<%BANNER%>

DLOC



The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01011
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: April 26, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01011

Full Text










ANY TIMIE...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


CHIPS AHOY Pak ~R.


LOW 72F


(~I~c~rl.












a By ARTHIA NIXON the word "Bahamas" was typed
YOUNG Bahamians are mak- so eeobuy re ancthh figh he
ing their mark on the international .second on a list of 11,200 videos
arena in a way that could hit the relating to the Bahamas with videos
tourism industry, with students on Athintis, Paradise Island and
from The College of The Bahamas Junkanoo belowv it.
leading the way. However, COB is not the only
As of 4pm.yesterday, the popular tertiary level institution in the coun-
YoxiTube internet video website try making the rounds ojn
had recorded about 66,901 views 'YouTube. A University of the West
and received four out of five stars Indies Bahamas party, with 19,179
for: a brawl on the college's Oakes hits, showcased students at a dorm
Field campustinvolving two young---partydancini~gouggestively and "dry
men. humpmng .
The video included a rap sound- A total of 23,467 viewers
track and laughing by onlookers as watched a child estimated to be
those involved i~p the fight dragged eight years old starmng at two pre-
each other through wet grass and teens dancing provocatively and
eventually threw objects. simulatmng lesbian acts as a pre-
Most surprising was that from
three different computers, when SEE page 11
















.a Y






Pair charged with assaulting
and threatening son of 'Ninety'


PRICE 750


Shooting victim

dies in hospital
WBy DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
d maycock@tri b unemed ia. net
FREEPORT The second man critically wounded during a
shooting this week in Freeport lost his battle for life in hospital on
Thursday evening.
Terrel Mingo, alias Jamaal Stubbs, 30, of Nassau, died of his
injuries around 7pm in the Intensive Care Unit at Rand Memori-
al Hospital. His death pushes the homicide count for 2008 to four
on Grand Bahama.
SEE page ~11

Official denies St John's College
Students' claims over exam


THREE major fires in New Providence yesterday threat-
ened hundreds of homes in the Carmichael Road, Tropical
Gardens and Adelaide areas.
At press time last night, firefighters had brought the fires
burning close to Carmichael Road and Tropical Gardens
community, off West Bay Street, under control.
However, a blaze deep in the bush near the Water and
Sewerage Corporation wells, which is advancing parallel to
CoralHarbour Road towards Adelaide, was still burning at
As crews of firefighters battled the two fires close to Lyn-
den Pindling International Airport in the south-west and the
north-west of the island yesterday morning, a third blaze
broke out close to Miller's Heights sub-division, near the
Bargain City Shopping Plaza on Carmichael Road.
Press liaison officer Asst Sup't Walter Evans told The
Tribune that earlier yesterday the fire threatened "numer-
ous homes and a (Baptist) church" in the area close to the
shopping centre.
Three crews of firefighters were on the scene to prevent
the fire from spreading to homes in Miller's Heights.
The fire seems to have its point of origin in a vacant lot full
of derelict cars.
Last night, Mr Evans said the fire had been brought under
control and was now in the "smouldering phase."
However, residents still had to put up with significant
smoke development-
Also in the "smouldering phase" w~as the fire north of
the airport, which earlier yesterday had threatened to spread
to the Tropical Gardens community off West Bay Street.
Mr Evans said that fire services personnel have been
working non-stop since 4am on Thursday to contain the
fires-

SIEE page 11


olaraaylrms
u


?ij
gr~lS
rsc?


'0 5







ig1


i By MEGAN REYNOiLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
A CAMPAIGN to protect chil-
dren from exposure to pornogra-
phy is being planned by the Gov-
ernment after videos of school-
children having sex Yvere reported
in The Tribune.
Loretta Butler-Tilrer, Minis-
ter of State and Social Develop-
ment in the Ministry of Health,
said such videos are becoming
frighteningly widespread among
schoolchildren throughout The
Bahamas.
She said: "All of our children
have access to mobile phones and


computers, they are very com.
puter savvy, and therefore they
are.all potentially at risk of expo-
sure.
"We believe there is a direct
correlation between children
watching the films and making
them, and they are simply acting
out what they see." ~
To combat this damaging
behaviour, Miss Butler-Turner
intends to continue the kind of
sex education she and the Nation-
al Child Protection Council havre
propagated throughout Child
Protection Month this month and
raise awareness of how damag-
SEE page 11


THE nephew of drug convict
Samuel "Ninety" Knowles was
arraigned in Magistrate's Court
yesterday along with another
man on weapons and assault
charges.
Nehru Newton, 33, of
Clarence Hill Avenue, along
with Clarence Gray, 36, of Tre-
galon Gardens, have been
charged with assaulting and
threatening Knowles' son
Theodore Knowles.
Court dockets allege the two
men on Tuesday, April 22, were
found in possession of a silver
and black Lorcin pistol, five
.380 rounds, a black Ruger 9mm
pistol a'nd eight 9mm rounds.
It is also alleged that the two
men assaulted Theodore
Knowles and made death
threats against him.
Both men pleaded not guilty.
They elected to have the assault
and threats of death cases heard


in Magistrate's Court. Both
were remanded to Her
Majesty's Prison. A bail hearing
has been set for next Friday.
The men are being represented
by attorneys Dion Smith and
Alex Morley.
*A 28-year-old man of Hos-
pital Lane accused of being
found in possession of 29 live
rounds of ammunition was
arraigned in Magistrate's Court
on Thursday.
According to court dogets,
Elexis Taylor, on Tuesday,
April 22, was found in posses-
sion of 29 live rounds of .357
ammunition. Taylor, who was
arraigned before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel at Court Eight,
Bank Lane, on~ Thursday,
pleaded not guilty to the charge
and was granted $10,000 bail.
The case was adjourned to
November 24.


SBy ALISON LOWE
Tribn Staff Reortter

THE Director of Educatiori at
the Anglican Central Education
Authority has denied that students
at St John's College are set to be
made to take a BGCSE exam in a
subject for which they had no
teacher for most of the course.
Valencia Saunders admitted that,
although the teacher originally
assigned to teach the grade 12 stu-
dents the commerce class did leave
the school "suddenly" in January,
there has been a substitute teacher
regularly covering the lessons.
This comes after a concerned par-
ent yesterday told The Triibune that
students at St John's were set to
prts tx coo bv ah eat tht
exam in May.
They claim that they have had as
few as two or three classes in the
subject since their original teacher


left almost four months ago and
they are t ttahlly prepared through
Several from the class of "30
plus" also alleged that although it is
a two-year course, the school only
started attempting to teach them
the subject last September mean-
ing that they only studied the sub-
ject for around four months before
their regular teacher left.
When The Tribune visited the
campus yesterday, no protest was
underway, but senior students were
engaged in a mass meeting with the
school's principal in the auditori-
um.
Speaking on condition of
anonymity, some students said out~
side the meeting that they are wor-
nied about how their impending fail-
ul rtoage ewlel impt Ith ir uttu
prospects.
SEE page 11


I


nrb un e


The


BAHAMIAS EDITION

SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 2008


.-)I .
::l0.Pt~


Prtcto PO1 l 1'








p0PR Camp


Government plans to




ex110ur Sto OSeX f11ms








Illr~l~l





I ~ ~~


- II I II I ----


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 2008


*m b..rier._


,uo\ orvrs et joutitco

A GROUP of bus drivers say they are hoping to make
improvements across the entire public transportation system.
They aim to create more routes, but pointed out that better
service will make a price mecrease inevitable.
"We feel that it is important that Bahamians stop saying 'the
government, the government, the government'. The govern-
ment has a role, but they do not speak for our businesses. We
as business owners must take responsibilities for ourselves;
we need to speak to our customers, service our customers,
and when there are concerns, update them," said Pubic Trans-
port Association president Reuben Rahnung.
He was speaking to Romald Ferreira of the TV show
BA crig noMreRahming, some improvements have already
been made to the bus system and others are in the pipeline.
"My hope is that the fare increase will also come with value
added," he said.
He says his group aims to implement:
a system linking all buses
a route management system ~
the use of GPS technology
a transit safety system for children
an electronic fare paying system
Mr Rahming said bus operators want to be as fair to their val-
ued customers as possible.


/ '1 ~ F


e'd workaholic, a professional
extraordinaire, a teacher with a
passion to put and keep BTC
on the putting edge of technolo-
gy:
S"There are few persons in my
lifetime that I have had the plea-
sure to work with -in a profes-
sional capacity whose knowl-
edge of his' chosen field is as
extensive as Mr Williams," Mr
Roberts.
' Mr Williams had been per-
ceived by some as being close
to the formet'works~ mnuster a
fact which some observers spec-
ulate, did not endear him to the
new FNM government.
Sources at BTC told The Tri-
bune last-week that the decision.
to ask Mr Williams to resign
does not imply anything improp-
er or illegalton the former
CEO's part.


FORME~R Minister of Works
Bradley Roberts yesterday
likened the departure of Leon
Williams from the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
to the dismissal of a former gen-
eral manager who successfully
sued the government under the
first FNM administration.
Referring to Batelco's former
manager Barrett Russell who
worked at the company for 26
years before his transfer to the
Office of the Deputy ~Prigit
Minister as a consultant in 1994
- Mr Roberts said: "When I first
heard rumors of Mr William's
departure, my first reaction was
d~j8 vu, recalling how a former
general manager of Bahamas
Telecommunications Corpora-
tion under the FNM adminis-
tration was dismissed and the
subsequent legal action which


resulted in high six figures being
awarded by the courts to that -
general manager."
Mr Williams was last week -
asked to resign as BTC's CEO ~
and president.

Assessne~nt

BTC's executive chairman
Julian Francis in a statement to
the media said that following an
assessment of the company's
critical needs, the board of direc-
tors made the determination
that BTC "needs new leader-
ship in order to address its
numerous weaknesses and
shortconungs."
Mr Roberts, who had respon-
sibility of BTC during most of
the Christie administration,
described Mr Williams as a "gift-


1~~ )) a1 ~)~~


MBy TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Rep~orter
whyyo utlex@tri b une media. net


and cap~'t afford to buy my ol' lady any-
*thiing.
Living pay cheque to pay cheque,
-- Carmichael Road.


"I VEX that the former minister of state
for finance has publicly suggested that gov- "I happy because The Tribune said (Apr~il
ernment should consider writing off$410 25th, l B) we in the east finally gettin a bank.
million in unpaid taxes and in the meantime T'ank God! Now my couple 'a dollars could
senior citizens have difficulty getting their be close to me and I don have to sit in traffic
pension cheques from NIll '. to go visit it. T'ank yer very much Common-
"If the country is so rich to be able to write wealth Bank!"
off that huge amount of money maybe they Future Customer
should consider collecting it and giving it to
poor senior citizens. ---- - "I vex over dem CID officers who think
Concerned citizen, Nassau. they own the road on Thompson Blvd. They
come barreling up the middle of the road in
"I'm vex at people wfro think just because these big, black Explorers like someone dyin'
a company makes clothes in their size that and you see that theyjust turning into their
gives them the right to wear it. Yes, it's your parking lot.
body but does that give you the right to vio-. I mean they don 't even give people a
late my rights by havingf to look at your bad-- chance to move out their way, at least the
ly bulging body stretching out clothes that ambulance is put on brakes, but dem CID
should go in the garbage., would push ya car out the road if they
fsta ain i'suposusto wa dlgcertas me insol cou .I tired of hearing the police sirens
man. escorting the government armoured car. I
Fierce Fashionhita, Nassau. swear they almost give me a heart attack
today with all their wailing. Once again I
"I kinda vex that Mother'Is Day is right don 't understand why we have all these,
around the corner but my payday don 't sirens going offall the time making all dis
come until couple weeks after that. I fee# so noise polluttion it really don 't make any
pressured and I know I ga' feel worse when sense.
all dem basket stands pop up on the side of Praying for peace and quiet on Thompson
ht e roadl just to renI a me how bmrok Iant~ BIVd.


