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The Tribune
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01042
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: June 3, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01042

Full Text




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The


Tribune


BAHAMAS EDITION


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Volume: 104 F .161


TUESDAYJUNE 3204


Si


workers are


Stested in


Move after one

employee admitted

to hospital last week

* By ALISON LOWE the department which has its


Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
AROUND 60 workers at
the Department of Environ-
mental Health Services office
in Nassau Court off Bay Street
were tested for tuberculosis
yesterday after one employee
was admitted to hospital last
week suffering from the
chronic bacterial infection.
According to Minister of.
Health, Dr Hubert Minnis, the
infected.person was a 41-year-
old male.
Another staff member at


main office located off a court-
yard area behind McDonalds
on Bay Street, opposite the,
British Colonial Hilton, asked.
whether the TB case may
;have had anything to do with
the Department's poor work-
ing conditions that workers
have been complaining pub-
licly about for almost a year.
The run-down state of the
office itself, in addition to an
alleged lack of adequate
resources to protect certain of
the Department's staff in
SEE page 15


Attorney speaks out

over the judiciary'
* By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
THERE is a "wanton disregard" by the judiciary for real, clear
change that would lead to accelerated justice and improvements in the
system, attorney Paul Moss claimed.yesterday.
Mr Moss said he partially agreed with statements by Bishop Simeon
Hall, who criticised the judiciary for delays in the system and "a self-serv-
ing colonial mindset."
Bishop Hall's comments were spurred by the "swift" trial and con-
viction of Samuel 'Ninety' Knowles in a US court.
"I am not sure what he means by his comment but it is clear if one
compares the respect Atnerica has for its constitution, if you compare
SEE page 15


scare




Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
TWO days after the killing
:: .. .. .. ;;:'^ ^ :









4 ~the family of 16-year-old mur-
- called for government to bring
back automatic capital pun-
of all fallen soldiers" can be


S.march this Friday Labour
Day to make clear their
message to those in authori-
ty. .
..At the house where Khodee
grew up with his mother on
Reeves Street, Fox Hill, Jason
SCurry, Khodee Davis' elder
Cousin, said that although
Sthere is no "one singlereme-
dy" to the "ceaseless state ofrt



Scold-blooded murders" such
a measure is necessary so that
SEATED FROM LEFT: Brittnee Demoritte, Thelma Dill, Jason Curry, Genevieve Dill, Maurice Kemp, Leudy would-be criminals "fear the
Kemp at yesterday's press conference in Which they called for the government to bring back automatic capital SEE page 15
puni shment.tthat th ory
- .- .- .--. .- -- . -- -.- - -.- -.- --- - -. -- .--- -- --. .-.- I .. . . .. . . . ..red ; .- . . . .... ....... . ...... . . .


4 -<


Fatal stabbing blamed
on gang violence surge


* By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
A SURGE in gang violence
among young people is being
blamed for the fatal stabbing of
the youngest murder victim
this year, 15-year-old Joel
Simeus.
Less than an hour after the
Nassau Village teenager was
killed outside Solomon's
Supercentre in Old Trail Road
at around 9.30pm on Saturday,
gunshots were heard in his
neighbourhood.
The grade 10 CH Reeves
student was with five or six
other youths when they
crossed another gang of boys,
who reportedly asked if Joel
was from Nassau Village,
before he was fatally stabbed in
the chest.
As Joel's lifeless body lay
in Solomon's car park, his
friends are thought to have
gone to Nassau Village to
spread the word of his murder..


. Gunshots were heard com-
ing from the park in that area
at around 10pm.
Police searched a man near
the park's basketball court
shortly after 10pm, finding him
to be in possession of a 9mm
pistol, and 14 live rounds of
ammunition. He was arrested
SEE page 15



THE youngest murder
victim of the year, Joel
Simeus, is believed to be
related to the Simeus fami-
ly at the heart of the Nassau
Village riots last year.
The riots, sparked when
a Haitian woman was hit by
a car and an angry crowd
gathered in pursuit of the
SEE page 15


against c
SAMUEL "Ninety" Knowles
has filed an appeal against his
conviction on drug trafficking
charges.
According to the US Depart-
ment of Justice, the appeal was
filed just days before the drug
trafficker was sentenced to 35
years in prison by Florida Feder-
al Judge James Cohn.
Knowles was convicted on May
30 and the notice of appeal was
reportedly filed on May 28.
The US Court of Appeals is
now expected to set "a briefing
schedule", US authorities said
yesterday.
Knowles' attorney Jacob Rose
has expressed confidence that the
Appeals Court will rule in favour
of his client.
After almost two years after
being extradited to the US, drug
kingpin Knowles was sentenced
to 35 years in a Florida prison on
federal drug trafficking charges
last week.


conviction


Although US prosecutors had
argued for a life sentence for
Knowles, Judge Cohn acceded to
a petition by Knowles' defence
SEE page 15


PAPER.:
. . ...


44 I 10z M.- W 14


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


'Ninety' files appeal


PI?


PRICE 75

I Pcara


, ,


WOMA5 SECII









PAGE TUEDAY, UNE 3 2008THE TIBUN


Submissions invited for Tribune's

'Back to School' supplement
The Tribune will be pub- sought eg, bachelors degree
lishing its annual 'Back to in English, bachelors degree
School' supplement in in biology
August/September as usual. What career they expect
In preparation for the sup- to enter once their education
plement which will feature is completed eg, medicine,
all graduating seniors who teaching, engineering
will be attending universi- All extracurricular activi-
ty/college, whether locally or ties eg, club memberships,
abroad we invite all parents team sports/track and field,
and guardians to submit a church activities
profile on their graduating A list of honours/
seniors, along with a photo- awards/recognition the stu-
graph and contact informa- dent has received
tion.
The profile should include:
Name of student Please forward all
Age information to Lisa Lawlor,
Name of parents Tribune Junior Reporter,
A list of exams already at email address:
taken and the results eg, lisalawlor@gmail.com or fea-
Bahamas Junior Certificate tures@tribunemedia.net.
(BJC) exams, Pitman exams Please write: 'Back To
A list of exams expected School' in the subject line.
to be taken eg, Bahamas The information may also
General Certificate of Sec- be faxed to 328-2398, hand
ondary Education (BGCSE) delivered or mailed in to:
exams
The college/university Back To School
they expect to attend eg, The Tribune
College of the Bahamas, Har- Shirley and Deveaux
vard University, University ,Streets
of Miami P O Box N-3207
Name of degree to be Nassau, Bahamas




MAIN SECTION '
Local News ...............P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,15.6
Editorial/Letters ................................... P4
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USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

USA TODAY SPORTS SECTIQ PAGES
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Expected Cabinet shuffle



is 'refocusing of energies'

Source says PM making
decisive judgement on where
to place 'renewed focus'


THE expected Cabinet shuf-
fle by Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham is more of a "refo-
cusing of energies", rather
than a "punitive move",
sources within government
confirmed last night.
While refusing to speak to
the merits or demerits of vari-
ous ministers or ministers of
state,.the source insists that
the Prime Minister is making a
decisive judgment as to where
to place "renewed focus" with-
in his government.
This tactic, of thus thinning
out various ministries and hav-
ing one minister responsible
for a single portfolio, the
source said, will bring more
direct attention to some of the
larger problems facing the
country such as crime, educa-
tion, and immigration.
Also picking up on this
impending shuffle, former
Prime MinistePerry Christie
has called on Prime Minister
Ingraham to explain to the
country the "apparent
changes" that have already
been made to various minis-
terial portfolios as seen in
the 2008-2009 Budget exercise.
"These were not announced
by the prime minister but it
appears that there will be min-
isterial changes," Mr Christie
said at a press conference last
week.
As outlined then, Mr
Christie observed that the
Ministry of Education will now'
stand alone, with a separate
Ministry of Youth, Sports, and
Culture being created.
Currently, Education,
Youth, Sports, and Culture are
all grouped together in one
ministry under the substanitive
Minister Carl Bethel. Minis-


ter's of State Bryan Woodside,
and Charles Maynard head the
Ministry of Sports and the
Ministry of Culture respec-
tively.
As 'the Ministry of Educa-
tion in the 2008-2009 Budget
only makes provision for one
minister, and no minister of
state, political pundits specu-
late that either Mr Woodside
or Mr Maynard will now be
heading the Ministry of Youth,
Sports, and Culture,
which has provisions for one
Minister and a Minister of
State.
Other such alterations with-
in this year's budget can be
seen in the portfolios of Loret-
ta Butler-Turner, and Dion


Foulkes.
The only new post forecast
by the Prime Minister thus far
was the creation of an Envi-
ronment minister.
However, there was been no


FORMER PM Perry Christie has
called on Ingraham to explain to
the country the 'apparent changes'
that have already been made to
various ministerial portfolios
financial allocation for such a
post in this year's recurrent
budget.


Defence Force conducting

a disaster relief exercise


AS PART of efforts to ready itself for action~ n
the event of a hurricane or any other major dis-
aster, the Royal Bahamas Defence Force is con-
ducting a disaster relief exercise.
The exercise began yesterday, and will take
place at the Coral Harbour base as well as other
satellite Defence Force bases throughout the
Bahamas.
"To aid with assistance and relief in times of
disasters the RBDF has seen the need for such a
training exercise to be conducted during this time,
so as to ensure that we remain in a state of readi-
ness to effectively carry out our mandate," said
the force.
"The objective will be to evaluate and min-
imise the response time to effectively deploy offi-


cers and marines to all Family Islands affected by
i~fifural disasters, mass casualty and/or search and
rescue operations at sea."
The exercise will see various types of equip-
ment used by RBDF personnel in the line of duty
tested, including generators, field kitchens, com-
munications equipment and chain saws.
The 2008 Atlantic hurricane season officially
opened on June 1. The RBDF plays a key role in
any mitigation efforts both during and after any
hurricane or other disaster.
According to the force, while the exercise is
being conducted, all Defence Force personnel
will remain on base, except for those normally
involved in operational duties away from Coral
Harbour.


Man in court on armed robber


and house breaking


A 23-YEAR-OLD man of
Dorsette Alley was remanded
to Her Majesty's Prison
yesterday after being arraigned
on a long list of armed
robbery and house breaking
charges.
According to court dockets,
it is alleged that between Feb-
ruary 27 and 28, Jamal
McSweeney broke into the
home of Andre Virgille and
caused harm to him.
It is alleged that on April 7,
the accused attempted to rob
Emmaneul Joseph and caused
harm to him.
It is also alleged that on that
day, the accused robbed Bar-
rington Carter of cash and a
watch together at nearly $400.
It is alleged that on April 17,
McSweeney robbed Berthram
Thurston of $900 cash and


hundreds of dollars in person-
al belongings.
It is further alleged that on
the same day, he broke into
the home of Charlene Harris
at Golden Isles and stole
$6,860 worth of jewellery and
electronics.
Court dockets allege that on
April 18, the accused broke
into the home of Alphonzo
Ferguson and robbed him of
$350 cash.
Its is alleged that on April
27, McSweeney robbed Shel-
don Johnson of $50.
4 Court dockets also allege
that on April 30; the accused
robbed Veniece Mitchell of
$200, the property of Super
Wash.
It is alleged that on May 19,
he broke into the home of Joy
Thompson on Bacardi Road


charges
and there stole $i,500 worth
of her belongings.
It is also alleged that on May
27, the accused broke into the
home of Lavard Rolle and
Alvera Dean at Silver Gates.
There, it is alleged that he stole
$984 worth of electronics and
other items belonging to Dean.
McSweeney, who was
arraigned before Magistrate
Susan Sylvester at Court 11 in
Nassau Street, pleaded not
guilty to the housebreaking
charges and was not required
to plead to the other charges
against him.
A preliminary inquiry is set
to take place on August 22.
McSweeney has been
charged along with Noel
Roker and Kevin Whyms who
were arraigned on charges two
weeks ago.


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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


I I I











I LOCAL NEWS Il


O In brief


Fourth man in

court in connection

with drug seizure
A FOURTH man was
arraigned in Magistrate's
Court yesterday in connec-
tion with last Sunday's
seizure of 244 pounds of mar-
ijuana following a high speed
police chase.
David Arlington Cole-
brooke, 19, of Jasmine Gar-
dens, appeared before Mag-
istrate Carolita Bethel at
Court Eight in Bank Lane on
charges of conspiracy to pos-
sess dangerous drugs with
intent to supply, conspiracy
to import dangerous drugs
with the intent to supply,
possession of dangerous
drugs with the intent to sup-
ply and importation of dan-
gerous drugs.
Colebrooke pleaded not
guilty to the charges and was
remanded until today, when
he is to return to court for a
bail hearing.
He is charged with Rorie
Alistair Bennett, 27, of St
Anns, Jamaica; Taffron Fra-
zier, 37, and Edrico Frazier,
26, both of Carmichael Road,
who were all arraigned on
the charges last week.
Bennett has pleaded guilty.
A 25-year-old man and
an 18-year-old woman were
arraigned in Magistrate's
Court yesterday on weapons
charges.
According to court dock-
ets, it is alleged that on Fri-
day, May 30, Jozie Telfort of
Toote Shop Corer and
Tanesha Newbold of Ridge-
land Park were found in pos-
session of a black .32
revolver with its serial num-
ber erased.
Court dockets also alleged
that the accused were found
in possession of four .32
rounds of ammunition.
The accused, who were
arraigned before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel at Court
Eight in Bank Lane, pleaded
not guilty to the charges.
Newbold was granted bail
in the sum of $10,000. Telfort
was remanded to prison and
will return to court on June 5
for a bail hearing.
A 25-year-old Rocky
Pine Road man was
arraigned in Magistrate's
Court yesterday, charged
with forcibly taking away a
teenage girl and assaulting
her with the intent to rape
her.
Kennedy Ingraham was
arraigned on the charges
before Magistrate Linda Vir-
gill at Court 9 in Nassau
Street.
According to court dock-
ets, it is alleged that on Fri-
day, May 23, Ingraham
forcibly took the 16-year-old
girl away and detained her.
It is further alleged that on
the same day, he assaulted
the girl with the intent to
rape her.
Ingraham pleaded not
guilty to the charges and was
granted bail in the sum of
$10,000. *
The case was adjourned to
September 17.


BTC to hold

second annual

blood drive
BTC will hold its second
annual blood drive on June
14.
The event will be held in
the centre court at the Mall
at Marathon from 10am to
6pm.
Doctors Hospital and the
Princess Margaret Hospital
will also take part.
The theme for this year's
blood drive is "every drop
counts".
BTC said everyone who
donates blood will receive a
gift.
Gifts will include cell
phones, phone cards and oth-
er goods.


PLP chairman voices



concern over local



government elections
D- -


PLP chairman Glenys Han-
na-Martin has expressed con-
cern that the FNM may be
preparing to conduct local gov-
ernment elections in a manner
contrary to the provisions of the
Local Government Act.
Yesterday, Mrs Hanna-Mar-
tin told Local Government Min-
ister Sidney Collie in a letter
that she is prepared to take
legal action if the matter is not
addressed.
"In particular the minister
asserts that he has the legal
authority to conduct elections
in Bimini, Mangrove Cay, Black
Point, Harbour Island and
Inagua without regard to polling
divisions, contrary to the man-
date of the local government
act," she said.
Mrs Hanna-Martin said she
has both spoken with and writ-
ten to Mr Collie to urge him to
abandon this course of action,
"which apart from being unlaw-
ful, would go contrary to the
spirit and intendment of the Act


and the underlying principles
of local government which
would in fact prove to be an
embarrassment to the democ-


......................................................................................... ;........... : ...........................

Malaria patient 'was not

a new victim of disease'


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
THE malaria patient at the
Princess Margaret Hospital last
week was a resident of Exuma who
came to the capital for treatment
and not a new victim of the dis-
ease, Minister of Health Dr Hubert
Minnis confirmed yesterday.
This came after another news-
paper reported that the case was a
new one.
In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Dr Minnis also sought to
calm any fears of a malaria "out-
break" and said health officials are
constantly monitoring the popula-
tion for signs of disease, in keeping
with international health guide-
lines.
He also noted that unlike neigh-
bours Haiti and Guyana, the
Bahamas is not a country where
the disease is endemic, but because
of travel appears it sometimes here
in isolated cases.
"There was one person brought
in from Exuma who was treated..
.Just one incidental person, that
person has gone home. We have
the female anopheles mosquito,
just like Florida, but we don't have






Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT -A 35-year-old
man is fighting for his life in the
Intensive Care Unit at Rand
Memorial Hospital following a
serious traffic accident on East
Sunrise Highway.
Gevin Adderley, a resident of
Pioneers Way, sustained serious
injuries after being ejected from
his vehicle when it crashed into
tree around lam on Sunday.
Chief Superintendent of Police
Basil Rahming reported that Mr
Adderley was driving his grey
2004 Ford Taurus west along East
Sunrise Highway when he lost
control of the vehicle.
According to an eyewitness, the
vehicle was travelling around a
curve near the Bishop Michael
Eldon High School when it skid-
ded onto the grass verge before
hitting the tree.
When police officers and para-
medics arrived on the scene, they
discovered Adderley lying on the
ground with serious injuries.
The vehicle has suffered exten-
sive damage.
Mr Rahming said traffic police
are continuing their investigation
into the accident.
He said police are appealing to
motorists to wear their seat belts.


the parasite. The parasite has to
be brought in.
"We're surrounded by two
endemic areas, both Haiti and
Guyana and then with world trav-
el nowadays individuals can come
from Africa, Afghanistan where
it's endemic and bring it here and
therefore we can possibly be infect-
ed. Because we know that we con-
tinue to monitor our nation for any
type of disease that can be brought
from anywhere in the world".
The male patient was released
from hospital over the weekend,
reports indicate.
Dr Minnis continued: "We may
have no new cases today, but
because of world travel and the
environment we may have (new
cases) again four or six months
from today. So you know, you just
have to accept that -that more will
be introduced again, not necessar-
ily malaria, but that's why we must
continuously monitor our borders".
He said the Ministry of Health
adhered to protocols outlined by
the Pan American Health Organi-
sation after 19 cases of malaria
were reported on Exuma.
According to the US Centre for
Disease Control website, malaria is
a mosquito-borne disease caused
by a parasite. Symptoms include
fever, chills, and a flu-like illness
and if untreated, an infected person
may develop severe complications
and die. However, malaria is a pre-
ventable and curable disease, the
CDC says.
In April, the Ministry of Health
reported three new cases of malar-
ia in Exuma one an Exuma resi-
dent and the other two visitors to
the island.
There is a two week incubation
period for the disease, Dr Minnis
said.


ratic process.
She said: "I await the minis-
ter's favourable response, failing
which legal proceedings will be
initiated to resist any unlawful
action by the minister of any
official which would seek to
avert due process and thwart
the principles of democracy."
Mrs Hanna-Martin expressed
another concern about the way
the local government elections
are being conducted, explain-
ing that notices for the election,
including the nomination of
candidates, were only published
yesterday -just 24 hours before
the process was to begin.
She said she is concerned that
some of the more remote
islands may not have received
proper notice of the proceed-
ings.
"I urge the government to
oversee these local government
elections across this country in a
fair, lawful and transparent
manner. The government
should be reminded, the voters
must trust the process," she
said.



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TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2008, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


EDI SI' -II T 0R T T HE EDITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398


A Budget to profit Bahamians


"THIS IS THE first Budget that really
excites me," a young Bahamian remarked last
week.
It probably excited him because it is the
first Budget that shows some imagination and
a government's will to empower Bahamians
to help themselves.
It is a budget bolstered by incentives. Gov-
ernment can't do it alone and so it has thrown
open the door to the Bahamian people with the
invitation for them to take over their own des-
tiny and build their own future.
The world economy has slowed, and, being
a part of that world, so has the Bahamian econ-
omy. Not only have costs of food items sky-
. rocketed, but high-priced fuel, which not only
turns the wheels of your vehicle, but also every
piece of technological equipment invented,
has raised the cost of production across the
board even down to the newspaper you
read.
The Bahamas' number one industry an
industry that every Bahamian, whether direct-
ly or indirectly depends for their daily bread -
is badly threatened. Many potential visitors
can no longer afford to take a vacation. Our
only advantage over other destinations is the
proximity of our islands to the American main-
land, which supplies most of our tourists.
To relieve New Providence of its popula-
tion congestion and to help revitalise the Fam-
ily Islands, the Ingraham government plans to
reintroduce the Family Island Encouragement
Apt.dtAcomesipto,effect onJly. "
'a The Aot dpovijtdfyrfrejicentivws to
encourage Family islanders to return totheir
. birthplaces .and build hom6s and businesses
there. For those lio return to construct a new'
building, or renovate or remodel or build an
extension on a new or existing building, duty
and excise taxes will be free on the importation
of all construction material. And for those
wanting to till the soil to provide for them-
selves and thdir families and possibly start a
market garden from which to sell their pro-
duce, the importation of any machinery for
clearing the land for farming or construction
also will be duty free.
Even before the Act has come into effect,
San Salvador is reporting a construction boom.
According to the island administrator the new
benefits will further improve San Salvador's
economy by allowing persons to develop small
guest houses, fishing villages and other con-
struction projects.
However, the administrator said that the
good news is that "we are seeing a number of
applications come in, particularly for second
home owners from the United States and
Canada, who want to invest on the island.
Additionally, many locals, particularly those
who are employed at Club Med, are building


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their own homes. I am getting plans in every
week."
It is now hoped that Bahamians will be in a
position to take advantage of an Act that has
been legislated for their benefit.
Even those in the city of Nassau will be
encouraged to revitalise their dying city. The
concessions granted under the Hotels Encour-
agement Act will now be extended to the mer-
chants of the city for the construction, refur-
bishment, upgrade and/or expansion of restau-
rants and shops. These exemptions will include
not only exemptions from customs duty on all
materials necessary for such investments, but
exemption from real property taxes on all
buildings comprising the investment, all addi-
tions and land on which the investment is locat-
ed, and exemption from excise taxes.
"We fully expect that this Bill when enact-
ed," said Mr Ingraham last week in his Budget
communication, "will serve as a catalyst for
investment in our capital city, restoring the
city centre to its former status as a charming
and picturesque capital catering to the needs
and tastes of individuals of wide ranging inter-
ests."
It is too bad that previous governments did
not have the foresight to encourage Bahamians
to preserve their heritage. Because there was
no tax on undeveloped land, the Bahamas lost
many of its gracious old Bahamian homes -
we are thinking particularly of Shirley Street
and Victoria Avenue. By the time the original
Owners died, their children had moved to their
own homes in the Eastern district, Cable Beach
and later to Lyford Cay. None of them was
Interested in living in the family homestead in
the city. Aid, because as long as the old homes
remained standing they attracted property tax,
it profited the new owners to tear them down.
A vacant lot attracted no tax. And even now
taxes have been a disincentive to improving
and upgrading one's own home.
Under this new legislation Bahamians are
being empowered to preserve what they have,
improve upon it and invest even further.
Maybe this will now discourage the tendency to
look to government for everything. Bahamians
are now being empowered to look to them-
selves to improve their lives.
In his first Manifesto in 1992 Mr Ingraham
promised that if elected his government would
work to "ensure that every Bahamian will have
the opportunity to be all that he or she wants to
be, assured of upward mobility in an open
society fuelled by a market-drive economy."
The City of Nassau Revitalisation Act and
the Family Island Development Act are two
pieces of legislation that we hope many
Bahamians will be in a position to take advan-
tage of as they grow and improve themselves in
a now open society.


