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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00961
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: February 25, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:00961

Full Text







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Four taken to hospital

after responding to call

of gunshots being fired


* By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
FOUR police officers were
injured and had to be taken to
hospital for treatment after they
responded to a call of gunshots
being fired in the area of Milton
Street off East Street Saturday
night.
However, incensed residents of
the area allege that the plain-
clothes police interrupted the
memorial of slain C C Sweeting
student Rico Farrington, who was
stabbed to death at school two
weeks ago.
They also allege the officers
did not identify themselves as
police before using excessive
force while dealing with the griev-
ing residents.
Assistant Superintendent Wal-
ter Evans said sometime around 8
pm Saturday, officers responded
to reports of gunshots being fired


in the urban area. Officers saw a
man with a weapon and
approached him.
ASP Evans said residents of
the area obstructed the officers
from doing their duty and as a
result, four officers were injured
and taken to hospital for treat-
ment. They were treated and dis-
charged.
An unmarked 2008 Ford
Crown Victoria Police Unit was
also damaged during the time of
this incident, police reported.
Shevaughn Woodside, sister of
Farrington and a resident of the
area, claimed she saw an officer
"body slam" a few party-goers
before taking them into custody.
She said family and friends had
met at Farrington's Milton Street
home to mourn his burial, when
police entered the backyard to
search a few of the young men at
the party.
"Apparently one of the offi-
SEE page eight


Dogs' strange behaviour leads

police to suspected marijuana
THE STRANGE behaviour of three dogs as they feasted on a
grassy substance led police to a Bootle Cay beach and a plastic bag
filled with what is suspected to be marijuana.
Around 7A5 am Saturday the island manager at Bonefish Cay, Aba-
co, notified the Coopers Town police station that he had noticed
his dogs behaving strangely after eating a grassy substance.
Officers went by boat to Bonefish Cay, where they did a foot
search and discovered a large plastic garbage bag, filled with what they
believed to be marijuana, on a sandy beach near the waterline.
The bag had been partially torn open, apparently by the dogs that
had found it. The police took the bag and its contents to the Marsh
Harbour Detective Unit for further investigation.


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' 7 t


THERE was no snub to
PLP Deputy Leader Cynthia
Pratt when her broadcast
address was cut short by ZNS
on the first night of the party's
convention, "but rather a
demonstration of complete dis-
regard for good order by the
PLP," Michael R Moss, Chair-
man of Bahamas Broadcasting
Corporation said in a state-
ment yesterday.
Essentially, Mr Moss said,
the PLP's supposed "formal
protest" would be registered
against the Broadcasting Cor-
poration for "fully adhering to
the agreement between the
Corporation and the PLP gov-
erning broadcast of the Party's
convention activities."
To date, however, no such
protest had been received at
the Corporation by close of
business on Friday, February
22.
"The maturity of Dr Not-
tage, once again demonstrat-
ing why he is a true leader, is to
be applauded," said Mr Moss.
"Though disagreeing with the
Corporation's action, he freely
admitted the PLP was at fault
and to be blamed. The Party
was well aware of the condi-


tions governing the broadcast,
but failed to do what the Cor-
poration indicated was a
required course of action in the
event of any overrun in the
agreed time for the broadcast."
At the same time he said the
corporation condemns utter-
ances by other PLP spokesper-
sons, who "regrettably adopted
a posture of blaming everyone
else but themselves, an atti-
SEE page eight


SBy TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
A WOMAN and a two-year-
old child narrowly escaped death
during a Friday night shooting in
North Eleuthera, which left three
persons, including the woman,
nursing gun shot wounds.
According to police. four per-
sons were travelling in a vehicle
between James Bay Road and
the Bluff in North Eluethera
around 8 pm Friday when their
car was riddled with bullets.
Reports from the island indi-
cate the driver had made a cell
phone call a few minutes before
the shooting and had arranged
to meet friends in the area.
Shortly after their vehicle
turned onto the dirt road,
another car pulled up and show-
ered their car with bullets.
The victims, who were
injured, were able to contact
police.


The two adult male occu-
pants of the car fled the vehicle
and hid in nearby bushes, while
the woman victim escaped onto
the main road with the young
boy, who was the son of one of
the male occupants of the car.
They reportedly told police
that they were in the area to
meet friends, but as they pulled
onto a dirt road another car
pulled in behind their vehicle
and opened fire.
Police found the woman, who
had injuries to her back and one
of her arms, walking along the
road with the small child in tow.
The woman was identified by
sources on the island as Janet
Cooper of Nassau.
After an extensive search of
the nearby area, police found
the two men who had escaped
from the targeted vehicle in
nearby bushes. They were suf-
fering from gunshot injuries.
SEE page eight


Concerns on Harbour Island

over increased development
* By XAN-XI BETHEL
RESIDENTS of Harbour island are concerned about the effects
that the increased development at Runaway Hill could have on the
small island.
According to some residents, it came to their attention that
Mark Messier and the Runaway Hill Club had applied for per-
mission to build a Bar and Grill on the dunes there. Also, 50 hous-
es, and a commercial centre are reportedly in Mr. Messier's plans.
Apparently, Mr. Messier already has a bar and restaurant located
50 feet from the proposed site for the new buildings.
Currently, Harbour Island is experiencing blackouts and short-
ages in electricity because the demand is too much for the system
to handle. The water supply is also being affected because the
pumps run off the regular electricity supply, residents report.
Harbour Islanders are also concerned about the effect that the


SEE page eight


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PAGE 2, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008 THE TRIBUNE


ocaNews...P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,12,13,14,15
Editoal/Letters....................................... P4
,.A dvts ................................................... P 11,16
-BUSINESS SECTION
Business ............................. P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8

Ad d ...... ...... ........ ............................ ....... P10
INSIGHT SECTION
:,nsight.......................................... P1,2,3,4,5
:Advts....................................... ......... P6,78

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 28 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

SPORTS SECTION
Local Sports ..................................... .P1,2,15
USA Today Sports............................P3 -14
W eather............................................ ....;.P16


__ __


FOX Hill MP Fred Mitchell,
at the PLP's 50th National Con-
vention, has questioned the
motive behind Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham's recent pro-
nouncement that the numbers
business should be legalised.
Mr Mitchell said on the face
of it, it is a reasonable proposi-
tion, but with Mr Ingraham
"there is always a catch."
"Could it be that the group


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that he now serves wants to get
into that business? Could that
be the real reason to run the
over-the-hill fellows out of the
business and give the business
to the Bay Street boys? Things
that make you go, hmmmm,"
Mr Mitchell said.
The MP also hit out at For-
eign Affair Minister Brent
Symonette saying that he
"should also get to work."
He said that he found it "curi-
ous" that every time there is a
trip that requires Mr Symon-
ette to travel to Africa to look
after the Bahamas' interests, Mr
Ingraham sends another minis-
ter, but when it comes to travel
to the United States "he is
freely available."
"He must get to work, repre-
senting all our interests," Mr
Mitchell said.
The former foreign affairs
minister also accused Mr
Symonette of not fully under-
standing the visa abolition
agreement between the EU and
The Bahamas.
"The PLP left in place a deci-
sion by the European Union to
grant visa free access for
Bahamians into Europe. This is
subject to a visa abolition agree-
ment between the EU and The
Bahamas and the other CARI-


"Could it be
that the group
that he now
serves wants to
get into that
business? Could
that be the real
reason to run
the over-the-hill
fellows out of
the business
and give the
business to the
Bay Street boys?"

Fred Mitchell

COM countries granted the
access.
"The last time this matter was
raised, the Minister at first said
he was not going to pursue it.
He clearly misunderstood what
the problem was. In December


The Lyford Cay Foundations
TECHNICAL TRAINING AND
VOCATIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS
.Aoolr_-'io Is Open
The Lyford Cay Foundations are pleased to announce that applications are
now being accepted for technical training and vocational scholarships
for study in the US,Canada, UK and the Caribbean.
Applicants mustbe Bahamian citizens and pledge to return toThe
Bahamas upon completion of their studies.
Technical training and vocational scholarships are directed primarily at
individuals who wish to train or upgrade skills In areas where there Is a
shortage of well-qualified Bahamians in the work force.
Approvedfields of study are agriculture and fisheries; air conditioning
and refrigeration; automotive, marine and aviation mechanics;
computer service technology; construction and related trades including
electrical, carpentry, plumbing, painting and masonry; health care
technology; heavy equipment operations;hospitality, tourism, and
culinary arts, and machine shop and welding.
Please visit our website at w v-.lvifardcdyfoundation.org for additional
Information and application forms.
Forms may also be obtained from high school guidance counselors,
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and Vocational Institute, and the Lyford Cay Foundation office. Please
address your application to:The Chairman, Screening Committee.
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2007, he told the Honorary
Consular Corps luncheon that
he expected to sign such an
agreement, changing their
minds when the facts caught up
with their brains," Mr Mitchell
said.
However, to date he said the
FNM has done nothing further.
"The issue is about to get
more complicated because at
least now you can get a visa for
Europe without actually going
to the consulates which are not
in Nassau to get the visa, but
soon Schengen countries will
require biometrics in the visa,
'like fingerprints and eye scans.
If the FNM does not act to com-
plete the job we started, each
person will have to physically
go to another country to get the
visa. Imagine the nightmare this
will cause?" he asked.
Switzerland, he said, has the
most Bahamian visitors because
of their mutual banking indus-
try.
"Switzerland will soon join
Schengen and require the visas
for Bahamians. It is imperative
that theMinister put a person to
work on this issue full time in
Brussels and to get it resolved,"
Mr Mitchell said.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


T^L JT__1' a Iarge








m- - r- fo9r onl >
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Js^&S ^.E,;b -I.jy l(^^:


Mitchell questions



'motive' behind



PM's comments on



numbers business


PAGE 2, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008


THE TRIBUNE







MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


ISIQ I


0 In brief
........S...................s e ...................

US seeks

transition to

democracy

in Cuba
* WASHINGTON
CUBA without Fidel
Castro as president should
move toward "peaceful,
democratic change" and
allow Cubans the chance
to become "masters of
their own lives," the Bush
administration said Sun-
day, according to Associat-
ed Press.
"The Cuban people, fac-
ing the legacy of decades
of tyranny, merit our soli-
darity and support as they
seek to construct a
brighter future," Secretary
of State Condoleezza Rice
said in a statement before
Cuban lawmakers selected
Castro's brother, Raul, as
his successor. The ailing
81-year-old Fidel Castro
said last week he would
not accept another term as
president.
"We urge the Cuban
government to begin a
process of peaceful, demo-
cratic change by releasing
all political prisoners,
respecting human rights
and creating a clear path-
way toward free and fair
elections," Rice said in a
statement released in
Washington while she
traveled in Asia.
Other countries should
help the Cuban people
witl the transition to
democracy, Rice said.
Raul Castro, 76, has
headed Cuba's caretaker
government for 19 months,
since Fidel announced he
had intestinal surgery and
was provisionally ceding
his powers.
"At tils significant
moment in Cuba's history,
we reaffirm our belief that
the Cuban people have an
inalienable right to partici-
pate in an open and com-
prehensive dialogue about
their country's future, free
of fear and repression and
to choose their leaders in
democratic elections,"
Rice said.
"We support their
efforts to obtain a voice in
their national destiny and
their desire to gain access
to the resources and
opportunities necessary to
become masters of their
own lives, enhance the
well-being of their families
and achieve their God-giv-
en potential," according to
the statement.
The chairman of the
Senate Foreign Relations
Committee said the U.S.
"should be preparing (for)
what that transition is
going to look like." Sen.
Joe Biden, D-Del., sug-
gested establishing mail
service and easing travel
restrictions for family vis-
its. He did not favor lifting
America's five-decade
trade embargo "until there
is a response to political
prisoners, all the things
that are wrong with this
Castro administration."
But engaging Cuba in
trade is a way to end "an
outdated, outmoded, unre-
alistic, irrelevant policy,"
said Sen. Chuck Hagel, R-
Neb. "It's always been
nonsensical to me about
this argument, 'Well, it's a
communist country, it's a
communist regime.' What
do people think Vietnam
is? Or the People's Repub-
lic of China? ... We trade
with them. We have rela-
tions. Great powers
engage. Great powers are
not afraid. Great powers
trade."
Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchi-
son, R-Texas, raised the
possibility of talks with
Raul Castro.
"If we can change the
Sunni chieftains in Iraq,
some of which were help-


ing the insurgents against
us, maybe talking to some-
one who seems to be a
hard-core enemy doesn't
hurt anything, and it might
help," she said.
Hagel was on "Late Edi-
tion" on CNN, while
Biden and Hutchison
appeared on "This Week"
on ABC.
TROPICA


3


POLICE report that "every effort is being made" to
extinguish a raging fire at the City Dump that started late
Friday afternoon.
According to a statement released Sunday by Assistant
Superintendent Walter Evans, around 4 pm last Friday,
Fire Services responded to a "huge fire" at the City
Dump, offTonique Williams Darling Highway.
At the scene, officers observed a large portion of the
dump site ablaze, ASP Evans said. Three additional
emergency vehicles were summoned to extinguish the
blaze.
ASP Evans reported that the fire is now "under con-
trol" with three units combating the blaze which is now
smouldering.
"The general public is reassured that every effort is
being made to extinguish this fire which provides
some smoke discomfort to homes nearby," ASP Evans
said.


American vessel



runs aground off



West End, Bimini


AN AMERICAN vessel
returning to Florida from a
fishing trip at Memory Rock
ran aground off the southern
tip of-West End, Bimini on
Saturday night, police
said.
At 8:04 pm Saturday, offi-
cers at' the West End Police
Station, were alerted by the
US Coast Guard in Miami
that a vessel with four persons
aboard, had just run aground
off the southern tip of West
End.
As a result, a team of police
officers and a BASRA offi-
cial, went to that area, where,
in the darkness, they located a
30 ft white Catamaran with
twin 250 hp Mercury engines,


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lodged against the rocks near
Pine Island, Chief Superin-
tendent of Police Basil Rah-
ming said.

Crashed
According to CSP Rahming,
the boat's captain Raymond
Depotter, 48, of Palm Beach,
Florida, employed at The
Bootle Bay Bonefish Lodge,
told the officers that he and
the other three passengers,
were returning from a fishing
trip at Memory Rock, when
he somehow ventured off
course and crashed into the
rocks near the Old Bahama
Bay inlet.


The entire crew are all from
Palm Beach, Florida, police
said.
No one aboard the vessel
sustained any injuries and the
vessel, which is valued at
$150,000, was not taking on
water.
The BASRA official
advised the Captain that due
to the low tide and the dark-
ness, it would be safer to
remove and refloat the vessel
at first light on the following
morning, to avoid further
damage.
The four persons were
then safely evacuated
and taken ashore at West
End.


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SEE YOU TODAY












for an



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at


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Monday, 25 February from 10am-5pm
at the Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Tel: 362-6527
Sachin Ahluwalia ofAnkasa will be introducing
the Spring 2008 collections


g,









PAGEO 4, MONDAY, R 2, 20 TRIBUNEHE EDITOR


Beware a





culture of





dependence


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (241) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Nottage wrong on his assumptions

DR BERNARD Nottage told the PLP on the campaign trail that "more tourists are
convention Thursday night that unless the coming now..." Neither was this true. In fact
party was prepared to "answer honestly," they were fast declining and those in the
"discuss openly," and act on its findings as to industry were worried.
why the 2007 general election was lost, it Instead of 5 million visitors in 2005, the fig-
will not be ready to become the government ure was 4.8 million and in 2006 the figure
again, if and when an opportunity presents had again dipped by a further 100,000 to 4.7
itself. million. So at the time of the May 2 election
He then asked? in 2007, weakening in the tourism market
"How do we explain that with the economy was of great concern to Bahamians. Already
growing at an accelerated rate; with unprece- workers in the industry were worrying about
dented foreign direct investment; with the job security. So Dr Nottage is deluding him-
lowest unemployment figures in years; with self if he believes that all was rosy with the
high ratings from the appropriate agencies; economy at the time of the May 2 election.
with the welcome prospects of universal Many of the billion dollar investments of
health insurance needed by the vast majority which the PLP now boast were being sat on
of citizens; with unprecedented numbers of by the Christie government, so much so that
houses being built in the public and private in April 2004 Julian Francis, governor of the
sectors and with the lowest downpayment Central Bank, urged that approval for invest-
requirements in our history, that we still lost ment projects be taken from the Cabinet to
the elections?" increase efficiency and remove politics from
We agree that questions have to be asked the process. He suggested that it be given to
and that they have to be answered honestly. an administrative body, which would operate
But the PLP will not get very far in its inves- in accordance with the "strict criteria" already
tigations if party leaders start by asking ques- in place. By January, 2006 even the US
tions based on incorrect assumptions. Ambassador was frustrated to the-point of
"How do we explain that (the loss at the courting criticism by calling for foreign direct
election) with the economy growing at an investment approvals to be transparent and
accelerated rate?" asked Dr Nottage. certain to enable this nation to compete in the
The truth of the matter is thatjthe econo- global economy. And so, even on this front,
my was not growing at an accelerated rate. the Christie government was scoring badly
Read the files of The Tribune for 2006 on the and Bahamians were concerned.
great concern felt for an eco'tfny that -- It was during this period that the public
showed signs even then of slowing, were urging Mr Christie to be more decisive.
By the end of 2006 these signs were evi- The total amount of inward foreign direct
denced by declines in bank liquidity relative investment in the Bahamas over the five-
to the same period the year before, a wors- year period of the Christie administration
ening balance of payments, softening of cap- was about $2.5 billion, almost half of which
ital inflows, accelerated declines in foreign reflected land sales and the bulk of the bal-
reserves and declines in tourism arrivals, ance came from the Kerzner Phase III project
As a matter of fact there was so much which was in the works before the PLP
fudging of tourism figures that it wasn't until became the government in the May 2, 2002
a few days after the Ingraham government election.
won at the polls on May 2, 2007 after a His other assumptions, which we shall deal
long and protracted argument with the press with in another article, are also incorrect.
trying to get correct figures that the Min- Dr Nottage and the PLP have to accept
istry of Tourism had to downgrade the total that there was a lot of uncertainty leading
number of tourist arrivals to the Bahamas up to the 2007 election with the electorate
for the year 2005. The figures given out by the concerned that the PLP had fumbled the ball
Ministry before the election were 5 million and it was no longer safe for them to leave the
visitors for that year. economy in that party's hands.
We knew from the Central Bank report Already before the 2002 election and
that that was not true, but the PLP still boast- America's growing economic problems, the
ed publicly on billboards and from platforms ha idwriting was on the wall for what we are
that 2005's tourism figures were in fact 5 mil- now going through only made worse by
lion. Mr Christie went so far as to declare the US recession.


