<%BANNER%>

DLOC



The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01088
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: July 30, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01088

Full Text


















Volume: 104 No.207


Tribune


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


BAHAMAS EDITION


~A~l


WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008 .,^, PRICE 750


Hospi
II


Prisoner's


escape from


police station


is investigated


Chief justice calls
action by Coroner
'palpably wrong'
F-
By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
A "FUNDAMENTAL
ERROR" made by Coroner
William Campbell in the
inquest into the death of burns
patient Christopher Esfakis y es-
terday led to the Chief Justce
quashing the verdict and order-
ing a new inquest.
The Coroner's Office Nas
also ordered to pay $10,000 to
the doctor who was primarily
responsible for the 42-year-old's
care in the three days, prior to
his death because Coroner
Campbell in essence deter-
mined the verdict himself by
offering jurors only one verdict
for their consideration at the
end of the hearing.
That February 2008 verdict
was that Mr Esfakis died at
Doctor's Hospital in April 2002
from natural causes "substan-.
tially and significantly con-
tributed to by neglect" on the
part of medical staff there.
In a remarkable turn of
events, a visibly surprised Chief
Justice Sir Burton Hall quickly
ruled on an application by Dr
James Iferenta for the verdict
to be quashed after hearing of
SEE page 15


POLICE are investigating the
circumstances of a prisoner's
escape from Central Police Sta-
tion last week, just months after
a Bahamian man wanted in the
United States escaped from cus-
tody.
Omar Smith, an inmate at
Her Majesty's Prison in Fox
Hill, got away when he was left
unattended, allegedly by a neg-
ligent police officer, The Tri-
bune has learned.
It is expected the officer
responsible will either be arrest-
ed or fired as a result of the
investigation.
Officers at Central Police
Station in East Street North,
downtown Nassau, were not


"-o




ROADWORKS ARE taking place to improve the surface of the Milo Butler Highway. The work should be
completed in time for the new school term.


Man accused of threatening to
kill GB chief immigration officer


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT A 28-year-old
West End man was arraigned
in Freeport Magistrate's Court


aafy i Re ABlown
way By A- urncane

Oi you can rest easy knowing
thar you have excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

SNobody does it better.


INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

1Xifa MrIMltR I UMW 13HOlT#


accused of threatening to kill
Grand Bahama's chief immi-
gration officer.
Edwin Deveaux appeared
before Magistrate Debbye Fer-
guson in Court 1 on Monday.
He was charged with two counts
of threatening to kill Mrs Faus-
teen Major-Smith, Acting Assis-
tant Director of Immigration in
Freeport.
It is alleged that the accused
made the threats on June 17
and 25, putting Mrs Smith in
fear for her life.
The prosecution alleges that
on those dates, the defendant
wrote letters that were deliv-
ered to Mrs Major-Smith,
in which, he threatened to kill
her.
Deveaux pleaded not guilty
to the charges and was granted
$2,500 bail with three sureties
on the condition that he makes
no contact with the complainant
or his bail would be revoked..
* Magistrate Debbye Fergu-
son adjourned the case to
March 16, 2009 for trial.


able to expand on information
received by The Tribune.
And press liaison officer for
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force, Walter Evans, was not
able to say why Smith was in
prison or why he was being'held
temporarily at Central Police
Station.
The escape occurred'just five
months after high-profile drug
suspect Melvin Maycock Senior,
42, disappeared from his hold-
ing cell at Elizabeth Estates
Police Station, and officers
found his son, Melvin Maycock
Jr there instead.
Maycock Sr, of Bougainvil-
SEE page 15


Body found floating at sea


FISHERMAN Charles McIntosh
noticed the body two miles off-
shore and immediately called
police.
Tim Clarke/Tribune staff


* By CAPUCINE DAYEN
A FISHERMAN discovered
a body floating at sea off New
Providence yesterday morning.
Charles McIntosh said he was
with his son and niece around
Coral Harbour when he noticed
the body two miles offshore.
"He must have been floating
for over a day," he said.
Mr McIntosh immediately
called police and brought the
body to shore "to let officials
deal with it."
An ambulance arrived on
The Ramp on Marshall Road
and shortly after the body was
carried away by Common-
wealth Funeral Home.
The man is believed be a
Haitian in his late thirties who
SEE page 15


Attorney calls on PM to inform

nation if he has read the EPA
* By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net
ATTORNEY Paul Moss is calling on the Prime Minister to
come forward and inform the country if he has read the Econom-
ic Partnership Agreement the Bahamas is set to sign with the
European Union (EU), and if he thinks it is in the best interest of
the Bahamas.
"We have yet to hear from our Prime Minister in a meaningful
way on this agreement. He has not said more than three sentences
about this agreement and now Parliament is on almost a two
month holiday," said Mr Moss yesterday at a news conference in
SEE page 15


The


j4WAKE UP!

.' -' -ndwich


SEE E-'CLTiO


Small contractors
consider forming
an alternative
lobbying association
* By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff
Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net
A GROUP of small con-
tractors are considering
forming an alternative lob-
bying association, as it is
claimed that Bahamas
Contractors Association is
a body primarily repre-
senting the interests of
large firms.
J Jefton Coakley, presi-
dent of Port Atlantic Con-
struction Developers, said
that a number of small con-
tractors have approached
him to form the alternative
body which may be called
the Average Black Con-
struction Association as
large white-owned firms
SEE page 15


.,' %..
"Y J:-:, .. :: "+,,' .,"w" .,' ; ,, );, -- :1.0-


lie







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008


LOA NW


ZNS acquires the exclusive TV


rights to Olympics for Bahamas |


THE Broadcasting Corpo-
ration of the Bahamas has
announced that it has
acquired the exclusive tele-
vision rights to broadcast the
2008 Summer Olympics in
the Bahamas.
The rights were acquired
from the Caribbean Media
Corporation (CMC), the
only entity authorised to
exhibit the NBC Signal in
English on free terrestrial
television and basic cable in
the region.
"Any retransmission of
NBC's 2008 Summer
Olympic Games coverage by
another cable, satellite or
television station will there-
fore be in contravention of
the exclusive rights acquired


by BCB," the corporation
said in a statement.
In addition, the BCB said,
Universal City Studios Pro-
ductions has confirmed that
in the event a cable company,
satellite company, or any oth-
er broadcaster in the region
has an already existing agree-
ment to retransmit the NBC
channel, such agreements
"do not extend to overage of
the 2008 Summer Olympic
Games."
The BCB said it intends to
protect all of its rights under
the agreement.
It said that all questions
about retransmission
rights for the NBC signal
should be directed to the
CMC.


Man in court on robbery charge
AN 18-YEAR-OLD man was arraigned in Magistrate's
Court yesterday on a robbery charge.
It is alleged that on Saturday, July 19, Rolin Alexis of Sir
Lynden Pindling Estates, being concerned with Andy Fer-
guson, robbed Doris Jauregui of a brown leather purse con-
taining $950.
Alexis, who was arraigned before Magistrate Derrence
Rolle at Court 5, Bank Lane, pleaded not guilty to the charge.
He was remanded to Her Majesty's Prison.
His co-accused, 25-year-old Andy Ferguson, was arraigned
on the robbery charge last week.
He has also been remanded to Her Majesty's Prison.
The case has been adjourned to September 5.


Anglican advisory group calls for



ban on same-sex union blessings


* By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
AN ANGLICAN advisory
group has called for a ban on
the blessings of same-sex unions
and the appointment of openly
gay bishops to avoid a "fracture"
within the Anglican church.
The advice was given at the
Lambeth Conference in Canter-.
bury, which is being attended by
Anglican Archbishop of the
West Indies Drexel Gomez.
In delivering its preliminary
observations to the 650 bishops
at the ongoing conference, the
Windsor Group said a moratori-
um on the controversial issues
is necessary to avoid "irrepara-
ble damage" to the Anglican
community.
The group, led by former
Archbishop of the Middle East
Clive Handford, also said a ban
must be placed on "cross-bor-
der interventions" which would
prohibit African bishops from
setting up "alternative" parishes
for traditionalists and ordaining
bishops to run them in the US.
The report says in part: "The
Windsor Report sets out
requests for three moratoria in
relation to the public rites of
blessing of same sex unions, the
consecration to the episcopate
of those living in partnered gay
relationships and the cessation
of cross border interventions".


Advice given at conference

attended by Archbishop Gomez


"The failure to respond pre-
sents us with a situation ivhere if
the three moratoria are not
observed, the Communion is
likely to fracture.
"The patterns of action cur-
rently embraced with the con-
tinued blessings of same-sex
unions and of interventions
could lead to irreparable dam-
age".
Assistant Bishop in the
Bahamian Anglican Diocese
Gilbert Thompson said the bish-
ops should agree to the ban to
allow the church more time to
study church doctrine:
"That (moratorium) would
give the bishops a chance to fur-
ther study the Anglican
covenant, in other words, if they
agree to those things.. .It would
give the church a better mecha-


nism for dealing with splits and
matters which now face us.
"I think if they adhere to
those now, it would give us time
to come up with some patents
for church governance".
The moratorium calls for the
cessation of future and past
actions and to "practices that
may have already been autho-
rised as well as proposed for
authorisation in the future".
The matter will be placed
before a majority vote.
Strains between different fac-
tions in the 70 million member
church surfaced after the US
Episcopal Church ordained
openly gay clergyman Bishop
Gene Robinson of the Diocese
.of New Hampshire in 2004.
The conference runs until
August 3.


* By LISA LAWLOR
"CANS for Kids", a non-profit organisation
that recycles aluminum cans, celebrates its 10th
anniversary this year, having donated all profits to
children's causes.
The organisation was founded in 1998 by
Ginny McKinney, but has really taken off
this summer with the help of her daughter
Sydney McKinney as well as volunteer Kristen
Eldon.
It's better to contribute the'can as a whole,
rather than already crushed, said Sydney, but
either way it is essential we stop clogging our
landfills..

Money
"We need to .start thinking about recycling,
and this can also be a way to generate money in
our country," she said.
Cans for Kids condenses the cans into blocks,
and sends the resulting mass of aluminum to
West Palm Beach, Florida.
The recycling company sends a cheque back to
"Cans For Kids" which is donated to children's
causes and among individual contributors based
on the weight of cans donated.
"At Cans for Kids," Ginny said, "we really


ANGLICAN ARCHBISHOP of the
West Indies Drexel Gomez attended
the Lambeth Conference in Canter-
bury.


emphasise the importance of people being part of
the process to look after themselves".
"Anyone receiving should also be participating.
Schools participating are guaranteed 50 cents per
pound of aluminum", she said, which gives them
. their motto "A good reason for putting a can
into our bin."
Individual contributors can either arrange a
bi-monthly pick up with the organisation, or drop
off their can donation to one of six public depots:
at the Lyford Cay School, the Sandyport Gas
Station, New Providence Community Church on'
Blake Road, Paradise Island between the two
bridges at the public dock, Port New Providence
or The Hub on Bay Street ,
There is also a privately run depot in Treasure
Cove.
To date, LW Young High School has been the
biggest success story, generating $1000 since last
September.
Kristen added that a number of schools will
be coming on board this September.
She gave totals for schools like Trinity Christ-
ian, which earned $248 and Temple Christian,
which earned $518 this school year.
Cans for Kids' mother company is "Waste Not"
on. Essex Street.
It is here that the cans are condensed,
placed on palettes, and sent to the docks for ship-
ping.


The Bahamas Embassy in Beijing


to assume consular


* By CAPUCINE DAYEN
AS OF August 1, the Bahamas
Embassy in Beijing, China will
assume responsibility for the pro-
vision of all consular services in
the People's Republic of China.
These services include the
issuance of visas allowing persons
in China to visit the Bahamas as


well as the authentication of doc-
uments and .passport services for
Bahamian nationals in China.
The British Embassy in Beijing
previously provided these services
on behalf of the government of
the Bahamas as part of a transi-
tion phase.
The embassy's office at No 14
Liang Ma He Road has been


services
under renovation since 2006.
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette has stated his
appreciation for the "excellent
and professional" support pro-
vided through the United King-
dom's offices in China.
On July 1, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham announced that
former minister of state for immi-
gration Elma Campbell will
assume responsibility for the
Bahamas Embassy in Beijing as
Bahamas Ambassador to the
People's Republic of China.
Mr Ingraham said that having
served in the Cabinet over the
past year, he believes that Ms
Campbell is "ideally positioned
to represent the government and
to pursue its objectives abroad."
In regard to the Bahamas'
embassy in China, Mr Ingraham
said: "It is the intention of my
government to staff and support
the mission in Beijing so as to
ensure that the Bahamas receives
the maximum benefit from its
representation in the most popu-
lous country in the world with
one of the most rapidly expanding
global economies."
Anyone wishing to avail them-
selves of consular services in Chi-
na can contact the Bahamas
Embassy at the following address:
The Embassy of the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas
4th Floor, Unit 2,
14 Linagmahe Nan Lu,
Chaoyang District,
Beijing, China 100600
Telephone 011-86-10-6532-2522


Buy? Sell?

Expect more from your broker.



Qt 0 o wi 4t CFAL
brok gt 5CtV' rCCS

D-.^ I \CV4^es colkec4C;

[ D CoofA+e .olow- y

fAvov AAb^le r^4

^ L.oc d ".,te.4'o4,o% 1 " 4 o'd;5

AI co 4M4' 40o reseArCt.

C As4o5w0VItCA 5e |

f S4Se4 ise

( O~^ Access




Whether you are a new or seasoned investor,

CFAL offers the most complete brokerage

service in The Bahamas.


Call us today. We'll show you how to get the most out
of your investments by getting the most out of us.







CFAL
Brokerage & Custodial Services 1 Investment & Corporate Advisory
Pension Administration I Shareholder Services
Nassau T: 242-502-7010 F: 242-356-3677
Freeport T: 242-351-8928 F: 242-351-4050
info@cfal.com I www.cfal.com


MAIN SECTION
Local News .....................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,15
Editorial/Letters. ....................................... P4
Advts .......... .............................. P10,14,16
Sports.......................................... P11,12,13
BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION
Business .................................... P1,2,3,4,5,7
Com ics..................................................... P6
Taste ...................................................... P8,9
Arts .............................................. P10,1i,12


CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION 8 PAGE SUPPLEMENT
USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES
USA TODAY SPORTS SECTION 12 PAGES


It's in the can as organisation


celebrates I Oth anniversary








WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


LOA NW


O In brief


Marijuana

seizure:

Police quiz

third person


POLICE have taken a
third person in for question-
ing in connection with last
week's seizure of $1.7 mil-
lion worth of marijuana.
At around 11.30pm on
Monday, officers of the Drug
Enforcement Unit (DEU)
detained Deangelo Adderley
at a home in the gated com-
munity of Treasure Cove.
Adderley was wanted for
questioning in a recent drug
Seizure that took place near
Stuart's Cove.
Two men have been
charged in connection with
the incident.
Anthony Gibson, 32, and
Marklyn Gibson, 31, both of
Sandilands, Village Road,
were arraigned before Mag-
istrate Carolita Bethel last
Monday, charged with pos-
session of dangerous drugs
with intent to supply; con-
spiracy to possess dangerous
drugs with intent to supply;
importation of dangerous
drugs; and conspiracy to
import dangerous drugs.
Both men pleaded not
guilty to all charges. Gibson
also pleaded not guilty to the
charge that he threatened
woman police Constable
2895 Ford with death on July
21.

BAIC staffers

upgrade their

business skills


THE Bahamas Agricultur-
al and Industrial Corpora-
tion's staffers have upgraded
their business services skills
as interest in entrepreneur-
ship grows.
"BAIC is rebuilding its
capacity to deliver one of its
core products the business
plan," said deputy general
manager Don Major.
Through its Business Ser-
vices Division (BSD), BAIC
offers entrepreneurs free
assistance in the preparation
of business plans.
"The quality of our prod-
uct is high," said Mr Major.
"We have had a great deal of
success in getting our plans
funded."
Pursuant to the fulfilment
of their mission, 'Building
Successful Businesses', Mr
Major organised the Busi-
ness Plan Training Course.
"We want our staffers to
remain on the leading edge
of the skills of the craft, so
that in their business adviso-
ry and development roles,
they would advance the
BSD's twin strategies of
'building entrepreneurs' and
'building enterprises.'
"BAIC is the premier
provider of entrepreneurial
training, development, and
support services through its
business advisory and devel-
opment department, its
handicraft development pro-
grammes, and its agricultural
development and support
activities."









Share


UNITED NATIONS REPORT




Bahamas helps





turn tide against





AIDS- UN study


* By KARIN HERIG
,Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net
FEWER people are dying of
AIDS worldwide and the
Bahamas has made its contri-
bution to the declining num-
bers, particularly by making
medication available to the
majority of its infected pregnant
women to prevent them from
transmitting the HIV virus to
their babies, the latest report
by the United Nations said.
According to the UNAIDS
2008 Report on the global
AIDS epidemic, which was
released yesterday, there have
been substantial decreases in
HIV infections and AIDS-relat-
ed deaths.
However, the AIDS epidem-
ic is not over in any part of the
world, the UN warned.
The report states that the
Bahamas is one of 10 of the 113
surveyed countries in which
over 75 per cent of infected
pregnant women received drugs
to prevent their babies from
developing the virus.
From 2005 to 2007, the per-
centage of HIV positive preg-
nant women receiving anti-
retroviral drugs to prevent
mother-to-child transmission
(PMTCT) went up from 14 per
cent to 33 per cent worldwide.
In this same period the num-
ber of new infections among
children fell from 410,000 to
370,000, the UN said.
"Several countries such as
Argentina, the Bahamas, Bar-
bados, Belarus, Botswana,
Cuba, Georgia, Molodova, the
Russian Federation and Thai-
land have achieved close to uni-
.versal access with more than 75
per cent coverage of PMTCT.
"The report shows that the


* Medication for infected

pregnant women paying off


* Fewer people worldwide

dying of the disease


combined will and efforts of
governments, donors, civil soci-
ety and affected communities
can make a difference."
The report states that about
one-third of pregnant women
worldwide with HI'V get drugs
that can prevent their babies
from catching the virus, up from
about nine per cent in 2004.
The UN further found that
there have been "significant
gains" in preventing new HIV
infections in a number of heav-
ily affected countries, including
Rwanda and Zimbabwe.
Changes in sexual behaviour
in those countries, the report
said, have been followed by
declines in the number of new
HIV infections.
Condom use is also increasing
among young people with mul-
tiple partners in many countries,
the UN found.
"Another encouraging sign is
that young people are waiting
longer to have sexual inter-
course.
"This has been seen in seven
of the most affected countries:
Burkina Faso, Cameiroon,
Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi,
Uganda and Zambia. In
Cameroon the percentage of
young people having sex before
the age of 15 has gone down


from 35 per cent to 14 per cent,"
the UN said in a press state-
ment.
However, despite these posi-
tive developments, the UN
found that rates of new HIV
infections are rising in many
countries such as China,
Indonesia, Kenya, Mozam-
bique, Papua New Guinea, the
Russian Federation, the
Ukraine, and Vietnam. Increas-
es in new HIV infections are
also occurring in more industri-
alised countries such as Ger-
many, the United Kingdom and
Australia.
Last year, Perry Gomez,
director of the National AIDS
Programme, in the Bahamas,
said that AIDS infections are
unfortunately once again
increasing.
World wide, about 2.7 mil-
lion people contracted HIV, the
virus that causes AIDS, last
year an eight per cent jump
from 2006, according to the
report.
The number of deaths
dropped by about 10 per cent to
2 million,
New cases stayed at 2.7 mil-
lion even as the percentage of
young people having sex before
age 15 fell in many African
countries.


New weapon in fight



against breast cancer


* By LISA LAWLOR
BREAST cancer, a frequent
killer of Bahamian women, can
now be more easily spotted
thanks to a new digital detec-
tion system at the Centreville
Medical Pavilion on Collins
Avenue.
The centre is now offering
digital mammographies with the
state-of-the-art Fischer Seno-
Scan machine. It is widely
accepted to be the best system
in catching the early develop-
ment of breast cancer.
Dr Arthur Porter, managing
director of the Cancer Centre,
said: "Recent studies prove dig-
ital mammography to be 28 per
cent more effective than con-
ventional analog film for.
women under 50." This is
because, the New England
Journal of Medicine revealed,
"digital has much better con-
trast resolution."
President and CEO of the
Centreville Medical Pavilion
(CMP), Dr Conville Brown
said: "This unit is the first of its
kind in the Bahamas and with
breast cancer being such an
important issue in our country
today, it is only right that our
women have access to the best
medical technology available."
"Conventional film mammo-
grams are 45 to 65 per cent spe-
cific. This means that the best
results give only a 65 per cent
accuracy report; the imaging
technology is just not there.
With the digital breakthrough
that figure goes up another 28
per cent to an average of up to
93 per cent specific accuracy,"
said Dr Kumar, radiologist at
the new breast centre.
Dr Kumar reported the new
digital system is being used
between five to 10 times per
day, and he has personally
caught three cases of breast can-
cer that might not have been
detected without the radiolo-
gist's new machine.
Those three cases were
women coming in with no sus-
picion of breast cancer, and
were just in for their annual
check-up.
He additionally reported five


Digital mammographies boost

chances of early detection


dl'





~


7"mT nmi -ss-,aa,.aIai.v. .
or six cases of "suspicious
lesions" that they will look into
with more tests an ultrasound,
biopsy or MRI (magnetic reso-
nance imaging).
The higher resolution of the
digital reading enables doctors
to see more detail within the
soft tissue of the breast. The
Fischer Seno-Scan produces;
images with more than twice
the resolution seen in conven-
tional scans.
The ifew digital system also
makes possible an enhancement
and zooming in of images up to
four times that of conventional
film mammography.
The system also has Comput-
er Assisted Diagnosis (CAD)
which more and more radiolo-
gists are welcoming as their
"second pair of eyes". CAD can
even pick up calcifications
which are suggestive of cancer.
The American Cancer Soci-
ety said "CAD systems may aid
the radiologist by substantially
improving detection of early
stage malignancies."
In the digital mammography
industry, the Fischer Seno-Scan
has the highest resolution avail-
able, delivering up to 60 per
cent less radiation per dose


"This unit is
the first of its
kind in the
Bahamas..."


Dr. Conville Brown

compared to film and other dig-
ital systems, and is large enough
to accommodate most breast
sizes without the patient need-
ing to be specially positioned.


Surprise over govt

plan to tear down,

replace schools


* By CAPUCINE DAYEN
The government's plan to tear
down and replace several high
schools in New Providence
comes as a complete surprise to
some school administrators and
union officials.
When asked about the plan
yesterday, a Bahamas Union of
Teachers (BUT) official seemed
amused by the suggestion that
the schools would actually be
demolished. He said some
repairs or extensions may take
place, but he doubted the
schools would be fully replaced.
"Such a project will never take
place," he told The Tribune.
The headmaster of DW Davis
said that he only found out
about the plan in The Tribune
last week. Nevertheless, he
agreed that his school has aged,
and said he would "welcome the
plan with open arms."
"We are in the 21st century
and we ought to be in a 21st cen-
tury facility," he said. "We need
the proper technology, a library
and gym, for a good environ-
ment helps the kids in their
learning.",
The principal of LW Young
Junior High did not seem aware
of the demolition plans at all, as
he told The Tribune: "The gov-
ernment wants to expand the
building. I think that is the
plan."
Last week, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham spoke about
the matter and stated: "We are
literally patching them up and
spending money on the schools
- they really should be
replaced."
He said government intends
to use the money from the sale


of BTC to demolish and replace
at least seven high schools in
New Providence.
According to Mr Ingraham,
the need to replace the schools is
a direct consequence of deci-
sions made 30 or 40 years ago -
the time of the public school
expansion exercise launched by
the first PLP government.
"All of these school ought to
have still been in good shape.
While you have schools like the
one on the corner of Collins
Avenue and Wulff Road that
have been there for about 60
years, these other schools like
LW Young are only 30 years
old."
The schools earmarked for
demolition are:
L W Young Junior High
School on Bernard Road
H O Nash Junior High
School on John F Kennedy
A F Adderley Junior High
School on Baillou Hill Road and
Tonique Williams Darling High-
way (already partly demol-
ished).
S C McPherson Junior High
School on Baillou Road.
D W Davis Junior High
School on Wilton Street in Cen-
treville.
Government High School
in Yellow Elder Gardens.


SCrystal Court atAtlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2
S Lyford Cay (Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay)
Tel: 362-5235


your


The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.








'": I.ESDAY, JULY 30, 2008


*: *'a


OiWN


THE TRIBUNE


EDIORIAULTTERSTOTH EITOR


i \ I oi he first time, an experi-
,*, 1,1(. 1 i] ti1 slho\,', promise for halting the pro-
_I ,. h ier's disease by taking a new
'i l up the protein tangles that
1. o i> iI results from the drug called
,. ed Tuesday at a medical con-
e h o. electrified a field battered by
lieh drug was developed by
i., TauRX Therapeutics.
I : torc rigorous studies show it
Sr still sc\ eral years away from
; c..,ind i\perts warned against
S: j, I'. Butl they were excited.
; L 1 ; ic lirst \cry positive results I've
..i. l,-i toppi]iig mental decline, said Mar-
S ; gori. director of Alzheimer's
IL .-i, II .I lin" NatioTal Institute on Aging.
"!t 1\ ',l :II ll :c."
..' l .'ncy funded early research
it, '-hic.h are made of a protein
: I;i :icld J lop inside nerve cells.
o! hI -ciantists have focused on a dif-
i'!~ iIn hla-amyloid, which forms
slick',. 'mps ouLisiN.e of the cells but have yet
;o .,' ;i \\ 01 [,nLah!C trLaatminrit;
.r,, in the scco;id of three stages of
d,' in ;'c and scientists arce paying special
:;incniioin to. potciitial treatments because of the
a ;n. .it l .. c l i i. which afflicts more than
:'. ,! people worldwide and is mushroom-
ii,' ; tihe j LotpulatIion ages.
Th.' li AI/lqimer's drugs currently avail-
,r ic iii ccs' s n\mpl(inis of the mind-robbing
list , riaux chiciel is Claude Wischik, a
bio ist uit the .l tni\ crsitly of Aberdeen in Scot-
laini \ vho lono, has done key research on tau
langis 'ud.i iic iigg testing that Rerriber can
di o c ihc,. I le is ani "esteemed biologist,"
nii t'ic iL .cseiLc'h "comes with his credibility
h'I t, i i."'id Dr. Sam Gandy of Mount
ini io icl Medicn in New York. He
Ie ':| i,. sI intilic advisory panel of the
:\ l ic; \, A \ssoeiatioin.
I L|.. litJv. 321 patients were given one of
i, ,, ,o Rtemhcr or dummy capsules three
tiiiL. ;, dau\. The capsules containing the highest
d i,. i.i a :; ILI\\ in formulation that kept them
lioiin oiikini', ;nd the lowest dose was too
vi\d to kep [lie disease from worsening, Wis-
L i. i. the middle dose helped, as
iii I!'A : \\ idclV used score of mental per-
loriiii ii
li h ,i I;lc iIon placebo lost an average of 7
I (' 1 ,1 r ,i 1- ir ii function over six months
I, .. ,s II;iio Io r itrlmenti didn't'decline at
,' abit i year. the placebo group had-
O, III'C ido uel4inc hbut those on the mid-lev-


., . a .

1, 't-:^






'-d in town on
with warranty!


1-!OCK




SAI COUPE
AI SANTA FE
S;'7;1leage, very clean
ELANTRA Very clean
AiTUSCON GLS
.H WI GRAND VITARA 5dr
SAND VITARA 5dr

'KI BALENO .+,
UKIl IGNIS 1d
FA AVALON



... .F. .. F LIMITED
IN tHE BAHAMAS
322-3775 325-3079
i 1--- r --cl; oQueen, Hwy, 352-6122


el dose of Rember had not. At 19 months, the
treated group still had not declined as
Alzheimer's patients have been known to do.
Two types of brain scans were available on
about a third of participants, and they show the
drug was active in brain areas most affected by
tau tangles, Wischik said.
"This is suggestive data," not proof, Wischik
warned. The company is raising money now
for another test of the drug to start next year.
The main chemical in Rember is available
now in a different formulation in a prescrip-
tion drug sometimes used since the 1930s for
chronic bladder infections methylene blue.
However, it predates the federal Food and Drug
Administration and was never fully studied for
safety and effectiveness, and not in the form
used in the Alzheimer's study, Wischik and oth-
er doctors cautioned.
On Monday at the International Conference
on Alzheimer's Disease, other researchers
reported encouraging results from a test of a dif-
ferent experimental drug that also targets tau
tangles. That drug, by British Columbia-based
Allon Therapeutics Inc., was tested in people
with an Alzheimer's precursor, mild cognitive
impairment. ,
The tau-drug results are in stark contrast to
the flop of Flurizan, which was aimed at block-
ing enzymes that form the beta-amyloid clumps.
Myriad Genetics announced in June that it
would abandon development of Flurizan after
the failure. Full results were presented at the
conference Tuesday.
Also, fuller results were given from a closely
watched test of bapineuzumab, an experimental
drug that aims to enlist the immune system to
clear out the sticky brain clumps.
Its developers New Jersey-based Wyeth
and the Irish company Elan Corp. PLC pre-
viously announced that the 240-patient study
missed its main goal of improving patients' men-
tal performance at 18 months.
But the company found a silver lining the
drug appeared to help the roughly 60 per cent of
people in the study who did not have a gene that
scientists think makes Alzheimer's disease more
severe.
The -results back up the company's claims of
potential effectiveness in some patients, but
now there are concerns about possible side
effects. Twelve cases of a type of brain swelling
occurred in those on bapineuzumab and none in
the placebo group. The swelling caused few if
any symptoms, company scientists said, but out-
side experts said it may have contributed to
other side effects.
(* This article is from The Associated Press
wire service).


e i Tribune Limited
D, )/ ICTUSUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
/,,,/ t) Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

S\ II. L). DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

//,:/ //.\. E DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

P'uhlisher/Editor 1919-1972
( (ntrihuting Editor 1972-1991

.' \ /V ) 'D'PUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Sl'irley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
ti : M niiement Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
.,.vilc/ hotard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
A advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


_zheimer's drug shows promise


EDITOR, The Tribune.


Fatherless is the common form of boarding schools at
chord that transcends any dis- national community servi
cussion on the plight of the male would bode well for our so
-and the single most destructive ety in the long term.
force in national development. a child into the 21st century. The fact is we have abdicat
On the contrary, the presence This is to say that the present our parental responsibilities a
of the father within a loving makeup of the law in fact emas- the evidence of our failure
marital relationship with the culates the male. glaring.n
assistance of a mother embodies Secondly, we need a cultural We must recognize that.o
the prototype of which we all transformation, which should country as we know it is sick
should aspire. This arrangement be led by men of strong charac- the core and on life support.
clearly approves the male child be led men ston carac As we seek solutions though
and sets hi a health cty society. These personalities should we must always be mindful th
This dea, however, spocieak to include fathers, elected leaders, there are in fact many dece
This idea, however, speaks to pastors, coaches and "n and responsible men in o0
more than just a physical pres- pastors, coaches and mentors. country who have raised a
ence of a father, but rather the Boys learn through example entred woavell-balancedyo ar
ene of a ataher, but rather the and dlin mentored well-balanced you
affirmation and mentorship of a nd modeling. men.
principled male figure that As men we need to accept Additionally, mothers in ge
speaks and models true man- and recognize our generational eral are also doing a remar
hood. responsibilities to impact our able service to this country
Our society is inundated with sons, nephews and mentees. attempting to single handed
a concept called father hunger The trite and cavalier attempting to sin an overly fed
and mother crowding. approach to other social ills, nised society.
This state of affairs engen-, such as sweethearting, domestic That being said we d
ders overly self-conscious, abuse and incest should be con- acknowledge that this is not
undisciplined and dysfunctional demned and vilified. Remem- part of God's plan for mankin
males who are devoid of self- ber, they are watching us. The sis are egregious.
love nor do they appreciate Thirdly, parenting classes The statistics are overwheious.
their masculinity. These males should.be mandatory under cer- ing.
are angry, bitter and on an tain conditions through the aus- The evidence is piercing.
orchestrated path of self- pices of the department of social The diagnosis speaks to
destruction for the sole purpose services. dying patient.
of seeking attention. In this regard the entire The ball is still in our prove
They are yearning for their department should be over- bial court. Unless and until w
father. These insidious and hauled and properly equipped deliberately and passionate:
almost deliberate circumstances to meet the needs of our people, accept that the modus operant
have become a part of our cul- Men need instruction and has failed miserably we will fo
ture., education so that we learn crit- ever be responsible before Go
In general, the male leaders ical information about our- for a generation of men lost.
in our country have been found selves.. With men lost we have n
wanting. This process is not automatic. nation to build.
Iny my view our legislature It takes a deliberate effort by ,
shovuldadept the-will to bring those of us in authority and the, ... DR KENDAL.O- MAJO]
our 'liws regarding the consti- community at large. Nassau,
tutiOnal rights of the father with I would proffer that a July 22,2008.

Lynden Pindling Airport concerns:

T-shirt kiosks, runways and costs


secured, structured, challenge
environment for boys in t]


EDITOR, The'Tribune.

So much was said today
concerning the Lynden Pin-
dling Airport as the House
discussed related legislation.
I recall not so long ago a let-
ter writer to The Tribune
made comment that in the US
Departure lounge it would
seem that we are satisfied with
having two T-shirt kiosks
which are only related to The
Bahamas because of the
imprinting on the 'T' shirt the
words The Bahamas.


Janaees Uniform Center

Chesapeake Road

20% OFF ALL SCHOOL BAGS PURCHASED
before 3 August 2008


Monograham Shirts starting @
NCA/Temple Christian/Cherub Christian
St. Thomas More/Church of God
Kingsway/Queens College/ Xavier's

Girls and Boys Shirts White &
Ass. Colours

Adult Shirts White & Ass. Colours

R.M. Bailey

Christian Heritage starting @

Plain Skirts starting @

Strip Skirts starting @


$12.80




$9.75

$12.95

$14.50

$20.00

$25.00

$30.00

$35.00

$25.00


Plaid Skirts starting 0


Most School Jumpers starting @


Plaid


$35.00

$35.00


G.H.S. Jumpers


Store Hours Mon Sat 8:30 5:30 pm
We also custom make uniforms!!!

Tel:394-8385


I will not pussy foot about
as I simply cannot accept that
we need the concession for
Harley Davidson and Hard
Rock as the seemingly exclu-
sive concession for as simple a
product as T-shirts.
Surely, and I know there to
be many Bahamian designed
and Bahamas produced excel-
lent T-shirts which depict
scenes of the Bahamas or Flo-
ra or Birds of The Bahamas,
not something which is basi-
cally a US-franchise for a
motorcycle and a franchised
group of restaurants.
Before I close it seems all
41 MPs forgot the state of dis-
repair of the airport runways
when there was a change of
Government in 2002 the
FAA very nearly closed Nas-
sau International owing to the
unsafe condition of the run-
ways further as a reporter rais-
es today in one of the dailies is
that still the radar system is


ng
he
nd
ce
ci-
ed
nd
is
ur
at
h,
hat
nt
ur
nd
ng
n-
k-
in
ly
ii-
lo
a
d.
m-

a
r-
we
ly
di
r-
od
1o

R


not operating this is years
now, Editor.
Whoever decides the level
of the costs at Lynden Pin-
dling had better be careful
that the fees do not exceed
the cost of flying we are
very, very close.
It has been said before that
the passenger cost for the
presence of US Preclearance
is exorbitant.... I believe there
is a hidden charge of some-
thing like $23.00 so times
203m passengers that's over
$52.9 million a year.
Why hasn't the government
asked the US Government for
a contribution as the Prime
Minister says he is asking the
hotels who have been levying
an illegal tax on all their guests
for years isn't that only log-
ical?

