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The Tribune
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01074
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: July 14, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01074

Full Text







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* By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net
POLICE are investigating a
suspicious death in Long Island
after the body of a man was dis-
covered in the middle of the
road with significant injuries to
the left side of his head.
The body of Nicholas
Knowles, 35, was discovered on
Queen's Highway at around
1.25am by police on patrol in
Simms, Long Island, according
to Acting Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Hulan Hanna.
Mr Knowles, a resident of
Doctors Creek, Long Island,


road


was discovered in the vicinity
of the Blue Chip Restaurant
and Bar. He was pronounced
dead on the scene by a local
doctor before being taken to
the nearby morgue in Simms.
Police are not clear on what
caused Mr Knowles' death.
However, Mr Hanna said the
incident has the appearance of
being a hit-and-run accident.
"Clearly, clearly, the indica-
tions are a vehicle was involved
but it has to be determined if it
was accidental, if it was criminal
- that is, you know, it might
have been maliciously done -
SEE page 14


Separate shootings in armed
robbery attempt, police shoot-out
* By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net
ONE man was shot in the hip in an armed robbery attempt
at his home, and another was shot in the stomach after a
high speed chase and shoot-out with police, in two separate
shootings over the weekend.
The chase and shoot-out occurred in Nassau Village in the
early hours of Saturday morning when officers of the mobile
division reported seeing a man acting suspiciously in the area
of Alexandria Boulevard and Taylor Street at around 12.52am.
According to police, the man then got into a black Nissan
Sentra, being driven by another man, while the officers called
SEE page 12


Candidates


in the BPSU


election 'are


not funded


by the PLP'
* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
CANDIDATES running against Bahamas Public Service Union
president John Pinder in the union elections have "categorically
denounced" speculation by Mr Pinder that the campaigns of some of
his opponents may be funded by the PLP.
Mike Stubbs, Sloane Smith and Derrick Ferguson, in a statement
issued yesterday, said that they are "self funded and simply here to
serve" adding: "That is our commitment and bond."
The three became the first union members last Monday to publicly
announce their intention to run for the positions of BPSU President,
Vice-President and Secretary-General.
SEE page 12
I a ,


PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham again stressed his
government's intention to pri-
vatise the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company, and lib-
eralise the country's wider
telecommunications sector, at
the opening ceremony of the
24th annual conference of the
Caribbean Association of
National Telecommunication


* SEE PAGE SEVEN
FOR RESULTS


Derek Carroll


Petition calling for
renegotiation of EPA


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
A PETITION has been
launched within the Caribbean
community calling for the re-
negotiation of the Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA).
Currently just over 250 peo-
ple, including some of the
Bahamas and the region's most
vociferous critics of the trade
deal, have added their names
to the petition in support of its
call for changes to be made to


the current EPA before it is
signed.
Specifically the petition
demands that the EPA be
trimmed down to an arrange-
ment that simply meets the
requirements necessary to make
it World Trade Organisation
compatible and that there
should be a commitment to a
mandatory review of the EPA
provisions within three years of
the agreement's signing that
would allow for the possibility
SEE page 14


Quiznos'SuB
H N ~~~~~~1 < '**" 1


Organizations.
"We in the Bahamas have
lagged in our liberalisation
efforts. But we propose to rem-
SEE page,13


BNT set for meeting to
discuss the environmental
impact of Bimini Bay Resort
* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
THE Bahamas National Trust is set to meet later this month with
top Bimini Bay Resort representatives, local government and sci-
entists to discuss the resort's environmental impact on that island.
The meeting will take place at Bimini.
This comes as BNT director Eric Carey claimed that the whole
project is already "under review" by the government, with a new
environmental impact assessment already being conducted.
The July 21 visit and meetings will be the first time the BNT has
"officially" engaged with the resort developers about the project.
It follows regular criticisms over a period of years of the projec-
t's impact on the local environment, said to be home to some of the
SEE page 13


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008


LOCALNW


Rubie Nottage begins to




fulfill judicial obligations


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The Tribune confirmed with
Supreme Court officials Fri-
day that Justice Nottage has
started hearing cases in the
Supreme Court.
Mrs Nottage, 64, wife of
former PLP MP Kendal Not-
tage, was sworn in as a Jus-
tice of the Supreme Court on
April 31. Her appointment by
the Judicial and Legal Services
Commission as a Justice of the
Supreme Court was met with
a mixture of criticism and sup-
port from a cross-section of
the community. -While some
believed she should not have
been appointed until a court
indictment against her in the
United States from the eight-
ies had been cleared, others
felt that she was eminently,
qualified to fill the position.
Mrs Nottage was mentioned
in the 1984 Commission of
Inquiry into drug trafficking


in the Bahamas and almost 20
years ago she was indicted in
the US on drug money- laun-
dering charges. However, US
authorities never acted on the
indictment.
Mrs Nottage, who has 38
years of legal experience
behind her, has served as gen-
eral counsel to the Grand
Bahama Port Authority and
chancellor and legal adviser
to the Anglican Diocese of
The Bahamas and the Turks
and Caicos.
Neither Justice Nottage nor
her clerk was in office Friday
when The Tribune called.
While trying to ascertain what
category of cases Justice Not-
tage h-6s been hearing, -The
Tribune was directed to the
Supreme Court Registry's
department. However efforts
to get information up to press
time proved fruitless.


Junkanoo takes the UK's


Henley Festival by storm


ICED MOCHA CHILLER


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The Bahamas Electricity Corporation ("BEC") is extending its deadline for submission of proposals
from Companies / Entities / Firms ('Tenderers") wishing to supply electrical power from
renewable sources on one of the Islands within BEC's area of supply to:

Friday September 12th, 2008

Renewable Energy Firms wishing to pre-qualify for this project shall be required to submit
comprehensive details to allow the following areas to be evaluated;

S ) Experience and past performance of the company on similar projects,
II) Capability of the company to undertake the project with respect to personnel,
equipment, structure, organization and financial resources

Requests for Prequalflication documents or any other Information may be made by mailing: ,


All proposal documents mult be prepared In English and every request made for the prequalifica-
tion documents must be accompanied by an application fee of US$100 if applying from outside
the Bahamas and B$50 if applying frem within the Bahamas. Documents may be sent by eleop'
ironic mail, The method of payment will be cash, cashier's check or wire transfer to a speciflid
bank account.

Completed documents shall he delivered to the following address no later than 4:00 PM an the
deadline specified above: .
Kevin Bosden,
General Manager
Bahamas Ilectricity Corporation,
P.O. Box N-7809, Nassau, Bahamas,
Teo +1(242) 302-1000 / Fax +1 (242) 323-6852

Attm Renewable Technologies Committee (RTC)
EMallh rttcahamselectricity.com

Label Envelope
Request For Proposals Renewable Inergy -Power Generation
Implementation Project

The Corporation reserves the right to reject any or all proposals. All decisions made by the
corporation will be final,


HENLEY, United Kingdom -
Whenever the contingent of
Junkanoo artists from New Prov-
idence, Grand Bahama and
Eleuthera performed for the
crowds at the Henley Festival in
the United Kingdom, the crowd
was in seventh heaven.
The Henley Festival is recog-
nised as one of the largest and
most significant of England's Arts
Festivals with its net profits going
to support cultural and artistic
ventures.
Artistic Director for the festival,
Stewart Collins said each July
large audiences are welcomed to
one of England's most beautiful
locations for five nights "under
the stars, with the stars".
"The Henley Festival is, and
has always been, a wonderful
playground; a playground for bril-
liantly talented people to do what
they do best with the expressed
purpose of leaving us all feeling
better about ourselves."
Festival goers dressed in
evening gowns and tuxedos
enjoyed a mix of opera, classical
music, comedy, jazz and rock,
dance and visual art showcases
including this year for the first
time Junkanoo.
Notwithstanding being dressed
in their finest, when they heard
the Junkanoo beat attendees
could not help but to get down to
the sounds of the horns, the shak-
ing of the cowbells, and the beat
of the goatskin drums, while at
the same time waving the
Bahamian flag.
This is part two of the
Junkanoo Live initiative and the
second time this year a contingent
of Junkanoo artists have come to
the United Kingdom.
In April 2008, during part one
of Junkanoo Live, a group of
Junkanoo artists and performers
travelled to the Isle of Wight for
an exchange and residency pro-
gramme. Parts one and two of the
initiative are sponsored by the
Arts Council of England.
The Bahamas Government has
fully endorsed both ventures.
During a press conference to


MITCH THURSTON, a scraper, is the youngest member travelling with the
group. Both Mitch and his dad are helping to not only showcase Junkanoo
to festivals throughout the United Kingdom, but they are also acting as
ambassadors of the Bahamas.


promote the'cfiifelttrip, Minister
of State for Culture Charles May-
nard said, "This is a historic occa-
sion for the Bahamas.
"This is going to help promote
our tourism industry, this is going
to help promote our culture and
most of all, we are going to send
off the best in terms of our
Junkanoo artists, to show the
world what is special about The
Bahamas."


Angelique McKay, project
manager for the initiative and
manager of the National
Junkanoo Museum of The
Bahamas explained that since the
group arrived July 3 to perform at
various festivals throughout the
United Kingdom for 21-days, peo-
ple cannot seem to get enough of
Junkanoo.
Ms. McKay said people have
been saying things like "this i.s
brilliant", "this is fabulous, gor-
geous", "this is beautiful" or "I
want to go back to The Bahamas
with you".
"We have these people mov-
ing," she said. "Junkanoo has
these people moving and it is a
good feeling to see that.,
"To see these people getting
just as excited about Junkanoo as
we do when we are watching. it
on Bay Street is priceless."
Prior to Henley, the 30-member
group performed in Isle of Wight
and is now headed to London.
Working alongside Ms. McKay is
"Quentin "Barabbas" Woodside
of Barabbas and the Tribe.
Barabbas had the awesome
task of choosing the Junkanoo
artists for the group, but he said
the task was not too difficult.
One of the main criteria Barab-
bas used to choose his team mnem-
bers were persons who were
involved in community outreach
projects and endeavours such as
the Paraplegics Rush through the
Streets.
"They do not get paid for these
things so this is a way to say thank
you, and I think they deserve it."
He also explained that it is not
all fun and games for the group
while they are in the United King-
dom:
"We are here on a mission to
promote The Bahamas and to
bring as much people to our
shores."
Ms. McKay added, "The cul-
ture of the Bahamas is what brings
the visitors to our Bahamas."


ALTHOUGH her appoint-
ment as a Supreme Court
judge has been mired in con-
troversy, newly appointed
judge Rubie Nottage has
already started to fulfil her
judicial obligations.


MAIN SECTION
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;^TIH M l


US^J~d^^^-19W ED







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008, PAGE 3


6'ALEW


0 In brief

Man charged

with causing

grievous harm
A MAN charged with
causing grievous harm was
arraigned in Magistrate's
Court Friday.
It is alleged that Dexter
Miller, 25, of Swaziland
Crescent caused grievous
harm to Daria Forbes on
Tuesday, July 8.
Miller, who appeared
before Magistrate Linda
Virgill in Court 9, Nassau
Street, pleaded not guilty
to the charge and was
granted bail in the sum of
$3,000.
The case was adjourned
to November 4.

The Bahamas Signs

CDEMA Agreement
/ By LINDSAY
THOMPSON
Bahamas Information
Services
THE Bahamas signed an
agreement establishing the
Caribbean Disaster Emergency
Management Agency (CDE-
MA), a central organisation
through which members of the
Caribbean Community can
access funds in the aftermath of
hurricanes and other disasters.
This was disclosed by Deputy
Prime Minister and Minister of
Foreign Affairs Brent Symon-
ette, who represented Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham at the
29th meeting of the Conference
df Heads of Government of the
Caribbean Community (CARI-
COM) held July 1-4 in Antigua.
The meeting also marked the
35th anniversary of CARICOM.
Heads of Government attended
a ceremony at Dickenson Bay,
site of the signing in 1965 of the
Caribbean Free Trade Associa-
tion (CARIFTA) Treaty fore-
runner of CARICOM.
Other agreements discussed
at the CARICOM level, but not
signed by The Bahamas are:
Agreement establishing the
Caribbean Aviation Safetv aind
Security Oversight S I. ,
(CASSOS).
Acr.-r, Lcm id t.,-I, -.ing.L. ,
CaribK, n Dc...I..' i Fur LI.J
(CDF);
Maritime and Airspace
*Security Co-operation Agree-
ment and the CARICOM Arrest
Warant Treaty
"There was some difficulty as
to fhe Maritime and Airspace
Agreement and the Caribbean
Arrest Warrant, which is being
reviewed by Cabinet. We are
going over some questions raised
by other Caribbean countries
and we hope to be in a position
to sign those shortly," Mr.
Symonette said.
The CARICOM Arrest War-
rant seeks the "speedy arrest and
transfer" of suspects within the
region for various criminal
offences. It is similar to the extra-
dition agreement between
The Bahamas and the United
States.
"The Caribbean is trying to
get closer so that we can deal
with criminals and crime that
happens throughout the
Caribbean," Mr Symonette said.
The CASSOS is to succeed
the Regional Aviation Safety
Oversight System (RASOS) with
expanded functions. It formalis-
es arrangements for coordinating
in a cost effective manner the
sharing of the limited technical
aviation expertise of the region;
the harmonisation of training,
licensing, certification and
inspection procedures; and pro-
viding technical support to the
participating State.
This would enable States to
achieve and maintain full com-
pliance with international safety
and security standards in keeping
with their obligations as Con-
tracting States to the Conven-
tion on International Civil Avia-
tion (Chicago Convention, 1994).
Regarding safety, Mr. Symon-
ette said Heads approved the
implementation of the CARI-
COM Travel Card, a mechanism
to facilitate hassle-free travel
within the region for nationals
and legal residents of CARI-
COM without compromising the
security of the Community.
Heads spent an entire day on


tourism, discussing ways to
enhance regional tourism in the
context of current international
trends.
In this vein, Heads agreed on
a strategy of a regional market-
ing campaign, including the
adoption of a Caribbean region-
al brand and the creation of a
marketing fund of an estimated
$60 million.


PetC.to


Man is killed in


traffic accident


A CIVIL Aviation department employee was killed
in a traffic accident on Coral Harbour Road when
the vehicle he was driving was involved in a head-on
collision with a truck.
Shawn Munroe, 49, an electronic technician, had just
passed the Million Air airport at around 5.45pm on
Friday when a Ford F150 truck coming around the
curve lost control and hit his white Suzuki car, accord-
ing to the police. This death registers the Bahamas'
24th traffic fatality for the year.'
As a result of the crash, a significant portion of
Coral Harbour Road had to be cordoned off by police
as they examined the wreckage of the high-speed col-
lision.
Mr Munroe was taken to hospital and pronounced
dead on arrival. Police report that the driver of the
truck only received minor injuries.
This ftraffic-fatality comes only days after a woman
was killed on Prince Charles Drive in a car crash.
Ismae Stuart-Mackey, 44, died at the scene of the


KILLARNEY MP Dr Hubert
Minnis launched a Summer read-
ing programme on Friday night
at the Sheraton Cable Beach
resort.
His "Let's Read Killarney"
project is intended to get more
children to spend their free time
reading over the holiday.
As an incentive to read as
many books as they can, young
people have been offered the
chance to win one of six comput-
ers two laptops for high school
children and four desktops for
junior and primary school stu-
dents.
Children have been asked to
submit book reports for each
book read, with older children
being asked to provide longer and
more detailed descriptions of the
book's themes, what they
liked/disliked and learnt from
each.
Ultimately it is hoped that the
Killarney students will, through
their exploration of literature,
"become more open minded and
global thinkers" and be equipped
to "make up a strong Bahamian
work force that will be able to
compete with persons of differ-


crash at 5am on Independence Day. She was one of
four passengers in a grey Hyundai Accent car travel-
ling west on Prince Charles Drive.
Eye-witnesses reported that a red Ford Ranger
truck travelling east, near the rear entrance of St
Augustine's College, was overtaking another vehicle
when it crashed headlong into the gray Hyundai
Accent in the opposite lane.
Mrs Stuart-Mackey, who had just picked up her
son from his work at the nearby Shell service station,
was sitting in the front passenger seat and took the
brunt of the impact.
With the front part of the Hyundai Accent
completely mangled, Fire Services had to use the
jaws of life to extract the four passengers from the
car.
While Mrs Stuart-Mackey died at the accident
scene, the Hyundai's other three occupants and the dri-
ver of the Ford Ranger truck, were taken to hospital
to be treated for their various injuries.


ing nationalities," according to
Dr Minnis' website.
At Friday's launch health min-
ister Dr Minnis read the story
"Hard-head Bird" from the book
"Once Below a Time", edited by
Bahamian Telcine Turner, to a
gathered group of Killarney chil-
dren.
The'night was called a "huge
success" by Dr Minnis' con-
stituency office assistant, Barbara
Donothan-Henderson.
Those interested in taking
part in the programme can
register online at:
www.killarneynews.com/lets.read.htm


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PAGE4, MONDAYJULY14TR208TETTTRISTTHEBUNE


TO READ UK newspapers today is as
depressing as reading the local press when it
comes to crime.
A 16-year-old London schoolboy as part of
his English GCSE course work wrote a letter to
British Prime Minister Gordon Brown recently
suggesting parenting classes, curfews and youth
clubs as possible solutions to Britain's teenage
violence.
He accused government of standing-by as
teenagers were being killed. He feared that vio-
lence was becoming a "part of our culture." He
wrote that "problems like this will continue to
grow unless change starts to happen. Society
needs to see a difference before it's too late," he
told the. prime minister.
His letter, written a few weeks earlier, was
found by his parents after he was knifed to
death in north London at the end of last month.
Three teenagers have been charged with his
murder.
Ben Kinsella expressed a fear for his own life
and wanted knife crimes stamped out before
he himself became a statistic.
"'It's heartbreaking," he wrote, that so many
young people were fighting. "Parents need to
consider bringing their children to parenting
classes to build a relationship or else lose them
for good," he wrote.
According to The Sunday Telegraph of Lon-
don in the first five months of this year 37 teens
have been killed in the UK 18 of them in
London. ....
A teenager murdered in a street ambush in
south London last week just day's after the
death of Ben Kinsella was reported to have
told his parents that a gang of teenagers wanted
to "get him." Police believe that the 16-year-old
boy might have made a pass at a girl who was
dating a gang member.
His death was brutal. Surrounded by masked
gang members with knives and baseball bats, he
was stabbed, kicked and beaten to death.
As he lay in critical condition, he begged for
his mother. He died in hospital the next day.
Britain has acknowledged a knife epidemic,
In the first six months of the year accident and
emergency departments in seven major cities
have dealt with 900 persons with knife injuries.
This is six per cent higher.than the same time
last year.
A consultant at City Hospital in Birmingham
told The Sunday Telegraph: "As far as I can
see it is related to drugs and gang culture. One
young boy of 17 had been stabbed 13 times in
the chest -and was brought in by his friends.
Half an hour later, an ambulance brought-in a
friend of his and he was saying 'when I get out
of here I will get them for you'."


