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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01101
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: August 22, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01101

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ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE 1


BAHAMAS EDITION


Volume: 104 No.226


FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008


PRICE 750


Medal glop


Triple jumper gets Olympic

bronze for the Bahamas


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
BEIJING, China: With four
days left before the end of the
XXIX Olympic Games, Leevan
'Superman' Sands finally got the
Bahamas in the medal count with
his bronze in the men's triple
jump Thursday night at the Bird's
Nest.
Day seven of the athletic com-
petition saw the Bahamas line up
its final three individual competi-
tors for a medal, but only Sands
survived with his leap of 17.59
metres or 57-8 1/2 to' erase his
previous mark of 17-5 on the third
of his six jumps to get him into
the medal round of the last eight
competitors.
With his performance, the
Bahamas moved into a nine-way
tie for 72nd spot on the charts.
Portugal's Nelson Evora won
the gold with.a season's best of
17.67 (57-11 3/4) and Great
Britain's Phillips Idowu claimed
the silver with his SB's of 17.62
(57-81/2).


For Sands, who celebrated his
27th birthday on August 18, last
night was a time for him to enjoy
the moment that came just after
Chris "Bay" Brown got nipped
at the tape on a dive from David
Neville to complete a sweep of
the three medal positions in the
men's 400 metre final.
"I don't what how I'm going to
celebrate this. It hasn't hit me yet
that I am the Olympic bronze
medalist," he said. "Maybe when
I get my medal tomorrow (today),
I can really celebrate."
The Bahamas was close to cel-
ebrating here with the first medal
from Brown, who trailed Ameri-
can Lashawn Merritt, who upset
and dethroned compatriot Jere-
my Wariner (44.74) with his per-
sonal best of 43.75.
But in the winding 20 seconds,
Neville stormed back and actu-
ally dove across the line to edge
out Brown for the bronze in 44.80
as the Americans completed the
sweep.
Brown, who argued that the
SEE page nine


Accomplished musician

Hilda Barrett dies age 80
A W( MAN noted for her
musical accomplishments and her
cheerful smile, died in her sleep
yesterday at the age of 80.
Hilda Grace Barrett, who, at
the age of eight, became the organ-
ist of St John's Baptist Cathedral of
which her father the late Bishop "
Timothy Donaldson was pastor, '
died during the early morning
hours of Thursday at her Grove q .
Avenue, West Bay Street home.
Her two daughters, Juliette and
D'Anne Barrett lived with her.
Mrs Barrett gave music lesson up
to the time of her death. .
Hilda Barrett was born in Nas- t 1
SEE page nine


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A SENIOR foreign bank
official is not expected to be
called in again by police in
connection with the murder
of handbag designer Harl
Taylor, The Tribune has
learned.
Despite reports in another
publication yesterday, the
banker, who is said to be in
his early 40s, is not expected
to be brought in by police
after he was questioned last
week.
Initially, police treated the
foreign banker as a "person
of interest" for Taylor's mur-
der. However, it has since
been brought to light that
police "have no information
that would make him a sus-
pect".in this case.
According to reports
reaching The Tribune, the
married man is said to be
leading a "double life" and
enjoys the company of homo-
sexual men.
The banker, and one of his
present lovers, an executive
at a development company.
were said to frequent a num-
SEE page nine


0 fop SanS









EXPATRIATE hotel development work-
ers in Nassau fear a looming recession lasting
"at least two years" could lead to a new peak
in crime.
91 (One construction boss told The Tribune
S yesterday: "I've had young Bahamian guys
_. ABOVE A delighted coming up to me and offering to work for
Leevan Sands after his one dollar an hour. I feel sad for them."
bronze mrredal Win in And he added: "People don't realise, but
the triple lump (left at nothing is going into the ground construc-
the Olympic Games in tion-wise. The Bahamas is on the brink of a
Beljing mini-recession."
His comments came after a Tribune story
highlighted postponements of the Harbour-
4 side phase three timeshare development at
Atlantis, and the Hurricane Hole marina pro-
SThe ecxpat said: "People at Atlantis are
S.. having a chuckle at the reference to delays.
S' = These delays could last one or two years or
more. Things are very difficult now.
Some of the mid to senior people there
are already talking about moving on to Dubai
.. E (where new Atlantis projects are underway)
or returning to the States.
"It's what they talk about when they go
home at night. It's on everyone's mind."
Expatriate concerns are being expressed
Car'ih against a backdrop of general disquiet over

SEE page nine

More than $100,000 in stolen items recovered by police
0 By BRENT DEAN
I Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net
POLICE are holding more than $100,000 in stolen
items recovered on a special operation by officers at the
Carmichael Road Police Station.
The media was shown yesterday a stockpile of goods at
the station, including two motorbikes, a large flat screen
TV, computers, play pens and car stereo equipment.
The officers also recovered a large amount of jew-
ellery. Six bags of gold chains, watches, rings, and bracelets
were on display along with a microwave and coils of
stolen copper.
Assistant Supt. Walter Evans said that the items were
recovered by police during special operations during the
last week. He is encouraging people who have been
robbed to come to the Carmichael Road Police Station
With the proper documentation in order to recover their
items.
A "We want to give credit to the fine work here of the
Officers here at this station." said Mr Evans. "And this has
U been a tremendous effort. It's been quite a bit of items
INSPECTOR JAMES MILLER, crime manager at that were recovered and again we are encouraging tilhe
Carmichael Road Station, shows the media stolen SEE page nine
jewellery yesterday. SEE page nine

Claim the EPA 'will damage Bahamian economy'


* By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE European Partnership
Agreement will damage the
Bahamian economy regardless of
the schedule of services to be
added to the annexes of agree-
ment, argued lawyer Paul Moss.
The activist and new member


of the PLP, who has just
announced he will run for the
position of deputy leader of the
party, said the schedule of ser-
vices released yesterday to be
added to the EPA annexes of
agreement does not remove the
threat of the FPA.
Minister of Finance Zhivargo
Laing said the schedule mirrors


the current National Investment
Policy of the Bahamas, and will
ensure the 13 industries currently
reserved for Bahamians will
remain to be exclusive to Bahami-
ans.
But Mr Moss said there is a
hidden danger in signing an
SEE page nine


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PAGE 2 FRIDY, AUUST 2, 200CTHE RIBUN


o In brief


Book and supply

drive for Adelaide

Primary School
A BOOK and school sup-
ply drive for the Adelaide
Primary School will be held
on Saturday, August 23.
The event, organised by
Rotaract Club of South-East
Nassau Centennial
(RSENC) from 12pm to
4pm at the Town Centre
Mall's Main Entrance.
This will be RSENC's
fourth fundraising event for
this project.
The group is encouraging
members of the public to
look for old reading books .
for children grades 1-6 or to
donate school supplies.
"RSENC wants to thank
those who have donated
thus far. We have been suc-
cessful in collecting reading
books, pencils, composition
books, chalk, black board
eraser and monetary dona-
tions," said the group in a
statement. "Also of course
we need volunteers . per-
sons interested in volunteer-
ing should email us at
rotaract.senc@gmail.com."


Two new bus routes





set to be introduced


* By LLOYD ALLEN
JUST in time for the new
school year, two new bus routes
are being introduced and a third
recommended by a local bus
association.
Public Transportation Asso-
ciate of the Bahamas (PTAB)
president Reuben Rahming told
The Tribune that by the start of
the school year there will be
two new routes operating under
the PTAB flag.
The new routes, according to
Mr Rahming, are a part of the
organizations' plan to have its
members service the entire
island.
Mr Rahming said: "We're
talking about providing services
to many areas for the first time
in history using a common sense
approach."
The new Route 22A, which
will become Nassau's' longest
bus route, will travel a similar
route as Route 8 up until School
Lane. From there it will travel


to Baillou Hill Road, Poinciana
Drive, Thompson Blvd.,
Christie Avenue, Tonique
Williams Darling Highway
(passing Robin Hood), Sir Milo
Butler Highway and Faith
Avenue. From there, it will turn
east on Cowpen Road, head to
Baillou Hill Road South, Mar-
shall Road, back to Faith
Avenue, on to Carmichael
Road, and back onto Baillou
Hill Road.
The 22B will travel a similar
route up to the Main .Post
Office, where it will also make

iT~T' fl ii,111


history as the first route to trav-
el south on East Street, accord-
ing to Mr Rahming.
The new route will run up to
Summer Haven, then onto Mar-
shall Road, Faith Avenue, St
Vincent Road, then back onto
Baillou Hill heading into down-
town.
A third route being recom-
mended by PTAB will operate
along what Mr Rahming refers
to as a feeder route.
The proposed route would
not travel through the down-
town area but instead would be
I Pr I I I MI I


servicing areas of eastern and
southeastern Nassau, including
Bernard Road, Sea Breeze
Lane, and Joe Farrington Road.
Mr Rahming says after a
series of town meetings with
residents of Marshall Road and
South Beach, and with the help
of key' government representa-
tives, this vision of national ser-
vicing by public transportation
is being achieved.
He added that in addition to
the new routes, future changes
being worked on include CCTV
systems being added to PTAB
buses, extended bus scheduling,
a Paradise Island route, and
additional feeder routes.


AFTER BEING disrupted by the stormy weather this week, these lucky pigeons were given a slap-up meal by a
thoughtful man in Nassau.


CURRENT and former
members of an Englerston
community have joined togeth-
er to improve the standard of
living in their neighbourhood.
Former residents of Podoleo
Street announced yesterday
that they have decided to come
together in a concerted effort to
give back to the community.
"Our main objective would
be to affect the mindset of
those who now reside in this
village," the group said in a
press release yesterday.
For that purpose, a number
of those who formerly lived on
the street came together to
form the Podoleo Street
Reunion Committee (PSRC)
to spearhead a number of com-
munity activities.
Starting on October 18, the
committee will hold a "mini
street festival", showcasing a
number of marching bands.
Bahamian food and arts and
craft will be sold at the event.
Then on November 15, the
committee is scheduled to car-
ry out a clean-up campaign.
The committee hopes to also
hold a health fair on this date,
beginning that morning and
ending at 7.30pm with a dis-
cussion on men's health, includ-
ing such issues as prostrate can-
cer, diabetes and impotence.
On December 7, the
Podoleo Street committee will
host a gospel concert featuring
various Bahamian artists and
church choirs.
The committee plans to close
out the year's events on
December 21 with an awards
banquet, where persons will be
recognized for their achieve-
ments in their various endeav-
ours.
The committee hopes to
make this course of activities
an annual event.
President of the PSRC is
Ferlin Henfield, Charles
Sawyer is the group's vice-pres-
ident.
"There is a saying that goes
'it takes a village to raise a
child' and Podqleo Street was
that village that raised us main-
ly in the 1970s and 1980s.
"We have collectively decid-
ed to return and give some-
thing back," the committee
said.


The o atrot.h-.


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V. -. *


MAIN SECTION
Local News.........P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,18,19,20
Editorial/Letters .................................. .... ...P4
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BUSINESS SECTION
Business ............................ P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,10
C om ics..................................................... P8
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CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

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' "- ,- -^ . _ __ j > .


F~ttisj#~~;fl::2a~,~ ~G~~hrJ! ~B~pP~'a %.%~~t:~.r~-~R;~;~5


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008


THE TRIBUNE






FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


LOA NW


0 In brief

Police find hand
gun in area of
Golden Gates
Shopping Centre

POLICE officers from the
Carmichael Road Police Station
recovered a 9mm hand gun
while in the area of the Golden
Gates Shopping Centre.
Officers from the station,
who were acting on a tip, went
to the area at noon on Wednes-
day where they conducted a
search of an individual, accord-
ing to Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans.
The search revealed the
weapon that contained no live
rounds of ammunition.
A 33-year-old Miller's
Heights resident is assisting
police with this investigation.

Armed robber
targets Shell
Service Station
THE Shell Service Station at
Milo Butler Highway was
robbed yesterday morning by a
bandit who initially held a pump
attendant at gunpoint.
The robber entered the sta-
tion at 4am and robbed a
cashier of an undisclosed
amount of money before fleeing
on foot, according to Assistant
Superintendent Walter Evans.
No shots were fired and no
one was injured in the robbery,
said Mr Evans.

Praise for
Jamaica's
female athletes
Jamaican athletes Shelly Ann
Fraser and Melanie Walker
were commended by Secretary-
General of CARICOM Edwin
Carrington for their perfor-
mances at the Beijing Olympics.
The secretary-general said it
was with "great pride and plea-
sure that I extend to Ms Fraser
and Ms Walker in particular and
their compatriots for the fine
example they have offered to
regional youth of world class
excellence". In a history-making
performance, Ms Fraser won
-the 100 metre women's final,
whileMs Sherone Simpsornand,;
Ms Kerron Stewart tied for sec-
ond place.
"The Caribbean can be justly
proud of these athletes as well
as its unprecedented achieve-
ment of providing 10 of the 16
finalists in the 100 metre event
finals at this Olympics six men
and four women and winning
five of the six medals on offer,"
the secretary-general said.
"Ms Melanie Walker further
underlined the depth of talent in
Jamaica with her Olympic
record victory in the 400 metres
hurdles. The Caribbean can be
justly proud of these athletes as
well as its unprecedented
achievement of providing 10 of
the 16 finalists in the 100 metre
event finals at this Olympics -
six men and four women and
winning five of the six medals
on offer."



322-2157/I


DRAMA OCCURS SHORTLY AFTER TAKE-OFF



Cockpit smoke forces



charter plane pilot into



emergency landing


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT Thepilot of
a small charter plane was
forced to make an emergency
landing after noticing smoke
in the cockpit.
The incident occurred short-
ly after the take-off of a white
twin-engine Beechcraft 1900
from the South Bimini Inter-
national Airport.
Captain Justin Swiel of Fort
Lauderdale took off around
6.10pm on Wednesday with
seven passengers aboard.
The plane, which is owned
and operated by Bimini Island
Air, was on its way to the Hol-
lywood Fort Lauderdale Exec-
utive Airport.
According to Chief Supt
Basil Rahming, five minutes,
into the flight, Captain Swiel


* By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net
FINAL submissions in the
Marco City Election Court case
will not be heard until October, as
the court granted attorneys for
both sides an extension yester-
day.
The court had set aside yester-
day and today for the final oral
submissions by the attorneys rep-
resenting Pleasant Bridgewater
and Zhivargo Laing at the last
sitting of the case in June.
Thamara Saunders, attorney
on the legal team of Ms Bridge-
water, made the request for the
extension for both sides. She was
standing in for Philip Davis, who
was said to have been ill with
influenza and a fever.
Senior Justice Anita Allen
granted the request for the exten-
sfon.
Both sides will present their
written final submissions to the
court on or before September 18.
October 1 to 3 has been set aside
for final oral arguments.
In the last session of the case,
both sides pledged to update the
court on the final number of vot-


LARGEST STOCK IN THE BAHAMAS


noticed smoke emanating
from somewhere inside the
cockpit and declared an emer-
gency. Mr Rahming said the
pilot turned the aircraft
around and headed back to
South Bimini, where he was
able to make a safe emergency
landing at the airport.
No one was hurt and pas-
sengers were safely escorted
into the terminal building.
Mr Rahming said the Civil
Aviation Department was
notified about the incident
and will be conducting an
investigation.
This latest incident comes
just two weeks after a report-
ed crash-landing of a Western
Air flight in South Bimini.
Chief Supt Basil Rahming
told The Tribune in an earlier
interview that a Western Air
flight from New Providence
crash-landed in South Bimini
on August 7.
However, Western Air pres-


ers being challenged by Ms
Bridgewater and Mr Laing.
As of the last count, Ms
Bridgewater is challenging 80 vot-
ers and Mr Laing 22. It is unclear
if these numbers have changed.
The Marco City case is the sec-
ond and final court challenge of
the results of the 2007 election.
The results of the Pinewood con-
stituency election was unsuccess-
fully challenged by the PLP.
The Marco City case began in
late February and has been con-
tinuing for nearly six months.
Mr Laing defeated Miss
Bridgewater by 47 votes.


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ident and CEO Rex Rolle
refuted this police report,
claiming that the flight in
question landed safely after
the "aircraft's tyre was blown
out (and it went) into a ditch
on the shoulder of the run-
way."
In the police report, Chief
Supt Rahming said that the
twin-engine Metro-Liner air-
craft slid 100 feet down the
runway after the landing gear
collapsed, resulting in the
plane skidding along the tar-
mac on its right wing.
However, Mr Rolle said the
aircraft's landing gear never
collapsed. He also said that
the plane's right wing did not
touch the runway.
Mr Rolle said that the pilot,
who was assisted by a co-pilot,
made a safe stop and the pas-
sengers exited the aircraft
"through the rear."
No one was injured in that
incident.


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If so, call us on 322-1986
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PAG 4 FIDAYTAGSTTT 2, 208THE RIITBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
.Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahamu: 1-(242)-352-6608


Caribbean tightening up on crime


A BAHAMIAN who has just returned
from a visit to Barbados has sent us some
interesting newspaper clippings. They show
that we all share common concerns crime,
drug smuggling, fear of signing on to a bad
deal with the EPA, yet a reluctance to be
left out of this European partnership agree-
ment.
There is also the fear that more serious
criminal elements will be introduced into the
island nations by the free movement of
Caribbean people in a region that has now
opened its markets under the CSME.
Barbados is particularly fearful of having
a spill over of violence from Trinidad and
Tobago, where there is a very high rate of
murders and kidnapping. Oil-rich Trinidad
and Tobago are not dependent on tourism,
but tourism is the lifeblood of nearby Bar-
bados. In a scathing article on crime in the
Caribbean, in which the Bahamas was dis-
missed as a place "not to go" because of its
growing crime, The Daily Telegraph of Lon-
don recommended Barbados as one of the.
safest places for honeymooners, and credited
Barbados' lower murder rate to its "strict
policing" and its "first-class education sys-
tem."
Yet Barbados is, also challenged. In a
message to its tourists it says:
"Barbados is a relatively safe place to vis-
it. Crime most often is characterized by pet-
ty theft and street crime. Incidents of violent
crime, including rape, do occur occasionally,
so visitors should be especially cautious on
the beaches at night.
"Always secure valuables in a hotel safe
wheQLpossible and take care to always lock
and secure hotel room doors and windows..
Barbados is still much safer than most large
cities in the United States and Europe, but
staying alert and taking proper precautions
are always the best way to ensure a safe and
secure vacation."
On February 21, the US Embassy in
Bridgetown, issued the following warning:
"U.S. citizens visiting or living in Barbados
should be aware that on January 16 and again
on January 30 groups of tourists on guided
tours of the island were the victims of highly
unusual robberies or attempted robberies at
gunpoint. In the second incident, shots were
fired by the assailants, although there were no
reported injuries."
And the police advised Bajan businesses to
install closed-circuit television and burglar
alarm systems, especially during the "Crop-


f irst 9aptitst CIurd)
289 Market St. South P.O. Box N-7984 Nassau, Bahamas


"Prayer moves the hand that
moves the world."
SUNDAY SERVICES
7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am
PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor
Phone: 323-6452 393-5798
Fax: 326-4488/394-4819


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Over" period the 12-week festival from
May through August, which celebrates the
end of the sugar cane harvest.
On August 10, The Barbados Advocate
published a criticism of the Trinidadian police
by Trinidad and Tobago's Opposition chief
whip. Ramesh Lawrence Maharaj was
alarmed by his government's handling of
crime as statistics showed police solved only
1,583 out of 8,893 serious crimes reported to
them between January and June this year.
The article is illustrated with a photograph of
a woman being escorted by armed guards.
The newspaper said that in Trinidad and
Tobago, with crime at an all-tinie high, busi-
nessmen have resorted to hiring armed body
guards to protect them as they carry out their
day-to-day business.
In the British Virgin Islands Premier Ralph
O'Neal has announced that his government
plans to recruit seven former UK police offi-
cers to help fight crime in the British Virgin
Islands. And in Antigua since the killing of a
honeymoon couple, which sparked the bad
press about crime in the Caribbean, Antigua
Prime Minister Baldwin Spencer announced
joint patrols for Antigua.
He plans to tighten immigration proce-
dures, enact legislation to monitor deportees
to Antigua and Barbuda and deport convict-
ed foreign criminals from the twin-island
nation. He said the military will be partnered
to rid the country of illegal guns and drugs.
The police and defence force, he said, will
resume the random stop-and-search of indi-
viduals and begin systematic searches of
pockets within the various communities for
firearms and illegal drugs.
His government will also revisit the Mag-
istrate's Code of Procedure Act and amend
existing legislation to ensure that fines are
not a penalty option for violent crime, and
that all bail applications for violent crimes
and the possession of offensive weapons will
be returned to the High Court.
He also appealed to Scotland Yard to help
his island crack unsolved murders.
Not only are borders being tightened in
'Antigua, but surveillance cameras are being
installed in strategic locations. Consideration
is also being given to introducing wiretap-
ping legislation. And so, when all is said and
done, nowhere can be guaranteed as a safe
vacation haven. However, intelligent people
can enjoy a carefree vacation on the resort-
islands of the Caribbean provided they take
intelligent precautions.


Stop dredging




until there is a




public review

EDITOR, The Tribune. Nature Conservancy explain


The following letter requests
that the Minister of the Environ-
ment puts an immediate stop to
dredging at Adelaide beach until
there can be a full public review.
I would appreciate The Tribune
publishing this letter.
Dr. Earl Deveaux
Minister of Environment
West Bay Street.
Dear Dr. Deveaux:
I am writing to you in your
capacity as Minister of the Envi-
ronment to request that you put
an immediate hold on the cutting
through of Adelaide beach until
this matter can have a full public
review. The destruction of Ade-
laide beach is, in my opinion,
inexcusable and is in direct con-
flict with international treaties,
local laws, Government policies,
proclamations and promises.
Several scientists at the BEST
Commission have confirmed that
the BEST Commission advised
the government not to permit the
construction of a channel through
Adelaide beach. Despite repeat-
ed requests for you to release this
information, as you promised you
would do, it has not been
released. For the record, here's
what Government agencies say:
Port Department The Port
Department wrote; "With regards
to the development of marinas or
docks which cut through beaches
in The Bahamas, this is not gen-
erally done but may be recom-
mended after Environmental
Impact Assessment has been sub-
mitted and reviewed by the BEST


Commission."
BEST Commission Several
BEST Commission scientists con-
firmed that the BEST Commis-
sion advised the Prime Minister's
Office NOT to allow developers
to cut through Adelaide beach
for a marina.
In fact, the Albany EIA
Addendum quotes the BEST
Commission:
At this-time BEST cannot
recommend approval for the
marina component of this pro-
ject. The Commission disagrees
with the statement on page 22
that the site is suitable for marina
development."
Ministry of Tourism: The Min-
istry of Tourism wrote, "... the
Ministry of Tourism is very con-
cerned that our beaches be pre-
served and sustained for the use
of Bahamians and visitors alike."
Prime Minister's Office: Rep-
resentatives in the Prime Minis-
ter's Office confirmed that the
policy of the Bahamas Govern-
ment was NOT to permit the cut-
ting through of Bahamian beach-
es. In fact, Mr. Audley. Greaves
said that cutting Delaporte beach
for the S'andyport canal was a
mistake, and that Government
learned their lesson, and would
not permit channels through
beaches again.
Here's what environmental
groups say:
The Nature Conservancy: Mrs.
Eleanor Phillips, Director of The


"The Conservancy therefore does
not support the destruction of
wetlands, fragmentation of beach-
es or unsustainable sand mining."
BREEF: Mrs. Casuarina McK-
inney, Executive Director of
BREEF said, "BREEF does not
support cutting through beaches,
sand mining from beaches, or
beach "re-nourishment" projects
that import sand from other
sites."
ReEarth: Mrs. Sam Dun-
combe, President of ReEarth
said, "The Government should
absolutely not allow developers
to cut through Bahamian beaches
for channels and marinas."
Bahamas National Trust: Mr.
Eric Carey, Executive Director
of the BNT wrote, "The Bahamas
National Trust would prefer to
see all remaining beaches remain
in a pristine state, with full access
to Bahamians."
If all of these Government
agencies and NGOs advise
against cutting through Bahamian
beaches, why has the Govern-
ment authorized the cutting of
Adelaide beach?
In keeping with the Govern-
ment's commitments to protect
the environment, beaches and
coastlines, I request that you put
a stop to the channeling through
Adelaide beach until this matter
can have a full public review.
Specifically, I request that you
stop dredging activities on land
and sea until this. matter can be
reviewed publicly. Thank you in
advance for your assistance.
ETIENNE DUPUCH III
Nassau,
August 12, 2008


Destruction of freshwater lenses is heinous


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I write in response to state-
ments made by Christopher
Anand of the Albany develop-
ment reported on August 14, 2008
as quoted in a local daily. Mr
Anand questioned the qualifica-
tions of the Director of reEarth,
Sam Duncombe.
First, let me start by giving you
my qualifications. My degrees are
in Environmental Technology
and Oceanographic Technology.
I have over 30 years of experi-
ence dealing with environmental
issues affecting The Bahamas
within a system that is, in my
opinion, for all intents and pur-
poses corrupt.
I had the pleasure of meeting
Sam Duncombe during the time
environmentalists from all over
the country were fighting to have
the very destructive method of
longline fishing banned in 1993.
I can tell you that her fervent
commitment to protecting the
Bahamian environment for future
generations is genuine and
unmatched. I fully support her in
every cause that she takes on


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because I know that she research-
es every topic thoroughly and
completely before making any
statements to the press.
As Dr Richard Cant was
recently quoted as saying in The
Tribune, "the marina and golf
course will undoubtedly destroy"
the area..."when you dig any
canal or marina or anything in a
fresh water lens, you destroy it, so
in that given area it will be
destroyed," meaning the fresh
water lens will be impacted and
will only produce salt water. .
As to lining a marina or canal
system, sir, once you cut into the
substrate of an island the cut is
final, there is no going back you
will introduce salt water intru-
sion. God only gave us land once.
To be cutting and blasting and
destroying freshwater lenses all
for the benefit of a few at the
expense of the many is heinous.
Surely Mr Tiger Woods can dock


his mega yacht at one of the fine
facilities located in New Provi-
dence. Or if he wants it close to
Albany, perhaps he should invest
in an anchor and station his crew-.,.,-I
on board off shore. Oprah parks
her yacht at a marina that has
already been installed. Mr
Woods, take a tip from Oprah.
I could.go on but the point is
Mr Anand, bear in mind, you are
a guest here. You would not want
to wear out your welcome before
you move in. The children of this
country are watching and they
will remember when all is said
and done at the end of the day.
Ecologically yours,
GAIL WOON
Founder
EARTHCARE
Freeport,
Grand Bahama
August 15, 2008.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008


d,


~1,,,,7,~


- ---









THE T R I BY A


0 In brief

Justice Isaacs
to make decision
on murder trial
WITH only a few weeks left
before four men are expected to
stand trial in the murder of busi-
nessman Keith Carey, Supreme
Court Justice Jon Isaacs is con-
sidering whether to vacate the tri-
al date or allow the matter to pro-
ceed.
Following closing arguments
yesterday on a constitutional
motion filed by attorneys Craig
Butler and Roger Gomez Jr, Jus-
tice Isaacs took the mattel under
advisement.
Justice Isaacs informed attor-
neys in the matter that he would
let them know when he had
reached his decision.
Mr Carey was shot and killed
on the steps of the Bank of the
Bahamas on the Tonique
Williams Darling Highway on
February 27, 2006, while attempt-
ing to deposit $40,000 that
belonged to the Esso Service Sta-
tion, which he operated on Faith
Avenue and Carmichael Road.
Sean Brown, Jamal Glinton
and Dwight Knowles have been
charged in Carey's murder and
Vaughn Carey, a cousin of the
deceased, has been charged with
conspiracy to commit armed rob-
bery.
Brown, Glinton and Carey ini-
tially stood trial in March, how-
ever in a surprising turn of events.
the prosecution entered a nolle
prosequi (no further prosecution)
and also brought charges against
Dwight Knowles who'had been a
witness for the prosecution who
testified that police had "coached"
him to give his statement.
September 29, has been set as
the new trial date.
Attorneys Butler and Gomez
allege that there was an abuse of
the court's process and that the
indictment against the men should
be stayed.
Attorney Garvin Gaskin of the
Attorney General's office argued
that the trial should proceed. He
claimed that Knowles' actions had
taken the prosecution by surprise
and that the nolle had not been
initially contemplated.

TROICAL

EXTRMNAOR


Abaco cay developers: we went


through all appropriate channels


* By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
DEVELOPERS of a small cav in Abaco
accused of bypassing local government to
get their plans approved claim they went
through all the appropriate channels.
Hope Town residents were outraged to
see plans by Bahamian construction com-
pany Cavalier to build 19 houses, six town-
houses, a club house, marina and artificial
beach on Joe's Cay for the first time in
July this year, after the plans had already
been provisionally approved by the cen-
tral government department of physical
planning.
Plans
But Vernon Wells, heading the project at
Cavalier, maintains plans to build 15 to 20
houses on the 4.599 acre cay linked to
Elbow Cay by a thick forest of mangroves,
were submitted to Hope Town District
Council by original owner Morris Davies in
May 2004 and approved in principle.
Mr Davies, he said, understood that the
buildings should cover no more than 20
per cent of the total land mass, and plans


for the boat basin, channel and
artificial beach would require separate
approval.
The drawings and blueprints of the pri-
vate residences have not.changed since
they were approved by Hope Town Coun-
cil in 2004, Mr Wells maintains, and the
buildings cover less than 20 per cent of the
total land mass.
According to Mr Wells, the plans were
again viewed and discussed by Hope Town
District Council in August 2007, after Cav-
alier had taken over the project and before
they were submitted to central govern-
ment.
He said: "Cavalier has proceeded with-
out missing any steps required by Hope
Town District Council, who already grant-
ed approval in principle for land use.
Cavalier informed Hope Town District
Council of the specific plan proposed prior
to submission to the Town Planning
Department, which is the only route when
Crown land, docks and harbour, Hotel
Encouragement Act are involved.
"And Cavalier will submit plans to Hope
Town District Council for approval and
permits once the docks, harbour, beach
and Hotel Encouragement Act is granted


by government."
Hope Town councillor Dianne Bethel
said councillors had approved plans in prin-


ciple in 2004 on the understanding that
only around three houses would be built on
Joe's Cay.


THE BAHAMAS FILM Commission is keeping open communications with its Florida counterparts
in hopes of continuing to attract film and television projects to the Bahamas. The Bahamas team
recently met with industry professionals on the set of US.A cable channel's Burn Notice, which is
filmed entirely on location in South Florida. Pictured on the set of Bum Notice are Grace Hart-Caron
of the Bahamas Film Commission, lead actress Gabrielle Anwar, Bahamas Film Commissioner Craig
Woods and casting director Ellen Jacoby.


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A MAN pleaded guilty in a
Magistrate's Court yesterday
to fraud charges.
Police charged Michael Wal-
ter Capron, 21, of Eastwood
Estates with-forgery, uttering a
forged document and fraud by
false pretences.
According to court dockets,
it is alleged that on Friday, July
'4, Capron forged a First
Caribbean International Bank
cheque in the amount of
$289.80.
Capron, according to court
records, passed off the fake
cheque and on the same day
obtained $289.80 in cash from
Standard Services and Sup-
plies on Shirley Street.
Court dockets also state that
on Friday, July 18, Capron
forged another First
Caribbean International Bank


cheque in the amount of
$289.80. Court dockets state
that on the same day he passed
off the fake cheque and
obtained the cash from Stan-
dard Services and Supplies.
Court dockets also state that
on August 18, Capron forged a
third First Caribbean Interna-
tional Bank cheque in the
amount of $289.80., Court
dockets state that Capron also
passed off this cheque on the
same day and attempted to
obtain $289.80 cash from Stan-
dard Services and Supplies.
Capron., who was arraigned
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez at Court One, Bank
Lane, pleaded guilty to all
charges. He was remanded to
Her Majesty's Prison and will
return to court today to be
sentenced.


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FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 6, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008 THE TRIBUNE


0


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B
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Y


* ;;*4 I


Poor performance of


graduating students


* By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com
www.weblogbahamas.com


THE backslapping and blovi-
ating of Ministry of Education
(MOE) officials about the D-plus
national average was conduct
that, frankly, was unwarranted
and can be interpreted as equiva-.
lent to that of malignant narcis-
sists.
Like many discerning Bahami-
ans, I am concerned about the
poor performance of graduating
students in the basic areas of lit-
eracy and numeracy. The
BGCSE results show that we are
failing as a nation, as we are pro-
ducing youngsters who cannot
function in a globalised worldand
whose academic qualifications do
not meet required standards for
enrolment in any reputable ter-
tiary institution, including the Col-
lege of the Bahamas, where stu-
dents who were unsuccessful in
the national exams must enter
and pass continuing education
prep classes before college enrol-
ment.
The much-celebrated D-plus
average, which the MOE refers to
as the median grade, isn't
acknowledged by serious educa-
tional institutions or by certain
sectors of the job market.
Minister of Education Carl
Bethel's attempt to connect the
recent results to the removal of
police from public schools
appeared to be a smug attempt
to politicise the results and was
a cheap shot at playing the pro-
paganda game instead of rising
above political lines and focusing
on entirely revamping our almost
defunct educational system.
The minister should know that
another year of depressing results
does not indicate the develop-
ment or strength of our human
capital or educational system. D
still means Dunce, Donkey or
Dimwit, whether plus or minus.
The minister should know, or
have been advised, that data from
his ministry shows that the nation-
al mean grade for 2005 and 2006
- when police were situated on
school campuses was also a D-
plus and that any improvement
or drop in the grades may have


hardly been related to their pres-
ence, or lack thereof.
It appears that what the min-
istry is not addressing is the num-
ber of graduates who leave school
without diplomas, have failing
grade point averages and turn out
poor national exam results, and
who end up being sent into the
"real world" with nothing. The
revelation that fewer than 50 per
cent of the thousands of annual
high school students actually
graduate with a diploma is indica-
tive of our archaic educational
system being fatally flawed and
overly institutionalized.
Clearly, the value for life and
education has been relegated to
the trenches when nearly 60 per
cent of the nation's high school
graduates finished with atten-
dance certificates instead of diplo-
mas, for failing to meet a cumu-
lative grade point average (GPA)
of 2.0 during six years of high
school.
In 1992, the grade range was
based upon a five point letter
grading scale ranging from A
to F. When the BGCSE came
about in 1993, that scale was
revised so that a seven point letter
grading scale was introduced and
included grades A, B, C, D, E, F
and G. A U (unclassified) grade is
not officially a part of the scale
and can only be given when a stu-
dent is absent for an exam with
a good cause or when a stu-
dent may have fallen below the
minimum requirements. Howev-
er, according to one educator, this
doesn't appear on the exam
results slip.
Since the grading system is on
a seven point scale that doesn't
reflect pluses or minuses, I'm curi-
ous as to how the MOE arrives at
overall results which sometimes
reflect pluses or minuses while,
on the other hand, examination
candidates collect result slips that
only show straight letter grades
- no pluses or minuses.


A revolutionary approach
must be taken to improving the
educational system and ensuring
that at least 90 per cent of all
school leavers graduate with
diplomas. As I have said before,
in curbing school failure/dropouts,
the ministry via the schools must
forthrightly implement a policy
to bring an end to socially pro-
moting students until they gradu-
ate since they most likely leave
school without a basic education
and become leading candidates
for a criminal lifestyle, enforce
the mandatory 2.0 grade point
average for movement to another
grade, cultivate a positive school
climate, produce a relevant cur-
riculum, encourage peer tutoring
by offering stipends to more
advanced students for tutoring
rendered to their struggling peers,
recruit more remedial teachers,
further develop the educational
programme and the training of
prospective teachers at COB,
increase evaluations by psycho-
logical services for troubled stu-
dents, require all failing students
to attend summer school and lim-
it their participation in extra-cur-
ricular activities.
Furthermore, I challenge all
ministers of education to follow
the example of former US presi-
dent Jimmy Carter and enrol
their children in the public school
system to show their confidence
in the system.
As Governor of Georgia,
instead of merely paying lip ser-
vice to his plans to give a facelift
to public education and ensure
the safety of students, Mr Carter
enlisted his children in the sys-
tem that he had committed to
improving. Locally, no member
of parliament has children that
attend public school, and certain
past ministers of education appear
to have seen it as simply a politi-
cal job, since they even refused
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008








FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


Chile seeks closer ties with the Caribbean


CHILE'S new Ambassador
to CARICOM yesterday under-
scored his country's interest in
developing closer ties with the
community in trade, poverty
alleviation and coastal border
administration.
Josd Gabriel Zepeda pre-
sented his credentials to CARI-
COM Secretary-General Edwin
Carrington at the headquarters
of the CARICOM Secretariat
in Georgetown, Guyana.
In his remarks Secretary-
General Carrington noted that
Ambassador Zepeda's accredi-
tation to the community was the
third from Chile.


Country lauded for its 'sound

policies and commitment to

human resource development'


He lauded Chile's "sound
policies and commitment to
human resource development",
noting that with improvement
of its infrastructure, Chile was
positioned as a "model for sus-
tainable growth and develop-
ment not only for Latin Amer-
ican countries but also for
CARICOM."


Secretary-General Carring-
ton noted that the Caribbean
Community had enjoyed 13
years of "strong relations" with
Chile and expressed apprecia-
tion for the technical support
that country had offered to
CARICOM over those years.
In particular, the Secretary-
General noted Chile's support


at both the United Nations and
the Organisation of American
States for resolutions relating
to an integrated management
approach to the Caribbean Sea,
in the context of sustainable
development and the necessity
for the implementation of the
Barbados Programme of
Action on Small Island Devel-
oping States (SIDS).
The new Ambassador
offered commendations to
CARICOM for what he
described as an "enormous
contribution in the noble task
of uniting the people of the
Caribbean."


Signalling his country's inter-
est in developing closer ties
with CARICOM in the area of
trade, Ambassador Zepeda
said that Chile had defined
itself as an "open economy"
and was therefore proposing
that "CARICOM members
begin negotiations to sign a free
trade agreement."
He added that Chile had
intended to "initiate those
negotiations as soon as possi-
ble."
With regard to coastal bor-
der administration, he said that
Chile was interested in assist-
ing in developing policies for


environmental management
and developing coast guard
capabilities of island states.
In the area of poverty reduc-
tion the Chilean Ambassador
said that his country was inte-
grally involved in the allevia-
tion of "dire poverty" in the
region, adding that programmes
with this objective had begun
in Jamaica, Trinidad and Toba-
go and Saint Lucia.
These three areas, Ambas-
sador Zepeda said were those
that Chile had "greater poten-
tial for contributing towards a
better quality of life for the
Caribbean people."


Polish ambassador to the Bahamas aims to


boost relations between the two countries


THE first Polish ambassador
to the Bahamas Robert
Kupiecki says he is here to
look for economic, cultural and
political opportunities for the
two countries.
He noted that the Bahamas
is already one of only three
economic partners that his cen-
tral European nation of 40 mil-
lion trades with in the region.
He said an enhanced part-
nership is definitely likely
between the two, in light of the
fact that Poland is already the
fourth largest export market
for the Bahamas.
According to the ambas-
sador, current trade between
the Bahamas and Poland is
estimated to be worth between
$700 and $800 million.
Mr Kupiecki met Governor
General Arthur Hanna yes-
terday to present his creden-
tials.
The 41-year-old ambassador
noted that state-to-state rela-
tions between the two coun-
tries were begun in 2003 and
established officially in 2004.
The ambassador, who is
based in Washington, DC, said
that his term as a non-resident
ambassador will last for a peri-
od of four years.
"Wherever and whenever
we see the opportunity to
work together to do business
for the benefit of our two
countries, we should come and
seize the opportunity," he said.
Comparing the Bahamas to
Poland, Ambassador Kupiecki
said both are countries that
can be defined by similar val-
ues, as both are democratic
nations belonging to the same
international community, and
both are members of the Unit-
ed Nations.
He said it is therefore only
natural for the two partners to
promote mutual development.
Commenting on the small
Polish Bahamian community,
the ambassador said: "I think
they enrich the ethnical mosa-
ic you have in your beautiful
country."
The ambassador spoke of
the numerous iconic musicians
and culturalists that are auto-
matically synonymous with
Poland, the most famous being
the composer Fr6d6ric
Chopin.
He said that upon his arrival
in the Bahamas, the first thing
he noticed was the use of
bright, intense colours.
He added that he is
impressed by what he has
learned about the history of
the Bahamas and is truly excit-
ed to be a part of the new and
historic relationship between
the two countries.
While here on a week-long
visit, the ambassador with his
wife and two children, will tour
the various islands in the arch-
ipelago.


.;a pq"W.


Felipd Major/Tribune staff











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You've been gone for a year, but the memory of
you still lives on. Its seems just like yesterday
you left my heart can still feel the pain every
birthday, every holiday, I wish I could spend
with you like the many years before.

Now I can only share these days with the
memory of your hugs, your voice the memory of
you, I still cry at night as I think of the past of
all the memories we had even the ones that
were once faint they stand out more then ever.

You've been gone a year but the memory of you
still lives on with me.


