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The Tribune
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00964
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: February 28, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:00964

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FOR LENT I'm loin' it
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SUNNY AND
BREEZY


The


Tribune


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


BAHAMAS EDITION


E- U 1. U 'E 1 1 J I-- -- a~~~FPlr1 LB .~~


itank


State of high alert as vessel

holding 120,000 barrels

grounded off Lyford Cay


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
GOVERNMENT entities,
environmentalists and the Shell
Oil company are on a high state
of alert after a supertanker car-
rying hundreds of thousands of
barrels of oil ran aground off
the coast of Lyford Cay at
around 9am yesterday morning.
A specialist team has been
flown in by Shell from London,
England, to address the situa-
tion, The Tribune has learned.
Up to press time yesterday
efforts on the part of Port
Department-provided tug boats
to free the 44,788 ton tanker -
"The Ficus" from the rocky


underwater peninsula next to
Goulding's Cay where it was
grounded were unsuccessful.
The circumstances surround-
ing the grounding of the vessel
on the peninsula, known as
"point of bar", were unclear,
however it wap said to be travel-
ling around New Providence
towards Clifton Pier where it
was due to offload when the
collision took place.
Yorick Cox, sales and mar-
keting manager with the Sun
Oil company, said that the
tanker is presently holding
120,000 barrels of their oil,
along with ah unknown quanti-
ty of product that it was trans-
SEE page 14


15-year-old is questioned in
connection with student stabbing
By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
POLICE are questioning a 15-year old Government High School
student in connection with the lunchtime stabbing of a fellow stu-
dent on Tuesday.
This .omes as Princess Margaret Hospital spokesperson, Thelma
Rolle, said that the victim, a 12th grade student, is now in stable
condition, having had surgery on Tuesday evening. She was unable
to say when he might be discharged.
The senior student suffered three stab wounds to the abdomen
during the attack, which initial reports indicated involved three oth-
er boys.
Chief Superintendent Hulan Hanna said yesterday, however,
that at this stage police do not suspect that anyone else was respon-
sible for the student's injuries. However, they are following sever-
al leads and investigations are continuing.
The student was attacked at around 1.30pm, according to reports.
SEE page 14


,~ar wrecon" the"rmoN!uoI tv


THE REMAINS of this burnt out car have been an eyesore in the area between AF Adderl
Sir Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium for weeks now.
Adderley fails
to stand with
PLP in bid to lsh 'io


overturn
adjournment
By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
WHEN every number count-
ed, the PLP's MP for Elizabeth,
Malcolm Adderley failed to
stand in unison with his party
as they tried to overturn the
House of Assembly's morning
adjournment.
Yesterday, as the leader of
the government's business Tom-
my Turnquest moved a motion
for the House to adjourn at
12.45pm for the luncheon
adjournment until 3pm, Alfred
Sears, the PLP MP for Fort
Charlotte objected.
Mr Sears contested that if the
government was so serious
about debating the supplemen-
tary appropriation bills, it could
use the final 15 minutes of the


SEE page 14


M.By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
DURING a heated debate
in the House of Assembly yes-
terday, Dr Bernard Nottage,
PLP MP for Bain and Grants
Town, referred to Sidney Col-
lie, FNM MP for Blue Hills, as
a "foolish ass" for interrupting
him on a point of order.
Dr Nottage, who was
defending himself from asser-
tions made by FNM Garden
Hills MP Brensil Rolle, was
attempting to make a point
when Mr Collie made com-
ments from his seat.
"That is a foolish question,
and you are a foolish ass," Dr
Nottage exclaimed as the
debate escalated.
House Speaker Alvin Smith
intervened and the assertions
by Mr Rolle were later with-
drawn, however the rankling
continued.
Next to enter the heated


argument was
More's PLP MP
who asked FNM
MP, Zhivargo L
had not yet br
House the promi
his involvement
to illegally low
Duties on juice pr
sister-in-law.
SEE page


SPM: Some govt
corporations
face 'cut backs'
By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
CASH guzzling entities such
as the Broadcasting Corpora-
tion of the Bahamas will not get
all its desired funding from the
Ministry of Finance, Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham said yes-
terday.
Along with other entities such
as Bahamasair, and the Water
S and Sewerage Corporation, Mr
Ingraham said that such gov-
ernment corporations will have
to face "cut backs."
SEE page 16

Death of man
after shark attack
t-
sparks investigation
By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
.. kherig@tribunemedia.net
THE Bahamas Port Depart-
S ment is investigating a possible
u- violation of diving regulations
ey School and by the American charter opera-
tor whose Austrian passenger
died after being attacked by a
shark near Bimini.
Markus Groh, a 49-year-old
lawyer from Vienna, Austria,
sustained fatal injuries after
S being mauled by a shark off the
coast of Great Isaac Cay on
Sunday.
Mr Groh was on a diving
excursion with the Riviera
Beach-based Jim Abernethy's
SEE page 16

Final senator
is sworn in
THE final senator was sworn
into the upper chamber
Wednesday morning.
Senator Anthony Musgrove
took his oath and seat as sena-
tor and completed the consti-
St Thomas tutionally required 16 senators
Frank Smith to the Upper Chamber of the
's Marco City House of Assembly.
aing, why he Yesterday the Senate tabled
ought to the several bills, resolutions and
sed report on agreements.
in an attempt The Senate is scheduled to
'er Customs meet again March 5 to debate
*oducts for his the Bill to Amend the Central
Bank Act, conveyance of land
:to the Ministry of Housing, and
16 the mid-term budget report.


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US drug csar notes huge increase in cocaine



moving through the Bahamas' neighbours


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedla.net
A MASSIVE increase in


the volume of cocaine mov-
ing through the Bahamas'
neighbours has been noted by
the US drug czar for the
region.


John Walters, head of the
White House Office of
National Drug Control Poli-
cy told The Associated Press
that the amount of cocaine


heading from Venezuela
through Hispaniola the
island shared by Haiti and the
Dominican Republic has
mushroomed by 40 per cent


in a year.
"I'm not aware of another
period of time where the flow
has increased so rapidly," said
Mr Walters, who likened the
influx to a "tidal wave."
The cocaine travelling via
Hispaniola is now equivalent
to one tenth of the total 1,521
metric tons of the drug which
left South America bound for
the U S and Europe last year.
In light of this, Mr Walters
expressed concern for the
island's residents.
"When you have, in a rela-
tively short amount of a time,
a giant tidal wave of cocaine
descending on the island ...
there's a very great danger to
the citizens who live here," he
said in an interview with the
AP from Port-au-Prince.
Mr Walters claims that US
authorities believe an
increased reliance on the
Venezuela-Hispaniola traf-
ficking pathway may have
come about as a consequence
of the success of anti-drug
agents last year in seizing
drugs smuggled along the
well-established eastern pacif-
ic route.
That concern was enough
to cause Mr Walters and act-
ing U S Drug Enforcement
Administrator Michele Leon-
hart to visit the Dominican
Republic this week to hold
talks on how the flow can be
stifled with President Leonel
Fernandez.
The US, in conjunction with
the Haitian and Dominican
Republic authorities, launched
Operation Rum Punch last
year.-However, the AP
reports that despite this effort,
the quantity of drugs seized
in the central Caribbean actu-
ally fell 40 per cent to just 6.4
metric tons.
Mr Walters suggested that
many operations are too short
in duration, allowing smug-
glers to wait and then resume


JOHN WALTERS, head of the
White House Office of National
Drug Control Policy. (AP)

activity.
In September last year, the
Bahamas was again listed on
the White House's annual nar-
cotics report as a major illicit
drug-producing or drug-transit
country for 2008.
Narcotics affairs officer at
the US embassy David Foran
said that the Bahamas largely
has its geographic location to
thank for the listing, but also
mentioned the trend in traf-
ficking into Hispaniola as
playing a part.
In July of last year, cocaine
believed to have been smug-
gled from the Dominican
Republic with an estimated
street value of $3 million was
found stashed in a sailboat
occupied by two French-Cana-
dian men off.the coast of
Eleuthera.


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dreom
E rn t l i" r; ... 0

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Taniya Nayak

D-signr Ho., M.rclh





PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


THE TRIBUNE






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


r LOALNEW


0 In brief

Baha Mar

seeks rentals

for expatriate

workers
THE $2.6 billion Baha Mar
project is inviting proposals
from property owners for
housing for its expatriate staff.
"Baha Mar, dedicated to
the development of Cable
Beach, is seeking to lease
these housing units for some
S10 years for the said staff to
fill a part of its housing
needs," said the company in a
statement. "The housing is to
consist of some 150 multi-
family residential housing
units located in the Cable
Beach area close in proximity
to the project."
The staff expected to live
in these units work for Baha
Mar, Caesars Bahamas Man-
agement Corporation and
Starwood Resorts Worldwide
Inc and their respective con-
tractors, consultants and sup-
pliers, it said.
Baha Mar said it plans on
leasing all or the majority of
these units within a single
development, at the option of
the developer.
It is requesting that the
units be divided into thirds
consisting of one, two and
three bedroom facilities.
All the units are to have
air-conditioning systems, the
kitchens are to be fully
equipped with energy-effi-
cient appliances, washers and
dryers and generators, it said.


Reopening of

the Minislry of

Education website
THE Ministry of Educa-
tion, Youth, Sports and
Culture has announced the
reopening of its website,
Bahamaseducation.com.
The ministry said the
purpose of the website is
to increase the public's
awareness of the services
it offers, improve commu-
nication within the ministry
and to enhance interaction
between the ministry and
the public in an effort to
encourage successful part-
nerships in education,
youth development, sports
and cultural initiatives.
"The revised website
represents the spirit of the
mega-ministry through its
inclusion of links, articles
and information relative to
education, youth, sports
and culture." said a press
release.
The website features a
student section, the Safe
Schools Manual, the Edu-
cation Act and other infor-
mational documents and
pamphlets.
Individuals can also
access the website to com-
plete important business
transactions such as appli-
cations for employment,
scholarships, medical forms
and requests for transfers.

Pygmy sperm

whale dies in

Florida Keys
* KEY LARGO, Fla.
A MALE pygmy sperm
whale that stranded off the
Florida Keys died Wednes-
day, despite rehabilitation
efforts, according to Associat-
ed Press.
Volunteers were preparing
the 10 1/2-foot-long whale for
an endoscopy, but the ani-
mal unexpectedly died
before the procedure began,
according to Robert Lingen-
!flser, president of the
Marine Mammal Conservan-
cy.
Officials don't know why
the roughly 1,000 pound
whale died or stranded in the


first place. They have been
performing tests since find-
ing him Saturday.
A necropsy will be per-
formed Wednesday at the
National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administra-
tions National Marine Fish-
cries Laboratory in Miami.

FOR_3 IN I LA RVICE


Three in court in



connection with



North Eleuthera



shooting incident


* By NATARIO
McKENZIE
THREE men were
arraigned in Magistrates
Court yesterday in con-
nection with last Fri-
day's shooting incident
in North Eleuthera,
which reportedly left
three persons in hospi-
tal.
Kino Jamal Johnson,
22, Edward Shavargo
Johnson, 25, both of
Eleuthera along with
Audley Scimilen, 40, of
Freeport appeared
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez at court
one in Bank Lane on
charges of possession of
a firearm with the intent
to endanger life and
causing damage.
According to court
dockets, it is alleged that
on Friday, February 22,
the accused, being con-
cerned together while at
Eleuthera, were found in
-possession of a AK-47
rifle with the intent to
endanger the lives of
Janet Cooper, Terry
Daxon and Nicholas
John.

Dockets
Court dockets also
allege that on the same
day the accused caused
damage to a 2002 Buick
Park Avenue valued at
$7,000, the property of
Nicholas John.
The three accused men
all pleaded not guilty to
the charges against
them. The prosecutor
Inspector Anne Marie
Neely objected to bail
being granted to the
accused.
She told the court that
Kino Johnson is present-
ly on bail in connection
with a murder charge,
while Scimilen has previ-
ous convictions.
The prosecutor
requested more time to
check the antecedents of
the second and third
defendants, Edward
Johnson and Audley
Scimilen.
All three men were
remanded to her
Majesty's Prison yester-
day.
The matter was
adjourned to March 3
for a bail hearing and
transferred to court 11,
Nassau Street.


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IN RESPONSE to the spate of violent incidents in public
schools, the Ministry of Education has issued hand-held metal
detectors to be used by security personnel and administrators in
selected schools to scan for weapons
In a statement issued yesterday, the ministry said that offi-
cials at the Government High School where a senior student was
stabbed on Tuesday were issued two hand-held metal detectors
last v,:ek.
"'Now'iithsl.:inding the improvements to security and random
screening, a knife was brought to the campus and this unfortunate
incident occurred, said the statement.
'hie ministry noted that the 17-year victim is now in hospital and
is iisted as being in stable condition.
TI he Ministry of Education said it is in the process of reviewing
the following additional short-term measures:
'[he issuance of batons to all security officers at public schools
The installation of security cameras in senior high schools
An evaluation of the current security personnel in the schools
The employment of an additional 58 security officers to high
sch!oou in New Providence and Grand Bahama
"' 'ihe ministry will have an evaluative meeting with principals,
other administratorss and the Bahamas Union of Teachers officials
to assess further interventional and rehabilitative measures for the
public school system," said the statement.
-1t c minister of education and senior officials express their
regct ; at tb,: persistence of violent incidents ... in and around our
I schools whicl disrupts teaching and learning and the lives of
both t-:echcrs and the thousands of earnest and mannerly stu-
Sdens. '


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PAUL 4, THURSDA, FEBRUARY 28, 008TTHE TRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeportfax: (242) 352-9348



Pollution boost for plug-in cars


BARACK Obama has called for every
government car to be a plug-in hybrid.
Every single one of them.
Hillary Clinton proposes funding
research to make plug-in hybrid cars com-
mercially available while offering con-
sumers up to $10,000 in tax credits for buy-
ing a plug-in hybrid.
John McCain has promised to build part-
nerships between the auto industry and
utilities to help bring plug-in hybrids to
market quickly.
No matter who occupies the White
House next January, the future of plug-in
hybrids looks bright.
Or does it?
Two studies report that plug-in hybrids,
whose batteries can be recharged from a
standard electric plug, may actually pol-
lute the environment and endanger health
more than current hybrids or perhaps even
gasoline engines.
Considering the lemming-like rush that
well-intentioned Americans make toward
promising new technologies, it should come
as no surprise to learn that there could be
flaws in this latest environmental saviour.
The stampede to subsidize, support and
mandate ethanol use and production now
has been tempered by the realization that
it takes nearly as much energy to produce
ethanol as the product delivers in return.
Ethanol made from corn also increases
land use, boosts food prices and promotes
greater demands on water supplies.
Now, in hindsight, more effort is going
into research to make ethanol from switch-
grass, which would solve most of corn-
based ethanol's problems.
As good as conventional hybrid cars are
in reducing gasoline consumption, plug-in
hybrids (PHEVs) are a significant leap for-
ward.
Besides achieving 100 miles per gallon or
more in overall fuel economy, plug-in
hybrids also offer motorists significant over-
all transportation savings. It costs very lit-
tle to charge a plug-in hybrid's batteries
compared to paying $3-plus for a gallon
of gasoline.
The Holy Grail of the motoring public
would be a car that could travel long dis-
tances comfortably, safely and inexpen-


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sively while reducing air pollution and
decreasing America's dependence on for-,
eign oil. And, while we are at it, we also
should be reducing greenhouse emissions
while tooling down the road.
Plug-in hybrids, which are on the drawing
boards of most major automobile compa-
nies, have been touted as meeting these
motoring dreams.
According to a February 26 news story in
USA Today by James R. Healey, a study
by the environmental advocacy group Nat-
ural Resources Defence Council reports
that when plug-in hybrids are recharged
with power produced by dirty coal-fired
plants the result could be significant
increases of soot and mercury. One makes
it hard to breathe, and the other is toxic.
In states that rely heavily on coal-fired
power plants for their electricity, plug-in
hybrids could further endanger the envi-
ronment and public health, according to
some experts.
Another study reported in the USA
Today article found that plug-in hybrids
also could result in more sulfur dioxide
production from coal-fired power plants.
Sulfur dioxide also is toxic as well as an
ingredient in acid rain.
Assuming these studies are accurate,
rather than scale back efforts to produce
plig-in hybrids, more. effort should be
made to clean up dirty coal-fired power
plants.
Congress and the next occupant of the
White House should set new .clean-coal
standards for utilities. The new standards
should require significant reductions in
soot, mercury, sulfur dioxide and carbon
dioxide.
The next administration should resur-
rect the FutureGen project recently
derailed by the Bush administration.
FutureGen sought to have zero emissions
by turning coal into a hydrogen-rich gas
and sequestering greenhouse gases.
Also, more emphasis should be placed on
nuclear power, which is a proven technol-
ogy.
Then, plug-in hybrids can live up to their
potential.
(This article was written by Rowland
Nethaway of Cox News Service).


Pastors must




preach against




violence in




our schools


EDITOR, The Tribune.
IT HAS been the cause for
much alarm as one of the main
talks among concerned citizens,
who are very much disturbed
of the recent murders in the
schools, that schools are becom-
ing war zones and that students
enter them in fear of their'lives.
Due to the shocking murders
in Bahamian schools, many
have come to the conclusion
that the students are not learn-
ing anything, but only causing
trouble in the schools. The
Bahamian students today need
to know their purpose for com-
ing to school and stop bringing
their violent behaviour in the
school, because the school is
where they come to learn to
help them become someone in
life.
The latest incident of violence
occurred in New Providence
last week when a 17-year-old
Sale student of C V Bethel
Senior High School was stabbed
to death after an altercation
with another student. Several
days before that, 17-year-old
Rico Farrington of C C Sweet-
ing High School was also
stabbed to death by a male stu-
dent of his school.
High schools in Grand
Bahama have also endured
their share of violence. In Jan-
uary, a mother, whose daugh-
ter attends Jack Hayward High
School was charged with


assaulting a female student after
learning that the young female
, had been threatening her
daughter. Another incident hap-
pened about three weeks ago
when a 16-year-old student of
Jack Hayward was brutally
beaten by another male student
while he was walking to class.
Shortly after that incident, a
male student from Eight Mile
Rock High School was stabbed
following an argument with a
fellow student.
While addressing the
OAS/UNESCO Caribbean
Regional Workshop on the
Reduction in School Violence
held in the capital earlier this
month, Education, Youth,
Sports and Culture Minister
Carl Bethel promised that his
ministry is committed to reduc-
ing the level of violence among
students
Thankfully, there are pro-
grammes being implemented
that are geared towards assist-
ing troubled youth in our school
system. Educators can only do
so much, the rest of the work
lies with the parents of the stu-
dents. Bad-parenting has affect-
ed our society negatively as stat-
ed by the news article. In many
cases, some children are


neglected by their parents-
therefore proper training, man-
ners and good conduct are not
instilled in their lives. As a
result, they have no one to look
up to as their role models in
making the right choice. Par-
ents must set the right exam-
ples. However there is a hard
core of feckless parents who
have corrosive effects on the
rest. There is a cycle of disre-
spect starting in the schools, and
lasting throughout their chil-
dren's lives! They therefore suf-
fer, and thus end up engaging in
criminal activities such as steal-
ing, abusing, killing and assault-
ing.
I recommend that we shall all
pull ourselves together and help
to combat these crimes. We
need to encourage young peo-
ple to attend church regularly,
in order to hear and understand
God's word and to know that
God wants them to do what is
right and pleasing in His sight,
free from sinful deeds. It now
seems that the pastors need to
go in the schools too, and
preach against crime and vio-
lence in the schools. We must
stand up strong and gain this
country back to a crime-free
country. Let's make a commit-
ment to attain less violence and
maintain more peace.
SHAVADO GIBSON
Nassau,
February 26, 2008.


Gambling needs to be looked


at from several perspectives


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I PRAY you deem my hum-
ble opinion expressed in this
simple statement with reference
to the article put forth by the
well-respected president of The
Bahamas Christian Council.
With respect to the statement
put forth by Bishop John
Humes, President of The
Bahamas Christian Council, on
gambling and the possible legal-
izing of the Web Shops with ref-
erence to the lottery or num-
bers as stated by the Prime Min-
ister.
Yes, I am happy to read the
views outlined by the president
and I respect him for this state-
ment.
However, I honestly think we
ought to critique this topic ana-


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lytically from several perspec-
tives.
First, I would be grateful to
read a statement from the pres-
ident with regards to the coun-
cil's position as it relates to the
government granting our sov-
ereign Crown land to foreign
investors to construct the largest
gambling facility in The
Bahamas and the Caribbean.
SSecond: What is your posi-
tion on the fact that this gam-
bling facility promises to engage
labour from an estimate 7,000
young Bahamian intellectuals
to facilitate gambling especially
on Sunday?
Third: Is it right to deny the
Bahamian citizens the liberty
to gamble or not to gamble?
I can recall a two-part theo-
logical statement "Render to
Caesar the things that are Cae-
sar's, and to God the things that
are God's." There was no fur-
ther discussion afterwards.
Forth: What impact would
this Cable Beach gambling facil-
ity have on these Bahamian


labourers being able to attend
worship services on Sunday and
Sabbath?
In my humble opinion, I
think this facility would bring
about much destruction in the
family and create a void in
Church attendance. (An esti-
mated 3,000) I also think, it is
impossible to cater to gamblers
every day and be a saint over
the hill.
Dear Mr President, please
remember, it was this one-sided
thinking by blacks that con-
tributed to the destruction of
black civilisation, slavery and
eventually apartheid.
In closing, if you support the
gambling facility on Cable
Beach, then, please allow the
free spirited Bahamians the lib-
erty the be equal and I stress,
equal.

EUGENE K ROBINSON ;
AA B/Th
Nassau,
February 16, 2008.


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HAUL 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 5


LOCAL....S


Grant reveals areas




of tourism funding

* By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
thompsontribunemedia.net BREAKDOWN ON EXP
THE Ministry of Tourism
spent $25.4 million of the $88.2
million allocated in its 2007/2008 The breakdown of the Ministry of Tourism's $25.41 million expe
budget on various areas of term budget presentation is as follows:
development for the country's Personal emolument and allowances ....................................
number one industry. Travel and subsistence .............................. ........ ........................
Minister of Tourism and Avi- Transport ... .....................................
ation Neko Grant said in the Rent, communications, and utility ........................
House of Assembly yesterday Printing and reproduction .... .......................... .....................
that the primary areas receiv- ter cntratu ri .... ......................
ing the funds were airlift devel- Other contractual services .............................................................
opment, cruise development, Supplies and materials ... ..................... ...................
product development, market- Acquisition and construction ............................................
ing and promotion. Rent and fixed charges .........................................................
S He said the funds were also Total expenditure .......................................... .....................
used for the rebuilding and
redevelopment of Grand Ministry of Tourism "Boosts" in Airlift Development for the fi
Bahama's tourism sector. year:
During the first half of the New non-stop WestJet Calgary-Nassau service (November, 2
fiscal year, the Ministry of An increase in Delta Air Lines' Atlanta-Nassau service from
Tourism spent $1.2 million on New scheduled daily services by Spirit Airlines between F(
airlift development, achieving (December, 2007)
a significant boost in air services Direct air service between US markets and various Out Islai
to major airports in the country, Atlanta Georgetown Exuma (Delta Airlines); Atlanta North I
said Mr Grant. Lauderdale Chub Cay (Gulfstream); Ft Lauderdale Great Ha
"WestJet services alone
accounted for nearly 111,000
more Canadian visitor nights, development remained a "top
which more than doubled the "While there are priority" for his ministry with
2006 total. While visitor nights an expenditure to date of $1.1
by travellers on Air Canada, a indeed challenges million for that sector.
mainstay in our market, were to overcome, my "Grand Bahama has a critical
up an estimated 10 percent, or task ahead of it not only to
20,000 more visitor nights than ministry's efforts rstr the island's tourism busi-
in 2006".
n 2006".the area of cruise deel- are all geared ness to previously achieved lev-
In the area of cruise devel- els, but to raise the bar even
opment, the ministry used towards strength- further and broaden the distri-
$416,307 to address the esti- enng the econo- bution of the industry's bene-
mated softening in the cruise t fits to greater numbers of
business to strengthen stake my's capacity to Grand Bahamian families.
holder relationships and drive i f es "While there are indeed dal-
cruise business to Grand achieve of these nges t overcome, my min-
Bahama Island, said Mr Grant.
Bahama Island, said Mr Grant. things and more." istry's efforts are all geared
"My ministry's efforts to gS. towards strengthening the econ-
boost the Grand Bahamian omy's capacity-to achieve all of
cruise sector netted a commit- these things and more".
ment by Norwegian Cruise Neko Grant With marketing and promo-
Lines (October) for 28 new calls tion being the "principal func-
into the port of Freeport over opment. These funds went to tion" of the Ministry of
the 20'-2009 period; 28 new increasing the development of Tourism, $12.5 million has been
calls which will directly benefit authentic Bahamian crafts; spent thus far of the intended
Bahamian straw and craft ven- developing the Bahamas Film $26.1 million for the year, said
dors, taxi drivers and tour oper- and Tourism Commission; eco- Mr Grant. "Of the moneys
ators; as well as that island's tourism and sustainable tourism expended during the period, my
providers of entertainment and planning; Family Island devel- ministry engaged a US-based
recreational activities, restau- opment; group travel; tours and interim promotional and mar-
ra: and retail services; 28 new entertainment; weddings and keting agency (Y Partnership)
calls which have the potential honeymoons, vertical markets to develop a campaign at a cost
to significantly boost the Grand and sports tourism; and nation- of $5.7 million.
Bahamian economy," said the altourism awareness. The campaign targeted our
minister. The ministry spent The minister told parliament key geographic markets, in par-
$3.7 million on product devel- that Grand Bahama tourism tirclar: South Florida. New


F *O* 1 130 ***I 'IO RD.
www*cbsbahams^o


ENDITURE


enditure in the 2007/2008 mid-
........$6.69 mil
.......... $0.9 million
.........$0.12 million
..........$1.34 million
.........$0.14 million
..........$15.12 million
......... $0.24 million
.......... $0.17 million
...... $0.69 million
......... $25.41 million
rst half of the 2007/2008 fiscal
2007)
three to six flights daily
ort Lauderdale and Freeport ,
nd destinations, among then:
Eleuthera (Delta Airlines); Ft
arbour Cay (Gulfstream)

York, Philadelphia, Boston,
Washington DC, Atlanta,
Orlando, Tampa and St Peters-
burg Florida, and.covered both
the print and broadcast media.
"My ministry, in collabora-
tion with our private sector
partners, undertook an adver-
tising agency review and ulti-
mately selected Arnold World-'
wide, (which is) currently devel-
oping its concepts for the pro-
duction of a brand new adver-
tising campaign, intended to be
launched in May 2008".
Mr Grant said his ministry
will seek $10.841. million in sup-
plementary funding for "pro-
duction and media", and an
additional $1.9 million for a UK
and European based media
campaign.


[ TROPICl o

lM E]MlINATORS'


THE Marco City election court case did not proceed as expect-
ed yesterday, as the attorneys for MP Zhivargo Laing were
reportedly unable to fly out of Freeport.
Damien Gomez, an attorney for opposition candidate Pleas-
ant Bridgewater in the case told Justices Anita Allen and Jon
Isaacs that he had spoken to Mr Laing's attorney Fred Smith,
who informed him that the weather in Freeport was very bad and
that he and his team was unable to fly to Nassau yesterday.
The matter was adjourned to today and will resume at 10am.
The Marco City election court case began on Tuesday with Ms
Bridgewater testifying.
While on the witness stand on Tuesday, Ms Bridgewater gave
evidence in relation to 20 of the 103 persons whose vote she is
challenging.
Ms Bridgewater, who lost her seat by 47 votes to Free Nation-
al Movement's MP Zhivargo Laing, is asking the court to declare
that she, and not Mr Laing, is the duly-elected Member of Par-
liament for Marco City.



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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


LOA LN WI


Mount Tabor Estates




East official opening


THE Mount Tabor Estates
East Subdivision has been offi-
cially declared open with 56
homeowners taking up resi-
dence.
At a ceremony on Monday,
Governor General Arthur Han-
na said, "This development is a
sign of progress, when Bahami-
ans own their own home."
Housing Minister Kenneth
Russell, pledged his ministry's
support for private developers
like Bishop Neil Ellis, senior
pastor at Mount Tabor Full
Gospel Church, and Arawak
Homes.
Mr Russell also vowed to
continue encouraging private
developers to work together to
assist low and middle income
Bahamians in their quest to own
a home.
Member of Parliament for
Sea Breeze and Education Min-
ister Carl Bethel, officially wel-
comed.the new residents into
his constituency and welcomed
plans to immediately implement
a'crime watch group in the area.
Bishop Ellis announced that
the church has acquired 30 addi-
tional lots, and said that by
year's end, more than 80 per-
sons will be living in houses they
can call their own.
The street signs unveiled
throughout Mt Tabor East Sub-
division are named in honour
of dedicated members who have
made significant contributions
to the ministry at Mount Tabor
over the years, said the church.
in a statement.


THE STREET signs throughout Mt Tabor East Subdi-
vision were named in honour of dedicated members
who have made significant contributions to the ministry
at Mt Tabor over the years. Pastor Emeritus Charles
Williams unveils the street sign named in his honour.


MAXINE NEWTON unveils the street sign named in
honour of Dehavilland Newton, deceased charter mem-
ber and deaconess of Mount Tabor Full Gospel Baptist
Church.


BISHOP Neil Ellis and Governor General Arthur Han- GUESTS watch as the street names are unveiled. At
na tour the newly developed subdivision located in Sea front: the governor general, Carl Bethel and Bishop Neil
Breeze. Ellis


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* BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT Two Freeport men were charged with two
counts of armed robbery and one count of attempted
armed robbery in Freeport Magistrates Court this week.
Ryan McKenzie, 26, aka 'Skunk' of Tamarind Street,
and.Otis Antonio Brown, 18, of Beach Way Drive,
appeared before Magistrate Debbye Ferguson in court
two on Monday.
It is alleged that on February 17,the accused men, being
concerned together and armed with a baseball bat, robbed
Jaroslaw Waszcyk of $85 cash and one set of keys, togeth-
er valued $90.
It is also alleged that on February 18, the men attempt-
ed to rob Anna Delloste and used violence against her.
/At another arraignment on Wednesday, both men were
charged with the armed robbery of a Bahama Reef resi-
dent.
It is alleged that on February 18, McKenzie and Brown
robbed the resident of cash, a black and silver Blackberry
phone, a black Freestyle watch, and a gold chain, together
valued $2,682.
The men were not required to enter pleas to the charges
and the matters were adjourned to.May 28.
McKenzie and Brown were remanded to Her Majesty's
Prison, Fox Hill. Simeon Brown and Cassietta McIntosh
appeared on behalf of the defendants.
In other court news, a 20-year-old man was charged with
possession of a firearm and ammunition on Monday.
Dudley Seide Jr, of Amberjack Street, pleaded not guilty
to the charges before Magistrate Debbye Ferguson.
It is alleged that on February 22, the accused was found
in possession of a .9mm semi-automatic pistol with 12 live
rounds of ammunition.
Seide was granted $2,000 bail with two sureties. The
matter was adjourned to June 19.


I


-j


.:r ..


3 .i~.;


I







THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


Elcott Coleby accuses BCB



chairman of a 'politically



motivated' diatribe S l


FORMER candidate for the
chairmanship of the PLP Elcott
Coleby is accusing the chairman
of the Broadcasting Corpora-
tion of the Bahamas of being
"politically motivated" in his
defence of the decision to cut
coverage of the opposition's
convention at 11pm last
Wednesday.
Mr Coleby, who lost the
chairmanship race to Engler-
ston MP Glenys Hanna-Martin,
said he was offended by the
tone and tenor of comments
made by chairman of the BCB
Michael Moss in defence of the
corporation's decision to "cut
away" from the speech of PLP
deputy leader Cynthia Pratt's
address to the party's 50th con-
vention.
Mr Moss said in statement
that the corporation condemns
PLP spokespersons, who
"regrettably adopted a posture
of blaming everyone else but
themselves., an attitude symp-
tomatic of many of the serious
problems affecting this great lit-
tle country of ours today."
Mr Moss said that based on
the contract, coverage for the
event was to end at llpm, fol-
lowed by the pre-recorded late
night news.
In a press statement released
at the weekend, Mr Moss said
that "the feeble attempt by one
spokesman (of the PLP) to sug-
gest a parallel between a vice-
president of the United States
and the deputy leader of the
PLP is also symptomatic of the
delusional mindset seemingly
still prevalent among some
PLPs."
This comment, Mr Coleby
said, could be interpreted as
politically motivated diatribe
and raises the question of
whether Mr Moss was speaking
as the chairman of the BCB or a
spokesman for the Free Nation-
al Movement.
Mr Coleby further said that
Mr Moss' statement "smacks of
bias, discrimination", and raises
questions about the BCB chair-
man's desire to execute his


office in a manner consistent
with the spirit of the Broad-
casting Act and established con-
ventions.
The record will show that the
decision by the BCB to "cut
away" at llpm last Wednesday
is a clear shift in policy and a
drastic departure from estab-
lished conventions," Mr Coleby
claimed.
He said that opposition MPs
Fred Mitchell and Obie Wilch-


combe "raised the issue of free-
dom of speech, equal access,
and the role of the government
in ensuring this. Clearly the PLP
raised policy issues and never
did any of these gentlemen
engage in personal attacks on
any person or persons associat-
ed the BCB," he said.
Mr Coleby hastened to
remind Mr Moss that as chair-
man, his public statements
about the corporation he chairs,
should be dispassionate and
"clinical" and should address
issues of corporation policy,
standard operating practices,
and established conventions,
not his personal feelings about
the PLP.
"The corporation is not
owned by the FNM, but the
government of the Bahamas
and by extension, the Bahamian
people. The BCB is an institu-
tion..that must be responsibly
used to aid us in the develop-
ment of our democracy. His
comments ought to be roundly
condemned," he said.


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Housing Parliamentary Secretary Brensil Rolle


reveals details of 2002-2007 expenditure


As part of the $22 million
in recurrent supplementary
appropriations sought by the
government for the 2007/2008
fiscal period, $800,000 has'


been earmarked for the Min-
istry of Housing and National
Insurance to reimburse the
Corporation Sole Account for
salaries advanced to contract


workers in the Department of
Housing.
Parliamentary Secretary in
the Ministry of Housing and
National Insurance Brensil


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Rolle explained the need for
the reimbursement during his
contribution to the mid-year
budget debate in the House
of Assembly yesterday. Mr
Rolle said that when the Free
National Movement became
the government in May 2007,
it met some 80 persons
employed by the Department
of Housing on short term con-
tracts outside of the Public
Service structure such as
development officers, build-
ing inspectors, maintenance
supervisors, general service
workers, office managers and
handymen. "These people,"
he said, "were all being paid
from the Corporation Sole
Account resulting in an annu-
al wage bill of $1,250,000."
Mr Rolle added that the
Department of Housing
retained the services of per-
sons whose contracts had not
expired and whom it needed,
and as no provisions were
made to pay those salaries,
and as these persons were
hired outside of the Public
Service structure, their salaries
were paid from this account
until funds could be made
available.
He said the Public Service
has been directed to regularise
most of these persons and to
provide benefits and salaries
in accordance with its policies
and procedures.
"The Corporation Sole
Account was never designed
for recurrent expenses," Mr
Rolle said. "Spending from
the Corporation Sole's
account has been set up to
allow efficiency of operations
by the minister responsible for
housing and to avoid the
delays inherent in the process-
es established for expenditure
from the Consolidated Fund.
"However, spending should
still be rationalised and the
philosophy underlying use of
the people's money still
applies."
Mr Rolle said it appears that
little control was exercised in
the use of funds in the account
during the period May 2002
to May 2007, so that in May


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TENDER NO. 653/08

INVITATION TO TENDER

PAINTING OF THE ADMINISTRATION
BUILDING
EXTERIOR WALLS, PERIMETER
WALLS, RAILS & GATES
BLUE HILL & TUCKER ROADS

You are invited to bid in competition with others for
the painting of the Administration Building, exterior
walls, perimeter walls, rails and gates located Blue
Hill and Tucker Roads.

Tenders shall be submitted by filling out and com-
pleting the Form of Tender. Tenders not submitted
using the Form of Tender shall not be considered
bona fide and may be rejected.

Tenders should show the total price to cover the
whole works from start to finish.

All Tenders shall be collected from and returned to
the Executive Office of the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill and Tucker Roads no later
than Thursday, 13th March, 2008 by 4:00 p.m.

Tenders shall be enclosed in a sealed envelope
bearing no mark by which the sender may be identi-
fied, and addressed to:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
P. O. Box N-7509
Nassau, Bahamas

and marked: Tender No. 653/08

All enquiries and queries concerning this tender
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Mr. Dudley Smith at telephone No. 302-1214.


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PARLIAMENTARY SECRETARY in the t
Insurance Brensil Rolle delivers his con
on the government's mid-year budget r


"The
Corporation
Sole Account
was never
designed for
recurrent
expenses."


Brensil Rolle
2007, the balance of the Cor-
poration Sole Account was
-$89,465.31, representing an
unapproved overdraft by the
Ministry of Housing.
This compares with the bal-
ance in the Corporation Sole
Account in June 2002 of
$2,892,399.42 and a cash book
balance of just under half a
million dollars, all left by the
minister of housing under the
previous FNM government,
he said. He said this state of
affairs came about because in
addition to capital works asso-


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i
a

Ministry of Housing and National
tribution to debate in parliament
report.
ciated with the construction
of houses under the govern-
ment's housing programme,
money from the Corporation
Sole Account was used for
recurrent items like vehicle
purchases and insurance
$595,662), assorted supplies
$145,491), utilities
. $269,474.72), travel and sub-
sistence ($243,702) and other
services rendered ($374,043).
"Mr Speaker, I am going to
conclude that had this mid-
year budget performance
review been in place in 2002,
we would have been able to
curb the illegal and reckless
spending that took place in
the Ministry of Housing," Mr
Rolle said.


!.;YB~PIPI(IYPPO.~"g


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


~t
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kyL` '.-.






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGJ 9


THE TRIBUNE


6ALEW


POLICY ON INTERNATIONAL, DOMESTIC ROUTES TO CHANGE



Bahamasair: baggage rates




to rise effective March 1


Bahamasair has announced
that it will change its baggage
policy effective March 1 on
international and domestic
routes.
Passengers on the interna-
tional routes will now be
allowed two checked bags at
60 pounds per bag rather than *
the 70 pounds previously
allowed.
On domestic routes, pas-
sengers will continue to be
allowed two checked bags
with a combined weight of 44
pounds.
In a statement issued yes-
terday, Bahamasair said there
will also be a change in excess
baggage charges system wide.
International flights will car-
ry the following excess bag-
gage charges:
Third bag or more $85
per bag
Bag greater than 60 lbs -
$100 per bag
Bag greater than 62 linear
inches $100 per bag
Any bag oversize and
overweight $125 per bag
Domestic flights will carry
the following excess baggage
charges:
Third bag or more, under
44 lbs and 62" $50 per bag
Allowable bags longer
than 62 linear inches $60 per
bag
Allowable bags heavier


than 44 lbs $65 per bag
Any bag oversize and
overweight $65 per bag
According to Van Diah,
deputy general manager at
Bahamasair, this change in
baggage policy reflects
changes across the global air-
line industry.
"Despite, the constrictions
on allowable baggage,
Bahamasair policy remains
more liberal than its competi-
tors on international flights.
Most international carriers
have reduced the allowable
bags to 50 lbs per bag with
some airlines charging for the
first and second bag while
some airlines are not accept-
ing more than two bags with a
weight in excess of the 50 lbs
per bag," said Bahamasair's
statement.
Mr Diah said that the
change in the domestic arena
will better equip passengers
to anticipate the excess
charges if applicable.
Previously, the excess bag-
gage charge on domestic
routes was based upon the
cost of airline ticket, but now
the charge is a flat $50 for an
extra bag or $65 if the two
bags exceed the 44 lbs, he not-
ed.
"Today, the airline faces
numerous obstacles with facil-
itating flights with passengers


carrying excess baggage and
at times the airline is forced
to charter baggage flights to
follow the passenger aircraft
to ensure the swift delivery of
the passenger's bags," said the
statement.
"The change in policy is
expected to defray these char-
ter costs and reduce lost bag
claims.
"The airline's Dash 8 fleet
baggage capacity is typically


two bags per passenger with
a maximum combined weight
of 44 pounds.
"The baggage capacity is
further restricted with
increased stage length flights
and is compounded by the
lack of fuel in a number of
Family Islands which requires
the airline to uplift return fuel
on departures out.of Nassau,
thereby further restricting the
baggage carrying capacity."


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Setting the Standard'"





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SSupport Technician for Mac Products
Advanced Technical Solutions Representative

Candidates must be enthusiastic and knowledgeable about
computers (PC and/or Mac) and related products They
must possess an energetic and friendly personality, enjoy
serving people solving problems and working in a team,
and be goal oriented, reliable, articulate, honest, prepared
to study and happy to learn
vMembers of The Know How Team are expected to display
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Custom Computers is a leading provider of technological
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...... ......... ., .,.,,,_ ...o-. ., ;:,- : .......


