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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01054
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: June 19, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01054

Full Text






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CHIPSAHOY P mlvin"It
HIGH 88F
LOW 77F


CLOUDS WITH
A T-STORM


The


Tribune


BAHAM


AS EDITION


profiled in


Police seeking I

'suspect' in killings

of four gay men


* By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
POLICE are seeking a man
profiled in The.Tribune yes-
terday in connection with the
murders of four gay men.
The person responsible may
be part of an extensive culture
of male prostitution in the
Bahamas, according to a
member of the LGBT (les-
bian, gay, bisexual and trans-
gender) community.
As COB department head
Dr Thaddeus McDonald,
handbag designer Harl Tay-
lor, AIDS activist Wellington
Adderley and Jamaican wait-
er Marvin Wilson were all
murdered in their homes, the
LGBT community believe
they had invited the suspect
in before he killed them.
The source, who was close
to Harl Taylor, informed The
Tribune of the suspect's place
of work and claimed he had
taken two weeks off after Mr
Taylor was murdered.
It is also claimed that the
man took time off after Mar-
vin Wilson was killed just two
weeks ago.
Chief Supt Glenn Miller,
leading the investigation, is


now working with the suspec-
t's employer to determine his
identitN. if'the information giv-
en to the press is correct.
Mr Miller said: "We have
no name as yet so we are con-
ducting a search."
The source also explained
the suspected murderer is
believed to be part of the so-
called "trades" culture where-
by men sell their bodies for
drugs and money, and many
of them post their profiles on
the gay dating website
adam4adam.com.
Information that "trades"
frequent an over-the-hill bar
off East Street where they
meet men to accept their busi-
ness and carry it out in the
parking lot is also greatly val-
ued by police.
Mr Miller said: "What we
need is for more people to call
us with information., as they
are calling The Tribune,
because we are not getting the
clues we figure we should be
getting.
"If they want to remain
anonymous they can do so,
just as they are with iThe Tri-
bune."
SEE page eight


Tribune


.,. .,


.i ; i t
E
MEMBERS OF the public have been voicing concerns about open
graves in the Old Trail Cemetery. Several graves have been opened
prompting calls for action.

Claim that LNG firm 'working on
deal to divert some gas to Nassau'


* By REUBEN SHEARER
ENVIRONMENTALIST.
Sam Duncombe claims that the
liquefied natural gas company
AES "is now working hard on a
deal to divert some of the gas to
Nassau" in an effort to make
its proposal more appealing.
She claims the company is
doing this despite earlier assur-
ances to the contrary, as the
new FNM government has yet
to take a definite position on
the issue.
According to Mrs Dun-
combe, high-level BEC sources,


say they are "unaware of such a
deal" and have "considerable
concern regarding the cost of
outfitting BEC to accept LNG
for local energy consumption."
Mrs Duncombe's statements
come after former minister of
trade and industry Leslie Miller
criticised her for "opposing
every significant undertaking
that is supposed to enhance the
Bahamas," on Tuesday's Real
Talk Live Show on More 94
FM.
He accused the environmen-
SEE page eight


PM warns



parties in


GB Port


Authority



dispute


* By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net
PRIME Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham has issued another warning
to the warring parties in the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
dispute, indicating that the go\-
ernment is seemingly willing to
radically intervene in the row to
bring relief to Grand Bahamians.
"No-one is likely to ever again
grant to foreigners the authority
over the governance of a place


that was granted to the Grand
Bahama Port Authority," said Mr
Ingraham yesterday in the House
of Assembly.
"Indeed, governments of the
Bahamas will have to give con-
sideration as to whether or not it
is prepared to continue to permit
a Grand Bahama Port Authority
to be'in foreign hands as opposed
to national and Bahamian hands."
When asked by a sitting mem-


SEE page eight


Reore t

-hineeEmas


* By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
GOVERNMENT has
launched a full review into secu-
rity measures in place at facili-
ties protected by the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force after
thousands of dollars were
reportedly stolen from the Chi-
nese Embassy, Minister of
National Security Tommy
Turnquest said yesterday.


The Tribune reported previ-
ously that a Defence Force offi-
cer reportedly the brother
of a Cabinet minister -- is
assisting police with their inves-
tigation into the theft last week-
end of more than $4,000 from
the embassy on Village Road.
SEE page 10


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Concern for deaf teenage
girl after alleged assault
* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net
WITNESSES of an alleged assault on a deaf teenage girl
have expressed concern about the status of the case and the
fate of the young girl.
The incident reportedly took place two weeks ago on
Yamacraw Beach and involved a pastor of a church.
An eye-witness told The Tribune yesterday that she had not
seen the matter reported by any of the country's media and
SEE page eight


; ,-V- I.


%jE












Experience the Cavalier Construction attorneys

argue Rudolph King bankruptcy

I y 7 appeal should be dismissed


* By NATARIO McKENZIE
ATTORNEYS for Cavalier
Construction Company Limited
argued yesterday that the bank-
ruptcy appeal of businessman
Rudolph King should be dis-
missed even if the Court of
Appeal finds that it does in fact
have jurisdiction to hear it.
Attorney Jason T Maynard
argued that the appellant had not
complied with the Court of
Appeal rules and that there was
no explanation as to why the
appellant's record of appeal was
filed out of time. He submitted
that no indulgence should be
granted as the time limit should
have been adhered to.
The issue of whether of not
the Court of Appeal has jurisdic-
tion to hear the bankruptcy
appeal was argued on Tuesday
and although the court has not
ruled on the issue, attorneys
involved in the matter have been
allowed to make their submis-


sions on the substance of the
bankruptcy appeal.
King, a Nassau events organ-
iser who is.-also known_.as Dr
Rudolph King or Rudolph King-
Laroda, was declared bankrupt
in the Supreme Court in 2006
when he was being pursued by
Cavalier Construction Ltd for an
alleged unpaid debt. King is said
to owe the company $824,938 for
renovations carried out to his
home.
Mr Maynard told the court that
King's home was seized and sold
but no money has been paid to
his client.
The lawyer explained that
because the! appellant had pushed
for a deadline; the contractor had
not sought immediate payment.
He said that after the work was
completed however, King.could
not pay the: balance and failed to
meet the deadline for payment.
The court questioned how
there could be a judgment against
four separate entities for the same


sum of $824,938 but the respon-
dent is only seeking to enforce it
against one of the entities Mr
King.
Mr Maynard admitted that the
respondent could not receive the
sum of $824,938 more than once.
He submitted however that the
respondent could seek to enforce
the judgment against one entity.
Questions also arose over the
filing and issuance of the debtor's
summons. Maynard contended
that summons was served in time.
Mr King's attorney Wayne
Munroe submitted that the record
of appeal had not been lodged
out of time.
In response to a submission
made by Mr Maynard on Tues-
day, Mr Munroe also submitted
that a bundle of documents had
been filed in time and the docu-
ments Mr Maynard claimed were
absent from the bundle were not
relevant to the appeal.
The Court of Appeal has taken
the matter under advisement.


Rum Cay developer

applauds budget

THE developer of a 897-acre project on the
remote island of Rum Cay yesterday applauded
government for Family Island concessions
announced as part of the 2008-2009 budget.
John Mittens said the move "would have a
long-term, far-ranging positive impact on the
country's economy."
Mr Mittens is chairman of Montana Holdings
Ltd, a Nassau-based international real estate
development company gearing up to re-start work
on the project.
"The re-introduction of incentives for Family
Island development sends a powerful welcome
message to foreign and Bahamian developers
and demonstrates this government's commitment
to provide opportunities for jobs and business
development in the Family Islands," said Mr Mit-
tens. "Given the increase in the price of oil and
the impact that the increase in the cost of living
has had on Rum Cay families, many of whom
struggle to make a living as it is, and the cost of
doing business, this news could not have come at
a better time. It will reduce our building costs
by 35 per cent and restore what we lost when
the previous Act expired."
Like other developers, Rum Cay had priced
pre-construction sales based on having the earli-
er incentives available.


'---"The-earlier.Family Island Encouragement Act
was created with the best of intentions, I'm sure,
but it painted the Family Islands with a very
broad brush, wittingly or unwittingly granting
concessions to all islands, including several that
were booming rather than segmenting those that
really needed the extra incentives in the form of
concessions to drive business development and
thus, provide job opportunities," said Senator
Tanya Wright, immediate past president of the
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce. "So there was
a brief lapse of incentives. However, under the
new Act, islands that will benefit from the con-
cessions have been carefully selected based on
need, Rum Cay included. The government is
committed to careful development in the Family -
Islands and to the decentralisation that will
result."


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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


THE TRIBUNE










HETIBE TY JE 1


0 In brief

Bahamas and

US in passport

validity deal

THE Bahamas and the US
have concluded a bilateral
Extended Passport Validity
Agreement that will allow US
authorities to issue non-immi-
grant visas in Bahamian pass-
ports up to the final day the
passport is valid.
Similarly, Bahamian visitors
to the US can travel on their
existing passport up to the
final day the passport is valid,
with a police certificate.
Originally, US law requires
a passport to be valid for at
least six months for a visitor to
travel to the US or apply for a
visitor's visa.
On the Bahamian side, the
agreement was facilitated by
the fact that citizens of the
Bahamas have always been
able to return to the Bahamas
on expired Bahamian pass-
ports.
In view of these new mea-
sures, Bahamians no longer
need to apply for a new
Bahamian passport six months
in advance of the expiration
date of their current passport.
However, the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs advises that it
is still necessary to have a
valid police certificate for trav-
el to the US without a visa and
visas are vital for travel to the
US from a third country by
cruise ship.


Woman in PMH

after attack by

her husband
A WOMAN is in "serious,
but stable" condition after
being attacked by her husband
on Tuesday night.
According to police, the
incident occurred in a home
off Carmichael Road at
around, t m, .. p
Police. reported that the
domestic dispute broke out
over a seemingly innocent top-
ic.
The woman is now recover-
ing at the Princess Margaret
Hospital.


RM Bailey class
of 1988 to meet

The 1988 class of RM Bai-
ley will be meeting tonight at
7pm at the school, located on
Robinson Road.
All alumni are invited to
attend.

OVERSEAS NEWS

Chavez has
talks with ailing
Fidel Castro







k : '%i3V s S



1* '11"


* HAVANA, Cuba


Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez had. an "animated and
warm" meeting with former
Cuban leader Fidel Castro
during a visit to Havana, state-
run media said yesterday, but
no photos or videos of the left-
wing allies were made public.
Chavez, upon arrival on
Monday for a two-day visit,
told reporters he would meet
with top Cuban officials
including the ailing, 81-year-
old Castro and Raul Castro,
Fidel's younger brother, who
took over as president in Feb-
ruary.
It was the first images of
Fidel Castro shown by Cuban
television in more than five
months.


GB detectives





probe skeletal





remains riddle


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT Grand
Bahama Police are trying to
determine whether skeletal
remains found in the Barbary
Beach area are human bones.
Officers of the Central Detec-
tive Unit (CDU) said they are
awaiting the results of an autop-
sy on the remains, which were
discovered by a resident of the
island earlier this week.
According to a senior police
official, the discovery was made
on Sunday by a Freeport man
who was out raccoon hunting.
Chief Superintendent of


M Tests conducted to see

whether bones are human


Police Basil Rahming reported
on Tuesday that the hunter
stumbled across what appeared
to be skeletal remains lying on
the ground while he was walk-
ing through the pine forest.
Mr Rahming said the man
informed a police officer.
A number of uniformed and
plainclothes officers were dis-
patched to the scene at around
7pm to investigate..
Supt Rahming said the man
led them to the bones, which


were lying about 45 feet off the
eastern end of a back road at
Barbary Beach.
"The condition of the bones
indicates that they were in that
location for a long period of
time," said Mr Rahming.
Scenes-of-crime officers
processed the area, he said.
The skeletal remains were
taken to the morgue at the
Rand Memorial Hospital,
where the autopsy is being con-
ducted.


MPs pass bill to boost



stamp tax collection


* By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

The House of Assembly has
unanimously passed a bill to
strengthen collection of stamp
tax with the potential to
increase revenues for the state.
"This bill comes about as a
result of a need to bring clarity
to a number of provisions in the
stamp act," said Prime Minis-
ter Ingraham, in moving the
stamp tax 'amendment in the
House yesterday.
The amendment is intended
to remove loopholes toJthe col-
lection of revenue by the gov-
ernment. Some of its main pro-
visions seek to:
increase and introduce new
penalties for people who take
more than six months to pay
government owed stamp tax
revenue
empower the treasurer to,
on his or her own volition,
express opinions on the dutiable
nature of a transaction without
awaiting a request to do so
make clear that documents
that have been executed out-
side the Bahamas relating to
properties inside the Bahamas
are unquestionably subject to
the stamp tax laws of the
Bahamas
make promissory notes sub-
ject to the same rate of duty as a
mortgage or debenture where
the note is used in lieu of a
mortgage or debenture redemp-
tion
clarify the law where the
whole or part interest in land is
the subject of a transaction, to
denote that the value of the
land or the interest in the land is
what is subject to stamp duty


clarify that in any transac-
tion of shares that affects direct-
ly or indirectly a person's inter-
est in a company which has
property, and that interest is
increased, stamp tax is payable
(this. also applies to interna-
tional business companies
regardless of whether those
transactions are being conclud-
ed outside the Bahamas)
The new rates for time
elapsed payments of stamp tax
to the state are, in addition to
the payment of the tax, a sur-
charge of 15 per cent on the
unpaid duty for non-payment
of between six months and a
year; a 20 per cent surcharge
for non-payment of between
onw'and 10 years; a 25 per cent
surcharge for non-payment of
between 10 and 20 years; a 30
per cent surcharge for non-pay-
ment of between 20 and a 30
years; and a 35 per cent sur-
charge for non-payment of over
30 years.
Mr Ingraham noted that in


many cases when stamp tax is
not paid, it is often not the fault
of the purchaser or the seller,
but the fault "of another". This
appeared to observers be d ref-
erence to lawyers not advancing
these funds to the government.
"Mr Speaker, when we were
in office last time, we had done
a substantial review of the
Stamp Act and when the mem-
bers opposite.came to office
they carried that forward and
produced a new Stamp Act
which has had a tremendous
good effect on the revenues of
the Bahamas. And this here is
intended to enhance that rev-
enue collection. We are not
going to catch all but we are
tightening the noose as we find
these loopholes," said Mr Ingra-
ham.
Those that have Crown Land
leases will now by law also be
subject to stamp tax when they
sell their properties. The Crown
leases in question are for 10
years or more.


rateae 35 years of


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THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE








IAIEI4,HUI.IJUNE19,I20I08E TOTETHEITIBUNE


WHEN I was in Cairo last week, Osama
Ghazali Harb, an Egyptian political analyst,
told me about a speech that he had recently
given at the main Coptic Cathedral there.
,It was a discussion about the state of Arab
politics.
After he had finished, he said, an Iraqi man
who had come with some Egyptian friends, got
up to ask a question and along the way made the
following statement: There are "only two
democracies" in the Middle East today: "Iraq
and'Israel." The audience booed.
"The audience got very angry with him,"
Harb told me apparently because he had
suggested that Iraq was a democracy, and there-
fore in some way superior to Egypt, because
he compared Iraq to Israel in a complimentary
way and because he didn't acknowledge the
U.S. role in "imposing" democracy in Iraq.
Iraq has become one of those subjects that so
many people now come to with so much emo-
tional scar tissue that it is very hard to have a
sober discussion about the actual situation there
today.
So much is coloured by how you feel about
George W. Bush or whether you were for or
against the war.
As a result, what we do next in Iraq how
and why is barely getting discussed in the
presidential campaign.
Too bad, because this is going to be a really
hard call one that will require sorting through
three conflicting political realities.
The first is the mood of the American public,
which has rendered a judgment that the price we
have paid in Iraq over the last five years far, far
exceeds what has been achieved there to date.
Therefore, whoever wins the presidency John
McCain or Barack Obama will take office
knowing that the American people will not tol-
erate another four years dominated by an open-
ended commitment to Iraq.
But the second is the reality on the ground in
Iraq, which is no longer an unremitting horror
story. Clearly, the surge has helped to dampen
the internal conflict.
Clearly, the Iraqi army is performing better.
Clearly, Iraq's Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki,
by cracking down on rogue Shiite groups from
his own community, has established himself as
more of a national leader. Clearly, the Sunnis
have decided to take part in the coming parlia-
mentary elections. Clearly, Kurdistan contin-
ues to operate as an island of decency and free
markets. Clearly, al-Qaida in Iraq has been
hurt. Clearly, some Arab countries are coming
to terms with the changes there by reopening
embassies in Baghdad.
The third reality, though, is the fact that the


reconciliation process inside Iraq almost five
years after our invasion still has not reached
a point where Iraq's stability is self-sustaining.
And Tuesday's bombing in Baghdad, which
killed more than 50 people at a bus stop in a Shi-
ite neighbourhood, only underscores that. The
U.S. military is still needed as referee. It still is
not clear that Iraq is a country that can be held
together by anything other than an iron fist.
It's still not clear that its government is any-
thing more than a collection of sectarian fiefs.
It is this volatile swirl that will likely greet the
next president: the deep desire of the U.S. pub-
lic to be finished with Iraq because of the huge
costs; the glimmer of hope that a decent out-
come, one that might redeem some of those
costs, is still possible; and the fact that Iraq still
has not cohered as a country yet.
We can continue debating the merits of the
war all we want until Jan. 20, 2009, but from that
day forward there will be only one question for
the next president: In light of these three con-
flicting trends, what are you planning to do with
the Iraq you're inheriting?
If McCain is the next commander in chief, the
U.S. military will tell him on day one that we
can't stay in Iraq at the present troop levels
indefinitely because the cost to our armed forces
is becoming unbearable; if it is Obama, the
Iraqis will tell him on day one that we can't
leave Iraq precipitously because it will explode.
It would be a huge mistake for McCain to
give up his goal of salvaging something in Iraq.
But it would also be a big mistake to assume
that the public would tolerate another presi-
dent's open-ended commitment there. Similar-
ly, it would be a huge mistake for Obama to
now give up his commitment to a phased with-
drawal. That is very important leverage on the
Iraqis. But it would also be a big mistake not to
give Iraq a fresh look and ask: can something
decent still be salvaged there at an acceptable
cost something that can still serve our inter-
ests, do right by Iraqis and maybe put in place
the seeds of an open society that will pay long-
term benefits?
"When it comes to Iraq, most Americans
really want to leave, but they still don't want to
lose," argues Michael Mandelbaum, author of
"Democracy's Good Name." Navigating these
conflicting moods and trends on the ground in
Iraq is going to be one of the most excruciatingly
difficult challenges ever handed from one pres-
ident to another.
It might be useful to start talking about it.
(This article was written by Thomas L. Fried-
man -
c.2008 New York Times News Service).


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
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Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
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EDITOR, The Tribune.
Please publish the follow-
ing open letter to:

Re: Conservation and
Farming Ideas
The Hon Lawrence S
Cartwright, MP
Ministry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources.

Dear Minister Cartwright:
I write to you to share some
ideas that I had that I feel will
benefit the country. It is
always a good and civic mind-
ed affair to share ideas. My
idea can be applied to fishing
and agriculture.
Recently, my mother made
a trip to Grand Turk and told
me about her visit to a conch
farm.
Her enthusiasm and fasci-
nation led me to think. A farm
could be very beneficial to our
country. I know that an
attempt to farm shrimps was
made in the past but these are
different times.
Why can't the government
allocate an uninhabited cay(s)
and convert it to a protected
place where we can establish
conchs, grouper and
crops/vegetation, and help
maintain optimal growing con-


editions for them? After the
products have established a
healthy size or reached har-
vest, the majority of the
marine life can be processed
and sold.
Some of the marine life
could be released to help
rebuild the wild population.
The crops grown in these facil-
ities can be sold locally to ease
our dependence on imported
produce.
My other idea would be to
initially hire local fishermen
or create a department within
Agriculture to safely capture
the dreaded lionfish that are
endangering our local waters.
In the eastern hemisphere, I
understand that lionfish are a
delicacy enjoyed once the poi-
sonous spines of the dorsal fin
are removed.
Our. government should
take advantage of this and cre-
ate a plant that can process,
fillet and export this "delica-
cy" worldwide as a means to
generate income for the coun-
try and create jobs for many
Bahamians.


If the processing plant is set
up in such a way that you can
see these fish swimming in a
manufactured environment
without endangering our
wildlife, then I think this
would be a wonderful way to
not only preserve our
Bahamas for future genera-
tions but can also be used as
an attraction to entice envi-
ronmental tourists from all
over the world.
Conservation is becoming a
huge deal to people and this
would be a forward approach
to it. Guided tours can be held
at grouper, conch and lionfish
farms as a way to educate peo-
ple.
Many Bahamians do not
know how our local species
propagate.
It can afford some Bahami-
ans an opportunity to be edu-
cated by going to Grand Turk
and learning about the conch
reproductive cycle.
Thank you for the opportu-
nity to share my ideas and I
sincerely hope that there can
be further research and dis-
cussion about this. It is an idea
worth looking at.

JULIET W HOLMES
Nassau,
June 4, 2008.


EDITOR, The Tribune.
THE unexpected statement
of the Rt Hon Prime Minister
and warning, certainly excep-
tionally serious, bearing in mind
that the sole approach, unless
there was agreement from all
parties, to acquire would have
to be under the provisions of
The Constitution to acquire
through compulsory purchase
the assets of The Grand
Bahama Port Authority.
Was this statement just a
statement to try to distract the
media and the public?
If, and this is a fact, neither
the Hayward side'nor the St
George side have been able to
arrive at a settlement even with
mediation and from reading
between the lines with new
players in the fray like Fleming
Partners and Hutchison-Wham-


pao the principal argument
remains who owns what?
We saw and witnessed the
refusal for weeks and public
statements from the-Ministry of
Finance refusing to accept that
probably The Treasurer of The
Bahamas owned 7.5 per cent of
the shares in GBPA, it was in
many ways reassuring that
someone did check and sur-
mised well possibly The
Treasurer certainly does as all
Annual Company Reports as
to who owns shares in GBPA
since the purchase from
Benguet show that the Trea-
surer does.
The FNM has always had a
political and economic policy
of divesting of public corpora-
tions and it makes total fun of
their policy and spirit for exam-
ple behind their intent to sell
49 per cent of BTC at this


immediate moment and then
the Prime Minister announces
that if things do not resolve
themselves his Government
would consider purchasing
GBPA.
Hubert A Ingraham knows,
and his advisers both in and out-
side of Government will advise,
that any such move will further
aggrieve the legal situation and
plunge the issue into a further
litigation as obviously both cur-
rent sparing parties, Hay-
ward/Fleming and St George
and whoever will immediately
challenge that order all the way
to the Privy Council with an
expected judgment three-four
years hence. Is that what the
Prime Minister wishes?
C PERCENTIE
Freeport,
June 8, 2008.


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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


THE TRIBUNE







THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


LAN


PM to attend New York Conference on the Caribbean


PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham will travel to New
York City to a attend the New
York Conference on the
Caribbean, June 19 to 20.
He will then travel onto to
Washington for the first annu-
al Caribbean Tourism Sum-
mit to be held June 21 to 24.
Mr Ingraham will be joined
in Washington by Minister of
Tourism and Aviation the
Neko Grant.
The New York Summit will
examine issues such as invest-
ment, trade and education.
CARICOM leaders are


expected to meet with US
House Ways and Means Com-
mittee chairman, Congress-
man Charles Rangel; New
York Governor David Patter-
son, New York City Mayor
Michael Bloomberg as well as
other elected officials.
Prime Minister Ingraham,
as chairman of the Conference
of CARICOM Heads, will
attend this year's annual
Caribbean Tourism Summit,
which will bring together lead-
ers from political, tourism and
investment communities and
the Caribbean Diaspora.


Chairman of the US Feder-
al Reserve Board Alan
Greenspan will deliver the
keynote address at the sum-
mit and will hold a breakfast
meeting with CARICOM
heads. While in Washington,
the prime minister and heads
of government of the
Caribbean Community are
also to hold discussions with
representatives from the Inter-
American Development Bank
(IDB), the International Mon-
etary Fund (IMF), the Inter-
national Finance Corporation
(IFC) and the Overseas Pri-


vate Investment Corporation
(OPIC).
Prime Minister Ingraham
will use his time in Washing-
ton to sign the $100 million
loan agreement with the Inter-
American Development Bank
in connection with the
expanded New Providence
Road Corridor Enhancement
Project.
He will also visit the World
Bank to sign the agreement
marking the Bahamas' acces-
sion to the International
Development Association
(IDA). Prime Minister Ingra-


ham will depart Nassau on
Thursday, June 19 and return
to Nassau on Monday, June
23. Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette will act as
prime minister and Minister
of State for Finance Zhivar-
go Laing will as minister of
finance during the prime min-
ister's absence.

TllROPIlC


Faulty traffic lights blamed



on repairs contract expiry
* By ALISON LOWE -
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net


MALFUNCTIONING traffic
lights that have been plaguing
motorists at numerous major
junctions across New Providence
have not been fixed because -a
contract with the company who
does tends to the lights ran out, it
has been revealed.
Meanwhile, the company which
was contracted last week to take
up the responsibility seems
unaware that the latest deal had
been signed, Director of Works,
Gordon Major said.
The government outsources
traffic-light maintenance across
New Providence, and according
to Mr Major, the last major con-
tract with a company to do so ran
out "around the end of last year."
Since then shorter interim con-
tracts have been issued, said Mr
Major, but there seems to have
been. a period since the expira-
tion of the last contract when no
one has been taking responsibili-
ty for operating and repairing the
traffic control apparatus.
Four high-volume junctions in
particular have been brought to
the attention of The Tribune as
being troublesome for travellers.
Traffic lights at the Shirley
Street / Village road intersection,
those at the Shirley Street / East
Street corner, and at the inter-
section of Bay Street and East
Street have been "blinking"
orange for alifiost two weeks,
forcing motorists to have to nego-
tiate the crossroads with extreme
caution.


iiA'


... .
S. ,

w -
.... -- U L5

---.
00s

It-~L~ZI~ pal


I NAJM:M luc ioing l*ighs aecasdpole sa h Es tet/hre tre ucion


The traffic light on the south-
ern side of the Village Road and
Shirley Street junction where
Village Road joins the intersec-
tion has been totally destroyed
and is lying in pile by the side of
the road, apparently having been
. hit bya vehicle: ~... --. ..... -.-
SMeanwhile, a red light at the
very busy intersection of Fox Hill
Road and Prince Charles Drive
has also been out for some time.
The outages have led to traffic
accidents or close calls for many


unsuspecting motorists as well as
traffic backlogs.
Mr Major said that the govern-
ment is seeking to negotiate a
longer term, possibly three year,
contract with the company which
originally maintained the lights.
., --H said tolth.the,.contrct
involves regular maintenance of
the apparatus.
"They are. supposed to check
lights eviry day on a regular basis.
It means them replacing damage.
Sometimes you have accidents,


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and they are responsible for
replacing damaged lights."
The Tribune was unable to get
in contact with the company who
Mr Major identified as having
been awarded the most recent
contract yesterday, as they are
,not listed in the phone book and
have no website.


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Local business donates


protective vest to police


GRAND BAHAMA Entech Building Systems
showed their support for the Royal Bahamas Police
Force and donated a protective vest as part of
Rotary Club Grand Bahama Sunrise's initiative
"Protect the Protectors."
Greg Farrington, president of Entech Building
Systems said he understands the importance of pro-
tecting the country's police force and has therefore
decided to step up to the plate and make a donation
to the Rotary Club of Grand Bahama Sunrise for
their "Protect the Protectors" campaign to purchase
protective vests.
"These brave men and women need the proper
equipment to do their job to keep to keep our streets
safe and we at Entech are happy to support this
valuable Rotary programme" said Mr Farrington.
President of Rotary Club of Grand Bahama Sun-
rise Tom Leeder said: "The goal of this programme
is for Rotary and the community to show apprecia-
tion to the men and women in uniform and to raise
enough money to pay for 75 custom fitted protective
vests.
Mr Leeder explained that earlier this year, "an


officer who was not wearing a vest was killed in a
shooting."
"This was the call to action to 'Protect the
Protectors.' The Grand Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce was the first to act and they have donated 23
vests that were custom sized and purchased.
"The Grand Bahama Sunrise Club has planned an
aggressive campaign to secure more vests for our
local protectors and encourages the public to attend
the "Rib Fest" on July 5," he said.
Police Appreciation Week will be celebrated
from June 30 to July 5, culminating with the Rotary
Club of Grand Bahama Sunrise's "Protect the Pro-
tectors Rib Fest" at the Seahorse Plaza from noon to
6pm.
Entertainment will be provided by the Royal
Bahamas Police Band and demonstrations will be
given by the police and the fire department.
The Rib Fest tickets are being sold by members of
the Rotary Club of Grand Bahama Sunrise and the
police for $12.
All of the proceeds of this event will be used for
purchasing protective vests for the police force.


(L-R) RICARDO MURRAY of the Rotary Club Grand Bahama Sunrise; Greg Farrington, president of Entech
Building Systems, and David Hilton of Entech Building Systems, on the construction site of the Fenestratton
and Glass building on Queens Highway being built by Entech.


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Call for total

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CAMPAIGNERS are urging
a total ban on the hunting of all
sea turtles before the new sea-
son opens in August.
They are anxiously awaiting
replies from the government to
letters sent to various ministries
last month.
Failing a total ban, the
Bahamas Sea Turtle Conserva-
tion Group is desperate to
impose a ten-year moratorium
on turtle fishing throughout the
Bahamas.
The group's new initiative
comes amid gruesome stories of
cruel treatment of turtles by
Bahamian fishermen.


STOP THE KMlIN


Members say the creatures
often have their flippers punc-
tured before being left to die a
slow death.
Yesterday, the group issued a
press statement calling for urgent
action, warning that the torture
and killing of turtles will contin-
ue once the season reopens.
"As the Bahamas professes to
be a very desirable tourist desti-
nation, promoting our beautiful
oceans, beaches and marine life,
we find it ironic that the govern-
ment still allows one of the most
beautiful creatures swimming in
the ocean to be continually bru-
talised and slaughtered," said the
group.
Urging Prime Minister Hubert


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said: "Let us show the world that
we do care about our environ-
ment and the creatures that need
to be protected. Once these crea-
tures disappear from the planet,
they will never return."
In a direct plea to the prime
minister, it adds: "You are the
only one who has the power to
change the plight of these ani-
mals in the Bahamas. Now is the
time to act.
"We appreciate the magnitude
of problems that you have to deal
with that the country is facing at
present. However, this act is so
easy on your part to implement
and yet the results will be so
tremendous.
"Sometimes you have to take
little steps in order to achieve the
much larger goals."
The group has printed hun-
dreds of car stickers bearing the
message: "Stop the Killing!"
Yesterday, a member said:
"The turtles pass through the
Bahamas on the way to their
breeding grounds in South Amer-
ica, so what the fishermen are
killing is breeding stock.
"In fact, we believe very few
Bahamians enjoy eating turtles,
so the demand is low. However,
we now feel fishermen are catch-
ing them so that we will come
along and buy them so that we
can set them free."
She said some fishermen strap
the turtles' flippers together and
punch holes in them before leav-
ing them to die in the sun.


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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


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.~;;


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Row over Bimini future,



anchor project goes on


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
THE ongoing tug of war over the
future of Bimini and its anchor project,
the Bimini Bay Resort and Marina, con-
tinued yesterday with Bahamian envi-
ronmentalist Sam Duncombe calling a
local man's comments in favour of the
development "mind boggling."
Two weeks ago, a delegation of Bimini
residents visited The Tribune to lay out
their case in support of the Bimini Bay
Resort and Marina.
The project has for several years now
come under attack from local and inter-
national environmentalists, as well as sci-
entists, for allegedly destroying vital eco-
logical resources in and around the island.
Local government councillor Ashley
Saunders delivered a petition contain-
ing 300 signatures to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham saying that criticism of
the resort, and calls for its Phase II devel-
opment to be stopped, were "senseless"
and "hurt" the island's people.
Responding to these claims, president
of the Bahamian environmental organi-
sation reEarth Sam Duncombe, said:
"The ecosystems that lie in Bimini's


"The ecosystems that
le in Bimini's waters
are not Mr Saunder's,
the government's, or
Bimini Bay's to
destroy, they belong
to the Bahamas, and
to the world. Those
systems are vital for
future generations."

reEarth president
Sam Duncombe

waters are not Mr Saunder's, the gov-
ernment's, or Bimini Bay's to destroy,
they belong to the Bahamas, and to the
world. Those systems are vital for future
generations."
Mrs Duncombe said that she found it
"mind boggling that Mr Saunders is
favouring the developers who are in fact


jeopardising the children of Bimini by
removing the very systems that will pro-
tect and feed them into the future."
She defended the negative press which
Mr Saunders and the group of nine resi-
dents who came with him spoke out
against, saying that the "bad press" can
hopefully "save what is left of Bimini for
the children."
If the bad press is to stop, the govern-
ment must do as the younger relatives of
ocean explorer and conservationist
Jacques Cousteau have been saying, and
stop the development of Bimini Bay's
phase II, which will include a luxury Con-
rad hotel, she said.
"Local and international groups will
continue to pressure Bimini Bay and oth-
er unsustainable developments. Restrict-
ing the further degradation of Bimini by
stopping further development, greening
the Bimini Bay development to the extent
possible, will go a long way to stop the
negative press," she added.
Bimini Bay rejects suggestions that it is
harming the environment. Representa-
tives for the project have said in the past
that they are working in conjunction with
environmental experts to ensure the
"environmental integrity" of the island
is preserved.


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Conrad Knowles, former


police officer, dies age 85
By ALISON LOWE I- Joan said the entire family


p
e nubirT Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net


CONRAD KNOWLES, for-
mer police officer and long time
public servant, passed away at
age 85 at his home in Nassau on
Tuesday afternoon.
Mr Knowles had been in hos-
pital for three weeks, having suf-
fered a stroke. He was married
to Annette Knowles, nee
Archer, for 62 years and they
had four children Dr Ronald
Knowles, former minister of
health; Joan Albury, CEO of
public relations firm Counsel-
lors Limited; Paul Knowles and
Sonia Forbes.
Mr Knowles had served his
country since the age of 18 when
he moved from his home town
of McCann's in Long Island to
join the Royal Bahamas Police
Force in Nassau.
Eventually earning the rank
of assistant superintendent, one
of Mr Knowles' most precious
memories of which he spoke
frequently, according to his
daughter, Joan was having
represented the Bahamas at the
coronation of Queen Elizabeth
II in London in 1953.
Mr Knowles had many "vivid
memories" of his time on the
force which he cherished, his
daughter said.
Retiring from the RBPF in
1959, he went on to serve in
both Nassau and Grand Bahama
in roles such as assistant con-


" i

Y. :L :?%~. if.
~r~ ": "A(
-i
.. ~~
i
'1 ~i


troller of the Road Traffic
Department, deputy director of
Immigration, permanent secre-
tary in the ministries of Trans-
port and Home Affairs, chair-
man of the Licensing Authority
and later, deputy to the gover-
nor general.
Joan said that many were sur-
prised to hear of his death as he
had always been a very active
person, who lived a "positive
life" and was dedicated to
advancing his "mind, body and
soul."
"He was committed to a
healthy lifestyle. He was some-
body who walks every morn-
ing," she said.


luved their IIather dearly and he
in turn had love for all not just
his immediate relatives, but the
extended family, too.
He was a humble, unselfish
man; who was also a committed
Anglican and the "heart of the
family."
According to his daughter, he
had a strong belief in education,
and Joan credits him for the fact
that all of his children went to
university and now work for
themselves.
"He taught us the importance
of self-reliance," she said.
She also remembered him as
a man who "loved his country,
his church and politics".
Mr Knowles instilled in the
family the importance of coming
together on a regular basis and
they did every Sunday to "break
bread". Joan said this tradition
would continue.
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham remembered Mr Knowles
on Tuesday as a "truly out-
standing Bahamian gentleman, a
dedicated public servant and a
loyal friend".
His family have tentatively
scheduled his funeral for next
Tuesday.


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PAGE N 8J8


Search on for man


profiled in Tribune

FROM page one
The Tribune also spoke to leading psychologist Dr David
Allen seeking a psychological profile of the kind of person
who could have killed the four gay men, which proved valu-
able to the police investigation.
But with the murders yet unsolved, the LGBT communi-
ty continue to live in fear that the killer could harm them in
some way.
With the wealth of forensic evidence collected at the four
murder scenes they are hoping the killer will soon be caught.
Acting Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson said he is
not sure when arrests will be made, but trusts his team to take
the right course of action.
He said: "The possibilities are there, and when we narrow
these down who knows there are a number of things that
could be happening."
Anyone with any information which could assist police in
their inquiries are urged to urgently call the incident room on
502-9938, 502-9953 or 502-9942.


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PM warns parties in GB


Port Authority dispute


FROM page one


ber if this statement means that he is about to
nationalise the GBPA, Mr Ingraham said: "I
said what I meant, and I meant what I said."
These comments by the prime minister
come two weeks after he announced that
government is willing to buy the GBPA.
"I might advise that I indicated to one of
the principal shareholders of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority, Sir Jack Hayward,
that the government of the Bahamas can-
not wait much longer for them to settle their
dispute and the government is willing to buy
the Port Authority," he said on that occasion
in the House during the budget debate.
"We cannot wait for an indefinite period
for them to settle their differences. The gov-
ernment of the Bahamas is willing to buy
the Grand Bahama Port Authority and get
Grand Bahama moving again."
The GBPA dispute has continued for
more than a year and a half despite the
courts ruling that Sir Jack Hayward and the
estate of Edward St George have 50/50 own-
ership in the GBPA.
Control over the shares qf the GPBA,
which are held in the Cayman Islands, is the
latest chapter of the saga that is being played
out during what has been described as an
economic depression in Grand Bahama.


FROM page one
talist of spreading incorrect
information on liquefied natur-
al gas (LNG) compiled by
"fringe groups" in the US,
adding that, "It is up to us as
intelligent people to dissemi-
nate the garbage from reality."
AES, a US-based company,
put a proposal to the former
PLP government for an LNG
re-gassification plant on Ocean
Cay near Bimini. The compa-
ny wanted to construct a 95-
mile pipeline to transport the
gas to South Florida, where it is
in demand.
The company has been wait-
ing for five years for a decision
from the government, and
according to Minister Miller, its
plans might soon be approved.
Mrs Duncombe has criticised
the plan, alleging that AES only
wants to locate the plant in the
Bahamas to avoid US environ-
mental law.
She has noted that AES
already operates one of the dirt-
iest plants in the US, and claims


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Recent tourist arrival statistics further
indicate that the economy of Grand Bahama
is still declining, with air and sea arrivals
down 13.5 per cent in the first quarter this
year.
The prime minister's repeated references
to the matter in the House seem to be delib-
erate messages to the Port parties to rapid-
ly reach a settlement before he intervenes
with one.
Senior Justice Anita Allen's decision to
recuse herself from the Port dispute further
throws into question when the quarrel will be
resolved.
In her written ruling on Monday, Justice
Allen accused the Court of Appeal of "inter-
ference" with her independence as a judge,
adding that the case had been "bedeviled" by
Justice Neville Adderley hearing matters
related to the ownership dispute in his court.
This, Justice Alien ruled, had "resulted
in a game of musical chairs or 'judge shop-
ping' by the parties, which is repugnant to
our system of justice."
Noting that the case was being controlled
by the parties' respective lawyers, something
that had hampered her case management
efforts and bid to move the dispute forward,
Justice Allen also said:
"This matter is of national importance,
and its resolution critical to the economy of
Grand Bahama and the Bahamas as a whole.


I trust the parties and their counsel will com-
mit themselves to the fair and speedy reso-
lution of this matter."
Yet to date, "there appeared to be no
commitment on the part of the parties and
counsel to resolve the dispute on the basis of
the real interests of all concerned."
The recusal applications were made on
Monday, June 9, 2008, the date originally
scheduled to hear an application by the late
Edward St George's estate for the GBPA
and Port Group Ltd share registers to be
rectified to show it and Sir Jack as the ben-
eficial owners.
The Chief Justice will now have to select a
new judge to hear the matter.
In addition to government's potential
intervention, the prime minister described
Freeport yesterday as a unique creation that
will not again be replicated.
"It is not something that is likely to ever
be replicated anywhere else in the Bahamas
certainly not on my government's watch and
I would doubt on any future government's
watch.
"No one will permit, I believe in the
future, for an island...to have canals cut all
through; for the water resources to be
destroyed; for the island to be virtually cut in
two," said Mr Ingraham, noting the damage
that can be done from this process to water-
bearing land.