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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


F-v~--. -M -- LNEu


FROM page six


Poor performance of graduating students


Sponsored by:
The Hon. Sidney S. Collie
Vi;bwr ofP.)l ameni l for the Blue Hills Constituency

Residents for a Better Blue Hills Community .
in collaboration with -
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Bethel Brothers Morticians
Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026




ETHEL-LOUISE
MOXEY, 95
of #10 Patton Street, West
Street South will be held on
Saturday, August 23rd, 10:00
a.m. at Bethel Baptist Church,
": y3Meeting Street. Pastor Timothy
., Stewart. assisted by other
ministers of the gospel will
officiate. Interment will follow
in the Western Cemetery,
Nassau Street.
She is survived by one (1) son,
Kirkford Moxey; two (2)
./ daughters, Mrs. Birdina
Moxey Taylor and Mrs.
Jacqueline Moxey Johnson; 15 grandchildren, Monique Taylor-
Cartwright, Narissa and Moyia Taylor, Gerard, Tenniel, Nelson Perez,
Mici.elle, Donathan, Nyoka Johnson, Meisha Moxey-Washington of
Texas, Seneka Moxey-McKinney of Atlanta, Nefeteria, Shavanna and
Nukia Moxey, and Anthony Burnside; 13 great-grandchildren, Alexter
and Rashad Frazier, Tennier, Chandler, Taye Taylor and Giovohanni
Knowles. Diazio Pratt, Shaniah Henfield, Brenton and Brendon Albury,
Mekhi McKinney, Adorah Washington and Leslia St. Albord; Son-in-
law, Bishop Nelson Johnson; sisters-in-law Alean and Calvese Moxey;
Brother-in-law, Nelson Moxey of Freeport, Grand Bahama; grandsons-
in-law. Andrew Cartwright and Michael McKinney; nieces, Winnifred
Ferguson, Madge Thurston, Laverne Fox, Bernadette Cooper, Delores
Davis, Janice Russell, Natasha Storr, Natisha, Stephanie and Shavann
Moxey, Hilda Flowers, Deborah Huyler, Kephee Bain, Sophia Carey,
Shcila Culmer, Carol Bowleg, Brenda and Linda Watkins, Theresa and
Majorie Joseph, Patrice Moxey, Antoinette Moxey; nephews, Jerome,
Michael, Scott, Derek, Rickey, Cliphe, Bradley and Bernard Moxey,
Vincent Gardiner, Randol Flowers, Eugene Bums, Sidney, James and
John Watkins, Dawson Fawkes, Kermit Cooper, Marvin Storr and James
Riley; grandnieces, Marcia Weir and Kathleen Ferguson; great-
grandnephews, Cleveland, Theophilus and Joshua Weir, John Davis,
Ted King and Gladstone McEwen; great-grandnieces, Jacqueline
Zonicle, Cheryl Whylly, Darnette Weir, Esther Newton, Caroline King,
Gina Ferguson, Veronica, Valerie and Stephanie McEwen; great-
grandnieces, Dannelee Thompson, Cherica Whylly; great-great-
grandnephews, Cedric Whylly, Daniel Zonicle, Jr., Willis Simmons,
Jr. C ivargo Whylly, Donte' Armbrister, Cephas Whylly; godchildren,
Walbertha Rolle, Kirklynn Marsh, Nathiel Roxbury and Clement
Ferguson: caretakers, Mrs. Delores Francis and Anthony Wilmore and
a host of relative and friends including, Claygon and Yvonne Taylor
of Mason's Bay Acklins, The Bahamas, and the Taylor and Johnson
families, Venus Johnson and family, Brenton Albury Sr., Kathleen
Ferguson and family, John Davis and family, Rev. Mathias Munroe,
Reginald, Calista and Billy Austin, Judge Margaret Carey-McCray of
Mississippi, Cookie Carey Peoples of Pasadena California, James,
Thomas and Ruth Carey of Key West, Florida, Richmond Bostwick,
Clco Nixon, Atwell Pintard, Mispah Tertullien, Willamae Bridgewater,
Clothelda Ferguson, Katherina and Willard Rutherford, Astrid and
Vernice Davis, Gwen McDeigan, Harold Munnings, Audrey and Patricia
Fountain, Mavis and Roscoe Davies, Cleomi Burrows, Gwen Hanna,
Doris Fritzgerald, McDonald Deveaux, descendents of Peter Adderley,
Maria Thompson, Mervin, Rodney and Wendel "Skinny" and of Andros,
h.... l.., i, Sweeting of New York, Mary Moxey Mache and family,
FEdwin Moxey and family Wanda Dean and family, Cleo Henry of New
York. Berniece and Naomi Eneas, Telzena Coakley, Coakleys of King
Street, Agatha Williams, Charles Murray family, Yvonne Maura and
family, Blanche Moss, Nora Dorsett, Doris Adderley of Fresh Creek,
Andros, Margaret (China) Ferguson and the family of the late Joseph
Johnson, Charles Clarke and Family, Francis Clarke and family, Basil
('hristic. Timothy Sawyer, Gregory Cash, Clarence Johnson, Dudley
"Bones" Moxey, Lendreux Ross, Jeff Brown, Deacon Jeffrey Lloyd,
Velva Rahming, George Strachan, Eddison Brown, Deborah Fawkes,
.Jacqueline Wright, Ben Pickering and family, Persis Bullard and family,
Patricia Rolle and family, Kirk and Val Roker, Andrew Burrows, Kevin
Knowles, Janice Cecile Longley, Raquel Graham, Ava Clarke, Helen
Williams and Wesley Clarke of Florida, Vernal Edwards, Althea Williams
of Opa Locka, Florida, Delores Ingraham, C. C. Sweeting Jr. and D.W.
Davis Schools Jr. High Schools, Bethel Baptist Church family, Pastor
Timothy Stuart, St. Agnes Anglican Church family, Archdeacon 1.
Ranfurly Brown, Pastor Dr. Gayle Brown and the True Worshipers of
tChurch of The Divine Resurrection, Minister Pamela Pierre, of Divine
Design, Seventh Day Adventist Church, St. Georges Anglican Church
and Bethel Baptist Church Outreach Programs, Audrey Dean and family,
Curfew Lodge #816, St. Hilda's Chapter #1 PHA, Cabinet Office Staff.
Staff of Government Printing Department, The Tribune Staff, Public
I hospitals Authority Staff, Lucine Cargill Wilmott and family, Winston
and 'ylvia Culmner, Antoinette Bowe, Nathalie Hutchinson and family,
(leophas and Jose Adderley, Carmen Bostwick, Stephanie Francis and
family. Rhoda Wildgoose, Anna Ingraham, The Jones/Archer families,
Ililzabeth (Betty) Mackey and family, Elizabeth (Betty) Simms and
family, Synida Dorsett and family, Elsie Strachan, Gwen Moncur and
alm.y. Musienne McDonald and family, Patricia Coakley and family,
(Christopher Richardson and family Stephanie McKinney and family,
Sandra North and family, Bahamas Public Services Union, Public
\\ workers Co-operative Credit Union, Bahamas Co-operative Credit
Union League, Old Timers Softball League, Bethel Baptist Boys Brigade
Company No. 15, The entire West Street Community, Helena Babbs,
Clharles Stewart, the Bamboo Blvd family, the Pintard, Wilson, Lockhart.
Munroe. Maycock, Adderley, Moxey, Moss and Armbrister families of
...i Island, The Bahamas; The Munnings families of Cat Island and
\Andros Island. The Bahamas, Woodside, Rahming, Coakley, Hinsey,
tCargill. Lundy, Minnis and Thompson families of Central Andros, The
Htahamas.
May her soul and the souls of the dearly departed rest in peace.
Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel B their Morticians #44
Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:0 .m. and on Saturday
at tihe church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.


to send their chiklren to ((COB.
I double that thle cCiiiClc edtl-
cation minlistelr.o iil oithclr piill-
liamen tlurian, wou lie flllattered
or rcmotcl\ aIcceptingll of their
childiciln friinineii home ai report
card of l)s.
It alwa is alnazes me ho\ suc-
cessive g'ovCernmlents haiCe not had
the giravitas to reform the system
and have enough confidence inl
their reformatory measures to
take a new approach by at least
S i a timeline for when
the BGCSE average will be a C
or, by their calculations, a C-
minuis.


THE OLYMPICS!

The 2008 Olympics Opening
Ceremony in Beijing, China, was
a mesmerising event that featured
awe-inspiring animation and
colours and proved to be a daz-
zling display of Chinese culture
- even from thousands of miles
away.
While I congratulate those
members of Team Bahamas who
would have set national records
and performed to their best, spe-
cial recognition must be paid to
Leevan Sands, wVho thus far has
earned thee country's first medal
- a bronze.
As sports enthusiast,. must


\
:.5





al


express my disappointment at the
apparent lack of a forward look-
ing approach hy the Bahamas
()lympic Association (BOA)\ in
preparation for this year's games.
I was also rather disappointed
but somewhat expectant of Chris
Brown's failure to medal as"once
again a nation's heart was bre-
ken as he was yet again beaten
at the finish line.
Instead of f ll 11,.. Jamaica's
example and seeking young ath-
letes to develop for future games,
it appears that the BOA and oth-
er local sporting organizations are
failing to develop a scouting and
training programme, where sports
scouts travel to the islands in
search of the abundance of tal-
ent that lie dormant just wait-
ing to be discovered.
Over the years, I've known
and been told of first-rate ath-
letes who, upon finishing high
school, settle into jobs or family
life as there probably were no
opportunities to attend college or
hone their athletic abilities and/or
they became discouraged due to a
lack of support.
Although many of our older
athletes have made the country
proud, our performance when
compared to other countries (eg,
Jamaicans, Americans) shows
that rather than constantly "recy-


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cle" athletes who can no longer
compete against younger, better
trained participants from other
countries, we must focus on
grooming younger competitors.
Because of their developmen-
tal programmes, Jamaica can
boast of having the fastest man
(100m 200m) Usain Bolt -
and the fastest woman (100m) -
Shelly Ann Fraser in the
world, who both fulfilled their
Olympic dreams, and made their
country proud, at age 21.
Usain Bolt has dominated the
Olympic sprint events and has
electrified his country and the
world with his world record per-
formances.
At this Olympics, the Bahamas
sent a team that included sprint-
ers/field competitors, swimmers,
tennis players and a boxer. How-
ever, why can't we develop -
with government and private sec-
tor sponsorship our sports pro-
grammes and field a team that
also competes in archery, softball
or baseball (which we once dom-
inated), canoe/kayak events,


cycling, diving, equestrian events,
fencing, judo, rowing, sailing (with
our many regattas and experi-
enced skippers this should be
automatic), shooting, 'ynchro-
nised swimming, wrestling,
weightlifting, volleyball (indoors
or beach), taekwondo, table ten-
nis, handball, trampoline, gym-
nastics and even basketball?
There are numerous events
that make up the Olympic sched-
ule and I know of quite a number
of talented, athletic Bahamians
who already compete in these
events and can qualify if the prop-
er developmental programmes
are in place and, if the Bahamas'
sports ministry and the BOA
weren't so short-sighted.

This Sunday, August 24, Juan
McCartney and I will be launch-
ing and co-hosting a new talk
show on Star 106.5 FM that
promises to provide an impartial,
straight-tall outlet that holds no
punches and expounds upon the
issues of the day. The show begins
at 4pm.


NOTICE TO PUBLIC

It has come to our attention that our
Cash Sales Receipt Books, Nos. from
46000 to 46251 have been stolen, and


they are now
Purchase Orders.


being used as


Please note that these are not
Purchase Orders,. as they are being
accepted by various suppliers. See copy
of specimen Purchase Order below.


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PURCHASE ORDER
Dale: ______.____


Tel: 322-1722/3/4/5

33309


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THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008, PAGE 9


LOA NW


Stolen items

FROM page one
public to come out. And once
they have the proper informa-
tion that is the documents -
then those items can bhe
returned to them."
Inspector James Miller, crime
manager at Carmichael Road
Station, said that officers at the
station were involved in a one
week joint operation with other
police units.
"And as a result of our intel-
ligence and the information we
received we were able to recov-
er the items that were shown to
you much earlier," he said.
The items were found in the
possession of three people,
according to Mr Miller. How-
ever, police were unable to
release information on where
they were found because their
investigation is continuing.
Police are questioning one or
two people in relation to this
find, Mr Miller said.
A significant amount of con-
struction tools and building
materials were recovered by
police. This included lumber,
skill saws, chainsaws, drills,
lighting fixtures and tiles.
Police again warned Bahami-
ans that knowingly receiving
stolen goods is a crime. Mr
Evans said the items being
offered are at significantly
reduced prices indicating they
may be stolen and should not
be purchased. Those who are
selling them, he added, should
be reported to police.



Medal glory

FROM page one
Bahamas' team officials should
protest the result, had to settle
for fourth in 44.84.
A protest was lodged, accord-
ing to team manager Foster
Dorsett, but the meet officials
ruled that Neville got his tossil
over the line ahead of Brown,
so he will remain the bronze
medalist.
Earlier in the night, veteran
sprinter Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie fell short in her bid
to duplicate at least her bronze
medal feat from the last
Olympics in Athens, Greece
when she came across the line
in seventh place in a subpar
22.61.
All that's left for the
Bahamas is the men's 4 x 400
metre relay. The preliminaries
will be run today with the
Bahamas in lane three in the
,last of the two heats ahead of
Trinidad and Tobago in two
and Japan in four.
Jamaica, which has per-
formed exceptionally well in
both the men's and women's
sprints, is in lane seven.
The finals will be contested
on Saturday.


FROM page one

sau, the second of six children of
the late Bishop T.E.W. Donald-
son, and his wife. Mildred.
She was educated at Go\crin-
ment High School. %\ here she was
the school's pianist. She becameI
Senior Girl prefect in her final
year.
Mrs Barrett, an Associate of the
College of Perceptors. became a
Ministry of Education teacher in
1955.
She taught Mathematics. Eng-
lish Language and Literature and
music at Eastern Senior School of
which the late Donald Davis was
headmaster. She also taught at HO
Nash Junior High and was Senior
Mistress at Kennedy Secondary
School in 1967.


Hilda Barren

I'm1 1 the age l I1 she worked
with ianld acctmi]pniiel I'he Ebony
Musical Assiocimion. which was
Iounlle'd and dI ( ctedv b Rev
Richiird 5. BH ;rcll,. \\ho t was a dca-
Con Ma Siti .ohnl' Baptist (Church.
In t)1947 hle becMaine her husband.
The liboni\ NMusical group gained
inlternitionlIl rIccognilion and was
noted lor pioneering classical
choral music in the Bahamaas.
Mrs Hail ett was committee
member, pianist and coral direc-
tor o lithe Nassau Amateur Oper-
atic Society. She was the pro-
gramme director and organiser of
many local classical concerts and
was accompanist for many visiting
performing artists. She was a mem-


FROM page one

agreement that seems to maintain the status quo.
"No one makes an agreement for you to have the
status quo, and there is nothing to say that it will be
allowed to remain," he said. "So we don't know
what we have signed."
Minister Laing said a provisional dale for signing
the EPA has been set for September 2, but without
having a full public consultation or debating it in par-
liament, the Government is showing contempt lor
the country and its people. Mr Moss said.
"This is a life-altering agreement," he argued.
"And we have yet to hear our Prime Minister speak
on this issue, but he allows a junior minister. who has
no experience, to commit this country to an agree-
ment which is bad not only for this country but lor
countries around the world."
Mr Moss said joining the EPA will open the
developing Bahamian market to established Euro-i
pean countries with which the Bahamas cannot coin-
pete.
Although it will benefit the fishing industry and
Bacardi rum trade with Europe, it will damper olth-
er industries that rely on the billions of dollars
brought in by the United States every year.
It also calls for the reduction and elimination of
tariffs, a source of 60 per cent of national revenue.
and the government has no plans to replace this
income, Mr Moss said.


FROM page one

the Atlantis postponements, the
Baha Mar hold-up at Cable
Beach, the reported slow start in
the Rose Island hotel develop-
ment, and continuing failure to
address the airport and straw
market issues.
One senior worker inside
Atlantis said the timeshare and
Hurricane Hole developments
would have created 500-600 con-
struction jobs.
But he said the only building
work now taking place was
remodelling of existing structures.
with no prospect of new-build
projects getting off the ground
for at least one, and probably
more than two years.
"There have been nine break-
ins on Paradise Island in the last
two months that nobody tells the
press about. That's because peo-
ple are getting desperate.
"Two girls were robbed in their
condo in broad daylight only a
few days ago, but we didn't read
about it in the newspapers."


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her of the Board of Directors of
the YWCA and for a time trained
and conducted the "Y" Choral
Society.
Mrs Barrett assisted Lady Bet-
ty Arthur, wife of Governor Sir
Raynor Arthur, who started the
Bahamas Music Festival in 1958.
She served on the Music Festival
Committee for many years serv-
ing in many capacities, including
adjudicating the Bahamas Section
of the Festival. The work of train-
ing and accompanying groups and
soloists featured greatly in Mrs
Barrett's musical career and the
introduction of a Department of
Music in the Ministry of Educa-
tion schools is attributed to her.
She was organists at St John's
Baptist Cathedral for 30 years and
for another 30 years was organist at
St Andrew's Presbyterian Kirk.


EPA claim
"That is irresponsible. When you are running a
nation you must care for your citizens, and if you are
eliminating one income without a plan to replace it,
you are incompetent."


Harl Taylor

FROM page one

ber of parties that Mr Taylor and deceased Col-
lege of the Bahamas Professor Dr Thaddeus
McDonald once attended.
The banker is believed to have been at Dr
McDonald's 59th birthday party shortly before
both he and Taylor were brutally murdered last
November.
Taylor, an internationally-known handbag
designer, was stabbed to death at his home,
Mountbatten House, West Hill Street.
His body was found two days after McDonald
a senior academic at the College of the
Bahamas was found bludgeoned to death in
his Queen Street guesthouse.


Fears 'recession' could lead to crime rise


He said some Atlantis workers
had been reduced to four, three
and sometimes even two-day
weeks as the hotel tries to keep
up occLpa1ncy rates with cut-price
packages.
"Worse still," said one senior
hotel worker. "is the impact the
opening up of Cuba to the Amer-
icans will ha\e on the Bahamas. It
has been stated that we'll lose 20
per cent of our tourist business if
that happens.
"But that's nonsense it's
much more likely that we'll lose
70 per cent of our American busi-
ness.
"One of the problems is that
hotels that try to offer four-star
service here are unable to offer
more than two-star service
because of the bad attitudes of
local labour.
"I have seen staff treating
tourists poorly, with one waitress
actually saving 'I don't know what
I'm doing here' in front of the
people who provide her liveli-


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try of Education and approved by the Department of
Public Personnel Credits earned at Success are trans-
ferable to Nova Southeastern University. Graduates
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Success now for program and registration infornna-
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hood."
He said the automatic 15 per
cent gratuity had killed staff's
incentives to do their jobs well.
One source, predicting an
upsurge in break-ins and other
forms of theft in the coming
months, said: "I dread to think
what this Christmas will be like if
things don't start happening soon.
"All indications are that noth-
ing significant building-wise is
going to happen here until at least
Christmas, 2009, and possibly the
spring of 2010.
"The government needs to
state what plans it has in mind to
overcome these problems. What's
happening at the airport, which
is a disgrace? What's happening
at the straw market site in Bay
Street, which is now a big waste-
land?
"If the government doesn't act
soon, they will lose the 2012 elec-
tion and let in the PLP, who will
also do nothing. This is a serious
situation."


As a Ministry of Education
Teacher, she entered the Guild-
hall, London, in 1966 and returned
with the LGSM and the LTCL
(CMT) Diplomas.
In 1970 she joined the staff of
the Nassau Branch of the Bank of
Nova Scotia, as personnel officer.
In September 1973 she did a course
at the bank's Regional Training
Centre in Toronto, Canada and
became the bank's training officer
for New Providence and Family
Island branches.
In April 1974 she was awarded
the Distinguished Citizens Award
for the Performing Arts.
She was a member of the Coun-


cil of the Girl Guides Association
and a member of the Corona Soci-
ety.
Mrs Barrett is survived by her
son, Dr Timothy Barrett and his
wife, Samantha, two daughters,
Juliette and D'Anne Barrett,
brothers, Charles, Dennis, TB
Donaldson, Luther Donaldson of
Atlanta, an adopted brother, Dr
Davidson Hepburn, and her sis-
ter, Mrs Verna Neilly of Home-
stead, Florida, six grandchildren
and two great grandchildren.
She was predeceased by
her son, Brockholst Barrett, in
2006. Funeral services will be
announced later.


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Left.to right Kir Pritchard, assistant Kraft Brand Manager,
Winner Mrs. Philippa Shaw, and
Mr. Alec Pinder Kraft Brand Manager.


U-'-


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.P --


GLINTON I SWEETING I O'BRIEN


COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
303 I, Y STREET P 0 BOX N- 492
NASSAU. NEW PROVIDENCE ITHE BAHAMAS
t 242 328 3500 1 f242 328 8008 ___ '. .1


THE PUBLIC IS IHEREBY NOTIFIED THAT
OUR OFFICES WILL BE CLOSED ON
FRIDAY, 22ND AUGUST 2008 FOR OUR
ANNUAL STAFF RETREAT.


WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY
INCONVENIENCE CAUSED.


I I I.


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ITel: 25-081/2Open Mon-Fr~iT'jTi. 8af. Tn3P.Ma
^^^^^^^^^^^^Sat. 8aff'Hir. fffB2noomm


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I


MI








n PAGE 10, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008


FHE TRIBUNE


AUGUST 22, 2008


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Issues Round- Washington McLaughlin Bill Moyers Journal (N) Cl (CC) Waking the Dead Thin Air" (Part 1
WPBT table discussion. Week (N) n Group N) (CC) of 2)
(CC)
The Insider (N) NFL Preseason Football Houston Texans at Dallas Cowboys. From Texas Stadium in Irving, Texas. (Live)
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SOlympic Ozone XXIX Summer Olympics From Beijing. Track & field, finals: men's 4x100m relay, pole vault, women's 4x100m
B WTVJ relay, long jump, 5000m, decathlon, 1500m; diving, men's platform semifinal. (Live) (CC)
Deco Drive Are You Smarter Than a 5th Grad- Are You Smarter Than a 5th Grad- News (N) (CC)
B WSVN er? Adults try to answer elementary- er? n (CC)
school questions. (CC)
Jeopardy! "Teen ** COLLATERAL (2004, Suspense) Tom Cruise, Jamie Foxx, Jada 20120 "Babyland" Doctors and or-
U WPLG Tournament" Pinkett Smith. A contract killer uses a cabdriver for his jobs. n ganizations work together to fight in-
(CC) ant mortality. (N) (CC)

(:00) CSI: Miam Miami ami "Backstabbers" The CSI: Miami "Internal Affairs" Natalia The Cleaner "Here Comes the
A&E After the Fall" team must find a suspected terrorist, is accused of her ex-husband's mur- Boom"A boy asks for William's help
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(:00) BBC World BBC News Click BBC News Our World News
BBCI News America (Latenight). (Latenight). Kenya's post
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BET Hell Date (N) Baldwin Hills Baldwin Hills **aK WOMAN THOU ART LOOSED (2004) Kimberly Elise, Loretta
(CC) Movie premiere. Movie premiere. Devine. A young woman tries to overcome a life of abuse. (CC)
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CNBC XXIX Summer Onthe Money High Net Worth Fast Money (Live) The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
S Olympics (CC)
:00) Lou Dobbs CNN Election Center Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
CNN N Tonight (CC)
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dia to appear in a musical.'NR' (CC) n (CC) a (CC)
DY This Old House This Old House Sweat Equity Hammered- Wood Works Wood Works New Yankee
DIY_ (CC) Exterior finish. Diresta Lamp table. Workshop (CC)
DW Johannes B. Kerner Echt antik Journal: Tages- Quadriga Journal: In Euromaxx
_W__ them Depth
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E !Loose ing Mental Disorders (N) _Door
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P down tol, Tenn. (Live) (Live) (CC),
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WT Daily Mass: Our The World Over Life Is Worth The Holy Rosary Defending Life Reasons for Our
EVWTN Lady Living Hope
FI TV 00) Cardio National Body Challenge "Losing National Body Challenge "Girth Control" A family that likes fatty foods
FT TV Blast (CC) Big in Vegas"ALas Vegas. (CC) and hates exercise makes a pact. (CC)
FOX-NC Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (CC) Hannity & Colmes (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
X-N Shepard Smith _Susteren (CC)
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rolrL (Live) __ out) (Live)
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GOLF oeing Classic -- First Round.
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(:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger Walker sus- JANE DOE: YES, I REMEMBER IT WELL (2006, Mystery) Lea Thomp-
HALL exas Ranger pects foul play in the death of a son, Joe Penny, Donna Mills. A woman and her mother investigate an
n (CC) high-school principal. C (CC) agent's kidnapping. (CC)
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N VcEveryday Life (CC) .day James Robison (CC)Truth (CC)
Reba Reba's in My Wife and According to Family Guy Lois Family Guy Pe- Two and a Half Two and a Half
KTLA the middle of a Kids Claire Jim Dana takes becomes a black ter knocks out the Men That Spe- Men "A Bag Full
legal battle. C1 learns to drive, credit for a gift. bet. (CC) city cable. cial Tug" (CC) ofJawea"
Still Standing Reba Brock Reba Reba LOVE NOTES (2007, Drama) Laura Leighton, Antonio Cupo. A woman
LIFE "Still Rocking" ) spreads his fa- hooks up with an wants to give her baby to her infertile best friend. (CC)
(CC) their's ashes. C old flame.
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N American Dog moves his family. n (CC) (CC)
SPEED Pass Time 101 Cars You 101 Cars You 101 Cars You 101 Cars You 101 Cars You 101 Cars You
SPEED must Drive must Drive must Drive must Drive must Drive must Drive
Dr. E.V. Hill (CC) Behind the The Hal Lindsey Joel Osteen Dr. Frederick K. Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Scenes (CC) Report (CC) (CC) Price (CC)
Everybody Seinfeld Jerry Seinfeld George ** THE WEDDING DATE (2005, Romance-Comedy) Debra Messing,
TBS Loves Raymond dates Miss wonders about Dermot Mulroney, Amy Adams. A woman brings a male escort to her sis-
( (CC) Rhode Island. Yada yada." ter's wedding.
(:00) What Not What Not to Wear "Michelle G." What Not to Wear "Glenda" A moth- Who Are You Wearing? "Ali
TLC to Wear Teen Philosophy student. (CC) er of two buys clothes that do not fit Sweeney" (Series Premiere) Alison
wardrobe. (CC) her body or age. (N) Sweeney. (N)
:00) Law & Or- * THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING (2001, Fantasy) Elijah Wood, lan
TNT der C (CC) McKellen, Liv Tyler. Creatures unite to destroy a powerful ring and defeat a lord. (CC)
(DVS)
George of the NARUTO THE MOVIE: NINJA CLASH IN THE LAND OF SNOW (2004, Chowder Misadv. of Flap-
TOON Jungle Adventure) Voices of Yuko Kaida, Kazuhiko Inoue. jack
TRU ops World's Wildest Forensic Files Forensic Files Suburban Se- Suburban Se-
U "Seattle/Tacoma" I(N) crets (N) crets (N)
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(:00) Querida Al Diablo con Los Guapos Mila- Fuego en la Sangre Hermanos La Rosa de Guadalupe "A Como
UNIV Enemiga gros yAlejandro enfrentan la mal- buscan venganza. de Lugar" Despuds de volverle la
dad, y la mentira. espalda.
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USA der: Special Vic- A rape suspect handles his own trial Monk develops a crush. (N) (CC) death on an offshore oil rig leads to
times Unit 0 defense adroitly. (CC) a jurisdictional battle. (N) (CC)
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Best C (CC) Twelve stylists compete. C (CC) liances. n (CC) Cl (CC) to Hollywood
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WGN Funniest Home Brody, Mira Sorvino. The Son of Sam killings strike fear in a Bronx neigh-
Videos n (CC) borhood. n (CC)
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Hilary Swank. 'R' (CC) Theatre in Washington, D.C.


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H BO-W DAYS (1995, Comedy) Holly Hunter. Comedy) Albert Brooks, Sheetal Sheth, John Carroll Lynch. Albert Brooks FORMERS
1) 'PG-13' (CC) makes a comedy mission. Cl 'PG-13' (CC) (2007) 'PG-13'
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his beloved fiancee. Cl 'PG-13' (CC) 'R' (CC)
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THE CRADLE work together to pull off a scam. n 'R' (C ) and Randal now flip burgers. n 'R' (CC)


i'm lovin' it


Enjoy Great Food Prizes and Lots of Fui


FRIDAY EVENING


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FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


-GO'


ER


E


NOTICE


SMinistry Of National Security Office



Of The Parliamentary Commissioner


Occupation
and address

Building Contractor, Cargill Creek

Mechanic, Cargill Creek


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-

Candidate's Other Names Votes
surname in full Polled

BAIN Joel 28

BOWLEG Doreen 25

LEADON Terrance 63
. . . . .. . .. .. . .. . .. .. . . . . . .. . . .. .. .. . . . . .. . . . .. . .. . .. ..-. . ..


Date: 20'h August, 2008


Sign: Donald Cash
RETURNING OFFICER





NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

South Andros Constituency Polling Divisions 11 & 12
Autec, Andros Town, Fresh Creek, Calabash Bay,
Small Hope, Small Hope Bay and Love Hill
In the Fresh Creek Town Area
Of the Central Andros District



DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.
Candidate's Other Names Occupation
surname in full and address
DOUGLAS peter. .M...anagper Tourins.m.Andros Town
DUNCOMBE-M9 IS Theresa Sr. Executive Secretary F resh Creek
HANNA ..Rgd.ey. ............. ..Carpenter, Love Hill
.MCQUEEN-S.TUBBS Donna ......... Sr. TourismOfficer,.Calabash Bay
-PENN C..c...il..... .. .cHd--..a............ a.. dm..an, freshh Creek. ..
STUBBS .Mable . ..Account, Fresh Creek .
SWEETING .Deo .................... .Self-Employed, Fresh Creek .

AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname
ADDERLEY.
AGARO
BODIE
DOUGLAS
. .DU. NC BE-MINNIS
EMMANUEL.
HANNA
HINSEY
.................................
HINSEY
MCQUEEN-STUBBS
PENN
STUBBS
SWEATING
_ .. ....... q.. ....... .......---
THOMPSON
WRIGHT
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Other Names
in full
.D.ennis ...........
Colin
Seva Jane
- .T.e r....... ... ......


Beterty P.



Christopher






TaheresT.
---EvelynC.
-Sandra - - - - - -










--....---------------------------


Votes
Polled
.............6........
--.------ ...I.-- 6.9
----- 68.......-
---- 130........30
--..---- ------.99-- ....
----- 91
--- .- .103 ..
........ 61.
..92
.. .. 181






..............97 ...........


Date: 20'h August, 2008,

Sign: Donald Cash
RETURNING OFFICER


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

North Andros Constituency Polling Division 11
Stafford Creek
In the-Staniard Creek Town Area
Of the Central Andros District


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.

Candidate's Other Names Occupation
surname in full and address

SHERMAN Wilfred Taxi Driver, Stafford Creek
I. -. - - - --. - - - - - - --.- - - - - - --. .- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

MURPHY

SHERMAN
. . . . . . . . . . . . ..- -


Other Names
in full

Solomon

Wilfred
--..--------------------------


Votes
Polled

9

20
.......................


Date: 20h August, 2008


Sign: Donald Cash
RETURNING OFFICER




NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION


Exuma Constituency Polling Division 8
The Forest
In the East Exuma Town Area
Of the Exuma District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.

Candidate's Other Names Occupation
surname in full and address

CLARKE Frederick B. Maintenance, The Forest
. . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - -.-- - - - - -.-- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-

Candidate's Other Names Votes
surname in full Polled

CLARKE Frederick B. 62
C L- A R KE-- -... ......... F. r.ede.. 'ck.. B.................... ............ .............

FORBES Kirkwood 6
-.. -- - - -- ---. -. -- -- -. .- - - - - .- .-- - -- -- - - - - - -- - -. . .. .. . . .. .. .. .. .. ..

Date: 20'h August, 2008


Sign: Ivan Ferguson
RETURNING OFFICER




NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION


Exuma Constituency Polling Division 9
Jimmy Hill, Mount Thompson and Ramsey
In the East Exuma Town Area
Of the Exuma District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.

Candidate's Other Names Occupation
surname in full and.address

CLARKE Teddy Fisheries Officer, Jimmy Hill

AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-

Candidate's Other Names Votes
surname in full Polled

CLARKE Teddy 39

ROLLE Gary Vincent 37

ROLLE Leroy Thomas 20


Date: 20'h August, 2008

Sign: Ivan Ferguson
RETURNING OFFICER


.1. ____________________________________________________________________________________________


_ i L 1


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

South Andros Constituency Polling Division 9B
Cargill Creek and Man-O-War Sound
In the Behring Point & Cargill Creek Town Area
The Central Andros District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.


Candidate's
surname

BAIN

LEADON
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Other Names
in full

Joel

Terrance
-..------------------------


I L I I 1_1.


-------------------------------


1 --. . -- --- ...........










PAGE 12, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22 2008


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Exuma Constituency Polling Division 10
Hermitage, Tar Bay and Moss Town
In the East Exuma Town Area
Of the Exuma District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.


Other Names
in full


Occupation
and address

Contractor, Moss Town
....................................


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-


Other Names
in full

Virginia..........


Votes
Polled

25

61


Date: 20'h August, 2008


Sign: Ivan Ferguson
RETURNING OFFICER







NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Exuma Constituency Polling Division 11 & 14
George Town, Jolly Hall and Bahama Sound
In the East Exuma Town Area
Of the Exuma District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given'that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.


Other Names
in full


Occupation
and address


BROWN Kevin .Owner/.peratr, Bahama Sou..nd.

CARROLL Kenneth R. .Retired Pil.ot Hop.r's. ..............
MCPHEE George K. S.D. Mechani B.ah.ama Sound...........
ROLLE ..Liigston.P. .............. .Truck.Driver, Bahama Sound............

* AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for.the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

.Bo E................
BROWN ..........

CARROLL.
FISHER ......

.MCPHEE .........

MORLEY..........
ROLLE.


Other Names
in full
Eurika Kishna

.Kevin ...............
Kenneth R.

Ernest A... .......

..Gesop K.............

SoniaD .............
Livingsto P..


Votes
Polled

53 .............

148
141

93.

177............
84
............84.............
............ .117.............


Date: 20th August, 2008


Sign: Ivan Ferguson









RETURNING OFFICER

NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Exuma Constituency Polling Division 12
Rolle Town and Hartswell
In the East Exuma Town Area
Of the Exuma District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.


Candidate's
surname

DAMES ..........


Other Names
in full

Leonard


Occupation
and address

Plant Electrician, .Rolle Town


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-


Other Names
in full

Leonard
-----------.---..------------.

Bradford R.

Bernard G.


Date: 201h August, 2008


Sign: Ivan Ferguson
RETURNING OFFICER


Votes
Polled
55


35

9


THE TRIBUNE
-- - I .


T


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Exuma Constituency Polling Division 13
Forbes Hill, William's Town and The Ferry
In the East Exuma Town Area
Of the Exuma District





DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.


Candidate's
surname

THOMPSON


Other Names
in full

Keith Edward
............................


Occupation
and address
Businessman, Williams Town


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

.G.RA Y ...................

.THOMPSON

TU RNQUEST


Other Names
in full

GodfreyM .......

Keith Edward

Arvin Peter
...............................


Votes
Polled

............................
...............78......

0


Date: 20th August, 2008


Sign: Ivan Ferguson
RETURNING OFFICER











NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Exuma Constituency Polling Division 4
Barreterre and Arnetts Track
In the West Extma Town Area
Of the Exuma District




DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.


Candidate's
surname


Other Names
in full


MCKENZIE Wayn.....


Occupation
and address

Entrepreneur, Barreterre
..........................................


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

MCKENZIE

MUNROE


Other Names
in full

..ayn.m. .................

Fadora
...............................


Votes
Polled

39

23


Date: 20'th August, 2008


Sign: Ivan Ferguson
RETURNING OFFICER





NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Exuma Constituency Polling Division 5
Stuart Manor, Curtis and Alexander
In the West Exuma Town Area
Of the Exuma District




DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL'

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town area.


Candidate's
surname

SMITH


Other Names
in full

Don


Occupation
and address
Entrepreneur, Stuart Manor
. . .......................................


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

SMITH

WILLIAMS


Other Names
in full

Don

Desmond Burton
................................


Votes
Polled

59

27


Date: 20'h August, 2008


Sign: Ivan Ferguson
RETURNING OFFICER


I


Candidate's
surname

HOLBERT
.. ...................


Candidate's
surname

DEVEAUX

HOLBERT
---.-.-------.--.----..--


Candidate's
surname


Candidate's
surname

DAMES

CURLING

ROLLE









THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008. PAGE 13


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Exuma Constituency Polling Division 6
Rolleville
In the West Exuma Town Area
Of the Exuma District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.

Candidate's Other Names Occupation
surname in full and address
POITIER Willamae .Store Owner Rolleville.......

..ROLLE ..Qunton................... ...s...ry.e.rCar.enter, .................

AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-

Candidate's Other Names Votes
surname in full Polled
MCKENZIE .... .MarvinA. 27.
MCPHEE TrevaO'Brian 33........ ............3.3...........
MUNNINGS Gary 32
. .. .... ... ..S. ..... y .................... ............3.2............
POITIER ......... .W illamae 36..........................3.6...........
ROLLE Godfrey C.............. 23.
....LL E o........................................81...........


Date: 20th August, 2008


Sign: Ivan Ferguson
RETURNING OFFICER





NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Exuma Constituency Polling Division 7 & 15
Farmers Hill, Gilbert Grant, Steventon, Roker's Point,
Harts, Ocean Bight & Calvin Hill
In the West Exuma Town Area
Of the Exuma District


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.
Candidate's Other Names Occupation
surname in full and address
ARMBRISTER F1 Q......... ..Realtor, Roker's Point,

RO E ......................Magn Entrepreneu Roke's. Point
SMITH Cecil L. RealtorGilbert Grant
----------------------------.---------- -- ------ ................ . ........................

AND NOTICE is hefeW' Vei uiat the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-
Candidate's Other Names Votes
surname in full Polled
ARMBRISTER Q.................. .........122
DAVI.......S Glenn L. 81
..D.A V I. S ----...... -.-.-.-.-.- G le..L ... ................. ..........8.............
GIBSON Albert Henry .......... 48

.M UNR E ................. lenroy 36.................3.6.........
NIXON........ ...... Zelma .------- .....36 -
ROLLE -.........M.agn9la.... ..................--gno----96.-

SMITH ............... C .ecil L. 87
THOMPSON. R........ binLynden.. ......15...........1.5..........


Date: 20th August, 2008

Sign: Ivan Ferguson
RETURNING OFFICER






NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

West End and Bimini Constituency Polling Division 1
In the West End Town Area
Of the West Grand Bahama District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.

Candidate's Other Names Occupation,
surname in full and address
JONES Franchelle E. Dental Assistant, West End
9.. .. 8.... ............. ...... ----------------------------... -----nta--------- .--- an t.W_-- e-s- -- .---- .....

SMITH ........... ..Philip Grdon Bus Driyer, West End

.WILCHCOMBE ... .Mo.n.Sr.. A/C. Mechanic,. West End ...

AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-

Candidate's Other Names Votes
surname in full Polled
COLTON C...... ..ora Lasha 48
..... .--- .. ....................... ........ ..................... .
FRITZ Deloris 60

.... .. . ....... .... ...... .ran .he.. .. .. E -. ............ .......
JONES Franchelle E 78
MOORE Quentin 55...... .....

SM ITH ..........Phi.ip.Gordon ..............63.
SWANN Frederick 28

WILCHCOMBE ..Morton Sr. ........66.


Date: 201h August, 2008


Sign: Rufus Johnson
RETURNING OFFICER


m


Date: 20'h August, 2008


Sign: Rufus Johnson
RETURNING OFFICER





NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

West End and Bimini Constituency Polling Division 3
i In the West End Town Area
Of the West Grand Bahama District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.

Candidate's Other Names Occupation
surname in full and address
ALBURY Jeffrey............ .Self-Employed, West End

MCQUEN............Marvin............ ..Welder, West End...
SMITH KingsleyJr.,i .. ..Technician, West End (q 1
.S.. !.. .... ..... .......... .K. ~ # .. .,r :... .. .. e.. .~ ~a...,W st...n....d..,--- -- --- -- ---------------------------

WILCHCOMBE Morton K. Jr... Cmputer Spqcilist, pg a

AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-

Candidate's Other Names Votes
surname in full Polled
ALBURY Jeffrey P ..............87

CAREY Jonathan Christopher 46
MCKENZIE Arvell Ronald 59
MCQUEEN Marvin 119
.C..Q U E.E.N............ .. .M .a ......................... .............1..9............
. ...M.T.H .............. ...K o 4sF. ................... ............ .1..6 ............
WILCHCOMBE Morton K. Jr. 92


Date: 201h August, 2008


Sign: Rufus Johnson
RETURNING OFFICER







NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

West End and Bimini Constituency Polling Division 4
Holmes Rock
In the Eight Mile Rock West Town Area
Of the West Grand Bahama District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.

Candidate's Other Names Occupation
surname in full and address

ROL1.E I lolmes Edward Bus Driver, Holmes Rock

STUART Kern Air Traffic Controller, Holmes Rock

AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-

Candidate's Other Names Votes
surname In full Polled

ROLLE Holmes Edward 77

STUART Kern 65

STUART Threason 38

WALKER Lorenzo Jr. 56


Date: 20"' August, 2008


Sign: Rufus Johnson
RETURNING OFFICER


&


I _C


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

West End and Bimini Constituency Polling Division 2
.In the West End Town Area
Of the West Grand Bahama District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.

Candidate's Other Names Occupation
surname in full and address
GREENE Mark Warehouse Supervisor We End
SROLLEJerrethR. Director. West End
..o.. .......... .. J....r I e...... ................ .... t.o.rI .W.... .E.n..d.. .....................

AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the.several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-

Candidate's Other Names Votes
surname in full Polled
ADDERLEY Jerrisma Mettiebell 32
GARVEY .......... .Michael Antonio....... .......... 38..........
GREENE Mark 51
......................... ............................... ........................
HANNA Constance 41
. . . ..... .... ns n e............................4..1..........
HANNA Edna 30
......................... ............................... ........................
. ROBERTS ........ .Cardinal M. ...........25..........
RQOLLE Jerreth R. 50









THE TRIBUNE I


14, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008


I .- I


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

West End and Bimini Constitueay PolliNg Division 5
Martin Hill
In the Eight Mile Rock West Town Area
,Of the West Grand Bahaman District


.DECLARATION OFRESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby 'given, that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.


Candidate's Other Names
surname n ftll

DEAN . .hi. ..........

STUART-MCINT.SH9. Jy.n. ......

MORRIS Kevin Lavar


Occupation
and address

Cade-Aide, Holmes Rock
........................................... ......
Office Administrator, Holmes Rock
.....................................
Businessman, Holmes Rock
.................................................


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

DEAN ............

STUART-MCINTOSH

MORRIS

ROBINSON


Other Names
in full


Votes
Polled


119
..S .ph. ..... ..........................


.Joyann...............

Kevin Lavar
be.vit. ...S.v...............

Gi-l-be rl.S....................


165

115
.............55.............
'55
.........................


Date: 20t August, 2008


Sign: Rufus Johnson
RETURNING OFFICER





NOTICE QF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

West End and Bimini Constituency Polling Divisiu 6
Seagrape
In the Eiglht Mile Rock West Town Area
Of the West Grand Bahama District


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following- was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.


Candidate's : Other Names
surname Ja ck ~min full


Sad address


D..L.................... ....... .... ................... .
RIGBY s th Decorator, Seagrape
.RIGBY ..... ... .Chr he..Jnatan.......... ..D o s agpe.....................

AND 40OTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

DELANCY

FRANCIS

LAWRENCE

RIGBY


Other Names
in full

Derick
............................. .

Natasha Helena

Tyron..e ............

Christopher Jonathan


Votes
Polled
55
.. .......... ....
27

32

51


Date: 20"' August, 2008


Sign: Rufus Johnson
RETURNING OFFICER






NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

West End and Bimini Constituency Polling Division 7
Jones Town
In the Eight Mile Rock West Town Area
Of the West Grand Bahama District


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that oh the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town' Area.


Candidate's
surname


Other Names
in full


OUTTEN .Clifford


Samuel Frederick
.. . ......................


Occupation
and address
Self-Employed, Jones Town

Electrician, Jones Town


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

FORBES

MOULTRIE

OUTTEN

SCOTT *


Other Names
in full

Joanna

Glenvino

Clifford

Samuel Frederick
-............ ........... ...


Votes
Polled
24

48

63

80


Date: 20'h August, 2008


Sign: Rufus Johnson
RETURNING OFFICER


U-


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Eight Mile Rek Coutiteeat y PIlg Division 6
iepburs Taw
I the Eight Mile Rock East Tows Area
Of the Wet Grad Bahama District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.


CandMate's
sR E am.

ROLLE E


is teSl yer
S m. .~ ....


Occupation
ad address
Buminessman, Hepburn Town


AND NOTICE is hereby given that he numbers of the vote cast for the several
candidates in the said election were foll6ws:-

Candate's Other Nmes Votes
surname i htl Polled


CURRY,.

ROLE

ROLLINS


. .d ........................ .................


CharhSivester32
............ ............... ...........32...........

CanUetta 10
........... .... ................................ ..... ... .... ...........


Date: 20 Augus, 2001


Sign: Rfts Johnson
RETURNING OFFICER






NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Eight Mile R.tk Cstltmecy PoUllng Divisions 10 & 11

In the Eight Mile tRock East Town Area
Of the West (rd Bahama District


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.