EDITOR, The Tribune.
IT HAS long been established
in most free countries that price
controls serve no useful purpose
yet here in The Bahamas the
political class continues along as if
business is a game of Charades.
Price controls played a promi-
nent role in communist countries
where freedom is limited anc
their economies completely
closed, leading to an abysma
standard of living for their citi
zens. Examples include Russis
and China. Cuba and North
Korea on the other hand remain
stuck in a time warp where ec.
nomic policy is concerned.
Free enterprise v/s price control.
Even though the US govern-
ment does not control prices Wal-
Mart manages to sell their goods
at everyday unbelievably low
prices.
In The Bahamas, the food ven-
dors sell their breakfasts and
lunches for $1 and $1.50 respec-
tively without the Price Control
Act forcing them to sell at prices
that some bureaucrat decides is
"fair."
The reality that is often missed
by politicians and bureaucrats is
that it is not in the best interest oi
a business to over charge foi
goods and/or services because
consumers are smart enough to
find alternatives local or for-
eign. A business must cover theii
costs and make a profit to remain
in business and by extension, ful-
fil consumer's needs and desires.
However, if one were to accept
the premise that most Govern-
ment's believe they are "helping"
Bahamians with price controls,
you would not think that the
unintended consequences of this
"noble effort" would be food
shortages that hurt everyone.
A Local E-Mail Exchange
But let's review the case ol
price controls in The Bahamas.
Following is an example from a
recent exchange between a local
retailer and wholesaler, (the e-
mails have been slightly edited):
Tuesday, May 20, 2008
To: Robert Pritchard, Asa I
Pritchard Ltd. ..
From: Garnet W.ong, Meat
Max & Groceries
Subject: Mahatina 5 ,bs. Rice
Good day Mr. Pritchard, Hope
all is well with you?
Please send
1 pallet 5 lbs mahatma long
grain rice special price please
1 pallet 5 lbs mahatma Gold
rice special price please.
Thanks Mr. Pritchard.
Best regards,
Tuesday, May 20, 2008
To: Garnet Wong, Meat Max
& Groceries
From: Robert Pritchard, Asa
H. Pritchard Ltd
Subject: Mahatma 5 lbs. Rice
Thanks for your order Mr
Wong, but until Price control gets
new pricing for us we cannot
import the usual number of corO
tainers.
Since they have taken so long
we have lost the supply from the
plant in Houston...they have sold
our allocation to non priced con-


A leading local wholesaler seeks a qualified person for
the position of:
Brand Manager

The Brand Manager will be responsible for planning and
developing the marketing efforts for various brands in
support of the company's overall business strategy.
He/she will be in charge of implementing brand plans
and analyzing their impact for a specific product portfolio.

Skills & Educational Requirements:
Bachelor's degree in business administration
or marketing
Effective communication and presentation abilities
Proficiency in time management, planning,
and organizing ,
SProficiency in a variety of computer applications
e Self-motivated team player
Previous sales experience in the wholesale /
retail business

Candidates should possess a reliable motor vehicle, be
willing to travel to the family islands, to the U.S., and
other foreign countries.

Please send application letter and r6sum6
by June 5, 2008 to:

Brand Manager(

Nassau, Bahamas~o~o


i


E



r

1
1




j





j


E


trolled countries.
We realise that your customers
will be complaining but the mat-
ter is beyond our control...sorry
about this.
Best regards,
What's wrong with this picture?
In the example above, the
wholesalers have been subject to
price increases of up to 30 per
cent, as a result of the world mar-
ket, and our government is not
efficient enough to process their
required paper work in time so
goods can be ordered to stock the
local store shelves.
It's a perfect example of gov-
ernment price controls causing
food shortages.
Another Example:
In another case, a local whole-
saler has had to place up to 50
calls to receive the correct price
control sheets to price products to
get goods to the shelves. A
process that should take minutes
to resolve took days to complete.
After exchanges to help the
price control division correct their
errors, the wholesaler finally gave
up and collected the incorrect
sheets.
To make matters worse,
reports are that the Price Con-
trol office has moved and has
been without phones for some
three weeks so far!
This "process" is what frus-
trates business people and
inevitably the Bahamian con-
sumer because they cannot get
the goods they require. And in
this case it prevents them from
getting basic food items.


Time to scrap the Price Control e' y. .
S Act Vision:
The Bahamas Price Control To see The Bahamas become
Act was implemented with much the first small, developed, sover-
fanfare in the early 1970's as a eign country in the region, recog-
fanfare in the early 1970's as a nised as a model for the world.
political tool to help protect the sed as a model for the world
"small man" from what was, and Web Site: www.nassauinsti-
is, described as the evil business tute.org


The condition of


Rawson Square
EDITOR, The Tribune.
WE CONSTANTLY hear the whining of the Bay Street mer-
chants and I wonder if it is just a pathetic hand-out they want from [
Government as from a walk dowf Bay Street today from Number
One Bay Street (The Hilton) to Rawson Square what I saw that
was ugly was solely in the realm of responsibility of the merchants,
except the horrible sight in Rawson Square.
I realise we need rain but the garden area either side of the Square
has watering sprinklers surely at the least this one Public Square in
the capital next to Cabinet building, close to Parliament and within
very close walking distance to the Port of Nassau surely this could be I
a picture perfect garden at all times? The Royal Palms are dying and
seemingly everyone is blind and we complain and complain and the i
Bay Street Development boys constantly ask for a Treasury hand-out i
rather than maintaining the street themselves as it should be. i
Why in recent times vehicles have been allowed to park in Rawson I
Square and now all over the brick there are oil stains?
To me even Sir Milo was frowning and seemingly asking: What has I
happened to my once proud brothers and sisters? He is right it is
a disgrace.
July 10th, if this Government doesn't know what that day is it is our
Independence Day is just over 30+ days away can we in that time
make Rawson Square look good and tidy and blossoming? By the
way, merchants, there is no excuse for not cleaning the side walks and
why these days middle of the day there are large white plastic garbage
bags the whole length of Bay out of the bins just lying on the side-
walk? By old Dirty Dicks opposite the Straw Market site you sriell the
previous night's sugary cocktails and in this heat that's yak.
The once proud, regal Bay Street it seems no one cares it is so
sad but a reflection of where we are. Merchants and Government talk
is cheap!
ABRAHAM MOSS
Nassau,
May 20, 2008.



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with special guest instructor Sensei Glen Olson from
Knoxville, TN, June 14, 2008
First session begins 10am
Parents and their kids should attend this special event
which provides practical solutions on such topics as;
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Ask about special school and group rates


Food shortages




and price control


community making a profit at the
expense of the "small man."
Instead of the Price Control
Act, The Bahamas Government
should create the necessary con-
ditions where competition, hon-
esty, old-fashioned hard work,
ideas and entrepreneurs are I
rewarded.
Research indicates that
Jamaica, certainly not a bastion of
free market principles, aban-
doned price controls and prices
fell over time as a result of a more
competitive market.
The importance of prices as sig-
nals on how to behave should not
be overlooked. A higher price
means that the goods or service is
relatively scarce and tells the con-
sumer to reduce consumption and
look for substitutes. At the same
time manufacturers are signalled
to produce more. In other words,
prices allow allocation of the
goods or service to those who val-
ue it most.
Price controls will continue to
create further reductions of sup-
ply, black market prices or both.
Most of the free world has
already assigned price controls to
the dustbin of history. Any pru-
dent government would tell the
Bahamian public the truth about
this ill-conceived policy and do
the same.
THE NASSAU
INSTITUTE
Nassau,
May 24, 2008
Mission:
The Nassau Instituteis an inde-
pendent, a-political, non-profit
institute that promotes economic
growth in a free market econo-
my with limited government, in [
a society that embraces the rule of I
law and the right to private prop-










I LOCA NEW


AIDS Foundation

administrator is

mourned after

'untimely death'

THE AIDS Founda-
tion of the Bahamas has
issued a statement say-
ing it mourns the "trag-
ic and untimely" death
of Solomon Wellington
Adderley, its adminis-
trator since 2003.
The foundation
praised Mr Adderley
for working to educate
the public about HIV
and AIDS.
"He knew that the
reduction of the inci-
dence of HIV and
AIDS and the accompa-
nying prejudice would
only be realized
through education and
awareness in the wider
community," the state-
ment said.
"He was a passionate
advocate in the fight
against stigma and dis-
crimination directed at
persons living with HIV
and AIDS. He was gen-
erous and caring to
those in need and
always willing to defend
the rights of the down-
trodden. Mr Adderley
would not tolerate
injustice and prejudice.
He was determined and
dedicated to the cre-
ation of a better
Bahamas."
The foundation said
Mr Adderley was very
active in both the
Bahamas and the
Caribbean. He was the
Charter President of
BNN+ (Bahamas
National Network for
Positive Living), a
member of the
Bahamas Human Rights
Network, a charter
member of the Associa-
tion of Fundraising Pro-
fessionals (AFP)
Bahamas Chapter, a
judge for the National
Junkanoo Committee
and a member of Bethel
Baptist Church.

Board

On the regional level,
he was a board member
of CRN+ (Caribbean
Regional Network for
Positive Living),
founding member of the
Caribbean Treatment
Action Group and the
International Prepared-
ness Coalition Regional
Network organizationss
dedicated to assisting
the fight against HIV
and AIDS and advocat-
ing for the rights of
persons living with HIV
and AIDS in the
region).
He travelled the
world representing the
Bahamas at HIV and
AIDS conferences and
networked with other
community activists.
"This is a devastating
loss to all who knew
and worked with
Wellington in the
Bahamas, the
Caribbean region and
indeed the world," said
the statement.
It said condolences
have come in to the
foundation from
international, regional
and local organis-
ations.
"As a result of the
important legacy left by
Solomon Wellington
Adderley, the AIDS
Foundation of the
Bahamas will overcome
this senseless act of
cruelty and grow
stronger and more dedi-
cated to the fight
against HIV and AIDS,
including the battle to
end stigma and discrim-


nation against persons
living with the virus, in
The Bahamas."
The statement asked
that the public support
the work of the AIDS
Foundation by attend-
ing its candlelight vigil
in memory of Mr
Adderley on Tuesday,
June 10 from 6.30pm to
8.30pm at the Anglican
Diocese of the
Bahamas, in Addington:
House on Sands
Road, between East
Street and Elizabeth
Avenue.


Putting the brakes on





dumping of stolen cars


Suggestion for a


new green scheme


THE IDEA has been put to the minister of health and the environment as a potential solution to the dumping of
stolen cars, and the common practise of keeping immobile cars for scrap parts in private yards.


FIVE Bahamian prison offi-
cers made history when they
took part in a mock riot train-
ing exercise in West Virginia
this month.
The officers, members of the
Special Security Services Unit,
funded the training them-
selves. The trip was organised
by Corporal Alfreda Skinner-
Rolle.
The training programme
was called: OLETC MOCK -
Mock Prison Riot 2008.
It is a joint initiative of the
Office of Justice Programmes,
the National Institute of Jus-
tice and the West Virginia
High Technology Consortium
Foundation.
The Bahamian officers were
the first group from a
Caribbean country to partici-
pate in such a large prison
training exercise and the
Bahamas is only the second
country outside of the United
States to be a part of this
event, the other being Singa-
pore.
During their five day trip,
the officers became certified
in:
cellphone detection
explosive breaching
forensic death investiga-
tions
*tactical tracking
edged weapons defence
and tactics
Controlled F.O.R.C.E.
(hand-to-hand tactics)
According to Her Majesty's
Prisons, is expected that in
2009, a larger group of officers
from the Bahamas will partici-
pate and take part in the areas
of: room clearance, hostage
rescue, bulls eye shooting,
command marching, various
riots and crowd control scenar-
ios, as well as the biggest event
of all the obstacle course.
This annual training work-
shops is geared to correctional
or prison officers, police and
military personnel.




I_ j


* By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
RACING stolen cars through
pine barrens before dumping and
burning them there poses a serious
environmental threat to the
Bahamas.
However, the practice, revealed in
The Tribune on Saturday, has
brought about a suggestion for a
new green scheme to scrap cars
effectively.
A Tribune reader, who wishes to
remain anonymous, has suggested
a car scrapping scheme that would
benefit the poor and generate an
income for the government.
The idea has been put to the min-
ister of health and the environment
as a potential solution to the dump-
ing of stolen cars, and the common
practise of keeping immobile cars
for scrap parts in private yards.
The danger is that highly car-
cinogenic car fluids filter into the
earth contaminating the land and
water supplies, presenting those who
drink the water with a risk of devel-
oping cancer.
4
* THE SOLUTION
Car owners would pay $1,000 to
register their new or used car on the
scrap scheme, and this money would
be kept in a trust to be paid out to
the last owner of the car when it is
taken to a government approved
scrap dealer.
Those who pay the contribution
do not lose the money, however, as
they will be in a.position to add
$1,000 to the value of the car when
they decide to sell it.
When the cars are eventually
turned in, they would be stripped
of any useful parts by the owner or
scrap dealer, then crushed and


shipped abroad where steel can be
sold. Minister of Health and the
environment Hubert Minnis said he
will look at the proposed scheme
and consider adopting ideas.
"Regardless of how simple or.
complex an individual's idea may
sound, they still have something we
could extract," he said.
"I am open to everybody's ideas."
Mr Minnis' department is cur-
rently dealing with dumped cars by
clearing up New Providence area
by area, before moving to the Out
Islands.
He said he was not aware of the
problem in Pinewood Gardens high-
lighted in The Tribune, but will vis-
it the area this week.
He added: "We have an aggres-
sive programme to move all the
abandoned cars in New Providence.
"It would be a lot easier if we had
a system where cars VIN numbers
were listed on a computer so we
could prosecute the people who
dump their cars."
Such a programme could be fund-
ed by the interest generated in the
car scrapping scheme, as every
10,000 vehicles registered for $1,000
would provide around $500,000
interest for the government.
And the funding generated would
increase year on year as the scrap
fee increases by $100 every year up
to $2,000, when it could be reviewed
annually based on 25 per cent of the
average value of vehicles registered
in the Bahamas each year.
When sold, each car would have
the scrap value attached, so the last
owner would be entitled to the scrap
fee, thereby benefiting the country's
poorest people.
If the financial bonus is not
enough of an incentive, the govern-
ment could ensure the scheme is
applied to every car sold in the next
five years.


Timeshare owners consider complaining to'PM
* By DENISE MAYCOCK Jack Rabowski, president ofClub, Baha, the ers have toiwalklsofaro getto the-bazqar now,
Tribune Freeport Reporter developers of the Freeport Resort' Club, said, .when it:was only 300 yards before," he said.
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net that they received approval from the Grand "We had approval for the short-cut walking
Bahama Port Authority in 1981 and again in path and when they closed that off, they created
FREEPORT Timeshare owners at the 2000 for a footpath near Royal Oasis. an alternate path, which was also cosed when the
Freeport Resort Club are considering complain- He said that to deny the owners access to the hurricanes hit.
ing to the prime minister about the closure of a bazaar is to violate their rights. "The Port and the government should see to it
short-cut to the International Bazaar. According to Mr Rabowski, the issue of access that when they took that public land for a private
Sue Vougt, a timeshare owner from New Jer- arose after Princess Resorts, the former owner of use, they should have seen to it that anybody's
sey, said she and other owners who vacation at the resort, discontinued its investment in rights who were violated would be protected,
the club have been using the route for years. Freeport. and they have not done so, and now we have
"I have been coming here for 15 years and "When Driftwood came in and had West Sun- hundreds of families who are fed up and want
when they closed access at the Sunrise Highway, rise Highway closed, everyone was impacted by access restored," he said.
it left us with no way of getting to the Interna- the inconvenience of having to go around, but we Ms Vougt said that she and other elderly own-
tional Bazaar," she said. were the ones most impacted," he said. ers are unable to walk such a long distance to the
Last week, a number of timeshare owners held He claims that the Freeport Resort Club's bazaar.
a public demonstration at the Ranfurly Circus, land value has been significantly affected by the "We enjoyed the short cut to the bazaar for
near the entrance of the Royal Oasis. The group change, many years. We can't take a taxi every day and I
is calling for the re-opening of the short-cut, "We had our seven-acre land locked and so the certainly can't walk 30 minutes every day to get
which blocked off by the developers of the resort. value of the land is worsened and all of our own- down there," she said,
U UI'


-. *-.w~~*


322


-5773e OR
t *COLORS


18 t


OlS$


13 COIOIU


LOCATED NEXT TO JOHNS SHOE STORE ROSETTA ST.
LC E NXT


TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


YI

C








PEUD JU 28HTB


Dolphin Encounters welcomes


first guests to sea lion programme


Sutler' uunet ranl p mes

& Crematorium
Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas
Fue ral ou ceen


BLUE LAGOON ISLAND -
Victor and Michelle Portugues,
along with daughter Gabriella
Rodriguez and her friend Maria
Vigoreaux, all of Puerto Rico,
were the first guests to partici-
pate in the new Sea Lion
Encounter Programme offered
by Dolphin Encounters on Blue
Lagoon Island.
The company says the pro-
gramme, the first of its kind in
the Bahamas, is based on Dol-
phin Encounters' highly suc-
cessful and award-winning inter-
active dolphin programmes and
allows guests to meet California
sea lions up-close in an all-nat-
ural marine mammal habitat.
"It is with great pleasure that
we welcomed the Portugues
family and their friend as the
first guests of our exciting new
sea lion programme," said
Robert Meister, managing direc-
tor of Dolphin Encounters.
"One of the few programmes of
its kind in the world, the Sea
Lion Encounter is truly unique
as it allows guests to interact
with these extraordinarily play-


of Penny Saving Bank
Lane and formerly of
Mortimer's, Long Island
will be held on
Wednesday, June 04th,
2008 at 11:00 a.m.,at Holy
Family Catholic Church,
Robinson and Claridge
Roads. Officiating will be Deacon Andrew Burrows.
Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier
Road.

Left to cherish her memories are her Mother: Bernice
Mortimer; Father: Thomas Watson; Step-mother:
Lorene Watson; Two (2) Sons: Gerard and Bruno-
Rolle; Three (3) Daughters: Michelle and Kishna
Rolle and Mrs. Katrina Greaves; Four (4)
Grandchildren: Rashad, Bruno Jr. and Paris Rolle
and Jim Brown; One (1) Daughter-in-law: Latoya
Rolle; One (1) Son-in-law: Trevor Greaves; Five
(5) Sisters: Geneva Munroe, Vendalyn Dean, Dianne
and Claretta Cartwright and Sandy Carroll; Eight
(8) Brothers: Virgil Gray, Johnny Cartwright,
Donald, Thomas II, Ernest, Wayne, Fred and Dennis
Watson; Two (2) Aunts: Lucy Watsqn and Mae
Williams; One (1) Uncle: Cyril Turnquest; Five (5)
Sisters-in-law: Blanche Watson, Celia Gray, Silvia
and Latoya Watson and Brenda Gray; Four (4)
Brothers-in-law: David Dean, Elias Cartwright,
Simeon and Paul Carroll; Numerous Nieces and
Nephews and other relatives and friends including:
The Community of Mortimer's, Long Island, The
Penny Saving Bank Lane family and others too
numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held at the chapel ofButlers' Funeral
Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets
on Tuesday from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and on
Wednesday from 10:00 a.m. until service time at the


been to Dolphin Encounters
before and really enjoyed the
dolphin programmes and had
booked dolphin swims for this
trip.
"Then we learned about the
Sea Lion Encounter and wanted
to try something new and I am
really glad we did. It was really
different and a great deal of fun
- each one of us enjoyed it
.immensely."
The six sea lions PJ, Kalika,
Xena, Maggie, Torey, all female,
and Murray a male came to
Dolphin Encounters over a year
ago after surviving Hurricane
Katrina and the destruction of
their former home at Marine
Life Oceanarium in Gulfport,
Mississippi.
Having all been born under
human care, their habitat at Blue
Lagoon Island was first time the
animals had ever been in a nat-
ural ocean environment.
"The animals very quickly
became adapted to their home
here at Dolphin Encounters and
enjoy learning new behaviours,"
said Ms Terrell.
"Our new programme is a
wonderful experience for the
animals as well as visitors. It is a
new opportunity to interact with
another marine mammal species
and provides extraordinary edu-
cational opportunities for the
thousands of students that visit
p oir facility."


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company, Limited (BTC)


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) is soliciting proposals
from qualified parties to provide a "War Gaming Proposal".

BTC is seeking to secure the services of a consultant or agency to analyze the opera-
tional and marketing performance and strategies of BTC with respect to its mobile
market segment. The agency or consultant is expected to provide a proposal that
will introduce a "dummy" company by the name of Megacell into the marketplace
with the primary purpose of penetrating BTC's mobile customer base.

Megacell will develop a full marketing and product roll out strategy to be imple-
mented in a virtual environment. It should include the following:
* Launch plans and related collateral and activities
SBudgetary provisions for all marketing activities
SMarketing collateral geared to specific and ongoing promotions, specials, and
other differentiators
SPricing of goods and services, including seasonal pricing
SStrategy for corporate sponsorship and corporate civic citizenship
SWholesale and Retail Distribution strategy, including third party licensed retailers
and/or handset subsidies andpricings as may be applicable.
* Customer care strategies, including specific strategies for customer acquisition
and retention
* Strategies(both formal and informal) for managing and influencing the regulatory
environment and for competitor and market intelligence gathering

Interested parties may obtain further information, including eligibility to participate
as of May 26, 2008 from the BTC Marketing Department, Bay Street, Nassau, Baha-
mas.

Any queries should be directed to Eldri Ferguson, eferguson@btcbahamas.com,
242-302-7540.

Please respond to this RFP by no later than July 8, 2008 addressed to:

Mr. Kirk Griffin
Executive Vice President
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
P.O. Box N-3048
John F. Kennedy Drive
Nassau,.Bahamas

Proposals will be opened 12 Noon, July 11, 2008, BTC Mqrketing Office, Bay Street.