FROM page one
was concerned about what
became of the case after
it was reported to Eliza-
beth Estates police station.
She explained that
two weeks ago, she and
her boyfriend were
parked by Yamacraw
Beach when they saw
another car pull up.
The occupants, she
said, were a young
woman, estimated to be
15 or 16 years old, and
an older man with "salt
and pepper" hair.' ."
The witness claimiie'd
that the two were hav-'
ing an argument, with
the man pulling the
girl's hair and attacking
her.
"We saw him swing-
ing his hand at her, but
he tried to block our
view with his body,"
she said.
At this point, the wit-
ness said, a red car
pulled up to the beach.
A man got out of the
vehicle and approached
the car with the older
man and the girl in it.
The witness said she
was later told that the
man in the red car had
called the police.
"By this time, me and
my boyfriend had also
called the police," she
said.
Two police cars
arrived on the scene a
short time later and the
officers ordered the two
occupants to get out of
the car.
The witness said she
saw how the older man
got out of the car and
"zipped up his pants."
"The man and the girl
were arguing, she was
signing and he was sign-
ing something back, we
could tell the girl was
very upset," the witness
said.
The police officers
then separated the two,
she said.
As the police officers
were taking her and her
boyfriend's statements,
the witness said, they
were told that the man
in the car with the
teenage deaf girl was a
pastor.
The witness said that
the matter was then
reported to Elizabeth
Estates police station
and that the man in the
red car accompanied
the older man, the girl
and the police officers
to the station.
"I am very concerned
about what happened to
this girl. She was so
young and deaf as well,
it really concerns me,"
the witness said.
The Tribune last night
made several attempts
to contact police about
the incident without
success.


that the plant and the pipeline
pose serious threats to the
marine ecosystem. AES denies
her claims.
Mrs Duncombe, who point-
ed out that more than 5,000
people signed her petition
against LNG, is calling on gov-
ernment to be more "transpar-
ent" about its stance on the
issue, and heed to the concerns
of environmentalists.
"It is outrageous that
talks continue to proceed even
though thousands of Bahami-
ans have spoken against the
project," she said.
On Tuesday Mr Miller reit-
erated his support for the AES
plan, saying that if it is
approved, Bahamians would see
a reduction in their "enormous


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electricity bills."
Mr Miller added that the
Bahamas would earn $1.2 to
$1.5 billion from the LNG plant
over a 20-year period.
He also refuted suggestions
that LNG plants are dangerous,
saying that it is impossible for
them to explode.
Mr Miller said there has been
no loss of life at any re-gasifica-
tion facility in the world since
1944.
Brushing off suggestions that
the plant might become a target
for terrorists, he asked: "Why
try and blow up an LNG facili-
ty that cannot explode?" -
In 2004, an explosion at
an LNG facility in Algeria
killed 27 people, leaving 80
injured.


Camp Jumpstart
and Spanish
Immersion Camp
Full day camp
(9am 2:30pm)
July 7 August 1
Ages 2-12


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Claim that LNG firm is

'working on deal to divert

some gas to Nassau'


Lake Waterloo, East Bay Street
Waterloo Compound
Tel: (242) 3984-4781/3 for further information


~if-


- ----I


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


HJ f- ..- "













ii 5 Tyre removal continues from

island near Lake Okeechobee


* WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.
WATER managers are removing thousands of
tyres from Kreamer Island near Lake Okee-
chobee, according to Associated Press.
South Florida Water Management District
authorities have already removed some 2,000
tyres. But they believe there are another few
thousand still scattered on the large island.
Dave Unsell is a Lake Okeechobee manager


for the district. He says residents know about the
hidden tyres that may be from farming machin-
ery and were dumped as far back as World War
II.
The dumping stopped when Kreamer Island's
only connection to the mainland, a bridge to
nearby Torry Island, burned in the 1970s.
Unsell says the dumping must have been an
organised project since there are so many. But
exactly what happened is still a mystery.


Abaco's Junkanoo



Summer Festival


underway


HUNDREDS of visitors
and locals experienced a
spectacular night at the
Goombay Park in Marsch
Harbour last Friday as the
Abaco Tourist Office
kicked off its Junkanoo
Summer Festival under the
theme "Rush to the Beat
of our Culture."
The festival opened with
the world-famous Royal
Bahamas Police Force
Marching and Pop Bands;
Obeah dancer Mettellus
Chipman; fire dancer
Fontella Chipman; Spice;
New Entry Band; April
and Tika Cultural Skit; the
Spring City Rockers
Junkanoo Group, and oth-
er festive activities that
idelivered;an Abaco brand
iof t:e. popular Bahamian
festival tgqtthehundreds in
attendance.
This year's theme was
the creation of Matthew
Joseph Grammatico, an
eighth grade student of St
Francis de Sales School,
who won the Junkanoo
Summer Festival theme
competition.

Culture
The festival continues on
Friday, June 20, followed
by two more consecutive
weeks of Bahamian enter-
tainment and culture
through the music, food,
dance and arts and crafts
that will be on full display.
Taking centre stage at
Goombay Park during the
remaining three week peri-
od will be Geno D; Avvy;
the Abaco Youth Marching
Band; Denton's Dance
Group; the Abaco Drama
Club; KB; Terez Hepburn;
Estin Sawyer; April and
Tika Cultural Skit; Impact
Band; the Motown Shocker
Junkanoo Group; Ophie
and the Web; Ancient
Man; the New Wave
Dancers; Lassie Doe Boys;
the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force Marching
anl Pop Bands, and the
Central Abaco Primary
Junkanoo Group.


Practical or Luxury?


You may ask the question: Is it practical
to own a Mercedes-Benz or is it a luxury?
Well, Mercedes-Benz would like to ask
you a question. Are excellent gas
mileage, top safety standards and
superior driving technology considered a
luxury? Mercedes-Benz doesn't think so
and you shouldn't either. You deserve to
get the most out of your gas dollar.


You and your family deserve to be safe
and comfortable when maneutering
through our nation's less-than-perfect
roadways. That's why these features and
so much more come standard in every
class and model of Mercedes-Benz. So do
something practical while rtill enjoying
the best of life bei:cme an owner of a
beautiful new Mercedes-Benz today.


STAFF AT the Ministry of Tourism office in the Abaco's, present a.
cheque to Matthew Grammatico, winner of Abaco's Junkanoo Sum-
mer Festival theme competition.


r- '-" -
b '. ',,
A, *^ '* 1 -
..

14,- "_ .''
IF". "


1p 7


THE Junkanoo Summer Festival
gets underway in Abaco.


2 '


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Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


- -- --- II


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


;


; - i.
r:
:
'


j C' .::


..






PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008 THE TRIBUNE


Grace Community Church

Is seeking to honour

...les who have

.y# een married for

0 y'ers or more. Please

call u if you know of such

S a couple.


/ Couples will be honoured
during our 11th Annual

S' Marriage Is Honourable

Celebration

June 29, 2008

11:00 a.m.


Speaker:

Dr. Rex Mdjor.T
."X '- -.. .
-
Our Contacts:
Tel. 394-7223, 393-8120 .r
Fax: ,394-6243
E-mail: gracebahamd.@.yahoo.com
PO.Box SS-5267, Nassau, Bahamas :,




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FROM page one
Speaking to The Tribune
outside the House of Assem-
bly yesterday, Minister Turn-
quest said any breach of.secu-
rity of an area guarded by
RBDF officers is a matter.for
"serious consideration."
When asked if the officer
reportedly on guard during the
time of the robbery was placed
on administrative leave, Mr
Turnquest said: "I cannot say
at this time."
"We have turned the mat-
ter over to the police and we
are reviewing it and giving it
the serious consideration that
it warrants. I do not want to
prejudice the investigation by
making any further comments
other than saying an investi-
gation is ongoing and it is
being handled by both the
Defence Force and the
police," said Mr Turnquest,
adding that he was made
aware of the theft on Friday
evening.
"I've ordered the review of
all the security protocols in


place for the Defence Force
to ensure that places that are
being guarded by them
through their commando
squadron are receiving full and
proper attention.
"It is a matter of serious
consideration and so we want
to make sure we definitely do
not have a recurrence and that
when we say that we are pro-
tecting a facility, the facility is
protected."
Former Minister of Foreign
Affairs Fred Mitchell hopes
the cordial relationship
between China and the
Bahamascontinues in spite of
the breach of security.
"I was concerned when I
heard and saw the report, and
from our point of view, we
believe that our countries
(China and the Bahamas)
have good relations, we want
those to continue.
"In speaking with the Min-
ister of National Security this
morning, it appears to me that
the appropriate steps are being
taken to make sure that the
matter is being properly inves-
tigated and is being taken with


appropriate seriousness.
"And I want to be sure that
whatever investigation takes
place, that the government is
satisfied that whatever took
place is isolated simply to that
and not part of some conspir-
acy or other series of events.
"But certainly it is a matter
of concern and we wait to see
what the investigation
reveals."
Reports to The Tribune
revealed that a Defence Force
officer was on guard at the
embassy over the weekend.
During his watch the
embassy's camera caught a
man breaking into the con-
sulate.
It was reported that RBDF
commander, Commodore Clif-
ford Scavella, cut short his
attendance at a conference in
Trinidad to handle the inci-
dent.
Yesterday, Mr Turnquest
denied this report. He said that
while the commodore was
away on official business the
matter was being handled by
the acting commander of the
Defence Force until the Com-
modore returned on Sunday
morning.
Officials from the RBDF
continued to remain tight-
lipped on the robbery and sub-
sequent investigation.
"At this time, the Defence
Force is not able to make any
comment, or statement, on the
matter. At this time I speak
for the Commodore (Scavel-
la), he won't be making any
statements on the matter,"
RBDF Chief Petty Officer
Ralph McKinney said yester-
day.


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Reported theft at


Chinese embassy


sparks review of


security measures


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


THE TRIBUNE







ITIBUNETHURA ,JN 1


I I L !


BAIC names its senior Lari or Ianks
The family of
b 0. The Late

business services officer ThLa
AS THE Bahamas Agricul-
tural and Industrial Corpora- :onne 9fi i
tion (BAIC) readies its series

business services officer.
Mrs Burrows is BAIC's pri- Perhaps you sent a lovely card,
mary representative in the
organisation and together with Or sat quietly in a chair;
Keith Daley of the Ministry of Perhaps you sent beautiful flowers,
the Agriculture and Marine If so, we saw them there.
Resources, has responsibility of ..
the food processingworkshops. Perhaps you sent or spoke kind words
Mrs Burrows, who joined -'
BAIC in November 2003, also As any friend could say;
plays a leading role in the train- Perhaps you were not there at all
ing of prospective entrepre- Just thought of us that day.
neurs.
An offices division, her business ser-
vices division, her promotion Whatever you did to console the heart,
was "in recognition of her ster- We thank you so much, whatever the part.
ling contributions, her very
enthusiastic attitude, and her .
ability to perform," said BAIC's We extend our heartfelt appreciation to the many Friends and
deputy geral manager Don
deutMajor.y general manager Don family members for prayers, telephone calls, visits, kind words or
"The public can feel very sat- encouragement, floral arrangements and many gracious acts of
isfied that they are in very capa- kindness and expressions of love during our time of bereavement.
ble hands with the staff at
BAIC. Mrs Burrows is one of Special thanks to the family of St Barnabas Church, clergy and the
many competent BAIC staffers.
"W e are here to sterse the Visitation Group, Oncology Clinic, Staff at the Surgical Suite,
public. Persons may be in busi- Epcot Medical Centre,the staff of Island Merchants & New
ness for themselves, but not by motion is "an honour." BAIC'S new senior business services officer Tonjia Burrows Oriental Laundry, Alice Wells, Cyprianna Edgecombe, Thomas
themselves because wve are here "It gives me the opportunity (centre) is congratulated by deputy general manager Don Major Stubbs, Vernon Dean, Nicole Colebrook, Charlotte Ridge
to help." to help more people," she (left) and assistant manager Lester Stuart. Families and The Picnic Group for their support.
Mrs Burrows said the pro- said.

Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort &
Offshore Island
Offshore Island From June Is June 30, 2008
Invites application for the position of:

EXECUTIVE CHEF ENTER TO WIN A ORLANDO PACKAGE

REOUIREMENTS: With a $50 purchase from selected brands

Been in a similar position for the past 5 years
Posess a sound culinary background: ... '
Must be a self motivated person I
Experienced with on the job training .
Being able to develop budgets and necessary controls "
Good leadership skills are a must
College or culinary institute training is an asset
The will and desire to join an organization where
quality assurance is guaranteed. ,"

SALARY AND BENEFITS Commensurate with
experience

Interested persons should submit resume by
email to:

Director of Human Resources .
P.O. Box CB-13005 "
E-mail CMajora(rp.sandals.com


4 Round trip airfares to Orlando, FL


GlaxoSmithKine a leading global researcbased 5 day, 4 night Hotel
of premium healthcare products, seeks QUALIFIED
candidates for the following position:
MEDICAL REPRESENTATIVE Stay at a selected Disney Resort
Reporting to the District Sales Manager, this position
will be responsible for managing and promoting 4 ti
institutional brands and maintaining pharmaceutical ick M g ingm
brands within the healthcare community in Bahamas
and Bermuda.
Functional skills and educational requirements include: 4 tickets to Sea W ord
/ A Bachelor of Science degree 4
/ Qualified Certified Pharmacist
/ At least 5 years experience as a senior
Institutions/Vaccines Representative
/ Results oriented with passion to excel
Proven selling skillsogianln
Proficiency in organizational and time


management skills
/ Effective communication and presentation skills W hat does CK stand for?
/ Computer literate.
J Self motivator and team player
The postioroffers a competitive remuneration package and Selected Brands include: Davidoff, Jennifer Lopez, Sarah Jessica Parker, Baby Phat, Gwen Stefani,
The positiorvoffers a competitive remuneration package and
related training opportunities. The successful candidate will Kenneth Cole, Calvin Klein, Marc Jacobs *excluding Daisy, Phot Farm and Joop
be required to travel island wide as well as overseas. All
applications will be treated in the strictest confidence. *RESTRICTIONS APPLY Trip must originate from the Continental U.S. and/or Bahamas Any Visas need are responsibility of the winner to obtain
MEDICAL REP Winner must book within one year of prize received Black out dates apply
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
orFax: 393-0440
No later than June 25, 2008
We thank all applicants for their Interest but only
short-listed candidates will be contacted.


I iI rrVl I I


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 11







PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008 THE TRIBUNE


Salespersons

&

Customer Service Representatives








SC
MEDITERRANEAN SHIPPING COMPANY

In view of MSC's success and growth in the Bahamas Market,
the Nassau office is seeking qualified salespersons and
customer service representatives.


Please send resumes to mruiz@msc.us


A l


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from suitably
qualified individuals for the position of Senior Associate/Database Administrator in its IT
Technical Services Department, Nassau.
JOB SUMMARY:
The Database Administrator (DBA) is responsible for maintaining the health of BTC Oracle,
SQL and DB2 databases. The DBA implements databases, develops backup and restoration
procedures, performs database tuning, and manages the growth and performance of the IT
databases. The DBA utilizes diagnostic tools to determine system performance problems
and implements database and indexing changes as needed in order to maximize database
performance.
he DBA also researches patches and implements database upgrades and releases to keep
the database environment current. This position requires regular interactions with internal
customers to understand their existing and strategic business needs and that service levels
are being met effectively and on time. The DBA maintains adequate documentation and
communication of all related system upgrades, outages, and modifications, keeping Busi-
ness Partners well informed of changes in policies and procedures. This position interfaces
frequently with other IT staff to resolve issues, implement upgrades, and deliver solutions.
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:
Manage the day-to-day health of the IT Oracle, SQL and DB2 production databases;
Implement and support various test and training database instances as required;
Installs new databases, configures them, tunes them, and monitors performance
Utilizes diagnostic tools and explain plans to identify database performance issues;
Modifies the database schema where required to implement application system upgrades;
Works closely with the Backup and Archival Specialist to Implement database backup pro-
cedures to ensure that data is comprehensively copied ;
Implements systems diagnostic and alarming tools for early detection and notification of
potential problems.
MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS:
Bachelor's degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Information Engineering,
Information Systems, Management Information Systems and a minimum of three (3) years
post graduate experience or
Associate's degree and four (4) years relevant experience or
-Seven (7) years experience as an Associate;
7+ years experience managing, implementing and maintaining Oracle databases;
7+ years experience managing, implementing and maintaining DB2 databases;
5 years experience with AIX, OS 400, and Linux operating systems;
5 years of database design and application system development support;
Strong leadership ability
All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no later
than June 19th, 2008 and addressed as follows:
VICE PRESIDENT
HUMAN RESOURCES & ADMINISTRATION
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
P.O. Box N-3048 Nassau, Bahamas
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
RE: Senior Associate/Database Administrator, IT Technical Services Department

www.btcbahamas.com I CALL BTC 225-5282


Egyptian student expected to plead

guilty to supporting terrorists


* TAMPA, Fla.
AN EGYPTIAN college
student who videotaped him-
self showing how to turn a
remote-controlled car into a
bomb detonator is expected
to plead guilty in Tampa to
supporting terrorists,
according to Associated
Press.
Ahmed Abdellatif Sherif


Mohamed is one of two for-
mer University of South Flori-
da students arrested in South
Carolina last August.
He's expected to enter a
guilty plea at a hearing
Wednesday morning.
Prosecutors said Mohamed
has agreed to plead guilty to
providing material support to
terrorists. In exchange, prose-
cutors will drop six other


charges against him.
He faces up to 15 years in
prison when he is sentenced
later.
The video was found on a
laptop computer in the car he
was driving when deputies
pulled him over near
Charleston, South Carolina.
Deputies say they also found
pipe bomb ingredients in the
trunk.


The Nature

Conservancy

Protecting nature. Preserving life.




The Nature Conservancy has moved
to Caves Professional Centre, Unit
#2. We are located at the rear of
Caves Village
(West Bay Street and Blake Rd)
Telephone: 242-327-2414


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www.p reownedbahamas.com


we Via Drop Box Drawing
for any pre-owned vechic
that is purchased during t
200 1Month of JUNE 2008.
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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


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THETRBUE HUSDYJUN 1, 00, AG 1


Chamber meets with US judiciary members

on improving the criminal justice system


Executives of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce met with
key members of the United States
judiciary to discuss ways to fur-
ther improve the criminal justice
systems in the Bahamas and the
United States.
They also sought to address the
issue of crime in both nations.
The meeting, which took place
on Tuesday, was arranged by
United States Ambassador, Ned
Siegel. It was attended by Judge
James L Martz of the Palm Beach
County Court and Statewide
Prosecutor for the State of Flori-
da along with other prominent
members of the US judiciary.
Heading the exchange was
Chamber president Dionisio
D'Aguilar along with Senator
Tanya Wright, Chamber execu-
tive director Philip Simon and
Khaalis Rolle, first vice president.
Both groups described the
meeting as highly productive.
"The business people are clear-
ly well educated, they are inter-
ested, they are engaged and they
really want what is best for the
Bahamas. And I don't think any-
body can question that after this
meeting," said Judge Martz.
"I think the Americans have
made significant advances in mov-
ing matters quickly through their
judicial system, while here in the
Bahamas we certainly have age-
less challenges and a long way to
go," Mr D'Aguilar said. "For the


most part there continues to be a
large number of complaints from
members of the community about
the volume of cases that have
clogged our system and our seem-
ingly inability to find a way to
make our judicial system work
properly in providing swift jus-
tice to people and providing them
with a mechanism to resolve their
problems.
"I think the Americans have
been a lot more successful in
achieving this goal and I think we
have a lot to learn from them. I
think we have to be very innova-
tive. And I say this all the time,
do not maintain the status quo in
the administration of justice; and
the politicians seemingly are
always doing this and we need
something new and fresh and I
think the Americans have a lot
of new and fresh ideas to offer,"
he said.
The Chamber chief also used
the opportunity to commend
Ambassador Siegel for his efforts
in assisting the BAhamas on a
number of important issues
including the downtown redevel-
opment project, crime and immi-
gration.
Senator Wright said the meet-
ing was a timely one, as senators
ate presently discussing the gov-
ernment's budget communication.
"We are so appreciative of the
gentlemen who are volunteers,
who are really just sharing infor-


4 ,4, -, f, '.... ,


mation about how they have done
it, and their success stories. I think
that there is a lesson in it for our
entire country. It really empha-
sises how the private sector can


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provide solutions... and can par-
ticipate in bringing about those
solutions as opposed to waiting
for the government to do it," she
said.


CHAMBER president Dionisio
D'Aguilar presented a copy of the
Bahamas Handbook to visiting Unit-
ed States Judge James L. Martz of
the Palm Beach County Court and
Statewide Prosecutor for the State
of Florida.


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PICTURED from left to right are Mike Kuykendall, first vice president of
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William N Shepherd, Statewide Prosecutor for the State of Florida; <
Steven Jansen, director of the National Centre for Community Prosecu- j
tion and Anti Gang Violence Initiative in Washington, DC; Dionisio .
D'Aguilar, president of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce; Judge c
James L Martz of the Palm Beach County Court and Statewide Prosecutor
for the State of Florida; Mat Machera, Boston lawyer; Commissioner
Scott Gordon of the Los Angles Superior Court, Family Law Depart- 1
ment; Senator Tanya Wright, Philip Simon, executive director of the *
Chamber; Judith Van Zalen, NAS programme assistant with the United
States Department of State and Khaalis Rolle, first vice president of the
Chamber of Commerce.


The Men and Boys Choir of
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THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


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PAG 1 R U
I II I I 1


Atlantis


welcomes


Miss USA


contestants
FIVE American beauty
queens took over the
Atlantis Resort last week-
end, adding excitement to
events that took place at
some of the resort's top
venues.
Last Thursday, Atlantis
welcomed four of the top
ten contestants in the Miss
USA Pageant, Miss Mis-
souri Candace Crawford;
Miss Indiana Brittany
Mason; Miss Pennsylvania
Laurcn Merola, and Miss
Oklahoma Lindsey Har-
rington, as well Miss Teen
USA Hilary Cruz for a
weekend of fun.
During their weekend
visit, the American beauty
queens met Kerzner Inter-
national Bahamas president


MISS USA Contestants pose with Bottlenose Dolphin at Dolphin
Cay, Atlantis, Paradise Island.


and managing director
George Markantonis and
the world famous Katrina


Dolphins at Dolphin Cay.
On Friday and Saturday
afternoon, the girls heated B
up the scene at the "Cain
at the Cove", where the`
contestants tested their'"n
disc-jockeying skills along'-`
side DJ Carlos from Mia- "
mi.
At night the girls took ,
over another Atlantis hotvi,
spot, the Aura night club. ,,
v--
Mingle o
The beauty queens got toIr
mix and mingle with some,,d,
of the club's VIP guests. o
While visiting the resort, ij
the five pageant queens,Vf
also had the opportunity ton,
meet- and greet, as well asani
be photographed with
resort guests and dine atro-j
some of Atlantis' topiaj
restaurants includingF
Nobu. fm1
The event was organisedtor
as a part of Kerzner Inter-7
national's on-going rela''oq
tionship with the Miss Uni-'1"
verse Organisation.


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on the 12th day of June 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008








THE RIBNE TURSAYJUNE19,2008 PAE 1


L A


Student inducted into



prestigious society


IRIS SAUNDERS, 23,
daughter of Walt and Gigi
Saunders, and an honours
senior at Barry University in
Florida, has been inducted
into the International Hon-
our Society of Beta Gamma
Sigma, the premier honour
society for the best students
in business programmes
accredited by the Association
to Advanced Collegiate
Schools of Business
(ASCSB).
A lifetime membership in
Beta Gamma Sigma is the
highest recognition a business
student anywhere in the


Miccosukee

Tribe sues over

Everglades

restoration
* MIAMI
THE Miccosukee Tribe of
Indians has sued the federal
government over an integral
part of Everglades restoration,
according to Associated Press.
The tribe claims the govern-
ment failed to consider alterna-
tives to a plan that would allow
more water to flow into the
Everglades ecosystem. The
complaint was filed in Miami
federal court Monday.
The government wants to
relocate a one-mile section of
the Tamiami Trail, which cuts
across the Everglades from
Miami to Tampa, as part of its
overall effort to restore more
natural water flow into the wet-
lands.
Lawyers for the tribe claim it
could lead to "the irreparable
destruction" of park lands.
The tribe wants the govern-
ment to instead use existing cul-
verts.
The Department of Trans-
portation declined to comment,
citing the pending litigation.


world can receive in AACSB
accredited baccalaureate or
post-baccalaureate pro-
grammes.
Iris joins an impressive
group of academic and busi-
ness leaders dedicated to
excellence, integrity and life-
long learning.
Iris attended St Andrew's
School but finished high
school at Lakefield College
in Ontario before entering
Barry University.
Upon graduating this
December, she plans to join
her family's business before
going to Harvard Law School.


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THE TRIBUNE









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Father's Day Specials

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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16 THURSDAYJUNE 19 2008


0'w
WAS. V&95
S- $1695
OW.,
7, N 9
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Taliban prep for




battle outside




city of Kandahar -


* ARGHANDAB,
Afghanistan
TALIBAN militants
destroyed bridges and planted
mines in several villages they
control outside southern
Afghanistan's largest city in
apparent preparation for bat-
tle, residents and officials said
Tuesday, according to Associ-
ated Press.
More than 700 families -
meaning perhaps 4,000 people
or more had fled the
Arghandab district 10 miles
northwest of Kandahar city,
said Sardar Mohammad, a
police officer manning a check-
point on the east side of the
Arghandab River. Police on
Tuesday stopped and searched
every person passing on the
road.
On the west side of the river,
hundreds of Taliban controlled
around nine or 10 villages,
Mohammad said.
"Last night the people were
afraid, and families on tractors,
trucks and taxis fled the area,"
said Mohammad. "Small
bridges inside the villages have


been destroyed."
The Afghan army flew four
planeloads of soldiers to Kan-
dahar from the capital, Kabul,
on Tuesday. Canadian forces
have also moved in to the
region.
"When we get permission
from commanders, we will
attack the Taliban," Moham-
mad said.
Aircraft of the NATO-led
security force dropped leaflets
in the Arghandab area telling
residents that Afghan troops
were coming to force out the
Taliban and warning residents
to say indoors in case fighting
breaks out, said spokesman
Mark Laity.
"Some 700 Afghan troops
have moved into Arghandab
region," he said.
The Taliban assault Monday
on the outskirts of Kandahar
was the latest display of strength
by the militants despite a record'
number of U.S. and NATO
troops in the country.
The push into Arghandab dis-
trict a lush region filled with
grape and pomegranate groves
that the Soviet army could nev-


er conquer came three days
after a coordinated Taliban
attack on. Kandahar's prison
that freed 400 insurgent fighters.
Police and army soldiers
increased security throughout
Kandahar and enforced a 10
p.m. curfew.
A Taliban commander
named Mullah Ahmedullah
called an Associated Press
reporter on Tuesday and said
that around 400 Taliban moved
into Arghandab from Khakrez,
one district to the north. He said
some of the militants released in
Friday's prison break had joined
the assault.
"They told us, 'We want to
fight until the death,"'
Ahmedullah said. "We've occu-
pied most of the area and it's a
good place for fighting. Now we
are waiting for the NATO and
Afghan forces."
The hardline Taliban regime
ousted from power in a 2001
U.S.-led invasion of
Afghanistan regarded Kanda-
har as its main stronghold, and
its insurgent supporters are
most active in the volatile south
of the country.


-C


Cr




REINFORCEMENT Afghan soldiers wait at Kabul airport for taking flight to be transferred to Arghandab
district where is partly controlled by the Taliban militants in Kandarhar province, south of Kabul,
Afghanistan, Tuesday, June 17, 2008. The Afghan army, which flew four planeloads of soldiers to Kan-
dahar on Tuesday from the capital, Kabul, said 300 to 400 militants had gathered in Arghandab, many
of them foreign fighters. The U.S.-led coalition, however, said it conducted a patrol through the region
"and found no evidence that militants control the area." (AP Photo/Musadeq Sadeq)


Bureau of Land Management announces 'major' dinosaur find in Utah


* SALT LAKE CITY
A NEWLY discovered batch
of well-preserved dinosaur
bones, petrified trees and even
freshwater clams in southeast-
ern Utah could provide new
clues about life in the region
some 150 million years ago,
according to the Associated
Press.
The Bureau of Land Man-
agement-announced- the find-


Monday, calling the quarry near
Hanksville "a major dinosaur
fossil discovery."
An excavation revealed at
least four sauropods, which are
long-necked, long-tailed plant-
eating dinosaurs, and two car-
nivorous ones, according to the
bureau. It may have also uncov-
ered an herbivorous
stegosaurus.
Animal burrows and petri-
fied tree trunks 6 feet in diam-


eter were found nearby. The
site doesn't contain any new
species but offers scientists the
chance to learn more about the
ecology of that time, said Scott
Foss, a BLM paleontologist.
The fossilized dinosaurs are
from the same late Jurassic peri-
od as those at Dinosaur Nation;
al Monument, which straddles
the Utah-Colorado state line,
and the Cleveland-Lloyd quar-
ry-near Price. It could be a


decade or so before the full
importance of the Hanksville
quarry is known, Foss said. "It
does have the potential to
match the other major quarries
in Utah," he said.
The site, roughly 50 yards
wide by,200 yards long, was
excavated by a team from, the
Burpee Museum of Natural
History in Rockford, Ill. Muse-
um officials visited the site for
about a week last summer and


returned this year for a three-
week excavation.
The area has long been
known to locals and BLM offi-
cials as a dinosaur haven. But
no one knew of the site's mag-
nitude until excavation began.
The bones -ere found in a
sandstone channel of an ancient
river.
"The preservation of these
dinosaurs is excellent," Foss
said. The nmi. of dinosaurs, trees


and other species in the area
may help scientists piece togeth-
er what life was like 145 mil-
lion years to 150 million years
ago, including details about the
ancient climate, Foss said.
BLM plans to close the site to
conduct an environmental
assessment for continued work
in the area. The agency isn't
disclosing the exact location of
the find because of security con-
. cerns, ....... ... .... .


+


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


S A


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-THE TRIBUNE
Kilt.Wlfflhh


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 19


INERATIOALNW


n brief


nappers



iladline for

jalks to free

SPhilippine

journalists

T"IIMANILA, Philippines

A;AL-QAIDA-LINKED mili-
*' tants extended a Tuesday dead-
*ne for a ransom payment to
free a popular TV news anchor
and her cameraman kidnapped
in te southern Philippines, a
C$otiator said, according to
St Associated Press.
NThe kidnappers, whom
plice have identified as Abu
af militants, earlier set the
deadlinee at noon Tuesday for
tie payment of a $337,000 ran-
som for ABS-CBN anchor Ces
SDrilon, her cameraman and a
university professor. They had
threatened to behead the
Shortages two hours later if the
ransom was not paid, one of
Sthelhegotiators, Jun Isnaji, told
Reporters on southern Jolo
Island.
Jsnaji said the abductors did
set a new deadline, but
SagIeed to continue talks. Isna-
iji hs been negotiating with the
'" nappers with his father,
A rez Isnaji, who is mayor
of Sulu province's Indanan
township.
Isnaji said he couldn't say for
sure that the deadline had been
extended indefinitely.
'" He said he told the kidnap-
Hers that instead of a ransom
tey could be given funding for
V^ielihood projects," without
aifying the nature of the
tjects. He did not say what
t eir reaction was.
Stional police Chief Aveli-
azon, who met with police
military officials in south-
n Zamboanga city, said
thorities hoped the hostages
d be freed through nego-
aions, but were ready to
ch a rescue operation if
necessary.
SHe said ground troops and
r and'navalassets are "on
standby, ready for immediate
deployment." ,
SPolice identified two of the
kidnappers Monday and
announced a $11,200 reward
for each. On Tuesday, they
released artist sketches of the
suspects Sulayman Patta and
a man named Walid.
The deadline was extended
tNs the journalists' families made
.%eral tearful appeals on radio
I" the hostages to be freed.
S BS-CBN. the country's
Iaaesi television network, said
.4, M onday it w as doing every-
thing it could to help the
hostages and their families
through the ordeal, but insisted
it would not pay ransom
because it would encourage
biilore abductions.
Si-DIrilon, her two cameramen
ct Mindanao State Universi-
of. Octavio Dinampo were
.jcted June 8 on Jolo.
The U.S. lists the Abu Sayyaf
i' terrorist group responsi-
rble for bombings, beheadings
and abductions.
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A VERMONT STATE FORESTS, Parks, and Recreation sign at the trailhead to Southwest Cove area on Lake Willoughby, warns of the possibility of encountering nude
bathers, Friday, June 7, 2008, in Westmore, Vt. Southwest Cove is one of the most famous nude beaches in the country but some Westmore residents want to be able to
use the beach without having to worry they or their kids will have to confront a naked person. (AP Photo/Alden Pellett)


NTd-i +hb r-i r


"For me, it's


IN UUL Ut lll IIIabout common
public decency -
getting families
and kids and

ontrover y people and West-
more back down
d l --'11


* WESTMORE, Vt.
FROM THE beach of Lake
Willoughby's Southwest Cove, the
sheer cliffs of Mount Pisgah tower
over the deep, frigid water. Across
the narrows, Mount Hor's peak com-
pletes the look of a Scandinavian
fjord, according to Associated Press.
In the summertime, the beach
offers a different view: naked sun-
bathers. Southwest Cove is one of
the most famous nude beaches in
the country, but.there's a move
under way to make people put their
suits back on.
For decades, people have come
,to visit the beach, which is listed-in
nudist guides and on Web sites. All
are welmine, naked br ndt,,while
cameras without permission and sex-
ual behavior are forbidden.
The beach is on public land that
isn't visible from the highway. The
state which has no laws banning
public nudity advises visitors with
a sign at a trail head leading to the
beach that warns "be advised, you
may encounter nude bathers."
But some Westmore residents
want to be able to use the beach
without having to worry they or their
kids will confront a naked person.
They're pushing the town to pass an
anti-nudity ordinance.
"For me, it's about common pub-.
lic decency getting families and
kids and people and Westmore back
down to what they all talk about as
being the most beautiful place, and
they don't go there any more," said
Tony Strange, who lives about a half-
mile from Southwest Cove and
helped circulate a petition asking the
Select Board to enact the ordinance.
Regulars say the nude beach is an
accepted part of the area that does-
n't cause any trouble.
On a recent hot Saiurda\ alter-


noon, about 15 people were at the
beach. Other than the absence of
swimsuits, there was nothing to dis-
tinguish it from a traditional beach:
People brought beach chairs and
coolers, some paddled canoes, others
just sunbathed.
"We try to make it clean, safe and
enjoyable for everyone, that includes
families with children, that includes
anyone from anywhere, and yet
we're being accused of dominating
the area," said David Timson of St.
Johnsbury, who has been going to
Southwest Cove for 20 years. He is
head of a newly formed organiza-
tion called Friends-of Southt-est
Coi .E..-." T -',
Wc~"ismore.7bouit20 riles south'.
of the U'.S -Cjnrda T'-iorIm north-
easternl \ermont, has a year-round
population of 319, which jumps to
about 1,000 in the summer.
Town Clerk Greg Gallagher said
.the three-member town Select'
Board has been asked to deal with
the issue of nudity before but chose
not to. "They didn't see how they
could enforce it," he said.
Enforcement remains a question,
though the board is due to consider
the issue again at its June 23 meeting.
Vermont has long been known
for clothing-optional swimming
holes, some clandestine, others semi-
public. Southwest Cove, which is
part of Willoughby State Forest, has
had a reputation for being nude
friendly for about a quarter-century.
Several years ago, the state
Department of Forest, Parks and
Recreation looked at the issue and
decided to leave the situation as it
was.
The only problem at the beach
stems from visitors clearing it too
much, said Forest and Parks Com-
missioner Jonathan Wood. By
rcmmiong Jiitfmood and %ege[laon,


the users are interfering with natur-
al processes#
"The front of the beach is getting
undermined. We're losing beach,"
Woods said. "I don't care who's
using it or what they're wearing,
when you utilize public land you
need to utilize it in a responsible
manner."


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Midwest prepared for the Mis-
sissippi River's wrath, the rest
of Iowa began the slow move
from protection to cleanup,
according to the Associated
Press.
The federal government pre-
'dicts that 27 levees could
potentially overflow along the
river if the weather forecast is
on the mark and a massive
sandbagging effort fails to raise
the level of the levees, accord-
ing to a map obtained Monday
by The Associated Press.
Officials are placing millions
of sandbags on top of the lev-
ees in Illinois, Iowa and Mis-
souri to prevent overflowing.
There is no way to predict
whether these levees will
break, said Ron Fournier, a
spokesman with the Army
Corps of Engineers in Iowa.
In much of Iowa, there were
small signs of a return to nor-
malcy: Interstate 80 reopened
near Iowa City for the first time
in days, with Interstate 380 to
the north scheduled to reopen
early Tuesday. On the Univer-
sity of Iowa campus, officials
began to take stock of the dam-
age.
And in Des Moines, where a
levee failure Saturday sent
water pouring into the Bird-
land neighborhood, some resi-
dents returned for the first time
to see the damage.
"It's really bad. I mean, I


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can't believe this," said Gloria
Ruiz, whose home suffered
flood damage.
Ruiz pointed to a dirty line
about 5 feet up on her base-
ment wall showing how high
the water rose. Her washer,
dryer and boiler, and most of
her children's toys, including a
stereo and an Xbox video game
system, were ruined.
Floodwaters lingered about
50 feet from her driveway.
"We don't know how long it
will stay like that;" she said.
Where floodwaters
remained, they were a noxious
brew of sewage, farm chemi-
cals and fuel. Bob Lanz used a
22-foot aluminum flatboat to
navigate through downtown
Oakville, where the water
reeked of pig feces and diesel


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strength of God
to fight this flood,
and I ask for the
grace to accept
whatever happens."

Brian Weigand


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"You can hardly stand it,"
Lanz said as he surveyed what
remained of his family's hog
farm. "It's strong."
LeRoy Lippert, chairman of
emergency management and
homeland security in nearby
Des Moines County, warned
people to avoid the floodwa-
ters: "If you drink this water
and live, tell me about it. You
have no idea. It is very, very
wise to stay out of it. It's as
dangerous as anything."
Gov. Chet Culver and oth-
ers pointed to the next looming
trouble spot, in southeastern
Iowa. Most requests for state
aid were coming from Des
Moines County, where the Mis-
sissippi River was expected to
crest Tuesday evening at 26
feet in a mostly rural area near
Burlington. Early Tuesday, the
river was at 25.7 feet more
than 10 feet above flood stage
- and still rising.
Crews were working to shore
up a levee about 7 miles north
of Burlington, where water
covered about 2 blocks of the
downtown area. Several busi-
nesses spent the night pump-
ing water from basements, said
Sgt. Chad Zahn of the Burling-
ton Police Department.
Several thousand acres and
about 250 homes would be
flooded if the levee breaks, said
Gina Hardin, the county's
emergency management coor-
dinator.
Brian Wiegand, 48, of
Oakville, was sandbagging the
levee Monday evening near a
drainage pumping station. He
was concerned about more
flooding as water began lap-
ping to within a foot of top of
sandbag wall.
"The Bible says the prayer
of one man, God hears," Wie-
gand said. "Here's my prayer: I
ask for the strength of God to
fight this flood, and I ask for
the grace to accept whatever
happens."
On the Illinois side of the
river across from Burlington,
a levee broke Tuesday morning
south of Gulfport, Ill., forcing
the closure of a bridge that con-
nects the two cities.
Two more deaths were
reported Monday, bringing the
state's death toll to five.
Also Monday, the American
Red Cross said its disaster


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THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 22; THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


INERATIOALNWI


i. .



.r..... .. ..




JON VAN SCIVER, center, slips a wedding ring onto the finger of his partner Craig Morgan, right, while officiant Aron Miller, left, reads them their vows after obtaining a marriage
license at the San Diego County Administration Building Tuesday June 17, 2008 in San Diego. Hundreds of gay and lesbian couples had appointments to secure marriage licenses and
exchange vows Tuesday, the first full day same-sex nuptials will be legal throughout California.




Gay couples rush to get





married in California


M SAN FRANCISCO

HUNDREDS of gay and les-
bian couples had appointments
to secure marriage licenses and
exchange vows Tuesday, the first
full day same-sex nuptials will be
legal throughout California,
according to Associated Press.
From San Diego to San Fran-
cisco, couples,readied their for-
mal wear, local licensing clerks
expanded thdir staffs and con-
servative groups warned of a
backlash as the nation's most
populous state prepared to join


Massachusetts in sanctioning gay
unions.
Unlike Massachusetts, which
legalized same-sex marriage in
2004, California has no residency
requirement for marriage licens-
es, which is expected to encour-
age a large number of couples
to head west to wed.
"We might wait a long time in
Tennessee, so this is our chance,"
said Robert Blaudow, of Mem-
phis. He and his partner, Derek
Norman, 23, decided to get mar-
ried at the Alameda County
clerk's office late Monday while


they were in the San Francisco
Bay Area for a conference.
The May 15 California
Supreme Court ruling that over-
turned the state's bans on same-
sex marriage became final at 5:01
p.m. Monday, and clerks in at
least five counties extended their
hours to mark the historic occa-
sion.
Already, dozens of same-sex,
couples have seized the oppor-
tunity to make their relationships
official in the eyes of the law'-. .-
"We're glad that we're living
in this time when history is being


made," said Sandy Mills, an.Oak-
land physician who was getting
married to her partner of nine
years, Mar Stevens, an employee
of the county district attorney's
office.
"I'm tired of checking the sin-
gle box," said Danielle Lemay,
34, who picked up a marriage
license in Woodland with her
partner, Angie Hinrichs. "I
feared I'd be checking that my
whole life."
- -The big rush to the altar was
expected Tuesday, when every
county was required to start issu-


6 The Tribune

Swill be publishing its annual


supplement in August/September. In preparation for the supplement, which will
feature all graduating seniors who will be attending university/college, whether
locally or abroad, we invite all parents, guardians and graduating seniors to submit
a profile on the graduate, along with a photograph and contact information.



* Name of student
* High School you are graduating from
" Age
* Name of parents
* A list of exams already taken and the results eg Bahamas Junior Certificate (BJC)
exams and Pitman exams
* A list of exams expected to be taken Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary
Education (BGCSE) exams
* The college/university they expect to attend eg College of the Bahamas, Harvard
University, University of Miami
* Name of degree expected to be sought eg Bachelors degree in English, Bachelors
degree in biology
* What career they expect to enter once their education is completed a doctor, Math
teacher, engineer
* All extracurricular activities club memberships, team sports/track and field, church
activities
* A list of honours/awards/recognition student has received

Please include your telephone/contact information and also note that photos will not be
returned. Forward all information to Lisa Lawlor, Tribune Junior Reporter at e-mail -
lisalawlor@gmail.com or features@tribunemedia.net -please note 'Back To School' in
the subject line. The information may also be hand delivered or mailed to:


Back To School
The Tribune
Shirley and Deveaux Streets
PO Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas.


ing new gender-neutral marriage
licenses with spaces for "Party
A" and "Party B" where "bride"
and "groom" used to be.
On Monday, San Francisco
Mayor Gavin Newsom, who
helped launch the series of law-
suits that led the court to strike
down California's one-man-one-
woman marriage laws, presided
at the wedding of Del Martin,
87, and Phyllis Lyon, 83.
Newsom picked the couple for
the only ceremony Monday in
City Hall to recognize their 55-
year relationship and their sta-


"It really disturbs
me that the will of
the people was
overridden by four
members of the
Supreme Court."