JMOORE
Nassau,
July 23, 2008.


AIR-CONDITIONERS! AIR-CONDM
AIR-CONDITIONERSI AIR-CONDIIO
AIR-CONDITIONERS! AIR-CONDITIOI


STAY COOL ALL YE











939.01


* .


* -'a- *.


a *


Yu
CNNOT
EVEN IN .
. '" -: -r ,":: "*. -::-*, 4 :,* t,5i.,~


The male




crisis stopin




our national




development


I r U - T -D Q


w







WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALN


0 In brief


Bank of the

Bahamas opens


state-of-the-art

Straining centre
IN A move designed to revo-
lutionise the way staff look at
customer service the Bank of
the Bahamas says it has opened
a full-time, fully staffed state-
of-the-art training centre on Vil-
lage Road.
"Our goal is simple make
sure every customer we see not
only feels good about their
banking experience that day, but
treats and accepts BOB as their
banking partner for life," said
V Genra Brown, assistant manager
't for human resources, training
bi and development.
3- "That means going beyond
-i: transactions to establishing life-
long relationships built on
b. knowledge, assistance and
bi trust."
2i The centre includes 25 com-
puters for technical and systems-
related training, complete audio-
visual capabilities, ceiling-
mounted projectors with drop-
down screens and features an
Accordion divider allowing the
to large training room to be split in
In two for maximum flexibility of
*IL space usage.
bi The bank, with more than
Wf $716 million in assets, was
named the 2007 Bahamas
-n Chamber of Commerce Busi-
-A ness of the Year and recently
ni won Euromoney Magazine's
y_ prestigious Award for Excel-
.i lence for the second time.
BOB operates 12 branches on
o1 seven islands as well as BOB
Financial Services in Coral
SGables, Florida.


Three in custody

in connection WthI

SIllegal firearms I

- discovery
-( THREE men were taken into
custody for questioning over the.
last two days in connection with
on 0 f"ddis'overy of illegal firearms.
Officers from the Wulff Road
police station's detective unit
Jl ,feI, pAt.fip n the damiltonP1
Street area around 5pm on
Monday when they saw a Nissan
Sentra rental car with one occu-
pant.
As the officers approached
the vehicle, the driver attempted
to pull'off, dragging the officers
a short distance and causing
damage to an unmarked 2007
Ford Explorer.
21 As the driver got out of the
car, officers observed him
Is throwing an object under the
-r vehicle.
i -The police retrieved the
b object and discovered it to be a
S.45 handgun with four live
rounds of ammunition.
A 34-year old-resident of First
t Street in Coconut Grove was
taken in for questioning in con-
'J nection with this incident.
s" Yesterday, police also discov-
-; ered a handgun at a home on
a Peardale Road.
Officers of the Central Detec-
tive Unit (CDU) carried out a
search of the home at around
Ji 4am.
T They reported finding a .45
5 handgun with one live round of
3 ammunition and 12 live rounds
of ammunition for a .40 hand-
lI gun.
.- Following this, two men, one
22 and the other 28 were taken
in for questioning.

-Man is found guilty of
drug possession charge
A LONG Island man was
fined $5,000 after being found
guilty of a marijuana possession
charge.
On Monday, Magistrate Car-
olita Bethel fined Teko Pratt of
Simms, Long Island for posses-
sion of marijuana with the
intent to supply.
According to court dockets,
Pratt was found in possession
of the drugs on Tuesday, Janu-
ary 8 of this year.
Police reportedly executed a
search Warrant on a St Michael
Road home on that day, and
found 10 and a half pounds of
marijuana.
Five people were initially tak-
en into custody in connection
with the seizure.
However upon the comple-
tion of a trial, the other four
S defendants were acquitted.
Along with the fine, Magis-
trate Bethel also ordered the


seizure of the home where the
drugs were found.

ETRINATOR
FORPET PROBLEM


IN THIS undated photo provided by the FBI, Clark Rockefeller carries
his daughter Reigh on his shoulders. Authorities allege Rockefeller,
who is going through a bitter divorce with his wife Sandra Boss,
snatched 7-year-old Reigh in Boston on Sunday, July 27, 2008 and
may be trying to flee on a yacht from Long Island.
...... ................

Bay Street straw market

confirmation is 'Victory for

straw vendors everywhere'


PLP Chairman Glenys Han-
na-Martin is calling the confir-
mation that the straw market
will stay on Bay Street "a victo-
ry for straw vendors every-
where".
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham announced this week that
the government is not planning
to move the vendors from their
traditional territory, and said
he is hoping to meet with them
soon.
"It is a victory for straw veft-
dors everywhere 'and in partic-
Sular for those in the Bay Street
'Straw Market that the prime
minister has now announced
that the government has aban-
doned its plans to relocate the
Straw Market off Bay Street,"
Mrs Haina-Martin said in a
statement released yesterday.
She said: "It was the unre-
lenting and principled resistance
of straw vendors that has forced
the government to this position,
a position'which the prime min-
ister himself once held in the
days before the 2002 general
elections.
"It is however, a matter of
great regret for our country that
the newly-elected FNM gov-
ernment in May 2007 saw fit to
stop the work for the construc-
tion of a new straw market
which would have otherwise
been close to completion
today."
Upon coming into office, the
FNM cancelled the former PLP
administration's plan to build a
$23 million market complete
with restaurants and other facil-
ities, to replace the market that
burned down in 2001.
The FNM's position on the
matter was the facility their pre-


decessors had in mind was too
expensive and a waste of public
funds.
Since the fire, vendors have
been operating under a tent at
the western end of Bay Street.
Mrs Hanna-Martin said that
one year has now elapsed since
the election, "with no clear
articulated policy or plan
from the government as to
what will happen to these hun-
dreds of Bahamian entrepre-
neurs.
"As a consequence, today the
vendors continue to languish in
uncertainty under that tent in
sweltering heat conditions."
She said the PLP i4 calling
upon the government to begin
"as a matter of clear govern-
mental policy and aggressive
action, all the necessary steps
towards the reinstatement of
the straw market on the basis
of extreme urgency."


Bahamas coffee drinkers

still have beans to spare
COFFEE drinkers in The Bahamas are still buying their $3-a-day
caffeine infusions despite the credit crunch and a slowing economy.
Starbucks in Nassau reports brisk business even though the
famous coffee chain is experiencing well-publicised woes else-
where in the world.
Shammine Lindsay, store manager at Crystal Palace Casino,
said: "None of the things going on internationally are affecting the
Latin American region. Business has still been up, employee
morale is up no-one feels their jobs are threatened."
A supervisor at the Marina Village outlet said: "We are still
doing very well and we are not affected by what's going on else-
where."
Their comments came as Starbucks announced the closure of
three-quarters of its Australian coffee shops in the face of global
economic troubles.
The chain said 61 of 84 outlets were closing so it could concen-
trate on three main centres Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane.
The move follows its shock decision to close 600 coffee shops
across the United States as customers cut back on their caffeine
intake.
In America, a Save our Starbucks campaign has been launched.
In Nassau, however, there is no sign of a downturn for Star-
bucks business at its various outlets, including Woodes Rogers
Walk, Harbour Bay Shopping Centre and Marina Village, Par-
adise Island.
Bahamians are still ordering their lattes, mochas and frappucci-
nos, according to Starbucks sources.
The group, founded in Seattle in 1971, has more than 15,000
coffee shbps in 47 countries round the world.
Chairman Howard Schultz said the decision to close the Aus-
tralian outlets would help boost the company's international busi-
ness.
It in no way reflected the "strong state" of Starbucks' business in
other countries outside the United States, he said.
"There are no other international markets that need to be
addressed in this manner," he said.


Man sought in




alleged abduction




case 'may be headed




for the Bahamas'


UNITED States authorities were on high
alert yesterday, searching for a New York mil-
lionaire who allegedly abducted his daughter
and may be planning to flee to the Bahamas.
The New York police department, the US
Coast Guard and other officials yesterday con-
tinued the search for J Clarke Rockefeller, 48,
who police fear may be heading to the
Bahamas aboard a 72-foot catamaran, Ameri-
can media reported yesterday.
Police believe the catamaran "Serenity" is
docked in Long Island, New York.
Rockefeller, who police say has been oper-
ating under at least three different aliases in the
past, was last seen in Boston on Sunday after-
noon during a supervised visit with his daugh-
ter, Reigh Boss.
Reigh and her mother Sandra Boss, who
live in London, were in Boston for the visit.
During the supervised visit, Rockefeller
reportedly shoved a social worker and then
grabbed his daughter and jumped into a wait-
ing black SUV driven by an unidentified man,
US police said.
The social worker attempted to stop Rock-


,efeller's escape by hanging onto one of the
vehicle's door handles.
He was dragged for several feet before losing
his grip, US police said. The social worker sus-
tained minor injuries.
The black SUV was later seen near Grand
Central Terminal in Manhattan.
The suspect and his daughter were last seen
in front of the train station about 7.30pm.

Warrant

Police issued a warrant for Rockefeller's
arrest on Sunday evening.
Police yesterday had the SUV driver in cus-
tody and were interviewing him about the kid-
nap plan.
Rockefeller and his wife, Sandra Boss,
divorced last year. Reigh lives in England with
her mother, who is a partner in the consulting
firm McKinsey and Co, and is the chairman
of The Mount, author Edith Wharton's estate
in Massachusetts.
Seven-year-old Reigh goes by the nickname
of "Snooks".


AlHP Make your weekends work for you! Earn
a degree in Business, Accounting,
Computers, Human Resource Manage-
ment or Public Administration.

| New classes are forming now. Call Success for registration and program details. 324-7770



QUALITY DIESEL

HEAVY DUTY TRUCKS


$30,


"DU P T R.



400.00


L


$24, 355.00


g g


I( I
Bahamas Bus & Truc'k Co. Ltd.
^^^^^Montrose Ave.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^P ^^^ho e 32I 1 2 /F x 326-7452^^r*^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

^^^^^^HBIH^^^^^^^^BiBH^^^^^BH'^^B^^^^^^^^^^Ii^^A^HHH


40 Ah


p-


~' 1"~'"~ `








PAGE WENESDA, JUY 30,2008THE TIBUN


0 In brief

Bacardi Store
opens with

weeklong

celebration
THE new Bacardi Store will
celebrate its grand opening on
Bay Street with a week-long cel-
ebration featuring daily specials,
activities and the international
launch of Bacardi Reserva Lim-
itada a rare aged rum never
before sold outside its produc-
tion site in Puerto Rico.
The store is just steps away
from the cruise ship port, and
will bring "new excitement to
the high-traffic tourist area" of
Bay Street, the management
said.
"For many years, I have
dreamed of being an active par-
ticipant in the revitalisation of
Nassau and in particular Bay
Street," said Juan Bacardi, own-
er of Bristol Group of Compa-
nies Limited. "With the grand
opening of the Bacardi Store, I
am very excited to lead the
charge of the revitalisation of
the Bay Street business and
tourist district with 'such a high-
end offering. With the clout of
the Bacardi name and its inter-
national appeal, we're confident
this store will serve as a 'gate-
way' to the east end of Bay
Street."
To commemorate the open-
ing of the store, customers will
be able to sample a number of
the company's products under
the guidance of Willie Ramos,.
master brand ambassador for
Bacardi rums.
"The first-of-its-kind Bacardi
concept store, under a trade-
mark licence agreement with
the Bacardi trademark owner,
will be owned and operated by
the Bacardi Nassau-based dis-
tributor Bristol Group of Com-
panies Limited," said the man-
agement in a statement.
"The Bacardi Store will pro-
vide an unparalleled experience
for spirits consumers with its
premium, sleek design in keep-
ing with the Bacardi image -
featuring the Bacardi portfolio
of products at duty-free prices
and for the first time, a variety
of high-end Bacardi branded
accessories including hats,
shirts, gym bags, umbrellas, tow-
els and other items not available
for purchase in any other inde-
pendent retail store in the
w9rld."


HAITI MISSION: Special Series


On th


e


* BY MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
SPARSELY stocked shelves in the
supermarkets of Port-de-Paix are just
another sign of how the global food
crisis has hit Haiti harder than per-
haps any other country.
Families in North West Haiti who
are facing rising food prices have
become so desperate to fill their stom-
achs they are making soup out of dirt.
Pastor Degirjean Eneck, who
worked with Bahamian missionaries
from Grace Community Church in
Palmetto Village, Nassau, on their pro-
ject in Port-de-Paix, said: "They take
the earth, and mix it with water, and
maybe some green mango, and cook
it. That is how hungry they are."
In Pastor Eneck's home of Port-au-
Prince, mud-cakes made from clay
trucked in from an area north of the
capital mixed with tiny amounts of
salt and margarine, are becoming a
staple food for those living in the city's
vast slums.
The mud-cakes, which sell for one
Haitian gourde (around two cents),
are one of the only food items not
affected by the inflation pushing
Haiti's population towards starvation
and revolt.
Supermarkets can no longer afford
to import goods, and people cannot
afford to buy them.
Rather people in Port-de-Paix, sur-
vive on 'earth' and the sugar cane,
plantains, bananas or mangoes grown
on subsistence farms in the region.
In the poorest country in the West-


brink of


; '- ,. ._ -
-f


GRACE SHORT-TERM MISSIONS TEAM
members draw water from the well.
ern hemisphere, located just 70 miles
from Inagua, two-thirds of the popu-
lation live on less than $1 a day and
half are undernourished.
If the situation gets worse there
could be starvation in the next six to 12
months. The UN's Food and Agricul-
ture Organisation predicts Haiti's food
import bill will leap 80 per cent this
year, the fastest in the world.
Haiti is particularly vulnerable to
.global economic trends of higher food
and oil prices as it is almost completely
reliant on food imports, and migrant
relatives affected by the economic
downturn in the United States are now
less able to send remittances.
Food riots toppled Prime Minister
Edouard Alexis in April. Emergency
subsidies curbed prices and brought
calm, but the cash-strapped govern-
ment is gradually lifting them, and
fresh unrest is expected.,
Haiti has suffered from political tur-
moil and instability for many years.
Domestic agriculture is a disaster.
The slashing and burning of forests


One look at its super-solid, workhorse body tells you that the Nissan
Pickup was built to last. Designed for ease of maintenance and long-
running, trouble-free operation, the Pickup is an unbeatable worker.
And it's also an unbeatable companion when the job is done: with a
comfortable cabin and second-to-none versatility, it can handle nearly
any leisure pursuit. For work or play, on the road or off the NIssan
Pickup is tough to beat.


PICKUP


SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED
*


SHIFT the future !SA


Thompson Blvd. Oakes Field
t. 2, .326.6377*f. 242.326.6315
sanpin@coralwave.com


ON THE SPOT FINANCING WITH
COMMONWEALTH BANK
INSURANCE AVAILABLE WITH
ADVANTAGE INSURANCE
BROKERS & AGENTS LTD.


..,.....


.^ .

!, '= :"', ', ..
, 7 ;..


EMPTY shelves in a
Haitian supermarket


for farming and charcoal has degraded
the soil and rural infrastructure is
almost non-existent.
A decision in the 1980s to lift tariffs
when international prices were low-
er, and flood the country with cheap
imported rice and vegetables has com-
pounded Haiti's problems.
Now that imports are rocketing in
price, the government has vowed to
rebuild the withered agriculture sector
but that is a huge task given scant
resources, degraded soil and land own-
ership disputes.
Hope to restore agricultural devel-
opment in the country once capable of
producing world-class coffee for
export, is not felt however, by the
, Haitian people. Although Pastor
Eneck has faith in president Rene
Preval's new candidate for prime min-
ister, Michele Pierre-Louis, he does
not think she, or anyone, will be strong
enough to withstand the inherent cor-
ruption in Haiti's political system.
Mme Pierre-Louis, a former direc-
tor of FOKAL, a foundation providing
libraries, youth education programmes
and women's networks in Haiti, would
be the country's second woman prime
minister, and although Pastor Eneck
says he has heard good things about
her, he has very little hope.
."There is something in the system to
prevent prime ministers from doing
what they came to do," he said.
"They may go away and study in
the United States or Europe, and
come back with good intentions for
Haiti, but when they return, some-
thing stops them from achieving it."


-- BAHAMIAS High Commissioner to
BAHAMAS Canada lMichael Smith recently toured
High Commis- the North Pole weather station oper-
sioner to Cana- ated by the Canadian government.
da Michael He w'as with a contingent of 19
Smith (centre) Ambassadors and High Commissioners
stands with 17 from countries representing Europe.
Ambassadors Asia. the Amencas. and Africa. Organ-
missionerst ised by the Canadian government, w\ho
the Eureka paid three quarters of the cost, the vis-
weather station it was designed to expose the ambas-
near the North sadors to Canada's northern territories
Pole. The diplo- and to impress on them some of the
mats were Canadian government's priorities
from countries regarding climate change issues, arctic'
in Europe, Asia, sovereignty, 'polar science and eco-
the Americas, nomic development.
and Africa. The Eureka weather station is locat-
ed in the Canadian High Arctic (80
degrees north, 86 degrees west) on
Ellesmere Island and was established
jointly by the United States and Cana-
dian governments. The facility is iso-
lated from the rest of the world and is
only visited periodically by small twin
otter supply aircraft.
It is the most northerly area of con-
tinued habitation. Only about eight to
10 people weather the winter months
there. High Commissioner Smith said


G


A


M


B


I


E


R


JULY 31P
S SHOW
OPENING
7
BASKET B
IPM
CHURCH


while temperatures at Eureka can reach
40 degrees below zero during February,
their visit during the height of the sum-
mer w\as comfortable as the tempera-
ture was about 50 degrees above. He
did say, however, that the 24 hours of
sunlih ht was difficult to get used to.
The weather station provides the
data requred-l.or..the undaxsanmdHng
and prediction of meteorological phe-
nomena on a hemispheric scale and
more specifically to improve weather
predictions for North America. The
data collected is also used by airlines,
northern shipping, climatological stud-
ies and research.
High Commissioner Smith was par-
ticularly interested in the data collect-
ed on climate change, as the Bahamas
could be significantly impacted by rising
oceans and major changes in tradition-
al weather patterns. The Ambassadors
and High Commissioners spent nine
days touring other important govern-
ment facilities, stopping at the port of
Churchill in Manitoba, on the Hudson
Bay, before continuing on to Yel-
lowknife and Whitehorse,'the capitals
of the Northwest Territories and the
Yukon, as well as Inuvik.


GREAT HOMECOMING FESTIVAL .

COMENCES JULY 31-AUG 4

PAGEANT & TALENT COME AND ENJOY LIVE! (rncr
8PM oAcsii, JUNKANO0,
CEREMONIES AG 1 POLCE
PM rWE, ENTERTAINMENT


ALL GAMES AU: 2ST
THE PARKw& .
SERVICE AUG 34


M A11 @ MT. ZION


GOSPa MUSC ARTIST
CHURCH CHHORS
rmj IVEA n-mAkLAklBE*P


CUIWNG WITH THE ANUAANMUCHMORE
UG 4,12 NOON -Ull )DONT MISSTHIS ONE
M-


DA)


If you want to pursue a career in the legal field start by enrolling
in Success Training College'sParalegal Diploma program. Suc-
cess has everything to get your career started today.


Call For Registration Details


324-7770
Success Training College is registered with the Minis-
try of Education and approved by the Department of
Public PersonneL Credits earned at Success are trans-
ferable to Nova Southeastern University. Graduates
may also transfer to other colleges and universities in
Canada, the USA, the UK and the Caribbean. Call
Success now for program and registration informa-
tion.


- -I


- --


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008


*Bahama Hig Commissioner to

Canada Visits orthPoe watertaio


lpw


THE TRIBUNE


>







I Ht- I hI-IDUI-.


I- LOCA NEWS'


0 In brief

Six are taken
into custody in
connection
with dangerous
drugs discovery
A NUMBER of persons
were taken into custody by
police following an "inner-city
operation" conducted by police
in two residential subdivisions
in Freeport.
Chief Superintendent Basil
Rahming said six people four
men and two. women were
taken in for questioning in con-
nection with the discovery of
danger z drugs.
Police officers executed
search warrants at around 4pm
on Monday in the Winchester
Circle and Epsom Road areas
in search of illegal weapons
and/or dangerous drugs.
Mr Rahming said the opera-
tion resulted in the seizure of a
significant quantity of drugs.
He said that six persons rang-
ing in age from 17 to 40 are
helping police with their inves-
tigation.

Judge: EPA turned
Everglades 'blind eye'
E WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.
A FEDERAL judge says
the U.S Environmental Pro-
tection Agency turned a
"blind eye" to protecting the
Everglades under the Clean
Water Act, according to Asso-
ciated Press.
In a ruling Tuesday from
Miami, U.S. District Judge
Alan Gold ordered the EPA
to review water pollution
standards set by Florida for
the Everglades. Gold says the
EPA must determine whether
they meet federal require-
ments.
The ruling comes from a
2004 lawsuit filed against the
EPA by the Miccosukee Indi-
ans and Friends of the Ever-
glades. They claim the EPA
violated the Clean Water Act
by allowing Florida to change
its water pollution require-
ments for the Everglades and
to push ahead its pollution
compliance deadlines.
The tribe called the ruling a
victory. EPA had no immedi-
ate response.


National Security Minister stresses



importance of transparent policing


* By MATT MAURA
A TRANSPARENT and
incorruptible police force is the
bedrock of a country's democ-
racy and the foundation of its
freedom, Minister of National
Security Tommy Turnquest
told senior police officers.
Addressing a Royal
Bahamas Police Force anti-cor-
ruption seminar at the Paul H
Farquharson Conference Cen-
tre on Monday, Mr Turnquest
told the divisional commanders
that integrity and ethics are
essential elements of a suc-
cessful police force.
"It is absolutely important
that, as we move forward, no
one can point a finger at any
police officer [or] any law
enforcement officer, and that's
part of the whole process of
getting our country back to a
peaceful and safe one," Mr
Turnquest said.

Laws

"Police officers must not
only be incorruptible, but must
also be seen to be incorrupt-
ible. The Bahamian public sees
you as the embodiment of the
laws of the Bahamas; they see
you as the keepers of the gates
and as the moral protectors of
a higher and a more noble call-
ing," he added.
Mr Turnquest said a society
can only remain law-abiding if
law enforcement maintains its
moral fibre. He encouraged the


MINISTER OF National,Security Tommy Turnquest addresses divisional commanders.and senior offi-
cers attending the Royal Bahamas Police Force's anti-corruption seminar.


officers to always guard and
uphold the Bahamian values of
kindness, honesty and indus-
try.
He said law enforcement
officials hold "immense pow-
er" to keep the nation "safe
and lawful" so that the com-
munities can be places of moral
development for the children
of the country.
"I thought it was important
for me to attend this seminar
because I thought it was impor-
tant for me, as minister, to lend
my support to it and to send
the message that there is noth-


ing absolutely more impor-
tant," Mr Turnquest said.
He said that the seminar -
which will be held over two
days in New Providence and
two days in Freeport was
designed as a proactive mea-
sure that focuses on one of the
tenets of the Commissioner's
Policy Statement for 2008.
which speaks to the anti-cor-
ruption measures that are in
place and those that will be put
in place to rid the force of cor-
ruption wherever and whenev-
er it is found.
"This seminar acts as a


proactive step to providing the
senior officers and managers
of the Royal Bahamas Police
Force with the necessary tools
to deal with any matters of cor-
ruption if and when they do
come across it," Mr Turnquest
said.

Statement

Acting Commissioner of
Police Reginald Ferguson told
the divisional commanders and
senior officers that his policy
statement on corruption and


integrity is "non-negotiable."
"Therefore we, as an organ-
isation, must seek to minimise
corruption in order that pub-
lic confidence in the force is
heightened and to ensure that
its integrity is maintained. This
can only be achieved if all
employees and those who hold
formal positions, practise ethi-
cal leadership all of the time,"
Mr Ferguson said.
"You must have the courage
to live out. the core values of
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force courage, loyalty and
integrity when there is pres-
sure to compromise or even
rationalise.
"There are many benefits to
ethical leadership and they
include building trust which
brings credibility to both the
organisation and its employ-
ees," Mr Ferguson said. "This
is especially important for the
police force as we seek to build
the relationship between the
force and the community."
Mr Ferguson said the public
expects members of the force
to be held accountable for their
actions "and rightly so."
"Those who come to high
office must come with clean
hands," Mr Ferguson said. "In
fact, I believe that when citi-
zens have faith and trust in the
police, that they live up to their
responsibility and report crim-
inal activities. Indeed, I believe
that the elevation of trust
between the citizen and the
police contributes to crime pre-
vention."


Sir Arthur Foulkes welcomes Chinese politicians


* By LINDSAY THOMPSON
BAHAMAS Information Services
Director General Sir Arthur Foulkes wel-
comed a delegation from the, Internation-
al Department of the Central Committee
Communist Party of China on Monday.
It was one of several courtesy calls the
delegation is making, including a call on
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham.
Ambassador of the People's Republic
of China to the Bahamas Hu Dingxian,


accompanied the group headed by Ju
Lidong, director-general of the Interna-
tional Department.
Sir Arthur, who served as the Bahamas'
first Ambassador (non-resident) to China
and is a founding member of the China
Bahamas Friendship Association, noted
that China is becoming more important to
small developing states like the Bahamas.
He expressed gratitude for the assistance
China is giving the Bahamas in education,
cultural and sports development.


He also said that the Bahamas, though a
small country, is looking forward to
medalling at the 2008 Olympic Games slat-
ed for Beijing, China, in August.
Sir Arthur said he hoped that the stadi-
um in New Providence, being donated by
China, will be finished in time for Carifes-
ta 2012, to be held in the Bahamas.
Director-general Ju said China appre-
ciates the Bahamas' adherence to the "One
China" principle, and the promotion of
peace, mutual respect and sovereignty


between the two countries.
He also thanked the Bahamas for its'
support of the victims of the massive earth-
quake that impacted the lives of over 45
million Chinese.' Director-general Ju said
despite this, the will for hosting a success-
ful Olympics has not been shaken.
The People's Republic of China is being
touted as the world's fastest growing econ-
omy with a projected Gross Domestic
Product growth rate of 9.6 per cent for
2008, despite a slow-down from 2007.


'A'


t. .,'
A,



'A


\


I -. o /, :,,, /


9.W.
IAW-


2WD 4-cylinder
engine has EPA
ratings of 24mpg
city/30mpg
highway.


._ 1.4" longer

The all-new RAV4 has a powerful,
yet modern, eye-catching look and
comes equipped with air conditioning,
alloy wheels, air bags, ABS, 2.4 litre
engine, power mirrors, windows and
steering and CD player.


Large wheels
emphasise the
powerful nature
of the SUV.


40% more cargo space


All new Toyota vehicles are backed by
a 3-year/60,000-mile factory warranty.

Auto Mall. Shirley Street (opp. St. Niwhcux 'h uirc.i)
EXECUTIVE Open Mon to Fri 8a>m 5:30pm
MOTORS Sat 8am-12noon /M
Tel: 397-1700
E-mail: c,.cem inoir.- bitclnr[ hb
AlFTHOIISED TO() T)A 1)E..ER Parts and service guaranteed
Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeporti Queers Hwy, 352-6122 *Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd. 36;-2916


;', "- .-,- -, ,




A . A .- .,A "' ..64



From the beginning of my tiling job
to the very end, I know I can get
everything I need at the Tile King!
Tiles in every colour & texture,
grout, tools and even help
llg, when I need it!












It's those unique

touches that
make Tile King
Extra Special!


V -I I -v-, -








PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


We should think of Savannah





as we face Nassau's challenges


"My mama always said life was
like a box of chocolates,. You nev-
er know what you're going to
get." Forrest Gump

SAVANNAH, Georgia-
Live oak and magnolia
trees drape the historic squares of
this 18th century town, whose
cobbled streets and museum-
quality buildings attract hordes
of movie producers and millions
of visitors from all over the
world.
Greater Savannah is about the
same size as Nassau, and it is a
model of architectural preserva-
tion, restoration and adaptive
reuse. But since this is still Amer-
ica, the park bench where Tom
Hanks sat to deliver his opening
lines in the movie Forrest Gump
is nonetheless one of the city's
top visitor attractions.
Almost every gift shop offers
copies of Clint Eastwood's 1997
film, Midnight in the Garden of
Good and Evil, which portrays
Savannah's eccentric Southern
society through the lens of a cel-
ebrated murder trial. And tour
guides will niention these cine-
matic novelties in the same
breath as they discuss Savannah's
actual history.
Founded in 1733 as a philan-
thropic project to help the Eng-
lish poor start a new life, Savan-
nah was the original capital of
Georgia, the last British colony to
be established in North America.
It also became home to one of
the most important African
American communities, giving
rise to the first black church in
the United States.
In fact, like Nassau, Savannah
has had a majority black popula-
tion throughout much of its his-
tory. Today it is governed by an
African-American mayor named
Otis Johnson, who was re-elected
last year with 70 per cent of the
vote, defeating five other candi-
dates. Johnson has a PhD in
social policy and is a former dean
at Savannah State University.
The city is divided into four
historic zones, including the 2.5-
square-mile landmark district
which is on the National Register
of Historic Places. Walking its
pleasant, tree-shaded streets is
like stepping back in time. Old
Salem in North Carolina or Colo-


nial Williamsburg in Virginia are
both meticulously restored muse-
ums, but Savannah is a living,
breathing entity whose historic
architecture is part and parcel of
the modern business and resi-
dential ecosystem.
Here's a glimpse of the way
the city promotes itself: "Hip and
historic, Savannah is where you'll
find amazing architecture, spooky
cemeteries and rich history...It's
where history resonates into the
present day."
In other words, many of the
assets we seem to devalue are
touted as major tourist attrac-
tions in Savannah.
And they generate a lot of
business.
Savannah has many more hotel
rooms than Nassau, and the 6.7
million people who visited the
city last year spent almost $2 bil-
lion more than we earn annu-
ally from our entire national
tourism industry.
ECONOMIC IMPACT
Back in 1965 before restora-
tion of the city began the eco-
nomic impact of tourism was
minimal.
Savannah's economy relied on
its busy container port, paper fac-
tories and a huge military base,
but tourism is the leading indus-
try today. And according to the
Visitors Bureau, historic preser-
vation has been the driving force
behind that growth.
The park bench made famous
by Tom Hanks was situated on
Chippewa Square one of 24
public spaces that were laid out in.
a grid by the city's founders.
According to the US National
Trust for Historic-Preservation,
"It was a design "so organised
and comprehensive that although
not one building remains of (the
founder's) period, the whole
today, largely a mid-nineteenth
century city, reflects the spirit as
well as the design of the 1733
plan."


In fact, Beth Reiter, who is
director of preservation at the
Municipal Planning Commission,
told me that her agency's goal is
to restore and maintain the city's
original 1733 plan. Several advan-
tages stem from this, including
the fact that one ofthe guiding
principles of the city's founder
was a strict ban on lawyers.
But the real point is that,
rather than acting as a drain on
public finances or an imposition
on commerce, historic preserva-
tion has become the city's eco-
nomic lifeblood. Property values
in the greater downtown area
have increased from $38 million
in the 1980s to more than $140
million today.
"One of the biggest issues we
face is affordability," Reiter con-
firmed. "Properties in the land-
mark district are in the million
dollar range these days, and we
must be careful to avoid the eco-
nomic dislocation of residents
arising from this."
Reiter is white, and she is con-
sidered the grand dame of his-
toric preservation in Savannah.
She points to the rise in property
values as proof that history is
good for business. Her father
worked for the parks service and
she started out with the Historic
Savannah Foundation as a young
architectural historian in the
1960s.
TURNING POINT
For Savannah, that decade was
a turning point not only for the
civil rights movement, but also
in the struggle to prevent demo-
lition of the city's rich but decay-
ing heritage. The Foundation
played a key role in convincing
black and white citizens that the
old buildings they wanted to turn
into parking lots were a more
valuable resource if they could
be restored.
Today, the decrepit row hous-
es have been converted into posh
residences and shops, eclectic
restaurants, tea rooms, art stu-
dios, museums, inns and theatres.
And this list does not take into
account all the buildings restored
and used for various reasons by
the ubiquitous Savannah College
of Art and Design that are scat-
tered across the city.
Outlying neighborhoods and
suburbs have also benefitted
from the restoration drive. And
in spite of the disenfranchisement
of African Americans through-
out much of Savannah's history,
there is a high degree of buy-in to


STOU'H CALLH


Bahamas Bus & Truck Co.,, Ltd.
Montrose Avenue

Phone:322-1722 Fax: 326-7452


EXTRA, EXTRA,



EXTRA,

of
Used Cars

INSTOCK




l COME CHECK


US OUT
, -_ New Shipments Arrived




Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and

Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Insurance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying


CALL3224SSSB


the idea of historic preservation,
which may have something to do
with the fact that the city was
never heavily segregated.
"Savannah, indeed, had its
shortcomings in race relations,
but the city did not subscribe to
Jim Crow housing," wrote histo-
ry professor Whittingdon B.
Johnson in a 1997 monograph.
"In one of the city's leading busi-
ness centres, 38 per cent of the
inhabitants were African Amer-
ican....(and) the two largest black
churches in Savannah...were
located in (districts) which had
white majorities."
The current chairman of the
Historic Savannah Foundation is
John Mitchell, an African Amer-
ican developer whose father was
a railroad worker.
"People want to see the real
deal," he told me over a couple
of glasses of lemonade in a con-
verted garage now doing busi-
ness as the SohO Cafe. "And sav-
ing old buildings puts a lot of
money into the tax rolls.
"But more importantly," he
added, "we are on this Earth for
only a portion of the cycle of life
and must act as stewards for
future generations. We all need
to have a sense of place and his-
toric preservation ensures that."
REVOLVING FUND
Mitchell oversees a revolving
fund that has saved blocks of
buildings throughout the city
over the years.
The. Foundation buys up
endangered properties and sells
to those who will restore them
in accordance with specific
covenants. In the 1990s, for
example, only $170,000 invested
in eight dilapidated structures
generated the redevelopment of
over $3 million worth of proper-
ty in a" dying neighbourhood.
In Nassau, we seem to be at
the same stage Savannah was in
when citizens began to organise
the successful restoration of their
town back in the 60s.
An inventory of historic build-
ings was undertaken and Savan-
nah's downtown area was
declared a national historic dis-
trict in 1967.
Strict zoning regulations and
a public-private historic review
board soon followed.
Beth Reiter's planning com-
mission is today a powerful body
which controls all visible changes
to building facades in the city. It
has researched and published
extensive architectural guidelines
for the historic districts, main-
tains public monuments, helps
develop and apply legislation,
and protects natural resources.
In Nassau, a9 register of his-
toric buildings was started by the
Bahamas National Trust decades
ago and is supposed to be main-
tained by the Antiquities Corpo-


"Many of
the assets
we seem to
devalue are
touted as
major tourist
attractions in
Savannah.
And they
generate a lot
of business."

ration. But it is little more than
an incomplete list of locations.
Architect Jackson Burnside pro-
duced a set of guidelines for a
Nassau historic district a few
years back, but nothing has been
done to implement them. Mean-
while, our priceless historical her-
itage continues to disappear as
the city becomes more dysfunc-
tional with each passing year.
SIGNS OF CHANGE
But there are signs of change,
thanks to the efforts of a public-
private sector task force that has
been working on plans to revi-
talise the city of Nassau for the
past decade. Perhaps most impor-
tantly, shipping interests have
finally come together and are
close to presenting a compre-
hensive plan to move the port
out of the city something that
has been recommended by every
study ever undertaken on down-
town Nassau.
The government says it will
take container trucks off Bay
Street by year-end. Jackson
Burnside has been retained as a
consultant to drive the revital-
ization effort and intensive plan-
ning sessions are being held. In
the most recent budget, the City
of Nassau Revitalization Act was
introduced, providing for finan-
cial incentives including for-
giveness from real property tax


'STUDIO OF

DRAPERIES
"Home Of Custom-made Drapes"
WULFF RdAD 323-6410




Double Drapes...$100.00 (Assorted Drapes)
Double Short Drapes...................$60.00
I Double Drapes (Off Rack)...........$150.00
C Triple Drapes........................$170.00
4 DoubleUSheers .............$140.00(Off Rack)
Triple Sheers..............$165.00 (Off Rack)

SHead down to Studio of Draperies on WulfRoad


Royal Bahamian Resort &


Offshore Island


Invites application for the position of:

CHIEF ENGINEER
Applicants should satisfy the following minimum requirements:
* Have a Bachelors.Degree in Mechanical Engineering from
a recognized College/University.
* At least a Minimum 5 years experience in a similar or closely
related field.
* Must be conrputer literate
* Be proactive, self motivated and be ready to work long
hours.
* Be able to lead a team of Engineers and technicians with
varied trades.
Major Responsibilities
The successful applicant will be required to reside on a Private
Island and be responsible for the complete
Engineering/Maintenance operations of a hotel.
This Includes:
. Budget preparations and stock controls
* HVAC & Refrigeration Systems
* Sludge activated waste water treatment plant
* Reverse osmosis water plants
* Standby generators up to 3.0MVA
* Commercial Kitchen equipment
* Laundry Machines
* Environmental and computerized energy management
systems and preventive Maintenance
Applications should be email to
Cmajor@grp.sandals.com


Sut'lr' s Aunmd Pb

& &rmatorhum
Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas




MR. AUDLEY KIPLING
RITCHIE, 63

of Bellot Road and
formerly of Buckley's,
Long Island will be held
'- Thursday, July 31st,
2008 at 11:00am at Grace
Community Church,
Palmetto Village.
Officiating will be Dr.
Rex Major, Senior Pastor
Emeritus, assisted by
Pastor Leroy "Tinkle"
Hanna. Interment will
follow in Lakeview
Memorial Gardens and
Mausoleum, John F.
Kennedy Drive. and
Gladstone Road.