"A democracy cannot exist as a
permanent form of government.
It can only exist until the voters
discover that they can vote them-
selves money from the Public
Treasury. From that moment on,
the majority always vote for the
candidates promising the most
money from the Public Treasury,
with the result that a democracy
always collapses over loose fiscal
policy...."
There are only two ways gov-
ernment programmes can be paid
for: Additional taxes or increased
borrowing, and increased bor-
rowing will lead to more and
higher taxes in the future, to pay
for the borrowing. I say to us all,
we are headed towards a welfare
state that cannot be maintained.
Whatever happens, the only cry
you hear: let government take
care of it. Who is the govern-
ment? What do you think this so-
called Urban Renewal is all
about? It is a welfarism, which
promotes a culture of irresponsi-
bility. This is where the State
attempts to meet the needs of a
child no matter the actions of the
parents. The question is the same,
who pays? Everyone else who


We are paying the price of


EDITOR, The Tribune.
THE dictionary defines
"Recession" as the falling off of
business activity. The country is in
a recession, and anyone who says
we are not, are either too blind or
too stupid to recognize the tell-
tale signs. If you think we are not
in a recession then, pray tell me,
what do you call it when business
falls off to the extent that it has, in
the country; when people in the
hundreds are being dismissed
from jobs, every day and/or put
on short work weeks; when
household incomes are reduced
to a minimum; when houses in
the hundreds are being foreclosed
on and when normal everyday
household bills are left unpaid for
months?
When a recession threatens a
country, the normal reaction of
a prudent government would be
to get money to consumers for
spending. This, however, more
often than not, would necessitate
the government itself, providing
most of that money to house-
holds, either in the form of cash
or tax incentives.
I don't claim to be an econo-
mist, like Zhivargo Laing, but
those of us who manage our own
businesses, know that this makes
good financial sense; you don't
stifle spending, you enhance it.
Consumers' spending money cre-
ates a beehive of activity in a city,
which facilitates employment and
enables growth to take place.


Thinking Bahamians, question
the wisdom of this FNM admin-
istration for withdrawing those
tax breaks given to less fortunate
Bahamians, by the Christie PLP
government in the form of duty
free vehicles for public service
drivers and stamp tax relief given
to first time, Bahamian, home
buyers. This lame brain move
makes no sense if we are to min-
imise the adverse effects of this
growing recession.
This economic depression, we
are experiencing, came about in
my view, for the most part, as a
consequence of the irresponsible
remarks and actions of Hubert
Ingraham since he regained gov-
ernance of the country on May
2, 2007. Usually foreign investors
are pretty jittery about investing
big bucks in these, what they
often call, "banana republics."
They really do not trust these lit-
tle tin god prime ministers to
keep their word and I, certainly
understand why. In the Bahamas
we have had, until recently, an
honour system, where successive
governments, notwithstanding,
accept, without question, the con-
tracts and/or heads of agreements
finalised, agreed, signed and
sealed by their predecessor in
office. I said, until recently,
because Hubert Ingraham broke
that trust when he declared, after
taking office, that his government
would not accept, without ques-
tion, the contracts and/or heads of


EDITOR, The Tribune.
IN recent times the news media
has reported daily about one
group or the other who complains
about certain tax concessions that
are peculiar only to the group
being affected. I often ask who
pays, and where are the monies
coming from, when taxes that
should be paid into the public
purse is not. I am sure all of us
would prefer to pay no taxes. In
the scheme of life is this possi-
ble? The obvious answer is no.
In this country a parent is respon-
sible for a child until he/she reach-
es legal age or suffers perpetual
mental retardation.
I read and heard the com-
plaints of a group that had a con-
cession for 20 years, as to why it
should continue. Are they not of
legal age or mentally deficient to
the point where they cannot sup-
port themselves independently
on a daily basis?
Then there are those who had
some concessions to do with buy-
ing a house. This was a special
law that was good for five years
only. The time has now expired,
and some are screaming foul.
How is that so, you never had it
prior to five years ago, before
then nothing was wrong. Now
that the time has expired, sud-
denly it's unfair, why?
I mentioned these two interest
groups to lead into the following:


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seeks to do the right things, like
being responsible and paying the
high taxes that are needed to fund
such madness. It is the welfare
system that helps to produce the
fatherless children, and the con-
sequent misery they visit upon us
all. This welfarism encourages
negligent behaviour because it is
detached from any form of
responsibility.
This welfare mentality encour-
ages many Bahamians to want to
live in Freetown, on gimme street,
and something for nothing
avenues, is eroding their basic
individual responsibility for get-
ting a job and planning for the
future. I ask again, with all these
give-a-ways, who's supposed to
pay; where is the money coming
from? As a people we must
always be willing to assist persons
with genuine needs, who some-
times fall on hard times through
no fault of their own. In the
meantime, however, we must stop
the politics that encourages this
culture of dependence. We must
wake up from this slippery slope
of political, social and economic
demise. I say that prudence in the
use of scarce resources and time is
of the essence.
DENNIS W MARTIN
West Ender
Nassau,
February, 2008.

an FNM govt
agreements, entered into by the
PLP and that he and his govern-
ment were prepared to stop work,
whether in progress or not, and
place them all under review. This,
I am convinced, was what caused
Investors to stop, sit up and take
a second look at the Ingraham
administration to determine if
their investments would be safe
under his tenure. This.is now the
mode we are in and this is why so
many of us are catching eternal
hell, all of us, except Ingraham.
We are our own worst enemy;
and until we learn to recognize
an "uncle tom" when we see one,
we will always suffer the conse-
quences of our bad decisions. It
was a bad decision when Bahami-
ans voted the FNM back into
office, for when you'll did that
you voted against national health
insurance; now you all around
town begging for "hand outs" to
pay your medical bills. For the
record, I have no sympathy for
you, so keep on begging and
maybe Hubert and Laing will
pass by and throw a few pennies
in your collection box. Those are
my views.
FORRESTER
J CARROLL JP
Freeport,
Grand Bahama,
February 14, 2008.


Carey Building,
Dowdeswell Street
Tel 32-11S03
Mon-Fri


PAGE 4, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


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LOCAL NEWS


0 In brief

800-pound
pygmy sperm
wale found
stranded near
Islamorada
KEY LARGO, Fla.
WILDLIFE authorities are
investigating why a 900-pound
pygmy sperm whale became
stranded in shallow waters in
the Florida Keys, according to
Associated Press.
The 9-foot male was discov-
ered by a local fisherman Sat-
urday about 8 a.m. near Islam-
orada. With the help of the fire
department, wildlife officials
lifted the animal onto a boat
and took it to the Marine
Mammal Conservancy in Key
Largo.
Conservancy chairman Art
Cooper says the mammal is in
critical condition and will
undergo tests. Experts were
surprised that the whale was
stranded because it had no
obvious injuries.

Miami Zoo
collects over
150 exotic pets
SMIAMI
WITH alternately tearful
goodbyes and barely contained
impatience, more than 100 South
Floridians surrendered their
unwanted exotic animals at the
Miami MetroZoo on Saturday,
according to Associated Press:
The canopied plastic tables
became exhibits of their own as
passers-by hoisted up children
and snapped pictures of the
snakes, scorpions and turtles
being handed over in laundry
baskets, food storage contain-
ers, and in one case, pillow cases.
The "Exotic Pet Amnesty
Day" event was designed to give
owners a safer alternative to
turning the critters loose. Of the
more than 150 pets handed over,
all but six found new homes.
Among the more bizarre sub-
S missions of the day were a rhino
: 9d [j tiJV p4-g iaPttea Afund in seival
.. . :at; rand a coatrnunpj,,a racoon-
A., ,- .Q9kjpg maemri a lfoun. i; South
I 4..nerica. ,, vrifim


Sears: former Cabinet lacked 'political



will' needed for judiciary 'investment'


Former AG speaks

out on one of his

greatest 'regrets'


ONE of the greatest "regrets"
of former Attorney General
Alfred Sears was that the for-
mer Cabinet lacked the "politi-
cal will" to make the "invest-
ment" that was needed to estab-
lish a judiciary that could deal
with the "requirements of a 21st
century Bahamas."
Mr Sears made the statement
yesterday when he appeared on
More 94's Sunday talk show,
"The Last Word."
One great need, he said, was
the establishment of a proper
judicial complex the rational for
which was so "compelling that
the political will should just
flow."
To date, he said, it is difficult
to maintain the security or
judges and court personnel
because there is currently no
way to segregate the general
population and patrons of the
court form the judges.
"We also have witnesses in


very serious trials who must be
rubbing shoulders with the fam-
ily of accused persons, so there
are many compelling reasons
for a building that is customized
for the judiciary," he said.
The former Attorney Gener-
al said what the country must
do is make a very "hard deci-
sion" to invest the resources
that are necessary to establish a
judiciary that can deal with the
requirements of a 21st century
Bahamas.
"We do have the resources,
but we need the political will.
One of the regrets I have had
after serving in the Cabinet of
the Bahamas is that we did not
have the political will to make
the kind of investment that was
needed," he said.
The cost of the proposed judi-
cial complex, Mr'Sears said, was
set at $50 million and when
asked if the country could have
had that to spend he said "of


"We do have the resources,
but we need the political wilL
One of the regrets I have had
after serving In the Cabinet of
the Bahamas is that we did not
have the political will to make
the kind of investment that
was needed."

Former Attorney General Alfted Sears


course we do but we have to
make a hard decision."
"I think that when we:look
at the capital budget it's a hard
choice to make but the provi-
sion of a judicial complex is crit-
ical to the modernization and
improving the function of the
judiciary," the former minister
said.
He pointed out that current-
ly the supreme court is scattered
over four buildings which
makes it difficult for judges to
easily and regularly conference
among themselves.
"We have to be moving doc-
uments from one building to the
next compromising the integri-
ty of vital documents for the
prosecution and conduct of judi-
cial proceedings. We also have
one supreme court library,
which is in one building'and
fragments of libraries in differ-
ent centres.
"We also have a situation
where it is difficult to sequester
juries thus exposing or compro-
mising the integrity of our jury
process," Mr Sears said.


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Man arraigned

on drug charges

A 26-YEAR-OLD man from Alice Town, Bimini, was
arraigned in the Freeport Magistrate's Court on Thursday
morning on drug charges.
Cyril Rashad Gooding pleaded guilty to possession of
dangerous drugs with intent to supply.
Magistrate Debbye Ferguson convicted him and sentenced
him to one year at Her Majesty's Prison, Fox Hill.
In addition, Gooding was also fined $1,000, or in default of
payment, ordered to spend an additional eight months in
prison.
The court ordered that the drugs be destroyed. ,


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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 6, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


LOA'NW


The Glory Harris Banks Gallery



finally receives official opening
ON a lovely balmy Bahamian million-dollar donation to the
night in Grand Bahama the Min- Trust. Manv Bahamians did not
ister of Tourism and Aviation know Glory Harris Banks as she
officially opened the Glory Harris died over 15 years ago. but before .
Banks Gallery at the Rand she died she chose to leave her r.
Nature Centre. The gallery, estate to the Bahamas National
which has been in use since its Trust, with the specific request to
completion in 2006, finally build an art gallery in Grand
received its proper opening and Bahama. Leaving her legacy on
the unique Glory Harris Banks an island she adopted when she
received her due thanks for her moved here in 1977, she made
certain that young Bahamian
artists had a proper gallery to


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showcase their worK.
Mrs. Banks was a professional
commercial artist in the United
States during the 1940s and 1950s
before she moved to Europe, and
then Germany with her first hus-
band. She remarried Alexander
Banks in 1974 and continued to
develop her artistic skills, became
an avid photographer and had a
one-woman show of her water-
colours.
The Banks retired to Freeport
in 1977, where they spent the rest
of their lives, enjoying the ocean
and their gardens. Mrs Banks
became very active in the


THE OFFICIAL OPENING of the gallery gave Trust members the opportunity
to honour Mrs. Glory Harris Banks who donated a million dollars to the
Bahamas National Trust to help promote young Bahamian artists. Pic-
tured (left to right), Glen Bannister, President of the Bahamas National
Trust, Karin Sanchez, Chairman of the Grand Bahama Regional Branch, and
Pericles Maillis, Deputy President of the BNT. Mrs. Banks, an artist in her
own right, moved to Grand Bahama in 1977 and has now left her legacy
for young artists'to display their creations.


Freeport community, participat-
ing in the activities of the Hawks-
bill Yacht Club, the Grand
Bahama Humane Society, the
Grand Bahama American Wom-
en's Club, Sir Charles Hayward
Library and, of course, the
Bahanias National Trust.
By all accounts Mrs. Banks was
a volunteers "volunteer", always
there, always willing to help. Ivy
Elden, who was her close friend,
spoke about her at the opening.
She said "she was tiny in physical
stature and due to her age could
not help with the heavy work at
the Humane Society, but she
would go from restaurant to
restaurant collecting scraps for
the dogs at the shelter. And if we
could not make ends meet, she
would always dig into her pock-
et."
Lucaya MP Neko Grant offi-
cially opened the gallery on Fri-
day night with his wife and the
Trust's President.
"When I was invited to open
the gallery, I don't think you
knew that I too knew Mrs.
Banks," he joked, "she used to
visit me once a month in my
office before my political career
began and you just could not tell
that little lady 'no'." Mr Grant
also thanked Trust members in
Grand Bahama for all the work
they do and continue to do for
the environment. He pledged his
government's commitment to the
environment and hoped that he
would be able to come to a simi-
lar event to reopen the east park
and bridge soon.
Trust President Glenn Bannis-
ter, who travelled from Inagua
for the event, said that "the
Bahamas National Trust is aware
that the delay in the formal open-


ing of this Gallery and many
issues which have surrounded it,
have created a deal of consterna-
tion and mistrust amongst the
members of the Freeport com-
munity.
"Indeed," he said, "the Grand
Bahama regional branch has
made a concerted effort to com-
municate these concerns and I
must tell you that the Bahamas
National Trust has heard what
they have had to say. So I speak
to you this evening, m a new spir-
it of communication and work-
ing together to build, maintain
and support the national park sys-
tem throughout The Bahamas."
After the presentations the
Banks Gallery was opened and
those attending were invited to
see Mrs. Banks' work along with
the work of several students from
Jack Hayward High School, Eight
Mile Rock High School, St.
Georges High School, Catholic
High School and Lucaya Inter-
national School.
"We are very proud to show-
case Glory's work and the work
of several students tonight," said
Cecilia Bodie, Administrator and
Education Specialist, Bahama
National Trust. "This is exactly
what Glory wanted to see young
artists exhibiting and showing off
their many talents, we hope to
make her proud."
The Glory Harris Banks gallery
will showcase its current work for
a month and is open to all. The
branch hopes to use the gallery to
showcase other work, giving a
permanent gallery to Bahamian
artists to display their incredible
work..For more information
about the gallery or to visit the
new display, contact the Rand
Nature Centre 352-5438.


Furniture Plus, PMH


Foundation link up for


fundraising campaign

FURNITURE Plus has partnered with the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital Foundation to launch its annual fundraising
campaign titled "Charity of Hope, Candle or Angel of Hope"
Campaign.
This partnership is seeking to raise funds to purchase a ven-
tilator machine for the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the
Princess Margaret Hospital by selling candles at eight dollars
each and miniature angels at the cost of one dollar each.
The VIP Bird ventilator and monitor is a piece of medical
equipment used in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. It is a crit-
ical tool used for the respiratory maintenance of premature
infants to provide ventilator support and supplement ICU care.
The campaign's goal is $50,000. Thus far the first cheque
presentation of $10,000 was made for the initial payment for the
purchase of the Ventilator.
Persons can contribute to the campaign by purchasing a Can-
dle and Angel at all Furniture Plus store locations and at the
NICU, Princess Margaret Hospital. With every purchase of a
Charity Of Hope Candle or Angel of Hope, Furniture Plus
will match all proceeds collected and donate the funds to the
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.
Furniture Plus Ltd. and the Princess Margaret Hospital Foun-
dation wish to appeal to the community to continue supporting
the efforts of the fundraising campaign as they assist the Neona-
tal Intensive Care team at the Princess Margaret Hospital pro-
vide the best critical health-care to the paediatric patients and
their families at the Hospital.

Pair expected to be charged with

firearms, ammunition possession

TWO twenty-year-old men are expected to be formally
charged in Freeport Magistrate's Court this morning with
firearms and ammunition possession.
Acting on information, two police officers from Grand
Bahamas Central Division went to Rum Spout Sports Bar on
East Atlantic Drive, around 7.40pm Friday.
There they discovered a .9mm semi-automatic pistol that
was loaded with 12 live .9mm "hollow point" bullets.
Two men one from Imperial Park and the other from
Amberjack Street were taken into custody, and, according to
police, are expected to be charged.






IN Friday's article under the heading, "Some suspect
arson after gov't complex destroyed", The Tribune report-
ed that the fire in Crooked Island began in the early morn-
ing hours of Wednesday.
However, the fire began in the early morning hours of
Thursday. Police said the area was last patrolled at 11 pm
Wednesday night and believe the blaze began between 11
pm Wednesday and 7 am Thursday.


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LOCAL NEWS


KINGDOM WOMEN IN BU


Speakin

FORMER Senator, lawyer,
and College of The Bahamas
Alumni Hall of Fame inductee,
Tanya McCartney will be
among several women from the
financial sector speaking at the
Kingdom Women In Business
Seminar on Saturday at the
British Colonial Hilton.
The seminar, which begins on
Friday, February 29, and con-
tinues through Saturday, March
1, is designed to motivate and
inspire women to pursue their
career goals, overcome chal-
lenges such as unfair business
practices in the workplace, and
form strategic alliances with
other businesswonien.
All of this, while seeking first
the Kingdom of God. McCart-
ney, who is presently the Man-
aging Director of RBC Finco,
will be addressing Principles For
Women Executives.
"We are thrilled to have
speakers who are examples of
what we seek in KWIB," said
founder of the organization,
lawyer Melisa Hall.
"As Kingdom Women, we
believe in enriching ourselves
to increase our wealth.
"These ladies are enriched
through their education and
experience and we are pleased
that they have extended their
knowledge to us and the semi-
nar participants."
Hall introduced the other
ladies from the financial sector
taking part in the seminar.
Among them is Antonise Col-
lie, formerly of
Citigroup/Cititrust Bahamas
Limited. Collie now serves as
the Assistant Manager of the
Latin American Investment
Bank. Her presentation will
focus on Balancing Life as a
KWIB.
Manager of Marketing, PR
and Business Development at
British American Financial,
with responsibility of the
Dreams Investment Group For
Women, Cecillia Cox is sched-
uled to speak on Capitalizing
Investment Opportunities.
"I'm happy to be a part of
this seminar because I feel that
wonjien e, planjbg re9igSei r .,
and active, playing leading roles,


ISINESS SEMINAR: British Colonial Hilton


g up for women


Former Senator Tanya

McCartney to speak at

seminar on Saturday


in the Bahamas and I am dedi-
cated to seeing this become a
reality in the very near future,"
Ms Cox said.
Meanwhile, Charlere Paul
will discuss Financial Planning
For Kingdom Women Bud-
get and Wealth Creation. Paul's
expertise comes from her expe-
rience as senior manager at
Deloitte (formerly Deloitte and
Touche) and managing audit-
ing and liquidations for numer-
ous banks locally, in North
American and Switzerland. She
also served at Commonwealth


computers


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"As Kingdom
Women, we
believe in
enriching
ourselves to
increase our
wealth. These
ladies are
enriched
through their
education and
experience and
we are pleased
that they have
extended their
knowledge to us
and the seminar
participants."