Doug LaMalfa

tus as pioneers of the gay rights
movement. More than 650 same-
sex couples have made appoint-
ments to get marriage licenses in
San Francisco before the end of
the month.
Newsom called officiating the
wedding "this extraordinary and
humbling gift." After the mayor
pronounced Martin and Lyon
"spouses for life," the couple
kissed, then emerged to a crowd
of well-wishers who showered
them with rose petals.
The celebrations are tempered
by the reality that in a few
months, Californians will go to
the ballot box to vote on an ini-
tiative that would overturn the
high court ruling and again ban
gay marriage.
On Monday, three lawmakers
and a small group of other same-
sex opponents gathered outside
the Capitol to criticize the
Supreme Court decision. They
urged voters t9 approve the bal-
lot measure.
"This is an opportunity to take
back a little bit of dignity ... for
kids, for all of us in California,"
Republican Assemblyman Doug
LaMalfa said.
"It really disturbs me that the
will of the people was overrid-
den by four members of the
Supreme Court."
In both San Francisco and
Beverly Hills, where two women
became the first same-sex cou-
ple in Los Angeles County to
marry legally, small groups. of
protesters waved signs with say-
ings like "Repent or Perish," but
they were outnumbered by sup-
porters waving rainbow-striped
flags.
Groups that oppose same-sex
marriage have pursued several
legal avenues to stop the wed-
dings. On Monday, just hours
before the ruling went into effect,
a conservative legal group asked
a Sacramentb court to order the
California agency that oversees
marriages to stop issuing gender-
neutral marriage licenses.


o In brief


Spanish city

hosts forum

on world's

water woes
* ZARAGOZA, Spain

SPANIARDS associate it
with a basilica and a folk
dance performed with cas-
tanets. Glitzy, it is not. But
now the city of Zaragoza is
trying to etch a place on the
map by staging an interna-
tional exposition on the
world's water woes, according
to the Associated Press.
This decidedly un-A-list
destination halfway between
Madrid and Barcelona is
eager to follow in the foot-
steps of other, larger Spanish
cities that cashed in big when
they had the chance to grab
the world's attention.
Barcelona won praise for its
well-run hosting of the Sum-
mer Olympics in 1992, Seville
held a Universal Exposition
that same year, and Bilbao's
opening of its gleaming, silver
Guggenheim Museum in 1997
is credited with helping trans-
form the Basque city's image
as a dying, industrial relic.
Now it is up to Zaragoza,
which over the past three
years has dished out $4.5 bil-
lion to build the exposition
site on the banks of the Ebro
River and spruce up this city
of 600,000 for the three-month
expo that started June 13. Pri-
vate sponsors have chipped in
another $3.12 billion.
It is all a huge windfall for a
sparsely populated region that
lacks the political might of
other regions and would oth-
erwise only dream of this kind
of funding.
"In three years we have
accomplished what would nor-
mally have taken 20," Mayor
Juan Alberto Belloch said in
an interview.
Expo Zaragoza 2008 orga-
nizing committee chairman
Roque Gistau chain-smokes
as he tells of frenzied prepa-
rations and wishes days had
more than 24 hours. He said
the Spanish government
alone, through embassies and
its tourism agency Turespana,
has spent nearly $55 million
to advertise.the exposition.
But he said it is all worth-
while, both for the new infra-
structure the city will inherit
and the boost the event gives
to Spain's image around the
world. Organizers expect 6
million visitors.
"My sincere opinion is that
it is a profitable venture," Gis-
tau said.
People in the city are over-
whelmingly in favor of the
exposition who would
oppose new roads and other
upgrades but small protest
groups have complained
about the cost. One of them,
known as ZH20NO, says the
project has mainly benefited
construction companies and
real estate speculators and
gutted government coffers.
A total of 106 countries are
taking part in this forum ded-
icated to water as a precious
resource and how best to
manage it. One of the mar-
quee additions to the city is a
bridge designed by Iraqi-born
architect Zaha Hadid, winner
in 2004 of a Pritzker prize, the
field's top honor.
Water is an appropriate
theme for perenially drought-
stricken Spain, where parts of
the bone-dry southeast are
undergoing decertification and
regions regularly bicker over
who gets access to the riches
of what river.
This spring had been so dry
that neighboring Catalonia
devised an emergency plan to
siphon off water from the
Ebro and even started bring-
ing in drinking water aboard
tanker ships.
But it rained abundantly in
May in much of Spain so
much so that, in a wry trick of
nature, the Ebro's level is so
dramatically high Expo 2008
organizers have suspended
shows that were to be per-
formed on a platform in the
middle of the river.


The exposition is the first
of a new, scaled-down format
devised by the Paris-based
International Exhibitions
Bureau, which regulates the
frequency and quality of such
events.
Traditionally they are
known as Universal Exposi-
tions, but Zaragoza's is the
first of a new line that must
focus on a single-theme in
this case water last three
months instead of the usual
six and are limited as to how
much surface area they can


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Japan hangs three convicted murderers


. TOKYO

A SE RIAL KILLER who
mutilated the bodies of four
young girls and reportedly drank
tlie blood of one of his victims
was among three convicted mur-
derers executed in Japan on
Tuesday for crime's an official
called indescribably cruel, accord-
ing to the Associated Press.
T'sulomu Miyazaki, 45, whose
rish of grisly killings in the late
1980s triggered calls for tighter
restrictions on violent porno-
graphic videos, was hanged at a
detention center in Tokyo, Justice
Minister Kunio Hatoyama said.
Miyazaki burned the body of
one 4-year-old and left her bones
on her parents' doorstep. He also
wrote letters to the media and
victims' families taunting police.
Japanese newspaper reports said
he ate part of the hand of one of
his victims and drank her blood.
The two others executed Tues-
day were Shinji Mutsuda, 45, who


Govt accused of quickening

the pace of executions


had been on death row for the
murder and robbery of two peo-
ple, and Yoshio Yamasaki, 73,
who was convicted of killing two
people for the insurance money,
the Justice Ministry said in a
statement.
"I ordered their executions
because the cases were of inde-
scribable cruelty," Hatoyama
said. "We are pursuing execu-
tions in order to achieve justice
and firmly protect the rule of
law."
Japan, one of the few industri-
alized countries that has capital
punishment, has picked up the
pace of executions over the past
year amid rising concerns about
violent crime.
The three executions brought
to 13 the number of death row


inmates hanged in the past six
months under Hatoyama, an out-
spoken supporter of the death
penalty. Only one inmate was
executed in 2005.
Amnesty International Japan
protested Tuesday's hangings and
said the pace of executions in
Japan is quickening. In a state-
ment, the group also demanded
Japan abolish capital punishment.
Prime Minister Yasuo Fuku-
da said there is no need for a
change.
"There is no other policy than
to maintain the current policy,"
Fukuda said Tuesday. "There are
people who want to abolish it,
but that is a minority view. The
majority want it to be maintained.
I feel there is no need to change
it, but we must also keep an eye


on world opinion."
Hatoyama, who took office last
August, denied his ministry was
purposely picking up the pace of
hangings. Three men were exe-
cuted in December, three more
in February and another four in
April.
In 1997, Tokyo District Court
found Miyazaki guilty of killing
four girls aged 4 to 7 years old in
1988 and 1989, and sentenced
him to death.
The Tokyo High Court upheld
the sentence in 2001, and the
Supreme Court followed suit on
Jan. 17 this year, exhausting
Miyazaki's appeals.
Miyazaki was also convicted
of the abduction and sexual
assault of a fifth girl.
The murders and Miyazaki's
arrest dominated Japanese head-
lines, along with the discovery
that his home was filled with a
collection of thousands of violent
pornographic videos, animated
films and comic books stacked
floor-to-ceiling.


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IN THIS August, 1989 file photo, Tsutomu Miyazaki attends an on-the-
spot investigation by police of his serial killing of girls in Tokyo. Japan
has executed the man convicted of iIIn'i and 'iiliI.inl young Pirls in
a series of crimes in the late 1980s.


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PAGE 24, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


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T H TRIBU N E




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THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


ON B uines- ibueediti-e,,


'Out of the box' tax reform plan

* Former GB Chamber head says Freeport businesses achieving US industry standards through 'sales tax' system permitted by over-the-counter bonded sales
* System ensured building materials supplies in Freeport 30% higher for 2004 hurricane season, due to better inventory turns, cash flow, product availability
* Suggests system could be model and 'test bed' for wider Bahamas as government looks to protect revenues under World Trade Organisation
* Proposal for accounting firms to audit Grand Bahama Port Authority licensees to ensure correct amount of duty being remitted


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
F" reeport-based retail busi-
nesses have achieved US
industry benchmark stan-
dards through the 'sales tax'
mechanism provided by over-the-
counter bonded goods sales, a former
Chamber president has revealed, a sys-
tem that increased building material
supplies availability by 30 per cent in


the aftermath of the 2004 hurricanes.
In a follow-up paper produced as an
addendum to a previous report on
over-the-counter bonded goods sales,
Chris Lowe, a former Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce president, said
this mechanism provides a potential
'model' alternative tax system that
could be adopted by the whole
Bahamas in light of the Government's
move towards full World Trade Organ-
isation (WTO) membership.


Mr Lowe said some 20-plus
Freeport-based retailers and whole-
salers, in compliance with the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement and Supreme
Court rulings that had backed the sys-
tem, were selling bonded goods duty-
free to Grand Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) licensees for use in their busi-
nesses.
The same companies were also sell-
ing these bonded goods to individuals
and households, but collecting the cus-


toms duty normally levied by the Gov-
ernment 'post paid' that is, at the
point-of-sale or store check-out.
The 'post paid' duty collected by
Freeport retailers and wholesalers is
then remitted to the Customs Depart-
ment on the 15th of each month.
As a result, Mr Lowe said that these
Freeport companies were effectively
operating a sales tax through their col-
lection and remittance of 'post paid
duty' to the Government, albeit one


that was based on the Tariff Act and
freight charges (CIF or cost of import-
ed freight).
The former Grand Bahama Cham-
ber president said: "The benefits to
businesses practicing this 'sales tax'
are: No funds tied up in prepaid duty.
No pre-burden. This allows for better
cash flow and greater product avail-

See TAX, page 2B


Business seeks mediation Bahamian firms miss out on spa industry supply


to speed up judicial system


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
T H E
Bahamian
judicial system
needs to use
mediation
much more to
settle cases
involving busi-
ness and civil
matters, the
Bahamas
Chamber of
Commerce's president said yes-
terday, pointing out that in the
US some 70-80 per cent of all


Chamber chief: 95 per cent
of Bahamas cases make court
or dropped, compared to 20-
30 per cent in United States

legal matters never made it to
court.
Speaking after Chamber rep-
resentatives met with US judi-
cial officials to discuss ways the
justice systems in their respec-
tive countries could be
improved, Mr D'Aguilar said


SEE page 4B


+Q Government: Settle, don't

complain, on tax demands


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
BAHAMIAN companies
have yet to exploit the poten-
tial for them to supply the
growing luxury spa industry in
this nation by providing local-
ly-grown products to enhance
the experience for resort
guests.
Linda Hall, the spa consul-
tant for the newly-opened
Marley Resort Spa, and'
founder of the Caribbean
Essentials line of spa products,
told Tribune Business that
many items used by Bahamian
spa operators are in abundant
availability locally. All that
was required was for someone
to take the initiative, and
ensure these products were
developed and produced in the


quantities needed.
For example, Ms Hall said
that at the Marley Resort, the
aim was to provide a spa expe-
rience that was a blend of the
Bahamas, the Caribbean and
Africa.
"So to do that, we offer a
bath that we float petals in, like
Roses or Hibiscus. Now, as you
know, Hibiscus grows in abun-
dance here, but I cannot find
anyone in the country who I
can purchase, say, 10 pounds of
dried hibiscus petals ready to
go from," Ms Hall said.
"Or we use a lot of orange
peels, so why not have some-
one who uses oranges and
throws away the peel prepare
it for us to use."
Ms Hall added that in her
product line, which she sup-
plies to boutique spas in the
Caribbean, she always seeks to
use the natural products of the


islands, whether it be spices in
Grenada, lemon or fever grass
in Jamaica or, in the case of
the Bahamas, salt or sponges.
"I am always looking for
locally-produced items. It
makes it easier to fill orders,
and you don't have to deal
with shipping costs. So you
save money and it is also good
for the local economy and the
spa client," Ms Hall said.
She added that the challenge
was to ensure that the quality
and quanity of product needed
can always be available.
Ms Hall designed and devel-
oped the spa menu and design
for the Marley Resort and Spa,
and provides her Caribbean
Essentials line of products for
use at the facility. The prod-
uct line is produced and man-
ufactured in the Caribbean,
using an array of local prod-
ucts.


* By NEIL HARTNELL L
Tribune Business Editor
BUSINESSES hit with
demands for allegedly overdue
taxes and licence fees should
meet the relevant government
agencies to settle the matter, a
minister said yesterday, rather
than complain about public ser-
vants merely doing their job in
collecting due revenue.
Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, told The Tri-
bune that while a number of
factors had resulted "in a more
intense effort to produce
greater compliance" from busi-
nesses and residents in paying
due taxes, it was not fair to crit-


icise civil servants for doing
their jobs in collecting what was
due to the Government.
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham yesterday responded to
Tribune Business's exclusive
story on Tuesday this week, in
which two businessmen includ-
ing Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce president Dionisio
D'Aguilar complained that
they were suddenly hit with
demands that they pay business
licence fees allegedly overdue
from as far back as two to three
decades ago when they went in
to pay their current renewals.
Mr Ingraham told the House
SEE page 5B


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P BT D J 1 0H B


Commerce creates


'electric'


legal issues


AS e-commerce is becoming more of
a modern-day reality for small and
large businesses, it is important that
the legal issues surrounding the tech-
nological framework businesses oper-
ate within, locally and internationally,
become a primary consideration.
The Electronic Communications and
Transactions Act 2003, enacted in
June 2003, is designed to facilitate
online commercial activity in the
Bahamas and recognize, in law, elec-
tronic writing, electronic contracts and
electronic signatures. This is especially
in instances where there is a statutory
or legal requirement for a document to
be in writing, executed with a signa-
ture, or be an original or copy.
These requirements may be now be
satisfied, under the relevant provisions
of the Act, once the writing, contract or
signature is generated electronically,
and the information contained within
the electronic communication is acces-
sible and capable of retention by the
intended recipient.
Additionally, the Act allows the par-


ties to a contract to establish, negotiate
and conclude the contract and other
legally binding commercial arrange-
ments through the use of electronic
devices.
Under the Act, 'electronic commu-
nication' is defined as information that
is communicated, processed, record-
ed, displayed, created, stored, gener-
ated, received or transmitted by elec-
tronic means.
An 'electronic signature' is defined
as any letters, characters, numbers,
sounds, process or symbols in elec-
tronic form attached to, or logically
associated with, information that is
used by a signatory to indicate his
intention to be bound by the content of
that information.
'Electronic authentication' is defined,
under the Act, as any procedure
employed for the purpose of verifying
that an electronic communication is
that of the originator, and that it has
not been altered during transmission.
The Act has very specific consumer
protection provisions, particularly


Legal

Ease


where goods are being purchased for
household or personal use. It requires
vendors to provide consumers with a
record of the transaction in writing, to
ensure the consumer has expressly
consented to the transaction being con-
ducted electronically, and has not with-
drawn his consent.
The Act also requires that prior to
consenting, the consumer has been pro-
vided with a clear and conspicuous
statement about the right to have the
record provided in paper form, his right
to withdraw from having the record of
the transaction provided electronically,
and the conditions, consequences and
fees for such withdrawal by the con-


summer. The consumer must also be
informed of the procedures for the
withdrawal of consent, and for obtain-
ing a paper copy of the electronic
record and any fee to be charged in
connection with such withdrawal.
The Act provides specific legal rules
relating to electronic communication,
particularly where the law requires, by
common law or statute, that a com-
munication be in writing, under signa-
ture or in an original form. The Act
also ensures that the validity, admissi-
bility and enforceability of electronic
communications are recognized and
adhered to by the courts. The reliance
on the admissibility of electronic com-
munication in evidence is based on the
following conditions:
The reliability of the manner in
which the electronic communication
was generated, stored and transmit-
ted.
The reliability of the manner in
which the integrity of the information
is maintained.
The manner in which the originator


was identified, and any other relevant
factor.
One should note that the Act also
allows a contract to be formed, docu-
ments notarised, and information deliv-
ered or documents served, electroni-
cally, under certain specific conditions.
@2006. Tyrone L.E. Fitzgerald. All
rights reserved.
NB: The information contained in
this article does not constitute nor is it
a substitute for legal advice. Persons
reading this article and/or column, gen-
erally, are encouraged to seek the rel-
evant legal advice and assistance
regarding issues that may affect them
and may relate to the information pre-
sented.
Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is an attor-
ney with Fitzgerald & Fitzgerald.
Should you have any comments on
this article, you may contact Mr
Fitzgerald at Suite 212, Lagoon Court
Building, Olde Towne Mall at Sandy-
port, West Bay St., P. O. Box CB-
11173, Nassau, Bahamas or at
tyronet&tlefitzgeraldgroup. com.


TAX, from 1B

ability on-island for both bond-
ed and duty-paid customers.
"It allows for better gross
return on inventory figures,
which is simply better business
efficiencies. Most businesses
practicing this have achieved
better than national average
inventory turns, thereby elimi-
nating typically large spoilage
and inventory losses."
And Mr Lowe added: "The
result has been higher than
average revenues for the trea-


sury, based on the broader
product availability, with faster
market response times. Supply
and demand at almost interna-
tional standards. There is at
least one company in Freeport
running on par with US-like
industry standard benchmark
ratios in retail."
The benefits to Freeport busi-
nesses and consumers from all
this were shown when Hurri-
cane Frances struck the island in
September 2004, Mr Lowe said.
Prior to the storm, "almost all
building materials needed were


on island, and at reduced
expense immediately available
to consumers and business
alike".
This situation was repeated
post-Hurricane Frances, "where
replenishment, again at reduced
landed costs, had already
occurred before Hurricane
Jeanne hit six weeks later.
":If all the products had been
required to be duty paid, the
amount available would have
been 30 per cent less, as cash
flow availability affects inven-
tory futures directly. No suppli-


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er gave credit once hurricane
warnings were posted, particu-
larly in Florida," Mr Lowe said.
"It also had benefit to non-
governmental organizations and
Government, with respect to
instant fulfillment of exigency
orders for hurricane relief from
on-island bonded inventories."
As the over-the-counter
bonded system had evolved in
Freeport, Mr Lowe said most
retailers and wholesalers had
developed computer-based sys-
tems to differentiate between
bonded, post-paid, and duty
pre-paid goods they sold.
He suggested that these com-
panies should be reimbursed by
Customs for collecting and
remitting to it the revenues due
on post-paid goods sales, point-
ing out that in nations such as
the UK, Canada, and the US,
the tax authorities paid busi-
nesses a fee equivalent to 2 per
cent of the amount collected to
cover their costs.
"Therefore, while Bahamas
Customs receives its revenue
constantly and in correct per-
centage of imported value, in
either pre-pay or post-pay, the
effect on the business is direct in
that operating cash flow is not
as stressed. No prepay of duty;
instead, collect and remit," Mr
Lowe said of the existing sys-
tem.
"A.ny. se. i.. sensible
wholesaler/retailer will trans-
late:this directly:into increased
inventory, therefore boosting
local expenditures by business
and individuals alike. The
increased inventory translates
into increased local sales, which
in turn creates expansion of
business in physical plant and


staffing requirements."
The Governifliiet's-desire-to
protect its revenues from WTO
accession, the Excise Tax being
the first step in this process, cou-
pled with its aim of reducing
the increasing financial burden
many Bahamian families are
grappling with as a result of
food and energy price rises,
would all be aided by a tax sys-
tem such as the one being prac-
ticed in Freeport, Mr Lowe
added.
With income tax ruled out,
he described a consumption-
based tax such as a sales of
Value-Added Tax (VAT) as
being the best alternative struc-
ture.
"Freeport, therefore, as it is,
in limited form, is able to be
used as a testing ground by the
Ministry of Finance as a proving
ground, business by business,
for the study of the collection
and implementation of a sales
tax without changing any exist-
ing legislation," Mr Lowe
added.
The main obstacle towards
doing so, he acknowledged,
would be the Customs Depart-
ment's fears that it would lose
substantial revenues from such
an initiative.
While admitting that his pro-
posal would be "so out of the
box" for the Customs Depart-
ment to handle, Mr Lowe-said-
the current over-the-counter
bonded goods system was still
generating the same amount of
revenue post-sale as that which
would have been collected at
the border.
While there was the possibil-
ity fraud might occur, the for-
mer Grand Bahama Chamber


position

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president said that "a greater
incidence of fraud" and cus-
toms/Stamp Duty evasion
occurs at the Bahamas borders,
pointing to how the Discovery
Cruise Line vessel was being
used by some businesses and
individuals to avoid due taxes.
To ease Customs' fears, Mr
Lowe said PricewaterhouseC-
oopers (PwC) Freeport manag-
ing partner, Kevin Seymour,
had been "approached to devise
a 'sales tax audit' or 'duty paid
sales audit', which would give
the Ministry of Finance an
unprecedented level of confi-
dence in tax remittances from
practicing businesses, without
invoking the business commu-
nity's fear or wrath of Bahamas
Customs".
Such audits would ensure that
Freeport-based businesses
remitted the correct amount of
post-paid duty to the Govern-
ment, especially given that a
Supreme Court order barred
Customs from doing such work.
"If conducted in a standard
format by independent char-
tered accountants approved by
the Ministry of Finance, it
would do doubt be treated as a
normal 'cost of doing business'
by most licensees and would
provide another readily imple-
mentable aspect of a tax migra-
tion move," Mr Lowe-said-of
-"the proposal. ..... .....
"Bahamas Customs' main
Sbeef.has been.the perceived
potential for fraud, and while it
does have its fraudulent aspect,
the traditional Customs
approach of 'power by intimi-
dation' cannot be said to have
worked in reducing fraud any-
where in the country, for that
matter.
"Court rulings have also
shown where Customs 'policy'
has been in conflict with the
written law by practice, which
has had the effect of impeding
business processes, frustrating
economic progress, and placing
impediments in the revenue
stream's way for both Govern-
ment and private sector
investor."
The Customs Management
Act provided for the Customs
Department to investigate and
prosecute fraud, but Mr Lowe
said it had "seemed to be reluc-
tant to exercise this legal
authority".
"The one reason that most of
the business community of the
Bahamas has such issues with
the bond, Bahamas Customs
included, is that duty has always
been treated and considered a
'cost of goods'," Mr Lowe con-
cluded.
"This thought trend has
blocked a decent understand-
ing of separating duty or tax
from the goods themselves,
while they remain a consump-
tion tax. Once the concept,of
'collect and remit' is under-
stood, and that duty or tax is
floated off of the goods, but is
still connected at the consumer
point of sale, it is no longer a
pre-burden to business concerns
and is, other than the collection
and remittance with suitable
record keeping, not a part of
the businesses overheads or
costs."


I I


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


I by Tyone Fizgeral


'I .-


:. .











One-time plane sale gain reduces losses at Bahamasair 20%


* By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
DESPITE its net loss for fiscal 2007
declining by 20.2 per cent to $15.893
million, that was about as good as it
got for Bahamasair, the national flag
carrier eating up a $32.592 million gov-


ernment (taxpayer) subsidy to keep it
in the air during the 12 months to June
30,2007.
While Bahamasair's net loss dropped
from $19.919 million in fiscal 2006, this
was largely due to an almost-$3 mil-
lion decrease in its fuel costs, coupled
with a one-time $2.434 million gain on


disposal of a Dash-8 aircraft that
crashed during the year.
Without that one-time gain, the car-
rier's operating loss was just $1.1 mil-
lion less, at $16.708 million, than the
$17.806 million posted the previous
year. Meanwhile, the Government's
subsidy was used to cover $12.023 mil-


lion in vendor payments; $9.768 mil-
lion in loan repayments; $7.674 million
to settle monies owed to the Airport
Authority; and $3.127 million in salary
payments to union employees.
It will now come as little surprise
that Bahamasair, since its inception in
1973, has bled taxpayers of $351.322


million in subsidies to keep it flying,
racking up an accumulated deficit (total
losses) of $413.883 million. Deloitte
and Touche, Bahamasair's auditor, said
that at June 30, 2007, its current and
total liabilities exceeded its total and
current assets by $57.454 million and
$53.308 million respectively.


Attorney hopeful over Pioneer staff resolution


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
NEGOTIATIONS towards a
possible settlement for the
recently-terminated employees
at-Pioneer Shipping are under-
way at the Labour Board, their
attorney telling Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday he was hopeful
that a settlement can soon be
reached.
Obie Ferguson said he and
representatives from Pioneer
Shipping have had several
meetings before the Labour
Board this week, adding that
both he and his clients are hope-
ful that a resolution can be
reached by week's end. This
would eliminate the need to file
any legal action.


Mr Ferguson
was initially
hired by about
18 of the 50
employees who
lost their jobs
when Pioneer
was taken over
by a partner-
ship between
Miami-based
Laser Interna-
tional Freight Transport and the
Nassau-based Mailboat Com-
pany. Now several more have
approached him for legal rep-
resentation. The employees are
upset at the way their termina-
tion was handled, given the fact
that they were not given any
severance packages and lost
much-needed medical coverage.
Mr Ferguson said the age of
some of the.workers, combined


with the fact that not all pos-
sess qualifications other than
their on-the-job experience,
means they don't have the flex-
ibility to easily find alternative
employment.
The employees said they had
been given letters from Pioneer
Shipping president, Arthur
Thompson, stating that they
were owed two weeks' salary
and two weeks' vacation pay for
each year of service.
However, they claimed that
the letter was not legally bind-
ing and makes no commitment
as to when the money will be
paid. Instead, they said that they
were told that payments would
begin when the company's
dockyard and other properties
on Bay Street are sold. The
four-acre site has been given a
$22 million appraisal value.


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BAHAMAS AGAINST


CRIME

ARE YOU:-
An unemployed young male?
Want to work in the Security Industry?
Drug Free and don't abuse alcohol?
Have a clean Police record?

THEN REGISTER NOW FOR THE:


BAHAMAS AGAINST CRIME


FREE 2 WEEKS

SECURITY OFFICERS TRAINING

COURSE



Monday Friday 6:00 p.m. 8:30 p.m.
C.H. Reeves Jr. High School
Robinson Road

Course conducted by Mr. Paul Thompson,
Former Assistant Commissioner, RBPF

'Complete attached application form and return to:

BAHAMAS AGAINST CRIME
UPSTAIRS
MT. OLIVE BAPTIST CHURCH


P.O. Box N-


Meadow and Augusta Streets
9861 Phone: 328-8984 Fa


ix: 325-7909


BAHAMAS AGAINST CRIME
SECURITY OFFICERS TRAINING PROGRAM


C.H. Reeves Jr. High School


REGISTRATION FORM


NAME


D.O.B / /
MD Y


ADDRESS BOX TEL


CELL FAX E-MAIL


MARITAL STATUS:
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___ Y lrl


,I ,


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 3B


BEahamas Against Crime








P 4TT TRIB


All candidates for the LLB degree with the University of Huddersfield/Holborn Col-
lege are Invited to register for review sessions scheduled for June 30 July 2.
All sessions will be conducted by a senior professor from the university. Candidates
who are preparing for upcoming exams are especially urged to attend.
Call Success for registration information, 324-7770




jlLyfordO -i
International School

Maintenance Manager

Lyford Cay International School seeks a Maintenance Manager starting in
mid-July 2008.

The Job
The job includes overseeing the maintenance of the school':; facilities and
grounds, management of a crew of 7 workers and the orderly and effective
support of school activity. Candidates must be prepared to work unusual hours,
be on call as needs arise, and carry out maintenance duties when necessary along
with the maintenance crew.

The Qualifications
Candidate must be high energy, fast hard workers who are patient, good humored,
articulate, good at planning, efficient in their work, good at communicating, and
knowledgeable in use of computers arid software related to maintenance work.

In addition, the success candidate must have experience managing work crews
and maintenance, projects and supporting others in getting their work done. The
individual must also possess a wide knowledge and experience in Using the tools
and materials necessary for building maintenance and small building projects.
Finally, the individual must be willing and interested in learning about building
materials and be keen to learn new techniques'and act on constructive criticism.

Inquires can be made to 242 362 4774
Applications should include: 1) letter of application,
2) curriculum vitae,
3) digital photo of the candidate.

Application should be sent to:
jobs@lcis.bs


Dern tIZ Ste Ca rhr off


gll ^iuarJ thils Sumer !v


Business seeks



mediation to speed



up judicial system


FROM page 1B

the fact that 95 per cent of all
cases brought in the Bahamas
either went to trial or "fall by
the wayside" contrasted sharply
with the 20-30 per cent equiva-
lent figure in the US.
"In the Bahamas, 95 per cent
of cases that come before the
courts either fall by the wayside
or go to trial," Mr D'Aguilar
told The Tribune. "But in the
US, 70-80 per cent of cases are
disposed of through plea bar-
gaining.
"All the minor cases [in the
Us] are done through media-
tion. Very few cases come to
court, and the ones that do are
murders, armed robberies and
rapes the ones you want to
come to court."
Cases
Mr d'Aguilar described the
high percentage of cases that
came to court in the Bahamas,
especially the minor ones, as
"that's where your backlog is
right there".
"The thing that stands out
immediately is the efficient way
in which the Americans seem
to dispense justice," the Cham-


ber chief said.
"We have to adapt our judi-
cial system to include plea bar-
gaining, work through cases as
quickly as possible and get to
settlement. Work through the
backlog as quickly as possible."
Bargaining
Plea bargaining and media-
tion, he suggested, were also
required to speed up cases
brought or involving members
of the Bahamian business com-
munity. Mediation as a means
of resolving disputes was a lot
more attractive than waiting
two to three years for the courts
to process a case.
"Face it. If you don't want to
go to court to have a matter
resolved, and don't want to
spend huge amounts of money
on legal fees, go to mediation,"
Mr D'Aguilar said.
"It's a much cheaper way to
get justice. It may not be idle,
but it's a quicker way to get jus-
tice dispensed. It's much better
to have $60,000 tomorrow than
$100,000 six years from now."
The Chamber president
added: "The administration of
justice is a huge animal that
needs dome innovative ideas to
solve this problem as quickly as


possible. Currently, it's just the
status quo and no one is taking
the stapes to fix it.
"You don't ever get justice, as
it takes for too long, unless
you've got money and time to
waste going back and forth
dealing with our justice system.
"The business community is
very frustrated with our judicial
system, to the point where a lot
of them don't use it. If some-
one rips you off, you just take
the loss."
Incentives
Mr D'Aguilar said incentives
needed to be implemented to
encourage persons to pay fines
for minor offences, such as traf-
fic infractions, rather than have
such warrants clog up the court
system.
In the US, to encourage
prompt payment of traffic-relat-
ed fines, the fees for taking such
matters to court and fighting
them were higher than the orig-
inal fine levied.
In the Bahamas, Mr
D'Aguilar suggested that such
traffic offences be recorded on a
driver's licence. If the fines were
not paid, then that driver's
licence should not be renewed
until they were.


Are you interested in studying Law? Holborn College in conjunction with the Univer-
sity of Huddersfield is currently accepting students for the September session. To
learn more plan to attend an information session Wednesday July 2 at 6 p.m. at the
British Colonial Hilton Resort. Prof Michael Newns from the university will be in
attendance. Call Success Training College at 324-7770 to register.

K 'U


Betty K. Agencies Ltd.

To Our Valued Customer


We have now re-opened our Nassau office and
warehouse on Saturday until further notice
FROM 8:00 AM TO 12 NOON
Please contact our customer service
Representative for further information


Nassau (Office)
Betty K Agencies Ltd.
C.Trevor Kelly Bldg.
East Street North
P.O. Box N-351
Nassau, Bahamas

Miami (Office)
Betty K Agencies (USA)
LLC
3701 NW. South River Dr.
Miami Florida 33142
Telephone (305) 635-4650
Fax (305) 635-4661


Telephone (242) 322-2142
Fax (242) 322-6809


Abaco (Office)
Don Mackay Blvd.
Marsh Harbour
P.O. Box AB 20116,
Abaco, Bahamas
Telephone (242) 367-0593
Fax (242) 367-0594


Serving the Bahamas with Pride from 1920!


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


THE TRIBUNE













Government clamps down on Stamp Act


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government yesterday moved
to tighten Stamp Duty revenues
payable on Bahamas-based real estate
transactions and increase the penalty
for thelate Stamping of documents
through a raft of amendments intro-
duced to the House of Assembly, in
addition to giving legal basis for the
exemptions granted to the $4.9 billion
Ginn project.
Unveiling the Stamp Act amend-
ments, Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said they would ensure that "doc-
uments executed outside the Bahamas
relating to properties [and real estate
transactions] in it are unquestionably
subject to the Stamp Tax laws of the
Bahamas" where the beneficial own-
ership of land changes.
This, he added, would "put beyond
doubt" situations such as the one that
arose in the $900 million purchase of
the Bahamas Oil Refining Interna-
tional Company (BORCO) by the First
Reserve private equity firm and its
Dutch partner, Vopak.


Mr Ingraham
said that in the pur-
chase, "discussions
arose as to whether ?
Stamp Tax was *; '*
payable on the
transaction", hint-
ing that this was
because some doc-
uments relating to
the deal and the
sale of real estate
involved were
being executed outside the Bahamas.
The BORCO buyers and its seller,
the Venezuelan state-owned oil firm
PDVSA, eventually relented and paid
$40 million in Stamp Duty.
Another loophole the amendments
aim to close, Mr Ingraham added, was
where wealthy developers and perma-
nent residents had entered into long-
term leases with the Government for
private cays and islands across the
Bahamas.
"These persons have placed on these
cays substantial developments. Because
the fee simple still rests with the Gov-
ernment, these persons do not pay real


property tax or Stamp Duty other than
the $10 when the land is transferred,"
the Prime Minister added.
The Government had previously
adopted a policy of trying to encourage
these wealthy landowners to pay the
full amount of Stamp Duty that was
normally due, the same that ordinary
Bahamians do.
Despite Mr Ingraham having refused
to approve any land transactions
involving leased private islands since he
took office in May last year, because
there was no statutory, basis in law to
do so, his efforts had not met with great
success.
As a result, the Government was
amending the law to ensure that "per-
sons who own these valuable proper-
ties and want to sell them pay Stamp
Duty".
The Act's amendments also require
that Stamp Duty now be paid in share
transactions where a company pur-
chases its own shares, redeems or can-
cels itsshares, retains shares in its trea-
sury, converts or exchanges shares for
another asset, or does anything to
increase a shareholder's equity interest


in the company.
To illustrate the point, Mr Ingraham
used the example where 'A' and 'B',
each owning 50 per cent of a real estate
company, engaged in a deal that would
see the former buy out the latter.
Rather than a direct share sale, to
avoid Stamp Duty under current
arrangements 'A' donated $1 million to
the company, which would then pur-
chase the shares from 'B' and cancel
them leaving 'A' as the 100 per cent
shareholder, as the transaction intend-
ed.
Other amendments will require that
International Business Companies
(IBCs) pay Stamp Duty on transac-
tions involving Bahamas-based real
estate, while a lien is created on a
Bahamian-based company being sold
by an international parent until Stamp
Duty is paid.
The Treasurer of the Bahamas, who
currently has to be asked to provide
an opinion on the amount.of Stamp
Duty payable, will now be able to ren-
der an opinion at his/her own discre-
tion.
Promissory notes that are used in


place of mortgages or debentures will
also be subject to Stamp Duty, and the
Government has increased the penalty
for the late Stamping of documents -
those overdue for between six to 12
months to 15 per cent of the amount
owed.
Documents late for Stamping by
between one-10 years will face a 20
per cent surcharge; those late for 10-20
years will face a 25 per cent surcharge;
and those 20-30 years overdue will face
a 30 per cent surcharge. Those over 30
years overdue will face a 35 per cent
penalty.
The Government also introduced a
Bill to give legal effect to the Stamp
Tax incentives granted to Ginn. On
condo and other real estate sales, Ginn
and its clients will pay Stamp Tax on a
sliding scale ranging from 2 per cent up
to 6 per cent for the first five, years,
compared to the normal 10 per cent
rate on properties worth more than
$250,000.
The former government had looked
to give effect to this via an Economic
Zone Act, but Mr Ingraham said he
did not favour this course of action .


Government: Settle, don't complain, on tax demands


FROM page 1B

of Assembly: "I find it unimag-
inable for people, especially the
Chamber of Commerce presi-
dent, to complain that a gov-
ernment agency is doing what it
should be doing.
"Just because someone was
negligent in the past does not
mean that the Government is
giving up on its rights to collect
what is due."
Speaking with Tribune Busi-
ness later, Mr Laing said that
while there was no official "con-
certed effort" to clamp down
on defaulters and collect what
the Government felt was owed
to it in taxes, there had been
"an ever-increasing effort to
enhance compliance with the
law" across successive admin-
istrations.
"Everyone knows there is a
fair amount of non-compliance
on paying taxes and fees due,"
Mr Laing said yesterday, point-
ing to the increased training and
technology use, the targeting of
inefficiencies ard tax loopholes,


more staff resources and more
focused leadership in collecting
outstanding revenues as ways
to combat this.
"I think all of these things are
coming together to result in a
more intense effort to produce
greater compliance," he added.
Complaints
When it came to business
complaints that they were
unable to agree or disagree with
government claims that they
owed outstanding taxes and fees
from more than a decade ago,
as they did not keep business
records going back that far, Mr
Laing responded: "Let's look
at the flip side of life."
He pointed out that the Gov-
ernment was doing nothing dif-
ferent from many Bahamian
companies who were owed
money by clients, in some cases
for many years. These firms, the
minister said, like the Govern-
ment, still had such debts on
their books as accounts receiv-
ables and had not written them
off.


- Referring to the concerns
expressed, Mr Laing said: "It
would be like me as a customer
complaining if a business called
me and said that I had not paid
a debt dating back six, seven,
eight, nine, 10 years, and that I
now owed 'x' amount of dol-
lars.
"If it was me, I would sit
down with them to see if I owed
it, and if I did, what amount I
can afford to have it paid. You
don't expect business people to
stop what they're doing."
In that same fashion, Mr"
Laing said that rather than com-
plain, businesses supplied with
demands for 'back taxes' should
meet with the government
agency involved to determine
whether any money was owed;
if it was, how much; and Work
out a payments system to make
good the debt.
"The point the Prime Minis-
ter was making is that it is not
really fair to complain that peo-
ple in government are doing
what they're paid to do, which is
pursue the Government's tax-
es," Mr Laing said.


In response, Mr D'Aguilar
said the main point he had been
making was that if a Bahamian
business did not pay its busi-
ness licence fee in a certain
year, it should have been
refused its licence the follow-
ing year, not suddenly hit with a
tax demand some 20 years later.
He explained: "If you don't
pay for 1977, and paid for 1978,
they shouldn't have let you have
that renewal. That should never
have been done. You don't let
20 years go by and all of a sud-
den, not having made a claim
between 1977-2007, all of a sud-
den throw it up. If people don't
pay, don't let them operate
without paying."

Concern
Mr D'Aguilar said his other
concern was that government
agencies did not always post the
correct amount to be paid, and
it was impossible for companies
to verify tax demands that dates
back decades because they did
not keep records dating back
that far.


Notice

Rainbow Owners Open House
All Rainbow Cleaning Systems Owners are invited
to An Owners Open House

When: Saturday.28th June, 2008
Time: 10:00a.m. 12:00p.m.
Venue: Overflow Enterprises Ltd.
Royal Palm Mall, Mackey Street, dbove
Fashion Hall f

Forgot how to use your Rainbo.\
Lost parts 4S -
Need Supplies? 'PofWer


Need a refreshers demo
Owners Open House is where you need to be!!!

Phone: 394-5314 or 393-2159
Fax: [242] 393-2493
Email: ouerflow@batelnet.bs
Website: www.rainbowsystem.com
Also see the new Rainbow E 2 Series
Space is limited so register early


Saturday, 21 June, 2008



Sponsored by the Department of Cooperative Development

in conjunction with

Bahamas Co-operative League Limited


All you walkers,

join us in celebrating Cooperative Month.

Come and meet other members of the

movement and learn more about...

"Making a Difference... The Cooperative Way"


JOIN A COOPERATIVE TODAY!



REGISTRATION FORM

Name:


Sex: U male


P.O. Box:_


a under 30 under 40 a under 50 U 50 and over

Trophies awarded to top 3 males & females in
various groups
Start Time 6:00 a.m. Sharp
Starting at Goodman's Bay traveling west along
West Bay Street to Sandy Port returning east along
West Bay Street ending at Goodman's Bay.


- Application can be collected at any credit union office.


Participant's signature: Date:


Prizes:

Time:
Route:


DEADLINE FOR ENTRY IS 5PM ON FRIDAY, 20 JUNE, 2008


r-


Phone#:


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


Age:


U female


Participant's signature:


Date:















US and China are wrapping





up high-level economic talks


SBy MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

S ,\ l'(l.IS, Mld. (AP)-
'i' niled Stalles and China.
p to delfuse sillnmering
i:ic i. 'nsions, were cobbling
gc'icter a set of modest
!chiciie.ments to cap two days
)f higL,-level economic talks.
However, the deals in such
treas as boosting energy secu-
itl. !owcring global pollution
nd 'expanding food monitor-
Ing. were unlikely to still vocal
JS critics.
'1'liho critics contend that
'hi-it soaring trade deficit,
vhich last year reached an all-
iiilc high of $256 billion, is the
result or unfair trade practices,
tcl ~ud g currency manipula-
in, .nd has contributed to
hc loss of three million manu-
acturing jobs since 2001.
The two sides were wrapping
.) their talks at the US Naval
kcaidemy with a joint news
rconfirence at the Treasury
apartmentnt. The expectation



Share

your

newsvv
The Tribune wants to hear
ifom people who are
marking news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
viu are raising funds for a
go,,d ri!use, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
if so, c; l! us on 322-1986
and! shI-,. your story.