~'L'U IW V CLL rrl r II UI


Fax: 242-377-1261


THE TRIBUNE


Bradley Robetrts speaks out


on Leon WJ~illiams departure


POSITION AVAILABLEE

GLOBAL UNITED LI~MITED is looking to employ a CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER.
The successful candidate will be required to metet-the following criteria:-


RESPONSIBILITIES
* Supervise all staff, providing general staff management and allocating statff
resources while monitoring professional development.
* Lead financial oversight including budgeting,~ growth modelling, cash flow
management and related functions.
* Provide leadership and oversight for all operational functions.
* Contribute to strategic decisions as a member of the firm's leadership team.
* Develop systems and processes that support the firm's business development
activities.

EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
* Bachelor degree or higher
* CPA designation

EXPERIENCE
* At least five years work experience in a Eofi~iltingg business or comparable busi-
ness or firm.
* Significant experience in overseeing and implementing operations functions,
managing coinplex projects and supervising staff.
* A proven track record of entrepreneurship.

SKILLS.
* Strong leadership and management skills.
* Excellent communication skills *'
* Outstanding skills in analysis.
* Ability to manage and advance multiple tasks and responsibilities at the same
time.
* Ability to work in a dynamic, fast-paced environment.


Salary commnensurate with current salary scales, skills,
qualifications and experience.

Deadline for Sub;mission of Resumis is April 30th, 2008

Please forward cover letter and r~sumb~ via mail, fax or email to:-

Hunian Resource Department
Global United Limited
P.O. Box CB-13838
Nassiu, Bahamas
Re: Chief Operating Officer


Apr il 26th, 2008

Poop Deck Sandyport

3:00pm -7:00pm










I I


IECEPTION NEW 1:00 s:;o NIA 6:00 5:20 10:40


ORBIDDEN KINGDOM T 11:00 3:25 NIA 6:00 8:20 10:40
ORGETTING SARAH MARSHALL c 1:30 NIA 4:30 7:30 NIA 10:30
1EETTHEBROWN T I1:10 3:35 N/A 6:10 8:35 10:55
TREETKINGS c 1:15 3:30 N/A 6:05 8:25 10:40
ROM NIGHT c 11:20 3:45 N/A 6:20 8:30 10:45
HE RUINS c 11:15 3:40 N/A 6:10 8:40 10:55
Ith'S ISLAND A 1:10 3:45 NIA 6:15 8:35 10:35
HUTTER T r1:25 3:20 N/A 6:25 8:45 10:50


E OUE-AO O ESRE ICET7f 80319ORNWAALRAijEACM
8 MINUTES NEW 1:05 3:35 NA 6:00 8:15 10:30
ORBIDDEN KINGDOM T i1:00 3:30 N/A 6:10 8:30 10:45
ORGETTING SARAH MARSHALL C i:15 3:50 N/A 6:05 8:25 10:40
IEET THE BROWN T 1l:10 3:30 N/A 6:15 8:25 10:35
TREET KINGS c 1:10 3:40 N/A 8:15 8:35 10:45


3






:I


4


k


cmig an I re



Species in the Bahamas, animal
experts reveal.
They say tough new laws are
the only way to slow the rapid-
ly accelerating disappearance
of these creatures.
Kevin Dagenhard, executive
director of the Bahamas
Humane Society and Eric
Carey, executive director of the
Bahamas National Trust, sat
with Romauld Ferreira on
SBahamas@Sunrise this week to
Discuss the disturbing trend.
SPresently, fishermen are
Allowed to catch most specieS
Ssea turtles within three to four
days of the season opening and
closing. But this has led to over-
fishing, the experts say and
nowy there are significantly few-
er turtles in Bahamian waters.
Mr Dagenhard and Mr Carey
agreed that there should be a
moratorium on catching the tur-
ties.
The pointed out that the ani-
mals are extremely sensitive to
sunlight and are often cruelly
treated by the fishermen, who
catch them and leave them
exposed to the sun's rays..
Mr Carey recalled an incident
in which a fisherman tortured
a turtle in this way so as to
induce a horrified bystander to
buy it from him at a handsome
a profit.
The experts said that many
videos of Bahamian fishermen
being cruel to turtles are now
available on the internet for
all the world to see.
Both men said they are
deeply concerned. about the
trend.
Mr Carey said: "Turtle pro-
tection is a no-brainer. We're
long past the days when we
should be commercially har-
vesting Green Turtles".
Mr Dagenhard,said he is
hopeful that the new legislation
that is being proposed to protect
the sea creatures will pass, and
that marine experts will work
to explain to fishermen how
important it is to protect the
turtles.


MAIN SECTION
Local News ........................P1 ,2,3,5,6,8,11,12
Editorial/Letters. ........................................P4
Advts .............................................P791
SPORTS SECTION
Sports ...........................................P,2,3,4,5
COmT1CS.............................................P
A d t......................................... ..... ...*
Wete............................................


CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES


USA TODAY WEEKEND EDITION 8 PAGES


Life. Money. Bala nee both.


c 11:15 13:45 NIA 6 :25 8:30 10:251


TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF
FUEL SYSTEM REPAIRS
POWER STATION SITE
HATCHET BAY
ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS


The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders from eligible bidders for
the provision of Fuel Tank Repairs at the
Corporation's Hatchet Bay,
Eleuthera Power Station Site.

Bidders are required to collect packages
from the Corporation's Administration
Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by con-
tacting Mrs. Delmeta Seymour,
Telephone No. 302-1158.

Tenders are to be delivered on or before



S Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nas 4u Baha BS

Marked: Tender No. 663/08
Fue S stm Rep~airs

Hatchet Bay
Eleuthera, Bahamas

The Corporation reserves the right to
accept or reject the whole or such part
. of any Tender the Corporation
deems necessary.


The Scotia bank Rate Booster Deposit
Combines the higher interest rates of a longer term
investment with the flexibility of a short term deposit.


Your interest rate in~creases twice dunngllS theC term1 of youlr Investmecnt,
so your money Is guaranteed to g~row Ilster 1 P-lusc your have aIccess to
yourr money at two set dates withiin theC termIT of your dllposit, giving
you penalty free access to youlr mroney.


SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 2008, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


on to the sand, causing horrific injuries which led
to his death.
For six years, his parents fought for a hearing
before the Bahamas courts, claiming that some-
one must be held responsible for the tragedy-
Mr Cash said: "This Gallagher case has really
upset our spirits. My wife and I are very upset."
Children's rights campaigner Clever Dun-
combe criticised the Attorney General's Office
for not presenting a stronger case.
He said the outcome had "international impli-
cations"' because it once again showed the world
how inefficient and dysfunctional the country'S
legal system is.
"This is a sad day for the Gallaghers. My heart
really goes out to them," he said.
Other Bahamians called The Tribune to

Ongestreader said: "This is wrong. This family
has not been given justice. It is a disgrace."
During the hearing, the jury was told that the
boat driver was trying to "right" his banana float
when the tragedy happened,
He was at the back of the boat when his feet
became entangled in rope. As a result, the boat
veered out of control, striking the beach.
Paul Jnr was sleeping in his pushchair when
the boat struck. He suffered severe head injuries
and doctors were unable to save him.


BAHAMIANS reacted with anger and dis-
may yesterday following the acquittal of three
defendants in the Par~adise Island toddler
tragedy.
They criticised the Attorney General's Office
and said the verdict would again expose the
Bahamas to international shame. .
Justice campaigners Greg and Tanya Cash
expressed "great disappointment" after hear-
ing that Judge Elliot Lockhart had directed the
nine-member jury to acquit following legal delib-
erations.
Mr Cash said: "This once again shows
that our system is at fault. What is happening
in our country? How can we dismiss such a
case?"

Discussions

The judge's decision to direct an acquittal
came after legal discussions in the jury's absence.
Charges of manslaughter against three defen-
dants were thrown out, leaving a friend of the
toddler's family to yell out mn protest that justice
had not been served.
Paul Gallagher Jnr, a two-year-old toddler,
was asleep in his pushchair on Cabbage Beach in
2002 when an out-of-control motorboat charged


Hardwoods Can Last Forever
ye, 'everone los a tih, beu ful hardwood floor. A hardwoods truly can last to mver
maintained, are ttleeasiest of alfl oor surfaces to keepdcean and new alookng.

oust-Free Process
geo fro ucs Tse 96ie nidut ae designed tofel clan rep nd reris e onur
floors to a spectacullar appearance Mtaintenance treatments every 1-3 years, depending on
traffic levels and type of ulse, will keep youir fooms iool:;ii no a nt fo7r th~e ihfeom7e of y~our
home or business. --

Does your floor need to be redfinirshcd
An easy wvay to tell is If cleaning no longer restores your flors to an aceptable appearance. Besides
the dull appearance, look forscratches, gouges and separation between boards. Repairing such dam-
age Isako possize.


CALL. PRHO( 'I-III AHAWMAS
i~ n 1PHONE: 323-1i94I 1323-81)83


"~~? Y .ONLI)IZ T:'GDOITRllIGIT"
pyverware v ~L
name C~3li~R a sn s


Visit your nearest Scotiabank branch today.


SSomne conditions apply Rates subll et to changes.
STrademarks of The Bank: of Nov., beaiia
Trabdemarks used under license and~ control ofi Th~e Bnkl~ of Nea 'Lct:a


Anger at acquittal



111 tOddler tr aged


oln brief




Of 010leci0H

COUrt IPGUII



FOR the second time, a
man accused of commit-
ting election fraud failed to
appear in court.
The trial of Wilfred
Swain, 50, which has
already been put off sever-
al times before, is being
heard before Magistrate
Susan Sylvester at Court
11 on Nassau Street.
Swain was a no show
again on Thursday. Last
October Swain failed to
appear in court for the
continuation of the hear-
ing. On that occasion
lawyer Ian Cargill, who
along with Fayne Thomp-
son is representing Swain,
said that he had learnt that
Swain was supposedly ill
and in hospital.
Swain, of McCullough
Corner, has been accused
of committing election
fraud during the May 2,
2007 general election.
He has pleaded not
guilty to fraudulently tak-
ing ballot paper #146672
out of polling division
number 12 in the Farm
Road and Centerville Con-
stituency, having possessed
a counterfeit ballot paper
known not to be genumne
and uttering a counterfeit
document.,
Parliamentary Commis
sioner Errol Bethel and
presiding officer for the
polling division in ques-
tion, Cynthia Wilson, have
already testified at the tri-

On Thursday, Magis"
trate Sylvester noted that
she will have Swain taken
into custody until the com-
pletion of the trial if he
fails to appear in court
again.
The case has been
adjourned to next Tuesday
at 10am. Calvin Seymour
of the Attorney General's
Office is prosecuting the
case, with the assistance of
Shaven Bethel.


VicO PPOSIII8HI

Did( Cheney

visits Panhandle

FORT WALTON
BEACH, Fla.

VICE PRESIDENT
Dick Cheney is visiting the
Panhandle to raise money
for U.S. Rep. Jeff Miller,
according to Associated
Press-
Cheney will be in Fort
Walton Beach Friday. He
will be speaking at the
Northwest Florida Fair-
grounds to also raise cam-
paign funds for the Nation-
al Republican National
Committee.
Attendees paid $100
each, or $2,000 for two
people and a photo oppor-
tunity with the vice presi-
dent.
Miller, a Republican
from Chumuckla, is seek-
ing a fourth term in office.
His district covers Escam-
bia, Santa Rosa and
Okaloosa counties.
Miller is up against
Democratic contenders
James E. Bryan and
Robert Crockett Peterman
II, and Independent Joe
Roberts.


Hardwood Floor







~1=1 ~llJ131~~=~L~~I= 13=lrll~~)=


The Tr~ibune Limited
NULLIlUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA JMA GISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogrnas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D. Litt .