Melisa Hall


Bank for 12 years in various
capacities, including Vice Pres-
ident of Operations, V.P. and
Group Financial Controller and
V.P. Audit and Inspection.
Rounding out the panel is
Nadeen Eugene, of Higgs and
Johnson who will present
Accounting Principles for King-
dom Women: Profitable Busi-
ness Accounting. During her
career in finance, she was
employed as a Senior Associ-
ate at the KPMG accounting
firm.


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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008, PAGt: /


THE TRIBUNE


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FROM page one


tude symptomatic of many of the serious prob-
lems affecting this great little country of ours
today."
"The feeble attempt by one spokesman to sug-
gest a parallel between a Vice-President of the
United States and the Deputy Leader of the PLP
is also symptomatic of the delusional mindset
seemingly still prevalent among some PLPs. For
surely, if a parallel is to be drawn with the position
of the U.S. Vice-President, that position will be
Deputy Prime Minister of the Bahamas, a position
presently held by the Hon. Brent Symonette,"
Mr Moss said.
He said for a former broadcast journalist to
have weighed in on the issue is contemptible.
"This individual did not take his PLP party to
task when they went against every principle of
decency and fair play allowing the FNM only
minimal access to the state run BCB during the
election campaign of 2007. In fact, rather than
allow the FNM access to ZNS radio and television
for broadcast of a mass rally, ZNS rebroadcast a


FROM page one

development would have on the
environment. "It would dam-
age the already vulnerable
beach. The dunes are the main
line of defense for the island
against erosion and hurricane
damage," said one resident.
Many residents believe that
over-development would open
the small island to catastrophe.
"Harbour Island is an inter-
esting example of how a once
small and quaint historic island
has attracted a jet set clientele
with very deep pockets for vaca-
tion homes, and it has also
attracted major foreign devel-


ZNS chairman Police officers


previously televised PLP rally," the chairman
said.
History, he said, will show how terribly unkind
the PLP was to the opposition regarding access to
the medium of broadcast for more than 25 years
prior to 1992.
"Notwithstanding the foregoing, Prime Minis-
ter Ingraham has given the Board of the Broad-
casting Corporation a mandate to govern its
actions democratically and in a spirit of fair play.
Accordingly, in spite of the PLP's existing huge
debt to the Broadcasting Corporation, as was
disclosed by the Prime Minister, the PLP request-
ed and was granted three nights of free radio and
television broadcast, between the hours of 8 pm
until 11 pm.
"The Broadcasting Corporation will not allow
the PLP to confuse the issue. This was no snub to
the Deputy Leader of the PLP, but rather a
demonstration of complete disregard for good
order by the PLP," Mr Moss said.


Harbour Island
opers looking to exploit its pop-
ularity." The new development
would also destroy over two
acres of vegetation on the
island, leading to a greater
chance of soil erosion.
"The island is already crip-
pled by the inability to provide
proper electrical services," said
a resident. Another lady
explained, "There are daily
power cuts ongoing in addition
to voltage irregularities when
there is power. Vast monies
have been spent by homeown-
ers on appliances which have
been blown due to surges and


irregular voltage. Our home
recently had a spike which cost
us $10,000 in replacement costs
and there seems to be no end in
sight of the BEC and water
woes."
They say that additional
development will put a further
strain on the already stressed
electricity system and that such
a development should not even
be considered at this time.
Member of Parliament for
Eleuthera, Alvin Smith, com-
mented on this issue. While
making clear that he did not
oppose the new development,
he said that he agrees that the
development should not be giv-
en the go-ahead until the elec-
tricity and water problems are
dealt with on the island.
"It will increase,demand on
utilities. The electrical supply
in Harbour Island and
Eleuthera are far from accept-
able," he said. However, he
assured residents that plans are
underway for the total upgrade
of the system in Eleuthera. He
regretted that such an initiative
had not been done years ago.
"Harbour Island is a gem and
we don't want it to be spoiled,"
he said.


FROM page one
cers came across the road where
we was having the 'lil party,
searched a few fellas at the back
of the yard and they came out
there and grab another fella, took
him down the road where they
body slam him in the road about
three times they body
slammed him to the tree, then
they body slam him on the car,
and then they body slam him on
the road.
"Now when the crowd saw that
everyone started to rush and then
the bottles started flying at the
police started shooting the guns in
the air."
She said her family members
intend to file a formal complaint
with the Complaints and Corrup-
tion Unit against the arresting
officers. Yesterday, Chief Supt.
Glenn Miller told the media he
was not aware of any claims of
police brutality by residents of
the area.
Several individuals are being
questioned by police in relation to
this matter.

Three shot

FROM page one
One of the men reportedly was
shot in his leg and hip, while the
second man suffered gunshot
wounds to his arm. Police also
found the victim's car set ablaze
by the gunmen.
Assistant Supt. Walter Evans
said the child was taken to the
local clinic where he was treated
and discharged. He was not
injured. The woman and two men
were airlifted to New Providence
Friday night, ASP Evans said.
Up to press time yesterday,
their conditions were unknown.
The woman, whose mother lives
in Hatchet Bay, was visiting from
Nassau, and one of the men, orig-
inally from Nassau, is now a resi-
dent of Eleuthera, while the oth-
er injured man lives in New Prov-
idence.
Several persons are in custody
and being questioned by police
in relation to this incident.


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PAGE 8, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008


THE TRIBUNE








MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008, PAGE 9


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A VIRGIN Flight leaves London's Heathrow Airport for Amsterdam with one engine powered by Biofuel con-
taining coconut and babassu nut oil yesterday. Virgin Atlantic conducted the world's first commercial flight
powered by biofuel in an attempt to show that the fuel can produce less carbon dioxide than normal jet fuels.
Some analysts praised the jumbo jet test flight as a potentially useful experiment. But others criticised it as
a publicity stunt by Branson, and noted it comes as scientists are questioning the environmental benefits of
biofuels.


* By SHELLEY EMLING
Cox News Service
LONDON

Virgin Atlantic set an avia-
tion milestone yesterday by
flying the first commercial air-
craft powered by biofuel in an
effort to reduce the airline's
carbon footprint.
Although challenges
remain, airline industry ana-
lysts agreed that biofuel feasi-
bility is no longer in question.
But environmentalists charged
that more attention should be
paid to curbing the continued
growth in air travel.
"Virgin Atlantic and its
partners are proving that you
can find an alternative to tra-
ditional jet fuel and fly a plane'
on new technology such as
sustainable biofuel," said
British billionaire Richard'
Branson, Virgin Atlantic's
founder and president.
The Boeing 747 made the
90-minute journey from Lon-
don to Amsterdam with one
of its four main fuel tanks
filled vWith a blend of coconut
and babassu oil. The babassu
tree is a species of palm that is
native to Brazil's Amazon rain
forest.
The jet aircraft reached an
altitude.of 25,000 feet and car-
ried five people pilots and
technicians but no passen-
gers..
Other airlines said they had
no current plans to test bio-
fuels on their aircraft,
although all admit to closely
watching developments in this
area.
"We continue to work with
airports, aircraft manufactur-
ers, and engine makers to
explore ways of operating our
current fleet with as minimal
environmental impact as pos-
sible," said Jaspreet Thind, a
spokesman for Dallas-based
American Airlines.
Olivia Cullis; a spokes-
woman for Atlanta-based
Delta Air Lines, said that
while Delta is not currently
set up to participate in a test of
alternative jet fuel, the airline
"fully supports" the Commer-
cial Aviation Alternative
Fuels Initiative, an industry-
wide group.
Biofuels, which are mostly
derived from crops such as
grain, sugar, and vegetable
oils, are seen by proponents
as a good way to cut carbon
emissions while also increasing
energy security by reducing a
dependence on fossil fuels.
Robert Mann, an aviation
consultant in Port Washing-
ton, N.Y., said there's no
doubt biofuel is feasible.
"The U.S. Air Force has


already flown a B-52 on both
biofuel and on coal-and-gas-
to-liquid fuel," he said.
Rolls-Royce Group has said
it will partner with Air New
Zealand for biofuel trials
sometime next year, he added.
But Mann said that biofuel
as a substitute for the petrole-
um-based fuel normally used
by jet aircraft remains a "sus-
pect" alternative that could
have "unintended conse-
quences."
He said he suspects that
"the future will require the
allocation of specific fuel types
to specific uses."
Henry Harteveldt, an air-
line industry analyst at San
Francisco-based Forrester
Research, said engine and air-
craft manufacturers would
never allow a test flight to go
forward if they didn't believe
biofuel to be viable.
"The challenge, of course,
is what non-petrol resources
will be used in the develop-
ment and manufacture of bio-
fuels, whether for aviation or
other forms of transport," he
said.
"Obviously a concern is that
if a food-based resource, such
as corn, is used, we need to
find cost-efficient, environ-
mentally responsible ways to
increase production without
reducing the output available
for human food consump-
tion," he said.
"And if it is non-food based,
it must be a sustainable prod-
uct that can be harvested in a
safe, responsible manner," he
said.
Virgin Atlantic officials said
that they are committed to
using only "truly sustainable"
types of biofuel that do not
compete with food and fresh
water resources.
But at least one environ-
mental group, Friends of the
Earth, said that any carbon
savings from crop-based fuels
would be negligible and that
Virgin Atlantic and other air-
lines should instead work to
reduce air travel.
"Even if every plane leav-
ing the (United Kingdom) was
able to run on biofuels tomor-
row, any carbon savings would
be wiped out in less than 10
years by the rapid growth of
the aviation industry," the
group said in a statement.
Yesterday's test flight by
Virgin Atlantic and its part-
ners Boeing, General Elec-
tric and Imperium Renew-
ables did not require any
change to the airliner's
engines.
It comes at a time when air-
lines are eager to do anything
they can to offset the high cost


of jet fuel, which is now more
than $2.60 a gallon, and to
help reduce emissions. The
European Commission, the
executive arm of the Euro-
pean Union, has been urging
the aviation industry to reduce
greenhouse gas emissions,
which account for about 3 per-
cent of the total in the EU.
"Airlines are very keen to
ensure they don't increase
their carbon emissions even
as the industry is projected to
operate more aircraft and car-
ry more people," Harteveldt
said. "And anything that can
be done to offset the high cost
of fuel is important in helping
the industry reduce its costs
and maintain profitability."

Shelley Emling's e-mail
address is semlingcoxnews.com


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to promote farming
* By Gladstone Thurston
Bahamas Information
Services .


The government is to purchase
502 acres of farm land in North
Andros from Kersner Interna-
tional, a farmers-buyers meeting
here was told.
The property is to be vested in
Bahamas Agricultural and Indus-
trial Corporation (BAIC) and
used to promote farming.
Much of the land is already
being used by Andros farmers to
cultivate a wide variety of prod-
ucts for export.
BAIC intends to lease the
property to persons interested in
agricultural production, farmers
were told.
Agriculture and Marine
Resources Minister, Lawrence
'Larry' Cartwright, and BAIC
chairman Edison M Key, toured
North Andros farming facilities
last weekend to promote direct
connection between farmers and
buyers.
They were accompanied by
Patrick Treco of Continental
Food Company, Don Carnine of
Bahama Food Services, Cranston
Hanna of Prime Bahamas, Wes-
ley Bastian of Subway Restau-
rants, Dr Marikis N Alvarez of
the Inter-American Institute for
Co-operation on Agriculture, and
a team from the Ministry and the
Corporation.
"In making every, decision on
every policy, I'm fully committed
to putting farmers and fishermen
first," said Mr Cartwright.
He toured farms, BAIC prop-
erties, the government packing
house, the proposed handicraft
market in Red Bays, and the
YEAST Camp.
"When you succeed the whole
country succeeds," he told the
meeting. "It is you first because
we have to have vibrant and sus-
tainable agriculture and fisheries
industries if we are to feed our-
selves.
"And this government must
work hard to help you to grow
and succeed through the provi-
sion of innovation and technolo-
gy."
Mr Cartwright noted that the
efficiency of the agricultural sec-


AGRICULTURE and Marine Resources Minister Lawrence 'Larry'
Cartwright says hello to students in the YEAST program in North
Andros.


tor can be improved through an
effective marketing system.
He encouraged direct market-
ing between farmers and non-
governmental organizations, co-
operatives and private companies.
"Direct marketing enables
farmers and buyers to economize
on transportation costs and to
improve price realizations con-
siderably.
"So, it is very important for us
to build a sound agricultural mar-
keting system and help our farm-
ers to access it."
Production levels "are becom-
ing increasingly significant," he
said, and this trend is expected
to continue.
"So, we have to upgrade our
facilities for post harvest handling
to include cleaning, washing, dry-
ing, packaging, labelling, and even
cold storage for your produce to
improve its marketability.
"When produce leave Andros
it should be ready for any market,
local or international."
Mr Cartwright also under-
scored the need for agro process-
ing.
"Due to the perishable nature
of agricultural products and their
seasonality, we need to convert
excesses of these products, so that
they can be available to con-
sumers all year round.
"Those undersized, perfectly
matured fruit and vegetables that
are not marketable can be
processed and packaged for mar-
ket."
BAIC chairman Mr Key, said


he was impressed by the produc-
tion he saw in North Andros.
He praised the agricultural pro-
gramme at the North Andros
High School, under the direction
of tutor Rai Budhu.
"I was very impressed as I
drove through the fields...you are
trying, but you need help and that
is why we are here," said Mr Key.
"We have some money in
BAIC and hopefully we might be
able to buy you a tractor and a
disk and maybe some other
pieces of equipment to assist
you," he said. "We want to see
North Andros become the bread-
basket of the Bahamas."
About $500 million in food is
imported annually, he noted.
"There lays the parameter for a
major industry," he said. "But we,
as a people, must get serious
about it."
Each week trailer loads of fruit
and vegetables are brought into
Nassau from South Florida.
"Why do we want to make
these farmers rich when we could
be using that money to expand
our agricultural industry and keep
that hard currency in the
Bahamas?
"I would like to see at least 50
per cent of that leaving Andros
going into Nassau. You are only
ten minutes away. You are
blessed.
"I am going to do everything
possible to assist the Minister to
make agriculture a success in the
Bahamas. I want you in Andros
to work with us," Mr Key said.


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PAGE 10, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008


W-%,%r.=






MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 20U8 PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 12, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


THE GUYANESE WANT A NATIONAL EFFORT TO UPHOLD LAW AND ORDER



Politicians are failing their people


N By Sir Ronald Sanders

OPPOSING politi-
cal parties in
Guyana are in
grave danger of
failing the Guyanese people by
what appears to be a determina-
tion by some of their leaders to
cast blame on each other for two
recent incidents of criminal law-
lessness in which twenty-three
people were slaughtered by ram-
paging gunmen.
What the Guyanese people are
crying out for is not finger-point-
ing and mud-slinging by oppos-
ing political camps that have
ensued in the aftermath of these
heinous acts, -but a unified and


concentrated. approach by all
their political representatives to a
frightening problem that has cre-
ated profound anxiety and intense


