 6, 2008 to the last registered address,

It is important that your shares be represented and voted at the
meeting. You can vote your shares by appearing in person or by
completing and returning the proxy form enclosed. You can revoke a
proxy at any time prior to its exercise at the meeting by following the
instructions in the accompanying proxy statement.

By order of the Board of Directors:


Mrs, Cheryl Bowe-Moss
Secretary


www.btcbahamas.com I CALL BTC 225-5282


SHAREHOLDERS ARE INVITED TO VISIT THE WEBPAGE AT
Wl11 TSWCCUL.COM FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION (PROXY FORM
AND PROXY STATEMENT)


N V."NN "NtN N".\\\\.k


-Quote

of the

Betty Taylor week-
Journalist I Entrepreneur


your survivaC and
sustainability depends on
your solution to your present
situation.
Seek to be innovative!!!



mypersonalquote@live.com


YOUR CONNECTION 0 THE WORLD


PU BL


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e-mail,


I 'I


PLACE:


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008








MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


Intellectual property


rights and the Bahamas


* By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

W ITH continuing
lay-offs and an
economy that's now in the
doldrums, this Yuletide sea-
son is likely to feature a spike
in crime, the. occurrence of
fraudulent activities and an
increase in the sale of coun-
terfeit items.
Having this in mind, it is
rather perplexing how, in the
face of widespread breaches
of intellectual property rights,
the Bahamas has not been
sanctioned and is no longer
included on the Special 301
list for its blatant abuse of
international copyright laws
- particularly since it has had
a constant presence there for
the past six years and has done
very little to combat the vio-
lation of intellectual property
rights.
The straw market once
thought of as being represen-
tative of genuine Bahamian
culture and lifestyle is now
an infamous depot for fake
designer goods, ranging from
Prada to Gucci to Fendi to
Louis Vuitton and much
more. Paris might be the fash-
ion capital of the world, but
downtown Bay Street (mar-
ket) is a knock-off mecca
around these parts. From
stealing satellite/television sig-
nals to the open sale and ped-
dling of pirated CDs/DVDs at
eateries, food stores, sidewalks
and out of car trunks, the
Bahamas is comparable to
China (per capital) in terms of
its disregard for intellectual
property rights..
While Desmond Bannister,
the present Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture and for-
mer Minister of Legal Affairs,
celebrated the removal of the
Bahamas from the Special 301
list in his 2008/2009 budget
contribution, I am curious as
to what efforts the country's
intellectual property depart-
ment is undertaking, especial-
ly since there doesn't appear
to be a concerted effort to rec-
tify'this most prevalent, almost
ubiquitous violation of the
law.
Furthermore, the minister
also indicated in his commu-
nication that the budget would
make provisions for the prop-
er staffing of that department,


so as to populate its database.
Has this department been
properly staffed and outfitted
with the means and necessary
equipment to confront the
theft and violation of intellec-
tual property?


What happened to
Desmond Bannister's much
promised draft legislation.
which was supposedly dis-
seminated to industry partners
for consideration? Where is
the legislation that Mr Ban-
nister promised would "pro-
vide for the introduction of
the lucrative concept of reg-
istering service marks" and
"pave the way for future inter-
nationally compliant intellec-
tual property legislation?"
It is' imperative that the
Bahamas assess and revise
present copyright legislation
relative to that of countries
around the world, particularly
those that adhere to pacts gov-
erning intellectual property.
Whether it's through the pas-
sage of legislation or via train-
ing and prosecution, we must
ensure that international copy-
right/intellectual property
laws/agreements are upheld
and that we also employ a
strict copyright registration
system.
At present, I'm curious as
to what efforts to combat


Hurricane season is

officially at an end
* MIAMI
YESTERDAY market the final official day of the 2008 Atlantic
hurricane season, according to Associated Press.
This year's season saw 16 named storms, eight of which were hurri-
canes. Five of those hurricanes reached Category 3 strength or higher.
State officials say the most devastating storm was Tropical Storm Fay,
which resulted in 15 deaths, just in Florida. The storm caused 41 coun-
ties to be declared federal disaster areas.
Four systems Fay, Gustav, Hanna and Ike threatened Florida
within a single month. The State Emergency Operations Center in Tal-
lahassee was activated for 27 days to support response and recovery
operations.
Now that hurricane season is over, state emergency managers are
warning residents that cooler and drier temperatures increase drought.
and fire conditions in Florida.


intellectual property theft
could have possibly warranted
the Bahamas being removed
from the Special 301 list, espe-
cially when intellectual prop-
erty rights are being infringed
upon on every street corner.


THE HOTELS AND THE
DRASTIC ECONOMIC
DOWNTURN
T his week, I decided
to feature a piece by
Ivoine Ingraham, a busi-
nessman and social activist
who describes himself as "al
advocate for the small man,
an advocate for the man
who is afraid or unable to
speak for himself."
Mr Ingraham, a good
friend and social commen-
tator, submitted this piece
yesterday while expressing
to me that he generally has a
"serious problem when it
appears that Bahamians are
being taken advantage of."
Mr Ingraham's comments
with reference to the recent
lav-ofls andl his colourful
views entitled 'the hotels
are usin-, a big stick with
stinging ants to shaft us' -
are seen below.
Ivoine Ingraham writes:
The unconscionable
dumping of hardworking
Bahamians was inhumane to
say the least.
The economic downturn
and the threat of a depres-
sion was the perfect excuse
for certain hotel giants to
use this great opportunity to
gel rid of employees, many
of whom gave invaluable
service.
The real story is that the
recession that has been
mentioned in the United
States came about as a result
of the collapse of the giants
A1G and Lehman Broth-
ers. Wall Street panicked
and caused the United
States to bail out the giants
with a $700 billion pack-


A DR. A N GIB S.


are certainly not as ignorant
as investors think we
are.
The million dollar ques-
tion is: "Will the fired
employees be replaced with
foreigners?" These and oth-
er questions must be
answered by the inhumane
people at the major hotel
groups.
The things that we sacri-
fice to encourage these con-
glomerates to invest in our
country should be revisited.
We owe them nothing, in
fact they owe us.
We expose ourselves too
much to these people who
see us negotiating from a
position of weakness and we
are given the shaft, with
stinging ants on it. In fact,
they drive it all the way
home with a smile on their
collective faces. I believe
that they call their friends
and brag to them about their
good fortune.
This Bahamas has been
too accommodating for far
too long. We must begin to
seriously plan for the
Bahamas to benefit Bahami-
ans first. We have seen too
many incidences of investors
who "use" us then discard


us like an old wash
rag. They get what they
want, bring in who they
want, allow them to stay as
long as they wish and never
leave.
Too many construction
companies are now operat-
ing because companies came
in to do a job, get a Bahami-
an to front for them and to
open their company and
start their business, only to
later discard the Bahamian.
And the rest is history!
Aren't we tired of being
used?
Shouldn't Bahamians get
the message that in a short
time we would be second-
class citizens in our own
country especially if we do
not change the way we do
things. What would it take
for us to qualify ourselves,
combine our efforts and
conduct business as busi-
ness?
When would our work
ethics change to not settling
for mediocrity?
When would respect for
each other return? Then and
only then would we really
benefit from what foreign-
ers have been benefiting
from all along!


age. The American taxpayer
will foot the bill for decades
to come.
Freddie Mac and Fannie
Mae followed suit by using
the same scare tactics to
force Uncle Sam to come to
their aid or face foreclosure
on millions of homes.
Of course, this would raise
the eyebrows of many, espe-
cially since thousands have
already experienced fore-
closure on their homes.
Recently "the big three"
automobile giants Ford,
GM and Chevrolet have
also been jockeying to get
theirs.
With this as the backdrop
some "big time" hotels in
the Bahamas, even though
they were enjoying high
occupancy rates, decided to
throw.hardworking Bahami-
ans out on to the street with-
out any conscience whatso-
ever.
They unceremoniously -
without notice turned the
lives of its staff upside down
which, in some cases, may
eternally have devastating
effect.
The "last in first out" pol-
icy did not matter in these
cases.
People were selected at
random and longevity did
not matter.
Performance did not mat-
ter and certainly loyalty did
not matter. The only thing
that mattered was the bot-
tom line.
The cold and callous way
in which the firing was done
speaks volumes.
This was a great oppor-
tunity to "purge" the staff
and bring heavy pressure on
the remaining staff to go the
extra hundred miles for the
same pay or risk being faced
with lay-offs or firing.
After some telephone
calls and undercover work, I
have discovered that no
expatriate was fired. NONE!
The pronouncements that
some expatriates were sent
home is hogwash.
If it is said that they were,
it was only because they
wanted to pretend that they
were even-handed. I chal-
lenge all concerned to pro-
duce proof that the same
percentage of expatriates
were indeed fired. But we
know better and Bahamians


I- >~:-~ ~


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or have won an award.
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PAGE MODAY, ECEMER 1,2008THE TIBUN


0 Prince Charles Drive IC



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Holiday T Javel Iieals-sall s!

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Newark (NJ) $331.80


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Minivan
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OPEN FROM 9A.M. 6P.M.


I


TONYA Bastian Galanis,
who was appointed principal
of the Eugene Dupuch Law
School on August 1,-2008,
paid a courtesy call on Col-
lege of the Bahamas president
Janyne Hodder on Thursday,
November 27.
Students who have com-
pleted the University of the
West Indies LLB degree at
COB gain automatic entry
into the Eugene Dupuch Law
School where they study for
their certificates before being
called to the Bahamas Bar.
Mrs Galanis was called to
the Bahamas Bar in 1985 and
began her legal career in the
Office of the Attorney Gen-
eral where she practiced for
more than 12 years. When the
Eugene Dupuch Law School
opened in 1998, Mrs Galanis
was among the first full-time
tutors and she has been there
for the last ten years.
A graduate of St John's Col-
lege and COB, she obtained a
Bachelor of Laws degree
(Hons) from the University of
the West Indies in 1980. She
then attended the Norman
Manley Law School in
Jamaica and was awarded the
Certificate in Legal Education
from the Council of Legal
Education and also earned
post-graduate diplomas in leg-
islative drafting from the Roy-
al Institute of Public Admin-
istration in London, England,
and the University of Ottawa,
Ontario, Canada, in 1993.
More recently, during a year-
long sabbatical, Mrs Galanis
pursued further studies at the
University of the West Indies
leading to a Master of Laws
degree in corporate commer-
cial law.
Mrs Galanis is a member of
the Bahamas Bar Association
and is also involved in numer-
ous civic organizations, includ-


a >M "iM i

1 ,nW


ing the Zonta Club of Nassau,
where she served as president
from 2004 to 2006. She has
also served on the Bahamas
National Revenue Task Force,
the Financial Advisory Ser-


vices Board, the CARICOM ried to former Senator and
Intergovernmental Task Force managing partner of HLB
and the Securities Commis- Galanis Bain Chartered
sion of the Bahamas. Accountants, Philip Galanis.
A member of Holy Trinity The couple has one daughter,
Anglican Church, she is mar- Zoe.


CECELIA


ANNE


GRANT
March 29th, 1930 -November 29th, 2007


One year Mom my
I'IIlrds can not e6re5ss thiL pain, thiL love, that Z'e possess
S se Smil, e cry through out the days as we work. and as we ptay
But no one really knows, those thil]ys we cannot say,'I
Like the hungeror your toucfi and missinq you so mucdi.
Lile missing af our talls and shoppitj in the store. '.
Tle long to see your face, to feel your warm embrace
To see your beau tifilfsmile, if only for a'file.
1 'le ktow uwe u.ifflbe tegetqier aqain in I'heav'en, ufiire you went,
untiltthen we zifflive the life /ou uwish for us of peace and Love
andli happiness and most of al a ife ntf 'i God.
'Tianfyou mommy, there is no other, l//(' a mother.
'We love you mommy and miss you, uit/i all our hearts evenrdaqi
andalways
a.... ,y Ch/il en,. I ii mu a. ia ulh ai t Kaih le, Ka'I K .4Autiin
/III. Robi it and Jo: vii. aiulhdren; .wi er,. Stella
'^. Nichollh. .lainily andl l'l icnt .


Forever in our hearts
Absent from the body and
present with the Lord.
To God Be The Glory
Thank You .Jesus,
Thank You .esus,
Thank You Jesus!


~, ~


A FEW of the workers
seen here getting
together for a photo.


Harbour Bay


eve


Is cutting the store in half


One

HALF IS
$5.oo

$1 0.oo
$1 5.oo



$20.oo


THE OTHER HALF IS


30/o Off

All Clothing


Eugene Dupuch Law School


principal pays a courtesy


call on president of COB


--


al


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008


I
It


AL


'





* L.'L..'~.JL...IViLJL... I, ~ I a l'..A~


Venezuela in the OECS? r


* By SIR RONALD
SANDERS
(The writer is a business
consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat)

T HE member-coun-
tries of the Organi-
sation of Eastern Caribbean
States (OECS) must feel like
a confused young girl unsure
of who to choose between
her suitors as both Trinidad
and Tobago and Venezuela
make applications to join
them in a kind of matrimony.
Earlier this year Trinidad
and Tobago's Prime Minis-
ter Patrick Manning pro-
posed the creation of a polit-
ical union between his oil-
rich nation and the seven
island-states that comprise
the OECS. The proposal was
later amended to a different
proposition one in which
Trinidad and Tobago would
become a member of the
OECS in 2013 after the exist-
ing member states completed
the creation of an Economic
Union by 2009.
It has now emerged that
the government of President
Hugo Chavez has proposed
that Venezuela should join
the OECS. The only inkling
that the public has of
Venezuela's request and the
OECS' response is a state-
ment attributed to the OECS
Director-General Dr Len
Ishmael that the matter was
discussed at a meeting of the
OECS heads of government
in Montserrat in late Novem-
ber and Venezuela's request
was being considered.
The only logical benefit
for Venezuela of OECS
membership is the consider-
able influence that the
Chavez government would
exert on these small coun-
tries.
And, it is understandable
why the OECS countries
have not as deftly as possi-
ble declined President
Chavez's request. Many of
them have become recipients


WR V

WOL- -W -r -S -- g

WORLD VIE. --


of Venezuelan credit for a
portion of oil they purchase
under an agreement entitled
Petro Caribe. None of the
recipients would want to
endanger the deferred pay-
ment scheme they now enjoy,
although they should all
realise that their debt is
mounting
Some of the members of

"The Chavez
government had
planned a budget
for 2009 based
on oil prices
averaging $60 a
barreL With the
price dropping to
$53 a barrel, there
is a huge hole in
his domestic
spending
ambitions and an
even bigger one in
his promises to
other countries."

the OECS have also enjoyed
other gifts from Chavez's
government. Just how much
both the oil credits and other
loans to the OECS countries
have totalled is a mystery,
since while the promises,
adding up to billions of dol-
lars, are announced with
much fanfare practically
nothing is said about the
actual delivery.
It has become clear, how-
ever, that with oil prices now
lingering at $53 a barrel,


Chavez's capacity for largesse
is considerably reduced from
the heady days of $147 a bar-
rel. He had said that
Venezuela was immune from
the current global financial
crisis a boast that turned
out to be empty. PDVSA, the
Venezuelan state-owned oil
company, on which Chavez
relies for the monies he has
waved around at less well-off
governments, failed to get a
$4 'billion loan two months
ago, and its revenues have
dropped significantly as the
price of oil plunged.

The Chavez govern-
ment had planned a
budget for 2009 based on oil
prices averaging $60 a bar-
rel. With the price dropping
to $53 a barrel, there is a
huge hole in his domestic
spending ambitions and an
even bigger one in his
promises to other countries.
Two further worries for
Chavez is that although the
government claims to pro-
duce 3.24 million barrels of
oil a day, the oil-cartel,
OPEC, reports that it pro-
duces no more than 2.33 mil-
lion barrels a day, and while
the Chavez government is
urging OPEC to cut produc-
tion to force the price of oil
up to $100 a barrel, this is
unlikely to happen in the pre-
sent global financial melt-
down.
In any event, the govern-
ments of OECS countries
would want to be very careful
about Venezuela joining their
organisation. The OECS is a
natural alliance born out of a
common history, common
culture, common language,
common laws and traditions
and shared problems. While


* SIR Ronald Sanders


a relationship with Venezuela
should be cultivated, the
small OECS countries ought
to do so collectively and in
areas of mutual benefit.
There is no need for
Venezuela to join the OECS.
Account should also be
taken of the fact that
Venezuela's GDP is $334.3
billion whereas the combined
GDP of the six independent
countries of the OECS is a
mere $7 billion. This is a very
large shark and some very
small sardines.
And, one has to ask the
question: If the government
of Venezuela is so keen to
forge stronger ties with
Caribbean countries, why not
seek to do it with the wider
Caribbean Community and
Common market (CARI-


COM) whose members
include not only the OECS,
but also the Bahamas, Bar-
bados, Belize, Guyana,
Jamaica, Suriname and
Trinidad and Tobago?
It will be recalled that
after careful study, the West
Indian Commission, estab-
lished by Caribbean Heads
of Government to chart the
course for the region's future
made the following two
points that remain valid:
"On the economic side,
we have to feel our way in
enlarging the CARICOM
market so that we make
progress in that direction
without being overwhelmed
by new members and end up
being lost within our own
widened community; and
CARICOM should
remain the inner core of our
relationship in the region,
and we should consciously
create space beyond mem-
bership of CARICOM for
development of CARI-
COM's integrationist rela-
tionships."
In the case of the Manning
government's proposal, the
OECS countries and
Trinidad and Tobago enjoy
an historical relationship
based on culture, language,
laws, administration, univer-
sity education and that all
important glue Cricket. As
members of CARICOM,
they already enjoy a close
relationship, and there are
several inter-governmental


ladai

bodies and areas of functionq-
al cooperation that woul I
make Trinidad and Tobago'
membership of the OECd
feasible.

O0 f course, account
would have to be
taken of the fact that the
economy of Trinidad ank
Tobago, at about $26.9 bitl
lion, is almost four times lar-
er than the six independent
OECS countries combine,
and critical matters such^
freedom of movement of
the factors o.f production
especially labour, would have
to be settled well in advance
of any deeper integration. :
The world economic cirit
cumstances including the losd
of preferential markets tot
their primary exports
increased costs of impo4tsi
and the downturn in touriinj
have highlighted the limited
capacity of the OECS co ni
tries to cope and alliances
with "god fathers" must seen
tempting. But, it has to b4
said that the better prospect
for the OECS and CARI.
COM as a whole. is to com,
plete the Caribbean Singli
Market and Economy andLtdt
put in place a structured alnd
empowered system of govrr,
nance.


Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com:


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PAGE 10, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL6NEWS


Phasing out, phasing in

YOU'VE been listening and secure loans that were down- plans? Either way, banks and
reading reports in the media for right inappropriate for them, lenders are beginning to for-
some time about increasing and now we're experiencing the mulate loans more carefully,
numbers of mortgage defaults fallout, which can affect both buyers
and the sub-prime fiasco. A If you're planning to sell or and sellers in the real estate
frenzy of financing in the last buy a home in the near future, market.
few years (particularly in the what effect might the number Buyers can certainly expect
US) allowed many buyers to of foreclosures have on your a tightening of credit. It'vill be


IA -


LI Tp w


1. TWYNAM HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 117
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Family Residence, 3 Bed / 21/2 Baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Heading west along
Prince Charles Drive from Fox Hill
Road, take the corner east of Super
Value Food Store. Heading south,
take the second corner on the left,
continue around the curve then take
the third corner on the left. Traveling
north, the property is the 10th lot on
the left or first property after passing
Tote Avenue.
APPRAISED VALUE: $302,000

2. SOUTH BEACH ESTATES
SUBDIVISION
LOT.NO. 1 Block 22
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Split
Level Residential Building with 3
Apts.
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,600 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel south of Bamboo
Boulevard off East Street South then
turn through the first corner right
onto Bougainvillea Blvd. Heading
west on Bougainvillea Blvd. take the
second corner right onto Madeira
Avenue. At the T-junction, turn left
onto Oxford Drive. Property is the
third house right, on the corner of
Serville Drive and Oxford Avenue.
APPRAISED VALUE: $297,000

3. BEL-AIR ESTATES CARMICHAEL
ROAD
LOT NO. 259
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 3 Bed / 21/2 Baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.,
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Carmichael Road from Faith Avenue
take the 4th corner on the right
(Turtle Drive) property is 4th house
on right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

4. GOLDEN GATES ESTATES II
LOT NO. 1372
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 4 Bed / 21/2 Baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: At junction of
Carmichael Road and Cedar Way
(corner opposite BFM) travel south
to the t-junction, turn right onto
Golden Gates Straight, then take the
first corner right onto Comet Terrace.
The property is the second house on
the right, yellow with white trim.
APPRAISED VALUE: $224,000

5. CHIPPINGHAM SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 17
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Storey Residence, 2 beds / 1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,375 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Quarry Mission Road off Nassau
Street, building is approximately
500 ft from Nassau Street on the
northern side of the street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $120,000

6. ROCKY PINE ROAD
LOT NO. "A"
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-
Family Duplex Apartment
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,288 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel west on
Carmichael Road from Faith Avenue
and turn through McKinney Drive
(Bamboo Shack is on the corner),
then turn left through Rocky Pine
Road. The property is at the end of
the third corner on the left, painted
light orange.
APPRAISED VALUE: $275,000


1. OPULENT HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 28
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family Lot
7,597 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling on Carmichael
Road, west of Millar Road, take
the first new paved road pass "The
Outdoor Patio" on the left, then take
the second left, then first right; the
property Is second to the last on the
right, before the road ends.
APPRAISED VALUE: $80,000


7. POLHEMUS GARDENS
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 17
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,700 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on Boyd
Road, from Providence Avenue take
the third corner on the left. The
subject property Is the third lot on
the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $169,000

8. CORAL LAKES SUBDIVISION


LOT NO. 39, Block 6
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-
storey Residence, 11 bed / 1 bath on
Ground and Upper floors.
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,800 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On corner of Masthead
Lane and Reef Lane Road In Coral
Lakes.
APPRAISED VALUE: $227,000


9. NASSAU EAST SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 2 Block 5
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,800 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Situated on the
southern side o( Cambridge Road
and east of Nassau East Boulevard
APPRAISED VALUE: $214,804

10.WEST STREET NASSAU
LOT NO. Commercial Lot of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two (2)
Concrete Block Structures, 1 Single-
storey cottage 1 bed / 1 bath &
1 Two-storey apartment 2 beds
/ 1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 3,895 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Situated on the western
side of West Street and South of
Delancey Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $156,104

11.WEST STREET NASSAU
LOT NO. Commercial Lot of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-
storey Four Unit Apartment Structure
PROPERTY SIZE: 16,767 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Situated on the western
side of West Street and South of
Delancey Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $660,000

12.ELIZABETH ESTATES
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 36
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Situated on the western
side of Tobago Crescent in Elizabeth
Estates.
APPRAISED VALUE: $218,000

13.PINEWOOD GARDENS
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 13
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Situated on Mahogany
Street in Pinewood Gardens.
APPRAISED VALUE: $105,000

14.VICTORIA GARDENS
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 168
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey residence under construction
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Enter Victoria Gardens
from Gladstone Road, proceed to
the T-junction, heading east along
the road reservation, the property is
13th lot on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $90,000


2. BERNARD TERRACE_
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 14
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family Lot
9,700 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Immediately north of
Monastery Park Subdivision and
South of Bernard Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $89,000


15.FOX HILL EASTERN DISTRICT
LOT NO. 4 Unit 4
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Four
Unit Townhouse Complex
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,592 sq. ft. (Unit
4 1,281 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Situated on the
eastern side of Plumbago Drive,
approximately 198 feet northeast of
Step Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $175,000

16.NASSAU EAST SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 4 Block 18
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Seven
Unit Complex: Four 1 bedrobm &
Three 2 bedroom Units
PROPERTY SIZE: 17,614 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Situated on the left side
of Yamacraw Road opposite the
Treasure Cove Gated Community.
APPRAISED VALUE: $422,000

17.CARMICHAEL VILLAGE
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. Parcel of Land a
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Fourplex Apartment: Four 2
bedroom 1 bath Units
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east along
Carmichael Road from Golden Isles
Road take the first corner on the
right. The property is the second lot
on the left from the dead end.
APPRAISED VALUE: $255,000

18.MARSHALL ROAD
LOT NO. 17D
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Triplex
Apartment: One 2 bedroom/ 2 bath
& Two 2 bedroom /1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west along
Marshall Road from South Beach
Road, take the first corner on the
right (Tiao End Road). The subject
property is the fourth building on the
left painted green with white trim.
APPRAISED VALUE: $288,000

19.GAMBLE HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. Parcel of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Split Level Residence with Two 1
bed/1 bath Apartment Units under
construction
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,141 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south on
Blue Hill Road from Faith United
Way, take the first corner on the left
(Sunrise Road). Heading south on
Sunrise Road, take the fifth corner
on the left and proceed east to
the first corner on the right. The
property is the seventh lot on the
right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $150,000

20.SOUTH BEACH CROWN
ALLOTMENT
LOT NO. 52
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 37,550 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On the northwestern
corner of Marshadl Rd.
APPRAISED VALUE: $199,000

21.GOLDEN GATES II
LOT NO. 738
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 4 beds / 3 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Mermaid Boulevard
Road
APPRAISED VALUE: $203,000


3. CORAL HARBOUR SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 13
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot
12,113 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Hopkins Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $120,000


INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS
TO: CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOX SS-6263
NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.


Share
your news
The 4ribline wants to hear
froim people who arc making
nc\\s in their neighborhoods.
Pr'ci hp\s yon are raising funds
fli :I goodI cause, campaigning
for improvements in the arIea
01 hIv\ won an award.
If so. call us on 322-1986 and


ability of lower offers.
However, there is always light
at the end of the tunnel in every
market. Real estate, like the
economy, always goes through
phases, and always regains its
footing. A home is more than a
commodity it's shelter and
security, and always a solid
investment.


BELLA INVESTMENT SERVICES' hazmat personnel prepare their protective
gear before moving into an area containing dangerous materials.


TWO MEMBERS of Bella Investment Services' hazmat response team
prepare dangerous chemicals in Freeport for shipping to a processing
facility in the United States.



Training seminar


for emergency


personnel to be


held in Freeport


FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA Emergency per-
sonnel, first responders and those
who handle hazardous materials
can upgrade their skills and learn
new techniques for carrying out
essential services in the Bahamas
during a four-day training semi-
nar to be held from December 8-
11 in Freeport.
Grand Bahama-based Bella
Investment Services, one of the
few qualified hazardous materials
handling companies in the
Bahamas, is organising the inten-
sive training course to help
improve local skills and expand
the Bahamas' ability to respond
to natural and man-made emer-
gencies.
Darren Rollins, president and
managing director of Bella
Investment Services, said his
company has established key
relationships in the region that
have made the training course
possible.
"While we already have well-
trained first responders in the
Bahamas, we know it is vital that
we ensure our standards and pro-
cedures meet the international
code," Rollins said. "To do that,
we have engaged Florida State
Fire College experts for this
course, and they will be actually
carrying out the training here."
Florida State Fire College Bat-
talion chief Nick DeVita and oth-
ers will be in Grand Bahama to
work with local personnel seek-
ing to improve or expand their
skills in the areas of emergency
services and hazardous materi-
als.
The instructors hold certifica-
tions in hazardous materials
response, structural collapse,
high-angle rescue, confined space
rescues, trench rescue, advanced
structural firefighting, aircraft
rescue fire fighting, incident com-
mand, among other specialised
skills. They have responded to
major natural disasters in the


United States, including Hurri-
cane Katrina and wildfire disas-
ters.
Dale Russell-Jones, safety offi-
cer at Bella Investment Services,
advised that the training course is
an excellent opportunity for the
Bahamas, and Grand Bahama
in particular, to meet demands
of growing industrial and com-
mercial sectors of the economy.
"When international compa-
nies come to the Bahamas either
as companies establishing a base
here or as companies that need
these types of emergency ser-
vices, we have to be able to
assure them of our compliance
with the standards such as those
from OSHA [US-based Occu-
pational Safety and Health
Administration]," Russell-Jones
stated.
"We also have millions of con-
tainers and other shipments pass
through our ports every year,
and we must be capable and
ready to deal with any issues that
may arise because of that."
The safety officer is confident
that the upcoming training
course will help prepare, ahami-
ans to meet those situations.
The course will be'held at Bel-
la Investment Services' head-
quarters off Oak Street in
Freeport, Grand Bahama, from
December 8 through 11.
There will be three days of
concentrated classroom study
and teaching and a full day of
practical field training. Industri-
al companies, shipping agencies,
hotels, government agencies,
chemical plants, and medical per,
sonnel will all benefit from this
training course.
Interested companies and
individuals can contact Bella
Investments via e-mail at bel-
lainvestmnists@coralwave.com
or via hope at 352-7170 or 352-
8278. Special pricing has been
established for groups that
attend.


more dillicult 10 secure a morl-
gage it \ou h i\c le.s-than-per-
feet credit ou'll need to janic-
ipate slightIl higher interest
rates ,nd-or a large dow n pa -
ment to outset the perceived nrk
on the lender's part.
When buyers have more dif-
ficulty obtaining loans, sellers
can feel the effects as well.
That's because there may be
fewer buyers out there, and they
might be spending less because
of the less favourable mortgage
terms for which they qualify.
That boils down to the possi-


--





THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 1. 2008. PAGE 11


COMING
SOON 2


(Excluding Net Items and New Arrivals)
for the Entire Month ofNovember!
PLUS FABULOUS In-Stwo Spe
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Building, Painting
Tiling The BahamasJ


I -


O







PAGE 12, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008


Royal Bahamian Resort & Offshore Island

Invites application for the position of:

FOOD & BEVERAGE DIRECTOR

A five star resort is seeking a person to plan, direct
and coordinate all activities of its food service
Ihcilities, including kitchen preparation and sanitation,
restaurant, catering, banquet, beverage service
operations and support services with:

A thorough background in all aspects of food and
beverage operations, including, "outside The
Bahamas experience".
Expertise in food, wine and service details with
extensive operational experience in each.
International training of service flow and
accountability is essential.
A proven, sustained record of results with regards
to cost management and customer satisfaction.'
Intense leadership skills and style with proven
management development.

At least ten years appropriate experience coupled
with a degree is desired.

