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The Tribune
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01035
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: May 26, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01035

Full Text







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The


Tribune


Volume: 104 No.154


MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


PRICE 750


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ppurssededs dreams

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denies conspir


Former PLP chairman

refutes suggestion he is

orchestrating takeover -

with Wilchcombe


* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
FORMER Chairman of the Progressive Liberal Party Raynard
Rigby denied that he, and deputy leader hopeful, Obie Wilch-
combe, were orchestrating a take-over from within the PLP.
Mr Rigby, as the guest of the radio programme Parliament
Street, replied to questions from hosts Steve McKinney and Fayne
Thompson on his criticism of the party, and his political future with-
SEE page 11

Supermarket hold-up


* By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
MASKED gunmen held up
supermarket staff at the new
City Market store in Cable
Beach on Saturday night and
got away with thousands of dol-
lars.
The supermarket had closed
for business when the two gun-
men, whose faces were covered,


broke into the store just after
10pm and threatened staff at
gunpoint.
They" also threatened the
store manager at gunpoint, forc-
ing him to open the safe before
they got away with cash in the
region of $5,000 to $6,000. The
full amount has not yet been
determined.
SEE page 11


NEARLY $600,000 worth of mari-
juana were seized by officers from the
Drug Enforcement Unit when they
raided a home on Winder's Terrace,
near East Street south.
According to Assistant Superinten-
dent of Police Walter Evans, around
10.30 am yesterday officers discovered
11 crocus sacks, and four taped pack-
ages of marijuana. The drugs have a
weight of 576 pounds. As a result, four


men were arrested and are currently
in Police custody.
ASP Evans added, that the police
were only able to make this significant
arrest due to the continued cooperation
of the public.
"The public has supported the police
significantly in the past and we contin-
SEE page 12


'Holding only

a deputy

leadership

race absurd'
0 By PAUL G:
TURNQUEST
Tribune
Staff Reporter
ptumquest@tribunemedia.net
THE idea of holding
only a deputy leadership
race for the Progressive
Liberal Patty is "absurd",
according to former chair-
man Raynard Rigby yres-
terday.
Speaking as the guest on
the radio programme Par-
lianient Street, Mr Rigby
said the PLP needs to have
a franki, and honest dis-
cussion" about its leadership hinting at the possi-
ble removal of Perry Christie from the post.
Mr Rigby has for sometime been quite critical of
the leadership of the former Prime Minister. l[ifact,
his outspokenness has led to reports that factions
within the party were seeking to have him
"expelled."
However, Mr Rigby quickly brushed these threats
SEE page 12
Drowning victims brought asho"l e
B By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT: The bodies of four persons who
drowned at sea were recovered off West End on
Sunday evening, acc .:. a senior police offi-
cial. Their bodies _, e brought ashore at Old
Bahama Bay.
Chief Supt Basil Rahming said police were dis-
patched to West End around 7.45pm Sunday after
receiving reports that a number of bodies were dis-
covered in waters off West End.
Grand Bahama police are investigating.


THE MOTHER of
Khodee Davis, Sonia
Dill, places a rose on
the coffin of her son
on Saturday at St.
Mark's Native Baptist
Church, Fox Hill.


*Mnutder aibir
Mm Polo-I
faM<'7


* By MEGAN REYNOLDS Relatives, friends and neigh-
Tribune Staff Reporter hours of the grade 11 student
lined the streets as Khodee's
HUNDREDS of mourners coffin was carried from Prince
said a final farewell to murdered Charles Road to St Mark's
teenager Khodee Davis in a Native Baptist Church in Fox
funeral procession through Fox Hill in a procession led by a
Hill on Saturday. marching band.
The community was left in Mourners wore T-shirts and
shock after the popular 16 year badges bearing Khodee's pho-
old was fatally stabbed in the tograph, the dates of his birth


heart as he walked onto Cab-
bage Beach with his friends on
Whit Monday, May 12.


SEE page six


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PAGEH 2, MONDAY MA 2, 00C8HERBUN


0


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THE UPGRADED infrastructure will bring about a replacement of BTC's fixed voice network with the
ultra-moder IP based core network.



BTC invests




$55 million in



new network


TELECOMMUNICATIONS
in The Bahamas is set to become
faster, more flexible, more reli-
able and more secure with a $55
million investment in the Next
Generation Network.
The upgraded infrastructure
to be delivered by the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
Ltd (BTC) in agreement with
Socus Networks and partnering
firm Calix will bring about a
replacement of BTCs fixed voice
network with the ultra-modem
IP based core network.
"We at BTC take very seri-
ously our corporate responsibil-
ity to the entire populace of The
Bahamas to provide the most
modern, most reliable service
delivery platforms," said BTC's
executive vice president Kirk
Griffin.
."In moving towards an IP
based infrastructure, we are
establishing the most ultra mod-
ern operating platform that will
allow residential and commer-
cial customers.to onnect in ways
that could not.have been imag-
ined just a.few years ago."
This NGN is yet a further step


"The new
network will
certainly keep the
Bahamas on the
cutting edge of
technology."

Kirk Griffin
towards modernising national
communications infrastructure
that will enable BTC and The
Bahamas to keep up with the
needs of sophisticated consumers
and enterprises.
Bandwidth will increase in vol-
umes not reached before in The
Bahamas, connections will be
more secure and a range of hew
packages will be available to
DSL subscribers; VoIP cus-
tomers and over 300,0088' -
lar customers. -....
. And extreme weather should


not affect services as it has in the
past, Mr Griffin said.
"NGN is designed with a dis-
aster communications recovery
site in Miami, Florida to assist in
times of natural disasters," he
said.
"The IP based network is built
and managed to swiftly commu-
nicate so that services are
restored. This provides greater
assurance to the company's resi-
dential and enterprise cus-
tomers."
He added: "The new network
will certainly keep the Bahamas
on the cutting edge of technolo-
gy, a characteristic that is looked
upon strongly by foreign
investors. Investors in islands as
far south as Inagua will have
access to world renowned
telecommunications services.
This keeps the country on par
with the rest of the hemisphere."
BTC also announced this
weekend that it will merge its
i~ills with Cerillon Technologies
to eliminate the need for sepa-
rate bills for fixed voice and wire-
less customers.


2W ; '. .,


PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


'"


ip ; 0 1









THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008,CAPAGEWS
S-T


0 In brief


Man hurt

after shots

fired from

passing car

GUNSHOTS were fired from
a passing car hitting a man in
the back as another man fled.
The two men were standing
in Walnut Street, Pinewood
Gardens, at around 7pm on Fri-
day when a gold coloured Nis-
san Maxima pulled up and a
gunman fired.
The injured man was taken
to hospital by ambulance. He
is reported to be in stable con-
dition.
Police are investigating the
circumstances of the crime.
Witnesses are urged to call
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force at 322-4444.

Police seize

firearms In

separate

searches
FIREARMS were seized by
police on Friday in two sepa-
rate incidents in Nassau.
Drug Enforcement Unit offi-
cers recovered a .45 handgun
with one round of ammunition
and a small quantity of mari-
juana when searching a home
in Windsor Lane on Friday
morning. Three men, a male
juvenile and a woman were
arrested and remain in police
custody.
Just an hour later, police on
patrol in Bellot Road and Faith
Avenue, spotted a group of men
in a bushy area who fled as offi-
cers approached.
Officers searched the area
and found a large Ziplock bag
containing a .380 handgun, 23
live rounds of ammunition for a
.762 assault rifle, 32 shotgun
shells, and 14 live rounds of
anmmuiptioqn pr, 5.56,weapaa,
.Police arse pekingthm .nn
believed to have dropped the
weaponry.
Anyone with any information
is urged to call the Royal
Bahamas Police Force on 322-
a444.

Officers

issue 37

traffic

citations
EXUMA Police issued 37
traffic citations and made one
arrest during a two-hour oper-
ation in Farmers Hill.
In Operation Sunset officers
apprehended the 37 drivers
for driving either unlicensed
or uninsured vehicles, or for
driving at excessive speed in
the area between 4pm and
6pm on Friday.
Police also made one arrest
for a drug offence.
Four illegal immigrants
were seized in the operation.

New president
of Retired
Police Officers
Association
FORMER Police Assistant
Commissioner Grafton Ifill
was elected president of the
Retired Police Officers Asso-
ciation in elections held on
Friday, May 2, at police head-
quarters, East Street.
Contesting the position was
former police officer Erring-
ton Watkins. The count was
61 votes for Mr Ifill; 15 for Mr
Watkins.


rI I


DEATH OF KHODEE DAVIS


Murder strikes fear in heart




of the Fox Hill community


THE murder of teenager Khodee
Davis struck fear in the heart of the Fox
Hill community, which is now calling on
Government to give them more protec-
tion.
Losing yet another young life in such a
public place as Cabbage Beach in Par-
adise Island led Rodney Moncur, a rela-
tive of the deceased, to speak out about
a need for change at Khodee's funeral in
St Mark's Native Baptist Church, fol-
lowing a speech by Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell. He said: "The blood of my
cousin Khodee Davis is partly on my
head and partly on the head of Fred
Mitchell because we have defended the


* Call for return of capital punishment


human rights of convicted murderers
while ignoring the human rights of mur-
dered victims."
Mr Moncur, first cousin of Khodee's
father Derek Davis, called on Mr
Mitchell and Government to take action
by making significant changes to protect
young people who are so often falling
victim to crime.
He made a case for the return of cap-
ital punishment and called on the people
of Fox Hill to demand that Fred Mitchell
does something to ensure convicted mur-


derers are executed. Mr Moncur said:
"For the last 32 years I have opposed
capital punishment but now I have dis-
covered that young men have been train-
ing how to stab their victim to ensure
death. The problem in our country is the
young men have no fear and we have a
duty to put fear in their hearts."
Releasing accused murderers on bail is
causing witnesses and families in Fox
Hill to live in fear of being apprehended
and they feel they have no protection
from crime, said Mr Moncur. In his


funeral speech Mr Mitchell said: "The
authorities need to do their part to seek
to stamp out crime.
"Our country cries out for a vigorous
social intervention to put stop to the
death of our young people in these cir-
cumstances. The authorities cannot sit
idly by and do nothing."
Two men have been charged with the
murder of Khodee Davis on May 12.
They are Andy Francis, 20, of Adder-
ley Street, and a 16-year-old boy from
Step Street, Fox Hill, who cannot be
identified for legal reasons.
They are due to appear at Magistrate's
Court 11, Nassau Street, on June 3.


Iia -I -e
BAHAMAS High Commissioner in London Paul Farquharson (right) presents his BAHAMAS High Commissioner in London Paul Farquharson (right) chats with Secretary General of
credentials as Permanent Representative to the International Maritime Organisa- the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) E Mitropoulos at IMO Headquarters, London on May
tion (IMO) to IMO Secretary General E Mitropoulos at IMO Headquarters, 4 Albert 6. Mr Farquharson presented his credentials as Permanent Representative to the IMO to Mr Mitropou-
Embankment, London on May 6. los.


FREE
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BAHAMAS High Commissioner in Lon-
don Paul Farquharson presented his
credentials as Permanent Representa-
tive to the International Maritime
Organisation (IMO) to IMO Secretary
General E Mitropoulos at IMO Head-
quarters, London on May 6. Pictured
from left are Ms Judith Francis, Mar-
itime Attache; Secretary General IMO,
Mr E Mitropoulos; High Commissioner,
Mr Paul Farquharson and Mrs Teresa
de Oliveira, IMO Secretariat.


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MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 4,EMONDAY, MAY26,R2008 THE TRIBUN


The virus that's killing civil


AT LAST AN attempt is to be made to
raise the standard of the public service.
From the day, almost 20 years ago, when
Sean McWeeney then a minister in the
Pindling administration, recommended that
the dead wood destroying the bloated civ-
il service be jettisoned, no government has
had the courage to do the necessary job.
Until this is done the civil service will
remain the same old lumbering civil service
- top heavy with staff and slow to serve.
Partnering with the College of the
Bahamas and the Caribbean Centre for
Development Administration, which spe-
cialises in transforming and modernising
the public sector, a serious attempt to trans-
form the public service is to be made.
Recognising that "effective public ser-
vice is essential to good governance", Prime
Minister Ingraham now hopes that the ser-
vice can be transformed into an organisa-
tion that will be "effective and responsive"
to the needs of the general public.
"Anecdotal evidence from around our
country, and indeed from around our
region, suggests that the public is general-
ly of the view that government depart-
ments and agencies are failing to deliver
acceptable levels of service," he said.
Today the largest portion of our
nation's budget goes to pay for an organi-
sation that does not justify the financial
outlay.
We believe that before anything can
be done, strict ground rules should be set
for hiring staff for the public service.
The service has been destroyed by politi-
cians who have used it as a general dump-
ing ground to provide jobs for their con-
stituents, regardless of their ability to fill the
positions for which they have been
employed.
Also regardless of whether the various
departments to which they have been
assigned need them.
Several years ago a certain ministry
demanded salary increases. Government
said it could not afford the demands.
A spokesman for the group told The Tri-
bune that the reason government could
not afford the increases was because politi-
cians had landed too many unemployables
on them.


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These persons were not only not needed,
but could not do the job.
They were resented by the qualified
members of the department, who had lost
interest in their own production because of
their presence.
These outsiders were seen as depriving
deserving public servants from their just
due. It was the age old story of the prodigal
son.
The fatted calf was being sacrificed for
the son who had made no contribution,
while the work of the son who had
ploughed the fields in his absence was not
rewarded. Of course, he, and like him the
complaining civil servants, were not happy.
This country cannot afford persons like
former PLP cabinet minister Philip Bethel,
once Bahamasair chairman, who had to
admit that the failing airline could not
afford to pay its staff.
He was also forced to admit that his own
hiring practices had turned the airline into
"almost a social service."
A statement made by Fred Mitchell,
who was public service minister at the time,
indicated that he also felt that government
had a social obligation to provide jobs for
'young persons who had no academic qual-
ifications.
He felt the PLP was foolish to follow the
Ingraham government's 2001 policy that
put a moratorium on civil service hiring.
According to Mr Mitchell this is what cost
the PLP the 2007 election. It is this attitude
that over the years has undermined the
integrity and quality of the public service.
There should be qualification rules,
which should be strictly met.
No person should be hired on a politi-
cian's letter alone without the necessary
qualifications. Nor should they be hired if
their services are not required.
Until the politicians and their misleading
letters are banned from the hiring prac-
tices of the public service, no matter how
hard governmenttries, it will fail.
The public service will just be filled with
persons, whose main ability will be to mark
an X at election time against the name of
the politician who got him the job.
This is the main virus killing the service.


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau'Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeportfax. (242) 352-9348


EDITOR, The Tribune.
THIS matter has weighed
heavily on my mind for
months as I awaited direction
from the good Lord.
I refer to two of our public
institutions: The Simpson
Penn Centre for Boys and the
Willie Mae Pratt Centre for
Girls (commonly known to
many of us as the Boys' and
Girls' Industrial Schools).
These institutions are main-
tained by the Government of
The Bahamas and are the
beneficiaries of their own bud-
gets under Head 41 Simp-
son Penn and Head 42 -
Willie Mae Pratt.
I thought it important to ask
the following questions prior
to the impending budget


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debate in Parliament, so that
the inclusion of appropriate
sums may be made.
Are these institutions simply
repositories (holding places)
for boys and girls under the
age of 16 years who have been
deemed to be unruly either by
their parents, or by the courts?
What is being done to mod-
ify the behaviour of these
young persons whilst they are
detained?
If we accept that these
young persons have been
placed in these centres
because of behavioral prob-
lems, then I ask: How realistic
is it to expect change in them
without a structured behav-
iour modification programme?
Do we simply 'hold' them, and
then return them to the wider
community with the same
behavioral problems-or,
God forbid, even more?
My people, the time has
come, starting with this
upcoming budget, to include
provision for the engagement
of a practising Clinical Psy-
chologist who would establish
a regimen of visits by these
wards of the State.
Assuming there are about
fifty-three to sixty young per-


sons, they should all be able to
see the Psychologist possibly
once every two weeks, but at a
minimum once a month. Visits
should also continue for a
period after their discharge.
I believe that the Hon
Loretta Butler-Turner, the
current Minister of State with
responsibility for these cen-
tres, cares about the well being
of her wards as did the for-
mer Minister, the Hon
Melanie Griffin.
I implore us to further
demonstrate our care for these
young persons (and our com-
munities) by providing ade-
quate fundingin the upcoming
2008-2009 budget to imple-
ment post haste this pro-
gramme.
Only those who have seen it
will understand the conse-
quences of not doing so!
For the children...

BERNADETTE A
GARDINER
A Bahamian Taxpayer
"Nothing Is Accomplished
Without Effort."

Nassau,
May 21, 2008.


PLP still blaming




everyone else for




their problems

EDITOR The Tribune. He has disgraced their party
and he has disgraced parlia-
When Glenys Hanna Mar- ment.
tin took over as Chairman of Furthermore, his threat is
the PLP it was a sign of hope an idle one since it would be
that the opposition party clearly out of order for him to
might have been on a self-cor- ers whose names and identi- table the results of his sordid
reacting course after their dis- ties are well known. Peeping Tom activities in the
mal scandal-studded five years She should start with her House.
in office and their defeat last fellow MP Shane Gibson who And if he attempted to do
year. made one of the sleaziest rev- so he would be liable to legal
But that hope was dimmed relations and most outlandish proceedings.
last week when Mrs. Martin threats ever heard in any rep- The rules of parliamentary
demonstrated that the PLP is utable parliament anywhere, privilege do not cover any filth
still not prepared to look in the world. that a member may attempt
inward where the problem is, Shane Gibson announced, to desecrate the table of the
but prefers to play the same apparently with no shame at House with.
game of lashing out wildly at all, that he had been spying That's how ignorant he is of
others and blaming everybody on the private lives of his par- the rules and conventions of
under the sun for the sorry liamentary colleagues! the honourable chamber in
state in which they find them- Not only should Mrs. Mar- which he unfortunately sits.
selves.tin have rebuked him, but her Mrs. Martin should also put
Mrs. Martin called on the tin have rebuked him, but her distance in the case of a very
Leader Perry Christie should well known mudslinger who
governing party to distance eadone so as we ll.well known mudslinger who
itself from some statements have done so as well. used to sit in the House and
published in the press and In fact, every Member of who is still at it with, the
attributed to unnamed Parliament, FNM and PLP, approval and connivance of
sourcesshould express their outrage the party leadership.
Why in heaven's name that they have amongst them a She should put distance as
should the FNM waste time man who spies on them! well in the case of a particu-
repudiatingIf he spies on members of larly vulgar and vicious web-
repudiating evetributed to anony the Government whom he site which every week peddles
mous sources? blames for his self-inflicted a torrent of lies and defama-
For all we know, those misfortunes, then he is proba- tory muck on the internet.
reports could have been plant- bly spying on those of his col- Everybody knows the iden-
ed by people in the PLP who leagues who were also dis- tity of this church-going hyp-
are itching to expose the activ- gusted with his behaviour ocrite and misogynist muck-
ities of a certain group in their before the last election. raker.
party. That's where Mrs. Martin
What Mrs. Hanna should should put distance.
concern herself with is trying In fact, all of them from FORMER
to impose some kind of decen- now on should put distance MP
cy code on some of her own between them and Mr. Gib- Nassau,
PLP colleagues and support- son. May 24, 2008.

Adequate funding must be provided

for the care of our young people


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June 23-July 11

M-Th 8:30a-3:00p

Fri 8:30a-12:30p






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Registration $25 (nonrefundable) --
Tuition for 3 weeks: $200 first child, 0..
$150 each additional child

Registration Deadline May 30

Out East: Joe Farngton Road
Out West: YWCA, Dolphin Drive

For more information, call 364-6773
Email: allstarbahamas@gmail.com


I


PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


THE TRIBUNE









TIHET IBUNEMONAYMAY26,L200,LPAGES


0 In brief


PM hails

Bahamas

as public

services

pioneer
* By Lindsay Thompson
Bahamas Information
Services
THE Government officially
launched its Public Service
Improvement Programme on Fri-
day, aimed at enhancing the level
of work delivered by the Public
Service.
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham delivered the keynote
address to senior public servants
assembled in the Paul L Far-
quharson Conference Centre, at
the Police Headquarters on East
Street.
"It is true that effective Public
Service is essential to good gov-
ernance and to the effective and
responsive delivery of services to
the general public," the Prime
Minister said.
"Anecdotal evidence from
around our country, and indeed
from around our region, suggests
that the public is generally of the
view that government depart-
ments and agencies are failing to
deliver acceptable levels of ser-
vice."
He said he was pleased to learn
that The Bahamas is among pio-
neers in the region in taking a sci-
entific, measured approach to
improving public services deliv-
ery.
"We commit to advance the
pace of modernisation in the Pub-
lic Service," the Prime Minister
said. "We recognize the inherent
pitfalls in mandating a public
agency to transform itself and also
to oversee the transformation of
other public agencies."
In this vein, the Government
is partnering with the College of
the Bahamas and the Caribbean
Centre for Development Admin-
istration (CARICAD), a region-
al inter-governmental organisa-
tion specialising in transforming
and moderni'sing the public sector
of Caribbean states in'the con-
duct of pilot programmes.
The public will engage in an
evaluation of public sector cus-
tomer satisfaction, the Prime Min-
ister said. Additionally, the Col-
lege of The Bahamas will con-
duct a series of customer satis-
faction surveys so as to establish a
scientific baseline from which the
Government will seek to measure
improvement in service delivery
over time.
"We will also canvass public
officers responsible for the deliv-
ery of service to the public to
determine attitudes, behaviours
and values which impact their
performance," the Prime Minister
said. "We will seek to explore the
extent to which the organisation-
al culture of the public sector
impacts performances and atti-
tudes in the delivery of service to
the public."
Information gathered from the
public and from public officers
will inform the design of targeted
improvements in the government
system, the Prime Minister
explained. The results of the sur-
veys are likely to be used to
change the way the public ser-
vants work.
At the Eighth Annual Public
Service Week Awards Ceremo-
ny in October 2007. the Prime
Minister reaffirmed his "long-
standing commitment" to cause
improved customer service in the
public sector.
This commitment was repeated
in his 2008 New Year's Address
to the Nation at which time he
:nnounccd the service improve-
ment pilot project to be launched
in six public agencies, namely:
The Department of Public
Service
The Registrar General's
Office
The Building Control Divi-
sion
Road Traffic Department
The Department of Physical
Planning. and
The Passport Office
"Change is always difficult;
individuals accustomed to behav-
ing in a certain fashion tend to
resist change," the Prime Minister
said. "So as to win support for
the programme and to gain buy-
in from stakeholders, each of the
pilot agencies will have a Service


Improvement Team, comprising
focal points."
The focal points will be respon-
sible for keeping the aims and
objectives of the project in the
forefront by galvanising support
for the project among public offi-
cers in and outside the pilot agen-
cies.




