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The Tribune
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00987
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: March 29, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:00987

Full Text









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LOW 71F

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SHOWERS


The


Tribune


BAHAMAS EDITION


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Volume: 104 No.106 SATURDAY,, MARCH 29, 2008 PRICE- 750



I I



Ni at'ion Park I I A gIGH
ENIRNENA ATVIT UGEGVE MET P aus ae uli erat rina atue togod


Ex-minister:


PetroCaribe


would combat


rising oil costs


a By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
A heated row erupted over
the government's reluctance to
sign on to the PetroCaribe ini-
tiative yesterday, which one for-
mer Cabinet minister said is the
key to reducing "astronomical"
fuel costs.
Former Minister of Trade
and Industry Leslie Miller said
the country would not be faced
with "exorbitant" gas prices
today if the former administra-
tion had signed on to the Petro-
Caribe initiative in 2005. He
also called on the present gov-

No arrests

made over

Spanish
Wells

robberies
* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
POLICE have yet to
arrest any of the culprits
behind the brazen night-
time raids on five businesses
on the quiet Eleutheran
island of Spanish Wells, The
Tribune has learned.
Abner Pinder., a local
councillor, said police picked
up "a couple" of people for
questioning believed to be
connected to the robberies
but were unable to find
enough evidence against
them to hold them in cus-
tody.
"They had to release
them. So right now, as far
as I know, they haven't been
able to find out anything
concrete," he said.
The spate of burglaries
took place over the course
of several hours early one
mid-February weekend
morning.
According to one source,
hundreds of thousands of
SEE page 11


ernment revisit the agreement.
"Why should we continue to
let these people (fuel providers)
ride on our backs and the
Bahamian people suffer? Had
the Bahamas government
signed on to PetroCaribe when
we had an opportunity when I
was the minister, no Bahamian
in this country would have paid
more than $4 a gallon at this
time for fuel.
"Our price would always
have been a dollar less than
what it is today that's what
PetroCaribe had offered us -
one dollar less than the prevail-
ing market prices we would
have been paying today," Mr
Miller argued.
When he was minister, he
predicted gas prices would surge
to unprecedented levels.
"All of us (on the Fuel Usage
Committee) saw this day was
coming...we said if we're not
careful the price of fuel is going
to exceed $5 (a gallon) and it
has now come to pass."
However, current Minister of
State for Utilities Phenton Ney-
mour said PetroCaribe is not a
priority as the government is
looking at alternative initiatives
to the Venezuelan agreement.
"(PetroCaribe) is not a pri-
ority of the government at this
particular time...there are
advantages and disadvantages
to PetroCaribe and we have to
make a decision that is in the
nation's best interests.
"Other countries (have
signed on) and it may serve as a
benefit to them because of their
deficiencies but we have to look
at it from our perspective. The
government feels that there are
other initiatives that are of more
importance than the Petro-
Caribe agreement that can
bring us greater benefits," he
told The Tribune.
Minister Neymour said these
other initiatives included pro-
ceeding with the assembly of a
National Energy Policy to dic-
tate what direction the nation
should take.
All of the countries in the
Caribbean with the exception
of Trinidad and Barbados have
signed on to the initiative, Mr
Miller said. He claimed Jamaica
had received benefits "in excess
of $100 million" from the agree-
ment over the past 18 months.
Mr Miller, part of the now
dismantled Fuel Usage Com-
mittee which made recommen-
SEE page 11


By NATARIO MCKENZIE
TWO brothers were each sentenced to 24
months in prison yesterday after pleading guilty to
a long list of fraud charges related to the forging
of cheques used to obtain cash and goods from
several local foodstores.
Three others were also arraigned in Magis-
trate's Court on fraud charges for allegedly forg-
ing cheques to obtain cash and goods from local
foodstores.
Tamaro Rahming, 31, of Tamarind Way, off
Mermaid Boulevard, and his brother Vivian Rah-


ming, 33, alias Darren Rahming, both pleaded
guilty before Magistrate Susan Sylvester to a list
of fraud charges related to the forging of First
Caribbean International Bank cheques.
Court dockets stated that Tamaro Rahming
forged cheques in the amounts of $342 and $415
between Wednesday, November 21, and Thurs-
day, December 27, 2007.
They also alleged that he obtained cash and
goods from foodstores such as City Market in
SEE p 1ge 11


Internal

court to

probe

prison

incident
N By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
afowe@tribunemedia.niet

Details of an incident which,
left a prison officer and an
inmate in hospital on Thursday
remained shrouded in mystery
yesterday as a National Securi-
ty spokesman said it was too
early to release further infor-
mation on the matter.
However, the episode was
considered serious enough to
prompt authorities to convene
an internal Court of Inquiry "to
investigate the circumstances
that led to the incident," accord-
ing to the ministry.
The matter was first brought
to the attention of the press late
Thursday evening when the
government issued a press
release stating that the incident
involving an inmate and "sev-
eral officers" had occurred in
the maximum security unit of
Her Majesty's Prison shortly
before noon that day.
"As a result of the incident,
the inmate and a prison officer
received injuries, and were
treated at the Princess Margaret
Hospital," said the statement.
Yesterday, Thelma Rolle, a
hospital spokeswoman, did not
return calls seeking further
information on the status of the
inmate and the officer, and the
injuries they had received.
Pressed for further details,
under-secretary in the Ministry
of National Security Peter
Deveaux Isaacs told The Tri-
bune that he did not wish to
comment further on the matter
While an investigation is under-
way.
"I think we may be able to
come out with some prelimi-
nary information fairly soon.
particularly because a lot of
stuff is circulating out there, but
I don't want to endorse any bit
of information that is out there
because it's really too early in
the investigation to say," he
said.
However, Mr Deveaux Isaacs
did confirm that the incident
did not come about as a result
of an attempt by the inmate to
escape the prison.
In March, s-'1, a prison offi-
cer, Corporal Deon Bowles.
died and two other officers were
injured when four inmates
escaped from the maximum
security wing by cutting through
the bars of their cells.
SEE page 11


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PAGE 2SRYAH


US Ambassador Ned Siegel
met with members of the Youth
Ambassador for Positive Liv-
'ing organisation in Rawson
Square yesterday.
YAPL is a branch of the
Commonwealth Youth Pro-
gramme Caribbean Centre
(CYPCC) that seeks to deter
sexual promiscuity among
young people, and encouraging
them to make "healthy"
lifestyle choices.


YAPL conducts presenta-
tions and workshops on HIV
and AIDS, decision making,
drug abuse and prevention, peer
counselling, and education at
high schools, colleagues, church-
es, and youth organizations..
In addition to this, YAPL
hosts a number of events such
as youth expos, rallies, and
street campaigns all aimed at
promoting positive lifestyle
choices.


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Contest for top


maths achievers


THE Ministry of Education
and the College of the Bahamas
are partnering to organise a
nationwide mathematics com-
petition for students in grades
four to 12 who achieved at least
a B grade in mathematics on
their last report card.
This follows on the heels of
last year's successful competi-
tion which was organised in col-
laboration with the Organisa-
tion of American States (OAS)
as part of the recognition of the
25th anniversary of the
Bahamas becoming a member
of OAS.


Dr Brenda Cleare, Dean of
the Faculty of Pure and Applied
Sciences at the college, is spear-
heading the competition again
this year.
She is assisted by Theresa
McPhee and Joan Rolle, the
education officers,with the
Department of Education who
have responsibility for high
school and primary mathemat-
ics, respectively.
The organising committee
includes members of the math-
ematics department of the col-
lege along with math personnel
from the Ministry of Education.
Greta Kemp, mathematics
lecturer at the college, said,
"Many people have expressed
concerns about the low levels
of mathematics achievement in
both the BJC and the BGCSE
examinations. One of the ideas
behind the competition is to try
to provide a stimulus for
improving students' achieve-
ment in such an important sub-
ject."
The questions that the stu-
dents are asked to answer will
be based on the national math
curriculum but the aim,


according to Mrs Kemp, is to
promote problem solving using
knowledge of math concepts
rather than rote learning and
regurgitation of figures.
The competition will expose
the students to non-routine
problems that will stimulate and
challenge their minds, and
enhance their mathematical cre-
ativity and resourcefulness.
"Excellence in the subject is
what we are looking for,"
explains Mrs Kemp, "and we
try to ask the type of questions
that the students have never
seen before in their texts or on


their school and national exams.
They will be challenged to apply
their knowledge and skills in
unusual territory. The competi-
tion is similar to international
Math Olympiads and it is
designed to get the students
thinking and thinking quickly."
The competition will be
organised in three categories:
primary, grades four to six;
junior high, grades seven to
nine; senior high grades 10 to
12.
All entrants will take a writ-
ten examination on April 25
and then the top 10 from each
category will proceed to the oral
test which will be administered
over three days, May 13 to 15.
Spectators will be permitted
to attend the oral sessions of
the competition and the first.
second and third place winners
in each categoi~% will receive
prizes.
Students throughout the
Bahamas are encoiura.igcd to
participate in the competition.
Registration forms will be
available at all public and pri-
vate schools in the New Provi-
dence and the Family Islands.


U-


MAIN SECTION
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Editorial/Lettr. ..,.... ............. .............P4
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CLASSIFIED SECTOR" 132 PAGES

USA TrODAY, WEEKE EDITIONN


- ~-~ ~~-~ i..-~~..`---~ ~..~...