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all proposals.


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MS. ANGELA
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WATSON, 63


participate in our sea lion
encounter and we wanted to
mark the occasion with a cele-
bration."
Kim Terrell, marine mammal
director at Dolphin Encounters,
greeted the family and intro-
duced them to PJ, a female sea
lion.
Standing on specially
designed, waist-deep water plat-
forms immersed in a lagoon, the
guests were able to pet, kiss,
hug, feed and interact with PJ
face-to-face. The 30-minute pro-
gramme allows time for guests
to ask questions and learn about
marine mammals, the organis-
ers say.
"This was an amazing experi-
ence," said Gabriella Rodriguez.
"I have never done anything like
this before. We have been in
with the dolphins and loved that
but this was really great I did-
n't want to get out!"
Her friend Maria agreed.
"This was a once-in-a-lifetime
experience. To be honest I was a
little afraid at first before we
went in and I wasn't. sure, but
PJ was so sweet and Kim was
really good about teaching us
about sea lions that it was just so
much fun I'wanted it to last
longer and I definitely want to
do it again."
Victor Portugues said: "We
have been coming to the
Bahamassincq.1996 and have


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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


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(111
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LIFE UNDER THE 'BIG TENT'


When wil


* SYLVIA WILSON
'Tourists should come

here and feel comfortable'






















We are under the world famous Big Tent." Syl ia
\ ilson. ow ner of stall no 11. told The Tribune.
She has two quesnons for the government: "When will the
newt market be built." and "Where is it going to be built ?"
Mrs \\ lson said she is tired of tourists inquiring about
government's plans to address the poor conditions in the
present market, so she tells them that vendors are on a
-"waia ng list."
She added that government should reconsider its plans to
con ert the oinnal straw market site into a green space. and
should make the construction of the new market the first pn-
orit\ on their agenda.
The vendors have stationed in a tent at the end of Bay
51reet since the original market burned down in 2001. Last
March. Minister of Works Earl Deveaux announced that the
original straw market site between Bay Street and the
\\oodes Rogers Wharf %would be converted into a green
space
"\\ e don't need an extra place for dog to be pissing up
the place." Mrs \\ ilson said.
"Tourists should be able to come here and feel comfort-
able. but this straw market is very hot and unfit for our
guests.


* 'SOAP LADY' SANDRA BAIN-GOJKOVIC


the new straw market be built?


E TEKl MACKEY

S R'Luck to get $20 a day'


here i d., Teki
blacke, told Thg "-7.,
OE+ TS and PHOTOS: Sh, h.,s bt.n
aHorking as a %,endor

ye irs old
REUBEN SHEARER ye;,k-ldes ;i. .,idA'
she onn v.,orks at
Re D:. "' : .....; the str.,, m.jrket
"R '" three months out ot
the \cai, and can't
TIM CLARKE p'- nr NaI'nal'
Insurance tees,
v. which ha \e been
Tri l Photographer c :"u bluck t
gel '2.1 here a dj\.
because \when the rain comes down it damages m\ straw
products." she said. For this reason, she is calling on govern-
ment to repair the tent that series as a "temporary" shelter for
* LARRY MCDONALD the _endos_


'Government get us paying all kind of bills'


wood carver by trade
Since his teens, Larry
McDonald has been working at
the straw market for six years.
He sells sculptures made of
S- .. wild tamarind and mahogany
wood.
"Government joking man.
.They get us paying all kind of
bills, squeezing out all of our
money, but we don't have any
facilities," he said of the tempo-
rary tent where vendors have
been working for the last seven
years.
In regards to an extension that
vendors have been given to make
National Insurance payments, Mr
McDonald said that he and his
colleagues are still not making
enough to pay off the balance.


'A lot of customers look for

different and unique things'

ir Soap Lady" Sandra Bain-Gojkovic sells hand-made
"' y g products with enticing names like "Nassau Goom-
S.bay Summer", "Long Island Getaway" and "Crooked
'.".'.. Island Pink Pearl".
:i Mrs Bain-Gojkovic has been in the market a little over
.' the year, and makes body butters, sea salt scrubs, natural
ssoaps, and candles. "A lot of customers are looking for
things different and unique," said Mrs Bain-Gojkovic,
adding that she gets up 5am each morning to make her
soaps, and brings them to her stall for sale.
' .. "My products are something different from the usual
I1 .4 'souvenirs that the straw vendors sell," she said.
Her sweet-smelling soaps are made from lie, glycerin,
2... and soy based products. She stressed that each soap is
S' prepared with natural fruit oils.
S.: aShe told The Tribune team that the bars are sold at $8
for one and $12 for two.
* KERNEVA MEADOWS

Not afraid to speak her mind


affectionately known as 'Dynamite,
A. to vendors, Kerneva Meadows go
that name for her high-spirited, talkative nature
The vendors call her their spokesperson
because she says exactly what is on her mind.
"A lot of people is talk amongst themselves
but they don't voice their opinion when the
need to," she said. "Very few people here don
speak up, but I am one who does.
"You see, government faithfully promise
that they would build a new market, and the
they changed their minds on us, and I have
-serious problem with that," she said.
"We are under the tent temporarily until th
market is built, but nothing has happened ye
So we'll continue to wait and pray."
Mrs Meadows agreed that the rain destroy
her products. "It's impossible for my business t
N VINCE THOMPSON


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n,
s,
y
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.e prosper under these conditions."
t. Even though she is unhappy with the market's
present state, she said: "As long as I'm here,
Ys healthy with no sickness, I will be here on the
o job."



'There is a lack

of patriotism'


Vendors need unique products if they are to
survive and prosper in the straw market,
Vince Thompson told The Tribune.
He estimates that he is one of 20 male vendors
operating at the market, and said that business for
male vendors is good since they sell hand made
products unlike the "typical" female vendor.
Mr Thompson, who sells maracas, flutes, and
Junkanoo drums, with a "Bahamas" logo imprinted
on them, said that vendors would walk away each
day satisfied with the money they made if they sold
nothing but locally made products.
"There is a lack of patriotism because some of
these vendors import products from foreign coun-
tries," he said.


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~111


THE TRIBUNE


I UtivUAY, JUNI- 3, 200Ut, HAUI /


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PAE UEDA, UE ,208THATIBNIEES


The Shuttle

Discovery

closes in on

space station
* HOUSTON
SHUTTLE Discovery closed
in on the international space
station early Monday with a
super-size delivery: a scientific
lab that's as big as a school bus,
according to Associated Press.
Discovery was also ferrying
up the space station's newest
resident: astronaut Gregory
Chamitoff.
"We're having a great time
up here. Today is going to be
even more exciting as we get to
see the space station as we
approach and dock," Chamitoff
said as the shuttle headed for its
Monday afternoon rendezvous.
Chamitoff will call the space
station home for the next six
months. He'll replace Garrett
Reisman, who will return to
Earth aboard the shuttle.
The space shuttle and its sev-
en astronauts are delivering the
$1 billion lab on behalf of
Japan. They'll install the lab,
with help from the space sta-
tion's three residents, on Tues-
day.
It's named Kibo, Japanese
for hope, and is 37 feet long and
weighs more than 32,000
pounds.
Shuttle commander Mark
Kelly and his crew also have a
new pump for the space sta-
tion's malfunctioning toilet. The
Russian-built toilet broke 11/2
weeks ago, and space officials
hope this pump from a dif-
ferent manufacturing batch
than the spares on board -will
get it working normally.
Before parking at the space
station, Kelly was going to
guide Discovery through a slow
back flip so the station residents
could photograph the'shuttle's
underside.
It's one of the safety mea-
sures put in place by NASA
after the 2003 Columbia acci-
dent to check for launch dam-
age.


point at nurses


E. By LLONELLA GILBERT
Bahamas Information
Services
LAKERAH ROLLE, staff
nurse from Sandilands Rehabil-
itative Centre, led her debate
team arguing against the topic
"Be it Resolved that Nurses Do
Not Eat Their Young" to win
the first ever Nurses Association
of The Commonwealth of The
- Bahamas National Nursing
Debate on Thursday.
Nurse Rolle, who also won
best speaker, was supported by
team-mates registered nurses
Eldora Beneby and Glendina
Minus. They won the debate by
scoring 452 out of a possible 500
points.
The team won the debate by
utilising strong openings and
powerful arguments. For exam-
ple, in beginning her argument,
Nurse Rolle said: "While it must
never be forgotten that inherent
in nursing duties is the care of
the patient, it is ironic, that nurs-
es suffer from the Dr Jekyll and
Mrs Hyde syndrome.
"While in one instance we are
caring, supportive and concerned
for our patients, in contrast we
neglect, bully and devour our
young nursing colleagues.
"The question must be asked
who is caring for the.caregiver. It
appears that the physical, psy-
cho-social and professional needs
of the nurse have been leeched
upon and neglected sadly by
nurses."
Ella Jane Anderson, nursing
officer at Princess Margaret Hos-
pital, led the proposition and was
supported by clinical nurse
Camille Bowleg and Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre clinical
nurse Shantell Bryan.
They received a score of 379


COMMONWEALTH BANK

Employment Opportunity
Assistant Manager Recruitment,
Humi an Resources

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New. Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed to delivering superior quality, service, to
training and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability in
the community.

Commonwealth Bank is presently considering applications for
Assistant Manager Recruitment, Human Resources.

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
* Actively recruiting staff through job fairs, focused advertising and
in house posting
* Overseeing the testing of applicants
* Screening / interviewing of applicants
* Performing all background checks, obtaining references and
transcripts on potential candidates
* Preparing job letters, job descriptions and other new hire forms
and documents
* Conducting the welcome and familiarization program for newv
hires
* Overseeing the Bank's Employee Referral program
* Maintaining the HR Database
* Preparation of HR reports
* Setting annual objectives for direct reports and appraising their
performance semi annually
* Training and coaching of direct reports
* Promoting and maintaining excellent customer service

QUALIFICATIONS, SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE:
Candidates must meet the following criteria:
* Possess a Bachelor's Degree or higher in Human Resources or
in a related discipline from an accredited University
* Minimum of five years experience in Human Resources with a
minimum of two years experience in recruiting
* Excellent interpersonal skills
* Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications
* Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills
* Excellent organizational and time management skills
* Team Player with the ability to add value and strength to the
team and team goals
* Honest, hardworking and ability to meet deadlines

REMUNERATION PACKAGE:
Commonwealth Bank is a Great place to work! We offer an
exciting work environment with the opportunity for growth and
development. We also offer a competitive compensation package,
reflecting the successful applicant's experience and qualifications,
including a performance based incentive plan, health, vision,
dental and life insurances and a pension plan.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes before
June 13, 2008 to:

Human Resources Department
Re: Assistant Manager HR
P.O. Box SS-6263
Nassau Bahamas
Telefax: (242) 393-8073
E-mail address:hr@combankltd.com

"Commonwealth Bank sincerely thanks all applicants for their
interest in becoming a part of our Bank, however, only those
under consideration will be contacted."


LAKERAH ROLLE, staff nurse at Sandilands Rehabilitative Centre and
overall best speaker.


and also strongly supported their
arguments.
Beginning her argument,
Nurse Anderson said: "Nurses
eating their young, this despica-
ble expression implies that expe-
rienced nurses do not treat
novice nurses kindly.
"Senior or experienced nurses
can be compared to mothers.
Which mother cares and nour-
ishes or places another person's
child above her own, unless you
are a cruel mother?
"Nursing is all about caring;
the majority of us enter the pro-
fession because we had a desire
to care for others. How can one
possibly care for others without
caring for self?"

Phrase
Nurse Rolle explained that it
is common for bad news to trav-
el fast and often be accepted as
gospel. She said many new nurs-
es hear the negative phraseand
if they encounter a nurse who is
less friendly and caring, it is
accepted as the norm.
Chairperson of the Education
and Research Committee and
organiser of the event Perse-
phone Munnings said "eating
their young" has been a subject
of private debates among nurses
for a number of years.


"This nursing debate, the first
of its kind in The Bahamas, gives
nurses the opportunity to
express their views on the topic,"
Mrs Munnings said. "The give-
and-take of debating is essential
to the process of democracy."
She applauded participants for
their boldness and willingness
to speak on a topic that has been
avoided for so long.


ate


NURSING OFFICER II at Princess Margaret Hospital Ella Jane Anderson
led the team of proponents at the first-ever Nurses Association of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas National Nursing Debate.


"I am certain that the experi-
ence has been rewarding as it
.allowed you to experience team-
work and friendly discourse and
has sharpened critical thinking
skills," Mrs Munnings said.
"The debate provides an
avenue to strengthen cama-
raderie, as nurses from through-
out the country were invited to
participate."


President of the Nurses Asso-
ciation Prescola Rolle said nurs-
es attending the debate should
listen to the arguments for and
against and evaluate themselves
from the information presented.
"These points will be a guide
for us to review our actions and
decisions concerning our
colleagues," Mrs Rolle
explained.


0


C_')
a ;;

THE GOVERNMENT High School class of 1968 poses for a.photo after
attending East Street Gospel Chapel, where class member Ed Dorsette
serves as one of the pastors. Pictured (l-r) are: Michelle Brennen, Pastor
Ed Dorsette, Louise Blyden, Kelsie Dorsette, Dr Albert S Ferguson, Myrtle
McCartney (and husband Clinton, not from the class of 1968), class pres-
ident and reunion co-ordinator Dr Rhonda Chipman-Johnson, Sandy J Fer-
guson (wife of Dr Albert S Ferguson and not from the class of 1968).


THIS year is a special one
for 1968 graduates of the
original Government High
School.
Led by class reunion presi-
dent for the last 20 years Dr
Rhonda Chipman-Johnson,
now executive vice president
of the College of the
Bahamas, the class of 1968 is
celebrating the milestone in
grand style with family,
friends and other GHS "old
scholars" from the era.
- The celebrations began
with a church service at the
East Street Gospel Chapel.
Class of 1968 members
along with their families
have attended church
together three times a year
for more than 10 years.
In February, the group
held a payer breakfast at the
Albania Academy Confer-
ence Centre, with GHS old
scholar Dr Timothy Barrett
as the motivational speaker.
In March, .the class of 1968
held a walkathon and break-
fast, raising money for com-
munity charities.
Later this jear, 30 mem-
bers of the class will go on
cruise of northern Europe
and Scandinavia, departing
from London. The grand
finale of the year of celebra-
tions will be a 40th anniver-
sary banquet, where the con-
tributions of several unsung
national heroes and heroines
from the field of education
and the original Government
High School will be remem-
bered.
GHS old scholars and
members of the public who
wish to play a role in these
celebrations were told to
contact Dr Albert Ferguson
at Albania Christian Acade-
my.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for'improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Lakerah Rolle makes her


YOUR CONNECTION 0 THE WORLD


The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders

from experienced companies to provide

Graphic Artist Services for the 2009 Tele-

phone Directories. Interested companies'

may pick up a specification document
from BTC's Head Office located at #21

John F Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas,

between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm,

Monday to Friday. Bids should be received
by 4:00 pm, Thursday June 5, 2008.


Bids are to be marked, "Tender for Graphic Artist
Services" to the attention of:
Mr. I. Kirk Griffin
Executive Vice President
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd
#21 John F Kennedy Drive
P 0 Box N-3048
Nassau, The Bahamas




www.btcbahamas.com I CALL BTC 225 -5282


M IIT1li

!KT^


I -


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2008


9 --~c~
.;;i3B










THE TRIBUNE


TI IIFnAY .11INF 92008. PAGE 9


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd invites tender for salvage used vehicles as listed.


All tenders should be sent to the attention of I. Kirk Griffin, Executive Vice President, P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau, Bahamas
in a sealed envelope clearly marked "Tender Salvaged Used Vehicle" to our JFK Administration office on
John F. Kennedy Drive, so as to arrive no later than June 5th, 2008 at 4pm.


Participants will be notified in writing of the selected bids.


Salvage vehicle can be viewed at BTC compound Perpall Tract between 9:00AM and 4:00PM Mondays through Fridays.



Tag # .ak Mdl era6#Tg#MkeMdleia


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Ford Ranger Truck 1994 T00738 '
Ford R P/u 1994 T00741
Ford Ranger Truck 1994 T00744
Ford Ranger P/u 1994 T00748
Ford Ranger P/u 1994 T00750
Ford Ranger P/u 1994 T00751
Ford D21 P/u Truck 1995 T00754
Nissan D21 1995 T00756
Ford Ranger P/u 1996 T00763
Ford Ranger 1996 T00764
Ford P/u Truck 1996 T00768
Ford R 1996 T00769
Ford Ranger P/u 1996 T00770
Ford R.P/U 1996 T00773
Ford Ranger 1996 T00774
Ford Ranger P/u 1996 T00776
Ford Ranger P/u 1996 T00777
Ford Ranger 1996. T00778
Ford Ranger P/u 1996 T00779
Ford Ranger P/u 1996 T00781
Ford Ranger P/u 1996 T00782
RANGER P/U TRUCK
Ford Ranger Truck 1996 T00784
Toyota Camry 2003 T00151
Ford Ranger Truck 1996 T00786
Ford Ranger P/u 1998 T00788
Ford Pickup Truck 1996 T00789
Ford Ranger P/u 1996 T00790
Ford Truck 1996 T00795
Ford Ranger Truck 1996 T00796
SFord Ranger U/p 1996 T00797
Ford RTruck 1996 T00798
Ford Ranger P/u 1998 T00799
Ford F800 Truck 1996 T00804
Ford F350 Cargo 1996 T00806
Ford F800 Truck 1998 T00815
Ford Crew 1990 T00851
Ford F450 Truck 1996 T00862
Ford F350 1996 T00867
F450 BUCKET TRUCK
F450 Lift Truck 1997 T00886
Ford F450 Truck 1999 T00887
Tractor Head 1992 T00925
Ford Ranger Truck 1996 T01000
Ford R 1996 T01001
Ford Ranger Trk 1996 T01003


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Nissan Sentra
Nissan Sentra
Nissan Sentra
Nissan Sentra
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Sentra
Nissan Sentra
Nissan Sentra
Sentra
Sentra
Sentra
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Kia Pride
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Ford Escort
Ford Escort
Ford E150
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Ranger
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Ford Ranger
Ford Ranger
Ford Ranger
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Ford Ranger
Ford F800
F350
F800
F600
F450
F350
M247
F450
Ford F450
L9000
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Ford Ranger
Ford Ranger


Ford P/u Truck 1996 T01004
Ford Truck 1996 T01006
Ford R Truck 1998 T01012
Ford Ranger Truck 1998 T01016
Ford Ranger P/u 1998 T01017
Ford Ranger Truck 1998 T01019
Ford Ranger Trk 1996 T01025
Ford R Truck 1996 T01030
Ford Truck 1996 T01037
Ford Ranger P/u 1998 T01040
Ford P/u Truck 1998 T01042
.F150 P/u Truck 1998 T01049
Ford F25 P/u Truck 1997 T01054
F250 P/U TRUCK
Ford F250 Truck 1998 T02007
RANGER P/U TRUCK
RANGER P/U TRUCK
Ford Ranger 1999 T02023
Ford F250 2003 T02086
Ford F250 P/u 2003 T02088
F250 P/U TRUCK
Club Car Gulf Cart 1998 T00938
Carryall Gulf Cart 1998 T00934
Ford Ranger P/u 1996 T00791
Ford E150 Van 1994 T00596
Ford E150 Van 1994 T00404
Ford F350 Truck 1997 T00877
Ford Ranger Truck 1994 T00713
Ford E150 Van 1994 T00584
Ford Truck 1995 T00752
Ford E150 Van 1998 T00449
Ford F350 Truck 1996 T00863
Chevy S10 Truck 1992 T01094 NP
Ford E150 Van 1994 T00592
Ford Truck 1996 T00868
Ford E150 Van 1994 T00595
Chevy S10 Truck 1992 T01083
Ford E150 Van 1994 T00598
Nissan Sentra 1993 T00117
Nissan Sentra 1993 T00270
FordTruck 1996 T00865
Ford E150 Van 1994 T00589,
F250 P/u Truck 1995 T01051
Ford Ranger 1999 T02028
Ford E150 Van 1996 T00415
Ford E150 Van 1996 T00419
Ford Ranger P/u 1998 T01044
Ford F350 1996 T00870
RANGER P/U TRUCK
Ford F150 P/u 1995 T01053
Ford Ranger Truck 1998 T01024
Ford Ranger P/u 1999 T02048
Chevy S-10 Truck
Chevy S-10 Truck
Chevy S-10 Truck
Chevy S-10 Truck
Ford F SuperDuty Truck.
Nissan Sunny
-Nissan Sunny
Nissan Truck
Nissan Sunny
Nissan Sunny
Ford F250 Truck
Chevy.S-10 Truck
Ford E150 Van 1994 T00576
Ford E150 Van 1994 T00578
RANGER P/U TRUCK
RANGER P/U TRUCK
Ford F350 Lift 1993 T00858
Ford E150 1996 T00410
Ford E150 Van 1994 T00406
Ford 1994 T00400
Ford E150 Van 1994 T00593
Ford Ranger P/u 1996 T00785
Ford E150 Van 1996 T00414
Ford F450 Bucket 1997 T00879
Nissan Bus 1990 T00569
Nissan Bus 1991 T00575
Nissan Bus 1991 T00571
Nissan Bus 1990 T00568


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1 FTYR1 OCXWTA32602 Ranger
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1 FTYR1 OC1WTA32603 Ranger
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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2008

TUESDAY EVENING JUNE 3, 2008

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Florida Roadtrip Change Your Brain, Change Your Life Dr. Daniel G. Amen demon- Stay Rich Forever & Ever With Ed
6 WPBT Diving and snor- states how to overcome behaviors such as depression, ADD and anxiety. Slott Tax adviser Ed Slott gives re-
keling. f (CC) tirement-saving tips. (CC)
The Insider (N) NCIS "Driven" A highly classified ro- 48 Hours Mystery A computer ge- Without a Trace The team search-
O WFOR n (CC) botic vehicle causes the death of a nius, his Russian bride, the KGB es for a competitive eater who dis-
Navy lieutenant. ( (CC) and the ultimate betrayal, appears after a contest.
Access Holly- Most Outra- Most Outra- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
B WTVJ wood (CC) geous Moments geous Moments Trade" A pregnant woman is found Wounded, Lake takes a hostage
( (CC) Home videos, raped and murdered. \ and goes on the run. (CC)
Deco Drive The Moment of Truth Contestants Hell's Kitchen Two teams are com- News (N) (CC)
0 WSVN take on a lie-detector. (N) n (CC) bined into one. (N) 0 (CC)
Jeoardy(N) Accordin to Accordin to SamanthaWho?Samantha Who? Boston Legal Alan tries to prove
* WPLG (CC) Jim Cheryl sets Jim "The Perect The Hockey Samantha falls that Patrice was temporarily insane
some rules. A Fight" (CC) Date" for Kevin. when she killed a man. (CC)

