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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01069
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: July 7, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01069

Full Text





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Schoolgirl alleges students

giving sexual favours for money .


CHILDREN as young as nine
are selling their bodies to, older
men who wait for them outside the
school gates and give them money
for sex, it was claimed.
According to a schoolgirl who
spoke to The Tribune on the con-
dition of anonymity, girls learn to
give men sexual favours for money
when they are in grade four and
will continue the practice through-
out high school.
She said a "majority" of school-
girls engage in this "voluntary"
prostitution and it has become nor-
mal for them to go out with men in
their 30's.
The men go to public and pri-
vate schools across Nassau to pick
up vulnerable young girls after

Permanent
secretaries
shuffle is
announced
AS PREVIOUSLY report-
ed by The Tribune, govern-
ment yesterday announced the
shuffling-of several permanent
secretaries.
Most notable in govern-
ment's statement was the
announcement of the three-
month leave of Permanent
Secretary Harrison Thompson
in the Ministry of Local Gov-
ernment and Lands.
This comes after the resig-
nation of Sidney Collie from
the post of Cabinet minister
over the. recent errors leading
up to local government elec-
tions.
Despite Mr Collie's stepping
down from his post, members
of the PLP opposition have
been calling for more people
to tender their resignations as
they do not believe that the
SEE page 11


school and take them out. The girls
are then pressured to perform sex-
ual favours for money and treats.
"They learn they can sell their
bodies and get the material things
they want," she said.
"There is pressure to buy cer-
tain clothes or whatever because
you want to look good or up-to-
date, so they will do things with
guys to get money.
"A lot of school girls really like
older men because they are work-
ing so they can give them things."
Acting Commissioner of.Police
Hulan Hanna, however, negated
the claims of prolific prostitution
among Nassau schoolgirls, but
maintained that police are doing
all they can to protect students
after school.
"We have consistent police
patrols at schools in New Provi-
dence particularly at senior schools
and whenever persons are found to
be loitering they are told to leave."
Mr Hanna said the police force
has no information to justify the
claim that the majority of school-
girls in schools across New Provi-
dence are selling their bodies and
performing sexual favours for cash.
SEE page eight

Five suspected
male prostitutes
detained and
questioned
DURING a recent investiga-
tion at a local hotel, five suspect-
ed male prostitutes were detained
and questioned by police.
The men, who were reportedly
between the ages of 18 and 20
years, were said to be dressed in
female clothing -' even down to
their undergarments.
Originally, police received a
complaint from one of the men
SEE page 11


CD,






DEPUTY Prime Minister Brent Symonette, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest enjoy this dancer's
performance during the Royal Bahamas Defence Force Band's rendition of 'Obeah' during the Beat Retreat event at Rawson Square yesterday.


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Four murdered schoolboys

are finally laid to rest


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT Four murdered
missing schoolboys were finally
laid to rest on Saturday following
a solemn funeral service at the
Community at Heart Tabernacle
Church of God of Prophecy.
Four identical blue caskets
adorned with bouquets of white
and light blue carnations were dis-
played at the front of the church,
with the photographs of each of


the boys Mackinson Colas,
DeAngelo McKenzie, Junior
Remy, and Desmond Rolle.
The occasion was bitter sweet
for the mothers, and families who
have waited five long years to
bury their sons' remains.
At the gravesite, families cried
as the coffin of each of the boys
was lowered one by one into their
final resting place at Grand
Bahama Memorial Park.
Grand Bahama MPs Kenneth
SEE page 11


COMMONWEALTH Mis-
sion Baptist Church in Eliza-
beth Estates honoured mem-
bers of the press at its Inde-
pendence Day church service
yesterday.
Bishop Arnold Joscy, the
church's pastor for the past 21
years, came in close contact
with the working press as press
liaison officer during four of
the 26 years that he served with
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force.
Bishop Josey said that just
days before the official cele-
bration of the nation's 35th
anniversary he wanted to pause
to "say thanks once again to
those persons who though valu-
able have somehow been trivi-
alized and minimized."
"Today," he said, "we say
thank you to the media, and
some of its personalities who
championed the birth of our
nation. The story would not
have been told if they didn't
tell it. It would not have been
known if they had not recorded
it."


SEE page 11


High number
of Bahamian
women 'may be
carrying breast
cancer gene'
* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net
OBSERVATIONS by leading
oncologists suggest that an unusu-
ally high number of Bahamian
women may be carrying the so-
called breast cancer gene.
Alarmed by the "distressing"
number of women who are being
diagnosed with the disease at a
young age, a group of local oncol-
ogists, in conjunction with spe-
cialists in Miami, is seeking fund-
ing to create a comprehensive
data registry of breast cancer suf-
ferers in the Bahamas.
Speaking with The Tribune, Dr
SEE page eight

E Michael Barnett and
Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace will be sworn in as
Attorney General and Min-
ister of Tourism respec-
tively at 9am at Govern-
ment House today.


k". I';


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PAGE 2 MONDY JUL 7,200OTHE RIBUN


MAI SECTION
I News .............P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12
wcalNews...............P13,14,16,18,19,20,23
oria/LK letters. ....................................... P4
id .......................................P15,17.,21,24
?.................................................... P22
SINES SECTION
SBui .--S.. -..........................P1,2,3,4,5,7,8
s.:. ..... ............. .................... P6,11
............ ........ ...... .........P9,10,12

SLM$#IED SECTION 40 PAGES

,USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 28 PAGES

,SORTS SECTION
LocalSpc ts ................................ P1,2,14,15
USA Today Sports............................ P3 13
.ter:................................................ P16
f -.'*."" ;"'*


I


Patricia Francis widow of Francis


Francis dies in Switzerland aged 93


MRS. Patricia Francis, aged
93, widow of Francis Francis
died peacefully at her son,
Craig Francis's home in
Switzerland Wednesday
morning, July 2.
Mrs. Francis came to the
Bahamas with her husband in
the late 1940's and settled on
Bird Cay in the Berry Islands,
which they purchased from
Mr. Francis's sister Marion B.
Carstairs during the war years.
She sold Bird Cay in 2002 and,
had been living between
Lyford Cay and Switzerland
for the past few years.
Before her marriage to
Francis Francis, as Patricia
Leonard, she was a very suc-
cessful stage actress in the the-
atre in London performing in
countless plays and reviews
put on by impresario Andre
Charlot.
She happily gave up her


fame to follow her husband to
the Bahamas, together they_
developed Bird Cay from an
island covered in scrub bush
into one of the most devel-
oped private islands in the


Bahamas. They entertained
many dignitaries and famous
people on Bird Cay over the
years. After her husband's
death on Bird Cay in 1982,
Mrs. Francis assumed a qui-


. eter life style surrounding her-
self with her family and close
friends.
She loved the Bahamas
dearly and especially cher-
ished the time spent on Bird
Cay, the beauty of the Berry
Islands and the solitude of liv-
ing in the Out Islands gave her
great pleasure.
Many people will remem-
ber her fondly for her gen-
erosity and philanthropic care
of children and animals.
Her brother Major Gerald
Leonard predeceased her by
two months passing away in
late March, they were both
extremely close.
Her daughter Mrs. Kim
Aranha is the President of the
Bahamas Humane Society,
and her son is Craig Francis
formally proprietor of
Caribbean Shipping who now
resides in Switzerland.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008







MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008, PAGE 3
wIlk ufC^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^I


THE TRIBUNE


0In brief

Assistance
sought in the
identification of
woman's body
POLICE are still seek-
ing assistance in identify-
ing the badly decomposed
body of a woman who was
found off St Vincent Road
on Friday.
The woman, who has
been classified as the
country's latest homicide,
was found in the back of a
building under construc-
tion on Vinspin Road at
around 10.30am.
Chief Supt Glen Miller,
officer in-charge of the
Central Detective Unit,
told The Tribune yester-
day that the body of the
murdered woman will be
transferred to the morgue
sometime today.
It is hoped that an
autopsy will yield some
clues which will point to
the victim's identity and
possibly to her killer.
"So far, no one has
come forward to claim
her," Mr Miller said.
The CDU chief in an
earlier interview said that
there were visible injuries
to the head of the woman
whose body was dressed
with a top, but was
unclothed beneath.
It is believed that the
woman has been dead for
more than a week.
This discovery came just
days after the body of
Haitian Louis Jaochim,
36, was found in the
bushes off Carmichael
Road.
The body of Jaochim,
who worked as a gardener
with Stuart Cove, showed
no signs of trauma, but his
death is being regarded as
suspicious pending an
autopsy.


Youth arrested

in connection

with robbery

AN 18-YEAR-OLD
youth has been arrested in
connection with the rob-
bery of the Royal Castle
Restaurant and Take-
Away on Baillou Hill
Road.
According to police
reports, the establishment
was held up by a gunman
at 6.30am on Saturday.
The suspect threatened
the cashier and escaped
with approximately $1,300
in cash.
Police later that day,
acting on information they
received, arrested a 18-
year-old boy of Anderson
Street..
In his possession, offi-
cers found a .38 pistol and
six unfired rounds of
ammunition.

I '] ]IIt i TiCl~,


Suspected marijuana and

more than $800 seized


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT Grand Bahama
police made a drug arrest in East
Grand Bahama on Saturday that
resulted in the seizure of suspect-
ed marijuana and more than $800
cash.
Chief Superintendent of Police
Basil Rahming said a 22-year-old
resident of Murphy Town, Abaco,
was taken into custody sometime
after 5pm near the settlement of
Freetown.
According to reports, officers
of the Eastern Division were on
mobile patrol around 5.20pm on
the Grand Bahama Highway
when they pulled over a white
Buick Century in the vicinity of
Freetown.
Mr Rahming said officers
stopped the vehicle because the


PM attends
ecumenical
service of
thanksgiving
PRIME Minister
Hubert Ingraham and his
wife Dolores yesterday
afternoon attended the
ecumenical service of
thanksgiving for the 35th
anniversary of Indepen-
dence at theOSir Kendal
Isaacs Gym.
In his message, printed
in the service's pro-
gramme, Prime Minister
Ingraham reflected on
the country's 35 years of
Bahamian Independence.
"We are are a talented, resourceful
and cultured people. During the
past 35 years we have drawn on
our talents, our resources and our
cultural strength to make institu-
tions and principles inherited from
colonial times, our own," he said.
Inviting all Bahamians to join in
this year's Independence celebra-
tions, Mr Ingraham said that "all
our combined efforts have made
us a great little nation and a respon-
sible international member of the
international community."


driver was acting suspiciously aft er
spotting the police cruiser.
While searching the vehicle, a
plastic bag containing one half
pound of marijuana was retrieved,
along with $830 cash, which is sus-
pected of being the proceeds froi n
the sale of dangerous drugs.
The driver was arrested an.d
taken into custody. He is expected
to be formally charged in these
Freeport Magistrate's Court o0a
Monday.
BREACH OF FISHERIES ACT
THREE Abaco men were.
arrested on Saturday after they
were allegedly caught with crawr-
fish and stone crab during the
closed season.
Acting on information received,.
officers of the Eastern Division
pulled over a blue Hyundai
Accent car on the Grand Bahama


Highway in the vicinity of South
Riding Point around 6.20pm Sat-
urday.
According to Supt Rahming,
the occupants were found in pos-
session of two Styrofoam coolers,
which were in the back trunk.
On inspecting the coolers, offi-
cers discovered 224 pounds of
freshly caught crawfish, along with
six pounds of fresh stone crab
claws.
Mr Rahming said the crawfish
harvesting season does not open
until August 1 and the stone crab
season begins on October 1.
The three male residents of
Moores Island, Abaco, were
arrested and taken into custody
at the High Rock Police Station.
The seafood was confiscated.
Formal charges are expected to
be filed in the Freeport Magis-
trate's Court on Monday against
the three.


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hear from people who
are making news in
their neighborhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an
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If so, call us on
322-1986 and share'
your story.







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008


p *A TjH ITOR


YESTERDAY, Bishop Arnold Josey -
policeman turned preacher honoured the
press corps, which had harassed him for four
long years when he was the,police force's
press liaison officer.
Many were the occasions when Officer
Josey, as he then was, was pestered by a
reporter, trying to meet his deadline, for
information about a criminal information
that only Mr Josey could provide. Often Mr
Josey was wearing his pastor's robes when
reporters were in search of him. While he
was busy preaching to the saved, the reporter
was anxious to talk to him about the crimi-
nals. There was many a verbal tussle between
policeman-pastor and reporters over the
years, but we all survived, and much to his
credit, Bishop Josey never lost his cool.
His is a community church always encour-
aging his Elizabeth Estates parishioners to
live up to their full potential and finding
excuses to publicly honour them when they
do..
Every year his church celebrates the coun-
try's ILidependence in a special way by hon-
onming those persons who are essential to the
smooth functioning of our community, but
are too often taken for granted and never
thanked:
Among them have been the teachers, nurs-
es, boat builders, taxi drivers, small business
men and women and garbage collectors, who
he prefers to call "sanitation technicians:"
Yesterday it was the press the Fourth
Estate.
"Amidst this historic and timeless
moment," he told his parishioners yesterday,
"the world around us is shrouded in one great
big question mark." And it was that big ques-
tion mark that took him around the world
touching on its trouble spots war in Iraq
;and Afghanistan complicated by perceived
involvement of Iran, earthquakes, flooding
Said death in China, the Tibetans and their
Dalai Lama, the flooding and tragedy in
Myanmar (Burma), the despair of Africa and
the need for someone to get President
. Mugabe to listen, the oil crisis and so on it
went until he arrived back in the land of his
birth "the greatest little country on earth."
I'- small, he recognized that it too is a
en ,wh major problems.
He touched on the election court and the
need, when the final case has been settled, for
the "glaring defects in the system" to be
repaired before the next election.


GENERATOR


S p obcat on
Bahamas
Versatility Productivity Reliability
Crawford 5t., Oakes Field
'*-;-6) 1. ')/2

He urged that work be started early on
the electoral boundaries to avoid the confu-
sion of the 2007 election. The question of
the Kennedy constituency and whether an
elected member of a political party be
allowed "arbitrarily to decide only weeks lat-
er that he isn't really what he said he was."
He felt that the people who elected him
should have a say in the MP's decision.
And, of course, being a former police offi-
cer, he had much to say about crime. He was
disappointed in how government has dealt
with crime. He said that in January Prime
Minister Ingraham had said that his govern-
ment "commits to ensuring that our laws are
vigorously enforced, modernised and
strengthened where necessary." Bishop Josey
said that Bahamians now wanted to hear per-
sonally from the Prime Minister as to what
they should do, "who must do what, and who
is doing what."
He talked of the summons and warrant
system that has to be updated. He con-
demned a system where people with arrest
warrants can get their cars licensed, and trav-
el and conduct business with impunity.
He said there are cases in police stations,
especially traffic matters, that have languished
so long that they are nqw statute barred.
He suggested that persons who could help
expedite these matters we're many justices
of the peace, senior retired police officers
who should be called back into service and
would be happy to continue serving their
country.
"Let's get the community courts going
right away one in the East, one in the
South, and one in the Southwest," he said,
offering to volunteer himself "to get the ball
rolling."
He dealt with coroner's courts, the magis-
trate's courts, school policing, and many oth-
er issues.
The big question mark: How is this country
to be saved? And the answer in the mind of a
former police officer is to uphold and enforce
the laws. "If ye be willing and obedient ye
shall eat of the good of the land," he con-
cluded, quoting from the Bible.
If not then just look around and see, on
the eve of her thirty-fifth birthday, the
depraved state to which this disobedience
has brought our beloved Bahamas and
the downward path on which it will continue
unless Bahamians are prepared to turn. it
around.


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Adveitising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


witt


EUDITOR, The Tribune.
THANK you for space in
your invaluable column. Please
allow these comments to be
expressed concerning an article
written on page two of The Tri-
bume's Monday, June 23, 2008
edition under the storyline:
"H opes of joint ventures with
Bahamians and foreign
investors in light of EPA".
Declarant here is that the
reporter did an excellent job
ho wever; the contents of the
stciry itself were a bit disturb-
ingg.
The article in question her-
aids the Minister of State for
Finance's announcement that
Bathamians will be able to col-
laborate with foreign investors
through the Economic Partner-
shiip Agreement ("EPA") due
to a "most significant change"
that will be made to this coun-
try's National Investment Poli-
cy ("NIP").
Additionally, these changes
to the NIP would apparently
complement industries in The
Bahamas that would be opened
to foreign participation but only
if the outside investor agreed
to "join hands" with a Bahami-
an.
Strangely, the Minister failed
to mention that the NIP is only
a -policy and not a statute and is
therefore predisposed to the
whims of the Government.
Further, it is asserted that if
-this Government was serious
about Bahamian participation
int any particular sector or ser-


I
vices,
sector
only,
imple
port ti
Thi
gressi
state t
yet to
made
by Th
liberal
indust
Af
that w
was th
tors oi
the Ei
be ma
June.
Ins
tolera
ment
to sell
Howe
vexing
Gover
citizen
and p
action
Thi
tant t(
the wa
it.
Adc
that t
lars in
tion ai


docility
Ito address this matter properly
or in a timely manner to the
country.
Unfortunately, they have
buried their heads in the sand
concerning this Treaty.
they would have kept the Even the special interest
or services for Bahamians groups that oppose the EPA in
and they would have some form or fashion have not
merit legislation to sup- fostered well in presenting the
his position. most crucial issues from their
s article, which got pro-' platform.
vely worse, went on to It is just absurd that the
hat "The government has Opposition and the Church are
release the full offer being allowing the Government to
to the European Union expose only portions of a docu-
e Bahamas in terms of the ment of such significance to
alisation of its services only a select group of individu-
tries". als, over such a short space of
further ominous statement time.
vas made by the Minister It is a firm belief that the
hat a list showing the sec- process that the government is
r services to be offered to using to sell their position to
uropean Union "should" the public about the EPA is
ade public by the end of egregious to say the least.
The hands that hold the cards
some instances, one can to this country's future is being
te the vagaries of govern- kept too close to the chest by a
actions, as they attempt small group of persons and
their views to the public. nobody has the political will to
aver, nothing can be so oppose this position.
g as to see members of this Even as a person who has
rnment casually inform its pro-treaty views, I am a firm
ns about a life changing believer in public education;
possibly irrevocable trans- and it is evident that a contract
i. such as the EPA should not be
s Treaty is far too impor- entered into without absolute
o be treated with docility, dialogue with the common man
ay our leaders are treating because only the common man
will have to pay the price.
ditionally, it is sad to see
wo other influential pil- DWAYNE J HANNA
this society, the Opposi- Nassau,
nd the Church, have failed June 23, 2008.


EDITOR, The Tribune
Mr Adrian Gibson's a
"Our Educational Syst
an inadequate Sham'
rnad with meticulous in
While he presented a n
oif salient and relevant i
hie has made some misle
i ll-advised and inacc
statements.
First, the national gra
'.D' in both the BGCS
BJC is an acceptable


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expected academic outcome:
a. the point is that the 'D' grade
represents the average grade
article, on a scale of A to G.
tem is If we want to improve the
', was national results by a letter
terest. grade, that is, from D to C,
umber then we must change our
points, philosophical approach to the
,ading, examinations by allowing only
;urate the best students to sit the
examinations.
ade of Secondly, not to advance
E and students to the next grade lev-
e and el unless they earn a 2.00 or
better GPA is an ambitious
ideal but a highly unrealistic
one at this time.
The Ministry of Education
does not have the resources
to implement such a policy.
Thirdly, although Mr Gib-
son commented on the lack of
parent support in the schools,
he should have made this the
crux of the whole matter. The
parents are the primary rea-
son for poor student perfor-


mance, not Minister Carl
Bethel and the Ministry of
Education or the curriculum.
By the way, the essential dif-
ference between the private
and public schools is that the
parents in the former make
things happen.
Fourthly, considering the
fact that our country is
plagued with a myriad of
social-ills, it's a wonder we
have 50 per cent of the stu-
dents with high school diplo-
mas.
Thanks be unto God for the
hard working and caring Min-
istry Officials, school admin-
istrators, teachers, parents and
students who are responsible
for the academic success sto-
ries throughout our beautiful
Bahama land.
PERRY R
'CUNNINGHAM
Nassau,
June 30, 2008.


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MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


SMany BPSU members are 'disgruntled


J
,~~~~ llL


C0






BAHAMAS AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL CORPORATION (BAIC)
executive chairman, Edison M Key, paid a courtesy call on Hu Dingxian,
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the People's Republic
of China on Tuesday. Mr Key presented him with a replica of the Abaco
sloop racing champion Stormy Weather. They discussed co-operation
in agriculture. Pictured from left are BAIC general manager Benjamin
Rahming, second secretary, Chinese Embassy, Luo Xiao Qing, BAIC
executive Joyce Treco, BAIC execu-
tive chairman Mr Key, Chinese FORl3_INIIWN\SERVI C
Ambassador Hu Dingxian, BAIC
Handicraft Development and Market-
ing Department manager Donnalee Pet"tro
Bowe, BAIC assistant manager t iTlo
Arnold Dorsett, and first secretary, ,,
Chinese Embassy, Tan Jian.


with leadership and ready for c
'
hange


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
MANY members of the Bahamas Public
Service Union are "disgruntled" with its lead-
ership and are ready for a change, three can-
didates set to run in the union's September
elections claimed yesterday.
With the stated aims of better representing
members, bringing "greater transparency",
consultation and "fiscal prudence" to the
union, the three candidates officially
announced their intentions on Friday.
Mike.Stubbs, a Chief Climatological Offi-
cer at the Department of Meteorology, Sloan
Smith, a senior immigration officer, and Derek
Ferguson, a Stores and Purchasing Supervisor
in the Industrial Tribunal, will run for the
positions of President, Vice President and
Secretary-General of the BPSU in September.
Mr Stubbs told The Tribune that "by all
means" the contest, in which incumbent Pres-
ident John Pinder has already declared his
intention to vie for a third term as president,
should be a hot one.
While declaring that they appreciate what
Mr Pinder has achieved for the union during
his almost six years in office, Mr Smith said the


union needs new vision and direction.
Canvassing government offices over the
last three weeks, Mr Stubbs claimed the team
has been confronted by members who showed
"a high degree of dissatisfaction" with the
current leadership.
"(It went) to the extent that people went to
the level of using some profanity to express
their disgust" with the top team, he claimed.
A particular concern expressed, alleged
Mr Smith, is that "there may be a political
force behind certain of our (union) leaders."
"I think Mr Pinder has shown himself to be
partisan towards a political party..But when it
comes to the union, in order to be objective,
and to be fair to the members, you can't just
say it, you've got to appear to be that way."
One of the major issues the team hopes to
address if elected is the viability of the union's
medical plan, which is currently not accepted
by Doctor's Hospital and other individual
doctors after members' bills allegedly went
unpaid.
The malfunctioning plan is a "very major
concern" for a number of members, said Mr
Stubbs, an executive vice president of the
union from 2002 to 2005.
"A lot of our members who have now
retired they don't want to see it fall apart


because it's very difficult for them to get med-
ical coverage."
Meanwhile, "timely" financial reports,
access to all such reports by all members, a
"code of ethics" for executive members, open
dialogue by the executive team with shop
stewards, a vote from members on any union
investment over a certain value and an "up-to-
date website" are other plans the team have in
the pipeline, they claim.
Mr Smith said that a $10 increase in mem-.
bership dues instituted around 18 months ago,
from $15 to $25 a month, although making
the union "viable" again after a period where
it was faltering financially, left unadddressed
the root cause of the organisation's problems.
"It makes it look like it's profitable now but
what it says is, you've not effectively dealt
with the proper management of what you
have that has to change within the union.
The people are investing their money, they
have a right to have sound business practices
going on within the union and that is why we
are here."
A "people's investment" by the union in a
rental apartment complex has not yielded the
returns it could have, pointed out two of the
candidates, as it has been in a dilapidated and
vacant state for around five years.