-- --- --- 1-~


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2008


IA UrP IIMA
(mfl KW* mom"







THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2008, PAGE 3


Activists: Make Adelaide






Beach into National Park


THE environmental organi-
sation reEarth has asked that
Adelaide Beach be declared a
protected national park -
despite plans by the Albany
developers to cut through the
area to facilitate a yacht marina.
In an open letter, reEarth
asked the council of the
Bahamas National Trust to
draft a resolution recommend-
ing the creation of such a
national park.
The group said "the highest
and best use of Adelaide Beach,
its adjacent marine environ-
ment, wetlands, sawgrass fields,
and pine barren" would be to
preserve it for the long term
benefit of the Bahamian peo-
ple.
reEarth noted that the
Bahamas National Trust Act
states that the Trust "shall be
established for the purposes of
promoting the permanent
preservation for the benefit and
enjoyment of the Bahamas of


lands and tenements (including
buildings) and submarine areas
of beauty or natural or historic
interest and as
regards lands and submarine
areas for the preservation (so
far as practicable) of their nat-
ural aspect, features, and ani-
mal, plant and marine life."
The group noted that during
the "long and hard fight" over
the Clifton, which began in
1998, "and was in part champi-
oned by one of your council
members at the time, and cur-
rent deputy president Mr Peri-
cles Maillis," the trust passed a
Resolution of the Council of the
Bahamas National Trust on
April 7, 2000 to save the area
from development.
"This bold move set a prece-
dent for the trust's role in the
preservation and protection of
lands under threat by develop-
ment," the letter said.
"What confounds us is that
the issues of Clifton are mir-


Environmentalists seeking

protected status for area to

combat Albany marina plans


rored almost exactly by those
of the Tiger Woods/Joe
Lewis/Ernie Els Albany devel-
opment, in fact Albany threat-
ens the very same resources as
Clifton, and yet the Trust
remains silent on the issue," it
said.
The letter noted that the
Trust's resolution to protect
Clifton was justified based on:
the recent development
proposals for the Clifton area
having stimulated and initiated
considerable study and analy-
sis of the state of development
of New Providence
the fact that council finds
there to be unique and nation-


ally significant cultural and nat-
ural resources in the Clifton
area of New Providence
a the fact that there are
equally significant marine
resources in the adjacent waters
the growth of development
and population of New Provi-
dence rapidly eliminating criti-
cal natural and cultural
resources
the increasing need for pub-
lic open space and access to
these remaining nationally sig-
nificant resources
"All of these points were laid
out in the resolution to save
Clifton from the proposed
Clifton Cay development and


all of these points still apply to
the rampant unsustainable
development going on in the
south western New Providence,
as well as in the Bahamas gen-
erally," said the letter.
"Adelaide's beaches, cultural
assets, the same reefs and water
lens protected under the Clifton
resolution, the adjacent forests,
the public's access to places of
natural beauty, and community
are all jeopardised by the
Albany development.
"These same resources, pro-
tected by the Resolution to save
Clifton in 2000 are worthy and
entitled to the same preserva-
tion given to Clifton, for the
very same reasons, in 2008," it
said.
The letter continued: "Set all
the environmental issues aside,
Adelaide trumps Clifton in that
there is a human community liv-
ing in Adelaide that has never
been properly and truthfully
told of the potential cata-.


strophic impacts to the public's
beach, their properties, and sub-
sequently their community as a
result of the beach erosion that
the Albany EIA has admitted
will result from their develop-
ment.
"We therefore request that
the council of the Bahamas
National Trust recommend to
government that the highest
and best use of the Adelaide
beach, its adjacent marine envi-
ronment, wetlands, sawgrass
fields, and pine barren, be des-
ignated a national park for the
long term benefit of the
Bahamian people in order to
preserve these natural and cul-
tural resources."
"We also call on the Bahamas
National Trust to join reEarth
in a call to government to
impose an immediate morato-
rium on cutting through
Bahamian beaches (including
Adelaide beach), dredging of
canals, and new golf courses."


NEW 1:O00


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HERO MOVIE NEW 1:20 3:0 WA :20 8:45 10:55
IT TAYLOR T 1:05 3:40 WA g610 1040
ER T 1:25 3:20 WA 625 :45 W1050
m__________A 1:20 2:45 WA 6:20 8:40 10:35
BACK DOWN C 1:00 3:25 WA :0 8:15 10:40
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10,000 BC


1:10 130 I WA


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COLLEGE ROAD TRIP B 1:00 35 WA 6:00 8:20 10:45
VANTAGE POINT C :15s S 815 830 10:4
STEP UP2 THE STREETS T 1:15 330 A 6:15 8:30 10:45


SUPERHERO MOVIE NEW 1:20 3135 WA 620 8:30 10:30
SHUTTER T 110 35 WA 610 8:40 10:30
HORTON A 1:10 30 WA 6:05 8:25 10:20
NEVER BACK DOWN C 1:00 3:35 WA 60 8:20 10:40
10,000 BC T 1:00 :30 WA 6:05 8:35 10:45
COLLEGE ROAD TRP B 1 340 WA* 6:5 :35 1035
" .... . = __ _


Students show 'range'


of their commitment


* By Matt Maura

THE decision of students
from 15 schools in New Prov-
idence to join the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force's
ranger programme is "quite
significant" as it proves how
many young Bahamians are
committed to acting in the
best interests of the country,












* By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribuneme-
dia.net

FREEPORT A 36-
year-old resident of
Freeport was charged with
gun and ammunition pos-
session charges in Freeport
Magistrates Court.
Darin Pratt, a resident of
Lincoln Green Estates,
appeared before Magistrate
Debbye Ferguson on
charges of possession of an
unlicensed firearm and
ammunition.
It is alleged that on March
26, Pratt was in possession
of a firearm that was loaded
with ammunition.
Pratt was represented by
K Brian Hanna. He pleaded
not guilty to both charges.
The matter was adjourned
to September 18. Pratt was
remanded Her Majesty's
Prison, Fox Hill, until that
date.


ITROP IL


Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest said.
Mr Turnquest encouraged
the rangers to take full advan-
tage of all of the opportuni-
ties the programme allows to
participate in nation-building.
Addressing the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force's
ranger installation ceremony
held at the Kendal G L Isaacs
National Gymnasium, Mr
Turnquest said the decision
also comes at a time "when a
few, delinquent and deviant
Bahamian youth" are com-
mitting terrible crimes, includ-
ing the crime of murder.
"Some have brought this
crime and violence into our
schools," Mr Turnquest said.
"The positive result of the step
you take today as rangers says,
for all to hear, that you are
young Bahamians who intend
to do the best that you can for
your country.
"Together with your par-
ents, you have made a patri-
otic decision to contribute to
the growth and development
of our country. I urge you to
participate in nation-building
and to be productive Bahami-
ans, doing all you can to uplift
your schools, your corrimuni-
ties, your church and your
country, both now and in the
future.
"I also urge you to always to
bear in mind that you have
accepted the responsibility


and discipline that comes with
being a Royal Bahamas
Defence Force ranger. The
ranger programme is a very
positive programme for our
young people," Mr Turnquest
added.
He told the newly installed
rangers that they must "fully
participate" in the many com-
munity projects that comprise
the ranger programme as that
participation will help them
to get to know and understand
what is going on in communi-
ties and how, through team-
work, those communities can
be improved.
Mr Turnquest applauded
Commodore Clifford Scavella,
commander of the Defence
Force, and the programme's
instructors for. providing an
"invaluable service" to the
Bahamas through the ranger
programme.
"Instructors, it is an invalu-
able service you are render-
ing and we commend you for
your untiring dedication and
commitment to the success of
the programme," Mr Turn-
quest said.
"Ranger inductees I have
only one further point to
make.
"As you embark on your
time as a ranger, let the motto
of the ranger programme:
'Discipline, dedication arid
determination', guide you in
all that you do."


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4. SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2008


EDITIRI 0-'E S TO THEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Tibet suffers while the world yawns


PITY THE people of Tibet. Through six
decades of Chinese occupation, ethnic purifi-
cation and cultural devastation,'they've nev-
er found the need to adopt the modern
means necessary to make their cause worthy
of international patronage.
No assassinations. No suicide bombings.
No hijackings. No massacres of Olympic
athletes.
In the dictionary of political symbolism,
those are the acts that pay off, the ones that
have the most bang for their buck, so to
speak. They're the ones that let progressive
people everywhere know that the people
you are killing rather than the people
doing the killing are depraved monsters.
Those are the acts that earn U.N. Securi-
ty Council condemnations of the victims,
not the perpetrators. The acts that get aca-
demics and trade unionists exercised about
boycotts and such.
Instead, Tibetans have the Dalai Lama
exhorting followers from his exile in India to
cling to a campaign of non-violence. And
as China brutally crushes dissidents who
recently took to the streets inside Tibet, the
world yawns. Last week, the Security Coun-
cil declined even to consider the issue.
China is supposed to be putting its best
face forward in preparation for the 2008
Summer Olympic Games in Beijing: .-he
games themselves are supposed to show-
case China's emergence as a responsible
member of the international community.
Nothing could be further from the truth.
And the blurry images and eyewitness
accounts of security forces beating and
arresting Buddhist monks should surprise
no one.
China has been the primary accomplice of
the Sudanese government's genocidal cam-
paign against black Africans in Darfur. As
the rest of the world was scaling back arms
sales to Sudan in 2005 in compliance with a
U.N. arms embargo, Chinese arms manu-
facturers which, needless to say, are either
state-owned or state-controlled were
ramping up sales and cashing in.
According to a recent report from Human
Rights First, China is Sudan's largest supplier
of small arms the weapons the Sudanese
military and its Janjaweed militia allies use to
slaughter residents of Darfur's villages.
China provided 90 per cent of Sudan's


Come Join
*rtimer Voll


small arms in 2004 and 94 percent in 2005.
If China's communist leaders are willing to
turn a blind eye to atrocities in Sudan, they'll
have no compunction about carrying out
their own atrocities against those who pose
a challenge to their authoritarian rule.
In 1989, it was the proponents of democ-
ratic reform in Tiananmen Square who felt
the government's fury. Today, it is the advo-
cates of autonomy in Tibet. In between, it
has been the followers of Falun Gong, Chris-
tians and members of China's Muslim
Uighur minority.
In the future, it may be uppity residents of
Hong Kong or the "renegade province" of
Taiwan.
Western corporations that have shelled
out hundreds of millions of dollars to
become official partners of the Beijing
Olympics don't want the public to dwell on
such matters. Politics shouldn't get in the
way of selling sneakers, sodas or french fries
- which is the capitalist complement of the
Chinese policy that prevents politics from
intruding on oil deals and arms sales.
Business is business.
But perhaps the Beijing games, now
dubbed the Genocide Olympics, won't be
business as usual. On Monday, pro-Tibet
activists disrupted the torch lighting cere-
*diay in Olympia, Greece. Steven Spielberg
has withdrawn his services as an artistic
adviser to the Beijing Olympic Committee
because of China's complicity in Darfur.
Olympic gold medalist speed skater Joey
Cheek co-founded Team Darfur, an inter-
national coalition of athletes committed to
raising awareness about Darfur.
"At some point," Cheek told USA Today,
"if you actually believe the Olympic ideal,
you have to take action."
The official theme for this summer's
games is "One world, one dream."
With China, however, there are two
worlds: The world of an industrious and
educated populace hoisting its nation into
the 21st century; and the nightmare world of
fearful dictators who will cut any deal,
imprison any opponent and crack any num-
ber of skulls to retain their monopoly on
power.
(This article was written by Jonathan Gur-
witz c.2008 San Antonio Express-News for
the New York Times News Service).