Applications should be email to
cmajor@grp.sandals.com


FIFFvI







in w ai
with Bahmas Fil

Festival (BFF)


THE Pan Commonwealth
civil society network for
HIV and AIDS is rallying
civil society leaders at, all
levels to speak up on the
battle to end stigma and dis-
crimination today World
AIDS Day.
The network, which brings
together charities and civil
society groups working to
address HIV and AIDS
issues around the Common-
wealth, is urging people to
speak out against the dis-
crimination that continues
to jeopardise HIV strategies
like universal access and
confidential testing and basic
human rights.
The Network is urging its
members and other civil
society leaders to tell their
stories of the damaging
effects of stigma and to
share good practice in tack-
ling stigma to help hard-to-
reach and vulnerable com-
munities who still endure
stigma in their role as car-


ers of those living with HIV
and AIDS.
South African Supreme
Court Judge Edwin
Cameron has for many years
been a strong advocate
against stigma and discrimi-
nation. Justice Cameron was
the first senior South
African official to publicly
state that he was living with
HIV after hearing of the
stoning and .stabbing by
neighbours of activist Gugu
Dlamini after she spoke on
radio about living with HIV.
Justice Cameron stressed
the importance of clear voic-
es against the prejudice and
discrimination people living
with and affected by HIV
and AIDS experience.
"Stigma and discrimina-
tion show in many different
communities, social groups
and countries," said Justice
Cameron. .'But the end
result is the same: a massive
challenge for those people
and their families trying to
live constructively with HIV
and AIDS, which is now ful-
ly medically manageable.
Stigma particularly in its
enacted form discrimina-
tion, involves disrespect for
human dignity," he added.
"Negative labels and stereo-
types pinned on those affect-
ed by HIV and AIDS add
immensely to the burden of
the disease, and discourage
people from testing, from
accessing life-saving treat-


Civil society leaders ar


rallied to end HIV/AIDS


Son of radio boss is 38 pounds
of cocaine

quizzed over murder seized in

FROM page one FreepOrt

missioner Reginald Ferguson, the five men include two
Abaco residents and three from New Providence. FROM page one
Abaco authorities saythe men are expected to be
flown to Nassau today. opening the door to the con-
Police stated that shortly before 8pm Thursday two trainer, officers found two
men armed with guns entered M and R Foodstore in black and blue knapsack bags
Abaco. One approached Strachan, who was operating' one containing seven browns
the cash register, and gun-butted him. black and red kilo package.
Police say Strachan, who was shot and killed as he of suspected cocaine and thl
attempted to flee, was discovered lifeless near the food- other containing eight browi
store's storage room by his father. and red packages also with
The gunmen reportedly fled into bushes with an unde- quantity of suspected cocaine
termined amount of cash. at the top front portion inside
A source claimed police were contacted by Abaco, of the container.
Air who refused to allow the men to board a Nassau- "The suspected cocaine,
bound flight as they suspected they had blood on their estimated at 38 pounds, was
clothes. However, police did not confirm or deny this taken into police custody for
claim. safe-keeping in New Provi-
This latest killing bumps the country's homicide count dence. Police are continuing
to 72 for the year, and is the first reported murder for their investigations," the
Abaco this year. report read.


j


1!
Ii


- I


ARCHER'S NURSERY
P.O. BOX N-313
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TELEPHONES (242) 325-1769
OR (242) 323-5904
FAX: (242) 356-6691


ORDER FORM


POINSETTIAS




QUANTITY POT SIZE PRII
RED (R) PINK (P) WHITE (W)
MARBLE (M)


S10.00

$16.00


__(R) 10 "(fr) $22.0

Company Name:. Contact ...Per.o.:._____.

Telephone No: _______ Fax No: .P.O Box_____

Address:




FREE DELIVERY FOR TWENTY
PLANTS OR MORE!
ARCHER'S NURSERY
#55 DUNMORE AVE, CHIPPINGHAM-SOUTH OF
BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY
HOUSE GARDEN & LANDSCAPING PLANTS-SEEDLINGS,
LANDSCAPING, INTERIORSCAPING
YARD & MAINTENANCE SERVICE


-(R)_ (P)__ (W)


e being


stigma

tive social implications that
came with HIV. I still fell it
was unfair when I myself got
infected. Why the rejection,
why the antipathy? WhZ
cannot HIV positive people
get a loan? Why can a youn|
man not attend his owil
church but has to walk td
neighboring village church,
Why is a 16-year-old kicke
out of his family home an,
village when disclosing hi
status to his parents? Wh
does a wife and mother los
her husband, son, job an,
family? Why are people
hung, beaten to death, tie
to a tree, or stuck under
house and fed like a pig? S
I felt like it was a 'normal
thing to tell everyone. -
"HIV is not contagious, it
is transmissible and pre-
ventable! But HIV can affect
anyone and HIV is hard to
handle sometimes. Yet life
carries on. But, HIV kills
eventually, if we do not take
care, if we do not have safe
practices and most impor-
tant if we do not talk about
it."
At the Commonwealth
People's Forum in Uganda
in November, 2007, civil
society members produced
a statement with recommen-
dations for Commonwealth
heads of government calling
for, among other things, the
adoption of legislation to
protect HIV-positive people
from discrimination.
... .. ... ..... ..... .. ..... ... .. ... .. ..... .. *. I.


ment, and from speaking out
about their own status."
Citizens around the Com-
monwealth are speaking out
as leaders against stigmati-
sation. Tahitian-born Maire
Bopp-Dupont came out with
her HIV positive status
when she was 23 years old
and became an activist on
HIV and AIDS issues. .
She is now chief executive
of Pacific Islands AIDS
Foundation; the Pacific
region's leading organisa-
tion for the Pan Common-
wealth civil society network
on HIV and AIDS.
"Living with HIV means
today there is still a lot of
discrimination. If you are
going for a job, because you
are HIV positive, you are
not going to get that job,
even if you are as good or
better than others." Dupont
said HIV and AIDS was a
medical condition so it did
not make people victims.
"So far, we are not victims of
HIV, we are victims of peo-
ple's attitudes," she said.
"In a restaurant, after you
have eaten, they ask your
friend, what do we do with
her cutlery? How would you
feel about it? The stigma
and ostracising can kill peo-
ple before the virus does."
Dupont said that speaking
out against stigma and dis-
crimination was a natural
response for her. "I have
never understood the nega-


CIBC Private


- Wealth Management


CIBC TRUST COMPANY (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
is seeking the services of a

General Manager
CIBC Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited has been in The Bahamas for over 35
years and places great importance on recognizing and rewarding strong performance.
CIBC offers room for advancement, a stimulating work environment and the resources
to help you make the most of your career. Together, we continue to make CIBC a
great place to work.
POSITION SUMMARY:
Reporting to the Chief Executive Officer Caribbean, as well as to a Board of Directors,
the General Manager is directly responsible for the profitable development and
promotion of the offshore trust business in the Bahamas.
The incumbent is also responsible for achieving service excellence and operational
efficiency, supporting the strategic direction for the business and building the
appropriate organizational structure in support of current and future business objectives.
REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:
Candidates must meet the following criteria:
* Minimum often years experience in a bank and trust environment at a senior
management level with significant exposure in developing operational strategies
and must be able to demonstrate ability and experience for effective diverse risk
management capabilities.
* Experience in managing complex trusts and developing fiduciary standards for
high net worth clients.
* In depth knowledge of trust, company, mutual fund, estate planning and investment,
products.
* Strong technical and managerial skills required for activities such as business
model development; creation of profit plan objectives and delivering results.
* Proven experience managing people in particular, senior level direct reports and
excellent organizational, time management and communication skills.
* Excellent and proven negotiation and conflict resolution skills are essential.
* Expertise in current banking and trust legislation and regulations, able to ensure
compliance with certain areas including Qualified Intermediary; Sarbanes Oxlcy
Act; AML and KYC Legislation.
* Strong problem-solving and decision making-making skills
* Strong interpersonal, oral and written communication skills
* Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications.

CIBC is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes applications from all interested
parties. We thank you for your interest, however, only those candidates selected for
an interview will be contacted.
Qualified candidates only should submit application in writing, marked Private and
Confidential, by December 12, 2008 to:
Manager, Human Resources Caribbean
CIBC Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited,
P.O. Box N-3933,
Nassau, Bahamas
or e-mail to: carolyn.longley@wi.cibc.com
NO PHONE CALLS OR FAXES WILL BE ACCEPTED.


WUIMC


rA*Ililr7
LILIP






MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008, PAGE 13


Government expects $150m



shortfall in revenue intake


FROM page one


ity had to be put in place to
increase the government's over-
draft from $100 million to $150
million with effect from Novem-
ber 26, 2009.
"We do not now expect this
new limit to become standard
and will do our utmost to return
to our standard limit as soon as
circumstances permit.
"We will keep the position
under continuous, watchful
review," he said.
The prime minister said the
steady deterioration in the
Bahamian economy during the
second half of 2008 "has nearly


eliminated the gains recorded
during the first half of the year."
Nevertheless, Mr Ingraham
said the Bahamas' economy is
still stable, and that the country
is in a better condition than the
majority of other small states,
especially in this region, to deal
with the economic downturn.
He also said parity between
the United States and the
Bahamian dollar will be main-
tained.
As it concerns possible gov-
ernment borrowing in the com-
ing months, Mr Ingraham said
he cannot say at this time. How-
ever, he emphasised that any
government borrowing "will not
exceed what we consider to be


the critical limit of 38 per cent of
GDP."
Giving the public a better pic-
ture of the health of the
Bahamas' economy, Mr Ingra-
ham said that during the first
three quarters of 2008, foreign
investment inflows strengthened
by 18.8 per cent, slightly ahead
of the 15.8 per cent pace of
2007.
"However, property pur-
chases by international persons,
which also supports construc-
tion, declined by an estimated
18.9 per cent. With most of the
lift to construction occurring in
the early months of the year,
activity has since subsided.
Loans for local mortgage


Electricity bills may decrease
FROM page one
down from 24 cents, that should be reflected in billings for November."
However, Mr Ingraham said he expects an even further decrease from
the 16.08 cents.
He explained that when the initial offer was made for the government
to subsidise consumer electricity bills specifically for households con-
suming 800 or fewer kilowatts per month he said that BEC indicated it
would likely cost the government $1.5 million for three months.
With that period stretching over October, November and December, the
prime minister said after the first instalment of $500,000, he was informed
by BEC that due to the drop in oil prices on the global market, addition-
al funds would not be required.
Since then, BEC has not received any further payments and, according.
to Mr Ingraham, the corporation has advised the government that a bal-
ance is owed.
"In recent times, they have indicated that they will have some change
to give to the government. If that is so, and that is so, the reduction by BEC
ought to be more than 16.08 cents."
Mr Ingraham said he expects a response from BEC executives as to
when a further reduction in surcharges is expected to be implemented.


FROM page one
Fans of The Tribune's Face-
book page will also be able to
click and hear The Tribune
News Network's daily afternoon
radio newscast, which will be
embedded on the page every
weekday afternoon.
As more and more Bahami-
ans are going online to com-
ment and have discussions
about issues that affect them,
The Tribune editorial team will
also use its Facebook page to
post discussion questions and


Tribune joins
the Facebook
revolution
allow the audience to have a
say on key topics.
In order to become a fan of
The Tribune's Facebook page,
Facebook members can simply
search for Tribune News Net-
work within Facebook.
For further information
regarding The Tribune's digital
media development, contact
jrobertson@tribunieme-dia.net,


financing from commercial
banks and insurance companies
through the end of September


show an increase of some 7.6
per cent over last year, 2007,"
he said.


Island 102.9 FM
Sis in search ofI'
| rinchwuia s rikairk reariwv : orn in 'iviJ l - 6e a part nofA
i. i'inr, 'l n .. l. I i i ain i
Al pliw .M a im i ( Im h s, iruii,,t.Iii.ie, i,
ki tleI", ,f ri <, 11 j *,-,l. i, .i.
Isl nd r '
Alai Rhundi TrcU
[uLdJIE; rhionrdiF"'ii.[andlmunijnt .>um


Royal Bahamian Resort & Offshore Island
Invites application for the position of:

EXECUTIVE SOUS CHEF

The applicant should have the following minimum
requirements

* Been in a similar position for the past 5 years
* Possess a sound culinary background
* Must' be a self motivated person
* -Experienced with on the job training
* Being able to develop budgets and necessary
controls
* Good Leadership skills are a must
* College or culinary institute training is an asset
* The will and desire to join an organization where
quality assurance is guaranteed

SALARY AND BENEFITS Commensurate with
experience.

Applications should be email to
'.. emajr@grp.sandals.com


Marketing Manager

The successful candidate must possess the following:


A creative think
big ideas.
A proven track.
impact.
Must be adaptab
Able to deal wit]
and enthusiasm.
Able to work in
rial spirit and a'
Focus on possibi
Strong customer

tKey Responsibilities: .
* Develop and e.xe
S iiMnual key initial
Lead efforts to ei
S market activities
D Direct media piI
Establish and ctI


6


Ruqui


er with a knack for advertising and a history of creating

record of driving sales and significant organizational

ie to a changing, fast-paced environment.
h a variety of personalities and situations with energy

a culture/environment that promotes an entrepreneu-
'let's get it done now" attitude.
ilities rather than problems.
orientation


acute effective local marketing plans that support

effectively plan, execute, measure and evaluate local

inning and graphic design
ltivate PR/media relationships


Develop and Mai ige budgets
Customer Relations and management of complaint process
Build Lrmm unnity goodwill and manage relatiinnship., with influential
organizations
Serve as the local steward of the brand, ensuring all local marketing
a ctiviiiets are aligned with established brand Istanda rds,

niremcnts:
B.Lhel,_rs degree in Communications, Marketing or a closely related.
field or equivalent, work experience.
Minimum five years professional related experience

Competitive Salary & Benefit Package


If you have an OLD CLUNKER
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S'New direction' for

'Dept of Immigration

FROM page one
able to deal with applicants in a timely manner, whether it is a
person seeking residency in the Bahamas, or persons born in the
Bahamas applying for status, whether it's terms of spouses of
Bahamians who are applying for their residency status in the
,Bahamas.
- "We expect them to deal with illegal immigrants where
appropriate to deal with them, we expect that, generally
,speaking, that Immigration will be a place that will not have
as many things said about it or against it that has been said in
the past. We think that after a period of time that is likely to
'happen," he said.
While reports of corruption have plagued the Department
of Immigration for years, last week Minister of State for
Immigration Branville McCartney insisted that the govern-
ment's decision to offer a large part of the senior tier of the
Immigration Department "early retirement" packages had
"nothing to do with corruption".
This month, seven senior officials, many of whom have
been with the department for decades, have been made
redundant, and beginning this month, former head of Road
Traffic, Jack Thompson, will assume the role of director of
Immigration.
The former director, Vernon Burrows, retired separately,
along with deputy director William McDonald, and is now
scheduled to take up a posting as Ambassador to Cuba.
Mr McCartney said the officials have not yet been replaced
but they will be in due course. He confirmed the changes are
part of an overall "restructuring" effort.


Send r6sume to: marketingmanager.opportunity@gimiail.com
Deadline for application is Monday, December 1st 2008.


, , i t r


I


THE TRIBUNE


Job Opprtunit







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14. MONDAY, DECEMBER 1;2008


* GENEVA
SWISS voters overwhelm-
ingly approved Sunday a
move to make permanent the
country's pioneering pro-
gramme to give addicts gov-
ernment-authorised heroin,
according to Associated Press.


I 1.
;,


At the same time, voters ing the health and daily lives member of parliament from
rejected a proposal to decrim- of addicts since it began in the central city of Zug, said
inalise marijuana. 1994. he was disappointed in the
Sixty-eight.percent of the Some 63.2 percent of vot- failure of the marijuana mea-
2,264,968 voters casting bal- ers voted against the marijua- sure because it means 600,000
lots approved making .the na initiative, people in Switzerland will be
heroin programme perma- On a separate issue, 52 per- treated as criminals because
nent. It has been credited with cent of voters approved an they use cannabis.
reducing crime and improv- initiative to eliminate the "People have died from.
statute of limitations on alcohol and heroin, but not
pornographic crimes against from cannabis," Lang said.
children before the age of The government, which
-- puberty. opposed the marijuana pro-
Olivier Borer, 35, a musi- posal, said it feared that lib-
cian from the northern town eralising cannabis could cause
of Solothurn, said he wel- problems with neighboring
corned the outcome in part countries.
because state action was "This could lead to a situa-
RMYNT required to help heroin tion where you have some
addicts, but he said legalising sort of cannabis tourism in
marijuana was a bad idea. Switzerland because some-
D R SALE "I think it's very important thing that is illegal in the EU
to help these people, but not would be legal in Switzer-
S ; to facilitate the using of land," government
. drugs," Borer said. "You can spokesman Oswald
-- a.ST just see in the Netherlands Sigg told The Associated
how it's going. People just go Press.
i" '. there to smoke." The heroin programme is
Parliament approved the offered in 23 discreet centers
heroin measure in a revision across Switzerland that offer a
.of Switzerland's narcotics law range of support to nearly
in March, but conservatives 1,300 addicts who haven't
challenged the decision and been helped by other thera-
forced a national referendum pies. Under careful supervi-.
under Switzerland's system of sion, they inject doses of care-
hrs 32' direct democracy. fully measured to satisfy their
point, ne.w Iinglass& soft good. The heroin programme has cravings but not enough to
0onditi. helped eliminate scenes of cause a big high.
large groups of drug users The aim is to help the
shooting up openly in parks addicts learn how to function
that marred Swiss cities in the in society, with counseling
1980s and 1990s, supporters from psychiatrists and social
say. workers.
U.N. narcotics board have pler of the right-wing Swiss
criticised the programme as People's Party, which led the
potentially fueling drug abuse, campaign against the heroin
but several other governments programme, said she was dis-
have started or are consider- appointed in the vote.
ing their own programmes "That is only damage limi-
modeled on the system. station she said. "Ninety-five
t p owfin The marijuana issue was percent of the addicts are not
calop of the line equipmentfa based on a separate citizens' healed from the addiction."
Sruse initiative to decriminalise the Health insurance pays for
consumption of marijuana the bulk of the programme,
-, and growing the plant for.per- y.hich costs 26 million Swiss
osiontn'l M.r tnnte .-. sonause se.. ., -.-...-- ..-. francs ($22 million) a year.
80:BOATC(Z623i ,, ,o Lang, a. Greei Party .All residents in Switzerland


are required to have health
insurance, with the govern-
ment paying insurance pre-
miums for those who cannot
afford it.
The current Swiss statute of
limitations onprosecuting
pedophile pornography is 15
years. The initiative will result
in a change in the constitu-
tion to remove that time lim-
it;
Previously only genocide,
war crimes, crimes against
humanity and terrorist acts
were defined under Swiss law
has being without a statute of
limitations. ,I.. ,
The governmen.t,',;had
argued that it will be difficult
to put the change into prac-


tice, partly because of the
legal problems of determin-
ing the onset of puberty,
which varies with each child.
Also, the government said, it
will be very difficult to prove
such crimes in trials many
years after the crimes are
committed.
The proponents said in
campaign literature that
sometimes it only becomes
possible years later to build a
case against a pedophile when
other victims "alsofinally find
the strength to bring charges."
"It must therefore be only
up to the victim to decide
whether iit should be forgotten
or'prosdcuted," the propo-
nents said.


IN LOVING MEMORY OF

FREDERICA F.D. SAWYER

(NEE CLARIDGE)


r -i
di
-A


u~.


March 21st, 1960 November 30th, 2007

The Broken Chain

We little knew that
morning that God was


going to call your name.
In life we loved you dearly.
In death we do the same.

It broke our hearts to lose you,
you did not go alone;
for part of us went with you,
the day God called you home.

You left us peaceful memories,
your love is still our guide:
and though we cannot see you.
you are always at our side.

Our family chain is broken


and nothing seems .
the same,
but as God calls us one by one,
the Chain will link again.
We will always love you and miss you.
HUSBAND, BRADLEY; SON, ROBERT; MOM & DAD


eI
. i


Reward Offered

For Two Lost Dogs

Last Seen Cable Beach




REWARD OF


$500 EACH



PHONE. 327m7276/37-6m2500


Swiss approve pioneering



legal heroin programme
C^ A .1? *se:"e-


Cu
....








THIS Sept. 14, 2006 file photo shows disinfectant utensils in the injection
room of the drug drop-in center in Bern, Switzerland. Dr. Daniele Zullino
keeps glass bottles full of white powder in a safe in a locked room of his
office. Patients show up each day to receive their treatment in small
doses handed through a small window. The programme has been criticized
by the United States and the U.N. narcotics board, which said it would fuel
drug abuse.


U









THE TRIBUNE


...m
nnssar o ig oPrdise' Islan


Freshmen see
little playing
time in their


NCAA basketball

N by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter'
High profile freshmen are see-
ing scarce playing time on the
hardwood in their transition
from high school to NCAA bas-
ketball. In their first seasons
at their respective schools at the
NCAA level, Dwight Miller and
Probese Leo have seen little use
early in the season.
Leo a forward/center for the
Bucknell Bison of the Patriot
League, has played in two of the
team's five contests thus far.
The 6'9"210 pound freshman
saw four minutes of play in the
team's loss in the season opener
against the Maryland Terrapins.
Leo totalled two points, one
rebound and one block in his
limited action.
Following a pair of "did not
plays" in the Bisons' losses
against Boston and St. Francis,
PA, Leo played three minutes
in the team's lone win of the.
season, 83-82 over Old Domin-
ion. Leo failed to reach the
stat sheet and was assessed with
three fouls in his three minutes
of play.
The Bison are 1-4 on the sea-
son and are ranked seventh of
eight teams in the Patriot
League. Miller, a forward for
the Pittsburgh Panthers, of the
Big East Conference, has not
feared as well personally but his
team remains one of the elite in
the nation. Miller has yet to
play in any of the team's first
seven games as the Panthers as
expected, got out to a 7-0 start
behind a relatively easy sched-
ule for the fourth ranked team
in the nation.
The Big East is home to sev-
en of the NCAA's top 25
ranked teams including four in
the top 10, the Panthers (4),
Connecticut Huskies (2),
Louisville Cardinals (3) and
Notre Dame Fighting Irish.(8).
The Panthers have beaten
opponents by an average mar-
gin of victory of more than 19
points. They face their first.
true test against on January 13th
against the Georgetown
Huskies, ranked 16th in the
country.
Both Leo and Miller were
products of the Frank Ruther-
ford Elite Development Pro-
gram and were highly touted
recruits coming out of St. Pius X
High School in Houston, Texas.




RESULTS of 'All or Nothing'

CHAMPION Ama-
teur Boxing Club staged
another amateur boxing
show on Saturday at the
Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex.
The show was dubbed:
"All or Nothing."
The show was
sponosred by the Trophy
Case, Henry F. Storr,
Steve's Cafe and V8
Splash.
The results of the
show are as follows:
Valentino McPhee
def. Elios Edgecombe in
thel33 pounds light-
weights.
Rashield Williams def.
Rashad Saunders in the
152 lbs welterweight.
Max Lexcima def.
Godfery Pinder in the
175 lbs light-heavyweight.
Richard Charlton def.
Tyrone Saunders in the
112 lbs flyweight.
The best fight of the
day was between Max
Lexcima and Godfery
Pinder.
The most improved
boxer was Rasheild
Williams.
The most outstanding
boxer was Valentino
McPhee.


2008 FATHER MARCIAN PETERS BASKETBALL INVITATIONAL: DAY 3







Pacers edge h


* by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
The Intermediate boys division
dominated the schedule on day
three of the 2008 Father Marcian
Peters Basketball Invitational yes-
terday at the Kendal G.L Issacs
Gymnasium.
Intermediate Boys
R.M Bailey Pacers 29 (OT)
Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins
-28
In easily the most exciting
game of the afternoon, the Pacers
defense delivered a clutch play
to seld the overtime win and pre-
vent a successful comeback by
the Marlins.
Protecting a one point lead
with just under 10 seconds
remaining on the clock, Lyndrick
Storr stole a cross court pass and
raced down the sideline before
being fouled on his way to the
basket.
Storr who finished with a team
high 10 points and three steals,
missed both free throws, but fol-
lowing the ensuing rebound off
the final miss just one second


Stick


arins in thrilled


The intermediate boys division dominates the schedule


remained on the clock.
A last minute desperation
heave fell short as the Pacers held
on for the win in dramatic fash-
ion.
The Mystic Marlins trailed by
as much as 10 early in the third
quarter, but rallied to trim the
deficit to just two, headed into
the fourth quarter, 22-20.
The Marlins were able to force
overtime anaking a series of tough
contested shots but were futile
from the free throw line for much
of the second half and were
unable to gain the lead despite
getting to line seemingly at will.
Eddison Minnis chipped in
with three points, three rebounds
and one assist for the Pacers while
the Mystic Marlins were led by
Nashee Lightbourne with eight
points and two rebounds.
Mt. Caramel Cavaliers 33
H.O Nash Lions 13
The size and athleticism of the


Cavaliers simply overmatched the
Lions as they cruised their way
to a 20 point win.
Led by K. Pratt and C. Gaitor,
the Cavs followed the tone set by
the versatile duo from the game's
outset.
Pratt finished with 12 points,
six rebounds, three assists, two
steals and one block, while Gaitor
finished with 12 points, two
rebounds, four .assists 'and three
steals.
Randon Swaby was the lone
bright spot for the Lions finishing
with eight points and four
rebounds.
Church of God Academy
Flames 28
Zion Christian Eagles 21
Alvin Glinton's effort on the
defensive end ignited the Flames
to help them hand the Eagles
their first loss of the afternoon.
Glinton finished with a game
high six steals two rebounds and


* By BRENT STUBBS N PHOTOS: Esther Miller
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net


IT was a special night for
Basil and Paula Neympur.
The Grand Bahamian busi-
nessman and his wife were
showered with praises at the
Road Runners ninth annual
Awards & Presentation Ban-
quet on Saturday night.
But before they left the Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort & Crystal
Palace Casino, the Neymours
were presented with a huge
plaque from club coach/presi-
dent Dexter Bodie.
Additionally, Mrs, Neymour
was given a bouquet of flowers
and Mr. Neymour got a suit
from Fine Treads. To top off
the accolades, the Neymours
also got a dinner for two cer-
tificate.to one of the top restau-
rants in Grand Bahama on their
return home.
Attending the function with
two of the coaches from the
Neymour Track and Field Club
- Joe Simmons and Cordell
McNabb, Neymour expressed
his gratitude to Bodie and the
club for their generosity.
But throughout his speech,
Neymour took the time to also
praise his son, Phenton Ney-
mour, the Minister of State for
Environment and Desmond
Bannister, the Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture.
"Tonight, I'm thankful to be
able to hear my first born intro-
duce his father," said Neymor,
about the remarks made by
SEE page 18


CHARLIZE DEAN receives the
Dominique Higgins Award from
Higgins' mother, Ivy.


ABIAH MISSICK receives the
Dominique Higgins Award from
Higgins' mother, Ivy.


Charlize Dean, Abiah Missick

scoop the biggest awards

* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
MORE than 500 awards were presented on Saturday night as the
Road Runners Track and Field Club hosted its ninth annual awards
and presentation banquet.
But the two biggest awards went to Charlize Dean and Abiah
Missick before a jammed packed ballroom at the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino as they were presented with the
Dominique Higgins Awards.
The prestigious female and male awards were presented in hon-
or of Higgins, one of the most outstanding athlete to excel through
the ranks of the club and onto the collegiate scene.
SEE page 18


two blocks to go along with four
points and three assists on offense
for the Flames.
Delano Forbes finished with 10
points, two assists and two steals,
while Tevin Hall also chipped in
with 10 points. Anthony Oliver
led the Eagles with a game high
14 points and four rebounds.
Queen's College 24
Zion Christian Eagles 22
The Eagles lost.their second
game of .the afternoon as their
comeback effort fell just short
late in the second half.
Devin Corey led the Comets
with six points while Chakeim
Strachan added four points and
three steals.
Junior Boys
C.C Sweeting Scorpions 37
Teleos Cherubims 21
An intense defensive effort in
the first half gave the Cobras a
big enough cushion for them to


easily maintain in the second half
for their second win of the tour-
nament. Roosevelt Whylly led the
Cobras with 16 points and five
rebounds, Marvin Saunders
added 10 points and Angelo
Lockhart chipped in with nine
points and three assists.
Henry Rolle led Teleos with
14 points and two steals.
Junior Girls
D.W Davis Pitbulls 22
C.H Reeves Raptors 5
The Pitbulls scored on the
opening tip and never left the out-
come of the game in jeopardy.
Brushea Bain paced the Pit-
bulls with nine points while Patri-
cia Ferguson added eight for the
defending junior girls champions.
The tournament continues
today at the Kendal Isaacs Gym-
nasium beginning at 3pm with
Family Island teams scheduled to
make their debut.


While all of the awardees are too many to list, here's a look at
a few of the recipients of the outstanding awards presented on Sat-
urday at the Road Runners ninth annual Awards & Presentation
Banquet at the Wyndham Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino:
Dominique Higgins Award
Female Charlize Dean.
Male Abiah Missick.
Shawn Lockhart Awards
Xavier Coakley and Demitri Forbes.
Most Outstanding Athletes (Male)
Under-9 Edvaughn Carey.
Under-11 Daril Davis.
Under-13 Demitri Forbes and Recarno Nixon.
Under-15 Rayord Rigby and Sharad Mackey.
Under-17 Drew Kerr and Navante Lamm.
Open Stavenco Brown and Ivan Stubbs.
Most Outstanding Athletes (Female)
Under-9 Ashley Williams and Shakara Whymms.
Under-13 Charlize Dean and Philane Sargent.
Under-15 Antonique Butler.
Under-17 Rashanda Dean and Vashti Colebrooke.
Open Edvania Missick and Dayvonne Fox.
Athlete of the Year (Male)
Under-9 Miquel Bethel.
Under-11 Branson Rolle and Katraz Coakley.
Under-13 Jenero Knowles and Xavier Coakley.
Under-15 Maverick Bowleg.
Under-17 O'Jay Ferguson and Patrick Bodie.
Open Shawn Lockhart.
Dianna Lynn Thompson Award
Males Shawn Lockhart, Jenero Knowles, Abiah missick,
Antwan Hoyte, Branson Rolle, Xavier Coakley, Miquel Bethel,
Demitri Forbes, Rayford Rigby, Drew Kerr, Patrick Bodie,
Edvaughn Carey, Kareem Cumberbatch, Dominic Nairn, Navante
Lamnm and O'jay Ferguson.
Female Ashley Williams, Kaynesha Gibson, Angel Butler,
Charlize Dean, Felicity Dorsette, Shanelle Knowles, Danielle Moul-
trie, Carnesha Nixon, Faythe Miller, Sara Mackey, Edvania Missick,
Rashanda Dean, Danika Sargent, Philane Sargent and Krysten
Black.