:00) CSI: Miami The First 48 "Candy Lady; Best of The First 48 "Candy Lady; Best of Gene Simmons Gene Simmons
A&E Bunk" (CC) Friends" A beloved neighborhood Friends" A beloved neighborhood Family Jewels Family Jewels
"Candy Lady" is murdered. "Candy Lady" is murdered. "Lil Gene" (CC) Hiring a nurse.
(:00)BBC World BBC News Sport Today BBC News. Women on the BBC World News America
BBCI News America (Latenight). (Latenight). Front Line
BET The Boot (CC) PAPER SOLDIERS (2002, Comedy) Kevin Hart, Beanie Sigel. Mishaps Iron Ring (CC)
occur when bumbling thieves mentor an inept upstart. (CC)
Just for Laughs Rick Mercer Re-- Ha!ifax Comedy Just for Laughs Winnipeg Come- CBC News: The National (N) C/
CBC Gags (CC) port d( (CC) Fest n (CC) n (CC) dy Festival (CC)
C (:00) Kudlow & Fast Money Deal or No Deal Contestants get a The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNac Company (CC) chance to win money. t (CC)
C N0) Lou Dobbs CNN Election Center Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
CNN night (CC)
Scrubs J.D.'s The Daily Show The Colbert Re- Futurama Fry South Park (CC) Drew Hastings: Irked and Miffed
COM faith is restored. With Jon Stew- port (CC) searches the ru- The comic performs. (CC)
In (CC) art (CC) ins for a clover.
(00) * PIXEL PERFECT (2004) (:40) Wizards of (:05) Hannah The Suite Life of Wizards of Wa- Life With Derek
DISN RickyUllman. A hologram sings for Waverly Place ontana New Zack&Cody very Place ( Lizzie's coach
a struggling band. n (CC) ) (CC) classmates. Ballroom dance. (CC) asks Casey out.
DThis Old House This Old House Sweat Equity Desperate-Land- Rock Solid (N) Kitchen Renova- Kitchen Renova-
DIY l (CC) Kitchen options. scapes tions ions
DW Beckmann ML Mona Lisa Journal: Tages- Global 3000 Journal: In Euromaxx
_W__ them Depth
E! The Daily 10 (N) THS Investigates: Dating Nightmares The dark side of dating. Denise Richards Denise Richards
ESPN NFL Live (Live) 2007 World Series of Poker Main 2007 World Series of Poker Main Baseball Tonight (Live) (CC)
S N (CC) event, from Las Vegas. (CC) event, from Las Vegas. (CC)
ESPNI Tennis French Open -- Men's and Women's Quarterfinals. From Paris. Euro 2008 Pre- Soccer 2000 Euro Championship
rNI (Taped) (CC) view Show Final France vs. Italy. (N)
TN Daily Mass: Our Mother Angelica Live Classic Religious Cata- The Holy Rosary Threshold of Hope
EWTN Lady Episodes logue
FT 00) Cardio Shimmy (CC) Shimmy Belly- Namaste Yoga Namaste Yoga Body Challenge Participants watch
l ast (CC) dance moves. Core strength. "Gate Opening" the awarding o the trophy.
FO C Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (CC) Hannity & Colmes (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
SO-N heard Smith Susteren(CC)
S FL (:00)MLB Baseball Florida Marlins at Atlanta Braves. From Turner Field in Atlanta. (Subject Inside the Mar- The FSN Final
FS FL to Blackout) (Live) lines Score (Live)
GOLF Golf With Style The Approach Golf Central Big Break: Ka'anapali One com- Big Break: Ka'anapali (N)
GOLF (N) (N) (Live) petitor feels the pressure.
GSN Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire ( )Family Feud Family Feudn Russian Whammy (CC)
N (CC) (CC)(CC) Roulette (CC)
G4Tec :00) Attack of X-Play (N) Unbeatable Ninja Warrior NinjaWarrior Attack of the Showl Internet idiots.
G4Tech the Show! (N) Banzuke
1:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger While on a JANE DOE: EYE OF THE BEHOLDER (2007, Mystery) Lea Thompson,
HALL Texas Ranger plane, Walker and Trivette's prisoner Joe Penny, Billy Moses. An agent investigates the disappearance of a
n (CC) tries to escape. n (CC) valuable painting. (CC)
BuyMe "Debara Designer Guys Design Inc. Colin & Justin's Home Heist "40 Green Force (N) Take It Outside
HGTV &Sokthy" Acool teen Bathroom. n Year Old Grannies" Junk shop. r n (CC) Outdoor lounge.
(CC) lounge. 1 (CC)(CC) (CC) (N) (CC)
INSP Victory Joyce Meyer: Christ in Inspiration To- Life Today With This Is Your Day The Gospel
Everyday Life Prophecy dayJames Robison (CC)
Reba Kyra con- MyWife and According to Family Guy "Bri- Family Guy Pe- Two and a Half Two and a Half
KTLA sides moving in Kids "Bahamas" Jim "Coach Jim" an Sings and ter buys a fishing Men Jake lures Men Charlie's
with her father. (CC) .. (CC) Swings" C boat. (CC) birds inside. n boycott. (CC)
THE CAPTURE OF THE GREEN RIVER KILLER THE CAPTURE OF THE GREEN RIVER KILLER (2008, Docudrama)
LIFE (2008) (Part 1 of 2) Toni Cavanagh. Detective David (Part 2 of 2) Tom Cavanagh, Amy Davidson, Sharon Lawrence. Detective
Reichert searches for a serial killer. (CC) David Reichert searches for a serial killer.
MSNBC Hardball Countdown With KeithOlber- Verdict With Dan Abrams Countdown With Keith Olber-
MSNBC cC mann mann
I v Zoey 101 SpongeBob Drake & Josh Home improve- Home Improve- George Lopez George Lopez
NICK (CC)SquarePants r\l)C (CC) ment C (CC) ment n (CC) (CC) (CC)
NTV :00) Bones l NCIS "Driven" n (CC) House "Alone" A (PA) (CC) News (N) C. News
NTV (PA) (CC) (CC) _______
SPEED Pass Time American Thun- American Thun- Street Tuner Livin'theLow Super Bikes! (N) Super Bikes!
der(N) der Challenge Life
Extraordinary Behind the Joyce Meyer: John Hagee To- Bill Gaither (CC) Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Health With Jor- Scenes (CC) Enjoying Every- day (CC)
dan Rubin day Life (CC)
S Everybody Family Guy Family Guy Pe- Family Guy Pe- Family Guy Jeal- The Office The Office
TBS Loves Raymond "Road to Europe" ter receives a ter campaigns ousy rears its Michael strikes up "Michael's Birth-
n (CC) n (CC) $150,000 check. against Lois. n ugly head. friendship. n day" / (CC)
(:00) The New 48 Hours: Hard Evidence "Match- 48 Hours: Hard Evidence A toddler 48 Hours: Hard Evidence "Why
TLC Detectives makers" Unlikely love matches. (CC) stops breathing while in the care of Did Eric Kill?" A boy convicted of
"Silent Killers" a babysitter. murder goes up for parole. (CC)
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order "Cry Wolf A radio per- Law & Order Talking Points" A col- Bones The Man on the Fairway"
TNT der "Evil Breeds" sonality claims to have been shot lege student is killed during a ques- /3 (CC)
A and almost killed. ntion-and-answer session.
George of the Camp Lazlo Johnny Test / Chop Socky My Gym Part- Courage the Grim Adven-
TOON Jungle (CC) Chooks ner's a Monkey Cowardly Dog tures
TRCops A burglar- Cops "Rescues Cops n (CC) World's Wildest Inside American Inside American
ized home. (CC) Special Edition" Jail (N) Jail
TV5 (:00)Toute une Pekin express "Oulan-Bator" Les equipes doivent re- Fourchette et Les R4fugiBs de la planite blue
S histoire joindre Oulan-Bator.sac dos Les refugies Bcologiques.
T1WC (:00) Abrams & Bettes: Beyorld the Forecast Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
(:00) Yo Amo a Al Diablo con Los Guapos Fuego en la Sangre Hermanos Aqui y Ahora
UNIV Juan Querend6n buscan venganza.
Law & Order: Special Victims Unit * OCEAN'S TWELVE (2004, Comedy-Drama) George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Da-
USA "Consent"/ (CC) mon. Indebted criminals plan an elaborate heist in Europe. (CC)
VH 1 Trista & Ryan Trista and Ryan's Wedding n Trista and Ryan's Wedding Trista Rehn exchanges vows with Ryan Sut-
(Part 2 of 3) (CC) ter, the Colorado firefighter she chose on "The Bachelorette."
VS. (0)WEC WEC WrekCage (CC) WEC WrekCage (CC) WEC WrekCage (CC)
ViS, __ WrekCage (CC)
(:00) America's Barney Miller A Barney Miller A Barney Miller Barney Miller A WGN News at Nine (N) n (CC)
WGN Funniest Home teen holds the man claims to be "Hash man is falsely ar-
Videos (CC) squad at bay. a werewolf. rested.
Family Guy "Bri- Beauty and the Geek "When Reaper Sam must use a remote- CW11 News at Ten With Kaity
W PIX an Sings and Worlds Collide, Part 2" A backyard controlled monster truck to capture Tong, Jim Watkins (N) (CC)
Swings" n barbecue gets spicy. (CC) the escaped soul. n (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) Dr. Phil Controversial love affairs. News (N) Jeopardy! (CC) Frasier The gang Frasier Boston
WSBK (CC) (CC) heads to the bar-mate Sam
Caribbean. Malone visits.

(:00) Barbaro nl * A SHREK THE THIRD (2007, Comedy) Voices of (:35) Kung Fu BIG MOMMA'S HOUSE 2
HBO-E (CC) Mike Myers. Animated. Shrek and friends look for the Panda:HBO (2006, Comedy) Martin Lawrence,
true heir of Far, Far Away. 'PG' (CC) First Look (CC) Nia Long. n 'PG-13' (CC)


(5:45) ** *T LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE (2006, Comedy-Drama) Greg Kinnear, John Adams "Don't Tread on Me"
H BO-P DREAMGIRLS Steve Carell, Toni Collette. Members of a dysfunctional family take a road Adams falls victim to an illness. C
(2006) 'PG-13' trip. 'R' (CC) (Part 3 of 7) (CC)
(6:30)** (:15) BLUE STREAK (1999, Comedy) Martin Lawrence, Luke Wil- Barbaro The Kentucky Derby win-
H BO-W HANGING UP son, Peter Greene. Thief tnes to retrieve a cache from a police station, ner struggles with a shattering leg
(2000) 'PG-13' 'PG-13' (CC) injury. C (CC)
(:00)*** FRACTURE (2007, Suspense) Anthony t MICHAEL (1996, Drama) John Travolta, Andie :45) The Making
H BO-S Hopkins.A prosecutor plays a cat-and-mouse game MacDowell, William Hurt. Tabloid oumalists see the Of: Ocean's
with a dangerous suspect. C 'R' (CC) light with an angel's help. 'PG (CC) Thirteen (CC)
(6:30) JOHN * ANYWHERE BUT HERE (1999, Comedy-Drama) Susan Saran- WAIST DEEP (2006, Action)
MAX-E TUCKER MUST don, Natalie Portman, Eileen Ryan. A flighty mother uproots her daughter Tyrese Gibson. A man's son is in-
DIE (CC) and heads West. T 'PG-13' (CC)side his hijacked car. n 'R' (CC)
LAKE PLACID (1999, Horror) Bill Pullman, Bridget *t TALK TO ME (2007, Biography) Don Cheadle, Chiwetel Ejiofor,
MOMAX Fonda, Oliver Piatt. A monstrous crocodile chomps on Taraji P. Henson. Premiere. Ralph Petey" Greene becomes a '60s radio
villagers in rural Maine. n 'R' (CC) icon. C 'R' (CC)
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THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11


TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2008


----I


And re ROdi ers b a seball


opre orders hasehall


tour


* By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

one of the country's largest
all-encompassing sporting
events is set to take place,
the Bahamas Baseball Fed-
eration executives have announced that all
preparations are in place and they are eagerly
awaiting a weekend of competition.
The BBF will host its 6th Annual Andre
Rodgers baseball tournament, sponsored by
Gatorade, June 5-8, featuring over 30 teams
and nearly 500 athletes.
The tournament, will also feature six age cat-
egories with venues alternating between the St.
Andrews Field of Dreams and the Freedom
Farm Baseball Fields.
Participating leagues will field teams from
Bimini, Exuma, Grand Bahama, Long Island,
Inagua, and here in the capital.
Freedom Farm and the Junior Baseball
League of Nassau are defending champions in
each of the divisions contested last year.
Freedom Farm took the Coach Pitch, 9 and
10, and 12 and 25 and under divisions while the
JBLN took the 13-15 division.
BBF President Craig Kemp said they have
lofty expectations for the success of the nation-
als. "We expect this to be the largest ever and


neY in iwo nays




Gatorade-sponsored event to feature about


500 athletes and more than 30 teams

------------....----------------------- ------------------------- --- -------------------------------------------------------- ------------------ I------------------- -- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------


we hope this will be the best nationals we have
ever had," he said, "We expect a large number
of islands will be represented so we are looking
forward to a great weekend."
Kemp said the federation has high expecta-
tions for its newest brainchild featuring older,
more experienced players.
"We are looking forward to a great overall
tournament, but expect great things from the
college division," he said. "We have a number of
guys who have been playing in college to return
home to play. In previous years we have only
been able to showcase our youth, division, but
because we have had such success in high school
and college, people are looking for the matchups
in those areas."
BBF Secretary General Teddy Sweeting said
hosting a tournament of these proportions is a
momentous task for the federation, however
they expect the event to be play out as planned.


"It is a very tedious task to undertake and
to co-ordinate all the islands and different par-
ticipants to come in and to get ready," he said,
"Right now we are pretty on schedule for where
we would like to be. We started the preparations
in November 2007."
Sweeting said the television broadcasting of
the opening ceremony will attract more poten-
tial viewers to the event.
"For the opening ceremony we will have a live
television broadcast and an 11-12 game will
immediately follow the opening ceremonies
which will also appear live on television between
Freedom Farm, the defending champions and
the JBLN."
Sweeting said despite the minor setback of
Eleuthera not being able to attend, the remain-
der of the field will be highlighted by various
additions throughout the archipelago.
"We are a little disappointed Eleuthera could


not make it to the tournament this year due to
some financial constraints," he said, "But we
do celebrate the return of Bimini which should
make things extremely exciting, and we have the
newcomer, the island of Exuma which will be
fielding a team in the Coach Pitch division."
Sweeting said there remain a number of
changes the Federation must make to accom-
modate each of the age divisions. "Our biggest
challenge and what we have been trying to over-
come over the past two and a half years is that
we have yet to have a proper senior baseball
facility," he said, "Right now we have to play the
senior boys at the JBLN which is more of a
junior sized field but we still want to play them
so we still accommodate them."
Play begins Thursday, January 5th, however
the official opening ceremonies will take place
Friday, June 6th, at the Freedom Farm Baseball
Complex at 7:30pm.n


I-I


THE GRAND BAHAMA Cycling Club staged its 2nd Annual Cycling Championships on Saturday, May 24, with a distance of 50 miles completed
by the elite cyclists. Shown here are members of Team Warriors, coached and managed by Barron 'Turbo' Musgrove...


Elite




cyclists



complete



50-mile



race


See more pictures on page 13...


THE New Providence Cycling Association hosted its third duathlon over the weekend, resulting in a few upsets and competitors
successfully braving the arduous course. Competition was intense as the five cyclists attempting the two mile run and second bike
leg to Coral Harbour. All finished the first South Ocean loop simultaneously. The fourth and final duathlon will be late Sep-
tember/mid October, and our overall winners will be announced.
PLACE/NAME BIKE RUN BIKE TOTAL TIME
1st Simon Lowe 18:42 11:69 48:33 1:18:43.88
2nd Mark Davies 18:42 13:14 50:48 1:22:04.44
3rd Tracy Sweeting 18:42 13:14 53:03 1:24:59.38
4th Wayne Price 18:42 19:61 53:51 1:31:55.35
5th Barron Musgrove 18:42 19:61 53:52 1:31:55.91
1st Anthony Colebrook (junior) 20:37 20:21 56:87 1:37:45.57
Results: South Ocean loop /1 mile run / South Ocean.
OPEN MEN:
1st Larry Russell 29:16 22:28 41:66 23:10:94
UNDER 12
1st Antinece Simmons 23:36 8:90 25:01 57:27.97
2nd Justin Minnis 23:36 8:90 25:24 57:49:06
(UNDER 14)
1st Rihaime Colebrook 23:36 8:90 25:01 57:27:97
2nd Tony Mackey 21:42 11:83 25:80 59:05:22
3rd Carlano Bain 28:14 17:88 36:42 1:22:44:32


THE Grand Bahama Cycling
Club staged its 2nd Annual
Cycling Championships on Sat-
urday, May 24, with a distance
of 50 miles completed by the
elite cyclists.
This race was sanctioned by
the Bahamas Amateur Cycling
Federation. The day started off
with novice and junior cyclists
in action.
Team Warriors, coached as
well as managed by Barron
'Turbo' Musgrove, dominated
this division. They covered one
lap of the 12 mile course and it
was action packed from start to
'finish.
Carlano 'The Car' Bain and
Justin The Jet' Minnis
assumed the pace for the first
few miles, but the only female
in the junior category, Antinece
'Lillie' Simmons, was right up
there with the guys battling it
out.
Later in the race, Rihaime
'The Rocket' Colebrook
launched several attacks but he
was eventually pulled back by
the pack.
In the end it was'Anthony
'Biggie' Colebrook, who out-
sprinted the pack only just -
with Biggie, Lillie and The Jet
coming in at 38.08 mins.
The Rocket and The Car
crossed the finish line in 40.52
mins. The novice cyclist with
this group, Larry Russell, com-
pleted his 12 miles in 45.24
mins.
In the Open Male, top senior


cyclists took to the streets for
their show, with much anticipa-
tion over who would be
crowned champion.
They covered four laps -
approximately 50 miles of the
course on Chicken Farm Road.
The race started and finished
at a very high speed.
Vince Turnquest, Keith
Major and Robert 'Penetrator'
Bethel all hammered the pace.
Throughout the race there were
countless attacks by various
cyclists. In the second lap GBs'
Bruce Silvera took quite a lead
but was pulled back into the
pack. It was Musgrove who out-
sprinted Jones for the victory
at the finish line.
'Turbo' is still the most cele-
brated Bahamian cyclist and,
even as President of the
N.P.C.A and coach to the Team
Warriors among other things,
is still competing.
In the Open Women division,
Grand Bahamas' own Vicki
Stafford and Leigh Termath
tied to the finish line in 1:40:31,
for two laps.
In the Open Men/Novice, GB
again dominated this as Bruce
Silvera completed three laps in
1:45 and Jim Goodrum two laps
in 1:06.
Results: 1st Barron 'Turbo'
Musgrove 2:11:06.12 2nd
Rowshan Jones 2:11:15.66 -
3rd Keith Major 2:13:16.44 -
4th Vince Turnquest 2:14:11.79
- 5th Robert 'Penetrator' Bethel
2:17:19.91
















THE FRENCH OPEN


Monfils topples


Ljubicic


N Sharapova stunned by Dinara Safina

* Dementieva reaches quarterfials


FRANCE'S GAEL MONFILS jubilates after winning his fourth round match against Croatia's Ivan Ljubicic at
the French Open tennis tournament in Paris on Monday June 2, 2008.


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4 02


PERMANENT SECRETARY


* By STEVEN WINE
PARIS

Gael Monfils kept the French
flag flying at Roland Garros
yesterday, beating Ivan Ljubicic
in four sets to reach his first-
ever Grand Slam quarter-final.
Monfils succeeded where four
of his compatriots failed, win-
ning his fourth-round clash 7-6
(7/1) 4-6 6-3 6-2.
The 21-year-old won the
junior title in Paris four years
ago but has often struggled to
live up to the hype that followed
that triumph in the senior ranks.
Elena Dementieva advanced
Monday to the French Open
quarterfinals, winning five con-
secutive games to start the final
set and beating fellow Russian
Vera Zvonareva 6-4, 1-6, 6-2,
according to the Associated
Press.
For the No. 7-seeded Demen-
tieva, it's the best showing at
Roland Garros since she was
runner-up, to champion Anas-
tasia Myskina in 2004. Demen-
tieva closed out the victory by
smacking a backhand winner,
then celebrated with a whirling
leap and a yelp.
The 11th-seeded Zvonareva
committed 41 unforced errors
and grew increasingly frustrated
as the final set slipped away.
After falling behind 3-0, she
pounded the clay with her rack-
et three times forehand,
backhand and forehand.
Dementieva and Zvonareva
were among. five Russian
women in the final 16.
On Sunday, three-time
defending champion Rafael
Nadal returned to the quarter-
finals by beating fellow
Spaniard Fernando Verdasco
6-1; 6-0,6-2.
The win was Nadal's most
lopsided yet at Roland Garros,
where he's 25-0. He had lost at
least six games in each previ-
ous match.
Seeded second behind Roger
Federer, Nadal is bidding to
become the first man since
Bjorn Borg in 1981 to win a
fourth consecutive French Open
title. On Tuesday Nadal's
22nd birthday he'll play yet
another Spaniard, childhood
chum Nicolas Almagro, who
beat Jeremy Chardy 7-6 (0), 7-6
(7), 7-5. "If I win, it's going to be
a beautiful birthday present,"
Nadal said. "And if it's not,
well, too bad."
Almagro, seeded 19th, is
making his first appearance in a
Grand Slam quarterfinal. When
he had completed his fourth-
round victory, he turned to his
family and friends in the stands
and moved his hand from front
to-back across his hair, as
though holding clippers.
"That was a bet that I had
with my team. So now I won,"
he said. "I'm going to shave
their heads. I'll use the razor.
... I don't know how my father is
going to react when I shave his
head. I won't do that to my
mother."
Also renewing a friendly
rivalry Tuesday will be No. 3-
seeded Novak Djokovic and 19-
year-old Ernests Gulbis. They
shared adventures on and off
the court a few years ago at
coach Niki Pilic's tennis acade-
my in Munich, Germany.
"He was destroying me in


FRANCE'S GAEL MONFILS returns the ball to Croatia's Ivan Ljubicic
during their fourth round match at the French Open tennis tournament in
Paris on Monday.


practices..I couldn't win a
match. Practice? No chance,"
Djokovic said. Jokingly he
added: "So all the pressure's on
him, OK? He's the favorite."
Actually, Gulbis will be an
underdog playing in his first
Grand Slam quarterfinal. He
advanced by beating Michael
Llodra 6-4, 7-6 (4), 6-3, while
Djokovic swept No. 18 Paul
Henri-Mathieu 6-4, 6-3, 6-4.
In the women's quarterfinals,
No. 2-seeded Ana Ivanovic will
play No. 10 Patty Schnyder, and
No. 3 Jelena Jankovic will face
19-year-old qualifier Carla


RUSSIA'S MARIA SHARAPOVA serves to compatriot Dinara Safi-
na during their fourth round match of the French Open tennis tour-
nament, Monday June 2, 2008 at the Roland Garros stadium in
Paris. Dinara Safina came from match point down to dump top seed
Maria Sharapova out of the French Open as history repeated itself
at Roland Garros.Sharapova led by a set an 5-2 and was just one
point from victory at 5-3 in the second set before a stunning turn-
around saw Safina move on to a 6-7 (6/8) 7-6 (7/5) 6-2 victory.