I


February 29 & March

10am- 5pm


2008


Tyreflex Star Motors
Wulff Road, P. 0. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas, Tel 242.325.4961 Fax 242.323.4667


The Second Annual

Jann Mortimer

Volleyball Classi


Playing at
Sir Kendal Isaacs gy n m\

APRIL 11, 12, &L

Registration Open to AI

Church League
Bankers League
& Night League Teams

Registration Fee: $150.00 per team
Deadline for team entries:
March 21, 2008

For more information contact:

bridgetterolle@yahoo.com or
677-4530


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an .
award. ....
,fscal.us on 322-1986
8 S \,'oufrstibr5; .
If a 6^^ ^ __^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^













Building our partnership through




the Summit of the Americas


We live in a
hemisphere
characterized
by dynamic,
positive change.
Democracy, free markets,
and economic integration have
unleashed powerful popular
forces.
The elected governments of
the Americas are working to
translate these forces into tan-
gible benefits for the peoples of
the Americas such as expand-
ing economic opportunity and
reducing poverty; connecting
national infrastructures, inte-
grating electricity grids and
energy markets; and collabo-
rating on alternative energy
sources. This story of positive
change has an underlying
theme: dialogue and engage-


ment between countries, and
broad recognition that we must
address our differences but also
appreciate the commonalities


that bind us together. So it is
no coincidence that the success
stories of our region are increas-
ingly products of co-operation


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FIRSTCARIBBEAN
S INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
for

HOME FINANCE SPECIALIST
Qualifications:

* Bachelor's Degree in Banking or related field
* Experience in sales and lending
* Proven negotiation, communication and interpersonal skills
* High level of quality management
* Demonstrated excellence in lending roles over a reasonable
period of time

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

* Manage a portfolio of 200-300 clients to achieve growth,
retention, profitability and other targets
* Maintain statistics on sales for feeding into country's sales
return
* Report weekly on activities within the portfolio specifically
volumes, declines, approvals, actions taken and justifications
* Analyze activity and reports to determine trends in loan
performance
* Adjudicate credit within own discretion and consistent with
- the Bank's risk management policies

If you are interested:

Submit your resume private & confidential in WRITING ONLY
on or before March 6, 2007 to:

Dawnika Rolle
Human Resources Business Associate
P.O. Box N-3221
Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: Dawnika.Rolle@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank thanks all applicants for their interest, however
only those under consideration will be contacted.
Vacancies are open to Bahamian nationals only


and collaboration, and vibrant
multilateralism.
A great example of this sub-
stantive dialogue takes place
this week in Tobago, as negoti-
ations begin for the Fifth Sum-
mit of the Americas in Trinidad
and Tobago early in 2009.
Bipartisan
The ongoing presidential
campaigns in the United States
remind us that there will be a
new U S president participat-
ing in that summit. Yet amidst
this dynamic background, the
discussions in preparation for
the 2009 summit underscore the
continuity of U S policy in the
Americas, as well as our com-
mitment to engaging, in a bipar-
tisan manner, in the dialogue
of the summit and the impor-
tant partnerships this collabo-
ration fosters.
Looking forward to the Fifth

"The United
States remains
committed, in a
bipartisan
manner, to our
partnership with
the
Americas, and to
the Summit of
the Americas."


summit process positively
affects their lives. Trinidad and
Tobago has shown leadership
in this area.
These summits have helped
to consolidate the region's com-
mitment to democracy. At the
Third Summit in Quebec in
2001, the region's 34 democrat-
ically-elected leaders mandat-
ed the Inter-American Democ-
ratic Charter, which states that
the "peoples of the Americas
have a right to democracy and
their governments have an
obligation to promote and
defend it."
To promote prosperity, at the
Fourth Summit in 2005, Presi-
dent Bush called for the first-
ever Americas Competitiveness
Forum, which then took place
in Atlanta June 10 to 13, 2007
and focused on.small business
development, supply chain
management, education and
training, and innovation.
He also announced the Latin
America and Caribbean Infra-
structure Development Pro-
gramme, a partnership with the


which could have an impact of
as much as $800 million to $1
billion in new investments.
At Nuevo Leon in 2004, lead-
ers committed to create the con-
ditions to reduce by half the
average cost of remittance
transfers. According to the
IDB, transaction costs to send
remittances have been reduced
from 15 per cent pre-2000 to 5.6
per cent in 2006.
Resource
The summit process has also
helped the region to invest in
its greatest resource: its people.
Based on a 2001 Summit
commitment, the United States
funds three regional Centres of
Excellence for Teacher Training
in Central America, the
Caribbean, and the Andean
regions.
By 2007, over 18,300 teach-
ers received training, reaching
roughly 600,000 students in the
region. With U S support, about
640,000 individuals living with
HIV/AIDS in the region were
receiving anti-retroviral therapy
by November 2005, exceeding a
2004 Special Summit goal.
Finally, the summit-mandated
Special Conference on Security
in Mexico City (2003) produced
the Declaration on Security in
the Americas, which builds a
hemispheric approach to
address regional challenges such
as terrorism, drugs, natural dis-
asters, and trafficking in per-
sons. The United States remains
committed, in a bipartisan man-
ner, to our partnership with the
Americas, and to the Summit
of the Americas process. The
summits have helped to lay the
groundwork for the pillars of U
S policy toward the region -
consolidating democracy, pro-
moting prosperity, investing in
people to advance social justice,
and securing the democratic
state we have developed con-
crete programmes in all of these
areas.
The United States looks for-
ward to building upon these
i:commitmenits with our'hemi-:
,,spheric partners as vwe'Begin
.negotiations for the Fifth Suiam-
mit of the Americh!'-.. '' ''"


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OPINION article by Thomas A Shannon,
Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of Western
Hemisphere Affairs, U S Department of State,
Washington, DC


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CHOP
S T I


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


THE TRIBUNE










LOA N


CAMPAIGN TO IMPROVE COASTAL ENVIRONMENT


Bahamas' coastlines: how



you can make a difference


THE Coastal Awareness
Committee of the Bahamas has
announced that the focus for its
campaign in 2008 will be pro-
viding Bahamians with tangible
ways to positively affect the
coastal environment.
The committee is made up of
stakeholders from the private
and public sectors with an inter-
est in promoting the sustainable
development of the Bahamas.
"Our committee was formed
four years ago to bring national
attention to the challenges of
sustainable tourism develop-
ment of coastal communities,"
said Earlston McPhee, director
of sustainable development for
the Ministry of Tourism and
chairman of the Coastal Aware-
ness Committee. "We have
spent each year bringing the five
main threats that affect our
coastlines to the attention of the
public. Our committee has
decided to focus this year on
tangible and simple actions that
each one of us can take to make
a significant difference to our
coasts.
"We will offer solutions on
reducing the use of plastic bags,
saving on electricity for example
and provide opportunities
through our various activities
to learn more about our coastal
environment. Our committee,
in collaboration with our part-
ners, will release a number of
public service' announcements
that address some of the prob-
lems that face our coastal
regions. Our goal is to educate
the public and to offer real solu-
tions to people that collectively
will help us as a developing
country and as a tourist desti-
nation," he said.
The committee has already
begun plans for a beach clean-
up as one of the main activities
during the month of April,
which is Coastal Awareness
Month in the Bahamas.
During Coastal Awareness
Month the committee will also
host, in collaboration with its
strategic partners both in the
public and private sectors, a
number of'activities, including:
an educational marine exhibi-
tion at the Marathon Mall.
They will also erect banners,
hold a national, school science
competition, a national t-shirt
day, and conduct field trips to
Dolphin Encounters on Blue
Lagoon Island and Dive Stuart
Cove to provide students with
an opportunity to learn about
protecting the coasts and enjoy-
ing the marine wonders of the
Bahamas.
As this is a national initiatives
beach clean-ups and other
coastal awareness activities are
planned for the islands of Aba-
co, Andros, Bimini, Eleuthera,
Exuma and.San Salvador.


"All beneficiaries of the
tourism industry must take an
interest and active role in con-
serving the resources of this
vital industry, particularly in
growing small island develop:
ing states (SIDS) like the
Bahamas," added Mr McPhee.
"As we depend on the tourism
industry for approximately 75
cents of each dollar in earned
foreign exchange, the econom-
ic sustain ability of the Bahamas


60 th. eddiii


hinges on our ability to maintain
the natural beauty of these
islands that attract millions to
our shores.
"We thank all those corpo-
rate sponsors who contributed
to this worthwhile effort. We
also ask the public to partici-
pate in our upcoming events as
we strive to sustain the natural
beauty of these islands for our
socio-economic welfare and that
of our guests."


rsary


Congratulations to our parents:

Rudolph & Joyce Burgzorg
Celebrating sixty years of marriage.

May God's blessings continue to surround you, may good health
and prosperity be with you to the end of your life's journey

We love you and thank you for your faithfulness
to each other and your family.

From vour children:
Carver, Lena, Carol, Joan, Frederick, Trevor, Ian,
Otto, Selvyn, and Lue.
Grandchildren:
Allen, Jason, Sarah-Vaughan, Samantha, Nicole, Seleyse, Seiron,
Shaquille, Synnamon, Savanah and Rudolph
Great Grandchild: Nakia
~BP~~~ sRi~;pr~j~gr ~'-'l-


Presentation by InnoWorks


THE COLLEGE of the Bahamas'
InnoWorks Chapter visited St Andrew's
School this week to present principal
Robert Wade with the 2007 InnoWorks
camp portfolio. According to the organi-
sation's'website, InnoWorks is "an inno-
vative science and engineering initiative
'By Students, For Students,' designed
and implemented by college volunteers
for middle-school students from disad-
vantaged backgrounds." Pictured at front,.
centre (left to right) are: Colinalmperial
vice president of human resources
Richenda King; Robert Wade; director of
InnoWorks Peter Blair; College of the
Bahamas faculty director for the pro-
gramme, Judith Blair.


The 2008 Coastal Awareness Committee includes members
from the following organizations:
Ministry of Tourism
Bahamas Environment Science and Technology Com-
mission (BEST)
Bahamas Hotel Association
Bahamas National Trust
Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation
(BREEF)
Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas
College of the Bahamas
Department of Environmental Health Services
Department of Marine Resources
Dive Stuart Cove
Dolphin Encounters Ltd
The Nature Conservancy
Ministry of Education, Science and Technology
Port Department
The College of the Bahamas
The University of the West Indies


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MANUFACTURER


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


i


i


.- RE
-*^~BBssase






THE TRIBUNE


New appointed Senator

Anthony Musgrove sworn il


THE PACE

FOUNDATION
presents the Documentary


"Interrupted"

SThe National Centre For The Performing Arts
Saturday, March 1st, 2008 at 7pm
Dress Code: Elegawr Casual
Donations ar w elcumwd
Cheques may be nudeC pJayble to The PACE Foundation
Visit Our Website .o www.pacebahamas.org
Enuil: shanique.taylorr'gmail.com or R.S.\l.P 393-6465

Make it a family affair!


NMEMBERS of lodge St Nlichael ffri.34 S C ilrted the All Saint's
Camp for those suffering from HI\. AIDS to donate clothing and
non perishable goods. Right \orshipful Nlasicr Dae Nlunroe
explained that as part of its efforts to asi.i. persion- in need through-
out the Bahamas, the lodge is emphasising "brotherly love and
relief". He said the lodge will continue to assist persons facing
challenges wherever possible. Pictured from left to'right are:
Richard Wright, Bran Seymour, Chaplin; Marco Rolle, Arthur
Chase, Dave Munroe, Drew Seymour, Ms Glinton, assistant direc-
tor of the All Saint's Camp; Clem Foster, Romauld Ferreira and
Alex Roberts.


BEGIN YOUR NEW YEAR WITH WEEKLY
ACTING CLASSES
TAUGHT BY ACTRESS AND
FOUNDER OF BAHAMAS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL
LESLIE VANDERPOOL








Leslie Vanderpool will be offering Audition and On Camera classes.
Discover ways to enjoy your self on stage or on film and your audience will in return
enjoy you.

Starting MARCH 4TM MARCH 27TH
TUESDAY & THURSDAY 6:30 pm 8:30 pm
on going acting classes twice a week
Ages 13 and up

Where:
Bahamas International Film Festival office
4th Terrace East Collins Ave
Building 10, "t floor
RSVP A MUST: 356-5939


4 weeks classes $300.00
Individual classes charge of $40.00

Class size 12 people, therefore please be one of the first to register




The Tomlinson


Scholarship


***$12,000 per year***

Heading to Canada for University?

McGill University
McMaster University
Queen's University
University of Guelph
University of Toronto
University of Waterloo
University of Western Ontario

If you are planning to attend one of these schools
then apply NOW for one of our scholarships!

Undergraduates only

Applications must be in by
March 31st, 2008
Application forms may be obtained by writing to the Tomlinson
Scholarship, P.O. Box CB 10975, Nassau, Bahamas


The Tomlinson Scholarship is funded by High Tor Limited
and family members in memory of Mr Joseph Tomlinson


NEWLY APPOINTED Senator Anthony Musgrove is sworn in in the
Upper House yesterday.


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HUGH JOHN ARTHUR
COTTIS, 77


r-Lur i-, I riUtoutT, r-r-tb-IUAr -iY 2UU


'EXPRESS YOURSELF & WIN VALUABLE PRIZES'
THE YAMACRAW FREE NATIONAL MOVEMENT




INVITES
ALL YOUNG PERSONS AGES 13 THROUGH 19 YEARS AND
LIVING IN THE CONSTITUENCY
TO ENTER


ON THE FOLLOWING TOPICS:
"Ideas For Effective Solutions In My Bahamaland"
#1 800 words (for ages 13-15 years)
"Describe what you think are the major social problems facing The Bahamas
today (for example: the family, education and religion), and give your
suggestions for addressing them."
1'" Prize $500.00
2nd Prize $300.00
3rd Prize $150.00
#2 1000 words (for ages 16-19 years)
"Briefly describe the major social issues facing young Bahamian adults today
and give attainable solutions to address them."
1" Prize $800.00 or Laptop
2nd Prize $400.00
3rd Prize $200.00
RULES & GUIDELINES
1. Typed work preferred.
2. Size 12 font and double spaced.
3. Ensure pages are numbered and each page has your name, telephone
number & email address if possible.
4. Participants are requested to keep a copy of their entry in their
possession.
5. No pornography or obscenity will be judged.
6. Individuals must have knowledge of subject matter as an interview with
the judges will be .part of the process for the two best essays in each
category.
7. Research is encouraged but your work should be in your own words as
much as possible.
8. There will be a small entry fee of $5.00 per application/entry. You are
encouraged to submit only one essay.
APPLICATIONS CAN BE PICKED UP FROM OUR HEADQUARTERS IN
EASTERN ESTATES OR FROM THE NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS ON
MACKEY ST.
WINNING ENTRIES WILL BE PUBLISHED IN THE NEWSPAPERS AND
PRESENTATIONS WILL BE PHOTOGRAPHED.
ALL ENTRANTS WILL RECEIVE CERTIFICATES OF PARTICIPATION
THE DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS 31ST MARCH 2008
Tel: (242)324-9550
Email:fnm@coralwave.com


of Dundas Town, Abaco and formerly of
Essex, England, Long Island and Exuma,
will be held at 3p.m. on Saturday, 1 March,
2008 at the Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel.

Officiating will be the Rev. Charles
Sweeting.


I





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 13


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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


THE TRIBUNE

6'ALEW


BPIJ"TAGE

2008 MODELS A .. .'
The Power to Surprise


FROM page one

porting for other companies.
Sun Oil has a licensing and supply agreement
with Shell Oil in the Bahamas.
Environmentalists are seriously concerned
about the possibility that the integrity of.the
supertanker's hull may yet be compromised, cre-
ating an environmental catastrophe in the form of
an oil spill right off the coast of New Providence.
Furthermore, one suggested that a large per-
centage of any potential leaked product would
drift into the Lyford Cay bay, sullying the coastal
environment around the community's many mil-
lion dollar residences.
The Shell response team were due to arrive in
Nassau this morning to make an assessment and
chart a course of action, according to Mr Cox. The
boat is owned by Elka Shipping, and managed
and operated by Shell International Trading and
Shipping Company Limited.
Calling from their London headquarters, Sarah
Smallhorn, another Shell spokesperson, stressed
that there has been no breach of the double-
hulled tanker, nor any injuries among crew mem-
bers. She stated that the vessel was "stable",
while Mr Cox claimed it represents a "very low"
spillage threat.
However, a local environmentalist.pointed out


FROM page one Adde

House's seating to hear from i
another speaker before it W il
adjourned at 1pm. When Mr
Sear's objection received little ~v M
sympathy from Mr Turnquest over.
or the Speaker of the House
Alvin Smith, the Opposition
opted to object as a whole when length, Mr Ad(
'the government put forward the say that he did
motion for adjournment. in the House g
When the Speaker put for- at that time.
ward the option that those in However, p
favour of the motion should have question
remain seated, and the contrary loyalty to the
would rise, Mr Adderley most saw his public
noticeably did not rise from his slap in the face
seat with the rest of his PLP col- Perry Christie
leagues. Concerns o0
At the beginning of the first arose whel
demonstration, the Opposition to remain as
had a total of 12 members chairman ui
standing, outnumbering the administration
government momentarily and lost the govern
potentially overturning the
motion for dismissal.
This was quickly reversed, 15-y
however, when Verna Grant,
FNM MP for Eight Mile Rock, C
hurried to the House's Smok- connect
ing Room to call back to their
seats government MPs who FROM ]
were there. During this time
the leader of Opposition Busi- After the stab
ness in the House Dr Bernard jumping the w
Nottage called for a count of area.
standing members so that the School prince
motion-couldebe: defeated. :frequent bag c
Howet r; as PF'NM MPs'beganip ;uih att4ks.
to flood the Parliament floor,, In addition,
the demonstration was quickly der," controlli
quashed, and the Speaker of the "But obvio'
House moved the motion to jump, they jun
adjourn Parliament to 3pm. dispute betwe
Quickly leaving the chamber, In view of v
The Tribune caught up with Mr lence, The M
Adderley on the steps of the saying it would
House to inquire about his deci- install security
sion not to stand with his party. ty personnel,
While not speaking at any New Providen


Oil tanker

runs aground
that depending on the speed at which the tanker
was travelling when it struck the peninsula, could
vary the threat level.
Mr Cox explained that Shell was seeking per-
mission to have some oil pumped out of the boat
to lighten its load and ease the force required to
float it off the rocks.
The Tribune was informed that the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force had been alerted to the
emergency yesterday afternoon, and requested to
send a large boat to aid in the attempts to move
the supertanker. The US Coast Guard was also on
alert in case its services are required.
The Tribune was unable to reach the RBDF's
press department yesterday to confirm whether or
not a defence force boat had in fact been dis-
patched or what the outcome may have been.
A member of the government's oil spill
response committee informed The Tribune that
the "onus" of addressing the problem is on the oil
companies involved.
Sun Oil in conjunction with Shell are expected
to provide further information regarding the sta-
tus of the operation to move the tanker today.


rley fails to stand

th PLP in bid to

turn adjournment

derley would only year.
not see the sense At that time, sources in the
going beyond 1pm PLP claimed that former Prime
Minister Christie was furious
politicall pundits with Mr Adderley's decision to
ed Mr Adderley's stay on in the position after
PLP before, and numerous other PLPs were
action as another stripped of their posts follow-
e for party leader ing the May 2, 2007 general
elections.
ver Mr Adderley A PLP source told The Tri-
n the MP decided bune yesterday that the party
Gaming Board needs to make up its mind
under the FNM about what it is going to do with
n when his party Mr Adderley before he embar-
iment in May last rasses the party any further.


ear-old is questioned in

:tion with student stabbing
page one

bbing, it is understood that three boys were seen
tall of the school at the western end, fleeing the
cipal Geoffrey McPhee said the school carries out
hecks and spot inspections of students to prevent
Mr McPhee said that the school has a "secure bor-
ng who'comes in ard out of the school.
usly with a day like today, when they want to
ip," he said, suggesting that there was an ongoing
en the victim and the boys.
what appears to be a proliferation of school vio-
inistry of Education issued a release yesterday
d issue batons to all public school security officers,
' cameras in senior high schools, evaluate securi-
and employ 58 security officers at high schools in
ice and Grand Bahama.


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ALL RISKS (BUILDINGS & CONTENTS, PLANT, MACHINERY
& EQUIPMENT INCLUDING SUB-STATION SITES

TENDER NO. 654/08

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the provision of
general insurances as described above.
Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before
28 March 2008 by 3:00 p.m. and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 654/08
"GENERAL INSURANCES BUILDINGS, PLANT & MACHINERY"
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF GENERAL INSURANCES
PUBLIC & EMPLOYER'S,LIABILITY, PERSONAL ACCIDENT
AND PRIVATE CAR & COMMERCIAL VEHICLE

TENDER NO. 655/08

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the provision of
general insurances as described above.
Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before
28 March 2008 by 3:00 p.m. and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 655/08
"GENERAL INSURANCES PUBLIC & EMPLOYER'S AND VEHICLES"'
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF GENERAL INSURANCES
MONEY & FIDELITY

TENDER NO. 656/08

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the provision of
general insurances as described above.
Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before
28 March 2008 by 3:00 p.m. and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs. Delineta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 656/08
"GENERAL INSURANCES MONEY & FIDELITY"
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF GENERAL INSURANCES
MARINE INSURANCE

TENDER NO. 659/08

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the provision of
general insurances as described above.
Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before
28 March 2008 by 3:00 p.m. and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 659/08
"GENERAL INSURANCES MARINE INSURANCE
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF GENERA INSURANCES
PROFESSIONAL INDEMNITY DIRECTORSS & OFFICERS)

TENDER NO. 657/08

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the provision of
general insurances as described above.
Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration
Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before
28 March 2008 by 3:00 p.m. and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 657/08
"PROFESSIONAL INDEMNITY DIRECTORS & OFFICERS"
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF GENERAL INSURANCES
ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT& MOBILE RADIOS

TENDER NO. 658/08

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the provision of
general insurances as described above.
Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before
28 March 2008 by 3:00 p.m. and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 658/08
"GENERAL INSURANCES ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT & MOBILE RADIOS
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 15


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
PO. BO N-7509

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P 1T D F U 2 0H I


Dr Nottage refers to MP as

'foolish ass' in House debate


FROM page one
"It has been more than two full weeks since I
asked the Minister of State for Finance to
explain his role, if any, of a receipt of a relative
of his of a special customs duty rate of the Mon-
ami juice drink. The minister promised to pro-
vide a full report presumably to show that his
hands had not been in the proverbial "cookie
jar."
"To date the Minister has failed to do so. In
this mid-term budget on page five, the PM says
it drives home the message to persons of the
highest levels, ministers and senior managers in


the public sector, that they are clearly mandat-
ed to manage the people's money with the
greatest care and responsibility and that they
are accountable to Parliament and the Bahami-
an people," said Mr Smith.
The St Thomas More MP continued to taunt
Mr Laing, asking him to "speak now".
"Mr Prime Minister, demand that your Min-
ister of State for Finance speak now," he urged.
Mr Laing stood on a point of order and reit-
erated that he had promised the House a full
report on'the matter, and that it was now com-
pleted and when government's agenda allowed,
he would read it.


FROM page one
Scuba Adventures (JASA) at.
the time of the attack.
According to reports in the
international media, the water
had been baited with bloody
fish parts to attract sharks to
the area.
The Austrian tourist was not
protected by a cage or any oth-
er safety equipment.
Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Nalini Bethel, senior
director of global communica-
tions at the Ministry of
Tourism's Miami office,
explained that although JASA
is an American-owned diving
operation, the boat used dur-
ing the excursion in question is
registered to the Bahamas.
For this reason, she said, the
onus is on the Bahamas to
investigate if there were any


Investigation
possible violations of the coun-
try's charter-diving guidelines.
"We have certain guidelines
when it comes to interacting
with marine wildlife. The Port
Department, (under) Captain
Anthony Allen, will lead the
investigation into this matter,"
she said.
Mr Groh, who died at Jack-
son Memorial Hospital in South
Florida after being airlifted
there by the US Coast Guard,
was participating in the contro-
versial practice of "cageless"
shark diving which is illegal
in the waters off Florida, but is
still undertaken by dive opera-
tors in Bahamian waters.
Following the report of the
incident on Sunday, British
media warned vacationers from


the United Kingdom not to par-
ticipate in skark-feeding dives.
Ms Bethel said yesterday that
the Ministry of Tourism is "very
saddened" by the death of Mr
Groh and concerned about the
possible fall-out for the industry.
"Of course the victim was
Austrian, so there will be
(media) coverage in Europe.
When something like this hap-
pens we are always concerned,"
she said.
However, Ms Bethel said that
the Bahamas can be proud of
the fact that it strictly advocates
"best and safe practices" when
it comes to diving expeditions.
"We still have one of the
most beautiful natural marine
habitats for swimming and div-
ing. We will just have to wait
and see what happens (with the
media coverage of this event),"
she said.


PM: Some govt corporations face 'cut backs'


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FROM page one
"In respect to the Broadcasting Corporation of
the Bahamas I told them they will be given $8 mil-
lion to spend for their year; that we would only
consider giving them another set of money if they
had capital items. They came forward with anoth-
er $2.2 million more. But they could only identi-
fy $480,000 worth of capital works and that's all
we're going to be giving them. They will have to
cut that cyst they have at ZNS.
"Whatever the capital items are we will buy
them. That's no problem, no problem. Whatever
the capital items are, the government of the
Bahamas will provide so that by 2009 ZNS can be
digitized. No problems with that. We are not giv-
ing them any more monies to be spent on salaries
or anything like that. Not a penny more!" Mr
Ingraham exclaimed.
Other than ZNS, Mr Ingraham explained, the
WSC, and Bahamasair are two other public orga-
nizations that continue to burden tax payers. At
least 20 per cent of every dollar continues to be
pumped into these entities, Mr Ingraham said,
warning that a fundamental decision will have
to be made in short order.
"Fundamental decisions must be made about
loss-making public sector enterprises such as
Bahamasair, Water and Sewerage Corporation


and the Broadcasting Corporation of the
Bahamas. At least 20 per cent of the monies bor-
rowed by the Bahamas government under the
disguise of capital expenditure will continue to be
transferred and pumped into these entities to
pay operational expenses, such as salaries, office
supplies and gasoline, diesel and whatever other
recurrent expenses.
"And then we burden the taxpayers of the
Bahamas for 20-30 years to pay that money back.
In respect to these items that can't be seen, can't
be felt, anything. Just consumed, it disappears.
Generations after generations have to pay it back.
Fundamental decisions have to be made. So, Mr
Speaker, in the future, beginning in May we are
going to budget up-front the exact money that is
going to be allocated for Bahamasair, the Water
and Sewerage Corporation and ZNS, that will
reduce substantially the amount of money allocat-
ed for other projects. Ministers and members are
going to have to do, like they say, 'put question to
his Ma'," Mr Ingraham said.
Of these three entities, Mr Ingraham tabled a
list of Supplemental Appropriations over the last
12 years. The table showed that Bahamasair
received $96.9 million more than its budget. The
Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas $21.5
million over what was budgeted, and the Water
and Sewerage Corporation some $43.5 million
over budget.


Junkanoo Boxing Day results issued


THE 2007 Junkanoo Boxing
Day results were issued
Wednesday.
At a press conference
at the Ministry of
Education yesterday, Leslie
Johnson of the Junkanoo Cor-
poration revealed the official
results:


* SHIRLEY STREET
1st Place Kingdom Warriors
2nd Place Original Congos
3rd Place Conquerors for
Christ
* DIVISION A
Overall Winner One Family
2nd place The Saxons
3rd place Roots


4th place Music Makers
5th place The Valley Boys
Mr Johnson told the media
The Prodigal Sons were disqual-
ified on Boxing Day for "insuf-
ficient membership".
The annual Junkanoo
Awards Event is scheduled for
March 15.


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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


THE TRIBUNE







THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 17


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rrac o1, I nurivouM, l-ttbHUARY 28, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


INTERNATIONAL NEWS


Colombian rebels free four more


hostages into Venezuelan


* SAN JOSE DEL _
GUAVIARE, Colombia .. '"


Colombian rebels freed four
lawmakers yesterday after hold-
ing them for at least six years
each, the guerrillas' second
hostage release this year as they
seek to persuade the interna-
tional community to strike them
from lists of terrorist organiza-
tions, according to the Associat-
ed Press.
The rebels handed over the
four Colombian politicians to
the International Red Cross and
Venezuela's interior minister
around midday in a clearing in
Colombia's southern jungles.
Two Venezuelan helicopters
with doctors aboard flew them
to Venezuelan territory, on
their way to family reunions in
Caracas. Venezuelan President
Hugo Chavez spoke to them by
phone.
"They are safe and sound,"
said Jesse Chacon, a top Chavez
aide. He said Venezuela hopes
the release "will help us contin-
ue advancing on the path to
achieving liberations of the


RESIDENTS watch the departure
of a Venezuelan helicopter with
International Red Cross insignias at
the airport in San Jose del
Guaviare, in southern Colombia,
yesterday. The helicopter is en
route to pick up four rebel-held
hostages who have spent more
than six years in captivity..
remainder, and of course to
what we all yearn for: peace in
Colombia."
Chavez's intercession in


Colombia's long-running con-
flict and the hostage releases
it has reaped has raised the
profile of the rebel Revolution-
ary Armed Forces of Colom-
bia, or FARC, as it seeks to per-
suade the European Union to
remove it from its list of inter-
national terrorist groups.
The FARC has been fighting
for more than four decades for
a more equitable distribution
of wealth in Colombia, but has
in recent years drawn wide
reproach for its methods: It kid-
naps civilians for ransom and
funds itself largely through
cocaine trafficking.
The four hostages were freed
in the same region of Guaviare
state where the FARC released
two other politicians on Jan. 10:
Clara Rojas and Consuelo Gon-
zalez.
Those released Wednesday
were former Reps. Gloria
Polanco and Orlando Beltran
and former Sens. Luis Eladio
Perez and Jorge Gechem. All
were said to be ailing Polan-
co with thyroid problems;
Gechem with heart, back and
ulcer problems.
"Such a kidnapping surely
tears out one's insides," Daniel
Polanco, the youngest of Gl6ria
Polanco's three sons, told
Colombia's Caracol radio from
Caracas. He was 11 years old
when his mother was kid-
napped.
His two older brothers were
seized with his mother and
released in 2004 after a ransom
was paid. Their father was later


custody
murdered, allegedly by the
FARC. Daniel Polanco said
they had bought their mother
flowers, balloons, two or three
changes of clothes and cosmet-
ics "so she can be pretty the first
days."
Aboard the helicopters were
Venezuela's interior minister,
Ramon Rodriguez Chacin, and
Colombian Sen. Piedad Cordo-
ba, a close Chavez collabora-
tor, as well as four Red Cross
representatives and doctors.
In a statement Wednesday on
a pro-rebel Web site, the FARC
thanked Chavez for his media-
tion efforts. After last month's
release, Chavez called on the
international community to rec-
ognize the rebels as a legitimate
armed opposition group, rather
than calling them terrorists.
The rebels repeated their
demand that a safe zone be cre-
ated for talks that could lead to
a 'swap of rebel-held hostages
for imprisoned rebels. And they
accused the hardline govern-
ment of President Alvaro
Uribe, Washington's top ally in
Latin America, of mounting "a
gigantic military operation" in
the area where the hostages
were freed.
The FARC has proposed.
trading some 40 high-value cap-
tives including former
Colombian presidential candi-
date Ingrid Betancourt and
three U.S. defence contractors
- for hundreds of imprisoned
guerrillas.
It has held some captives for
a decade.


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Measure to allowwarrantless

searches fails in Mexico

MEXICO CITY
Mexican lawmakers on Tuesday stripped a controversial
provision from their plan to overhaul the country's judiciary
that would have given police officers, who are widely mis-
trusted here, the ability to enter homes without obtaining
warrants beforehand, according to the New York Times News
Service.
Warrantless searches would have been allowed only in
emergencies and in cases of hot pursuit of criminal suspects.
But human rights groups had strongly opposed the measure,
fearing a police force notorious for corruption would abuse the
authority. One newspaper labelled the plan the "Gestapo
law."
The last-minute change, approved overwhelmingly by the
House of Deputies, delays passage of a revamping of the
country's judicial system that is meant to speed up trials that
now stretch on for years and to better equip the country in its
battle against narcotics traffickers.
"In this country, no one is satisfied with our justice sys-
tem," said CesarCamacho Quiroz, a legislator representing the
opposition Institutional Revolutionary Party, who opposed the
expanded police powers.
The reforms amending Mexico's Constitution will now go
back to the Senate, which had endorsed the search provision.
If both chambers agree on a reform proposal, a majority of the
31 states must approve the changes before they go into effect.
There is widespread agreement that Mexico's judiciary is
broken and ill-equipped to address the heavily armed orga-
inized crime figures who control huge swaths of the countryside.
The backlog of criminal cases grows greater by the month.
Corruption mars many of the decisions that are handed down.'
The reforms put forward by President F61ipe Calderon
would replace the current system of secretive .paper trials
with one of oral arguments similar to those held in American
courts, albeit without juries. In addition, criminal defendants
would be presumed innocent, a new legal standard in Mexico.
Calderon had also proposed allowing police to enter homes
without warrants if they were pursuing a suspect in the act of
committing a crime or if they had reason to believe someone
inside was in danger.
Some critics have complained that the provisions go too far,
however, giving law enforcement officials too much leeway to
monitor phone calls and to review private records. They
feared that allowing police officers access to homes even in lim-
ited cases would open a loophole that dishonest officers could
exploit.
, Mexican lawmakers also approved new restrictions on
cigarette smoking that will prevent smokers from lighting up
in offices, restaurants and other public spaces across the coun-
try. Those establishments wishing to set up areas for smokers
would be required to install equipment to ensure that sec-
ondhand smoke does not reach nonsmokers.
The smoking law, approved by the Senate on Tuesday and
earlier by the lower chamber, was hailed by anti-tobacco
advocates as a groundbreaking step that would serve as a
model for Latin America.
"Smoking has been so ingrained in the culture of Mexico,
and this shows Mexico is waking up to the economic and
health effects of smoking," said Mark Hurley, spokesman for ;'
the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids in Washington, D.C.' :
Mexico City's legislature also approved its own strong anti-'
smoking measures on Tuesday. -
I. Al l




















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TH TRIUNETHRSDYIEBUARA28 208,PAG 1


Kenya's opposition calls off mass


protests at Kofi Annan's
* NAIROBI, Kenya


Kenya's opposition leader on
Wednesday backed off plans for
mass protests at the request of
former U.N. Secretary-General
Kofi Annan, who is pushing the
two rivals to share power,
according to the Associated
Press.
Opposition leader Raila
Odinga announced after a
meeting with Annan that ral-
lies planned for Thursday were
"postponed until further
notice," saying it was in
response to a request from
Annan.
The plans for protests had
sparked widespread fears of
renewed fighting in the East
African country.
Clashes since the disputed
Dec. 27 presidential election
already have killed 1,000 people
and forced 600,000 from their
homes, and previous demon-


CHILDREN are seen near a burnt down house in Kibera slum, Nairo-
bi, Kenya. The government'urgied Kenyans to reject opposition calls
for nationwide protests on Tuesday as the United States added to
weeks of international pressure on the two sides to share power and
end the deadly postelection crisis.


stations have turned violent as
police pushed back crowds.
President Mwai Kibaki and
Odinga both claim they won the
election. Local and internation-
al observers have said the
results were manipulated, mak-
ing it unclear who won.
Odinga's Orange Democrat-
ic Party had said it would call


for street demonstrations if no
tangible progress was made
toward a power-sharing gov-
ernment by the end of the day
yesterday. The reversal comes
as attempts to mediate
appeared on the edge of disin-
tegrating.
Annan suspended monthlong
talks between the two political


request
parties on Tuesday, saying he
would personally appeal to their
leaders to strike a deal because
talks were "turning around in
circles."
No details on any move
toward a deal emerged from the
Annan-Odinga meeting. Annan
also was meeting separately
with President Mwai Kibaki on
Wednesday.
International pressure on the
two sides has been mounting.
Secretary of State Condoleez-
za Rice, who visited Kenya ear-
lier this month to urge progress,
said Tuesday that U.S. relations
with any future Kenyan admin-
istration are at stake.
"I want to emphasize that the
future of our relationship with
both sides and their legitimacy
hinges on their cooperation to
achieve this political solution,"
Rice said in a statement, with-
out elaborating.


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THE TRIBUNE


I
I,
i
i
i
I


1.


.....














TB resistant to many



drugs hits highest



recorded rates


* By LAWRENCE
K. ALTMAN
Multiple-drug-resistant tuber-
culosis cases in parts of the for-
mer Soviet Union have reached
the highest rates ever recorded
and could soar even higher,
spreading the bacterial disease
elsewhere, the World Health
Organization said Tuesday in
releasing findings from the
largest global survey of the
problem, according to the New
York Times News Service.
The highest rate was in Baku,
the capital of Azerbaijan, where
22.3 percent of new tuberculosis
cases were resistant to the stan-
dard anti-tuberculosis drug reg-
imen during the survey period
from 2002 to 2006. That exceed-
ed the previous high of 14.2 per-
cent, in Kazakhstan.
Studies in China also suggest
that multiple-drug-resistant TB
is widespread in the inner Mon-
golia and Heilongjiang regions,
WHO said.
The new survey, the first in
four years, shows that earlier
predictions were correct and
that governments have lost con-
trol of tuberculosis in many
areas. The reason, health offi-
cials say, is that countries have
failed to invest enough to build,
equip and staff the laboratories
needed to detect the disease.
The countries also failed to
assure sufficient amounts of
standard drugs, and then to
monitor patients to ensure that
they complete a full course of
therapy.
Inadequate therapy often
leads to development of multi-
ple-drug-resistant strains of the
tuberculosis bacterium.
Drug-resistant tuberculosis,
like drug-sensitive TB, can be
transmitted from an infected
individual to a non-infected per-
son in droplets through cough-
ing, sneezing, singing and other
activities. The drug resistant
form can take two years to treat
with drugs that are 100 times


more expensive than the first-
line regimen, the health agency,
a unit of the United Nations,
said.
The survey also found alarm-
ingly high rates in Moldova
(19.4 percent), Donetsk in the
Ukraine (16 percent), Tomsk
Oblast in Russia (15 percent)
and Tashkent in Uzbekistan
(14.8 percent).
Those levels surpassed the
highest levels that nearly all
experts once thought were pos-
sible, Dr. Mario C. Raviglione,
who directs the health organi-
zation's Stop Tuberculosis pro-
gram, said in an interview.
"We are seeing levels of mul-
tiple-drug-resistant TB that we
never expected 20 percent is
a very high level," Raviglione,
said. The Global Plan to Stop
TB is a road map for reducing
by half TB prevalence and
deaths by 2015 compared with
1990 levels.
When WHO started a drug
surveillance project in 1994, he
said, "the general thinking was
that multiple-drug-resistant TB
would never be a real problem
since it was felt to be confined
to immunosuppressed patients."
A decade ago, when WHO
first received reports of 9 to 10
percent rates of multiple-drug-
resistant TB in some areas,
many scientists thought the fig-
ure was inaccurate due to a mis-
classification that mixed new,
previously treated and chronic
cases together. Experts also said
higher rates were not possible,
Raviglione said, but "we see
now it is possible, it tells you
they are really doing something
wrong in places where this form
of TB is spreading."
Overall, about one in 20 new
cases of tuberculosis in the
world is resistant to first line
drugs, which translates into
nearly 500,000 of the 9 million
new tuberculosis cases that are
detected each year, according
to the WHO survey, which
involved 90,000 patients in 81


countries. The World Health
Organization says that there is a
financial gap of $2.5 billion of
the estimated $4.8 billion need-
ed this year for overall TB con-
trol in low- and middle-incoine
countries.
For the first time, the survey
included analysis of extensively
drug-resistant tuberculosis, or
XDR-TB, a virtually untreat-
able form of the respiratory dis-
ease because the causative bac-
teria are resistant to virtually
all the most effective anti-TB
drugs.
XDR-TB has been reported
in 45 countries, but because few
countries have the necessary
laboratories to detect it, the
data were limited.
The true extent of the prob-
lem remains unknown in some
pockets of the world because
only six countries in Africa, the
region with the world's highest
incidence of TB, could provide
drug resistance data for the
report, Raviglione said. Other
countries in the region could
not conduct surveys because
they lack the laboratory equip-
ment and trained personnel
needed to identify drug-resis-
tant TB.
Outbreaks of drug'resistance
are likely going undetected,
Abigail Wright, the principal
author of the WHO report, said.
Although the WHO report
highlights the extent of drug
resistance, Raviglione said there
were successes where govern-
ments invested in control mea-
sures. He cited the Baltic coun-
tries of Estonia and Latvia as
"the model" because they were
the drug resistant tuberculosis
"hot spots" 13 years ago. Today,
following a substantial invest-
ment and a sustained assault on
multiple-drug-resistant TB.
rates in these two countries are
stabilizing and rates of new TB
are falling.


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THE TRIBUNEi


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NORTH KOREAN MUSICIANS, NY PHILHARMONIC GET IN HARMONY


VIOLIN


DIPLOMACY


By BURT HERMAN
Associated Press Writer
PYONGYANG,
': ;, North Korea
Swirling dancers and musi-
cians beating traditional drums
S welcomed the New York Phil-
Sharmonic to North Korea Mon-
day for a historic cultural
exchange between countries
%that have been technically at
\var for more than a half-cen-
tury, according to the Associat-
ed Press.
In a burst of musical diplo-
macy notably devoid of propa-
ganda glorifying leader Kim
Jong II or attacks on U.S. policy,
North Korean dancers balanced
water jars on their heads or
twirled pink and green fans to
entertain the celebrated Amer-
ican orchestra which gave
them a standing ovation.
The Philharmonic is the first
major American cultural group
,to visit the isolated communist
nation and the largest-ever del-
egation from the U.S. to visit
its longtime foe.
As part of its 48-hour trip, the
S 106-member orchestra was to
S' play a concert on Tuesday that
will be broadcast on state-run
radio and TV, where the U.S. is
S the target of daily condemna-
tion. The national anthems of
S both countries will be played,
', :followed by a program featuring
Antonin Dvorak's Symphony
', No. 9 in E Minor popularly
Known as the "New World
Symphony" and written while
the 19th-century Czech com-
poser lived in the United States
and George Gershwin's 'An
American in Paris."
The orchestra held a dress
rehearsal on Tuesday morning
in preparation for the evening
concert at the 2,500-seat East
Pyongyang Grand Theater.
Orchestra musicians will also
give master classes to North
Korean students and play cham-
ber music with members of the
North's State Symphony
Orchestra.
Philharmonic music director
Lorin:Maazel said despite the
trip's political o\ clrtones, it was
the right decision to go.
S"It would have been a great
mistake not to accept their invi-
tation," he said after arriving at
the Pyongyang airport aboard
a chartered 747 jet from Bei-
jing. A stem-faced border guard
checked his passport upon exit-
ing the plane before North
Korean cultural officials greeted
the orchestra with handshakes
and smiles.
"I am a musician and not a
politician. Music has always tra-
ditionally been an arena, an
area where people make con-
tact. It's -neutral, it's entertain-
ment, it's person-to-person,"
Maazel said.
He said if the music moves
the audience, "we will have
made whatever contribution we
can make to bringing our peo-
ples just one tiny step closer."
But before the American
orchestra was to take the stage,
it was the North Koreans' turn.
At the 500-seat Mansudae


~.iJ 0


=
=)


THE AUDIENCE stands for the National.Anthem of the United States at the start of a concert by the New York Philharmonic in Pyongyang, North


Korea on luesaay.


;trf. f


U


NORTH KOREAN men take photos of one another inside the main atrium-
of the East Pyongyang Grand Theater at the end of a concert by tne New
York Philharmonic in Pyongyang, North Korea.