More
photos Oil
Page 18 1

















Temple Fellowship rout Golden Gates 12-1


IT was a day for Temple Fel-
lowship to celebrate on Satur-
day at the Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex as they clinched their
berth in one championship
series and kept their hopes alive
to advance in two others in the
Baptist Sports Council's 2008
Rev. Dr. William Thompson
Softball Classic.
Pennant-winning Temple
Fellowship routed Golden
Gates 12-1 to complete a sweep
of their best-of-three playoff
series to secure their berth in
the 17-and-under best-of-five
championship series.
They will now go on to play
Macedonia in the series that will
get underway on Saturday at 11
a.m. Macedobia advanced with
a 13-10 decision over Faith
United to also complete'a
sweep of their playoff.
Temple Fellowship kept
their winning streak alive on the
day when their men upset pen-


Complete sweep of best-of-three playoff series


nant-winning Shaw AME Zion
11-8 to even their playoff at 1-1,
forcing a third and deciding
game on Tuesday at 7 p.m.
The winner of that series will
go on to play .the, winner
between defending champions
Transfiguration and former
champions Calvary Deliver-
ance, who are deadlocked at 1-
1 and will play their decider on
Tuesday at 8 p.m.
Temple Fellowship wasn't
quite done yet as their co-ed
team stunned defending cham-
pions Macedonia 8-6 to pull
even at 1-1. Macedonia won the
opener earlier in the day 13-8.
The third and deciding game in
the series will be played on Sat-
urday at 10 a.m.
The winner will advance to
the championship to play pen-
nant-winning Golden Gates.


Golden Gates swept Faith Unit-
ed by winning both games on
Saturday.
Here's a summary of how
they played on Saturday:
Temple Fellowship 12, Gold-
en Gates 1: Angelo Butler and
Rudolph Fox both had three
hits and Addie Finley two. All
three players scored two runs
apiece to lead Temple Fellow-
ship into th'e 17-and-under
championship.
Dominic Collie got the win
on the. mound and Dareko
Carey got the loss.
Kyle Carey scored the lone
run for Golden Gates
Macedonia 13, Faith United
10: Brian Cambridge and Lam-
ont Bullard both had three his,
including a three-run and two-
. run home runs respectively to
lead Macedonia into the 17-


and-under championship.
D'Kyle Rolle had a pair of
hits and scored four times, while
Bernard Ferguson had two hits
and scored twice.
Walter Bell got the win on
the mound over D'Angelo
Cartwright. -
Weston Saunders had a pair
of homers nd Ashton Aliens
and Leslie Darville added one
each in the loss.
Macedonia 13, Temple Fel-
lowship 8: Lynden Gaitor had a
pair of his, including a homer,
scoring three times; Cardinal
Gilbert two hits and four runs
ad Brian Capron and Tonya
Armbrister both had two hits
with two and three RBIs respec-
tively, scoring a run as Mace-
donia took the opener in their
co-ed playoff.
Cardinal Gilbert got the win


over Brian Armbrister.
Angelo Butler was 2-for-2
with a two-run homer, scoring
twice and Natasha Campbell a
hit, scoring twice and Donovan
Hepburn had two hits with a
RBI, scoring a run in the loss.
Temple Fellowship 8, Mace-
donia 6: Brian Armbrister was
2-for 3, including a two-run
homer, finishing with four RBIs;
Alfred Munnings was 2-for-3
with a solo homer and Ricardo
Major and Angelo Buther both
had two hits, scoring two runs
each.
Keva Major also scored twice
as Temple Fellowship staved off
another elimination.
Alfred Munnings got the win
over Harold Ffitzgerald on the
mound.
Lynden G itor and Cardinal
Gilbert were both 2-for-3 with


two runs scored in the loss.
Gilert also had a RBI. Brian
Capron had a RBI triple, scor-
ing a run.
Temple Fellowship 11, Shaw
AME Zion 8: With seven runs
on the board in the fourth, high-
lighted by back-to-back solo
homers from Brian Armbrister
.(his second in the game) and
Fred Tapia, Temple Fellowship
avoided elimination and forced
a deciding game in their men's
playoffs.
Alfred Munnings got the win
on the mound over Val
Munroe.
Leonardo Stevens had a two-
run homer, Lavardo Gilbert
had two hits with a RBI and run
scored and Shanto Albury had
one hit and two runs scored in a
losing effort.


THE MARK KNOWLES CELEBRITY TENNIS INVITATIONAL




Stars set to descend on





PI for tennis invitational


THE Mark Knowles
Celebrity Tennis Invitational
will take place at the Atlantis
I Tennis Center on Paradise
S' Island on Friday and Satur-
day.
Here's a list of some of the
players that will be coming to
participate:
S Sabine Lisicki of Germany
will be making her first
appearance in the Bahamas.
Sabine turned pro in 2006
BELGIUM'S XAVIER MALISSE, one of the stars taking part in the Mark and is already ranked #. on
Knowles invitational, is. seen in a 2003 file photo. the WTA singles tour. ,
Sabine is just 19 years old


and has wins over Dinara Safi-
na, Lindsey Davenport and
Anna Chakvetadze.
She was born in Troisdorf,
Germany and now resides
between Berlin, Germany and
Bradenton, Florida where she
is a pupil at the world
renowned IMG Nick Bollet-
tieri Tennis Academy.
She is five-feet, 10-inches
tall which enables her to have
a formidable serve to go along
with her strong groundstrokes.
She will be joined by:
Michaella Krajicek of the
Netherlands, who burst upon
the scene in 2004 when she
was the #1 ranked ITF junior
in the world. She played a lim-
ited schedule on the WTA
tour and won four ITF circuit
singles titles.
In 2005, she qualified for
the Australian Open and
Roland Garros, but, unfortu-
nately, injured her knee and


had surgery. Later this same
year, she won her first WTA
tour title in Tashkent.
Her breakthrough seasons
came in 2006 and 2007 with
wins over Dementieva, Pen-
netta, Safina and Ivanovic and
she finished with a top 40
ranking in both years.
Krajicek reached a career
high ranking of #30 in Febru-
ary 2008, then suffered a wrist
injury, closely followed by a'
knee injury. She is coming
back from these injuries and
hopes to have a full season of
play in 2009.
Krajicek was featured in
Glamour Holland's Women
of 2007 and was also honoured
as one of the most powerful
females in Holland by Heleen
Magazine. Krajicek comes
from a tennis playing family -
her brother Richard was the
1996 Wimbledon Singles
champion.


Some of the rest of the field
includes these players:
Kei Nishikori, the 18 year
old Japanese phenom, who
became the youngest player
in the Top 100 and is the face
of tennis in Japan, a country of
127 million people.
Nishikori rocketed to fame
in February of this year by
winning the Delray Beach
Championships defeating
James Blake in the finals. He
had a great U.S.Open in Sep-
tember recording wins over
Juan Monaco and David Fer-
rer.
Xavier Malisse of Belgium,
a former Top 20 singles player
and 2004 French Open Dou-
bles Champidn.
Malisse has career wins over
Lleyton Hewitt, Dimitri Tur-
sunov, Nikolay Davydenko &
Rafael Nadal. He is an out-
standing singles and doubles
player having won 3 Singles
Title and 4 Doubles titles.
Don Johnson of the U.S.A.
won the Wimbledon Doubles
crown in 2001 with Jared
Palmer and was ranked #1
doubles player in January
2002.
Mark Knowles of the
Bahamas recently won his
50th career doubles title and
3-time grand slam doubles
winner. Knowles has been
ranked as the #1 doubles play-
er in the world on two occa-
sions and 5-time Olympian.
The proceeds of the event
go to aid local children's' char-
ities such as The Cancer Soci-
ety, the Sassoon (Bahamas)
Foundation for Pediatric
Heart Care, The Special
Olympics, The Association for
the Physically Disabled and
the Mark Knowles Tennis
Scholarship Fund.
To date over $300,000 has
been distributed to various
charities.
Some of the major sponsors
are Kerzner International,
The Ministry of Youth &
Sports; American Airlines,
Bristol Cellars, Everkey Glob-
al Fund, H30, Lombard Odi-
er Darier Hentsch Private
Bank & Trust, Templeton
Global Advisors. There are
a few sponsorship opportuni-
ties available and.interested
parties should contact Vicky
Andrews at vickyk@batel-
net.bs or cell: 357-9670


r


0
0
0~
0~
b.
a,


BALDWIN.

O7 e d (^ /f t


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*FINE BUILDERS HARDWARE & PLUMBING*

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PAGE 16, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008


TRIBUNE SPORTS

















Basketball Federation president thrilled by turnout


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net.
BAHAMAS Basketball Federation's president
Lawrence Hepburn was quite thrilled by the turnout for
he Junkanoo Jam in Grand Bahama, despite the eco-
nomic crisis being experienced.
The Junkanoo Jam featured a number of visiting
women's college teams that competed in two separate
divisions at the St. George's High School.
Number two ranked North Carolina Tar Heels just
barely held off Oregan State 82-78 to remain udefeat-
ed at 8-0 as they clinched the title in the Freeport Divi-
sion.
Center Jessica Breland scored 13 points and pulled
down 11 rebounds with three block shots, three assists
and two steals to lead the Tar Heels, while forward
Iman McFarland produced a game high 16 points,
including the game winning basket in the final 11 sec-
onds.
In the Lucaya Division, the University of Florida
Gators prevailed with a 65-60 upset win over the No.,
21/19 Arizona State Sun Devils as senior Sha Brooks
scored a season high 25 points and was named the
MVP..
Hepburn, who along with his executives were on
hand to host the tournament, said it far exceeded their
expectations as the fans showed up in great numbers.
"We were really pleased- with the support we
received from the people in Grand Bahama," Hep-
burn stressed. "The tournament had a tremendous
impact on the, economy of the island and we were
pleased that the residents came out and showed their
support."
Hepburn said the fans were not disappointed as the
teams provided a lot of excitement throughout the
tournament. He noted that both championships were
quite entertaining.
Next year, Hepburn said the tournament is expected
to be even bigger as teams have already confirmed
their participation, including North Carolina.
One addition to the Tar Heels line-up next year as
they defend their title is expected to be Bahamian
Waltia Rolle, who is completing her high school in
Houston, Texas under the Frank Rutherford Elite
Development Programme.
Later this month, Hepburn said New Providence
can embrace two tournaments that will be headed by
Sports Tours International. They will be bringing down
a number of male division II in the Sunshine Shooutout
and III teams before they feature the women in the
Goombay Shootout in January.
Hepburn said the tournaments bode well for the
Bahamas as it will provide the spotlight on the country
in the tough economic times as the teams bring down
their oen following of fans.
"We really look forward to this time of the year," he
stated. "It's good to have the college teams here in
Grand Bahama and those that come to New Provi-
dence."
The only problem is that there is not that much,
opportunity for the local players to interact in the tour-
nament as the games count towards the visiting schools'
overall win-loss record. But Hepburn sad it's still an
opportunityfor the local players-who aspire to become
college players to come 6iut and view the collegiate
players in action.


Lucayan Division


Freeport Division


i -

FREEPORT DIVISION CHAMPIONS North Carolina who defeated Oregon
State in a thrilling championship game.


"We were really
pleased with the
support we
received from
the people in
Grand Bahama."

Lawrence Hepburn


FLORIDA
GUARD
Lonnika
Thompson
setting up the
offense
I '. "


NORTH CAROLINA FORWARD Shay Shegog seen here shooting over two
Oregon State defenders.


I* *FIIsa Glr (.per Close SI a sIo I


December 1, 2008 Februqry 28, 2009

The closed season gives Nassau grouper a chance to'reproduce.
Because grouper gather at predictable places in the winter .
months, they are an easy target for fishermen. I'm on my
Honeymoon...

Catching the fish at this time threatens the survival of the EAT
species and the livelihood of the people who depend on them. LIONFISH!


Nassau Grouper are already commercially extinct in much of the
Caribbean. We must act NOW to ensure a plentiful supply of this fish in
The, Bahamas for future generations.
Please support our Bahamian fishermen and enjoy other fish during the
closed season.


Here's how YOU can help:

Do not catch, buy or sell Nassau grouper during the closed season. Violators will
be subject to prosecution.

Do not eat Nassau grouper during the closed season. Boil fish is excellent with red
snapper. GO GREEN-Protect our Marine Environment, try lionfish as an alternate'
this season. Lionfish are tasty and can be safely handled.

Support the establishment of National Parks and No-take Marine Reserves. These *
reserves are replenishment zones for our important marine species. They must
include the habitats required for all stages of the Nassau grouper's life cycle:
mangrove creeks, shallow reefs, deep reefs and spawning aggregation sites.


For more information, contact BREEF at
www.breef.org
Tel:(242) 327-9000
or
The Department of Marine Resources
Tel:(242) 393-1777


.eef Eni





Sal Fo


0~~TCAAV~)t~


TheNature
Conservancy f
Protecting nature. Preserving life.


ISup or ur F sh r en h e c oi e w ak e od yd e id e wh t e a t to m rro wI


TRIBUNE SPORTS


MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008, PAGE 17


ii








PAGE 8, MNDAY DECMBER ,200 TRIUNEOPORT


ROAD RUNNERS TRACK


C


LUB AWARDS BANQUET


Saluting Basil and Paula Neymour

FROM page 15
Phenton on his behalf. "The saying if you want to know me stay
with me is all true and its love."
Having had a rather difficult time during his tenure off to school
in New York to study engineering, the elder Neymour said his
* son found out the hard way about the facts of life.
Through it all, Neymour said he perserved and today is one of the
few men who were chosen by Prime MinisterHtibert Ingraham to
be apart of his cabinet.
"Tonight, I'm a proud father because he was an obedient child,"
he charged. "He caused me to be able to be successful and to
make it. He's been chosen because he is a loyal one and he's been
chosen because he is a.truthful one.'Tonight, I am proud of him."
To his wife, Paula,"Ieymour said he's lucky because he have a
good woman beside him,. not behind him.
And he assured the audience that they have another excellent
example in Olympic gold medalist Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie,
who has been a pillow of strength because of the support she got
from her mother, Elka Ferguson, who attended the banquet with
her.
As he took the time out to comment on!Bannister, Neymour said
he have a good friend who is going to be aP'good and honest min-
ister.
"If you didn't give me the opportunity to give Andrae (Williams)
and michael (Mathieu) the chance to run ji Carifta, they would not
have.been able to qualify and compete in the World Champioships
and become silver medalists (in the men's 4 x 400 relay) at .the
Olynipic Games., You helped me to help others."
Neymour said he"s elated to have been honored, by Bodi'e because
he's quite pleased with the support he's seen from the MPs as
well as the executives of the Bahamas Associations of Athletic
Association.
"The BAAAs are coming. So it means Dexter that you must be
doing something right," he charged. "So parents, don't give up
on your children.
"Tonight I feel good because I believe that I've done my best.
Many time I wondered if I was failing. Many times I was wondering
if I was doing the right thing. But I know that I've done my best."
Neymour said he will continue to support the sport as long as he
can, rather than do as most of the rich people who would perfer to
keep their wealth to themselves.
And he assured Bodie that he will always show his appreciation
to his club because he's pleased to see the strides he has made over
the years in molding the .oung children.




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MORE than 500 awards were pre-
sented on Saturday night as the
Road Runners Track and Field Club
hosted its ninth annual awards and
presentation banquet. Some of the
recipients' are pictured with their
awards: On the left The Tribune's
Senior Sports Writer, Brent Stubbs,
is pictured with awardees.


PHOTOS:
Esther Miller,


Charlize Dean, Abiah Missick scoop the biggest awards
FROM page 15 said. just hope thai I do elen interim pieident Curn Mr H' Jamaicin sprinter T-sain Bolt
better next season." Hollingsworth: Ire.isurei Rosic didn't have such a great start in
Missick is a 10-veali-old Carey and hel assistant Debhie their junior careers.
Dean, a 12-year-old sprinter sprinter in grade five at Faith Smith and public relations offi- But Bannister said the two of
who competed in the under-15 Temple. cer Kernut Tailor. them never gave up. They
division, was quite surprised .Throughout the night. which David WallacL. a former perserved and was able to come
when she was announced as the saw the athletes decked out in Giand B.haim,,'s \\'ct End back as champions.
female w inner, their best suits, awards were gi\- Member of Parliament. kept the He made reference to Bain
"It feels wonderful. I was very en out for academics, outstand- audience laughing throughout won the NCAA Indoor and
surprised with the number of ing performances from a meet the night with his lively jokes Outdoor 400 metre titles andV
awards that I got," she lament- in Jamaica; outstanding perfor- as the Master of Ceremonies. ran on the Bahamas' silver 4 x
ed. "I worked hard,'but I'm mances from the Baytaf in He even had a number of 400relayat the Olympic Games
hoping that next year I will be Florida; most improved athletes; participants, including athletes, in Beijing, China, while Bolt
able to make one or the junior president's list; the Shawn Lock- parents, coaches, Hollingsworth, emerged as the first athlete to
national teams like Carifta." hart Award; the Dianne Lynn Phenton Neymour, Bannister post a triple record breaking
The ninth grader at Galilee Thompson Memorial Award; and club coach/president Dex- performance in the 100, 200 and
Academy said the award has the Most Outstanding Athletes ter Bodie, perform during the as a member of the Jamaican 4
really inspired her. and the Athletes of the Year in evening, much to the delight of x 100 relay at the games.
Although he was inspired, the respective age groups. the audience. Bannister said those are just
Missick was actually sleeping The night was held under the Bannister, in his address, took two examples of what the ath-
when his name was called to patronage of Grand Bahamian the time to first of all salute letes can achieve. if they put
receive' is award. businessman Basil and Paula Bodie for having the leadership their mind to it and climb to the
I'm happy. I was surprised Neymour. The theme for the to motivate his athletes and top of the ladder.
when they wake me up," he night was "Climb Till your their parents through the host- As a special guest, Ferguson-
Dream Come True." ing of the banquet as they McKenzie used an example of
Among the dignitaries pre- reflect not just on the athletic, climbing a hill to the success of
sent were the Minister of but academics of the athletes. a student-athlete attaining an
Youth, Sports and Culture Touching on the banquet's A and exceling at the Olympics
Desmond Bannister and Min- theme, Bannister said the hon- Noting that it's not easy try-
ister of State for Enivoronment, orees deserve all of the recog- ing to get to the hill, Ferguson-
Phenton Neymour, the son of nition that they receive, having 'McKenzie said the student-ath-
the honorees. put so much emphasis on help- letes can either "walk or run
Also present was Olympic ing young people. but either way, it's not an easy
golden girl Debbie Ferguson- And then he took the audi- task and many times you ma)
McKenzie and members of the ence on a journey through the fall."
Bahamas Association of Ath- Carifta Games where Bahamian Putting herself in he picture
letic Associations, including quarter-miler Andretti Bain and Ferguson-McKenzie said it was-
n't easy for her to achieve hei
goals because after she lost a
w i ifew races, "I kept on racing.'
in stiL dgfe; h4 a for | After she suffered a few
_from_0_0_US _UUUUNNNNNinjuries, "I got treatment an(
.......from $6,900.00 when I was better, I kept or
training." And when she was-
n't interested in practising, "I
........ from $9,900.00 gopt some rest and was right
back out there the next day."
Sin a iliaHer message was simple: ",
,from $8,900.00 never gave up. No matter whale
....... the obstacle, I found a way
$8a50f00Throughout the years in m
u.................$8,5000 career, I've seen that through
aoepassion, motivation, sacrifice
determination, one can usually
in rIsUUuueelrNNnreach that goal or ultimate
................$9,500.00 dream.
"As the song says: 'If at first
$8e00a0lagrta losineyou do not succeed, try and try
............... $8o,00.00 again."
Hollingsworth, making hi
first official address since taking
$9,900.00 over from Mike Sands, who was
............... voted out of office in Septem
Or. a tber, also lauded Bodie for the
initiative of honoring the athlete
n ta u efor their accomplishments.
He also said that while it's a!
Fitting time to honor the Ney.
~Stp nS mours, he further encourages
them to continue to give to thi
IEAR SHIRLEY STREET development of sports, not just
in Grand Bahama, but through-
1-0323/5or394-1377 i--- out the country.


_ ~__ ~


PAGE 18, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008


TRIBUNE SPORTS






I THE TRIBUNE


, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008, PAGE 19


51 wounded in Bangkok explosions
0 BANGKOK, Thailand hit Somchai's Bangkok office compound, which pro-
testers seized in August and have held ever since, an
Attackers set off explosions at anti-government anti-government television station, and a road near
protest sites Sunday, wounding 51 people and rais- the main entrance to Bangkok's domestic airport,
ing fears of widening confrontations in Thailand's which the protesters are also occupying. At least
worst political crisis in decades, which has stran- 51 people were injured, including four seriously,
gled its economy and shut down its main airports, officials said. No one claimed responsibility, but
according to the Associated Press. Suriyasai Katasiya, a spokesman for the protest
Thousands of government supporters gathered, group, blamed the government.
meanwhile, in the heart of Bangkok for a rally The protesters, who call themselves the People's
denouncing the protesters, further inflaming ten- Alliance for Democracy, overran Suvarnabhumi
sions. The rally was designed to show support for airport, the country's main international gateway,
Prime Minister Somchai Wongsawat, who has last Tuesday. They seized the domestic airport a
appeared helpless in ending the crisis that has strand- day later, severing the capital from all commercial air
ed up to 100,000 travelers, brought the key tourism traffic and virtually paralyzing the government.
industry to a virtual standstill and affected plane The alliance says it will not give up until Somchai
schedules worldwide. resigns, accusing him of being a puppet of ousted
Somchai has been forced to run the government Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, the alliance's
out of the northern city of Chiang Mai because of original target. Thaksin, who is Somchai's brother-
fears for his safety in the capital. Sunday's explosions in-law, was deposed in a 2006 military coup.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 20 MONDAYDECEMBE 8


011


S


ERI



US!


"






MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE


LOA NW


'There are no safe


corners


BAHAMIANS must realise
that there are no crime-free cor-
ners of the country, and that
no-one can feel complacent, it
was claimed yesterday.
The Rev C B Moss of
Bahamas Against Crime issued
another stern warning about
spreading violence following the
Abaco killing, saying no island
was free of the scourge.
"There are no safe corners in
the Bahamas," he told The Tri-
bune. "This is being demon-
strated every day. There is no
safe quarter in the country, no
matter how tranquil."
Rev Moss' comments came
after the senseless murder of a
young man on Abaco which left
a family devastated and a com-
munity reeling from shock.
Roderick Strachan, propri-
etor of M and R foodstore in
Marsh Harbour, recalled leav-
ing his shop on Thursday night
to take a customer home, only
to return 15 minutes later to dis-
cover that his son Brendon had


in the Bahamas'


Rev C B Moss issues stern warning about spreading


violence following senseless killing on Abaco

-- - -- - -- - ------ -- - -- - - -- - -- - -- - - -- - -- - -- - - -- - -- - - -- - -- - -- - - -- - -- - -- - - -- - -- - -- - - -- - -- - --- - - -- - -- - -


been killed.
Police say that Dion "Bren-
don" Strachan, 24, was shot in
his father's foodstore while
attempting to flee from gunmen
who were robbing the estab-
lishment.
. On Friday night, police were
said to be holding two Nassau
and two Abaco men after they
were detained at Marsh Har-
bour airport.
Rev Moss said Abaconians,
along with others living outside
Nassau, had become compla-
cent over crime issues, thinking
their island was less affected.
"They told us they didn't
have any kind of problem
there," he said, "That same atti-


tude exists in the government.
We can't get the Chamber of
Commerce to sit down and dis-
cuss this issue.
"Yet the same voices you
hear after the fact are the same
people who were apathetic
before. We have to find a way
to get people to understand that
once the horse is out of the
barn, it's gone."
Rev Moss and fellow cam-
paigners have been advocating
a series of anti-crime initiatives
over many years.
"People must realise that,
while their community may
look safe today, tomorrow it
could explode. I am beginning
to see the criminal element


emerging as predators who feel
they can do what they want to
do.
"In other words, they are not
under control, they feel power-
ful, they are in charge. Our
entire society must tell this ele-
ment they are not in charge. No
matter what your circumstances,
you don't have the right to
invade persons' homes and
businesses."
Rev Moss said the Bahamas
lacked the leadership to tackle
the problem. But all stakehold-
ers must sit down and discuss
how to address crime earnestly.
"It is the long-term plans that
are going to achieve the best
results," he added, "Where is


the investment to address
crime? We must recruit people
who possess the skills, we must
put boots on the ground.
"The nation must focus on
the inner city communities
because by and large this is
where the germination of these
criminals begins."
He said influential Bahami-
ans in the business and profes-
sional arenas generally turned
their backs on the over-the-hill
district.
"But it is no good turning
your backs on the factory to
deal with the storage shed.
Resources must be directed
over-the-hill because that's
where most crime begins."


AIDS 'eating up funding' at the expense of more


pressing health needs, some experts complain


* By MARIA CHENG
AP Medical Writer
LONDON (AP) As
World AIDS Day is marked on
Monday, some experts are
growing more outspoken in
complaining that AIDS is eating
up funding at the expense of
more pressing health needs.
They argue that the world has
entered a post-AIDS era in
which the disease's spread has
largely been curbed in much of
the world, Africa excepted.
"AIDS is a terrible humani-
tarian tragedy, but it's just one
of many terrible humanitarian
tragedies," said Jeremy Shiff-
man, who studies health spend-
ing at Syracuse University.
Roger England of Health
Systems Workshop, a think
tank based in the Caribbean
island of Grenada, goes further.
He argues that UNAIDS, the
UN agency leading the fight
against the disease, has outlived
its purpose and should be dis-
banded.
"The global HIV industry is
too big and out of control. We
have created a monster with too
many vested interests and rep-
utations at stake...too many rel-
atively well paid HIV staff in
affected countries, and too
many rock stars with AIDS sup-
port as a fashion accessory," he
wrote in the British Medical
Journal in May.
Paul de Lay, a director at


UNAIDS, disagrees. It's valid
to question AIDS' place in the
world's priorities, he says, but
insists the turnaround is very
recent and it would be wrong
to think the epidemic is under
control.
"We have an epidemic that
has caused between 55 million
and 60 million infections," de
Lay said. "To suddenly pull the
rug out from underneath that
would be disastrous."
UN officials roughly estimate
that about 33 million people
worldwide have HIV, the virus
that causes AIDS. Scientists say
infections peaked in the late
1990s and are unlikely to spark
big epidemics beyond Africa.
In developed countries,
AIDS drugs have turned the
once-fatal disease into a man-
ageable illness.
England argues that closing
UNAIDS would free up its $200
million annual budget for other
health problems suoh as pneu-
monia, which kills more chil-
dren every year than AIDS,
malaria and measles combined.
"By putting more money into
AIDS, we are implicitly saying
it's OK for more kids to die of
pneumonia," England said.
His comments touch on the
bigger complaint: that AIDS
hogs money and may damage
other health programmes.
By 2006, AIDS funding
accounted for 80 per cent of all
American aid for health and


population issues, according to
the Global Health Council.
In Ethiopia, Rwanda, Ugan-
da and elsewhere, donations for
HIV projects routinely outstrip
the entire national health bud-
gets.
In a 2006 report, Rwandan
officials noted a "gross misal-
location of resources" in health:
$47 million went to HIV, $18
million went to malaria, the
country's biggest killer, and $1
million went to childhood ill-
nesses.
"There needs to be a ratio-
nal system for how to appor-
tion scarce funds," said Helen
Epstein, an AIDS expert who
has consulted for UNICEF, the
World Bank, and others.
AIDS advocates say their
projects do more than curb the
virus; their efforts strengthen
other health programmes by
providing basic health services.
But across Africa, about 1.5
million doctors and nurses are








readInsigh
onMo da.ys


still needed, and hospitals reg-
ularly run out of basic medi-
cines.
Experts working on other
health problems struggle to
attract money and attention
when competing with AIDS.
"Diarrhea kills five times as
many kids as AIDS," said John
Oldfield, executive vice presi-
dent of Water Advocates, a
Washington, D.C.-based organ-
isation that promotes clean
water and sanitation.
"Everybody talks about
AIDS at cocktail parties," Old-
field said. "But nobody wants


to hear about diarrhea," he said.
These competing claims on
public money are likely to grow
louder as the world financial
meltdown threatens to deplete
health dollars.
"We cannot afford, in this
time of crisis, to squander our
investments," Dr Margaret
Chan, WHO's director-gener-
al, said in a recent statement.
Some experts ask whether it
makes sense to have UNAIDS,
WHO, UNICEF, the World
Bank, the Global Fund plus
countless other AIDS organi-
sations, all serving the same


'-." eft 1 ,n- v I iraroo
Ld D,, ir 110 ..h 6m.,'. i m,.,H


70 BOOTHS



e Best of The B


ahamas"


cause.
"I do not want to see the
cause of AIDS harmed," said
Shiffman of Syracuse Universi-
ty. But "For AIDS to crowd out
other issues is ethically unjust."
De Lay argues that the solu-
tion is not to reshuffle resources
but to boost them.
"To take money away from
AIDS and give it to diarrheal
diseases or onchocerciasis (riv-
er blindness) or leishmaniasis
(disfiguring parasites) doesn't
make any sense," he said.
"We'd just be doing a worse job
in everything else."


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PAGE 22, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008 THE TRIBUNE


SINERATIO ALNWI


'Sacred carnival'


offers


res


in


troubled year


SKULL replica sits at a Gede
ceremony at the home of
Voodoo priest Erol Josue in
Miami. The ceremony is meant
to provide spiritual sustenance
to both the living and dead in
Haiti and the US to help the
linked communities cope with
disasters that have embroiled
them the past year...


