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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00993
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: April 5, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:00993

Full Text




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BAHAMAS EDITION


Police intervene


after fight at GHS


* By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net
A MAJOR fight between
students at Government High
School escalated to the wider
Yellow Elder community yes-
terday, requiring major police
intervention.
The fight between two
groups of male students report-
edly began at a school dance
at 2pm.
According to a school source
who did not wish to be named,
the brawl led to the entire
school being placed in lock-
down until 3pm.
The fight then reportedly re-
erupted outside of the school
campus in the area known as
"The Gulf". This is the vacant
space next to the school which
houses electrical poles, and
runs parallel to Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway and
into the Yellow Elder commu-
nity.
Officers from The Grove
police station responded to the
fight, said the source. One stu-
dent, The Tribune was told,
was grabbed by officers and
slammed against the respond-
ing police bus.
This, the source said, led to a
skirmish between officers and


students before some students
were taken into custody.
When The Tribune contacted
The Grove station last night,
police said they did not have
any GHS students under arrest
or in custody.
The violence at GHS came
just one day after fighting
broke out at D W Davis Junior
High School.
According to witnesses at D
W Davis, a fight broke out
between two groups of students
and the situation escalated
when they started attacking
each other with rocks.
It was also claimed that oth-
er students and some teachers
ran for cover to avoid injury.
When The Tribune arrived
at the school shortly after 11am
on Thursday, one student -
sporting a bloodied T-shirt with
his head heavily bandaged -
was being led away by a police
officer t6 receive medical treat-
ment.
Three other students were
being escorted to a waiting
police vehicle by3 officers.
Supt Charles Walkine, offi-
cer in-charge of nearby Wulff
Road police station, confirmed
that several students, all under
16, were taken into custody for
questioning. Two students, he
said, sustained minor injuries.


CHIEF Justice Sir Burton Hall ,
said yesterday that it is "'seldom
appropriate" for members of the
Judicial and Legal Serm ices (Cor-
mission to comment on why par-
ticular persons are, or are not,
appointed judges.
According to the country's leading jurist, there is a "mandate of
confidentiality" which governs the Commission.
Yesterday a US embassy official in Nassau was quoted as stating
that he found the move by the Commission to appoint Rubie Not-
tage as a Supreme Court justice "surprising". Mrs Nottage was men-
tioned in the 1984 Commission of Inquiry report into drug-traf-
ficking.
Sir Burton's comments came in a written release issued after The
Tribune sought his response, as the Commission's chairman, to
the embassy official's remarks.
In the release he quoted his own comments, given at the opening
of the 2007 legal year, before stating that he "accordingly, has no
further comment" on the appointment of Mrs Nottage.
In those remarks, he 1uggil sd that if the public fails to trust the
Commission society is in trouble.
"At the risk of appearing elitist, it seems to me that if the pre-
sumption of integrity does not apply to the decisions of the Com-
mission the membership of which, chaired by the Chief Justice,
includes a Justice of Appeal, the chairman of the Public Service
Commission and two counsel and attorneys who have been in
practice for at least ten years this would be symptomatic that, as
a community, we have so serious a fracture in the civil order that the
disintegration of society is just over the horizon."
SEE page eight


THIS WAS the scene in the early hours of yesterday morning as a fire broke out at Strachan's Auto Repairs on Soldier Road. Firefighters were
eventually able to get the blaze under control. SEE PAGE NINE


Govt aiming to recoup unpaid Man found
duties, taxes from Global United shot dead in


* By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
THE government is taking
action to recoup a "StubiIIiil"
amount of unpaid custom duties
and taxes from shipping com-
pany Global United Ltd, Min-
ister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing told The Tri-
bune yesterday.
The company reportedly
owes the government some $7
million in unpaid taxes and
duties, sources told The Tri-
bune.
Minister Laing could not state
the amount the company owes,
but revealed the amount was
"substantial" and the govern-
ment is presently "addressing"
the matter.
"I don't know what their sit-
uation is today, but they have
outstanding payments to the
government. I don't know the


exact amount but it's substan-
tial."
When asked how far back
these lapsed payments date, and
SEE page eight


church yard
* By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net
A MAN was found in the
yard of a church in Redland
Acres, off Soldier Road, early
yesterday morning, shot to
death by a bullet to the head.
Police were called to Out-
reach Evangelic Church just
after midnight after reports that
Preston Cooper, 41, was lying
injured in front of the church.
When EMS personnel
arrived, the man was pro-
nounced dead at the scene.
The man. the ltlh murder
victim in the country this year,
appeared to be in his late 30s
or early 40s. He was dressed in
a black short-sleeved shirt and
SEE page eight


Bus drivers set for '100-day

challenge' to improve service


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
BIG changes are planned for the public trans-
port industry. The Tribune has learned.
Bus drivers are set to participate in a "100-dav
challenge" to improve the service they provide to
justify proposed fare increases and ensure gov-
ernment efforts to ease traffic flow through road
improvements are no in vain.
Furthermore, owners have asked the govern-
ment to ainclid the Road T'raffic Act so that cus-
tomners will no longer pay with cash once onl
board, but ahead of time using a "flash card sys-
lem", thereby reducing the risk of robbery for dri-
vers.


Bus unions and government are working to
produce a list of measurable ways in which they
will improve their service during the challenge
period with the ultimate aim of bettering the
industry as a whole in the long-term.
"'We'll publicise it so the public will know
'Okay, this is what they are promising to do and
this is what you're measuring them against." said
Minister of Works Earl Deveaux yesterday.
The minister in turn told bus drivers and union
executives that the government will sponsor an
amendment to the act to facilitate flash cards at
the "earliest opportunity."
Meanwhile, union executives have indicated
an intntion to replace some of the induslIr's
SEE page eight


i2f~ 4 '.'~...


Two Jamaican
men held after
discovery of
huge drug field
By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff
Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net
TWO Jamaican men are
in police custody after yet
another multi-million dollar
drug field was discovered
in Andros, containing some
3,000 marijuana plants.
The big drug find was
made on Thursday after-
noon by the Drug Enforce-
ment Unit (DEU) in a spe-
cial operation, police
report.
In April, 2007, authori-
ties found what was then
the largest marijuana field
ever discovered in the
Bahamas. The mile and a
half by 200-foot tract con-
tained some 1,060 plants.
In 2007, according to the
International Narcotics
Control Strategy Report,
2008, written by the US
State Department, Bahami-
an authorities and OPBAT
seized 630 kilograms of
cocaine and about 50.5
metric tons of marijuana.
Whereas, in 2006, the US
report noted that 1.6 metric
tons of cocaine was seized
along with 140 metric tons
of marijuana. This number,
in relation to the marijuana
seizures, was ten times Ihe
amount seized in 2005.
For the second consecu-
tive year the US govern-
SEE page eight


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Omar Archer yW


speaks out over



dumping in the



South Beach area


PLP member Omar Archer
has hit out at the "nasty" con-
dition of some areas of the
South Beach constituency.
He said that the unautho-
rised dumping of trash and
derelict vehicles seems to go
on unhindered.
Mr Archer added that while
travelling in South Beach last
week, he was "shocked" to see
metal pipes, air-conditioning
units, metal staircases, glass
bottles and plastic garbage
bags floating in a canal.
"Members of the South
Beach community must not
continue to allow their imme-
diate environment to be treat-
ed as such," Mr Archer said
in a statement. "This poses
serious health and also major
environmental hazards for
many different species of fish
and other sea creatures.
Bahamians actually fish in
these Canals."
He said that while in the
area, he noticed a wrecker
about to dump a half burnt
SUV right alongside the main
South Beach road.
"Where is the pride? What
are we thinking? Why are
some Bahamians so nasty?"
he asked.
Calling the situation "a total
disgrace" Mr Archer noted
that there are no government

TROP;[ ICAL
EXTERM1 1 v INATO.RSt[ .


signs stating that dumping is
prohibited in the area, "only
hand painted signs which were
done by residents."
But according to Mr Archer,
the situation is not entirely the
government's fault.
"We must be more respon-
sible as a people. This shows
me and many people like
myself that we are becoming a


people totally void of pride,"
he said.
"I am calling on the entire
South Beach Community to
partner with (the Department
of) Environmental Health-and
together clean up this filthy
area.
"Together, we must assist
the residents of South Beach
and clean up that community.


One piece of paper at a
time."
He added that with the
exception of Minister of state
for Tourism Branville McCart-
ney and Minister of State
Sports Byron Woodside,
"there are absolutely no Cab-
inet ministers who have dis-
played a hands on approach
to governance."


Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.
Montrose Avenue

Phone:322-1722 Fax: 326-7452


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I It*a5f


Miller's attorney



makes a 'no



case' submission


* By NATARIO McKENZIE .'
AN ATTORNEY represent- '
ing well-known talk show host :
Darold Miller made a "no case" -.
submission yesterday, claiming
the prosecution had not made W -
a case against his client to
require him to lead a defence
against the charge of sexual "
harassment.
Attorney Willie Moss sub-
mitted that there was no evi- A.l'
dence to support the allegation
that the virtual complainant was
sexually harassed and that Mr
Miller should be acquitted.
In Mr Miller's defence, Mr
Moss pointed to what he
claimed were several contradic-
tions in the virtual complainan-
t's testimony.
It is alleged that between Feb- *
ruary 2 and March 22, 2007, Mr
Miller, while holding a position of authority over
the virtual complainant, importuned her for sexual
favours under the promise of her benefiting while
employed at GEMS 105.9 FM.
Mr Moss told the court that his client did not
importune the virtual complainant for anything.
Mr Moss also submitted that there was no evi-
dence to show that Miller had done anything to the
virtual complainant at her place of employment.
Mr Moss also argued that there was no evi-
dence that Mr Miller had made any suggestion to
the virtual complainant to the effect: "If you give
me this, I'll give you that."
Highlighting the testimony of the complainant,
Mr Moss said the woman had stated that the first
incident of sexual harassment had occurred
between February 1 and 2, 2007, in the driveway of
Mr Miller's Millennium Gardens home.
There the woman claimed that Miller had
unzipped his pants and exposed himself to her.
The woman had testified that Miller had reached
towards the back of her neck and pulled her
towards his crotch.
She claimed that Miller told her that he wanted
her "to take his load off him" and that when she
refused his advances Miller had told her that he
was simply testing her and that if she had acceded
to his advances he would not have hired her.
Mr Moss pointed out, however, that at that time
the complainant had already been hired at GEMS.
Mr Moss added that, during cross-examination
by Mr Miller's other attorney Michael Kemp, the
woman had stated that there was no sexual harass-


ment until after she and Mr
Miller had returned from cov-
ering elections in The Turks
and Caicos Islands.
Mr Moss argued that, in light
of this, the acts the woman
claimed happened on February
1, 2007, must be rejected.
Mr Moss told the court that
sexual harassment must be rel-
evant to what took place.
He highlighted another inci-
S'- dent which the virtual com-
plainant claimed had allegedly
taken place at Mr Miller's home'
26- while she was living there.
The woman had told the
court that, while she was falling
asleep in Miller's bedroom,
Miller came in and began
pulling down her pants. The
woman had testified that she
struggled with Miller but he
eventually passed out.
Mr Moss, however, argued that there could not
have been much of a struggle as the woman in
his estimation outweighed Mr Miller by 40
pounds.
Lorna Longley Rolle, prosecuting, said there
was sufficient uncontradictory evidence to show
that the offence of sexual harassment was com-
mitted by Mr Miller and that there was sufficient
evidence to require a defence.
Mrs Rolle submitted that Miller was in a posi-
tion of authority over the complainant and used his
position as chief operating officer at GEMS, where
the complainant worked as a reporter, to impor-
tune her for sexual favours.
Mrs Rolle submitted that the complainant's evi-
dence as a whole showed that Miller had impor-
tuned sexual favours from her.
Mrs Rolle pointed out that Miller made sexual
suggestions to the complainant by telling her that
he was horny, that he wanted her to "take his
load off", "let me have it," "let me eat it," and by
exposing his penis to her.
Mrs Rolle further argued that, according to the
virtual complainant, the news anchor job at GEMS
would have been one of the benefits of sexual
favours.
Mrs Rolle noted that the complainant had tes-
tified how she was taken off the radio station as a
news anchor and that Miller had wanted her to beg
for the job back.
The case, which has been adjourned to May 9, is
being heard before Magistrate Renee McKay at
Court Six, Parliament Street.