Mr. Ritchie is survived by his two (2) sons, Juan and
Darrin Ritchie; two (2) daughters, Tanya Ritchie and
Sabrina Thurston; mother, Remilda Ritchie; twelve (12)
grandchildren, Alvin Jr. and Aaliah Thurston, Juan,
Dillincia, Juanicia, Gilecio and Savannoh Ritchie, Brazyl
Clarke, Karl Jr., Giovinni and Katya Turnbull and Johann
Ritchie Jr.; six (6) sisters, Mavis Major, Maxine Darville,
Vernice Turnbull, Janet Adderley, Francita and Arlene
Ritchie; one (1) son-in-law, Alvin Thurston Sr.; one (1)
daughtek-in-law, Gia Ritchie; one (1) sistervin-law, Elsa
Ritchie; two (2) brothers-in-law, Ephrim Darville and
Henry Adderley; eleven (11) nieces, Renee Turnbull,
Tiffany Turnbull-Clarke, Karen Robinson, Laverne
Darville, Charmaine Rollins, Susan Chee-A-Tow, Cheryl
Bowleg, Janis Henfield, Sharon, Danielle, Michelle,
Nicolette and Carol Ritchie and Racquel Maycock; eleven
(11) nephews, Karl Tumbull, Johann Ritchie Sr., Larendzo
Darville, Stephen Adderley, Paul, Andy, Craig and Earl
Major, Dex Kenda and Phillip Ritchie; two (2) uncles,
Alden and Ullin Ritchie; six (6) aunts, Elva, Carmen,
Elva and Coreese Ritchie, Merle Wells and Alma Major,
other relatives and friends including, Gloria Ritchie,
the staff of IUC & IMCU Doctors Hospital and Bahamas
Welding and Fire and others too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers' Funeral
Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on
Wednesday from 10:00am until 5:00pm and on Thursday
from 10:00am until service time at the church.


and exemption from Customs
duties for those investing in
the city for the next five years.
And private sector investment is
beginning to flow.
According to Frank Comito
(who h.as been closely involved
in the process as an executive at
the Nassau Tourism Develop-
ment Board), a professional city
manager is about to be hired to
drive the redevelopment. He said
the experience of other cities,
Savannah included, showed that
the process takes time. And until
a genuine public-private sector
partnership is forged and an
effective management structure
in place, it is difficult to achieve
change.
"What we are doing now is
building on our foundational
work the Historic Nassau
study, the EDAW report and the
Ecorys port relocation study.
Revitalization efforts in other
cities took time. They were all
subject to the same changes in
politics and private sector pres-
sures. And until they had the
proper legislated structures in
place to manage the process, they
struggled. I'm extremely encour-
aged with what is happening
today, but not naive enough to
think that it will get any easier. It
won't.
"We will continue to be faced
with challenges as we move to
transform the city. But the fan-
tastic news is that we are at a new
level of commitment and will see
unprecedented acceleration. I'm
convinced that there are enough
of us now in the private and pub-
lic sectors with a persistence and
belief in what we can accom-
plish."
As we face these challenges
we should think of Savannah, and
the millions of visitors from
throughout the world who enjoy
walking its historic riverfront and
its magnificent shaded squares.
And as for ourselves, why just
about anything is better than
what we have now even if
lawyers are included.
What do you think?
Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com







WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALN


Trade talks

collapse as

US feuds with

China, India
* GENEVA
TRADE officials said Tuesday
that a high-level summit to sal-
vage a global trade pact collapsed,
after the United States, China and
India failed to compromise on
when poor countries could raise
import tariffs on farm products,
according to Associated Press.
Trade officials from two devel-
oped and one emerging country
told The Associated Press that a
meeting of seven commercial
powers broke up without agree-
ment at the World Trade Orga-
nization on Tuesday.
The officials, who asked not to
be named because the news was
soon to be announced to a larger
meeting of countries, said a U.S.
dispute with China and India over
farm import safeguards had effec-
tively ended any hope of a break-
through.
Two officials said WTO chief
Pascal Lamy had informed min-
isters that an agreement slipped
away after nine days of talks
aimed at a comprehensive deal
to lower the tariffs and subsidies
that hinder international trade.
The meeting had been working
on a broad compromise that, in
short, would have let poor coun-
tries sell more produce to rich
countries while giving the devel-
oped world greater market access
in developing countries for ser-
vices and manufactured goods.
U.S. Trade Representative
Susan Schwab appeared down-
cast as she began to brief
reporters. She said negotiators
were "so close on Friday," but
then stopped speaking. Asked if
the entire Doha trade round was
over, she said "I didn't say that'
and walked away.
Negotiators were hoping for a
deal this week on farm and indus-
trial trade, so that crisis-ridden
WTO talks could be saved. They
were launched in 2001, but have
repeatedly stalled amid deep divi-
sions between rich and poor
nations.
Some officials had described
this meeting at the WTO's Gene-
va headquarters as a last chance
for the trade round launched in
Qatar's capital seven years ago,
noting that U.S. and other nation-
al elections would make negotia-
tions difficultoyer the next couple
of years.


Fishermen are warned


about illegal crawfishing


THE Department of Marine Resources has
warned fishermen and members of the public
against harvesting undersized crawfish this sea-
son.
In a statement issued yesterday, the depart-
ment said crawfish which have tails -less than
five inches in length, carapaces less than three
inches in length, or which are bearing eggs, are
not to be collected.
All persons capturing crawfish are required
by the law to have a measuring gauge onboard
their vessel to ensure size compliance.
"Fishers are reminded as to the important
role the crawfish industry plays to the economy
of the Bahamas, employing thousands of
Bahamians and contributing millions of dol-
lars to the economy," the statement said. "All
violators of the fisheries regulations can expect
to be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the
law."
The crawfish season opens on August 1, 2008
and closes on March 31, 2009. During this peri-


od, fishermen are legally permitted to use air
compressors to harvest crawfish.
"Persons expecting to use an air compressor
to harvest marine resources must first obtain a
permit from the Department of Marine
Resources," the statement said. "The air com-
pressor permit allows usage between depths of
30 feet and 60 feet."
Anyone seeking to obtain an air compres-
sor permit must first present proof of dive com-
petency at the' Department of Marine
Resources.
Application forms for air compressor per-
mits may be, obtained .from the Department of
Marine Resources on East Bay Street or the
extension officer's headquarters on individual
Family Islands.
The department asked members of the pub-
lic who witness illegal behayiour, or who suspect
that illegal behaviour may be taking place, to
contact the Department of Marine Resources
at: 393-1014; 393-1015 or 393-1777.


FirstCaribbean hosts a
fun-filled day for residents
of Elizabeth Estates
Children's Home
BINGO! While there was no jackpot, it was
one of the many games that members of the
wealth management department at First-
Caribbean International Bank played with res-
idents of the Elizabeth Estates Children's
Home.
Through the bank's Adopt-A-Cause Pro-
gramme, staff members volunteer their time
to brighten the lives of those in need.
The wealth management team hosted a fun-
filled day for the residents, which included
grilled hot dogs and hamburgers, music and
dancing, scrabble games and lots more.
To top off a fun-filled day, the team pre-
sented the home's administrator with several 77,
gifts, including water coolers, a laundry
basket, towels, toiletries and other bathroom
items.
In addition, each resident was presented with
gift bags filled with personal items.

PICTURED FROM LEFT: Dorothea Delaney, one of
the home's supervisors; wealth director, Dennis .C4
Govan; Bernadette Cartwright, wealth manage-
ment; the home's assistant administrator, Vonita ii-
Cleare; and wealth management's Sean Blyden. 1,


Success Training


College 'graduation


HILTON OUTTEN CONVENTION CENTRE, FREEPORT


SmartSet
Smart people know a good deal when they see one and right
now is the smartest time to get into a new Ford.


2008 FORD EDGE

$37,80000


i-^ -


kL


2008 FORD TAURUS
s37,30000
3.5L V6
-'" automatic,
fully
S --- Loaded,
with
leather
KINSWIOOinterior


During the Ford Model Year Clearance you can experience the best
deals of the year, Don't miss the truly amazing opportunity to get
behind the wheel of the most stylish vehicles on the road,


Available at

FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD
THOMPSON BOULEVARD TEL.: 356-7100 FAX: 328-6094 S.ma.hoce
EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com


Ala






PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008


U-_ IU iv.













The profile should U The Tribune will be publishing its
annual Back to School' supplement
INCLUDE: in August/September. In preparation
for the supplement, which will fea-
* Name of student ture all graduating seniors who will
* Age be attending university/college,
whether locally or abroad. we invite
* Name of parents all parents, guardians and graduating
* A list of exams already taken and the seniors to submit a profile on the
results- e.g. Bahamas Junior graduating seniors, along with a
Certificate (BCs) exams and Pitman graduating seniors, along with a,
exams photograph and contact information.
DeadlineIQ. July 31, 2008.
* A list of exams expected to be taken- Deadline July 31 2008.
Bahamas General Certificate of

* The college/university they expect to
attend e.g. College of the Bahamas,
Harvard University, University of Miami .
* Name of degree expected to be
sought e.g .- Bachelors degree in
English, Bachelors degree in Biology .
,; '. ... .4or ,A ., """ ,t is aw o rbu 6
* What career they expect to enter Pleae at .nformaon to sa Lawlor, e
once their education is completed a i. lisalawor @gmi.com ..
doctor, Math teacher, engineer pi School' in the subject line. The .
atin .0 o be hand delivered or mailed in:
All extracurricular activities -
club memberships, team------
sports/track and field, church
activities
A list of honours/awards/?U
recognition student has
received .


Illb ~r ''1 Irs~aaa~~e~s II .lp3~r~a~l~BHl:4S:I


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIB LNE


PAG E


Donaghy

sentenced to

15 months

in prison
Seepage 13


N ES DAY, JLi LY 3 2008(


PAE 3 6Ineratonlsports nw


Team Bahamas may organise







'small' training camp in China


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
W without the finances or the time
to assemble all of the athletes
for a pre-Olympic Games
training camp,h t rack and
field team will meet the team
officials in Beijing, China.
According to team manager Foster Dorsett,
the BAAA encountered problems with the camp
so they arranged to do everything when they
meet at the games village next week.
"Everybody has received their travel docu-
ments and identifications for the games...We will
be meeting in Beijing on August 6.
"We are still working on the possibility of hav-
ing a small camp because track and field doesn't
start until August 15. So we might have some
type of time with all of the athletes away from the
village," he told The Tribune.
Dorsett, who will travel along with coaches
Frank "Pancho" Rahming, Keith Parker and
Tyrone Burrows, said he has been in contact with


all 17 athletes on a daily basis and they are all
eager and ready to travel.
"Some of them are still working with their indi-
vidual coaches before they leave," he said. "The
coaches for the team are aware of that and they
don't have any problems with it."
The only thing they have to get sorted out for
the team before he leaves Monday is the team
uniforms and Dorsett said he's working with the
Bahamas Olympic Association's designated man-
ager, Livingston Bostwick, to ensure that every-
body is properly fitted.


"The uniforms are here," said Dorsett of the
gears that have been provided by the Dasslers' sis-
ters on behalf of the sponsored Adidas company.
While the majority of the athletes are either in
the US or Europe, the only two athletes still in
New Providence are sprinter Sheniqua "Q" Fer-
guson and quarter-miler Ramon Miller.
As the games draw near, Dorsett said they are
confident that the Bahamian athletes will be
ready as they have been getting into shape over
the last month.
"We've heard about the performances of Der-,
nick Atkins, Chris Brown, Chandra Sturrup and
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie," he said.
"So we are expecting some very good perfor-
mances when the games get underway."
In the absence of the pre-Olympic camp;
'Dorsett said the athletes will get the chance to
spend more time with their coaches to fine-tune
their skills.
"If we had the 4 x 1, it would have taken away
from them if we didn't have the camp," Dorsett
said. "They wouldn't have the opportunity to gel
together as a sprint relay. '
"But with the 4 x 4, it's a little different from the


4 x 1, so it wouldn't take that much away from
them. Plus we still have a week together because
the meet doesn't start on August 15."
In addition to that, Dorsett said the quarter-mil-
ers will have until the final 2-3 days of the games
around August 24-25 to compete, so they have
some extra time to work out together.
. "They will actually have at least three weeks to
get together, so not having the camp will not take
away from their performances," he said.
As for the remainder of the Bahamian delega-
tion going to Beijing, boxer. Taureano "Reno"
Johnson was expected to return home last night
from Cuba where he has been training. He will be
leaving with coach/manager Andre Seymour and
assistant coach Prince Hepburn on August 5 and
should arrive in Beijing on August 7.
The four swimmers, including coach Andy
Knowles, will be traveling from Singapore where
they are currently attending a mini training camp.
And the two tennis players, along with coach
John Farrington, will travel directly from.the US.
All of the athletes are expected to be in Beijing in
time for the official opening ceremonies slated for
August 8.


9


Sa.' I


e


* Derrick Atkins finishes fourth

* Andretti Bain places fifth in 400m

* Leevan Sands jumps for fifth

* Donald Thomas gets up


high for sLxth pla

* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs,'tribunemedia.net
THE road to Beiling contin-
ued for at least four of our
Bahamian athletes as. the\ com-
peted at the Herculis Super
Grand Prix meet '.esterda. in
Monaco
Leading the charge was
World Championships silver
medalist Derrick Atkins. He
competed in the men's 100
metres, coming in fourth in a
time of 10.02 seconds as he was
nipped at the line by Jamaican
Nesta Carter.
The race was won by former
world record holder Asafa Pow-
ell from Jamaica in 9.82. Amer-
ican Darvis Patton got second in
9.98.











FOSTER Dorsett, presi-
dent of the Masters Track
and Field Association, is ask-
ing all persons interested in
joining the newly formed
body in the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Athletic Associa-
tions (BAAA) to attend a
meeting 7pm Thursday at
the Ministry of Education's
headquarters. Plans for the
completion of the executive
board and other matters per-
taining to the association will
",e discussed.


Atkins collected 12 points to
sit in third place in the World
Athletics Tour's standings \ ith
68S points after fi'e meets.
Carter leads the field with 74
points after five meets and Pow-
ell is second with 70 after foui
meets.
Also at the meet %as NCAA
champion Andreitt Barn. ho
picked up a fifth place finish in
45.85 in the men's 400. The race
was won by Great Britain's
Martyn Rooney in 44.72, fol-
lowed by Jamaican Ricardo
Chambers in 44.90 and French-
man Leslie Djhone in 44.95.
Sweden's Johan Wissman was
fourth in 45.65.
In collecting 10 points from
the meet, Bain moved to 21st
on the world list with 16 points
after just his second meet.
Chris "Bay" Brown, who opt-
ed not to compete in the meet,
is sitting in second place with
74 points after five meets.
American Jeremy Wariner,
who also didn't participate in
the meet, heads the list with 96
after five meets as well.


-j


.1
,. ..- .. .... .. ....,. .
0~
*,,.

J
J(cson

JAMAICANS Asafa Powell (right) and Nesta Carter compete in the l00m yesterday during the Monaco Grand Prix international athletics meeting...


World champion Donald
Thomas ended up tied for sixth
place in the meet in the men's
high jump as he matched the
same height as Czech Repub-
lic's Tomas Janku with 7-feet, 4
1/2-inches.
Winning the event was Russ-
ian Andrey Silnov with 7-7 3/4.
Sweden's Linus Thornblad was
second with 7-7 and another
Russian, Andrey Tereshin, was
third at the same height.
Thomas, who earned seven
points for his performance, is


now in 10th place in the world
standings with 21 points after
four meets. Silnov tops the list
with 58 points after four meets
as well.
Also on the field, Leevan
"Superman" Sands mustered up
a fifth place finish in the men's
triple jump with his best leap
of 56-0 3/4. Grenada's Randy
Lewis was the winner with 57-1
3/4.
With 10 points earned from
the meet, Sands remains in sec-
ond place on the standings with


49 points after a total of five
meets. Lewis is out front with 70
points after five meets.
And rounding out the
Bahamian participation in the
meet was sprinter Debbie Fer-
guson-McKenzie, who had to.
settle for a photo finish of 11.13
for seventh place over Kim
Gevaert.
Jamaica dominated the first
two spots as Kerron Stewart
won in 10.94, followed by
Sherone Simpson in 10.95.
American Torri Edwards was


BBF to 'court' single team in Antigua


* By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
WITH the Caribbean Basketball Cham-
pionships changing its venue and format
within the last week, the Bahamas Basket-
ball Federation (BBF) has been forced to
readjust their selection process, merge both
practicing squads and field a single team
for the tournament.
The federation had originally planned to
field two teams for this weekend's event in
the Dominican Republic but that country


was forced to withdraw from the tourna-
ment and would be unable to act as hosts.
The CBCs switched to Antigua and will
now become a 16-and-under tournament
after the island's Basketball Federation
undertook host responsibilities.
The tournament is now scheduled for
August 10-18. The federation had planned
to field both a 15-and-under and 18-and-
under team. However, as a result of the
change in format, the 24 members selected
for both squads would have to be merged
into one group. Practice sessions for


prospective team members are conducted
daily at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium with
the junior national team coaching staff.
Led by Anastacia Moultrie, the staff con-
sists of Felix Musgrove, Kelly Albury,
Jurelle Nairn, Sherell Cash and Terrence
McSweeney.
In preparation for the CBCs, the BBF
has attempted to get the team as much rep-
etitions as possible with participation in the
Independence Tournament and also recent-
ly staged several exhibition games against
an 18-and-under Jamaican national team.


third in 11.02.
Ferguson-McKenzie's five
points she secured at the meet
pushed her 12th place total on
the world list to 32 after five
meets.
Jamaicans Sheri-Ann Brooks
and Veronica Campbell are out
front with 58 and 56 points
respectively.
Veteran Chandra Sturrup is
in fourth with 44 after five
meets behind Amenrican
Carmelita Jeter with 44 after
five meets as well.



Congrats

to Miller!

THE executive board of
the Amateur Boxing Asso-
ciation of the Bahamas con-
gratulates Wellington Miller
on being selected as the new
president of the Bahamas
Olympic Association.
Special kudos came from
Akenna Johnson, George
Turner and national coach
Andre Seymour.


S 4






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12. WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008


YOUR C ONECrJON TO THE WOLR


Age: 26.

Birthday: August 16th.

Height: 6-feet, 3-inches.

Weight: 176 pounds.

High School: Temple Christian and
Florida Air Academy.

College: Auburn University.

Major: Adult Education.

Sports events: Triple and long jumps.

Personal best performances: 57'5 (triple jump) and
26'8 (long jump).

Coach: Henry Rolle.

Favourite colour: White.

Favourite food: Curry Goat.

Favourite song: 'Ya can't keep a good man down'
by Sizzla.

Favourite movie: 300.

Hobbies: Playing basketball.

Interest: Trying to help the young Bahamian jumpers to
get where I am or better.

Idol: Jesus Christ.

Parents: Leevan and Elaine Sands.

Siblings: D'Angelo, Vandia and Bria Sands.

Status: Engaged.


BEIJING OLYMPICS 2008










PROFIT LES


L ' ";-*. ;' '1
. . . . ,
i :" . '


S .,..


; ,.a..go :."..







,*' *,.," 'i i i,,., **',. ,.,, .. ^ .., i ) ::.
^ ./. .. aril,-
y -. -:4







;* .? *' ;" ',
\Lf .. .... ;*! ^
I, /'V. -
W ",all









.,,. '.-
JOpt







,;4 4. .4
,,' q..i~." ,-"


.. .
,^ . .;* '
* < ; ;* .s


~4~4y.


q ',


y ....^ '*
'. ***


,.:.^


' i:


* .4A.
..4.


- 4
pr
~ &


AI l .
f ~.


: -";Z",.-^..


It(


.x



.~ ~tt4




4 ~4'~44~
.


I_ __ _


* -


1\11,


Z". "

" " -,' ," '*









TRIBUNE SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008, PAGE 13


National Basketball Association


Donaghy sentenced to




15 months in prison


E By TOM HAYS
Associated Press Writer

NEW YORK (AP) Former NBA
referee Tim Donaghy was sentenced to
15 months in prison Tuesday for set-
ting off a gambling scandal that tar-
nished the league's reputation and
raised questions about the integrity of
its officiating.
The sentencing in Brooklyn federal
court culminated a case that hung over
the league throughout the season and
even into the NBA finals between the
Boston Celtics and Los Angeles Lakers.
League commissioner David Stern has
repeatedly denied Donaghy's claim that
corruption among referees goes beyond
him.
Donaghy's lawyer had asked US Dis-
trict Judge Carol Amon to give his client
probation, arguing Donaghy is a patho-
logical gambler. Amon, who could have
imposed a sentence of 33 months, gave
the former ref credit for cooperating
with investigators, but scolded him for
disgracing the sport.
"The NBA, the players and the fans
relied on him to perform his-job in an
honest manner," she said.
In addition to the prison time, the
judge' ordered Donaghy to serve three
years of supervised release.
Folding his arms but showing no oth-
er emotion, the 41-year-old Donaghy
apologized to the court. "I brought
shame on myself and my family," he
said.
Donaghy pleaded guilty last August
to conspiracy to engage in wire fraud
and transmitting betting information
through interstate commerce for tak-
ing payoffs from a professional gam-
bler for inside tips on games.
"By having this non-public informa-
tion, I was in a unique position to pre-
dict the outcome 6f NBA games," he
told a judge at the time.
Donaghy didn't stop there: In June,
he marred the NBA finals by making
fresh accusations that the league rou-
tinely encouraged refs to ring up bogus
fouls to manipulate results, but dis-


FORMER NBA referee Tim Donaghy exits Brook
yesterday in New York...

courage them from calling technical
fouls on star players to keep them in
games and protect television ratings.
The allegations contained in court
papers arguing that Donaghy deserved
leniency for voluntarily disclosing the
alleged corruption included one
instance claiming referees rigged a 2002
playoff series to force it to a revenue-
boosting seventh game.
Though the papers didn't name the
teams involved, only the Los Angeles
Lakers-Sacramento Kings series went


<.

/ s.
.-I

[ -J

dyn federal court following his sentencing,


to seven games during those pJayoffs.
The Lakers went on to win the cham-
pionship.
Both Stern and the league's officials
have said Donaghy made the claims to
get a lighter sentence.
"We anticipate that the judge's sen-
tencing decision, together with the
changes we have made to our referee
operations staff, will enable us to con-
tinue with the improvements we are
making to our anti-gambling rules, poli-
cies and procedures," Stern said Tues-


day.
"There is little comfort to be gained
from the mandatory prison sentence,
especially as it affects Mr Donaghy's
children and their mother, but hope-
fully the healing process can begin in
earnest for all."
The NBA has made a number of
changes to its officiating programme in
the wake of the scandal. Former Army
General Ron Johnson was hired as
senior vice president of referee opera-
tions, Bernie Fryer and Joe Borgia were
promoted to new management posi-
tions and the league reassigned Ron-
nie Nunn, who had been the director
of officials for five years.
Still pending is a report from the
league into the Donaghy scandal and
betting among officials. The NBA has
promised to release the report, though
it did not set a date for that Tuesday.
Last week, two of Donaghy's former
high school classmates were sentenced
to over a year in prison for their roles in
the scheme.
James Battista, a professional gam-
bler and admitted drug addict, got 15
months in prison for making bets based
on inside tips. Thomas Martino, the
scheme's middleman, was sentenced to
a year and one day for paying the ref-
eree thousands of dollars for the tips.
The three men attended school togeth-
er in Springfield, Pa.
The league had demanded nearly $1.4
million in restitution. But the judge last
week set the restitution at $217,266, to
be paid jointly by the three defendants.
"Though we believe no sentence
would ever be able to repair or justify
the damage caused by this criminal and
scoundrel, we are glad to finally put this
behind us," said Lamell,McMorris,
spokesperson for the National Basket-
ball Referees Association.
"Tim acted in a completely selfish
and unforgivable way, and has forever
compromised the way people look at
sports and officiating. However, NBA
referees will continue to officiate with
the highest level of integrity and pro-
fessionalism."


Top-seeded


Radwanska


advances


in Nordic


Light Open


STOCKHOLM, Sweden
(AP) -. Top-seeded Agniesz-
ka Radwanska beat Nathalie
Dechy of France 6-2, 6-3
Tuesday in the first round of
the Nordic Light Open. "
Radwanska was in full con-
trol on center court at the
Olympic Stadium until she
led 5-1 in the second set.
Dechy won the next two
games and appeared to be
turning the match, but the
Pole broke her opponent for
the win.
Barbora Zahalova Strycova
of the Czech Republic beat
Petra Cetkovska 6-4, 6-7 (2),
6-4, and Cetkovska then
refused to shake hands.
Zahalova Strycova protest-
ed several calls in the match.
Down 3-0 in the third set, she
called for medical attention
and a massage. After the
interruption, she turned the
match around and won the
last set.
Zahalova Strycova will
meet fifth-seeded Anabel
Medina Garrigues of Spain in
the second round. Medina
Garrigues beat Swedish wild
card Sandra Roma 6-3, 6-1.
Katarina Srebotnik of
Slovenia also advanced to the
second round, beating Anna
Lapushchenkova of Russia 6-
2, 6-1, while No. 4 seed Caro-
line Wozniacki of Denmark
had to work hard to over-
come Germany's Angelique
Kerber 6-3, 6-4.
Wozniacki faces Finland's
Emma Laine in the second
round.
Swede Johanna Larsson
delighted the home crowd
when she rallied from a set
down to beat Julia Goerges 3-
6, 7-6 (5), 6-4.


National Football League




Since surgery, Manning hasn't practiced with Colts


* By MICHAEL MAROT
AP Sports Writer

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (AP)
- Peyton Manning finally
arrived in town. Where he is or
when he'll practice with the
Indianapolis Colts remains a
mystery.
The two-time league most
valuable player had surgery
July 14 to remove an infected
bursa sac in his left knee, but
still has not appeared on the
Colts' practice fields. Team offi-
cials are keeping his where-
abouts hush-hush.
"He's doing fine. He's here
and he's immobilized," coach
Tony Dungy said after Tues-
day morning's practice. "We
don't want a lot of people see-
ing him, so that's why we're not
saying where he is."
Manning did not report with
the rest of his teammates to
Rose-Hulman Institute of
Technology on Thursday,
though he did answer reporters'
questions during a conference
call and said then that it proba-
bly wasn't smart to be around





ag ic



wav


ORLANDO, Florida
(AP) The Orlando Magic
have waived little-used for-
ward James Augustine.
The 24-year-old would
have been entering his third
year with the team this sea-
son. Orlando took Augus-
tine out of Illinois with the
41st overall pick in the 2006
NBA draft and released him
Tuesday.
Augustine appeared in 27
career games in two years,
all but two of them last sea-
son. The forward averaged
1.6 points and 1.2 rebounds
in 5 8 minutes a game.
z ..-, ' .


150 people.
Doctors are taking a cautious
approach to Manning's recov-
ery to lower the risk of -infec-
tion.
He was initially entrenched
at his Indianapolis-area home,
his knee compressed and ele-
vated while he took antibiotics
intravenously. Dungy's state-
ment suggests Manning still
isn't able to get around easily
and Manning made it clear that
if he was going to be immobi-
lized, he'd rather be in Terre
Haute where he had quicker
access to team trainers.
For one of the league's best
and most durable quarterbacks,
it's a rare absence.
The last time Manning didn't
report with his teammates was
1998 when he missed five days
because of a contract holdout
before his rookie season. Since
then, Manning has made 160
consecutive regular-season
starts, the second-longest streak
in league history behind only
Brett Favre (253).
He's never missed a regular-
season or postseason game and
has missed only one play in his
career because of injury.
Jim Sorgi, a fifth-year veter-
an, has replaced Manning dur-
ing the team's first six non-spe-
cial teams practices and is
expected to start Sunday night's
preseason game against Wash-
ington. Sorgi has completed 77
of 126 passes for 751 yards with
six touchdowns and one inter-
ception in sparse backup duty.


Teammates have given Sorgi
good reviews for.what he's
done in training camp so far.
Rookie tight end Tom Santi
is recovering from a similar
injury and the Colts are using
Santi's rehabilitation pro-
gramme to get a better idea of
when Manning might return.
Santi was diagnosed with an
infected bursa sac during the
league's rookie symposium last
month and had surgery about
two weeks before Manning.
Santi reported on time and
has been seen on the field
although he has not yet prac-
ticed. The sixth-round pick out
of Virginia has declined to take
questions about the injury.
Dungy continues to believe
Manning is on schedule to
make it back within the four to
six weeks the team initially pre-
dicted. The prognosis means
there's a good chance Manning
won't practice at all before the
Colts head home from Terre
Haute on August 15.
"We were told it would be
six weeks from the onset (of
Manning's surgery)," Dungy
said. "Our big thing is not to
rush him out here for Week 3
or Week 4 of the preseason.
There's no reason to rush it
because we're looking at the
long haul."
Manning isn't the Colts' only
big-name player missing the
early part of training camp.
Defensive player of the year
Bob Sanders, 2004 league sacks
champion Dwight Freeney,


IN THIS May 16, 2008 file photo, Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Ma
minicamp at the team's training facility in Indianapolis...


starting guard Ryan Lilja and
starting linebacker Tyjuan
Hagler and Santi remain on the
physically unable to perform
list. None are expected to play
in this weekend's Hall of Fame


Game at Canton, Ohio.
Dungy believes all the play-
ers except Hagler will be ready
for the regular-season opener
September 7 against Chicago.
Should Freeney get his way,


ta




E
i-

inning passes during a football


he might be the first one back
on the field. Freeney is recov-
ering from November foot
surgery.
"Dwight is lobbying to be full
go." Dungy said with a smile.


WNBA leads in sports diversity study


* By TRAVIS REED
Associated Press Writer

ORLANDO, Florida (AP) The
WNBA has received the first A-plus
given in Richard Lapchick's annual
diversity report card on race and gender.
The Institute for Diversity and Ethics
in Sport study, which grades professional
leagues on the number of participating
women and minorities, shows women
own three WNBA teams, up two from
2007 and one the previous year.
The number of minority head coach-
-there was


a slight decrease in women and minori-
ty assistant coaches.
Lapchick, director of the University of
Central Florida institute, said the
WNBA has long led the way in his stud-
ies and benefited from its relative youth.
The league began play in 1997.
"They started at the same time the
(NBA) began its diversity initiative, so
the WNBA was able to include a good
pool of candidates from the very begin-
ning," Lapchick said.
Carla Christofferson and Katherine
Goodman own the Los Angeles Sparks,
Colleen J. Maloof and Adrienne Mal-


oof-Nassif own the Sacramento Mon-
archs, and the Seattle Storm's owners
are Anne Levinson. Ginny Gilder,
Dawn Trudeau and Lisa Brummel.
There are now as many teams with
women holding a partial or full stake in
a WNBA team as there are in the NFL
and more than in any other sport.
Women own all or part of the St. Louis
Rams, San Francisco 49ers and Jack-
sonville Jaguars in the NFL and the
Sacramento Kings and Washington Wiz-
ards of the NBA. Major League Base-
ball has no female majority ownership.
Of the WNBA's 14 teams, five had


female head coaches: Linn Dunn of the
Indiana Fever. Pat Coyle of the New
York Liberty. Jenny Boucek of the
Sacramento Monarchs. the Houston
Comets' Karleen Thompson and the
Atlanta Dream's Marynell Meadors.
Five head coaches were black:
Thompson, Michael Cooper of the Los
Angeles. Sparks, the Chicago Sky's
Steven Key, Corey Gaines of the
Phoenix Mercury and Tree Rollins, who
was recently fired by the Washington
Mystics.
The WNBA did not immediately
return messages seeking comment.


SPORTS


I"m*arpmrrn~~


4%a~siga~disjb~


a


~YU~~








FAGE 1, !. V' I,'IESDAY, JULY 30, 2008
WEDNESDI VY EVENING


7:30

.'l I Florida
7 \7i P3Ti .-i -

T.e n. A idiir -N
SVVFOR c-

SHAcc3s lcily-
WVVTVJ ,'o:d ^:.,

e_ .'c) Drive
l WSVN

f^ WPLG


| 8:00 8:30


WOK-ANiNBELS


Marilyn Monroe, Beyond the Leg-
end nf


Big Brother 10 One housemate is
evicted. (Live) n (CC)

The Baby Borrowers One couple
faces a.tough decision; a difficult
family outing. P\ (CC)


So You Think You Can Dance LL
Cool J performs; two are eliminated.
( (CC)
Wife Swap "McGoldrick/Noel' A tra-
ditional wife trades places with a
punk-rock wife. n, (CC)


7. ALX!F


. r: iami i Dog the Bounty
; ^ f ; Hunter Aggravat-
;' ',ed car theft.
,(:,f;. ;1)(C World BBC News
i / ]i'ric (Latenight).

'1 1i Li .i J) Access Granted

'r Has Litile Mosque on
S1i"s (CC' the Prairie
(:.] i'.dlIow & The Suze Orman
iC r.) y (CC)
:', I ic 'nbK CNN Election Cei

Sen. ts 'y Fruit The Daily Show
C IC ,' A (CC) With Jon Stew..
art (CC)
( O0) READ IT AND WEEP (2006,
"?- ay Panabaker, Danielle
n(CC)
jThs Oil House This Old House
, (^ _t n(Cc)C
C c;


Dog the Bounty
Hunter (CC)

Asia Business
Report


Baldwin Hills
(CC)


9:00


T 9:30


Nova scienceNOW "Phoenix; Mam-
moth Mystery; Judah Folkman Trib-
ute' (N) nf (CC) (DVS)


Criminal Minds "Damaged" Rossi
decides to revisit an unsolved mur-
der case. n (CC)
The Baby iBorrowers The couples
learn valuable lessons as they care
for senior citizens. (N) (CC)


So You Think You Can Dance Top
six perform. (N) 0 (CC)

Supemanny "Dostal Family" A cou-
ple with a misbehaving son receive
advice. f1 (CC)


Dog the Bounty Hunter "Felons In-
terrupted" Ice addict. (N) (CC)


BBC News
(Latenight).