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editorl1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M. G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., E.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
SFreeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JULIA DOLCE
of BALFOUR AVE #3, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, houltdhisnend y- h tnd nsd signehde s tmdnt
of April 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


TORTECEE is h~ereb yVe~n t at LBOISXC BSDOD2TAo S5ATUH
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
26th day of April 2008 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,. P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that DAVID EDWARD
JENNETTE of 57 SEA VIEW LANE, P.O. BOX F-60287,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 26th day of April 2008
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


Established Bahamian Company in Construction,
Service and Retail
Is looking to hire an energetic and ambitious Bahamian person as


M ANAG ER

Salary plus incentive scheme. Also possible share
purchase option. Reply in writing with resume
"MANAGER", P.O. Box CB-11541


2006 Mercedes Benz CLS500-5000CC

Fully Lo'aded Limited Edition
Just Like New!


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 2008


The press, in the Bahamas, is
anything but free. Essentially
owned by a single publishing
magnate, its editorial position
has materialised down the side
of one political viewpoint, to
the exclusion of all others. The
editor/publisher's objectives
seem to come down to:
(1) publish anything and
everything that would promote
their own political views and
(2) publish anything and
everything that would demote
all other opposing political
views, without exception. The
Bahamian media is no more
effective, in the Bahamas, in
terms of the role it should play
in our democracy, than those
in communist China, Cuba
and/or Iran.
More than four decades ago,
before the advent of majority
rule, the leading Bahamian
publication's editorial board
of one, took the decision to
fight, at all cost the efforts of
the Progressive Liberal Party
(PLP) to promote the liberal.
tion of the majority popula-
tion; its educational, economic
and social interests and its pur-
suit of its independence from
Great Britain in 1973.
The Tribune also promoted
and stood alongside those in
the Abacos, who wanted to
secede from the Bahamas and
remain a part of Great Britain
when the Bahamas would have
become an independent
nation.
Their venomous dislike for
the PLP and its successive gov-
ernment's policies and objec-
tives should not be unexpected
as it has become, after all these
years, endemic and a part of
. what motivates their contin-
ued existence.
The Tribune has built up a
fortune over these many years
of enjoying an almost monop-
olistic market share and has
used their unneeded resources
to fight successive PLP gov-
ernments in their quest to rid
the majority population of all
the remaining vestiges of slay-
ery and the slavery mentality.
The Progressive Liberal Party
has never had the good for-
tune of "fair comment" from
the media, period, and even
when they are obliged to print
a positive story, they would,
conveniently, arrange the Edi-
torial page, for that day, to
explain how that positive story
would be a negative, after all.
Recently, The Tribune was
allowed to purchase the hold.
ings of both The Nassau
Guardian and The Freeport
News. This, in effect, killed any
chances of the Bahamas ever
having a fair, unbiased and.
free press. The consequences
are the same as what happens
in China or Cuba; you will
know what the State wants you
to know; nothing more and


EDITOR, The Tribune.

YOU know that newspaper
readers and electronic media
listeners are totally fed up and
disgusted with the mass media
when the most read and lis-
tened to sections are the obit-
uaries.
The media generally in the
Bahamas is so biased in its
reporting that one can hardly
distinguish between what is
actual truth from what is man-
ofactured..Truth is truth and
it should never matter where
the chips fall, so long as the
unadulterated truth is reported
in all its gory details.
A free press, in a democracy,
is commonly known as the
"Third Force" ranking it very
high up among the important
institutions in a society, which
helps make democracy work,
effectively. The press is sup-
posed to mirror the communi-
ties it serves and should always
convey the reflection of who
people are; what they are all
about and how well they man-
age the freedoms given them
under their various constitu-
tions. The press should give a
true picture of what actually
goes on and not give, screened
and selective, items that a par-
ticular editor, with their own
agenda, wishes you to know on
any giveri day of the week. The
"Pen" is said to be mightier
than the sword, and when put
in perspective, no one can
deny that assumption,
It is my view, that most
Bahamian politicians would
not be able to survive the spot-
light of the American system
of media scrutiny. In that sys-
tem, if you put yourself for-
ward as a candidate for elec-
tive office, be prepared for a
total airing of your whole life
from childhood to your pre-
sent state.
Things which you have for-
gotten; your bedroom business;
childhood friends; your par-
ents, are all fair game for
America's probing press and
there is no other consideration,
other than the public's right to
know. They are obsessed with
and relentless in, reporting the
true facts, notwithstanding
who is helped or hurt by them-
It was interesting to note that
in the present democratic race
between Senator Clinton and
Senator Obama, the media, for
almost a week, had the good
senator answering questions
about a relationship he had
with a man who he served with
on a corporate board; the man
was somewhat of a rebel when
Senator Obama was a little
boy of eight years, but the
press is demanding that the
good Senator answer to this
relationship, as they contend
that this association speaks
volumes about the Senator's
character.


nothing less. In our case, we
get to read what the FNM
(whether they are the govern-
ment or not) wants us to read,
because the owners/publish-
er/editor have all committed
to promoting the FNM and all
its left wing, market forces
policies, while at the same
time, committing themselves
to the total silencing and even-
tual destruction of the PLP.
That is their mission and they
have dedicated* all their
resources to complete that mis-
sion. Can we stop them? Yes
we can. Those are my views.
FORRESTER
J CARROLL JP
Freeport,
Grand Bahama *
April 23, 2008.

(As usual Mr Carroll is way
out in left field. He is not telling
the truth when he says that The
Tribune has bought The Nas-
sau Guardian and The Freeport
News, resulting in those two
publications losing their edito-
rial independence. The Tribune
has not spent one red cent in
the purchase of either publica-
tion. The truth is that The Tri-
bune and The Guardian have
entered into a joint operating
agreement on the business side
of the publications eventu-
ally one press, one accounts
department, one sales and
delivery section, etc. Neither
newspaper dictates or even
consults on the editorial pol-
icy of the othqr. Nor do they
consult on how the daily news
should be covered or presented.
In a time of rising costs this
decision to cooperate probably
makes too much business sense
for Mr Carroll to grasp with-
out seeing in it a sinister plan
that includes the destruction of
the PLP.
(Mr Carroll complains that
The Tribune was allowed to
purchase the holdings of The
Guardian and The Freeport
NewsF. 'Tie only way that thjiE'
business agreement could have
been stopped would have~ been
if these organizations were in
fact located in communist Chi-
na, Cuba, or Iran. As we are
located in the Bahamas, which
is still a democratic country,
regardless of Mr Carroll's
belief, this business arrange-
ment will assist the growth of
an independent press.
(Also regardless of what Mr
Carroll says the PLP, and even
its propaganda machine, gets a
fair break in the press. Howev-
er, Mr Carroll is upset that The
Tribune refuses to let the PLP
get away with its propaganda.
This is put into context with
both sides of the story being
told. The issue is then left to
our readers to decide for them-
selves where the truth really
lies.
(Incidentally, we should
point out to Mr Carroll that the
press is known as "the Fourth
Estate" not the "Third Force. "
- Ed).


the slack. .
The politics of farm subsidies also
influence decisions on land use. The
increase in ethanol production here and
abroad has at least as much to do with
placating farmers and agribusiness as it
does with environmental and eriergy
independence concerns. When more
acreage is devoted to corn for ethanol,
less is available for food production.
Similarly, an increase in meat con-
sumption worldwide has meant more
grain is grown for cattle and less for
humans. Cows are natural grass eaters,
not corn eaters; they are fed corn in
part to get rid of what was a surplus
born of subsidy.
Citing the huge numbers of people
endangered worldwide, the U.N. has
called this crisis a "silent tsunami." Here
in the United States, food is less often a
matter of life or death, but it is putting
an additional and dangerous strain on
families who are already struggling to
get by in a faltering economy. Wages
have remained stagnant, unemployment
is up, and food prices are going through
the roof you do the math. Already
there are reports of charitable food
pantries unable to meet the needs of
those they serve.
A disaster is brejiving worldivide, aid
here at home the faltering economy is
taking on a nasty edge. First, the fore-
closure wave threatens shelter; now,
out-of-control prices threaten food. And
yet we are hearing virtually nothing
about this from a presidential race that
is mecreasingly lost in a thicket of trivi-
alities.
For this, we can blame the candidates,
but we. also can blame our media. This
week, your reporter heard a cable-news
anchor ask a correspondent if rising
food prices meant that people are "eat-
ing out in cheaper restaurants." I don't
know what planet this man is living on,
but here on Earth, people are going
hungry.

This article appears courtesy
of Hearst Newspapers


NEW YORK The ability of rela-
tively fewer farmers and acres of farm-
land to feed ever-greater multitudes has
been one of the wonders of the mod-
ern era, a development that has held
out the promise of not only alleviating
but actually banishing hunger. Such a
thing seems possible, but the world
serves up constant reminders that
hunger persists, despite and some-
times because of the march of
progress.
New reminders can be found in the
news now, and their implications are
frightening. According to the United
Nations' Food and Agriculture Organi-
zation, 100 million peo le in 36 coun-
tries are currently at risk due to the
soariilg prices of commodity staples
such as rice. Their desperation is
already evident in places such as Haiti
and Egypt, which have seen riots in
response to food shortages.
When and where there is hunger,
there are usually a variety of culprits.'In
the current case, drought in Australia, a
major source of grain for much of Asia
and elsewhere, has combined with sky-
rocketing fuel prices as proximate caus-
es. The effects of these causes have been
magnified by the fierce competition foi
scarce resources brought on by the eco-
nomic miega-boomsii~ Mr iatio~ns such as
China and India. And they have, in turn,
exposed glaring flaws in the global food
infrastructure.
Many of these flaws turn on issues of
politics and economics, rather than nat-
ural occurrences such as crop failure.
The global economy means that reduced
crop yields in a major supphier such as
Australia lead to rampant speculation
on- world commodities markets, driving
up prices. The global economy has also
led many developed countries to turn to
protectionist policies for their domestic
farmers, while international lending
policies for developing nations discour-
age native agriculture and encourage
imports. So when a big food exporter
can't deliver, there can be precious lit-
tle food supply left at home to pick up


THE TRIBUNE


Disgust with




the mde


A food disaster is brewing


Sernng The Bahamian Community
Since 1978


*SAFE -

coot

*DOUBLE .
ACTION
DEADBOLT
LOCK -

*WHIITE OR
BRONZE


ALSO FOR
WINDO WS


DON STAINTON

(PROTECTION) LTD.
HILLSIDE PLAZA THOMPSON BLVD.
PHONE: 322-8160 OR 3 2-8219









Il~rC~i~l


Grand Bahama sees sight

riSe in unemployment
MBy DENISE MAYCOCK
Trbune Frteeport Realmrter

FREEPORT Grand Bahama's unemployment rate rose
slightly to 8.8 per cent in 2007, according to the latest statistical
figures released yesterday by the Department of Statistics.
According to the Labour Force and Household Survey taken
in 2007, the island's total labour force comprised of 28,850 per-
sons, 2,540 of which were unemployed.
In 2006, the unemployment rate was at 8.3 per cent, and the
total labour force was slightly smaller at 27,445.
This year, the Departmdnt of Statistics will conduct its annu-
al labour force survey from May 5 through May 23 on Grand
Bahama.
Clara Lowe, assistant director of the Department of Statistics,
Freeport, said more than 600 households on the island will be
visited.
Some 25 enumerators and five supervisors took the oath of
secrecy at an official swearing-in ceremony at the Local Gov-
ernment Training Centre in Freeport.
Mrs Lowe said the information they gather will help to deter-
mine the rate of unemployment, the average household income,
and the labour force size-and composition.
The 2007 statistics showed that individuals aged 35 to 44
accounted for the highest number of persons unemployed on
Grand Bahama at 28 per cent.
The total number of households on Grand Bahama was
15,975, and the total household income was $651,837,500.
It was estimated that the average household income was
$40,804.
Men earned the higher average income of $45,597 over
women who earned an average income of $32,033.