Art Theater, North Korean per-
formers played traditional
instruments such as the
kayagum, a type of zither, and
sang about their country's nat-
ural beauty.
Like all parts of society under
the authoritarian North Korean
regime, the arts are viewed as a
means to instill loyalty and bol-
ster Kim's personality cult.
Still, only the last number was
overtly political: A woman
dressed as a guerrilla and bran-
dishing a red scarf performed a
dance dramatizing Korean resis-
tance to Japan's colonial occu-
pation before World War II,.
which according to North Kore-
an official history was led by
late founding ruler Kim II Sung,
father of current leader Kim
Jong II.
Dancers in flowing white
robes swept across the stage,
symbolizing the harsh winters
suffered by the fighters. At the


triumphal end of the perfor-
manc'e, the backdrop picturing
the Korean peninsula's tallest
peak, Mount Paektu, morphed
into a stylized Pyongyang sky-
line where the windows of every
building were filled with light.
Even the privileged residents
of the North Korean capital suf-
fer regular blackouts, but as the
orchestra drove through the
city, the streets were illuminat-
ed with neon propaganda slo-
gans atop buildings and five-
pointed stars dangling from
streetlights. One billboard
showed a fist crushing an Amer-
ican soldier. However; some
anti-American posters were
tom down before the U.S. musi-
cians arrived, a diplomat based
in the North Korean capital told
orchestra members.
After the concert, Maazel
presented the lead dancer with
a bouquet and later praised the
performers for their dedication.


"Through our music, through
our art, we'will be able to
express our friendly feelings to
North Korean artists and the
North Korean people," he said
in a toast at a lavish banquet in
the People's Palace of Culture
that featured roast salmon, crab
au gratin and pheasant ball soup
accompanied by an assortment
of North Korean alcohol, from
beer to ginseng liquor.
Michelle Kim, the South
Korean-born assistant concert-
master of the Philharmonic, said
the North Koreans' perfor-
mance featured traditional ele-
ments familiar to all Koreans.
"As I was listening to the con-
cert. I didn't think of it as North
Korean or South Korean but
jusl Koreans," said Kim, a nat-
uralized American citizen.
"That's our traditions, we're the
same people."
The North's official news
agency the country's main
voice to the outside world -
reported briefly Monday on the
Philharmonic's arrival. At the
same time, the Korean Central
News Agency also carried a sep-
arate piece highlighting the
country's own symphonic
works, with titles such as "The
Leader Is Always with Us" and
"Victory in Great Anti-Japan-
ese War."
The report said such works
give "a profound symphonic
rendition to the idea that social-
ist Korea centered.on the pop-
ular masses is the best in the
world."
For the Philharmonic's visit,
the North Korean government
allowed a delegation of nearly
300 people, including musicians,
staff and journalists.
It was not known whether
North Korean leader Kim


would attend the Philharmon-
ic's concert. Philharmonic
spokesman Eric Latzky said the
group had not directly invited
him.
After landing, buses carried
the visitors through the snow-
covered streets of Pyongyang,
which appeared relatively
crowded as people walked or
rode bicycles home from work.
.One person was seen waving,
but others seemed to give the


motorcade passing or no inter-
est.
Most visitors to Pyongyang
are first taken to a large statue
of Kim II Sung, where they are
expected to pay respects, but
the orchestra was spared that
obligation.
The Philharmonic accepted
the North's invitation to play
last year, with the encourage-
ment of the U.S. government, at
a time of rare optimism in the
long-running nuclear standoff
involving the two countries.
After successfully testing an
atomic bomb in October 2006,
North Korea shut down its main
nuclear reactor in July and has
been working to disable it in
exchange for aid and removal
from U.S. terrorism and sanc-
tions blacklists.
But disarmament has stalled
this year because of what Wash-
ington says is North Korea's
failure to give a full declaration
of its atomic programs to be dis-
mantled, as Pyongyang
promised to do under an inter-
national agreement.
The musicians said they
hoped their performance might
help overcome difference
between the two countries,
whose troops face off across the
Demilitarized Zone that has
divided the peninsula since the
1953 cease-fire that ended the
Korean War.
"I think it's important to
reach people through something
other than politics," said Stanley
Drucker, the orchestra's prin-
cipal clarinet and its longest-
serving member, who joined the
ensemble in 1948 at the age of
19. "What we do is universal.
Music is pure in itself; it's what
you make out of what you
hear."


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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 23


THE TRIBUNE


Visit our Showroom & Office Located at the Red Carpet Inn, East Bay Street
Open Monday Friday 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. I








PAGE 24, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


INERATI* ALNW


Hints of change are met in Cuba with cynical eye


* By JAMES C.
McKINLEY Jr.
HAVANA, Cuba

n his first state reception as
Cuba's president, Raul Cas-
tro met on Tuesday not with left-
ist Latin American leaders like
Hugo Chavez and Luiz Inacio
Lula da Silva, nor with Chinese
officials, but with the secretary of
state of the Vatican, a traditional
enemy of communism and a crit-


ic of Cuba's record on human
rights, according to the New York
Times News Service.
Castro's decision to begin his
tenure by meeting the Vatican's
top diplomat, Cardinal Tarcisio
Bertone, a possible go-between
with the United States and
Europe, reflects his practical, no-
nonsense style as well as his
greater willingness to put ideolo-
gy aside to achieve his goals than
his brother often showed.
The younger Castro, 76, is


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hardly a fresh face to Cubans,
having served as the defense min-
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Many people doubt that he
intends to upend his brother's
legacy. Yet he does seem inclined
to govern more pragmatically
than his more doctrinaire and
romantic brother, who ran this


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country for 49 years as if it were
his own business, signing off on
almost every government deci-
sion.
Raul Castro has said the gov-
ernment needs to shrink and
become more compact. He has
promised "structural changes"
and "big decisions." "We have to
make our government's manage-
ment more efficient," he said Sun-
day, adding, "We have to plan
well, and we cannot spend more
than we have."
Since he became acting presi-
dent after Eidel Castro fell ill and
disappeared from public view in
July 2006, Raul Castro has sought
to improve public transportation
and shake up the state-controlled
dairy monopoly. He also s -,)ckc
people when he acknowicoagc
the average salary of about $19 a
month was too little to live on.
As he took office Sunday, he
raised the possibility of revaluing
the Cuban peso to give salary-
earners greater buying power.
The younger Castro's decision
on Sunday to put his closest
friends and loyalists in the major
positions of vice president and
defense minister also suggest he
has control of the government,
even though he has promised to
consult Fidel Castro on impor-
tant matters.
Despite such steps, many
Cubans say they see few signs of
real change. Some say they sus-
pect that Fidel Castro will con-
tinue to rule from behind the
scenes. Others see little ideologi-
cal difference between the ex-
president and his brother. Still
others argue that the centralized
bureaucratic apparatus of the
state is too rusty to be reformed.
A young man stood in
Havana's central park Monday,
scanning the faces of the new gov-
ernment leaders, his face
scrunched up in puzzled concen-
tration. When a reporter asked
him what he thought of the new
president, he muttered "it's
good," rattled the paper shut and
marched quickly away, casting a
furtive glance at a nearby police
officer. "Everyone is afraid to
talk," said a student sitting on a
park bench nearby who identi-
fied himself only as Alejandro.
"This is the time when the people
should go to the street, but they
are afraid. My country is like a
prison."
A few blocks away, Jose, a
store clerk in his 30s, was wait-
ing in line outside a post office in
Old Havana to send an e-mail
message to a family friend
through a secure Internet cori-
nection that allows no other con-
tact with the outside world.
"There was no change," he
said, echoing the views of others.
"Look, if you paint this tile here
and you paint it with the same
color, there is no change. The
brothers think alike."
Many experts on Cuba, how-
ever, say the two brothers often
have not seen eye to eye. They
have clashed over the years on
everything from Fidel Castro's
short-lived flirtation with the
American public in 1959 to the
necessity of allowing some pri-
vate enterprise during tlh" ec
nomic crisis here in the 1L, L,.
Fidel Castro, 81, was renowned


CUBA'S President Raul Castro, left,
talks to Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone,
Vatican's Secretary of State, at the
Revolution Palace in Havana.
for his ability to recall arcane
details and second-guess his Cab-
inet members, fostering an atmos-
phere in which even high-rank-
ing officials were afraid to act
without the president's explicit
approval.
Raul Castro, who spent most
of his life at the head of Cuba's
military, has a reputation for del-
egating authority and demanding
results from managers, people
who know him say.
"He once said to me after I had
given a report at a meeting, 'All
right, this is your report, if one
word of this is not true, I'm going
to cut you in half,' recalled
Vladimiro Roca, a former fighter
pilot who fell out with the author-
ities and has become a leading
dissident.
Fidel Castro often rambled on
for hours in sometimes dull but
occasionally stunning oratory.
Raul Castro gives short, precise
speeches, always going directly
to the heart of his subject.
Where Fidel Castro sought the
international limelight, his broth-
er focuses more on bread-and-
butter domestic issues.
In recent public speeches, Raul
Castro appears to have calculated
for political reasons that he can-
not distance himself too much
from his brother, who, despite his
long illness, continues to head the
Communist Party and to cast a
large shadow over Cuban poli-
tics. For example, the new presi-
dent made it clear in his first
speech to the National Assembly
this weekend that he would con-
tinue to consult Fidel and even
asked for a vote to authorize him
to do so, drawing extended
applause from party regulars.
But the younger Castro's
actions show he is willing to take
Cuba in a different direction from
that of his more dogmatic broth-
er. Over the last year and a half,
Raul Castro has openly criticized
state salaries as too low to live
on, and speaking to the congress,
he raised the possibility of revalu-
ing the Cuban peso to give salary-
earners more buying power.
Raul Castro has taken steps to
decentralize the production and
distribution of milk. He has
imported hundreds of buses from
China to alleviate transportation
woes and rid the streets of tractor-
trailers fitted out for public trans-
portation, eyesores known as
camels. He has all but done away
with the obligatory mass demon-
strations Fidel Castro often orga-
nized to rally people against the
United States.
The younger Castro has even
encouraged a measure of public
debate about government pro-
grams, something his brother
rarely allowed. Last fall, he autho-
rized town hall meetings across
the island to let people vent their
frustrations with the system,
though he made it clear that deci-
sions about changes would rest
with the ruling party.
Indeed, one of the two state
newspapers, Juventud Rebelde,
has done exposes on the filching
of goods and food from state-run
businesses that has become part
of life here. Leading cultural fig-
ures, meanwhile, have called for
dropping onerous visa require-
ments and other limits on per-
sonal freedom.
Raul Castro seems firmly in
control of the Council of State,
the main governing body. He
named his old friends and mili-
tary comrades Jose Ramon
Machado Ventura and Gen. Julio
Casas Reguiero as first vice
president and defense minister,


respectively.
The upper echelon of the coun-
cil is stacked with other military
leaders who are considered close
to the new president, among them
Gen. Abelardo Colome Ibarra
and Juan Almeida Bosque. "This
is Raul's team, the group of vice
presidents," said Brian Latell, a
former CIA analyst who wrote
the book "After Fidel" and has
studied the brothers for years. "I
do think that Raul is in charge.
He's going to pay proper homage
to Fidel but not obeisance."
What is more, Raul Castro gays
he will not officially appoint the
rest of his Cabinet until Decem-
ber at the earliest. Some politi-
cal analysts says this gives him
time to purge the Cabinet mem-
bers considered to be more loyal
to his brother than to him if he
wishes.
Still, after 49 years of living
under Fidel Castro, many Cubans
are skeptical of their new lead-
er's ability to get things d.oji...,
They are waiting for Raul Cas-
tro to do something concrete to
improve. the4r lives, like ras.e ,
salaries.
"His speech sounded more or
less like more of the same," said
Alberto, a veteran driver for the
official government taxi service.
"There is a big gap between what
is said and what is done."
Yoani Sanchez, who writes a
political blog, said: "In general,
there is a sense of frustration,
because we had expected more.
SThere is talk of changes, but he
puts off defining those changes."
Still, many Cubans took heart
that Castro had promised in his
speech to lift some regulations
and restrictions that stifle eco-
nomic growth.
For starters, he said it was time
to revalue the Cuban peso, a step
toward getting rid of the dual-
currency system that has impov-
erished millions of Cubans. For
years, the government has used
a nearly worthless peso to pay
government salaries while
restricting the distribution of a
so-called convertible peso that
can be exchanged for foreign cur-
rency. The system has led to a
kind of economic apartheid.
Cubans with access to convert-
ible pesos live far better than their
compatriots. Those who live sole-
ly on government salaries can
barely survive, even with free
health care and subsidized rations
of some basic foodstuffs and
tobacco.
Restrictions on travel and
access to the Internet also rankle
many Cubans, who believe the
rules are virtually imprisoning
them on their island. University
students recently clashed with the
president of the National Assem-
bly over travel rights, a scene that
was filmed and distributed clan-
destinely. Some Cubans expect
that Castro might lift some travel
restrictions as a crowd-pleaser.
Others said they hoped they
would be allowed to own cell-
phones and to stay at tourist
hotels, small but symbolically
important steps. In the long run,
however, his biggest challenge is
revamping Cuba's centralized
economy. Raul Castro said in his
first speech to Parliament that the
government needed to be stream-
lined and decentralized. No insti-
tution was safe from reforms, he
said. Yet his appointees are them-
selves members of the old guard,
mostly men in their 70s. That dis-
appointed some here who had
hoped a younger generation of
technocrats might rise.
In some circles there is a feeling
the veterans of the revolution can
never dismantle the current eco-
nomic system, which offers peo-
ple little incentive to work.
"Raul has to' make the coun-
try more efficient and give incen-
tives to for work because really
no one works in Cuba now," said
Juan, a man in his forties who
acts as a consultant to importers.
"How to you put a country to
work that isn't used to working?
That is the trick."


a





A CYCLIST rides past a billboard, with an image depicting Cuban
Leader Fidel Castro, that reads in Spanish "Socialism or death" in
Havana. Despite talking about a vacation and retirement, Castro
has retained a role as commentator in chief and possibly as com-
mander in chief.


FAX 394-8198


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CRYPTIC PUZZ

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WHEN I GET A fEAPAC=E, '.TAKETWO ANP FP
I 0 EXACTLY WHAT THE AWAYFRO4M CI//LPENi.
ASPIRIN BoTTLE SAYS..."


Contract Bridge

By Steve Becker


Test Your Play


1. You are declarer with the West
hand at Four Hearts. North leads the
A-K-Q of diamonds, South follow-
ing suit. How would you play the
hand?
West East
+AK8 *6432
VAKQI105 96
*J4 *952
+Q93 +AKJ 10
2. This is a double-dummy prob-
lem, which means you are permitted
to look at all four hands in trying to
find the solution. You are declarer
with the South hand at Five Clubs,
and West leads the jack of diamAods.
How would you play the hand?
NORTH
+K6532
V 10 97
*A6
+543
WEST EAST
+QJ97 +A104
VK62 VJ854
J 10 9 7 4 *Q853
46 +K2
SOUTH
*8
VAQ3
*K2
+AQJ 10987
1. Ruff the diamond and lead the
ten ofhearts! This unusual play gives


you your best chance to make the
contract. If you were to play the A-
K-Q of trumps instead, hoping to
find the suit divided 3-3 or to catch
the doubleton jack, the contract
would be in jeopardy if either oppo-
nent started with the J-x-x-x of
trumps.
By leading the ten of hearts at trick
four, you maintain control of trumps
to the fullest extent possible. The
opponent who wins with the jack
cannot profitably return a diamond,
since you would ruff it with
dummy's nine. And if he leads any-
thing else, you can then draw trumps
with the A-K-Q and make the con-
tract except in the unlikely event that
the trumps are divided 5-1 or 6-0.
2. The only problem, of course, is
to overcome the shortage of entries
to dummy. To resolve this issue, win
the diamond with the king and return
the queen ofhearts!
West wins but is helpless. Let's say
he returns a diamond. You win in
dummy and lead the ten of hearts. If
East covers with the, jack, you win
with the ace, lead a heart to dummy's
nine and take the trump finesse. If
East does not cover the ten of hearts,
you remain in dummy and take the
trump finesse that much sooner. In
either case, you wind up with 11
tricks.


HOW many words of four letters or more can you
make from the letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No plurals, or verb forms
ending in "s", no words with initial capitals and no
words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted. The
first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in
inkjet printer).
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 11; very good 17; excellent 23 (or more).
Solution Monday.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION
aide aired arid attired axed dare dart date dear
dearie deer deter dexter diet dieter dire dirt
drat eared edit eider exited EXTRADITE idea
iterated radix raid rated ratted read reed
retied ride taxed taxied teed tetrad tide tied
tiered tirade tired trad trade tread treated
treed triad tried


A


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I


Tribune

Horoscope


By LINDA BLACK


THURSDAY,
FEB 28

AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Things are shifting into a higher or a
lower gear this week, Aquarius. This
could be a promising change, a gate-
way into the next phase of your life.
PISCES Feb 19/March 20
You'll be surprised how quickly
things happen this week, Pisces.
Don't fight the tide it's taking
you to better places, new experi-
ences and acquaintances.
ARIES March 21/April 20
While you don't lack ambition this
week, you're short on people who
share your enthusiasm. Look for
romance in an unexpected place.
TAURUS April 21/May 21
Prickly colleagues complain that
you're egotistical and uncompromis,
ing, but in your mind, you're simply
confident and exacting. Whatever.
You prefer to work alone anyway.
GEMINI May 22/June 21
Hold on, Gemini, this week
promises some surprises at home
and at work. Keep your cool and
others will be impressed with your
management skill. A lost love finds
his way back to you on Friday.
CANCER June 22/July 22
It's about time you stepped out of
your shell for a bit, Cancer. In fact,
you're feeling downright adventur-
ous this week. Great! Get out there
and show 'em what you've got.
LEO July 23/August 23
A windfall relieves some of you:
money woes, but that doesn't mean
that you're rich. Spend this cash
wisely now, and the real rewards
will follow.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
This is a time to go it alone, Virgo.
People are too unpredictable this
week. Have faith in yourself-
everyone else does.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
Nothing will work out as planned
this week, Libra. It's just one of
those weeks. While.certainly frustrat-
ing, it will teach you to adapt. Take
time for yourself on Tuesday.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
You're on fire, Scorpio at your
creative peak. Others will be look-
ing for a chance to share in your
spotlight. Friends look to you foj
romantic advice. Stay out of it!
SAGWITARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
People are free to do what they want,
Sagittarius, a fact that you'll find
most annoying this week. Instead of
getting angry, use your energy to
find a way to accomplish your goal.
A special someone has a gift for you.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
Aren't you tired of going to the
same place all the time? Go.
someplace new, where you can
be yourself without worrying
what others will say.


CHESSbyle.ar: arde


as a Di oi lun al a pany (31
ckward yoo' (3)
n sorelirqn and irNere s apl tO'b
cedy going around (7)
I'ca nair Sl yle '(3)
ei ased on lamrr.1ar
lcomTrrio,' (16
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cs 15)
py 1t guve advice lu a lanree 151
SIr, a tDrcr urfilorrm 13
oral cperaiie ,in CiDon Ojainr, (4)


Yesterday's easy olutions
ACROSS 0 I F,:.l 6 (r., :a bgr.ea. lu,Pagan 11,Plead
121 Ha.le 1:1 Beneii 15 Bea 17 ia 18,Divine 19,Pecan
20 Orer.: 22 iiore 24 Net 2' Learier 26, Cited 27,
Hades 28 A.a .,, 2O Dtacie 30 Siiei 31, Plied
DOWN 2 Leaier 3 Athald d 1,-, 5 (neat 6, Captain 7,
idle 8 Crae.' 12 hisds 13 Balon 14 Niche 15,Bison 16,
Deitr 18 Daiei 19 Pjisca 21 Ternar 22,Travel 23,
Mec.ace 25 Legal 26 CeCd 28 Alp


ACROSS
1 Yarn (6)
7 Creator (8)
8 Stalk (4)
10 Stop working (6)
11 Royal residence
(6)
14 Mineral (3)
16 Called (5)
17 Adhesive strip (4)
19 Sensational (5)
21 Italian city (5)
22 Dead language (5)
23 Injury (4)
26 Take unlawfully (5)
28 Brown (3)
29 Using plants (6)
30 Hark (6)
31 Performs (4)
32 Catered (8)
33 Over there (6)
1


DOWN
1 Tower (6)
2 Whole (6)
3 US coin (4)
4 Skin pigment (7)
5 Vapour (5)
6 Avarice(5)
8 Cease (4)
9 Before (3)
12 Boy (3)
13 Tree (5)
15 Flower (5)
18 Gemstone (5)
19 Illuminated (3)
20 Sprinted (3)
21 Infectious
disease (7)
22 Scienisl's room (3)
23 Hurry (6)
24 Insects (4)
25 Trusted adviser (6)
26 Form(5)
27 Mistake(5)
28 Twitch (3)
30 Titled woman (4)


Konstantin Chernikov v Lajos Seros,
Budapest 2004. One of the ploys
often recommended in this column
is to encourage your opponent to
make or defend a minor, secondary
threat, which will divert attention
from your own major tactic or even
facilitate your plan. Today's puzzle
is a classic of its type. White's
bishop pair are active but Black's
pieces are poised for an invasion of
the white camp by Q or Rd2+. So
Whihe chose the apparently
defensive 1 Rfdl, encouraging Black
to step up his pressure on the target
square by Ne4, which already
threatens Rd2+ Rxd2 Qxd2+ Kfl Qxf2
mate. In fact, the 1 Rfdl Ne4
sequence set up White's clever
decoy trap. Can you spot the finish?


8551



6-
51
73 1 Ila






a b c d e A g h



LEONARD BARDEN


Chess: 8551:1 Rfdl Ne4? 2 Be6+! fxe6 2 Qxe6+ Rd7 3
Qxd7 mate.


~sr~l~SIP~


VM, .UUO, t-A.at i2


rV4l.z(lr-. I .t pa T






PAGE 26, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


The


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2. Coloring may be done with crayons and other decorations. Adults or older child may assist the child in filling out the entry form, 1UT NOT IN
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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


(dJ1nins feim
ll_/


GEORGE ADDINGTON
WHITE, M.D.
13th November, 1931
26th February, 2007
Tribute on the First Anniversary
Of the passing of
GEORGE ADDINGTON WHITE
"Large was his bounty, and his soul sincere,
Heaven did a recompense as largely send:
He gave to Misery all he had, a tear,
He gained from Heaven (twas all he wish'd) a friend.
"No farther seek his merits to disclose,
Or draw his frailties from their dread abode
(There they alike in trembling hope repose),
The bosom of his Father and his God."
THOMAS GIAY "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard"
REMEMBERED WITH LOVE
AND ALWAYS IN OUR MEMORIES
Your loving wife, Michele; children, Andre,
Gregg and Debra, Carla and Robert and
Monique and Yusef; grandchildren, Tristan, Angelique,
Jessica and Brent; sister, Alicia White; brother, Lewis
White, other family members and many friends.


.... ....

^B^to:'A
*^^|f54m7

-reififsere or....
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THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES










Cebar Crest funeral ome
DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street P.O.Box N-603 e Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352


S- CAPTAIN
KENDAL GENIECE
MAYCOCK, 73

of #175 Canary Terrace, Monestary Park
and formally of Duncan Town Ragged
Island will be held on Saturday March
1st 2008 at 10:00a.m. at Christ The King
Anglican Church, Ridgeland Park,
Officiating will be The Rev'd Fr Rodney
Burrows, Rev'd Fr Ivan Eldon and Canon
Samuel Sturrup. Interment will be made
in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.
Genise was predeceased by his parents,
son, Kendal Jr. and his brothers, Lawson and


Left with cherish memory are his wife, Oraline Maycock; 1 son, Marvin
Maycock; 5 daughters, Wanda Maycock, Lucinda Rolle, Geneva
Copeland, Sandy and Esther Maycock; 2 sons-in-law, Michael Rolle
and Clifford Copeland; 9 grandchildren, Devinn Cartwright, Ashton
Maycock, Jekyle Rolle, Accacia Rolle, Dannay Maycock, Kandise
Maycock, Alexander Copeland, Diorshea Moss and Altoniquee Kemp;
3 brothers, Patrick Sr., Fritzgerald (Gerry) and Clement Lavern Maycock;
1 sister, Mary Jane Moxey; 1 uncle, Lamon Maycock; 2 aunts, Maud
Maycock and Iva Wilson; 5 brothers-in-law, Emmette, Oscar and Joseph
Munroe, Daniel Moxey Sr. and Marcus Moxey; 6 sisters-in-law, Maxine
Maycock, Peggy Maycock, Reba Moxey, Juanita Munroe, Patricia
Munroe, and Julia Neely; his nephews, Anthony, Corey, Patrick Jr,
Fritzgerald (Fritz), Henricus, Henrier, Cyril and Keith Maycock, and
Daniel Moxey Jr.; his nieces, Sharon Scott, Paulette, Lydia, Cyntishe,
Joanne, Darlene, Sheena, Denise, and Carla Maycock, Beverly Johnson,
Susanne Marsh, Keysha Forbes, Renea Knowles and Deidre Moxey, his
cousins, Cresswell and Orville Wilson, Clothilda Ferguson, Peggy
Bridgewater, Arthur Maycock, Maurice Wallace, Wilhemina Smith,
Florence Watson, Elexis, Tyrone, Eddison, and Gregory Joffre, Marjorie
Wallace, Savalta Lockhart, Cloretha Wilson, Verdell Ferguson, Errol
Munroe, Richard Munroe, Atwell Pintard, Audrey Lockhart, Tezel Butler,
Valarie Culmer, Eula Burrows, Carol Moxey, Sheena, Kenya, Kent,
George, Lester, Sheffield and Terrence Wilson, Marva and Harcourt
Wilson of Florida, Nezera Brown, Murial, Moiah, Deborah, Edith and
Melberth Charlton, and other relatives and friends including, Wendal
Nesbitt, Eliza and Carolyn Wallace, Nelson Moxey, Samuel Johnson,
Jed and Sean Munroe, Faye Smith, the Monestary Park family, the Crew
of the Courageous, the Maycock, Munroe, Lockhart, Adderley, Wilson,
Moxey, Nesbitt, Wallace and Armbrister families, the entire community
of Duncan Town Ragged Island and others too numerous to mention.

Special Thanks to the staff of Bahamas Electricity Corporation Clifton
Piere, Rev. Fr. Rodney Burrows, the visiting Committee of Christ The
King Anglican Church, Dr. Du Vaughn Curling, Dr. Sheena Antonio, Jen
Rolle, Mrs. Jolly, the staff of Doctors Hospital Intensive Care Unit and
Princess Margaret Hospital Private Medical and Male Medical II wards.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral


Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from 12:00 noon to
6:00p.m. and at the Church on Saturday from 8:30a.m. to service time.
.......................................................................................... .............................................................................


GARNELL
PATRICE CLARKE
ARMBRISTER, 53

of #26 Faith Avenue, Heritage
Subdivision Freeport Grand Bahama will
be held on Saturday March 1st 2008,
11:00a.m. at Zion Baptist Church, East
and Shirley Streets, Officiating will be
Rev. Ulric V Smith assisted by Rev.
Anthony A Sampson and other associate
ministers. Interment will be made in the
Woodlawn Gardens Soldier Road.


Left with cherish memory are her daughter, Nicarra Brooks; her adopted
daughters, Cleo, Patricia, Crystal and Melinda Jacque, Shonli Beneby,
and Takarra Farrington of Freeport Grand Bahama; expecting son-in-
law, Alfred Lloyd; 3 sisters, Avis Annbrister, Mary Evans and Idelle
Ferguson; 3 brothers, Orville Murphy, Don Sears and Anthony Evans;
1 adopted sister, Sandra Jacque of Freeport Grand Bahama; 7 aunts,
Eloise Annbrister, Virginia, Adrian, Augusta, Josephine and Lisa Clarke,
all of the United States; 3 uncles, Leroy Annbrister, Theodore and Donald
Clarke of Hollywood Florida; 1 sister-in-law, Clarabell Murphy; 1
brother-in- law, Michael Thompson Sr.; numerous nieces and nephews
including, Shaneka Davis, Chavez Thompson, Sbarryece and Shalisa
Thompson, Michael Thompson Jr., Carlos and Teddy Gray of Las Vegas,
Shannon Armbrister, Dereka and Dedrick Ferguson, Katia, Tameka and
Shaquell Murphy, Nicarra Smith, Curtis, Tyrel, Raquel and Tanya Evans,
numerous Grand nieces and nephews including, Taj, Shai and Kanika
Gray, Careen Gray, Edviana Rump, Dominique Storr, Keanu and Aaliyah
Thompson; numerous other relatives and friends including, Delores
Mounts and family, Dellamae Johnson and family, Judy Morris and
family, Antionette Pratt and family, Pamela Brice and family, Marina
Smith and family, Eleanore Bain and family, Brenda Cunningham and
family, Ronnie and Rusty Armbrister, Pauline, Paul, Harold, Laverne,
and Rubin Annbrister, Prince Ferguson and family, Theresa Brooks and
family, Barbara Romer and family, Florinda Bastian and family, Debbie
Fox and family, Vonetta Spence, Lasasha Knowles and family, Betty
Rose and family, Victoria Grant and friends including, Beverly Smith
and family, Janet Laing, "Nett" Laing, Clarice Evans and family, Mildred
Louis, Viola Clarke, Daisey and Mambo, Linda and Ruby Ward, Kelsene
and family, Anna Stubbs and family, Henrietta Poitier and family, Etta
Forbes and family, Ruby and Dorcas McKinney and family, Essiemae
Thompson of Freeport Grand Bahama, Pastor Mathew Allen and family,
Pastor Cedric Beckles and the Life Community Church family, Insurance
Management Freeport, Lily Dean and family, the Lloyd family and others
too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral
Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from 12:00 noon to
6:00p.m. and on Saturday at the Church from 9:30a.m. to service time.


Henricus and Vashti;
Eldridge.


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THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 3-







PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008



Yager funeral tome & Crematorium
Queen's Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301




IVY ROLLE, 70

a resident of #154 Clive Avenue
and formerly of James Cistern,
Eleuthera will be held on
S"Saturday, 1st March, 2008 at
s ,;s l1:00am at Church of God
Temple, Peachtree Street,
Freeport. Officiating will be
Bishop Lonford Bethel, assisted
by Rev. Judy Bethel and Rev.
Anthony Ferguson. Interment
will follow in the Grand Bahama
Memorial Park, Frobisher Drive.

Memories will linger in the hearts of her husband, Ret. Asst.
Commissioner of Police Nathaniel J. Rolle; two sons, Stephen
and Joseph Rolle; two daughters, Jennifer Charlton and Catherine
(Gay) Albury; adopted children, Thelma Gibson, Sonith "Sonny",
Don, Junior "Shorty" and Joy Lockhart; five grandchildren,
Domenick Newbold, Lakeisha Ferguson, Don Jr., Khadijah and
Donerro Albury; one great-granddaughter, Keshanna Ferguson;
four brothers, Lebron Bethel of James Cistern, Eleuthera, Claudius,
James and Nelson Bethel; three sisters, Nathalie White of James
Cistern, Eleuthera, Evelyn Johnson and Remonda Moore; two
sons-in-law, Kevin Charlton and Don Albury; one daughter-in-
law, Josephine Rolle; one grand son-in-law, Nekolus Ferguson;
eight brothers-in-law, Dewitt Whyte, Clifford Woods, James,
Lionel, Edison, George and Hasting Rolle and George (King)
Bethel; six sisters-in-law, Daisy and Patricia Bethel, Gloria,
Bernice, Hildamae and Marilyn Rolle; fifteen nephews including,
Bruce, Brian, Robert, Perry, Virgil, Twain, Russ, Thedore, James
Jr., Jameiko, Nelson Jr., Nelvolari (Chico), Sylvannus and Xavier;
twenty four nieces, Birtha, Nurse Melda, Karen, Melissa, Bonnie,
Diane, Sharon, Yvonne, Michelle, Monique, Yvette, Nicole,
Rosa, Zephanie, Claudine, Monique, Kizzy, Jameika, Shakira,
Una, Shonoray, Denise, Charene and Brenda; godchildren, Norma
Rolle and Donna Thurston of Nassau and a host of other relatives
and friends including the extended family in James Cistern and
Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera, Bishop Longford and Evang. Judy Bethel,
officers and members of Church of God Temple, Bishop Albert
Hepburn, Rev. John N.T. Rolle, Pastor Fred and Mrs Newchurch,
Central Home for the Elderly staff, Doctors and Nurses of the
Rand Memorial Hospital, Pastor E. Brian Tinker and Members
of the Seventh Day Adventist Church.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral
Home & Crematorium on Queens Highway on Friday from
12noon until 6pm and at the church on Saturday from 9:30am
until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED
22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas




HUGH JOHN ARTHUR COTTIS
1930- 2008


A Memorial Service will be held at 3pm on 1 st March,
2008 at The Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel for the late
Hugh John Arthur Cottis, aged 77 years, of Dundas Town,
Abaco, The Bahamas and formerly of Essex, England,
Long Island and Exuma.

He was born on 15th October, 1930 in Tolleshunt D'Arcy,
Essex, England, and died on Thursday, 14th February,
2008 at Doctors Hospital, Nassau, The Bahamas.

Hugh Cottis was an outstanding man of many talents who
dedicated much of his life to community service.

He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Sylvia, his son
Gregory, sister Roma, aunt Margaret, brothers-in-law,
Derek and Ernest, sisters-in-law, Jean and Olive, nephews
Timothy, Michael, Colin and Paul, nieces Beverley,
Lynda, Anne and Jane and their children. Olivia Knowles
and family, members of The Presbyterian Kirk of The
Pines, Marsh Harbour, The Cancer Society, The Rotary
Club of Abaco and friends in The United Kingdom, Long
Island, Exuma, Abaco and Nassau.

Donations in his memory may be made to The Abaco
Branch of The Cancer Society, of which he was President,
or to the building fund for The Presbyterian Kirk of The
Pines, Marsh Harbour, of which he was an Elder.


May he rest in peace.


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^nutkcr's ^uncral ^nimcs & (rcmatorimn

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas


CAPTAIN ROLLY
BERTRAM
"The Grand Master"
GRAY, 85


of Staniel Cay, Exuma will be held
on Saturday, March 01st, 2008 at
11:00 a.m. at Mt. Oliveth Baptist
Church, Staniel Cay, Exuma.
Officiating will be Bishop Samuel
SR. Greene Assisted by Rev. Henry
Rolle and other Ministers. Interment
will follow in the Public Cemetery, Staniel Cay, Exuma.

Left to cherish his memories are his Five (5) Sons: Ruel Gray,
Capt. Tony Gray, Capt. Frederick Gray, Sandy and Bradshaw
Gray; Five (5) Daughters: Veronica Rolle, Barbara Gray,
Penelope Nixon, Yvonne Gray and Cassandra Hart; Fifteen
(15) Grandsons: Theodore and Ricardo Role, Randy, Rhodrigo,
Fredrico, Anthony, Sanchez, Kiethan, Sandrio, Rumel and
Shadyden Gray, Travis Nixon, Kameron Moxey, Shavargo
Dames and Michael Hart Jr.; Fifteen (15) Granddaughters:
Corise Rolle, Bernadette Chamberlain, Tamicka Nixon, Erica
Wallace, Tyechia, Tischka, Leschelle and Filisha Gray, Ebony
Nixon, Kevonne Moxey, Latoya Dames, Bradshanna, Latisha,
Crystal and Shenique Gray; Sixteen (16) Great-grandchildren;
One (1) Brother: Lenneth Brozozzog; Nine (9)
Adoptedchildren: John Saunders, Brooks Miller, Joel, Steve
and Capt. Dudley Smith, Oliver Munroe, Carlon Cartwright,
Fredericka and Emily Miller; Two (2) Sons-in-law: Wayde
Nixon and Michael Hart Sr.; Three (3) Daughters-in-law:
Nurse Karen Gray, Deidre and Joan Gray; Two Brothers-in-
law: Fred J. Cooper Sr. and Bertram Bodie; Three (3) Sisters-
in-law: Beverley Brozozzog, Coralee Wright of Orlando,
Florida and Rosenell Bodie; Fourteen (14) Nephews: Nineteen
(19) Nieces: Numerous Grandnieces and Nephews and a
host of other relatives and friends including: The entire
communities of Staniel Cay, Black Point, Farmer's Cay,
Barretarre and Great Exuma, The entire Sailing Community
of the Bahamas, The Mailboat Association and others too
numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers' Funeral Homes
and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on Thursday from
10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. on Friday from 9:00 a.m. until


12noon and in Staniel Cay from 5:00 p.m. until service time
on at the Church.


MR. PAUL DOUGLAS
JENOURE, 61


Sof Carmichael Road and formerly
of Freeport, Grand Bahama will be
r held on Saturday, March 01st, 2008
Sat 11:00 a.m. at Golden Gates
SNative Baptist Church, #3 Lobster
\ Avenue. Officiating will be Rev.
Alonzo Hinsey Assisted by Rev.
Donald Carey, Rev. Leonard Miller
and Rev. Albert Brown. Interment
will follow in the Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

Left to mourn his passing are his Children: Matthew, Ellis
and Tiffany Jenoure; Mother: Grace Jenoure; Adopted-
parents: Raleigh and Rose Butler; Four (4) Sisters: Elizabeth
Brown, Diane Johnson, Sinah Skinner-Major and Clarita
Saunders; Two (2) Brothers: Peter and Joseph Skinner; Two
(2) Step-sisters: Faye Ann Skinner-Rolle and Betty Ann
Skinner; Two (2) Brothers-in-law: Albert Brown and Paul
Major; One (1) Uncle: Frank Young; Seven (7) Nieces:
Alvonnia Brown, Alisa Russell, Aline Sargent, Alison Swan,
Sasha and Yasmin Skinner and Kirsten Major; Five (5)
Nephews: 903 CPL. Patrick Johnson, Michael Johnson, Alex
Brown, Jonathan and Francis Skinner and a host of other
relatives and friends including: Charlamae Forbes and family,
Annie Diggiss and family, Leonard Young and family, The
Young and Jenoure families, Gloria Skinner and family, Ivy
Knowles and family, Stefan Russell and family, Shanaino
Swan and family, Val Maura, Renee Moss, Glenroy Rolle,
Benjamin Butterfield, Willard Hepburn, Keith McSweeney,
Craig Russell, Richard Fawkes, June Grant, Nurse Marsha
McQueen and the Coastline Community Home family, the
entire Freeport community and others too numerous to
mention.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers' Funeral Homes
and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on Friday from
10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m.
until service time at the Church.


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4'. -
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i I I I ~a~ I I I -I


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 5


FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS






PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


Pinder s funeral onwn
"Servicc SeyondfMeasure"
PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570/ 393-1351 CELL: 357-3617
RANNIE PINDER President

A


St. Cecilia's Church.


LEO PRINCE
FERGUSON, 66

of Pastell Beach, Acklins
3 will be held on Saturday,
10:00 am at St. Cecilia's
Catholic Church, 3rd &. 4th,
Street The Grove.
Officiating will be Rev.
Simeon Roberts. Interment
will follow in Old Trail
Cemetery, Old Trail Road.


He is survived by wife, Sandra Ferguson; two sons,
Ernest and Eric Ferguson of Chicago; four sisters,
Rev., Curlena Cox of Chester, Acklins, Madeline
George of Pastell Beach, Acklins, Inez Ferguson and
Evangelist Petrona Ferguson; one brother, Edward
Johnson; forster-brother, Elvis Young; one aunt,
Lotie Darling; twenty two nephews, King Errison
Johnson of Las Vegas, Henry, Rodney Johnson, Rev.
Reno Smith, Thades, Eric, Ken and Julian Ferguson,
Kent, Terrance, Pedro Darling, Lowell, Burcel, Michael,
Trevor, Cedric, Camo, Greg, Cameron, Edward, Donely
and Roston Cox; nineteen nieces, Geraldine Ferguson,
Edwina Gibson, Elrica Williams, Velma, Gloria,
Brenda, Isma, Agatha, Evangelist Altamese Ferguson,
Arris Francis, Annie, Sharon, Madie Ledad, Joyann,
Yvonne, Patricia Grant, of Flordia, Melly, Marilyn
and Patrice; cousins, Roselyn Hanna of Acklins,
Everald, Mae Williamson, Venicie, Wendell Deveaux,
Rosenell; Laban, Elvis Rolle, Valarie, Cynthia, Geneva,
Judy, Godfrey Collie and Gwen Hanna; other relatives
and friends including, numerous great-grand nieces
and nephews, Copland, Rolle, Larry and Alrena
McKinney, Curtis Hanna Sr., the Community Police
of Acklins, Rev. Simeon Roberts and the Members of


Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at
Pinder's Funeral Home. Friday from 2:00pm to 5:00pm
and at the church from 9:00am until service time.


ROSALIE
KNOWLES, 87


will be held on Saturday 1st
March, 2008 at 12 noon at
St. Thomas More Church,
Madeira Street. Msgr.
Simeon Roberts, Fr. Glen
Nixon and Msgr. Alfred
Culmer will officiate and
interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens
Cemetery, Soldier Road.


Predeceased by her husband, Mitchell Orie Knowles
and by a daughter, Mrs. Joyce Pinder and is survived
by five (5) daughters, LaVerne Knowles, Roseann
Affolter, Maria Campagna, Audrey Lowe and Elvira
Lowe; five (5) sons, Mitchell, Samuel, Peter, David
and Gerard Knowles; daughters-in-law, Peggy, Diana,
Leah, Ruth and Justina; sons-in-law, Richard Affolter
and Frederick O. Lowe Sr.; 28 grandchildren and 19
great grandchildren and many other relatives and
friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at Pinder's Funeral
Home, Palmdale Ave. on Friday, 29th February, 2008
at 5:30-7:30 pm.

The family wishes for all friends and relatives to wear
white and pastel colours in celebrating her life.


- ---


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES












nur tis 4 nfmorial -korrtuarg

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma Tel: 345-7020* Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761


MATRIARCH
GERTRUDE MELVINA
WOOD, 87

Sof Willis Street, Ridgeland Park West
will be held on Sunday at 2:30pm at
Zion Baptist Church, East and Shirley
Streets. Officiating will be Rev. T. G.
Morrison, assisted by Rev. Ulric V.
Smith II, Associate Ministers, Deacons
and Evangelists. Interment in The
Eastern Cemetery, Dowdeswell Street.