Here in the Bahamas w ve had our share
of brutality. And as Ben said in his letter of
England: "Violence is becoming a part of our
culture."
There are young students among us today
who are afraid to go to school, to walk certain
streets for fear of trespassing on another gang's
turf.
We know of a young schoolboy who is so
afraid of his school where there have been
several violent incidents that his parents
have kept him at home. He now goes to work
with his father on his construction job and when
school reopens will be enrolled at Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI).
As soon as there is a disagreement, there is a
flash of blades and someone is "jooked" -
often the "jook", as Bahamians call it, is fatal.
Just this weekend in Freeport there were two
unusual cases one in which the stab victim
and his attacker both disappeared from the
scene, the other where the victim refused to
name his assailant. (See page 5).
In the first incident police were notified of a
stabbing outside a Freeport sports bar in the ear-
ly hours of Saturday morning. When they got
there they probably found only blood and a lot
of excited people giving their version of what
took place. But there was neither victim, nor
attacker.
Police were given certain information that
took them to bushes off East Sunrise Highway,
where they found a teenager who had been
stabbed several times.
Was he left there by his assailant to die -
knowing that dead men tell no tales who
then took off to escape the police?
However, the victim did not die. He was
rushed to hospital where he underwent surgery.
In the meantime police are looking for a man
who they say is "well known" to them.
Reporters have learned that when someone is
"well known" to police this is their way of say-
ing that that person has a criminal record -.- and
the better known they are to the police, the
longer the record.
Probably somebody else who should be
behind bars, but the courts have again let out on
bail.
We cannot let this way of life become a part
of our culture. Something has to be done.
There are many things that government can
do, but here in the Bahamas legislators should
consider at least one of them take the bail
discretion from the courts in certain serious
cases certainly in cases of violence.
--.. It's scandalous that a court would release
on bail a person charged not only with one mur-
der, but several.


Mr.


Collie's


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N,-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


EDITOR, The Tribune.
A Commission of Inquiry
Report was published in
December 1984.
From that time to date,
many Bahamians including
myself have been waiting for
answers from the then Minis-
ter of Foreign Affairs and
-Attorney General, as to why a
certain Minister of Agricul-
ture, Fisheries and Local Gov-
ernment did not resign or
apologise to the nation after
the commissioners assessment.
A quotation from paragraph
30 on page 146 states "We rec-
ommend that the Attorney
General review the evidence
relating to the minister to
determine what further action
may be appropriate in the cir-
cumstances." Unquote.
The Minister was made
Honourable for life, (a fla-
grant insult to the nation).
Maybe Mrs Hanna-Martin
was too young at the time to
realise the dire embarrassment
caused. I am certain that if she
were to read, mark and
inwardly digest the contents
as outlined in the reports from
all of The Commission of
Inquiries held in the Bahamas,
she would take a deep. breath,.
slow down and eventually cool
off.
Under the former adminis-
tration of which Mrs Hanna-
Martin was and still is a force,
the scandals are, as it is said in
obituaries about friends, "too
numerous to mention."
Embarrassment after embar-
rassment had become the
norm.
"Hello Bahamas!" Some of
those PLP Parliamentarians
should not only have resigned,
but they should have gone
into hibernation and stayed
there, but no, oh no! Some are
still in the parliament talking
nonsense, trying to look pret-
ty and smiling.
The MP for West End and
Bimini did not resign from the
Cabinet, nor did he apologise
for appearing to try to make
Bahamians believe that he was
responsible for obtaining an
extension from the USA for


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Americans travelling with or
without passports.
Did the Minister of Tourism
take responsibility when his
ministry misled the public by
posting inaccurate visitors
arrival figures?
Many times I wonder if
these people lost their memo-
ries from shock of loosing the
2007 election, or whether their
brains are mixed with sieve
wire.
Mr Collie has taken respon-
.sibility for-the errors and blun-
ders made, he has openly
apologised to the nation, and
he has resigned his Cabinet
post with humility.
I have yet to see anyone
from the other side be so gra-
cious.
The fact that the opposition
voted against a Bill which
would remedy the errors
made and also ensure that
there would be no similar inci-
dents, leaves a lot to be
desired; no wonder the 2007


elections were the most con-
fusing and mind-boggling ever
held in the history of the
Bahamas.
Members of Parliament
bear the title honourable,
therefore they are expected
to be God fearing and humble
with integrity, they should be
most productive and non-par-
tisan when necessary for the
good of the country.
They ought to be respectful
and sincere, they must per-
form vigorously to accomplish
the work they are being paid
to do and also maintain will-
power zealously.
It is regrettable that so
many Bahamians are oblivi-
ous and nonchalant in many
ways to what has happened or
what is happening in the coun-
try.
My consolation is that The
Master is watching over us
always.
Happy Independence
Bahamas.
PEGGY
PHILIP
Nassau,
July 5, 2008.


Ashamed .ofstate of gardens by House

of Assembly and in Rawson Square
EDITOR, The Tribune.
I AM totally ashamed as to the state of the gardens on Queen
Victoria side close to the House of Assembly and across in
Rawson Square.
Days before we celebrate our 35th anniversary and this real-
ly shows how we don't care less about our Bahamas.
Someone please do something.
Get a couple of private companies to donate some new land-
scaping now!
The Tribune should photograph the state of the so-called
planted flower and ornamental plants...... it is a total disgrace.
NO NAME
Nassau, -
July, 2008.

Changing definition of a mixed marriage

EDITOR, The Tribune.
IT seems the definition of a mixed marriage has changed.
In days gone by, either a black man marrying a white woman,
or a white man marrying a black woman, was considered a
mixed marriage.
With recent events, it would appear that the marriage of a man
to a woman must be considered mixed.

NORMAN A WHITLOCK
Nassau,
June 18, 2008.


humility set





an example





for all MPs


A new part of our culture?


DON STA:ITO
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008







MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


0 In brief

Motorist finds

loaded firearm

ABOUT 6.30pm on Thursday
Grand Bahama resident, driving
in the Queen's Cove area,
stopped to urinate in roadside
bushes when a shiny object on
the ground caught his attention.
On closer inspection, the object
turned out to be a chrome with
beige handle .32 snub-nose
revolver. It was loaded with seven
live .32 rounds of ammunition.
The motorist telephoned the
police, who arrived and collect-
ed the weapon.

Man stabbed

during dispute
A New Providence man is
detained in stable condition at
the Rand Memorial Hospital, suf-
fering from multiple stab wounds
about the body, which he
received during an altercation
with another man at a Freeport
night-spot.
Around 2.25 am on Saturday,
a woman telephoned the Duty
Officer at the Police Dispatch
Centre and reported that a man
had just been stabbed by another
man during a fight at. the
Caribbean Island Sports Bar in
the International Bazaar. It was
also reported that both men had
fled the scene following the inci-
dent. Uniformed and plain-
clothes officers responded and
after receiving additional infor-
mation, proceeded to East Sun-
rise Highway where they discov-
ered the stabbed victim, Marco
Mather, believed to be in his late
teens/early twenties, of Soldier
Road, New Providence. He was
lying on the ground in bushes
behind the bus-stop across from
Burger King Restaurant.
He had multiple stab wounds
to his torso and hands. He was
rushed to the hospital, where he
immediately underwent surgery.
A male, who is known to the
Police, is being sought in connec-
tion with this incident.

Man found with

stab wounds
At about 2.10 Sunday morn-
ing, the Police received informa-
tion that a man was lying on the
ground in the vicinity of the Kid-
ney/Dialysis Centre on West Mall
Drive, suffering from stab wounds
about his body.
Officers went to the location
where they found the victim,
Kevin Ferguson of Deadman's
Reef, with multiple stab wounds
to his head, face and abdomen.
He was conscious and alert,
but refused to give the officers
any information as to how he was
injured. He was taken to the
Trauma Section at the Rand
Memorial Hospital and under-
went surgery shortly after his
arrival. Medical Staff reported
that he is in stable condition,
although his injuries are said to be
serious.


ii'


LOA NEW


Fireworks display brings GB


Independence celebrations



to a spectacular climax
* By DENISE MAYCOCK ic. They wore the colours of the
Tribune Freeport Reporter flag and some persons carried
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net miniature flags and other wore
dmacoc~tduneedi~ne 0 A'Ranainiiauua qn ULU3ait.nian,,qcti


FREEPORT The 35th Inde-
pendence celebrations on Grand
Bahama climaxed with a spectac-
ular firework display at the Inde-
pendence Park at midnight on
July 10. Many persons turned
out for the event, which also fea-
tured a Time Line of Bahamian
Music Concert by prominent
Bahamian entertainers.
Emcee Charles Carter hosted
the concert, which featured per-
formances from the great Ron-
nie Butler who sang some of his
oldest and greatest hits. KB (Kirk
Bodie), and other local enter-
tainers also performed. However,
the most anticipated event of the
evening was the Inspection of the
Guard and the Police Tattoo.
For the first time, the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force Officers
marched with the Royal Bahamas
Police Force.
As the officers, dressed in full
Police and Defence Force uni-
form, emerged onto the field


from behind a Fort-like structure
there were screams of excitement
from the audience.
Inspecting the Guard was Min-
ister of Housing and National
Insurance Kenneth Russell,
accompanied by Assistant Police
Commissioner Eugene
Cartwright, and Defence Force
Lieutenant Commander Martin-
borough. After the ceremonial
inspection of the guard, the offi-
cers performed various drills,
including stunts using police vehi-
cles, motorcycles, fire engines,
and the K-9 unit. There was also
a 21-gun salute, which was then
followed by the flag-raising cere-
mony and playing of the national
anthem.
Bahamians were very patriot-


Armed men hold up NAPA Auto Parts
NAPA Auto Parts, Balliou Road and Coconut Grove Avenue, was
held-up by two armed men on Friday afternoon.
According to police, at around 3.40pm the two men entered the store
and ordered the customers to lie down on the ground.
The men then robbed the business of an undetermined amount of
.money. The bandits then made their escape in an unknown direction,
police report. One of the men was described as wearing jeans and a
black T-shirt. The other suspect was similarly dressed in jeans, a shirt
and wearing black sunglasses. The police investigation into the robbery
is continuing.

BUT president tight-lipped on whether

police will return to public schools


* By REUBEN SHEARER
BELINDA Wilson, president
of the Bahamas Union of Teach-
ers, declined to comment Friday
on whether police officers will be
returned to public schools for the
2008-2009 academic year.
Speaking with The Tribune,
Mrs Wilson said, "there's noth-
ing I could-say in regards to secu-
rity at the moment, and therefore
I won't be able to give a fair
assessment. School is closed, so
we're trying to do some internal
work to get organized in time for
its reopening in September."
While there is no definite
answer to whether police will
return to schools in New Provi-
dence, the Ministry of Education
in Freeport has hired new securi-
ty officers for schools in the area,
and are training them for the
upcoming school year.
The issue of whether or not
police should return to public
schools was a platform of and said
to be the defining moment of Mrs
Wilson's campaign in last mon-
th's election. She defeated incum-
bent Mrs Poitier-Turnquest to


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become president of the union.
The differing positions on the
issue between Mrs Wilson and
union president Ida Poitier-Turn-
quest became obvious at the
beginning of the school year in
September 2007 when there were
a series of high profile stabbings
at schools, including CI Gibson.
Mrs Wilson, after consultation
with teachers, publicly called for
the reinstatement of the police
on school campuses, along with
other security measures such as
metal detectors, security cameras
and extra security. Mrs Poitier-
Turnquest, weeks later confirmed.
that the policy of the union is not
to have the police in schools,
which is also the position of gov-
ernment.
Last month, Mrs Wilson said a
questionnaire on the subject
would be made available to mem-
bers of the union and by Septem-
ber, she hopes the executive of
the union will be able to "come to
the membership and say what the
position is definitely." Accord-
ing to her, the questionnaire is
still being prepared.
The policy of having police in
schools was in place from 2004
- a year before the current lead-
ership of the BUT came to power
- and the previous executive
team, which headed the union,
had agreed to this with the former
government.


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2bdf2,fbM Townhouse Units


BaailllUanll uttonsu an pins an t-.
* shirts. Although the event was
well attended, there was limited
seating and those attending were
squeezed along a small section at
the south perimeter of the field
where there was standing room
only. Despite this, many persons
seemed to have enjoyed the cele-
brations. "I come every year, and
I loved that the concert aspect
was added this year," said one
woman. "It was very entertain-
ing."


sto
clc~
L _____ AT __


Well done Sheniqua!

DESMOND Bannister, the new minister of youth, sports and cul-
ture, has publicly congratulated Sheniqua Ferguson (pictured) for
winning gold and bronze medals at the World Jr Championships.
"Ms Sheniqua Ferguson, at these championships, surpassed the
quality of medals our country was able to win in the World Junior
Championships' history, winning bronze in the 100m and returning
two days later to win the gold in the 200m," the minister said in a
press statement over the weekend.
"She has performed well and I am confident it will continue in the
4x100m relay. As minister of sports, and on the behalf of the proud
and grateful people of the Bahamas, I express sincerest congratu-
lations and wish her and the entire team best wishes," he added. Ms
Ferguson won her medals last week in the championships held in
Bydgoszcz, Poland.

Man 'chopped about the body'
A man has been chopped about the body, allegedly by a man in a
wheelchair. Dominic Missick, 30, told police that he was attacked and
chopped about the body at around 10.25pm on Friday in the area of
Cordeaux Avenue.
Mr Missick reported to police that he was chopped with a cutlass.
He was treated at the Princess Margaret Hospital and released.
A 25-year-old man is in custody assisting police with this investiga-
tion.


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M By Sir Ronald Sanders

IT HAS become patently
evident that the European
Union (EU) is taking the
Caribbean for a ride over the
Economic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA) initialled last
December.
The Caribbean has to stop the
ride and renegotiate the deeply
troubling aspects of the EPA
before any signing takes place.
There was a moment after the
initialling of the EPA by Carifo-
rum countries when I thought all
was lost, and I urged the estab-
lishment of a Caribbean wide task
force to study the agreement
carefully and to implement it in
the region's best interest. But,
recent events indicate that the
game is not over, and Cariforum
countries have an opportunity to


ity.
Her report is 'a devastating
indictment of the "tactics pres-
sure, paternalism and threats -
employed by the (European)
Commission to impose its point of
view and interests." Even some
of the supporters of the EPA
have admitted that Cariforum
countries had "a gun at their
heads." Cutting aid and increasing
taxes on exports through the
application of a GSP were the
ultimate threats that tipped the
balance.
The smaller Caribbean coun-
tries the members of the OECS
- should be especially mindful of
her criticisms of the EU over
scrapping most of the taxes they
levy on imports from Europe. She
argues that in countries that
depend on these revenues, their
"national institutions" could be
rendered "powerless."'
As for the "development"
component of the EPA, Taubira
says that the entire "basis for the
negotiations should be re-thought
so that there is a greater emphasis
on social and economic develop-
ment." Senior Caribbean econo-
mists have been arguing for
months that there are no legally
binding protocols in support of
the development of production
sectors. Consonant with the views
of persons, including me, who
have been involved in global
trade negotiations at the World
Trade Organisation (WTO), she
urges the removal from the EPA
agenda of the issues of "invest-
ment, competition policy and
public procurement." These are
issues that remain controversial
in the WTO and are not settled.
Yet, the EU imposed them on
Cariforum countries in the EPA.
Their implementation, outside of
a global framework in which spe-
cial consideration is given to
small, developing countries, will
be a disaster for local companies
and could lead to a re-colonisa-
tion of Caribbean economies.
Taubira also argues that the
EU should recognizee the right
of poor countries to feed them-
selves by allowing them to
exclude agricultural goods from
trade liberalisation."
Already, Caribbean farmers
are being put out of business by
the subsidies to farmers in the US
and EU some of whose products


country has the size and resources
of a medium size European com-
petitor.
There are 39,000 EU trans-
national companies; in Caricom
there are ten Pan-Caribbean firms
of any significance:
The idea that Europe will be
open under the EPA for
Caribbean business is misleading.
Open yes, but there are individual
national obstacles to getting
through the door, and once
through the door, there are fur-
ther impediments to doing busi-
ness even if companies could raise
the necessary funding to be com-
petitive.
The market access in services
granted by the EU in the EPA is
worthless not only by the certifi-
cation requirements but also
because the EU has no authority
to negotiate what is called Mode
4 visa approval; this is left exclu-
sively to individual EU states.
Therefore, no Caribbean coun-
try not even Barbados, Jamaica
and the Bahamas would benefit
from the EPA reference.
In the meantime, even small
European companies could wipe
out small Caribbean companies
in their own markets.
Cariforum countries have to
bear in mind that each of them
will be an individual signatory
with the EU to the EPA. In other
words, while the EPA negotia-
tions were conducted between a
joint Cariforum group of nego-
tiators and the European Com-
mission, the EPA, once signed, is
an agreement between the EU as
a group and each Caribbean
country individually. Any infrac-
tions of the EPA, after its signing,
will force each small Caribbean
country to take on the might of
the EU on its own. The EU
would roll over them like a jug-
gernaut.
The delay in the signing of the
EPA, occasioned by Guyana
President Bharat Jagdeo's reluc-
tance to do go until he has had
full stakeholder consultations,
presents a golden opportunity to
follow the advice given by Stiglitz
to Africa: "Ensure an agreement
that would favour local business-
merV4nd the country's economic
i...d velppment," ..... -
All Caribbean countries
should now stop the ride on
which the EU is taking them.
(The writer is a former
Caribbean Ambassador to the
World Trade Organisation).
Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com to:ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com


are, therefore, cheaper than the
produce of Caribbean farmers
who have to import high-cost
inputs for agriculture. The result
is less food production and less
food security in the area as a
whole.
The second recent develop-
ment of significance is a state-
ment made about the EPA in
Ghana this week by the Nobel
Economic laureate and former
World Bank top economist,
Joseph Stiglitz. Stiglitz urged cau-
tion and told the Ghanaian gov-
ernment to "take a cold hard
look" at the EPA and negotiate
away its inimical aspects.
He said: "EPAs do not give
sufficient opportunities for the
businesses in LDCs to develop
levels where they can compete
favourably with their counterparts
in the EU and that is critical to
the development of a country like
Ghana."
In talking about LDC's,
Stiglitz's reference was to coun-
tries that are less developed than
those of the EU which has a $12
trillion economy, 88 times larger
that all Cariforum states.
This is a particularly important
observation in the context of
those who have been arguing that
Caribbean companies somehow
have some competitive advantage
in Europe in the area of services.
Not even the largest Caribbean


Santander Bank & Trust Ltd.