Sherl'ROR
Grand Baharnalsland
OUR LUCAYA
REPORT


~~_~


We offer exceptional pay and benefits.
Qualified applicants should submit their resumes in writing no later than May "15, 2008 to:
ourlucayajobs~id!starwoodhotels.com
The Westin and Sheraton Grand Bahama Island Our Lucaya Resort
Attn: Human Resources
P.0, Box F-42500
Freeport, Grand Bahama


SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


oIn brief

Cuban phone
company contracts


HAVANA
CUBA'S telephone monop-
oly says 7,400 new cell phone
accounts have been contract-
ed in the 10 days since all
Cubans were allowed to sign
up for service, according to
AP evo sly cllular phones
were offered only to foreign-
ers or Cubans in top govern
inent positions or jobs with for-
eigners. But many other
Cubans already had cell phones
through contracts foreigners
opened for them.
ETECSA phone company
official Maximo Lafuente
Vazquez says about 300,000
cellular lines already existed
on the island before April 14,
when President Raul Castro's
new government lifted the
restriction on service.
Lafuente's comments appeared
Thursday in the Communist
Youth newspaper.
A cell phone contract costs
about US$1120 (euro76) to acti-
vatre s afa year's wages on

SHrh81HS VIa WHIS to
0ViSon 0011 miinIng COMPSaCI
With CMnaillM COMIMy
PARAMARIBO, Suriname
SURINTAME wants to rene-
gotiate its contract with a Cana-
dian mining company because
of soaring gold prices, accord-
ing to Associated Press.
Natural Resources Minister
Gregory Rusland said Wednes-
day that prices have risen
be ond eex ec ationsasemcertahe
govern sgne cnrt
with Rosebel Gold Mines NV
in 2005.
The South American country
currently receives royalties
amounting to 2 percent of Rose-
bel's production as well as pay-
ments for the use of a hydro-
electric dam that vary accord"
gR s ble spp sman Roy van
Aerde said the subsidiary of
T roto-b sd IAMGold -
ope no disc seions.is:


sideration at the moment," said
Mr Laing. "The extent to which
you increase minimum wage
means the cost to (entrepre-
neurs) goes up, and they may
determine it's too expensive to
have as many employees and let
some employees go so that oper-
ating costs stay in line.

Econom
"That's why you can't just
consider increasing minimum
wage, there are duplications to
that. In a bad, or slower econo-
my if they are not making more
money and government mecreas-
es their costs, they are going to
be forced to make some adjust-
ments and that can mean letting
people go, et cetera," he said.
The government is weighing
Other options to counteract the
local effects of the global crisis
of rising food and energy costs
said Mr Laing, who did not want
?so pe mp announce mens th
the issue mn an upconung session
of the House.
HofH s the did sahat oe
costs of foods such as fruits and
vegetables.
He also cautioned Bahamians


about taking on additional con-
sumer loans, adding that he does
not think banks should lower
interest rates to encourage con-
sumer spending in the current
economic climate.
"This is the reality: if you are
faced with a situation where you
don't have increased income
coming in, you are uncertain as
to what's going to happen with
your income in the future, the
best thing to do is to be prudent
with your spending," he said,
adding he and his family have
cut down on energy use and fuel
consumption.
However these words of eco-
nomic wisdom provide little
solace to Bahamians struggling
to make ends meet on a small
paycheck.
"Honestly, I feel minimum
wage needs to be increased
because the cost of living is too
ex ensive and making $150 a
week or $4 an hour, that just
can't cut it when the price of gas
goAnud then everyday price
control items like cream, sugar
and butter,' all them increasing',
2 -year-old NakeithaoWaallac ,
station, told The Tribune yes-
terday '


Although she doesn't have
any children and lives at home,
Nakeitha said she has had to cut
down on "going out and party-
ing because necessities like
food and gas are eating away at
her paycheck.
Trade Union leaders recently
called for an increase in the $150
minimum wage for the private
sector following a US State
Department Human Rights
Report which said Bahamian
minimum wage "did not provide
a decent standard of living for a
worker and family".
The civil service minimum
wage is currently $212.

Study
A 2007 Inter-American
Development Bank study
revealed that the Bahamas' min-
imum wage is 50 per cent higher
than Trinidad and Tobago's
when measured against per capi-
ta eo eame report also said the
Bahamas' minimum wage
was 15 per cent higher that the
U he country's Minimum
Wage Act was introduced in
2001 by the first FNM admimis-
tration.


WBy TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson~tribunemedia.net
THE GOVERNMENT is not
considering increasing the coun-
try's minimum wage to provide
relief for Bahamians dealing
with a steadily rising cost of liv-
ing, Minister of State for
Finance Zhirvargo Laing said
yesterday.
The raising minimum wage
could become a catalyst for
inflation and force small busi
ness owners to drastically cut
employment to lower their over-
head costs, he added.
"We are looking at some oth-
er things that can be done to
bring some relief, but (increas-
ing minimum wage) is not a con-


-~lr&$

.r


A minimum of ten years golf experience in a managerial
capacity, exemplary customer and human resources skills,
proven experience in cost and revenue management,
forecasting and training.


A minunum of seven to ten years management experience
in a major hotel facility within the engineering field. A
Bachelors degree in Engineering. Technological proficiency
in computer programs, Excel and Microsoft word.


A minimum of two years experience as an Asian
Chef de cuisine in a resort or hotel with multiple food
outlets and 500+ rooms. Thorough knowledge in Thai,
Chinese, Japanese and Korean cuisines. Bachelors
or culinary degree from an accredited institution
preferred.


Position requires creativity in culinary, budgetary
analysis capabilities. Knowledge in writing menus, sanitation
standards and applicable health codes. Minimum of
3 years experience as an executive sous chef in similar
size operation with multiple food outlets in excess of
75,000 square ft. Culinary or apprenticeship program
.preferred.


Assistant Controller Sales Manager
Will lead, direct and malage the accounting This aggressive, result oriented candidate will be responsible
Department and produce accurate, efficient and for the soliciting of group business that will enable the hotel
relevant operational information for the Resort. to meet and/or exceed revenue goals in room and food and
perform regulatory audits, formulation, compilation beverage and will be required to conduct property site
and presentation of forecasts, budgets, financial inspections.
statements and reports.


Basic computational and budgetary analysis capabilities
required. Thorough working knowledge in Excel, Delphi
and Microsoft word. Extensive knowledge of sales and hotel
and competitive market. Bachelor's degree preferred. At
least 3 years experience in hotel sales preferred.


A minimum of 5 years experience in accounting,
finance or related field with at least 3 years
experience in the management and administration of
an operational or accounting department. Proficient in
Excel, Word and Delphi. Bachelor's Degree preferred.


STOREWIDE



APRIL 24 MYAY 3


T~n(i'R. Swveetin q's


Laing: minimum wage



rise not being considered


-.


IH WETI
GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND
OUR LU AYA
Resort


EXCELLENT CAREER OPPORTUNITY EXIST FOR



Diredsr d Enginaernn Director of Golf
Candidate will be responsible for leading a 70-member The qualified applicant should be certified from recognized
team and the overall management of and maintenance of PGA program and must be able to demonstrte a high level of
the entire hotel.~ Should be highly skilled in all aspects of competence in playing the game. The position involves working
engineering, inclusive of mechanical, electrical, HVAC with a team of dedicated teaching professionals within a golf
systems and related equipment in accordance with energy school and the daily management of two 18-holes golf courses.
conservation and preventative programs.


Asian Sous Chef Exeecuive Sousehef
This successful candidate will assist the executive Successful candidate will support and assist the executive
chef and oversee the day-to-day culinary chef by overseeing the day-to-day culinary and banquet
operations of the hotel's "fine dinitig" room, train operations and will train and supervise staff and monitor
and supervise staff and monitor food quality. food quality.


. .


1BSO FF
OE E..ludln.H ale


Pastry Chef
Candidate will manage and coordinate pastry
production of a volume food operation with a minimum
of 8 restaurant outlets and banquet operation in excess
of 90,000 square feet indoor/outdoor with emphasis on
plated and modern buffet set up techniques.

Extensive knowledge and experience in sugar and
chocolate work, pastillage showpieces and must
be capable of preparing dessert, plated and buffet
presentations. Culinary degree from an accredited
Institution preferred.





? C1R SE Lw D EwOEL STRE TS 1 9:: 3521

SUNDAY, APRIL 27TH, 2008.
m(.)Oc:ra a .: reaking offreadServic~c
7 /:00 a.m,2 ~Membcwirthi 'Meeing
(,:30 p'1m. thr~ye~r 1(alk
ct'eaker:. 't'artor- Ownar~ton Inode k
Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
*community Outreaph: 11:30 a.m.*Evening Serv~ice: 7:00 p.m-
*Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (We nesdlays
*Sisters' Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)


rr


~ 9~llg~ C~IL HURCH
SOiNt~~~RjbR ROD OLD TRAIL
'Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preaching~~ 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:
Pastor:H. Mills
Sunday 6pm ZNS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are"
Pastor: H. Mills Phone: 393-0563 Box N-3622


11 LGHTAND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Worship time: 11am & 7pm i


Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:
The Madeira Shopping :
Cete

(Next door to CIBC) Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

.ALL ARE WELCOME TO A 17FND

PaStor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone riumber 325-5712
EMAIL -~ lynnk@batelnet.bs








Worship Time: 11a.m. & 7p.m.
Prayer Time:10O:15a.m. to 10:45a.m.
Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Special Event

April 26, 4-6p.m.

Milt/Ster: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O.Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2 587
COME TO WORSH~li LEA VE TO SERVE


Ci3 THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS
ISLANDS CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS
a a-daL'EGLISE MAITHODISTE DANS LA
CARAI~BE ET LES AMbRIQUES NASSA kagfT E~
CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES
108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432;
Fax: 328-2784; methodistconference@msn.com
METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF GOD,
TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY THE CHURCH
AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL HOLINESS THROUGHOUT
THE LAND (Father John Wesley)
"Celebrating 225 years of continuous Methodist witness for Christ
in The Bahamasn
SIXTH LORD'S DAY OF THE RESURRECTION, APRIL 27,
2008.

('OLLECT Gdod our rdeems ,tou av delivered us from the ptter

as by his death he has recalled us to life, so by his continual presence
in us he may raise us to eternal joy; through Jesus Christ your Son our
Lord.

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108 Montrose
Ave. near Wulff Rd)
10:00 a.m. Worship at Good Shepherd Anniversary Service
6:30 p.m. Conducted by Eastern Zone
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street, Fox
HI 00 a.m. Sis. Ruth Pratt
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Dr. Kenneth A. Huggins
6:30 p.m. Providence Youth
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST CHURCH
(28 Crawford St, Oakes Field
7:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr. (Holy Communion)
9:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes
METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD (Fire Trail
Rd)
10:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte/ Bishop Dr. Raymond
R. Neilly
Anniversary (Holy Communion)
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
5:30 p.m. Friday Children's Clu~b
9:00 a.m. Sunday Rhodes Praise Team
MONSTARY PARK FELLOWSHIP
4:45 p.m. Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly (Holy Communion)
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop and
other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford St.,
Oakes Field) Reception to Primary
PEACE AND JUSTICE CAMPAIGN: All Methodists of the
Conference are urged to pray and to fast for Justice to prevail in
the Methodist Cases and for an end to the upsurge in violence. The
fast begins weekly after the evening meal on Thursday and ends at
noo on Friday. This we proclaim unswervingly: "My God and My

RADIO PROGRAMS
"Vision" On the Lord's Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; "Great Hymns of
Inspiration" On the Lord's Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.; "Family
Vibes" ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; "To God be the Glory" ZNS 1,
Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.


come ogtohe and xeie 0 etiean Heallin~l.-
Sand Victory( in the *presence of God.'-




SUNDAY SERVICES


WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.
'Ce~llave Elble :eochlng
P:..ol angr!Jr IBM' CluOl J1-16 yrs
U.r.;:lomrsette l!'i Club) 5-10 it

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.