She is survived by her children, Shirley Wood-Hutchinson, Willis Wood
Jr., Eric Wood, Fredrick (Mae Eunice) Wood, Doreen Wood-Whitehead,
Shirlene (Ivan) Wood-Butler, Mavis (Leonard) Wood-Scott, Erica
Robinson, D'Alfer Gibson, Ruth and Naomi Wood, Richard (Nikita)
Wood, Cherian Wood, Edward (Arnicker) Wood, Eleanor (Franklin)
Wood-Year Wood, Marilyn Deveaux, Evelyn Frazier, Curtis and Posha
Wood and Erick (Marilyn) Wood, Edison Johnson; 100 grandchildren
including, George (Evelyn) Wood, Elise (Dwight) Knowles, Candy
(Patrick) Thompson, Evelyn Moss, Princess Harris, Erris (Zenobia)
Hutchinson, Harriett Wood, Kevin, Lisa, Keith, Andrew and Utah Wood,
Nathalie (Ray) Dorado, Theresa (Pedro) Wood-Saunders, Latimer,
Lanique, Brandon and Jason Wood, Ray, Fredrick (Nikki) Wood,
Gertrude, Justina, Ordell, Steven, Aston and Darwin Wood, Eduado
Wood, Jerome and Jamal Whitehead, Sholanda (Vincent), Shavnie and
Doderick Smith, Lavencio, Anton Buinside, Saunders, Le'Shay and
Kelia Knowles, Erika, Erik, Brittany and Shenese and Danielle.Wood,
Rebecca, Aaron and Felicia Year Wood, Adrian, Elecoe, Tia, Rashael,
Karen (Aaron) Nixon, Augusta and Leonard Robinson, Marissa, Denise,
Dennis, Jol- .que, Laverlancio, Carla Cleare, Monique, Adrian, Demond,
Shawn and Dankeo Scott, Monisha and Christopher Deveaux, Janae,
Wesley, D'Alphanique, Takhia, Fantashia, Pedronique, Pedro... 90 great
grand including, Wesny, Nikita, Gabriel, Ariestol, Gamez, Tavier, Rudy,
Godfrey, Duke, Johnitan, L.J. Seymour, Renique, Chadika, Shannel.
Eulase, Adrian, Diana, Garrett, Wade, Henrinique, Henry, Timothy,
Wilfred, L.J. Hall, Zoe, Dynique, Dhyane, Chadika, Lavinquiso, Woody,
Henryck, Henrynique, Errisa, Erris; one brother-in-law, George Astwood;
one sister-in-law. Ileane Astwood; four godchildren, Rev. Terrance
Jones, Rev. Donald Stubbs, Priscilla Hall and Ruby Ann Mulling; nieces
and nephews, James (Mima) Stubbs, Donald Grant, Melsay (Herbert)
Williams, Joyce Martii Martha Rolle, Joseph Stubbs, Evangelist Easter
Stubbs, Irene (Hilliard) Higgs, Glenn Stubbs, Caroline (Thomas) Forbes,
Elkena, Clarabelle and John Stubbs, Louise Smith, Rev. Geoffrey
(Heather) V )d, John (Dulice). Russell, Glenroy, Keith, Yvonne.
Cleomie, Ma- -ie and Sandra Wood, Heartland Strachan, Hazel (Charles)
Turnquest. v :ria (Herman) Armbrister, Beatrice Astwood. Magistrate
Vera (Floyd) .ttkins, George Astwood Jr., Cheryl (Anthony) Fountain,
Lillian Clark Llewellyn (Rosalyn) Astwood... host of other relatives


and friends including, Randolph Curtis, Valerie Walkes, Vivian and
William and family, Una, Randy and Uranda Curtis, Debbie Archer and
family, Winfred Bannister, Garth Thompson, Darrin Morley and family,
Becky, Charles and Louise Hall, Deacon James and Wilamae Farrington
and family, Rev. T. G. and Royann Morrison, Rev. Ulrick Smith and
family, Ruth Turnquest and family, Dr. Dean Tseretopoulos, Dr. Sands,
Nova, Sharell, Ms. Saunders and the staff at Doctor Hospital I.C.U.
Department, Dr. M. Darville, Eric Smith, McDonald Clarke and family,
Phyllis Kelly and family, Carolyn Thompson and family, Ridgeland
Park family, Zion Baptist Church family, Rev. Kenneth A. Duke and
The New Jerusalem Primitive Baptist Church family, Ralph Johnson
and family, staff at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Ricardo Knowles and
family, Bernice Forbes and family, Perecita Collier and family, the
Seymour family, T. Smith and family.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson Road
and Fifth Street on Saturday from 10am until 5pm and at the church on
Sunday from 1:30pm until service time.


MONIQUE
CLARKE, 42

of Ritchville Drive off Soldier Road
will be held on Saturday at 11am at
Church of God of Prophecy, Soldier
Road. Officiating will be Bishop
Elikem Ferguson, assisted by Pastor
Samuel Moss, Pastor Chevol Gray and
Deacon Dencil Gaitor. Interment in
The Southern Cemetery, Cowpen and
Spikenard Roads.


He is survived by seven children,
Glendina, Precious, Deandra, Isaiah Clarke, Ruben, Rebecca and
Rubenique Gilbert; two grandchildren, Alexander Sherman and Cordesah
Clarke; Mr and Mrs Julien and family, Mr and Mrs Joel LaFleur and
family, the Cartwright family, the Burnside and Kelly families, the
Hanna and Deveaux family, Mr and Mrs Andrew Sinclair and family,
Keisha Leary, Nicola Ferguson, Anthon Robertson, Stacy and family,
Marlon and Rose, Victor Holness, the Moss family, Rose and family,
the Glinton family, Frederick Ferguson and family, Wheatley Wilson,
Shelly and family, Mr Mitchell and family, Jimmy and family, Glenroy
Wolfe and family, Francita, Bernadette, Craig, Rubin and family, the
Bain Town family, the Soldier Road Community, the staff of Audley
Kemp East Street South and Cess Restaurant and Lounge.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary. Robinson Road
and Fifth Street on Friday from 12noon until 6pm and at the church on
Saturday from 10am until service time.


- -- ---- --


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 7


.THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES







PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


Rurtfes fflremarial flnrtuari
Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma Tel: 345-7020. Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

LA TE FR


ESTINE
RAHMING, 50

of Hospital Lane, will be held
on Sunday at 1:30pm at Grants
Town Seventh-Day Adventist
Church, Wellington Street.
Officiating will be Pastor Eric
D. Clarke, Pastor Andrew E.
Burrows, Pastor David
Ferguson, Pastor Ronald Bastian
and Elder Kenny Deveaux.
Interment in Woodlawn Gardens.


S_) She is survived by her husband,
Arlington Rahming; one
daughter, Cheryl McPhee; sisters, Adrean Brice, Jenniemae Major,
Inslee Rolle, Bernadette Brown, Cynthia Flowers, Angela Rolle
and Laverne Williams; eight brothers, Albert, Michael, Emmanuel,
Errol Sr., Lawrence Rolle, Patrick Major, David and Randolph
Ferguson; five grandchildren, Petra, Sharell, Michaela, Lashan
and Deandra; one great grandchild, Reginald McPhee; one uncle,
Sidney Williams; two grandaunts, Victoria Munroe and Castella
Curtis; one son-in-law, Pedro McPhee; five sisters-in-law, Cindy
Ferguson, Marie, Terry, Joan and Melitza Rolle; two brothers-in-
law, Ronald Brown and Wellington Flowers; twenty two nieces,
Shakira, Derinique, Cynthia, Peaches, Deandra, Janiene, Latisha,
Lakeisha, Samantha, Gina, Rochelle, Tamay, Jenea, Remeka,
Indira, Maquita, Jucynthia, Sherry, Jasmin, Nadia, Marie and
Kity; eighteen nephews, George, Tyrone, Jason, Paul, Jimmy,
Ronald, Trevor, Steven, Angelo, Teron, Stefan, Marco, Geni,
Larenzo, Mikie, Scott, Errol Jr., and Brian; five grand nieces,
Resha, Bianca, Kerrdra, Nova and Demicia; ten grand nephews,
Deron, Jason, Brendan, Joel, Jervon, Nicholas, Clarence, Calvin,
Chardae and Taren; host of other relatives and friends including
Prince Hart, Deidre Woods, Randy Curtis, Juan Smith, Jennis
Woods, Mable Newton, Jerome Woods, Dr. Dellarese Woods,
Linda Outten, Barbara Reckley, Paul Hanna and family, Esthermae
and family, Kessie Moncur and family, Victoria Flowers and
family, Tabitha Deveaux and family, the Hospital Lane Community,
Valderine Mills and family, Gloria Reid and family, Marge Cox
and family, Elaine Hamilton and family, Josephine McKenzie
and family, Pastor Ruth Saunders and family, Pasty Pinder and
family, Delancey and family, the Barton family, Faith Vnited
Missionary Baptist Church and family, Commonwealth Mason
Eastern Star Lodge, Brenda Rolle and family, Elizabeth Johnson
and family, the Hanna family, Pro-Tech Security and family,
Beverley Adderley and family, Christine Toote and family, P.M.H.
Switchboard Department and family, Dr. Fox and family, P.M.H.
Housekeeping Department family, Grace Stubbs and family,
Shannon's Beauty Salon and family and many other too numerous
to mention.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary; Robinson
Road and Fifth Street cn Saturday from 10am until 5pm and at
the. church on Sunda-y from 12noon uniil scicc lin'e.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


*- *- !':r . -~


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Tel: 11242! 393 6367 C'el. 1242j 457- 1986


RUBY FUNERAL SERVICE
For

Mr. Cecil "Cec" Dean, 71
of #48 Mason Addition will be held on
Saturday, March 01, 2008 at loam at
Church Of God Cathedral, East Street and
Lilly of the Valley Corner. Rev. Dr. Moses
A. Johnson, assisted by Rev. Earnel Cleare
will officiate and cremation will follow.


The Radiance of this "Ruby ofA Gem"
will always glow in the hearts of his:
One Son: Cyprian "Papa San" Dean;
One Daughter: Helena Dean;
One Adopted Son: Brendon Dean Sr.;
Two Adopted Daughters: Telvern Dean and Denise Bryant;
Five Grand Children: Jamiko Sr., Glenkiah, Michael and Lachara
Dean and Nykeisha Carey;
Seven Adopted Grand: Jamiko Jr., Brendisha and Brendon Dean Jr.,
Valentino, Indira and Racheal Williams and Trent Strachan;
One Great Grand Child: Jamika Dean;
Three Brothers: Mervin Sr. of West Palm Beach, Florida, Hubert and
William Dean Sr.;
Two Sisters: Alsaida Hanna and Marina Dean;
Thirty Four Nephews and Nieces: Lillie McDaniel, Dellia Finney,
Naomi Belk, Mervin Jr., Ethel, Merlene. Simon, Willamae, Arnold,
William Jr., Janus, Janet, Wendy and Edward Dean, Cynthia Beckford,
Pastor Gladstone and Minister Alexander Thurston, Minister Mildred
Dorsette, Minister Neville Seymour, Geraldine Thurston-Williams,
Francina White, Patrice Parker, Edward, Prince and Luther Hanna, Olive
Knowles, Leroy, Cleveland, Haywood, Sidney and Denise Poitier, Elma
Miller, Joanna Sanders and Sherry Armaly;
One Uncle: Harry Wright;
Two Aunts: Ethel Adderley and Julia Huyler;
One Daughter-in-law: Winifred Williams;
One Sister-in-law: Delilah Dean;
Many other loving family and friends including: Pearl Huyler,
Dr. Kevin Alcena, Mrs. Christine Wemyss, Ms. Valderine Frazer, Pete
Smith, Donny Jolly, Nelson Wilson, Marlene Dean, Peggy Farrington,
Melissa Lockhart, Ms. Mary, Ms. Reilly, Mr. Hepburn, Mrs. Culmer, Mrs.
Neily, the Fortune, Saxon Superstars, Fort Fincastle and Mason Addition
Families.

Visitation will be in the "Emerald Suite" at Emerald Ridge Mortuary
& Monument Company Ltd. #20 Claridge Road on Friday, February 29,
2008 from ipm to 6pm and at Church Of God Cathedral, East Street and
Lilly of the Valley Corner on Saturday, March 01, 2008 from 9am to
service time.
Visit our websitc: vwwv.eicmraldridgemortuary.com view video tributes.
sign guest book, send condolence, sympathy, share memories and
male funeral arrangements.


g

I TZllPla9CYIZ






THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

@ eating' olninal
t ortuarij kunb (rematorium
84 Blue Hill Road P.O. Box N-8161 Tel: 325-7867
SFax: 325-7867

FIALIE AN BRAL


REV. THOMAS
OBEDIAH
McKINNEY SR., 97


a resident of Bannerman Town
Eleuthera, will be held on
Saturday 1st March 2008 at St.
James Native Baptist Church,
St. James Road at 10:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Bishop
Michael C. Symonette assisted
by Rev. Dr. Carrington Pinder and Other Ministers.
Interment will follow in the Church's Cemetery, St. James
Road.

.Cherish memory will always linger in the Hearts of his
wife, Ena; seven sons, Inspector Eugene and Corporal
Wellington McKinney of Her Majesty Prison, Hermon,
Varian, Hilton, Tyrone of Freeport, Grand Bahama and
Julian McKinney; three daughters, Eula Rolle, Barbara
Horton and Glendina McKinney; brother, Gerald
"PoBoy" McKinney; sister, Fairdora McKinney; son-
in-law, Felix Rolle; grand son-in-law, Charles Davis;
grand daughter-in-law, Monique Rolle; grand-niece,
Marie Lightbourne; grand nephew, Chief Inspector
David S. Rolle of Her Majesty Prison; two brothers-in-
law, Alfred and Mervin Cooper; two sisters-in-law,
Mildred McKinney and Fairdora Butler; thirty grand-
children, thirteen great grand-children and a host of
other relatives and friends including, George and Burt
McKinney, Rev. Dr. Lavania Stewart, The Fox, Curry,
Patricia Moxey, Myrtle Sweeting, Rosemarie Musgrove,
Margaret Rolle of John Millers, Florence Mackey, The
family of John Millers, Eleanor Rolle, Alice Gray, Cecil
Williams, Rebecca Miller, Alfred Bullard, Philip and
Fristina McPhee, Irene McKinney, Rock Sound, Eleuthera
and the entire South Eleuthera Community including
Pauline, Virginia Curry and families.

The body will repose at the Chapel of the Saints Sweeting's
Colonial Mortuary and Crematorium, #84 Blue Hill Rd.
from 10.00am on Friday until 6.00pm and on Saturday
from 9.00 a.m. at the Church until service time.


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 9


Reergreen



Mackey Street e P.O. Box N-4404
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-341-6451 Nights 242-322-3242
24 Hour Cell: 242-427-5414




i CONSUELLA
PARKER SMITH, 41

of Butlers Street, Nassau Village
and formerly of Cargill Creek,
Andros will be held on Saturday,
March 1st, 2008 at Mt. Pleasant
Green Baptist Church, East and
Quakoo Streets at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Wesley
L. Thompson assisted by Rev.
Nelson McFall, Rev. Garth
.. Johnson and Rev. Mary Johnson.
S Interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish fond memory are her mother, Estella Smith; two
daughters, Shoniquer and Archera; step daughter, Joey Neymour;
six sons, Ricardo and Terran Davis, TouKenny, Wesley, Akeem and
George Neymour; special friend, Marcus Neymour; eight sisters,
Alfreda Parker, Denise Rolle, Monique Josey, Lucille, Josephine
Edden, Schedar Parker Braynen, Erica Stubbs and Cynthia Fowler;
four brothers, Theodore Parker, Jean Guerrier Jr., Worrington and
Elvis Parker; six aunts, Albertha Johnson, Virginia Saunders,
Consuella Hanchell, Cynthia Smith, Beatrice and Katherine Smith;
seven uncles, Bernard Smith, William, Joseph, Caphias Miller, Gary
Saunders, Daniel Johnson and John Bain; numerous nieces and
nephews including, Alexis Cunningham, Sanderia Rolle, Romica
Josey, Jamica Brown, Domonique Josey, Rashan Smith, Alexandera
and Lindora Parker, Alexanderia Guerrier, Sandy Rolle, Jr,, Thophanis
Cunningham, Romeo Josey, Jr., Gilbert Bain, Rashad Smith, Jameco
Brown and Sanzario Rolle; three brothers-in-law, Sandy Rolle Sr.,
Romeo Josey Sr., and Carlton Smith; two sisters-in-law, Linda
Parker and Florence Guerrier; cousins, Michelle, Angela, Daniel
Jr., Jerome and Jeffrey Johnson; and a host of other relatives and
friends including, George and Syble Neymour, Cleveland and Macia
Neymour, Clyde and Keisha Neymour, Wilfred and Malvern Mackey,
Samuel and Evangelist Arlene Lindsay, Sergeant 697 Stephen and
Evangelist Idamae Riley, Melveria Neymour, Lynden and Shenek
Paul, Allen and Everette Neymour, Malissa, Samantha, Eldora and
Lawrence Mackey, Ettamae Leadon, Aneka and Stephen Riley Jr.,
Perez Lindsay, Ashlas, Shaquille, Clenero, Clyde Jr., and Aston
Neymour, James Brown, Theophilus Cunningham, Yoline and Lora
Guerrier, Tara and Raymond Forbes, Arnold and Sharlene Braynen,
Dovis Bain, Dorothy Neely, the Neely, Neymour, Leadon, Bain,
Farrington, McKenzie, Rissell, Mackey and Seymour Families and
many other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.
Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Evergreen Mortuary,
Mackey Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. and again
at the church on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until service time.







P EnWA tt', i, r'iJ r UAiRL.\ 9 2008 TV E -.--I
_,,= rJ-, I H


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c~eE4 e~stna&;~i~~ium~~a


FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005


@g


FUNRA S


DANETTE
MARGARET DAMES,
41

OF BAILEY TOWN, BIMINI AND
FORMERLY OF NASSAU, NEW
PROVIDENCE WILL BE HELD AT
BORN AGAIN FULL GOSPEL
BAPTIST CHURCH, BAILEY
S.'_ TOWN, BIMINI ON SATURDAY,
MARCH 1, 2008 AT 11:00A.M.
OFFICIATING WILL BE PASTOR ORAL J. ELLIS ASSISTED
BY EVANGELIST PERTINA ROLLE. INTERMENT WILL
FOLLOW AT THE NORTHERN PUBLIC CEMETERY, BAILEY
TOWN, BIMINI.

Left to cherish her memories are her Husband: Jeff Dames; Mother:
Ann Moxey; three Children: Kermica Stuart, Janelle and Breann
Dames; four Brothers: Tyrone, Cornell, Ulyesses and Rodney; four
Sisters: Adassie, Malinda, Bendra and Lakeisha Moxey;
Grandmother: Ada Williams; adopted Parents: Joel and Edris
Rolle and Creswell Romer; adopted Children: Larry Burrows and
Shelise Rolle; five adopted Sisters: Lashanty and Lindsey Bain,
Latoya Laing, Joelette Rolle and Julie Dottin; eleven adopted
Brothers: Glenroy, Glenrick and Levell Rolle, Elkin, Jerry and
Thomas Butler, Ellison and Elsworth Robins, Clevon and Devard
Dames and Joel Rolle, Jr.; two Stepchildren: Jabor Dames and
Crystal Hall; four Grandchildren: Andre, Tatianna Clarke, Jaquel
Dames and Dashae' Saunders; ten Nieces: Tyiesha, Tyrena, Tyreann,
Khadijiah, Starmia, Lecinthia, Shianne, Cordesha, Destiny and
Jaslaine; eleven Nephews: Alano, Tydrae, Levon, Tyron, Henfield,
Lortario, Ulyesses Jr., Kakeem, Corrane, Raymond and Valdez Jr.;
eight Aunts: Oralee Johnson, Maria Brown, Debranka Levarity,
Dorasheen Rolle, Jane Stuart, Pauline Levarity, Jada Carter and
Violet Levarity; six Uncles: Jack, Ralph, Aceie, Amil, Jarret and
Lenny Levarity; Grandaunts and uncles: Verna and Bill Cooper,
Edith and Denise Dames, Birdie Edgecombe, Emma and Esther
Rolle, Luke Rolle, Annis Robins, Esmerelda Smith, Essie McKinney,
Rev. James Dames, Prescola Ramsey and Doris Robins; Mother-
in-law: Elosie Dames; four Brothers-in-law: Barry, Ervin, Rudy
and Justin Dames; four Sisters-in-law: Michelle Dames, Quasette
Wallace, Jerrene Brennen and Felice Dames; Godchildren: Harvette
McIntosh, Nicholette Johnson, Jasmaine Williams, Destiny Adderley
and Laquan Ellis; Godmother: Eleanor Robins; and a host of other
Relatives and Friends including: Langford Stuart, Cleolia Hanna,
Robbie Smith, Custom Department Staff, Faye Saunders and family,
Venenchia Rolle and family, Corwell Bain, Ladies of the Straw


Market, Tasha Rolle and the Local Government Staff, Judith Rolle
and family, Philomena Rolle and family, Pastor Oral and First Lady
Grace Ellis, Evelyn Sawyer and family, Glen Campbell, Edward
Adderley, Anthony Gilbert and Lavar Outten of Freeport, Corporal
Pinder and family, Patrice Kemp and family, Naomi Smith and
family, Indra, Veronica Kelly and family, Nurse Keva and family,
Janet Marshall and family, Bianca Williams and family, Marshall
family, Merlene Saunders and family, Whitlene Bullard and family,
Lavern Williams and family, Vernona Laing and family, Gretchen
Eartha Rolle, Lloyd Edgecombe and family, Nurse Celestine King
Dorsett and family, Sherlene Bain, Alethia Romer, Nurses and Doctors
at the Rand Memorial Hospital, Staff at Bimini Clinic, Administrator
and Staff, the Royal Bahamas Police Force at Bimini, Immigration
Staff and the entire Bimini Community.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD AT THE BORN AGAIN FULL
GOSPEL BAPTIST CHURCH, BAILEY TOWN, BIMINI ON
FRIDAY FROM 1:00 P.M UNTIL SERVICE TIME AT THE
CHURCH ON SATURDAY.


DEATH

ANNOUNCEMENT


MS. EVELYN
"Mavis"
REYNOLDS, 75

OF #9 PIONEERS WAY, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA AND FORMERLY
OF CLARENDON, JAMAICA DIED
AT THE RAND MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL ON MONDAY,
FEBRUARY 18, 2008.


She is survived by her Daughter: Venetta Linden; one Stepdaughter;
six Grandchildren; thirteen Great grandchildren and a host of other
relatives and friends.

FUENRAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A
LATER DATE.


NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034


----- -----------;-- -;----- --- -- ----- --


T71E T. IB.J NE OiT.j;'.AlIES


- A
..'*--'
;?* *
*t.






THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERA SERVE FO


CLYDE LESLIE
KING JR., 43


OF DUNDAS TOWN, ABACO
WILL BE HELD AT FRIENDSHIP
TABERNACLE CHURCH,
DUNDAS TOWN, ABACO ON
SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 2008 AT
11:00 A.M. OFFICIATING WILL
BE PASTOR SILBERT MILLS
ASSISTED BY ELDER WENZEL MCBRIDE. INTERMENT
WILL FOLLOW AT THE PUBLIC CEMETERY, DUNDAS
TOWN, ABACO.

Left to cherish his memories are his parents: Alice Morley
Deveaux and Leslie King; step mother: Juanita King; brothers:
Rev. Kenneth R. Knowles, Minister Freddy Archer, Richard
Morley, Absalom Albert, Rev. Christopher R. Dean, Joseph,
Gordon and Garnet Dean, Deacon Anthony King, and Harrison
King; sisters: Eleanor Hield, Charmaine Wells, and Branhilda
Pascal; brothers-in-law: Rodney Wells and Kesner Pascal;
sisters-in-law: Nathalie Knowles, Shane Archer, Jackie Morley,
Christine Dean, Sandra Dean, Claudine King and Winnifred
King; nieces: Nancy Seymour, Raquel Knowles, Chervain
Stuart, Lachrisser Scriven, Christy Wells, Trudy Dean, Abria
Miller, Joevaughnia Dean, Aisha Walker, Sharon Knowles,
Prescola Knowles, Latonya, Janell, Mulice and Breanna King,
Sophia and Shenique Dean; nephews: Kareem Knowles, Richard
Morley Jr., Corderro Dean, Gordon Dean Jr., Jerome Dean,
Shepon Hall, Javon Walker, Lavisco Ramon, Casanova and
Shakyno King and Rodney Wells Jr.; step-brothers: Selvin,
Marvin & Lynden Dean; step-sisters -in -law: Bernadette,
Dianne & Shanishka Dean; step-mother: Enamae Dean; uncles:
Rev. Copeland Morley and Wilfred Edgecombe; aunts: Crescola
Edgecombe and Louise Morley; a host of relative and friends
including: David, Ishmael, Esther and Paula Morley, Whitney
& Sue Ann Kenny, Henry Seymour, Joseph & Eunamae Sawyer,
Janet & Mark Clarke, Sylvan & Sarah Edgecombe, Ed & Iris
Mackey, Nurse Ola Butler, Friendship Tabernacle Church
Family, Zion Baptist Church Family, Cost Right Management
and Staff, Marsh Harbour Government Clinic Staff, Chris &
Paulette Nesbitt, Lowell Albury, Pastor Stephen Knowles, Rev
Lernis & Mother Cornish, Bishop Clifford & Mother Henfield,
Rev. Floyd Swain, Pastor Audley and Mrs. Epsy Swain and
Idena Wildgoose of Grand Bahama.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD AT THE FRIENDSHIP
TABERNACLE CHURCH, DUNDAS TOWN, ABACO ON
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 2008 FROM 1:00 P.M. UNTIL
SERVICE TIME AT THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY.


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 11


ffi^4ie4a ^4(emo^U aM~wi4
anup d wuwema&uwn SEinmhid
FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034
FUNERAL SEVC O


HAROLD LIVINGSTON
FORBES JR., 48

of Regency Park will be held on Saturday
March 1, 2008, at 10:00 am at Church
of Christ Highbury Park. Officiating will
be Elder Earl William Miller. Interment
will follow in the Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.


He is survived by his Father: Harold
S_ Forbes Sr., Wife: Jeanette Forbes, Three
Sons: Darius, Delano and Tashon Forbes;
Two Daughters: Anquanela Forbesand Jannelle Curtis, One Grand
Daughter: A'lexxis Thador, Two Brothers: Terrance Malcolm and
Godfrey Forbes, Four Sisters: Donna "Liz" Henfield, Denise Hepburn,
Cheryl Forbes and Etherel Forbes, Mother-in-Law: Milliant Lewin,
Brothers-in-Law: Earl and Carlton Lewin, Tony Henfield and Michael
Hepburn, Aunts: Evelyn Thompson of Eleuthera, Sally Hutchinson,
Gladys Seymour of Grand Turks, Audrey Lyttle of Clearwater, Florida,
Alice Williams of New York, Madge Williams and Dorothy Malcolm,
Grand Aunt: Loise Taylor, Uncles: Robert "bob" Taylor, Raymond
Forbes, Lewellen Malcolm and Henry Lyttle, Nieces: Denotra Taylor
and Chenise Hepburn, Nephews: Chavaz French, Whitfield Saunders,
Denzel Carroll, Travis and Chavez Hepburn, Cousins: Llewelyn, Leroy,
Roscoe and McArthur Thompson, Arturo, Antwann and Ian Hutchinson,
Robert Higgs, Hon. Floyd Seymour, James, Burke and Philip Williams,
Calvin, Bradley, George and Edwardo Taylor, Richard, Hosea and
Dickinson Seymour, Louis, Stuart and Richard Taylor, Conrad Lyttle,
Barry Forbes, Cecilia Forbes Watson, Arnold Forbes, Patrice hall,
Anthony Forbes, Linda Laing, Jennifer Symonette, Patrice Thompson,
Sharon Sawyer, Karen Panell, Terse Taylor, Cheryl Smith, Brenda Wong,
Barbara Maycock, Shanta Williams, Dorothea Martin, Geraldine,
Margaret, Brenda, Dianne, Loma, Hilda, Mary, Leila, Allison, Alvarkay,
Pearl, Patricia, Linda, Laurie, Mellisa Thompson, Mia Lyttle, Andrea,
Michelle, David Forbes, Christine Forbes, McIntosh, Rodney Forbes,
Livingston Munroe, Alfreda Sturrup, Fred Sturrup, Maria Rox, Michelle
Watson, Alexnader "Lorie" Adams, Maltina Storr and Family, Almonda
Taylor and Family, Hugh Fulford and Family, Lea Ashwood and Family,
Hon Derek Taylor-and family, Florence Williams and family, Rosemary
Simon and family, Children of the late Louise Taylor, Georgina Ingraham
and family, Sally and family, Sandra and family, Jennifer Tumquest and
family, Linda, Patsy, Earl, Barbara, Harold, Richard and John Taylor,
Thelma Osboume and family, Valarie, Missick, Herbert Oembler, Father
Curtis Robertson, Bessie Mae Rolle.

Other relatives and friends including: Maria Ferguson, Denise Moss,
Charise Bethel, Loretta Astwood, Jacqueline Major and family, Deacon
Raymond Forbes, Gurth Knowles and Dozer Heavy Equipment family,
Mr. & Mrs. Stafford Greene and family, Trevor Turnquest, Bernard
Baker and family, Deangelo Dames, The Armour Car Family, The Turner
family and numerous other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held in Celestial Suite at Restview Memorial Mortuary
and Cremat9rium Ltd., on Soldier and Robinson Road, on Friday
February 29r" 2008,from 10:00am to 6:00pm and on Saturday March
1, 2008 from 9:00am until service time at the church.









PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


and w,"RAVA&M Z;i
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awel ^e8~mCU4iuutft~ 35w/


FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005


NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034


FU -NER AL S V SFO


BASIL MATTHEW
WOODSIDE, 68

of Golden Gates # 1 and formerly of
Stanyard Creek, Andros will be held on
Sunday march 2nd, 2008, at lla.m. at
Hillview Seventh Day Adventist Church,
Tonique Williams-Darling Highway.
Officiating will be Pastor Joseph. Interment
will follow in Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery,
Soldier Road.


_I He is survived by His Wife: Althea
Woodside; Seven Daughters: Renee
Woodside, Budrick of Jacksonville, Florida, Nadine Woodside Neely, Sabrina
Woodside Roberts, Beulah Linder of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Lakeisha,
Nkoma of New York, and Sally Woodside; Five Sons: Dwayne Sr., Damien
Sr. Mugabe St. Valentine and Donovan; Three Sisters: Estella Woodside
Dorsette, Norma Woodside and Clarise Woodside Jones; One adopted
Brother: Wellington Knowles; Thirty-five Grand Children: Satino Stubbs,
Dwayne Jr., Denzil, Mugabe Jr., Cruz, Damien Woodside Jr., Juan Ferguson,
Jerome Nicholes, Thomas, Themo, Terrell, alex Jr., Adjani, Akeem, Ahnad,
Ahineer Neely, Herbert Minnis, Godfrey Minnins, lapeachra, Shakeitra,
Shania Ferguson, Dwaynette, Karen, Danell, Donnel, Denisha, leshie, mariska
Woodside, Lyvartinique Johnson, Valancia Minnis, Gloria Martin and
Elizabeth Martin; Sons-In-Law: Carlos Roberts, and Alex Neely Sr.;
Daughters-In-Law: Jayann and Carlene Woodside of New York; Nieces:
Akleria, Shenique Jones, Keisha Ferguson, Esther, Andrea, Gabrella,
Coleen,Channel, paml Ruby, Debese and Bridgett: Grand Niece: Aquilla
Cleare; Nephews: Clint Woodside, Jamal, Jermaine and Jerome, Jones,
Colen, Howard Jr., Dexter, Jamal, Ricardo, Austin, Emerson, Charles, Edgar
and Allen; Grand Nephew: Shavantie Woodside; Uncles: Basil Lewis (Old
Tack), Clarence Woodside and Haston Bastian; Aunts: Eula Toler of Hartford,
Connecticut, Dorothy Grant of Hartford, Connecticut, Althea Lewis, Merline
Woodside and Rosalee Davis; Sisters-In-Law: Katherine McPhee, Ivy
Knowles, Enid and Eunice Fernander; Brothers-In-Law: Wendell Dorsett,
Walter Jones, Kenneth Fernander, Hector Knowles, and Howard McPhee;
Other Relatives and Friends Including: Families of Orati Woodside,
Oralee Smith, Morris Lightbourne of Miami, Florida, Carnetta Ellis of
Hartford, Connecticut, Ellamae Davis, Anel woodside, Wilbert Edgecombe,
Tony, Smiley and Wesley Bastian, Eulease Johnson, Sidney, John Joshua,
Caleb, Ida Davis, Granville, Eric Antonio, Vanrea Rolle, Sheila Davis, Joy
Brown, Daisy Strachan of New York, Yvonne Ming, Carolyn Miller of New
York, Tracey Brown, Lucille Williams, Miriam Jones, Alda Mae Lloyd,
Maxwell Brown, Iris Amith, Ruth Gibson, Naomi Whymms, Solomie Moss,
Lynn Thompson, Geraline Lightbourne, Pearline Rolle, Anna Mae Strachan,
Joyce Bannister, lona Williams, Shirley Rolle, Gloria Dawkins, Hester Kerr,
Rowena Ferguson, Alonza Butler, Alonza Daxon, Kirkwood Williams,
Kirklyn Barr, Inez Knowles, Paula Rolle, Ruth Adderley, Pearlmae Neilly,
Beverley, Donna, Garret, Basil, Pastor Charles, James, Lewis, Sandra Bethel,
Patrick, Herbert, Glenn, Jackie, Cherry, TC Woodside, Jodine Brown, Blanche
Middleton, Ophelia Cooper, Inez Brown, Dell Davis, Gerdell Davey, Joseph
Butler, Phyllis Bastian, Venecha Blatch, Dellerese Flowers, Barbara Miller,
Iva Bain and Corene Saunders. The Community of Stanyard Creek, Andros,


the Bahamas Electricity Corporation, the Doctors and Nurses of Princess
Margaret Hospital, the Staff of Male Surgical Ward and Male Medical Ward
I and II and The Community of Golden Gates Number I.

Viewing will be held in Perpetual Suite at Restview Memorial Mortuary
& Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and Soldier Roads, on Friday February
29, 2008from 10:00am to 6:00pmand on Saturday March 1, 2008 from
10:00am until service time at the church.


EDWARD JOHN
DEVEAUX, 69

of Jenny Street and formerly of Hard Hill
Acklins will be,held on Saturday March 1,
2008, at 11:00am at New Covenant Baptist
Church, Independence Drive. Officiating
will be Bishop Michael A. Ferguson.
Interment will follow in the Woodlawn
Gardens, Soldier Road.


He is survived by his wife: Edna Deveaux,,
children: Annette, Julian and Terrance Deveaux, Lynette and Alton Ferguson,
mother: Hilda Johnson Seven grand children: Tiffany, Julio, Terrance
and Terran Deveaux, Ranard Moss, Aysha and Alton Ferguson II One great
grand child: Jeremy Two Sisters: Lerlean Collie and Marjorie Goodman.
One Aunt: Daisy Johnson. Eight Sisters in law: Mildred Williamson,
Nora Smith, Francis, Sybilene, Clara and Catherine Mcphee, Marietta
McKinney, and Cynthia Brown. Brothers in law: Alphonso Goodman,
Arthur Williamson, Winston Smith, Evangelist and Joel McPhee, and Hayward
McKinney. 150 Nieces, 120 Nephews, Godchildren: Attorney Wallace
Rolle, Jayfus Ferguson, Girty Bullard, Ethlyn Deveaux, Carolyn Williamson,
Evenika & Deanika Jeantry, Rose Rigby and Roseberline Sigoro,

Other relatives and friends including: Bishop Gloria Redd and the Revival
team, Basil Marshall, Timothy Ferguson, Neville Thompson, Yule Johnson,
Everick and Ibertha Jeantry, Rose Marie Rigby, Oral Ferguson & family,
Elkina Collie & family, Lavita Johnson and family, Lulamae Rolle & family,
Magarine Moss & family, Gloria Hanna and family, Manerva Edwards and
family, Elton Williamson, Coreen Miller & Family, Elizabeth Farquharson
& family, Cleamese Cox and family, Joy Bell and family, Lilly Edwards &
family, Doreen Bain and family, Myrtle Deveaux and family, Apostle &
Lady Jones and the Annex Baptist Church family, Ellajane Cox & Melvern
Seymour, Marietta Moss, Francina Johnson, Lisa Gibson & family, Michelle
Damtal, Carol Simpson, Timothy Burnside, Harrold Miller & Family, Ronald
Miller & Family, Carleen Rolle, Christopher and Vergie Rolle,

Viewing will be held in the Serenity Suite at Restview Memorial Mortuar
& Crematorium Ltd Robinson & Soldier Road on Friday February 29"
2008 from 10:00am to 6:00pm and on Saturday March 1, 2008 from
10:00am until service time at the church.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


PAGE 1.2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 13


FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034


LILLIAN OLEAN
-4 JOHNSON, 76
of Yellow Elder and Formerly of The
Bluff Eleuthera will be held on Saturday
March 1st, 2008, At 1:00 pm at New
Dimension Ministries, Joe Farrington
SRoad. Officiating will be Dr. John N.
Humes, Assisted by Dr. Donie Storr.
Interment will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.

She is survived by her Daughters: Nurse
Alberta Hudson, of Freeport, Nurse Rosalie Kemp, of Freeport, Sara
Saunders, of the Ministry of Labour, and Eugenie Johnson, of Freeport,
Sons: Bishop Victor Johnson, Retired Sergeant Aaron Johnson, Dr.
Charles Johnson, Bishop Moses Johnson, Dr. James Johnson, Sidney
Johnson, Dr. Hasting Johnson and Tyrone Perpall; Granddaughters:
Jaton Johnson, Tiffany Johnson, Visha Johnson, RoBertha Hudson,
Talietha Johnson, Monique Johnson, Marissa Johnson, Sasha Johnson,
Marisha Johnson, Candia Saunders, Michelle Johnson, Angel Kemp,
Crystal Johnson, Yasmine Johnson, Kristin Saunders and Tylyn Perpall;
Grand Sons: Reymond Hudson, Romeo Hudson, Aaron Johnson Jr.,
Moses Johnson Jr., Romado Hudson, Anthon Johnson, Elroy Kemp,
Elvardo Kemp, Mauricio Johnson, Jeremy Johnson, Anwar Johnson,
Victor Johnson Jr., Jeron Johnson, Jaden Johnson, Perez Johnson and
Tyrone Perpall Jr.; Great Grand Daughters: Ramanda Hudson and
Erinique Johnson; Great Grand Sons: Romando Hudson,. Renaldo
Hudson, Ramon Hudson and Aydin Johnson, Daughters-in-law:-
Jacqueline, Betty, Deborah, Cynthia, Eileen and Dr. Rhea Johnson and
Jacqueline Perpall, Sons-in-Law: Raymond Hudson, Lowell Kemp,
Sisters: Nurse Annis Neely, Daisy Cartwright, Brothers: John Neely,
Limon Neely, Rev. Reynold Neely and Wyonne Neely, Sisters-in-Law:
Francis Johnson, Renee, Kayle, Christine and Sandra Neely; Brothers-
In-Law: Limon Johnson and Lander Cartwright, Nieces: Majorie Pedican,
Rosetta Hudson, Lucille Munnings, Marsha Gibson, Molly Davis, Ladonna
Gardiner, Willimae Neely, Doris Wilson, Felicity Ferguson, Latoya Neely,
Caliope, Paula, Rochelle, Sherelle, Sophia, Felicia, Sherina, Sandra, Risa
and LaDonna Johnson; Nephews: Michael Johnson, Alfred Neely, Gregory
and Lynden Johnson, Solomon, Douglas, Christopher, Wesley, James
and Dale Neely, Laron, Lander & Giovanni Cartwright, Keno, Jermaine,
Scott, Shanard, Derek, Matthew, Albert, Jonathan and Reynard Neely;
Numerous other relatives and friends including: Dr & Mrs. W.M.
Johnson, Brent Saunders, Prudence Johnson, Dr. & Mrs. Harcourt M.
Pinder, Dr & Mrs. Donnie Storr, Mr & Mrs. Samuel Pedican Jr., Effelyn,
Vasco and Shanda Neely, Uleta Hudson, Bishop & Mrs. Theophilus
Stuart, Bishop & Mrs. Dudley Kelly, Bishop & Mrs. Fred Newchurch,
Bishop & Mrs. Ivan Neely, Sergeant Philip Johnson, Sergeant Mervin
Dean, ASP Locksley Knowles and Carmie Smith, Paula Cartwright,
Bishop & Mrs. Leslie Woodside, Pastor Henry Moncur and the Shiloh
Seventh Day Adventist Church Family.

Viewing will be held in Perpetual Suites Restview Memorial Mortuary
& Crematorium Ltd., Robinson & Soldier Road, Friday February 29,
2008from 10:00am to 6:00pm and on Saturday March 1, 2008from
9:00 to 10:00am and again from 12:00noon until service time at the
church.


S Vaughn O. Jones

MEMORIAL CENTER
"Honoring the memories of loved ones"
INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

*FU a11 ALAUCME


ANDREW
ROLLE SR., 71


of Kemp Road and formerly of
S Rolleville, Exuma will be held on
Saturday March 1st, 2008 at 11:00
a.m. at Glad Tidings Tabernacle,
Kemp Road. Officiating will be
Rev. Irene Russell assisted by
other ministers. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Precious memory will forever linger in the hearts of his
four brothers, Rueben Rolle of Winter Gardens, Florida,.
William Rolle of Zellwood, Florida, Thomas Rolle of
Freeport, Grand Bahama and Vernal Rolle; two sisters,
Lillian Smith and Stella Rolle; two sisters-in-law, Marge
and Aranice Rolle; sixteen nephews, Henry Smith, Wendell
Smith of Zellwood, Florida, Donavan McKenzie of
Zellwood, Florida, Cardinal and Steven Rolle, Dena and
Darin Cummings, Zephaniah, Randolph and Bernard Curtis,
Victor, Freddie and Audley Rolle, Alton, Camkimio and
Thomas Rolle Jr.; eleven nieces, Marsha Smith, Sharon
Rolle, Patricia Farrington-Sands, Holl-Jane Cummings,
Linda McKenzie of Zellwood, Florida, Sonia, Charlene
nad Topaz, Bessiemae Lloyd, Linda and Yvonne Curtis;
nine grandnieces, ten grand nephews and other relatives
and friends including, Celeste and Veronica Rolle and
family, Rev. Charles Rolle and family, Bishop Salathiel
Rolle and family, Roland, Paula, Verlene, Dorcas and
Mispah Rolle, Mavis McPhee, Ophelia Smith, Francina.
Nixon and family, Jestina Neely, Una Rolle and family,
Vicky Johnson and family, William Smith and family,
Burcil and Earnest Rolle, Margaret, Althea, Adrian and
Phyllis Rolle, The Management and Staff of Unity House,
The Management and Staff of Club Waterloo and the
Communities of Kemp Road and Rolleville, Exuma.

Viewing will be held in the "Legacy Suite" of Vaughn O.
Jones Memorial Center, Wulff Road and Primrose Street
on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the church
on Saturday from 10:00 am to service time.