Suarez Navarro. In a fourth-
round shock, top-ranked Maria
Sharapova lost to No. 13-seeded
Dinara Safina.
Another matches scheduled.
Monday was Federer against
Frenchman Julien Benneteau.
Almagro lost his two previous
tour matches against Nadal, but
it has been more than two years
since they last played. They
competed against each a lot
growing up and shared a rooting
interest in the Real Madrid soc-
cer team. "He is a model for'
me," Almagro said. "He is a
great friend; might change on
Tuesday."
Nadal said he expects his
toughest match yet in the tour-
nament, because he ranks
Almagro in the top five among
clay-court players.
But Nadal's in a league of his
own on the surface, as he
reminded Verdasco. Nadal
feasted on a weak second serve
by Verdasco, who lost nine of
his 10 service games and
dropped 10 consecutive games
during one stretch.
"It wasn't a good day for
him," Nadal said.
For Nadal, the biggest scare
was a bout of dizziness during
warmups following a rain delay
early in the second set. After
he received a visit from a train-
er and doctor, bread and
bananas solved the problem.
Foot blisters that have both-
ered Nadal in recent weeks
weren't a factor, he said.
He has dropped only seven
sets in four years at Roland
Garros and has yet to be
pushed to five sets. Through
four rounds in 2008 he has lost
only 22 games and no sets.,
beating a fellow left-hander
each time.


"44


. .a _





SPAIN'S DAVID FERRER jubilates after defeating Czech Republic's
Radek Stepanek during their fourth round match at the French
Open tennis tournament in Paris on Monday.

David Ferrer came through a ding-dong'battle with Radek
Stepanek to book his place in the last eight of the French Open.
In a match which swung one way and then the other, Ferrer
prevailed in a thrilling final set to post a 4-6 6-2 1-6 6-3 6-3 victory.
Stepanek, one of only two men to beat Roger Federer on
clay in 2008, claimed the only break of the first set in game nine
to claim the early advantage, but Ferrer won four games in a row
to close out the second set and level the match.


I I


-- ~"


I -


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2008


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Highlights: Cycling Championships


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TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2008, PAGE 13


TRIBUNE SPORTS


stgd~l i ts 2nl d l Annr al Cy[cl1ng
Championships n SaturdayMay IF
24 iha itne of 50 miles
cmpltedb h lit ylss


t ...
. t .. -**<.


?:
~G I~









PAE 4,TUSDYSJNE3,208TRBUE POT


BasePToda
--------s


* By The Associated
Press

SCOREBOARD
Tuesday, June 3
TAMPA Bay at Boston
(7:05 pm EDT). The top two
teams in the AL East open a
three-game series at Fenway
Park. The Rays' Matt Garza
(4-1, 3.78 ERA) faces the
Red Sox's Justin Masterson
(1-0, 1.46).

STARS
Sunday
Gabe Gross, Rays, hit a
tying two-run triple in the
fifth inning, and then home-
red leading off the bottom of
the 10th to lift Tampa Bay to
a 4-3 victory over the Chicago
White Sox.
Pat Burrell and Chase
Utley, Phillies. Burrell had a
tiebreaking two-run double
in the seventh inning and
Utley hit his major league-
best 20th homer in a 7-5 vic-
tory over Florida.
Braden Looper, Cardi-
nals, gave up three runs in 5
2-3 innings and had two sin-
gles, scored a run and added
an RBI in a 7-4 victory over
Pittsburgh.
Johan Santana, Mets,
gave up six hits and struck
out six in 7 2-3 innings to earn
his 100th win as New York
beat the Los Angeles
Dodgers 6-1.
Ryan Braun and Rus-
sell Branyan, Brewers, each
hit two-run homers in a 10-1
victory over Houston.
Jack Cust and Mark
Ellis, Athletics, homered in a
nine-run seventh inning to
rally Oakland to a 13-8 vic-
tory over Texas.
Dan Haren and Orlando
Hudson, Diamondbacks.
Haren pitched seven sharp
innings- and Hudson hit a
three-run homer in a 5-0 vic-
tory over Washington.
Fred Lewis, Giants, hit a
tying two-run triple in the
10th inning and scored the
winning run on an infield sin-
gle to rally San Francisco to a
4-3 win over San Diego.

ANOTHER FINAL. ,
SAT-BAT WIN:

Kendrick was hit by a pitch
from Blue Jays closer B.J.
Ryan with the bases loaded
in the ninth inning to force
home the tying run, and
Maicer Izturis singled in the
game-winner one pitch later
to lift Los Angeles to a 4-3
win on Sunday. All four of
the Angels' victories in their
six-game homestand were
walk-off wins.

STREAKS
HOUSTON'S 10-1 loss to
Milwaukee on Sunday was
the Astros' season-high fifth
straight. The Cubs beat the
reeling Rockies 5-3 on to
complete a perfect seven-
game homestand and send
Colorado to its seventh
straight loss.
Kansas City's 6-1 victory
over Cleveland on Sunday its'
second straight victory after a
12-game skid.
Texas' Michael Young sin-
gled in the first inning of a
13-8 loss to Oakland, extend-
ing his hitting streak to 17
games. Rangers teammate
lan Kinsler stretched his
career-best hitting streak to
16 games with a sixth-inning
single.

SCARY
MINNESOTA pitcher
Nick Blackburn escaped with
just a bruised nose and upper
lip after getting hit in the face
by a line drive off the bat of
the Yankees' Bobby Abreu
in the fifth inning of the
Twins' 5-1 win Sunday.
Blackburn fltmng his arms out
and flopped on the turf in
front of the mound, but
quickly rose to his feet and
walked off the field on his
own with a towel pressed to
his face to keep the blood
from spurting out of his nose.
The impact was lessened
because Blackburn bent
backward to try to dodge the
ball. It grazed off his glove
before hitting the right side
of his nose, which was bruised
and swollen afterward. X-rays
showed no broken bones.


BEATING SEATTLE
PLACIDO Polanco hit a
tiebreaking single and Detroit
scored four times in the ninth
inning off struggling J.J. Putz
to lift Detroit to a 7-5 win
vder Seattle on Sunday. Mag-
glio Ordonez and Miguel
Cabrera each drove in two
runs as the Tigers won for the
fifth time in six meetings with


the Mariners. Detroit has also
fared well against the Yan-
kees winning four of five
- but is 15-30 against every-
one else.

BIG PAPI AILING
RED Sox slugger David
Ortiz wasn't in the starting
lineup for the Boston Red
Sox on Sunday, and the des-
ignated hitter could only hope
his injury was a minor set-
back. Ortiz sprained his left
wrist in the ninth inning Sat-
urday night while swinging at
a pitch in Boston's 6-3 win
over Baltimore. He left for a
pinch hitter with the count
full. Ortiz had missed only
four games before Sunday.
He is batting .252 and leads
the Red Sox with 13 homers
and 4J RBIs.

COMEBACK
DELAYED
PADRES pitcher Mark
Prior will undergo season-
ending surgery on his injured
right shoulder, the latest med-
ical setback to a once-promis-
ing career. Prior, one of the
top young pitchers in the
game for the Chicago Cubs
just a few years ago, has not
pitched in the majors since
Aug. 10, 2006. He had been
trying to make a comeback
with his hometown Padres
this season, but his rehab
process was shut down at
extended spring training
about two weeks ago when
he had more soreness in the
shoulder. Prior, 27, had
surgery on the same shoulder
in April 2007 while with the
Cubs.

CALLING IT A
CAREER!
FORMER catcher Mike
Lieberthal signed a one-day
minor league contract Sun-
day and officially retired as a
member of the Phillies. The
36-year-old Lieberthal spent
13 of his 14 years in the
majors with the Phillies. He
signed with the Los Angeles
Dodgers last winter and
played.in only 38 games as a
backup to Tussell Martin, hit-
ting .234 in 17 at-bats.
SLiebeithal thiew out the cer-
emonial first pitch before the.'
Phillies' 7-5 win over the Mar-
lins at Citizens Bank Park
and received a warm ovation
from the fans. He hit .274
with 257 doubles, 150 home
runs, 610 RBIs while playing
in 1,212 career games.

STRONG STARTS
JOHAN Santana gave up
six hits and struck out six in 7
2-3 innings to earn his 100th
win as New York beat the
Los Angeles Dodgers 6-1 on
Sunday.
Arizona's Dan Haren
struck out five and limited
Washington to four hits in
seven innings of a 5-0 win.
Brian Bannister yielded
one run and five hits in 7 1-3
innings to lead Kansas City
to a 6-1 victory over Cleve-
land.
Milwaukee's Dave Bush
gave up one run and four hits
in seven innings of a 10-1 win
over Houston. A.J. Burnett
gave up two runs and three
hits in eight innings of the
Blue Jays' 4-3 loss to the Los
Angeles Angels. Tim Lince-
cum allowed one run and
four hits in seven innings of
San Francisco's 4-3, 10-inning
win over San Diego. .

HITTING NO. 501
MANNY Ramirez hit his
501st home run in Boston's
9-4 victory over Baltimore on
Sunday. One day after
becoming the 24th major lea-
guer to hit No. 500, Ramirez
drove a 1-0 pitch from Brian
Burres into the right-field
seats to put Boston up 6-3 in
the fourth inning.

STUCK AT 599
ONE day after hitting his
599th career homer, Ken
Griffey Jr. remained stuck
one shy of joining Barry
Bonds, Hank Aaron, Babe
Ruth, Willie Mays and Sam-
my Sosa in the 600 club. Grif-
fey went 2-for-3 with a double
in the Reds' 6-2 win over
Atlanta on Sunday in their
final home game before an
eight-game road trip.


SPEAKING
"IT'S all about having fun.
You have to remember this
is a game and you have to
have fun."
The Mets' Johan San-
tana, after giving up six hits
and striking out six to pick up
his 100th career victory in
New York's 6-1 win over Los
Angeles on Sunday night.


..: .' .... .

".. ':'. -- '.^' ir 'f ** '; "= : ". ,-
,. '; . *. .... .. .' .
: c: r; : ]~i'lt: '--.' "' .-.' .2


~Le~"'s; .7igps~s.


'`-fp.~~~aa6r.


4. .. -


NEW YORK Mets pitcher Johan Santana follows through on a second inning pitch against the Los Angeles Dodgers in a baseball game at
Shea Stadium in New York on Sunday. The game was Johan Santana's 100th career victory.
(AP Photo: Kathy Willens)


SAN FRANCISCO Giants' Fred Lewis swings for a two-run, game-tying triple off San Diego Padres' Trevor Hoffman during the 10th inning of a
baseball game on Sunday in San Francisco. The Giants won 4-3.
(AP Photo/Ben Margot)


TAMPA BAY Rays' Gabe Gross hits a
two-run triple off Chicago White So x
starter Mark Buehrle during the fifth
inning of a baseball game on Sunday
in St. Petersburg, Florida. Gross also
hit a walk-off homer off Chicago closer
Matt Thornton in the 1 Oth inning to beat
the White Sox 4-3.

(AP Photo: Steve Nesius)


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 14, TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2008


I


rdl
?r,
- cd*b .,


-









THETRBUNEUESDAIY, JUNE 3,2008,PAG


Stabbing

FROM page one

and is in police custody.
Although police have not
yet officially linked the inci-
dents, the attempted retalia-
tion echoes that of Khodee
Davis' murder on Whit Mon-
day.
Hours after 16-year-old
Khodee was knifed to death
on Cabbage Beach, an inno-
cent man was shot.in Step
Street, Fox Hill, in a shoot-
ing believed to have been
aimed at Khodee's killer.
Carlos Reid, president of
Youth Against.Violence, said
the murder of every young
person perpetuates another
in a growing gang culture.
He said: "Every young
man that gets killed in this
country is connected to some-
body and every young man
has brothers, cousins, and
gang members, so the more
who get killed the more the
Bahamas becomes a blood-
bath."
Mr Reid, a former gang
member who helps young
people find positive alterna-
tives' to violence, wants to
spread his outreach work to
schools.
"The schools," he said,
"are a breeding ground for
these anti-social gangs
because that is where young
people from different areas
are brought together and
clash. It's a war zone."
Education Minister Carl
Bethel said programmes are
being developed with leading
psychologist Dr David Allen,
but he believes the problem
does not belong solely to the
Schools.
"The society is what fos-
ters these gangs and they are
manifested at school," he
said.
"We are trying to deal with
the consequences of the soci-
ety, the community breeds
these activities and we are
d4ling with the symptoms.
"Every social institution
has a role to play, but it is
unfair to place the sole
responsibility on the school."
Joel's mother, Cleance
Pierre, has described her son
as a quiet, polite and well[
behaved boy who attended
School and church. She said
no one complained about his
behaviour.
A juvenile has been arrest-
ed in connection with the
murder.

'Ninety'
FROM page one

attorney and took into
consideration the time
Knowles has already spent
behind bars.
Knowles is expected to ulti-
mately serve only 25 years in
jail and is scheduled to be
released at the age of 75.
Upon his release, Knowles
has 72 hours to report to a pro-
bation office for the com-
mencement of a five-year
supervised release.
Knowles' first trial in Florida
was declared a mistrial earlier
this year. The retrial, however,
which came to a close on
March 5, resulted in a.guilty
verdict.
The 12 person jury found
Knowles guilty of conspiracy
to import and conspiracy to
possess with intent to distrib-
ute five kilogrammes or more
of cocaine.
At the trial, the US estab-
lished that Knowles who was
blacklisted by the Bush admin-
istration was the leader of a
multi-national drug trafficking
organisation.


Victim's family calls


for automatic hanging


FROM page one
law" once more.
"There is no fear of the
because the law has no teeth,'
Mr Curry, surrounded by Kho
other family members, includii
aunt, Genevieve Dill, grandma
Thelma Dill, and brother, E
Barr.
While advocating program
teach people to restrain themsel
"tense and volatile situations'
the upgrading of policing techni
Mr Curry said all of these effort
be ineffective if people do no'
breaking the law.
Therefore Mr Curry said the
ly's hope is that through the
hanging march they can "bring (
position clearly to the law-mak
this country to remove all o
impediments that have been th
in the way to prevent murd

FROM page one

driver, involved an altercation
between police officers and a
Mr Simeus.
His daughter Guyanne


being hanged."
A convicted murderer can still be
hanged in the Bahamas. However,
since a March 2006 ruling by the
Privy Council in London a murder
verdict does not result in automatic
hanging. The Privy Council has ruled
that automatic hanging is unconsti-
tutional.
A convicted person must now go
through a separate sentencing hearing
in which a judge will decide, based
on the details of the case, whether
he or she should face the ultimate
penalty of death.
Legal commentators note that calls
for government to change this situa-
tion are misguided, as it is not possi-
ble for government to interfere with
a ruling by the Privy C6uncil, con-
sidered the "appeal court of last
resort" for most former British
colonies.
At present, were any individual to


Murder victim
Simeus approached the officers
and reprimanded them for the
way they spoke to her father.


be sentenced to automatic death for
murder in the Bahamas, their lawyer
would simply appeal the sentence on
the basis of the Privy Council ruling,
and it would most likely be quashed.
However, Khodee's family said that
they do not wish for the Bahamas to
be "held hostage" by criminals and
lawyers or by "so-called liberal politi-
cians and judges."
"We charge that too many Bahami-
ans," said Mr Curry, "have conspired
to subvert the law when it comes to
perpetrators of violent crimes and
have thus created mayhem and vio-
lent confusion in our communities."
They said that the Privy Council
ruling is yet another example of the
"championing of the so-called rights
of criminals" over victims.
"We are calling on members of the
public, students, classmates of
Khodee, his neighbours, friends, the
families of other murder victims, wit-


She claimed she was hit with
the butt of a gun.
Then her brother, Wilson
Simeus, made an attempt to get
closer to his sister and was shot
in the face as he held his two-
year-old son in his arms.


Sixty workers





are tested





in TB scare


FROM page one TB surveillance team in Nassau is keen to
"jump on" any new case in the Bahamas.
instances where they are required to clean "We do the necessary surveillance to make
up potentially hazardous and unsanitary sure it doesn't increase in the Bahamas," he
waste, such as used condoms, discarded san- said.
itary napkins and human faeces, have been "Once we detect any TB case our surveil-
cause for staff to speak out since July, 2007. lance team automatically goes out and screens
"It's unsanitary. It's every word you could those who may have been in contact with
use that's in opposition to hygienic," said the him at Environmental Health and all those
anonymous office worker yesterday, describ- who he lives with, who are in the same yard,
ing his office. and then they manage them appropriately,"
Last week it was announced in the Budget he said.
presentation that the Department will receive The Department's results are expected to
a large capital allocation in the new fiscal be back on Wednesday. Persons who are
year, which was presented last week. At $6 found to have been exposed are not neces-
million, the Department will get more money sarily in imminent danger to others, as their
than the police or the Defence Force. own immune systems may be suppressing the
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said the infection, but Dr Minnis said that out of pre-
allocations indicated government's contin- caution all those found to have been exposed
ued commitment to modernising and expand- will be given the necessary medical treat-
ing the nation's infrastructure. ment, usually a course of medication, to rec-
However, Dr Minnis dismissed the sugges- tify the problem.
tion that working conditions may have con- TB can be transmitted from person to per-
tributed to the likelihood of staff members son when the germs are released into the air
contracting TB. through sneezing, coughing and/or talking.
The minister also said there was no reason Symptoms of infection include a prolonged
for persons in the area, which would include cough, fever, night sweats and weight loss.
a large number of tourists as well as down- According to the MayoClinic.com factors
town shoppers and employees, to fear having which increase persons' risk of contracting
contracted the disease unless they had "pro- the disease include doing work which expos-
longed exposure" to the infected man, equiv- es you to people who are ill, working in a
alent to spending many hours at a time in his prison, immigration centre or nursing home
company. (because the risk of catching the disease is
Noting that TB is on the increase worldwide higher where there is poor ventilation and
following a period when it was considered to overcrowding), being malnourished or suf-
have been virtually eradicated, with an aver- fering from lowered immunity, which is a
age 22,000 new cases a year in the US and side-effect of other infections such as
eight million globally, Dr Minnis said that the HIV/AIDS or diabetes.


FROM page one

both systems and you see how
the administration of justice is
carried out, it is an indication of
how one (country) respects the
constitution. Reasonable time in
this country is out of whack,"
said Mr Moss.
He told The Tribune that the
reality is the constitution pro-
vides that a person must come
before a fair and balanced tri-
bunal in a reasonable amount of
time and accused "those who sit
in authority" of not ensuring
there are sufficidt funds for the
judiciary and for the adminis-
tration of justice.
In that vein he highlighted the
need for a single judicial com-
plex, which he said should be
wired to allow persons to have
access to information in real
time.
He said the prime minister's
budget communication which
revealed plans, to improve the
state of the judiciary is a "step in
the right direction" to ensure
thesp improvements are actu-
alised '" .. '' "'"'
"Bishop Hall did not have to
go all the way to (Samuel) 'Nine-
ty' Knowles to see what swift
justice is, he just needs to stay
right and to see that Anna
Nicole Smith's son who was the
victim of an untimely death
clearly got their matters on and
adjudicated in a timely fashion
over and above persons whose
loved ones have been on the
waiting list for years.
"It's a kind of 'curry favour'
that you see in the system --and
it's unfortunate I believe


nesses in murder cases who are afraid
of retaliation by murderers on bail,
and all those who believe that mur-
derers should be hanged, to join us in
this march," said Mr Curry.
The march is planned to be "the
longest in the history of social and
political action in the Bahamas." It
will begin at Fox Hill Parade at nine
in the morning on Friday, and will
proceed along Bernard Road and
Wulff Road to the College of the
Bahamas, before returning to Fox
Hill along the same route.
His family said that they will be on
Nassau Street today to see the two
accused of Kodee's death enter court
number 11.
Khodee, the son of prominent Fox
Hill businessman Dereck Davis and
Sonia Dill, was killed on May 12 near
Cabbage Beach on Paradise Island.
He died as the result of a stab wound
to the chest.


Attorney
though it can be turned around
by someone who is very serious
and committed to giving their
all to make it happen," Mr Moss
said.
However, he said he felt that
this problem will not be solved
until a new generation of per-
sons emerge who really under-
stand the Bahamas cannot be a
true member of the internation-
al community until it eliminates
instances where "justice delayed
has become justice denied."
"There needs to be a com-
plete review of the judicial sys-
tem and no-one seems to want
to do it and so I believe that it's
going to take a new generation,
it's unfortunate but that's how I
see it. Unfortunately, we have
people that will say look we
don't have sufficient money to
do the things we want to do -
well that's not good enough -
you have to find the ways to
raise the money through taxa-
tion," Mr Moss saiid. '
The attorney said that many
times matters are allowed to be
adjourned which adds to the
delay.
"If you have your case and
your case is not ready, you
should deal with it. If you are
defending a matter and you're
not ready and you have notice
that the matter is going on, you
should lose it. It really should
be that kind of no-nonsense
approach so that all concerned
would come to the table with a
kind of professionalism that the
system (needs);" Mr Moss said.