/ I
TROPICA L -


Defence Force arrest




ten poaching suspects


Dominicans
charged before
the courts

THE Royal Bahamas
Defence Force apprehended
10 Dominicans suspected of
poaching in waters in the
southeastern Bahamas.
According to a statement
from the Defence Force, while
on routine patrol they discov-
ered a 45-ft Dominican regis-
tered vessel, "Mas o Mefios"
on the Cochino Banks.
The vessel was boarded and
upon further investigation a
large quantity of scaled fish
were found on board. The for-
eign fishermen and their ves-
sel were arrested.
The patrol craft, HMBS P-
42, was assisted in bringing the
vessel into the Defence Force
Base early Saturday morning.
SThe Dominican fishermen
were turned over to the Police
for further investigation.
"This marks the second
apprehension of Dominican
fishermen for the year. On
March 10, a 100-foot Domini-
can registered vessel was
apprehended with,11 foregn-
ers.
"They have since been
charged before the courts,"
the statement read.


SUSPECTED Dominican poachers being escorted into the Defence Force
Base early Saturday morning by HMBS P-42. The Dominican poachers with
their catch and their vessel were apprehended last Thursday in the south-
eastern Bahamas for alleged poaching.


SUSPECTED DOMINICAN poachers at the Defence Force Base early Sat-
urday morning after being apprehended for alleged poaching. They were
later turned over to the Police.


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Saturday morning. The foreigners
were apprehended on Thursday
past in the Southeastern Bahamas
for alleged poaching.


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-------


MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


'401CRIO014








PAGE MONAY, MY 26 2008THE TIBUN


THE FUNERAL OF KHODEE DAVIS


Hundreds say final farewell to Khodee


FROM page one
and death and a message in
loving memory.
Young people who had
grown up with Khodee in Fox
Hill, known him at Temple
Christian School, or at his for-
mer school Bahamas Baptist
College in Jean Street, joined
the procession led by a Chris-
tian band.
Friends and colleagues of
Khodee's mother Bahamas
Customs officer Sonia Dill and
father Derek Davis, a promi-


nent Fox Hill businessman,
also showed their support.
The crowd was so large that
many people could not get into
the church, which was filled to
capacity for the four-hour ser-
vice from 1pm to 5pm.
Khodee's mother Sonia Dill
said: "It was overwhelming.
But the person that Khodee
was, and everyone loving him
so much, I anticipated a crowd.
"It went very, very well. I
know now that he is at peace. I
truly believe that it is all God's
doing and he is at peace."
Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell


spoke at the funeral, as did his
school principal Neil Hamil-
ton, his form teacher Akeia
Knowles, and Keith Miller,
leader of the St Mark's Native
Baptist Church Youth Group
that Khodee regularly attend-
ed.
Following the service,
Khodee was buried in the St
Mark's Native Baptist Church
graveyard in Romer Road.
Refreshments were served
to the crowd at the Fox Hill
community centre.


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ed his funeral.


PHOTOS: Felipe Major/Tribune staff


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PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


I


.;i--., i.






THE TOY 8


THE FUNERAL


OF


KHODEE DAVIS


INSIGHT!
For the sto-
* *

ries behind
the news,
read Insight
on Monday

. . .. . .. . .


DCLey iayiIor
Journaiist t-'Entrepriadufr"


-Quote
of the

.week-


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controLs the bocdy.
Therefore, fily our
minc witt positive
thoughts, and the
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accordingly "
quoteoftheweek@live.com


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


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public. This person should be an experienced
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Interested persons should possess:
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degree in pharmacy with a minimum of five
years' experience as a licensed pharmacist
STraining and experience in customer service
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Olympic

swimming

hopefuls to

put times

to the test

SWIMMERS striving for
Olympic success will put their
times to the test in the
Bahamas National Swim
Championships in June.
The annual event has been
sanctioned as an official qual-
ifier for this summer's
Olympic Games in Beijing
and the Bahamas' best swim-
mers will be competing for
their personal best.
The event featuring swim-
mers from the Bahamian
national teams of Carifta,
CISC, CCCAN, Pan Am and
the Olympics will be held at
the Betty Kelly Kenning
Aquatics Centre in the nation-
al sports complex at Oakes
Field from June 26-29.
President of the Swimming
Federation Algernon Cargill
said: "Many of our elite ath-
letes have become well-known
to the Bahamian public
through their hard work and
stellar performances and we're
looking forward to showcas-
ing these talents for the public
during our nationals and also
introducing some outstanding
new and up-and-coming swim-
mers.
"Everyone will be going
after national records and
Olympic qualifying times. It
will be very exciting."
Royal Bank of Canada and
RBC FINCO have announced
they will sponsor the event for
the 25th time this year, show-
ing commitment to a partner-
ship with The Bahamas Swim-
ming Ferderation.
RBC Finco's managing
director Tanya McCartney
said:. "RBC believes that ath-
letic training is critical to help-
ing young people realise their
full potential.
"We view the success and
increasing popularity of swim-
ming in The Bahamas as a vic-
tory for the swimmers, our
bank and for the country as a
whole."
Mr Cargill added: "The
relationship between swim-
ming and the Royal Bank of
Canada is one of the most loy-
al, stable and mutually
rewarding partnerships in
national sports.
"We thank and salute RBC
for its commitment to the suc-
cess of young Bahamian swim-
mers."
The Swim Championships
will be televised live by Cable
12 and everyone is welcome
to attend the event to encour-
age athletes in their perfor-
mance.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


THE TRIBUNE










FUNERAL: HUNTINGTON HARTFORD



Remembering a 'creative


and fascinating' person


k, 4 t 1,
* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
HUNTINGTON Hartford, the once ex-playboy
who was noted for squandering a lavish fortune,
was laid to rest Saturday in a small service at St
Christopher's Church, Lyford Cay.
With only a handful of close friends and relatives
attending, the simple and elegant service was
referred to by Archdeacon Keith Cartwright not as
a funeral, but "a celebration of Hunt's life..
Most notable was the repeated praise for Hart-
ford's daughter, Juliet, who cared for him during
his final years in the Bahamas. As his nurse Pearl
McKenzie recalled during her dedication that Mr


/m THE BODY of Hunt-
-Iington Hartford is
laid out at St.
Christopher Angli-
can Church, Lyford
Cay. He was
dressed in a simple
black shirt with the
initial "H".



Hartford never complained, but rather "always
boasted of his love for Juliet."
"If she walked into the room a thousand times, he
would smile," Ms McKenzie said.
Also paying their respects were Mr Charlie Dana,
and Minnie Winn, both close friends of.Hartford. Mr
Dana noted of how a quick check on the internet
revealed that during Hartford's life, he dated some
of the world's most notable women, including Lana
Turner, Elizabeth Taylor, and Marilyn Monroe to
name a few.
"But he was always someone who was fascinating,
and terribly creative," he said.
Following the short service, Mr Hartford's body
was taken by Bethel Brothers Mortuary to the Lake-
view cemetery where it was interred.






CHARLIE DANA,
Huntington Hart-
ford's best friend,
pays tribute.


.Your.
radi-. rg -.ean
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.* 5 -'. t : . ; ,








annoudcer a vehie kt4 a
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Wqtff Road. P. O, Box N 9123. Nassau. The Bahamas, TeL 242.325,49621 ax4 ;.23A*4T'


SIDNEY SAWYER,
general manager
of Bethel Brothers
Mortuary, carries
the mahogany
coffin followed by
Huntington Hart-
ford's daughter,
Juliet, and his for-
mer wife, Diane
Brown.


FAMILY mem-
bers and friend
gathering at the .. .
gravesite at .
Lake View
Cemetery. Pic-
tured are
daughter, Juli-
et Hartfod, for-
mer wife, Diane
Brown, Sibilla
Clark and Min-
nie Winn.
PHOTOS: Franklyn


ARCHDEACON KEITH
CARTWRIGHT, of St
Christopher's Angli-
can Church, Lyford
Cay, officiates at the
ceremony.


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MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


4" "s







PAGE 0, MODAY, AY 26 2008THE TIBUN


HARBOURSIDE


MARINE CfSW

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Fictional story serialised in Tribune

inspires in pupils a love of reading


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S PUPILS found a love of
S reading through a story pub-
lished in The Tribune.
The Orphan Journey
Home, a fictional story seri-
alised in The Tribune in
December, was read by chil-
dren in.grades five and six at
Garvin Tynes Primary School
in south west New Providence.
Grade six student Georgette
McKenzie said she was fasci-
nated by the tale.
"From the time I started
reading it it has encouraged
me to read more,"-she said.
"My favourite characters in
the story are Moses and Jesse
because they inspire me the
most.
"They are so brave and
mature to take care of their
little siblings like their own
children."
Isiah Grant in grade five,
said: "There are so many dif-
ferent emotions you feel when
reading it. Sometimes I get
down and excited at the same
time. This is the reason I love
newspaper stories!"
Teacher and librarian Judy
Moncur said the stories are
S--:(:"-' great for children aged eight


to eleven or older, and she is
looking forward to more great
stories in The Tribune.
"Orphan Journey Home is
an excellent story for teach-
ers' read aloud collection. I
recommend it very highly as a
story that can captivate and
hold students attention from
the beginning to the end.
"It is good for those
moments when your class just
needs to settle down quietly,
after lunch or in the morning.


It can also be used. for class
discussion.
"I am looking forward to
some more great stories in the
future."
Mrs Moncur has been com-
piling stories published in The
Tribune for the past three
years and has made two 'big
books', Reading the Sky and
The Secret School. She is cur-
rently putting together a col-
lection of The Orphan Jour-
ney home.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008








THE TRIBUNEMONDYMAY6,2008APAGEW1


Gunmen target

supermarket
FROM page one
The violent robbery in west
Nassau occurred less than two
weeks after New York police
officer John Casper was shot in
an attempted armed robbery in
the area on Wednesday. May
14.
Mr Casper, a father-of-three,
was just metres away from the
former Prime Minister's house
in Cable Beach when he was
accosted by gunmen on his way
to the Cable Beach casino.
However, police superinten-
dent Glen Miller warns resi-
dents all over Nassau to remain
vigilant as armed robberies are
extremely sporadic across the
island.
Hubert Winters, 63, was
killed when a gunman attempt-
ed to rob the Subway sandwich
shop in Palmdale at lunchtime
on Saturday, April 26.
Mr Miller said: "Whenever
these incidents occur we are
concerned and we ask people
to be alert," he said.
"If you see people acting sus-
piciously, or vehicles lurking
suspiciously call police imme-
diately on 919."
Mr Miller said police are
working with City Market to
improve technical security in
the Cable Beach store, and
warns business owners they
should be particularly careful.
He said: "We have had
reports of robbers coming in as
regular customers and then
putting their masks on to hold
up the place.
"And then there are other
incidents when the robbers
storm in wearing masks.
"In the supermarket it may
not be simple to stay safe
because there are so many peo-
ple going in and out.
"But it is important to call
police as soon as you see any-
thing suspicious."
The Central Detective 'Onit
is based in Cable Beach and
mobile units carry out regular
patrols of the area in addition to
officers from local police sta-
tions observing the area, Mr
Miller said.
Anyone with any information
related to Saturday's armed
robbery is "urged to -'afll'
Bahamlas Police'on 322-4444.


Former PLP chairman Raynard Rigby denies conspiracy


FROM page one
in the PLP.
"There is no conspiracy." Mr
Rigby said, "there is no joint
effort here. There is no joint
ventureship there by us."
Mr Wilchcombe has publicly
stated his desire to run for the
deputy leadership of the party
whenever the post is vacated by
the MP for St Cecilia. Cynthia
Pratt. However. since this
announcement. PLP commen-
tators have questioned the
motives behind Mr Rigby, and
other members within the party
who were also critical of the
leader following the party's loss


at the polls. In fact, when Mr
Wilchcombe defended some of
Mr Rigby's more controversial
remarks, insiders believed that
the pair along with others -
were a part of a grand scheme
to wrestle control of the party
away from the Christie faction.
"Wilchcombe he's a for-
mer national chairman of the
party and I think being a for-
mer national chairman of the
party, he understands some
things that unless you hold the
position, you would not under-
stand about our party," Mr Rig-
by continued. "And I think he
recognizes that when I speak
publicly, critically sometimes


about the party, that I speak
because I want to see the best
out of the party.
"And obviously he knows the
party well enough to know that
there will be some out there
who will say, 'well what is he
doing, I wonder if he is still with
us?' I guess by him coming out
publicly and supporting me is
his way of demonstrating that
there are more in our party who
are not as immature, who
believes that you are anti-PLP.
And I take it in that vein," Mr
Rigby said.
Hopefully, Mr Rigby contin-
ued, this will be the beginning of
a culture, where the party


demonstrates that there are per-
sons within the party who are
willing to speak "honestly" with
the people even if it means to
be critical of the party itself.
"Remember now, there are
some people in this country who
believe, that to do what I'm
doing is clearly a 'no, no' in the
PLP, that this would have
caused you to be expelled. But
the party has grown, and we


have to show the country the
level of our party's maturity.
And by doing that is by indi-
cating to the public that you can
be a PLP, you can have a dif-
ferent view from that of the
leadership, you can criticize the
leadership publicly, and you can
still be one of us, marching with
us, shoulder-to-shoulder as we
regain the government. That's
what I'm all about," he said.


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008, PAGE 11










OVERSEAS NEWS


Mexico's war against


* MEXICO CITY
The assassination was an inside
job. The federal police com-
mander kept his schedule secret
and slept in a different place
each night, yet the killer had
the keys to the official's apart-
ment and was waiting for him
when he arrived after midnight,
according to the New York
Times New.s Service.
When the commander, Com-
missioner Edgar Millan Gomez,
the acting chief of the federal
police, died with eight bullets


in his chest on May 8. it sent
chills through a force that had
increasingly found itself a target.
The police say the gunman
had been hired by a disgruntled
federal police officer who
worked for a drug cartel in
Sinaloa state, and the inside
nature of the killing under-
scored just how difficult it is for
President Felipe Calderon to
keep his vow to clean up police
corruption and end the drug-
related violence racking Mexi-
co.
Since coming to office in


December 2006. Calderon has
sought to revamp and profes-
sionalize the federal police
force, using it. with the arm,.
to mount huge interventions in
cities and states once controlled
by drug traffickers.
The result has been mayhem:
a street war in which no target
has been too big, no attack too
brazen for the gangs.
Opposition politicians and
even some police officials have
begun to question whether the
president's ambition has
exceeded his grasp, with dan-


drugs 1

gerous and destabilizing conse-
quences for a country that
shares a 2.000-mile border with
the United States. Bush admin-
istra-tion officials have said
Calderon's efforts might
founder unless the U.S. Con-
gress approves a S1.4 billion
package of equipment and
training over three years for
Mexico's police.
Top security officials who
were once thought untouchable
have been gunned down in
Mexico City, four in the last
month alone. Drug dealers


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killed another seven federal
agents this year in retaliation
for drug busts in border towns.
Others have died in shootouts.
Drug traffickers have killed
at least 170 local police officers
as well, among them at least a
score of municipal police com-
manders, since Calderon took
office. Some were believed to
have been corrupt officers who
had sold out to drug gangs and
were killed by rival gangsters.
investigators say. Others were
slain for doing their jobs.
The president has vowed to
stay the course, portraying the
violence among gangs and
attacks on the police as a sign of
success rather than failure. The
government has smashed the
cartels, he says, forcing a war
among the splinter groups. The
killing of Millan, he has said,
marked "a desperate act to
weaken the federal police."
"What it signifies is a strategy
of some criminal organizations
who seek to terrorize society
and paralyze the government,"
he said last week. "The ques-
tion is, should we persevere and
go forward or simply hide in
our offices and duck our heads?
No way is the Mexican govern-
ment going to back down in
such a fight."
The violence between drug
cartels that Calderon has sought
to end has only worsened over
.the past year and a half. The
death toll has jumped 47 per-
cent to 1,378 so far this year,
prosecutors say. All told, 4,125
people have been killed in drug
violence since Calderon took
office.
But the steady drumbeat of
police killings has caused more
shock here. On Wednesday, for
instance, the second in com-
mand of the police in Morelos
state and his driver were found
dead in the trunk of a car. A
placard on the bodies warned
against joining the Sinaloa Car-
tel.
Several terrified local police
chiefs have resigned, the most
recent being Guillermo Prieto,
the chief in Ciudad Juarez, who
stepped down last week after
his second in command was
killed a few days earlier.
"It is not just happening in

LOCAL NEWS


Ciudad Juarez." Mayor Jose
Reves Ferriz said at the funeral
for the deputy commander,
Juan Antonio Roman Garcia.
"It's happening in Nuevo Lare-
do, in Tijuana, in this entire
region. They are attacking top
commanders to destabilize the
police."
One reason for the surge in
violence is that Calderon and
his public security minister,
Genaro Garcia Luna, have
upset longstanding arrange-
ments between the police and
drug traffickers at every level
of government, several experts
on crime in Mexico said.
Last year, Garcia Luna
removed 284 federal police
commanders across the coun-
try, replacing them with his own
handpicked officers, many from
outside the force, who had been
trained at a new academy and
who had been closely vetted for
signs of corruption.
He has also restructured the
department, demoting dozens
of career officers and putting in
command people he trusts a
small circle of highly educated
outsiders, most with a back-
ground in the military or in
Mexico's espionage service.
Most of these commanders
also served under Garcia Luna
in the previous administration
of President Vicente Fox as part
of the Federal Investigation
Agency, or AFI, an elite force
modeled on the FBI.
The agency showed results.
Fox's government arrested sev-
eral of the country's most noto-
rious drug kingpins, among
them Osiel Cardenas, leader of
the Gulf Cartel, and Benjamin
Arellano Felix, who controlled
Tijuana. The arrests caused tur-
moil inside the cartels and turf
wars among them.
When he took office,
Calderon merged the investiga-
tive agency with the existing
federal police force and put
Garcia Luna in charge. Over
the past 18 months, the new
force has recruited heavily
among college students and for-
mer soldiers.
The government has raised
the starting.pay for officers and
greatly improved training.


'Holding only a


deputy leadership


race absurd'


FROM page one

aside yesterday.
"The PLP can do whatever
they want to do with Raynard
Rigby, I am going nowhere.
They are going to have to deal
with me.
"We have to stop this per-
sonality cult, which is gripping
and destroying the essence of
independence, the essence of
free thought, and the essence
of political creativity. And what
I mean by that is, there is a cul-
ture in the PLP, that unless you


Remicade"

INFLIXIMAB


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ld~~~l l. i :n..uND]oll


are in line with the view of the
leader, or the view of the main-
stream of the party, you are
somehow anti-PLP if you
oppose that position that they
take. Now that is foolish. It is
immature, it is political imma-
turity at its highest level.
"Because all political organi-
zations have groups of people in
there, one who have a particular
view on a subject matter, and
others who would have a dif-
ferent view on a subject mat-
ter.
"Now the responsibility of the
leadership of that party, is to
find a way to bring these two
conflicting and opposing views
together to find the common
group.
"That creates a stronger par-
ty. What if you only have a par-
ty where the membership are
allowed to hold the view of one,
or the view of a few? Then what
happens to those who have the
independence, who can think
for themselves?
"What happens to them? Are
they to be left out of the main-
stream of your political organi-
zation?" he asked.
Mr Rigby said that if change
is to truly come to the PLP, it
must come full force not
halfway.
"It makes no political sense.
That issue, is an issue of tim-
ing. When I said I was not run-
ning again, I said why, because
I felt that as National Chairman
after the party's defeat (at the
polls), you do the honourable
thing and resign," he said.


Marijuana haul
FROM page one

ue to look forward to their sup-
port in the future to making this
country a better country for all
citizens," Mr Evans added.
It is unknown at this time if
the four men in custody have
.any previous drug arrests or
outstanding warrants.


PAGE 12, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008 ,


THE TRIBUNE


~rL











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THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


I& S M-


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0 By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
pburrows@tribunemedia.net

FINALLY, Inagua's best kept secrets will be told
or will they? The southernmost district of the
Bahamas comprised of Great Inagua and
Little Inagua (uninhabited by humans) is home to
friendly folk, unique cuisine, interesting wildlife,
E .I I .I


) extensive ecosystems, indust
way of life that many city re
Fr Still, the island of Inagua
u goes unappreciated, even
) unnoticed, by many Bahami-
ans. Apart from homecoming
time and occasional visits
from central government offi-
BTU cials who come for work, few
yD | Bahamians visit the island,
said br Preston Cunningham,
island administrator.
For the most part, the lack
of Bahamian visitors to this
southern jewel has a lot to do
with the fact that few
Bahamians know about the
island, Dr Cunningham
believes. '
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Exactly what makes Inagua
the Bahamas' best kept
secret? "Well, if I tell you, it
wouldn't be a secret any-
more. We have to keep the
secret you know," Dr Cun-
ningham said with a laugh.
However, he did reveal that
location makes Inagua among
the Bahamas' best kept
secrets.


try, and a quaint island GREAT INAGUA
,sidents crave. The third largest island in
the Bahamas at 596 square
dearth of visitors is the steep miles, Great Inagua lies about
price of getting to the island 55 miles from the eastern tip
($256 on Bahamasair), which of Cuba. The island is about
is perceived to be the main 55 x 19 miles in length, the
reason why Bahamians do highest point being 108 ft on
not consider Inagua as a East Hill. It encloses several
place to visit. lakes, most notably the 12-
Vying for the number one mile long Lake Windsor (also
reason however, Dr Cun- called Lake Rosa) which
ningham believes that occupies nearly one fourth of
unavailability of flights to the the interior, making room for
island is more to blame than Inagua to have a teeming
the cost of the flight. There ecosystem.
are three Bahamasair flights "I often brag that I am one
to Inagua per week, and of the few people in the
those flights are shared with Baha ma.who can get up on
MagaUana. ......'%, ,.
Mayagu ana. anvy ~ giv morning and enjoy
"Iiare foi ar fror niat;: he sounds of the Bahamian
ties when I flel, Bah4roa' .parrot right from my porch,"
salrdis full. So there is diffi- Dr Cunningham told Tribune
culty getting on the flight. Travel.
And when you do manage to And while the island of
get on, you're so limited with Inagua has a lot of potential
respect to what you can bring as a vacation venue, currently
with you. there is insufficient accom-
"It has been my experience modation on the island.
quite a number of times with Rather than bringing in major
my arrival to Inagua that my international investors, Dr
piece didn't arrive. And that Cunningham believes it is far
is very discouraging especial- more beneficial to have
ly for the person who comes Inaguans themselves invest in
down on the Monday flight their own island.
to return on Wednesday. So "What I would like to see
by the time his bag gets here happen is for a number of the
on Wednesday, he is already residents to get together in
on his way back," Dr Cun- little groups and build small
ningham said. guest houses on the beach.
The challenge with air trav- One of the things I observed
el aside, Dr Cunningham in Long Island is where the
maintains that Inagua is still a residents invested in their
place to visit. In fact, it is tru- island which is good to sus-
ly the best kept secret in the, tain the economics of the
Bahamas. island.