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fear throughout the country.
The brutal, deliberate and
cold-blooded killing of eleven
people men, women and chil-
dren in their homes on January
26th in the tiny village of Lusi-
gan on Guyana's Atlantic coast
was followed on February 17th
by the murder of another twelve
people.in the town of Bartica, a
bustling town up the Essequibo
river.
The first to be killed in Bartica
by a group, who disappeared as
quickly as they appeared, were
five policemen at the town's
police station. The murder of the
policemen was as starkly symbol-
ic as it was callously strategic.
By killing the policemen first,
the gunmen not only deprived the
residents of the town of protec-
tion, they also demonstrated their
contempt for the authority of the
police and their capacity to elim-
inate them. They left no doubt in
the minds of the public that the
police are powerless in the face of
the violent resolve of criminal
gangs.
At the time of writing
this commentary, it is
not known whether the same
gang committed both these acts of
atrocity, though there have been
unsubstantiated claims by some
in authority that it is the same
gang.
In a sense, it would be a relief
if it is the same gang. For, if it
isn't, then the problem of criminal
lawlessness in Guyana has
reached epidemic proportions,
and the large scale slaughter of
innocent people could occur any-
where and anytime.
If, on the other hand, it is the
same gang responsible for both
acts of carnage, then there is the
chance that their containment
would end the turmoil that now
engulfs the nation.
Whether it is the same gang,
or more than one that is terroriz-
ing Guyana and challenging the
authority of-the State, the:reality


is that the country has been bad-
ly affected. There have been
reports of businesspeople and
tourists postponing visits; resi-
dents of the country have limited
night time activities; restaurants
have suffered.
Right now, Guyana is not
regarded as a plum location for
investment, and its beleaguered
people many of whom have
been fleeing its shores for more
than four decades are continu-
ing the exodus from its shores.
Yet, Guyana remains what it
always was a country rich in its
vast natural resources of gold,
diamonds, bauxite, and, if the US
geological surveys are right, huge
reserves of oil. Additionally, its
immense expanse of arable land
produces large quantities of food
that could easily feed the entire
Caribbean but most bf which is
dumped everyday.
There simply is no good rea-
son, apart from its political strife,
for Guyana to be the second
poorest country in the Caribbean,
and for its people to leave in
search of a better life abroad.
Indeed, the reverse should be the
case the vast resources of the
country should be a magnet for
attracting human and financial
capital from the Caribbean and
further afield to Guyana.
Immediately after the January
26th atrocity at Lusignan, I wrote
the following in my weekly com-
mentary: "The lawless acts that
occurred in Lusignan (and which.
have happened before in Guyana
in other areas of the country) in
which innocent people are killed
and the perpetrators disappear,
demands the widest possible
national participation in ending
it."
"There should be the deepest
and most meaningful consulta-
tion between the government, the
opposition political parties and
civic groups along with the law
enforcement agencies on effec-
tive measures to ehsuire that law-
lessness does no't'scalate to ter-


jag

POLICE OFFICERS express their condolences to Indira Frederick, wid-
ow of fellow officer Shane Frederick during his funeral in George-
town, Guyana, on Friday. Shane Frederick is one of twelve people
killed during an attack by gunmen in the mining town of Bartica on Feb-
ruary 17, in a massacre considered the second major attack blamed on
gangs in recent weeks. No one has claimed responsibility.
ror." sion of the political parties in
As it happened, there was no times of crisis such as this. It
attempt to convene such a con- reads: "The principal objective of
sultation after the Lusignan mas- the political system is to estab-
sacre. lish an inclusionary democracy
Instead, there was political by providing increasing opportu-
back-biting and snide accusations nities for the participation of cit-
in a political game that conjured izens, and their organizations in
the image of Nero fiddling while the management and decision-
Rome burned, making processes of' the State,
t with particular emphasis on those
t took a further atrocity at areas of decision-making that
Bartica to motivate the directly affect their well-being."
summoning of a meeting of rep- In invoking the article, they
resentatives of the political parties would not be required to share
on February 19th. But, it was a ement" they could share
meeting that failed to produce "gov e." And, there is a dif-
what it promised. At its end, the govvenance." nd, t withe a dif-
political parties again flayed each ference. Government with all its
other with accusations of bad trappings and authority would
faith and double-dealing, and the remain, but councils made up of
people of Guyana were left with representatives of all political par-
no sense of hope or expectation ties could be given legal authori-
that their political leaders had the ty to govern structures that are
capacity to set aside their narrow focused on solving particular
political interest in order to serve areas of national concern.
the higher national cause of the Failure by the political leaders
people. There is absolutely no of Guyana to establish such struc-
doubt that the people of Guyana tures of shared governance could
want an end to the criminal atroc- well fail their people.
ities they have endured; they want
tangible assurance that they can
live in safety with confidence that 4(The writer is a business
law and order will be upheld, and executive and former Caribbean
that their representatives from all diplomat)
political parties will come togeth-
er to guarantqeethe nationP l efLr J ; ,
to achieve it. Responses to: ronald-
The Guyana Constitution pro- sanders29@hotmail.com vides at Article 13.forthe cohe-.v totronaldsanders29@hotmail.com


Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.
Montrose Avenue

Phone:322-1722 Fax: 326-7452




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MEMORIAL SERVICE


Vincent Yelverton


Aguilar


Born.: 25 December 1932
Died: 18 February, 2008


Memorial service will be held on


Wednesday, 27 February 2008

at 4pm

St. Francis Xavier Cathedral,

West Street,
Nassau Bahamas



In lieu of flowers, please make donations to
Cancer Society of the Bahamas
and/or
National Art Gallery of the Bahamas


I


I


D'







MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008, PAGE 13


LOCL6 NWS'


MISS BAHAMAS WORLD


, Searching The Bahamas' most beautiful woman


? THE quest is on to find the
next Miss Bahamas World, and
this year thanks to a new Real-
ity TV show members of the
public will be given the inside
scoop as they help to choose the
most beautiful woman in The
Bahamas.
The new show, Miss Bahamas
World: Backstage Pass! will give
the viewing audience an oppor-
tunity to watch the brightest and
the best compete for the title in
the weeks leading up to the com-
petition, which culminates with
the Grand Finale set for June 29,
S 2008, at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort's Rainforest Theatre.
Beauty, brains, a charming per-
sonality, and a fabulous body- if
that describes you, then you could
become the next Miss Bahamas
World. The Miss Bahamas Orga-
nization has officially launched
its search for the new queen, and
is asking eligible young women
to sign up for what promises to be
a spectacular event. This year's
pageant to select representatives
to the Miss World, Miss Tourism
Queen International, Miss Inter-
continental, Top Model of the
World, and the recently acquired


Reality TV show to give the public a

chance to help choose new queen


Miss Hawaiian Tropic competi-
tions will be held under the theme
"Pure Elegance."
Once again, Bahamians are
being invited to help choose the
winner by voting for their
favourite contestants. The con-
testant receiving the highest num-
ber of votes automatically
advances to the semifinal round
of the competition as the "Peo-
ple's Choice" fast track win-
ner. However, this year the public
is being given an insiders view of
the hopefuls in an effort to aid in
their choice. For the first time in
The Bahamas, a Reality TV show
focusing-on the contestants will
hit the airwaves during the month
leading up to the finals, allowing
the audience to learn more about
the contestants before the big
night. And, unlike last year, when
the public got to vote just once,
this time pageant enthusiasts will


get four votes one each week -
following the broadcasts of the
four part TV show. "We are
always trying to raise the bar -
always seeking ways to think out
of the box," said MBO President
Michelle Malcolm. "This year, not
only are we introducing a ground
breaking new television series,
but we're helping the public to
learn more about the young
women who want to be their rep-
resentative to the world, thereby
assisting them in making more
informed decisions when choos-
ing their semifinalist."
The show will be hosted by the
reigning Miss Bahamas World
Anya Watkins.
"I'm so excited!" she exclaimed
on learning of her new role as TV
show host. "I am really looking
forward to doing this show, as this
will be a totally new experience
for me. I had no idea when I
signed up for Miss Bahamas
World last year that I would be
given so many amazing opportu-
nities, and I am just so thankful
that I did," she said.
In addition to hosting the TV
show, Anya will also welcome
another unexpected opportunity -
specifically the chance to com-
pete in the Miss Hawaiian Tropic
pageant this May in Las Vegas.
The Miss Bahamas Organization
was recently invited to send a del-
egate to the competition, and
Anya was selected as the ideal
choice. She will spend five days
in Las Vegas competing for a
chance to become the spokesper-
son for Hawaiian Tropic for one
year, as well as a cash prize of
$10,000. Says Anya, "Oh my
goodness Vegas!" I'm going
to hit the gym really hard to make
sure I'm in fine form for that
competition!" Her prize of a
year's membership at Bally's will
help her to do just that.
Although MBO is just now
launching its recruitment drive,
18 applications have already been
received. Included in this year's
competition will be delegates
from a number of Family Islands,
including Grand Bahama, San
Salvador, and Exuma. However,
to add to the excitement of the
pageant, only 20 applicants will
be accepted as contestants. "We
are inviting as many young ladies
as possible to sign up because
who knows, you could be among
the select 20 who are chosen to
enter the competition, and even
go on to win it," says Miss Mal-
colm. "We are opening the appli-
cation process because although
some gorgeous women have
applied, we believe that there are
many more out there that we
have not been able to reach," she
said. "By limiting the number of
entrants to 20, we are ensuring
that only the best of the best will
compete for the Miss Bahamas
World title, and as a result, our
queen will truly be the creme de
la creme," she said.
An impressive, $30,000 pack-
age of prizes awaits the young
woman who emerges the winner
of the Miss Bahamas World
Pageant, including a trip to


LSc MMEL1m fix* a-'RNW

under the theme: "ALL OR NOTHING"

Anointed Speakers include:






Bro. Byron Pastor Apostle Pastor Apostle Conference Hosl
Brown Ivry Johnson Kelson Miller Mario Moxey Raymond Wells Dwayne Mortime
Dates: Sunday, February 24'h, 8:00am & 10:30am
Week Nights Monday thru Wednesday at 7:30pm Monday Mid-day at 12:30pm

Get ready to receive:
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*r


I This i isGo 's se tie tprpelyonino ur eas


Ukraine to compete in this year's
Miss World pageant; $15,000 in
diamond jewellery from Dia-
monds International; a trip to
New York for a photo shoot with
the world renowned fashion pho-
tographer Fadil Berisha; appear-
ance opportunities and much
more. Interested young women
are being urged to apply quickly
as space is limited. Deadline for
entry is March 1, 2008.
SYoung women interested in
entering the pageant may apply
online at
www.missbahamas.net. Suitable
young women between the ages
of 17 and 24 are being sought to
compete. Entrants should be
beautiful in form and face, grace-
ful, intelligent and charming,
while possessing poise, a pleas-
ing character, and high moral con-
victions.
Candidates must be single,
must not have children, nor have
ever been pregnant or given birth.
Minimum height requirement is
5' 5" and maximum height
requirement is 6' 2". Weight must
be proportionate to height.
Candidates should be of
Bahamian ancestry, or citizens of
The Bahamas, and hold a
Bahamian passport.
The Miss Bahamas Organiza-
tion reserves the right to refuse
an application or dismiss a con-
testant, using the Organization's
codes and regulations as the basis
for its decision.
Applicant must submit a head-
shot and a full body shot of her
own choice for review with her
application.


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CUSMOSES BErUI


MONODAlY 3ri March


Join Bishop V.G. Clarke

& The Family of



The Calvary



Deliverance church
East Street South Bishop V. G. Clarke

as we present this year's


THE TRIBUNE


I


I


1


r!.

i~9~






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008


PRESENTATION On ~ -
Thursday, February 21, ..
the Cookie Kids for Kids ..
Team made a food pre- '
sentation to the Lewis .
Yard Primary School to
help children in need with -
breakfast, lunch and din-
ners. Seen here from left
to right is Mrs. Bent.
Lewis Yard Primary %,
Senior Mistress and meal
coordinator, three Lewis
Yard Primary students, .
Mrs. Cindy DeGregory, .u
baker and owner of "Take
the Cake", and the Cookie L
Kids: Cassie Haddad,
Katie Hindley, Michaela
Ince, Jackie Blower _...
(front), Keana Pakosh "'
(behind), and Alexis M. '
DeGregory. *1

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ON THURSDAY, February
21st, the Cookies for Kids Team
made a presentation of food to
the Lewis Yard Primary School.
This donation will go toward
helping children who need


breakfast and lunches as well
as providing those in extra need
to carry food home to their fam-
ilies for dinner. The food was
purchased through B.W.A.,
who gave their best prices as


well as making a small dona-
tion, and will continue to sup-
port the project.
Mrs. Pinder, Lewis Yard !'ri-
mary Vice principal, said urgent
assistance is needed for school
textbooks and workbooks. They
have a list available and $2,800
is required to fulfil'and assist
the academic needs of the stu-
dents. Also, their school library
is in desperate need of books.
Anyone wishing to donate new
or used books can drop them
off at the school or contact the
Cookies for Kids Team.
The Cookies for Kids Team
would like to put out a chal-
lenge to other schools, or com-
munity groups to follow suit and
do the same or similar.
Persons wishing to make
monetary donations, or pur-
chase cookies to help this cause
can contact Cindy DeGregory
at 242-373-9717 or email her at
CookieKids4Kids@yahoo.com.
Lewis Yard Primary School can
be contacted at 242-353-7001.

Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Bahamas Lighthouse Museum
Preservation, Education, History
Ish u-s I'ighthos,



NP

* Maritime Military History

* Gift Shop

* Art Gallery

* Photos

* School/Club Field Trips


Bay Street and East Street
Contact: Ms. Latiska Barr (Manager)
Phone: 242-326-0511
. djshepbahamaslighthousemuseum@yahoo.com


It's a Time of Joy and Celebration!
Come Let us Worship the Lord, Let us giue him the Praise!




58th ANNUAL GENERAL CONVENTION

OF THE BAHAMAS STATE COUNCIL
OF THE PENTECOSTAL ASSEMBLIES OF THE WORLD INC.

MARCH 2nd 7th, 2008 Greater Bethel Cathedral,
Faith Way, off Blue Hill Road South
(Corner of Carlton E. Francis School)

Host Pastor
Suffragan Bishop Christopher Minnis

Early Morning Prayer ----5:00am-6:00am
Day Session ---- 12:00noon 2:00pm
Evening Worship Service ---- 7:30pm

THEME; "Let God Magnify Thee"
"...This day I will begin to exalt you in the sight of all Israel....."
Scripture text: Joshua 3:7

Day Session Speakers:
Suffragan Bishop Christopher Minnis
Officer of The Royal Bahamas Police Force
Asst. Pastor Elder Troy Mott
Evangelist Brenda Maycock

Evening Worship Speakers:
Bishop Ellis Farrington J.P
Suffragan Bishop Ezekiel Munnings
Suffragan Bishop Wintson Redwood
Suffragan Bishop Wilfred Mackey
Suffragan Bishop Christopher Minnis
Pastor Sharon Rolle
District Elder Paul Rolle

Don't miss your blessing! Be there!


I


LOCAL NEWS


Cookies for Kids


serve up a treat


for Lewis Yard


Primary School








T TB EOA FB A 2,0,A


Awareness


Each year government
agencies, non-governmen-
tal organizations, and
groups of citizens at all
community levels take
advantage of the date to
raise awareness about
wetlands values and their
benefits in general and
the Ramsar convention in
particular.
Students from seven
public and private schools
attended the week long
run of performances,
which introduced them to
the functions of mangrove
wetland ecosystems:
storm protection; fresh-
water replenishment;
marine nurseries for
crawfish and conch;
essential habitat
for wildlife and as
important open spaces
for recreation and relax-
ation.
"Teachers were very
impressed with the way
the puppet show intro-
duced ecosystem
concepts and felt that this
was a great activity to
support the ecosystem
unit in the Primary Sci-
ence Curriculum com-
mented Portia Sweeting,
BNT Director of Educa-
tion.


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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008, PAGE 15 .


THE TRIBUNE


I


2@@ mia,@
~t as i








PAGE 16, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008


Our future needs


a clear vis on



and plan.


At CFAL, we always use the beginning of the New Year to review
our strategic plans: how we did, where we stand, and consider
changes if necessary to ensure we are still on track towards our
future goals. Likewise we advise our clients to reflect in the
same manner as this discipline is necessary as ones goals
Sand expectations are ever evolving. Prudence demands a
similar approach anc' to ignore periodic reflection of this
nature is grossly irresponsible.


This is true also of our Government and its economic outlook. However,
we have not heard the discussions which would lead us to believe this
dynamic process is being undertaken in the halls of our representatives.
What is the vision for a 21st Century Bahamas? Do we even have
one? With globalization, political and economic uncertainty we believe
the Government has an urgent need to prepare a strategic plan for
the Bahamas with input frcm civic groups, trade unions, chamber of
commerce and the private sector. Like with our personal portfolios, we
need to review where we came from, were we are today and were we
want to go. We have an urgent need to articulate a clear vision for the
Bahamas TODAY; one that is supported and "bought into: by its citizen
to ensure its success.

We heed a Bahamas that can provide for its people, be competitive in the
global village and morally just. The original framers of the Independence
declaration succinctly captured this over 35 years ago when they
crafted our motto FORWARDR UPWARD, ONWARD, TOGETHER". We
believe they envisioned a Bahamas providing a social safety net for all,
a Bahamas continuously improving as a people and nation, a Bahamas
where black and white work side by side, and a Bahamas commanding
its respectful role in the international community.

Independence has served us well. But it was only the platform, the
foundation. We still need to determine what type of house we want to
build as well as what mater als and tools are going to be required. So
until we make that determination, the burning question will continue to
be this: "Where do we go frc m here?".


We arechallenged byforceswhich in many instances
we cannot control. Gone are the days when we can
be assured that developments, investments and
tourists will arrive simply because of our proximity
to the States. Regulations, global economies, foreign
markets, domestic crime, regionall players, and
alternative destinations have all changed. Hence
the urgent need for a strategic plan which utilizes
independence and the traditions of the Bahamian
people as a springboard. We must plan today to
position us for the future whi e enabling us to leave
a positive indelible to mark our place in history.


In this regard we recommend! that the Country develop:

A Corporate Governance mandate which serves as the principal
guide for all, including our politicians, civil servants, civic
organization and the business community;
Our number one resource, Human Capital. If we intend to compete
in the global arena we must educate our people to improve not only
on domestic services but also on an international level. A (D grade)
average won't prepare us for the competitive global village;
A completely restructured economic and financial model. We need
to plan our finances for tie next 20 years, not 5 years. We need to
position our finances so tlat we are less dependent on international


investors in order to be able to withstand economic shocks to our
financial system. This will entail revamping our taxation model
which may not be a popular decision but in our view, it is the only
responsible decision. Time is simply not on our side;
*A plan to capitalize on the ever expanding opportunities outside of
our borders;
A plan to protect our environment while improving our physical
infrastructure; and
A sustainable and affordable programme to ensure the health care
and social services to our less fortunate long into the future. In
short, we need to build in a self sustaining social safety net.

We recommend a re-Branding of The Bahamas. The original brand "Its
Better in the Bahamas" served us well in the past. Unfortuantely, this
brand has run its course. While many will argue that the Bahamas is
much better than most in the region, this perspective is limiting. The
challenge with this line of thinking is that we need to start comparing
ourselves, not to others, but to our potential.

More importantly, while we continue to live on the dividends of past
investments, our regional counter-parts are busy reinvesting in people,
infrastructure and other investments for the future. They are positioning
their portfolio for globalization and against the political and economic
uncertainty of that process. In our view we have not made the necessary
preparations for The Bahamas and our current portfolio is not positioned
to withstand a down-turn. It's only a matter of time before we are
surpassed by the competition and that is especially so if
we don't re-evaluate our portfolio and make some very
tough decisions.


Collectively as a nation and individually as people, we
should take a look in the mirror and evaluate were we are
today and were we want to go tomorrow. What type of
country do we envision for our kids? We reiterate that we
have to stop comparing ourselves to others and measure
our selves to our own potential. If we do this correctly,
we will surely conclude that our nation is failing in many
important aspects.


We believe the Government has to make some very bold
decisions regarding the direction of our beloved country: decisions
which will require tenacity and fortitude. Some of which are bound to
be politically un-popular decisions. Indeed, many of which our elected
officials might fear could jeopardize their political careers orthe mandate
to govern in 2012. We submit however, that if our officials decide and
act always in the best interests of its people, then their places in the
annals of our history are secured

The historic and legitimate role of all right thinking and loyal
Bahamians is to participate in this evaluation process and
to unite and join hands, not for our sake, but for the sake of
our children and our children's children.


C A I
PIN ~ 9'
ol1


/' I '


Erikerage Corporate Advisory Investments Pension Administration RTA


Independence
has served us
well. Where
do we go from
here?