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TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2008, PAGE 15


- -- i


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 16, TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


- ERAT hALNW


* SEOUL, South Korea

THE South Korean govern-
ment said Monday it was delay-
ing the planned resumption of
U.S. beef imports, after a request
from the ruling party and large
weekend street protests, accord-
ing to Associated Press.
Agriculture Ministry
spokesman Kim Hyun-soo said
the ministry had decided to put
off the final administrative step
needed to clear the way for
imports to begin.
He offered no details, includ-
ing how long the delay would
last.
The ministry had earlier
requested that new quarantine
rules announced last week be
officially published Tuesday in
a government journal, which
would allow for inspections of
U.S. beef. shipments to com-
mence.
President Lee Myung-bak's
Grand National Party, howev-
er, requested Monday that the
ministry hold off, according to
party spokeswoman Cho Yoon-
sun.
The delay comes after tens of
thousands'of South Koreans
took to the streets over the
weekend to protest the govern-
ment's decision to implement an
April beef import agreement
with the United States.
U.S beef has been banned by
South Korea for most of the past
four and a half \ears over fears
of madptvw disease.
A total of almost 60,000 peo-
ple rallied in downtown Seoul
over the weekend to denounce
the goN ernment and call for the
agreement to be scrapped.
Police clashed with protesters
and detained about 300 of
them. though some were
released
Early Sunda) morning police
fired watercannons at crowds.
Protests Monday night were
much smaller, with police esti-
mating about 1,500 people gath-
ered in central Seoul amid heavy
rain:
: Lee told GNP Chairman
Kang Jae-sup earlier Monday
that he would take steps to
resolve conce ms ate r listening to
opinion on[ the issue, according
to presidential spokesman Lee
Dong-kwan.
Repeated calls to the
spokesman seeking comment on
the reason for the delay went
unanswered late Monday.


Myanmar reopens schools





one month after cyclone


i THUWANA, Myanmar

MYANMAR'S military gov-
ernment reopened many of the
country's schools Monday, allow-
ing some children to return to
buildings badly damaged in last
month's cyclone and raising con-
cerns about their safety, accord-
ing to Associated Press..
The junta continued to cope
with rebuilding after Cyclone
Nargis killed 78,000 people and
left another 56,000 a month ago,
with soaring prices and limited
supplies for materials to rebuild
homes, schools and other build-
ings.
UNICEF said more than 4,000
schools serving 1.1 million chil-
dren were damaged or destroyed
and more than 100 teachers were
killed. The government planned
to train volunteer teachers and
hold some classes in camps and
other temporary sites.
Teachers, parents and inter-
national aid groups were con-,
cerned about the safety risks to
students.
"Sending (children) to what
can be unsafe buildings with ill-
trained and ill-equipped teach-
er' can actually set them back
rather than leading them on a
road to speedy recovery," said
Gary Walker, a spokesman for
the U.K. charity Plan.
Khin Yir, a teacher from the
northern Yangon suburb of
Hlaing Tha Yar, said it was a
"bad choice" to reopen so soon.
Nargis' 120 mph winds ripped
the roofs off two of the three
buildings at her junior high and
rain flooded the interior.
The regime in Myanmiiar, also
known as Burma, has been criti-
cized for its storm response, with
U.S. Defense Secretary Robert
Gates saying the government
had' acted with "criminal
neglect."
Foreign aid workers say the
junta is still slo* on allow ing.
quick and full access to survivors
of the disaster.
"Access remains problematic
both for logistic staff inside Bur-
ma to the delta and for staff try-
ing to get in from.the outside,'.'
said Lionel Rosenblatt,president


SCHOOLCHILDREN LEAVE their school with cyclone damaged roof, windows and walls in the village of Thuwana, 26 kilometers (16 miles) south
of Yangon, Myanmar, Monday, June 2, 2008. Schools reopened Monday with many in and around Yangon still bearing the scares and damage of
the May 2-3 Cyclone Nargis that left more than 130,000 people dead or missing.


emeritus of the U.S.-based
Refugees International.
Myanmar Deputy Defense
Minister Maj. Gen. Aye Myint
said at a conference in Singapore
that the government moved
quickly to rescue and provide
relief to the estimated 2.4 mil-
lion survivors.
The government delayed the
June 2 start of the new term for
several schools in the harder-hit
Irrawaddy delta, where entire
villages were wiped off the map.
But around Yangon, the nation's
biggest city, most schools wel-
comed students.


The teachers did not get any
new supplies and were using
books they were able to hand
dry after the storm, Khin Yir
said, asking that her school not
be named for fear of government
reprisals against her for talking
to a reporter.
Khin Yir feared for her stu-
dents' safety and was concerned
about how to help them cope
with trauma, she said.
At Primary School No. 20 in
the northeastern Yangon suburb
of Dagon, the words "Safety
First" were printed on white
paper and posted on the walls of
the school.
The school opened Monday,
but some parents said they could
not afford school uniforms or
books.

Fees

Most public schools in and
around Yangon charge about $7
in fees for the academic year, the
equivalent of almost a week's
work for laborers in this impov-
erished country.
"Sending my daughter to
school is a burden to me," said
Khin Myo, as she dropped her
6-year-old off. She said the storm
damaged the family's home and
destroyed the small shop where
she sold onions and chilies.
"I still haven't been able to


put my life back together," she
said.
Anupama Rao Singh, UNICE-
F's regional director, said
reopening schools in the delta
"may be too ambitious," since
construction materials were still
on the way and there was not
enough time to rebuild schools
and train new teachers.
Meanwhile, demand and
prices have soared for the mate-
rial needed to rebuild homes.
Many survivors say they have
been forced to pick through the
storm debris for supplies.
In Hlaingthayar Township,
fisherman Ko Niang has man-
aged to patch together a rickety
lean-to from scavenged bamboo
bits and soggy palm fronds. He
said he tried to borrow money
from friends and family to build
a new shack.
"There was no one to borrow
it from. Everyone is in need," he
said.
The Irrawaddy delta region
was the center of production for
Nipa palm, whose feathery
leaves are woven into a low-cost
thatch widely used for walls and
roofing. The storm destroyed
many of the palm plantations
and prices have since tripled.
At least 35,000 homes were
destroyed, according to an ini-
tial estimate by the Internation-
al Federation of Red Cross and


Red Crescent Societies, or IFRC.
Thousands of other buildings will
also have to be rebuilt, UNICEF
has said.
Ma Myoe We, the owner of a.
construction material shop in
Yangon, said a sheaf of 100 palm
sheets, which used to sell for
about $6.50 now goes for $17.50.
But she said she has run out of
stock and has no idea when more
will be delivered.
The price of sturdy bamboo
poles, onto which the thatch is
anchored, has nearly doubled
from 70 cents per pole $1.20.

Materials

Ramesh Shrestha, who repre-
sents UNICEF in Myanmar, con-
firmed prices in the country have
risen since the cyclone not
only for construction materials,
but also for food, petrol and oth-
er essentials.
With bridges smashed and
roads impassable, supplies can't
get to market, said IFRC staffer
Eelko Brouwer, who heads a
group of international organiza-
tions and aid groups working to
shelter storm victims.
Brouwer said that if thatch
prices remain high, aid groups
will consider importing palm
from neighboring Bangladesh or
Thailand in a bid to drive the
cost down.


A YOUNG school boy walks outside a classroom in a school with cyclone damaged roof, windows and walls
in the village of Thuwana, 26 kilometers (16 miles) south of Yangon, Myanmar, Monday, June 2, 2008.












THE TRIBUNE



/ n -''
.. i ^''S 1^ r


InleSs
WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008
WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008


Corporation 'exhausted'




ability to pay $5.6m bill


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
T he Water & Sewerage
Corporation has
"exhausted their [gov-
ernment] subsidy" for the
current 2007-2008 finan-
cial year, the chief executive of its
major water supplier said yesterday,
blaming its cash-strapped position as
the reason his firm is owed $5.6 million
in accounts receivables.
Asked by Wall Street analysts to
explain why that position had accu-
mulated on Consolidated Water's
books at March 31, 2008, Rick McTag-
gart, the BISX-listed company's chief
executive, replied: "The Corporation
there in the Bahamas is subsidized by
the Government, and the Budget goes
from June to June.
"It's our understanding that they've
[the Corporation] exhausted their sub-
sidy for this fiscal year, and we've been
working with them to ensure they get
up to date on payments when the new
government budget is due next
month."


* But minister questions figure, saying W & S Corporation

will meet 'all obligations' and has not run out of money

* Says it has 'lived up to' payment plan with Consolidated

Water and 'made strides' in reducing accounts receivables


SWhen contacted by The Tribune
yesterday, Phenton Neymour, minister
of state for public utilities, disputed
the figure given by Mr McTaggart.
He said the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration's chief financial officer had
informed him "that as of the end of
March, the outstanding invoices to
Consolidated were approximately $3
million".
Expressing concern that Consoli-
dated Water, which supplies the Water
& Sewerage Corporation with.water
from its Blue Hills and Windsor
reverse osmosis plants, was revealing
information on the Corporation's
financial position (something it is oblig-
ed to do to comply with Securities &
Exchange Commission requirements),


Mr Neymour acknowledged that it had
a number of outstanding accounts.
"The Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion is a corporation that has strug-
gled financially for a number of years,
and is still facing increasing challenges
throughout the Bahamas," Mr Ney-
mour told The Tribune.
"However, we have an agreement
with Consolidated Water in terms of
payments and reducing our outstand-
ing payments, which we have lived up
to.
"We have made strides in reducing
the outstanding fees this year. We
intend to meet out obligations to Con-
solidated Water, and the Water &
Sewerage Corporation has been mak-
ing payments to them since March 31.


"The Government is right now
preparing an Action Plan for the
Water & Sewerage Corporation, which
we shall address in short order."
Mr Neymour added that the $100
million bond issue proposed under the
former Christie administration, the
proceeds of which would have financed
upgrades to, and the built out of,
Water & Sewerage, Corporation infra-
structure, was "not a priority for the
Government at this particular time".
In its 10-Q filing with the SEC in
the US, Consolidated Water said of
the situation: "Included in our consol-
idated balance sheet as of March 31,

SEE page 6B


Cruise line

could give

$22m boost

* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
THE Government is
expected to receive almost $8
million between July 2008
and December 2009 in cruise
passenger head tax through
the arrival of the Norwegian
Sky's weekly calls, starting
later this summer. Bay Street
merchants could experience a
$22 million spending injec-
tion from tourists brought in
by all the cruise line's vessels
Tourism Minister Neko
Grant announced that Nor-
wegian Cruise Lines (NCL)
will reflag, and rename, the
former Pride of Aloha and
launch the ship as the Norwe-
gian Sky, offering three and
four- day cruises to the
Bahamas from Miami start-;:.
ing on Friday, July 18. I
NCL is also expected to

See CRUISE, 5B


Bahamas 'runs the risk' Cable Bahamas makes products 'more affordable'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A FORMER
government
minister yester-
day said trie '
likely failure to
place the
amended Secu-
rities Industry.
Act on the Par-
liamentary leg-
islative agenda
before year-end left the
Bahamas "running the risk of
falling short of international
best practices" in the key cap-
ital markets business.
James Smith, former minis-
ter of state for finance in the
Christie administration,
described the delays in bring-
ing the revised Act forward as
"unfortunate", given that the
Bahamas needed "much
strengthened" securities legis-
lation to grow its capital mar-
kets.
Mr Smith, now CFAL's
chairman, told The Tribune
that the revised Securities
Industry Act upon which
work was begun when he was
in office was part of a bigger
picture, in that it was linked to
regulatory consolidation and
other economic and monetary
reforms the Government was
eyeing.
"It would clarify the grey
areas in terms of what the
Commission could or could not
do," Mr Smith said, "and how
far it could go in terms of infor-


mation exchange with other
regulators.
"At the same time, it would
have strengthened the plat-
form BISX [the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange] has to operate on
as it takes on a more futuristic
role. It would also further the
aim of relaxation of exchange
controls.
"It [the Act] is part of a larg-
er picture. We need a much
strengthened securities legis-
lation in place in order to pro-
tect capital markets in the
Bahamas. It's a pity it will not
make the legislative agenda
[this year]."'
A press release issued yes-
terday by the Securities Com-
mission, the capital markets
regulator, confirmed Tribune
Business's exclusive story of
Tuesday, May 13, stating that
the regulations accompanying
the revised Securities Industry
Act would be released to the
private sector in the 2008
fourth quarter.
Mr Smith yesterday
acknowledged to The Tribune
that the Government and cap-
ital markets regulators had not
moved fast enough bringing
the Securities Industry Act
reforms forward, saying the
legislation had "sort of been
dragging along".
"It's been falling too far
behind," Mr Smith said. "It
really has to come-up to speed


See ACT, 5B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
CABLE Bahamas has
moved to make its products
"more affordable to a wider
cross-section of consumers",
through leasing deals for its
digital set-top and video
recorder-boxes, as it eagerly
awaits growth opportunities
that may be produced from the
Bahamas Thlecommunications
Company's (BTC) privatisa-
tion.
Barry Williams, Cable
Bahamas' vice-president of
finance, said that while the
BISX-listed company's leasing
programme had "started slow-
ly", the roll-out of its promo-
tional and marketing campaign
via radio and TV advertise-
ments was helping it to "take
off now".
The leasing programme is


* Company eagerly awaits opportunities
that may follow BTC privatization
But comes out on losing end of
US interest rate swap agreement

likely to be greeted warmly by Williams said Cable Bahamas
Bahamnian consumers, espe- was leasing the first box to sub-
cially residential onfs, whose scribers at the rate of $5 per
disposable incomes and house- month. Depending on how
hold budgets are likely com- many boxes *subscribers
ing under increasing strain applied for, Cable Bahamas
from rising electricity, gas and would lease a second for $3
food costs. per month, and the third for
Mr Williams said the leasing $2 per month.
programme, started by Cable "What we've basically done
Bahamas at the end of March is to make it more affordable
2008, was designed to make to a wider cross-section of con-
the digital set-top boxes need- sumers," Mr Williams added,
ed to access its Ocean's Digital "One of our goals is to make
TV service more accessible to sure a large cross-section of
consumers.
Such boxes would cost $150 SeCABL
to purchase outright, but Mr See CABLE, 3B


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PAGE W E


For many, wages are a real


EARLIER this month, as
the debate about the implica-
tions of rising oil and food
costs was making the rounds
on the various 'radio talk
shows', several callers raised
the issue of whether the
government would consider
raising the minimum wage.
Since July 1, 2000, the min-
imum wage for government
employees in the Bahamas
has been established at $4.45
per hour or about $175 per


week. If my memory serves
me correctly, I believe that
the actual legislated rate is $4
per hour or some $160 per
week.
When asked whether the
Government was considering
raising the minimum wage in
light of escalating prices, the
minister of state for finance,
Zhivargo Laing, was quoted
as indicating the negative.
Over the years, I have
found that very few persons


9


The Anglican Central Education Authority invites
applications from qualified Teachers for positions
available at St. John's College, St. Anne's School
and Bishop Michael Eldon School in Freeport and
St. Andrew's in Exuma.

NURSERY TEACHERS

Only qualified Teachers, with Bachelor or Master
Degrees from an accredited University or
College and Teaching Certificate need apply.

For further details and applications, from, please
contact the Anglican Central Education Authority on
Sands Road at telephone (242) 322-3015/6/7.

Letters of application and/or completed
application forms with copies of required
documents must be sent by Friday,,May 30th, 2008 to
the Anglican Education Department addressed to:-

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
P.O.Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas


actually take time to under-
stand the issues involved in
establishing and maintaining
a minimum wage policy. The
arguments in favour of a min-
imum wage seem just as
strong as those against it.
Informative
Several years ago, I discov-
ered a March 13, 2007, article
by Lisa Smith, entitled
Exploring the Minimum
Wage, posted on
www.investopedia.com. This
provided an excellent and
extremely well written, easy
to read, discussion, which I
regard as a 'must read' on the
topic and reprint below:
"The International Labour
Office in Geneva, Switzer-
land, reports that some 90
per cent of countries around
the world have legislation
supporting a minimum wage.
The minimum wage in coun-
tries that rank within the low-
est 20 per cent of the pay
scale is less than $2 per day,
or about $57 per month. The
minimum wage in the coun-
tries that represent the high-
est 20 per cent of the pay
scale is about $40 per day, or
about $1,185 per month.
Despite paying one of the
highest minimum wages in
the world, the minimum wage
is a perpetual hot potato
among politicians in the US.
The last time the minimum
wage was federally increased
in the US was 1997. Propo-
nents of an increase argue
that the cost of living has
risen more than 25 per cent
since then. Since the mini-
mum wage is not indexed to
inflation, it does not system-
atically increase in propor-
tion to changes in the costs of
living.
Arguments in Favour
Those in favour of increas-
ing the minimum wage argue
that such an increase lifts
people out of poverty, helps
low-income families make
ends meet and narrows the
gap between the rich and
poor. That last argument is


Fi


IZ


underscored by t
tant salaries earn
executives and o
rate titans, who a
same people gen
ing against an inc
minimum wage.
an increase also 1
populist appeal,
in a nation where
about social class
are held at all a
always framed in
rich versus the pc
Arguments Ag
On the other si
discussion is the
that increasing tl
wage hurts small
squeezes profit n
leads to inflation
employers to dov
staff and increase
goods to the end
Interestingly, the
against an increa
focus on the fact
portion of states
mandate a wage
than the federal
wage.

By The Numbi
Economically
theory of supply
suggests that the
of an artificial va
wages, which is h
the value that wo
tated in a free-mi
creates an ineffic
and leads to unei
The inefficiency
when there are a
number of work
the higher paying
there are employ
to pay the higher
ics disagree.
What is genera
upon by all part
number of indivi
on the minimum
US is less than 5


However, this statistic is
financial largely ignored in favor of
citations regarding the num-
FOCUS ber of people that live in
poverty. Keep in mind.that
learning more than the mini-
mum wage does not necessar-
ily mean that one is not living
he exorbi- in poverty. According to esti-
ied by chief mates from the CIA World
their corpo- Fact Book, some 13 per cent
ire also the of the US population lives in
erally argu- poverty that is 37 million
crease in the people.
The idea of To put this in perspective,
has a strong the federal poverty level for a
particularly working adult was $9,800 in
e discussions 2006, according to the US
s when they Department of Health and
re nearly Human Services. At $5.25
i terms of the per hour, a minimum wage
oor. workers earns $10,920 per
year, which is already greater
against than the federally determined
ide of the poverty level.
argument
he minimum Pay
businesses,
margins, If the worker's pay jumps
, encourages to $7.25, yearly earnings
wnsize their would move to $15,080 per
es the cost of year for a 40-hour week.
consumer. From a mathematical and
arguments logical perspective, increasing
se rarely the minimum wage does not
that a good lift anyone out of poverty
already because the prior minimum
that is higher wage already paid more than
minimum the official poverty rate.
The numbers would seem
to put the minimum wage
argument to rest, but only
ers because of the misaligned
speaking, the focus on the phrase 'mini-
and demand mum wage'. When referring
imposition to that phrase, many people
lue on .actually seem to be seeking a
higher than living wage, which is general-
uld be dic- ly defined as the aoiiount
market system, required to raise a family on
:ient market a single wage-earner's salary.
employment. Pegging that number to the
:y occurs poverty rate for a family of
greater four moves the bar to $20,000
ers that want per year. Looking at the
Sjobs than argument from this perspec-
'ers willing tive, neither the current mini-
* wages. Crit- mum wage nor the proposed
increased wage will provide a
ally agreed living wage. Even if an
es is that the increase would move the
duals relying salary of every worker in the
wage in the country to this level, it would
per cent. make little difference in the


issue


statistical comparison
between the earnings of the
average worker to those of
the highest-paid chief execu-
tives.
No Easy Answers
What is the solution to the
minimum wage/living wage
issue? Statistics can be gath-
ered to support both sides of
the argument. While there
are no easy answers, a good
first step is to frame the
debate in realistic terms.
Referring to the minimum
wage as a wage designed to
support a family confuses the
issue. Families need a living.
wage, not a minimum wage.
With that said, working at
McDonalds or the local gas
station isn't a career. These
are jobs designed to help
entry-level workers join the
workforce, not to support the
(long-term) financial needs of
a family.
On the core issue of mini-
mum wage itself, political
wrangling is unlikely to result
in a real solution. A more
practical solution is to join
the workforce at the low-end
of the wage scale, build your
skills, get an education and
move up the ladder to a bet-
ter-paying job, just as mem-
bers of the workforce have
done for generations."
Until next week...
NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president pensions,
Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insur-
ance Company in the
Bahamas.
The views expressed are
those of the author and do
not necessarily represent
those of Colonial Group
International or any of its
subsidiary and/or affiliated
companies. Please direct any
questions, or comments to
rlgibson@atlantichouse.com.
bs


During the
6 2 i month of May!




242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com HJi
Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-6501 ilf|
F I N A N C I A L



Financial Solutons for Life!

MORTGAGES MUTUAL FUiDS.- LiFE ISlURANCE HEALTH INSURANCE
ANIUtTIES & PENSION PLARS FINANCIAL PLAlEGIS & INVESTIMETS


Public Utilitis Commission


JOB OPPORTUNITY


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR


The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) has been established by statute
for the regulation of the telecommunications, electricity and water and
sewerage sectors in The Bahamas.

The PUC is seeking a utility regulatory professional with training and
experience, particularly in the field of telecommunications regulation, to
fill the position of Executive Director.

The Executive Director is the Chief Executive Officer of the Commission
reporting to the Chairman, and is responsible for the day-to-day
administration of the affairs of the Commission and for ensuring that the
Commission is provided with high quality technical advice and guidance
in the execution of its functions.

The successful candidate will be required to provide leadership and
management direction to the PUC. The candidate will also be a high-
level practitioner with direct experience in a wide variety of utility
regulatory activities including liberalization(especially with respect to
telecommunications) granting of licences, approval of rates, service quality,
licence enforcement measures, universal service policies, radio spectrum
management, and international best practices. This post will be offered
on a contract basis.

The successful applicant will have a Master's Degree or Professional
Certification in Economics, Management, Law or Engineering and is
expected to have had ten (10) years practice as a trained regulator.

The PUC offers a very attractive remuneration and benefits package
together with a pleasant working environment. Further information about
the PUC can be obtained from the website: www.PUCBahamas.gov.bs

Interested applicants may deliver resumes to:

Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission
4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue
Fax No. (242) 323-7288
E-mail: PUC' a pucbahanias.gov.bs

Applications should be received by 16 May, 2008. Only applicants who
have been short-listed will be contacted.