'Bus fares need to double'


M By REUBEN SHEARER
and CAPUCINE DAYEN
THERE needs to be drastic
increase in fares for buses in New
Providence, drivers and the pres-
ident of the Public Transporta-
tion Association Bahamas
(PTAB), Reuben Rahming said
at a press conference yesterday.
"Bus fares need to double. The
point is not to rape Bahamians
of their money," Mr Rahming
explained. "We only want the
industry employees to be com-
pensated, due to the rise of cost in
fuel that has negatively impact-
ed our finances."
PTAB is calling on govern-
ment to consider a proposal sub-
mitted on November 16, 2005,
regarding the financial challenges
facing the transportation indus-
try. Mr Rahming and the drivers
are disappointed that no "formal
discussions" have been arranged
to date to formulate a compro-
mise providing the increase in bus
fares.
It was revealed that 60 per cent
of the revenues from buses go
straight to purchasing fuel, and
"that is without expenses," he
said. "The industry is collaps-


ing, and tomorrow's too late."
In a survey conducted by The
Tribune team, bus drivers say that
on average they pay around $130
a day to fill their tanks with
diesel. Prices are $6.31 a gallon
for diesel at most gas stations, it
was confirmed; and many say that
after paying this much at the
pump, they can merely muster
$80 on a good day.
One bus driver observed that
this is the first time in the nation's
history that diesel has been more
than gas. He remembers when it
was $3 ten years ago.
As part of a comprehensive
proposal, the PTAB is also asking
government to be given latitude
with a maximum and minimum
fare. "We don't want to lose
our short drive riders," he said, "it
would be unfair that they pay $2
for their ride."
Mr Rahming said that the pro-
posal would also allow bus pas-
sengers who need a bus transfer
to pay at least 10 per cent less on
their second ride.
He said that the current fare of
50, cents for ,Senior .,Citiz.ens
should, be,"revisited". as he,
believes that they.should, pay, the.;
"normal" fee like everyone else,,.


"Although we love providing
good service to them, it is unfair
that the PTAB has to compro-
mise for a certain class of citi-
zens," he explained.
Drivers say that "politicians
are behind the desk but we are
the ones who face the public. We
are the ones to see them," he
said. "We deserve much more
than we get, we are the ones who
deal with this on a daily basis."
Speaking to The Tribune,
Lawrence Thurston, a driver for
20 years, reiterated Mr Rahming's
comments, stating that the fare
should be the same for everyone
"across the board."
He explained that all of his
money goes to Diesel. "I can't
even spend a normal $200 on gro-
cery like everyone else," he
said. "I can only spend $100 and I
don't have anything left."
* President Rahming thanked
outgoing Transport Minister Ear-
le Deveaux for his service on
behalf of the PTAB, and com-
mended him on his new post in
charge of the environment. He
lopk f9grward to meeting with the
new'Minister of Transport in the
conmifig weeks regarding these
concerns.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008


Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute graduates celebrate their success


GRADUATES of the Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Institute
(BTVI) celebrated their success at
Bahamas Faith Ministries with over
1,000 teachers, relatives and friends.
Senior vice president of the plan-
ning, development, instructional and
effectiveness department at Daytona
State College, Dr Charles Carroll, con-


gratulated the 205 graduates for their
educational achievement despite life's
difficulties.
He said: "You've juggled exams,
families, jobs and challenges to be here
today. This diploma represents a lot of
hard work and sacrifice."
Dr Carroll encouraged the gradu-
ates to look inward for the qualities of


character integrity, courage and a con- share some of the excitement I feel
tinued desire to learn. The Minister of about this awesome journey that life
youth and sports Bryan Woodside also will represent for you even amidst the
advised graduates on how their choic- whirlwinds.
es from now on will determine who "I want to give you some encour-
they become. He said: "You are at an agement that chn help you make cer-
amazing moment in your life today. tain choices."
"I am not here to tell you what the He encouraged the graduates to live
purpose is in your life, but I want to fully, seize opportunities, be daring


and above all, keep ahead of the game.
Eric Taylor, representing the 2008
BTVI graduating class, challenged his
fellow graduates to dream big, aim for
the stars, set goals and commit to a life
of continuous learning. He was pre-
sented with the Manager's Award and
inducted to The National Technical
Honour Society.


Ragged Island residents frustrated


in their bid for harbour channel


CALLS from Ragged Island residents
for a much-needed harbour channel have
again fallen on deaf ears, it emerged last
night.
Islanders say the channel would revitalize
the economy by attracting passing yachts-
men from the United States.
However, the best they can expect in the
foreseeable future is a new dock at Gun
Point, where the government intends to
establish a Defence Force base.
Island spokesman Myron Lockhart-Bain
told The Tribune last night that the dock
project had been revealed during a meeting
between local MP Larry Cartwright and
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham.
An improved road linking the main set-
tlement, Duncan Town, with Gun Point at
the northern tip of the island will also be
built to replace the rough track in place at
present.
"Something is better than nothing," said
Mr Lockhart-Bain, "and it will enable the
mailboat to unload.straight on to a dock.
"But people here are disappointed
because we have been waiting for a new
channel for a long time.


Dock project revealed during talks

between local MP and Ingraham


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and other consultation procedures enjoyed
by larger islands. They feel their low voting
strength has made their community "The
Cinderella Isle" of the Bahamas.
"They are going to fix the road going out
to Gun Point, but none of this will help us to
diversify the economy here, which is what
we want most of all," said Mr Lockhart-
Bain.
Residents have also called for a third
teacher at the island school.
This, they claim, would enable students to
stay on the island for an extra two years
before being forced to seek secondary
schooling in Nassau.
There are real fears that life on Ragged
Island could become "untenable" unless
crucial matters like the school and channel
are addressed.


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Four business were affected Island Delite Cafe, L & L
Fashion Boutique, Audiotronics and Ride In Style Car wash.
Firemen were still working up until 7.45pm to ensure that the
fire was completely extinguished.


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"We have been told repeatedly that
European Union money was available for
the channel, which would enable passing
yachtsmen to come right in here."
Residents feel a channel would enable
Ragged Island's 68-strong population to
cash in on the tourist trade by providing
meals and refreshments for visitors.
As things stand, most yachts pass by on
their way to the Caribbean, leaving Ragged
Island in what residents feel is deepening
isolation.
"It sounds like the decision has been
made and that it's final," said Mr Lock-
hart-Bain.
"Our hopes have been dashed without
any kind of consultation."
Ragged Islanders have felt strongly for
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March in

honour of

murdered

Khodee Davis
FAMILY, friends and neigh-
bours of Khodee. Davis, who was
murdered in broad daylight on
Whit Monday, will march in his
honour and memory on Indepen-
dence Day, July 10.
The march will start at Freedom
Park in Fox Hill, continue west
along Bernard Road and Wulff
Road to Marathon Road, then
south along Marathon to Robinson
Road. The march then continues
east along Robinson Road and
Prince Charles Drive to Fox Hill
Road and then north back to Free-
dom Park.
"Once again, we, the free and
sovereign people of Fox Hill, are
obliged, in the face of rapid social
deterioration, to take action to
bring about necessary change in
our community and in the country
as a whole; to ensure that persons
charged with murder are not grant-
ed bail and persons convicted of
murder are hanged promptly,"
community activist Rodney Mon-
cur said in a press statement.
"The curse of lawlessness, gang-
sterism, mayhem and unrestrained
violent criminality is spreading
more and more in our beloved
country as murder, attempted mur-
der and other violent crimes con-
tinue to escalate with each pass-
ing day."
Mr Moncur said that the
Bahamas is "now.almost paralysed
by fear brought on by uncontrolled
violence over the recent weeks,
months and years."
"There is now a real threat that
the peaceful life that has been a
hallmark of Bahamian culture for
generations is about to be
destroyed because convicted mur-
derers are no longer hanged and
persons charged with murder are
all granted bail. The laws dealing
with punishment for murder have
been diluted and de-fanged," he
said.
"We reflect that at another time
in the history of The Bahamas,
there was a similar break-down in
law and order, when the pirates of
the 17th century, 'filled with plun-
dering zeal', as the late composer,
Timothy Gibson described them,
took over these islands."
History shows that Sir Woodes
Rodgers, the first Royal Gover-
nor, with a forceful hand, caught'as
many of these pirates as he cquld
and had them tried promptly'and
hanged without delay. In that Way,
the fear of the law was rejntro-
duced, the rule of law was re-estab-
lished and peace,; security and
prosperity were restored to these
islands and were sustained from
then until recently.
"A few days ago," said Mr Mon-
cur, "we the sovereign people of
Fox Hill were shocked to hear the
Attorney General of The Bahamas
give an explanation as to why the
Government cannot restore the
Rule of Law."
Mr Moncur said that in Fox
Hill her argument had been reject-
ed. As the people saw it the judi-
ciary, in giving reasons why per-
sons were being released on bail,
were making their own rules and in
so doing had "emasculated the
Government, reduced Parliament
to a non-entity, made us all subject
to their anti-social opinions and
have made us all victims of mur-
derers who are allowed to run free
throughout this country.
"This is not acceptable," he said.
"The free and sovereign people
of Fox Hill in particular, and of
The Bahamas in general," said Mr
Moncur, "will entertain no argu-
ment and no explanation as to why
the Rule of Law cannot be
restored and maintained in the
Bahamas. For us to entertain such
arguments is for us to commit
national suicide."
He said the primary function of
Government is to establish and
maintain an environment where
the Rule of Law reigns supreme
and is unchallenged. "This is what
Woodes Rodgers did several cen-
turies ago; and this is what is need-
ed once again today," he said.
Clearly, if the Attorney Gener-
al's arguments are accepted, then
the Bahamian people must come
to the painful conclusion that Gov-
ernment has failed miserably and
there is need therefore to look for
a new cohort of leaders who, being
neither hobbled by the legal mis-
interpretations of non-elected
judges, nor compromised by their
own opposition to capital punish-
ment, will restore and re-establish
law, order and security in this our
beloved country."


Mr Moncur said that the peo-
ple of Fox Hill believe that "this
curse of lawlessness is a complex
social phenomenon, the solution
to which requires an integrated
approach, embracing strengthening
of the police force; enlightening
the citizenry at large in areas such
as anger management and conflict
resolution; youth mentoring;
expansion of educational and eco-
nomic opportunities and so on.
"Further," he said, "we believe
that the core, the axis, of this inte-
grated approach must be the instill-
ing in the hearts of all Bahamians,
young and old, rich and poor, a
fear of the law that punishes all
convicted murderers by hanging
and that denies bail to those who
are charged with murder. "


Businessman donates $5,000





to 'Help Build the Bridge'


HAROLD "Sonny"
Waugh, one of Grand
Bahama's best known busi-
nessmen put his money where
his mouth is and donated
$5,000 to "Help Build the
Bridge" fund for the Lucayan
National Park.
"Sonny", as he is affection-
ately known in Grand
Bahama, "is not only a com-
munity builder, but also an
activist who always steps to
the plate to take the right
action to assist Grand Bahama
and its citizens," .said a
Bahamas National Trust
spokesman. He lives his life
by the Rotary motto, "Service
Above Self."
Mr Waugh, a long time sup-
porter of The Bahamas
National Trust, generously
donated $5,000 in support of
the "Help Build the Bridge"
fund, which means he will
have his family name stamped
on eight planks.

Damage

"The bridge is being rebuilt
after years of wear and tear
and hurricane damage," said
Karin Sanchez of the Grand
Bahama Regional Branch of
the Bahamas National Trust.
She noted "This bridge cam-
paign is just the first step in
the complete renovation of
the Park, which once fully
completed will feature not
only a new bridge but a wel-
come centre for guests,
improved parking, and other
amenities worthy of a Nation-
al Park."
When asked about his rea-
sons for this very generous
donation, Mr. Waugh replied
that he had been involved as
the initial chairperson of the
Bahamas National Trust when
the branch was established by
the late Basil Kelly, president
of the BNT in Nassau."
He added, "I have a rather


long and intense history with
the Trust, it was a great fight
to get the Trust on Grand
Bahama. I shudder to think
of the number of meetings I
attended with the Port
Authority and the government
when we wanted to make
Peterson Cay a national park.
"It was at a time when the
fragile nature of the environ-
ment was just being recog-
nized and I knew that this was
a big thing which we needed
to do. Closing the caves was a
fight, but at that point it need-
ed to be done to protect its
fragile ecosystem."

Tenacious

Sonny Waugh is a tenacious
man who has a special place in
his heart for his country and
its beauty. Mr. Waugh, a Nas-
sau native, came to Freeport
in 1956. At that time, he estab-
lished West End Yacht Haven
and Service Centre and was
the ESSO distributor for
Grand Bahama.
He married and he and his
late wife, Alice, had four chil-
dren Gregg who lives in
South Carolina, and Godfrey,
Brian and daughter Lee, all
of whom live in Grand
Bahama.
It is his vision that all school
children need to be better
educated as to the environ-
ment ,and it is his hope that
his $5,000 donation will help
towards the development of
the Lucayan National Park as
a tourist destination on Grand
Bahama.
Mr. Waugh challenges all
businesses in The Bahamas to
make a donation or match his
donation.
He believes strongly that if
the community works togeth-
er, good things happen. The
Trust is building an environ-
mentally sound bridge, in
compliance with the standards


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set down by the Grand
Bahama Port Authority and
their Environmental Depart-
ment.
"This in itself assists with
the continued strong develop-
ment we are seeing in Grand
Bahama as an ecotourist des-
tination," said a Trust
spokesman.
Cecilia Bodie, Administra-
tor and Educational liaison at
the Rand Nature Centre stat-
ed, "This very generous dona-
tion by Mr. Waugh is greatly
'appreciated. We are so very


thankful for his generosity.
The total cost of the bridge is
$250,000 and the Bahamas
National Trust has committed
$100,000 towards the project."
Forms for the "Help Build
the Bridge" campaign are
available at the Rand Nature
Centre, on the BNT website
and a mail/e-mail campaign is
also planned. Different levels
of bridge sponsorship are
available so that even school-
children can take part in this
project to assist their commu-
nity.


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OBITUARY

Norma Catherin Albury
January 22nd, 1944 -June 2nd, 2008.

Norma passed away on Monday June 2nd,
2008 and following a church service at Epworth
Methodist Church, she was laid to rest in the Cemetery
at Cherokee Sound.

Norma is survived by her husband, Bernard
Albury, daughter, Carol Sweeting, sons, Colin
Albury and Todd Albury,; son-in-law Blaine Sweeting,
daughter-in-law Heather Albury, sister, Eleanor
Jorgensen, brother-in-law, Michael Jorgensen,
sister-in-law, Sherry Albury, Aunt, Una Sawyer,
grandchildren, Lauren and TJ Albury, Elizabeth and
Dylan Sweeting and many other relatives and friends.

Gone, but never to be forgotten by those who
knew and loved her.


-I








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008


SOANW


FROM page one Child prostitution claim


He said: "What we are aware
of is that there arc young girls who
have liaisons with adult men, and
where it is brought to our atten-
tion we deal with it, but we do not
know that this is a rampant situa-
tion in all the schools."
Mr Hanna said there will be
an investigation into the claims.
The Tribune 's school girl
source explained that going out
with older men is widely accepted,
and even encouraged in the com-
munity.
"Some of the girls are still in
primary school, and their parents
either do not know what they are


doing or they encourage their chil-
dren to do it so they will bring
things home.
"And that is starting from
grade four. It's the environment
they grow up in."
The girl claims that some
teachers are involved in the illicit
sex trade, which has become so
common girls will perform sexual
favours for a $5 lunch snack.
Youth worker Carlos Reid said
he is well aware of this emerging
trend of child prostitution in the
Bahamas and is working with
young people to help them realise


how damaging it is.
He said: "More and more of
these girls are involved in this anti-
social lifestyle and they want to
get paid.
"They learn how to get things
by laying down and letting fellas
have their way. It's easy money
as far as they're concerned."
Mr Reid said the girls are influ-
enced by older women, such as
their mothers, aunts, sisters and
cousins who they will see with a
variety of men.
"We are on the verge of social
collapse," he said.
"Our young girls are off the
chain."


Albany environmental



manager acquires



CIWEM Chartered



Scientist certification


ROCHELLE NEWBOLD, Environmental
Manager of the $1.3 billion Albany community on
New Providence, is one of the first Bahamian
women to acquire certification as a Chartered
Scientist by the Chartered Institution of Water
and Environmental Management (CIWEM).
Ms Newbold is one of only six Bahamians to
receive the certification, along with Stacie Moul-
trie, an Environmental Consultant for Albany,
who also acquired the CIWEM membership. The
CIWEM is an independent professional body and
a registered charity within the United Kingdom,
advancing the science and practice of water and
environmental management for a clean, green
and sustainable world.
CIWEM has thousands of members in nearly
100 countries, working with local authorities, water
companies, regulatory bodies, governments, uni-
versities and the private sector.
The certification process involved considera-
tion of academic qualifications and minimum
years of relevant work experience as well as an in-
depth professional review, including an interview
with the organization's board members.
"We are very proud of Rochelle for this impres-
sive accomplishment," said Dr. Tyrone McKenzie,
Vice President of Albany Development Limited.
"This certification is an indication of Rochelle's


drive and dedication to the environment and we
couldn't be more fortunate to have such a well-
qualified member on our team."
Ms Newbold joined Albany in March and is
responsible for monitoring and ensuring Albany's
environmental commitments are in compliance
with the terms and conditions set for the devel-
opment by the BEST Commission and govern-
ment of the Bahamas.
Honoured
"We are honoured to have Rochelle on our
team, serving as Albany's key advocate for the
environment," said Christopher Anand, Albany's
managing partner.
"Rochelle is highly respected and joins an
esteemed group of environmentalists with her
CIWEM certification."
With a Masters of Environmental Management
degree from Duke University and Bachelor's
degree in Marine Biology from the University of
North Carolina at Wilmington, Mrs. Newbold is
respected in the Bahamas and within the envi-
ronmental field as a strong environmentalist and
a passionate guardian of the sea and coastal eco-
systems.


*ALO
The Bahamas Association of Compliance Officers
"Cormm#e/fao om/)m'


Special Assembly

feat n a d liscr T.sion on the

Economic Partnership Agre .: t (EPA)

Tuesday July 8,2008 Promptly from 7pm to 9pm
British Colonial Hilton Hotel

Panel Guests
Hon. Zhivargo Laing,
Minister of State for Finance
Mr. Charles Carter,
CEO, Island FM & Carter Marketing
Mr. Fayne Thompson,
So-Chair of BARF Bahamians Agitating
e: Lfor a Referendum on Free Trade
Mr. Hank Ferguson,
Economist Consultant, Bahamas Chamber
Cof CTmerce
Moderator
Mr. Michael Pintard,
Author, Speaker & Talk Show Host

Re-,eirve your seat o, .., .-: a is limited.

RSVP by July 4th and submit your questions for the panelists to
BACO's Administrator via web site: www.bacobahamas.com
or email m.pratt@bifs-bahamas.com

Aired Live on GEMS Bahamas 105.9FM & Streamed via www.gemsbahamas.com


FROM page one-
John Lunn explained that there is
unfortunately no complete statis-
tical data on breast cancer in the
Bahamas. Therefore, it cannot be
accurately determined how many
women suffer from the disease
and if that number has increased
over the years .
However, he said that Princess
Margaret Hospital's records show
that 50 per cent of their breast
cancer patients are under the age
of 50.
In most other countries, only


20 per cent of breast cancer suf-
ferers are younger than 50, he
said.
These numbers alone, Dr Lunn
said, suggest that Bahamian
women are very susceptible to
breast cancer.
"It's very distressing," he said.
Dr Lunn said that further ran-
dom testing led to even more
alarming discoveries.
Of 24 women who were ran-
domly tested for the breast cancer
gene, 12 were carriers and two of
those had very unique mutations
of the gene.
Dr Lunn explained that there
are approximately 700 mutations
of the gene, and that two specific
ones can be found in the
Bahamas.
One of the forms of mutation
which is found in the Bahamas, is
also seen in West African women,
the other mutation form seems
to be unique to the Bahamas, Dr
Lunn said.
According to the United States'
National Breast Cancer Founda-
tion most inherited cases of breast
cancer are associated with two
genes, the BRCA1, which stands


for breast cancer gene one, and
BRCA2, or breast cancer gene
two.
"The function of these genes
is to keep breast cells growing
normally and to prevent any can-
cer cell growth. But when these
genes contain abnormalities, or
mutations, they are associated
with an increased breast cancer
risk," the foundation said. -
Dr Lunn said that women who
have a family history of breast
cancer could be likely candidates
for carrying the breast cancer
gene.
Those diagnosed with having
the breast cancer gene, he said,
usually follow one of two paths.
Some women decide to surgi-
cally remove both their breasts
as a preventive measure, while
others choose to take the less
drastic route of routinely getting
tested and carefully monitoring
their bodies for any signs of breast
cancer.
Women with the breast cancer
gene are 15 times more likely to
get the disease, he said.
"It's a terrible diagnosis," Dr
Lunn said.


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THE Bahamas Humane Soci-
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urday to report a cow in her
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she had unsuccessfully attempted
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BHS Inspector Carl Thurston
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Upon arriving there he met
police officers from the Cable
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the owner of the cow:.. ,I
BHS executive director
Stephen Turnquest arrived on the


scene at 12.45pm and was told by
Ms Russell that they had contact-
ed everyone for assistance and
only the police officers showed
up.
* Mr Turnquest then contacted
every heavy equipment operator
in the Coral Harbour and
Carmichael Road area for assis-
tance, but none were available.
While checking for tow trucks or
backhoe drivers in the Adelaide
Road area, Mr Turnquest came
across Arlington Sherman and his
wife, who were on their way to
clean up their property.
Mr Turnquest explained to Mr
Sherman the dilemma of the cow
and the need to use his equipment
in order to rescue the animal.
The group of rescuers then tied
a rope around the cow's horns
and fastened it to the tractor's
bucket.
Mr Miller and Inspector


Thurston guided the cow's head
and Mr Turnquest and a neigh-
bour used two pieces of wood
under the cow's hip and together
they got the animal out of the
well.
After the cow had been heaved
up out of the well, BHS officers
removed the rope from its horns.
"The cow went on it's way, a
little bruised but very thankful to
be out of that well," the BHS said
yesterday in a press statement.
Mr Turnquest said the
Bahamas Humane Society wants
to send a warning to persons who
let their livestock go astray and
who leave open well pits on their
properties.
"Both of these can endanger
the lives of humans and animals.
The BHS would like to say a spe-
cial thank you to Mr Arlington
Sherman, he is truly a good
Samaritan," he said.