I' I 'At


"The foreign guy can come
here with a big hotel and any
minute he can pull up and
he's gone. Where does that
leave us? But the Bahamians
have got no place to go," Dr
Cunningham explained.
And though there may have
been Inaguans who were
interested in building guest
houses on the island, Dr Cun-
ningham said that they may
have been discouraged by the
fact that Inagua was neglected
for far too long.
"We've been left behind all
this time. Suppose I'd invest-
ed my money ten years ago,
where would that have left me
at this time?
"So I figure that right now
somebody must be able to
convince the minds of the
people here that they should
forget about 50 or 70 years
ago when nothing was hap-
pening. We're moving Inagua
forward at this time," he said
explained.
Dr Cunningham also
applauded the Ministry of
Tourism for its renewed inter-
est in the island. Since he
came to Inagua, the Bahama-
host programme was brought
in, and shortly after that there
was a programme for restau-
rant operators.
"It was all to promote qual-
ity service. Inagua is so far
away for a person to come
and find out that the service
isn't the best. That could be
horrible. So we want to make
sure that when these visitors
come, they can be enjoying
Al services," Dr Cunningham
added.
Born in Crooked Island, Dr
Cunningham came to Inagua
in June 2007. However, this
is his 38th year in public ser-
vice' the first 20 spent in edu-
cation and the last 18 years
serving in various islands.
"And trust me, every island
has its merit," Dr Cunning-
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THE TRIBUNE


i
~bx


MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008, PAGE 15 .
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BEGINNING
as sea water
6 months to
one year
earlier, salt
finds its way
on piles at
Morton
Bahamas
Limited.


By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
pburrows@tribunemedia.net

B WITH a climate of low rainfall and tradewinds that has
created the perfect environment, Inagua has natural salt
ponds which Morton Bahamas Limited, the largest
employer on the island hiring close to 80 per cent of
the working population mines through a modernized process.


In a nutshell, the salt is pro-
duced through evaporation of sea
water. However, from the point
where the sea water is pumped
into deep trenches to the final
manufacturing stage where it
finds a home in mounds with oth-
er salt crystals of the same grade
(the company produces three
grades of salt; coarse, chemical
and fishery), there are acres upon
acres of land to cover and much
patience required at each stage
of production. Between six to
twelve months of good weather
(that is, no rain) the sea water
becomes salt.
Sea water is pumped inland at
two stations. During a recent tour
of the salt factory, our visit began
at the lighthouse pumping station
in the southern part of the island
where 50,000 gallons of water is
pumped per minute, 24 hours per
day and every day of the year.
And while you might be con-
cerned that sea life also passes
through this pump, that is virtu-
ally impossible since a large pro-


peller, which revolves at a rate of
2,000 RPM, allows nothing solid
to pass through. However, eggs
can easily get through which
makes it easy to understand how
the salt plant has created a large
ecosystem of its own.
At the time of our visit, local
fishermen had their nets ready at
the opening of the lighthouse sta-
tion to catch fish.
"This plant has been in opera-
tion since the late 1930s and ear-
ly 1940s so it actually created a
whole new ecosystem of fish and
crab and crawfish, and birds feed-
ing, and natural mangroves grow-
ing in the plant now. In fact, the
northern system has just been
labeled a migrant bird stop.
"Right here at the lighthouse
pumping station, we allow peo-
ple to fish freely. This is the sea-
son when the fish are spawning,
when you begin to get broad
chads, snappers, bonefish, bar-
racuda. They catch an abundance
of fish here and send it to family
in Nassau and other islands,"


Vivian Moultrie, manager of
administrative services at Mor-
ton Bahamas, explained during a
recent tour of the facility.
The salt water makes its way
from the south of Inagua, through
a reservoir system and travels
approximately 14.miles eventu-
ally ending up at the northern
part the island.
"As the water moves, it will be
controlled by gates and reservoirs
which are large holding areas
which can be anywhere from 18
to 20 acres to as much as a few
hundred. It is bounded around
by limestone and mud and we
hold water in those large areas
and constantly measure the den-
sity,' Mr Moultrie said.
When the sea water reaches
the density that Morton is looking
for to make salt, it is moved along
to salt pan systems where,
through a continuation of natural
evaporation, the salt water is crys-
tallized into rock salt. This process
takes between six months to one
year with good weather (no rain).
The salt is then harvested,
processed and ready for shipment.
Morton Bahamas Limited is a
branch of'a larger international
company, Morton Salt Compa-
ny, which is based in the United
States.
In 1936 $he Erickson brothers,
of Swampscott, Massachusetts,
revived the salt industry in Inagua
into a successful operation in the
southern portion of the island


m .a = r-..
.- a"-_- .___.-- _._. -.
-r -
.- m. j


which they called "West Indian
Chemical". However, when the
Morton Salt Company bought the
plant from the Ericksons in 1954,
the new owners realized that the
plant needed to be expanded in
order to meet the demands in the
United States for road salt (to be
used for de-icing in the winter
months).
"The Morton Salt Company
created a totally new company in
the northern part of the island.
So you see how much more
expansive the facility is now to
meet the demands of salt," Mr
Moultrie said.
The new system, which covers
both the northern and southern
areas of the company (over 12,000
acres), easily produces 1.2 million
tons of salt per year. Mr Moul-
trie noted that the old southern
system alone produced less than
200,000 tons per year.
"So you're talking about a 300
to 400 per cent increase. The
southern system was designed ini-
tially for manual labour where
people went in and raked the salt
with rakes and shovels and piled it
onto carts drawn by mules, then
in the 1950s came the locomo-
tives which replaced the mules,"
Mr Moultrie said.
Though the factory does
employ nearly 80 per cent of the
population, a tour of the facility
reveals that times have definitely
changed. Like any big business
today, technology at Morton has


lightened the load. Ergonomical-
ly altered tractors are used to
break up the brine in the salt
ponds and loads of salt are carted
off. The salt arrives at the wash
and deposit plants where it is
washed and passed through an
automated sorting system that
separates the various grades of
salt. A large machine acts as the
sifter, separating the fine fishery
grade salt, the slightly larger
chemical grade salt, and the large
salt crystals or x-coarse grade salt.
Each grade moves up a different
Conveyor belt that piles the salt
according to grade.
At the time of our visit, there
were only a few piles of salt -
which is in contrast to pictures
I've seen of the salt mounds in
Inagua. However, it all speaks to
the unpredictability of any busi-
ness. Mr Moultrie said that
unprecedented rainfall in Inagua
over the past three years is to


"~.- ."




'''






blame. The company found itself
having to cut off some interna-
tional sales.
The salt produced at Morton
Bahamas is packaged for different
purposes and exported to cus-
tomers in the United States,
Canada, Greenland, Iceland,
Puerto Rico and Jamaica to be
used as rock salt for many differ-
ent applications. X-coarse grade
salt for example, is used to pro-
duce rust remover and water salt
softener. Eighty per cent of the
chemical salt is used for highway
safety or de-icing snow. Fishery
grade is shipped mostly to Nor-
way, Canada, Iceland and
Argentina for the preservation of
fish.
Ironically though, the Morton
brand of table salt that we pur-
chase in the Bahamas is not pro-
duced in Inagua. It is imported
from a Morton plant in the Unit-
ed States.


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Invites applications for the positions of:


DIRECTOR OF TRAINING

FOOD & BEVERAGE

Applicant must have at least five years experience
as the Director of a Five Star Restaurant must
have excellent teaching, written and oral
communication organizational and interpersonal
skills are able to train and motivate team
members, good track record in Managing people
able to establish and maintain high standards.
Formal qualifications and computer skills
desirable, be able to work flexible and long hours.

Fax or email resumes with proof of qualifications
and experience to:
cmajor@grp.sandals.com
Fax 327-6961

Closing date May 30, 2008.


BALDWIN
-77se e / Q7 2a /*


Charles L. Cae
&Son-
*FINE BUILDERS HARDWARE & PLUMBING*
Established 1951
Dowdeswell Street Tel: 322-1103


I


PAGE 16, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBNE MONDYTMAYV6L 2008OPAGES1


THE CONTACT BAND of Inagua perform at a brief musical showcase on the homecoming grounds in
Inagua.


INAGU


4i,



U By PETURA BURROWS bec
Tribune Feature Writer
pburrows@tribunemedia.net doi
CIO


IF Inagua is known internationally for its salt,
then the island is known nationally for its
musical exports. Thanks to several sons of the
soil like Avvy and Stiletto, the very inconspicuous
island of Inagua is seen as a major contender when
it comes to popular Bahamian music.


Now, the Contact Band (for-
merly Island Breeze Band) is
adding their sound to the line-
up of Inagua's musical exports.
Their breakout hit, "Lawn-
mower" is a seductive ditty
which is open to interpreta-
tion. It's typical of other pop-
ular Bahamian songs that have
obvious innuendoes. Howev-
er, songwriter Donavan Roker,
lead singer of the band, isn't
admitting to any undertones.
"At home you always have
women making you do this and
that and they always want to
get catered to. They want you
to go outside and cut the grass.
So I just decided to come up
with this song about women
wanting you to be their lawn-
mower," he said.
"But like KB says, every-
body puts their own meaning
to a song, so it's whatever to
them," he said.
While performing their hit
song at the regatta grounds in
Inagua, the band had the small
crowd very much entertained.
Some onlookers even attempt-
ed to try the dance for the
song. There were actually
three different dances going
on.
"See what I'm saying, every-,
body has their own dance and
the song has its own meaning
to them," Mr Roker said.
The true lawnmower dance,
however, begins with the per-
son starting up the lawnmower
by pulling the string and then


moving along as if pushing an
actual lawnmower. But one
resident's version of the dance
- which was some sort of down-
ward whining motion seemed
to be the most popular. She
was busy teaching several
members of the Nassuvian del-
egation her version.
No stranger to entertain-
ment, Mr Roker and his band
know how to get a crowd
hyped. Mr Roker began as a
singer in church, he then start-
ed up the Contact Band. And
they would back up Avvy and
Stiletto whenever they per-
formed.
When it comes to Inagua
producing Bahamian singers
like Avvy, Stiletto or even
Bassie, who sings "The Num-
ber Man", Mr Roker believes
that Bahamians should watch
out for the islanders.
"We have a lot of stuff going
on in the community. So peo-
ple just look and write what
they see. So basically what
you're hearing is exactly what
is going on in the island. We
had a lot of bands, but nobody
really broke out nationally in
those days," Mr Roker said of
Iriagua's musical background.
He credits Avvy with putting
Inagua's artists on the map,
and also helping to mold the
band. "Avvy got the young
people back into the music and
he really pushed it. He always
used to work with us and said
we got to keep practicing


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cause he said we were good.
'So we said since Avvy is
ing something, we need to
Snm th;nn ton WP ;t it


Uo something I ooJll e JUOL
couldn't have a band without
having a song out there," he
added.
The band's first song, "Island
Girl: Bahamian Soca" was put
on ZNS. After a while howev-
er, it was dropped from rota-
tion. Now, "Lawnmower" is
enjoying serious popularity.
Fans can also listen out for
upcoming hot ones like "Nosey
iIn-Law", "Mi Cha Cha" and
"Go Gal". An album will drop
this summer.
Considering all of the music
that Inagua is presenting, Mr
Roker said that Contact is not
lacking local support. During
homecoming, rather than
bringing in bands Avvy, and
other stars, even persons like
KB who hails from another
island, use the Contact Band.
They've played for Terez
Davis, Geno D, Ira Storr, and
travel to the Turks & Caicos
on a regular basis.
"People can look out for
some big, big things coming out
of Inagua," Mr Roker boasts.


NEW AD as of
FEB 18, 2008


Great Guana Cay. Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
You are invited to apply for the following position currently available.


Director Food & Beverage


Key Responsibilities
4 Provide overall administration of all food and beverage outlets.
\ Create and implement department policies, operating manuals, and
job descriptions; ensure adherence to department and overall
company policies.
4 Manage and direct the recruitment, selection and ongoing training of
food and beverage staff to Club standards and ensure compliance
with proper food handling and sanitation procedures.
4 Make revenue forecasts; manage department budget, inventory,
labor, and food and beverage costs.
4 Along with the Executive Chef, plan menus, set prices, and coordinate
special events.
' Facilitate set up and breakdown of events and internal functions.

Qualifications
4 High School diploma or equivalent
4 A minimum of a Bachelor's degree in Food and Beverage
Management or related field is preferred
4 At least 10 years related experience in the same or similar position
4 Previous experience in a hotel dr private club preferred.
4 Experience working in multiple operations preferred.
4 A minimum of two years international experience an asset.
4 Experience in opening a property a plus

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing
and dynamic organization and must be a self-starter, team player,
work at the highest standards of performance, .and meet deadlines.


If you are progressive and prepared to advance
your resume to the attention of the Director
hr(bakersbvclub.com or by fax at 242-367-0804.


your career, submit
of HR & Training,


m i.













ag iL's.
_'h l






















4r 4 4 *. 4 4 .




-a


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008, PAGE 17









PG1,OD ,M 2,28HTRU


Wfld


IN IC


Xavier Cathedral


WILL BE


CLOSED

to retain ownership rights between the
hours of 6:00am to 6:00pm
on Friday; June 6th, 2008


&


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
pburrows@tribunemedia.net


H THEY say that a trip to Inagua is not complete
until you've had a taste of some of the exotic
local delicacies made by some of the best
chefs on the island. While the thought of consuming
wild hog and wild donkey may not induce instant
salivation for you, to many Inaguans there is nothing
quite as satisfying as one of those delectable dishes.


Forty-eight year old Lilly
Beneby, who has lived in
Inagua all her life, has been
cooking since she was nine
years old. During our trip to
Inagua, (the Ministry of
Tourism hosted a media
familiarization trip) she
cooked up the infamous wild
hog as Bahamas @ Sunrise
cameras looked on. She is
also known for making a
mean steamed wild donkey,
which she cooked just in
time before I was scheduled
to leave the island.
Truth is, wild meat isn't
the easiest to prepare. The
wild hog is hunted, then
cleaned.-..to some degree.
When the meat is purchased
from hunters, Ms ieneby
npted, cooks still have' togo
.gver the meat with a razor
in order to thoroughly clean
it for cooking.
The meat is then chopped
up and seasoned, just like
you would any pork product.
The meat is then boiled
depending on how thick the
hog's bran (skin) is. Usually,
this boiling process takes one
hour. After boiling, some of
the water is preserved, and,
the meat is simmered down
with chopped onions, celery,
sweet peppers and other veg-
etables, tomato paste and/or
barbecue sauce, and a little
bit of browning. It is then
seasoned with thyme and hot
pepper.
"That's a real popular dish
around here in.Inagua, so we
do it in homecoming time or
sometimes you cook it at
home for a Sunday dish. It's
many ways you can cook the


meat. Some people souse it.
You can curry it, put it in the
baker and barbecue it down -
do it anyway you want to do
it," she added.
Inaguans swear that this
wild hog has a far better
flavour than the regular
pork. After the hog is killed
and cleaned, hunters
swingee" it over the fire.
"That gives like a smoked
taste," Ms Beneby said.
When it comes to the wild
donkey, which is competing
with the hog meat for popu-
larity, Ms Beneby said that
it is difficult to tell the dif-
ference between Inaguan
wild donkey meat and prime
beef.
"If they put that in the
shop, you'll think that's the
real beef you get out the
store. The meat is very good
and tender. It doesn't take
long to done. You can bar-
becue that down, you can
steam it, curry it or make
souse. Some people slice it
up like pork chops or cut it
up like ribs and cook that.
Some people say it tastes like
beef," she noted.
Although she champions
the wild donkey meat, ironi-
cally, Ms Beneby said that
she doesn't eat it herself.
"I just don't have the
nerve to eat it, I see them
running round. But I cook it
a lot," she added with a
laugh.
Historically speaking, no
one on the island actually
knows exactly when and how
Inaguans first caine to eat
wild donkey arid hog meat.
HoWever, :Ms 'Beleby- told


tasty

Tribune Travel that for some
time people didn't eat it.
Then, in recent years, the
young people began cooking
the meat again during a par-
ty or after a wedding.
"People even ship it out to
Freeport and other islands
when they're having a big
party or a wedding. So don-
key meat is in the midst.
When you go to Nassau to,a
party you never know;'you
may be eating donkey meat
and don't know," Ms Beneby
said.
I seriously doubt it.
Ms Beneby said that she
was able to fool an unsus-
pecting Morton Salt worker
into eating donkey meat. She
cooked up a nice pot of don-
key meat and took it to the
salt factory and gave it to the
workers on their lunch break.
One of the men, who swore
that he would never eat wild
donkey meat, ended up eat-
ing the meal and askingfor
seconds. When it was
revealed that the meat was a
wild donkey, the man wanted
to vomit.
"But by then it was too
late. The meat was already
down," Ms Beneby recalled.
All of the other workers were
in on the ruse, and they also
found it to be very funny.
Another cook on the
island, 73 year old Geraldine
Pyfrom, doesn't bother with
the wild meat. In fact, you
will never find wild donkey
or hog in her pot, she said
with a laugh.
"Now they say the wild
meat is better than any roast
beef, but I never put my
hand on it. A lot of people
are crazy about it though.
They come up here and they
go crazy over wild boar and
wild donkey, oh my good-
ness. They say that it is the
best meat going," she told
Tribune Taste with a laugh.
Fortunately for squeamish
tastebuds, Ms Pyfrom's taste
of Inagua is more tame. She
has a very tasty Cream
Conch Chowder that is also a
hit among Inaguans:' (See
recipe).
*. i i ,. - ,,'*


The Bahamas Electricity Corporation ("BEC") is seeking for proposals from Companies / Entities /
Firms ("Tenderers") interested in producing electrical power from renewable sources on one of the
islands within BEC's area of supply.

Tenderers wishing to submit proposals for this project will also be required to submit
comprehensive details to allow the following areas to be evaluated for pre-qualification: -

i) Experience and past performance of the company on similar projects.
ii) Capability of the company to undertake the project with respect to personnel,
equipment, structure, organization and financial resources

Documents may be obtained by contacting the address below no later than 4:00 PM on
9th June, 2008.

All documents must be prepared in English and every request made for the documents must be
accompanied by a non-refundable application fee of US$100 if applying from outside the
Balamas and B$50 if applying from within the Bahamas. Documents may be sent by electronic
mail. The method of payment will be by cashier's check or wire transfer to a specified
bank account.

Completed documents iust be received no later than 4:00 PM EDT, 21st July, 2008 at the
following address:

Kevin Basden,
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
Executive Offices
P.O. Box N-7509, Nassau, Bahamas.

Renewable Technologies Committee (RTC)
E-Mail: Rtc@Bahamaselectricity.com
Fax: +1 (242) 323 6852

Label Envelope
Request For Proposals: Renewable Energy -Power Generation
Implementation Project


All decisions of the corporation will be final.


Sister, Sister
c.. r Ccw &uppoa Grp
'. :


* DOCTORS HOSPITAL

The Tribune
1, wa. /%y W''/1


I-- -


- ---


I -ao~s~a~laRaIBL e -


PAGE 18, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


THE TRIBUNE







IiT AVLi TO RIMI


naguan



Ponch (


Scream

Show er

howh-I-der


* By GERALDINE PYFROM
INIEDIENTS:
6 fresh conchs; skinned and
bruised
6 Irish potatoes; peeled and
diced
One tin of whole kernel corn
(sweet corn)
4 strips of bacon
1 whole onion; diced
1/2 stick of butter
1 tin of condensed milk
METHOD: I
1. Boil the conch and put them
in a pressure cooker for 20 min-
utes to tenderize.
2. Put the conchs in a food
processor and grind them to a
coarse texture. Set that aside.
3. Boil the potatoes in about 6
cups of water (the excess water
is for the broth). Once potatoes
are soft, mash half the potatoes,
in the water, leaving the other ,


half unmashed in the same
water.
4. Add the processed conch to
the water.
5. Add a tin of whole kernel
corn (sweet corn). Pour in the
water as well.
6. Fry the bacon strips until
crisp. Remove it from the fat
and set aside.
7. Saut6 the diced onions in the
bacon fat, then add the onions
to the conch and potato mixture.
8. Let the mixture simmer for
10 minutes.
9. Crumble bacon strips and
add to the mixture..
10. Add the butter and stir until
melted (margarine doesn't give
the chowder much flavour).
11. Pour in the condensed milk.
*.Cook until the cream is heated.
Do not allow it to boil since, it
will develop suds.
12. Season the chowder to taste
,with salt and pepper or any sea-
sonings you like.


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THE TRIBUNE





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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 20 MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


..OVA&3


VA ir


* *


~i~
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'"


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;


"-







INTRNTINALNES*


IN THIS PHOTO released by the Florida Keys News Bureau, Bebe Clark leads the Key West Comparsa Dancers
down Duval Street in Key West, Fla., late Friday, May 23, 2008, during a Coast-to-Coast Conga Line that
opened the Key West Cuban American Heritage Festival. The festival, that celebrates economic and cultural impacts
of those Cubans that immigrated to Key West since 1868, continues through Sunday, May 25. Cuba is just 90
miles south of Key West.


AP opens exhibit of


photojournalism

Workshop also organised for photographers


* HAVANA
The Associated Press opened an exhibit of his-
toric and current photojournalism on Saturday, to
be followed by a three-day workshop for promis-
ing local photographers.
The three-month exhibition was mounted at
the San Francisco Convent in Old Havana, across
a plaza from the AP's Cuba bureau. A parallel
workshop for 16 Cuban students and working
photographers aimed to foster quality news pho-
tography on the island.
The exhibit features dozens of historic images
from AP's photo archive, focusing on coverage of
conflicts in places such as Vietnam, Iraq and oth-
er parts of the Middle East. It also includes stand-
out images from Latin America.
AP's director of-photography, Santiago Lyon,


opened the exhibit at a gathering of about 200
journalists, artists and officials.
"We look forward to showing some of the AP's
best photojournalism to the Cuban public and
professionals as well as working with Cuban pho-
tographers to demonstrate and explain best prac-
tices and techniques fpr effective visual commu-
nication," he said.
The exhibition was edited by Enric Marti, the
AP's regional photo editor for Latin America
and the Caribbean, and Dario Lopez, the AP's
chief photographer for Mexico and Central Amer-
ica.
The workshop was organized by Ricardo Maza-
lan, AP's chief photographer for Colombia, and
was being conducted by Mazalan, Marti, Lopez
and AP's chief photographer for Cuba, Javier
Galeano.