I


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008


THE TRIBUNE














Tourism plans its Disaster Response


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

TOURISM and disaster
management officials yester-
day met to discuss strategic
plans to help the industry
recover in the aftermath of a
natural disaster.
The national workshop
held yesterday is a compo-
* nent of the Regional Disaster
Risk Management for Sus-
tainable Tourism in the1
Caribbean project.
The $1 million initiative is
largely sponsored by the
Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank, which donated
$800,000. It is a three-year
project involving the


CABLE, from 1B

our customer base can afford
our products."
Cable Bahamas has also
applied the leasing programme
to Digital Video Recorders
(DVRs), an expensive piece of
equipment that Mr Williams
said would cost around $800
to purchase.
DVRs allow consumers to
record their favourite pro-
grammes, and come in both
Standard and High Definitions.
The former can be leased at a
rate of $12.96 per month, the
latter for $29 per month.


Caribbean Disaster Emer-
gency Response Agency, in
collaboration with the
Caribbean Tourism Organi-
sation.
The purpose of the project
is to develop standardised
methods for hazard mapping
and risk vulnerability assess-
ments in' the region, which
will aid the regional approach
to disaster risk prevention
and response.
Geneva Cooper, senior
director of the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation, said
that being one of the pilot
countries in the project
places the Bahamas, "in a
position to involve a wide
cross-section of our own
tourism stakeholders in the
development of a framework


Meanwhile, Cable Bahamas
is eagerly awaiting new
telecommunications growth
opportunities that could be
ushered in if the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny (BTC) is privatised by year-
end 2008, something Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham has
committed to.
The company has in the past,
under its original chairman and
former largest shareholder,
Philip Keeping, made no secret
of its desire to expand beyond
its core cableTV, Internet and
data services base, having said
in a previous annual report


for understanding and
responding to potential risk
and crisis situations. These
include hotel operators, trav-
el agencies, food and service
organizations, emergency ser-
vices and local government
authorities".

Pointed

She pointed out that con-
tributing to the development
of the plan guarantees full
ownership of the end results.
Ms Cooper said the work-
shop's goal was to develop a
plan that will complement
each country's existing
national plan.
"It is crucial that we have
such comprehensive plans in
place, and persons with the


that it would pursue a cellular
licence.
Mr Williams now told The
Tribune: "The Government
and the Prime Minister have
indicated that BTC should be
privatised by year-end. We
would hope that with that
would.come more liberalisa-
tion of the rest of the telecom-
munications market, and we
would be more than willing to
be participants in that liberali-
sation.
' "We are ready and willing
to take advantage of that. We
feel the Government is one
that is certainly pro-competi-
tion and-liberalisation."
The only figure in Cable
Bahamas' 2008 first quarter
results that went in the wrong
direction was the company's
interest rate expenses, which
increased by 45.3 per cent to
$1.108 million from $607,000
the year before.
Mr Williams attributed this
to an interest rate swap agree-
ment, which had not worked
out as expected.
He explained that Cable
Bahamas did most of its bor-
rowing in US$, in addition to
having to pay US$ for all its
signals -apart from local pro-
gramming and electronics.
"Our borrowing for capital
projects is mostly in US$, so
what we did a year-and-a-half
ago was to enter into swap
agreements to mitigate interest
rate risk at the time," Mr
Williams said.
Cable Bahamas locked in its
interest rate risk exposure at
6 per cent, only for US interest


appropriate expertise and
authority to be able to imme-
diately respond should a cri-
sis arise," Ms Cooper said.
She said this was important
regardless of which govern-
ment or private sector agen-
cies persons belonged to, and
that Bahamians see them-
selves as having a direct con-
tribution to make in protect-
ing the tourism industry.
Ms Cooper said the min-
istry needs to involve more
stakeholders in workshops
and training programmes,
and give practical support in
risk management.
"We must recognize that
risk management is not only
reserved for large resorts, but
every small business must
also take active steps to


rates to go the other way and
dip below that figure as the US
Federal Reserve embarked on
a series of rate cuts to save the
economy from recession.
Accounting treatments
require Cable Bahamas to
record the accrual of any dif-
ference between the fixed rate
interest and the interest it is
actually paying until the swap
agreement ends.


M ERNST& YOUNG


ensure the continuity of their
business and, by default, pro-


tection of the industry," Ms
Cooper said.


ARAWAK

i-homes




MR. RODRICKVWOOD



is no longer employed with

Arawak Homes Ltd and is no

longer authorized to conduct

business on behalf of Arawak

Homes or any of it's affiliates.


SFVrnml YIi W I.LP
"*.,v. Y rkIn S .,, i, Iin" tr.ir


Report of Independent Auditors

Board of Directors
Mizuho Corporate Bank (USA)
New York, New York

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Mizuho Corporate
Bank (USA) (the "Bank") as of December- 31, 2007 and 2006, and the related
consolidated statements of income, stockholder's.equity and cash flows for the years then
ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Bank's management. Our
responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the
United States. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain
reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of
material misstatement. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence
supporting the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements,
assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management,
and evaluating the overall consolidated financial statement presentation. We believe that
our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, .the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in
all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Mizuho Corporate Bank
(USA) at December 31, 2007 and 2006, and the consolidated results of its operations and
its cash flows for the years then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally
accepted in the United States.

I4mt t Y tvsLLP

March 27, 2008

Mizuho Corporate Bank (USA)

Consolidated Balance Sheets


(In thousands, except share amounts)
Assets
Cash and due from banks (Note 3)
Interest-bearing deposits with banks
Federal funds sold
Securities (Note 4)
Available-for-sale
Held-to-maturity
Loans and leases (Notes 5 and 21)
Allowance for credit losses (Note 6)
Net loans and leases
Accrued interest receivable and other assets
Total assets
Liabilities
Noninterest-bearing deposits
Interest-bearing deposits (Note 9)
Total deposits
Federal funds purchased
Other borrowings (Note 10)
Accrued taxes, interest payable and other liabilities
Total liabilities
Stockholder's equity (Note 14)
Common stock-S100 par value; (authorized, issued and outstanding
984,742 shares in 2007 and 2006)
Capital surplus
Accumulated deficit
Accumulated other comprehensive (loss)/income
Total stockholder's equity
Total liabilities and stockholder's equity


December 31
2007 2006
S 28,882 $ 86,276
100
710,000

270,260 360,250
34,017 160,712
2,502,271 2,294,164
(10,289) (12,209)
2,491,982 2,281,955
72,432 81,570
S2,897,573 53,680,863

S 101,608 S 103,238
1,348,312 1,546,571
1,449,920 1,649,809
270,000 904,000
66,129 31
91,915 125,794
1,877,964 2,679,634


98,474 98,474
1,222,036 1,222,036
(276,240) (319,286)
(24,661) 5
1,019,609 1,001,229
$2,897,573 $3,680,863


See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

Interested persons may obtain a complete copy of the-Audited
Accounts from SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited,
P. O. Box N-7788, West Bay Street, Nassau Bahamas.


Exaua Lots






6



ForSale.



or

35973160I ^ I
J^JT~jamu -i6s


I


,


WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


VlTiTT fTTTI ITiTTT'I IM '







PAGE 4B, _

ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited ,
(Incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas)

Balance Sheet
As of December 31,2007
(Expressed in United States Dollars)


ASSETS


Cash and cash equivalents
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss
Trustee fees receivable, net
Prepayments and other assets
Furniture, equipment and leasehold improvements


Notes



11
3&11
4
6
5


Total Assets


2007


104,160
652,132
282,946
67,751
254,221

1,361,210


2006
$


59,945
635,843
257,456
89,424
124,715

1,167,383


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY


Liabilities
Accrued expenses
Accounts payable
Unearned revenue


25,597
220,573
38,306


Equity
Share capital: authorized, issued and fully paid
1,000,000 shares of US $1 each
Retained earnings



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY


25,621
18,170
20,962


284,476 64,753
*


1,000,000
76,734


1,000,000
102,630


1,076,734 1,102,630

1,361,210 1,167,383


Signed as approved on behalfof The Board of Directors:


Director


April 18, 2008
Date


Director


Notes to the Balance Sheet
December 31, 2007

1. Incorporation, Business Activity and Group Structure

ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited (the "Company") is incorporated under The Companies Act,
1992, and is licensed to cany on trust business in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. The
address of its registered office is Providence House, First Floor Eastern Side, East Hill Street,
Nassau, The Bahamas. Its previous registered office was located at the British American Building,
Second Floor, George Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

The Company is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Amsterdam Trust Corporation (ATC),
Chuchubiweg 17, Curacao, Netherlands Antilles.
2. Summary of Significant Accounting Poliies

The principal accounting policies applied in preparation of this balance sheet are set out below.
These policies have been consistently applied to all years presented, unless otherwise stated.

(a) Basis of presentation

The Company's balance sheet is prepared in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards (IFRS) and under the historical cost convention as modified by the
revaluation of financial assets at fair value through profit or loss.

In the current year, the Company has adopted IFRS 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures
and the amendments to IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements, which became effective
for fiscal periods beginning on or after January 1, 2007. The impact of the adoption of
IFRS 7 and the changes to IAS 1 Has been to expand the disclosures provided in these
financial statements regarding the Company's financial instruments and management of
capital.

The remaining standards and amendments and interpretations to published standards that
became effective for fiscal periods beginning on or after January 1, 2007 were not relevant
to the Company's operations and accordingly did not impact the Company's accounting
policies or balance sheet.

The application of new standards and amendments and interpretations to existing standards
that have been published but are not yet effective are not expected to have a material impact
on-the Company's accounting policies or balance sheet in the period of initial application.

(b) Use of estimates

The preparation of a balance sheet in accordance with IFRS requires the use of certain
accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgment in the process
of applying the Company's accounting policies. Estimates and judgments are continually
evaluated and are based on historical experience and other factors including expectations of
future events that are believed to be reasonable under the, circumstances. Actual results
could differ from those estimates.

(c) Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash on hand and at bank, and short-term deposits with
contractual maturities of three months or less from the placement date.

(d) Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss

The Company has classified its investments in securities as financial assets at fair value
through profit or loss. A financial asset is classified as financial assets at fair value through
profit or loss if acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the short term or if so
designated by management. Management determines the classification of its investments at.
initial recognition.

Regular way purchases and sales of securities are recognized on trade date the date on
which the Company commits to purchase or sell the asset. Securities are initially recorded
at fair value, and transaction costs are expensed. Securities are derecognized when the rights
to receive cash flows from the investments have expired or when the Company has
transferred substantially all risks and rewards of ownership.

(e) Fdrniture, equipment and leasehold improvements

Furniture, equipment and leasehold improvements are stated at historical cost less
accumulated depreciation. Improvements, which extend the useful lives or increase the
value of these assets are capitalized. Uponretirement or other disposition, cost and
accumulated depreciation are relieved from the accounts and any resultant gain or loss is
included in the income statement. Depreciation is calculated on a straight-line basis over the
following estimated useful lives of the respective assets:


Computers
Office equipment
Furniture and fixtures
Leasehold improvements


3 years
3 years
5 years
10 years or term of lease,
whichever is shorter


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


(f) Provision for impairment of accounts receivable

A provision for impairment is established if there is objective evidence that the Company will
not be able to collect all amounts due. The provision established is equal to 80% of the
balance outstanding for more than one year and 100% of the balance outstanding for more
than two years.

(g) Investment in subsidiaries

Included in other assets is the Bank's investment in its three wholly-owned subsidiaries that
are not consolidated, Universal Administrators Limited, Universal Directors Limited and
Universal Shareholders Limited, which are all incorporated under the/International Business
Companies Act, 2000 of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. The activities of the
subsidiaries are limited to providing nominee services on behalf of the Company's customers.
The effect of not consolidating these subsidiaries is not material because each subsidiary has a
share capital of $2.

(h) Fiduciary accounts and assets under administration

The Company acts as trustee and in other fiduciary capacities that result in the holding of
assets on behalf of its customers. These assets are excluded from this balance sheet, as they
are not assets of the Company.

3. Financial Assets at Fair Value through Profit or Loss


2007
$


Money market fund
Corporate bonds
Principal protected minimum return equity linked certificate
Accrued interest on corporate bonds

Total financial assets at fair value through profit or loss


104,140
366,524
177,000
4,468


2006
$

86,082
371,403
174,000
4358


652,132 635843


During the year, the Company invested $18,058 (2006: $23,042) in the money market fund of
which $4,175 (2006: $3,209) represented the reinvestment of earnings. There were no other
investments or disposals during 2007 (2006: $Nil).

The principal protected minimum return equity linked certificate matures on January 6, 2009 at
which time the Company will receive the principal amount of $150,000 plus a distribution equal to
the greater of 9% and an amount based on the percentage change in the S&P 500 Index, subject to a
monthly appreciation cap of 4.5% .


4. Trustee Fees Receivable



Trustee fees receivable, gross
Less: provision for impairment


2006
$


318,778 322,506
(35,832) (65,050)


Total 2

The movements in the provision for ipipairment during.the year are as follow


Balance as of January 1
Provision charged for the year
Receivables written-off
Recoveries of bad debt


65,05
32,41
(66,3
4,68


vs:

07 2006
$ $

50 63,331
81 46,773
83) (48,635)


84


3,581


Balance as of December 31

5. Furniture, equipment and leasehold improvements


As of December 31, 2007
Opening net book amount
Disposals
Additions
Depreciation charge
Closing net book amount
As of December 31, 2007
Cost-
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount

As of December 31, 2006
Opening net book amount
Additions
Depreciation charge
Closing net book amount
As of December 31, 2006
Cost
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount

Disposals are in resp
account.


Furniture
&
Computers Fixtures
$ $


47,892
(7)
32,182
(7.712)


25,264
53,909
(19.211)


office Laol
Equipment Improvements
$ $
1,798 49,761
(11)
24,773 8s5,50
(7.380) (12287)


124,715
(18)
196,114
(66590)


52,355 59,962 19,191 122,713 254,221

99,191 121,950 29,219 135,000 385360
(46,836) '(61,988) (10,028) (12287) (131,139)
52,355 59,962 19,191 122713 2521

14,553 33,290 4,443 10,785 63.071
51,817 5,303 49,750 106,870
(18,478) (13,329) (2,645) (10,774) (45,226)

47,892 25264 1,798 49,761 124715

67,016 68,041 4.446 49,761 189264
(19,124) (42,777) (2,648) (64,549)
47,892 25,264 1,798 49,761 124715


)ect


of fully depreciated assets that have been relieved from the books of


6. Related Party Balances

Related parties include the parent company and its directors, affiliates and their directors and other
entities over which they exercise significant influence. This balance sheet includes the following
balances with related parties not disclosed elsewhere in the financial statements.


2007


Assets
Prepayments and other assets


16,301


160,928


Liabilities
Accounts payable


2006

594
6,594


7. Commitments

On November 16, 2006, the Company entered into a sub-lease for the lease of office space
commencing December 1, 2006. The sub-lease term is for an initial period of five (5) years and
expires on November 30, 2011, with an option to renew for a further five (5) years. Prior to
entering into the sub-lease the Company occupied office space under a lease that expired on July
31, 2006, but was extended to February 28, 2007.
The future minimum lease paymentgunder the lease are as follows:


2007


No later than 1 year
Later than 1 year and no later than 5 years


128,650
385,950


2006
$


144,088
514,601


514,600 658689

8. Capital Management

The Company's objectives when managing capital are:

To comply with the capital requirements set by the Central Bank df The Bahamas (the Central
Bank);
To safeguard the Company's ability to continue as a going concern so that it can continue to
provide returns for its shareholders and benefits for other stakeholders; and
To maintain a strong capital base to support the development of its business.

Capital adequacy and the use of regulatory capital are monitoredby the Company's management,
employing techniques designed to ensure compliance with guidelines established by the Central
Bank. The required information is filed with the Central Bank on a quarterly basis.


I I


LI







THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 5B


The Central Bank requires each entity with a public trust license to maintain a regulatory capital
of at least $1,000,000. The Company has complied with all of the externally imposed capital
requirements to which it is subject.

For capital adequacy purposes, the Company's eligible capital base comprises its issued and fully
paid ordinary shares and retained earnings.

9. Risk Management

The Company is exposed to various types of risks in the normal course of business, including
fiduciary, credit, market risk (interest rate and price risks) and liquidity risks. The Company's
financial performance is dependent on its ability to understand and effectively manage these risks.

Mduciary risk

The Company is susceptible to fiduciary risk, which is the risk that the Company may fail in
carrying out certain mandates in accordance with the wishes of its clients. To circumvent this risk,
the Company takes a very conservative approach in its undertakings. High risk instruments are not
considered attractive instrument vehicles and are not invested in unless the Company is specifically
advised to do so by its clients and covered by an indemnity agreement.

Credit risk

Credit risk arises from the failure of the counterpart to perform according to the terms of the
contract. Most of the Company's credit exposure consists of cash, investments and trustee fees
receivable. Credit risk is managed by restricting counterparties to approved, well-established, high
credit quality financial institutions.

Market risk

Market risk is the risk that there will be a change in the value of a financial instrument due to
changes in general and specific market conditions. The Company's exposure to such risks is
concentrated in its financial assets at fair value through profit or loss. Market risk is considered
minimal as the Company principally invests in money market instruments, high grade debt
securities and is guaranteed a return of capital on its principal protected minimum return equity
linked certificate.

Lonidltv risk

The objective of liquidity management is to ensure the availability of sufficient funds to honour all
of the Company's financial commitments. Management is responsible for ensuring a level of liquid
assets is maintained which could be sold immediately to meet cash requirements for normal
operating purposes.

10. Dividend

During the year, the Company declared and paid a dividend of $300,830 (2006: $300,000) to ATC,
its parent company.

1L Corresponding Figures

The corresponding figures for cash and cash equivalents and financial assets at fair value through
profit or loss have been re-presented to conform to the presentation adopted for the current year.
In particular, the Company's investment in the money market fund was previously included
within cash and cash equivalents and has now been reclassified to financial assets at fair value
through profit and loss.


PiCE W4ERHQUsEP PERS U


INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT

To the Shareholders of ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited


Prickrwst-Coopen
PiovidmcmHann

Websit ,www.pwc.com
E-mail: pwcb@bs.pwc.com
Telcpmcn (242) 302-5300
Pacimile (242) 302-5350


We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited as of
December 31, 2007 and a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory notes.

Management's Responsibilityfor the Balance Sheet

Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of this balance sheet in
accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards. This responsibility includes: designing,
implementing and maintaining internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of
financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error; selecting
and applying appropriate accounting policies; and making accounting estimates that are reasonable in
the circumstances.

Auditors' Responsibility

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet based on our audit. We conducted
our audit in accordance with International.Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we
comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance
whether the balance sheet is free from material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures
in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditors' judgment, including the
assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or
error. In making those risk assessments, the auditors consider internal control relevant to the entity's
preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that
are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the
effectiveness of the entity's internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of
accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as
well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements.

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis
for our audit opinion.

Opinion

In our opinion, the accompanying balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial
position of ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited as of December 31, 2007 for the year then ended in
accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.

Emphasis ofMatter

Without qualifying our opinion, we emphasise that the accompanying balance sheet does not
comprise a complete set of financial statements in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards. Information on results of operations, cash flows and changes in equityy is necessary to
obtain a complete understanding of the financial position, performance and changes in financial
position of ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited.


Chartered Accountants
Naau, Bahamas
April 18,2008



P ublsh your

CARD OF THANKS or

IN LOVING MEMORY

in OBITUARY SECTION

E ery Thursday]

Call us today

5 02-2352 or 502-2354


Cruise line could give $22m boost


FROM page 1B
increase calls by a number of
its other vessels, including the
Norwegian Sun and the
Majesty.
"Government head tax
projections from the Norwe-
gian Sky are expected to be
$7.9 million over the period
July 2008- December 2009.
Total head tax projections
from all NCL ships visiting
the Bahamas over the next
year-and-a-half is estimated
at $21.4 million," Mr Grant
said.
"The redeployment of the
Norwegian Sky on a dedicat-
ed Bahamas itinerary repre-
sents a significant commit-
ment by NCL to the
Bahamas, and will have a
major effect on our cruise
arrivals and positively impact
the bottom lines of those
businesses that focus on this
sector of the industry.
Mr Grant added that feed-
back from Bay Street mer-
chants indicated that NCL's


ACI


as other
He a
Baham
keep ai
tional rt
"Our
to spee
we've
weakne
risk of
internal
need m
lation i
the acti
begin tl
rities fr'
Kenw
tive at
an inve
said he
ed" thai
been m
Securi
althou
process
at all".
"It's
there to
ry regi
pointing
Act wa


passengers spent consider-
ably more than other cruise
line passengers, which will
bode well for the economy.

Gain

He said the Bahamas could
stand to gain $22 million in
passenger spend between the
period July 2008 and Decem-
ber 2009, with the Norwegian
Sky generating almost 50 per
cent of this amount. The
addition of the Norwegian
Sky brings the number of
NCL vessels calling on the
Bahamas, inclusive of the
Pearl, Dawn, Gem, Majesty
and Spirit, to six, and togeth-
er they are expected to con-
tribute a total visitor spend
by passengers of approxi-
mately $39.86 million over
the next year-and-a-half.
Mr Grant explained that
the the Norwegian Sky's itin-
erary will include Nassau and
Great Stirrup Cay twice a
week, which amounts to a
minimum projection of 96


[, from 1B greater securities trading and
market activity in and of itself,
things are happening." it was likely to provide greater
idded: "I think the protection for minority
as has to now always investor.rights.
n eye on the interna- Hillary Deveaux, the Secu-
egulatory framework. rities Commission's executive
Act was not quite up director, had told this newspa-
:d, and to the extent per that the Bahamian capital
got these apparent markets industry was not very
sses, we always run the comfortable" in reviewing the
falling short of best revised Securities Industry Act
itional practices. We without seeing the accompa-
lodern securities legis- nying regulations.
n place to encourage A major concern voiced by
vities of BISX, and to many in the Bahamian capital
he cross-listing of secu- markets was that the regula-
om other countries." tions were critically important,
Iood Kerr, chief execu- given that provisions omitted
Providence Advisors, from the first Securities Indus-
-stment advisory firm, try Act such as trading from
was also "disappoint- a broker's own account and
t more progress had not the short selling prohibition -
lade with the revised were supposed to have been
ties Industry Act, transferred to the regulations.
gh the delays to the If anything, this increased the
Were "not a surprise void caused by the regulations'
non-release and non-develop-
always a plus to have it ment.
enhance the regulato- The Securities Commission
ime," Mr Kerr said, opted to. place the main
g out that while the new requirements and real details
s unlikely to stimulate into the regulations and rules it
.. .. -. .. . ',.. .


calls per year, bringing poten-
tially some 182,400 passen-
gers. The calls to Great Stir-
rup Cay will mean year-
round employment as
opposed to being open for
the winter months alone.
A minimum of 42 calls are
expected to Grand Bahama
over the course of the year,
which should give that island
a much-needed financial
boost. Twenty-one calls will
be made to the island before
the end of 2008, an average
of one per week, delivering at
least 39,900 passengers
Colin Murphy, vice-presi-
dent of special projects for
NCL, said that with the Nor-
wegian Sky the line is going
back to its roots, as the com-
pany pioneered cruising from
Miami more than 41 years
ago.
He thanked the Bahamas
and the Government for all
of their support, and encour-
aged Bahamians to show
passengers "the very best of
the Bahamas".


can make, leaving the legisla-
tion to set out the general
obligations, so it could better
keep pace with evolving inter-
national best practices and
global standards.
Placing the main details into
the regulations is designed to
enable the Securities Commis-
sion to avoid having to seek
Parliamentary approval every
time any change however
minor is needed to the Act,
thus avoiding time-consuming
delays.
Among the main changes
heralded by the reformed
Securities Industry Act are the
registration of industry partic-
ipants by function rather than
title; provisions that ensure
compliance with securities and
capital markets principals
established by IOSCO, the
international association of
securities regulators; provisions
for information sharing;
enhancement of the Securities
Commission's regulatory and
investigative powers; simplifi-
cation of the disciplinary
process; and new disclosure
provisions.