Candidate's
surname
KEMP ...........


Oter Names

RostoR.........
...... .... .....................


Occupation
and address
Enginee.r,Pinedale


VEGA ............ Jams.Alexander .. .Salsm.an. Pinedale

AlN NQ)Q C iE p s) by give tha the numbers ofithe votes castfor the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname,


MOher Names
in fuN


CAREY ...... Tinmess D.......


FORBES
. EP.. UR. ... ...........
*.H -EPO UR .N*....................


Votes
Polled

................. ...............
............... 14...............


andyk ........ ............... 2 ...............


LIGHTBOULR.NE . Auttea Claudine
...E M..P. ........................ .. .... .. ...............


..23..............
..............5.4...............


VEGA James Alexander 74
VEG A ......... ...A es Alexander ..... ...............7.4................


Date: 20" August, 2008


Sign: Rufus Johnson
RETURNING OFFICER







NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Eight Mile Rock Constituency Polling Division 12
Martin Town & Russell Town
la the Eight Mile Rock East Town Area
Of the West Grand Bahama District




DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for
the above mentioned Town Area.


Candidate's
surname


Other Names
ia run


BARTLETT Calvis Odell

RODGERS Yannick Orlando


Occupation
and address
Food & Beverage Controller, Russell Town

Asst. Planner, Russell Town


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

BARTLETT

CIIARLTON

RODGERS


Other Names
in fln

Calvis Odell

Perry P.

Yannick Orlando


Votes
Polled
85


Date: 20"' August, 2008


Sign: Rufus Johnson
RETURNING OFFICER


PAGE


1*a


SCOTT


ml I I I I l l I .. u


....... ....








S.. FROAY, AUGSU, M.
'~~~~~ ~~ I*'a l.. .* 1..; .'l" .. .: .,.: I IU- ^


THE TRIBUNE


Sign: Rufus Johnson
RETURNING OFFICER


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Eight Mile Rock Constituency Pollig DIVislos I
Lewis Yard
In the Pinder's Point Tow. Area
Of the West Grand Bahama District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/i for
the above mentioned Town Area.

Candidate's Other Names Oeempatoes
surname in full and address

FORBES WayneAlexandi *r c i
.....s......... ...... w..an ..ai i......i..'f.. C r L. Yitr ,dYa
RUSSELL Linda Marie Clerk Lewis Yard
........................... ....................... .... ....................... ...
.. ............qM.a................... U...nm p.o d.. d
RUSSELL'Myne .ntm Vq e Yard

AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-
Candidate's Other Names Votes
surname in full Pod .
FORBES Wayne Alexander 53
..... ............... .................
RUSSELL Linda Marie 67
RUSSELL Maydone 60
RUSSELL .......... .... ...44..........
RUSSELL Ruth Naomi 44
--------------------- ........................... ....... ..................


Date: 201h August, 2008

Sign: Rufus Johnson
RETURNING OFFICER





NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Eight Mile Rock Constituency Polling Division 2
Pinder's Point
In the Pinder's Point Town Area
Of the West Grand Bahama District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committee Member/s for.
the above mentioned Town Area.

Candidate's Other Names Occupation
surname in full and address
DARVILLE Marorie ..... BuinesswomanPindcr's Point
LAING Claudine Businesswoman, Pinder't Point
..... N..G.................... .Claudine................ .. ........ .1 P '..1Point .....
AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-
Candidate's Other Names Votes
surname in full Polled
DARVILLE .. Marjorie .......40
GRANT Sheila C. 15
...... .. .... .. ..................
KNOWLES Loma 35

......................... ....... ..... ..... ............. ....
PINDER Burton Lowell W. g


Date: 20" August, 2008

Sign: Rufus Johnson
RETURNING OFFICER


-


'- --~


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Eight Mile Rock Constituency Polltg Divison 13B
Hunters and Mack Town
In the Pinder's Point Town Area
Of the West Grand Bahas District .

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following was/were elected as Town Committ". Members for
the above mentioned Town Area.

Candidate's Other Namesa Ot"eapl
surname in full a" addrs
BEVANS Wilfred Leon .us .nFBu.H ers
LEW IS Simon...... w.. d. ................. . ....... ...........
.E W S ........ .. S o... .......................... ................ ................
RUSSELL Georgianna Jeanette....... ..ffie.A. ...........
AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-
Candidate's Other Names Via
surname in full
BEVANS ........... ..W ilfred.Leon ..... .......... ............ ..........
. -.-- ......--...... .. ...... .
JOHNSON B.....rn .Bem adett.................. ..............7. ..........
..LEW IS .Simon.............. .... ... ........ .............7 ..........
LEWIS .Thad.deus.'"qddy."......... ..................
. .RUSSELL.. ........... .. i...e ..... ........... .. ..............

RUSSELL ... ..... .J.a.cquel. e."J.ke"....... ...... .............:.

Date: 20*' August, 2008


Othqr Names







S .o .. ...........
Isaa


? .. .. ..





*.. : ..... :

.a ** ;'. 4 '* !'*'
i* 'S.****i****


Date: 20th Augut,2008

Sign: Stephen Wilb
RETURNING O .





NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTrEST l ELWi'tt
*.* LOCAL GOVtERlIMENt iLECmO" w

MICAL Ciaditukeiyq Plgm 3 hI .
Pompey y, OSprIO Mk I. ,
f t !" ii6-,
S. t i Aek h. .. .

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF TIE L
NOTICE is hereby given that on thewting ithePoll in te d *im mimmwiu
was contested, the following were elected as Meonters for de ab own nd lD.L

Candidate's 0 m. -' '


surname in .- -. 'ilMl -. i *; "

J ..... : : .:. ':: ..... ... .... ...A..............

.L... ... .... .:

AND NOTICE is hereby iven that the numbers o the ots at forhe seen adHi i *
the said election were as follows'., :
CandMalte's. :itbe* N age *et
surname A.' .
BULLARD .T n i.... ... .. .. ........ .... .......
CAMPBELL Marvin:. .

:FORBES Dia.. ...... .... . ........ ., .

............................... .. .. .. ... .......,. ..;. :, ;o ,,i ... ., :..........
ROLLE .Co ..and.kI ', IS ,


Date: 20th. August200

Sign: Stephen Wilson
RETURNING OFFICER

., t :, ,
i: : / -: y o : . .. .. :*


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

MICAL Coostieauty Polline INi ? 1 *, '
.SaH, .Pois
The Ackiles fliseglti.

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on ihe taking of the Poll in the bnovt.mentio.-d
election which was contested, the following were elected as Members for the
above mentioned District.

Candklate's Other Names ." O "
surname ihn fI 1N adr asm
ROSE.Steven Jr. B8 alit Point
........... .. ..... .... ....... ................. .. . .... ...... ...... ........... .
..STLs... Kevin ... Christopher .tirts/FLnnaiSai.nPoint
. ....... .. . .. ........ ...r
AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several cdidts in
the said election were as follows:-

Candidate's Other meein
sername In full ptele
. r
FORBES Ruvin athincr 27
.. . . ... . . . . . . . .. . . . .

OrTLES KeyRf ahristoph7r '


Date: 20th August, 2008

Sign: Stephen Wilson
RETURNING OFFICER


I. .


*


--L- -


1715"


NOTICE OF RlSWLT O OMfc TABLClTOWN
LOCAL GOVERMErILUCnIiON

MICAL Ceulemamy fMU4 :.. .4
Lwlery byit C buii'al AVM1 ''* e'



DECLARATION OFr MrULT OF TM rOIU
NOTICE is hereby given that o the ktag of the OW6 te emilMl l M_
was contested, the following wr decNted a Momw f* > l .

surname be hi
*

WILLIAl" OW u* t -. Oe ll :. ".





AND NOTICE is hereby given tha dlnue tia of dE voses eMM s Nr"iH. mIesi
he said election w as pillows:


CMeddhe's
surname
OLLIE ...... ....

CO X ...................
.....................

.W.LLIAM...............
WILLIAMSON........


i


i









THE TRIBUNE /


PAGE 16, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22 ,2008


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

West End and Bimini Constituency Polling Division 8
The Bimini District


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above-mentioned election which was
contested, the following were elected as Members for the above mentioned District.


Other Names
in full


Occupation
and address


Lorrick Charles Businessman, Alice Town

Mendell Lionel Boat Captain, South Bimini
............... .................. .... .


Ashley Bing
....................................


Writer/Teacher, Alice Town


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several candidates in the
said election were as follows:-


Other Names
In full


Woodrow

Lorrick Charles

Mendell Lionel

Philip Andrew

Ashley Bing
.................................


Votes
polled


46
............................

86
............................

87

44

57
............................


Date: 20th August, 2008


Sign: Sherrick Ellis
RETURNING OFFICER



NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

West End and Bimini Constituency Polling Division 9
The Bimini District


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above-mentioned election which was
contested, the following were elected as Members for the above mentioned District.


Other Names
in full

Paul L.

Robbie
.................. .............


Occupation
and address

Retired, Bailey Town...........

Dock Master, Bailey Town


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several candidates in the
said election were as follows:-


Other Names
in full


DUNCOMBE Paul L.
.................................... ..............................


Kevin Matthew Sr.

Felicia

Kitty J.

Robbie


Votes
polled

60


31


20

1.


Date: 20th August, 2008


Sign: Sherrick Ellis
RETURNING OFFICER b

NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

West End and Bimini Constituency Polling Division 10
The Bimini District


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above-mentioned election which was
contested, the following were elected as Members for the above mentioned District.


Other Names
in full


Occupation
and address

Building Contractor, Bailey Town

Manager, Bailey Town


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several candidates in the
said election were as follows:-


Other Names
in full


Antonio A.

Aaron Lincoln

Basil H.

Montez M.

Miriam L. K.
........... -.... -. ....... . .


Votes
polled


40
............. ..... ....

81

53

83

14
..... ................ ....


Date: 20th August, 2008


Sign: Sherrick Ellis
RETURNING OFFICER


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

West End and Bimini Constituency Polling Division 11
The Bimini District


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above-mentioned election which was
contested, the following were elected as Members for the above mentioned District.


Date: 20th August, 2008


Sign: Sherrick Ellis
RETURNING OFFICER


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION


MICAL Constituency Polling Division 1A
Landrail Point
The Crooked Island and Long Cay District


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above-mentioned election
which was contested, the following were elected as a Member for the above mentioned
District.


Candidate's
surname

GIBSON

MCKINNEY


Other Names
in full

Andrew

Kirkwood
....................... .


_ U__ _____P11~_W4911II


Candidate's
surname


EDGECOMBE

ROBERTS
....................... .


Other Names
in full


Lloyd John

Anva Merle
....................................


Occupation
and address


Businessman, Bailey Town

Entrepreneur, Bailey Town


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several candidates in the
said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

DAVID

EDGECOMBE

ROBERTS

ROBINS
...........................


Other Names
in full

Ebenezer S.
...................................

Lloyd John

Anva Merle

Ellsworth Orlando Sr.
-.---..-------.--.....-----------.-


Votes
polled

28

105

80

4....2............
...........................


Occupation
and address

Fisherman, Landrail Point

Mailboat Agent, Landrail Point


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

GIBSON

MCKINNEY

SCAVELLA


Other Names
in full

Andrew

Kirkwood-
..... .. ........ .. ...............


Elvin


Votes
polled

19

29
-----.----------------.-------.


9


Date: 20th August, 2008


Sign: Francita Neely
RETURNING OFFICER



NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION.,,,,. .

MICAL Constituency Polling Division 2
Cabbage Hill, Fairfield and Church Grove
The Crooked Island and Long Cay District


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above-mentioned election
which was contested, the following were elected as a Member for the above mentioned
District.

Candidate's Other Names Occupation
surname in full and address

THOMPSON .. Timothy Avon Resort Manager, Cabbage Hill

AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

CUNNINGHAM

FERGUSON

FERGUSON

TIHOMIPSON


Other Names
in full


David A.

Habakkuk

Reuben Nicolas

Timothy Avon


Votes
polled


9

19


Date: 20th August, 2008


Sign: Francita Neely
RETURNING OFFICER


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

South Abaco Constituency Polling Division I
Guana Cay
In the Hope Town District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above-mentioned election which
was contested, the following were elected as a Member for the abovee mentioned District.


Candidate's
surname

LAING


Other Names
in full

Gle m. Carroll


Occupation
and address

Bartendcr/\Waiter, Guana Cay


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the oltes cast for the several candidates in
the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

ALBURY

LAING



ROBERNTS

SANDS


Other Names
in full

.roy Duiin

Glenn Carroll
Forrest Robert

Anthony Michael

Donna Mac


Votes
polled

3

28


0

4

21


Date 20th August, 2008


Sign: Cephas Cooper
RETI RNINGfi (O I'FR


Candidate's
surname

ROBERTS

ROLLE

SAUNDERS
...........................


Candidate's
surname


JONES

ROBERTS

ROLE

ROLLE

SAUNDERS


Candidate's
surname

DUNCOMBE

SMITH


Candidate's
surname


PINDER

ROLLE

SAUNDERS-VALDEZ

SMITH


Candidate's
surname


ROLLE Aaron Lincoln

SAUNDERS Montez M.
........................ ...... .......................


Candidate's
surname


DUNCOMBE

ROLE.

ROLLE

SAUNDERS

TOOTE
..........................









THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008, PAGE 17


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

South Abaco Constituency Polling Division 2
Man-O-War Cay
In the Hope Town District


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above-mentioned election which
was contested, the following Were elected as Town Committee Members for the above
mentioned District/Town Area. *

Candidate's Other Names Occupation
surname in full and address

SWEETING Jeremy Terris w...........arehouse Manager, Man-O-War Cay

SWEETING Philip Walter Store Mana r, Man-O-WarCyCa

AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several candidates in
the said election were as follows:-

Candidate's Other Names Votes
surname in full polled

ALB R .............. .... A d L ............................. ........... 84 ..

SWEETING r..... .lr 91.................... ..

SWEETING Phili.PWalter.................:... 92:


Date: 20th August, 2008


Sign: Cephas Cooper
RETURNING OFFICER



NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

South Abaco Constituency Polling Division 3
Hope Town
In the Hope Town District


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above-mentioned election which
was contested, the following were elected as Town Committee Members for the above
mentioned District/Town Area.

Candidate's Other Names Occupation
surname in full and address

MALONE Harold L. Businessman, Hope Town

RUSSELL Lana Juanita Proprietor, Hope Town

AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several candidates in
the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

BETHEL

MALONE

MALONE

RUSSELL


Other Names
in full

Diane Elizabeth

told ...............

Mark Jtpheni

Lana Juanita


Votes
polled.

47

...-........ ..........
99

39

........... 85..........


Date: 20th August, 2008


Sign: Cephas Cooper.
RETURNING OFFICER






NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

South Andros Constituency Polling Division 7
Lisbon Creek, Victoria Point, Blue Hole, Orange Hill,
Grants, Peats, Dorset's, Swain & Pinders
In the Mangrove Cay District


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above-mentioned election which
was contested, the following were elected as Members for the above mentioned Distr.ct.

Candidate's Other Names Occupation'
surname in full and address
BULLARD Garnett Businessman, Pinders

GRAY-BRAYNEN Lenora Jane Store Manageress, Pinders
SAUNDERS Lynward Businessman, Pinders .


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several candidates in
the said election were as follows:-

Candidate's Other Names Votes
surname in full polled
BMiN HeoryChurten 50
.B.A N ..H.e .ry.9..u. en .. ...... .............---- --- .... -'- ..
BULLARD ........Ga ...................... .......... .4...
GRAY-BRAYNEN Lenora Jane 67

GREE...N George .......... ........ .... ...........
GREENE Glen 16

MCKENZIE Rosemarie "Rose" 48

PENNERMAN David 3

SAUNDERS Donald A. 32

SAUNDERS Lynward 77*

STUBBS Dwayne Wilfred 22

STUBBS Vernice Laverne 7
. .... ....... ... ...... ... ... ........ ..... .. -........... .. .. .. .. ... .. .. . ..


Date: 20th August, 2008

Sign: Annamae Rolle
RETURNING OFFICER


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

South Andros Constituency Polling Division 8
Burnt Rock & Little Harbour
In the Mangrove Cay District


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above-mentioned election which
was contested, the following were elected as Members for the above mentioned District.

Candidate's Other Names Occupation
surname in full and address

BOWLEG Sidney Contractor, Burnt Rock

JOLLY Jeffrey....................--- ..B.usinessman2 Little.Harbour

KING RochelleDanica Business Manager,..Lit Harbour...

M .XEY Brian Calton- -UTM-EC Little Harbour...............

AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several candidates in
the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

BOWLEG......

BOWLEG

BULLARD

JOLLY

KING

KING
.MOXEY
MOXEY

MOXEY

MOXEY


Other Names
in full



Sidney

SWayne Harris

Jeffrey

Patrick

Rochelle Danica
...............................
Brian Calton
-.-.--.-----------.-----------
Judy
. alp-..- .....h -- ....--
Ralph
- . - - - - - - - - - - - - .


Votes
polled

63

74

3

126

66

67

93

41
- - - ---4 9 - -
-------------------.---------


Date: 20fh August, 2008


Sign: Annamae Rolle
RETURNING OFFICER



NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

MICAL Constituency Polling Division 9
Abraham's Bay
In the Mayaguana District


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above-mentioned
election which was contested, the following were elected as District Council Members for
the above mentioned District.

Candidate's Other Names Occupation
surname in full nand address

CHARLTON ........ Audrey Laverne ........... Telephone Operator, Abraham's Bay

MOSS Sh............andika Shanelle Cook, Abraham's Bay

AND NOTICE is hereby given that'the numbers of the votes cast for the several candidates in
the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

BROOKS

BROWN

CIIARLTON

JOSEPH'

MOSS


Other Names
in full

Deborah

Cleveland

Audrey Laveme

Leroy...

Shandika Shanelle
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..-


Votes
polled

28

26

30

11

37


Date: 20th August, 2008


Sign: Jackson McIntosh
RETURNING OFFICER

NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

MICAL Constituency Polling Division 10A
Pirates Well
In the Mayaguana Distriet


DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above-mentioned
election which was contested, the following were elected as District Council Members for
the above mentioned District.

Candidate's Other Names Occupation
surname in full and address

BROWN Earnel Alexander Builder, Pirates Well

EDWARDS Leon. Businessman, Pirates Well


AND NOTICE is hercby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several candidates in
the said election were as follows:-


Candidate's
surname

BROWN

('11ARITON

:E)WARD)S

WILLIAMSON


Other Names
in full

Eamel Alexander

Edvardo

Leon

I uel A.


Votes
polled

35

16

23

09


Date. 20th August. 2008


Sign: Jackson Mclntosh
RETURNING OFFICER


V.


: I_ ---


I I


I ~










l K. IMPRESSIONS OF THE BAHAMAS' OLYMPIC YOUTH


THE


My name is Eri-
ka Rahming
and I am the
Olympic Youth
Ambassador for the Bahamas.
As the Olympic Youth Ambas-
sador, I have been sent to Bei-
jing, China, where the current
Olympics are being held.
I have been sent here for the
Beijing 2008 Olympic Youth
Camp, which is designed to give
young people the opportunity to
make friends from other coun-
tries or regions and to learn about
each other's cultures.......
There are about 500 people
from over 200 countries that are
attending the camp. Some of the
campers are disabled and come
from the host country.
After flying for a total of 18
hours, I finally reached my desti-
nation.
Throughout the final flight I
could not sleep in fear that I
would miss some of the views of
China.
As we flew from New York to
Beijing, we passed over the mas-


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crone and I met up with other
Youth Ambassadors from many
different countries. As we waited
for other campers to arrive, we
began to talk and introduce our-
selves to the campers present. To
my surprise, many of the campers
that had arrived with us were
from Caribbean countries and so
we had much in common and
much to talk about.
On our way to the school that
we are staying at, we passed the
Bird's Nest, which is the stadium
were all of the track and field
events are taking place, as well
as the National Aquatics Centre.
The National Aquatics Centre,
or the "Watercube," looks as
though hundreds of gigantic water
bubbles are frozen in a cube. At
night the Watercube gives off a
blue glow and is truly a sight to
see.

Friends
After getting checked into the
camp, I received my camp uni-
form, was told which team and
group I am in, and given the key
to my dorm. As I was unpacking,
my roommates came in and intro-
duced themselves to me. My
roommates come from a variety
of countries,-UgadfdalAlg&ia'arid
also China. I easily became
friends with these three girls.
In the morning of my first day
at camp, my new Chinese friend
showed me around the campus
of the middle school we are stay-
ing at. The campus of the school
is enormous, much bigger than
any school that I have seen
before. The school has many
sports facilities including a gym-
nasium, a track course, soccer
field, basket ball courts, and ten-
nis courts. The school also has its
own post office and bank for
campers who wish to send off
postcards or change their mon-
ey.
When I came back from the
long tour of the campus, I went to
the soccer field for the first activ-
ity of the day. This activity con-
sisted ot several ice breaker
games such as ball and drum, and
jump rope. The game of ball and
drum is simple but hard. The idea,
is to bounce the ball on a drum
eight times without letting it drop.
The drum has 16 equal length
strings attached for each person
of the team to hold. This makes
the game hard because everyone
must move fast enough to reach
the ball, as well as keep the string
taut so that when the ball hits the


I
' ; .


drum, it does not go flying.
These icebreaker activities
brought me closer to my new
friend from Uganda. The activi-
ties were fun, hard and energiz-
ing. It made me extremely happy
that I was chosen because I saw
and took many opportunities to
make new friends.
That evening was the opening
ceremony for the youth camp.
The special guests that night were
the president of the Olympic
Youth Camp (OYC), the past
president of the International
Olympic Committee, Juan Anto-
nio Samaranch, arnd also the may-
or of Beijing. After the Olympic
Youth Camp flag was raised, the
special guests made speeches and
Mr Samaranch revealed the sym-
bol of the OYC, officially opening
the camp.
After the ceremony, many
dances were performed. These
dances were done by Chinese
performers to represent some of
the many cultures that exist with-
in our camp. It was very exciting
and full of energy. Everyone
cheered at the end and for some
of the moves that were done. The
final dance that was performed
represented the Olympics.
On the second day of the camp,
I had to wake up early in order to
get ready for the trip to the Mei
Lanfang Grand Theatre, which is
an opera house and museum. In
the museum part of the theatre
there are many wax figures of the
characters in the play. They each
have a plaque at their feet
describing the character and their
clothing.
After passing through the
museum, we stopped to have our
faces painted as one of the char-
acters in the opera. This character
is a monkey and so everyone had
fun laughing at how everyone
looked. We also had the chance
to dress up in one of the cos-
tumes.
After the face painting and
dressing up, we were seated in_
fihe theatre and got a history les-
son on Opera. I learned many
things about Chinese culture just
through that history lesson. When
the history lesson ended the play
began. The play was about the
"Monkey King" who is one of the
Chinese mythical heroes.
,,, In the afternoon we went to
the'Forbidden City a'nd walked
around within the walls. I loved
the architecture of the whole
place and the ingenious ways they
put dragons into their designs. I
was very intrigued to see how
much of the Chinese culture was
actually there through the paint-
ings, sculptures and designs. And
even though the day was hot, it
was a lot of fun and very memo-
rable.
That night many things went
on at once: there was a kung fu
show, calligraphy and ceramic
making, and also a band from the
US was playing. I spent most of
my time that night at the kung fu
show because I was amazed to
see how teenagers were breaking
thick wooden sticks on each oth-
er. But most of all I was amazed
at a child who looked to be about
five or six. This child was doing
SEE page 19


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sive icebergs that made up the
Arctic. As we came closer to Chi-
na I saw rich green hills and wind-
ing rivers down below. Because of
my sleeplessness though, I missed
the view of Beijing that I wanted
to see.
Getting off the plane, Kieran
Deveaux (the other Bahamas
Youth Ambassador), our chap-


NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC CHANGE IN OPERA TING HOURS


WE WISH TO AD VISE THAT EFFECTIVE MONDAY SEPTEMBER 2008, OUR
OPERA TING HOURSFOR PREMIUM PA YMENTS WILL CHANGE TO
REFLECT THE FOLLOWING:


* INDEPENDENCE BRANCH -8:30AM 5:00PM


* PALMDALE BRANCH (Rosetta Street)- 9:00AM- 4:00PM


* CARMICHAEL BRANCH- 9:00AM- 4:00PM





B British
P American
SN A N C 1 A L


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I -7--{,.


M "WJijr'ol


*w,)


:-;---- -:----- ~lr~er~rr~P~r~a~


PAGE 18, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008


-23'^S


,I-;T "~L,


~_al:


THE TRIBUNE


,-ON,


..- '... ,, '-.: r ,.. : ;
...* -',_ *. -* -. ... ".@ ..? .. ...


N' ~ . i f, sn
:s'. .-' Yt:."


~B~n~






FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008, PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE


L N


AMBASSADOR ERIKA RAHMING, 16, IN BEIJING


EXPERIENCE


OF


A LIFETIME


' When my country


was


announced, excitement and

pride built up inside me and I

couldn't help but cheer.


A7 'T,71. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
2. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

Call for registration and program details
324-7770
EM **


SOME CAMPERS who chose to dress in their traditional garments.


ME with one of the disabled torch bearers.


FROM page 18
pushups on two fingertips on
each hand. He also did hand-
stands on the same four fingers.
I was truly amazed!
Tb, third day of the camp was
the day of the Opening Cere-
mony for the Olympics. Every-
one was up and about getting
ready because our campsite was
the last part of the Olympic
torch relay. Some people
dressed in their, traditional wear
because it was asked of us to do
so if we wanted to. There were
many people who dressed up
and performed for their fellow
campers as we waited on the
sacred flame's arrival.
While we waited, the six torch
bearers, one of which was dis-
abled, prepared themselves.
When the sacred flame arrived
everyone cheered and when the
torch was lit the cheers grew
louder. As the torch bearers
passed on the sacred flame the
crowd ran alongside them to the
finishing spot.
When the torch finally
reached its destination the
crowd went wild.
That afternoon we had to go'
on the bus at 4.30pm to go the
Birds Nest for the Opening Cer-
emony even though it didn't
start until 8pm. When we
arrived, I could see thousands
of people who all were to enter
the stadium that night. The secu-
rity checkpoint at the gate we
were at was very long, with at


least 100 people in each line.
The co-ordinators ended up tak-
ing us campers to a checkpoint
that was farthest from the Birds
Nest: This was less crowded and
took little time to get through.
As we neared the Birds Nest I
was awed at the true size of it.
The architecture of the place
really amazed me and I won-
dered at how anyone could be so
creative. Getting nearer I saw
the Watercube and had the urge
to go up to the building and
touch it to find out what it was
made of.

Creativity
When I got to my seat inside
the building I was astonished at
how many people were in there
already. The Birds Nest can seat
over. 90,000 people!
As we settled in and the
Opening Ceremony started I
was astounded by the creativity
of the performances and of how
much Chinese culture was incor-
porated in them. One of my
favourite performances was the
first part of the calligraphy
dance. It was amazing how the
performers drew as they danced
and the picture that they were
painting amazed me even more.
After the opening .perfor-
mances ended, the Games were
announced to be officially open
and the athletes were intro-
duced. When my country was
announced, excitement and
pride built up inside me and I


couldn't help but cheer.
As more and more countries
were announced, I noticed that I
had never heard of a some of
them. The names of countries
took a long time to finish as
there were 204 countries com-
peting in this year's Olympics.
The sizes of some of the teams
SEE page 20


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PAGE 20, FRIDAYAUGUST 22,2008THETRIBUNEEWill


IMPRESSIONS OF THE BAHAMAS' OLYMPIC YOUTH AMBASSADOR ERIKA RAHMING IN Bil!Ji: G


THE EXPERIENCE OF


A


/r-;Tr--~


Watching the Opening Ceremony
made me feel extremely honoured
to have been chosen to be the
Olympic Youth Ambassador.


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PAGE 20, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008


THE TRIBUNE










THE TRIBUNE




US


ness


FRIDAY,


AU G II ST 2 2, 2008


Employers chief renews call for govt to
bring forward Industrial Relations Act
replacement that was shelved in 2001


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas Employers
Confederation's (BECon) pres-
ident yesterday urged that the
"rule of law" govern all indus-
trial-related actions in the
Bahamas, as the business com-
munity was alarmed that dan-
gerous precedents were being
set when trade unionists
escaped punishment for partic-
ipating in illegal industrial
actions.
Brian Nutt, commenting on
the issues raised by the recent
Bahamas Telecommunications


Company (BTC) and Morton
Salt industrial actions, reiterat-
ed BECon's call for the Gov-
ernment to bring forward the
Trade Union and Labour Rela-
tions Bill which it shelved in
2001 as the replacement for
the Industrial Relations Act.
"It would be very good for us
to have had that [Bill] in place,
simply because it provides a lot
more definition as to what's
legal industrial action, and pro-
vides more penalties for failing
to abide by the law when it
SEE page 6B


Royal Bank: 'No'

job losses from

branch closure

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
There will be "absolutely no" job losses resulting from
Royal Bank of Canada's decision to close its Bay & Victoria
Street branch by end-November 2008, a senior executive said
yesterday, the move coming as the bank restructures its branch
network to exploit "growth in the southern part" of New
-Providence.
Ross McDonald, Royal Bank's Caribbean regional head,
told Tribune Business said the 18 staff members at the Bay &
Victoria outlet would be relocated to staff the bank's new
40,000 square foot flagship branch on Carmichael Road or
placed elsewhere within its Bahamas network.
He described the reasons for closing the Bay & Victoria
Street branch as its lack of customer parking, the relatively old
age of the building, and its proximity to Royal Bank's down-
town Bay Street branch, which was only several blocks away.
"There's no parking at Bay & Victoria, and it's close to
the main branch," Mr McDonald told Tribune Business.
"That's an old, old branch and the growth in the city and the
island is down south. We're having a combined location there
[at Carmichael Road] with FINCO, and lots of parking.
"We're also relocating some of our head office functions
from East Hill Street [head office] to Carmichael Road -
operational functions, technology groups. We've outgrown
the space here, which is why we're relocating these func-
tions."
SEE page 6B



Nine more posts


eliminated at


Colinalmperial

* By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
Colinalmperial Insurance Company has eliminated a further
nine company positions in what it described as a strategic
restructuring exercise to streamline operations.
Melanie Hutcheson, the company's corporate communications
officer, confirmed to Tribune Business yesterday that the nine
employees in management and administration were all given
renumeration packages and treated fairly.
"We implemented a strategic restructuring exercise that.
among other things, eliminated certain positions and consoli-
dated specific departments in an effort to streamline processes
to better serve our clients," Ms Hutcheson said.
It is also coming off the company's merger, [between Col-
ina and Imperial Life back in 2005/2006]."
Ms Hutcheson explained that the downsizing exercise was a
normal part of any company's growth cycle, and will help Col-
inalmperial realise its targeted growth in those divisions.
She also noted that there are no plans to eliminate any more
positions in the immediate future.
The latest redundancies follow the departure of Colinalm-
perial's president. Monty Braithwaite, whose contract had come
to an end, and vice-president of sales. Dashwell Flowers.
Mr Braithwaite has been replaced at the helm by executive
vice-chairman Emanuel Alexiou, who is also a principal and
chief shareholder in Colinalmperial's majority shareholder. A.
F. Holdings.


Tourism demand off




10-15% from norm


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Tourism demand for a
Bahamas-based hotel vacation
-may be" off by as much as 10-
15 per cent from normal levels,
a senior industry executive told
Tribune Business yesterday,
with resorts seeing "tremendous
softness" in the market com-
pared to last year.
Robert Sands, Baha Mar's
senior vice-president for exter-
nal affairs and government rela-
tions, said the relatively bleak
short-term economic outlook
had been a key factor behind
the company's decision to ter-
minate 43 jobs and close two
towers at its Wyndham Nassau
resort, reducing available rooms
from 850 to 550.
"The forecast and economic
conditions right now indicate
some tremendous softness, so


* Bahamian resorts seeing 'tremendous

softness' in current market

* Baha Mar's Sheraton and Wyndham

properties both have 'room for growth'


we made these adjustments,"
Mr Sands told Tribune Busi-


ness. "We're seeing further soft-
ness compared to last year.
We're seeing it basically in
terms of demand, occupancies.
Rates are holding, somewhat."
When asked how much
tourism demand for a Bahamas-
based hotel (stopover) vacation
was down, compared to previ-
ous years, Mr Sands said: "I
would say for this time of year,
it may be 10-15 per cent."
He attributed the Bahamian
tourism industry's current woes


to the economic downturn in
the US, which may or may not
be in recession, depending on
which economists are being lis-
tened to.
"It's the economic situation
in the US. There's no question
that it's driving demand right
now. The overall issue is the
economic condition in our main
market," Mr Sands said.
SEE page 4B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Government will seek to
borrow $100 million from the
Bahamian capital markets via
a government-registered stock
issue next month, the minister
of state for finance said yester-
day, adding that it was "a good
thing" it did not have to launch
such a bond issue sooner.
Several capital markets
observers had expressed sur-
prise to Tribune Business that
the Government had not
launched a government-regis-
tered stock issue sooner, saying


for a better life


college


this was usually done after the
late May Budget communica-
tion, but Zhivargo Laing said
the capital markets would only
be tapped when there was a
need.
The minister said he had been
told by the Treasurer that the
timing for government-regis-
tered stock (bond) issues var.-
ied from year to year, the Gov-
ernment sometimes going to
market in July, but in other
years selecting September.
SEE page 5B


SUFAMN I I Y GdJARDIiAN
INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED


E cookouts
_-_ student loans
- spon,,or sheets
[.i1 guaranteed college fund


ASlUBSIDIARYDI OF
I AM(1|FAMGUARD
SCOIRORArION LIMI ED
SALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com


FAMILY GUARDIAN
INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED


* ~iY.'.,
.2'
.


Government eyes $ 100m


bond issue for September

Hires extra officers to target more timely
collection of Family Island revenue


DEFERRED A


44


~p- ~w


k4 h







PAG 2, RIABUAGUTI2,N00STESRIU I


EPA


travails


to


assist


other trade


deal


talks


JOIN US!


Ross University School of Medicine is experiencing remarkable
growth and is excited to announce the opening of our new
Med School campus in Freeport, Grand Bahama Island! We have
excellent ground floor opportunities available for the following:
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE & ACCOUNTING
Degree & 5 yrs. managerial experience required
DIRECTOR OF IT
Degree & 10 yrs. experience as a Director required
PURCHASING COORDINATOR
Previous experience purchasing in the Caribbean required
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
Will provide administrative support to the Campus Administrator.
Previous experience and strong Microsoft Office skills required.
Ross University offers highly competitive salaries and a
comprehensive benefits package including tuition assistance for
graduate and undergraduate degrees. To apply, please visit our
website at www.RossU.edu/med, select "Careers" and copy/paste
your resume, or complete our online application process.


ROSS
UNIVERSITY
EOE S H n L F M iDIC( INE



BSi BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
international private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for

HEAD TREASURY MANAGEMENT

Applicants for the position of Head Treasury Management within the Financial
Services Unit must have Banking or Financial education and at least 10 years
experience in the offshore banking sector, good knowledge of the treasury
business (Deposits, Placements, Floating Rate Notes book management,
Reverse Repos, ... Applicants. shall also have execution capabilities on the
Foreign Exchange, Stock and Bond markets and have knowledge of local
legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking
practices. Proficiency in Italian is highly desirable.

Personal qualities:

Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Strong problem solving, investigative
Service oriented
Good capability to interact with functional reporting lines and counterparties
Must be able to work under pressure
Commitment to quality and service excellence
Efficient organisational skills
Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary

Responsibilities:

Manage the Bank's liquidity according to the assigned guidelines
Ensure timely and precise execution of orders
Ensure proper and continuous reporting to the functional reporting lines
Direct involvement with External Asset Manager's clients
Foster and maintain communication with internal/external banking professionals
Meet deadlines on timely basis

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitae to:-

Human Resources Manager
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre, West Bay Street and Sea View Drive
P. O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax no. (242) 502 2203 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
The Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) is one of
several trade agreements the
Bahamas is likely to sign on to,
the minister of state for finance
saying yesterday that he hopes
the experience gained in nego-
tiating the agreement with the
European Union (EU) paves a
smoother path for future trade
talks.
Zhivargo Laing told West
Nassau Rotarians that one of
his regrets regarding the pro-
posed EPA services offer was
that there was insufficient pub-
lic consultation in too short a
timeframe, which led to some
confusion about the process.
Mr Laing and several senior
Ministry of Finance officials
have been criss-crossing the
Bahamas in an effort to set out
the facts about the Bahamas'
EPA services offer.
Mr Laing said he hopes this
process will open persons'
minds to other trade agree-
ments that will undoubtedly
come up in the near future, and


'I
of which Bahamians need to be
aware.
"The Caribbean Basin Initia-
tive will end next year, and that
was a lopsided, one-sided trade
agreement. It is unlikely that
the United States will negoti-
ate another such agreement,"
Mr Laing said.
He also pointed out that the
CARIBCAN agreement with
Canada is scheduled to end in


2010, and will also need to be
renogoiated.
- "It is very likely that those
agreements will go the way of
an EPA, so it will be very nec-
cessary that there be public con-
sulation. One,thing we know
very clearly is that the Bahamas
cannot decide to go it alone in
trade negotiations," Mr Laing
said.
The country's ascension to
the World Trade Organisation
(WTO) is 'still at a stalemate,
Mr Laing said. If the country
had completed its application
process for WTO, it would
have put the Bahamas in a bet-
ter position to negotiate other
trade agreements.
The Cabinet has just
approved the EPA services
offer, and awaits the signing of
the agreement. It will then have
to go to Parliament to become
law.
The services offer is available
on www. bahamas.gov.bs. :"


For further information please contact the

Bahamas Real Estate Association at 356-4578.


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an T
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


-:..___


wm


Zhivaro La


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008


THE TRIBUNE








THE TIBUN FRIDY, AGUST 2, 208,IPGES3


CLICO (Bahamas)





hit by downgrade



A. M. Best lowers financial strength and issuer rating, citing

asset-liability 'mismatch' and high exposure to affiliate loans


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear -
from people who are
making.news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning I
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

II. 1


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CLICO (Bahamas) yester-
day saw its financial strength
rating downgraded to B (Fair)
by the leading international
insurance rating agency, which
expressed concern that the
company's huge exposure to
a Florida-based real estate
development was "mis-
matched" with its liabilities.
A. M. Best, which down-
graded CLICO (Bahamas)
financial strength rating from
the previous B+ (Good), also
lowered the company's issuer
rating from 'bb' to 'bbb-' and
placed both ratings on a neg-
ative outlook.
Neither of the two A. M.


Best analysts who conducted
the ratings could be contacted
for comment yesterday.
In its release, the insurance
rating agency said: "The
downgrades reflect the signif-
icant exposure CLICO
Bahamas has to affiliated
loans as a percentage of assets
and capital, the volatility of
earnings in its international
operations and its somewhat
modest market share in the
Bahamas, when compared to
its competitors.
"CLICO Bahamas' loan to
a real estate subsidiary, which
represents a concentration risk
and high exposure to the
depressed Florida real estate
market, has been revalued to
reflect the current market con-


editions.
"A.M. Best feels that given
most of its reserves are fixed
annuities, this real estate expo-
sure represents a mismatch to
CLICO Bahamas' liabilities.
In addition, certain of its non-
Bahamas regions have pro-
duced operating losses."
A. M. Best added: "CLICO
Bahamas' ratings recognize its
ownership by CL Financial, as
well as its overall insurance
premium growth and prof-
itability. CLICO Bahamas
benefits from being part of CL
Financial by leveraging infor-
mation technology, adminis-
tration, actuarial, investment
and other group resources to
effect operating efficiencies in
its operations."


Tribune Business revealed
previously how CLICO
(Bahamas) management had
considered writing down a $57
million loan, representing
about 59 per cent of its total
assets, but did not do so after
it was guaranteed by its
Trinidadian parent.
That loan was made to a
CLICO (Bahamas) parent,
CLICO Enterprises, whose
main investment was Welling-
ton Preserve, a Florida real
estate project that suffered a
more than 20 per cent decline
in market value, falling from
$104 million at year-end 2006
to $80,5 million at year-end
2007.


College has Success




in holding down fees


* By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
Despite the continuing increase in opera-
tional costs facing many companies, one of
the country's tertiary institutions has decided
it will not raise fees and cause students to
discontinue their education.
Success Training College, which offers asso-
ciate degrees, Diploma and certificate pro-
grammes in a number of business subjects
announced, this week that its fees and charges
will remain unchanged for the new academic
year.


"Although increased operational costs have
led many institutions to raise fees and charges,
Success is committed to its current pricing
schedules and will hold them steady during
these challenging economic times when every-
one needs help in easing unavoidable bud-
getary strains," Deswell Forbes, Success' pres-
ident, said in a press release.
He added that the college remained dedi-
cated to the continued growth and develop-
ment of the Bahamas, and would continue to
'provide quality training and academic oppor-
tunities for all aspiring Bahamians.
Success Training College was established


in 1982, and provides classes geared toward
working individuals.
Current major areas of study include Busi-
ness Administration, Accounting, Banking
and Finance, Human Resource Management,
eBuisness management, Computer Informa-
tion System, Computer Graphics, Website
Development, Network Administration, Net-
work Security, Medical Assisting, Pharmacy
Technician, Early Childhood education, and
Electronics Technology at either the Nassau
Campus on Bernard Road or its Freeport
campus located in the Kipling Building.


NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that Majorie Ruth Joiner late of 65
Clarington Boulevard, Bowmanville, Ontario, Canada
died on the 6th day of July A.D., 2007 domiciled in
the Dominion of Canada, Certificate of Appointment of
Estate Trustee withaWill of the deceased were granted by
the Superior Court of Justice of the Province of Ontario
Dominion of Canada to GORDON MERLE GREENE
of 430 Pearl Street, Burlington, Ontario, Cananda on
the 16th day of January, 2008. At the date of her death,
the deceased left only a bank account at Ansbacher
(Bahamas) Limited and had no other assets in the
jurisdiction. Application has been made to the said
Ansabacher (Bahamas) Limited to have the assets
distributed pursuant to $.50 of the Supreme Court Act
without necessitating the Probate of the Estate within
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and Bank has
agreed to do so provided the provisions of the Section
are complied with and accordingly, this is to advise that
anyone having a claim to an interest in the Estate of
the deceased person must within 3 months of the date
hereof submit particulars of such claim in writing to the
Bank herein before stated date failing which the assets
will be distributed by the Bank to the persons entitled
on the intestacy of the deceased.
DATED the 15th day of August A.D.,2008


JOHNSON & CO
#1 New Bond Street
Governors Harbour,
Eleuthera, Bahamas
Attorneys for GORDON MERLE GREENE
personal Representative of the Estate
of Majorie Ruth Joiner


ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE
NETWORK SUPPORT SPECIALIST

Atlantic Medical Insurance (AMI), part of the Colonial Group of Companies (CGI) with headquarters in
Bermuda, is seeking a Network Support Specialist who will provide support services to all the Colonial
Companies in Nassau.

CGI has offices in Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands as well as The Bahamas, and
offers a complete range of premier financial and insurance services and, over the past few years, has
undertaken significant growth. This is an opportunity to be part of a rapidly growing innovative company,
focusing on providing clients with first class service and access to competitive products.

The post of Network Support Specialist, will report to the Vice President of Information Technology in Ber-
muda as well as each of the General Managers for each of The Bahamas companies, and will be respon-
sible for assisting with the day-to-day operations, management, and backup of the computer networks for
the Colonial Group of Companies in The Bahamas.