Applications are invited from suitably qualified Bahamians for the following position:

WEALTH MANAGEMENT COUNSEL

* Minimum 3-5 years Call to The Bahamas Bar
* Minimum 3-5 years experience in the corporate services department or the Trust
Drafting Department of a reputable law firm or Trust Company
* Excellent communications skills
* Computer literate
* Fluency in Spanish desirable
* A TEP qualification is desirable
* Must be highly motivated and focused.

Salary and other benefits commensurate with qualifications and experience

Applications in writing with details of education and experience should be
addressed to the Director of Human Resources, Santander Bank & Trust Ltd., P. 0.
Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas or via fax to 502 7955 not later than July 25, 2008.

m I A



WE"VE GT YOU OVERED


i


PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008


Cyril Peet


THE TRIBUNE






MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNW


Just Rush Junkanoo Parade


attracts thousands of fans


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedianet
FREEPORT Thousands
of junkanoo fans attended the
second annual Just Rush
Junkanoo Parade held in
downtown Freeport on Satur-
day.
Four major groups the
Saxon Superstars, Valley
Boys, and Roots out of Nas-
sau, and the Swingers com-
peted in this year's parade
titled "The Bahamas' 35th
Independence."
Many persons travelled
from New Providence, Aba-
co, and Bimini for the parade,
which also provided a major
economic boost for Grand
Bahama.
The results of the parade
were not released up to press
time on Sunday.
Roots was the first group
out of the blocks. Their cos-
tumes depicted various things
indigenous to the Family
Islands, such as the Long
Island Billy Goat, Eleuthera
Pineapple, and Exuma Regat-
ta.
There were also costumes
of the Bahamian Blue Marlin
and Crab. And, the group's
choreographed dancers -
dressed as Bahama Mamas
with fruit baskets atop their
heads performed with syn-
chronized precision.
The Saxon's Superstars was
second and depicted elaborate
costumes of gold, yellow, and
red. Although the group did
not display a central theme
around Independence, many
persons enjoyed the music
segment and choreographed
segment.
Grand Bahama's only com-
peting group, the Swingers,
was third. Their banner, read
"Happy Birthday Bahamas."
The Valley Boys was fourth
and was one of the larger
groups on the parade route.
All of the groups made two
laps along the parade f6ute.
Despite the late start and gap
between groups, fans were
pleased with the overall
parade.
Parade organizer Peter
Adderley, president of Cre-
ative Works, said that com-
peting groups are required to
have a minimum of 150 mem-
bers to qualify for the $100,000
in cash prizes.
Mr Adderley said ticket
seating was made affordable
for families because of the
economic challenges on
Grand Bahama.
Bleacher seats were filled
to capacity along the parade
route on Explorer's Way.
"I realized that families
with children cannot afford
top dollar tickets, so that is
why I made provisions for $5
tickets, and I have extended
the standing room on the
parade route so that those
who cannot afford to buy tick-
ets can also view the parade,"
he explained.
Ministry of Tourism offi-
cials were pleased with the
parade.
Kerry Fountain, senior
tourism executive, hopes that
the parade venue can be relo-
cated to Port Lucaya to cater
to more visitors.


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First place -
Valleyboys,
1067 points
Second -
Saxons,
1037 points
Third -
Roots,
962 points
Fourth -
Swingers,
915 points


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2008 COMPETITION Coming August 15TH
'"IC""S^> *


By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

N an increasingly
promiscuous society,
where there are escalating
incidences of private and pub-
lic school children having
sex-in private dwellings or
on school campuses-its high-
time we consider making con-
doms obtainable at schools.
The reality is that teenagers
are sexually active, are daily
inundated by sexually explic-
it material via different medi-
urns and that abstinence is
hardly practised despite the
various programmes/group-
i ings touting self-restraint.
; : The availability of condoms
: decreases the likelihood of
sexually active teenagers hav-
ing unprotected sex and
a. e undoubtedly is a pragmatic
approach to fighting the dis-
persion of sexually transmit-
Sted diseases (STDs)', particu
ts larly since teenagers-with
: raging hormones- rarely
exert self-control or delay sex-
ual relations until they are
more mature and/or married.
What are the current sta-
tistics on how many teenagers
have become pregnant or
have contracted STDs/AIDS?
In Bahamian schools, con-
doms should be made avail-
able as part of a comprehen-
sive sex education programme
that seeks to decrease the
probability of sexually trans-
mitted diseases and averting
inadvertent pregnancies, while
also encompassing coun-
selling, education, contracep-
tion and abstinence-only fea-
tures.
In European countries such
as the Netherlands, teenagers
are provided with the edifica-
tion and material means while
being trained, since elemen-
tary school, about sexual rela-
tions in far-reaching sex edu-
cation programmes. This is
unheard of in the Bahamas,
where sex and even safer-sex
erudition remains taboo.
According to Dr Susan
I Blake, a member of the
- Department of Prevention
and Community Health at
George Washington Univer-
sity's School of Public Health
and Health Services in Wash-
ington, D.C. "there is a con-
tinuing need for effective
HIV, STD and pregnancy
prevention programmes that
discourage the early onset of


YOUNG MAN'S VIEW

ADR IAN G IB SON



"Today, the Bahamas has
been negatively impacted by
the scourge of the HIV/AIDS
viruses and other STDs
through unprotected sex, with
a growing number 6f
teenagers being among the
infected."


sexual activity and encourage
protection among adolescents
who are already sexually
active." The Bahamas should
take note!
According to the Ameri-
can Civil Liberties Union
(ACLU):
"Eighty-five per cent of
male teenagers and 76 per
cent of female teenagers in
the United States have had
sexual intercourse by the age
of 19. The percentage of sex-
ually active students increases
dramatically with each year
of age from 22 per cent for
females and 27 per cent for
males at age 15 to 51 per cent
for females and 59 per cent
for males at age 17." Unques-
tionably, based upon what
I've been told, the statistics
are similar or perhaps even
higher among Bahamian
teenagers.
According to the
Guttmacher Institute, leading
think tank on sexual and
reproductive health issues, a
complete sex education pro-
gramme should engage both
the school and the surround-
ing community, with condom
availability not being the focal
point of such a programme.
Recalling a campaign in a
rural South Carolina commu-
nity where condoms were
available through the school's
nurse, the institute's approach
then proposes that such a pro-
.gramme can only become
reality when teachers, com-
munity leaders and peer coun-
selors are trained in sexuality


education; when some form
of sex education is incorpo-
rated throughout a child's
schooling; when the media,
community groups and even
churches address these issues
and staunchly discourage
unplanned pregnancies and,
when school nurses or guid-
ance counselors inform stu-
dents on family planning
while also providing condoms.
If condoms were made
available to students,
schools with the highest rates
of reported sexual activity and
STDs in the student popula-
tion, pregnancies and
dropouts should firstly be tar-
geted for strong sex education
programmes. However, to
take a broader approach, all
high schools-inclusive of
junior high schools, but prin-
cipally the senior schools-
where students range in age
from 15-21 and are actively
engaging in sex long before
the legitimate age of consent
-should have sex education-
programmes where condoms
are accessible. Studies in the
US show that roughly half of
all adolescents in grade nine
to 12 have had sex, leaving no
doubt that in our impression-
ist culture the figures may be
similar or even more, espe-
cially since sex education does
not take precedence.
In the US, prestigious med-
ical associations such as the
SEE page 9


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008








THETRBUN IIUNIA, ULYOCALUO NEWSZ


PROBABILITY OF STDS IS NEEDED





at our schools



FROM page 8

American College of Obste- "Amids reports of sex on
tricians and Gynecologists, the
American School Health school campuses, I recently
Association and the National s a a video m aking the
Medical Association have all saw a video making the
endorsed making condoms rounds on the internet of
available at schools as a part
of comprehensive school what appears to be tWO
health programmes.
Today, the Bahamas has Bahamian students being
been negatively impacted filmed by another in a raunchy
the scourge of the HIV/AIDS
-viruses and other STDs c
though unprotected sex, with sex session.
a growing number of
teenagers being among the
infected. Even more, the saw a video-making the
country is suffering from une- ed, reckless choices and ately, I was disap- rounds on the internet-ol
educated reckless choices and pointed to learn that what appears to be two
the lack of sex education a 15-year-old, ninth grade stu- Bahamian students being
steadily rising instances of dent of mine, who had just filmed by another in a
teenage and pre-teen preg- completed junior high in June raunchy sex session. Shortly
nancy.ge and pre-teen preg- with failing grades, was with after, I was told of high school
These days, the Princess child. Recent news reports students who cannot afford
Margaret Hospital is cess have revealed a plot by sever- condoms or are to embar-
Margawith children Hospitalaving teeming al American girls who all rassed to ask store clerks foi
with children having children; made an idiotic pact to them and consequently resort
misguided, unwanted young- become pregnant by the end to using unconventional con-
stebourhoods; areterrrizngourneigh- of the year, recklessly desir- traceptives such as plastic bags
is bourhoods; the poverty levelmuming to be unemployed teenage or saran wrap, or as they say.
wage workers are hustling and mothers rather than being going "bareback" (unprotect-
"scrapping" to provide for concerned with education, a ed). School condom pro-
unplanned, illegitimate chil- career, marriage or a stable grammes would improve stu-
dren; there is a strain on the home. The same can be said. dents' acquisition of condoms
educational system as schools of some pregnant local and lessen the discomfiture
are overcrowded by some teenagers who become preg- faced when requesting con-
misbehaving miscreants and nant because of a lack of sex doms from behind counters
violent crime is surging due, education and in hopes of sal- at pharmacies, food stores and
violent crime is surging due, in aging relationships, but gas stations.
large part, to a failure to aging relationships, but gas stations.
implement a comprehensive instead become baby facto- In developing a compre-
sex educationmprogramme ries with two to five children hensive sex education pro-
sex education programme bo t a 25 r gramme with a condom avail-
which could curb the numbers before they are 25, receive a gramme with a condom avail-
ofwhich unwanted offspring and court ordered $20 per week ability aspect, schools seek the
thereby reduce much of the child support cheque and have blanket consent of parents so
societal pestilenduce much of thea stable of bastard children as to cover all health services
societal pestilence are now who all have different sur- (including condom issuance).
sizeable percentage of grand- names/daddies. This is a stark with hopes that such an
mothers cein their 30s who are contrast to Europeans, most approach would prevent a
raising unruly children/grand- of whom decide to wait until school being sued and/or the
children who arelikelyto their late 20s or early 30s to impression of an encroach-
le bear children.
repeat this crazed, vicious bearist ren.ports of .sex on
cycle. Amit reports of sex on SEE page 15
h-1-inf Cimns1y%-3 T tecInt l


Ia. .


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IS

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I-
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I-
et


I--m ,- I ------- I *r I I ------------------------------


I


THE TRIBUNE


IVILINUAY, JULY Iq-, -uuo, rmU-.i a


sc oo campuses, r y


J k







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008


LOALNE


KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED
22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

Mr. John Herbert Bethell, 91

Mr. John Herbert Bethell, 91


of Skyline Drive,
Nassau, The
Bahamas, who died
at home on 5th July,
2008 will be held at
the graveside, The
Western Cemetery,
Nassau Street,
Nassau on Tuesday,
15th July, 2008 at
6:00 p.m.
Rev. Charles A.
Sweeting will
officiate.


Mr. Bethell was pre-
deceased by his first wife, Hilda; his second wife,
Deidre and a daughter, Pete.
He is survived by his children, Johnny and Beth
Bethell, Sandy and Adrian Towning, Debby and
Donny Tomlinson and David and Janice Weir; his
grandchildren, John Harold and Aaron Bethell, Jeremy
and Bianca Towning and Geoffrey, Christopher and
Ashley Tomlinson; a grand daughter-in-law, Michelle
and 4 great grand daughter, Stella Margaret.
The family would like to thank the many care givers
who gave such wonderful love and attention to Dad,
including Pat Knowles, Beverly LaRoda, Jennifer
Murray, Louise Newbold, Yasmine Rolle, Cheryl
Wells and also Elsa Barret and Yasmine Sweeting.
The family request that in lieu of flowers donations
may be made to The Salvation Army, P.O.Box N.205,
Nassau in memory of Mr. John H. Bethell.

-Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited,
22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.




Rut2rs JI1untral Mrna

& Qrnmattoriuntm
Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas
FuealSricei


WSC support

for regatta's

Class 'A' race
THE Water & Sewer-
age Corporation is help-
ing to keep the tradition
of regatta a)ive and well
in the Bahamas with its
support of the All Andros
& Berry Islands Regatta.
This year the Corpora-
tion sponsored the Class
'A' Race.
Pictured above at
cheque presentation
(from left) Godfrey E.
Sherman, General Man-
ager, WSC; Alphonso
Smith, Regatta Com-
modore; and Robert Deal
Jr., AGM Family Island
& Marine Operations,
WSC.


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you've already been pre-
approved by your lender, and
your offer has been accepted.
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purchase, like almost everyone
does, you'll actually be paying
more than the final sales price of
the home.
Many buyers don't stop to
think about how much they'll
really be paying for their home
.by the time they've reached the final payment.
It's worth considering, and it makes it evident
ihat you should shop around and get the best
loan terms possible.
Be sure to discuss your options with your
trusted BREA real estate agent, who can pro-
vide mortgage information, illustrate different
financing options, and even recommend lenders
suited to your needs.


ft \\ith man options a ilable, it's
helpful to bcgin with the basic facts to
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Determine ho% much is aalilable
for a down payment.
If you're putting up a low down pay-
ment, you'll need mortgage indemnity insur-
ance.
This will add to the overall cost of your loan,
at least until you've paid off a significant per-
centage.
Again, discuss your loan options with your
BREA agent before you make any offers, in
order to avoid unpleasant delays and unex-
pected expenses.


TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF
LANDSCAPING SERVICES
(Administration Building)
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders from eligible bidders for
the provision of Landscaping Services
(Administration Building) at the
Corporation's main offices at Blue Hill
and Tucker Roads.
Bidders are required to collect packages
from the Corporation's Administration
Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by con-
tacting Mrs. Delmeta Seymour,
Telephone No. 302-1158.
Tenders are to be delivered on or before
July 18th, 2008, 4:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads"
Nassau, Bahamas
Marked: Tender No. 671/08
Landscaping Services (Administration
Building) Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
The Corporation reserves the right to
accept or reject the whole or such part
of any Tender the Corporation
deems necessary.


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Mr. Urban Sinclair
"Frenchie" Miller Jr., 56


of Lincoln Blvd. and
Cordeaux Avenue will be
held on Tuesday, July
15th, 2008 at 11:00 a.m.
at Church of God
Auditorium, Joe
Farrington Road.
Officiating will be Elder
Jonathan S. Meyer
Assisted by Bro. Craig
Allen and Bro. Enoch
Woodside. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn


Gardens, Soldier Road.


Left to cherish his memories are his Wife: Anita
Miller; Adopted-son: Carlton Sands and his Wife
Nikita Sands; Two (2) Grandchildren: Robert and
Sankanah; Two (2) Brothers: Drexwill Miller and
Edwin Smith; Three (3) Sisters: Joycelyn Varence,
Delores Ingraham and Nicole Campbell; Mother-
in-law: Alecia Hall-Dean; Five (5) Brothers-in-
law: Winston Varence, Rt. Hon. Hubert Ingraham,
Peter Campbell, Oswald and Wellington Dean; Four
(4) Sisters-in-law: Ernestine and Rita Miller, Ann
and Veronica Dean; Five (5) Aunts: Vernita Major,
Dorothy Hamilton, Whitlean Forbes, Dorcus Cox,
Willimae Greene and Spouses; Two (2) Uncles:
David Major and Frank Miller; Fourteen (14)
Nieces: Denise, Tanya, Michelle, Keisha, Kelli,
Keva, Kara, Krysti, Krystina, AnaYah, Daniah, Lisa,
Danielle and Ocala; Seven (7) Nephews: Kristaan,
Drexwill Jr., Keith, Alex, Andre, Antone and Raleigh
and a host of other relatives and friends including:
The Miller and Dean families, The Assemblies of
Yahweh family, The National Insurance Board
family, The Lincoln Boulevard family and others
too numerous to mention.
Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers'
Funeral Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York
Streets on Monday from 12noon until 5:00 p.m.
There will be no viewing at the Church.