THE TRIBUNE










THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008


r' y


- .


-. -~


Bahamas aims to preserve NEC




and Immigration rights in EPA


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas will attempt
to retain the Govern-
ment's right to approve
all foreign investments
in this country, and the
need for foreign nationals working in
this nation to obtain a work permit,
through its services offer on the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement (EPA)
with the European Union (EU).
A draft copy of the Bahamas' EPA
services offer, which has been
obtained by The Tribune, reveals that


* Draft services offer seeks reservations on government's approval of EU firm investments and
land purchases, subsidies to Bahamas firms, exchange controls and access by EU workers
* Devil in detail, as fisheries faces rules of origin, health standards and closed season issues
* Telecoms only sector where no commitments or reservations made
* Bahamas has to liberalise 116 of 155 services sectors


in its 'horizontal commitments' -
those which apply to all economic
sectors this nation is seeking to
reserve its position on government


approval for EU companies to set up
operations in this nation, the purchase
of land by EU nationals, and the
exchange control system.


Those three areas are known 'mar-
ket access', and the Bahamas is also
seeking to reserve its EPA position in
an area known as 'national treatment'


- which means that companies and

SEE page 6B


Downtown authority

structure still up

for discussion

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BOTH the Government and private sector have agreed
that creating a management authority to oversee downtown
Nassau's revitalization is critical, the Nassau Tourism and
Development Board's (NTDB) chairman told The Tribune,
the only questions left to resolve being its identity, structure
and shape.
Charles Klonaris, speaking to The Tribune during the
weekend's : Downtown
Improvement Association con-
ference in Nassau, said that SEE page 4B


Bahamas firm 'has

to be the best' with

client number 25


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
INTERNATIONAL Private
Banking Systems (IPBS), the
Nassau-based provider of spe-
cialist wealth management
software, today announced
that it signed up a 17th
Bahamas-based institution in
the shape of Dartley Bank &
Trust, its founder telling The
Tribune: "We have to be the
best. Second is not worth it."
Bruce Raine, who is also
IPBS's president, said his com-
pany had managed to achieve
global success, having eight or
nine clients outside the


Bahamas for a total of 25, by
focusing on service and believ-
ing it could compete interna-
tionally, rather than relying on
protectionist policies.
Mr Raine said: "I think a lot
of people feel and think that
because they are Bahamian,
everyone has to deal with
them, particularly in the local
market. You have to be able to
provide a service, and if you
provide that you can compete
with other people in the global
market. That's what we've
done.

SEE page 4B


Atlantic Medical 'ahead of

curve' with web portal


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ATLANTIC Medical, the
Bahamas-based health insur-
er, has launched a web portal
designed to give clients, group
plan sponsors and medical
providers access to essential
real-time data, a move the
company believes will "put us
ahead of the curve" on service
in this market.
The company's Health Now
initiative involves a password
protected website that allows
Atlantic Medical clients, com-
pany group plan sponsors, and


medical service providers "to
access certain information" rel-
evant to their needs and busi-
ness.
Darren Bastian, a senior
accounts executive with
Atlantic Medical, said the web
portal was designed to enhance
customer service and efficien-
cy when it came to administra-
tion of healthcare policies and
plans.
He explained that from the
.medical provider perspective,
they would be able to use the

SEE page 5B


New Providence could 'double' cruise

spend through Bay Street's revival

-. By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
NASSAU could "practically
-... double" its per capital cruise
passenger spend if downtown
Bay Street was revitalized and
made into the thriving district
it should be, a tourism deputy-
general told The Tribune at the
weekend, helping this nation
to catch up with its Caribbean
rivals.
David Johnson, speaking

euSEE page 2B


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PAGE B, MNDAY FEBUARY25, 008UHEITIBUN


Nassau could 'double'


cruise


spend through Bay Street's revival


NOTICE


IN THE ESTATE OF LEON
RAHMING, late of #35 Kenwood
Street in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against
the above Estate are required to send
their names, addresses and the
particulars of their debts or claims duly
certified in writing to the undersigned
on or before the 29th February, A.D.
2008, after which date the Executrix
will proceed to distribute the assets
having regard only to the proved debts
or claims of which notice have been
given.

And Notice is hereby given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate are
requested to make full settlement on or
before the date herein before mentioned.

EDWARD B. TURNER & CO.
#10 Petrona House
Fowler Street off East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executrix of the
Estate of the late Leon Rahming

*"'',3to so i 93 ta \i \w


FROM page 1B

during the International
Downtown Association Con-
ference held in Nassau at the
weekend, said upgrading
downtown Nassau and Bay
Street was "critical to our suc-
cess as a cruise tourism desti-
nation in the first instance".
Adding that all Bahamians
and residents had to play their
part in reviving Bay Street, Mr
Johnson said: "We have the
ability to practically double, if
we were to do so, our revenue
from cruise tourism. Our.
intake [per passenger spend]
is $60-$70, when most of our
competitor destinations in the
region get $110, $120. It makes
economic sense to do so."
From a stopover tourism
perspective, Mr Johnson said it
was also key that Nassau
revived its main business dis-
trict, and commercial and cul-
tural hub, because the
Bahamas could not develop a
winning product that was
founded merely on its hotels.
"Tourism can't succeed if it's
in the hotel the environs of
the hotel," he added. "We
have to drive the demand, and
for New Providence, the desti-
nation is driven by Nassau and
the city.
"It will enhance their expe-
rience if we can transform Bay
Street into a thriving residen-
tial/commercial area. We need
to bring life back to Bay
Street.... It's about the pre-




on onay

0 6


sentation of our product. We
have to give tourists a quality
experience and value. I think
we can do that.""
Mr Johnson said it was not
correct to assume that guests at
major resorts, such as Kerzner
International's Atlantis, and
the forthcoming Baha Mar and
Albany/South Ocean develop-
ments, would not leave those
properties to explore Nassau
because all they wanted/need-
ed to do was located there.
If Bay Street "had some-
thing of value to offer", tourists
at major Bahamian resorts
would "take it". The Bahamas'
target tourism market, Mr
Johnson added, was the
wealthy, sophisticated trav-
eller, who was also seeking and
adventure and experiences.
These clients would not want
to be confined to a hotel where
they missed out on the local
culture, and the deputy direc-
tor-general said: "The reality
is that in every party of three,
there's only one gambler.
They're quite happy to give
their 'other half the credit card
to do what they want while
they gamble.
"If we make Bay Street the
magnet it can be, it will draw
from Paradise Island, draw
from Cable Beach, and be a
win-win for everybody."
Adding that there was
"tremendous economic oppor-
tunity" that could flow from
Bay Street's revitalization, Mr
Johnson said: "I think that
today we're at the point for the
first time where there's con-
sensus. It's now the 'how', but
the motivation is there across
the board to effect change."
Mr Johnson said one of the
key factors in maintaining the
Bahamas' market share in
Caribbean cruise tourism was
that it had its main cruise port
in the middle of Nassau, set


among a natural, protected
harbour, along with this
nation's proximity to the main
US cruise market.
"It's when they get off the
piers and on to Bay Street and
it's surrounding environs; that's
where we are suffering the rev-
enue leakage," he added. Nas-
sau was a "known port", Mr
Johnson said, ranking along-
side Havana in terms of his-
torical reputation, and now it
had to further underpin its rep-
utation.
When it came to dredging
Nassau Harbour to expand the
turning basin to accommodate
the larger Freedom Class
cruise ships that Royal
Caribbean Cruise Lines
(RCCL) and Norwegian
Caribbean have introduced,
the Ministry of Tourism direc-
tor-general said Nassau should
be back on the ports of call
itinerary for these vessels by
early 2009.
"I think we're on schedule
to have it completed on time
for their [the cruise lines]
schedule next Spring/Summer.
I think we'll be in shape for
2009,"Mr Johnson said.
Describing the planned
upgrades to the harbour and
Prince George's Wharf as
"very important", Mr Johnson
said the Freedom class cruise
ships had the potential to bring
in 5,000 passengers per vessel
to Nassau, plus 2,000-2,500
crew.
"They're big numbers. The
spend is there, and we have
the capacity as a destination to
manage that. We can't have
two or three of those [ships]
at the same time, but we're
able to handle that," Mr John-
son said.
Meanwhile, he added that
the Government and Ministry
of Tourism were "very close
to being able to share publicly"


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details of the new Cruise
Overnight Incentive Act agree-
ments that they had been
negotiating with the two major
cruise lines, Carnival and Roy-
al Caribbean, who together
account for more than 80 per
cent of the market.
The previous agreements
expired at the end of 2002, and
had come under criticism for
allowing cruise ships to keep
their bars, restaurants, shops
and casinos open while they
were in port. This, it was felt,
deterred passengers from get-
ting off the ships, reducing rev-
enue and spend enjoyed by
Bay Street businesses, Bahami-
an tour operators, excursion
providers, surrey drivers and
taxi drivers.
However, Mr Johnson said
the previous agreement
"achieved for us what we
intended. Before the Act, we
were seeing far less cruise traf-
fic. The provision that some of
the facilities be allowed to
open in return for staying in
port overnight, 18-20 hours, as
opposed to four, five, six, sev-
en hours, stimulated the econ-
omy much more. No one is
going to stay on ship while in
port".
The longer the vessels stayed
in port, the more chance the
passengers would leave the
ship and participate in more
activities, he added. "Our chal-
lenge has been not being able
to bring a wider range of things
to do over the past eight to 10
years," Mr Johnson said. "If
we had done so, our cruise
yield would have been double
what we,have."
He added that many mer-
chants had failed to respond
to the Ministry bringing in
cruise ships on Sunday,
remaining closed for.business
despite the potential customer
base.


FIRSTCARIBIEAN
INT ISN"IOAI Ikl
i t THNINT. TQGITHIN.


4


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008


THE TRIBUNE













Freeport enjoys seven


per cent housing


certificate rise


0-


" F THE BAHAMAS


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
FREEPORT enjoyed a sev-
en per cent increase in hous-
ing occupancy certificates in
2007, a senior Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) exec-
utive said, adding that the for-
mer Uniroyal plant is under
contract for sale to an unnamed
buyer, whose project should
start in the 2009 first half.
Carey Leonard, the GBPA's
general counsel, said the organ-
isation was working hard to
ensure the island did not expe-
rience any major fallout from
the current sub-prime US
mortgage situation.
He said Grand Bahama
needed critical mass to turn
into a destination, and ensure
the continued growth of the
Freeport area and the rest of
the economy.
"A key priority for the medi-
um /long-term development of
the island is the construction
of more hotel rooms and resi-
dential units, targeted at the
international buyer. My col-


Ex-Uniroyal plant under

contract, with production

start hoped-for in early 2009


leagues at the Port Authority
and Devco are working hard
to close transactions which will
facilitate the development of
the high -end mixed use resort
developments in eastern
Lucaya. Major international
partners have been identified
and detailed planning work is
ongoing," Mr Leonard said.
However, he pointed out
that finalising these projects
was somewhat time-consuming
and construction was unlikely
to start until next year.
There had been a seven per
cent increase in housing occu-
pancy certificates granted over
the past year, a measure of the
construction industry, Mr
Leonard told persons attend-
ing the Grand Bahama Busi-
ness Outlook conference.
One of those projects; he
said, was the Old Uniroyal Plan
on Sunrise Highway, where the


GBPA has entered into a con-
tract to sell the plant.
"It is hoped that the project
will receive all necessary Gov-
ernment approvals. It is hoped
that in the first half of 2009,
production can, begin," Mr
Leonard said.
Additionally, he said con-
struction was expanding, with
extensions planed for a num-
ber of properties, including the
proposed Freeport Container
Port expansion, the Heritage
School, the Grand Bahama
Hospital and the Grand
Bahama Heritage Park, where
the first phase. is now complete
with some 200 additional sites.
Extensive repairs have also
been made to the GBPA's
website so that the license fee
structure is more easily avail-
able.
An extensive Intranet has
also been established.


Abaco Markets invests


$lm in Cost Right store


Vistu our website at www.cob.edu.bi


...L''CAljrVC -L, 7 WT GXICaUMALU N


I IN MiiMllIMI/


Mr. Hugh Cottis
Coordinator, The College
of The Bahamas, Abaco Centre
(1999-2002)


The College mourns the passing
of Hugh Cottis and extends
condolences to his wife and son.


PLACEMENT EXAMINATION
The placement examination for the Fall 2008 semester is as follows:

Wednesday, 5th March Thursday, 6th March Friday, 7th March
Aquinas College Government High School St. Andrews
Queen's College R. M. Bailey High School St. Anne's High School
C.I. Gibson C.C. Sweeting High School Westminister
Charles W. Saunders Temple Christian Mt. Carmel Preparatory
C. R. Walker Faith Temple Christian Bahamas Academy
Doris Johnson Secondary Academy St. John's College
St. Augustine's College C.V. Bethel Secondary Nassau Christian Academy
Kingsway Academy Prince William High School
All Family Islands

Saturday, 8th March
All applicants who are not currently enrolled in high school or out of school applicants
All exams will be administered at the Kendal G.L. Isaacs gymnasium beginning at 8:00 a.m.
Students should be attired in their school uniforms and bring with them their school ID cards or
a passport, two pencils and a ruler. For more information please call 302-4499 or email
admissions@cob.edu.bs


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CERTIFICATES


Continuing Education Units
Now Available


ABACO Markets, the BISX-
listed retail group, said it had
invested $1 million in renova-
tions, upgrades and inventory
expansion at its newly-opened
Cost Right Abaco store.
"The completion of our con-
version from the previous Aba-
co Wholesale to Cost Right
Abaco is an important step for
both our company and for the
Abaco community," said Craig
Symonette, the retailer's-chair-
man and chief executive.
"For Abaco Markets, this sig-


nals the completion of our core
market strategy, which focused
our energies and resources on
markets that provide the great-
est opportunities.
"We look forward to playing
our role in ensuring that con-
sumers in Abaco have easy
access to high quality products
at reasonable prices in an envi-
ronment that is becoming ever
challenging with increasing costs
of living. To this end, our Cost
Right model is committed to
offering our customers, both


--I ~i~
'Ki.'


businesses and individuals, seri-
ous savings in bulk purchasing
through strategic buying and
focusing on driving down costs
wherever possible."
During the official launch cer-
emony, Mr Symonette
announced that Abaco Markets
will return to Abaco for its 2008
Annual General Meeting after
an absence of many years. This
will provide the company's
many shareholders in Abaco
with the opportunity to attend
the AGM.


ds
-iC
I 5?,
-
f dBr~
~-ji~


Classes begin 2"' February 2008
What is your career goal?
/ PROMOTION
QUALITY SERVICE
/ INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION
/ SALARY INCREASE
/ CAREER CHANGE/ ENHANCEMENT


The Professional Development Department can help
you achieve your career goal! A wide array of courses and
-"rogramnies leading to certificate, certification and licensure are offered. You can become a pioneer in setting
- p: f,- 'i im'c standards in your organization. We have secured partnerships with leading international
institutions to help you accomplish your career goala.~ou can attaiwyour professional development credentials
at The College ofTheBahamas. Success is at yourfinger tips. Call us today.

Choose the courses or programme to help you accomplish your career goals...
Certified Professional Manager
Certificate for The Office Assistant
A+ Computer Technician Certification
Certified Computer Operator (Microsoft Office Specialist- MOUS)
Certificate in Law
Certified Project Manager a ..,. ... . ...
Becker Certified Public Accountants' Review (CPA)
Certificate in Human Resource Management Programme Duraion may range
SCertificate in Supervisory Management *
Journeyman Plumbing License Course External Registration is required
Master Plumbing License for UK and US Institutions.
Single Phase Electrical Course Affordable Tuition To B Pad
SThree Phase Electrical Course Per Term
Managerial Accounting For Non-Financial Managers 0
Ethics and Professional Responsibility or Master Degreeofessionals mayholdng the Bachelor
S" or Master Degrees may apply for
SWriting and Research Skills exemption from prerequisite courses.
Introduction to Computers, Windows & The Internet

Enroll in our International Certification Programmes.
No entrance exams required. Tuition Payment is due per term.
Visit COB's Centre For Continuing Education & Extension Services on Moss Road,
or Telephone us at (242) 325-5714 or (242) 328-0093


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Personal Development Spring Semester 012008
COURSE SECT COURSE TIME DAY START DUR FEES
NO. NO. DESCRIPTION
BUSINESS
6:00pm-
BUS1900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS I 9:00pm Tues 19-Feb 8 wks $225
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER 9:30am-
CUST900 01 SERVICE WIS 4:30pm Thur 21-Feb 1 day $170
COMPUTERS
9:30am-
COMP960 01 MICROSOFT POWERPOINT W/S 4:30pm Thur 6-Mar 1 day 170
WEB PAGE DESIGN 9:30am-
COMP930 01 WORKSHOP 430pm Tues/Thur 13-Mar 2 days $550
COSMETOLOGY
600pm-
COSM802 01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION 9:00pm Mon 25-Feb 8wks $225
DECORATING
6.00pm-
DECO800 01 INTERIOR DECORATING I 900pm Tues 26-Feb 8 wks $225
6:00pm-
FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN I 9.00pm Mon 18-Feb 10wks $225
ENGLISH
6:00pm-
ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 900pm Tues 19-Feb 8 wks $225

SEWING
BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING 600pm-
SEW 800 01 I 9:00pm Thur 21-Feb 10wks $225
BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING 600pm-
SEW 802 01 I119:00pm Mon 18-Feb 10wks $250
6:00pm-
SEW805 01 DRAPERY MAKING I 900pm Tues 19-Feb 10wks $225
MEDICAL
600pm-
MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 900pm Wed 27-Feb 10wks $225
ENQUIRIES Contact the Coordinator at Tel (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0096 / 328-1936 / 302-4300 ext 5201

All fees are included with the exception o the applaton fee of S40.00 (one tilm).
CEES rrsxerv, thr righp t o rhmlge Tainon. Fres, CTr'.ir CortIltl ("art n Sc.hedule rmd Course AaMerials


(


'TE BAHAAMAS RED CROSS


"COME EXPERIENCE THE JOY OF

LIVING TOGETHER FOR HUMANITY" -

i A..,


M ARfl 8tH, 8 OO
tta~sl


" _'H_| if .!,1!. i~ p


i;.