* By JENNIFER KAY
Associated Press Writer
MIAMI (AP) Goat meat
stewing on the stove and sweet
potatoes baking in the oven.
Cooked fish, complete with
bones and eyeballs. Spicy pep-
pers soaked in bottles of rum.
The food is an offering to the
spirits expected to dance among
the revelers at Voodoo priest
Erol Josue's Miami home that
night.
Josue's belief: Provide spiri-
tual sustenance to both the liv-
ing and dead in Haiti and the
US to help the linked commu-
nities cope with disasters that
have embroiled them the past
year. Worldwide economic tur-
moil, the ruin and death left in
Haiti by four tropical storms
and a school collapse that killed
90 all have left an imprint.
Josue's night-long celebration
of the dead, a condensed ver-
sion of the two-day festival in
Haiti that opened November,
was repeated in other homes in
Haitian-American communities
during the month. Vodouisants


I,


/


believe the Gede, or the dead,
rituals honour their ancestors
and the spirits and help clear
the pain of recent tragedies.
About one million Haitians live
in the US, most in Florida.
Large communities are also in
New York, New Jersey and
Massachusetts.
"Artists and advocates for
Haiti have been doing relief
concerts to bring money for
Haiti, which is very good, but
as a spiritual person, as a priest,
I think first of all we have to
pay respect for our brothers and
sisters, for those souls who have
died," Josue said.
Hours before the "sacred'car-
nival," Josue and a handful of
vodouisants gathered before a
small altar to pay special
homage to the nearly 800 storm
victims and those killed in the
November 7 school collapse.
He had expected at least 20
people for the daytime service.
But many have reserved their
extra cash to help relatives in
impoverished Haiti. They told
Josue they couldn't afford'the
gas for driving to the outskirts
of Miami twice in the same day.
And when they came for the
night service, they would wear
the same black and purple
clothes they had on last year,
not being afford new things.
"And there's only one goat,"
Josue said and sighed.
In the past, many guests laid
offerings on the altars adorned
with decorative skulls in black
top hats. This year, they spent
what they could to honour the
dead, while still trying to sup-
port the living, Josue said.
"I don't think the Gede will
be offended," Josue said. "They
will be concerned about the
condition of the world, because
they have a lot of work to do
now."
Voodoo, a blend of Christian
tenets and African religions,
was sanctioned as an official
religion in Haiti in 2003. It is
widely practiced in the
Caribbean country of nearly
nine million people, and emi-
grants continue traditions fused


by slaves in Haiti's colonial past.
Believers look to the cele-
bration of the dead as a way to
relinquish the pain of the past
year and "start the new year
with a positive attitude and let
go of anything that is going to
weigh you down physically and
emotionally," Raymonde Bap-
tiste of Miami said after the
requiem at Josue's home. "This
is a way of moving on."
All worries seemed to be
abandoned at Josue's front door
by 10 pm, when the festivities
began. About 75 people, from
young adult to old, crammed
into his living room, emptied of
its furnishings to make room for
four conga drummers and a
central pole draped in black and
purple, the colours of death and
strength. More guests, includ-
ing a few wearing skull T-shirts,
spilled onto a sun porch and
into the front hallway.
Josue and a few initiates, now
dressed in black and purple,
began calling the spirits with
dancing and singing around the
pole. When the spirits overtook
their bodies, they staggered and
lurched in the small space, sup-
ported by the outstretched arms
of the crowd.
The drummers maintained an
upbeat, sometimes frenzied
pace well into the early morn-
ing. The air grew thick with
incense and the sweaty crush of
guests joining the other dancers
in the hip-swiveling gyrations
that reflect the Gede's joking,.
vulgar nature.
The Gede festival, believers
say, is a time to say and do
things usually discouraged the
rest of the year. It's just the fix
for a tough year at home in the
US, and at home in Haiti.
Haitians abroad sent about
$1.83 billion home last year,
amounting to about 35 per cent
of the country's gross domestic
product, according to the Inter-
American Development Bank.
"When you do the Gede, it's
like therapy," said Ingrid Llera,
a Voodoo priestess who lives in
Homestead, Florida. "You just
let it all out."


VOODOO followers participate in a Gede ceremony at the home of Voodoo
priest Erol Josue in Miami...


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YM1 11:O"4 A


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 22, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008






I I .L I FrUL.-;ii-


Officer recalls chilling 10-minute



ride through streets with gunmen


* By RAJANISH KAKADE
Associated Press Writer
MUMBAI, India (AP) -
The militants waited in the
shadows for the police van to
pass, and when it slowed down
in the na.row road, they
sprayed it with gunfire.
The gunmen opened the
doors and dumped five slumped
officers' bodies into the streets,
then piled into the van to con-
tinue their siege.
What they did not know was
that two officers, including con-
stable Arun Jadhav, were in the
backseat, alive.
Jadhav was taken on a chill-
ing 10-minute ride through the
dark streets of Mumbai with
some of the gunmen who had
launched a siege that would last
for 60 more hours and leave at
least 174 people dead.
While one of the men drove
the van, another pointed his
rifle out the window and fired
on a crowd milling outside a
cinema. Later, he threw a
grenade outside a state govern-
ment building.
The young gunmen said lit-
tle during the harrowing drive,
but spoke Hindi with a strong
Punjabi, north-Indian accent.
They scoffed when they saw
that the police officers they had
killed had been wearing bullet-
proof vests.
"One of them laughed and
said, 'Look, they're wearing
jackets,'" Jadhav said.
He was in the backseat, with
an officer who was unconscious,
both left for dead. Jadhav had
been hit by three bullets, two
of which left his hands nearly
paralyzed.
At one point, a cell phone
trilled from the pocket of Jad-
hav's colleague. The gunman in
the front seat turned around
and fired.
"He didn't even look back
properly, he just fired," Jadhav
said. "I think my colleague had
been still alive. He died with


those bullets."
Before the carjacking, Jad-
hav and his colleagues -
including Hemant Karkare,
head of the Anti-Terror Squad
- were racing to respond to
emergency calls of a shooting
inside Mumbai's main railway
station, the attack that began
the siege. Then a report came in
that a car was seen speeding
away from the terminal; and
Jadhav's van rushed to follow
it.
While they were searching for
the gunmen, the gunmen found
them.
From the backseat, Jadhav
could not reach his weapon.
"I kept trying to lift my gun,
but I couldn't reach it," he said.
Finally, one of the van's tires
went flat, and the gunmen aban-


doned the vehicle.
They stopped another car,
pulled out the driver and drove
away, he said.
Jadhav climbed forward and
used the police radio to call for
backup and tell the authorities
what direction the gunmen had
gone.
Minutes later, a team of offi-
cers blockaded a road lining the
coast, and opened fire at the
hijacked car. One gunman was
killed and another arrested -
the only militant to be captured
during the entire two-and-a-half
day ordeal.
Jadhav is now recuperating
from his injuries at a city hospi-
tal, and replaying the episode
again and again in his mind.
, ."1 wish I could have lifted my
gun," he said.


MUMBAI.police constable Arun Jadhav, the only survivor from the hijacked Mumbai police vehicle, recovers from
wounds received during the terror rampage at a hospital...


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PAGE 24, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


INERAIOA0 NW


O a pis inMefwIcall 502-2371 today!


ROBERT KONU carries his nephew, Brenten Middletan, on his back and his niece Alayna Middleton, in his
cart, while his wife shops at Best Buy in Chesapeake, Va, during shopping for Black Friday specials...




Black Friday shoppers out



in force, but cautious


* By ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer
NEW YORK (AP) Shop-
pers, who had snapped their
wallets shut since September,
turned out in force Friday to
grab early morning deals and
hard-to-find items like Elmo
Live and the "Wii Fit" exercise
game, but many said worries
about the economy have them
focusing on fewer gifts and less
expensive, more practical items.
Meanwhile, the start of the
shopping season proved deadly
at both a Wal-Mart store in Val-
ley Stream, N.Y., and a Toys
"R" Us store in Palm Desert,
Calif.
A temporary Wal-Mart work-
er died after a throng of unruly
shoppers broke down the doors
and trampled liTm moments
after the store opened early Fri-
day, police said.
Nassau County police said
about 2,000 people were gath-
ered outside the Wal-Mart store
at the mall about 20 miles east
of Manhattan. The impatient
crowd knocked the man down
as he opened the doors, leaving
a metal portion of the frame
crumpled like an accordion.
Shoppers stepped over the
34-year-old man on the ground
and streamed into the store.
When told to leave, they com-
plained that they had been'in
line since Thursday morning.
"This crowd was out of con-
trol," said Nassau police


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spokesman Lt. Michael Flem-
ing. He described the scene as
"utter chaos."
A shooting inside the Toys
"R" Us killed two people,
authorities said. Toys "R" Us
released a statement late Fri-
day, noting "our understanding
is that this act seems to have
been the result of a personal
dispute between the individu-
als involved. Therefore, it would
be inaccurate to associate the
events of today with Black Fri-
day." The Wayne, N.J.-based
retailer added that it's "work-
ing closely with local law
enforcement officials to deter-
mine the specific details of what
occurred."
Elsewhere at malls and stores,
it was the usual hectic start of
the season, as crowds of shop-
pers frantically picked through
piles of discounted merchan-
dise.
"It was like everything we
bought was already on sale and
was an additional 50 percent off
*at the register," said Lynn
Mahloy of Snellville, Ga., who
arrived at Atlanta's Lenox
Square Mall just after 6 a.m. on
the traditional start of the holi-
day shopping season. But she's
slashing her holiday budget to
about $1,000 this year from
about $2,500 in past years
because of economic worries.
"I'm just buying smaller, less
expensive presents," added
Mahloy, who had bags filled
with sweaters, shirts and dicss-
es.
Preliminary reports from
major retailers including
Macy's, KB Toys Inc., Best Buy
Co. and Toys "R" Us and mall
operators such as Taubman
Centers Inc. said the crowds
were at least as large as last
year's. But analysts said sales
Friday may not match the year-
ago levels as Americans, wor-
ried about layoffs, dwindling
retirement accounts, and tight-
ening credit, slash their holiday
budgets, even for their own chil-
dren.
"I've always filled the tree.
But you have to be honest," said
Shannon Keane, 38, of Cary,
N.C., a single mother who was
recently laid off from her job.
"This year, I'll do the best I
can." She was out with her 13-
year-old son, Miles, at a local
Wal-Mart, buying one item: an
iPod.
"He really wanted this one
thing," Keane said. "So we're
here for this one thing."
And while the steep price cuts
which were even more
aggressive than the deep dis-
counting offered throughout the
month- are great for con-
sumers, such moves are expect-
ed to depress sales and profits in
a season that many believe
could show a rare contraction
in spending, according to Janet
Hoffman, managing partner of
the North American retail prac-
tice of Accenture.
At a Milwaukee Wal-Mart
store, Shirley Jackson, a tech-
nician, arrived at about 8 a.m.,
too late to get a 42-inch
Polaroid HDTV selling for
$598. Instead she focused on the
necessities, buying shoes and
pajamas for her family and
stocking up on 500-threadcount
sheets discounted to $20 from
$70.
"It's just as well I didn't get
the TV. I have to focus on what
1 need I need sheets, I need
groceries," said Jackson, who is
in her 40s. "I'm spending a
whole lot less this year. I have
bills to pay, and I don't want to
have it come down to choosing
between buying medicine and
buying groceries."
Black Friday, the day after
Thanksgiving, received its name
because it historically was the
day when a surge of shoppers
helped stores break into prof-
itability into the black for
the full year.


But this year, .with rampant
promotions of up to 70 percent
throughout the month amid a
deteriorating economy, the
power of this landmark day for
the retail industry could be fad-
ing.
Still, while Black Friday isn't
a predictor of holiday sales, it's
an important barometer of peo-
ple's willingness to spend for
the rest of the season. This year,
industry executives are taking
note of how the economy is
shaping buying habits.
One significant change and
a big worry for merchants is
that an increasing number of
shoppers like Jared Smith are
using cash or debit cards,
instead of credit cards to pay
for their purchases as they are
either maxed out or just want
to manage their money better.
"I'll spend less this year
because I want to reduce my
debt," said Smith,. who was at
the Owings Mills Malls in
Owings Mills, Md. "I'm going
to try not to use my credit card."
Hoffman noted that based on
reports from retailers, children's
clothing is faring better than
adult clothing as parents focus
on their young ones.
Karen MacDonald, spokes-
woman at Taubman, which
operates 24 malls in the U.S.,
said sales of small home appli-
ances like pots and pans as well
as coffee makers did well Fri-
day, indicating that people are
staying closer to home and are
wanting to buy more necessi-
ties. She added that children's
and teen apparel also fared well.
Terry J. Lundgren, chairman
and chief executive of Macy's
Inc., reported about 5,000 shop-
pers in line for the 5 a.m. open-
ing at the New York flagship
store, at least as many as a year
ago. But he also agreed that
shoppers are focusing more on
basics. He noted that heavily
discounted coats and anything
cashmere, including basic
sweaters and gloves, were sell-
ing out, while houseware prod-
ucts like single-serve coffee
makers fared well.
Sales of flat-screen TVs,
which had seen a slowdown in
recent weeks, were a big attrac-
tion, but they were heavily dis-
counted, according to reports
from Sears Holdings Corp. and
Best Buy Co. Tom Aiello, a
spokesman at Sears Holdings,
which operates Sears Roebuck
and Co., and Kmart, said that as
of noon Friday, both chains
were beginning to sell out of
TVs, including a 46-inch Sharp
TV, at $899, down from $1,399.
Chuck O'Donnell, a manager
at the Best Buy store in West
Paterson, N.J., said that video
games did especially well as
shoppers focus on items that can
be enjoyed by the entire family.
As for traditional toys, Toys
"R" Us Chief Executive Jerry
Storch pointed out that cus-
tomers were either looking for
bargains or the hot. hard-to-find
toys like Fisher-Price's Elmo
Live and Spin Master Ltd.'s
Bakugan. He added that the
$139 Spike, a radio-controlled
dinosaur from Fisher-Price, was
faring well. Another popular
item, which has been hard to
keep in stock, has been Ninten-
do's "Wii Fit" game.
"What kids want are the hot
toys," he said. "It's not about
the cheap toy."
James Fielding, president of
Disney Stores Worldwide, how-
ever, noted that parents are
focusing on deals. "The magic
price was anything under $15,"
he said.
Associated Press writers
Ashley M. Heher in Chicago,
Dinesh Ramde in Milwaukee.
Kate Brumbackin Atlanta, Bar-
baru Rodriguez in Raleigh, N.C.,
Benjamin Greene in Baltimore.
and Colleen Long in New York
contributed to this report.


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ix








MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008, PAGE 25


THE TRIBUNE


INTER INA'


International hotels




draw elites and




terror threat


PEOPLE participate in a memorial prayer for the victims of the attacks near
the landmark Taj Hotel in Mumbai, India...


* By GREG KATZ
Associated Press Writer
LONDON (AP) Consider
how a city looks to a terrorist
seeking targets.
There's the airport invit-
ing, but heavily secured. There's
the US Embassy, perimeter
guarded by crack local forces
and Marines. And there's the
plush international hotel, open
to anyone with a decent outfit
and money for a cup of coffee.
Across the world, the finest
hotels draw foreign business-
men, droves of tourists, and
local movers and shakers who
crowd the restaurants and bars
to see and be seen. There are
society weddings, banquets and
even "Sweet Sixteen" birthday
parties for the daughters of the
well-to-do.
In places where Western-style
amenities are rare, internation-
al hotels are often the most vital
connection to the rest of the
world. Their business model
demands openness and acces-
sibility for visitors and guests,
making total security virtually
impossible despite security bar-
riers, metal detectors and high-
tech surveillance gear.
That's why, experts say,
hotels have been attacked by
terrorists in Pakistan, Jordan,
Afghanistan and now Mumbai,
India, where commandos bat-
tled security forces for three
days in a deadly rampage
focused on the renowned Taj
Mahal and Oberoi hotels.
"There is obviously a trend
for hotels to be targets," said
Christopher Newberry, gener-
al manager of the Serena Hotel
in Kabul, Afghanistan, where
three militants slaughtered eight
guests in January.
The Marriott in Islamabad,
Pakistan is being rebuilt with a
16-foot high security wall to
protect against bomb blasts
after a massive truck bomb
explosion in September that
killed 54 people and wounded
more than 250. A series of Pak-
istani hotels have been targeted
in attacks dating back to 2002,
when 14 people were killed by
militants targeting the Sheraton
in Karachi.
Security has been tightened
around hotels in Islamabad,
with direct access to hotels
blocked by heavy concrete bar-
riers. Motorists have to drive
past surveillance cameras and
over a bomb detector to get in,
and paramilitary troops are
deployed at kiosks built of sand
bags.
"The threat against diplo-
matic targets persists, but due to
target hardening, the terrorists
seek to attack international
hotels," terrorism analyst
Rohan Gunaratna said in a
report on the bombing of the
Islamabad Marriott. "As West-
erners frequent such h tels,
they should be consider sec-
ond embassies."
In many parts of th world,
the best hotels are u ed as a
personal playgroun by the
city's elite. The pub 'c relations
value of attacking a symbol of
national pride like the Taj
Mahal makes it even more


A VENDOR sells newspapers featuring front page stories and photos
from the attacks in Mumbai, India, Sunday...


attractive to terrorists. And the
sheer size of major hotels, with
hundreds of rooms, dozens of
hallways, and many hiding
places, makes them tough to
defend.
The social scene of a big-city
hotel lured jihadists in Jordan in
2005 when suicide bombers
killed 60 people in three coor-
dinated attacks that targeted,
among other things, a wedding
party with 300 guests at the
Radisson hotel in Amman.
"Many of these hotels are
landmarks, very dramatic
venues, like the Taj Mahal in
Mumbai," said Brian Jenkins,
a security analyst with the Rand
Corporation. "What they are
going to see in any major hotel
is number one a very cos-
mopolitan collection of foreign
visitors and local elites."
At the Marriott Hotel in
Cairo, Egypt, lush gardens are a
rare splash of green, drawing
the chic and the wealthy, who
take their sweet tea and car-
damom-spiced coffee at wick-
er tables under shade umbrellas
while checking each other out
from behind their designer sun-
glasses.
The hotel, a former palace
built in 1869 for the visiting
French Empress Eugenie, has
nearly a dozen restaurants,
including the much loved out-
door garden, a rooftop movie
theater and a casino. It is also
one of the preferred venues for
splashy Egyptian weddings, fea-
turing belly dancers and pop
stars.
Life at the Marriott used to
be free and easy for visitors who
looked like they belonged, but
layers of security have been
added since Islamic unrest
spread in Egypt in the 1990s,
and new procedures have been
put in place since a series of car
bomb attacks on luxury hotels
in other parts of Egypt in 2004
and 2005. Now each car is
checked for bombs before it can
enter the grounds, and guests
must pass through metal detec-
tors.
The same is true in Amman,
where major hotels now seem
like armed camps because of
the security barriers, bomb
checks and rifle-toting guards.
Magnus Ranstorp, a terror-
ism analyst with the Swedish
National Defense College said
terrorists often attack hotels as


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a way to paralyze the tourist
industry, which is vital to coun-
tries like Egypt.
"No matter what security
measures are taken, there are
so many hotels that they really
become easy prey," he said.
"This is the greatest fear over
time. Other groups are looking
at Mumbai and will probably
mimic this type of attack
because it seemed to work."
Jenkins said the best hotels
usually have well-developed
security systems that make cor-
porate chiefs feel safe sending
their employees there. He said a
recent Rand inquiry found that
people in a hypothetical place
called Hotel Landcomprised
of all the world's hotel guests
at any given point_are 140 times
less likely to meet a violent
death than a citizen in the Unit-
ed States.
Still, terrorism experts warn
that, despite recent improve-
ments, most hotels are vulnera-
ble if terrorists spend sufficient
time and money developing a
plan.
Newberry, the manager of the
Serena, said hotels around the
world have dramatically
upgraded security procedures
in response to the increased
threat but agreed that they are
still vulnerable.
"Inevitably if a gang of ter-
rorists want to get into a par-
ticular location, whether it's a
hotel or another location,
they're going to do it one way
or another," he said.
Associated Press writers
Paisley Dodds in London, Paul
Schemm in Cairo, Jason Straz-
iuso in Kabul, Asfi Shahzad and
Zarar Khan in Islamabad and
Robert Reid in Baghdad con-
tributed to this report.


Tel (242) 341-4000 Fax (242) 341-5080
Email: eaglebahamas@gmail.com



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PAGE 26, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008


THE TRIDuim-


COI6 PG


Tribune Comics


JUDGE PARKER


CALVIN & HOBBES


>AA


I'LL BET A PET
GOTTEN OUT, O F
A W .M./


I/A


DENNIS THE MENACE


NO PVOBLMi
OUST TeLL. Me
WHAT YOU WANT!


APT 3-G


BLONDIE


MARVIN


TIGER


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


"'..ANP I'M THANKFUL WE PON'T HAVE BROCCOLI
EVMRY MEAL-."


Across
1 One breaking art's rules in
a strange way (10)
8 Think about the chickens
to be counted (5)
9 New Orleans in Italy? (7)
10 and 18 Down: Brilliant
example of one that's
switched on (7,5)
11. Many remaining split (5)
12 Give no consideration (6)
14 New plates may be made
of metal (6)
17 Furnaces where links are
forged (5)
19 Having no end in sight (7)
21 Get hint about contract (7)
22 What one thinks about a
bad side (5)
23 Nominally it forms a loose
attachment (3-2,5)

Yesterday's Cryptic Solutic
Across: 1 Lay off, 4 Ladder, 9
Trudeau, 10 Idles, 11 Ached, 12 Hic
tea, 13 Firm friends, 18 Line-out, 20
Conga, 22 Acrid, 23 Elderly, 24
Sedate, 25 Adders.
Down: 1 Lethal, 2 Youth, 3 Freedon
5 Aping, 6 Diluted, 7 Rascal, 8
Authorities, 14 Ignored, 15 Encoded
16 Pleats, 17 Satyrs, 19 On dit, 21
Nerve.


Down
2 I put on a perfectly good
disguise (7)
3 Lines in circles (5)
4 Specify how a token may
be regarded? (6)
5 It's forbidden, and badly
one hundred take it (7)
6 Concise part of letters
especially (5)
7 They're not easy to enter
because of the locks (10)
8 Bills of fare (3,7)
13 A political favour? (7)
15 Go the front (7)
16 A girl came in to study the
weapon (6)
18 See 10 Across
20 Obtain a girl's name, or I
am upset (5)


Yesterday's Easy Solution
Across: 1 Affect, 4 Bleach, 9
Several, 10 Total, 11 Surge, 12
Expanse, 13 Fifth column, 18
Fraught, 20 Until, 22 Alone, 23 One-
time, 24 Ending, 25 Assert.
Down: 1 Assess, 2 Fever, 3
Current, 5 Let-up, 6 Antonym, 7
Helmet, 8 Altercation, 14 In a word,
15 Laurels, 16 Of late, 17 Client, 19
Green, 21 Trite.


Sudoku Puzzle
Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday

9

9 5

75 2 1 8

3 72

1 6

9 5 1

2 _6 3 5 1

9 2

8


Difficulty Level ***


11/27


Kakuro Puzzle


From a game on www.chessdub.
com, 2008. White (to mqve) is
a bishop down, but by expert
standards he has a routine
winning attack. Black mishandled
the opening, leaving his castled
king underguarded, and White
responded by the "Greek Gift*
Bxh7+ sacrifice which follows
up by Ng5+ and Qh5. Now the
black king is a cornered duck,
but White's problem is that the
natural Re3 and Rh3 mate is
stopped by Bxe3. Instead, White
spotted a clever idea. He went
1 Ne6 threatening both 2 Qxg7
mate and 2 Nxc7. Shocked, Black
tried 1 Ne6 Bxf2+ hoping for
2 Kxf2 Qb6 but when White
replied instead 2 Khl Black
resigned. Neat, huh? In fact every
move in this brief sequence 1 Ne6
Bxf2+ 3 KhI is a blunder! Can you
explain? LEONARD BARDEN


--2 3 4 5 6





101
-MI
12 1 14 15
16
17 18 19 20


22
23


Across
1 Before all else (5,5)
8 Deadly (5)
9 Souvenir (7)
10 Hawaiian guitar (7)
11 Attain (5)
12 A vast treeless
plain (6)
14 A guiding signal (6)
17 Subordinate to (5)
19 Sure (7)
21 Habitual (7)
22 Excessively fat (5)
23 Keen intuitive
power (5,5)


Down
2 Enter uninvited (7)
3 Find answer to (5)
4 To moderate (6)
5 Engross (7)
6 Birthplace of
Colombus (5)
7 In a very showy
way (2,3,5)
8 Solid and strong (10)
13 Baffle (7)
15 A mountain
antelope (7)
16 Burn superficially (6)
18 French
impressionist (5)
20 Scoundrel (5)


Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.


Yesterday's
Sudoku Answer


5 4


386 1
715
8 41 6
239


91513


15 48

83 1


7 114


Yesterday's
Kakuro Answer


1 a05. 2 h-7, 3 ieMt.4 "I7. aiS QI7mat, I1 I
Ne6 cm be 1m be6& 20 7 IW t ft qe.eei
ai6 3 3 or d x7 ard na e W ace


The
Target

words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition).


HOW many words of four letters
or more can you make from the
letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used
once only. Each must contain
the centre letter and there must
be at least one nine-letter word,
No plurals.
TODAYS TARGET
Good 1' vern, good 23' excellent 30
(ormrn r" lur.l..i iiin.n.mw
YESTERDAY'S SOLUrtON
acid acme becalmed became
cable cabled cadi calm calmed
came camel cede celeb clad
claim claimed clam climb
climbed clime dace debacle
decal decibel decimal declaim
dice iced lace laced mace
malice medic MEDICABLE
medical mica


Chess
8751



12 3



c 0 1 c


Target


Contract Bridge

by Steve Becker


Diversionary Tactics


South dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.


WEST
*Q 104
V62
+ Q J 4
*1 109


NORTH
4 AK J 8 3
VKJ
K 1096
+A8


2 +8
7 4(
SOUTH
*76 2
VA Q 10973
*A 5
*4 K4


EAST
9 5

Q 6 573
Q 6 53 i 2


The bidding:
South West North East
1 V Pass 2 + Pass
3 V Pass 4 NT Pass
5 V Pass 5 NT Pass
6 Pass 7 ?I
Opening lead jack of clubs.
A defender should do everything
possible to steer declarer away from
the winning line of play. Declarer
may not take the bait, but it is cer-
tainly better to give him something to
think about than to do nothing at all.
Consider this case where, w ith the
queen of spades favorably located,
South seems certain to make seven
hearts. 1 however, that's not the w\ay it
turned outl,
Declarer won the opening club
lead with the king, drew trumps and


then cashed the ace of spades. When
the queen did not appear, he had one
additional chance before being
forced to rely on the spade finesse: If
either opponent held the Q-J-x of
diamonds, an extra trick in the suit
could be developed by playing the A-
K and ruffing a diamond.
So South cashed the ace and king,
whereupon West seized the opportu-
nity to divert declarer from the win-
ning course. Instead of routinely fol-
lowing lo\V to both diamonds, he
played the deuce on the ace and the
queen under the king!
This gave South a brand-new
option. If West actually started with
the Q-x of diamonds, a ruffling
finesse was available against East.
Furtheniore, declarer could add to
his chances by first cashing the king
of spades; if the queen fell double-
(on, he would not have to risk the
ruling finesse in diamonds.
South thought long and hard,
and eventually opted for the second
approach. Alter playing the king of
spades, he led the nine of diamonds
and let it ride, discarding his losing
spade. Down one.
Percentagewise, the line of play
South chose was distinctly inferior to
the line lie originally embarked on.
Ilul the point is that without West's
clever fallscCard, declare would have
had nothing al all to think about and
would have made the grand slam.


lTomorrow: Ilidding quiz.
S 21)008 Kinhg I :,Uiics S Idlicatel Inc.