RADIO MINISTRY
:1.; j.3,; ~31 5 301' a mI -1.:- 1 TEMr~PLE fl;E
Visit Our Book Store: TEIVPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY


EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE
listnwl/>/ Of' God








THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH
Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax :393-8135
IIII~iCHURCH SERVICES
SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2008
SIXTH SUNDAY OF EASTER

( APEMMETHORDelSTMCHkU CH, Soldier Road

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart

COKE dMMdORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
ll:00AM Pastor Charles Moss
CURRY MEMORIAL METHOlIlST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard
10:00AM Rev. Charles Sweeting
EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,
East Shirley Street
ll:00AM Rev. Charles NewlGift Day
7:00PM Rev. Charles New
GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH'
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly
ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00AM Connections Rev. Philip Stubbs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs
TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
ll:00AMRev. William Higgs

iRIRADIO PROGRAMMES
'MISETHL'ODISTna MOETS on:3 each. weda atS 6:5a
Your Host: Rev. Charles A. Sweeting
*******9:Q%;***********************************


The 2008 General Conference will be held May
21-25, 2008 at Wesley Methodist Church, Harbour
Island under the theme: Peace Begins With Me."





Qiraint's Eatnn W23esley fietiobis't Op~urcil
'"ou,, H~Il Ra & Cnaper Sreat) P.O.Box CB- 13046
1 he Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)
S UNDAY, APRIL 27TH, 2008.
7:00a~m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Franklyn Bethel


:11111)


PAG;E 6, SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 2008


AS part of Coastal
Awareness Week, the
Bahamas National Trust
hosted a display at the Mall
at Marathon to educate the
public about the impor-
ftance of coastal wetlands
and the ongoing attacks
they endure from natural
environmental change and
human behavior.
The effort was a lead-up
to a full scale campaign
promoting the conserva-
tron of Bahamian wetlands
with the Trust partnering
with the US-based environ-
.mental organisation, Rare.
Pictured (1-r) are Trust
volunteer Chrystal Bethell,
student Felicia Archer and
Shelley Cant, BNT educa-
tion officer. Felicia, a stu-
dent at DW Davis, was the
contest winner, successful-
ly answering the most envi-
ronmental questions cor-

learn about wetland con-
servation.


rl^~td
I P J
in~
Ic-


cult Eucan~lon .
..pni Irno Sae .
6E\nlrng worshcio kprace


j cdo a m
9 45 m
o 45. m
11 00C am
d 00 a rn
6.30 pm


Photo courtesy of BNT


11:00 a.m.
I 00 p.m.


Sanctuary Choir Anniversary
Santuary Choir


THE TRIBUNE


The Wight kind of music

RYDE, Isle of Wight, Eng- i t 1
land Master drummer ,
Quentin "Barabbas" Woodside,
of Barabbas and the Tribe, P,4~rlp
shows Greenmount Primary -'1
School students how a junkanoo .;
drum sounds, during a visit to $ e.
the school on April 22. Mr
Woodside is a member of the
Bahamian team of junkanoo iYg' wc- slCk,8lg; bnrl
artisans and performers on the
English island undertaking a
residency programme there. a
Lead beller Frank "Laing"
Wallace of the Saxon Superstars
poses with Greenmount Prima-
ry School female students who J"
won a bell-ringing challenge
against the boys I ~~I
Treilon "Raker" Stuart of the
Saxon Superstars shows the stu- ?
dents a basic fringe and paste
pattern on a white sheet of
paper
Ms Junkanoo Bahamas and
Valleys Boys member Deviar
"Diva" Wilson leads students
in a basic dance routine
Barabbas poses with the stu- sa,




Bahamnas National Trust promotes coastal awareness


P

1-7'"
.9
~~Clp~~ L. ~1CI





~ri 1 1~51 e~ i I hi n I I LI hi fl~l
I


B. Silver Fox:



C. The Athlete:



3. Life Lessons: What important life lessons have you learned that you can share with others who
want to follow your example for a healthy, active, beautiful, "ageless" life (100 words or less):


THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 2008, PAGE 7


SAge: Date of birth:
Phone number Day/Evening and Cell:


Name:
Address:


1. Tell us what makes you an Ageless Beauty (100 words or less):


2. Beauty secrets: Tell us about your defining feature and how you maintain it (100 woids or less):
A. Body Beautiful:


d
P-
i


rL1


NEW YVES SAINT LAURENT CLEANSERS
SENSATIONS OF PLEASURE, AMAZING GLOW.


jl 3j~
I~
'111


Mall at Marathon 393.4406


C41N4\ u~NT


Trib un e


The


44~ 4 9l


IF you've got a youthful spirit, with the looks to match, THE TRIBUNE wants you! Are
you or your Mother, (or someone you know) always celebrated as looking at least ten er
younger than you actually are? If so, THE TRIBUNE wants to hear from you. We re
looking for timeless beauties 50 and over for the launch of the Fabulous at Any Age
promotion starting this Mlother's Day.
There are three categories to enter:

Body Beautiful: We're; looking for women who are' in top physical form, 10kngsi, rm
and fantastic for their age.
*Silver Foxes:: When you walk down the street does every third person stop you and tell
you how fabulous your silver trsses; look? Do your friends constantly ask for the secret to your JZ
*auoshl hnIer okn~o o. The Athlete:i Still playing on the softball team? Never miss a walk/runi a-ho r
marathon? Love to` get your heart pumping with an early morning swim? Still hitting the tennis
courts with your-college-bound grandkids? We want to hear from, you. Cut';out the official
Fabulous at Any Age application form. Mail or hand deliver your completed appliation-along
With two recent colour photos, four by six or five by seven inches, one close-up and the other
a full-length shot. You may also scan and e-mail application forms and images to
features~tribunemedia.net. Include the following information in the e-mail or on the back of
each photo: age, birth date, address and phone numbers.
Photos will not be returned.
All entries must be received by May 2nd, 2008. Good luck.

SEE APPLICATION FORM BELOW

"Fabulous at Any Age" Th rbue&Jon ll


-





I


r
I


enuII liiiiil



;11111 11111 c









MINISTER OF National Security Tommy Turn quest spoke at the Voice of
Deliverance's 26th annual general assembly on Thursday. Pictured at left
Iis senior pastor and general overseer, Chief Apostle Leon Wallace.


0 l y


lE~3~S;4 ROA~~FDELTY ~~Q G CAPITAL MA~RKETS

C FA L'"
.BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITilt"6 AS OF.
:-).~L : L~~i ;~. FRIDAY, 25 APRH.. 2008
EX*A CLOSE 1,933.94 | CHG 4.67 j %CIHO 0*94 j YTD -132.81 | YTD% -6.43
'= ~R n iFINDEX: TCLOSE 900.41 I 0%w -5.412% (2007 28.29%b
... (WWW.BIXBAH~AMAS.COM FOR MORED ATA iMPORMATION
2k--I -52.maLO~-Low SBecUrer, Pres.l.~.u Ch;se Tc. saLy Close inar.ge Deny~ '.ol EpS E D. PE Yaesa. .
6.5 1.10 Ar~aco 7.iarketr. si 1r 950 0 1.*= ii vCOc 1.l ..
11.80 11.50 Bahamas Property Pund 11.80 11.80 0.00 1.502 0.400 7.9 3.3%
3.68 9.00 Bank of Bahamas 9.61 9.6'1 0.00 0.643 0.160 14.9 2.71%
3.99 0.85 Benchmark 0.99 10.90 -0.09 '1,000 0.188 0.030 4.8 3.3%
.74 2.50 Bahamas Waste 3.50 3.50 0.00 0.289 0.090 12.1 25%
.70 1.30 Fidelity Bank 2.39 2.39 0.00 0.058 0.040 41.2 1.67
a7 120.141 Cabe lhhae no.7 137 .0 19 0.40 12 1 2
50 4.75 Commonwealth Bank (Sl) 7.13 7.13 0.00 0.428 0.290 '16.7 4.07%
.22 3.60 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.76 4.84 0.08 1,403 0.157 0.052 30.4 1.09
3.0 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 3.00 3.00 0.00 0.316 0.040 9.5 1.3%
3.0 5.94 Famguard 8.00 8.00 0.00 0.7'13 0.280 11.2 3.0
13.01 12.49 Finco 12.50 12.50 0.00 700 0.810 0.570 15.4 4.6%
4.75 13.24 FirstCaribbean 13.24 13.24 0.00 500 0.65'1 0.470 20.3 3.5
5.10 5.05 Focol (S) 5.05 5.32 0.27 5,755 0.386 0.140 ~13.8 2.63%
1.OO 0.54 Freeport Concrete O.55 0.55 0.00 0.035 0.000 15.7 0.00
3.0 6.86 ICD Utilties 6.86 ~ 6.86 0.00 0.411 0.300 16.7 4.37
1250 8.60 J. S. Johnson 12.30 12.30 0.00 1.059 0.620 11.6 5.04%
10 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.167 0.600 8.6 6.00
EM~r:O:Av elity ove.-Th-n.Counsoer seaurktis :. _
2k-1-I 52wk-Low Symnor BIr3 Ash 5 Last Pace Weekly V'ol EPS 1 DL I PE Vlcid
14.60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarnels 14 ..0) 15 E.J 1.3 60 1 16 9E134 6 6
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80
O 54 O 20 RND Hordings O 35 ir l1 3 35 -0: 02 O00 N r.l i0 CC
Coline Over-'The-Counter Securlkles
41.00 41.00 ABDAB ,41.00 43.00 41.00 4.450 2.750 9.0 6.70
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.160 0.900 13.4 6.1%
(L55 0.40 RND H-lodings 0 15X Lite M t uni 0.45 -0.023 0.000 NIM 0.0%
2H-19 j24k-Low Fund Name NA; IC.D L~ass12 r 1:,.atr.2 C[*.5 i 1913
1.3081 1.2443 Colina Bond Fund 1.308126"** 1.25% S.61%
4.08 2.6629 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.996573**** -0 14% 13.11%
1.85 1.2647 Colina Money Market Fund 1.387505*** 0.90% 3.87%
.7969 3.1827 Fidelity Bahamas G &I Fund 3.7011'*** -2.52% 17 78%
121010 11.4992 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.1010'* 1 40% 5.72%
10.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.00 *
10.0060 100.0000 QFAL Global Equity Fund 100.OO "
i.0000 1.0000 CFAL HighGrade Bond Fund '1.00**
HO5000 9 6346 Claellrv Ioaernallo.-.al Ir.aesmer.I Furnd *a s 317-8 -2 -8 a-
) hMarket Terms N A.V. Key
5wH -Highest dcslong price in last 52 weeks Bid S Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 31 December 2007
52kLw- Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask S Selling price of Colinal and fidelity "'" 11 April 2008
PrvosClose Previous days weighted price for dally volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price """ 31 March 2008
Today's Close Current daysa weighted prie. for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Chne- Change in closing price from day to day EPS S A company a reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
DlyVol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Valu.
DI Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
PE- Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1. 1994 = 100
S)- 4-for-1 Stock Spilt Effective Date 8/8/2007
Si l forT 1 telo Solit Effe-tive Defe 7/11/2007
TO nML~hit~PiL6;r~t~ YOQ PIDE.I.ITY 242- 28-l776 | FG CAPITAL MARK TS 242-398-400.I POR M~OREDAT~A INORFIdATON CALL 242-Ms4.ED.