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1P *"*-*


. 1*1 10. 0


~33~X~t;: i

~Bj~i~











THE MIDDLE EAST



Sewage spreading from Gaza's



shores is a growing health concern


* By ROBERT W. GEE
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip
The fish are no longer safe to
eat, beaches are empty, and an
expanding sewage crisis in the
Gaza Strip threatens Israel's
shores, according to Cox News
Service.
Shortages of fuel and spare
parts have crippled Palestinian
sewage treatment facilities,
already strained by the fast-
growing population, forcing offi-
cials to divert constant streams


of raw and semi-treated sewage
into the Mediterranean Sea.
"It's a matter of regional con-
cern, not just a Gaza concern,"
said Mahmoud Daher, head of
the Gaza office of the United
Nations World Health Organi-
zation. "Because the sea cur-
rent is going to the north, what
is done to the Gaza beach will
certainly reach Ashkelon and
Tel Aviv, or Haifa even," he
said, referring to Israeli coastal
cities.
A recent United Nations


report cites Israel's blockade on
the territory part of an ongo-
ing effort to isolate Hamas, the
Islamist organization that seized
power last summer and is
pledged to Israel's destruction
- as the primary factor in the
sewage dumping.
Israel claims that Gaza
receives ample fuel for human-
itarian needs, including the
operation of sewage treatment
plants, but that Hamas hordes
fuel for its own use. Hamas has
denied this.


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Water quality tests conducted
in late April by the World
Health Organization at 13
points along Gaza's coast found
that four sites three in Gaza
SCity and one in Rafah, in the
south are contaminated with
dangerous levels of bacteria
associated with feces.
The findings, to be published
in an upcoming report warning
of health risks in Gaza and
Israel, revealed high concentra-
tions of fecal coliforms and fecal
streptococci, which indicate the
possible presence of disease-
causing bacteria and viruses.
Palestinian health officials
have recommended that beach-
es near the contaminated water
be closed for the season and
have urged fishermen not to fish
close to the coastline.
Since January, between 13.2
million and 16.9 million gallons
of partially treated and untreat-
ed sewage from the Gaza Strip
have been flowing daily into the
Mediterranean Sea, according
to Palestinian water authority
officials and a report issued by
the United Nations humanitar-
ian office in Gaza.
Gaza sewage has long flowed
into the Mediterranean, some-
times in open streams, the result
of long-term neglect, but the
problem has sharply worsened
in recent months, Palestinian
officials said.
Last October, Israel declared
Gaza a "hostile territory" and
reduced electricity, fuel and oth-
er supplies into Gaza as sanc-
tions against Hamas, which con-
tinues to fire rockets into south-
ern Israel. This month, rocket
strikes killed two Israelis and
seriously injured three others.
Frequent, hours-long cuts to
the territory's electricity have
forced officials to increasingly
rely on generators to power the
sewage treatment network, but
Gaza's water authority has
received only one-third of the
fuel it ieeds t0orifi the geinera-
tors, the U.N. report said.
Two weeks ago,. Israel


"There is a
political will
to punish
Gaza. We are
polluting our
sea, but
Israelis are
paying their
own price."

Monther Shoblak
responded to a months-old
request for spare parts for
Gaza's sewage system. Thirteen
of 25 shipment requests were
approved and are awaiting
delivery, eight remain under
review and four were rejected
because they included pipes that
could be used to make rockets,
said Peter Lerner, spokesman
for Israel's Defense Ministry.
Of all the consequences of
Israel's blockade rising
unemployment and poverty, a
greater reliance on food hand-
outs, and a beleaguered health
care system the sewage
dumping affects a shared
resource for both Palestinians
and Israelis.
"We are concerned about the
sewage being pumped into the
sea. Of course it doesn't stop at
the border," Lerner said.
A spokesman for Israel's
environment ministry said the
ministry was not aware of
sewage polluting the Mediter-
ranean.
The general director of the
Ashkelon Desalination Plant,
which is located three miles
north of Gaza and produces 13
percent of Israel's domestic con-
sumer demand, confirmed that
seawater processed by the plant


is polluted by sewage believed
to be from Gaza. according to
the U.N. report.
The plant did not respond to
questions regarding additional
costs the facility may be incur-
ring to treat the polluted water.
Roughly one-third of the
sewage being dumped into the
sea comes from pumping sta-
tions in Beach Camp, a refugee
camp of 80,000 people. Gener-
ators lack the fuel to pump
sewage to Gaza City's treat-
ment plant, so most of the
sewage from the camp flows
directly into the sea without any
treatment at all, according to
top officials with Gaza's water
authority.
The sewage that does make it
to the main treatment facility
can only be partially treated
because its generator is running
at 40 percent efficiency.
Gaza's sewage woes gained
international attention last year
when a lagoon of human waste
breached a sand embankment
and inundated a village. Five
Palestinians drowned.
A $74 million project admin-
istered by the World Bank
meant to expand the limited
sewage treatment network that
led to the tragedy has been
delayed by violence and poli-
tics. Israel has approved the
project, but Israeli military
incursions, Palestinian infight-
ing, fuel shortages, and most
recently a strike by Palestinian
fuel distributors, has slowed
progress.
Other international projects
to rehabilitate the sewage sys-
tem are on hold after Western
countries restricted aid money
to Gaza because Hamas is wide-
ly labeled a terrorist group.
"There is a political willing-
ness to punish Gaza," said Mon-
ther Shoblak, director of the
Gaza Emergency Water Project
of the Palestinian water utility.
"We are polluting our sea, but
(Israelis) are paying their own
price."


LEBANON: Back from the brink of civil war


ta

o

MEMBERS of Hezbollah plant flowers in a flowerbed as they restore the site of the opposition protest camp to
its former state, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, Friday, May 23, 2008. Normal life continued to return to the area
of the former protest camp after protesters removed their tents and authorities took away barricades, razor wire,
and concrete roadblocks from the downtown area of Beirut.
























-a-
styles with a

%oOFF o
VSALE ""d

5E ^ LEBANESE take a stroll past a mural in the Hamra street shopping district
of downtown Beirut, Lebanon, Saturday, May 24, 2008. A the eve of its
long delayed presidential election, Beirut was in a festive mood as war-
S 327,.7072 weary Lebanese were cautiously jubilant that their country has stepped
back from the brink of an all-out civil war.


PAGE 22, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


THE TRIBUNE







I Mn I MIUic ... .



EUROPE


Italy embraces



nuclear power

* By ELISABETH ROSENTHAL
ROME
Italy announced that within five years it planned to resume
building nuclear energy plants, two decades after a public refer-
endum resoundingly banned nuclear power and deactivated all
its reactors, according to the New York Times News Service.
"By the end of this legislature, we will put down the foundation
stone for the construction in our country of a group of new-gen-
eration nuclear plants," said Claudio Scajola, minister of econom-
ic development. "An action plan to go back to nuclear power can-
not be ueiayed anymore."
The change is a striking sign of the times, reflecting growing
concern in many European countries over the skyrocketing price of
oil and energy security, and the warming effects of carbon emissions
from fossil fuels. All have combined to make this once-scorned form
of energy far more palatable.
"Italy has had the most dramatic, the most public turnaround, but
the sentiments against nuclear are reversing very quickly all across
Europe Holland, Belgium, Sweden, Germany and more," said
Ian Hore-Lacey, spokesman for the World Nuclear Association, an
industry group based in London.
The rehabilitation of nuclear power was underscored in January
when John Hutton, the British business secretary, grouped it with
"other low-carbon sources of energy" like biofuels. It was barely
mentioned in the government action plan on energy three years ear-
lier.
Echoing the sentiment on Thursday, Scajola said, "Only nuclear
plants safely produce energy on a vast scale with competitive costs,
respecting the environment."
A number of European countries have banned or restricted
nuclear power in the last 20 years, including Italy, which closed all
its plants. Germany and Belgium have long prohibited the building
of reactors, although existing ones were allowed to run their natural
lifespan. France was one of the few countries that'continued to rely
heavily on nuclear power.
Environmental groups in Italy immediately attacked any plan to
bring back nuclear power. Giuseppe Onufrio, a director of Green-
peace Italy, called the announcement "a declaration of war."
Emma Bonino, an opposition politician and vice president of the
Italian Senate, said building nuclear plants made no economic
sense because they would not be ready for at least 20 years.
"We should be investing more in solar and wind," she said. "We
should be moving much more quickly to improve energy efficien-
cy, of buildings, for example. That's something Italy has never
done anything with."
But conditions were very different in the 1980s, when Euro-
pean countries turned away from nuclear power. Oil cost less than
50 a barrel, global warming was a fringe science and climate
change had not been linked to manmade emissions. Perhaps more
important for the public psyche, almost all of Europe's nuclear bans
and restrictions were enacted after the 1986 Chernobyl disaster in
the Soviet Union in which radioactivity was released into the envi-
ronment.
The equation has changed. Today, with oil approaching $150 a
barrel, most European countries, which generally have no oil and
gas resources, have been forced by finances to consider new forms
of energy and fast.
New nuclear plants take 20 years to build. Also, Europeans
watched in horror in 2006 as President Vladimir V. Putin of Rus-
sia cut off the natural gas supply to Ukraine in a price dispute, leav-
ing that country in darkness.
New green technologies, like solar power, wind and biofuel,
cannot yet form the backbone of a country's energy strategy, and
it is not clear that they will ever achieve that level.
Italy is the largest net energy importer in Europe, but nearly all
European countries rely heavily on imported energy particularly
oil and gas.
ENEL, Italy's leading energy provider, announced this year that
it would close its oil-fired power plants because the fuel had
become unaffordable. Italians pay the highest energy prices in
Europe. ENEL has been building coal plants to fill the void left by
oil, a move that created controversy. Coal plants are cheaper but
create relatively high levels of carbon emissions, even using the type
of new "clean coal" technology that ENEL had planned.
A few European countries, like Germany and Poland, could
likewise fall back on their abundant coal reserves if they rejected
oil and gas but most of the coal mined in each country is of low
grade and pollutes highly.
After the government announcement opening Italy to nuclear
power, ENEL's managing director, Fulvio Conti, said, "We are
ready." But he added that "new regulation and strong agreement
on the plan within the country" would be needed.
ENEL, which operates power plants in. several European coun-
tries, already has at least one nuclear plant, in Bulgaria, and has
been researching so-called fourth-generation nuclear reactors,
which are intended to be safer and to minimize waste and the use
of natural resources. Italy's old reactors still exist, but are too out-
dated to be reopened. New ones would have to be built.


Teen actor in upcoming 'Harry Potter'

film stabbed to death in London brawl


~1t

0 :


UNDATED image released Saturday May 24, 2008, by Britain's Metropolitan Police, showing murdered actor who stared in a Harry Potter movie,
teenager Robert Knox, right, with his mother Sally and 17-year old brother Jamie. Ron Knox was stabbed to death in a fight outside a bar in Sid-
cup, England on Saturday May, 24, 2008. Four other men were hurt in the fight, and one man is arrested on suspicion of the murder. Knox played
Marcus Belby in the movie "Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince".


* LONDON
A British teenage actor playing a minor
role in the upcoming "Harry Potter" film
was stabbed to death during a brawl in Lon-
don on Saturday, police saic, according to
the Associated Press.
Rob Knox, 18, was stabbed after he got
caught up in a fight outside a bar in south-


west London early Saturday, London's Met-
ropolitan Police said in a statement.
Knox plays Ravenclaw student Marcus
Belby in the upcoming film "Harry Potter
And The Half-Blood Prince," the sixth
installment of the popular series set for
release in November.
Warner Bros., the studio that is producing
the film, said it was shocked by the news.


Knox was one of five young men taken to
various hospitals after the brawl, police
said. Among them was a 21-year-old who
has since been arrested on suspicion of mur-
der.
The fight did not appear to be gang-relat-
ed, police added, but it puts the number of
violent teenage deaths in London at 14 so
far this year.


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THE IRAQ CONFLICT


US SOLDIERS of 4th Infantry Division, 42nd Field Artillery, search a house as they patrol at Sheik Marouf
neighborhood, Karkh district, Baghdad, Iraq, on Friday, May 23, 2008.


E



GASAN, son of Jalal Kassan Thabit who was released from detention by U.S. troops, looks for his father, as the
released people swear on the holy Quran to obey the laws of Iraq, at a U.S. base inside Baghdad's Sunni neigh-
bourhood of Azamiyah, Saturday, May, 24, 2008. U.S. troops released 21 men from detention Saturday.



US spending in Iraq is



in shambles, audit finds

* By JAMES GLANZ


S.,, Much re, .ore .
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A Pentagon audit of $8.2 bil-
lion in American taxpayer mon-
ey spent by the U.S. Army on
contractors in Iraq has found
That almost none of the pay-
ments followed federal rules
and that in some cases, con-
tracts worth millions of dollars
were paid for despite little or
no record of what, if anything,
was received, according to the
New York Times News Service.
The audit also found a some-
times stunning lack of account-
ability in the way the U.S. mili-
tary spent some $1.8 billion in
seized or frozen Iraqi assets,
which in the early phases of the
conflict were often doled out in
stacks or pallets of cash. The
audit was released on Thursday
in tandem with a congressional
hearing on the payments.
In one case, according to doc-
uments displayed by Pentagon
auditors at the hearing before
the House Committee on Over-
sight and Government Reform,
.a cash payment of $320.8 mil-
lion in Iraqi q9pq y was autho-
rized on the basis of a ingle sig-
nature and the words "Iraqi
Salary Payment" on an invoice.
In another, $11.1 million of tax-
payermoney was paid to IAP,
an American contractor, on the
basis of a voucher with no indi-
cation of what was delivered.
Mary L. Ugone, the Pen-
tagon's deputy inspector gen-
eral for auditing, told members
of the committee that the
absence of anything beyond a
voucher meant that "we were
giving or providing a payment
without any basis for the pay-
ment."
"We don't know what we
got," Ugone said in response to
questions by the committee
chairman, Henry A. Waxman,
D-Calif. The new report is espe-
cially significant because while
other federal auditors have
severely criticized the way the
United States has handled pay-
ments to contractors in Iraq,
this is the first time that the Pen-
tagon itself has acknowledged
the mismanagement on any-
thing resembling this scale.
The disclosure that $1.8 bil-
lion in Iraqi assets was mishan-


"The report is further
documentation of the fact that the
United States had absolutely no
preparation to use contracting on
the scale that it needed either at
the military or aid level in going to
war in Iraq."


Anthony H. Cordesman


died comes on top of an earlier
finding by an independent fed-
eral oversight agency, the Spe-
cial Inspector General for Iraq
Reconstruction, that U.S. occu-
pation authorities early in the
conflict could not account for
the disbursement of $8.8 billion
in Iraqi oil money and seized
assets.
"This report is further docu-
mentation of the fact that the
United States had absolutely no
preparation to use contracting
on the scale that it needed
either at the military or aid lev-
el in going to war in Iraq," said
Anthony H. Cordesman of the
Center for Strategic and Inter-
national Studies in Washington.
"We had really allowed our-
selves to become more and
more dependent on contractors
in peacetime," said Cordesman,
who spoke in a telephone inter-
view on Thursday. "We were
unprepared to use contractors
in wartime, and all of this had
an immense impact."
The Pentagon report, titled
"Internal Controls Over Pay-
ments Made in Iraq, Kuwait
and Egypt," also notes that
auditors were unable to find a
comprehensible set of records
to explain $134.8 million in pay-
ments by the American military
to its allies in the Iraq war.
The mysterious payments,
whose amounts had not been
publicly disclosed, included
68.2 million to the United
Kingdom, $45.3 million to
Poland and $21.3 million to
South Korea. Despite repeated
requests, Pentagon auditors said
they were unable to determine


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why the payments were made.
"It sounds like the coalition
of the willing is the coalition of
the paid they're willing to be
paid," said Waxman, who later
in the day introduced what he
called a "clean contracting"
amendment to a defense autho-
rization bill being debated on
the House floor. The amend-
ment, which was accepted by
voice vote, would institute a
number of reforms including
new whistleblower protections
and requirements on competi-
tive bidding.
The audit was carried out by
the Defense Department Office
of the Inspector General, which
is led by Claude M. Kicklighter,
a retired lieutenant general.
Kicklighter was not at the
Thursday hearing because of a
scheduling conflict.
Many of the previous investi-
gations of payments to contrac-
tors in Iraq have focused on the
flawed effort to rebuild the
country's decrepit electricity
grid, oil infrastructure, trans-
portation network and public
institutions. The feeble account-
ability and spotty paperwork of
the contracts examined by Kick-
lighter's office make it difficult
to say what many of them were
for, but the report indicates that
many appeared to be for things
as mundane as bottles of water,
truck rentals and food deliver-
ies. According to the report, the
Army made 183,486 "commer-
cial and miscellaneous pay-
ments" from April 2001 to June
2006 from field offices in Iraq,
Kuwait and Egypt, for a total
of $10.7 billion in taxpayer mon-
ey. The auditors focused on $8.2
billion in so-called commercial
payments to contractors -
American, Iraqi and probably
other foreign citizens -
although the report does not
give details on the roster of
companies.
Because the contracts were
too numerous to be examined
one by one, the auditors said
they took a standard approach
and examined 702 statistically
representative contracts, then
extrapolated the results to the
full set.
When the results were com-
piled, they revealed a lack of
accountability notable even by
the shaky standards detailed in
earlier examinations of con-
tracting in Iraq. The report said
that about $1.4 billion in pay-
ments lacked even minimal doc-
umentation "such as certified
vouchers, proper receiving
reports and invoices," to explain
what had been purchased and
why.
Another $6.3 billion in pay-
ments did contain information
explaining the expenditures but
lacked other information
required by federal regulations
governing the use of taxpayer
money things like payment
terms, proper identification
.numbers and contact informa-
tion for the agents involved in
the transaction, Taken together,
those results meant tha(almost
95 percent of the payments had
'not been properly documented.


SlDIS3 JONEI &C


PAGE 24, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


r Intelligent. Creative. Efficient. :] I


pIAYEtS
S,! iR~ hC)I "








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008, PAGE 25


INERAIOA NW


Mexico ties rise in killings to its crackdown on drugs


* MEXICO CITY
Killings related to an underworld war
between drug cartels have increased sharply
this year, a clear sign the rising tide of vio-
lence in Mexico is not about to ebb, the attor-
ney general said Friday, according to the New
York Times News Service.
In a radio interview, the nation's top prose-
cutor said 1,378 people had been killed in 2008,
compared with 940 in the first five months of
last year, when President Felipe Calderon
began an unprecedented assault on drug cartels
with thousands of soldiers and federal agents.
The prosecutor, Eduardo Medina Mora,
echoed recent comments by the president as he
characterized the soaring violence as a sign
the government had succeeded in weakening
and breaking up the country's main cartels.
The government's theory is that recent
arrests and seizures have created a power vac-


uum, and lower-level groups are fighting for
turf. "Evidently when they are cornered and
weakened, they have to respond with violence,"
Medina Mora said.
Not all the dead have been gangsters. The
cartels have also struck at the police.
At least 450 law enforcement officials are
among the 4,152 people who have died over the
year and half since the Calderon administration
bzgan pressing the drug gangs with major fed-
eral intervention in states and cities they once
controlled, Medina Mora said. Among the
dead were several federal and state police com-
manders. Even as the prosecutor released the
figures, a rare glimpse in a country where crime
statistics are seldom made public, newspapers
reported Friday that an additional 15 people
had been executed in gangland-style killings
across five states. Among them were five peo-
ple whose heads were found in a cooler in
Durango state, the newspapers said.


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Colombian defence minister says

top guerrilla may be dead after

four decades leading rebels


* BOGOTA, Colombia
The legendary leader of Latin
America's largest guerrilla army
may be dead, Colombia's defence
minister said in an interview pub-
lished Saturday, according to the
Associated Press. Juan Manuel
Santos told Semana magazine
that Manuel "Sureshot" Maru-
landa may have died on March
26, citing "a source who has nev-
er failed us."
Santos said the government
was trying to corroborate the
report. He said "the guerrillas
say" Marulanda died of a heart
attack, but noted that three
bombing raids targeted Marulan-
da on that date. It was not clear
whether "the guerrillas" included
the source mentioned by Santos.
Asked by Semana whether the
magazine could title its article
"Sureshot is dead," Santos
replied: "At your own risk."
Marulanda, whose real name


is Pedro Antonio Marin, has led
the leftist Revolutionary Armed
Forces of Colombia, or FARC,
for more than 40 years. Colombi-
a's government has announced
his death various times over the
past 15 years, but each time proof
that he was alive cropped up
months later. Marulanda, who is
believed to be about 80, may have
been replaced as FARC leader
by a rebel ideologue known as
Alfonso Cano, Santos said.
'The army has for months said it
has Cano cornered in the south-
west Colombian jungle and that
his death or capture is imminent.
FARC statements have denied
Cano is in the area.
The FARC has suffered a num-
ber of blows this year, including
the killing of its chief spokesman
and a senior commander, and the
defection of a female leader well
regarded inside the rebel group.
Born to a poor peasant family,
Marulanda was radicalized by the


vicious civil wars that ravaged
Colombia in the middle of the
last century, pitting Liberals
against Conservatives.
He and other survivors of a
1964 army attack on a peasant
community escaped to the moun-
tains and formed the FARC,
which grew over the decades to
include a reputed 15.000 fighters.
Marulanda's deadly aim in
combat against the army earned
him the name "Sureshot."
Notoriously reclusive, he is said
to have never set foot in Colom-
bia's capital, giving just a handful
of interviews over the course of
his life. Even senior commanders
within the FARC speak of Maru-
landa with awe, and he is known
to have the final word over any
major decision taken by the
FARC. The guerrillas remain
strong in many parts of Colombia,
especially in the countryside, but
many accuse them of having lost
their Marxist ideology.


