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The Tribune
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01005
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: April 19, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01005

Full Text









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The


Tribune


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


BAHAMAS EDITION


Volume: 104 No.124 SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2008 PRICE 750


Two aI. pir


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OP


Husband and


wife duo taken


to US to face


drug charges


* By NATARIO MCKENZIE
DWIGHT and Keva Major's
nearly five-year extradition bat-
tle ended yesterday as the
alleged drug conspirators were
taken to the United States,
where they are expected to lie
arraigned on substantial drug
charges on Monday.
The US alleges that the hus-
band and wife were part of a
drug conspiracy between
August, 2002, and January,
2003, involving the transport of
hundreds of pounds of cocaine
and marijuana.









THE EXTRADITION
of alleged drug conspirators
Dwight and Keva Major is a
"clear breach of interna-
tional law" and a violation
of their constitutional rights,
Bahamian attorney Paul
Moss said yesterday.
The Majors who have
been fighting a US extradi-
tion request for almost five
years lost their battle when
they were extradited to the
US yesterday morning.
The couple were report-
edly flown from Millionaire
Airport to Florida around
11am and are expected to
be arraigned on drug
charges on Monday.
Paul Moss, who has been
outspoken on extradition
issues in the past, argued
that the Majors' removal
from the country to face
drug charges in the US vio-
lates their constitutional
rights.
"The Bahamas has laws,
the laws are patently clear
as to when a person who has
(an extradition request) can
be removed from the juris-
diction," said Mr Moss.
He said that, with an
appeal pending, the Majors
should not have been extra-
dited before outstanding
matters were concluded.
"Clearly, there is a
breach of international law
when you can essentially
expel citizens of your coun-
SEE page 6


The couple were taken to
Millionaire. Airport yesterday
morning and were reportedly
flown to the Florida around
11am.
The extradition came as a
surprise to lawyer and former
MP Keod Smith who called the
move a disgrace, claiming that
the rule of law had been "torn
to shreds."
"Justice has been seriously
breached in this country over
these two people," Mr Smith,
the Major's former attorney,
said in an interview with The
Tribune yesterday.
Mr Smith said he did not
believe the couple could get jus-
tice in the US, particularly in
the case of Dwight Major, who
he claimed is a political prison-
.er.
He questioned how the US
could try Major, citing that he
had been a political prisoner
when the request for his extra-
dition was made, and a political
prisoner when the alleged
offences were committed.
Mr Smith also pointed out
that the request for the couple's
extradition was based on a par-
ticular case which he said had
already been adjudicated upon
here in the Bahamas.
"What is the basis for the
request in that regard, it's
against the law. Two jurisdic-
tions can't be seized with the
same matter," Mr Smith said.
Mr Smith also pointed out
that the couple still had several
court matters pending in the
Bahamas, including an appeal
for relief in regards to the con-
ditions under which they were
being detained at Her Majesty's
Prison.
When contacted by The Tri-
bune yesterday, Deputy Prime
Minister and Minister of For-
eign Affairs Brent Symonette
did not comment heavily on the
matter but said that government
had acted appropriately in han-
dling the couple's extradition.
"The court ruled yesterday
(Thursday) in regard to the
Majors' extradition case and the
government has acted appro-
priately to the court order," Mr
Symonette said.
Former Foreign Affairs Min-
ister Fred Mitchell had signed a
warrant of surrender in 2006
authorising the couple's extra-
dition.
On Thursday, Chief Justice
Sir Burton Hall refused an
application for leave to amend a
review of the lawfulness of the
former minister's actions. Sir
Burton had also previously
determined that other pending
SEE page 6


0


tradition


Newly-arrived Haitian's

body found in bushes


* By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

A 35-year-old Haitian man who entered the
country only three weeks ago has been found
bound and dead in bushes off Gladstone Road.
A small crowd gathered yesterday afternoon
at the scene of the 22nd murder for the year in


U By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net
THE president of the
Bahamas Communications and
Public Officers Union has
charged that the exclusion of its
members from the Privatisation
Committee for BTC "is an injus-
tice of the highest order."
"All issues relating to pri-
vatisation of BTC are relevant to
the 1,070 members of BCPOU.
The discussions at this commit-
tee and the recommendations
submitted will impact them,
their families and their way of
life for the immediate and dis-
tant future," said Mr Robert
Farquharson yesterday at a
press conference at the union's
headquarters at Farrington
SEE page 6


the country, as nine police and forensic office
removed the body of Cassius Reinard fro
bushes at the southern side of the entrance
the Victoria Gardens sub-division into a wai
ing hearse.
Mr Reinard was covered in blue tarp as 1
was placed in the vehicle.
SEE page 6


US warns on


Exuma travel


* By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE US Centres for Dis-
ease Control and Prevention
issued a travel advisory to vis-
itors to Great Exuma follow-
ing the report of a confirmed
case of malaria in a tourist
who visited the island last
month, its website said yes-
terday.
On Thursday, the Ministry
of Health confirmed three
new cases of the disease were
detected in Exuma.
Dr Minnis said the three
patients one Bahamian and
two foreigners were diag-
nosed with the disease, which
is spread by the bites of
infected mosquitos.
However, Dr Minnis
sought to assuage fears, say-.
ing this does not constitute a
malaria "outbreak" on the


island because the parasite.
which causes the disease does
not exist in The Bahamas.
The CDC said it received
an official report of a con-
firmed malaria case in a per-
son who travelled to Exuma
in March, 2008. This patient
had no recent travel history
to any other country, the
website said. The report not-
ed "two prior outbreaks of
malaria in the past two years
in Great Exuma in which
travellers became sick with
malaria; one in May, 2006,
and another in August, 2007".
Travel advisories were
issued in both instances.
According to the CDC, due
to these "the repeated
instances" of malaria occur-
ring in travellers to Great
Exuma, "there appears to be
an ongoing, low-level risk of
malaria infection for people
SEE page 6


rOW




Stabbed

officer in

serious

condition
By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
A POLICE officer is in hos-
pital in serious condition after
he was stabbed in the chest
while trying to resolve a domes-
tic dispute on Thursday night.
The officer, whose identity
has not been released, was try-
ing to separate an arguing cou-
ple in Peach Street around
11pm Thursday, police said.
Asst Supt Walter Evans said
a 47-year-old female and her
male companion, who had a
knife, were in a heated row
when an off-duty officer
approached and attempted to
separate them.
During the scuffle, the police
officer was stabbed to the left
chest area. The assailant then
SEE page 6


Accused

charged

with rape
A MAN who was arraigned
on an attempted murder charge
earlier this week returned to
court yesterday to face addi-
tional charges.
Tamico Ferguson, 31, of Fox
Hill, alias "Syndicate" and "Tall
Boy", appeared before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez
charged with rape, forcibly tak-
ing a young girl away and
detaining her. According to
court dockets, Ferguson on Fri-
day, April 4, raped a girl aged
16. It is also alleged that on the
same day Ferguson forcibly
took the young girl away and
detained her with the intent to
rape her. Ferguson was not
required to plead to the charges.
Ferguson, who was arraigned
on the charge of the attempted
murder of Jamal Cooper as well
as causing grievous harm to
him, told the court yesterday
that police had questioned him
with regard to the alleged rape
incident but he knew nothing
about the other offenses for
which he had been previously
arraigned.
Ferguson also alleged that,
while being detained, police had
kicked him in his genitals.
Ferguson was again remand-
ed to Her Majesty's Prison. His
case has also been adjourned to
April 29 the same date he is
expected to return to court on
his previous charges. The case
was transferred to Court 10,
Nassau Street.


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PAGE 2SUAAI1


TOP THE VIO i
. ,.,, il


Pastor urges respect for others


Two arrested



on bullet find


AMMO ARREST
POLICE arrested a two men in connection
with the discovery of five live rounds of ammu-
nition in a vehicle.
Assistant Superintendent of Police Walter
Evans said that acting on information, CDU
officers travelled to Cumberland Street shortly
before 2am yesterday, where they searched a
white Toyota Corolla.
The ammunition found in the car was for a
.380 handgun.
Following the discovery, a 40-year- old man
from Lifebouy Street and a 33-year-old man
from Meadow Street were taken into custody
for questioning.
ARRESTS IN BURGLARY CASE
THREE suspects, including two juveniles,


are in police custody in connection to a burglary
in the Meadow Street area Friday morning,
police said.
According to Assistant Superintendent Wal-
ter Evans, a few residents of a Meadow Street
home were watching television around 12.30am
when they heard a sound outside.
Mr Evans said two persons went outside to
investigate and were confronted by a dark man
who produced a 9mm handgun.
The residents reportedly ran inside and but
were pursued by the gunman.
'Moments later, the gunman was seen fleeing
the area with others, witnesses told police.
Officers on patrol in the area arrested three
suspects: two juveniles one a school student -
and a 24-year-old man from John Road. They
are currently helping police with their inquiries.
Police did not disclose what if anything was
stolen during the burglary.


IN ORDER for there to
be peace in the country,
everyone must be more con-
siderate of others, COB
Chaplain Rev Robert Lock-
hart told thousands of stu-
dent's at a peace rally.
"We must begin to live
,again by the golden rule
which says, 'Do unto others
as you would have them do
unto you,'" Rev Lockhart


said at the rally, held on the
R M. Bailey Park Tuesday.
The Urban Renewal Live-
able Neighbourhoods Pro-
gramme and the Ministry
Housing and National Insur-
ance organised the event.
The students attending the
event came from schools in
the Englerston area and
included E P Roberts Prima-
ry, C H Reeves Junior High,


R M Bailey Senior High,
Columbus Primary and C V
Bethel Senior High Schools.
Minister of State for Youth
and Sports Byran Woodside
also had a message for the
students.
"We are counting on you
to make a difference; we are
counting on you to stop the
violence and we are saying
to you to let there be peace
in our schools; having said
that peace must be begin
with you and me," Mr Wood-
side said.
He added, "I challenge you
to turn away from violence,
to turn away from peer group
pressure that will tell you to
do wrong things."
Minister of Housing and
National Insurance Kenneth
Russell told the students that,
by being at the rally, they are
saying: "let peace begin with
us".
"This is important because
peace is not a condition that
you talk about and it hap-
pens," Mr Russell said.
"It has to come from
inside. It has to be part of
our make-up. We have to live
peace in .order to spread it
around.


MAIN SECTION
Local News ...........................P1 ,,,3.5,7,872-
Editorial/Letters ...................... .......P4.
Advts ..........................................P9,10,11
SPORTS SECTION
Sports............. .............P1,2,3,4,5
C om ics.....................................................P6
Advt ........................................... .......... P7
W eather.......................................................P8

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES
USA TODAY WEEKENDER 12 ES
USA TODAY WEEKENDER 12 PAGES


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BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE








INTERNAL AUDITORS
INTERNAL AUDIT DEPARTMENT
Vacancies exist in the Corporation for Internal Auditors in the Internal Audit Department.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Produces audit programs and submit the same for approval of the Chief Internal Auditor'
Conducts complete risk assessment for areas being audited
Conducts financial, operational and ITS audit assignments in accordance with established
audit programs. This involves a complete assessment of the systems of internal control,
risk exposures and the efficiency, effectiveness and economic use of resources to
achieve management objectives
Produces audit reports on audit concerns, their causes, effects and the audit
recommendations in accordance with the IA Standards
Conducts some audit investigations, evaluate findings and produce investigation reports;
exercising the IA's ethical standards e.g., confidentiality, etc.
Conducts reviews of budgetary systems (including variances analysis), policies,
manpower efficiency and new computer applications
Produces audit reports and submit the same to the Chief Internal Auditor for review
and release to management and the Audit Committee
Assembles audit files and conducts cursory reviews of audit files produced by the
Assistant Internal Auditors and the Audit Clerks
Trains, coaches and direct the activities of the Audit Clerks, and offers general supervision
and technical support to the Assistant Internal Auditor(s)
Conducts corporate research, and investigations on vendors and conducts fraud
investigations.(producing the associated reports)
Assist the AGM/Chief Internal Auditor in the annual audit planning exercise and offer
direct assistance on major investigations
Conduct audits in conjunction with the External Auditors and produce working papers
for the External Auditors year-end audit
Conducts stock taking observation exercises, Family Island audits and special assignments

Job Requirements include:

Bachelor degree in Accounting or other closely related discipline
Professional accounting certification (e.g., CA, CPA,), in addition completing the CIA
would be highly desirable
Understand and apply Internal Audit Standards and International Accounting Standards
Good investigative, interviewing and analytical skills
Good problem solving skills
Knowledge of Microsoft Word & Excel computer programs. Also knowledge of audit
software and a good working knowledge of the H.T.E system are required
Good knowledge of the Corporation's operating policies, systems and procedures
Management and supervision skills
5 years experience

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to:
The Manager Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:
Thursday, May 1st, 2008.