I s a n .... ^ .I.Pf,2;2 ,6,7,8,9,,1011,12
Editorial/Letters....................................P4

Sports..........................................P1,2,3,4,5
Com ics ..................................................... P6
Advt................... ............ ........ ......... ........ P7
IWeather..,. ............................................. P8

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKEND EDITION 8 PAGES


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


a4








THE TIBUNESATURAY, ARILL52A08,PAGES


0 In brief

Burns House

group donates to

Ride For Hope
THE Burns House Group
of Companies has
announced that it will join
the growing list of corporate
companies participating in
the Ride For Hope bike-a-
thon on April 5.
Already, the expected
number of riders has almost
doubled over last year, and
organizers Stephen
Holowesko, Susan Larson,
Anne Marie Holowesko
Hall say they are thrilled.
All funds go to the Can-
cer Society of the Bahamas
and the planners say they
are proud to confirm that no
monies raised are spent on
the event's expenses.
They admit that this kind
of planning is hard work,
but gratifying because of the
end results.
A Burns House
spokesperson said: "if we
can help alleviate even a bit
of the trials patients and
loved ones go through when
affected by this disease, then
we have achieved something
great."
Other major sponsors
include: Odyssey Aviation,
Kerzner International,
Bahamas Ferries, the Royal
Bank Of Canada, New
World Aviation, Holowesko
and Company, Holowesko
Realty, Goodfellow Farms
and Bradford Marine.


Local authors

will be signing

at Book Fair
LOCAL authors will be
signing copies of their work
at a Book Fair in Nassau
today.
The fair is being held in
the grounds of Chapter
One Book Store at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas from
11am to 5pm.
The Commonwealth
Writers of the Bahamas will
be taking part with three
authors offering reviews or
excerpts from their books.
They are: Capt Paul
Aranha, author of The
Island Airman; Cynthia
Fowler (Life on the Lumber
Farm) and Lucinda Petsch
(Greed). Vera Chase will
discuss her upcoming book
In Search of Bahamian His-
tory.
Other writers will be at
the fair, which is being
described as a family day.


FNM Monatgu


iTHE FNM Montagu brancnh
will be holding its monthly
meeting on Monday, April 7.
The meeting is set to begin
at 7.30pm and will be held at
the L W Young Junior High
School on Bernard Road.
The guest speaker will be a
representative from the
Department of social services,
who will speak on the issue of
child welfare.
All persons who live in the
Montagu constituency and the:
surrounding areas are invited
to attend.
Montagu MP Loretta But-
ler-Turner will be in atten-
dance.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Detectives confident they will solve



murders of Taylor and McDonald


THE tragic life story of Anna Nicole Smith
will be the subject of a new production to be
staged at London's Royal Opera.
The project is being developed by the co-cre-
ator of the cult musical "Jerry Springer: The
Opera" Richard Thomas and composer Mark-
Anthony Turnage.
Mr Thomas told the UK newspaper The Inde-
pendent that the life of the former Playboy mod-
el and reality television star is ideally suited to be
adapted for an opera.
"It's an incredible story. It's very operatic and
sad. She was quite a smart lady with the tragic
flaw that she could not seem to 'get through life
without a vat of prescription painkillers." he said.
The production, which will be accompanied by
a 90-piece orchestra, will focus on Ms Smith's
life story and end with her death from an acci-
dental drug overdose in 2007 at age 39.
"For me, it ends when she does. It's an Amer-
ican story. I love American culture. Especially
for opera, the stories seem to work on a grander,
more epic scale," Thomas said.
The opera will most likely also focus on Ms
Smith's time in the Bahamas and the death of
her 20-year-old son Daniel Smith at Doctors Hos-
pital in Nassau.
The opera is scheduled to debut at London's
Royal Opera in 2010.
Mr Thomas' last production, the Jerry Springer
musical, is famed for its profanity and its treat-
ment of Judeo-Christian themes. Fringe Christian
groups have labelled the production as blasphe-
mous and led protests at venues where the musi-


DETECTIVES hunting the
killer of two high-profile
homosexuals handbag
designer Harl Taylor and aca-
demic Dr Thaddeus McDon-
ald are confident they will
solve the case.
All they need is the vital
"breakthrough" to match
with their solid forensic evi-
dence, lead investigator ASP
Leon Bethel said yesterday.
His comments came after
Bishop Simeon Hall, of New
Covenant Baptist Church,
had raised concern over the
police's failure to crack the
case.

Stabbed

Taylor, 37, and McDonald,
59, were brutally murdered
at their homes in Nassau last
November one stabbed mul-
tiple times, the other blud-
geoned with a clothing iron.
ASP Bethel said his team
had interviewed close to 100
professional and social asso-
ciates of the two men, but had
yet to produce a suspect.
However, he said he was


p -


confident the killer would be
found and appealed for pub-
lic help in securing the cru-
cial piece of information that
would lead to the culprit.
"We are full-steam ahead
with the investigation," said
ASP Bethel, "There has been
no lull in our inquiries since
day one, but we need to get
this person off the streets."
He said the killings, partic-
ularly in the case of McDon-
ald, were unlikely to have
been premeditated.
"I don't think this is the
work of a psychopath," he
said, "I don't think they were
planned. That is what the
crime scenes told us, espe-
cially the first one (McDon-
ald).
"We know it is someone
very close to Harl Taylor and
Dr McDonald. We are look-
ing at all the associates of
these two men. In some cases,
we have spoken to them two
or three times."
He said investigators had
"good quality" forensic evi-
dence. "Now we need some-
one who has some knowledge
of what went on," he added.
ASP Bethel is also keen to
locate anyone with knowl-
edge of the widely-reported
"birthday cake" incident,
when McDonald is said to
have offered Taylor a piece
of cake at his 59th birthday
party, sparking off a row with
a jealous third person.
Officers would also like
information about the alleged
intimate relationship between
the two men, and anyone else


cal was being shown.
When the show was first broadcast on British
television, the BBC received over 55,000 com-
plaints.
The show ran for 609 performances in Lon-
don from 2003 to 2005. In 2006, the musical was
taken on tour throughout the UK.


who might have been
involved with them.
"We need this break-
through. Once we have that
breakthrough, we would be
well on the way to solving this
matter. We know we are
going to solve it," he said.
The officer said one diffi-
culty was that many men
covertly involved in homo-
sexual activities were reluc-
tant to talk. Known gays were
more co-operative.

Circle

"It is very likely that people
within that circle can tell us
what happened. If they don't
come forward they may be in
a position where the killer
might turn on them. Once
someone has committed an
act like that, they should not
be in society."
McDonald, a senior lectur-
er at the College of the
Bahamas, was discovered
dead at his home in Queen
Street on Novefiber 16 last
year.
Taylor's body was found
two days later at his home,
Mountbatten House, in West
Hill Street.
Several Dominican cater-
ers who were serving at a
wedding reception at Mount-
batten House that weekend
were interviewed, but no
arrests have been made.
Anyone with information
can contact police at: 328-
8477 (Crime Tipsters), 322-
2256 (CDU) and 502-9991.


branch to hold Family plans events in memory of man

meeting Monday who fell into coma after alleged beating


***NOTICE***



In accordance with the Association's Constitution,
Members of MAB are hereby notified that the
Annual General Meeting will be held on:



Date/Time: Thursday, May 8 at 6:00p.m.


Venue:


MAB House, 6th Terrace


Centerville, Nassau, Bahamas


Elections of Officers will take place. In or-
der to vote, all members must be in excellent
financial standings. Members must be seated
promptly at 6:00p.m.

You are encouraged to participate in this
process to ensure the continued growth
and development of our Association.


S. .. ..... / ..


Linelle Haddox,M.D.
President


* By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
FAMILY and friends have
organised a number of events
to keep alive the memory of a
father-of-six who fell into a
coma after allegedly being
beaten by police officers.
Verona Bastian, Desmond
Key's grandmother, said the
first event will be a souse-out
when part of the proceeds will
aid in the care of the six small
children her grandson left
behind.
Key, 26, died in January
after lapsing into a coma
about six months before his
death.
He was reportedly brain-
dead and spent the last few
months of his life at Jackson
Memorial Hospital in Florida
after being transferred from
Princess Margaret Hospital in
Nassau. His family believe his
death is the result of an inci-
dent of alleged police brutali-
ty in 2007.
Desmond was described by
his family as a hard-working
breadwinner who provided for
his children, the last of whom
was born while Desmond was
in the Intensive Care Unit of
PMH last year.
Although family and friends
were prepared for his death,
they are still overcome with
the loss, Ms Bastian told The
Tribune, although prayers and
concern from the public assist-


ed with the grieving process.
"(The family) has been try-
ing. We are not really coping,
we are trying," said Ms Bast-
ian.
"I believe it's only because
of my strong faith in God and
the concerns of the Bahamian
public, and I would like to
thank everyone for their sup-
port and concern."
She said she hoped peace
would prevail at the culmina-
tion of her family's ordeal.
Sheena Dawkins, the moth-
er of Desmond's two eldest


children, said she will always
miss how Desmond was
"always there for (her) chil-
dren" and the "lil' talks and
moments" they shared.
The planned souse-out will
be held this Saturday at 180
Montgomery Avenue, Flamin-
go Gardens.
The event starts at 11am
and donations are $10, Ms
Bastian said.
The family is also planning a
memorial service for
Desmond in the next few
months.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JAMES LOUIS of LUCKY
HEART CORNER OFF EAST ST, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as. a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5th day
of April 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENTTO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, AVERY CHRISTOPHER
WILLIAMS of Alexander Blvd., P.O. Box CR 56365, Nassau,
Bahamas, intend to change my name to AVERY CHRISTOPHER
MOXEY. If there are any objections to this change of name by
Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of the publication of this notice.