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PAGE 26, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY EVENING MAY 26, 2008

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008, PAGE 27


EARTHQUAKE AFTERMATH




Chinese wonder why schools crumbled


* DUJIANGYAN, China
The earthquake's destruction of
Xinjian Primary School was swift
and complete. Hundreds of chil-
dren were crushed as the floors
collapsed in a deluge of falling
bricks and concrete. Days later, as
curiosity seekers came with video
cameras and as parents came to
grieve, the four-story school was
no more than rubble, according to
the New York Times News Ser-
vice.
In contrast, none of the nearby
buildings were badly damaged. A
separate kindergarten less than
20 feet away survived with barely
a crack. An adjacent 10-story
hotel stood largely undisturbed.
And another local primary
school, Beijie, a "key" school
catering to children of the elite,
was in such good condition that
local officials were using it as a
refugee center r.
"This is noti a natural disaster,"
said Ren Ycngchang, whose 9-
year-old son died inside the
destroyed school. His hands were
covered in plaster dust as he
stood beside: the rubble, shouting
and weeping as he grabbed the
exposed steel rebar of a broken
concrete column. "This is not
good steel. It doesn't meet stan-
dards. They stole our children."
There is no official figure on
how many children died at Xin-
jian Primary School, nor on how
many died at scores of other
schools that collapsed in the pow-
erful May 12 earthquake in
Sichuan province. But the num-
ber of student deaths seems like-
ly to exceed 10,000, possibly much
higher, a staggering figure that
has become a simmering contro-
versy int China as grieving par-
ents say their children might have
lived hard the schools been better
built. The Chinese government
has enjoyed broad public support
for its handling of the earthquake.
But as 'parents at different schools
begin l;o speak out, the question
of whether official negligence,
and possibly corruption, con-
tributed to the student deaths
could turn public opinion. The
government has launched an
investigation, but censors, wary,
of the public mood, are trying to
suppress the issue in state-run
media and online.
An examination of the collapse
of )(injian Primary School offers
a disturbing picture of a calamity
that might have been avoided.
Many parents say they were told
the school was unsafe. Xinjian
was poorly built when it opened
it,; doors in 1992, they say, and
never got its share of government
funds for reconstruction because
of its low ranking in the local edu-
cation bureaucracy and the low
social status of its students.
A decade ago, a detached wing
of the school was torn down and
rebuilt because of safety concerns.
But the main building remained
unimproved. Engineers and
earthquake experts who exam-
ined photographs of the wreck-
age concluded that the structure
had many failings and one critical
flaw: inadequate iron reinforcing
rods running up the school's ver-
tical columns. One expert
described the unstable.concrete
floor structure as "a time bomb."
Xinjian also was ill-equipped
for a crisis. A bulldozer, an ambu-
lance and other rescue vehicles
that responded after the earth-
quake could not fit through the
small entrance into the school's
courtyard. The bulldozer finally
dug up the ground beneath the
front gate to create enough over-
head clearance. Parents say they
believe several hundred of the
school's 660 pupils died.
"It is impossible to describe,"
said a nurse standing on the rub-
ble of the Xinjian site. "There is
death everywhere."
Schools are vulnerable to
earthquakes, especially in devel-
oping countries where less atten-
tion is paid to building codes. The
quake in Sichuan province has
already claimed more than 55.000
lives, and some of the flattened
schools, especially those buried
under landslides, could not have
stood under any circumstances.
The government has not yet pro-
vided a public list of those
schools, but one early estimate
concluded that more than 7.00(0
"schoolrooms" were destroyed.
China has national building
codes intended to ensure that
major structures withstand earth-
quakes. The government also has
made upgrading or replacing sub-
standard schools a priority as part
of a broader effort to improve
and expand education. Yet codes
are spottily enforced and educa-
tional goals are far from realized.
In March 2006. Sichuan province
issued a notice that local govern-
ments must inspect schools
because too many remained
unsafe, according to one official
Web site.
Nothing is more central to the
social contract in China than
schools. Parents sacrifice and "eat
bitter" so their children can get
educations that lead to better


lives. In turn, children care for
their parents in old age. Affluent
Chinese fight to gain entrance to
top schools from kindergarten
onward. But the families who sent
their children to Xinjian are nei-
ther wealthy nor well connected.
They are among the hundreds of
millions still struggling to benefit
from China's economic rise.


"This is not
good steel It
doesn't meet
standards. They
stole our
children."

Ren Yongchang
Many lost their jobs when a local
cement plant shut down. Some
sought work in more prosperous
parts of China, leaving their chil-
dren behind to attend school.
Angry parents at several
destroyed schools are beginning
to stage small demonstrations. On
Wednesday, more than 200 Xin-
jian parents demonstrated at the
temporary tents used by
Dujiangyan's education bureau,
demanding an investigation and
accusing officials of corruption
and negligence. One of the par-
ents, Li Wei, said his 11-year-old
son was one of 54 students who
died in a class of 60 fifth-graders.
He said education officials told
the demonstrating parents that
the bureau had reported safety
concerns to municipal leaders in
the past. But their complaints
were ignored.
"We want to bring justice for
our children," one father said the
day before the protest. "We want
the local officials to pay the
price."


C'
a-
CL




A MAN looks at a car being half flattened by a huge rock as motorists ride through a damaged road head to Hongkao in Dujiangyan, in southwest Chi-
na's Sichuan province, Saturday, May 24, 2008. China's earthquake death toll has passed 60,000 and could rise to 80,000 or more, Premier Wen Jiabao
said Saturday as he and U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon visited the disaster area.


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PAGE 28, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008 THE TRIBUNE
U UI


_ ___ __ ______ __ __









THE TRIBUNE





MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


Price control delays cause rice shortage


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

told The Tribune it
had to ration rice sup-
plies to local retailers
after it was unable to
import a scheduled shipment due to
Price Control approval delays, high-
lighting how government inefficien-
cies are causing food shortages.
Robert Pritchard, of wholesaler
Asa H Pritchard, which distributes
the Mahatma rice brand in the
Bahamas, confirmed to this newspa-
per that the firm had "to hold back"
on a rice shipment because it would
have made a loss on it without having


* Wholesaler unable to import scheduled shipment because to do so
would have caused loss without government-approved increase
Rice prices set to increase by 17 per cent between May-
June 2008, taking it to 30 per cent increase for year
Flour, corn beef also up in price by one-third
Think-tank calls for price control abolition
................. ---------- --------------- -- ------------------------- .. .. .... -- -- ---- -- --- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ---


prior price control approval.
"We had to hold back from order-
ing rice," Mr Pritchard told The Tri-


bune. "It had to sit in a warehouse
until they [the Price Control Depart-
ment] approved it, because you never


know how long it's going to take.
"We've had to limit it to so many
bales per customer with rice, and


increasingly it's all sold out now."
Asa H Pritchard's dilemma with
the Mahatma rice brand is the first
real-life illustration of the warning
Dionisio D'Aguilar, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce's president,
gave to The Tribune last week, in
which he warned that the Price Con-
trol Department's failure to respond
in a timely manner to increase
requests for price-controlled items
could cause food shortages and supply
chain interruptions in the Bahamas.
Asa H Pritchard's decision to delay
importing a scheduled rice shipment
until the Price Control approval was

SEE page 9B


$200m recurrent

surplus needed to

eliminate deficit


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
PUBLIC
infrastructure
demands
throughout
the Bahamas
mean the
Government
will not elimi-
nate the fiscal
deficit "in the
V foreseeable future", a minis-
ter explaining that to do so


* Unlikely to happen
in 'foreseeable
future'

it would have to currently
achieve a recurrent Budget
surplus of around $200 mil-
lion.
Zhivargo Laing, minister
of state for finance, said the

SEE page 6B


Doctors sees cost

challenges despite

46% profits increase


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
DOCTORS Hospital
Health Systems (DHHS)
today unveils a 46 per cent
rise in net income to $3.403
million for the year ended on
January 31, 2008, although its
chief financial officer said it
expects this year to be "more
difficult" on cost contain-
ment.

SEE page 2B


* Main tenant for Western
Medical Plaza falls
through after no
government approval
* BISX-listed healthcare
provider sees $75,000
electricity bill rise in
first quarter
* Average accounts
receivables drop to
56 days from 66


Commission fees

create 'barrier' to

capital markets


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
REGISTRATION and
prospectus filing costs with
the Securities Commission
should be revised because
they provide a barrier to
entry that discourages small
Bahamian businesses from
coming to the capital mar-
kets for financing, the
Bahamas International Secu-
rities Exchange's (BISX)
chief executive has urged.


BISX chief:
Consutnerist
culture inhibits
our entrepreneurs

Keith Davies. addressing
the Bahamas Institute of
Financial Services (BIFS)
week, said a Bahamian entre-
preneur seeking $250,000

SEE page 10B


Bahamas First suffers a

$2.453m first quarter hit


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMAS First Holdings
suffered a $2.453 million first
quarter hit due to the decline
in value of its Commonwealth
Bank shareholding, an invest-
ment that accounted for 68 per
cent of the income increase
that allowed the company to
report that 2007 net profits
more than tripled to $14.36
million.
The Bahamas First General
Insurance parent, in its 2007
annual report, warned share-
holders that as at April 14,
2008, its Commonwealth Bank
stake had declined in price by
$1.15 per'share from the year-


* General insurer's 2007 profits
more than triple to over $14m,
with 68 per cent of increase
accounted for by Commonwealth
Bank stock appreciation


end date value of $8.37, reduc-
ing the carrying value of its
investment by-$2.453 million.
Bahamas First Holdings
books the unrealized gain/loss
on its securities investments in
its annual income statement,
,meaning the majority of that
$2.453 million decline is likely
to have been felt during the


2008 first quarter.
This contrasts with the
impact the appreciation in
Commonwealth Bank's shares
had on the holding company's
2007 performance, with unre-
alized gains on all investments

SEE page 8B


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Err Doctors-sees cost


challenges despite

American Advantage 46%/o profits increase
A P A a __


FROM page 1B

A lease agreement with
DHHS main prospective ten-
ant for the Western Medical
Plaza also fell through after
government approval for that
company was not forthcoming.
Joanne Lowe, the BISX-list-
ed healthcare provider's chief
financial officer, said patient
service revenues "seem to be
holding their own" for the cur-
rent fiscal year to date, being
slightly up on last year.-
Yet she predicted that "this
year is going to be more diffi-
cult" when it came to DHHS
controlling its cosj.' and
expenses, due to thq.siaring
costs of energy andarans-
portation, the latter of which
had increased the cost of med-
ical supply imports.
Mrs Lowe pointed to;
DHHS' electricity costs, which
had increased by $75,000 for
the fiscal 2009 first quarter -
the three months to April 30,
2008 compared to last year.
She told The Tribune: "Last,
year, we did very well control-
ling expenses. They were what
was expected, and as a per-
centage of revenues, lower
than the previous year.
"This year is going to be
another story. This is the year
we're now going to start get-
ting bit by more than we were
last year. Everybody has pret-
ty much upped their shipping
prices. It's not the onep.little
place that's feeling it; it's every-
where that it's trickling down."
In his report .touDHHS
shareholders, chairman fJoseph
Krukowski said the'tbdipany
produced its second hitst net
income in history in fiscal 2008,
with total expenses increasing
by $2.1 million or 5.8 percent
to $38.098 million,. This com-
pared to $36.012 million the
Previous year. .. .i. -, .
Warning that business:0sts
continued "to rise amidst an


increasingly complex and
unstable economic environ-
ment", Mr Krukowski said
increased productivity and cost
controls, while maintaining ser-
vice quality, were key objec-
tives in fiscal 2009.
Meanwhile, Mrs Lowe told
The Tribune that Western
Medical Plaza, the Blake Road
complex owned by DHHS,
was "still up for lease" by a
major tenant.
She explained: "The major
tenant we had for it has fallen
through, but we still have the
tenants we had previously. The
person that wanted to rent the
whole place, they're gone."
Mrs Lowe said DHHS had
been in negotiations with a
company interested in using
Western Medical Plaza as a
rehabilitation centre for a busi-
ness involving oigan donations
and transplants.
"They didn'i'ge-t-NEC
[National Economic Council]
approval for their company, so
they finally gave up," she
explained
The failure to obtain gov-
ernment approval is likely to
have given DHHS a sense of
deja vu, given that a previous
deal to sell Western Nfedical
Plaza to a combinatipn'of
Med-Link and the Bahamas
Public Services Union (BPSU)
fell through because the Gov-
ernment did not approve the
foreign ownership element.
Buyer interest in Western
Medical Plaza remains strong,
though, Mrs Lowe telling The
Tribune: "We get the phone
calls all the time. They're most-
ly foreign companies,so.we let
them know what they have to
go through if they're serious.
"The phone calls don't stop
coming, but unfortunately
there's not been any local
interest."
Total patient services rev-
enues showed a net 8 percent.
increase in fiscal 2008, increas-
ing from $38.098 million to


$40.889 million, due largely to
a combination of increased
patient activity, total admis-
sions, surgical procedures,
newborn deliveries and emer-
gency room visits. All showed
"record increases".
DHHS total revenues for the
year ended on January. 31,
2008, also rose by 8 per cent
to $42.097 million, compared
to $39.08 million the year
before.
In his report to sharehold-
ers, Mr Krukowski said DHHS
served 4,577 patients in fiscal
2008, an increase of 3.6 per
cent upon the previous year,
with surgical cases and ambu-
latory admissions up by 6.7 per
cent.
Mrs Lowe said accounts
receivables days had dropped
in 2008, with DHHS making
progress in reducing the debts
owed by third-party payers,
such as insurers, and patients.
She added that the company's
Meditech system "seems to be
paying off" when it came to
monitoring accounts.
She described the average
56 days in accounts receivables
achieved last year as a "signif-
icant" reduction on the 2007
figure of 66. and 2006's 74.
Overall, accounts receivables
owed by patients had fallen to
$1.27 million as at January 31,
2008, compared to $1.378 mil-
lion the year before, while
sums owed by third-party pay-
ers had declined to $4.787 mil-
lion from $5.094 million over
the same timeframe.
"We still no longer accept
the BPSU [as a third-party
insurer] because they're still
paying down on their debt,"
Mrs Lowe said. "We're also
working with the National
Insurance Board to bnng them
into line. They've built up extra
days in accounts receivables.
but we're in negotiations with
them to work that out. The
majority of insurance compa-
nies have all improved."


0 on new/
0 nannulSies

j during the
I o month of May!




242-4611000 www.babfinancial.com .t i
Freptrt 242-352-7208 Exuma 242-336-3835 Abace 242-387-6501
F I N A N C I A L



Financial Solutions for Life!

MORTGAGES MUTUAL FUIDS LIFE IISURAICE HEALTH IBSURAICE
AIIUITIES & PEISIOI PLAIS FIIAICIAL PLAIIIIG & INVESTMENTS


F -


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008








THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008, PAGE 3B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government has
"committed" to mobilizing the
main contractor for the New
Providence Road Improve-
ment Project before the cur-
rent Budget period ends on
June 30,2008, with the project
set to cost taxpayers almost
$110 million more than the ini-
tial projections.
The Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank (IDB), in
announcing that it had
approved a 25-year, $100 mil-
lion loan to the Government
to finance the remainder of the
project, said the total estimat-
ed cost had increased to
around $162 million.
The IDB blamed the
increased price on "escalating
costs in recent years", caused
by high demand for construc-
tion services, equipment mate-
rials and labour in the
Bahamas.
Dr Earl Deveaux, minister
of works and transport, told
The Tribune that "the original
cost price" for the New Provi-
dence Road Improvement Pro-
ject's 18 corridors had been
pegged at $52.2 million when it
was first conceived around
2000-2001.
The project was put on hold
after Associated Asphalt, the
main UK-based contractor,
went bankrupt in 2001. When
the PLP government took
office in 2002, they broke up
the New Providence Road
Improvement Project into
smaller components, in a bid
to give Bahamian contractors
more work.
Yet to date, only two com-
ponents the Charles W Saun-


ders High-
way, complet-
ed under the
first Ingra-
ham adminis-
tration, and
work at the
B 1 u e
Hills/Tonique
Williams-
Darling
Highway -
have been
completed.
Explaining
how the pro-
ject's estimat-
ed total costs had risen by
almost $110 million over a sev-
en to eight-year period, Dr
Deveaux told The Tribune:
"The same thing that hap-
pened to the price of oil.
"Oil has gone from $20 to
$137 a barrel, which means
asphalt, concrete and all the
things that help you build
roads have increased by the
same margin as oil."
He added: "To date, the
Bahamas has spent approxi-
mately $41 million in this work.
The current contract with
Knowles Construction for Sir
Milo Butler Highway is just
under $10 million. When you
take the bid price for the cor-
ridors to be completed, that
number [the $162 million fig-
ure by the IDB] will not be too
far off the mark."
The New Providence Road
Improvement Project will,
according to the IDB, involve
constructing 15 kilometres of
new roads and the improve-
ment of 23 kilometres of exist-
ing roads.
The IDB added that with 69
per cent of the Bahamas' total
population living on New Prov-


idence, the island's 1,600 kilo-
metres of roads were mostly
paved and in adequate condi-
tion, but insufficient to accom-
modate growing traffic vol-
umes in Nassau.
With the IDB loan in place,
Dr Deveaux, describing the
next steps, told The Tribune:
"We have to give the contrac-
tor notice, and then they have
28 days to respond with the
delivery schedule, terms of the
contract and conditions con-
tained in the contract. Then
we have to mobilize the con-
tractor.
"All of that we are sched-
uled to do before the close of
this fiscal period. That's not a
hope. That's a commitment."
Dr Deveaux said current
work on the East-West High-
way and Prince Charles Drive
was being done specifically to
prepare for the New Provi-
dence Road Improvement Pro-
ject, whose main contractor is
Argentine firm, Jose Cartel-
lone Construcciones Civiles
(JCC) the lowest bidder at
$88 million.
"There is much that the
Government of the Bahamas
has to do; there is much that
the utility companies have to
do" in preparation for the con-
tract, Dr Deveaux added.
"The project is over three
years. It's 1,000 days, plus or
minus 11 days. That's from the
start," Dr Deveaux said.
"It's one of the significant
steps in improving the traffic
congestion. Improving the pub-
lic transport system is another.
Improving the traffic flow by
reducing the vehicles on the
road and making them flow
more efficiently is another.
These are all important parts."


Roads project to




cost $110m more




than first estimate


Tel.: 364-0695


I U


U,' El


The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the
following position:


CUSTODIAN

Performs a wide range of janitorial duties throughout the Embassy.
Works alone, or as a part of a group, under the Facilities Management
Supervisor. Assist with other trades as required.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

Completion of elementary and secondary schools is required.
At least one year experience in the janitorial field is required.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Must have basic knowledge of the janitorial field and of products
used in the cleaning of buildings.
Must have the ability to use all machinery and tools connected
with the job function.
Must have a friendly, pleasant personality.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance-baseo incentives, medical and dental
insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for training and
development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible
for employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday
through Friday at the security area of the American Embassy, Queen
Street. Completed applications should be returned to the United States
Embassy: addressed to the Human Resources Office no later than,
June 5, 2008.

'Telephone calls will not be accepted.



o







EXPLORE A NEW CAREER IN

THE MEDICAL FIELD


THE BAHAMAS BAPTIST COMMUNITY

COLLEGE IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

CAREER STEP, LLC, UTAH

Introduces






Persons interested in learning more about the

program are invited to attend an

OPEN HOUSE

at

The Bahamas Baptist Community College,

Room 7, June 11lth, 2008 at 6:00p.m.


SPEAK DIRECTLY
with

REPRESENTATIVES from CAREER STEP

Refreshments will be served


For more information contact our

Admissions Office


NOTICE OF VACANCY

A vacancy exists at The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited Building
and Development Services Department for one (1) Projects Manager.

The successful candidate will be required to manage vertical and horizontal
construction projects as initiated by The Grand Bahama Port Authority,
Limited or affiliated Companies. Technical support and guidance in the
areas of super-structure and infrastructure development including roadways,
rehabilitation works and civil.engineering capital projects are included.

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE
* BSc. in Building, Structural or Civil Engineering
* Minimum of Ten (10) years relevant engineering experience
* Minimum of Five (5) years relevant supervisory experience
* Professional registration a plus

SPECIFIC KNOWLEDGE REQUIRED

* Sound knowledge in construction techniques and safety parameters.
* Sound knowledge in engineering design and the governing code,
internationally accepted standards.
* Sound knowledge of established construction practices and related
statutory regulations.
* Sound knowledge of Contract Administration.

REQUIRED SKILLS AND SPECIAL TECHNIQUES
* Competence in the application of project management techniques.
* Good coordinating skills.
* Good human relations skills.
* Ability to communicate effectively.
* Computer literacy as evidenced by full working knowledge of
Microsoft Word, Excel, Auto Cad and Microsoft Projects.

Resumes with supporting documentation should be submitted to:

The Personnel Department
The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited
P.O. Box F-42666
Freeport, Grand Bahama
BAHAMAS
OR
Email: personnel@gbpa.com
On or before July 31, 2008


11
r,.f


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008, PAGE 3B










NOTICE

Public Utilities Commission LAND AND BUILDING FOR SALE


Land Shark Divers Resort Hotel
(In Receivership)
is for sale
PUBLIC NOTICEisforale

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

BAHAMAS NATIONAL NUMBERING PLAN

The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) hereby invites comments '''.
from licensees, other stakeholders and the general public on ,
its consultation document on the National Numbering Plan for -
The Bahamas. -C

The goals of this consultation are to:

a) inform licensees, other stakeholders and the general public of the -
PUC's intention to develop a National Numbering Plan to
administer and manage numbering resources for current and All that piece of parcel or lot of land located on West Bay Street having an
future needs; and area of 23,400 sq.ft being lot numbers 6, 7 and 8. Block #2 situated in the
b) invite comments from licensees, other stakeholders and the subdivision known as Westward Villas, the said subdivision situated in the
general public. western district of the Island of New Providence, Bahamas. This two storey
structure is comprised of 40 rooms, kitchen, open dining area, bar and
Section 6(4) of the Telecommunications Act, 1999 requires the PUC swimmingpoolwithabuildingsizeofapproximately12,280sq.ft.Thisbuildingis
to act in a timely, transparent, objective and non-discriminatory equipped with air conditioning units and is elevated to prevent the
manner and consistent with the objectives of the Act. While possibility of flooding under normal weather condition, including annual
section 6(5) of the Act requires the Commission to publish its heavy rainy periods.
proposals on any general instruction intended to be issued under
any part of the Act and allow a reasonable period of consultation. Serious prospective purchasers who would like to tour the property prior to
bidding should contactthe Hotel Manager at (242) 327-6364 between 9:00am
Copies of this document can be obtained from the PUC's office located and 12:00 noon, Monday through Friday.
at 4h Terrace East, Collins Avenue or downloaded from the PUC's
website at www.pucbahamas.gov.bs. Written comments should All offers should be made in writing in a sealed envelope addressed to:
be submitted by August 15, 2008 via post, hand delivery, Mr. John S.Bain, Receiver & Manager
facsimile or e-mail to: HLB Galanis Bain, Shirlaw House, Shirley Street
P.O. Box N-3205 Nassau, Bahamas
Mr. Barrett Russell, Marked:"Tender-Land Shark Dive Resort in Receivership."
Executive Director
Public Utilities Commission Offers must be received by 4:00pm on Friday, May 30th, 2008.
P.O. Box N-4860
Fourth Terrace East Each bid should be considered a bonifide offer to purchase and shall be
Collins Avenue binding upon the bidder after submission to us
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242 323-7288 The Receivers reserve the right to reject any and all offers.
Fax: 242 323-7288
Email: info(@pucbahamas. gov.bs.