Responsibilities include:
* Providing end-user support for PC technologies and workstation operating systems
* Building workstations for use on the network
* Installing application software
* Overseeing user administration of the network
* Managing VOIP telephone users and accounts
* Performing network backup and restoring operations
* Working with external service providers for support of other systems
* Providing support to network operations
* Participation in, or leading on, special projects

The ideal candidate will possess:
* Knowledge of networking technologies (Ethernet LAN, switching, routing) and networking protocols
(IPX, TCP/IP, NDS, DNS, DHCP, SNMP, VOIP)
*An industry recognized qualification such as CNE, CNA, MCP, MCSE
*A minimum of three years experience in the network support service delivery field
* Knowledge of Checkpoint administration
* Knowledge of SQL Server administration
* Knowledge of client/server technologies (Novell NetWare, Microsoft 2000/2003 Servers) and
host-based technologies (AS400, HP3000)
* Knowledge of operating systems (Novell Netware, Microsoft Windows 2000/2003/XP Server/
workstation, DOS, MS SQL Server)
* Knowledge of network hardware used in servers, workstations, switches and routers
* Knowledge of Mitel VOIP-based telephony and related products
* The ability to plan and organize projects and tasks as they relate to Information Technology strategies

Compensation for the successful candidate will be attractive and linked to performance. AMI offers an
attractive benefits package that includes comprehensive medical insurance, contributory pension plan, life
insurance, and long term disability.

If you have a keen commitment to quality results and want to contribute your talents to a dynamic company,
contact us about this opportunity. Applications will be treated in the strictest confidence and should be
made in writing to:

Atlantic Medical Insurance
Attn: Human Resources
P.O. Box SS 5915

Or email:
acash@atlantichouse.com.bs

Closing Date for internal applications is August 20th 2008


THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES
< '.- OPEN CAMPUS
u-L THE BAHAMAS

JOB ANNOUNCEMENT

PROGRAMME OFFICER

The University of the West Indies Open Campus, The Bahamas, invites suitably and
well-qualified applicants to fill the position of Programme Officer at the UWI Open
Campus The Bahamas Site. Candidates should possess a Master's Degree in Education,
Business, Information Technology or other related disciplines or comparable knowledge
and experience in education management. Candidates must also have at least five years
relevant experience at a senior administrative level preferably in a tertiary institution.
Candidates should have good interpersonal skills, the ability to communicate effectively
both orally and in writing, and good time management skills. Knowledge and experience
in an online and distance learning environment, as well as in project management and
training, would be an advantage
The successful candidate will be required to:
1) work with the Head of the Open Campus in The Bahamas to build programme
delivery capacity;
2) liaise closely with the Open Campus Registry and the local staff to provide
outstanding service, support and responsiveness to students in-country;
3) supervise, assign duties and manage the job performance of relevant support staff
of the local site;
4) oversee the day to day operations of the site in the absence of the Head; and
5) identify, develop and implement relevant projects and programmes for outreach
and institutional building.
Please submit application with curriculum vitae and the names of at least three referees
to reach the Head of the Open Campus, The Bahamas by
FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 2008. Write under CONFIDENTIAL cover to:
Professor Howard Spencer
UWI Coordinator
Head
The University of the West Indies
Open Campus, The Bahamas
P.O. Box N-1184
Nassau, Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
Fax (242)328-0622
Email:uwibahamas48@hotmail.com
Additionally, you may send in advance an electronic version to E-Mail address: howard
.spencer@uwimona.edu.jm
Please note that an electronic version alone will not be acceptable.
Applicants are advised to ask their referees to send references under CONFIDENTIAL
cover DIRECTLY to Prof Howard Spencer without waiting to be contacted by the
University.
For further particulars of the post, contact us by E-mail at:
howard.spentcera uwimona. edu.jm; hws007@hotmaiL corn
Only applicants selected for interviews will receive notification. The successful
applicant will be expected to assume duties on Wednesday, October 1, 2008 or if
advised otherwise.

UWI


SIXTIETH


FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


Notice is
Company
on the 8th
is Argosa

Bahamas.


Legal Notice


NOTICE

OVID LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


hereby given that the above named
is in dissolution, which commenced
day of August 2008. The Liquidator
Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

RHILL HEIGHTS

INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)






TEACHING VACANCIES

Temple Christian Elementary School
invites applications from qualified teachers
for the 2008-2009 school year for:





Applicant must:

A. Be a born-again practicing Christian who
is willing to subscribe to the Statement of
Faith of Temple Christian Schools.

B. Have an Associates and or Bachelor's
Degree in Education from a recognized
College or University in the area of
specialization.

C. Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or
Diploma.

D. Be willing to contribute to the school's
extra curricular program.

Application must be made in writing with full
Curriculum Vitae, a recent coloured photograph
and three references should be sent to:

The Principal
Temple Chrisitan School
Collins Avenue
P.O.Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas


Tourism demand off






10-15% from norm


FROM page 1B
One Bahamian taxi driver
spoken to by The Tribune yes-
terday said that September tra-
ditionally the slowest month in
this nation's tourism calendar -
had "come several weeks ear-
ly". While the fear of hurri-
canes, the Back to School sea-
son in the US and the upcoming
US presidential election in the
US are all likely to be influenc-
ing demand for a Bahamas
vacation, there seems little
doubt that the current down-
turn is further exposing infra-
structural weaknesses both
physical and human in the
Bahamian tourism product,
especially when it comes to
matching service with the 'five-
star' product.
Bahamian hotels have
already begun normal prepara-
tions for the slow season, with
Atlantis set to shut down the
Beach Towers for the Septem-
ber-October period as it nor-
mally does. Employees there,


"The reality is
that we still
have growth
room at the
Sheraton, and
lots of growth
room at the
Wyndham."

and elsewhere in the sector, are
being encouraged to take vaca-
tions and put on shorter one,
two, three and four-day work
weeks. Mr Sands said Baha
Mar's employees at the Shera-
ton and Wyndham resorts were
working three and four-day
weeks, following the previous
adjustments in staffing levels.
With the trading environment
"challenging", Mr Sands said
that while Baha Mar felt the
Sheraton, in particular, was
"gaining momentum", both its


Legal Notice

NOTICE



CLERKENWELL INC.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of CLERKENWELL INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

KARMA INT'L

HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of August 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


ROYAL F CADELIPT Y MARKE


C F A L"'
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF
TUESDAY, 19 AUGUST 2008
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: A CLOSE 1.801.87 | CHG 0.31 I %CHG 0.02 I YTD -264.88 I YTD% -12 82
FINDEX: CLOSE 8568.42 I YTD% -10.04% I 2007 28 299',
WWW BISXBAHAMAS COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
5^ K- i -H I :-. .'.'m.L :,... .5e ..*'._.*e. .'o,"1s C i l3 T,. E 5 C '. Sg r Ir," _____ L l' :,1 LEF C' l L7- '-'I. _
o..ns Al-11. 1 1 1... -.e 1. .n 1 Cr. -C ...... *
11.80 11.60 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 11.80 0.00 1.061 0200 11.1 1.69%
9.68 8.50 Bank of Bahamas 8.50 8.50 0.00 0.643 0.16C 13.2 1.88%
0.99 0.85 Benchmark 0.89 0.89 0.00 -0.823 0.020 N/M 2.25%
3.74 3.49 Bahamas Waste 3.49 3.49 0.00 0.209 0 090 16.7 2.58%
2.70 1.57 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 0 040 43.1 1.69%
14.11 10.75 Cable Bahamas 14.11 14.11 0.00 1.224 0240 11.5 1.70%
3.15 2.74 Colina Holdings 2.88 2.88 0.00 0.046 0.040 62.6 1.39%
8.50 4.80 Commonwealth Bank (Sl) 6.82 6.82 0.00 0.449 0.300 15.2 4.40%
B.88 3.20 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.17 4.46 0.29 0.122 0.052 36.6 1.17%
3.00 2.25 Doctor's Hospital 2.75 2.75 0.00 0.308 0.040 8.9 1.45%
B.10 6.02 Famguard 8.10 8.10 0.00 0.728 0.280 11.1 3.46%
13.01 12.50 Finco 12.50 12.50 0.00 0.650 0.570 19.2 4.56%
14.75 11.54 FirstCaribbean Bank 11.55 11.55 0.00 0.550 0.450 21.0 3.90%
6.10 5.05 Focol (S) 5.50 5.50 0.00 0.385 0.140 14.3 2.55%
1.00 1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%/
1.00 0.41 Freeport Concrete 0.44 0.44 0.00 0.035 0000 12.6 0.00%
8.00 5.50 ICD Utilities 5.57 5.57 0.00 0.407 0.300 13.7 5.39%
12.50 8.60 J. S. Johnson 12.00 12.00 0.00 1.023 0.620 11.7 5.17%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180 0.000 55.6 0.00%
Fidaoliy Over--The-CounLer Securities
52 K..H I. L. L --,%..A -, z. B.d_ As. ._ L '_ ,...-,- 1 :.l = . r 'eld


1-1..1Z r.-- ...T. S F -iT .- 1s1?s
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
n 20 RND Holdina
41.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.40 RND Holdings


1.2652
2.8869
1.3493
3.3971
11.7116
100.0000
99.9566
1.0000
9.4733
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000


F -. r I -
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment
FG Financial Preferred Income F
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund


i 0.3U00 13.4 2.U /o
0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
-0.023 0.000 N/M 0.00%
4.450 2.750 9.0 6 70%
1.160 0.900 13 4 6.16%
-0.023 0.000 N/M 0.00%
iv$ Yiold%


Market Torms N.AV. Key
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1.000 00 YIELD last 12 month dividend, divided by closer. pr11 1 SiL, hi .1(U
52wk-H Highest closig price in last 52 oIks Bid 5 Buyi pricO ot Colino and Fidollly "" n< nl 2007)
52wk-Le Lowest cos1ig price in last 52 wook A-k S Soling price of Coelinn n1 fldll.lly *3 "JJu 2(010
Pm-vou Coso Previo- day's oightod prlcn for daily volume Lst Pro ias Irdod ovor-thcounor prico I Ap-il 20(
Todays Ccso Cront day's aighlod price tor daily volume Wookty Vol Tr1ding volume of the prior wk Amt .I 2011
Change Chae on colrI prico, from day 1o day LPS $ A company* eprt'Jd l 1 ll pi h,11 TOt- 1h11l0 111 2...... 11.
Daily Vol Numbor of lotal shares traded todI.y NAV Net Asaol Vilu
DV S Divdonds p.,r sh.ro pid n li, -Iii1 12 -onth- N/M Nol Mo-inil ,l
P/E ClObng price dlividld by t1 last 12' month 0ornls FINDEX T-h Fidolity Ba.-rnn- Slock Ir.dox J.Inur 1, 994 1)
iS) 4-fol 1 Ko.-k Sptt Eff.Ctlvo Dale 010/2007
([S 3-for-1 Siock Splt Effective Dole 711112007
TO TRADE CALL CFAL .E42- 2o 7010? I FIDELITY 2d2-.5 s.774 I FG CAPITAL, MARKETS 242-3.0 i00X FOR MORFd Rol. 4 INFORMATION CALL 42. af-c253


properties still had "some room
for growth".
With its 680 rooms all now
open, the Sheraton was cur-
rently posting 72 per cent occu-
pancy level and an average dai-
ly room rate of $150. This com-
pared to a 65 per cent occupan-
cy for the same period last year,
when only 350 rooms were
open, and a $128 average daily
room rate.
"We feel that hotel is gain-
ing momentum, and we're see-
ing the best returns to date,"
Mr Sands said.
"We believe that our capital
investment of $100 million-plus
at the Sheraton, the branding
of it and the quality offering is
paying dividends. While we
have some room to grow to get
to projected levels, we're
encouraged by the results we're
seeing at the Sheraton."
At the Wyndham, current
occupancy levels are running at
75 per cent (after the 300-room
reduction), with average daily
room rates standing at $105.
This compared, Mr Sands
said, to a 65 per cent occupancy
rate at the same time in 2007,
again with rooms closed, and a
$93 average daily room rate.
"We believe that even though
there is some improvement in


our business levels, and we've
come a long way, we're not
where we need to be, particu-
larly at the Wyndham," he
added. "The reality is that we
still have growth room at the
Sheraton, and lots of growth
room at the Wyndham."
Meanwhile, Mr Sands con-
firmed to Tribune Business that
the Wyndham had begun a
"minimal select roll-out" of an
all-inclusive package, priced at
$189 per person, per night, in a
bid to diversify its product offer-
ing and exploit new markets.
"The whole reason for this is
to add some dimensions to our
product offering, and create
some opportunities for a seg-
ment of the market that wants
all-inclusive pricing," Mr Sands
said.
The all-inclusive package
starts for rooms booked from
August 28, 2008, and lasts for
stays through to December 17,
2008. It is being trialled in select
US markets.
Mr Sands said Baha Mar was
working to ensure the all-inclu-
sive package did not conflict
with other guests, adding:
"There is some demand in the
market for that type of all-inclu-
sive pricing, especially from
some European countries."


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Legal Notice

NOTICE



GENESIS I HOLDINGS LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of GENESIS I HOLDINGS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice


NOTICE

BURNT OAK LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 15th day of August 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


14.E0
8.00
0 54
41.00
14.60
0.55

1.3320
3.0008
1.4075
3.7969
12.3289
100.0000
100.9600
1.0000
10.5000
1.0110
1.0119
1.0098


6.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Courrter Securities
41.00 43.00 41.00
14.60 15.60 14.00
0.45 0.55 0.45
BIS Listed Mutual Funds
NA YTC. Last 12 Months
1.331954 "... 3 09% 5.27%
3.015033 "-""- -0.48% 8.11%
1.407540"... 2.36% 4.32%
3.5562 ...... -6.34% 6.47%
12.3289-..... 3.32% 5.75%
100.00"
100.96""' 1.01% 1.01%o
1.00"
Fund 9.4733 """ -9.78% -9.78%
und 1.0110-" 1.10% 1.10%
1.0062"* 0.62% 0.62%
1.0098"* 0.98% 0.98%


I


m


BUSINESS
















Government eyes $100m






bond issue for September


FROM page 1B

"We'll go out in September
for some funds, $100 million,"
Mr Laing said.
"This always depends on rev-
enue projections. So if revenues
are flowing in such a way that
there is no need, you don't do it.
Why incur the expense [of ser-
vicing] the loan when you don't
have to do it?"
He added: "When the need
arises, we'll do what is neces-
sary. I would have thought it's a
good thing that the country
does not find itself in a state
where it has to go out for funds
immediately the fiscal year
starts."
Government-registered stock
and Treasury Bill issues are usu-
ally highly sought after by insti-
tutional investors, particularly
banks and insurance companies,


and issues are often fully sub-
scribed. They are especially
valuable to banks, insurance
companies and the National
Insurance Boqrd (NIB) because
they always rank highly in any
capital risk-rating analysis. Gov-
ernment-registered stock and
Treasury Bills are always
ranked 100 per cent, given that
the Government is regarded as
a borrower that always pays up
and meets its debts, with no risk
of default. As a result, Govern-
ment-registered stock and Trea-
sury Bills also provide Bahami-
an institutions with good liq-
uidity and a relatively risk-free
return on invested capital.
Meanwhile, Mr Laing said the
Ministry of Finance had hired
an extra "five or six" revenue
officers to focus on collecting
revenues due to the Govern-
ment in the Family Islands, an


area being targeted for
improved cash flow and more
timely collection.
"We've engaged revenue offi-
cers we expect to be engaged
in the collection of government
revenue, particularly in the
Family Islands," Mr Laing said.
He said the revenue issues in
the Family Islands were "not
slippages of leakages. What
we've found is that because
there's not been the focus on it,
there's been revenue sitting
around".
The minister explained that
many businesses had "revenue
sitting around waiting to be col-
lected", but because "no one
said to them: 'I need to have
my tax revenue in'", it had not
been paid or delivered to the
Treasury.
Mr Laing said it was often the
case that, following a meeting


held with Customs and govern-
ment revenue officers, compa-
nies owing six-figure revenue
sums or more paid the amount
owed via cheque the very next
day. It was not that they could-
n't or didn't want to pay, but
rather that there had been no
one on the Government end
following up on the taxes due to
the Treasury. "We expect that
with these Family Island rev-
enue officers focusing on that,
that there will be more curren-
cy in revenue collections on the
Family Islands," Mr Laing said.
"It's the kind of vigilance we
have to demonstrate to make
revenue collection more timely.
The bills are still required to be
paid at the same time every
month."
Mr Laing added that the
Government had no plans to
tap the international capital
markets for additional financ-
ing, as it had done earlier this


year with a $10o million bond
issue, as there was "no need for
concern" when it came to the
public finances.
Revenue trends for the first
two months of the 2008-2009
fiscal year were in line with pre-'
vious years, the minister said,


and "for the most part" were
ahead of 2007-2008 depending
on which day they were
assessed. "Things are proceed-
ing as we would expect. There is
nothing to be alarmed about at
this point. It is early in the fiscal
year," Mr Laing said.


Financial Intelligence Unit


ANALYST

Applications are invited from suitably"qualjfietpersons for the post of Analyst at the
Financial Intelligence Unit (the "FIU").

JOB SUMMARY:
The successful candidate will be responsible for analyzing reports submitted to the FlU
by financial institutions pursuaht to Section 14 of the Financial Transactions Reporting
Act, 2000 and Section 4 of the Financial Intelligence Unit Act, 2000.

CRITICAL COMPETENCIES:


Beverage


Overall Responsibilities

Management of all aspects and functions of all food and beverage outlets in accordance with Club
standards
Direction, implementation and maintenance of the Ritz-Carlton Club's service and management
philosophy, which serves as a guide to respective staff
Providing support, training, direction, focus and help to staff members to ensure continuous
success
Development of the understanding of the Food and Beverage service processes.


Essential Job Functions

Monitor and maintain complete knowledge of all Club services, restaurant food concepts, menu price
range, dress code and ambiance
Ensure the set up of workstations with necessary supplies including menus and wine lists
Review daily event list and catering contracts and be familiar with guests' names and room
locations
Accommodate all customer requests expediently and courteously. Follow up with designated Club
personnel to ensure completion of requests
Maintain complete knowledge of all wines, liquor brands, beers, and non-alcoholic beverages, and
designated glassware and garnishes.
Train employees and ensure successful completion of the certification process for all areas in F&B
and hold them to The Ritz-Carlton standards.
Energize The Gold Standards in daily quality line up and throughout shift.
Identify, document and ensure processes are in place and working to maintain The Ritz-Carlton
service standards.

Qualifications

High School Graduate, some college.
Minimum 21 years of age to serve alcohol beverages
Certification in alcohol awareness program
5 years experience in similar position, preferably in a 5 Star Hotel.
HACCP qualifications or equivalent.
Knowledge of various drink recipes and beverage service standards
Ability to communicate in English to the understanding of employees, management and guests
Ability to provide legible communication and be functionally computer literate (Microsoft).
Ability to do basic mathematical calculations.


Please send resume to the attention of:


Director of Human Resources
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB-20571
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Bahamas
OR
Email: humanresourcesatheabacoclub.com


Deadline for applications is Friday, September 5, 2008


Anthony M. Johnson
Director
Financial Intelligence Unit
P.O. Box SB 50086
Frederick Street
Nassau, Bahamas


WOINOG SAY
AOACO. OAI*AMA>


Vacancy for a
Assistant Director of Food and


r~e Itribupe)a


I=


- I I LI--I-sl-Ls


m


FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008, PAGE 5B


The successful applicant must have:
a strong command of the English Language, coupled with excellent report
writing and presentation skills.
solid intuitive and deductive reasoning skills.
possess practical experience in either financial investigation, banking,
accounting, auditing, and AML/CFT Compliance, or any combination thereof.
be computer literate with proficiency in the use of the Internet-and various
Microsoft applications.
highly disciplined with the ability to work within a team environment as well
as independently.
be reliable, conscientious and confidential.
good research and typing skills.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:
Completion of formal analysis of assigned reports on a timely basis.
Ensure the on-going maintenance and management of assigned reports.
*Assist with delivery of training programs by the FlU for financial institutions
upon request:
Assist with proper functioning of the department on a daily basis, inclusive of
formulation/identification of programs for continuing professional development.
*Assist with preparation of typology reports for inclusion in the FIU's Annual
Report.
Participation from time to time in local and international seminars and
conferences on issues relating to AML/CFT and Methodologies.
Full execution of all other related duties that may be assigned by the Head of
Analysis from time to time.

EDUCATION & EXPERIENCE:
Minimum requirement: a Bachelors Degree from an accredited tertiary
institution in Business Administration or Accounting;
Related experience or investigative background preferred but not required.

Interested persons may obtain additional information from the FlU's website at
www.bahamas.gov.bs/fiu and should submit written applications inclusive of
resumes and copies of relevant certificates) by 29th August 2008 to:


B' i~z~


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE B, FIDAYAUGUT 22,2008THEITIBUN


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MIKA KADET JOSEPH OF LEWIS
YARD, P.O.BOX F-45048, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 15th day of AUGUST, 2008 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.


Legal Notice



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
COURT ENGINEERING LIMITED
In Voluntary liquidation

"Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of
2000), COURT ENGINEERING LIMITED is in Dissolu-
tion."


'Rule of law' must




govern labour actions


FROM page 1B

comes to industrial action.
"I would that Bill to come
forward. That was something
that, from 2003, the employers
have been recommending that
these Bills be looked at and
debated."
Mr Nutt said the failure to
take action against trade union
leaders and members who par-
ticipated in illegal strikes had
created a "culture" where there
was no accountability for
actions, with persons believing
that no punishment would be
levied against them.
"One of the things that needs
to happen in the Bahamas is
that the rule of law needs to be
brought to the carrying out of
any industrial actions," Mr Nutt
said.
"Many of these industrial
actions are illegal.
"One of the things we have is
that we have developed a cul-
ture that there is no punishment
for persons involved in these
kinds of action. They're still
kept in their place of employ-
ment, and seniority is not affect-
ed.
"Unless there is some pun-
ishment meted out to those
involved in these actions, you're
going to see this remain as the
landscape in industrial relations
in the Bahamas."
Mr Nutt said the business
community's reaction to the
industrial action initiated by
BTC unionists, who blocked


Bay Street and other high-traf-
fic arteries on New Providence
and Grand Bahama, was
"almost one of shock that these
actions are going on and can go
on".
In its latest newsletter,
BECon said the BTC strike of
last week was illegal because
none of the two unions involved
had taken a strike vote.
In addition, the employers
body said Section 75 of the
Industrial Relations Act made a
strike illegal if it was designed to
coerce the Government either
directly or by inflicting hard-
ship on the community.
Mr Nutt told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday that the trade
unions had never raised the
spectre of impending industrial
action despite being members,
along with BECon, in the TRI-
FOR committee. This was the
three-way body, established by
the Government and featuring
business and the trade unions,
designed to act as a forum in
which the various members
could dialogue on social and
labour issues.
Mr Nutt said the last TRI-
FOR meeting had been held on
July 31, 2008, when it was
agreed that no meetings would
be held in August and the
forum would pick up where it
had left off in September.
"I am sure that when we meet
again in September, the
employers side will bring this
up as a topic, asking how and
why these actions are taking


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JIMMY CADEAU of
CARMICHEAL ROAD, P.O. BOX CB-13372, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
15TH day of AUGUST 2008 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
. Bahamas.



PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENTTO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, MITCHELL NONHOMME
of Roberts Drive Bamboo Town, Nassau, Bahamas, intend
to change my name to MITCHELL NONOME. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of the publication of this notice.




NOTICE


OF

PERENOSKA LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 20th day of August,
2008, Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, P.O.Box
N-3023, Nassau, The Bahamas has been appointed


Liquidator of the Company.



./
I' .. .
w U^M^


'/7


Y/'


Legal Notice
NOTICE

DAKIRI LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows.

(a) DAKIRI LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137(4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 21st August, 2008 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse
Trust Limited, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis, Geneva

Dated this 22nd day of August, A.D. 2008


Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator


place when they have TRIFOR have dialogue, dialogue is not
providing a venue to pursue dia- taking place on any of the issues
logue," Mr Nutt said. occurring right now the indus-
"Although there is a focus to trial actions taking place."


Royal Bank: 'No'


job losses from


branch closure


FROM page 1B

Commercial accounts based at the Bay & Victoria branch will be
dealt with directly by Royal Bank's country head office on East Hill
Street. Retail or individual clients will have their accounts trans-
ferred to the main Bay Street branch, unless an alternative location
is requested.
Given that Royal Bank's 100,000 Bahamian account clients used
the entire branch network to conduct their transactions, Mr McDon-
ald said he did not believe the Bay & Victoria branch's closure
would be too disruptive.
Yet that branch has proven extremely useful for persons who
work in the area, not to mention the numerous Paradise Island-
based construction workers who used it.
Mr McDonald said a November opening was being targeted for
the Carmichael Road branch, in a bid to tie it in with Royal Bank's
100th anniversary in the Bahamas celebrations on November 8.
Meanwhile, Mr McDonald said the Bahamian clearing banks
were "operating in more difficult conditions" than they had been
for the past three to four years, due to the slowing economy and
reduction in demand for credit.
Still, the Royal Bank chief said the slowdown in credit creation
was not all bad, given that it had allowed commercial banking
sector liquidity to further recover from the low point reached at end-
2006, which in turn had eased pressure on the foreign exchange
reserves.
And the credit growth rates enjoyed between 2005-2007 simply
could not be sustained over the long-term, allowing the Bahamian
commercial banking sector to pause for breath and consolidate the
gains achieved in the previous years.
Mr McDonald said: "There's certainly way less demand for cred-
it than we've seen in recent years, 2005-2007, both personal, con-
sumer and commercial credit. Nobody's surprised by this. That's the
reality.
"It's taken the pressure off liquidity, which is good, and translates
into the foreign reserves. As a banker, these are more difficult
conditions to operate in, but as a country it's good to get a healthy
pause. We're not able to continue growing credit at double digit
rates because that's unsustainable."
The Central Bank of. he Bahamas, in its update on monthly
economic developments for June, reported that private sector
loans in arrears those 30 days past due had risen by $60.5 million
in the 2008 first half or 11.4 per cent to $590 million, accounting for
10.1 per cent of all outstanding loans.
This was a 78 basis point increase over December 2007 levels, and
the Central Bank said: "Commercial arrears constituted some
two-thirds of this increment, and were concentrated in the 31 to 90-
day segment. Consumer loan arrears, which grew by $14.6 million,
exhibited a steady movement into the non-interest accruing cate-
gory. Although mortgage arrears were relatively stable, more of
their loans became non-performing."
CIoans that are 30 days past due do not unduly worry banks,
who are mainly focused on those 90 days past due that are classified
as non-performing.




PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENTTO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, CHANTAL PROPHETE
of Podoleo Street, P.O. Box SS-19753, Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to CHANTAL AGENOR. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of the publication of this notice.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MARC JEAN JOSEPH OF
MARSH HABOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 15TH day of AUGUST, 2008 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that DAPHNE BEVERLY CHIN-
MUNNINGS OF #215 DRUMFISH STREET, P.O.BOX F-43985,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 15th day of AUGUST, 2008 to the Minister responsible for




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that DIANA WIGHTMAN, P.O. BOX
AB20419, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why


the 17th day of


The date of commencement of dissolution is
July 2008.
James Andrew Ramsden
of Harbour Reach,
Rue De Carteret,
St. Helier, Jersey,
--Channel Islands
Liquidator


Legal Notice



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
AVIATECH LIMITED
In Voluntary liquidation

"Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 1,37
(4) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of
2000), AVIATECH LIMITED is in Dissolution."


commencement of dissolution is the 14th day of


The date of
July 2008.


Mr. Carlos Cambon
c/o Fidepar S.A.
Rue de Hesse 1
1204 Geneva
Switzerland
Liquidator


Substituted Service of the Suammons below is hereby effected on the Defendant
Michael Colin Quirke pursuant to the Order of the Learned Deputy Rtegistrar Mrs,
Marilyn Meeres dated the 29th day of May A.D., 2008, a copy of which Order is
available for collection by the Defendanat the chambers of Clinton Sweating
O'Brien, 303 Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas, Attorneys for the Plaintiff.
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2007-
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/GEN No. 00827
Common Law & Equity Side
BETWEEN
LAWRENCE CASE
Plaintiff
SUPREME COURT AND'
JJN 'I ll MICHAEL COLIN QUIRKE
Defendant
NASSAU.BAHAW _______
SUMMONS
LET ALL PARTIES CONCERNED attend before the -.zL. L
i, I' '
r:uir '.'f' h- Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in
chambers at the Su reme Court precincts, Nassau, Bahamas on
.', the day of it A. D. 2008 on the hearing
of an application by the Plaintiff pursuant to Order 77, Rule 5 of the Rules of
the Supreme Court,
FOR AN ORDER:
That, no Appearance having been entered by or on behalf of the Defendant
to the Writ of Summons filed in these proceedings on the 25" of June 2007,
the Plaintiff has leave to file Judgment in these proceedings for the relief
claimed in the Writ and costs to be taxed if not agreed.
Dated the 24 day of Jurie A. D. 2008


REGISTRAR
FO: The Defendant, by substituted service pursuant to the Order of the Deputy
Registrar dated the 29"' ofMay 2008.

UOMMONWbAL1 OFHUI til h 13AHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Side
BETWEEN

LAWRENCE CASE
Plaintiff
AND

MICHAEL COLIN QUIRKE
Defendant



SUMMONS

2007

CLE/GEN No. 00827



GLINTO 4sit ETING O'BRIEN
Chambers
303 Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Plaintiff


registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 15TH day of AUGUST, 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008


* I







FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


Small farmers struggle


to


match


world


pace


* By STEVE SZKOTAK
DAYTON, Virginia
ASSOCIATED PRESS
At the wholesale produce mar-
ket in this Mennonite community,.
farming families arrive by horse
and buggy and pallets are stacked
high with freshly harvested
Shenandoah Valley onions, corn,
green peppers and squash.
The setting evokes a simpler,
pre-industrial era. In reality,
small-scale farmers are experi-
encing growing pains as they
adapt to the country's expanding
diet for locally -grown foods and
the exacting demands of high-vol-
ume distributors of their produce.
Companies such as Sysco
Corp., Whole Foods Market Inc.
and Wal-Mart Stores Inc. want
guaranteed volumes, set prices
for an entire season and the abil-
ity to trace produce back to its
source in the event of a food-
related health scare, among other
things.
However, such standards, and
other formal trappings of the
business world contracts, attor-
neys, technology often conflict
with the ethics, and practical con-
siderations, of small-scale farmers,
especially those who are deeply
religious.
"They feel they are producing
something as safe and secure as
their relationship with the Lord,"
said David Watson of the Asso-
ciation of Family Farms.
Moreover, growers in temper-
ate climates don't have a 12-
month supply of produce. "Trying
to match what the buyers need
with what's being planted" is one
of the biggest challenges, said
Richard Rohrer, a Mennonite
farmer and manager of the
Shenandoah Valley Produce Auc-
tion.
- When one large, buyer recently
demanded insurance which is
needed in case a fruit or vegetable
makes someone, ill the Day-
ton farmers balked. "


"We deal more on the hand-
shake, personal commitment -
look the grower in the eye," said
' farmer Vernon Hoover, the Day-
ton auction's independent buyer.
Still, Amish and Mennonite
and even non-religious small-scale
growers in Virginia, Pennsylva-
nia, Ohio, Iowa, Tennessee, New
York and other states are mindful
of the money to be made from
this emerging relationship with
big distributors. And they are
willing to engage in some horse
trading to create business rela-
tionships.
For example, they want indus-
try demands such as specialty
boxes and company labels to be
factored into their price, accord-
ing to Rich Pirog, associate direc-
tor of the Leopold Center for Sus-
tainable Agriculture at Iowa State
University. And while wholesale
markets, or auctions, benefit the
food industry by bringing togeth-
er larger numbers of growers in
one location, they also make it
easier for smaller growers to
make connections to representa-
tives of big companies and their
resources, including refrigerated
trucks and bar-code labels.
"If you have a quality product,
consistently packaged, don't top
dress by taking the worst and
putting it on the bottom all
that is the way you build your
name here at the auction," Char-
lie Martin, the Dayton auction's
board chairman, said. He proud-
ly stood before a large stack of
unblemished yellow and green
squash that his 16-year-old daugh-
ter picked that morning, wearing
surgical gloves to avoid marring
their flesh.
The demand for what small-
scale farmers have to offer is bur-
geoning.
'- Wal-Mart last month said it
would sell $400 million worth of
locally grown produce this year,
making it the largest player in
that market.-Its suppliers include
"many Amish and Mennonite


growers" who work through third
party suppliers, spokeswoman
Deisha Galberth said.
Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc.
in June pledged to purchase 25
percent of at least one produce
item for each of its stores from
small and mid-sized farms located
with 'n 200 miles.
Whole Foods Market pur-
chased 22 percent of its produce
locally last year, up from the pre-
vious year's 19 percent.
By any measure, though, the
nation's 50-plus Amish and Men-
nonite produce auctions remain a
sliver of food industry sales. Total
combined retail and food service
fresh produce sales were $94.8
billion in 2005, according to indus-
try and government estimates.
The Cumberland Valley Pro-
duce Auction in Shippensburg,
Pa., began in 1994 with roughly
500 Amish and Mennonite grow-
ers, whose customers were pri-
marily local grocers and restau-
rants. Since then, it has doubled in
size, thanks in large part to the
demand from large, well-known
companies. Buyers come to Ship-
pensburg from New York, Pitts-
burgh, Washington, D.C., and
other points.
A decade ago, Cumberland
Valley wrestled with many of the
same issues the Mennonites of
Dayton, Va., are dealing with
today. Now, the auction is large
enough to afford liability insur-
ance, in case a legal action arises
from a tainted product, manager
George Cleary said.
Cleary said there is a simple
formula for success: "Good prod-
uct and plenty of it."
In northeast Ohio, the Home-
rville Wholesale Produce Auc-
tion has instituted a system that
tracks every box of produce to
the grower's field, enabling chain
grocers and food distributors to
know the origin of any fruit or
vegetable they sell.
The Homerville auction, which
began, operations in 1997, has


seen annual growth of 20 percent
to 40 percent, says F.W. Owen, a
former dairyman who manages
the market. The auction sells pro-
duce grown primarily by the
Amish, but also has Mennonite
and other growers, he said.
The auction initially attracted
independent regional grocers and
farmstand owners from all around
- Cleveland, Akron, Wooster
and Elyria. Now national chains
account for 25 percent of its sales,
Owen said.
After studying the success of
these other operations, the Day-
ton auction, which began in May
2005, has seen its annual sales top
$1 million a significant mile-
stone for an isolated farming
economy that was once based in
dairy. The growers are primarily
Old Order Mennonite, many of
whom get around by horse and
buggy and reject modern enter-
tainment such as a TV and radio.
That said, many splurge on the
latest in farm equipment, includ-
ing high-end tractors that can cost
tens of thousands of dollars.
Eric S. Bendfeldt, an agricul-
tural extension agent who has
worked closely with the Men-
nonite community to get the auc-
tion up and running, said that
while the agrarian-based Amish
and Mennonite communities are
currently grappling with the
demands of a new market, they
are ultimately a natural fit for the
big food companies.
They know and accept the rig-
ors of farmwork, are committed
to quality farm practices and their
large families provide a key ele-
ment of farming: labor.
Pirog, of the Leopold Center
at Iowa State, said the farm prod-
ucts of the emerging Amish and
Mennonite growers also connect
with consumers seeking foods tied
to a place or a country, such as
Spanish hams or Italy's Parmi-
giano-Reggiano cheese.
Mennonite-grown, he added,
"has a certain-cachet." .


NOTICE OF SALE

The Lagoon Court Management Co. ("the
CJLipany") invites offers for the purchase of
ALL THAT Apartment Unit No. 307 in the
Lagoon Court Condominium situate in the area
known as "Olde Towne at Sandyport" in the
Western District of the Island of New Providence
being a three bedroom/ 3 bathroom apartment
unit of 2,052 square feet with ALL THAT
5.4818% share in the common property of the
Condominium.

The Company makes no representations or
warranties with respect to the state of repair of
the Unit which is offered for sale "as is where
is".

The Company will sell under power of sale in
accordance with Section 21(4) of the Law of
Property & Conveyancing (Condominium) Act.

TERMS: Ten percent (10%) of the purchase
price at the time of contract and the
balance upon completion within
Sixty (60) days of contract.

This sale is subject to a reserve price. The
Company reserves the right to reject any and
all offers.

Interested persons may submit written offers
addressed to Lagoon Court Management Co.,
c/o Dana C. Wells, P.O. Box N-272, Nassau,
Bahamas to. be received flo later than the close
of business on the 8th day of September, 2008.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE




E .



ASSISTANT INTERNAL AUDITOR
INTERNAL AUDIT DEPARTMENT


Vacancy exists in the Corporation for an Assistant Internal Auditor in the Internal
Audit Department.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to,
the following:

* Works unsupervised, and attends weekly meeting with the AGM/Chief
InternalAuditor
* Consults with the Internal Auditor or AGM/Chief Internal Auditor to
resolve queries or obtain guidance on audit assignments
* Develops audit programs for conducting audits, from the planning to
reporting stages for approval by the AGM/Chief Internal Auditor
* Conduct financial, operational and ITS audits at Head Office and the Family
Islands Operations
* Provides feedback on Audit Clerks in the preliminary performnnance
evaluation for them
* Coaches, supervises, and assists in the training of Audit Clerks
* Collects information and updating continuous audit monitors on plants and
Family Island branches and produce regular reports
* Assists, External Auditors in the preparation ot work papers for the annual
audit exercise

Job Requirements include:

* Bachelor degree in Accounting or other closely related discipline
* Completion of a professional certification (ACCA, CA, CPA or the CIA)
* Understand Internal Audit Standards and Procedures, and International
Accounting Standards
* Good investigative, interviewing, problem solving and analytical skills
* Excellent written and verbal communication skills
* Knowledge of internal controls, operational audit techniqti s as well as
the ability to identify and assess risks
* Good knowledge of the Corporation's operating policies, systems and
procedures
* The ability to assess and evaluate the Corporation systems of internal
control
* The ability to conduct some risk analysis for major areas within the
Corporation
* The ability to conduct financial, operational and ITS audits and
investigations and exercise strict audit code of ethics (e.g. confidentiality)
* Ability to lead, supervise and training audit clerks
* A minimum of 3-5 years experience


Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department,
Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. 0. Box N-7509
Nassau Bahamas on or before: Tuesday, September 2, 2008.


VACANCY NOTICE

Clerk of Works Buildings Department 7
Applicition?.are i.t'ted from suiiably qualified persons for the position of Clerk of Works at The Naional Insurance
Board.
JOB SUMMARY.
The individual would be responsible under the Assistant Director l.i.Jr,- to represent The National Insurance
Board on projects being undertake an;1d ens-uriin contractors' compliance with design and materials specification
and to ensure consistent stand:diii inJ sorkmaniislip.
QUALIFI(C\ 1i INI,, SKILLS AND REQUIREMENTS
Applicants are required to have subsrannal 'ite experience in the construction industry.
Be honest, and vigilant to ensure that the work ,i materials meet the required standard.
Must have a broad understanding nid diverse experience in rhe building industry, including knowledge of materials,
trades, methods and legal requirements.
Be attentive to details when cht'cklng w',rk and materials.
Have good written and verbal comunucaition I .*
Musr demonstrate tlc ability io: ',J) detine obijectn s, plan the work and communicate priorities; (2) be able to
establish an appropriatxei working rlaiosi'ii.s",p t'hd lihe contractor's staff while remaining diplomai:c and independent.
and 3) be keen, decisive and pe rsuii.i\t in conimnnicacing any inconsistencies that may require corrcctiono <,r
compromise.
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Be fainiliar with legal reiiremcirs and ensure that work complies with them.
2. Be fainiliar with all ihe rel\.nt drawings aaid wrinen instructions, checking them, and using them asi : refrencc
when inspection" ilite wrrk.
3. T''akes measuremenut aInd 0*inples on site CT cnure diat thile work and materials meet the specificaions and
qualit\ standards.
4. Provides accuritte' c xriniis ior ork ,.lxii iiecx ., r.
5. writess specificAion;: compile \ii-caad drawiniiig ,ind obtains competitive estimates quota'ioi x fon bblildcr,'
work to be carried n l,.
6. Ensures that work on xious .,ro r tt,1 cx, c.i ed out to tile client's standards, speciicationns and schdulc.
7. ns:s dhait co rncmct n.nal ii |nd piocedtures are used and thai thie client is given quality work .nid valn ftor
moev.
8. Advise omilractiois alin xiui icrtn Ip c I lie work but not give ,advice that cu'ld lie ine1rprcred ,'is a.n
instruction wlich l ixx, ld] iv 'i'. ;I d k iiniio il co.pendlture l )o t he contract.
9. Inspects works ,is jp1 i)]';j prl dcc -
10. Keeps dtralIx n'ord. olm n\:in u, pcl',c o1 ilie woik.
1 1. Produces reular s,!'-'-i ,eri, whlch 'v iih l i nlude jpro',trscs and anv delays, iie number and type ot worker,
emliplo d, \e i, i r din : .. ie, draxixan's received, deliveries, instruction and n d clll], o aiii
signiticaliti i even
[2. Paricipaes in i.m s:, i in !. ., 1p, i req eltcd and l iundenakr : any work nrcxssar 111 i pl \linagemcnr '. ini!n -.
13. ( )thli r isks :, .i s
APPLICATION
lIntcrcstcd il 's 1,ii i]A\ .ippi'1>\ I iIl'i'C i ,',t 1 tji1)plCled a |pplicatiox tlu il r aong with di t c iiccss.arty plro x t
qualification, on or before Frid'n, August 29, 2008, iW:
lih \auni; )irecior
THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD
(. h '(. d )arlini', o( nplex
I' i io \ o -75iS
,is I M MSU, l--i- - --aS


BUSINESS


m


0







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22 2008


COMC AG


Tribune Comics


JUDGE PARKER


CALVIN & HOBBES


DENNIS THE MENACE Sudoku Puzzle


APT 3-G


BLONDIE


"PAP NFPSG AToW9LL,QUICK! 415 SWIM
SUIT JUST WENT OUT WITh T1I4 TTP6E"


Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
.3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday

4 1

6 4 8_2

3 1 8

2 7

5 9

8 4

8 9 6

4 5 6 3
9 2
Difficulty Level AA rA 8/23


Kakuro Puzzle
B M Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
6 may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.