~~_i


Harl aylo


Anna Nicole Smith's life


set to get opera treatment
I


-


SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 2008, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


" ~e







PAGE 4, SATURDAY, APIL 5,2008 THE TRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


A not-so-fine romance


IN THE aftermath of the Tibet upheavals,'
the complicated romance between America and
China is degenerating into mutual recrimina-
tions, muttering about Olympic boycotts and
tensions that are likely to rise through the sum-
mer.
It would be convenient if we could simply
denounce the crackdown in Tibet as the unpop-
ular action of a dictatorial government. But it
wasn't. It was the popular action of a dictatorial
government, and many ordinary Chinese think
the government acted too wimpishly, showing
far too much restraint toward "thugs" and "riot-
ers."
China and the United States clash partly
because of competing interests, but mostly
because of competing narratives. To Americans,
Tibet -fits neatly into a framework of human
rights and colonialism. To Chinese, steeped in
education of 150 years of "guochi," or national
humiliations by foreigners, the current episode is
one more effort by imperialistic and conde-
scending foreigners to tear China apart or hold it
back.
So what do we do? A boycott of the Olympic
Games themselves is a nonstarter. House Speak-
er Nancy Pelosi has raised the possibility of a
boycott of the opening ceremony, and that is
plausible.
The best answer is: Postpone the decision until
the last minute so as to extort every last ounce of
good behavior possible out of the Chinese gov-
ernment on Darfur as well as Tibet. But at the
end of the day, if there have been no further
abuses, President Bush should attend for stay-
ing away would only inflame Chinese nationalism
and make Beijing more obdurate.
If Bush attends the ceremonies, however, he
should balance that with a day trip to a Tibetan
area. Such a visit would underscore American
concern, even if the Chinese trot out fake monks
to express fake contentment with fake freedom.
Bush and other Western leaders should also
continue to consult with the Dalai Lama, even
though this infuriates Beijing. The Dalai Lama is
the last, best hope for reaching an agreement
that would resolve the dispute over Tibet foiev-
er. He accepts autonomy, rather than indepen-
dence, and he has the moral authority to per-
suade Tibetans to accept a deal.
The outlines of an agreement would be simple.
The Dalai Lama would return to Tibet as a sir-
itual leader, and Tibetans would be permitted to
possess his picture and revere him, while he
would unequivocally accept Chinese sovereign-
ty. Monasteries would have much greater reli-
gious freedom, and Han Chinese migration to
Tibet would be limited. The Dalai Lama would
also accept that the Tibetan region encompasses


DON STAINTON

PROTECTION

WE SELL OUTER SPACE
TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-8160



ALL ALUMINUM PATIO ROOF OR
SCREENED ROOM


IWE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL!


ALL ALUMINUM CAR PORT
Serving The Bahamian Comn unity Since 1978


only what is now labeled Tibet on the maps, not
the much larger region of historic Tibet that he
has continued to claim.
With such an arrangement, China could
resolve the problem of Tibet, improve its inter-
national image, reassure Taiwan and rectify a
50-year-old policy of repression that has cata-
strophically failed.
But don't hold your breath. Instead, Presi-
dent Hu Jintao who made his reputation by
crushing protests in Tibet in 1989 will make up
for failed policy within Tibet by trying to stir up
Chinese nationalist resentments at nosy for-
eigners.
America and China get on each other's nerves
partly because they are so similar. Both are big,
self-absorbed, and insular nations; both are entre-
preneurial overachievers; both are infused with
nationalism and yet tread clumsily on the nation-
alism of others whether in Vietnam or Iraq, or
Tibet and the Muslim region of Xinjiang.
Both the United States and China also hurt
themselves by petulantly refusing to engage lead-
ers they don't like. The U.S. shrinks from talking
with Iranian and Cuban leaders, and China refus-
es to negotiate directly with the Dalai Lama,
whom it recently denounced as "a jackal wrapped
in a habit, a monster with human face and ani-
mal's heart."
That refusal to talk is stunningly foolish. Near-
ly every Tibetan I've ever spoken to in Tibet,
Qinghai, Sichuan or Gansu has been loyal to the
Dalai Lama except those who think he's too
gentle and accommodating toward China. After
the Dalai Lama dies, there will be no one to
hold Tibetans back, and more militant organizers
in the Tibetan Youth Congress and other orga-
nizations will turn to violence, and perhaps ter-
rorism.
The only other Tibetan who could fill that
vacuum is the Panchen Lama, the No. 2 Tibetan
leader, who turns 19 later this month. But the
Chinese government kidnapped the Panchen
Lama when he was 6 years old and apparently
has kept him under house arrest ever since.
Americans sometimes think'that the Tibetan
resentments are just about political and religious
freedom.
They're much more complicated than that.
Tibetan anger is also fueled by the success of
Han Chinese shop owners, who are often better
educated and more entrepreneurial. So Tibetans
seek solace in monasteries or bars, and the eco-
nomic gap widens and provokes even more frus-
tration which the spotlight of the Olympics
gives them a chance to express.
This article appears courtesy of the
c.2008 New York Times News Service


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ROSELINE DESTAMA OF PEACH
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29TH
day of MARCH, 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


AIR-CONDITIONE
AIR-CONDITIONE



m 'A :- E


Waste disposal



arrangements



are a 'trial and



error 9 operation


EDITOR, The Tribune.
THE landfill update
meeting held in Marsh Har-
bour recently was interest-
ing in many ways, and not
necessarily because the
Minister of Health and his
high powered team con-
ducted it.
Leading up to the meet-
ing by several weeks The
Abaconian published an
editorial and an article on
the new land fill, discussing
purpose, functionality,
effectiveness and public
education surrounding the
operation of this new unit.
In my own words, and
definitely not those of the
minister, it would seem that
our brand new waste dis-
posal arrangements are a
"trial and error" operation
in which the Department of
Environmental Health
(DOEH) will "feel its way"
on the systems operation of
the landfill complex.
The ideas and intentions
behind the new methods of
disposal are certainly sin-
cere, and we all know that
Abaco and its population
need to be more concerned
about waste and its eventu-
al destination. In this I must
commend both the minister
and his team. But exactly
how we are going to
achieve these goals still
seems a little unclear to me.
On the positive side the
residents of Central Pines.
subdivision are now able to
see an end to their plight of
burning garbage fumes and
rotten smells wafting over
their homes and gardens. In-
addition, the rest of us will
no longer be exposed to the
mounds of roadside garbage
leading up to an overflow-
ing dump site on the S C
Bootle Highway. The nat-
ural water table and wet-
land systems of the creeks
behind the dump will no
longer be exposed to addi-
tional toxins and hazardous
waste as this dump closes.
For the new Snake Cay
site:
Garbage haulers will not
be charged a tipping fee for
the first 12 months of the
new site operation.
The operation of the
landfill and transfer stations
will be contracted out, by
the DOEH, to a suitably
qualified private contractor.


RSI AIR-CONDITION R
RSI AIR-CONDITIONERS!
S AIR0ONDII S


tA.I YEAI



6000 o BTU
$2265.d


_1 _-'- 7000BTI


;-"0 4110 BTU
$399.0

^.4w diW-


Local settlement collec-
tions will be maintained by
the various councils, subse-
quently delivered to the
transfer sites by the local
operators. Treasure Cay
will be able to haul directly
to the landfill rather than
follow a rather lengthy 60
mile staggered route, and,
the possibility of an addi-
tional transfer station in
Southern Abaco seems pos-
sible.
In addition, the settle-
ments of the Mud and
Pigeon Peas and Bahama
Palm Shores will receive
council-operated garbage
collection services.
The actual method of
operation of the major
landfill seems elusive; how-
ever, separation of haz-
ardous waste, hard goods,
appliances and domestic
garbage seems in order.
The use of lined pits to pre-
vent leaching into the sur-
rounding environment is a
definite plus. The daily lev-
eling and addition of a soil
layer also seems worthwhile
for the composting activi-
ties of endemic bacteria and
fungi to take place.
The DOEH is also
encouraging weekend gar-
deners to keep their garden
trash at home and compost
it and recycle as organic
matter for their homestead
soils.
But this is where it all
seems to stop.
Other problems are not
accounted for.
No recycling of content is
planned or even allowed
for. This includes aluminum
tins, glass items, domestic
batteries and small elec-
tronic items.
Opening hours are to be
restricted to those posted
at the site, ie closed Sun-
days, public holidays and
Saturday afternoon.
Domestic waste will not
be sorted at either of the
transfer stations or the
main landfill, so any sort-
ing must be done at either
the household or settlement
level. Distance haulage by
local contractors will still
be necessary with the resul-
tant loss of load, mixing of
local hazardous and domes-
tic waste en route, loss of
load in transport and road-
side pollution all being
unmonitored. The concern
for indiscriminate dumping
in the pine forest still exists,
and the lack of understand-
ing at both local and opera-
tional level still exists.
However as the minister
inferred, operations will be
observed over the initial
start-up period, and
changes to the system may
be made as necessary. One
that he might immediately
consider would be night-
time operations of leveling
and layering by landfill
equipment, thus allowing
for seven day a week accep-
tance of waste.
The actual decommis-
sioning of dump sites and
reservations on their future
use as properties and devel-
opments, eg industrial,
commercial, domicile, have
not at present been thought
out.
However, the single most
difficult problem is the pro-
cessing of unsorted domes-
tic waste and the inability
to accept medical waste.
The result of this will be
onsite generation of treated
waste with the potential for
hazardous material content,
whether chemical or bio-
logical.
This out of necessity pre-
sents a challenge for local
councils and their commu-
nities.
Suggestions would
include:


a) Placement of 40-foot
sectioned waste containers
in settlements as demand
requires, and local sorting
of waste by local council
contracts to local private
operators. This followed by
haulage of these containers
to the main landfill site for
processing. This actually
provides for the councils to
establish local household
and commercial regulations
and the licensing of entre-
preneurs to enter into the
privatised recycling busi-
ness. Included could bd
cooking oils, metal, plastic
and glass containers, motoi
oils, batteries and electron-
ic goods. This would result
in encouragement of pre-;
sorting by households to
assist in landfill efficiency
as well as provision for pri,
vate sector development
and incomes. I
b) A separate collection
of all medical waste and the
proper supervision of its
processing.
c) A major publicity and
educational campaign to
encourage the Abaco public
(us) to take full advantage
of the system being offered.
d) The manner of decom-
missioning of the present
dump sites at various loca-
tions over Abaco.
e) Consultation with
DOEH and the public
before final start up.
f) The institution of
deposits on product con-
tainers from batteries to
food and juice items. This
will help in roadside clean
up costs as well as encour-
age proper disposal of haz-
ardous items such as vehicle
batteries.
And for a final comment:
It is essential that we all
become involved in this
process for two major rea-
sons. Firstly, we may actu-
ally begin to save money by
our own recycling consid-
erations. Secondly, of
course, is further action to
help preserve our environ-
ment.

JOHN HEDDEN
Abaco,
March 2008.


Leslie


Miller and,


oil prices

EDITOR, The Tribune.
PLEASE do not waste
precious space in your news-
paper printing news releases
about the ex-minister's
(Leslie Miller- former Minis-
ter of Trade and Industry)
continued combat against
high oil prices in hopes of
getting them lowered.
During his time in office,
prices got higher and higher
despite his talking and talk-
ing and talking about fight-
ing the high prices at that
time.
At one point, realising tha
his best efforts were not
helping to lower oil prices,
Mr Leslie Miller drove a
Volkswagen car in an effort
to reduce the amount of
money which he spent on
fuel while the Bahamian
people continued to suffer.
This man did nothing then ,
and cannot do anything now
- but give off hot air.
He could not convince his
own political party which
was the Government in
office at the time, to sign the.
PetroCaribe initiative in ,
2005 and now he appears to
be giving off just stale hot airl
at this time.
NELSON M
FERGUSON
Nassau,
March, 2008.