*""
S, -iXWl







THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008, PAGE 11


New Ambassador to the People's Republic of China


AMBASSADOR TO the People's Republic of China Elma Campbell was presented with letters of appoint-
ment by Governor General Arthur Hanna during a ceremony at Government House on Friday, July 11,
2008. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and Attorney General Michael Barnett attended the ceremony.
Ambassador Campbell leaves the country on Saturday to take up her post.



'Very Light Jet' service between


South Florida and Nassau


NORTH American Jet Charter Group, LLC
has announced the availability of its Very Light
Jet (VLJ) service between airports in South
Florida and Nassau.
In a press statement on Friday, the compa-
ny said it will use its new Eclipse 500 Very
Light Jet, to fly on-demand charters from Boca
Raton, Palm Beach, Fort Lauderdale and Opa
Locka to Nassau.
The ultra-modern jet carries three passen-
gers in its BMW-appointed leather interior.
Flights take approximately 45 minutes.
"We're experiencing a lot of demand for
service to the Bahamas," said Ken Ross, the
company's CEO and President. "The Eclipse is
the perfect aircraft for a quick flight to the
islands or anywhere within 500 miles."
Jay Carney, a Fort Lauderdale business con-
sultant and avid angler, agrees. "Until now,
getting to the islands for a day was too much of


a hassle. I'd spend more time at the airport
than on the water. Now with these Eclipse
flights, we can spend the whole day fishing and
still be home for dinner. "
North American Jet Charter Group operates
six Eclipse 500 aircraft and is expanding its
fleet to accommodate the increasing number of
Eclipses being delivered throughout the Unit-
ed-States.
"Our expertise in managing and operating
the Eclipse enables us to put aircraft on our
Part 135 certificate in less than a week. We're
actively seeking additional aircraft to base in
Florida and other parts of the country," said Mr
Ross.
In June 2007, the company operated the
world's first passenger revenue flight on a VLJ.
Since then, North American Jet has expanded
its VLJ fleet to six, with five Eclipses based at
Chicago Executive Airport.


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MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


a







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008


LOA'NW


FROM page one

for back-up and pursued the car as it speed
off. The car was intercepted not far from
where officers first saw the man and police
report that upon stopping the car, a man
emerged from the vehicle and began shoot-
ing with a handgun in the direction of the
officers.
Police returned fire, and in the exchange,
a man was shot in the stomach. On taking
the suspect into custody, police recovered a
.40 hand gun with nine live rounds. A fur-
ther 10 rounds were later recovered with
more than $4.000 of cash, police report.
Two men from Pinewood Gardens are in
police custody in relation to the incident,
with one being taken to the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital for treatment for the gun-
shot wound. The officers involved in the


Separate shootings in armed

robbery attempt, police shoot-out
shoot-out were not injured.
Just before this incident occurred, at
around 12.13am, Edgar Moss, 47, told police
that he was held up by two armed men on
Second Street and Palm Avenue as he
arrived home. The men ordered him to get
out of the car he was in. Mr Moss got out
the car and ran in an attempt to escape the
men.
As he tried to flee, a shot was fired and
Mr Moss was hit in the hip.
He reported to police that the men then
escaped in a gold Honda Accord.
Mr Moss was taken to the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital for treatment for an injury,
which is not life threatening.


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FROM page one

While Mr Pinder did not
name the three specifically as
those persons who were being
supported financially by the
Opposition party, the group
claims he was directing his com-
ments at them.
Mr Pinder's allegation came
after they claimed just over a
week ago that they believe sig-
nificant numbers of the BPSU's
membership are "disgruntled"
with Mr Pinder's leadership and
are ready for a change.
And they also said that many
members are worried about Mr
Pinder's political impartiality
when it comes to doing union
business.
It was on the following Tues-
day that Mr Pinder declared his
confidence that his record would
enable him to secure a third term
- despite "hearing that the
opposition is helping to finance
some (of his opponents') cam-
paign(s)."
Yesterday, Mr Stubbs, Mr
Smith and Mr Ferguson denied
that they are "aligned with any
political party" or are "card car-
rying members of any such
grouping."


BPSU
"Our candidacy for the union
is.based solely upon service of
our members, where we seek to
eliminate the pungent baggage
of political puckering that cur-
rent President John Pinder
appears to be dragging around,"
they said.
The team added that the fact
that "observers view this in the
context of the larger political
arena and a movement against
government" is of "no interest to
them."
This was a reference to a pre-'
vious suggestion that the pos-
tures of recently defeated
Bahamas Union of Teachers
president Ida Poitier-Turnquest
and Mr Pinder are seen in polit-
ical circles as reflecting those of
the FNM.
Rather than any political
undertones "at issue here is the
proper management of union
members' business and properly
addressing any grievances they
niay experience at the hands of
any office of any government,"
said the three unionists.
Turning the tables on Mr Pin-
der, the three claim that Mr Pin-
der revealed his political prefer-


ence when he allegedly hinted
at running against Fred Mitchell
in Fox Hill in the last general
election.
The candidates called on the
current president "to then leave
the members' business to per-
sons who are transformative and
capable of properly managing
the affairs of the members."
They have criticized his han-
dling of the industrial agreement
negotiated and signed shortly
before he won his second term in
office, and claim that there needs
to be greater consultation with
members in all areas affecting
them.
Also understood to be chal-
lenging Mr Pinder's presidency
are former Vice President God-
frey Burnside, Kenneth Christie
and Alexander Burrows.
According to the BPSU's
website, the union is the coun-
try's second largest, represent-
ing 5,000 members employed
throughout government min-
istries, boards and corporations.
The exact number of mem-
bers has been disputed, however,
by Mr Pinder's opponents who
suggest that many have left over
a perceived lack of representa-
tion combined with increased
membership dues.


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008, PAGE 13


LOCAL NEWS


FROM page one

edy that deficiency by privatising our
state-owned Bahamas Telecommuni-
cations Company (BTC) in short order.
Full liberalisation of the Bahamian
telecommunications market space is
expected to follow," said Mr Ingraham
yesterday evening at the opening cer-
emony of the conference at Atlantis.
"For us, the goals of privatization
and liberalisation are those already
being achieved elsewhere: Expanded
consumer options, improved customer
services, lower costs, increased employ-


PM stresses intention to privatise BTC


ment opportunities and economic
growth," he added.
CANTO was founded in ] 985 and it
is a non-profit association of telephone
operating companies in the Caribbean.
Its creation marked the first time that
Caribbean operating companies had
come together to address a wide array
of telecommunication issues of mutual
concern.
As of 2007, the organisation had 92
members from 34 countries up from


the nine member countries it began
with in 1985.
Mr Ingraham has previously
declared that BTC will be privatised by
the end of the year. More recently, the
government has also indicated that it is
willing to sell more than the 49 per
cent stake in the company, which was
what was initially offered.
The proceeds of the sale of BTC,
the prime minister said in a recent com-
munication in the House of Assembly,


BNT set for


meeting to discuss


the environmental


impact of Bimini


Bay Resort


FROM page one

Bahamas' more sensitive and
fertile natural resources, by
Bimini residents, visitors, sci-
entists and both local and inter-
national environmental organi-
sations.
On Friday, newly-appointed
minister of the environment Dr
Earl Deveaux said government
would be guided by the BNT's
recommendations on Bimini
Bay.
He said as far as he is aware
they should be in possession of
plans and approvals relating to
the resort, and would be in a
position to check what is hap-
pening on the ground against
what was initially allowed.
"If somebody has taken off
from the benchmarks estab-
lished by the approval and they
become aware of that then its
(the BNT's) duty to raise
(awareness about it)," he said of
the resort.
"The BNT is unconditionally
free to review and evaluate
what is going on in Bimini."
According to the minister, he
wants BNT members to have
free rein to investigate their
concerns as they relate to any
part of the Bahamas' environ-
ment, and to marshall resources
needed to mitigate those ele-
ments that may be found to be
having a-negative impact.
Dr Deveaux encouraged
those who are in closer contact
with the development to con-
tinue to keep government
informed of any issues that
might arise with respect to the
environment there.
"The Biminis are important
nursery grounds for all manner
of fish and it's a community
that's far from Nassau-based
authorities. For those who have
concerns about damage that is
current we want to know and
we want to address (it) and for
those who are concerned about


density and potential impact in
the absence of monitoring we
ask with as much pleading as
we can summon that they keep
us abreast (of what is occur-
ring)," he said.
Asked, however, if govern-
ment was prepared in any way
to halt the development of
Phase II of the project as
called for by environmentalists,
including the descendants of
legendary conservationist and
ocean explorer Jacques
Cousteau earlier this year Dr
Deveaux was circumspect.
He said that he had not yet
personally received a request
for consideration of such a step,
adding: "I frankly don't know
the answer to that question, and
that's a matter which we will
review with BEST, BNT and
(the Department of) Physical
Planning but I don't want to
unnecessarily alarm the devel-
oper or encourage the detrac-
tors."
Jean-Michel Cousteau pro-
posed in an internationally-pub-
lished article in May's "Diver"
magazine that "if Bimini is to
be saved" Phase II of the Capo
Group's plans which
involves a luxury Conrad hotel
- "must be stopped." He said
that the resort is a "catastro-
phe" for Bimini that has left a
"devastating scar."
His comments were followed
shortly by the presentation of
a petition to government by a
group of Bimini residents, led
by local councillor Ashley Saun-
ders, which supported the resort
and its affect on Bimini's econ-
omy and calling for an end to
attacks on the development.
Of the environmentalist's sug-
gestion that future development
should be scaled back, Dr
Deveaux said: "If Mr Cousteau
finds compelling reasons to sug-
gest that something like that
should be reviewed and he puts
it to the government, certainly
we'd look at it."


FAMILY ISLAND LISTINGS


;E i D] Nl &fO.'MMIR'AI l -


1. HAWKSBILL SUBDIVISION,
FREEPORT
LOT NO. 152
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Family Residence
PROPERTY SIZE: 0.12 acres
LOCATION: Northwestern side of
intersection of Inagua Drive & Court #3
APPRAISED VALUE: $82,250
2. BAHAMA BEACH, GRAND BAHAMA


LOT NO. 264
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Family Residence, 4 beds / 3 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 0.16 Acres
LOCATION: Western side of Rocky
Point Road
APPRAISED VALUE: $211,536


I@


3. HAWKSBILL SUBDIVISION PHASE 1.
FREEPORT
LOT NO. 57
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Family Residence
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,487 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Abaco Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $89,000
4. ROYAL BAHAMIAN ESTATES,
FREEPORT
LOT NO. 5 Block 17
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Storey Residence, 3 Bed / 2 Bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 15,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: North along Dominica
Avenue and east of Beach Way Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $250,000

5. QUEENS COVE, FREEPORT
LOT NO. 5 Block 25
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Family Residence
PROPERTY SIZE: 0.22 acres
LOCATION: Along Victoria Lane south
of Whitehall Place
APPRAISED VALUE: $170,000'
6. CIVIL INDUSTRIAL AREA, FREEPORT

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Split Level,
Commercial Building
PROPERTY SIZE: 17,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Fronting Walton Street and
east of Wimpole Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $625,000


7. BAHAMIA WEST REPLAT
SUBDIVISION, FREEPORT
LOT NO. 5 Block 17
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Family Residence, 4 beds / 3 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 0.28 acres
LOCATION: Northern side of a
cul-de-sac called Churchill Court
APPRAISED VALUE: $307,420
8. BAHAMIA NORTH SUBDIVISION,
FREEPORT
LOT NO. "Fairway Manor"
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Condominium Apartment #304,
1 bed / 1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 650 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Opposite the Golf Course
APPRAISED VALUE: $65,000

9. HAWKSBILL SUBDIVISION,
FREEPORT
LOT NO. 124
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Family Residence, 1 bed / 1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,400 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Abaco Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $70,000

10. REGENCY PARK SUBDIVISION,
FREEPORT
LOT NO. 60 Unit 2 / Section III
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Storey Residence, 3 bed / 2 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 11,340 sq. ft.
LOCATION: 265 yards west of the
intersection of West Regency Drive and
Brighton Drive.
APPRAISED VALUE: $132,300

11. BAHAMIA WEST REPLAT
SUBDIVISION. FREEPORT
LOT NO. 22 Block 16
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Family Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 16,300 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On Ivemrness Lane
APPRAISED VALUE: $259,000
12. HERITAGE SUBDIVISION, PHASE I,.
FREEPORT
LOT NO. 27 Block 8
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Storey Residence, 3 bed / 2 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 0.19 Acres
LOCATION: Southern Side of
Independence Avenue.
APPRAISED VALUE: $118,440


13. YOEMAN WOODjFREEPORi3
LOT NO. 6 Block 58 Unit 2
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Family Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 0.27 acres '
LOCATION: The property lies along the
end of a short unnamed and unpaved
cul-de-sac which connects to Birnam
Place which connects to Spinney Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $122,000

14. BAHAMIA WEST REPLAT, FREEPORT
LOT NO. 1 Block 7
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Family Residence 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 12,100 sq. ft. or 0.28
acres
LOCATION: The property is located on
the Southwest corner of Yorkshire Drive
and West Sunrise Highway.
APPRAISED VALUE: $250,000
15. ROYAL BAHAMIAN ESTATES,
FREEPORT
LOT NO. 9 & 10 Block 14 Sect. "B"
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Family Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 32,000 sq. ft. or 0.74
acres
LOCATION: The property is located
on the Northeastern corner of Australia
Road and Samoa Drive.
APPRAISED VALUE: $260,000
16. BAHAMIA SECTION X111
LOT NO. 1 Block 36
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Family Residence, 3 beds / 2-1/2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 0.26 acres
LOCATION: The property is located
along the northern side of a cul-de-sac
on the neighborhood collector street
called Yorkshire Drive.
APPRAISED VALUE: $256,500


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1. WINDSOR PARK SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 29 Block 10
PROPERTY SIZE: 0/.37 acres, Single
Family Lot
LOCATION: Southern Side of Dartmoor
Way
APPRAISED VALUE: $33,000

2. BAHAMIA SOUTH, SECTION VII,
SUBDIVISION. FREEPORT
LOT NO. 5 Block 9
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family
Residential, 1.03 acres
LOCATION: Southern side of Pinta
Avenue and Santa Mari Avenue.
APPRAISED VALUE: $75,000
Di nFRBV SUBDIVISIN_ FREPnOcRT


LOT NO. 9 Block 17 Unit 3
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot,
0.30 acres
LOCATION: Queens Highway &
Dagenham Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $33,000


I@


1 4. DERBY SUBDIVISION, FREEPORT
LOT NO. 19 Block 1 Unit 3
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot,
0.30 acres
LOCATION: Northern side at the end of
a cul-de-sac called Hadstock Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $60,000


5. BAHAMIA WEST RELATE
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 28 Block 19
PROPERTY SIZE: 0.25 acres
LOCATION: Northern side of
Columbus Way
APPRAISED VALUE: $26,000


6. VOYAGER BAY SUBDIVISION,
FREEPORT'
LOT NO. 1 Block 25
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family,
21,009 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Fronts along the curve of
Bradfield Lane.
APPRAISED VALUE: $57,000
7. LINCOLN GREEN SUBDIVISION,
FREEPORT
LOT NO. 26 Block 1 Unit 1
PROPERTY SIZE: Duplex Lot,
13,800 sq. ft.
LOCATION: South Side of Ludford
Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $38,000
8. LINCOLN GREEN SUBDIVISION,
FREEPORT
LOT NO. 46 Block 16 Unit 5
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot,
0.26 acre
LOCATION: Southern side of Moor
Close east of intersection of Moor drive
& Moor Close.
APPRAISED VALUE: $31,000
9. LINCOLN GREEN SUBDIVISION,
.FREEPORT
LOT NO. 1 Block 12 Unit 12
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family Lot,
21,108 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Intersection of the paved
roads known as Langton Avenue and
Fulston Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $43,000

10. HOLMES ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA
LOT NO. Tract of Land
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family lot,
0.20 acres
LOCATION: Southern side of Queens
Highway /eastern side of PC Plaza
APPRAISED VALUE: $20,000


11. ROYAL BAHAMIAN ESTATES,
FREEPORT
LOT NO. 15 Block 18
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family lot,
0.43 acres
LOCATION: In the interior of the
subdivision along Dominica Avenue
which connects to Coral Ruad and
opposite the Southern end of Australia
Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $25,000

12. REGENCY PARK FREEPORT
LOT NO. 9 Unit 2
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family '"t;
10,764 sq. ft.
LOCATION: West Regency Drive.
APPRAISED VALUE: $25,000
13. BAHAMA PALM SHORES, ABACO
LOT NO. 11 & 12 Block 27
PROPERTY SIZE: 20,000 sq. ft., Single
/ Multi-Family lot
LOCATION: Southeast of Ocean View
Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $52,000


INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS (INCLUDE TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS)
TO: THE A.V.P. MORTGAGE & COMMERCIAL LENDING, P. O. BOX-SS-6263, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
VIA EMAIL: CHERRY.MISSICK@COMBANKLTD.COM OR IN FREEPORT
TO: CHRISTOPHER.KNOWLES@COMBANKLTD.COM
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.
02000 Clt.aiv lttontjt


r')r'Clrr!!KI"Al 0 ^^RARArM^IAI


m


3. UhKUTZS UIjUlj Iv,Ii 1 rn.rrvn


i


will in part go towards the construc-
tion of a new hospital and judicial com-
plex.
Citing a recent study at a United
Nations and World Trade Organisa-
tion Conference, the prime minister
noted that countries with fully liber-
alised telecoms sectors grow, on aver-
age, up to one per cent per annum
faster than countries with restrictive
telecoms sectors.
"Brazil's liberalisation reduced
mobile service costs by 20 per cent,
increasing the number of cell phone
users from 15 million to 66 million in
just eight years. And the liberalisation


of the Jordanian telecoms sector led
to a 42 per cent increase in
sector employment," observed Mr
Ingraham.
Referring to the wider significance
of the twin policies of privatization and
liberalisation in the Bahamas and
region, Mr Ingraham emphasized that
these processes, must be used to "con-
tribute toward the realisation of our
national and regional development
goals, facilitating sustained economic
growth and supporting improved stan-
dards of living for our people."
The conference will run until July
16th.