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LOCAL NEWS


MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


I __-Nifc1


- R KN T A CA R




















TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF
LANDSCAPING SERVICES
(Administration Building)

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders from eligible bidders for
the provision of Landscaping Services
(Administration Building) at the
Corporation's main offices at Blue Hill
and Tucker Roads.

Bidders are required to collect packages
from the Corporation's Administration
Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by con-
tacting Mrs. Delmeta Seymour,
Telephone No. 302-1158.

Tenders are to be delivered on or before
July 18th, 2008, 4:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Marked: Tender No. 671/08
Landscaping Services (Administration
Building) Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

The Corporation reserves the right to
accept or reject the whole or such part
of any Tender the Corporation
deems necessary.


COLLEGE OF BAHAMAS FIRST DISTINGUISHED LECTURE:
35 YEARS LATER: INDEPENDENCE and the BAHAMIAN PSYCHE



Foreigners, businessmen shaped



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Salary & Benefits commensurate with experience.
Interested persons should submit resume to the Head Office on
Harold Road or email
humanresources@aetosbahams.com


* By LISA LAWLOR
Tribune Junior Reporter

THE business of the
Bahamas was long ago decid-
ed on by foreigners and local
businessmen, with no consid-
eration to the loss of culture,
as discussed at the College of
the Bahamas' first Distin-
guished Lecture on "35 Years
Later: Independence and the
Bahamian Psyche".
Economist Dr. Olivia Saun-
ders said that the "format" of
our current tourism model
"was not crafted and deter-
mined by any premier or
prime minister of the country,
or even Stafford Sands", sup-
porting the popular view in a
2003 poll that the Bahamas
has "never been truly inde-
pendent (because) it relies on
the outside world to feed
itself.
"And we as a people have
given consent to (this tourism
model's) continuance and
deepening," Dr Saunders said.
In her opinion "we are a
sorry country if we can't imag-
ine doing anything but
tourism.
Others decided for
(Bahamians) what our busi-


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TENDERS FOR


Customs Clearance &
Delivery Services

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders from eligible bidders for
Customs Clearance & Delivery Services
to and from:
(1) Docks
(2) Airports & Post Offices.

Bidders are required to collect packages
from the Corporation's Administration
Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by con-
tacting Mrs. Delmeta Seymour,
Telephone No. 302-1158.

Tenders are to be delivered on or before
July 31st, 2008, 4:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Marked: Tender No. 672/08
Customs Clearance & Delivery
Services to and from Docks

Marked: Tender No. 673/08
Customs Clearance & Delivery
Services to and from Airports & Post
Offices
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject
the whole or such part of any Tender the Corporation


deems necessary.


ness would be, and we are in a
bad state if we can't do any-
thing other than what others
told us to do.
"We are ignoring our social
situation because we're stick-
ing with the economic format
that we know," she said,
"resulting in the loss of our
culture."
Dr Saunders noted that
promotion of our major
resorts is the tool currently
used to attract tourist busi-
ness, not "historical sites, not
cultural events, not purchas-
ing unique Bahamian prod-
ucts, not about getting to
know Bahamians." (See side-
bar).
"This explains why.our
policies tend to be directed
towards how Bay Street looks
and its security more so than
the appearance and safety of
Grant's Town," Dr Saunders
said.
Furthermore, she said,
because of this focus on devel-
oping the tourism industry
rather than on developing the
betterment of the Bahamian
people, we face:
Embarrassing illiteracy
and innumeracy;
Rise in chronic lifestyle
illnesses;
Appalling disparities in
incomes;
Overcrowded prisons;
Disturbing rise in disaf-
fected Bahamians regretting
having returned home from
university or not returning
because our business is not
about them demonstrating
and applying their brilliance.
Environmental degrada-
tion
In looking towards the next
35 years of independence,
"our task is to craft a business.
model for The Bahamas that
aims to bring together the
genius of Bahamians and res-
idents for the primary bene-
fit of Bahamians and resi-
dents," she said.
Dr Saunders also denied
any input to what another pos-
sible "primary business" could
be, if it is no longer this
"exploitative" form of
tourism, but concluded that
"tourism is not about the peo-
ple of The Bahamas, or that
Bahamians are the primary
beneficiaries."
According to her "Bahami-
ans do not have ownership of
their own business."


*I ^Reasonsto comehe reI


Nine of ten top reasons to visit the Bahamas have to do
with supporting non-Bahamian tourist attractions, as shown
on the Ministry of Tourism's website (www.nassauparadis-
eisland.com):
Enjoy our sparkling white-sand beaches and
breathtaking, warm turquoise blue waters.
Spend some time visiting with the dolphins. Bet-
ter yet swim with them.
Party like a celebrity at Aura, our new 9,000
square foot nightclub.
Try your luck at the two largest casinos in the
Caribbean.
Dine at the Graycliff Restaurant, the Caribbean's
first 5-star establishment. Or choose from a host of other
famous restaurants like Nobu, Caf6 Martinique, Mesa
Grill and Carmine's of New York.
Be one of the first to experience our three newest
hotels, the Sheraton Cable Beach Resort, The Reef
Atlantis, and The Cove Atlantis.
Make a splash at Aquaventure, our new, revo-
lutionary waterscape, filled with slides and rides.
Relax and indulge in world-class pampering at
the Red Lane Spa@ or the Mandara Spa.
Jump into our clear, turquoise waters and take
advantage of the best diving and snorkeling in the
Caribbean.
Tee off at two spectacular 18-hole, par 72 golf
courses.
BEST OF ALL Enjoy great rates on world-class
hotels and resorts!


--I


PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008


THE TRIBUINt-








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008, PAGE 11


Press members
FROM page one
Bishop Josey said: "On behalf
of all Bahamians everywhere,
those who didn't say it, or wouldn't
say it. thank you. You are appre-
ciated, but as priceless treasure,
though not always seen, your value
is never diminished."
Receiving the corporate trophy
of an eagle "soaring with eagles'
wings" being the motto of the
Commonwealth Mission Baptist
Church were The Tribune and
The Nassau Guardian. The two
trophies were received on behalf of
the two newspapers by Mrs Eileen
Carron, CEO of Tribune Media
Group and chairman of the joint
operation between The Tribune
and Nassau Guardian.
Framed certificates of honour
were also presented to media indi-
viduals for their "sacrificial com-
mitment and defence of democra-
tic rights as a champion in the birth
of our nation."
Mrs Carron was presented with
a certificate and thanked for the
training of so many young Bahami-
an journalists by herself, her hus-
band and staff and her father, the
late Sir Etienne Dupuch.
Also receiving the certificates of
honour were Mr Carl Bethel and
Edison (Ed) Bethel, Mr Calsey
Johnson and Mrs Elva Russell-
Rolle, representing the Nassau
Broadcasting Corporation (ZNS).
Mr Kenneth Francis, former pub-
lisher of The Nassau Guardian,
was also honoured as was Mr Fred
Sturrup whose certificate was
received by his wife.
Also honoured, but not present
to receive their certificates, were
Mr Charles Carter of Island FM,
Mrs Athena Damianos, former
Tribune news editor, and Mr Regi-
nald Smith.
After the church service those
honoured joined church members
for lunch.


FROM page one

Russell, Minister of National
Insurance and Housing and
Deputy-Speaker of the House
Kwasi Thompson attended the
funeral service, which was held at
11am.
Rev Peter Pinder, pastor of Mt
Zion Baptist Church, delivered a
powerful sermon in which he
expressed strong concern about
the crime situation in the
Bahamas.
He noted that the five missing
boys' tragedy was a tragic period
in the history of the country, espe-
cially on Grand Bahama.
On May 9, 2003, 12-year-old
Jake Grant was the first to disap-
pear. A week later, 11-year-old
Mackinson Colas disappeared on
May 16 while on an errand for his
mother.
On May 27,13-year-old DeAn-


gelo McKenzie disappeared while
walking home from school. Two
months later, Junior Remy, 11,
also disappeared while walking
home from school on July 29.
Desmond Rolle, 14, left his part
time job as a packer in the food-
store on September 28 and never
made it home.
After months of unsuccessful
searching and assistance from
international law enforcement
agencies, including Scotland Yard
and the FBI, the bodies of the
four boys were later discovered
in a remote area in East Grand
Bahama.
Jake Grant's body has never
been found.
Rev Pinder said the situation of
the missing boys ought to have
changed the country's attitude
towards young children.
"We ought to change our atti-
tude at how we look at children
and how we treat children and


Five suspected male prostitutes

detained and questioned
FROM page one

that his cellular phone had been stolen.
When the officers arrived at the hotel they discovered the five men
in the room. Escorting them to a nearby police station, the men were
interviewed and it was discovered that neither of them was employed.
When asked if they engaged in male prostitution, one of the men is
alleged to have responded that he did not need to "sell" as he was "tak-
en care of".
Shortly after arriving at the station, a source within the department
informed The Tribune that a man from Freeport, Grand Bahama -
accompanied by another young man arrived to claim the five boys.
This Freeport resident was quoted as saying that the boys "worked for
him."
'As the matter over the stolen phone had been resolved, the men were
released.


FROM page one

former minister acted without the knowledge of sev-
eral other government officials. *
In other developments of the shuffle, former per-
manent secretary Anita Bernard is coming out of
retirement to be the new permanent secretary in
the Ministry of Works and Transport.
The Ministry of Works and Transport was until
recently led by Earl Deveaux, but is now headed by
former Tourism Minister Neko Grant.
The other changes in the permanent secretary
portfolios are as follows:
Creswell Sturrup is moving from the permanent
secretary's post in the Cabinet Office to be the per-
manent secretary in the Ministry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources.
Ronald Thompson is moving from the perma-
nent secretary's post in the Office of the Prime Min-
ister to be the permanent secretary in the Ministry of
the Environment.
Colin Higgs is moving from the permanent sec-
retary's post in the Ministry of Public Works and
Transport to be the acting financial secretary in the
Ministry of Finance.
Thelma Beneby is moving from the permanent
secretary's post in the Ministry of Maritime Affairs
and Labour to be permanent secretary in the Office
of the Attorney General and Ministry of Legal
Affairs.
Leila Greene is moving from the permanent
secretary's post in the Office of the Attorney General
and Ministry of Legal Affairs to be secretary to the
Governor-General at Government House.
Dr Patricia Rodgers is moving from the perma-
nent secretary's post in the Cabinet Office to be per-
manent secretary in the Office of the Deputy Prime
Minister and Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Dr Rodgers


Permanent secretaries
was also permanent secretary in the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs under the previous PLP administration.
Archie Nairn is moving from the permanent
secretary's post in the Ministry of Tourism and Avi-
ation to be permanent secretary in the Ministry of
Youth Sports and Culture.
Barbara Burrows is moving from the perma-
nent secretary's post in the Ministry of Health and
Social Development to be permanent secretary in the
Ministry of Labour and Social Development
Camille Johnson is moving from the permanent
secretary's post in the Ministry of Housing and
National Insurance to be permanent secretary in the
Ministry of Health.
Coleen Nottage is moving from the permanent
secretary's post in the Ministry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources to be permanent secretary in the
Cabinet Office.
David Davis is moving from the post of Direc-
tor of Investments at the Bahamas Investment
Authority in the Office of the Prime Minister, to be
permanent secretary in the Office of the Prime Min-
ister.
Hyacinth Pratt is moving from the post of sec-
retary to the Governor-General to be acting per-
manent secretary in the Ministry of Tourism and
Aviation.
Melvyn Seymour is moving from the post of
under secretary in the Ministry of Housing and
National Insurance to be acting permanent secre-
tary in the Ministry of Housing.
Joy Carey-Jibrilu is moving from the post of
. Deputy Director of the Bahamas Investment Author-
ity in the Office of the Prime Minister to be Director
of Investments at the Bahamas Investment Author-
ity.


what direction we are going to
take as a nation for the future of
children in this country," he said.
Rev Pinder said the crime situ-
ation is out of control. He said
that neither the police nor any
government can solve the crime
problem.
"The increase of police officers
will not solve the problem, and
both the FNM and PLP govern-
ment have tried, but failed. Only
God can turn the situation around
and what we have to do is teach
the word of God to our children,"
he said.
Rev Glelqroy Bethel, who
assisted the families in getting the
boys' remains, said the deaths of
the five boys should not go in
vain.
He said the four families lived a
daily nightmare for five years and
can finally have closure.
"Five years ago, was a dark
time in the history of Grand
Bahama. It is my hope that these
boys did not die in vain. Their
deaths, tragic as they may be, hold
valuable lessons that we as par-
ents and members of the wider
community must all strive in our
daily lives to take an active role in
the lives of our children. Know
their friends, schedules, and spend
quality time with them," he said.
The Grand Bahama Port
Authority took care of all funeral
cost for the four families.
Cordell Farrington has been
charged with the murders of four
schoolboys. Four minors charged
with manslaughter of Jake
Grant were discharged in Magis-
trate Court due to insufficient evi-
dence.


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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


Man faces armed robbery charges


NASSAU LISTINGS


LRESDENTAL&COEAL


1. TWYNAM HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 117
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single Family
Residence
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Take Portland Boulevard east
of Super Value Food Store Prince Charles
Drive south to the 2nd comer (Continental
Avenue) on the left. Continue around the
curve then take the 3rd corner on the left
(Tropical Avenue), Traveling north the property
is the 10th lot on the left or first property after
passing Tote Avenue.
APPRAISED VALUE: $302,000

2. SOUTH BEACH ESTATES SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 1 Block 22
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Split Level
Residential Building with 3 Apts.
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,600 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel south along East Street
from Bamboo Boulevard take 1st corner
on right Bougainvillea Blvd. Heading west
on Bougainvillea Blvd. take the 2nd corner
on the right Madeira Avenue come to the
"T" junction and turn left onto Oxford Drive.
Property is 3rd house on the right at the
western corner of Serville Drive and Oxford
Avenue.
APPRAISED VALUE: $397,000

3. BEL-AIR ESTATES, CARMICHAEL ROAD
LOT NO. 259
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storey
Residence
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: East on Carmichael Road from
Faith Avenue take the 4th corner on the right
(Turtle Drive) property is 4th lot on right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

4. GOLDEN GATES ESTATES II
LOT NO. 1372
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storey
Residence, 4 Bed / 2 Bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From the junction of Carmichael
Road and Cedar Way (corner opposite BFM)
travel south to the T-Junction, turn right
onto Golden Gates Straight, then'take the
.,.....first corner right onto Comet Terrace. The
property 3rd lot or the 2nd house on the right,
yellow with white trim.
APPRAISED VALUE: $224,000

5. BRICEVILLE SUBDIVISION, PINE BARREN
ROAD
LOT OF LAND
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Five Unit
Apartment Complex
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,200 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Heading west along Prince
Charles from Fox Hill Road take the third
corner on the left (Pine Barren Road). Travel
west along Pine Barren Road take the second
corner on the left (Ceira Close) then take the
second comer on the right. Subject building
is at the dead end on the right painted white.
APPRAISED VALUE: $292,000


S 6. PINEWOOD GARDENS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 1467
m, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single Storey
Triplex Apartment, 2 1 bed/bath; 1-2 bed
i Bf /bath;
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Enter Pinewood Gardens from
South Beach Police Station drive East
to Thatch Palm Avenue, take first right off
Thatch Palm, the property is second building
on right hand side fenced in.
APPRAISED VALUE: $145,000


1. GARDEN HILLS ESTATES
LOT NO. 1021
PROPERTY SIZE: Single-family, 7,024 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel west on Independence
Highway, exiting at British American, turn
left and travel south to the top of the hill at the
T-junction, turn left and travel East to the end
of this road which is a T-Junction; at the
T-Junction turn left (north) and the subject lot
is first left on the southern corner.
APPRAISED VALUE: $85,000

2. CHIPPINGHAM
LOT NO. 106
PROPERTY SIZE: Single-family, 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Western side of Providence
Avenue (opposite house No. 45)
APPRAISED VALUE: $85,000


7. ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 10 Block 47
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Commercial
Development
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,062 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel west on Wulff Road from
Pinedale Street take the first left onto Minnie
Street. The subject property is on the eastern
side of Minnie Street about 1,050 ft. south of
Homestead Avenue. (liquor Store erected on
property).
APPRAISED VALUE: $137,000

8. ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 9 Block 47
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Commercial
Development
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel west on Wulff Road from
Pinedale Street take the first left onto Minnie
Street. The subject property is on the eastern
side of Minnie Street about 1,000 ft. south of
Homestead Avenue.
APPRAISED VALUE: $115,000

9. PARADISE CONDOMINIUMS
LOT NO. 65
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Townhouse
Unit One
FLOOR AREA: 1,215 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Eastern Side of Faith Avenue
passed Texaco Gas Station and 100 feet
south of Hamster Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $154,000

10. PASTEL GARDENS
LOT NO. 149
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single Family
Residence, 3 bed / 1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,701 sq. ft.
Location: Traveling north along the main
entrance to Pastel Gardens from Marshall
Road, come to the four-way junction and
continue to head north onto Lemon Street.
The subject property is the 11th house on the
left painted white with yellow boxing and light
brown asphalt shingled roof.
APPRAISED VALUE: $142,000"

11. CHIPPINGHAM
LOT NO. 17
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single Storey
Residence, 2 beds / 1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,375 sq. ft.
LOCATION: North side of Quarry Mission
Road 500 ft West of Nassau Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $130,000

12. ROCKY PINE ROAD
LOT NO. "A"
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-Family
Duplex Apartment
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,288 sq.ft.
LOCATION: Travel West on Rocky Pine Road
off Carmichael Road,
property is midway on the third comer on
the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $275,000


3. CARMICHAEL ROAD & FAITH AVENUE
LOT OF LAND "A"
PROPERTY SIZE: Single-family, 4,651 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Southeast of Carmichael
Road and South West of Faith Avenue
South.
APPRAISED VALUE: $72,000.00


INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS (INCLUDE TELEPHONE CONTACT AND
POSTAL ADDRESS) TO: THE A.V.P. MORTGAGE & COMMERCIAL LENDING,
R 0. BOX-SS-6263, NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR VIA EMAIL: CHERRY.MISSICK@COMBANKLTD.COM
OR IN FREEPORT TO : CHRISTOPHER.KNOWLES@COMBANKLTD.COM
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.


A 27-year-old man of Robert's Street was arraigned in Magis-
trate's Court on armed robbery charges.
According to court dockets, Kenson Cyril Dean being concerned
with others on June 29, while armed with a handgun, robbed Ken-
tucky Fried Chicken of $9,777. It is also alleged that Dean being
concerned with others robbed Thia Robinson of $450 and an
assortment of jewellery valued at $500. It is also alleged that he con-
spired to commit armed robbery.
Dean who appeared before Magistrate Linda Virgill at Court 9,
Nassau Street, was not required to plead to the charge. He was
remanded to Her Majesty's Prison and the case was adjourned to
July 9 for a status hearing.

Teenager accused of unlawful sex
A 15-year-old boy accused of unlawful sexual intercourse with
a girl, 7, was arraigned in Juvenile Court yesterday.
It is alleged that the Pinewood Gardens resident committed the
offense between January and June of this year. The accused plead-
ed not guilty to the charge and was granted bail in the sum of
$7,500. The case has been adjourned to October 16th.

CHAIRMAN of
the Board of the
Grand Bahama
Port Authority
and Port Group ,
Limited Erik .-
Chr~istiansen paid
a courtesy call on
Prime Minister
'Hubert Ingraham
at his office in the
Churchill Build- =
ing, Thursday,c
July 3. .


GET


SERIOUS!



FAMILIAR with the law of
supply and demand? In real
estate when there is a shortage
of buyers then prices come
down and vice versa. But what
could really be in shortage may
be serious, legitimate sellers.
A committed seller is will-
ing and able to accept the best
offer in the current market,
and be motivated to do so.
Receiving a fair offer is inex-
tricably connected to pricing
your home fairly.
The best way to arrive at an
attractive price is to aggres-
sively challenge the competi-


tion. Using past prices,
your investment in the home,
or even appraisals may not
produce the ideal value factor
for your home.
If you're serious about sell-
ing, let a BREA agent describe
to you how an appropriately
priced and aggressively mar-
keted home will always gener-
ate interest and offers, and will


0 In brief

Police discover

container filled
with marijuana

seeds at house

FREEPORT Two men
were arrested on Friday after
police discovered a container
filled with marijuana seeds at
a house in Fortune Bay.
Chief Supt Basil Rahming
said DEU officers executed a
search warrant on a house on
Blockade Drive, Fortune Bay,
around 11.45am.
During a search of the
premises, officers discovered
and seized one ounce of pack-
aged marijuana, along with a
jar that was filled with mari-
juana seeds.
As a result, two male occu-
pants, ages 23 and 19, were
arrested and taken into cus-
tody.
Formal charges will be filed
in the Freeport Magistrate's
Court on Monday.


ultimately sell for exactly what
it's worth in the current mar-
ket. All other factors being
equal, a home that languishes
on the market is simply over-
priced, and a seller willing to
wait for more than fair price
would be better served by wait-
ing until the market catches up
before entering the fray.
Remember this Golden
Rule: There is a buyer for
everything. Any home can be
sold in any market when prop-
er pricing is combined with
effective marketing.


Montrose Avenue and Oxford Street
(2 doors North of Multi-Discount)
P.O. Box N-1552
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 323-3460
Monday Saturday
9:30 AM 5:30 PM
Children's Clothing, Shoes, Socks, Hair, Accessories
Undergarments etc...






Celebrate




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Monday June 30th


- Saturday July 12th


*^1^^^^^B^^H^^|^^1|HH^H^^|^H^^1^^^^H^^^^^^^LOCAL NEWS^^^^^^HI


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THE TRIBUNE


IlM:.


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Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

STEP BACK IN TIME


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MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008, PAGE 13


ii'' a.


anm?


4 .o


7--


a 11


Day













Martin Luther King's dream or ole time America?