"This space is kindly sponsored by

]Balm tirx Re2i1y" -


I


I


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


r~
sl! r'


"' ''`'


,
t .^ 1
1


Q NC~









PAGE 4B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


Bahamas firm 'has to be the best' with client number 25


FROM page 1B
"It's not easy, but we have to be
the best. Second is not worth it."
Mr Raine said he felt that one fac-
tor behind IPBS's success was "that
we pay tremendous attention to the
support side of the business. If clients
have problems, that's our first and
only priority. Service is they key, and
has driven it.
"The other thing is that we've
always tried to stay ahead of the
curve, and with technology changing


as rapidly as it is today, we make sure
our company and software is always
at the cutting edge."
Clients also have the ability to
select the IPBS software modules that
meet their requirements, taking either
the whole package or ones specifical-
ly tailored to trusts, fund administra-
tion, private banking, accounting, e-
banking, and e-trading.

Clients

With new clients in Trinidad and


Jamaica, Mr Raine said IPBS had
been forced to modify its products to
give those financial institutions the
ability to deal with tax issues. Previ-
ously, its clients had all been in non-
tax environments.
IPBS now employs 12 persons,
including two Bahamians who work
from remote locations in Canada.
Dartley Bank & Trust focuses on
providing investment and merchant
banking services, and has gone live
with the latest IPBS system. It origi-
nally ran its accounting and record


keeping on several different systems,
but has now consolidated this through
IPBS.

Staff

The institution has five staff that
use the IPBS software daily to man-
age and administer investments for
the bank, as well as external clients.
William E. Whitaker, Dartley's
Managing Director, said: "It was
important to have access to local
resources and experts who understand


the nature of the market that we oper-
ate in, our business requirements and
challenges. The IPBS team is respon-
sive and they have extensive bank-
ing, business and technology experi-
ence."
Mr Raine added: ""Dartley are a
well- established bank with a reputa-
tion for providing service and quality
to its clients. By investing in its back
office infrastructure and disaster
recovery, Dartley is well positioned to
continue its business success and
growth."


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
2007
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side
No. 1272

IN THE MATTER OF a piece parcel or lot of
land contained by measurements three and seven
hundred and six hundreths (3.706) acres and
situate on the northeastern side of the Queen's
Highway in the vicinity of Palestine Baptist
Church in the settlement of Deadman's Cay in the
Island of Long Island, The Bahamas.
AND
IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Orlando M. Turnquest
AND
IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act 1959
NOTICE
The Petitioner in this matter claims to be the owner in fee simple
possession of the tract of land hereinbefore described and the
etitioner has made an application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of the
Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined
and declared in the Certificate of Title granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.
Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal office
hours at:
(1) The Registry of The Supreme Court.
(2) The Administrators Office at Clarence Town,
Long Island
(3) The Chambers of the undersigned.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower or
right to dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized in
the Petition shall before the 30th day of April, A.D.,2008 from
the publication of notice inclusive of the day of such publication
file Notice in the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau in the
Island of New Providence aforesaid and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned a statement of his or her claim in the prescribed
form verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. The
failure of any such person to file and serve a statement
of his or her claim within the time fixed by the Notice
aforesaid shall operate as a bar to such claim
Dated this 25th day of FebruaryA.D., 206---"
PYFROM & CO,
Chambers
No.58, Shirley Street,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner.






Trust & Corporate Services

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in
The Bahamas, arbados, the Cayman islands, Guernsey, Switzerland, Hong
Kong, Malta and the United Kingdom, Butterfield Rivate Bank offers a wide
range of servicesto local and international dients

An exciting opportunity currently exstsfor a results oriented self starter with
a record of professional achievementsto join a dynamic Trust & Corporate
Srvicesteam.


Cbre Peqonsibilities

0 Manage large portfolio of complex accountsincluding trust, estates
and agencies
* Rovidefinandal information to dientsasrequeted.
SAct on clients' behalf in mattersdealing with lawyers, benefidaries, etc.
* Extensive experience with all aspectsof trust administration.

Desired Qjaifications

* Bachelor's Degree in Bsiness or related discipline from a well recognized
university.
* A minimum of five yearsprogessve Fidudary experience in the Rnancial
9rvices Industry.
* STEPtraining or other suitablequalificationswill be advantageous
* Rofident in Microsoft Office suite of products
* Srong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, project
management and customer service skills




Cosng Date: February 27, 2008


Obntact
Human Resources
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Lmited
P.O. Box N-3242
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax (242) 393 3772
E-mail: recruitmentbutterfieldbank.bs
www.butterfieldbank.bs


Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) SONTAR EUROBUSINESS LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on January 4, 2008
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the
Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Shakira Burrows of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 7th day of April, 2008 to send their names and
addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made before such debts are proved.

February 25, 2008
SHAKIRA BURROWS

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY




Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) GRAN GUARDIA CORPORATION is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on January 30, 2008
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the
Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Shakira Burrows of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 7th day of April, 2008 to send their names and
addresses and particulars of their debts orclaims to the Liquidator of the
company or, in default thereof, they.may be excluded from the.benefit of .
any distribution made before such debts are proved.

February 25, 2008
SHAKIRA BURROWS

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY








Trust & Crporate Srvices

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in
The Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands Guernsey, Switzerland, Hong
Kong, Malta and the United Kingdom, Butterfield Rivate Bank offers a wide
range of servicesto local and international dients

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with
a record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trust & Corporate
Servicesteam,


Core F3ponaibilities

" Oversee a group of complex client relationships
" Rovidetechnical advice to taff on truth and company structures
* Act on clients' behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, etc.
* Extensive experience with all aspectsof trust administration.


Desired Qdaifications

* Bachelor's Degree in BJsinessor related disciplinefrom a well recognized
university.
SFive 8ght yearsprogresive Rduciary experience in the Financial %9rvices
Industry.
* SfEPtraining or other suitable qualifications will be advantageous
0 Roficient in Microsoft Office suite of products
* Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, project
management and customer vice skills


osing Date: February 27, 2008


contact
Human Resources
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas Umited
P.O. Box N-3242
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax (242) 393 3772
E-mal: recruitment@butterfieldbank.bs
www.butterfieldbank.bs bi v


Downtown authority structure

still up for discussion


FROM page 1B

while the private sector and
former Christie government
had been exploring the cre-
ation of a Business Improve-
ment District (BID) to man-
age the city and its revival, "the
present government is think-
ing more in terms of local gov-
ernment".
However, Mr Klonaris said
the Ingraham administration
was in agreement with the pri-
vate sector that downtown
Nassau needed a management
authority "if we're going to
have such a city".
Describing the BID propos-
al as being "in transition right
now", he added: "We would
want to re-enact the legisla-
tion, structure the legislation,
enhance the shape of what we
can do, the services and what
powers we have in terms of
revenue collection. We're
about 50 per cent there, and
did that before the adminis-
trations changed.
"The [BID] process is ready
now in terms of having sup-
port from the Government and
the local population, in terms
of understanding how vital it is
to have a BID that gives ser-
vices above what the Govern-
ment offers, providing a safe,
cleaner and stronger city."
The NTDB chairman said it
was "very important" to attract
Bahamians and residents back


to downtown Bay Street and
the city to live, especially given
New Providence's transporta-
tion problems and traffic con-
gestion.
Through legislation, Mr
Klonaris said it was hoped to
enact tax incentives, such as
real property and stamp duty
breaks, to encourage contrac-
tors and developers to build
residential housing options for
downtown Nassau.
He added that people would
also be encouraged to return to
live and shop in downtown
Nassau if there was a better
transportation and parking sys-
tem, facilitating "a more con-
sumer-type city" where peo-
ple could meet and go shop-
ping.
This would involve "reclaim-
ing the waterfront" from the
container shipping facilities,
Mr Klonaris said, praising the
Government for "moving
quickly" to relieve traffic con-
gestion, plus noise and air pol-
lution, in the city of Nassau by
restricting the movement of
container traffic to the early
morning hours by year-end.
When it came to addressing
downtown Nassau's rundown
properties both historic and
modern Mr Klonaris again
called for legislative change
that gave "real teeth" and
allowedt.,he Government',to,,
takeovere" and maintain,
properties if they were not
kept at a high level.


I


Urgently seeking Director Of Human Resources
5-10 years experience, salary commensurate with
experience and qualifications.

Write to: P.O. Box CB-12707
Nassau, Bahamas




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that YVNER PETITFOR of 1250
2ND STREET, APT#201, SARASOTA, FLA 34236, UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18TH day of FEBRUARY, 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



A leading law firm with offices located in Nassau and
Freeport is presently considering applications for the
following positions.


The successful applicant should possess the following
minimum requirements:
* Associates degree in related Computer Sciences
* Two or more years work experience in the industry
* Excellent working knowledge of Microsoft Office
products
* Very good working knowledge of Windows 2000/2003
Operating Systems
S Experience with SQL a plus
* Previous knowledge of law firm operations an assest

General responsibilities will include but not limited to:

* Maintaining, troubleshooting and repairing hardware
and software
* Maintaining Network trustees and security
* Maintaining system backups
* Recommendation and implementation of new
technologies
Liase and Coordinate with various
vendor-based projects/solutions

WE OFFER
A competitive salary, Pension Plan, Health and Life Insurance
and other attractive benefits.

Interested persons should apply in writing to:
The Office Manger
P.O.Box N-7117
Nassau, Bahamas









TBEITRIBY


Chamber president urges: Move industry to Freeport


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
IF the Bahamas is serious
about Grand Bahama becom-
ing its industrial capital, those
industries must be moved to
that island.
Gregory Moss the newly-
elected president of the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce, said there was no rea-
son why the ministry that has
responsibility for industrial mat-


ters should not be located in
Freeport, which would allow for
greater monitoring of the sec-
tor.
It would also aid in relieving,
if only slightly, some of the mas-
sive traffic congestion experi-
enced now in Nassau, he added.
Similarly, Mr Moss said the
technical programmes and
degrees offered at the College
of the Bahamas should be locat-
ed at its northern campus in
Freeport. He said this would
allow those students in Nassau
an opportunity to experience


not only being away from
home, but enjoy internship
opportunities in Freeport.
"This would be very similar
to persons attending the Uni-
versity of the West Indies,
where it is understood that you
go to one island when you want
to study law and another one if
you want to study medicine.
This would send the very strong
message that the Government
was serious about establishing
Freeport and Grand Bahama
as the centre of industry," the
Chamber president added.


Atlantic Medical 'ahead of curve' with web portal


FROM page 1B

web portal to monitor the
progress of claims they had
submitted, determine whether
a bill had been paid, and see
whether patients had paid a
deductible.
For the insured client, the
portal would help them track
their "eligibility status", moni-
tor the payment of bills and
insurance premiums, and track
claim submissions and their
medical history.
Mr Bastian added that
employer sponsors of group
health plans could use Health
Now to assess how their group
was performing over different
time periods, such as month-
to-month of per annum, and
assess those employees who
were submitting high claims
volumes and values.
"Our emphasis at Atlantic
Medical has always been on
service," Mr Bastian told The
Tribune. "Service, service, ser-
vice, and delivering that ser-
vice to clients, whether the
insured, group sponsors or
providers.
"We feel this is going to put
us ahead of the curve again
from the company's perspec-
tive, and we will continue to
be on the cutting edge, making
sure we offer the best service
out there.
"Even though we feel our
service is very good, especially
on-theclaims turnaround time,
which is-three working days,
we've added more and more
irl fi Ir: Io--


benefits to clients. The invest-
ment we've made in the web
portal we don't count in terms
of dollars; we count our invest-
ment in terms of client satis-
faction."
Annastasia Francis, Atlantic
Medical's operations manag-
er, said that when the company
held focus groups on the ini-
tiative in late 2007, the
response was: 'How soon can
you do it.'
Pointing out that "illness is
not a 9am to 5pm thing", she
added that Atlantic Medical


clients wanted to know what
was happening with their poli-
cies and claims 24/7, wherever
they were in the world.
"Having real time access
gives people a comfort level,"
Ms Francis said.
Mr Bastian described
Atlantic Medical's initiative as
"groundbreaking", adding:
"We're going to find people
picking up a lot on the things
we're entertaining. As far as
we're concerned, the level of
access our clients have is truly
unprecedented."


That being said, he said per-
haps the Government should
reconsider whether the pro-
posed liquefied natural gas
(LNG) terminal and pipeline
would fit into the concept of
Freeport as an industrial city.
Mr Moss said that because
Freeport was initially designed


to be an industrial zone, the
island never fully developed
itself as a tourism destination. If
that component was to be
added, it needed to be devel-
oped and developed well.
Most importantly, this would
include the development and
operation of hotels by skilled


hoteliers, which would enhance
the island's tourism product, as
well as the creation of a cruise
port away from the industrial
zone.
His comments came at last
week's Grand Bahama Busi-
ness Outlook at the Westin
Hotel in Freeport.


NOTICE OF TENDER


The Ministry of National Security invites tenders for sale of the following
vehicles, "where is, as is":-


Year of Vehicles


2001
2002


Description

Chevy Impala
Nissan Ad Wagon


2. Vehicles can be viewed at the Ministry of National Security between
the hours of 9:00 am and 4:00pm Monday to Friday.


3. Tenders are to be submitted in sealed envelopes and clearly
addressed as follows:-

PERMANENT SECRETARY
MINISTRY OF NATIONAL SECURITY
CHURCHILL BUILDING
P.O. BOX N3271
NASSAU, BAHAMAS


4. Tenders are to reach the Ministry of National Security, Churchill
Building by 5:00 pm 29th February 2008.



Permanent Secretary
Ministry of National Security











UK University Distance Learning in Bahamas


MBA University of Wales
-PRIFYSGOL
* One year minimum by online learning CYMRU
* US$8,500 total fee UNIVERSITY
OF WALES
* Flexible payment options available
* A member of the Association of
Commonwealth Universities


MBA University of Bradford
* Top 10 MBA in the world (Economist, Jan 2008)
* AMBA/EQUIS accredited BRADFORD
* US$15,000 instalmentt plan available) SchooloManagement


Also recruiting now to degree
programmes: MA Education,
LLM Commercial Law, MSc Public
Administration and Development,
BSc Psychology, BSc Computing,
BSc and MSc Hospitality, BA
Business and HND in Business, from
University of Birmingham, University
of Sunderland, University of Derby,
Sheffield Hallam University, University
of Teesside and University of Wales








; info@rdicaribbean.com r
..1.i ( 3l 54 ear5 ni n
S1 (703) 549 5424 I whl es



www.rdicaribbean.com


Quality Auto Sales Ltd

PARTS DEPARTMENT

Will be CLOSED for

STOCKTAKING

FEB 28 thru MAR 1
(Thursday, Friday & Saturday)
We will re-open for business as usual on Monday, March 3.
We apologise to our valued customers and regret any
inconvenience this may cause. All other sections of the
AUTO MALL will be open for business as usual.

QUALITY ,.
AST SIRLE T T LIMITED
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 397-1700


TO BAHAMIAN LAND OWNERS,
DEVELOPERS AND INVESTORS:


REQUEST FOR


PROPOSALS
for

LONG -TERM LEASE OF

EXECUTIVE STAFF RENTAL HOUSING


Baha Mar Development Company Ltd. invites proposals from Bahamian land
owners, developers and investors to build and lease to Baha Mar on a long-
term basis a total of approximj, ti.-h 150 intlli-f. i ily residential housing units
located in developments of at least 30 units each, conveniently located to Cable
Beach for occupancy by the executive staff of Baha Mar, Caesars Bahamas
Management Corporation and Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide Inc. and
their respective contractors, consultants and suppliers.


For further information or to obtain a proposal package contact:

Steven Katz
BAHA MAR DEVELOPMENT COMPANY LTD.
Email: skatz@bahamar.com Tel: 242.677.9081


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 6B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


FROM page 1B


Bahamas aims to preserve NEC and Immigration rights in EPA


investors from EU countries
must be treated no less
favourably than their Bahami-
an counterparts.
In its draft offer, the
Bahamas is seeking that "sub-
sidies, fiscal incentives, schol-
arships, grants and other forms
of domestic support, whether
financial or otherwise may be
restricted to Bahamian nation-
als or Bahamian-owned enter-
prises".
As its services offer will be
submitted as an annex to the
offer submitted by CARIFO-
RUM, the regional Caribbean
grouping that negotiated the
EPA on behalf of the Bahamas
and others, this nation will be


expected to liberalise at least
75 per cent of its services
industries some 116 out of
the 155 on the CARIFORUM
schedule.
It is understood that the
Bahamas' services offer will
mirror that made by Barbados
as much as possible, with one
or two tweaks to allow for the
Bahamian economy's specific
needs and structure.
On the market access front,
the Bahamas wants to preserve
the National Economic Coun-
cil's (really, the Cabinet) abil-
ity to first approve any invest-
ment in the Bahamas by a for-
eign or EU national that is
worth more than $250,000.


In its draft services offer, the
Bahamas said that in regard to
investments by EU companies
seeking to establish businesses
in this nation: "Approvals will
be granted on the basis of an
assessment of the economic
needs and benefits to the
Bahamas arising from the
investment project under con-
sideration."

Position

The Bahamas also wants to
'reserve' its position, or pre-
serve, the National Economic
Council's (NEC) ability to
approve the acquisition by for-
eign nationals or companies of


Abaco Markets Limited, a leading food distribution company
with five retail and club outlets in New Providence, Freeport and
Marsh Harbor Abaco is seeking applicationsfor the position of:











THE JOB.
To lead the company's program to Reduce Risk in the
area of: Inventory Control, Shrink, and Loss Prevention,
Risk Analysis, Safety and Security. The candidate will be
required to create, implement and manage Shrink and Loss
Prevention Programs ensuring that Training programs

and follow-up monitoring is consistently maintained.


REQUIREMENTS
* College Degree in a similar or related field
* A minimum of 5 years Experience in the area of Inventory
Controls
* Proficiency M/S suites
* A proven track record of success in the field desirable
* Possess strong leadership skills with excellent People and
Communication skills


Competitive compensation and benefit packages
(inclusive of incentive based bonuses)
Interested persons should send their resumes to

hr(labacomarkets. com


i


RENT


Commercial Building
East Street South

www.bahamasrea Ity.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com


move than five acres of land.
This nation also wants to
ensure that for what are known
as all four 'modes of supply'
of services the cross-border
supply of services; travelling
abroad to consume services;
EU companies establishing a
commercial presence in the
Bahamas; and EU nationals
coming to work in the
Bahamas the Central Bank
of the Bahamas' exchange con-
trol policies and administrative
system is preserved.
This would enable the Cen-
tral Bank to continue to
approve the establishment of
foreign currency and external
Bahamian dollar accounts, and
to approve capital investments
and loans made to Bahamian
firms and individuals by non-
resident firms.
The final 'horizontal com-
mitment' reservation that the
Bahamas is seeking to achieve
relates to provisions in the
EPA that would allow the tem-
porary entry of six EU worker
categories into this nation.
These categories are for
senior executives setting up an
EU company in the Bahamas,
who are eligible to stay for up
to three years.
Managers and senior spe-
cialists, who can stay for up to
three years. These persons
have to have been employed
by the EU head company for
more than a year.
Graduate trainees, who
have a university degree and
are being transferred by the
parent to a Bahamas branch
or subsidiary for career train-
ing and development. They
would be allowed to stay for
up to three years.
Business services sellers,
who are selling services in the
Bahamas on behalf of, an EU
company. They cannot make
direct sales to the public, and
must not receive a salary from
a Bahamian firm. Under the
EPA, they can enter for 90
days in a 12-month period.
Contract services suppliers
from the EU, who can enter
for 12 months.
Independent professionals,
who also have contracts to sup-
ply services in the Bahamas.