^ ------


r


Marathon Mall
393-6113


Growing feet in safe hands


--


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2008


9Fully trained


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SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2008, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


LOCL-EW


A WALK past the swimming pool at the College of the
Bahamas has become an eye-catching experience as a brightly
coloured mural has brought the wall to life.
Designed by art professors Sue Bennett-Williams and John
Cox, the mural shows people, "who could be any of us," moving
in profile towards and away from each other, touching and not
touching, protected and unprotected.
"It is only when we look a little closer that we notice the
AIDS ribbon on one of the figures and then understand the full
significance of what is being depicted and suggested," explained
the college.
Painted by art students at COB, the mural is part of a larger
campaign on AIDS awareness that began in November 2007. The


College Campus Life Department and the College of the
Bahamas Union of Students (COBUS) set things off with a day
of on-campus HIV testing which continued in December with a
human red ribbon on World AIDS Day, then included an after-
noon of documentary films on the topic of AIDS.
Partnering with the College of the Bahamas in this campaign
were the AIDS Secretariat, the AIDS Foundation of the
Bahamas, Burns House and the Bahamas International Film
Festival (BIFF).
The Campus Life Department is planning to keep the cam-
paign going in the next academic year which begins in August
2008.


Two-year old


seriously hurt


in car accident


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT A two-year-
old girl is in hospital with seri-
ous injuries after being struck
by a vehicle.
Jade Darling was among a
group of five children who
were attempting to cross the
street when the incident took
place at around 5pm on Thurs-
.day.
The toddler was transport-
ed to Rand Memorial Hospital,
where her condition is listed
as guarded.
According to Chief Super-
intendent of Police Basil Rah-
ming, the little girl was
attempting to cross the street
when she ran into the right
front fender of a Chevy Lumi-
na.
Mr Rahming said the driver
told police that she was driving


the vehicle west along Gren-
fell Avenue, and as she got in
the vicinity of Cornwallis Place
a group of little children sud-
denly dashed out from the
northern side of the road
across the path of her vehicle.
She further stated that
before she could react, a.little
girl in the group crashed into
the right front fender of the
car and was knocked down'
onto the tarmac.
The police and emergency
medical personnel were noti-
fied and responded to the
scene.
Traffic Police are continuing
their investigation into the
accident.


S.g
Pes C.tro


Ministry finishes abused child care plan


* By MATT MAURA

THE Ministry of Social
Development has completed a-
National Child Abuse Protocol
that will address the need for
children in the Bahamas who
are traumatised by abuse to
become "a corporate responsi-
bility, shared across statutory
and non-statutory agencies,"
Minister of State for Social
Development Loretta Butler-
Turner said.
Delivering the keynote
address at the opening of a one-
day workshop on "the trauma-
tised child" held at the -School
of Nursing as part of National
Child Protection Month, Mrs
Butler-Turner said child abuse
is "very real" in the Bahamas.
Citing child abuse statistics
for 2007 that were compiled by
the Children and Family Ser-
vices Division of the Depart-
ment of Social Services, Mrs
Butler-Turner said there were
almost 1,600 cases of child
abuse reported in the Bahamas.
Child neglect was the leading
form of abuse with 672 reported
cases, followed by physical


abuse (356), child sexual abuse
(286), care and protection (159),
abandonment (24), incest (21),
verbal/emotional abuse (20) and
others at 44 for a total of 1,582
cases.
Mrs Butler-Turner said the
situation becomes even more
vexing "when one realises that
only one-third of the cases of
child abuse are reported."
"Child abuse can destroy the
very soul of a child and child
sexual abuse is probably one of
the best kept secrets," Mrs But-
ler-Turner said. "Every day
there is one child who experi-
ences one of the many forms of
abuses (while) many children
suffer repeated physical abuse
at the hands of their parents or
guardians under the guise of
discipline.
"Educating our children and


adults on the various forms of
abuse is critical (as) too often,
an abused child is not brought
to the authorities when they dis-
close that they have been vio-
lated to a family member."
Mrs Butler-Turner said the
National Child Abuse Protocol
will ensure that there is an effec-
tive co-ordination and partner-
ship process that will include
caregivers and service users.
She said there is a tendency
for parents or guardians to
underestimate the need for
counselling, which is a key com-
ponent in the recovery of
abused or traumatized children.
"Some guardians for exam-
ple, feel that the counselling ses-
sions serve to keep the trau-
matic event fresh in the mind
of the child because they do not
fully understand what the


process is about," Mrs Butler- P IGHT C 1 345 I A 5 8:30 10:25
Turner said. "It is our role to PROM NIGHT C 1: :4 WA 2 :3
ensure that they understand the, i
necessity of therapy for that
child.", .







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COB mural brings colour to


AIDS awareness campaign


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-------


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THE TRIBUNE


EIDOT TOt3 HEED6ITORB


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeportfax: (242) 352-9348



Those missing millions


NO informed person in The Bahamas will
have been surprised by yesterday's Tribune
headline saying: Millions Go Missing. It con-
firmed what we always knew about the Min-
istry of Housing on the PLP's watch. Money
was going out of the door without proper
regulation and ending up in pockets we have
yet to pinpoint.
Nor will readers have been surprised to
hear that $410 million in unpaid taxes once
again, mostly accumulated under PLP gov-
ernments will almost certainly have to be
written off.
When you think what this money might
have been used for in terms of school and
road building, and in improving our deprived
communities in so many ways, it beggars
belief that more was not done to harness the
cash and direct it into projects that would
have carried this country forward.
However, even to entertain such thoughts
is to misunderstand what the PLP was about
during its three solid decades in power.
Though it has always laid great stress on its
altruistic intent, especially towards poorer
sections of society, it has rarely suited action
to word. Thus, education has gone back-
wards over the last four decades, deprived
communities have remained deprived, and
money that might have benefited all Bahami-
ans has been squandered and misappropri-",
ated in the most reckless'manner. ""r
Most disturbing of all the Auditor Gener- ..
al's recent disclosures, though, is that more
than $3 million of taxpayers' money was paid
by the Ministry of Housing to two companies
without any proper records being taken, or
any evidence that work was carried out to
justify the fees.
It is particularly troubling because it ties in
neatly with Tribune investigations exposing
financial irregularities at the ministry around
that time which officials were unwilling, or
unable, to explain.
A string of contractors told The Tribune -
and we certainly believed them that min-
istry employees were forcing them to pay
bribes in return for contracts. The tales
springing up from within the building indus-
try prompted the then newly-appointed min-
ister Neville Wisdom to call in the police.
One person was subsequently charged, but
this did not reflect in any way the true extent
of the problem.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that YVONNE JOSUE of P.O.
AB-20409, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day
of April 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




TAYLOR

INDUSTRIES LTD.
111 Shirley Street










Thursday, April 24

Friday, April 25

Saturday, April 26


We regret any inconvenience this

will cause to our customers


The Auditor General's revelations are
commendable, if only to demonstrate that
financial irregularities will ultimately see the
light of day.
But revelation without a firm, resolute
reaction from the government of the day is
insufficient. What we need to know 'is who
the beneficiaries were of these unrecorded
payments, what the money was used for, and
who authorised the transactions in the first
place.
Then we need to see action taken against
the culprits, through the courts if necessary,
and punishment meted out in terms com-
mensurate with the gravity of the offences, if
that's what they turned out to be.
To let such matters ride, or to allow them
to be influenced by political expediency in
any form, is unacceptable. Not only does this
encourage similar transgressions in future,
it also creates an impression of slackness
among those whose job is to protect the pub-
lic interest.
Many of The Bahamas' current woes are
due to a failure on the part of successive
governments PLP and FNM to take firm
action against wrong-doing. This backslid-
ing on the issue of enforcement has created
an "anything goes" culture, particularly in
the public service, that now permeates prac-
ticallyzevery area of Bahamian life.
'" ,The'real tragedy behind any kind of cor-
ruption and this:has-been proved repeat-
edly in post-colonial societies throughout
the world is that the poor always suffer
most.
During The Tribune's inquiries into the
Ministry of Housing two years ago, it became
clear that low-cost home owners were the
real victims of whatever chicanery was afoot.
They were the ones whose homes were being
poorly-built, a fact made worse by the official
intimidation they faced if they dared to com-
plain. Once again, the PLP's classic con-
tempt for the poor was on display for all to
see;
In light of the most recent disclosures by
the Auditor General, it would be heartening
to see someone actually brought to justice
and made to pay the price for misdirecting
public money. Naming and shaming those
who fell short would go a long way towards
preventing such misuse of public funds hap-
pening again.


Haiti must





become its




own saviour


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I AM writing about the crisis
in Haiti. First of all I am sorry
to hear about the Haitians
starving in Haiti because their
own people have made it diffi-
cult for them to receive the
food rotting in the imported
vessels docked in Haiti.
Secondly, I do not think that
The Bahamas must always be
the saviour of Haiti and the rest
of the Caribbean. We cannot
possibly feed eight million
Haitians and we already have
so many Haitians in The
Bahamas that should not be
here. Our mindset is clearly
misguided. We have operated
for years in error that once you
are born in The Bahamas that
you are automatically a
Bahamian. The Constitution
does not say that and the large
numbers of so-called Hait-
ian/Bahamians who reside here
if they have not received lawful
citizenship papers from the
Department of Immigration
they are not lawful Bahamians
even though they have been
born here. The Constitution
says that anyone who is born of
non-Bahamian parents may
apply on the age of majority to
become a citizen of The
Bahamas and the Ministry of
Immigration has a discretion
on whether to grant them citi-
zenship or not based on two
principles one of which is if it is
not against the national securi-
ty interests of The Bahamas.
My question is having large
numbers of Haitian nationals
who have children who speak
English, French and Creole
who we cannot understand and
who have established their own,
independent culture are not
they a threat to our national
security if they threaten to out
number us and all in their
mindset is Haiti and promot-
ing the Haitian culture?
Thirdly, investigate the pri-
vate school on East Street
where the Haitian children
attend exclusively and speak
Creole, English and French, tell
me if we are not setting a dan-
gerous trend in years to come
for these very young children
to take over our country espe-
cially since we are not learn-
ing French and Creole in our
schools? I think that young
Bahamian children should
learn French, but definitely not
Creole. Why are we so com-
placent as a people that we
think that it is fine for a large


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ASHLEY PHILIPPE of
TREASURE CAY, ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister, responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
April 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





PRICE BUSTERS

"SAVINGS AND A SMILE IN EVERY AISLE"


YOURCHOICE 50% OFF SALE

fpril 18th and 19th
Pncebusters is having a 2 da\ "Your Chnice 504 )Oft
Sale" this weekend. Spend o\er $ 10 on regular priced
items and get 50% off any single item 'on choose or spend
over $20 and get 50' off any two items including Limps,
dinner sets, toys. sheet sets. health and beauty aids and
more. It's the Pricebusters" Your Choice 50% off Sale"
for 2 da\s only this Friday and Sat. April l th and 19th at
Pricebusters 5 locations: Palmdale. N.tsaau St.,
Carmichael Rd, Prince Charles Drive and Mariathon Mall.