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ball CLASSIC


April 11th, 12 th & 13th

Sir Kendal Isaacs Gym
Registration Open to All
Church Leagues
Bankers Leagues
& Night League Teams

Registration Fee: $150 per team
Deadline for teams entries:
April 6th, 2008
For More Information Contact
bridgetterolle @yahoo.rom or
677-4530


'Selling the




family silver'




for low jobs


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I HAVE held back from writ-
ing this letter for several weeks
but Monday's newspaper was
the last straw. I am English and
so I have no political or eco-
nomic bias in the views that I
hold about the Bahamas, just
my best wishes for the people.
It takes hundreds of years for
a country to earn prosperity.
Europe has taken several hun-
dred years and America over
two hundred. You cannot
achieve it in three decades!
Prosperity comes from educat-
ing the people and hoping that
entrepreneurs will emerge and
build the prosperity that all
Bahamians wish for.
Prosperity does not come,
from "selling the family silver"!
You do that only when you are
in desperate straits and have no
other alternative and I do not
believe that the Bahamas is in
that situation. Yet that is pre-
cisely what is happening and it
probably stems from the desire
by the government to be seen to
be achieving instant prosperity
for the people and hence more
votes for them in the future, but
this is the wrong tactic for the
country. The richest people in


the country seem to be the real-
tors! That's wrong they should
be the farmers and the wealth
generators.
In your paper on Monday a
new development was
announced for Eleuthera, a let-
ter was published expressing
major concerns about the
Albany development and there
are many other developments
in progress such as Crab Cay in
Exuma all of which are exam-
ples of selling the family silver,
ie selling some of the most valu-
able land in the Bahamas for
foreigners to make money.
Yes there will be jobs but in
the long term these jobs will be
just waiters, gardeners and
maintenance, they will not lead
to prosperity. They will not lead
to ownership and wealth. You
could almost say that the end
result will be just one step away
from a return to slavery led by
foreigners.
And to satisfy the develop-
er's hunger for maximum prof-
it they are allowed to build gat-


ed developments. What an
insult to the people of the
Bahamas! It creates "them and
us". Is it a suggestion that local
people do not behave properly?
It prevents Bahamians from
enjoying what was their beauti-
ful land before the government
sold it. And then there are all
the other worrying factors that
were very well expressed in
Monday's letter about the
Albany project. The Eleuthera
project is to be three high
hotels!
Do the people of the
Bahamas really want their land
to look like Miami? What hap-
pened to the Bahamian culture
and architecture? Why become
just another Miami when you.
could be Bahamian!
So my message to the
Bahamian government is: -
Slow down. Stop selling land.
The beautiful land is your
wealth so guard it safely.
Instead educate the young peo-
ple to their maximum potential
and be patient. Wait for them to
bring prosperity.
PAUL TATHAM
George Town,
Exuma,
March 17,2008.


EDITOR, The Tribune.
THE former Prime Minister
should not have chosen this
time to blame the present Prime
Minister for the "failure" or
interruption of the Baha Mar
project. He may have forever
damaged whatever legacy he
was hoping to have, because the
key reasons for Baha Mar's
problems are coming to light
and the light is shining in the
direction of the persons he may
have "consulted" with. It is now
apparent that the inability of
the past administration to lay
all of the cards on the table is
coming back to haunt them and
there is one particular piece of
information circulating that
well before the last election the
then governing party could not
agree to what the investors were
asking for. There is further
speculation that chief concern
in the proposal revolved around
the ownership the Cable Beach
Golf Course; because it is the
only property that would allow
for an unrestricted view to the
beach and harbour if the


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ROSELINE DESTAMA OF PEACH
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29TH
day of MARCH, 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





FRUESFREISFIEI


I'U


V-0 0 *


5 CUBE $353.00

7 CUBE $445.00

9 CUBE $522.00

15 CUBE $650.00

25 CUBE $995.00


planned condominium devel-
opment was to take place. It
may also give the reason as to
why the original heads of agree-
ment document was never
tabled in the House; if that was
made public the election would
not have been close at all.
The fact that the abrupt with-
drawal/departure of Harrah's
occurred shortly after the Min-
ister of Education pointed out
that the deed for the golf course
had a covenant restriction, a
legal restriction that did not
allow for what the investors
wanted and may have engen-
dered future problems, social
and political.
If there is one good thing to
come out of this situation, it is
the possibility that the cabinet
ministers who were a part of
that agreement will have to
come clean as to what exactly it
is that they could not agree to
and put an end to news confer-
ences where no one is allowed
to ask questions. The circum-
stances surrounding Baha Mar
have caused the property own-
ers affected by the Albany pro-
ject to take a closer look at just
what it is they are agreeing to. I
must continue to state that pro-
jects like Baha Mar and Albany
have no real benefit to the
Bahamas, unless they are
planned properly, and the per-
sons most affected by them are
made aware of what is going


on. There is an unconscionable
group of local businessmen in
this country who are only look-
ing at the next dollar and seek-
ingfor"fays to expand theif
empires, and they do not care
about .whatdamage is done to
an already fragile social fabric.
If these projects were in Europe
or the US more than a traffic
impact study would have been
needed. Demographic, social
and environmental studies
would have been done, even
before a heads of agreement
was even considered. The
"bourgeois" in the Bahamas
seem to have a preoccupation
with one shot deals.
A problem we have as a peo-
ple is that we have not truly
embraced the responsibility that
came with 1973.
It is an all encompassing
responsibility, but some seem
to be more content with keep-
ing the populace up to date with
what some members of the
UBP were doing more than 55
years ago. I will admit that that
regime did have its issues, but
we will have to admit that if a
person like Stafford Sands was
at the Baha Mar negotiating
table it would be a whole lot
better for all Bahamians con-
cerned.
EDWARD HUTCHESON
Nassau,
March 12, 2008.


Ministers must come


clean on investor deals


BKGA410.03

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$71,000,000.00 of 91-Day
Treasury Bills will be received by the Banking
Manager, The Central Bank of The Bahamas, Frederick
Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on Tuesday, April 1, 2008.
Successful tenderers, who will be advised should take up
their bills against payment on Thursday, April 3, 2008.
These bills will be in minimum multiples of B$100.00.
Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable from the
Central Bank of The Bahamas or Commercial Banks.


Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked "Tender". The Central Bank of
the Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


APLANE YS.GIAR

323&3 25240-3-- 77N@ 3 '-71)
EVEN IN .- -


I


M009


mood






SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


h yorune xr


* By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
whyyouvex@tribuneme-
dia.net

"1 vex because there aren't
any feasible dining options
for vegetarians on this island.
Here I am trying to be
healthy but I am tired of
going to fast food places and
the only non-
meat items
on the menu
are greasy
french fries
or a dry,
small salad. I

eat good
food, but I
also eat
healthy food.
"With our
obesity rates
soaring along \.
with hyper-
tension and
diabetes, you ' .
would think
more restau-
rants would
have healthi-
er options for people who
don't want to eat a dead ani-
mal. Also, Bahamians should
educate themselves on what
they put in their bodies
instead of looking like a deer
caught in headlights when
someone has different eating
habits than them."
Arthur M, Nassau.

"I vex at whoever is
responsible for the timing of
these traffic lights. Why is the
turning signal at the Wulff
Road and Montrose Avenue
light, near Super Value, so
fast? Only one car can barely
make it through. Meanwhile,
the light at Wulff and Baillou
Hill Roads, near St Barnabas
Church, has a turning lane
that allows up to 10 cars (yes,
I've counted 'em!) to get
through.


By WILL WEISSERT
Associated Press Writer

HAVANA (AP) First
microwaves, now cell phones.
Is this the new Cuba?
Raul Castro is revolutioniz-
ing his brother's island in small
but significant ways the latest
in a decree Friday allowing ordi-
nary Cubans to have cell phone
service, a luxury previously
reserved for the select few. The
new president could be betting
greater access to such modern
gadgets will quell demand for
deeper change.
Many Cubans hope cell
phones and new appliances are
only the beginning for a post-
Fidel Castro government that
will improve their lives. Com-
munist bureaucracy currently
limits everything from Internet
access to home ownership.
Could cellular phones in dis-
sidents' hands give state securi-
ty forces an edge in monitoring
their conversations or tracking
their movements by satellite?
Perhaps, but government oppo-
nents including the few who.
have cell phones already
assume someone's always lis-
tening.
Until now, the only people
legally allowed to have a cell
plan were foreigners, Cubans
working for foreign companies
and top government officials.
Thousands more illegally use
phones registered to foreign
friends or relatives.
"Finally. We have waited too
long for this," said Elizabeth, a
middle-aged housewife waiting
in line to pay her home tele-
.phone bill.
The new program could put
phones in the hands of hun-
dreds of thousands of Cubans,
especially those with relatives
abroad who send them hard
currency.

FO 3INI LAWN.SERVICE
Fer~tilierFngicde


"Speaking of St Barnabas,
who cut down that beautiful
almond tree that was grow-
ing out of the sidewalk on
Wulff Road? Hope they
realise the children using that
new playground equipment
are gonna bake in the heat,
now that their little piece of
shade is gone."
Wulff Road Driver.

"I wonder how some of the
vehicles can pass inspection
to be on our
roads. There
are cars,
trucks, dri-
o ving at night
with bright
disco lights. 1
think that
Most of our
streets have
e nenou gh
lights on
them. There-
fore, we
don't need
to be driving
in front or
back of a
vehicle that
has bright
flashers on
like they're
pretending
to be the police."
Concerned driver.

"What happens to speed
cops at night-time on our
streets? I feel that they should
be visible around this island
day and night. I only see the
speed cops when they are
directing traffic from the new
Paradise Island Bridge.
"Also, we should be able
to feel safe on our streets and
if I can't feel that way on our
streets then where can I feel
safe?
It was a horrible sight to
see that a race car almost ran
a taxi that was loaded with
tourists off the road. How stu-
pid was that person to do such
a thing. We as Bahamians are
really getting terrible each
time the clock ticks."
KD, Nassau.


But they will remain out of
reach for most on the island
because minutes are billed in
convertible pesos which cost
Cubans 24 times the regular
pesos they are paid in.
"I'd love one!" said Juan
Quiala, a retiree living on a $10
monthly pension. "But how am
I going to pay for it?"
The government controls
over 90 percent of the econo-
my, and while the communist
system ensures most Cubans
have free housing, education
and health care and receive
ration cards that cover basic
food needs, the average month-
ly state salary is less than $20.
Nobody should expect to see
iPhones for sale in Havana any-
time soon. Although visitors
who bring their Internet-
equipped phones to Cuba can
use them through Cuba's net-
work, Cuba's cellular phone
company offers such phones to
only a limited number of cor-
porate clients.