M By Sir Ronald Sanders

My previous commen-
taries on Barack Oba-
na's candidature for the Presi-
dency of the United States have
made it clear that I am sceptical
about his winning. I am now even
more sceptical despite his de fac-
to defeat of Hillary Clinton for
the nomination of the Democra-
tic Party.
This is not because I don't
want him to win.
I firmly believe that his elec-
tion as US President could make
lr a stronger America both with-
1 its own borders and. in the
world.
For, if Obama wins it will be
occause a majority of white peo-
Iic joined black people in Amer-
ic.i to vote for him. And, this is a
ci ucial point to remember. If all
the black people in the US voted
lor Obama, they alone could not
elect him. They are simply not
enough. He needs the votes of
the majority white people, and
not only the intellectuals and
j,.,\ ie stars, but a very large num-
bKI of ordinary white men and
white women.
If that large majority of white
men and white women vote for


Obama, it would indicate that
mainstream America has matured
and overcome the prejudice and
bigotry that I knew when I went
to school there in Boston and
encountered black people who
had never socialised with whites,
and whites who would never
dream of socialising with blacks.
That would be a major step for-
ward in realising the dream of
Martin Luther King that "one day
on the red hills of Georgia, the
sons of former slaves and the sons
of former slave owners will be
able to sit down together at the
table of brotherhood".
It would be a wonderful devel-
opment in the US itself. Black
people would, at last, feel that
their citizenship is equal to white
people. White people would feel
that they had, at last, laid down
the heavy burden of slavery's con-
sequences for, in helping to elect
Obama, they would have demon-


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strated their acceptance of black
people as their equal with the
entitlement to lead a country in
whose development black people
played as significant a role as
whites.,
Such an America as long as
there is no triumphalism by black
people that "it is our time now" -
would be stronger as a nation
than at any time in its history. In
turn, it Would be an America that
the rest of the world Christian,


Muslim, Hindu or Jew would
be compelled to respect.
If Obama remains true to the
promise that he has offered not
only to the American people,but
to the people of the world who
cheer for him every day, then
America could oversee a new age
of enlightenment where dialogue
with a perceived enemy could
avert war and carnage, and where
reasonableness and responsibility
would replace chauvinism and
coercion.
But, the task is not easy, and it
is by no means a foregone con-
clusion. Regular viewers of the
political talk shows on the world
wide US TV networks, CNN and
Fox, would be familiar with the
contributions of Lanny Davis. He
is a self-confessed supporter of
Hillary Clinton and was, in addi-
tion to being a White House
Counsel, Bill Clinton's defence
attorney in the Monica Lewinski
debacle. What he says should not
be dismissed lightly.
I should admit here that I
know Davis having worked with
him in the past. The fact that I
know him personally does not
make me a disciple of his views,
but it causes me to take what he
says seriously.
In a recent communication,
drawing attention to the daily
Gallup tracking poll which in the
first days of July showed Obama
with a small lead over the Repub-
lican candidate John McCain of
47 per cent to 42 per cent, Davis
makes the point that "this is the
first time that Obama has a lead
over McCain beyond the margin



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of error of +/- 2 per cent. The
biggest margin he has enjoyed
was in the first week of June,
where he went up +7 per cent,
right after Hillary Clinton
endorsed him".
He goes on to say: "What is
pretty clear, however, is that Oba-
ma leads McCain as of now
nationally by a relatively small
margin and about the same
margin that John Kerry led
George Bush in June of 2004".
And, we all know despite his lead
Kerry lost to Bush.
This Obama lead over McCain
should be bigger. After all, as
Davis indicates, Obama's narrow
lead comes at a time when all the
bad news is on the McCain side of
the political equation. These
include: "Bush's below 30 per
cent approval ratings, fuel prices
skyrocketing, and McCain him-
self conveying neither coherent
themes nor projecting positively
in the daily TV sound bites".
Davis also makes the point
that the historical pattern of elec-
tions shows that "in the closing
days, often literally the last week-
end, Republican moderate con-
servative undecided leanerss"
and Democratic social conserva-
tives who up to then have been
soft for the Democratic candidate
or undecided, break dispropor-
tionately for the more conserva-
tive Republican candidate. While
they are not great in number, they,
can swing a close election, espe-


cially in the battleground states
(as they did in Ohio and Florida
in 2000 and 2004)". Read all those
fancy descriptions as white people
with fears and prejudices.
To win, therefore, Obama has
to carry these voters. In Davis'
view, Hillary, as Obama's run-
ning mate for the Vice Presiden-
cy, could swing it for him.
This seems an unlikely sce-
nario right now despite the
attempted show of unity by Oba-
ma and Hillary after the bruising
contest they conducted for the
Democratic Party nomination.
But, nothing is impossible in pol-
itics. Realities could still bring
Obama back to such a ticket how-
ever unpalatable it might now be.
If the Obama-Clinton ticket
does not happen, that old time
America may yet rouse itself from
its seeming stupor to reassert the
bigotry and prejudice that has so
long been integral to American
society.
If it does, then the Obama
dream will be over, and America
and the world will be the poorer
for it.
Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com to:ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com
>

(The writer is a business con-
sultant and former Caribbean
diplomat)


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Nassau Airport
Development Company







REFURBISHMENT OF CANOPIES

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) is seeking bids
from suitably qualified local Bahamian contractors to carry
out the Refurbishment of the Canopies in front of the Lynden
Pindling International Airport.
Qualified contractors must:-
Demonstrate an ability to obtain $500,000.00 liability
insurance
Provide evidence that all Government tax payments are
current
Provide at least three references from owners of projects in
excess of $30,000.00
Bid packages can be obtained from the offices of NAD on
Monday, July 7, 2008 Wednesday, July 9, 2008 between the
hours of 9am and 5pm.
A site visit has been arranged for 9am on Monday, July 14.
Contractors wishing to participate are asked to notify NAD of
their intention no later than 5pm on Friday, July 11, 2008 at
telephone number 702-1000.

The Deadline for submission of bids is 4:00pm
on July 16. 2008. Bid packages should be
delivered to the NAD offices no later than
4:00pm July 16. 2008. All packages received
after this time will be returned unopened
NAD reserves the nght to reject any or all bids


AIR.CONDITIONERS! AIR-CONDITIONERS.
AIR-CONDITIONERSI AIR-CONDITIONERSI!
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008


Owl .i:: :!




MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008, PAGE 15


of Independence






PAGE 6, MODAY, ULY ,2008THE TIBUN


BEATING THE RETREAT


CROWDS turned out on Saturday to watch The Royal Bahamas Police Force Band put on a stirring display on Bay Street at their Independence Beat
Retreat.

PHOTOS: Felip6 Major/Tribune staff


THE ROYAL BAHAMAS POLICE FORCE BAND drummer plays his snare
drum like a congo drum.


U.


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&


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NASSAU,
NEW PROVIDENCE

AAROW TRAVEL
Phone: (242) 393-1981
CARIBO TRAVEL
NETWORK
Phone: (242) 3565395
FIRST CLASS TRAVEL
Phone: (242) 322-7127
INNOVATIVE TRAVEL
Phone:(242) 325.0042
LEISURE TRAVEL
Phone: (242) 325-6848
MAJESTIC TRAVEL
Phone: (242) 328-0908
MIRACLE TOURS
Phone: (242) 326-0283
PREMIER TRAVEL
Phone: (242) 328-0264
STARTS TRAVEL
Phone: (242)325-7122

FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA

BEST ISLAND TRAVEL
Phone: (242)3524811
GLOBAL EXPRESS
Phone: (242) 352-4885
WIDE WORLD TRAVEL
Phone: (242) 352-6253

MARSH HARBOUR,
ABACO

A & W TRAVEL
Phone: (242) 367-2806
TRAVEL SPOT
Phone: (242) 367-2817


THIS ROYAL BAHAMAS DEFENCE FORCE BAND woman marine entertains
the crowds with her cymbal playing.
Res.ino \\es Condondonjmums Under Construcon
NEW CONDOS FOR SALE
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008

































HOW THE AES LNG FACILITY PROPOSED FOR

OCEAN CAY WILL BENEFIT THE BAHAMAS


The Project


Benefits to BEC


* Construct an LNG terminal on Ocean Cay to capitalize on an ever
increasing demand for natural gas as a relatively cheap source of
energy
* Build a 88-mile Pipeline from Ocean Cay to Florida, where the
demand for natural gas is growing
* Build a 120-mile pipeline from Ocean Cay to Clifton Pier to deliver
natural gas to BEC to drive its turbines as a means of reducing the
Corporation's fuel costs and emissions of pollution from burning
diesel.


Commitments to
The Bahamas, the Host Country

1. Ensure that the host country derives fair and transparent financial
benefits
2. Ensure controls and monitoring for minimal negative environmental
impact
3. Assist in reducing The Bahamas pollution index.


LNG Project rect nancial Benefits

$150,000 for marine research to be paid to such research institute as may
be selected by the government, with such payment made by a date
that is twelve (12) months after the commencement of construction of
the LNG Storage Facility.

Seabed Lease revenue of US$ 6 million annually escalating annually.

An average of 300 work permits per year over the 3 year construction
period totaling nearly US$5 million.

Construction of a 120-mile gas pipeline to Clifton Point at an estimated
cost of US$150 to $200 million.

Import Duties and Stamp Tax or equivalent ranging from $20 to $40
million annually on Natural Gas sold to BEC.



FORECAST OF BEC ANNUAL FUEL SAVINGS
(US $ MILLIONS)
NYMEX FUTURES CONTRACT DERIVED FUEL FORECAST THRU 2028


The LNG Project's 120-mile pipeline to Clifton Point will deliver natural
gas to BEC to reduce the use of diesel to drive turbines at Blue Hills
Power Station.

The LNG Project will sell natural gas indexed to US natural gas prices.
These innovations will result in


BEC Fuel Savings Benefits


With current NYMEX- based forecasts BEC would initially save US$140
to $210 Million per year depending on the volume of Natural Gas
consumed.

With current NYMEX-based forecasts BEC would save $3 to $4 Billion
over the first 15 years.

Savings to BEC will result in savings passed on to the consumer In the
form of lower electricity rates.


Contribution to Slashing Pollution Levels- How
Burning Natural Gas versus Diesel Will Help to
Reduce BEC Emissions of Greenhouse Gases

* Sulphur Dioxide Reduction
A ninety-percent (90%) reduction totalling 2,000 tonnes.
* Nitrogen Oxide Reduction
A 2,000 tonne reduction from just under 3,500 tonnes to less than
1,500 tonnes.
* Carbon Dioxide Reduction
The expected carbon dioxide reduction will greater than 150,000
tons per year, which would lower the current BEC emissions from
diesel by approximately 27%.


PRELIMINARY PIPELINE ROUTE FROM OCEAN CAY TO CLIFTON POINT


.. ...-- .. .. .. ... ^.. ^...." ..,^ .).,^i..... ,^ ... :,. .4.. ... .






.. ' . .- '-' i ' '



... . .. : ... ;. ..-......




, . , .K . '


--- BEC Fuel Savings 90% Diesl replacement -I*--BEC Fuel Savings @ Maximum Supply
I-- Duies/StampTax at Max Supply Crude Oil Forecast (/BBL)


Duties/Stamp Tax at 90%Dlesel Replacement


Note: This chart was based on crude oil at $100 per barrel. The price is currently at $140 per barrel and
predicted to rise. This has significant impli-cations for the price of the diesel now consumed by BEC.


$350.0

$300.0

$250.0

$200.0

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PAGE 18 MONDAYIJULYR72008OTHLTRIBUN


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MESSAGING


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www.btcbahamas.com I CALL BTC 225-5282


- ,.


SUPPORTERS of the governing party, Movement Towards Socialism,
MAS, put party flags at the base of a seven meter tall statue made of
scrap metal of Cuba's late revolutionary hero Ernesto "Che" Guevara
prior to the statue's inauguration in El Alto, Bolivia, Saturday, July 5,
2008.


,22

21

20

19

18

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FUEL SURCHARGE 2006 2008


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9 9.9140C 9.707 3 |.45 1-C761


JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP~ OCT NOV DEC


f./'


Your electricity bill is made
upd the basic rate, which is
constant and has not
changed since October 2003,
and fuelsur ia, Which
is based on the price of
pe numin the international
market and is calculated
mon USgatiedf


CUBA'S PRESIDENT Raul Castro
holds up his press card during the
closing ceremony of the 8th Con-
gress of the Cuban Journalists
Union, UPEC, in Havana, Saturday,
July 5, 2008. Castro was made an
honorary member of UPEC by its
members.
M I


0


Share our
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. If so, call us on 322-
1986 and share your story.


PAGE 18, MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


F" -- T


V-1


16896 16.155eC
? a- iy --


JUL AUG SEP OCT


JAN FEB


MAR APR MAY JUN


NOV DEC


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THE TRIBUNE


IVIUNUMT, JULY /, -UUO, rm/u I i


Delays and disputes on pact





allowing US to remain in Iraq


By ALISSA J. RUBIN
BAGHDAD
Declaring that there will not
be "another colonization of
Iraq," the country's foreign min-
ister raised the possibility
Wednesday that a full security
agreement with the United
States might not be reached this
year, and that if one was, it
would be short-term, according
to the New York Times News
Service.
American officials, speaking
anonymously because of the
delicate state of negotiations,
said they were no longer opti-
mistic that a complete security
agreement could be reached by
the end of the year.
At a news conference in
Baghdad, the foreign minister,
Hoshyar Zebari, told reporters
that some headway had been
made, but that negotiators were
at loggerheads over issues like
the extent of Iraqi control over
American military operations
and the right of American sol-
diers to detain suspects without
the approval of Iraqi authori-
ties.
Negotiations are being com-
plicated by political currents in
both countries. Iraqi politicians,
facing elections scheduled for
the fall, do not want to be seen
as capitulating to the Untied
States. At the same time, they
are eager for some form of
agreement to prevent the rapid
departure of American forces.
In the United States, Presi-
dent Bush has been pushing
hard for a deal to be completed
by July 31. But congressional
Democrats are reluctant to sign
off on an agreement before the
presidential elections, while
Republicans are divided.
As a result, Iraqi politicians
say, the likelihood is that the
two sides will agree to an inter-
im pact that will extend the
presence -of American troops in
Iraq ini:some mutually accept-:
able form for a limited amount
of time.The security agreement,
sometimes referred to as a sta-
tus of forces agreement, is need-
ed to replace a U.N. mandate
that serves as the legal basis of
the American troop presence
and expires on Dec. 31.
"There is controversy here in
Iraq," Zebari said. "We have
an election here; they have an
election there; it's a political
matter."
Noting that the United States
cannot stay in Iraq without legal
authorization, Zebari listed
three options: "Either we con-
clude a status of forces agree-
ment, or we have an interim
agreement until a SOFA can be
completed, or we go back to the
Security Council at the end of
the year and ask for another
extension."
An interim agreement, he
said, could take the form of a
memorandum of understanding
and related documents, which
would be less extensive than a
formal security agreement.
They likely would be appended
to the document that Bush and
the Iraqi prime minister, Nouri
Kamal al-Maliki, signed last
year that laid out the principles
for the continuing relationship
between the two countries.
In the past, Iraqi policymak-
ers have been emphatic about
avoiding a further extension of


the U.N. mandate, but some are
reconsidering that position.
Under that resolution, Iraq is
immune from liability lawsuits
stemming from the era of Sad-
dam Hussein, which could run
into the billions of dollars. A
spokeswoman for the Ameri-
can Embassy in Iraq said that
she could not elaborate on the
negotiations. "It's too many
moving parts, positions are
changing too rapidly," the.
spokeswoman, Mirembe Nan-
tongo, said. "It's an ongoing
negotiation. We know where
we are in terms of Iraqi sover-
eignty. We don't want anything
that will weaken or compromise
Iraqi sovereignty."
Zebari said that on his recent
trip to the United States, in
addition to Bush, he had met
with the presumptive presiden-
tial nominees for both political
parties, Sen. John McCain, R-
Ariz., and Sen. Barack Obama,
D-Ill. He said that Obama had
asked him, 'Why is the Iraqi
government in a rush, in a hur-
ry? This administration has only
a few more months in office."'
Zebari said he told Obama
that even a Democratic admin-
istration would be better off
having something "concrete in
front of them to take a hard
look at."
Zebari also indicated that
even a full agreement would be
short. "We are not talking about
50 years, 25 years or 10 years;
we are negotiating about one
or two years, so this is not going
to be another colonization of
Iraq," he said.
Most Iraqi policymakers pre-
dict that the two sides will reach
an interim agreement, though
possibly one that will extend
longer than Zebari described.
"We are thinking there is no
benefit from signing a long-term
security agreement," said Eman
al-Asadi, a member of the
Islamic" Supreme Council of
Iraq, a leading Shiite party. But
she added.that a memorandum
of understanding could be
extended to last as long as 10
years and include provisions for
a gradual drawdown of Ameri-
can troops.
Still, no one is giving up yet
on negotiating a larger agree-
ment, said Hassan Sinead, a
member of Dawa, Maliki's par-
ty.
"If we can't reach a final
agreement with the Americans
about the security agreement
by the end of this year, then we
have another choice: to attach a
protocol to the strategic frame-
work agreement that will
arrange the relationship
between the American forces
and the Iraqi government."
At a practical level, changing
the form of the agreement will
not affect the American pres-
ence in Iraq in the short term.
There appears to be no discus-
sion of forcing American troops
to leave Iraq at the end of the
year. It is more a matter of find-
ing a form for an agreement
that is acceptable to all sides,
giving the American military
the practical authority it needs
to function in combat while let-
ting the Iraqis say they are not
locked into a lengthy agree-
ment.
Zebari's remarks were his
most detailed public statements
about the negotiations with the


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A VEHICLE DESTROYED in a car bomb blast stands on a street in Baghdad
medical officials said a car bomb in Shaab has killed six people and injured


United States over the future
status of American forces in
Iraq, now in its sixth year of a
war that began with the Amer-
ican-led overthrow of Saddam
in the spring of 2003.
On Tuesday, Zebari told
Iraqi lawmakers in parliament
that the Americans had con-
ceded on one area of contention
in the negotiations: the legal sta-
tus of private security contrac-
tors in the country. He said that
the United States had agreed
to lift immunity for them, so
they would be subject to prose-
cution under Iraqi law.


The private security compa-
nies, like Blackwater USA,
have a reputation for using
excessive force in protecting
diplomatic and other foreign
clients, and operate with immu-
nity from Iraqi law.
That status became a political
issue last fall, after a Blackwater
shooting in Baghdad left 17
Iraqis dead.

Helene Cooper, Steven Lee
Myers and Thom Shanker con-
tributed reportingfronm Wash-
ington.


.... ,. .- -o
-. 2





's Shaab neighborhood, Iraq, Sunday, July 6, 2008. Iraqi police and
14 others, including three policemen.

.










NOURI AL-MALIKI, Iraq's Prime Minister, arrives at a ceremony marking
the fifth anniversary of the 2003 assassination of Ayatollah Mohammed
Baqir al-Hakim, a leading opponent of Saddam Hussein.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 20, MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008


INERATIOALNW


Wildfire chases July 4



visitors from Big Sur


FIREFIGHTERS work a brush fire burning out of control in the Santa Ynez Mountains near Goleta, Calif., on
Saturday July 5, 2008. A slew of wildfires, most ignited by lightning two weeks ago, have burned more than
800 square miles of land throughout California. The blazes have destroyed at least 67 homes and other build-
ings and contributed to the death of a firefighter who suffered a heart attack while digging fire lines.


* By AMANDA FEHD
BIG SUR, Calif.

Independence Day is nor-
mally a booming time for
tourism here, with visitors set-
tling into cliffside vacation
homes or trekking out to camp-
grounds nestled among the red-
woods. But this year, the only
out-of-towners in Big Sur are
firefighters working around the
clock to save the storied com-
munity from flames.
A ferocious wildfire burning
through the Los Padres Nation-
al Forest continued creeping
closer to town Friday, after
jumping a fire line aid claim-
ing several more homes this
week. Locals who feared for
their homes and businesses also
had to worry about lost revenue
during peak season.
"I'm sure the season is just
toast," said Kurt Mayer, who
ignored mandatory evacuation
orders to defend his Big Sur
Deli from the approaching fire.
"Usually the busiest time is July
and August, so I'm sure it's just
going to be zero."
The stubborn blaze, which
has burned more than 100
square miles, was just one of
hundreds raging around the
state. On Thursday, officials
reported California's first fire-
fighter death this year a vol-
unteer who collapsed on the fire
line in Mendocino County.
At least 20 homes have been
destroyed near Big Sur since
the blaze broke out June 21.
The fire was only 5 percent con-
tained by late Thursday.
Crews near the Pacific Coast
Highway fought., back flames
from homes and historic land-
marks, including the upscale
Ventana Inn which was sur-
rounded by crackling, burning
brush Thursday afternoon.
Several homes perched on a
ridge about a quarter-milefrom
the inn fell victim to the fire the
night before.
Kirk Gafill, general manager
of the nearby Nepenthe restau-
rant, said he and five employees
were working feverishly to pro-
tect the cljffside business his
grandparents built in 1949.
Wearing dust masks, the crew
scrambled to stamp out embers,
some the size of dinner plates,


file SholdInclde


A FIREFIGHTER stands watch as a brush fire burns out of control in the
Santa Ynez Mountains near Goleta, Calif., on Saturday July 5, 2008.


that were dropping from the
sky, he said.
"We know fire officials don't
have the manpower to secure
our properties," Gafill said.
"Based on what we saw during
Katrina and other disasters, we
know we can only rely on our-
selves and our neighbors."
A total of 367 wildfires were
burning Thursday across the
state, most ignited by lightning,
according to the California
Department of Forestry and
Fire Protection, known as Cal
Fire, and the-U.S. Forest Ser-
vice. That figure was down from
a peak of roughly 1,500 fires
just a few days ago.
In all, the wildfires have
scorched more than 790 square
miles and destroyed at least 65
structures since June 20,.accord-
ing to the Cal Fire.
With firefighting resources
stretched thin early in the fire
season, counties have been
recruiting volunteer firefighters
to help with smaller blazes.
On Thursday, volunteer fire-
fighter Robert Roland, 63, died
at a hospital after collapsing a
day earlier while battling a 550-
acre blaze in Mendocino Coun-
ty, north of the San Francisco
Bay region.
It was the first reported death
of a firefighter this season, and
the governor ordered flags at
the Capitol to fly at half-staff.
Crews made progress at a
separate wildfire burning near-
ly 130 square miles southeast of
Big Sur.
The blaze, also in Los Padres
National Forest, was about 95
percent contained Thursday.
Meanwhile, a third wildfire


in the southern extension of the
Los Padres forest north of San-
ta Barbara forced residents to
evacuate the town of Goleta as
strong winds pushed flames
toward homes in the foothills
of the Santa Ynez Mountains.
In all, authorities told residents
of about 1,700 homes in several
small communities to leave.
Gov. Arnold Schwarzeneg-
ger on Thursday declared a
state of emergency in Santa
Barbara County to free up
resources to fight that blaze,
which has burned nearly 5
square miles since breaking out
Tuesday.
In the Sequoia National For-
est east of Bakersfield, crews
struggled to contain a blaze
burning nearly 22 square miles,
which was about 15 percent
contained Thursday.
Nearby residents remained
under voluntary evacuation
orders.
Elsewhere, a nearly 15-
square-mile wildfire in Arizona
that destroyed three homes in
the historic mining community
of Crown King earlier in the
week was still just 10 percent
contained Thursday night.
Evacuations continued in the
town, 50 miles north of Phoenix,
and nearby Horsethief Basin.
The fire, which broke out late
Saturday, is believed to have
been started by lost hikers.

Associated Press writers Scott
Lindlaw, Malia Wollan and
Jason Dearen in San Francisco,
Jordan Robertson in Carmel,
Calif., and Amanda Lee Mey-
ers in Phoenix contributed to
this report.


THE BASIN COMPLEX fire burns a mountainside south of Big Sur, Calif.,
Saturday, July 5, 2008. A slew of wildfires, most ignited by lightning two
weeks ago, has burned more than 800 square miles of land throughout Cal-
ifornia.