Tel: 364-6452


group of foreign nationals such
as the Haitians and their seed
to increase in number? Also
why do we think that we
should save the eight million
starving people in Haiti? We
are not the United States of
America even though every
impoverished land in the
Caribbean seems to think so.
What happens to the slow rape
of The Bahamas by these
Caribbean nations when our
nation becomes poor from
helping them? We cannot con-
tinue to feel sorry for impov-
erished peoples in the
Caribbean, especially Haiti
when Haitians and their seed
living here send millions of for-
eign exchange to that land to
build up those persons' lives. I
ask you complacent Bahami-
ans when you become hungry
and suffering who will help you
since most of these people in
the region are only concerned
about themselves to the detri-
ment of The Bahamas.
Examine the Cayman Islands
and Bermuda which are wise
nations that have preserved
their countries for full-blood
citizens first and foremost and
do not see themselves as'the
United Nations of the
Caribbean like The Bahamas
seems to.
Wake up Bahamians,
Haitians and their children do
not really care about the future
of The Bahamas. We are drain-
ing our country,.of the most
important funds to take care
of these people who we use for
cheap labour. It is time
Bahamians bring in other per-
sons other than Haitians for
labour on a contract who will
be willing to leave once their
contract is over. Bahamians,
Haiti is not our concern, since
no matter how we assist Haiti
and Haitians these poor and
rich people have to learn to
help themselves restore democ-
racy and peace to their land. It
is up to the United States of
America, France, Canada and
the United Nations and other
first world nations to intervene
and restore stability to Haiti


the way the United States isl
willing to do so in Iraq. Per-I
haps, Haitians need to discovery
oil in Haiti in large amounts;
then they will receive the inter-i
national, first world assistance
that they need. The Bahamasj
already spends millions annu-1
ally deporting Haitians and thek
home remittances to Haiti by
Haitians living here surely adds
up to millions as well.
Wake up Bahamians and;
speak up we are not a seconds
Haiti and we should stop allow-I
ing these selfish people who
refuse to help their own impov-
erished land to work a guilty)
trip on us and drain all of our)
precious foreign reserves and,
Bahamian culture. Their
Bahamas is for Bahamians and
Bahamians for The Bahamas
first and foremost. Haitians and
Haitian Bahamians need to
return to Haiti and build up
Haiti instead of re-colonisation
of someone else's country. It
is time these people stop raping
The Bahamas. We are the only
nation in the world that is s
slack that we allow this to hap-
pen on the pretext that these
people are so poor and help-
less. These people need to help
themselves in.Haiti by taking,
back Haiti and not by the"
recolonisation of The
Bahamas. Ask yourself if we
were poor like Haiti how many
of them would allow us firstly
to live in Haiti and then to send:.
millions of US dollars out of|
the country to build up our
land? How many of us would
be allowed to call ourselves
Haitian-Bahamians without
them driving.us out of their
land and back to The
Bahamas? Many of us would
actually be killed if we even
tried to enter Haiti looking for
a better way of life. Think
about that.......We need now
save The Bahamas for Bahami-
ans......
THE BAHAMAS
IS FOR
THE
BAHAMAS
AND NOT FOR
HAITI.....
HAITI....
SAVE
YOURSELF......
Nassau,
April 12, 2008.


MORTON SALT



ROHM

HRRAS .
Seeks a qualified candidate for the position of

PROJECT ENGINEER
At Its Great Inagua Plant
Responsibilities include (but are not limited to):
* Plant Safety, Health, and Environmental responsibilities and
knowledge of Regulatory Compliance
* Development and management of Capital Budgets and projects
* Construction and Capital equipment installation, physical plant
maintenance, on equipment and machinery
* Comprehensive knowledge of standard and specialized
engineering computer applications including, reliability, and
data streaming
* Identification of source problems and opportunities for
improvement
Successful candidate should possess:
* Effective communication skills for internal and external
customers
* Proficient oral and written communication skills
* Positive can-do attitude easily adapts to change and is a team
player
* Uses good judgment, Demonstrates a high level of
professionalism and integrity, discretion and ethical behavior.
* A Degree in Engineering, Five years experience with reasonable
field experience
Morton Bahamas Limited offers excellent benefits and salary
Interested applicants may submit resumes and proof of
qualifications to
Morton Bahamas Limited, Human Resources Department,
P.O. Box MT-509,
Matthew Town, Inagua,
The Bahamas.
Or, to vmoultrie@mortonsalt.com
The Company will only contact candidates under consideration.
All applications will be held in strict confidences. The candidate
must be willing to relocate to Great Inagua.


I


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2008







SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


Women's rights




organisation




celebrates 80 years


(p

- ,,


MINISTER of State for
Social Development Loretta
Butler-Turner announced yes-
terday that the Bahamas will
be celebrating the 80th
anniversary of the Inter-Amer-
ican Commission of Women.
The commission, she
explained, is a specialised enti-
ty of the Organisation of
American States (OAS).
The Inter-American Com-
mission of Women (CIM) is
the principal forum for gener-
ating hemispheric policy to
advance women's rights and
gender equality.
Established in 1928 at the
Sixth International Conference
of American States (Havana,
Cuba), CIM was the first offi-
cial inter-governmental agency
in the world created expressly


n By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

"I vex that is cost $20 to
take my car from below
empty to just above empty
on my fuel gauge. I am so
tired of spending all my
money to fill up my car and
then I have to spend hours
on end in traffic.
"It is. getting ridiculous,
everything is going up,
exceptfor my lil' paycheck.
Sometimes I wonder what
it's going to be next and if I
have will have to chose
between getting to work
and eating for the week."
KAYLA D,
South Beach

"I vex because dem jitney
drivers complaining 'bout
they want a fare increase
because the cost of gas
going up. Now, I can
understand'dat, but as a
man who got to catch jitney
everyday, I want to know if
dese renegade drivers ga'
stop blasting music in my
ear and risking my life
everytime I get on the bus.
"If you want my dollar
and couple cents and you
making' money off of me,
the least you can do is
make the ride lil' comfort-
able, you know?"
DeAngelo S,
Pinewood Gardens
"What have me vex is
Bahamians don't seem to
respect the sanctity of mar-
riage and the family struc-
ture anymore. People seem
to be more comfortable
getting pregnant and rais-
ing four, five kids in a
home what ain' have no
daddy and mummy out
working most of the day.
"How children suppose
to grow up to be produc-
tive citizens when they ain't
getting love at home?"
Michelle T,


to ensure recognition of the
civil and political rights of
women.
As such, the omission has
played a crucial role in mak-
ing the participation and sup-
port of women a legitimate and
indispensable part of gover-
nance and international con-
sensus building in the Americ-
as.
The minister noted that she
was pleased to have Juliet Mal-
let-Phillip, the director of the
Organisation of American
States in the Bahamas, join the
Bahamas in celebrating the his-
toric milestone of the CIM.
The celebrations were
launched yesterday at the
Bureau of Women's Affairs
Monthly Forum with repre-
sentatives on non-governmen-


tal women's organizations. Mrs
Mallet-Phillip was the guest
speaker for the forum.
Other activities planned to
commemorate the 80th
Anniversary of the CIM
include:
An exhibition which will
be officially opened in May
A talk show on the OAS
Convention on the Prevention,
Punishment and Eradication
of All forms of Violence
Against Women, the Conven-
tion Belem do Para and the
Bahamas' work in this area.
A presentation by the
OAS local office to the stu-
dents of the Willie Mae Pratt
School for Girls.
The activities are expected
to conclude in September with
a visit from the President of


I ... .- .~ 7 .- -
FORMER Kingsway Academy student Philip Simon, now executive director of the
Commerce, lends a helping hand to his former teacher and basketball coach Paul
Simon's daughter Nadja Niara Simon, a second grader at Kingsway Academy.



Teacher unveils


one-stop web


shopping mall


for real estate


A VETERAN teacher says he
has a plan to make life easier for
home buyers across the
Bahamas.
During his more than 30 years
of teaching at Kingsway Acade-
my, Paul Sattem has mentored
some of the country's brightest
minds. His former students
include Philip Simon, executive
director of the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce; Branville
McCartney, Minister of State for
Tourism; Bahamian basketball
legend Rick Fox and many oth-
ers.
Now as the school prepares to
celebrate its 50th anniversary and
Mr Sattem progresses to another
level in his career as a teacher's
aide and basketball coach, he has
discovered a new love real
estate.
With the help of family, friends
and former students, Mr Sattem,
now a certified broker, launched
Bahamas Homes and Land Real
Estate Company Limited, a one-
stop shopping mall for real estate
via the internet.
"Bahamas Homes and Land
Real Estate has made it simpler


and more convenient for persons
wishing to make that important
purchase of a home or land as
they now have complete access
to the websites of seven of the
country's leading real estate com-
panies and realtors simply by log-
ging on..." he said.
H G Christie tops the list of
featured real estate companies
on the website. Also featured
is C A Christie; ERA Bahamas;
Paradise Real Estate; Morley
Realty; Paradise Sales and
Rentals and Bahamas Water-
front Realty.
"It is a joy to help people find
property, especially Bahamians,
I have a strong desire for that,
and then to have Philip (Simon)
turn around and help me out so
much, it has just been phenom-
enal," Mr Sattem said.
He said that he actually got
the actual "one stop shopping
mall" concept from Mr Simon,
who suggested that he rent the
web space to various realtors.
Now Mr Sattem says that he
is getting listings from people
who wish to sell their property
as well.


CIM, Dr Jacqui Quinn-Lean-
dro.
The public is invited to par-
ticipate in the activities.
The CIM is made up of thir-
ty-four principal delegates, one
for each member state, who
are designated by their respec-
tive governments.
Using international commit-
ments as leverage, CIM has
supported the efforts of
women in individual OAS
member countries to secure
their civil and political rights.
To this end, CIM has drafted
and promoted international
conventions, which recognize
women's rights and establish
a standard against which the
provisions of national laws are
judged and eventually
changed.


Bahamas Chamber of
Sattem. Also pictured is Mr


DEA H NOTICt



I.






I I







KALLIOPE KLONARIS, 93

Funeral senices for Kalliope Klonaris, formerly of L~'ord
Cay. New Providence, Bahamas will be held at the Greek
Orthodox Church of the Annuncialion. Wlest Street at 10 a.m.
on Tuesday, 22nd April, 2008. Internment uill folloI at the
Ebenezer Methodist Church, East Shirley Street

Kalliope is survived by her sister Kalotina Karavokiros of
Helsinki. Finland, her four sons Anthony, Nicholas, Charles
and John and their respective wives, Kathryn, Pamela J.,
: Pamela L. and Carmen, nine grandchildren, Mike Anthony
and Kristina. Tara and Mike, Leah and Kally, Nomikos and
Alexander. Sean. one great grandchild Robert Holcombe, one
granddaughter-in-law Arantxa Klonaris and one grandson-
in-law Mark Holcombe. Kalliope was predeceased by her
husband Nomikos Klonaris founder of Mike's Stoe Store.

She ill he sadly missed by ler faithful caregivers Cynthia
and Minerva Santos and Adep Baptiste and numerous family
members and friends in Finland, Greece and The Bahamas.

May her memory be eternal.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to "The Greek
Orthodox Church" in memory of Mrs. Kalliope Klonaris c/o
P.O. Box N-7776(514), Nassau, Bahamas.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE








TEMPORARY HANDYMAN
INAGUA OPERATIONS
FAMILY ISLANDS DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Inagua Operations Family Island Division for
a Temporary Handyman.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the
following:

* Cleans station and company vehicles by using appropriate cleaning
solutions and apparatus
* Cleans and gardens in the power plant compound and lawn areas. This
includes collecting and removing debris and waste, and transporting
them to disposal areas
* Pumps fuel
* Assists with various metering activities, such as installs and performs
meter readings, cleans meters for testing, disposes of obsolete meters
* Drives company vehicles (e.g. car, small truck) to assist with chauffeuring
and messenger services

The Job requirement includes:

* Completion of High School Diploma/GED
* Requires basic knowledge of building and yard maintenance and
cleaning, and general plumbing, carpentry, include masonry, painting,
gardening techniques
* Knowledge of cleaning solutions and their applications
* Ability to use various tools and equipment to affect the cleaning and
maintenance of work areas and related equipment
* A valid drivers' license

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to The Manager Human Resources & Training, Bahamas
Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau-
Bahamas on or before: Thursday, May 1st 2008.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JULIA DOLCE
of BALFOUR AVE #3, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 19th day
of April 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


I I










PAGE 6, AR


IEu atae 6 0o I


FROM page one

travelling to the island".
As a result, late Thursday the
CDC reinstated its recommen-
dation that travellers to Great
Exuma, Bahamas, take the fol-
lowing precautions:
To take chloroquine malar-
ia preventive medication (pro-
phylaxis).
To use an insect repellent
when outdoors, to stay in an air-
conditioned or well-screened
area, or sleeping under an insec-
ticide-treated bed net during
the peak biting period for the
mosquitoes that carry malaria
(dusk and dawn).
The website said that as there
is "no known risk of malaria on
other islands of the Bahamas"
prophylaxis is not necessary for
travel to those islands.
Dr Minnis said it should be
noted the advisory made spe-
cific warnings for travel to Exu-
ma and not the entire chain of
Bahama islands. This "points


out to the world that the
remainder of The Bahamas" is
free of malaria cases, Dr Minnis
said. On the current malaria
situation in Exuma, Dr Minnis
said: "We have found no new
cases. However, I can say we
will continue to do our surveil-
,lance and our monitoring which
we have always done."
He also stressed: "We do not
have the parasite in the
Bahamas and therefore it must
be introduced from the outside.
We have the mosquito but
Florida also has the mosquito,
which means that the disease is
always brought into the country
by outside sources, (namely)
human carriers," explained Dr
Minnis.
He said it was a long-shot that
the disease was introduced to
Exuma by infected mosquitoes
which travelled into the county.
Symptoms of malaria include
fever, headache and vomiting
and usually appear within 10-
15 days of the mosquito bite.