Ingraham lauds 'public



servant's 'rich legacy'


PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham paid tribute yester-
day to the memory of Arthur
Barnett, who he said treated
him "as another son" and who
Mr Ingraham "respected and
loved and valued" as a father.
The prime minister told Mr
Barnett's family that he left
them with "a rich legacy".
"He was an honest, honor-
able, respected and hardwork-
ing man. He was raised at a
time in the Bahamas when a
man's word was his bond. He
never forgot that. He believed
instinctively in standing for what
was right, for helping those in
need and in serving his country
and his God," the prime minis-
ter said.
He pointed out that Mr Bar-
nett was proud of his children
and expected that they would
strive to meet his high standards
in terms of education and work
ethic.
"He took particular pleasure
in recounting stories of the
growing number of his grand-
children, seeing the birth of
each as another of his own
accomplishments.
"He has been in failing health
for some time. I know that he
found that difficult and I can
only imagine the hardship
which it placed on you, his ded-
icated and loving wife and fam-
ily.
"When the fresh pain of his
passing has waned, I know that
you will be heartened and
uplifted by the countless won-
derful memories of a loving hus-
band, a father who led by exam-
ple, a civil servant of the highest
order and a citizen extraordi-
naire." Mr Ingraham said.
He noted that Arthur Bar-
nett came from "humble but
honourable" beginnings in New
Providence.


"A product of Grants Town,
he learned the cobbler's trade
while still in primary school and
before winning a scholarship to
the Government High School, a
prized accomplishment for a
young black boy in 1939.
"He excelled at school
achieving a first grade Cam-
bridge Certificate of Educa-
tion," Mr Ingraham noted.
Mr Barnett joined the work
force in 1941 working first in
the private sector and then
briefly in the public service
before pursuing undergraduate
studies on a church sponsored
scholarship in the United States
beginning in 1944.
He remained in Minnesota
for four years unable to afford
the air passage back to the
Bahamas during any school
breaks.
"But he didn't get lost at St
John's University in Minnesota
and returned home straight
away after graduation in May,
1948 when he elected to re-
enter the public service.
"He retired from the Public
Service in April 1980 having
completed some 32 years of
consecutive employment in the
public service of our country,"
Mr Ingraham noted.
After retiring from the public
service, Mr Barnett commenced
a second career in tourism,
assuming responsibility for the
administration of the Bahamas
Hotel Association as executive
director. He held the post for
nine years.
Mr Ingraham said that the
FNM was fortunate to count
Arthur Barnett "a man of
stature and accomplishment" -
among its membership.
"He provided invaluable sup-
port and leadership at the con-
stituency level in Delaporte
in 1982, 1987 and in Bain Town


in 1992. I owe Arthur Barnett a
debt of gratitude. He treated
me as another son and I
respected and loved and valued
him as a father," he said.
Mr Ingraham said that Mr
Barnett was one of the seasoned
elders in the party upon whom
he relied heavily for advice,
guidance and support when he
first became party leader 18
years ago.
"He was one of the party


elders who stood with me as we
made changes in the party and
its slate of candidates in prepa-
ration for the 1992 general elec-
tion.
"And he was one of the two
persons to whom I turned to
oversee the conduct of a hotly
contested primary election to
determine the will of our sup-
porters in the newly created
Lucaya constituency in Grand
Bahama," he said


Health minister pushes recycling,


mulching to reduce garbage levels

By MATT MAURA surface fire that ignited on Tuesday at the may experience exposure to smoke
landfill, their neighborhoods. However, presc
RECYCLING and mulching tech- "The fire was contained late Wednes- ly there is no reason to believe that
niques could play a critical role in elimi- day with no structural damage to nearby fire poses any additional public hea
nating the amount of garbage that is being homes and "with no immediate threat of threat."
deposited at the sanitary landfill off the spreading to the surrounding areas," Dr The Minister of Health, who visi
Tonique Darling Highway, Minister of Minnis said. the landfill site on Tuesday, said the
Health Dr Hubert Minnis said. The Ministry of Health issued a press face fire ignited at the old dump site in
Dr Minnis said he will present a com- statement late Wednesday afternoon area known as "the construction a
prehensive report to his colleagues out- advising parents and guardians to keep demolition area."
lining the part recycling and mulching their children away from the area to avoid He said officials from the Departm
can play in garbage reduction. "unnecessary risk of injury." of Environmental Health Servi
He said the report "is very important" The statement went on to read: "Due (DEHS) and the Fire Services Branc
as a study completed by local environ- to the increased volume of smoke asso- the Royal Bahamas Police Force h:
mental health officials indicated that at ciated with the fire, persons with respira- been working "around the clock"
least 40 per cent of the garbage in the tory diseases such as asthma and chronic ensure that the fire was contained.
Bahamas can be recycled, obstructive lung disease, in addition to Strong winds were a concern for hea
Dr Minnis said the study also showed the very young and the elderly are cau- and fire safety officials who closely m
that another 15 to 20 per cent of that tioned to avoid the area. itored the situation for the possibility
garbage can be mulched. "Should persons with these conditions the fire "jumping" to the nearby hon
"And so therefore, once you have the reside in the immediate area, they are "Officials, however, were able to isol
appropriate programmes in place, those encouraged to remain indoors in an air- the area where the fire existed and w
two measures can automatically remove conditioned environment, or if this is not able to safely deal with that situation,"
60 per cent of the garbage away from the possible, they should consider removing Minnis said.
zones which means that the lifespan of the themselves from the area until the smoke "I would like to congratulate and co
landfill can quadruple while eliminating resolves, mend the Department of Environm
many of the fires we see at the site today, "Persons who experience respiratory tal Health and the Fire Services Branc
because you would have removed cer- diseases are reminded to seek immedi- the Royal Bahamas Police Force on
tain things from there," Dr Minnis said. ate medical attention. excellent job they did in bringing this
His comments came in response to a "Due to the wind factor, individuals under control," he added.


in
ent-
the
alth

ted
sur-
an
and

ent
ces
h of
ave
to

alth
on-
y of
ies.
late
ere
Dr

onl-
aen-
h of
the
fire


The BNT In partnership with RBC Royal Bank of Earth Hour Is coordinated by the World Wildlife
Canada, RBC FNCO, HIgg & Johnson, Federation (WWF) to symbolize that Individuals
Scotlatrust and UBS Is pleased to announce an can make a difference In the fight against
exciting environmental initiative called Earth Hour. climate change.


Let's make a difference together.

LIGHTS OUT AT 8:00 PM,

SATURDAY, MARCH 29,2008
-1---- ... ...A........ -........ .. .


UI1


LOCAL NEWS


I m

Cuba unveils the

4gizmo' revolution













ghh
*










lass ..--.-
fare rni



lin Feepor


By CALVIN FORBES
FREEPORT As people
continue to express concern
over what they call the pro-
longed economic depression in
Grand Bahama, one ex-union
boss warned that higher bus
fares may be on the horizon.
The Freeport resident said
that despite making requests to
those in authority for some
relief, "we have only received
an increase in overall cost of
living."
Voicing his concern about the
recent increases in power and
water costs in Grand Bahama
as a reflection of how the cost of
living has increased since two
major hurricanes wrought dev-
astation here in September 2004
and October 2005, former pres-
ident of the Grand Bahama
.Public Bus Drivers Association
(GBPBDA) Timothy Nottage,
said "we are desperately in need
of a reprieve."
Over the last few months, the
Grand Bahama Power Compa-
ny (GBPC) has raised water
rates and the Grand Bahama
Utility Company (GBUC) has
raised the cost of garbage col-
lection.
Many feel that these increas-
es were not fair, because they
reflect the fact that the burden
of the suffering Freeport econ-
omy is being passed on to resi-
dents, who are unable to afford
it.
Mr Nottage, who said he
fought for better conditions


"With fluctua-
tions in fuel
prices, we as
public service
drivers are
having to bear
the cost of
operating our
franchises
under adverse
conditions.
There are
many of us on
this line, and
it has not
moved for
some time."


when he was president, also
pointed outthat an increase in
the cost of fuel has caused his
company to consider asking the
government to increase the cost
of public transportation.
He noted that some people


BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH[
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL,


Sunday School: 10am
Preaching 11am & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday 6pm ZNS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm


FUNDAMENTAL


I .,. r
FUNDAMENTAL ,
EVANGELISTIC
Pastor:H. Mills


"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are"
Pastor: H. Mills Phone: 393-0563 Box N-3622


IC;



'41


THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH
Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
-- CHURCH SERVICES
-- SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 2008
SECOND SUNDAY OF EASTER
AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
H 11:00AM Rev. Mark Carey
ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM Ms. Janice Knowles
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard
10:00AM Mr. Sidney Pinder
7:00PM No Service
EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,
East Shirley Street
11:00AM Rev. John Tudor
7:00PM Mr. Percy Sands
GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen's College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly
ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00AM Connections Rev. Philip Stubhs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs
TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00AM Rev. William Higgs

RADIO PROGRAMMES
'RENEWAL' on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS I
Your Host: Mr. Andre Darville
'METHODIST MOMENTS' on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Your Host: Mr. Andre Darville
There will be an official visit of a team from Betlhune Cookinll
University, Daytona, Florida from April 2nd to April 51h.
Distinguished Lectre and Dinner Thursday, April 03, 2008, 7:30p.m.
Wyndham Nassau Resort on Cable Beach The Eleuthera Room. This will
be the official event, sponsored by the BCMC and Q.C. to welcome the
delegation from Behtune Cookman University. The President of Bethune,
Dr. Trudle Reed will present the lecture. "TRANSFORMATIVE LEADERSHIP".
We have Invited the Prime Minister and Mrs. Ingraham, The Leader of The
Oppostlon and Mrs. Christie, some Cabinet Ministers and some Members of
Parliament and others. Tickets for the event are available from tl BCMC
Office and from Q.C.
Donation: $65.00


Oranit'i ton Weolep jmet1obisit Clurcl'
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY, MARCH 30TH, 2008
7:00 a.m. Sis. Tezel Anderson/Sis. Alice Woodside
11:00 a.m. Sis. Nathalia Thompson/Sis. Lily Benson
7:00 p.m. Bro. Jamicko Forde/Board of Visitation,
Outreach and Social Witness

5i ngSou r SallleSllllll..iJ ,n im.. f orI. HeIcr sfior us(1er-5:7


have been claiming that bus
fares will rise from $1.50 to
$2.50 in Freeport, but said these
numbers were only a suggestion
and "that what people may
have heard was simply a
rumour.
"With fluctuation in fuel
prices," said, "we as public ser-
vice drivers are having to bear
the cost of operating our fran-
chises under adverse conditions.
As you can probably see, right
at this moment there are many
of us who have been on this bus
line for sometime now and the
line has not moved."
Mr Nottage said that the pub-
lic should now that while "we in
the transportation industry
understand what a possible
increase in the cost of public
transportation may mean to the
public, it must be understood
that franchise holders are bear-
ing the burnt of the cost."
According to Mr Nottage,
holders of bus licenses pay a
considerable amount of money
annually for vehicle licensing,
inspection, company licenses
and insurance.
He added that the increase
in utility costs have "only
caused public services drivers
an additional cost we cannot
afford at this time."
Mr Nottage asserted that
while government has done
much in the past to assist the
business community in
Freeport. "a further step may
be needed by at least lowering
the cost of one of the four fees
charged by government."
He said he has asked the
Road Traffic Department for
an explanation of certain fees
franchise holders pay but "to
date no one there is able to
assist him."