You'll wonder how you ever got along without it.


t,.\. ,








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008, PAGE 21


JULY 7, 2008


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

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HGTV "Josh & Tracy" (CC) Buying real es- Cara and Alvaro. New Orleans. A (CC)
Josh and Tracy. tate. fl (CC) (N) (CC) (CC)
IcNSP Victory Joyce Meyer: Ed Young Everyday Life Today With This Is Your Day The GospelI
INSP Everyday Life Woman James Robison (CC) Truth (CC)
Reba Reba takes My Wife and According to Family Guy The Family Guy Two and a Half Two and a Half
KTLA in hurricane sur- Kids "Let Them Jim Cheryl tries Griffins open a "Jungle Love" Cl Men Judith has a Men Comments
vivors. Eat Pie" (CC) to surprise Jim. restaurant. (CC) (CC) new beau. A about Evelyn.
Reba Reba ques- Army Wives "The Hero Returns" WHEN ANDREW CAME HOME (2000, Drama) Park Overall, Jason
LIFE tions her deci- (CC) Beghe, Seth Adkins. A mother must rehabilitate her traumatized son. (CC)
sion. (CC)
':00 Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Verdict With Dan Abrams Countdown With Keith Olber-
MSNBC (cc mann mann
Zoey 101 C SpongeBob Family Matters Home Improve- Home Improve- George Lopez George Lopez
NICK (c) SquarePants 0 "Busted" (CC) ment (CC) ment ( (CC) 0 (CC) 1 (CC)
S :00) Canadian How I Met Your Rules of En- Bones "Intern in the Incinerator'" News (N) C News
NTV Idol ( (CC) Mother 0 (CC) gagement (CC) (PA) (CC) (CC)
SPEED Pass Time This Week in NASCAR (N) 101 Cars You Car Crazy Barrett-Jackson 2008: The Auc-
SPEEDmust Drive tons (N)
Bishop T.D. Behind the Mark Chironna Jentezen Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Jakes (CC) Scenes (CC) (CC) Franklin (CC) (CC)
Everybody Friends Phoebe Friends Phoebe Family Guy Pe- Family Guy Lois My Name Is Earl My Name Is Earl
TBS Loves Raymond finds links to her finds her birth ter joins a gun runs for mayor. "Buried Treasure" An apartment
n (CC) past. (CC) mother. Cl (CC) club. C (CC) C (CC) (CC) search. C
Little People, Kids by the Dozen "The Jeub Fam- Jon & Kate Plus Jon & Kate Plus Jon & Kate Plus Jon & Kate Plus
TLC Big World Soc- ily" Parents of 13 children. (CC) 8 Birthday cup- 8 Family talent 8 "Leah and Joel" 8 "Mady's Day"
cer rematch. cakes. (N) show'. (CC) (CC)
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order "Cut" A novelist's Law & Order "Invaders" McCoy Saving Grace The squad prepares
TNT. der "Kid Pro death appears to have been caused uses a corrupt DEA agent to lure for a murder suspect's hotshot attor-
Quo" C by careless liposuction. psychopathic killers out of hiding. ney. (CC)
Chop Socky George of the Ben 10: Alien Johnny Test C Johnny Test Cl Ben 10 Ben is Naruto
TOON Chooks Jungle Force (CC) (CC) hypnotized.
Cops A stolen Party Heat'Texas Blowout" Beach Patrol Beach Patrol Smoking Gun Presents: World's
TRU vehicle is found. Dumbest
T:00) Toute une Palais d'Europe "Les Chateaux (8:55) Palais Le Dessous des Passez au vert Une ville un
TV5 histoire fous de Louis II de Bavibre" d'Europe cartes style
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(:00) Querida Al Diablo con Los Guapos Fuego en la Sangre Hermanos Cristina Los gorditos del espectac-
UNIV :nemiga buscan venganza. ulo.
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USA der: Criminal In- Detectives look for suspects at a Bash, who is the power behind RAW? (Live) n (CC)
tent "Stray" C dead bully's school. C (CC)
VH1 630) I Love 40 Greatest Reality Moments 2 C I Love Money: Meet the All Stars
VM1 Money Cl(CC) Cl__ (CC)
VS. 0) WEC Cycling Tour de France Stage 3. From Saint-Malo to Nantes, France.
VS. IWrekCage (CC)
:00) America's ALF Mrs. ALF "Looking for ALF ALF is relo- ALF "Ballad of WGN News at NIne (N) Cl (CC)
WGN Funniest Home Ochmonek baby- Lucky" (CC) cated to the fami- Gilligan's Island"
Videos C (CC) sits Brian. (CC) ly garage. (CC)
Family Guy The Gossip Girl "Hi, Society" Serena One Tree Hill "Running to Stand CW11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Griffins open a does not want to attend the debu'- Still" Brooke faces a ghost from her Tong, Jim Watklns (N) (CC)
restaurant. (CC) tante ball. C (CC) past. C (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) Dr. Phil C (CC) News (N) Jeopardy! (CC) Frasler r asier Frasier Frasier
WSBK CC) picks a fight. C helps his agent
(CC) quit smoking.

(6:45) * s FIRST KNIGHT (1995, Adventure) Sean The Art of Failure: Chuck Connel- (:15) * THE MATRIX RE-
HBO-E onnery, Richard Gere. The evil Malagant threatens ly Not for Sale (N) LOADED (2003, Science Fiction)
the peace of Camelot. C 'PG-13' (CC) Keanu Reeves. C 'R' (CC)
(6:00) 1* *n MIAMI VICE (2006, Crime Drama) Colin Farrell, Jamie Foxx, Gong (:15) Making: * THE NE-
H BO-P EADY TO Li. Detectives Crockett and Tubbs take on drug lords in South Florida. C Generation Kill GOTIATOR
RUMBLE (2000) 'R' (CC) Cl (CC) (1998) 'R' (CC)


(6:00) *', ** EDWARD SCISSORHANDS (1990, Fantasy) (:45) **, FIRST KNIGHT (1995, Adventure) Sean
HBO-W CRAZY IN AL- Johnny Depp, Winona Ryder. A man-made misfit cuts Connery, Richard Gere. The evil Malagant threatens
ABAMA (1999) a tragic figure in suburbia. C 'PG-13' (CC) the peace of Camelot. 'PG-13' (CC)
6:1A5) ** John Adams "Unnecessary War" President Adams John Adams "Peacefield" Adams * FRIED
HBO-S EVAN tries desperately to keep the nation out of war. a begins to write his memoirs, C GREEN TOMA-
ALMIGHTY (Part 6 of 7) (CC) ,(Part 7 of 7) (CC) TOES (1991)
(6:35) * FAST FOOD NATION * THE FLINTSTONES (1994, Comedy) John * LIVE FREE OR DIE HARD
MAX-E 2006, Drama) Greg Kinnear. C 'R' Goodman. Premiere. A caveman is set up by a schem- (2007) Bruce Willis. America's com-
CC) ing Stone Age secretary. n 'PG' (CC) puters fall under attack. (CC)
(:00) * ANYWHERE BUT HERE (1999) Susan * LEATHERFACE: TEXAS CHAINSAW MAS- THE PLEASURE
MOMAX Sarandon, Eileen Ryan. A flighty mother uproots her SACRE 111(1990, Horror) Kate Hodge. A cannibalistic ZONE: ALL
daughter and heads West. A 'PG-13' (CC) family preys on highway travelers. A'R' (CC) OUTTA LOVE
** CASINO ROYALE (2006, Action) Daniel Craig, Eva Green, Mads Mikkelsen. iTV. Weeds The Secret Diary of a
SHOW James Bond plays poker with a man who finances terrorists. Cl 'PG-13' (CC) Three Coolers" Call Girl Belle is
(N) (CC) hurt. (N)


TMC


..












LeA C aie t he

Backnicin PuAppet cand
his sidekick Derek put-xit
so011We Sml/ile-S On youbr





Mccippy Hour a McDoniacld's if

Maloo I VStre-e-t Cvery eTkursday


fo1101 3:30pro to 4:30pm during the
1olnth of July2008.




SEnjo Great Food, Prizes andI Los of Fun.




i'm lovin' it
kids *faces fik


MONDAY EVENING


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REED FISH Strangers' lives collide on three different continents. l 'R' (CC) DEAD GIRL
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PAGE 2, MODAY, ULY 7 2008THE TIBUN


Tribune Comics


JUDGE PARKER


APT 3-G


BLONDIE


MARVIN
I KNOW WE'VE
BEEN tNSEPARABLE
FOR '-EARS


TIGER


CALVIN & HOBBES













DENNIS THE MENACE


"I MU6TA PSEN A t131RP LOV6R."


J\ST G0ES-T T
stM SAEMIN6, Y
BUT I SURE









Sudoku Puzzle
Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday

7 3 5 4 8

9 1 6__

8 9-

4 12 7 1

2 4__

5 76 1

7 4

3 2 6

2 6 3 1 9
Difficulty Level 7/07a
7_/e7J^ _


Kakuro Puzzle


Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.


Saturday's
Sudoku Answer


857
943
574
289
361
612
798


Saturday's
Kakuro Answer


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


Across
1 Loud in
music (5)
8 Intrude (8)
9 Lure into trap (5)
10 Consistently accurate
(8)
11 Indispensable (5)
12 Spider's trap (3)
16 Withdraw from feder-
ation (6)
17 Not fairly matched (6)
18 Endeavour (3)
23 Slight
colouring (5)
24 Assess too highly (8)
25 20 per cent (5)
26 Tolerate (5,3)
27 Existence (5)


Across
1 Cut and
share out (5)
8 Supporter has backing of
fifty down below (8)
9 Attractive material for a
jacket? (5)
10 The making of Haydn's
oratorio (8)
11 Placing of the winner may
create rifts (5)
12 Tree snake (3)
16 Going downhill in cold
weather? (6)
17 Give way concerning a fast
time (6)
18 A to-do? Yes (3)
23 An awkward brute to dis-
prove (5)
24 Having responsibility in
attack (2,6)
25 Strike when times are bad
(5)
26 A firm grasp of what
hunger strikers propose to
do (4,4)
27 In an emergency it
appears stupid (5)


Yesterday's Cryptic Solution
Across: 1 Tidal river, 6 Scow, 10
Sofia, 11 Reservoir, 12 Hustling, 13
Hindi, 15 Attacks, 17 Sensing, 19
Threats, 21 Cadenza, 22 Pluck, 24
Lee shore, 27 Paper hats, 28 Rumba,
29 Rare, 30 Waitresses.
Down: 1 Task, 2 Defaulter, 3 Leant, 4
In ruins, 5 Ensigns, 7 Clown, 8
Working day, 9 Orphaned, 14 Waste
paper, 16 Crackers, 18 Ignoramus, 20
Sultana, 21 Cresset, 23 Upper, 25
Horde, 26 Bars.


Down
2 Perhaps he is link in for-
eign capital (8)
3 A sign of wrong and right,
we hear, in a puzzle (8)
4 Where rackets may be
exposed (6)
5 Make a profit and brighten
up (5)
6 He wrote books in two
parts (5)
7 Fetch a key ring (5)
12 Turkish leader is a little
extravagant (3)
13 One in favour of being
paid? (3)
14 Senior citizen (8)
15 Prepare for take-off? (8)
19 Assimilate a summary (6)
20 A possibility of power? (5)
21 Plate of fish (5)
22 Port and orange (5)


Yesterday's Easy Solution
Across: 1 Opera house, 6 Scam,
10 Uncle, 11 Provident, 12
Budapest, 13 Beryl, 15 Letters, 17
Dubious, 19 Cardiac, 21 Premium,
22 Mould, 24 Acoustic, 27
Grapevine, 28 Yearn, 29 Chew, 30
Stationery.
Down: 1 Opus, 2 Encounter, 3
Arena, 4 Oppress, 5 Spotted, 7
Clear, 8 Mettlesome, 9 Zimbabwe,
14 Black magic,116 Evildoer, 18
Originate, 20 Chariot, 21 Protest, 23
Usage, 25 Say-so, 26 Only.


Chess


Where are the white and black
kings? The two monarchs have
to be placed on the board in such
a way that White has an instant
checkmate in one move. try your
lateral chess thinking powers on
this unusual punle which has
just a single possible answer. There
are several near-misses, so you
should look carefully to ensure that
your solution really works. And
if you think it's impossible, keep
trying, there really is a way to the
one-rove mate, and it's simple
once you see it


Down
2 Partial (3-5)
3 Hypocritical (3-5)
4 Copper and tin alloy
(6)
5 Extortionate money-
lending (5)
6 Usual practice (5)
7 Treatment (5)
12 Rainy (3)
13 Purchase (3)
14 Characteristic of
women (8)
15 Intensify (8)
19 Fixed allowance (6)
20 Succeed with mini-
mum effort (5)
21 Coniferous tree (5)
22 Group of lions (5)


.-... .....--.
-F I..... .... ....

...... ......


i i -. 0 :.
B C 0 .... F 0


Chess S643: Place the white kig atf3, the black
ki"ng is at i. Btack's last mtre was QfZ+ so that
White he mate from the dS bishop. Nothing else wor-ks-


Target


R



E[



0


I R








N-1P


The







21st
Target
(ION
odbos)


HOW many words orf our
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may
be used once only Each must
contain the centre letter and
there must.b at east o .
nine-letter word. No plurals,
TODAY'S TARer
Good 12; very good 18; excellent
24 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.
YESTEROA'S SOLUTION
anil anvil aural avail canal
earnal carnival caul eavil clan
cranial curl lacuna iain lair
larva lava liana liar lira lunar
nail naval NAVICULAR racial
rail rial rival ulna ulnar uncial
uracil vial viral


Contract Bridge

by Steve Becker


Famous Hand


the North players opened one club;
others opened one diamond.
It is odd that in this highly touted
event, which included most of the
top players in the United States and
Canada, only one North-South pair
thought enough of their cards to
ST undertake a game contract. But even
6 4 3 at their table something peculiar
9 4 occurred, since the bidding went:
9 North East South West
76 14 Pass I* Pass
3 4 Pass 3 V Pass
34 Pass 3 NT Pass
4 NT Pass 5* Pass
64
South bid three hearts to invite
North to bid three notrump if he had
West a spade stopper. But North obviously
Pass misunderstood the call and never did
let go until six diamonds was
des. reached.
A heart lead, of course, would
ntema- have sunk the slam, but unfortu-
n 1964. nately for West, he was dealt a nice,
tables, safe, top-of-a-sequence spade lead.
f them, Declarer won the queen of spades
c been with dummy's ace and, after drawing
that at trumps and forcing out the ace of
core in clubs, finished with 12 tricks for a
score of 1,370 points. This was more
-South than the total at the other eight tables
nds, at combined, where the various North-
, and at Souths scored either 150 or 170 in
omie of Iheir diamond partscores.


North dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
+A
VJ 10 3
*AQ72
+KQ 1092
WEST EA
4QJ 1075 4KS
I K876 QC9
*J4 10
SOUTH
*92
VA52
*K8653
48 5 3
The bidding:
North. East South
1 4 Pass 1 *
2
Opening lead queen of spa
This deal occurred in the I
tional Team Trials in Dallas in
The hand was played at nine
and you'd think that at most o
the final contract would hay
five diamonds. But the fact is
eight of the tables, only a parts
diamonds was reached.
At three tables, the North
pairs ,stopped in two diamot
three tables in three diamonds,
two tables in four diamonds. S


Tomorrow: The right time to lose a trick.
t. 2008 King IFeaures S. indicate Inc.


_I CRYPTIC PUZZLE


2 3 4 5 7


9

isie

12 13 14 15
1617


20 21 23
24
25
26
-- m -- -- 27 -- "-


T
R


B
U
N
E


T
W
0


I
N


0
N
E


C
R
0
S
S
W
0
R
D


I


PAGE 22, MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


2381 2 1
78 92 748 |9
4 2 2211 6 7
45 2 31 9 718
9 7 9 8
2 41 1 '6 58.9
6 9 1 28 112
1 3 4 79'2 8
8142 583










THE RIBUE MNDAYIJUERYA7I208,3AGES323


Body of missing 12-year-old Vermont girl is found


* By LISA RATHKE'
RANDOLPH, Vt.
Instead of gathering at a vig-
il to offer prayers for the safe
return of a missing 12-year-
old girl, residents found them-
selves mourning the news that
her body had been found, the
Associated Press reports.
Police unearthed Brooke
Bennett's body Wednesday
from a makeshift grave about
a mile from her uncle's house,
ending a weeklong search for
the subject of Vermont's first


Amber Alert. "Brooke Marie,
I love you so much," her
mother, Cassandra Gagnon,
said at the gathering later in
the picturesque town of a little
more than 5,000. "I just ask
that justice be done for the
person who took my baby
away," she said, sobbing.
The girl's father, James
Bennett, added, "I know
Brooke knows that we love
her and will always love her."
As state police announced
the grim news Wednesday
evening, they said Michael


minister K.


MONDAY- FRIDAY
6 A.M. 10 A.M.


101.9
Celebrating .; years


Jacques, the girl's uncle and a
convicted sex offender, will
face federal kidnapping
charges.
Bennett, who had just fin-
ished seventh grade at Ran-
dolph Union High School, dis-
appeared on June 25 after
being seen at a convenience
store with Jacques.
Jacques, 42, has been in cus-
tody since Sunday on charges
of aggravated sexual assault
against a different underage
girl. He has pleaded not guilty.
Jacques has 1993 convictions
for kidnapping and aggravated
sexual assault.
After searching in and
around his home across town
for days, police said they
found the girl's body in a spot
where the earth had been dis-
turbed.
"The painful discovery of
Brooke's body today is tragic
and heartbreaking," State
Police Director Col. James
Baker said. He called the
death "clearly suspicious" but
declined to give details before
a planned briefing Thursday
morning.
In an affidavit unsealed
Wednesday in U.S. District
Court in Burlington, the FBI


said an unidentified 14-year-
old girl told investigators she
was present on June 25 when
Jacques tricked Bennett into
thinking she was going to a
party and took her to his Ran-
dolph home to be initiated
into a sex ring.
The teenager said she was
led to believe Bennett "would
have sex with adult males"
during the initiation. The 14-
year-old said she herself had
been having sex with Jacques
since she was 9, as part of the
sex ring.
The teen said she and Ben-
nett watched television for a
while before Jacques told her
to leave and took his niece
upstairs. The witness said she
left the house with her
boyfriend and didn't see Ben-
nett again.
In another blow to the fam-
ily, Bennett's former stepfa-
ther, Raymond Gagnon, was
formally charged Wednesday
with obstructing justice in the
case.
He entered no plea at the
federal hearing and was
denied bail pending another
hearing on Monday. The 40-
year-old Gagnon, who lives in
Texas, was on a regular visit to


"I know
Brooke knows
that we love
her and will
always love
her."


James Bennett
Vermont when he was arrest-
ed.
According to the affidavit,
Gagnon told police he
accessed his former step-
daughter's MySpace page
from a computer at his San
Antonio home after getting
login information from
Jacques.
Police said they have evi-
dence that postings to the
account were altered to make
it appear that the 12-year-old
had discussed a secret ren-
dezvous shortly before she dis-
appeared.
On that day, Jacques
dropped Bennett off at a con-
venience store, and surveil-


lance video shows they left in
separate directions. She had
told family members she was
going to meet a friend and vis-
it a hospitalized relative of the
friend. At the vigil for Ben-
nett in Randolph a site that
still featured big banners read-
ing "Come Home, Brooke,
We Love You!!" Gary
Finch, Bennett's homeroom
and math teacher last year,
said she was an energetic and
enthusiastic learner whom he
loved having in class.
"She was always volunteer-
ing, always with a smile on her
face. Smart, creative. It's a
tragedy. It's unbelievable. It's
hard to comprehend. I didn't
think anything like this would
happen to such a great kid,"
said Finch, one of about 300
people who attended.
Finch said that when school
started last fall, Bennett was
nervous about transferring
from her small elementary
school to the high school.
"She conquered that," he
said. "She didn't conquer
this."
Associated Press writer Wil-
son Ring in Burlington con-
tributed to this report.


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MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008, PAGE 23


THE TRIBUNE
























































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THE TRIBUNE


,W


MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008


Confidn ce Fo[r#ife]
*HBHBHH


IMF: Bahamas


by

* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
T he Bahamas would
among the world's har
est hit economies if
and food prices increa
by 20 per cent mo
than earlier predictions, an Intern
tional Monetary Fund (IMF) repo
finding the combined effect would 1


hit worst


oil, food increases


Fund report predicts 20% oil, food price rises above projection would wipe out almost
be one month's worth of nation's foreign reserves and widen current account deficit by 2.7%


rd-
oil
se
re
a-
>rt
be


to wipe out almost one month's worth
of this nation's import reserves and
widen the current account deficit by
2.7 per cent.
The IMF paper described the


Bahamas as being among "the high-
impact countries, with [foreign
-exchange] reserves coverage below
three months" if 2008 and 2009 food
prices were 20 per cent more than


forecast in the Fund's World Eco-
nomic Outlook (WEO), which was
issued in the Spring.
If this actually happened, the
Bahamas would lose 0.4 months


worth of foreign currency reserves
that could be used to purchase
imports, the IMF estimated, leaving
SEE page 4B


Government handling of Call for 'amnesty' over

tax changes 'unacceptable' Fre ort post aid

M By NEIL HARTNELL Freeport post-paid tax


Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce's president has
slammed the Government's
failure to inform the business
community in advance of its
planned 2008-2009 Budget tax
increases as "unacceptable",
warning that many people had
been "caught off guard" and
their business plans thrown
into confusion.
Dionisio D'Aguilar, who is
also Superwash's president,
said Bahamian companies
were being forced to make
sudden adjustments to their

SEE page 4B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government should
"create an amnesty or grace
period" for one month to allow
Freeport-based
wholesalers/retailers to become
familiar with the new tariff
rates and headings introduced
by the 2008-2009 Budget, a for-
mer Grand Bahama Chamber
of Commerce president has
told Tribune Business.
Christopher Lowe said such
an adjustment period was nec-
essary to maintain the orderly
collection and ri. ,;'tii-i, to
Customs of 'post-paid' taxes
on over-the-counter bonded


0


Port licensees facing 'logistical and practical nightmare'
due to lack of timely details on new rates and headings


goods sales, as currently both
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty (GBPA) licensees and Cus-
toms were unfamiliar with new
tax rates and headings.
Mr Lowe, who as operations
manager at Kelly's (Freeport)
is one of the GBPA licensees
who collects and remits 'post
paid' duty taxes to the Gov-
ernment, told Tribune Busi-
ness: "In order to avoid legal
ramifications, I think the Gov-
ernment is going to have to
consider an amnesty or grace
period for those who, in


Freeport, collect revenues on
the Government's behalf with
respect to duty post-paid on
sales, and allow them to
become familiar with the cor-
rect tariff headings and rates.
"They're not going to be
able to hold us to account for
collecting the right amount of
duty, because they did not pub-
lish the correct tariff rates in
advance."
Mr Lowe last week told Tri-
bune Business that the 'post
SEE page 3B


EU trade deal paves wayfor

US to obtain 'EPA-plus'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas will likely
end up granting "EPA-plus"
trade preferences to the US
over any Caribbean Basin Ini-
tiative (CBI) replacement, a
leading attorney has warned,
especially if this nation signs
on to the current agreement
reached between CARIFO-
RUM and the European
Union (EU).
Brian Moree, senior partner
at McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, reiterated that by
going much further than the
'goods-only' trade deal


Attorney says going
much further than
needed with EU will
set US talks starting
point 'much higher'
required to make the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) compliant with the
World Trade Organisation's
(WTO) demands, the
Bahamas would enable the US
to "pocket" numerous incen-

SEE page 5B


Exuma *Abaco *Freeport *


Insurance


Cayman


Private sector: FNM health

plan 'absolutely' better

than NHI scheme


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE catastrophic health
insurance plan being proposed
by the Ingraham administra-
tion is "absolutely" better than
the former government's
National Health Insurance
(NHI) plan, the private sector
believes, although it is anx-
iously awaiting details on the
latest initiative.
Winston Rolle, the former
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce president and Coalition
for Healthcare Reform
spokesman, told Tribune Busi-


ness that while the catastroph-
ic health insurance plan was "a
sensible approach", it was
unclear whether this'was the
first step towards more com-
prehensive reform.
Responding to Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham's
announcement of the scheme
during the Budget debate, Mr
Rolle said: "A catastrophic
plan was something that was
recommended to be imple-
mented years ago. It is a sensi-
ble approach. Whether it's the

SEE page 2B


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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


rel F~r~v~iI I IMARKE T 1A1


* By Royal Fidelity Capital
Markets
IT was an active week in the
Bahamian stock market, with
investors trading in eight out of
the 19 listed stocks. Of these,
five declined and three
remained unchanged.
A total of 116,133 shares
changed hands, representing
an increase of 40,406 or 53.36
per cent in comparison to last
week's trading volume of
75,727 shares.
Commonwealth Bank(CBL)


led this week's trading volume
with 45,993 shares, declining
by $0.28 or 3.8 per cent to end
the week at $7.
Trading
Colina Holdings Bahamas
(CHL) followed with 30,290 of
its shares trading, to close the
week unchanged at $2.88.
ICD Utilities (ICD) was the
laggard of the week, with
25,000 shares trading, plum-
meting by $1.29 or 19 per cent
to close at a new 52-week low


of $5.50.
Some 8,500 shares of Doc-
tors Hospital Health Systems
(DHS)also traded, the stock
decreasing by $0.08 to close at
$2.84. FirstCaribbean
International Bank
(Bahamas) Limited (CIB) had
3,100 of its shares trade, also
declining by $0.14 to end at a
new 52-week low of $11.65.
COMPANY NEWS:
Earnings Releases:
There were no financial
results reported by any of the


Who assisted in L


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held on May 15th at the
Sheraton Cable Beach Resort.