' I


was that a series of modest
agreements would be
announced, including fleshing
out details of a 10-year coop-
eration agreement on energy
and the environment that was
initially announced in Beijing
in December.
But it was clear that the
fourth round of talks, known as
the Strategic Economic Dia-
logue, would leave both
nations far apart on a number
of contentious subjects includ-
ing US unhappiness over the
slow pace of China s economic
reforms.
Treasury Secretary Henry
Paulson, who is leading the
large US delegation from Pres-
ident Bush's Cabinet, hoped
that the discussions will pro-
duce enough results to per-
suade the next administration
to continue the meetings.
The twice-a-year discussions,
alternating between Beijing
and Washington, were begun
in 2006 at Paulson's urging.
Chinese Vice Premier Wang
Qishan, the head of the Chi-
nese delegation, on Tuesday
urged patience going forward
as China implements necessary
reforms. He cautioned that the
two countries needed to avoid
"complicating and politicizing
economic issues."
The Chinese have grown
concerned about a number of
bills introduced in Congress
that would impose economic
sanctions on China unless the
country moves more quickly
to allow its currency to rise in
value against the dollar.
"Our cooperation is an irre-
versible and unstoppable cur-
rent,' Wang said, speaking
through an interpreter.
The talks also featured Fed-
eral Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke and Zhou Xiachuan,
the head of China's central
bank. Zhou said the Chinese
were interested in learning


from Bernanke's presentation
the regulatory mistakes that
had been made that con-
tributed to the subprime mort-
gage crisis.
Zhou said the weak dollar
was not a specific topic of dis-
cussion, although Chinese offi-
cials have been making the
point that the dollar's decline
against other currencies has
contributed to rising global
prices for oil, food and other
commodities.
Those comments were
meant to send a message to the
Bush administration to stop
pressuring China so much to
allow its currency to rise in val-
ue against the dollar, an action
that makes the US currency
even weaker but is seen as crit-
ical by American manufactur-
ers to narrow the US-China
trade gap.
While the Chinese have
allowed their currency to rise
in value by 20 per cent against
the dollar since July 2005, US
manufacturers contend that
the yuan is still significantly
undervalued, putting US prod-
ucts at a competitive disad-
,vantage.
The Bush administration
wants the Chinese to open
their financial system to for-
eign banks and investment
houses. But that effort is meet-
ing strong resistance from the
Chinese, given the billions of
dollars in losses suffered by US
financial giants in the credit
crisis that erupted last August.
One of the areas the admin-
istration is touting as a success
is in food safety, where the
United States used the dia-
logue to press the Chinese to
strengthen inspections after a
series of high-profile recalls
last year.
Health and Human Services
Secretary Michael Leavitt said
Tuesday that the United States
expects to have food and drug


,' at the BREA's office as soon


Igned.


PATRICK STRACHAN, REGISTRAR OF REAL ESTATE


DTat: iune 3rd. 2008


inspectors placed in three Chi-
nese cities Beijing, Shanghai
and Guangzhou by the end


of this year.
But Chinese officials said the
approval is being held up until


the US grants a Chinese
request for increased Chinese
inspectors in the United States.


ELEUTHERA LOT NO. 90-D, LOWER BOGUE
All that piece parcel or lot of land containing 42,616 sq.
S*.. ft. and being Lot # 90-D on a survey plan situated in the
S----- site encompasses a commercial building consisting of a
restaurant and disco that is approximately 1.3 yrs old, with
a total sq. ft. of approximately 4,852.12, which includes
male & female rest rooms, stage area, 2-dressing rooms,
dining room, commercial kitchen and storage
improvements also includes a 660.4 sq, ft, front veranda,
752 sq, ft, concrete walk-ways, and 192 sq, ft, back porch. This building is central air-
conditioned.
Appraisal: $490,671.00
This property is situated on the western side of the main Eleuthera Highway & approximately
2,219 ft. northerly of Four-For-Nothing Road, in the settlement of Lower Bogue North
Eleuthera. All utilities and services available.




WINTON MEADOWS (Lot No. 382)
,,All that piece parcel or lot of land having an
Area of 8,300 sq. ft. being lot No. 382 situated
in the subdivision known as Winton Meadows,
A. *- the said subdivision situated in the Eastern
S District of the Island of New Providence,
Bahamas. This property is comprised of a 24
year old single family residence with an
attached efficiency (formerly the carport)
consisting of approximately 2,675 sq. ft. of
enclosed living area, front porch-198 sq. ft., back patio-380. The building is a two storey
house. Besides the efficiency apartment, the house is comprised of 3-bedrooms, 3-
bathrooms, inclusive of a master bedroom suite upstairs. Foyer, front room, dining room,
family room, powder room, utility room, breakfast nook and kitchen downstairs. Climate
control is provided by ducted central air conditioning, with air circulation enhanced by
ceiling fans and other amenities. Quality of construction: Average. Standard of maintenance;
Average. Effective age: seven years (7) the land is on flat terrain; however the site appears
to be sufficiently elevated to disallow,the possibility of flooding under normal weather
condition, including annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are well kept, with
improvements including neatly maintained lawns with flowering trees, and a concrete
garden/storage shed, which is located in the backyard. The yard is enclosed along the
sides with chain-link fencing, and concrete block walls that are topped with metal railings,
and metal gates at the front and back.
APPRAISAL: $365,000.00
Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive, pass the streetlight at Fox Hill Road until you get
to Meadows Boulevard, turn right onto Meadows Boulevard, go south and take the 4th
left, then 1st right. The subject house is the 2nd house on the left side painted beige
trimmed white.



ELEUTHERA
Lot No. 117, Lower Bogue
All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements
... -containing 14,091 sq. ft. and being lot # 117, situated
.on Skyline Drive, in the settlement of Lower Bogue
on the Island of Eleuthera, this site encompasses
S:4 a single story structure still under construction and
comprising of 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms, living
room, dining room, kitchen, and garage, with a total
living area of approximately 1,431.3. property also
includes a covered front porch with a total sq. ft.
of approximately 103.5 sq. ft. this structure is approximately 65 % completed and is a new
construction.
Appraisal: $127,399.00.
This property is situated on Skyline Drive in the settlement of Lower Bogue North Eleuthera.


Lot B, Marigold Farm Road Ailotment 67
All that lot of vacant land having an area of 1,173 acres and being referred to as the plot. the property is lot No. B and is situated
on Marigold Farm Road in the area known as Allotment 67, a subdivision situated in the south eastern district of New Providence
Bahamas. This property is zoned multi family.
Appraisal: $290,000.00
Traveling from Joe Farrington Road onto Marigold Farm Road heading south. The subject is th 2nd to last property on the left
hand side of the road near the pond.
BLACKWOOD, ABACO
All that lot of land having an area of approximately 258,064 sq. ft. This property is yet to reach its highest and best use. It is ideally
suited to single or multi-family development as is'the nature of surrounding properties within the community. The site may also serve
well as a commercial site as the area remains un-zoned the property remains largely in its original state. It is covered with low brush
and broad leaf coppice vegetation intersperse with broad strands of mature Yellow Pine indigenous to the area. The property is well
drained and represents no immediate flooding danger under normal conditions.
APPRAISAL: $219,354.40
The subject property is vacant and is situated at the Southeastern entrance of the Community of Blackwood, Abaco. The property is
undivided and comprises approximately 6 acres of a larger tract of land of approximately 26 acres.
Lot B, Wilson Street, Rock Crusher
All that lot of land having an area of 10,498 sq ft, being lot B, between the subdivision known as Rock Crusher and
in the vicinity of Perpall Tract situated in the western district of New Providence, Bahamas. This property is zoned
multi family/single family. Also located on this property is a structure comprising of a duplex at foundation level under
construction, and consisting of approximately 1,566 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with a patio consisting of 270,
sq. ft. the starter bars are in place and foundation poured.
Appraisal: $97,214.00
Traveling West on Farrington Road take a right after the P.L.P. headquarters, go about midways through to
Wilson Street, go though the corner all the way to the dead end. The property is located behind the chain linked
fence at the back of the yard.
NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA)
Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment Ltd.,
this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing
inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft.
Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic
Ocean.
Appraisal: $41,275.00


4,-


Notice


PAYMENT OF REAL ESTATE DUES


Members of the Bahamas Real Estate Association
are hereby advised that dues for Certificate of
Membership, Certificate of Registration and Annual
License are now due.


Members who have not paid their dues for the 2008
year as yet are to do so as soon as possible. Only
those persons whose dues are paid by June 30th
will be gazetted in the newspaper and allowed to
practice real estate.


In accordance with the Real Estate Brokers and
*salesman Act, 1995, Section 16 (b) (ii) a subsequent
,,'tzette notice will be published listing the names
of those persons who ceased to be registered due
to non-payment of dues.


In order to remain financial members are asked to


.1- rrmpwwm mnp IM R I rm F pl


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


i1


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 7B


AJune 19,200
MISCLLANOUS ROPETIE


Cable Beach

All that lot of land situated in the western district of the island of New Providence, known as Towers of Cable Beach, is a freehold condominium complex. Apartment 20A is situated on the 2nd floor of
the southern block in the mid-section of the building. And consist of 2-bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living-dining room, kitchen and porch. The residence is approximately over 40yrs old and,
consisting of approximately 615 sq, ft, of living space. Amenities includes swimTning pool, security, beach, parking, laundry, and landscape gardens. The land is on a grade and level; however the site
appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods.
Appraisal: $225,500.00
Traveling west on west bay street after passing the Crystal Palace Casino. Go pass 2 roundabouts and pass the city market food store and proceed around the next roundabout and head back east. The
subject property is on the left side of the street just opposite the City Market food store painted pink trimmed white.


Lot No. 3 Yamacraw
Beach Estates
All that lot of land having an area of 10,000 sq ft, being lot
no. 3 in Yamacraw Beach Estates, in the said subdivision
situated in the eastern district of New Providence Bahamas.
Located on the subject property is a single-storey triplex

_. bathroom, living, dining, kitchen apartments unit and one
1 1 "' unit being used as a barber and beauty salon, the land is
Son a grade and level; however the site appears to be
sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding
during annual heavy rainy periods of the year.
Appraisal: $313,016.00
Traveling south on Fox Hill Road, go pass Yamacraw Hill Road and Joe Farrington Road. The subject
property is located on the left hand side of Fox Hill road painted white trimmed brown.


Eleuthera Island Shores Subdivision LOT

"' ELEUTHERA ISLAND SHORES
All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of
9,644 sq.\ft being lot #1 in block-45, Section "E" in
the subdivision called and known as Eleuthera Island
Shores Subdivision, situated in the vicinity of Hatchet
Bay Harbour, on the island of Eleuthera, one of the
'. islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahams. This
S;--' / t"-',,',^'."-. *. .... site encompasses a two storey building which is
approximately 14 yrs old and is abandoned. There is
a wooden landing approximately 7'-4" wide by 20'-
0" on the upper level, approximately 1,610 sq. ft. of
enclosed living space, with 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms, front room, dining room, den, kitchen, and utility room. The
wooden porch on the upper level is approximately 148sq. ft. There is also a water cistern under the dining room floor
area. All utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $151,007.00
This property is situated in Eleuthera Island Shores.
LOT NO. 1 WESTERN SHORES
All that lot of land having an area of 7,389 sq. ft., being
lot #1 of the Subdivision known as Western Shores Phase
., II, the said Subdivision situated in the Western District of
S. -* New Providence, Bahamas. Located on the subject property
is a single structure comprising of a single family residence
."' consisting of approximately 2,430 sq. ft. of enclosed living
space. The residence comprises of 3-bedroom with closets,
2 1/2 bathrooms, living/dining rooms, study, kitchen, utility
room, porch and enclosed garage with electronic door. The
land appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the
possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods
of the year. The grounds are fairly well kept with
improvements including driveway, walkway and swimming
pool. The yard is enclosed with walls.
Appraisal: $753,570.00
Traveling west on West Bay Street. Go pass Orange Hill and Indigo Subdivisions, the house is located on the left near
Tusculum Subdivision and painted all white.

..(Lpt No..62, Lower Bogue) ELEUTHERA
S'-. All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements, in
.the settlement of Lower Bdgue, North Eleuthera, being
^ 11 "',' 1-!* No. 62, comprising of about 34,210 sq. ft., this site
I encompasses a 12 year old single storney home comprising.
of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, front room, dining, breakfast
room, kitchen and laundry room, with a total living area
of approximately 2,342.06. Property also includes a double
.-;,..; car garage, and front entrance with a total sq. ft. of
: approximately 655.75. This home is approximately 85%
completed. The property is well landscaped with crab
S- grass, fiascos and some fruit trees.
S- Appraisal: $229,426.00
This property is situated on the western side of Eleuthera
Highway in the settlement of Lower Bogue.


DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)
.A 3 two bed, 1 bath fourplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no. 18b with
an area for a small shop. Age 12 years the land is a portion
of one of the Dundas Town Crown Allotment parcels
Stretching from Forest Drive to Front Street, being just
Sunder a quarter acre in size and on the lowside. A concrete
block structure, with asphalt shingle roof and L-shape in
design with a total length of 70x26 ft, plus 50 x 22 ft.,
2,920 sq. ft., the interior walls are concrete blocks, ceiling
is sheet rock and the floors of vinyl tiles.
Appraisal: $265,225.00

LOT NO. 12, BLOCK 3, MILLER'S HEIGHTS
All that lot of land having an area of 7,500 sq. ft., being lot
12, of the subdivision known and designated as Millar's
Heights, situated in the Southwestern district of New
Providence, Bahamas. This property is comprised of a 25
,.. yr old single family residence consisting of approximately
-- 2,375 sq. ft of enclosed living space with three 2-bedrooms,
S1-bathroom, living/dining rooms, and kitchen apartment
complex. The land is on a grade and level and appear to
be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding
during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly
kept, with improvements including parking area, walking
pathway and low shrubs. The yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing at the back and southern sides.
Appraisal: $239,500.00
Traveling west on Carmichael Road, enter West Avenue, on the South side immediately after Topps Laundromat. Take
first right which is Wimpole St., go around the curve on the left which is London Avenue, traveling south on London
Avenue the subject property is the 9th building on the right before the T, Junction (high street) the subject building is
an L shape triplex, painted green, trimmed white.


1'


I LOT NO. 1490 GOLDEN GATES SECTION 2
S,. J All that lot of land having an area of 6,000 sq. ft.
' "being lot no. 1490 of the subdivision known and
Si designated as Golden Gates, the said subdivision
'.: -.:: ~.~~P !. Providence, bahamas. This property is comprised
... of a 25 yer old single family residence consisting of
Approximately 2,480 sq. ft. of enclosed living space
with three bedrooms, three bathrooms, living, dining
Rooms and kitchen. The land is on a grade and level,
however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated
to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The grounds are fairly kept, ith improvements
including driveway, walkway and low shrubs. Yard is enclosed on one side wth a 5 foot chain linked fencing and a low cement
block'wall to the front.
Appraisal: $162,400.00
Traveling west on Carmichael Road turn left then right onto the service road opposite Bahamas Faith Ministries Complex, then
first left again after passing clico and pre-school. The subject house is the 6th house left painted green trimmed white.


bu "i i ng -i c a ai r.-o..it n -ed .





building is central air-conditioned.


ELEUTHERA, LOWER BOGUE (Lot No. 90-D)

All that piece parcel or lot of land containing 42,616 sq. ft. and
being Lot # 90-D on a survey plan situated in the settlement
of Lower Bogue on the island of Eleuthera, this site encompasses
a commercial building consisting of a restaurant and disco that
is approximately 13 yrs old, with a total sq. ft. of approximately
4,852.12, which includes male & female rest rooms, stage area,
2-dressing rooms, dining room, commercial kitchen and storage
improvements also includes a 660.4 sq, ft, front veranda, 752
sq, ft, concrete walk-ways, and 192 sq, ft, back porch. This


Appraisal: $490,671.00
This property is situated on the western side of the main Eleuthera Highway & approximately 2,219 ft. northerly
of Four-For-Nothing Road, in the settlement of Lower Bogue North Eleuthera. All utilities and services available.


Westward Villas
"f All that lot of land having an area of 7,500 sq ft, being lot 56 of the subdivision known
S. as Westward Villas, the said subdivision is situated in the western district of new
S' providence bahamas. This property is comprised of an approximately 42yrs old single
i:' family residence consisting of approximately 1,375 sq. ft of enclosed living space.
The residence comprises 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms, living/dining room, family
room, kitchen and laundry room, ventilation is supplied by central
air-conditioning and ceiling fans. the land is on a grade and level; however the site
appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual
heavy rainy periods, the yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing and is overgrown
with various trees and shrubs.
Appraisal: $250,188.00
Travelling west on West Bay Street to the roundabout at Prospect Ridge Drive, take the first corner on the right, and the subject property
will be the 2nd on the left side, white trimmed white [behind many trees]


KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)
Lot No. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story
house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living room, dining area,
family room, kitchen, study, laundry and an entry porch.
Appraisal: $188,406.00
Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to
Kennedy Subdivision on the left, then take the 1st corner
on the left then 1st right, house is second on your right
with garage.


Dorsetteville, Bamboo Town
Investment Opportunity Must Sell Lot No. 51
All that lot of land having an area of 5,000 sq ft, being lot no. 51,
of the subdivision known as Dorsetteville, the said subdivision situated
-.G'.' .:- in the southern district of New Providence Bahamas. Located on
I.,-'' '. the subject property is a structure comprising of an approximately
S"ai 20yr old duplex apartment comprising of approximately 1,641
i sq. ft. of enclosed living space which includes two 2-bedrooms, 1-
bath, kitchen, living & dining rooms units. and an approximately
,i 9yr old one bedroom apartment building comprising of 382 sq.
:. --, ft. with bath, kitchen, living/dining room. the land is on a grade
. .. .. and level; the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow
the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the
year. The grounds are fairly kept with improvements of concrete
parking area & concrete walkways around the premises. The yard
is enclosed with chained linked fencing at the sides and back.
Appraisal: $202,225.40
Traveling south on East Street from Soldier Road, turn right at Porky's Service Station [Victoria Blvd]. Travel pass the third
corner on the left, the subject property will be the 9th on the left side. Painted green trim white.


Investment Opportunity Must Sell Lot No.
217 Pinewood Gardens Subdivision
All that lot of land having an area of 5,000 sq ft, being Lot
~F ,. No. 217 of the Subdivision known as Pinewood Gardens, the
.. said subdivision situated in the Southern District of New
S- ';, Providence Bahamas. Located on this property is a structure
a comprising of an approximately 20 yr old single family residence
M1 consisting of 992 sq. ft of enclosed living space with 3-
bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living/dining rooms, kitchen, drive
way and walk way. The land is on a grade and level and
appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility
of flooding. The grounds are fairly kept and yard is open.
Appraisal: $127,988.00
Traveling south on East. Street to the junction of Soldier Road, make a left at the light then turn right into Kennedy
Subdivision, go all the way to T-junction, turn right then first left then right again toward Mount Tabor Church building,
after passing Mount Tabor take first left sapodillaa blvd), the subject house is about 400 yards on the right painted yellow
trimmed green, with green and white door.


MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 44,714 sq. ft., and designated "E" which forms a portion of land known as "Mutton Fish Point" situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the island of
Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly by the land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance of 393.13 hundredth ft.;
outwardly by a 30' wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 402.57 hundredth ft; eastwardly by the main Queen's Highway and running thereon for a distance of 109.73 hundredth ft; westwardly by land now or formerly the
property of Caridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 110.75 hundredth ft. this property having an area of approximately 44,714 sq. ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential development and is quiet, peaceful and has
a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $51,421.00


Island Harbour Beach, Exuma
All that parcel or lot of vacant land containing 10,000 (80'X 100') sq. ft. being Lot No. 9, Block.2, Island Harbour Beach
Subdivision situated the western most portion of the Hermitage Estate, Little Exuma Bahamas. The property is located
on an unpaved road known as Stocking Road. The property also has a commanding view of the ocean.
Appraisal: $80,000.00



Rainbow Subdivision Lot No. 3, Block 27
All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 14,052.59 sq. ft. being lot no. 3, block 27, section b, of Rainbow
Subdivision with residential zoning. This property is bounded about 103.44 ft north by Queens Highway, and 137.02
ft. East and about 99.94, ft south of Rainbow Hill Circle. 139.91 ft West. All utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $40,328.00




MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
All that piece, parcel or tract of land containing 1 acre situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory
Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting
as follows:- Northwestwardly by the main Queens Highway and is running thereon for a distance of 125.462 feet
northwestwardly by the land now of fonnerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance of 390.274
hundredth ft.; southwestwardly by a 30' wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 128.128 hundredth
ft; southeastwardly by the land now or formerly the property of the Venor and running thereon for a distance of 322.955
hundredth ft. This property having an area of approximately 44,847.76 sq. ft. This neighbourhood is zoned commercial
development and is quiet and peaceful with a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $51,421.00
This lot is vacant land and is located in the area known as "Mutton Fish Point"


LOT NO. 10B, PALMETTO POINT
All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 9,000 sq. ft., and being Lot No. 10B situated North of Ingraham's
Pond and Eastwardly of North Palmetto Point, on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- on the north by Lot No. 3B and running thereon for a distance of (90) -
ft; on the East by Lot No. 11B and running thereon for a distance of (100) ft; on the south by a 20' wide road reservation
and running thereon (90) ft on the west by Lot No. 9B running thereon for a distance of (100) Ft, the said Lot is overgrown
with shrubs and is in close proximity of a white sandy beach. This neighborhood is zoned residential development and
is quiet and peaceful with a topography of approximately 50ft and because of this there is no danger of flooding. The area
is approximately 80% developed with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $72,000.00






MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land and improvements containing approximately 44,587 sq. ft. and designated "F"
which forms a portion of land known as "Mutton Fish Point" situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement
of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and bounded and
abutting as follows:- Northwardly by the land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for
a distance of 383.56 hundredth ft; southwardly by land now or formerly the property of Caridon Limited and running
thereon for a distance of 393-19 hundredth ft. eastwardly by the main Queen's Highway and running thereon for a distance
of 113.40 hundredth ft. westwardly by land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited and running thereon for a
distance of 113.40 hundredth ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential development and is quiet, peaceful
and has a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $51,276.00


Phili Whie @ 02-377 eail hili~whie 9, e 9 .-. or arr ole @50- 3034* ealhrr9o e9ctaak~o ax3635
To view properties go to: wwwmstopnshopbahamaCRtly eo
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IN [ MUS-F SE m I I


No. 17 WESTRIDGE ESTATES


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feet of living space with a three Car Ga
The building is 75% completed and cc
half baths study, living/dining, family ro
room.
Location: From SuperValue West Bay, take th
the first corner on the Right, Westridge Dr
seventh on the right hand side of the road.






Lot #18 BLOCK #27 VENICE
A mulitfamily lot of 12,225 square feet
complete unit at the front comprising 1
of living space. A middle structure (t
living space that's 80% complete and 1
property up to belt course comprising 1
two bedrooms, one bathroom, living an<
areas and kitchen.

Directions: Travelling West on Carmichael Rd,
Bacardi Road. Travel South past Millar's P
before reaching Bacardi. Turn Right onto pa
after passing the pond. Subject is located on
side of the road.







--. .........







Lot #31 TWYNAM ESTATES
A single family property comprising
11,350 square feet.
Located on this property is an 11-year.
old single family two .storey residence
comprising 3,794 square feet of living
space.
The lower floor consist of living, dining
and kitchen area, guest bedrooms, c
stairway, bathroom and other public
areas. The upper floor contains two
bedrooms, one bathroom, Master Suite
inclusive of bedroom, bathroom anc
balcony.
Directions: Travelling East on Prince Charles
Proceed to the T-Junction, turn left, then an immed
End corner on the Right side of the road.






LOT No. 21 B FRASER ALLO'
OFF SOLDIER ROAD











building is of sound construction ar
ground floor comprises 2 bedrooms,
family room. The second floor comprise
and dining areas.
Directions to property: Heading East on Sol<
opposite Lowes Wholesale, 2nd to last house


Appraisal: $930,000.00
All that lot of land having an
area of 30000 square feet,
Being lot Number 17 of the
:subdivision known as
Westridge Estates Addition.
Situate in the Western District
on the island of New
Providence.
Located on the subject
property is a newly con-
structed single storey
structure comprising 6,000
rage.
)mprises five bedrooms, four and a
)om, kitchen, laundry and generator
e road heading west into Westridge, take
ive. Subject property will be about the






BAY Appraisal $591,955.00
Comprising three structures. One
638 and a porch of 200 square feet
own house) of 1626 square feet of
the third building at the rear of the
627 square feet. Each building has
d dining.


turn onto
pond just '| .
ved road
the Right
aved road .... .'TT )' k. :


-~I I


Appraisal $456,000.00
/ .' :- ,
*V ,


Drive, turn Right at Super Value Food Store,
liate Right. Property is located near the Dead


TMEN


T
Appraisal: $303,000,00


,; The subject property
consisting of 8,400
i square feet is
developed with a
split leveled home
with 1925 square
feet of floor area on
Sthe ground floor, a
Sporch area of 437
square feet and
P,-_- second floor area of
735 square feet. The
id completed in its entirety. The
one bath, a kitchen; dining and
;es two bedrooms, one bath, living

dier Road, turn left onto first paved road
e on the road with chain linked fence.


LOT #3436/37
SIR LYNDEN PINDLING EST.
All that parcel of land having an
area of 5,000 square feet. Located E
on the single Family Property is a "'
one-year-old house comprising
1,137 square feet of enclosed living L
space inclusive of three bedrooms,
two bathrooms, living, dining,
kitchen with two baths and utility
rooms.


Appraisal: $169,000.00


-~ j
i~1a


Directions: Travelling east on Charles Saunders Highway, turn onto Lady Marguerite
Pindling Avenue. Take the second corner on the left. House is the second property
before the end of the corner #3436/37.



FREEPORT


Lot 188 SCOTT AVE, EASTSECTION 1 SUBDIVISION,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $140,000.00


The subject lot is
approximately 12,322 square
S' feet. Situated on this
property is a single story
single family dwelling of
. BFW -2,800 square feet of living
space. This includes a small
A.. front porch, a large foyer, a
sunken living room with
fireplace and chimney, a
.. dining area, a full service
S kitchen, a family room with
adjoining laundry and
storage room. A hallway with linen closets, a hallway bathroom. Three
auxiliary bedrooms with closets and a master bedroom with walk-in
closet and private bathroom,


Lot 67 Block 7
BAHAMIA WEST REPLAT
Located on this .30 of an acre
property is a newly built 1,900
square feet of living space single
family dwelling comprising an
entrance porch, four bedrooms,
two bathrooms and kitchen; a
living, dining, powder and laundry
room with adequate closet and
storage space.


Appraisal: $219,614.00

.:-- .-
4;
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Lot 12 Block 13 Unit 2


GREENING GLADE
FREEPORT, GRAND BAH/
Located on this .35 of an acre
property is a sixteen-year-old
single family residence
comprising four bedrooms, two
bathrooms, living, dining,
storage, utility and laundry
rooms; there is a foyer, kitchen
and den. The total area of living
space is 3,016 square feet.


Lot 5, Block 6, Unit 2
GREENING GLADE DRIVE


Appraisal: $254,355.00


.
. ..
'*3" lt : "

- .o -:*;** :' ,. -2 : ,z: ':" .. ,.' il .... ': ..' :


Appraisal: $245,827.00


The subject lot contains an
approximate area ,of (17,789
sq. ft) seventeen thousand
seven hundred and eighty
nine sq. ft. or 41 of an acre.
Situated thereon is a single
storey, single family dwelling
of conventional concrete
blocks and poured concrete.


Accommodations are three bedrooms, three and a half baths,
living, dining, full service kitchen with centre island stove with a
snack counter opened into a family room, exiting to an opened
patio at the rear. Adjourning the patio is a study, laundry room and
single car garage. The structure contains approximately 2,567 sq.
ft of living space.


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PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


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THE TRIBUNE


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INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY






FREEP1ORTEEP


Lot 23A, Block KN, John Wentworth Avenue,
BAHAMIA NORTH SUBDIVISION
FREEPORT GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $718


Unit 1

,000.00


Located on this Multi Family lot of 23,564 square feet are two
incomplete buildings. Single story Triplex of 3,502 square feet
inclusive of Living and dining area with full service kitchen three
bedrooms inclusive of Master bedroom and two bathrooms per unit.


......................C.**"" ef


LOT 238 SUN CLOSE
SUNSHINE PARK


Appraisal: $136,000.00


Located on this 4,200 square feet .
single/multi family property is a 20-
-year-old building of T-111 wood with ]
concrete floor, consisting approxi- I.
mately 2,198 square feet of enclosed
space. The structure was formerly -I .
used as a retail store and storage i
facility.
Directions: From Golden Gates Shopping Centre, Baillou Hill Road. Take the third
corner on the Right after passing Farmer's Market. Take the second Right then
First right (Sun Close) subject is the fourth property on the Right white trimmed
black.


LOT No. 13, BLOCK KN, UNIT 1
BAHAMIA NORTH SUBDIVISION Appraisal: $40,000.00
The property has an area of 13,027 square feet or .30 of an acre.


Lot No. 20, Block 1, Unit 3
FORTUNE POINT SUBDIVISION


Appraisal: $38,000.00


All that lot of vacant land having an area of 12,650 sq. ft. being lot No.
20, Block 1 Unit 3 of the Subdivision known and designated as Fortune
Point Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Duplex property zoning
with a rectangle shape.


EMERALD BAY SUBDIVISION Unit 2 Block 43
Lot Numbers 20 & 21, DUNTON LANE
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $37,000.00 ea.

Each lot is vacant and irregular in shape and contains an area of 18,278
square feet. The lots are Multifamily zoned.


EMERALD BAY SUBDIVISION Unit 2 Block 43
Lot Numbers 23, 24, 25, 26 & 27
DEBEN LANE FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
Appraisal: Lot 23 $37,000.00, Lots 24-27 $35,000.00 ea.

Each lot is vacant and irregular in shape and contains an area of 18,278
square feet. The lots are Multifamily zoned.


Lot No. 37 BLOCK 33, CHURCHILL COURT,
BAHAMIA MARINA & BAHAMIA 4 SUBDIVISION,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $337,000.00


All that lot of land having an area of 16,533 sq. ft. being lot No. 37 of
the subdivision known and designated as Bahamia Marina and
Bahamia Section 4 Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Located on
this property is a structure comprising a 3 year old duplex structure
which covers approximately (3,058) square feet. Apartment
consisting of two 2-bedrooms, 2-bathroom with private Jacuzzi in
master bath, spacious living and dining room, full service kitchen, a
laundry and utility room, foyer/hallway with linen and storage closet.
The property is fully secured by six foot plastic coated chain-link
fence runs along the side and rear and adjoins the painted 4 foot
wall, with 5 foot pillars at front with electronic gate.


ue a.. a, .,.. C *9i CV


Lot 96 HUDSON ESTATES


Appraisal: $116,190.00


Located on this 72x102 feet property is a 16 years old single
family dwelling comprising 1,490 square feet of living space. This
includes, a living, dining and laundry room, kitchen, three
bedrooms, two bathrooms, a garage and entrance porch.





CASTELRAG ESTATES, LOTS 129 & 130
EXUMA HARBOUR SUBDIVISION Appraisal: $673,075.00


~ir


.P1


*i..


~


The subject property is located on Kingway Road and is
developed with an area of 20,000 square feet. Situated thereon is
a residence comprised of 3,645 square feet of living
accommodations, inclusive of 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, with laundry
and utility spaces and a two bedroom one bath guest cottage of
600 square feet. The property is fenced with white picket fencing
and has a Gazebo at the highest portion of the property.


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE


r or
PHILIP WHIT @ 502-307


I





PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


r"Your Bahamian Su ermarkets' A LIBBY'S
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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 11B


HEALTHY

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h PH: 39.3- 10 OR .393- i i 18


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m N






PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


TIE TRIBUNE


Professional networking website




finally grabbing the spotlight


* By BRAD STONE
c.2008 New York Times
News Service

SAN FRANCISCO -For a
Web site, it could hardly look
less exciting. Its pages are heavy
with text, much of it a flat blue,
and there are few photos and
absolutely no videos.
But LinkedIn, the social net-
work for professionals, is dull
by design. Unlike Facebook and
MySpace. the site is aimed at
career-minded, white-collar
workers, people who join more
for the networking than the
social.
Now, in the midst of Silicon
Valley's recession-proof enthu-
siasm for community-oriented
Web sites, the most boring of
the social networks is finally
grabbing the spotlight.
On Wednesday, LinkedIn
will announce that it has raised
$53 million in capital, primarily


from Bain Capital Ventures, a
Boston-based private equity
firm. The new financing round
values the company at $1 bil-
lion. That heady valuation is
more than the $580 million that
the News Corp. paid for
MySpace in 2005, but less than
the $15 billion value assigned
to Facebook last year when
Microsoft bought a minority
stake.
LinkedIn's investment round
delays a rumored initial public
offering, which would have
finally tested the public mar-
ket's interest in social network-
ing.
"What we didn't want is to
have the distraction of being
public and to be worried by
quarterly performance," said
Dan Nye, the buttoned-down.
chief executive of Linkedin,
who would not be caught dead
in the Birkenstocks and rum-
pled T-shirts favored by


MySpace and Facebook
employees.
LinkedIn, which says it is
already profitable, will use the
investment to make acquisitions
and expand its overseas opera-
tions.

Create

"We want to create a broad
and critical business tool that is
used by tens of millions of busi-
ness professionals every day to
make them better at what they
do," Nye said.
The average age of a
LinkedIn user is 41, the point
in life where people are less
likely to build their digital iden-
tities around dates, parties and
photos of revelry.
Linkedln gives professionals,
even the most hopeless wall-
flower, a painless way to follow
the advice of every career coun-
selor: build a network. Users


ou eekeds wok fo u! Earn

1 Nke your weekends work for you! Earn


a / degree
Computers,


in Business, Accounting,
Human Resource Manage-


Iment or Public Administration.

New classes are forming now. Call Success for registration and program details. 324-7770




























I I II
Reta^i/CommercialsLots.




Starting at$ 1659000



Ca ll:
S 0.3 Iw5 6 `



(242 477957


BAHAMAS

OLYMPIC


OLYMPIC HEALTH DAY
5 MILE RACE
WHEELCHAIR AND HEALTH WALK
7:00a.m., Saturday 21st June. 2008


*T-shirts for allparticipants
* Trophies For all categories
* IOC Certificates all finishers
* Health Breakfast


Run Route: Starts Q.E. Sports
Center, Nassau Street, Bay Street,
P.I.Bridge, Ending at the P.I. Crafts
Market

ENTRY FEE: School Children: FREE


CATEGORIES.
Male: Under 19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49,50+
Female: Underl9, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50+
Children And Group Awards


WHEELCHAIR AND HEALTH WALK:
Starts Fort Montagu, west on Shirle Street
to Church Street. P.I. Bridge to the
Crafts Market

Adults:$10.00


Entry Form
Olympic Day 5 Mile Race And Health Walk
Drop off ENTRY FORM at the BOA Office, Building #10. 7th Terrace West of Collins Avenue, Mail
P.O.Box Ss-6250, Tel: 322-1595, Fax: 322-1195, E-nail:nocbah@coralwave.cont


Namre (Last):


(First):


Age: Date of Birth: SEX: M F Affiliation:


Event:


5 Mile Run


Wheelchair


Health Walk


Liability Waiver: In consideration of your accepting this entry, I, intending to be legally bound
heredy for myself, my heirs, executors and administrators waive and release any and all rights and claims
of darnage I may have against tie Bahamas Olympic Association and/ Or its successors and assigns for
all injuries or other eventually sustained by me in this event. I agree to abide by the decisions of the
organizers and medical advisers.


Signature Of Applicant


maintain online resumes, estab-
lish links with colleagues and
business acquaintances and then
expand their networks to the
contacts of their contacts. The
service also helps them search
for experts who can help them
solve daily business problems.
The four-year-old site is
decidedly anti-social: Only last
fall, after what executives
describe as a year of intense
debate, did the company ask
members to add photos to their
profiles.
That business-only-please
strategy appears to be paying
off. The number of people using
LinkedIn, based in Mountain
View, Calif., tripled in May over
the previous year, according to
Nielsen Online. At 23 million
members, LinkedIn remains far
smaller than Facebook and
MySpace, each with 115 million
members, but it is growing con-
siderably faster.
LinkedIn also has a more
diversified approach to making
money than its entertainment-
oriented rivals, which are strug-
gling to bring in ad dollars and
keep up with inflated expecta-
tions for increased revenue.
LinkedIn will get only a quar-
ter of its projected $100 million
in revenue this year from ads.
(It places ads from companies
like Microsoft and Southwest
Airlines on profile pages.) Oth-
er moneymakers include pre-
mium subscriptions, which let
users directly contact any user
on the site instead of requiring
an introduction from another
member.
A third source of revenue is
recruitment tools that compa-
nies can use to find people who
may not even be actively look-
ing for new jobs. Companies
pay to search for candidates
with specific skills, and each
day, they get new prospects as
people who fit their criteria join
LinkedIn..
LinkedIn is set to undergo a
radical shift in strategy to find
other sources of revenue.
Instead of catering primarily to
individual white-collar workers
the site will ,oon ihntoduce new


services aimed at companies. It
is a risky move that could alien-
ate members who prefer to use
the networking site to network
- without their bosses peering
over their shoulders.
One new product, Company
Groups, automatically gathers
all the employees from a com-
pany who use LinkedIn into a
single, private Web forum.
Employees can pose questions
to each other, and share and
discuss news articles about their
industry.
Soon, LinkedIn plans to add
additional features, like a group
calendar, and let independent
developers contribute their own
programmes that will allow
employees to collaborate on
projects.
Firms

The idea is to let firms exploit
their employees' social connec-
tions, institutional memories
and special skills knowledge
that large, geographically dis-
persed companies often have a
difficult time obtaining.
SFor example, in a test of the
feature by AKQA, a digital ad
agency in San Francisco, an
employee based in Amsterdam
recently asked her 350 col-
leagues on LinkedIn if the firm
had done any previous work for
television production compa-
nies. Executives in San Francis-
co, New York and London
promptly responded to the
query. "This is a collected, pro-
tected space for employees to
talk to each other and reference
outside information," said Reid
Hoffman, LinkedIn's founder
and chairman.
Becoming even more corpo-
rate is something of a gamble
for LinkedIn. Many companies
might resist the idea of confi-
dential corporate information
circulating on LinkedIn's
servers and perhaps being
exposed to former employees
who are included in the group
because they have not updated
their LinkedIn resumes.
(LinkedIn says every member
of a company group can remove


people whom they identify as
former workers or inerlopers.)
Diffusing the purpose of the
site might also repel sane users.
"It will be extraordinarily
challenging to simultaneously
serve as a corporate ool and
yet promote the 'branl of me'
in an emerging frei-agent
nation," said Keith Rbois, a
former LinkedIn executive who
is now vice president atilide, a
maker of applications fc social
networks.
Jeffrey Glass, a partner at
Bain Capital, says hi firm
invested in LinkedIn primarily
because it is now becoming; pop-
ular enough to introducethese
kinds of products to companies
and other organizations like
universities.
"This is a powerfultool
because inside the corporation,
there are massive bodies of
knowledge and relationships
between individuals thatthe
corporation has been unabs to
take advantage of until nwv,"
he said.
The new services could hip
LinkedIn fend off some aw
competition. Microsoft, lihg
covetous of rapidly growag
social-networking properties is
internally testing a service cabd
TownSquare that allows
employees of a company to fl-
low one another's activities n
the corporate network.
Executives at Faceboo:,
meanwhile, have recently sal
that they see networking tocs
for professionals as a primary
avenue of growth. The sit
recently added networking b
the list of options that new usei
select when they are asked t
specify what they intend to d
on the site.
Hoffman was an earl
investor in Facebook and say
he does not want to disparagt
the competition. But he sai
that most members of Facebool
who are older than 30 use it foi
entertainment, like playing
Scrabulous, a version of Scrab-
ble not for doing their jobs.
"Scrabulous is not work, and
it does not enable you to be an
effective professional," he said.'


N4AD
Nassau Airport
Development Company


The Nassau Airport Development
is seeking an energetic IT Technic
our dynamic IT & Electronics Teai

Reporting to the Manager, It & Ele
the ideal candidate will be respon
for providing It and Electronics su
equipment and assets of Nassau
Development Company.