Wulff Road and Primrose Street,
Opposite Studio of Draperies
Telephone: 326-9800/1 24 Hour Emergency
434-9220/380-8077
\;wu-,. .*;':'s _,; Ijll;"( IC |) '\flllf'in fiffnl 1r .ti l.' 10; Y f bnf; ni:H ,d 'J-


I *, 3.,,,_


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES






PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


ammornntealti uncra[l homn


S Independence Drive Phone: 341-4055




S' MICHAEL EZEKIEL
S-BAILLOU, 41
affectionately called "Big Mike"
..
of Blackwood Abaco, will be held on
1 -Saturday 11:00 a.m. at St. Simon By The
SSea Anglican Church Treasure Cay,
"""' Abaco. Father Dwight Rolle assisted by
Canon Ivor Ottery and Father Earl
J Hepburn will officiate and interment will
Follow in the Public Cemetery
Blackwood Abaco.

As a loving husband, Michael will be
missed by his wife, Elaine Baillou; a great son missed by parents,
Catechist Euclid and Marjorie Baillou, a super dad never to be forgotten
by his children, Michael (Jr.), Mikelle, Miguel and Makaeo; a wonderful
brother always to be cherished by his brothers, James, Arthur and
Eugene Baillou and sisters, Anna and Mona Lisa Baillou, Norma Jane
Baillou-Smith, Tyronia Stuart and Margo Kelly; nieces, Samantha,
Candi and Semajra Baillou, T'Neil McIntosh, Tyronisha, Talycha and
Taliyah Stuart, Vanisha Smith; nephews, Seranno, Samantino and
Nathario Baillou, Stanley Mcintosh III, Justin Moss, Israel and Kaylano
Kelly; aunts, Evalina Baillou, Eva Baillou-Hanna, Kessie Moncur,
Susie Mae Longley, Mary Whylly and Jessie Mae Reckley; mother-
in-law, Vivian Cornish; aunts-in-law, Inez Baillou and Jacqueline
Reckley; uncle-in-law, Andrew Longley; brothers-in-law, Derham
Smith, Oganger Stuart, Rudy, Lenward, Sydney, Eddison, Wesley and
Clyde Cornish, Latario Kelly and Nigel Bootle; sisters-in-law,
Gwendolyn Baillou, Belinda Baillou, Evamae Reckley, Jennalee Bootie,
Florina Cornish and Mizpah McIntosh; cousins, Andrea, Floyd and
Patricia, Maxine, Shezelle, Fenrick and Andrew Longely, Jacqui Gibson,
Solomonia and Raynard Rigby, Roberto and Delcina Reckley, Ladrana
Reckley, Ramona Moncur, Rose, Allenia, Wendell, Bunny and Edvardo
Beneby, Albert and Jan Mortimer, Trisha and Betty, Cynthia Mackey,
Jessie Burrows, Barbara Thompson, John and Ivy Mackey, Steve and
Melanie, Stanley and Coralee Pedican, Sharmeen and Harold Pierre,
Sandra Cooper, Ricardo Baillou, Althea Munroe, Veronica, Verneka,
Valinda, Verona, Vincent, Virgil, Victor, Lerlene, Jenanine, and Junior
Baillou; a host of other relatives and friends including, Rt. Hon
Hubert A. Ingraham, Sherry Bethel, Tracey Greene, Nyosha and
Lakeisha Reckley, Ravonne Hepburn, Vanessa, Lenrita, Lorotte,
Carmelle, Pauline, Kevelyn, Shandeka, Myquesha, Lesha, Clydesha,
Mona Lisa, Fredrick, Bob and the entire Ferguson family, Adams and
Adderley, Russell, Williams, Cornish and Albury families of Black
Wood; Emmanuel Williams, Johnathan Reckley, Nadine and Vernita
Reckley, Hiram McIntosh and family, Darron Lightbourn and family,
Kevin, Marvin, Lamont, Hansel, Brother Coakley, Pippins, Roselyn,
Gerda and Jeff, The Rolle, McIntosh, Bootle, Edgecombe, Cox, Pritchard
and Mcintosh families of Coopers Town, The entire Blackwood and
North Abaco Communities, Bahamas Softball family and many other
relatives and friends, too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE CHAPEL OF
MEMORIES COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME
INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Thursday from 1:00-7:00 p.m. on Friday
from 10:30-1:00 p.m. and at the church on Friday from 5:00 p.m. to
service time on Saturday.


^ mteritte'S 1 f untral 4oxm e
BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET P.O. BOX GT-2097 TEL: 323-5782
FUNEA SEVIE FO


ORAN
ROLLE, 83


a resident of Guinep Street, Pinewood
Gardens and formerly of Simms, Long
Island, will be held at The Annex Baptist
Church, Wulff Road & Pinedale, on
Saturday at 10:00 a.m. Officiating will be
Apostle Mitchel E. Jones. Interment follows
in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish her memory are her sons, Leo, Felix, Wesley, Larry and
Gary Rolle; daughters, Aremintha Butler, Shirley Stuart, Sandra Kemp,
Marilyn Bullard, Peggy Bethel and Diane Rolle; sons-in-law, Agnus
Bullard, Henry Bethel and Allan Stuart; daughters-in-law, Eric, Villadale
and Maike Rolle; brother, Clifford Knowles of Simms, Long Island;
sister-in-law, Jennie Rolle; grand children, Stephen, Brian, Colette,
Kent and Cora Ferguson, Betty Stubbs, James and Michelle Coakley,
Brenda, Melonie, Barry and Marsha Stuart, Dion, Calvin, Marvin, Chad,
Michael and Willis Rolle, Dyanza and Sharee Lamm, Geoffrey and
Monique Miller, Kendal Jr. and Vashti Turner, Mark Capron, Tracy Rolle,
Myrrhra Dixon, Meagin Bullard, J'Liesa Bethel; great grand children,
Torrian, Kenton and Kennedy Ferguson, Geoffrey Jr. and Montaye Miller,
Kendalia and Mia Turner, Mark Capron Jr., Aaron,Brianna, Blair Lamm,
Deanzmine, Philycity, Trenyce, Deiontae, Deivonta and Kaysar Rolle,
Ryan and Tatianna Coakley, Dervin Weech, Racine, Barry Jr. and Ramon
Stuart, Aaron, Antonique Lightbourne and Ashley Burrows; nephews,
Cedric Pratt, James Knowles, Bradley, Ithel, Delvin, Frank, Alfred,
Theophilus, Ellis, Falcon, Alonzo, Edward and Reverend Joseph Knowles,
Reverend Oscar Moss, Leon, Franklyn and Cedric Moss, Sargeant Andrew
Rolle, ASP Kevin Rolle, Blaise, Peter and Keith Rolle; nieces, Linda
Williams, Hazel Rolle, Rosemarie Knowles, Judith McEwen, Vernice
Knowles, Ingrid Higgs, Eulease and Mary Knowles, Beatrice Davis,
Willamae Sands, Crebla Kelly, Reverend Helen Rahming, Dorothy
Springer, Emerald Rolle, Nurse Bridgette Cash, Remilda Rolle, Patricia
Gibson, Rosetta Haven, Judy, Barbara, Margaret and Patrice Roberts;
other relatives and friends including, The Sunshine Prayer Band,
Llonella Cooper, Evelyn Rolle, Vera Cartwright and family, Sister Olive
Deleveaux and family, Tina Hamilton, Kirkwood Rolle, Charles McKinney,
George McPhee, Milton and Mary Saunders, Dorothy and Malvese
Knowles, Tony Capron, Sidney Kemp, Brenda Stevenson and family,
Alma Mills of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Gwendolyn Hall, Keith Coakley
and family, Susan Forbes and family, Debbie Adderley, Preston and
Cheryl Rolle, Clyde and Murie Seymour and family, Bishop Harcourt
and Sister Hazel Pinder, Harry and Monica Dean and family, Naomi
Knowles of Simms, Long Island, Julius Marshall and family, Greg Bullard
and family, Pat and Ann Kelly and family, Andrew Murray and family,
Johnson Alley family, Guinep Street family, Apostle Mitchel E. and Lady
Jones, The Annex Church family, numerous grand nephews and grand
nieces and many other friends too numerous to mention; special thanks,
Dr. Cyprian Strachan and Staff of Javon Medical Centre, Princess Margaret
Hospital Female Medical I I, Dr. Smith and Dr. Sanjay, Nurse Forbes,
Christie, Josey, McKenzie and Perez.
'
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday at the church
from 9:00 a.m. until service time.


-,- iV;g


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 15


~elrnwritte J nm
BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET P.O. BOX GT-2097 TEL: 323-5782

FU A S


LIOUISE BRANHILDA
STUBBS, 89


a. resident of John Road, and
formerly of Mastic Point, Andros,
". will be held at The New Bethlehem
Baptist Church, Independence
Drive, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m.
SOfficiating will be Rev. Dr.
Everette Brown, Min. Toriano
Lloyd, Rev. Joseph Saunders,
Elder Yvonne Deveaux and Pastor Arlington Moss. Interment
follows in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

Remembering Louise Branhilda Stubbs are her five children,
Stephen and Carl Stubbs, Elder Cora McPhee, Mrs. Julia
Anderson and Mrs. Keva Harris of Albany, Georgia; 25
grandchildren, Min. Christine Johnson, Therese Bullard,
Antionette Bellman, Rev. Sterling McPhee, Dwayne, Lavonne,
Fredricka and Fredrick McPhee Jr., Carlene Woods, Julian
Anderson Rolle, Karl Anderson, Kandi Cash, Shanna Martin,
Stephanie Cox, Sherice Hudson, Michael and Patrick Stubbs,
Carla Keron and Kyle Stubbs, Devin Harriss, June Burrows,
Belinda Hanna, Kevin Russell and Lester Simmons; 44 great
grandchildren, Chrystal McPhee, Huden Jr., and Christian
Johnson, Lavardo and Lateia Bullard, Angelica, Abigail, Artel
and Anton Bellman, Shalom, Charo and Charris McPhee,
Giovante Tomlins, Dorin, Deora and Djae Woods, Anthony
and Lyric Anderson, Candyclyn Rigby, Carrin Anderson
Rolle, Ametri, Tehryn and Atreo Cash, Deshannon, Dangle,
Danielle Martin, Lashea Basden, Latravia Kelly, Donavon,
Lanae Cox, Durran, Kellise, Donnaleigha, Stai, Sidney
Hudson, Mia Stubbs, Carla, Shan, Shantel, Carrol, Calvin
Burrows, Kristin, Tache, and Christopher Hanna; her two
sons-in-law, Michael Harriss of Albany, Georgia and Fredrick
McPhee; her two daughters-in-law, Miriam and Rosamund
Stubbs; her niece, Mrs. Lorraine Knowles; cousins, Eva and
Chrystal Glinton; other relatives and friends including, the
John Road community, members of the Strachan, Campbell,
Tinker, Dean and Smith families, Gloria Laing, Nelson Lord.
Carnie Cooper and family, Telcine Turner Rolle and family;
Carnetta Seymour and family, and relatives throughout the
USA.


Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday
and on Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service


"'i


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


time.


LORETTA JULIA
GARDINER, 91

S a resident of Rupert Dean Lane and
formerly of The Cove, Cat Island,
S will be held at Apostles Of The
Endtime Church, West and
Ferguson Streets, on Saturday at
S- 10:00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev.
S Charles Wallace. Interment follows
in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier
Road.

Left to cherish her memory are her 16 grandchildren,
Cleveland, Larry, Reginald, John, Wendell, Spencer and
Kemmitte Bonaby, Samuel and George Cartwright, Ms. Agnes
Bonaby of Miami, Fla., Mrs. Natasha Smith, Ms. Wendy
Bonaby, Mrs. Barbara Hunt, Mrs. Cheryl Loach Dottin, Mrs.
Christine Cartwright and McQuella Cartwright; 28 great
grand children, Antonia, Tamara, Margo, Tessa, Kesna,
Lacara, DeEdra, Eddira, Andrea, Abigale, Latoiya, Sharia,
Mellissa, Crystal, Anahja, Tia, Regina, Lamont, Gerard, Mark,
Glenwood, George, Ivano, Larrenzo, Edney Jr., John, Brandon,
Mekhi; 19 great great grandchildren; 5 nephews, Rubert
Ramsey of Delray Beach, Florida, Herman Ransey of Goulds,
Florida, Danny, Rudon and Fred Ramsey of Delray Beach,
Fa; 2 nieces, Loretta Ramsey of Gould, Florida and Lanora
Ramsey of Miami, Fla; 1 son-in-law, Wendall Bonaby of
Freeport, Grand Bahama; 4 grand daughters-in-law, Mrs.
Muretta Bonaby, Mrs. Bridgette Bonaby, Mrs. Janine Bonaby
and Mrs. Dorris Bonaby; 6 grandsons-in-law, Anthony
Thompson, Edney Gibson, George Hunt, Steven Ash, Hugh
Dottin and Marvin Smith; a host of other relatives and
friends including, Basil, James Lightbourne, Kelly and
family, Dorothy Roberts and family, Mino and family, Howard
Sweeting J.P., Bro. Roy Hepburn and family, Mrs. Florence
Morley and family, Mrs. Princess Turner and family of Miami,
Fla., Barbara Knowles, Arnette, Agnes Francis and family,
Pastor Wallace and family and the entire community of Bain
Town.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday
and on Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service
time.






THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


enteriffte' Jfunteral BImw
BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET P.O. BOX GT-2097 TEL: 323-5782


MRS. MAUD JANE
MOXEY, 81

a resident of The Persis Rodgers
Home, and formerly of Deep
Creek, Eleuthera, will be held
at Rhodes Memorial Methodist
Church, Montrose Ave. on
Friday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating
will be Bishop Dr. Raymond R.
Neilly, Rev. Emily A. Demeritte
and other ministers of the gospel.


Cremation follows.


Left to mourn Maude's passing are Jewel Cartwright and her
children, Crystal, Corsette and Philmon, Persis Rodgers and
the family of the Persis Rodgers Home for the Aged, Rev.
Dr. Raymond Neilly and the Family of Rhodes Memorial
Methodist Church, Miss Carmeta Stuart and the adopted
friends of ACW Holy Trinity Anglican Church, Corine
Mackey, Thelma Clarke, The Fowler Street family and
Numerous Other Friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 1:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Thursday
and on Friday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service
time.


ONEIL
"Sly"
VALENTINO OJAY
ROACH, 23


Eleuthera, will be held at
-- Wesley Methodist Church.
S James Cistern Eleuthera, on
Saturday at 11 :00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev. Godfrey
Bethel. Interment follows in
James Cistern Public Cemetery.


Left to cherish his memory and untimely passing are his wife,
Vonia Roach; his son, Ojay Roach; stepchildren, Valencia,
Lashan and Omar; his mother, Ruby Thompson; step-father,
John Thompson; brothers, Shayne and John Thompson Jr.,
Shachan, Jhohann Rahming; sisters, Sheena Thompson and
Esther Rahming; aunts, Martha Bethel, Grace Johnson,
Rosemary, Dorothy, Fredrica, Debra Johnson, Betty Rolle,
Aunty Laura, Denise Knowles, Crystal, Carla, Katie Roach,
Giear Rodgers, Angie Hinsey, Lora Roach, Jennifer Roach,
Gelitha Ferguson, Stephanie Culmer, Sherry Morris, Edna
Hanna, Paulette, Veronica, Constance, Melanique Rahming,
Rhonda Rolle, Maisie Pinder, Donna Davis, Yvette Carey,
Betsy Thompson, Pastor Clarice Thompson; uncles, Claudius,
Israel, Thomas and Isaac Johnson, Raymond Rolle, Dicey
Sands, Brian Bethel, Mark Hinsey, Wayne Roach, Bernard
Rodgers, Pastor Orlando Thompson, Byron Rolle, Darryl
Davis, Pat, Newton, William, Jeptah and Absolom Rahming,
Leonard Culmer, Benjamin Ferguson, Cederick Hanna, Allen
Carey, and Dorian Roach; mother-in-law, Jamima Johnson;
brothers-in-law, Dealo Johnson, James Bethel, Brad, Barry,
Roderick, Carlton, Bruce, Dave Steven; sisters-in-law,
Rowena McClain, Agnes Knowles, Maude, Allyson, Crawley,
Kimberly Johnson; grandmothers, Frances Rahming, Kathy
Roach, Eloise Davis, Rosemary Thompson; great grand-
mother, Lovitte Johnson; grandfathers, Eugene Rahming,
Osmond Roach, Garnet Thompson; grand aunts, Pasty Roker,
Lucinda Davis, Meryl Dowes, Virginia Morris, Louise Adderly,
Beverly, Jenny Davis and Freda Mayne; grand uncles,
Theolphilus Davis and Hubert Roker; Niece: Shawnae Bethel;
nephews, Jyohann Rahming Jr., Raymond Rolle Jr., Shachan
Rahming Jr., and Traveno Miller; god-fathers, Harry Brown
and Johnny Burrows; god-mothers, Paulette Smiley, Lenny,
Jackie Cooper; other friends and relative too numerous to
mention including, Chantel Fowler, Valerie Barr, Local
Government Staff of James Cistern, the Officers and members
of Wesley Methodist Church and Global Outreach Ministries,
Nurse Bernadette Colebrook, nurses from Alice Town Clinic,
Princess Margaret Hospital (I.C.U.), Vernita Bethel, Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Johnson and the entire community of James'
Cistern.


Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 4:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.on Thursday
and on Friday at the church in Eleuthera from 6:00 p.m. until
service time on Saturday.


i~--- -----~ 3- .. ICP~LYII~LI~d--I .C- --


`"'~""'"'


..,.,,.,,,..,..,., ...,~,..~.,.,. ~.,-~,..~ ~~,i... ~ ..~1.1,. I










aienweritte's ;uneral TPmw
BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET P.O. BOX GT-2097 TEL: 323-5782


MR JAMES
KING, 58

a resident of McQuay Street, will be held at Bethel
Baptist Church, Meeting Street, on Friday at 10:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev. Melvin Grant, and Pastor Javon
Neely. Interment follows in Southern Cemetey, Cowpen
and Spikenard Roads.

Left to cherish his memory are his parents, Mrs. Helen
McQuay Demeritte and Roland Demeritte; wife,
Deaconess Marsha Cooper King; sons, Kenneth, Jamie,
Abdule, Javier and Akeem King and Alexander Strachan;
daughters, Karen, Candice, Naballieu King and Sh'neka
McKay; grand-daughters, Kellian and Krystal Kelly;
grand sons, Kenneth Jr. and Kaiden King; sisters,
Agnes Walkine, Relinda Arnett, Augusta Demeritte
Taylor, Barbara, Joan and DeAnn Demeritte; brothers,
Edwin, Leo, Christopher and Albert Demeritte; sisters-
in-law, Caroline Demeritte, Gerthalene Edgecombe,
Janet Dean, Seanalea Lewis, Vendale Brown and
Shyvonne Cooper; brothers-in-law, Dwayne Walkine,
Norris Arett, Limas Taylor, James Cooper, Wellington


and Shane Dean; aunts, Carrier Cooper and Susan
Freeman of Miami Florida; nephews, Brian Maycock,
Jamel and Levon Arnett, Darwin, Darron and Rajaukai
Demeritte and Ronaldo Taylor; nieces, Annastacia,
Monique and Dwynette Walkine, Norisha and Lynishka
Arnett, Rolanda Taylor and Jadon Demeritte; grand
nieces, Nore and Jalyn Amett; cousins, Morris, Vealthia,
Annalee, Therese, Dave, Pauline, Janet, Latoya, Morrisa,
DiAnn, Alicia, Kashala, James, Melissa, Danielle,
Avania, Amanda, Emmanuel, Christian, Gekeria,
Gregory, Terrance, Dave Jr., Shanique, Jamie, Brandon,
Theophanis, Dominique, Antonique, Stephan, Latori,
Laquan, Vashtia and Latallia; other relatives and
friends, Charlene Newbold and family, Victoria
Thompson and family, Margaret Lyons and family,
Doris, George, and Claudius Gaitor and family, Flora
Seymour and family, Albertha Collie, Curlean, Vince,
Eddie, Beverley and Louis McQuay, Vangy Storr and
family, Dianne and Leslie Lightfoot and family, Keith
Archer, Ray Scavella, Edison Armbrister and family,
Reggie Sweeting and family, Deborah Longley and
family, Charles Grant and family, Mena and Ethel Grant,
Vernon Grant, Gomez family, Basil Huyler and family,
Ken Huyler and family, Anthony 'Poker' Huyler, Francis
Clarke, Philip and Vincent Simms and family, Tony
Roberts, Irene Smith and family, Jennings family, Virgill
'Duckie' Dean and family, Mickey Brooks, Ervis Rolle
and family, Dianna Thompson and family (Wendy, Joy,
Jackie, Margaret, Sylvia), Freddie Kemp, Mark Bowe,
Ann Simmons, Gregory "Rat" Taylor, Clyde Seymour
and family, Patsy Taylor and family, Fred, 'Chicken'
Taylor and family, Jessie Taylor and family, Charles
Gibson, Leanna Simms and family, Frankie Smith,
Eddie T, and all of the Harlem, Nassau and South Street
Crew.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on
Friday and on Friday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until
service time.


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


. .
: M -1. i






THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


SBethel Brothers Morticians

1-1C/ Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030

Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026


Thomas "Uncle Movey"
Wilmore Sweeting, 74
of A/E Comfort Home, Bread Fruit
Street, Pinewood Gardens andformerly
of Gregory Town, Eleuthera will be held
on Saturday 10:00 a.m. at Bethel Baptist
Church, Meeting Street. Pastor Timothy
Stuart will officiate. Internment will be
made in Woodlawn Memorial Gardens,
Soldier Road.
Left to mourn is daughters, Leander
Maycock and Miriam Ferguson; sons,
Robert and Kirkwood Sweeting;
stepson, Derek Carter; grandchildren,
Anita Maycock Moss, Craig Maycock,
Eleanor Maycock Wallace, Annamae
and Wesley Maycock, Theron Thompson,
Remon Narin, Quinton and DC Fergurson, Robert, Roberta and Wilmore
Sweeting, Kirkwood Jr., Kershia and Kerkston Sweeting; great-
grandchildren, Hollis Jr. Sean Jr., Denton, Deonte, Courtney, Craig
Jr., Janae, Juliann, Tyiece, Talisha, Alaiyah, Terenique; son-in-law,
Quebell Ferguson;daughter-in-law, Wendy Sweeting; sister-in-laws,
Clara Wallace, Yvonne Munroe, Claudine Joffre, Marion and Eunice
Sweeting; brother-in-laws, Edwin, Roscoe and Christopher Wallace,
Edward Munroe and Cyril Joffre; nieces, Antionette, Myrtle, Arlene,
Willamae, Bertha, Jan, Muriel and Wealthy; nephews, Teddy, Ossie,
Leon, Max, Robert, Howard, Adrain, John, Paul, Alex, Nebert, Solomon,
Simon Randy and Limbert, 37 grand nieces, 54 grand nephews;
other relatives and friends including, Mary Sweeting, Mavis Johnson,
Leonard Major, Willie Maurice, Anthony Dean, Basil LaRoda, Viola
Johnson, Dennis and Eulene Johnson, A and A Comfort Care Nursing
Home family, Michelle Brennen and family, Ethel Lewis and family,
Samuel Rahming and family, Reverend Elijah Ferguson and family,
Marjorie Rahming and family, The Bethel Baptist Church family, St.
Margaret Pastoral Care family, Pastor Dawkins and church family, The
entire Gregory Town, Eleuthera community, The Ragged Island
community and the Nurses and Doctors of Male Medical I and Tia's
Barber Shop.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, # 44
Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday
at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

Millicent Alicia Wilson-Johnson, 8

of Faith Ave., North of Carmichael Road will be held on Saturday
10:00 a.m. at St. Barnabas Anglican Church, Wulff and Baillou Hill
Road. Canon Basil Tynes assisted by other ministers of the gospel will
officiate. Internment will be made in the Church's Cemetery.


Left with cherished memory that will
linger in our hearts, are her four sons,
Ersley, Victor Jr., Roderick, and
Barrington Johnson; six daughters,
I Rosalie Prescola McPhee, Ernestine
Dean, Andrea Johnson, Hyacinth Russell,
Vincola Henfield, and Natasha Johnson;
one step daughter, Betty Hepburn; two
brothers, Thaddeus and Donald Wilson;
,f three sisters, Eloise Wilson, Sister
Vernice Wilson of Saint Martin's
Convent, and Hilda Joseph; four
daughters-in-law, Arlene Wilson,
Claudell, Marilyn and Susan Johnson;
three sons-in-law, Olander McPhee,
Roscoe Russell, and Jay Henfield; one step son-in-law, Ralph Hepburn
Sr.; three sisters-in-law, Eldica, Rosemary, and Viola Wilson; one
brother-in-law, Ersley Johnson Sr. of Haines City Florida; twelve
nephews, Tyrone, Gary, Sidney Sawyer, Cedric, Austin, Vinick and
Sidney Wilson Jr., Cornelius Clyde, Paul Major, Leroy Davis, Ersley
Jr., Victor Jr., and Kenneth Johnson, of Haines City Florida, Henry
Williams; sixteen nieces, Bettymae Bain, Louise Rigby, Albertha
Archer, Deloris Clarke, Sharon Clyde, Darnell Adderley, Altima Johnson,
Yvonne Bootle, Deidre Young, Vanessa Johnson, Donnarose Haley,
Dawn and Mahalia Wilson, Carolyn, Joyce and Janet of Haines City
Florida; twenty eight grandchildren, Constantine McPhee, Yolanda
Rolle, Hessica Ingraham, Ersley Johnson Jr., Rochelle Knowles, Tiffany
Johnson, Donnica McPhee, Erin and Eran Johnson, Pedro Stuart,
Zoie Wilson, Shancola Rolle, Tanya Martin, Abigail Whyms, Tonya
Johnson, Tetuan Johnson, Javon Wilson, Meredith Johnson, Deon Dean,
Jamere Wilson, Osvaldo Newbold, Rotisha Russell, Dishann Stubbs,
Javano Stubbs, Theo, Talnesya and Zakiya Johnson, and Jayvin Henfield;
five grand children-in-law, Shawn Rolle, Firstnell Rolle, Leslie
Ingraham, Dale. Knowles, and Graylin Martin; seven step
grandchildren, Bernadette, Christine, Judy, Antoinette, Theresa, Philip
and Ralph Jr.; twenty two great grand children, a host of other
relatives and friends including, Courtney Stubbs, Shari Marshall,
Alice Bastian, Dorothea Farnngton, Paulette Turnquest and family,
Caretakers Almarie, and Michelle, Elenore Smith, Larry Rahming,
Sean Bain, Tia Wilson, Mr. Williams and family, Ms Smith and family,
Sherrie and family, Claudine Mortimer, Marsha Murray, The Gaitor
family, Oswald Dean and family, Joyclen Owens, Rosetta Taylor, Judy
Barnwell, H.E. Sir Arlington Butler and Lady Butler, Basil Johnson
and family Ruthy Wolff, Lenora Forbes and The Ross Corner family,
Andrea Mitchell, Ms. Mcintosh, Sis Sands, Sis Miller, Carmetta Walks,
Franklyn Wilson, Dr. Dwayne Sands, Dr. Davis and the Surgical Team
D, Princess Margaret Hospital, Joseph Rolle, Darnell and Monty Ward,
Mr. and Mrs. Maureen Duvalier

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, # 44
Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday
at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.














1 Bethel Brothers Morticians

*Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026


Mother Francita Moss-Rahming, 74
of Geranium Avenue, Garden Hills Estate
.andformerly of Lovely Bay, Acklins will be
held on Saturday 11 :00 a.m. at the Church
S' "" of God Auditorium, Joe Farrington Road.
Pastor Franklin C. Lightbourne assisted by
Elder Edgburt Tinker, Elder Godfrey Rahming
and other ministers of the Gospel will
officiate. Internment will be made in
Lakeview Memorial Gardens. J.F.K. Drive.
Left to continue the legacy and fond memory
are her loving husband of 50 years, Apostle
Amos Rahming; five children, Godfrey
Rahming, Princess Tinker, Prisca Burrows,
Joycelyn Wilmore, and Glenda Nairn; three
adopted daughters, Nelrose Frazer,
Rosemary Smith and Claudette Strachan;
twenty-six grandchildren, Nadia, Carla,
Candise, Nicole, Rashad, Rosario, Danario, Khadijah, Terrence, Kendrick,
Thereze, Treva, Anton, Tervallis, Edgburt, Victoria, Karen, Kenneth Jr., Kristin,
Katrell, Kru'en, Anthony, Jamaal, Javon, Jeremy, and Deandrea; four great
grandchildren, Laa'maj, Cailyn, Ashton and De'ja; two sons-in-law, Edgburt
Tinker, Crosby Wilmore; one daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Rahming; four
sisters-in-law, Susan Fife, Renabelle, Annabelle, Evelyn Rahming; twenty-
four nieces, Hilda, Sylvia, Edna, Iva, Francis, Nathalie, Anne, Joanne, Margaret,
Carolyn, Judy, Brenda, Barbara, Grace, Viola, Donnett, Rosemary, Tanya,
Dianne, Sherell, Elizabeth, Margo, Monique, and Leah; fourteen nephews,
Joel and Hubert Moss, Robert, Randolph, Elisha, and Joshua Beneby, Vincent,
David, Raymond, Ricardo, Huel, Apostle Leroy Jones, Harvey Emmanuel,
and Errol Johnson, Edward and Sherman Buchannan, fifty-seven grandnieces,
fifty grandnephews, numerous relatives and friends including, Pastor
Franklyn Lighthbourne and the family of Revival Faith Mission Church
especially Evangelist Hyancinth Lightbourne, Rev. Kenneth Burrows, Apostle
J.B. Sands and family, Bishop Stanley Seymour and family, Hubert Moss and
family, Barret Mcdonald and family, Apostle and Mother McGowan of
Seagoville, Texas, Pastor Rolf and family of Houston, Texas, Bishop Henry
Wright and family of Coopers Town, Abaco, Mother Steven and family of Ft.
Pierce, Rorida, Apostle Marvin Smith of West Palm Beach, Florida, Pastor
Norwood Rahming and family, Apostle Leon Burrows, Glenn Ferguson and
family, Uncle Oral and Uncle Carl Rahming and family, James Moss and
family, Alruda Moss and family, Eunice Deveaux and family, Elder Wilson
and family, Lionel Gilbert and family, Freddie Rahming, Aunt Alanna and
family, Aunt Girdie and family, Charles Rogers and family, Elder Bursil Rolle
and family, Bishop Curry of Opalocka, Florida, Minister Verona Seymour,
Apostle Etienne and family, Bishop Simeon Wallace and family of Church of
the Lord Jesus Temple, Ella Collie and family, Sister Vemice Bain and family,
Pastor Lockwood Deleveaux, Keith Hall, Mother Keva Rolle and family, Ella
Coleby and family, Apostle Duncombe and family, Bishop Archer and family
of Ft. Pierce, M.R.F family, E.PC family, Shield of Faith, Lighthouse Apostolic
Ministries, Sheva Farrington and family, James Bodie and family, Ashton
Roache, George Brown, Conroy Smith, Communities of Lovely Bay Acklins
and Garden Hills #3 and a host of other relatives and friends too numerous to
mention. May her soul rest in Peace.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians. # 44 Nassau
Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church
from 10:00 a.m. until service time.


Alfred McGregor Lewis, 59
/\ of Millennium Gardens will be held on
Saturday 10:00 a.m. at Salem Union Baptist
Church, Taylor Street. The Rev. Dr. C. W.
Saunders assisted by other ministers of the
Gospel will officiate. Internment will be
made in Woodlawn Memorial Gardens,
Soldier Road.
S Cherished by his memory are his devoted
sisters, Joan and Lauriel Lewis and Othlease
Coleby; three (3) sisters-in-law, Edna
Lewis, Marion (Lee) Lewis and Maude
Lewis; nieces, Dezerine Schroeter and
family, Daphne Barr and family, Brenda
Lewis and family, Dorothy Roberts, Linda
.... ... Major, Patricia Thompson, Debbie Sands,
S / Rev. Roslyn Astwood, Marie Wilson, Cecile
Brown, Bernadette and Hazel Lewis, Ethlyn
Capelle, Janet Lewis, Dorothy Hanna, Carolyn Stillwell of Kendall, Florida,
Rosemary Dorsette of Ft. Lauderdale, Andrea Missick, Willdale Francis of
Virgina, Boby Jane Smith, Tetshua Wright, Jenniemae, Linda, Althes, Princess,
Pauls Adderley, Juankah Lewis, Sherry King, Keva Josey, Stacy Dean, Ella
Lewis, Chelsea Walker, Angela Lewis of Miami, Florida, Allison Lewis of
Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera, Lesley Lewis, Elsine Pickstock, Debbie Marion
and Sandra Lewis, Annamae Lewis of Miami, Florida, Particia Young of
Orlando, Florida; nephews, Rendal, Dwight, Lennox, Elcott and Dennis Colbey,
Seanray Jennings, Jason Saunders, Gregory Archer, Leonard Fergsuon, Kenneth,
Michael and Erick Lewis, Edmund, Samuel, Roderick, Dudley, Tony, Wellington,
Brian and James Lewis, Bishop Tyrone Jones, David Jones, Barzeal Jones,
Byron, Norman and Virdon Burnett (USA), Samuel and Tommy Lewis of
Miami, Florida, Rev. Terrance G. Morrinson, Aunts, Hazel and Leanna
Edgecombe, Leah Wiiliams of San Salvador, Lillian Humes and Estella Smith;
numerous grand nieces and nephews, W/Assistant Superintendent Elaine
Sands, W/Sag. 1872 Deidre Ferguson, PC 799 Leslie Lewis, PC 2927 Edmund
Lewis Jr., Raina Hanna, Donna, Sharon, Lyn and Derry Lewis; other relatives
and friends including, Roselie Neymour, Junita, Mary, Delerese, Celena, Iris,
Walter, Steve, Joseph and Aron Neymour, Teria Bowe, Mildred McNeil, Helena
Humes, Marsha Young. Rev. Urban L. Knowles and family of Long Island,
The doctors and nurses of the Eye Wing (P.M. H.) Dr. Valentine Grimes and
Team, Rev. Dr. C. W. Saunders, Rev. Cedric Farquharson, Rev. Adam Brown,
Deacon Lawrence Butler, Deacon Richard Clarke, Deacon Roger Demeritte,
Deacon Simeon McPhee, Ella Johnson and family, Anthony Butterfield and
family, Simeon Thurston, Raymond and Linda Rolle, Carla Smith and family,
Alberta Bullard and family, Sis. Vera Roile and family, Sis. Vernie Rolle, Sis.
Dorothy Laing, Mr. Gary Bethel, Ruth Ferguson and family, the Kerr family,
Dr. Percival McNeil and family, Shelly Lewis, Janice Lewis Brooks, The
Edgecombe family, the Jones family, Deacon Thomas Cooper, Renold and
Laurette Souffrant and family, Paul Murray and family, Ella Roile and family,
Mrs. Delores Jones, Sharon Burnett, Pamela Deveaux, Keith Fernander, Velma
Burrows, Cynthia Bastian, the Salem Union Baptist Church family and the
Bahamas Baptist Union of Churches.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, # 44 Nassau
Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church
from 9:00 a.m. until service time.


I


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2r-08 PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES






PG20* husdyFerur 2, 00 RLIIO Tibn


NEWBOLD BROTHERS

CHAPEL
#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street
P.O. Box N-3572
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 326-5773

FUNERALSERVICE7


CHARLES LEROY
RAHMING, 50

of Bernard Road, Fox Hill,
will be held on Saturday,
March 01st, 2008 at 10:00
a.m., at Mount Carey Union
Baptist Church, Fox Hill
Road. Officiating will be Rev.
Warren Anderson. Interment
follows in the Fox Hill
Cemetery, Fox Hili.


He is survived by three
sisters, Thoy Rahming-Strachan, Deborah Rahming-
Fernander and Rochelle Fletcher of North Carolina; one
adopted sister, Michelle Wells; eight brothers, ESP
Richard Rahming, Agustus, Clyde, Theodore; Sid, Cy,
Corporal Nelson and Clay Rahming; one adopted brother,
Glen Burnside; twenty nieces, seventeen nephews; eight
grandnieces, six grandpephews; brothers-in-law, Billy
Fletcher of North Carolina, and Timothy Ferander; sisters-
in-law, Elder Helen Rahming, Mary Rahming and Michelle
Rahming; one adopted brother-in-law, George Wells;
one adopted sister-in-law, Diane Burnside; aunts, Maria
Knowles, Agnes Rahming, Marillita Butler, Arnette
Rahming and Faye Knowles; uncles, Dr. Frank L
Edgecombe, Oswald Knowles and Jimmy Butler; other
relatives and friends including, Peggy Coakley and
family, Don Cornell, Nita and Netta of Sarasota, Rev.
Rosita Young and Kathryn Cash of Arizona, Rose Gibson
and family, Peter Rolle and family, William Rahming,
Lynette Rahming, Sylvia Edgecombe, Sharon Ferguson
and family, Jenny Rolle and family, Daphne Smith and
family, Deanne Smith and family, Cedric Moss, The
Management and Staff of Excelsior Printing Press Ltd.,
the entire Fox Hill Community and a host of other relatives
and friends.

Relatives and friends may sign the memorial book at
Newbold Brothers Chapel, Palmetto Avenue & Acklins
Street off Market and East Streets, on Friday from 10:00
a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m.,
until service time.


OPERATION FISH-A-MEN
Grace Community Church's
22ND ANNUAL GLOBAL
MISSIONS CONFERENCE

March 1 9, 2008
Guest Speakers:
Dr. Larry Moyer, President Evantell
Dallas, Texas, USA
Pastor Wilney Joseph, Haiti
Richard Albury, Camp Bahamas, Eleuthera


Dr. Larry Moyer, President Evantell


OPERATION FISH-A-MEN TRAINING SEMINARS


Sunday, March 2,9:30 a.m.-What's So Scary About Evangelism -
And How Do You Overcome Those Fears?
Monday, March 3,7:30 pm-What Kind Of Person Do You Need To
Be To Lead People To Jesus Christ?
Tuesday, March 4,7:30 pm-Three Essentials In Your Relationship
With Lost People
Sunday, March 9,11:00 a.m-Grace's 3 Summer Outreaches to
SCamp Bahamas, -Eleuthera Port-de-Paix, Haiti YWAM Tyler, TX

GU 19 Grace Ave, Palmetto Village, Nassau, 394.7223, gracebahamas@yahoo.com


__


.. .. .. .....


The Tribune


PG 20 Thursday, February 28, 2008


RELIGION







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The Tribune


A


God of Love


* By REVEREND JAMES MOULTRIE

Text: John 3:16-17

THERE is a lady who sits at various points
along Village Road with a sign which quotes
one verse of holy scripture. She faithfully sits
there day after day proclaiming her message in
complete silence. She is not belligerent like
some over-zealous born again people, and
does not force her ideas of salvation on any-
one. Her message is simply displayed for all to
see. Each time my eyes encounter her I think:
What great faith!
There is an attendant at the gas station
where we have our account who religiously
writes John 3:16 on our charge receipt. He is a
simple gentleman who promotes God in this
small way. Each time I receive a blessing at his
hands I think: what simple, yet great faith!,
They remind me of the message that is often
displayed at major sporting events on televi-
sion such as the World Series, the NFL cham-
pionship game or a major game in the NCAA.
In the midst of all that is going on in and
around the game someone holds up a poster
with John 3:16 on it. It is a message to all who
view it and each time I see it I think what a
powerful message to the whole world! What
great faith!
The message today is the same: John 3:16-
17. It speaks powerfully of the love of God for
humankind. Our world is so cynical that we all
look for some general creedal certainty and a
rational basis for the hope we have in JC.
There is even an insistent demand, though qui-
etly held, for empirical proof that "God so
loved the world..."
In our crime-ridden world and in the
unnerving present mood of our nation, not
many fervently appear to believe that God has
demonstrated his love for us, "in that while we
were yet sinners, Christ died for us" (Romans
5:8). We want proof. So did Nicodemus. Fut
unlike us, he had the good sense to go to Jesus
for answers. We look to the world for proof
which the world cannot give!
But the question is why do we not see the
logic in life? Nicodemus could not see the
logic either, hence the long discourse with
Jesus until he understood. We fervently
believe that if God is a God of love He would
not inflict pain on us. If God so loved the
world why do we have illness, hunger, disease,
death and wars?
But what we do not seem to appreciate is
that without pain we would not appreciate
pleasure; without sorrow we would not appre-
ciate joy; without despair, we would not appre-
ciate hope; without darkness, we would not
appreciate light; without error, we would not
appreciate truth; without hate, we would not
appreciate love; without temporal life we
would not appreciate eternal life.
The contrasting dualities balance each other:
man and woman, earth and sky, day and night,
time and eternity, here and hereafter. God has
never given a hunger without providing a cor-
responding satisfaction. Our very thirst for
water tells us that there are cooling springs
somewhere. The psalmist tells us this in Psalm
42:1... As the deer panteth after the water


brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, 0 Lord.
We are not the only ones wanting proof. It is
human to want proof in matters of faith and
belief.
The devil in the wilderness wanted proof
that Jesus was who He said he was: If you be
the Son of God, command that these stones be
l-ade bread. (Matthew 4:3)
Thomas wanted proof in the upper room:
Unless I see in His hands the print of the nails,
and put my finger into the print of the nails,
and thrust my hand into his side, I will not
believe. (John 20:25)
John the Baptist wanted proof: Are you
the one who is to come? Or would we look for
another? (Luke 7:20; Matt. 11:3) Jesus told
John's disciples to go back and tell him what
they have seen and heard: the blind see, the
lame have thrown their crutches away! Tell
him the lepers are cleansed, the deaf hear and
even the dead are raised. (Luke 19:40).
The couple under the canopy of the moonlit
skies wants proof of love. No matter the size
or attraction of our cards on Valentine Day,
our significant others want to hear the magical
words: I love you. And we cannot just say it
with cards or flowers, although there is an
unspoken competition in most of the offices of
our country to see which lady will receive the
largest and most beautiful floral arrangement!
Many children today in the homes of our
nation want positive proof of parental love.
Our world today is proof positive that our chil-
dren are yearning for parental love, bearing in
mind that parental love comes closest to God's
love. It's okay to want proof.


* By REVEREND JAMES MOULTRIE
. THE first proof of God's love that I offer is the manger.
On that cold, damp night in Bethlehem, love came down to
earth. God became flesh in Jesus Christ in what we call, the-
ologically, the incarnation. In that miracle of birth, God
demonstrated His love for us in that He sent His only son as
our saviour. In Jesus we see His two natures, human and
divine, combined. To prove that he was human He was born
of a woman. To prove that He was divine, He was born of a
virgin. In that manger scene we experience God's amazing
love and grace up close and that love continues to keep us
close to Him,

The second proof I offer you this Lent of God's ultimate
love is the cross.
The cross is a bloody romance between hearth and heav-
en!
The cross is the human mirror of God's divine love.
The cross is heaven's medicine for earth's chronic sick-
ness.
The cross is heaven's remedy and pardon for earth's con-
fusion and sin.
The cross is heaven's absolution for earth's guilt.
The cross is heaven's joy for earth's sorrow.
The cross is heaven's hope for earth's despair.
The cross is heaven's triumph for earth's disaster.
But the cross is not the ultimate reality. The cross is but
an historic symbol of God's eternal involvement in the sins
and griefs of man. The cross was Jesus' throne and from it
he dispensed love and mercy, not judgment. That is why we
can rely on the comforting words of John 3:17... "For God
sent not His Son..."