I)
rr I I I c~Ti' l~r t


1


Vacancy for a
Sales and Marketing Project Director

Overall Retsponsibiilities

Onsite coordination of sales, sales administration and marketing
'Achievement of targeted sales volume and maintaining inventory
Develop future (MVCI) managers and implement self development programs
*implementation of tour efficiency and building of strong team values
Forecasting and budgeting of annual sales targets
*Ensuring communication between personnel and others '
Providing weekly report and updates to Ritz-Cariton/MCVI Corporate offices


Essential Job Functions

Monitor and evaluate sales and marketing processes
*Monitor and evaluate specific sales and marketing field operations best practices, policies and
guidelines
Monitor and evaluate structure sales and marketing presentation training
*. Review all sales and marketing assumptions in the feasibility process, ensuring strategic and
operational reasonableness, comparability among PEPS, budgets, forecasts and LRP


Qualifications

College degree
*Minimum of ten years in marketing vacation ownership
Minimum of five years in management of sales, marketing and/or administration
Excellent communication, listening and organizational skills
Ability to communicate effectively at senior management level
*Strong leadership skills
Ritz Cariton Club experience preferred

Please send resume to the attention of: Director of Human Resources

fhe A~bc BClu on Winding Bay
Mnanshm Hrbour, Abaco

OR
Email: humanresources~~theabacoclub. com


PAGE 8, SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 2008


SIn bie

Cuba blasts back at
U8 over breakup of
Havana protest
M HAVANA

CUBA is accusing Ameri-.
can officials of fabricatmng a
small protest in Havana this
week and of financing other
actions against the commu-
nist government, according to
Associated Press.
U.S. officials say they
"deplored" Cuba's handling
of a protest by the wives of 10
political prisoners. Police-
women carried the women to .,
a bus and took them home. f
But the Cuban Foreign
Ministry blames the U.S. for
encouraging "a small number
of counterrevolutionary ele-
.ments." It notes that U.S.
President George W. Bush!
has praised the protesting
goup, known as the Women
Cuba's statement Thursday

al:egs ::thatU d ofca s RBDF
have increased aid to Cuban
dissidents, such as giving MIDSHIPM
them radios, literature, T- during a gr
shirts and access to comput- inspecting
ers. Midshipm;


Midshipme1n sesorts queen at gradlution ceremny
IAN Byron McClain of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force escorts Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
radiation ceremony on April 10 at the Britannia Royal Naval College, England. The Queen was
the officers at their passing out parade in Dartmouth, England. Midshipman McClain and RBDF
an Bovair Davis successfully completed the cou~rse.


TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF
CONSULTANCY SERVICES

PUBLIC RELATIONS
and/or
ADVERTISING & MARKETING


The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
inviteS Tenders from eligible bidders for
the provision of Consultancy Services In
Public Relations and/or Advertising &
Marketing for the Corporation.

Bidders are required to collect packages
frOm the Cor portion's Administration
Office. Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by
COntacting Mrs. Delmeta Seymour,
Phone No. 302-1158.

Tenders are to be delivered on or before
1st May, 2008, 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows.

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
NaSsau, Bahamas

Marked: T nde No. 660/08^i
Consultancy Services in Public Rela-
t1008 and/or Advertising & Marketing

The COrporation reserves the right to
accept or reject the whole or such
part of any Tender the Corporation
deems necessary.


ii


It ems







SBOutiiqueF


5


q
- **


THE TRIBUNE





ii I r.


)~
1~Y~r IYllbvl~r\C


I


S(h)! Valuation or derivative fnuancial instrumentr

Fonvard currency contracts are valued using the forward rate for the remaining period to
maturity as of the last business day of the financial year.

Options contracts are valued at the closing settlement price established on the last trading
day of the reporting period by the exchange on which they are principally traded.

(i) Investments in securities

Investments in securities comprise securities held-to-maturity and are carried at amortized
cost using the effective interest method, less any provision for impairment. Held-to-
maturity investments are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable
payments and fixed maturities that the Bank'il management has the positive intention and
ability to hold to maturity. If the Bank were to sell other than an insignificant amount of
held-to-maturity investments, the entire category would be reclassified as available-for-sale
and would therefore be measured at thir value rather than amortized cost.

All regular way purchases and sales of investments in securities are recognized at trade
date, which is the date the Bank commits to purdhuse or sell the securities.

(j) Translation of foreign currencies

The currency of The Bahamas is the Bahamian dollar (BSD). However, items included in
the balance sheet are measured using the currency of the primary economic environment in
which the Bank operates ("the fractional currency"). The financial statements are presented
in Swiss Francs (CHF) which is the Bank's functional and presentation currency.

Monetary assets and liabilities in currencies other than CHF: are translated to CHF at the
rates of exchange prevailing at the year-end.

Non-monetary assets and liabilities in currencies other than CHF are translated to CHF at
the rate of exchange prevailing on the transaction date.

(k) Assets under administrations

The Bank commonly acts as trustee and in other fiduciary capacities that result in the
holding or placing of assets on behalf of individuals, trusts and other institutions.

No account is taken in this balance sheet of assets and liabilities of customers held by the
Bank in a trustee, nominee or custodial capacity.
3. Balances with Related Parties

Related parties include the parent company and its directors, afflihates and their directors, other
entities over which they exercise significant influence, and key management personnel of the
Bank. This balance sheet includes the following significant balances with related parties:


Banque PrivQe Edmond de Rothschild Ltd.
(Incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas)


Balanlce Sheet
As of 31 December 2007
(Expressed la Swiss Francs)


2007
CHF

62'733'601
23'280'S94
6'061'929


2006
CHF

67'994'629
5'408'l38
4'540'693

I'272'571
63'740
336'505
29'913
52'234
2'l65'(i22
81'864'04S



3'l74'386
42'211'487

I71'203611

47'760'765



15'000'000
14'000'000
5'103'280
34'103'280


Notes


3 4
3 & 4
8


ASSETS
Due from banks
Loans and advances to customers
Investments in securities
Positive replacement values of derivative
financial instruments
Investment in subsidiaries
Acrcrud income and prepaid expenses
Other assets
Fixed assets
Property and building
-TOTAL ASSETS

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
Llablitis .
Due to banks
Due to customers
Negative replacement values of derivative
financial instruments
Accrued expenses and other liabilities
Total Liablltles
Shareholders' Equity
Share capital*
Authorised, issued and fully paid:
15,000 shares of CHF 1,000 cach
General banking resrve
Retained camnings
Total Shareholders' Equity
TOTAL IABIITIES AND
SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY


3 &7 I'386'l25
63'740
3 468'586
23'154
5 29'935
6 & 7 4'lil2'938
98'860'602


12'970'O91
44'760'l68


3 4
3 &4


3 &7 I'301'387
3 1'6jp'339
(ip'9)g98



15'000'000
9 16'000'000
7'213'617
)(I'213'617


'of The Board on 18 March 2008:



Disoctr


2007
CIIF
000's

35,882

873
40
12,932
205
493
243


17


2006
CH1F
000's

28,530
76
508
36
2,985
241
591
234


18


Balances
Due frm banks
Loans and advances to customers
Derivative financial instruments assets
Accrued income and prepaid expenses
Due to banks
Due to customers
Derivative financial instruments liabilities
Accrued expenses and other liabilities

Off-Balanee Sheet Commitments
Guarantees


Notes to the Balance Shee't
31 December 2007

1. Gcenerl Information

Banque Priv~e Edmond de Rothschild Ltd. (the Bank) is incorporated under' the Companies Act'
1992 of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and is licensed under the Banks and Trust
Companies Regulation ~Act, 2000, to carry on unrestricted banking and trust business frm within
The Bahamas. The principal activities of the Bank are pmovading banking, investment
management and other financial services. The Bank is a wholly owned subsidiary of Banque .
Priv~e Edmond de Rothschild S.A., (the parent company) which is incorporated in Geneva,
Switzerland. All significant balances with the parent company and companies in which the
parent company controls 20% or more of the issued share capital (termed affiliates) are disclosed
in this balance sheet (see Note 3). .

The restered office of the Bank is located at No. 51 Frederick Street, Nassau, Bahamas, and at
the ymared the Bank had 14 (2006: 13) employees.

2, Significant Accounting Policies

The principal accounting policies applied in the preparation of this balance sheet are set out
below. These policies have been consistently applied to all years presented unless otherwise
stated.

(a) Basis of preparation

The Bank prepares its balance sheet in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards (IFRS) and under the historical cost convention, as modified by the revaluation
of all derivative contracts.

The preparation of a balance sheet in accordance with IFRS requires management to make
estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and
disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the balance sheet.

In the current year, the Bank has adopted IFRS 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures and the
amendments to IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements, which became effective for
fiscal periods beginning on or after I January 2007. The impact of the adoption of lFRS 7
and the changes to IAS 1 has been to expand the disclosures provided in this balance sheet
regarding the Bank's financial instruments and management ofcapital.

'The remaining standards and amendments andi interpretations to published standards that
became effective for fiscal periods beginning on or after i January 2007 were not relevant
to the Bank's operations and accordingly did not inipact the Company's accounting pohicies
or balance sheet.

The application of new standards and amendments and.interpretations to existing standants
that have been published but are not yet effective are not expected to have a material impact
on the Company's accounting policies or balance sheet in the period of initial application.

(b) Change in accounting reference date

In December 2006, the Bank made a decision to change its policy for recording deposit
taking and placement activities from trade date, the date on which details of the deposit are
agreed, to value date. The change was made to align the Bank's accounting reference date
with that of the parent compariy wrho also made a similar change during that year.

(c) Cash and cash equivalelts

Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash on hand, demand deposit baktoces and precious
metals with banks.

(d) Loans and advances to customers

Loans and advances to customers are stated at the principal amount outstanding less any
specific provisions for impairment which the directors consider necessary. Both loans and
advances to customers are adequately collateralized by cash, cash equivalents and
marketable securities held by the Bank on behalf of the borrowers. Accordingly, the Bank
has not established a provision for impairment of loans and advances.

(e) Investment in subsidiaries

Investment in subsidiaries consists of the Bank's investment in its four (4) nominee
companies, namely, Ebony Nominees Ltd., Ivory Nominees Ltd., Orion Nominees Ltd. and
Mercury Nominees Ltd., and are stated at cost. .The effect of not consolidating the
subsidiaries is immaterial as they each have a nominal amount of share capital and their
activities are limited to providing nominee services on the Bank's behalf to its customers.


(2) Fixed assets

Fixed assets are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation is provided on
the straight-line basis over a period of 3 years, being the estimated useful life of the assets.

(g) Property and building

Property is stated at cost, including legal fees. The building is in the construction phase and
therefore not yet deprecflatd.


4. Financial Risk Management

The Bank engages in transactions that expose it to a variety of financial risks in the normal
course of business. These risks include operational, market, liquidity, interest rate, currency and
credit risk. The Bank's financial performance is dependent on its ability to understand and
effectively manage these risks.

Operational risk

The Bank provides significant asset management, custody and trustee services to third parties.
These activities give rise to an operational risk, which is the risk that the Bank may fail in
carrying out certain mandates in accordance with the wishes of its customers. To manage this
exposure, the Bank has established risk management facilities and installed software to
control the attendant risks.

Market risk

Market risk is th~e risk that there will be a change in the value ofa financial instrument due
to changes in general and specif ic market conditions. The Bank's exposure to such risks is
concentrated in its held-to-maturity securities. Market risk is considered minimal as the
Bank principally invests in high grade debt securities and intends to hold the securities to
maturity.