Yesterday's
Sudoku Answer


2 24 5

394



9 21
5 76


Yesterday's
Kakuro Answer

897 :517318
61,2M 711 3215
7.1_ 3 2:5
73 118 1 9
42 7869
9 7 ,1 1-[5 2:7 9 5 3 7
1 5 91 8 5 1
1 8 l 2 9 8 7 3
6 9-7-2-8- 9-8 4
217 3 119 1 4!2


e-.25


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


CRYPTIC PUZZLE


Across
1 A base for the weaver (6)
4 and 14 Across: Where
nothing is the limit? (8,4)
9 I spoil the games figura-
tively speaking (6)
10 Many returning lazily with-
out betraying any emotion
(8)
12 Trial run in the theatre (4)
13 Nevertheless it's inactive
(5)
14 See 4 Across
17 Exchanging gold
is enough for accommoda-
tion (7,5)
20 He cheats by giving two
cards instead of one? (6-6)
23 Is indisposed to alter sail
(4)
. 24 Ground has a tenant, it
seems (5)
25 Gets older and agrees
about being dropped (4)
28 Bird gives one a shock
after dark (8)
29 Given a position in various
depots (6)
30 Possibly re-unites trains
(8)
31 First violin starts a cas-
sette tape (6)


Down
1 Clearly write a note
according to fact (8)
2 Its contents go to pot (3,5)
3 Frank is no writer (4)
5 Means to get at the drink
(6,6)
6 Lois becomes a medium
(4)
7 Is nude, gets out bra and
pants perhaps (6)
8 My note is about the first
form (6)
11 How an actor gradually
gains experience? (5,2,5)
15 He is stubbornly resolved
to leave a small piece out
(5)
16 He introduces us to the girl
(5)
18 Pole is fired and insulted
(8)
19 One engaged in a Red
Cross operation? (8)
21 Way men ran all over the
place (6)
22 Fifty in the battle escape
(6)
26 Where they teach only 10
letters of the alphabet? (4)
27 The violent demo is In
fashion (4)


Yesterday's Cryptic Solution Yesterday's Easy Solution


Across: 1 Shift, 4 Located, 8 Aye, 9
Portrayed, 10 Enthral, 11 Amble, 13
Secure, 15 Debate, 18 Sally, 19
Debited, 21 Repulsive, 23 Air, 24
Analyst, 25 Manse.
Down: 1 Sea legs, 2 Identical, 3
Taper, 4 Lordly, 5 Carcase, 6 Try, 7
Dodge, 12 Boat train, 14 Royalty, 16
Endorse, 17 Adrift, 18 Syria, 20
Bream, 22 Pea.


Across: 1 Sound, 4 Licence, 8 Rut,
9 Coup d'etat, 10 Immerse, 11
Chary, 13 Extort, 15 Blithe, 18 Sum
up, 19 Radical, 21 Espionage, 23
Air, 24 Protest, 25 Maybe.
Down: 1 Service, 2 Ultimatum, 3
Decor, 4 Laurel, 5 Codicil, 6 Net, 7
Entry, 12 Autocracy, 14 Reprove, 16
Enlarge, 17 Arrant, 18 Sweep, 20
Dream, 22 Pro.


Across
1 German composer
(6)
4 Miscellaneous (8)
9 Ag (6)
10 Diplomatic
etiquette (8)
12 Whip (4)
13 Courteous (5)
14 Au (4)
17 Myopic (5-7)
20 Of many
years'
duration (4-8)
23 Gas used in lighting
(4)
24 Point of view (5)
25 Outlay (4)
28 Incarcerate (8)
29 To leave (6)
30 Indefatigable (8)
31 Much loved (6)


Chess


Loek van Wely v Magnus Carlsen,
Corus Wijk 2008. Imaginative chess
by the low-ranked Dutchman put
Norway's 17-year-old prodigy in
serious trouble, and here White
(to play) has the large material
advantage of two rooks and two
pawns for bishop and knight.
However, van Wely was horribly
short of time, just a few seconds on
his clock with two moves remaining
before the move 40 clock control
Hastily he went 1 Qe3? QxdS*
2 Kg3? Nc4l3 Qf2? Qd3+ and
suddenly Biack's attack is winning.
If vanWely could have thought for
a little longer, he would probably
have spotted the right move in the
diagram which solves all White's
problems and forces a winning
endgame. Can you find the one-move
knock-out the Outch grandmaster
missed?
LEONARD BARDEN


Down
1 Without foundation
(8)
2 Reference (8)
3 Submissive (4)
5 Frankness (8,4)
6 Swearword (4)
7 Magnate (6)
8 Mislead (6)
11 Lacking candour (12)
15 Lower oneself (5)
16 Sham attack (5)
18 Prehistoric reptile (8)
19 Overexcited (8)
21 Charge with crime (6)
22 Cu (6)
26 Face of a watch (4)
27 Pb (4)


8667


Che)~8667:1 th8+landifKxh82t e8+or Bid82
Qe7.T n both cases White exangesqueens and son
promotes his 6 pawn.


Target


11C).W x)iI- y vo-tIs ofr
ro-r lotte-rs ox- lor Ca
you itlakte f-on, the
1-flaine g a, word, eac x



t a lest

on- nlo-lctt--r tV.orl-.
ffor-mT emitting r ". L. nio
-wordes witen initial
fjpost-o i rr p i p tiittedt .
m 'lie U 0rl 1r-l orf i



lb-tii u-ntleructin-



linineti U-nftie U-ntil


For example, if you're declare, at
five clubs in this hand, you see you
must lose a diamond, almost surely a
spade and possibly a heart. What you
would like to do is to minimize the
chance of losing a trick in hearts,
where an ordinary finesse offers only
a 50 percent chance of succeeding.
By far your best hope of achiev-
ing this goal is to try to set up an end-
play. So, after ruffing a diamond con-
tinuation at trick two, you cross to
dummy with a trump and ruff
dummy's last diamond. You then
draw a second round of tnrumps and
play the A-K and another spade.
You don't know which opponent
will \\in the third spade, but you
hope it is West. If so, you are sure of
making the contract whether he
returns a heart or gives you a ruff-
and-discard.
In the actual hand, Fast wins the
third spade, which is not ideal but
much better than relying on a straight
finesse. When he returns a low heart,
you play low, which traps West's
queen and puts you on lasy Street.
Note that even after East wins
the third spade, you go down only
when West started with both the
queen and ten of hearts -just a 1-in-
4 possibility. This is certainly better
than taking the straightforward heart
linesse b leading to the jack, which
has about ain en-money chance of
losing, and would cost youL the con-
tract in the actual deal.


EAST
4QJ3
T 10876
* AK Q 6
454


East dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
4K 107
IK92
*543
K 1083


WEST
49852
VQ 54
+J 10972
46


SOUTH
*A64
VAJ3
*8
4AQJ972
The bidding:
East South West North
1 + 24. 2* 34
Pass 5 4
Opening lead -jack of diamonds.
Let's say you have a 50 percent
chance of making a contract if you
adopt a certain line of play. This is
surely not the worst of odds, but, if
you are a perfectionist, you should
not settle for a mere 50-50 chance of
success. Instead, you should look for
some other approach that might raise
your chances to 75 percent, or even
100 percent, if possible.
The opportunity to apply this
principle occurs time and time again.
The general idea is that if declarer
cannot attain the 100 percent chance
he'd like to have, he should look for
the next best thing to it.


'2008( King I c.iturcs Sy id!'e Inc.


MARVIN


Ad X/mX


TIGER


ALL YOUR BABY
QUESTIONS ANSWERED!
8 -13.3 _af-


AI X
B.T


Contract Bridge

by Steve Becker


Maximizing Your Chances


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!ACK-TO-SCHOOL with a


Washington offers



no relief for savers


* By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON
Two giant mortgage compa-
nies get into hot water over
risky investments. The govern-
ment steps in to throw them a
lifeline should they need it.
Hundreds of thousands of
Americans buy homes more
expensive than they can afford.
Congress approves a rescue
package.
Troubles erupt at a Wall
Street investment firm that
made bad bets on mortgage
investments. The Federal
Reserve steps in and provides
financial backing for the com-
pany's takeover.
Meanwhile, tens of millions
of people pay their mortgages
on time, don't max out their
credit cards and put money into
retirement funds. They may
even save a little extra on the
side.
In return, they get rates on
their savings that don't even
keep up with inflation. They
also are witnessing the horror
of their nest eggs shrinking as
the value of their homes plum-
mets and the stock market tum-
bles.
Washington policymakers
seem more focused on rescuing
those who behave badly by
putting at risk taxpayers who've
played by the rules and shunned
the get-rich-quick schemes of
Wall Street croupiers.
If the government can toss a
lifeline to troubled mortgage
underwriters Fannie Mae and
Freddie Mac, then why won't
they do something for Ameri-
cans who save their money?
Why aren't the nation's
savers storming the Federal
Reserve or the Treasury'
Department or the halls of Con-
gress demanding that something
be done for them?
"Perhaps there is a mentality
that you can't beat city hall,"
ponders financial adviser and
author Ric Edelman.
Or, maybe it's just that the
mentality of people who are
savers also helps make them
flexible enough to roll with the


punches. "I'm not a crybaby
about what goes on in the
world," says Cathy Tozzi, 70, a
retired school finance director.
The elderly who are no
longer working and are living
off their income from savings
and other investments are get-
ting walloped by the current
economic hard times.
"People like my mom. You
expect them to be upset. People
who are doing a lot of saving
now versus people who are
done saving are two very dif-
ferent groups," said John
Huizinga, professor of econom-
ics at the University of
Chicago's Graduate School of
Business.
Tozzi, who lives in Brooklyn,
N.Y. has cut back. "I shop at
the 99 cent stores. There are
ways of saving money." Even
so, she worries about inflation
"eating into my savings."
People who grew up during
the hardships of the Great
Depression are from a genera-
tion that was more frugal and
knew how to save. To them,
debt was a-dirty word.
"They grew up with the men-
tality that you make the best of
what is handed to you. They
don't worry they won't make it
to Rome or Paris this year.
They will settle for a car trip,"
says Alan Hilfer, director psy-
chology at Maimonides Med-
ical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y.
The average rate on a one-
year CD these days is around
2.3 percent, according to
Bankrate.com. However, infla-
tion has been rising closer to 5
percent over the past year, so
savers are seeing their returns
wiped out.
"Savings are taking it on the
chin," says Greg McBride,
senior financial analyst at
Bankrate.com. "The Fed's rate
cuts geared to aiding ailing
homeowners with adjustable-
rate mortgages have come at
the expense of savers and
retirees dependent on fixed
income," he said. "For the past
12 months, there has been a
double whammy for savers as
interest rates have fallen and
inflation has increased."


The average rate on a savings
account is a rock bottom 0.37
percent, Bankrate says. That's
even worse than the 0.46 per-
cent rate for the same time last
year.
David Middleton and others
are so mad about the situation
in Washington that they got
together and formed the grass-
roots group, Fed Up USA. The
group whose members num-
ber around 40 have protested
in Washington and elsewhere
against "federal financial irre-
sponsibility."
Middleton, 32, who once
worked in the information-tech-
nology field and is now self
employed, says he was spurred
to put on an "activist hat" ear-
lier this year. That's when the
Fed provided a loan of $28.82
billion as part of JPMorgan's
takeover of the ailing Bear
Stearns.
"I was outraged. These com-
panies make their decisions and
their bets and they should be
responsible for that. They
should not be bailed out on the
backs of the taxpayers," he said.
He was equally aghast at the
sweeping housing-rescue pack-
age approved by Congress and
signed into law by President
Bush last month.
The package provides cheap-
er mortgages to struggling
homeowners and lets the gov-
ernment lend money to Fannie
Mae and Freddie Mac or buy
their stock should they need it.
Mike Shedlock, who writes
the popular blog Mish's Global
Trend Analysis, urged his read-
ers to contact their elected offi-
cials in Washington to vote
against the Fannie and Freddie
aid package. Some people did-
n't think it would make a dif-
ference in the outcome but they
wrote protest letters anyway,
he says.
"People are getting disgust-
ed," says Shedlock.
At the same time, he
acknowledged trying to moti-
vate people to rise up is tough.
Shedlock frets that the United
States is "being run into the
ground in debt" by Washing-
ton.


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PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


CONTEST ENDS SEPTEMBER 30TH CALL OR VISIT US TODAY'








9 TRIBUNE SPORTS'





FRIDAY,


AUGUST 22, 2008 SECTION E


YOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD


Debbie finishes

seventh in the

200m final
* TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
BEIJING, China: Veteran
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie
knew that if she was going to
win the Bahamas' first medal
at the XXIX Olympic Games,
she had to produce a personal
best in the women's 200 metre
final last night.
But she didn't manage to
and had to settle for seventh
place in a time of 22.61 sec-
onds.
Thankful of the opportunity
she got to compete in her third
straight 100/200 final at the
Olympics, Ferguson-McKen-
zie said it was a bittersweet
appearance in Beijing because
she didn't achieve any of her
goals at the Bird's Nest
National Stadium.
"Coming off the curve, I
realized that I started running
more tight and I started to
chase," said Ferguson-McKen-
zie, who competed out of lane
two. "When you start to chase
like that and running tight, it's
never good. So. I was a little
disappointed in my time."
While she wasn't pleased
with her performance, she
couldn't help but revel in the
continued dominance of
Jamaica in the sprints as
Veronica Campbell-Brown
turned in the fastest time for
the year in a personal best of
21.74 to add the gold to the
one that Shelly-Ann Fraser
got in the centurvyin her PB of
10.78 as she led a 1-2-3 sweep
for the neighboring country.
Ferguson-McKenzie, sev-
enth in the 100 in 1.19, said
not having a chance to review
her race in the 200, it would
appear that she just didn't get
a chance to set it up the way


'Superman'





Sands leaps





to medal win


Bronze for Bahamas

in the triple jump


* TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
BEIJING, China: With the mem-
ory of a six-month suspension that
almost ruined his career behind
him, Leevan 'Superman' Sands
said he can finally breathe a sign of
relief with the Olympic bronze
medal around his neck.
Sands turned in his best perfor-
mances on his third jump as he
soared 57-feet, 8 1/2-inches (17.59
metres) to lower his national
record of 57-5 (17.50).
"I feel so good, man you'll just
don't know. I'm thankful to God. I
just want to praise him," he said.
"Last year (at the World Champi-
onships) I didn't make the final.
"I started off this year not mak-
ing the final at
k 'indoor worlds


and a lot of people didn't count
me for a medal, but I came here
and I did it."
The performance enabled the
Bahamas to join eight other coun-
tries for 72nd spot on the medal
chart that has China ahead 46-29
over the United States in gold, but
trailing the US 95-83 in the total
count.
Sands, who celebrated his 27th
birthday on August 18, was actu-
ally sitting in second plate behind
champion Nelson Evora of Portu-
gal with his season's best of 57-11
3/4 (17.67).
But on his fifth jump, Great
Britain's Idowu Phillips pulled
ahead of Sands with his season's
best leap of 57-9 3/4 (17.62) to pull


.t'
p .4
iJ


LEEVAN SANDS celebrates his bronze medal winning performance in the triple jump
at the Olympic Games in Beijing. Sands said afterwards: 'I started off this year not
making the final at indoor worlds and a lot of people didn't count me for a medal,
but I came here and I did it.'


COVERAGE BROUGHT


TO Y U B Y


s; .I.s ..
t~Iefl5 20~


F ~I ffN


official restaurant


..-













. .-


,


4 .













SPRT


FROM page one

third place for diving across the
line. I find that strange."
Brown, 27, said he had hoped
that the Bahamas delegation
protested Neville's action.
"It's disappointing. I've been
running well all season and this is
what I've been waiting for," he
said. "Now to come down to the
big dance and basically give it
away, I'm disappointed.
"I know a lot of people were
depending on me to come home
with a medal. I feel as if I let a lot
of people down, but I only can do
my best. Today that was my best."

Protest

When contacted, team manager
Foster Dorsett said they made the
protest, but after reviewing the
race, they were told by the appeals
committee that Neville will hold
onto the medal because he crossed
the finish line ahead of Brown.
"It was quite disappointing for
Chris because this is the third time
in a major championship that he
didn't win a medal," Dorsett said.
"I really felt for him because he
had the medal in his hand before
David took it away from him."
Neville, when asked about the
decision to take the dive at the end,
said he was prepared "to do what-
ever it takes to win the medal. That
wasn't the first time that I did
something like that. I felt sorry for
Chris, but I was worried about me
not getting a medal."
Brown, running out of lane five,


said he didn't see Neville, who was coming home and then pressed in
in lane nine, until the last 20 metres the final metres, he would have
because his focus was on Merritt been assured of the medal.
and Wariner in front of him. "When I saw him (Neville), I
"I saw Jeremy starting to tying tried to press a little too hard," he
up, but I didn't see David in the insisted. "I think that was what lost
picture until he made the dive," it for me."
Brown pointed out. As for Merritt and Wariner,
Looking back at his race, Brown Brown said they were both run-
said if he had relaxed a little more ning after each other all year, so


it wasn't a surprise. tie was just
hoping to be the spoiler.
"They are two great competitors,
They are the only two guys who
have been running 44s low all sea-
son so I just have to train harder,
put God first and get ready for the
relay and my wedding."
Set to marry on October 24 in
Atlanta, Georgia, Brown will take


a rest today as the remainder of
the men's 400 pool team up for the
preliminaries of the 4 x 400 relay
today.
The Bahamas, coming as the sec-
ond ranked team behind the Unit-
ed States, will run out of lane three
in the last of the two heats with
Trinidad & Tobago in two and
Japan in four.
Jamaica is in seven.
The United States will head the
field in heat one in lane three as
well.

Heat

The first three in each heat and
the next two fastest times will
advance to the final on Saturday.
The coaching staff, headed by
Frank 'Pancho' Rahming, has still
not disclosed the order for the
Bahamas team. With Brown tak-
ing a rest, the combo will come
from Michael Mathieu, Andretti
Bain, Andrae Williams, Avard
Moncur and Ramon Miller.
"The guys would love to see me
with a medal and I would love to
have a medal. I think that would
motivate the guys a lot," said
Brown about his fourth place. "I
feel a little disappointed me, the
team and the country.
"I was really looking forward to
coming out here and bring home
an individual medal. But it's sad
for me. I'm disappointed, so I have
to do it in the relay."
Brown said he wants to wish his
teammates the best, but he assured
the Bahamian public that they
will not take any prisoners in the
relay.


- I..


FROM page one and I think at one point
were like that ,here we w
Sinnine medals left. right
". she needed to. centre. But thev desert,
"Coming off the cure, I That why the are in
. .. .... : :':": ..... + :-;:Z~ i : : '. That'- w,.hv they are inn
7....4.;knew I was in lane two, but I
"." .%,as just light getting oI ih
curve and that part didn't 'o
well. It didn't flow." she stat- PerfOrm an(
ed. "'That %%as one of the rea-
sons that I ran such a slow,. The 32-ear-old. who i,
time." contemplating competing
,.... "--' :,.-,: \With the Jamaicans running her fifth Ol mpad in 201
such fast time% and snatching London. sad however r ci
'', five. of the six medal in the out ,,ith the best performa
z_... women s sprints to go along wouldd emerge ictorous
:- :,- ith the double dose of \ic- it was the Jamaicans.
..... -- tory from Uisain Bolt in the Witb their performan,
.- men's double sprints. Fergu- the Jamaicans are poised
.. ., -''- son-NicKe'nzie had nothing s\%eep both the mena
~ ~but respect tor her ri'ak. %\omen 4 \ 10111 mere rel
-"The; came here and the\ For the tirst time in t'
',-. ... ... perfoimd." she stated. OlImpics. the Bahamnias
"Nobody is going tog 1 i',e 0ou be competing, as the team,
E= --.---; anything so ohb iousl they n't finished a, one of the
S, came out here and they took it qualifier. prior (to the ;gan


.e.

tzaitiIIfl9 ZIi'08


TO YOU BY

















official restaurant


I... ja


COVERAGE


BROUGHT


PAGE 2C, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008


TRIBUNE SPORTS























Friday, August 22, 2008 Medalist Croatia's Martina Zubcic, right, won bronze.


Sportsline

Baseball/American League m 3B
Cleveland 10, Kansas City 3 Toronto 14, New York 3
Minnesota at Los Angeles Oakland at Seattle
National League 0 4B
Chicago 3, Cincinnati 2 Los Angeles 3, Colorado 1
San Francisco 4, Florida 3 Washington 4, Philadelphia 3
New York 5, Atlanta 4 San Diego at Arizona
Soccer/MLS
Chicago at Los Angeles


Florida's Tim Tebow by John Raoux. AP

Encore time?
Why 2008 in college football could be
just as good as last year, Pages 5-6B

Sisters could meet in U.S. Open quarters
Thursday's U.S. Open draw put the Williams sis-
ters on a course to meet in the quarterfinals, should
they advance that far. The sisters, both two-time
Open champs, played in
VensthWllams:re- Venus beating Se-
rena in straight sets. Al-
so, new No. 1 RafaelNa
dal lines up against
several players who
have been playing well



Dinara Safina in the quarterfinals.
ByTobyMe vIle. Reuvters four-time defending



m- The eco-friendly U.S. Open, 2B
Big Brown makes return to grass
Big Brown is going back to the grass in prep-
aration for the Oct. 25 Breeders' Cup Classic. The
Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner will run in
the Monmouth Stakes on Sept. 13, his first start on
grass since last year. Big Brown co-owner Michael
lavarone said the 11/s mile race will serve as the 3-
year-old colt's final tune-up before the Classic.
NBC increases swimming coverage
Riding the wave of Michael Phelps' record-set-
ting Olympic performance, NBC announced Thurs-
day more swimming broadcasts next year's
world championships in Rome and the U.S. national
championships in 2009 to 2011. Phelps won eight
gold medals in Beijing, helping NBC average 30 mil-
lion viewers during the first eight days of the Olym-
pics 13% more viewers than the 2004 Athens
Games. NBC has the rights to the 2012 London
Olympics, and Phelps has said he plans to compete.
Little League field down to four
Bryce Jordan homered and his brother, Beau, had
an RBI double to back up starter Kennon Fontenot's
11-strikeout night as Lake Charles, La., advanced to
the U.S. finals of the Little League World Series with
a 6-1 win Thursday over Tampa, Fla., in South Wil-
liamsport, Pa. The Saturday semifinals are now set:
Hawaii and Louisiana will square off in the U.S. final;
Tokyo and Mexico in the international final.
Compiled from staff and wire reports

Our views
> Olympics: Mike Lopresti on beach volleyball in
the rain, 8B; Christine Brennan on softball, 11B
O See the finalists and cast your vote for USA
TODAY's Minor League Player of the Year at
baseball.usatoday.com

USA TODAY Olympic Snapshots

Long distance gold
medal drought
The U.S. team of Ryan Hall,
Dathan Ritzenhein and
Brian Sell are expected to
be in medal contention
in the men's marathon
Sunday. The last American
man to win the marathon
gold medal was Frank
Shorter in 1972. The best
US. finishers since:
Frank Shorter 1976 2nd place
Meb Keflezighi 2004 2nd place
Don Kardong 1976 4th place
Source: New York Road Runners/Marry Post
By Matt Young and Robert W. Ahrens, USA TODAY


vvww^^K-AAusatoda* y CI*c* omC* ii^^^^


IGeUs9m5i208:


t ling legacy: Free agency and prosperity market m .P s ;haw's reign as NFL Players Association chief.



Players lose leader;



football loses legend


Gene Upshaw, dead at 63,
leaves major mark on sport
By Larry Weisman
USA TODAY
He led.
He led running backs on power sweeps; he led
players through two strikes, through protracted law-
suits and into prosperity unimaginable a generation
ago.
Cover Now the link between the ages, be-
Vtween a time when players had few
story rights and an era when the NFL's
--- wealth flows freely to its blockers and
tacklers, is gone.
Gene Upshaw, the executive director of the NFL
Players Association since 1983, died Wednesday night
at his vacation home in Lake Tahoe, Calif. He was 63
and had been diagnosed Sunday with pancreatic can-
cer. Funeral arrangements are pending.
Before he became the first African American to
head a major sports union, Upshaw played 15 years
for the Oakland Raiders. The six-time Pro Bowl pick


and on e-time AFL all-star at left guard was voted into
the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1987, but his legacy
stems i more from the boardroom than the field.
"He I brought free agency to the players and changed
the eni tire structure of the NFL," said Tom Condon, a
former player and union
president who was Up- "Gene was a true
shaw's friend of 30 years pioneer as one of
as weli lI as his agent. "He the few
was as important and the few
power] Ful as the commis- African-American
sioner." leaders of a major
Conc on nominated Up- union. He was the
shaw fi or executive direc- equal ofowners in
tor in 1983, and Upshaw equ owners in
was un animously elected, negotiations and
His ten ure would include made the league a
a .15-di iy strike by players better place."
in 198.7, a series of law-
suits aimed at achieving Former Oakland
free ag( ncy and the even- Raiders player and
tual achievement of that coach Art Shell
aim with a negotiated
settle tent of a high-profile case in 1993.
See COVER STORY next page '


At nfl.usatoday.com:
I View a photo gallery of Gene Upshaw's career
> Read Jarrett Bell's analysis of where the NFL Ph lyers Association will turn for its successor
> Visit The Huddle blog to see what analysts acro ss the nation are saying


Mahan's 62 lowers bar in The Barclays


By Steve DiMeglio
USA TODAY
PARAMUS, N.J. Ignited by an ea-
gle-2 on his first hole, Hunter Mahan
fired a course record 9-under-par 62
Thursday to grab the lead after the
opening round of The Barclays.
He wasn't the only one putting up
red numbers.
On a windless, sun-kissed day at
Ridgewood Country Club, 43 players
broke par and another 20 matched it on
the renowned golf-course architect
A.W. Tillinghast's tough 7,319-yard,
par-71 track in the first of four $7 mil-
lion FedExCup playoff events.
Paul Casey shot 66 and trails by
four shots. Five players shot 67, six shot
68 and 11 shot 69.
"I1 thought the scores weren't going
to be as low as they were," Phil Mick-
elson said after his 70. "I1 obviously need
to make up some ground (today)."
No one had a better day than Mahan,
who also shot 62 in the first round of
his only PGA Tour victory in the 2007


"When he gets hot, he does do some
crazy stuff," said Matthew Goggin,
who, despite a 67, trails by five shots.
Mahan said there was nothing crazy
about his round except, perhaps, for
'i '_ the big-breaking, 40-foot bomb he
# made for birdie on the 14th hole.
"I was surprised to shoot so low,"
said Mahan, who needed just 23 putts
with his new Ping D66 putter. "I didn't
have any idea what was going to be a
good score out there. But there are a lot
of good players here, and you can
S/ to hit good shots."
,'. A repeat of the par-busting first
round, however, could be a stretch this
Fiy Mei Ev.ns. Al' weekend. Many players struggled with
On a roll: Hunter Mahan sal nk eight the rough rimming the fairways and
birdies in Thursday's first ro und. greens Kenny Perry called the rough
terrible and the smallish, titled
Travelers. Championship p. Mahan greens should firm up with no rain in
knocked his second shot of i the day into the forecast.
the hole from 98 yards with a 54- "It's going to be a lot tougher" to go
degree sand wedge for a 2 1on the 380- low, Mahan said. "The greens are going
yard first hole, then added eight birdies to dry out. The rough is growing. It's
and a lone bogey. going to get a little harder, a little faster."


In AL,

playoff



sneak


peelk?

Rays in Chicago;
Twins visit L.A.

By Bob Nightengale
USA TODAY
They were mostly ignored be-
fore the baseball season began.
They've been told all summer
that it couldn't possibly last.
Now with the dog days of Au-
gust turning into the pennant
stretch, the American League's
three most improved teams -
the Tampa Bay Rays, Minnesota
Twins and Chicago White Sox -
are playing in weekend series
that could be a playoff prelude.
The Rays (77-49), who have al-
ready seven more wins than in
any other season in franchise his-
tory, are in Chicago for a three-
game series against the White
Sox who have already eclipsed
last year's victory total.
The Twins (72-54), whose 40-
19 record since June 13 is the
best in baseball over that span,
are in Los Angeles against the An-
gels, the only team among the
quartet that had been expected
to be in first place.
"We Ipve proving everyone
wrong," Twins All-Star first base-
man Justin. Mornew.,--says. "It
gives -you that -extra' edge. It
seems like wedo that every year,
so let's do it again."
If these four teams are going to
have first-round rematches in
October, the Twins and Rays will
have to win on the road. The Rays
have baseball's best home record
(47-18) and the Twins have the
fourth-best mark (46-23), but
they are about to be severely
tested. The Twins are on their
longest trip in 39 years, playing
14 games in 15 days.
"This trip will make us or break
us," says Twins pitcher Boof Bon-
ser, a reliever on a staff that has a
5.43 ERA on the road compared
to 3.28 at home.
No team is a bigger surprise
than the Rays the first since
1890 to have baseball's best rec-
ord this late in a season after pre-
viously having the worst mark.
The Rays are in a stretch of
playing a contender in 28 of 31
games. They are batting .248
with a 4.38 ERA on the road com-
pared to a .270 batting average
and 3.07 ERA at Tropicana Field.
"Everything becomes more
magnified, and that's a good
thing," Rays manager Joe Mad-
don told reporters Wednesday
night. "Pressure's great."
The White Sox (73-53), whose
.135 winning percentage im-
provement is second only to
Tampa Bay's .204, have won five
consecutive games and 12 of
their last 16. Yet they lost three of
four games to the Rays at Tampa
Bay this season, scoring nine runs
in the series.
Based on Thursday's standings,
the White Sox and Rays would
match up in a division series.
"I felt strongly about our
chances to compete for the divi-
sion championship all along,"
White Sox GM Kenny Williams
said. "I really thought we'd be in
better position than we are, but
I'll take it. If we take care of our
own business, we won't have to
worry about anyone else."


Earn it Carlos Pena and the
Rays face a difficult stretch run.


Taekwondo

first family

,, Mark Lopez
won silver
Be wd and Diana
Beijing Lopez bronze
in taekwondo. To-
day, Steven Lopez
aims for his third
gold; olympics
.usatoday.com


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2B FRIDAY, AUGUST 22,2008 USA TODAY



'I don't think the players of today realize how much he's done'


Continued from 1B

In 1982, when players struck
for 57 days and shut down the
NFL for eight weeks, the average
player salary was about $90,000.
Last year: $1.75 million, with im-
provements in pension, benefits
and health care.
"From where the union started
to where it is today is leaps and
bounds," said Philadelphia Eagles
safety Brian Dawkins, who is on
the union's executive committee.

Cover story

Cincinnati Bengals wide re-
ceiver T.J. Houshmandzadeh, a
player rep, agreed.
"I don't think the players of to-
day realize how much he's done,"
he said. "Gene blazed the trail. He
stood his ground for the players
whether it was popular by public
opinion or not."
Upshaw wanted to continue to
lead, but events conspired against
him. On one front was a group of
reps that wanted to begin the
process of finding a successor, as
the NFLPA's retirement age is 65.
On the other was the recent
move by NFL owners to termi-
nate the current labor agree-
ment. If not extended, it ends in
2011 and the salary cap disap-
pears after the 2009 season.
Upshaw adamantly main-
tained he would stay on until a
new deal could be reached. The
NFLPA executive committee
Thursday appointed longtime in-
house counsel Richard Berthel-
sen as interim executive director
but might turn to a search firm to
compile a list of candidates. The
uncertainty threatens a key Up-
shaw principle unity.
"Whatever you do, stay to-
gether. That was Gene's mantra,"
said Greg Coleman, a punter for
12 years in the NFL and the Min-
nesota Vikings player rep in the
early 1980s, when Upshaw held
that same post with the Raiders.
Coleman first got to know Up-
shaw when his Florida A&M
roommate, offensive lineman
Henry Lawrence, was about to be
selected by the Raiders in the
first round of the 1974 draft.
Phone calls came constantly from
Upshaw, coach John Madden and
offensive tackle Art Shell. Cole-
man and Upshaw, it turned out,
were fraternity brothers (Alpha
Phi Alpha).
Coleman said Upshaw embod-
ied the dream for black players at
a time when the NFL had few Af-
rican Americans as head coaches
'or in positions of authority.
"There was a quiet pride we all
felt when Gene accomplished
what he did, because it set a tone
you can do whatever you want
to do with hard work," he said.

Hard-fought battles

Upshaw led the players as their
union president through the
1982 work stoppage, through a
failed strike in 1987 and through
a series of maneuvers that ac-
complished in court what could
not be gained on the picket line.
In 1993, a settlement of the
case known as Reggie White v.
NFL yielded the current system of
free agency, allowing player
movement and the teams to im-
pose a salary cap to restrain their
spending. 'The salary cap was


3, DO.,f L'..e .i rI...3-A
Appearance before Congress: NFL Players Association exec utive director Gene Upshaw testifies
Feb. 27 at a congressional hearing in Washington on drugs in sports.


Sept. 10, 1967. A first- [.
round pick of the Oak-
land Raiders in the 1967
draft, Upshaw makes his
first AFL start in a 51-0
win vs. the Denver Bron-
cos.
Dec. 31,1967. The Raid-
ers win the AFL title,
beating the Houston Oil-
ers 40-7.
Jan. 14,1968: The Raid-
ers lose Super Bowl II to
the Green Bay Packers
33-14.
Jan. 9,1977' Upshaw
helps the running game
gain 266 yards as the
Raiders get their first Su- L
per Bowl win, beating
the Minnesota Vikings Teal
32-14. agaii
Jan. 25,1981: The Raid-
ers top the Philadelphia Eagles
27-10 in Super Bowl XV, Up-
shaw's final .postseason game.
Dec. 21,1981: Upshaw plays in
his last NFL game, a 23-10 loss
to the San Diego Chargers.
June 1983: Upshaw is elected
executive director of the NFLPA.
Aug. 8,1987. Upshaw is en-
shrined in the Pro Football Hall
of Fame, the first player to be
inducted who played his career
exclusively as a guard.


$34.6 million in 1994, the first
year it was instituted, and has in-
creased to $116 million.
"His biggest asset was his un-
derstanding of the business of the
game, and you always knew that
his concern for the game's best
interests guided his actions,"
Pittsburgh Steelers owner Dan
Rooney said in a statement.


FilephotobyAndy Hayt,Gettylr
m leader: Upshaw plays f(jr the Rai
nst the Chargers in 1980.

Sept. 27-Oct.19,1987. One
week's worth of games are can-
celed and replacement: players
fill NFL rosters for three weeks
during a strike as play ers fight
for the right to free age ncy.
Dec. 5,1989: In their ongoing
battle for free agency, the play-
ers decertify their union after
the Eighth Circuit Court of Ap-
peals rules that, as long as a
union represented players, they
had no rights under antitrust


Supporters and detra ctors

If the owners think I ie got too
much in the last deal, others said
he accepted too little anid was too
close to management a nd former
commissioner Paul Tagi iabue.
"It has been because of Gene
Upshaw that there have been so
many benefits accruing to the


laws to sue owners. The
W, NFLPA is reformed as a
professional association
and brings a new anti-
trust action against the
owners months later to
obtain free agency.
Aug.20,1993: U.S. Dis-
trict Judge David Doty is-
sues his final approval for
a labor settlement after a
protracted battle be-
tween owners and play-
4 ers. The players gain free
agency while agreeing to
a salary cap.
Oct. 6,2004: The Man-
heim Touchdown Clu
announces the establish-
mages ment of the Gene Upshaw
ders Division II Lineman of the
Year Award.
March 8,2006: Upshaw
helps avert another labor war,
brokering a collective bargain-
ing agreement. Owners commit
nearly 60% of revenue toward
player salaries.
May 20,2008: Citing imbal-
ance in revenue distribution,
NFL owners opt out of the cur-
rent CBA, which could lead to
an uncapped season in 2010
and possible lockout in 2011.

By Nate Davis


players that they might not have
gotten with a more adversarial
relationship," said Matthew Mit-
ten, director of the National
Sports Law Institute at Marqu te
University.
Not everyone felt the love. Re-
tired players began to demand
increases in pension benefits and
a relaxation of the rules govern-


Tennis



U.S. Open touting environmental awareness


Grand Slam is taking
a green approach

By Reid Cherner
USA TODAY

It's hard being green.
But the U.S. Tennis Association,
along with some environmental
heavy hitters, is going to try to
make that easier.
Today, the USTA is announcing
its environmental awareness
plan for the U.S. Open.
During the two weeks of play,
which begins Monday, it is esti-
mated 700,000 fans will come
to the USTA's Billie Jean King Na-
tional Tennis Center in Flushing,
N.Y. The carbon footprint they
leave behind will be huge but
hopefully smaller than in past
years.
The USTA along with the Natu-
ral Resources Defense Council
and Environmental Resources
Management will begin a pro-
gram that USTA President and
chairman Jane Brown Grimes
hopes will one day lead to "100%
recycling when the science and
equipment are available."
The plan is to introduce pro-
grams ranging from recycling to
transportation to merchandise
that allows for less energy waste
to more education.
"The most important thing is
not to try to reinvent the wheel,"


By Robert Deutsch. USA TODAY
New approach: Four-time defending champ Roger Federer will be playing in a U.S. Open that plans to re-
cycle 500,000 plastic bottles and 20,000 cans, along with using more hybrid vehicles and recycled paper.


said King, who along with Venus
Williams and the championship
doubles team of Bob and Mike
Bryan will do public service an-
nouncements. "You start with
the things you can do quickly."
The plan is to recycle 500,000
plastic bottles and 20,000 cans,
along with using more hybrid ve-
hicles and recycled paper.
In addition, King, who
launched GreenSlam in 2007,
and model Heidi Klum will
offer personally designed T-shirts
and hats.
A portion of the proceeds of
those items will go to help main-


tain Flushing Meadowvs Corona
Park, home of the Opent.
"By using clean non-fossil fuel
energy to power th is event,
switching to recycled paper
products, promoting I:Ihe use of
public transportation and assur-
ing the recycling of jits plastic
debris, the USTA is making an im-
portant statement that we all
need to lighten our i impact on
the planet," said Allen Hershko-
witz, senior scientist, NRDC in a
statement.
Grimes explains that the USTA
did not decide on the spur of the
moment to become gre ener.


What fans will see during tne
two weeks of the Open is a result
of two years of study.
"We have come up with a plan
that is very well thought out and
will have an impact long term,"
she said. "I think we will be a
leader in sporting events not only
by what we do and not only in re-
cycling but by using our tremen-
dous influence on our fans and
vendors to educate them. I think
the first step is awareness."
The tournament will end
Sept. 7.
The 2007 winners were Justin
Henin and Roger Federer.


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Gene Upshaw file
Name: Eugene Thurman Up-
shaw Jr.
Born: Aug. 15,1945, in Robs-
town, Texas
Died: Wednesday in Lake Tahoe,
Calif.
Family: Wife, Terri; three sons,
Eugene Jr., Justin and Daniel. His
brother Marvin was an NFL de-
fensive lineman from 1968 to
1976. His cousin Willie Upshaw
was a first baseman for the To-
ronto Blue Jays.
College: Texas A&I (now Texas
A&M-Kingsville)
NFL career: Guard, Oakland
Raiders, 1967-81
NFL honors: Hall of Famer, six-
time Pro Bowler and one-time
AFL all-star; member of NFL's
All-Decade Team for the 1970s
and its 75th Anniversary All-
Time Team (selected in 1994)
Notable: Upshaw, the Raiders'
offensive captain for nine sea-
sons, started the first 207 games
of his career and didn't come out
of the lineup until an injury tem-
porarily sidelined him during his
final season in 1981. He missed
one game in 15 seasons. He
played the majority of his career
next to Hall of Fame left tackle
Art Shell, forming arguably the
most formidable offensive line
combination in NFL history. Up-
shaw played on three Super
Bowl teams with the Raiders, in-
cluding the Super Bowl XI
(1976) and Super Bowl XV
(1980) championship clubs; he
was the first player to participate
in Super Bowls in three decades.
Upshaw is the only player to
start on teams that won champi-
onships in the AFL (1967) and
NFL. Only Jerry Rice (29)
amassed more playoff starts than
Upshaw's 24,
Post-NFL career: The NFL Play-
ers Association president as a
player, Upshaw was elected the
organization's executive director
in 1983, a post he retained until
his death. Under his watch, the
players earned the right to free
agency and made enormous fi-
nancial gains; the players will be
paid $4.5 billion this year, ac-
cording to owners. He also
helped negotiate the salary cap.
In addition, Upshaw oversaw a
15-day strike in 1987 and drew
criticism from former players for
not doing more to address their
health concerns and pension
plans.
By Nate Davis

ing disability claims. The argu-
ments and criticisms of Upshaw
and the union grew pointed. At
one point Upshaw said of former
Buffalo Bills guard Joe DeLamiel-
leure, another Hall of Famer, "I'd
like to break his neck."
"He did a wonderful job for the
current guys but not for the guys
who built this league. .... I don't
think he really had a feel for what
was going on" with crippled or
destitute retirees, DeLamielleure
said.
Yet Upshaw expressed con-
stant interest in players with
troubled lives.
"With the two guys we had in-
volved in different issues off the
field, Odell Thurman and Chris
Henry, Gene was always very
concerned about them and what
he could do personally to help
them," Bengals coach Marvin


Reaction
0 "Gene Upshaw did every-
thing with great dignity, pride
and conviction. He was the rare
individual who earned his place
in the Pro Football Hall of Fame
both for his accomplishments on
the field and for his leadership of
the players off the field. He fought
hard for the players and always
kept his focus on what was best
for the game. It is a sad day for
the NFL, but Gene's positive im-
pact and legacy will live on." -
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell
> "Gene Upshaw's career suc-
cesses as a professional football
player and a union leader are un-
paralleled. He is as prominent a
sportsman as the world has
known." Oakland Raiders own-
er Al Davis
> "All of the young men who
play in the NFL today owe a great
debt to Gene, and all of us who
enjoy the success of the NFL will
be forever indebted to Gene." -
Dallas Cowboys owner jerry Jones
> "People can say what they
want to say. ... But Gene always
told you the truth. Gene got the
job done." NFLPA President
Kevin Mawae
> "Whether it be raising the
minimums for rookies, whether
it be for veterans, whether it be
for retired players, you name it
... he's done nothing but im-
prove the game." Indianapolis
Colts center Jeff Saturday
> "It's not polite to speak ill of
the dead, and I hope his soul is at
peace. But he was a mean-spir-
ited man who disregarded the
plight of many of his former col-
leagues who sought improved
... pension and medical bene-
fits." Attorney James Acho, who
represented former players in
grievances against the NFLPA
> "You hear all the older play-
ers who complain that we should
have better this or better that.
They wouldn't have what they
have today if not for Upshaw." -
Former teammate Willie Brown
> "He was a confidant and
friend long before we became
colleagues in the labor move-
ment. ... The NFL, its players,
fans and the entire sports indus-
try have lost an icon whose im-
pact was truly unique." NBA
players union chief Billy Hunter
> "We talked often about
common issues, and I will miss
those conversations." MLB
players union head Donald Fehr
> "All who played the game
know of ... his passion for the
future of youth football. ... (He)
recognized football's unique abil-
ity to teach our youngsters val-
ues." Jack Kemp, USA Football
chairman

Lewis said.
Upshaw had repeatedly insist-
ed he planned to see the labor
situation through and gave no
hint of being ill.
Then the phone started ringing
early Thursday morning, and
Condon got the news from Up-
shaw's wife, Terri.
"It's shocking," Condon said.
"God only knows what Gene
knew and when he knew it, be-
cause he never told anyone any-
thing. He was a heroic kind of
character, outsized. You felt privi-
leged to be his friend."