MLI DSCUN FRNTUE N

WE CCPTAL. MJORCRDI CRD
wE32-53 -3IN 0. -32 -75.32-49


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 2008


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRBUNE ATURDY, APIL 5,2008,PAGES


WHI



VE


l, ;. "I












I
r -




'YOU



1(7


* By TANEKA
< THOMPSON
i Tribune Staff Reporter
whyyouvex@
tribunemedia.net
"I vex at how everything on
dis' lil' island going up and up,
and it seem like it all changing
overnight. I tired of going to
the food-store, and spending
almost all of my paycheck on
groceries that don't even last
me 'til the end of the week.
' "How can I eat healthy and
hot go broke when things so
tight.like this?"
, Darnelle, Carmichael
Road
* "I am vex because the traf-
fic light at the junction of Bar
20 Corner and Mackey and
Madeira Streets have been
blinking off and on for
WEEKS now and no agency
(government or private)
seems to give two hoots that
they are not working!
"On a daily basis the public
has to literally fight to make it
through those intersections
safely. I want to know HOW
LONG MUST WE WAIT!"
- EC, Nassau
"I vex because there aren't
enough police presence on the
road to enforce traffic laws.
So much of these no good
Bahamians can't drive, risk-
ing people lives on the road-
with their speeding and cut-
ting off and ting. I think a
stronger police presence
would make some of these
law-breakers scared or at least
the government can make
some money offa them."
-Stanley, Nassau.
"Why are we paying so
much money to get our cars
licensed? Where is that mon-
ey going? Obviously it's not
going towards improving the
infrastructure of our roads! I
tired of dropping into huge
potholes and bursting my
good tires. But the govern-
ment don't pay for that! The
next time I drop in a pot hole,
I sending the Ministry of
Works a bill."
Peter J, Cable Beach


Frtizi Fticid,




I IWITION
FITMNESS


Ground broken on new




homes in subdivision


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT Ground
has been broken for the con-
struction of new homes in
the Regency Park Subdivi-
sion, which is now in its
fourth phase of develop-
ment.
Developer Louis Missick,
president of Missako Con-
struction, said that 20 new
homes will be built during


phase four, which will bring
the total number homes con-
structed by his company in
Regency Park to 78.
Attending the small
groundbreaking ceremony
were Charles Pratt, manager
of development at the
Grand Bahama Port
Authority and former MP
David Thompson, as well as
family members and friends
of Mr Missick.
Mr Pratt commended Mr
Missick for the "good work"
that he has been doing in


New graveyard


for Freeport

E By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT About 10,000 acres have been handed over by
the Grand Bahama Port Authority for Phase II of the Grand
Bahama Memorial Park graveyard.
Grand Bahama Port Authority president W Albert Gray
announced that more than $250,000 has already been spent to
complete the first section of Phase II.
He said the first section consists of 230 double vault grave
encasements surrounded by professional landscaping.
There is also parking, an administrative/storage building and
restroom facilities.
"Today, the Grand Bahama Port Authority Limited con-
ducted an official hand over of the Grand Bahama Memorial
Park Phase II, which consist of some 10,000 acres, to the GB
Memorial Park Committee," Mr Gray said a press conference
on Wednesday.
Also present were committee members Elkenny Lockhart,
committee chairman and director; Bertram Pinder, vice presi-
dent and director, April Crowther-Gow, secretary and director;
Deann Seymour, treasurer and director: Allison Campbell,
planning engineer and director; Nekcarla Grant, director and
legal advisor.
The issue of insufficient graves for the Grand Bahama com-
munity and the condition of the original park has been a concern
for residents for quite some time.
Late last year, Lawyer Fred Smith expressed his frustration
over the dilapidated condition of the original park. He also
called for the construction of a new and better graveyard for the
nation's second city.



Sir Orville Turnquest


appointed Chairman


of the Board of


Trustees of the GGYA


without discrimination on the
basis of sex, religion or physi-
cal capability.
Participants work toward
bronze, silver and gold medals
by completing activities over
one or two years in four areas
- skills, physical recreation,
community service and adven-
turous journey.

Award
Formerly known as the
Duke of Edinburgh's Award
Programme, the GGYA is still
a part of the worldwide award
family and adheres to its tenets
and operational guidelines.
"Since its inception n the
Bahamas 20 years ago, the
GGYA has grown from
strength to strength and has an
average of 1,000 students par-
ticipating each year, in units in
all the major government and
private schools, as well as in
many of our Family Islands."
said the programme in a state-
ment.
"The programme in the
Bahamas has a very high suc-
cess rate in directing and moti-
vating the participating youth
of our country towards goals
of self-reliance, perseverance
and responsibility to them-
selves, community and good
citizenship."
The responsibility of the
board of trustees is to oversee
all aspects of running of the
programme, with particular
emphasis on fund-raising and
fiscal management.
"As its new chairman, Sir
Orville brings a wealth of
experience from his varied
public, private and profession-
al life which will be invaluable
as the GGYA continues to
develop and expand in it's next
decade of operations here in
the Bahamas," the statement
said.


developing the subdivision
over the past four years.
"Today, we see the com-
pletion of 58 homes and
commencement of the
fourth stage of this develop-
ment.
"In terms of economic
activity, it will translate any-
where from $5 to $7 million
dollars," Mr Pratt said.

Significant
"The groundbreaking is
significant in that it is now
the fourth phase of devel-
opment. And we have seen
Missako grow and comply-
ing with all building require-
ments as it relates to infra-
structure work and the con-
struction of the homes."


Mr Pratt said that they
have not received any "sig-
nificant complaints" regard-
ing the homes or the work
carried out by Missako.
"Mr Missick has complied
with the timeline specified
by our development
arrangements.
"He is a good developer
and we are proud of what
he has accomplished," he
said.
"He has not only done a
lot just for this immediate
community, but Grand
Bahama as a whole and
keeping people employed
and putting people in their
homes who are first time
homeowners.
"The Port Authority is
very happy for his level of
success and we look forward


to doing business with him
as we develop Regency
Park Subdivision."
Mr Missick said that the
home prices range from
$129,000 to $135,000.
He is also offering special
incentive packages that
include a stove, washer, dry-
er and jacuzzi for higher-
end home.
There are four models
and home sizes start from
1,300 square feet and go up
to 1,547 square feet.
The homes will have fully
landscaped front yards, he
said.
Mr Missick that his com-
pany is also willing to work
along persons who are
want to expand and
make modifications to the
homes.


0 t "t ""


THE BAHAMAS Electricity Corporation honoured 100 employees during their 2008 Annual Long Service
Awards Ceremony for 20, 30 or 40 years of service.

[I I I


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


VACANCY NOTICE

Excellent opportunities for career advancement exist in the Legal Department
of The Grand Bahama Port Authority Limited & Group of Companies.
Qualified applicants are invited to apply for the position of Legal Counsel.

The successful candidate must have a minimum of 3 5 years experience
in Litigation, Real Estate & Development and Commercial Law. Candidates
must demonstrate an ability to work independently and possess a thorough
working knowledge and technical competence in the areas mentioned.
(Applicants with experience in only one of the mentioned areas may also
apply).

Successful candidate can look forward to competitive remuneration and
benefits.

R6sum6s with supporting documentation should be submitted to:

The Personnel Department
The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited
P.O. Box F-42666
Freeport, Grand Bahama
BAHAMAS
Or
Email: personnel@gbpa.com
On or before April 28, 2008


SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


I


THE Governor-General's
Youth Awards has announced
that former governor general
Sir Orville Turnquest has been
appointed chairman of its
board of trustees.
He takes over from Robert
Nihon, the long-serving chair-
man who passed away in
August of 2007.
Sir Orville joined the board
in 2002, following the conclu-
sion of his six year term as gov-
ernor-general.
Born in Nassau in July 1929,
he completed his early educa-
tion in the Bahamas, and later
obtained an law degree from
London University. He was
admitted to the English bar as
a member of Lincoln's Inn,
London, where he is also
now an honorary bencher.
He has served in the
Bahamas as a magistrate, pres-
ident of the Bahamas Bar
Association, lecturer in law at
the Bahamas Extra Mural
Department of the University
of the West Indies, attorney
general, minister of justice,
minister of foreign affairs and
deputy prime minister. He has
also served as a member of
both Houses of Parliament
between 1962 and 1994.
A life long Anglican, Sir
Orville served as chancellor of
the Diocese of Nassau and the
Bahamas from 1962 until 2002.
The recipient of many hon-
ours over the years, he holds
honorary doctorates from the
University of the
West Indies, Elmira College,
NY, and Sojourncr-Douglass,
Maryland, and lifetime awards
from Rotary International, the
Salvation Army, the Bahamas
Scout Association, the Lions
Club and 100 Black Men of
America.
The Governor General's
Youth Awards (GGYA) is a
programme open to everyone
between the ages of 14 and 25,










Higgs and


iaJohnson Law


Firm continues

to support road
*s safety, youth

development


* CARACAS,
Venezuela
PRESIDENT Hugo
Chavez on Thursday
ordered the nationaliza-
tion of Venezuela's
cement industry, saying
his government cannot
allow businesses to con-
tinue exporting raw
materials needed to help
tackle a domestic hous-
ing shortage, according
to Associated Press.
Speaking during a
nationally televised
address, Chavez said the
affected cement compa-
nies, which include Mex-
ico's Cemex SAB,
France's Lafarge SA and
Switzerland's Holcim
Ltd, will be paid fair
compensation in the state
takeover.
"We are going to pre-
pare a plan to modernize
these cement plants," he
said.
Chavez, who says he is
leading Venezuela
toward "21st century
socialism," said the
nationalization would
take place in the "short
term," but did not pro-
vide specific dates.
Chavez spent much of
2007 promoting his rev-
olutionary vision of a
new Venezuela, and he
began by nationalizing
the country's electricity,
telecommunications, nat-
ural gas and oil-indus-
tries.
But Chavez began ton-
ing down his rhetoric
after a stinging electoral
defeat in December,.
when his opponents vot-
ed down proposed
reforms that would have
allowed him to enshrine
his socialist agenda in
Venezuela's Constitution
and push forward with an
agenda for revolutionary
change.
Thursday's takeover


order represents his most
radical nationalization
move since then.
Most of the cement
market in this South
American country, which
has suffered from a
severe housing shortage
for decades, is supplied
by foreign companies.
In Venezuela, Cemex
runs three plants that
produce about 2.4 million
tons annually. Holcim
operates two cement
plants in Venezuela with
a production capacity of
roughly 2.4 million tons
a year. Lafarge has two
plants that produce 1.5
million tons a year.
In Mexico, calls to
Cemex offices were not
immediately answered
late Thursday.
In Caracas, business
chamber offices were
closed and there was no
immediate comment. But
in the past, the presiden-
t's critics, including lead-
ers of local business
chambers, have argued
the nationalizations will
hurt Venezuela's econo-
my by scaring off foreign
investors.
Chavez's political allies
argue the takeovers are
necessary for the success
of the government's
development plans.
Prior to Thursday's
announcement, Chavez
had repeatedly expressed
frustration with the high
cost of construction
materials and threatened
to seize control of com-
panies that fail to pro-
vide low-cost cement for
the domestic'market.
Last year, he said many
of Venezuela's cement
factories prefer to sell
their product abroad at
higher prices and warned:
"If the cement factories
do not (sell in
Venezuela), we will occu-
py them."


0ranft's iotin elep tlethiobist QChurch
IBafilou Hill Rd & Chapel Streaelt) PO Bo CB- 13046
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY, APRIL 6TH, 2008.
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Franklyn Bethel
11:00 a.m. Rev. Charles Carey/Bro jamicko Forde (hc)
7:00 p.m. Bro. Ernest Miller/Board of Evangelism

"L astin,.II.IIIeIupi mforilell llrlflr :us"II.I0Il. IlPeerJ:7


- Be Reneaied In The

G ory ofGo's Preselcl"
*HH~~tetf^,,jjL^ ^^ **B


A l
I


SUNDAY SERVICES


Morning Worship Service .....
Sunday Schcol for all ages
Adult Education ... . ......
Worship Service ................
Spanish Service ., ..., .. .
F. i Worsnip Sorvice ...


8,30 a.m
9.,45'a.m.
9.45 am.
1 ,00 am.
8 00 om.
6.30 p(m.


WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Select ve Bible Teaching
Rov ,(Boys Cub) 4-16 ys
Missionetles |Girls Club) 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting
RADIO MINISTRY
Surndays at ,:30 a.m. ZNS 1 I TEMPLE TIME
Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE
Assembly Of God


CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, APRIL 6TH, 2008.
11:30 a.m.Speaker:

Pastor Marcel Lightbourne

NO EVENING SERVICE
Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
SCommunity Outreach: 11:30 a.m. Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
Sisters' Prayer Meeting: 10.00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)


[BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH]
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL I


Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preaching 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:


Sunday 6pm ZNS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm


Pastor:H Mills


a. 44


"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are"
Pastor: H. Mills Phone: 393-0563 Box N-362;
- - - - - - - -


THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OFTHE METHODIST CHURCH
Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
SP.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
IIm CHURCH SERVICES
SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 2008
E E THIRD SUNDAY OF EASTER
AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
D 11:00AM Rev. Mark Carey/HC
ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Charles Moss/HC
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard
10:00AM Rev. Charles Sweeting/HC
7:00PM Rev. Charles Sweeting
EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,
East Shirley Street
11:00AM Rev. Charles New/HC
7:00PM Rev. Charles New
GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen's College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly/HC
ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00AM Connections Rev. Philip Stubbs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs/HC
TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
S 11:00AM Dr. Reginald Eldon/HC

RADIO PROGRAMMES
'RENEWAL' on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Rev. William R. Higgs
'METHODIST MOMENTS' on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Your Host: Rev. William R. Higgs
******************************* *********************

The 2008 General Conference will be held May
21-25, 2008 at Wesley Methodist Church, Harbour
Island under the theme: Peace Begins With Me."


LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &


e Future



.?-


Geared To Th
Worship time: H11am & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:
The Madeira Shopping
Center
(Next door to CIBC)


Re'. lIlr. Fi'ankliin Kno les


ALL ARE WELCOME TOATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE- 16807
7Tlephone, number 3-25-5712
EMAIL lvnnk@abatelhit.bs


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 2008








THE TRBUNE ATURDY, APIL 5,2008,PAGES


Bus drivers set for




'100-day challenge'




to improve service


'FROM page one dors that will
ciency of the m
biggest smog producers with cles but if we
more energy efficient, cleaner improvement
buses. transportation
These plans were floated on lic education
Thursday night when public feel the full
transport union leaders and improvement
around 100 members met with Deveaux.
Mr Deveaux in their first public "We have
meeting since the FNM took these now toj
power, elementary w
Mr Deveaux said the discus- 30 months," he
sion, which covered issues such The minist
as fares, improving reliability, pleased to see
cleanliness and safety, was preparedness
"short but very, very produc- the bus indl
tive." towards soluti
Scheduled two weeks ago plaints common
prior to the demonstrations by patrons and in
the unions on Wednesday in ciency of the
favour of fare increases in light whole.
of rising oil costs the meeting "The most
was intended to update bus was really to ge
owners on progress in the a) reliable b)'
government's New Providence d) affordable
Road Improvement project. and one of the
That project, estimated to offered was hl
cost around $100 million, will number of thi
involve work on 23 road corri- put to the pub
dors and junctions, with the aim them because
of reducing congestion. to put ourselv
"When we do the road corri- said Mr Devea

FROM page one

grey pants.
Senior Pastor at Outreach Evangelic, L H Bur-
rows, told The Tribune that he is not surprised
that the incident occurred, as he and parishioners
heard gunfire while worshipping on several occa-
sions.
"In the area we always have gunfire. You hear
gunfire while church is going on," he said.
Referring to an unrelated incident, Pastor Bur-
rows said a young man came to the church last
week while members were cleaning the building.
He had a knife tucked in his waist and said that
someone wanted to kill him.
"We prayed with him and talked with him,"
said Pastor Burrows, and he and his members
invited him to church. The man came back one
time after, the pastor said, but now he does not
know what has happened to him.


improve the effi-
novement of vehi-
e don't have the
it in the public
side and the pub-
n side we won't
impact of the
it," said Mr
to try to do all
gether in a com-
ay over the next
e stated.
.er said he was
a "great deal of
" on the part of
ustry to "work
ons" to the com-
nly made by their
proving the effi-
system on the

important thing
et a consensus on
clean c) safe and
public transport
things that they
et us agree on a
ings that we will
blic and let's test
we're prepared
'es on the line,"
aux.


Additionally, the minister
said union leaders asked that
government consider allowing
drivers to increase fares and
reinstate duty exemption on
buses.
However, while government
,will look at the need for a fare
increase based on increased
costs, it would not be done with-
out a "conscious review" or the
public getting something in
return, said Mr Deveaux.
"When you do the fare
increase you offer a package to
the public so the consuming
public that will pay the extra
fare knows they are getting
something in return...so we're
looking at upgrading the fleet,
changing the dress code,
improving the reliability," he
said, adding that the govern-
ment had put forward the same
position to taxi-drivers.
Meanwhile, though the gov-
ernment is "not minded" to
institute a blanket duty exemp-
tion, Mr Deveaux told mem-
bers the Minister of Finance has
the authority to grant exemp-
tions in response to specific
applications.


Man found shot

dead in church yard
Outreach Evangelic Church has been broken
into four times in the last two years. Pastor Bur-
rows said, adding that the church's pre-school
has been broken into three times within the last
year.
At this stage, the pastor said, it doesn't "make
sense" calling police because they have been inef-
fective in responding to past complaints. They
take fingerprints, but the church does not hear
from them after this is done, he said.
During one robbery, said the pastor, all the
church instruments were stolen. "Our PA sys-
tem, recording set and all of our insti uments our
four speakers."
Police investigations continue into this latest
murder.


FROM page one

While recognising that there
are often questions raised "as
to the manner in which judi-
cial officers, especially
Supreme C 'ourt judges, are
appointed" Sir Burton said
that their "cry for transparen-
cy one of those modern buzz-
words is, in (his) view, mis-
guided."
He suggested that this is
because of the impact that the
commission's conclusions, if
disclosed, could have on the
"professional and personal
reputations of the candidates
whom it considers and...on the
public perception of the
integrity of the system
generally" in a "small commu-
nity."
"For these reasons, it is sel-
dom appropriate, even where
legally possible, to share with
the public why particular can-
didates have been considered


Chief Justice tight-lipped on

Rubie Nottage appointment


or approved, or not," said Sir
Burton.
He said the "translucent"
(semi-transparent) appoint-
ment process that the consti-
tution has provided for is
"vital" to the commission's
"frank deliberations".
The Chief Justice added that
Commission regulations in fact
make it illegal for any mem-
ber to make public any infor-
mation which has come before
him in his deliberations as part
of the commission without first
seeking the written permission
of the Governor General.
Rubie Nottage, appointed
by the commission to the
Supreme Court bench in
March, featured in the 1984
Commission of Inquiry report
into drug-trafficking.


The now famous 1984 probe
said it appeared that Mrs Not-
tage "knew or should have
known who was the principal
beneficial shareholder for
whom she was acting" when
she operated several compa-
nies in the 1980s.
Those companies were
owned by Salvatore Michael
Caruana a New England
organised crime figure and
drug-trafficker and were
involved in money-laundering
in the Bahamas.
Mrs Nottage's husband,
Kendal, was also mentioned in
the commission report. He
resigned from the Cabinet dur-
ing the commission.
The Tribune tried to reach
Mrs Nottage for comment but
calls were not returned.


Govt aiming to recoup unpaid



duties, taxes from Global United


FROM page one
the reason the payments were long overdue,
the minister who was out of office at the
time said:
"I really can't say. I can't say how far back,
but they extend a good period of time. All I
know is that the payments are due and
demands have been made for them and they
have not been forthcoming with the pay-
ments.
"Why that is, I can't say. (But) the matter
is being addressed by the government even as
we speak."
Mr Laing said the company not only owes
the government money for customs duty, but
also unpaid passenger taxes which the com-
pany collects on behalf of the companies they
represent.
According to Mr Laing, once the shipping
company collects the passenger taxes, it is
obligated to remit them to the government.
Flie Tribune contacted deputy comptrol-
ler at Bahamas Customs Department
Nehamiah Francis about Global United's
outstanding customs duties, but he said he
could not comment.
"We wouldn't want to comment on that
right now." Mr Francis said.
Attempts were made to contact acting
comptroller Anthony Adderley but a repre-
sentative from his office said he was off the


island. The Tribune plans to write a formal
letter of request to the Bahamas Customs
Department for a complete breakdown of
Global United's overdue payments.
This latest issue adds to mounting prob-
lems for the shipping company. Earlier this
week a pilot claimed that the Shell Oil tanker
which ran aground off New Providence in
March was not provided with a local naviga-
tor because Global United, its agent, failed to
pay over $30,000 to the Harbour Pilots Asso-
ciation.
Chief Pilot of the Harbour Pilots Associa-
tion Garnett Rolle told The Tribune the oil
tanker "Ficus" was devoid of a local naviga-
tor because of the outstanding payments
owed by Global United. He explained that a
shipping company cannot engage a local pilot
until it secures clearance from the Pilots
Association first.
The Tribune tried to contact Global Unit-
ed CEO Jackson Ritchie for comment yes-
terday but a representative said he was
unavailable.
According to its website, Global United is
a "customer focused, full service ship agency,
logistics and travel management company
dedicated to providing uncompromised, effi-
cient, and reliable delivery of goods and ser-
vices with the highest degree of profession-
alism and integrity."


Two Jamaican men held after discovery of huge drug field


FROM page one
ment commented on the cul-
tivation of marijuana in the
Bahamas by Jamaicans on
remote islands and cays.
"Although there are no
official estimates of marijuana
hectarage in the islands, cul-
tivation of marijuana by
Jamaicans is a continuing
trend.
"The majority of marijua-
na seized in 2007 was in plant


form grown by Jamaican
nationals on remote islands
and cays of the Bahamas.
OPBAT and the RBPF
co-operated in identifying,
seizing and destroying the
marijuana," said the 2008
report.
When The Tribune con-
tacted the head of the DEU
yesterday and asked if there is
a particular major drug organ-
isation operating out of
Andros, Supt Anthony Fer-


guson said: "No, you know,
nothing significant."
Once officers receive infor-
mation, they act on it, said Mr
Ferguson. At this time. how-
ever, the DEU does not think
there is a group of people
who operate connected mari-
juana fields on the island,
added the DEU chief.
Andros has miles of unin-
habited forest and favourable
conditions for growing. This.
at least in part, may be what is


attracting drug producers to
set up operations on the
island.
When asked about the issue
in the US report of Jamaicans
growing marijuana in the
Bahamas. Mr Ferguson did
not think the problem lies
with these foreigners coming
to the country by themselves.
Rather, he said, these indi-
viduals are more likely to be
acting in concert with
Bahamians.


.i .


r r


.4/
It~'


.1


ETHEL KENNEDY, widow of Robert F. Kennedy, and their son Max Kennedy, look over a peace memorial in Martin Luther King, Jr., Park in Indi-
anapolis, Friday, April 4, 2008. Forty years ago today in the park Kennedy broke the news to a crowd that King had been assassinated. The
memorial shows Kennedy and King reaching their arms out towards one another.


"- THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS ,
CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS
L'EGLISE METHODIST DANS LA CARAIBE
ET LES AMERIQUES "
NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES '
108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:
328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnetbs
METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF
GOD, TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY
THE CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL
HOLINESS THROUGHOUT THE LAND (Father John
Wesley)
"Celebrating 225 years of continuous Methodist witness
for Christ in The Bahamas"
THIRD LORD'S DAY OF THE RESURRECTION,
APRIL 6, 2008.

COLLECT: Living God, your Son made himself known to his
disciples in the breaking of bread: open the eyes of our faith, that
we may see him in all his redeeming work; who is alive and reigns,
now and for ever.