The third proof of God's love that I offer is the resur-
rection of Jesus that first Easter morning. But the empty
tomb is not the reality. The reality is the power of God that
makes the empty tomb possible. The reality is the power of
God that took the sting out of death and robbed the grave
of its victory. As St Paul said, O death, where is your sting?
Where is your victory? The sting of death is sin, and the
power of sin is the law. But thanks be to God, who gives the
victory in Jesus Christ our Lord. (I Corinthians 15:55-57)

The tomb is a joyous and triumphant sequel to the
prophetic juxtaposition of the manger and the cross. The
resurrection is the powerful connection between sin and
forgiveness which the love of God offers to all of us. St Paul
puts it this way in I Cor 15:12-14,
Now if Christ is proclaimed as raised from the dead, how
can some of you say there is no resurrection of the dead? If
there is no resurrection of the dead, then Christ has not been
raised; and if Christ has not been raised, then our proclama-
tion is in vain and your faith has been in vain.
Do you need further proof of the matchless love of God?
The manger, the cross, and the empty tomb collaborate to
affirm and authenticate the words of John 3:16-17. Jesus is
the only begotten son who most concretely and personally
expresses God's love for a lost and sinful world. "God so
loved the world..." What a powerful statement! But John
3:17 is equally as powerful and reassuring, "For God...."'
God is a God of love. That is something tremendously
important to know about God. God loves us. not because
we are good, but because He is good.
Our very existence is a sign of God's love. God's uncondi-
tional love for us is the good news of salvation. And our
response to that love can only be one of trust in God and
love towards one another. That is what St Paul meant when
he said to the Corinthians: Help one another. Be united: live
in peace, and the God of love and peace will be with you.
God so loved the world...!


G 2 0 husdaFeruay 8, 00 == l 19%K


~~-----








The Tribune


RELIOHON~


Thursday, February 28, 2008 PG 23


LET'S TALK: Steps to peace


* By REVEREND DEON SEYMOUR COX
Universal Truth Ministries

WE are always given the opportunity to take steps
towards peace. What appears as a challenge is an
opportunity to practice.
Mind is the common meeting ground between God
and man, and it is only through the most highly accel-
erated mind action, as in prayer, that we can con-
sciously create a union with God, the one and only
creator. Therefore prayer is the first step to peace.

What is prayer?
It is said that "prayer is the language of spirituality
and improves the quality of man's being". It is con-
scious affirmation of truth, a complete awareness of
the allness of spirit (omnipresence. omniscience.
omnipotence). Prayer makes man master in the
realm of creative ideas. The inner silence of prayer is
a great source of spiritual power. There is no excep-
tion to this rule. Be still, and know that I am God.

The living word of God, what is it?
The word is your realisation that you are child of
God, never alone and worthy of God's will and
absolute good. I believe to keep the word is to
revolve it in your mind, to go over it in all its aspects,
to believe in it as truth, to treasure it as a saving balm
in time of need, and above all, to obey the law it sets
forth.
The second step is to keep the word.
As you begin to keep your mind stayed on this
truth, it is in this inner realm you will find the spiritu-
al ethers heavily charged with ideas that turn to spir-


itual substance. As your consciousness (awareness)
expands, you touch the everlasting truths and you
find that every blessing is abundantly added. What
seems new is but the unveiling of that which has been
forever.
In the book, "Keep a True Lent", it is said that per-
sistent meditation on the truth contained in the word
of God opens the mind to a greater inflow of spirit.
All words then become quickening life and nourish-
ing substance in both mind and body. "Let the word
of Christ dwell in you richly."
Meditation is the third step.
Thinking truth zealously and affirming it audibly
will dissolve error in consciousness and at the same
time reveal greater spiritual illumination.


In this consciousness, appropriate words of truth,
you should "eat them," so to speak. Partake of that
with which you form the spiritual substance and
which will manifest itself in the Christ, or perfect
body. Let "Christ be formed in you."
Know that the holy spirit is filling your being with
its illuminating, resurrecting power and that the all-
knowing one shines in you as it did in Jesus and that
you manifest greater and greater spiritual under-
standing.
Knowing that all is well, no matter what appears, is
the final step.
When man praises the spirit of wisdom within he
expands and deepens and enriches his consciousness.
As the Christ radiance lights man's mind, he sees
with the inner eye and he finds that truth is a never-
failing light that makes for peace.
Peace is possible, because we can all think on truth.
(God's will for us is absolute good).
During this Lenten season let us hold fast to the
truth that passes all understanding. Let us have faith
that we build a platform each day as we remember
whose and what we are one with God. Until next
week...

Universal Truth Ministries for Better Living
Dewgard Shopping Plaza, Madeira St
PO Box SS-5391, Nassau Bahamas
Telephone 242.393.8460 or 242.328.0314
Sr Minister: Rev Deon Seymour-Cox
The Universal Truth Ministries is a Bible-based
ministry for thinkers. We are a teaching ministry and
we invite you to join us in our classes. Monday -
Thursday 7pm to 9pm.


No Good News


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON

IN a movie like "The Basketball
Diaries", where heartthrob Leonardo
DiCaprio is involved in a scene of
school yard mayhem and of slaying, or
the video games with which young peo-
ple become involved, not merely
watching as passive observers, but
involved in the destruction of others
along the way as they do in games like
Doom or Mortal Kombat, these are all
part and parcel of the jigsaw puzzle
which makes up the explanation for
the growing acts of violence, acts of
needless violence, and for others, acts
of imitative violence.
This is an issue which all of us as par-
ents are well aware of, one we have to
face from day to day. Whether it's in
terms of violence, whether it's in terms
of sexuality, whether it's in terms of
smoking or consumerism, we know
that there are people who are absolute-
ly skilled out there who use the media
to influence.
They are evangelists, not of good
news, but of bad news. They are deter-
mined to influence the lives of young
people and whether or not that is the
motive, they have the skills, they have


PART TWO

the tools within their hands to do pre-
cisely that and that's surely in part, at
least, what happened at C C Sweeting
last week. So that for some, while it
may be primarily a matter of growing
violence, for others of needless vio-
lence, this incident that happened, for
others is an act of imitative violence.
When I myself look at the situation,
I suppose I would have a great deal of
sympathy with every one of these
descriptions of what went on, although
I would add my two bits into the pic-
ture by saying what I see here is what I
would call an act of limitless violence.
An act of violence without limits, with-
out boundary, without control...
Which is precisely, is it not, where
the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ
comes into the picture or at least ought
to.
We may or may not be able to solve
all the problems of violence for all the
young people of our nation across the
board, although as parents, as citizens,
as concerned followers of Jesus Christ,
I've hinted at some areas that surely
demand our attention and they have to


do with the awareness of accessibility:
weapons, images, whatever they may
be, of destruction so easy to get and to
find in the hands of our young people.
Something surely can be done in that
area. Whatever is done, we may or may
not be able to solve all the problems
everywhere but we surely can act local-
ly. And we surely can, act within our
own church, with our own children and
with a commitment to an increasing
number of young people that should be
our deliberate goal, our deliberate aim
to reach out to and to touch with the
good news of the gospel of Jesus
Christ.
There is within our lives, within this
book, within our church, good news
which is a treasure, a treasure which
those of us who have been raised with
it all of our lives sometimes ignore and
which is surely the very word that the
disillusioned need. Whether it's others
or whether it's ours.
Disillusioned with ourselves? There
is a good word from God for you and
me. The good word from God starts
with realism. Sometimes young people
live in a world in which there is no real-
ism. That realism is that we are all sin-
ners. Every single one of us. There is a


standard of perfection which young
people strive for which sometimes
causes the most unbelievable frustra-
tion in their lives.
They see the perfect ones the ath-
letes, those who seem to have it all -
and they think they do have it all. But
the gospel tells us that no one has it all,
that we are all in the same boat as sin-
ners. But the gospel, the good news,
does not stop there. It tells us that God
loves "us sinners" as we are.
There is power in that statement. We
may need to rephrase it to see the
power within. God values us. God
treasures us as we are, and as they are,
whoever "they" may be.
God loves us enough to bear our
shouting at God just as the psalmists
shouted at God in the book of Psalms.
They take out their frustrations on
God, and express thoughts that we find
to be outrageous. But God says,
"Throw them onto me."
God loves us enough to come and
live within us. Did you hear that word
in the reading from I John? By God's
spirit, God wants to come and live
within us. That's how much God loves
us and treasures us. And young people
(older people too!) Need to know thiz








PG 24 Thursday, February 28, 2008


RELIGION


The Tribune


'We


all gat issues!'


* By PASTOR MATTHEW ALLEN

If we say that we have no sin, we
deceive ourselves, and the truth is not
in us.
I John 1:8

AS a nation, we've done a very
good job in hiding our religious
hypocrisy, and it's from this premise
that the enemy is having such a field
day in killing off and incarcerating
the Bahamian male seed.
There was a time in this country
when one heard of a murder being
committed and such news and events
would have left a taste of bitterness
in our mouths for years. A spirit of
shame and disgrace would come
upon the family of the persons
accused of committing any kind of
serious crime in this country, but sad
to say that this is not the case in the


land today.
What has happened to us? How is
it that we've become so desensitized
to sin that murders are being com-
mitted on our streets and in our
schools and we go about our business
as if everything is all right?
Throughout the length and
breadth of the Bahamas our young
men and women are.battling with
many issues. The worst part of their
struggle is that they don't have any
role models who are willing to be
genuinely transparent and can relate
to what they're going through.
Watch this! Here's how the majori-
ty of our young men and women who
feel disenfranchised, like a foreigner
or an alien in their own country, view
the present state of leadership in the
Bahamas.
1. The politicians, lawyers,
accountants, etc, are living in their


own world and speaking a language
that only persons of like mind can
understand.
2. The civic leaders are to busy in
their various dignified clubs, lodges,
fraternities, etc, planning their next
money making venture.
3. The religious leaders, like
the politicians and civic leaders, are
talking a good talk, but at the end of
the day it's all about the money
which stays within a certain circle in
the church world.
The reality is; we've all gat issues.
As leaders, if we can only be real
and take the mask of falsehood and
hypocrisy off, we will be able to hear
the cries of our youth and be com-
passionately moved to minister to
their needs. In so doing there is a
very good chance of helping to
change the course our young people
are taking.
As you read this article, can you
honestly say that you care about the
issues or struggles of your neighbour
or co-worker? The correct religious
answer to this question is "yes" but
that's not true, because if it was our
communities would be more posi-
tively impacted by our loving care.
As a pastor, I find it kind of hard
to relate or communicate with many
of the political, religious and civic
leaders of today. If you're not on the
same level (materially) as most of
our leaders, you are normally over-
looked and bypassed until your situa-
tion or condition has changed. With
this being the case, what message are
we sending to our youth who are fac-
ing many issues and challenges?
A good place to start from in try-
ing to reach and help our troubled
young men and women is at a point
called truth. As leaders we've got to
be prepared to tell them the truth.
Let's tell them of the'struggles and
issues we've had to over come and
those ones we're still dealing with
today, rather than lying about how
good things have been since we've
accepted Yeshuwa Messiah as our
Lord and Saviour.

Sex: Let's tell our young men
and women that it's okay for them to
have their sexual urges and desires.
Then let's explain to them that sex is
an honourable gift from God to a
man and his wife which will produce
Godly seeds in the earth.

Homosexuality: Let's take the
time and explain to our young peo-
ple that homosexuality and lesbian-
ism is the enemy's perverted sexual
plan which can never produce Godly
seeds.


God's prosperity plan: This
book of the law shall not depart out
of thy mouth; but thou shalt meditate
therein day and night, that thou
mayest observe to do according to all
that is written therein: for then thou
shalt make thy way prosperous, and
then thou shalt have good success.
Joshua 1:8

The enemy's prosperity plan:
The sale of illegal drugs and pro-
ceeds derived from such and every
other criminal act will ultimately lead
to the destruction of families and the
nation's core values.

How do we deal with the many
issues and challenges that we're
faced with as a nation?
1. Let's stop being religious
and hypocritical and hiding under
the umbrella of prayer and fasting,
and become a doer of the word
rather than just preachers and hear-
ers only.
2. Let's inform our young peo-
ple that we're constantly fighting the
good fight of faith.
3. Let's tell them that they
must stay away from all forms of
negative influences (family members,
friends and criminal activities).

Join Pastor Brendalee and
myself along with the family of
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center
Int'l, every Sunday morning @
10:30am and Thursday nights @
7:30pm at the Bishop Michael Eldon
High School Auditorium. For ques-
tions, comments or speaking engage-
ments contact us via e-mail: pastor-
mallen@vahoo.com or ph
225.3850/441.2021.


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The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, February 28, 2008 PG 25


'Christian Youth for Positive


Change'


IN an effort to provide hope and
encouragement for young people,
and to address the increase in crime,
violence and other forms of negativi-
ty in the society, the Anglican
Diocesan Youth Department will
hold a "Christian Youth for Positive
Change" Rally, on Friday, February
29, at St John's College Auditorium,
Stapledon Gardens, beginning at
7pm.
The event will bring together an
impressive line-up of speakers and
entertainment, with a view to pro-
moting peace and harmony among
the youth of the Bahamas.
The speakers include Rev Diana .
Francis, who address the topic
'Anger and Conflict Resolution'. Ms
Simone Bowe will speak on
'Responsibility'; Nurse Mitzi
Fernander on 'Abuse and Sexual
Responsibility'; Mr Theophilus
Glinton on 'Making the Right
.Choice'; and Mr Carlos Reid on
'Gangs, Violence and Crime'.
Entertainment will be provided by
St Margaret's praise team, Manifest,
the Anglican Youth Ensemble, St
Barnabas Band and Dancers,'Holy
Cross Junior Praise Team and
Dancers, and DJ Counsellor.
Emcees for the evening will be
Rev Ethan Ferguson, assistant
curate, Holy Cross Parish, and Mr
John Darville, youth officer,
Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports
and Culture.
Rev Enrique McCartney, Anglican
Diocesan youth officer and rally


rally set for Friday


The event will

bring together

an impressive

line-up of

speakers and

entertainment


organiser, believes that young people
need to be positively motivated. He
said that amid the current social
environment, with so many acts of
crime and violence, the rally is being
held to provide another positive
forum for young people.
"I believe that our young people
need to be motivated to change their
behaviour and to positively influence
their peers. This event is being
organised to bring them together in a
spiritual setting to addresses the
issues that they are facing, and to
provide a spiritual perspective on
what they are experiencing," said
Rev McCartney.
Hundreds of young people from
around New Providence are expect-
ed to attend the rally. The event is
free and open to all youth groups
and yourg people.


THE Anglican Sunday School
Children will honour Archbishop
Drexel Gomez in tribute and exhibi-
tion on Saturday, March 1 and
Sunday, March 2.
All Anglican members are invited
to attend a celebration of thanksgiv-
ing for the service of Bishop Gomez
to the Anglican community on
Saturday, March 1 at the Anglican
Church of the Epiphany, Prince
Charles Drive from 9:30am to noon.
Tribute will be paid to Bishop
Gomez, and an exhibition highlight-
ing some of Bishop's Gomez' pivotal
points in ministry will be staged.
The exhibition is open to the pub-
lic from March 1 to March 8.
The public is invited to attend.


On Sunday, March 2, Anglicans
will gather on the Eastern Parade for
a procession of witness to Christ
Church Cathedral for the annual
Mothering Day Service. The
Archbishop will deliver the sermon.
Temple of the Word Ministries,
Pinewood Gardens, will host their
Annual Pastoral Anniversary and
Appreciation Services, March 7- 9.
Guest speakers for the services are
Apostle Raymond Wells and
Paulette Zonicle.


* Calvary Bible Church, Collins
Avenue, will hold its 36th Annual
Missions Conference, March 2-9,
under the theme "Proclaiming
Release to the Captives: Freedom
from Spiritual and Human Slavery".
Key speakers for the week, Dr Chin
Aik and Mr Sean Litton, are both
front-line personalities involved in
the fight to eradicate modern day
slavery. The movie, Amazing Grace,
will be shown, gratis, in the
Sanctuary at Calvary Bible Church
on Tuesday, March 4 at 7pm. Only


the movie will be shown on Tuesday
evening, this will take the place of a
regular service.
* Services will be held:
Sunday Morning, March 2 @ 11am
Sunday Evening, March 2 @ 6:30pm
Monday, March 3 @ 7pm
Tuesday, March 4 Amazing Grace -
7pm
Wednesday, March 5 @ 7pm
Friday, March 7 @ 7pm
Sunday Morning, March 9 @ 11am
The public is invited to participate in
this 36th Annual Missions
Conference. For more information
contact the Church @ PO Box N-
1684, e-mail info@calvarybible.org.bs.
or telephone 326.0800


Church Notesr


J.S .
." iii~jc "o ^






PG 26 Thursday, February 28, 2008


R E LI O~ION h


The Tribune


Lent: A time for





deepening discipleship


* By REVEREND ANGELA
BOSFIELD PALACIOUS
WHO or what is a disciple? The
Webster Dictionary offers this defini-
tion: one who believes in and helps
disseminate the teachings of a master;
one of the companions of Christ; an
active adherent.
There are three images that may be
helpful in considering the nature of
our companionship with Jesus Christ
through the presence and power of
the Holy Spirit. Each highlights differ-
ent aspects of training and commit-
ment. Let's call them the ABCs of dis-
cipleship: An apprentice; a boot-camp
beginner; a child-like Christian.
The apprentice follows what the
master craftsman does every day.


"There are three images that may

be helpful in considering the nature

of our companionship with Jesus

Christ through the presence and

power of the Holy Spirit. Each

highlights different aspects of

training and commitment..."
Rev A B Palacious


Tasks include learning to identify vari-
ous tools and to use them, to select

























n Mission


types of materials, to price completed
items and handle potential customers,
and to pick up any other secrets of the
trade.This knowledge is acquired by
observation, association, and applica-
tion which in turn may be passed on
to another generation of apprentices.
The disciple develops in a similar
way. Association through prayer,
observation by studying the Holy
Scriptures and application under the
guidance of the Holy Spirit, enables
us to "take up our cross and follow
Jesus" as his disciples. The cross may
be the wounds we receive while trying
to love and assist others, the teaching
of certain truths that the listeners may
not wish to hear, or preaching about
sins that offend the intentional perpe-
trator of moral, spiritual and other
socially unacceptable crimes. Our goal
is to accomplish the greater things
that Jesus promised we would be able
to do, because we are empowered by
the same motivation, inspiration and
desire for transformation that kept
our Lord and master faithful to the
end.










INSIGHT.


Annual Lente


The boot-camp beginner learns
how to dress for inspection with shiny
shoes, a clean weapon and a proper
salute. The drills develop the
demeanour, manner and bearing of a
uniformed officer even as a rookie.
Likewise, the disciple puts on the
whole armour of God (helmet of sal-
vation, breastplate of righteousness,
shoes of gospel of peace, belt of truth,
shield of faith, sword of the Spirit),
goes through the drill of daily devo-
tions, and is always on duty to witness
and engage in ministry at a moment's
notice. We never take off the uniform
of Christ-likeness because holy
thoughts and ways are required at all
times.
The child-like Christian is like any
other child who wants to be like
daddy, mummy, big brother or sister,
and cannot wait to grow up to be just
like them. So it is that the disciple
should want to be just like Jesus when
it comes to loving others, pleasing
God and living a holy life. We are
called to trust without full understand-
ing, hope in the promises of God, and
follow obediently the example of our
Older Brother.
Do you want to be a disciple if you
are not one already? If you are sup-
posed to be then what kind of disciple
are you? Are you ready to deepen
your level of discipleship? If so, then
pray to dress in the virtues of holiness
so as to look, feel, act and live the
part.


I::

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The Tribune RELIGION


Thursday, February 28, 2008 PG 27


Helping people who are 'hurting'


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
pburrows@tribunemedia.net

THE Christian Counselling
Centre opened its doors in
1986 with a mission to help
hurting people. What began as
a response to a great need for
help by cocaine addicts and
their families in its first two
years, blossomed into a
Centre that provides a wide
range of family services to a
cross section of the Bahamian
public.
The quaint facility at #58 on
the busy Collins Avenue thor-
oughfare is inconspicuous, but
many people who need real
direction in life or help in nav-
igating through life's decisions
continue to find themselves at
the Centre's doorsteps.
In its first year, the Centre
held approximately 500 con-
sultations. However, in 1996
alone, they handled approxi-
mately 2,000 consultations.
The numbers have increased
in more recent times.
"I don't have the exact sta-
tistics, but our consultations
have definitely peaked. The
majority of the clients today
come for pre-marital and mar-
ital issues, relationships, and
HIV/AIDS. We counsel per-
sons who are infected with
HIV/AIDS, but also persons
who are affected too like a
family member of an infected
person might also come to us
for counseling," Helen Arnett,
director of Counselling
Services at the Centre told
Tribune Religion.
Mrs Arnett, along with her
husband, Pastor Frederick
Arnett, who servers as execu-
tive director at the Centre,
and Paula Adderley, are the
certified counsellors. Deborah
Arnett is an adjunct counsel-
lor there. Erika Lowe and
Ruth Pinder are certified
counsellors at the Christian
Counselling Centre in Marsh
Harbour, Abaco.
While the Christian
Counselling Centre continues
to see clients on a regular
basis, Mrs Arnett told Tribune
Religion that there is still
room for more growth. She
believes that many persons
fail to seek help out of fear
that their issues will be dis-
closed.
"I want to encourage people
to know that we have a strong
confidentiality policy, and I


"I don't have the exact statistics, but our consultations have

definitely peaked. The majority of the clients today come for

pre-marital and marital issues, relationships, and HIV/AIDS.

We counsel persons who are infected with HIV/AIDS, but also

persons who are affected too like a family member of an

infected person might also come to us for counseling."

Helen Arnett, director of Counselling Services


think that it's important to
state that because a lot of peo-
ple are afraid that their busi-
ness will be disclosed or that
people will their car parked
here or see them coming
inside.
"We want to strongly
emphasize that persons will
not get their business," she
added.
Mrs Arnett noted that
another setback is that many
people wait until a situation is
terribly out of control before
they seek assistance. They
come looking for a band-aid to
their problem, but counselling
is never that.
"Many people wait until
they can't handle the problem
and when it hits, the want a
quick fix. But I want people to
know that counselling is not a
magic wand you wave and
everything goes away.
Counselling is not about cure,
but care. Counselling is a
process, so don't wait until
after a problem has been
going on for 20 years and then
you expect the therapist to
make it all go away," Mrs
Arnett warned.
Apparently, a number of
engaged persons who seek
counselling at the Centre pay
little attention to this process.
Mrs Arnett suggests that
engaged couples make an
effort to get their pre-marital
education at least six months,
even one year, before the wed-
ding date.
"For example, if you're get-
ting married in April, coming
in a few weeks before the wed-
ding and trying to rush
through the inventory does
not work well. You have no
time to work on the issues that
come out, like marriage
expectations or the financial
side of things like knowing
about a budget.
"People try to cram all of


this within one month or six
weeks, but it is too much
information to assimilate in a
few days. You have to look at
it like this: you're getting tools
for your marriage and that's a
lifetime. But the problem is
that people are just too
focused on planning the big
wedding," Mrs Arnett
explained.
She noted further that this
pre-marital education is
important for all couples,
whether they are having a big
wedding or simply going
before a Justice of the Peace.
The effectiveness of coun-
selling services at the Centre
has resulted in many repeat
clients who come for myriad
reasons. Mrs Arnett revealed
that many clients are coun-
selled for a particular issue, go
away and do well in that area,
and return to the Centre later
for counselling in another area
of life. Others still come for
"booster sessions" long after
they have put a handle on
their issue.
It's also interesting that the
Centre sees quite a number of
men who initiate counselling
sessions if they are struggling
in relationships with their
wives or girlfriends.
"Counselling is definitely not
a female thing only. Males are
now initiating the counseling
process whether their wives
and girlfriends come with
them or not. [Men] are realiz-
ing that real change is from
within, so a lot of times their
partners see the growth and
changes in their lives and are
surprised. It really shows
maturity when you can say
that you can't handle some-
thing on your own and you
need to seek help," Mrs
Arnett told Tribune Religion.
"They realise that there is
no sense in suffering in
silence," she added.


Though persons may be
intimidated by the name of the
Centre, Mrs Arnett said that
counselors do not "bash peo-
ple with the Bible". The
Centre operates first from a
psychological standpoint
where Freudian theories and
those of other psychologists
are recognized. The only dif-
ference is that the Centre inte-
grates biblical principles.
"Even if you don't believe in
God you can come. We don't
impose on people with prayers
or Bible reading. Our training
is psychological and we
respect people's views. We
also do not care about denom-
ination. All we want is to
know how we can help you to
be able to manage your prob-
lem," said Mrs Arnett.
Manage is the operate word
though. Mrs Arnett added
that some problems never go
way.
At the Centre, individual,
couples and family therapy is
conducted by appointment,
and group therapy is offered
to adolescent or adult groups
as needed. The minimum ses-
sions required for individual,
couples, and families is 8 to 10
weekly 50-minute sessions
(30-minute sessions for chil-
dren). However, the actual
number of sessions varies
depending on what the thera-
pist and clients agrees to.
When it comes to client
fees, that is based on a sliding
scale. Special fundraising is
handled by a select committee
which organises individual,
corporate and church support
of either one-time donations,
memorials, estate donations,
or a series of pledges given at
regular intervals though Mrs
Arnett admits that the Centre
does not see much outside
sponsorship.
From 1986 to 1992, the
Centre was directed by the


leadership of Calvary Bible
Church. However, since then,
the Centre is operated by
Triple C Limited, a non-profit
organisation which is man-
aged by an inter-denomina-
tional board of directors com-
prised of leading business and
professional persons in the
community. That bpard con-
sults with an. international
board of advisors.


The Counselling Centre is
open Monday to Friday, 9am
to 5pm. Closed on Fridays
from 12pm to 1pm. For more
information, call 323.7000
(Collins Avenue office) /
367.6215 (Abaco office)



: ..- -BS

e ..t ,












DO you have a new
bouncing baby? Did you
recently tie the knot? Is
your church planning a
special event?

TRIBUNE
RELIGION wants to
know what's going on in
every area of your life.
So go ahead and send in
your wedding photos,
birth announcements,
and church activities
schedule to be posted in
upcoming Tribune
Religion sections.
This service is free.
Send all information,
including photographs,
to features@tribuneme-
dia.net.
Information can also
be hand delivered to
The Tribune's office at
Shirley and Deveaux
Streets or call us with
religious news at
502.2368.









PG 28 Thursday, February 28, 2008


RFI IC~IflN


The Tribune


'We have turned the Junkanoo





shack into a community centre...


* By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Tribune Features Editor
ybdeleveaux@triburnemedia.net
Celebrating the recent
opening of Junkanoo
shack-turned-
Community Centre with
a splash of talent, energy
and encouragement, Creative
Christian Arts Ministries
International, headed by Pastor Henry
and Dr Ann Higgins, has set its sights
on capturing the hearts and minds of
the community's children.
By proclaiming the love of God and
fostering a better understanding of
their destiny in him through dance,
music, drama and other community
support programmes, the two look to
be agents of change, and bearers of
hope and the promise of a new day for
the Windsor Lane community.
"We are proud to say that after
Junkanoo we had a mission and a man-
date to keep our children occupied by
giving them positive programmes to
keep them off the street and away from
criminal activities," Dr Higgins said.
"We have turned the Junkanoo shack
into a community centre. We have pro-
grammes set up that will shape the
lives of these children and we are excit-
ed about the turn around in the Farm
Road area," she added.
Evidence of the impact that the new
centre is already having on the area;
gifted youngsters took centre stage on
Saturday past during the official open-
ing, demonstrating their talents
through a number of dance routines
and a performance by the centre's own
marching band.
Directed by Brian Ferguson, the
youngsters would have just three
weeks of music practice before their
first performance as a band. With
trumpets, trombones, saxophones,
flutes and clarinets at the ready, band
members, dressed in jeans and
Conquers for Christ T-shirts, offered a
glimpse at the depth of talent that wait-
ed to be unearthed in their lives.
Also showing their fearlessness and
love of the arts, brothers Chase and
Chad Miller delighted the audience
through song, dance and playing the
piano.
Other highlights of the afternoon
Included a dance performance by 7-12
graders, and a special presentation by
children in grades 1-6.
Joining Pastor and Dr Higgins at the
centre's opening, and throwing their
full support behind them, were Bishop


U


CHASE MILLER performs with his brother, Chad


Arnold Josey, Ms Camille Bullard,
director of Community Affairs, and
Rev C B Moss.
The idea for a Community Centre,
Pastor Higgins said, grew out of a
desire to maintain a presence in the
community and to be in a position to
support and help the area's youth.
It was in May 2007 that the
Conquers for Christ Junkanoo Group,
which he and his wife lead, found
themselves in the midst of a transition
as they looked for a new place to house
their shack, in preparation for the
upcoming Junkanoo parades.
As the group settled into the build-
ing, located about a block west of the
Stephen Dillet Primary School, they
soon found that many of the children
from the community wanted to be a
part of the Junkanoo experience, and


even after Christmas the could be
found hanging around the shack.
According to Pastor Higgins, as a
former resident of the area himself, he
attended Stephen Dillet as a child, he
felt the call of God to return to his
roots. "When we first got here, the
building was dirty, nasty, but we
cleaned it up, and now this is just the
beginning. As more members come on
board we will be able to create more
programmes."

A mind to go forward
The opening of the centre seems to
have drawn out the best, not only in
the youngsters in the area, but also
some of its older residents and friends.
Pastor Higgins told the gathering of
receiving a gift of six, 5-gallon buckets
of grey paint. A bus has also been
donated, along with building and office
supplies, including a fax machine.
But while the centre continues to
need assistance and donations, includ-
ing supplies like bathroom equipment,
children's books, a bookcase, computer
equipment and help with roofing and
building supplies, Pastor and Dr
Higgins have not slowed down their
push to create a centre, an environ-
ment, where the children feel safe and
free to come to pursue their talents and
giftings, and to get help with their stud-
ies. At present, the Community Centre


offers:
An after-school home work assis-
tance programme: Monday to Friday
3:30pm to 5:30pm
Music classes: Tuesday and
Thursday from 4pm to 5:30pm
Dance classes: Monday and
Wednesday from 6pm to 9pm for teens
and Saturday 10am to 1pm for children
Drama and choir rehearsal on
Saturday from 1:30pm to 4pm
Youth night on Friday night

Said Dr Higgins, "We have designed
a programme to run up to summer
time and we will end the first pro-
gramme the week of June 2, before the
school testing time. We will have a
week long conference of workshops
with the students, inviting other stu-
dents from abroad in a cultural
exchange. The theme is 'Dance
Children Dance, A fight against
crime'.
Looking toward the future, Pastor
and Dr Higgins are hopeful of creating
a schedule that will include a summer
camp where they focus on Junkanoo,
dance and drama and other forms of
the arts. They are also looking at intro-
ducing additional classes/programmes
that will focus on caring for the elderly,
parenting skills, a step programme, an
employment agency and an entre-
prenuership programme.









THE TRIBUNE





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22008
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


Ex-minister warns
on danger of end to
exchange controls
* By CARA
BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
FORMER minister of state
for finance, James Smith, has
warned that the removal of
exchange controls if done
under less than favourable
economic conditions could
be more harmful than bene-
ficial to the Bahamian econ-
omy.
Speaking at the Nassau
Conference, on the effect of
exchange controls on capital
markets, Mr Smith said:
"The removal of exchange
controls may have some ben-
eficial effects in the local cap-
ital market.
"However, the floating
exchange rate that must fol-
low from that policy stance
is likely to seriously disrupt
other markets if conditions
are not favourable, and the
negative effects of the fall-
out on the wider economy
might outweigh the benefits
to be derived from capital
market liberalisation."
The former minister said
the real question was how a
fixed exchange-rate regime
limitrf a country's ability to
fully participate in the inter-
national capital markets.
Mr Smith said the Bahami-
an capital markets were not
as efficient as they could be in
allocating and pricing capital
transactions, and if confi-
dence was shattered, the

SEE page 11


Bahamas 'out gunned'




on cruise sector talks


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas is "out
matched and out gunned" when
it comes to negotiating with the
cruise lines, Bahamian excur-
sion and tour operators charged
yesterday, expressing concern
that the Government was not
seeking their input in talks over
new Cruise Overnight Incen-
tive Act agreements.
A spokesman for the
Bahamas Association of Shore
Excursion Providers and Oper-
ators (BASE), responding to a
Tribune Business article on
Monday in which David John-
son, the Ministry of Tourism's
deputy director-general, said
revitalising downtown Bay
Street could double per capital
cruise passenger spend, said the
Government had given no
details on how this objective
could be accomplished.
While agreeing with Mr John-
son on the principals he out-
lined, such as increasing visitor
spend, and improving the phys-
ical infrastructure and plant at
Prince George's Wharf and Bay
Street, the BASE spokesman
expressed'concern that Bahami-
an private sector partners in the
cruise industry had provided
very little input into the cruise
line negotiations.
The BASE spokesman, who
requested anonymity, said per
capital cruise passenger spending
in Nassau stood at $53 accord-
ing to the latest reports, less
than the $60-$70 referred to by
Mr Johnson.
"The two things that control
to a great extent that spend lev-
el is the degree of usage of the
private islands, from which, as it
stands now, the cruise lines ben-
efit almost 100 per cent, and the
degree in which the Govern-
ment allows cruise lines to exe-
cute their itineraries," the
BASE spokesman said......
"Based on recently-published
reports by the Ministry of
Tourism, and the recently high-
lighted report done for the Min-
istry of Tourism, they are fully
aware that our spend levels
dropped from $95 in 1995 to
$53 in 2005, so is Mr Johnson
saying that we can achieve this
increase of 100 per cent in the


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same period of time, given all
the other parameters and mar-
ket forces that exists today?"
Tihe BASE spokesman
added: "Everyone knows that
the redevelopment of down-
town is at least a 10-15 year pro-
ject, and given how we do things
here in the Bahamas, that could
be longer.
"In addition, the state of
downtown and the port area are
not the only challenges we face


with our tourism product. What
about the cost of doing business
here in the Bahamas, failing
infrastructure, mediocre service,
traffic, etc. These are all chal-
lenges to achieving assertions
of doubling our revenues."
An issue "even more vexing"
to Bahamas-based tour opera-
tors and excursion providers,
SEE page 10


BTC's privatization

committee selected

Attorney for potential
purchaser hopes deal
for 49% stake can be
concluded amid
declining telecoms
industry values
0 By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government has
"finalised" the negotiating com-
mittee to hold talks on the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company's (BTC) potential privatization, the minister of state for
finance telling The Tribune yesterday that negotiations were expect-
ed to resume "soon".
Zhivargo Laing, when asked whether talks with Bluewater Com-
munications Holdings had resumed, replied: "Not yet, but really
SEE page 12


Court of Appeal president says
Baker's Bay raises questions on whether
Guana Cay residents may have right to
constitutional challenge on right to
freedom of movement within the Bahamas


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Baker's Bay Golf &
Ocean Club developers are
"unlikely to recover" what could
be more than $8 million in costs
that they incurred when they vol-
untarily stopped work on the
Great Guana project, a Court of
Appeal verdict has revealed.
Justice Milton Ganpatsingh,
in his written reasons for reject-
ing the appeal by the Save Gua-
na Cay Reef Association against
a Supreme Court verdict that
allowed the $500 million project
to proceed, said Arizona-based
Discovery Land Company had
incurred substantial costs through
the undertaking it gave on
November 23,2005, to carry out
no new work on the develop-
ment.
That undertaking was given
after the Association and its
attorney, Callender's & Co part-
ner Fred Smith, had successfully
appealed to the Court of Appeal
for their judicial review action
against the Baker's Bay project


to be reinstated.
Justice Ganpatsingh said Dis-
covery Land Company had
expected that the trial on the sub-
stantive issues raised by the
Association's judicial review
application would "proceed with
expedition".
"The reasons for the under-
taking given by Ed DeVita, vice-
president [of Discovery Land
Company], were that they were
mindful of the fact that the
Christmas vacation was immi-
nent, and little work would be
done during that period, and they
reasonably expected a speedy
resolution of the judicial review
proceedings," Justice Ganpats-
ingh wrote.
While Acting Justice Norris
Carroll completed hearing the
substantive issues in the
Supreme Court on February 3,
2006, he reserved his decision,
which was not handed down until
October 12 that year.
While the Court of Appeal
had approved Discovery Land
SEE page 10


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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008 THE TRIBUNE


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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


'Reserve judgment'




over $32.lm Stamp




Duty difference


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMIANS were yester-
day urged to "reserve judg-
ment" on whether the Govern-
ment's Stamp Tax estimates
were "too exuberant" until the
2007-2008 fiscal year ended,
with the global economic slow-
down and compliance issues
impacting first half revenues.
Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, told The Tri-
bune that it was "too early" to
conclude that the Ingraham
administration had been overly-
optimistic with its Stamp Tax
estimates, even though it was
$32.1 million lower than fore-
cast for the six months to
December 31, 2007.
"So much of the revenue
intake of the Government is in
the second half of the year," Mr
Laing said.


Minister says too early to say if Budget estimates 'too exuberant',
with collection and economy issues impacting real estate taxes


"This
being the
first half of
the fiscal
year, we
would not
expect the
bulk of
[that] rev-
enue to
come in at
that time.
I would
reserve
judgment on whether the fore-
casts are too exuberant until the
end of the year, knowing how
government revenue flows."
The minister pointed out that
the $32.1 million difference
between the forecast and actual


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amounts collected during the
2007-2008 Budget first half
could easily be bridged by one
major Bahamas-based corpo-
rate merger or acquisition.
The transaction that took
Kerzner International private
in 2006 provided a significant
one-time boost to the Treasury
via the 4 per cent Stamp Tax
now imposed on the assets of
businesses being sold, and there
are a number of candidates to
achieve similar during this
financial year.
Chief among these is the
Bahamas Oil Refining Com-
pany International's (BORCO)
$900 million purchase by US
private equity firm, First
Reserve, which the parties have
said is likely to be completed in
the 2008 second quarter before
the Government's June 30
financial year-end.
Other potential deals that
could generate significant
amounts of Stamp Tax revenue,
although may be not in this
financial year, are the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC) privatization and even
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA).
Mr Laing said "a combina-
tion of things" was behind the
failure of property-related taxes,
such as Stamp Tax and real
property tax, to match govern-
ment forecasts during the 2007-
2008 Budget year's first half.
Real property tax was off by
$8.1 million.
"Part of it is compliance," Mr
Laing said. "We have real prop-
erty taxes that are due but not
collected, and we will have a
sizeable measure of these uncol-
lected real property taxes out-
standing.
"Additionally, some of that
has to be attributed to the econ-
omy and its situation. Some of
that certainly has to be that. I
think it's any combination of
these two things."
Mr Laing added, though, that
the Government still expected
to hit its fiscal targets set in.the
Budget a GFS fiscal deficit
equivalent to 1.8 per cent of
national GDP; revenue and
expenditure and had no reason
to make adjustments based on
an expected increase in eco-
nomic activity and enhanced
revenue collection measures.
Stamp Taxes were projected
to account for 76.5 per cent or
just over $109 million of the
projected $143 million increase
in government revenues for the
2007-2008 Budget year, taking
total revenues to $1.49 billion
from $1.356 billion in 2006-2007.
As a proportion of total rev-
enues, Stamp Tax was projected
to account for 27 per cent, just
behind customs duties at 41 per
cent.
The bulk of the 2007-2008
Stamp Tax increases were pro-
jected to come from two
sources. These were Stamp Tax
earned on real estate transac-
tions valued at $.250,000 or
more, where it is levied at a 10


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per cent rate, and Stamp Tax
on import duties.
Stamp Tax from those real
estate transactions was expected
to increase by more than $50
million, rising from $47.257 mil-
lion in 2006-2007 to over $98
million in 2007-2008.
Stamp Tax on imports was
forecast to rise by $50.951 mil-
lion in 2007-2008, growing from
$148.8 million to $199.751 mil-
lion.
Meanwhile, real property tax-
es were projected to increase
by 21.4 per cent in 2007-20098,
compared to the current fiscal
year, growing from $70 million
to $85 million. Of this $15 mil-
lion increase, the bulk some
$8.37 million is expected to
come from real property tax
imposed on undeveloped real
estate owned by foreigners.
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham again reiterated to the
House of Assembly yesterday
the need to make "fundamental
decisions" about loss-making
public sector corporations such
as.Bahamasair and the Water
& Sewerage Corporation.
Otherwise, he warned that
"at least 20 per cent of the
monies" borrowed ostensibly
for capital expenditure would
continue to go to these corpo-
rations to cover operating
expenses salaries, rents, office
supplies, fuel and other items.
The Prime Minister pledged
to make the Government's han-
dling of the public finances
more accountable and trans-
parent, placing more authority
in Parliament's hands to con-
trol maximum government
spending.


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OAS SCHOLARSHIP ANNOUNCEMENT 2009
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs announces that applications for the captioned
fellowship at the Graduate and Undergiaduate, for the 2009-2010 levels
are now being accepted.

Applications will be accepted in the fields of study related to the OAS
priority development areas of Social Development and the creation of
productive employment, Education, Economic diversification and
integration, trade liberalization and market access, Scientific development
and exchange & transfer of Technology, Strengthening of democratic
institution, Sustainable development of tourism, sustainable development
and the environment, culture.

Candidates are required to be citizens or permanent residents in OAS
member states, produce transcript with a minimum GPA of 3.00, passport
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Recommendations from Professors/Lectures, Copies of Academic
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or by email to
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INVESTMNT OPPRTUNI:


Investment Opportunity Must Sell lot No. 51,
Dorsetteville, Bamboo Town


"i All that lot of land having an area of 5,000 sq ft, being lot no. 51, of the
Subdivision known as Dorsetteville, the said subdivision situated in the southern
':! a district of New Providence Bahamas. Located on the subject property is a
Structure comprising of an approximately 20yr old duplex apartment comprising
of approximately 1,641 sq. ft of enclosed living space which includes two 2-
bedrooms, 1-bath, kitchen, living & dining rooms units. and an approximately
.,-. 9yr old one bedroom apartment building comprising of 382 sq. ft with bath,
kitchen, living/dining room. the land is on a grade and level; the site appears
to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual
heavy rainy periods of the year. The grounds are fairly kept with improvements of concrete parking area & concrete walkways
around the premises. The yard is enclosed with chained linked fencing at the sides and back.
Appraisal: $202,225.40
Traveling south on East Street from Soldier Road, turn right at Porky's Service Station [Victoria Blvd]. Travel pass the third
corner on the left, the subject property will be the 9th on the left side. Painted green trim white.