Contributing: Jim Corbett in
Cincinnati


l 7, i













USA TODAY FRIDAY AUGUST 22, 2008 3B


Major League Baseball


American
League
Last vs.
East W L Pct. GB Strk 10 Div. Home Away
Tampa Bay 77 49 .611 L-1 7-3 28-19 47-18 30-31
Boston 73 54 .575 4/ L-1 6-4 23-24 43-18 30-36
New York 67 60 .528 10 L-1 4-6 24-24 38-27 29-33
Toronto 66 61 .520 11 W-1 7-3 23-21 36-27 30-34
Baltimore 61 65 .484 16 W-1 5-5 20-30 32-26 29-39
Last vs.
Central W L Pct. GB Strk 10 Div. Home Away
Chicago 73 53 .579 W-5 8-2 36-21 45-19 28-34
Minnesota 72 54 .571 1 W-2 7-3 36-21 46-23 26-31
Detroit 62 65 .488 11/ L-1 4-6 21-30 33-28 29-37
Cleveland 59 67 .468 14 W-4 7-3 20-30 36-29 23-38
Kansas City 55 72 .433 18 L-5 2-8 18-29 28-34 27-38
Last vs.
West W L Pct. GB Strk 10 Div. Home Away
LosAngeles 77 48 .616 W-1 5-5 20-13 37-23 40-25
Texas 63 65 .492 15 W-1 3-7 20-15 33-30 30-35
Oakland 57 69 .452 20 L-2 3-7 14-20 34-33 23-36
Seattle 46 80 .365 31V L-6 1-9 14-20 24-38 22-42


Thursday's results

Cleveland 10, Kansas City 3 Toronto 14, New York 3
Minnesota at Los Angeles Oakland at Seattle

Today's probable pitchers, lines
Career
vs.
2008season opp. 2007-08 vs. opp. Last 3 starts
Pitchers W-L IP ERA W-L W-L IP ERA W-L IP ERA
New Yorkat Baltimore, 705ET (Line:; Total runs:)
N.Y.-Mussina(R) 16-7 153Vl 3.35 10-8 1-3 21 7.89 2-0 20 2.70
BaI.-LizeR) 4-3 47 7.47 0-0 0-0 42 2.0R 1-2 13- 11.20
Boston at Toronto, 7:07 ET (Line; Total runs:)
Bos.-Byrd(R) 7-11 138i 4.55 4-4 1-2 24 2.55 2-1 23- 2.70
Tor.-Marcumn (R) 8-5 1311 3.36 4-1 3-1 27 3.67 3-0 18 200
Cleveland at Texas, 8-05 ET(Line: ;Total runs:)
Cle.-Carnona (R) 5-5 84 4.71 1-3 1-2 17 4.24 0-2 17 6.75
Tex.-l.arrison(L) 5-2 43% 5.77 3-0 1 3.72
Detroit at Kansas City, 8:10 ET (Line:; Total runs:)
Dct.-Veilander(R) 9-13 G16415 4.60 6-1 3-1 421 3.59 1-2 18 5.50
K.C.-Ba.nnister(R) 7-12 140 5.96 3-1 3-1 24; 1.82 0-3 12 12.75
Tampa Bay at Chicago, 8:11 ET (Line:; Total runs:)
T.B.-lackson(R) 9-8 143 3.97 0-2 0-2 16i 7.71 2-I 18% 2.41
Chi.-Danks(L) 10-5 150 3.11 3-0 3-0 18 2.50 2-1 19\ 1.83
Minnesota at Los Angeles, 10:05 ET (Line:; Total runs:)
Min.-Perkins(L) 10-3 116; 4.17 2-0 201 3.98
LA-SaunderslL) 14-5 157, 3.14 2-0 2-0 15 1.20 0-0 18 3.50
Oakland at Seattle, 10.10 ET (Line:; Total runs:)
Oak.-G.Gonzalez(.) 1-2 14 7.53 1-2 14i 7.53
Sea.-Feierabend 1L 0-1 3 18.00 0-0 0-0 9V 2.89 0-1 3 18.00
Lines by Danny Sheridan


Results, upcoming games
Wednesday Saturday
Min. 3, Oak. 1 Bos. at Tor., 1:07
Chi. 15, Sea. 3 T.B.at Chi., 3:55
Bal. 11, Bos. 6 N.Y. at Bal., 7:05
Cle. 8,K.C.5 Det. at K.C., 7:10
N.Y. 5,Tor.1 Cle.atTex., 8:05
L.A. 5. T.B. 4 Min. at L.A., 9:05
Tex. 9, Det. 1 Oak. at Sea., 10:10


Sunday
Bos. at Tor., 1:07
N.Y. at Bal., 1:35
T.B. at Chi., 2:05
Det. at K.C., 2:10
Min. at L.A., 3:35
Oak. at Sea., 4:10
Cle. at Tex., 8:05


Baltimore: LHP Garrett Ol1-
son, whose 6.38 ERA was the
worst among the Orioles' start-
ing pitchers, was demoted to
Class AAA Norfolk (Va.). Olson
had been demoted to the bull-
pen earlier in the week. ... 3B
Melvin Mora has been the hot-
test hitter in the league in the
second half of the season, bat-
ting .408 with 10 home runs
and 47 RBI in the 31 games
since the All-Star break. He is
nine RBI away from tying his ca-
reer high of 104, set in 2004.
Boston: RHP Clay Buchholz
was demoted to Class AA Port-
land (Maine) in an attempt to
rebuild his confidence, mechan-
ics and fastball command. In his
last seven appearances, Buch-
holz was 0-6 with anh 8.27 ERA
and had allowed eight home
runs. "I've never been one to
say the pressure is too much for
me, but I've had a lot of weight
on my shoulders," Buchholz
said. "I've been trying to be per-
fect." ... SS Julio Lugo
(strained left thigh) appeared
ready to embark on a rehab as-
aignment until he had a setback
Wednesday. Those plans were
put on hold after he felt the
thigh muscle grab in the same
trouble spot.
Chicago: LF Carlos Quentin
has reached base 19 times in
the last six games 11 times
on hits, including three home
runs and two doubles.
Cleveland: SS Jhonny Per-
alta needs three more home
runs to tie Woodie Held's team
record for home runs in a career
by an Indians shortstop. Held hit
85 homers while playing short-
stop for the Indians from 1958
through 1964. ... The Indians
turned five double plays Thurs-
day, one shy of the club record.
They've had six on three occa-
sions, most recently July 10,
1988.
Detroit: DH Gary Sheffield
hopes to get to 500 career
home runs by the end of the
season. He's at 494. "Now I'm
starting to feel like myself every
day," Sheffield said. "I still have a
ways to go, but I'm going to get
there." ... RH closer Fernan-
do Rodney has settled in since
blowing his third save chance in
a row Aug. 3. Rodney has
thrown nine consecutive score-
less innings over six appear-
ances and has earned four saves
in the process. He has struck
out 13, walked one and given
up three hits. "With Fernando,"
manager Jim Leyland said, "it's
a matter of learning how to
handle the (closer) job mentally.
His equipment is good enough."
Kansas City: 3B Alex Gor-
don left the game in the fifth in-
ning because of tightness in his
upper right thigh. He is day-to-
day.
Los Angeles: RH closer
Francisco Rodriguez recorded
his 48th save of the season
Wednesday, breaking his club
record of 47, set in 2006. He re-
mains on track to break Bobby
Thigpen's single-season record
(57), but his pace has slowed in
August. The save Wednesday
was Rodriguez's fourth this
month after he recorded at least
0lin each of the fi st four
months of the season. ... OF
Reggie Willits (concussion) be-
gan a rehab assignment with
high-A Rancho Cucamonga
(Calif.) on Wednesday and went
1-for-3. He is eligible to come off
the disabled list Sunday.


Minnesota: The Twins got
two more bunt hits Wednesday
to increase their major league-
leading total to 57. Houston was
a distant second with 25. Twins
CF Carlos Gomez was leading
the majors with 27 bunt hits.
New Yorklc B Jason Giam-
bi struck out four times Tuesday
and had two hits in his last 19
at-bats, but he was in the lineup
against a left-hander Wednes-
day as part of manager Joe Gi-
rardi's attempt to use a more
consistent lineup. Girardi
caused a stir recently when he
sat hot-hitting Johnny Damon
against a left-hander and point-
ed to rookie Justin Christian's
strong numbers in a small sam-
F le as a factor. Giambi went 0-
or-3 on Wednesday but drove
in a run.
Oakland: RHP Justin Duch-
scherer (right hip inflamma-
tion) and RHP Sean Gallagher
(right arm fatigue) were placed
on the disabled list. Duchscher-
er is scheduled to get a corti-
sone shot today and is expected
to be able to throw again by
early September. ... OFCarlos
Gonzalez went into Thursday's
game against Seattle mired in a
0-for-20 slump. The rookie
struck out three times Tuesday
and struck out as a pinch-hitter
Wednesday.
Seattle: C Jeff Clement's dif-
ficult season offensively has
turned around this month. He
entered Thursday batting .358
for the month, third among ma-
jor league rookies in August.
Clement hit safely in 12 of the
first 18 games in August, raising
his season average to .224 after
he ended July with a .165 aver-
age. ... RHP Felix Hernandez,
who took a line drive off his left
foot in his start Tuesday, was
walking without noticeable
pain, and he is expected to be
able to make his start Sunday
against Oakland.
Tampa Bay: LF Carl Craw-
ford rejoined the Rays on
Wednesday for the first time
since last week's surgery on his
right hand and said he hopes to
return before the end of the
regular season. However, Eric
Hinske is hitting .413 over his
last nine games since becoming
Crawford's primary replace-
ment. ... Manager Joe Mad-
don said he hadn't heard yet
from Major League Baseball, but
he was expecting to get fined
for his on-field actions and post-
game comments after a contro-
versial call Tuesday. "When
you're right," he said, "some-
times it's difficult to fine some-
body."
Texas: I B Hank Blalock fin-
ished a three-game rehab as-
signment with Class AA Frisco
(Texas) on Wednesday, and gen-
eral manager Jon Daniels said
there were "no changes" to the
Rangers' plans for activating
him for today's game. Blalock
went 6-for-1 2 with Frisco, get-
ting two hits in all three games.
He had two doubles and a walk
and struck out once.
Toronto: Class AAA Indian-
apolis IF/OF Jose Bautista was
acquired from Pittsburgh for a
player to be named. Bautista,
27, spent all of 2007 and the
first four months of this season
as the Pirates' primary third
baseman, until 38 Andy La-
Roche was acquired from the
Dodgers in a trade.

From The Sports Xchange


Inside the AL


By Mark Duncan,.AP
Dugout Ieception: Shin-Soo Choo gets a high-five after belting a two-run homer in the
third during the Indians' 10-3 win, which completed a three-game sweep of the Royals.



Indians' Lee goes to 18-2


Sizemore drives
in seven runs

From wire reports

CLEVELAND An 18-2
record pitching for any team
is impressive.
Cliff Lee's season has
been remarkable because
he has been practically un-
beatable for a team that has
been less than mediocre.

Game of the day

The Cleveland Indians'
left-hander recorded his AL-
best 18th victory and won
his seventh consecutive de-
cision in a 10-3 win against
the Kansas City Royals on
Thursday.
Lee, the Cy Young award
front-runner, allowed three
runs two earned and
six hits in seven innings. He
struck out seven and in-
duced four double plays. Lee


leads the AL in wins, win-
ning percentage (.900) and
ERA (2.43) for a team that's
59-67 and, until recently,
was fighting to get out of
last in the Central Division.
"He's had a great year,"
said Indians center fielder
Grady Sizemore, who didn't
have a bad day himself with
a career-high seven RBI. "It's
not a surprise anymore
when he goes out there and
pitches like that."
Lee hasn't been basking
in his success.
"I'm focused on my next
start," he said. "It's against
Detroit (on Tuesday). That's
where my focus is."
While the Indians com-
pleted a 7-3 homestand, the
Royals head home after a
1-8 road trip.
"It wasn't a good day or
road trip," manager Trey
Hillman said after his team
made two errors, leading to
four unearned runs. "It's
frustrating, obviously."


Sizemore had a three-run
triple in the second, a run-
scoring single in the sixth
and a three-run homer in
the eighth. Shin-Soo Choo
hit a two-run homer in the
third and Jhonny Peralta hit
a solo homer in the seventh
for Cleveland, which swept
the three-game series.
Zack Greinke allowed five
runs in five innings. Despite
the errors by his defense,
the right-hander took the
blame for the loss.
"I usually do a good job of
getting out of those prob-
lems," he. said. "It's not like
those errors would have
ended the inning."
Lee didn't give his latest
Scouting a favorable review.
"I didn't feel like I had my
best stuff," he said. "I had to
battle. The double plays
were big. Give credit to the
offense. When you get five
runs in the first three in-
nings, it gives you some
cushion."


Thursday's games


BLUE JAYS 14,
Yankees 3


Roy Halladay beat the Yankees for the third consecutive time, Marco Scu-
taro hit a three-run homer as Toronto handed New York its worst loss of the
season. Halladay improved to 13-5 in 30 career games against the Yankees,
allowing three runs and five hits in seven innings. He walked two and
matched a season high with nine strikeouts. New York's previous worst loss
was a 12-2 home loss to Baltimore on May 20.


Minnesota Twins second baseman Alexi Casilla was activated from the disabled list for
vs. LOS ANGELES this game. Casilla, who was hitting.313 before his injury, hasn't played since
July 28 because of a thumb injury. The Angels hadn't faced the Twins since
the first series of the season, when they took three of four at the Metrodome
despite losing on opening day. Minnesota went 1-5 at Anaheim last year and
had dropped seven of its last eight overall against Los Angeles.


Oakland
vs. SEATTLE


Oakland hadn't won a series since taking three of four at home against Seat-
tle from July 7-10. The last time the Athletics lost 11 series in a row was 1960,
when they played in Kansas City. The Mariners had lost six in a row and were
coming off a 15-3 loss to the White Sox on Wednesday. The 15 runs were the
most allowed by Seattle since Kansas City scored 17 on July 3, 2007.


'HOME teams in caps



AL wild-card standings

W L Pct GB
Boston 73 54 .575 -
Minnesota 72 54 .571 'A
NewYork 67 60 .528 6
Toronto 66 61 .520 7

Indians 1 oyals 3
Kansas City...... 000 030000- 3
Cleveland ....... 032 001 13x 10
Kansas City ab r h bi bb so avg
Avlles2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .328
GermanIf 4 0 0 0 1.234
Dejesuscf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .294
Guillendlh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .251
Butler b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .261
Gordon 3b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .254
Smith ph-31 3 1 1 0 0 0 .211
Buckc 4 1 1 0 0 3 .222
Teahen rf 2 1 2 0 0 .247
Pena Jr.ss 3 0 1 1 0 1 164
Totals 31 3 8 3 2 8
w Batting 2B: Teahen (22). RBI: Tea-
hlien 2 (42): Pena Jr. (11). GIDP. German:
Butler 2: Pena Jr.. Team LOB: 4
P. Fielding-E: Btler(2): Pena Jr.(9).
Cleveland ab r h bi bb so avg
Slzemorecf 5 1 4 7 0 1 .272
Gutierrezrf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .231
Franciscodh 5 0 1 0 0 0 .284
Peraltass 5 2 1 1 0 2 .276
Choolf 4 1 1 2 1 0 .262
Garkolb 4 1 1 0 0 1 .255
Shoppachc 4 0 0 0 0 2.260
Carroll3b 2 3 1 0 2 0 .265
Cabrera2b 3 2 1 0 1 0 .226
Totals 36101010 5 6
P Batting 3B: Sizemore (5). HR: Size-
more (29); Peralta (21); Choo (6) RBI:
Sizemore 7 (79); Peralta (70); Choo 2
(34).TeamLOB: 7
4 Baserunning- SB: Sizemore (31).
P> Fielding E: Carroll (3); Lee (1). DR
5.
Pitching ip i r er bb so era
Kansas City
GreinkeL 9-9 5 6 5 1 4 3.86
Tejeda 1 I I 1 2 1 3.82
Peralta 1 I I 1 0 0 5.40
Newman 2 3 3 2 7.71
Cleveland
LeeW.I8-2 7 6 3 2 2 7 2.43
Betancoult I 2 0 0 5.57
Ponnclly I 0 0 0 0 1 1227
HBP Teahen (by Lee). Batters faced;
pitches-strikes: Greinke 24: 99-63: Te-
Jeda 6: 34-18: Peralta 4; 15-9; Newmani
7; 32-17; Lee 27; 102-70: Betancourt 4;
17- 1:;Donnelly3: 13-9.
b Umpires HP: Cooper; IB: rostel:
2B: Cousins; 3B: Hernandez.
> Game data -T: 3:02. Att:21.391


Blue Jays 14, Yankees 3
NewYork......... 000 000 300- 3
Toronto........ 115 330 0lx--14
NewYork ab rh bi bbso avg
Damoncf-lf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .313
jeterss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .297
Ransomss 0 0 00 0 01.000
Abeu rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .288
Gardnercf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .192
A. Rodriguez3b 2 1 0 0 1 1 .308
Betemit3b 1 00 0 0 0 .259
Giambi lb 3 0 2 0 0 1 .250
Molina lb 1 0 0 0 0 .226
Nady f-rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .315
Matsui dh 4 1 3 0 .317
Cano2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .261
i. Rodriguez c 3 0 10 0 1 .288
Totals 32 3 7 3 210
. Batting HR: Matstn (8). RBI: Ma-
ts ui 3(37). GIDP Abreu.Tea iLOB: 4
1 Baserunning-SB: Daron 2(23).
Fielding- E: Giambi (7).
Toronto ab r h bi bbso avg
Inglett2b 5 3 4 0 1 0 .308
Scutaro 3b 6 3 4 4 0 1 .268
RiosrIf 6 2 3 3 0 1 .289
V.Wellscf 4 1 0 0 1 0 .284
Lindll 5 3 3 1 0 1 .303
Overbayb 4 0 1 0 1 2 .267
Stairsdh 5 0 2 3 0 1 .248
Barajas 4 I 2 1 0 0 .255
McDonald ss 5 1 2 2 0 0 .222
Totals 44 1421 14 3 6
> Batting 2B: Inglett (10): Scutaro
(14); Rios (37): Stairs (11): Barajas (18).
HR: Scutaro (5). SF: Barajas. RBI: Scutaro
4 (47); Rios 3 (58): Lind (36); Stairs 3
(44): Barajas (41): McDonald 2 (16).
Team LOB: 10
> Baserunning-CS: Rios(8).
> Fielding-DP: 2.
Pitching ip r er bb so era
New York
Ponson L.7-4 2 8 7 7 1 0 4.67
Robertson 1l, 3 2 2 1 1 5.96
Traber 2'i 7 4 I I 2 7.02
Ramiciez 10 0 0 0 1 3.57
Briton 2 3 1 I 0 2 1.61
Toronto
ialladay 7 5 3 3 2 9 2.68
W. 15-9
Downs 1 I0 0 0 I 1.38
League 1I 0 00 0 2.08
Batters faced: pitches-strikes: Ponson
14-, 51-31, Roleilison 8. 31-19: rirber
15, 4-R-31. Ramiriez 1: 6-4: lHntlon 10
38-27: Hlalladay 27: 941-66; Downs 3:
13-10. League 4; 8-6.
> Umpires HP: Baiksdale: 1B: Ecd-
dings: 2B: Barrett: 3B: DeMuth.
Game data -T:2:57. Art: 37.037.


New youth

tournament
more inclusive

By Bob Nightengale
USA TODAY

The idea nagged at Chi-
cago White Sox vice chair-
man Eddie Einhorn for
years, and he finally decided
to do something about it.
Einhorn, believing base-
ball needed a youth cham-
pionship that wasn't limited
to the Little League World
Series, unveiled the inaugu-
ral National Youth Baseball
Championships on Thurs-
day in Memphis.
The four-day tournament
is the initial effort of the Ma-
jor Youth Baseball Alliance,
made up of eight youth
baseball organizations. It
will crown national champi-
ons in the 10- and 12-under
divisions.
"It's a start. There's never
been anything like it," Ein-
horn says.
"It's like what would hap-
pen if there was no Final
Four, the basketball season
ending with just conference
champions.
"The Little League World
Series represented just one
organization. Now, with
these leagues representing
8 million kids, we're estab-
lishing a true national
champion."


4 I














By Mic Smith., The (Charleston, S.C.) Post and Courier, via AP
Major start: Carl Pavano, show playing with Charleston
(S.C.) in July, will start for the Yankees on Saturday.

Pavano to start: Carl Pavano, written off by many New
York Yankees fans, will return and start for the team on Sat-
urday at the Baltimore Orioles.
The Yankees chose Pavano over fellow righty Phil
Hughes, who is working his way back from a fractured rib.
"We liked the way (Pavano) was throwing the ball, and
we felt that Hughes needed some more work," manager
Joe Girardi said.
Pavano, 32, signed a four-year, $39.95 million contract
with the Yankees before the 2005 season, but injuries to his
shoulder, back, buttocks, elbow and ribs have limited him
to 19 appearances for New York, and two since June 27,
2005. He is 5-6 for the Yankees.
"He's experienced," Girardi said. "He's pitched in big
games before; he's pitched in the playoffs. You're not talk-
ing about a kid coming up that is a rookie. ... We're ex-
pecting him to throw well and keep us in the game and give
us an opportunity. If he can go six innings, it would be
great."
Pavano received the news from Yankees general man-
ager Brian Cashman in a telephone call Thursday, accord-
ing to the pitcher's agent, Thomas O'Connell. Pavano, who
had been in Trenton, NJ., with the Yankees' Class AA team
on a rehabilitation assignment, will meet up with the Yan-
kees in Baltimore today.
"Obviously, he's very excited to be back in the big leagues
and to pitch for the club," O'Connell said. "His plan and his
focus was to make it back this year, and, obviously, he
worked extremely hard to put himself in this position."

Maier's beaning: Kansas City Royals outfielder Mitch
Maier's right eye was swollen shut and his nose still bleed-
ing Thursday, less than 24 hours after he was hit in the face
with a pitch. The Royals placed Maier on the 15-day dis-
abled list with multiple facial fractures.
Maier was holding an ice bag on his face and watching
television in the Royals' clubhouse before Thursday's game
against the Cleveland Indians. He had a large bandage near
his right cheekbone and his nose was stuffed with tissue.
"I don't have any pain," he said. "I still have a bloody
nose. I can see out of my eye if I open it, but it feels better
with it closed right now."
Maier said Cleveland left-hander Zach Jackson, who
threw the pitch, called him Wednesday night.
"He said he was sorry," Maier said. "I appreciated the call.
He wasn't trying to hit me."

Hall gets creamed: Chicago White Sox catcher Toby
Hall, who appeared to injure his shoulder while trying un-
successfully to hit teammate Jermaine Dye in the face
with a shaving-cream pie Monday, was notably absent
from the lineup in a day game after a night game Wednes-
day, but the White Sox continued to downplay the injury.
Hall, who had been wearing ice packs on his shoulder in
recent days, was expected to start Wednesday, but man-
ager Ozzie Guillen opted to go with AJ. Pierzynski.
"We will pick a time to rest (Pierzynski) later on," Guillen
said.


From wire reports, The Sports Xchange


'a


, ,'-4',''


y R onlal MilnIez.;Collvy Imsage
That takes the cake: Chicago's Toby Hall sat out a game
after appearing to get hurt in a shaving-cream pie prank.

AL leaders (through Wednesday)
Batting On-base + slugging ,liqI1- P.i,
Based on 3 Iplate appearances foreach Bradley, Tex... 1.033 ,
ga.ie a player's team ha s played A. Rdiigez, NY ..9861, A Rdilligez, NY -589
apaye AB R H Avg Quent1in,Chl ..983 Quentin,Chi ..585
MaueMin 110 398 78 12 324 Youkilis. Bos...-95 Youkilts. Bos...577
Youkilis, 8n1 117 442 79 142 321 Drew, Bos....... -930 Dye. Chl... .. ......570
Pedrola, Bos 124 524 95 167319 Raliez, Bo ....926 Hatiiltoi.Tex 553
KinserBTex 121 518 102 165 .319 DyeChii ....... ....922 HuI. Bait ..... 552
Bradley,Tex 100 331 68 105 .317 Walks On-base pct.
Ordonez, Det 111 428 55 134 .313 Cust, Oak ........... 86 BradleyTex.....444
Damon, NY 109 425 72 133 .313 Maikakis, Bait.....82 Maiuer. Min .......416
Suzuki.Sea 126 532 83 166.312 Upton.TB ...............82 Drew. Bos .......... 408
Polanco, Det 112 461 74 143 .310 Sizemore.Clev ..80 Markakis, Balt404
A.Rdrigez.NY 106 394 79 122 .310 Drew, Bos ..............78 Quentin.Chi ....398
Home runs Runs batted in P hin
Quentin.Chi........35 Hamlton.Tex ..115 Pitching
DyeChi .................29 MorneauMinn..98 Victories Strikeouts
Hatmilton.Tex ....29 Cabrera, Det .. 97 Lee, Clev .............17-2 BurnettTor .......178
A. Rdriguez, NY .28 Quentin. Chi .......97 Mussna, NY ...16-7 Santana., A .166
Sizemore, Clev .28 Mora, Balit ..............95 BurnettTo ..16-9 HalladayTor ....159
Huff. Balt ...............27 Youkilis.Bos ........88 Matszaka, Bos 15-2 Vazquez, Chi .159
Thome. Chi .........26 Huff. Balt ..............87 Saundeilrs. LA ...14-5 Beckett. Bos ....145
Cabrera. D t ........25 Ibaez. Sea ............87 Halladay, or ...14-9 Gremke. KC ........142
Pena.TB ...............25 Abreu.NY ..............81 Santana LA .....13-5 Hrnandez.Sca .140
Doubles Hits Floyd. Chl ..........13-6 innings
Roberts.Bal .......45 Pedrola, Bos.......167 Snansti e.TB ..13- alla ay.o ....191
K sler, Tex .......41 Suzuki,Sea..1.......66 Petlitte. NY ....13-9 Gu-l) e, Bal t ....177
Pedroia. s .....40 Kinsle Tex .... 165ERA Binell. ro .171 -
Ibane/. Sea ...........39 Ibanez. Sea ...... 151 I ee. lev ...... 2.3 Shields. s, .. ..71
Mai kakis., Ball ....39 HamillonTex .150 Dihscher Oak2.54 Lee, Clev ..... 170
Triples I|opez. Sea 1...... .118 Halladay, lohr -l4,1 Games
Crawlbrd, rB 10....... l RobelIs.Balt. .:.18 Danks, Clii .... 1 w I\ eight, le\ ...........60
Gianders. D 10 Youg. lex ..........148 Saudes, A.3 14 Qalitystarts
Roberts. Bal ........... 8 Stolen bases (Cllin.Balt ...3 15 ia Bal --1
Inglett, lor. ........ ....7 ihsb rury. Bos ........A1 Galarlaga. Deo .3.17 t Lee. i e B. ......... 1
3tied ..................... 6 Sutzuki. Sea. .... 381 le teiBos ........ 3.17 .e l .. I
Shleils, IlB .... .. 18
Runs Upton TB ........... 36 Saves Shutouts
Ilnsells ex ... 102 Roberts. Ba ....31 I .Rounigic.I A Sn.18 a
Pedl ia, l os 95 Rios, loi ... .. 30 Nathan. Minn ...... .1 Gar/l I ......... l ....2
QuClntllnCh .. 92 Si/emolel Cle .30 apelblon. Bos .... 3 alladav.
Maik akis. Ball ...89 Total bases 5olia KC ................ 33 L ,et. h 2
Robeits. Ballot ....88 Hamillon. lex .273 Shellinll. 31 ai t 1t C'. 2
Suzuki. Sea .........3 Ilsles ex .......268 Rivei a NY. .........i...28N S e sI .Ml ....
Crandcrison .Dcl 82 IlulTB'll .... Hl 266 Comp.gamies
Hamillon.ex ....81 Quen ,in.C i ....2161 I lallada ......... Holds
H ut1, Balt ........81 Dye. Ch ......... 258 tied ...... .... 3 eelei. . ...


American League notes


I












4B FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008 USA TODAY'


Major League Baseball


Inside the NL


Lowe cools off Rockies


National
League


By John Gress, Reuters
Successful surgery: Braves starter Tom Glavine is expect-
ed to begin a throwing program in January.

Glavine has surgery: Atlanta Braves pitcher Tom Gla-
vine had surgery on his left elbow and shoulder Thursday
and is expected be ready for spring training.
Glavine's partially torn tendon in his elbow was repaired
by James Andrews, who also cleaned up Glavine's shoul-
der. The Braves said the 42-year-old left-hander should be
able to start a throwing program by January.
"We were pleased by the report that there was not a sig-
nificant injury to the elbow or shoulder that would prevent
Tom from pitching in the future," Atlanta general manager
Frank Wren said in a statement.
Glavine isn't under contract for next season and only
wants to pitch for Atlanta, close to his family. He had said
he'd retire if he needed ligament replacement surgery.
Glavine gave up seven runs in four innings last Thursday
in an 11-7 loss to the Chicago Cubs, his first start since
spending two months on the disabled list. He is 2-4 with a
5.54 ERA in 13 starts this season and 305-203 in his career.

Church to return: Ryan Church could be back in the
New York Mets' outfield for the opener of a four-game se-
ries against the Houston Astros tonight.
Church has been sidelined by post-concussion syndrome
since he left a game on July 5 against the Philadelphia Phil-
lies due to dizziness, six days after he came off the DL. He
"missed most of June following a May 20 concussion, his
second in less than three months.
Church was scheduled to play another rehab game for
Binghamton (N.Y.) on Thursday night after going 0-for-4
and playing nine innings in right field for the Mets' Class AA
affiliate on Wednesday night.
"He's healthy, playing well, obviously getting the at-bats
that he needs," Mets manager Jerry Manuel said Thurs-
day. "And he hasn't had any setbacks. So, with all those
things being said, if he does have another good night he'll
be playing right field (Friday) night."
Second baseman Luis Castillo (strained left hip flexor)
also played for Binghamton on Wednesday night, and went
1-for-4 with an RBI. Manuel said Castillo will work out in
front of Mets coaches on Friday, and a decision on his status
will be made in the next day or two.
"I haven't seen him in a long time but basically baseball
shape, baseball ready," Manuel said when asked what he's
looking for with Castillo. "Just kind of talk to him and see
where he is also mentally."
The return of Church and Castillo would be a boost for NL
East-leading New York. Church is batting .307 with 10 hom-
ers and 36 RBI in 57 games this season.
Manuel said Church could get some extra days off to ease
him back, into the regular lineup.
"He was a very good player for us for a while, a very good
player probably our best player for a period of time,"
Manuel said. "I would like to see him get back to that level.
That would be a great, great addition to us."

Ramirez out: Florida Marlins shortstop Hanley Rami-
rez sat out Thursday with a bruised right thumb, and he
might not be available today.
"It hurts a lot, any movement I do," he said.
The thumb was struck by a ball when he was sliding
head-first on a steal of second base in the third inning
Wednesday. Ramirez stayed in the game but came out a
half-inning later. X-rays showed no break.


From wire reports, The Sports Xchange


"o., -' ""'"
By Ben Mai
Sore thumb: The Marlins' Hanley Ramirez injured his
thumb stealing second on this play.


rgot, AP


NL leaders (through Wednesday)
Batting On-base+ slugging Sluggingpet.
Basedon 3 plate appearances for each Pujols, St.L.....1.069 Pujols,StL ...........613
game a player's team has played C. JonesAtl.. ..1.035 Ludwick, StL :..609
cG 3AB 66R H11 AvX Holliday.Col. .1.028 Brkman, Hou ....597
C. Jones, At 100 356 66 129 .362 Brkmn, Hou...1.028 HollidayCol .....595
Pujols.StL 115 411 77 143 .348 Ludwick, St.L .-989 BraunMil ........589
Holliday.Col 111 430 90 148.344 Burrell,Phi ......939 C.Jones. Atl.......573
Berkman,Hou 125 444 97 146.329 Lee, Hou. ............937 Lee, Hou .........569,
Lee, Hou 115 436 61 137.314 Walks On-base pclt.
Theriot,Chi 117 460 66 144.313 Dunn,Cin-Ari....91 C.Jones, Atl........462
Schmaker,StL 121 436 73 135 .310 Burrell, Phil .........87 Pujols, StL ........ 456
Winn.SF 120 450 68 138 .307 Pujols. StL............82 Holliday,Col ..433
Ludwick.StL 119 422 84 129.306 Wright.NY .....77 Berkman.Hou.431
Hudson, Ari. 107 407 54 124 .305 Berkman. Hou .75 Hawpe,Col .....394
Home runs Runs batted in Pit g
Dunn,Cin-Ari....34 Howard, Phil ....104
Howard, Phil..33 Lee, Hou ...............100Victories Strikeouts
Braun, Mil..............31 Wright, NY ..........97 Webb, Arin.........18-4 Lincecum, SF.192
Ludwick.StL......31 Ludwick.StL...94 Volquez,Cin-..15-5 Billingsley.LA..168
Utley, Phil ...........30 A.Gonzalez,SD..92 Cook, Col ...........15-8 Haren.Ari.........160
Burrell, Phil ..29 Berkman. Hou ....89 Dempster, Chi 14-5 Cain, SF ...........157
Fielder,Mil...........28 Braun,Mil..............86 Haren.Ari.........14-6 Hamels,Phil......157
A.Gonzalez, SD .28 Reynolds,Ari.....85 Lincecum, SF..13-3 Volquez,Cin......150
Lee,Hou.................28 Ramirez,Chi.84 Lohse,StL ..........13-6 Dempster. Ch ..149
Ramirez, Fla..27 Hits ERA Innings
Doubles J.Reyes,NY.161 Lincecum.SF...2.60 Hamels, Phil..181z%
McLouth,Pitt..39 Holliday,Col......148 Volquez,Cin....2.73 Cook, Col.............177
Berkman, Hou..38 Berkman, Hou .146 SantanaNY .2.75 Santana, NY.177
YoungAri.............36 Lee. Chi ...............146 Peavy,SD...........2.84 W ebb, Ari. .........177
Hart,Mil................35 Ramirez,Fla......145 Webb,Ari..........2.85 Cain,SF..........176%
3 tied .....................34 Atkins,Col ..........144 Dempster, Chi2.92 Games
Triples TheriotChi.....144 Billingsley,.LA.3.10 oyer,Atl ............. 67
J .eyesNY 14 Pujols. SL ...........143 HarenAri.........3.12 Ohman Atl ........... 67
, Fis,.SF......o....10 Stolen bases Sheets. Mil .......3.16 Qualitystarts
Ltyw. Ari........... .. Taveras.Col 59 Hudson, A .....3.17 Haren,Ari......... 20
Rollins,Phil......8 J. Reyes, NY..........40Saves F 3 LiSncecumS.F....20
Rlens Pierre, LA...........38 Wilson, SF............. 33santana, NY .20
Berkman, Hou 97 Bourn. Hou.........33 Valverde,Hou .32 WebbAr ............20
Ramirez, Fla .96 Rollins, Phil...31 Lidge, Phil .... .31 Shutouts
Holliday.Col o90 Ramirez.Fla. 29 Gregg, Fla .............. 27
J.Reyes,NY ...........89 Total bases Wagner. NY .27 Hamels, Phil..........2
Beltran, NY............87 Braun, Mil ..........279 Hoffman, SD ......26 Kuroda, LA..............2
Sabathia, M .2
McLouth, Pitt.87 Berkman, Hou 265 Comp. games Sheets, Mil .. 2
Wright, NY ...........87 Utley, Phil ..........265 Sabathia, Mil ..5 Holds
Ludwick,. StL.84 Ramirez Fla ....260 Sheets, N ............... 4
Utley. Phil..............82 J. Reyes. NY .......259 Webb, An ...............-3 McClellan. St.L .29


By John Nadel
The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Derek
Lowe knew he faced a diffi-
cult assignment against the
Colorado Rockies. Not only
were the defending NL
champions on a roll, but
they match up well against
him.

Game of the day

So the 35-year-old right-
hander did his best to keep
the Rockies guessing.
Lowe cooled off Colorado
by allowing one run in 6V3
innings and James Loney
homered and drove in two
runs as the Los Angeles
Dodgers beat the Rockies
3-1 Thursday to salvage the
series finale.
Manny Ramirez contrib-
uted a stolen base, of all
things, as the Dodgers com-
pleted their 10-game
homestand with a 7-3 rec-
ord.


By Reed Saxon,AP
Big win: Derek Lowe helped
the Dodgers avoid a sweep.

"I think they have one of
the best offenses we face,
especially against me.
They're all low-ball hitters,"
Lowe said. "I threw a lot of
breaking balls and tried not
to be so predictable, throw-
ing sinker away, sinker away.
You have to command your
off-speed pitches against
this lineup. I was fortunate
to keep it to one run.


"Manny got a stolen base
to get us going. The bullpen
did a great job."
The loss ended a five-
game winning streak for the
Rockies. It also ended Colo-
rado's four-game winning
streak against the Dodgers.
The Rockies scored their
run in the first when Clint
Barmes singled, stole sec-
ond, took third on an infield
out and came home on Matt
Holliday's sacrifice fly.
The Dodgers tied it with
an unearned run against
Jorge De La Rosa in the
fourth when Ramirez
reached on an error by third
baseman Stewart, stole sec-
ond without a throw and
scored on Loney's single, the
first Los Angeles hit. The
stolen base was Ramirez's
first with the Dodgers and
second of the season.
"Juan Pierre told me to
go, so I went," Ramirez said
afterward with a smile.
Pierre, who has 38 stolen
bases, denied the claim.


Thursday's games

CUBS 3, Chicago's Carlos Zambrano earned his 13th victory on the fourth try and
Reds 2 also homered. Bothered by a sore tooth, he walked the leadoff batter Chris
Dickerson on four pitches but recovered. "I was talking to myself. I told my-
self, 'Is it that hard to throw strikes? Come on, let's go,' "Zambrano said.
GIANTS 4, San Francisco's Emmanuel Burriss scored the winning run on a wild pitch
Marlins 3 in the bottom of the ninth. Burriss drew a one-out walk off closer Kevin
Gregg, stole second and took third on a fly out. Pinch-hitter Bengie Molina
was intentionally walked, but Gregg's first pitch to Fred Lewis skipped past
catcher John Baker, allowing Burriss to score standing up.
Nationals 4, Austin Kearns hit a tiebreaking RBI single in the eighth inning and Washing-
PHILLIES 3 ton snapped a 12-game losing streak. Ryan Madson couldn't protect a one-
run lead after Carlos Ruiz put Philadelphia ahead with a solo homer in the
seventh.
METS 5, Carlos Delgado went 5-for-5, including the game-winning, walk-off single in
Braves 4 the bottom of the ninth that scored David Wright, who had doubled.
San Diego Diamondbacks pitcher Brandon Webb was looking for his career-best 19th
vs. ARIZONA win. He has won five in a row.
"HOME team in caps


NL wild-card standings
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 73 55 .570 -
St. Louis 71 58 .550 2V
Philadelphia 68 59 .535 4
LosAngeles 65 62 .512 7
Florida 65 63 .508 8

Cubs ? Reds 2
Cincinnati........... 000 001 010- 2
Chicago 111 000 00x -3
Cincinnati ab r h bi bb so avg
Dickersonlf 2 0 1 0 2 0 .344
Keppingerss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .262
Brucerf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .257
B.Phillips2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .267
Vottolb 4 1 3 1 0 1281
Encarnacion3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .247
Pattersoncf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .196
Bakoc 4 0 1 0 0 2 .213
Foggp 1 0 0 0 0 1 .105
Rosalesph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143
Massetp 0 0 0 0 0 0.000
Cabreraph 1 0 0 0 0 .327
Lincolnp 0 0 0 0 00.000
Valentinph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252
Totals 32 2 7 2 46

Votto (55). GIDP Keppinger. Team LOB
7
Baserunning SB: Votto (5). CS: B.
Phillips(8);Patterson(7).
R Fielding-DP:3.
Chicago ab rh bi bb so avg
Sorianolf 2 1 0 0 2 1 .288
Therlotss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .315
Leelb 3 0 0 0 0 1 .289
Ramirez3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .287
Edmondscf 3 0 0 0 0 2 232
DeRosa2b 3 1 1 10 1 281
Fukudomerf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .265
Blancoc 3 0 1 0 0 0 .293
Zambranop 2 1 1 1 0 0 .361
Marmolp 0 0 0 0 0 0.000
Fontenotph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286
Woodp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 27 3 6 226
SBatting 2B: Ramirez (3). HR De-
Rosa (15); Zambrano (4). RBI: DeRosa
(73); Zambrano(13).Gl Therlot: Lee;
Zambrano.Team LOB:2
Fielding E: Theriot (12). PB: Blan-
co.DP:2.
Pitching ip h rer bbso .er
Cincinnati
FoggL2-6 4 4 3 3 1 4 7.66
Masset 2 2 0 0 0 1 1.69
Lincoln 2 0 0 0 1 1 4.01
Chicago
Zambrano 7 6 1 1 4 4 3.29
W.13-5
Marmol H24 1 1 1 1 0 0 2.86
WoodS.26 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.61
WP: Fogg. Batters faced; pitches-strikes:
Fogg 16; 60-41; Masset 7; 19-14; Lin-
coln 6; 23-14; Zambrano 29; 105-59;
Marmol4; 14-8; Wood3; 18-12.
0 Umpires HP: Everitt; 1B: Tichenor;
2B: Vanover: 3B: McClelland.
> Game data -T1 2:14. Art 40,730.

Dodgers 3, Rockies 1
Colorado__-. 100 000 000-1
Los Angeles 000 110 10x -3
Colorado ab r h bi bb so avg
Barmesss 4 1 2 0 0 1 .286
Vizcainop 0 0 0 0 0 0.000
Grillip' 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Smithcf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .270
Taverasph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .260
Hollidaylf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .344
Hawperf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .294
Atkinslb 4 D 0 0 0 2 .293
Stewart3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .291
lannettac 4 0 1 0 0 1 .265
Baker2b 2 0 1 0 2 1 .263
DeLaRosap 2 0 0 0 0 1 .111
Melhuseph 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tulowitzkl ph- 2 0 0 0 0 2 .237
ss
Totals 33 1 6 1 212
> Batting 2B: Barmes (21); Holliday
(33); Stewart(13).SF:Holliday.RBI: Hol-
liday(74).Team LOB:8
b Baserunning-SB: Barmes (7).
R Fielding E: Atkins (11); Stewart
(7).DP:2.
Los Angeles ab r h bi bb so avg
Kempcf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .300
Ethierrf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .279
Garciaparra ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .259
Ozuna2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .188
Ramirezlf 2 1 1 0 1 0 .406
Martin c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .289
Loneylb 3 1 2 0 0 .292
Blake3b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .266
Berroa 2b-ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .206
Lowe p 2 0 0 0 1 .157
Kuop 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250
Broxton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 28 3 5 3 27
I Batting 2B: Kemp (33). HR: Loney
(10).RBI:Ethier(55):;Loney2(70).GIDP:
Martin; Blake. Team LOB: 3
0 Baserunning- SB: Ramirez (1).
I Fielding-E: Loney (11).
Pitching ip h r er bb so era
Colorado
De La RosaL.,6-7 6 4 2 1 2 3 5.86
Vizcaino 1 1 1 1 0 3 5.03
Grilli 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.50
Los Angeles
LoweW,10-10 6i 4 1 1 2 7 3.89
KuoH,10 1% 1 0 0 0 2 2.21
BroxtonS,10 1 1 0 0 0 3 3.62
WP: Broxton. Batters faced; pitches-
strikes: De La Rosa 23; 83-52: Vizcaino
4; 14-11; Grilli 3: 10-7; Lowe 26; 107-
64; Kuo6; 25-16:; Broxton 4; 16-12.
> Umpires HP: Crawford; 1B:
Nauert; 2B: Hoye; 3B: O'Nora.
> Game data -T. 2:36.Att: 44.885.