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
9:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)
6:30 p.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes H & W
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108
Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)
7:00 a.m. Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly (Holy
Communion)
10:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte
11:00 a.m. Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly/ Rev. Emily A.
Demeritte /First Communion
Reception (Holy Communion)
6:30 p.m. Southern Zone
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street,
Fox Hill)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr.
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
9:00 a.m. Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly (Holy
Communion)
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST
CHU RCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field
7:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)
9:00 a.m. Bro. Colin Newton
METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD (Fire
Trail Rd)
8:00 a.m. Rev. Dr. Kenneth Huggins
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
5:30 p.m. Friday Children's Club
9:00 a.m. Sunday Youth Encuentro
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop
and other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford St.,
Oakes Field) Reception to Primary

PEACE AND JUSTICE CAMPAIGN: All Methodists of the
Conference are urged to pray and to fast for Justice to prevail
in the Methodist Cases and for an end to the upsurge in violence.
The fast begins weekly after the evening meal on Thursday
and ends at noon on Friday. This we proclaim unswervingly:
"My God and My Right."

RADIO PROGRAMS
"Vision" On the Lord's Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; "Great I lymns of
Inspiration" On the Lord's Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.; "Family
Vibes" ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; "To God be the Glory" ZNS
1, Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.


SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 2008, PAGE 7


tfw


THE TRIBUNE


4,





PAGE 8, SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 2008


- ..~ -


4'B
LA


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*9 J' *
4, \^
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"My work at The Tribune is rewarding
and challenging. I enjoy contributing
to the look of our newspaper while
meeting the needs of our advertisers.


I am proud to work here. The
Tribune is my newspaper."


ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE


The Tribune


Z4 '09


/


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. "...
,I-
-


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THE TRIBUNE


..


,..; 64


'- *!*,.. ..


~cL


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9


S11 .





SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 2008, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNW


Huge blaze


tackled by



firefighters


FIREFIGHTERS tackle a huge blaze at Strachan's Auto Repairs on Soldier Road in the early hours of
Friday morning. The fire was eventually contained without any reported injuries.


Boys Choir of Bahamas

on song ahead of tour


C2

MEMBERS OF the Boys Choir of the Bahamas end a medley of Bahamian songs with a flourish during their
final rehearsal before their April 4 to 6 tour of Acklins and Crooked Island on April 2. The choir will perform
for students, the community and at church services.


MEMBERS OF the i hoir pose, with choir
director Patricia Bazard and assistant
director Alfred Dean, during their tinal
rehearsal


NOTICE OF VACANCY
A vacancy exists at The Grand Bahama Development Company Limited for one
(1) Projects Manager. This position reports to the Vice President of Development
The successful candidate will be required to provide technical support and
guidance in the areas of super-structural and infrastructural developments and
rehabilitation works as necessary; perform condition survey on Company buildings
and infrastructure (including roadways) throughout the Lucaya areas when
required; plan, implement, and manage civil engineering capital works projects
undertaken by the Company.
QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE
* BSc. in Building, Structural or Civil Engineering Postgraduate studies a
plus
* Minimum of five (5) years relevant engineering experience
* Minimum of three (3) years relevant supervisory experience
* Professional registration a plus
SPECIFIC KNOWLEDGE REQUIRED
* Sound knowledge in road design and rehabilitation.
* Sound knowledge of construction techniques and safety parameters.
* Sound knowledge of engineering design techniques and the governing code
required in achieving internationally accepted standards.
* Working knowledge of Contract Law.
* Sound knowledge of established construction practices and related statutory
regulations.
* Sound knowledge of Contract Administration.
REQUIRED SKILLS AND SPECIALIZED TECHNIQUES
* Competence in the application of project management techniques
* Good coordinating skills.
* Good human relations skills.
* Ability to communicate effectively.
* Computer literacy as evidenced by full working knowledge of Microsoft
Word, Excel, Auto Cad and Microsoft Projects.

R6sum6s with supporting documentation should be submitted to:
The Personnel Department
The Grand Bahama Development Company Limited
P.O. Box F-42666
Freeport, Grand Bahama
BAHAMAS
Or
Email: personnel@gbpa.com
On or before April 28, 2008.


I


I








PAGE 10, SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


INERATIOALNWI


* BEIJING

NEW VIOLENCE has broken out in a volatile Tibetan
region of western China, leaving eight people dead, an
overseas Tibet activist group said Friday. China's official
Xinhua News Agency said a government official was
seriously injured, according to Associated Press.
The London-based Free Tibet Campaign said police
opened fire on hundreds of Buddhist monks and lay
people who had marched on local government offices to
demand the release of two monks detained for possess-
ing photographs of the Dalai Lama, Tibet's exiled Bud-
dhist leader.
Xinhua made no mention of deaths or injuries among
protesters, but said a "riot" had flared up Thursday
night outside government offices in the Garze Tibetan
Autonomous Prefecture high in the mountains in Sichuan
province along the border with Tibet.
It said the official was "attacked and seriously wound-
ed," and said police were "forced to fire warning shots
and put down the violence." No other details were given.
The report indicates continuing unrest in Tibetan areas
despite a massive security presence imposed after some-
times violent anti-government demonstrations broke out
last month in Tibet's capital Lhasa and neighboring
provinces.
Late last month, Xinhua reported that protesters in
Garze attacked police with knives and stones, killing
one officer.
Matt Whitticase, spokesman for the London-based
Free Tibet Campaign, said the incident originated at
the Tonkhor monastery in Garze with government
attempts to enforce a new "patriotic education cam-
paign" a program of ideological indoctrination blamed
for stirring deep resentment among monks. The cam-
paign demands that monks denounce the Dalai Lama, the
spiritual leader of Tibetan Buddhism who fled to India
amid a failed uprising against Chinese rule in 1959.
Whitticase said the chief monk, Lobsang Jamyang,
refused to allow a government team to enter on Wednes-
day, but they returned Thursday with a force of about
3,000 paramilitary troops. The two monks, Geshi Sonam
Tenzing and Tsultrim Phuntsog, were detained after
photos of the Dalai Lama were found among their
belongings.
Soon afterward, the monastery's 370 monks marched
on local government headquarters to demand their
release, joined by about 400 lay people, Whitticase said.
The group left after being told the two monks would be
freed at 8 p.m., but returned after officials reneged.
Along the way, they were confronted by troops at a road
block, who opened fire on the crowd, Whitticase said.
Whitticase provided the names of six of the eight peo-
ple reportedly killed, who included at least three women
and one monk. He said information on the incident had
been relayed by a monk at a Tibetan Buddhist monastery
in southern India, who received it from anonymous con-
tacts in Garze.


Education

Stepped-up patriotic education has been ordered as
part of a crackdown on dissent following deadly riots in
the Tibetan capital, Lhasa, on March 14, in which author-
ities say 22 people died. Other reports say up to 140
people were killed in the protests and ensuing crack-
down.
Beijing has accused supporters of the Dalai Lama of
orchestrating the violence, a charge the 1989 Nobel
Peace Prize winner has repeatedly denied.
Authorities earlier this week said they plan to put
rioters on trial and reopen Tibet to foreign tourists by
May a tight timetable that would allow the govern-
ment to put the issue behind it ahead of the August Bei-
jing Olympics.
Both Tibet and Tibetan communities in three neigh-
boring provinces where the protests spread, however,
remain largely closed to foreign journalists. Outside of
Tibet, police turned away foreign reporters at road-
blocks leading into Tibetan areas, saying they were
unsafe for travel.
A state media report on Friday said officials in Tibetan
areas were being forced into political study sessions in a
bid to make sure Beijing's dictates are followed.
"The numerous party members and grass-roots officials
must further launch education in opposing separatism
and preserving the unity of the motherland," the state-
run Xinhua News Agency said, citing a notice from the
party's powerful Organization Department, which over-
sees personnel issues.
Communist troops marched into Tibet in 1950 and
Beijing strengthened its hold on the region after the
Dalai Lama fled in a failed uprising against Chinese rule
in 1959.





MIW .w.


Bahamas Internatonl Securities Exchange


Wreck pictures to bear




witness to Australian




warship's final moments


* CANBERRA, Australia
Associated Press

A REMOTE-CON-
TROLLED submarine scour-
ing the shipwrecked remains
of an Australian warship has
revealed new clues to a World
War II battle that cost more
than 700 lives. But the mystery
persists: What caused Aus-
tralia's worst maritime
tragedy?
Did a well-aimed German
torpedo sink the pride of the
Australian navy? Or was it a
catastrophic explosion in the
ship's ammunition storage area
that ensured that none of its
645 crew would survive?
Part of the puzzle was solved
last month when a sonar search
led by American shipwreck
hunter David Mearns found
the wrecks of battle cruiser
HMAS Sydney and, nearby,
Germany's converted freighter
HSK Kormoran.
Both vessels sank after the
Nov. 19, 1941 battle, and pre-
vious attempts to find them
proved fruitless.
Until now, the official record
of the battle has been based
on the accounts of German
survivors who were captured
as they drifted toward Aus-
tralia in lifeboats.
The Sydney spotted the Kor-
moran as it was prowling for
Allied merchant ships to sink,
about 500 miles north of Perth.
The Australian vessel moved
to intercept the suspicious ship
and demanded that it identify
itself. The Kormoran hedged,
raising flags that claimed it was
a Dutch trader and sending
misleading radio signals.
All the while, the Sydney
was being drawn closer until it


IN THIS undated photo released by the Finding Sydney Foundation, the Australian warship HMAS Sydney II
is shown.


eventually lost the advantage
of having longer-range
weapons.
German survivors said the
Kormoran eventually dropped
the artifice, raised its German
ensign and opened fire when
the ships were within a mile of
each other.
Crews engaged in a furious
exchange of naval artillery, tor-
pedo and machine-gun fire for
about half an hour, though
Australia's official history says


CL


S.












IN THIS photo released by the Finding Sydney Foundation, the gun tur-
ret of the Australian warship HMAS Sydney II taken off the Western

Australian coast is seen Thursday, April 3, 2008. Did a well-aimed Ger-
man torpedo sink the pride of the Australian navy or was it a cata-
strophic explosion in the warship's magazine that ensured that none of
its 645 crew would survive? A remote-controlled submarine delving 2
1/2 kilometers (1 1/2 miles) below the sea surface off Australia has
revealed fresh clues to a ferocious World War II battle that cost more
than 700 lives and spurred an enduring mystery.
1 .a
: 8



















than 700 lives and spurred an enduring mystery.