THE BAHAMAS
SUPPORT PROGRAMME FOR TRANSFORMING EDUCATION AND TRAINING
BH-L1003
MANAGER, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, BTVI
The Government of The Bahamas (GOB) has secured a loan from the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB) to finance the Support Programme for Transforming Education &
Training. The project will support the development and implementation of activities aimed at
improving the quality and competitiveness of the Bahamian labour force. Part proceeds of this
loan is being used to Restructure, Reposition, and Reorganize BTVI into a recognized institute for
technical and career educational development. In support of this initiative, and the direction of
the Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture, BTVI requires the services of a Manager,
Information Technology. ,
The Manager, Information Technology is a senior position and integral part of the
administrative team. This position will be responsible for assisting in the development of goals,
operating plans and objectives of the Institute/College as it relates to information technology.
This position reports directly to the Manager/President of BTVI.
Qualified persons interested in fulfilling the role detailed below are invited to apply:
1. Assist in the planning and implementation of additions, deletions and major i
modifications to the supporting regional infrastructure
2. Implement network security. -
3. Oversee the administration and maintenance of the Institute's IT infrastructure .
4. Manage and develop all changes and upgrades to the telephone system including =
routing for seating assignments
5. Oversee the administration and maintenance of computer stations and software
programs of the Student Success Learning Centre and provide additional support if
necessary. i '
6. Oversee administration and maintenance of 'Empower' administration software.
7. Collaborate with internal clients on all levels to resolve any IT-related issues..
8. Build and maintain vendor relationships and the procurement of both hardware and -
software products.
9. Ensure accurate inventory of all IT assets maintained. '
10. Remain current with emerging industry practices.
11. Responsible for other special tasks, projects or assignments as assigned by the
Manager/ President.
12. Position Ireports directly to the President/Manager, BTV1. .- -
13. Serve as industry liaison with Business Community, Board of Trustees. '
14. Work closely with the President of the Institute in assuring that the development
goals of the institute/college are met. ---
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE


Minimum Bachelor degree in Information Technology. Master's degree preferred with "BHinz informed about local news, sports,
Business Management experience.
Certifications in MCSE, CCNA, MSSQL, Oracdeand JavaScriptarebeneficial. entertainment and w rld events is important to
At least Five years programming, system analysis and project leadership experience. me. The Tribune is my choice for news and
information. The Tribune is my newspaper."
All interested persons must submit Curriculum Vitae/Resumes so as to arrive no later than
May 30,2008 and addressed to: JASON RAHMING
The Permanent Secretary CONSTRUCTION FOREMAN
Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture
P. O. Box N3913/14 Purchase The Tribune from your
Thompson Boulevard local store or street vendor.
Nassau, The Bahamas
Attention: John Haughton
IDB PROJECT EXECUTION UNIT T
Telephone: (22) 3255204748 T he une
Fax: (242) 325-4660
Email: ihaughtonidbproiect@yahoo.com tPL0 K/ /'./i


I


__


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


Bank in 21 per cent



profits growth


BANK of The Bahamas
International's 2008 third quar-
ter net income increased by
21.14 per cent to $10.3 million,
with assets topping the $700
million mark.
Boosted by a $43 million
increase in deposits during the
last quarter, total assets
jumped from $683 million in
the second quarter to $716 mil-
lion by March 31, 2008.
The bank reported a 8.23 per
cent increase in deposits, and
an increase in earnings per
share from $0.49 to $0.60.
Record earnings and growth
represented significant sus-
tainability in what managing
director Paul McWeeney
called the bank's "growth
momentum".
"The bank's performance
over the past three quarters of
our fiscal year from July 1,
2007, to March 31, 2008, was
very strong," said Mr
McWeeney. "While it is always
gratifying to report positive
results for our 4,000 share-
holders, what gives us even
greater confidence going for-


ward is to know that the strate-
gies and the business plan we
are implementing have allowed
us to experience sustained per-
formance as we transition into
a full financial enterprise and
become a recognized Bahami-
an franchise."
Mr McWeeney said the
bank's interest income growth
remained strong at 19.97 per
cent, despite a slight curtailing
of credit growth in response to
a softening of the global econ-
omy. In addition to external
conditions, Mr McWeeney said
the bank deliberately managed
its rate of expansion to main-
tain satisfactory performance
with present resources, as it
handled dramatic growth over
the past three years.
"Bank of the Bahamas has
experienced 58 per cent growth
in less than three years," he
said, "and that is tremendous
by any standard in any indus-
try. Thus, it is incumbent upon
us to manage that and handle
the volume of business that
accompanies those figures
without sacrificing what our


BAHAMAS "

LIMITED



Bahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading supermarket
chain in The Bahamas. As a market leader, the Company prides
itself on delivering premier service through its City Market
supermarkets, having a strong commitment t9 its customers,
associates and community.
An opportunity for a Chief Accountant to join this market leader
has arisen.
Reporting to the Financial Controller, the successful applicant will
need to hold a professional accounting qualification (CA, CPA, ACCA
or CMA) and have previously led a high-performing accounting
team in a diverse accounting environment. Key selection criteria
include:
Sound technical and practical experience in financial
accounting, and financial management controls and
systems
Strong business acumen with the ability to creatively
solve problems
Ability to manage, with a strategic focus, all aspects of a
high-volume accounting environment while providing
quality and meaningful financial information
Manage relationships within the business encompassing
budgeting, forecasting, reconciliation and analysis of all
operational accounts, cash flow and asset management
Ability to lead and motivate a dynamic financial team
Ability to identify system, control and process
improvements'
Have superior communication and interpersonal skills
with the ability to mentor a team
Solid functional computer skills with working knowledge
of Microsoft applications and automated financial hnd
distribution reporting systems
If you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging role,
forward your resume and cover letter to:
Humari Resources Director
Bahamas Supermarkets Limited
East-West Highway P. O. Box N 3738 Nassau, Bahamas
Or e-mail to: humanresources@bahamassupermarkets.com
No telephone inquiries please


clients, employees and share-
holders expect. That being
said, despite prevailing market
indicators signalling a softening
in economic growth and
reduced credit demand, the
bank's outlook continues to be
positive."
Mr McWeeney predicted
similar results for year-end as
the 2007 results, in which the
bank reported $10.8 million in
net income.
It was during the last quarter
that the bank became the first
Bahamian retail financial insti-
tution to open a service cen-
tre abroad. That centre, locat-
ed in the high-end Coral
Gables district of Miracle Mile,
opened a new chapter in
Bahamian banking history and
launched what the bank
Expects to announce in com-


ing yeays in further interna-
tional expansion. In 2007, it
also established a relationship
with a Caribbean bank, and
that along with the Miami
operation are intended to facil-
itate trade as new trade agree-
ments are signed.
The bank's performance and
innovation has led to both local
and international recognition.
It was last year's winner of the
prestigious "Best Bank in the
Country" Euromoney Award,
presented bi-annually to a
handful of the world's leaders
in banking and finance, and
was named the winner of the
2007 Bahamas Financial-Ser-
vices Board award for the
financial institution that had
done the most to develop and
promote financial services in
the Bahamas.


KIRILUS INVESTMENTS LTD.
(Company number 110,130)

An International Business Company

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

I, Jean-Francois Rochette Liquidator of KIRILUS INVESTMENTS
LTD. hereby certify that the winding up and dissolution of KURILUS
INVESTMENTS LTD. has been completed in accordance with the
Articles of Dissolution and that KIRILUS INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been dissolved as of the 30th day of April, 2008.

Dated this 21st day of May, 2008


Jean-Francois Rochette
Liquidator


ROBERTS, ISAACS & WARD
(incorporating the previous firm known
Isaacs &'Co.),
Counsel & Attorneys-at-Law,
The Rigarno Building,
Bay Street & Victoria Avenue,
P. O. Box N-4755,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Partners: S. Oswald A. Isaacs
Isaacs W. Scott Ward

Firm Manager: Gregory D. Roberts
Tel:(242)322-1751-4
Fax:(242)322-3861

E-mail:info@riwlawfirm.com


as Roberts,


For Sale
Lot 3D 23,000 square feet for Sale
at Airport Industrial Park
Cost: $235,000
Contract: 424-4960 / 394-9396
email: mturnuest@coralwave.com


N.C.S
Nassau Courier Service & Purchasing Agent
"14 Move Cargo"
Servicing the Family Island for over ten years!
We do Pick-ups from all your Favorite Stores.


^E^;nTct ~iTn ii~~in


Have your orders
shipped to
or dropped of at:
Nassau Courier & Purchasing Agent
850 S.W. 34th Street
Ft. Lauderdale Zip 33315
(with your name or your company's name)
WE SHOP
iE LWWHOLESALE!


CLOSED FOR STOCKTAKING

Nassau Motor Company's

Parts Department
will be closed for stocktaking...

MAY 2008
25 26 27 28 29 30 31:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7


JUNE2008

We will be closed from 5:00pm
Wednesday, May 28 through
Sunday, June 1.
We will re-open on Monday, June 2.

We regret any inconvenience
to our valued customers.



SNMo-


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear'
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.




Fop thestopie


4TH

Business


&Education



Development

Seminar

Tuesday May 27th, 2008
8am 5pm
British Colonial Hilton






Bahamas US Embassy Bahamas
Chamber of Deveopment
Commerce Bank


RSVP:
[242] 322-2145
info(thebahamaschamber.com


SeminarCost* $100


ANNOUNCEMENT ....

We are pleased to afiounce the formation of the law
firm to be known as:-


I


r- BUSINESS I


Id vI It i IN- I 11(i & Cn"It i 11(i ( )1)1)()I-t 11 ni t iv
Keith Stokes, Eyecut-i'v'e Direct !, rj
Newport Chanciber of Commer,.e

Tmlri-:111 as a TO(d ill Bilsilles"., & I 'Ill reprellem-1,11
Devch)pInent: Think 111--'Ide The 1)()X'
Vincent Va ndernool -Vla I lace, Secr,-tary Gner;d
hl, -1 ri 7 -- u r s rr, 0 r o z
-a ;j atinn

Makinti, 'Alaxinliz1w; & PrOvoill
Ym I r 11IN-tNtnivill (Parld Dkcll'-mm)
lerorra
liprome Pinder In--pertv q -rjr

1111';illv;" ill I'lle
(hillel
Barrv Malrohm ('hwz4-er Coocjer Mario Car--,vrgh-
A n d r e vi -vv i I r) C/ hr I s 1",A o r t i m r1- r


IVIVIVUNAY, IVIAY Zo, eUUO, r-AM- oD












$200m recurrent surplus needed
MORE. INTERESTpls nede


The Scotiabank


Rate Booster Deposit


Combines the higher interest rates of a longer term
investment with the flexibility of a short term deposit.


FROM page 1B


pressing need for roads,
schools, hospitals and other
infrastructure across the
Bahamas, and especially in the
Family Islands, meant the
Government was always likely
to run a substantial Budgetary
deficit on the capital side.
For the 2007-2008 Budget
year, which ends in June, Mr
Laing said the Government
had projected that it would
earn just $5 million in capital
revenues, but incur capital
spending of $225 million.
This translated into a $220
million deficit, he added,
explaining that to eliminate
this would require the Gov-
ernment to generate an equiv-
alent $220 million surplus on
the recurrent side of its Bud-
get.
This is the side that deals
with revenue and spending-
related to the Government's
fixed costs, such as public ser-
vice salaries and rents. The
Bahamian government,
though, has never come close
to generating a $200 million
recurrent Budget surplus,
although Mr Laing said it had
produced minor surpluses of
around $20 million "in recent
-times".
"When are we going to be
able to have a recurrent sur-
plus like that," Mr Laing
asked, referring to the $220
million figure. "I can't foresee
that in the foreseeable future.
"We have had recurrent sur-
pluses of $20 million in recent
times. But you're talking about
enormous changes in revenue
collection or expenditure to
overcome a capital deficit in
that regard."
Mr Laing said this explained
why, whenever a government
talked about a 'Balanced Bud-
get', they were referring only


to the recurrent side. He added
that he did not know of any
country that generated sub-
stantial revenues on the capital
side of a government's Bud-
get.
The preliminary figures for
the 2006-2007 Budgetary year
highlight the difficulties
explained by Mr Laing. In that
year, the final one of the
Christie government, the fis-
cal deficit increased year-on-
year by $76.4 million or 72.1
per cent, jumping from $106.08
million the previous year to
$182.511.million. The latter fig-
ure was some $57.2 million or
45.6 per cent greater than pre-
Budget forecasts.
Yet total government rev-
enues of $1.338 billion were
slightly ahead of recurrent
spending estimates of $1.286
billion, indicating that a recur-
rent surplus may have been
achieved in 2006-2007. It was
capital spending of $166 mil-
lion, plus lending to the public
corporations of $69 million,
that pushed the Government
finances into deficit yet again.
Mr Laing told The Tribune
that despite the national debt
pushing past the $3 billion
mark, the total debt level was
not the main factor. The key
determinant in assessing the
Bahamas' national debt, and
public finances performance,
was whether this nation was
able to service its debt levels.
"The Government of the
Bahamas has had no difficulty
in servicing its debt," Mr Laing
said. "Like personal and
household incomes, the level
of indebtedness is not the thing
that concerns those who man-
age the macroeconomic affairs
of the country."
He compared the Bahamas'
ability to service its sovereign
debt to that of a household
with a mortgage. While the
amount borrowed for the
mortgage might be "signifi-


cant" and three or four times'
the household's total annual
income, Mr Laing said what
really mattered was their abil-
ity to meet mortgage payments
- in full and on time.
When it came to the Gov-
ernment's ability to repay, the
minister said that while the
national debt may have grown
to just over $3 billion, the
Bahamas' annual national
income (Gross Domestic Prod-
uct) had "grown to almost $7
billion".
Mr Laing said this had to be
factored into any assessments
of the Bahamas' fiscal situa-
tion, as rising national income
- especially if it was growing
at a faster rate than debt levels
- meant this nation's
debt/GDP ratio would be more
favourable.
Pointing out that the consis-
tently high credit ratings on
the Bahamas' short and long-
term sovereign debt, provided
by rating agencies Moody's
and Standard & Poor's (S&P),
showed that Wall Street was
comfortable with this nation's
ability to service its debt, Mr
Laing said this nation's
debt/GDP ratio was among the
Caribbean's best.
He compared it to Jamaica's,
where debt was around 150-
170 per cent, and Barbados,
with an 80 per cent ratio. The
Bahamas was around 35 per
cent.
"That's why you'll see our
focus has been on having a
debt/GDP level within a cer-
tain limit, and bringing the
debt/GDP ratio down to a cer-
tain level," Mr Laing said.
Mr Laing said the Govern-
ment's target was to further
reduce the debt-to-GDP ratio
over its next four years in
office to between 30-35 per
cent, targeting the lower end
of that range, depending on
global economic develop-
ments.


Visit your nearest Scotiabank branch I




Some cccfion.^ply. Ratu? !q cheno ,,,- ,.!,. .
STrademat~= o The Bank of Noga Scoia.
STradcnar!ts uq-, qpder kicenj.anc ntrol of The Bank of Nova Scotia,
; ,.,.., .
| t .. r tlf| A r r i yt i-- **


Life. Mrony., Balance both:


*1 -


To All


Hospital Health


SHAREHOLDERS,
The Board of Directors of Doctors Ibatinalrdp]tth below. summary financial
the year ended January 31, 2008. Thef cfiip&tea~aeftatements will be con
Company's annual report and posted on r waPR bsWthaaO..com


Consolidated Statement of Income
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Year em January 31,
2008 2007

Revenues
'Patient service revenue, net 40,8$9 38,098
Other revenue 1,208 982
Total revenues 42,097 39,080

Expenses
Salaries and benefits 15,338 14,396
Medical supplies and services 10,423 9,393
Depreciation and amortization 2,642 2,202
Bad debt expense, netof recoveries 2,252 3,006
Other operating 1,869 1,633
Utilities 1,388 1,287
Government taxes and fees 948 947
Outside services 934 878
Insurance 693 695
Repairs and maintenance 535 543
Rent 368 362
Dietary expenses 362 319
Legal expenses 346 351
Total expenses 38,098 36,012
Income before interest 3,999 3,068

Interest expense (596) (738)

NET INCOME $ 3,403 2,330

Earnings per common share:
Basic and fully diluted (34 0.23

Selected Balance Sheet Data
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

January 31,
2008 2007
Cash and cash equivalents $ 6,630 $ 1,


Accounts receivable-patients, net 1,270 1,378
Accounts receivable-third party payors, net 4,787 5,094
Total current assets 14,582 15,477
Property, plant and equipment 8,920 9,359
Total assets 31,255 29,019
Total current liabilities 4,385 9,115
Total non-current liabilities 7,066 3,302
Total liabilities 11,450 12,417


.otal..hareholders --7- --19.8--0..


Your interest rate increases twice during 'the term
of your investment, so your money is guaranteed to
grow faster! Plus you have access to your money at
two set dates within the term of your deposit, giving
you penalty free access toyour money.t


NOTICE


Doctors


THE BAHAMAS

SUPPORT PROGRAMME FOR TRANSFORMING EDUCATION AND TRAINING
BH-L1003

VICE PRESIDENT/CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION, BTVI
The Government of The Bahamas (GOB) has secured a loan from the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB) to finance the Support Programme for Transforming Education &
Training. The project will support the development and implementation of activities aimed at
improving the quality and competitiveness of the Bahamian labour force. Part proceeds of this
loan is being used to Restructure, Reposition, and Reorganize BTVI into a recognized institute for
technical and career educational development. In support of this initiative, and the direction of
the Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture, BTVI requires the services of a VP, Career &
Technical Education.

The VP. Career & Technical Education is a senior and integral part of the administrative
team. This position will be responsible for assisting in the development of goals, operating plans
and objectives of the Institute/College and assist in coordinating and directing activities to
achieve these objectives.
Qualified persons interested in fulfilling the role detailed below are invited to apply:
1. Position reports directly to the President/Manager, BTVI.
2. Serve as industry liaison with Business Community, Board of Trustees.
3. Work closely with the President of the Institute in assuring that the development
goals of the institute/college are met.
4. Serve as spokesperson for the institute to diverse audiences, including industry
leader and partners, communication media, donor, community organizations,
students and parents.
5. To assist in working consistently towards the growth, development and promotion
of the institute.
6. To collaborate with industry to enhance the development of the Institute, staff,
programmes and physical resources.
7. To assist with the guidance and motivation of staff in the performance of their duties.
8. To promote a positive image of Technical /Vocational education.
9. To assist with conducting meetings with administrators, general staff and students.
10. To assist with the coordination and preparation of the annual budget.
11. To represent the Manager/President where necessary.
12. Responsible for other special tasks, project or assignments as assigned by the
Manager/President.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE
Doctorate in Education preferred, but minimum of a Master's degree in Educational
Leadership, Business or related discipline considered.
Five to Ten (5-10) years of leadership, supervision or management experience.
Must possess strong leadership ability, supervisory experience and willingness to accept
responsibility.
Must have excellent Interpersonal and Communications skills.

All interested persons must submit Curriculum Vitae/Resumes so as to arrive no later than
Friday, May 30, 2008 and addressed to:
The Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture
P. O. Box N 3913/14
Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, The Bahamas
Attention: John Haughton
IDB PROJECT EXECUTION UNIT
Telephone: (242) 325-5200/4748
Fax: (242) 325-4660
Email: ihaughtonidbproiecKtiahoo.com


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


16.61


I -


Total shareholders'
y


19.805


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008, PAGE 7B


Bank moves to





protect minority





shareholders


COMMONWEALTH Bank
shareholders voted over-
whelmingly to amend the
bank's governing documents
to allow minority shareholders
to nominate directors and pro-
pose resolutions, powers usu-
ally reserved for directors.
The vote that paves the way
for the protection of minority
investors came at the bank's
annual general meeting
(AGM) on May 21 at Super-
Clubs Breezes. More than 200
shareholders attended the
meeting.
"Commonwealth Bank is
unique in the Bahamian envi-
ronment in that it has no one
controlling shareholder, and
has all of its shares in the hands
of the Bahamian public," said
director Larry Gibson, pre-
senting the resolution that
passed unanimously.
"This is a major step forward
in the protection of minority
interests and I can now state
proudly that Commonwealth
Bank is not only the country's
largest publicly-held company
and the country's most suc-
cessful publicly-held company,
but the number one company
in corporate governance."
The proposals require pro-
posed shareholder resolutions
to have the backing of 10 per
cent of the shareholders. A
proposed resolution will then
be included in the proxy mail-
ing distributed by the bank,
giving the shareholders a voice
to reach every shareholder.
Resolutions nominating
directors require completed
background forms on the nom-
inees so that Commonwealth
Bank cas prolvi.dehe 'appro-,-
priat information' to The Cen-- .
tral Bank of The Bahamas for
the approval of elected direc-
tors.
"Among the few exceptions
for the bank to refuse the res-
olutions are where the resolu-
tion is to pursue a personal
grievance, is irrelevant to the
business of the company, or
the sole purpose of the reso-
lution is to seek publicity,"
explained Mr Gibson.
"As chairman of Common-
wealth Bank, my goal has been
for the bank to operate at the
highest levels of corporate gov-
ernance. Today, we have taken
a significant step forward in
advancing the rights of minor-
ity shareholders in the
Bahamas," said chairman T.
B. Donaldson.


Share

your

news
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from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.