Lot No. 1056 Pinewood Gardens Subdivision
.. All that lot of land having an area of 5,000 sq ft, being lot no. 1056 of the
..subdivision known as Pinewood Gardens, the said subdivision situated in
:. f the southern district of New providence Bahamas. Located on this property
is a structure comprising of an approximately 10 yr old single family residence
consisting of approximately 1,205 sq. ft of enclosed living space with 3-
41 .;:""l'." ;' aff~sl l B bedrooms with closets, 2-bathroom, linen closet, living, dining rooms, kitchen
S 'and covered front porch. the land is slightly elevated to disallow the possibility
Lof flooding, the grounds are fairly kept.
Appraisal: $144,977.00
Traveling south on East Street to Sapodilla Boulevard, turn right at thatch Palm
Street, turn left onto Rosewood Street, the subject property is the second on the right hand side painted blue trimmed
white.
BLACKWOOD, ABACO
All that lot of land having an area of approximately 258,064 sq. ft. This property is yet to reach its highest and best use. It is
ideally suited to single or multi-family development as is the nature of surrounding properties within the community. The site
may also serve well as a commercial site as the area remains un-zoned the property remains largely in its original state. It is
covered with low brush and broad leaf coppice vegetation intersperse with broad strands of mature Yellow Pine indigenous
to the area. The property is well drained and represents no immediate flooding danger under normal conditions.
APPRAISAL: $219,354.40
The subject property is vacant and is situated at the Southeastern entrance of the Community of.Blackwood, Abaco. The
property is undivided and comprises approximately 6 acres of a larger tract of land of approximately 26 acres.

Lot B, Wilson Street, Rock Crusher
All that lot of land having an area of 10,498 sq ft, being lot B, between the subdivision known as Rock Crusher
and in the vicinity of Perpall Tract situated in the western district of New Providence, Bahamas. This property
is zoned multi family/single family. Also located on this property is a structure comprising of a duplex at
foundation level under construction, and consisting of approximately 1,566 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with
a patio consisting of 270, sq. ft. the starter bars are in place and foundation poured.
Appraisal: $97,214.00
Traveling West on Farrington Road take a right after the P.L.P. headquarters, go about midways through
to Wilson Street, go though the corner all the way to the dead end. The property is located behind the chain
linked fence at the back of the yard.

NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA)
Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment
Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing
and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The
foundation is 2,511 sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant
and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean.
Appraisal: $41,275.00


THE Yuma Estates residen-
tial development has less than
30 of its original 115 lots avail-
able for purchase, its develop-
ers said, with all triplex lots
and fourplex lots sold.
Lead developer and former
MP Tennyson Wells said the
remaining lots at the 25-acre
private gated community,
located off Kisskidee Drive
two corners west of Orange
Hill on West Bay Street, were
available for sale at a starting
price of $105,000 for a single
family lot. Duplex lots are
going for $137,500.
A third open house for 'ie
project was held on Saturday,
February 16, 2008, and Mr
Wells said the provision of an
affordable and secured home
environment is "where people
are headed".
"They want to make sure
that certain standards are met
and that properties are prop-
erly maintained, landscaped
and looking tidy, and that
recreation facilities are avail-
able in their communities," he
added.
Those amenities at Yuma
Estates include 24-hour secu-
rity, jogging trail, basketball
and tennis courts, swimming
pool, gazebos, barbeque grills


J ,














and a playground "for chil-
dren's parties, birthday and
weeding reception".
Mr Wells said: "The entire
infrastructure (cable, tele-
phone, electricity, and water
and sewerage) is underground
in Yuma Estates, and is now
awaiting connection by BEC
and the Water and Sewerage
Corporations, which should be


completed in the next 30
days."
Streets lights have been
installed, and the road paving
should be completed within
the next 15 to 21 days.
Six houses are already
under construction, one of
which is nearly completed.
One of those owners is expect-
ed to move in within the next
couple of weeks.
Mr Wells started his career
in land development back in
the 1970s, and said the Sanctu-
ary Investment Group
includes a banker, an accoun-
tant and an engineer who are
all Bahamians.
"Our motto has been to
deliver what we promise. If
there is a complaint, we cor-
rect it. It has always been our
policy to be up front with peo-
ple. No hidden agendas," said
Mr Wells.
All the major banks and
mortgage companies are offer-
ing financing to, and have
financed, properties bought by
purchasers in Yuma Estates.
These include First Caribbean
International Bank, Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas), FINCO,
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional, Commonwealth Bank
and Scotiabank.


PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for staff accountants to pursue a programme of
training culminating in a professional accountancy qualification. Prospective candidates should
have a graduate or undergraduate degree in accounting with a cumulative grade point average
that exemplifies your success as an achiever and leader.
Applications are being accepted for the 2008 Programme. Expectant May/June 2008 graduates
are also encouraged to apply.
Successful candidates will undergo a period of rigorous training, both academically and
on-the-job, with the objective of developing professional skills. Much of the on-the-job experience
will entail auditing the financial statements of entities in the financial services industries such as
banks, trust companies, investment funds and insurance companies. The positions offer excellent
salaries and promotional opportunities, and benefits include medical insurance and provident
fund. Also, as a team member of PricewaterhouseCoopers there are opportunities to work in
another country where PricewterhouseCoopers has an office.
Please submit your application, with a current curriculum vitae and a copy of your most recent
transcript, before 31 March 2008, to:

Human Resources Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O.Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas





Abaco Markets Limited, a leading food distribution company
with five retail and club outlets in New Providence, Freeport and
Marsh Harbor Abaco is seeking applicationsfor the position of:










THE JOB
To lead the company's program to Reduce Risk in the
area of: Inventory Control, Shrink, and Loss Prevention,
Risk Analysis, Safety and Security. The candidate will be
required to create, implement and manage Shrink and Loss
Prevention Programs ensuring that Training programs


and follow-up monitoring


is consistently


maitained.


REQUIREMENTS
* College Degree in a similar or related field
* A minimum of 5 years Experience in the area of Inventory
Controls
* Proficiency M/S suites
* A proven track record of success in the field desirable
* Possess strong leadership skills with excellent People and
Communication skills



Competitive compensation and benefit packages
(inclusive of incentive based bonuses)
Interested persons should send their resumes to
hr@abacomarkets.com


PICWATERHOUSEOOPERS 3


3


~I*


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


THE TRIBUNE







THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY






NWPODN- EP [OIjDNCE


SANDYPORT Appraisal: $300,000.00
All that lot of land having an area of 9,626 square feet, being lot number 40,
of the subdivision known as SandyPort, situate in the Western District of
New Providence. The property is irregular in shape, is on a level grade and
zoned as single family residential. An electrical connection outlet is located
near the property. The property is located on Sandy Port Drive just on the
bend before Governor's Cay on the Southern Side of the road.


No. 17 WESTRIDGE ESTATES


Appraisal: $930,000.00


All that lot of land having an
area of 30000 square feet,
Being lot Number 17 of the
.. subdivision known as
.. 'yB': i Westridge Estates Addition.
r .. ^W Situate in the Western District
o on the island of New
; Providence.
Located on the subject
(S'"' ; property is a newly
.. constructed single story
feet of living space with a three Car Garagestructure comprising 6,000
The building is 75% completed and comprises five bedrooms, four and a
half baths study, living/dining, family room, kitchen, laundry and generator
room.
Location: From SuperValue West Bay, take the road heading west into Westridge, take
the first corner on the Right, Westridge Drive. Subject property will be about the
seventh on the right hand side of the road.


Lot #18 BLOCK #27 VENICE BAY


Appraisal $383,855.00


All that lot of land having an area of
12,225 square feet, being lot #18 Block 9 s
#27 of the subdivision known as Venice .. tL
Bay Annex, situate in the Western
District of New Providence. The
property is on a level grade and zoned iS
as multi family residential. Located on ,,,
the subject property is a cluster of 4 :
buildings comprising a completed unit 4- i
at the front of the property, a middle -
section consisting two town houses -- -- ......
about 80% completed and designated .- ..
units 3 and 4 and is the subject of this appraisal. This section has a square
footage of approximately 2,490 square feet and a porch of 200 square feet.
Directions: Take Carmichael Road heading West, turn onto Bacardi Road heading
South. Proceed past Millers Pond. Just before reaching Bacardi, turn Right onto
paved road just past the pond. Subject is located on the Right hand side of the road.
LOT o.21B FRSER LLOT


LOT No. 21B FRASER ALLOTMI
OFF SOLDIER ROAD


ENT
Appraisal: $303,000.00
SThe subject property
consisting of 8,400
Square feet is
developed with a
split leveled home
with 1925 square


i feet of floor area on
the ground floor, a
porch area of 437
square feet and
second floor area of
S 735 square feet. The
building is of sound construction and completed in its entirety. The
ground floor comprises 2 bedrooms, one bath, a kitchen, dining and
family room. The second floor comprises two bedrooms, one bath, living
and dining areas.
Directions to property: Heading East on Soldier Road, turn left onto first paved road
opposite Lowes Wholesale, 2nd to last house on the road with chain linked fence.


#7 MALCOLM ROAD

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Appraisal: $156,747.50
SLot 18, House #7, Malcolm Road
West having an area of 5,000 square
feet. Existing thereon is a 40-year-
Sold split leveled residence divided
into five (5) one bedroom, one
bathroom, apartments, four located
on the main floor and one on the
Supper portion is made of durock and
is about 50% complete. The building
is in fair condition and is in serious
need of maintenance.


Directions: From Baillou Hill Road heading South pass S.C. McPherson School,
take Malcolm Road heading East. Pass the first corner on the left to House #7
painted white trimmed green.


Lot 1440 GOLDEN GATES 2
Located on this 6,000 square feet
property is split level single family
dwelling comprising four bedrooms,
two and a half bathrooms, living and
dining rooms, kitchen and TV room.
Attached to the main house are two
one bedroom apartments.


Appraisal $335,000.00


a


SEABREEZE Appraisal $638,676.00
Executive styled house which has p "i
been converted into three units. j-
The first unit features an open
plan in the outer area consisting ,
of living, dining with sunken floor, "..*- .
kitchen, and powder room. The '
inner area consists of three | '*
bedrooms, three baths including a : .-" ""'
master suit and master bath,
consisting of a large Jacuzzi,
shower and walk in closets.The second unit consists of two bedrooms, one
bath, living, dining, kitchen, office area. The third unit consists of an open
plan with kitchen, living, bedroom and a private bedroom.
Added features: Enclosed pool, central air condition, courtyard, and fenced
in patios.
Directions to property: Take Prince Charles heading east, turn at the light at the
intersection of Seabreeze and Prince Charles Drive, Golf Course Boulevard, take
third corner on the right, Bay Cedar Avenue then take second corner on left, Darling
Plum Grove, subject will be about the 5th property on the left.


Lot 188 SCOTT AVE, EAST SECTION 1 SUBDIVISION,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $140,000.00
The subject lot is
approximately 12,322 square
aH feet. Situated on this
property is a single story
s single family dwelling of
2,800 square feet of living
M -space. This includes a small
S- front porch, a large foyer, a
sunken living room with
S fireplace and chimney, a
dining area, a full service
kitchen, a family room with
J adjoining laundry and
storage room. A hallway with linen closets, a hallway bathroom. Three
auxiliary bedrooms with closets and a master bedroom with walk-in
closet and private bathroom.



FAIRWAY MANOR CONDOMINIUM Appraisal: $73,000.00


3'


~L.


Apartment 402, 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms.
Lot 4, Block GN, Edward Birch Court, Bahamian North


Lot 96 HUDSON ESTATES


Appraisal: $116,190.00


Located on this 72x102 feet property is a 16 years old single family
dwelling comprising 1,490 square feet of living space. This includes, a
living, dining and laundry room, kitchen, three bedrooms, two
bathrooms, a garage and entrance porch.
,


Unit 2, Block 10, Lot 16
GREENING GLADE


Appraisal: $30,000.00


A 14,910 square feet single family residential vacant land. The lot
is rectangular in shape.



TO VIEW PROPERTIES GO TO:

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Cick on "Real Estate Mall"

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"Enter Online Store"


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I NETET OPRUIY 3 -U E


Lot No. 130, St. Andrews Beach Estates
All that lot of land having an area of 8,100 sq ft, being
lot no. 130, of the subdivision known and designated
as st. andrews beach estates, the said subdivision
situated in the eastern district of New Providence,
Bahamas. located on the subject property is a structure
comprising of anapproximately 12yr old duplex.
Appraisal: $245,237.00
Traveling east on yamacraw hill road take the third corner
right. with sign for st andrews beach estates, then take
first left, then first right, the subject property is the 2nd
property on the left side painted beige trimmed orange.


Beach Estates
All that lot of land having an area of 10,000 sq ft, being lot
no. 3 in Yamacraw Beach Estates, in the said subdivision
situated in the eastern district of New Providence Bahamas.
Located on the subject property is a single-storey triplex
-4; ".. .v building comprising of 3 units with two 2-bedrooms, 1-
Sbathroom, Iliving, dining, kitchen apartments unit and one
4li 3 H unit being used as a barber and beauty salon, the land is
Son a grade and level; however the site appears to be
sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding
during annual heavy rainy periods of the year.
Appraisal: $313,016.00
Traveling south on. Fox Hill Road, go pass Yamacraw
Hill Road and Joe Farrington Road. The subject property is located on the left hand side of Fox Hill road painted
white trimmed brown.

Eleuthera Island Shores Subdivision LOT NO. 1,
BLOCK NO. 45,
SHORES
All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of
9,644 sq. ft. being lot #1 in block 45, Section "E" in
the subdivision called and known as Eleuthera Island
Shores Subdivision, situated in the vicinity of Hatchet
Bay Harbour, on the island of Eleuthera, one of the
S, islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahams. This
..' .. ,, ..: .site encompasses a two storey building which is
S- approximately 14 yrs old and is abandoned. There is
". a wooden landing approximately 7'-4" wide by 20'-
S* 0" on the upper level, approximately 1,610 sq. ft. of
enclosed living spade, with 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms,
front room, dining room, den, kitchen, and utility room. The wooden porch on the upper level is approximately 148sq.
ft. There is also a water cistern under the dining room floor area. All utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $151,007.00
This property is situated in Eleuthera Island Shores.
LOT NO. 1 WESTERN SHORES
All that lot of land having an area of 7,389 sq. ft., being
lot #1 of the Subdivision known as Western Shores Phase
11, the said Subdivision situated in the Western District of
. ... ".,'e.-.. New Providence, Bahamas. Located on the subject property
is a single structure comprising of a single family residence
consisting of approximately 2,430 sq. ft. of enclosed living
Space. The residence comprises of 3-bedroom with closets,
2 1/2 bathrooms, living/dining rooms, study, kitchen, utility
room, porch and enclosed garage with electronic door. The
land appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the
possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods
of the year. The grounds are fairly well kept with
improvements including driveway, walkway and swimming
pool. The yard is enclosed with walls.
Appraisal: $753,570.00
Traveling west on West Bay Street. Go pass Orange Hill and Indigo Subdivisions, the house is located on the left near
Tusculum Subdivision and painted all white.

(Lot No. 62, Lower Bogue) ELEUTHERA
.. All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements, in
S,,a. the settlement of Lower Bogue, North Eleuthera, being
4'_' No. 62, comprising of about 34,210 sq. ft., this site
'f 8|encompassas a 12 year old single storney home comprising
of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, front room, dining, breakfast
S.....room, kitchen and laundry room, with a total living area
of approximately 2,342.06. Property also includes a double
car garage, and front entrance with a total sq. ft. of
approximately 655.75. This home is approximately 85%
completed. The property is well landscaped with crab
grass, fiascos and some fruit trees.
. Appraisal: $229,426.00
.;:.* ... :;...... This property is situated on the western side of Eleuthera
Highway in the settlement of Lower Bogue.


DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)
3 two bed, 1 bath fourplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no. 18b with
an area for a small shop. Age 12 years the land is a portion
:" '" of one of the Dundas Town Crown Allotment parcels
S. stretching from Forest Drive to Front Street, being just
-n m under a quarter acre in size and on the lowside. A concrete
.. block structure, with asphalt shingle roof and L-shape in
t. : -,.. design with a total length of 70x26 ft, plus 50 x 22 ft.,
1 2,920 sq. ft., the interior walls are concrete blocks, ceiling
N *-' . is sheet rock and the floors of vinyl tiles.
Appraisal: $265,225.00

LOT NO. 12, BLOCK 3, MILLER'S HEIGHTS
All that lot of land having an area of 7,500 sq. ft., being lot
12, of the subdivision known and designated as Millar's
Heights, situated in the Southwestern district of New
Providence, Bahamas. This property is comprised of a 25
--, .. .. -.i.. yr old single family residence consisting of approximately
I Sgi ".... ........ 2,375 sq. ft of enclosed living space with three 2-bedrooms,
1-bathroom, living/dining rooms, and kitchen apartment
complex. The land is on a grade and level and appear to
S-- -:be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding
I .........' '''during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly
kept, with improvements including parking area, walking
pathway and low shrubs. The yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing at the back and southern sides.
Appraisal: $239,500.00
Traveling west on Carmichael Road, enter West Avenue, on the South side immediately after Topps Laundromat. Take
first right which is Wimpole St., go around the curve on the left which is London Avenue, traveling south on London
Avenue the subject property is the 9th building on the right before the T, Junction (high street) the subject building is
an L shape triplex, painted green, trimmed white.


T


LOT NO. #7, BOILING HOLE SUBDIVISION
All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements situated
-. on the Island of Eleuthera, North of Governor's Harbour,
_- comprising of Lot No. 7 in the Boiling Hole Subdivision and
"- ,' a comprising of approximately 10,000 sq. ft., this site
encompasses a 17 years old duplex with each unit consisting
:a ; . Se. of 2-bedrooms; 1 bathroom, frontroom, diningroom and kitchen
with a gross floor area of approximately 1,474.20 sq. ft. and
S covered porch area of approximately 164.70 sq. ft. this duplex
was built in accordance with the plan and specification as
approved, and at a standard that was acceptable to the Ministry
Of Public Works. This structure is in good condition. Each apartment could be rented at $800.00 per month. The
land is landscaped and planted with ficus trees, but needs some manicuring.
APPRAISAL: $153,521.00


LOT NO. 1490 GOLDEN GATES SECTION 2
All that lot of land having an area of 6,000 sq. ft.
.-- .. being lot no. 1490 of the subdivision known and
,. designated as Golden Gates, the said subdivision
situated in the southwestern district of New
,. .k..- Providence, bahamas. This property is comprised
:-' of a 25 yer old single family residence consisting of
" approximately 2,480 sq. ft. of enclosed living space
with three bedrooms, three bathrooms, living, dining
-------- rooms and kitchen. The land is on a grade and level,
however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated
to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The grounds are fairly kept, ith improvements
including driveway, walkway and low shrubs. Yard is enclosed on one side wth a 5 foot chain linked fencing and a low cement
block wall to the front.
Appraisal: $162,400.00
Traveling west on Carmichael Road turn left then right onto the service road opposite Bahamas Faith Ministries Complex, then
first left again after passing clico and pre-school. The subject house is the 6th house left painted green trimmed white.


.r.
,", .. i: "-.;-. ,
* r. -. ,-, . .... **-'*' ,:. ,


Must Sell Lot No. 597
All that lot of land having an area of 3,200 sq ft, being lot 597
Melvern Road of the subdivision known as Yellow Elder Gardens,
the said subdivision is situated in the southern district of New
Providence Bahamas. This property is comprised of a 26 yr old
single family residence consisting of approximately 1,510 sq. ft
of enclosed living space, with 3-bedrooms including master bedroom,
2-bathrooms, living/dining room, kitchen and utility room. The
residence also consists of a front porch and two patios.


-..... ... '.' The land is on a grade and level; however the site appears to be
Sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during
annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly kept, with
improvements including driveway and walkway. The yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing.
Appraisal: $133,395.00
Traveling west along Melvern Road from the sport center road, follow the road to the left. the subject property is the 5th property
left situated between Zris Court and Richie Court, painted White trimmed yellow.


HAMILTON'S, LONG ISLAND
All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements situated
in the settlement of Hamilton's in the Island of Long Island,
and comprising of approximately 13,547 sq. ft. and is elevated
approximately 7-8 ft above sea level. This site encompasses
a 35yr structure. A simple style home consisting of two
bedrooms, one bathroom, kitchen, living and dining room.
the home however is consisted of 2 separate constructions;
613.60 sq. ft of concrete construction and 624 sq. ft of wooden
construction all amenities are to the property such as electricity,
water, cable and telephone.
Appraisal: $67,000.00.
The property is accessed by the main Queen's Highway.


KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)
Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story
house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living room, dining area,
Sil.J. family room, kitchen, study, laundry and an entry porch.
V Appraisal: $188,406.00
Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to
Kennedy Subdivision on the left, then take the 1st corner
on the left then 1st right, house is second on your right
with garage.


LOT NO. 382 WINTON MEADOWS
All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 8,300 sq. ft. being
lot No. 382 situated in the subdivision known as Winton Meadows, the
said subdivision situated in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, Bahamas. This property is comprised of a 24 year old single
I Family residence with an attached efficiency (formerly the carport)
consisting of approximately 2,675 sq. ft. of enclosed living area, front
S B porch-1 98 sq. ft., back patio-380. The building is a two storey house.
T ."1i Besides the efficiency apartment, the house is comprised of 3-bedrooms,
S. 3-bathrooms, inclusive of a master bedroom suite upstairs. Foyer, front
Si room, dining room, family room, powder room, utility room, breakfast
0.. U- jj,5ind |lj nook and kitchen downstairs. Climate control is provided by ducted
:.., ______central air conditioning, with air circulation enhanced by ceiling fans
and other amenities. Quality of construction: Average. Standard of
maintenance: Average. Effective age: seven years (7) the land is on flat terrain; however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to
disallow the possibility of flooding under normal weather condition, including annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are well kept,
with improvements including neatly maintained lawns with flowering trees, and a concrete garden/storage shed, which is located in the
backyard. The yard is enclosed along the sides with chain-link fencing, and concrete block walls that are topped with metal railings,
and metal gates at the front and back.
APPRAISAL: $351,044.00
Traveling east on Princ6 Charles Drive, pass the streetlight at Fox Hill Road until you get to Meadows Boulevard, turn right onto Meadows
Boulevard, go south and take the 4th left, then 1st right. The subject house is the 2nd house on the left side painted beige trimmed white.

Investment Opportunity Must Sell Lot No. 217
Pinewood Gardens Subdivision
All that lot of land having an area of 5,000 sq ft, being Lot
S.No. 217 of the Subdivision known as Pinewood Gardens, the
S. .. said subdivision situated in the Southern District of New
: Providence Bahamas. Located on this property is a structure
S' .' comprising of an approximately 20 yr old single family residence
.A MB@B consisting of 992 sq. ft of enclosed living space with 3-
bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living/dining rooms, kitchen, drive
way and walk way. The land is on a grade and level and
... appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility
S ~o.. f flooding. The grounds are fairly kept and yard is open.
Appraisal: $127,988.00
Traveling south on East Street to the junction of Soldier
Road, make a left at the light then turn right into Kennedy Subdivision, go all the way to T-junction, turn right then first
left then right again toward Mount Tabor Church building, after passing Mount Tabor take first left sapodillaa blvd), the
subject house is about 400 yards on the right painted yellow trimmed green, with green and white door.


I VA ANTPRO ERTES


Lot No. 15, Block 10, Winton Heights
All that lot of vacant land having an area of 17,144 sq ft, of the subdivision known as Winton Heights situated
in the Eastern District of New Providence Bahamas. This property is rectangular in shape and zoned multi family
- single family.
Appraisal: $171,440.00
This property is about 230ft West of Sassoon Drive and is about the third lot on the North Side of Hill Side Road.



Island Harbour Beach, Exuma
All that parcel or lot of vacant land containing 10,000 (80'X 100') sq. ft. being Lot No. 9, Block 2, Island Harbour Beach
Subdivision situated the western most portion of the Hermitage Estate, Little Exuma Bahamas. The property is located
on an unpaved road known as Stocking Road. The property also has a commanding view of the ocean.
Appraisal: $80,000.00



Rainbow Subdivision Lot No. 3, Block 27
All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 14,052.59 sq. ft. being lot no. 3, block 27, section b, of Rainbow
Subdivision with residential zoning. This property is bounded about 103.44 ft north by Queens Highway, and 137.02
ft. East and about 99.94, ft south of Rainbow Hill Circle. 139.91 ft West. All utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $40,328.00


MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
All that piece, parcel or tract of land containing 1 acre situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory
Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting
as follows:- Northwestwardly by the main Queens Highway and is running thereon for a distance of 125.462 feet
northwestwardly by the land now of formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance of 390.274
hundredth ft.; southwestwardly by a 30' wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 128.128 hundredth
ft; southeastwardly by the land now or formerly the property of the Venor and running thereon for a distance of 322.955
hundredth ft. This property having an area of approximately 44,847.76 sq. ft. This neighbourhood is zoned commercial
development and is quiet and peaceful with a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $51,421.00,
This lot is vacant land and is located in the area known as "Mutton Fish Point"


MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 44,714 sq. ft., and designated "E" which forms a portion of land
known as "Mutton Fish Point" situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the island
of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:-
Northwardly by the land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance of 393.13
hundredth ft.; outwardly by a 30' wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 402.57 hundredth ft; eastwardly
by the main Queen's Highway and running thereon for a distance of 109.73 hundredth ft; westwardly by land now or
formerly the property of Caridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 110.75 hundredth ft. this property having
an area of approximately 44,714 sq. ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential development and is quiet,
peaceful and has a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $51,421.00


LOT NO. 10B, PALMETTO POINT
All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 9,000 sq. ft., and being Lot No. 10B situated North of Ingraham's
Pond and Eastwardly of North Palmetto Point, on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- on the north by Lot No. 3B and running thereon for a distance of (90)
ft; on the East by Lot No. 11B and running thereon for a distance of (100) ft; on the south by a 20' wide road reservation
and running thereon (90) ft on the west by Lot No. 9B running thereon for a distance of (100) Ft, the said Lot is overgrown
with shrubs and is in close proximity of a white sandy beach. This neighborhood is zoned residential development and
is quiet and peaceful with a topography of approximately 50ft and because of this there is no danger of flooding. The area
is approximately 80% developed with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $72,000.00



MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land and improvements containing approximately 44,587 sq. ft. and designated "F"
which forms a portion of land known as "Mutton Fish Point" situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement
of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and bounded and
abutting as follows:- Northwardly by the land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for
a distance of 383.56 hundredth ft; southwardly by land now or formerly the property of Caridon Limited and running
thereon for a distance of 393-19 hundredth ft. eastwardly by the main Queen's Highway and running thereon for a distance
of 113.40 hundredth ft. westwardly by land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited and running thereon for a
distance of 113.40 hundredth ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential development and is quiet, peaceful
and has a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $51,276.00


Forconitins f sle nd 9he -normtio cotac


;i9~c4


\







THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY






FREEP[UTjzFREEPORT:


Lot 67 Block 7
BAHAMIA WEST REPLAT
Located on this .30 of an acre
property is a newly built 1,900
square feet of living space single
family dwelling comprising an
entrance porch, four bedrooms,
two bathrooms and kitchen; a
living, dining, powder and laundry
room with adequate closet and
storage space.


Appraisal: $219,614.00
S .... ---

*: -


Lot 12 Block 13 Unit 2
GREENING GLADE


FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
Located on this .35 of an acre
property is a sixteen-year-old
single family residence
comprising four bedrooms, two
bathrooms, living, dining,
storage, utility and laundry
rooms; there is a foyer, kitchen
and den. The total area of living
space is 3,016 square feet.


Appraisal: $254,355.00


LOT 29 IMPERIAL PARK SUBDIVISION #2
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $185.000.00
The size of the property
is 90x100 or 9,0.00 sq. ..
ft. Located thereon is a .
single storey single ,,,Imff i
family dwelling of
approximately 1,900 sq. '.
ft. of living space. .
Accommodations
include a front porch, a foyer, living and dining rooms, kitchen with
pantry, family room with utility closet, master bedroom with Jacuzzi
bathroom with an additional two bedrooms and two bathrooms.



Lot No. 37 BLOCK 33
CHURCHILL COURT, BAHAMIA MARINA
& BAHAMIA 4 SUBDIVISION, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $337,000.00



1.. ,




All that lot of land having an area of 16,533 sq. ft. being lot No. 37 of the
subdivision known and designated as Bahamia Marina and Bahamia Section
4 Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Located on this property is a
structure comprising a 3 year old duplex structure which covers
approximately (3,058) square feet. Apartment consisting of two 2-bedrooms,
2-bathroom with private Jacuzzi in master bath, spacious living and dining
room, full service kitchen, a laundry and utility room, foyer/hallway with linen
and storage closet. The property is fully secured by six foot plastic coated
chain-link fence runs along the side and rear and adjoins the painted 4 foot
wall, with 5 foot pillars at front with electronic gate.


LOT No. 13, BLOCK KN, UNIT 1
BAHAMIA NORTH SUBDIVISION


Appraisal: $40,000.00


The property has an area of 13,027 square feet or .30 of an acre.


GREENING GLADE SUBDIVISION Appraisal: $75,000.00
All that piece parcel and lot of land described as lot 7 block 21,
Albacore Drive, Victoria Place and Mid Chipman Road, Unit 2, Greening
Glade Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. The lot contains 20,580
sq. ft. and zoned as multi-family residential.


LINCOLN GREEN, CANEBY CLOSE Appraisal: $38,500.00
Unit 5, Block 17, Lot #48 Single family residence, Clearwater Close.
Located on fresh water canal. Approximately 17,404 sq. ft.


Lot 5, Block 6, Unit 2
GREENING GLADE DRIVE

The subject lot contains an
approximate area of (17,789
sq. ft) seventeen thousand .
seven hundred and eighty
nine sq. ft. or 41 of an acre.


Appraisal: $245,827.00


Situateo inereon is a single
storey, single family dwelling
of conventional concrete
blocks and poured concrete.
Accommodations are three bedrooms, three and a half baths,
living, dining, full service kitchen with centre island stove with a
snack counter opened into a family room, exiting to an-opened
patio at the rear. Adjourning the patio is a study, laundry room and
single car garage. The structure contains approximately 2,567 sq.
ft of living space.


EXUMA


Appraisal: $170,000.00


DUPLEX IN LOT 6625
BAHAMA SOUND No. 8, EAST, EXUMA


Trapezium shaped lot 35 ft.
above sea level comprising
10,000 sq. ft. Situated thereon is
a 10-year-old single storey
duplex, 2 bed, 1 bath, kitchen,
living/dining area and porch.
(Building is in need of repairs).


":-.:*~
-a
$, ~~


CASTELRAG ESTATES, LOTS 129 & 130
EXUMA HARBOUR SUBDIVISION Appraisal: $673,075.00
The subject property is located on
Kingway Road and is developed
with an area of 20,000 square feet.
Situated thereon is a residence
comprised of 3,645 square feet of
living accommodations, inclusive ..
of 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, with
laundry and utility spaces and a
two bedroom one bath guest ,,
cottage of 600 square feet. The """'' ...
property is fenced with white
picket fencing and has a Gazebo at
the highest portion of the property.


ELEUTHERA A|
NORTH PALMETTO POINT
All that piece parcel or lot of land and
improvements situated to the West of
the Settlement of North Palmetto Point,
on the Island of Eleuthera. The total
area is approximately 8,118 square .
feet. Situated on the property is a 26-
year-old building, comprising
approximately 1,263 square feet of
enclosed living space and a basement
area of 144 square feet. Three
bedrooms, two bathrooms, living room,
dining room, kitchen, utility room, and
beauty parlour (an additional 480 square feet).


appraisal: $134,822.00





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TO VIEW PROPERTIES

GO TO:

www.stopnshopbahamas.com

CMk on "Real Estate Mall"

CD&e on Doorway

"Enter Online Store"


. 7 1il


[ FAMILY ISLANDS I


FOR CONDITIONS OF SALE AND ANY OTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

HARRY COLLIE @ 502,3034

E-mail harry.collie@scotiabank.com

or

PHILIP WHITE @ 502-3077

E-mail phillipwhite@scotiabank.com

Fax: 356-3851 send bids to P. 0. Box N-7518 Rosetta Street, Nassau, Bahamas


.;"


................. 0 !


S;.
s





PAG 8B THRDY ERUR 8 08 H RBN


'Your Bahamian Su ermarkets'

.*J.

SUPER

VALUE
NOW ACCEPTING
ITIUSUNCARD
QUANTITY RIGHTS AND PRICES RESERVED


SPECIALS GOOD FEB. 28 MARCH 5, 2008 1 II


LIBBY'S
WHOLE KERNEL
CORN
or SLICED
BEETS
15 oz.

990
__r_1,


I


DOUBLE STAMPS EVERY SUNDAY,


MUELLER' S
READY CUT

MACARONI
16 oz.


AUNT JEMIMA
PANCAKE MIXES
32 oz.
$289
PANCAKE SYRUP
$ 24 oz.
$389


KRAFT
BBQ
SAUCES,
18 oz.
$1 99
y


KRAFT
MACARONI
& CHEESE
7.25 oz.


CAMPBELL'S
VEGETABLE/VEGETARIAN/
CHICKEN
SOUPS
10 oz.


CAMPBELL' S CHUNKY SOUP, 19 OZ.
._ t ,,-n


PASTA RONI
PASTAS
4.6 oz.

2/$300


/


COKE
SODAS
12 oz., 6 pk.


/ DOLE
SSLICED/CHUNK/
CRUSHED
PINEAPPLES
20 oz.


2/$


POST
CEREALS
15 OZ.


$


99


00


Case $11.89


/ '-GAIN
POWDERED
DETERGENT
126 oz.
$099


SHURFINE
BIG ROLL
TOWELS
1 ROLL


'I I I 1 I I


MAX STAR
FOIL
PAPER
25 ft.


K


F (PINE SOL
)CLEANERS
28 oz.


4
K


$


PT


I




1k


99


.REDEEM DULITY TAMPS~l AT BED. I BAT & HOM


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


\


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\





THE RIBUE THRSDA, FBRUAY 28 200, PAE 9


BARS

MEAT &

CHICKEN 1


HOT DOGS


09


mvZ i DIu& FM F


GALAXY SLICED, 10 oz.
;HEESE.......................$1 .49
'OUFAYAN ASST'D., 12 oz.
EITA BREAD ................$1.59
iUPER VALUE ASST'D. GAL.
:RUIT DRINKS...........$2.49


GREEN GIANT, 12 Ears
CORN-ON.COB..........................$479
GREEN GIANT FROZEN, Asst'd. 16 oz.
VEGETABLES..........................$2.1 9
PEPPERIDGE FARM LAYER Asst'd., 19 oz
CAKES ...........................................$2.99


I


THE BAHAAS RElD CROSS

"COME EXPERIENCE THE JOY OF
GIVING TOGETHER FOB HUMANITY"

ALO L


'a)
7k


5ATURS -


mlARa A /


S : . ,
* l , r- '-.' .


/"
.- ...*d .3-^
r*. ,.t +,fWS "


.1.


"This space Is kindly sponsored by




BED BATH & HOME

&0? 4 /o,0ntk, Sa!e


4;


7;


BAR-S BAR-S
SLICED, COOKED MEAT OR CHICKEN
HAM HOT DOGS
12 oz. 12 oz.

$449 $1o09


FRESHOA


FRESH BAKED
POUND CAKES

$ 99
9^ 4


WHOLE ROTISSERIE
CHICKENS
each
S$799


2 a


RUGS
TOWELS
SHEET SETS
TABLE CLOTHS
THROW PILLOWS
COMFORTER SETS
SHOWER CURTAINS
GLASSWARE SETS
BATHROOM ACCESSORIES

^a t -* _


LAMI PS
BLENDERS
FIGURINES
BAKEWARES
WALL CLOCKS
WALL PICTURES
PICTURE FRAMES
FLATWARE SETS
COOKWARE SETS
DINNERWARE SETS

..-- -
4 +


C------- SALE STARTSI--'
MONDAY FEBRUARY 25TH SATURDAY MARCH 1ST, 2008
LOCATED: HARBOUR BAY SHOPPING CENTER
PH: 393-4440 OR 393-4448


)SCAR MAYER
SLICED
BACON
1 Ibl


^MEAT SPECIALS B^


B~iiLUNCH MEATS I~ss~ r


q PRODUCE SPECIALS -IF I


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE


.i I: 1
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1,:b3
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BUEBY 8 T T I


Bahamas 'out gunned'


FROM page one

,iand ctailers and other businesses reliant on
il! irmise industry, was that the private sector
hI:i not been given the opportunity to provide
ii,'p into negotiations between the Govern-
mntH aind cruise lines particularly Carnival,
i-i'il ('t ribbean Cruise Lines and their lobby-
i,: "Lrup. the Florida-Caribbean Cruise Asso-
Sition (FCCA).
\\ hilic the Ministry of Tourism had offered to
im;, l,.c Bahamian companies and private sector
n i: nisations in discussions on the Cruise
~ \einight Incentive Agreements some 18
i;ilhs ago. the BASE spokesman added:
- i Iher is not a single group who can say with
;i, aniicc that its concerns were heard, under-
,i, .. and received. Neither is there any confi-
,a nncc that any recommendations made were
-', i eciven consideration.
\s it stands now, everything the Ministry of
'~n ism has done seems to fully benefit the
; ; termn needs of the two principal cruise lines,
( nni\al and Royal.
illased on Mr Johnson's assertion that the
\'iusiy r of Tourism will be able to announce the


6
\d


content of the new incentive agreements with
the cruise lines, one can only expect that once
again these agreements will be loaded with out-
landish concessions, tax breaks and trappings
favourable more to the cruise lines" than
Bahamian businesses.
The BASE spokesman said that without pri-
vate sector.feedback, Bahamian negotiators
would be "out matched and out gunned", and
not "stand a chance at the table" when negoti-
ating with the cruise lines.
When it came to stopover tourism, the BASE
spokesman questioned whether guests at
Atlantis and Baha Mar would leave the resort
property to explore Bay Street, Arawak Cay
and other Bahamian attractions, given that the
hotels provided equivalent attractions.
"The reality of it is that guests are not going to
be lured off of these mega properties now or in
the future," the BASE spokesman said.
"If the Government of the Bahamas continues
to grant concessions at the rate it is doing, what
we see happened at Atlantis will happen at
Baha Mar. Where there is nothing to leave the
property for because you have rooms, food and
beverage, gaming, excursions and entertain-
ment, all right at your finger tips."


Ecology of the

Andros Iguana:

Implications for Conservation


Lecturer Charles Knapp, Ph.D.
Center for Conservation and Research for Endangered Species
Zoological Society of San Diego
Escondido, California USA
&
-:.:.. Conservation Department
N John G. Shedd Aquarium
SChicago, Illinois USA

Dr. Knapp will be discussing the general
ecology of the iguana in a framework of
conservation management. He will also
e discussing the results from


V...,
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a #


two rapid ecological assessments
(2006 and 20071 that were
conducted to claritl the
island-wide distribution
of the Andros Iguana.
Recommendations for
long-term conservation
action will then be addressed.


Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited





Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers of the Royal Island resort
and residential project at North Eleuthera invites suitably qualified
individuals to apply for the following positions with the company:

Superintendents
Project Engineers

We are currently seeking individuals to oversee the underground
infrastructure systems for Royal Island, and as such, we are looking for
dynamic individuals who posses strong leadership and communication
skills. Salary is commensurate with Experience and Education.

Interested persons should submit their resumes with cover letter to:

Harcourt Management Services Ltd.
P.O. Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas

Fax to: (954) 745-4399

Or Email to:
aileen.miller@royalislandbahamas.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their
interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.


Bahamas trust



administrators



told: 'Own client



relationships'


* By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
BAHAMIAN trust administrators need to further
develop the relationships they have with their private
wealth management clients to develop a competitive
edge over rival jurisdictions, leading international
practitioners have urged.
Jeremy Arnold, of Barclays Capital, encouraged
Bahamian executives attending the Nassau Confer-
ence to move beyond just managing their clients'
financial affairs, and provide networking and per-
sonal interaction experiences for them as well.
This, he said, provided a stronger relationship
base and will assist trust administrators in better
serving their clients.
Mr Arnold said the Bahamas has much to gain
from establishing such relationships, whether by
having clients come on retreat or seminars to this
nation, both from a tourist and financial services
perspective.
This is something that would not be difficult to
facilitate, given that many clients are based in the
US.


FROM page one

Company's application that it be
relieved from the undertaking by
May 31, 2006, an injunction was
obtained by the Association on
similar terms from the Privy Coun-
cil.
Justice Ganpatsingh noted:
"Clearly, the developers expecta-
tions' had not been realized. In the
meantime, the shut down cost


"You have to own the client relationship," Mr
Arnold said.
Philip Marcovici, of law firm Baker and McKen-
zie, added that in some jurisdictions, clients are
moving towards independent trust administrators
who are supplying personalised service after leaving
larger firms.
He said that just talking about the Bahamas as a
trust administration jurisdiction was not enough.
Mr Arnold added that the Bahamas needed to
establish itself as a knowledge-based centre for trust
administration
"This could be a place where persons come to
learn the dynamics involved," he said.
He added that the only way trust administrators
can be successful is if they can truly meet all of their
clients' needs.
The two men spoke at the Nassau Conference,
held at the Atlantis resort on Tuesday.
They led a Panel Discussion on the topic: The
Changing Landscape: Competition Amoung Trust
Jurisdictions and the Drivers for the Selection of
Jurisdictions.


Developers
amounted to $0.5 million, and the
monthly fixed costs sustained were
estimated at $758,375. The devel-
opers are unlikely to recover these
outgoings."
Based on the 10 months that
elapsed between the undertaking
and Justice Carroll's ruling, and
using this figure, it is possible that
the Baker's Bay developers


Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) DOMUS OVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on February 27, 2008
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 27th day of March, 2008 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such
debts are proved.
February 28, 2008

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY












Pudgy:

A Bahamian Parable
Based on a story by
Dr. David Allen



Date: Feb. 29, 2008.
Time: 7:00 pm
Location: Logos Bookstore
Harbour Bay Shopping Centre


NOTICE
Notice is hereby given of the loss of Bahamas Government Registered Stock Certificate as follows:

Stock Interest Certificate Maturity Amount
Rate No. Date
2004-20016 1.2500 APR 48-396 23/9/2016 $30,000.00

I intend to request that the Registrar issue a replacement certificate.
If this certificate is found, please write to
P.O. Box SP 60743 Nassau, The Bahamas or call 327-5339.