FastTrack


JULY 30, 2008

10:00 10:30


Carrier "Rites of Passage" A storm
poses danger to pilots who need to
land. ) (CC) (DVS)


CSI: NY The team realizes two New
York murder victims had a criminal
past in common. f (CC)
Law & Order "Personae Non Grata"
The murder of an automobile me-
chanic. n (CC)


News (N) (CC)


Primetime: Crime (CC)


Criss Angel Mindfreak "Building
Implosion Escape" Building implo-
sion. (Live) (CC)


** LOCKDOWN (2000, Drama) Richard T. Jones, Gabriel Casseus.
Three friends land in prison after a wrongful conviction. (CC)


Sophie n (CC) CBC News: the fifth estate n
(DVS) (CC)


Show (CC)

nter


Made in China: The People's Re-
public of Profits (N)
Larry King Live (CC)


CBC News: The National (N) n
(CC)
The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch

Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)


The Colbert Re- Futurama Planet South Park The South Park Ms. Lewis Black's
port (CC) Express is threat- boys try to lose a Garrison's failed Root of All Evil
ended, ball game. relationship. Comics debate.
35) The Suite Hannah Mon- The Suite Life of Wizards of Wa- Life With Derek
ife of Zack & tana "Get Down Zack & Cody verly Place Alex 'Two Kisses One
Cody 0 (CC) Study-udy-udy" "Graduation" alters time. Party" n


Sweat Equity

37 Grad


Deconstruction Man Caves

Journal: Tages- Made in Ger-
thema many


SPNI
Ca. ';\/1!








EW'fN
I. T -T N



DEWI








FIT TV

FOX-NC
.^FSNFL


ATP Tennis: W&S Financial Group
MasIters


Under Construc- Under Construc-
tion tion (N)


Journal: In
Depth
Living Lohan
"Acting Up"


Euromaxx

Wildest Wed-
ding


Milwaukee. (Subject to Blackout)


Boxing: 1997 Boxing Wednesday Night Fights. Jose Luis Castillo vs. Larnardo Tyner.
Gatti vs. Ruelas From El Cajon, Calif. (Live)


Daily Miass: Our EWTN Live Super Saints The Holy Rosary The Healing Prophet: Solanus
Lady Casey -
(:00) Lo Max: The Dan Ho The Dan Ho Get Fresh With Get Fresh With Art of the Athlete "Dawn Staley"
Cath, Friedrich Show Show (CC) Sara Snow (CC) Sara Snow (CC) Dawn Staley. 1 (CC)


Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (CC)
Shepard Smith
1 i .i0 .LB Baseball New York Mets at Florida Marlins.
.l .., to Blackout) (Live)


Hannity & Colfes (CC)

From Dolphin Stadium in Miami.


On the Record With Greta Van
Susteren (CC)


Inside the Mar-
lins


The FSN Final
Score'(Live)


S oato the Inside the PGA Golf Central 19th Hole (N) The Approach Top 10 19th Hole
GOTL PGA Champ. Tour (Live) I Hle (N)INA 1 Hl


GSN Catch 21 (CC)
S I '
: .I' IL._J !, ., (N)
(:00) Walker,
HALL Texas Ranger
"The iceman"
Property Virgins
HGTV Lookiig for a
home. (I (CC)
INSP Victo'y
Reba Cheyenne
KTLA hides her morn-
ing sickness. AI,
Still Standing
1 F E .S.il' n n",
n., i



1.V i i"IBoi(nes n

SF ..F Pas. ime (N)


(:00) Billy Gra-
ham Classic
Crusades


Who Wants to Be a Millionaire
(CC)


Family Feud
(CC)


I- ,---------.---I. -


X-Play (N)


Unbeatable
Banzuke


Walker, Texas Ranger "Forgotten
People" C.D. goes under cover as
an Alzheimer's patient,


The Property .
Shop Tatiana
moves Mikey.
Joyce Meyer:
Everyday Life
My Wife and
Kids "Samba
Story" f (CC)
Reba "TwoWed-
dings and a Fu-
neral" (CC)


Big City Broker
Couple can't
agree. f (CC)


Family Feud n Catch 21 (CC) .Pyramid n
(CC), (CC)


Ninja Warrior Ninja Warrior Attack of the Show! Internet mys-
teries; Blogs.
* STAGECOACH (1986, Western) Willie Nelson, Kris Kristofferson,
Waylon Jennings. Passengers on a coach encounter marauding Indians.


Property Virgins
"Over the Thresh-
old" (CC)


The Unsellables
f (CC)


Flipping Out "Closer Inspection"
Jeff installs a hidden camera in his
office. (I


Zola Levitt Pre- Inspiration To- Life Today With This Is Your Day The Gospel
sents (CC) day James Robison (CC) Truth (CC)


According to
Jim "Dana Gets
Fired" ( (CC)
Reba Reba is .
rushed to the
hospital. (CC)


Countdown With Keith Olber-
mann


Family Guy The
Griffins build a
parade float.


Family Guy
"Saving Private
Brian" f (CC)


Two and a Half Two and a Half
Men n (CC) Men Thanksgiv-
ing dinner. (CC)


LIVING WITH THE ENEMY (2005, Suspense) Sarah Lancaster. A newly-
wed thinks her husband killed his first wife. (CC) ,


Verdict With Dan Abrams


Countdown With Keith Olber-
mann


SpongeBob Family Matters Home Improve- Home Improve- George Lopez
SquarePants f (CC) ment (CC) ment f (CC) f (CC)


George Lopez
n (CC)


Big Brother 10 One housemate is In Plain Sight "High Priced Spread" News (N) News
evicted. (Live) f, (CC) (CC) "(CC)


American Thun- American Thun- Pinks
der der


Behind the Grant Jeffrey
Scenes (CC) (CC)


Pinks -- All Out- Wrecked
takes (N)


Ancient Secrets Jack Van Impe
of the Bible (CC) Presents (CC)


* DIARY OF A MAD BLACK WOMAN (2005, Comedy-Drama) KIm-
berly lise, Steve Harris, Shemar Moore, A woman starts over after her
husband leaves her. (CC)


Jon & Kate Plus Jon & Kate Plus Jon & Kate Plus
8 Musical instru- 8 "Sunny Day" 8 Visiting a cray-
ments, Ion factory.


Jon & Kate Plus
8 "Household
Chores"


ler Perry's
House of Payne
Curtis' father.
Jon & Kate Plus
8 Reorganizing
the house.


Wrecked "Fire
and Ice"


Macedonian Call Annual fundrais-
ing event.

Tyler Perry's Tyler Perry's
House of Payne House of Payne
(N) Counseling. (N)
Must Love Kids Vanessa, Kristin,
and Tracy have formal dates with
their remaining suitors.


(:00) L aw & Or- Law & Order Fontana and Green Law & Order "Positive" A gunman Cold Case "The Key" Jeffries re-
.ar Dar'inian" uncover a cult that encourages sex- seeks revenge for the death of his opens a 1979 murder case. ,\
Si(C.) 'DVS) ual relations with children. n baby sister. n (CC) (DVS) (CC)
Clvr S-c';ty George of the Ben 10: Alien Total Drama Is- Johnny Test (n Chowder Game Ben 10 Framing
.- Jungle Force land (CC) night. Ben.
jCops n (CC) Most Shocking Most Daring Black Gold Justin starts to reach a
boiling point with Derek. (N)
(:00) Tute une L'ILE AUX TRESORS (2007) Grard Jugnot. Une (:45) Imago Vivre a velo Partir autrement
histoire equipe lIve I'ancre direction 'ile aux tresors. "V0lo-famille"
(:00) Abrcms & Bettes: Beyond the Forecast Weather: Evening Edition (CC)

(:00) C uerida Al Diablo con Los Guapos Fuego en la Sangre Hermanos Don Francisco Presenta Willy
En iemija buscan venganza. Chirino; Baby Boy y Dareyes de la
Sierra.
T THE SCORPION KING (2002, Adventure) The **x THE MUMMY RETURNS (2001, Adventure) Brendan Fraser,
I Rock. Steven Brand, Michael Clarke Duncan. A warrior Rachel Weisz, John Hannah. Two evil forces pursue the son of adventur-
ai n evi ruler and a sorceress. (CC) er Rick O'Connell. (CC)
'in 'ii. '-.i- 100 Greatest Teen Stars "Hour 4" 100 Greatest Teen Stars "Hour 5" Brooke Knows Brooke Knows
.r: ; ,1rs Teens 40-21. t Teens 20-1. 0 Best ( (CC) Best (CC)
(:00) Vorld Extreme Cagefighting WEC WrekCage (CC) TapouT (CC)

(:00) A Terica's Corner Gas Corner Gas A Becker Reggie Becker Becker WGN News at Nine (N) T (CC)
Funni st Home Emma quits knit- dog outwits investigates her agrees to barter
Videos (f (CC) ting. n Hank. n beau's ex-wife. medical care.


Family Guy The
Griffins build a
parade float.
JeoparJy! (CC)


America's Next Top Model The
models become creative muses for
student designers. n (CC)
Dr. Phil f (CC)


SLICESE TO WED (2007, Romance-Comedy)
-obn .' i.-i.,llInj' puts a newly engaged
copi hr(,ugh te ringer. f 'PG-13'.(CC)


Pussycat Dolls Present: Girli-
clous An argument causes one
woman to consider quitting. (CC) .
News (N) Jeopardy! (CC)


Generation Kill t (Part 3 of7)
(CC)


CW11 News at Ten With Kaity
Tong, Jim Watkins (N) (CC)

Frasier Frasier Frasier "Four for
builds a house. the Seesaw" ft
n (cc) (CC)

:15) ** FINAL DESTINATION 3
2006, Horror) Mary Elizabeth Win-
stead. f 'R'(CC)


HARM POT- Costas NOW Examining the current state of major s WE ARE MARSHALL (2006, Drama) Matthew
T, PI '- ii league baseball. th McConaughey. A new coach struggles to rebuild a col-
l[_ lege football team. ft 'PG' (CC)
:,L poris With Bryant Gumbel (:45) * u FLICKA (2006, Drama) Alison Lohman, Tim McGraw, Maria LICENSE TO
n Bello. A rancher's teenage daughter tames a mustang. 'PG' (CC) WED (2007)
Robin Williams.
iran JAKOB THE LIAR (1999, Comedy-Drama) THE REAPING (2007, Horror) Hilary Swank, (:45) Making:
ans. A ghetto dweller in 1940s Poland David Morrissey, Idris Elba. A former Chrstian mission- Generation Kill
.p ,' .-o, hope. P, 'PG-13' (CC) ary debunks religious phenomena., f 'R' (CC) n (CC)
F .V,; FfRIX (1999. * ACCEPTED (2006, Comedy) Justin Long, Jonah ** BALLS OF FURY (2007. Com-1
Reeves. A Hill, Blake Lively. A college reject and his friends create edy) Dan Fogler, Christopher
a fake university. 8, 'PG-13' (CC) Walken. PG-13' (CC)
'.. -* -11E HEARTBREAK KID (2007, Comedy) ***s EASTERN PROMISES (2007, Drama) Viggo (:45) ***
y: A man meets his true soulmate Mortensen. A midwife uncovers evidence against a FIGHT CLUB
: '- sh re. 'R' (CC) London crime family. ,( 'R' (CC) (1999) Brad Pitt.
S" ( 201,'6. Historical Drama) Anthony Secret Diary of a Weeds Nancy * JOURNEY TO THE END OF
II i V ',/ lous people's lives intersect after Call Girl (ITV) goes over Guiller- THE NIGHT (2006, Suspense) Scott
FK's assassination. 4 'R' (CC) mo's head. Glenn. iTV. C) 'R'(CC)
[:20)EACK IN (.05) * HEAVEN (2002, Suspense) Cate Blanchett, Giovanni Ribisi, ** ; TRAINSPOTTING (1996,
HE DAY (2004) Remo Girone. A cop helps a woman escape custody to kill a drug dealer. Drama) Ewan McGregor, Ewen
Jj Ru P' 1 .: u ..' 1.l-English) 'R' (CC) Bremner. n 'R' (CC)


;i .
.;~U mj rk .u :*. ***T:^*,~tA(^.;Si4B.(<4'"-


t~\ a


L et C l ,irlit l e ... ...

Bakciminc Puppet and

his sidekick Derek puti
some smSiles o youi ltA

kids's faces.




Bring your ckildreien to the

Mc Happy H+Io at fMDonIalds in

MV\alborouhk Street every Thuksday

from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the

month of July2008.





EnjoN Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.





i'm lovin' it


THE TRIBUNE


Thea ; 10 (N) Britney Spears: Price of Fame: The E! True Hollywood Story Britney
BiSpears. f (CC)
('00) Baseball MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee Brewers. From Miller Park in I
tohiqht (CC) (Live) (CC)


TBN


TBS


TLC

INO



TRU

TV5


TW


USA



VHs

WGN

WPIX

WSBK




HBO


HBO ;

^'n-


'~MC


I


i


-f-.


-L


I I I I i .. -


-t


--t--


--I


CABLE CHANNELSl


mmmmmmmmp


I I -- -- I I


I I


--


I


.11









THETRIBUNEWEDNESDAYJULY30,2008LOCALNEWSPAGE1


Small contractors
consider forming
an alternative
lobbying association

FROM page one

are dominating the indus-
try.
Mr Coakley said that a
few large firms control
the local construction
industry to the extent that
they can influence how
contracts are awarded.
They can also, he said,
force small contractors to
work as employees for
them, rather than sub-
contractors, due to their
influence in the market.
Small contractors are
also uneasy about the
draft Contractors Bill that
government is preparing
to present to Parliament.
Mr Coakley was particu-
larly concerned about a
possible stipulation that
may be included, requir-
ing contractors to put up
performance bonds in
order to secure contracts.
Few contractors would
be able to put up large
sums to secure contracts,
said Mr Coakley, which
would mean' that the larg-
er firms "keep a big part
of the pie in their pock-
ets because they know
they have the money."
Mr Coakley said that
there are at least 700 con-
tractors with whom he is
in discussion.
"We have thousands of
construction workers out
of work right now.
"We have thousands of
sub-contractors who are
very good workers who
want to be a part of these
projects, but they would
not give them a sub-con-
tract.
"They want them to
come in on an hourly rate
to perform their duties.
These sub-contractors
have groups of 50 and 60
persons working with,
them that (are) out of
work right now," he said,
emphasising that the gov-
einment qeeds to consult
\\ith mr'aller'contractors-
When considering changes
to the industry.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good .ause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


FROM page one


this error alone ultimately
brought to his attention by the
lawyer defending Coroner
Campbell's ruling.
Sir Burton had spent the ear-
lier part of the afternoon hear-
ing arguments from Dr
Iferenta's lawyers for a judicial
review of the ruling on about
10 different grounds only one
of which mentioned the fact
that Mr Campbell had offered
only one verdict to the jury.
These included the'assertion
that the Coroner was unfairly
biased against Dr Iferenta,
whom he criticised significantly
during his summing-up at the
end of the inquest, and that he
had made "improper" com-
ments to the jury that were not
based on evidence.
But in an ironic twist to the
proceedings, it was the first line
of defence offered by the lawyer
, representing Mr Campbell,
Patrick Mackey, that convinced
an incredulous Sir Burton to
rule that the verdict be quashed
as there was "nothing else
to be considered."


Verdict quashed

Mr Mackey's decision to
point out the fact that the Coro-
ner chose to only offer the
jurors one verdict a fact
which both he and the lawyers
for Dr Iferenta had apparently
decided was not of the utmost
significance in the whole affair
- was all that the Chief Justice
needed to hear.
The attorney had made the
point immediately after Dr
Iferenta's attorney Oscar John-
son had told Sir Burton that in
Mr Campbell's "summing-up"
to the jury he had "misdirected"
them by making comments that
were inappropriate in the cir-
cumstances.
"The point (Mr Johnson) is
making about misdirection (of
the jury) doesn't matter"
because "the jury never had a
chance to deliberate," said Mr
Mackey in his submissions to
the judge.
Upon hearing this, Sir Bur-
ton immediately interjected,
asking: "What did you say?"
When the attorney repeated


his point, Sir Burton called an
end to both lawyer's submis-
sions and immediately made a
ruling on the application -
deeming all of the other
grounds upon which Dr Iferenta
was originally applying for the
verdict to be quashed as "acad-
emic."
Sir Burton said: "This deci-
sion cannot stand. This point
about the Coroner directing the
jury vitiates everything. The
whole thing collapses."
He asked Mr Mackey to tell
him on what legal basis had he
claimed that the Coroner had
the authority to do what he had
done, but Mr Mackey failed to
offer the answer that Sir Burton
was looking for.
As a last resort the Coroner's
attorney tried to defend the ver-
dict on the basis that "no injus-
tice has been done because the
Coroner directed the jury based
on the evidence in the inquest."
The Chief Justice disagreed,
calling Mr Campbell's direction
to the jury "palpably wrong."
In his summing up to jurors in
February, Mr Campbell had
said: "In my view as Coroner, if
the evidence points in one direc-


tion, only points towards one
verdict and no other, then I am
bound to direct you to arrive at
that verdict and no other. This
case points in one direction over
another and I have a responsi-
bility to direct you to that ver-
dict that Christopher Esfakis
died from natural causes with
a substantial and significant con-
tribution made by neglect."
Sir Burton said yesterday:
"When a Coroner's Inquest is
undertaken and a jury is empan-
elled they are bound, accord-
ing to the oath that they take,
to, with the guidance of the
Coroner...to themselves arrive
at a verdict.
"The course taken by the
Coroner in this case means that
on the face of it that verdict was
not made by the jury. As a
result, the verdict of the Coro-
ner's jury is quashed and the
matter is remitted for hearing
before a different Coroner."
Yesterday Mr Esfakis' sister,
attorney Leandra Esfakis, who
fought for an inquest into his
death, said that while the verdict
is a "victory of sorts for Dr
Iferenta" it is a "technical vic-
tory."


Prisoner's escape


"The facts and evidence
underlying the Coroner's deci-
sion remain the same.
"The records of the hospital
will not change. The autopsy
results will not change. The
expert opinion evidence on
those records will not change,"
she said.
Asked whether she herself
had questioned the Coroner
directing the jury in the way he
did, Ms Esfakis said she had,
but having little experience in
the Coroner's court, was
uncertain as to the usual prac-
tice.
Outside the Chief Justice's
chambers, Dr Iferenta and his
wife appeared relieved, but had
no public comment to make on
the ruling.
The inquest, which spurred
Mr Esfakis' family to form a
group to advocate for the rights
of hospital patients and for
greater accountability in health-
care, was convened five years
after his death and saw 22 wit-
nesses called to give evidence,
some from abroad.
Ms Esfakis vowed yesterday
that she would push ahead with
the second inquest.


Body

*found


from police station floating


is investigated


FROM page one

'lea Avenue, was accused of being a drug gang mastermind respon-
sible for smuggling marijuana and cocaine into the United States
through the Caribbean. He was wanted in the US and arrested in
Nassau on February 28.
Maycock Jr, or 'Lil Mel', 24, of Joan's Heights, Nassau, is also
fighting extradition to the United States where he is wanted on
drug-related charges.
, He and Police Sergeant Troy Lewis, 38, of Pinewood Gardens,
pleaded not guilty to charges of aiding the escape of a prisoner and
.were granted $20,000 bail in April.
Their case was adjourned to September 23.
Drug Enforcement Unit officers captured Maycock Sr on the air-
port road in Nassau last month. He has been arraigned on several
drug related charges as well as weapons and ammunitions charges.
Magistrate Carolita Bethel, who had issued a warrant for May-
cock senior's arrest on an extradition request four years ago,
denied his application for bail on July 7.
His cases have been adjourned to October 2 and 9, and the
Attorney General's office is expected to proceed with the case
for his extradition.


at sea

FROM page one
was attempting to enter the
Bahamas.
It is assumed the man
was travelling with 300 sus-
pected illegal immigrants
apprehended off southern
New Providence on Mon-
day.
One officer at the scene
told The Tribune: "The
chances are, when you see
one body wash up, there
are more to come."
An autopsy and investi-
gation is underway.
Journalists were kept
away from the scene and
were unable to take any
close up photographs. Offi-
cials were unresponsive
and gave no additional
information regarding the
matter.


Attorney calls on PM

to inform nation if

he has read the EPA

FROM page one

Rawson Square, accompanied by other members of Bahamians
Agitating for a Referendum on Free Trade.
"This means that there will be no debate in Parliament
before August 30, 2008 when, according to the junior minister,
the agreement is to be signed. We think that this is disrespect-
ful, smacks of arrogance and is inconsistent with freedom of
information. This is no time for a holiday when the country is
in crisis and such a life altering agreement is about to be
signed."
EPAs are the successor trade pacts to the non-reciprocal
preferential trade regimes that previously governed the trade
relationship between the EU and African, Caribbean and
Pacific (ACP) trade for more than three decades.
EPA negotiations began after the World-Trade Organiza-
tion determined that the old trade arrangements between the
EU and ACP countries were unfair to other WTO members.
ACP countries were given preferential access to European
markets that other WTO member countries did not get and
which they did not have to give Europe in return.
The agreement seeks to liberalise trade in goods and ser-
vices between the EU and ACP states with CARIFORUM
negotiating on behalf of the Caribbean Community and the
Dominican Republic.
Concerns have emerged in this country about the agree-
ment. Some of these relate to the access that would be given
to dominant foreign interests to industries formerly reserved
'for Bahamians if the EPA comes into force.
...- "We-maintain today this agreement is bad for our country
and the misinformation that is coming from our ministry of
finance will leave the Bahamas begging bread in years to
come if we sign on," said Mr Moss. "We know that we have an
education problem in the country and the millions of dollars
that would have to be spent to conform to the rules of the
EPA that should be earmarked for the education of our stu-
dents."
The Bahamas, and other Caribbean countries have initialed
the agreement, with the signing date scheduled for the full
EPA being currently set for late August.
Omar Smith, deputy leader of the Bahamas Democratic
Movement, also noted his organization's objections to the
agreement yesterday.
"In the light of all that is being said about the economic
partnership agreement from the comments in the Caribbean,
the comments in Africa and the Pacific, it has now become
clear that this agreement is an agreement that the European
countries are using to coerce the lesser countries in the
Caribbean, Africa and the Pacific to sign on in lieu of pressure
from tariffs that they (EU) will put on their (ACP) products
goods and services in their regions," he said.
After the signing of the EPA, the agreement would still
have to be debated in, and ratified by, Parliament.


Have You Seen



Rex?


WSIE4


My 88-year-old mother has lost her 8 year old
companion Rex, pictured above, and she is
heartbroken. Rex has a health condition that
requires special medication which he must have
every day. He is wearing a navy blue collar with
Union Jack flags around it.




Rex was lost on Saturday morning, July 26, just
before the violent thunderstorm in the area of the
Cable Beach Apartments in Westward Villas by
Rawson Court.


If you have seen Rex or have given him shelter
and taken him in, we thank you and ask that you
call Tony Appleyard at 525-2961 or 477-0950
or the Bahamas Humane Society at 323-5138.



WR K0000,0X


,U9, w oir Ltd'


Used Car


Ban .Nissan

FinancinAvailable SUN NY'S
Ron the. I Starting at


$4,69500
BRING YOUR OLD 4cyl. VEHICLE TO TRADE SO YOU CAN UPGRADE


I I


a~ I I Y 3 I


WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE


























~aasI


-qs^


.. 1


The Bay

Eleuthera


Eleuthera


't just fly here. We live here.


Reservations:


Nassau:


Family Islands:
US Toll Free:


~,,I~mas%
1~?322006
~, *~


377-5505


1-242-300-8359
1-800-222-4262


FW 1


H


.9 Lc~""


0


^^'^q INN ^


*""1"" ,, {r $ .a.. .""Qrl


' .. .


~II~Clrarrc~













b THE TRIBUNE

Pm


Si


ini


WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008

o--, .. .. .. .


Potential deal breaker for BEC 'private



Bahamas Film Studios bid monopoly' could
nlas t J o


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
T he Bahamas
Film Studios'
buyer yester-
day told Tri-
bune Business
it would have to reassess
whether the development
was economically "viable
and feasible as a stand alone
entity", its offer and busi-
ness plan having been M
impacted by the Prime Min-
ister's desire to reclaim a
substantial portion of the project's land.
Owen Bethel, the Nassau-based Bahami-
an banker who put together the Bahamas
FilmInvest International consortium, said
the agreement to acquire the Bahamas Film
Studios and the purchase price itself -'
would likely have to be renegotiated if Mr
Ingraham made good on his pledge to
reclaim much of the project's 3,500 acres of


Buyer to reassess whether project 'viamage SWltcU to
* Buyer to reassess whether project 'viable a


and feasible as a stand alone entity'

* PM's move to reclaim 3,500 Crown

Land acres means hotel, theme park
components may not proceed

.................... ...................................................................................... .................................


Crown Land.
Mr Bethel, who is president and chief
executive of the Montaque Group, indicat-
ed to Tribune Business that despite its water
tank and associated film/TV production
facilities, the Bahamas Film Studios' eco-
nomic sustainability had always relied on
the development of a hotel, movie theme
park and residential real estate component
as per the original business plan.
Bahamas. FilmInvest International had


previously told this newspaper it was com-
mitted to investing up to $90 million in the
build-out of those facilities, but their devel-
opment would require the same 3,500 acres
the Prime Minister wants to reclaim.
Mr Bethel said of the Prime Minister's
plans: "It does impact the arrangement with
Ross [Fuller, the Film Studios' chairman

SEE page 5B


Manufacturing sector 'in a rut'


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
SMALL Bahamian manufac-
turing companies are in danger
of becoming a dying species,
several told Tribune Business
yesterday, as many may be
forced to close their doors as a


result of escalating costs and
labour productivity issues.
Kevin Simmons, owner of the
Simmons Shoe Manufacturing
Plant, said that in addition to
the myriad problems affecting
all business owners due to
increases in operating costs,
manufacturers also have to face
challenges posed by a lack of
acceptance of their products by


Bahamian clients.
"The manufacturing industry
is in somewhat of a rut, and one
of my biggest concerns is that
the Bahamian public is not
accepting of the products," Mr
Simmons said, adding that
labour was another major con-
cern.
"Bahamian workers have not
really been trained in how to


work in manufacturing, how to
accept that you get paid based
on what you produce, and the
fact that you can't stop a pro-
duction line to talk on the
phone."
Mr Simmons added that the.
import-based tax system was

SEE page 5B


Venture fund reject tries BDB, private investors


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
AN entrepreneur whose bid for $68,000
in debt financing was rejected by the Gov-
ernments-sponsored venture capital fund
yesterday told Tribune Business he was
working with private investors and the
Bahamas Development Bank (BDB) to
bring his idea to reality.
Clever Duncombe said: "We are pursuing
and entertaining the idea of private


investors. We are also in talks with the
Bahamas Development Bank. They'd con-
tacted us and told us they wanted to pursue
it. They were impressed with what they've
seen so far. We're not going to give up.
"I'm just waiting for my partner to get
back from Africa so that he can go in [to the
BDB] and deal with any problems we're
encountering."
Mr Duncombe and his business partner,
Andrew Moxey, are attempting to start a
company called Bahamas Hydraulics, which


would supply and construct hydraulic hoses
for heavy equipment machinery, in addi-
tion to air conditioning hoses and propane
lines.
He previously told Tribune Business that
they felt the existing companies serving this
market, Automotive and Industrial Dis-
tributors (AID) and Caribbean Hydraulics,
had only tapped into 5 per cent of the avail-

SEE page 5B


renewable energy


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Government
must avoid
transforming
the Bahamas
Electricity Cor-.
poration (BEC)
from a public
monopoly into
a private one, a
leading busi-
nessman said
yesterday ,
expressing con-
cern that its cur-
rent market domination could
stifle the switch to alternative,
renewable energy sources.
Dionisio D'Aguilar, the
Bahamas Chamberoof Com-
merce's president, told Tribune
Business that BEC would be "a
little more complexLto privatise
tha the Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC), sim-
ply because the electricity indus-
try's economic made it much
more difficult for competition
to instantly enter the market.
"It's easy for a cell phone
company to move into this mar-
ket, expand and provide com-r
petition to _BTC," .Mr
D'Aguilar, who is also Super-'
wash's president, told Tribune
Business.
Yet the sheer capital require-
ments of the electricity indus-
try, and demands for heavy
investment in power generation
and infrastructure capacity,
meant the barriers to market
entry for new competitors were
much higher than in the tele-
coms industry.
Manyobservers believe that
BEC tends towards being a nat-
ural monopoly, and while Mr
D'Aguilar said it was critical
that the Government exited the
ownership and running of all
utility companies and other
business interests, the first ques-


* Chamber chief questions
whether Government will
privatise power generation,
distribution or both
* Urges that there be
Bahamian ownership
in renewable energy
suppliers
* Believes BEC privatization
unlikely to be completed in
current government's term

tion to be answered when it
came to this nation's electricity
industry was what is actually
going to be privatized.
"Are you going to privatise
the generation of electricity, the
distribution of electricity, or are
you going to privatise both?"
Mr D'Aguilar asked. "If you
just privatise generation, and
put it in the grid, the monop-
oly remains on the distribution
side. We don't want private
monopolies replacing a public
monopoly, and driving up the
price. It's easier to privatise gen-
eration than it is distribution."
_ While agreeing that "BEC
needs to be taken out of the
control of government, because
it's not running it well, clearly",
Mr D'Aguilar said the Hawaii
governor's description last week
of the private electricity monop--
oly that existed on her island
provided a salutary warning for
the Bahamas.
Protected by its monopoly
status, Hawaii's energy genera-
tion giant responded to soaring
global oil prices by passing the
full cost on to the consumer, as
it had "no motivation" to
absorb part of the increase by
being more efficient, let alone


SEE page 7B


Baker's Bay opponents


gain leave to appeal


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
OPPONENTS of the multi-
million dollar Baker's Bay Golf
& Ocean Club project on Great
Guana Cay have been given
conditional leave to appeal to
the Privy Council, their attor-
ney telling Tribune Business
that the highest court would
now decide "matters which are
of fundamental importance for
the future development of the
Bahamas".
Fred Smith, an attorney and
partner with Callenders & Co,


said the Save Guana Cay Reef
Association and Aubrey Clarke,
the two plaintiffs in the action,
were now moving to post the
bond for the Privy Council
appeal and "settle the record"
for the hearing.
"I'm pleased to confirm the
Save Guana Cay Reef Associa-
tion and Aubrey Clarke were
able to get conditional leave to
appeal to the Privy Council
against the Heads of Agree-
ment judgment from the Court
of Appeal," Mr Smith said.
"We are moving to comply
with the ruling, lodging the
security for costs and settling
the record. We hope to be
before the Privy Council in the
very near future."
He added: "We believe we
have a very strong case, and
have been denied due process.
The issue of the ability of the
Prime Minister to bind the
country as to Heads of Agree-
ment will be determined at the
highest level."
Mr- Smith said other issues
raised by the Save Guana Cay
Reef Association's action were
the Cabinet's ability to "ride
roughshod over local rights and
local structures".
"These are very important
issues, and the basis on which
we have applied for leave. For
the future development of the
Bahamas, these are matters
which are of fundamental
importance."
The continuing opposition to
the Baker's Bay project by what
they perceive as a small group
with vested interests is likely to


How do you attract and retain

'best of class' employees?


WITH A 'BEST OF CLASS' PENSION PLAN
Superior performance Cost effective Customised
Calfl the Royal Fidelity pension experts today!'










Nassau: ,"Ai 'ir"01 (!efmrt


SEE page 4B


ROYAL a FIDELITY
Money at Work


NASSAU OFFICE
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010


'..;..'. -I .
.:., 249., !.








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008


Tourism requires special protection


AS the Romans conquered
the known world, one critical
element continued to follow
them as they expanded their
territory the ability to retain
and secure their newly-acquired
assets.
It is a widely-agreed fact that-
new acquisitions demand invest-
ment in securing them. The
Bahamas' growing involvement
in the tourism industry can be
compared to the acquisition of


new territories the Romans
gained, as they progressed
through central and southern
Europe, then into North Africa.
Even though today we face dif-
ferent challenges, the principles
remain the same.
Before we continue, it must
be emphasised that in this inves-
tigation, Preventatives Mea-
sures' focus is loss prevention,
which for us equates to asset
protection or security. Crime


and terrorism are the potential
losses, with the Bahamas' con-
tinued viability as a tourist des-
tination, inclusive of investor
and visitor interest, the asset
being protected.
With this in mind, an April
2005 report by Abadie and
Gardeazabal, entitled Terror-
ism and the World Economy,
said that from an economic
standpoint, terrorism has four
major fallouts. They are:
1. The capital shock
2. Uncertainty
3. Redirecting resources to
security issues
4. Negative affect on tourism
This being the case, it is fair
to assume that the investor will


Safe &
Secure
LI _- _


direct his/her interest to regions
that are least affected by crime
and terrorism. This, however,
is easier said than done, as the
general consensus among ter-
rorism experts is that this phe-
nomenon is multinational and
knows no borders. This defi-
nitely complicates matters, espe-
cially when we consider that just
as the investor attempts to stay
away from potential high-risk
crime areas, the criminal ele-
ment will be attracted to large-


scale investmentand perceived
economic booms.
An attack on these locations
will aid the terrorist cause or
statement. This impacts deci-
sions made by foreign and
domestic investors, not to men-
tion individual tourists who will
reconsider the trip. Similarly,
residents will even leave their
native land for a place perceived
to be less dangerous.
Jonathan Essner, in his 2003
report for the World Tourism
Organisation, Security and
Development, said: "The bur-
den upon a state managing a
terrorism problem may be enor-
mous, serious and unmanage-
able, particularly as terrorists
seem undeterred by an under-
developed set of global norms


4 .


fbikkiaBro.-Ken,

WEEKENDS





/ 101.9
,; Celebrating 5 years


and international laws against
terrorism."*
This is the reality of the situ-
ation. It has become apparent
that a more aggressive approach
to combating terrorism is nec-
essary, if we are to be serious
about prevention.
Three immediate steps should
be taken, the first of which is
to define the terrorist act spe-
cific to tourism. It is the
absence, in my opinion, of a
clear definition of this threat
that has left management wan-
dering around aimlessly. Sec-
ond, after this is done, specific
penalties/legislation is needed
to codify all actions associated
with tourism terrorism. Finally,
an agency/department mandat-
ed to police this threat must be
set-up.
Sounds a bit far-fetched, you
think? I then refer you to the
2000 Financial Intelligence Unit
Act. This newly-formed policing
agency was developed to moni-
tor crime relating to financial
services, specifically money
laundering. The ease with
which this unit was formed and
legislated was primarily because
of existing legislation, which
originated from clear local and
international accepted defini-
tions of what constituted finan-
cial crimes.
Does tourism need such a
specific unit? If the industry is
the primary/fundamental 'bread
and butter' industry, then the
question should be why haven't
we done so yet. Again, it is my
opinion that the global commu-
nity has not established a set of
standards or prerequisites for
one to establish such a unit.
Iromc, isn't it? We are well-pre-
pared to monitor our wealth
and that of our guests, but not
our personnel safety nor that of
our visitors .
NB: Gamal Newry is the
president of Preventative Mea-
sures, a loss prevention and
asset protection training and
consulting company, specialis-
ing in policy and procedure
development, business security
reviews and audits, and emer-
gency and crisis management.
Comments can be sent to PO
Box N-3154 Nassau, Bahamas,
or e-mail gnewry@preventa-
tivemeasures.net


.-...~ ~--~
-a -
'-A


Denim Day is Friday, October 3rd



242-461-1000 www.babfinancial.com British
Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-5601 A merican
F ; N A I C ) A L


MORTGAGES MUTUAL FUNDS LIFE INSURANCE HEALTH INSURANCE
ANNUITIES & PENSION PLANS FINANCIAL PLANNING & NVE;.iU.II'.