Nationals 4, Phillies 3
Washington- 000 001 120- 4
Philadelphia- 000 001 200- 3
Washington ab r h bi bbso avg
Hernandez2b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .556
Guzmanss 5 0 2 0 0 1 .296
Zimmerman3b 1 2 0 0 1 .268
Milledgecf 4 1 1 0 1 0 .261
Belllardlb 3 00 0 1 0 .268
,Floresc 4 0 1 1 00.267
Orrpr 00 0 0 0 .245
Hanrahan p 1 0 0 0 0 .000
Kearsrf 3 0 01 1 10.216
Harris If 3 0 1 0 1 2251
Reddingp 2 0 0 0 0 1 .179
Booneph 1 00 0 0 .243
Rlverap 0 0 0 0 0 0.000
Nievesph-c 1 0 0 1 266
Totals 37 410 3 4 6
> Batting S: Belliard. RBI: Hernan-
dez(1); Flores(54): Kears (31). Team
LOB: 11
w Fielding- E: Zlmmerman (6). DP: 1.
Philadelphia ab r h bi bb so avg
Rolllnsss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .261
Werthrf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .265
Utley 2b 3 0 2 1 1 0 .285
Howard lb 4 0 0 03 .229
Burrelllf 401 0 0 1 .263
Victorinocf 4 1 20 0 0290
Feliz3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .254
Dobbsph 1 0 01 0 0 .304
Bruntlett3b 1 0 0 0 01 .214
Rulzc 4 1 1 1 0 0 .220
Moyerp 2 0 0 0 0 1 .100
Durbinp 0 0 0 0 0 0.143
Jenkinsph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .244
Madsonp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Romeropp 000 0 00
Condreyp 0 0 0 0 0 0.000
Costeph 1 0 0 0 0 0.277
Totals 34 3 8 3 2 7
0 Batting 2B: Werth (10); Jenkins
(15). HR: Ruiz (3). RBI: Utley (84); Dobbs
(31); Ruiz (22). GIDP: Burrell. Team LOB:
> Baserunning -SB:Victorino(28).
7 Fielding E: Utley (11); Bruntlett

Pitching ip h rer bb so era
Washington
Redding 6 3 1 1 1 5 4.54
Rivera 1 3 2 2 0 0 3.60
W,4-5; B,5
HanrahanS.4 2 2 0 0 1 2 3.77
Philadelphia
Moyer 6% 5 2 1 3 4 3.54
Durbln 0 0 0 0 0 2.08
Madson s 4 2 2 0 0 3.38
L.,3-2; B,2
Romero 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.23
Condrey 1 1 0 0 1 0 3.54
IBB: Belliard (by Condrey). Batters
fated; pitches-strikes: Redding 22; 86-
56; Rivera 6; 19-14; Hanrahan 8; 41-24
Moyer 28; 106-65; Durbln 1; 2-2; Mad-
son 5; 11-7; Romero2; 10-7; Condrey 6;
24-13.
> Umpires HP: Hickox; 1B: Bucknor:
2B: West: 3B: Rapuano.
Gamedata-TP.2:57.Att:41,568.

Mets 5, Braves 4
Atlanta 100 003 000-4
New York... 101 010 101- 5
Atlanta ab r h bi bb so avg
Escobarss 4 2 3 1 0 0 .287
Kotsaycf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .293
C.Jones3b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .360
McCannc 4 1 3 2 0 0 .300
Infantelf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .303
Johnson2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .263
Francoeurrf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .228
Pradolb 4 0 1 0 2 .315
Hamptonp 3 0 0 0 0 2 .250
Bennettp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222
Ohmanp 0 00 00 0 -
Tavarezp 0 00 0 0 0 -
Blancoph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .257
Nunezp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 34 4 9 4 2 6
I Batting- 2B:Escobar(21);: McCann
(32). HR: Escobar (7). RBI: Escobar (50);
McCann 2 (72): Infante (29). GIDP: Kot-
say.Team LOB: 5
Baserunning-- CS: Johnson (4).
> Fielding- E: C.Jones (11); Prado (6).
New York ab r h hi bb so avg
J.Reyesss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .300
Evansif 5 1 1 0 0 1 .272
Wright3b 4 3 3 1 1 1 .295
Beltrancf 3 0 0 0 2 0 .271
Delgadolb 5 0 5 3 0 0 .262
Tatisrf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .297
Ayala p ,0 0 0 0 0 0.000
Easley2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .262
Castro c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .254
Martinezp 2 0 0 0 0 0.138
Felicianop 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chavezrf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .273
Totals 37 513 4 3 3
I Batting 2B: Evans (9); Wright 2
(36): Delgado (26). HRi Wright (25). S:
Martinez. RBI: Wright (98); Delgado 3
(84).Team LOB: 11
P Fielding- PB: Castro. DP 1.
Pitching Ip h rer bbso era
Atlanta
Hampton 6 8 3 3 1 2 6.47
Bennett H.7 1 1 1 0 1 1 4.32
OhmanBS.3 0 1 0 0 0 0 3.20
Tavarez 1B 1 0 0 0 0 4.01
Nunez L.-1 2 1 1 1 0 6.07
New York
Martinez 7 7 4 4 1 6 4.97
Fellciano 2 1 0 0 1 0 3.69
AyalaW,2-8 1A 1 0 0 0 0 5.58
IBB: Beltran (by Nunez). Batters faced;
pitches-strikes: Hampton 27; 100-64:
Bennett4; 14-6; Ohman ; 5-3: Tavarez
5; 25-15; Nunez 4: 20-9: Martinez 28;
101-65; Fellclano 3;9-4: Ayala 5: 13-10.
> Umpires HP: Runge; 1B: GIbson;
2B: Reliford;:3B: Catmpos.
Game data -T.2:58.Att: 51,952.


Replay certain

to mean delay

By Ronald Blum
The Associated Press

Those who think major
league games are too long
soon will have to endure re-
play delays.
Before the end of the reg-
ular season, MLB will start
allowing umpires to review
video to determine bound-
ary calls on home runs.
"Major League Baseball
and the (news) media, they
want instant replay, and
we're going to have instant
replay," World Umpires As-
sociation President John
Hirschbeck said. "So if it de-
lays the game, then there's
nothing we can do about it."
The average time of a
nn-ie-inning game in 2008 is
two hours, 50 minutes, says
the Elias Sports Bureau.
MLB officials hope replay
delays will be offset by a re-
duction in arguments over
disputed calls.
"Hopefully, they (let) the
pitchers have a few pitches
just to make sure they're
loose," the Chicago Cubs' Ja-
son Marquis said.

Giants 4, Marlins 3
Floridan 010 100 100-3
San Francisco- 000 210 001 -4
Florida ab r h bi bb so avg
Amezagass 5 0 1 0 0 0.254
Bakerc 4 0 1 0 0 0 .255
Cantu3b-lb 4 0 1 0 0 1 281
Jacobslb 2 1 0 0 1 0 234
Helmsph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250
Uggla2b 2 1 1 1 2 0 .262
Willingham If 3 0 2 1 1 0.262
Rosscf 3 1 1 0 1 2 .256
Hermidarf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .251
Johnsonp 2 0 1 0 0 0 .222
Gonzalezph 0 0 0 1 0 0 .262
Lindstromp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rhodesp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nelson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
LoDucaph 1 0 0 0 0 0.236
Greggp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 30 3 8 35 5
b Batting-2B:Willingham(16); Ross
(21). HR: Uggla (27). S: Hermida. SF:
Gonzalez. RBI: Uggla (71): Willinghamn
(35); Gonzalez (39). GIDP: Cantu; Her-
mida.Team LOB: 7
0 Baserunning-SB:Cantu (6).
> Fielding-DP: 2.
San Francisco ab r h bi bb so avg
Winnrf 5 1 2 0 0 0 .308
Ochoa ss 2 0 1 0 0 0 .253
Mollnaph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .282
Lewis If 4 0 1 0 0 3 .285
Rowandcf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .287
Sandovalc 4 1 1 0 0 1 .450
Ishikawalb 3 0 0 0 0 0 .261
Auriliaph-lb 1 0 1 0 0 0 .270
Velez2b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .222
Yabup 0 0 0 0 0 0.000
Taschnerp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Walkerp 0 00 0 0
Roberts ph 1 0 0 0 0 0.242
Wilsonp 0 00 0 0 0 -
Rohlinger3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .120
Palmerp 2 0 1 0 0 1 .333
Burriss2b 1 1 1 0 1 0 .261
Totals 34 412 3 2 6
> Batting 3B: Rohlinger (1). S:
Ochoa. RBI: Rowand (66); Velez (13);
Rohlinger (2). Team LOB: 8
> Baserunning SB: Velez (12): Bur-
riss (11). CS: Rohlinger (1).
> Fielding-DP:2.
Pitching ip h r er bb so era
Florida
Johnson 6 9 3 3 0 4 3.51
Lindstrom 1 1 0 0 0 0 3.27
Rhodes % 2 0 0 0 1 0.00
Nelson 0 0 0 0 0 1.89
GreggL,6-6 ? 0 1 1 2 1 2.81
San Francisco
Palmer 6 6 2 2 3 2 8.64
YabuH.7 1 1 1 I 0 0 3.76
TaschnerBS.4 1 1 0 0 0 0 3.95
Walker ; 0 0 0 2 2 4.73
Wilson W.2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 4.26
WP: Gregg. IBB: Molina (by Gregg).HBP:
Ochoa (by Johnson). Batters faced;
pitches-strikes: Johnson 26: 100-67;
Lindstiromn 3; 7-4; Rhodes 4: 17-13; Nel-
son 1: 5-2. Gregg 4: 23-9: Palmer 24:
100-57: Yabu 2: 3-2; Taschner 4 17-10;
Walker4:20-10; Wilson3; 16-12.
I, Umpires HP: Nelson, B: Johnson:
2B: Tiller; 3B: Joyce.
> Game data -T3:03.Att: 32,.515.


East
New York
Philadelphia
Florida
Atlanta
Washington

Central
Chicago
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Houston
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati

West
Arizona
Los Angeles
Colbrado
San Francisco


W L Pct.
71 57 .555
68 59 .535
65 63 .5Q8
56 72 .438
45 83 .352


W L Pct.
78 49 .614
73 55 .570
71 58 .550
64 63 .504
57 70 .449
56 72 .438


W L Pct.
66 60 .524
65 62 .512
59 70 .457
55 72 .433


Last
GB Strk 10
W-3 9-1
2V2 L-1. 4-6
6 L-2 3-7
15 L-5 1-9
26 W-1 1-9
--- Last
GB Strk 10
W-1 8-2
5V2 W-1 6-4
8 W-1 6-4
14 L-1 6-4
21 L-1 4-6
22/ L-1 4-6
Last
GB Strk 10
W-2 7-3
11/2 W-1 7-3
8V2 L-1 6-4
112 W-2 5-5


vs.
Div. Home Away
29-20 39-23 32-34
27-22 34-28 34-31
27-21 35-31 30-32
20-29 34-31 22-41
17-30 23-39 22-44
vs.
Div. Home Away
35-23 47-18 31-31
32-24 38-24 35-31
29-28 34-29 37-29
27-30 34-28 30-35
26-30 34-31 23-39
20-34 32-33 24-39
vs.
Div. Home Away
33-16 35-26 31-34
24-24 39-30 26-32
19-29 34-29 25-41
21-22 26-37 29-35


San Diego 48 78 .381 18 L-3 4-6 20-26 27-38 21-40


Thursday's results

Chicago 3, Cincinnati 2 Los Angeles 3, Colorado 1
San Francisco 4, Florida 3 Washington 4, Philadelphia 3
New York 5, Atlanta 4 San Diego at Arizona

Today's probable pitchers, lines


Career
vs.
2008 season opp. 2007-08 vs. opp. Last 3 starts
Pitchers W-L IP ERA W-L W-L IP ERA W-L IP ERA
Washington at Chicago, 2:20 ET (Line:; Total runs:)
Was.-Lannan(L) 6-12 141 3.81 1-0 1-0 7 0.00 0-1 17 5.29
Chi.-MarquisfR) 8-7 129 4.67 3-4 2-1 17% 4.58
Los Angeles at Philadelph:a, 7:05 ET (Line:; Total runs:)
LA.-Maddux(R) 6-9 153 3.99 29-19 1-2 201 3.10 2-1 19 1.89
Phi.-Kendrick(R) 10-7 134 5.01 1-2 1-2 15 9.39 1-2 13 9.00
Houston at New York, 7.10 ET (Line:; Total runs:)
Hou.-Oswalt(R) 11-8 149 4.28 5-4 1-1 20 4.95 3-0 22 1.64
N.Y.-Santana(L) 11-7 177 2.75 1-0 0-0 6 1.42 2-0 23 1.96
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 8:05 ET (Line: ; Total runs:)
Pit.-Duke(L) 4-11 145 5.26 3-3 0-2 111 10.32 0-2 19 5.21
Mil.-Bush(R) 7-9 139 4.26 1-4 1-2 30 4.80 2-0 201 1.77
Atlanta at St. Louis, 8:15 ET (Line:; Total runs:)
Atl.-Morton(R) 3-7 62 5.95 0-1 0-1 3M 19.64 1-2 15 4.11
StL-WainwrightlR 6-3 9:1 3.14 2-0 2-0 14 1.29 2-1 21 3.43
Cincinnati at Colorado, 9:05 ET (Line: ; Total runs-.)
Cin.-Harang(R) 3-13 1301 5.59 3-2 0-1 5 9.00 0-3 11% 16.97
Col.-Cook1R 15-8 177 3.86 2-0 2-0 131 4.05 1-2 161 7.16
Florida at Arizona, 9:40 ET (Line:; Total runs: )
Fla.-Sanchez(R) 2-2 23 3.S2 1-0 1-2 17A 3.63
Ari.-lohnson(L) 10-9 138M 4.16 8-1 1-2 206 3.10
San Diego at San Francisco, 10-15 ET (Line:; Total runs-.)
S.D.-Baek(R) 4-7 76V 4.83 1-0 1-0 1 0.00 1-2 18V 3.93
S.F.-Lincecum(R) 13-3 1699 2.60 1-1 1-1 39 1.36 2-0 20 1.80
Lines by Danny Sheridan


Results, upcoming games
Wednesday Saturday
Mil. 5, Hou. 2 Was. at Chi., 1:05
Phi. 4, Was. 0 Atl.at St.L.,3:55
N.Y.6,Atl.3 L.A. at Phi., 3:55
Cin. 2, Chi. 1 S.D. at S.F., 4:05
St.L. 11, Pit. 2 Pit. at Mil., 7:05
Ari. 8, S.D. 6 Hou. at N.Y., 7:10
Col. 4, L.A. 3 Cin. at Col., 8:05
S.F. 6, Fla. 5 Fla. at Ari., 8:10


Sunday
Hou. at N.Y., 1:10
Pit. at Mil., 2:05
Atl. at St.L., 2:15
Was. at Chi., 2:20
Cin. at Col., 3:05
S.D. at S.F., 4:05
Fla. at Ari., 4:10
L.A. at Phi., 8:05


National League notes


Arizona: 3B Mark Rey-
nolds took infield practice at
second base Wednesday. He
might be an option there when
RF Justin Upton (sore left side
muscle) comes off the disabled
list. The Diamondbacks could
move OF Adam Dunn to first
base and 1 B Chad Tracy to
third.
Atlanta: B Greg Norton
was held out of the lineup be-
cause of left shoulder stiffness,
and Martin Prado started at
first base for the first time in his
big-league career. Prado ap-
peared at the position briefly in
two games this season.
Chicago: RH reliever Carlos
Marmolallowed his first run
since the All-Star break when he
gave up an eighth-inning homer
to Cincinnati's.Joey Votto. Mar-
mol had not allowed a run in 15
outings, covering 16 innings.
... RHP Jason Marquis starts
today's series opener against
Washington. It'll be his first start
since Aug. 13, when he picked
up a victory at Atlanta, although
he has won two consecutive
starts. Manager Lou Piniella
said he was trying to keep Mar-
quis' arm fresh and that's why
he bypassed him in the Cincin-
nati series.
Cincinnati: B Joey Votto
posted his team-leading 14th
three-hit game. His 15 homers
are a record for a Reds rookie
first baseman, topping Ted Klus-
zewski's 12 in 1948. ... OF Jay
Bruce is 5-for-40 (.125) since
the end of a 13-game hitting
streak during which he was 17-
for-49.
Colorado: C Chris lannetta
returned to the lineup after
missing two games with a
bruised left foot. ... OF Scott
Podsednik (fractured left pin-
kie) likely will be activated Fri-
day, manager Clint Hurdle said.
Podsednik was 6-for-12 with
two stolen bases in his first
three rehab games for Class
AAA Colorado Springs.
Florida: C John Baker en-
joyed a successful homecoming
in the series at San Francisco. A
graduate of De La Salle High
School in suburban Concord,
Baker caught a shutout Tuesday
in his first game at AT&T Park
and hit a game-tying three-run
homer Wednesday as a pinch-
hitter. In the three games, he
went a combined 6-for-9.
Houston: RHP Brian Moeh-
ler vowed to work on his me-
chanics after saying he was for-
tunate to escape with a victory
Tuesday against Milwaukee. He
allowed nine hits in 51/3 innings
but limited the damage to two
runs (one earned). "It's repeti-
tion, just going out there," he
said. "It's nothing major. Just
trying to stay back on the rub-
ber and quit rushing so much."
Los Angeles: RHP Jason
Schmidt (right shoulder sur-
gery in June 2007) threw off a
mound Wednesday and ap-
pears on the verge of restarting
is minor league rehab assign-
ment. If Schmidt returns this
season, it would be as a reliever,
manager Joe Torre said. The
Dodgers also are holding out
hope that RHP Brad Penny
(shoulder) could join the bull-
pen down the stretch.


Milwaukee: Thanks to a
succession of deep-inning out-
ings by the rotation in recent
weeks, some Brewers relief
pitchers have been getting ir-
regular work. With three off
days in an eight-day span, the
bullpen will be getting even
more time off. "There's a little
rustiness," manager Ned Yost
said. "Everybody else is com-
plaining that their bullpen is
worn out. Ours is a little rusty."
New York: 2B Luis Castillo,
sidelined for six weeks with a
strained left hip flexor, will join
the Mets on Friday for a work-
out before the team determines
his next step. Castillo was
4-for-16 (.250) in his first five
rehab games with Class AA
Binghamton (N.Y.).
Philadelphia: LH Cole Ha-
mels could have pitched today
on his regular rest, a move that
would have let him face the
New York Mets next Wednes-
day. It won't happen. The Phil-
lies decided to give him an extra
day of rest. He'll pitch Saturday
against the Los Angeles Dodgers
and then next Thursday against
the Chicago Cubs.
Pittsburgh: RH closer Matt
Capps, who as a team-high 17
saves this season, could be acti-
vated from the disabled list be-
fore today's game. He has been
out since July 2 with shoulder
bursitis. Capps made a com-
bined six rehab appearances at
three levels of the Pirates farm
system, and he allowed one un-
earned run in 63% innings. '
St. Louis: RHP Joel Pineiro,
who has made 21 starts, will be
in the bullpen for the first time
this season today when he acts
as protection for RHP Adam
Wainwright. Manager Tony La
Russa hopes Wainwright, re-
covered from a sprained right
middle finger, can get up to 80
pitches. If that doesn't translate
to many innings, Pineiro could
see action, too.
San Diego: RF Brian Giles
committed errors Tuesday and
Wednesday after making three
in the season's first 124 games.
San Francisco: RH closer
Brian Wilson earned his first
two wins of the season on back-
to-back days. However,
Wednesday's victory came after
he suffered his first blown save
in 25 chances. He is 33-for-36 in
save opportunities this season.
... LH Jonathan Sanchez
(sore left shoulder) had an MRI
that showed a mild strain, and
he's expected to pitch again this
season. He hopes to begin
throwing in a few days.
Washington: SS Cristian
Guzman returned to the lineup
after missing six games with a
bruised left thumb. ... RHP
Collin Balester has shown
flashes of brilliance since mak-
ing his big-league debut July 1,
but the 22-year-old has been
plagued by an inability to retire
hitters the second and third
time he faces them. Opponents
are hitting .178 against Balester
in their first at-bat in a game but
.306 the second time and .341
after that. "It's part of the devel-
opnment process," manager
Manny Acta said.

From The Sports Xchange


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Friday, August 22,2008


I~f ..1L.
.. - 1 . . ,, ,.: m =


Preview


College



football


Get the latest college football
news all season at
collegefootball.usatoday.com
> In-progress scores, team
reports and stats
> Live audio and streaming
video of select games
> Video of coaches' news
conferences and player
features
> Photo galleries and
players of the week
> Chats and game
predictions by Erick Smith of
USA TODAY


USA TODAY. FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008 5B
The road
d to Miami
The major-
college season
' 4 kicks offAug. 28
and ends Jan. 8 in
Miami at the BCS
title game.
School-by-school
schedules at
By H. Darr Bse, USA TODAY collegefootball
Goal: It's to hoist the BCS national title trophy. .usatoday.corn.


By H. Darr Belser. USA TODAY
Ready to go: Ohio State, which has lost the last two national championship games, returns nearly all of its starters and hopes the third time is the charm in its bid for its second BCS title.


With monumental upsets, colossal collapses

and a stirring string of surprises, 2007

is roundly considered one of
a


the most compelling college

football seasons in memory,

which raises the question:


By Duane Burleson, AP
Bring on LSU: Kevin Richardson helped Appalachian
State stun Michigan last year. Is another upset brewing?


Can 2008 be just as great?


By Kelly Whiteside
USA TODAY


When Florida coach Urban Meyer thinks of last sea-
son, one of the most unpredictable in recent memory, he
refnembers watching TV highlights late on Saturday
nights wondering if he could half-believe what he was
seeing. "Wow," he would say to himself.
You name it, it happened last year from
Appalachian State upsetting Michigan to Preview lineup
LSU reaching the national title game after its
second loss of the season in late November. n Mike Lopresti on teams
Meyer, like others, thinks 2008 could be that Better Do Something, 6B
just as compelling, mostly because of a fa-
miliar explanation. And at collegefootbalI
Cover "I just think what has hap- .usatoday.com:
Cover opened; you hear it every > National notes, includ-
story year, but it's never been more ing Heisman hopefuls
__- - true: the parity in college > Archie Griffin talks
football," he said. "Top about Tim Tebow
schools right now are basically the same. > Conference-by-confer-
When they jog out of the tunnel, they all ence breakdowns
look the same. They all get guys drafted in > JeffSagarin's preseason
the NFL. It's just which team can stay computer ratings
healthy and which team plays better on a > Jesse Palmer, new on
given night. We had a national champion Thursday nights for ESPN
with two losses last year." > Division I-AA team-by-
The coach of that championship team, team schedules
Les Miles, has another explanation: "I think
the Lord certainly helped us in a number of
ways. All those ways I don't know."
Let us count the ways eight, in fact in which 2008
can be just as great.


1. Appalachian State pulls off another monu-
mental opening upset. This time against LSU, the de-
fending national champion, on Aug. 30. Last year's Michi-
gan miracle was probably the most stunning moment of
the season. The three-time Football Championship Sub-
division champion won't be sneaking into Death Valley
unknown and overlooked. The Mountaineers have one
of the top quarterbacks in the country, Armanti Ed-
Please see COVER STORY next page P-


Iv nI. l.on,':. I: II;l,g*es
Aiming for history: If Florida's Tim Tebow wins the Heisman Trophy again, he would be-
come the only player other than Ohio State's Archie Griffin to win the award more than once.


By iElee-n RI-s. USA I ODAY
Still formidable: The quarterback situation at LSU is unsettled, but the Tigers are coming off a
victory in the national championship game and appear to be pointed toward another big sea-
son with plenty of talent everywhere else on the field.









6B FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008 USA TODAY


2006 photo by Mark Wallheiser," allaliassee Democralt via AP
Keeping pace: Florida State coach Bobby Bowden, left, and Penn State coach Joe Paterno are neck-and-neck at the top of the major-college career victories list.


USC, Ohio State are set for early showdown


Continued from 5B
wards, among their 14 returning starters
and are favored to win another FCS (for-
merly Division I-AA) title.
Edwards accounted
Cover for an eye-popping 3,536
yards of offense and 38
story touchdowns last season.
In contrast, LSU, after
quarterback Ryan Perril-
loux was dismissed in the spring for mul-
tiple violations of team rules, turns to
sophomore Andrew Hatch, a Harvard
transfer who completed one pass last
year, or redshirt freshman Jarrett Lee,
who hasn't taken a college snap. Even so,
this is LSU; the rookie quarterback will
be surrounded by talent.

2* Southern California-Ohio State
lives up to its billing. The game of the
year comes early Sept. 13. at the Los
Angeles Coliseum. The No. 2 Trojans
hope quarterback Mark Sanchez, who
dislocated his left kneecap at the start of
camp, is healthy. Their defense is per-
haps the best in the country with line-
backer Rey Maualuga, safety Taylor
Mays, linebacker Brian Cushing, strong
safety Kevin Ellison and tackle Fili Moala.
No. 3 Ohio State counters with nine
starters returning on each side of the
ball, including offensive tackle Alex
Boone, linebacker James Laurinaitis and
cornerback Malcolm Jenkins, who all
passed up the NFL for a shot at their
third consecutive national title game.
This time, they hope to leave with a ring.
As big as this game is, the loser could
have a shot at the national title if it wins
its remaining games. Consider last year,
when Ohio State lost to Illinois in No-
vember and competed for the crystal
trophy. Even with. an early loss to Stan-
ford (yet another classic frbm 2007), the
Trojans might have made it to the title


game had they not fallen to Oregon.

3J A former power has a colossal
collapse (see Notre Dame 2007) or a
team full of promise falls fiat (see
Michigan 2007, Louisville 2007). No. 1
Georgia begins the season with enor-
mous expectations and as an obvious
candidate for the latter.
"If you start getting carried away with
(the hype), you might be like the (1988)
Seminoles that got thrashed by Miami
the first time we were preseason No. 1.
We got beat 31-0," says Georgia coach
Mark Richt, a former Florida State assis-
tant. The Bulldogs also have a treacher-
ous schedule, with back-to-back trips to
South Carolina and Arizona State, fol-
lowed by a home game against Alabama.
Georgia also plays four consecutive
weeks away from home (LSU, Florida in
Jacksonville, Kentucky and Auburn).
Runner-up: Clemson. It's the first time
Clemson has been picked to win the At-
lantic Coast Conference since 1991, also
the last year the Tigers won the ACC.

"4 Final-month drama. Last year
brought us Pittsburgh 13, West Virginia
9; Arkansas 50, LSU 48 (30T); Illinois 28,
Ohio State 21; Missouri 36, Kansas 28.
Until the season plays out, it's any-
one's guess on the games that could turn
the national title picture upside down,
but two have promise:
Florida vs. Georgia in Jacksonville on
Nov. 1: The reverberations from Geor-
gia's touchdown celebration last year
continue. In an authorized biography,
Urban's Way, Meyer said: "That wasn't
right. It was a bad deal. It will forever be
in the mind of Urban Meyer and in the
mind of our football team. We'll handle
it, and it's going to be a big deal."
Said Richt last month: "I don't think
there's any doubt (last year's game) in-


tensified the rivalry. But what intensified
the rivalry is that we won, OK? I mean,
that's the reality."
Michigan at Ohio State on Nov. 22: A
new era at Michigan begins with Rich
Rodriguez; for their first meeting his
team will be big'underdogs. Buckeyes
coach Jim Tressel is 6-1 vs. the archrival.

5o Florida quarterback Tim Tebow
wins his second Heisman Trophy. He
is only a junior, but college football
might never see another quite like him.
In the offseason, he preached to prison-
ers, went on missions including one to
the Philippines, where he aided on mi-
nor surgical procedures -'and made his
usual trips to hospitals to cheer up
gravely ill kids.
Only one player, Ohio State running
back Archie Griffin, has won back-to-
back Heismans. Of course, Tebow being
Tebow, he is rooting for teammate Percy
Harvin. "He's probably the most explo-
sive player in college football," Tebow
says of the versatile wideout. "If he can
stay healthy, he has a great chance to
compete for and win the Heisman."

U. Brigham Young is this year's BCS
buster. The No. 17 Cougars have 10 of-
fensive starters returning, including
quarterback Max Hall, whose unit aver-
aged 30.1 points, and could be 2008's
Utah/Boise State/Hawaii a team that
crashes the BCS party. The two-time de-
fending Mountain West champion can
climb in the polls and earn style points if
it defeats Pacific-10 teams Washington
and UCLA.
Other candidates: No. 25 Fresno State
would have to get past a challenging sea-
son opener at Rutgers then beat
Wisconsin, Toledo and UCLA before be-
ginning Western Athletic Conference
play. Two other unranked Mountain


West teams, Utah and Texas Christian,
could be in the running if all three don't
eliminate one another in league play.

/eA new face in the BCS title game.
During the first decade of the BCS, the
same 11 teams have hogged the 20
spots in the title game. A newcomer
would be nice. Two would be even bet-
ter. How about Georgia-Clemson? Both
must avoid the pitfalls (see above).

8. Penn State's Joe Paterno and
Florida State's Bobby Bowden retire
at the same time tied in number of
wins. The race to be the winningest
coach in major-college history Bow-
den leads with 373 to Paterno's 372 -
should end with the legacies of these
Hall of Famers intact. Both programs
have slipped of late: Paterno's team has
had off-field problems with an alarming
number of arrests, and Bowden's has
struggled with consecutive 7-6 seasons.
Paterno will turn 82 and Bowden will be
79 by the time bowl season arrives. May
both go out with victories and shared
spot at the top of history.
Of course, what made last season so
much fun was that it was unpredictable.
Which is why it might be pointless to
predict what 2008 could bring except
the unexpected.
"Last year was one of the wildest,
most unpredictable seasons in recent
memory," said former Georgia coach
Vince Dooley, who has seen his share of
history during a half-century in the
game. :'But at the same time, I think we
are going to see more like it not every
year, but more often. ... This term par-
ity we've been using for the last 20 years
has become more of a reality than ever."
Contributing: David Jones of Florida
Today and Glenn Guilbeau of The
(Shreveport, La.) Times


By the numbers


0
Bye weeks this season for New Mex-
ico and Purdue. They are the only Divi-
sion I-A schools without an open week.



5
Head coaches in the Southeastern
Conference who have won national ti-
tles (Alabama's Nick Saban, Florida's
Urban Meyer, LSU's Les Miles, South
Carolina's Steve Spurrier and Tennes-
see's Philip Fulmer).



6
Games for Louisville on days other
than Saturday. The Cardinals will play
on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday (three
times) and Sunday (the opener Aug. 31
against Kentucky). Of the six Saturday
games, four are at home.



8
Consecutive bowl game victories for
Boston College, the longest active string
in Division I-A. Florida State (1985 to
1995) set the record of 11 in a row.



10
Touchdown receptions Rice's Jarett
Dillard needs to tie the Division I-A ca-
reer mark of 50 set by Troy Edwards of
Louisiana Tech from 1996 to ,1998.



34
Bowl games this season, two more
than after the 2007 season. The Con-
gressional Bowl in Washington, D.C.,
and the St. Petersburg Bowl in Florida
are new. It means 57% of Division I-A
schools will play in bowls this season.



101
Days that encompass the regular-
season schedules of Cincinnati and
Connecticut, from Aug. 28 to Dec. 6.
That's the longest for Division I-A
schools this year.



586
Games coached by John Gagliardi of
Division III Saint John's (Minn.), five shy
of the all-time mark set by the late Ed-
die Robinson of Grambling from 1941
to 1997.


By Jim Mone,AP
Fixture: John Gagliardi has coached at
Saint John's (Minn.) since 1953.


Burden of expectations gives this top 10 an extra-heavy to-do list


Let's hear it for the Notre Dame Fighting Irish.
They're No. 1.
In the Bowl Championship Series rankings? Nah.
The BDS rankings.
As in ... Better Do Something. And we don't
need computer printouts or algebra formulas to fig-
ure it out,
Let's be clear. College football brings demands
and expectations everywhere. They don't like to
lose at Utah State any more
than at Southern California.
But current conditions
have some places carrying
.' more urgent burdens than
I* others. So here's the BDS
preseason top 10, all of them
accomplished programs but
with assignments they real-
ly, really need to get done.
No. 1: Notre Dame.
Commentary Isn't it hard to fathom?
By Mike Lopresti Charlie Weis, NFL offensive
guru, coached a team that
was last in the nation in offense. Another statistic to
shake down the thunder: Eighty-nine other schools
have won a bowl since Notre Dame last won one
Jan. 1, 1994. The Irish, with a softer schedule, need
to do a lot better than 3-9. They need to get to a
bowl. One of these decades, they need to win one.
With such modest requests, it's easy to forget
sometimes this is Notre Dame we're talking about.
> No. 2: Clemson. Nothing less than an Atlantic
Coast Conference title will do for Tommy Bowden.
His reputation, fair or unfair, is he builds fine rec-
ords but seldom survives the big games that sep-
arate the true contenders from the Chick-fil-A
Bowl. There's one way to do something about it.
No. 3: Michigan. The school chipped in to help
pay the $4 million needed to finalize Rich Rodri-
guez's divorce from West Virginia. For that alimony,
his new offense had better work.
> No. 4: Ohio State is returning so many key in-
gredients, I think even the tuba section is back in-
tact. It's not that Jim Tressel doesn't have a hugely
successful program. But two things keep happening


[ly J Olh I.rll2 Dion e l. (cti ly li i es
Year to forget: Notre Dame and coach Charlie Weis were 3-9 in 2007 and last in the nation in offense.


in Columbus in January: low wind chill factors and
the Buckeyes limping home after a BCS title game
walloping. The onus is on them to convince people
they can truly play with the elite from outside the
Big Ten. Like on Sept. 13 at Southern California.
> No. 5: Louisville. The more reasonable Cardi-
nals fans all nine of them, if l.ouisville is like ev-
eryplace else will be willing to give coach Steve
Kragthorpe a first-season mulligan. But not if the
Cardinals go 6-6 and lose to Syracuse again.
> No. 6: Oklahoma. Bob Stoops owns a fine rec-
ord, but the Sooners have lost four of their last five
bowls. Norman is one of those places where each
season thY ,i III- i1 lo igeAt i wlld you did last.


0 No. 7: Florida State. It is uncomfortable and
sad when the masses turn on a civic treasure when
the championships stop. Who wants to see some-
one's grandfather raked over the coals? Bobby
Bowden will soon turn 79, and his pride keeps him
going. But the price in being blessed with a coach-
ing wonder is that it is often impossible for every-
one to agree when enough is enough. Then things
can turn ugly. Bobby could use a big year.
> No. 8: Penn State. So could Joe Paterno. His
program has encountered recent turbulence. If this
is it, the college football gods owe him a proper
farewell tour, so he will not be remembered as the
legend who stayed too long. We should pause and


remind ourselves how astounding this is that an
81-year-old man is still trying to coach a major-
college football team.
> No. 9: Washington. For a decent guy who
needs a good season as desperately as Tyrone Wil-
lingham needs one, you'd like to see early games
against Army, Duke and New Mexico State. Instead,
the Huskies get Oregon, Brigham Young University
and Oklahoma. USC is on the road. No mercy for the
embattled.
> No. 10: USC. The Trojans are loaded. Again. But
they need to keep sprinting forward, because if
they slow down and look behind or get upset by
Stanford again the unanswered Reggie Bush
questions might be gaining on them.
Also receiving votes:
P- Nebraska. Bo Pelini need not perform acts of
human levitation this first season. But in the name
of Tom Osborne, don't give up 76 points to Kansas
anymore.
> Miami. The Hurricanes went 5-7 and closed
down the Orange Bowl by losing 48-0 to Virginia, as
all the former players who came back cringed on
the sideline. Miami quickly grows restless when it
has no reason to swagger.
> Georgia. As the Bulldogs finished fast last sea-
son, the accolades poured in, suggesting the Bull-
dogs were as good as any team in the nation. The
downside, of course, is that the next season every-
one expects them to prove it.
o Arkansas. No coach in America took more
abuse from talk shows than Bobby Petrino, con-
cerning his quick eye for the exit. He needs to show
he's worth the trouble.
> Iowa. Mediocre records and a messy sexual as-
sault scandal. Bad combination.
Florida. Two things the nation has never seen: An
African-American man with a chance to be presi-
dent, and a junior quarterback already owning a
Heisman. The highest point in the state of Florida is
the expectation put on Tim Tebow and the Gators.
But the Southeastern Conference is tough to live in
when your goal leaves you no margin for error.
Mike Lopresti also writes for Gannett News Service











Ic-3


r ... s Beijing





Friday, August 22,2008 O lyp ic


All's fare on
Beijing's
--' backstreets
Three U.S..Olym-
i plans sample and
learn about Beij-
ing's street foods
from pig stom-
ach to scorpions to
sea horse to silk-
worms to "stinky
V ,., ,.,,,, ...., tofu." Story and
Street eats: Ariel Rittenhouse, left, Bryan video at olympics
Volpenhein, middle, and Christina Loukas. .usatoday.com


Medals table


Through Thursday's 21 medal events
Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
USA 29 34 32 95
China 46 15 22 83
Russia 16 16 19 51
Britain 17 12 11 40
Australia 11 13 14 38
Germany 11 8 12 31
France 4 12 14 30
South Korea o 10 10 6 26
Japan 9 6 9 24
Italy 6 7 8 21
Ukraine 5 5 9 19


At olympics.usatoday.com
After two-plus weeks of com-
petition, the curtain falls on
Beijing on Sunday with the clos-
ing ceremony. Get a detailed ac-
count of the ceremony as it hap-
pens in our Going for Gold blog
starting at 8 a.m. ET, and check
out a photo gallery afterward.
Plus:
> The USA House makes
Olympians and their families feel at
home. Take a tour in our Sights and Sounds.
> Celebrate the hard-fought gold medal win of
beach volleyball stars Misty May-Treanor and Kerri
Walsh with a photo gallery from the championship
match, and leave a message for Walsh on her ath-
lete blug at tL,1 m.Au a'_,amtodavconm


Wrapped up in victory: Natasha Kai, left, and Heather O'Reilly are jubilant after the U.S. women's soccer team shocked Brazil 1-0 to win the gold medal. Carli
Lloyd's goal in the96th minute lifted the USA, which entered the (lympics without it s star player, Abby Wambach, who broke her leg in a pre-Olympic match.




Glory, gold in soccer


USA stuns Brazil

on overtime goal

By Kelly Whiteside
USA TODAY
BEIJING When the Olympic gold medal was
placed around goalkeeper Hope Solo's neck, she
gazed at it for a moment, then kissed it. Perhaps
no one on the U.S. women's soccer team deserved
it more.
"It's a storybook ending for me, it really is," she
said after the USA defeated heavily favored Brazil
1-0 in overtime Thursday. "I always play better un-
der pressure. I had no doubt I was going to play one
of my best games."
The USA wasn't the most dangerous team on the
field, but it certainly was the most resilient, keeping
Brazil's Marta in check with superb defense and
Solo's strong play. For Solo, the victory was espe
cially meaningful, given the controversy after Bra-
zil's 4-0 romp in last year's World Cup semifinals
when Solo was famously benched.
The victory, clinched on Carli Lloyd's goal in the
96th minute, was one of the most significant in the
team's history. Once the USA lost its best player, Ahl


~~I


Silver: Fi om Itll, /\iidii m I) i lonnie Iinclh and
Caitlin Lowe afieri Japan ii|fl tlie USAi in solihall.
by Wa iiil ) Id l i, kei n i iin a pI)'-Olym pic
match alid was upset by Nom way in its opener, the
Amerlicans' chances of defending heir 2004 Olym-
pic title seemed dinl.
Overall lor leiam USA, what could have been a
banner (lav wis dampened nol only hv tlihe rain
but also i v st ninHi t ii~n mp', ..... t. ,,. '!in (he


softball teanim's 3-1 loss to Japan in the gold medal
game.
It was the team's first loss since 2000, ending a
22-game Olympic winning streak for the USA,
which won the previous three gold medals. What
makes the loss even more heartbreaking is it's the
sport's last appearance at the Olympics unless it is
icinslated by the IOC.
The U.S. 4x 100 meter relays had a dreary day as
well. On the men's side, Darvis Patton and Tyson
Gay dropped thlie baton in their exchange. Then Tor-
ri Edwards and Lauryn Williams did the same on
the women's team, and two gold medal contenders
didn't even advance to the final.
Also on the losing end was the U S. women's wa-
ter polo team, which was upset by the Netherlands
9-8 in tile final minute.
On the sunny side, Ker i Walsh and Misty May-
Treanor ignored the downpour "This is just
another reason why we play in bathing suits,"
May-Treanor said -- and won their second consec-
utive gold medal by beating a pair from China in
straight sets.
In the men's 110 hurdles final, Americans David
Payne and David Oliver won the silver and bronze,
respectively, behind Cuban gold medalist Dayton
Robles.
Thile U.S. men swept the 400 meters, led by win-
ner LaShawn Merritt, followed by Jeremy Wan ner
and !o\id! Neville.


~ao









8B FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008 USA TODAY

It's the final weekend of
See video with competition. Get in-
Mike Day and progress updates on men's
San interactive and women's basketball,
Our documentarians ,- graphic showiig track and field, the closing
discover families what the course ceremony and more in our
are glued to their looks like, Going for Gold blog at
S LJII l TV setsinZhaoq- at olympics olympics.usatoday.com.

lU LI1111 .usatodav.com .usatodaycom



By Steve Wieberg O


Two bright stars


They've been magnificence squared in these Olympics,
swimmer Michael Phelps dominating Week 1 and sprinter
Usain Bolt electrifying Week 2. Sizing them up side by side:


By Jakt ,ull USA IODAY
Golden touch: Swimmer Michael Phelps won eight gold medals in
Beijing, increasing his career total to 14.


Phelps
"Fei yu" or "Flying fish," Nickname
bestowed by Chinese media
23,6-4,201 Age, height,
weight


Baltimore, known for crabs,
Cal Ripken Jr.


Bolt
"Lightning"

22 (on Thursday), 6-5, 190


Hometown Trelawny Parish, Jamaica,
known for yams, tourism


Michael Jordan Admires
First to win eight golds in one Beijing
Olympics, breaking legacy
seven world records
28% (8 of 29) %of
country's
golds


Fifth, at age 15, in 2000
Olympics' 200-meter butter-
fly, then breaking world
record seven months later
Broad shoulders, long,
buoyant torso and 6-7
wingspan that extends reach
of each stroke


Allen Iverson
First to set 100- and
200-meter world records on
same Olympic track
40% (2 of 5)


On the scene Winning world junior 200-
since meter championship in 2002
.- at 15, youngest ever to win
world title
Anatomy 101 Tallest world-class sprinter
ever; former hurdles champ
Renaldo Nehemiah estimates
his strides cover a foot more
than competitors'


12,000 calories daily; heavy On the menu
on pizza, pasta and energy
drinks at dinner


Tossing flowers to mother


Chicken McNuggets


Postrace Preening, dancing,
ritual camera-mugging


No positive drug tests; has Is he dean?
additional blood and urine
screening as voluntary
participant in USA's
"Project Believe"


No positive drug tests;
Associated Press reports he
has passed four since late July
and 11 this year


President Bush On the Jamaican Prime Minister
phone Bruce Golding


"I just kept thinking, 'Wow,
greatest Olympian of all time.'
It's a pretty cool title."
"He is just a normal person,
but maybe from a different
planet." Russian swimmer
Alexander Sukhorukov

Thumbs up. "The Olympic
Games live around super-
heroes. You had Jesse Owens,
you had Paavo Nurmi, Carl
Lewis. And now you have
Phelps. And that's what we
need to have."