VACANT LOTS


j







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008


Petition calling for




renegotiation of EPA


^^ BACU5 HFIRST If we're serious about building a national litera-
ture, and we should be. it's time to discuss the
SoLi t tear ry followingoisnaes
-^ ^^ Hov'. imp.r;ir!nt are the I.iler ir, rtnt. I:r naional


development '
* What should be he role -.I t.hL vwriier ,in
society?
* What is the state of writing in The Bahamas
today?
* What level of support is there for Bahamian
writing and publications and how can we gen-
erate more? What are the obstacles?
* What standards' should we be setting for our-
selves in the Literary arts? What forms of rec-
ognition for excellence should we develop?
DON'T MISS IT.


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FROM page one

of renegotiation at that time.
It also asks that specific
"legally-binding provisions" be
included for financial and tech-
nical assistance from the Euro-
pean Commission for develop-
ing Caribbean industries and
services and that "legally bind-
ing criteria designed to mea-
sure the socio-economic
impacts of the EPA on key
segments of Caribbean soci-
eties women, youth, chil-
dren, farmers, workers and
fisher-folk" are also a
part.
The petition reflects con-
cerns voiced within the
Caribbean community over the
last few months in particular
over the extent to which open-
ing up of trade between the
Caribbean and Europe under
the EPA may be to the detri-
ment of the region's develop-
ing economies.
As of yesterday, some of the
more recognisable names
added to the petition are that
of former Caribbean diplomat
and business executive, Sir
Ronald Sanders see his col-
umn, published on page 6 of
today's Tribune accusing
the EU of "taking the
Caribbean for a ride" with the
EPA as well as University
of the West Indies Professor
Norman Girvan and Bahami-
an attorneys Paul Moss and
Fayne Thompson.
Also adding his name to the


list is EPA critic Havelock
Brewster, Alternate Executive
Director for the Caribbean at
the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank and former consul-
tant to the Caribbean Region-
al Negotiating Machinery
(CRNM), the group that large-
ly brokered the EPA deal
with the EU on the region's
behalf.
The petition was created by
the Barbados-based Caribbean
Policy Development Centre
(CPDC), which describes itself
as a coalition of Caribbean
non-governmental organisa-
tions established in 1991 to
"sensitise NGOs and the gen-
eral public on key policy issues
and to impact policy makers
on decisions which put the
interests of Caribbean people
at the centre of the Caribbean
development strategy."
The Bahamas is expected to
sign onto the EPA with the
rest of the CARIFORUM
countries, which includes all
CARICOM countries in addi-
tion to the Dominican
Republic, sometime around
the end of .this month, or in
August.
The sign-on date, until the
end of the Caricom Heads of
Government meeting in
Antigua and Barbuda two
weeks ago, had been set for
July 23 after already having
been delayed twice.
The latest delay in signing
the deal has been attributed to
concerns raised about the EPA
by Guyanese President Bhar-


rat Jagdeo, who has said that
he would like to engage his
country in a "full national pub-
lic consultation" on the deal
before signing.
He is one of the most high
profile proponents of forging
a "goods only" EPA rather
than the all-encompassing
goods and services EPA that
has been crafted.
Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing has suggested
that making a deal that also
involves liberalising and "lay-
ing out the rules which gov-
ern" trade in services will ben-
efit the Bahamas a services-
based economy to the
extent that European investors
will know "what the rules of
the game are" when they come
to invest in this country.
At a town meeting on the
EPA last week Hank Fergu-
son, a trade consultant to the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce who was also involved
in the EPA negotiations, dis-
cussed the suggestion that a
"goods only" deal could have
sufficed, and by other com-
mentators who contend that
the Caribbean was pressured
by the EU into "giving up too
much for too little."
He said: "The inclusion of
services was our idea. It was
collectively supported by all
(Caribbean) governments...its
inclusion was deliberate and
agreed."
The petition can be
found at:
http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/epal.


Man found dead in middle of road


FROM page one

so that's what the investigation is hoping to deter-
mine," said Mr Hanna.
"Right now we are in the process of sending -
if not already traffic officers to do their investi-
gation to tell us what their findings are," he added.
Mr Knowles was a crane operator, mason and
fisherman. Mario Simms, owner of Blue Chip,
said that Mr Knowles was at his restaurant that
night and he last saw him at around 11.30pm.
Mr Knowles told Mr Simms that he was going


fishing on the North Side. That night, Mr Simms
also said that Mr Knowles was walking and not
driving as usual.
He always walked or caught rides, noted Mr
Simms.
Mr Simms only became aware that Mr Knowles
was dead when he received a call sometime
between 1.15am and 1.20am, informing him that
a patron was dead in the road.
Residents suspect that it was a hit-and-run acci-
dent, said Mr Simms, but "we don't know yet."
He also confirmed that detectives have arrived on
the island to investigate Mr Knowles' death.


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Belt Tensioners/Pulleys
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THE TRIBUNE


M'ONDAY, II""LY 1." 2008


ISID Itrntonlsports ne U


Women's


relay team

falls short


of bronze

n By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
THE women's 4xl00m relay
team just fell short of winning
another medal for the Bahamas
at the 12th IAAF world Junior
Championships.
In Bydgoszcz, Poland on Sat-
urday, the team of Sheniqua 'Q'
Ferguson, Krystal Bodie, Tia
Rolle and Nivea Smith clocked
44.61 seconds.
It was the same time as
Brazil.
But in the end, Brazil was
awarded the bronze as they
edged out the Bahamas. Brazil's
Rosangela Santos leaned her
head across the line ahead of
Smith.
The United States, led by
Jeneba Tarmoh, who beat out
Ferguson for the gold in the
100m, won the race in a world
junior leading time of 43.66 with
Jamaica taking the silver in
43.98.
Ferguson, the 18-year-old
Olympic bound sprinter, was
looking for her third medal of
the games, having won the gold
in the 200m and the bronze in
the 100m.
But looking at the race as it
got underway, she was a bit
fatigued having three rounds of
the 100m, two in the 200m and
the 4xl00m heats to put the
Bahamas in contention from the
break.
Although the rest of the team
tried to make up the difference,
it.wasn't enough to get another
medal.
The Bahamas would wind up
with just the two medals after
Raymond Higgs could do no
better than seventh in the men's
high jump and the men's
4x400m relay team ended up in
eighth place.
They represented the last
chance for a medal for the
Bahamas, who finished 15th on
the medal table.
The United States led the
way with 17, inclusive of 11
gold, four silver and two bronze.
Jamaica was the top Caribbean
nation in ninth with six one
golf, four silver and a bronze,
just ahead of Cuba with eight -
one gold, two silver and five
bronze.

SEE page 2E



dfeldi





THE Baptist Sports
Council is inviting all church-
es wishing to participate in
the 2008 Rev Dr William
Thompson Track and Field
Classic to attend a meeting
6:30 pm today at the
Bahamas Baptist College,
Jean Street.
The event is set for 9 am
Saturday at the Thomas A
Robinson Track and Field
Stadium. It will feature an
age group segment and open
division with the majority of
events contested. There is
an entry fee for athletes.


. .- ^ .Champions


crowned in


basketball

S" tournament

n By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
betibbhhestrihbnmIaediiA net

THE Bahamas Basketball
Federation winded down its
35th Independence Basketball
Tournament last night at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium with
the champions in the men and
women being crowned.
However, results of the cham-
pionship games were not avail-
able up to press time last night.
IBut at the end of the double
Si elimination format on Saturday
night, both the New Providence
All-Star teams went' into the
playoffs as the favourites.
The ladies had to hold off the
. ; pesky College-All Stars for a
57-48 victory, while the men
. eventually out-lasted San Sal-
vador down the stretch 67-52.
In some of the other games
played on Saturday, the College
All-Stars blasted the under-15
S... girls. 64-16; the under-18
knocked off the Junior All-Star
ladies 27-20; the College All-
Stars pounded Exuma 88-69;
Grand Bahama routed
Eleuthera men 77-46 and Grand
.'Bahama nipped the under-18
All-Star ladies 39-38.
New Providence 57, College
.All-Stars 48: It appeared that
... the College All-Stars were look-
.. .--.ing forward to posting a huge
upset when they stayed under
10 points throughout the sec-
-" ond half.
But the experience of the
New Providence stars proved
to be just a little too much for
their younger foes as they man-
aged to avoid the defeat to
remain undefeated in the tour-
nament going into the playoffs
as the top seeds.
Diasti Delancy led the way
for New Providence with 15
points. Jerelle Nairn had 10,
including three consecutive key
baskets in the third, to go along
with five rebounds; Chantell
Rolle had just seven points and
Linda Pierre finished with five
points and as many rebounds.
New Providence coach
Randy Cunningham said there
was never any doubt about the
outcome of the game.
"We have a mixture of young
and old players and they are
playing good basketball," he
DERRICK ATKINS. of the Bahamas, said. "They are focused. They
competes in the 100m dur..g the IAAF a. know what they have to do. We
Athens Grand Prix Tsiklitiria at the were kind of slow today, but
Olympic stadium in Athens yesterday. : they took care of business with
Atkins won with 10.10 seconds... their experience."
9 At'the end of the tourna-
ment, Cunningham said his
See page 2E team will prevail as the cham-
pions.

SEE page 2E



In overtime, Digitals beat Cyboys 107-104.


LORENZO Carter arrived a few min-
utes late, but that didn't prevent hfm for
getting in an offensive groove as he
dialed up the Batelco Digitals for a sea-
son high 56 points.
Carter, who canned 10 consecutive
three-pointers in the fourth quarter,
helped the Digitals are they rang the
Electro Telecom Cyboys 107-104 in over-
time.
Saturday's Bahamas Government
Departmental Basketball Association's
showdown at the DW Davis Gymnasium


* Lorenzo Carter explodes for season high 56 points

BEC Shockers defeat the Gems 58-43


was tied at 96 at the end of regulation.
Creto Knowles and Billy Sands scored
25 and 17 respectively in the loss.
In the only other game played, the
BEC Shockers shocked the Gems 58-43
as Nipsy Jones scored 12 and George
Kelly had nine.


For the Gems, Craig Hanna had a
game high 15 and Kenton Rolle added
six. Also on Saturday, the NIB Stars won
by default over the NIB Kings and the
Bamboo Shack Aces won by default
over the Airport Authority.
BGDBA action is scheduled to con-


tinue tonight with a triple header:
6:30 pm Sandilands is slated to play
NIB Kings
7:30 pm RBDF Mariners to meet
NIB Stars
8:30 pm Electro Telecom Cybots to
face the Police Royals.






TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 16E, MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008


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MARK JELKS (far left), of the United States, Derrick Atkins (second from left), of the Bahamas, Darvis Patton (centre), of the US, Olusoji Fasuba (second from right), of Nigeria, and Aziz Zakari (far right), of Ghana,
compete in the 100 meters during the IAAF Athens Grand Prix Tsjklitiria at the Olympic stadium in Athens yesterday. Atkins won in 10.10 seconds...




Women's relay team falls short of bronze


FROM page 1E

And in the team placing, the
Bahamas was tied for 17th with
Hungary with 24 points each.
Again, the United States
topped the list with 174 points
and Jamaica sat in eighth place
with 57, just behind Cuba in
seventh with 59.
Higgs, the only individual
male competitor to make a final
at the championships, had to
settle for eighth place with a
leap of 7-feet in the men's high
jump yesterday.
Ukraine's Bohdan Bon-
darenko soared a world junior
leading height of 7-5 to snatch
the gold. The silver went to
Poland's Sylvester Bednarek
with a season's best of 7-4 1/4.
Miguel Angi Sancho of Spain
was awarded the bronze with
7-3 .. . .
Andthe men's relay team of
Juan Lewis, Jeffery Gibson,
Lesley Hanna and La'Sean
Pickstock ran 3:21.75.for eighth
place in the grand finale yester-
day.


Champions

crowned in

basketball

tournament

FROM page 1E

Phylicia Kelly had a side high
15 points with eight rebounds
for the College All-Stars, who
trailed throughout the game.
Rudy Simms had an all-around
game with eight points, 10
rebounds, two assists and two
blocks. LaQuinta Ellis added
eight points.
New Providence 67, San Sal-
vador 52: Just when visiting San
Salvador thought they had the
game, tying the score at least
three times late in the fourth,
they had a complete offensive
let-down as New Providence
surged to another victory.
Christopher 'Chicken' Turn-
quest stepped up big in the mid-
dle with a game high 17 to lead
the attack for New Providence,
who took advantage of their
height down the stretch. Jeremy
Hutchinson had nine, Adrian
Miller and Roney Thomas both
added eight and Oratio Whylly
chipped in with six.
"We knew San Salvador was
going to be competitive. They
have some of the guys who play
here locally, which helped to
boost up their roster," said New
Providence coach Perry
Thompson.
"I think it was good for us
because we're still trying to find
the best chemistry to use in the
tournament. It's kind of hard
to find a good rotation with 12
good players. But the victory
for us was important to get into
the playoff round so that we can
get ready for the match up with
Grand Bahama."
Grand Bahama, led by
national team player-turned
coach Scott Forbes, was to have
played in the feature playoff
game last night to determine
who got into the final. It was
their first meeting in the tour-
nament, which saw Grand
Bahama also go undefeated.


It would have appeared that
the Bahamas may have been
involved in a collision in the
race as the same team ran slow-
er than the 3:10.10 they ran on
Saturday for second in their
heat to qualify for the final.
Trinidad & Tobago was dis-
qualified.
The United States wrapped
up a clean sweep of all four
relays 4 x 1 and 4 x 4 for men
and women with a world
junior leading time of 3:03.86
for the gold. Great Britain got
the silver in 3:05.82 and Ger-
many took the bronze in
3:06.47.
In the only other final for the
Bahamas, beside the pair that
Ferguson competed in, Krystal
Bodie was seventh in the wom-
en's 100 hurdles in 13.72.
American Teona Rodgers
won the gold in 13.40, Jamaican
Shermaltie Williams the silver
in 13.48"and Cuban Belkis
Milanes the bronze in 13.49.
Ferguson, who was inter-
viewed at the IAAF about
going to the Olympics in Bei-
jing, China without any pres-
sure, won the Bahamas' first
medal with a bronze in the
women's 100 in 11.52.
She came back and inked her
name in the history books as
the first double medalist when
she took the gold in the 200 in
23.24.
In the interview on the IAAF
website. Ferguson said she's not
concerned about her older
peers in Beijing.
"The pressure will be on
them because that's their meet,"
said the national junior college
double champion, who quali-
fied at the BAAA's Scotiabank
Olympic trials when she ran the
A standard of 22.85 for second
behind her idol Debbie Fergu-
son-McKenzie.
'"They are the seniors, they
will have more pressure on
them. not to let me beat them. I
am just going there to have fun
and get the experience. But of
course, my goal is to make it
into the final of the 200."
The former Jordan Prince
William standout. now heading
into her final year at Southwest
Mississippi Community College,
thanked God for her success at
the championships.


SHAYLA MAHAN (left),Tiffany Townsend (second from left), Gabrielle Glenn (second from right), and Janeba Ta40 9M r of the'Wo nr.
winning the 4 x 100m relay final at the World Junior Championships in Bydgoszcz, Poland, on Saturday...


JASHUA ANDERSON (nght), from the US winning team, finishes in 4x400m relay final and Takecia Jameson
from the US winning team finishes in the 4 x 400m relay final Sunday...


SPORTS


V.?


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PAGE 7E, ONDA, JUY 14 200 TRIUNEOPORT


BEIJING
A:, *
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PR(


OLYMPICS


1LET


)FI'L


2008




ES


Age: 18.
Birthday: November 24.
Height: 5-feet, 4-inches.
Weight: 120-pounds.
High School: Jordan Prince William High
School.
College: Southwest Mississippi Community Col-
lege.
Major: Accountant.
Sports events: 100m & 200m.
Personal best performances: 11.44 and
23.21 seconds.
Coach: George Cleare.
Favourite colour: Baby Blue.
Favourite food: Home made spaghetti.
Favourite song: The Way You Love Me by
Faith Hill.
Favorite movie: Titanic.
Hobbies: Reading and watching television.
Interest: Music.
Idol: Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie.
Parents: Daphne and Carnell Ferguson.
Sibling: Sister Shakera Rolle and brothers -
Desmond, Donavon and Jameko Ferguson.
Status: Single.