Key Responsibilities will inc

* Maintaining computer network,
and peripherals
* Managing the installation of cat
networking infrastructure
* Assisting with repairs and main
Automatic Doors & Gates
* Overseeing communication tec
such as radios, cell phones anc
phones
* Maintaining the operation of bi
information systems such as fir


public address, flight information display
systerrs and baggage information display
system


CAREER



NPOITY


IT Technician



Company Qualifications and Skills:
cian to join
m. High School Diploma
Post Secondary Education in Electronics
ectronics, and/ or Computer Technology
sible 3- 5 years experience in a related field
pport to Experience in working with Microsoft
Airport products and network administration in an
Active Directory Environment
Working knowledge of TCP/IP protocol
clude: and WAN/LAN equipment
Promptly resolve computer hardware and
hardware applications issues
Understanding of basic Electronics
bling and Knowledge and experience working with
building management systems such as
tenance of fire alarms, PA, IFIDS, and BIDS
Excellence in both written and oral
hnologies communications
d desk
A competitive salary and benefits will be
building offered to the successful candidate.
e alarms,


If you are interested in joining our
dynamic team, please submit your
resume by June 25th 2008 to:

Manager, People
Nassau Airport Development Co.
PO Box AP59229
Nassau, Bahamas

Only those applicants short listed will be
contacted.


~~~~~~~"~~~~~~"*~~"~~"~11111


Parent/Guardian if under 18 years age \


I~-l~~-----C-~- -- I -~









THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 13B


US


to


lag


on


tech growth


* By LAURA M HOLSON
c.2008 New York Times
News Service
WATCHING television,
gaining access to the Internet
and listening to music on mobile
phones will be a viable business
in the next few years, says a
study by a consulting arm of
PricewaterhouseCoopers. But
while marketers and advertis-
ers have much to cheer in the
coming digital revolution, the
fastest growth will be in emerg-
ing markets, with the United
States lagging behind.
Overall global consumer
spending both online and by
mobile phones is expected to
grow 21.8 per cent annually, to
$234 billion by 2012, according
to the study that Pricewater-
house expects to release
Wednesday.
By contrast, spending in the
United States will grow at a rate
of 16.1 per cent, to $75 billion.
The firm said there was more
opportunity for Internet and
mobile entertainment growth
in countries like India and Chi-
na because people there would
use phones as a primary source
of entertainment.
The good news is that tradi-
tional media companies like
Time Warner and NBC Uni-
versal have less to fear from
new media competitors.
Stefanie Kane, a partner in
the entertainment, media and
communications consulting
firm, said.old media companies
would be big players in the dig-
ital revolution.
"The world is not going to
change dramatically," she said.
"The established media com-
panies will dominate revenues
for the future.":
Of course, there will be some
paii in the transition. Mobile
and online advertising, which
many had hoped would com-
pensate for declines in tradi-
tional forms of print and broad-


"The world is not

going to change

dramatically. The

established media

companies will

dominate revenues

for the future."
Stefanie Kane


cast advertising, has not grown
as quickly as the industry has
expected.
And despite the colliding
interests of Hollywood execu-
tives and technologists, the cul-
tures are vastly different. "They
are coming to the realization
that they have to work togeth-
er," Kane said.
Indeed, several companies
are already testing relationships.
Last December, Nokia and the
Universal Music Group agreed
to offer unlimited, free down-
loads of Universal songs to buy-
ers of certain Nokia mobile
phones.
In January, CBS and TiVo,
which makes digital video
recorders, entered into a
research partnership to figure
out how to better advertise to
consumers.
Partnerships, whatever the
form, could not come soon
eiiough. Worldwide mobile tele-
vision subscriptions are expect-
ed to grow fivefold to $19 bil-
lion, by 2012 compared with
$408 million last year, Pricewa-


terhouse said. The United
States is expected to make up
$2.1 billion of that 2012 figure.
And Pricewaterhouse expects
that the online and mobile
music distribution will surpass
physical distribution by 2011,
although music downloaded
over the Internet is expected to
grow at a greater percentage
than music delivered over
mobile phones.
Stock analysts expect media
companies to benefit from the
proliferation of so-called smart-
phones, like the BlackBerry or
iPhone, which are minicomput-
ers that consumers carry in their
pockets.
Of interest to many con-
sumers is using the Internet
while on the go. Spending here
is expected to grow.
According to Pricewater-
house, both home computer
and mobile Internet access in
the United States will increase
to $69.3 billion in the next five
years, from $41.3 billion in 2007.
The firm said it did not sepa-
rate the two categories.


BUINS


The American Embassy is presently considering applications
position:


for the following


Commercial Assistant

Assist with promoting all trade events locally and in the U.S.

Maintains all commercial subject files, including newspaper clipping files, US
company database, and investments database.

Drafts and distributes commercial newsletter and maintains database of
Econ-Commercial contacts.

Assists with research for major reports including the Country Commercial Guide,
the Investment Climate Report, and other special reports.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

Associates Degree in Business Management, Economics or Finance.
Three years job experience in economic research, business management,
marketing, investments, trade promotion or other related business
experience

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

- Some knowledge of the business climate and rules for doing business in
The Bahamas.
- Good organizational and computer skills, particularly word-processing and
excel.
- Good writing skills

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package
including performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life
insurance, pension and opportunities for training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible for
employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through
Friday at the security area of the American Embassy, Queen Street. Completed
applications should be returned to the United States Embassy: addressed to the
Human Resources Office no later than, June 24, 2008. Telephone calls will not
be accepted.


CIBC Private
Wealth Management

CIBC Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited
is presently considering applications for a

Trust Administrator



Requirements:

Applicants should posses a degree in Business Administration or equivalent
combination of education and experience

STEP Foundation Certificate or equivalent

At least 2 years experience in trust administration

Good oral and written communication skills

Excellent organizational skills

Good computer literaCy on PC and host software.

Duties will include:

Day to day administration of a small group of client relationships
Monitor account activity from a money laundering perspective
o Communicate in an effective, professional and courteous manner
Open and close accounts
Prepare administrative, investment and risk reviews and complete corrective
action
Initiate and complete process to incorporate and dissolve companies
SProcess Investment Authorities for the purchase and sale of investments,
securities, etc,
Review and prepare documents to open bank/custody/investment
management accounts

ONLY BAHAMIANS MEETING
THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS NEED APPLY

Applications only should be submitted to
Manager, Human Resources
P.O. Box N-3933
Nassau, Bahamas
(No phone calls, faxes, emails will be accepted)

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS
JUNE 27, 2008


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 13B


Core responsibilities:

* Performs operational and compliance audits and prepare comprehensive
reports in credit areas of all branches and departments.
* Performs audit reviews and audit testing for any major new system
implemented by the Bank.
* Reports any suspicious activity or possible fraud discovered.
* Reviews and verifies the Bank's weekly and monthly consolidated
financial reports.
* Assists with special audit reviews, projects and investigations.
* Assists external auditors during year-end audits.


Knowledge, Skills andAbilities:

* Detailed understanding of the credit (loan) process of the Bank.
* Strong written communication skills, in particular of audit terminology.
* Ability to communicate regulatory compliance information to internal
persons
* Bachelor's degree along with relevant professional certification or three
(3) to five (5) years of banking experience.
* Strong accounting and auditing skills to analyze financial statements.
* Computer literate Ability to use Electronic Working papers, MS Word
and Excel.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with
experience and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and
vision) and Life Insurance; Pension Scheme.



Interested persons should apply no later than
June 27th, 2008 to:


DA 63503A
c/o The Tribune
P.O. BoxN3207
Nassau, Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


-- '- ""'".";. t "
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", v."


"I get a better sense of what

is happening in The Bahamas

from reading the Tribune.

Where other daily

newspapers fall short, the

Tribune delivers. I'mn

confident knowing The

Tribune looks out for my

interests. The Tribune is

my newspaper.


NELSON JOHNSON
TAXI DRIVER


V
\


The Tribune


_ ~_ ____ ~ _-. I


THE TRIBUNE


..~.!..


,,
.;
.----
;
~1
--


:~~
14~~F~"









THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 15B


"


Call Success For Details A CNO Tg I I



Registration in Progress lO i c l A
Swcm Traiag Clqge Iqebamt wh de Miuatty of
neL Czedl earned at Swsm ae twrrble to 1nva Soth.
eastra Uwisdnity. Graduat may als tramhr tb other
n fi.r. p.. ro. ergiotiin. Core responsibilities:

Prepares loan portfolio balance, loan repayments and loan payoff
reports using the Banks banking software.
Prepares accounting entries for posting via the Accounting Department.
S* Processes Loan applications for two main entities.
.i, / '-* Prepares letters outlining loan portfolio balances as well administrative
// l fees debited from accounts.
...................../ Liaises and answers all queries from various portfolio holders.
N s; Ev Audits work on a daily basis.


Knowledge. Skills and Abilities:
Vacancy for
Sr. Area Director, Development & Construction Core accounting/math skills to calculate, reconcile reports or files.
Basic knowledge of Bank operations to advise in or correct reconciliation
A minimum of twenty (20) years experience in the Construction industry with specific documented errors.
experience in project and/or construction management. Oral and written communication skills to interact with associates and
A minimum of ten (10) years experience leading project teams on multiple projects in remote,
international locations with single-point accountability for capital budgets and schedules. external persons.
Professional degree in technical field from an accredited university Computer literate Ability to use Electronic Working papers, MS Word
Strong leadership, management, and communication skills providing the ability to work in a and Excel.
dynamic, multi-functional matrix management environment, as a "Team Player". Pro-active, Associates degree, or Institute of Financial Services Certificate.
assertive, motivated and disciplined.
Experience in leading, managing, and coordinating design, construction, and other professionals.
Experience in qualifying, contract negotiation, recommendation, and administration of Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with
Professional and Contractor Agreements. experience and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and
Proven ability to understand the business goals of stakeholders and implement a partnering vision) and Life Insurance; Pension Scheme
relationship that will enable mutual success.
Experience in legislative/jurisdictional approval processes.
S, Proven ability to comprehend, and critique design and contract documents.
Lead and coordinate resources to achieve complete technically acceptable design and contract
documents within Design Guides, Construction Operations Manual, project scope, schedule, and Interested persons should apply no later than
cost.
Computer literacy on Microsoft Office products, Primavera P3 or Suretrak (or other scheduling) June 27th1 2008 to:
and, Primavera Expedition (orother Project Management) software applications.
Ability to reside full-time in Abaco for the full duration of the project.

DA 63503B
Please send resume to the attention of: Director of Human Resources C/O The Tribune
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. BoxAB-20571 P.O. BoxN3207
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas
OR
Email: humanresources@theabacoclub.com











vaferlq ?Blvap ^
GOLF &. OCEAN CLUB
HEALTH PROMOTION WEEi
Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas FITNESS RUN,WALK, PUSH

ENTRY FORM
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Date: Saturday, June 28. 2008
You are invited to apply for the following position currently available. Time: 6:00 a.m.


'Sous Chef

Key Responsibilities

V Required to skillfully prepare international cuisine.
V Assist in ordering food supplies and kitchen equipment as needed.
Will be required to oversee majority of cooking and methods of food
preparation.
/ Along with the Executive Chef, instruct kitchen employees in the finer
points of cooking.
/ Assist in planning meals; making of menus, and assigning prices.
/ Assist in butchering and/or prepares meats and poultry for cooking.

Qualifications

V High School diploma or equivalent
Culinary degree from approved school or completion of an approved
apprentice program is preferred
/ 5 to 10 years in different supervisory positions in the kitchens including
sous chef and/or chef d' cuisine position.
V Previous experience in a hotel or.private club preferred.
V Highly skilled cooking ability in all areas of kitchen including the ability to
prepare various ethnic cuisines.
/ Experience working in multiple operations preferred.
/ A minimum of two years international experience an asset.
V Experience in opening a property a plus

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and
dynamic organization and must be a self-starter, team player, work at the highest
standards of performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of the Director of HR & Training, hr().bakersbvclub.com or by fax
at 242-367-0804.


"Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!"


Route: at the steps of the Main Entrance to the Central Bank, north on
Frederick Street. West on Bay Street to Goodman's Bay.
Entry Fee: (FREE)
Entry Deadline: Friday, June 27'h, 2008 AT 12 NOON
For Registration, please coniaci:
Nls. L',neie Boi leg 302-98.i)7. Siephane Green 302-9883 or Mrs. Bridget Roker 302-9875
Fax. 356-4324
Awards for Winners in the Following Categories:
I Please Tick the appropriate box)
S18& ULnder
o 19- 30
O 31 -45
o 46- 59
S60 & over

PLEASE PRINT

Name:

Institution: Contact'

Emergency Contact: Phone #:
Run. 0 Stroller (Push): 0 Walk: 0

The Central Bank of Bahamas will not be held responsible for any injury/sickness
caused as a result of the fun, run walk, push. Persons with any medical conditions
should refrain from signing up for the race. Entrants should consult their physician
before participation in the event.

Signature of Participant: Date:






Refreshments will be served


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 15B


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 16B, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


Too much skin showing?





Create an office dress code


* By JOYCE M
ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) Here's
a scenario very likely to hap-
pen at a small business this sum-
mer: The owner arrives in the
morning, and is greeted not only
by the company's receptionist,
but her exposed navel. And
maybe her nose ring too.
In the summer heat, many
employees, particularly those in
their first jobs, may show up for
work in rather skimpy attire
that a small business owner feels
is unsuitable for the workplace.


The solution is to create a dress
code something that every
business has the right to do.
Tory Johnson dealt with the
issue just a few weeks ago.
Three interns, ages 19 to 21,
showed up at Johnson's Man-
hattan recruitment services firm
with tank tops, exposed bra
straps and flip-flops.
"Not only is that totally inap-
propriate in any office I
couldn't care less how hot it is
outside but since my compa-
ny focuses on the advancement
of professional women, it's dou-
bly unacceptable to me," said
Johnson, CEO 'of Women For


* Ranging From 1,332 to 2,807 sq. ft.
* Finished Shell
* Ready For Immediate Occupancy
* Parking Facilities Available
* For More Information Call 396-0000


Hire.
Johnson spoke to the young
women, and "they got it imme-
diately."
As is often the case, they had
no idea about how they should
dress for work.
Bonnie Beirne, director of
service operations for Admin-
istaff Inc., a Houston-based
company that provides human
resources outsourcing, says a
dress code should be in writing,
but even if a business doesn't
have one yet, an owner still has
the right to tell a staffer that he
or she needs to wear more
appropriate attire.
That means telling an
employee: "I realize we don't
have something in writing, but
I'm going to be putting togeth-
er a policy communicating our
dress code policy more formal-
ly."


C
I
c



N


An owner also needs to
explain to workers that how
they dress delivers a message
to customers and vendors.
"It goes back to image and
branding for your company -
what are you saying to your cus-
tomers," Beirne said.
When staffers dress for work
as if they're going to the beach,
,there's also likely to be plenty of
resentment among co-workers
who do dress more profession-
ally.
At Logos Research Systems
Inc., the dress code was ultra-
casual; even the president came
in wearing shorts. Just about
anything was OK until a new
employee showed up not only
in' sweats and a baseball cap,
but not having taken a shower
for several days running.
Dan Pritchett, vice president
for marketing and business


I i t




BAHAMAS REALTY LTD.
COMMERCIALL
n association with:

CBRE
CB RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD


development for the Belling-
ham, Wash.-based software
company, said, "sadly, we were
big chickens, we waited longer
than we should have" to address
the situation. But after about
three weeks, it had to be dealt
with and the staffer was told to
dress better and take a shower.
"The reaction was much
rejoicing because the majority
of the people couldn't take the
smell and the look," Pritchett
said.
Logos does have a dress code
now, but it's still quite lenient;
shorts, but not cut-offs, are OK.
But Pritchett said the general
attire in the company, while
casual, has become much more
serious because the president,
Pritchett's brother Bob, is dress-
ing a little more professionally.
"He got tired of being embar-
rassed" when customers, ven-
dors, even journalists would
show up wearing business
clothes while the president was
wearing shorts, Dan Pritchett
said. When Bob started dressing
better, wearing slacks and a but-
ton-down shirt, so did staffers.
There are other issues
'beyond appearance that can
make a dress code crucial, such
as worker safety. Many manu-
facturing companies have dress
codes to ensure that garments
aren't caught in machinery, for
example. Even'in an office set-
ting, safety can be an issue. If
someone drops a box of com-
puter paper and it lands on the
foot of an employee wearing
only flip-flops, that can lead to
injury and a workers compen-
sation case.


A dress code should spell out
what is and isn't appropriate for
that company. But it should be
specific: For example, if you
want to allow workers to wear
shorts, you should make clear
how long they should be, and
if you are banning cut-offs, say
so. If it's all right for women to
wear sleeveless tops but nol
tank tops, and if their blouses
shouldn't be made of see-
through fabric, you need to
state that as well.
When you do address the
issue with an individual employ-
ee, Beirne suggests doing so in a
non-threatening manner. Very
often, a worker truly doesn't
realize that his or her clothes
don't belong in a workplace.
And make it clear you're not
singling out this employee -
you'll be creating a dress code
for everyone to follow.
"Keep explaining, this is how
we want our company to be
run," she said.
With that context, employees
aren't likely to balk, as John-
son and Pritchett's company
found. If they do, then an own-
er is likely to end up dealing
with a performance and disci-
pline issue.
You should also consider the
physical environment in your
company is there a lot of
exposed skin in your office
because the air conditioning is
faulty, or because there are no
shades on the windows to pre-
vent the sun from streaming in?
If so, you should remedy the
situation, and, in the process,
acknowledge your employees'
needs.


A leading wholesaler seeks to hire a highly motivated
individual for the position of:


ADMINISTRATIVE

ASSISTANT,

The Administrative Assistant will be responsible for
coordinating office services such as records control,
follow up, and other administrative activities for a
department/division. The person will compile data
and format reports, graphs, tables, and records as
well as categorizing facts and figures for computation.

Interested persons should possess:
- An Associate's degree in business or equivalent
4 Excellent administrative/clerical skills
SAt least two years' experience working in a
business environment
SExcellent communication and presentation skills
4 Proficiency in various computer applications

Please send application letter and resume
by June 25, 2008 to:

Administrative Assistant
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
or Fax 393.0440

We thank all applicants for their interest, however;
only short-listed candidates will be contacted.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

ANNANI LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ANNANI LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137(4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 16th June, 2008 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse
Trust Ltd. of Geneva, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis,
1211 Geneva 70

Dated this 19th day of June, A.D. 2008


Credit Suisse Trust. Geneva
Liquidator




Legal Notice
NOTICE

SALMON MANAGEMENT LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) SALMON MANAGEMENT LIMITED is in
voluntary dissolution under the provisions of
Section 137(4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 17th June, 2008 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd. of Road Town, Tortola, British
Virgin Islands

Dated this 19th day of June, A.D. 2008

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator










MT. CARMEL PREPARATORY ACADEMY


HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS WANTED


English Language

Economics

Spanish


Please submit resume at the

school office or by:

Fax #325-7151


SUMMER "LEARN TO SWIM" CLASSES
June 29th to July 18th 2008



REGISTRATION AT
QUEEN'S COLLEGE POOL
SATURDAY June 21st, 2008
9:00 A.M. TO 11.00 AM















S registration forms available
on the website:
www.barracudaswimming.org


Fl ) Saffrey Square
Bay Street


RENT
R I Owww.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com


PRIME OFFICE SUITES


W IS E ROYAL-FITDEL1TY ROKERA31E ADVISORY SVCES

C F A L"
.isT. ; .:.-...' -B XlS ED & TRADO SECURmES AS OP:
II VI .- -1ONIPAYY, 16 JUNE 2008
S BSX ALL' SHARE 1MFI !NQ -.. .. .881. 5.33 I CHG -0.1,1 I %CHG 0.01 I YTD -181.42 I YTD% -8.78
*?!A" ; SCL.OSC 884As I YTD% -7.06% 12007 28.29%
W- .. .. ,"R. ,FQR MOR~ DATA & INFORMATtON
52wk. H 5~ak.Low Secunrt Previous Close Toaay's Close Change Daily Vc' EPS S D,. t pE Yield
1.95 I 18 Abaco Markets 1 84 184 000 0 135 0 000 136 O 00
11.80 11.59 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 11.80 0.00 1.086 0.400 10.9 3.39%
9.68 9.40 Bank of Bahamas 9.43 9.43 0.00. 0.643 0.160 14.7 1.70%
0.99 0.85 Benchmark 0.89 0.89 0.00 -0.647 0.030 N/M 3.37%
3.74 3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.60 3.60 0.00 0.209 0.090 17.2 2.50%
2.70 1.30 Fidelity Bank 2.35 2.35 0.00 0.055 0.040 42.7 1.70%
14.10 10.60 Cable Bahamas 14.00 14.00 0.00 1.121 0.240 12.5 1.71%
3.15 2.21 Collna Holdings 2.87 2.87 0.00 0.046 0.040 62.4 1.39%
8.50 4.80 Commonwealth Bank (81) 7.30 7.30 0.00 0.440 0.300 16.6 4.11%
7.22 3.23 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.40 3.30 -0.10 0.131 0.052 25.2 1.58%
3.00 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.95 2.95 0.00 0.308 0.040 9.6 1.36%
8.00 6.02 Famguard 8.00 8.00 0.00 0.728 0.280 11.0 3.50%
13.01 12.50 Finco 12.50 12.50 0.00 0.650 0.570 19.2 4.56%
14.75 12.30 FirstCaribbean 12.30 12.30 0.00 0.651 0.470 18.9 3.82%
6.10 5.05 Focol (S) 5.55 5.55 0.00 2,213 0.386 0.140 14.4 2.52%
1.00 1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1.00 0.41 Freeport Concrete 0.44 0.44 0.00 0.035 0.000 12.6 0.00%
8.00 6.79 ICD Utilities 6.79 6.79 0.00 0.411 D.300 16.5 4.42%
12.50 8.60 J. S. Johnson 12.00 12.00 0.00 1.023 0.620 11.7 5.17%
1000 1000 Premier Real Estale 1000 10 00 0 OO 0 180 C0 ,00O i 6 O00a
,-* .. . ':. ," :;.. : PeIy Over-Thre-Counter securetl
52wk.HI 52nk.Lo. Symbol Bid S Ask Last Price Veeekl, '.01 EPS Di. 1 P E Yield
14 60 14 25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14 60 1560 1460 1 160 0600 134 4 11 '
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
054 020 RND Holdings 0 35 040 0 3 .0 00;3 C 000 N ..1 0 00
W" 1- ". Coflna Over-The-counter Securt es
4100 4100 ABDAB 4100 4300 41 00 4 450 2 750 90 6 70:,
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.80 15.60 14.00 1.160 0.900 13.4 6.16%
055 0 40 RND Holdings 045 055 045 0033 0 000 N'M 0 OO'
y- : .... :" ..i,'' ,' .MX 'td i tu Funds
52wk.HI 52.k.LO. Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 r.lonths DI. Yelao
1.3152 1.2485 Collna Bond Fund 1.315228** 1.58% 5.47%
3.0008 2.7399 Collna MSI Preferred Fund 2.998763"* -0.07% 8.13%
1.3932 1.3427 Collna Money Market Fund 1.393169**** 1.31% 3.76%
3.7969 3.2920 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.6707"** -3.32% 14.65%
12.2142 11.6049 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.2142-* 2.35% 5.73%
100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.00"*
100.0000 98.2100 CFAL Global Equity Fund 99.956603* -0.04% -0.04%
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.00"*
10 5000 96346 Fidellty Internallonal Investrrent Fund 100060"" -4 70%, -4 70%;
. ..'..- -- n " '" t Terms N AV. Key
B'S AL- L .l. -a E INO E 16 De.: C2 I OuO ,-j Co0 ELD aS l ; r-.;-l r al...,ee.e e I.0.7l.e :1-5 *
52wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid S Buying price of Collna and Fidelity 31 December 2007
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask S Selling price of Cotlnaand fidelity ." 30 May 2008
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price "" 31 April 2008
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week ".. 30 April 2008
Change Change In closing price from day td day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mts ...... June 2008
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV S Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 100
S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/812007
iSl) 1 3Ic.. Slc-, -,i.1I E"ne.l.'e Dale I I 20u'
'T TTABDl O CALU OFPA 242-602-7tO010 I PsiBITF.YULr&*-.L7.74 I1 P I APITAL AAKtS-2-39IqOOOI FOR I P MORA 3ATA IA&I4FRMAtION OA L. Sq QtO e 4-'


j


I








THE TIBUNETHURDAY, UNE 1, 208,SPAEESS


Billionaire



investor off



to smoother



start as Ford



shareholder


* By BILL VLASIC
c.2008 New York Times
News Service
DETROIT After waging
epic battles with management
at Chrysler and General
Motors, the billionaire Kirk
Kerkorian is off to a more
peaceful start as a major share-
holder in the Ford Motor
Company.
Kerkorian, 91, who has
amassed a 5.6 per cent stake in
Ford, held his first meeting
Tuesday with the automaker's
executive chairman, William
C Ford Jr, and chief executive,
Alan R Mulally. -
Ford Motor described the
meeting as positive, and indi-
cated that the company con-
sidered the investment by
Kerkorian's Tracinda Corpo-
ration as a sign of confidence
in Ford's turnaround
prospects.
"The informal meeting was
positive and a chance'for the
leaders of both companies to
discuss elements of Ford's
transformation plan that we
have announced publicly,"
Ford said in a statement. "We
continue to welcome confi-
dence in Ford by our various


shareholders."
A Ford spokesman declined
to elaborate on the meeting.
There was no immediate com-
ment from Tracinda.
Tracinda completed a ten-
der offer last week to acquire
20 million shares of Ford for
$170 million, in addition to 100
million shares that it had
already bought since April.
In regulatory filings, Kerko-
rian has praised Mulally and
his plans to streamline Ford
and return the company to
profitability after losing a com-
bined $15.3 billion in 2006 and
2007. But Ford executives
have privately expressed con-
cern, given Kerkorian's previ-
ous forays into the auto indus-
try at Chrysler and GM.
In 1995, Kerkorian started
an unsuccessful takeover
attempt at Chrysler that led
management to seek a merger
with the German automaker
Daimler-Benz.
In 2006, Kerkorian and his
chief adviser, Jerome York,
tried to push GM into an
alliance with Nissan and
Renault. When GM rejected
the deal, Kerkorian sold off
his stake in the company and
York resigned from its board.


The Nassau and Freeport

offices of


RCEWATERHOUSEF OPERS a








on

Friday, 20 June 2008


To alTow staff to enjoy their


Annual Fun Day


We regret any inconvenience
this may cause.

Normal working hours will resume on
Monday, 23 June 2008.





LEB[IY[U


Notice is hereby given that the Twenty-eigth (28th) An-
nual General Meeting of THE PUBLIC WORKERS'
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LIMITED will
be held at The British Colonial Hilton Hotel, West Bay
Street, on Friday, July 4, 2008 commencing at 6:30 p.m.
for the following purposes:

* To receive the report of The Board of Directors.
* To receive the Audited Accounts for 2007
* To elect members of The Board of Directors, and
Supervisory Committee
* To discuss and approve the budget for 2009.

All eligible members wishing to run for a position on the
Board of Directors or Supervisory Commitee are asked to
submit their names to any of the Credit Union's Offices
in Nassau or Freeport, no later than Friday, June 27, 2008
by 4:00 p.m.

All members are urged to attend, and
refreshments will be served!


Northwest plans




more fleet cuts


* By MICHELINE
MAYNARD
c.2008 New York Times
News Service
NORTHWEST Airlines said
yesterday that it planned to
eliminate more planes from its
fleet, including Boeing, Airbus
and McDonnell Douglas jets,
by the end of December, its sec-
ond cut in capacity this year.
The airline attributed the
reductions, the latest by a major
airline, to the record price of
jet fuel, which has nearly dou-
bled in the last year.
Northwest will ground 14
Boeing 757 and Airbus jets dur-
ing the final three months of
2008. It also said that only 61
of its aging DC-9 jets would
remain in its fleet by the end of
December. It had 94 DC-9s at
the beginning of 2008, and 103 a
year ago.
Overall, Northwest is reduc-
ing its domestic and interna-
tional flying by up to 9.5 per
cent, the airline said in the reg-
ulatory filing. In its previous
round of cuts, announced in
April, Northwest said it would
reduce flying capacity by about
seven per cent this year.
Northwest's chief executive,
Douglas M Steenland, said the
airline did not plan to eliminate
any cities from its schedule.
"We expect to accomplish


this with fewer frequencies,"
Steenland said in an interview,
referring to the number of
flights the airline operates to a
particular city each day.
Some jobs will be cut as a
result of the flight reductions,
but the airline did not say how
many. Northwest said it hoped
the reductions would come
through buyouts and voluntary
retirement programmes.
Northwest had already
announced plans to reduce its
DC-9 jets, but it had not speci-
fied whether it would retire
them or simply idle them in
hopes that traffic would
strengthen. But Steenland said
Tuesday that the airline had
decided to ground them.
Airlines have been hurt by
the rise in the price of jet fuel,
which is up 83.6 per cent in 12
months, according to the Inter-
national Air Transport Associ-
ation.
Several carriers, including
American, Continental, Delta
and United have announced
plans to retire planes and elim-
inate flights.
They are also raising fares,
imposing fuel surcharges and
adding fees, like a $15 charge
for checking bags that has been
or will be put in place by Amer-
ican, United and US Airways.
The rise in jet fuel "is signifi-
cantly increasing the cost struc-


ESSAY COMPETITION



The Department of Public Service will host an
Essay Competition as one of the activities for the
Ninth Annual Public Service Week. The
Competition is open to Junior and Senior School
Students.

Students interested in participating should write
a 250-300 words (Junior High), and 450-500 words
(Senior High), essay on the topic: "The Public
Service Focused on Improving Customer
Service."

The deadline for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Ms. Antoinette Thompson,
Deputy Permanent Secretary, Department of Public
Service, is Friday, 27th June, 2008.

A Dell Desktop 2400 computer system will be
awarded to the- winner in each category.

The winners will be announced during the Ninth
Annual Public Service Week Awards Ceremony
scheduled for 11th October, 2008.






F'J HIGGS & JOHNSON
Counsel & Attorneys-at-Law

invites applications for an attorney for our Abaco
Office.

Applicants must have a minimum of 3-5 years
experience in Litigation and Real Estate,
demonstrate an ability to work independently
and possess a thorough working knowledge and
technical competence in the areas mentioned.
(Applicants with experience in only one of the
mentioned areas may also apply).

Successful applicants can look forward to
competitive remuneration and benefits.


Apply in confidence to:

Vacancy
P. O. Box N-3247
Nassau, Bahamas
or via email at: gbastian(lh ig siohnson.com
gbatlaa g sjohnson.com


ture" for the airlines, Steenland
said.
"It puts us and others in a
position where we need to pass
through those costs to our cus-
tomers."
He acknowledged that the
fare increases, charges and fees
would deter some passengers
from flying. "As costs get
passed through and fares go up,
there will be a reduction in trav-
el," Steenland said. "The num-
ber of seats is going to be
reduced."
In April, Northwest and
Delta agreed to merge in a deal
that would create the nation's


biggest airline, ahead of Amer
ican. The two airlines hope 1(
receive federal approval by thi
end of the year.
Both airlines filed for Chap
ter 11 protection in 2005, whej
fuel prices spiked in the wake o
Hurricane Katrina.
Steenland said his airline dih
not anticipate making mort
capacity cuts in 2008. But h(
said, "If things change we'll
have to respond. At these fu:
prices, you watch every drop.
Northwest shares rose I1
cents, to $6.78 in regular trading
before the latest cuts wer<
announced.


Looking foriilgrn a pl chIaeng



Burns House Group of Companies is looking
for an ambitious Marketing Manager with a
proven track record in consumer marketing.

Burns House Group of Companies (BHG) is the
leading beverage company in the Bahamas: With its
broad portfolio of consumer brands, extending from
beer to spirits and wines, BHG is the market leader
and trend setter in the respective categories.

Within our marketing department we seek to fill the
position of Marketing Manager. In this position you
will be responsible for a large portfolio of consumer
brands like Budweiser beer, Ricardo rums, Climax
energy drink, Hennessy cognac and Carlo Rossi
wines to name a few
The marketing manager we are looking for is a team
player has profound knowledge of the marketing mix
and is an excellent planner with great passion for
execution.

BHG will offer you a challenging environment with
international growth potential.
We offer an above -market average incentive
programme and international training opportunities.


Profile of the ideal candidate
* Bachelor Degree in Marketing or Business
Administration is essential; Masters in Business
an advantage
* 3-5 years of supervisory experience in marketing
* Team building skills
* Consumer goods Marketing experience

Interested?
Send your Resume by email to:
ccash@burnshouSe.com or fax to:
Human Resources Manager: (242) 326-6078



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2005
IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 81
Equity Side
NOTICE
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1969
The Petition of PEARLINE BULLARD AND DORIS STURRUP
both of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of:
ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate in the Settlement of
George Town in the Island of Exuma one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and being Lot Number 137 and
bounded on the NORTH by a ten (10) feet wide public road in the
said Settlement of George Town and running thereon Ninety-six and
Ninety Hundredths (96.90) feet on the EAST by Lot Number One
Hundred and Thirty-eight (138) of the said Settlement of George
Town and running thereon One Hundred and Nine and Sixty-one
Hundredths (109.61) feet SOUTH by Lot Number One Hundred
and Forty-two (142) of the said Settlement and running thereon
Ninety-seven and Twenty-five Hundredths (97.25) feet WEST by
Lot Number One Hundred and Thirty-six (136) and running thereon
One Hundred and Sixteen and Seventy-two Hundredths (116.72)
feet.
The Petitioners, PEARLINE BULLARD AND DORIS STURRUP,
claim to be the owners of the fee simple estate in possession of the
pieces parcels or lots of land hereinbefore described and the Petitioners
have made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959,
to have their title to the said land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared, a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said
Act.
Copies of the field plan may be inspected during normal office hours
at:-
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Second Floor, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
(b) The Chambers of HOPE STRACHAN & CO., Equity House,
Mount Royal Avenue North (Hawkins Hill),'Nassau, Bahamas.
Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or right of
dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized in the said
Petition shall on or before the 21st day of July, A.D. 2008 file in the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioners or undersigned a Statement
of Claim in the prescribed form veruicd by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such personal to file and serve a Statement
of Claim on or before the 21 st day of July, A.D. 2008 will operate
as a bar to such claim.
HOPE STRACHAN & CO
Chambers,
Equity House,
Mount Royal Avenue North (Hawkins Hill),
Nassau. Bahamas


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 17E


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 18B, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


C P


Tribune Comics


CALVIN & HOBBES
REMEMBER LS UARt, HEN WWOJT QUESTION, TAT WAS |ES, %JT IT BTUI
IT PARED AULLEK? IT ONE OF TE WS EXPE- CARACER.
tWRED SOM R WW* MOD FENCES OF W LIFE.
N MRMAYESk FIRE.r--- --


DENNIS THE MENACE


'CAN YOU BELIEVE T1uAT, RUFF? THAT
COW1oY'S TALKIN'To tlIS HORSE "


Sudoku Puzzle
Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday

8 3

9 2

4 7
1 -9

2 87361

4 6

2 6 134579

9 33

7 5Level 9 6 2 6/18
Difficulty Level A A 6/18


Kakuro Puzzle


MARVIN


TIGER


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
V
cI'P YI~/!ffTfr PAMP CAMTLi W4LL4
'olI ALL. ARECOLPA AINlTMYFA 4cKXI
Me? I.


Across
1 To be without an escort is
incautious (9)
8 Scent the beginning of a
romance (5)
9 Commanding officer tried
new explosive (7)
10 Place free of corruption (6)
11 A character in literature?
(6)
12 Made rare excursion to
find the river (8)
15 He remains detached, in
the main (8)
18 .A sound to disturb (6)
20 Things said about fifty
planets (6)
21 Defames a large number
and gets into a row (7)
22 She's in dire need (5)
23 He may investigate an
insect and its changing
form (9)


Down
2 Ring in the nose as a hal-
ter (5)
3 Latest version of a quiet
duet perhaps (6)
4 Held back free trade when
in the red (8)
5 Blue Viennese flower (6)
6 Downtrodden shoe-cleaner
(7)
7 Furniture dealers are famil-
iar with it (4,5)
11 Be prone to ambush
(3,2,4)
13 and 19 Down:
Authorisation needed by
new union members (8,5)
14 Rejoiced in godlier fashion
(7)
16 Gives someone a sharp
reminder? (6)
17 Some restrictions are
severe (6)
19 See 13 Down


Yesterday's Cryptic Solution Yesterday's Easy Solution


Across: 1 Premium, 4 Peach, 7
Need, 8 Grasping, 10 Spirit lamp, 12
Beheld, 13 Ostend, 15 Impoverish, 18
Consumes, 19 Limb, 20 Range, 21
Raiment.
Down: 1 Pants, 2 Eyesight, 3 Myrtle,
4 Past master, 5 Aria, 6 Haggard, 9
Fieldmouse, 11 Definite, 12 Bouncer,
14 Co-heir, 16 Habit, 17 Anon.


Across: 1 Cabaret, 4 Dogma, 7
Envy, 8 Drawback, 10 Peripheral, 12
Legion, 13 Shelve, 15 Boisterous,
18 Narrowly, 19 Gala, 20 Dated, 21
Macbeth.
Down: 1 Cheap, 2 Beverage, 3
Turner, 4 Down-at-heel, 5 Grab, 6
Askance, 9 Up to no good, 11