CRYPTIC PUZZLE


T
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T
W
0


I
N


0
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E


C
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0
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THE RIBNE MNDA, OEEMBR 1,200, PAE 2


MONDAY EVENING


17:30 1


The Best of the
* WPBT Jack Benny
Show f (CC)


0 WFOR


* WTVJ


The Insider Nikki
Blonsky; Daniel
Craig. (N) '


Access Holly-
wood (CC)


8:00 8:30 9:00


NETWORKCHANN


Yanni Voices Yanni and Ric Wake produce new music WPBT Favorites
with singers Nathan Pacheco. Chloe, Ender Thomas
and Leslie Mills. f (CC)
The Big Bang How I Met Your Two and a Half (:31) Worst
Theory A time Mother "The Men Resisting Week "Pilot" ft
machine prop. Bracket" (CC) temptation. (CC (CC)
Chuck Casey discovers that his Heroes Sylai and Elle face off
sense is now one of the most want- ,,; ;, i ll R ', while Claire struggles
ed rogue agents. (N) n (CC) lo survive. (N) n (CC)


DECEMBER 1, 2008

9:30 10:00 10:30


CSI: Miami Horatio confronts an in-
vestigator who is systematically de-
stroying the team. f (CC)
My Own Worst Enemy Edward
confronts Alislair Trumbull about his
parents' death, (N) f (CC)


Deco Drive Terminator: The Sarah Connor Prison Break "Deal or No Deal" T- News(N) (CC)
WSVN Chronicles "Self Made Man" Bag gets a new partner who black-
Cameron's surprising, secret life. mails Gretchen. (N) (CC)
Jeopardy!(N) Shrek the Halls (:32) Dr, Seuss' (:02) Samantha (:31) Samantha :01) Boston Legal "Juiced" (N) n
f WPLG (CC) n(CC) How the Grinch Who? "The Park" Who? (N) (CC)
Stole Christmas (N) (CC) (CC)

00 CSI: Miami Intervention "Mike and Jenny" Ob- Intervention "Asa" Bulimia and an The First 48 "The Witness; The
A&E Sta kerazzi" 0 sessive-compulsive disorder. (CC) addiction to alcohol. (CC) Trunk" Double homicide. (CC)
(CC)
(:00) BBC World BBC News Asia Business BBC News Click News
BBCI NewsAmerica (Latenight). Report (Latenight).
BET News Spe- *; WOMAN THOU ART LOOSED (2004) Kimberly Elise, Loretta Keyshia Cole: Keyshia Cole:
BET cial (N) Devine. A young woman tries to overcome a life of abuse. (CC) The Way It Is The Way It Is
CBC Jeopardy! (N) Dragon's Den (N) n (CC) The Border "Double Dealing" (N) CBC News: The National (N) )
CBC) (CC) (CC)
CNBC (:00) CNBC Reports On the Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
N 00) Lou Dobbs Campbell Brown: No Bias, No Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
N N Tonight (CC) Bull
Scrubs "My Of- The Daily Show The Colbert Re- Futurama A South Park (CC) Futurama Leela Futurama "Three
COM fice" J.D. and El- With Jon Stew- port (CC) pushy playboy enters a parallel Hundred Big
liot compete. f art (CC) I targets Leela. universe, (CC) Boys" (CC)
Hannah Mon- YOU WISH! (2003. Fantasy) A.J. Trauth. Spencer (:45) Phineas Wizards of Wa- Life With Derek
DISN tana "Get Down Breslin, Lalaine. A teenager wishes that he didn't have and Ferb (CC) very Place n "Just Friends"
Study-udy-udy" a younger brother. (CC) (CC) (CC)
DI Ask This Old Cool Tools "Top 25 Countdown" Desperate Land- Yard Crashers Indoors Out Renovation Re-
DIY House T (CC) Top 25 tools. scapes Stylish bar. alities (N)
D In Focus (Ger- Journal: Tages- Johannes B, Kerner Landerspiegel Journal: Tages- Typisch deutsch
W man). them them
E The Daily 10 (N) The Girls Next Snoop Dogg's Hollywood's Baddest: Boyfriends The Soup The Soup Pre-
*E Door Father Hood sents
ESPN :00) Monday Night Countdown NFL Football Jacksonville Jaguars at Houston Texans. From Reliant Stadium in Houston.
ESPN Live) (CC) (Live)
ESPNI Cronometro (N) NFL Esta Noche NFL Football Jacksonville Jaguars at Houston Texans. From Reliant Stadium in Houston.
ESPNI_ (Live) (Live)
WT Daily Mass: Our The Journey Home Reasons to Be- The Holy Rosary Abundant Life
EWTN Lady lieve
FIT TV Stretch Max: Healthy Deca- Healthy Deca- Just Cook This! Just Cook This! Blaine's Low Blaine's Low
IT TV Cathe Friedrich nce dence With Sam With Sam Carb Kitchen' Carb Kitchen
FOX NC Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (CC) Hannity & Colmes (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-N Shepard Smith Susteren (CC)
FSNFL In Focus on FSN World Poker Tour: Season 1 Best Damn Red Bull Air Race Best Damn Top The FSN Final
From Rotterdam, Netherlands. (N) 50 Special Score (Live)
GOLF Top 10 School of Golf Golf Central Ryder Cup Highlights (N) The Turn (N) Playing Lessons
GOLFTop_'______(Live)
N Catch 21 (CC) Who Wants to Who Wants to Family Feud FamilyFeud n Catch 21 (CC) Pyramid ft
GSN3 CBe a Millionaire Be a Millionaire (CC) (CCO (CC)
(T:00) Attack of X-Play (N) X-Play Attack of the Show! Holiday gadg- Cops 2.0 Fresno, Cops 2.0 Bike
G4Te h the Show! (N) et guide. Calif. sting, t (CC)
:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger A crime ring SINGLE SANTA SEEKS MRS. CLAUS (2004, Romance-Comedy) Crys-
HALL Texas Ranger leader hires Alex's long-estranged tal Bernard. Steve Guttenberg, Dominic Scott Kay. Santa's heir romances
'The Plague" father as defense. (CC) a widowed advertising executive. (CC)
Property Virgins My First Place Home to Stay Property Virgins Marriage Under Income Property House Hunters
HGTV Andre&Kerry" Couple have six Finding the per- (N) t (CC) Construction (N) Basement apart- Moving from
S(CC) weeks to close, fect look (CC) fn (CC) ment. (N) Chicago. (CC)
INSP Victory Joyce Meyer: Ed Young Inspiration To- LifeToday With This Is Your Day The Gospel
Everyday Life day James Robison (CC) Truth (CC)
The Wayans My Wife and According to Family Guy Pe- Family Guy Two and a Half Two and a Half
KTLA Bros. "Dee's Kids "Learning to Jim "Date Night" ter's religious fa- "Saving Private Men f (CC) Men f (CC)
Baby Daddy" Earn It" (CC) n (CC) other moves in. Brian" n (CC)
Still Standing Reba Brock Reba Reba HOLIDAY SWITCH (2007. Comedy) Nicole Eggert. A married woman en-
LIFE n (CC) spreads his fa- hooks up with an counters a former boyfriend. (CC)
other's ashes. f old flame.
M C 001 Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- The Rachel Maddow Show Countdown With Keith Olber-
MSNB cc)C mann. mann
NICK Drake & Josh SpongeBob SpongeBob Home Improve- Home Improve- George Lopez George Lopez
NICK (CC) SquarePants SquarePants ment n (CC) ment n (CC) (CC) (CC)
N V (:00) My Own Prison Break T-Bag gets a new Heroes "The Eclipse Part II" (N) News (N) r News
NTM Worst Enemy partner who blackmails Gretchen. n (CC) (CC)
SPEED Pass Time SuperCars Ex- SuperCars Ex- My Classic Car My Classic Car Barrett-Jackson 2008: The Auc-
Sposed posed tions
Bishop T.D, Behind the Mark Chironna Jentezen Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Jakes (CC) Scenes (CC) (CC) Franklin (CC) (CC)
Seinfeld Jerry Family Guy Pe- Family Guy Pe- FmilyGuyLois Family Guy My Name Is Earl My Name Is Earl
TBS ries to rent Ital- ter's given sensi- ter joins agun helps Peter at "Jungle Love" n "Bad Earl" n "White Lie Christ-
ian villa. (CC) tivity training, club. n (CC) work. n (CC) (CC) (CC) mas" (CC)


TLC


Little People,
Big World Vaca-
tion in Odando.


Little People,
Big World Road
Irip. (N) (CC)


Little People,
Big World Napa
Valley, Calif. (N)


Jon & Kate Plus
8 New York City.
(N)


Jon & Kate Plus
8 Meeting Oprah
Winfrey.


17 Kids and
Counting (CC)


17 Kids and
Counting (CC)


(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order "Fear America" A Law & Order "Driven" Two murders Bones Booth and Brennan are
TNT der "Fluency' f young Middle Eastern man dies in occur near a playground. f (CC) called upon to solve a murder in
(CC) (DVS) an apparent hate crime. n (DVS) midair. n (CC)
TO Courage the Chowder Chowder Johnny Test f Johnny Test \ 6teen "Waiting Total Drama Is-
mOON Cowardly Dog (CC) (CC) Ex-Sale" land
TRU CC "Texas" Smokings Gun Presents: World's Operation Repo Operation Repo Operation Repo Speeders
TV5 0 Toute Ine Des racines et des ailes "L'Age d'or de I'Europe medieval" Partir autrement Expression
mTV5 histoire.
TW C Abrams-Bettes Weather: Evening Edition (CC) When Weather Changed History A Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
severe drought in the 1930s.
(:00) Las Tontas Cuidado con el Angel Marichuy es Fuego en la Sangre Hermanos Cristina'Querida Enemiga'.
UNIV No Van alCielo una joven criada en un hospicio. buscan venganza.
(:0) NCIS "Pop House "Hunting" House treats WWE Monday Night Raw New World Heavyweight Champion John
USA lfe (CC) unique symptoms exhibited by a gay Cena vs. The Monster Kane. Plus a DMXMas. (Live) t (CC)
AIDS patient and his father.
VH1 Celebrity Rehab Rock of Love Charm School Real Chance of Love Love connec- Scream Queens Final moments.
MVi With Dr. Drew Anger management. n (CC) tions grow stronger. n (CC) ft (CC)
VS (:00) WEC NHL Hockey Colorado Avalanche at Minnesota Wild. From the Xcel Energy Center in St. Hockey Central
vs. WrekCage (CC) Paul, Minn. Subject to Blackout) (Live) ( (Live)


WGN


(:00) 7th Heaven
'Work" t (CC)


it in JURASSIC PARK (1993, Science Fictich) Sam Neill, Laura Dem, Jeff Goldblum. Cloned dinosaurs
run amok at an island-jungle theme park. A (Ci)


Family Guy Pe- Gossi Girl Blair and Chuck make Privileged Megan grounds Rose as CW11 News at Ten (N) (CC)
WPIX ter's religious fa- a bet that they can find the perfect punishment for planning to cheat on
other moves in. dates for each other. (N) her final. (N) n (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) Dr. Phil f (CC) WBZ News (N) That '70s Show Frasier (CC) Frasier n (FraCCsier
W SBK (CC) Grandma dies in dates his friend's
_Eric's car. (CC) wife.
(:00) WILD WILD WEST (1999, Action) Will Smith, * RENDITION (2007, Suspense) Jake Gyllenhaal, Reese Wither-
H BO-E Kevin Kline. Secret agents fight to stop a presidential spoon, Alan Arkin. Premiere. A CIA analyst witnesses an unorthodox inter-
assassination. f 'PG-13' (CC) rogation. f 'R' (CC)
(6:00)** */ NORBIT (2007, Comedy) Eddie Murphy, Cuba (:45) Four EPIC MOVIE (2007) Kal Penn.
HBO-P THE BOURNE Gooding Jr. A henpecked husband's childhood sweet- Chnstmases: Four adult orphans have anir incredi-
ULTIMATUM (f heart moves back to town. ft 'PG-13' (CC) HBO First Look ble adventure.'PG-13' (CC)
(6:30) ** FIREHOUSE DOG * ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS (2007, Comedy) WILD WILD WEST (1999) Will
H BO-W (2007, Comedy) Josh Hutcherson, Jason Lee, David Cross. Three singing chipmunks be- Smith. Secret agents fight to stop a
ruce Greenwood. f 'PG' (CC) come pop sensations. f 'PG' (CC) presidential assassination. (CC)
H (:15) **'; DISTURBIA (2007, Suspense) Shia * THE PAINTED VEIL (2006, Drama) Naomi Walls, Edward Norton,
H BO-S LaBeouf, David Morse. A troubled youth suspects his Liev Schreiber. An adulterous woman accompanies her scientist husband
neighbor is a serial killer. n 'PG-13' (CC) to 1920s China. n 'PG-13' (CC)
* ,, THE DEPARTED (2006, Crime Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon, Jack * MR, WOODCOCK (2007,
MAX-E Nicholson. An undercover cop and a criminal lead double lives. 1) 'R (CC) Comedy) Billy Bob Thornton, Susan
Sarandon. 'PG-13' (CC)
(:00) ** JAWS 2 (1978, Horror) Roy Scheider, Lor- * THE CRAFT (1996, Horror) Robin Tunney, (:45) Co-Ed Con-
MOMAX raine Gary. Tourist town and police chief dread huge Fairuza Balk, Neve Campbell. L.A. teens strike back at fidential 2
white shark at beach. 'PG' (CC) tormentors with witchcraft.,f 'R' (CC) Sophomores fn
* 10 ITEMS OR LESS 2006, Drama) Morgan Dexter "Go Your Own Way" (iTV) Californication Californication
SHOW Freeman. iTV. An actor bonds with a cashier while re- Dexter and Miguel compete. f Hank awaits test Hank awaits test
searching a role in a barrio. f 'NR' (CC) (CC) results. results.
6:00) ** *a FATHER OF THE BRIDE (1991, Comedy) Steve Martin, Diane MATERIAL GIRLS (2006, Come-
TMC COPYING Keaton, Kimberly Williams. Premiere. A doting dad deals with his daugh- dy-Drama) Hilary Duff, Haylie Duff.
BEETHOVEN ter's impending wedding. f 'PG' (CC) Anjelica Huston. 'PG'


Let CkCalie tke
Backmia PuAppet and
kis sidekick DerAek put "
some. smiles on y60 P -'
[kids 's faces.




Bing your1 children to the

Mc+-Ippy lour of McDonald's in

Palmdale every Tkhursday

fromV 3:30pmo to 4:30 pmo duLwinlg the

motVh of Decemberl 2008,





EnjoN Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.




i'm lovin' ift"


., '' .'. -. -" ;.- *. ."e*,k f i' --"'^- ; :,"--" '" I
: l. -..- ... .. .. -,-, ?-.-.,.... ..|


I


LS';.


1. .. .. 1


MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008, PAGE 27


THE TRIBUNE





, P\- V) eI NINIfI f F-vflFM-RF ,1 ,u THE TIU


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THE TRIBUNE


AP GE 28 MONDAY DECEM 8


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TRIBUNE N.E





MONDAY, DECEMBER
V ~- i,


1, 2008


p|1ill. [o i fe


Higgs & Johnson in Cayman law merger


M By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
RH iggs & Johnson's man-
aging partner has said
the law firm's merger
with a Caymanian
counterpart will enable
it to "become more competitive in the
international legal services" market,
and enable it to supply products and
"services to clients that it did not previ-
ously offer.
SJohn Delaney, unveiling the Bahami-
an law firm's expansion into the Cay-
man Islands via its merger with Tru-
man Bodden & Company, which takes
effect from January 1, 2009. said the
move aimed to establish Higgs & John-
son as a "regional brand" in the
Caribbean, and enable it to compete
directly for business with major law
firms from other international financial
centres.
"Fundamentally, the merger is about
enhancing and developing the Higgs


* Leading Bahamian commercial and civil litigation specialist is
'dominant partner' in tie-up with Truman Bodden & Company
* Move designed to develop H&J as regional brand and give it
size, economies to compete in global legal services market
* Product synergies, complements between two jurisdictions
ripe for exploitation
* Bahamian law firms increasingly looking overseas for
expansion, with Lennox Paton targeting BVI office


NEW PARTNERS (L-R): Gina Berry, director Truman Bodden & Co; Philip Boni, direc-
tor Truman Bodden & Co; John K F Delaney, managing partner Higgs & Johnson; Philip
Dunkley, senior partner -Higgs & Johnson; Earl Cash, partner Higgs & Johnson;
Surinder Deal, partner Higgs & Johnson


& Johnson brand as a regional brand'
for legal and corporate services," Mr
Delaney told Tribune Business, "there-
by expanding our market and achieving


greater scale.
"It also seeks to enhance the sale of
Bahamian and legal corporate services
which, we have determined, needs to


be done more by blending our products
with those of other centres.... We're
more apt to look at seeing how we can
evolve Bahamian products."
Bahamas-domiciled products were
often used in combination with Cay-
man-based ones in specialist financial
structures, and Mr Delaney added that
the merger would allow the Bahamian
office to act as a conduit in selling Cay-
man-domiciled products to its existing.


client base, and vice versa.
For example, Mr Delaney the
Bahamas was home to numerous high
net-worth permanent residents and fre-
quented by many other wealthy visi-
tors, as evidenced by the numerous
high-end yachts that typically filled
Bahamian marinas, and private places
parked at Odyssey Aviation, based at
See MERGER, page 6B


Cable seeking $30m MPs 'hoping to complete' warehouse deal 'tomorrow'
Ser ch an ges By NEIL HARTNELL thing signed on Tuesday." there, with enormous potential
r W Tribune Business Editor Mr Wilchcombe, MP for to serve a whole range of local
-, ... West End and Bimini, and Ms suppliers with food, toys and
TWO leading PLP politicians Bridgewater are hoping to cre- appliances. We sought a meet-
S. "hope to complete" their lease ate desperately-needed jobs for ing with the owners to see if it
.. .. of Associated Grocers' Grand their constituents and the rest of was possible to acquire it, and
.. ..-; .. Bahama-based warehouse by the island, and revive Grand play a role in reinvigorating the
tomorrow, one told Tribune Bahama's economy by dupli- Grand Bahama economy.
; - Business, with the deal said to eating the distribution business "This is an opportunity we
S- be "moving in the right direc- model that Associated Grocers are seeking to create. We are
tion". had for its still-unused 86,000 not engaged with anyone else
Obie Wilchcombe. the for- square foot warehouse. on this. We are colleagues


mer minister of tourism, said of
the proposal put forward by
himself and ex-Marco City MP
Pleasant Bridgewater: "We
hope to complete by Tuesday
[tomorrow]. IJ's all mnQypgmn
the right direcuton. Everything's


good. The lease agreement
should be completed and every-


When contacted previously
by Tribune Business after this
newspaper was tipped-off about
the proposed, Mr Wilchcombe
had said: "We're trying to find a
way for Bahamians to get jobs.
"It's a building lhat'siilling


friends. We have a lot of people
who are not working, and at the
end of the day all Bahamians
are going to have to step in to
play a role in revitalizing the
See DEAL, page 4B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
CABLE Bahamas has con-
firmed Tribune Business's
exclusive revelation that it is
mulling a $40 million private
placement of preference shares
to buy-out the 30 per cent stake
held by its largest shareholder,
Columbus Communications,
with a proposal that appears to
have met with mixed reaction
from the investment communi-
ty.
In a long-awaited statement,
following this newspaper's arti-


* Company projects $38m
operating income for 2008,
as it admits Tribune
Business revelations
* $14.28 per share price
values largest shareholder's
stake at just over $85m

cle some three weeks ago, the
BISX-listed utility/telecommu-
nications provider confirmed
there had been "several discus-
See CABLE, page 8B


Concern on debit card fees


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamian business
community is concerned about
the possibility of 2-4 per cent
transaction fees being levied for


debit card use, the Chamber of
Commerce's president has told
Tribune Business, fearing it
would discourage their use and
hinder the creation of a 'cash-
less society'.
Dionisio D'Aguilar, who is
also Superwash's president, said
he was getting a groundswell"
of concern from various parts
of the private sector, over "
these debit card fees that banks
are seemingly wanting to
impose".
In the US, UK and other
developed countries, debit card
fees were levied at around
$0.10-$0.20 per transaction, far
cheaper than the proposed lev-
els in the Bahamas.
Unlike credit cards, debit
cards conclude payment trans-
actions by drawing upon the
savings in the purchaser's own
bank account, not the creation
of credit and, by extension,
more debt. Transaction risk is
also reduced.
Currently, only Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) and Scotiabank
have issued debit cards to their
clients, but the impending cre-
See DEBIT, page 8B


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[APTOPS STAR






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008


ROYAJ FI]ELITA!KET WRAP]


International Markets

FOREX Rates


CAD$
GBP
EUR


Weekly
1.2371
1.5389
1.2703


Weekly
$55.18
$819.10


Commodities


Crude Oil
Gold


%Change
-2.34
+3.32
+0.88


% Change
+10.51
+2.50


International Stock Market Indexes:


DJIA
S &P500
NASDAQ
Nikkei


Weekly
8,829.04
896.24
1,535.57
8,512.27


% Change
+9.73
+12.03
+10.92
+7.60


* By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets
LAST week, investors trad-
ed in 11 out of the 25 listed
securities in the Bahamian cap-
ital markets, of which five
declined and six remained
unchanged.
EQUITY MARKET
A total of 245,569 shares
changed hands, representing a
significant increase of 149,635
shares, versus last week's trad-
ing volume of 95,934 shares.
There were no advancers in
the market this week.
Focol Class 'B' Perpetual
Preference shares led the vol-
ume this week. A total of 75,000
shares changed hands at the par
value price of $1.
Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) saw 60,000 shares
trade, declining by $0.01 to end
the week at $2.64. Common-


wealth Bank (CBL) saw 52,952
shares trade, falling by $0.11 to
end the week at $7.19. Fam-
guard Corporation (FAM) trad-
ed 25,550 shares and closed
unchanged at $7.80. The lagger
of the week was Bahamas
Waste (BWL), which fell by
$0.34 to a new 52-week low of
$3.15 on a volume of 1,414
shares. Finance Corporation of
The Bahamas (FIN) decreased
by $0.02 to a new 52-week low
of $11.87 on a volume of 15,400
shares. Cable Bahamas (CAB)
traded 12,400 shares, falling by
$0.11 to $14.04.
BOND MARKET
Investors traded $150,000
(par value) worth of Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) Notes, all in
Series B Notes (FBB22) Due
2022.
COMPANY NEWS
Earnings Releases
Benchmark Bahamas (BBL)
released its unaudited financial
results for the third quarter end-
ed September 30, 2008. For the
first nine months of the year
BBL reported a net loss to com-
mon shareholders of $590,000,
representing a significant
decline of $2.1 million or 139
per cent in comparison to the
same period in 2007.
Earnings per share declined
to a $0.12 loss from $0.30 in
comparison last year. This loss
was driven primarily by large
declines in net unrealised and
realized gains on investments.
For the quarter, BBL report-
ed net income of $424,000 com--
pared to $1.1 million in the 2007
third quarter, a decrease of
$691,000 or 62 per cent. Earn-
ings per share decreased to
$0.09 from $0.23 or 61 per cent.
BBL's net investment income
declined by $410,000 or 159 per
cent, with the company report-
ing losses of $152,000 in the
quarter. Net realized and unre-
alised gains on investments of
$576,000 were also down quar-
ter-over-quarter by $281,000 or
33 per cent.
Total assets and liabilities
stood at $26.2 million and $24.4
million respectively, compared
to $22.3 million and $19.9 mil-
lion at year-end 2007.


The Bahamian Stock Market


FINDEX 858.89


BISX
SYMBOL
AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FBB
FCC
FCL
FCLB
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE


CLOSING
PRICE
$1.71
$0.73
$7.64
$11.80
$13.86
$3.15
$14.04
$7.19
$2.83
$11.50
$2.14
$2:64
$7.80
$2.37
$0.33
$5.20
$1.00
$11.87
$6.81
$11.10
$10.00


(-9.30%) YTD


CHANGE
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-0.74
$-0.34
$-0.11
$-0.11
$-
$-
$+0.05
$-0.01
$-0
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-0.02
$-
$-
$-


VOLUME
0
0
650
0
0
1,414
12,400
52,952
203
0
0
60,000
25,550
0
0
.2,000
75,000
15,400
0
0
0


YTD PRICE
CHANGE
3.01%
-14.12%
-20.50%
0.00%
-5.07%
-13.93%
16.51%
-14.71%
-10.16%
-21.23%
-57.54%
12.34%
8.33%
-10.57%
-57.14%
0.39%
0.00%
-8.34%
-6.07%
0.91%
0.00%


DIVIDENDS/AGM NOTES:
Premier Commercial Real Estate Investment Corporation
(PRE) has declared a dividend of $0.86 per share, payable on
December 2, 2008, to all shareholders of record date December
1, 2008.
PRIVATE PLACEMENT OFFERINGS:
FOCOL Holdings (FCL) announced it will be extending the
deadline of its private placement offering. The preferred shares
will be paying a dividend rate of prime + 1.75 per cent, payable
semi-annually.


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BUSINESS


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U5;







THETRBUN MNDA, ECEBEB1S208,EAGS3


Globalisation



must become



'two-way street,


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A SENIOR attorney has
urged Bahamian law firms to
expand beyond this nation if
they are going to become more
competitive and grow, arguing
that it was vital for the economy
to change globalization's 'one-
way' impact to date.
John Delaney, managing
partner at Higgs & Johnson,
speaking in the wake of his law
firm's expansion into the Cay-
man Islands via a merger with
Truman Bodden & Company,
which takes effect from Janu-
ary 1, 2009, said Bahamian law
firms needed to raise their sights
beyond this nation's legal ser-
vices market if they were to
obtain true scale.
"I recommend that Bahamian
firms generally, legal and oth-
erwise, that are looking at posi-
tioning themselves beyond the
Bahamas, do so," Mr Delaney
told Tribune Business.
"It's extremely important for
the development of the
Bahamian economy that we do.
We are more accustomed for
globalization to affect us from
other firms coming in, and we
need to change that and in prac-
tice make it a two-way street.
"Bahamian firms are best
able to promote Bahamian ser-
vices because they have a vest-
ed interest in doing so. If we're
truly going to compete, we have
to achieve scale. We can't local-
ly achieve scale to compete
internationally if we remain in
the Bahamas."
Mr Delaney added: "Higgs &
Johnson is not going to get
much larger if it stays in the


Bahamas. We won't be able to
compete on an international
level without expanding our
market.
"If we're going to grow, we
have to extend beyond the
Bahamas to grow and compete
with larger regional firms. Oth-
erwise, Bahamian firms will find
they remain here only to
become the prey of other
regional firms in due course.
"I think that there are many
jurisdictions in the [Caribbean]
region that Bahamian law firms
can get into now BVI, in addi-
tion to Cayman. In terms of
leading jurisdictions, you have
Cayman, BVI, Barbados and
Bermuda.
"I think there's a big market
for legal and corporate services,
and I think the Bahamian law
firms, if they want to increase
their market share, are going to


have to move outside the
Bahamas. They're going to be
doing local law in those juris-
dictions, and can blend in
Bahamian products as called for
in financial structures."
Mr Delaney said Truman
Bodden & Company was a nat-
ural merger partner for Higgs
& Johnson because it had acted
as its Caymanian correspondent
for some two decades, especial-
ly over the last 10 years. Talks
on the merger had begun ear-
ly last year".
When it came to overseas
expansion, Mr Delaney said it
would depend on the circum-
stances of each situation and
the options available, but
acquiring or merging with'an
established firm was usually the
easiest prospect.
"We went through all the
options," Mr Delaney added in
terms of Higgs & Johnson's
Caymanian move. First, we
determined to be in the Cay-
man Islands, then by what
mode. It didn't take us very
long to realise that if we wanted
to minimize the risk in getting
there, let's look at a going con-
cern that's holding its own, has
an established client base and
that we just need to grow and
develop.
"Once we came to that con-
clusion, it was: 'Which one of
the Cayman firms do we
approach?' We looked at them,
and thought we were best
approaching the one we dealt
with on a correspondent basis."
Another advantage in head-
ing to Cayman is that it is anoth-
er jurisdiction that is also based
on English common law, like
the Bahamas.


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Noew Povidence, oa001 ai, Exuma
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THE CHURCH Of
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at 5:00pmr


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BAHAMAS


CONFERENCE OF THE

METHODIST CHURCH
NASSAU, REGION


ItrinifJ Melholist Ckhupc

"l' encourage vyour prayers dur ing
this festive time of the year


I Special Events


SUNDAY 30TH NOVEMBER 7PM
Navsau Regional Service at Curry Memorial
Methodist Church to Pray for Peace.

MONDAY. IST DECEMBER 6:30PM
Special meeting at Queens' College Primary
School Hall with Re\ Neal Christie. of the
United Methodist Church (USA) Board of
Church and Society focus on issues of
Silence and crime in our SocietN.
,. WEDNESDAY. 3RD DECEMBER
if BCMC Da\ of Pray ing. Fasting & Giving.
\We encourage everyone to pray for our
1' nation and foi those \\ ho aue negati\el.
impacted by the economic crisI. We also.
elClcouL'ge c1 \ CI )one to fitb. focusing on
God. Our 1,'ust.ainei. And we encomiage
S etei.one to gite to help others (.ma.\be
\\ hat; \ouir ltmchi would have cost) doing
t\\ hout so that \\e can assist someone else.

,* ** SUNDAY. 14TH DECEMBER
3RD SLINDAY IN ADVENT
I lain \Whie Gift Service led by the Sunday
School. Followed by a fellowship luncheon.

SUNDAY 21TH DECEMBER
4TH SUNDAY IN ADVENT
aln W Iam Worship Serv ice
17 7pm Candle lighting Service

THURSDAY, 25TH DECEMBER
Christmas DaI)
II .im nWorship Service

WEDNESDAY, 31TH DECEMBER
NEW YEARS EVE
;*N I Ilpm Watch Night Seivice

A genterouts person will be enriched.
Proverbs 11:23


NOTICE


P ,sigatpLhe proyjsions.of Section 137 of the International Business Companies

Act, (No. 45 of 2000), NOTICE is hereby given that BROAD MANAGEMENT

LTD. is in dissolution and the date of commencement of the dissolution is

November 21, 2008



Lorna Kemp and Margaret Tatem-Gilbert
LIQUIDATORS
c/o EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd
1 Bay Street
2"d Floor, Centre of Commerce
P.O. Box SS-6289
Nassau, Bahamas


I


MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


f.. r.
^^^L~-j


r


~;~t~


. 6 /







PAE BMODABEUMBINE00STESRIUN


MPs are 'hoping to



'complete' warehouse



deal 'tomorrow'


10 Bank of The Bahamas
INTERNATIONAL


GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED ADVANCED
EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME


In collaboration with The Education Guaranteed Fund ILoan
Program of the Ministry of Education, the Bank of the Bahamas
Limited is pleased to advise that the cheque disbursement for ALL
students in the Loan Program will take place at Holy Trinity Activity
Centre, Stapledon Gardens, beginning Monday, December 8th to
Friday, December 12th, 2008 from 9:00a.m. to 3:00p.m. as follows:


NEW AND RETURNING STUDENTS




A-C Monday, December 8, 2008
D-1 Tuesday, December 9, 2008
J-M Wednesday, December 10, 2008
R-Smith Thursday, December 11, 2008
Spence-Z Friday, December 12, 2008



TIME: 9:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.

Place: Holy Trinity Activity Centre

Stapledon Gardens

Returning Students and/or Guarantors should be present and must bring
relevant identification (valid Passport and National Insurance Card).

New Students and Guarantors should be present and bring relevant
identification, (valid Passport, valid Marriage Certificate (where relevant),
National Insurance Card, Current job letter and copy of a utility bill).

All accounts must be current and all necessary documentation completed
before cheques are released.