Bapas Hea'h: fIrnsalwrag Center of Marnv


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9 h Mr Roesassss Lid.
R- ree-a-?. l'^,*-^ia--wa .*'cspra.iii
Sha!^ was|^.--r & Co.
'Serandtards ar- feaniachwr-. Cantire
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SPAmiis~riw CHt?'<.ilr Mr'.i 4.e-.! -^

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Somery& 1 P*: Ecisdes14

YrLErtw~y TPaeay
Oxefsd Law Ora--.lhry.
C Tva .Vh.Cap.rt Obmbeers


We woL&
Addeefy forw he4pntrV1 makse0 "^f event as occ


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www.shatteringthestigma.com


19-listed companies during the
week.
Offerings
Private Placement
Offerings:
FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be extend-
ing the deadline of its private
placement offering. The pre-
ferred shares will be paying a
dividend rate of prime + 1.75
per cent, payable semi-annu-
ally.


Private

sector: FNM

health plan

'absolutely'

better than

NHI scheme

FROM page 1B

final or the first step remains to
be seen, but we think it's a sen-
sible approach to examine.
"The devil is in the detail.
We have to see how the plan
will be administered, paid for
and everything else."
A catastrophic health insur-
ance scheme was examined
under the first Ingraham gov-
ernment, with assistance from
the International Labour
Organisation (ILO), but the
proposal was dropped follow-
ing the 2002 election after the
Perry Christie-led PLP gov-
ernment took office.
That administration, in a bid
to make good on its political
and election campaign promis-
es, looked at implementing a
one-size-fits-all, all-encom-
passing NHL scheme that
would have required every
Bahamas resident and business
to contribute to a government-
funded healthcare plan.
The PLP scheme ran into
much opposition from the
medical profession and private
sector, who qtiestioned
whether the NHI plan would
be self-sustainable financially


The Bahamian Stock Market


BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE


AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FBB-
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE


$1.84
$0.89
$9.37
$11.80
$14.60
$3.49
$14.00
$7.00
$2.88
$11.65
$3.20
$2.84
$8.00
$2.35
$0.44 .
$5.55
$12.50
$5.50
$12.00
$10.00


$-0.06

$-0.28
$-0.06
$-
$-0
$-
$-0
$-0.28
$-
$-0.14
$-0.70
$-0.08
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-1.29
$-
$-


0
0
1,500
0
0
0
1,250
45,993
30,290
31,000
0
8,500
0
0
0
0
500
25,000
0
0


10.84%
4.71%
-2.50%
0.00%
0.00%
-4.64%
16.18%
-16.96%
-8.57%
-20.21%
-36.51%
20.85%
11.11%
-11.32%
-42.86%
7.14%
-3.47%
-24.14%
9.09%
0.00%


DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
J. S. Johnson & Company (JSJ) has declared an interim
dividend of $0.16 per share, payable .on July 16, 2008, to all
shareholders of record date July 9, 2008.

Consolidated Water Company BDRs (CWCB) has
declared a quarterly dividend of $0.013 per share, payable on
August 7, 2008, to all shareholders of record date June 30,
2008.
J. S. Johnson & Company (JSJ) has declared an interim
dividend of $0.16 per share, payable on July 16, 2008, to all
shareholders of record date July 9, 2008.

ICD Utilities (ICD) has declared a quarterly dividend of
$0.10 per share, payable on July 25, 2008, to all shareholders
of record date July 4, 2008.
Abaco Markets (AML) announced it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on Friday, July 18, 2008 at 4pm at
the Abaco Beach Resort & Boat Harbour, Marsh Harbour,
Abaco.
ICD Utilities (ICD) announced it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on Tuesday, July 22,2008, at 6pm at
the Manor House, Great Harbour Cay, The Westin Grand
Bahama Island Our Lucaya, Royal Palm Way, Freeport,
Grand Bahama.
Benchmark (Bahamas)(BBL) announced it will be hold-
ing its Annual General Meeting on Thursday, July 24,2008, at
6:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, No.1 Bay Street,
Nassau.


and a host of other issues.
While Mr Ingraham's cata-
strophic health insurance plan
"has a lot of credibility with
the Coalition", given that it
heralded a phased approach to
healthcare reform, and not the
'one-time big bang' that the
Christie administration
promised, Mr Rolle said the
Government. had yet to issue
any details on the scheme.
Adding that the Coalition
was unsure whether the pro-
posed catastrophic health
insurance plan had undergone
additional work since the FNM
retook the Government, or
whether it was "conceptual" in
nature, Mr Rolle said it was
unclear if this was just the first
step towards more compre-
hensive healthcare reform.
He also reiterated the Coali-
tion's concerns that the Nation-
al Health Insurance Act, the
enabling legislation for the for-


mer government's proposed
NHI scheme, had been passed
by Parliament.
The Christie government's
strategy had been to develop
the regulations governing NHI
after the 2007 elections, and
implement the scheme in 2008,
but it was voted out of office.
Still, with the legislation
remaining on the statute book
and not repealed, Mr Rolle
said the Coalition remained
concern that any incoming
administration could decide to
pick up and revive the plan.
"Take a look at the Act,"
Mr Rolle told Tribune Busi-
ness. "The Act passed in Par-
liament leaves the door wide
open for whatever is specified
in the regulations. That [the
catastrophic health insurance
plan] may be the initial offer-
ing, but it does not prevent any
government from adding ini-
tial elements over time."


I
L


summer




of saVI s


Village Road. Ph: 394-2378


BUSINESS I





months sales contracts written were thme
highest since last October.
"I think we are at the bottom because
since last October the annualised number of
homes sold has bottomed out at around
five million," Mr Gillespie told the seventh
annual Coldwell Banker Island Affiliate
Management Conference.
And he said the demographics are over-
whelming.
"There are 78-79 million baby boomers
that are still in their prime and will be pur-
chasing real estate for decades to come," he
explained.
The youngest are in their early 40s and
are in their prime earning years, having
more money than any previous generation
their age.
They are purchasing second homes,
retirement homes and also have discovered
real estate as an investment, Mr Gillespie
said.
Their children 73 million of them will
fuel real estate for the next four decades, he
added.
This, coupled with legal immigrants, the
dramatic increase in home ownership
among minorities 40-50 per cent more in
the last decade and the rise in power of


FROM page 1B

paid' tax collection system in
Freeport had been thrown into
"disarray" by the Governmen-
t's apparent-failure to inform
GBPA licensees in advance of
what the new rates and prod-
uct headings would be under
both the Tariff and Excise
Acts.
This meant, of course, that
GBPA licensees did not know
whether the tariff rates they
.were levying on 'post paid'
over-the-counter duty sales
were the correct ones.
Mr Lowe told Tribune Busi-
ness that although the Tariff
and Excise Act books, con-
taining all the new tariff rates
and headings, had been made
available in Freeport late last
week, GBPA licensees and
Customs officers were still
familiarizing themselves with
the changes.
Again questioning why all
the new Tariff and Excise Act
rates had not been Gazzetted
before they took effect on July
1, 2008, something he said was
required to make them
become law, Mr Lowe said:
"They're [the Government]
going to have to create some
sort of half-way situation.
"They can't expect Customs
officers in Grand Bahama to
be immediately familiar with
the new tariff rates and the
new tariff headings when
they've had no chance to study
these books beforehand.
"It is even more ludicrous to
expect the private sector to
have familiarity with these
things, particularly as the rates
were made available after the
fact."
A further "logistical and
practical nightmare", Mr Lowe
added, had been created by
Customs converting its com-
puter system to reflect the
2008-2009 Budget tariff rates
and headings before the previ-
ous fiscal year ended.
With no way to harmonise
the new rates and headings
with the 2008-2009 ones, Cus-
toms was now rejecting 'post
paid' duty submissions from
GBPA licensees for May and
June, despite the old rates and
headings having then been in
effect.
Customs had already indi-
cated that it was not going to
accept Kelly's (Freeport's)
'post paid' duty submission for
June, and Mr Lowe said: "The
June duty-paid submissions to
Customs, on behalf of several
companies, have already been
rejected even though the new
duty rates were then not in
force.
"They [Customs] can't even
find half the tariff headings


COLDWELL BANKER president Jim Gillespie
(left) and Mike Lightbourn, head of Nassau-
based Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty...

single women are other major contribut-
ing factors for a bright future, he said.
"As usual, Jim put it right in perspec-
tive,' said Mike Lightbourn, Coldwell
Banker Lightbourn Realty's owner in Nas-
sau. Mr Lightbourn was one of the affiliates
to attend the recent conference, held at the
Regent Palms Resort on Grace Bay.
According to Mr Gillespie, there's a lot of
pent up demand in the market. '
This is illustrated by a 12 per cent increase
in Coldwell Banker website traffic last year
in a down real estate market.
Gillespie said the US government knows
the importance of real estate "and how we
will probably lead the country out of this
economic slump we are in".
"When it comes to housing, every politi-


from the old system, and the
duty rates are not there any-
more.
"It's a logistical nightmare;
it's a practical nightmare.
While Customs can tell us: 'We
must collect more from you',
we in turn cannot go back to
customers and say: 'Can you
pay'more, the extra that Cus-
toms demands?'"
Given these problems, Mr
Lowe said it was no surprise
that Customs in Freeport was
"clogged up", with import ship-
ments being cleared last week
"at a snail's pace".
Freeport, through the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
'and with the support of numer-
ous Supreme Court rulings


against Bahamas Customs,
works differently from all oth-
er parts of the Bahamas when
it comes to tax collection.
Freeport-based wholesalers
and retailers are able to sell
bonded goods, meaning that
no import or stamp duties have
been paid on them at the bor-
der, to other GBPA licensees
provided the goods are for use
in their own business.
Yet they also collect 'post
paid' duties taxes paid after
the products are sold if the
goods and materials are pur-
chased by Freeport residents
and individuals for use in their
homes.
In this case, Freeport's mer-
chants calculate the duty due.


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ing on t e rea ed state me IitUown Uin eil 1UO
has been distorted.
He said real estate was local even down
to each neighbourhood, and that eight states
represent 69 per cent of the homes actually.
lost to foreclosure.
As a result, the other 42 states suffer
from negative foreclosure press coverage
that discourages buyers from entering the
market.
Rather than being in the middle of a giant
national real estate bubble, there are region-
al bubbles which California, Florida, Neva-
da and Arizona are experiencing, he said.
"The real estate story that should be told
is how resilient real estate prices have been
during this market correction," Mr Gillespie
said.
The market, he said, started its correction
in August 2005, after an incredible bull
market that lasted over 10 years, with the
last five years seeing appreciation levels of
well over 100 per cent in many markets.
NAR predicts prices in the US will
decrease by 8.4 per cent this year.
Mr Gillespie hoped buyers would take
advantage of the bargains, because next
year NAR predicts price appreciation of
about 4.4 per cent.


to the Government 'post
import' on its landed cost, and
remit the correct amount to
Customs by the 15th of each
month.


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CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

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of interest from licensed Internet Service Providers (ISPs)
for spectrum in the 1.7, 2.1 and 2.3 GHz bands to provide
Broadband Wireless Access (BWA) for last mile Internet service
applications. Allocations will be in 5 MHz blocks at a price
of $3,000 per annum. Those ISPs with exclusive last mile
facilities would be prohibited from applying for BWA spectrum.


Section 6(4) of the Telecommunications Act, 1999 requires
the PUC to act in a timely, transparent, objective and
non-discriminatory manner and consistent with the objectives
of the Act.


Additional information can be obtained from the PUC's office located
at 4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue or downloaded from the PUC's
website at www.pucbahamas.gov.bs. All expressions of interest
should be submitted by August 8, 2008 via post, hand delivery,
facsimile or e-mail to:


Anthony Rolle
Chairman
Public Utilities Commission
P.O. Box N-4860
Fourth Terrace East
Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242 323-7288
Email: info@pucbahamas.gov.bs.


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MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


THE TIBUNEMONDA, JUL 7, 208,IPGES3


Developers: Economic climate no impediment to property purchases

0 By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL Added amenities will include tennis and bas- buy, and the Destini Lakes developers had
Business Reporter ketball courts. no fears that the current economic climate
Speaking with Tribune Business, Lorraine will make it difficult to sell the lots.
THE developers of a New Providence- Hamilton, the Destini Lakes administrator, "The banks are still willing to lend, and
based gated community believe the difficult said the company was looking to target there are qualified persons out there. We
economic climate will have no impact on young and upwardly mobile couples. "I think have received overwhelming interest. To
their project, having sold eight out of the 49 what sets our community apart is the size. It's date we have sold eight lots, including several
lots already. Buyers are likely to be able to a smaller subdivision, and the fact that we sales today," Ms Hamilton said.
start construction of their properties by year- are right on the lake and there is no chance At the moment, the infrastructure is being
end. for any other development to be built around placed in the ground, and Ms Hamilton said
Destini Lakes officially launched lot sales it. Also, our lots are larger than average and it was likely this will be completed within
for the 49-lot gated community, which is are priced very reasonably. They are good three to six months, which means that lot
located in South West Ridge, and being value for money because construction costs owners will likely be able to begin construc-
developed by Stanley Bethel of Bethel's will only continue to go up," Ms Hamilton tion by year's end.
Trucking, at a special open house for inter- said. Ms Hamilton said that while the devel-
ested homeowners at the weekend. The lots in Destini Lakes range in price opers can assist with house plans and con-
The subdivision consists of large lots, 95 ft from $135'000 to $155,000. struction, there are no mandatory house
by 100 ft in size, and is zoned for single fam- Ms Hamilton said the fact that prices will plans for residents must build. There are no
ily dwellings, duplex and fourplex structures. only increase makes it an excellent time to set square footage requirements for homes.


Coldwell global chief bullish on real estate

COLDWELL Banker president Jim I -M cian and branch of the government races to
Gillespie told Bahamian, Bermuda and find solutions...housing is a matter of public
Caribbean realtors he was bullish on the policy, thus the huge tax breaks," Mr Gille-
short and long-term future of real estate. spie said.
Addressing Coldwell Banker owners, .. Mr Lightbourn concurred, pointing to
brokers and managers in Providenciales, theBahamas government's recent decision
Turks and Caicos Islands, he said the to exempt first-time home buyers on stamp
National Association of Realtors (NAR) tax for homes valued below $500,000.
pending sales index reflects the previous 1Mr Gillespie indicated that the report-
-.++. -_-+1. 1 iinn i nLha l iuitd in th I







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008


Government handling of tax changes 'unacceptable'


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FROM page 1B


business models to enable
them to remain competitive,
having in some cases experi-
enced "material changes" to
the duty rates levied on prod-
ucts through the Tariff and
Excise Acts' reforms.
"Clearly, the Government
did not do an adequate job of
informing the business com-
munity about what was to hap-
pen in any detail," Mr
D'Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness.
"It has taken a number of
businesses that have experi-
enced significant increases in
their duty rates completely off-
guard, and now they're scram-
bling to adjust their business
models to compete in the field
they are in.
"You develop a business
model based on cost. If you
have a duty rate that increases,
for example, from 16 per cent
to 42 per cent, that's a materi-
al change. It's so shocking that
you're caught off guard. You
don't have time to plan and
adjust you're business model
to cope with the increase."
Pointing out that the 2008-
2009 Budget had been formal-
ly presented to Parliament in
late May 2008, more than four
weeks ago, but it was only now
that Bahamian businesses were
finding out about how tariff
rate and heading changes
would affect their operations
when they "went to the win-
dow" to clear and pay Customs


for import shipments, Mr
D'Aguilar described the Gov-
ernment's failure to inform the
business community on the
details as "unacceptable".
He explained that while
Bahamian businesses did not
mind paying duties and taxes
to the Government, their main
complaint here was that they
had not been informed and
given time to adjust.

Sector

The private sector thrived
best in an economic, taxation
and regulatory framework
characterized by continuity,
predictability and certainty,
which was not the case with
the way the 2008-2009 Budget
reforms were introduced.
"It seems as if they've
rounded more things up than
they've rounded down," Mr
D'Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness. "As a general rate, it was
35 per cent import duty plus 7
per cent stamp duty, which
equals 42 per cent. That vast
majority of items coming into
the Bahamas were taxed at
that rate, and they've decided
to round that up to 45 per cent.
That, right off the top, is a 3
per cent increase."
The Chamber president said
it was unclear whether the
Budget's tax increases would
be offset by its exemptions and
cuts, but it was likely that com-
panies impacted by duty
increases would pass at least
some of the rise on to con-
sumers fuelling inflation and
cost of living pressures.


"This is just one more thing
we have to deal with," Mr
D'Aguilar said. "We are
already experiencing resistance
to increasing prices. God for-
bid that Florida removes the
6.5 per cent export sales tax
exemption. I think we're in for
a rough ride over the next
year."
He added of the Budget: "So
many people have been affect-
ed by this. It's begun to irri-
tate a lot of people. It's so
important to keep people
informed to they can plan.
Catching so many people off
guard, especially in business,
is not good.
"They did not handle the
process well. It was a signifi-
cant change in the way they
calculate import taxes. It would
have been good if they had
published one page in the
newspaper, saying this is what
the rates were and this is what
they are now."
Meanwhile, the Nassau Insti-
tute economic think-tank crit-
icised the Government's
planned tax increases for being
particularly ill-timed, arguing
that they would create a 'dou-
ble whammy' for the Bahami-
an economy by stifling private
sector investment and ingenu-
ity during a worldwide slow-
down.
"One effect of higher taxes is
to reduce the level and effi-
ciency of capital formation.
Savings and Investment by the
private sector means more job
creation and growth. Lower
taxes end up generating more
revenue to the Public Trea-


sury," the Nassau Institute
said.
"Ironically, in a period when
more Bahamian entrepre-
neurial risk-taking is required
to grow the economy,
increased taxation reduces
availability of capital resources
in tandem with an economic
slowdown; a sort of "double
whammy" to a struggling econ-
omy."
Urging that the Government
needed to downsize the public
sector if it was to lower taxes,
balance the Budget and main-
tain fiscal prudence, the Nas-
sau Institute said the Bahamas
could not continue running
annual Budget deficits.
Cycles

"Business cycles are the
inevitable result of monetary
policy of the world's central
banking systems," the Nassau
Institute said. "The Bahamas is
not exempt from economic
downturns and the prudence
of an 'anchor to the windward',
such as less debt and higher
reserves, would have been a
far-sighted fiscal strategy to
reduce the risk of devaluation
of the Bahamian dollar.
"Over time, perhaps over
dependence on foreign invest-
ment for capital infusion has
led to an assumption that there
will always be a Knight in shin-
ing armour to come to the res-
cue, and maybe there will.
Nevertheless, good 'house-
keeping' includes low taxation
to encourage local savings and
investment."


IMF: Bahamas hit worst by oil, food increases


FROM page 1B

this nation with just half a
month's worth of reserves.
In addition, a 20 per cent
food price increase above pro-
*! _i'os would increase this
nation's current account deficit


FOR SALE
Lot No. 23, Block 1 Unit 1
Cannon Bay Subdivision, Grand Bahama

All that parcel of Vacant Land containing 25,000
square feet or .57 acres situate in Unit 1 of Cannon
Bay Subdivision. The property is located on the west
side of Breech Drive, north of Cannon Ball Lane,
and is one hundred and twenty-five feet along the
waterway. All the roads are paved with asphalt and
all utilities are in place. The area is approximately
seven miles east of the Commercial District of
Freeport.