NOTICE

Request for Proposals
Investment Banking Services

The Committee for the Privatization of The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limited (BTC) is seeking proposals from suitably qualified
firms to provide Investment Banking services relating to the privatization
process, which is expected to be concluded by the end of this year. The
Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas is planning to sell
a majority interest in BTC to a suitable investor.

The role of the Investment Banking Institution will include: close
collaboration with the Committee's Privatization Advisors, KPMG
Corporate Finance Ltd. in providing advice to the Privatization Committee;
preparation- of any necessary sales information; identification of a short
list of potential investors and participation in negotiations with potential
investors.

Proposals should contain the following:

* Names and resumes of key team members to work on the project;
* Most recent relevant client/transaction lists;
* Relevant experience of firm;
* Relevant experience of team members to work on the project;
* A clear statement of pricing for services;
* Identification of any potential conflict of interest, related to the
project, on the part of the firm or members of the team who will
work on the project

Proposals should be emailed by 5:00 p.m. (Nassau time), on Friday,
August 8, 2008 to:

Mr. Craig Tony Gomez
Baker Tilly Gomez
at cgomez@btgomez.com
Telephone: 1(242) 356-4114

A hard copy of the proposal should be delivered to:

Baker Tilly Gomez
The Deanery
No. 28 Cumberland Street
P.O. Box N-1991
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mr. Edward R. Rolle



BAKER TILLY
C(OM Z


I I


BUSINESS









THE_ TRBN ENSDY UY3, 08 AE


Marsh Harbour




needs tourism




improvement


JQ-7n ci x

'V
4,'


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter
WHILE Abaco's tourism
numbers are on track with Min-
istry of Tourism expectations,
officials said yesterday they
were concerned about Marsh
Harbour, where arrivals have
declined slightly as a result of
persons choosing to visit the
Abaco Cays instead.
Don Cornish, head of the
Ministry's Abaco office, told
Tribune Business yesterday that
Marsh Harbour remained a
challenge, and it was looking at
ways in which they can improve
that area's visitor experience.
"We are looking at a number
of things, because the cays have
more of an appeal for our visi-
tors.. So visitors only come
through Marsh Harbour rather
than stay, because it does not
have the same type of hold," he
said.
Although, he did not have the
ministry's latest statistics, Mr
Cornish said initial indications
are that Abaco's numbers for
2008 will be on par with other
years.
"Basically, we are on track,
and the numbers are about the
same as 'other years except for
last year, but then last year was
significantly ahead of other



INSIGHT

FOP stories behind news,
readP H ht Mondays


years," he added.
Mr Cornish said that while
the island had experienced
some fallout as a result of the
financial climate in the US, it
was not significant.
Earlier this month, Vintage
Props, an airline with twice dai-
ly flights between Florida and
Abaco, announced it was ceas-
ing operations.
The airline had been flying
to the Abacos for 16 years from
various Florida airports, includ-
ing Daytona Beach since 1999.
Mr Cornish said that while
the island was understandably
disappointed, given the airline's
long term presence in Abaco,
they were able to mitigate the
impact by another airline pick-


ing up the route.
He explained that at the same
time Vintage was departing,
Craig Air expanded its services.
"They service much of the same
area, so we were able to benefit
from their 19-seater."
Mr Cornish said Craig Air
also serviced Jacksonville and
St Augustine, which was bene-
ficial considering that the major-
ity of tourists to Abaco came
from the Carolinas and North
Florida.
In fact, he said the airlift issue
should significantly improve
once the St Augustine airport
put in place its customs and
immigration departments,
which would greatly assist pas-
sengers.


South West Ridge


SALES OFFICE OPEN
Monday Friday 9:00 AM 4:00 PM Daily

PRECONSTRUCTION PRICING
HOUSE & LOT PACKAGES STARTING AT -
$335,000.00
TOWNHOUSE UNIT STARTING AT -
$250,000.00
SINGLE FAMILY LOTS STARTING AT -
$98,000.00
DUPLEX LOTS STARTING AT -
$115,000.00

MODEL HOUSE IS OPEN FOR
APPOINTMENT VIEWINGS
TO RESERVE YOURS CALL OUR
SALES OFFICE

Ph 242-341-4042
Fax 242-341-1407

emeraldcoastbahamas @ hotmail.com
www.emeraldcoastbahamas.com


JOB OiPPOiR;TUITi


SWIM CLUB NEEDS COACH
for intermediate & senior
competitive swimmers. ASCA level
3 or higher required. Proficiency in
Hy Tek.


Starting September 2008.


Send resume
and coaching philosophy to:
nmanfdebhatelnet.bhs


p"i -\ 9?; T~~

in .. ~ j ^ j. -* e iiif


-I-- --~-" --~----------~"


WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


,i








PAGE4BWEDNSDA JUY 30 208 TH TRBUN


Baker's Bay opponents




gain leave to appeal


Essex Street


Ground Floor 4,500 sq.ft
$2800/month


First Floor $4500 sq.ft

$2400/month



Tel: 359-3850





INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

In Voluntary Liquidation
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
JUNEL HOLDINGS LTD., is in dissolution.Continental
Liquidators Inc. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
60 Market Square, P.O. Box 1906, Belize City, Belize.
All persons having claims against the above-named company
are required to send their names, addresses and particulars
of their debts or claims to the liquidator before 28th day
of August, 2008.

P..

Sor C io, a i Liquidajotrs, inc.
Liqpidaeot


FROM page 1B


dismay both the developers and
the Government, not least
because additional time and
costs will be incurred in defend-
ing the project at the Privy
Council.
Indeed, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham told Tribune
Business last week that the
Government was holding up the
Baker's Bay project as the mod-
el all developers in the Bahamas
needed to meet when it came
to environmental standards.
In its Notice of Motion for
leave to appeal to the Privy
Council, the Save Guana Cay
Reef Association alleged that
both the Court of Appeal and
Supreme Court had "misun-
derstood the ground of review"
on its contention that the Cabi-
net/National Economic Coun-
cil (NEC) had no power to law-
fully enter into the Heads of
Agreement with Baker's Bay's
developers, Discovery Land
Company.
The Association said the legal
basis for its challenge in this
area came from the fact that,
for instance, the power to lease
Treasury land was vested in the
Treasurer and could not be
exercised without the Gover-


nor-General's approval, while
the power to issue town plan-
ning permits was held by dis-
trict councils, not the central
government.
In its Notice of Motion, the
Association alleged that both
courts had misunderstood its
case as a challenge to the Cabi-
net's power to enter into an
agreement with Discovery Land
Company, rather than "a chal-
lenge to the Cabinet's power to
confer the rights and conces-
sions granted and conferred
pursuant to the agreement".
Another ground for the Privy
Council appeal is that the Court
of Appeal was allegedly mis-
taken in rejecting the Associa-
tion's argument that the Heads
of Agreement was more than
an agreement in principle, and
agreed to give the developers
the necessary approvals and
permits, plus Treasury and
Crown Land leases.
"There was a clear agreement
to grant the leases and conces-
sions and to expedite the per-
mits and approvals, there was
consideration for this agreement
and the appellants have
adduced ample evidence that
the developers have acted in
reliance upon this agreement,"
the Association alleged.
In addition, it alleged that
both the Court of Appeal and


Supreme Court failed to prop-
erly consider its contention that
it was "irrational to conclude
that the development would
have a positive impact on econ-
omy of the Bahamas and Great
Guana Cay in particular".
The Association is also
appealing on the alleged
grounds that both courts wrong-
ly concluded that the entrance
into the Heads of Agreement
by Wendall Major, the Cabinet
secretary, "did not constitute a
fettering of the discretion of any
person or body".
And it further contended that
it was wrong for the courts to
have concluded that Guana Cay
residents had been "properly


consulted" prior to the Heads of
Agreement signing.
The judicial review action
that is the subject of the Privy
Council appeal is the first of
three launched by the Associa-
tion in a bid to stop the Bak-
er's Bay development.
The second judicial review
action, upon which a Supreme
Court judgment is awaited, is
challenging Whether specific
government ministers and agen-
cies had the power to grant cer-
tain permits and approvals to
Discovery Land Company.
And the third is challenging
the permits and approvals
issued to Baker's Bay by the
Hope Town District Council.


YOUR CONNECTIO O THE WORLD


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Limited invites qualified vendors) to provide
direct top-up solutions for wireless prepaid
services. If your company offers top-up solutions
for prepaid and is interested in participating in
this selection process please see the following
guidelines relative to the application process.

Selection Process Schedule:
July 11: NDA document will be available for pick-up
at security desk of BTC's JFK Headquarters.
July 14: RFP available for pick-up at security desk of
BTC's JFK Headquarters. RFPs will not be
issued until a signed NDA has been
completed and returned to BTC.
Aug. 5: RFP responses should be submitted to:
I Kirk Griffin, EVP (BTC Building) 21 JFK Drive,
PO Box N3048,Nassau, NP Bahamas
(Attention: eTop-up)






www.btcbahamas.t om CALL BTC 225-5282


An entrepreneurial spirit, original thinking, and a passion to succeed.
If you have it, we want you.


We are growing!
Royal Fidelity invites applications for the position of:


- MANAGER, PENSION SERVICES -


PROFILE

THE SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATE WILL HAVE THE
FOLLOWING MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:

A Bachelor's degree, preferably in finance;
A minimum of five years business experience;


HUMAN RESOURCES
Re: Manager, Pension Services
51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau, Bahamas
F: 326.3000
careers@royalfidelity.com


[ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS]


* Strong presentation and communication skills;
* Highly motivated with ability to work under
own initiative;
* Strong work ethic with ability to get things done.


SUMMARY


The successful applicant will be primarily responsible for
Royal Fidelity's business development for pension


business including soliciting new business, presentations
to prospective clients, periodic meeting with plan
participants, monitoring administration thereof, regular
reporting to clients and overall service quality.



AN ATTRACTIVE COMPENSATION PACKAGE, INCLUDING A COMPREHENSIVE RANGE OF EMPLOYEE
BENEFITS, IS BEING OFFERED. SALARY RANGE SUBJECT TO QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SULTANE VALCOURT
of WILSON TRACK, P.O. BOX CB-12299, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
30TH day of JULY 2008 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.


Full Time Cashiers


Needed

Applicants must be 30 years old or older, honest,
flexible, reliable and customer service oriented.
Must be able to work shifts;
(8am-4pm / 4pm midnight / midnight 8am).
Expereince is an asset.
Serious enquiries only
Tel: 325-5488 Mon-Fri 9am-4pm
Fax: 328-5498

Deli worker needed
Applicants must be able to work shifts
(7am-3pm & 3pm 11pm), be honest, flexible
reliable and customer service oriented.
Serious enquires only
Mon-Fri 9am-4pm
Tel: 325-5488
Pax: 328-5498


IC r I I II ~~i~ IIIIII ~ ~ r I I


. r r;-rr,


I II


- ----aa~--~B~t~


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008


THETRIBUNE


b advptisein M


TENDER FOR DIRECT TOP UP SOLUTIONS








THE TRIBUNE


VVtL)VUN UAY, JULY 3U, ZUUO, t-r-c OD


Potential dealbreaker for Bahamas Film Studios bid


FROM page 1B


and vendor], in that Ross will
not be able to deliver the full
package in terms of the arrange-
ment and what we have under-
taken to do, meaning the resort,
residences and the theme park
element of the development.
"One will have to look at the
Studios as a single entity, and
whether in its own right it will
be able to pay for itself.
"It does mean going back to
the drawing board and looking
at the viability of a standalone
Film Studios in the Bahamas."
Mr Bethel said that if the
Government made good on its


announced intention to rene-
gotiate the Bahamas Film Stu-
dios' Heads of Agreement, "I
would certainly think it will
have a bearing on the purchase
price".
That sum is currently thought
to be an eight-figure one some-
where below $14 million, with
Mr Bethel adding that the Gov-
ernment's plans "may draw out
the process" for Bahamas
FilmInvest International to
acquire the development.
That, in turn, may impact the
Bahamas Film Studios' and
the wider Bahamas ability to
attract major TV and film pro-
ductions, Tribune Business hav-
ing revealed previously that
Disney was looking at the


Grand Bahama-based project
for the shooting of its Pirates
of the Caribbean IV sequel in
the New Year.
The Pirates of the Caribbean
II and Ill productions pumped
some $40 million into the
depressed Grand Bahama econ-
omy, but for the Bahamas Film
Studios to host the Disney
blockbuster once again they will
have to be ready by October.
That is now looking like a tall
order, and Mr Bethel said yes-
terday: "When we come back
to the issue of having the Stu-
dios ready to attract Disney and
others, it's a further [delay]."
He added: "While we would
certainly want to see the con-
tinuation of the Studios, it was


contingent on the success of the
surrounding activities support-
ing that on an ongoing basis.
"We would certainly have to
renegotiate if, as has been indi-
cated by the Prime Minister,
Ross will not be able to deliver
to us what he has undertaken
to deliver. We would have to
renegotiate with him, and that
will impact the liabilities we
have undertaken.
"We're certainly ready and
able, but we now need to look
at what are the terms of the
package Ross can offer, and
whether the whole venture is
viable and feasible in the cur-
rent economic conditions as a
standalone Studio. We will have
to wait and see what we can


Venture fund reject tries BDB, private investors


able business something Mr
Duncombe believes includes
6,100 heavy equipment
machines and 17,000 light duty
machines.
He and Mr Moxey applied to
the Bahamas Entrepreneurial
Venture Fund for $68,000 in
debt financing, pledging to
invest $17,000 of their own equi-
ty into the venture, but were
rejected by the fund's Board.
Mr Duncombe has since
appealed that decision to the
Ministry of Finance. In a July
9, 2008, letter to Colin Higgs,
the financial secretary to the
Treasury, he wrote: "We were


obviously interested in know-
ing the specific reasons for the
Board's decision, so that we
might address them and resub-
mit the proposal.
"We have not received a con-
sistent explanation from indi-
viduals who were involved in
the evaluation process. Some of
the verbal responses given
include:
The proposal's lack of clar-
ity
Failure of applicants to
appear in person
Absence of collateral
Project is not viable
Financial numbers do not


make sense"

Referring to the Bahamas
Entrepreneurial Venture
Fund's annual report for the
period May 2005 to April 2006,
when it received 145 business
plans but only decided to fund
20 of them, Mr Duncombe
questioned "what message are
we trying to send" to entrepre-
neurs whose ideas were reject-
ed.
He also asked what happened
to the business ideas of those
who the Bahamas Entrepre-
neurial Venture Fund rejected,
and added: "It shows they're


FROM page 1B

another issue, saying that
Bahamians will have to get to
grips with the fact that with all
the proposed trade arrange-
ments, protectionism will be
abandoned.
To offset these challenges,
Mr Simmons suggested that
manufacturers try to carve out a
niche for themselves and spe-
cialise in one particular aspect
of their industry.
For example, he said that his
competition was China, given
that that nation manufactures
more than 60 per cent of the
world's shoes very cheaply.
Women's shoes were challeng-
ing, because women want "a
variety of shoes, whereas men
just want a good pair of shoes".
Therefore, Mr Simmons said
his specialty was well-made,
high quality men's shoes, some-
thing China cannot provide.
"It is a continuous struggle
to provide what no one else
does, and to do so at a compet-
itive price," he said.
Larry Phillips, owner of
Phillips Sailmakers, said yes-
terday that Bahamians simply
do not have the disposable
income they used to, which
made it increasingly difficult for
them to purchase non- essen-
tials.


-* *ib CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
FirstCarnbbean ,a f,


FirstCaribbean is a major Caribbean Bank offering a full range of market-leading financial .
services in Corporate Banking, Retail Banking, Credit Cards, Wealth Management, Capital ti.
Markets and Treasury. We are the largest regionally listed bank in the English-speaking
Caribbean with over 3,500 staff, 100 branches and banking centres, and offices in 17
regional markets, serving 800,000 active accounts. We are looking to fill the following
position:


Email applications to Mrs. Eloise Jackson (Email address: eloise.jackson@firstcaribbeanbank.com)

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:
* Co-ordinate all aspects of financial planning segment and functional unit. Requires understanding of trends,
business opportunities, segment strategy and economic factors'. Set targets, present basis and spearhead
negotiation with business leaders
* Manage all financial systems related projects, developments, application upgrades, implementation/system
integration etc.
* Perform various financial and business performance analyses. Develop and co-ordinate all financial and capex
planning for business and functional units, ensuring alignment with strategic objectives
* Responsible for the integrity of and interfaces between all financial systems including Smart Stream,
Consolidations, the Cognos suite of products, FirstWarehouse & Treasury Systems
* Responsible for conducting financial analyses, annual Capital Expenditure Eudl',:'.ri monthly financial
forecasting and providing recommendations to Executive
PREREQUISITES:
* MBA/accounting designation level
* Seasoned finance/business professional with proven bank experience
* At least six years of related experience in the financial services industry. 10+ years overall professional
experience
* Proven ability to manage a team and to manage laige processes such as the corporate planning process for a
large conglomerate
* Experience communicating with Executive Management
* In-depth knowledge of all banking segments (Offshore, Retail, Commercial, Capital Markets)
* Excellent communication/presentation skills given regular exposure to Executive and external parties
* Excellent analytical and financial modeling skills and conversant with leading-edge measurement
methodologies such as Value Based Management (VBM)
* Business development acumen
* Strong leadership, motivational, negotiating and influencing skills

* *l de n .......iing
you prfesioalquaifcaton oreqivaen. ...


not serious about giving
Bahamian investors an oppor-
tunity. What was wrong with
our proposal? We couldn't get
equity or debt? That's what
we're trying to establish.
"We have over 300,000 vehi-
cles in this country. Most of
them use air conditioning.
We're in the business of con-
structing air conditioning lines
as well. We'll always be in busi-
ness. It's a revenue cycle.
"Included in our business
plan, we were also coming up
with a mobile van with which
we could visit remote places in
the Family Islands."


"If you have to choos,
between buying a pair of pants
for yourself or paying your
child's school fees, it's a no-
brainer that you are going to
pay your child's school fees,"
he said.
Mr Phillips added that con-
sidering the cost of raw materi-
al supplies has increased at a
rapid rate, it is possible that
some manufacturing companies
who are unable to absorb these
costs will simply be forced out
of business.


negotiate further with the Gov-
ernment."
Apart from Mr Bethel's
group, another potential bidder
for the Bahamas Film Studios is
Bahamian filmmaker Cedric
Scott. Mr Scott, who is based in
Los Angeles, is understood to
have been seeking financing in


recent months with a view to
mounting a potential bid.
It is thought that the Gov-
ernment has been waiting to see
whether Mr Scott could raise
the capital to mount an offer,
in the hope that it could com-
pare his proposal with that of
Mr Bethel and his group.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

PARAMOUNT STAR LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of June 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice
NOTICE

CELICOELECTRO INC.

(in Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company 'is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of July 2008. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


NAD
Nassau Airport
Development Company





Insurance Brokerage Services &
Quotation On Insurance Requirements


Nassau Airport Development Company Limited invites Tenders for providing
Insurance brokerage services and quotation on insurance requirements at
The Lynden Pindling International Airport

In keeping with NAD'a o5b btves, proponents:

Must be a holder of a current Business License
Must demonstrate the ability to fulfill the requirements set out by
NADIs official Request for Proposal (RFP)
Must show a sound track record of quality performance and
customer satisfaction
Must show the ability to maintain the contract

RFPs may be collected from NAD's corporate office in Terminal i at the
Lynden Pindling International Airport between the hours of 10 00am to 4pm
commencing August 5th, 2008.



The ,."C3,'ir." fi.-r ruL-r.,;i.',rn i
Monday. August 18th, 2008 at 3:00 pm.
T.-leprone 1242 37711-20


AScotiabank


is seeking the services of

SENIOR MANAGER HUMAN RESOURCES

With over 55,000 employees in over 50 countries, Scotiabank places great importance
on recognizing and rewarding strong performance. We offer room for advancement, a
stimulating work environment and the resources to help you make the most of your
career. Together, we.continue to make Scotiabank a great place to work.

POSITION SUMMARY:

As the Senior Manager, Human Resources, you are a member of the senior management
team of Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd., with a focus on dealing with the strategic and
tactical Human Resources needs of a growing and profitable organization. This will
include but not be limited to: developing the HR strategy for the organization; working
with the Bank's support groups in the head office on the development of the annual
total rewards program; maintaining and developing a dynamic employee relations
strategy; ensuring the effective recruitment and orientftion.of new employees; managing
the relationship between the Bank and third-party service suppliers; and the identification
of training needs and the evolution of the training and development curriculum. You
will need to be capable of working in a highly cross-functional environment and be
capable of managing tight time lines and conflicting priorities. You are an exemplar of
communication and relationship-building skills, an excellent coach, and can effectively
establish and maintain an open, co-operative work environment.

Key accountabilities for this role:

Contribute to the achievement of the overall business objectives of Scotiabank
(Bahamas) Ltd.
Ensure the recruitment, development and maintenance of an engaged workforce.
Support people through and act as an agent of change in the environment.
Be prepared to liaise with a wide variety of Departments, balancing the needs of
all against the objectives and strategies of the Optimization program

QUALIFICATIONS:

Ten years of experience as a Human Resources professional.
A minimum of an undergraduate university degree, while a graduate degree or
a major in Human Resources is an asset.
Experience in the financial industry is an asset.
Proven experience managing people.
Excellent and proven negotiation and conflict resolution skills are essential.
Ability to learn quickly, adapt to an ever changing environment and adapt to ever
changing priorities are essential.

OTHER INFORMATION:

Frequent travel to the Family Islands
Occasional travel internationally.
Spanish Language is a bonus in an organization that is expanding rapidly in
Spanish-speaking countries.

The Scotiabank Group is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes applications
from all interested parties. We thank you for your interest, however, only those candidates
selected for an interview will be contacted.

Qualified candidates only should submit applications in writing marked Private and
Confidential by Monday, August 11, 2008 to The Managing Director @ email:
scotiabank.bs@scotiabank.com


BUSINESS


Manfacturi


secto 'in rut


FM









THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B WEDNESDAYJULY 30., 2008


CM* G


Tribune Comics


JUDGE PARKER


APT 3-G


HOW LONG THAT PEPENPS. IF I
WILL YOU TAKE THE JOB,I'LL NEEP
E GONE TO SPEN TIME SKETCHING
L ANN' ? FIELPSTUPIES.6






7-29


BLONDIE
THIS IS THE WHAT DOES
HOTTEST NEW GIZMO IT DO?
ON THE MARKET
~-^y* zi


^r^^-'i,


MARVIN
I SEE YOU
MOVED YOUR
PLACE UNDER
THEI: (.ES


TIGER

-r h,, "1"o r P J 1 6- oNM
4UZ'9? /A4 O.A?


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE



psJGLIS4A4AN/I






1 Y7-29 7
v4i~jfe ot r r/KV eY J


T
R


B
U
N
E


T
W
0


I
N


0
N
E


C
R

0
S
S
W
0
R
D


PLEASE PON'T MENTION
ANY OFTHIS TO ALAN,
MARGO0. I WANT TO TELL
HA MYSELF.







r \


NOTHING! THAT'S THE BEAUTY OF
IT! SINCE IT DOES NOTHING, THERE'S
NO WAY YOU CAN








7-29 r-?


HE'LL B


rt



I^E~


YOU'LL NE
SAOUT 1-
UP6GR




Sl


44
I7~ -
v[r


S0NTIN6


CRYPTIC PUZZLE


Across
1 For wrapping or handker-
chiefs its uses are varied
(7).


4 Deck that is trouble to the
Royal Navy (5)
7 New star making a come-
back at Stratford (4)
8 Shakespearean character
to sort out crime (8)
10. It eats almost everything
(6,4)
12 Endlessly ask the advice
of a national representa-
tive (6)
13 Setback in
retirement (6)
15 Fit after trailing badly (4,6)
18 It braves a new order, but -
trembles (8)
19 Just nothing left in New
York (4)
20 Substantial figure (5)
21 Breed of dog that will
change some day (7)


Yesterday's Cryptic Solutic
Across: 1 Odds and ends, 9 Uniting
10 Titan, 11 Halo, 12 Sinecure,-14
Urgent, 16 Lessee, 18 Haltered, 19
Mint, 22 Ogled, 23 Lantern, 24 Roai
sweeper.
Down: 2 Drill, 3 Skin, 4 Noggin, 5
Extremes, 6 Detours, 7 Hush-hush
job, 8 Interesting, 13 Intended, 15
Galileo, 17 Fellow, 20 Irene, 21 Kne


Down
1 Instruct attendants (5)
2 Identifying rash
symptoms (8)


3 Observe present
and past in
child's play (6)
4 Man of principle made
riches in a way (10)
5 Sort out old bits and
pieces (4)
6 Old ones like this have lit-
tle sense (7)
9 Small employee works
round the clock (6,4)
11 The quality
of mercy (8)
12 Sticks together one hun-
dred pages (7)
14 Young swimmers in wild
revels (6)
16 Wood spirit (5)
17 Pronounced fit
to be the first murder
victim (4)


DENNIS THE MENACE


6 50 HAPPY ANP
GROUP OF ME/


/(R HAVE TO WORRY
HAVING TO BUY AN --
,DED MODEL!
I'LL
T!S





B-


4~7


Across
1 Derisive cry (7)
4 Quick-witted (5)
7 Unsightly (4)
8 Jubilant (8)
10 Reverie (5,5)
12 Go up and down (6)
13 Haughtily supercil-
ious (6)
15 As an instance (3,7)
18 Grandiloquent lan-
guage (8)
19 Disgusting (4)
20 Subsequent (5)
21 Ancestry (7)


18 191


20 21


Yesterday's Easy Solution
Across: 1 Illustrated, 9 Oppress,! 10
Cacti, 11 Deem, 12 Deadlock, 14;
Absurd, 16 Invest, 18 Narcotic, 19
Ogre, 22 Raise, 23 Pioneer, 24
Well-meaning.
Down: 2 Lapse, 3 Used, 4 Tassel, 5
Accident, 6 Enclose, 7 Good man-
ners, 8 Sick at heart, 13 Arboreal,
15 Service, 17 Simple, 20 Green, 21
Soon.


CALVIN & HOBBES
SWU%. CMN cSw 11w
MW MERE I T5'Z 700.I|


I HOP 4E tE LEAST RAS
THE lSESE 10 STAn um,
K W VER lE IS.


.I'M 100 VOOUNGTO T EAP T14E NEWSPAPER
5so I PAVTA WATCI4 ALOTOFCARTOONS."


Sudoku Puzzle

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9X9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday

3 91 7

4699 91A-

73 65 7




6 2 4_ 1

8 9 3

83 72

DfutLv * 7/2


-I


Kakuro Puzzle


Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the emipty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.


Yesterday's
Sudoku Answer


Boris Spassky v Jurgen Klages,
junior world championship,
Antwerp 1955. Spassky, the
later world champion, was hot
favourite for the junior title and
lost only one game. He had been
attacking throughout until his
unknown German opponent
suddenly developed
counterplay. Black plans simply
Qal + followed by Qxb2 or
Nc4 +. Spassky probably
realized he was lost, but spotted
a chance for a last-ditch
brilliancy by the strange choice
1 BxcS. White is offering both
his rook to Bxd6 and his bishop
to Rxc5. Klages saw through the
trap, captured neither piece, atid
made a decisive move of his
own which induced Spassky's
immediate resignation. Can you
explain what happened?


Down
1 Small particle (5)
2 Discuss (4,4)
3 Carelessness (6)
4 Abstemiousness (4-
6)
5 Slightly open (4)
6 Strength (7)
9 Out of favour (2,3,5)
11 Consist of (8)
12 Separate (7)
14 Supporting (6)
16 Choose (5)
17 Natural
aptitude (4)


517
7 8 5
146


961


Yesterday's
Kakuro Answer


+ f8 4 Pxfmate.
I White resigned
' 4 Ke2 R;2+ 5 Rd2


Chess ,

I,


-- i -i


Chess solution 8394: It I Bxc5 Bx
I BxcS fxc5?r 2 Qg7! Bxg7 3 Rd8
The gamn emnied 1 Bxc5 Nb3+! and
tnwcause of 2 cxb3 Rxc5t 3 Kdl OQb
Rxd2* 6 Kxd20xb2* and Qxg2.


Target


The
Target
uses

words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Diionary

edition).


HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
ftom the letters shown here? In
mnakine g a word. each letter may
be used once only. Each mUst
contain the centre letter and
there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 18; very good 27;
excellent 36 (Or more>)
Solution tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION
agape agar agate
agent agnate anger
angry gantry gape
gaper garnet gate
gayer gean gear gent
gentry gnat gran grant
grape grapy grate gray
great grey gyrate gyre
pagan page pageant
PAGEANTRI.Y pager
pang parget prang
raga rage rang range
rangy tanager tang
tangy trepang yang


Contract Bridge

by Steve Becker


Let There Be Light


South dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.
NORTH
*KQ
VAK7
*A8 753
+Q 104
WEST
4J10953
VJ 95


*Q 1062
42


EAST
*A8 762
VQ 1064
+9
+863


SOUTH
,4
V8 32
+ K J 4
4AKJ975
The bidding:
South West North East
1 Pass 1 Pass
2 + Pass 4 NT Pass
5 Pass 6 +
Opening lead jack of spades.
It is not a good idea to separate
the play on a particular trick from the
play of the hand as a whole. Playing
to a trick in isolation is like playing a
hand with the lights out.
For example, take this deal where
last won the opening spade lead
wi t the ace and returned a spade to
dummy's king. Declarer discarded a
heart on this trick, reasoning that
since his third heart was a loser, he
would dispose of it then and there.
South then drew trumps, led a
diamond to the ace and returned a
diamond, planning to finesse the jack


if East followed low. But when East
showed out on the second diamond,
the contract collapsed, and the slam
went down one,
South's failure to make six clubs
is directly attributable to his play at
trick two. While it is true that dis-
carding a heart assured not losing a
heart trick, and also kept a diamond
finesse in reserve, the simple fact is
that declarer should have kept the
heart and discarded a diamond
instead. Had he done that, he would
have raised his overall chances from
about 50-50 to a near certainty.
Observe what happens if South
discards a diamond at trick two.
After drawing trumps, he cashes the
K-A of diamonds and ruffs a dia-
mond. If the missing diamonds arc
divided 3-2, there is nothing further
to the play.
But even in the actual case,
where the diamonds are divided 4-1,
declarer still gets home safely. Ile
crosses to dummy with a heart and
ruffs another diamond. Dummy is
then re-entered with a heart, and
declarer's heart loser is discarded on
the fifth diamond.
By adopting this approach, South
makes the slam whenever the dia-
monds are divided 3-2 or 4-1 a 96
percent chance. That's a lot better
than the 50-50 shot he gave himself
by discarding a heart at trick two,
when, in effect, he was playing the
hand in the dark.


Tomorrow: West gets an unwanted assist.
,12008 King Features S) indicate Inc.


IT'LL HELP
KEEP THE4
COrT.TAGE
COOLER
0



0 7


...PLUS; IT'S THE CLOSEST *
THING 4 --i
HAvib \
INDOOR
PLUMB5NC'!



i_ 0

b07


W vV


i -1 .


-r


JO& I i tr i 1 1 -,


II


,\Ii


. .. ,-,


-14


- ---- -~c-


I


7/29


Difficulty Level **










THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008, PAGE 7B


electricity from them, making
it unprofitable," the Chamber
president said.
"So the switch is never made
to alternative energies, because
they don't want it to happen.
Therein lies a fundamental
problem."
Mr D'4guilar said the
Bahamas' geographic layout
created a natural problem for
electricity supply, as "the tradi-
tional method of building a gen-
eration plant is very inefficient -
building 50 generation plants
on 50 different islands. It
requires so much capital to


Legal Notice



NOTICE



ESSO PIPELINE COMPANY LIMITED


Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on
or before 19th August, A.D., 2008. In default thereof they
will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
by the Liquidator.

Dated the 28th day of July, A.D., 2008.

Julio C. Rodriguez
Liquidator
800 Bell Street
Houston, Texas 77002, U.S.A.







Major firm in the financial and legal services industry
invites applicants for the following position:



LEGAL SECRETARY


Must have minimum five years legal experience in
Commercial or Litigation areas; ability to draft
legal documents; possess excellent typing, shorthand
and communications skills; ability to multi-task and
prioritize.

Compensation: commensurate with qualifications
and experience.

Reply in confidence to legalsecretary38 @ gmail.com






LENNOX PATON

Counsel & Attorneys-At-Law


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Lennox Paton is seeking an enthusiastic and
dynamic Administrative Assistant for our
Corporate Litigation Department.


REQUIREMENTS
A minimum of two years experience in a similar
position
Proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook &
Powerpoint
Good working knowledge of general office
procedures and database management

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES
Must be conscientious, thorough and organized
Must meet deadlines
Must have good client liaison skills
Require minimum supervision


Interested persons must submit a cover letter and
current resume no later than August 15th, 2008 to:

HRmanager@lennoxpaton.com

OR

Human Resources Manager
Lennox Paton
P.O. Box N-4875
Nassau, Bahamas


build a generation plant".
New Providence already sub-
sidises the Family Islands when
it comes to BEC revenues, and
Mr D'Aguilar said there
appeared to be recognition at
last week's conference on
renewable energies that alter-
native sources such as solar
and wind needed to replace
diesel plants in the Out Islands.
Yet the Chamber president
said it was critical to ensure
there was a Bahamian owner-
ship component in companies
that supplied alternative energy
to BEC, in order to ensure
there were tangible foreign
reserves and other economic
benefits for this nation.
"If you start to switch to alter-
native methods, you don't want
to go from sending $1 billion a










IS IG.


year for diesel to the Arabs to
sending $1 billion to someone
else for a wind plant," Mr
D'Aguilar said. "It's important
there's a Bahamian component
there, so that some of the dol-
lars stay here."
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham last week told Tribune
Business exclusively that the
Government planned to priva-
tise BEC "as soon as BTC is
finished", as the electricity
monopoly's capital demands -
some $300-$500 million
required over three years were
now almost beyond the Gov-
ernment's capacity to meet.
However, Mr D'Aguilar was
more sceptical as to when
BEC's privatization would be
achieved, saying: "I don't see
this happening in this five-year
term. I would be surprised, giv-
en the complexity of it. The
Government's got a lot on its
plate it's got BTC to deal with.
I think they should encourage
the build-up of the alternative
generation of electricity, so they
can tie that into the grid."
The Chamber chief urged the
Government to set achievable
targets for reducing BEC's
dependence on diesel fuel, and
benchmarks for how much of
its electricity supply would be
generated by renewable ener-
gy sources.


BEC 'private monopoly






could damage switch






to renewable energy


You and us. A wiiniig partnership


for an outstanding g ca reer.


A premier financial firm like UBS runs on exceptional talent like yours. We seek out uniquely gifted individuals who can bring
something differentto our organization and offer them superb career opportunities to match their potential.

UBS Wealih Management is looking to expand its team of Senior Client Aduisors/Relationship Managers into the UBS (Bahamas)
Ltd. office for the European, Brazilian, Canadian and Latin American markets.