NAD
Nassau Airport
Development Company





REQ UEST


FOR PROPOSAL .


IT CONSULTANT DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION
ADMINISTRATION SERVICES


NASSAU AIRPORT DEVELOPMENT COMPANY LPIA -
EXPANSION PROJECT

Request for proposal D-107 IT consultant- design & construction administration
services.

NAD is seeking -IT design and construction administration services from
qualified IT Consultants for the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope of work
includes:

Meeting with all stakeholders and preparing a design requirement
report;
S Preparing technical specifications and drawings for the IT component of
the Project;
S Providing administrative and inspection services during construction;
and
System commissioning and training.

Qualifications:
S Consultant should be familiar with Airport Operations Database Systems
(AODB) and the integration of security systems, FIDS / BIDS, baggage
control and monitoring, fire and alarm, access control, CCTV and
building systems monitoring;
S Good communication, reporting and tracking procedures; and
S A design quality control program.



RFP packages can be picked up between ,
May 7th 23rd, 2008 at
The Lynden Pindling International Airport
Nassau Airport Development Company,
Terminal 1, Concourse 2nd Floor,
PO Box AP-59229
Nassau, Bahamas

Contact' Ms.Coakley at 377-0209


L.-- I ------------~







PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008 THE TRIBUNE


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that DIEUNETTE PETIT-BEAU
of CARMICHEAL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of
May 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
* Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that GREGORY SMITH
of SOUTH OCEAN GOLF RESIDENCE, P.O. BOX
CB-12951, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14th day of May 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


Are you a Bahamian Artist interested in
displaying your talent in a busy
down town museum and gift store?


If so please call us at (242) 326-0511 and
become a part ofa successful business
venture



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that DIEULA PETIT-BEAU of
CARMICHEAL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of May 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE-LOURDES
MONPREVILLE of FIRE TRAIL ROAD, P.O. BOX
N-7060, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of
May 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE VIRTA ALTIME of
18621 NW 8TH RD, MIAMI FL., 33169 is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 6th day of May 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


Corporation 'exhausted'




ability to pay $5.6m bill


FROM page 1B

2008, are approximately $5.6
million in accounts receivable
due to our Bahamas subsidiary
from the Water & Sewerage
Corporation.
"This receivable balance
exceeds the amounts billed to
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration during the three months
ended March 31, 2008 by
approximately $1.3 million.
"During April 2008, we met
with representatives of the
Bahamas government to
inquire as to the reasons for
the increase in the receivable
balance. We were informed in
this meeting by the Govern-
ment representatives that the
delay in paying our accounts
receivables was due to operat-
ing issues within the Water &
Sewerage Corporation, that


the delay did not reflect any
type of dispute with us with
respect to the amounts owed,
and that the amounts would
ultimately be paid in full.
"Based upon this meeting,
we believe that the accounts
receivable from the WSC are
fully collectible and therefore
have not provided any
allowance for possible non-
payment of these receivables
as of March 31, 2008."
Elsewhere, Consolidated
Water said revenues generated
by its bulk segment into
which the two Bahamas-based
reverse osmosis plants fall -
increased by 18 per cent or just
under $1 million to $6.167 mil-
lion for the 2008 first quarter.
Revenues generated by the
Bahamian operations
increased by $657,000 year-
over-year in the three months
to March 31, 2008, but "higher


diesel and maintenance costs"
at the Windsor plant dropped
gross profit margins (or gross
profits as a percentage of sales)
from 26 per cent in 2007 to 17
per cent in 2008. Gross profits
themselves declined from
$1.339 million in 2007 to $1.028
million this time around.
Mr McTaggart admitted to
analysts that the increase in
bulk sales was "more than off-
set by higher maintenance and
operational costs at the Wind-
sor plant". The repair and
maintenance costs for the 2008
first quarter were some
$271,000 more than that
incurred during the 2007 com-
parative period.
He added that the Windsor
plant's new Bahamian man-
agement team were working
to aggressively reduce costs,
with planned improvements to
the plant having been in the
development stage for more
than nine months.
"New wells and other
improvements we are making
will resolve this problem once
and for all", Mr McTaggart
said, adding that increasing
diesel and fuel costs were
becoming a "more material
part of our operations".
Diesel prices had risen by 58
per cent over a 12-month peri-
od, but while Consolidated
Water's contract with the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion for the Windsor plant
allows it to pass these fuel
increases on to the Corpora-
tion, it could not do so during
the 2008 first quarter because
stipulated efficiency levels had
not been achieved.
"Our contract with the
Water and Sewerage Corpo-
ration for our Windsor plant
provides for the pass through


of increases in diesel costs' to
the Corporation if the plant is
operating at or better than the
efficiency specified in the con-
tract," Consolidated Water
said in its SEC filing.
"In early 2006, we reconfig-
ured the Windsor plant in
order to mitigate membrane
fouling. However, this recon-
figuration resulted in a
decrease in the fuel efficiency
of the Windsor plant and we
have not been able to pass
through all of our diesel costs
to the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration.
"This inefficiency was exac-
erbated by a 58 per cent rise in
diesel fuel prices over the past
12 months. Consequently,
$207,000 was incurred in diesel
costs during the first three
months of 2008 that could not
be billed to the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation.
"We are currently con-
structing new feed water wells
and will replace the reverse
osmosis membranes on two of
four of our production trains.
While we anticipate that these
improvements will allow us to
reverse the plant reconfigtira-
tion and improve the Windsor
plant's fuel efficiency by the
end of the third quarter of
2008, our gross profit for our
Bahamas operations in the
interim will continue to be
adversely affected by its diesel
costs.
S"The repairs and mainte-
nance costs for our Bahamas
operations for the 2008 quarter
exceeded those for the 2007
quarter by approximately
$271,000."
Mr McTaggart said that
while Consolidated Water had
seen "some" similar issues at
its Blue Hills plant, it had been
able to address these quickly
and did not foresee any more.
The company is still in talks
with the Government and the
Water and Sewerage Corpo-
ration over its now-completed
non-revenue water contract,
which stipulated that it had to
reduce water leaks from the
Corporation's distribution sys-
tem by one million gallons per
day.
While Consolidated Water
said the project was completed
on March 1, 2007, the Corpo-
ration said the actual date was
July 1, 2007, forcing the com-
pany to "reserve" the $332,000
it believes the latter owes it for
water supplied between those
two dates.
Mr McTaggart said yester-
day that the Water and Sewer-
age Corporation had hired an
independent consultant to
review Consolidated Water's
calculations on the non-rev-
enue water project, and
pledged to get back to the
company on that.
He added that Consolidat-
ed Water currently had no
plans to redeem the $10 mil-
lion bond issue that was used
to finance construction of the
Blue Hills plant.


Al 0..f BA_ I!XAS SOI TYO EEI I



S- *. PRESENTS

GODFREY SHERMAN, General Manager, The Water & Sewerage Corporation

Son "The Evolving Role Of Water In An Energy Conscious Environment"



J... Thursday, May 15, 2008

BSE's Monthly Luncheon East Villa Restaurant* East Bay Street *Time: 12:00 pm Donation: $25.00

S.To confirm your attendance e-mail:
SQuentin.knowles@flameless.com or gracesharma05@yahoo.com or jeelliott@bahamaselectricity.com


MR. GODFREY SHERMAN
General Manager,
Water and Sewerage Corporation
Godfrey Sherman, General Manager of the
Water and Sewerage Corporation is a fully
qualified civil engineer with over fifteen years
experience at the level ofsenior management.
Mr. Sherman is especially known for his


outstanding implementation strategies in the
area of project management and extensive
operational experience in the water sector
including sewer treatment and disposal. He is
also highly accomplished in policy formulation,
finance and union negotiations. Mr. Sherman
graduated from Northeastern University,
Boston, Mass., in 1977 with a Bachelor of
Science Degree in Civil Engineering with


honours. He also attended Harvard University's
School of Business Administration Program
for Executive Management. He is a member
of several professional bodies including the
Caribbean Water and Wastewater Association
and the Bahamas Society of Professional
Engineers. He has travelled and trained
extensively in the Water and Wastewater
Industry.


SALES CAREER

A multi facetted communications/consulting company that is
currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person
would have a minimum of three years in commission sales;
have their own private vehicle. We are looking for excellent
communicators that are driven. Candidates must have computer
skills and be able prepare public presentations on behalf of
companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV's and reference letters to:

DA#6282
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas
by May 31, 2008.


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008


THE TRIBUNE









STHE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


iitr ... ... fibune Comics
,e> .i ,.i ..w -...- ** ,..,,: . f. ,V' _-., .\ . .___


APARTMENT 3-G


I


CRYPTIC PUZZLE


ACROSS
9 So tree the tied up or incarcerated (9)
10 Wlling to, which is bice (9)"
12 Tne chap doesn't have complete
insurance (4)
13 Suppress it? The nerve! (6)
14 Wil lver fish be about where there's
rubbsn? (7)
15 Dorn allow to contain copy writing (9)
17 L ten to the man and areworried
14.2 3)
18 Let move about, lean on for support (7)
19 An expert player? Well, that's an
aavantage (6)
20 Stil drink'(4) "
23 A1i ertising, for a doctor, is getting into
IrouDle (9)
25 The damned birds! (3,6)
26 re' given the apprentice a day off (4)
27 I'm ionry for being mean to the fellow (6)
29 Tre spendthrift, a law-breaker, involved
the rest in (7)
32 Va'nous Russians caught, having
,r.nirjed the plant (9)
34 is reversed, and covered by another
i"i, g i (9)
35 Bones not broken though having fallen,
Mrriaps, from an apple tree (7)
36 n; infomed by tips right through (6)
37 Snouts out "W'thout us? Nonsense!" (4)
38 Mears firsttr give the religious
cenominati 1(9)
39 i.a, 10o fol'.ie wrapping paper and
ivai oose)

.:a,. JTI- --,.rnONS


DOWN


1 Ajarcontainingflowersinthe kitchen? (8)
2 Either give the shivers to or have no
effect on (5,3,4)
3 People move in close:the band enters (8)
4 Getting the seat does clinch it(6)
5 Try to win later, locked in battle (8)
6 In sea water, a giant floating ship (10)
7 Don't lip-read the word rumour" (7)
8 Goesin andtalks aboutteentroubles(10)
11 "Bit ofluckyou say, finding a thicket" (5)
16 The bad thing about having a tot play
with thread (6)
19 When your number is up, drink (3)
21 Why the worn rug was thrown out? (4,8)
22 She might be easiest to get a deduction
for (6)
23 Mum or dad could show you one and
did (10)
24 While away, a tin I threw out, containing
runner beans (2,8)
25 It's The Unfinished Melody," child (3)
28 Does get upset overthe ex:it'svery sad (8)
29 Was holding the reins loosely but with
vigilance (8)
30 Having the cover broken early is tough (8)
31 How you said"No. It has police backing"(7)
33 To disprove it, be back in your old
routine (5)
34 Saves, from frost. half the buds (6)


0. 'ho 7. FIou-lru 8, Sa6. 10, A0n. 13. Who-M 14, Lena .15 Yo.o
." 1.a. 19, L-a.i 21. Jack.-knf 23. Til 24. Mo-l 26. Thy 27. R-a.d
3 1M 33. Pm-E 34. H.t-her 35, Ove,0-ct 36. St-rMI
'.:,, Md 4& Z2. W-O, 3. 01.1f, 4, S,"W (BLneyl 5 .L-m 6, Opn -d. 9,
.,. s 12 N, aal 13, WO-ka.,n 15. Yak(Kay 16. Ue 18. ACI- 20,
22. Ned 23 Thrdft 25. Yn 28.E ol 30. Royi 31. Ne.h 32, Th.-O


*.l: THURSOAY31STJaNUARlY20 8 OCK4
3reau, Fein s ,1,1 e 1 n 14,.Tone I5.sr F 1 .
S 19, Ison 21.Meandered 23.T Vrb 24. 3Gle 26, .saw 27, ite 29. Dnp
'- As 11 e 34,, Canss 3., Tao 3.6. Ver.
* ,t1 ..It 2..ein 3. T 1 o 4. 0.1. 5. E ,l Sullen 6, Endti 11. Let 12.
l5j edg 1d F8 I. POd 16. 18. R6b,11, 250 6eed 21. M, 22. im 23,
.11 a id 28,.l 30. Ridge 31. Penny 3,0D, 3. A33.'


Good Partnership Defense


West dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.
NORTH
*AKQ 105
V874
*A7
4952
WEST EAST
*J43 .98
VK92 V5
*KJ Q86532
+AQ1074 +KJ83
SOUTH
4762
VAQJ 1063
10 9 4
+6
The bidding:
West North East South
1 1 2 2V
3+ 3V 44 4V
Opening lead ace of clubs.
Good defense is usually a cooper-
ative effort, with both defenders
making use of every inference and
scrap of information they have at
their disposal. An excellent example
of two minds operating on the same
wavelength is provided by today's
deal.
West led the ace of clubs against
four hearts, and East signaled with
the eight Had West now blindly con-
tinued with a club, declarer would
have had no trouble scoring 11 tricks.
But West reasoned that since East
had supported clubs twice during the
bidding, South would surely ruff the


The

E Iwod I i
the main
body of
A Chambers

Dictionary
21st

T ER t1999
edition).
HOW many words of four letters or
more can you make from the
letters shown here? In malting a
word, each letter may be used once
only. Each must contain the centre
letter and there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 21; very good 32; excellent 42
(or more). Solution tomorrow.


9 7


1 13 14
1214

15 56


'p..-


S19 20 21
22
26I 24 1__

26 827 2 29. -30

32 33 341

353 37 1


LAStM "39 6li


*Zi


ACROSS
9 Jewish building (9)
10 Complicated In
design (9)
12 Darts line (4)
13 Perspires (6)
1jM%,-.q(7)
15 Ameniun state
(3,6)
17 Large ape (5-4)
18 Mean or miserly
persu.. ;?i
19 Fractures (6),
20 Arm or leg (4)
23 Massacre (9)
25 Chess term(9)
26 Dull pain (4)
27 Wax stick (6)
29 Cast a spell over(7)
32 Augments (9)
34 Blocks up (9)
35 Sport forwomen (7)
36 Takes illegally (6)
S37 Entreaty (4)
38 Abode orhome (9)
39 Take apart (9)


DOWN
1 A the very
moment that
(2,4,2)
2 Inastaleof anaer
(2,3,7)
3 Albumen (3,5)
4 Pleasure craft (6)
5 Diamond, say (8)
6 Ridty, derelict (10)
7 Funeral
procession (7)
8 Fair,average (10)
11 Turn aside (5)
16 Sufficient (6)
19 Drinks counter (3)
21 Incoherent (12)
22 ',bab spike(6)
23 Wring materials
(10)
24 Medical operation
(10)
25 Actor's .-imp:'3)
28 Calamity (8)
29 Unfounded (8)
30 Kidnapped people
(8)
31 Returns to
custody (7)
33 Quotes (5)
34 Exaggerate (6)


next club. It would then be a simple
matter for declarer, after losing a
trick to the heart king, to discard
whatever losers he had left on
dummy's spades.
So at trick two, West shifted to the
king of diamonds! This did not figure
to cost a trick even if South had the
queen, because declarer's diamonds
were due to disappear on dummy's
spades eventually.
South took the king with the ace
and led a trump to the queen, losing
to the king. West returned the jack of
diamonds, and it was now East's turn
to shine.
He reasoned that since West had
ignored the club signal at trick one,
he must have known declarer had no
more clubs. In addition, the unusual
diamond lead from the K-J made it
clear West.was interested in obtain-
ing a diamond ruff. So East overtook
the jack with the queen and returned
a third, diamond, and West trumped
with the nine to set the contract one
trick.
East-West's excellent defense
notwithstanding, South should have
made his contract anyway. He should
have recognized the danger of an
opposing diamond ruff and taken one
simple step to prevent it.
Had he ducked West's king of
diamonds at trick two, he would have
made it impossible for West to reach
his partner's hand later, and the con-
tract would have been secured.


fl!l


I offense I


WEDNESDAY,
MAY 14

AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
You are not scoring well in the love
department, Aquarius. Fawning over
your partner has only been giving
you the reputation of a pushover.
Define what you want, and go for it.
PISCES Feb 19/March 20
Financial success is imminent this
week, Pisces. Just be sure to share
your wealth with someone deserving.
It will make it much more rewarding.
ARIES March 21/April 20
Risk-taking is not on the agenda this
week. Aries. Walk the straight and
narrow path, and you'll find that
things will go much more smoothly.
Expect Scorpio to pose a concern.
TAURUS April 21/May 21
See that new project through, Taurus.
Don't give up now that things have
just begun. If you're feeling over-
whelmed, seek the assistance of a
family member who wants to help.
GEMINI May 22/June 21
Yuur funk is over, and you have
found a new outlook on life. This
week should be a breeze for you,
Gemini, with particularly good news
arriving on Friday.
CANCER -June 22/July 22
Bad news findS you on Tuesday,
Cancer. While it may be a blow,
you'll survive the turmoil. Keep your I
chin up -.- better things will come
your way next'week.
LEO July 23/August 23
The world is still offering you
lessons, but you've tuned out. Get
those cars working again and accept
the things that you must change
about yourself.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
Flirtation gives rise to passion by
Thursday. Virgo. You're showing off
your wild side and loving every
minute of it. Those close to you
might become concerned.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
A friend comes to you with a.serious
problem, Libra. In your current state
you are by no means ready to offer
solid advice. Guide this person to
someone who can help for now.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Your ego has gotten in the way
again. Scorpio. but you can redeem
yourself. That charitable act you've
been pondering could be the perfect
way to showcase your sweet side.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
Trouble at home escalates by
Wednesday, Sagittarius. You've
made a mountain out of a mole-
hill. Change your strategy and you
could find a quick resolution.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
No one is being fooled by yoursincer-
Sity act. Capricorn. They're all on to
your hidden agenda. Don't try to deny
your motives it will only make
things worse in the end.


I C H E S by L e nard ard en 1


Jeff Horner v Milos Pavlovic, Isle of
Man 2007. Horner achieved an
unusual record. He had scored two
of the three required results for the
international master title long ago
back in the 1970s, but then his
teaching work restricted his
opportunities. Aged 58 and newly
retired, he scored his third and final
IM norm at Isle of Man, and this win
against an established grandmaster
was the highlight. White (to move)
is rook for knight ahead, but Black's
position looks solid and hard to
break down. A tactical sequence did
it. Can you work out the win? A key
factor is the exposed black rook at
b8. For full solution credit, you need
to spot and defeat a sneaky trap by
which Black hoped to turn the
tables.


LEONARD BARDEN


Chess: 8559:1 Bxf7 Qxf7 (if Kxf7 2 Qh7+ and 3 Qxg6
wins) 2 Rxg5! fxg5 3 Rxg6+! Qxg6 4 BxeS+ Kf7 5
Qf3+! avoidingq ghe trap 5 Qxg6+? Kxg6 6 Bxb8 d3l
and the black pawn queens) Kg8 6 Bxb8 and White
* won a bishop ahead.


I a


PAGE 7B


Dennis


Contract Brdge

A'~~.


i.









0
I



N



E




.R








0

R


I TARGET


means or tactics
in attempting to
score ]


I II I


|


-- ~ "


ii


" '- ~- -


I


I


I


IN m mm -- M












Royal Bank unveils $600k


branch for Spanish


Wells


ROYAL Bank of Canada
this week unveiled its new
$600,000 branch for Spanish
Wells, the building three
times bigger than the 1,000
square foot property it origi-
nally opened on the island in
1973.
Planning for the new Span-
ish Wells branch began in
late 2006, with construction
starting in August 2007. Roy-
al Bank began operating
from the branch when it
opened in November last
year, although the official
opening was postponed until
this week.
Nathaniel Beneby, Royal
Bank's vice-president and
country head, said in a state-
ment: "This year will make a
century since we began serv-
ing clients in the Bahamas.
We are proud to have been
able to help generations of
Bahamian families meet their
personal and business bank-
ing needs.
"Our entry into Spanish
Wells in 1961 marked a peri-
od of great expansion for the
bank into the Family Islands.
Spanish Wells was only our
third Family Island branch,
but in the 47 years that we
have spent here we are proud
to have become a fixture in
this community."







on Mondays


SHOWN (I-f) are: Keith Wells, manager of corporate real estate for the Bahamas and Caribbean; Kirkwood Tex Pinder, manager of client care and operations, RBC Royal Bank of Cana-
da, New Providence and Grand Bahama, and former branch manager for Spanish Wells; Joyce Coleby-Riviere, area manager for the Family Islands, RBC Royal Bank of Canada. Cut-
ting the ribbon is Irwin Kelly, former branch manager for Spanish Wells; Nathaniel Beneby, vice-president and country head, Bahamas, RBC Royal Bank of Canada; Walter Carey, branch -4
manager, Spanish Wells; and Jason Sawyer, assistant risk manager, Bahamas Regional Office.


& Telephone Banking


Deposits & Investments


Insurance


Credit Cards


Personal Loans
Mortgages


We each have our goals, things we want to achieve. At
different times of. our lives, those aspirations may
change and we may choose a different path. No
matter what stage of life you find yourself in,
FirstCaribbean is right there with you, encouraging,
helping, cheering you on. Take the first step. Make us
the people you talk to. Make us your life partner.


Wealth Management


Small Business Banking
Corporate Banking

Foreign Exchange and Derivatives
Capital Markets


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.


Internet


I


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008


THE TRIBUNE