NO DISBURSEMENT WILL BE MADE AT THE BANK
(Without a penalty fee being incurred)


FROM page 1B


economy."
Mr Wilchcombe said if they
were successful, they hoped "to
immediately hire 50 people.
"Over the next few weeks, as
we. grow and expand opera-
tions, we hope to hire 200 peo-
ple," Mr Wilchcombe told Tri-
bune Business.
Sources close to the situation
had told Tribune Business that
Associated Grocers had been
seeking $12 million for an out-
right purchase of its Grand
Bahama warehouse, which cost
some $8 million to construct.
If Mr Wilchcombe and Ms
Bi'idgewater are to succeed,
they will have to develop a
strong retail/wholesale customer
base and secure supply chain.
One way of doing the latter.
would be to act as a distribu-
tor/wholesaler for Associated
Grocers, and source product
exclusively through it.
It is critical that the Associ-
ated Grocers warehouse, which
was owned by its International
Distributors of Grand Bahama
subsidiary, succeeds because it
was the first venture to take
physical form in the Sea/Air
Business Centre.
And, furthermore, it was very
much the prototype model for
the logistics/transshipment/dis-
tribution hub that Freeport
seems -ideally suited for. Fail-
ure would send a bad message
to international investors and
businesses, with the Bahamas
losing the opportunity cost the
"what might have been' -
through Associated Grocers'
decision to exit.
That came as little surprise,
given that Calvin Miller, Asso-
ciatcd Grocers' president and
chief executive, had said earlier
this year that the company was
placing the Grand Bahama
warehouse and business plan
'on hold temporarily'. The sale
move comes almost one year
after the warehouse was offi-


cially opened, with Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham in atten-
dance.
It is highly likely that the
company lost patience with.,the
long wait for the Government
and Port Authority to amend
its licence, and let the Freeport
warehouse sell directly to major
Bahamas-based wholesalers and
food store chains.
The licence change was key
because the rationale for the
Freeport warehouse business
model had disappeared. It had
originally been designed as a
distribution/transshipment hub
that would allow Associated
Grocers to supply customers in
46 Caribbean and Latin Amer-
ican countries with product that
do not have to go through the
US, thus eliminating US
import/export taxes and addi-
tional supply chain costs from
the loading/unoloading of con-
tainers.
However, Associated Gro-
cers has since developed its own
bonded warehouse in Fort
Lauderdale, next to the major
ports and shipping companies,
which allows it to avoid those
taxes any way. It then sought
to supply the domestic Bahami-
an market from the Freeport
facility, believing that it had a
strong argument, given the rise
in food prices and general cost
of living.
Mr Deffler had previously
told The Tribune that the
restriction preventing it from
selling any goods in the
Bahamas through Freeport
meant "the real positive impact
will sadly be missed" in Grand
Bahama, New Providence and
other Bahamian islands.
He explained: "Most items
we procure from anywhere out-
side of the United States will
stop in Freeport. To supply any
retailer located in the Bahamas,
the product must then be sold
and shipped to Florida to our
parent company, Associated
Grocers. Associated Grocers
would then re-load the item(s)
back on a container destined to
a retailer located in the
Bahamas.
"This entire process adds


The University of the West Indies

Faculty of Law


UWI


he F iculiy of Law, University of the West Indies, extends warmest congratulations to lan
and '.lare-Jacqueline Winder of The Bahamas on their successful completion of the
Ma'. tei ol Laws (LLM) Corporate and Commercial Law Programme. Mr. Winder received
his Degree in 2007; and Mrs. Winder received her Degree on Saturday, October 25th, 2008, at
the Cave Hill Graduation Ceremony in Barbados. They are the first nationals of The Bahamas to
con iplete ilt Progr rin ,.:- irn Corporate and C(-'nrin icaa.l Law; and they have both done excep-
tiornall-.' wrll. thus distinguishing themselves. The Faculty of Law wishes them continued
',UCCe"s' in ihc-ir careers.,


The Faculty of Law now invites applications from other Bahamian nationals for entry
in January 2009 to its LLM and Postgraduate Diploma Programmes in:


'andCommercial Law ,



and to its

r'& rstgraduate Diploma Programme

g!itative Drafting for entry in September 2009

The Corporate and Commercial Law Programme was estaDlished in response to tlhe call aor advanced training
from lawyers practising in the area of Corporate and Commercial Law;. and for the benefit of non-lawyers working
in the insurance industry and in the financial services sector of the Region. The inauguration of the Caribbean
Single Market and the Caribbean Court of Justice, in addition to the growing volume of international commercial
transactions in the Region, has further underscored the critical need for advanced training in Corporate and
Commercial Law.

The Public Law Programme, developed as a complement to the Legislative Drafting Programme, is also a critical
response to the changing dispensation in the Region, wrought by the inauguration of the Caribbean Single Market
and the Caribbean Court of Justice. There is now the urgent need for advanced training for lawyers in the area of
Public Law, who would seek audience before the Caribbean Court of Justice, particularly in its appellate jurisdic-
tion. But there is also the growing need of CARICOM Governments for training of senior managers in the Public
Service in the area of Public Law, given that their work has become increasingly complex, often entailing decision
making that assumes an executive, legislative and, sometimes, an adjudicatory cast.

The Legislative Drafting Programme is a fully residential programme, and has existed since the 1980s. The
Programme is directly linked to good governance, hence the requirement that, in addition to the core Legislative
Drafting Course, candidates for the LLM are required to take Advanced Constitutional Law and Advanced
Administrative Law.
011 A.,.! ,i -1
.. ,' 1 , ' ;' '" :;-3


Legal Notice


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
LENZBURG LIMITED
In Voluntary liquidation

"Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of
2000), LENZBURG LIMITED is in Dissolution."

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 18th day of
November, 2008.

Christopher John Roscouet
Fairbairn Trust Limited
Fairbairn House
31 Esplanade, St. Helier,
Jersey, JEI 1FT
Liquidator




PUBLIC NOTICE





The Road Traffic Authority Board will hold
a Public Sitting on Tuesday, December 2nd,
2008 at 10:00am at Workers House, Tonique
Williams Darling Highway.


All persons who have submitted applications
for the grant of Self-Drive Cars/Scooters and
School Bus Franchises must be in attendance
or their relatives.


CONTROLLER


unnecessary costs to all retailers
of the Bahamas, and these addi-
tional costs are most certainly
born by you and I, the con-
sumer. All of our other retailers
throughout the Caribbean and
South/Central America will
benefit greatly, as we can dis-
tribute the product either direct-
ly from the manufacturer or
through our Freeport facility."
Speaking at the warehouse
opening, which took place just
over one year ago today, Mr Mr
Deffler had said: "Eventually,
our goal is to have about 1.5
million square feet of ware-
house space and we could very
well become one of the eco-
nomic. engines for Grand
Bahama."
He added: "We will proba-
bly employ about 400 to 500
persons when we are all done
with the three phases of con-
struction."
He had previously told The
Tribune that a major invest-
ment by the Chinese electron-
ics/industrial conglomerate,
CITIC, which had signed an
agreement with International
Distributors in June 2007, could
transform Grand Bahama into a
free trade zone rivalling the
Free Trade Zone in Panama.
CITIC had been planning to
construct warehouse and show-
room facilities at the Sea Air
Business Centre on Grand
Bahama, the same site where
International Distributors is
located, turning the area into a
'buyers emporium'. Potential
purchasers and buyers would
be attracted from across the
Western Hemisphere to come
to Grand Bahama, where they
would view a variety of Chi-
nese-made goods.
Apart from Mr Wilchcombe
and Ms Bridgewater, another
interested party is the Trinida-
dian conglomerate, Neal &
Massey. That company, through
its purchase of Barbados Ship-
ping & Trading (BS&T), is the
largest shareholder in BSL
Holdings, the buyout group
which owns a 78 per cent stake
in Bahamas Supermarkets, the
holding company for the 12-
strong City Markets chain.


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008


THE TRIBUNE








II I II IIL.." .J % I.-


BUSIN'0


RBC
Royal Bank
of Canada


PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE
Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.
*HmnSES/Ai 1ASA1 llS 11111111 |INGS


THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company's chairman,
T.B. Donaldson, is expected to
address the Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce at a special lun-
cheon this Thursday, Decem-
ber 4, at the British Colonial
Hilton.
"The subject of privatization
is very important to the future
development of business in this
country," said Philip Simon, the
Chamber's executive director.
"The world of commerce
today spins on information -
how fast we get it, absorb it,
exchange it, use it, build on it.
And nothing drives us further
or impedes us more than the
speed and quality of how we
communicate that information,
whether by e-mail, fixed line or
wireless. If we are serious about
growing business in the
Bahamas, then we must be just
as serious about delivering the
fastest, most reliable communi-
cations.
"We at the Chamber defi-
nitely look forward to Mr Don-
aldson's presentation and an
update on when the privatisa-
tion will take place and under
what terms and conditions, what
the new partner is likely to look
like and what we can expect in
the way of change following the
sale of the majority share of
BTC."
The movement towards pri-
vatisation has picked up speed
since the new BTC privatisa-
tion committee headed by Mr
Donaldson was named earlier
this year. The deputy chairman
is former governor of The Cen-
tral Bank Julian Francis, who.
is also chairman of BTC.
The Government has
announced its intention to sell
51% of BTC and open fixed-


line service to competition
immediately following the sale.
Wireless services will be open
for competitive licencing a ye4r
after the sale, with the first call
from a licenced competitor
planned for the two-year
anniversary.
Observers expect dramatic
growth in the telecoms sector
following the end to the monop-
oly BTC has enjoyed on some
services, pointing to the break-
up of AT&T in the US, which
gave rise to eight Baby Bells,
lower rates and more services.
Mr. Simon said: "The tremen-
dous potential wrapped within
the telecommunications infra-
structure that exists currently
within the Bahamas has yet to
be fully and effectively utilized.
"Notwithstanding the fact
that there may be any number
of reasons for this, the liberali-
sation of the industry and pri-
vatisation of the monopoly
would go a long way in improv-
ing the efficiency and effective-
ness of businesses across the
board."


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


'Legendary Past ... Glorious Future!'

Now accepting applications for teachers for September, 2009

for the following areas:


EARLY LEARNING CENTRE (Ages 3-5)
Classroom Teachers

PRIMARY SCHOOL (Grades 1 6)
Classroom, Physical Education (including teaching Swimming)

HIGH SCHOOL (Grades 7"- 12)
Chemistry, Biology, Physics, English Language, Geography, Modem Languages
(French and Spanish) Social Studies. Mathematics, Home Economics, Music, Art



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Acc.- r.i ir. F1 ,1 i ,clu.]li, r.,,,n. pur:ued.*.vhcre teaching and learning are
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p,'1rrd in,:luling g uily, penrirri, hedtIh nd
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imal.e i .:ic'ri, f t'rn t ic -ol k in h .ren'.' ,., .,... :ratLI,:h .I in u
mch T- lthe .hn-.cI iIi fe '[r.r... :ih .- iz hun:l h J- d I a
l v f E'" m'[ 'r.rr. r', r '-ll i .- Th"~~ Inicrrnationl A ":'c l .I n'
Th';.- JIk'h'" t h '.1 ',ur'cl o1" ,' h .. 5 : i. ., ] i.Ik h. J':t ...:l,- l:, College: an, .l
pm U:n' lr,,, -n [ !.;: (I Abl', CI.1)


Application forms are available from lie Human Resources Office at the school or may be downloaded from
our award winning website "r.w qch nrcefbch corn The completed application, together with a covering
letter, a statement of educational philo ophy and a recent photograph must be sent to:
The Principal
Queen's College
P.O. Box N7127
Nassau, Bahamas
Or faxed to: 242-393-3248, or ema ed to dlynch@qchenceforth.com and should arrimve no later than
December 31, 2008. Candidates short listed will be contacted by telephone, fax or email for an Interview.

QUEEN I' L. COLLEGE
PO Box N-'"12'
NasQau, Bahamva.
Tel. (2-12) 3 1666-393 2153 193.2646 Fax. (242)393-324
WebsIte: www qieitceforth cam Email., uen',ia'qachnceforth.com


(400) Property situated in Cala-
bash Bay on the Island of An-
dros. 75' x 150' and containing
thereon a small grocery store
480 sq ft and an incomplete 3
bed 2 bath house 900 sq ft Ap-
praised value: $65,000

(902) Lot containing commer-
cial building housing a sports
bar, restaurant and a two sto-
rey commercial building on
Queens Highway, Tarpum Bay,
Eleuthera.
Value: $180,000

(902) Lotofland94x94x150x150
on Queens Highway just south
of Palmetto Point with a two
storey stone building containing
two apartments. Each unit has
3 bed/2 1/2 bath, kitchen, living
room and 3 linen closets.
Appraised value: $287,209

(902) Lot#31 situated at the in-
tersection ofAlbert &Victoria
Streets in Hatchet Bay contain-
ing a 2 storey concrete build-
ing with an incomplete 2 bed/1
bath apt and store downstairs.
Property approx 2,250 sq ft
Appraised value: $65,000

(601) Lot #17 located VillageAl-
lotment with fourplex. Value:
$500,000


(808) Lot #3 Block24 in the Cen-
treville Subdivision. Building
#109/Eastern side of Collins'Av-
enue. Comprising commercial
2,800 sq ft commercial building.
Appraised value: $582,000.00

(902) Parceloflandlocatedon
the south side of Dry Hill Road in
Palmetto Point containing 1.087.
acres with partially started struc-
ture. Appraised value $38,000

(501) All that piece, parcel
or lot of land situated on Cow-
pen Road (1000 ft east of the
Faith Avenue Junction) in the
Southern District of New Provi-
dence, Bahamas containing a
duplex apartment comprising of
two 2-bedroom/1-bathroom
apartments. Appraised value
$150,000,

(501) All that piece of land
being Parcel #3 and Parcel #4
situated on the South side of
Prince Charles Drive, New Provi-
dence, Bahamas containing a
commercial building housing
two shop space on the ground
floor and three shop space on
the second floor with.a large
storage area in the rear. Total
area 8400 sq ft. Appraised value
$366,650


(501) All that piece, parcel or
land having an approximate
area of 2100 sq ft situated on
the Western side of Blue Hill
Road about 70 ft North of Peter
Street and about 115 ft south
of Laird Street in the Southern
District of New Providence, Ba-
hamas containing a commercial
building housing a two bed/
one bath unit on the top floor
and a store on the first floor.
Appraised Value $154,000

(801) Two parcels of land con-
taining 21,120 sq ft situated on
the southern side of East Shirley
Street and 100 feet west of its
junction with "Shirlea" in the
Eastern District of the Island of
New Providence The Baha-
mas. Situated thereon is a Gas
Station andAuto Repair Shop.
Appraised value $799,497

(802)Developed Lot #16B
(2.039 acres), Britannia Boul-
evard, Freeport, Grand Bahama
containing a 34,500 square foot
commercial building. Building
features a bowling alley, pool/
game room, gym, restaurant &
bar and manager's office. Ap-
praised Value $3,637,800


PRAOPERTIES


(902) 0.281 acre of vacant land
off Queen's Highway in the set-
tlement of Governor's Harbour,
Eleuthera. Appraised value
$31,320

(701) Undeveloped lot #149.
Seafan Lane, Lucayan Beach
Subdivision. Grand Bahama,
18,750 sq ft. Appraised value:
TBA

(402) Lot 89, Block 7 Aberdeen
Drive, Bahamia West Replat
Subdivision, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, consisting of 12,100
square feet.
Appraised value $51,000

(723) Vacantlot #20 comprising a
portion of the Murphy Town
Crown Allotment #72 situated
in Murphy Town, Abaco, Baha-
mas.
Appraised value: $18,000

(902) Vacantlotoflandsituatedin
South Palmetto Point, Eleuthera
measuring 97 x 127 x 82 x
121.
Appraised value: $38,000

(908) Vacant residential Lot#30
comprising 6f 1.02 acre located
Dundas Town, Abaco.
Appraised value: $20,000

(108) Vacant canal lot#71 Silver
Cove Court, Silver Cove Subdivi-
sion. Zoned: Tourist Commercial.
Approximately 0.4 acre.
Appraised value $175,000

(108) Vacant Single Family Lot#5
Block F Bahamia South Sub.
Appraised value $35,700

(702) Undeveloped lots #4A;
16,17,18 and 19 located Chap-


man Estates, West Bay.
Appraised value $348,000

(565) Vacant lot #5 located Eleu-
thera Island Shores, Seaside Drive
Section B, Block#15, Eleuthera,.
9,691 sq ft
Appraised value: $27,620

(800) Vacant property located.
Bahamia South. Block 16 lot 9A,
Freeport, Grand Bahama con-
sisting of 24,829.20 sq.ft.
Appraised walue $52,000

(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65
sq ft) situated in Mango Lane
Section "B" Block#15, Eleuthera
Island Shores on the Island of
Eleuthera. Appraised value:
$50,189

(909) Vacant residential Lot#
63 (7800 sq ft). Crown Allot-
ments located Murphy Town,
Abaco.
Appraised value: $18,000

(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5
Block #5 Unit #1 Devonshire.
Appraised value $30,000

(802) VacantCommercialLotNo:
3A, Block 60 Bahamia Subdivi-
sionVI containing 3 acres located
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
AppraisedValue $750,000

(724) Vacant land at Love Beach,
Western District of New Provi-
dence comprising a portion of
"Love Estate" containing I acre.
Appraised value $225,000

(569) Vacant property located
in Subdivision called "Culmer-
ville" being a portion of Lot #47
and a portion of Lot #57.
Appraised value $24,000


(569) All that piece parcel or
lot of land being Lot No. 102
in the Subdivision known as
"EXUMA HARBOUR" in the
Island of Great Exuma meas-
uring 10,000 sq.ft.
Appraised value $20,000

(569) All thatpiece parcel or lot
of land situate in the settlement
of James Cistern on the Island
of Eleuthera one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas measuring approx
10,000 sq.ft.
Appraised value TBA
(202) Vacant lot of land con-
taining 1.786 acre, situated east
of Knowles Drive, approximately
1,420 ft. southward of Harold
Road in the western district of
New Providence.-'Bahamas.
Appraised value $ 170,000

(202) Vacant lot of land con-
taining 41,164 sq ft, being Lot
#8 in Love Estate, Phase 1, situ-
ated 2,300 ft. south ofWest Bay
Street in the Western District of
New Providence, Bahamas.
Appraised value $165,000

(501 Ten acres of land situated
onWoods Cay, known as Little
Abaco, between Cooper's Town
and Cedar Harbour in Abaco,
Bahamas. The property is unde-
veloped but have aview of the
sea from both the North and
South side. Appraised Value
$1,078,750.00
(501) Vacant property con-
sisting of Lot #894 situated in
the Freeport Ridge Subdivision,
Section #1, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Bahamas. Appraised
value : TBA


OFFICE


COMMERCIAL BANKING
CENTRE
Tel: 242-356-8568
(800) Mrs. Monique Crawford
(801) Mr. Jerome Pinder
(802) Mr. Brian Knowles
(805) Mrs. Tiffany Simms O'Brien
(806) Mrs Lois Hollis
(807) Mr. Lester Cox
(808) Mrs. DaShann Clare-Paul
(810) Miss. LaPaige Gardiner
PALMDALE SHOPPING
CENTRE BRANCH
Tel: 242-322-4426/9
or 242-302-3800
(201) Ms. Nicola Walker
(202) Mr. Robert Pantry
(205) Mrs. Cedricka Clarke
NASSAU INT'L AIRPORT
Tel: 242-377-7179
(433) Mrs. Suzette Hall-Moss
GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR,
ELEUTHERA
Tel: 242-332-2856/8
(902) Mr. Brian Hanna
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
Tel: 242-333-2230
J901) Ms. Velderine Laroda


ANDROS TOWN
Tel: 242-368-2071
(400) Mrs. Rose Bethel
NASSAU MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-322-8700
(701) Mr. James Strachan
JFK DRIVE BRANCH
Tel: 242-325-4711
(402) Mrs. Chandra Gilbert
PRINCE CHARLES
SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-393-7505/8
(501) Mr. Keith Lloyd
(505) Ms. Patricia Russell
CABLE BEACH
Tel: 242-327-6077
(466) Mrs. Winnifred Roberts
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO
Tel: 242-367-2420
(908) Mr. Antonio Eyma
(909) Mrs. Sylvia Poitier
(910) Ms. Cyprianna Williams
BIMINI BRANCH
Tel: 242-347-3031
(105) Miss Ganiatu Tinubu
GRAY'S, LONG ISLAND
Tel: 242-337-0101
(100) Mrs Lucy Wells


LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
Tel: 242-502-5170/242-502-5180
(716) Mrs. Ingrid Simon
(717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby
(723) Ms. Deidre King
(724) Mrs. Faye Higgs
(725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson
(565) Mrs. Catherine Davis
(569) Mrs. Vanessa Scott
MACKEY STREET
Tel: 242-393-3097
(601) Ms. Cherelle
Martinborough
BAY & VICTORIA BRANCH
Tel: 242-322-2451/3
(301) Ms. Thyra Johnson
(304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-352-6631/2
(101-F) Ms. Garnell Frith
(102) Ms. Elaine Collie
(103) Mrs. Damita Cartwright
(108) Ms. Sylvie Carey
LYFORD CAY BRANCH
Tel: 242-362-4540/4037
(101-N) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson


11VSeaam ' ^aic B



K~Queen's Cffege'^


I


I


IVIJl Jrl/ UL-..tJL-IIDV .T- I, -.UUO, r-iU.lC OD


I








PAGE 6B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008 THE TRIBUNE


The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the
following position:
CASHIER

Serves as Collection Clerk with responsibility for collecting Consular
fees in accordance with specific guidelines.

Receives logs of all incoming visa applications from courier service
agents and maintains a spreadsheet log of same.

Examines Non-Immigrant Visa applicants for basic requirements to
ensure completeness.

Serves as back-up NIV Clerk. Prints Machine Readable Visas (MRV)
approved by the Consular Office.

This Position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

Completion of Secondary School is required.
MS Office Computer Applications required
One year of experience in performing basic clerical and cashering
functions.


PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

- Must be able to operate an electronic cash register.
- Must possess good interpersonal skills.
- Must have the ability to deal with the general public.


BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance-based incentives, medical and dental
insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for training and
development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible
for employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to .5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday at the security area of the American Embassy, Queen
Street. Completed applications should be returned to the United States
Embassy: addressed to the Human Resources Office no later .than,
December 9, 2008. Telephone calls will npt. be accepted.





We're looking for a few good

people to join our team.



DO YOU HAVE


WHAT IT TAKES?


Apply for the position of






Sales Executive




Must have prior sales experience

Must have transportation

Must have great communication skills

Must be able to work flexible hours

Must be computer literate

Must be able to manage client

accounts/collections and receivables




Please drop off resumes to



The Tribune


MERGER, from 1B

Lynden Pindling International
Airport (LPIA).
This meant that the Bahamas
was a fertile market for yacht
and aircraft registries, but this
nation has neither yet, even
though the Bahamas Maritime
Authority (BMA) is said to be
working on developing a
Bahamian yacht registry. The
Cayman Islands, though, has
both yacht and aircraft reg-
istries.
As a result, Mr Delaney said
the merger with Truman Bod-
den & Company would enable
Higgs & Johnson's Nassau
office to offer yacht and aircraft
registry services to its Bahanras-
based client base, acting as a
conduit to funnel their business
to its new Cayman office, which
would take care of them.
"We have identified a num-
ber of synergies, and it just
makes absolute sense," Mr
' Delaney said of the merger. "It
will all be done, as far as the
client is concerned, under one
roof and seamlessly.
"Both offices have existing
clientele, and we can look at
our existing client bases to see
how we can cross-sell services
that will be of benefit to them.
Doing that previously may not
have made business sense for
us, or it may not even have
occurred to us."
He added: "Unquestionably,
we would practice law in an
international environment not
just be in an international finan-
cial centre selling services to the
world, but actively practicing
against firms on the ground
from elsewhere, which we don't
have in the Bahamas."
Breaking into the interna-
tional legal services market via
the Cayman Islands, Mr
Delaney explained, "was the
right step for us", as it would
enable Higgs & Johnson to
compete with the "great
Bermuda law firms, the domi-
nant British Virgin Islands
firms, and Channel Islands
firms".
"It's where we want to be at
this particular time." he added,
"which is being more competi-
tive in the international legal
services business and develop-
ing Higgs & Johnson as a
regional brand for legal and cor-
porate services."
Higgs & Johnson, which is
currently celebrating its 60th
anniversary, will be "the domi-
nant player" in the merged enti-


ty, which after a 12-month tran-
sition period as Higgs Johnson
Truman Bodden & Company
in the Cayman Islands, will
become known in that territory
as Higgs & Johnson from 2010
onwards.
Similarly, both companies'
corporate services provider
departments, H&J Corporate
Services and Trulaw Corporate
Services, will merge following
regulatory approval. After
another 12-month transition
period in the Cayman Islands,
trading as H&J Trulaw Corpo-
rate Services Ltd, the company
will become H&J Corporate
Services (Cayman) Ltd.
Adding that to his best
knowledge, Higgs & Johnson
was the first Bahamian law firm
to expand beyond this nation
into the Caribbean, Mr Delaney
declined to say whether any dol-
lar value had been paid for the
Cayman firm, saying: "We call it
a merger."
Higgs & Johnson has some
40 attorneys on staff and Tru-
man Bodden & Company eight,
the latter's total workforce com-
plement reaching 31. In the
Bahamas, the Higgs & Johnson
group employed a total of 111
persons..
Bahamian law firms are
increasingly looking outside the
Bahamas to grow, with some -
like Higgs & Johnson unable
to expand any more in this mar-
ket given its size. Tribune Busi-
ness understands that fellow
commercial and civil litigation
specialist, Lennox Paton, is also
looking to move into the
Caribbean via the creation of
its own office in the British Vir-
gin Islands.
Meanwhile, Mr Delaney told
Tribune Business that the merg-
er would strengthen both law
firms in the areas where some
might perceive them as weak.
The agreement would "make
the Bahamas stronger where it
is less strong, on the institu-
tional, funds and capital mar-
kets side of things", areas where
Cayman's expertise is
renowned, while the Cayman
office would be able to draw on
this nation's world-class repu-
tation for private wealth man-
agement and fiduciary/corpo-
rate services.
Apart from providing Higgs
& Johnson with a better avenue
for targeting institutional and
investment fund markets, Mr
Delaney said: "From a business,
point of view, we are now mul-
ti-jurisdictional and multi-law.


Cayman will not just be some
place to sell Bahamian legal ser-
vices to, as there we will be
practicing Cayman domestic
and ,international law.
"Then there are the
economies of scale. It should be
more efficient to operate a large
large law firm, than if we had
two separate operations with
duplication of costs. And we
cannot ignore the mitigation of
multi-jurisdictional risk."
The Higgs & Johnson man-
aging partner explained that
with the international financial
services market and its regula-
tion being especially volatile
and dynamic at this moment,
the'diversified markets and
business/revenue streams served
by the Bahamian and Cayman-
ian operations would help
lessen the impact of any nega-
tive change in one area.
Mr Delaney said the focus
was now on ensuring Higgs &
Johnson's merger worked, and
that the integration process was
smooth and the two offices
functioned as one business unit,
with the same IT infrastructure
in place.
Higgs & Johnson has
obtained the major approvals
necessary for the transaction
from the Cabinet (the National
Economic Council) and the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
on exchange control approval.
Mr Delaney said there were
"a couple of remaining regula-
tory approvals, which are well
underway. We have approval
in principle, and they will be
coming as a matter of course.
We're in contact with all the
regulators".
Among the outstanding
approvals is the final sign-off
from the Securities Commission
of the Bahamas and its equiva-
lent in the Cayman Islands on
the financial and corporate ser-
vices provider side.
Mr Delaney will continue as
Higgs & Johnson's managing
partner for the Nassau office,
and have overall responsibility
for both operations, while Chris
Narborough will serve as coun-
try managing partner for the
Cayman Islands.
Higgs & Johnson will contin-
ue to focus on its existing prac-
tice areas, including business
transactions, litigation, banking
and trust company issues, secu-
rities, real estate transactions
and private client business. Tru.-.
man Bodden &,.Company,
located in Grand Cayman, has,.,
been in business for 35 years.


'Legendary Past ... Glorious Future!'


Has a vacancy for a dynamic and versatile


PROPERTY SUPERVISOR


The successful candidate must be able to:

* Determine the needs of the department to affect work production

* Develop and maintain a preventative maintenance programme in
a timely manner

* Plan schemes of work in order to have a continuous upkeep
programme of the property

* Establish work schedules and monitor performance, discipline and
staff evaluation

* Assist with recruitment and oversee training of new staff

The starting salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.
However, preference will be given to candidates with relevant training received
at a recognized technical school. We offer a competitive benefits package
including gratuity, pension, health and dental insurance and discount on
children's'tuiboron



Application forms are available from the Human Resources Office at the school or may
be downloaded from our award winning website ww,,chericetorth.com. The
completed application together with a covenng letter a statement of educational
philosophy and a recent photograph must be sent to

The Principal
Queen's College
P.O. Box N7127,Nassau, Bahamas
Or faxed to. 242-393-3248. or emailed to dlynch@qchenceforth.com and should arrive
no later than December 12, 2008. Candidates shortlisted will be contacted by
telephone, fax or email for an interview

QUEEN'S COLLEGE
P.O. BllyN N.'12. Nasii. iBiianiss
Tel::1242139. 1666.193l215'9.3 .2646 0 F. i-4mi 393..,1)4S
I;


/~4i t4~f'/


Shirley & Deveaux Streets

or email: tribune@tribunemedia.net

c/o Sales Manager


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008


I BUSINESS I


o?>n,, Y-~y\ rb


14a / 1 ,+
7 W


THE TRIBUNE


r>









TH TIBNEMODBUECMBRNE00,SAGI7


Visa exemption to boost


Bahamas financial services




competitiveness


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE visa waiver exemptions
that Bahamians travelling to the
European Union (EU) will
enjoy from Spring 2009 onwards
will make this nation's financial
services industry more compet-
itive and 'level the playing field',
Tribune Business has been told,
creating "huge "relief" for the
business community.
Wendy Warren, the Bahamas
Financial Services Board's chief
executive and executive direc-
tor, said the previous require-
ment for Bahamians to possess
a visa before they could travel
to the EU "certainly made us
stand out" given that the same
requirements were unlikely to
have been imposed on rival
international financial centres
such as Bermuda and the Cay-
man Islands, which are both US
Crown dependencies.
Acknowledging that the visa
issue had been a bureaucratic
impediment and nuisance to the
conduct of business by Bahami-
ans in Europe, Ms Warren said
the visa waiver was likely to
enhance the financial industry's
competitiveness.
"Certainly, I imagine Cayman
and Bermuda had no difficul-
ties, so it's another step in lev-
eling the playing field," Ms
Warren said of the EU visa
waiver set to come on line for
Bahamians. "It will allow us to
compete on a level playing
field."
The Bahamas and EU ini-
tialed the visa waiver agreement
on November 19, 2008, and it
now has to be ratified by both
sides before it can take effect.
An EU spokesman told Tri-
bune Business the date when it
would be implemented was not
certain, but Spring 2009 is real-
istic"."'