I S HT:


FoIte' toIe

beh~indth


I


& fri~,


run Saffrey Square
Bay Street
wRET ww.bahamasrealty.bs
B EN* www.cbrichardellis.com


PRIME OFFICE SUIT

Ranging From 1,332 to 2,807 sq. ft.
Finished Shell
Ready For Immediate Occupancy
Parking Facilities Available
For More Information Call 396-0000


WANTED
Applications for the position of




Experience in managing people
Must have excellent organizational skills,
excellent customer service and sales skills

Please mail
SResume and photograph to:

Assistant Manager Position,
P.O. Box N-523,
Nassau, Bahamas


'ES

BAHAMAS REALTY LmD
COMMERCIAL
In asocation with:

CBRE
CB RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD


Insurance Company


of The Bahamas


Insurance Company of The Bahamas Umited
Balance Sheet
Year ended Decernber 31, 2007, with corresponding figures for 2006


ASSETS
Cash and bank balances (Notes 5.7)
Term deposits (Noles 6,17)
Reinsurance Recoveries (Notes4.12.17)
Due from agent (Noles 7.17)
Deferred commission reserve (Notes 7.17)
,- ,.pqldfe elqsijwranqe pfremlfmenx otes.s ?)'
.. Jep'aymets.and other receivables .
Investments in securities
fair value through profit and loss (Notes 7, 817)
held-to-maturity (Notes B.17)
available for sale (Notes 8,17)
Investment property (Notes 9,17)
Property, plant and equipment (Notes 10.17)


Expressed in Bohomian dollors


$ 862,794
5,148,030
14,444,488
6.241.574
5,600,044
S ,-.20,0812,005
S... 42,370


3,605,515
6.835,381
2,212,500
536,917
1,361,687


243,578
3.536.870
13,323,554
9,953,548
5,680,650
i 20.127.4k+r.-.o .-.. '.
519,899.
2,286,797
5.418,724
2,000,000
536,917
1,394,156


Total assets $ 66,972,305 65,022,114
LIABILITIES
General insurance funds:
Unearned premium reserve (Notes 12.17) $ 24,628,586 24.885.954
Outstanding claims (Notes 12.17) 16,902,927 16,127,701
41.531,513 41,013,655
Other liabilities:
Margin Loan 1,000,000
Unearned commission reserve (Note 17) 5,056,626 5,063,488
Due to reinsurers (Nole i,.l 7) 4.629,046 4.916,930.
Accounts payable and accruals (Note 7.17) 377,190 1,027,394
Total liabilities. 51.594.375 53,021,467
NET ASSETS $ 15,377,930 12,000,647
Represented by:
Share capital
Authorized, issued and fully paid:-
3,000,000 ordinary shares of $1.00 each'. $ 3,000,000 3,000,000
General reserve (Note 14) 2,000,000 2,000,000
Retained earnings 10,377.930 7.000.647
$ 15.377,930 12,000,647


See accompanying notes to finonclot statements
These financial statements were authorized for issue on behalf of the Board of Irectors on April 21, 2008 by:
Director L{. Director /n




Statement of Income
Year ended Decembel 31, 2007, with corresponding figures for 2006


Expressed in Bohtaron aoFoas


INCOME
Gross written premiums (Note 7)
Premium tax


$ 51,793,130
(1,476,230)


2006
49,924,609
(1.379,945)


50,316.900 48,544.664
Ceded to reinsurers (40.975,310) (38,762,463)
Net retained premiums 9,341.590 9,782,201
Decrease/(lncrease) In unearned premium reserve (Note 12) 210.952 (233,622)
Portfolio transfer (Note 13) (373.786) (841,833)
Net premiums earned 9.178,756 8.706,706

EXPENSES
Net claims incurred (Note 12) 1,834.578 1,798.991
Net commissions incurred (Notes 7. 11 ) 1.179,010 1,499.675
Excess of loss reinsurance 4.287,271 3,823,171
7,300.859 7,121,837
Underwriting profit 1,877,897 1.584,869

OPERATING INCOME AND EXPENSES
Interest income (Notes 5. 6. 8) 683.338 536,514
Net profit and loyalty commissions (Note 7) 876,703 578.015
Dividend and other income (Note 7) 507.614 563,141
Change in net unrealized gains
on investments in securities (Note 8) 1.058.888 286,175
Net realized gain on investments in securities 102.408
5.004.440 3651.122
Personnel expenses (Notes 7. 16) (440.397) (389.346)
Depreciation (Note 10) (60,626) (56,398)
Interest expenses (1.750) (14,540)
General and administrative expenses (Note 7) (374.384) (437,520)
NET INCOME $ 4.127,283 2.753,318


Statement of Changes In Shareholders' Equity
Year ended December 31, 2007, with corresponding figures tor 2006


Expressed in Bahamlan dollars
Sh ar General Retained
capital Reserve E0anings Toal

'B balance at December 31, 2005 ,$ 3,000,000 2,000,000 4,247,329 9.247,329
Net Income 2,753,318 2,753,318
Balance at December 31, 2006 $ 3,0000000. 2,000,000 7,000,647 12,000,647
Net Income 4,127,283 4,127,283
Dividends (70,000) (750,000)

Balance at December 31,'2007 $ 3.000,000 2.000.000 10.377,930 15,377,930




Statement of Cash, Mows
Year ended December 31, 2007; with corresponding figures for 2006 Expressed in Bahamian dollars

CASH ROWS FROM OPERAIINO ACTIVIIES 2007 2006
Net Income $ 4,127.283 2,753.318
Adjustments for:
Unearned premium reserve 210,952 (233.662)
Interest income (683.338) (536,514)
Dividend Income (276.270) (178.266)
Interest expense 1,750 14.540
Change in net unrealized gains on investments in securities (1.058.888) (286,175)
Depreciatioh 60.626 56.398
Loss on disposal of property,plant and equipment 14,271
Net realized gain on investments In securities (102.408)
2.382.115 1.501.502
(incese) deceae in asete
Reinsurance recoveries (1.120.934) 2,707.702
Due from agent 3.711.974 (7.374.469)
Deferred commission reserve 80,606 (66,5070)
Prepaid reinsurance premiums 46.416 (934,646)
Prepayments and other receivables (23,261) (195.460)
Inceae (decrease) in iabiles:
Unearned premium reserve (468.320) 1,401.970
Outstanding claims 775.226 (3.731.204)
Unearned commission reserve (6,862) 720,555
Due to reinsurers (287.884) 3.995,963
Accounts payable and accruals (650,204) 279.926
Net cash (used In) provided by opallno aciMe 4438A,72 (2.1921
CASH LOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVIES
Net maturity of term deposits (1,579,783) 1,545,567
Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment 1.677
Purchase of property, plant and equipment (28,157) (272.968)
Purchase of Investments in securities (1,416.431) (3.916.324)
Proceeds from sale of investments in securities 50.000 282,083
Interest received 630.195 631.151
Dividends received 276.270 178,266
NOet ci (Ued ln)/provded by Imwehing eo (067,90) (1O.U)
CASH FLOWS FROM RNANCIN ACIVIES
Didend paid (750,oo)
Interest paid (1.750) (14.540)
NO cash used in dancing oailsee (781,7s) (1d,4o4
Net (Odcrea )/icore ae in oash and cash equivsld*s 1,619,216 (1,79M19)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year (756A22) 3s001.897
Cash ando ash equdev aonlb ofyeard11a 4 8M2.794 (7IM 22)

Cash and cash eshifaiss arep a pre med by.
Cash and bank balances 862,794 243,578
Margin Loon (1.000000)
S" ,7N (94 QM


The full audited Financi
including the ns wl
Integral part of the 4
are available on theJ
atwwwjbb


-an- wr--, I


BUSINESS~


t~i~s~L~~








PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


THE TRIBUI


Bahamas First suffers a $2.453m first quarter hit\


FROM page 1B

more than tripling to $8.959
million, compared to the
$2.299 million.booked in 2006.
Commonwealth Bank's
stock appreciated markedly in
value following its three-for-
one stock split in late 2007,
with investors running the
price of the split shares up to
more than $8, a price that
would have valued the bank
pre-split at over $25 per share.
The $6.66 million gain


accounted for 68 per cent or
more than half the $9.874 mil-
lion increase in Bahamas First
Holdings' net profit for the 12
months to December 31. 2007.
This more than tripled to
$14.36 million, compared to
$4.486 million in 2006. with the
company and the whole
Bahamian general insurance
agency aided by the absence
of claims incurred from a
major hurricane.
Strip out completely the
$6.66 million unrealized invest-
ment gain, which Bahamas


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, JADEN MATTHEW
LARKIN of Golden Gates #2, Cedar Way, Nassau,
Bahamas, intend to change my name to JADEN
MATTHEW CLARKE. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas, no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) RITTER KREUZ FUND LTD. is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on May 23, 2008
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered
by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Alisa Richardson of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.
(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company
are required on or before the 30th day of June, 2008 to send
their names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims
to the Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they
may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
before such debts are proved.
May 26, 2008
ALISA RICHARDSON
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY


NOTICE


iN THE EStATE OF JOAN ENICE ALBURY late of the
City of Nassau on the Island of New Providence on of
the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all person having any claim
or demand against the above Estate are required to send
the same duly certified in writing to the Undersigned on
or before the 13th day of June, A.D., 2008, after which
date the Executors will proceed to distribute the assets
having regard only to the claims of which they shall than
have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all person indebted
to the said Estate of JOAN EUNICE ALBURY are
requested to make full settlement on or before the date
hereinbefore mentioned.

LEANDRA A. ESFAKIS
Attorney for the Executors
Chambers
P.O. Box SS-19269
No. 16 Market Street
Nassau, New Providence
The Bahamas


1St ISA2.


First Holdings largely attrib-
uted to its Commonwealth
Bank holdings, and the com-
pany's net profits would only
have increased by $3.215 mil-
lion in its 2007 financial year.
This would have taken
Bahamas First Holdings' 2007
net income to $7.701 million, a
72 per cent increase upon the
previous year. While still an
impressive result, it is not quite
as good as net profits more
than tripling, with some ana-
lysts and insurance industry
insiders telling The Tribune
that the performance of the
Commonwealth Bank stake is
a key factor in determining
Bahamas First's annual finan-
cial performance.
Bahamas First management
acknowledged to shareholders
that the Commonwealth Bank
investment was unlikely to per-
form in "the immediate future"
as well as it had done in 2007.
What Commonwealth Bank
did for Bahamas First Hold-
ings' income statement, the lat-
ter's sale of a 20 per cent stake
to Canada's The Economical
Insurance Group (EIG) did for
the 2007 balance sheet. .
The $10.75 million invest-
ment, paying close to $1.50 per
Bahamas First Holdings share,
compared to a 2006 year-end
value of about $1.24 per share
according to figures derived by
the KPMG accounting firm,






on onay


boosted the Bahamian insur-
er's contributed surplus by
S10.678 million.
That. coupled, with a more
than $11.6 million increase in
retained earnings to $18.356
million, saw Bahamas First
Holdings' total shareholder
equity almost double at 2007
year-end to $46.489. compared
to $23.251 million in 2006.
There was no let-up in
Bahamas First Holdings' strat-
egy to grow by acquiring
agents in 2007. the company
purchasing a 30 per cent stake
in General Brokers & Agents
in return for writing off
$500,000 from the latter's
receivables balance. This
added to the Carib Insurance
Agency purchase concluded
earlier in the year.
Patrick Ward, Bahamas
First's president and chief
executive, told shareholders
that the group's solvency ratio
had increased to 120 per cent
at 2007 year-end, compared to
just 68 per cent the previous
year, giving it a coverage level
of 1.2 times net written premi-
um.
The combined operating
ratio, Mr Ward added, fell
from 98 per cent in 2006 to 89
per cent last year, as Bahamas
First Holdings generated net
underwriting income of $14.3
million. The latter figure was a
67 per cent increase upon the
previous year's $8.562 million.
For 2007, Bahamas First
Holdings saw its gross written
premiums increase by almost
10 per cent year-over-year to
$108.498 million, compared to
$98.91 million the year before.
Net written premiums,
though, which deduct the
amount paid to reinsurers, rose
by 12 per cent to $38.637 mil-


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LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


BARKLEY DEVELOPMENT S.A.
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
BARKLEY DEVELOPMENT S.A., is in dissolution as of
May 22, 2008.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.


Liquidator


lion, compared to $34.408 mil-
lion in 2006.
Bahamas First attributed the
premium growth to "increased
placements" with the company
by its agents, saying that "in
some cases the increases were
substantial".
However, the company not-
ed that the Bahamian insur-
ance market was now demand-
ing lower premium pricing,
adding that "underwriting dis-
cipline" would be key.
Bahamas First Holdings had
maintained "technically sound
pricing for the vast majority of
our portfolio" in 2007.
"Property rates in the
Bahamas, particularly for cat-
astrophe cover, were under
pressure for most of the year
and trended downward in com-
parison to 2006," Bahamas
First Holdings management
said.
"While the rise in the cost
of reinsurance for catastrophe
protections was abated in 2007,
the fall in original gross rates
was well ahead of the decline
in some cases. In certain
instances, we were obliged to


forego renewals or new busi-
ness prospects due to pricing
considerations.'
Bahamas First Holdings said
the loss ratio for its property
insurance portfolio finished
2007 below 15 per cent, gen-
erating improved margins,
despite experiencing its largest
fire loss on record. This result-
ed in a claim for more than $5
million, believed to be the fire
that destroyed much of the
shopping plaza at Top-of-the-
Hill, Mackey Street.
Gross written premiums for
property insurance increased
by 8 per cent, Bahamas First
Holdings saying its net written
premium grew "by more than
twice this level of growth".
On the motor and liability
insurance side, Bahamas First
Holdings said their 2007 loss
ratios were "exceptional and
produced the largest under-
writing profit ever achieved by
these lines of business in the
history of the group".
Bahamas First Holdings said
it now insured more than
60,000 motor vehicles in the
Bahamas.


MACKADO CHARTER SERVICE
Phone/Fax: (242) 327-5669/Cell No. 466-8201 P.O. Box N-9371
Email: lilymcdonald@hotmail.com Nassau, The Bahamas

SCHOOL TRANSPORTATION
FROM THE WESTERN AREA

This Information Is For All Parents/Guardians
Living In The Western Area of New Providence
All parents who are interested in having their children
transported to. and from schools for the September 2008
term, from the Western areas to schools in the Eastern
areas.

Schools under consideration for round trip transportation
are: Mount Carainel, Queen's College, Kingsway
Academy, St Augustine's College.





COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2007
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/equ/ 1436
Equity Division


IN THE MATTER OF all that piece parcel or
lot of land situate on the Southeastern corner of Union Village
and Wulff Road in the EasternDistrict of the Island of
New Providence 'one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas being 9,424 sq.ft

AND

IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF The Petition of Betty Strachan


NOTICE


BETTY STRACHAN, the Petitioner claims to be the
owner in fee simple possession of the piece parcel or lot of land
hereinbefore described and has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3
of the Quieting Titles Act to have the title to the said piece parcel
or lot of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the Act.
Copies of a diagram or plan showing the position boundaries
and shape marks and dimensions of the said pieces parcels and
lots of land may be inspected during normal working hours at
the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
House, East Street in the City of Nassau, New
Providence, The Bahamas.
(b) The Chambers of Davis & Co., British Colonial
Hilton, Centre of Commerce, 4th Floor Suite 400,
One Bay Street, Nassau, The Bahamas, Attorneys
for the Petitioner.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person or persons
having a right of Dower or an adverse claim not recognized in
the Petition shall within thirty (30) days after the appearance of
the Notice herein file in the Registry of The Supreme Court in
the City of Nassau aforesaid and serve on the Petitioners or the
undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed form,
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a statement
of claim within thirty (30) days herein will operate as a bar to
such claim.

Dated this 7th day of May A.D., 2008


DAVIS & CO.
Chambers
4th Floor, Suite 400
British Colonial Hilton
Centre of Commerce
One Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008, PAGE 9B


P Price control delays




cause rice shortage


FROM page 1B
-I
in hand was simply rational
> economic behaviour, as no
- company wants to make a loss
. in any product/line item.
S The situation was highlight-
ed in the latest missive pro-
duced by the Nassau Institute,
which detailed an e-mail
r exchange between Mr
L. Pritchard and a Bahamian
1; retailer that took place last
r week on Tuesday, May 20.
n Garnet Wong, of Meat Max
& Groceries, placed an order
for one pallet of five pound,
long-grain Mahatma rice bags,
S and another pallet of five
pound Mahatma Gold rice
bags.
S In reply, Mr Pritchard
informed him- "Thanks for
your order Mr Wong, but until
. Price Control gets new pricing
i for us we cannot import the
usual number of containers.
"Since they have taken so
long we have lost the supply
From the plant in
Houston...they have sold our
allocation to non-price con-
trolled countries. We realise
that your customers will be
complaining but the matter is
beyond our control...sorry
about this."

Reductions

Reductions in food supply
can result in price increases.
This is something Bahamian
consumers can ill-afford at a
time when they are grappling
with across-the-board rises in
the price of key food staples,
not to mention soaring ener-
gy costs.
And more increases are on
the way, Mr Pritchard telling
The Tribune that rice prices
are due to increase by 17 per
cent between May and June
2008. With rice having
increased by 15 per cent
already since January 2008, he
estimated that this key staple's
costs will have grown by 30 per


cent for the year to June.
Mr Pritchard said other food
items seeing major price
increases included flour, with a
similar 30 per cent rise year-
to-date, while corn beef will
have increased by 37 per cent
when the cost per case rises by
$10 in the next shipment.
Apart from supply shortages
caused by the increased use of
corn to produce ethanol, cou-
pled with droughts in key food
producing countries, Mr
Pritchard said other factors
behind the increase in food
prices this year included record
global oil prices. This, he
explained, had pushed up
transport and shipping costs
facing all Bahamas-based food
importers.
"I don't think the price
increases have stopped yet,"
Mr Pritchard told The Tribune.
"It's all around, and it's pretty
bleak."
Most price-controlled items
in the Bahamas have their
margins set at around 13 per
cent for wholesalers, and 23
per cent for retailers. With the
margins fixed, whenever
import costs facing these
Bahamian companies rise, they
are forced to apply to the Price
Control Department for an
increase in the prices they can
charge.
Yet with the increased
volatility in global prices of
food staples, increasing num-
bers of Bahamian wholesalers
and retailers have complained
that the Price Control Depart-
ment is not responding in a
timeframe to match, leaving
them facing losses on ship-
ments where price increases
have not been approved.
Once requests are submit-
ted to the Price Control
Department, which is part of
the Ministry of Lands and
Local Government, they then
have to be forwarded to the
Attorney-General's Office for
approval.
This is seen by many in the


private sector as an unneces-
sarily bureaucratic and time-
consuming process, adding to
the costs of doing business. In
previous interviews with The
Tribune, government officials
acknowledged that the process
was long, but said this was nec-
essary.

Commentary

In its commentary, the Nas-
sau Institute said it had learned
of one episode where an
unnamed wholesaler "had to
place up to 50 calls to receive
the correct price control sheets
to price products to get goods
to the shelves. A process that
should take minutes to resolve
took days to complete.
"After exchanges to help the
price control division correct
their errors, the wholesaler
finally gave up and collected
the incorrect sheets.
"To make matters worse,
reports are that the Price Con-
trol office has moved and has
been without phones for some
three weeks so far."
Urging the Government to
abolish price controls, the Nas-
sau Institute said competition
and free markets would work
more effectively in keeping the
prices faced by Bahamian con-
sumers down.
The Nassau Institute added:
"Wholesalers have been sub-
ject to price increases of up to
30 per cent, as a result of the
world market, and our gov-
ernment is not efficient enough
to process their required paper
work in time so goods can be
ordered to stock the local store
shelves.
"It's a perfect example of
government price controls
causing food shortages. This
'process' is what frustrates
business people, and inevitably
the Bahamian consumer,
because they cannot get the
goods they require. And in this
case it prevents them from get-
ting basic food items."


Report of IndepaMunt Audbmr

To Dkiretor and StimkhohilM
Banco ha0 BBA SAS


1 The accompin ba she hmi ban derkd kom im fnawM mIswIm O
Banco Ia B SA for the yewr nded Dammber 31.2007 mad f 200Li. Thiee
sheetse t p m ne empoabi o Baro t manrageit Our eMpNye Imb toi s
an opinion on whdmer the Ibnalane dW amwonMam in I IN adml pedt wIh
ue finan i matnerImts rm dch they m rke
2 We have audid tdi Iances emamdds of mie lsM BMA A. tar oe ymer ded
December 31. 2007 and 200. from wdd0 bInie l .mamweei ml tedi. h
accordna= wl appwrovd eB lnm mdig iUindmi Ip r npt dM Fbuiy 11.
206 we expreamd an unqudied opon on e IInUMl InmMie tarm lich Ie
balance oshe sw red d.
3 our opinion, Ve anompnyIm blWnme uhreI am ieone meW aep
wilm thin e inani iman rm wh i a hle ien sI I ua Im Iidt
4 WlMou qusmyilg our qphton, we eap ieetI hi smoop III etme M s do
not compflr commlpYte of Id WindW lM timMi hi ModN lh ma IoMAin
prdiceI adopted In a. nhourm aon a miid of qpemlAn ii Iag n lIt l
posklio and adn e in i*quy of Bmneo W iat BA and n sanw y m t ge
aountlng plcies and oi explaaWofy nole mre seeay to obthan d o a eopheI
unlai'dnof' me ith ncld pomllon. pomMo and dmingll In pomon d
the Bank.
5 For a beaer urndtandg ofd hia BlTi ncdi poai n and ho mmt of
operations for ite yew ad of lhe ctpe ofur aoudZ, Ihwee blhem l tle shod be
road in comnun*on with mse inIaM tslbmnm a Ie whid ch Ne bamne tI ew
derived and aor audit port them

So Paulo, Febuay 11,2006


PricewatehaouCoopen
Audkores hidpndente
CRC 2SP000160/0-5


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BAANCESHEETS AT DECEMBER31
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GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, YOUTH, SPORT & CULTURE
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION



NOTICE


Procurement of School Computers for the Districts Homework
Centres/Study Hall programme


1.0 The Department of Education, (hereafter called the "Purchaser")
now invites sealed bids, from Suppliers for the procurement of
school computers, printers and LCD projectors for Ministry of
Education School.

2.0 Interested Bidders may collect the bidding documents from the
Purchasing/Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education,
Science &Technology Headquarters, Thompson Blvd. from
Friday, 23"d May, 2008,and obtain further information, at the
second address given below.

3.0 Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a
sealed envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed
with the subject bided on (e.g. "School Computers, Printers" ).

4.0 Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first
address,on or before Friday, 13" June, 2008 by 5:00 p.m. (local
time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they
may be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned
unopened.

5.0 Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of
those Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at
10:00 a.m. on Tuesday 17th June, 2008 at the
first address below.