Sandals promotes



Bahamian manager


SANDALS general manager
Robert Keesler announced the
promotion of Andre Pyfrom to
the position of director of oper-
ations.
Crediting Mr Pyfrom as a dri-
ving force in the resort's daily
operation, Mr Keesler said the
decision to promote Mr Pyfrom
was in keeping with the resort's
policy of promoting from with-
in.
"Mr Pyfrom is an invaluable
team member and we were
pleased to promote him to a top
key position within our team.
Constantly he has proven that
he is a high achiever and is
always willing to go above and
beyond the call of duty."
With a career in the hospital-
ity industry spanning more than
20 years, Mr Pyfrom acknowl-
edged that he is looking for-
ward to the challenge ahead
with his new position.
In addition to his overall
assistance within the resort, Mr
Pyfrom's responsibilities now
encompass the overseeing of
the following areas: the
belldesk, laundry, transporta-
tion, security, brokerage and


"CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, MARCH 30TH, 2008

11:30 a.m. & 7:00 p.m.

Speaker: Elder Brentford Isaacs
= Bible Class: 9.45 a.m. Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
( Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
Sisters' Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)









Worship Time: la.n2. & 7p.m.

Prayer Time: 10:15a.m. to 10:45a.m.

Church School during Worship Service
Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O.Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEA VE TO SERVE



II LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH I


Worship timi
Sunday Sc


Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

e: 11am & 7pm
hool: 9:45am f. 0


Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:
The Madeira Shopping
Center
(Next door to CIBC)


the "can-fix-it" team.
Mr Pyfrom said he is most
proud of his can-fix-it team,
which has performed excep-
tionally well.
"We started with a team of
four men which has grown to
13. These team members per-
form daily room preventative
maintenance ensuring that all
rooms meet our required cor-
porate standard as well as the
approval our guests."
He added that to see young
people not only secure a job but
also use their skills to the fullest
in the hospitality industry is
always encouraging.
"When young persons think
about the hospitality industry,
they merely think about restau-
rant and housekeeping posi-
tions, but there are plumbers,
painters, carpenters, electricians
and masons," he said.
Upon graduating from
Queen's College, Mr Pyfrom
immediately went to work at
the Sheraton British Colonial
Hotel and several years later,
at the Trust House Forte of
London.
His enthusiasm for the hos-
pitality industry led him to pur-
sue a tertiary degree in Flori-
da.
Here he obtained an associ-
ates degree in business admin-
istration and a bachelors degree
in business administration from
Nova University in Davie.
While in Florida, he worked
at Carnival Air Fun Tours and


upon returning home took up
employment at Sandals Royal
Bahamian in 1996 while the
resort was under construction.
"It was during this time that
Mr Pyfrom proved his hands-
on approach in administration
and worked diligently with the
projects department," said the
resort.
In 1998 with the completion
of the resort's Windsor Build-
ing, Mr Pyfrom was offered the
position of junior assistant man-
ager with special interest in the
food and beverage department.
In 2001 he was promoted to
assistant manager with added
responsibilities for the front and
heart of the house operations.
In 2006, Mr Pyfrom was
offered the new position of
operations manager.
This position exposed him to
more intricate areas of the hotel
such as accounting and budget-
ing.
Mr Pyfrom said he is looking
forward to ensuring that his new
areas of responsibility not only
perform well but beyond what is
expected.
"We have a great team and
being a part of such vigorous
persons who believe in giving
their best is motivating to me. I
have started meeting with all
my areas and ensuring that they
have the support and assistance
that they need that will sustain
our position as the Caribbean's
number one all inclusive
resort."


-- -' d -
ICome! Join Us this Sunday as

Connect To God Through Prayer
LK iiiir~ii ^1 .tK^ A. J


SUNDAY SERVICES
Morning Worship Service ,-..
Sunday School for all ages.,,
Adult Education ..............
Worship Service .................
Spanish Service ...................
Evening Worship Service .......


8.30 a.m.
9.45 a.m,
9.45 a.m.
11.00 a.m.
8,00 a.m.
6.30 p m.


WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Selective Bible Teaching
Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs.
Misslonettes (Girls Club) 4-16 yrs.


FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting
RADIO MINISTRY
Sunday at 8:30 a.m. ZNS 1 TEMPLE TIME
Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE
Assembly Of God


ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL lynnk@batelnet.bs


I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2008







SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2008, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALSNEWS I


Caribbean water pollution





threat to tourism, fishing


THE discharge of large vol-
umes of untreated wastewater
into the marine environment in
the region poses a serious threat
to the livelihoods of persons
who depend on fisheries as well
as tourism and other sectors,
according to the Caribbean
Environmental Health Institute.
In addition, the institute said
that the practice is having a neg-
ative impact on human health as
well as the health of the coastal
and marine ecosystem.
As a result, the near-shore
waters of many islands in the
Caribbean are now becoming
environmental "hot spots",
where sedimentation and algal
growth threaten vital coastlines
and coastal resources.
"In many ways this further


impacts on the economic
growth and social conditions of
Caribbean countries," the insti-
tute said.
In an effort to address these
problems, the Caribbean Envi-
ronmental Health Institute
(CEHI) in collaboration with
the United Nations Environ-
ment Programme (UNEP)
through its Regional Co-ordi-
nating Unit for the Caribbean
Environment Programme
(UNEP CAR/RCU) hosted the
Wastewater Management
Training Course in Jamaica
from March 25 to the 28.
The course was the second of
its kind in the Caribbean, the
first having been hosted in Suri-
name.
The course is being funded


by United Nations Environ-
ment Programme Global Pro-
gramme for Action (UNEP-
GPA) based in the Netherlands.
The training seeks to provide
participants with analytical
tools, substantive information
and skills on how to select, plan
and finance appropriate and
environmentally sound munici-
pal wastewater management
systems.
It will focus on objective-ori-
ented planning: innovative tech-
nological and financial
approaches; stakeholder
involvement, presentation tech-
niques and feasibility reporting.
the course targeted waste-
water managers and decision-
makers, town planners, and rep-
resentatives from stakeholder


and user groups in the fisheries,
tourism and public health sec-
tors, along with communities
and environmental NGOs.
"It is felt that this target
group could provide support
and technical solutions to the
discharge of untreated waste-
water which pollute our coastal
and marine environment," the
institute said.
The training comes shortly
after the United Nations
observed World Water Day on
March 22 under the theme of
sanitation.
The aim of the day was to
encourage greater action when
it camne to improving water,
sanitation and hygiene provi-
sion at the national, regional
and global level.


Rieso oSours to

wor0r for q are


spriso and ange* o te uate; obVa BrgnVPan
geneal ana er;Se leLing esr alsamiitrtv ass


WEST END, Grand Bahama
- Laundry supervisor Delores
Adderley and resort sales
administrative assistant Sherelle
Laing have been chosen as
Manager and Employee of the
Quarter at Old Bahama Bay.
Making the announcement
was Bob Van Bergen, vice pres-
ident and general manager of
Ginn sur Mer, who applauded
the winners and his entire staff
for their "outstanding service"
during the past quarter.
Delores Adderley started
with the property more than 10
years ago as a marina dock
attendant at the former Jack
Tar Village.
She then transferred to the
guest activities and laundry
departments and has held her
supervisory post for the past
three years.
Excited about being chosen
as Manager of the Quarter for a
second time, Ms Adderley
attributed it to having a posi-
tive outlook. She also credits
her team for her success.
"My staff is supportive and
hardworking which makes my
work more manageable and
enjoyable. Receiving this recog-
nition as back-of-the-house per-
sonnel makes me feel appreci-
ated and keeps me on track as
my department strives to pro-
vide clean and pristine service
for our guests," said Ms Adder-
ley.
Initially, Sherelle Laing want-
ed to be an elementary school
teacher, but fell in love with
tourism after entering the field
six years ago.
She originally worked in food
and beverage but transitioned
to sales and marketing, obtain-


ing an associates degree in busi-
ness management/human
resource management in the
process.
"Wanting to be a good exam-
ple to others and always striving
to be a top achiever in whatev-
er I do helps me to keep a pos-
itive attitude on the job," stated
Ms Laing.
The two awardees expressed
gratitude to management for
recognizing their efforts.
"Working in tourism is chal-
lenging but wonderful and
rewarding. Knowing you pro-
vide quality service to guests
year after year makes it even
more satisfying" said Ms
Adderley.
"When you join the tourism
industry you become a partici-
pant in one of the most impor-
tant sectors of our economy and
are able to learn and develop
new skills. I would encourage
others to enter this field because
tourism is global, diverse,
vibrant and exciting," Ms Laing
added.


The Scotiabank Rate Booster Deposit
Combines the higher interest rates of a longer term
investment with the flexibility of a short term deposit.

Your intcrel rate inilre(ass";I twice dtiriniq lhe trnm of yyour investment,
so your ilonrley is (;qutlrl1iteod lo grow ifaste I PlIs you hive Yaccess to
your moni'y at two set dates within 1her term of your deposit, qivincg
you pr'nlty free ( ccss0, to your mronuey.


Visit your nearest Scotiabank branch today.


:[,l~ll~ll ,[Jt~J 11,1(i itr'L', ,l l ~ llll, he I t' i,-nk o l U~~ t I


Life. Money. Balance both:
Life. Money. Balance both:


THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS ]
+ TH AAACONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS
L'EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE
FL..- -..P ET LES AMERIQUES
NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES
108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:
328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnetbs
METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF
GOD, TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY
THE CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL
HOLINESS THROUGHOUT THE LAND
(Father John Wesley)
"Celebrating 225 years of continuous Methodist
witness for Christ in The Bahamas"
SECOND LORD'S DAY OF THE RESURRECTION,
MARCH 30, 2008.

COLLECT: Risen Christ, for whom no door is locked, no
entrance barred: open the doors of our hearts, that we may seek
the good of others and walk the joyful road of sacrifice and peace,
to the praise of God the father.

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
7:00 a.m. Bro. Arthur Chase
11:00 a.m. Sis. Cecilia Gardiner
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108
Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)
7:00 a.m. Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly (Holy
Communion)
10:00 a.m. Bro. Colin Newton
11:00 a.m. Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly/ Prayer Band
Fresh Expressions/
Induction of FOWL
6:30 p.m. Prayer Band
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street,
Fox Hill)
11:00 a.m. Sis. Patrice Strachan
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m. Sis. Katie Carter
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST
CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field
7:00 a.m. Bro. Andrew Hunter
9:00 a.m. Sis. Viviene Huggins
METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD (Fire
Trail Rd)
8:00 a.m. Youth
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
5:30 p.m. Friday Children's Club
9:00 a.rr Sunday Circuit Women
METHOoIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop
and other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford
St., Oakes Field) Reception to Primary

PEACE AND JUSTICE CAMPAIGN: All Methodists of
the Conference are urged to pray and to fast for Justice to
prevail in the Methodist Cases and for an end to the upsurge
in violence. The fast begins weekly after the evening meal on
Thursday and ends at noon on Friday. This we proclaim
unswervingly: "My God and My Right."