In its draft services offer,
though, the Bahamas-is seek-
ing to remain 'unbound' when'
it comes-to making offers on
worker movements, meaning
it is not making any commit-
ments to open up the Bahami-
an labour market to EU work-
ers, except for the six cate-
gories mentioned above.
And even with those six cat-


--- --ElLl 1
. . . . .


BAHAMAS REALTY LTD.
COMMERCIAL
In association with:

CBRE
CB RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD


egories, the Bahamas' draft
offer says: "The entry and res-
idency of all foreign natural
persons working in the
Bahamas is governed by the
Immigration Act and regula-
tions.
"A work permit must be
obtained prior to entry into the
Bahamas by foreign nationals
intending to take up employ-
ment. Labour market tests are
applied in determining.
whether such foreign workers
are to be admitted."
Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, told The Tri-
bune that the Bahamas' efforts
to craft an EPA services offer
were "coming along well".
He added: "At this point, the
technical people are holding
their discussions, and arranging
meetings with the service sec-
tors. I'm pleased with the
progress we are making.
"We have six months to get
this [services offer] all com-
ple.ted. We're on schedule to
get as much done in the time
we have."
Mr Laing said there was "no
question" that the Bahamas
would sign off on its goods
trade or 'market access' offer
on the EPA, "but services are
up-for discussion now".
The Government has
already met with the Bahami-
an insurance industry over the
EPA, and The Tribune under-
stands concerns were
expressed over the possibility
that EU brokers and agents
would be allowed to establish a
commercial presence in the
Bahamas an area that has
traditionally been reserved for
Bahamian ownership only.
The EPA goes far beyond
securing duty-free market
access for Bahamian exports
to the EU, such as those from
the fisheries industry, Bacardi
and Polymers International.
The Bahamian economy's reg-
ulatory, legislative and policy
framework will have to under-
go a major reworking once the
agreement takes effect,
although there is understood
to be a five-year 'breathing
space' between the EPA's
signing and when the services
aspects come into force.
Fisheries is one area where
less than obvious changes will
occur: Briefing documents pre-
pared by the Ministry of
Finance detail how the EPA
will require a Rules of Origin


regime to determine which
goods are manufactured and
caught in the CARIFORUM
area, to qualify them for tariff-
free entry.
This, though, could present a
problem for Bahamian fisher-
men and the crawfish industry,
as the EPA Rules of Origin
specify that fisheries products
can only be specified as
Bahamian if they are caught
in this nation's terrestrial
waters.
Yet the Ministry of Finance
pointed out: "Traditionally, the
Bahamas has defined the fish-
ing grounds of the Bahamas as
the 200 mile nautical mile
exclusive economic zone."
In addition, Bahamian fish-
eries exporters will also have to
adhere to high food import
health and safety standards
imposed by the EU, while the
transition to a rules-based trad-
ing regime "is likely to mean
that greater effort will be
placed on fisheries manage-
ment practices such as closed
seasons, quotas for fisheries
products and restrictions on
the types of gear and equip-
ment used"'. Closed seasons for
conch and grouper are already
unpopular with Bahamian fish-
ermen.
When it came to'the draft
sector-by-sector services offer
by the Bahamas, the most glar-
ing hole was for telecommuni-
cations, which has currently
been left blank. This is because
the technical team drafting the
EPA offer, led by Canadians
Mark Sills and Murray Smith,
is understood to be waiting ion
directions from the Govern-
ment.
The EPA would liberalise
telecoms still further in the
Bahamas, but this, of course,
would undermine the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny's (BTC) privatization val-
ue. That process should be
completed five years from
now, when the EPA's services
provisions take effect, but giv-
en the Bahamas' track record,
that is by no means guaran-
teed.
Yet Mr Laing told The Tri-
bune: "I don't think that's
going to be an issue. There is
no timeline that the EPA has
that is going to conflict with
the Government's plans for lib-
eralization of the telecommu-
nications sector in the
Bahamas."


Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers for the
following positions for the 2008-2009 School Year.

-Journalism/Literature (Gr. 10-12)
-Religious Knowlege Bible (Gr. 7-12)
-Math (Gr. 7-12)
-Physics (Gr. 10-12)
-Agriculture (Gr. 7-9)
-Technical Drawing (Gr. 7-12)
-Accounts/Commerce/Economics (Gr. 10-12)
-Physical Education (Gr. 7-12)
-Spanish (Gr. 7-12)
-Geography/History(Gr. 10-12)
-Chemisrty
-Business Studies (Gr. 10-12)
-Health Science (Gr.7-9)
-General Science (Gr. 7-9)
-Computer Studies (Gr. 7-12)
-Music (Gr. 7-12)
-Biology (r. 10-12)
-Language Arts/Literature (Gr.7-12)
-Art/Craft (Gr. 7-12)
-Food Nutrition (Gr. 10-12)
-Clothing Construction (Gr. 10-12)
-Social Studies (Gr. 7-9)
-Home Economics (Gr. 7-9)

Applicants must:

A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing
to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple
Christian School
B. Have a Bachelor's Degree in Education or higher
from a recognized College or University in area of
specialization.
C. Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or Diploma
D. Have at least two years teaching experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent communication
skills.
E. Applicants must have the ability to prepare students
for all examinations to the BJCBGCSE levels.
F. Be willing to participate in high school's extra
curricular programmes.

Application must be picked up at the High School Office
on Shirley Street and be returned with a full curriculum
vitae, recent coloured photograph and three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O.Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas


OFFICE & RETAIL SUITES
(Completion 2009)


* Six Units at 726 sq. ft. each
* Popular High Traffic Commercial Area
* Brand New Attractive Design
* Ample Parking Available
* For More Information Call 396-0000


Pricing Information As Of: F A L'"
Friday 22 February 2008
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,996 93 / CHG 0.11 /%CHG 0.01 / YTD -69.82 / YTD % -3.38
52.k-H. .2s -L.Lc..s Secur.l jP Pra.1.j: Cl.5Te TcJay's Close Cnar.ge DC'ail .-l tEPS I. Di. ., PE Yiela
1.73 0.75 Abaco Markets 1.73 1.73 0.00 0.157 0.000 11.0 0.00%
11.80 11.25 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 11.80 0.00 1.502 0.400 7.9 3.39%
9.68 8.11 Bank of Bahamas 9.61 9.61 0.00 0.612 0.260 15.7 2.71%
0.99 0.80 Benchmark 0.99 0.99 0.00 0.188 0.030 5.3 3.03%
3.74 1.95 Bahamas Waste 3.66 3.66 0.00 0.289 0.090 12.7 2.46%
2.70 1.25 Fidelity Bank 2.60 2.60 0.00 0.058 0.040 44.8 1.54%
12.70 10.03 Cable Bahamas 12.70 12.70 0.00 1.030 0.240 12.3 1.89%
3.15 2.00 Colina Holdings 3.14 3.14 0.00 55 0.031 0.040 101.3 1.27%
8.50 4.58 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 7.50 7.50 0.00 0.428 0.260 17.5 3.47%
7.22 4.48 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.49 4.55 0.06 0.129 0.052 34.8 1.16%
2.60 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.44 2.45 0.01 13,000 0.316 0.020 7.8 0.82%
7.79 5.70 Famguard 7.79 7.79 0.00 0.713 0.280 10.9 3.59%
13.01 12.30 FInco 13.00 13.00 0.00 0.801 0.570 16.2 4.38%
14.75 13.99 FirstCaribbean 13.99 13.99 0.00 0.914 0.470 15.3 3.36%
6.10 5.12 Focol (S) 5.15 5.15 0.00 235 0.363 0.140 14.2 2.72%
1.00 0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.74 0.74 0.00 0.035 0.000 21.1 0.00%
8.00 7.20 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.411 0.300 17.6 4.14%
12.50 8.60 J. S. Johnson 12.30 12.30 0.00 1.059 0.610 11.6 4.96%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.167 0.600 8.6 6.00%
Fdlelity Over-Tne-Ccunier Securities
52.4..1-. 5-'.*..KL:. ,A 5,r.E.:.. EBic 1. LS .l PR.o. .e i. .: Er'S I C I FE 1 t. l
14.60 14.25 Bar.armac Su e.i-r.arei 1-14 I0 I .6 0 1: I.I.i 1 lE.it 1 1Ilj I_- 8 1L
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35 -0.023 0.000 N/M 0.00%
Conna Over-The-Counler Securntes
dl4 0 .11 o i. BDA B1B 4i .:. 4.3 00 41.00 4.450 2.750 9.0 6.70%
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.160 1.125 13.4 7.71%
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0.030 0.000 N/M 0.00%
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
52iK..i i2AKLC.., Funa Narrme NA V i.-r: Lost 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.3001 1.2037 Colina Bond Fund 1.300059""
3.0008 2.4723 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.999402"5 19.97%
1.3805 1.2647 Collna Money Market Fund 1.380476****
3.7969 3.0569 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.7442.* -1.40% 27.72%
11.9880 11.3545 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.9880"* 0.46% 5.53%
100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.00"
100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.00"
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.00"
10.5000 9.6628 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.6628"*
FINDEX CLOSE 922 65 /YTD -3 09% I 2007 34 47%
5. .._ :,. ,t.., :. i-..?..: : : I ,::. :* .. "MARKET TERMS YIELD last 12 month dividendsdivided by closing price NAV KEY
52wk-Hi Highest closing pnce in last 52 weeks Bid S Buying price of Collna and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Collna and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price 31 December 2007
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol Trading volume of the prior week "' 31 January 2008
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths "** 2 January 2008
Daily Vol Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value **. 15 February 2008
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/IM Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1. 1994 = 100
S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date /81/2007
TO TRADE CALL CFAL 242-502-7010 / FIDELITY 242-358-7764 / FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CALL (242) 394-2503


BUSINESS I


_ _ _ __ ___ _







THETRBUE ONAYUFBRARN2,E00,SAGI7


Investments boost island's prospects


* By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
GRAND Bahama's economic future is
looking brighter due to a number of pro-
posed foreign direct investments.
Speaking at the Grand Bahama Business
Outlook conference, Central Bank Gover-
nor Wendy Craigg said prospects for the
island were brighter, reinforced on the
tourism side by new jet services, indications
of increased cruise business, the eventual
return of the Royal Oasis to the room
inventory, several hotel refurbishment pro-
jects, and the continuing build out of the
Ginn development.


The island is also set to benefit from the
ongoing Phase V expansion of the Freeport
Container Port transshipment facility.
"By and large, these investment inflows
are anticipated to mitigate the weakness in
tourism performance, provide opportuni-
ties for strong job growth, and basically
contribute to improvements in the monetary
environment including the external
reserves pool," Ms Craigg said.
Painting the current state of the Grand
Bahama economy, Ms Craigg said that con-
struction investments were leading the eco-
nomic recovery efforts on Grand Bahama
with the value of housing starts increasing
by nearly 8 per cent.


"The value of permits issued rose by 34
per cent to $138 million the highest level
since 2001," she added.
Grand Bahama was also contributing to a
stronger credit picture, with consumer cred-
it increasing by nearly 12 per cent and mort-
gages in excess of 30 per cent during 2007.
"Over the years, Grand Bahama has been
successful at attracting a steady flow of for-
eign direct investment. As a special eco-
nomic zone, Freeport, because of its high
quality infrastructure, strategic geographic
position, industry attraction plan, and access
to a productive labour force, has been suc-
cessful at building a vibrant industrial base,"
she said.


Ex-McKinney partner joins Higgs & Johnson


Michael
Allen, a former
McKinney,
Bancroft &
Hughes part-
ner, will join
rival law firm
Higgs & John-
son as a part-
ner with effect
from March 3,
2008..
At McKinney, Bancroft &


Hughes, he advised interna-
tional and Bahamian clients on
a variety of trust, corporate and
commercial structures for gen-
eral business and wealth man-
agement purposes.
For more than 15 years, he
has provided legal support to
major Bahamian real estate
acquisitions and resort devel-
opment, assisted in the creation
of financial products connect-
ed with wealth management


concerns, and issued formal
opinions on a wide range of
multi-jurisdictional structures
available for the conduct of
business in and through The
Bahamas.
"Michael is a very competent
lawyer who has achieved much
throughout his career," said
Higgs & Johnson managing
partner John K. F. Delaney.
"Our clients are familiar with
his professional reputation, and


he is well respected by our cur-
rent partnership. He comple-
ments the talent pool of the firm
and we are confident that he
will be a tremendous asset as
we continue to prepare for our
next stage of development."
Mr. Allen is a former chair-
man of the Bahamas Financial
Services Board.


Automotive General Manager


A prominent new car dealership
is seeking a general manager.

The ideal candidate will have
wide experience in the
automotive business as well as
good written and oral
communication skills.


Send resumes with references to:
Automotive GM
P.O. Box N-9240
Nassau, Bahamas


Responsibilities:
- Create and organize vehicle sales activities
- Create and organize parts and service
operations
- Manage follow-up systems for existing
customers
- Cultivate new business
- Develop and implement company policies and
programmes
- Train and lead staff in a team environment
- Stay up-to-date in dealership technology
Requirements
- 5+ years of experience in the automotive
industry
- Experience with Japanese automotive brands
- Strong leadership and management skills
- Superior communication and customer service
skills
- Account management and budgeting
experience
- Proficiency in computers


NOTICE


RICARDO (RICK) SPIRONELLO



AND


MATTHEW SPIRONELLO


(Managing Personnel: Marmat Ltd.)


Please be advised that Ricardo (Rick) Spironello

and Matthew Spironello are no longer employed

by or connected in any way with Paradise Blue

Water Limited or Paradise Island Condominium

Joint Venture Limited ('the Companies'), the


developers' of the


Ocean


Club Residences


& Marina on Paradise Island, and


are not


at thorised to conduct any business on behalf

of the Companies or utilize in any fashion any

of the Companies' proprietary and confidential

information.


INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY


Three 2 Storey townhouses about 80% completed which require some repairs. Each unit comprises
676 sq.ft. on the upper floor and 676 sq.ft. on the lower floor (total floor area 1,352 sq.ft. per unit)
and consists of 3 Bedrooms 2 Baths, Living, Dining and Kitchen.
Driveway & Walkways are improved with 12 x 12 Spanish Type Tiles, 1,775 Sq.Ft. Swimming
Pool and Jacuzzi which are 85% completed.
The Buildings are situated on Lot #17376 comprising 10,000 sq.ft. located in
Bahama Sound of Exuma Section 18, Exuma, Bahamas


SThe units are being sold collectively.
. ."' i For conditions of the sale and any other
information, please contact:
: _. The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
-"11 Aft at: 356-1685 or 356-1608
Nassau, Bahamas
SInterested persons should submit offers
in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit,
..: .' P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
"Serious enquiries only





NOTICE






MARMAT LTD.


Please be advised that Marmat Ltd.

is in no way connected with Paradise

Blue Water Limited or Paradise Island

Condominium Joint Venture Limited

("the Companies"), the developers of the


Ocean


Club Residences & Marina on


Paradise Island.



Please also be advised that it has come

to the attention of the management of the

Companies that Marmat Ltd. is using the

Companies' proprietary and confidential

information in its marketing materials

and passing off the said development as

its own.


of the

Betty Taylor week
Journalist / Entrepreneur

"a4 goodfriend,

whio's by

your side in

trou6Ce times is

tike water to a

thirsty soul"'


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE










PAGE 8B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


|I Bank of The Bahamas
INTERNATIONAL

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE FOR THE SIX- MONTH PERIOD ENDED
DECEMBER 31, 2007 WITH QUARTERLY AND YEAR OVER YEAR
COMPARISON


The Bank continues to build on the momentum developed during the last
fiscal year. Despite sustained systemic challenges the Bank posted record
net income for the six-month period. This result keeps the Bank on pace for
another good year. We are pleased with these results which signal continued
robust organizational development and sustained creation of shareholders
wealth.

The development of the Bank's financial strength coupled with expanding
public confidence, continues to be evident with total assets growing to
$676 Million steadily moving towards the significant milestone of $1 Billion.
The level of investor confidence also continues to be high evidenced by a
rising share price currently trading at $9.61 and increase of six (6) cents
since the last quarter. The six month period is highlighted by Interest Income
increasing to $24.9 Million or 21.92% over the same period last year. With
non-interest expense being tightly controlled showing an increase of 4.2%;
Net Income rose by 20.9% to $6.25 Million.

As the Bank moves to consolidate on its strategic achievements and to take
advantage of the significant growth experienced over the last three years,
there is now a careful and deliberate focus on capacity building geared at
making the Bank of The Bahamas experience for all stakeholders second to
none. These plans which are a fundamental aspect of the Bank's long term
strategic thrust is expected to augment the Bank's value proposition and
competitive positioning thereby concretizing the sustainability of our long term
profitability.

We express sincere gratitude for the outstanding support of our staff and
continue to be very grateful for the confidence and support of our growing
customer and shareholder base.