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YOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 17E, MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008















'Future looks bright' for football


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
FOR the third consecutive year, Alex Smith
came to town to put on his National Football
League camp.
And based on what he has seen, the son of leg-
endary Ed Smith the first Bahamian to play in
the NFL as a defensive end with the Denver
Broncos said the future looks bright here for the
sport.
"So far, so good. Everybody has been working
hard," said Smith, -now in his fourth year with
the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. "Everybody seemed
to be picking up on their skills from what we
have been teaching them."
With a number of campers returning from.last
year, Smith said he was pleased with the turnout
and he noted that his only goal is that each
camper leave having learned some valuable
lessons about the game.
Smith,. a tight end looking forward to another
great year with the Buccaneers, invited about 14
players and' coaches from the NFL to participate
in the one-day camp Saturday at the Thomas A
Robinson Track andField Stadium.
Everywhere you looked around, there was red
shirts with the words Alex Smith's Football Camp
printed on the front, indicating who were the
instructors and volunteers. Around 100 campers
were on the field decked in white shirts as they
spread around the four different stations.
Among the players present were D'Brickashaw
Ferguson, a-Bahamian decent'out of Fox Hill.
Ferguson, who at age 24, is entering his third sea-,
son with the New York Jets. Ferguson is expect-
ed to host his first camp next year.
Others in attendance were St Louis Rams' tight
. end Anthony Becht, Rams' quarter-back Bruce


Gradkowski, Derek Jones, Miami Dolphins' wide
receiver Greg Cemarillo, Buccaneers' wide receiv-
er. Ike Hillard, Washington Redskins' defensive
back Leigh Torrence, Rams' free safety OJ Atog-
, we, San Diego Chargers' outside linebacker
Shaun Phillips, Detroit Lions' cornerback Stanley
Wilson and Chargers' inside linebacker Stepheri


tSmith a great tight end with "great hands and a
1*4Le good blocker. He could do it all. He's a great
C athletic guy and I see.great things for him in the
= future.
C.h "He works hard and he's going to be just fine."
Al Brennen, one of the local organizers, said the
:a f camp has definitely improved to a certain level.
is s "They brought along a few more instructors
ES this time and based on what I'ye seen, they are
d moving the children around from one.station to
the next, teaching them the basic fundamentals,
a whether it be in the area of passing, blocking and
ey getting down on the football stance," Brennen
a_ said.
ALEX SMITH looks overthe'field as he hosts his "So I see progress, I see this as a good sign for
rso our young and coming players."
third annual NFL bamp at Thomas A Robinson But Brennen, a long-time executive and coach
Track and Field Stadium on Saturday... in the Commonwealth American Football
League, took it a bit further in his elevation.
Cooper. "The question is: Where do we go from here in
Coaches Otto Stone; Ron Middleton, Smith's terms of football in the countyy" he said. "Would
position coach at Tampa Bay and Derek Jones, these same kids come back next year? Would
the quarterback coach at Drake University, were that period be too long? Can we find some time to
all in attendance as well. sustain them for that period of time?"
Gradkowski, a former quarterback at Tampa ......And he provided a solution.
- --Ba ybeforTe-w-as tra--ed to- heGSaLouis Rams "I feel if there is some local organisation in
this year, said what Smith and his family are place to continue with the same children that are
doing here is just awesome and he's proud to be enrolled and when the summer comes around
a part of it.. I: with the input of the professional players, it would
"They're giving them something to look for- really help a whole lot," he said.
ward to, a nice:camp and try to teach them things "Then in that case, I feel we can really be in a
about-football," he stressed. "There's a lot of position to introduce flag football in the schools
kids that doa geat joband.we are just glad that and the future of the sport will really develop
they' are respectful and Twell mannered. because our football league is basically designed
S "We're happy to work With the kids, especial- for guys who have already.surpassed the college
.y because of their positive attitude. So what Alex level and are just basically playing for fun."
is doing here is.just awesome, giving back to this Without the presence of any scouts coming ifi,
community. For him to involved me, I feel hon- Brennen said very few players get the opportunity
oured." to go off to college or get invited to a pro camp so
As a former team-mate, Gradkowski called that they can take their game to another level.


Bahamian natives host their- first NFL camp


By BRENT STUBBS -
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
TWO Bahamian natives, Samari
Rolle and Fred Taylor combined their
resources to host their first National
Football League .camp on Saturday at
the Bahamas Football League's
National Developmental Center.
The camp, which came as a surprise
as it was not one announced with the
separate Devard and Devaughn Dar-'
ling Camp at the Winton Rugby Pitch
and the Alex Smith Camp at the
Thomas A Robinson Track and Field
! Stadium, attracted around 100
camp aer.s ...
Rolle, a six foot, 31-year-old corner


back for the Baltimore Ravens, said
he's honoured to be able to host the
camp along with Taylor, a 32-year-old
. 6-1, 228-pound running back for the
Jacksonville Jaguars.
"The camp is wonderful. I'm glad
that the campers are enjoying it," said'
Taylor, who along with the players in
attendance interacted with the campers
through the instructions given and the
game they played.
"There's some talent over here. I
wish that there were some more foot-
ball leagues here. I wish that I would
have been doing this a long time ago.
But I'm glad that I finally get to do it.
It's gcud bh ..mi-. thel pl.ierstvan pl.y.y
T hat n i 1 I l i ,i ih i .: l> -i r '
Rolle, who started his career with


Tennessee in 1998 before he went to
Baltimore.in 2005, had 22 tackles with
an interception last year.
Taylor, who has roots in Long Island,
said last year after vacationing -here,
he and Rolle decided to put their
resources togetheriand this is the result
of their efforts. *
Roots
"It feels good to come back and
retract your roots," he said. "We got to
enjoy some time with the kids in a
sport that is not as popular here. They
catch on quick and they are learning a
lot' Soit' been worthwhile.
.Now in .his llth year with-the
Jaguars, Taylor said he's looking for-


ward to having a great season as he
work towards becoming a NFL Hall
of Famer in the future.
Taylor, a running back, had 223 car-
'ries for 1,202 yards, an average of 5.4
with five touch downs for the Jaguars.
Lionel 'Brave' Stuart of the Ministry
of Tourism's Sports Department, who
spearheaded the local organisation of
the camp, said this is the first time that
the camp is being staged here, but it
definitely won't be the last..
"We have the NFL Network here
following Samari Rolle and Fred Tay-
lor. Hopefully it will be viewed during
their upcoming NFL games," said Stu-
art, wFro noted that the publicity
deiived-froni the camp will go a long
way in providing additional publicity


for the country.
Santonio Holmes, a wide receiver
with the Pittsburgh Steelers and Jevon
Kearse, a defensive end with the
Philadelphia Eagles, were among the
athletes present..
Holmes, the 24 year-old 5-11, 189-
pounder, had 52 receptions for 942
yards, an average of 18.1 with-eight
TDs for the Steelers last year. The 31-
year-old 6-4, 265 pound Kearse, now in
his fourth year with the Eagles after
playing his first five in the NFL with
the Tennessee Titans, had 12 tackles
with 3.5 sacks.
Stuart said the camp will definitely
be an annual one and they look for-
ward to increasingg the cast of celebri-
ties next year.


\ ".* ,' ,

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TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 18E, MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008













Condoms should be made available in our schools


FROM page nine

ment on rights of
parents/guardians while still
covering all healthcare issues
and thus not restricting a stu-
dents' access to condoms, par-
ticularly if a parent refuses to
accept the reality that their
child is sexually active and
wrongly fantasizes that they
can prevent them by forbid-
ding their access to condoms.
Parental misjudgment such as
that usually leads to a child
rebelling and continuing to
have sex-most likely unpro-
tected!
Secondly, students must
also be counseled-in strict
confidentiality-about safe
sex and how to use a condom.
Of course, condoms should
only be available from nurses
or guidance counselors!
At present, many promi-
nent American cities such as
New York, the District of
Columbia, Los Angeles, San
Francisco. Seattle, Baltimore,
Chicago, Dallas, Houston, and
Philadelphia, among others,
have made condoms available
in all or nearly all the schools.
According to the Western
Journal of Medicine, "in New
York city, public high schools
are required to provide con-
doms and a health resource
room to students."
Locally, the ministry of
education and the ministry of
health should work in con-
junction to develop efficient
school clinics and health cen-
tres that offer students vari-
ous services ranging from gen-
eral treatment, health exami-
nations and physical, mental
health evaluations, dietary
guidance, substance abuse,
therapy to sex education. It is
preposterous for one nurse to
be split between two to three
schools per week and appears
to be an unsafe, flippant
approach to the dealing with
health concerns of
students/teachers.
While churchmen and even
some politicians may be
against making condoms avail-
able at educational institu-
Ji1 1''. 1 ,^1


tions, possibly by asserting
that the accessibility of con-
doms would increase sexual
activity, according to a May
2003 Centre for the Advance-
ment of Health report, it does
not increase activity but
instead "protects those who
are already sexually active
from some sexually transmit-
ted diseases."
Jeannie Rosoff, former
president of the Guttmacher
Institute, rightly asserts that
"certain elements like reli-
gious traditionalism militate
against acceptance of con-
doms and other contraceptive
programmes even in commu-
nities where the problem is
great." This is so true of the
Bahamas!
Frankly, while sex educa-
tion should be a part of a cur-
riculum, Bahamian parents
are also failing to effectively
communicate with their chil-
dren. With children as young

"...students
must also be
counselled in
strict
confidentiality -
about safe sex."

as nine having sex and even
bearing children, parents must
stop hiding their head in the
sand like an ostrich and, while
teaching morals and values,
inform their children about
their expectations and openly
discuss sex and birth control
with them. At a young age, a
child should be made cog-
nizant of molestation and
when someone touches them
inappropriately.
In heightening students'
awareness of STDs/sex/ con-
traception, the Guttmacher
Institute notes that in addition
to a comprehensive sex edu-
cation programme both the
Schools and the community at
large must employ "absti-
nence groohps, peer education
programmes, special assem-


blies, media and theatrical
productions, health informa-
tion tables, rap sessions, health
fairs, posters, contests" and
firsthand accounts by teenage
parents, doctors, people liv-
ing with HIV/AIDS, field trips
to the All Saints (AIDS)


Camp and/or a hospital ward
and even by creating projects
and emulating the NAMES
project quilt, as is done in the
US.
With the increasing inci-
dences of STDs/AIDS cases,
the ministry of health should


set about providing condoms
to be placed in restrooms-
free of charge-at service sta-
tions, restaurants, bars, clubs
and during major events, all
in an effort to cultivate a cul-
ture of healthy living and safe
sex. A school condom avail-


ability programme would
lessen sexual risk-taking,
encourage students to live
healthy lifestyles and serve as
an inexpensive means for stu-
dents to access condoms. A
box of condoms is cheaper
than a pack of pampers.


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MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008, PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE


*''*;^-w .';'ti :r ;S


alft.
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The schamas Chamber of Commeone's e2M
LMifme Achieveomne Af Aidi Winner, Fm
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Presidemnf of The Bahamas Chamber Of
Commerce, Dijnisio D'Aguilar at The
Chamber's Annual Awanls Banquet.
..... ... :


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PAGE 20 MONDAYJULY 14 2 8


. -


THE TRIBUNE

















MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008
* B* r,-


Cuba opening could cost


Bahamas


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
T he Bahamas
could lose
h up to one-
third (one
out of three) current
US stopover visitors to
this nation when Wash-
ington lifts its travel
embargo on Cuba, an
International Mone-
tary Fund (IMF) study
hlis warned, with one
leading hotelier urging this nation to
"get our ducks in order" now to miti-


1/3 of stopovers


* Study for IMF says end to US travel embargo against communist island could
see Bahamas' total stopover drop by between 30.5 per cent and 34.2 per cent
* Bahamian hotel executive urges nation to 'get our ducks in order' to mitigate
potentially disastrous consequences


gate the potentially disastrous conse-
quences.
The study's author, Rafael Romeu,
said that based on his estimates the
likeliest scenario was that the Bahamas
would lose between 30.5 per cent and
34.2 per cent of its existing US stopover


market once Cuba was fully opened
to American tourists.
This was the highest percentage
decline for any Caribbean nation oth-
er than the US Virgin Islands, and the
estimates are likely to come as no sur-
prise to anyone in the Bahamian


tourism industry, given this nation's
over-reliance on the US for 85 per cent
of its visitors.
While unable to comment directly
on the IMF working paper because he
had not read it, Robert Sands, Baha
Mar's senior vice-president for. external


affairs and government relations, said
the Bahamian tourism industry needed
to prepare now as it was a question of
'when', not 'if', Cuba would eventual-

SEE page 4B


New car sales off 29 Investor appeals $68,000 venture capital rejection


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
NEW car sales are down- by
almost 30 per cent year-on-year
for June 2008, an auto industry
executive told Tribune Busi-
ness, adding that 68 per cent of
clients responding to his com-
pany's on-line survey felt the
economy's overall performance
was likely to get worse this year.
Rick Lowe, operations man-
ager at Nassau Motor Compa-
ny, said that with only one deal-
er left to report, June 200,8's
new carsales were only 71 per


Dealer's on-line
survey finds 68
per cent of clients
believe economy
likely to get worse
cent of the 2007 performance.
So far, Bahamian auto dealers
collectively managed to sell only
188 new cars last month, com-

SEE page 5B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A BAHAMIAN investor has
appealed to the Ministry of
Finance over the government-
sponsored venture capital fund's
decision not to provide the
$68,000 in financial backing that
he was seeking, questioning why
the fund did not provide rea-
sons for its rejection.
Clever Duncombe told Tri-
bune Business that the "poten-
tial is unlimited" for the start-up
business he and his partners
were proposing, namely sup-
plying hydraulic hoses required
by heavy equipment machines
used in this nation's construc-
tion industry.


He and his fellow investors,
including a scientist from the
construction industry, felt exist-
ing Bahamas-based businesses
had only tapped into 5 per cent
of this market, and that their
business plan and research were
better than "90 per cent" of the
proposals submitted to the
Bahamas Entrepreneurial Ven-
ture Fund.
"We were looking at starting
Bahamas Hydraulics, which
would be involved in the con-
struction of hydraulic hoses for
heavy equipment," Mr Dun-
combe told Tribune Business.
It would compete with the
likes of AID (Automotive and
Industrial Distributors) and
Caribbean Hydraulics, and Mr


Duncombe said: "When wetdid
our research, we found that they
had not tapped into 5 per cent
of the market for heavy equip-
ment in our country.
"The market is untapped.
According to our research, they
have over 6100 heavy equip-
ment machines which are regis-
tered at the Ministry of Works.
There are another 17,000 light
duty machines which operate
off hydraulics. That does not
include the shipping machinery
side.
"The potential for a busiinss
such as ours is unlimited. I'm
not too sure what the venture
capital fund is looking for. We
did ask for a copy of their annu-
al report, but they rcfu:. JJ,I


give it to us. We should have
that, because they are investing
and lending public money.
"We did file an appeal with
the Ministry of Finance, so they
can see whether or not the
fund's decision is consistent with
their policies. If they're trying to
help small businessmen, they
need to work with them like an
accounting firm does."
Mr Duncombe added that the
Bahamas Hydraulics proposal
was submitted to the Bahamas
F.intrepreneturial Ven.ituic Fund
in 2007, but was rejected by the
fund's Board without any rea-
sons or explanation being given.

SEE p '" 6B


Venture capital fund head

pleads for new ideas


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government-sponsored
venture capital fund's adminis-
trator has urged Bahamian
entrepreneurs to come up with
new, innovative business ideas,
telling Tribune Business that
too many of the business plans-
submitted were for the "same
old, same old" proposals.
Jerome Gomez, an accoun-
tant and partner in the Baker
Tilly Gomez accounting firm,
said "the challenge has been
finding good ideas to fund", the


Bahamas Entrepreneurial Ven-
ture Fund having provided debt
or equity financing to only 46
of the more than 300 business
plans submitted to it.
"I think the fund's worked
very well, where we've found a
good idea we can work with,"
Mr Gomez said. "There are not
many good ideas out there.
Many of them are the same old,
the same old.
"The challenge has been to
find good ideas to fund. That's

SEE page 2B


Bethell Estates

eyeing property

redevelopment

* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BETHELL Estates is the lat-
est downtown Bay Street land-
lord to consider investing in the
redevelopment of its properties,
a government minister has told
Tribune Business.
Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of
the environment,.said there had
been "a significant and extra-
ordinary" response to the pas-
sage of the Act to revitalise
downtown Nassau via a series of
investment incentives, some-
thing that had already prompt-
ed landlords and property
developers to begin making

SEE page 2B


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Venture capital fund head pleads for new ideas


FROM page 1B

why we've not funded as many
proposals as we could."
Apart from new ideas, Mr
Gomez suggested there had also
been a dearth of innovation
when it came to doing estab-
lished businesses in a different
way. Too many proposals sub-


mitted to the Bahamas Entre-
preneurial Venture Fund, he
said, had been for businesses
where the market was already
relatively overcrowded wom-
en's beauty salons, retail, restau-
rants and liquor stores.
When the Bahamas Entre-
preneurial Venture Fund was
established under the former
Christie administration, Mr


MONDAY SATURDAY
10 A.M. 2 RPM.