Majors' attorney:


law 'torn to shreds'


FROM page one

criminal matters did not pro-
hibit their extradition.
Daniel O'Connor, US
Embassy political officer and
spokesman, also confirmed the
Majors' extradition to Florida,
saying the couple are expected
to appear in court on Monday.
"They are scheduled for their
initial court appearance in Mag-
istrate's Court on Monday,"
O'Connor said. "Generally,
once all the legal processes have
been complete and the order is
signed, then they are extradit-
ed," O'Connor said. "All the
prerequisites have been met
from our perspective and the'
Bahamian government
approved it," O'Connor said.
The Majors, both 39, have
been fighting the extradition


request since 2003. Dwight
Major was already in prison on
a charge of conspiring to smug-
gle 1,600 kilos of Colombian
cocaine into Long Island when
the US made a request for his
extradition while his wife has
been in prison since she was
arrested on the extradition war-
rant in 2003.
In November last year, the
Privy Council refused an appli-
cation by the Majors for per-
mission to file a challenge
against a court's order that they
be extradited to the US to fate
drug charges.
In August, 2006, alleged drug
kingpin Samuel "Ninety"
Knowles was suddenly extra-
dited to the US, following a six-
year legal battle. The US is
seeking the extradition of 22
other persons, mainly on drug-
trafficking charges.


CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Telt 325-2921
SUNDAY. APRIL 20, 2008:
11:30 a.m.Speaker
PASTOR MICHAEL JOHNSON

NO EVENING SERVICE
Bible Class 9:45 .m. Breaking of Bread Servie: 10- am.
SCommunity Outreach: 11:30 am. Evenng Serice: 00 p.m.
SMidweek Service 7:30 pmn. (Weieday
Sisters' ayMeeUn 10:00 am. (ad Thuraty of each month)


THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH
Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
0_0__ P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
___ Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
I- CHURCH SERVICES
urn SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 2008
Fifth SUNDAY OF EASTER
AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
D 11:00AM Rev. Mark Carey
ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Charles Moss
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard
10:00AM Rev. Charles Sweeting
EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,
East Shirley Street
11:00AM Mr. Henry Knowles/Youth Service
7:00PM Rev. Charles New


"Iy4I'Ii'


GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen's College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly
ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00AM Connections Rev. Philip Stubbs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs
TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00AM Rev. Hartis Pinder

RADIO PROGRAMMES
'RENEWAL' on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Rev. Marie Neilly/Dr. Reginald Eldon
'METHODIST MOMENTS' on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Your Host: Rev. Marie Neilly
$********************************************* ****


The 2008 General Conference will be held May
21-25, 2008 at Wesley Methodist Church, Harbour
Island under the theme: Peace Begins With Me."





Orant's TEton Weilep Ob 1lrd)lr

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY, APRIL 20TH, 2008.
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Tezel Anderson
11:00 a.m. Bro. Jamicko Forde/Youth
7:00 p.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Marilyn Tinker (HC)

L sLJI. re HIi.I [,cllae follus.lo lliiJ 4l .lllu L1Ptr 5:7)


FROM page one
Road.
"It is for these reasons that
the BCPOU believes that we
should have a representative on
the committee."
Mr Farquharson emphasised
that the union should be includ-
ed in all phases of the privatisa-
tion process, which is a process
the body does support. Not
doing so, he explained, is a vio-
lation of "the principle of good
industrial relations."
The union chief told the media
that his body was verbally
informed of the appointment of
the committee, chaired by T B
Donaldson, in early March and
sent a letter to Minister of State
for Finance Zhivargo Laing on
March 10 to confirm its appoint-
ment, but to date, he said, they
have not received a written
response.
Mr Donaldson, they acknowl-
edged, had informed the union
on March 14 of his appointment


FROM page one

try. I think it's Article 25 of our
Constitution that really gave cit-
izens a right to be in this juris-
diction, not to be spirited out
of the country, particularly
when you have matters pend-
ing. And then no one makes
noise because they say, 'Well,
theseare ae alleged drug dealers',
but all it means now is that it's


FROM page one

The victim, who was found
about 100 yards into the bushes,
was bound by the hands with
doth and suffered trauma to the
face, according to Inspector
Christopher Wright of the
homicide squad at the Central
Detective Unit.
His brother, who was not
named by authorities, reported
to police at Carmichael Road
Police Station at around 10pm
Thursday that he had not seen
Mr Reinard for 24 hours.
The brother and another rel-
ative, who was also not named
by police, returned to Victoria
Gardens where the victim was
last seen, and yesterday discov-
ered his body after an extensive


as chair, and his intention to
consult with the union on rele-
vant issues pertaining to the pri-
vatisation process.
However, after Julian Fran-
cis, executive chairman at BTC,
released names of the members
of the committee on March 18,
Mr Farquharson noted, no
union member was on it.
The only response the union
received, he said, was that this
was a decision of the govern-
ment. In a letter to Mr Laing, on
March 25, added Mr Farquhar-
son, they raised this issue with
the minister, but to date had
received no written response
from him.
Both the FNM government in
1998 and the PLP in 2002
allowed the union to be a part of
all segments of the privatis: 'on
process, said the BCPOU leader.
The decision at this stage, he
said, to exclude his group leads
them to "conclude that the gov-


search.
Mr Reinard was said to have
been visiting relatives in the
area when he was last seen on
Wednesday.
This is what led the two men
to search the area, police report-
ed.
While the victim was in Nas-
sau, he lived with his brother in
the East Street South area.
Insp Wright said police have
no motive in this crime, but they
are now appealing for informa-
tion regarding Mr Reinard's
death.
Police were unable to con-
firm yesterday what caused Mr
Reinard's death. At this stage of
:the investigation, said Insp
SWright, police are also unable
to say how long the body was in
the bushes.


BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL


Sunday School: 10am
Preaching 11am & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday 6pm ZNS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm


FUNDAMENTAL
EVANGELISTIC

Pastor:H. Mills


"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are"
Pastor: H. Mills Phone: 393-0563 Box N-3622


LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &
:Pr- Geared To The Future

Worship time: llam & 7pm' '
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:


ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.OBox EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL lynnk@batelnet.bs









Worship Time: Ila.m. & 7p.m.
S Prayer Time: 10:15a.m. to 10:45a.m.
Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Special Event
Spring Tea
April 26, 4-6p.m.

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O.Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587
COME TO WORSHIP LEAVE TO SER 'E


ernment of the Bahamas has
changed its policy of inclusion
of stakeholders and moved away
from the position of trans-
parency and openness in deci-
sion-making."
Contacted by The Tribune
yesterday, Mr Laing rejected
the suggestion that he had been
unwilling to talk with the union.
He said that he takes Mr Far-
quharson's calls and the union
was informed that they will be
on one of two committees the
government decided to create
regarding BTC's privatization.
The first committee, of which
Mr Donaldson is chairman, is
charged with negotiating with
Bluewater Communications
regarding the proposal that was
on the table when the FNM
came to office.
The government and Bluewa-
ter are still in exclusive negotia-
tions over the sale of a 49 per
cent stake in the telecommuni-


Extradition criticized


Dwight and Keva Major today,
it will be someone else tomor-
row".
In 2006, former Foreign
Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell
signed a warrant of surrender
authorising the couple's extra-
dition. On Thursday, Chief Jus-
tice Sir Burton Hall refused an
application for leave to amend a


review of the lawfulness of the
former minister's actions. Sir
Burton had also previously
determined that other pending
criminal matters did not pro-
hibit their extradition.
When asked what form of
recourse the couple, or any oth-
er Bahamian who believes they
have been extradited unjustly
had, Mr Moss recommended fil-
ing suit against the government.
When contacted for comment
on the issue yesterday, Mr
Mitchell said: "I don't comment
on extradition matters.." '
Meanwhile, Minister of For-
eign Affairs Brent Symonette
said: "The court ruled yester-
day (Thursday) in regard to the
Majors' extradition case and the
government has acted appro-
priately to the court order."
Article 25 of the Constitution


cations company.
There is a second advisory
committee, said Mr Laing, that
he will chair he is not on the
first committee which will be
comprised of other Cabinet min-
isters, senior government offi-
cials, private sector partners and
union members.
"Now that advisory committee
is the one that will ultimately set
whatever mandate for the nego-
tiating committee that has to be
set in respect of privatization if
we cannot get to an agreement
with the present proposal or
also, to review the outcome of
the negotiations with Bluewa-
ter's in respect of the present
proposal before that goes to the
government itself," he said.
Mr Farquharson did not say
yesterday what response his
union will have if they are not
included in all parts of the
process.

says in part: "Except with his
consent, no person shall be hin-
dered in the enjoyment of his
freedom of movement, and for
the purposes of this Article the
said freedom means the right
to move freely throughout The
Bahamas, the right to reside in
any part thereof, the right to
enter The Bahamas, the right
to leave The Bahamas and
immunity from expulsion
therefrom.
"Nothing contained in or
done under the authority of any
law shall be held to be inconsis-
tent with or in contravention of
this Article to the extent that
the law in question makes pro-
vision- (b) for the removal of
a person from The Bahamas to
be tried outside The Bahamas
for a criminal offence or to
undergo imprisonment in some
other country in respect of a
criminal offence of which he
has been convicted."


Woman dies in



traffic accident


FROM page one

fled after the female, who was
able to escape, police said.
The officer was taken to hos-
pital where he is in serious con-
dition, ASP Evans said.
Police also reported a traffic
fatality in Eleuthera. I
According to ASP Evans, a
female driver of a Chevy Trail-
blazer lost control of her vehicle
while travelling along Queen's
Highway, near Deep Creek,
Eleuthera, around lam yester-
day and ran off the road.


Her body was partially eject-
ed through the windshield and
she was pronounced dead at the
local clinic, police-said.'' '
She has been identified as 34-
year-old Kenyatta Thompson.
The fatality is the second on
the island within a week.
Taxi-driver Benjamin 'Ben'
Delancy, 67, of Hatchet Bay,
was killed when he swerved
away from an oncoming car
shortly after dropping off a pas-
senger.
He was thrown from his cab
on to the road and died instant-
ly.


Union wants BTC privatization seat


Police appeal for


murder witnesses


The Madeira Shopping
Center
(Next door to CIBC)


Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles


Is It time for
SDDa, Ne, a fresh start?


SUNDAY SERVICES
.u .' ,'- ..':.1 :r',C. '.i e e 2, i rr.


-,.. "C < r.i J . 3 -
i IC 'r I T .


WEDNESDAY at 7 30 p.m.
a. -.':;. -E [ r,,r. ~
ro ,T i r.' -l -,o i,:, C It I i, ,.
r '.,-;,:.,e ri ., i,":,,' *: '.u .l a i,-. ;

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.