RADIO PROGRAMS
"Vision" On the Lord's Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; "Great Hymns
of Inspiration" On the Lord's Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.;
"Family Vibes" ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; "To God be the
Glory" ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.


I






PAG 8 SA UR AYOMA CH 29, 20 8EHESRI U N


THIRTY-ONE of the
best young speakers in the
Bahamas competed last
night in the semi-finals
round of the Texaco 7th
annual Speech Contest at
the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel.
The participants are high
school students from New
Providence and the Family
Islands who are finalists in
the Junior Achievement,
Debutantes, Gentlemen's
Club, Abaco Rotary and the
Ministry of Education
debating contests.
The topic for the
evening's competition was
"Road safety. Making the
difference."
The young people paid a
courtesy call on Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham at his
Cable Beach Office yester-
day afternoon at 3pm.
The semi-finals breakfast'
and announcement of final-
ists will be held this morn-
ing, at 8am, in the Wedge-
wood Room of the British
Colonial Hilton.
Guest speaker for the
breakfast will be Philip
Simon, executive director of
the Chamber of Commerce.
The finals will be held on
Sunday April 13 at 7pm, at
the Dundas Centre for the
Performing Arts on Mackey
"Street.


.





A NUMBER of businesses have committed to taking part in Earth Hour this year.
The Royal Bank of Canada, RBC Finco, Higgs and Johnson, Scotiatrust, and UBS are all joining the
Bahamas National Trust in the initiative, which calls for all unnecessary lights to be turned off on Sati
urday, March 29 from 8pm to 9pm.
Earth Hour is co-ordinated by the World Wildlife Federation as a symbol that individuals can make,
a difference in the fight against climate change. ,
The BNT said it would like to encourage Bahamians to turn off their unnecessary lights at 8pm oR
Saturday to show their concern about the state of the planet.


SJapan ambassador

1 Ivisits Prime Minister


PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham met with Japan's Ambas-
sador to the Bahamas, Masahiro Obata, at the Cabinet Office on
Thursday, March 27. The ambassador was accompanied by
Bahamas Honourary Consul to Japan, Basil Sands.


InsEight- ,
lo, Mondays;


;,:,. 6".-'flH ^ ^ k. J^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^




of^_ the Hoseo Asmbyyetrdy


INDUSTRIALILABOUR RELATIONS OFFICER (MANAGER)

Qualified Bahamians are invited to apply for the position of Labour Relations Officer.

Applicants should be between the ages of 25-35 years of age and should possess
the minimum qualifications of a University Bachelor's degree in Industrial Relations or
equivalent major in Economics or Business Administration.

A minimum of 3-5 years basic Industrial Relations experience would be valuable; experience
in the field of Personnel Management in the Hotel/Catering, Restaurant or related industries
would be an asset.

The successful candidate will undergo a period of apprenticeship training in the field of
Labour Relations/Industrial Relations so as to be fully equipped to deal with all facets of
trade disputes resolution and negotiations with Trade Unions.

Persons who have recently completed College and are desirous of a career in Industrial
Relations may also apply.

Applications are to be submitted in writing only together with curriculum vitae not later than
2008 to:

DA 60964
C/O P.O. BOX- N-3207
NASSAU, N.P., THE BAHAMAS


ut-~plux~n~----- -


Firms back


Earth Hour


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2008


PM pashisrespets tox-mist,

I mmmm


r


*IF' .


II
f .' ,


^;-a'..*?a-? !y'v.,:<&;


.In loving Memo
*^ar'" :f "" J-1


JUSTIN ROSS SCOTT
16th March 1979 29th March 2003


I will not let this world keep me down
I will rise above it
Like the Phoenix rising above the ashes.
And when I am done,
The world will be a better place,
Because I have made it that way

written by Justin Ross Scott
27th January, 2001



Lovingly and deeply missed by your
mom Ann Bease, stepfather, Bob Bease,
dad, Michael Scott, brothers Jamie
and Conor, sister Sasha and all those
who still hold you close to their hearts



Goodbye My Golden Boy








T^HE TRIBUNE SATURDAYMARCH 29, 2008,OPAGEEW9


A cry to


fight the cruel


treatment of sea turtles


By DIANE PHILLIPS
He wielded a billy club and
wore a full black wet suit,
though the water wasn't all that
cold. The large net was out, held
in place by lines with lead
weights, a circle of death. Ten
or so men in two dinghies cir-
cled it. A third boat with a sin-
gle man aboard stood off a little
ways. There was a diver in the
Water.
They were already in place,
preparing for the kill when we
pulled toward them off Green
Cay across from Rose Island.
"What are you netting?"' we
asked with friendly wave and
smile that Sunday. "Goggle
eye," one of the fishermen lied,
waving back. We pretended to
be as stupid as they took us for,
partially because the sun was
brilliant and the beach so entic-
ing it threw us off, our instincts
for a moment lulled. Maybe we
wanted to believe the best, not
wanting to believe what we
feared, that what they were
really netting was a turtle. We
had seen it there a week before
and had come back up to look
for it again, wondering if it
would still be there, thinking
out loud how great it was to see
a turtle close to Nassau, a once
common sight, now rare.
The fishermen paid little
attention to us at first. We
moved off and watched the
boats from a distance. I swam
and dove down twice to touch
young queen conch, silently
wishing them safety from
greedy hands. There were too
many small shells on the bot-
tom, their crown smashed, meat
snatched before their lip was
turned. The day before I had
noticed a whole stand of fight-
ing conch on Bay Street in front
of what is still called the Straw
Market for some reason, taken
for the sale of their magnificent
multi-coloured brown shell, the


YO U --M -



OPINION


inedible meat inside tossed
aside. I swam and wondered at
the recent absence of milk
conch that used to be every-
where. And starfish. And sea
biscuits instead of just sea
urchins.
I snorkelled back to the boat
and looked over at the fisher-
men, a sickening visceral feeling
in the pit of my stomach begin-
ning to rise up inside me and
take hold. Even from that dis-
tance, I could see the man in
the wet suit. He was leaning
over the side of one of the boats
ready to clobber, the billy club
poised. We started up, upped
anchor and ran over, two
women and one young man try-
ing to stop the inevitable, inter-
fering by staring and glaring at a
dozen fishermen bent on death
for dollars. We circled and hov-
ered and hovered and circled.
One of the boats began to chase
us.
Down in the net, still swim-
ming probably frantically, we
couldn't see, maybe confused,
fighting for a freedom he had
no means of expressing in words
that the men above him could
understand, was the sea turtle.
They later said it was a logger-
head as if that made it okay.
They didn't hear him cry.
They didn't see the tears. Did
they know a turtle shed tears,
just like a child? Did they know
it cried like a baby? That its
sound was plaintive and painful
and could break your heart, like
your own child crying out in
pain when you can't run to him
fast enough to kiss it all better.
The sound, the fear, the howl


of a wounded being pleading to
the sky for help. And no one
answers.
Did the fishermen know any
of that? Did they know that the
Bahamas was one of 115 coun-
tries that banned turtle killing in
1973 when they signed on to
The Convention on Interna-
tional Trade in Endangered
Species of Wild Fauna and Flo-
ra (CITES)? Did they know'?
Did they care?
We had watched them for
nearly two hours, hoping to
shame them into letting the tur-
tle go free. We got a call from
Nassau and had to pull off, hop-
ing still they knew they had
been seen and they could not
do what we feared they wanted'
to do.
The last thing we heard was
the cry.
Where has our humanity
gone? When did we fool our-
selves into thinking that we
were civilized because we are
kind enough to let a car out in
front of us in traffic, when we
turn our backs on child molesta-
tion? When did we stop caring
that the elderly woman down
the block had not been seen all
week, that the young boy who
used to smile at us now scowls,
that the gang of teens with bag-
gy pants and swagger in their
step wanted identity so badly
they were willing to grab hold of
it wherever they could find it?
What we do to a sea turtle is
not just about turtles. It's about
us as a people. If 115 countries
agree it is morally and environ-
mentally wrong to slaughter a
threatened or endangered


species, if some countries go to
the trouble of funding turtle
excluder devices that save tur-
tles from being netted even
where nets are used, and we
continue the barbaric practice
of clubbing, towing, and drag-
ging 300 pounds of crying flesh
up a boat ramp before death
comes as a kind alternative.,
what does it tell the world about
Bahamians?
Not all our inhumanity to one
another can be replaced with
kindness o\ ernight, but we can
begin as we did today with the
turtle. Instead of allowing tur-
tles to be slaughtered, we can
delineate Nw wildlife refuges or pre-
serves, particularly near inhab-
ited islands so that those who
reside or \isit c:in see the
marine wonders of our world.


We can create a nesting protec-
tion programme that would
become an activity for adults
and schoolchildren and even for
visitors to enjoy. walking the
beach by night with low flash-
lights, putting up small protec-
tive fences during nesting sea-
son to protect turtle eggs and
then monitoring them. We can
make understanding the life
cycle of a turtle a part of the
marine biology curriculum. And
while government does not
have the resources to patrol
every foot of our 100.00)0 square
mile waters, it can sound a clar-
ion call about the heinous
nature of inhumane slaughter
and the legal consequences of
breaking the law. including fines
and possible inimprisonment. The
Bahamas Natjl,'n i T"rt,


BREEF and other conservation
organizations can appoint
"eyes" or deputize wardens
with civilian arrest authority, as
the National Trust does now in
certain other areas. All those
steps combined create a begin-
ning. Beyond that, it is really
about finding the gentle side of
ourselves again. Dr David Allen
is right when he says we have
become an angry nation. Our
inhumanity to turtles when oth-
ers alil over the world have
banned such inhumanity is only
one sign. The mother who has
lost a child to violence knows a
far graver sign.
We in the Bahamas are for-
tunate. We have no outside war
with an enemy whose ideology
differs from our own. Our war is
with ourselves. Our greatest
threat lies within, the widening
of our own vacuous morality
that pays lip service to what is
good and right and fails to
admit that we watch a child
being bullied without getting
involved or we see the slaughter
of an animal without taking
action, it means we are immune
to pain. If we do not feel the
pain of others, then we must
look carefully in the mirror and
ask ourselves who we have
become.
Silence is the voice of cow-
ardice. The last thing I heard
was the cry of the turtle.
It stirred me to action and I
vowed it would not be the last
battle I fought.