I DEllTY


C FA L'"


F3SXLSTED TRDEDSECRITES.S O
V RSDAa.:RI 20
1 llj~l 025//`CH -0 1/Y C)10A2 YlD S 5a )


52wk-HI
1.93
11.80
9.68
0.99
3.74
2.70
13.63
3.15
8.50
7.22
2.50
7.90
13.01
14.75
6.10
1.00
8.00
12.50
10.00


52wk-Low
0.95
11.50
9.00
0.85
2.30
1.30
10.35
2.10
4.73
3.60
2.20
5.94
12.49
13.50
5.12
0.54
8.88
8.60
10.00


Security
Abaco Market.
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Bank of Bahamas
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Bahamas Waste
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Colina Holdings
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Doctor's Hospital
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ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
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Prevlous Close
1.93
11.80
9.81
0.98
3.88
2.80
13.63
2.87
7.22
4.72
2.50
7.90
12.92
13.50
5.50
0.67
8.88
12.30
10.00


1,w-1H15vwyIbI -Id $ Weekly Vol. BPS PI iel


52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $
14.60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35


410 41.00ar~~mr r-rr~r~r


41.00 41.00
14.60 14.00
0.55 0.40


92WK-HI 2W9-LOW und Nam


52wk-HI
1.3847
3.7969
3.0008
1.3041
12.0429
100.00
100.00
1.00
10.50


52wk-Low
1.2647
3.1827
2.6254
1.2037
11.4992
100.00
100.00
1.00
9.8433


ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings


Fund Name
Collna Money Market Fund
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CFAL Global Bond Fund
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CFAL High Grade Bond
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Today's Close
1.93
11.60
9.61
0.99
3.66
2.60
13.83
2.85
7.22
4.73
2.50
7.90
12.92
13.50
5.50
0.67
8.86
12.30
10.00


Ask $
15.60
6.25
0.40


43.00
15.60
0.55


NAV
1.384667-"
3.6651'
2.982729"
1.304134"
12.0429"
100.00"*
100.00."
1.00"*
9.8433"


Change Dally Vol. EPS $
0.00 0.135
0.00 1.502
0.00 0.643
0.00 0.188
0.00 0.289
0.00 0.058
0.00 1.093
-0.02 6,683 0.031
0.00 300 0.428
0.01 0.157
0.00 0.316
0.00 0.713
0.00 1.000 0.810
0.00 0.914
0.00 0.386
0.00 0.035
0.00 0.411
0.00 1.059
0.00 1.167


Last Price
14.60
6.00
0.35


Div $
0.000
0.400
0.160
0.030
0.090
0.040
0.240
0.040
0.270
0.052
0.040
0.280
0.570
0.470
0.140
0.000
0.300
0.610
0.600


Yield
0.00%
3.39%
2,71%
3.03%
2.46%
1.54%
1.76%
1.40%
3.74%
1.10%
1.60%
3.54%
4.41%
3.48%
2.55%
0.00%
4.37%
4 96%
6.00%


Weekly Vol. EPS $ DIv $ PIE Yield
1.999 1.160 0.900 13.4 6.16%
0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
-0.023 0.000 NM 0.00%


4.540 2.750 9.03 6.70%
1.160 0.900 13.4 6.16%
-0.023 0.000 NIM 0.00%


YTD%
0.70%o
-3.47%
-0.601%
0.94%
0.92%


Last 12 Months
3.92%
18.28%
14.89%
5.70%
5.69%


DIv S Yield


-0.20% -8.16%


I LLX (,II 181:02-1.0000Y fIEL AT -12 /2 0071I 28.29%,I


Bilsx/ ALL SH>ARE= INDEX 19 DEC 02 1.000.00oo
52WK-HI HIGHEST CLOSING PRICE IN LAST 52 WEEKS
52WK-Low LOWEST CLOSING PRICE IN LAST 62 WEeKS
PREVIOUS CLOSE PREVIOUs DAY'* WEIGHTED PRICE FOR DAILY VOLUME
TODAY'S CLOSE CURRENT DAY'S WEIGHTED PRICE FOR DAILY VOLUMs
CHANGE CHANGE IN CLOSING PRICE PROM DAY TO DAY
DAILY VOL. NUMBER OF TOTAL SHARES TRADE TODAY
DIV $ DIVIDENDS PER SHARE PAID IN THE LAST 12 MO 8InH
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" 31 DI c Mukn 2007
* 21 MA-CH 2000


both ships were probably
irreparably damaged in the
first five minutes.
As they took to lifeboats and
set off charges to scuttle their
vessel around midnight, the
Germans later described seeing
the glow of fires aboard the
Sydney as it drifted about 10
miles away.
For years, the Germans'
account of the battle was
viewed with suspicion and left
important questions unan-
swered. Among them: If the
Australian ship was able to
limp away aflame, but afloat
- why was there no sign
lifeboats were launched?
The first photos transmitted
from the wreck show the Syd-
ney's turrets still trained to its
port side as they were when
the Kormoran was in their
sights.
All the cradles where the
lifeboats once hung were emp-
ty.
Naval historian David
Stevens said this does not
mean the crew abandoned
ship. The boats were tied to
the upper decks and would
likely have come loose as the
ship sank.
"They're the sort of stuff that
gets really damaged when your
upper deck is getting shot to
pieces," Stevens said.
As the Germans said, the
top of a gun turret was blown
overboard by gunfire. One
photo shows a hole blasted by
a direct hit between its twin
guns.
The Sydney's bridge section
had clearly taken the brunt of
the Kormoran's heavy gun bar-
rage and an 80-foot section of
the bow had snapped off
around where the Germans
recalled a torpedo struck with
devastating effect.
"All you can say so far is that
the Germans' descriptions are
very accurate," Stevens said
after seeing the initial pictures
and searchers' reports.
Searchers have suspected
since seeing high-resolution
sonar images of the wreck last
month that a torpedo weak-
ened the hull and caused the
bow to snap off, ultimately
sinking the ship.
Another theory offered to
explain the total loss of life is
that the burning ship's ammu-
nition storage area erupted in a
catastrophic explosion.
The Sydney's fate has cap-
tured Australian imaginations
for generations, and the hulk's
discovery, announced by Prime
Minister Kevin Rudd, led news


bulletins and was splashed on
front pages nationwide.
The sinking has fueled con-
spiracy theories including
one, denied by the Germans,
that Australian survivors in the
water were shot to death. And
it has occasionally thrown up
tantalizing clues.
On Feb. 6, 1942, a decom-
posed body with a shrapnel
head wound was found washed
ashore in a lifeboat on Christ-
mas Island, 1,100 miles north of
the wreck.
The Australian navy found
the unmarked grave in 2006
and have used DNA and den-
tal records to try to identify the
body. Although authorities are
almost certain he was a Syd-
ney sailor, they have so far
excluded more than 500 of the
crew without finding a match.
The government, which has
spent $3.9 million on the
search, has appointed a retired
judge to hold an inquiry into
the new evidence.
The loss of the Sydney
stunned Australia and the gov-
ernment banned all media
from reporting the news for 12
days as it scrambled to explain
what happened.
Most of the 397-man Ger-
man crew survived, plucked
from the ocean by Allied war-
ships and tankers or reaching
the Australian coast in
lifeboats.
The German captain,
Theodora Detmers, main-
tained that, in accordance with
the rules of war, his ship
dropped its disguise and hoist-
ed a German navy ensign
before firing the first shot.
It was Detmers' account of
the battle, inscribed using a
simple code in a German-Eng-
lish dictionary while he was a
prisoner of war, that proved
crucial to locating the wreck
of the Sydney.
He penciled tiny dots
beneath letters, spelling out a
few words on each page.
"We wouldn't have found
the wrecks as quickly as we did
without these documents,"
Mearns told Australian Broad-
casting Corp. "They were very,
very accurate."
But some elements of the
mystery are sure to endure.
"Did the Germans machine
gun people in the water? Did
they raise their flag before
opening fire? We're never
going to answer those ques-
tions." said Jeremy Green,
chief maritime archaeologist at
the Western Australian Muse-
um.


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OIm nm~ll I Ai 1 .. .. I I ? II NFIIOMli IT[I LVI[W.\NWWMSXPA'iAMA( :)-


L Pepopts new violence in volatile
T'ib'eit"a'u'pegion, activists say eight killed,


r^AM^








THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 2008, PAGE 11


-.... .. __A .
-J.1


LONDON

QUEEN ELIZABETH
II's husband, Prince
Philip, has been admit-
ted to a hospital with a
chest infection, Bucking-
ham Palace said Friday,
according to Associated
Press.
A spokeswoman said
the 86-year-old was tak-
en to the hospital for
"assessment and treat-
ment for a chest infec-
tion." She said she had
no information about his
condition.
"His royal highness's
program of engagements
for the weekend have
been canceled," the
spokeswoman said on
condition of anonymity
in line with palace poli-
cy.
Officials at King
Edward VII's Hospital
in central London said
they would not comment
on Philip's condition.
Philip was taken to the
hospital Thursday
evening by private car
after suffering from a
cold for three or four
days without showing
signs of improvement,
the palace said.
An ambulance was not
needed and it was not an
urgent transfer to the
hospital, said a palace
spokesman, who also
spoke on condition of
anonymity in line with
palace policy. He said
doctors want to "work
out exactly what is
wrong."
Another Buckingham
Palace spokesman said
Philip walked into the
hospital without assis-
tance and spent Friday
working on.his corre-
spondence from his hos-
pital bed.
Philip did not attend a
memorial service on
Wednesday for Sir
Edmund Hillary, the
first man to conquer
Mount Everest, because
he was ill with a cold,
Buckingham Palace said.
Last week, Philip
looked well as he joined
the queen in saying
goodbye to French Presi-
dent Nicolas Sarkozy
and his wife Carla Bruni-
Sarkozy at the end of a
two-day state visit.
Philip smiled as the
Sarkozys' car pulled
away and waved to the
departing guests from
Windsor Castle.
An active man who has
enjoyed good health well
into his 80s, Philip is
known as the queen's
constant companion at
public events.
This week, a.coroner
at an inquest into the
death of Princess Diana
forcefully rejected a con-
spiracy theory that
Philip was behind a
secret service plot to kill
the princess and her
boyfriend Dodi Fayed.
The theory has been
ridiculed by many, but
tenaciously put forward
for more than a decade
by Dodi Fayed's father,
Mohamed Al Fayed.
Lord Justice Scott Baker
shot down the idea, say-
ing there was "no evi-
dence, that the Duke of
Edinburgh (Philip)
ordered Diana's execu-
tion and there is no evi-
dence that the Secret
Intelligence Service or
any other government
agency organized it."
Philip has been mar-
ried to the queen since
1947. A member of the
Greek royal family, he
renounced his royal title
when he became a natu-
ralized British subject in
1947.
He joined the Royal
Navy in 1939 and saw
active service through-
out World War II, rising
to the rank of lieutenant.
After Elizabeth became
queen, Philip gave up his
naval career to support
her.
He has no constitu-
tional role other than as
one of the queen's privy
counselors.


Philip is a great-great-
grandchild of Queen
Victoria.


4. .






i .2






PEOPLE QUEUE for food in front of election posters with portraits of main opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai, left, in Harare, Zimbabwe Friday, April 4,2008. In a desperate attempt to
stabilize the faltering economy, the government authorities introduced a new $50 million bank note, state media reported. Intruders Thursday ransacked offices of the main opposition
party and police detained foreign journalists in an ominous sign that President Robert Mugabe might turn to intimidation and violence in trying to stave off an electoral threat to his 28-
year rule.





Zimbabwe's ruling party





declares presidential runoff


SIt t C'
i' i




COUNCIL WORKERS remove campaign posters of President Robert Mugabe in Harare, Zimbabwe Friday,
April, 4, 2008. Intruders ransacked offices of the main opposition party and police detained foreign journal-
ists in an ominous sign that President Robert Mugabe might turn to intimidation and violence in trying to
stave off an electoral threat to his 28-year rule.


* HARARE, Zimbabwe.