RADIO MINISTRY
.Lr 3' : .'.' ,? 7 S I i~!, 1L llr.'-

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE
Assembly Of God


PAGE 6, SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2008


THE TRIBUNE









T T UA D A L, 8A
* A~i


Losing sight of





t fg on te ral gam




Not focusing on the real game


Recent calls inviting Barbados and Trinidad
and Tobago to join the Organisation of
Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) are
akin'to a batsman losing sight out of the ball in a


crucial cricket match.
The objective of the game of
regionalisation, which the 15-
member Caribbean Communi-
ty and Common Market
(CARICOM) is playing,
should be to strengthen the
group as a whole, not weaken
it.
Yet, if this invitation is pur-
sued, its consequence would be
to weaken CARICOM without
bringing any greater benefit to
the OECS.
The first of these two calls
came from the Prime Minister
of St Lucia, Mr Stephenson
King. It was then reportedly
echoed by the Director Gener-
al of the OECS, Dr Len Ish-
mael, presumably in response
to a question from a journalist.
Prime Minister King's call
was the second of two respons-
es to an unexpected announce-
ment by the prime ministers of
Trinidad and Tobago and St
Vincent and the Grenadines
that their governments are
contemplating the formation of
a political union of their coun-
tries along with St Lucia and
Grenada.
In his first response, King
rejected the notion of a politi-
cal union of these countries
and rightly talked about the
need to deepen the OECS, a
sub-group of CARICOM,
comprising its seven smaller
member states.
The OECS is already a inore
deeply integrated group than
CARICOM. It enjoys a single
currency, a common central
bank, a common judiciary and
a host of areas of functional co-
operation.
Additionally, a proposal for
an Economic Union of the
OECS is on the table of discus-
sion, even though it has not.yet
been agreed.
As Prime Minister King
acknowledged, at the time, it
makes far more sense for the
three members of the OECS -
Grenada, St Lucia and St Vin-
cent and the Grenadines to
pursue a deeper relationship
with the other four members,
than for three to splinter off
into a political union with
Trinidad and Tobago.
In any political union


between the three OECS coun-
tries and Trinidad and Tobago,
Trinidad and Tobago would
become the dominant entity in
the group and would also have
to assume many of the conse-
quential burdens alone. There
would be no help for Trinidad'
and Tobago from the other
larger CARICOM countries,
Jamaica, Guyana, Barbados
and Suriname.
It would be interesting to
test, in a referendum, the reac-
tion of the people of Trinidad
and Tobago to such a scenario.
By the same token, the
OECS would disintegrate at



"It would be
interesting
to test, in a
referendum,
the reaction of
the people of
Trinidad and
Tobago to such
a scenario.




least in its present form. The
remaining four countries -
Antigua and Barbuda, St Kitts-
Nevis, Dominica and Montser-
rat would be right to contin-
ue to cling together, but they
would be weakened by the
departure of the other three.
Fortunately, it is most
unlikely that the governments
of Barbados and Trinidad and
Tobago would respond
favourably to the invitation to
them to join the OECS.
There is no benefit to these
two countries in joining anoth-
er "association of sovereign
states" within the CARICOM
grouping. Indeed, it would sim-
ply add yet another layer of
government and costs to their
decision-making apparatus.


For, in addition to CARICOM,
they would also be paying for
membership of the OECS.
If what were being contem-
plated by the invitation to Bar-
bados and Trinidad and Toba-
go was a political union of
these countries with one cen-
tral government, one central
bank, a common currency and
free movement of labour, capi-
tal and services, then the invi-
tation would make sense.
The OECS would disappear,
and CARICOM would have
seven members instead of 15.
The single country of what is
now the OECS states, Trinidad
and Tobago and Barbados,
would be a strong unit along
with The Bahamas, Belize,
Jamaica, Guyana, Haiti and
Suriname. Over time, if the
political union of the OECS,
Barbados and Trinidad and
Tobago is seen to work, others
might join eventually leading
to a political union of all.
I recognize that Jamaica
would probably be the last
country to join given the histo-
ry of reluctant bride in the
Caribbean marriage. But, if the
bridegroom becomes interest-
ing enough and his standing
and prospects are sound
enough, even the most reluc-
tant of brides might overcome
her predispositions.
But, all of this is in the realm
of speculation and wishful
thinking. None of it will hap-
pen because there is no seri-
ous, all-inclusive discussion
within CARICOM of the
future governance of the
grouping. And, by this, I do
not restrict the absence of seri-
ous discussion to governments
- it is also not happening in the
private sector organizations, in
the trade union movement and
or even in theatres of
Caribbean universities.
Given the absence of a
meaningful discussion on gov-
ernance of the region, the
member states of CARICOM
(which includes the members
of the OECS) ought to be
focusing their energies now on
completing the arrangements
for a Single Market and work-
ing toward a Single Economy
by as many of them as is prac-
ticable. For, that is the game
that is being played and that is
the ball that is being bowled.
Countries in the Caribbean
region have been preoccupied
in the last few years with the


Grand Bahama based



legends inducted into



sports hall of fame


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT Some 19 per-
sons will be inducted to the
Grand Bahama Sports Hall of
Fame for their contributions to
12 sporting disciplines here on
the island.
In addition to the original 15
inductees, four persons have
been named as honorary
inductees: Lucaya MP Neko
Grant, the Minister of Tourism;
Greg Christie, Godfrey "Gully"
Pinder, and Churchill "Tener"
Knowles.
Under the theme, "Legends
of Sports," the 19 inductees will
be honoured at an official induc-
tion ceremony on May 17 at the
Westin at Our Lucaya Resort.
This event is being held in con-
junction with the Grand Bahama
Sports Council and the City of
Freeport Council.
According to local government
officials, representatives of vari-
ous sporting associations and the
public were invited to submit
candidates for nomination.
Council member Harold
Williams said that after a careful
review by the Sports Hall of
Fame Committee, the names of
the selected nominees were then
sent to the Sports Hall of Fame


Commission for ratification.
The 2008 inductees are:

Derrick "Bookie" Nesbitt
and Coach Gladstone "Moon"
McPhee basketball
Pat Ingraham baseball
Varnette Laing softball
Coach Bert Bell swimming
Basil Neymour and Rickey
Moxey track and field
Josey Seide soccer
Gary Davis and coach Ter-
ence "Terry" Goldsmith boxing
Dwight Palacious body-
building
Rozena Russell-Nesbitt -
volleyball
Keith Major cycling
Wellington "Doc" Stewart -
golf
Rodger Smith tennis
Nominations and inductions
into the Grand Bahama Sports
Hall of Fame are held every two
years.
Mr Williams said this year was
very challenging in terms of get-
ting nominations.
"In the beginning we tried to
invite as many of sporting asso-
ciations to meetings and we
found we were not getting the
kind of attendance we needed,
and so we delay the deadline
from April 4 to the 14.
"It was crucial for us to go the
press and make an appeal to


members of sporting associations
and the public to become a part
of the process," he said.
Mr Williams said it is very
important to honour athletes and
persons who have made signifi-
cant contributions to sports.
"We wanted to make sure that
we had afforded every opportu-
nity for those persons who
deserve to be inducted to the GB
Sports Hall of Fame.
"It is important for us to note
that over the years we have lost
records and statistics of those
who contributed to sports, and
it is very difficult to access those
records and so we had to rely on
the memory of elder statesmen
to give us information so we
could make the most fairest deci-
sion in selecting these individu-
als," he said.
Island Administrator Alexan-
der Williams said Bahamians
must demonstrate greater pride
and respect for Bahamian ath-
letes who have done so much to
advance sports in communities.
"It is appalling that interna-
tional audiences have recognized
our athletes before we do so as a
people," he said.
Mr Williams said persons may
view the past inductees from
2005 and their profiles on the
council's website: freeportcoun-
cil.com by accessing the link enti-
tled 'GB Sports Hall of Fame'.


loss of preferences in tradi-
tional markets for agricultural
production particularly. Some
of them have also been agitat-
ed about the threats to their
services industries, especially
financial services.
Daily these challenges grow
in ways that strongly indicate
that small states will not be
able to cope with them indi-
vidually. In this connection,
the world is entering an era of
global companies whose tenta-
cles will reach far beyond even
the current multi-national
companies. It is not wildly
imaginative to suggest that
their inter-company transac-
tions will determine a large
percentage of world trade,
pricing and supply in ways
that will affect the capacity of
elected governments to
respond.
For all these reasons, now is
the time for the region, as a
whole, to focus its combined
energies on strengthening
CARICOM and the Single
Market not weakening them.

., Responses to;:ronl:d-
sanders29@hotmail.com


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE








ASSISTANT INTERNAL AUDITOR
INTERNAL AUDIT DEPARTMENT

Vacancy exists in the Corporation for an Assistant Internal Auditor in the
Internal Audit Department.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

* Works unsupervised, and attends weekly meeting with the AGM/Chief
Internal Auditor
* Consults with the Internal Auditor or AGM/Chief Internal Auditor to resolve
queries or obtain guidance on audit assignments
* Develops audit programs for conducting audits, from the planning to
reporting stages for approval by the AGM/Chief Internal Auditor
* Conduct financial, operational and ITS audits at Head Office and the Family
Islands Operations
* Provides feedback on Audit Clerks in the preliminary performance evaluation
for them
* Coaches, supervises, and assists in the training of Audit Clerks
* Collects information and updating continuous audit monitors on plants and
Family Island branches and produce regular reports
* Assists, External Auditors in the preparation of work papers for the annual
audit exercise

Job Requirements include:

* Bachelor degree in Accounting or other closely related discipline
* Completion of a professional certification (ACCA, CA, CPA or the CIA)
* Understand Internal Audit Standards and Procedures, and International
Accounting Standards
* Good investigative, interviewing, problem solving and analytical skills
* Excellent written and verbal communication skills
* Knowledge of internal controls, operational audit techniques as well as the
ability to identify and assess risks
* Good knowledge of the Corporation's operating policies, systems and
procedures
* The ability to assess and evaluate the Corporation systems of internal control
* The ability to conduct some risk analysis for major areas within the
Corporation
* The ability to conduct financial, operational and ITS audits and investigations
and exercise strict audit code of ethics (e.g. confidentiality)
* Ability to lead, supervise and training audit clerks
* 3-5 years experience

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to: The Manager Human Resources & Training Department,
Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509
Nassau Bahamas on or before: Thursday May 1st, 2008.


THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS
ISLANDS CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS
% ayi L'EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA
CARAIBE ET LES AMERIQUES NASSAU-d -
CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES
108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432;
Fax: 328-2784; methodistconference@msn.com
REPOSITIONING FOR MIRACLES: ENERGIZING THE
CONFERENCE NOWW
(Nurture Outreach Witness Worship)
"Celebrating 225 years of continuous Methodist
witness for Christ in The Bahamas"
FIFTH LORD'S DAY OF THE RESURRECTION,
APRIL 20, 2008.

COLLECT: Risen Christ, your wounds declare your love
for the world and the wonder of your risen life: give us compassion
and courage to risk ourselves for those we serve, to the glory of
God the Father.

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
7:00 a.m. Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly
(Holy Communion)
11:00 a.m. Sis. Katie Carter
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108
Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts, Jr.
(Holy Communion)
10:00 a.m. Prayer Band
11:00 a.m. Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly
6:30 p.m. Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly
(Holy Communion)
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street,
Fox Hill)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr.
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m. Bro. Arthur Chase
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST
CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field
7:00 a.m. Rev. Dr. Kenneth Huggins (Holy Communion)
9:00 a.m. Bro. Andrew Hunter
METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD (Fire
Trail Rd)
8:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
5:30 p.m. Friday Children's Club
9:00 a.m. Sunday Youth & Young Adults Commission
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop
and other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford
St., Oakes Field) Reception to Primary

PEACE AND JUSTICE CAMPAIGN: All Methodists of
the Conference are urged to pray and to fast for Justice to
prevail in the Methodist Cases and for an end to the upsurge
in violence. The fast begins weekly after the evening meal
on Thursday and ends at noon on Friday. This we proclaim
unswervingly: "My God and My Right."

RADIO PROGRAMS
"Vision" On the Lord's Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; "Great Hymns
of Inspiration" Onthe Lord's Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.;
"Fa.mily Vibes'? ZNS 1,,Tuesday, 7:30 p:m:; "To God be the
Ggr'., s 1, TNsda\7T d4y,7 :-.... ..


SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2008, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8. SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2008


L N


In days gone by...


This week
In Days

Gone By

looks back at

moments in the

history of

the Medical

Association of

The Bahamas.


1.JANUARY 29,1981
Lady Sassoon has a corsage
pinned on her by Dr Perry Gomez,
president of the Medical Association
of the Bahamas. Lady Sassoon is
the moving force behind the charity,
the Sir Victor Sassoon Foundation,
which she established in memory of
her late husband.

S2. MARCH 3, 1986
Nurse of the year. Picture shows,
from left, Health Minister Dr Nor-
man Gay, Nurse of the Year June
Moss-Reid, Dr Earle Farrington, Dr
Carol Gay, MBA past president Dr
Percival McNeil and Dr Bernard Not-
tage.

3. MARCH 3,1986
President's Party Shown at the
Medical Ball from left, are: Dr Ejnar F
Gottlieb and Mrs Gottlieb, Mrs
Newry and BMA president Dr
Eugene Newry, Dr Carol Gay and
Health Minister Dr Norman Gay.

4. JANUARY 19,1985
The Medical Association of the
Bahamhas Ball was attended by, from
left: Dr Woheed Khan of the Chil-
dren's Hospital, Washington; Dr


Yvonne Skeffery, Dr Larry Carrol, Dr
Carol Carrol, Health Minister Dr Nor-
man Gay, Dr Carol Chaney and Mr
and Mrs Barry Farrington.