INSIGHT


The stories

behind the

news


[ #7 PSi-#ssu ob/ Iamers;


SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2008, PAGE 9


DIN PHILLIP


THE TRIBUNE















Zimbabwe military go on


alert for 'election


violence'


By ANGUS SHAW
Associated Press Writer

HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP)
- Soldiers took to the streets
with armored cars and water
cannons Friday as Zimbabwe's
security chiefs warned that they
were ready to confront any vio-
lence during the weekend's cru-
cial presidential election in his
economically wrecked African
nation.
The opposition urged its sup-


porters to defend their ballots
against what they have charged
is a plot by the ruling party to
rig Saturday's vote.
President Robert Mugabe,
the 84-year-old revolution
leader facing the toughest chal-
lenge since he won power in
1980, told his final campaign
rally that the election would
show Zimbabweans' opposition
to former colonizer Britain,
which he accuses of supporting
the opposition.


"Zimbabweans are making a
statement against the meddling
British establishment," the pres-
ident told about 6,000 people
in Epworth, an impoverished
town outside the capital of
Harare.
Mugabe called for discipline
at the polls despite "provoca-
tion from outsiders who are
already claiming the elections
are not free and fair."
Running against Mugabe are
opposition leader Morgan


Tsvangirai, 55, who narrowly
lost the disputed 2002 election,
and former ruling party loyalist
and finance minister Simba
Makoni, 58. Preliminary results
are not expected until Monday.
Tsvangirai urged opposition
supporters to stay at polling sta-
tions until they close and count-
ing begins.
"They would not rig in front
of you," he told about 4,000
people in Domboshawa, a farm-
ing community north of Harare.


"We have won this election
already. What's left is for us to
defend our vote."
Zimbabwe's security chiefs
are firmly behind Mugabe and
they gathered to warn against
unrest, telling reporters the
armed forces were "up to the
task in thwarting all threats to
national security."
In Harare, soldiers on all-ter-
rain vehicles and police on
motorcycles escorted a convoy
of armored cars and water can-
nons making a show of force.
"Those who have been
breathing fire about Kenya-style
violence should be warned," the
security chiefs said, referring to
bloody protests in that East
African nation after a Decem-
ber presidential election so
rigged no one knows who won.
More than 1,000 people were
killed there.
The security chiefs have
made veiled threats of a coup if
Mugabe should lose. The
Defense Forces commander,
Gen. Constantine Chiwenga,
warned that his soldiers would
not serve anyone but Mugabe.
On Thursday, Tsvangirai
appealed to soldiers and other
public servants to reject any
attempt to fix the voting.
"Mugabe cannot rig elections
by himself," he said. "If some-
one tells you to falsify the
results of "the elections, ignore
the instructions."
Mugabe has said he would
crush any anti-government
demonstrations.
"Just dare try it," he was
quoted as saying by the state-
controlled Herald newspaper.
"We don't play around while
you try to please your British
allies. Just try it and you will
see."
Mugabe blames Britain and
other Western nations for the
ruin of this southern African
nation's economy, which once
exported food, tobacco and
minerals. Zimbabweans now
struggle to survive amid 100,000
percent inflation and dire short-


ages of food, water, electricity,
fuel and medicine.
Some 5 million people, a third
of the population, are thought
to have fled the country in
recent years. An average of
1,000 Zimbabweans pick their
'way through barbed wire barri-
ers to sneak into South Africa
every day, the Organization of
International Migration says.
Western sanctions introduced
after independent monitors said
the 2002 election was rigged
involve visa bans and frozen
bank accounts for Mugabe and
100 of his cronies, but the pres-
ident has convinced many sup-
portdrs the sanctions are to
blame for the country's woes.
Mugabe's critics argue .that
the agriculture-based economy
was derailed by the govern-
ment-ordered, often violent
eviction of white farmers so
their lands could be handed
over to blacks.
But Fungai Shangwa, a 30-
year-old unemployed mother of
two, said land reform was one
of the reasons she would vote
for Mugabe.
"The opposition will give
back land to the whites," said
Shangwa, who got no land her-
self. Most of the seized farms
went to Mugabe's friends, rela-
tives and allies.
The president also is accused
of trying to buy votes by hand-
ing out tractors, power genera-
tors and state-subsidized food.
Makoni, a longtime ruling
party politburo member until
he was kicked out for challeng-
ing Mugabe in February, has
shaken up Zimbabwe's politics
with his appeal to disillusioned
citizens, threatening to take
,votes from both the opposition
and Mugabe.
Makoni told The Associated
Press in an interview on Thurs-
day that his priority as presi-
dent would be to restore the
rule of law to pave the way for
economic recovery and re-
engage with the international
community.


Press Release


2008 FORD FOCUS DEMONSTRATES FORD'S COMMITMENT TO SMALL CARS

The 2008 Ford Focus brings a bold design, modem interior, improved driving dynamics and competitive fuel economy to the growing small car market.
All-new exterior design strikes an exciting pose in two-door coupe and four-door sedan body styles. Redesigned cabin offers contemporary styling and features such as
silver metallic finishing on the dashboard and center console, available ambient interior lighting and available leather seating with contrast stitching all creating a modern
atmosphere. Available Ford SyncTM offers advanced levels of connectivity to help create a second home on wheels inside the car. New suspension tuning and chassis
refinements improve an already rewarding and dynamic driving experience. Improvements to sealing and sound deadening materials reduce noise, vibration and harshness
levels providing a quiet, comfortable ride. DETROIT, Mich.. Jan 7. 2007 Redesigned from the inside out, the 2008 Ford Focus brings a bold new look, a modem interior
and a high level of driving enjoyment to the small car segment. Joining the new Focus four-door sedan is, for the first time, ever a sporty two-door coupe, which is designed
to attract new and younger buyers to a growing small car market. The 2008 Focus strikes an impressive pose. Designers drew inspiration from the Ford Fusion's prominent
chrome-bar grille design, flared wheel arches and sweeping, crisp lines to create a small car that's stylish and sporty. "We raised the beltline to give Focus more modem
proportions," says Lon Zaback, Focus chief designer. "By raising the beltline we created a sleeker profile. The overall look is solid and more substantial."

FORD BRINGS NEW EDGE TO HOT CROSSOVER MARKET
Bold, American design: Ford Edge stands out in fast-growing CUV market Perfonnance-plus: Edge's new 3.5-liter V-6 delivers 265 horsepower and is mated to a 6-speed
automatic for performance and fuel efficiency Innovation: MP3-player jack, console laptop storage, panoramic Vista RoofrM and advanced safety features, including Ford's
industry-leading Advance Trac with Roll Stability Control (RSC) Safety: Standard safety features abound, including Ford's industry-leading Advance Trac with
Roll Stability Control (RSC), seat-mounted side air bags. Safety CanopyM air curtain system and Ford's Personal Safety System. "Edge underscores the bold, American
design direction for all Ford vehicles going forward," says Mark Fields, president, The Americas, Ford Motor Company. "Edge also is packed with Ford innovation -
from its panoramic glass roof and laptop-friendly center console to fuel-saving engine and advanced safety features. We expect Edge to make waves in the hot crossover
market this year just like the Fusion did for midsize cars last year." With its unique combination of styling, capability and driving dynamics, Edge is the perfect complement
to Ford Motor Company's expanding CUV lineup. Ford outpaced the competition in CUV growth in 2007 and looks to further energize the CUV market in 2008 with
the new Edge and two other crossovers the Lincoln MKX and Mazda CX-7.

2008 FORD TAURUS FEATURES MORE POWER, STYLE AND MORE STANDARD SAFETY FEATURES

Safety Leader. Taurus provides families outstanding protection in being rated the safest large car in America. More of Everything. New Ford Taurus features more than
500 engineering changes, making it more distinctive, quieter, faster and safer. Powerful. 3.5-liter Duratec V-6 delivers 263 horsepower an increase of nearly 30 percent
from the previous engine. Confident. Available electronic stability control and all-wheel drive provide confident ride and handling in all weather conditions. Connected.
Ford SyncTM offers new levels of connection, control, simplicity and personalization for electronic devices such as cell phones and media players. The 2008 Ford Taurus
features more than 500 improvements that make it more distinctive, quieter, faster and safer. Highlights include new exterior styling, a new powertrain, a new all-wheel-
drive system, more standard safety features and structural upgrades to further enhance crash protection. "Customers will find the 2008 Taurus delivers more of what they
are looking for, including a strong design, high-quality interior, power and performance, must-have features like Ford Sync and a great safety reputation," said Cisco
Codina, Ford's group vice president, North America Marketing, Sales and Service.

NEW FORD EVEREST SUV SCALES NEW HEIGHTS

Boasting significant upgrades to powertrain, safety, styling and performance, the new Ford Everest combines the latest in vehicle engineering with the legendary 'Built
Ford Tough' ruggedness that is a hallmark of all Ford SUVs."The new Ford Everest takes all the knowledge Ford has gleaned in more than 100 years to deliver a premium
SUV for Thailand," said Ford Thailand President Mr Tom Brewer."With a host of upgrades, the new Ford Everest provides a vehicle that adapts endlessly to our customer's
needs.Whether he's travelling in Nassau to an important business meeting, or the Family Islands transporting his family in absolute safety, exploring the beaches and
forests, or enjoying a well-deserved holiday with his children, the new Ford Everest will get him there in the lap of luxury. The new Ford Everest becomes the first locally
manufactured SUV to offer side airbags, working in tandem with advanced dual stage driver and passenger airbags to offer a cocoon of safety in the event of an accident.
The new Ford Everest combines a host of active and passive safety features to make it one of the safest and most secure SUVs on the road. Active safety features in the
new Ford Everest include larger 16-inch wheels, all terrain tires and an improved braking system for infproved handling in all weather conditions and in all types of terrain.
Braking performance in the new Ford Everest is outstanding, incorporating ABS with Electronic Brake Force Distribution and a load sensing proportioning valve to ensure
optimum stopping capabilities on all surfaces. Headlamps have been improved with a greater light distribution to give the driver increased vision, while upgraded tail
lamps, side indicators and a new centre high-mounted stop lamp improve visibility to other drivers.The new Ford Everest becomes the first locally manufactured SUV
to offer side airbags, working in tandem with advanced dual stage driver and passenger airbags to offer a cocoon of safety in the event of an accident. The body construction
of the new Ford Everest has been significantly strengthened as well, with door intrusion beams and reinforced A, B and C-pillars to manage crash forces away from the
driver and passengers and maintain the shape and integrity of the passenger safety cell.The new Ford Everest also incorporates Ford's unique Passive Anti-Theft System
(PATS), for improved vehicle security.