A PRESIDENTIAL runoff
between .President Robert:
Mugabe and opposition: leader,
Morgan Tsvangirai appeared ter-'
tain Friday after the ruling party
said it had agreed to a second
round, according to Associated
Press.
Party secretary and Minister
of State Didymus Mutasa also
charged that the opposition
bribed electoral officials and said
his party would contest the
results of 16 parliamentary seats.
"We agreed to have a rerun
at a date to be set by" the elec-
toral commission, Mutasa said
at a news conference after a five-
hour party politburo meeting,
the first since official results
showed ZANU-PF had lost con-
trol of parliament in weekend
elections.
The law requires a runoff with-
in 21 days of the first round. But
diplomats in Harare and at the
United Nations said Mugabe was
planning to declare a 90-day
delay to give security forces time
to clamp down.
While official presidential elec-
tion results have not yet been
released, independent observers
had projected a runoff, saying
Tsvangirai won the most votes,
but not the 50 percent plus one
vote necessary for an outright
victory.
The opposition, which went to
court Friday to force the elec-
toral commission to release
results, had claimed to have won
the presidency outright, but also
said it would contest a runoff if
one was ordered.
State Department spokesman
Tom Casey told reporters Fri-
day that "people can claim any-
thing they want about the results
and about whether those results
will then indicate or make nec-
essary a runoff.
"The Zimbabwe election com-
mission has continued to fail in
its duties and fail the Zimbab-
wean people by not immediately
providing the results of the pres-
idential vote," Casey said. "The
longer they delay in this process,
the more suspicious it becomes."
Earlier Friday, police escorted
about 400 war veterans as they
paraded silently through down-
town Harare. The feared veter-
ans in the bush war that.helped
end white minority rule are used
to intimidate opposition sup-
porters and spearheaded the
often violent takeover of white
farms in recent years.
At a news conference, Jabu-
lani Sibanda, head of the Zim-
babwe War Veterans' Associa-
tion, said ZANU-PF lost the
elections because "people were
pushed by hunger and illegal
sanctions. Under current cir-
cumstances the spirit of our peo-
ple is being provoked. We will
be forced to defend our sover-
eignty."
Also Friday, outspoken
Mugabe critic Lovemore Mad-
huku, who in the past has suf-


fered police beatings and an
arson attack on his home, urged
Zimbabweans to "defend their
vote."
Madhuku called on Zimbab-
weans "not to give in to any form
of intimidation, any form of vio-
lence ... that would be used to
stop change or to steal the vote."
Zimbabwe's opposition party
filed an urgent suit late Friday,
asking the courts to force the
release of the presidential results,
according to party spokesman
Nelson Chamisa.
Chamisa said the delay in
reporting results had resulted in
"a lot of anxiety being created
among the (opposition), the
nation at large and the interna-
tional community." He said a
hearing was expected Saturday.
The opposition has been
weakened by internal divisions.
But Friday, a splinter faction said
divisions weren't an issue should
there be a runoff.
"Whatever formation is there
to remove Mugabe, we are there
to support it," said Abednico
Bhebhe, spokesman for the
Arthur Mutambara faction of the
MDC.
On Thursday, the Movement
for Democratic Change said that
Mugabe has "unleashed a war"
in his bid to stay in power after
party offices were raided and for-
eign journalists detained.
"Mugabe has started a crack-
down," MDC secretary-general
Tendai Biti told The Associated
Press, saying rooms used as
offices by the opposition at a
Harare hotel were ransacked
Thursday by intruders he
believed were either police or
agents of the feared Central
Intelligence Organization.
The journalists, meanwhile,
were detained by heavily armed
riot police who surrounded and
entered a Harare hotel fre-
quented by foreign reporters,
lawyers said.
The U.S.-based National
Democratic Institute added one
of its staff, an American, was
detained by authorities at
Harare's airport as he tried to
leave the country Thursday.
The government had rejected
most foreign journalists' appli-
cations to cover the elections,
and had barred Western election
observers.
Casey, the State Department
spokesman, told reporters that
four Americans had been
detained by Zimbabwean
authorities on Thursday. Casey
said Friday that U.S. officials had
been in contact with the two
Americans still detained.
He said he could only give lim-
ited details because of privacy
concerns.
Lawyer Harrison Nkomo said
the attorney general had said
there was no case against two
foreign journalists and that is was
up to police to release them or
put new charges to them. He said
two of his colleagues were at the
Harare central police station "to
facilitate their release."


.timefor







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 2008


INERATINLNW


N MUSCAT, Oman

THE United States intends
to send many more combat
forces to Afghanistan next
year, regardless of whether
troop levels in Iraq are cut fur-
ther this year, Defense Secre-
tary Robert Gates said Friday,
according to Associated Press.
It is the first time the Bush
administration has made such a
commitment for 2009.
Gates told reporters while
flying to this Persian Gulf
nation from a NATO summit
in Bucharest, Romania, that
President Bush had made the
pledge to other allied leaders at
the summit on Thursday.
Bush was not specific about
the number of additional
troops that would go to
Afghanistan in 2009, Gates
said. The United States now
has about 31,000 troops there
the most since the war
began in October 2001 and
has been pressing the allies to
contribute more.
Until now, the heavy com-
mitment of U.S. forces in Iraq
has been a constraint on the
ability to increase U.S. troop
levels in Afghanistan. But
Gates said he did not believe
that would be the case in 2009.
Gates also said he expected
a Bush decision "fairly soon"
on a proposal to reduce sol-
diers' combat tours from 15
months to 12 months, a move
the Army deems urgent in
order to relieve stress on
troops and their families. Gates
indicated for the first time pub-
licly that there are drawbacks
to doing it.
"It really is whether we're
prepared and ultimately the
president to sign up to
something that clearly imposes
some limits on what we could
do in the future," Gates said.
He was referring to the fact
that 15-month tours enabled
the Army to build up in Iraq in
2007 a cornerstone of
Bush's revised Iraq strategy
known as the "surge" with
the limited number of ground
combat brigades in its ranks.
"So the bottom line is, we're
all still looking at that," he
added.
His comment suggested a
link between reducing tour
lengths and the prospect of
substantially expanding the
U.S. troop presence in
Afghanistan next year. Such
an expansion could make it dif-
ficult, if not impossible, for the
Army to maintain troop rota-
tions for both wars in 2009 and
beyond if it is unable to sub-
stantially cut forces in Iraq in
the near term, while tour
lengths are shortened by three
months.
Regarding the pledge to
send more combat troops to
Afghanistan in 2009, Gates
said he advised Bush to make
the statement to allied leaders
in Bucharest even though the
movement of the unspecified
additional troops would ulti-
mately be a decision for the
next president, who will take
office in January.
"The question arises, how
can we say that about 2009?"
Gates said. "All I would say is,
I believe ... this is one area
where there is very broad
bipartisan support in the Unit-
ed States for being successful"
in Afghanistan, where by many
accounts progress against the
Taliban resistance has stalled.
"I think that no matter who
is elected president, they would
want to be successful in
Afghanistan. So I think this
was a very safe thing for him to
say," the Pentagon chief added.
Gates said he believed it was
too early to decide how many
additional combat forces the
United States should plan on
sending in 2009.
* He said it would depend on
several things, including the
extent of U.S. and NATO suc-
cess on the battlefield this year,
as well as the impact of a new
senior U.S. commander taking
over in coming months.
Gen. David McKiernan is
due to replace Gen. Dan
McNeill this spring as the top
overall commander in
Afghanistan
McNeill has said he believes
he needs another three


brigades two for combat
and one for training. That
translates to roughly 7,500 to
10,000 additional troops. The
Bush administration has no
realistic hope of getting the
NATO allies to send such large
numbers.
McKiernan on Thursday
told Congress that while he
can't yet say how many more
troops he would want there,
he believes he needs addition-
al combat and aviation forces,
intelligence and surveillance
capabilities, and training and
mentoring teams.


* .. ,


CL





CD

A MAN cycles past cooling towers of the coal powered Fuxin Electricity Plant in Fuxin, in China's northeast Liaoning province in this Feb. 17, 2005 file photo. At the Bangkok, Thailand,
U.N. Climate Conference, the carbon market idea is getting a boost in negotiations as there is a call for a new pact on global warming aimed at keeping temperatures from rising so high
they trigger an environmental disaster.




UN climate talks agree on agenda




for 2009 global warming pact


* BANGKOK, Thailand


A LONE pedestrian walks along a footbridge above a busy street in Bangkok, Thailand, Thursday, Dec. 16,
2004. Negotiators at the UN conference agreed Saturday on an ambitious agenda for talks they hope will lead
to a historic global warming pact.


CLIMATE negotiators
agreed Saturday on an ambi-
tious agenda for talks they hope
will lead to a historic global
warming pact, overcoming a
heated dispute between Japan
and developing countries on
how to cut greenhouse gas emis-
sions, according to.Associated
Press.
The schedule came after five
days of marathon talks in
Bangkok and requires negotia-
tors to settle contentions issues,
including how countries will cut
their emissions and how rich
nations will help the poor adapt
to climate change effects.
"This is significant in the
sense that it's an important set
of steps to implement the Bali
action plan," said Kyoji
Komachi, Japan's top negotiator
in Bangkok.
Talks had bogged down earli-
er in the day because of devel-
oping nations' opposition to ear-
ly discussion of a Japanese pro-
posal to set industry-specific
emissions reduction targets.
Developing nations want rich
countries to agree to set nation-
al targets first.
Representatives from 163
countries met in Bangkok for
the first negotiations on a warm-
ing pact meant to take effect
after 2012. Scientists say the
world needs to stabilize green-
house gas emissions in the next
10 to 15 years and cut them by
half by 2050 to avoid the worst
effects of climate change.
The schedule discussed Fri-
day postponed in-depth discus-
sions of the Japanese proposal
until August to satisfy critics in
developing nations.
Instead, other issues such
as rich countries' efforts to help
poor nations adapt to rising
temperatures will be dis-
cussed first.
Delegates also deleted from
an earlier draft a call for discus-
sion of what the U.S. emissions
reduction t.irgcl s might be in
the new agreement, delegates
said, leaving talk of that for 2009
- when a new American presi-
dent will be in office. The gov-
ernment of President Bush has
been critical of deep emissions
reductions.
"It's just a political call of
when you deal with the things
that are most difficult," said Ian
Fry, representative of the island
nation of Tuvalu.
The draft schedule also called
for discussions of the transfer
of clean technologies from rich
countries to developing nations
at the June meeting in Bonn. A
subsequent meeting in Ghana
in August would address the
Japanese proposal, as well as
deforestation.
The Japanese plan triggered
strident opposition earlier in the
day from China, India and other


developing countries. They
argued it was an attempt to shift
the burden of responsibility for
climate change from rich to
poor nations.
Tokyo hopes for an agree-
ment on energy efficiency tar-
gets for specific industries across
national boundaries. Proponents
say it would preserve competi-
tion, while rewarding nations
like Japan that already have
high levels of energy efficiency.
Poorer countries, however,
fear it would favor nations with
a technological edge by allowing
them to make fewer cuts in
greenhouse gas emissions. They
objected to holding in-depth dis-
cussions on it in June, as called
for in an earlier draft work plan.
"We would have very strong
reservations," Su Wei, a Chi-
nese delegate who is responsible
for the government's climate
change policy, said Friday.
"It is intended to substitute
for targets and would shift
the burden on developing coun-
tries, which are not very
advanced in energy efficiency
technology."
An Indian delegate dismissed
the Japanese proposal as a
"huge protectionist scam," while
the G-77 grouping of developing
countries refused to include any
reference to it in the work'plan.
Japan, which is struggling to
meet its greenhouse gas reduc-
tion targets under the 1997
Kyoto Protocol, is campaigning
to put its approach at the center
of the future warming agree-
ment, which is to take effect
when the Kyoto pact ends in
2012.
Komachi said Japan was not
using the proposal to force
developing countries into the
same emissions targets as
.cllithy industrialized nations.
But he was happy with the final
document.
"I think it's positive," he said.
The other sticking point in the
talks has been the U.S. insis-
tence that discussions over
actions it will take to reduce
greenhouse gases coincide with
talks about what developing
nations will do.
Developing nations argue that
U.S. and other industrialized
countries should take the first
steps in cutting emissions, since
they are responsible for the bulk
of today's emissions.
The new global warming pact
is meant to succeed the first
phase of the Kyoto Protocol,
which requires 37 industrialized
nations to reduce greenhouse
gas emissions an average of 5
percent below 1990 levels by,-
2t12.
The United States is the only
industrialized nation not to have
ratified Kyoto. but it agreed
with nearly 200 other nations at
a conference in Bali in Decem-
ber to negotiate a new agree-
ment by the end of 2009.