5. MARCH 14, 1988
New commissioner of Police
Bernard K Bonamy (centre) was one
of the many guests attending the
annual banquet of the Medical Asso-
ciation of the Bahamas. Pictured
from left are: Dr Robin Roberts, Mrs
Bonamy, Dr Mark Weech, Mrs Robin
Roberts, Commissioner Bonamy,
Mrs Mark Weech, Dr Hubert Minnis,
Mrs Hubert Minnis and Dr Granville
Bain.

6. JANUARY 28,1982
The head of chemistry at the
Princess Margaret Hospital. Chemi-
cal Pathologist Dr Segismundo
Obregon, was presented with a
plaque by Governor General Sir Ger-
ald Cash at the Medical Ball. From
left Dr BJ Nottage, Dr S Obregon, Sir
Gerald and Dr Perry Gomez.

7. JANUARY 25,1979
Dr Maude Stevenson receives
her plaque from the Medical
Association.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE


Vacancies exist in the Inagua Operations Family Island Division
for Station Diesel Mechanic Mates who might be male or female
between 18 and 35 years of age.


Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the
following:


* Performing switching operations and monitoring systems stability
by recording hourly reading (e.g. pressure, temperature, oil/water
levels etc)
* Cleaning work area and assisting with station landscaping
* Performing systems restorations by diagnosing system shutdowns,
reviewing system stability, reading and liaising with distribution
staff
* Assisting with consumer complaints by answering telephone and
recording such complaints
* Required to do shift wdrk


The Job requirement includes:


* Applicant should be high school graduate
* A minimum of 1-2 years experience or equivalent
* A minimum of five (5) BJC's including English Language and
Mathematics with grade "C" or above


Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an
Application Form to: The Manager Human Resources & Training
Department, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker,
P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: Thursday May
1st, 2008.


ROYAL.- FiA FG CAPITAL AM
B 1 35I ROYAL FIDELITY .OKERAGE ADVISEO

C FAL'"
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 17 APRIL 2008
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1.941.14 I CHG -0.03 1 %CHG 0.00 I YTD -125.61 I YTD% -6.08
FINDEX.: CLOSE 905.20 I YTD% -4.92% I 2007 28.29%
WWW.BISXBAHAMIAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION


MARKETS
rY SERVICES


52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Previous Close Today's Close Change Dally Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
1.94 1.05 Abaco Markets 1.94 1.94 0.00 0.135 0.000 14.3 0.00%
11.80 11.50 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 11.80 0.00 1.502 0.400 7.9 3.39%
9.68 9.00 Bank of Bahamas 9.61 9.61 0.00 0.643 0.160 14.9 2.71%
0.99 0.85 Benchmark 0.99 0.99 0.00 0.188 0.030 5.3 3.03%
3.74 2.40 Bahamas Waste 3.66 3.66 0.00 0.289 0.090 12.7 2.46%
2.70 1.30 Fidelity Bank 2.60 2.60 0.00 0.058 0.040 44.8 1.54%
13.70 1041 Cable Bahamas 13.70 13.70 0.00 1.093 0.240 12.5 1.75%
3.15 2.10 Colina Holdings 2.87 2.87 0.00 1.500 0.091 0.040 31.5 1.39%
8.50 4.75 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 7.22 7.22 0.00 0.428 0.290 16.9 4.02%
7.22 3.60 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.89 4.86 -0.03 0.157 0.052 31.2 1.06%
2.66 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.66 2.66 0.00 0.316 0.040 8.4 1.50%
7.92 5.94 Famguard 7.92 7.92 0.00 0.713 0.280 11.1 3.54%.
13.01 12.49 Finco 12.92 12.92 0.00 0.810 0.570 16.0 4.41%
14.75 13.24 FirstCaribbean 13.24 13.24 0.00 0.651 0.470 20.3 3.55%
6.10 5.05 Focol (S) 5.05 5.05 0.00 0.386 0.140 13.1 2.77%
1.00 '0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.61 0.61 0.00 0.035 0.000 17.4 0.00%
8.00 6.86 ICD Utilities 6.86 6.86 0.00 0.411 0.300 16.7 4.37%
12.50 8.60 J. S. Johnson 12.30 12.30 0.00 1.059 0.620 11.6 5.04%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.167 0.600 8.6 6.00%
F;d-al1ty Over-Tne-Counier Securlles
52wk-HI 52wk-Low S Ib,:l 6.3 I L~atl ...:e .eekl, .ol EB S I Ci. I PE I-la
14.60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarkels 4. l:, 1-5 ,':* t 6 1 i. uI 1- '4 6 C-


6.00
0.20
I 1 CC.
14.00
0.40
,5 w-LOA
1.2443
2.6629
1.2647
3.1827
11.4992
100.0000
100.0000
1.0000
9.6346


Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00
RND Holdings 0.35
Coiir.a Over
LBDA6I 41.00
Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60
RND Holdings 0.45
BISX L
Fu.-.a Na.eo NAV
Colina Bond Fund 1.308126.""
Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.996573""
Colina Money Market Fund 1.387505""*
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.7011 ."
Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.1010"-
CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.00*
CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.00"
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.00"
Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.6346'


6.25 6.00
0.40 0.35
-Tne-Counler Securties
43.00 41.00
15.60 14.00
0.55 0.45
.slea Mluual Funds
YTD% Last I Z.1:.r.1r.
1.25% 5:61%
-0.14% 13.11%
0.90% 3.87%
-2.52% 17.78%
1.40% 5.72%


-8.24%


-8.24%


0..


0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
-0.023 0.000 N/M 0.00%
4.456 2.750 9.0 6.70%
1.160 0.900 13.4 6.16%
-0.023 0.000 N/M 0.00%


0.ei..t


Market Ternms N.A.V, Key
.: *. -. -= r .:. i C : = ,;,;, ,. YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 29 February 2000
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 31 December 2007
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask S Selling price of Colina and fidelity 11 April 2008
Previous Close Previous day's weighted prce for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price *. 31 March 2008
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in losing price from day to day EPS A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol Number of total shares traded today NAV Not Asset Value
DIV S Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1, 1994 = 100
(S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/812007
S ITO TRADE CALL PAL -7Q FlOE 5 G APITA MARKETS 2236 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATN CALL 2423 3
TO TRADE CALL; F.AA- 242-I -79'10 1 FIDELT r'd;.35F-7764 I FG CAM T/tL MARKET== 22326-3400D I FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CALL 242-394-2-503


8.00
0.54
41.OC
14.60
0.55
-A kA.HI
1.3081
3.0008
1.3875
3.7969
12.1010
100.0000
100.0000
1.0000
10.5000





THE TRBN AUDY PI 920,PG


The Tribune
4I Nasau4and BahamaIsands' Leadin pae!


3fobn Tfmt


IF you've got a youthful spirit, with the looks to match, THE TRIBUNE wants
you! Are you oryour Mother, (or someone you know) always celebrated as
looking at least ten years younger than you actually are? If so, THE TRIBUNE
wants to hear from you. We're looking for timeless beauties 50 and over for the
launch Fabulous at Any Age promotion starting this Mother's Day.
There are three categories to enter:

*Body Beautiful: We're looking for women who are in top physical fom'looking
slim, trim and fantastic for their age.
SSilver Foxes: When you walk down the street does every third person stop you
and tell you how fabulous your silver tresses look? Do your friends constantly/ask for i
the secret to your fabulous hair? Then we're looking for you.
* The Athlete: Still playing on the softball team? Never miss a walk/run-a-thon or
marathon? Love to get your heart pumping with an early morning swim?.Stilhitting
the tennis courts with your college-bound grandkids? We want to hear from you. Cut
out the official Fabulous at Any Age application form. Mail or hand deliver-your .
completed application along, with two recent colour photos, four by six or five by
seven inches, one close-up and the other a full-length shot. You may also scan and
e-mail application forms and images to features@tribunemedia.net. Include the
following information in the e-mail or on the back of each photo: age, birth date,
address and phone numbers.
Photos will not be returned.
All entries must be received by May 2nd, 2008. Good luck.
SEE APPLICATION FORM BELOW

"Fabulous at Any Age" The Tribune & 3JoFn Ju

Name: Age: Date of birth:
Address: Phone number Day/Evening and Cell:
1. Tell us what makes you an Ageless Beauty (100 words or less):



2. Beauty secrets: Tell us about your defining feature and how you maintain it (100 words or less):
A. Body Beautiful:



B. Silver Fox:



C. The Athlete:


3. Life Lessons: What important life lessons have you learned that you can share with others who
want to follow your example for a healthy, active, beautiful, "ageless" life (100 words or less):


I _


SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2008, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE











PAGE 10, SATURDAY, APRIL 19,2008 THE TRIBUNE

. -ii -I I II I


a Chakred Accountanb
O)n MonlagueF large
Ihii I loor
Easl Bay Street
P.O. Box N-l431
Na.Wii,. ahama.


* PfIIP. 0:4/I MlVT-hilXH
iFx: .411'4 S 2 4il0-
www.yx'in m


INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT TO THE SHAREHOLDER OF
ANSBACHER (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited and its subsidiaries (the
Bank) and a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory notes.

anagerent's Responsibilty for the Balance Sheet

Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the balance sheet in accordance with International
Finncial Reporting Standards. This responsibility includes: designing, implementing and maintaining internal control
relevant to the preparation and fair presentatior, of a balance sheet that is free from material misstatement, whether due
to fraud or error: selecting and applying appropriate accounting policies; and making accounting estimates that are
reasonable in the circumstances.

Auditors' Responsibh;i.y

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the balance sheet based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance
with International Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and
perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain evidence about the anfounts and disclosures 'n teibalhnce heet: T "''* '"
procedures selected depend on the auditors' judgment, Including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of
the balance sheet, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control
relevant to the entity's preparation and fair presentation of the balance sheet in order to design audit procedures that are
appropriate for the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity's
Internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness
of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the balance sheet.

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

Opinion

In our opinion, the consolidated balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Bank as
of 31 December, 2007 in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.








March 25, 2008
A member lirm of Frnst & Young (lobal I imitMd


Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited
Notes to the consolidated balance sheet
31 December 2007



1. Corporate information

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited and its subsidiaries (the Bank) are incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas. The Bank is licensed under the Banks & Trust Companies Regulation Act, Chapter 287, 2000 to carry on
banking and trust business. The Bank's principal activities comprise: private and specialist banking; wealth protection
and management; and fiduciary services. The registered.office of the Bank is located at Ansbacher House, Bank Lane.
P. O. Box N-7768, Nassau, Bahamas.

The consolidated balance sheet of the Bank as of December 31, 2007 was authorized for issue by the board of the
directors on March 25, 2008.

The Bank's ultimate holding company is Qatar National Bank SAQ, which is incorporated in Qatar. The immediate
holding company is Ansbacher Overseas Group Limited (the Parent), a company Incorporated in Guernsey. The
smallest higher group in which the consolidated balance sheet of the Bank is consolidated is headed by QNB
International Holdings Limited sart, a company incorporated in Luxembourg.

The principal accounting policies adopted by the Bank are set out in note 2.


2. Summary of SignificantAccounting Policies ....

Statement of compliance
The consolidated balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards
(IFRS).

Basis of preparation
The balance shee, has been prepared under the historical cost convention as modified by the inclusion of certain
,financial instruments at fair valuation. The balance sheet is presented in US Dollars, which is the Bank's functional
.currency, and allvalues are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars (5000) except when otherwise indicated.

Basis of consolidation
The consolidated balance sheet includes the balance sheets of the Bank and its subsidiaries. Subsidiaries are
consolidated from the date of their acquisition, being the date on which the Bank obtains control, and continue to be
consolidated until the date that such control ceases. Control comprises the power to govern the financial and operating
policies of the invested so as to obtain benefit from its activities and is achieved through direct or indirect ownership
of voting rights. The balance sheets of subsidiaries are prepared for the same reporting year as the Bank, using
consistent accounting policies.

All intra-group balances are eliminated in full.

Listed below are the names of the wholly-owned subsidiary undertakings of the Bank at 31 December 2007.