For conditions of sale and any other information.
please contact:
Credit Risk Management Collection Unit
At: 502-0929 or 356-1608

Interested persons should submit offers in writing
addressed to:
The Manager,
Credit Risk Management-Collection Unit
P.O.Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas

To reach us before July 31, 2008
Serious Enquires Only


EfS ROYAL-FIDELITYC
CFAL
C F A K I."
....' ';"'"- --.-,:" I 'LIaT.it'TFILADUID SECURITIIES AS OF:
.,I.,:.... ,F PAY, 4 JULY 2008
.,'A.U L CHO -b.51 I %CHO -0.03 | YTD -244.70 I YTlr% -11.84
S.-'' '. '.,-LO N 870if.39 I YTTD% -8.57% | 2007 28.29%
_: w.. AMAAa.M:OM FOR MORE DATA A INFORMATION
1 wk-HI 52wk-Low S""r.oIty Prevlious lose Tod.ay' Close Chan g. Dally Vol BPS Divv S PE Yield
1 9 5 1 5 1 5 1 b f .aree l a a i t ) .: ,.: ,. 1 1 : G C C' 1 c '
11.80 11.80 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 11.80 000 1 086 0.400 10.9 3.39%
9.88 9.37 Bank of Bahamas 9.37 937 000 0.643 0.160 14.6 171%
0 99 85 Benchmark 089 0.89 000 -0.823 0.030 N/M 3 37%
3.74 3.49 Bahamas Waste 3.49 349 000 0.209 0,090 16.7 258%
2.70 1.48 Fidelity Bank 2.35 2.35 000 0055 0.040 427 1 70%
14.10 10.60 Cable Bahamas 14.00 14.00 000 1.121 0240 125 1.71%
3.15 2.35 Collna Holdings 2.88 2.88 0 00 0.046 0.040 62.6 1 39%
8.50 4.80 Commonwealth Bank (51) 7.01 7.00 -001 14,000 0.440 0.300 15.9 4.29%
7.22 3.20 Consolidated Water BDRs 320 320 000 0.131 0 0052 24.4 1.63%
300 220 Doctor'. Hospital 284 2.84 000 0308 0040 9.2 1 41%
800 6.02 Famguard 800 800 000 0.728 0280 110 3.50%
13.01 12.50 Finco 1250 12.50 0.00 0.650 0.570 19.2 4.56%
14.75 11.65 FirstCarlbbean Bank 11,65 11.65 0,00 0.550 0.450 212 386%
6.10 505 Focol (S) 555 5.55 000 0.386 0140 14.4 2.52%
1.00 1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1 00 1.00 0.00 0,000 0,000 N/M 0,00%
1.00 0.41 Freeport Concrete 0.44 044 000 0.035 0.000 12.6 0.00%
800 5,50 ICD Utilities 5.50 550 0.00 0.407 0 300 13,5 5.45%
12.50 8.60 J. S. Johnsori 12.00 1200 000 1.023 0620 11 7 517%
10.00 1000 r.emi.er eal Esole 10 1 0 O 00 0I 190 ?00 -5 6 0.00%
d. lity Ouer-Th-Coounter eaeurntlei
S,2wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid S Ask 5 L.st Price Weekly Vol. EPS Dlu S PiE Yi.ld
*403 '21. A.-, ,6..F 'r.O--5 4m.. 1 *. I.p.-. I I l U'C,


8.00 600 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6 25 6 O 0.000 0.480 NM 7.1
'-. .a. .J.--
,,,, C ,,-Th'-Oun=i curtr
4 1 0 0 0 0 B CE.:, B 4 1 ,1.-' 1 1 1, d :1 .1
14860 14 00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15 60 14.00 1 160 0 900 134 6
0 55 0 40 RND Holdings 0 45 0.55 045 -0.023 0 000 N/M 0 0
S.- SX Lslwtai Mutual Funds
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund NrVm. NAV YTD"% Last 12 MIonths Dlv$ YI.ld-%
1.3152 1.2485 Collna Bond Fund 1.315228-* 1 58% 5 47%
3.0008 2.7399 Collne MSI Preferred Fund 2.998763-' -0.07% 8 13%
1.3948 1.3458 Collne Money Market Fund 1.394847"-" 1 44% 3 80%
3.7869 3.3971 Fidelity Bahamas 3G & I Fund 3.6707-' -3.32% 14 65%
12.2142 11.6581 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.2142"* 2.35% 5.73%
100.0000 100.0000 CFAL G31obl Bond Fund 100,00"
100.0000 98.2100 CFAL Global Equity Fund 99.956603' -0.04% -0 04%
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.00O
10.5000 9.6346 Fidelity International Investment Fund 10 0060**1 -4.70% -4 70%
1.0039 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0039--*
1.0038 1.0000 FG Finanoial Growth Fund 1 0038*-"
1 0038 1 00000 F3 FInminancala Diversified Fund 1 0038""
. -'. .' -. Mrket Trimv N.A.V. Kmy
MEN ALL BUHARMINDa rC.- -; .- : BILD : -,-- .-,- *. ?1 Ma.h 200.0
52w-l. Highest Clo ing price in last 2 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 31 Deeaer 2007
Wk-L.ow Low.t closing price in last 52 weeks Ask S .Sellin price of Colinn end fidelity -* 30 May 2000
PMVbelu Coll- Pr.viou days weighted price for dally volume Last Prioe- Last traded over the-counter price "" 31 April 2008
TrdM/y COla- Current day's weight price for dally volume We.kl Vol.- Tradino vnl,-e of the prior week *** 30 April 2000
Chang- Change in io.sing price front day to day EPs A company reported earning. per shnre for the lat1 12 mth .. 20 June 2008
Dlly Vol.- Numbtr of total share traded today NAV Net A*set V:lue
DIV $- Dividendl per ahare paid In tho lat 12 month, NIM Not MonnngfulI
PIn Closing Prll, divldd by the last 12 month earnings FINDX Thoe FIdeIty BaniTm- Stock Indox January 1, 194 = 100
[i) 44or-1 Seak apli iffeotIve DOat 8//2007
SIt. -f, 55l.0k1 spin ff*-at D 1te 0 11,2007
^&Sh>4tAte $ifla*i.5,54vie*L h.*41 fhl d 1 .Aldbiz S5j..&0.71A i mP CA31rTAL MaRKIH1- M 2.2.39"5-4 I V fRA MODR DATA & INFORMAT1ON CALL 247-3.943260


80%
,_,:,_-, :
16%
30%


lion as of May 2008. Given that
the US Commerce Depart-
ment's website showed that the
Bahamas imported $2.468 bil-
lion worth of goods and ser-
vices from the US in 2007, and
that about 85 per cent of this
nation's imports come from the
US, it can be estimated that
the Bahamas imported 2.838
billion worth of goods in total
that year.

Translates

That translates into roughly
$236.5 million worth of imports
that the Bahamas purchased
every month. Given that fig-
ure, at May-end 2008 this
nation had foreign exchange
reserves that were equivalent
to 2.95 months' worth of
imports just below what the
IMF recommends, but cer-
tainly nowhere near as bad as
the picture painted in this latest
report.
The Fund itself warned that
the report could not be con-
sidered as actual projections
for a country, and therefore
could not be used to assess the
true impact of oil and food
price shocks.
Nevertheless, given the
Bahamian economy's open-
ness, and the fact this country


imports at least 90 per cent of
everything it consumes, there
can be little doubt that the
Bahamas is more vulnerable
than most to oil and food price
rises and the inflationary, cost
of living pressures they bring.
Post-September 11, the
Bahamas was rated as the
world's fourth most vulnera-
ble economy to external
shocks, and given this nation's
small size and the fact it is
neither an oil producer, not a
major agricultural producer it
is forced to be a price taker,
leaving it at the mercy of world
markets.
Rising oil prices, now over
$143 per barrel, have sent
unleaded gasoline prices at the
pump shooting upwards to $6
per gallon, with BEC's fuel
surcharge now approaching
$0.20 per kilowatt hour.
As for food, wholesalers told
Tribune Business at end-May
2008 that rice prices were due
to increase by 17 per cent
month-on-month between
May and June 2008. That was
set to drive the increase in rice
costs "to 30 per cent for the
2008 first half. Other com-
modities and staples, such as
flour and corn beef, had suf-
fered similar year-on-year
increases.


from 13.8 per cent to 14.8 per
cent, a full 1 per cent rise.
Although admitting that
food prices being 20 per cent
higher than forecast was a
'worse case scenario', the IMF
warned that given current oil
prices and oil futures trends,
the same could not be said for
oil. It added that oil being 20
per cent higher than the WEO
outlook forecasts was a 'con-
servative' prediction.
Should the latter scenario
come to pass, the Bahamas
would lose half a month's
worth of foreign exchange
reserves for import purchases,
and see its current account
deficit increase from 13.8 per
cent to 15.5 per cent.
Together, the combined
effect of oil and food prices
increasing by 20 per cent more
than the IMF's existing fore-
cast would be to wipe-out what
the Fund estimated was this
nation's entire 0.9 months'
worth of foreign exchange
reserves, leaving the Bahamas
with nothing, and raise the cur-
rent account deficit from 13.8
per cent to 16.5 per cent.
Foreign exchange reserves
levels are considered relative-
ly low if they fall below three
months' worth of imports, but
this latest IMF report should
probably be treated with some
caution, at least as far as the
Bahamas is concerned.
The Central Bank of the
Bahamas website showed that
this nation's foreign exchange
reserves stood at $698.3 mil-


LOT NUMBER 20~ BLOCK 8 OF SEA BREEZE















A- Four Bedrooms, two bathrooms, single-family residence, with living room, dining room,
family room, covered porch, foyer, kitchen, laundry room with own half bathroom and a
two-car carport. Building has an effective age of Twenty-two years and a gross floor area
of 3,305 sq, ft. Land size is 10,000 sq. ft.
The building is located on the southern side of Silver Palm Grove, 400 feet west of Silver
Palm Lane or 200 feet of Silver Palm Boulevard.
For conditions of sale and any other Information, please contact:
Credit Risk Management Collection Unit At:
502-0929 or 356-1608
Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management-Collection Unit
P. 0. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before July 31, 2008
Serious Enquires Only


NOTICE

The Law Firm of

Harry B. Sands,


Lobosky & Company




will be closed on




Friday, July 11,2008

for the Firm's



Annual Fun Day


BUSINESS








MUNUAY, JULY 1, 2UU8, PAUL- b


THE TRIBUNE


Boyle named as City Markets chief


BAHAMAS Supermarkets, operator of
12 City Market stores in New Providence
and Grand Bahama, has named Stephen
Boyle as its chief executive to replace.Ken
Burns.
Mr Boyle joined the company in Sep-
tember 2007 as chief operating officer, over-
seeing the day-to-day operations of the gro-
cery chain.
"We at Bahamas Supermarkets are very
pleased to announce the appointment of
Stephen Boyle to the position of chief exec-
utive," said chairman Basil Sands.


"Mr Boyle came
to Bahamas Super-
markets with 27
years experience in
the industry in sev-
eral countries. In the
time he has been
with Bahamas
Supermarkets, his
energy has been
boundless. When
Mr Burns left, the
directors were hap-


py to have someone of Mr Boyle's expertise
capable of immediately stepping into that
post. It allowed for a seamless transition,
and for the company to retain its strong
executive management team."
The chairman said directors were
"extremely appreciative" of Mr Bums' ser-
vice, including helping to open its 24,000
square foot flagship store at Cable Beach in
2007, overseeing installation of some $4
million in in-store technology and launching
a programme for upgrading all the older
stores.


Bank focuses on customer service


Bank of The Bahamas
(BOB) has initiated the 'BOB
First Line of Defense Customer
Care Workshop' programme as
part of its 'Customer Life Cycle
Management', consisting of a
series of seminars and training
sessions aimed at increasing the
customer service capability of
its staff.
"Customer care has to be our
number one focus," said
Vaughn Delaney, deputy man-
aging director, information and
technology and human
resources, whose responsibili-
ties include training.
"Regardless of the products
and features you offer, if your
customers are unhappy then
you're looking at a serious prob-


BOB Training manager
Gmina Brown


lem. With this new training ini-
tiative, 'Customer Life-Cycle
Management', we're looking at
building quality relationships
with our clients through their
life spans, and ideally with their


.., /


/


subsequent generations. This
, will allow us to get to know our
clients on a personal level and
provide the best possible care
that we can."
Signifying a commitment to


the entire family unit of their
clients, the bank hopes to build
customer loyalty, retention and
growth through such training as
telephone etiquette, communi-
cation skills and customer rela-
tionship management. Staff will
be able to anticipate customers'
needs by delivering proficient
and professional service in all
areas of banking.
Bank of The Bahamas most
recently opened its Cat Island
branch in early June, joining
existing branches in New Prov-
idence, Grand Bahama, Exu-
ma, San Salvador, Inagua,
Andros and Coral Gables,
Florida. It is a publicly-held
company with more than $716
million in assets.


EU trade deal paves way for US to obtain 'EPA-plus'


FROM page 1B

tives without doing anything
to get them.
This is due to the 'Most
Favoured Nation' clause
attached to most trade agree-
ments, which means that coun-
tries cannot discriminate
against others. This means that
what the Bahamas offers to the
EU, in terms of trade prefer-
ences and benefits if it signs
the EPA, must also be offered
to the US.
Yet Mr Moree argued that
by going further than neces-
sary to satisfy the WTO's
demands for a two-way trade
agreement with the EU, and
including the most crucial areas,,
of the Bahamian economy -
services, investments, e-com-
merce and others in the
EPA, the Bahamas was ensur-
ing the baseline starting point
in trade negotiations with the
US would be "much higher".
"I'm not at all satisfied that
we've got a good deal with the
Europeans," Mr Moree told


Tribune Business. "We've cer-
tainly given more than we had
to give. If we were trying to
establish a baseline for talks
with the US, I don't know why
we've gone further than
required."
He added: "I don't think
anyone who's been involved
in these trade arrangements
and has expressed a view on
them would disagree that,
when we sit down to discuss
our trading relations with the
US, the starting point is going
to be EPA-plus. It's not going
to be the EPA."
This was because the US is
the Bahamas' largest trading
partner, having in 2007 export-
ed to this nation some $2.468
billion worth of goods and ser-
.vices about 85 per cent of
this nation's total import bill.
In turn, the Bahamas exported
$503.9 million worth of goods
and services to the US.
All this gave the US more
leverage than the EU in trade
talks with the Bahamas, and
Mr Moree said: "What the
Americans will do is put every-


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT 2007/CLE/gen/00894
Common Law & Equity Division


BETWEEN


SUISSE SECURITY BANK & TRUST LTD.
(In Liquidation)
AND

MOHAMED HARAJCHI

MICHEL HARAJCHI

SONJA HARAJCHI

CHRISTOPHER. LUNN

DEREK RYAN


Plaintiff



First Defendant

Second Defendant

Third Defendant

Fourth Defendant


Fifth Defendant

IN CHAMBERS
BEFORE THE DEPUTY REGISTRAR, MR. ERNIE
WALLACE, ESQ.
THE 2nd DAY OF JULY, A.D. 2008

ORDER
UPON a Summons filed herein by the Plaintiff on the 2nd day of July, 2008
coming on for hearing this day

AND UPON READING the Affidavit of the Keri Davidb Sherman sworn on the 1st
day of July, 2008 and filed herein on the 2nd day of July, 2008

AND UPON HEARING Anthony A. McKinney, Esq. of Counsel for
the Plaintiff

IT IS ORDERED THAT service of a copy of this Order and a copy of the
Amended Writ of Summons in this action by inserting an advertisement of such
Order and Amended Writ in one issue of The Tribune newspaper, shall be good
and sufficient service of the Notice to the First Defendant

MOHAMED HARAJCHI and that service shall be deemed to have been
effected on the day of the publication of the said advertisement and that the time
of entry of appearance be within 14 days from such date.

AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED THAT the costs of this application be costs
in the cause.
BY ORDER OF THE COURT

REGISTRAR
This Order was drawn by Messrs. McKinney, Turner & Co. of chambers situate
at Oakbridge House, 6 West Hill Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Attorneys for the
Plaintiff.


thing we've negotiated on the
EPA in their pocket. They
don't even have to ask for it.
The starting point will be
EPA-plus.
"From my point of view, it
doesn't make sense. I don't
know why, before we sit down
with them, we're showing the
Americans that the EPA is in
their pocket and they don't
have to ask for anything.
"The starting point for the
Americans will be the EPA,
and here is what else we want.
This is as opposed to a goods-
only EPA. This would make
the starting point baseline with
the US much lower, and the
US would not take it for grant-
ed that they would get some-
thing on services, investments,
capital investments and the
environment.
"To the extent they were put
on the table, we would expect
to get some reciprocity, so we
would end up with a balanced
trade agreement that would be
mutually beneficial."
Mr Moree said that if the
Bahamas signed on to the
EPA as currently worded, this
nation would have "shown our
hand" to the US and "said start
from here".
"The baseline will be much
higher than if we had a goods-
only EPA," Mr Moree added.
"I think it's unwise, because
even before the Americans
turn up for negotiating the pro-
visions of a trade agreement, in
effect we've given them the
benefit of everything extended
to us by the Europeans."
And if the Bahamas grants
the US more favourable trade
preferences and incentives in
any CBI replacement than the
EU, this nation will be obliged
to extend to the same to the
Europeans.
Acknowledging that the
Bahamas would not be able to
keep the one-way trade pref-
erence regimes it currently
enjoys with the US and Cana-
da for an "indefinite period",
and that they would eventual-
ly go the same way as the
Cotonou agreement with the
EU, Mr Moree said the
Bahamas should keep them
"as long as we can".
"Give up as little as you can
for as long as you can, and ulti-
mately do what you have got
to do" should be the Bahamas'
free trade strategy, Mr Moree
argued.
The senior attorney also
asked Zhivargo Laing, minister
of state for finance, who has
responsibility for the EPA, to
inform the Bahamian people
what it would cost this nation
to comply with all its EPA
obligations, what new laws
would need to be enacted, and
"whether our laws will be sub-
jected to a harmonization
process".
Mr Moree also asked what
new committees, bureaucra-
cies and organizations would
be created by the EU and
CARIFORUM to oversee the
EPA, and what role each
would play.
"It would also be useful for
the minister to indicate if the
Bahamas was going to get a
piece of the European Devel-
opment Fund, and if so how
much of it, and over what peri-
od of time," Mr Moree said.


given that the Fund's primary
purpose was to assist countries
in meeting their EPA obliga-
tions.
Mr Moree also asked Mr
Laing to confirm whether the
EPA would have to be ratified
by enabling legislation passed
by Parliament, and whether
this would give the Bahamian
people another opportunity for
consultation.


Kingsway Academy is seeking applicants for
teaching positions in the following areas:

ELEMENTARY:
Teachers for Grades 2 through 6

HIGH SCHOOL
Clothing Construction and Craft/Needlework
Music (Part-time or full-time)
Spanish
French
Home Economics/Art and Craft
Carpentry and Joinery
Chemistry
Physical Education/Health Science
Laboratory Technician

High School applicants should be qualified and
willing to teach to the BGCSE, S.A.T.II, and
AP level with at least a Bachelor's Degree, or
equivalent, with 6 years experience at the High School
level in the particular subject area along with a
Teacher's Certificate. A Masters Degree in
education, in teaching and learning. or the content area,
would be an asset.

All successful candidates should have the following:
* An Academic Degree in the area of specialization
* A Teaching Certificate
* Excellent Communication Skills
* A love for children and learning
* High standards of morality
* Be a born again Christian

Letters of application together with a recent
color photograph and detailed Curriculum Vita
(including the names and addresses of at least three
references, one being the name of one's church
minister) should be forwarded to:

Ms. Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
Kingsway Academy Business Office
Bernard Road
Nassau

Salaries would be commensurate with qualifications
and experience.
Deadline for Applications is
Monday July 14, 2008


IMPORTANT NOTICE TO ALL CUSTOMERS

AND CREDITORS OF DOMINION

INVESTMENTS (NASSAU ) LTD
(In liquidation )

The Liquidator hereby notifies all Customers and Creditors of Dominion that he
has applied to the Supreme Court of the Bahamas for the determination by it of
the following questions:

a) whether any of the assets held by Dominion are trust assets and, if
so;
b) whether any of the costs incurred in the course of the liquidation
should be paid from the trust assets and, if so;
c) the approach that should be adopted to the payment of those costs.

The specific questions that the Liquidator is asking and the Orders he is
seeking are set out in the Summons and the Supplemental Summons filed
on the 18th May, 2007 and 19th June, 2008 and the facts upon which he
relies set out in the Liquidator's Affidavit filed on the 23rd June, 2008.
These documents may be accessed on the website www.bdomannjudd.com

The Liquidator's affidavit does not reveal any confidential information
relating to its customers or the assets which it holds for them.

On the 19th June, 2008 the Supreme Court of the Bahamas fixed the hearing of
the Liquidator's application for 10 am on Monday the 10th November, 2008,
however, it is possible that, if the Court's calendar permits, an earlier date for
the hearing may be set. Accordingly you are advised to check the website
frequently for updates. Anyone who has given notice to the Liquidator of
their intention to appear ( see below ) will be contacted if an earlier date is set.

If you intend to appear on the hearing of the Liquidator's application you will
need to serve on the Liquidator a Notice of Appearance in the proceedings or
to instruct an Attorney in the Bahamas to do so for you. The Appearance needs
to be filed in the Registry of the Supreme Court of the Bahamas and to be in
one or other of the forms shown on the website, depending on whether you
are claiming a debt owed to you (Creditor's Appearance) or that Dominion
is holding assets beneficially owned by you ( Customer's Appearance).

If you are a customer or creditor of Dominion and you need any further information
or clarification in regard to the application and the questions to be determined
please contact the Liquidator directly and he will do his best to assist you.

G. Clifford Culmer
The Liquidator of Dominion Investments (Nassau) Ltd.
(In liquidation)
BDO Mann Judd
P.O. Box N10144
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 325-6591
Fax: (242) 325-6592
E-Mail: cculmer@bdomanniudd.com


0 -





PAGF lR MONDAY JULY 7. 2008 THEWTRIBUNE


-w


Your Bahaman Su ermarkets



SUPER
VALUE


$


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE GB MONDAYJULY 7 20 8


.. 1


^ft


-1 DJ3 Y D KU
- 'II
DD.R









THE TRIBUNE MONDAY JULY 7, 2008, PAGE 7B


BAJi 14 j nIGrHTMjOD


NAD
Nassau Airport
Development Company


More Exciting Opportunities At Lynden Pindling International Airport


Here we grow again! The I Jas aij Airport Development Company iNAD) 15 ccnoinuirn'g i e itir-ili,jrin
of the Lynden Pindling Irnt i.iati'.inal Airporl iLPIAl b> adding additional service. u ti rei.e" i. nee-rd .i
ourcustomers andenharnci their experience at LPIA The latest new opportunities include fntr e.vpr 'ie
Food Outlets and a Comrnion .lje Lourjge
NAD's goals and objectives are to:
(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer iervlce,
(b) offer a mix of cn:r.pr: ihati customers find attractive and that willienhrnce the image of LPIA as a
world class airl':-r
(c) offer food & be.er',ge and re[iul choices to passengers at reasonable pnces
(d) offer a rnix of .c i rational and iniernanonal brand-name companies-
(e) develop and design retail and food & beverage facilities thai corriplemerit the qualities of the
current and new terminals while re.:nogriinq the distinctive spirit and charac ier of the community
the airport serves; and
(f) optimize revenue to NAD.


For all of the RFPs, Proponents must be Bahamian and incorporated in The Bahamas.


FOOD OUTLETS
NAD is Inviting individual proposals for four
separate (4) Food Outlets:
one in the U.S. Departures Lounge of 500-
1000sq.ft.;
two in the Domestic Departures Lounge of
approximately 500sq. ft. each; and
one in the Domestic Check-in area of
approximately 1100 sq.ft.
The successful Proponents will be required to
design, construct, finance, maintain, manage and
operate the food & beverage outlet.
Proposals will be evaluated based on the
proponent's relative experience; the proposed
concept, the proposed design; the ability to
finance the capital investment required for design
and development of the food & beverage outlet,
the operating, marketing and customer service
plans; and the financial offer to NAD.
Qualified and interested parties may pick up
the Request for Proposal package at NAD's
office, Terminal 1 (Domestic/International),
2nd floor, LPIA until July 14th, 2008. A pre-
proposal briefing for those who have picked
up packages will be held in NAD's Boardroom
at the airport on Tuesday July 22nd, 2008 at
10:00anm.