Have you been working with high net worth dients over the last 5 years of your career?
We seek candidates preferably with relevant previous work experience and who can demonstrate outstanding past performance and
achievement in the areas of sales building and client management; flexible & creative; possess strong analytical and interpersonal skills;
enthusiastic and committed. A strong work ethic and personal integrity is critical and excellent language skills are an advantage (e.g.
English, French, German, Spanish or Portuguese). Candidates must have a minimum of a BA degree, preferably with an emphasis in
Finance or Economics.


To apply forthis fulltime position, please send your resume and cover letterto: hrbahamas@ubs.com

Wealth
Management


SUBS


i sUBS 101. ThekeypmtiflndIa&n ghtrktndaru orragkte radiradercarklntfl.IS. SI rlrtsik raval. int-st .)ls)an0trixurKrIrs't1iractngancibreketfag it8c.1, jnrIM A 1c1V.-rYitlfaretiprhded-ll tis
Saoure ILC a ralstsrsli)airdsasti1srth i 6 a tolkw 5ned sulsliaryof US A< 3 nasrmef tho Nta4 t ttskE:hrI gehrrs sod ttwr prtrltlBhS canasanonlarrtoercfSIPC6UBiBah1anaitLt.t6 tLbsidaiyotf BSAC


^. WT FG CAPITAL MARKETS
ROYAL FIDELITY ROKERA.AVSO EICE

C FA L"
BISX LISTED 8. TRADED SECURITIES AS OF
TUESDAY, 29 JULY 2008
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: &CLOSE 1.815 86 | CHG 0 06 I %CHG 0 00 | YTD -250 89 [ YTD% -12 14
FINDEX: /\CLOSE 000.00 | YTD% -8 57% | 2007 28 296
VVIWVV BISXB.AHAMAS COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
.-... .. "2..L..:... o ...l: -.-- .... :l:. u T,:j03,i s- .. 5. C ..nge.., C ,..' EPS Div$ P E Yield
1.95 1.51 Abaco Markets 1.81 1.81 000 0.135 0.000 134 0.00%
11.80 11.60 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 11.80 0.00 1.086 0200 109 1.69%
968 8.50 Bank of Bahamas 8.50 8.50 0.00 0.643 0 160 132 1.88%
0.99 0.85 Benchmark 0.89 0.89 0.00 -0.823 0.030 N/M 3.37%
3.74 3.49 Bahamas Waste 3.49 3.49 0.00 0209 0090 16.7 2.58%
2.70 1.57 Fidelity Bank 2.35 2.35 0.00 0.055 0.040 42.7 1.70%
14.10 10.75 Cable Bahamas 14.05 1405 0.00 1.224 0.240 11.5 1.71%
3.15 2.41 Colina Holdings 2.88 2.88 0.00 0046 0.040 62.6 1.39%
8.50 4.80 Commonwealth Bank (Si) 7.00 700 0.00 0.449 0,300 15.6 4.29%
7.22 320 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.89 3.94 0.05 0.131 0052 30.1 1.32%
3.00 2.25 Doctor-s Hospital 2.85 2.85 0.00 0.308 0,040 9.3 1.40%
8.00 6.02 Famguard 8.00 8.00 0.00 0.728 0280 11.0 3.50%
13.01 12.50 Finco 12.50 12.50 0.00 0.650 0570 19.2 4.56%
14.75 1165 FirstCaribbean Bank 11.65 11.65 0.00 05550 0450 21 2 386%
6.10 5.05 Focal (S) 5.53 5.53 000 0.385 0.140 144 2,53%
1.00 1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0 00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1.00 0.41 Freeport Concrete 0.44 0.44 000 0.035 0.000 126 000%
8.00 5.50 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 000 0.407 0.300 13.5 5.45%
12.50 8.60 J.S. Johnson 12.00 12.00 0,00 1.023 0.620 11.7 5.17%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 1000 0.00 0.180 0.000 55.6 0.00%,
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities *
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
14.60 1 S a 1460.15600 34 4.11%


14.60
8.00
0.54
41.00
14.60
0.55
52wk-H,
1.3231
3.0008
1.4020
3.7969
12.2702
100.0000
100.0000
1.0000
10.5000
1.0077
1.0119
1.0086


14.25
6.00
0.20
41.00
14.00
0.40
52wk-Low
1.2576
2.7399
1.3467
3.3971
11.6581
100.0000
98.2100
1.0000
9.5611
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000


0 000 0.480 NM 7.80%
-0.023 0.000 N/M 00091
* 4.450 2.750 9.0 6.70%
1.160 0900 134 6.16%
-0 023 0 000 N/M 0.00%


DivS


Yield%


Market Terms N.A.V. Key
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dc 2 = 1.000 00 YIELD IB-t 12 rnonth ldidnls divided by clocSnn price 1 i. 2008
52wk-HI Highest cosIng price In las1 52 week.. BJ $ Blyl., p-co. of1 Co-l- Fd Fidelity i31 iOc.r-ber 200i
52wkLow Lost closing price in last 52 weeks Ak $ Selling price of Colim art fidelity 30 June 2008
Pr.,ious Cose Previous day.'s weighted price fr daly .,volume Lsi Pric - L.st tradnd ovdr-ticoulr- p-ici .. 31 Apil 2008
Today's Cos Cuent day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol Tradin volume of ti, prior afok ..... 3.1 My 2008
Chnge Change n closing price frm day to day EPS S A company's repoe.d odrnini pfer -lfri for ths Iai.t 17 1 t1 27 -2 Jno 2008
Daly Vel. Number of total shares traded today NAV No Asset Voin
DI $- Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months N/M Not Mouningful
P/E Csing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX Trh Fidelity Bah.-mn Stock Irdox Jnnuiry 1, 1994 100
(S) 4for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007
TO TRADE CALL CFAL ..1.5O07. 7.101 I FIDELIT-Yi42.3' t61 [ FO CAPITAL 0 API

Legal Notice



NOTICE


ESSO PIPELINE COMPANY LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ESSO PIPELINE COMPANY LIMITED is in dissolution under
the provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 25th
July, 2008, when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Julio C. Rodriguez of 800
Bell Street, Houston, Texas 77002, U.S.A.

Dated the 28th day of July, 2008.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO., LTD.

Attorneys for the above-named Company




LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE



PRIORY LANE

INVESTMENTS LIMITED


Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137
(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of PRIORY
LANE INVESTMENTS LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register. The date of
completion was May 29th, 2008.


Anthony B. Dupuch
Liquidator


FROM page 1B

switch to alternative energies.
Mr D'Aguilar said the same
situation could easily occur in
the Bahamas, even if the elec-
tricity grid was opened up to
private companies supply pow-
er from alternative, renewable
energy projects, as BEC would
still retain its distribution
monopoly.
"The fear is that right now,
if you allow private companies
to do that, BEC will dictate the
price at which they purchase


Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings
ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings
Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund


14.60 15-60 14.60u
600 6 25 6.00
0.35 0 40 0.35
Colnas Over-The-Counter Securities
41.00 43 00 41 00
14.60 15.60 14.00
0.45 0.55 0.45
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.323145.". 2.41% 5.21%
2 990639'" -0 34% 9.15%
1 .401975.""* 1.96 4.23%
3.6007-". -5 17% 9.38%
12.2702-"* 2.82% 5.73%
100.00""
99.956603- -0,04% -0.04%
1.00"
9 5611"** -8.94% -8.94%
1.0077 ..... 0.77% 0.77%
1.0119"" 1.19% 1.19%
1 .0086**... 0.86% 0.86%


BUSINESS


I --- --I


--


7-^









PAGE 8, WEDESDAYJULY 0,N200TTHENRIBUN


S -


CATWALK


CHAMPIONS


BETTY

STUART


DEN(IL

'DENNI'

NATHAN


By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Features Writer
pburrows@tribunemedia.net

N recent weeks we've seen reality show,
.:. "Super Model 101", on JCN where the
Supermodel of the Bahamas Organisa-
tion puts their models through severe
model training.
The model hopefuls ran laps, worked
out extensively, catwalked through hoola
hoops, and coped with the sometimes
abrasive nature of their director all in
hopes of being polished into stellar super-
models.
On Sunday. the public was invited to
tlhe Rain Forest Theatre to see which of
these reality TV stars could turn out a
model performance and emerge with the
title of "Supermodel of the Bahamas".
Fifteen-vyear old Candice beat out ten
..; other female models for the title. And
21-year old Omar modeled his way past
three other male contestants to win the
male title. Denni and Betty were chosen
as runners-up.
The even! began with a sexy, choreo-
graphed number where the male and
female contestants were assisted by actu-
al motorcycles near the end of the per-
formance. Audience members also saw
video footage of each contestant in com-
mercials, and a reel of photos featuring
each contestant in various looks from
couture to commercial.
In one of my favourite segments of the
night, the female contestants appeared in
a designer showcase featuring the designs






















-0 0 -. 0














05 3100100


of Cedric Bernard, Jasper Knowles, Bryn-
da Knowles, Percy Wallace and Aneska
Simmons. ---
Oilin Sha Coakley, director and
founder of the organisation, noted tlhi
the Bahamas is filled with unique and
beautiful people. For the male and female
contestants of the competition, this is dan
opportunity to present themselves as
national models, and also to be exposed to
an international audience.
The fifteen contestants got a taste of
what it takes to make it international .
during the preliminaries on Saturda
when they were critiqued by two repre-
sentatives from Elite Model Management,
and Romae Gordon, manager of Pulse .,, -
Models Jamaica, whom Mr Coaklei t..c
brought in to scout the models.
According to Mr Coakley, the repre-
sentatives mentioned that he had gath-
ered a great pool of models. ..


Ms Photogenic

R receiving honourable mention
were Marissa Pratt, who the%
noted has great potential as a .higL
fashion model. She needs only to lose
a few pounds. Then there's first run-
ner-up Betty whom they noted need-
ed only lose a few pounds in her hip
area.
They also liked Ali, who managed
to snag the Ms Photogenic and Best
Body prizes on Sunday night. They
noted that she has the commercial
look that is ideal for print model-
ing. However she, like Denni, first
runner-up in the male category,
won't do for high fashion, possibly _
because of their height. Denni will
be promoted as a print model and
in acting roles.
Mr Coakley is convinced that this inter- SPOKESMODEL of The Bahamas Celeste Mai
national interest is evidence that Bahami-
ans have tremendous supermodel poten-
tial.
"We do have models, that's one of the '
reasons why people are coming and seek-
ing our models out. This is why I made an
investment for my students to bring these
international scouts in and that's why I
took my personal students to develop a
competition to get them on their way and
to take them to the next level," Mr Coak- MAL
ley told Tribune Entertainment. OF
The male and female winners, and the Oma
organisation's spokesmodel, 16-year old
Celeste Marshal (who appears on the pro- ,'."f ,-.-.-
gramme booklet cover), have been signed" .
to Pulse Models Jamaica. Celeste leaves f..
for Jamaica in August to compete in the
Caribbean Top Model Search, which will
be televised live here in the Bahamas. -
The two winners will compete in the Elite _________
Makers International Model Search in
Jamaica in March 2009. And the runners
up will compete in the International Mod-
el Search in Mexico in 2009.

A ll of these models, and other -
Bahamian model hopefuls,
have the potential to do well whether
competing in regional or international
competitions, Mr Coakley said. "
"All they need is proper training, a ,
great personality, great skin and great
body. But the business is really 90 per
cent attitude. That's attitude in terms of
being able to take a lot of wear and tear,
work with anyone in the business and just
to be able to survive in the business. They
have to realize that the fashion industry is
a hard industry," Mr Coakley explained.
Still, modeling competitions are only a
foot in the door.
"You have models who think that when r
they win a competition that it just happens ..
overnight. But it will take going to client
after client, hearing no after no. Some-
times it takes a year or two to get vour big .
break. Competitions are only a foot in
the door." FEMALE SUPERMODEL OF THE BAHA


Candice Diah


rshal


.E SUPERMODEL
THE BAHAMAS,
ar Francis.


AMAS,


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008


THE TRIBUNE








WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE


E RAI


Bahamian comedian Naughty Niggs celebrates




10 years of comedy with 'LaughFest'


CELEBRATING 10 years as a stand-up
comedian, Naughty Niggs, the country's
hottest entertainer, will headline an all-star line-
up in LaughFest, a comedy show at the Rainfor-
est Theatre this Friday.


Scheduled to ring in the celebra-
tions alongside Naughty are six pop-
ular US comedians, including some
of the most popular and diverse
comics today, such as Nikki Carr and
her 'Fat Girl Anthem'; Ray Lipowski
from Showtime's 'White Boyz in the
Hood' and 'the Gentleman of Come.-
dy', Tony Woods.
Inigo 'Naughty' Zenicazelaya is the
most well-known comic in Bahamian
entertainment, having performed
stand-up as the house comic and MC
at the Jokers Wild Comedy Club in
the Atlantis Resort,on Paradise Island
for the past 10 years. He is currently
the only touring comedian based in
the Caribbean and has performed in
clubs throughout the US, Canada and
the Caribbean.
As our own Bahamian comedic rep-


resentative, Naughty has opened for
such major acts as Chris Tucker,
Damon Wayans, Ray Romano,
Cedric the Entertainer, Tommy
Davidson, Louis CK, Blake Clark,
Tony Rock and Diane Ford, and has
made numerous corporate appear-
ances at major international organi-
sations including Monster.com, BET,
Learning Tree, Bacardi, Heart Sur-
geons of America, Michael Jordan
Celebrity Golf Invitational, Mugsy
Bogues Celebrity Invitational and the
2008 Cacique Awards.
He was host of the popular Bahami-
an entertainment television show
"Island Grooves", as well as guest
host on the "Isle of MTV" and on the
Spanish channel Univision. :
Many Bahamians know him as an
on-air radio personality on local sta-L


*""*" '-, '""W yi Ul
tions More 94.9FM and 100 Jamz, a
well as from hosting local promotions
"Stop the Violence" in Freeport, the
Jamzfest concerts, various Spring
break promotions and more.
A graduate of St AAdrews School in
Nassau, Naughty furthered his edu-
cation in Florida before returning
home, getting married and starting a
family. His nickname of the "Groovin'
Cuban" comes from his multicultural
Spanish and Bahamian background.
Naughty. cites his professional influ-
ences as Richard Pryor, George Car-
lin, Chris Rock, Robin Harris and
Adam Sandier.
The show is entirely Bahamian-pro-
duced by WizeGuy Entertainment
and BEAM Bahamas, in association
with Bang-4-Buck Entertainment.
Laughfest 2008 takes place on Fri-
day, August 1 at the Rainforest Theatre in
the Crystal Palace Casino in Cable Beach
Doors open at 8pm and show time is at
9:30pm sharp. Tickets can be bought at
the Rainforest Box Office, with limited
VIP tickets available. Group rates and
more information are available by calling
(242) 552-0970 or visiting online
www.thenewbreed.tv


'Mr Munks' new sound


a big hit with tourists


* TVG Ent
tvg242@gmail.com
HUNDREDS of tourists
landing the port of Nassau for
their summer holiday were
entertained at rock star stan-
dards by rising sensation, Mr
Munks, at the downtown
restaurant Sen6r Frogs.
Performing his nu wave
sound, called 'JunkaPOP',
which is a fusion of traditional
Bahamian Junkanoo with a pop
twist, several visitors in the
audience gladly shared genuine
interest in the new style of
Bahamian entertainment.
"Man, we come here every
summer and always find some-
thing new. Watching homeboy
throw down tonight was real
hot. We know about Junkanoo,
but damn, that stuff he did
tonight was hot," said Marino
Devine, who was visiting with
his wife from New York.
With the spring season leav-
ing just as swiftly as it rolled in,
Munks has successfully com-
pleted the two prime landings of
the 'Nu New Tour', promoting
his LP composed of JunkaPOP
originals like "The Art of Woo
(Shake that thang girl)."
Concluding a series of
appearances and concert per-
formances in Eleuthera and
Abaco, the latter with the Min-
istry of Tourism, Munks quick-
ly shifted gears into high speed
in search of some summer heat.
Returning to the comfort of
home in Nassau just in time for
the American Independence
celebrations, Munks was fea-
tured in concert at Sen6r Frogs,
in a seven-set performance that
had the crowd rocking from
start to finish.
Said Mack Kelly, who hails
from London, UK, "At first I
looked at my girl, and I was like
who is this guy? Next! But then
when he started getting
pumped, you could have felt it.
I actually had to let her get clos-
er to the stage. Dude was get-
ting off for real, you, that's true
performing".
Obviously enjoying herself,
Carolyn Petty, who hails from
the sunny west coast state of
_..';fornia. said. "Oh my God, I
love this kid. I ncvc- saiw a


MR MUNKS is shown at Senior Frogs as he performs his nu wave
sound 'JunkaPOP'.


young rapper move his waist
like that. Me and my girls all
bought some of his CD's and
he was so cool about signing *
them for us, I think I wanted to
kiss him".
There were few in the crowd
who were not left impressed,
many giving kudos to the young
artist's stride and effort.
"He was alright. Nothing spe-
cial for me really, the guy's got a
lot of energy and his JunkaPOP
thing is different, I'll give him
that. At least he seems passion-
ate about what he's doing. Keep
that up and he might be the next
Sean Kingston," said Tracy
Carter, who was visiting Nassan,
from Tampa, Fl .


Like most artists, Munks has
had to quickly learn how to
remain positive through the
unseen pressures of entertain-
ment business, but with his latest
gig, he finally seems to be gain-
ing the level of crowd response
that he has been seeking to earn
for several years now, and as a
result, he is left with great antic-
ipation of one day playing in the
largest stadiums in the world.


If you or someone you know
is an artist seeking exposure
and/or publicity, contact TVG242
at Tva242@1gmail.com and set up
:i? C ( ;/c i le, I ; I/{t;. /lod/ay.


|SA :


Ranch




S .P p,


1. Buy any 3 or the 5 featured KRAFT items (including KRAFT
BBQ Sauce, KRAFT Singles, KRAFT Salad Dressing and
OSCAR MAYER Hot Dogs.
2. Circle item on your original store receipt, answer the
question on entry forms provided.
3. Write your name, address and telephone number on original
store receipt.
4. Deposit receipt and entry form into entry box, located in all
participating stores or drop off at The d'Albenas Agency,
MadeirafStreet, Palmdale.
5. Promotion runs ftom July 7 to August-1, 2008. dinner will
be chosen on AuguJst 8, 2008. }
-:. 0'


-...--- ----------.-.--
To qualify to win, fill in the blanks
and attach to your original recc!pt.
Drop in entry boxes or bring to
The d'Albenas Agency, Palmdale.

If I were an
0 rM _r Weider
- - - --'- -


m


"


-I..,"':!'


Iss~f~








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008


Eyes wide, tongue tied diversity speaks in


DADA

By ALEXIS ALLEYNE-CAPUTO

BAHAMIAN poet, Alexis Alleyne-Caputo,
has qualified to participate in one of the
largest national poetry competitions in the
US. Representing Delray, Florida as part of its five
poet team, DADA Slam, Ms Alleyne-Caputo will
bring the richness of her literary spirit to the US
National Poetry Championship 2008, being held in
Madison, Wisconsin in August.


Nicknamed the Olympics of
literary arts, the event will fea-
ture both international and
American presenters.
"It is serendipity, seeing a long
time dream unfold," said Ms
Alleyne-Caputo, artist, educa-
tor, writer, journalist and activist,
who placed second in qualifying
for the team. "I have wanted to
present on a large scale platform,
as an artist representing the
Bahamas and in honour of my
father for a long time now, and I
ultimately want to build a bridge
between US and Bahamian
artists in different art genres. It is
a great opportunity to exchange,
share and collaborate.
"I've had to negotiate cultural
influences on so many levels and
particularly in my work as an
artist, and it feel's great to do so
in honour of ancestry and lin-
eage. One admirable trait is the
diverse ethnic and cultural back-
ground of the team and the com-
mon thread we have in language,
the use of it in self expression
and reaching audiences particu-
larly in this genre of literary
arts."
Joining Ms Alleyne-Caputo
are:
Cuban-American Matthew
Hernandez, writer, spoken word
artist and youth mentor. He
teaches and shares the literary
art form of poetry. He has per-
formed in slams, open mic
venues and for charities, in addi-
tion to hisitlevision appearance
portfo ift -,
A"f fiAmerican team
mihiber Adam Freilich said that
he was honored to be part of the


team because he had been trying
for five years to qualify and pre-
sent in nationals. "It's a dream
come true. The greater part of
being on this team is the immea-
surable strength I have found. I
am a recovering drug addict and
a great part of my healing and
recovery came from the discov-
ery of voice and choice.
Puerto Rican actress and
poet Deborah Magdalena, the
sister of Latin Grammy winner
Nestor Torres, said, "I never
understood the importance of
slam poetry or even cared for it.
I turned to spoken word after
years of being an actress and
having to wait on the permission
of a director to practice my art
form. In slam poetry, 1 needed
no one's permission to be cre-
ative."
Reagan Mendoza, who
shares a long line of diverse
ancestry, comments, "most
artists feel a sense of loneliness.
I've felt this way as a poet and
have found a way to tap into an
expressive part of who I am. My
writing is very personal and the
experience of sharing the con-
tent and depth during perfor-
mances can be spiritually drain-
ing. Being on this team is a
breath of fresh air. I am enjoying
the creative energy, the chance
to collaborate with some great
poets and the overall cama-
raderie."

,,F.ranmore information on the
poetry,'i-3mpionship or to register
as a participant for next year's con-
test, visit www.poetryslam.com


SLAM


/

~,** ,K.


MAKE-EM Listen is set to
begin its Summer series
Showcase 2008, hosted by
Natural Empress (100 Jamz)
and Kemis.net, August 30 at
the Rainforest Theatre, Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort at 9pm.
Among the artists scheduled
to perform are Rap Quelle,
Apollo Kre-ed, Sammi Starr
Shanoon and Travis.


ALEXIS
1'


~

&


The renaissance man


SCRIMMAGE 08: Popop-
Studios/Centre for the Visual
Arts invites one and all to their
ongoing summer exhibition
showcasing a rotation of
artists and artworks. The exhi-
bition is open all summer
long. Gallery hours are Tues-
day Saturday from 11am to
7pm.

This July & August, The
National Art Gallery will be
hosting its first Summer Con-
cert Series! Come and enjoy
great performances by talent-
ed Bahamian musicians. *
Terneille "Ta Da" Burrows
& Ithalia Johnson
Friday, August 8 at 7:30pm

Kim Welcome & Pam
Woods
Friday, August 15 at
7:30pm

Tickets are available at the
NAGB Store: Contact Noel '
Thompson, manager at
328.5800/1 or at ntjomp-
son'@nago.org.bs

M* ur-mi-don: Marie
Jeanne Dupuch will be featur-
ing new paintings at The Hub,
No 2 Colebrooke Lane (Bay
Street). The exhibition runs
until August 19. For more
information check out
www.thehubbahamas.org or
call 322.4333.


. aI....Ia .
.... 3600-15103
S.'"" \ Mead 750ct
Playmate Loos

S Mini Leaf

| Cooler Paper
$ 5 reg $2.99

^^ nef JgaI


THE term "Renaissance
Man".is hardly, if ever, used to
define any of the modern
Bahamian artisans that are now
influencing the country's art
scene.
To use such a term to define
an artisan whose preferred medi-
um and style is usually relegated
to the teeny bopper's scene
would seem like sacrilege to
some. But such a term is only
fitting for a man like Stefan
Davis, professional airbrush
artist and owner of Airbrush
Junkies, a long time staple of the
Mall at Marathon.
The Vendetta Group recently
sat down witfi Mr Davis to dis-
cuss his past, present, and future.
In the Bahamas, Stefan Davis
has become somewhat of an
iconic figure in the community
since first opening the doors to
his business. Stefan was quick to
remind us however, that even
before getting to that stage there
were many obstacles he had to
first overcome. One such obsta-
cle was learning the craft which
had attracted his young mind.
It was on the cold streets of
Philadelphia during the early
90's where a juvenile Stelain
started to take notice of the
growing number of graffiti tags
around the city, and he slowly
became consumed by the art
form. His fascination carried him
around town seeking someone
that could help him learn this
new skill.
After the many cold shoulders
and outright snubs from other
artists Stefan decided that he
would train himself. He fever-
ishly sought out any material


ale




Off
Except On
,ed t gg ed
d .t
items


July 26th Sept 3rd, 2008
Mead Color Book 100 sheets ................ now $ 1.19
#3600 )9918
Oxford Geometry Set ............................ now $ 5.16
# 2600. 10010
Encore Space Savers ........................... now $ 1.60
#3600-9569.1
Encore Correction pen wIFluid ........... now $ 1.56
93600 ?7065
Encore 2pk Correction Fluid ................. now $ 1.59
#3600 968-10
Encore l2pc Jumbo Crayons ................ now $ 1.20
b 3600 93152
Encore 2pk Scissors ............................... now $ 1.48
#300 20182
Black Backpack .................................... now $10.28
#3600 69001 1
Encore One Hole, Punch ........................ now $ 1.56
#3600 20M
Encore Mini Calculator .......................... now $ IAO
1360C 18077
Webster's Dictionary ............................ now $ '1.27
31 60 4.5,502
High School Muskat Backpack ............ now $ 22.92
#7'598 23488
Construction Paper 96 sheets .............. now $ 3.08
#3600 53336
Encore Lettering Stencil ....................... now $ 1.68
#1600 6542
3pk Transparent Tape ......................... now $ 1.16
#3600 82391
Mead Spiral Notebook 120 sheets ...... now $ 1.92
#3600 0574A
Mead Spiral Notebook 180 sheets ........ now $ 2.64
-3600 J!,80
Mead Spiral Notebook 100 sheets ........ now $ 2.28
Encore Stapler ....................................... now $ 3.19
3600 8-32 1
Encore Plastic Pencil Case ........ 4 .......... now $ 1.68
Encore 24pk Crayons ............................ now 68
-360D 164/4
12- Neon Plastic Ruler ......................... now 60
360C 29000
Elmers Glue ........................................... now 804
46146-37500
Asst Color PocketlClasp Folders ........... now 76
#3600 5//13

House&

Kellys Home
Mail at Marathon
Monday-hiday 9:00am-8:00prn
Tel: (242) 393-4002 Saturd.y 9:00arn-9:00prn
Fax: (242) 393-4096 Sunday dosed
Iellysbahornosmrn


that would further his cause and
before long he began to garner.a
name for himself.
Eventually the winds of fate
brought Stefan back to the
Bahamas where he immediately
hit the ground running. To him
Nassau was an untouched dia-
mond just waiting to be seized
because at that time no one was
doing airbrushing.
One by one he started con-
verting customers to his vision
and their numbers soon became
a flood. He jokingly remarked
that a lot of his initial customers
now bring their kids to him for
his services. And amongst the
high school crowd it has become
tradition to sport a custom
designed backpack from the air-
brush guru himself.
Over the years it seems no job
was too big or too small for him
to take on; from a peace sym-
bol on a single white tee to the
giant murals on walls and ceil-
ings at the Atlantis Resort.
With all of this under his belt
one would think Mr Davis
would now sit back and kick his
feet up, but in true renaissance
fashion he delves into something
brand new.
His eyes are now fixed on the
world of high fashion, where his
new clothing line. Swagger, will
soon be making a big smash. The
line at present is shrouded in lots
of secrecy and the only thing Ste-
fan will say, is --it will all be orig-
inal and one of kind pieces."
With Airbrush Junkies now a
household name and Swagger
poised to be the same; Stefan
Davis is truly worthy of being
called a Renaissance Man.


The National Art Gallery
of the Bahamas (NAGB) has
invited the general public to
view its Fourth National Exhi-
bition (The NE4). The exhibi-
tion features an exciting array
of 51 works produced within
the last two years by 31
artists. This artwork repre-
sents a rich diversity of art
and ranges from paintings,
sculptures, installations, prints
and mixed media works to
photographs and alternative
media. The exhibition will be
on display to January 30,
2009 at the NAGB on West Hill
Street.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
vou are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in th'e
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


I ARTS


W









TUe- TDIII IMIC


WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2008, PAGE 11B


..I I II 1 I IlJO'.Tl


THE Asian-
inspired decor
invites diners
to relax and
enjoy them-
selves.


Moso


One of Wyndham Nassau


Resort's top eateries

11 By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Tribune Features Editor
ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net

WHILE the city of Nassau has any number of Chinese and Asian style
restaurants, the truth is it can still be hard to find one that leaves a lasting
impression on the senses from the palate to the pocket.


Making a delicious move to fill the position
as the number one spot lusted after by Chi-
nese food lovers, Moso, listed among the
Wyndham Nassau Resort's top eateries,
offers diners an array of mouth watering
options.
During a recent visit to the restaurant, nes-
tled on the second floor of the Crystal Palace
Casino with a view overlooking the ocean,
my sister and I had the opportunity to sam-
ple a number of Chef Leung David's
favourite dishes. The specialty chef for
Moso, who hails from Hong Kong and who
has lived in the Bahamas since 2000, has
been with the restaurant since it opened two
years ago. He sent out an interesting variety
of dishes, from beef to chicken, to tuna and a
sampling of dumplings, which meant that we
left the table utterly satisfied and (perhaps)
filled to capacity. *
According to Chef David, Moso, with a
staff of nine two Chinese sous chefs and
seven Bahamian chefs, including Chef Jason
McBride, features an Asian-styled restaurant
that offers a Western twist on Thai, Japanese
and Chinese cuisine meaning strong
flavours and spices.
First up were the Dim Sum and Tasters.
Our appetizers included Steamed Chicken
Dumplings with lemongrass flavour; Wok
Seared Pork Potstickers, and Chinese Spare
Ribs marinated in Chinese spices and roast-
ed with honey.
The pork potstickers, which reminded me
of rounded egg rolls, were healthy sized por-
tions of fried dumplings filled with well-sea-
soned pork. I was a bit more hesitant howev-
er, reaching for the steamed dumplings. I
love big, bold flavours and the fact that they
were steamed left me feeling a bit timid, but
I quickly found that these were equally as
flavourful as the potstickers, despite the
absence of the fire and oil. The almost-
translucent dough, which was thinly rolled,
was mild in flavour and provided the perfect
backdrop for the chicken filling.
And then we come to the spare ribs who
doesn't like them. When they are cooked
well, that is are tender and flavourful, they
can stand up to the best of dishes and these
definitely didn't disappointment.
Hearty pieces of meat, tender, rich in
flavour perhaps it was the honey they
were indeed satisfying.


Definitely the table's favourite entr6e, the
braised beef short ribs huge chunks of
bone-in beef covered in a rich oyster sauce -
were "melt-in-your-mouth" tender, succulent
and savoury, bursting in flavour. Proof of this
dish's great flavour was that despite there
being many other dishes to sample, both my
sister and I returned again and again to the
ribs.
Next on my list was, surprisingly, the
Seared Ahi Tuna Tataki sushi grade tuna,
seared, sliced and served with yuzu lemon
sauce. Having waited until I had eaten some
of the more spicy dishes see Thai Chicken -
I found the tuna to be a welcome relief. Mild
in flavour, but with an interesting texture
and taste, I enjoyed eating something that
was a little exotic and easy to consume.
And then we come to the Thai Chicken.
With its chunks of chicken and vegetables -
green peppers, carrots, scallions, onions and
red pepper flakes in a sauce this was one
spicy dish...for me. While diners who love to
walk the line with their peppery spices and
challenge their palates with a fiery fiesta may
see this dish as being on the mild side, my
super sensitive palate told me to take it slow.
Even with the heat exploding in my mouth
with each bite of the chicken however, I have
to admit it was not overpowering to the point
where I couldn't detect that there was a
depth of interesting flavour. So for those din-
ers who like a moderate kick in their meals,
this is a great choice.
Returning to the beef again, I highly rec-
ommend the Crispy Beef Sichuan a little on
the sweet side, this was thinly sliced beef,
almost like noodles, fried with ginger, garlic
and chili another great dish with strong
flavours and spices, as Chef David said.
Rounding out the meal to be honest we
almost didn't have enough room, but I'm
glad we made the effort was a sweet treat of
Cinnamon-Banana Spring Roll with Vanilla
Ice Cream and Green Tea Anglaise. We also
had a Crispy Lotus Bun drizzled with
caramel which was like a donut with no hole,
with a delicious cream filling.
So for those of you who love Chinese food,
M6so is one of the best options in Nassau.
With attentive service, a great atmosphere
,and a fantastic view, this restaurant comes in
at a price point that won't damage your
pocket, but will definitely please your palate.


I.




V.,





Catwalk

to stardom

See page eight


. T ... .:. '4 ,. ,, J .
'.,~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ M P.*' ,-v' ,,.' f. .t a-,.,'" :


*'
4ji* .* '- 4,


4"



-

h44


* .4~


. . 7,


*- -',-. 4- --


-4" -^at--"..T.TI.





w ^ .- -:'' ... ^ .

.fe'- T. . .. -I .".-


t.4~,'.


I


By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
pburrows@tribunemedia.net

A MISSION that began in 2005 with 'Sacred
Space' at Clifton Pier has truly taken on both nation-
a and international significance, and created a
new brand of environmentally-conscious art.


Traveling far from home to partic-
ipate in the Caribbean Summer Fes-
tival at the Westfali laAk in Dort-
mund, Germany last month, Anto-
nius Roberts, who recently returned
home, had the opportunity to create a
wooden sculpture that is symbolic of
Bahamian life, but also speaks to
cross-fertilization and cultural
exchange.
Mr Roberts' work, titled 'A Rosie
Bahamian Woman' was sculpted
from a 3-metre tall oak tree from
Germany which was destroyed during
a storm in 2007. A local German artist
secured this piece of natural wood
which was felled from a forest in Ger-
many, and the tools that were used in
the sculpting of this work.
Since the tree weighed nearly a ton,
a crane had to be used to set the
wood in the Westfalenpark where Mr
Roberts would begin his work. Due to
the size of the material, and the lack
of funding for scaffolding, Mr Roberts
was not able to produce the sculp-
ture with the wood standing erect'-
which is his usual way. Instead, the
wood was sculpted on the ground.
Not surprisingly, the work attract-
ed much attention.
"People gathered, they looked,
they touched it. It was amazing
because they saw the complete trans-


formation of the piece, from wood to
the final outcome," Mr Roberts
recalled.
Though he was able to complete
the piece in four days, Mr Roberts
left Germany before the piece was
erected in place. He awaits a photo-
graph of his sculpture which is set to
be erected in the park.
Along with Mr Roberts' work, the
festival included performances of
steel drum orchestras, the youth steel
band Pan Gang, percussion work-
shops for children and adults, stage
performances and games, as well as a
marching procession of Junkanoo cos-
tumes through the park.
Organisers of the festival first met
Mr Roberts during a tour in Grand
Bahama earlier this year during the
unveiling of his Taino Beach (Grand
Bahama) project, 'Original Bahami-
ans'. While inspired by the 'Original
Bahamians', his German installation
is not an exact replica. Mr Roberts
tries not to reproduce the same work.
CALLING
For Mr Roberts, who has found a
new calling in transforming spaces
into works of art using natural
resources, this recent installation is
further conformation that people are
interested in and excited about -


seeing works of art displayed in public
spaces.
"I feel honoured because it is my wish,
hope, and dream to have the opportuni-
ty to travel around the Bahamas and the
world just being able to contribute-to.eie
transforming of spaces and leavirg-a.syxn-'-,
bol or monument ,s a testament to the 'N.
Bahamas. [A RosiedBahafiian Woman] is
a piece of art and sculpture that was cre-
ated by a son/of tthe Bahamas," Mr
Roberts told The Ars.
"As when I Wvent fo China and had my
work displayed in the [Changchun] World
Sculpture Park there, just to have a struc-
ture stating that it was produced by a
Bahamian, sends a strong message that
we from the Bahamas are world-class,
and that we must beheLe \%e all have
something to contribute to the world,
he added. .... ..
In 2006, Mr Roberts was one of 45
artists selected from countries all over
the world to participate in the 8th
Changchun China Symposium. Today,
his "Rebirth" sculptures stand among the
hundreds of sculptures in the Changchun
World Sculpture Park.