Automotive General Manager


A prominent new car dealership
is seeking a general manager.


The ideal candidate will have
wide experience in the
automotive business as well as
good written and oral
communication skills.



Send resumes with references to:
Automotive GM
P.O. Box N-9240
Nassau, Bahamas


Responsibilities:
- Create and organize vehicle sales activities
- Create and organize parts and service
operations
- Manage follow-up systems for existing
customers
- Cultivate new business
- Develop and implement company policies and
programmes
- Train and lead staff in a team environment
- Stay up-to-date in dealership technology
Requirements:
- 5+ years of experience in the automotive
industry
- Experience with Japanese automotive brands
- Strong leadership and management skills
- Superior communication and customer service
skills
- Account management and budgeting
experience
- Proficiency in computers


incurred substantial, unexpected
monthly costs that totalled $7.584
million. Add in the $0.5 million
initial shut down costs, and that
figure comes to more than $8 mil-
lion.
All three Court of Appeal jus-
tices Dame Joan Sawyer, Justice
Ganpatsingh and Justice Emanuel
Osadebay handed down separate
written verdicts on the Guana Cay
case.
Perhaps giving encouragement
to the Association, Dame Joan in
her verdict wrote that "perhaps
unfortunately, I find myself hav-
ing to dismiss the [Association's]
appeal on all of the grounds put
forward on their behalf'.
She noted that all the grounds
submitted by the Association relat-
ed to arguments that the first
defendant, Wendell Major, in his
capacity as National Economic
Council (NEC) secretary, and the
Prime Minister as the minister
responsible for the Crown Lands,
related to them "acting outside the
scope of their powers in authoris-
ing or signing the Heads of Agree-
ment".
While constitutional and statu-
tory provisions negated the Asso-
ciation's arguments, Dame Joan
did note that Justice Carroll, in his
Supreme Court judgment, men-
tioned the impact that Baker's Bay
as a so-called 'gated community'
could have in preventing Guana
Cay residents from having access
to the northern part of the island
they had previously visited using
existing roads and tracls.
Dame Joan said: "'It appears
also that [Baker's Bay] will
bestride the new public road. Be
that as it may, it is possible that
questions about the infringement
of those inhabitants' constitution-
al right to freedom of movement
within the Bahamas may arise
under Article 25 of the constitu-
tion. As the issue has not been
raised in this court, I say no more
about it."
Justice Ganpatsingh appeared
noticeably more unsympathetic to
the Association's case, saying its
affidavits had "emotional content",
attributing this to Mr Smith's activ-
ities as a human rights activist.
"One cannot help but note that
there are an estimated 300 resi-
dents on Guana Cay and 73 of
them, purporting to speak on
behalf of the remainder, have since
July 125, 2006, expressed a wish in
writing that the Association 'limit
its claims and opinions to include
only the members of the Associa-
tion, and not include the island and
community members of Guana
Cay'," Justice Ganpatsingh said.
"So, that on the evidence, it
would seem that the community
is bitterly divided between those
who do and those who do not
oppose the development."


1


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


'':Sia^


ROW,


-.d


THE TRIBUNE











Ex-minister warns on danger




of end to exchange controls


FROM page one
attractiveness of the investment
climate will be affected.
"Given the importance that
monetary stability and the one-
to-one exchange rate between
the Bahamian and the US dol-
lar has on our main industry (
tourism), the impact or fall-out
as a result of changes in that
relationship would have to be
measured against any expected
gains brought about by the lib-
eralisation of the local capital
market," Mr Smith said.
He explained that were the


Bahamas to dismantle the
exchange control regime and
float the Bahamian dollar in the
international markets, the new
exchange rate would settle at a
value less than the US dollar.
Mr Smith said the downward
pressure on the Bahamian dol-
lar via currency, speculation
and/or loss of confidence would
continue until it reached its
equilibrium level. This would
probably be well below the cur-


rent one-to-one peg, which
would raise the cost of all goods
for Bahamian firms and resi-
dents and fuel inflationary pres-
sures.
Mr Smith said the existence
of exchange controls had retard-
ed the development of the
Bahamian capital markets, but
in turn benefited tourism and
contributed to the maintenance
of a relatively stable monetary
sector.


TO BAHAMIAN LAND OWNERS,
DEVELOPERS AND INVESTORS:

REQUEST FOR

PROPOSALS
for
LONG -TERM LEASE OF
EXECUTIVE STAFF RENTAL HOUSING

Baha Mar Development Company Ltd. invites proposals from Bahamian land
owners, developers and investors to build and lease to Baha Mar on a long-
term basis a total of approximately 1.50 multi-family residential housing units
located in developments of at least 30 units each, conveniently located to Cable
Beach for occupancy by the executive staff of Baha Mar, Caesars Bahamas
Management Corporation and Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide Inc. and
their respective contractors, consultants and suppliers.

For further information or to obtain a proposal package contact:

Steven Katz
BAHA MAR DEVELOPMENT COMPANY LTD.
Email: skatz@bahamar.com Tel: 242.677.9081




V AR


NOTICE
IN THE ESTATE of MERIH HAINES
late of No. 85, Devonshire Street,
Westward Villas, Western District,
Island of New Providence in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
required to send the same duly certified in writing
to the undersigned on or before the 7th March,
2008 after which date the Executors will proceed to
distribute the assets having regard only to the claims
of which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE .is hereby also given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to make
full settlement on or before the date hereinbefore
mentioned.


MAILLIS AND MAILLIS
Chambers
Fort Nassau House
Marlborough Street
P.O. Box N-4014
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executors


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CHINA GOVERNMENT SCHOLARSHIP
ANNOUNCEMENT FOR ACADEMIC YEAR 2008

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs announces that applications for one Chinese
Government Scholarship, for the 2009 academic year are now being accepted.
Application Requirements
The following items should be submitted to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in
Triplicate for processing:-
1. Original Application Form for Foreign Students Scholarship
2. Physical Examination Record for Foreigners
3. Two (2) letters of recommendation from professors
4. Copy of Diploma of most advanced studies
5. Copy of academic record, report/transcript
N.B. Applicants must qualify for admission in Chinese University before award
is granted. Preferences of Chinese University must be included on application
form. Check website: http://www.csc.edu.cn or directory at the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs.
Applicants must provide proof of qualifications by providing the original certificate
for verification by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
Benefits:
1. Full Scholarship including tuition, room and board, healthcare, textbooks and
living expenses.
2. One year Chinese Language Proficiency Studies (Beijing University of Language
and Chinese Culture).
Deadline for submission of applications is 14th March 2007. Applications are
available at the Technical Assistance Division, Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
Goodman's Bay Cooperate Centre. Additional information can be obtained by
contacting the Ministry of Foreign Affairs at telephone number 356-5956/9 or
by e-mail to technicalassistance@mfabahamas.org


Agape Christian School t
A Ministry of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel __
P.O.Box AB20760, Marsh Harbour, Abaco Bahamas


Now accepting applications for



TEACHER POSITIONS


Lower Primary Grades
r

Junior and Senior High School
with BJC and BGCSE experience in Language Arts, Literature,
Mathematics, Music, Spanish, French, Computer Science,
Physical Education, Biology, and Art

For the school year beginning SEPTEMBER 2008

Applicants must be Born Again Christians and adhere to the
Statement of Faith of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel.
Teachers must also have at least a Bachelors Degree in
Education or a Teacher's Certificate and must be a
Bahamian or a permanent resident of the
Bahamas with work status.
Qualifying persons are asked to contact the office at
Telephone (242) 367-4777 8:30am 3:45pm
or fax (242) 367-5777
or visit our website www.agape-school.com for job or
student applications


Agape Christian School uses the A Beka Book Curriculum
which emphasizes Christian values as well as a very high
standard of education and is approved by the Bahamas
Ministry of Education.

We seek to train the mind, guide the person, and love the
personality.

"Study to sowv tfhyself approvedunto good.... "2 Timothy2:15


'IHURSDA'Y, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE "; iB


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


bune when contacted that he
had been informed the Gov-
ernment had appointed its
negotiating committee, and his
client was hopeful it could now
complete a transaction it had
agreed in principle with the


Temple Christian High School

Shirley Street

Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers for the
following positions for the 2008-2009 School Year.

-Journalism/Literature (Gr. 10-12)
-Religious Knowlege Bible (Gr. 7-12)
-Math (Gr. 7-12)
-Physics (Gr. 10-12)
-Agriculture (Gr. 7-9)
-Technical Drawing (Gr. 7-12)
-Accounts/Commerce/Economics (Gr. 10-12)
-Physical Education (Gr. 7-12)
-Spanish (Gr. 7-12)
-GeographyiHistory(Gr. 10-12)
-Chemisrty
-Business Studies (Gr. 10-12)
-Health Science (Gr.7-9)
-General Science (Gr. 7-9)
-Computer Studies (Gr. 7-12)
-Music (Gr. 7-12)
-Biology (Gr. 10-12)
-Language Arts/Literature (Gr.7-12)
-Art Craft (Gr. 7-12)
-Food Nutrition (Gr. 10-12)
-Clothing Construction (Gr. 10-12)
-Social Studies (Gr. 7-9)
-Home Economics (Gr. 7-9)

Applicants must:

A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing
to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple
Christian School
B. Have a Bachelor's Degree in Education or higher
from a recognized College or University in area of
specialization.
C. Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or Diploma
D. Have at least two years teaching experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent communication
skills.
E. Applicants must have the ability to prepare students
for all examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.
F. Be willing to participate in high school's extra
curricular programmes.

Application must be picked up at the High School Office
on Shirley Street and be returned with a full curriculum
vitae, recent coloured photograph and three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O.Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas


FROM page one

soon. We have finalised the new
committee and will make an
announcement about that soon.
We expect the talks to begin
soon."
Philip Davis, Bluewater's
attorney, confirmed to The Tri-


former Christie administration.
"I was advised that the com-
mittee has been appointed
with a view to completing
negotiations on the transaction
between my client and the
Government," Mr Davis said.
' "Hopefully, there will be a
meeting soon to identify all the
issues and ensure a speedy
conclusion to the transaction,
with a view on the Prime Min-
ister's commitment to com-
plete privatization by year-
end."
Mr Davis said of Bluewater:
"They're heavily committed to
it, and are committed to the
agreement already arrived at
with the Government,
although the global telecom-
munications market and indus-
try has seen a drastic decline in
values."
Bluewater had initially been
prepared to pay $225 million
for a 49 per cent stake in BTC,
the former Christie govern-
ment having initially held out
for $250 million.
An agreement was reached
where Bluewater would pay
$220 million upfront, a further
$35 million after a five-year
cellular monopoly expired, and


iCONT1CT:,70m2OlJ5


S/ East Street South


SK IB www.cbrichardellis.com



OFFICE & RETAIL SUITES
(Completion 2009)
B
* Six Units at 726 sq. ft. each c
* Popular High Traffic Commercial Area '"
* Brand New Attractive Design
* Ample Parking Available c
* For More Information Call 396-0000 NA


3AHAMAS REALTY LTD.
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association with:


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NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD


Pricing Information As Of: C FA L '
WVednesday 27 February 2008
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WNWW.BISX1BAH)AMAe.5O-FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX. CLOSE 1.972.657 /CH -24.4 -.%CHQ. -1.23 / YTD -94.18 / YTD % -4.56
"- .'. iL. P. 'i L L .,. ..,urt ,* iPre i,h u Clo ,e Trda 's CioeS Chaa-ie Dai, 1 EPS $ C.-. I P 'E Y ,3iei
. 0,7- .. a:: z r.1. at 1.73 1 7 000 1 ',0 0 15 i 0 000 C ,' i
11.80 11.25 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 11.80 0.00 1.502 0.400 7.9 3.39%
9.68 8.50 Bank of Bahamas 9.61 9.61 0.00 0.643 0.260 14.9 2.71%
0.99 0.80 Benchmark 0.99 0.99 0.00 0.188 0.030 5.3 3.03%
3.74 1.95 Bahamas Waste 3.66 3.66 0.00 0.289 0.090 12.7 2.46%
2.70 1.25 Fidelity Bank 2.60 2.60 0.00 0.058 0.040 44.8 1.54%
12.95 10.03 Cable Bahamas 12.70 12.95 0.25 1.200 1.030 0.240 12.6 1.85%
3.15 2.00 Colina Holdings 3.14 3.14 0.00 0.031 0.040 101.3 1.27%
8.50 4.62 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 7.50 6.95 -0.55 1.500 0.428 0.260 16.3 3.73%
7.22 4.48 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.65 4.48 -0.17 0.129 0.052 34.9 1.15%
2.60 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.45 2.45 0.00 0.316 0.020 7.8 0.82%
7.79 5.80 Famguard 7.79 7.79 0.00 0.713 0.280 10.9 3.59%
13.01 12.30 Finco 13.00 13.00 0.00 0.810 0.570 16.0 4.38%
14.75 13.99 FirstCaribbean 13.99 13.99 0.00 0.914 0.470 15.3 3.36%
6.10 5.12 Focol (S) 5.15 5.15 0.00 5,500 0.363 0.140 14.2 2.72%
1.00 0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.74 0.74 0.00 0.035 0.000 21.1 0.00%
8.00 7.20 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.411 0.300 17.6 4.14%
12.50 8.60 J. S. Johnson 12.30 12.30 0.00 136 1.059 0.610 11.6 4.96%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.167 0.600 8.6 6.00%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities.
-. .. -..L:.s. .T-.:.. B.a i. Ask i Last Price Reeki. .'01 EPS F i I P E Yiel.
14.... -.i -: ar.a.T.aS ;upe. ur,.ets 4a .ij 1 60 1 16 00 1 160II: 1 a1 5 13d 8 12'
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35 -0.023 0.000 N/M 0.00%
Colina Over-The-Counte r Siurcts
41 '.u 4 ia.,'. BCi- 410 0i 4300 .1 00 4I 5 2'j 90 c 0::
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.160 1.125 13.4 7.71%
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0.030 0.000 N/M 0.00%
BISX ULatd MutaFu lif:'. '
52 ,r .- .L.:..5 Fu.-. fa43-. N '. YTD- Lesl 12 MG.-.Ir.s CD. I Y.el -


2.4723
1.2647
3.0569
11.3545
100.0000
100.0000
1.0000
9.6628


BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1.000 00 MARKET TERMS YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price NAV KEY
52wk-HI lighost closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colna end Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price 31 December 2007
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week 31 January 2008
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths "" 2 January 2008
Daily Vol Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value ""' 22 February 2008
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index, January 1, 1994 = 100
S) 4-for-1 Siock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007
ll .ir.f or k Spit vff.Ctivn Oet i 7/111i2n7
TO TRADE CALL CFAL 2-12-502-7010 FIDELITY 242.-3g'7794./ FrF 1MQB3 PATA & INFORMATION CALL (242) 394-503 _


3.0008
1.3812
3.7969
11.9880
100.0000
100.0000
1.0000
10.5000


S :,l,.n E :r. 3 Fur-,. 1 300'C"59" 0 62-'. 6 1
Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.999402** -0.04% 15.53%
Colina Money Market Fund 1.381183."" 0.39% 3.85%
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.7442"* -1.40% 27.72%
Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.9880"* 0.46% 5.53%
CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.00"*
CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.00""
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.00"
Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.6628"*
FINDEX CLOSE 22.67 1 Y D -3.08% 1 2007 34A47%


BTC's privatization committee


a final $5 million in the sixth
year.
That price was double the
amount offered by Bahama-
Tel, the leading bidder in the
failed 2003 privatization exer-
cise, which had taken the form
of a transparent, open beauty
contest.
When that collapsed, the
Government opted for a new
process that called for expres-
sions of interest from poten-
tial BTC bidders. Bluewater
was the only one to come for-
ward and meet the Govern-
ment's criteria, paying a
deposit and earning itself an
exclusivity period.
However, the change of gov-
ernment in May 2007 did Blue-
water's privatization bid no
favours. The incoming Ingra-
ham FNM administration
appeared to view the agree-
ment in principle that was
reached with its Christie pre-
decessor with suspicion, per-
ceiving it as a 'PLP deal'.
Mr Laing previously said
Bluewater had 15 business
days left on its exclusivity peri-
od, and suggested that if the
Government was unable to
reach a satisfactory deal with
Bluewater within that time, the
Government would then open
the privatization process up to


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given the MELANDE LISSAINT of
LEXINGTON AVE. OFF WULFF RD., NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 21st day of February, 2008 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JONESE S. FATAL of
Malcolm Rd. East, P.O. BOX N4584, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28TH day of
FEBRUARY 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE


VIKA SHIPPING LIMITED



Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 12th day of February, 2008.



David McLeman
Liquidator
of
VIKA SHIPPING LIMITED




.LEGALNOTICE

NOTICE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
COUSTEAU LIMITED is in dissolution. Mr. Nelson Ivan
Andrade Apunte is the Liquidator and can be contacted
at GCFN Investments, Inc. of 161 Bay Street, 27th Floor,
Toronto, Ontario, MJ5 2S1, Canada. All persons having
claims against the above-named company are required to
send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts
or claims to the Liquidator before 31st of March, 2008.




iquklator


LEGAL NOTICE
"-A



NOTICE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
ROTHBURN LIMITED is in dissolution. Mr. Nelson Ivan
Andrade Apunte is the Liquidator and can be contacted
at GCFN Investments, Inc. of 161 Bay Street, 27th Floor,
Toronto, Ontario, MJ5 2S1, Canada. All persons having
claims against the above-named company are required to
send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts
or claims to the Liquidator before 31st of March, 2008.




I ~i I Il


other potential bidders.
The protracted BTC privati-
sation process, .which has
dragged on for the best part of
a decade, has slowed up the
other arm of the Government's
telecommunications sector pol-
icy, liberalisation/deregulation,
with continuing attempts to
restrict the competition pro-
vided by the likes of IndiGo
Networks to protect BTC's pri-
vatisation value.
This has deprived Bahami-
an business and residential
consumers of greater choice,
the better telecoms prices com-
petition would bring, and an
improved quality of service.
And all the while BTC's long-
distance fixed line revenues
and profitability are being
eroded by the likes of Skype,
Vonage and other Voice over
Internet Protocol (VoIP)
providers.
BTC is now heavily reliant
on its cellular monopoly for


BUSNES


more than 64 per cent of its
revenues, and the bulk of its
profits, a key factor behind
Bluewater wanting a five-year
cellular monopoly to justify its
$260 million price.
To offset any 'monopoly'
effects from this, Bluewater
had offered to set up a 'virtual
mobile network', where other
cellular operators could pay to
use BTC's infrastructure to
carry their services.
Among Bluewater's princi-
pals are ex-Time Warner exec-
utive Roger Ames; former
NTL chief financial officer
John Gregg; Andrew
Sukuwaty, chairman and chief
executive of global satellite
communications company,
Inmarsat, and a former chief
executive of Sprint PCS; and
Carlos Espinal, chief executive
of TSTT, the national tele-
phone company for Trinidad
& Tobago.







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 13B
I


THE BAHAMAS INSTITUTE OF CHARTERED
ACCOUNTANTS


Surname First Post Office
Name -Name Box


Telephone: 326-6619


Fax: 326-6618


Website: www.bica.bs
P. 0. Box N-7037


PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTE: The Public Accountants Act, 1991 empowers the Council of The Bahamas
Institute of Chartered Accountants ("The Institute") to issue licences to persons
qualified as Public Accountants in The Bahamas. The Act stipulates that "no
person shall hold himself out as a public accountant or engage in public practice
unless he is the holder of a valid licence". Any person who contravenes this
provision is guilty of an offense and is liable, on summary conviction, to a fine,
imprisonment or both. Only persons licenced by
the Institute are eligible to perform auditing services and issue written opinions,
reports and certificates concerning financial statements or data for the purpose
of enhancing the credibility of the statement or data.

Public Notice is hereby given that only persons listed below have been Licenced
by the Institute to practice as public accountants until 31 December 2008. Persons
excluded from this list should neither hold themselves out as public accountants


nor engage in such practice. Persons who do so will be subject to prosecution.


Surname First Post Office
Name Name Box


1 Adderley
2 Adderley
3 Albury
4 Andrews
5 Antonio
6 Aranha
7 Aranha
8 Archer
9 Atkinson
10 Atkinson
11 Bain
12 Bain
13 Bain
14 Bain
15 Bain
16 Barrett
17 Bartlett
18 Bastian
19 Bates
20 Beneby
21 Bethel
22 Bowe
23 BRwe.
S24 l Braynen
25i ;B-hi ows ,mo5ii "
26 Butler
27 Butler
28 Butler
29 Butler
30 Cambridge
31 Cancino
32 Cassar
33 Carey
34 Cartwright
35 Cartwright
36 Cartwright
37 Cates
38 Chea
39 Chea
40 Chipman
41 Christie
42 Clarke
43 Clare
44 Cleare
45 Cochinamogulos
46 Cole
47 Comery
48 Cooper
49 Cooper
50 Cox
51 Culmer
52 Culmer
53 Cunningham
54 Davies
55 Davis
56 Davis
57 Dean
58 Delancy
59 Delaney
60 Deleveaux
61 Delva
62 Donaldson
63 Edgecome
64 Elliott
65 Eugene
66 Ferere
67 Ferguson
68 Ferguson
69 Ferguson
70 Ferguson
71 Fielder
72 Fletcher
73 Forbes
74 Galanis
75 Gardiner
76 Gibson
77 Gill
78 Glinton
79 Gomez
80 Gomez
81 Gomez
82 Gomez
83 Grant
84 Greene
85 Haines
86 Hall
87 Hamilton
88 Hanlan


Charmaine
Natasha
Patrick
Geoffrey
Patrice
Nayasha
Wayne
Kevin
Bennet
Ronald
Fabian
John
Sean
Shonalee
Terrance
Natishkah
Karen
Howard
Alan
Jeffrey
Ira
Diveane
Evanne
MailO .
Nerika
Eric B.
Louis A.
Maurice
Tricia
Marilyn
Lindsay
Ivylyn
Tanya
Carlton Jr.
Mario
Sheldon
Maitland
Patrice
Stanton
Habert
Kendrick
Graham
Tanya
Gregory
Theofanis
Alan
Dionne
Graham
Nadia
Rhonda
Clifford
,Olga
Michael
Leonard
Ann Marie
Don
Lynden
Joseph
Pedro
Charmaine
Ellison
Elwood
Adrian
Andrea
Nadeen
Maria
Chandrice
Charlene
Daniel
Kirvy
Michael
Diane
Roger
Philip
Nicolette
Lisa
Sonia
Lawrence
Craig
Dominic
James
Paul
Tonya
Cecile
Errol
Leisa
David
Sheena


''I


F-41257

N -10748
N- 7120
CR 54522
CB -11226
N-3910
N 4505
N- 8326
N 8326
0
N 3205
SS-19006
N 9058
EE -16255
F-44171
SS 6362
N 8250
N-63
N 7958
N 8326
N-123
N-4363
CB 13473
N- 8817


N-7619
N-7619
N -4837
SS-19375
CB -11683
F-43571
N 9214
CT-30350
SS-6384
F-42643
SS-6059
N- 4036
N -3231
N -8285
CB -13026
N 7757
N 7776
CR- 55210
N 9934
N -1547
N 8160

GT- 2422
N-10144
N-838
N -7680'
N- 4584
N 3522
N 4899
CB -13471
N-680
CB -11036
SB -51122
F-42643
N-916
N-317
N-3147

N- 3932
CB- 12215
SB 51004
CB 11171
N 9964
N-1608
SS- 6664
N- 7201
N- 3205
N-9219
N- 3697
SS 5389
CB 12754
N- 1991
N -363
SS- 6269
N 8285
N-1335
SS- 6232
CB 11438
CB 11910
F-44171
SP- 63958


97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
.140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149,
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168,
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210


211
212
213
214


Hanna
Harper
Hepburn
Herrington
Higgs
Horton
Horton
Hunt
Ingraham
Ingraham
Isaacs
Isaacs
Johnson
Jones
Jones
Kelly
Kemp
Kemp
Kikivarakis
Kiriaze
Knowles
Knowles
Knowles
Knowles
Knowles
Knowles
Knowles
Knowles
Lawrence
Lewis
Lockhart,
Lockhart
Longley
Longley
Lopez
Mackie
Mackey
Martin
Major
Maycock
McDonald
McFall
McPhee
Miller
Minnis
Mitchell
Moncur
Mortimer
Mortimer
Mortimer
Moss
Moss
Moss
Moxey
Moxey
Moxey
Munnings
Munnings
Munnings
Nairn
Neilson
Noronha
Patton
Pinder
Pinder
Pinder
Pindling
Pratt
Rahming
Ranson
Rigby
Rivere
Roberts
Robertson
Rolle
Rolle
Rolle
Rolle
Rolle
Rolle
Rouse
Roy
Russell
Russell
Rutherford
Sands
Saunders
Saunders
Saunders
Sawyer
Seymour
Simms
Smith
Smith
Smith
Smith
Smith
Smith
Smith
Springle
Stubbs
Stubbs
Swain
Symonette
Taylor
Taylor
Thomas
Thompson
Thompson
Thronebury
Townend
Treco
Treco


Turnquest
Underwood
Wallace
Watson
Watson
Wilde
Williams
Williams
Williams
Williams
Wilson
Winder
Winter


Michelle
Disa
Leo
Ivor
Paul
Clement
Francina
Jacqueline
Basil
Kingman
Berencia
Sharon-
Clifford
Dawn
Royston
Stuart
Shaneska
Renee
Anthony
Donna
Cindy
Daniel
Elijah
Kelly
Kim
Ronald
S. Brvce
Tracy
SJohn M.
Lawrence
Milford
Renee
Lambert
Sean
John
David
Troy
Karl
Stacia
Lynden
Justin
Jamaine
Kenue
Diana
Aisha
Roma
Annischka
Dario
Gerard
Myra
Allison
James
Susan
Edgar O.
L. Edgar
Sheryl
Mark
Ruiz
Tara
Hendrick
Michael
Roshan, ,.,j:,
Whit.ey
Barbara
Cliff
Deirdre
Diane
Lynette
Emily
John
Paula
Geneen
Bruno
MacGregor
Barbara
Norwood
Phyllis
Sean
Valretta
Warr-n
Melaiict
Nicola
Sheryl
Tiffany
Peter
Basil
L. Sydney
Ruthlee
Sherene
Gerald
Kevin
Nakeisha
Barry
Cindy
Frank
Kathleen
Margaret
Patrick
Shawn
Ronald
Monique
Philip
John
Debra
Michael
Vanessa
Yolanda
Ednald
Michelle
Arlene
Simon
Alison
Geoffrey
K. Peter


Racardo
WilL.n.r
Ansel
George
Gordon
Barry
Chantal
Clarence
E. Patrick
Franklyn
Raymond
Marva


N -7130
N- 7664
F-43718
N -4931

CB- 12361
N -1335
N 4837
N- 8892
N- 4485
CB- 13878
CB 13682
N -3911
N- 8759
N- 9653
SS 6232
CR-56781

N -7120
N-291
N-8326
FH -14431
EE 15484
GT -2174
F- 41729
CB- 11651
N -7120
N -123
CR -56766
N -7120
N -522
N-8338
N 123
CB -12407
F 40025
F- 43584
SS 5348
F- 41060
N -3319
EE- 15953
CR- 56718
GT 2304
AP -59223
CB -13193
N-4188
CB -11880
N -10431
N -636
N-4814
N-636
CB 13598
CB 13598
F- 44964
N 3447
N-3911
N-1893
N -7120
SS 6502
SS 5664
FH- 14166
N- 1531
. SS -5382
CB- 11327
CB -13069
SS-6462
N -806
N-7815
SS- 19500
Congo Town
N -3910
CR-54755
N- 10730
N-13116
N -4010
F-42831
N-8615
AB -21021
SB -52912
N 9360
EE- 17447
CB- 11515
N -1353
N -1561
EE- 16129
N 7509
N -8335
CB 13229
SS 5077
N -4656
N 1480
F- 42682
N- 4301
N- 4407
CB 12775
N -3180
N -9105
CB -11280
N 8423
N 8998
N- 4562
CR- 55652
EE- 16174
F-1884
SS-5320
N 7777
SB 50771
N- 8285

N -3231
SS 5476
N- 123
N- 3932
N -1587
F- 40895


N 3920
N 8335
CB -12148
SS -5389
N- 1132
CB -13050
EE-16276
N 4439
EE -15655
N 3739
N -7120
N 7209






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008


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share your story.


GN-651


Ministry Of Maritime

Affairs & Labour





NOTICES


PROPOSAL TO CHANGE A SHIP'S NAME

The Director of Maritime Affairs for the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, hereby gives notice
that in consequence of the owner's personal choice,
application has been received under Section 42 of the
Merchant Shipping Act, Chapter 268 in respect of the
ship "PANAM CARIBE" Official Number 8001039
Gross Tonnage 8254 Register Tonnage 4725 owned
by Geisel Compania Maritima S.A., with its principal
place of business at 31st Street, 3-80, P.O. Box 7412,
Panama 5, Republic of Panama for permission to
change her name to "CLIPPER CARIBE" registered
at the port of Nassau in the said new name as owned
by Geisel Compania Maritima S.A.

Any objection to the proposed change of name must
be sent to the Director of Maritime Affairs, P.O. Box
SN-4679, Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas within vyen days
from the appearance of this notice.

Dated at Nassau this 6th Day of February, 2008.

Ken McLean
Director of Maritime Affairs



PROPOSAL TO CHANGE SHIP'S NAME

The Director of Maritime Affairs for the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, hereby gives notice
that in consequence of the owner's personal choice,
application has been received under Section 42 of the
Merchant Shipping Act, Chapter 268 in respect of the
ship "NOBEL FORUM" Official Number 710752
Gross Tonnage 45777 Register Tonnage 24889 owned
by Aveline Maritime S.A., with its principal place of
business at 80 Broad Street, Monrovia, Liberia for
permission to change her name to "ANTOINE D"
registered at the port of Nassau in the said new name
as owned by Aveline Maritime S.A.

Any objection to the proposed change of name must
be sent to the Director of Maritime Affairs, P.O. Box
N-4679, Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas within seven days
from the appearance of this notice.

Dated at Nassau this 6th Day of February, 2008.

Ken McLean
Director of Maritime Affairs


PROPOSAL TO CHANGE A SHIP'S NAME


The Director of Maritime Affairs for the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, hereby gives notice
that in consequence of the owner's personal choice,
application has been received under Section 42 of the
Merchant Shipping Act, Chapter 268 in respect of the
ship "POLAR EXPLORER" Official Number
8001404 Gross Tonnage 2881 Register Tonnage 925
owned by Arrow Seismic Invest IV Limited, with its
principal place of business at Darenth House, 60 High
Street, Offord, Kent TN14 5TL, United Kingdom for
permission to change her name to "SOUTHERN
EXPLORER" registered at the port of Nassau in the
said new name as owned by Arrow Seismic Invest IV
Limited.

Any objection to the proposed change of name must
be sent to the Director of Maritime Affairs, P.O. Box
N-4679, Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas within seven days
from the appearance of this notice.

Dated at Nassau this 6th Day of February, 2008.

Ken McLean
Director of Maritime Affairs.


Fed chief signals


By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) -
Federal Reserve Chairman
Ben Bernanke warned Con-
gress that the nation is in for a
period of sluggish business
growth and sent a fresh signal
Wednesday that interest rates
will again be lowered to steady
the teetering economy.
"The economic situation has
become distinctly less
favourable" since the summer,
the Fed chief told the House
Financial Services Committee.
Since Bernanke's last such
comprehensive assessment last
summer, the housing slump has
worsened, credit problems
have intensified and the job
market has deteriorated.
Bernanke said that the conflu-
ence of these factors has
turned people and businesses
Alike toward a more cautious
attitude toward spending and
investment. This, he said, has
further weakened the econo-
my.
Incoming barometers con-
tinue to "suggest sluggish eco-
nomic activity in the near
term," Bernanke told law-
makers. At the same time, he
added, the Fed must keep a
close eye on inflation given the


recent run-up in energy and
other prices paid by consumers
and businesses.
Were energy prices to con-
tinue to rise at a sharp clip -
which the Fed doesn't antici-
pate it would "create a very
difficult problem" for the econ-
omy. It would spread inflation
and would put another damper
on growth, Bernanke said. If
that happened, he added, it
would be a "very tough situa-
tion."
For now though, the No. 1
battle is shoring up the econo-
my.
Bernanke pledged anew to
slice a key interest rate to help
the wobbly economy, which
many fear is on the verge of a
.recession or possibly has
already toppled into one.
The Fed "will act in a timely
manner as needed to support
growth and to provide ade-
quate insurance against down-
side risks," Bernanke said,
hewing closely to assurances
he offered earlier this month.
The central bank, which
started lowering a key interest
rate in September, has recent-
ly turned much more aggres-
sive. Over the span of just eight
days in January, it slashed rates
by 1.25 percentage points -
the biggest one-month reduc-


FEDERAL RESERVE Chairman Ben Bernanke testifies yesterday
on Capitol Hill in Washington before the House Financial Services
Committee hearing on the latest measures to heal the United States
economy.


tion in a quarter century.
Economists and Wall Street
investors predict the Fed will
cut rates again at its next meet-
ing on March 18.
There are dangers that the
economy will weaken even fur-
ther. "The risks include the
possibilities that the housing
market or labor market may
deteriorate more than is cur-


rently anticipated and that
credit conditions may tighten
substantially further,"
Bernanke cautioned.
As Bernanke began his first
day of back-to-back appear-
ances on Capitol Hill to dis-
cuss the economy, there was

SEE next page


A leading law firm with offices located in Nassau
Freeport is presently considering applications for
following positions.


and
the


The successful applicant should possess the following
minimum requirements:
Associates degree in related Computer Sciences
Two or more years work experience in the industry
Excellent working knowledge of Microsoft Office
products
Very good working knowledge of Windows 2000/2003
Operating Systems
Experience with SQL a plus
Previous knowledge of law firm operations an assest

General responsibilities will include but not limited to:
Maintaining, troubleshooting and repairing hardware
and software
Maintaining Network trustees and security
Maintaining system backups
Recommendation and implementation of new
technologies
Liase and Coordinate with various
vendor-based projects/solutions

WE OFFER
A competitive salary, Pension Plan, Health and Life Insurance
and other attractive benefits.

"Interested persons should apply in writing to:
The Office Manger
P.O.Box N-7117
Nassau, Bahamas


I I.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2007
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/01438
Common Law and Equity Division
IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Tides Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
comprising 250 acres forming a portion of the Henry Armbrister
Grant E.79A situate approximately 2 miles Northwest of the
Arthur's Town Airport on the Island of Cat Island one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
CAMPERDOWN HOLDINGS LIMITED
NOTICE

THE PETITION OF CAMPERDOWN HOLDINGS LIMITED in
respect of:
"ALL THAT pieces parcel or tract of land located
approximately two (2) miles Northwest of Arthur's Town
Airport on the Island of Cat Island in the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas in the vicinity of that tract of land known
as Camperdown and more fully described as follows:
Commencing at a point at the High Water Mark thence
SOUTHWARDLY to Dickies Road and land originally granted
to Robert Stubbs (recorded in Book E at page 255) and running
thereon Nineteen Hundred and Thirty-seven and Twenty-
one Hundredths (1,937.21) feet and SOUTHEASTWARDLY
by land originally granted to Emma Culmer, Thomas Butler,
James Thurston, John Strachan and Charles Hepburn
and running thereon a total distance of Forty Six Hundred
and Nineteen and Ninety-six Hundredths (4,619.96) feet
and SOUTHWESTWARDLY by land originally granted
to the aforesaid Charles Hepburn and George Dean and
running thereon a total distance of Twenty Three Hundred
and Nine and Eighty-nine Hundredths (2,309.89) feet and
SOUTHEASTWARDLY by land originally granted to Jupiter
and Jacob Thurston and running thereon Ten Hundred and
Ninety-eight and Thirty Hundredths (1,098.30) feet and
NORTHEASTWARDLY by a tract of land originally known as
"Camperdown" and originally granted to Henry Armbrister and
running thereon Thirty Eight Hundred and Sixty-two and Sixty-
five Hundredths (3,862.65) feet NORTHWESTWARDLY by the
High Water Mark and running thereon a total distance of Seventy
Three Hundred and Twenty-five and Eighty-five Hundredths
(7,325.85) feet back to the point of commencement."
Camperdown Holdings Limited claim to be the owner of the
unincumbered fee simple estate in possession of the said
land and has made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of
the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have its title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the
Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.
Copies of the Petition and the Plan of the said land may be
inspected during normal office hours in the following places:
1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street North in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas;
2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Munroe, #35 Buen Retiro
Road, off Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas; and
3. The Commissioner's/Administrator's Office at New Bight
and Arthur's Town, Cat Island, Bahamas.


NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or right to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim
not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the
expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of
these presents, file in the Supreme Court and serve on
the Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement of his claim in
the prescribed form verified by an affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of his
Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final
publication of these presents will operate as bar to such claim.

LOCKHART & MUNROE
Chambers
#35 Buen Retire Road
Off Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas
A attorneys for the Petitioner


VICE PRINCIPAL NEEDED

The Anglican Central Education Authority
invites applications from qualified Bahamians for the
position of Vice Principal for St. John's College
beginning September 2008.

The applicant must have a Degree in Education
from a recognized University, with at least 5 years
accumulative experience. The applicant must also
be computer literate.

Key job functions and responsibilities include:

- Assisting with staff supervision and evaluation
- Admissions and student orientation
- Scheduling (Timetables; examinations,
invigilations)
- Assisting with discipline
- Assisting with supervision of academic programmes
- Assisting with Curriculum Development
- Administration of School and External
examinations
- Inventory
- Requisitions

Applicants should sumbit a cover letter,
Curriculum Vitae, copies of degree certificates,
three references and passport photographs to;

The Director of Education
Anglican Central education Authority
P.O.Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas

The Deadline for Applications is
Friday, March 14, 2008


I a


BUSINESSO I





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008, PAGE 15B


THE TRIBUNE


ExrtherUratESSu


AL bpLLL JL nw M w W Ra wm


FROM page 14B

more bad news on the hous-
ing and manufacturing fronts.
Sales of new homes fell
in January for a third straight
month, pushing activity down
to the slowest pace in nearly
13 years, the Commerce
Department reported. The
median price of a new home
dropped to the lowest level in
more than three years.
And, orders to United
States factories for big-ticket
manufactured goods dropped
in January by the largest
amount in five months.
On Wall Street, stocks fluc-
tuated at first, then moved
higher after the release of
Bernanke's prepared com-
ments.
The Fed chief was hopeful
that previous rate reductions
along with a $168 billion stim-
ulus package of tax rebates for
people and tax breaks for busi-
ness will energize the econo-
my in the second half of this
year.
Bernanke has come under
some criticism for not acting
sooner in cutting rates to
respond to the economy's
problems. However, Rep.
Spencer Bachus, R-Ala.,
offered the Fed chief some
sympathy. "There is perhaps
no other public figure in
American who has been sub-
jected to as much Monday
morning quarterbacking as you
have over the past six months,"
Bachus said.
The panel's chairman, Rep.
Barney Frank, D-Mass., sug-
gested that the economy is not
suffering through a garden-
variety slowdown.
"I don't want to appeal to
you to use the word recession,
because I'm not going to be
responsible for the nervous
people at the stock market
who overreact when you twitch
your nose," Frank told
Bernanke. "But the problems
we now have are different."
Even as the Fed tries to
shore up the economy, it must
remain mindful of inflation
pressures, Bernanke said.


Record high oil prices -
topping $100 a barrel are
pushing consumer prices
upward. That's shrinking pay-
checks, and with people feeling
less well off because the val-
ues of their homes have
dropped, consumer spending
"slowed significantly" toward
the end of the year, the Fed
chief said.
The Fed forecasts that infla-
tion will moderate this year
compared with last year. But
the Fed's recently revised infla-
tion projection of an increase
Between 2.1 per cent and 2.4
per cent is higher than its old
forecast from the fall.
Risks
Bernanke said there are
"slightly greater upside risks"
that inflation could turn out to
be higher than the Fed cur-
rently anticipates, given the
recent run-up in energy and
food prices.
"Should high rates of overall
inflation persist, the possibility
also exists that inflation expec-
tations could become less well
anchored," Bernanke warned.
If people, companies and
investors think inflation will
move higher, they will act in
ways that could turn inflation
even worse, a sort of self-ful-
filling prophecy. And
Bernanke said that could com-
plicate the Fed's job of trying
to nurture economic growth
while also keeping inflation
under control.
With the economy slowing
and prices rising, fears are
growing that the country could
be headed for a bout of stagfla-
tion, a dangerous economic
brew not seen since the 1970s.
The Fed for now is focused
on bolstering the economy
through interest rate reduc-
tions. To combat inflation, the
Fed would raise rates.
At some point over the
Course of this year, the Fed will
need to "assess whether the
stance of monetary policy is
properly calibrated" to foster
the Fed's objectives of price
stability "in an environment of


downside risks to growth,"
Bernanke said.
With home foreclosures at
record highs, the Fed has pro-
posed rules to.crack down on a
range of shady lending prac-
tices that has burned many of
the nation's riskiest "sub-
prime" borrowers those
with spotty credit or low
incomes who have been
hardest hit by the housing and
credit debacles. The rules also
would curtail misleading ads
for many types of mortgages
and bolster financial disclo-
sures to borrowers.
The effectiveness of the reg-
ulations will depend on strong
enforcement, Bernanke said.
To that end, the Fed is working
with other federal and state
regulators.
Bernanke said consumers
need to be financially savvy -
understanding mortgages,
credit cards and other finan-
cial products.
"Well they certainly need to
know the interest rate and how
it varies over time and what
that means to them in terms
of payments," Bernanke said.


INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY



Three 2 Storey townhouses about 80% completed which require some repairs. Each unit comprises
676 sq.ft. on the upper floor and 676 sq.ft. on the lower floor (total floor area 1,352 sq.ft. per unit)
and consists of 3 Bedrooms 2 Baths, Living, Dining and Kitchen.
Driveway & Walkways are improved with 12 x 12 Spanish Type Tiles, 1,775 Sq.Ft. Swimming
Pool and Jacuzzi which are 85% completed.
The Buildings are situated on Lot #17376 comprising 10,000 sq.ft. located in
Bahama Sound of Exuma Section 18, Exuma, Bahamas


The units are being sold collectively.
For conditions of the sale and any other
information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
at: 356-1685 or 356-1608
Nassau, Bahamas
Interested persons should submit offers
in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit,
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
Serious enquiries only


F: SPAYROLL

For: SMALL BUSINESSES


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2008
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