Allocate, 12 Learned, 14 Asylum, 16
Smash, 17 Fret.


Across
1 Direct from source
(5-4)
8 A hard, dark wood (5)
9 Style of dressing (7)
10 Search about (6)
11 Mediterranean island
(6)
12 Put off (8)
15' East African country
(8)
18 French novelist, d.
1850 (6)
20 Crudely
colourful (6)
21 Ivy League university
(7)
22 A preference (5)
23 Preparation (9)


Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number.on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.


Yesterday's
Sidoku Answer


- : '-,- 'Chess,
8564


Nigel Short v Arnar Gunnarsson,
European Cup, Turkey 2007. Just
like its soccer equivalent, the
chess Eurocup has many teams
containing grandmaster
mercenaries to boost the core of
local experts. So the UIKs best
known GM found himself
playing board five of six for
Bosna Sarajevo. He was low
down the order because of
some recent setbacks due to
poor health. But Short showed
his class with an unbeaten
4.5/6, including a neat finish in
today's puzzle where a virtually
forced sequence induced his
Icelandic opponent to resign
after just three turns. What
happened?


Down
2 Elephant tusk (5)
3 The ringed planet (6)
4 Unsophisticated (8)
5 Misrepresentation (6)
6 A US whiskey (7)
7 Produced artificially
(9)
11 Rebuke severely (9)
13 Coastal region (8)
14 Absorb total attention
of (7)
16 Solution (6)
17 Divided (6)
19 Tapestry for a wall (5)


Yesterday's
Kakuro Answer

13 98
3521 6189
23 293 7 97
12 79
1 3 2 113 5 7
1 3 719


- ,-


Chess8564: 1 Oh6~8i (ifa cd3 2 mates wQg7o
wins the queen) 2 fg6 (not now 2 f6 Rg8) fg6 3
Bxg6! when if Rx34 Qxh7 mate or Qxg6 4 xf8+ or
Qe7 4 Bxh7! when lack loses atleast two pawv
while White keeps up his attack.


Target


The
Target

words In
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)


HOW many words of four letters
or more can you make from the
lettersshown here? In making a
word, ach letter may be used
once only. Each must contain the
centre letter and there must be
at least one nine-letter word.
No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 22; very good 34; excellent
45 (or more). Solution tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION
elite enter entire feet feint felt
fertile fete filet filter finite fleet
flint flintier flirt flit fret frit
inert INFERTILE inlet inter
left lent lift lint lite litre niftier
nitre refit relent rent rete rift
rite teen ter tier tile tiler tine
tinier tire tree trifle trine


Contract Bridge

by Steve Becker


Minor Deviation Pays Off


East dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.
NORTH
*K4
VAJ543
*765
+4972
WEST EAST
*Q98763 45
S1086 t Q97
*K10 *AQJ9432
454 486
SOUTH
AJ 102
K2
*8
+AKQJ 103
The bidding:
East South West North
3* Dble Pass 4V
Pass 54 Pass 6
Opening lead king of diamonds.
A falsecard need not be flagrant to
be successful. Sometimes, the play
of a seemingly insignificant spot-
card can be enough to lead the oppo-
sition astray.
Consider this deal from a French
tournament. North-South did well to
reach the good club slam after East's
opening pre-empt, and West led the
diamond king. East overtook the
king with the ace and returned the
diamond queen, South ruffing high.
Declarer's only problem was


what to do with his J-10 of spades.
Many options were open to him, but
the simplest and best approach
appeared to be to try to establish
dummy's hearts by cashing the K-A
and ruffing a heart. If the outstanding
hearts divided 3-3, as in the actual
deal, or if the queen fell doubleton,
his problems would immediately be
over. Even if the hearts divided 4-2
and the queen did not fall, other
chances would remain.
So at trick three, South cashed the
ace of trumps, planning next to draw
a second round before tackling the
heart suit. But this was where East
found the subtle play that diverted
South from the winning course.
Instead of routinely following low on
the ace of clubs, East dropped the
eight!
This falsecard had a telling effect
on declarer, who reasoned that East
would not have dropped the eight
unless it was his only club. Surely,
South thought, East would have
retained the eight if he could, hoping
for a possible overruff of dummy.
Declarer therefore abandoned his
plan to establish hearts in favor of
ruffing two spades in dummy with
the 9-7 of clubs. But when South led
a spade to the king and returned a
spade toward his hand, East pro-
duced the six of clubs to sink the
seemingly unsinkable slam.


Tomorrow: Assembling the necessary clues.
02008 King Features Syndicate Inc.


APT 3-G


BLONDIE


CRYPTIC PUZZLE


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THE TIBUNETHURDAY, UNE 1, 208,SPAEESS


Flintstones and the Jetsons
rather than Stewie, the diaboli-
cal infant from "Family Guy";
Peter, the buffoonish patriarch
of the Griffin family; and Brian,
the family dog who behaves like
a person a person who
smokes and drinks martinis.
But in recent months, big
brands like Coca-Cola, Subway
and White Castle have been
borrowing for their marketing
efforts characters from "Family
Guy," which has been criticised
for everything from anti-Semi-
tism and sexism to homopho-
bia and overall disgustingness.
"Looking at who our cus-
tomers are and what program-


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE C. FILSAIME OF WEST
STREET, P.O. BOX N-720, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizeinof The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12TH
day of JUNE, 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MONIQUE GABRIELLE EVARISTE
OF BEATRICE AVENUE, P.O. BOX-CR-54834, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person.who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization, should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12TH day of JUNE, 2008 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, ELIZABETH ALECIA
WEECH of Nassau, Bahamas intend to change my name
to ELIZABETH ALECIA MACKEY. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT-TO-CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, MICHELLE MONIQUE
GREENE of Nassau, Bahamas intend to change my name
to MICHELLE MONIQUE MILLER. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.

GN 698







GOVERNMENT NOTICE


OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND SURVEYS

NOTICE OF TENDER

Tenders are invited for the sale of the following
Government vehicles.

Two (2) Ford Rangers
(1) Black 1998
(1) White 1998

Sealed tenders should be submitted to the

Director
Department of Lands and Surveys
East Bay and Armstrong Streets
P.O. Box N-592
Nassau, The Bahamas

Deadline for tender is June 30, 2008.

Vehicles can be viewed at the Department's parking
lot between the hours of 9:30 am to 4:30 pm.

For additional information please contact the Director
at 502-1200 or 322-2328.


* By STUART ELLIOTT
c.2008 New York Times
News Service
THE characters on the Fox
television series "Family Guy"
make tasteless jokes about sex,
AIDS, religion and bodily func-
tions, purposely offending just
about every group of people
you could name.
So why are they all of a sud-
den the darlings of Madison
Avenue?
Mainstream advertisers nor-
mally gravitate toward whole-
some characters from main-
stream shows that steer clear of
hot buttons. Think Snoopy, the


read Insigh
o n6 M o nd ays-
-I--'lell


Crude characters still


find advertising work


ming they like, 'Family Guy'
fell into that," said Kim Bart-
ley, vice president for marketing
and site development at White
Castle System in Columbus,
Ohio.
"We're looking for teens and
young adults and young-at-
heart adults," she added, "who
are interested in being a part of
something different."
Beginning this week, the
White Castle restaurant chain
is introducing a campaign that
features members of the ani-
mated cast of "Family Guy" like
Stewie and Brian. There will be
cups bearing likenesses of the
characters, posters in stores and
radio commercials by JWT, part
of the WPP Group.
"Our brand is quirky," Bart-
ley said, "not a brand like Burg-
er King or McDonald's."
That made the agreement to
use the "Family Guy" cast for
the campaign "a good fit," she
added.
The trend on Madison
Avenue to develop ads with car-
toon characters that not so long
ago would have had their
anthropomorphic mouths
washed out with soap is fairly
recent. The concept gained pop-
ularity with "The Simpsons,"
accelerated with "South Park"
and continues with the dys-
functional Griffins from "Fam-
ily Guy," which along with "The
Simpsons" is part of the Sun-
day night lineup on Fox Broad-
casting, part of the News Corp.
"The Simpsons" is probably the
mildest of the three, with
"South Park" at the other
extreme.
Hiring rude, crude 'toons
instead of warm and fuzzy ani-
mated characters "goes with the
times," said Ira Mayer, presi-
dent and publisher at The
Licensing Letter, a newsletter
in New York owned by EPM
Communications.
"Edginess is acceptable,"
Mayer said, particularly in
appealing to teenagers. He
offered as an example the fact
that girls are wearing T-shirts
in public with provocative slo-
gans "that 10 years ago girls
never would have worn."
As unusual as it may be to
license animated misfits for ads
and merchandise, Mayer said,
"with a cartoon, character you:,,
still have a certain level of con-
trol and can control the offen-
siveness." With an actor or a
rock star, on the other hand,
you take your chances, he said.
The Subway chain of sand-
wich shops. used Peter Griffin
- a working-class guy with a
New England accent in a
campaign at the end of last year
that included television com-
mercials and signs in stores.
The ads promoted a new
menu item, the Subway Feast,
that Would appeal to the char-
acter if he were real, because it
is "a large sandwich with lots
of meat," said Tony Pace, chief
marketing officer at the mar-
keting arm of Subway in Mil-
ford, Conn., known as the Sub-
way Franchisee. Advertising
Fund Trust.
"Peter's a good representa-
tion of the people who are inter-
ested in the Feast," Pace said,
and "Family Guy" is a show
"that appeals to that target.
audience."
Still, there was "definitely a
cadre of folks who thought it
was a little controversial," he
added, particularly "some cus-
tomers and some people in our
system who were not big fans,
of being involved with it at all."
So Subway and its national
agency, MMB, which was
involved in the campaign, were
careful in development to make
sure that "relative to the con-
tent of the show, it was pretty
tame," Pace said.
For instance, of the half-
dozen scripts that were consid-
ered for the commercials, "four
we couldn't use," he added,
laughing, because "we're still a
family restaurant."
"Peter was a bit of entertain-
ment to get people to pay a lit-
tle more attention," Pace said.
"We like to use things that are
culturally relevant to sell our
product, but you have to appeal
to the target audience without
denigrating your brand."
For the Feast, "sales were
pretty good during that time"
the campaign ran, he added,
and Subway would consider
another "Family Guy" cam-
paign.


GN694










GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF HEALTH & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH


TENDER FOR MAINTENANCE OF GENERATORS

The Department of Public Health, Ministry of Health & Social Development invites
suitably qualified firms to submit bids to provide monthly maintenance for the generators
located at the following at the following Community Clinics on the Family Islands.

Cat Island
Fox Town
Governor's Harbour
Harbour Island
Inagua
Miriam Green
Nicholl's Town
Spanish Wells

Tender documents outlining scope of services may be obtained from the office of the
Undersecretary General Administration, Ministry of Health & Social Development,
between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked "Tenders for Maintenance of
Generators: and delivered on or before June 24th, 2008 to:-

Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Health & Social Development
Meeting St.
P.O. Box N-3730
Nassau, The Bahamas

The Department of Public Health, Ministry of Health & Social Development reserves the
right to reject any or all tenders.



TENDER TO SERVICE AIR CONDITIONERS
ON THE FAMILY ISLANDS

The Department of Public Health, Ministry of Health & Social Development invites
suitably qualified firms to submit bids to provide servicing for air conditioning systems at
the Community Clinics on the following Family Islands:

Nicholls Town,.Andros
Fresh Creek( And'os ,
Mangrove Cay, Andros
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Cooper's Town, Abaco
Bimini
Crooked Island

Tender documents outlining scope of services may be obtained from the office of the
Undersecretary -.General Administration, Ministry of Health & Social Development,
between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday to Friday.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked "Tenders to Service Air
Conditioners on the Family Islands" are delivered on or before June 24th, 2008 to:-

Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Health & Social Development
Meeting St.
P.O. Box N-3730
Nassau, The Bahamas

The Department of Public Health, Ministry of Health & Social Development reserves the
right to reject any or all tenders



TENDER TO SERVICE AIR-CONDITION SYSTEMS

The Ministry of Health & Social Development invites suitably qualified firms to submit
bids to provide monthly preventative maintenance on a-

Central Air-conditioning System

and quarterly preventative maintenance on several-

Wall Units

located in the Project Building in the Royal Victoria Gardens, Nassau, Bahamas.

Tender documents outlining the scope of services may be obtained from the office of
the Undersecretary General Administration; Ministry of Health & Social Development,
between the hours of 9:00 a.m to 5:00 p.m. Monday to Friday.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked "Tenders to Service Air-
conditioning Systems": and delivered on or before June 24th, 2008 to:-


Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Health & Social Development
Meeting St.
P.O. Box N-3730
Nassau, The Bahamas

The Department of Health & Social Development reserves right to reject any or all
tenders.


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 19B


THE TRIBUNE








I 1I


President's Circle


Congratulations on making the distinguished

British American Financial President's Circle 2008

Clockwise from top; Frederick Arnaly, FPc-ihouda Bodle,
Carissa Collie, Verenna Dawkins. Michael Fr;nrcis, Helen
Gardiner, Ashra Johnson, Jonece Johnson, Tobintte
Munnings, Pharnes Louis. Patrice Rolle, Margel Smith &
Athena Turnquest


242-461-1000 1 www.babfinancial.com R British
Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 .Abaco 242-367-5601 ..rican
r 1 N A N C S A k


MORTGAGES MUTUAL FUNDS LIFE. INSURANCE HEALTH INSURANCE
ANNUITIES & PENSIDON PLANS FINANCIAL PLANNING & INVESTMENTS


Bush targets offshore to


combat oil price spike


* By H JOSEF HEBERT
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) A
House panel put off a vote
Wednesday on extending Con-
gress' ban on offshore drilling,
even as President Bush was
poised to publicly renew his call
for lawmakers to open United
States coastal waters to oil and
gas development.
Drilling for oil and gas off
nearly all the American coast-
line has been banned over the
past quarter-century, in part to
protect tourism and to lessen
the chances of beach-blackening
spills.
Now, $4-a-gallon gasoline
prices are a part of people's dai-
ly lives and motorists are clam-
oring for something to be done
about the record price of oil,
much of it produced in foreign
countries.
In response, Bush was to call
again Wednesday for explo-
ration, arguing that it's high
time to battle high prices with
increased domestic production.
He planned to ask Congress to
lift the drilling moratoria that
have been in effect since 1981 in
more than 80 per cent of the
country's Outer Continental
Shelf and to let states help to
decide where to allow drilling.
"The president believes Con-
gress shouldn't waste any more
time," White House press sec-
retary Dana Perino told The
Associated Press on Tuesday.
"He will explicitly call on Con-
gress to...pass legislation lifting
the congressional ban on safe,
environmentally friendly off-
shore oil drilling."
Keith Hennessey, the director
of the president's economic
council, said that Bush will lift a
parallel executive order ban-
ning offshore drilling if Con-
gress does likewise with the law.
Asked why Bush doesn't act
first and lift the ban, Hennessey
said: "He thinks that probably
the most productive way to
work with this Congress is to
try to do it tandem."
Bush, in a Rose Garden state-
ment, will also call on Congress
to make it easier for oil refiner-
ies to be expanded.
Even a quick change in law is


expected to have no immediate
effect on oil supply. The impact,
Hennessey said, "is definitely
measured in years." But he said
that allowing a greater oil sup-
ply in future years could trig-
ger the market to use more sup-
ply now and reduce the price
of oil.
For their part, some lawmak-
ers had their own plan: Legisla-
tion that would continue the
ban into late 2009, and which
had been scheduled to be con-
sidered Wednesday by the
House Appropriations Com-
mittee. But the session was
postponed because the com-
mittee was focusing on disaster
relief measures involving the
Midwest flooding.
Congressional Democrats,
joined by some GOP lawmak-
ers from coastal states, have
opposed lifting the prohibition
that has barred energy compa-
nies from waters along both the
East and West coasts and in the
eastern Gulf of Mexico for 27
years.
On Monday, GOP presiden-
tial candidate John McCain
made lifting the federal ban on
offshore oil and gas develop-
ment a key part of his energy
plan. McCain said states should
be allowed to pursue energy
exploration in waters near their
coasts and get some of the roy-
alty revenue.
Senator Barack Obama, the
Democratic candidate for pres-
ident, opposes lifting the ban
on offshore drilling and says
that allowing exploration now
wouldn't affect gasoline prices
for at least five years.
McCain called for reform of
the laws governing the oil
futures trading market, and
drew a standing ovation from
his audience Wednesday when
he repeated his day-old support
for an end to the federal mora-
torium on offshore oil drilling.
He favours allowing states to
decide whether to explore off-
shore waters.
That drew a rebuttal from
Obama, who said his opponent
had switched positions from
when he first ran for president
in 2000. "I think he continues
to find himself being pushed
further and further to the right


in ways that in my mind don't
show a lot of leadership," he
said.
Obama also said there is "no
way that allowing offshore
drilling would lower gas prices
right now. At best you are look-
ing at five years or more down
the road."
New Mexico Governor Bill
Richardson, energy secretary
during the Clinton administra-
tion, called it "another bad
idea."
"It's going to take 10 years
to fully get that oil out of the
ocean. It's a fragile ecosystem,"
he said on CBS's "The Early
Show."
"You know this president, all
he wants to do is drill, drill, drill.
There is very little on conser-
vation, on fuel efficiency for
vehicles. Just last week the Con-
gress failed to pass a solar tax
credit give more incentives to
renewable energy, sola, and
wind. A one track mind drill
drill drill that's not going to
work," Richardson said.
The 574 million acres of fed-
eral coastal water that are off-
limits are believed to hold near-
ly 18. billion barrels of undis-
covered, recoverable oil and 77
trillion cubic feet of natural gas,
according to the Interior
Department. The country each
year uses about 7.6 billion bar-
rels of oil and 21 trillion cubic
feet of natural gas.
In another development,
Governor Charlie Crist of Flori-
da has dropped his long-stand-
ing support for the federal gov-
ernment's moratorium on off-
shore drilling and endorsed
McCain's proposal to let states
decide for themselves.
When Republicans held the
majority, the House twice voted
to lift the ban, only to have the
legislation die in the Senate.
The Serate last month by a 56-
42 vote rejected a GOP energy
plan that would have allowed
states to avoid the federal ban if
they wanted energy develop-
ment off their coast.
Bush's father, President
George H W Bush, issued a
parallel executive drilling ban
in 1990, which was extended by
President Clinton and then by
the current president until 2012.


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------ - ------ ----- --- I-e -


PAGE 20B, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008

IN LOVING MEMORY OF :

IL RED ALVIN ELCOCK
1938 18th June 2007
P A father lies in peaceful sleep,
His earthly cares are o'er;
2 And we who are left to mourn him,
SWill see him smile no more.
But he is not gone forever,
We shall meet hitn once again;
In the cloudless land with God
above,
J Where happiness knows no end.
We need not weep or shed a tear,
For the days are near at hand;
When we again will see him,
In that ever-promised land.
0--


Missed by your loving wife, Verna,
children, Avril Randy and Hal: your
t't sisters Mildred, Barbara and Monica;
brothers Christopher, Peter and
Leslie and your many nieces,
nephews and friends.









Lufen and Party Etienne and other
family members of the late

Minister Correan
Flossie Delancy




wishes to extend heartfelt thanks to all
w ho have expressed acts of kindness
through prayers, telephone calls and
other kind gestures during our great loss. The family is sincerely appreciative.
Special thanks to National Overseer Bishop Elgamet Rahmiug and The
Church of God of Prophecy National Office, Bishop Franklin M. & Mrs.
Ferguson and The Church of God of Prophecy East Street Tabernacle
family, especially the Band, Women's Auxiliary and Prayer band
Departments, Bishop Joseph Swann, Bishop Moses A. Johnson, Lynette
McPhee, Staff of Festiva Timeshare, Management and Staff of Restview
Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd., family and friends. You have
helped us during this difficult time, to realize that yesterday is but a dream,
tomorrow is but a vision, but today well-lived makes every yesterday a
dream of happiness and every tomorrow a vision of hope. May God
.continue to bestow His blessings upon you!
i -- -- ^ ^ _^ _- ---- --- __ ^ _ _^ __ __ _ _i


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


'~Cr~Y~S


L -


We the family of the late Khodee Valdez Da\is extend our heartfelt
gratitude and appreciation to all of our relatives, friends. colleagues and
neighbours for sharing lth us during our time of bereavement.
Your prayers, telephone calls, visits, words of consolation, floral
arrangements, cards. expres,,ion of love. food and numerous acts of
kindness, give us the strength and courage to carr\ on Please continue
to keep us in your prayers as we awaut that glorious d\ w hen we w ill
see our beloved Khodee again.
We extend special thanks to Re\. Dr. Carrington and Sabrina Pinder,
and the loving members of the St. Marks Natime Baptist Church, Rev.
C. B. Moss and the Families Against Murders Group. Bahamas Christian
Council. Bethel Brothers Mortician Staff. Bahamas Customs Staff, Neil
Hamilton and the Temple Christian High School. Wendell Miller and
the Charles W. Saunders High School, Rodney Nioncur. Keisha Smith,
Akia Knowles. Peter Symonette and the Print Shop Staff. Dais. Winder
and the staff of Rainbow Flo\wers. Archer's Nursen. El Shadai Party
Rental. Jewel Party Rental. Hon. Fred Mitchell and the Fox Hill P.L.P.
Branch, Sen. Jacinta Higgs, The Seventeen Shop. Suntee Bahamas and
the entire Fox Hill Community.
MAY HIS SOUL REST IN PEACE
FROM THE DILL & DAVIS FAMILIES


0






THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 3


THANK YOU!


Angela Lisa Burrows


Nurse Jennifer Marie Swain


.4',


Dwight William Swain

We the family of the late Angela Lisa Burrows (Mother
of four kids), Nurse Jennifer Marie Swain (our sister)
and Dwight William Swain (Father and Uncle) extend
our deepest gratitude to all our relatives, friends and
colleagues who cared for us and shared with us during
our time of bereavement.

Special thanks is extend to Pastor Gary Curry, Pastor
Vaughan Cash and the Evangelistic Temple family.
Pastor Rodrick Rolle, the Deacons and Elders and the
church family of Believers Gospel Chapel, Central
Gospel. and the family of Brethen churches, Ms.
Claudia Seymour, Mr. Dean and The Royal Palm staff,
Mr. and Mrs. Rahming and the staff of British Colonial
Hilton, Management and staff of Sandals, Management
and staff of Princess Margaret Hospital, especially the
Maternity Ward and A & E, Mr. Leon Griffin and the
Taxi Cab Union, Management and staff of The
Bahamas Development Bank and BAIC, Mr. Phil
Stubbs, Mr. Kirk Hall, Woody's Photography, the
Management and staff of Rock of Ages and
Dermeritte's Funeral Homes.

Let us, all remember that we will see our loved ones
again if we walk the path of righteousness.

The Swain Family


Tell me not, in mournful numbers Life is but an empty dream!
For the soul is dead that slumbers And things are not what they se1
Life is real! Life is earnest! And the grave is not its goal;
Dust thou art to dust returneth Was not spoken of the soul.
Not enjoyment, and not sorrow; Is our destined end or way;
But to act, that each tomorrow Find us farther than today.
Trust no future however pleasant! -
Let the dead past bury its dead!
Act, act in the living present!
Heart within, and God o'erhead!
Lives of great men all remind us We can make our lives sublime,
And, departing, leave behind us, Footprints on the sands of time.
Footprints, that perhaps another, Sailing o'er life's solemn main,
A forlorn and shipwrecked brother, Seeing, shall take heart again.
Let us, then, be up and doing, With a heart for any fate
Still achieving, still pursuing, Learn to labor and to wait.

Thomas Albert Sands Sr. during his earthly sojourn used
Shis God given talents to touch many people in a positive
way and as a result has left footprints on the sands of
: time for those of us who remain to walk in.

Albert, Daddy, Pappy, Grandfather....
We were blessed to have you touch our lives in a positive way.

CLAUDIA, THOMAS II, CHRISTEL, CHANDRA, LAMONT
NATASHA, THOMAS III, WILLIAM & NATALIA.
- aug ggagae-w


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES













SBethel Brothers Morticians

c ~Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030

Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026


COLIN DWIGHT
OLIVER SR., 42

of Meadows Blvd., Winton Meadows and
formerly of Nicholls Town, Andros will
be held on Saturday June 21st. at 11:00 am
at The Remnant Tabernacle of Praise,
Carmichael Road. Pastor Dr. Kendall
Stubbs and other ministers of the gospel
will officiate. Interment will follow in
Lakeview Memorial Gardens, J.F.K. Drive.

Devoted wife, Angelique; children, Sara,
Shenae and Colin Jr.; parents, Clayton and
Meryl Mackey, Alvin Oliver; mother-in-law, Ednamae Jones; father-in-
law, Audley Jones; grandparents, John and Marieth Rolle, Brontis Adderley
and Wilber Marshall of Titusville Florida; sisters, Andrea and Faye Oliver,
Latoya Mackey of Lawton Oklahoma; brothers, Donald and Neville Evans,
PC 1127 Floyd, Cassius, Christopher, and Mark Oliver, Van Mackey, and
Edison Watson; sisters-in-law, Patrice Rolle, Phillippa Jones, Elizabeth
and Marie Evans, Caroline Mackey, Sophia and LaToya Oliver; brothers-
in-law,Tyrone Rolle and Clinton Brown; aunts, Dorothy Coleby, Susan
Marshall, NellieMarshall, Jestina Balliou, Virginia Capron, Berrynetta
Oliver, Tracey and Loren Rolle, Pamela Munroe, Frances Smith, Paulene
and Marsha Adderley, Heather Sands and Marie McCartney; uncles, Herman
Coleby, James Oliver, Basil Marshall, Kandy Marshall of West Palm Beach,
Edgar Marshall Of North Carolina, Eric Marshall,Wilber Marshall Of
Washington DC, Kirk, Clyde, Ben and Loftus Rolle and Bartholomew
Bowleg, Norris and Erwin Mackey, Timothy, Insp. 1618 Lawrence and
Kevin Adderley, Roy Forbes, Earl Smith, Clinton Sands; grand uncles,
Bernard Evans Sr., Yorick Evans Sr., Wayde Major, Elkin and Roston
Flowers, Bernard Baillou; grand aunts, Gloria Evans and Evelyn Major;
nieces and nephews, Rashad, Camron, Zion, Ashley, Veronique,Vanneshia,
Rashae, Ragine, Alliaya, India, Joel, Christopher Jr. Shereka, Donovan,
Denagelo, Darryl, Taneil, Darnell, Eric, Naqua, Marko, Corey, Deandrea,
Phillipa, Rashae, Takia, Dakota and Travis; grand niece, Jazymne;
godparents, Barbara Sweeting and Icelyn Fowler; cousins, Desmond, Tovar,
Stacy, Inderia, Jeremy Gabrielle, Arielle, Donovan, Lavardo, Lavno, Lavonya,
Latanya, Anthranique, Domnick, Dania, Katrina, Burter, Wendell, Rena,
Eric Jr., Ann and Edwin Lightbourne, Benjamin and Judy Rahming, Irish,
Peter and Sandra Russell, Dr. Gertrude Holder and family, Nicole, Nedra
Carey and family, Maxwell and Jennie Cartwright, Nadia, Sheniquer, Francis
and O'Neal Johnson,Carla Hutchinson and family,Norma Hutchinson and
family, Monica Evans and family, Henry and Helen Lord,Pearl Simmons,
Jethro and Bassiemae Storr and family, Merril Storr and family, Alphonso
Smith and family, Daisy and Michelle Bowleg, Agatha Bowe and family,
Dorothy Walkes/Evans family, The Entire Oliver family, Edgar Pickstock
and family, Jewel Kelly and family, Bernard Evans Sr. and family, Kimberly
Dean and family, Wendal Evans and family, Darnel, Ruby, Kendal and Dale
Evans,Yvette Treco and family, Yorick Evans and family, the Richards/Evans
family, Angela McDonald and family, Olivia Sweeting and family, Shelton
Smith, James Sweeting, Indira, Tamika, Candice, Alex, Adrian, Clinton
Sands Jr.,Terrence and Katie Burrows, Barry and Lucille Roberts, the entire
Capron family, Cleveland and Cheryl Lightbourne, Renald and Paulamae


Demeritte, Levaugn and Emma Romer, Jenson and Helena Cooper, Dominque
and Frances Rolle, Dr. Raymond Baillou, lan Rahming, Garren, Ericka
Ferguson, Kevin and Eula Brown, Judy Johnson, Lella Hanna; special
thanks, Remnant Tabernacle Of Praise Church family, Nygard Cay Resort,
BTC family, Cedric Roker and family, DoDo, J.J., Dwayne, Andros,
Jacqueline Bourque, Antenel Brice, Sophia Moss, Melrose Rolle, Avis
Baker, BTC Marathon Mall family, Tyrise Johnson, Barbara Jones, Fr.
Roland Hamilton and family, Fr. Crosely Walkins and family, Fr. Peter
Scott, Fr. Shazz Turnquest and family, Fr. Steven Davies and family, Fr.
Joseph Mycklewhyte and family Bishop Kirkwood Murphy and family,
St.Margaret's Church family Nicholls's Town Andros.
Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday from
10 a.m. at the Tabernacle until service time.


HERBERT A.
KEMP, 73

of Castor Street, Highland Park will be
held on Saturday June 21 at 1:00 p.m. at
East Street Gospel Chapel, East Street,
north, Senior Pastor Tom Roberts, assisted
by Dr. William McCartney and Elder
Theodore Thompson will officiate.
Interment will follow in Lakeview
Memorial Gardens, J.F.K. Drive.


. ) He is survived by his wife, Yvonne Kemp
nee Williams; two children, Slavonia
Bonaby nee Kemp and Kymenski Kemp;
son-in-law, Andrew Bonaby; daughter-in-law, Esmeralda Kemp;
grandchildren, Alexi and Kyshana Bonaby; brothers, Bertram and Cosmo
Kemp; sister, Grace Kemp; sister-in-law, Sylvia, Prescola and Coral Kemp,
Cynthia Hanna and Violet Copeland; brother-in-law, Albert Williams; nieces,
Marie-Theresa, Margaret, Eveta, Templa, Chelsey, Linda, Dominique, Janet,
Tanya, Arlette, Sherry, Chrislyn, Betty, Rhonda, Sara, Willamae Gayle,
Denise, Bloneva, Linda, Patricia, Patrice, Ernestine, Vernette, Geneva, Ann-
Marie Chin, Marjorie Johnson and Pauline; nephews, Cyprian, Michael,
Peter, John, Osborn, Audley Jr., Christopher, Anthony and ITodd, Zane,
Demetrius, Dannielle, Brent, Kevin, Vallance Clement Kemp, Clinton and
Philip Bethel, Nageeb Hanna and Blake Chin; a host of grandnieces and
nephews and other relatives and friends including the following and their
families Pastor Tom Roberts, William McCartney, Ed Dorsette, George
Berry, Jimmie Shearer, Thomas Sands, Lolita Jackson, William Delancy,
the entire East Street Gospel Church, Calvary Bible Church, Allen and Leila
Pinder and Ronnie, Donna and Joshua.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday from
11:30 a.m. at the chapel until service time.

A memorial service will be held on Friday, June 20 at 7:00 p.m. at East
Street Gospel Chapel.


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES






THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 5


Bethel Brothers Morticians
Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026
FUNERAL SEVC O


MIZPAH MARINA
ROBERTS, 67
of Blue Hill Road, south will be held
on Sunday June 22nd at 2:30pm at
St. Agnes Anglican Church, Baillou
Hill Road. Archdeacon I. Ranfurly
Brown assisted by Fr. Bernard Been
will officiate. Interment will follow
in St. Agnes Cemetery, Nassau Street.


S; Left to mourn and retain fond memory
are,v children, Dion and Nikhia
Roberts; 1 sister, Ellen C. Grant; close
friend, Cyril "Bones" Brennen; 2
brothers-in-law, Vernon J. Grant, James
Wallace; 1 sister-in-law, Delores Roberts; nieces, Vashti Kemp, Crystal
Stubbs, Margo Roberts, Verlene Harris, Patricia Johnson, Sherry
Sahnoune, Andree Rolle, Deidrie Daniels of Fort Lauderdale, Florida;
nephews, Anthony "Skeebo" Roberts, Philip Roberts, Duane Miller,
Vernon P. Grant, Adrien Grant, Kevin Neely, Stephan Fynes; nieces-
in-law, Florinda Miller, Sophia Grant, Kim Grant, Gina Roberts,
Henrietta Miller; nephews-in-law, Alphonso Harris, Carlan Johnson"
Phillipe Sahnoune, Mark Deleveaux, William Daniels; grand-nieces,
Valderez, Rickelle and Richshande Miller, Delores Hunter, Kelly
Roberts, Lavonda Lowe, Danielle Kemp, Alexis Roberts Adrien
Parboosingh, Ellen and Jaqual Harris, Amanda and Dervina Daniels
of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Chantia Bethel, Nikia Neely, Natasha
Nixon; grand-nephews, Anthony, Antoine, Ashley, and Andre Roberts,
Ricardo Jr. and Laron Miller, Adrien Grant Jr., Tristan Sahnoune, Ashley
and Ashton Rolle, Nicholas Nixon; great-grand-nieces, Ashlee
Goldsmith, Raven Nixon, Shani Swaby, Tia Roberts, Aaliyah Wilson
and Rhett Roberts; great-grand-nephews, Anthony Adams and
Alexander Parboosingh, Omarion Cooper, Ryan Miller; godchildren,
Samuel Kemp, Lakeisha Major, Pheby Colby, Nathan Bethel; other
family and friends, Josephine Minus, Jackie Grey, Christine Roberts-
Rolle, Lolita Gaitor and family, Madge Bowleg and family, Megan
Jordon, Ricardo Smith and family, Abagail Charlow and family, Irene
Deveaux and family, Mary Moxey and family, Eleanor Bain and family,
Pedro Clarke and family, Ebony Steele and family, Sherelle Jones and
family, Renee Minus, the Turnquest family, Michelle Thompson, Sheila
Deveaux, Ruth Minus-Darbouze, the Minus, Roberts, Seymour, Sawyer,
Cooper and Rahming families, the Seven Hills and Sunshine Park
Communities; Farmers Market Crew, Nassau Beach Hotel Retirees,
SeeSaw Academy, Valentino Woodside, Paula Clarke, and Valtashia
Woodside, Neville Bethel, Dorothy Horton, Margaret Smith, Rose
King, Elaine Butler, Freddie Kemp and family, Brian Gibson, Leitha
Strachan and family, Alma Thompson and family, Father I. Ranfurly
Brown, the Guard Room and The St. Agnes Parish Church family,
Father Warren Rolle and family, Father Rodney Burrows and family,
Obrian Bain, Wayne Bastian, Herbert Glinton, O.P. Cooper, Edith
Smith, Irene Smith and family, Jermaine Coakley and family, the Sands
family, Mr. Fowler, Ali Taylor, The Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied
Workers Union, and many others too numerous to mention.
Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Nassau Street on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Sunday
from 10 a.m. to 12:30pm and at the church from 1:00 pm to service
Time.


Cebar Cresitfuneral 'ome
DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street P.O.Box N-603 Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

FUNERAL SER E F


EVELYN
BURROWS, 69

formerly of Deadman's Cay,
Long Island and a resident of
Sandy Point, Abcaco will be
held 2:30p.m. Saturday, June
21st, 2008 at St, Mark's
Native Baptist Church, Romer
Street Fox Hill. Officiating
will be Rev. Carrington S.
Pinder assisted by Rev.
Napoleon Roberts. Interment
Cemetery.


follows in Fox Hill


Cherished memory are held by two sons, Joseph and
David Stuart; three daughters, Virgina Wells, Antoinette
Dean and Allison Burrows; two adopted children, Vernell
Burrows and Adrianna Munroe and family; eight grand-
children, Narad, Treraine, Marc-Henry, Denashti,
Runaldo, Dawn, Donte; one great-grand-child, Bria; two
sisters, Geraldine Davis and Dorothy Burrows; eleven
nephews and nine nieces, two daughter-in-law, Donna
and Yvonne Stuart; three sons-in-law, Pastor Erskine
Wells, Don Dean and Rudolph Burrows; other relatives
and friends including, George Burrows and family,
Vernal Burrows and family, Herklyn Rolle and family,
Dafinetteand family, Betty Rolle and family, The Mont
Zion Baptist Church family, Rev. Napoleon Roberts and
family, Rev. Morris Bain and family, Gina Adderley,
Virie Lightboume, Lisa and Glacy Dean, Yvonne Bain,
Eliza Pinder, Mary Wells, Edward and Isadora Pinder,
Dolly Russell, Sandy Burrows, Dentry Bowe, Aljavon
Russell, Deborah Carroll, Viola Parker, Edna Burrows,
Joyce Williams, Rose Roberts and family, Shirley
Saunders and family, Annie Green and family, Inez Fox,
Leonie Green and family, Muriel Burrows, Rev. Dr.
Kendal and Mrs. Capron and the staff of Golden Age
Retirement Home and many others through out the
communities of Sandy Point Crossing Rocks and the
Bahamas.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar
Crest Funeral Home on Robinson Road and First Street
on Friday from 12:00 noon to 6:00p.m., and on Saturday
from 10:00a.m. to 12noon and at the Church from
1:00p.m. to service time at the church.


-- ---- ------ ----- -- --- -----------------r---l-~l~~--~l--llr


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES






PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


Yager Funeral Kom &e'* rematonum
Queen's Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301


MRS. THELMA BARBARA
SAM, 74


Ascension
Bahama.


-A

Anglc


Anglican


of #1 Albacore Drive and
formally of George Town
Guyana died at the Rand
Memorial Hospital on
Tuesday 17th June, 2008.
Mrs. Sam was
predeceased by her
husband: Canon Eric L.
Sam; the founder and first
rector of Parish of the
Church, Lucaya Grand


Her immediate survivors include her sons:
Christopher and Anthony Sam; brother: Clifford
Wong; her sisters: Irene Chookang, Norma Buehler,
Claudette Hesseberger, Olyve Schuler and Yvonne
Gator; her in-laws: Hugh Sam and Natalie
Decamera, numerous nieces, nephews and other
relatives.
A Service of Thanksgiving celebrating her life will
be said on Sunday 29th June 2008 at 5:00 p.m. at
Church of the Ascension, West Beach Drive,
Lucaya. Officiating will be The Venerable Cornell
J. Moss assisted by Rev. Fr. Curtis Robinson.
In lieu of Floral Contributions donations may be
sent to Church of the Ascension, Outreach
Ministries, C/O P.O. Box F42651 Freeport
Bahamas. In memory of Thelma Sam.
Arrangements entrusted to Yager Funeral Home
& Crematorium Limited, Queens Highway
Freeport.


lnutlcr' unrntal ^omee

& JreQrmattrium
Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

--unra Announemen


MR. VERNAL
JAMES
MAJOR, 79


of #15 Abraham Street
Sand formerly of Rose's,
Long Island will be held
on Saturday, June
S21st, 2008 at 11:00
a.m. at The Chapel of
Butlers' Funeral Homes and Crematorium,
Ernest and York Streets. Officiating will be
Pastor Timothy Stewart. Interment will
follow in the Southern Cemetery, Cowpen
and Spikenard Roads.

Left to cherish his memories are his Wife:
Virginia Major; Two (2) Sisters: Curly Dean
and Emily Reckley; One (1) Brother:
Eustucthe Major; Two (2) Sisters-in-law:
Madelyn Major and Pearline Wallace; Three
(3) Brothers-in-law: Clement Dean, Leon
Reckley and Clarence Wallace; Numerous
Nieces and Nephews and other relatives
and friends including: Truman, Philip and
Percy Major, Dahl and Maris Sands and
family, Gwen Cartwright and family and
Lander Cartwright and family.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers'
Funeral Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and
York Streets on Friday from 10:00 a.m. until
5:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m.
until service time.


(
*!c3
"-' I
'"**?sls *mii-Mb


w


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


I (J I .





THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 7


I *.


EAST SUN


SE MORTUARY


*A Neu) Commitment to Serve"


THEO JARCARDO
BURROWS, 20

of Sunset Park will be held on
Saturday at 11am at the
Southland, Church of God,
Soldier Road. Officiating will be
Bishop Christopher Burrows,
assisted by Bishop Goliath
Burrows. Interment will follow
in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier
Road.


He is survived by his parents, Apostle Leon Burrows Sr. and
Pastor Cathrin Burrows; four brothers, Leon Jr., Daniel, Daran
and Demetrius Burrows; two sisters, Catrina and Athalia
Burrows; his aunts and uncles, Daniel and Judy Robinson
and family, George and Flo Robinson and family, Louise
Bethel and family, Derek and Iguline Oliver and family,
Corey and Rosemary and family, Bishop Goliath and Joyce
and family, Alvin and Barbara and family, Bishop Christopher
and Elease and family, Esley and Barbara M. and family,
Wilfred and Valderine and family, Leviticus and Glenda and
family, Paula Rolle and family, Linda Mortimer and family,
Harriet and Alfred Gibson (of the U.S.), his grandfather,
Alexander Burrows; numerous cousins, and a host of other
relatives and friends including, Alice Harvey and family (of
Turks & Caicos), The Outreach family, Pastor Monica Paul
and the Revelation Church family, Apostle Quebell Martin
and the Miracle Working Church of God family, Apostle C.
J. Miller and the Miracle Deliverance Outreach family, Pastor
Paul McPhee and the Carmichael Bible Holiness family,
Bishop Frankklin Burrows and the Gospel Truth Tabernacle
family, Apostle J. B. Sands and the M.R.F. Church family,
Bishop Missick and the First Holiness family, Pastor Stubbs
and the Southland Church family, Pastor Carlton Stuart and