INFLUENCE
Moving forward, Mr Roberts is looking
to continue building and expanding fur-
ther his transforming spaces concept. He
,was recently invited to speak with a local
developer about the possibility of trans-
forming spaces as a new phase of his
development. And as government 'offi-
cials continue talks of constructing nation-
al parks throughout the Bahamas, Mr
Roberts hopes that they will invite local
artists to participate.
Moreover, he is advocating that the
landscaping of these national parks incor-
porate indigenous products like lime-
stone and Casuarina as much as possible.
In fact, this theory offers a sneak peak
into Mr Roberts newest project.


During the
time of our interview, Mr
Roberts was in Eleuthera at the invi-
tation of personnel from the Island
School, which describes itself as "a
mind, body, and spirit journey" that
takes students away from the tradi-
tional high school curriculum and
forces them to confront authentic chal-
lenges. There, classes are designed to
allow first-hand engagement with the
people and environment of the
Bahamas. English, math, environ-
mental art, history and marine ecology
are offered, and each course focuses
on the application of knowledge to
real-world problems.
At this school, students also make
furniture out of Casuarina wood. and


4'


BAHAMIAN
sculptor Anto-
nius Roberts
works on "A
Rosie Bahami-
an Woman" in
Westfalenpark,
Dortmund,
Germany. The
sculpture is
made out of a
150 year old
oak tree which
was' destroyed
in Bolmke For-
est in Dort-
mund bya
storm named
Carril in March
2007.


use reusable,
natural sources of energy.
"I'm here exploring the possibility of
creating sculptures using the ocean,
rather than wood. We should d have
more water fountains around the
Bahamas because we are surrounded
by water. We can have a system that
pumps water inland from the ocean
and power it by solar energy. As the
water comes in from the ocean, it gush-
es up and creates different shapes. It
will also be an exciting visual for
tourists, so you can say that this is my
new project," Mr Roberts said.


F'


~


i 1/


Moso: One

of Wyndham

Nassau Resorts

top eateries

See page 11









Wednesday July 30, 2008 1 THE TRIBUNE
Ministry of Education 2008 GUARANTEED LOAN RECIPIENTS


SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

2008 DISBURSEMENT EXERCISE
THE GOVERNMENT OF THE BAHAMAS
GUARANTEED LOAN FUND PROGRAMME


THE FOLLOWING PERSONS ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE CHECKS
DURING THE UPCOMING DISBURSEMENT EXERCISE.

CHECK DISTRIBUTION EXERCISES WILL BIGIN ON JULY 31st 2008 AND WILL END ON AUGUST 15th 2008
BETWEEN TI IE HOURS OF 9A.M. AND 3P.M. T ITHE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS:
THE HOLY TRINITY ACTIVITIES CENTRE, STAPLEDON GARDENS, NEW PROVIDENCE AND
THE BANK OF THE BAHAMAS, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA (Grand Bahama and the Northern Bahamas)
CHECKS WILL BE DISTRIBUTED BY LAST NAME IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER ON A FIRST-COME-FIRST-SERVE
BASIS PLEASE CHECK THE NEWSPAPER, THE BANK OF THE BAHAMAS, OR THE SCHOLARSHIP DIVISION FOR
WHEN YOU ARE TO REPORT TO THE APPROPRIATE DISBURSEMENT CENTRES.
DO NOT REPORT TO THE DISBURSEMENT CENTRE IF YOUR NAME DOES NOT APPEAR ON 7HE FOLLOWING
LISTINGS.
New students and their guarantors are required to bring a valid Passport, National Insurance Card. a Utility Bill indicating the
current address, and a job letter with them.
Returning students and guarantors are required to bring a valid Passport AND National Insurance Card with them. Returning
students must ALSO ensure that the following requirements are met.


SURNAME


FIRSTNAME


MIDDLENAME


ISLAND


1. ALL LOAN ACCOUNTS AT THE BANK OF THE BAHAMAS MUST BE CURRENT
2. OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPT OF THE MOST RECENT SEMESTER MUST BE RECEIVED BY THE
SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION.
No checks will be issued if the above requirements are not satisfied.
THERE WILL BE NO EXCEPTIONS

IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR NEW AND RETURNING LOAN RECIPIENTS
A. CHECK DISTRIBUTION WILL RESUME ON AUGUST 18th AT THE BANK OF THE BAHAMAS,
TONIQUE W DARLING HIGHWAY BRANCH ONLY.
B. LATE FEES:
a. $100 COLLECTING CHECK AT THE BANK ON AND AFTER AUGUST 18th
b. $25 LATE TRANSCRIPT
c. $25 CHECK CHANGES

PLEASE CONTACT
THE SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION, MINISTRY OF EDUCATION,
THOMPSON BOULEVARD,
IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS CONCERNING THE UPCOMING DISBURSEMENT EXERCISE.


SURNAME


FIRSTNAME


MIDDLENAME


ISLAND


ALBURY
ALBURY
ALBURY
ANYANE
ARCHER
ARCHER
ARMBRISTER
ARMBRISTER
ARMBRISTER
BAIN
BAIN
BAIN
BARR
BASTIAN
BELLE
BENEBY
BETHEL
BETHEL
BETHEL
BETHEL
BETHELL
BODIE
BOSTWICK '
BOWE
BRENNEN

BRICE
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN-FORBES
BULLARD
BULLARD
BURROWS
BURROWS
BUTLER
BUTLER
CAMPBELL
CANCINO
CAPRON
CAREY
CAREY
CAREY
CARROLL
CARROLL III
CARTWRIGHT
CARTWRIGHT
CARTWRIGHT
CLARIDGE-
MCINTOSH
CLARKE
CLARKE-ROLLEF
COLE
COLEBROOKEu
COLEBROOKE
COLEBROOKE
COLEBY
COLEBY
COLLIE
COLLIE
COOPER
COOPER
COOPER
COOPER JR
COX
COX
COX


CHRISTAL
CHRISTINA
RANDALL
AKUA .
CARLISE
LEROY
CHELSEA
NADJA
SEBASTIEN
AMANDA
FRANCESCO
MAXINE
TALYA
TAJ
HAZARD
KEORA
CHAMAL
MICHELLE
MIQUELA
PRINCESS
KEITH
DALECIA
DESHINKA
GEORGIA
JOYCE

*DWIGHT
KATIS
MICHEAL
SAMUEL
VANESSA
WHITLEY
SHAKERA
KATRELL
KRYSIA
ADAM
PETURA
ELAINE
KRYSTAL
GARNELL
NOLAN
ANTONIO
DE'ANFRIA
GARRETT
LAKITA
DIETRICH
KENDALL
CLINTON
PETER
TERRON

DUSHINKA
SHARI
PATRICIA
COREY
ANGELIQUE
SANE'A
UVANCHA
RACQUEL
VINCENTLA
CASSANDRA
KAREN
CEONN
KYRON
LA\VERNE
VINCENT
DARRELL
REGIINA
'TYCHIKO


BIANCA
CARLA
EUGENE
JOANNA
CALRICA
HENRY BARRINGTON
ELLEN
COLLEZ
PHELAN STANLEY
ASHLEY
TRAVIRAS
PAULINE
CORMEIL
ANDRE
TAVARIS
SHANTICE
STEPEN
PORTIA
DENIQUA
AMY DEBBIE
DEVAUGHN
ILEAN
ARIMENA
LETICICA
PHILEA TRYPHOSA
MONEE'
ENGELBURT
OLIVIA
T
RENALDO
DIANDRA
TAMIA
STACY
SHARLENE MONALISA
EURYDICE
CONRAD
CAPRI
DENISE
YVONNE
ANGEL
DERAN
DESHON EDISON
VENESSA
IRVIN
GABRIELLE
JAMONN
DAVID
STEVEN
DAVID ENGLUND
GABRIEL

CORTEY
CARDEEECE


VERLINCIA\
TREVE'TTE
SHAKERA
PEARLE
EUGENA DES- I:
NAKI'I\A
VERONICA
ALEXANDER/
KENRICK HARPRS ON
DELREACE(
TREVO R
FRANKLIN
IJEOM,'
DUST'IJN


NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP


CUNNINGHAM
CUNNINGHAM
CUNNINGHAM

CURLING
CURRY
CURRY
CURTIS
CURTIS
DAMES
DAMES
DAMES
DARVILLE
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS-BULLARD
DEAL
DEAN
DEAN
DEAN
DEVEAUX
DORSETT
DORSETT
DOUGLAS
DUNCOMBE
DUNCOMBE
EDGECOMBE
ELDON
EVANS
EVANS
FAWKES
FAWKES II
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERNANDER
FINLEY
FLOWERS
FLOYD
FORBES
FORBES
FORBES
FOUNTAIN
FOUNTAIN
FOX
FOX
FOX

FRANKS-CAMPBELL
GAITOR
GAITOR-PINDER
GIBSON
GIBSON
GIBSON
GLINTON
GODET
GODET
GOODMAN
GOODMAN-DAVIS
GORDON
GRAY
GRAY


ATHENA
COURTNEY
LATICIA

STANCIO
LATRAVIA
PHILIP
COLLEEN
MISHLEAH
AUTUMN-JOY
LETHERA
RANDOLPH,
SIMONE
BREHON
DERRYL .
LAVAN
TONIELLE
DARSHANA
CLARENCE
D'OMMINI
SHERRYNDA
TENE'
MELIZZA
OLIVIA
ADAM
ASHEM
DEANGELO
SAMANTHA
KRISTIN
REONA
SHAWN
TREVOR
LARONE
D'ANGELO
DANIELLE
KHAMBRELL
LATOYA
LEONARDO
LORETTA
MONIQUE
PERRY
QUESWELL
RUTHNELL
KATHLEEN
RHONDA
KYM
DESTINEE'
ALVIN
LASEAN
METELLUS
BRITTNEY
SCYMONT
ANTOINETTE
JAMIE
KEVIN

SANDY
JULIETTE
LETERA
ALDRINIQUE
CAMERON
RASHANDO
OMAR
LORETTA
TATUM
LATHERA
SHARMAINE
JUNICKA
CELESTE
LASHAWN


MARIA
ALEXANDRIA
TAMARA DIANN
NICOLE
JARAN
MEGAN
RODNEY ROBERT
MARILYN
ARIEL
MONET
ALEXANDRIA
NEWTON
TERNIEL DIVIANIA
ANDREW REMON
ALEXANDER
RACQUEL
QUERIDA
DANICA
WILLIAM
ANDRIEL
BRID-DEL
LASHAWN
ANGELIQUE
VICTORIA BLANCHE
EDWARD
ISAAC
CARLOS
NADIA
LOUISE
RANELL
FRANKLIN
WILFRED
RECCERO
MARIO '
JANELLE
PHILANO ALEXANDER
CAREZE
LAMONT CLEOPHAS

MARIA
JAAMAL
LORENCE
ARUBA
AUGUSTA
MERICA
RODERICK
LOUELL
ALBERT
LECEITUS LJEROME
LIVINGSTON
TANISHA
ANDRE
RENEE
TAMARISK
JAMES
CHRISTOPHER
LINELLE
VALENCIA
SALLY
TISHIRA
ALEXANDER
ANTHON
ANTONIUS BYRON
LAURINE
ALEXANDRIA AMBER
ELIZABETH
SHERRY LAVANN
CHIVAS
INDERIA
LATER


NP
GB

NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
GB
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
LI
NP
GB
NP
NP
EL
GB
AN
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
AN
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
GB

NP
NP
NP
AN
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP


-I








Wednesday July 30, 2008 2 THE TRIBUNE
Ministry of Education 2008 GUARANTEED LOAN RECIPIENTS


MIDDLENAME


ISLAND


SURNAME


FIRSTNAME


MIDDLENAME


GRAY
GREEN
GREENE
GREENE
GREENSLADEJR
HALL
HAMILTON
HAMILTON
HAMILTON
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA

HANNA
HANNA
HARRIS-SMITH
HENFIELD
HEPBURN
HEPBURN
HEPBURN
HEPBURN-
THOMPSON
HIELD-BOWE
HIGGS
HILTON
INNISS
JACQUES-WILLIAMS
JOFFRE
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOSEY
JUPP
KELLY
KELLY
KELLY
KEMP
KEMP
KING
KING
KING-DUNCAN
KNOWLES
KNOWLES
KNOWLES-JOHNSON
KNOWLES-TOOTE
LEWIS
LEWIS
LIGHTBOURN
LIGHTBOURN
LIGHTBOURNE
LIGHTBOURNE
LIGHTBOURNE JR
LLOYD

LLOYD
LOCKHART
LOCKHART
MACKEY
MACKEY
MACKEY
MAJOR
MAJOR
MARC
MARTIN
MARTIN
MARTIN
MAYCOCK
MAYERS
MCALPINE
MCCLAIN-WOOD
MCDONALD
MCDONALD
MCHARDY
MCINTOSH
MCINTOSH
MCPHEE
MEADOWS
MILLER
MILLER
MILLER
MILLER
MILLER
MILLER
MILLER
MILLER
MINUS
MITCHELL
MITCHELL


MORLEY
MORRIS
MORRISON
MOSS
MOSS
MUNNINGS
MUNROE
MUNROE


VALERIE
ALICIA
BROOKE
LATOYA
GARRY
TANYA
AUERILIUS
REUBEN
RUSHAN
BRENIQUE
DAVID
NERISSA

RACQUEL
SANTITA
EKUA
ROCHELLE
BAHIYYAH
CANDICE
YURI

ANTONIA
KEERTRA
DEMETRE
GE'ANNE
DENNARD
VANESSA
ONDRE
CHANDIA
DONTE
EARLENE
JAVON
MICHAEL
PORTIA
SHARA
YANNIQUE
DE'WAYNIA
SCOTT
COYOTITO
DAWN
KIM
KEVIN
NAKEITHA
KELSON
YASMIN
VERNET
HAPYETIA..
LAVAN
PRINCESS
LUCILLE'
OLIVIA
RAMONA
TARA
TONIA
MAC
MYCHAL
HILGROVE
AKEIRO

ANTHONICIA
ASHLEIGH "
MARQUE
MARCHEA
SHADALE
TRAVIS
FIANKA
MICKEL
JERRY
ERNEST
PHILECIA
ZENADIA
JALIA
SERENNA
KEISHEL
CRYSTAL
BRADLEY
LAKEVA
TAMARAH
DELVERNIQUE
DORIAN.
JEREMY
RAMON
ANAYAH
CHARA
LEVANT
MARCIA
MELISSA
PHILIPPA
SHANANDA
SHAVONNE
TOVA
CORDERO
JULIE


DESHA
DENISE
JANELLE
GALADETTE
JESSICA
PETRA
KYLE
LATOYA


SHARMAINE
GORETTI
MERCEDEZ LAURENT
KATHRYN
LIVINGSTONE
GERTRUDE
ERASTUS RICARDO
BERNARD ABDULLAHI
SENOVIA
RACQUELA
JAZZMAN
MEZORIAN
JORDANNA
TENAJ'
BRITTANY
VANESSA
DELANO
ABDURRAHAN
BONITA
TENAIGE


RAQUEL
LA'SHELLE
ALBERTO
GABRIELLE
GRANTON
TANYA
OMAR
LAQUAYA
WILLIAM
MARIA
ERIC
EDWARD
MONIQUE
SHAWNIQUE
NIKETA
TYRISE
TERENCE JAMES
ANTONIO
MARIE
EVA
COURTNEY

KENDAL
ALISA
MELISSA
P
LATISE
DONNA
OLIVIA
SHAMIKA
VANESSA


SHAVAUGHN
CIFFORD CARREN
UNEIKO
SCLIFFORD
ALEMNEEM
RAYMOND
LESHANDA PETRA
CAITLIN
D'ANGELO
ALEXANDER
CHRISTINE
JAMAL
CHEMELLE
LEONA
JERICHO
TERRELL
PATRICE
O'KEISH
SHAMEICE
BRIANNE
ALLIYAA
MONIQUE
EUGENE II
MONETTE
TERESINE
ALEXANDRA PRISCA
THEOPHELIUS
CORDERO
ANTON
AZARIAH
OLIVIA
ALAISTER
VASSINA
ALVERNE
ANTOINETTE
MERRIEL
YOLANDA
DORSES
ALEXANDER
ELIZABETH
ELV INA
NICHOLE
TAMIKA
ZOYA EVELYN
ELIZABETH
CLARICE
STANLEY
DENISE


NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
AN
LI
NP
NP
GB
NP
GB


NP
GB
GB
GB


MURPHY
MURRAY
MUSGROVE
NAIRN
NEELY
NELSON
NEMORE
NEWBOLD
NEWBOLD
NIXON-COX
NORTH
NWANKWO
OBRIEN
OKPERE
PAUL
PAUL
PAUL
PEDICAN
PERPALL
PETTY
PETTY
PHILLPOT-VARGAS
PICKSTOCK
PINDER
PINDER
PINDER
PINTARD

PLAKARIS
POLIDOR
PRATT
RAHMING
RAHMING
RAHMING
RAHMING
RAHMING
RAHMING
RECKLEY
RICHARDS
RICHARDSON-
CHASE
RITCHIE
RIVERS
ROACH
ROBERTS
ROBERTS '
ROBINSON
ROKERJR
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROSE
RUSSELL
RUSSELL
RUSSELL
RUSSELL
RUTHERFORD
SANDS
SAUNDERS
SAUNDERS
SAUNDERS
SCAVELLA
SEARS
SEYMOUR
SEYMOUR
SHEPHERD
SHIEL-ROLLE
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH-COLEBY
STORR
STRACHAN
STRACHAN
STRACHAN
STRACHAN
STRACHAN
STRACHAN


STUART
STUART
STUBBS
STUBBS
STUBBS
STURRUP
SUTHERLAND
SWAIN


CLEOPATRA
SHERRICE
LATRICIA
D'LETHEA
SIMMOI4A
TARANO
DARIUS
JAMAAL
ZEPHIA
INEZ
LESLIE
KENTINO
DANAE
JANELLE
LOUINESS
SHERIA
TYRONE
STEPHEN
GODFREY
KATHERINE
ONYX
DIANNA
EUGENE
ALPHONETT]
MALESHA
NELSON
DANICA

NAJAH
IDA
PETRA
ALVAREZ
CLINTON
EARVIN
ETOSHA
KENYA
RAYFORD
ASHLEY
SELICIA

RHONDA
RE'ISHA -
TASSIA
PATREKA
DEANGELO
MARCIA
CLECHEA
SHAYE .
ALLISON. -
ANTONIA
ASHLEY
CASSANDRA
DANELLE
DANIELLE
GIAVANNI
IVA
JASON
JONELL
MARVIA
SHANELL
VANESSA
XAVIA
SIOBHAN
BRITTANY
DAREE
FRANCINE
MASHANNA
DEJA
KRISSPIN
KAREEM
SHEMIAR
SOPHIE
SEAN
FRANCHESCI
CORDERO
PATRICK
MEGAN
JONATHAN
BRATISHA
DARRENIQUt
IVANA
JOIA
OSBOURNE
RAYMOND
WILLIAM
LEOTHA
SHANDI
DAVEIA
GARI
KERMIT
MARILOQUIA
MARINO
SHANAE


CHERRELL
MACKELL
JAVAUGHN
RAQUEL
SANCHEZ
ASHLEY
KALIAH
KA-MESHA


E


ESTELLE
SHELOMI
JADE
LORNELL
KOBIE
PATRICE
AJAKA
DIQN
,- A I NE ,
DEANDERIA
ELGEAN
YVETTE
ALEYCI
CHRISTINA
CORTNEY
LORRAINE
JAMAL ERIC
JARLENE
VANRESE
MARGO
LAQUELL
ANN
SAOIRSE
SIMONE
ELAINE
GARRETT
LARIE
AMBER
ROMERO
ABDUL-JABBAR
MARKIA
SAMONE
CONRAD
A CLARRITTA
CLAYVONE
WILLIAM
NAOMI
PATRICK
LAVONNE
E SHONTEA
DOMINICA IGNATIA
MARVETTE
CRAIGSTON
ANDREW
KYLE
MELISSA
ANTONIA
MELISSA
MARGUERITE
C
ALEJANDRA
CLYDE
STEPHANIE
ANISSA
CANDES
PEREZ
RUBYANN
AMARIS
ROMEL
CARRON
YVETTE


SURNAME


FIRSTNAME


ISLAND


CAMILLE
ODESSA
ORELIA
CHANAE'
MECKYRA
RONALD
MICHAEL EUGENE
ARTHUR
BLONEVA
CARMITA
BROCK
C
ADELTIS
MARIE
TERRANCE
ANGENIQUE
ALFRED*
ANDREAS MELANO
VARAJ

LITHERA
MIRIAM
RASHARD LAMON
LAURENNA DANIELLE
SUELLA
TOBIAS
DEAHAN
OSBOURNQUE
JULIETTE

ASANTIA
TAIRO
EARL
AUGUSTUS
CAMELL
RYAN
REINALDO
RASHAD
ANNISE


NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
GB
NP

NP
KLNP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
BIM
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
GB
EL
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB


GB
NP
NP
NP
GB
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
AB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP

NP
NP
NP
GB
AN
AN
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP








Wednesday July 30. 2008 3 THE TRIBUNE
Ministry of Education 2008 GUARANTEED LOAN/ ELIGIBLE RETURNING STUDENTS


MIDDLENAME


ISLAND SURNAME


FIRSTNAME


MIDDLENAME


ISLA TRANS REQ.


SWEETING
SWEETING
SWEETING
SWEETING
TAYLOR
TAYLOR
THOMPSON
THOMPSON
THOMPSON
THOMPSON
THOMPSON
THOMPSON
THOMPSON
THOMPSON
THOMPSON JR
TOOTE
TURNER
TYNES
VARGAS-PHILLPOT
WALLACE
WATKINS
WEECH II
WILDGOOSE
WILDGOOSE
WILDGOOSE
WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS
WILSON
WILSON
WILSON
WILSON
WONG-
LIGHTBOURNE
WOOD
WOODS
WRIGHT
YOUNG
ZONICLE *


DERRELL
KAYLISA
SANDRA
SHAKERA
AINSWORTH
LE'ANDRA
CLEMENCIA
DeANNDREA
EDDIA
KENNY
LATOYA
REMAAL
THILICIA
VINCENT
WINSTON
RENALDO
GERARD
CHRISTOPHER
CARMEN
NEIL
ANGEL
JAMES
ATIYA
BRANDON
TIFFANY
ANNIE
RASHARD
ANYA
ARIEL
DAVARO
JANINA

JANILEE
RYAN
-KENDRA
SAFARA
CRYSTAL
LILLIS


ALETHEA
MICHELLE

STACY
ROBERTO
PHILICE
JANET
LATIA
AHBRIL
KEVIN
TAMIKA
JERVIS

HUGH TERRELL
DEBARRY

CALEB
PEREZ
LORRIANE
ANDREW
MICHELLE
RONALD
ALEXANDER
JILES
ARABELLA
IRENE
ADRIAN
THERESA
NIKITA
RAMONE
CLIANTHA

JOANNA
ORSON
OLIVIA
LOREAL BEATRICE
DIANA
NAOMI


NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
AN
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
EL
GB
NP
NP

NP
GB
NP
GB
NP
NP


CODES:
NP NEW PROVIDENCE GB GRAND BAHAMA
AB ABACO EL ELEUTHERA
AN ANDROS LI LONG ISLAND
BI BIMINI IN INAGUA
EX EXUMA


2008 ELIGIBLE RETURNING STUDENTS


SURNAME

ADDERLEY
ADDERLEY
ADDERLEY
ADDERLEY
ADDERLEY
ADDERLEY
ADDERLEY
ALBURY
ALBURY
ALBURY

ALCIME
ALLEN
ALLEYNE
ALBURY
ANDREWS
ANDREWS
ANDREWS
ANTONIO
ARCHER

ARCHER
ARMBRISTER
ARMBRISTER
ARTHUR

ASTWOOD
AUSTIN
BAILEY
BAIN
BAIN

BAIN
BAIN

BAIN
BAIN
BAIN
BAIN
BAIN
BAKER
BAKER
BARBES
BARNETT
BARR
BARTLETT
BASSETT
BASTIAN
BASTIAN


FIRSTNAME

ANTONIO
CRAIG
HAREEM
JOHNNEL
JOLANDO
TAIGE
TAVARIS
JASON
SHANIQUE
WHITLEY

DEBRA
JASMINE
WINIFRED
LAURA
KENRICK
SHANTAYA
SHATARAH
THEA
KRIZIA

OMAR
CARLIN
CARLISSA
WAYNETTE

ANDERO
ALDEN
ROBERT
CHAVASSE
INDIRA

. JOYCELYN
KYLE

NORIAL
PHILLANDRA
TANYA
VUITTON
WILNAYE
KENO
RYAN
NIKITA
SHANNON
KELMORE
KIM
MELISANDE
ANTILLIO
JADE


MIDDLENAME

WASHINGTON
TREVOR
LEON
ANDREA
KERON
JOSE
WILFRED
DAVID
ELNORA
CAROLINE
THERESA
ALTHIA
SHEINAY
DEBORAH

PRINCE
BIUNCA
JANICE
MARQUETTE
ANN MARIE
SYBIL NAOMI
TARAN
VALDO
PHILIPPA
SHANDEIKAH
SHARON
AARON
DENIER
MBOYA
ANITRA CANDY
CRYSTAL
CHERINA
GLORIA
MICHAEL
RASHAD
PRINCE
ERNESTINE
LASHELLE
D'ARRINGTON
ALEXANDRIA N
JHOVAR BOBBY
NAKEITO
LASHANDRIA
BETTINA

ANTHONY
SERGIA
MARK
ANDREA


ISLA TRANs REQ.


NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP


TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


NP TRANSC.


NP
NP
NP
EL
NP
NP
NP
NP

NP
NP
NP
NP

NP
NP
GB
NP
NP


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.


NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.


NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP


TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


BASTIAN
BASTIAN JR
BELL
BENEBY
BENEBY
BENEBY
BENEBY
BETHEL
BETHEL
BETHEL
BETHEL
BETHELL
BETHELL
BETHELL
BETHELL
BETHELL
BIRCH
BLACKWELL
BLAIR
BLYDEN
BODIE
BONABY
BOOTLE
BOOTLE
BOWE
BOWE
BOWE
BOWE
BOWE
BOWLEG-
KELLY
BRAUN
BRAYNEN
BRENNEN
BRICE
BRIDGEWATER
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN-
RUSSELL
BULLARD
BULLARD
BULLARD-
STAMP
BURKE
BURNSIDE
BURROWS
BURROWS
BURROWS
BURROWS
BURROWS
BURROWS
BURROWS
BURROWS
BURROWS
BURROWS
BURROWS
BURROWS
BUTLER
BUTLER
CADET
CAMPBELL
CAMPBELL
CAMPBELL
CAMPBELL JR
CAMPBELL-
COLEY
CANCINO
CAPRON
CAREY
CAREY

CAREY
CAREY
CAREY

CARGILL
CARGILL
CARGILL
CARGILL
CARROLL
CARTER II
CARTWRIGHT
CARTWRIGHT
CARTWRIGHT
CARTWRIGHT
CARTWRIGHT


CARTWRIGHT
CHANDLER
CHARITE
CHARLOW
CHARLTON
CHEA
CHEA
CHISHOLM
CHRISTIE


RYAN
ORMAND
SHANTRA
CATHERINE
D'ASANTE
GABRIELLE
KENDIRA
DANA
FALLON
NIKETRA
SHANNON
DONNEE
JERMAINE
MIKIKO
TIFFANY
WARREN
BRIAN
LAUREN
TASIA
EBONE
DANIELLE
ERICA
MONIQUE
YVONNE
ANDREW
BASIL
COREY
HUGHDON
LATOYA

-ALICE
MARCIA
ALBERT
DEVONN
XAVIER
SIMONE
ANTOINE
ASHLEY
DEMETHERA
JODEE
KRYSTAL
RUTHMAE
SHERMAN
SONIA


ONEAL *
CHRISTOPHER
TANTAQUE
LEANZA
HERMIA
ANTOINETTE
ROSAN
MONTINEZ
NICOLE
TAMIKA
ANTHONY
ADENA
SAMUEL
TAMANGI
A.
JOHN
JUSTIN SAMUEL
R.J.
VALENCIA
OLIVIA
CICILY
MERLENE
ISABEL
PATRICIA
ANTHONY
RANDOLPH
MIKHAIL
LERONE
ANITA

CARLINDA
JASMINE
JAMES
NIKITA

NATASHA
ALEXANDER
LA'SHAN
LOUISE
SHERENE
TAMIKA
IRENE
ANTHONY


INDIRA NYOKA
INEASE CIA'
MIKHAIL GIOVANNI

RHODA BLANCHE
CANDICE OLIVIA
GIA LINDERIA
AJA ANTHANISE
JACKLYN
JACQUELINE JEMISE
KASHIF RICARDO
MONICA OLIVIA
RENALDO EQUIANO
SHAKERA LA-TIA
SHEENA TENNILLE
STEPHON JULIAN
TAMARA LATREKA
TAWANA RASHEEDA
THEO TINO
JENNA ROYANN
KRYSTIEL GILLIAN
MARIANNE
NICKALET OLIVIA
RICHEENA JUDY
VASHELE LAUREN
RONALD ALBERT

ANDREA DELORES
LAMAR ANTHONY
MCCARDIA ADRIANNE
ANDREW ARNOLD
JASON PATRICK
WILLIAM
KEIRA VANESSA
LAKERA CHRISTA
PAULINA DELCINE
INDIANNA
CHIZELLE SHANIQUA
DENISE DEVALL
MICHAELA DESIREE
SUMAYYAH AULLAH RAHIM
CHERYL ANTOINETTE
MICHAEL CHARLES
EUGENE ANTHONY
IANTHE YOLANDA
JULIAN JOSHUA
KARLOU MICHAEL
NYCODA EDSIL
THEODORA NAOMI
ARIA PAMELA
JOVITA GEORGETTE
TIA
JASON RENARDO
CAPRI ASHLEY
HOLLY DIANE
LEWISA CYNDEL
DATRA SHERRISE


NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
EX
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
AN
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP

NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP

NP
NP


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.



TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.


NP TRANSC.


NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
AB
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP

NP
NP
NP
NP

NP
NP
NP

GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
IN
NP
NP
NP
' NP


TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.


TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


SURNAME


FIRSTNAME








THE TRIBUNE


Weuinesi Uay juy ., .. .. .
Ministry of Education 2008 ELIGIBLE RETURNING STUDENTS


SURNAME


CLARE
CLARKE
CLARKE
CLARKE
CLARKE
CLARKE
CLARKE
CLARKE JR
CLEAR
CLEAR
CLEAR
COAKLEY
COAKLEY

COERBALL
COLEBROOKE
COLEBROOKE
COLLIE
COLLIE
COLLIE
COLLIE
COOPER
COOPER
COOPER
COOPER
COOPER

COOPER II
CORNISH
CORNISH JR
COX
COX
CRAVATT
CRAWLEY
CULMER
CURRY
CURRY
CURRY
CURRY

DAMES
DAMES
DAMES
DAMES
DARLING
DARLING
DARLING
DARVILLE
DARVILLE
DARVILLE
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAWKINS
DAWKINS
DAWKINS III
DEAL
DEAL
DEAL
DEAN
DEAN
DEAN
DEAN
DEAN
DEAN
DEAN-ROLLE
DELANCY
DELEVEAUX
DELEVEAUX
DEMERITTE
DEMERITTE
DEMERITTE
DEVEAUX
DIEVEAUX
DEVEAUX
DEVEAUX
DICKENSON
DORSETT

DORSETT
DORSETT
DORSETT
DOUGLAS
DOUGLAS
DUNCOMBE
DUNCOMBE


DUNCOMBE
DUNCOMBE
DUNCOMBE II
DUNCOMBE-
MOXEY
DUVALIER
EDGAR
EDGECOMBE


FIRSTNAME


LESVIE
ANTHON
CASEY
DARA
MONIQUE
PHILIP
SOPHIA
LEONARD
CUTELL
PEDRECA
SHANTIQUA
DANIELLE
RANDIA

TIANN
LESTER
SHARI
COLLEEN
KEVIN
KISHNELL
TITO
ANQUIN
CLAUDINA
MONIQUE
NORDAINA
TEO

BRADLEY
D'ANDRA
CLYDE
DEBRA
LAMYSHA
WILLESHA
BRADLEY
ERICA
DONOVAN
KENDRAE
MEGAN
PARRALL

CHRISHAWN
GARNELL
LEROY
TARA
CARLENSEANO
STEVON
VASHTI
GABRIELLE
LAWRENCE
O'KEISHA
ALVIN.
CAROL
FLOYD
JACQUELINE
JAMAL
NATASHA
RAESHAN
RICCARDO
SHANTARRA
SHARMEREKA
DOMINIC
GABRIELLE
RICHARD
INDIRA
KRYSTAL
ROSSANO
D'ANDREA
DEVON
JHAMAL
KENO
LATHICE
STEPHEN
SUSANNA
EBONY
CHEQUELLE
SHERVANNA
BRADIA
DAWN
EDRICA
GACINTHA
KENNY
RACHAD
RUVANIA
BILLYCA
CARA

FORRESTALL
SASHA
WANDA
THEONE
TIFFANY
ERICA
HUSSEIN


PATRISHKA
STENARD
STEPHEN

TAMEKA
TERELLE
SANDRA
JAVON


MIDDLENAME


NICOLE
ELTON
ANN
VERNESSA
ELIZABETH
LEROY
LOREN
JAMES
INDIRA DAYNELL
SHARADE
AYESHA
LEONA
VERNETTA
KATHLEEN
GLORIA LEENELL
LINKE
ALICIA
LEAN
RENALDO DURAN
TYVETTE
OWEN
CRAIG
PATRICIA
MERISSA
SHAVONNE
OMARRACE
HARCOURT
STEPHEN
CRYSTALLE
ALEXANDER
JANISE
GLENIQUE
TERRELL
THOMAS
SHANTEL
CHRISTOPHER
EDWARD
ANGELICA
ITH'AMAR
.CHRISMORN
TEOPHILUS
CHEVOYNNE
KEITH
ELIZABETH

DEANDO
NATALIA
CHANTAL
RICHARD
DESIREE
FRED
CHARLENE '
RINALDO
SHARON
JAVON NORWOOD
TIFFANY
D'ATRA
ALEXANDER
LANIQUE
D'ANGELA
RAPHAEL
JADE
HENRY
MELISSA
LATOYA EULIE
TRINI
HENRIKA
LAMONT
ANDREW
AKEEM
TENILLE
GORDON
LUCILLE
GWENDOLYN
ANTOINDRA
MELTIKA
DALE
SUZANNE
DOMINIQUE
NAKOTA FELECIA
VIVIAN ANDREW
KISCHNA
EVITTA '
LECHELLE
GENEVA FRANCIS
GHABRIELLE
OSCAR ROGER
LAVERNE
NOELLE
ILALIA
SHAMELL
VANESSA
DAVID PATRICK


GAYLE
GERALD
GREGORY

SHAVONNE
LASHONDA
ELIZABETH
MIQUEL


ISLA TRANs REQ.


NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP

NP
NP
NP

NP
NP
NP
NP



NP
imp
NP




NP


PB
NP
NP

PX
NP
NP
NP
GB

NP



NP
NP
NP
NP

NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
iPB
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP

NP




NP
NP
BNP
INP
NP
NP









EL
NP

NP





NP
NP


NP
NP








NP
NP



NP


NP
NP
NP

NP
NP
NP
GB


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.




TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRIANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.



TRANSC.

TRANSC.


SURNAME


EDGECOMBE
ELDON
ELLIS
ELLIS
ENEAS
EVANS
EVANS
EVANS
EVANS
EVANS JR
EVANS JR.
EWING
FARQUHARSON
FARRINGTON
FARRINGTON
FARRINGTON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON JR
FERGUSON JR
FERNANDER
FERNANDER.
FITZGERALD
FLOWERS
FLOWERS
FLOWERS
FORBES
FORBES
FORBES
FORBES
FOWLER
FOX
FRANCIS
FRANCIS
FRANCIS
FRASER
FRASER
FRASER
FRAZER

FRAZIER
FRITZ
FRITZ
GARDINER
GARDINER
GAY
GIBSON
GIBSON
GIBSON
GIBSON
GIBSON
GIBSON
GIBSON
GILBERT
GILBERT
GODET
GOMEZ
GOMEZ
GOODMAN-
CAREY
GRAHAM
GRANT
GRANT
GRANT
GRANT-
COLLIER
GREEN
GREENE
GREENE
GREENE
GREGORY
HALL
HALL
HALL
HALL
HALL

HAMILTON

HAMILTON
HAMILTON
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA


HANNA
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA


FIRSTNAME


KAYWANA
CORY
KRYSTA
PHYLICIA
CRYSTAL
CAMERON
CRISTY
KRYSTOFF
WESLEY
GEORGE
SHALTON
DOVELLA
RUBY
ADDIEMAE
ASHLEY
LEADER
CANDICE
D'ANDRA
DESIREE
ETHAN
JAMAAL
KAYLISA
RAMON
TAMIKA
TENAJ
TYRONIA
MICHAEL
WELLINGTON
CHELSA
MORGAN
LATINA
CHRISELDA
MARTINDELL
REBEKAH
ANTOINE
BREANKA
KEYOTA
RENAJ'
DANNY
ARIEL
JANAE
KAMARAH
SIMONE
ASHLEY
BRADISHA
GARITH
DAVID

LACAIRA
AGATHA
TITO
KENNETH
SHANTIA
VALENTINO
DEANDRA
GENAYNE
GLENALEE
JENNA
KAMILAH
QUETTA
TRAMECO
JAN
MAKEDA
PASHLEY
CRISPIN
PHILLIPPA

VASHNI
LATOYA
ACHARA
DEKERA
VALENTINO

O'NEA
CHRISTINE
ANDREW
JOMAR
MELINDA
OWENIQUE
ALEXANDER
JUNARDO
KERESA
REINIA
YVETTE

CONSTENTINA

DEXTER
NERISSA
AMY
ANWAR
De'ANDREA
DEVARD


LATOYA
LAWSON
MARVIN
M'KHEL
PHILICIA
RICHARD
RYAN
SHERNIECE


MIDDLENAME


TOVA
TIOMTHY
VICTORIA KENVA
JONETTE
FLORINE
LAVER
ANGEL
BERNARD
TARYN RUSSELL
ANTHONY
WAYDE
ELAINE
RHEYNISCHKA

AMONG
R
CHRISTINA
JENEE
ANEKA
DENTON

SHONNELL
FRANKLIN
VIOLA MABLE
RENESHA
JUNETTE
ALEXANDER
KRISTOFF
SHAVONNE
CORY CRAIG
TAMARA
NITIEKA MURIESSA
MONIQUE
ANTONIA
PHILIP
ARIELLE
GERTRUDE
KELVIN
GLEN
RUTH DEE
LATOYA
NIKITA
DENISE
KANDICE
MARIE
NATALYA
GEOVANNI
GERALDO ;,
MIGUARITE vY riT
PATRICIA
KEITH
TAVARGO
TENECIA
RENARDO
KAVANA LASHANTI
GRETCHEN
VIOLA
TERYL
AUODELE
ANITA
CRISTANO
SONOVIA
KIZURI
SIMONE
LEVAR ANTHONY
VANESSA LOUISE

IRIS
SHARONA
SIMONE
DENAE
DAVID

TAMIKA
ANATASIA
STEPHEN
NGARA
DONNA
LAVINIA
WELLINGTON
MICHAN
OLYMPIA
CILICIA
PAULETTE ANITA
THERESA
IYAWUMI
DARNELL
RHYS
TERESA
ALICIA
ADDINGTON
CHARLENE
ROOSEVELT


NEKIESHA
JULIAN
LEMOYNE
ASHLEE
EBONIQUE
LEVITTE
BRADFORD
DANYELL SUSANNE


ISLA TRANs REQ.

NP TRANSC.
NP
NP TRANSC.
NP
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP
NP
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP
NP
NP TRANSC.
NP
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP
NP TRANSC.
NP
NP
NP TRANSC.
NP
AB
NP TRANSC.
NP
NP TRANSC.
GB TRANSC.
GB TRANSC.
GB
NP
GB
NP
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.

NP :TRANSC.
NP IA ARNSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP
NP TRANSC.
NP
NP TRANSC.
NP
AN TRANSC.
NP
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP
NP TRANSC.

NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.

NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP
NP
NP

NP TRANSC.

NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP
NP
NP TRANSC.


NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP
NP
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP TRANSC.
NP
NP TRANSC.
EL TRANSC.


d J l 30 2008








3i Wednesday July 30. 2008 5 THE TRIBUNE
Ministry of Education 2008 ELIGIBLE RETURNING STUDENTS


MIDDLENAME


ISIA TRANS REQ.


SURNAME


FIRSTNAME


MIDDLENAME


ISLA TRANS REQ.


HANNA
HANNA II

HART
HARVEY
HASSAN
HEASTIE
HENDERSON
HENFIELD
HEPBURN
HIGGS
HOLLAND
HOYTE
HUMES
HUMES
HUMES-
JOHNSON
HUNT
HUTCHESON
HUTCHESON
HUTCHINSON
HUYLER
INGRAHAM
INGRAHAM
INGRAHAM
INGRAHAM
INNISS
JACKSON
JACOBS
JACOBS
JAMES
JEAN
JESUBATHAN
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JO-INDON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON

JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON.
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JONES
JONES
JONES
JONES
KELLY
KEMP
KERR .
KERR
KERR
KING
KINTEH
KNOWLES
KNOWLES
KNOWLES
KNOWLES

KNOWLES
KNOWLES
KNOWLES
KNOWLES
KNOWLES
KNOWLES
KNOWLES
KNOWLES
KNOWLES


KNOWLES
LAING
LAING
LEADON
LEVARITY
LEWIS
LEWIS
LEWIS


YASMIN
ORLANDO

ACCINO
TAMMALIAH
KHADIJA
VALDERO
SOLOMON
INDIRA
MONTGANO
ARETHA
SHANI
SHIEKO
J'HAVIER
NADIA

CHARMAINE
ANNISHKA
ALENA,
GABRIELLE
TIFFANY
PHILECE
ANTONIQUE
CRYSTAL
KENCOVIA
KRISTIAN
DELRON
EDAJ
DEONDRA
DONTAE'
ALEXANDRIA
NELLIE
JEREMY
ALFREDA
CAPRICE
CHRISTIAAN
CHRISTOPHE
DESHAWN
EBONY
EDWIN
JAMES
JANICE
JERMAINE
KATURAH
KEENAN
KIM
KRISTYi-,
LASHAN
LASHAWN
LEONARDO

LIVINGSTON
LOUIS
MEREDITH
MILDRED
MONIQUE
NICKITO
ROBERT
SAMANTHA
SANIA
SEAN
SHERAZE
TAMEKA
TSHOMBE
VALENCIA
JANIQUE
JAVARA
MARIO
SHAKERA
VERNITA.
GREGORY
KYLE
SERGIO
VAUGHN
DEVAUGHN
LALEEA
ADRIAN
BRITNI
DANEAL
DEVON

EVA
HEATHER
HUREKA
JAYDE
LARANO
MELISSA
NATALIA
RHASHARD
SHAW


STEPHEN
DOMINIC
TAJAH
RONDELL
MATTHAN
ALETHIA
CINDY
KENNETH


ANN
REGINALD
RODRIQUEZ
NAMAL
ANNASIAH
IMAN
NATHANIEL
KAREEM JAMES
ALEXANDIRA
SHACARA
PATRICIA
ELLEN NAOMI
DEVERGO
JAMES
DANIELLE

JASMINE
LYNETTE
VALENTINE
PATRICE
CAROL
D'ANDRE
YOLETTE
MONETTE
IVY CURLEAN
TAMMARAH
BOCCACIO
DEAN
LE'SHAUN
ALONZO
SHELTRINA

ROHAN
AUGENETTE
VANDERA
BARNARD JAMAAL
MARK ASHLEIGH
DELORIS MEGAN
FLORENCIA
OVANDO
GERANOMO
VANDA
JOLTON
SUSAN
SIMEON PATRICK
'TIANIA
ANASTACIA
LAWANDA
FELICE
CHRISTOPHER
ANTONE
DEVAN
JAMARL
VICTORIA
MAGDALENE
ANGELICA
AZARD NEWTALIN
CRAIG FRANCIS
ALEXIS
AKIRA
ADLAI
PEETRA
ANTURA
TOREE
ANN
AYESHA
TENNEILLE
FRANKLIN
INDONEISA KANYA
LAVERN
WADE
NICHOLAS
DEVAUGHN
GEMAYEL
MAURICE
JALEIKA
DON
JORDAN
MONIQUE SYLVIA
JONATHON
ROSCOE
ADELAIDE
FELICITY
KRISHAN
KEVETTE
STAFFORD
LAUREL
EMILY
WILLIS
HENRY ELDRIDGE


D'LANN
ALONZO
ELLAMAE
RANDYKE
JAVAN
DARRELL
MALLISA
ANDREW


GB
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP

NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
IN
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
EL
NP
NP
GB
NP

SS
NP
SS
NP
GB
EL'
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
EL
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
AN
NP
NP

NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP


NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
GB


TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.






TRANSC.



TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
-TRANSC.



TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.



TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.


LEWIS LATEISHA
LEWIS LORENZO
LEWIS TASHAD
LIGHTBOURNE ARLINGTON
LIGHTBOURNE CARISSMA
LIGHTBOURNE JOERELL
LIGHTBOURNE LATERIA
LIGHTBOURNE QUINTON
LIGHTBOURNE TINESHA


LIGHTFOOT
LIGHTFOOT

LIGHTFOOT
LINDEN
LINDEN
LINDOR
LOGHAVI
LONGLEY
LONGLEY
LOTMORE
LOUIS
LUBIN
LUNDY
LUNDY II
MACKEY
MACKEY
MACKEY
MACKEY
MACKEY
MACKEY
MACKEY
MACKEY
MACKEY
MACKEY JR
MADER
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR
MAJOR JR
MAJOR-
MICHEL
MALCOLM
MARSHALL
MARSHALL
MARSHALL
MARSHALL II
MARTIN
MAYCOCK
MAYNARD
MCALPINE
MCCARTNEY
MCCLAIN
MCDONALD
MCDONALD
MCFALL
MCGREGOR
MCINTOSH
MCINTOSH
MCKENZIE
MCKENZIE

MCKENZIE
MCKENZIE
MCKINNEY
MCKINNEY
MCKINNEY
MCKINNEY JR
MCKINNEY-
COX
MCPHEE
MCQUAY
MCQUEEN
MEADOWS
MEADOWS
MIAH
MILLER
MILLER
MILLER
MILLER
MILLER
MILLER
MILLER
MILLER
MILLER
MILLER
MILLER
MILLS
MILLS
MINNIS
MINNIS
MINNIS
MISSICK


CARLA
NORMICA

SEAN
LAKISHA
NATHAN
ANTOINETTE
HAMEED
,JOETTE
LUCY
FELEICIA
CYNTHIA
ELIZABETH
TIFFANY
MARTIN
ALEXIS
BERRANDO
BRYSHON
DANIELLE
KARVOL
LAMONT
TARA
TARAN
VANESSA
GLENROY
KARAN
ANNA
ANNIKA
ASHLEY
FAITH
KAMER
MEKO
MICAH
NADIA
THERISMA
DON

INDIRA
RODLYN
ADRIEL
DIAHANN
GREER
ALBERT
STACY
KRYSTLE
HADIYA
KEISHA
ANWAR
ALEXANDRA
JAMERO
MIRIAM
RANNICE
JASMINE
CAROL
KEYSHNA
ANTONIA
SHAVONNE

SID
WILTHERINE
DAPHNE
DELTHIA
STEPHEN
VIRLEY

ARIELLA
DARIO
SUENAE
DOMINIQUE
SHAMSI
SHATORI
SAMANTHA
MUCOMBA
DANICA
DeANDREA
DESMOND
JOSHUA
JOY
SHARANIQUE
SHAVONNE
SHONIQUE
TERREA
TRAVIS
D'ANDRA
OMAR
AKIN
CORDERO
INDERA
SANDRA


NATASHA
JOHN
EVERARD
ALFRED
CHAMARVIA
ANITRA
RAQUEL
CHARLES LAMONT
LATARA
LUCINDA
SHAFLEUR
CUVANNA
RYAN
BERNICE
NATHANIEL
GENEVA
SAVONE
CARA
JANET
JOSEPHINE


LEAH
ARNOLD
ZORINA CUTEL
ARLINGTON.
SHAMIKA
SIMONE
KARLOS
VICTOR
LATISHA
SPENCER
AVERY
WILLIAM

FRANCIS
GLADYS
ALEXANDREA
ANGEL
TAHNEE
ENRIQUE
LOUISE
BIANCA
CANDEIRA
BRENDON

MICHAELLA
MELISSA
ROLAND
MARSHA MARIE
LATOYA MARIA
GEORGE
ALISON LANISHA
ROY-ANNE
Z
ANISHKA
QUINN
KRISTINA
CODERO
BAHAMA
RANDENIA
ANASTACIA
JOY
LA-CRESHA
AURELIA
CLAUDETTE
CONDACY
BRICE ,
CHRIS KAY
SAMANTHA
LEANDRA SHANAE
ARTHUR
ALFRED

LOLITA JULIANA
ELVIS
LOUISE
ANISKA
SHANESS
SANOVIA SHADAI
SONIA
KENYETTA JULES
NATHALIE
ELIAZABETH
JERMAINE
RUDAL
ALEXINE DEANDRA
KENYA
SYNETTE


LAURETTE
NARIENNE
BRYANTH
MARIA
DANA
AYORINDE
AVARD

ANDREA


.( SURNAME


FIRSTNAME


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.



TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRANSC.


TRANSC.


TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.


/


/
/


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.








Wednesday July 30. 2008 6 THE TRIBUNE
Ministry of Education 2008 ELIGIBLE RETURNING STUDENTS


MIDDLENAME


ISLA TRANS REQ.


SURNAME


FIRSTNAME


MIDDLENAME


ISLA TRANS REQ.


MITCHELL
MITCHELL
MITCHELL
MITCHELL
MONCUR
MONCUR
MONCUR-
POITIER
MORLEY
MORLEY
MORLEY
MORLEY
MORRIS
MORTIMER
MORTIMER
MORTIMER
MORTIMER
MORTIMER
MORTIMER
MOSS
MOSS
MOSS
MOSS
MOSS
MOSS
MOSS
MOULTRIE
MOXEY
MOXEY
MOXEY II
MULLINGS
MULLINGS
MUNNINGS
MUNROE
MUNROE
MUNROE
MUNROE
MUNROE
MUNROE
MURPHY

MURRAY
MURRAY
MUSGROVE
NABBIE
NAIRN
NAIRN
NAIRN
NEELY

NEELY
NEELY
NEELY
NEELY
NEWBOLD
NEWRY

NEWTON
NEWTON
NEWTON
NEWTON
NEWTON
NICHOLLS
NICHOLS

NIXON
NIXON
NIXON
NIXON
NOTTAGE
OBRIEN
PALACIOUS
PATTON
PAUL
PEARCE
PEARSON
PENN
PERCENTIE
PHILIPPE
PHILIPPE
PICKSTOCK
PICKSTOCK
PIERRE
PIERRE
PILGRIM
PINDER
PINDER
PINDER
PINDER
PINDER


PINDER
PINDER
POITIER
POITIER-
SHERMAN
POWELL
PRATT


DEXTER
ELKINO
JACOBI
SHAVON
ANDRE
SHAMIJA

DARRYL
CURLENE
EDWIN
TASHEIKA
TA'SHEIRA
LENARDO
ANGELO
DEANNA
KADESHA
KIEROHN
LLERENA
PRINCESS
ALYSIA
ARSENIO
CYPRIANNA
DELISA
JAHMALAH
RASHAD
TIFFANY
KRISTEN
LYNETTE
MARTINIQUE
BRADLEY
BIANCA
RHOTHALIA
CINDY
EBINIQUE
JAWANZA
KAILESA
KAYLE
KELSIE
NORVIN
RANETHA

DOREEN
KRISHNA
JASMINE
TAWANA
BRITTNEY
DEVERN
LEONARD
APPAKAESHA

DEANDREA
GABRIELLE
LACUREIZIA
RAQUEL
DAREN
AARON

CLAUDETTE
JENNETTE
RAMON
RASHAD
SHEANDRA,
GIOVANNI
RADINA

DARIEN,
JAIME
JERARD
TRAVAREZ
DALYA
CASANOVA
MANTANO
SHAKERIA
SIMONE
RICARDO
LEEMAN
ASHLEY
BRITTANY
GARTH
KEITH
CRYSTAL
KEINO
GERMAIN
GUERLANCY
BRENDAN
ANTON
DREXEL
ELLIEA
GRACESELLA
NADIA


RAQUEL
RON
ASHA

MONIQUE
DONAVON
ASHAUNTI


JAMAL
JAMAAL
JACODA
MICHELLE
RICARDO
ANTOINETTE

SIDNETTE
VERNEMAE
D'ANVILLE
ALLEYDICE
ADESHA
VASCO
DONALD
VAUGHN
ULRICA
MALACHI
PALCYNTH
DOMINIQUE
BRENETTE
O'DELL
ELAINE
MARIA
RAASHAN
LAVELLE
OLIVIA
LAMAR
LATEDRA CASSIEA
GREGORYETTA
KEVIN
ANTOINETTE

LATEISHA
LATONYA
MIKHAIL
AMANDA
AKEEM EDWARDO
MELVIN
EDMOND
AMMILLO
SANTIENKITA
CHRISE
GEOGINA
JANIKA
ASSUNTA
LATOYA
NICOLA
MARVIN
SHUKANYA
TANUAR
MICHELLE
BIANCA
ANTOINETTE
L'ORIELLE
INZELY
CHARLES
ALEXANDER
ALEXIS
RENEE
CECIL MIGUEL
PEREZ
MICHELLE
PHILIP
ALGERNIQUE
WINSTONETTE
KENDRICK
DI'ANDRA
PETER
LAMAR
LYNELLE
CHRISTOPHER
CHASE
ANDERIA
SHAMAAL
PAUL
JAMES HENRY
SACHET
SBERNIQUE


JE'KARA
W


ANTHONY
ADRIAN
STEVENSON
SHANDRIEA
CHANTEY
CANISHA


SHERRON
O'NEAL
MONIQUE LAUREN

SHARON
LAMONT
BERNADIA


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.


NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB

NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP

NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP

NP
NP
NP
GB
GB
NP
NP


NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
EL
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
GB
EL
NP
NP
NP
AN
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP

GB
NP
GB


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


PRATT
PRATT
PRATT
PRATT
PRATT-HANNA
PRINCE
PYFROM
PYFROM
RAHMING
RAHMING
RAHMING
RAHMING
RAHMING
RAHMING
RAHMING
RECKLEY
RICHARDSON
RIGBYJR
ROBERTS
ROBERTS
ROBERTS
ROBERTS
ROBINSON
RODGERS
RODGERS JR
RODRIQUES
ROKER
ROKER
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE JR
ROMER
RUSSELL
RUSSELL
RUTHERFORD
SANDS

SANDS
SANDS
SANDS
SANDS
SANDS
SANDS
SAUNDERS
SAUNDERS
SAUNDERS
SAUNDERS
SAUNDERS
SAUNDERS
SAUNDERS
SAUNDERS
SAUNDERS
SAWYER
SAWYER III
SCAVELLA
SEALEY
SEARS
SEARS


SEYMOUR
SEYMOUR
SEYMOUR
SEYMOUR
SEYMOUR
SEYMOUR
SEYMOUR
SHAKESPEARE


ERNEST
KENWOOD
KRISTIN
LATANYA
BERNADETTE
RENRICK
DIANDRA
SHERELLE
AMANDA
BRINIQUE
LAMANDA
LAMBERT
LEON
RASHANDA
TAMIKA
MALACHI
OMAR
BALDWIN
CAMILLE
GARY
JANE
LEVARD
KARISSMA
KENNADYA
JEFFREY
ERNESTA
ALEXIS
TOMMEL
ALDRED
ANGELA
ANGELICA
BENDEYON
BIANCIA
CAROLYN
CHARLOTTE
DAREN
DENCIL
DENISE
DURAN
GREGORY
HADASSAH
JANAE
KENYA
KERMETRA
LATER
LEOSHANA
LERON
LYNELL
NAKESHA '
NIKITA
OMAR
PHAREZ
PRIMO
RAVELLE
SHASHEENA
STEPHAN
TERRELL
TRENICKA
TROY
YONAE
ZHEN
EZZARD
LASHANDELL
DAVONYA
MARQUITA
DAVINA
CHARISMA

CLINTON
CYRIL
ERIC
JANELLE
LAVARDO
SHANELL
CHIKARA
JOVAN
KHALEIAH
KIMBERLEY
KRYSTLE
KYLE
LASHANTA
LATOYA
NICOLE
RAMOND
ERIC
GLENNIQUE
TANISHA
ALEXANDRIA
SARAI


CECILY ,
FREDERICK
KASHA
KENNEISHA
LATHARIO
SAMANTHA
WAINGER
SHAKENA


NP
LOFTHOUSE NP
JOWELLA GB
RAQUEL NP
GB
MICHAEL GB
DISHAN NP
AMELIA NP
CHESTELE NP
SHANDERA NP
CHRISTINA NP
NORMAN NP
DARRYL NP
DANIELLE NP
CHANDERA NP
SEBRIN NP
MELVIN NP
NP
IRENE NP
TYRONE GB
HELENA NP
GERONE NP
SANGARIA GB
O'NEEL DENISE NP
CLEVELAND NP
SHONELL NP
RUTH NP
ANTRICE NP
DEOVANNIE NP
ANITA NP
LORRAINE NP
DAVINIA NP
DARRICE 'NP
SYLVIA NP
PAIGE ELAINE NP
MARCO DAMONE NP
LARHON NP
LOUISE NP
ALEXIS NP
ANDERSON AN
TANGERIKA GB
MAKERIA NP
ANTONIA NP
BRITNEY GB
DEMEAN NP
ALTHENA NP
LEO CARMERONy, NP
MARISSA NP
JANEEN NP
CAROLYN NP
CHARLES NP
DISHON NP
KERMIT NP
ALEXAVIER ORIDA NP
BIANCA GB
JHAMAL. NP
MELICIA KENISE NP
KIARA GB
ANITA NP
PAULINA A. NP
ALEXANDRIA NP
CHARLES NP
MICQUELL NP
RAVON NP
KAMERO GB
ALETHEA GB
LEANNA
ELIZABETH NP
CHARLES NP
CHRIS NP
JUSTIN NP
ANISHKA NP
VINCENT NP
DEORNAFAYE NP
JAMILA GB
KRYSTAL NP
MELVINA NP
VIOLA NP
EBONY CATHERINE NP
VAN-DYKE GB
ANQUONETTE GB
TAMIKA NP
RENA NP
WESTER NP
DUDLEY THOMAS NP
ADRALLA EL
JANETTE NP
LOUISE GB
EUNICE NP


DENICE NP
LE-ANTON NP
ABAGIL GB
TAMARA NP
KRISTOFF NP
MARSHA OLYMPIA NP
DERICKA NP
SARAH NP


TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.



TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
STRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


SURNAME


FIRSTNAME








THE TRIBUNE


eY s. U .. JULey ..'Ju .,
Ministry of Education 2008 ELIGIBLE RETURNING STUDENTS


. SURNAME


SHERMAN
SHERMAN
SHERMAN II
SHIEL-ROLLE
SIMMONS
SIMMONS
SIMPSON
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH

SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH

SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH-
GREENE
SPENCE
ST.CYR
STANFORD
STEWART
STEWART
STEWART
STORR
LSTORR
STRAEHAN

STRACHAN
STRACHAN
STRACHAN
STRACHAN
STUART

STUART
STUART
STUART
STUART
STUARB
STUBBS
STUBBS
STUBBS
STUBBS
STUBBS-
STUART
STYLES
STYLES
SUCKIE
SWAIN
SWANN
SWANN
SWEETING
SWEETING
SWEETING
SWEETING
SWEETING
SWEETING
SYMONETTE
TAYLOR
TAYLOR
TAYLOR
TAYLOR JR
TELFORT
THOMPSON
THOMPSON
THOMPSON
THOMPSON
THOMPSON


THOMPSON
THOMPSON
THOMPSON
THOMPSON
THOMPSON
CODES:
NP NEW
BI BIMI]


FIRSTNAME


GLENDERIA
TRE'VARE
GLENN
NIKITA
MICHELLE
TREVONIA
HERBERT
ADRIAN
ALICIA
ALUNIQUE
ANDRICA

CHIVONNE
DELPHIA
DENISHA
DOMINIQUE
EUNICE
FELICIA
IANTHIA

KELECIA
KRISTIE
LAVETTE
LaVONDA
MEIKO
NASHID
REGINA
SHANAE
SHANIQUA
SUGAR
TASHAN
TIFFANY
VIOLA
WENDELL

MONIQUE
LATIA
LEONETTE
EBONY
MARKIRA
TAMARA
TAMEKA
KENDI
SAMANTHA ;
*KY 12 '"

MICHAEL
NICOLA
SHURANDA
THEO
DAVID

LAKEISHA
MEGAN
RAVONNE
RENALDO
STEPHANIE
ALFRED
DANIELLE
JANELL
MICHAELLA

RONNETTE
ELAINE
WILLETTE
CHRISTINA
ERIN
GHALY
VANESSA
CHERICE
GARY
LEO
RANDI
TAZIA
ZOE
CRYSTAL
ANDREW
KEITRA
LOTHARIO
JAMES
STEVENCY
ALANCHA
CRYSTAL
DARRELL
DEANDRA


JAIME
JA'LICIA
PETRA
REAH
RENO
ROCHAN


MIDDLENAME


SAMANTHA
KALEISTA
ALEXANDER

MCQUAY IONA
LATIAH
JAMES
ANTOINE
ELAINE
CHANTAVIA
ANGELIQUE
CHANTEL
MICHELLE
SHARON
ROSHANN
ALLISON
PRISCILLA
JENNY
SHASHICA
APHRODITE
KELDA
MARIE
LAVERNE
TRESIA
KASHANA YUMOKO
RAMADO
TONIA
KRISTEN
AMANDA
PATRICE
TAMARA
ANGELIQUE
PRISCILLA
ANTHONY

PATRICE
KEUNIKA
LEKARA
ANDREA ROBYN
OLGA
LOUISE
KATHLEEN
CHARIA
H:NICOLE A; ...
HARRISON
BRENDAN
ANTHONY TERRAN
THERESA
ADALIAH

BERNARD
REGINALD N.
SHAMEKA
D'ANGRA
LATOYA VELESTA
ANTONIO
PATRICE
DAVID
OLIVIA PATINA
VALINCIA
LAKIA

MARGO
PATRICE
TEDRA SHANIQUE
JOY
SWITCHANNA
SEPTIMUS
ALEXANDRIA
CAMILLE
FRANSICO
JAMAAL
LATIA
LATINA
NICOLE
ANNIE
GORDON
BIANCA
ODISSAN
ROBERT

LASHAN
LATOYA
DEMETRIUS
OWENNIKIA
MARIE CATHERINE


ASHLEY
OLIVIA
TAMARA CARMEL
CARAND
SHARRELL


ISLA TRANS REQ.


NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP

NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP

NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB

NP
NP
NP
AB
GB
GB
GB
AN
NP

NP
NP
NP
NP
GB

NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP

NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB


NP
GB
NP
NP
NP


TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.





TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.






TRANSC.


TRANSC.




TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.


TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.





TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


SURNAME


THOMPSON
THOMPSON
THOMPSON
THOMPSON
THOMPSON III
THOMPSON-
MACKEY
THOMPSON-
PRATT
THOMPSON-
ROLLE
THURSTON
THURSTON
THURSTON
THURSTON
THURSTON-
ROLLE
TINKER
TOOTE
TOUSSAINT
TRECO
TUCKER
TUCKER
TURNQUEST
TURNQUEST
TYNES
VERANCE
VIRGIL'
VIRGILL
.VIRGILL
WALLACE
WALLACE
WALLACE
WALLACE
WARD
WATSON
WELLS
WHYLLY
WHYLLY
WHYMNS
WHYMNS
WHYMNS
WHYMS
..WHYMS III "
WILiGOOSEv
WILDGOOSE
WILKINSON
WILKINSON
WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS

WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS
WILLIAMSON
WILSON
WILSON
WILSON
WILSON
SWILSON
WILSON-
BOSTON
WISDOM
WOOD
WOOD
WOOD
WOODSIDE
WORRELL
WORRELL

WRIGHT
WRIGHT
WRIGHT
WRIGHT
WRING


WRING
YOUNG
YOUNG
YOUNG
ZONICLE


FIRSTNAME

SHAKARA
THEANDRA
TIEASHER
YOLANDA
EARL

CHANNON

MELVINA


AYANAH
DONNA
JENEE'
KEISHCHELLE
SAMANTHA

JEANETTE
PRINCESS
SHENANDOA
NADEGE
ANNA
CARISMA
DWAYNE
RENALD
RYAN
IANTHE
NATALIA
KHRISNA
ALEXIA
JAMES
AVANDI
MERRILYN
NATASHA
SEBASTIAN
KENT
CHRISTAL


MIDDLENAME

DANIELLE
MELONIE
KETHERA
TERRA
VINCENTE


YVONNE


SHAKARRA
WINIFRED
ANITHA
EUGENIA
ASHLEY


LEANORE
PEROSA
LYNDORA MESAIDA

ALICIA
ANDEIRA
DEVEN C.
ARSENIO
GODFREY GABRIEL
ZANOBIA
MALISSA
MONET
JERDELL
SCOTT
SHANAZ
ALEXIS
SAMANTHA
EUTON
VICEROY
LAVERNE ANN


CHRISTOPHER AUGUSTUS
DEANGELO KALMAN
DEANZA KEVIN
DIANDRA DARNELL
KAMARA CHARIKA
MELISSA MONTEZ
RAQUEL NATRELL
RAPHAEL EMMANUEL
MICHELLE LERLENE
REMISKA SIMONE
ADRIAN ANTONIO
KAYSHAN LA-DREA
BARRY VALENTINO
BRIDGET PATRICE
CRYSTAL LYNETTE
CYLESTINA CUSAN
DEMARRA LAKEISHA
KEVIN JERMAINE
LYDIA DELPHINE
MARNEECE LEANDRAH
MARQUES ANTHONY ZENAS
MAUREEN SHERREL
NICODIA ROAHANNE
OSTENCIA *
PAIGE VALERIA
SHANELL MONIQUE
TIA-TONI LAKRISTA
VANCAS DEANGELO
NIKEISHA JOYANNE
CYNTHIA G'LAINE
JAMIE O'NEIL
KELSON CARDWELL
PAULETTE LORINE
ROKEISH SHENEKA

MARSHA MARIA
NICHOLAS KEITH
ANTHEA MARIA
KERON PICO
PRECIOUS MEO'SHIE
THEADORA VANSHREE
KEIANA ATINA
KYRIA DYRELL
ALEXANDRIA
DEBBIE YVONNE
EULICIA MANDI
KEVIN DWIGHT
RICHARD QUINTINO
JORDANNA MICHELLE
MARGO KAMILLE
BARON ZHIVAGO
CRISTA ZANDERA
PATRIEKA ANDREA'
ETHRIN EDEN STANLEY


.ISLA IRANS REQ.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.


NP TRANSC.

NP TRANSC.


NP
NP
GB
AB
NP

NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
EL
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP

GB
GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB

GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
GB
NP

GB
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP


TRANSC
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.


TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.






TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.





TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.
TRANSC.




TRANSC.
TRANSC.

TRANSC.


PROVIDENCE GB GRAND BAHAMA AB ABACO EL ELEUTHERA AN ANDROS LI LONG ISLAND
NI TRANSC OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPT IS REQUIRED BEFORE CHECK IS RELEASED.


Wd d Jl 302008







Wedne.da. JuI y 30. 200 THE..TRIBU


*1 "' 4 -:- *' ." 4 -"' "
:' -it -.. '". -: ' '
. ';,'. **'. *-, -.. ... ' -.-*.* .! *- -.
/,. ..-. :* ,*-"* ;.* **. ...

.. . :,-; ;

-..".: 4 : "^ ^ ; ";
r. ;' '' H '.' -- ": " '"



*. -. "- 4 .. ';-: ,-
-' 4' :}:U
a '-I -5"



a, k 4 tk'^.; ; *" ,
.4 .' .4... .>-t : .' '
^r 44'*. .._f:
......-.P 1"^-, ." .


.'I.. : 4..
J, r ,' o,.J .j -.
".i '-I -i '' y -:&
-- 4 "
I ,. ;.4..-.--, "4; -';'2 "" .. -, .
,K M.&. < 'i ''""


NW.s


3,"CE


.. :.,**.*-,.," :'>i *';^ ^ a f s T ii e ^ 'S S e S ~ ,'. .** .... .. "-.- .;.: .
.-." 5, '" '!:; : "
^ \: ^. 4 ': 2 <,,,-."i
.-' t f l3 -4 .... '
-N.. MN

-I", \ -


Ne of sidt, Back to


Age


one of pareils


A list of exams o ready token
and the results e.g. Bahamas
Junior Certificate (B(s) exams
and PFiImo exoms

A list of exams expected to
be taken- Bo ms imseneral
(erlificole of Secondary
Eduamlioi (BGCSEI eums

The oalIee/uaiversiy the
epect Io outend e. (Aollege
of the Bahamrn Horverd
University Unirsity c Miami

nime of degree expected to
be sought e. g,- Bchelors
degree in Engi h, Bachelors
degree in Biloegy

What career they expect to
enter ne ibteir edueia&n is
wEolled. a doctor, MWth
leaMher, engineer

All elmra.riular odivi-
lies ub memberships
teow s trtck end
field, church offidies

A list of hivN rs/
awOrds/recogniiin stnu-r
dent has rceNved


8 T*N Trifbune w.ill be publishing its annual
'Back 1o School' supplement in
August/September. In preparation for the
supplement, which will feature all graduat-
ing seniors wvho will be attending universi-
ty)/cll -ege. "w:either locally or abroad, we
invite all parents, guardians and graduating
seniors t, submit a profile on the gradual-
ing seniors, along with a photograph and
^ccoritact information. Deadline
is July 31, 2008.,





a Please onward aS nftxrmain to Ia LSawLor, TtXune
ii Juni or eparier s emma lis lworigrmai.c m
Seasft'notelZakTo Schoor inte s*ct ka we
S^wftormabon mVy also be hand dewrmd or rrmailed m:


- .


.... .M": W ". *'-., ..


- 4,


~n~Rlra~aepg~;~s~E~%Ellrlaas~;ls*r~;r I.;:i~ it


wwi-i.a Ul^^^CS-;^


Wednesday July 30 2008


THE TRIBUNE


cm';"W ~ti~ir/Wr~:r~*~~;r*." C ;iC-i -?r il