In London to participate in
closing ceremony handoffto
host of next Summer Games


In his words "I blew my mind, and then I
blew the world's mind."

In others' "He's a bad mamma-jamma.
words The guy came out and made
this the best Olympics of my
lifetime." U.S. 200-meter
silver medalist Shawn
Crawford
IOC Thumbs down. "That's not the
President way we perceive being a
Jacques champion. ... I think he
Rogge's take should show more respect for
his competitors and shake
hands, give a tap on the shoul-
der to the other ones immedi-
ately after the finish."
Comingup Today's 4x100-meter
relay final


Source: USA ODAY research


Rumble of thunder: Sprinter Usain Bolt became the ninth man to
earn the Olympic sprint double and the first since Carl Lewis in 1984.


Beijing scene

Olympic pin collectors say they haven't seen
such a frenzy over the small, metal commem-
oratives since the 1998 Nagano Winter Games.
"The Chinese are wild for them," says Timm
Jamieson of Roanoke, Va., who has been to
eight Olympics to trade pins and expects to
make enough at these Games to cover his air-
fare to and from Beijing'.
Produced in the.tens of thousands for coun-
tries and teams, sports venues, sponsors and
news media outlets, the pins and collectors'
furious trading are a feature of every Olympics.
Here, they range from an official Bird's Nest pin
to a corporate bauble twinning Listerine
mouthwash and the Temple of Heaven.
Beijing is different because, unlike previous
Games, authorities aren't allowing open buy-
ing and selling, traders say.
That has brought the pin business closer to a
strict barter system, says Dan Baker,; a trader
from Branson, Mo. He and Jamieson agree on
the hardest-to-find pin at the Beijing Games: a
CCTV Olympic torch pin, distributed by the
nation's largest state-run broadcaster, China
Central Television.
"That would be worth about $72," Baker
says if you could sell it.
By Elizabeth Weise
P> See a video on pin-trading at the Summer
Gaines at olympics.usatoday.com


Getting to know ...

Tom Daley

Age: 14
Representing: Great Britain
Sport: Diving
Events: Today's men's platform
Particulars: Don't let his youth and slight 5-1,
104-pound frame fool you.
Daley has been diving from the 10-meter plat-
form since he was 8 and beat the 2004 Olympic
silver medalist, Peter Waterfield, who is almost
twice his age, for Britain's national championship
this year. Daley was seventh on the platform in
the 2008 World Cup in Beijing.
He might be Britain's youngest Olympian in al-
most half a century since Kenneth Lester
rowed at 13 in the 1960 Games in Rome but he
has the attention of a sport long dominated on
the men's side by China.
"I think it's fantastic ... to have a non-Chinese
star," said Steve Foley, British diving's national
performance director. "And it's been great for the
rest of our team. They see Tom and say, 'If this
young man can do it, so can we.'"
Still, everybody including the teenage prodi-
gy is realistic about his prospects in his first
Olympics. Daley already has competed in syn-
chronized platform, finishing eighth with team-
mate Blake Aldridge. He gives away as many as
15 years to other divers in today's individual
platform.


By M.Iat lln ln etll, AFP/GcI.Iy IlyaeS'
Teen phenom: Tom Daley will be 18 when the
Summer Games land in London in 2012.

Daley set his sights on an Olympic medal
when he was 11 but conceded coming into these
Summer Games that he's not likely to win it here.
"I'm just hoping to gain some experience for
London 2012," he said.


Must-see TV

Marquee events today, Saturday and Sunday:
Lightning strikes again: Jamaican sensation
Usain Bolt hits the track again, this time in
the 4x100-meter relay. And the near-equal-
ly impressive Jamaican women go in their
4x100 (NBC, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET today).
The USA mines for gold in the decathlon,
where Bryan Clay is the favorite (NBC, 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. today), and in the 4x400 re-
lays (NBC, 7:30 p.m. to midnight Saturday).
Hoops heaven: The dominant U.S. men's and
women's basketball teams try to close out
their predicted golds. (Men's semifinal vs.
Argentina, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. today, and final,
12:30 a.m. to 5 a.m. Sunday, both NBC;
women's final vs. Australia, 10 a.m. to
6 p.m. Saturday, NBC)
Alone in the ring: U.S. boxing hopes are
down to heavyweight Deontay Wilder in
today's semis (CNBC, midnight to 4 a.m.).
Underdogs on a roll: American baseball and
volleyball teams go against medal favorites
in semifinals baseball vs. Cuba (CNBC,
midnight to 4 a.m. today), netters vs. Russia
(MSNBC, 5 a.m. to 5 p.m. today).
Grand finale: The men's marathon ends and
the closing ceremony commences (NBC,
7-11 p.m. Sunday).
> For late news, check Going for Gold blog
and instant results at olympics.usatoday.com


Beach blanket baptism: Who knew this was water sport?


Watch U.S. women win in
downpour, and anyone
can get immersed in game

BEIJING When it comes to Olympic moments,
we have now been to the mountaintop.
Beach volleyball in the pouring rain.
And not just any old beach volleyball. Gold medal
beach volleyball. This was the U.S. women Misty
May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh vs. China on Thurs-
day. Time to get down and dirty. Especially dirty.
Ever walk through wet sand?
"Hey, we're bound to get wet," May-Treanor
would say later. "We play in bathing suits."
Was she ever in the right place Thursday morn-
ing. I must have missed the monsoon warning.
The weather was a vexation from the start. You
can set your watch to the bus system, so ardent
have Beijing organizers been to make their Olym-
pics pun. So the rain was probably why we got to
the venue seven minutes late.
The downpour was going strong when the bus


pulled into Chaoyang Park Beach Volleyball Ground.
Chaoyang apparently is the Chinese phrase for
"What in the name of Mao are we all doing here?"
But the stadium was nearly full of soaked cus-
tomers, gazing down at the sand. Noth-
ing says a day at the beach like 10,000
Chinese huddled under umbrellas. .
If it rained like this back in Miami -
when May-Treanor's husband Florida
Marlins catcher Matt Treanor was
supposed to play, the tarp would be
down and the organ would be playing.
But those are wimpy baseball players.
Nothing stops beach volleyball, ap-
parently.
Arriving in the news media area, 1 Comment
was hoping for the customary Chinese By Mike Lo
efficiency. When it rained the other day
at softball, a volunteer had ponchos handed out on
press row before the number of drops had hit dou-
ble figures.
But, alas, while the computers were all snug and
covered, we were pretty much on our own at beach
volleyball. Part of the section was under a roof, but
nearly all the seats were taken. Besides, if we're go-


a
'p


ing to get drenched watching beach volleyball, let's
do it right.
The 24 beach girls were dancing in the rain for
everyone's pregame entertainment. That might
seem a little odd, but it was better than
S watching hurdle setters at track.
The scoreboard said spectators
should not use their umbrellas because
it might block the views of other fans. It
can be reported that China hasn't seen
this much civil disobedience since the
"" Boxer Rebellion.
The first set was back and forth.
When the ball hit the wet sand, it some-
times stuck like a Tiger Woods wedge to
ry a soft green. And it must have been
nresti harder to toss the ball in the air for
serves. That would be like trying to field
a pop-up in a shower.
Once, the rain seemed to be letting up. Were the
skies lightening in the west ... or the south ... or
whatever direction that was? No.
One of the Chinese players, Tian Jia, was eating
a banana during a timeout. It looked good, since
I had missed breakfast.


What looked even better, though, was her towel.
The USA eked out a 21-18 win in the first set,
then jumped to a quick lead in the second. The Chi-
nese fans seemed a tad discouraged. They were
probably thinking that when it rains, it pours. But
none of them was heading for the parking lot early,
so I knew I wasn't in Los Angeles.
"It could have been 500 degrees out here or
500 below," Walsh said, "and we would have been
happy to be playing beach volleyball out here."
Fair enough. But she should have been wearing
my socks.
The U.S. women kept charging, looking like the
veteran champions they are. It was over in straight
sets. May-Treanor and Walsh hugged in celebration,
the wettest American gold medalists since Michael
Phelps.
We all filed out, looking as if we had just played
in a water polo game. "Miserable" was one of the
few words I caught from a Chinese fan. But did that
mean the weather or losing to Americans?
At least nobody seemed worried about sunburn.

Mike Lopresti also writes for Gannett News Service
> Back-to-back golds make history, 9B










USA TODAY FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008 -9B


Beijing Games


pe~~~~~~~r ~ sY- ,.~ -


~l4nl*~r


f;4~
S


By Timothy Clary, AFP/Getty Irmages
No magic here: Chinese diver Guo Jingjing, who won two gold medals, says her nation's gold medal domination is a payoff. "'We worked very hard and-trained very hard every day," she said.





Chinese plan proves good as gold


USA maintains overall lead

in medals table for now


By Tom Weir and Vicki Michaelis
USA TODAY
BEIJING Two days before the
opening ceremony, only one per-
son was on duty inside the Chi-
nese Olympic Committee's main
press office. News. journalists
seeking media guides for
the home team were Trac
told, "Sorry," and, "May- Team
be soon."
That's changed now
that China has won 46 events and
is certain to achieve its goal of
dominating the gold medal
count. Visitors are welcomed,
given a high-tech pen and direct-
ed toward a wall devoted to pho-
tos of the Chinese gold medalists.
There, one can touch the pen to
any picture and instantly hear an
audio version of the champion's
biography, in English or Chinese.
Clearly, China knew this mo-
ment was coming but has hum-
bly delayed declaring victory.
"Not yet," Chinese Olympic
Committee spokeswoman Lin Li
says. "Maybe at the end."
But the U.S. Olympic Commit-
tee's top officials concede there's
no realistic hope to win the gold
medal count. With more than 80%
of the medals awarded, the USA is
second with 29 golds, and Britain
is a distant third, with 17.


USOC CEO Jim Scherr says he
knew the Chinese would have a
significant impact on the medals
race but admiringly adds, "The
magnitude of the improvement
has been a little bit of a surprise."
"They've broken through in
some sports that we thought it
would be very hard for
'king them to win medals in,"
China Scherr says.
For any American fan
who is disturbed that
the USA will fail to reap the most
golds at a Summer Olympics for
the first time since 1992, there's
a ready-made excuse. The defeat
is occurring primarily because
China is overwhelmingly superi-
or in four sports that are consid-
ered relatively minor in the USA:
badminton, diving, weightlifting
and table tennis.
In those sports, China holds a
whopping 20-0 advantage in
golds through Thursday's com-
petitions.
That provides no solace, how-
ever, for USOC chairman Peter
Ueberroth.
"We better learn how to devel-
op real teams in ping-pong and
badminton and some other
sports where they dominate,"
Ueberroth says.
Ueberroth played a role in Chi-
na's Olympic development when


By Andres Leighton.Al
Ouch: Weightlifter Zhang Xiangxiang was hit in the face by his coach
after a failed lift. He won gold. "I guess this method worked," he said.


he was president of the 1984 Los
Angeles Olympics Organizing
Committee. Ueberroth helped
persuade the Chinese to field
their first Olympic team, rather
than join a Soviet Union-led boy-
cott of the Los Angeles Games.
Training pays off *
Putting China's rapid rise in
perspective, Ueberroth referenc-
es the silver and bronze medals
China won in women's beach
volleyball Thursday and says,
"They didn't know what the
sport was 10 years ago."
Ueberroth adds that it's not
just the USA that's losing ground


to the Chinese: "They're taking it
out of the hides of the rest of the
world."
That's particularly true in
men's gymnastics, in which Chi-
na won one gold in Athens in
2004 but won eight in Beijing be-
tween the artistic and trampo-
line competitions.
"In 10 years, we have achieved
what European and North Amer-
ican countries worked on for 40
to 50 years," boasts Hu Xinggang,
coach of trampoline gold med-
alist Lu Chunlong.
Guo Jingjing, a double gold
medalist in diving, isn't comfort-
able with such gloating or the
perception that China has dom-


inated the race for gold purely by
virtue of its 1.3 billion popula-
tion. "It's not as relaxed or as easy
as you think," Guo says. "Actually,
we worked very hard and trained
very hard every day. We train
from morning to night."
The Chinese can sweep the
diving golds with a victory Sat-
urday in the men's platform.
China's weightlifting team had
one unsettling moment while
winning eight golds, when 146-
pound division winner Zhang
Xiangxiang had a run-in with his
coach after a failed lift.
"Then he slapped my face, to
encourage me," Zhang says. "It
got me so worked up, so I guess
this method worked."
But Ueberroth contends that
overall the Beijing Olympics have
changed the stereotype of Chi-
nese athletes being burdened
and pressure-driven. "The thing I
think you can see in the faces of
Chinese athletes is they're having
fun out there," Ueberroth says.
Measuring success
For the USA, there's still a
good chance to leave Beijing with
the most overall medals. The
USOC traditionally has empha-
sized that as more important
than the gold medal count; the
USA held a 95-83 lead on China
through Thursday.
In Athens in 2004, the USA
edged China in the gold medal
race 36-32 and won the total
medals count, with 102 to run-


ner-up Russia's 92.
"China clearly emphasizes gold
medal production," USOC
spokesman Darryl Seibel says.
"No doubt they're succeeding.
We emphasize total medal pro-
duction."
But China seemingly could put
the total medals tace out of reach
if it makes significant inroads in
the two sports that traditionally
generate the most U.S. medals:
swimming and track and field.
In Beijing, US. swimmers won
12 golds and 31 overall medals.
The .Chinese had one swimming
gold and six overall medals, but
that's a jump from 2004, when
they won two.
Says Scherr: "If they break
through in those medal opportu-
nities in track and field and
swimming, where we've tradi-
tionally been dominant and re-
lied on them for 50 to 60% of the
medals for the United States
team, then we'll have a much
more difficult time, obviously, to
maintain the total medal count."
Ueberroth is concerned there
could be a wide medals gap by
the time of the 2012 Olympics in
London, where he expects China
to be the first nation to qualify
athletes in every sport.
"By the time of the London
Games, there will be nothing un-
contested" by the Chinese, Ue-
berroth says. "It's not just us; the
rest of the Olympic movement
needs to salute them."


Contributing: Erik Brady


On sand, U.S. golden girls are a team for the ages


Legend siraly says feats of Walsh,

May-Treanor'rocked my world'


By David Leon Moore
USA TODAY
BEIJING Karch Kiraly once set the
volleyball bar so high that no one has
been able to clear it, winning three
Olympic gold medals, two in in-
door and one in beach.
Now he has seen Kerri Walsh /
and Misty May-Treanor set. the
bar so high, in slightly different
fashion, that perhaps no one
else will clear it.
"I don't think I will ever see Be
something like this in my life- Be
time," Kiraly said after Walsh VOlK
and May-Treanor made history
Thursday by becoming the first beach
volleyball team, male or female, to re-
peat as Olympic champions.
It's not just the two gold medals that
set Walsh, 30, of Hermosa Beach, Calif.,
and May-Treanor, 31, of Long Beach,
Calif., apart. It's the 108 consecutive
match victories. Including the Olympics,
they have won 19 consecutive tourna-
ments.
And the stat that raises the hair on Ii-
raly's arms? They played 28 sets in two
Olympics arnd won 28 sets.
Kiraly is in Beijing to provide com-
mentary for NBC. Not normally known
as overly emotional he was nick-
named "The Computer" during his play-
ing days he was overcome by the
enormity of Walsh's and May-Treanor's


a


accomplishments when Walsh nailed
down the winning point of a 21-18,21-18
final victory against China's Tian Jia and
WangJie.
"I absolutely broke down and cried
like a baby when they won," said Kiraly,
who won indoor gold medals in
1984 and 1988 and beach vol-
S* leyball's first Olympic gold
medal in 1996.
"When Misty ran over and
hugged her dad (Butch May, a
1968 U.S. indoor volleyball
ich Olympian) and spread some of
the ashes of her mother (Barba-
ypall ra, who died of cancer in 2002)
on the court, it just really
rocked me. What they did just really
rocked my world. It was awesome.
"The higher the stakes, the greater the
expectations, the more the pressure, the
better the field the teams here were
better than the teams in Athens."
Kiraly was a bigger part of it than just
analyzing it for TV. He has been a confi-
dante to Walsh and May-Treanor for
years. When the two slumped in 2006,
winning just three of eight FIVB interna-
tional tournaments, they sought out Ki-
raly to give them advice.
Kiraly suggested they contact Troy
Tanner, a former U.S. indoor Olympian,
for some tips. Tanner became their
coach in 2007 and is credited by the two
women for breaking down their game
and rebuilding it to an even higher level.


BD JeIf SwI gc, I ISA 1 OI)AY
Unbeatable: Kerri Walsh, left, and Misty May-Treanor embrace during the medals ceremony after they became the first team
to repeat as Olympic beach volleyball champions. They have not lost a set in two Games, going 28-for-28.


When told that her victory had made
Kiraly cry, May-Treanor got a mischie-
vous look in her eye and said, "Karch
doesn't have two Olympic gold medals
in beach volleyball, so now we have
something to hold over him."
Walsh and May-Treanor plan to finish
this season on the AVP tour, then try to
start families. Walsh is married to AVP


pro beach player Casey Jennings. May-
Treanor is married to Florida Marlins
catcher Matt Treanor.
Whether either or both of them show
up at the London Olympics in 2012 re-
mains to be seen.
But as far as Kiraly is concerned, it will
be next to impossible for anyone to
match what Walsh and May-Treanor did


the last four years.
Asked what she thought about that,
May-Treanor said, "I think it would be
pretty hard. ... Maybe when Kerri and I
come back, wc can do it again."
> Wondering what was on Kerri
Walsh's shoulder at the Games? Find
out at everwonder.usatoday.com.


:!


CI











10B -FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008 USA TODAY


Beijing Games


Merritt ends



Wariner's bid



to repeat


Victory leads American

sweep in 400 meters


By Dick Patrick
USA TODAY
BEIJING -When LaShawn
Merritt beat defending Olympic
and two-time world champion
Jeremy Wariner at 400
meters twice earlier
this season, he earned a
lot of attention for
puncturing the aura of
Wariner's invincibility.
Yet Merritt never
gloated. He was quick T,
to remind that the race Track
that counted would be
the Olympic final. He took the
same attitude when Wariner
beat him twice this season.
When the Olympic final ar-
rived Thursday night, Merritt
was the one running away from
Wariner and everyone else in the
homestretch. Finishing in a per-
sonal-best and 2008-leading
43.75 seconds, Merritt led a U.S.
sweep with Wariner second
(44.74) and diving David Neville
third (44.80), which was their or-
der of finish at the I.S. trials in
July. Merritt's .99 margin of vic-
tory was the largest in the event
since 1896.
Merritt was aware of his team-
mate's miscues in the relays, but
his focus remained on his race.
Merritt and coach Dwayne Miller


prepped seriously during the rest
day before the final, breaking
down not only Merritt's semifinal
but those of his opponents.
"I had a game plan; I can follow
a game plan. Now I've got a gold
medal, and I'm the hap-
S piest I've ever been,"
said Merritt, 22, who
lives in Suffolk, Va.
Wariner was a de-
spondent silver medal-
ist. He trailed Merritt
Field when they hit the
stretch and never re-
duced the lead.
"I felt good coming off the turn,
but when I tried to go, I (had)
nothing left," said Wariner, 24,
who in January left his longtime
coach, Clyde Hart of Baylor, for
Baylor assistant Michael Ford. "I
don't know what to say. I ran the
best I could. I didn't have nothing
left, and I didn't give up.
"I ran exactly like I wanted to. I
don't know what it was yet. I just
didn't have enough left at the
end."
The USA earned its fifth sweep
of the 400 and second in a row
thanks to Neville's belly-flop
landing.
"I had to dive to get the med-
al," said Neville, who declined an
offer for a stretcher. "It was in-
stinct."


By Robert Deutsch, USA TODAY
Well-merited: Clad in Old Glory, LaShawn Merritt celebrates his victory and the 1-2-3 American finish in the 400 meters Thursday.


Merritt's form never deterio-
rated.
It became an emphasis after he
broke down the semifinals. "1
saw some people were taking
less steps than me in the race,
and I'm 6-3," he said. "Why is
that? I'm not using what I have. I
used what I had which is my


stride length, my speed and my.
power and ran a great race."
Four years ago, when Wariner
made a name for himself at the
Athens Games, Merritt was a star
of the world junior champion-
ships, winning the 400 and run-
ning on the winning 4x100 and
4x400 relays.


He then targeted the Beijing
Games, improving his world
ranking yearly and finishing sec-
ond to Wariner at last year's
world championships.
"When you lose, it motivates
your life," he said. "I trained hard-
er than ever this year. I wanted it."
Now he's the fifth-best per-


former in the event's history.
Before the medal ceremony,
Merritt looked toward the sky
and saluted, a sign meant for old-
er brother Antwan, who in 1999
jumped from a college dorm
window during a fight and died.
"He's my inspiration," Merritt
said. "I dedicate this race to him."


Losing a grip on U.S. stature on the track


The USA's track struggles in Beijing continued as
two relay teams flubbed handoffs. A look at one:


Almost got it: In the 4x100 relay, anchor Tyson
Gay reaches for the handoff from Darvis Patton.


But no: The connection isn't made and the baton
tumbles toward the track, stunning both runners.


All is lost: Patton tries to retrieve the baton but
soon realizes the U.S. relay team is disqualified.


Photos by Olivle Mori .AFP
A mocking bounce: The metal stick skips off the
surface, and the team won't leave the first round.


Felix's best not


good enough

Jamaica's Campbell-Brown wins
second consecutive gold in 200


By Andy Gardiner
USA TODAY
BEIJING Allyson Felix posted
her best time this season. Team-
mates Muna Lee and Marshevet
Hooker ran the fastest races of
their careers. None of that was
enough to slow Jamaica's con-
tinued dominance of the sprint
events of these Olympics.
Veronica Campbell-Brown of
Jamaica ran a personal-best
21.74 seconds to win her second
consecutive gold in the women's
200 meters Thursday, holding off
Felix, who ended with silver for
the second time (21.93). Jamai-
ca's Kerron Stewart (22.00) add-
ed a bronze to the silver she won
in the 100. Lee was fourth in
22.01, lowering her previous top
time by .28 seconds, and Hooker
placed fifth in 22.34, bettering
her time by .15 seconds.
Jamaica has now won all four
gold medals in the 100 and 200,
with the women taking five of six
medals overall and the men
basking in Usain Bolt's twin
world record victories. That
could increase in the sprints for
Jamaica in the 4x100 relays. Ja-
maica's women's and men's
teams expected to feature the
sprint medalists, including Bolt -
advanced easily to today's finals
while botched handoffs eliminat-
ed both of the USA's teams.


Campbell-Brown had the two
fastest times this season and had
too much for Felix, who has won
two world championships since
the 2004 Olympics.
"Veronica ran her butt off. The
Jamaicans are just on fire right
now," said Bob Kersee. Felix's
coach. "Allyson ran well. She
made a late charge but didn't
make as much of a move off the
curve as I thought. Veronica
knew she had to open up a gap."
Silver, bronze: The USA fol-
lowed its medal sweep in the 400
by taking silver and bronze in the
110 hurdles as David Payne and
David Oliver finished second and
third behind world recordholder
Dayron Robles of Cuba.
Robles won in 12.93 seconds,
shy of his world mark of 12.87
and .02 behind the Olympic rec-
ord set in 2004 by Liu Xiang of
China. Payne ran a season-best
13.17 for silver, and Oliver took
bronze in 13.18.
Two of Robles' top challengers,
Liu and 2004 silver medalist Ter-
rence Trammell of the USA, were
halted by injuries in the first
round.
"Dayron is probably one of the
best of all time," Oliver said. "For
me and (Payne) to come in right
behind him is an honor. It's all
about getting medals, and I got
one."


,






.
.,' t


I


By Robeit Deutsch. USA TODAY
Job well done: Allyson Felix, right, congratulates 200-meter winner
Veronica Campbell-Brown after their race Thursday.


Record details: No electronic
timing figures have been issued
for intermediate distances on
Bolt's world-record 19.30 in the
200. But the international feder-
ation said a 9.9 hand-timed first
100 converts to a 10.10, meaning
he finished the second 200 in
9.20, just as Michael Johnson
(19.32) did in 1996. In the second
100, Bolt took 37V2 strides,
meaning his average stride length
was 8 feet, 9 inches. He needed
42 strides for the first 100.
Briefly: U.S. champion Nick
Symmonds was eliminated in the
800 semis, finishing fifth
(1:46.96). ... Gold-medal con-
tender Bryan Clay of the USA


grabbed the lead Thursday after
the first five events (100 meters,
long jump, shot put, high jump,
400) of the decathlon. Clay
(4,521 points) leads Andrei Krau-
chanka of Belarus (4,433) and
teammate Trey Hardee (4,428). "I
had three very good events, one
not so good event and one very
poor event (the high jump)," Clay
said. "If you take into account the
conditions (periodic heavy rain)
and the type of meet everyone
else is having, I think I'm doing
pretty good." The USA's Tom Pap-
pas withdrew after the second
event because of a foot injury.
Contributing: Dick Patrick, Seth
Livingstone


USA is still on track

to lead medal haul


By Dick Patrick
USA TODAY
BEIJING For all the disap-
pointments, the USA is still on
course to win the track and field
medals table, but the number of
golds and total medals might be
fewer than usual once the com-
petition concludes Sunday riorn-
ing with the men's marathon.
A sweep in men's 400 meters,
silver and bronze in the 110 hur-
dles and a silver in the women's
200 helped alleviate the disaster
of the 4x100 relay semifinals
Thursday. Both U.S. relays
dropped the baton on the ex-
change to the anchor Darvis
Patton to Tyson Gay and Torri Ed-
wards to Lauryn Williams.
"It was probably my fault," said
Gay, the 2007 world champion in
the 100 and 200, who failed to
advance beyond the 100 semi-
finals in his first meet since a
July 5 hamstring injury.
"Some people say that when it
hits the hand, you should have it.
I'm a veteran. I've run all kinds of
relays. I've never dropped a baton
in my life. It's kind of upsetting. I
can't believe it."
For the first time since the
women's 4x100 was introduced
in 1928, not including the boy-
cotted 1980 Games, the USA
won't medal in either relay.
"The whole Games haven't
gone quite as planned for Team
USA in track and field," said Wil-
liams, who picked up the baton
and finished the race. "I told my
team that we're running through
the line no matter what."


The USA has realistic possibil-
ities to add to the medal haul, in-
cluding two gold possibilities, in
the final weekend, led by the
men's 4x400 relay Saturday and
Bryan Clay, who tops the decath-
lon entering the second day to-
day. The women's 4x400 also
should medal Saturday. though
Russia and Jamaica will be seri-
ous threats for gold.
Other medal contenders in-
clude: Brittney Reese in the
women's long jump today; Sha-
lane Flanagan, who took bronze
in the women's 10,000, in the
5,000 today; world champion
Bernard Lagat in the men's 5,000
Saturday; Shannon Rowbury in
the women's 1,500 Saturday;
and Ryan Hall in the marathon
Sunday.
With three days remaining, the
USA (four gold, eight silver, eight
bronze, 20 total) leads the medal
count in track and field. Russia's
10 (5-2-3) and Jamaica's nine (5-
3-1) follow.
But the sense is that the USA is
struggling, in part because of
some high-profile disappoint-
ments, in part because of its pre-
vious high standards.
In Athens, the U.S. team earned
eight golds, 12 silvers and five
bronze for 25 total medals. In the
last two world championships,
the USA took home 14 golds in
each, and the average for the last
three major championships is 12
golds and 26 medals overall.
Troubling signs here: No final-
ists in the men's long jump, high
jump or triple jump, all Olympic
firsts.


8


I









USA TODAY. FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008 11B


Beijing Games


Softball,



women



stranded


Blown '05 call belies

lOC's gender goals

BEIJING Rain fell at the Olympic softball
venue for most of the day, which was fitting for
the sad farewell that took place there Thursday
evening. It wasn't so much that the USA didn't
win its fourth consecutive gold medal in soft-
ball, although that was a shocker, but more
that the sport itself had lost, kicked out of the
next Olympic Games by a 2005 International
Olympic Committee vote that we now know
was a mistake.
Losing to Japan is one thing. Losing your en-
tire Olympic sport is something else again:
It's not an easy thing to do, to get rid of a
women's-only sport after the IOC president
says he wants to increase opportunities for
women in sports.
IOC President Jacques Rogge has stated that
he wants equal participation at the Olympics
for men and women a 50-
L -50 split. Yet he's not even
Close: at these Games, it's
Only 42% women, 58% men.
So how could his IOC bud-
dies vote to take women out
of the Olympics? It wasn't
*,. easy. Some IOC members
apparently thought softball
was baseball, which de-
served to get the boot for its
Commentary weak drug testing policies of
By Christine Brennan its top stars, plus the fact
that major leaguers will nev-
er be in the Olympics.
Others clearly didn't like the fact that the
USA has been the dominant team in the game
(until Thursday night) and enjoy sticking it to
the Americans whenever they can, even as
they covet U.S. corporate dollars.
Whatever it was, softball was gone, out of
the 2012 Games and now fighting to be voted
back for the 2016 Olympics. All the while,
Rogge merrily talks about the importance of
women's sports in the Olympics with a
straight face.
On his watch, the numbers tell another sto-
ry. Of 111 IOC members, only 16 are women.
IOC members surface in public most often at
medal ceremonies. At these Games, I've wit-
.nessed dozens of medals being put around
athletes' necks, and only once have I seen a
female IOC member performing the task.
If the IOC is going to lead the way in the
development of women's sports, particularly
in nations that do not currently encourage
girls and women to play sports, it must look in-
ward first.
And it's not just the IOC. Even the U.S. Olym-
pic Committee is having its troubles. While it
fields Olympic teams that always feature
standout female athletes, at its opening news
conference before the Games began, five white
men sat before the world's news media. That
the USOC's leadership is all male and all white,
at least at the very top, is an unwelcome sur-
prise in 2008.
This is the uneven playing field on which
softball is trying to make a comeback. It is one
of seven sports going for two open slots in the
2016 Games: baseball, golf, squash, rugby, kar-
ate and roller sports are the others.
Golf had high hopes for making the 1996 At-
lanta Games, which quickly were derailed
when it proposed playing at Augusta National
Golf Club, which has no female members and
very few black male members.
Now, the International Golf Federation has
formed a committee to try to win a spot for
golf, perhaps at the expense of softball, in the
2016 Games. The committee has representa-
tives from, among others, the USGA, PGA Tour,
LPGA and, lo and behold, Augusta National.
The IOC should tell the IGF that there is no
place in the Olympic process for a discrimi-
natory club. But, because it's the IOC, the ulti-
mate old-boys network, it's unlikely it will.
So softball battles on, trying to persuade the
IOC to give it another chance. Back in 1996,
when the sport entered the Olympics, 86 na-
tions were playing the game. Now there are
131. That's significant progress. But instead of
encouraging and fostering its growth, the IOC
is now doing a great job of halting it.
One thing is for sure: The IOC can no longer
claim that softball is dominated by the USA,
not after Japan's surprising 3-1 victory in the
gold medal game Thursday. Of all the excuses
it uses to keep softball out of the Olympics, it
can't use that one anymore.
> For the latest from Beijing, go to Christine
Brennan's blog at brennan.usatoday.com


ir
(7


Bittersweet: From left,
the USA's Lovieanne Jung
and Jessica Mendoza are
subdued as Japanese
players celebrate their
gold medal, earned by
beating the Americans
3-1 in the softball final. It
was the first time the
USA had not won Olym-
pic gold since softball be-
came a medal sport in
1996.


Farewell gesture: With
softball voted out of the
Olympics for 2012 and
perhaps for good, the
USA's Cat Osterman
leaves her spikes at home
plate along with those of
some of her teammates
after the loss.


By Amy Sancetta, AP


Last blast: Crystl Bustos
finds a U.S. greeting com-
mittee at the plate after
her home run in the
fourth inning cut Japan's
lead to 2-1. But the USA
couldn't score again de-
spite loading the bases in
the sixth inning.


lv MalI enl iLh.USA IODA


Cutting weight sends U.S. wrestling captain to hospital


By Gary Mihoces
USA TODAY


BEIJING U.S. freestyle wrestling team captain
and medal hopeful Daniel Cormier was withdrawn
from his Olympic competition Thursday while in
the hospital recovering from
S complications because of exces-
p, sive weight cutting.
"For 10 years I've been taking
,I/ my body where it didn't want to
go, going up and down. I guess
my body had enough," Cormier
Wrestling told his hometown newspaper,
The Advertiser of Lafayette, La., in
a phone interview from the hospital.
Cormier, 29, a two-time Olympian and a bronze
medalist in the 2007 world championships, devel-


oped the medical issues in the hours after
his official weigh-in Wednesday after- |
noon. He made weight in the 211.5- f.
pound class.
USA Wrestling said it withdrew Cor- .
mier on the advice of doctors. No replace- :
ment was permitted.
"Up to 8:30 this morning, he (Cormier)
called me up and said, I'm going to come
over and just warm up and see how I feel
and go out there and compete,'" U.S. Out: No
coach Kevin Jackson said. Daniel C
"I said, 'I think the saying about the
doctor knows best is really what you should follow.
... Your health is a lot more important than any
medal at the Olympics Games or any games.'"
William Kuprevich, chief medical officer of the
U.S. Olympic team, said Cormier was initially unable


I I
Co


to rehydrate by drinking fluids, so he was
given intravenous fluids. "When you are
dehydrated, kidney function decreases,"
he said.
"We monitor Daniel every day. We
talk to him every day about his weight.
... He looked much better than he had
in years past," Jackson said.
In Greco-Roman wrestling last week,
"'". U.S. 163-pounder T.C. Dantzler said he
mat for had been off his game because of weight
ormier. cutting. He said he had been using a
scale that wasn't properly calibrated.
After winning a gold medal in the 121-pound
freestyle class Tuesday, the USA's Henry Cejudo
said he had a "rough" time making weight the pre-
vious day. Cejudo said he cut the weight in about an
hour and a half, using a plastic suit and sauna, riding


an exercise bike and skipping rope.
Saunas and plastic suits are not banned in inter-
national wrestling. They are in college wrestling.
The NCAA put the restrictions and other weight-
related rules in place in wrestling after the deaths of
three college wrestlers engaged in excessive weight
cutting during a six-week span in 1997.
U.S. boxer Gary Russell Jr. also was unable to
compete in these Games when he collapsed in an
attempt to make weight.
Cejudo, who bypassed college to focus on inter-
national freestyle, said of his method: "It's typical
for wrestling. Everybody cuts weight like that."
Jackson said of weight cutting in general: "For
the most part, these guys are professional where
they handle their weight. Every now and then,
you'll get one or two guys that aren't as disciplined
as others, and therein lies the problem."








PAGE140,FRIDY, AGUS 22,2008TRIBNEOSORT


j. ~


k;


~:w~ ~


JUST


* BEIJING
Associated Press
CRYSTL BUSTOS
rocked slowly from
side to side, kicked
away some dirt, then started
rocking again. As she and her
U.S. softball teammates waited
to receive their silver medals -
yes, silver the slugger clearly
wanted to get this over with.
Instead of capping their
sport's fourth and possibly final
Olympic appearance with a
fourth gold medal, the Ameri-
cans lost 3-1 to Japan in a game
they never led.
"You train your whole life
and you want to win," Bustos
said. "It hurts a lot."
What was supposed to be a
coronation turned into humili-
ation. The softball gals weren't
the only Americans feeling
that way Thursday, a rainy day
that was practically a washout
for the U.S. delegation.
Men's track
Start at the track, where the
chances for a 16th gold in the
men's 400-meter relay came to
an end not by getting beat,
but by dropping the baton on
the final exchange. In a first-
round heat, of all things.
"I take full blame for it,"
Tyson Gay said of his bad
exchange with Darvis Patton.
"I kind of feel I let them
down."
The drop means Gay, the
defending world champion in
the 100 and 200, will leave Bei-
jing not just empty-handed, but
without even running in a final.
Women's track
About a half-hour later, the
women made the same mis-


ONE OF THOSE DAYS...


Bad day for US at softball,

track and much more


tpke, when U.S. women's
relay anchor Lauryn Williams
couldn't get her hand around
the baton Torri Edwards was
trying to pass. It was eerily
reminiscent of the 2004
Athens Gaines, where
Williams'faulty exchange with
Marion Jones cost the U.S. a
medal.
"If people want to assess
the blame to me, that's OK. I
mean, I can take whatever it is
that people are going to dish
out," Williams said of the lat-
est dropped baton. "We had
good chemistry. The hand was
back there. She was there. I
don't know what happened."
Relay preliminaries are sup-
posed to be gimmes for the
United States. Setting aside
the boycotted 1980 Moscow
Olympics, you have to go back
to 1948 for the last time the
U.S. women failed to reach
the 400 relay final; 1912 and
1988 were the only previous
times it happened to the men.
This will be the first time the
men have gone consecutive
Olympics without winning the
400 relay.
Water polo
In water polo, the women
came in No. 1, favored to
finally win gold after coming
close in Athens and Sydney.
But the Netherlands jumped
ahead 4-0, and the Americans
never recovered, losing 9-8.
The U.S. also never found a
way to stop Danielle de Brui-
jn. She scored seven goals,
including the game-winner


PAGE 14C, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008


TRIBUNE SPORTS


,...


'<









TRIBNE SORTSFRIDY, UGUS 22,2008SPAGRTS


Leevan


'Superman' Sands


leaps to bronze medal win


FROM page one

off the silver medal.
With two of the best
jumpers in the world trail-
ing him, Sands watched as
neither Arnie David Girat
of Cuba (57-5 3/4 or 17.52)
or Marian Oprea of Roma-
nia (56-6 or 17.22) could
surpass him.
That's when Sands
flashed a big broad smile
across his face.
"I was just hungry.about
it. I just thought back
about the past and that was
the motivation for me,"
said Sands, who noted that
he was thrilled to have the
support of his coach Henry
Rolle and his parents,
Inspector Elaine and Lee-
van Sands Sr. in the stands.
His only regret that his
wife, Danielle, and his son,
Leevan III, were not able
to make the trip from
Auburn here to help him
celebrate.
"I knew when I came off
the hop that was it," said
Sands about his medal
leap. "The speed was nice
and I had a good hop. I
knew I had the jump, so I
just finished it."
Now that he can call him-
self an Olympic medalist,
Sands said he's relieved
that all of the setbacks that
hampered his progress over
the last two years are
behind him.
"I was really down. I was
down to the dogs," he
lamented. "A year ago I
didn't have a dime in my
name, I didn't have a con-
tract for two years. So I'm
just thankful."

Success_
Confident of success
from the preliminaries two
days ago when he needed
just his first jump 'to
advance to the final, Sands
said he knew he had a big
one in him, so he just had
to relax and execute his
phases and he would
achieve it.
"I wasn't too tense. I was
relaxed, so I knew the big
one was going to come," he
charged. "I knew that
David was a good competi-
tor behind me. But after
the last two jumps, I knew
I had it.
Tagged with the distinc-
tion of being the Bahamas'
first medalist at these
games, Sands said it's a
great feeling for his
achievement, which came
just after Chris 'Bay;'
Brown was denied that
opportunity when the
Americans swept the men's
400 final.
Asked if he got a chance
to see how David Neville
dived across the finish line
to nip out Brown for the
bronze, Sands said he
watched the entire race
and was just as stunned.
"I thought he was going
to run fast enough to at
least get a silver, but you
never know what happens
in the final," Sands pointed
out. "All of the other guys
stepped up their game.
"I was shouting from the
sidelines 'Chris, let's go.' I


don't know if he heard me,
but I think he did his best."
Sands he said spoke to
Brown and he knew that he
was prepared to put it all
on the line, but he really
got surprised at the finish
line.
Inspired by the crowd,
Sands said he used them to
help propel him to his first
Olympic medal by feeding
off thtffW'ehever one of
his 'competitors passed
.4'Ihb i m.
"The Chinese people was
clapping. They motivated
me," said Sands, who actu-
ally just ran through his
sixth and final jump when
he realized that the bronze
was his to collect.
He thanked all the
Bahamian people and his
friends from Temple Chris-
tian Academy, Barton
Community College and
Auburn University who
have been mailing him
and encouraging him to go
for it.
Sands, a bronze medalist
at both the Commonwealth
Games and the Pan Amer-
ican Games, became only
the second Bahamian to
win a medal in the triple
jump at the Olympics.
Frank Rutherford was the
first to do so when he won
the bronze at the 1992
Olympics in Barcelona,
Spain the first medal ever
.achieved by a Bahamian in
track and field.


CORRECTION
IN YESTERDAY'S sto-
ry 'Proud parents watch
Leevan Sands' Olympic
medal quest' Leevan's
father was -incorrectly
referred to as Inspector Lee-
van Sands when, in fact, it
was his mother, Elaine
Sands, who should have had
the 'inspector' prefix.


=.


FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008, PAGE 15C


TRIBUNE SPORTS









P 6 D G ,TS


OLYMI

SCHED

BEIJING, C1
Here's a look
events the Ba
an athletes w
competing in
XXIX OlymF
Games at a g.
this week:


N TODAY


Men's 4 x 400 me
heats

* Competitors Ch
pher Brown, Andr
(pictured), Michae
ieu, Andrae Williar
Avard Moncur and
Miller in lane three
two. Start time 8:1

* SATURDAY

Men's 4 x 400 me
final


PIC

ULE

hina:
at the
ahami-
ill be
at the
)ic
lance















tre relay


iristo-,
etti Bain
.I Math-
ms,
I Ramon
in heat
0.



tre relay


risto-
atti Bain,
\ndrae
oncur
Start


BOUDPARENTS


Mother and father of Leevan Sands
thrilled with his Olympic achievement


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
BEIJING, China: While
Leevan Sands Sr was keeping a
track of the performances in
the men's triple jump, his wife,
Inspector Elaine Sands said
she couldn't watch the end of
the men's triple jump.
But when it was completed,
she said she and her husband
were thrilled to walk down the
stairs in the stands at the Bird's
Nest National Stadium to con-
gratulate their son, Leevan
'Superman' Sands on winning
the bronze, medal last night.
"I am so excited for him,"
said Elaine. "He was quite dis-
appointed when he didn't win
a medal at the last Olympics
when we traveled with him in
Sydney, Australia and last year
at the World Championships.
"But we knew that he had a
good chance to win one here.
That was why we made sure
that we came here to support
him. It was just a great feeling
to see him finally do it."
While he watched patiently
recording the results, Leevan
Sr. said he was even more
proud of his son's big moment
because it was one that he had
dreamed about for a long time.
"I have been traveling with
him since he was six years ago


and he always talked about
being an Olympic medalist,"
the elder Sands stated. "I just
wanted to make sure that I
was here when he did it.
"I told him that I believed in
him and I knew that he could
do it. So when it happened,
for me, there was no greater
feeling than to be in the stands
to watch it happen."
The Sands, who had spent a
day in the Games \ village with
their son after he had quali-
fied for the final, said they
intend to take him out to din-
ner tonight and allow him to
order whatever he wants off
the menu.
But elder Sands said they
intend to shut down their
street in Pinewood Gardens
when his son comes back
home for a celebration.
"We are just so happy that
he finally won his Olympic
medal after all that he went
through," Sands Sr stated. "He
worked so hard to get to this
moment and we are so happy
that it finally came for him."
Sands joined former nation-
al record holder Frank
Rutherford as the second
Bahamian to win an Olympic
bronze medal. Rutherford
claimed his medal in
Barcelona, Spain in 1992 when
he became the Bahamas' first
Olympic medalist in track and
field.


Ijp~ .


PAGE 16C, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 200,8
4


TRIBUNE SPORTS