M .
Vv!K'..
"t" & r,


The spokesman added: "The
future visa waiver agreements
only cover short stays that do
not exceed three months in a
half year. The agreements pro-
vide for visa-free travel for the
citizens of the European Union
and for the citizens of the
Bahamas holders of all pass-
ports (diplomatic, service and
ordinary) between their terri-
tories for stays not exceeding
three months.
"The agreements cover all
categories of travellers, includ-
ing tourists, visitors, busi-
nesspersons, except for the cat-
egory of persons travelling for
the purpose of carrying out a
paid activity, for whom each
EU Member State and the
Bahamas remain free to impose
the visa requirement in accor-
dance with the applicable Com-
munity or national law."
Ms Warren told Tribune


Business that the EU visa.
requirements had been espe-
cially irksome when Bahamian
financial services employees,
were required to. travel to their
institution's European head
offices at short notice, some-
thing the bureaucracy made vir-
tually impossible.
As a result, it was possible
that head offices, realizing the
travel woes, would not call on
Bahamians to attend such meet-
ings even though their presence
may be urgently required.
With the Bahamas compet-
ing at a global level in financial
services, and the ability to trav-
el key to competitiveness, Ms
Warren said the obtaining of
the EU visa waiver would only
enhance this nation's business
platform.
Dionisio D'Aguilar, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce's president, said of the
EU visa waiver: "That will be a
huge relief for people going to
Europe, because it was very
costly, very time-consuming and
a natural impediment for us
when it came to doing business
in Europe."
He added that the move's
timing coincided perfectly with
the Economic Partnership
Agreement's (EPA) signing, for
if EU nationals and firms were
able to come to the Bahamas, it
was only natural for the EU to
reciprocate via a "two-way
street" to give Bahamians the
same access.
The Chamber president
added that Bahamians could
spend several thousand dollars
on flying to Miami and Wash-
ington to obtain visas from EU
embassies and consulates, inclu-
sive of air fares, hire cars, food
and daily spending, and possible
overnight stays at hotels, not to
mention the time spent.
"It's a huge relief, especially


for Bahamians in the financial
services industry, who fre-
quently have to make trips to
countries in the EU. The visa
was an enormous source of irri-
tation to them, and I think the
business community will be
greatly relieved that this imped-
iment is now being removed,"
Mr D'Aguilar said.
The visa waiver agreement
thus tackles one of the 'Vexing
Business Issues' the Chamber
identified in a paper submitted
to the Government earlier this
year.
The Chamber said at the
time: "Numerous complaints
were received about the need
for Bahamians to obtain visas
to travel to Europe.
"There is no substantial for-
eign representation by a Euro-
pean country in the Common-
wealth of The Bahamas. There-
fore, business persons, wanting
to travel to Europe are incon-
venienced by the requirement
that they obtain a visa which is
extremely difficult and expen-
sive to obtain.
"It usually involves either
incurring the cost (approxi-
mately $500) of flying to Miami,
renting a car and staying
overnight or 'Fedexing' one's
passport to the relevant con-
sulate
in Miami and being without
one's passport for an undeter-
mined amount of time (plus the
worry that your passport may
be lost or not returned in time).
"This is a nuisance, a time
wasting inconvenience, and a
true cost for those Bahamians in
the financial sector who require
visas often to travel to Europe
or through Europe. it also pre-
vents Bahamians from being
able to just pop on a plane and
be at a meeting in Europe, the
next day, as is sometimes
required."


L.EGALNOTICE

NOTICE

PHB LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

TAKE NOTICE that an Extraordinary General Meet
ing of the Shareholders of PHB Limited will be held at
the office of The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited,
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets,
P.O. Box N-3026, Nassau, The Bahamas on ihc 22nd
day of December, 2008 for the purpose of having the
Liquidator's final account laid before the Shareholders
and hearing any explanation that may be given thereon
by the Liquidator.

Dated the 21th flay of November, 2008.



MOXZV







Accounting records in bad shape?
Need financial statements for the bank? (2-4 weeks)
Need a business plan and financing proposal prepared?
Need business licence prepared/certified? (1-2 weeks)
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Business Start-Up Assistance/Consultations
Business Success Pack....$125
Construction & Contract Accounting
Computerized Quickbooks Set-up Training (Interactive)
Budgets & Cash Forecasting
Controllership Services Per Diem Low Rates
Small Business Accounting Services/System
Business Plans Handbooks....$45
NEW BUSINESS START-UP KIT ..... $50
A guide to starting and managing a small business
(Business Start-Ups Audio Tapes...$10)
BUSINESS SEMINARS REGISTRATION $30
(Materials + Refreshments + Special Discounts)
Small Business Accounting
December 13 @ 10am (Handbook...$25)
BUSINESS PLANS SPECIAL
Preparation + Financing Referrals
TEL: 325-7313 or 322-6000 FAX: 323-3700


Small Business Consultants


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHA. ..
COUNSELLING AND HEALTH-SERVICES EPSA. x1
Visit our wehsite at www.cob.edu.Lbs, '":; '"..





"THE HELPING LINK"
The Counselling and Health Services Department's
Response to the Financial Crisis

OBJECTIVES

1. To provide psychological assistance and support to persons who recently
lost their jobs as a result of the current financial crisis.
2. To provide career planning and development skills.
3. To provide educational information on coping skills and guidelines for
seeking re-employment.

ACTIVITIES.
1. Free psychological and career counseling on Mondays, Wednesdays and
Friday 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the Counselling and Health Services Department
of The College of The Bahamas, 3rd floor Portia Smith Student Services
Centre, Oakes Field campus. Appointments needed. Call 302-4439 /
302-4380.
2. A Series of Seminars will be offered to help displaced workers..


Tues, Dec 2, 2008


10 a.m. 12 noon
&
6 p.m. 8 p.m.


Information Group
Session


All Counsellors


Thurs, Dec 4. 2008 2 p.m. 4 p.m. Presenting the Best You Camille Smith

Coping With Stress and Dr. Suzanne Newbold
Thurs, Dec 4, 2008 6 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Loss in Challenging and Stan Smith
Times

Fri. 5th Dec, 2008 10:00 a.m. 12:00 noon Resume Writing Norma Turnquest

Tues Dec 9, 2008 10 a.m. 12 noon Presenting the Best You Camille Smith

Tues Dec 9,2008 12 noon 1:30 p.m. Interviewing Techniques Norma Turnquest

Wed Dec 10, 2008 12 noon 1:30) p.m. Career Survival and Dr. Joan Vanderpool
6 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Transition

Wed, Dec 10, 2008 3:30 p.m. 5:00 i.m. Financial Management C. Anthony Smith
Thurs. Dec 11, 2008 10:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m. Financial Management C. Anthony Smith
Thurs, Dec 11,2008 1 p.m. 2:30 p.m. Images of Resilience Anastacia Forbes
Fri, Dec 12. 2008 10:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m. Anger Management Teorah L. Ferguson
__11___ _


BIG SAVINGS


UP TO 25% off


On Select







SOutboards


SALE ENDS DECEMBER 31, 2008
SALE ON CURRENT INVENTORY ONLY, WHILE SUPPLIES LAST



Lightbourne Marine ..

East Bay Street, Nassau

242-393-5285


I


1


MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008, PAGE 7B


IJ44


THE TRIBUNE


Am







PAGE 8B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008


THE TRIbulvt-


Cable confirms mulled Columbus stake buyout


CABLE, from 1B

sions" with Columbus Commu-
nications over the latter selling
its 30.2 per cent stake back to
Cable Bahamas at a price of
$14.28 per share.
Cable Bahamas said that
price represented a modest 1
per cent premium to the price at
which its shares had traded at
recently. Given that Columbus
Communications owns
5,954,600 shares, it wbuld value
Cable Bahamas' stake at
$85.174 million, right where Tri-
bune Business had revealed,
with the entire company valued
at $282.035 million.


Explaining that no binding
agreement had been reached
between Cable Bahamas and
Columbus Communications, the
former's statement said the 1
per cent premium was relative-
ly modest for such transactions,
and reflected the fact that
Columbus's shareholding had
"exclusive and special rights"
Cable Bahamas also con-
firmed it had sounded out
'sophisticated investors' the
term commonly used to
describe institutional players,
such as pension funds and insur-
ance companies, plus select high
net-worth individuals bankers
and corporate/financial advis-


2008


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
CLE/qui/No. 00578
Common Law and Equity Division


TN TiHE MATTER OF ALL THAT TRACT of Land
comprising 53.513 acres being a portion of Crown Grant
1-42 to George Farquharson and situate in Braemar Settlement,
Crooked Island, Bahamas, approximately 1.2 miles Southeast
of Major's Cay
Landing

IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act of 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Japheth Edison
Deleveaux

NOTICE OF PETITION

Pursuant to an Order of The Supreme Court dated the 9th
day of June, A.D. 2008.

The Petition of Japheth Edison Deleveaux of
Imperial Park, Seabreeze Estate in the Eastern
District of New Providepce, one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth Of The Bahamas showeth in respect of:

ALL THAT tract of land comprising 53.513 acres being
a portion of Crown Grant 1-42 to George Farquharson
and situate in Braemar Settlement, Crooked Island,
Bahamas, approximately 1.2 miles Southeast of Major's
Cay Landing and bounded Easterly by another portion
of Crown Grant 1-42 and running thereon One Thousand
"Nine Hundred and Forty-seven and Thirty-fivehundredths
(1,947.35') feet and on the South by another portion of
Crown Grant 1-42 and running thereon One Thousand
Four Hundred and Eighteen and Thirty-one hundredths
(1,418.31') feet and on the West partly by another portion
of Crown Grant 1-42 and running thereon One Thousand
One Hundred and Nine and Fifty-six hundredths
(1,109.56') feet and partly by land said to be the
property of the Bain family and running thereon Seven
Hundred and Ninety-eight and Forty-fivehundredths
(798.45') feet and on the Northwest by another portion
of Crown Grant 1-42 and running thereon Sixty-three and
Fifty-nine hundredths (63.59') feet, and Northerly by
another portion of Crown Grant 1-42 and running thereon
Sixty-three and fifty-nine hundredths (63.59') feet.

The Petitioner, Japheth Edison Deleveaux, herein
claims to betheowner in fee simple in possession of
the said tract of land and 'has made application to
The Supreme Court Of The Commonwealth Of The
Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act
1959 to have his title to the said tract of land investigated
and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate Of Title to be granted by the
Court in accordance with the provisions of that Act.

Copies of the Plan showing the position boundaries
shapgeimarks and dimensions of the said tract of land may
be inspected during normal office hours at the following
places:

(a) The Registry of The Supreme Court, East Street
North, Nassau, Bahamas.
(b) The Chambers of Joseph C. LUd6e, Suite No. 6,
Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.
(c) The Administrator's office at Major's Cay,
Crooked Island.

Notice is hereby given that any person having Dower
or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before the expiration of
Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these
presents file at the Registry of The Supreme Court
in the City of Nassau, Bahamas, and serve on the
Petitioner or on the undersigned an Adverse Claim
in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be
filed therewith.


Failure of any. such person to file
Adverse Claim on or before the
Thirty (30) days after the final
these presents shall operate as a bar


and serve an
expiration of
publication of
to such claim.


DATED THIS 9TH DAY OF JUNE, A.D. 2008.

JOSEPH C. LEDEE, ESQ.
Chamber Suite No. 6, Grosvenor Close
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioner
(N.19,D.1,11)


ers to gauge reaction/sentiment
on the proposed deal and pri-
vate placement, telling them the
company's operating income
was likely to hit $38 million for
2008.
When contacted by Tribune
Business for comment, Anthony
Butler, Cable Bahamas presi-
defit and chief operating offi-
cer, replied: "At this particular
point, I've got nothing to add
to the statement as is, and we
will notify the media accord-
ingly as things move forward."
Cable Bahamas, in its state-
ment, confirmed that it was
"further exploring" the deal
with Columbus Communica-
tions, the $40 million private
preference share placement and
the re-financing of its existing
debt facility to help fund the
buy-out. The private placement
would be possibly the largest
deal of its kind in the Bahamian
capital markets.
Sources have suggested that
the preference shares would be
convertible to ordinary shares
or equity in Cable Bahamas
after a three-year period. Ini-
tially, the shares purchased by
the company from Columbus
Communications would be
retired, sources suggested,
* thereby increasing the stake of
all existing shareholders by
some 30 per cent prior to their
dilution.
And that would generate one
little-noticed irony. Just as the
Government is selling a major-
ity 51 per cent stake in the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC), it would
become the largest shareholder
in Cable Bahamas a competi-
tor via the National Insurance
Board (NIB) if this transaction
ever takes place. NIB is the sec-
Qnd largest shareholder cur-
rently behind Columbus with a
15.39 per cent stake.
As previously revealed by
Tribune Business, the $50 mil-


lion bank financing for the
Columbus deal has been pro-
posed as a syndicated loan led.
by Royal Bank of Canada, with
participation from other insti-
tutions such as Scotiabank.
Tribune Business under-
stands that the next one to two
weeks will be crucial in deter-
mining whether the deal
becomes hard' and proceeds,
as currently there is no agree-
ment or transaction in place.
Apart from final approval from
the Boards of Directors at both
Cable Bahamas and Columbus,
other documents requiring com-
pletion include a management
services agreement between
Cable Bahamas and Columbus
Commur-;tions, coupled with
all due ce requirements
and ar. iment approvals.
The .ion among the
investor and financial advisory
community to Cable Bahamas'
proposal has been mixed, it
seems. Many have said the com-
pany is "hugely encouraged" to
date, but others have sounded a
more cautionary note.
One source, speaking to Tri-
bune Business on condition of
anonymity, expressed concern
about why the Columbus Com-
munications stake buy-out was
being contemplated now, ques-
tioning whether the largest
shareholder, with management
rights, knew something the mar-
ket did not. For instance, Cable
Bahamas' existing 15-year cable
franchise (monopoly) expires
next year (thought to be in
October), potentially letting
other market entrants in.
The source also raised con-
cerns over Cable Bahamas' abil-
ity to access the necessary man-
agement, technology and finan-
cial expertise once Columbus
Communications was bought
out, something the management.
agreement appears designed to
tackle.
"People are concerned," the


source said. "It will be interest-
ing to see what the final deal
looks like."
The source also raised con-
cerns over the management
agreement, as the initial pro-
posal was for Columbus Com-
munications to receive a $2 mil-
lion per annum fee for this.
"They turn around and after
getting their $90 million, they
get their management fee of
around $2 million a year or
something like that," they said.
It was pointed out to Tribune
Business that the management
fee Columbus Communications
would receive would be greater
than the dividend yield it cur-
rently obtained from its 30.2 per
cent stake. However, on a cau-
tionary note, Tribune Business
understands that this $2 million
per year figure has not been
approved or decided upon yet,
and is subject to change.
The source pointed out,
though, that Columbus Com-
munications' share of the $4.8
million and $4.743 million in
dividends paid out by Cable
Bahamas in fiscal years 2006
and 2007 would have been $1.45
million and $1.432 million
respectively.
The source added, though,
that Cable Bahamas' plans, if
they came to fruition, were like-.
ly to be aided by "delays" in the
financing arrangements being
put together by the Nassau Air-
port Development (NAD)
Company for the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport
(LPIA) re-development. Both
had been due to go out to mar-
ket at the same time, and would
have been competing for capi-
tal.
With Christmas fast-
approaching, Cable Bahamas
.will have to be swift if it wants
to get its private placement
away. However, it is thought
Columbus Communications -
which sources have said wants


to base its permanent head-
quarters in Freeport, a natural
location given that many of its
Board members and managers
live there is keen on the deal
as it needs cash for its Trinidad
ventures.
Tribune Business under-
stands that Cable Bahamas
came under heavy pressure
from the Bahamas Internation-
al Securities Exchange (BISX)
to publish its statement, with
the exchange fearing that the
private briefings for select
investors had created an infor-
mation asymmetry in the capital
markets.
This could have resulted from
institutional investors knowing
more about the proposed trans-
action than their retail counter-
parts, and BISX is likely to have
become concerned that this -
in any developed market -
could effectively have created
two markets in Cable Bahamas'
shares.
RoyalFidelity Capital Mar-
kets is Cable Bahamas' finan-
cial adviser, and would be its
placement agent on any prefer-
ence share issue. Among
Columbus Communications'
existing special rights are that
it can nominate and elect three
persons to Cable Bahamas'
Board of Directors.





INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Monday


Conern o~W IIIn d Ieb~it card fees]


DEBIT, from page 1B

ation and 'go live' date for the banking sec-
tor's Automated Clearing House (ACH)
has been billed as the final step towards
making their use more widespread.
The ACH will allow payment transac-
tions to be settled electronically, allowing
businesses to accept payment from a debit
card issued by a different bank from the
one where its accounts are.
Yet Mr D'Aguilar said the business com-
munity's concerns centred on the belief that
Bahamian commercial banks were likely
to use the existing MasterCard/Visa sys-
tem for credit card transactions to operate
a debit card system, too.
The private sector wanted a separate sys-
tem for debit cards to ensure they did not


have to pay the interchange fees levied by
the credit card companies.
"The banks, in the opinion of the business
community,, are being very lazy about this
and are going to piggy-back off the current
MasterCard/Visa system. It's going to cost
businesses 2-4 per cent to accept debit
cards," Mr D' Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness.
"Businesses have to pay a fee when they
accept the card for payment. The reason
why the debit card works so well in devel-
oped nations is that the banks only charge
$0.10 per transaction.
"The Bahamian business community
wants to make sure the banks get it right,
and not use the MasterCard/Visa system,
which will not result in the widest use of
debit cards. That is what they want.


Legal Notice
NOTICE


NORVILLE MOUNTAIN INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 10th day of November 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE


MAN ON THE MOON

INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of October 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator).


"It takes cash out of everyday transac-
. tions. If we have a cashless society, it's much
better for business. It's much easier to get
the right outcome than it is to reverse the
outcome."
Luis Carlos Ochoa, the Clearing Banks
Association's chairman, and country head
of Citibank, could not be reached for com-
ment.
However, Anwer Sunderji, Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) chief executive, told Tribune
Business that thetransaction fee called an
interchange fee on the MasterCard and
Visa systems was set by the card compa-
nies themselves, not the banks, and the
Bahamian institutions have no say in this.
We are governed entirely by the inter-
change terms set. Our fees are entirely
dependent on what Visa sets".


Legal Notice
NOTICE


KAJSA ROSE VENTURES INC.
(In Voluntary Liqbidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, whicb commenced on
the 11th day of November 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


ODESSA SLOPES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 12th day of November 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that AYANA D. REMY OF #503
HAMPTON RIDGE, WESTRIDGE ESTATES, P.O. BOX CR-
56774, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 1ST
day of DECEMBER, 2008 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.














Readers have their say on





'another insightful article'


Re: More names for
the Dossier of Shame
THANK you for another
insightful article on the
Bahamas legal profession, but
I'm afraid you are only scratch-
ing away at the tip of a very big
iceberg. I have two more names
to add to your list (names pro-
vided) because they, between
them, took $10,000 of my mon-
ey and did absolutely nothing
for it.
These two, who are related,
were supposed to be getting a
case of mine before the
Supreme Court. That was four
.years ago. Nothing has hap-
pened, but I can't get my mon-
ey back. I have heard nothing
from either of them, but they
are still in practice.
To me, the letters LLB mean
"Legal, Lying B.....ds" and I
advise anyone seeking legal
help to go to one of the estab-
lished firms like Graham
Thompson, Jerome Pyfrom and
Co, Callenders or Higgs and
Johnson, because that way you
are likely to get honest attor-
neys.
It is a really sad thing that we
can't rely on our legal profes-
sion. The German guy (Harald
Fuhrmann) was right in every-
thing he ever said about


FROM page 12B

designer gear, including leather
bags by Louis Vuitton, jewellery
by David Yurman and every-
thing by Georgi'o Armani,
ought to be very much a part
of the new age of austerity..
They are all silly indulgences
we can do without.
Interestingly, all the 'big
name' buys of my life have been
duds. .My.,Omega watch was.
hopelessly unreliable, so bad in
fact that I actually threw it away
in exasperation. My Alfa
Romeo broke down more often
than it went, and was sold for
less than half what I paid for it.
My Crockett and Jones shoes
showed moisture marks at the
first wearing, prompting an infu-
riating accusation from the shop
manager that I was suffering
from "hot feet" and was there-
fore to blame. And I've always
found Dom Perignon undrink-
able, Black Sea caviar inedible
and foie gras as digestible as
ground up damp plasterboard.
That reminds me. Drink. It's
time to cut back. It's the best
part of 30 years since I downed
eight pints of Guinness a day
during my London years, when
Fleet Street was awash with
mind-liberating liquor and get-
ting absolutely blotto was a rite
of passage.
Now I have an occasional
dram of 12-year-old Glenlivet
before turning in, and a wine
or two when out to dinner, but
alcohol is not something I thirst
for. Even eleven bucks for a
bottle of egg-nog seems some-
what extravagant nowadays. I
drive past liquor stores with
hardly a backward glance and
luxuriate in the feelings of rec-
titude induced by self-denial.
What, you might ask, is so
uplifting about going without?
For a start, it gives you more
time for the good things in life.
Are you into second-hand
books? Those lushly wrapped
treasures of personal enlight-
enment, originally retailed at
forty dollars, now yours for two
and a half, with barely a mark
on them. Have you ever bought
a first edition for three dollars
knowing it's probably worth a
hundred or more, and enjoyed
reading it at the same time?
At the Mackey Street thrift
store, open daily courtesy of the
Salvation Army, I have battled
through entire battalions of
Haitian housewives to get to the
bookshelves.
While the women are there
to sort through heaps of
bloomers, girdles, petticoats and
more brassieres than you'd find
in a Hamburg bordello, I'm
there to unearth something by
Greene, or Isherwood, or
Waugh, or Graves. Amid that
jangle of Creole all around, I'm
on my knees in search of gems
of the English language.
In Cornwall, one of my great-
est pleasures was to collect fire-
wood on the beach, not because
I couldn't afford coal, but
because there was something


insight


Bahamian lawyers. It's taken us
a long time, but we're now com-
ing to realise he was right.
Nassau businessman
I WISH to furnish you with
information about two Nassau
atto- who were involved in
a o cheat a foreign
in it of $3.5 million.
C- .ilowed his/her own
account to be used for the
"loss" of $1.8 million. There is
much more, which I would like
to discuss with you at the earli-
est opportunity.
Concerned Bahamian
AS an attorney, I reluctantly
concede that everything you
said in this week's article was
correct. People like me are seri-
ously worried that your constant
exposure of the troubles within
our profession will have a very
grave impact on the Bar. I want
you to know, however, that


these things are being taken
seriously and will, I hope, be
addressed.
Nassau lawyer
I THINK the time has come
for the Bahamas Bar to split,
and for the honest sector of the
profession to distance them
selves from the rest.
There has'always been a
rogue element among Bahami-
an lawyers, but this constant
exposure of their misdeeds
potentially has very serious
implications not only for the
profession, but for the country
as a financial and investment
centre.
Good lawyers need to disre-
gard the short-term and begin
to consider the long-term wel-
fare of our profession. Some-
thing must be done or we're all
in a hole.
'Attorney of
long-standing'


deeply satisfying about watching
the minerals in driftwood burn-
ing in a riot of colour on the
fire. And all gratis, thanks to
the boundless generosity of the
sea.
In Nassau, one of the best
days I ever spent involved walk-
ing from Cable Beach to Par-
adise Island, an exercise in pure
serendipity, stumbling upon ele-
ments of city life that were invis-
ible from a car.,
After a double-scooped ice-
cream on PI, I ambled back
across the bridge to buy a warm
'old fashioned' loaf from the
Model Bakery in Dowdeswell
Street, then strolled into town to
catch the jitney home. There I
lashed salted Irish butter on the
hot fresh bread and sat con-
tented as a walrus on my bal-
cony as I wolfed it down with an
ice-cold Coke, legs aching from
my exertions. Pure delight.
Did I mention the jitney? A
friend Qf mine has lived in Nas-
sau for 50 years without ever
boarding one of these eternally
entertaining buses.
For rich banter, a blast of reli-
gious music, a rant of raucous
sermonising, and a ride to make
the hairs stand up on your neck
like spikes, there's nothing to
match them.
Traffic

I particularly like it when the
driver dodges traffic jams by
rushing up unexplored back
streets, revealing marvellous
new vistas of Nassau in the
process. Then there's the rush
you get when your jitney tries to
jostle for position with another
down the long stretch on Cable
Beach, drivers cursing like crazy
at each other as they go hell for
leather for that extra buck or
two.
If you're really lucky, a full-
blown Ba'hamian debate will be
in progress, usually on politics,
with the driver addressing his
audience via the rearview mir-
ror. And all this for a dollar
twenty-five.
When I see those sad souls
who stand behind the bell at the
New York Stock Exchange,
clapping the latest rise or
nowadays more likely the lat-
est fall in the Dow-Jones or
Nasdaq, I can't help feeling how
wrong they are about life and all
it stands for.
It's not about stocks and
shares, investment portfolios,
big cars, fancy watches, showing
off, status, all those ghastly false
values foisted upon us by the
grasping Eighties, it's about
those great little things that real-
ly make it worth living.
Remember that memorable
quote by the publisher Maxwell
Perkins, friend of Hemingway,
Wolfe and Fitzgerald, and the
most influential figure in 20th
century literature?
"The more a man is, the less
he needs," he said. I'd go fur-
ther and say the converse is
even truer. "The less a man is,
the more he needs."


Think about it. Recession
isn't all bad news. The upside
is that it could teach you how to
live your life in a way that is
ultimately more fulfilling, more
gratifying and more rewarding
than anything you've known
before.
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail
jmarquis@tribunemedia.net


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008


U1


The stories behind the news


MORE NAMES IN THE





DOSSIER OF SHAME


SB8 JOHN MARQUIS
Mon.aj'g Editor
I . .l ....n ....r.y wh
t itun prompily
r it h imtturd l d a i till) ht I triln t.

Snea'tf hur own. ii biut lne of tiiiiy


H i m l atcof n i n l
Inthe fm k .t..hat. t"ft a'...







T.ti( n i i h cur t i .1
I t i. i , i . ,



ithn Itrh .l.* :ai ha .in am .i n
p Schi insa tr ludalh satirrl. rnid h ar t>
,lil .ll a. 1 1 d J 1 i li n

r..t r -. .i .. .. rr h i ] iI


DISGRACED attorney Andrew Thompson, who was disbarred after misappropriating
more than $200,000 of his clients' money, is only one of many Nassau lawyers whose
behaviour has shocked clients. As Insight's dossier on criminality within the legal
profession grows bigger by the week, we cite some of the most outrageous cases,
and pose the question: Who is going to bring these people into line?


/i
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the same way."
She added: "A foreign ombudsman
must be appointed to rule on theae
complaints. hu tin a ay ihau h siara
made incorruptlic."
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aaml y told INSIGHT. lhatl sole
lat ers here arc in the profess.in
beeaus eittoffers onuounities for d.n-


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m mim m i m
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MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE


ei













The pure joy of doing without


11 By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor

CURMUDGEONS and
umisa'ers will invariably find
something to moan about.
\\hen things are good, really
o'ood, they nmumbleti : "There's
.il\\ a'vs a downsid '."
Io their credit, they are usu-
ili right. But there is a con-
\irs' argument, too.
When thirigs aie bad, really
b'dJ, as they are now, there is
always an upside, and I'm
already beginning to relish the
fruits of recession, even before
it sets in with a vengeance. In
ifct, I'm actually salivating at
the thought of straitened times,
:'dJ the official end of the age of
.ced.
Ever since the 1980s, when
,.an and Thatcher ruled the
tern world. greed has been
atchword of the free mar-

lie Oliver Stone movie, Wall
t, actually glorified greed
h, lie character of the odious
'don Gekko, played by
,cliael Douglas," who said:
"'reed is good."
An entire generation appears
to have taken him at his word,
revelling in an orgy of con-
sumerism that never made any
sense and is now beginning to
:ok more and more tacky and
i:ircical bv the day.
Stock market traders who
J numake million is in minutes,
\\hose fraught faces and
.Intic gesticulations summed
p for me the mnAdness of the
.em, became heroic figures
during the age of ivarice.
Buying and selling on the
press of a button, ihey were the,
lords of the free market, greed-
driven men whose rapid accu-
mulation of money rarely
seemed to translate into any-
thing worthwhile. They all
looked careworn, washed-out
and probably all too aware of
thc grinding futilit'.' of their call-

Well, their da' is done, at


Sv- .. .. ...... -

"-,. SmIl
_ _ V *


JITNEYS: one of the simple pleasures of Nassau and all for a dollar twenty-five...


bomb three years ago now
appear like sad, threadbare
relics of the "gimme, gimme"
age.
Houses whose market values
reached stratospheric levels a
year or two back are now sit-
ting unwanted behind fading
"For Sale' signs. People can't
give them away.


least for now, and few will Gas-guzzling cars are being
mourn their pass ng. Now it's sold off by owners who can no
ine to reflect on what was, and longer afford to slake their
what can be, and try to live life unquenchable thirst.
a better way. The holiday home that
Just look around i you. seemed such a good idea not so
Designer items which cost a long ago is now a flaking drain
G^ CA^-;1 I


on resources.
. Private schooling has sud-
denly become a luxury many
can ill-afford.
.And eating out, once the
favoured recreation of the mid-
dle class, is now once more
becoming what it always used
to be an occasional escape
from the kitchen sink to be
cooked for, and fussed over, by
someone else, usually for an
absurdly inflated price.
So what are my favoured vic-
tims of these harder, more
demanding times?
First off. motor cars. and


especially big ones. They are a
drain on life itself, voracious
contraptions which are, by any-
one's reckoning, very poor val-
ue for money.
There is no sense in buying a
big, gluttonous automobile
which loses a third of its value
the moment you put the key in
the lock on an island as small as
this.
Big beasts with high capacity
engines need to roar from time
to time on wide, endless high-
ways. They serve no purpose
.on corrugated, pitted roads.
which stretch no farther than


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Yamacraw in one direction and
Lyford Cay in the other.
I'm proud to say that my Kia
Delta, a bone-rattling little beast
with an exceedingly noisy front
offside wheel, cost me all of 850
bucks, sold to me on the spot
by a Canadian woman who was
flying off the island for ever that
very day.
It's given me three years of
more or less faultless service
and gets me to and from The
Tribune every day for the
princely sum of $20 per week.
No matter how long I leave it
standing, it starts first time, and
no matter how many pot-holes I
hit on Nassau's uneven streets,
it chugs on with the dogged
indeMructibility of a Churchill
tank.
It's no looker, that's for sure,
but judged on a pure return-
for-outlay basis, there's noth-
ing to match this tiny terrier of a
car, which bounces along with
the best of them as it vaults
BEC trenches, sunken man-
holes and assorted speed-
bumps.
The only time I've felt slight
embarrassment was when I
came out of an eatery one day
to find it parked alongside a glo-
riously pristine scarlet Austin
Healey 3000, one of the true
classics of its day.
"Your Healey?" asked a
friend who happened to be
passing at the time.
"No," I muttered as I allowed
him to disappear round a comer
before climbing awkwardly into
my turquoise tuna can.
What else do I want to see
the back of? Cellphones, the
most irritating menace of mod-
ern times, with their symphonic
chimes and brainless devotees.
I now know, after several
years of close research, that 99.9
per cent of everything said on
cellphones is superfluous rub-
bish, the kind of stuff that can
either go unsaid or wait till
teatime.
Women driving along in their
SUVs with mobiles stuck to
their ears are among the most
infuriating sights of all, prattling
away while oblivious to all
around them, creating enor-
nious hazards for others and
frying their brains into the bar-
gain.
What is it with these vile
devices? Why are people so
enslaved to them, thumbing
texts mindlessly while showing
tell-take signs of 'mobile slack-
jaw' that condition of terminal
vacuity which comes with over-
use of Blackberries and their
like.
More maddening still is that
these dreadful inventions have
invaded our lives with no
accompanying etiquette, which
means they go off in cinemas,
theatres, museums and even
during interviews when the
users register no shame in
answering them.
Every time a plane lands,
hordes of cellphone junkies on
board begin their ridiculous
prattling. "We're here. I'll call
again when we reach the bag
carousel. Then again when we
reach the arrivals hall. Then
again when we get to the taxi-
rank. If I don't call, you call me.
I would call you from the john,