Cla 5101.9
- Celebrating 5 years


Gomez said it and its Board had
been "eager to get to do more".
Initially, it had financed
upgrades to existing restaurants
and funded some clothing
stores, although it has moved
away from the latter. Among,
its most successful investments
have been in the paper shred-
,ding business, Sunryse Shred-,
ding Services, whose owner and
founder, Christiaan Sawyer,
won this year's Chamber of
Commerce Entrepreneur of the
Year Award.
Other businesses to receive
the fund's backing have includ-
ed Veritas Consulting, a project
management and consulting
firm; Palincia, the tub manufac-
turer; and Clear Hurricane
Shutters and Windows.
To date, the Bahamas Entre-.
preneurial Venture Fund has
financed 10 start-ups by taking
an equity stake in them, the


remaining 36 having received
debt financing in the form of
loans.
Out of the $3.1 million it has
invested in Bahamian entre-
preneurs and their dreams to
date, the Bahamas Entrepre-
neurial Venture Fund has allo-
cated about $1 million in equity
and the rest in debt. To date,
the fund has received $4 mil-
lion from the Government, and
has been allocated another $1
million in the 2008-2009 Bud-
get. I
Currently, the Bahamas
Entrepreneurial Venture Fund
is limited to a inaximum
$100,000 loan to any one appli-
cant, and a $200,000 maximum
equity stake, thresholds that Mr
Gomez suggested should be
increased. : ,, . .
"I think it's a good idea for us
to finance some of the larger
projects and increase our lim-


its to individual applicants," he
said, acknowledging that the
fund had to reject some pro-
posals because the amount of
financing they required was
above these thresholds.
Among the major weakness-
es in the proposals that come
before the Bahamas Entrepre-
neurial Venture Fund's Board
are the absence of "a clear mar-
keting strategy for selling their
product"; a lack of understand-
ing about the competition they
would face; and over-optimistic
projections when it came to rev-
enues and financial perfor-
mance.
Mr Gomez added that "in a
lot of cases", applicants did not
know or had not worked in:-
the industries they were looking
to launch startup businesses in,
and "many people want to b6
part-time businessmen, still
wanting to work and open' a


business at the same time".
Meanwhile, Mr Gomez said
he had not "heard any further
discussion" on ideas floated pre-
viously to merge the Bahamas
Entrepreneurial Venture Fund
with other government agen-
cies dedicated to assisting small
business growth and develop-
ment, namely the Bahamas
Development Bank and the
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC).
The idea would be that
Bahamian entrepreneurs derive
additional benefits from their
integration and co-operation,
but Mr Gomez said the
Bahamas Entrepreneurial Ven-
ture Fund and BAIC would not
be a good combination as their
skill sets were too far apart.
"I could see the venture cap-
ital fund becoming a subsidiary
of the Bahamas Development
Bank, but not merged into it. It
must have its own Board of
Directors and,own administra-
tion, because the skill sets are
vastly different. It [the venture
capital fund] really has to be
kept separate, and a subsidiary
at most," Mr Gomez said.


Bethell

Estates

eyeing property

redevelopment

FROM page 1B

plans.
"In consideration of the relo-
cation of the shipping facilities
and redevelopment of down-
town Nassau, a number of peo-
ple are exploring the redevel-
opment of their properties as
well," Dr Deveaux said, listing
Bethell.Estates, the Klonaris
brothers with Moses Plaza, and
several government buildings
as being among the projects
already identified. .
These were among "several
proposals" for development
that the Government and pri-
vate sector Task Force charged
with overseeing downtown Nas-
sau's redevelopment were seek-
ing to "put on the same page",
Dr Deveaux told Tribune Busi-
ness.
The private sector redevel-
opment plans are the first sign
that moving the commercial
shipping and container port
facilities from downtown Bay
Street to the proposed Arawak
Cay port will act as a spark to
revitalise the city centre, freeing
up land for use as commer-.
cial/residential space and
encouraging people to return
to live in the city.
The former 3.94 acre Pioneer
Shipping property at Union
Wharf is currently listed for sale
at $22 million with Bahamas
Realty. It has 826 linear feet of
wharf space, and could be rede-
veloped as a marina, hotel,
restaurant, condo-hotel or con-
do complex.
Meanwhile, Dr Deveaux said
he was meeting today with Jim-
my Mosko, chairman of the
company formed to develop the
new commercial shipping facil-
ity for New Providence at
Arawak Cay, to get an update
on the environmental issues
associated with the develop-
ment.
"We are actively factoring the
port location into the Task
Force plan for the development
of the City of Nassau," Dr
Deveaux told Tribune Business.
"There has been a significant
and extraordinary response to
the passage of the City of Nas-
sau Revitalisation Act, in terms
of the interest it has created. Ip
that sense, things are moving
very quickly, which is why it's so
important to develop the Mas-
ter Plan."
Tribune Business under-.
stands that the US Embassy,
and Ambassador Ned Siegel,
have provided extensive assis-
tance to the downtown Nassau
redevelopment efforts, helping
to arrange a visit by government
and private sector representa-
tives to Delray Beach, Florida,
to see how that city had been
redeveloped.
Upon their return, a planning
charette was held in Nassau
under the auspices of Bahamian
architect Jackson Burnside, and
a report from that and the Del-


ray Beach visit have since been
drawn up.
These reports, Dr Deveaux
said, were intended to guide
"what the Government should
now do, what should the pri-
vate sector do, what co-ordina-
tion mechanisms need to be put
in place to facilitate this hap-
pening, and what specific steps
by the private sector need gov-
ernment approval".


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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008


THE TRIBUNE












$675m default to have no 1


effect on Ginn project


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter
DEVELOPMENT of the
$4.9 billion Ginn sur Mer pro-
ject in West End, Grand
Bahama, will not be impacted
by the fact that its parent has
defaulted on a $675 million
credit facility led by Credit
Suisse, part of which is being
used to finance that develop-
ment.
Ginn Clubs & Resorts recent-
ly missed principal and interest
payments on its first- and sec-
ond-lien debt, highlighting the
fact that residential real estate
sales at the Eest End project -
as well as elsewhere at Ginn's
US developments have effec-
tively fallen off a cliff following
the US economic downturn and
credit crunch created by the
sub-prime mortgage fiasco.
Yet Ginn's president said it
had previously set up the funds
to complete the mega develop-
ment on Grand Bahama,
despite the parent borrowers
having had their credit ratings
reduced to 'D' or 'default' by
Standard & Poor's ( S&P), the
Wall Street credit rating agency.
Robert Gidel admitted in a
company press release that two


Ginn affiliated companies,
Ginn-LA CS Borrower, LLC
and Ginn-LA Conduit Lender,
did not make a principal and
interest payment on a non-
recourse $675 million credit
facility led by Credit Suisse. He
also said the company had
reached a 30-day forbearance
agreement and was actively
negotiating with ita lenders.
According to Mr Gidel, four
of the companies' retail devel-
opment companies will be
affected, including Ginn- LA
West End Ltd, which owns
Ginn sur Mer.
However, he said this situa-
tion will not prevent the West
End development from moving
ahead.
"Ginn-LA West End Limit-
ed previously set up accounts
which contain the funds neces-
sary to complete the infrastruc-
ture and the initial 18-hole golf
course at Ginn sur Mer. These
funds are not subject to the
credit facility and are unaffect-
ed by the current situation,
which means there will be no
disruption to the continued
development of the Ginn sur
Mer project or the operations
and development of Old
Bahama Bay. The properties
that are owned by Ginn-LA


OBB, including the resort core
of the Ginn sur Mer project, are
not subject to this or any other
credit facility," Mr Gidel said.
He explained that the com-
pany has been affected by the
ongoing slowdown in the resi-
dential real estate market a
vital component in the success
of its projects.
"It became clear that it would
not be possible to meet the
homesite sales objectives nec-
essary to make payments due
under the credit facility. We
have been discussing these
issues with the lenders for the
purpose of seeking ways to
restructure the terms of the
credit facility," he.said.
Mr Gidel further explained
that the forbearance provides
an "environment for both us,
as borrowers and the lenders,
to continue to work toward a
restructuring of the credit facil-
ity, which we believe will occur
in the next 30 days and will per-
mit each of the communities to
be completed as planned."
He also stressed that the "sit-
uation has no impact on our
ongoing business operations
throughout the company," and
that they were creating new
opportunities for their mem-


Tourism concerned at airport fee hikes


* By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Business Reporter
IT IS still too early to determine the impact the
20 per cent across-the-board fee increase at the
Lynden Pindling International Airport will have
on tourism arrivals, but the Ministry of Tourism
is concerned and intends to monitor the situa-
tion closely.
Tyrone Sawyer, the ministry's director of airlift,
told Tribune Business that the Ministry was
always concerned about the impact increases in
air costs will have on tourism arrivals.
However, he said it was working very closely
with the industry to mitigate any negative fallout
that could occur.
At the moment, Mr Sawyer said it was still too
early to determine if any of the airlines will reduce
their flights to the Bahamas to save on fees.
"We are working with our industry partners
to find ways that can offset the impact, andwe-.will
,do everything that we can to relin the traffic


and to grow the air traffic. We will do our very
best to secure the market," Mr Sawyer said.
Private airline charter companies have told
Tribune Business they will have to increase their
prices to compensate for the 20 per cent fee
increases the Nassau Airport Development Com-
pany recently announced it intends to implement
at the beginning of August.
One charter company employee said the pro-
posed landing fee increases will create a major
burden for charter companies' bottom lines, par-
ticularly as they make quite a few landings in a
given day.
"The prices will definitely have to go up. I
mean every other week fuel goes up, and we have
to deal with that. Twenty per cent is a very big
increase for landing fees. It depends on the size of
your aircraft and the amount of persons. But for
some of the smaller aircraft it's $12 each time
you land, and add 20 per cent to that. So think
about what that-means -for- the 'larger-airlines'"
budgets," the source said.


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MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


Only


-- art








PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


Cuba opening could cost



Bahamas 1/3 of stopovers


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soMng skills to assist our Clients with technical problems and implementation of
solutions. Technical Support Analysts have the ability to implement, document, troubleshoot, and
support IT equipment and environments utilizing a variety of software applications and
tools. Technical Support Analysts work and communicate closely with other team members,
Clients, and vendors in all aspects of service and support to meet business and technical goals.

Problem diagnosis and resolution, with appropriate escalation is required
Work independently, prioritizing tasks appropriately
Manage service requests to closure and Client's satisfaction
Strict adherence to industry standards and best practices
Identify root causes, and devise lasting solutions, not just patch symptoms


Technical Qualifications and experience
Proficiency in Microsoft Office suite Word, Excel, Outlook, Powerpoint and Access
Thorough understanding of DNS, WINS, DHCP, TCP/IP
Working knowledge of Microsoft Windows client/server network architecture
Prior experience with backup and/or antivirus utilities is a plus
3+ years previous experience in Helpdesk or user support role
Bachelor's Degree in Computing related discipline or Microsoft certified(MCP minimum)

Personal Qualities
Ability to work independently or as part of a team
Strong analytical skills with attention to detail
Excellent verbal and written communications skills
Client-centric sensitive to Client problems and needs
Critical thinker
Strong work ethic and willingness to learn
ability to work on concurrent tasks, work in a time-sensitive atmosphere
Mature professional, dedicated to continuously developing career skills


All interested persons should send a copy of .heir C.V. to info@spartanetlabs.com by July 25, 2008

_J_________^____________


FROM page 1B

ly re-open to US tourists.
"It's a reality, it's going to
happen and we have to get our
ducks in order," Mr Sands told
Tribune Business.
"Certainly, when the US mar-
ket opens up, it will pose some
additional concerns for
Caribbean hotels. We can't put
our heads in the sand or be
ambivalent about it. We have
to prepare for it.
"We have to ensure we have
got our room inventory in place,
we have to ensure the product
and product diversification is in
the best possible shape it could
be, we have to ensure that we
give true value for money, and
we have to ensure that service
improves.
"As long as we work towards
these goals, they should be a
suitable buffer against any
opening up from the North
American market."
Mr Sands said it was critical
that the Bahamas grow its exist-
ing hotel room inventory, which
has been stuck at around 15,000
since the mid-1980s, if it was to
ward off the looming competi-
tive threat from Cuba. The
communist-run nation is already
thought to have 50,000 hotel
rooms of its own.
The Baha Mar executive said
there was a "real need for
growth and improvement in the
room inventory. We can't con-
tinue to stand still at 15,000,
when Cuba already has 50,000
rooms in place."
Using 2004 tourist arrivals
data as the base, Mr Romeu's
paper, entitled Vacation Over:
Implications for the Caribbean
of Opening US-Cuba Tourism,
estimated that the Bahamas
would lose 499,000 of the 1.49
million American stopover vis-
itors it received that year.
This nation would gain some
token compensation from a
36,000 increase in European
and other non-US visitors,
meaning the Bahamas would
suffer a net loss of 463,000
tourists, based on 2004 figures.
In his most benign scenario,
andiestimating that between 3-


3.5 million American tourists
would visit Cuba once the
embargo was lifted, Mr Romeu
said that assuming all the Cuba
traffic were completely new vis-
itors to the Caribbean mean-
ing all other destinations would
maintain their existing US visi-
tor numbers the Bahamas
would s.ee a 2.4 per cent
stopovers increase, based on the
36,000 increase in European
arrivals.
This is unlikely to happen,
though, and assuming that
Cuba's American visitors were
composed entirely of market
share snatched from other
Caribbean nations, Mr Romeu's
work estimated that the
Bahamas would see a 31.1 per
cent decline on its 2004 total
stopovers a drop from 1.49
million to 1.027 million.
Variations
Minor variations on this sce-
nario projected that the
Bahamas would see declines in
total stopovers of 30.5 per cent
and 34.2 per cent. Even assum-
ing that just two-thirds of
Cuba's new US stopovers were
market share taken from exist-
ing Caribbean destinations, the
Bahamas would suffer a 19.9
per cent decline in total
stopover arrivals.
When Cuba opened up to US
tourists, among other Caribbean
nations "the clear winners are
destinations that have diversi-
fied away from the US, as this
redistribution is unlikely to
favour countries heavily depen-
dent on US tourism".
Mr Romeu added: "The
Greater Antilles, the Bahamas,
Cancun and Jamaica show the
largest losses were this scenario
to materialize....... For the
Caribbean, .Cuba would grow
to be the largest destination for
US tourists, while destinations
such as Jamaica, Cancun and
the Bahamas would decline."
Mr Sands told Tribune Busi-
ness: "The reality, as far as I'm
concerned, is that it's not a
question of when Cuba opens
up. It is, in fact, open, and gen-
erating a significant amount of


NEW


OPPORTUNITIES
More Exciting Opportunities At Lynden Pindling International Airport


Here we grow again! The Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) is continuing its revitalization
of the Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA) by adding additional services to meet the needs of
our customers and enhance their experience at LPIA. The latest new opportunities include four separate
Food Outlets and a Common Use Lounge.
NA goalsand objectiwesamto:
(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service;
(b) offer a mix of concepts that customers fjnd attractive and that will enhance the image of LPIA as a
world dass airport
(c) offer food & beverage and retail dchoices to passengers at reasonable prices;
(d) offer a mix of local, national and International brand-name companies;
(e) develop and design retail and food & beverage facilities that complement the qualities of the
current and new terminals while recognizing the distinctive spirit and character of the community
the airport serves; and
(f) optimize revenue to NAD.
For all of the RFPs, Proponents must be Bahamian and Incorporated in The Bahamas.


FOOD OUTLETS
NAD is inviting Individual proposals for four
separate (4) Food Outlets:
one in the U.S. Departures Lounge of 500-
1000sq. ft;
* two in the Domestic Departures Lounge of
approximately 500sq, ft. each; and
* one in the Domestic Check-in area of
approximately 1100 sq. ft.
The successful Proponents will be required to
design, construct, finance, maintain, manage and
operate the food & beverage outlet.
Proposals will be evaluated based on the
proponent's relative experience; the proposed
concept, the proposed design; the ability to
finance the capital Investment required for design
and development of the food & beverage outlet,
the operating, marketing and customer service
plans; and the financial offer to NAD.
Qualified and interested parties may pick up
the Request for Proposal package at NAD's
office, Terminal 1 (Domestic/International),
2nd floor, LPIA until July 14th, 2008, A pre-
proposal briefing for those who have picked
up packages will be held In NAD's Boardroom
at the airport on Tuesday July 22nd, 2008 at
10:00am.


COMMON USE LOUNGE
NAD Is Inviting proposals for a Common Use
Lounge In the U.S. Departure Lounge. The
Common Use Lounge will have a separate,
appropriately ventilated smoking area and can
have a tobacconist.The successful Proponent will
be required to finance, design, develop, operate
and manage the lounge.
Proposals will be evaluated on the proponent's
relative experience; proposed design;the abilityto
finance the capital investment required for design
and development; the operating, marketing and
customer service plans; and the financial offer to
NAD.
Request for Proposal packages may be picked
up at NAD's offices at the reception desk on the
second floor, Domestic/International Terminal
1 at LPIA until July 14th, 2008. A mandatory
pre-proposal briefing for those who have
picked up packages will be held In NAD's
Boardroom at the Airport on Wednesday July
23rd, 2008 at 10:00am.


business from the Canadian,
Latin American and European
markets already. They have
done well from these particu-
lar markets.
"Cuba is already a viable
competitor to the rest of the
Caribbean, with the volume
coming out of Europe, Latin
American and Canada."
If anything, the Bahamas
should be sending 'thank you'
telegrams to the Castro broth-
ers, because it was their 1959
decision to shut Havana's hotels
and casinos that acted as the
catalyst for the development of
this nation's existing tourism
model via Sir Stafford Sands.
The Bahamas caught much
of the market share created by
the exodus from Havana, and
the tourism model it spawned
has served this nation until this
day. Yet there can be little
doubt that with every day that
passes, Cuba inches closer to
receiving US visitors once again.
President George W. Bush
may have tightened travel
restrictions against the commu-
nist-run island, but the current
leader in the US presidential
race, Senator Barack Obama,
has already hinted that he
would hold talks with Cuban
leader Raul Castro without pre-
conditions, hinting there may
be some light at the end of the
travel embargo tunnel.
Compared to the Bahamian
tourism product, Cuba current-
ly has so much more to offer,
including its rich history and
culture, and the mystique
offered by the Revolution, Fidel
and Che Guevara.
Yet Mr Sands pointed out
that even in the event of the US
travel embargo being lifted,
Cuba may not open immedi-
ately to a major influx of US
tourists. The infrastructure in
Cuba "will take many years to
get up to speed to meet the
demands and wishes of US
clientele", he said, while there
also remains the billion-dollar
claims for reparations many US
businesses and individuals have
against the country over the
seizure of property after the
1959 Revolution.