The Lighthouse Fellowship Church family, Bishop George


Barr and the Church family, Pastor Charlton and Church
family, the Sunset Park Community, the staff of Four Seasons
Hotel and the staff of Public Areas at Atlantis.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary,
Rosetta Street; Palmdale from 10am to 6pm on Friday and
at the church from 10am on Saturday until service time.


"-:-" -" She is survives by two brothers,
Jason and Jamal Satchell; her
grandfather, Carl Stewart; six aunts, Lorraine Mullings, Dawn
Kemp, Eleanor, Helen, Euliemae and Valderine Stewart; five
uncles, Carl Leadon Jr., Mark and Randy Stewart, Frank
Mullings and Albert Kemp; one nephew, Jermaine Ingraham
Jr.; numerous cousins including, Schnord and Dawnette
Kemp, Shequetta, Nathan, Tabitha and Keith (Jr.) Higgins,
Natasha Charles, Kaye, Kenyon, Ronette, Krista, Karla,
Sasha, Salina, Latcya, Valentino, Levar and Markeira Stewart,
Doctor's, Nurses and Patients of Female Medical Ward #2
and the Church of God of Prophecy, Englerston family.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary,
#27 Rosetta Street, Palmdale from 10am to 6pm on Friday
and at the church from 8am on Saturday until service time.


A Srie



24 .- S
Cel # 35-95A Beeer 38 -.15 -or3011
-~l ~ i 0I :--. AYL *g~ :o ~~


---


f


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


~_ICLUL--ICC~q~4*I~C==~=


ROYANNE
SATCHELL, 21

of Acklins Street will be held on
Saturday at 9am at the Church of
God of Prophecy, Englerston (East
Street South). Officiating will be
Bishop Rudolph V. Bowe, J.P., and
interment will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens, Soldier Road.


I ___~_~_~~_~~~~~~~~~~~1~'-SZ"ui! i


"";~~" I






PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


NEWBOLD BROTHERS


CHAPEL
#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street


P.O. Box N-3572,
Tel: (242)


Nassau, Bahamas
326-5773


FNASVEF


BRENDA O.
LYNES, 86

Sof # 495 Antigua Street, Elizabeth
Estates, and formerly of Water Cay,
JGrand Bahama, will be held on
Saturday, 21st June, 2008, at 11:00
a.m., at The Voice of The Watchman
,- Outreach Ministries, Milton & East
;.. Streets. Officiating will be Apostle
--. John Mahorn, Apostle Livingstone
Lynes, Elder Christopher Minnis, Dr.
SCharles Culmer and other ministers
of the gospel. Interment follows in
S. Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

She is survived by four daughters, Evangelist Agnes Rolle Carey, Rev.
Carolee Lynes Wright, Elder Margaret Lynes Knowles and Albertha
Lynes; adopted daughter, Cuttie; six sons, Carl Rolle, Alvin Rolle
(deceased), Levi Laing, Ephraim, Raymond, Apostle Livingstone Lynes
and Oliver Lynes Jr.; fifty grandchildren, Elvin, Jerome, Michael, Keith,
Wayde and Wayne Carey, Sherry Gibson, Sheila and Sharon Carey, Dale
Walworth, Sean, Obadiah and Clyde Rolle, Carla Armbrister, lanthe Bain,
Darren, Robinson, Wallace, Marvin Rolle, Brennamae, Reginald, Leevan
Lynes, Sherice and Charmaine Lynes, Daphne, Pamela and Shalinka
Lynes, Troit Lynes, Kerryann, Brenda Lynes II, Kenneth, Walter and
Anthon Wright, Anita Dorsey, Kendrick Dames, Jevaughn Johnson,
Raymond and Simone Duncombe, Robin and Rashard Lynes, David and
Elvinia; adopted grandchildren, ASP Wayne Miller, Min. Charlene Paul
and Charmaine; numerous great grandchildren including, Eljanae,
Evita, Deandra, Jerome Jr. Hezron, Stephanie, Stephen, Stephano, Sterling,
Jessica, Stacy, Tiskia, Perez, Kennisha, Joshua, Gabriella, Sapporah,
Charlton, Kenneth, Kevin, Manessa, Jade, Tamika, Trae, Troit Jr. and
Dalinco, Dashia, Alexandra, Lakia, Kalyn, Kyle, Odeisha, Cladiah,
Donavan, Corrisa, Kishmere, Leslie Jr., Levanti, Trinity, Autumn Rhavanya
and Michael; numerous nieces and nephews including, Evangelist
Mavis Poitier, Leanna, Marilee, Mae, Louise, Gretel, Livingstone, Mavis,
Victoria, Beulah, Lois, Vera, Iva, Ena, Myrtle, Mary, Daisy, Jane, Clara,
Ruthmae, Bernice, Monica, Linda, Jackie, Verdell, Iceletta, Ishmael,
Harris, Hiram, Joseph, Nathaniel, Timmy, Emalchus, Linc, Johnny,
Elouise, Melvenia, Iva, Loretta, Laura, Levenia, Vertle, Perill, Deloris,
Hartley, Floramae, Corene, Shirlene, Alsaida, Victoria, Joyce, Annie,
Hilton, Nehemiah, Percy, Vernal, Wilmon, Eric, Gladstone, Horatio, Joey,
Johnny, Darling, Lean, Floramae, Louisa, Ellamae, Henry, Walter, Joseph,
Edison, Willmon and Alfred; daughters-in-law, Maria, Valencia and
Millicent Lynes; sons-in-law, George Knowles, Rollin Carey and Kenneth
Wright Sr.; sister-in-law, Louise Lewis; other relatives and friends
including, Grace (caretaker), Dr. Isaac, Nurse Petitfrere, Staff of Accident
& Emergency, Female Medical I, and South Beach Clinic.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Newbold Brothers


Chapel, Palmetto Avenue and Acklins Street off Market and East Streets
on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday at the church from
10:00 a.m. until service time.


.p a


EULEASE
SANDS, 67

of Pinewood Gardens and formerly
of Little Creek, South Andros will
be held on Saturday, 21st June, 2008,
at 11:00 a.m., at Good News Baptist
Church, Bamboo Blvd. and Pinewood
Drive, Pinewood Gardens. Officiating
will be Prophetess A. Catherine
Chisholm. Interment follows in Old
Trail Cemetery, Abundant Life Road.


She is survived by her husband, John
SSands; eight sons, Rufus, Samuel,
Boston, Charles, Cecil, Fredrick,
Solomon and Philip Sands; five daughters, Barbara, Sheva, Pamela
Sands, Magdalene Fernander and Betty St. Fleur; grandsons, Joseph,
Romel, Fredrick Jr., Emmanuel, Samuel Jr., Damien, Philip Jr., Ronald,
Macayle Sands, Dudley Butler, Shaqueille, Natarieo Johnson, Avery,
Kenrick, Kenneth, Gary, Vandyke Fernander, Brendan Bastian, Jermaine
and Jeron St. Fleur; granddaughters, Maelee Butler, Nakeisha Daniels,
Samantha Johnson, Latasha, Crystal, Fernancha, Mayiesha Sands, Terah
Marshall, Talisha McIntosh, Julicia St. Fleur and Vandisha Fernander;
great grandsons, Dashad, Rodney Darville Jr., Theo Butler Jr., and
Suntano Sands; great granddaughters, Joniqua, Latrell, Asenic, Alena
Sands, Dashanique Johnson, Rashaye Darville, Keishan Daniels, Ashantae
Smith, Jessica and Petra Rolle; sisters Leona Morris, Justina Farrington,
Geraldine Higgs, Emerald Frazer and Cleomey Forbes; brothers, Willey,
Henry and George; nieces: Verline, Vanrea Hanna, Anishka and Cleonicia
Forbes, Natasha Pleasant of Atlanta, G.A., Rosemarie, Mordell, Ritha,
Robertha, Yvonne, Loren and Lakisha Farrington and Mertis Ovaigbena;
nephews: Franklyn Johnson, Marvin, Fritzgerald, Mondez, Bruno, Curtis,
Dani, George Farrington Jr., Henry Farrington Jr., Cleon and Carl Forbes
Jr. of Atlanta. G.A., Geovanie, Gevaldo and Jaicoy Rodgers; daughters-
in-law, Christian, Sheska, Michelle, Ina, Monique, Brendalee Sands and
Marion Rolle; sons-in-law, Prince Fernander and Jane St.Fleur; sister-
in-law, Laura Barr; brothers-in-law, James, Eric, Hubert Sands and
Garett; other relatives and friends including, Amanda Sands, Latoya
Griffin, Dianna Thompson, Kenson Daniel, Floyd Lovis and Alfred Petty.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Newbold Brothers
Chapel, Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street off Market and East Streets
on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday at the church from
10:00 a.m. until service time.


- --


THE.TRIBUNE OBITUARIES





THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 9


Yochk of ;g3es 'iumrnafl HIrapI


Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 Fax:


328-8852


ALFRED
LUBIN, 75


of Taylor Street and
formerly of Haiti will be
held at Calvary Haitian
Baptist Church, West Ave.,
Centreville, Nassau,
Bahamas at 2pm on
Saturday, June 21, 2008.
Officiating will be Pastor
Henry Cheri-Aimie, assisted
the gospel. Interment wi
Cemetery, Cowpen an


Ad by other ministers of
11 follow in Southern
d Spikenard Roads.


Left to cherish his loving memory are his wife, Denise
Clerizier of Haiti; mother, Anna Honorat of Haiti;
daughters, Alzette Gerome of Haiti, twins, Sharmaine
and Antoinette George of N.Y.; sons, Sheler, Ignace
George and Bruce George (now deceased); brother,
Roberson Clerizier of Haiti; sister, Philocia Clerizier
of Haiti; sister-in-law, Meme Roberson Clerizier of
Haiti; grandchildren, Monouche, Bobby and Gedesky
Gerome of Haiti; nieces, Celeste Daniels, Marbe
Clerizier and Francesta Herard, Cassandra Jessica
Clerizier and Tash Helard of Orlando, Mirline
Valcount, Roberthe Janvier, Rosenadine, Mirlande,
Isenette and Marde Clerizier of Haiti; and Winie
Augustin of Nassau; nephews, Cherubin, Wysner
Pierre Louis, Alrold Ferdinand, Ulrick Edison, Leve
Sony, Rberson and Valentino Clerizier of Nassau,
Rubens, Flaubert Clerizier of Haiti, Jason and Stewart
Jr. Herard of Orlando and Edison Japheth of Haiti;
numerous other relatives and friends including,
Samantha Pierre, Lastana Cassilok, Elza Louis, the
staff of Unity House, D'Joulie, Bebe, Meme Yolene
Sanon and Laurette Charlostin and family, and Marina
Anne Louis of Nassau.

Friends may pay their last respects at The Rock of
Ages Funeral Chapel on Wulff Road and Pinedale,
on Friday from 10am until 5pm and at the church
from 1pm until service time.


Vommnntaelth funeral tmrnw

, Independence Drive Phone: 341-4055



Mrs. Gracie-Ann Adderley, 97

formerly of Burnt Ground Long
Island, and a resident of Warren
Street will be held on Saturday
10:00 a.m. at East Street Gospel
SChapel East Street. Pastor Tom
Roberts assisted by Pastor
James Shearer will officiate.
Interment will follow in the
.^ Old Trail Cemetery Abundant
Life Road.

SPrecious memory are held by
son, William Adderley; grand-
children, Dexter, Peter, Malchus, and Warren Adderley,
Natario Francis, Myrtle Wright, Sandra Ferguson and
Carolyn Gray; great grand-children, Nicki, Desmond,
Zharvago, Kenny, Tamara, Lamark, D'athera, Brandon,
Brion, Christian Alexia and Toyika; great great grand-
children, Crispen, Kenrick Jr., Danaz and Denero; nieces,
Janet and Christine Adderley, Agnes Taylor, Rowena
Gibson, Charlotte Smith, Geneva Dames, Ellen, Florie
Adderley and families, Geneva Rolle and Betty Fox;
nephews, George, Sammy, Granville and Obie Pratt,
Theophilus Adderley, Joseph Sweeting, George and Cecil
Minnis; daughter-in-law, Irene Adderley; son-in-law,
Herman Francis;brother-in-law, Kirkwood Sweeting;
grand sons-in-law, Mark Wright, Gretten Gray, Glen
Ferguson; grand daughters-in-law, Vanessaca Adderley
and Linda Adderley; grand nephews and nieces, Sidney,
Charles and Sherman Rolle, Reginald, Andrew and De-
Marco Dean, Alan, and Jayson Sweeting, Suzette and Ta-
Mara Sweeting, Judith, Denise, Bridget and Erica Dean,
Sharon, Janice and Annika Adderley, Troy and Kirk
Adderley, Helen Davis, Mona, Sandra and Sherry Pratt;
other relatives include, Lenox Taylor, Maxwell Adderley,
James Smith, Rosa Adderley and family, Wallace and
Kenneth Adderley, Dianna Adderley and family, Viola
Adderley, Rueben Gibson, Gloria Sweeting, (Arabella
Bodie, Freeport Gospel Chapel), Carriemae Adderley,
Lillian Jackson, Malvese Adderley and a host of other
relatives and mends too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE
CHAPEL OF MEMORIES COMMONWEALTH
FUNERAL HOME INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on
Friday from 11:00-7:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday
from 9:00 a.m. to service time.


~ -,

-~ -


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES










^eXuwrifiis ^une 'vrn1 ^Drhmw
BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET P.O. BOX GT-2097 TEL: 323-5782


ANITA
FORBES, 36

a resident of Cowpen Road,
will be held at Bahamas
Christian Fellowship,
Carmichael Road, on Saturday
at 10:00 a.m. Officiating will
be Pastor Paul Butler. Interment
follows in Lakeview Memorial


Gardens.

Left to mourn are her mother, Florida Forbes; father,
Anthony Forbes; children, Shanna, Rashawn & Rashad;
grandmother: Mercilia Pierre; sister: Christina Forbes;
brothers, Dwight & Michael Forbes; Fiance; Navado
Davis; brother-in-law, Ricardo Forbes; sisters-in-
law, Casey Forbes & Julieann Andrews; nieces, Theresa
& Chianna; nephews, Christin & Dwight Jr.; aunts,
Maria, Berthalee, Marion, Jane Forbes, Bazalia,Lana
of Ft. Lauderdale, Delia, Julita, Linda & Marlene;
uncles, Dieula of Orlando, Hilliary & Willy; cousins,
Prince, Ethel, Katherine, Shanette, Alfred, lan, Quentine,
Stephanie, Theodore, Stephen, Frank, Ambrose, Shawn,
Antonio, Christopher, Kevin, Mario, Lynette, Crystal,
Sharon, Lisa, Tameka, Annette, Stacey, Samantha,
Nancy, Wesline, Erica, Lyndisha, liana, Nadia, Vanessa,
Tarana, Claudna, Tanya, Shavandriah, Savalia, Madline,
Marymae, Darville, Valentino, Toriano, Marcelline,
Farilien & family, Jacquex, Clerveaux & family,-Willie,
Josephine, Marslin & Emmy; other relatives & friends
including, Diana, Shantel, Donnell, Edith, Neil,
Kenneth, Robert, Marie, Tracey, Crystal, Ms. Young,
Monique, Sophia, Dariel Johnson, Divincia, Divina,
Charlene, the staff of McDonalds & Burger King,
Winifred Forbes, Mae Todd & family, Gary & Stephanie
& family, Yvette Todd, Kevin Lockhart & family, Mrs.
Bacardi & family, Mr. & Mrs. Linzon & family, Sonia
Golt, the Meadows family & many others too numerous
to mention at this time.

Frik1ds may payt de-jit"^ e'pe'i-er T's


Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00
p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 9:00
a.m. until service time.


ANDREW KENNETH
LIVINGSTON
PRATT, 38

a resident of Market and Hay
Streets, will be held at
Progressive Baptist Church,
Brougham Street, on Friday at
11:00 a.m. Officiating will be
Rev. Samuel Saunders.
Cremation follows.

Left to cherish his memory are his son, Travis;
daughter, Davill; sisters, Evangelist Melvise Skippings,
Teriseta O'Brien, Rosey Carey and Naomi Johnson;
brothers, Stephen, Thaddeus, Bruce, Alphonso
Ferguson, Kendal, Henry and Shawn; special friend,
Debbie Pratt; adopted children, Maria, Donna, Darren,
Darrio, Maria and Daniel; nieces, Renae, Pumpkin,
Karen, Shimeaka, Fantisha, Denika, Rachel, Chernard,
Kendra, Tracey, Novia, Joyanne, Trisca and Alleyene;
nephews, Ricardo, Roddy, Oscar, Pedro, Anwar, Stevie,
Renaldo, Ally Jr., Valentino, Kendal Jr., and Shawn; 1
aunt, Jerelene; 2 uncles, Rufus Johnson and James
Mackey; brothers-in-law, Arthur.Skippings and Harvey
Johnson; sisters-in-law, Delores Rolle, Rosepary
Roberts; cousins, Coralee, Nickie, Corry and Perry;
numerous grandnieces and Nephews, other relatives
and friends including, Rosetta Pratt, Karen, the Andros
community, the Hay and Market Streets, the Bain Town
and Augusta Street crew, the doctors and nurses of
PMH including Mr. Kemp.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's
Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00
p.m. on Thursday and on Friday at the church from
10:00 a.m iuntilsewyiedime -.. ----


A.J r


i


rrpruo~a IIII--------


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES









emneritte u SJfern al Sinm

BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET P.O. BOX GT-2097 TEL: 323-5782
FUNEAL SRVIC FO


Retired Nurse
HEARTLYN PEARLINE
HAMILTON-STRACHAN,
79

'' a resident of Sunshine Park and formelry
of Turks and Caicos Island, will be held
at Berea Seventh Day Adventist Church,
Blue Hill Road South, on Sunday at 1:00
p.m. Officiating will be Pastor Leo Rolle,
Pastor Kent Price and Pastor Wilfred
Adderley. Interment follows in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Precious memory will always linger in the hearts of her son, Jason
Strachan Sr.; daughter, Yvolande Strachan-Pierre; adopted daughters,
Etta Simms, Carolyn Hanna, Kimberly Pratt, Azure Russell, Vistna
Williams, Georgina McKenzie, Camelle Davis, Ursula Joseph, Shelly
Mackey, Carol Thompson, Rose Hanna and Rose Johnson; adopted
sons, Vincent Simms, Pastor Leo Rolle, Clayton, Ronnald and Charles
Pratt, Andrew Farrington, Samuel Waldron, Ferris Hilton, Don Butterfield
and Jason Griffin; sisters, Evangeline Jervis, Nurse Lenora Pratt, Hazel
Turnquest, Beatrice Astwood, Magistrate Vera Watkins, Victoria
Ambrister, Cheryl Fountain, Lillian Clarke, Pat Hamilton-Rappel, Sheila
Hamilton, Nurse Inez Smith, Nurse Anna Turquest-Cooper Nurse
Freda Wilson and Sandra Rolle, Saide Miller; brothers, Charles Pratt
Sr., George and Andrew Astwood, Sherlock Hamilton, Jeffery Wood,
James T. Musgrove and Bertram Sears; grand children, Lamont
Lightbourne and Antwan Archer; Jason Jr. and Brianna Strachan;
Yordrique and Willow Strachan-Pierre; James and Jazzmin Strachan
and Jonique Peterson, Caprice Pierre, Germaine Moultry, Anthonique
Francis, Tiffany, Sophie, and Manasseh Simms, Linda Israel, Robert
Dorsette, and Donovan Butterfield; great grand children, Tyler and
Tyrell Lightbourne; uncle, George Astwood Sr.; aunt: IIene Astwood;
nieces and nephews, Annastacia Astwood, Melverne Saunders, Dorthy
Murphy, Joanne Glinton, Janet Newbold, Alladyce Jones, Marion
Astwood, Brazil, Rawson, Madison, Wilbert, and Thaddeus Macdonald,
George Newbold; 1 daughter in-law, Yuolanda Strachan; 2 sons in-
law, Leonard Lightbourne, Ordea Pierre; 1 sister in law, Wilhemina
Saunders; nieces and nephews in-law, Descendants of the late Rev.
Harriot MacDonald, Descendants of the late Siblean Strachan,
descendants of the late David Knowles, and Descendants of Wilhemina
Saunders; cousins, Descendants of the late John Wood, Descendants
of the late Adulphus (Eddie) Wood, Descendants of the late Willis
Wood, Descendants of George Astwood, and Descendants of the
Hamilton, Forbes and Outten families; other relatives and friends
include, Jervis family, Stanley and Nora Macalla, Etoy McKenzie and
family, Esther Rahming, Constance Rolle, Ms. Jennings, Mrs. Williams
and family, Ms. Gibbs, Freda Wilson and family, Julian Musgrove and
family, Ms. Josephine Price and family Pastor Herman Thompson, The
Freeport, Berea, and New Englerston Seventh Day Adventist Church
family, Freedom Baptist Academy family and the Sunshine Park
Community.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Saturday and on Sunday from
9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. No Viewiing at the church.


SLEONARD ERNEST
SMINNS, 77

a resident of Lincoln Blvd. and formerly
of Steventon, Exuma, will be held at The
,1 ; Church of God of Prophecy, East Street
S Tabernacle, on Saturday at 10:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Bishop Franklin M.
Ferguson, Bishop Woodley C. Thompson
and Minister Kendal C. Simmons.
Interment follows in Eastern Cemetery,
Dowdeswell Street.

Cherishing his fond memory as a beloved
husband, loving father, caring brother concerned uncle and trusted friend
are his widow, Veronica; children, Patrice Minns, Sharon Smith,
Veronica Lashan Henderson; adopted daughter, Sarah Rahming; sons-
in-law, Sherman Smith, John Henderson Sr.; adopted-son-in-law, Basil
Rahming, Chief Superintendent RBPF, Northern Branch; grandchildren,
Beaumont Todd, Bianca Taylor, Sherdeanya, Sherman, and Brittney
Smith, John and Jonette Henderson, Jane and Ava Minns, Debbie
Farrington, Latoya and Deangelo Rahming, Monique Coakley and Min.
Nicole Hanna; great grandchildren, Sherneya, Nickolyn and Jethro
Todd, Nero, Indiria and Nado Minns, Jacara Ingraham, Jarrod Cooper,
Petra Bevans, Aalyah Alce, Tyiesha Stubbs, Yvonne, Cyntche Douglas,
Indira Minns, Kenton Farrington, Paston Farrington; sisters, Merline
Smith, Emma Rhodriques and Diane Malone of California; brother,
Carl Minns; brothers-in-law, John Malone, James Mackey and Lemuel
Moss; sisters-in-law, Enid Nixon, Monica Moss and Naomi McCown
of Indiana; numerous nieces and nephew including, Clothilda Sands,
Leon Minns, Berthiamae Archer, Thomas and George Minns, Essen
Carter, Quebelle Minns of Miami Florida, Joanne Webb, Eula Larrimore
and Phillip Wallace, Cedric. Curry, Herbert Clarke, Thomas Smith,
Agnes Ferguson, Diane Minns, Maxine Curling, Sylvia Jones, John
Rhodriquez, Eloise Dorsette and Enid Deleveaux Leanna Newbold,
Mildred Smith, Fred and Alexander Smith, Ivy, Neville, Simeone Minns,
Yvonne Sands, Velthia Rolle, Brenda Moss, Hillard Minns, Harriet
Ingraham, Majorie Farrington, Elsworth Moss, Velthy Petty, Trudy
Nixon, Teresa Carroll and Veronica Meadows, Christopher and Michelle
Mackey, Jennimae Ferguson, Sheena and Sheila Minns; many grand
nieces and nephews along with other relatives and friends including,
Gertrude Clare and family, Maudline Josey and family, Abraham Rolle
and family, The Curry family, The Rolle family of Exuma, Carmen
Hepburn and family Bishop Franklin Ferguson and family, Mizpah
Rolle and family, The Lloyd family, The Bannister family, Eddie Godet
and family Keith Aranah, Paula Dames, Franklyn Forbes, Rose Beneby,
Evangelist Salatheil Simmons and family, Pastor Delegal Seymour and
family Acting Deputy of Commission of Police Herbert McCoy, Alvin
Clarke, Phychol Nicholson, Inell Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Forbes
and family, Mr. and Mrs. James Rolle and family, Lawson Dames,
Nelson Forbes, Erma Burrows and family, Paula Brice, Avon, the
Lincoln Blvd family, The John Road and John Street and Market Street
Communities.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday at the
church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.


* Y - $**i U '~~U 1~i ~J1


I ~ ~ ~ a aa1-a. ~;;?uWns cE..Y ~ ~UllNNN -~lplji~ll L..1J~Niitlr.ii; I YR I ,~~~Y C~I. *1I; ~-*.*j~ rX;Ldtf~__~L-1


11 i


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 11
















MICHAEL LIVINGSTON
(Bookie)
NEYMOUR, 57

a resident of Rupert Dean Lane,
will be held at Church of God
Greater Chippingham, Eden &
Rosebud Streets, on Fiday at
11:00 a.m. Officiating will be
Bishop C. Dennis Lafrenier,
assisted by Rev. Troy Hanna.
in Old Trail Cemetery, Old Trail


Left to cherish his memory are his father, Jeremiah
Neymour; stepmother, Yvonne Neymour; one son,
Omar; four grand children, Ominique, Chesanique,
Shawnfae, and Shanaire Bethel; two brothers, Derrick
and Rodney; two step-sisters, Michell and Kathy; sister-
in-law, Marilyn Neymour; ten aunts, Mary Neymour,
Mable Sands, Beryl Huyler, Alice Cole Dorsett, Patricia
Cole Bannister, Judy Mae, Rosemary, Shirleymae, and
Merlene Cole, Adora Cole Hanna; five uncles, Hezekiah
Neymour, Garnet Dorsett, Regional Hanna, Sammy
and Anthony Cole; six nieces, Lashanda, Ashanta,
Alicia, Tiffany, Tammy, and Christine; seven nephews,
Edward, Kevin, Randy, Dravanta, Derek Jr, William,
and Kareem; other relatives and friends including,
Donna, Shanti, Angelicia, Roy, Patrick, Delores,
Ambrose, Queenie and Family, Margaret and family,
Chloe Sands and family, Anthony Whylly and family,
Eleana Whylly and family, Altamese Trottman and
family, Barbara Trottman and family, Arlene Mackey
and family, Joyce Nairn and family, Rev. Raymond
Mackey and family, Cedric, Ivan, Sidney, Ronald,
Magnolia, Randolph Neymour and family, Kendric
Cole, Gregory Dorsett and family, Vernall and Cheryl
Huyler, Mary Neymour and family of Fox Hill, The
Leadon Family, Mary Bethell of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, The Farrington Family, Gloria Lightboum,
The Bain Town and Farrington Road family, Behring
Point Andros to Cargill Creek family, Lena Williams
and Berly Marshall and family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's
Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00
p.m. on Thursday and on Friday at the church from
10:00 a.m. until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


pleteritte's Jgtnneradl SInme
BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET P.O. BOX GT-2097 TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL tEVC O


Market Street & Bimini Avenue
P. Box G'1 2305
N\as'sau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 356-3721
Cellular: (242) 395-8931


Cockburn Town
San Savtador, Bahamas
Telephone:
(242) 331-2642


F NA SRI FO


MABLE
SAUNDERS, 70
will be held on Saturday June 21st
at 11am. At Bethany Gospel Chapel,
Murphy Town Abaco. Officiating will
be Bishop Bert Livingstone Williams
Jr. assisted by other ministers.
Interment follows in Murphy Town
Public Cemetery.


Left to cherish her memory are her
husband, Alexander Saunders;
children, Alvin, Sandra and Ricky
Laing, Elizabeth and Randy Curry,
Ethelyn Darville, Roselyn, Larry, Brian, Terry and Tamara Saunders, Tony
Knowles, Robert and Queenell Young; sisters, Olive Miller, Maria Wallace
and Aremena Bootle; brother, Leland Dawkins; grand children, Jewel,
Melissa, Angelo and Achaz Davis, Evante, Vanissa, Andres, Nathan and
Nicholas Darville, Charlene Brice, Jordan Saunders, Shakera Williams,
Felicia Swain, Merrick, Kareem and Leslie Jr. Parker, Alrick, Alvano Ricky
Laing Jr., Randy Curry Jr. Larranique and Lariel Saunders, Tonisha and
Teonia Knowles, Amy Young; great-grand children, Koman Williams Jr.
and Kiana Swain; daugthers-in-law, Lillian and Vivian Laing, Beryl Curry,
Nicole Saunders, Bean Knowles; sons-in-law, Thomas Davis and Van
Darville; sisters-in-law; Gertrude Dawkins and Viola Woods; brother-in-
law, Jacob Saunders and Brennon Davis; nieces, Sharon Russell, Eleanor
Seymour, Ernestine Sears, Kathleen Smith, Yvette Mitchell,Racquel Bootle,
Sharmann Davis, Norman Gray, Stephanie Mcintosh, Monaleatha Knowles,
Gayle Wallace, Theresa Woods, Janet Miller, Joan Hall, Henza, Margaret,
Patrice and Julie Dawkins, Elease Thervil, Friendly Cartwright, Carolyn,
Desiree and Crystal Saunders, Patricia Cornish, Cheryl Dawkins; nephews,
Denny and Cai Miller, Elkin, Cyril, Austin, Sidney, Michael,Sanford,
Raymond and Bradley McIntosh, Robert Burrows, Kendal Kemp, Neil
Wallace, Randy Davis, Lester Bootle, Pete, Lenny, Welvin and John Dawkins,
Shyan Gentle, Jason, Anthony and Rocklyn Saunders, Jerry and Livingston
Woods; god children, Junior Davis, Gary McDonald, Emma Dawkins,
Terah Mckenzie Ena Swain and family, Nadeen Feaster and family, Wilbert
and Denvill Newbold and family, Marina Moss, Evelyn Archer, Veronica
Archer, Joyce Smith and family, Amanda Davis and family; Mary Prince,
Winifred Carter, Bedie, Alexander and Sterlin Mckenzie, George Mckenzie
and family, Patsy, Patricia Hannah, Mable Darling, Judy Johnson, Dorathy
Gibson, Sallthiel Swain and family, Ida Swain, Hilma Curry, Leotha
Mcdonald, Maria Hall, Pastor Thomas Roberts and family, Doris Culmer,
Louise Swain, Hershel Davis and family, Bishop Bert Livingstone Williams
Jr. and family, Willamae Dawkins, Kenneth and Nathalie Knowles, Lernis
Cornish, Yvonne and Nykia Wilmore, Mary Smith and family, Zion Baptist
Church family, Strong Tower Church family, Victory Tabernacle Church
family and Bethany Church family.
Relatives and friends may pay their last respect at Bethany Gospel Chapel
on Friday from 6:30pm until service time on Saturday. Funeral is being
handle by RIVERSIDE FUNERAL CHAPEL Macket St. and Bimini ave.


qCverside funeral Chapel
"Where the river lies still.
24 HOURS A DAY
S. ,,. *,. :The Bahamas With Pride"
.V1, ^J FTiuK NM. COOPER Funeral Director
S. .."Profiessional People Who Care"


Interment follows
Road.


i-.~k,
;sa~C~ls~E


MA...- .


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"!" '-' .,.;:h
.:


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:5'





THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 13


9e etrde

f-ontica


103 Mt. Royal Ave. & Talbot St.
P.O. Box N-1546
Telephone: 328-4900
Fax: 328-4903 Cell: 456-9062
Robert D. Cox, Managing Director


F E SRIE IFO


WINSTON "Billy"
COLEBROOKE, 61


r of Masson's Addition, will he
l 'held on Saturday at 11:00a.m
at Zion Baptist Church, East
and Shirley Streets. Reverend
Ulric Smith II assisted by
Reverend Anthony Sampson
and other ministers of the
gospel will officiate. Interment
will follow in Ebenezer Cemetery Shirley Street.

He is survived by one daughter, Michelle Colebrooke;
two grand sons, Janoah and Stephen; special friend,
Verae Miller; seven sisters, Betty Young, Leona Rodgers,
Janet Colebrooke, Colamae Gardiner, Judith Colebrooke,
Sheryl Cox, Laura Colebrooke-Knowles; four brothers,
Charles (Junior), Michael, Coporal 745 Patrick
Colebrooke, Brian Colebrooke; neices, Donella Rodgers,
Joanne Knowes, Michaella and Kendra Colebrooke; two
aunts, Della Watson and Thomasina Watson; two brothers-
in- law, Sidney Young and George Gardiner; nephews,
Farouke Taylor, Sharad Young, Marlon Orleeh, Mario
Dean and Marvin Colebrooke, Douglas Knowles and
Robert Cox, Corey, Irvin and Myles Gardiner, Prison
Officer Byron Simmons, Dominique and Lintheo
Colebrooke; grand nieces, Philechia Rolle, Shannie,
Sasha, Summer and Sarah Rodgers, Shyanne and Brianna
Simmons, Monika and Neesha Orleech, Marissa Dean;
a host of relatives and friends including, Delores Simms
Leroy Watson of Freeport, Albertha Rodgers and family,
Anita Sutherland and family, David Duncombe, Ruth
and Roy McKenzie, Charlotte and Daniel Strapp, Tino
Pratt and Hubert Knowles, Kimberly and Phillip
Ferguson; cousins, Cynthia, Ivy, Colamae, Duke Hanna,
Mae Thompson and family, Carolyn Hanna and family,
Patricia Bell and family and the Saxon's family, and
Market Street Boys.


Friends may pay their last respects at Jones Brothers
Morticians Mt. Royal and Talbot Streets. Viewing will
be held in the State Room at Jones Brothers Morticians
Mt. Royal and Talbot Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m
to 6:00p.m and again at the church from 10:00 a.m to
service time at the church.


CAROLINE
DAMES, 96


Sof Pinewood Gardens and
Formerly of Sandy Point,
Abaco, will be held on
Saturday, June 21st at St.
S, Marks Native Baptist Church
Fox Hill, at 10:00 am.
Officiating will be Rev. Dr.
Carrington S. Pinder assisted
by other ministers. Interment will follow at the church's
cemetery.

Viewing will be held in the state room of Jones Brothers
Morticians on Friday from 10am-6pm and again on
Saturday at the church form 9:15 am to service time.

She is survived by two grand daughters, Deborah
Coakley, Delerise Bowe; three grand sons, Alonza
Prosper, James Bowe and Euland McKinney; seven
great grand children, Danille Coakley, Donta Coakley,
Codero Bowe, Genester Seymour, Ishie Bowe, Dentury
Miller, Destiny Bowe; one great grandchild, Jeston
Musgrove, a host of other relatives and friends
including, Olevia Moss, Fredrick Dean, Sis. Mary
Reckley and family, Sis. Yvonne Clarke, Rev. and Sister
Carrington S. Pinder, St. Marks Native Baptist family,
Rev. and Sis. Chadwick James, Mark and Gaylene Pinder,
Mr. and Mrs. Viola Nesbitt and the Staff of NICU/SCBU
P.M. H. Hospital.


--e --- I I-


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES






PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


@ meeting's Qolnnial
inrtnari n nb (lremnatorium
84 Blue Hill Road P.O. Box N-8161 Tel: 325-7867
Fax: 325-7867




Infant
JAMIA DESTNIEE
TANIQUE HIGGS,
4 months
will be held at the Southland
Church of God, Solider Road :
on Friday 20th June, 2008 at
1:00 p.m. Officiating will be
Pastor Tuedon Stubbs, and
Interment will follow in the .'
Eastern Cemetery, Shirley
Street.

Left to cherish her memory are her parents, Darlene Sands
and Jamil Higgs; sister, Shamil Higgs; grand-mothers,
Michelle Sands and Theresa Higgs; grand-fathers, David
Sands and Joel Higgs; step grand-mothers, Shelia Sands
and Mildred Higgs; great grand-fathers, Oswald Finley
and Oswald Sands; three aunts, Cindy Bashani, Tanaz
and Shantish Sands; five uncles, Andrew, Dario, Pete,
Delano and Sammy Higgs; six grand-aunts, Arnette and
Shacarrah Finley, Christine Poiter, Maria Gilcott, Janet
Sands and Juliet Newbold; five grand-uncles, Raymond
and Oswald Finley Jr., Felton and Thomas Sands and
James Newbold and a host of other relatives and friends
including, Charles Jr., Travis, Oneil, Ternisha, Tyreke,
Ryanna, Aiden, Darielle and Jetaime, Miriam Finley,
Leoni, Judy, Verdell, Marsha, Leroy, Locksley, Bill, Tonia,
Sheniqua, Vala, Lavado, Sharee, Lakeisha, Damon,
Sharmaine, Bernadette, Bianca, Timmar, Devonor,
Shukuanya, Deandra, Dominique, Jamal, Saffran, Merk,
Ernica, Patou, Kevin Burrows, Devancio Reckley, David
Adderley, Mark Gilbert, Shantell Hutechenson, Daniel
Sturrup, Coven, Sambria Williams, Andica Stubbs, Rodina
and Omar Armbrister, Talinda Williams, Tommasena
Turnquest, Krizia Williams, Tyrese Whylly, Alice Adams,
Elaine Wilson, Eleane Allen, Stacey Bethel, Sharon
McKenzie, Jamal Albury, Linda Mcphee, Newton Hill,
the Maycocks, Graveys, Moncurs especially Rev Patricia
Clarke-Rolle, the Cornerstone Church of God, the staff
of Majestic Tours and Lil Generals, the staff of BTC IT
Department, Dr. Lochan, Dr. Thomas, Dr. Mcdegan and
other Doctors and Nurses of the NICU Ward and families.
The body will repose at the Chapel of the Saints Sweeting's
Colonial Mortuary and Crematorium, #84 Blue Hill Rd.
from 12.00md on Thursday until 6.00pm and on Friday
from 10.00 am. and at the Church from 12:00p.m. until
service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034


MRS. ROYANNE
JOYCELYN
ROLLINS-CAREY, 47
OF HIGH ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA
DIED ON TUESDAY, JUNE 18, 2008.
.,' She is survived by her Husband: Henford
Carey; 2 Daughters: Henrietta Carey and
Kenya Kimberley Lewis of Abaco; 1
Granddaughter: Keyajah Lewis; 4
Brothers: Gary, Godfrey, Rodney and
Rev. Ivan Barnett; 4 Sisters: Maria
Brennen, Willimae Bowe, Rosemary
Pinder and Beverley Barnett, 1 Aunt: Emily Stuart; 2 Uncles: Benjamin
and Ennis Laing; Son-in-law: Earnest Lewis of Abaco; numerous nieces,
nephews and a host of other relatives and friends.

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A LATER
DATE.


MR. JODI ALBON
MARTIN, 27
S SON OF JOHN AND DEIDRE MARTIN
S".OF MARTIN TOWN, EIGHT MILE
ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA DIED AT
S THE MEMORIAL WEST MEDICAL
CENTRE, FT. LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA
.. '""' ON WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18, 2008.

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE
ANNOUNCED AT A LATER DATE.


MR. JAMES
THOMPSON, 91
OF #385 NANSEN AVENUE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA AND
FORMERLY OF LONG BAY CAYS,
SOUTH ANDROS DIED AT THE RAND
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL ON TUESDAY,
JUNE 17, 2008.


He is survived by his Wife: Whelmena
Thompson; 5 Sons: Rev. Stanville, Martin,
Ezekiel, Ednal and Dwayne Thompson; 3
Daughters: Fredericka Smith, Melsheva
"Melissa" Dewanard and Carmetta Rolle; 28 Grandchildren, 14 Great-
grandchildren, numerous nieces, nephews and a host of other relatives and
friends.
FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A LATER
DATE.
_'______________________ ___ _______ .


iZ 'a*'-. .- A-* '' p. 4. - - .- - --- -- "-
A.~~f ~ t*..42L* I. . ..L ,A.-..rl~lnst ~. p;~~V ~ **







THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 15


and wtnhw0km 26k&1


FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005


NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043/ (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034


N A SERVICE FOR


NOEL EZEKIEL
BAIN, 75


SOF #165 BIMINI PLACE,
4-4. : .: ..; HAWKSBILL, GRAND BAHAMA
.r .AND FORMERLY OF BLUE HILLS,
." PROVIDENCIALES, TURKS AND
CAICOS ISLANDS WILL BE HELD
S AT THE CHURCH OF GOD OF
PROPHECY, HAWKSBILL, GRAND
BAHAMA ON SATURDAY 21, 2008
; AT 11:00A.M. OFFICIATING WILL
S BE THE REV. KEITH PALMER
ASSISTED REV. JOSEPH TAYLOR,
PASTOR EMERITUS. INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW IN THE GRAND
BAHAMA MEMORIAL PARK, FROBISHER DRIVE, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA.

Left to cherish his memories are his 5 Sons: William, Henry, John, Frank
.and Whitfield Bain; 2 Daughters: Shirley Bain Smith and Annis Bain
Hall; 10 Grandsons: Denard and Deniko Bain, Rashad Hall, Whitfield
Jr. and Warren Bain, Tremain, Justin and Jason Bain, Christopher Bain
and Terouche Orlando; 9 Granddaughters: Shanitra and Shaderia Smith,
Natalia, Natasha and Rashad Hall, Acacia Bain, Lekeisha Mallory,
Stephanie Hall and Tammy Ann Butler; 1 Great-granddaughter:
Danarjea; 1 adopted Great-grandson: Darrien; 3 adopted Great-
granddaughters: Gabrielle and Cassidy Hall and Tanaya Orlando; 3
Brothers: George and Preston Harris of Providenciales and Bruce Bain;
1 Sister: Martha Johnson of Nassau; 1 Aunt: Elizabeth Palmer of Ft.
Lauderdale; 9 Nieces: Jaunita, Juliemae, Shellymae, Dedgrie, Anita,
Indira, Anaquia, Karen and Mary; 17 Nephews: Ricardo, Hiram, George
Jr., William, Ednel, Shannon, Jimmy, Milton, Howard, Robert, Brian,
Anthony, Barry, Bruce Jr., Steve, Allan and Theo Bain; 1 Son-in-law:
Hayward Smith; 4 Daughters-in-law: Clara, Melonie, Donna and Lynette
Bain and a host of other relatives and friends including: Arthur (Tonkie)
Hall, Troy Hall, Minna Outten-Winters, Edgar Hall, Croften Bain, Daniel,
Louise and Catherine Robinson, Charles and Princess Harris, George,
John, James and Donald Stubbs, Leisha Harris, Hilda Robinson, Amos
Harris, Eric Parker and family, Phyllis, Dottie, Mary, Patrina, Caranet,
Helen Simms, Alice Been, Clarita Forbes and family, Colin Ewing and
family, Suzanne Russell and family, Don Laing and family, Salvano
Bullard, the Mallory family, JeffMather, Derek and Eva Edwards, Rosada,
Sonia and Gordon King, Hillgrove King and family, Jappie Bain, Valarie
Bullard, Karen Pinder, Jennifer Knowles, the Lotmore family, Charmine
Hall, Brian Maycock, the Higgs family, the entire community of Hawksbill,
Straw and Souvenir Vendors at Freeport Harbour Company, Katherine
Simmons and family, Lyncoln Forbes, the entire Eight Mile Rock
Community, Walton Johnson, staff at Dorsett T's, staff of Robby's
Warehouse, management and staff at Bahamasair, management and staff
at Quality Auto, management and staff of Nassau Auto Mall, staff at
Xanadu Beach Resort, Victoria Palmer and family, staff at Ginn Sur Mer
West End, Doctors, Nurses and staff at the Rand Memorial Hospital.


VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE "PERPETUAL SUITE" OF
RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM
LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00 A.M TO 6:00 P.M. AND ON
SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 9:30 AM UNTIL SERVICE
TIME.


ALBERT "ABBY"
ELLIS JR., 39

OF #31 WOODCOCK LOOP,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
AND FORMERLY OF WEST END,
GRAND BAHAMA WILL BE HELD
AT THE CENTRAL CHURCH OF
GOD, CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA ON
SATURDAY, JUNE 21, 2008 AT
11:00A.M.. OFFICIATING WILL BE
BISHOP FRED NEWCHURCH
ASSISTED BY REV. STEVE DEAN.
CREMATION WILL FOLLOW.


Left to cherish his memories are his Mother: Leanna Burchill; Stepmother:
Joanne Ellis; adopted Mother: Ruth Clere; 9 Brothers: Ronald, Robin,
Ricardo "Rickey", R. Nathan, Carl and Carlos Ellis, Marvin Benson of
Nassau, Abdullah Sweeting of Miami and Pedro Sweeting of Nassau; 4
Sisters: Rhodamae C., Theresa, and Albertha Ellis and Uneska Sweeting,
of Jacksonville; adopted Sister: Gazal Clere; 3 Nieces: Adrianna, Stanika,
Alycia and Amaria; 5 Nephews: Mich and Essien, Dinavian, Ronald Jr.
and Ricardo Jr.; 11 Aunts: Glendina Ellis, Lottie Celestine, Olive Rahming,
Lillis Stuart, Evenlyn Ellis, Julia Johnson of Miami, Minta Poitier of
Miami, Jenny Ellis, Florence Gibson, Euls Brent and Alice Benson; 4
Uncles: Malachi Ellis, Elgin Rahming, Mark Celestine and Edwin Benson
of New York; Cousins: Florence Young, Rosanne and Howard Symonette,
Veronica McIntosh, Robert Stuart, Christopher and Arthur Sawyer, Sandra,
Orlando, Vincent, Kendal and Christine Tunquest, Keisha, Sylvia, Sherrol,
Terrance, Kenneth, Michael, Nicola, Christine, Maria, Eddie, Sammy,
Joey and a host of other relatives and friends: Tina, Shannel, Samantha,
Shaquira, Elton, Angelo, Patrick, Jamal, Jamika, Megan, Mario, Kendrick,
Olivia Augustine, Desmond, Kayla, Carlton, Quinton, Felicia, Carmella,
Arthur Jr, Abigail, Chrishan, Christopher, Christina, Christanique, Denzel,
Dean, Davanta, Fabian, Jermaine, Melissa, Lavon, Tazmon, Shantel,
Beverley Cooper and family, Nadine, Brenetta, Tiny, Ms. Vicky and
Clifford McDonald.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE "HALCYON SUITE" OF
RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM
LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00 P..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT
THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY FROM 9:30 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE
TIME.
i^^ j) [teiw-mi-ratBt in i


I _


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES






PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


and W'emah~&m 26dAi
FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNER~~AL EVC O


BESSIEMAE
NOTTAGE, 58

OF #80 CABOT DRIVE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
AND FORMERLY OF
STANDARD CREEK, ANDROS
SWILL BE HELD AT MARY STAR
OF THE SEA CATHOLIC
S CHURCH, EAST SUNRISE
HIGHWAY, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA ON SATURDAY,
JUNE 21, 2008 AT 10:00A.M.
OFFICIATING WILL BE REV. MSGR. J. AMBROSE
MACKINNON, S.F.M. ASSISTED BY DECON NIXON LINDOR.
INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW IN THE GRAND BAHAMA
MEMORIAL PARK, FROBISHER DRIVE, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA.

Left to cherish her memories are her Husband: Timothy Nottage;
Son: Demetri Rhodriquez; 13 Adopted Children: Sean & Crystal
Porter, Jemeke Pitt, Joletta Nottage, Tavashanique Nottage, Timothy
Nottage III, Anthony Nottage and Kenva Beneby, Delarese Sargent,
Frederick & Freddie Porter, Charlene Dawkins, of Exuma and Cloe
Johnson- Nairn; 8 Grandchildren: Demetri Rhodriquez Jr., Decarlo
Bullard, Kendira Rolle, Danielle Beneby, Jay, and Delon Sargent,
Shawna & Shawntae Porter; 2 Brothers: Oscar & Drexel Porter; 2
Sisters: Yvonne Porter and Sylvia Porter-Woodside; Nieces: Tiffany,
Tanya, Candiece, Daphnie, April Coyatiara, Cindy, Edrina Rolle,
Kaylesa & Alana McGregor, and Geneva Pinder; Nephews: Oscar
Jr., Tony & Vernon Porter, Antone Edward Jr., Edrico Edwin, Graylan
& Kendrick McGregor, Pastors Vaughn and Glen Miller; Aunt: Angela
Turnquest of Long Island; Uncle: Alvin Turnquest of Long Island;
Daughter-in-law: Nikki Seymour; Son-in-law: Sgt. Jay Sargent; 4
Sister-in-law: Clarissa McGregor, Mary Miller, and Marjorie Nottage,
Patient Forbes of Exuma; Brother-in-law: Edward McGregor, Sr.;
Cousins: Joyce Bannister & Family of New Providence; Hon. Thomas
Desmond Bannister, Pamela Sands & Family, Brian Bannister &