J. I. McWeeney
managing Director


BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME ( UNAUDITED)
3 MONTHS ENDED DECEMBER 31,2007
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


NET INTEREST AND OTHER INCOME:


Interest Income
Interest Expense
Net Interest income
Less Net Provision for Loan Losses
Net Interest Income after Provision for Loan Losses
Non-Interest Revenue
Income from Investments
Net Revenue
NON-INTEREST EXPENSES
NET INCOME


EARNINGS PER SHARE


$ 13,090.439
5,500,811
7,589,628
445,236
'7,144,392
1,408,964
388,637
8,941,993
5,804,933
$ 3,137,060

$ 0.20

15600000


$ 10,295,728
4,165,466
6,130,262
403,765
5,726,497
1,723,092
435.803
7,885,392
5,516,664
$ 2,368,728

$ 0.15

15560445


BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS (UNAUDITED)
6 MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2007
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
DEC DEC
2007 2006


CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
Net income
Adjustments for non-cash items

Net change in other non-cash operating items
Net cash provided by (used In) operating activities

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
Acquisition of fixed assets
Purchase of investments
Proceeds from maturity of investments
Net cash used in investing activities

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
Issuance of Preference Shares
Dividends paid
Net cash provided by (used In) financing activities

NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
DURING THE PERIOD

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS BEGINNING OF PERIOD

END OF PERIOD


$ 6,251,622 $ 5,171,853
1,491,099 1,485,354
7,742,721 6,657,207
(2,206,679) (5,260,227)
5,536,041 1,396,980

(1,187,410) (330,369)

2,700,000-
1,512,590 (330,369)

14,764,990
(3,057,883) (3.086,818)
(3,057,883) 11,678,172


3,990,749 12,744,783

124,629,757 44,198,930

$ 128,620,506 $ 56,943,713


December December
312007 31.2006


ASSETS
Cash and due from banks
Investments, Loans and Advances to Customers, net
Other Assets
TOTAL


LIBIUTIES
Deposits from customers and banks
Bonds Payable
Other Liabilities
Total Liabilities
SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
Share Capl:
Authorized 25,000,000 preferred shares of $B 1,000 each
25,000,000 common shares of $B1 each
Issued and Fully Paid 15,600,000 common shares (2005:12,000,000)
Issued Preference Shares (Redeemable By Issuer)
Share Premium
Treasury Shares
General Reserve
Retained Earnings
Total Shareholders Equity
TOTAL


September
30.2007


$ 128,620,506 $ 56,943,713 116,408,699
528,193,637 502,771,373 521,563,482
19,833,230 24,722,884 21,584,204
$ 676,647.373 $ 584,437,970 $ 659,556,385


517,537,523 444,562,200
37,000,000 17,000,000
29,145,945 31,104,594
583,683,468 492,666,794


15,600,000
14,764,990
28,587,866


15,600,000
14,764,990
28,587,866
(237,239)


499,414,772
37,000,000
27,681,308
564.096,080


15,600,000
14,764,990
28,587,866


34,011,049 33,055,559 36,507,450
$ 92,963,905 $ 91,771,176 $ 95,460,306
$ 676,647,373 $ 584,437,970 $ 659,556,386


BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED INTERIM CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(UNAUDITED)
6 MONTHS ENDED DECEMBER, 2007

1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES

These consolidated interim condensed financial statements are prepared in
accordance with IAS 34 Interim Financial Reporting. The accounting polices used in
the preparation of these consolidated interim condensed financial statements are
consistent with those used in the annual financial statements for the year ended
June 30, 2007."


The consolidated interim condensed financial statements include the accounts of
Bank of The Bahamas Limited and its wholly owned subsidiary, BOB Financial
Services, Inc.


As US economy cools,




companies starting to




shrink travel budgets


BUSINESS TRAVELER Brian Shenberg, a salesman from Chicago, checks in at the Bob Hope Airport in
Burbank, California. As the economy cools, companies are starting to shrink their travel budgets a move
likely to put further strain on the struggling airline industry.




MINISTRY OF LANDS AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971
r CHAPTER 339
THE PRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)
(AMENDMENT)( ) REGULATIONS, 2002

The public is advised that prices as shown in the Schedule for LEAD FREE
GASOLINE sold by ESSO STANDARD OIL S.A. LTD. will become effective on Monday
February 25, 2008.

GASOLINE SCHEDULE

MAXIMUM WHOLESALE SELLING MAXIMUM
PRICE PER U.S. GALLON RETAIL SELLING
PRICE PER US.
PLACE ARTICLE MAXIMUM MAXIMUM GALLON
SUPPLIERS' DISTRIBUTORS'
PRICE PRICE

PART A
NEW PROVIDENCE INCLUDING SEA FR EIGHT


ESSO LEAD FREE 4.14 4.14 4.58
PART C
GRANDBAHAMA INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
(NOT FREEP.)

ESSO LEAD FREE 4.04 4.20 4.62
PART D
ABACO,ANDROS NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
ELEUTHERA

ESSO DIESEL OIL 4.14 4.35 4.74
PART
ALL OTHER FAMILY NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
ISLAND

ESSO LEAD FREE 4.15 4.37 4.77






ARRISON TOMPSON
PERMANENT SECRETARY


BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOIATEO BALANCE SHEET (UNAUDITED)
AS OFDECEMBER 31,2007
1 Etasad In Bahamian dollars)


.... .. .
: .. .
Ila O










THE TRIBUNE I


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008, PAGE 9B-


iCOMICS'J jHH I|H


Tribune Comics


APARTMENT 3-G

I CONVINCED ERIC THAT I'/M
COMMITTED TO THE GALLERY.
> BUT NOW >
I NEED TO
BE.'- Up l .
MY EVENT-
PLANNG'N/
STAFF. A..


I1-13 I


I IN OTHER WORDS,
2 1 ANOTHER ME/


BLONDIE

WHY DON'T 5BLOGGING IS FOR HERE'S A GUY NAMED "PIZZA PETEV AGWOOD, IT'S 3 A.M.!
YOU HAVE PEOPLE WITH NO LIFE WHO'S BICYCLING ACROSS THE U.S.
AN ONLINE AND TOO MUCH H EATING NOTHING BUTHOY-IZ
JOURNAL, A E ON THEIR PD HONEY! 'PIZZA PETEE
PULLED PORK AND JUST PUT ME ON HISI
-'DAD.,. HANDS, ROOT BEER!_ ,.I ,u .


MARVIN


NON SEQUITUR


( Calvin & Hi

IT SMAS ON THE BACK
OF TIS RECORD TWRT TWE
COMPOSER COW.D PLA' ThE
PIANO AT AGE 1"E.T


"IF YOU WANT TO GFT MARGARET'S
ATTENTION, JUST WHISPER."


Contract Bridge

By Steve Becker


Famous Hand


South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
*KJ8652
VK7
*KQ764
+-
WEST EAST
*A943 4-
*9864 VQ103
"45 *J82
+7C43 4KQJ9852
SOUTH
+Q 107
VA J 52
*A 1093
+A 10
The bidding:
South West North East
I + Pass 1 # 1 NT
Pass 2 34 Pass
3 Pass 4 Pass
4 I Pass 6
Opening lead ace of spades.
This deal occurred during the
match between Italy and the United
States in 1951. The Italians scored
heavily on the hand but lost the
match by a wide margin on one of
the few occasions through the years
that an American team triumphed
over Italy.
The bidding at the first table
went as shown. Eugenio Chiaradia's


notrump overcall, as played by him
and his partner Augusto Ricci, indi-
cated a long suit in either hearts or
clubs.
John Crawford and B. Jay Becker
were respectively North-South for
the U.S. and wound up in six dia-
monds. Ricci, having listened care-
fully to the bidding, then led the ace
and another spade, ruffed by East for
down one. As the East-West cards
were divided, the U.S. pair could
have.made six spades.
At the second table, where an Ital-
ian pair held the North-South cards,
six diamonds was also reached -
but the outcome was not the same.
Here, the bidding went:
South West North East
1 V Pass 2* Pass '
34 Pass 3+ Pass
4+ Pass 4 Pass
4 NT Pass 6
The Italians at that time always
bid their shorter suit first with a very
promising hand, which accounts for
North's initial response of two dia-
monds.
The effect of this was that North
wound up as declarer at six dia-
monds instead of South. With East
on lead, six diamonds could not be
defeated, and Italy gained 1,470
points on the deal.


IA G


t oI N The
Ow L' t-00,L J Target main
k0- tIwr "or
E body of
TIGER E R 21st
TIGER c,.mbers


( E eAizE \ I / YOO)'LLNHAVE E N 0 (1999
'\oOU 0\NGY -o A. I ed tion)
5_ F! ./ I HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here?
SIn making a word, each letter
d may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter
and there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 18; very good 27;
w .. excellent 35 (or more).
SSolution tomorrow.

CRYPTIC PUZZLE Ms23 M4 E5 M

n ~i 11111 10011 1


ACROSS
9 With the branches stripped bare,
stops (6,3)
10 Possibly I can get into trouble by
doing nothing (8)
12 In the flower bed, would it give you a
little jab? (4)
13 Test put again, in a way (6)
14 Aiming to get a break point, you think
(7)
15 Expression of sympathy for the actor
given them? (4,5)
17 See what the note you were given in
the bar says? (5,4)
18 Refuse to do what the Latin teacher
asked you to? (7)
20 As an islander, can't travel about in
(6)
21 Drop, you say, a row (4)
24 Concealing a prison record, the grass
has gone straight (8)
26 In addition, agrees to prepare
forecasts (8)
28 Not wanting to get the site on the
hilltop (4)
29 Putting a name to the face on the
boat (6)
31 Not allowed to go off to gel drunk (7)
34 Not having anagrammatical clue for
"tiny" (9)
36 Don't notice that you don't understand
(4,2,3)
38 Are consuming suet pudding plain
and simple (7)
39 The whole network, to one's
exasperation (6)
40 Not the pupil's name (4)
41 Teach you how to give orders (8)
42 First thing the student carpenter
made? (4,5)


DOWN
1 Careless mistake over tne dosh
distribution (8)
2 Emblem of the prohibitionist? (6)
3 Go on, when one's back, tucking into
the ice cream (8)
4 Bids for the chests start with a
hundred (6)
5 Terribly staid, had set out to show
repugnance (8)
6 Making sure one doesn't look silly
wearing a visor? (6,4)
7 Opens up, letting one into the
passages (7)
8 Why you propose to turn it in (6)
11 As chiefs, they don't succeed (7)
16 No. Ring back and it will be provided
(4,2)
19 Do put the tom cat outside (5)
20 The fish, having risen, do get caught
(3)
22 Just what I need lunchtime traffic!
(5)
23 For many, a racecourse with charm
(6)
25 Made the grade when one
ascertained the specifications (10)
26 Criticise to one's face (3)
27 Manual translated to English for the
pupils (7)
30 Stops things happening to the pair (8)
31 Writing about a border flower (8)
32 Would kitchens look bare without
them? (8)
33 Agrees because a nest has been built
on (7)
35 Acting curiously when given a number
to perform (6)
36 The relation's nol slim not him! (6)
37 Bellow, making a racket again inside
(6)


CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS
S ACROSS: 4, (e's) Breasl 7. Over- ate 8. Golfer 10. Gr-eal 13, Pals (slap) 14, Hanc
15. Boroi 16, Pep 17. Oval 19, M-1-en 21, o, are part 23, Hits 24. Co-NE 26. B-ox
W 27, Seal 29. No-E-s. 32, P-art 33. L-EveL 34. Do-C-I-le 35. Showered 36, Crednr
DOWN: 1. Tough ? ?eve-N 3, sBn 4, B-E-gan 5, Eel6 6. ;-we-den 9, Old man 11.
Raw 12. Ado-PT ,.. polecal 15. BA-R 16, Pel 13, Vass l 20. -Rene 21. Six 22.
Pot 23. Ho-No u 25. See 26. Cr.-Est. 30. Over-t 31. Sl.de 32, Pied 33. Lawn
R EASY SOLUTIONS
ACROSS. 4, Cerise 7, Root bePr 8. Eraser 10. Orate 13, Reel 14, Mesh 15, Tell 16.
D Beg 17. Eton 19, Apes 21, Protested 23, Beer 24, Weed 26, Wi 27, Peat 29, Atom
32, Poll 33, Alone 34, Record 35, Eggshell 36, Stupor
DOWN: 1, Groom 2, Rotas 3, Able 4. Creel 5. Real 6. Sieves 9, Relale 11, Rep 12.
There 13, Renewal 15. Tol 16. Bed 18, Torpor 20, Pedal 21. Pe 22., Sel 23,
Bisect 25, Ton 28, Elder 30, Tower 31, Meals 32, Pomp 31, Apse


ACROSS
9 Thus (9)
10 01 Europe and Asia (8)
12 Cook in hot water (4)
13 Small round stone (6)
14 Tool, implement (7)
15 Progeny (9)
17 Police baton (9)
18 Planet(7)
20 Violent confusion (6)
21 Rescue (4)
24 Borrowing charge (8)
26 Wail palienlly (3,5)
28 Minute particle (4)
29 Late meal (6)
31 Deep purplish red (1)
34 Divulged (9)
36 Franbc (9)
38 Kitchen device (7)
39 Rich cake (6)
40 Second-hand (4)
4) US state (B)
42 Delect something
suspicious (5,1,3)


DOWN
1 Obstinate (8)
2 Credit (6)
3 Steep downward plunge
(4.4)
4 Bloodsucking wingless
insect (6)
5 Ollale (8)
6 Intending to deceive (10)
7 Fundamental nature (7)
8 Harass (6)
S1 Slim (7)
16 Stops briefly (6)
19 Christmas show (5)
20 Floor covering (3)
22 Palli0 (5)
23 Solitary (6)
25 01 horses and rdintg (10)
26 Teacher's little (3)
27 Brigands (7)
30 Genealogy (8)
31 Errors (8)
32 Short entertaining story
(8)
33 Flotage (7)
35 Card suit (6)
36 Hate (6)
37 Ludicrous (6)


'I Ca >
og) (g
Z )e h

2 ESi
B'S ^
Sn0)n 0 "o."
"* 0)0 S 3
IU 0 D)
5I < !a


obbes )

HE WROTE HiS F\RSV
SWMPHONA W4EN H E
WAS FOUR. ,
/ ,:


Tribune I

Horoscope I


SBy LINDA BLACK


MONDAY,
FEB 25

AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
After a bit of consideration, you've
decided to play "the wanderer's, for a
while. An extended vacation or'just a
time for reflection seems best. !vake
this a solo trip to really reap the benefits.
PISCES Feb 19/Marchi20
If your pockets seem empty, Pisces, it
could be that you haven't been as
thrifty as you hoped. Perhaps birthday
riches will come your way nex wcek
when you wish on your candles.
ARIES March 21/Apri 20
There's no use trying to knock down
a brick wall with just your hands,
Aries, you're going to need 4 little
help with that important obstacle.
Cancer lends a helping hand.
TAURUS April 21/May 21
You've got a spring in you; step,
Taurus, and it could be due o that
new relationship which is blossom-
ing. Expect some good fortune to
arrive in your wallet as well.
GEMINI May 22/Jung 21
Spent another all-nighter worrying
about work issues? Don't let ybur job
take up more than.its necessary share
of your day. This is" an unhealthy way
to live so make a change soon.
CANCER June 22/Ju 22
You have plenty of plans and ambi-
tions, yet few resources to mnke the
dreams a reality. It's bestgf you
start seeking assistance in influen-
tial places. Consult Scorlio for
some expertise.
LEO July 23/August 23
A visit to the doctor has you upset, but
there's no need to be, Leo. 'ou are
making a mountain out of a Ijolehill.
Do some Internet research and ask
around you'll get find some larii v
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
Sometimes it seems like liferis juist
passing you by, right Virgo? It's
fine time you stop watching the
train scoot by and climb aboard.
Cancer takes the ride, too. *
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 2i
A new business venture has you see-
ing green profits that is, Libfa. Yet,
all is not what it seems, so don't rish
into anything just yet. Concentrate >,n
some research before investing,,
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov, 22
As usual, in your quest to be "the
best" you've taken on more than you
can handle, Scorpio. You m4y just
have to give in to defeat for once.
Forget about extra work on Monday.
SAGIfTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
You've taken a gamble odn that
attractive stranger and nowyou're
ready to see if this person is the one.
If you don't find a connection by
Thursday, it might be best to throw
this one back and keep fishing.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
Someone close to you is giving you
bad vibes this week, Capricorn. Trust.
your intuition but don't make any rash
moves. Ask Virgo for a second opinion.
Make time for fun on Wednesday.


I CHESWSbyLeonBar Sden 6-


From a game on instantchess.com,
2007. White (to move) is rook for
knight ahead, but seems to have
run into trouble. His g5 knight is
pinned against the h4 queen, and is
subject to a three-pronged attack
by Black's queen, rook and knight.
It appears that White will lose
material, but after his next turn
Black quickly had to resign. Can you
find White's winning move?
Coulsdon hosts a one-day congress
on Saturday, where anyone from
expert to novice is welcome. All
entrants play the full six games,
each lasting a maximum one hour,
while winners qualify for cash
awards and English Chess
Federation ranking points. For
details, call Scott Freeman at 020
8645 0302.


LEONARD BARDEN


Chess: 8549: 1hxg6! Nxg5 2 Bxg5 Bxg5 3 Qxh7+ and
4 Q07 mate.


- d.
-a r I .4.E


IT WON'T BE EASY TO RND SOME-
ONE WITH STYLE, TASTE, BUSINESS
SENSE, PEOPLE SKILLS MAND
, CHARM.








PAGE 10B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2008

February is National Heart Month -




ENTER & WIN $200CASH IN THE


Ccardi btenr l anLW1)

at / y


E S


AY


WRITE A LETTER ANSWERING THE FOLLOWING QUESTION:

"What can you do to take better care of your heart?"


. :. *. ,- : -* ; ,l,'-* ; ".,: : -: ; .. . "
". , . ' .. ': ":v: '. ..' "


1. Children ages 6-13 may enter.

2. Write a letter answering the following question:'What can you
do to take better care of your heart?."

3. The body of the letter may not exceed 150 words. Adults
may assist thE child in filling out the entry form, but not in
writing the letter.

4. Limit one letter per child. All entries must be received by
Doctors Hospital Marketing Department before March 31st,
2008.


5. Only letters accompanied by original entry forms clipped from
the newspaper will be accepted. Photocopy, fax, carbon or
other copies will not be accepted.

6. One winner will be chosen. The decision of the judges is final.

7. Winner must agree to a photo presentation which will be
published in the newspaper.


Herla For ilf
Sf Y. 4 1 DOCTORS HOSPITAL
ES S AY C O NTE 0 8 OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM

C h ild 's N a m e : .. .... ...... ....... ......... ................................................. ...... ..... .......................... ............................... ...................


Age:


Date of Birth:


School:

Address:


Parent's Name:

Parent's Signature:

Telephone Contact:


P.O. Box:


Email:


(W)


(C)


(H)


I
S All entries become pr-perty of Doctors Hospital and can be used and reproducedfor any purpose without compensation.


THE TRIBUNE


CO N T E 0 8




"Remember
k. Good Health
SStarts With You. j
\ / Cardioman


_ 11_1___ 1_111__