Ark Limited
Baird Limited
Bitmore Limited
Boyne Limited
Chester Asset Holdings
Dunmore Properties Limited

3. Due from banks


Repayable on demand
Other deposits with fixed maturities


Country of
Incorporation/continuotion

Bahamas
British Virgin Islands / Bahamas
Bahamas
British Virgin Islands / Bahamas
British Virgin Islands / Bahamas
British Virgin Islands / Bahamas


Principal activities


Trustee and nominee services
Nominee services
Trustee and nominee services
Nominee services
Custodian services
Custodian services


31 December
2007
5000

$ 43,038
225,048

$ 268,086


The above amounts include:
Due from parent and fellow subsidiary undertakings


31 December
2006
5000

46.597
!2.487

$ k59,084


S 212,929 183.452


4. Loans and advances to customers


31 December 31 December
2007 2006
S5000 5000
-. ...... .. Residential mortgages *.. .... ....... 4 6.. ...... 9
Asset backed loans 17,390 18,080
Other 6,834 6.382
Gross loans and advances 87,065 74,431

Less: Allowance for impairment losses (50) (70)

Total loans and advances to customers 5 87,015 S 74,361



31 December 31 December
2007 2006
S000 $000
Concentration of credit risk
Property and real estate $ 62,841 $ 49,969
Other 24,224 24,462
87,065 74,431
Less: allowance for impairment/provisions (50) 170)
S 87,0(5 $ 74,361

31 December 31 December
2007 2006
Sooo $000


Geographical concentration of risk
North America
Bahamas
Europe
Other Countries


$ 41,599 $ 27.009
22,369 26,202
13,790 16,627
9,347 4,523
S 87,015 $ 74,361


The fair value of collateral that the Bank holds relating to loans Individually determined to be impaired at December
31, 2007 amounts to $2,600 (2006 $2,800).

5. Financial investment


Movement in available-for-sale financial Investments

1 January
Disposals (iale and redemption)
Impairment
At 31 December


S 2.004 $ 12,903
(1,999) (10,780)
(119)
S 5 5 2,004


The Bond held by the SaC. matured on I February 2007. The Bank codected the face value of the Bond. The
remaining investment, shares in the Bahamas Internat:Cial Stock Ex;..nige I(lSX) was written down o its fair value in
2006.


6. Property and equipment


remhold
ad
itesehold
eprovnsets
SOOO


Cost:
At 1 Jauary 2006
Additions
Disposals
At 31 December 2006
Additions
At 31 December 2007
Depreciation:
At 1 January 2006
Depreciation charge for the year
Disposals and reclassifications
At 31 December 2006
Depreciation charge for the year
At 31 December 2007
Nt book value at 31 Deceber 2007
Mt book value at 31Decmber 2006


FIxtutes,
office
equmMnt a

Sam


$ 1.317 $ 3,421 $ 4,738
11 163 174
(19) p19
1.328 3,565 4.893
88 175 263
1,416 3,740 5,156

964 2,625 3,589
132 267 399
HI) (11)
1,096 2,81 3,977
124 210 334

1,220 3.091 4,311
$ 19% 649 $ 845
S 232 S 64 916


7. ntagible assets

Intangble assets are comnpnsed entirely of computer software.

.*. M, Ii 4 ,,.. .' Si.lw. . l;itOi,*i> *'.' ' i' fn*,*i*. 'roR'-"*9' 7 4


Cost;
At 1January 2006
Additions
At 31 December 2006
Additions
At 31 December 2007
Amortuation:
At 1January 2006
Am.rttzation charge for the year
At 31 December 2006
Amortization charge for the year
At 31 Dcember2007
Net boo value at 31 December 2007
Net book value at 31 December 2006


$ 1,277
9
1,286
9-
11295

1,198
74
1,272
7

1,279
5 16
$ 14


6. Other Assts


Interest receivable
Prepaynents and accrued income
Sundry receivables


The amounts include:
Due from parent and fellow subsidiary undertaking


9. Customer depot


Current accounts
Saving accounts
Time deposits


J1 DeOember JI3December
2007 2006
soo ~soow

$ 556 S 457
,1,547 1,596
849 303
$ 2,951 $ 2,356

$ 501 5





1f December Jl Dcember
2007 2006
$000 so0

$ 6,SOS $ 64,613
245 165
280,962 254,414
$ 337,712 S 319,192


S* 10. Other llabHUie


31 December 3 ODecember
2007 2006
so0 $000
Interest payable $ 932 S 825
Accruals ano deferred income 1,46 1.310
Acounuts and fees .Pa,.* .*-,. .,b ***aneri .. esaus 5 a' ,w *,, *.
St'm rP~yP) s' ) 52 35
Other provisions 220

S 3,812 $ 4,064
Due to parent and fellow subsidiary undertaking 32 S 33

The other provision related to certain legal actions for which the Bank considered there to be a possible financial
impact. Significant accounting judgements and estimates have been made due to the uncertainty and timing of any
future cash flows associated with this litigation.


*11. Subordnated liabiities

On 10 November 2004, the Bak entered into a subordinated loan agreement with its Parent. The Loan is denominated
in US dollars, due in 2013 and accrues interest at a rate of LIBOR plus 0.9%. The loan Is unsecured and claims in
respect of it are subordinated to the claims of all other creditors. The balance of the loan at December 31, 2007 was
53.632 (2006: $3.632). Accrued interest related to the loan at December 31. 2007 was $31 (2006 $33).


1i. Called up share capital

3f December 31 December
2007 2006
$000 5000


Authonsed, issued and filly paid:
1,000 Class A ordinary shares of 550 each (2006:1,000 shares)
59,000 Class B ordinary shares of $50 each (2006: 59,000 shares)


S so $ 50
2,950 2,950
$ 3,000 S 3,000


The Class A shares carry all of the voting rights n the Bank. Both classes of shares carry equal rights to participate in
dividends.

13. Share premium

Share premium represents proceeds received for equity sha capital in excess of the nominal value per $50 ordinary
shares.

if aTer '3l Oecember
2007 2006
Sooo Sm


Share premium account:
40,000 Class B ordinary shares of $25 ach


$ 1,000 S 1,000


Share premium may be converted to ordinary shares of the class for which the premium was paid by means of a special
resolution of the Board f Directors. Upon converlon. share premium shall have the same rights and privileges of the
relevant class of ordinary shares.

14. Contingent liabilites and commitments

At the balance sheet date,/the contract amounts and risk weighted amounts or replacement costs of contingent
liabilities and commitments were:

c....***..*.*... e. -.-esa***.****a*** a a*eauhiae. **%*******l **..o. . win**D u bda e"> ..w e.*-*,....e C** '***
31 December 31 Decmber
2007 2006
contract contract
amnist mount
o$000 Sa

Contineont liabilities:
Guaraitees and irrevocable letters of
crec.-r ... .


Commitments:
Undrawn format facilities, credit lines id
other commitments to lend
one year and over
less than one year


S 1.539 S 2,003
__-.. 16,909 15,828
$ 18,448 $ 17,831


The Bank is a party to certain financial instruments with off-balance sheet risk, in the normal course of business, to
meet the financial needs of customers. These financial instruments include acceptance and guarantees, commitments
to extend lines of credit, and commitments to originate loans and mortgages. Exposure to loss is represented by the
contractual amount of each of the instruments. Where guarantees are issued on behalf of customers, the Ban either
holds collateral against the exposure or has the right of recourse to the customer.


15. Fair valueof financial instrument

Set out below is a comparison by class of the carrying amounts and fair values of the Bank's financial instruments that
are cared in the balance sheet. The table does not include the fair values of non-financial assets and non-financial
liabilities..


Financial assets
Cash and balances with central bank
Due from banks
Loans and advances to customers
Financial vestments available lor-sale
Other assets

Financial liabilities
Customer deposits
Other liabilities
Subordinated liablities
Total unrecognised change unrealised


Carrying

2007
.$ SOOO


Feair
Valu
2007
SOOO


Unreconwd
fain/(lou)
2007
s$00


131 131
268.086 268,151
87,015 87,427
5 5
2.535 2.535


337.712 117,824 112
.1.812 3.t12
3.632 3,663 31


Carrying
voaur
2006
S000


Fair Unreconised
value goiW(aossl
2006 200
s$000 50O


42 42
65 259,084 259,148
412 74,361 74,803
2,004 2.004
2,156 2,156


319,192 319,258 66
3,614 3,614
3,.32 3,666 34


Ir, vue- $ 620

Ihe following describes the methodologies and assumptions used to determine fair values for those fmancul
instruments which are not already recorded at fair alue in the financial statements.


S606


---- --,-.. --.--- ----- -----,----.;;;.n; li.S n~rru f~ laO-- 'a.


I ERNST& YOUNG













THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2008, PAGE 11


Assets for which fair value approximates carrying value
For financial assets and financial liabilities that are liquid or having a short term maturity (less than three months) it is
assumed that the carrying amounts approximate to their fair value. This assumption is also applied to demand deposits
and variable rate financial instruments.

Fixed rate financial Instruments
The fair value of fixed rate financial assets and financial liabilities carried at amortised cost are estimated by
comparing market interest rates when they were first recognized with current market rates offered for similar financial
instruments. The estimated fair value of f*xed interest bearing deposits is based on discounted cash flows using
prevailing money market rates for debts with similar credit risk and maturity.


S16. Maturity analysis of assets and liabilities

The table below shows an analysis of assets and liabilities analysed according to when they are expected to be
recovered or settled.


*Assets
Cash and balances with
central bank
Due from banks
Loans and advances to
customers
SFinancialinvestments -
available-for-sale
Property and equipment
Intangible assets
Other assets
Total assets
Liabilities
Customer deposits
Other liabilities
Subordinated liabilities
Total liabilities
Net








Assets
Cash and balances with
central banks
Due from banks
Loans and advances to
customers
Financial investments -
available-for-sale
Property and equipment

Intangible assets
Other assets
Total assets
Liabilities
Customer deposits
Other liabilities
Subordinated liabilities
Total liabilities
Net


Less
then
Demand 3 months
2007 2007
S000 $000



S 131 $
43,039' 208,625

810 12,376



952


3-12
months
2007
$000


S -

16,422

5,186


Subtotal
less
than 12
months
2007
$000



$ 131
268,086

18,372


2.952


1-5 Over 5
years years
2007 2007
$000 $000


Subtotal
over
12
months
2007
S000


$ 5 131
268,086

16,638 52,005 68,643 87,015


5 5
845 845
16 16
2,952
S 69.509 S 359.050


S 46.932 5221.001 21,608 $289,541 $ 16,638 $ 52,871


S 56,750 $247,466 $ 33,496 5 337,71,2 $ S S 337,712
3,812 3,812 3,812
S3,632 3632 3,632
.... 562 247,466 33,496 341,524 632L_ 3632 345,156
S (13,630) 5(26,465) $(11,888) 5(51,983) S16,638 S 49,239 565,877 $ 13,894

Subtotal Subtotal
Less less over
then 3-12 than 12 1-5 Over 5 12
Demand months months months years years months Total
2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006
Sooo S000 $000 $000. $000 $000 $000 $000



S 43 S S 43 $ $ .. $ S 43
46,357 198,598 14,129 259,084 259,084

1,287 2,983 11,110 15,380 12,1181 46,800 58,981 74,361

1,999 0 1,999 5 5 2,004
S. 916 916 916
14 14 14
2,356 2,356 2,356
S 50,043 5203,580 $ 25,239 $278,862 $12,181 547,735 $ 59,916 5338,778

$ 64,777 $237,720 5 16,671 5319,168 S 24 S 24 $319,192
4,064 4,064 4.064
S3,632 3,632 3,632
68,841 237,720 16,671 323,232 24 3,632 3.656 326,888
$ (18,798) $(34,140) $ 8,568 $(44,370) $12,157 544,103 556,260 $11,890


17. Risk Management

A summary of the Bank's classification of its assets is shown below:


SNote


Classification of financial instruments

Assets
Cash and balances with central banks
Due from banks
Loans and advances to customers
Financial Investments Available-for'sale .
Property and equipment
Intangible assets
Other assets
'-Total on balance shiet

Contingent liabilities
Commitments
Total off balance sheet
Total


3
4
.5
6
" 7
8



19
1


Loans/
receivables
2007
SooO


Available
for
sale
2007
$000


" $ 130 S
268,086
87,015


Non-
financial
Assets
2007
S00o


S$ S 1 S 131
268,086
87,015
S- 5
845 845
1 16


2,535 417 2,952
357,766 5 1,279 359,050

S 1 1 0 . . 1 1 0
18,448 ,- .. ... .. 18,448
18,558- -. -' -- 18,558
$ 376,324 $ 5 $ 1,279 5377,608

Total non-financial Instrument S 1.279

Total financial instruments $376,329


Loons/
Receivables
2006
$o000


Classification of financial instruments

Assets
Cash and balances with central banks
Due from banks
Loans and advances to customers
Financial investments Available-for-sale
Property and equipment
Intangible assets
Other assets
Total on balance sheet

Contingent liabilities
Commitments
Total off balance sheet
Total


Available Non-
'for financial
sale i Assets
2006 2006
S000 000


5 42 $ 1 S 43
3 259,084 259,084
4 74,361 74,361
5 2,004 2,004
6 930 930
7 14 14
8 2,156 200 2,356
$ 335,643 S 2,004 1,131 $338,778

19 $ 80 S $ 5$ 80
19 11,831 17,831
17,911 17,911
$ 353,554 52,004 5 1,131 $356,689
Total non-financial instruments 1,131


Total financial instruments 5355,558

Risk is inherent in the Bank's activities but It is managed through a process of ongoing identification, measurement and
monitoring, subject to risk limits and other controls. The Bank is exposed to credit risk. iquldity risk and market risk.
It is also subject to operating risks. The independent risk control process does not include business risks such as
changes in the environment, technology and industry. They are monitored through the Bank strategic planning process.