As goomdesend onthefinncil wrld an exert tr towor

out away o bet of a mjor nteratioal sumpINSI HT

reflecs ligt-heatedl onthebenfit ofadvrsiy..


don thrift shop at Iwo pounds
apiece, a saving"of probably
forty quid a tie. I wear them
with pride and will not feel
absolutely gutted if I end up
dropping mayonaisse down
them. There's so much to be
said for frugality.
So absolute prohibition of all

SEE page 9B


i


~:::"~


'pa


. .


but the signal's bad in there."
I once got stuck behind a
woman on a long-distance bus
who insisted on up-dating her
family every few minutes via
her cellphone on her exact
whereabouts.
"We're just leaving Lost-
withiel. We're outside the Spar
shop. No, the other one with
the striped sunblinds. I should
be with you in about twenty
minutes."
Then, three minutes later, she
was at it again. "The driver's
just said we'll be there in 17
minutes, so it's going to be more
or less what I said last time I
called you. We've just passed
the Gun and Pheasant. Oooh,
guess who I've just seen...that
man with the funny walk."
She'd been uttering these
meaningless missives ever since
we left London Victoria. I felt
like taking her cellphone, turn-
ing it sideways, then ramming it
down her gullet, so desperate
was I for relief from this garru-
lous airhead.
I want cell-phones, worthless
accessories of the consumer age,
to fall victims to the recession.
It's true they can be of use in an
emergency, but for the most
part they are conveyors of
banality, crass intruders with no
use but to make the discon-
nected look connected, the
uninvolved to appear involved.
I have no wish to be connected,
and no particular desire to be
involved, especially in other
people's idiotic conversations.
My secret dream is to put a
match to a mountainous pyre
built entirely of cellphones, and
to hear their chimes going off in
protest as they gasp their last
in the thickening smoke.
Next I want a curtailment of
television. I have a rule never to
switch on before 8pm because
the fare on offer is so poor and
the power consumed so expen-
sive. Yet some families switch
on at breakfast-time and hit the
off-button only when it's time to
fall into bed.
TV deifies mediocrity. It is
the most mind-deadening medi-
um on earth. True there have
been some good programmes,
but they were all made by the
British in the 1970s. What we
geqtnow are the wpostAmerica
canmoffer, a procssiobof truly
aggavatingindiv like Bilj.
O'Reilly, Sean Hahimty and that
batty harridan Nancy Grace, all
earning ludicrously high salaries
for spouting nonsense.
In the Bahamas, of course,
we are served programmes
which are, for the most part,
more or less unwatchable, save
for Bishop Neil Ellis's Sunday
night spectaculars, when the
pirouetting pastor, in all his
robes and finery, puts on a com-
edy show matched only by that
hilarious transvestite Eddie
Izzard, surely the stand-up
genius of the age.
Legislation is needed to
restrict television to no more
than four hours per day. Break-
.fast-time telly should be banned
altogether. Everyone would
then have more time to con-
verse, do something construc-
tive, and save money on the
electricity bill as well.
Designer clothes: who needs
them? One of my sons used to
wear his trousers low on his
backside just so that he could
show off the words 'Hugo Boss'
on the waistband of his under-
pants. Another was inordinate-
ly proud of the Nike 'tick' on
his shirt, even though it always
appeared to me like something
a bird had dropped on it.
As it happens, I quite like
Polo shirts, but I am as annoyed
as hell to find that every one of
them has a polo player sewn
into the left chest. The first
thing I do whenever I buy a
Polo shirt is to unpick the polo
player.
Other than that, I- an a firm
supporter of all things generic. I
go for the most obscure labels
when buying deodorant or shav-
ing cream just so.that I can save
a buck or two along the way. I
like mouthwash that looks and
tastes like Listerine, but costs a
third of the price. I avoid Bayers
aspirins because they cost four
times more than generic
aspirins, yet do exactly the same
job. Okay, I'm a tightwad, but
bargains are gratifying, and
there is a certain sense of tri-
umph when you beat the sys-
tem.
Last summer,1 bought two
silk Selfridge's ties from a Lon-





PAGE 10B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008


THE TRIBUNE







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MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008


The stories behind the news


Customs: It's time for a clean-out




Poicmutroouthcrosadptte beidbar'


0 By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor

A s Mrs Roslyn Ritchie
surveyed the remains
of her lovingly built
home, a smoking pile
of charred timber and
scorched blockwork, she was also
reflecting on what's left of Bahamian
integrity.
The arson attack on her home,
reportedly carried out in broad day-
light by four men in a red car, was .a
brazen and callous demonstration of
what we have all known for a long time
that this society is so degraded, so
utterly without standards, that its vil-
lains feel free to take the law into their
own hands wherever and whenever
they please.
Mrs Ritchie, a dedicated Customs
officer charged with the task of rooting
out corruption in a department that is
riddled with it, is one of those brave
Bahamians who hold the future of this
society in their palms.
They are among the courageous few
and the word 'few' is used advised-
ly- whose integrity is the only hope in
a land where right and wrong no longer
have any meaning, and where intimi-
dation is still a preferred option among
its criminal low-life.
The one great surprise to emerge
from this tragic story is that so huge a
task of rooting the'criminals out of
Customs should be left in the hands
of this dedicated woman and her mea-
gre seven-strong task force.
For the information crossing my
desk suggests that corruption is endem-
ic in Customs, and that many of its
officers allegedly are engaged every
day in robbing the Bahamas of rev-
enue, cheating its entire population in
the process.
Successive governments have known
for years of the crooks in Customs.
They must know of a junior officer
who, though from an over-the-hill fam-
ily with no fortune behind him, some-
how managed to build a 6,000 square
foot mansion out west.
They know of a senior officer who is
claimed to have retired with $5 mil-
lion in his personal accounts.
They must know of the influential
Customs figure who, when lubricated
by drink, would boast "I'm not in Cus-
toms for Customs, I'm in Customs for
Joe Blow" that not, of course, being
his real name.
He was a crook, he knew it, and he
was not afraid if others knew it, too.
What's more, his villainous example
percolated into the lower ranks, where
younger officers felt if he could do
what he was doing, then they could,
too.
Crookedness in Customs is just one
more component of a crooked society
in which some police officers, immi-
gration staff, Defence Force person-
nel and lawyers pillage with impunity.
Now the years of official connivance,
of turning blind eyes, nodding and
winking while bribes changed hands,
have culminated in the destruction of
Mrs Ritchie's home.
"I built this house brick by brick,"
she told The Tribune, "Our house was
a labour of love and now it's gone
because people don't want to be honest
and they don't want to pay revenues."
Customs chicanery does not stop at
the officers themselves.
Every businessman who has sought
to circumvent the system, to import
goods without paying the required
duties, has contributed to what we are
witnessing now.
Long years of corruption have given


The arson attack on the home of Mrs Roslyn Ritchie is the most graphic evidence yet of the
rottenness lying at the core of the Bahamas Customs Department. Now it's time for a full-scale
inquiry into an area of government that allegedly is robbing the country blind. INSIGHT reports..,


- 4


DESTRUCTION A firefighter is sepn inside .'..hal t ':is leti of Mr'_ Rii:hie s home


the offenders feelings of entitlement
that now stretch to destroying the
homes of those whose diligence might
catch them out.
"People tried to tell me that the cor-
ruption is bigger than me, but I tried to
do the job, and do the best I could."
said Mrs Ritchie. "Then they blew up
my house just for trying to be honest
and to make a difference. It is a sad day
for law enforcement in this country."
It is indeed. But her colleague
Vaughn Toote's additional comments
were a clear indicator that the fault
lies, not just with corrupt Customs per-
sonnel, but members of the business
community who try to pull tricks as a
matter of course, and involve weak-
willed Customs employees in the
process.
"We have been quite successful in
preventing and bringing to light indi-
viduals and companies who for years
have been defrauding the government
of its revenues," he said.
"We know Customs have been get-
ting complaints from the commercial
community about the task force being
an inconvenience to them and their
commercial operations. This is an effort
to deter us from our efforts, but it will
not deter me from my efforts."
Mr Toote revealed that the attack
on Mrs Ritchie's home is not the first
act of intimidation to be directed
against task force members.
Threats from those who stand to lose
most from their investigations are now
fairly commonplace.
Meanwhile, those Bahamians who
try to live by the rules and show regard
for the national interest suffer from
the villainy now rampant in Customs.
A Bahamian printing executive has
been complaining for years that some
of his competitors have been getting an
unfair commercial advantage over him
by dodging Customs duties.
Because of their tariff savings, their
cost base is significantly lower than his,
leaving him in a situation where he is


unable to tout for business in a com-
petitive manner.
Under the PLP, which appears to
have encouraged or ignored criminal-
ity in various areas of government over
many decades, it is accepted as read
that the 'bad men' in Customs and else-
where will prosper. The crooks have
been flaunting the fruits of their dis-
honesty for years.
It is hard to accept, however, that
the FNM, with its more rigorous
approach to ethical matters, will take
the attack on Mrs Ritchie's home lying
down. The first thing the government
needs to do is pay for the restoration of
her house, which was destroyed as a
direct result of her work.
The second thing they must tackle is
the reality of entrenched corruption in
the Customs department because the
country is heading for a period of
severe hardship that will make the
thieves' activities even more unac-
ceptable than they've been in the past.
Everyone in Customs knows who
the bandits are. I know this for a fact
because sources right at the heart of
the department call me regularly to
update me on who's doing what.
For some time now, they have been
distressed by young officers building
homes, and driving cars, that they can-
not possibly finance out of their mod-
est Customs salaries.
The good people in Customs are dis-
gusted by what's going on, but even
more so by apparent official impotence
in the face of the obvious.
"How much longer must we sit here
and watch these people prosper from
their wrong-doing?" one Customs
source asked me a few weeks ago.
"How much longer must we, who
try to do the right thing, have the rich
pickings of their criminality paraded
before us in the most coarse and
obscene way?"
These people are the future of the
Bahamas, yet they arc genuinely
aggrieved by stories abounding in their


midst about people who have used
their jobs, with their index-linked pen-
sions, to defraud the country and its
people.
Mentioning the name of a retired
senior official, one source told
INSIGHT: "We know for a fact that he
had more than $5 million in his bank
account when he left. How do you
accumulate $5 million on a Customs
officer's salary'? And why don't senior
people in the government know about
it?"
How indeed. It's something the gov-
ernment ought to be addressing. If
Customs personnel know for sure who
the villains are as they say they do -
then it ought not to be too difficult for
the government itself to do what's
required of them.
However, their grievances will not
have been dispelled by the truly lam-
entable performance of their acting
comptroller, Anthony Adderley, at last
Friday's press conference.
He spent the first half hour trying
to blame The Tribune, and the public,
for the horrors in his department. He
implied that people who offer Customs
officers bribes are more culpable than
the officers who accept them.
"It was a ludicrous and farcical per-
formance," one reporter told
INSIGHT, "and he found it difficult
to look us in the eye. Instead of con-
fronting the issues, he wanted to give
the impression that The Tribune's sto-
ries were inaccurate, which isn't so."
Mr Adderley yapped on endlessly
about "irresponsible journalism" when
all the evidence appears to point to
rampant irresponsibility in his own
department.
Any Customs officer caught fiddling
the Bahamas needs to be brought
before the criminal courts and be dealt
with accordingly. The men responsi-
ble for the destruction of Mrs Ritchie's
home need jailtimce, lots of it, prefer-
ably with hard labour.
As INSIGHT pointed out earlier this


year, Andros is alleged to be the centre
of a huge Customs scam involving vehi-
cles, boats and other items.
It is claimed that for more than a
decade the island has been used for
importing duty free millions of
dollars worth of goods which ought to
be earning much-needed revenue for
the nation.
One source told us: "There is a ring
or syndicate in Andros just bringing
in these shipments from the United
States and sending them through t6
New Providence unchecked.
"We have shipments coming in
wrapped in black tape labelled as
bleach but in fact are pallets and pallets
of beer or rum. They believe they can
do anything over here. We are in trou-
ble down here in Andros," he added.,
INSIGHT noted at the time that
there was "a concerted lack of interest
from both sides of the political divide"
when it comes to Customs corruption.
As with police officers who run pro-
tection rackets against Haitians, immi-
gration officers who help smuggle in
illegal immigrants, Defence Force per-
sonnel who deal in drugs, and lawyers
who systematically mug clients by steal-
ing their retainers, it is as though gov-
ernment is paralysed either by abject
resignation or a simple lack of will.
A less charitable interpretation of
their inertia might suggest that politi-
cians now accept corruption as an
immutable component of Bahamian
life and are cowed by its enormity.
In other words, it would appear that
they are unprepared to act against peo-
ple who are, in truth, stealing from the
treasury, severely undermining the
country's financial viability in the
process.
In such an environment, the wild
men feel emboldened to do outrageous
things, as we saw last week when Mrs
Ritchie's home went up in smoke.
By not clamping down sooner, suc-
cessive governments have contributed
to yet another breakdown in the legal
process, where crooks can cock a snook
at the law and intimidate others into
the bargain.
"This uniform started this and now
this uniform is all I have," said Mrs
Ritchie, touching her Customs tunic
as she looked forlornly at what was
left of her family home, a tangle of
smouldering wooden beams and buck-
led metal.
This attack marks a watershed in the
affairs of the Customs department. It is
the point at which the government
either takes the matter in hand, and
brings the villains down, or surrenders
effective power to those whose greed is
making life considerably harder for the
rest of us.
It is the moment when the country
decides whether authority is going to
control the bad men, or the bad men
are going to dictate society.
With a deepening global financial
crisis dealing a succession of de% :isalt-
ing blows to the Bahamian populace in
recent weeks, it is not a time to accom-
modate Customs cheats. These crooks
are not only taking money out of the
people's pockets, they are actually
helping to put the nation's future in
jeopardy. It's time to act. No more
dithering. Do it.
What do you think? Fax 328-2398
or e-mail jmarquis@tribunemedia.net


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We are pleased to update BTC customers, the Bahamian public, BTC staff and
vendors on the privatization of BTC, a process that is moving quickly, efficiently
and, as the Government has announced, with transparency as we prepare to
commence the bidding process. Along with direct staff communications, press
releases, a series of public appearances and meetings in Nassau, Grand Bahama
and the Family Islands and this supplement, a web site will be launched very
shortly to keep people informed.
A number of key decisions and steps have been made, including:


The Government has announced its decision to sell 51% of BTC, creating
a more attractive package for a prospective buyer than previously discussed
offerings of 49%.



Prime Minister Hubert A. Ingraham has announced the Government's
intention to open fixed line services to competition immediately upon the
completion of the sale of a 51% interest in BTC and to open cellular services
to bidding one year later, with the first cellular call through a competitor on the
second anniversary of the BTQ sale transaction. The public will be invited to
share input and express their views during the process.
The reason this approach is being taken is because it balances the value to
Government from the sale of its majority stake in BTC against early introduction
of competitive, quality telecommunications services throughout The Bahamas.
Allowing immediate competition throughout the sector would reduce BTC's
value; postponing it for too long would delay the benefits of competition.


In order to ensure that the Bahamian public and the country's visitors receive
the best possible choice, quality and prices of services, the Government is
determined to ensure that those who hold licences to operate in The Bahamas
must demonstrate that they have world class management, financial and
operational strength and a track record of success.


The Privatisation Committee, comprising representatives from the tourism,
financial and technology business sectors, BTC, Office of the Prime Minister
and Ministry of Finance, has reviewed bids from advisors from around the world
and has assembled a team of professionals to manage the process.
That team includes
KPMG Corporate Finance Ltd., Bahamas, supported by KPMG LLP, UK
Citigroup Global Markets Inc., in conjunction with Citigroup Bahamas
Charles Russell LLP, Legal Advisors, London; Higgs & Johnson Law
Offices, Bahamas
Analysys Mason, London and Washington, D.C., technical due diligence
Hogarth PR, UK, in conjunction with Diane Phillips & Associates,
Bahamas
Baker Tilly Gomez Chartered Accountants, administrated advisor
procurement process, Bahamas


8T U ha s pl t n oH n
BTC has completed the update of a very comprehensive Business Plan.
Citigroup and KPMG Corporate Finance have provided review and analysis.
The Plan is an important document for any investor, pivotal to establishing an
"enterprise value" of BTC for the purposes of the sale negotiation.


The existing legal and regulatory regime covering communications in The
Bahamas needs to be broadened to cover liberalisation of services and creation
of an overall regulator. Key recommendations in this respect have been drafted
and are under review.


This privatization is important to all who live and work in The Bahamas and to
those who visit, whether for business or vacation. It will introduce new services,
lower costs and bring new opportunities in an enhanced communications sector
to all Bahamians wishing to pursue careers in or connected to communications,
including existing employees of BTC.
So join with us as we anticipate exciting days ahead and a bright future for
you and for BTC.


//
T.B. Donaldson, C.B.E.
Chairman, BTC Privatisation Committe

Julian W Francis CB.E., Deputy Chairman
David Davis, Permanent Secretary Office of the Prime Minister
Felix Stubbs, President &d General Manager, IBM, Chairman, Grand Bahama Port Authority
Wendy Warren, Executive Director, Bahamas Financial Services Board
Felicity L. Johnson, VP Legal Regulatory & Interconnect & Company Secretary, BTC
Simon Wilson, Director of Economic Planning, Ministry ofFinance
Michael Moss, Chairman, The Broadcasting Corporation of The Bahamas
Tellis Symonette, Senior Vice President Family Islands and Administration, BTC


2 1 THE FUTURE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS WWW.BTCPRIVATISATION.COM
















Business spins on the speed of electronic transmission of data, voice
and Internet. In an electronics information age and in an industry
where major changes flow constantly, maintaining a foothold in an
increasingly global economy competing for everything from new
business development to satisfying a sophisticated tourist market
means offering the widest range of efficient telecommunications
services consistently at competitive rates.
As The Bahamas completes the privatization of BTC, paving the
way for full competition, the company and the country share a vision:
to create a telecommunications sector so dynamic and powerful
that it propels economic development, opens vast entrepreneurial
opportunities, provides consistently excellent services at more
competitive rates to all consumers and makes The Bahamas a
contender on the world stage.




c. "- . '
While the focus to date has been on the privatization of BTC, the goal of
creating a truly vibrant and dynamic telecommunications sector capable of
instantaneous change to keep pace with industry innovation and customer
expectation means welcoming competition by qualified licencees.
Competition in the sector is actually not new. This process started many years
ago and The Bahamas has demonstrated its easy adaptation to more than one
provider of a service that was once held by a monopoly. Remember when ZNS-
TV was the only television station and ZNS Radio the only radio station? In
1992, when the Government of The Bahamas announced it would issue new
radio licences, there were those who doubted it would work. Where would the
advertising dollars come from? How would these new stations survive?
Not only did the radio licencees survive, they multiplied, thrived and gave rise
to a broader economy.
The result: new buildings leased or built, equipment purchased or leased,
office furniture, security services, goods that had to be delivered daily, advertising
dollars spread throughout with significant ripple effects. Most importandy, along
with a renewed freedom of expression came jobs, hundreds of permanent jobs
everywhere from a station in Exuma to two more in the northern Bahamas.
The history of privatization and competition is one of success everywhere you look.
From AT&T's break-up into eight Baby Bells in the U.S. to the Cayman
Islands' introduction of three providers with a population less than one-fifth of
The Bahamas, the story is one of positive change. More services, more products,
lower prices.


Telecommunications in The Bahamas
began in February 1892 when a
submerged telegraph cable was [aid
between Jupiter, Florida and the
area now known as Cable Beach in
New Providence.
By 1906, the first voice
telephone system was
operational, offering
service within New Providence
only. In 1932, a radio telephone
circuit was activated allowing voice
communication beyond The Bahamas for the first time.
Fast forward 50 years to the introduction of cellular mobile
phone service introduced in 1988. The parents who were
introduced to direct dialing in 1971 are now grandparents surfing
the Internet and interacting with their grandchildren with
webcams. By 2008, the Bahamas Telecommunications Company,
re-named BTC, had re-branded itself and is handling Internet,
data, wireless and fixed line services with nearly one million
cell phone calls a day. The pace of change in the industry was
quickening at a greater speed in months than it had in decades
and BTC was continuing to strive to provide a wide variety of
telecom services, connecting this small island nation to the world
beyond.
Privatisation and the introduction of full competition is the
next chapter.
One thing will not change when BTC is privatised and that is
continued service to the Family Islands.



... ' ...


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THE FUTURE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS WWW.BTCPRIVATISATION.COM I 3












' ., '_ ,


Look almost anywhere in the world and the story is the same. Privatisation leads
to lowers phone bills, gives access to new services, cheaper, often free, handsets
and improved quality-fewer dropped calls or busy tones when dialling-and a
greater choice of billing plans to match your budget.
In the U.S., for instance, it's not unusual for a mobile phone company to give
away a handset with all the gizmos and gadgets just to entice someone to become
a post-paid customer loyal to that company.

Other specific benefits for customers are expected to include:

Free Features: Around the Caribbean, features like Caller I D, Call Waiting,
Call Forwarding, Call Transfer, 3-Way Calling, Call Hold, and Personalized
VoiceMail are free.

N, More Services: Privatisation brings more services, too. For business users,
connecting a laptop to hi-speed internet should become routine, wi-fi
should be widely available. It should also become commonplace to be able
to arrange conference calls with business colleagues and teleconferencing
will be possible.

More Choices: Want a better choice of handset? Barbadians have the
choice of over 40 different styles. Choices here will expand as competition
increases and more third party equipment suppliers enter the market.

More Features: Progress has already been made on introducing new features
such as picture to mobile by BTC. In future you will also be able to have
more sophisticated features such as instant messaging and television to
mobile.


Cheaper International/Long Distance Calls: As a result of increased
negotiating power when international providers enter the market.

Improvement to Quality of Services: Competition means that quality
rises, too. As competition increases dropped calls and busy lines become
things of the past and faults get fixed the same day or next day.

Good for Tourism: Privatisation is good for tourists and overseas business
visitors-which makes it good for us as well. Wherever people travel these
days, they expect to be connected at all times, never far from communicating
with those back home and drawing on the range of features and services
they are used to in other countries. These are no longer luxuries reserved
for techies. They're part of the vacation or business visitors unspoken list
of expectations.


-'F.U TFOR THE ,I- ISTCCIEC'. GOOD FOR .'.., GOOD .-.'N- *-WW. .

4 1 THE FUTURE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS WWW.BTCPRIVATISATION.COM


_ : .















FOR THE TELECOM SEiCTOR
This privatization and the competition that will follow is all about growing The
Bahamas' economy and that includes the telecommunications sector. In other
countries, following an increase in competition after privatization, employment
in the telecommunications sector as a whole has risen-and often dramatically
and rapidly.
We would expect the same to be true here with a range of entrepreneurial
opportunities opening up for Bahamians. These will be across two main areas:

R Telecom companies will be setting up or expanding business in The
Bahamas, opening offices, building an infrastructure and recruiting staff.

El More companies will also take advantage of liberalisation to sell a range of
services and products including a retail suite of products, in addition to
those who have already set up here in recent years.


FOR THE ECONOMY
The growth in telecommunications gives a real boost to the wider economy,
with benefits far wider than just the telecom sector. Often these spill-over effects
are greater than initial estimates.

They can include:
l Construction of new providers' headquarters,
] Buying supplies from electronic equipment to office furniture,
N Hiring security services
N Leasing retail space
E Advertising production and placement,
Y Donation to community efforts, even sponsorship of local sports teams

new business mens new ,.s and new jobs
mean new * ....i *,."F s.


PRIVATIZATION. LIBERALISATION. COMPETITION.
GOOD FOR THE CUSTOMER, GOOD FOR BTC, GOOD FOR THE BAHAMAS.
THE FUTURE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS WWW.BTCPRIVATISATION.COM 5


MOVING FORWARD, MOVING FAST



















The business community from the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce to the Bahamas Hotel Association,

from technology giant IBM to the Bahamas Financial Services Board speaks in a strong, clear and unified

voice in support of BTC privatization, paving the way for competition. Here's what they are saying:


The Bahamas close proximity to the United
States remains one of our core strengths as a
tourist destination. While we are physically
close to our major markets, visitors are often
frustrated at the world of distance between
home and The Bahamas when it comes
to telecommunications. They complain
about both the cost and the reliability of
staying connected. This has been one of the
determining factors in our ability to attract group business as well. Certainly, our
industry would enthusiastically welcome privatization efforts which can improve
both the services available to the travelling public as well as result in costs which
are similar to those which they are accustomed to in the United States and most
other areas. This has worked successfully elsewhere in the region and around the
world.






.-- 4 ...


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.


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Information
be likened to


communication can
the oxygen for a globally


-interconnected business such as financial
services.
To respond to the changing demands of
the sector and clients, BFSB has had the
pleasure of working with the BTC team over
the past several years as we sought to raise the concerns of clients and institutions,
located in Nassau and around the world. These concerns include the delayed
introduction of GSM, GPRS and other business services, and securing the
contracts with global telecommunication companies. All too often we relayed
the lament of people trying to call into country that the challenges experienced
in calling The Bahamas are not the experiences they have when conducting
business with our competitors.
The executives and staff at BTC have sought, as best as possible, to provide
solutions. The latest was the introduction of a BFSB help desk. The response
from our Members has been very positive. Notwithstanding the best efforts
of staff, BTC has been constrained as a small standalone telecommunications
company. Accordingly, the oxygen required by the sector has been in limited
supply, thus directly impacting the competitiveness and growth of the financial
services industry.


~n1~


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6 1 THE FUTURE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS WWW.BTCPRIVATISATION.COM


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The business world of today spins on
information -how fast we get it, absorb it,
exchange it, use it, build on it. And nothing
drives or impedes us more than the ability to
communicate that information whether by
e-mail, fixed line or wireless. Ifwe are serious
abour growing business in The Bahamas,
then we must be just as serious about delivering the
fastest, most reliable communications...
The tremendous potential wrapped within the
telecommunications infrastructure that exists currently
within the Bahamas has yet to be fully and effectively
utilized. Not withstanding the fact that there may be
any number of reasons for this, the liberalisation of the
industry and privatization of the monopoly would go
a long way in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of businesses across the
board.


i" There was a time when better-for-business
meant a quicker cash register, a faster
switchboard. Today, technology does not
just support business, it is the fuel that drives
it along ani information highway at speeds
the human mind can barely comprehend.
We in The Bahamas cannot continue to
chug along on a single lane road when the room we need to stay the course
let alone compete on a global scale zips along at dizzying speeds on open
freeways. Such speed cannot be accomplished under Government ownership.
Governments are designed to educate their citizenry and protect rights, not
to operate businesses where change happens so fast you can hardly record it
before it changes again. It is no accident that nearly every country in the world
has privatised its telecommunications company, realizing the private sector can
operate it better than a government can.
Privatisation followed by competition will not only benefit the business
community. The combination will allow an unshackled BTC to grow to a whole
new level and we might all be very surprised at what a new BTC has to offer.


y


THE FUTURE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS WWW.BTCPRIVATISATION.COM I 7


'a '












MOVING FORWARD, MOVING FAST


THE POSITIVE EFFECTS

OF PRIVATIZATION
What is Privatisation?
Wikipedia defines privatization as
the incidence or process of transferring
ownership of business from the public
sector (government) to the private sector
(bus i.ess). In a broader sense, privatization
refers to transfer of any government
function to the private sector including
governmental functions like revenue
collection and law enforcement.
3. MIn many countries, governments have
privatised basic services such as utilities,
railways and postal services. More recently,
there has been a growing trend to privatise
operations within government-owned
facilities, including school cafeterias, security services and prison operations.
Placing the operation of a function in private hands relieves governments of
running what business can run, often with greater cost-effectiveness and
efficiency.




Telecommunications -like many
other industries -functions best when
companies compete. That's been the
Experience in countries around the world
that have realized the benefits of taking
the telecom business out of government
hands and placing it in the hands of the
private sector where the basic principles
of buying power and supply and demand
drive development.
In recent years, 20 countries in the
European Union have sold stakes valued
at more than $140 billion. Among them: Belgium, Denmark, France, Italy,
Germany, Greece, Netherlands, Portugal and the United Kingdom. The results
have been similar across the board-more competition means lower rates, more
products, increasing search for cutting edge services and features, all netting an
economic boost growing the telecom sector and supporting commerce.
In the United States, anti-trust actions dating back nearly 100 years forced
railroad companies, the movie industry, American Tobacco and Standard Oil to
split as long ago as 1911. And when AT&T was ordered to split in 1984, the
move gave rise to eight Baby Bells, resulting in lower costs for customers and a
new environment in which competition flourished.


T ,:Ei


As s 1 provision of

". :.*ned 1'o competitio -i


* hod ~


Here's what happened in the Caribbean after privatization and competition:
In Cayman, with a population of less than 48,000, there are three providers,
Cable & Wireless, Digicel and Telecayman, and each one has to provide
both local and long distance services.
In Dominica, subscribership went from 1.6% in 2000 to 60% in 2004.
In Grenada, subscribership rose from 4.5% to 86% in the same time
period. Retail prices fell by 50%.


There is no reason to fear competition. The reality is that competition began
years ago, first with the granting of the Cable Bahamas licence to provide Internet
services, competing against Batelnet, later to Indigo to provide minutes for long
distance calls on fixed lines. Competition has come from other sources.
And competition will continue to grow. It must-for it is only through
competition that the needs of individuals and business can be met and The
Bahamas as a nation can compete in trade, tourism and quality of life with
the overwhelming majority of countries around the world which benefit from
privately-operated, competing telecom companies and environments.
To deny BTC the right to be ready for competition would be a grave disservice
to the company. To fail to create a competitive environment would be a grave
disservice to the residents, visitors and businesses of The Bahamas.


8 THE FUTURE OF TELECOMMUN- ..CATONS WWW. TCPIVATISATIONCOM

8 1 THE FUTURE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS WWW.BTCPRIVATISATION.COM