Liquidity risk

This is the risk that the Bank might not have the necessary liquidity to meet its contractual
obligations. The Bank manages its liquidity risk by matching liabilities with assets of
similar maturity periods. The most significant banking assets and liabilities can be
classified, based on the period remaining to maturity as of the balance sheet date as follows:

As of 1 De~cember 2007


Three to
Nine Months




14'000'000


Nine to
Twelye enths


'Three monlths
or es





16'454'O34
6'826'560


Tota


Assets
Due from banks
emand

Advances to customers
Fixed term loans
Total

Liabilties
Due to ns

-time
Due to customers
demand
-time
'Total

Liquidity gap


6'000'000 2'9'2
-16'454'034
-6'1(26'560


14'00000 6'000'000 86'014'l95


9'598'O91
3'372'000


9'598'O91
3'372'000


44'321'6i21 -
438'547 -


44'321'621
438'547


57'730'259 -57'730'259
8'283'936 14'000'000 6'000'000_ 28'283'936


As of 31 December 2006



Assets
Due from banks
-demand
-time
Advances to customers
Fixed term loans
Total

Liablities
Due to banks
-dnmand
-time
Due customers

-time
Total -

Liquidity gap


Nine to
Twvelve Mnluths
Cus



6'000'000


Three monuths
or less
CHF


38'814'683
9'l79)'946
5'O39'882
368'256


Three to
Nine Months
CHIF



14'000'000


Total
CBF


38'814'683
29'l79'946
5'039'8(82
368'256
73'40?'767


53'402'767 14'000'000 6'0)00'000


3'l74'386


3'l74'386


40'753'865
I'4157'622


40'753'865
l'457'672


45'385'87.' 45'385'873
S'016894 1'000'000 6'000'000 28'016'8941


srruRbA~ BPOPlk ~,;a~, r~se se


I


9sa8Y' 62, 811'864'045







r~~~~us~~~ I rr -


_ ~n


* Currpeny risk

Currency risk is the risk that the Ban~k's financial position, profitability and cash flows m~ay
fluctuate significantly as a result of changes in f'oreign; currency exchange rates. T'he Bank
manages its currency risk by matching foreign currency liabilities with assets de ominn
in the same currency that have the same or similar term. The table beo ws ows t Bn'
financial instruments at carrying amounts, categorised by currency.

As of 31 December 2007 ha CHF 000*s


7. C'ommnitmenls and Contingencies

(ar) D~erivative finanocial instruments

TIhe Banlk enters into forward currency contracts and over-the-counter equity, precious
metals and currency options as part of its customer-related trading activities. Forward
currency contracts are contracts to purchase or sell foreign currencies at specified rates of
exschange on specific dates in the future. Risk arises from the potential inability, of
counterparties to perform under th~e terms of the contracts (credit risk) and from fluctuations
in the foreign exchange rites markett risk). The Bank manages its market risk of customer-
related positions by taking offsetting positions with its affiliates, resulting in minimal
market exposure. The credit risk of customer positions is managed byl applying uniform
credit standards maintained f~or all activities with credit risk. Collateral held in support of
such derivatives activity generally includes cash, cash equivalents, and marketable
securities.


Equity, precious metals and currency options confer upon the holder the right but not the
obligation to buy or sell a specified quantity of equities, precious metals or currencies at a
specified price (the strike price) during a specified period. As a writer of equity, precious
metals or currency options, market risk arises frei potential unfavourable movements in
the price of the equities or currencies underlying the options. Collateral held in support of
such derivative activity generally includes cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities.

As of 31 December 2007, the Bank had contractual commitments under open forward
currency contracts and equity, precious metals and currency options as follows:


EUR

25'466
591




3


Other


(JSD

2'470
22'289




9


Assets
Due from banks
Loans and advances to customers
Investments in securities
Derivative financial insturuents
Investment in subsidiaries
Accrued income and
prepaid expenses
Other assets
Fixed assets
Property and building

Total assets

Llabilitie
Due to banks
Due to customers
Derivative financial instruments
Accrued expenses and
other liabilities

Total hiabilities


5'515 62'734
81 2 '8

l'386


29'283
320
6'062
I'386
64

456


4'813


42'414. 74'785 26'060 7 '0279'6


244 12'970
5'l30 44'760
l'301


12'601
10'522


103
25'983


2007
CHF
000's


2006
CHF
000's

150,498
150,397
774


Commitments to purchase foreign currencies
Commitments to sell foreign currencies
Options to sell equities, precious metals and currencies


139,034
138,949


26'088 5'374 60'647


Net on-balance sheet position


Credit commitments


_ 649 '5'461~ ~411~


P***-


7. Commitments and Contingencies (Corrrinueud)

(a) D~erivative financial instruments (Continued)

The contract amounts of these instruments ref ect the extent of the Bank's involvement in
forward currency contracts and equity, precious metals and currency options and do not
represent the Bank's risk of loss due to counterpart non-performance. The replacement
values of these customer-related derivatives are disclosed on the balance sheet. As of 31
December 2007, the credit risk is limited to those contracts with a positive fair value and
that amounted to CHF 1,386,125 (2006: CHF 1,272,571).

(b) Building: construction

As of 31 December 2007 the Bank has outstanding contractual commitments in respect of
the construction of an office building in the amount ofBSD 1,l million.

8. Investments in Securities Held-to-Maturity

'The fair values below represent the closing trade price established on the last trading day of the
current reporting period by the exchange on which the securities are principally traded.


EUR Other Total


USD


14'155
S4'182




13
23


Assets
Due from banks
Loans and advances to cutomrs
Investments in securities
Derivative financial instruments
Investment in subsidiaries
Accrued income and
prepaid expenses
Othe as et
Fixed assets
PRoperty andburilding -

Total sets

Lisblitles
Due to banks
Due tocustomers
Derivative financial instruments
Accrued expenses and
other liabilities

Total hanbilities

Net on-balance sheet position

Credit commitments


67'995
5'408
4'541
l'2 2


8'367
341




2


3'087
483


42'386
402
4'541
l'272
6

320

52
2'l66


1 336
7 30
52


2'L66


51'203 18'373 8710 3'578 81'864


35 155 3'l74
8'836 3'231 42'212
1'171


2'984
13'S37


16'608
1'171


684 518 2 '204

18'463 17'039 8'873 3'Tif 47'761


On~t Value

4599695 497650
501'312 493'000
497425 494'900
509~569 494'750
503'353 487000
499137 483'250
50(1122 489750
4599403 479250
4198212 48(12 0
5(11352 494'500
49904 4861500
502'158 5(X1500


gagreat
Iarie Marurity


thics 800[$
m i
5(%1000 Otigrap In EMT-
50(000 LIBSAG JerSey Ranch


1.5(Y/.
1.79/o
1080%
2(XP/o
1.875%
2.125% 0
175% o
1.75% o
275% 0
3.00% o
2.75%
3.125% 0


(T/.04.08
0L2.108
30.04.09
11509.09
0604.10
1&1210
14.0Kll
25.1(Lll
15.0112
04.0612
14.0613
1(110.14


5(X1(X)
5(X1000
50OOD
5O00000
5(1000
50000
500000
50@000
5(X000
50000


Italie-Elvl-
Pmvinr of~hario -EMT-
Cdalp~hmliveCo
19wYakrLfeFurding-Bvr-
IEBCFim~L~acen\xp-EM-
Gemlal Eecic OPtalCapG30C
Aegxac~ablminataiaml viniaessPIC
hdit Suisset~l ananrhanh
Sw~edish~eraed~ua~ndupaiil
Coxpagn~iedc~iuunnznutRxacie-EM-


*Credit risk

Credit risk arises from the failure of a counterpart to perform according to the terms of the
contract. From this perspective, the Bank's credit risk exposure is primarily concentrated in
its deposits placed with other banking institutions and in its loans and advances to customers.
The Bank's deposits have been placed with high quality international banking institutions'
and loans, advances and credit commitments to customers are fully collateralized by assets
held by.the Bank on behalf of these customers.

The following table presents the Bank's main credit exposure by geographical location, based


on the domicile of the counterpart:



200
CHF
soo's


2006


*/*

34
34


2
5
1
12
4 -
4


20106
CHF
soo's

27612
28'188
2'103
l'069
2'000
4'l54
SQ}
19000
3'034
3'90)


Assets
Switzerland
Luxembourg
United States of Amrica
British Virgin Islands
Belgium
The Bahamas
Panama
Netherlads
Venezuela
other



Credit Comositments
British Virgin Islands
Other


24'899
33'864
2'253
4'280
4'000
19'438
2'741

2'564
4'822g


3
1


95


5'626 92
484. 4
6*110 too


11'428
583


*Interest rate risk

Interest rate risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument
will fluctuate because of changes in market interest rates. The Bank's exposure to fair
value interest rate risk is concentrated in its investment securities, which are at fixed
interest rates. The Bank does not consider this risk to be significant, as it intends to hold
the investments to maturity.

5. Fixed Assets


2006
CHF'


Furniture
and
Filsures
CiF


Tier 1 capital
Share capital
IGeneral reserve
Retained camnings


Computer
Equipmlent
CHF


Leasehold Motor
Imorovemnlrts Vehicles
CHF CHF ~


15'000'000
14'000'000
$'103'280

34' 103'28)0

63'740

?303'541L.

39'95]')1777


15'000'000
16'000'000
7'213'617

38'213'617

63'740

381'449'877


55'214'036


Total
CHF


Cost
Balance as of I January 2007
'Additions


138'718 131'226 2810'l27 443'306 993'377
--- 18'104 18'lo4


Total Tler 1 capital

Less adjustments to base capital

Total eligible base capital

Risk-weightedl assets

Capital adequacy ratio


Balance as of 31 Decemlber 20071 138'718 131'226 2180'l27 461'410 l'01 l'481


Accumulated depreciation
Balance as of I January 200?
Charge for the year


138'718 97'486 276'015 428'9)24 94'l413
16'870 .1 2._ 19'421 40'403


Balance as of 31 December 24107 138'71 IF [L,' 280' 177 448'345 981'546

Net Book Value as of:


11. Fair Value Estimation of Fiunaincl Instruments

Finanlcial instruments utilised by the Bank include recorded assets and liabilities blown in the
balance sheet, as well as items disclosed in these financial statements that principally Iavolve off-
balance sheet risk. The majority of the Bank's 11nancial instruments, except those disclosed in
Note 8, are either short-termn in nature or have interest rates that automatically reset to mlarkiet on a
periodic basis. Accordiingly, their estimated fair values are not significantly different from their
carrying values for each ma~jor category of` the Ban~k's recorded assets :mld liabilities.


.31 December 20017

31 December 20)6


- -68( 13'0(,5 29'9" 3

- 33'740 4'112 I14'382 5'3


6. Property and Building

Jq 2006 the Bank purchased property in Nassau, H~alunas and is constructing thereon a building
for its office premises with a budrtgeled cost ofBrSD 5.10,r~000. At the balance sheet date, costs of
BSD 3,928,459 (CHF 4,812,938) ;love been incurredd ai~d are included as property and building.
Thke building: is expected to be complletedJ forI Iccupanrr cy inl 200)8


THE TRIBUNE


AP GE 10 SATURDAYAPRIL 26, 2008


5999783 9881300


Included in the amortised cost of held-to-maturity investments on the balance sheet is accrued
interest receivable amounting to CHF 63,146 (2006: CHF 34,006).

9. General Banking Reserve

The Bank makes appropriations from retained earnings to a general banking reserve for
unforeseeable risks and future losses. The general banking reserve can only be distributed
following approval by the shareholders in a general meeting.

10 Capital Management

The Bank's objectives when mnaginl~lg capital are:

To comply with the capital requirements set by the Central Bank of The Bahamas (the Central
Bank);
To safeguard the Bank's ability to continue as a going concern so that it can continue to
provide returns for its shareholders anid benefits for other stakeholders; and
To maintain a strong capital base to support the development of its business.

Capital adequacy and the use of regulatory capital are monitored by the Bank's management,
employing techniques designed to ensure compliance with guidelines established by the Central
Bank. The required information is filed with the Central Bank on a quarterly basis.

The Central Bank requires each entity with a public bank and trust licence to: (a) have regulatory
capital of at least $5,000,000 and (b) maintain a ratio of total regulatory capital to risk-weighted
assets at or above a minimum of 8%.




The table below summarises the composition of regulatory capital and shows the capital adequacy
matio of the Bank as of the balance sheet date. The Bank has complied with all of the externally
imposed capital requirements to which it is subject.