Liquidity risk management
Liquidity risk is the risk that the Bank is unable to meet its payment obligations when they fall due and to repla
when they are withdrawn, the consequence of which may be the failure to meet obligations to repay depositors and
fulfil commitments to lend.

Liquidity'management within the Bank has two principle strands. The first is day-to-day funding, managed by
monitonng future cash flows to ensure that requirements can be met. This includes replenishment of funds as they
rpature or.is borrowed, by customers. The second i.Aaccess.to Intra-group funding from. Ansbacher & Co. Ltd., London
and from QNB.

Analysis of financial liabilities by remaining contractual maturities

The table below summarizes the maturity profile of the Bank's financial liabilities based on contractual discounted
repayment obligatiorfs. See note 21 "Maturity of assets and liabilities" for the expected maturities of these liabilities.


On Less then 3 -12 -5 Over
demand 3 months months years 5 years
$000 $000 $000 $000 $000


Financial liabilities

As at 31 December 2007 .

Customer deposits
Other liabilities
Subordinated liabilities
Total undiscounted financial
liabilities 2007







Financial liabilities

As at 31 December 2006

Customer deposits
Other liabilities
Subordinated liabilities
Total undiscounted financial
liabilities 2006


$ 56,750
3,812


S 247,466 $ 33,496 5


S S 337,712
S 3,812


S3,632 3,632

$ 60,562 $ 247,466 $ 33,496 $ $ 3,632 $345,156



On Less then 3-12 1 -5 Over
demand 3 months months years 5 years Total
S000 S000 S0 $S000 S$000 Sooo




$ 64,777 5 237,720 $ 16,671 5 24 $ 319,192
2,083 2,083
3,632 3,632

$ 68,392 $ 23/,720 $ 16,671 $ 24 $ 3,632 $326,439


Weighted
25 basis gap
Pt position
X 000


As at 31 December 2007

GBP
0 1 month
I -3, months
0 3 months
3 6 months
6 12 months


Limits
000




25
17
17
17


n ,.. -~- 4.. ''1'rrl.. ,vxn.:taw~'.t. ,,.'.-' as ..i*.,,+.-.a'r ert. 5,- ".L. L b r54.4I.,L'f .5 ''. -'"-C--.


As at 31 December 2007

USD
0 1 month
1 3 months
0 3 months
1 6 months
6 12 months





As at 31 December 2007

EUR
0 1 month
I months
0 1 months
3 6 months
6 12 months


Interest rate risk (continued)





As at 29 December 2006

GBP
0 1 month
1 3 months
0 3 months
3 6 months
6- 12 months





As at 29 December 2006

USD
0 1 month
1 3 months
0 3 months
3 6 months
6 12 months





. As at 29 December 2006

EUR
0 1 month
1 3 months
0 3 months
3 6 months
6 12 months


weighted
25 basis Op
Pt position
% $000


Weighted
25 basis gap
Pt position
X 4000


25 basis
Pt
%


Weighted
gap
position
000



0
0
0
*0


Weighted
25 basis gap
Pt position
x $000



0.01 40.9)
0.04 4
0.05 .05
0.09 41.8)
0.18 3

Weighted
25 basis gap
,Pt position
X (000


0.01
0.04
0.05
0.09
0.18


Limits
$000



17
50
33
33
33



Limits.
O000



11
34
23
23
23


Room
$000



16
46
31
29
33



Room
(000



11
34
23
23
23


Limits
000



a
23
17
17
17



Limits
$000



16
44
32
32
32



Limits
c000


(0.21 12
1 34
0 25
0 24
0 25


The above modified duration calculations have been developed internally to quantify the IRR to the Bank's net Interest
income. The modified duration calculation is applied to each gap to convert the gap to a monetary value, using 25
basis point standardized shock. Assets are denoted by a positive value and liabilities by a negative value.

Note: The weights applied to the mismatch per time band is as per the 'Principles for the Management and Supervnsson
of interest Rate Risk" consultative document issued by Basel Committee on Banking Supervision in September 2003.
These factors (weights) are based on an assumed parallel 25 basis point shift throughout the time spectrum, and on a
proxy of modified duration of positions situated at the middle of each time-bank and yielding 5%.

Currency risk
Currency risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of
changes In foreign exchange rates.

Foreign exchange risk is controlled via net short open and foreign exchange gap limits. Foreign exchange trading has
not been a core activity of the Bank during the period under review and, in the opinion of the management, the risk
inherent in these limits is considered to be minimal.
Operational risk
Operational risk is the risk that deficiencies In Information systems or internal contols result in unexpected business,
financial and operating losses. The identification and control of these risks is managed by the Bank's Risk Committee.
The Bank's Risk Management Department and the Group's Internal Auditors carry out regular reviews of all operational
areas to ensure operational risks are being properly controlled and reported to the Risk Committee. Contingency plans
are in place to achieve business continuity In the event of serious disruptions to business operations.


18. Operating lease commitments

(a) Operating lease agreement where the Bank is lessee

Future minimum rentals payable on property under non-cancellable operating leases are as follows:


Not later than one year
After one year but not more than five years


S 1 December December
:! . 4. *, ... :*;' b'1 *
.. .... .., ..... ,$000- $000

$ 629 $ 500
944 1,250


$ 1,573 $ 1,750

(b) Operating lease agreement where th.Bank is lessor

Future minimum rentals payable on property urder non-cancellable operating leases are as follows:


Not after than one year
After one year but not more than five years:


3t December F PW nemr
2007 2006
$000 S00

$ 616 $ 597
296 1,070
$ 912 $ 1,667


19. Related party balances

Parties are considered to be related if one party has the ability to control the other party or exercise significant
influence over the other party in making financial or operation decisions, or one other party controls both.

(a) Subsidiaries
Details of the principal subsidiary are shown in Note 2.

(b) Entities with significant influence over the Bank.

The Bank als6 engages in banking activities with entities with significant influence over the Bank,

In aggregate, balances included in the balance sheet are as follows:


Due from banks


Other liabilities
Subordinated debt


20 Capital


$ 212,929 $ 183,452


$ 1,232 $ 1,882
3,632 3,632
: 4,864 S 5,514


The Bank maintains an actively managed capital base to cover risks Inherent in the businei. The adequacy of the
Bank's capital is monitored using, among other measures, the rules and ratios established by the Basel Committee on
Banking Supervision and adopted by the Central Bank of the Bahamas in supervising the Bank.

Capital management
The primary objectives of the Bank's capital management are to ensure that the Bank complies with externally
imposed capital requirements and that the Bank maintains strong credit ratings and healthy capital ratios m order to
support its business.

The Bank manages its capital structure and makes adjustments to it in the light of changes In economic conditions and
the risk characteristics of its activities. No changes were made in the objectives, policies and processes from the
, previous years.

A general provision for loan losses is required to meet the Bank's statutory requirements. The general provision is
shown as an appropriation of retained earnings and reflected as part of shareholders' equity. At 31 December, 2007
the statutory loan loss reserve was $810 (2006: $723).

Regulatory capital


Tier 1 capital
hier 2 capital
Total capital

Risk weighted assets

Tier 1 capital ratio
Tier 2 capital ratio


Actual
2007


$ 13,084
4.442


Required
2007
SOOO


Actual
2006
sooo


Required
2006
SOO


$ 11,972 $ 11,167 5 11,363
4.355


$ 17,526 S 11,972 $ 15,522 S 11,363


$ 119,722

11%
4%


5 113,635

105
4%


Regulatory capital consists of Tier 1 capital, which compnses share capital, share premium, retained earmnis including
current year profit/loss. Certain adjustments are made to IFRS-based results and reserves. The other component of
regulatory capital is Tier 2 capital, which includes subordinated long term debt.


Publish yo&ur

CARD OF THANKS or


IN LOVING MEMORY


in OBITUARY SECTION


Every Thursday


Call us today


502-2352 or 502-2354


m -I II .


- ,W ",- .


I ,= 1,.








PAGE 12, SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 2008 THE TRIBUNE






Ambassador hosts reception to




promote US/Bahamas relations


n April 5 and 6, US
Ambassador to the
Bahamas Ned Siegel and
his wife Stephanie hosted
a reception to bring US
federal government and Florida state,
city and county officials, along with US
business persons together with senior
Bahamian government figures and busi-
ness persons.
In his welcome remarks, Ambassador
Siegel noted that the "Bahamian Bash"
brought together government, business
and cultural leaders to enjoy "the best of
the Bahamas." He noted that the gath- cz
ering was indicative of his commitment to
promote deeper partnerships between
the US and the Bahamas. Ambassador 2
Siegel re-affirmed his desire to promote .
people-to-people connections and devel-
op partnerships on many levels.
1. From left: Mrs Diane Siegel, US
Ambassador Ned Siegel; Stephanie
Siegel; Daniel Siegel; Emmy Rossum,
singer/actress and Justin Siegel, son of
Ambassador and Mrs Siegel.
2. From left: Emmy Rossum, a Golden
Globe-nominated American actress and
singer-songwriter. She is most well
known for her leading roles in the films
The Day After Tomorrow, Poseidon and
The Phantom of the Opera; Sir Sean and
Lady Micheline Connery.
3. From left: U.S. Ambassador Ned L.
Siegel; Mrs. Carmen Capo and Mr. Ger-
ardo Capo, Developer, Treasure Cove:
Bimini Bay Resort.
4. From left: U.S. Ambassador Ned L.
Siegel; Mrs. Stephanie Siegel, and Mr.
James Smith, Chairman of CFAL, and
former Minister of State for Finance..
5. From left: Mr. Charles Carterf Vet-
eran Broadcaster and CEO, Carter Mar- -
keting & Island FM 102.9; U.S. Ambas-
sador Ned L. Siegel; and Mrs. Stephanie
Siegel.
6. From left: US Ambassador Ned L.
Siegel; Dr Sonja Lunn; Stephanie Siegel,
and Dr John Lunn.
7. From left: US Ambassador Ned
Siegel; Senator Michelle Sands;
Stephanie Siegel, and Sandy Sands, vice "
president, administration and external
affairs, Bah Mar.
8. From left: Branville McCartney, MP,
Minister of State, Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation; Stephanie Siegel; US
Ambassador Ned Siegel; Lisa McCart-
ney, owner of the Meridian School at
Unicorn Village.
9. From left: US Ambassador Ned
Siegel; Ms Wenche Sten1by; Stephanie
Siegel; Harold Hoffer, owner of Hoffer
and Sons.
10. From Left: U.S. Ambassador Ned
L. Siegel; Mrs. Allison.Maynard, former
Attorney General; Fred Mitchell, M.P.,
and former Minister of Foreign Affairs.
11. From left: U.S. Ambassador Ned
L. Siegel; Senator Claire L. Hepburn,
Attorney General and Mr. Livingstone
Hepburn.
12. From Left: Captain Paul Aranah;
Sir Jeffrey Johnstone; Franklyn G. Fer-
guson, Free Lance Photographer and
Justice of The Peace, and Mr. John
Bethel, President of Bethel Estate.
13. From left: Sidney S. Collie, M.P.,
Minister of Lands and Local Govern-
ment aind U.S. Ambassador Ned L.
Siegel












S -
.,


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,P: ~0


A ~ ad A' 1~g~ 1,3 Pi *~
%4C~u 'rusn ,~



-~~~~ ~e~~~~~~~a b ec


(242) 357-8472


//

P.O. Box N-4659,
Nassau, Bahamas


'I