Nassau Airport
Development Company


PICTET
1805



Pictet Bank & Trust Limited


Invites qualified applicants for the role of:-


SENIOR ADMINISTRATOR

REQUIRED SKILLS:-

- Strong understanding of account documentation, banking
correspondence and operations in a private banking context.
Excellent problem solving, organisational and management
skills; ability to work independently and under pressure to meet
strict deadlines.
Excellent oral and written communication skills; secretarial
skills and ability to work with correspondence in French and/or
Spanish an asset.
Proficiency in a variety of software applications, particularly
Word and Excel; Access or BusinessObjects an asset.
Strong sense of discretion, good judgment, ability to work
effectively in a team, and commitment to excellent customer
service.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-


- At least 3 years experience supervising a small team.
- 5 years related experience in an international private bank, or
possibly an accounting firm or trust company working with
private banks.

NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED. Please send
Resume to:


The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
P. O. Box 4837
Nassau, Bahamas

Offices in Geneva, Lausanne, Zurich, Luxemburg, London,
Montreal, Nassau, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong


I I I









THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JULY 14,2008, PAGE 5B


New car sales off 29 per cent


FROM page 1B

pared to 263 the year before.
This has been the trend in the
Bahamian auto dealer industry
since January 2008. Although
January new car sales were up
slightly by 2 per cent, Febru-
ary's new car sales were off 25
per cent; in March down 54 per
cent; and in April (gaining a
boost from the Car Show at the
Mall at Marathon), total new
car sales were only off 9 per
cent industry-wide.
For May, new car sales were
also down 25 per cent, another
sign that the economic down-
turn and soaring living costs are
taking a toll on sales of expen-
sive, luxury items.


"It's looking fairly dismal,"
Mr Lowe told Tribune Business
on new car sales. "Everyone [in
the industry] is paying the bills,
but it's not where we need it to
be. There's still customer inter-
est, but we're not closing as
many sales.
"We can't get a handle on
whether the banks have been.
asked to tighten up [lending cri-
teria] or not."
Mr Lowe said of the Bahami-
an industry: "It's certainly fol-
lowing the trends in the US. It
seems to be the general slow-
ing in the economy. I think it's
flat there's no growth and
when there's no growth, peo-
ple buckle down.
"We did an on-line survey
with our customers, and 68 per


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cent of our clients seem to feel
it's getting worse. The remain-
der felt the economy would be
the same or a little better. When
you've got that angst, it does-
n't bode well for the short-
term."
Factors
Other factors impacting new
car sales include ever-increas-
ing competition from the rising
number of used cars imported
into the Bahamas. These cheap-
er vehicles are especially attrac-
tive at a time when Bahamians'
disposable incomes were being
reduced through rising energy
and food costs, coupled with
potentially shorter work weeks
in key industries such as hotels
and increasing unemployment.
Increases in manufacturer
pricing and shipping costs have
meant that some new car mod-
els, through their higher prices,
have been pushed into higher
customs duties brackets.
Mr Lowe also pointed to the
tax increases brought in by the
new Excise Tax, introduced in
the 2008-2009 Budget, which
have increased duty rates on all
auto vehicles by 3 per cent.
The dollar's weakness against
all other currencies had also


fuelled the increase in prices
that Bahamian dealers were
paying to the manufacturers, he
added.
"There's always the people
that need a new car, and have to
have it, but I think most [auto]
businesses are preparing for
quite a drop," Mr Lowe said.
"Plus everything's gone up as a
result of the duty increases.
"The consensus seems to be
for at least the next two to three
months, people don't see any
great expansion. We've got our
fingers crossed.
"It's a natural cycle. Business
cycles do occur. We've just got
to roll-on, and hopefully no one
will have to lay anyone off. You
lick your wounds when times
are rough, and make your mon-
ey when times are good. My fin-
gers are crossed."
Mr Lowe said June 2008's
new car sales had been boosted
by several fleet deals with
Bahamian companies. While he
personally did not like to rely
on fleet deals because "your
margins are cut to nothing",
such sales to government
departments and car rental
companies kept things ticking
over because they came to
about several hundred vehicles
per year.


Legal Notice



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
"(No.45 of 2000)
PRESTWOOD INTERNATIONAL LTD.
In Voluntary liquidation

"Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of
2000), PRESTWOOD INTERNATIONAL LTD. is in
Dissolution."

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 25th day of
June, 2008.

Mr. Philipp Kieber
c/o Interadvice Anstalt
Landstrasse 25, P.O. Box 439
S:. 9490 Vaduz,
Liechtenstein
Liquidator



DENTAL CLINIC


SEEKS

Two dynamic people to join our team;
a dental and front office assistant.

Applicants should have the following
qualifications:

* Great leadership and organizational
skills
* A good work ethic and an outgoing
personality
* Computer skills are required

Qualified applicants can e-mail their resume to
attention dental position: caribsuppliers.com


ABACOMAETS
1.I MI 'I


announces that


Annual General Meeting

of Shareholders


will be held on the 18th of July, 2008
at 7 p.m.


at Abaco Beach Resort and Boat Harbour
in Marsh Harbour, Abaco



Legal Notice

NOTICE

BOSWORTH CONSULTING LTD.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000 the Dissolu-
tion of BOSWORTH CONSULTING LTD. has been com-
pleted, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-
pany has therefore been struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was the 15th day of May
2008.


FOR SALE
Lot No. 23, Block 1 Unit 1
Cannon Bay Subdivision, Grand Bahama

All that parcel of Vacant Land containing 25,000
square feet or .57 acres situate in Unit 1 of Cannon
Bay Subdivision. The property is located on the west
side of Breech Drive, north of Cannon Ball Lane,
and is one hundred and twenty-five feet along the
waterway. All the roads are paved with asphalt and
all utilities are in place. The area is approximately
seven miles east of the Commercial District of
Freeport.

For conditions of sale and any other information.
please contact:
Credit Risk Management Collection Unit
At: 502-0929 or 356-1608

Interested persons should submit offers in writing
addressed to:
The Manager,
Credit Risk Management-Collection Unit
P.O.Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas

To reach us before July 31, 2008
Serious Enquires Only


Kingsway Academy is seeking applicants for
teaching positions in the following areas:

ELEMENTARY:
Teachers for Grades 2 through 6

HIGH SCHOOL
Clothing Construction and Craft/Needlework
Music (Part-time or full-time),
Spanish
French
Home Economics/Art and Craft
Carpentry and Joinery
Chemistry
Physical Education/Health Science
Laboratory Technician

High School applicants should be qualified and
willing to teach to the BGCSE, S.A.T.II, and
AP level with at least a Bachelor's Degree, or
equivalent, with 6 years experience at the High School
level in the particular subject area along with a
Teacher's Certificate. A Masters Degree in
education, in teaching and learning. or the content area,
would be an asset.

All successful candidates should have the following:
* An Academic Degree in the area of specialization
* A Teaching Certificate
* Excellent Communication Skills
* A love for children and learning
* High standards of morality
* Be a born again Christian

Letters of application together 'with a recent
color photograph and detailed Curriculum Vita
(including the names and addresses of at least three
references, one being the name of one's church
minister) should be forwarded to:

Ms. Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
Kingsway Academy Business Office
Bernard Road
Nassau

Salaries would be commensurate with qualifications
and experience.
Deadline for Applications is
Monday July 14, 2008


N IE R YA WFIELTY __ SFG CAPITAL MARKETS
ROYAL FIDELITY C40K &9ADVIO.YSEIC
C FA L'"
S. BISX uSTD & TRADED m ,U .A-OF: .. '
*FRIDAY, 11,.IULY. '
lISX. ALL SHARE INDEX: A CLOSE 1.821.25 I CHMG 0.0 -1 6,00 1 YTD -245.50 | YTD% -11.8a ,
S. FINDEX: A CLOSE 870.39 -I Y D ft '.I 2607 28029% ',
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM F640 M EI bAlA&8 A iPOFMAT10N3
52.l.k-H, 52wk-LOk c S ritecnt, Pre ,out. Close Toda 9s Close Change Da'l% Vo, EPS I .r. P I::P E 1 Yield
1 95 151 Abaco MlarkelsB 1 84 1 84 o000 0 135 000 136 0.00%
11.80 11.80 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 11.80 0.00 1.086 0.200 10.9 1.89%
9.68 9.30 Bank of Bahamas 9.30 9.30 0.00 0.643 0.160 14.5 1.72%
0.99 0.85 Benchmark 0.89 0.89 0.00 -0.823 0.030 N/M 3.37%
3.74 3.49 Bahamas Waste 3.49 3.49 0.00 0.209 0.090 18.7 2.58%
2.70 1.48 Fidelity Bank 2.35 2.35 0.00 0.055 0.040 42.7 1.70%
14.10 10.80 Cable Bahamas 14.00 14.00 0.00 1.121 0.240 12.5 1.71%
3.15 2.35 Collna Holdings 2.88 2.88 0.00 6.660 0.046 0.040 62.6 1.39%
8.50 4.80 Commonwealth Bank (Sl) 7.00 7.00 0.00 1.400 0.440 0.300 15.9 4.29%
7.22 3.20 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.25 3.27 0.02 0.131 0.052 25.0 1.59%
3.00 2.25 Doctor's Hospital 2.85 2.85 0.00 0.308 0.040 9.3 1.40%
8.00 6.02 Famguard 8.00 8.00 0.00 0.728 0.280 11.0 3.50%
13.01 12.50 Finco 12.50 12.50 0.00 0.650 0.570 19.2 4.56%
14.75 11.65 FirstCaribbean Bank 11.65 11.65 0.00 0.550 0.450 21.2 3.88%
6.10 5.05 Focol (S) 5.53 5.53 0.00 0.386 0.140 14.3 2.53%
1.00 1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1.00 0.41 Freeport Concrete 0.44 0.44 0.00 0.035 0.000 12.8 0.00%
8.00 5.50 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 0.00 0.407 0.300 13.5 5.45%
12.50 8.80 J. S. Johnson 12.00 12.00 0.00 1.023 0.620 11.7 5.17%
10 00 1000 Premier Real Estate 1000 1000 000 0.180 0.000 55.6 0.00%
FIdelIty Over-The -Countlr Beari.tl ".
52'.1!h -=. 2mk-Low E.nte:. Bd I As. I Las- Frc VV Weekly V I EPSS i d S P E Yield
1.1 0, 14 25 Bahamas S.perr.a.-kel.. .1 4. 1 0 14 8,0 160O 0 600 13 4 4 11%
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35 -0.023 0.000 N/M 0.00%
Collna Over-The-Courtetr Se urtlUe * -":
41.00 41.00 ABDAB 41.00 00 3 00 41 GO 4 40 2 7S0 90 670%
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.160 0.900 13.4 8.16%
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0"-15 0.5 0 .4S .001.13 0 1:0 NM 000%
BIBX Listed MutuI-Furd.
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div$ Yield%
1.3231 1.2576 Colina Bond Fund 1.323145-* 2.41% 5.21%
3.0008 2.7399 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.990639***. -0.34% 9.15%
1.4020 1.3467 Collna Money Market Fund 1.401975 *.... 1.96% 4.23%
3.7969 3.3971 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.6007*** -5.17% 9.38%
12.2702 11.6581 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.2702"** 2.82% 5.73%
100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.00**
100.0000 98.2100 CFAL Global Equity Fund 99.956603^ -0.04% -0.04%
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.00**
10.5000 9.5611 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.5611"** -8.94% -8.94%
1.0039 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0039*:...
1.0038 1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.00385 *
1.0038 1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0038 .....
Market Terms N.A.V. y '
52wk-HI Highest Closing prca in last 52 eks Bi S Buying WIc of Colia enad Fidelity 31 Ocomber 2007
52wk-Lo Loest closing price in last 52 os ASk Sefin pce of Colia ad fidellt 30 Jun 2008
Previous Close Previouos day.' weghted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price 31 Apr 200
Todays Close Curent day's weighted price for daily volume Wekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior w kk -- --30 Apr 2008
Change Change n closing price from day to day EPS A company's reported earnings per h for last 12 m ...... 27 June 200
Daily Vol. Nurnber of tole shares traded today NAV Net Asset Vale
DIV $ DIvidends par share paid In te last 12 months NIM Not Mealngful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index Janary 1. 1 =- 100
(S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Dae 8/8/2007
TOT ADM CALL'.CJTAL 242- 02.7-O 1 IOBF] JT DIE 2Sa-7742 FMItr1 `4FC3 i fLA Fi'' B-.... -PATA "*f&1W


BUSINESS


MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JULY 14, 2008


Investor appeals


$68,000


venture capital rejection


FROM page 1B


"We were only asking the venture
capital fund to loan us $68,000, as were
providing $17,000 injecting 20 per
cent of the equity ourselves," Mr
Duncombe said.
Website
"One of the things, according to their
website, is if the idea is excellent, they
will provide up to $100,000 in debt
funding without any equity or collat-
eral.
"We submitted a proposal that was
well-researched, and had been vetted


by two of the leading institutions in
the Bahamas FirstCaribbean and
Commonwealth Bank. The only thing
that stopped us from obtaining the loan
from them was their demand for col-
lateral. They were saying it's an excel-
lent idea, and believed it could work."
Bahamas Hydraulics would have ini-
tially employed five to six persons, who
would have been sent to the US to
obtain the relevant certifications and
training. After one year, Mr Dun-
combe said the plan was to expand
staffing levels to around 12-14 persons,
with the business also expanding into
other areas such as air conditioning
hoses and propane lines.
Yet when the plan was presented to
the Bahamas Entrepreneurial Venture
Fund's Board, "they rejected it without


even giving us a satisfactory reason
why. They gave us nothing other than
the fund could not provide funding for
the project, and good luck".
Proposal
"We know the proposal is .90 per
cent more researched and better done
than what they receive across their
desks, and a lot of work has gone into
it in terms of research," Mr Duncombe
told Tribune Business.
A well-known and outspoken social
activist on a number of issues, he sug-
gested the rejection may have been
political because he had offended the
Government.
Jerome Gomez, the Bahamas Entre-
preneurial Venture Fund's adminis-


trator, dismissed this claim with a
chuckle, telling Tribune Business: "Not
at all. That [politics] was never con-
sidered. Mr Duncombe applied under
the PLP and was rejected under the
FNM. I don't think he can put that
claim forward."
Mr Gomez, an accountant and part-
ner in the Baker Tilly Gomez account-
ing firm, also explained that the
Bahamas Entrepreneurial Venture
Fund's Board could not give an expla-
nation for its rejection decisions
because doing so would open up too
much debate" and cause its time to be
taken up in talks with applicants.
On Mr Duncombe's claim that his
application was better than most, Mr
Gomez replied: "The 300-plus busi-
nesspersons who submitted proposals


all say that, but today we have only
funded 46 businesses.
"The Board determines those busi-
nesses to fund and those not to fund.
The venture capital fund Board does
not give a reason why they reject busi-
ness plans. We find that opens up too
much debate, and we can spend three
days, a week, debating with the appli-
cant.
Imagine
"You can imagine the number of
business plans we get. If we take time
to explain every detail to every appli-
cant, we would not be able to assess
these plans any more. It's just like some
banks. They only tell you they can't
finance your plans."


LOT NUMBER 20- BLOCK 8 OF SEA BREEZE












A- Four Bedrooms, two bathrooms, single-family residence, with living room, dining room,
family room, covered porch, foyer, kitchen, laundry room with own half bathroom and a
two-car carport. Building has an effective age of Twenty-two years and a gross floor area
of 3,395 sq, ft. Land size is 10,000 sq. ft.
.The building is located on the southern side of Silver Palm Grove, 400 feet west of Silver
Palm Lane or 200 feet of Silver Palm Boulevard.
For conditions of sale and any other information, please contact:
Credit Risk Management Collection Unit At:
502-0929 or 356-1608
Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management-Collection Unit
P. 0. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before July 31, 2008
Serious Enquires Only'.


ARAWAK
"rAiww K9/ y~v


Commercial Outboards


Qualifications:
* College Degree
* Minimum of 7 years experience in Sales, Insurance or
Banking preferably

Responsibilities:
* Meet with customers
* Qualify each customers to determine the amount they
can borrow from the bank
* Take each customer to show them their future home
* Meet customers on site if they have any question during
the homeownership process
* Walk through each home when it is completed with
each customer

Qualities:
* Self motivated
* Must be a team player
* Creative
* Patient
* A good listener
* A people's person
* Computer literate

Compensation
* Commensurate with both qualifications & experience
Assurance of Confidentiality
* Assurance is given that every applicant will be treated in
the strictest of confidence.

Those persons asked to interview will be required to provide
two references
Interested applicants must email resume to
position@arawakhomes.com


From 25 to 75 HP in stock now.

All Sea Pro's come standard with:
Blackmax aluminum propeller
Mercury six gallon fuel tank
Mercury one year commercial warranty

Featuring:
Stronger ignition systems
Extra heavy-duty gear cases
Rugged internal components


LIGHTBOURNE MARINE

EAST BAY STREET. NASSAU. BAHAMAS,


Deadline: 25th July 2008


BUSINESS


On The Water


PH: 393-5285









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JOY ANNIVERSARY
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S, Joy FMb owners, disc
jockeys, sales tear and
staff (pictured above),
paused for a moment of
reflection and fellowship
on the afternoon of Tues-
day, July 1 at Radio
House. Shirley Street.
The group indulged in
succulent cake and fruit-
flavoured cider in celebra-
tion of the stations fifth
birthday.


JOY ANNIVERSARY


CHURCH SERVICE
) Anniversary celebratons for The Sahamas'flret 24.
hour gos FM elation were officially launched on Sun-
day, June 29 during corporate worship at St. Agnes Parish,
Granf& Town. The Joy FM family particlpated fully in the
Mass through singing, reading and element bearing. At
the end of the service, which was broadcasted live on Joy
FM, Minster K gave remarks on behalf of the Joy team,
Minister K is pictured above as Ardfeacon, the Venerable
I. Ranfutly Brown, Rector of S. Ag it looks on. The
RevWd Fr. Denrick Rolle, prIest-in-charge of All Saints
Pamnh, Mangrove Cay, Andros, was the celebrant at the
efwies,


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THE TRIBUNE


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