I I1L I T\IUVIYL
I __,,,,,,_ I ,


- I'


I
_ ~


~~~~~~~~~~_______________


I LL_~


FROM page one

pubescent camera person instructed her to move out of
the way.
Another 31,743 viewers saw an all-out riot in
PHinWood Gardens between girls from C H Reeves
and R M Bailey schools which began on a jitney and
ended in the street
One poster wrote: "I am sick and tired of these i'
children acting like wild animals.. .primitive. This coun-
try will be in the gutter if you leave it up to them and the
thing is most of these children are scared of their par-
ents and want to show up so people think they're cool."
Government schools in New Providence are not
alone in the trend as nearly 2,000 viewers saw a fight on
Galilee Academy's c mpus which claimed the ma ch
St George's school classroom of chaos. Meanwhile,
Eight Mile Rock School had an astonishing six fight
postings in one month with a combined total of viewers
reaching a combined 69,855 viewers.
Bishop lan K Braithwaite of Holy Dove Ministries
and Raw Gospel, Coconut Grove, said the main reason


SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 2008, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


P'ri:~u warler ulet ouuprers

P..DxN310
Nassau, Uanamas
Webane., www pwc.com
b:-nual: pweb,~bs.pwc.co~ni
Telephone (242) 302-5300
Facsmtinile (242) 302-5350
INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT


To the Shar~eholders of Banque Privie Edmond de Rothschild L~td.

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Banque Privee Edmond de Rothschild Ltd. (the
Bank), and a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory notes.

Managemrent s Responsibility for the Balance. Sheet

Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of this balance sheet in accordance
with Intemational Financial Reporting Standards. This responsibility includes: designing, implementing
and maintaining intemal control relevant to the preparation and ~fair presentation of financial statements
that are 11ee from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error; selecting and applying
appropriate accounting policies; anrd making accounting estimates that are reasonable in the
circumstances.

Auditors' Responsibility

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet based on our audit. We conducted our
audit in accordance with Intemnational Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we comply
with ethical requirements and plan and perfonn the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the
balance sheet is free from material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in
the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditors' judgment, including the
assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or
error. In making those risk assessments, the auditors consider internal control relevant to the entity's
preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are
appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of
the entity's internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies
used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the
overall presentation of the financial statements. 4

We believe that the audit evidei~ce we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for
our audit opinion.

Opinion

Irour opinion, the accompanying balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial
position of the Bank as of 31 'December 2007 in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards

Emphasis ofMatter

Without qualifying our opinion, we emphasise that the accompanying balance sheet does not comprise
a complete set of fmancial statements in accordance with Intemnational Financial Reporting Standards.
Information on results of operations, cash flows and changes in equity is necessary to obtain a
complete understanding of the financial position, performance and changes in financial position of
Banque Priv~e Edmond de Rothschild Ltd.





18 March 2008 .


Thousands watch fight
The Bahamas is in a state of decay is because Bahami-
ans are forgetting that it takes a village to raise a child.
"We complain about sex and enime mn our kids but it
is human nature to inutate what we see," he said.
"Babies learn to walk, talk and eat solid foods
because they see our actions. We are allowing our chil-
dren to have these cellular phones to record these
videos, allowing them to go on the internet unsuper-
vised to post them and allowing our childreri to show us
these images and then laughing along with the unages
instead of being parents and finding the guardians of
those children to let them know that their children
have gone astray.
m"Parenttshare allomwinekidsoto smoke dpteha hlav
dren go out of the house, they don't need to experiment
because they are used to the real thing.
"This Bahamas is no longer a village that raises chil-
dren, especially when our children are the parents," he
added. "We need to read and follow the Bible and
bring our children back."


St Jo ns
stu enwt io av the rpp r uin%

leAn irate parent of one of the
Seniors yesterday said that this was
''not her understanding" of the
matter.
Her words were echoed in those
of another student on campus who
sairl that he felt that students
'should've been compensated" for
the alleged stign r iceones
or two topics and now they're
making us take the exam and we
aren't qualified to do it," said
another.
A message left for permanent
secretary in the ministry of educa-
tion, Elma Garraway, was not
returned up to press time yester-


Thre fires
FROM pae n

He explained that the depart-
ment is trying to maximise the
use of its resources as best as
possible to be able to fight fires
on three different fronts.
"We don't know the exact
causes for any of the fires, but
this is the bush fire season," he
said '
While the Carmichael Road
and Tropical Gardens fires hate
been br dgh und cnrl Mr
having dfiuht rer hinssitbt
Area between Coral Harbour
Road and Adelaide Road,
which spans hundreds of acres
of undeveloped land.
"Th~at is going to be a real
challenge," he said.
Heavy smoke from both the
Coral Harbour and Tropical
Gardens fires threatens to
reduce visibility for aircraft
landing and taking off at the
~airport if the situation is not
dealt with soon.


PrOtection

FROM page one
ing increasingly accessible
pornography can be.
The budding campaign will
focus on the need for parents
to communicate with their chil-
dren and monitor their use of
comM se suan imT e pone .
"Unfortunately there are those
children who will be influenced
by what they see, and we must
start protecting our families
from the large amount of
pornography that is surfacing
throughout the world, through
our computers.
"There are frightening things
out there and children are at
risk, so parents have got to be
more proactive and take more
responsibility for what their
.children are involved in."
The FNM minister is also
pushing for an adequate sex
education programme in
schools throughout The
Bahamas.
She said: "We as a society
have to realise that it is not a
taboo subject but a subject that
has to be embraced and taught
along with Christian morals, so
children know the truth about
sex and understand the conse-
quences so they do not engage
in this reckless sexual behav-
lour-

Shooting victim
FROM page one


I


Police are still searching for the gunmen involved in the brazen
Daylight shooting on Wednesday evening at Adventurer's Way, near
Watlins Lane.
Andy Wilfred Weekes, 32, of Adventurer's Way, one of the
two men shot, died Wednesday evening shortly after being taken
to hospital,
Police do not know the motive behind the shooting, which
occurred around 7pm.
According to reports, four men in a burgundy-coloured vehicle
opened fire on both men, who were later discovered at the rear of
a house with gunshot wounds to the head.
Asst Supt Loretta Mackey is appealing for information. Police
can be reached at 350-3107/8 or 911.


ZIMBABWE'S opposition Movement for Democratic Change, MDC, supporters are taken by police from out-
side the Harvest House, the headquarters of the MDC,- in Harare, Zimbabwe, Friday April 25, 2008.


Police raid headquarters


Of Zimbabwe's opposition


according to opposition party sec-
retary-general Tendai Biti, those
rounded up have been spirited to
Jails far from Harare, turning up
days or even weeks later.
"Some of them will never
resurface," Biti told The Associ-
cte .ress in neighboring South
"They will die and be buried
veolc spokesman Wayne
Bvudzijena said those arrested
were suspected "in connection
with some crimes that were comn-
mitted in the countryside."
Hundreds of opposition sup-
porters have been abducted, tor-
wu kds and a ts u ed nnrenenit
gious and human rights groups
tal iln cr ckdown on dist
least 10 of its supporters have
been killed.
On Friday, the opposition said
four more members had been
killed by Mugabe loyalists and
called on the U.N. to intervene
"to immediately stop the violence
against unarmed and defenseicss
citizens, whose only crime is vot-
ing for' change."


SHARARE, Zimbabwe


batons arrested about 300 peo-
ple in the sweep on the oppost-
tion's Harvest House offices in
the capital, Harare.
Scores of the detainees were
supporters who had sought refuge
in the downtown building after
lo asts to n ding ov ga ns
Mugabe.
te tlie ee orse dto atrh
spokesman Nelson Chamisa, who
fled the building to escape arrest.
"We asked about a warrant and
the answer was a baton stick."
With their homes in villages
across the countryside burned,
manbuo th she whoto refg in
clothes on their backs. Some had
tenlivingrin the atr hi d
medical attention, food and cloth-
mng.
They were taken to the city's
main police station and there
were fears they would be victims
of more violence.
"Their lives are under threat.
They are going to be subjected
to further torture," Chamisa said.
In similar cases in the past,


PREGNANT women, moth-
ers with babies strapped to their
backs, girls who had been threat-
ened with rape, men with broken
bones these were among the
h vdrds tf pole bat a n
police raid on Zimbabwe's oppo-
acorig, th tdu AoisateF Prss
Security forces also ransacked
the offices of independent elec-
tion monitors, hauling away mate-
rial documenting President
Robert Mugabe's apparent elec-
toral defeat. The strikes sent a
foo rul mege thd oun r 1'
onto power despite a growing
gld I clamor for him to step
Morgan Tsvangirai's Move-
ment for Democratic Change and
the independent Zimbabwe Elec-
toral Support Network both
maintain Tsvangirai won the
March 29 presidential vote, based
on their own surveys of tallies
posted at ballot stations. Official
results have yet to be released.
About 250 riot police wielding


FRPOM page one


just stryn totl M ke (th
principal) that they're really at a
disadvantage," one 12th grader
said, "People really don't want to
write the exam so it doesn't look
bad. on their resume or their tran-
scripts. They're really concerned.
Our student council president tried
togeb meeig swit pat ns ra-
the run around.,,
Principal Charles Mackey
declined to comment yesterday
outside the campus meeting, refer-
ring The Tribune to the Anglican
Central Education Authority
instead.
Director at the ACEA, Mrs
Saunders, was adamant that the
student's statements did not accu-
rately reflect the truth of the mat-
ter.
"A teacher did leave suddenly
and we have been looking for a
replacement. But in the meantane
we had a teacher who was working
with those students. What has
been happening is that students
have not always been turning up
whdn they should have."
She also said she found it "very
hard to believe" that the students
might have only started the two-
year course in their final year, as
all who The Tribune spoke with
had stated.
Mrs Saunders said that the
ACEA continues to "monitor" the
students because they "want every

dies in hospital


BRI$TOL


WVINE S &; SP IRITS






PUBLIC NOTICE






To: AII Our Valued Customers



Please be advised that the main

warehouse of Bristol Wines & Spirits,

G I ad sto ne Road .will be closed for

Inventory count on Wednesday April

30th. Our Customer Se rv ice De pt will

receive all orders for delivery before 11

am on Tuesday 29th and will re-open

for business on Thursday 1 st May



. We will be happy to fill any orders you

have on the 30th from one of our Retail

OUt lets near if I ]








II~__L , II ~-


NAS S AU E VE N TS CAP T U RED ON. CAMERA A


I ~gFor further information on High Society Pictues lease contc


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 2008


I_)


STHE Kingdor National
Parkinson Foundation's hon-
orees and guests filled the ball-
roorn at Sandals in Cable
Beach on Saturday, April l9,
for the charity's eighth annual
gala ball.
The event raised funds for
the charity which finances
research into Parkinson's Dis-
ease, a chronic and debilitating
disease of the nervous system.


A JUNE Cleo Lees with Betty Farquharson, Attorney Obie Ferguson Jr and chairwoman of Kingdor National Parkinson Foundation, Mavis
Darling-Hill.


A DR Janet Davis-Dorset, of Child and Adolescent Health in
Collins Avenue, with her husband Philip Dorsett, a senior mas-
ter at CC Sweeting Junior School.


A FROM LEFT: U.S. Ambassador Ned L. Siegel; Mrs. Carmen
Capo and Mr. Gerardo Capo, Developer, Treasure Cove: Bimini
Bay Resort.


At FREEPORT businessman and accountant Patrick Davis with Barbara Cartwright, of National
Insurance, and Kara Culner-Wilson, an accounting student at' Dalhouise University, whose father,
the late Stanley Wilson was one of the first Bahamian economists. Accountant Olga Culmer, the
first female accountant in The Bahamas, accompanies her daughter,


AROCHIELLE BEVANS, owner
of The Edge in Marathon
Mall, with his wife Sian,
human resource manager at
Commonwealth Brewery.


FROM LEFT:
U.S.
Ambassador
Ned L.
Siegel; Mrs.
Stephanie
Siegel, and
Mr. James
Smith,
Chairman of
CFAL, and
former
Minister of
State for
Finance.


The Kingdor National Parkinson Foundation


BALL


AI\1NUAL


GALA