(1) The Chairman Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530


(2) Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture
P.O. Box N-3913/4
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242) 502-8571


The Department reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders


--


' ~' ' ~'I '''" ~~' ` ` "


I - 2m


--.---ru --


---IE-. --AL


----1 M 17,1

-8 a3
(MUI~ Lo-









PAGE lOB, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008 THE TRIBUNE


CREDITSUISSE


Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas

Graduate Training Program


Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas has operated an Apprenticeship Training
Programme in The Bahamas since the early 1990's. Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas
is now pleased to announce the launch of its Graduate Training Programme, with
the first intake intended for July 1", 2008. Full details and an application form can
be obtained from:

The Graduate Training Program Administrator
Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch
The Bahamas Financial Centre, 40, Floor
Shirley & Charlotte Streets
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax No.: 242-356-8148

Application forms should be returned NO LATER THAN JUNE 9. 2008

AIM

Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas is committed to identifying and developing the
best young talent in The Bahamas. Credit Suisse Group, Bahamas is offering
one (1) year Graduate Training Contracts to College of The Bahamas graduates
or graduates returning to The Bahamas from accredited colleges abroad.

The program will accommodate three (3) graduates. Successful applicants will be
awarded a one year contract of employment during which time the graduates will
rotate between or within different business units or departments of Credit Suisse
Group entities. Permanent employment opportunities will be evaluated at the end
of this period.

CONDITIONS

1. The candidate is required to have a Bachelors Degree in one of the
following or suitably similar disciplines:

* Banking and Finance
* Engineering
* Mathematics
* Finance
* Economics
SEconomics & Finance
* Management
* Accounting
* Computer Information Systems

2. The candidate must have graduated with a minimum grade point average of
3.5.

3. The candidate cannot be an immediate family member of a person employed
at the Bank.

BENEFITS
Competitive Salary; Health and Life Insurance












GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, YOUTH, SPORT & CULTURE
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION



NOTICE

Procurement of School Computers, Printers & LCD Projectors

1.0 The Department of Education, (hereafter called the "Purchaser") now invites
sealed bids, from Suppliers for the procurement of school computers, printers
and LCD projectors for Ministry of Education School.

2.0 Interested Bidders may collect the bidding documents from the Purchasing/
Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education, Science & Technology
Headquarters, Thompson Blvd. from Friday, 23" May, 2008, and obtain further
information, at the second address given below.

3.0 Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject bided
on (e.g. "School Computers, Printers").

4.0 Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first address, on
or before Friday, 13' June, 2008 by 5:00 p.m. (local time). It will not be
necessary to submit bids in person since they may be sent by mail. Late bids
will be rejected and returned unopened.

5.0 Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those Bidders or
their representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday 17"'
June, 2008 at the first

address below.

(1) The Chairman Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N3017


FROM page 1B

from the capital markets would
incur costs equivalent to 8 per
cent of that amount from filing
and registration fees paid to
the Securities Commission.
Such entrepreneurs, Mr
Davies added, would have to
incur "significant legal and
financial advisory costs" to
produce a prospectus, then pay
the Securities Commission a
$1,000 filing fee and $20,000
minimum registration fee.
Describing this as an "area
of concern", the BISX chief
executive said: "I have sug-
gested, and I trust, that we look
seriously at the cost of capital
under the new securities leg-
islation to ensure that the reg-
ulatory environment does not
create any unnecessary barriers
to entry......
"Currently, the needs of
entrepreneurs who need capi-
tal to engage in new business
ventures for relatively small
amounts of capital, for exam-
ple up to $1 million, are not
being met in the capital mar-
kets through the existing secu-
rities exchange."
Mr Davies said the Bahami-
an capital markets were "one
of the critical avenues for fund
raising" by small businesses
and entrepreneurs. They were
not only for large companies


I


seeking to raise capital, he
explained, given BISX's efforts
to develop a listing tier for
smaller Bahamian firms look-
ing to 'test the water' before
initiatives such as going public.
Small businesses were the
lifeblood of the Bahamian
economy, Mr Davies said, with
the Department of Statistics
having found in 2004 that 3,249
out of a total of 3,607 compa-
nies on New Providence and
Grand Bahama some 90 per
cent could be classified as
such.
Commercial bank financing
remained the main way for
small businesses and entrepre-
neurs to access capital in the
Bahamas, and Mr Davies said:
"There is not an adequate or
acceptable level of 'risk capital'
in the market to properly ser-
vice and foster an entrepre-
neurial business environment."
Given the reliance on com-
mercial bank financing, and
these institutions' preference
to obtain physical security for
the funds they lend, Mr Davies
said a Bahamian entrepreneur
with a $60,000 capital require-
ment often had to find $20,000
in cash, a third of the money,
themselves.
Another way was to pledge
real estate to the bank, mean-
ing "there is going to be little
risk exposure to the bank and


the cost of failure to the indi-
vidual is great, because a fail-
ure in their business will prob-
ably result in the loss of their
property".
Mr Davies blamed "finan-
cial policies that ove;whelm-
ingly lean in favour of con-
sumerism" as a key reason why
the Bahamas had failed to cre-
ate an environment more
favourable to entrepreneurs,
with financial policies "dictat-
ing that we consume rather
than invest".
"Our lending practices are
designed to extend easy con-
sumer credit and facilitate con-
sumer spending, and a policy
of direct foreign investment
lends itself to a 'wait and see'
attitude for persons who would
otherwise have to be more pro-
ductive and responsible for
their own well-beings," Mr
Davies said.
"There is the problem of a
culture of consumerism, which
is stimulated and perpetuated
at all levels of our society. And
all parties are guilty of this,
from our government policies
down to our lending policies.
"It makes no sense to me
why you would risk $30,000 in
a car to a new car owner, and
not that same amount of mon-
ey on a researched and well
thought-out, but waiting to be
executed, business plan."


ME POSITIONS AVAILABLE

The Ministry of Public Works and the Nassau Tourism & Development Board
Through the Downtown Nassau Revitalization Task Force
Seeks Two Highly Capable Individuals


,, r ..... All Candidates Must Possess:
* Exceptional verbal and written communication skills;
* Ability to work with diverse groups and individuals
* Demonstrated record of superior managerial and administrative skills
* Ability to utilize technology to maximize performance
* A general understanding of business operations and government functions including:
planning, administration, research, finance, marketing, and public relations
* An intense desire to be part of a major transformation of the City of Nassau


Managing Director Position
The Downtown Revitalization'Task Force (DRTF) seeks a dynamic full-time Managing Director to
manage its day to day activities and ensure the successful fulfillment of its mandate. The ideal candidate
should have a strong management background with at least five years experience. Project management
experience desirable. The Managing Director is responsible for:
Organizing and Managing the fiscal and program activities of the DRTF;
Supporting the DRTF in the development and Implementation of an action plan in accordance
with its Objectives and Terms of Reference;
Working with task force members, technical consultants, urban planners, architects, financial
institutions and all relevant stakeholders;
Coordinating various elements of the plan to ensure continuity and collaboration among all
interdependent public and private entities;
Research and collation of all project information;
Ensuring the funding necessary to support the activities of the DRTF;
Communicating the activities of the DRTF to all stakeholders and the general public;
Liaising with the public and private sector and seeking consensus where necessary;
Executive Administrator
Exceptional administrative skills are required for:
Oversight of the day-to-day operations of the DRTF;
Coordination of meetings;
Maintaining records and accounting for all meetings and project financial transactions;
Maintenance of all financial records; accounts payables and accounts receivables;
Bank reconciliation and preparation of periodic financial reports;
Organizing and maintaining project databases, records and files, reports and relevant information;
Supervision of project employees, and administrative coordination with consultants as may
be required;
Provide administrative support as necessary to the Managing Director
The Downtown Revitalization Task Force (DRTF) is a public-private sector group comprised of
representatives of the Nassau Tourism & Development Board and the Government of The Bahamas.
The purpose of the task force is to advise and support on matters related to the immediate, interim and
long-term steps which must be undertaken to improve, stimulate, revitalize and transform the city of
Nassau, and the harbor; and to facilitate the implementation of key transformational activities. It is
anticipated that the DRTF would cease operations at such time that a legal entity such as a Downtown
Authority is formed and able to assume the management functions in support of the development of
the city.
The overall goal of the DRTF is:
To transform the City of Nassau and the waterfront into one of the most attractive harbor cities in the
hemisphere while ensuring development which is sustainable, economically viable and draws upon the
rich history and traditions of The Bahamas.
The DRTF's primary focus is in the following areas:
1. Produce a Master Plan for the City of Nassau and advise on initial revitalization activities;
2. Recommend the structure for the establishment of a Downtown Development Authority or management
mechanisms) responsible for the ongoing management of the city, its economic development and
enhancements;
3. Facilitate redevelopment of: (a) Woodes Rogers Wharf from Navy Lion Road to Victoria Avenue;
and (b) the present predominant commercial shipping area from Victoria Avenue to Church Street;
4. Advise steps to address the transportation and parking needs of the city;
5. Support immediate enhancements to the city with emphasis on streetscaping, landscaping, paving,
and addressing neglected and derelict properties.
The Managing Director reports to the DRTF. Successful candidates will be engaged in a one-year
contract, renewable up to two years, depending upon the needs of the DRTF Competitive salaries and
benefits.
Interested applicants may deliver responses to:


Downtown Revitalization Task Force Per
Hotels Centre
S.G. Hambros Building, West Bay Street
(South entrance, next to Cable Beach Golf Course)
Fax: 242-502-4220
Email: bhahotels@bahamashotels.org


manent Secretary Ministry of Public Works
Ministry of Public Works & Transport
Re: Downtown Revitalization Position
John F. Kennedy Drive
Fax: 242-326-6629
Email: colinhiggs@bahamas.gov.bs


Applications should be received by Monday, June 2, 2008
Only applicants who have been short-listed will be contacted


Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530


(2) Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture
P.O. Box N-3913/4
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242) 502-8571


The Department reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders


Commission fees


create 'barrier' to


capital markets


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MAY 26, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


I I


".







THE TRIBUNE


Legal Notice

NOTICE

SAMCOLE FAMILY HOLDING INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
23rd day of April 2008. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.
0





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

SIROCCO VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of May 2008. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


SANG INVESTMENTS
LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sectidn
138.(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SANG INVESTMENTS LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice

NOTICE

MARBLESTONE INDUSTRIES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 4th day of April 2008. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice


NOTICE

BIG BOOM MANAGEMENT LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
'


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of May 2008. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


TYNE-DALE CORPORATION

-- .
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of TYNE-DALE CORPORATION has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice

NOTICE

STABLE PREMIUM
INVESTMENTS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 14th day of May 2008. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal NQtice
NOTICE


LAPRIMROSE LTD.



Notice is hereby given that in Accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of LAPRIMROSE LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice

NOTICE

EARTH TRIBE LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced'on
the 14th day of May 2008. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice

NOTICE

KCP GROUP LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Legal Notice


NOTICE E

CHATERGOLD MA NAGEMENT
LIMITED] D
(In Voluntary Uqu idation)

Notice is hereby given the it the above-named
Company is in dissolution, w whichh commenced on
the 4th day of April 2008. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 N; assau, Bahamas.


ARGOSA CORF INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notio e

NOTICI E

FRILLINGDON INVE STMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liqu lidation)

Notice is hereby given thE it the above-named
Company is in dissolution, w whichh commenced on
the 6th day of May 2008. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 N, assau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORF INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice *
NOTICE] E


SMOKY FIEI LD INC.



Notice is hereby given that in a ccordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Busine :ss Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SMOKY FIEI ,D INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution i has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struc k off the Register.




ARGOSA COR P. INC.
(Liquidator )


Legal Notic e

NOTICI E

SAUVIGNON HOL] DINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liqu lidation)

Notice is hereby given thE it the above-named
Company is in dissolution, w rhich commenced on
the 6th day of May 2008. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 N assau, Bahamas.


ARGOSA CORF '. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notio e

NOTICI E

TOYBRIDGE KEEL
INVESTMENT 'S LTD.
(In Voluntary Uqu idation)

Notice is hereby given thi it the above-named
Company is in dissolution, w whichh commenced on
the 8th day of May 2008. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 N assau, Bahamas.


ARGOSA CORF
(Liquidator)


). INC.


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 6th day of May 2008. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


I I I I


?


i BUSINESS


MONDAY, MAY


26, 2008, PAGE 11B











THE WEATHER REP


RT


S I INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
t (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


My1 w*.'TODAYN T SWD D TUS'F13Y


Mostly sunny and Partly cloudy. Breezy with clouds Periods of clouds and Mostly cloudy. Partly sunny with
breezy and sun. sunshine. t-storms possible.
High: 840 High: 870 High: 860 High: 860
High: 850 Low: 71 Low: 71 Low: 73" Low: 73 Low: 730
I 88Do- I r 79' r'""5'77F I 93-79. F I r -Tf'f I r 9I ?
The exclusive ccuWeal er RealFeel Temperature* Is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body-everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.


ABACO
H:71'8F/2rC
Linz71"F/22"C


IT PALM BEACH
IIc 83SF/28'C
Lar73 F123'C


t6


'F/f2"C


S v


KEYWEST Ms
HIgh:84' F/298' C
Low:.78 F/2"C C





Shown Is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


Tuesday
W High Low
F/C F/C
a 87/30 58/14
s 67/19 43/6
S 84/28 65/18
s 79/26 58/14
S 82/27 57/13
pc 78/25 51/10
t ... .56/13 4t/5
s 85/29 66/18
t 58/14 42/5
t 63/17 44/6
pc 93/33 69/20
t 60/15 43/6
t 62/16- 40/4
s 86/30 73/22
s 92/33 72/22


Lo69*F/WI2 C


-9i


SNASSAU
.gh:S'F/29rC
W .r71'F/r22C
a


too"


A75ROS
Low:.75"F/24"C


Today Tuesday
High Low W High Low W
F/C F/C F/C F/C
84/28;64/17. 't 6.. Wf20 43 4 r
81/27 59/15 s 84/28 63/17 s
f6/ u 62/tnt, 6820. 5nt1,. t
79/26 60/15 s 87/30 66/18 s
-:92( 8,7081 ;:t 88- wa/8 671 t t.
70/21 56/13 pc 72/22 56/13 pc
87/30 71/21 pc 79/26 52/11 t
89/31 72/22 t 86/30 63/17 t
85/29 73/22 pc 65/29 73/22 a
66/18 45/7 c 63/17 48/8 pc
.8:7/3a. 6T-0 pc 82/276W15- t
87/30 73/22 t 87/30 70/21 pc
81/27 63/17 s 77/25 55/12 t
90/32 70/21 pc 88731 63/17 t
83/28 66/18 s 86/30 6/20 s


Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature
High ........ .............. ...................... 86 F/30" C
Low ............................................... 720 F/22" C
Normal high .................................. 85* F/29 C
Normal low ........................................ 72 F/22* C
Last year's high .................................. 830 F/28* C
Last year's low ................................. 73 F/23* C
Precipitation ,
As of 2 p.m. yesterday ............................. ... 0.30'
Year to date .................................................. 4.33'
Normal year to date .................................... 11.09"


ELEUTHERA
HRl9g7"F/31"C
Low:.73"F/23*C


AccuWeather.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2008


e 41s5 6
LOW MODERATE HIGH
The higher the AccuWeather UV
greater the need for eye and


High Ht.(f.)
Today 12:22 a.m. 2.6
12:48 p.m. 2.3
Tuesday 1:11 a m. 2.5
1:41 p.m. 2.4
Wednesday2:05 a.m. 2.4
2:37 p.m. 2.6
Thursday 3:03 a.m. 2.4
3:35 p.m. 2.7


Sunrise...... 6:21 a.m. Moor
Sunset....... 7:53 p.m. Moor
Last New F



May 27 JIu. 3 Ju,


n. 10 Jn. 18


CAT ISLAND
LHog:3F/28*C
Los70rF/z"C


GREATEXMA
Law:T7FC
LOPTKTYFC


Today Tuesday
High Low W High Low W
F/C F/C F/C F/C
dPhilaegphia .-,. jSS/204c/tCiI. E : -7a 581t 4 .4 t
Phoenix 89/31 65/18 s 94/34 71/21 s
RIsttBblutth.s.,..82/Bt 16-t, -~~72Aqt-,467 t
Portland, OR 69/20 54/12 c 70/21 56/13 c
IRalMSigD m a4:1 1 W2.: &1/16 ilt~84 -6,417 pc


St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego-
San Francisco
Seattle
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tucson
Washington, DC


87/30 66/18 t
68/20 50/10 t
91/32 75/23 s
67/19 61/16-pc
67/19 54/12 pc
68/20 53/11 c
87/30 62/16 s
86/30-67/19 s.
87/30 59/15 s
85/29 68/20 s


7AlA'F482C
r 2'F/2'C
IL7TRT


u-mw..
RAGGED ISLAND
HiguCrF/F31 C
l -Mfn EMi4 S


SMAYAGUANA
llgic 88F/31'C
Lr74" F/23'" C

B? j
rS1^


69-20- L9/9- r,, ," "
72/22 53/11 c REATIAU A
91/32 72/22 pc GRATINAM U
69/20 60/15 pc Higla8 F/32C
68/20 52/11 pc Lwr.:7/ 23"C
70/21 54/12 bs
89/31 63/17 s
87/30 69/20 s
94/34 64/17 s
83/28 60/15 t


NASSAU Today:
Tuesday:
FREEPORT Today:
Tuesday:
ABACO Today:
Tuesday:


WINDS
N at 10-20 Knots
NE at 12-25 Knots
NNE at 10-20 Knots
NE at 12-25 Knots
NE at 10-20 Knots
NE at 12-25 Knots


6116 34/1 pc 5412' 361/ pc



0A P 700' P2IDM IOO 703"s
VI~figston 6130 MIN c=*M@~86 "09 hA4- Mpc
I ToMn W W&IN l "5 4/ 2r M WMI M6 i "-
VA 0 fm a g NWA-Ill I&-V. 2 iPy v


Mai ila .86/30 77/25 sh 86/30 77/25 t
.Monterrey 102/38 74/23 s 103/39 74/23 pc
oscow 47 39/3 c 60/15 41/5 pc
Nairobi 79/2fi 5211 sh 75/23 53/11 r
Oslo 67/19 44/6 pc 68/20 50/10 pc
Prague 69/20 57/13 c 80/26 58/14 c
W .ca!I.nUw .'- ,0-fl iSW,::.B h :j:'.,. 2W7, ,..p; .
Riyadh 109/42 84/28 s 102/38 78/25 s
,lH M :.-;.- -.... '.'-; .~0r8.- O3/.7 i; :4. .-- 11- ,63/17,:s 5
St. Thomas 85/29 78/25 t 87/30 78/25 t
S&an:ad ,'s: --.. : 11t/18. 37/2 pCo.. ,18.iWt 28/-6:5I.
San Salvador 84/28 73/22 t 86/30 73/22 t
Sag~blao . :." -' 57/f3 .:; 436. 6 r: 0/" "::;r.s o0 37/2r.
Santo Domingo 84/28 72/22 c 83/28 73/22 c
SaoPauto"i- -~..~ -4 ,33.57/18'jiO ,; .. .-7a8/22. ,60/15 pc
Seoul 82/27 55/12 s 77/25 59/15 pc
OP- /J a 41-5 pc
yoney o. owo 'wo pu; i w 'q010o bi
Talp- .84128 75/23 r 90/32 76/24 c
Tokyo 75/23 63/17 pc 75/23 63/17 s
Toronto -77/25- 50/10 t 5 58/14 42/5 pc
Trinidad 83/28 65/18 pc 84/28 65/18 pc
Vancouver 67/19--56/13 sh 68/20 55/12 c
Vienna 79/26 67/19 pc 87/30 70/21 pc
Warsaw 6O20 48/8 pc 70/21 50/10 pc
Winnipeg 52/11 32/0 s 62/16 41/5 s
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
- storms, r-rain, st-snow flurries, so-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace


+4rrf~


I WORLDCITIS:


WAVES
1-3 Feet
3-5 Feet
1-3 Feet
3-5 Feet
1-3 Feet
4-6 Feet


VISIBILITY
4-7 Miles
6-7 Miles
4-7 Miles
6-7 Miles
4-7 Miles
6-7 Miles


WATER TEMPS.
81 F
81* F
80* F
80 F
79* F
79 F


./


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
83/28 6/13
62/16 45/7
83/28 64/17
81/27 62/16
85/29 65/18
78/25 62/16
74/23 53/11
81/27 61/16
80/26 49/9
81/27 56/13
94/34 74/23
64/17 44/6
79/26. 53/11
86/30 73/22
90/32 -74/23


Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chcango w-
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston


Indianapolis.
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando


Today Tuesday
S. High Low W High Low W
F/C F/C F/C F/C
V HiGh EXT Amsterdam 68/20 58/14 r 69/20 63/17 c
-I illlI-VItt 4 -.4 .. 45wll c. r,447P9i. 0=&N 1
Index" number, the Athens 86/30 70/21 s 89/31 69/20 s
skin protection. -W leiriS5 -i UW15 9%.49 ~06.0115 .-aW8 _
Bangkok 95/35 81/27 1 95/35 81/27 t

SLow H-.(q jwft.) %-? /,
L4 t. 3 Beirut 75/23 63/17 s 75/23 72/22 s
6:45 a.m. 0.3
6:53 p.m. 0.5 j e .Wle %-v"
3p.m. 0.5 Berlin 72/22 52/11 c 76/24 58/14 c
7.31 a.m. 0.3 0 2N i J-.- ~AQa ., "574/12.: z, a t-A
7:52 p.m. 0.4 Bogota 64/17 48/8 r 64/17 47/8 r
8:20 a.m. 0.2 01:~- -- ;-151/19 ;7W-08~i cr:
8:55 p.m. 0.4 Budapest 77/25 56/13 pc 83/28 58/14 pc
9:12 a.m. 0.2. i.lO -0-., _'..-W 64 4 .1 .:v5/12T2;_7 ,,;4
10:00 p.m. 0.3 Cairo 90/32 66/18 s 93/33 65/18 s
SJSiactIa Sl5a! 1 79s2 t 12400 Q;/20pe:
Calgary 56/13 40/4 c 62/16 43/6 pc
tg^^L^^, :in 3 :: :-i,.. I*Q 3 :1p.~ ~ I'8 m ,,9 /.a2
Caracas 81/27 71/21 r 80/26 72/22 c
nset .... 11:45 a.m. openhagen 317 53/Il r 69 720 54/i 'l s
first Full ,OII'MS 4 8. i14,. E
,a i. Frankfurt 79/26 62/16 c 87/30 70/21 c
Halifax 60/15 46/7 pc 59/15 41/5 sh


I MARIKEFWCAST I


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