Pricing Information As Of: C PA L'"
Friday. 28 March 2008
BISX UISTW ED 6 Th11n,,1 FO 0MYI1 l '&-i -
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Prv8oua Close Todays Close Change Dally Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
1.93 0.90 Abaco Markets 1.92 1.93 0.01 2000 0.135 0.000 14.3 0.00%
11.80 11.50 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 11.80 0.00 1.502 0.400 7.9 3.39%
9.68 8.65 Bank of Bahamas 9.61 9.61 0.00 0.643 0.160 14.9 2.71%
0.99 0.85 Benchmark 0.99 0.99 0.00 0.188 0.030 5.3 3.03%
3.74 2.10 Bahamas Waste 3.66 3.66 0.00 0.289 0.090 12.7 2.46%
2.70 1.30 Fidelity Bank 2.60 2.80 0.00 0.058 0.040 44.8 1.54%
13.63 10.35 Cable Bahamas 13.63 13.63 0.00 1.093 0.240 12.5 1.76%
3.15 2.10 Colina Holdings 2.87 2.87 0.00 202 0.031 0.040 92.6 1.39%
8.50 4.67 Commonwealth Bank (Si) 7.46 7.22 -0.24 1.600 0.428 0.270 16.9 3.74%
7.22 3.60 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.67 4.21 -0.46 .0.157 0.052 29.7 1.11%
2.50 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.50 2.50 0.00 0.316 0.040 7.9 1.60%
7.90 5.94 Famguard 7.90 7.90 0.00 0.713 0.280 11.1 3.54%
13.01 12.45 Finco 12.92 12.92 0.00 300 0.810 0.570 16.0 4.41%
14.75 13.50 FirstCaribbean 13.50 13.50 0.00 0.914 0.470 14.8 3.48%
6.10 5.12 Focol (S) 5.50 5.50 0.00 4.800 0.363 0.140 15.2 2.55%
1.00 0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.74 0.74 0.00 0.035 0.000 21.1 0.00%
8.00 6.86 ICD Utilities 6.86 6.86 0.00 133 0.411 0.300 16.7 4.37%
12.50 8.60 J.S. Johnson 12.30 12.30 0.00 1.059 0.610 11.6 4.96%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.167 0.600 8.6 6.00%
-. -- ,, -. -9,* .....Mt 62Pr:..
2.k.H. 52.AK-Lro.w Symbol Bid S Ask S Lasi Pnce Weekly Vol EPS S Di v PIE Yield
14 .60 1.125 Bahamas Supermarkels 14.60 1560 1460 1,999 1 160 0900 134 6 16%
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
054 020 RND Holdings 035 040 035 -0023 0000 N/M 000%
4 100 41 00 ABDAB 4100 4300 4100 4450 2 750 90 6 70%
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.80 15.60 14.00 1.160 0.900 13.4 6.16%
0 55 0 o0 RND Holdings 045 0 55 0 45 -0 023 0000 /M 0 00%
52.-K.H 52.e.-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div S Yield %
1 -0-11 I 2037 Colina Bond Fund 1 304134" 0 94% 5 70%
3.0008 2.6254 Coiina MSI Preferred Fund 2.982729" -0.60% 14.89%
1.3847 1.2647 Colina Money Market Fund 1.38465S7** 0.70% 3.92%
3.7969 3.1424 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.6651* -3.47% 18.28%
12.0429 11.4467 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.0429* 0.929 5.69%
100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.00**
100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.00*"
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bonid Fund 1.00..
10.5000 96433 Fldellt inlernallonal Inveslment Fund 9 6433" -020% -8 16%
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02- 1,000.00 MARKiET TERMS YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price NAV KEY
52wk-Hi Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colisn and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask S Selling price of Colina and fidelity 29 February 2008
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for dally volurne Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price 31 December 2007
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week "" 21 March 2008
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS S A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths t
Daly Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Aset Value
DIV S Dividends per share paid Inthe last 12 month NM Not Meaningfuls
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX. The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 100
(S) 4-for-t Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split- Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CAL, OFAL, o Ar^-.& .__ : '"


PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2008


THE TRIBUNE








SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2008, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


More charged over

fraud offence claims ..


FROM page one

Sea Grape and East Street
Shopping Plaza as well as the
City Market at Village Road
and Cable Beach.
Court dockets also stated that
Vivian Rahming forged a First
Caribbean Bank cheque drawn
on the account of Common-
wealth Brewery Limited in the
sum of $376.
Between November 14 and
212007, he obtained goods and
cash to that amount from food-
stores such as Super Value at
Prince Charles Shopping Plaza
and Blue Hill Road. Tamaro
Rahming is expected to return
to court on Monday to face
three additional charges.
Felecia Francita Cooper, 24,
of Exuma Street, Tammy St
Cyrin, 23, and Theo St Cyrin,
21, both of West Bay Street,
were also arraigned on a long
list of fraud charges before
Magistrate Sylvester.
It is alleged that between
Tuesday, November 2007, and
January this year, Cooper
forged a National Insurance
cheque for $325 and $500 which
she used to obtain cash and
goods from several local food-
stores.
Cooper, who was arraigned


on 39 fraud charges, is alleged
to have obtained cash and
goods under false pretences
from Super Value at Nassau
Street, Oakes Field, Prince
Charles as well as Budget Meat
Mart Nassau Village and
Wong's Trading Meat Mart.
Tammy St Cyrin was
arraigned on nine fraud charges
which alleged that between
Wednesday, December 19, and
Thursday, December 27, she
forged National Insurance
cheques in the amounts of $480
and $325.
Court dockets allege she used
the forged cheques to obtain
cash and goods from Lowe's
Pharmacy at Town Centre Mall,
Soldier Road and City Market
at Palmdale.
Theo St Cyrin was also
arraigned on charges related to
the forging of National Insur-
ance cheques.
On the nine fraud charges, it
is alleged that he forged
cheques for $365 and $288 and
under false pretences obtained
. cash and goods from City Mar-
ket at Baillou Hill Road.
All three accused pleaded not
guilty to the charges against
them and were each granted
$20,000 bail with one surety.
Their case has been adjourned
to July 17.


No arrests made over

island's robbery spree


FROM page one

dollars, along with jewellery and
other items, were stolen by what
locals believe to be a gang of
criminals, considering the speed
of their work.
Five businesses were report-
edly targeted between midnight
and sunrise on the weekend
morning, including the island's
Batelco office.
Mr Pinder believes locals pro-
vided some of the knowledge
that enabled Nassau crooks to
carry out the raids without
being detected.
"They were working along
with the people that the police
picked up but it puts the police
in a very precarious situation,"
he said.
The Tribune attempted to
confirm the status of the police's
investigation but was unable to
* reach the officer said to be in
charge of the Eleutheran arm
of the operation yesterday.
Nassau-based press
spokesman Asst Supt Walter


Evans did not return a call seek-
ing information up to press
time.
Mr Pinder again lamented, as
he did shortly after the rob-
beries occurred, that the failure
to bring to trial those charged
with a robbery of the bank on
the island several years ago con-
tributed to the criminals' deci-
sion to target the community in
February.
"The people have been out
on bail now for two and a half
years, and there's no sign that
they're going to be brought to,
trial...if they're going to be
brought."
He warned that if those
involved in the latest high pro-
file disturbance were to return
they would not be well-received
in the community.
"Let 'em come back. In the
Bahamas today if you want jus-
tice you have to get it yourself,"
he warned. According to Mr
Pinder, only one of the busi-
nesses affected was covered by
insurance at the time of the
raids.


Miller continues


PetroCaribe push


FROM page one

dations to the former govern-
ment on the agreement, admit-
ted it was his party's fault that
the country did not sign on to
PetroCaribe.
He called on the current min-
ister to revisit PetroCaribe and
reduce fuel providers' mark-up
margins in an effort to reduce
fuel costs.
Minister Neymour said those
supporting PetroCaribe should


"review the terms included in
the agreement because...they
may be onerous to our coun-
try." The Venezuelan oil deal is
an agreement between the
Venezuelan government and
interested Caribbean nations as
a means to counter rising oil
and gas prices.
Detractors of the plan claim it
is a rieans for Venezuelan Pres-
ident Hugo Chavez, who is at
odds with the US, to gain ties
within the Caribbean, a US
trading partner.


Few details on


prison incident


FROM page one

The Ministry of National
Security said the court of
inquiry will report to Superin-
tendent of Prisons Dr Elliston
Rahming on their findings in
relation to this latest distur-


bance by April 10, 2008.
A source inside the prison
said that although he heard
about the incident yesterday
details were still sketchy, and
he expects to be able to get
more information over the
weekend.


Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps !
you are raising funds for a
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for improvements in the
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award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


- i------







PAGE 2, SAURDA, MARH 29,2008THE TIBUN


NASSAU


EVENTS


CAPTU R ED


ON CAMERA


Faces at Exuberance '08


ROBERT PINDER, culture officer and entertainer in the
Ministry of Education and.Culture, with popular radio
talk show host Christine (Crissy Love) Thompson,
Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts.


JE'ROME HARRIS MILLER, artist, held an exhibition entitled Exuberance '08. The proceeds of the art auc-
tion, held at the Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts, went to the Winston Saunders Scholarship Fund.
From left: Eleanor Phillips (The Nature Conservancy), Shawn Sawyer (Cacique International), Phyllis Gar-
roway (Yodephy), Je'Rome Harris Miller, stylist and artist.


CHANTAL THOMPSON, a student of the College of Art
and Design in Savannah, Georgia, with her mother,
former Justice Jeannie Thompson.


PETER GARROWAY, (Satellite Bahamas), Phyllis Garroway, Yodephy, Steven Kelly (Odyssey Air) Debbie Geer
(Yodephy)


HUGH SANDS, chairman of The Bahamas Hotel Industries Pension Fund, escorting his wife Joan, owner of
Premier Travels, and Ms Clarice Granger, widow of the late Dean of Christ Church Cathedral.


DR NICOLETTE BETHEL, Director of Culture, and Dr Keva Bethel, president emeritus of the College of The
Bahamas, share the occasion with Dame Marguerite Pindling and Dr Gail Saunders, director, Archives
Department.


DAWN HANNA-BETHEL posing with the Rahming Brothers of Cat Island. The group is known for religious
songs, sung in a traditional Bahamian style. Mrs Hanna-Bethel is wife of former Consul-General to New York,
Ed Bethel.


DR GAIL SAUNDERS, widow of the late Winston Saunders, and attorney Terry North enjoy the cultural activ-
ities with Mrs Sheila Hailey of Lyford Cay, herself an author and widow of the late best-selling novelist Arthur
Hailey.


P


JSrznmkltm QE TJIergusn, 3I}


9e4cf 4 a


(242) 357-8472


P.O. Box N-4659,
Nassau, Bahamas


I ~~r~*SCc""~B1~~


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 2008


~-~e


950"-4