COMMON USE LOUNGE
NAD is inviting proposals for a Common Use
Lounge in the U.S. Departure Lounge. The
Common Use Lounge will have a separate,
appropriately ventilated smoking area and can
have a tobacconist. The successful Proponent will
be required to finance, design, develop, operate
and manage the lounge.
Proposals will be evaluated on the proponent's
relative experience; proposed design;the abilityto
finance the capital investment required for design
and development; the operating, marketing and
customer service plans; and the financial offer to
NAD.
Request for Proposal packages may be picked
up at NAD's offices at the reception desk on the
second floor, Domestic/International Terminal
1 at LPIA until July 14th, 2008. A mandatory
pre-proposal briefing for those who have
picked up packages will be held in NAD's
Boardroom at the Airport'on Wednesday July
23rd, 2008 at 10:00am.


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PH: 393-4440 OR 393-4448.t4#'" ,


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008, PAGE 7B


in .,.'"







PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008
n w 0 'eaI


THE TRIBUNE
i


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"My work at The Tribune is rewarding

and challenging. I enjoy contributing

to the look of our newspaper while
meeting the needs of our advertisers.

I am proud to work here. The

Tribune is my newspaper."

ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE


The Tribune


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MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008, PAGE 9B


Re: Brave Challenge (Philip Davis)


insight


FEEDBACK

ON balance, I think the PLP
will have a new leader in time
for the 2012 general election,
simply because Perry Christie
is still seen as having lost the
2007 election through his inabil-
ity to control his Cabinet mem-
bers.
Philip Davis is not leader
material and I agree that, as
deputy, he will bolster Christie's
chances of staying in power.
However, I still expect either
Nottage or Wilchcombe to
come through at the end as the
one leading the PLP in the next
election.
J P Allen, Nassau
DAVIS has nil charisma and,
considering he is an attorney,
limited ability as a speaker.
However, it's sometimes possi-
ble for deputies to make a big
impact by being "the power
behind the throne" history
is full of such characters.
Leonard, West Street
PHILIP DAVIS is a shorter,
slightly fatter and not quite so
vocal version of Christie, so
don't expect him to turn any
turf as a PLP leadership con-
tender. I've heard him speak,
and the experience is slightly
less exciting than watching milk
go sour, or mixing cement with
a kitchen spoon.
'Babby Boy'


DAVIS has a very long PLP
pedigree going back to his
father 'Brave' on Cat Island.
This kind of thing counts in the
PLP, where 'family' is impor-
tant, so expect him to come
through strongly in the deputy
leadership campaign.
PLP supporter
I SEE Obie Wilchcombe wel-
comes the challenge of Philip
'Brave' Davis, but I don't think
he means it. Davis will beat
Wilchcombe, mark my word.
'Inside the PLP'
PHILIP DAVIS may
come over as a quiet little fat
guy, but he has a following in
the party and can't be taken
lightly.
Caller
Re: In Memory of Mario
(Leslie Miller)
I PRAY that the Miller fam-
ily get the justice they seek. If
they don't, it looks bad for the
rest of us who have no influ-
ence or money.
Caller
YOUR story about Mario
Miller made me cry. ALL those
responsible must be brought to
justice, whatever their family
connections. Keep on it...
Lavinia Smith


INSIGHT
The stories behind the news


BRAVE CHALLE GE
f'"..* Could Davis reinforce
kod ,, Christie's position by
,jO7, seeking deputy post?








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*( fi~tnwinpf.-~tt*iLtftl~t~wtln. *~.*"-When"- allKt~ tcrtWK ay beco mes *l.;t mor t. l), *<


UNESCO keeps Dresden as World Heritage Site


A PLACARD of participants of a protest camp is seen close to the build-
ing site for the planned Waldschloesschen bridge in Dresden, Ger-
many, on Friday, July 4, 2008. U.N. officials decided Thursday, July 3,
2008, to retain Dresden's status as a World Heritage Site for now, in
hopes that construction of a bridge they claim would mar the German
city's skyline will be stopped.



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Written applications should be addressed to:


M QUEBEC CITY
U.N. OFFICIALS decided
last week to retain the east-
ern German city of Dresden
as a World Heritage Site for
now despite earlier warnings
that the construction of a
bridge endangered its status,
according to Associated Press.
In 2006, the UNESCO
World Heritage Committee
warned that the planned
2,085-foot-long bridge across
the Elbe River would mar the
city's skyline and landscape.
The committee, which is cur-
rently meeting in Quebec
City, now says that if con-
struction is not stopped and
the damage reversed, the
property will be deleted from
the World Heritage List in
2009. It remains on a danger
list.
The committee decided last
year that it would remove
Dresden from the list if the
bridge were built, but it decid-


ed to give Dresden more time
in view of legal proceedings
under way in Germany.
No site has ever been
stripped from the World Her-
itage List, which identifies
over 800 places around the
world with "outstanding uni-
versal value."
The committee, part of the
Paris-based United Nations
Educational, Scientific and
Cultural Organization, wants
officials to change plans in
place to build the bridge
across the Elbe to ease traffic
in Dresden.
The plans also have raised
the ire of environmentalists,
who say the bridge would
encroach on the habitat of the
rare lesser horseshoe bat. A
court ruled in November that
construction could proceed
despite the threat to the bat,
but ordered a strict nighttime
speed limit of 19 mph to limit
disruptions to the bat's habi-
tat.


GN-705

CABINET OFFICE


RE: THE OPENING OF SHOPS ON
PUBLIC HOLIDAYS
In accordance with Section 3 of the Public
Holidays Act, (Chapter 36), the following day will
be observed as Public Holiday:-

Thursday, 10th July, 2008 Independence Day

On the said day, all public offices, banks and
shops throughout The Bahamas must be kept
closed, except that shops may open:-
(a) for the sale of food, cooked or prepared for
consumption on the premises;

(b) for the sale of drugs, medicines or surgical
appliances;

(c) for the sale of ice;

(d) for the sale of bread, fresh and frozen fish, fresh
fruits, fresh vegetables, butcher's meat and fresh
dairy products, until the hour of ten o'clock in
the morning;

(e) for the sale of any article required for the burial
of a dead body, or in the case of illness of any
person or animal, or in any other emergency;

(f) for the sale of petroleum products

(g) for the sale of fresh water;

(h) for the sale of newspapers and periodicals.


THE TRIBUNE


TO: Mohammed Harajchi
Paradise Island
The Bahamas

AND TO: Sonja Harajchi
Paradise Island
The Bahamas

AND TO: Derek Ryan
Village Road
Nassau, Bahamas


AND TO: Michel Harajchi
Paradise island
The Bahamai t

AND TO: Christopher Lunn
Paradise Island
The Bahamas


WE COMMAND YOU that within 14 days after service of this
Writ on you inclusive of the day of such service, you do cause
an appearance to be entered for you in an action at the suit of
SUISSE SECURITY BANK & TRUST LTD. (In Liquidation, )
clo McKinney. Turner & Co. of Chambers, Oakbridge House,
West Hill Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

AND TAKE NOTICE that in default of your so doing the c
Plaintiff may proceed therein, and Judgement may be given in
your absence.

WITNESS the Honourable Chief Justice Mr. Burton Hall of the ,
Commonwealth of The Bahamas the day of July, A.D., ;J
2007.

REGISTRAR

N.B. This Writ is to be served within twelve calendar months i
from the date thereof, or, if renewed, within six calendar months
from the date of the last renewal, including the day of such date, |
and not afterwards,

The Defendant may enter appearance personally or by Attorney
either by handing-in the appropriate forms, duly completed, at the |
Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building, East Street,
in the City of Nassau in the Island of Newc Providence, or by J
sending then to that office by post.

If the Defendant enters an appearance he must also deliver a
Defence to the Attorney for the Plaintiff within fourteen days
from the last day of the time limited for appearance, unless such
time is extended by the Court or a Judge, otherwise Judgement
may be entered against him without notice, unless he has in the
meantime been served with a Summons for Judgement.

GENERAL ENDORSEMENT
The Plaintiff claims as against the First and Third Defendants
and each of them:
(i) The return of monies once unlawfully held at Barclays
Bank in the name of Suisse Security Holding Ltd. and Suisse
Security Inc. and thereafter removed from the jurisdiction of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas in breach of trust which said
monies are the property of Suisse Security Bank and Trust Ltd.:
(ii) Declaration that at all material times the First. Second and
Third Defendants and each of them were and are trustees of
the said monies under a resulting trust fbr the benefit for Suisse
Security Bank and Trust Ltd;
(iii) A Declaration that as directors of Suisse Security Bank and
Trust Ltd. the First, Second and Third Defendants and each of
them owed Suisse Security Bank and Trust Ltd. a fiduciaLi
duty to hold the said monies for the exclu:!ivc benelit cf Si,:-
Security Bank and Trust Ltd.;
(iv) An account and enquiry as to what has become of the .said
money;.an Order that the First, Second and 1 hird Detendants and
each of them do pay the Plaintiff such sums which are found due
and owing pursuant to such an account and enquiry;.
(v) Alternatively damages for misfeasance and/or breach of
trust;
(vi) An injunction against the First Defendant. Mohaimed
Harajchi and the Third Defendant, Sonja Harajchi restraining
them from conveying selling transfer;id g mortgaging
encumbering or otherwise dealing with property at Paradise
Island, Bahamas belonging to the First Defendant, Mohammed
Harajchi and mortgaged to the Third Detendant, Sonja I arajchi
(vii) Interest pursuant to the iyti Proc.tdure.(Aw.; .i1te.. .s
Act, Cap 80:
(2) And the Plaintiff claims as against the Fourth and ritth
Defendants and each of them for:
(i) A Declaration that the S 1ected-t -+hird-Fourth and iftih
Defendants and each of them as officers of Suisse Security Bank
and Trust Ltd. owed a fiduciary duty to Suisse Security Bank and
Trust Ltd. to inter alia ensure that h," assets s: S'is. Suciitv
Bank and Trust Ltd. were utilized IOr the exclusive use t Su:
Security Bank and Trust Ltd.;
(ii) Damages for their knowing assistance in the hrc.i '
fiduciary duties owed by the First, Second and Third I )elen.ianti
and each of them to the Plaintiff to wit the removal of moniii.
belonging to Suisse Security 3ank atnd Tiusl Ltd. to thel accouLIt
of Suisse Security Holding Ltd. and Suisse Scurny Inc. and
thereafter, the removal of the said monies from thejurisdictin ol
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas;

(iii) Damages for mislfeasance and breach of fiduciary duty:
(iv) Interest pursuant to the (Jil Pro LLdurL_ Award ofL I ntc :ie
Ag1, Cap 80: costs.
3. Such further or other reliefas the Court may order.
DATED the 12th day of July, A.D., 2007
MCKINNE, TURNER & CO.
Chambers
Oakbridge 1 louse
West Hill Street
Nassau, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Plaintif
^ ^ - - ^ _ j ^ _____ ,_l___ ___ 1


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division 2007/CL. 0-1 nl. L

BETWEEN
SUISSE SECURITY BANK & TRUST LTD.
(In Liquidation)
Pllainuff
AND

MOHAMMED IIARAJCHI First Defendant
MICHEL HARAJCHI Second Defendant
SONJA HARAJCHI Third Defendant
CHRISIOPHER LUNN Fourth l)efendant
DEREK RYAN Filth Detendait

AMENDED WRIT OF SUMMON

ELIZABETH THE SECOND, by the Grace of God. Queen o
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and of her other realms and [
territories, Head of the Commonwealth.


hrbahamas@ubs.com or


UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas


0 I Th TiunB2 e0


lWKDA M EtU'. 0,







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10B. MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008


FROM page 12
closely aligned to the legisla-
tive process.
The failings of the likes of
Grant and Collie, set along-
side jhe multitude of short-
comings within the former
Christie administration, and
those beginning to reveal
themselves in the FNM, are
bound to raise issues about
the nature of the system.
Election after election,
Bahamians are asked, to vote
for people they know nothing
about. Once in power, these
people are then appointed, by
their leader, to positions they
know nothing about. No won-
der, then, that clueless nonen-
tities end up round the Cabi-
net table.

Amateurs
Because they are essentially
amateurs in their ministerial
field, they in turn rely heavily
on the civil service, another
profession in which big ideas,
personal enterprise and later-
al thinking are at a premium.
Thus, government is
entrusted to people who are
very often not particularly
good in their own professions,
and whose ministerial respon-
sibilities are borne on a day-
to-day basis by comfortably
ensconced civil service drones
and non-thinkers on index-
linked pensions.
Viewed like that, it comes
as no surprise that the entire
governmental process is so,
sub-standard and that the pub-
lic sector consistently falls way
short of expectations consid-
ered normal in private com-
panies.
Laziness, incompetence and


complacency and a time-
serving culture in which origi-
nal ideas are virtually out-
lawed are what govern-
ments are often all about, not
just in the Bahamas, but else-
where across the world.
To imagine for one moment
that the vacuous, self-serving,
superficial and insufferably
irritating Tony Blair was the
best man in Britain to be
prime minister was, plainly,
laughable. To imagine that his
successor, Gordon Brown, a
rumpled academic with a tim-
orous str ak, is any better is
even more ridiculous.
.Yet politics continues to
clunk .out entire armies of
under-achievers who were not
especially good in their own
professions and who are spec-
tacularly ill-equipped to han-
dle their enormous responsi-
bilities.
The Bahamas' long line of
ministerial failures from the
likes of George Smith and
Simeon Bowe right through
to the Gibsons, Mitchells and
Wisdoms of modern times -
suggests that something is
worryingly amiss in the way
we run our democracy.
As a step towards improve-
ment, should it not be imper-
ative that would-be MPs state
their qualifications for the job,
their specific areas of exper-
tise, and the personal quali-
ties that make them natural
recipients of the voters' sup-
port?
Should we not be told how
successful they have been in
owning or managing a com-
pany and, even more impor-
tantly, in running their own
domestic affairs? Should we
not be given copper-bottomed
guarantees of their integrity
and something to suggest a


level of competence in what-
ever it is they are being asked
to do?
Running a country is much
like running a company and a
family. Developing an atmos-
phere of trust, drafting a strat-
egy for success, keeping down
costs and demonstrating man-
agement expertise are com-
mon to all. Discipline is also,
of course, a key component.
If you can't run your family
or a company effectively, then
it's pretty much certain that
you will never be able to run a
ministry or a country.
Yet political life here is
replete with people who have
never run anything success-
fully and whose personal lives
are deeply dysfunctional.

Debates
Public, preferably televised,
debates need to be organized
in advance of every election
so that the electorate can
make its own assessments of
the candidates on offer. All
should be subjected to pene-
trating analysis so that their
motives, objectives and quali-
ties can be appraised. There
needs to be a process for
exposing'their personal and
professional deficiencies
before they are let loose in
government.
Meanwhile, Neko Grant
and Sidney Collie walk into
the wilderness, having been
found wanting. Their failings
were as much systemic as per-
sonal because there is noth-
ing in the electoral process
today which suggests a link
between victory at the polls
and fitness for the job.
Mr Ingraham, like all chief
executives, is capable of


errors. Grant and Collie were
two of them, and doubtless
there will be more.
In appointing Vanderpool-
Wallace to the tourism post,
however, he may well do more
than redeem himself. He
could be pointing the way to a
new era, in politics in which
professional competence
ranks higher than political
oppportunism.
As a solid professional in
the tourism sphere whose
track record ranks with the
best, Vanderpool-Wallace is
well-placed to reassert the
Bahamas' claims to be a des-
tination of the first rank.
His appointment, though,
ought not to be a one-off.
There are sound arguments
for co-opting proven talent
from the private sector into
the political realm, and prece-
dents have already been set
with the likes of James Smith
and Sir William Allen.
The prime minister now
needs to look around in the
private sector for more peo-
ple probably retired or
close to it whose career
experience could be utilised
for the national good through
ministerial service.
Instead of stuffing the Sen-
ate with what one observer
called the "refuse" of politi-
cal life failed election can-
didates and the like the
main parties should be co-opt-
ing talent from private busi-
ness into the Upper House
and the Cabinet to tackle the
big issues. of the day.
If crime continues to run out
of control, the Ministry of
National Security could well
be the best place to start.
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


The Bahamas

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appointment points



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MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008, PAGE 11B









MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008


The stories behind the news


Politics needs prof essionals


Vanderpool-Wallace



appointment points



the way for future



NEKO GRANT'S removal from the Ministry of
Tourism, and Sidney Collie's resignation as Minister
of Local Government, point to fundamental flaws in
our political system and the way we run the country.
Were either of these two ever suited to the job?
Did they have anything at all to bring to the table?
INSIGHT reports...


* By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor

REPLACING Neko
R Grant with Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace as Min-
ister. of Tourism was not so
much an inspired move as an
acknowledgment of the obvi-
ous.
Whatever the field, whatev-
er the discipline, profession-
als are always better than
amateurs. They have the expe-
rience, the expertise, the
inside knowledge, the con-
nections and the commitment
that wannabes invariably lack.
Mr Grant's performance as
Minister of Tourism was, by
all accounts, lamentable a
fact brought home with
embarrassing clarity when he
was outflanked and compre-
hensively outshone by a pri-
mary school student at a pub-
lic presentation.
It was quite clear to every-
one present that the little girl
- a tiny tot with a big future,
it seems was a good deal
more inspired than Mr Grant
when it came to promoting
new ideas for our tourism
product.

Plans
While she spoke enthusias-
tically about her plans for
making the Bahamas a better
destination, electrifying her
audience in the process, Mr
Grant fumbled his way
through a prepared speech,
citing revenue figures and pro-
jected costs, inducing deep
tedium in all around..
People viwre left thinking:
so why was he ever Minister of
Tourism in the first place?
And why wasn't an acknowl-
edged expert like Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace installed in the
post from day one?
These are interesting ques-
tions. And they go right to the


root of the problem created
by our political system. Cabi-
net ministers are, for the most
part, people with virtually no
qualifications for the job at
hand. They are rank amateurs
carrying responsibilities which
ought to be handled by pro-
fessionals, people with proven
prowess in the field.
Poor old Sidney Collie, who
fell on his sword after the local
government election fiasco,
was another case in point.
Heavily dependent on civil
servants who are supposed to
know all about these things,
he paid dearly for his trust,
and his failure to heed advice,
and was elbowed from office
in a little over a year.
"In the cases of both Grant
and Collie, you had two basi-
cally nice guys who didn't
know what they were doing,"
said a media observer, "They
were so far out of their depth,
it wasn't funny. So why were
they ever appointed to the
job? It's something we all
ought to be-asking ourselves."
Grant, a 58-year-old liquor
firm executive, has a sport and
business resume which makes
no mention of tourism. Big in
Kiwanis and powerboat cir-
oles, he was elected to soft-


ball's hall of fame and was
once chairman of the Grand
Bahama Housing Commis-
sion.
There was nothing on his
CV, or in his public persona.
to suggest that here was a man
to front for the Bahamas'
most important industry. And
within little over a year, the
consequences of his failings
were becoming too manifest
to endure.
A senior media figure said:
"With Grant, you could ask
questions about tourism and
know you were never going
to get an answer.
"When reporters came
around, Grant would sudden-
ly be on his cellphone. I have
no proof of this, but he
appeared to use his cellphone
as a stalling device. He didn't
want his inadequacies
exposed."
With his predecessor, Obie
Wilchcombe, the country at
least had an affable, relatively
charismatic figure who could
- if required act as a pro-
fessional "greeter" for the
Bahamas. Grant fell short on
every count.
In Collie's case, the short-
fall in expertise for a local gov-,
ernment posting was less pro-
nounced. But this teacher-
turned-attorney, an island boy
made good, mismanaged his
responsibilities so catastroph-
ically that he felt compelled
to do the decent thing. Politi-
cal hari-kari was required and
delivered, so Collie's one
claim to distinction will prob-
ably be that he set new stan-
dards of accountability in gov-
ernment, which is no mean
achievement in a society like
this.
Whatever its failings and
there are many the FNM
government is significantly
more impressive than its PLP
predecessor in several ways.
The hasty departures of
Grant and Collie are them-
selves indicative of a "nonon-


NEKO GRANT AND SIDNEY COLLIE: why were they in the Cabinet in the first place?


sense" style of leadership from
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham that would have served
the PLP well during its five
scandal-ridden years in power.
Though far from perfect,
the FNM government at least
has a mechanism for removing
the incompetent from its
midst. Had Perry Christie han-
dled his party's imperfections

"In the cases of
both Grant and
Collie, you had
two basically
nice guys who
didn't know
what they were
doing. They
were so far out
of their depth, it
wasn't funny."

A media observer

with the same aplomb, it's
likely he would still be in pow-
er today.
However, Mr Ingraham's
job remains incomplete. Dra-
matic measures are required
on the crime front if Mr Tom-
my Turnquest, the Minister of
National Security, is to be
allowed to stay in his present
post. In fact, his being allowed
to retain the portfolio in the
recent Cabinet shuffle was a
big surprise for those who
already had him earmarked


for dismissal.
While villains run rainpant
in Nassau society. Mr Turn-
quest gives every impression
of being as clueless as his two
discarded Cabinet colleagues.
There appears to be no mas-
terplan for bringing crime
back in line, while Mr Turn-
quest himself is repeatedly pil-
loried as a man who is not
only out of his depth, but also
out of touch with the rest of
mankind.
Were INSIGHT to apply
the same rigorous scrutiny to
certain FNM ministers as we
did in 2006, after the PLP had
been in power for four years,
there would be at least three
ministers earmarked for 'Jok-
er' status, even at this early
stage. Regrettably for him, Mr
Turnquest would be one of
them.
But he is not alone. Media
observers are developing seri-
ous misgivings about several
FNM ministers. "Too many
appear low-key and not par-
ticularly active," said one
source. "This will work against
them. At least the PLP had
the savvy to hold press con-
ferences to create the impres-
sion that they were doing
something, even if they
weren't.
"With the FNM, you get the
impression that some minis-
ters see their jobs as driving
around in big limos, making a
few prepared speeches and lit-
tle else. It's not good enough."
However, shortcomings in
ministerial performance point
to an inherently flawed sys-
tem. Put bluntly, politics does
not attract society's finest, and
few who reach ministerial


rank have specialised exper-
tise to match their responsi-
bilities.
Last week, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce hon-
oured top-performing business
people and entrepreneurs. At
the awards banquet were
some of Nassau's most suc-
cessful managers.
What became clear during
those proceedings was that the
very best Bahamians, those
with genuine competence, flair
and business know-how, are
not parliamentarians. They
are people dedicated to doing
what they do best. They are
successful go-getters who
know what they are about and
get on with it.

Politics
They are not in politics
because they have neither the
time nor inclination to be
involved in something so
incorrigibly and irredeemably
bereft of quality.
Government, therefore, is
almost invariably left to the
third-rate. Many politicians
were not especially good at
what they were trained to do
and saw politics either as a
livelihood or a supplementary
source of income. Some were
virtually unemployable before
reaching the corridors of pow-
er, and return to the jobline
when ousted from office.
And too many of them are
in law, a profession that does
not lend itself to big entrepre-
neurial ideas and creative
thinking, but is, of course,
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