Family, Rosemary Braithwaite & Family, Henry & Oralee Smith &
Family of New Providence, John & Tom Bain, Jr. of Miami, Florida,
Alonzo & Alphonzo Bain of Miami, Florida, Richard .and Doralee
Bain Smith & Family of Miami, Florida, Woldek & Sandra Bain-
Browvoski & Family of Miami, Florida, Richard, Wesley, Anthony,
Addler, Paula, Pamela, Marilyn, Laverne (Titta) Bain & Family,
Sharon Neely & Family, Tasha & Terry, Claudine Dawkins & Family,
Anna Bain & Family, Shirley Bain & Family, Ellis & Naomi Whyms


& Family of Stanyard Creek, Andros, Norma Tumquest & Family of
New Providence, Donna Cargill & Family, Delores Berry & Family,
Linda Bain & Family and Pat Bain & Family, Koletta Bain of Stanyard
Creek, Andros, Kenneth Woodside & Family, Michael, Trevor, Leonard
& Pat Bain & Family, Dr. Archie & Edward Donaldson & Family of
New Providence, Coralee & Irish Donaldson & Family of New
Providence, Malcolm, Doris, Denise, Sharon Culmer & Family of
New Providence, Patricia Anderson & Family of New Providence,
Dencil & Kirklyn Barr and a host of other relatives and friends
including: Senator Pleasant Bridgewater & Family, Dr. Winston Forbes,
Dr. Robin Roberts, Jackie Saunders, Shelia Brown Thomas, Peggy
Roberts, Marjorie Cartwright & Family, Ruthann Wilson, Ed & Don
Bethel ofNew Providence, Stephanie Ferguson & Family, Oswald &
Dorothy Lightbourne & Family, Lloyd Kinglock & Family, Ricardo
Lightbourn & Family, Christopher & Monique Leary & Family, Pearl
Neely, Judith Dawkins & Family, Lauren Miller & Family, Doreen
Pinder & Family, Christine Cooper & Family of New Providence,
Oswald Brown & Family, West Bastian & Family, Roger Johnson &
Family, Rev. Reno Smith & Family, Gladstone & Daisy McPhee &
Family, Herbert & Paula Marshall & Family, Jackie Richardson &
Family, Donald & Betty McCartney, & Family, Gerald & Victoria
Wright & Family, Hansel & Doranel King & Family, Queenie Gibson
& Family, Dr. Cecil & Barbara Thompson & Family, Cleo Johnson
& Family, Keith Rolle & Family, Cloretta (Small) Duncombe & Family
(New Providence), Dorothy H. Bain-Lockhart & Family, Annamae
Dorsett & Family, Daniel & Crescie Verville & Family of Lauderhill,
Florida; Cheryl Brooks & Family, Vernita Williams & Family, Harold
Ferguson & Family, The Staff of The Rand Memorial Hospital, The
Staff of the Princess Margaret Hospital, Female Medical II, and the
Dialysis Unit, The Staff of the Lucayan Medical Center, The Ministry
of Education, Youth Sports & Culture, The Principal, Staff and Students
of the Lewis Yard Primary School, The Principal, Staff and Students
of the Martin Town Primary School, Members of the Grand Bahama
Players, Members of the Zonta Club, The Northern Bahamas Council
For Disabled, Members of the School Welfare Committee, Grand
Bahama Public Service Bus Union, Grand Bahama Taxi Union and
a host of numerous relatives and friends too many to mention.

A Memorial Service will be held at Wallace Groves Auditorium, East
Sunrise Highway, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday, June 20, 2008
at 7:00p.m.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE "SERENTIY SUITE" OF
RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY & CREMATORIUM
LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00 A.M TO 6:00 P.M, AND AT
.THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY FROM 8:30 A.M UNTIL SERVICE
TIME.


13 Stl~iD_ i Z: 4 -


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES






THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 17


FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034
FUNER~~AL EVC O


CLINT BRADSHAW
MILLER, 33

,"" of Simms, Long Island, will be
V. held on Saturday June 21, 2008
at 2:00pm at Church Of God,
*:Lilly In The Valley Corner.
Officiating will be Rev. Dr.
SMoses A. Johnson, assisted by
other Ministers. Interment will
Follow in the Southern
Cemetery, Cowpen and
Spikenard Road.

He is survived by his Father: Edward Miller; Mother:
Veronica Knowles; Stepmother: Polly Miller; Sisters:
Lorraine Taylor, Corese Deveaux, Veronica Knowles, Nursing
Officer II Mechelle Rolle, Gigi Miller, Brothers: Devitte
And Kenwood Miller; Stepbrother: Donnovan Miller; Nieces:
Shantell Cassandra and Julie Taylor, Tamika Harding, Tiara
Deveaux, Rachael Nixon, Denise Miller, Keniesha Rolle,
Samantha Burrows, Sharon Stanfoot, Nephews: Gary and
Darrel Taylor, Neville Adderley, Blenrick, Nyles and Kyles
Miller, Kenrick and Akeem Rolle, Jason Collie, Raymond
And Renardo Miller, Aunts: Mary Dawkins, Beatrice Fox,
Rita Moss, Cora and Olive Dean, Lagloria and Elva Miller,
Queen Reid; Sisters-in-law: Brenda and Melinda Miller;
Brothers-in-law: Frederick. Deveaux, Wellington Taylor,
Wendall Knowles and Kendall Rolle and a host of other
relatives and friends including: Karen Miller, Anastacia
Taylor, Scott Harding, Special Friend: Wendy Griffin,
Wellington Knowles, Pandora Adderley and family, Doctors
and Nurses of The Male Medical Ward II, Nurse Spence of
Simms, Long Island, Denzella Knowles, Jerry Knowles,
Barry Knowles, Scottfield Miller, Ivan Barr, Gwendolyn
Pinder, Rowena Cooper, Eliza Miller, Mauriel and Rev. David
Adderley, Ilene Smith, Helen Darville, Tyrone Romer,
Nicholas Knowles (Red Eye), Nurse Smith, Sgt. Duncombe,
Police Smith, Leonard Knowles, management and staff of
The Island Link, and the entire community of Millers and
Simms, Long Island..


Viewing will be held in The Serenity Suite, Restview
Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and
Soldier Road on Friday June 20, 2008from 10:00am To
6:00pm and on Saturday June 21, 2008from 1:00pm until
service time at the church.


and Spikenard Road.


DESMOND CEDRIC
MUNNINGS, 28

of Cox Way, will be held on
Saturday June 21st, 2008 at
2:00pm at Word Of Faith
Tabernacle, Coxway Off East
Street South. Officiating will
be Bishop Dr. Perry E. Newton
Sr., assisted by other Ministers.
Interment will follow in The
Southern Cemetery, Cowpen


Left to cherish his memories are his Sisters: Porsha Smith,
Patricia Smith, Sheneka Adderley; Brother-in-law: Greg Sr;
Aunts: Miriam Williams, Pandora Smith OfExuma, Myrtlean
Rolle, Margaret Smith, Leotha Munnings of Florida, Inez
Munnings of Freeport, Rebecca Smith of Florida, Gloria
Campbell of Maryland, Gwen Rolle of Freeport; Uncles:
Maxwell Smith of Exuma, Alfred Munnings, Macdonald
Smith of Exuma, John Williams, Michael Rolle, Shawn,
Dwayne, Peter, Tony Munnings of Freeport; Nieces: lana
Smith, Antonia Johnson, Johnesha Knowles; Nephews: Leon
Smith, Ricardo Collie, James Spence Jr., and a host of other
relatives and friends including: Wayde Delaney, Geraldine
And Family, Dell, Gregory, Shawn, The Rolle Family of
Mount Thompson, Yellow, Kevin, Blue, Bernie, Toomber,
Dollar, The Curry Family and Zovie.

Viewing will be held in The Perpetual Suite, Restview
Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and
Soldier Road on Friday June 20, 2008 From 10:00am to
6:00pm and again on Saturday June 21, 2008from 10:00am
to 12:00 noon and from 1:00pm until service time at the
church.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES






PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JUNE 19,2008 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


w$S4rw tAffma&ikUn 4

cecC b5^mcrrc~Q~w"inr Simu/ee/


FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005


NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034


F UNERAL SERVICEFOR


EZEKIEL
ROLLE, 84

of Johnson Road Fox Hill and
formerly of Farmer's Hill
4 Exuma, will be held on
Saturday June 21, 2008 at
11:00am at Southwest
Cathedral, Carmichael Road.
Officiating will be Bishop
Samuel Mortimer and Pastor
Patrice Rolle. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

He is survived by his children: Jacqueline and Kilroy Coakley,
Avery and Minister Patricia Rolle, Theresa and Elkin Butler,
Franklyn and Marina Rolle, Brendalee and Renaldo Minus,
Brian and Shirley Rolle, Theodore Rolle, Mario Sr. and
Sherrina Rolle; adopted daughter: Linda Williams; sister:
Eloise Mackey; sister-in-law: Minister Salome Rolle;
grandchildren: Monalisa, Angelo, Shandaria, Kayrell,
Kendowlyn, Cameron, Averia, Rayard, Klarance, Ashkan,
Marika, Rashad, Raygene, Karlene, Marion Jr., Saya, Rayshan,
Marco, Joshhua, Kendall and Nicole Williams, Wardell,
Cordell; adopted grandchildren: Sophia, Charmaine,
Laquelle, Salaika, Apryl, Karame, Bianca, Lester and Patricia
Williams, Dwight and Nicole Thompson, Gary Thompson
(Bats) and wife, Elkin Jr., Jerry and Thomas Butler; great
grandchildren: Maleek; Mario, Kavon, Khalycia and
Khandice Rolle; 21 adopted great grandchildren; nieces
and nephews: Madeline and Samuel Basden, Letisha and
Jocelyn Clarke, Augusta and Churchill McNeil, lona and
Keith Harris, Ashley and Christine Clarke, Louise Smith,
Mable Rolle, Silivia Rolle, Jenny Neely, Medelina Rolle,
Dorothy Smith, Pearl Munroe, Jocelyn Bolden, Michelle and
Charlene Rolle, Leonard and Livingston Rolle, Albert,
Arlington, Andrew, Roger and Sandra Armbrister, Minister
Jennifer and Sheldon Newton, Gregory and Bloneva Mackey,
Reuben Mackey, Evelyn Munroe. Lawrence and Ruth Rolle,
Kenneth and Nursing Officer Michelle Rolle. Wendell and
Pamela Rolle, Anthony and Sabrina Rolle. Kevin Rolle.
Christine and Lorene Rolle: other relatives including: Kenneth


and Alvina Beneby, Aruda Moss, Georgia Pennerman, James
Mackey, Bishop Samuel Mortimer and the New Solid Rock
Church of God family, Mama Co. and family, Arthur Johnson
and family, Adderley family, Captain Lee Armbrister, Christa
Taylor, The Staff of Male Medical Wards I and II of The
Princess Margaret Hospital, Mosko United Construction
Company, Nassau Harbour Club family, Winifred Moss and
family, Martha Ferguson, Margaret Stuart, Rev. Carl Rahming
and the Fox Hill Community, Oraline Butler and family and
a host of other relatives and friends.

Viewing will be held in the Irenic Suite, Restview Memorial
Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and Soldier
Road on Friday June 20, 2008from 10:00am to 6:00pm
and on Saturday June 21, 2008from 10:00am until service
time at the church.


Death Notice


BEVERLEY
THERESA KERR,
44

of Delaporte, died at the
Princess Margaret Hospital on
Friday June 13, 2008.


She is survived by her Father:
Rudolph George Kerr Sr.;
Sisters: Deborah, Rita, Marcia,
Ann Kerr; Minister Linda
Moxey, Minister Esmerilda O'Brien, Elizabeth Brown, Lisa
Knowles, Elaine Forbes; Brother: Rudolph George Kerr Jr.;
Grandfather: George Kerr and a host of other relatives and
friends.

Funeral arrangements will be made at a later date.


.-5ioH mluflu1 I


- -- -- --- -----------


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008,


iii I:


a
a
oi
1







THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008, PAGE 19


Pint er FuneralHome
"Service Beyond Measure'
PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570/ 393-1351 CELL: 357-3617
RANNIE PINDER President

FUE A SEVC FOR


BRADLEY
RANDOLPH
ALBURY


of Norfolk Road died at
the Princess Margaret
Hospital on Tuesday -
June 17th, 2008, will be
held at Pinders Funeral
Home Palmdale Ave.,
Palmdale on Thursday
June 19th, 2008 at
11:00am. Rev. Charles Sweeting


officiating.


He is survived by his loving wife, DonnaAlbury;
two daughters, Michelle and Candice Albury;
one son, Bradley Jr.; mother-in-law, Claudette
Lowe; two sisters-in-law, Karen and Sophia Lowe;
one brother-in-law, Christopher Lowe; two
uncles, Winston Albury of Marsh Harbour and
Kenny Roberts of Freeport; three aunts, Byrle
Albury, Agnes Roberts and Nadine Albury;
cousins, Gloria Hanna, Craig Sands, Ivan, Winston
and George Bethel, Kay, Mike, Billy and Robin
Albury, a very special thanks to friends, Robby
Archer, Andrew and Bonnie Malone and Gloria
Hanna, The Wong family; especially, Brian Wong,
Myma, Corzel, Daryl Collins, The Fishing Buddies
in Freeport, many other relatives and friends.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the
Cancer Society of the Bahamas P.O. Box SS-6539
in memory of Bradley Albury.

Funeral arrangements are being handled by Pinders
Funeral Home.


KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED
22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas
iiy I [] i v s[ I ]


DOROTHY EVANS, 79


of Montagu Heights, Nassau, The
Bahamas, will be held at St. Andrew's
Presbyterian Kirk, Princes Street,
Nassau, on Saturday, 21st June, 2008
at 1:00 p.m.
Reverend William Hayes will
officiate.


She was pre-deceased by her husband
of 41 years, Maldwyn G. Evans. She
is survived by her children, Brian and
Margaret of Nassau, and Douglas of
S Marsh Harbour, Abaco and his wife,
Lisa; grandchildren, Jonathan and
Nicholas Evans of Abaco, and Bryanne Evans of Nassau; sister,
Evelyn Wallace of Dumfries, Scotland; brother, Matthew Mair of
Manor Farm, Doddington, England; special friend and caregiver,
Patricia Knowles; brothers and sisters-in-law, Jenny Mair of England,
Ron and Lois Evans, Joan and Ray Chassie and Bill and Randi Evans
of Canada; nieces from Canada, Sandra Beaulieu, Linda D'Amico,
Rhonda Milligan, Darla Blair, Kristen Gray and Julie Evans; and from
England, Anne Saunders; nephews from Canada, Owen, Daryl and
David Evans and Darrin Collard; from England, John and Robert
Mair; and from Scotland, Jim, Ian, Matthew and Andrew Wallace.
Many dear friends too numerous to mention, but including, the ladies
of The Women's Corona Society, including the "craft group", especially,
Eileen Farmer, Dee Baker, Jeannie Sawyer, Joy Housser, Jeanette
Roberts, Joan Johnstone, Gloria Atkinson, Mini Karani, Rosie Sayer,
Rosie Roberts, Sue Hullarid, Carmen Maramag, Cora Carey and
Miriam Watson, Davidson Hepburn, Denis Donaldson, Robin
Brownrigg, Bruce Raine, Agreta Eneas-Carey, Dee Phillips, Earla
Bethel, Alistair Henderson, Lindsey Cancino, and the Kirk family,
Ivy and Reginald Dumont, Hugh and June Sands, Tony and Helen
Hepburn, Rob and Debbie Lotmore, Yvonne Bain (Isle of Man), Jean
Hill, Howard Lawrence, John Chaplain (Scotland), Bernard Albury,
Don and Heather Boorman, Mena and Derek Griffiths, Jude and
Doreen Kemp, Ray and Flora Claridge, David and Muriel Lunn,
Mike, Tony and Giselle Kelly, Billy and Chana Albury, Alicia Sands,
Eric and Carmelita Hall, David and Heather White, Margaret, Fiona,
Andrew and Hazel Stirling, Kit and Leslie Spencer, Britt and Birger
Sterner (Sweden), Irene and Joe VonLanthan, Anne Nisbet, Nancy
Spivey (USA), Hillary and Christopher Birch, Malcolm Lawson
(England), Chris and Tony Bull (Australia), Paul and Caroline
Greenaway, Karam and Puran Bhogra (India), Mike and Leslie
Reynolds (England), Dawn Davies, Helena Lightbourne, Jill and
Mike Pike (England), Elizabeth Johnson (Scotland), Peter and Jean
Dunn (England), Arthurlue Rahming and the Project Read tutors,
former teachers and students of St. Andrew's School.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to "The Women's Corona
Society", P.O. Box N-8716, Nassau or "Project Read", P.O. Box SS-
19502, Nassau in memory of Dorothy Evans.


Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES








PG 20 hrdy Jn 9 08rFII(I~MTe rbue. ~ .


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BY HIDING your
testimony you may
be inadvertently
denying giving God
the praise that is
due to Him.


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WHO can deny the power of one's personal tes-
timony? It is the basis of the believer's witness -
your firsthand, eyewitness account of how God
has rescued you from a life of destruction and set you
back in rightstanding with Himself. What's more, like the
blood of the Lamb, your testimony has the power to literal-
ly overcome the devil.


Yet, many believers are ashamed
to tell their story as they attempt to
live up to a facade of holiness that
ends up denying the redemptive
power of God. Rick Dean, pastor
of the Family of Faith Ministries in
Monastery Heights (Bernard
Road), calls it a sense of false
pride. And we know that pride
comes before a fall.
"I think it's a matter of false
pride and image. We don't give our
testimonies because we want peo-
ple to have a certain opinion of
who we are. But this is very detri-
mental because it indicates that
.W \ou are not free from your past,"
SPastor Dean told Tribune Religion.
, It could be guilt, but the main
issue why people hide their testi-
mony is because they want people
to perceive them as this idea of
Christianity. But false pride is a
S bad foundation to build your life
on
S,'" Pastor Dean believes that the


'Ut sS f-lk-k~. EU kA'.....y-


main danger with hiding your testi-
mony is that you are inadvertently
denying giving God the praise that
is due to Him. By not letting others
know how you got to the place in
Christ that you are today, the
believer is saying that he has made
it on his own.
"Your testimony points to God.
Without some background on
where you came from, you're not
giving glory to God. So it is not fair
to hide that," Pastor Dean
explained.
Though he stands as a minister
today, Pastor Dean is not ashamed
to tell you that years ago, his life was
headed in a completely different
direction.
While working at ZNS as a sports
reporter and anchor, Rick Dean got
involved in a life of partying and
drinking. From alcohol, he started
smoking marijuana, and later a
SEE page 23


HOW TO GIVE

YOUR TESTIMONY
Start with a simple 3-point
outline
A three-point approach is
very effective in communicat-
ing your personal testimony.
The outline focuses on before
you trusted Christ, how you
surrendered to him, and the
difference since you've been
walking with Him.
1. BEFORE: Simply tell what
your life was like before you
surrendered to Christ. What
were you searching for before
coming to know Christ? What
was the key problem, emo-
tion, situation or attitude you
were dealing with? What
motivated you? What were
your actions? How did you
try to satisfy your inner
needs? (Examples of inner
needs are loneliness, fear of
death, Insecurity. Possible
ways to fill those needs
include work, money, drugs,
relationships, sports, sex.)
2. HOW: How were you con-
verted? Simply tell the events
and circumstances that
caused you to consider Christ
as the solution to your
searching. Take time to identi-
fy the steps that brought you
to the point of trusting Christ.
Where were you? What was
happening at the time? What
people or problems influ-
enced your decision?
3. SINCE: How has your life
in Christ made a difference?
How has his forgiveness
Impacted you? How have
your thoughts, attitudes and
emotions changed? Share
how Christ Is meeting your
needs and what a relationship
with him means to you now.
SEE page 23


SILVER JUBILEE CELE-
BRATIONS: Rev Dr Ivan F
Butler, pastor of Kemp Road
Ministries, will celebrate 25
years of pastoral care, under
the theme, "Serving the
Lord...Serving the
Church...Serving the
Community, with
Gratitude!"

Sunday, June 29: T-shirt
Day (all services)
Church of God Mass Choir
and Minister Denzil Rolle
will be in worship service.

Sunday, July 6:
Appreciation Service
Speaker Pastor Omar
Rambisson


ThePOWER



ofPE RSONAL



TESTIMONY

E By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Features Writer
pburrows@tribunemedia.net


Did you recently give
birth to the newest little
angel on earth? Have you
and your beloved recently
tied the knot? Is your church
planning a special event?
Tribune Religion wants to
hear from you!
We want to know about the
special things going on in
your life, so go ahead and
send in your wedding photo-
graphs, birth announcements
and church activities sched-
ule to be posted in upcoming
Tribune Religion sections.
This service is free. Send
all information, including
(especially) photographs, to
features@tribunemedia.net.
Information can be hand
delivered to The Tribune at
Shirley and Deveaux Streets
or call the Religion section
@ 502.2368.




I NSIGH

For t stoies bhinth


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PG 20 Thursday, June 19, 2008


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The Tribune







The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, June 19, 2008 PG 21


Where does your help come from?


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON

WE must recognize that our
God is constant and he is
always close to us, even when
we do not feel it. We often talk
about God as if he were a
long way away. For example,
compare and contrast the fol-
lowing song lyrics.
Cliff Richard in his popular song
wrote: "God is watching us, God is
watching us, God is watching us, from
a distance", but Psalm 121:5 says, the
Lord watches over you, the Lord is
your shade at your right hand. Sorry Sir
Cliff, but God is closer than you think!
In Bible language the one at your right
hand is your closest ally.
As we look at Psalm 121, we under-


stand that one of the greatest perils for
the traveller of that day was the fierce
heat of the Middle Eastern sun, but the
promise is that God cares for the pil-
grim even through this. God is close
enough to take the heat for the trav-
.eller. Is your God close enough to take
the heat out of the situations you face?
We must realise that there are no cir-
cumstances in which God will abandon
us to look after ourselves.
Whatever it is that we are worried
about, God is close enough to help us,
and there is nothing he will abandon us
to face alone.
We may never have the nerve to say
it out loud, but underlying our fears is
the lack of belief that God is capable of
saving us. But as we saw he is the
maker of heaven and earth.
If God is God, there is nothing in our
lives that He can't deal with. He can
help us with our problems at work! He
can help with our family relationships!


The power of the 'spoken word'


* By MINISTER DEON
SEYMOUR-COX

LET'S talk about the 'spoken
word' and its importance. Why
is it so important, one may
ask? Owing to the vibratory
power of words, whatever man
voices, he begins to attract.
It is said that "words bring what is
invisible to visibility". It is further said
that, "the invisible forces are ever
working for man who is always 'pulling
the strings' himself, though he does not
know it".
If that is indeed the truth we should
all watch what we say, for as the Bible
says 'your words do not return to you
void'.
The thing about life is that in order
for one to have a revelation one needs
information. It is most difficult to
understand that for which you have no
information. This demands that we fill
in the blanks and find out more.

HERE'S FOR INFORMATION...
It is said that "word" means any
definitely formulated thought not
just the drifting thoughts that float
through your mind. The word is cre-
ative, and the strongest and most cre-
ative words is "I am". When you say
"I am" you are calling upon the uni-
verse to do something for you and it
will.
Remember, you don't have to use
the actual grammatical form "I am".
Every time you associate yourself
with anything or think of yourself of


LET'S
TALK


having, you are using a form of "I
am".
The verb "to have" is a part of the
verb "to be". In the very ancient lan-
guages there is no verb "to have". It
is a modern improvement like the
radio and the automobile. "I have"
means "I am" because you always
have what you are and you do what
you are.
If one does not know that every
time he speaks of disease, he draws it
to himself it does not stop it from
happening. The law just works. This
demands that we take full responsi-
bility of disciplining ourselves in all
areas of life.
For most of us this presents an
opportunity. After man knows the
truth he cannot be too careful with
his words. For example I had a friend
who would call and say "Come over
and lets talk about old times". These
old times meant an hour of about five
hundred to a thousand destructive
words, the principal topics being
lack, failure and who was sick or not
doing so well.
I must reply, "No thanks". I've had
enough 'old time' talks in my life,
they are too expensive, but I'll be
glad to have some new time talks,
and talk about what we want and not
what we don't want.
There is a saying that man only
dares use his words for three purpos-
es, to "heal, bless or prosper". What


He can help. with your debt! He can
help us with dealing with sickness. He
is the Lord of our future.
Do we secretly believe that God has
got it in for us? Are we concerned that
we are not good enough for him? Do
we see God as reluctant or grudging
with his help? As we've seen, that's not
the God of the Bible. Our God cares
for his people.
. Many of us are victims of worry, it is
one of the most common forms of
doubt and the most dangerous,
because we tend to feel as if we can
simply cope on our own. So to get
through life we rely on our intelli-
gence, our job, our charm, our savings,
and our family. We'd rather be self-suf-
ficient; we prefer to do things our own
way.
But at its heart, self-sufficiency is
pride, and pride is a rejection of God.
Spiritually speaking, the person who
relies on himself rather than trusting

man says to another would be said to
him, and what he wishing for another,
he is wishing for himself.
"Words, like chickens, come home
to roost". Decide what words you
want to speak.


God is like a child running away from
home. It is a rejection of one's parents,
a declaration of independence.
Once we've decided to go our own
way, it is no wonder we end up bearing
the worries that come with that choice.
Once we have left behind the One who
watches over us, we leave behind any
source of comfort.
It was while sitting in that little wait-
ing area in the Accident & Emergency,
outside of the operating theatre at the
Princess Margaret Hospital, awaiting
news of a brother who was afflicted
with cancer, scared and fearful, that I
was forced to look to God, that I real-
ized that My God is bigger than any
problem that could come my way.
I now look not necessarily to the
hills, because in this city there are not
many hills to look at, but just looking
at the sky or moon or sun, I know that
my God is there watching over me.


The Universal Truth Ministries is a
Bible-based ministry for thinkers. We
are a teaching ministry and we invite
you to join us in our classes. Visit our
bookstore any day from 11am to 2pm.


Shield of Faith


Evangelistic Church
Mutton Fish Drive Golden Gates #1


13th Annual General

National Holy

Convocation

Sunday 22nd June -

Sunday 29th June, 2008
Time 7:30 p.m. I


Theme:
"Let the church declare God's glory"
Text: Psalms 96: 1-3
General Overseer: Bishop Christopher Burrows







PG 22 Thursday, June 19, 2008


R F~L Itr~I ~N


The Tribune


Prophetic Voices honour fathers in concert


PROPHETIC Voices, a group of
dynamic young people from various
denominations, came together to hon-
our Bahamian fathers in a special con-
cert.
"We have had lots of persons who
have assisted us and it is these men that
we have chosen to honour," said
Natereo Johnson, the groups director.
Pastor CD Lafrenier, the host pastor -
Chippingham Church of God and one
of the honourees, was quite elated to be
chosen. "I applaud the choir's director
Natereo Johnson, and the other mem-
bers of Prophetic Voices. They have got-
ten quite focused and with God's direc-
tion they will go places."
The other honourees are Pastor
Timothy Johnson, Church of God of
Prophecy, Englerston; Pastor Al
Rahming, Christian Disciple Worship;
Dr Wesley Thompson, Mt Pleasant
Gieen Baptist; Apostle J R Roberts,
Five Porches Church; Bishop Dion
Mott, Lighthouse Apostle Ministries,


PICTURED from left, Santonio Bain, Alistair Marshall, Delano Rolle and Deon Mott, all
Tnembers of Prophetic Voices, were in full practice session before the concert.
and Minister Kevin Harris, Bahamas patronage of Pastor Al and Karen
Faith Ministries. Rahming, was an evening of praise and
The event, which was held under the worship.


"This year the choir has seen lots of
trials and tribulations," Prophetic Voice
member Canderia Gilbert said, "but the
challenges are all in the plan of God.
This group possesses people who are tal-
ented, anointed and just gifted."
Moika Rolle; former Ms Gospel
SBahamas, and also a choir member, is in
total agreement.
"So many times we go to God and ask
for something, riches and gold. We
never think that God may be requiring
us to just love him for a change. I see the
choir going from strength to strength,
we are better vocally, spiritually and we
are more united."
According to choir member Alistair
Marshall, this is the third year that the
group has held a concert. "We intended
to remind God of his promise in his
word the sick came to get healed, those
who were burdened down, came to be
set free".
The concert was held at greater
Chippingham Church of God.


q" THE HEALTH
.i CARE MINISTRY
holds its first
Ecumenical
Health Care
,Ministry
ThTaanksgiving and V ivingand
Commissioning Service Thanksgiving and
a ,..i | Commissioning
T i] iE'service at St
Tho onmnrahoneinn nf enu rramtnn Margaret's


SI IIU UIllIIIUII wIIU I Vl HIte UIPF UAll l
ctarte muith iti fiRFATiAR


Apostle Julian Johnson
and Church family
invites you and your family to join us this Sunday at
SUFFICIENT GRACE

INTERNATIONAL MINISTRIES
formerly Jehovah's People International Ministry
For a very special service under the theme:-
IT'S IN THE LATTER RAIN
Be amidst ordinary people who are
destined to do extraordinary things.
We are located Nassau Street north,
two storey yellow building (next door to
Albury Sayles Primary School) upstairs
Contact us at 431-8837
Until we meet may the gravitating power
of God draw you to us.
And remember his Grace it is sufficient for thee


-Kemp Road.

INITIATED by the Anglican Diocese Chairman Nurse Glendina Minus,
of the Bahamas, the Health Care Ministry parish nurse, St Barnabas Anglican
[parish nursing] began in the Bahamas in Church
2005. The ministry was endorsed and Vice chairman Ms Brenda Duvalier,
launched by then Minister of Health Dr HWC, St Margaret's Anglican Church
Marcus Bethel at the opening service held Secretary Ms Natasha Mackey,
at St Margaret's Parish. HWC, All Saint's Anglican Church
The ministry has grown and after three
years is now an ecumenical body. It was fit- Executive council members
ting therefore to hold its first Ecumenical Mrs Kathleen Johnson, parish nurse,
Health Care Ministry Thanksgiving and New Destiny Baptist Cathedral
Commissioning service where it all began, Retired director of Nursing Ms Mary
at St Margaret's Anglican Parish, Kemp Johnson, Macedonia Baptist Church.
Road. Nurse Lyndianna Rahming, parish
Moderating the service was Mrs nurse from Church of Epiphany, will serve
Kathleen Johnson, parish nurse from New as administrative assistant.
Destiny Baptist Cathedral, and praise and
worship was lead by St Margaret's Praise Bishop Godfrey Minnis, who represent-
& Worship Ministry. ed the Bahamas Christian Council, gave a
Welcoming members of the congrega- timely message. The service concluded
tion was Health and Wellness Carer with prayer ministry and laying on of
[HWC] Pastor-at-large Jarenda Rahming hands which was carried out by Rev
from the Church of God of Prophecy. The Angela Palacious, Rev Joseph
scripture reading was taken from Luke Mycklewhyte, Bishops Boyd and Minnis,
10:21-37 and read by Minister Doris Barry, as well as Chaplains Archer and Askew.
HWC, from Golden Gates Assembly. Also attending the service was the
Senior Nursing Officer Mrs Sandra Minister of State for Health and Social
Coleby represented the Minister of Health Development, Loretta Butler Turner. She
and Social Development Hubert Minnis pledged her support for the ministry and
and brought remarks on his behalf, was made an associate member.
Accompanying her to the service was Mrs Registered nurse Lisa Stovel Rolle and
Deborah Fox from the Department of trained clinical Nurse Lyndianna
Public Health. Rahming, the national nurses 2006 to 2008,
The ministry's administrative team was were also present.
also commissioned during this service by To God be the glory for great things he
Bishop Co-Adjutor Laish Boyd. The team has done.
is comprised of:









The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, June 19, 2008 PG 23


The power of personal testimony


FROM page 20

'friend' introduced him to cocaine. He
would go on to develop an addiction to
the drug.
In 1983 however, Rick gave his life to
Christ as he was: searching for a "way
out". His mother learnt about a Teen
Challenge programme in Jacksonville,
Florida and sent him to the pro-
gramme. He spent six months at Teen
Challenge, went on to obtain a commu-
nication degree from Lee College in
1988,- and returned home where he
became the director of Teen Challenge
Bahamas in 1989. He was succeeded by
Eric Fox.
In 2000, Rick became a pastor. It- is
an accomplishment that many people
would not have anticipated from a man
who was once a cocaine addict, but
even the Bible is laden with testimonies
of unlikely men who turned into minis-
ters.
Take Paul for example. Paul gives his
testimony in Acts 22:1-16 and 26:9-23.
First, Paul says, "I have not always
been a Christian, but God showed me
my need of Jesus Christ. I committed
my life to Jesus and now my life is dif-
ferent."
One must remember that a testimony
has authority. Many questions about
the Bible you may not be able to
answer, but you are the authority on
your testimony. The testimony also
reaches out and expresses to people
your very heart and life. You are not
talking merely in theological terms, you
are speaking about the things in life
with which you are familiar.
And as you talk about your experi-
ences with God you are relating with
people whose lives are like yours and
who are seeking to understand the
change that Jesus has brought about in
you.
Twenty-two year old Tyrone Miller is
preparing to attend the United
Theological College of the West Indies
in Jamaica soon. But who would have
thought that this was possible, consid-
ering how he grew up.
He grew up smoking marijuana, sell-
ing drugs on a small scale, and doing
other things that young people typical-
ly get into. What separated Tyrone
from the masses of Bahamian youth
however, was that he was also busy
planning how he would kill one of his
enemies and where he would dump the
body, when God saved him in a most
unusual way.
One day after smoking on the bas-
ketball court, Tyrone went home high,
turned on the TV and saw children in a
garden singing on a religious station.
"God was dealing with me from
there. So I got saved high. And from
then I've been trying my hardest to live
for God, he added. He was 19 years old
then.
Mr Miller suspects that Christians
tend to hide their testimony because
they have yet to forgive themselves for


AS YOU talk about your experiences with God you are relating with people whose
lives are like yours and who are seeking to understand the change that Jesus has
brought about in you.


the sins of their past. But he shares his
testimony whenever he can in order to
help somebody else.
"As a young person, I try to be an
example. I think that everyone in their
heart wants to be free. So when they
see someone coming from a place that
they were and from the same environ-
ment they are in, it's like a beacon of
light for them."
Forty-four year old Patricia Evans,
an evangelist at Soulwinning Church of
God in Christ, Lion Road (off Kemp
Road) knows firsthand about the
impact of such a beacon.
Three years ago, while attending a
church in South Beach, a visiting
preacher from the US touched her with
his honesty about the life he lived
before becoming a Christian.
"He talked about how he used to go
clubbing, drinking, caught up in forni-
cation. I saw myself in him, and I
thought, wow, that's me. I'd never for-
get; they started to sing 'As the deer
panteth for the water', and the Holy
Ghost came over me...," Evangelist
Evans recalled.
Today, she is grateful for the changes
God has made in her life. And she can't
understand why a Christian would hide
their testimony.
"I think that it's wrong for people to
sit down on their testimony. If God has
done something so great in your life,


why be ashamed of it? I am not
ashamed of my past because it helps me
to be who I am today.
"When you look at it, God takes our
past and throws it in the sea of forget-
fulness never to see it again. It's impor-
tant to share your story because it can
help someone else. I used to say if God
could do it for them then he could do it
for me. So people can be saved through
your testimony."
Revelation 12:11, states that believ-
ers overcome the devil by the blood of
Christ and the word of their won testi-
mony. To some, it seems unbelievable
that. the testimony holds so much
weight to be able to overcome the
devil. But Pastor Dean sees how that is
indeed possible.
"You are glorifying God by sharing
your testimony. And any time you glo-
rify God, you are overcoming the devil.
The devil, the prince of darkness, is the
one who hides things. So when we prac-
tice hiding things like our testimony, we
are working in the devil's territory. But
we can overcome him by speaking the
truth, regardless of what that truth is in
our lives."

Tune in to "Three's Company Fridays"
on Spirit Gospel: Splash 92.5FM (tomorrow
from 7am 9am) when Pastor Rick Dean
and Tyrone Miller will be in studio dis-
cussing the power of personal testimony.


HOW TO GIVE

YOUR TESTIMONY

FROM page 20
Five important tips to remember

Stick to the point. Your conversion
and new life in Christ should be the
main points.
Be specific. Include events, genuine
feelings and personal insights that clar-
ify your main point. This makes your
testimony tangible something others
can relate to.
Be current. Tell what is happening in
your life with God now. today.
Be honest. Don't exaggerate or dram-
atize your life for effect. The simple
truth of what God has done in your life
is all the Holy Spirit needs to convict
others of their sin and convince them
of his love and grace.

Things to Avoid:
Stay away from 'Christianese" phrases.
These "foreign" or churchh" words can
alienate listeners and readers and keep
them from identifying with your life.
Here are some examples:
Avoid using "born again"
Instead use:
spiritual birth
spiritual renewal
to come alive spiritually
given a new life
Avoid using "saved"
Instead use:
rescued
delivered from despair
found hope for life

Avoid using "lost"
Instead use:
heading in the wrong direction
separated from God
had no hope

Avoid using "Gospel"
Instead use:
God s message to man
the good news about Christ's pur-
pose on earth
Avoid using "sin"
Instead use:
rejecting God
missing the mark
falling away from the right path
a crime against God's law
disobedience to God

Avoid using "repent"
Instead use:
admit a wrong
change one's mind, heart or attitude
make a decision to turn away
Turn around
a 180 degree turn from what you
were doing

* Adapted from chrislianityabout.com








PG 24 Thursday, June 19, 2008 The Tribune


RELIGION


Inspiring


hearts and


h-J-
1







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-l4

U


HIS summer, Ricardo Clarke will
look to inspire the hearts and minds
of listeners with the release of his
first full length cd, titled 'Uprising'.
Hoping to encourage people to "not settle" in
anything, to see their value and pursue God's limit-
less future, Ricardo's freshman release includes the
songs, "Not Settling", "Sound of Rain" and "Once
I'm in Zion".
Engineered by Michael Davis, the album features
local and international producers, and an amazing
front and back cover design by photographer
Scharad Lightbourne.

Man on a mission
Seeking to empower, uplift, encourage and
enlighten humanity, Ricardo has long poured his
heart into many a community initiative, spearhead-
ing numerous social, spiritual, and youth oriented
efforts such as Mission Male Seed, Camp 3:16,
Operation SOW and Jubilee Jam.
The success of such events over the years, includ-
ing TGIF Parties, Dream Night, A Night of Praise
and the Uprising Conference, has created wide-
spread anticipation and interest for future happen-
ings. And his latest musical effort is certain to live
up to the bar of excellence that these initiatives
have set. Along with these outreach efforts, howev-
er, Ricardo's own testimony and messages of inspi-
ration have made him a requested name in church-
es, schools, workshops and conferences.
And recently he has been enjoying a budding
music career and has had his work aired on local
and international stations, as far away as London,
England.

Born to minister
Considering that his family is musically inclined,
singing, song writing and composing music have
always been second nature to Ricardo.
After being asked to participate in the Youth
Alive Soundtrack 2007 for Bahamas Faith
Ministries International, he found himself unex-
pectedly in the forefront when his song, "Last
Days", became consistently rotated on local radio
stations. At the time, singing was only a hobby and
something he did for fun. However, as he heard the
voice of God and the encouragement of some of his
respected musical friends, he decided to expose a


l Iam
indeed a
confessed
fan of
Ricardo's
music




Winsome Duncan (poet)


PG 24 Thursday, June 19, 2008


greater side of God's purpose for his life by launch-
ing a career in music.
And as a result, over the last 10 months a buzz
has, been generating around his music, and there
have been numerous requests by some of the
Bahamas' premiere gospel artists to work on
upcoming projects. Also, in a move to reach the
masses, he has been working hard to establish inter-
national connections that have allowed him to work
with some of reggae's best in Europe and Spain.
Winsome Duncan, a poet/facilitator and author
from London, England, said of Ricardo, "I am
indeed a confessed fan of Ricardo's music". She was
a recent guest on the BBC Channel, where she pro-
moted her book The Food Spiral", which has
received acclaim for its attempt to uncover infor-
mation on the subject of food addiction.
As he explodes onto the music scene not only
with a message of hope and upliftment for listeners,
but with a renewed passion for his purpose in
Christ, Ricardo credits the blessings of this new sea-
son to his relationship with Christ, great family sup-
port and a great church, Calvary Deliverance.
Ricardo is married to singer, songwriter and
Marlin Award winner Ayanna Cartwright-Clarke.


The Tribune


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